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Sample records for acid-catalyzed bamberger rearrangement

  1. 75 FR 65226 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bamberg, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bamberg, SC AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action establishes Class E... Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to establish Class E airspace at Bamberg, SC (75 FR 52654)...

  2. Lewis acid catalyzed cascade reaction to carbazoles and naphthalenes via dehydrative [3 + 3]-annulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaoyin; Chai, Zhuo; Wei, Yun; Zhu, Xiancui; Zhou, Shuangliu; Wang, Shaowu

    2014-07-03

    A novel Lewis acid catalyzed dehydrative [3 + 3]-annulation of readily available benzylic alcohols and propargylic alcohols was developed to give polysubstituted carbazoles and naphthalenes in moderate to good yields with water as the only byproduct. The reaction was presumed to proceed via a cascade process involving Friedel-Crafts-type allenylation, 1,5-hydride shift, 6π-eletrocyclization, and Wagner-Meerwein rearrangement.

  3. Acid-Catalyzed Isomerization of Carvone to Carvacrol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjonaas, Richard A.; Mattingly, Shawn P.

    2005-01-01

    The acid-catalyzed isomerization of carvone to carvacrol, first reported by Ritter and Ginsburg, is especially well suited with a permanent-magnet FT instrument. The acid-catalyzed isomerization of carvone to carvacrol produced a 61% yield after a three hour reflux with 30% aqueous sulfuric acid.

  4. Methods of Comparative Androgogy: An International Expert Seminar (Bamberg, Germany, September 24-27, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, Margaret A.

    A seminar collected, shared, and discussed the consensus on definitions, standards, methods, and current problems in research methodology in comparative andragogy. Alfred Hierold opened the seminar with a brief history of the evolution of the University of Bamberg. The opening session focused on the importance of the researcher as a tool in…

  5. Classification of Variable Objects for Search for GRB Candidates on Bamberg Photographic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, René; Kopel, Fabian; Macsics, Robert; Hadwige, Markus; Heber, Ulrich; Cayé, Walter

    We report on an ongoing study based on blink-comparison of more than 5000 Bamberg Observatory Southern Sky Patrol Plates performed within a continuation of a student high school project (Jugend Forscht). After a detailed analyses and classification, 6 non-classified objects were identified as emulsion defects, 19 as asteroids, 37 as variable stars, and 6 as real OT-GRB candidates.

  6. Acid-catalyzed dehydrogenation of amine-boranes

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, Frances Helen; Baker, Ralph Thomas

    2010-01-12

    A method of dehydrogenating an amine-borane using an acid-catalyzed reaction. The method generates hydrogen and produces a solid polymeric [R.sup.1R.sup.2B--NR.sup.3R.sup.4].sub.n product. The method of dehydrogenating amine-boranes may be used to generate H.sub.2 for portable power sources.

  7. Reactivity of Cations and Zwitterions Formed in Photochemical and Acid-Catalyzed Reactions from m-Hydroxycycloalkyl-Substituted Phenol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Cindro, Nikola; Antol, Ivana; Mlinarić-Majerski, Kata; Halasz, Ivan; Wan, Peter; Basarić, Nikola

    2015-12-18

    Three m-substituted phenol derivatives, each with a labile benzylic alcohol group and bearing either protoadamantyl 4, homoadamantyl 5, or a cyclohexyl group 6, were synthesized and their thermal acid-catalyzed and photochemical solvolytic reactivity studied, using preparative irradiations, fluorescence measurements, nanosecond laser flash photolysis, and quantum chemical calculations. The choice of m-hydroxy-substitution was driven by the potential for these phenolic systems to generate m-quinone methides on photolysis, which could ultimately drive the excited-state pathway, as opposed to forming simple benzylic carbocations in the corresponding thermal route. Indeed, thermal acid-catalyzed reactions gave the corresponding cations, which undergo rearrangement and elimination from 4, only elimination from 5, and substitution and elimination from 6. On the other hand, upon photoexcitation of 4-6 to S1 in a polar protic solvent, proton dissociation from the phenol, coupled with elimination of the benzylic OH (as hydroxide ion) gave zwitterions (formal m-quinone methides). The zwitterions exhibit reactivity different from the corresponding cations due to a difference in charge distribution, as shown by DFT calculations. Thus, protoadamantyl zwitterion has a less nonclassical character than the corresponding cation, so it does not undergo 1,2-shift of the carbon atom, as observed in the acid-catalyzed reaction.

  8. Cascade dearomatization of N-substituted tryptophols via Lewis acid-catalyzed Michael reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Wei; Dai, Li-Xin; You, Shu-Li

    2012-09-21

    Lewis acid-catalyzed cascade dearomatization of N-substituted tryptophols via Michael addition reaction was developed. The generality of the method has been demonstrated by the synthesis of versatile furoindoline derivatives with a quaternary carbon center in good yields.

  9. Brønsted acid-catalyzed Nazarov cyclization of pyrrole derivatives accelerated by microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Bachu, Prabhakar; Akiyama, Takahiko

    2009-07-15

    The Brønsted acid-catalyzed Nazarov cyclization of pyrrole derivatives was developed. Microwave irradiation accelerated the Nazarov cyclization significantly at 40 degrees C to give cyclopenta[b]pyrrole derivatives in excellent yields with high trans selectivity.

  10. Wagner–Meerwein-Type Rearrangements of Germapolysilanes - A Stable Ion Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The rearrangement of tris(trimethylsilyl)silyltrimethylgermane 1 to give tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)germane 2 was investigated as a typical example for Lewis acid catalyzed Wagner–Meerwein-type rearrangements of polysilanes and polygermasilanes. Direct 29Si NMR spectroscopic evidence is provided for several cationic intermediates during the reaction. The identity of these species was verified by independent synthesis and NMR characterization, and their transformation was followed by NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26294805

  11. Eventorientierte Veranstaltungen und Lebensqualität innenstädtischer Wohnbevölkerung. Das Beispiel Bamberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redepenning, Marc; Rhein, Niklas; Sauerwald, David

    2016-09-01

    Events do have, in addition to economic effects, impact on the quality of life of the affected population. Using a case study from the city of Bamberg this article addresses the subjective contentment with larger events. The results show variation in the range of contentment depending on age and time of residency in the city. Furthermore, it becomes obvious that the particular expectation on "life in the inner city" shapes the contentment. Cities should pay attention to this social heterogeneity when deploying strategies of revitalisation through festivals and events. They should take it seriously by using tools of collaborative planning to preserve the multi-functionality of inner cities.

  12. Acid-Catalyzed Preparation of Biodiesel from Waste Vegetable Oil: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bladt, Don; Murray, Steve; Gitch, Brittany; Trout, Haylee; Liberko, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This undergraduate organic laboratory exercise involves the sulfuric acid-catalyzed conversion of waste vegetable oil into biodiesel. The acid-catalyzed method, although inherently slower than the base-catalyzed methods, does not suffer from the loss of product or the creation of emulsion producing soap that plagues the base-catalyzed methods when…

  13. Optimizing the Acid Catalyzed Synthesis of Hyperbranched Poly(Glycerol-diacids) Oligomers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oligomeric pre-polymers were synthesized by the acid-catalyzed condensation of glycerol with succinic acid, glutaric acid and azelaic acid in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or dimethylformamide (DMF). The prepolymers were obtained, on average in 84% yield, and were characterized by proton NMR, MALDI-TOF ...

  14. 4-Dimenthylaminopyridine or Acid-Catalyzed Synthesis of Esters: A Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Berg, Annemieke W. C.; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    A set of highly atom-economic experiments was developed to highlight the differences between acid- and base-catalyzed ester syntheses and to introduce the principles of atom economy. The hydrochloric acid-catalyzed formation of an ester was compared with the 4-dimethylaminopyradine-catalyzed ester synthesis.

  15. Chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of 3-trifluoromethylthioquinolines.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji; Zhang, Qian-Fan; Zhao, Wei-Hao; Jiang, Guo-Fang

    2016-08-07

    A chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of 3-trifluoromethylthioquinolines has been successfully developed, providing direct and facile access to chiral 2,3-disubstituted 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline derivatives containing a stereogenic trifluoromethylthio group with up to 99% enantioselectivity.

  16. Chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed enantioselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azlactones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Sun, Wangsheng; Zhu, Gongming; Yang, Junxian; Zhang, Ming; Hong, Liang; Wang, Rui

    2016-01-25

    The first chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed highly diastereo- and enantioselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azlactones and methyleneindolinones was disclosed. By using a BINOL-derived chiral phosphoric acid as the catalyst, azlactones were activated as chiral anti N-protonated 1,3-dipoles to react with methyleneindolinones to yield biologically important 3,3'-pyrrolidonyl spirooxindole scaffolds in high yields, with good-to-excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivity.

  17. Acid-catalyzed autohydrolysis of wheat straw to improve sugar recovery.

    PubMed

    Ertas, Murat; Han, Qiang; Jameel, Hasan

    2014-10-01

    A comparison study of autohydrolysis and acid-catalyzed autohydrolysis of wheat straw was performed to understand the impact of acid addition on overall sugar recovery. Autohydrolysis combined with refining is capable of achieving sugar recoveries in the mid 70s. If the addition of a small amount of acid is capable of increasing the sugar recovery even higher it may be economically attractive. Acetic, sulfuric, hydrochloric and sulfurous acids were selected for acid-catalyzed autohydrolysis pretreatments. Autohydrolysis with no acid at 190 °C showed the highest total sugar in the prehydrolyzate. Enzymatic hydrolysis was performed for all the post-treated solids with and without refining at enzyme loadings of 4 and 10 FPU/g for 96 h. Acid-catalyzed autohydrolysis at 190 °C with sulfurous acid showed the highest total sugar recovery of 81.2% at 4 FPU/g enzyme charge compared with 64.3% at 190 °C autohydrolysis without acid.

  18. Mechanistic investigation of chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed asymmetric Baeyer-Villiger reaction of 3-substituted cyclobutanones with H2O2 as the oxidant.

    PubMed

    Xu, Senmiao; Wang, Zheng; Li, Yuxue; Zhang, Xumu; Wang, Haiming; Ding, Kuiling

    2010-03-08

    The mechanism of the chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed Baeyer-Villiger (B-V) reaction of cyclobutanones with hydrogen peroxide was investigated by using a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. Of the two pathways that have been proposed for the present reaction, the pathway involving a peroxyphosphate intermediate is not viable. The reaction progress kinetic analysis indicates that the reaction is partially inhibited by the gamma-lactone product. Initial rate measurements suggest that the reaction follows Michaelis-Menten-type kinetics consistent with a bifunctional mechanism in which the catalyst is actively involved in both carbonyl addition and the subsequent rearrangement steps through hydrogen-bonding interactions with the reactants or the intermediate. High-level quantum chemical calculations strongly support a two-step concerted mechanism in which the phosphoric acid activates the reactants or the intermediate in a synergistic manner through partial proton transfer. The catalyst simultaneously acts as a general acid, by increasing the electrophilicity of the carbonyl carbon, increases the nucleophilicity of hydrogen peroxide as a Lewis base in the addition step, and facilitates the dissociation of the OH group from the Criegee intermediate in the rearrangement step. The overall reaction is highly exothermic, and the rearrangement of the Criegee intermediate is the rate-determining step. The observed reactivity of this catalytic B-V reaction also results, in part, from the ring strain in cyclobutanones. The sense of chiral induction is rationalized by the analysis of the relative energies of the competing diastereomeric transition states, in which the steric repulsion between the 3-substituent of the cyclobutanone and the 3- and 3'-substituents of the catalyst, as well as the entropy and solvent effects, are found to be critically important.

  19. Brønsted Acid Catalyzed Oxygenative Bimolecular Friedel-Crafts-type Coupling of Ynamides.

    PubMed

    Patil, Dilip V; Kim, Seung Woo; Nguyen, Quynh H; Kim, Hanbyul; Wang, Shan; Hoang, Tuan; Shin, Seunghoon

    2017-03-20

    A non-metal approach for accessing α-oxo carbene surrogates for a C-C bond-forming bimolecular coupling between ynamides and nucleophilic arenes was developed. This acid-catalyzed coupling features mild temperature, which is critical for the required temporal chemoselectivity among nucleophiles. The scope of nucleophiles includes indoles, pyrroles, anilines, phenols and silyl enolethers. Furthermore, a direct test of SN 2' mechanism has been provided by employing chiral N,N'-dioxides which also enlightens the nature of the intermediates in related metal-catalyzed processes.

  20. Isotope Effects and Mechanism of the Asymmetric BOROX Brønsted Acid Catalyzed Aziridination Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Vetticatt, Mathew J.; Desai, Aman A.; Wulff, William D.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of the chiral VANOL-BOROX Brønsted acid catalyzed aziridination reaction of imines and ethyldiazoacetate has been studied using a combination of experimental kinetic isotope effects and theoretical calculations. A stepwise mechanism where reversible formation of a diazonium ion intermediate precedes rate-limiting ring-closure to form the cis-aziridine is implicated. A revised model for the origin of enantio- and diastereoselectivity is proposed based on relative energies of the ring closing transition structures. PMID:23687986

  1. Enantioselective Synthesis of β-Arylamines via Chiral Phosphoric Acid-Catalyzed Asymmetric Reductive Amination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Lee, Chun-Young; Cheon, Cheol-Hong

    2015-06-19

    A new method for the synthesis of chiral β-aryl amines via chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed enantioselective reductive amination of benzyl methyl ketone derivatives with Hantzsch ester was developed. Various chiral β-aryl amines were obtained in high yields and with good to high enantioselectivities. This transformation is applicable to gram-scale reactions, and the catalyst loading can be reduced to 1 mol % without sacrificing any catalytic efficacy. Furthermore, the resulting β-aryl amine was successfully converted into a tetrahydroisoquinoline compound without any loss of enantioselectivity.

  2. Stability of prostacyclin analogues: an unusual lack of reactivity in acid-catalyzed alkene hydration.

    PubMed

    Magill, A; O'Yang, C; Powell, M F

    1988-04-01

    Prostacyclin analogue 5 undergoes specific acid-catalyzed hydration (kH+ = 1.9 x 10(-7)M-1 sec-1 at 25 degrees C) and a pH-independent oxidation reaction (k0 = 1.2 x 10(-10) sec-1 at 25 degrees C) above pH approximately 5. The hydration reaction for 5 is much slower than for other structurally similar exocyclic alkenes, even though the rate-determining step is proton transfer. This slowness of reaction and an analysis of the pH-rate profile show that 5 does not exhibit significant intramolecular general acid catalysis, as does prostacyclin.

  3. Integrated Production of Xylonic Acid and Bioethanol from Acid-Catalyzed Steam-Exploded Corn Stover.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junjun; Rong, Yayun; Yang, Jinlong; Zhou, Xin; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Lingling; Chen, Jiahui; Yong, Qiang; Yu, Shiyuan

    2015-07-01

    High-efficiency xylose utilization is one of the restrictive factors of bioethanol industrialization. However, xylonic acid (XA) as a new bio-based platform chemical can be produced by oxidation of xylose with microbial. So, an applicable technology of XA bioconversion was integrated into the process of bioethanol production. After corn stover was pretreated with acid-catalyzed steam-explosion, solid and liquid fractions were obtained. The liquid fraction, also named as acid-catalyzed steam-exploded corn stover (ASC) prehydrolyzate (mainly containing xylose), was catalyzed with Gluconobacter oxydans NL71 to prepare XA. After 72 h of bioconversion of concentrated ASC prehydrolyzate (containing 55.0 g/L of xylose), the XA concentration reached a peak value of 54.97 g/L, the sugar utilization ratio and XA yield were 94.08 and 95.45 %, respectively. The solid fraction was hydrolyzed to produce glucose with cellulase and then fermented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae NL22 to produce ethanol. After 18 h of fermentation of concentrated enzymatic hydrolyzate (containing 86.22 g/L of glucose), the ethanol concentration reached its highest value of 41.48 g/L, the sugar utilization ratio and ethanol yield were 98.72 and 95.25 %, respectively. The mass balance showed that 1 t ethanol and 1.3 t XA were produced from 7.8 t oven dry corn stover.

  4. Solid acid-catalyzed depolymerization of barley straw driven by ball milling.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Laura; Haverinen, Jasmiina; Jaakkola, Mari; Lassi, Ulla

    2016-04-01

    This study describes a time and energy saving, solvent-free procedure for the conversion of lignocellulosic barley straw into reducing sugars by mechanocatalytical pretreatment. The catalytic conversion efficiency of several solid acids was tested which revealed oxalic acid dihydrate as a potential catalyst with high conversion rate. Samples were mechanically treated by ball milling and subsequently hydrolyzed at different temperatures. The parameters of the mechanical treatment were optimized in order to obtain sufficient amount of total reducing sugar (TRS) which was determined following the DNS assay. Additionally, capillary electrophoresis (CE) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR) were carried out. Under optimal conditions TRS 42% was released using oxalic acid dihydrate as a catalyst. This study revealed that the acid strength plays an important role in the depolymerization of barley straw and in addition, showed, that the oxalic acid-catalyzed reaction generates low level of the degradation product 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF).

  5. Mechanism of Brønsted acid-catalyzed glucose dehydration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Tsilomelekis, George; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2015-04-24

    We present the first DFT-based microkinetic model for the Brønsted acid-catalyzed conversion of glucose to 5-hydroxylmethylfurfural (HMF), levulinic acid (LA), and formic acid (FA) and perform kinetic and isotopic tracing NMR spectroscopy mainly at low conversions. We reveal that glucose dehydrates through a cyclic path. Our modeling results are in excellent agreement with kinetic data and indicate that the rate-limiting step is the first dehydration of protonated glucose and that the majority of glucose is consumed through the HMF intermediate. We introduce a combination of 1) automatic mechanism generation with isotopic tracing experiments and 2) elementary reaction flux analysis of important paths with NMR spectroscopy and kinetic experiments to assess mechanisms. We find that the excess formic acid, which appears at high temperatures and glucose conversions, originates from retro-aldol chemistry that involves the C6 carbon atom of glucose.

  6. Two-step one-pot synthesis of benzoannulated spiroacetals by Suzuki-Miyaura coupling/acid-catalyzed spiroacetalization.

    PubMed

    Butkevich, Alexey N; Corbu, Andrei; Meerpoel, Lieven; Stansfield, Ian; Angibaud, Patrick; Bonnet, Pascal; Cossy, Janine

    2012-10-05

    Substituted benzoannulated spiroacetals were prepared from (2-haloaryl)alkyl alcohols and dihydropyranyl or dihydrofuranyl pinacol boronates using a Suzuki-Miyaura coupling followed by an acid-catalyzed spirocyclization. Application of the reaction to a glycal boronate provides an approach to annulated spiroacetals in enantiopure form.

  7. A preliminary investigation of acid-catalyzed polymerization reactions of shale oil distillates

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.

    1991-04-01

    Sinor (1989) reported that a major specialty market may exist for shale oil as an asphalt blending material. Shale oil can be converted to an asphalt blending material by acid catalyzed condensation and polymerization reactions of the many molecular species comprising the composition of shale oil. To simplify the investigation, crude shale oil was separated by distillation into three distillates of different hydrocarbon and heteroaromatic compositions. These distillates were then treated with two different types of acids to determine the effect of acid type on the end products. Three western shale oil distillates, a naphtha, a middle distillate, and an atmospheric gas oil, were reacted with anhydrous AlCl{sub 3} and 85% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} under low-severity conditions. At relatively low temperatures, little change in the hydrocarbon composition was noted for the AlCl{sub 3} reactions. AlCl{sub 3}{center_dot} (a polymerized product and/or complex) was formed. However, it is assumed that the sludge was mainly the result of heteroaromatic-AlCl{sub 3} reactions.

  8. A preliminary investigation of acid-catalyzed polymerization reactions of shale oil distillates

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.

    1991-04-01

    Sinor (1989) reported that a major specialty market may exist for shale oil as an asphalt blending material. Shale oil can be converted to an asphalt blending material by acid catalyzed condensation and polymerization reactions of the many molecular species comprising the composition of shale oil. To simplify the investigation, crude shale oil was separated by distillation into three distillates of different hydrocarbon and heteroaromatic compositions. These distillates were then treated with two different types of acids to determine the effect of acid type on the end products. Three western shale oil distillates, a naphtha, a middle distillate, and an atmospheric gas oil, were reacted with anhydrous AlCl{sub 3} and 85% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} under low-severity conditions. At relatively low temperatures, little change in the hydrocarbon composition was noted for the AlCl{sub 3} reactions. AlCl{sub 3}{center dot} (a polymerized product and/or complex) was formed. However, it is assumed that the sludge was mainly the result of heteroaromatic-AlCl{sub 3} reactions.

  9. Solid acid-catalyzed cellulose hydrolysis monitored by in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zakzeski, Joseph; Grisel, Ruud J H; Smit, Arjan T; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2012-02-13

    The solid acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose was studied under elevated temperatures and autogenous pressures using in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy. Standards of cellulose and pure reaction products, which include glucose, fructose, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), levulinic acid (LA), formic acid, and other compounds, were measured in water under ambient and elevated temperatures. A combination of spectroscopic and HPLC analysis revealed that the cellulose hydrolysis proceeds first through the disruption of the glycosidic linkages of cellulose to form smaller cellulose molecules, which are readily observed by their distinctive C-O vibrational stretches. The continued disruption of the linkages in these oligomers eventually results in the formation and accumulation of monomeric glucose. The solid-acid catalyst accelerated the isomerization of glucose to fructose, which then rapidly reacted under hydrothermal conditions to form degradation products, which included HMF, LA, formic acid, and acetic acid. The formation of these species could be suppressed by decreasing the residence time of glucose in the reactor, reaction temperature, and contact with the metal reactor. The hydrolysis of regenerated cellulose proceeded faster and under milder conditions than microcrystalline cellulose, which resulted in increased glucose yield and selectivity.

  10. Computational Mechanistic Studies of Acid-Catalyzed Lignin Model Dimers for Lignin Depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Sturgeon, M. R.; Chmely, S. C.; Paton, R. S.; Beckham, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    Lignin is a heterogeneous alkyl-aromatic polymer that constitutes up to 30% of plant cell walls, and is used for water transport, structure, and defense. The highly irregular and heterogeneous structure of lignin presents a major obstacle in the development of strategies for its deconstruction and upgrading. Here we present mechanistic studies of the acid-catalyzed cleavage of lignin aryl-ether linkages, combining both experimental studies and quantum chemical calculations. Quantum mechanical calculations provide a detailed interpretation of reaction mechanisms including possible intermediates and transition states. Solvent effects on the hydrolysis reactions were incorporated through the use of a conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM) and with cluster models including explicit water molecules in the first solvation shell. Reaction pathways were computed for four lignin model dimers including 2-phenoxy-phenylethanol (PPE), 1-(para-hydroxyphenyl)-2-phenoxy-ethanol (HPPE), 2-phenoxy-phenyl-1,3-propanediol (PPPD), and 1-(para-hydroxyphenyl)-2-phenoxy-1,3-propanediol (HPPPD). Lignin model dimers with a para-hydroxyphenyl ether (HPPE and HPPPD) show substantial differences in reactivity relative to the phenyl ether compound (PPE and PPPD) which have been clarified theoretically and experimentally. The significance of these results for acid deconstruction of lignin in plant cell walls will be discussed.

  11. Acid-catalyzed hydrothermal severity on the fractionation of agricultural residues for xylose-rich hydrolyzates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Ye; Ryu, Hyun Jin; Oh, Kyeong Keun

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility of acid-catalyzed hydrothermal fractionation for maximum solubilization of the hemicellulosic portion of three agricultural residues. The fractionation conditions converted into combined severity factor (CS) in the range of 1.2-2.9. The highest hemicellulose yield of 87.88% was achieved when barley straw was fractionated at a CS of 2.19. However, the maximum glucose release of 15.29% was achieved for the case of rice straw. The maximum productions of various by-products were observed with the fractionation of rape straw: 0.88 g/L of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF), 2.16 g/L of furfural, 0.44 g/L of levulinic acid, 1.59 g/L of formic acid, and 3.06 g/L of acetic acid. The highest selectivities, a criterion for evaluating the fractionation of 21.55 for fractionated solid and 7.48 for liquid hydrolyzate were obtained from barley straw.

  12. Pilot-scale study on the acid-catalyzed steam explosion of rice straw using a continuous pretreatment system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Hua; Tsai, Chia-Chin; Lin, Chih-Feng; Tsai, Pei-Yuan; Hwang, Wen-Song

    2013-01-01

    A continuous acid-catalyzed steam explosion pretreatment process and system to produce cellulosic ethanol was developed at the pilot-scale. The effects of the following parameters on the pretreatment efficiency of rice straw feedstocks were investigated: the acid concentration, the reaction temperature, the residence time, the feedstock size, the explosion pressure and the screw speed. The optimal presteaming horizontal reactor conditions for the pretreatment process are as follows: 1.7 rpm and 100-110 °C with an acid concentration of 1.3% (w/w). An acid-catalyzed steam explosion is then performed in the vertical reactor at 185 °C for 2 min. Approximately 73% of the total saccharification yield was obtained after the rice straw was pretreated under optimal conditions and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis at a combined severity factor of 0.4-0.7. Moreover, good long-term stability and durability of the pretreatment system under continuous operation was observed.

  13. Potential of phosphoric acid-catalyzed pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis for biosugar production from Gracilaria verrucosa.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh-Min; Kim, Sung-Koo; Jeong, Gwi-Taek

    2016-07-01

    This study combined phosphoric acid-catalyzed pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis to produce biosugars from Gracilaria verrucosa as a potential renewable resource for bioenergy applications. We optimized phosphoric acid-catalyzed pretreatment conditions to 1:10 solid-to-liquid ratio, 1.5 % phosphoric acid, 140 °C, and 60 min reaction time, producing a 32.52 ± 0.06 % total reducing sugar (TRS) yield. By subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis, a 68.61 ± 0.90 % TRS yield was achieved. These results demonstrate the potential of phosphoric acid to produce biosugars for biofuel and biochemical production applications.

  14. Lewis acid catalyzed cascade reaction of 3-(2-benzenesulfonamide)propargylic alcohols to spiro[indene-benzosultam]s.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lang; Zhu, Yuanxun; Wang, Jing; Lu, Ping; Wang, Yanguang

    2015-01-16

    A highly efficient and convenient construction of the spiro[indene-benzosultam] skeleton from propargylic alcohols has been developed. The reaction proceeded in a Lewis acid catalyzed cascade process, including the trapping of allene carbocation with sulfonamide, electrophilic cyclization, and intramolecular Friedel-Crafts alkylation. In the presence of NIS or NBS, iodo/bromo-substituted spiro[indene-benzosultam]s could be prepared in excellent yields.

  15. Chiral Phosphoric Acid-Catalyzed Enantioselective Reductive Amination of 2-Pyridyl Ketones: Construction of Structurally Chiral Pyridine-Based Ligands.

    PubMed

    Abudu Rexit, Abulikemu; Luo, Shiwei; Mailikezati, Maihemuti

    2016-11-18

    A chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed one-pot enantioselective reductive amination of 2-pyridyl ketones was realized to provide chiral pyridine-based ligands in excellent yields with high enantioselectivities (up to 98% yield, 94% ee). Computational studies on the key intermediate imine and transition state of the hydride transfer process revealed that the nitrogen atom of the pyridyl ring might be an important factor to significantly promote both the reaction activity and enantioselectivity.

  16. Kinetics and mechanism of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of a hypermodified nucleoside wyosine and its 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Golankiewicz, B; Zielonacka-Lis, E; Folkman, W

    1985-01-01

    The rates of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of a hypermodified nucleoside, wyosine and its 5'-monophosphate were determined at various pH, temperature and buffer concentrations. The results show that despite distinct differences in structure and the glycosyl bond stability, the hydrolysis of wyosine proceeds via cleavage of the C-N bond by A-1 mechanism, analogously to simple nucleosides. Unlike majority of other monophosphates studied so far, wyosine 5'-monophosphate is not more stable than respective nucleoside. PMID:4000960

  17. Acid-catalyzed esterification of Zanthoxylum bungeanum seed oil with high free fatty acids for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junhua; Jiang, Lifeng

    2008-12-01

    A technique to produce biodiesel from crude Zanthoxylum bungeanum seed oil (ZSO) with high free fatty acids (FFA) was developed. The acid value of ZSO was reduced to 1.16mg KOH/g from 45.51mg KOH/g by only one-step acid-catalyzed esterification with methanol-to-oil molar ratio 24:1, H(2)SO(4) 2%, temperature 60 degrees C and reaction time 80min, which was selected as optimum for the acid-catalyzed esterification. During the acid-catalyzed esterification, FFA was converted into fatty acid methyl esters, which was confirmed by (1)H NMR spectrum. Compared with the other two-step pretreatment procedure, this one-step pretreatment can reduce the production cost of ZSO biodiesel. Alkaline-catalyzed transesterification converted the pretreated ZSO into ZSO biodiesel. The yield of ZSO biodiesel was above 98% determined by (1)H NMR spectrum. This study supports the use of crude ZSO as a viable and valuable raw feedstock for biodiesel production.

  18. Levulinic acid production by two-step acid-catalyzed treatment of Quercus mongolica using dilute sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hanseob; Jang, Soo-Kyeong; Hong, Chang-Young; Kim, Seon-Hong; Lee, Su-Yeon; Lee, Soo Min; Choi, Joon Weon; Choi, In-Gyu

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this research were to produce a levulinic acid by two-step acid-catalyzed treatment of Quercus mongolica and to investigate the effect of treatment parameter (reaction temperature range: 100-230°C; sulfuric acid (SA) concentration range: 0-2%) on the levulinic acid yield. After 1(st) step acid-catalyzed treatment, most of the hemicellulosic C5 sugars (15.6gg/100gbiomass) were released into the liquid hydrolysate at the reaction temperature of 150°C in 1% SA; the solid fraction, which contained 53.5% of the C6 sugars, was resistant to further loss of C6 sugars. Subsequently, 2(nd) step acid-catalyzed treatment of the solid fractions was performed under more severe conditions. Finally, 16.5g/100g biomass of levulinic acid was produced at the reaction temperature of 200°C in 2% SA, corresponding to a higher conversion rate than during single-step treatment.

  19. Mechanistic Investigation of Acid-Catalyzed Cleavage of Aryl-Ether Linkages: Implications for Lignin Depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, M. R.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-oxygen bonds are the primary inter-monomer linkages lignin polymers in plant cell walls, and as such, catalyst development to cleave these linkages is of paramount importance to deconstruct biomass to its constituent monomers for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. For many decades, acid catalysis has been used to depolymerize lignin. Lignin is a primary component of plant cell walls, which is connected primarily by aryl-ether linkages, and the mechanism of its deconstruction by acid is not well understood, likely due to its heterogeneous and complex nature compared to cellulose. For effective biomass conversion strategies, utilization of lignin is of significant relevance and as such understanding the mechanisms of catalytic lignin deconstruction to constituent monomers and oligomers is of keen interest. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the acid catalysis of a range of dimeric species exhibiting the b-O-4 linkage, the most common inter-monomer linkage in lignin. We demonstrate that the presence of a phenolic species dramatically increases the rate of cleavage in acid at 150 degrees C. Quantum mechanical calculations on dimers with the para-hydroxyl group demonstrate that this acid-catalyzed pathway differs from the nonphenolic dimmers. Importantly, this result implies that depolymerization of native lignin in the plant cell wall will proceed via an unzipping mechanism wherein b-O-4 linkages will be cleaved from the ends of the branched, polymer chains inwards toward the center of the polymer. To test this hypothesis further, we synthesized a homopolymer of b-O-4 with a phenolic hydroxyl group, and demonstrate that it is cleaved in acid from the end containing the phenolic hydroxyl group. This result suggests that genetic modifications to lignin biosynthesis pathways in plants that will enable lower severity processes to fractionate lignin for upgrading and for easier access to the carbohydrate fraction of

  20. Acid-Catalyzed Conversion of Furfuryl Alcohol to Ethyl Levulinate in Liquid Ethanol.

    PubMed

    González Maldonado, Gretchen M; Assary, Rajeev S; Dumesic, James; Curtiss, Larry A

    2012-09-20

    Reaction pathways for the acid-catalyzed conversion of furfuryl alcohol (FAL) to ethyl levulinate (EL) in ethanol were investigated using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and ab initio high-level quantum chemical (G4MP2) calculations. Our combined studies show that the production of EL at high yields from FAL is not accompanied by stoichiometric production of diethyl either (DEE), indicating that ethoxymethyl furan (EMF) is not an intermediate in the major reaction pathway. Several intermediates were observed using an LC-MS system, and three of these intermediates were isolated and subjected to reaction conditions. The structures of two intermediates were elucidated using 1D and 2D NMR techniques. One of these intermediates is EMF, which forms EL and DEE in a secondary reaction pathway. The second intermediate identified is 4,5,5-triethoxypentan-2-one, which is analogous to one of the intermediates observed in the conversion of FAL to LA in water (i.e. 4,5,5-trihydroxypentan-2-one). Furthermore, conversion of this intermediate to EL again involves the formation of DEE, indicating that it is also part of a secondary pathway. The primary pathway for production of EL involves solvent-assisted transfer of a water molecule from the partially detached protonated hydroxyl group of FAL to a ring carbon, followed by intra-molecular hydrogen shift, where the apparent reaction barrier for the hydrogen shift is relatively smaller in ethanol (21.1 kcal/mol) than that in water (26.6 kcal/mol).

  1. The Acid Catalyzed Nitration of Methanol: Formation of Methyl Nitrate via Aerosol Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riffel, Brent G.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid phase acid catalyzed reaction of methanol with nitric acid to yield methyl nitrate under atmospheric conditions has been investigated using gas phase infrared spectroscopy. This nitration reaction is expected to occur in acidic aerosol particles found in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere as highly soluble methanol and nitric acid diffuse into these aerosols. Gaseous methyl nitrate is released upon formation, suggesting that some fraction of NO(x) may he liberated from nitric acid (methyl nitrate is later photolyzed to NO(x)) before it is removed from the atmosphere by wet deposition. Thus, this reaction may have important implications for the NO(x) budget. Reactions have been initiated in 45-62 wt% H2SO4 solutions at 10.0 C. Methyl nitrate production rates increased exponentially with acidity within the acidity regime studied. Preliminary calculations suggest that the nitronium ion (NO2(+) is the active nitrating agent under these conditions. The reaction order in methanol appears to depend on the water/methanol ratio and varies from first to zeroth order under conditions investigated. The nitration is first order in nitronium at all acidities investigated. A second order rate constant, kappa(sub 2), has been calculated to be 1 x 10(exp 8)/ M s when the reaction is first order in methanol. Calculations suggest the nitration is first order in methanol under tropospheric conditions. The infinitesimal percentage of nitric acid in the nitronium ion form in this acidity regime probably makes this reaction insignificant for the upper troposphere; however, this nitration may become significant in the mid stratosphere where colder temperatures increase nitric acid solubility and higher sulfuric acid content shifts nitric acid speciation toward the nitronium ion.

  2. Tandem Suzuki-Miyaura coupling/acid-catalyzed cyclization between vinyl ether boronates and vinyl halides: a concise approach to polysubstituted furans.

    PubMed

    Butkevich, Alexey N; Meerpoel, Lieven; Stansfield, Ian; Angibaud, Patrick; Corbu, Andrei; Cossy, Janine

    2013-08-02

    Polysubstituted 2-(ω-hydroxyalkyl)furans were prepared by tandem Suzuki-Miyaura coupling/acid-catalyzed cyclization starting from appropriately substituted 3-haloallylic alcohols and dihydrofuran-, dihydropyran- or glycal-derived pinacol boronates.

  3. Degradations and Rearrangement Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianbo

    This section deals with recent reports concerning degradation and rearrangement reactions of free sugars as well as some glycosides. The transformations are classified in chemical and enzymatic ways. In addition, the Maillard reaction will be discussed as an example of degradation and rearrangement transformation and its application in current research in the fields of chemistry and biology.

  4. Brönsted Acid-Catalyzed One-Pot Synthesis of Indoles from o-Aminobenzyl Alcohols and Furans

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Alexey; Makarov, Anton; Rubtsov, Alexandr E.; Butin, Alexander V.; Gevorgyan, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Brönsted acid-catalyzed one-pot synthesis of indoles from o-aminobenzyl alcohols and furans has been developed. This method operates via the in situ formation of aminobenzylfuran, followed by its recyclization into the indole core. The method proved to be efficient for substrates possessing different functional groups, including -OMe, -CO2Cy, and -Br. The resulting indoles can easily be transformed into diverse scaffolds, including 2,3- and 1,2-fused indoles, and indole possessing an α,β-unsaturated ketone moiety at the C-2 position. PMID:24255969

  5. Acid-catalyzed Reactions in Model Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA): Insights using Desorption-electrospray Ionization (DESI) Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiddler, M. N.; Cooks, R. G.; Shepson, P.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are presently little understood in terms of their sources, formation, and effect on climate forcing, despite their significant impacts on climate change and respiratory health. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which were thought to arise entirely from simple gas-particle partitioning, have recently been found to contain oligomeric species which result from the condensed-phase reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The non-methane VOC with the greatest emission flux, isoprene, is known to produce aerosols through chemistry involving its oxidation products. We selected one of its major oxidation product, methacrolein, to assess its role in oligomeric SOA formation in response to the acidic conditions found in cloud water. Since it has been found that acidified aerosol produces oligomeric species with greater molecular weight and yield, acid-catalyzed oligomerization is likely a significant process in the formation of SOA. Aqueous solutions of methacrolein were acidified with sulfuric acid, and studied using linear ion trap mass spectrometry (LIT-MS) with a home-built desorption-electrospray ionization (DESI) source. An extremely heterogeneous mixture of products was produced in this system, resulting from hydrolysis, acid- catalyzed oxidation, reduction, and organosulfate formation. Evidence for disproportionation and heterocycle formation are proposed as reaction mechanisms hitherto unrecognized in the production of SOA. The proposed structure and formation mechanism for several species, based upon their MS/MS spectra, will also be presented.

  6. Studies of the Mechanism and Origins of Enantioselectivity for the Chiral Phosphoric Acid-Catalyzed Stereoselective Spiroketalization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Khomutnyk, Yaroslav Ya; Argüelles, Alonso J; Winschel, Grace A; Sun, Zhankui; Zimmerman, Paul M; Nagorny, Pavel

    2016-01-13

    Mechanistic and computational studies were conducted to elucidate the mechanism and the origins of enantiocontrol for asymmetric chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed spiroketalization reactions. These studies were designed to differentiate between the S(N)1-like, S(N)2-like, and covalent phosphate intermediate-based mechanisms. The chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed spiroketalization of deuterium-labeled cyclic enol ethers revealed a highly diastereoselective syn-selective protonation/nucleophile addition, thus ruling out long-lived oxocarbenium intermediates. Hammett analysis of the reaction kinetics revealed positive charge accumulation in the transition state (ρ = -2.9). A new computational reaction exploration method along with dynamics simulations supported an asynchronous concerted mechanism with a relatively short-lived polar transition state (average lifetime = 519 ± 240 fs), which is consistent with the observed inverse secondary kinetic isotope effect of 0.85. On the basis of these studies, a transition state model explaining the observed stereochemical outcome has been proposed. This model predicts the enantioselective formation of the observed enantiomer of the product with 92% ee, which matches the experimentally observed value.

  7. The cubyl cation rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Jalife, Said; Mondal, Sukanta; Cabellos, Jose Luis; Martinez-Guajardo, Gerardo; Fernandez-Herrera, Maria A; Merino, Gabriel

    2016-02-25

    Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations and high-level ab initio computations predict that the cage-opening rearrangement of the cubyl cation to the 7H(+)-pentalenyl cation is feasible in the gas phase. The rate-determining step is the formation of the cuneyl cation with an activation barrier of 25.3 kcal mol(-1) at the CCSD(T)/def2-TZVP//MP2/def2-TZVP level. Thus, the cubyl cation is kinetically stable enough to be formed and trapped at moderate temperatures, but it may be rearranged at higher temperatures.

  8. Acid catalyzed alcoholysis of sulfinamides: unusual stereochemistry, kinetics and a question of mechanism involving sulfurane intermediates and their pseudorotation.

    PubMed

    Bujnicki, Bogdan; Drabowicz, Józef; Mikołajczyk, Marian

    2015-02-11

    The synthesis of optically active sulfinic acid esters has been accomplished by the acid catalyzed alcoholysis of optically active sulfinamides. Sulfinates are formed in this reaction with a full or predominant inversion of configuration at chiral sulfur or with predominant retention of configuration. The steric course of the reaction depends mainly on the size of the dialkylamido group in the sulfinamides and of the alcohols used as nucleophilic reagents. It has been found that bulky reaction components preferentially form sulfinates with retention of configuration. It has been demonstrated that the stereochemical outcome of the reaction can be changed from inversion to retention and vice versa by adding inorganic salts to the acidic reaction medium. The unusual stereochemistry of this typical bimolecular nucleophilic substitution reaction, as confirmed by kinetic measurements, has been rationalized in terms of the addition-elimination mechanism, A-E, involving sulfuranes as intermediates which undergo pseudorotations.

  9. Chiral Brønsted Acid-Catalyzed Enantioselective α-Amidoalkylation Reactions: A Joint Experimental and Predictive Study.

    PubMed

    Aranzamendi, Eider; Arrasate, Sonia; Sotomayor, Nuria; González-Díaz, Humberto; Lete, Esther

    2016-12-01

    Enamides with a free NH group have been evaluated as nucleophiles in chiral Brønsted acid-catalyzed enantioselective α-amidoalkylation reactions of bicyclic hydroxylactams for the generation of quaternary stereocenters. A quantitative structure-reactivity relationship (QSRR) method has been developed to find a useful tool to rationalize the enantioselectivity in this and related processes and to orient the catalyst choice. This correlative perturbation theory (PT)-QSRR approach has been used to predict the effect of the structure of the substrate, nucleophile, and catalyst, as well as the experimental conditions, on the enantioselectivity. In this way, trends to improve the experimental results could be found without engaging in a long-term empirical investigation.

  10. Enantiodivergent Atroposelective Synthesis of Chiral Biaryls by Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation: Chiral Phosphoric Acid Catalyzed Dynamic Kinetic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Mori, Keiji; Itakura, Tsubasa; Akiyama, Takahiko

    2016-09-12

    Reported herein is an enantiodivergent synthesis of chiral biaryls by a chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation reaction. Upon treatment of biaryl lactols with aromatic amines and a Hantzsch ester in the presence of chiral phosphoric acid, dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) involving a reductive amination reaction proceeded smoothly to furnish both R and S isomers of chiral biaryls with excellent enantioselectivities by proper choice of hydroxyaniline derivative. This trend was observed in wide variety of substrates, and various chiral biphenyl and phenyl naphthyl adducts were synthesized with satisfactory enantioselectivities in enantiodivergent fashion. The enantiodivergent synthesis of synthetically challenging, chiral o-tetrasubstituted biaryls were also accomplished, and suggests high synthetic potential of the present method.

  11. Acid-catalyzed conversion of mono- and poly-sugars into platform chemicals: effects of molecular structure of sugar substrate.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xun; Wu, Liping; Wang, Yi; Song, Yao; Mourant, Daniel; Gunawan, Richard; Gholizadeh, Mortaza; Li, Chun-Zhu

    2013-04-01

    Hydrolysis/pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass always produces a mixture of sugars with distinct structures as intermediates or products. This study tried to elucidate the effects of molecular structure of sugars on their acid-catalyzed conversions in ethanol/water. Location of carbonyl group in sugars (fructose versus glucose) and steric configuration of hydroxyl groups (glucose versus galactose) significantly affected yields of levulinic acid/ester (fructose>glucose>galactose). The dehydration of fructose to 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural produces much less soluble polymer than that from glucose and galactose, which results in high yields of levulinic acid/ester from fructose. Anhydrate sugar such as levoglucosan tends to undergo the undesirable decomposition to form less levulinic acid/ester. Catalytic behaviors of the poly-sugars (sucrose, maltose, raffinose, β-cyclodextrins) were determined much by their basic units. However, their big molecular sizes create the steric hindrance that significantly affects their followed conversion over solid acid catalyst.

  12. Regioselective, borinic acid-catalyzed monoacylation, sulfonylation and alkylation of diols and carbohydrates: expansion of substrate scope and mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doris; Williamson, Caitlin L; Chan, Lina; Taylor, Mark S

    2012-05-16

    Synthetic and mechanistic aspects of the diarylborinic acid-catalyzed regioselective monofunctionalization of 1,2- and 1,3-diols are presented. Diarylborinic acid catalysis is shown to be an efficient and general method for monotosylation of pyranoside derivatives bearing three secondary hydroxyl groups (7 examples, 88% average yield). In addition, the scope of the selective acylation, sulfonylation, and alkylation is extended to 1,2- and 1,3-diols not derived from carbohydrates (28 examples); the efficiency, generality, and operational simplicity of this method are competitive with those of state-of-the-art protocols including the broadly applied organotin-catalyzed or -mediated reactions. Mechanistic details of the organoboron-catalyzed processes are explored using competition experiments, kinetics, and catalyst structure-activity relationships. These experiments are consistent with a mechanism in which a tetracoordinate borinate complex reacts with the electrophilic species in the turnover-limiting step of the catalytic cycle.

  13. Lewis acid-catalyzed Friedel-Crafts alkylations of 3-hydroxy-2-oxindole: an efficient approach to the core structure of azonazine.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Santanu; Kinthada, Lakshmana K; Bhunia, Subhajit; Bisai, Alakesh

    2012-10-18

    A Lewis acid catalyzed Friedel-Crafts reaction of electron rich aromatics with 3-alkyl-3-hydroxy-2-oxindole (5) has been developed. The methodology provides a straightforward access to the core of azonazine (2) sharing an all-carbon quaternary stereocenter at the tetracyclic ring junction.

  14. Phosphonate–Phosphinate Rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    LiTMP metalated dimethyl N-Boc-phosphoramidates derived from 1-phenylethylamine and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-ylamine highly selectively at the CH3O group to generate short-lived oxymethyllithiums. These isomerized to diastereomeric hydroxymethylphosphonamidates (phosphate–phosphonate rearrangement). However, s-BuLi converted the dimethyl N-Boc-phosphoramidate derived from 1-phenylethylamine to the N-Boc α-aminophosphonate preferentially. Only s-BuLi deprotonated dimethyl hydroxymethylphosphonamidates at the benzylic position and dimethyl N-Boc α-aminophosphonates at the CH3O group to induce phosphonate–phosphinate rearrangements. In the former case, the migration of the phosphorus substituent from the nitrogen to the carbon atom followed a retentive course with some racemization because of the involvement of a benzyllithium as an intermediate. PMID:25525945

  15. Synthesis of antiviral tetrahydrocarbazole derivatives by photochemical and acid-catalyzed C-H functionalization via intermediate peroxides (CHIPS).

    PubMed

    Gulzar, Naeem; Klussmann, Martin

    2014-06-20

    The direct functionalization of C-H bonds is an important and long standing goal in organic chemistry. Such transformations can be very powerful in order to streamline synthesis by saving steps, time and material compared to conventional methods that require the introduction and removal of activating or directing groups. Therefore, the functionalization of C-H bonds is also attractive for green chemistry. Under oxidative conditions, two C-H bonds or one C-H and one heteroatom-H bond can be transformed to C-C and C-heteroatom bonds, respectively. Often these oxidative coupling reactions require synthetic oxidants, expensive catalysts or high temperatures. Here, we describe a two-step procedure to functionalize indole derivatives, more specifically tetrahydrocarbazoles, by C-H amination using only elemental oxygen as oxidant. The reaction uses the principle of C-H functionalization via Intermediate PeroxideS (CHIPS). In the first step, a hydroperoxide is generated oxidatively using visible light, a photosensitizer and elemental oxygen. In the second step, the N-nucleophile, an aniline, is introduced by Brønsted-acid catalyzed activation of the hydroperoxide leaving group. The products of the first and second step often precipitate and can be conveniently filtered off. The synthesis of a biologically active compound is shown.

  16. Effects of cytoplasm and reactant polarities on acid-catalyzed lipid transesterification in wet microalgal cells subjected to microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Cheng, Jun; Qiu, Yi; Li, Tao; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-01-01

    The polarities of the cytoplasm and reactants were measured through dielectric spectroscopy, contact angle test, NMR, and FTIR to investigate the mechanisms underlying acid-catalyzed lipid transesterification in wet microalgal cells subjected to microwave irradiation. Organics with apolar functional groups in the cytoplasm decreased the contact angle of methanol against triglyceride by 13.92°, which subsequently increased transesterification efficiency by 2.4 times. The microalgal biomass, given its higher hydrophilicity index of 1.96 than lipids, was more accessible to hydrophilic alcohols, which subsequently promoted transesterification. Water in the cytoplasm promoted the dielectric constant of methanol and increased the contact angle of methanol against triglyceride by 20.51°, which subsequently decreased transesterification efficiency by 72.6%. The inhibitory effect of water on transesterification weakened with the prolonged carbon lengths of the alcohols because of decreased polarity. Microwave decreased the electric constants of alcohols and reduced the polarity difference between alcohols and lipids, thereby improving transesterification efficiency.

  17. Recent Developments in the Chiral Brønsted Acid-catalyzed Allylboration Reaction with Polyfunctionalized Substrates.

    PubMed

    Barrio, Pablo; Rodríguez, Elsa; Fustero, Santos

    2016-08-01

    Asymmetric allylboration has played a central role in organic synthesis ever since the pioneering work by Hoffman and Brown, having found applications in the total synthesis of many natural products. A new dawn for this 40 year-old reaction occurred with the beginning of the new century when the first catalytic asymmetric methods came into play. In less than one decade, several methodologies, able to achieve the desired homoallylic alcohols with ee ranges in the high 90s, were developed. Among them, in the present account, we will disclose our contribution to the development of the chiral binolphosphoric-derived Brønsted acid-catalyzed allylboration of aldehydes originally reported by Antilla in 2010. Our contribution to this field lies in its application to polyfunctionalized systems, both on the aldehyde and the allylboronate in question, which enables the rapid construction of molecular diversity and complexity. Parts of the work described herein have been carried out in collaboration with the groups of Profs. Akiyama and Houk.

  18. Role of keto-enol tautomerization in a chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed asymmetric thiocarboxylysis of meso-epoxide: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Ajitha, Manjaly J; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2015-12-07

    The mechanism of a chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed thiocarboxylysis of meso-epoxide was investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations (M06-2X). The nucleophilic ring opening of epoxide by thiobenzoic acid was found to proceed via a concerted termolecular transition state with a simultaneous dual proton transfer to yield the β-hydroxy thioester product. Electrostatic interactions together with the steric environment inside the chiral catalyst play an important role in determining the enantioselectivity of the reaction.

  19. Brønsted Acid Catalyzed Addition of Enamides to ortho-Quinone Methide Imines-An Efficient and Highly Enantioselective Synthesis of Chiral Tetrahydroacridines.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Martin; Hodík, Tomáš; Schneider, Christoph

    2016-08-08

    The direct and highly enantioselective synthesis of tetrahydroacridines was achieved through the phosphoric acid catalyzed addition of enamides to in situ generated ortho-quinone methide imines and subsequent elimination. This novel one-step process constitutes a very efficient, elegant, and selective synthetic approach to valuable N-heterocycles with a 1,4-dihydroquinoline motif. By subsequent highly diastereoselective hydrogenation and N-deprotection the reaction products were easily converted into free hexahydroacridines with a total of three new stereogenic centers.

  20. Scope and limitations of aliphatic Friedel-Crafts alkylations. Lewis acid catalyzed addition reactions of alkyl chlorides to carbon-carbon double bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, H.; Striepe, W.

    1983-04-22

    Lewis acid catalyzed addition reactions of alkyl halides with unsaturated hydrocarbons have been studied. 1:1 addition products are formed if the addends dissociate faster than the corresponding products; otherwise, polymerization takes place. For reaction conditions under which these compounds exist mainly undissociated, solvolysis constants of model compounds can be used to predict the outcome of any such addition reactions if systems with considerable steric hindrance are excluded.

  1. Amino acid-catalyzed seed regrowth synthesis of photostable high fluorescent silica nanoparticles with tunable sizes for intracellular studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabi, Shakiba; Treccani, Laura; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2015-06-01

    Size-controlled fluorescence silica nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used for nanotoxicological studies, and diagnostic and targeted therapies. Such particles can be easily visualized and localized within cell environments and their interactions with cellular components can be monitored. We developed an amino acid-catalyzed seed regrowth technique (ACSRT) to synthesize spherical rhodamine-doped silica NPs with tunable sizes, low polydispersity index as well as high labeling efficiency and enhanced fluorescence photostability. Via ACSRT, fluorescent silica NPs can be obtained by introducing the fluorophore in seed formation step, while a precise control over particle size can be achieved by simply adjusting the concentration of reactants in the regrowth step. Unlike the conventional methods, the proposed ACSRT permits the synthesis of fluorescent silica NPs in a water-based system, without the use of any surfactants and co-surfactants. By this approach, additional linkers for covalent coupling of the fluorophore to silica matrix can be omitted, while a remarkable doping efficiency is achieved. The suitability of these particles for biomedical application is demonstrated by in vitro tests with normal and malignant bone cells. We show that the particles can be easily and unambiguously visualized by a conventional fluorescence microscope, localized, and distinguished within intracellular components. In addition, it is presented that the cellular uptake and cytotoxic profile of silica NPs are strongly correlated to the particle size, concentration, and cell line. The results of in vitro experiments demonstrate that tunable fluorescent silica NPs synthesized with ACSRT can be potentially used for toxicological assessments and nanomedical studies.

  2. Genomic Rearrangements in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Christopher E.; Rubin, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Genomic instability is a fundamental feature of human cancer, leading to the activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressors. In prostate cancer, structural genomic rearrangements, resulting in gene fusions, amplifications and deletions, are a critical mechanism effecting these alterations. Here we review recent literature regarding the importance of genomic rearrangements in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and the potential impact on patient care. Recent findings Next generation sequencing has revealed a striking abundance, complexity, and heterogeneity of genomic rearrangements in prostate cancer. These recent studies have nominated a number of processes in predisposing prostate cancer to genomic rearrangements, including androgen-induced transcription. Summary Structural rearrangements are the critical mechanism resulting in the characteristic genomic changes associated with prostate cancer pathogenesis and progression. Future studies will determine if the impact of these events on tumor phenotypes can be translated to clinical utility for patient prognosis and choices of management strategies. PMID:25393273

  3. The acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of an α-pinene-derived organic nitrate: kinetics, products, reaction mechanisms, and atmospheric impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindelaub, Joel D.; Borca, Carlos H.; Hostetler, Matthew A.; Slade, Jonathan H.; Lipton, Mark A.; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V.; Shepson, Paul B.

    2016-12-01

    data, product identification confirms that a unimolecular specific acid-catalyzed mechanism is responsible for organic nitrate hydrolysis under acidic conditions. The free energies and enthalpies of the isobutyl nitrate hydrolysis intermediates and products were calculated using a hybrid density functional (ωB97X-V) to support the proposed mechanisms. These findings provide valuable information regarding the organic nitrate hydrolysis mechanism and its contribution to the fate of atmospheric NOx, aerosol phase processing, and BSOA composition.

  4. Claisen thermally rearranged (CTR) polymers

    PubMed Central

    Tena, Alberto; Rangou, Sofia; Shishatskiy, Sergey; Filiz, Volkan; Abetz, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Thermally rearranged (TR) polymers, which are considered the next-generation of membrane materials because of their excellent transport properties and high thermal and chemical stability, are proven to have significant drawbacks because of the high temperature required for the rearrangement and low degree of conversion during this process. We demonstrate that using a [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement, the temperature required for the rearrangement of a solid glassy polymer was reduced by 200°C. Conversions of functionalized polyimide to polybenzoxazole of more than 97% were achieved. These highly mechanically stable polymers were almost five times more permeable and had more than two times higher degrees of conversion than the reference polymer treated under the same conditions. Properties of these second-generation TR polymers provide the possibility of preparing efficient polymer membranes in a form of, for example, thin-film composite membranes for various gas and liquid membrane separation applications. PMID:27482538

  5. Immunoglobulin λ Gene Rearrangement Can Precede κ Gene Rearrangement

    DOE PAGES

    Berg, Jörg; Mcdowell, Mindy; Jäck, Hans-Martin; ...

    1990-01-01

    Imore » mmunoglobulin genes are generated during differentiation of B lymphocytes by joining gene segments. A mouse pre-B cell contains a functional immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene, but no light-chain gene. Although there is only one heavy-chain locus, there are two lightchain loci: κ and λ .It has been reported that κ loci in the germ-line configuration are never (in man) or very rarely (in the mouse) present in cells with functionally rearranged λ -chain genes. Two explanations have been proposed to explain this: (a) the ordered rearrangement theory, which postulates that light-chain gene rearrangement in the pre-B cell is first attempted at the κ locus, and that only upon failure to produce a functional κ chain is there an attempt to rearrange the λ locus; and (b) the stochastic theory, which postulates that rearrangement at the λ locus proceeds at a rate that is intrinsically much slower than that at the κ locus. We show here that λ -chain genes are generated whether or not the κ locus has lost its germ-line arrangement, a result that is compatible only with the stochastic theory.« less

  6. Cause analysis of the effects of acid-catalyzed steam-exploded corn stover prehydrolyzate on ethanol fermentation by Pichia stipitis CBS 5776.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junjun; Yang, Jinlong; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Lingling; Yong, Qiang; Xu, Yong; Li, Xin; Yu, Shiyuan

    2014-11-01

    The prehydrolyzate obtained from acid-catalyzed steam-exploded corn stover (ASC) mainly contains xylose and a number of inhibitory compounds that inhibit ethanol fermentation by Pichia stipitis. In this study, the effects of the ASC prehydrolyzate, specifically those of the carbohydrate-degradation products, lignin-degradation products (which were extracted from ASC prehydrolyzate using ethyl acetate), and six major phenolic compounds (added to pure-sugar media individually or in combination), on ethanol fermentation were investigated. Results indicate that the effects of the carbohydrate-degradation products were negligible (10 h delayed) compared with those of pure-sugar fermentation, whereas the effects of the lignin-degradation products were significant (52 h delayed). Meanwhile, the inhibitory effects of the major phenolic compounds were not caused by certain types of inhibitors, but were due to the synergistic effects of various inhibitors.

  7. Remarkable Differences in Reactivity between Benzothiazoline and Hantzsch Ester as a Hydrogen Donor in Chiral Phosphoric Acid Catalyzed Asymmetric Reductive Amination of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Akiyama, Takahiko; Cheon, Cheol-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Described herein are differences in behavior between a Hantzsch ester and a benzothiazoline as hydrogen donors in the chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed asymmetric reductive amination of ketones with p-anisidine. The asymmetric reductive amination of ketones with a Hantzsch ester as a hydrogen donor provided the corresponding chiral amines exclusively, regardless of the structures of the ketones, whereas a similar transformation with a benzothiazoline provided chiral amines and p-methoxyphenyl-protected primary amines in variable yields, depending on the structures of both the ketones and benzothiazolines. Because a benzothiazoline has an N,S-acetal moiety that is vulnerable to p-anisidine, the primary amine can be formed through transimination of the benzothiazoline with p-anisidine followed by reduction of the resulting aldimine with remaining benzothiazoline.

  8. Hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics-Based Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Polyols in Liquid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Caratzoulas, Stavros; Courtney, Timothy; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2011-01-01

    We use the conversion of protonated glycerol to acrolein for a case study of the mechanism of acid-catalyzed dehydration of polyols in aqueous environments. We employ hybrid Quamtum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Molecular Dynamics (QM/MM MD) simulations with biased sampling and perform free energy calculations for the elementary steps of the reaction. We investigate the effects of solvent dynamics and in particular the role of quantum mechanical water in the dehydration mechanism. We present results supporting a mechanism that proceeds via water-mediated proton transfers and thus through an enol intermediate. We find that the first dehydration may take place by two, low-energy pathways requiring, respectively, 20.9 and 18.8 kcal/mol of activation free energy. The second dehydration requires 19.9 kcal/mol of activation free energy while for the overall reaction we compute a free energy change of -8 kcal/mol.

  9. Difference analysis of the enzymatic hydrolysis performance of acid-catalyzed steam-exploded corn stover before and after washing with water.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junjun; Shi, Linli; Zhang, Lingling; Xu, Yong; Yong, Qiang; Ouyang, Jia; Yu, Shiyuan

    2016-10-01

    The difference in the enzymatic hydrolysis yield of acid-catalyzed steam-exploded corn stover (ASC) before and after washing with water reached approximately 15 % under the same conditions. The reasons for the difference in the yield between ASC and washed ASC (wASC) were determined through the analysis of the composition of ASC prehydrolyzate and sugar concentration of enzymatic hydrolyzate. Salts produced by neutralization (CaSO4, Na2SO4, K2SO4, and (NH4)2SO4), sugars (polysaccharides, oligosaccharides, and monosaccharides), sugar-degradation products (weak acids and furans), and lignin-degradation products (ethyl acetate extracts and nine main lignin-degradation products) were back-added to wASC. Results showed that these products, except furans, exerted negative effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. According to the characteristics of acid-catalyzed steam explosion pretreatment, the five sugar-degradation products' mixture and salts [Na2SO4, (NH4)2SO4] showed minimal negative inhibition effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. By contrast, furans demonstrated a promotion effect. Moreover, soluble sugars, such as 13 g/L xylose (decreased by 6.38 %), 5 g/L cellobiose (5.36 %), 10 g/L glucose (3.67 %), as well as lignin-degradation products, and ethyl acetate extracts (4.87 %), exhibited evident inhibition effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. Therefore, removal of soluble sugars and lignin-degradation products could effectively promote the enzymatic hydrolysis performance.

  10. An enantioselective strategy for the total synthesis of (S)-tylophorine via catalytic asymmetric allylation and a one-pot DMAP-promoted isocyanate formation/Lewis acid catalyzed cyclization sequence.

    PubMed

    Su, Bo; Zhang, Hui; Deng, Meng; Wang, Qingmin

    2014-06-14

    A new asymmetric total synthesis of a phenanthroindolizidine alkaloid (S)-tylophorine is reported, which features a catalytic asymmetric allylation of aldehydes and an unexpected one-pot DMAP promoted isocyanate formation and Lewis acid catalyzed intramolecular cyclization reaction. In addition, White's direct C-H oxidation catalyst system converting monosubstituted olefins to linear allylic acetates was also employed for late-stage transformation.

  11. DNA Rearrangements through Spatial Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonoska, Nataša; Saito, Masahico

    The paper is a short overview of a recent model of homologous DNA recombination events guided by RNA templates that have been observed in certain species of ciliates. This model uses spatial graphs to describe DNA rearrangements and show how gene recombination can be modeled as topological braiding of the DNA. We show that a graph structure, which we refer to as an assembly graph, containing only 1- and 4-valent rigid vertices can provide a physical representation of the DNA at the time of recombination. With this representation, 4-valent vertices correspond to the alignment of the recombination sites, and we model the actual recombination event as smoothing of these vertices.

  12. Optimal Arrangement of Components Via Pairwise Rearrangements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    reliability function under component pairwise rearrangement. They use this property to find the optimal component arrangement. Worked examples illustrate the methods proposed. Keywords: Optimization; Permutations; Nodes.

  13. Mechanism of an Organoboron-Catalyzed Domino Reaction: Kinetic and Computational Studies of Borinic Acid-Catalyzed Regioselective Chloroacylation of 2,3-Epoxy Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Graham E; Tanveer, Kashif; Taylor, Mark S

    2017-01-20

    A mechanistic study of the borinic acid-catalyzed chloroacylation of 2,3-epoxy alcohols is presented. In this unusual mode of catalysis, the borinic acid activates the substrate toward sequential reactions with a nucleophile (epoxide ring-opening by chloride) and an electrophile (O-acylation of the resulting alkoxide). Reaction progress kinetic analysis of data obtained through in situ FTIR spectroscopy is consistent with a mechanism involving turnover-limiting acylation of a chlorohydrin-derived borinic ester. This proposal is further supported by investigations of the effects of aroyl chloride substitution on reaction rate. The kinetics experiments also shed light on the effects of chloride concentration on reaction rate and indicate that the catalyst is subject to inhibition by the product of the chloroacylation reaction. Computational modeling is employed to gain insight into the effects of the organoboron catalyst on the regioselectivities of the epoxide ring-opening and acylation steps. The density functional theory calculations provide a plausible pathway for selective chlorinolysis at C-3 and benzoylation at O-1, as is observed experimentally.

  14. Integrin activation and structural rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Junichi; Springer, Timothy A

    2002-08-01

    Among adhesion receptor families, integrins are particularly important in biological processes that require rapid modulation of adhesion and de-adhesion. Activation on a timescale of < 1 s of beta2 integrins on leukocytes and beta3 integrins on platelets enables deposition of these cells at sites of inflammation or vessel wall injury. Recent crystal, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and electron microscope (EM) structures of integrins and their domains lead to a unifying mechanism of activation for both integrins that contain and those that lack an inserted (I) domain. The I domain adopts two alternative conformations, termed open and closed. In striking similarity to signaling G-proteins, rearrangement of a Mg2+-binding site is linked to large conformational movements in distant backbone regions. Mutations that stabilize a particular conformation show that the open conformation has high affinity for ligand, whereas the closed conformation has low affinity. Movement of the C-terminal alpha-helix 10 A down the side of the domain in the open conformation is sufficient to increase affinity at the distal ligand-binding site 9,000-fold. This C-terminal "bell-rope" provides a mechanism for linkage to conformational movements in other domains. Recent structures and functional studies reveal interactions between beta-propeller, I, and I-like domains in the integrin headpiece, and a critical role for integrin epidermal growth factor (EGF) domains in the stalk region. The headpiece of the integrin faces down towards the membrane in the inactive conformation, and extends upward in a "switchblade"-like opening upon activation. These long-range structural rearrangements of the entire integrin molecule involving interdomain contacts appear closely linked to conformational changes within the I and I-like domains, which result in increased affinity and competence for ligand binding.

  15. Microwave accelerated aza-Claisen rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Gajdosíková, Eva; Martinková, Miroslava; Gonda, Jozef; Conka, Patrik

    2008-11-14

    A study of microwave-induced and standard thermal Overman rearrangement of selected allylic trichloroacetimidates 1a-1f, 6-8 to the corresponding acetamides 2a-2f, 9-11 is reported. The microwave-assisted rearrangement of trifluoroacetimidate 13 is also described. Using this methodology, an efficient access to versatile allylic trihaloacetamides building synthons was established.

  16. Acid-, base-, and lewis-acid-catalyzed heterolysis of methoxide from an alpha-hydroxy-beta-methoxy radical: models for reactions catalyzed by coenzyme B12-dependent diol dehydratase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Libin; Newcomb, Martin

    2005-11-11

    [Reaction: see text].A model for glycol radicals was employed in laser flash photolysis kinetic studies of catalysis of the fragmentation of a methoxy group adjacent to an alpha-hydroxy radical center. Photolysis of a phenylselenylmethylcyclopropane precursor gave a cyclopropylcarbinyl radical that rapidly ring opened to the target alpha-hydroxy-beta-methoxy radical (3). Heterolysis of the methoxy group in 3 gave an enolyl radical (4a) or an enol ether radical cation (4b), depending upon pH. Radicals 4 contain a 2,2-diphenylcyclopropane reporter group, and they rapidly opened to give UV-observable diphenylalkyl radicals as the final products. No heterolysis was observed for radical 3 under neutral conditions. In basic aqueous acetonitrile solutions, specific base catalysis of the heterolysis was observed; the pK(a) of radical 3 was determined to be 12.5 from kinetic titration plots, and the ketyl radical formed by deprotonation of 3 eliminated methoxide with a rate constant of 5 x 10(7) s(-1). In the presence of carboxylic acids in acetonitrile solutions, radical 3 eliminated methanol in a general acid-catalyzed reaction, and rate constants for protonation of the methoxy group in 3 by several acids were measured. Radical 3 also reacted by fragmentation of methoxide in Lewis-acid-catalyzed heterolysis reactions; ZnBr2, Sc(OTf)3, and BF3 were found to be efficient catalysts. Catalytic rate constants for the heterolysis reactions were in the range of 3 x 10(4) to 2 x 10(6) s(-1). The Lewis-acid-catalyzed heterolysis reactions are fast enough for kinetic competence in coenzyme B12 dependent enzyme-catalyzed reactions of glycols, and Lewis-acid-catalyzed cleavages of beta-ethers in radicals might be applied in synthetic reactions.

  17. Rearrangements of organic peroxides and related processes

    PubMed Central

    Yaremenko, Ivan A; Vil’, Vera A; Demchuk, Dmitry V

    2016-01-01

    Summary This review is the first to collate and summarize main data on named and unnamed rearrangement reactions of peroxides. It should be noted, that in the chemistry of peroxides two types of processes are considered under the term rearrangements. These are conventional rearrangements occurring with the retention of the molecular weight and transformations of one of the peroxide moieties after O–O-bond cleavage. Detailed information about the Baeyer−Villiger, Criegee, Hock, Kornblum−DeLaMare, Dakin, Elbs, Schenck, Smith, Wieland, and Story reactions is given. Unnamed rearrangements of organic peroxides and related processes are also analyzed. The rearrangements and related processes of important natural and synthetic peroxides are discussed separately. PMID:27559418

  18. Rearrangements of organic peroxides and related processes.

    PubMed

    Yaremenko, Ivan A; Vil', Vera A; Demchuk, Dmitry V; Terent'ev, Alexander O

    2016-01-01

    This review is the first to collate and summarize main data on named and unnamed rearrangement reactions of peroxides. It should be noted, that in the chemistry of peroxides two types of processes are considered under the term rearrangements. These are conventional rearrangements occurring with the retention of the molecular weight and transformations of one of the peroxide moieties after O-O-bond cleavage. Detailed information about the Baeyer-Villiger, Criegee, Hock, Kornblum-DeLaMare, Dakin, Elbs, Schenck, Smith, Wieland, and Story reactions is given. Unnamed rearrangements of organic peroxides and related processes are also analyzed. The rearrangements and related processes of important natural and synthetic peroxides are discussed separately.

  19. Effect of acid-catalyzed formation rates of benzimidazole-linked polymers on porosity and selective CO2 capture from gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Altarawneh, Suha; İslamoğlu, Timur; Sekizkardes, Ali Kemal; El-Kaderi, Hani M

    2015-04-07

    Benzimidazole-linked polymers (BILPs) are emerging candidates for gas storage and separation applications; however, their current synthetic methods offer limited control over textural properties which are vital for their multifaceted use. In this study, we investigate the impact of acid-catalyzed formation rates of the imidazole units on the porosity levels of BILPs and subsequent effects on CO2 and CH4 binding affinities and selective uptake of CO2 over CH4 and N2. Treatment of 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride hydrate with 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(4-formylphenyl)benzene and 1,3,5-(4-formylphenyl)-benzene in anhydrous DMF afforded porous BILP-15 (448 m(2) g(-1)) and BILP-16 (435 m(2) g(-1)), respectively. Alternatively, the same polymers were prepared from the neutral 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine and catalytic amounts of aqueous HCl. The resulting polymers denoted BILP-15(AC) and BILP-16(AC) exhibited optimal surface areas; 862 m(2) g(-1) and 643 m(2) g(-1), respectively, only when 2 equiv of HCl (0.22 M) was used. In contrast, the CO2 binding affinity (Qst) dropped from 33.0 to 28.9 kJ mol(-1) for BILP-15 and from 32.0 to 31.6 kJ mol(-1) for BILP-16. According to initial slope calculations at 273 K/298 K, a notable change in CO2/N2 selectivity was observed for BILP-15(AC) (61/50) compared to BILP-15 (83/63). Similarly, ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) calculations also show the higher specific surface area of BILP-15(AC) and BILP-16(AC) compromises their CO2/N2 selectivity.

  20. Acid-catalyzed condensed-phase reactions of limonene and terpineol and their impacts on gas-to-particle partitioning in the formation of organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong Jie; Cheong, Gema Y L; Lau, Arthur P S; Chan, Chak K

    2010-07-15

    We investigated the condensed-phase reactions of biogenic VOCs with C double bond C bonds (limonene, C(10)H(16), and terpineol, C(10)H(18)O) catalyzed by sulfuric acid by both bulk solution (BS) experiments and gas-particle (GP) experiments using a flow cell reactor. Product analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that cationic polymerization led to dimeric and trimeric product formation under conditions of relative humidity (RH) <20% (in the GP experiments) and a sulfuric acid concentration of 57.8 wt % (in the BS experiments), while hydration occurred under conditions of RH > 20% (in the GP experiments) and sulfuric acid concentrations of 46.3 wt % or lower (in the BS experiments). Apparent partitioning coefficients (K(p,rxn)) were estimated from the GP experiments by including the reaction products. Only under extremely low RH conditions (RH < 5%) did the values of K(p,rxn) ( approximately 5 x 10(-6) m(3)/microg for limonene and approximately 2 x 10(-5) m(3)/microg for terpineol) substantially exceed the physical partitioning coefficients (K(p) = 6.5 x 10(-8) m(3)/microg for limonene and =2.3 x 10(-6) m(3)/microg for terpineol) derived from the absorptive partitioning theory. At RH higher than 5%, the apparent partitioning coefficients (K(p,rxn)) of both limonene and terpineol were in the same order of magnitude as the K(p) values derived from the absorptive partitioning theory. Compared with other conditions including VOC concentration and degree of neutralization (by ammonium) of acidic particles, RH is a critical parameter that influences both the reaction mechanisms and the uptake ability (K(p,rxn) values) of these processes. The finding suggests that RH needs to be considered when taking the effects of acid-catalyzed reactions into account in estimating organic aerosol formation from C double bond C containing VOCs.

  1. Diverse mutational mechanisms cause pathogenic subtelomeric rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yue; Hermetz, Karen E.; Jackson, Jodi M.; Mulle, Jennifer G.; Dodd, Anne; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Ballif, Blake C.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Cody, Jannine D.; Ledbetter, David H.; Martin, Christa L.; Rudd, M. Katharine

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangements are a significant cause of intellectual disability and birth defects. Subtelomeric rearrangements, including deletions, duplications and translocations of chromosome ends, were first discovered over 40 years ago and are now recognized as being responsible for several genetic syndromes. Unlike the deletions and duplications that cause some genomic disorders, subtelomeric rearrangements do not typically have recurrent breakpoints and involve many different chromosome ends. To capture the molecular mechanisms responsible for this heterogeneous class of chromosome abnormality, we coupled high-resolution array CGH with breakpoint junction sequencing of a diverse collection of subtelomeric rearrangements. We analyzed 102 breakpoints corresponding to 78 rearrangements involving 28 chromosome ends. Sequencing 21 breakpoint junctions revealed signatures of non-homologous end-joining, non-allelic homologous recombination between interspersed repeats and DNA replication processes. Thus, subtelomeric rearrangements arise from diverse mutational mechanisms. In addition, we find hotspots of subtelomeric breakage at the end of chromosomes 9q and 22q; these sites may correspond to genomic regions that are particularly susceptible to double-strand breaks. Finally, fine-mapping the smallest subtelomeric rearrangements has narrowed the critical regions for some chromosomal disorders. PMID:21729882

  2. Reversibility of cell surface label rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Cell surface labeling can cause rearrangements of randomly distributed membrane components. Removal of the label bound to the cell surface allows the membrane components to return to their original random distribution, demonstrating that label is necessary to maintain as well as to induce rearrangements. With scanning electron microscopy, the rearrangement of concanavalin A (con A) and ricin binding sites on LA-9 cells has been followed by means of hemocyanin, a visual label. The removal of con A from its binding sites at the cell surface with alpha- methyl mannoside, and the return of these sites to their original distribution are also followed in this manner. There are labeling differences with con A and ricin. Under some conditions, however, the same rearrangements are seen with both lectins. The disappearance of labeled sites from areas of ruffling activity is a major feature of the rearrangements seen. Both this ruffling activity and the rearrangement of label are sensitive to cytochalasin B, and ruffling activity, perhaps along with other cytochalasin-sensitive structure, may play a role in the rearrangements of labeled sites. PMID:1025154

  3. Lateral gene transfer, rearrangement, reconciliation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Models of ancestral gene order reconstruction have progressively integrated different evolutionary patterns and processes such as unequal gene content, gene duplications, and implicitly sequence evolution via reconciled gene trees. These models have so far ignored lateral gene transfer, even though in unicellular organisms it can have an important confounding effect, and can be a rich source of information on the function of genes through the detection of transfers of clusters of genes. Result We report an algorithm together with its implementation, DeCoLT, that reconstructs ancestral genome organization based on reconciled gene trees which summarize information on sequence evolution, gene origination, duplication, loss, and lateral transfer. DeCoLT optimizes in polynomial time on the number of rearrangements, computed as the number of gains and breakages of adjacencies between pairs of genes. We apply DeCoLT to 1099 gene families from 36 cyanobacteria genomes. Conclusion DeCoLT is able to reconstruct adjacencies in 35 ancestral bacterial genomes with a thousand gene families in a few hours, and detects clusters of co-transferred genes. DeCoLT may also be used with any relationship between genes instead of adjacencies, to reconstruct ancestral interactions, functions or complexes. Availability http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/software/DeCoLT/ PMID:24564205

  4. The continuous acid-catalyzed dehydration of alcohols in supercritical fluids: A new approach to the cleaner synthesis of acetals, ketals, and ethers with high selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.K.; Smail, F.R.; Hitzler, M.G.; Ross, S.K.; Poliakoff, M.

    1999-11-24

    This report describes a new a continuous method for forming ethers, acetals and ketals using solid acid catalysts, DELOXAN ASP or AMBERLYST 15, and supercritical fluid solvents. In the case of ether formation, the authors observe a high selectivity for linear alkyl ethers with little rearrangement to give branches ethers. Such rearrangement is common in conventional synthesis. The approach is effective for a range of n-alcohols up to n-octanol and also for the secondary alcohol 2-propanol. In the reaction of phenol with an alkylating agent, the continuous reaction can be tuned to give preferential O- or C-alkylation with up to 49% O-alkylation with supercritical propene. The authors also investigate the synthesis of a range of cyclic ethers and show an improved method for the synthesis of THF from 1,4-butandiol under very mild conditions.

  5. The cytogenetics of mammalian autosomal rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, A. )

    1988-01-01

    This book is covered under the following topics: Ascertainment and risks of recombinant progeny; Infertility, gametic selection, and fetal loss; origin of chromosome rearrangements; and Some implications of chromosome breakpoints.

  6. Glycolytic regulation of cell rearrangement in angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cruys, Bert; Wong, Brian W.; Kuchnio, Anna; Verdegem, Dries; Cantelmo, Anna Rita; Conradi, Lena-Christin; Vandekeere, Saar; Bouché, Ann; Cornelissen, Ivo; Vinckier, Stefan; Merks, Roeland M. H.; Dejana, Elisabetta; Gerhardt, Holger; Dewerchin, Mieke; Bentley, Katie; Carmeliet, Peter

    2016-01-01

    During vessel sprouting, endothelial cells (ECs) dynamically rearrange positions in the sprout to compete for the tip position. We recently identified a key role for the glycolytic activator PFKFB3 in vessel sprouting by regulating cytoskeleton remodelling, migration and tip cell competitiveness. It is, however, unknown how glycolysis regulates EC rearrangement during vessel sprouting. Here we report that computational simulations, validated by experimentation, predict that glycolytic production of ATP drives EC rearrangement by promoting filopodia formation and reducing intercellular adhesion. Notably, the simulations correctly predicted that blocking PFKFB3 normalizes the disturbed EC rearrangement in high VEGF conditions, as occurs during pathological angiogenesis. This interdisciplinary study integrates EC metabolism in vessel sprouting, yielding mechanistic insight in the control of vessel sprouting by glycolysis, and suggesting anti-glycolytic therapy for vessel normalization in cancer and non-malignant diseases. PMID:27436424

  7. Cortical microtubule rearrangements and cell wall patterning

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Plant cortical microtubules, which form a highly ordered array beneath the plasma membrane, play essential roles in determining cell shape and function by directing the arrangement of cellulosic and non-cellulosic compounds on the cell surface. Interphase transverse arrays of cortical microtubules self-organize through their dynamic instability and inter-microtubule interactions, and by branch-form microtubule nucleation and severing. Recent studies revealed that distinct spatial signals including ROP GTPase, cellular geometry, and mechanical stress regulate the behavior of cortical microtubules at the subcellular and supercellular levels, giving rise to dramatic rearrangements in the cortical microtubule array in response to internal and external cues. Increasing evidence indicates that negative regulators of microtubules also contribute to the rearrangement of the cortical microtubule array. In this review, I summarize recent insights into how the rearrangement of the cortical microtubule array leads to proper, flexible cell wall patterning. PMID:25904930

  8. New anticancer antibiotic acts through diradical rearrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Stinson, S. )

    1990-05-28

    This paper reports that chemists have found and characterized an anticancer antibiotic, dynemicin A, that may be the fouth of a series of antibiotics that act by metabolic rearrangement to a diradical. If true, diradical precursors may represent an antibiotic strategy that evolved widely in nature. And, there may be many more anticancer antibiotics awaiting discovery. Also, the unique internal trigger that seems to set off the dynemicin rearrangement gives chemists a new understanding of how these compounds work. If, indeed, the anthraquinone nucleus in dynemicin A binds by intercalation between strands of DNA as is now thought, chemists will learn more about how to deliver drugs to specific sites.

  9. Facile Oxidative Rearrangements Using Hypervalent Iodine Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Fateh V; Rehbein, Julia; Wirth, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Aromatic substituents migrate in a novel oxidative cyclization mediated by iodine(III) reagents. 4-Arylbut-3-enoic acids are cyclized and rearranged to 4-arylfuran-2(5H)-ones by hypervalent iodine compounds in good to excellent yields under mild reaction conditions. Other ring sizes are also accessible. The mechanism of the reaction is described in detail, and calculations highlight the cationic nature of the intermediates in the rearrangement. The fast access to heavily substituted furanones is used for the synthesis of biologically active derivatives. PMID:24551514

  10. Genomic rearrangements at rrn operons in Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Helm, R Allen; Lee, Alison G; Christman, Harry D; Maloy, Stanley

    2003-11-01

    Most Salmonella serovars are general pathogens that infect a variety of hosts. These "generalist" serovars cause disease in many animals from reptiles to mammals. In contrast, a few serovars cause disease only in a specific host. Host-specific serovars can cause a systemic, often fatal disease in one species yet remain avirulent in other species. Host-specific Salmonella frequently have large genomic rearrangements due to recombination at the ribosomal RNA (rrn) operons while the generalists consistently have a conserved chromosomal arrangement. To determine whether this is the result of an intrinsic difference in recombination frequency or a consequence of lifestyle difference between generalist and host-specific Salmonella, we determined the frequency of rearrangements in vitro. Using lacZ genes as portable regions of homology for inversion analysis, we found that both generalist and host-specific serovars of Salmonella have similar tolerances to chromosomal rearrangements in vitro. Using PCR and genetic selection, we found that generalist and host-specific serovars also undergo rearrangements at rrn operons at similar frequencies in vitro. These observations indicate that the observed difference in genomic stability between generalist and host-specific serovars is a consequence of their distinct lifestyles, not intrinsic differences in recombination frequencies.

  11. Facility rearrangement scoping study: Draft letter report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-17

    We assessed the feasibility of designing the salt repository layouts so that shafts, surface structures and facilities would be totally within the north-east (NE) and center-east (CE) (one square mile) sections of the 9 square mile Deaf Smith site. With the latest version of the SCP-Conceptual Design as the basis, rearrangement analyses were conducted for the surface and subsurface layouts. For the rearranged layouts that were workable, impact assessments, relative to the SCP-Conceptual Design, were performed. This study concluded that, on a qualitative basis, the salt repository surface facilities can be relocated to within the north-east and center-east sections of the site. A suitable subsurface layout can be designed to accommodate this rearrangement. The resultant surface rearrangement is depicted. The two study sections (NE and CE) are emphasized on this figure. For reference, the location of the surface facilities in the SCP-Conceptual Design is also shown. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Light chain replacement: a new model for antibody gene rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    A functional B cell antigen receptor is thought to regulate antibody gene rearrangement either by stopping further rearrangement (exclusion) or by promoting additional rearrangement (editing). We have developed a new model to study the regulation of antibody gene rearrangement. In this model, we used gene targeting to replace the J kappa region with a functional V kappa-J kappa light chain gene. Two different strains of mice were created; one, V kappa 4R, has a V kappa 4-J kappa 4 rearrangement followed by a downstream J kappa 5 segment, while the other, V kappa 8R, has a V kappa 8-J kappa 5 light chain. Here, we analyze the influence of these functional light chains on light chain rearrangement. We show that some V kappa 4R and V kappa 8R B cells only have the V kappa R light chain rearrangement, whereas others undergo additional rearrangements. Additional rearrangement can occur not only at the other kappa allele or isotype (lambda), but also at the targeted locus in both V kappa 4R and V kappa 8R. Rearrangement to the downstream J kappa 5 segment is observed in V kappa 4R, as is deletion of the targeted locus in both V kappa 4R and V kappa 8R. The V kappa R models illustrate that a productively rearranged light chain can either terminate further rearrangement or allow further rearrangement. We attribute the latter to editing of autoantibodies and to corrections of dysfunctional receptors. PMID:7629511

  13. Deep cytoplasmic rearrangements in ventralized Xenopus embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. E.; Denegre, J. M.; Danilchik, M. V.

    1993-01-01

    Following fertilization in Xenopus, dramatic rearrangements of the egg cytoplasm relocalize maternally synthesized egg components. During the first cell cycle the vegetal yolk mass rotates relative to the egg surface, toward the sperm entry point (SEP) (J. P. Vincent, G. F. Oster, and J. C. Gerhart, 1986, Dev. Biol. 113, 484-500), while concomitant deep cytoplasmic rearrangements occur in the animal hemisphere (M. V. Danilchik and J. M. Denegre, 1991, Development 111, 845-856). In this paper we examine the role of vegetal yolk mass rotation in producing the animal cytoplasmic rearrangements. We inhibited rotation by uv-irradiating embryos during the first cell cycle, a treatment that yields an extremely ventralized phenotype. Both uv-irradiated embryos and unirradiated control embryos show cytoplasmic rearrangements in the animal hemisphere during the first cell cycle. Cytoplasmic rearrangements on the SEP side of the embryo associated with the path of the sperm pronucleus, plus a swirl on the anti-SEP (dorsal) side, are seen, whether or not yolk mass rotation has occurred. This result suggests a role for the expanding sperm aster in directing animal hemisphere cytoplasmic movements. In unirradiated control embryos the anti-SEP (dorsal) swirl is larger than that in uv-irradiated embryos and often extends into the vegetal hemisphere, consistent with the animal cytoplasm having been pulled dorsally and vegetally by the sliding vegetal yolk mass. Thus the yolk mass rotation may normally enhance the dorsalward cytoplasmic movement, begun by the sperm aster, enough to induce normal axis formation. We extended our observations of unirradiated control and uv-irradiated embryos through early cleavages. The vegetal extent of the anti-SEP (dorsal) swirl pattern seen in control embryos persists through the early cleavage period, such that labeled animal cytoplasm extends deep into dorsal third-tier blastomeres at the 32-cell stage. Significantly, in uv-irradiated embryos

  14. Dynamics of genome rearrangement in bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Darling, Aaron E; Miklós, István; Ragan, Mark A

    2008-07-18

    Genome structure variation has profound impacts on phenotype in organisms ranging from microbes to humans, yet little is known about how natural selection acts on genome arrangement. Pathogenic bacteria such as Yersinia pestis, which causes bubonic and pneumonic plague, often exhibit a high degree of genomic rearrangement. The recent availability of several Yersinia genomes offers an unprecedented opportunity to study the evolution of genome structure and arrangement. We introduce a set of statistical methods to study patterns of rearrangement in circular chromosomes and apply them to the Yersinia. We constructed a multiple alignment of eight Yersinia genomes using Mauve software to identify 78 conserved segments that are internally free from genome rearrangement. Based on the alignment, we applied Bayesian statistical methods to infer the phylogenetic inversion history of Yersinia. The sampling of genome arrangement reconstructions contains seven parsimonious tree topologies, each having different histories of 79 inversions. Topologies with a greater number of inversions also exist, but were sampled less frequently. The inversion phylogenies agree with results suggested by SNP patterns. We then analyzed reconstructed inversion histories to identify patterns of rearrangement. We confirm an over-representation of "symmetric inversions"-inversions with endpoints that are equally distant from the origin of chromosomal replication. Ancestral genome arrangements demonstrate moderate preference for replichore balance in Yersinia. We found that all inversions are shorter than expected under a neutral model, whereas inversions acting within a single replichore are much shorter than expected. We also found evidence for a canonical configuration of the origin and terminus of replication. Finally, breakpoint reuse analysis reveals that inversions with endpoints proximal to the origin of DNA replication are nearly three times more frequent. Our findings represent the first

  15. Afrobatrachian mitochondrial genomes: genome reorganization, gene rearrangement mechanisms, and evolutionary trends of duplicated and rearranged genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial genomic (mitogenomic) reorganizations are rarely found in closely-related animals, yet drastic reorganizations have been found in the Ranoides frogs. The phylogenetic relationships of the three major ranoid taxa (Natatanura, Microhylidae, and Afrobatrachia) have been problematic, and mitogenomic information for afrobatrachians has not been available. Several molecular models for mitochondrial (mt) gene rearrangements have been proposed, but observational evidence has been insufficient to evaluate them. Furthermore, evolutionary trends in rearranged mt genes have not been well understood. To gain molecular and phylogenetic insights into these issues, we analyzed the mt genomes of four afrobatrachian species (Breviceps adspersus, Hemisus marmoratus, Hyperolius marmoratus, and Trichobatrachus robustus) and performed molecular phylogenetic analyses. Furthermore we searched for two evolutionary patterns expected in the rearranged mt genes of ranoids. Results Extensively reorganized mt genomes having many duplicated and rearranged genes were found in three of the four afrobatrachians analyzed. In fact, Breviceps has the largest known mt genome among vertebrates. Although the kinds of duplicated and rearranged genes differed among these species, a remarkable gene rearrangement pattern of non-tandemly copied genes situated within tandemly-copied regions was commonly found. Furthermore, the existence of concerted evolution was observed between non-neighboring copies of triplicated 12S and 16S ribosomal RNA regions. Conclusions Phylogenetic analyses based on mitogenomic data support a close relationship between Afrobatrachia and Microhylidae, with their estimated divergence 100 million years ago consistent with present-day endemism of afrobatrachians on the African continent. The afrobatrachian mt data supported the first tandem and second non-tandem duplication model for mt gene rearrangements and the recombination-based model for concerted

  16. Catalytic synthesis of amides via aldoximes rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Crochet, Pascale; Cadierno, Victorio

    2015-02-14

    Amide bond formation reactions are among the most important transformations in organic chemistry because of the widespread occurrence of amides in pharmaceuticals, natural products and biologically active compounds. The Beckmann rearrangement is a well-known method to generate secondary amides from ketoximes. However, under the acidic conditions commonly employed, aldoximes RHC=NOH rarely rearrange into the corresponding primary amides RC(=O)NH2. In recent years, it was demonstrated that this atom-economical transformation can be carried out efficiently and selectively with the help of metal catalysts. Several homogeneous and heterogenous systems have been described. In addition, protocols offering the option to generate the aldoximes in situ from the corresponding aldehydes and hydroxylamine, or even from alcohols, have also been developed, as well as a series of tandem processes allowing the access to N-substituted amide products. In this Feature article a comprehensive overview of the advances achieved in this particular research area is presented.

  17. Polyyne synthesis using carbene/carbenoid rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Chalifoux, Wesley A; Tykwinski, Rik R

    2006-01-01

    Rearrangement of a carbene/carbenoid intermediate to form an acetylene moiety, known as the Fritsch-Buttenberg-Wiechell (FBW) rearrangement, was developed for the formation of polyynes and polyyne frameworks within highly conjugated organic materials. Necessary precursors can be prepared through formation of an alkynyl ketone, followed by dibromoolefination under Corey-Fuchs conditions. The carbenoid rearrangement is brought about by treatment of the dibromoolefin with BuLi under mild conditions. The success of these FBW reactions is quite solvent-dependent, and nonpolar hydrocarbon solvents (e.g., hexanes, toluene, benzene) work quite well, while use of ethereal solvents such as diethyl ether and tetrahydrofuran (THF) does not provide the desired polyyne product. This protocol was successfully applied to the formation of silyl, alkyl, alkenyl, and aryl polyynes, including di-, tri-, and tetrayne products, as well as the construction of two-dimensional carbon-rich molecules. A one-pot variant of this procedure is being developed and is particularly applicable toward the synthesis of polyyne natural products. Formation of a series of triisopropylsilyl end-capped polyynes, from the triyne to decayne, was achieved. Third-order nonlinear optical properties of these polyynes were evaluated. This study shows that the molecular second hyperpolarizabilities for the polyynes as a function of length increase at a rate that is higher than all other nonaromatic organic oligomers.

  18. Structural analysis of a carcinogen-induced genomic rearrangement event

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, F.G.; Davis, R.J.; Eichenfield, L.; Emanuel, B.S. Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia )

    1992-02-01

    The authors have explored the mechanism of genomic rearrangement in a hamster fibroblast cell culture system in which rearrangements are induced 5{prime} to the endogenous thymidine kinase gene by chemical carcinogen treatment. The wild-type region around one rearrangement breakpoint was cloned and sequenced. With this sequence information, the carcinogen-induced rearrangement was cloned from the corresponding rearranged cell line by the inverse polymerase chain reaction. After the breakpoint fragment was sequenced, the wild-type rearrangement partner (RP15) was isolated by a second inverse polymerase chain reaction of unrearranged DNA. Comparison of the sequence of the rearrangement breakpoint with the wild-type RP15 and 5{prime} thymidine kinase gene regions revealed short repeats directly at the breakpoint, as well as nearby A+T-rich regions in rearrangement partner. Therefore, these studies reveal interesting sequence and chromatin features near the rearrangement breakpoints and suggest a role for nuclear organization in the mechanism of carcinogen-induced genomic rearrangement.

  19. Molecular Cytogenetic Analysis of Telomere Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Christa Lese; Ledbetter, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imbalances involving the telomeric regions of human chromosomes, which contain the highest gene concentration in the genome, are proposed to have severe phenotypic consequences. For this reason, it is important to identify telomere rearrangements and assess their contribution to human pathology. This unit describes the structure and function of human telomeres and outlines several FISH-based methodologies that can be employed to study these unique regions of human chromosomes. It is a revision of the original version of the unit published in 2000, now including an introductory section describing advances in the discipline that have taken place since the original publication. PMID:25599669

  20. Nonclassical 21-Homododecahedryl Cation Rearrangement Revisited.

    PubMed

    Jalife, Said; Mondal, Sukanta; Osorio, Edison; Cabellos, José Luis; Martínez-Guajardo, Gerardo; Fernández-Herrera, María A; Merino, Gabriel

    2016-03-04

    The degenerate rearrangement in the 21-homododecahedryl cation (1) has been studied via density functional theory computations and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics simulations. Compound 1 can be described as a highly fluxional hyperconjugated carbocation. Complete scrambling of 1 can be achieved by the combination of two unveiled barrierless processes. The first one is a "rotation" of one of the six-membered rings via a 0.8 kcal·mol(-1) barrier, and the second one is a slower interconvertion between two hyperconjomers via an out-of-plane methine bending (ΔG(⧧) = 4.0 kcal·mol(-1)).

  1. Structures of Local Rearrangements in Soft Colloidal Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiunan; Liu, Rui; Yang, Mingcheng; Wang, Wei-Hua; Chen, Ke

    2016-06-01

    We image local structural rearrangements in soft colloidal glasses under small periodic perturbations induced by thermal cycling. Local structural entropy S2 positively correlates with observed rearrangements in colloidal glasses. The high S2 values of the rearranging clusters in glasses indicate that fragile regions in glasses are structurally less correlated, similar to structural defects in crystalline solids. Slow-evolving high S2 spots are capable of predicting local rearrangements long before the relaxations occur, while fluctuation-created high S2 spots best correlate with local deformations right before the rearrangement events. Local free volumes are also found to correlate with particle rearrangements at extreme values, although the ability to identify relaxation sites is substantially lower than S2. Our experiments provide an efficient structural identifier for the fragile regions in glasses and highlight the important role of structural correlations in the physics of glasses.

  2. Molecular refinement of gibbon genome rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Roberta; Capozzi, Oronzo; Wilson, Richard K; Mardis, Elaine R; Lomiento, Mariana; Tuzun, Eray; Cheng, Ze; Mootnick, Alan R; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Rocchi, Mariano; Eichler, Evan E

    2007-02-01

    The gibbon karyotype is known to be extensively rearranged when compared to the human and to the ancestral primate karyotype. By combining a bioinformatics (paired-end sequence analysis) approach and a molecular cytogenetics approach, we have refined the synteny block arrangement of the white-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus leucogenys, NLE) with respect to the human genome. We provide the first detailed clone framework map of the gibbon genome and refine the location of 86 evolutionary breakpoints to <1 Mb resolution. An additional 12 breakpoints, mapping primarily to centromeric and telomeric regions, were mapped to approximately 5 Mb resolution. Our combined FISH and BES analysis indicates that we have effectively subcloned 49 of these breakpoints within NLE gibbon BAC clones, mapped to a median resolution of 79.7 kb. Interestingly, many of the intervals associated with translocations were gene-rich, including some genes associated with normal skeletal development. Comparisons of NLE breakpoints with those of other gibbon species reveal variability in the position, suggesting that chromosomal rearrangement has been a longstanding property of this particular ape lineage. Our data emphasize the synergistic effect of combining computational genomics and cytogenetics and provide a framework for ultimate sequence and assembly of the gibbon genome.

  3. Dynamic behavior of rearranging carbocations – implications for terpene biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Stephanie R

    2016-01-01

    Summary This review describes unexpected dynamical behaviors of rearranging carbocations and the modern computational methods used to elucidate these aspects of reaction mechanisms. Unique potential energy surface topologies associated with these rearrangements have been discovered in recent years that are not only of fundamental interest, but also provide insight into the way Nature manipulates chemical space to accomplish specific chemical transformations. Cautions for analyzing both experimental and theoretical data on carbocation rearrangements are included throughout. PMID:27340434

  4. Applications of the Wittig-Still rearrangement in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rycek, Lukas; Hudlicky, Tomas

    2017-02-16

    This review traces the discovery of the Wittig-Still rearrangement and its applications in organic synthesis. Its relationship to Wittig rearrangements is discussed along with detailed analysis of E/Z- and diastereoselectivity. Modifications of the products arising from the Wittig-Still rearrangement are reviewed in the context of increased complexity in intermediates potentially useful in target oriented synthesis. Early applications of the Wittig-Still rearrangement to modifications of steroids are reviewed as are applications to various terpene and alkaloid natural product targets and miscellaneous compounds. To the best of our knowledge, the literature is covered through December 2016.

  5. Cytoplasmic rearrangements associated with amphibian egg symmetrization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malacinski, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    Cytoplasmic rearrangements which follow fertilization were mentioned in normal and inverted eggs. A set of yolk compartments was resolved by cytological analyses of both normally oriented and inverted eggs. Those compartments were characterized by their yolk platelet compositions and movement during egg inversion. It is found that during egg inversion the yolk compartments shift minor cytoplasmic compartments which line the egg cortex. Those yolk mass shifts occurred only after the inverted egg was activated. The direction of shift of the major yolk components, rather than the sperm entrance site, determines the dorsal/ventral polarity of the inverted egg. Among different spawnings the rate of shift varied. Eggs that displayed the fastest rate of shift exhibited the highest frequency of developmental abnormalities during organogenesis. Interpretation of novel observations on cytoplasmic organization provide criticism of some earlier models. A new density compartment model is presented as a coherent way to view the organization of the egg cytoplasm and the development of bilateral symmetry.

  6. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents. PMID:25045626

  7. Synthesis of Methyl Cyclopentanecarboxylate: A Laboratory Experience in Carbon Rearrangement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orchard, Alexandra; Maniquis, Roxanne V.; Salzameda, Nicholas T.

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel guided inquiry second semester organic chemistry laboratory rearrangement experiment. Students performed the Favorskii Rearrangement to obtain methyl cyclopentanecarboxylate in good yields. The students learned about the individual steps of the Favorskii mechanism and were required to propose a complete reaction mechanism and…

  8. Human structural variation: mechanisms of chromosome rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Weckselblatt, Brooke; Rudd, M. Katharine

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome structural variation (SV) is a normal part of variation in the human genome, but some classes of SV can cause neurodevelopmental disorders. Analysis of the DNA sequence at SV breakpoints can reveal mutational mechanisms and risk factors for chromosome rearrangement. Large-scale SV breakpoint studies have become possible recently owing to advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) including whole-genome sequencing (WGS). These findings have shed light on complex forms of SV such as triplications, inverted duplications, insertional translocations, and chromothripsis. Sequence-level breakpoint data resolve SV structure and determine how genes are disrupted, fused, and/or misregulated by breakpoints. Recent improvements in breakpoint sequencing have also revealed non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between paralogous long interspersed nuclear element (LINE) or human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) repeats as a cause of deletions, duplications, and translocations. This review covers the genomic organization of simple and complex constitutional SVs, as well as the molecular mechanisms of their formation. PMID:26209074

  9. Photoinduced Brook-Type Rearrangement of Acylcyclopolysilanes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Previously unknown 1,1,4-tris(trimethylsilyl)-4-acyldodecamethylcyclohexasilanes (Me3Si)2Si6Me12(Me3Si)COR (16a, R = tert-butyl; 16b, R = 1-adamantyl) have been synthesized by the reaction of the potassium silanides (Me3Si)2Si6Me12(Me3Si)K with acid chlorides ClCOR, and their photochemical rearrangement reactions have been studied. The molecular structures of 16a,b as determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis exhibit an unusual twist-boat conformation of the cyclohexasilane ring. When 16a,b were photolyzed with λ >300 nm radiation, they underwent Brook type 1,3-Si → O migration reactions to generate the cyclohexasilanes 17a,b with exocyclic Si=C bonds along with smaller amounts of the ring-enlarged species 19a,b with endocyclic Si=C double bonds. While 17a,b were stable enough to allow characterization by NMR and UV absorption spectroscopy, the less stable products 19a,b could only be observed in the form of their methanol adducts. PMID:24465075

  10. Clonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangement in the infarcted lymph node syndrome.

    PubMed

    Laszewski, M J; Belding, P J; Feddersen, R M; Lutz, C T; Goeken, J A; Kemp, J D; Dick, F R

    1991-07-01

    The authors report a case of complete lymph node infarction in which a specific etiology could not be determined by morphologic or immunophenotypic studies; however, clonal rearrangement of the immunoglobulin gene was demonstrated by Southern blot hybridization of DNA extracted from the necrotic tissue. A subsequent lymph node biopsy later was diagnosed as malignant lymphoma, using morphologic, immunophenotypic and genotypic criteria. Identical clonally rearranged bands were present in DNA from both the infarcted nodal and the subsequent tissue biopsies. In the setting of lymph node necrosis, gene rearrangement studies may provide diagnostic information concerning clonality, even if morphologic and immunophenotypic studies are indeterminate for a lymphoproliferative process.

  11. Antiproton-hydrogen atom rearrangement-annihilation cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.L. Jr.

    1986-08-22

    For antiproton energies of several eV or less, annihilation in matter occurs through atomic rearrangement processes in which the antiproton becomes bound to a nucleus prior to annihilation. Existing calculations of the antiproton-hydrogen atom rearrangement cross section are semiclassical and employ the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. They also employ various arguments in regard to the behavior of the system when the Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down at small antiproton-proton separations. These arguments indicate that rearrangement is essentially irreversible. In the present study, a detailed investigation was made of the antiproton-hydrogen atom system when the Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down. The results of this study indicate that the previous arguments were approximately correct, but that there is a significant probability for rearrangement reversing prior to annihilation. This probability is estimated to be about 20%. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Somatic Rearrangement in B Cells: It's (Mostly) Nuclear Physics.

    PubMed

    Aiden, Erez Lieberman; Casellas, Rafael

    2015-08-13

    We discuss how principles of nuclear architecture drive typical gene rearrangements in B lymphocytes, whereas translocation hot spots and recurrent lesions reflect the extent of AID-mediated DNA damage and selection.

  13. The Petasis-Ferrier rearrangement: developments and applications.

    PubMed

    Minbiole, Emily C; Minbiole, Kevin P C

    2016-04-01

    In the mid-1990s, Petasis reexamined a promising but infrequently used rearrangement strategy, the so-called Ferrier-type-II reaction, and provided it with a modern update. Previously, Ferrier had developed a strategy where carbohydrate derivatives would undergo a fragmentation/aldol-type recombination sequence, generating a carbocycle, albeit under the promotion of stoichiometric mercury salts. Petasis' new variant showed the promise to effectively and stereoselectively convert a range of cyclic vinyl acetals to useful tetrahydrofurans and tetrahydropyrans, using less toxic promoters. Since these first reports, the 'Petasis-Ferrier rearrangement' has represented a vibrant area of research and innovation for organic chemists. With numerous applications in complex natural product total synthesis, the utility of the reaction has been resoundingly established. Recent developments have extended the reaction to a broader synthetic context, allowing for in situ generation of rearrangement substrates and more liberal interpretation of what fragmentation/recombination reactions warrant the designation of a Petasis-Ferrier rearrangement.

  14. Rearrangement and annihilation in antihydrogen-atom scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsell, Svante

    2008-08-08

    I review some results for annihilation and rearrangement processes in low-energy antihydrogen-hydrogen and antihydrogen-helium scattering. For the strong nuclear force results using a {delta}-function potential are compared to a scattering length approach. It is found that the {delta}-function potential does not give correct annihilation cross sections in the case of antihydrogen-helium scattering. Problem associated with the use of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for rearrangement calculations are reviewed.

  15. Ultrafast infrared studies of complex ligand rearrangements in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Christine K.

    2003-01-01

    The complete description of a chemical reaction in solution depends upon an understanding of the reactive molecule as well as its interactions with the surrounding solvent molecules. Using ultrafast infrared spectroscopy it is possible to observe both the solute-solvent interactions and the rearrangement steps which determine the overall course of a chemical reaction. The topics addressed in these studies focus on reaction mechanisms which require the rearrangement of complex ligands and the spectroscopic techniques necessary for the determination of these mechanisms. Ligand rearrangement is studied by considering two different reaction mechanisms for which the rearrangement of a complex ligand constitutes the most important step of the reaction. The first system concerns the rearrangement of a cyclopentadienyl ring as the response of an organometallic complex to a loss of electron density. This mechanism, commonly referred to as ''ring slip'', is frequently cited to explain reaction mechanisms. However, the ring slipped intermediate is too short-lived to be observed using conventional methods. Using a combination of ultrafast infrared spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations it has been shown that the intermediate exists, but does not form an eighteen-electron intermediate as suggested by traditional molecular orbital models. The second example examines the initial steps of alkyne polymerization. Group 6 (Cr, Mo, W) pentacarbonyl species are generated photolytically and used to catalyze the polymerization of unsaturated hydrocarbons through a series of coordination and rearrangement steps. Observing this reaction on the femto- to millisecond timescale indicates that the initial coordination of an alkyne solvent molecule to the metal center results in a stable intermediate that does not rearrange to form the polymer precursor. This suggests that polymerization requires the dissociation of additional carbonyl ligands before rearrangement can occur. Overall

  16. Recurrent DNA inversion rearrangements in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Flores, Margarita; Morales, Lucía; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Domínguez-Vidaña, Rocío; Zepeda, Cinthya; Yañez, Omar; Gutiérrez, María; Lemus, Tzitziki; Valle, David; Avila, Ma Carmen; Blanco, Daniel; Medina-Ruiz, Sofía; Meza, Karla; Ayala, Erandi; García, Delfino; Bustos, Patricia; González, Víctor; Girard, Lourdes; Tusie-Luna, Teresa; Dávila, Guillermo; Palacios, Rafael

    2007-04-10

    Several lines of evidence suggest that reiterated sequences in the human genome are targets for nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR), which facilitates genomic rearrangements. We have used a PCR-based approach to identify breakpoint regions of rearranged structures in the human genome. In particular, we have identified intrachromosomal identical repeats that are located in reverse orientation, which may lead to chromosomal inversions. A bioinformatic workflow pathway to select appropriate regions for analysis was developed. Three such regions overlapping with known human genes, located on chromosomes 3, 15, and 19, were analyzed. The relative proportion of wild-type to rearranged structures was determined in DNA samples from blood obtained from different, unrelated individuals. The results obtained indicate that recurrent genomic rearrangements occur at relatively high frequency in somatic cells. Interestingly, the rearrangements studied were significantly more abundant in adults than in newborn individuals, suggesting that such DNA rearrangements might start to appear during embryogenesis or fetal life and continue to accumulate after birth. The relevance of our results in regard to human genomic variation is discussed.

  17. Evolution of atomic rearrangements in deformation in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Shang, B S; Li, M Z; Yao, Y G; Lu, Y J; Wang, W H

    2014-10-01

    Atomic rearrangements induced by shear stress are fundamental for understanding deformation mechanisms in metallic glasses (MGs). Using molecular dynamic simulation, the atomic rearrangements characterized by nonaffine displacements (NADs) and their spatial distribution and evolution with tensile stress in Cu50Zr50 MG were investigated. It was found that in the elastic regime the atomic rearrangements with the largest NADs are relatively homogeneous in space, but exhibit strong spatial correlation, become localized and inhomogeneous, and form large clusters as strain increases, which may facilitate the so-called shear transformation zones. Furthermore, initially they prefer to take place around Cu atoms which have more nonicosahedral configurations. As strain increases, the preference decays and disappears in the plastic regime. The atomic rearrangements with the smallest NADs are preferentially located around Cu atoms, too, but with more icosahedral or icosahedral-like atomic configurations. The preference is maintained in the whole deformation process. In contrast, the atomic rearrangements with moderate NADs distribute homogeneously, and do not show explicit preference or spatial correlation, acting as matrix during deformation. Among the atomic rearrangements with different NADs, those with largest and smallest NADs are nearest neighbors initially, but separating with increasing strain, while those with largest and moderate NADs always avoid to each other. The correlations in the fluctuations of the NADs confirm the long-range strain correlation and the scale-free characteristic of NADs in both elastic and plastic deformation, which suggests a universality of the scaling in the plastic flow in MGs.

  18. An acid-catalyzed macrolactonization protocol.

    PubMed

    Trost, Barry M; Chisholm, John D

    2002-10-17

    [reaction: see text] An efficient macrolactonization protocol devoid of any base was developed derived from the use of vinyl esters in transesterification. Subjecting a hydroxy acid and ethoxyacetylene to 2 mol % [RuCl(2)(p-cymene)](2) in toluene followed by addition of camphorsulfonic acid or inverse addition provided macrolactones in good yields.

  19. Gold-Catalyzed Rearrangements and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cycloisomerizations of enynes are probably the most representative carbon–carbon bond forming reactions catalyzed by electrophilic metal complexes. These transformations are synthetically useful because chemists can use them to build complex architectures under mild conditions from readily assembled starting materials. However, these transformations can have complex mechanisms. In general, gold(I) activates alkynes in the presence of any other unsaturated functional group by forming an (η2-alkyne)–gold complex. This species reacts readily with nucleophiles, including electron-rich alkenes. In this case, the reaction forms cyclopropyl gold(I) carbene-like intermediates. These can come from different pathways depending on the substitution pattern of the alkyne and the alkene. In the absence of external nucleophiles, 1,n-enynes can form products of skeletal rearrangement in fully intramolecular reactions, which are mechanistically very different from metathesis reactions initiated by the [2 + 2] cycloaddition of a Grubbs-type carbene or other related metal carbenes. In this Account, we discuss how cycloisomerization and addition reactions of substituted enynes, as well as intermolecular reactions between alkynes and alkenes, are best interpreted as proceeding through discrete cationic intermediates in which gold(I) plays a significant role in the stabilization of the positive charge. The most important intermediates are highly delocalized cationic species that some chemists describe as cyclopropyl gold(I) carbenes or gold(I)-stabilized cyclopropylmethyl/cyclobutyl/homoallyl carbocations. However, we prefer the cyclopropyl gold(I) carbene formulation for its simplicity and mnemonic value, highlighting the tendency of these intermediates to undergo cyclopropanation reactions with alkenes. We can add a variety of hetero- and carbonucleophiles to the enynes in the presence of gold(I) in intra- or intermolecular reactions, leading to the corresponding adducts with

  20. A comprehensive molecular cytogenetic analysis of chromosome rearrangements in gibbons

    PubMed Central

    Capozzi, Oronzo; Carbone, Lucia; Stanyon, Roscoe R.; Marra, Annamaria; Yang, Fengtang; Whelan, Christopher W.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Rocchi, Mariano; Archidiacono, Nicoletta

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangements in small apes are up to 20 times more frequent than in most mammals. Because of their complexity, the full extent of chromosome evolution in these hominoids is not yet fully documented. However, previous work with array painting, BAC-FISH, and selective sequencing in two of the four karyomorphs has shown that high-resolution methods can precisely define chromosome breakpoints and map the complex flow of evolutionary chromosome rearrangements. Here we use these tools to precisely define the rearrangements that have occurred in the remaining two karyomorphs, genera Symphalangus (2n = 50) and Hoolock (2n = 38). This research provides the most comprehensive insight into the evolutionary origins of chromosome rearrangements involved in transforming small apes genome. Bioinformatics analyses of the human–gibbon synteny breakpoints revealed association with transposable elements and segmental duplications, providing some insight into the mechanisms that might have promoted rearrangements in small apes. In the near future, the comparison of gibbon genome sequences will provide novel insights to test hypotheses concerning the mechanisms of chromosome evolution. The precise definition of synteny block boundaries and orientation, chromosomal fusions, and centromere repositioning events presented here will facilitate genome sequence assembly for these close relatives of humans. PMID:22892276

  1. Modeling of the primary rearrangement stage of liquid phase sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik Tahir, Abdul; Malik, Amer; Amberg, Gustav

    2016-10-01

    The dimensional variations during the rearrangement stage of liquid phase sintering could have a detrimental effect on the dimensional tolerances of the sintered product. A numerical approach to model the liquid phase penetration into interparticle boundaries and the accompanied dimensional variations during the primary rearrangement stage of liquid phase sintering is presented. The coupled system of the Cahn-Hilliard and the Navier-Stokes equations is used to model the penetration of the liquid phase, whereas the rearrangement of the solid particles due to capillary forces is modeled using the equilibrium equation for a linear elastic material. The simulations are performed using realistic physical properties of the phases involved and the effect of green density, wettability and amount of liquid phase is also incorporated in the model. In the first step, the kinetics of the liquid phase penetration and the rearrangement of solid particles connected by a liquid bridge is modeled. The predicted and the calculated (analytical) results are compared in order to validate the numerical model. The numerical model is then extended to simulate the dimensional changes during primary rearrangement stage and a qualitative match with the published experimental data is achieved.

  2. Induced dicentric chromosome formation promotes genomic rearrangements and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Gascoigne, Karen E; Cheeseman, Iain M

    2013-07-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements can radically alter gene products and their function, driving tumor formation or progression. However, the molecular origins and evolution of such rearrangements are varied and poorly understood, with cancer cells often containing multiple, complex rearrangements. One mechanism that can lead to genomic rearrangements is the formation of a "dicentric" chromosome containing two functional centromeres. Indeed, such dicentric chromosomes have been observed in cancer cells. Here, we tested the ability of a single dicentric chromosome to contribute to genomic instability and neoplastic conversion in vertebrate cells. We developed a system to transiently and reversibly induce dicentric chromosome formation on a single chromosome with high temporal control. We find that induced dicentric chromosomes are frequently damaged and mis-segregated during mitosis, and that this leads to extensive chromosomal rearrangements including translocations with other chromosomes. Populations of pre-neoplastic cells in which a single dicentric chromosome is induced acquire extensive genomic instability and display hallmarks of cellular transformation including anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Our results suggest that a single dicentric chromosome could contribute to tumor initiation.

  3. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Homolka, David; Ivanek, Robert; Capkova, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiri

    2007-10-01

    Heterozygosity for certain mouse and human chromosomal rearrangements is characterized by the incomplete meiotic synapsis of rearranged chromosomes, by their colocalization with the XY body in primary spermatocytes, and by male-limited sterility. Previously, we argued that such X-autosomal associations could interfere with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Recently, supporting evidence has reported modifications of histones in rearranged chromosomes by a process called the meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC). Here, we report on the transcriptional down-regulation of genes within the unsynapsed region of the rearranged mouse chromosome 17, and on the subsequent disturbance of X chromosome inactivation. The partial transcriptional suppression of genes in the unsynapsed chromatin was most prominent prior to the mid-pachytene stage of primary spermatocytes. Later, during the mid-late pachytene, the rearranged autosomes colocalized with the XY body, and the X chromosome failed to undergo proper transcriptional silencing. Our findings provide direct evidence on the MSUC acting at the mRNA level, and implicate that autosomal asynapsis in meiosis may cause male sterility by interfering with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

  4. DNA Oligonucleotide Fragment Ion Rearrangements Upon Collision-Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Brett; Neumann, Elizabeth K.; Solouki, Touradj

    2015-08-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of m/z-isolated w type fragment ions and an intact 5' phosphorylated DNA oligonucleotide generated rearranged product ions. Of the 21 studied w ions of various nucleotide sequences, fragment ion sizes, and charge states, 18 (~86%) generated rearranged product ions upon CID in a Synapt G2-S HDMS (Waters Corporation, Manchester, England, UK) ion mobility-mass spectrometer. Mass spectrometry (MS), ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), and theoretical modeling data suggest that purine bases can attack the free 5' phosphate group in w type ions and 5' phosphorylated DNA to generate sequence permuted [phosphopurine]- fragment ions. We propose and discuss a potential mechanism for generation of rearranged [phosphopurine]- and complementary y-B type product ions.

  5. Rearrangement and Grouping of Data Bits for Efficient Lossless Encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B, Ajitha Shenoy K.; Ajith, Meghana; Mantoor, Vinayak M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the efficacy of rearranging and grouping of data bits. Lossless encoding techniques like Huffman Coding, Arithmetic Coding etc., works well on data which contains redundant information. The idea behind these techniques is to encode more frequently occurring symbols with less number of bits and more seldom occurring symbols with more number of bits. Most of the methods fail if there is a non-redundant data. We propose a method to re arrange and group data bits there by making the data redundant and then different lossless encoding techniques can be applied. In this paper we propose three different methods to rearrange the data bits, and efficient way of grouping them. This is first such attempt. We also justify the need of rearranging and grouping data bits for efficient lossless encoding.

  6. Conditions for predicting quasistationary states by rearrangement formula.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki Y; Ogawa, Shun

    2015-10-01

    Predicting the long-lasting quasistationary state for a given initial state is one of central issues in Hamiltonian systems having long-range interaction. A recently proposed method is based on the Vlasov description and uniformly redistributes the initial distribution along contours of the asymptotic effective Hamiltonian, which is defined by the obtained quasistationary state and is determined self-consistently. The method, to which we refer as the rearrangement formula, was suggested to give precise prediction under limited situations. Restricting initial states consisting of a spatially homogeneous part and small perturbation, we numerically reveal two conditions that the rearrangement formula prefers: One is a no Landau damping condition for the unperturbed homogeneous part, and the other comes from the Casimir invariants. Mechanisms of these conditions are discussed. Clarifying these conditions, we validate to use the rearrangement formula as the response theory for an external field, and we shed light on improving the theory as a nonequilibrium statistical mechanics.

  7. Conditions for predicting quasistationary states by rearrangement formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki Y.; Ogawa, Shun

    2015-10-01

    Predicting the long-lasting quasistationary state for a given initial state is one of central issues in Hamiltonian systems having long-range interaction. A recently proposed method is based on the Vlasov description and uniformly redistributes the initial distribution along contours of the asymptotic effective Hamiltonian, which is defined by the obtained quasistationary state and is determined self-consistently. The method, to which we refer as the rearrangement formula, was suggested to give precise prediction under limited situations. Restricting initial states consisting of a spatially homogeneous part and small perturbation, we numerically reveal two conditions that the rearrangement formula prefers: One is a no Landau damping condition for the unperturbed homogeneous part, and the other comes from the Casimir invariants. Mechanisms of these conditions are discussed. Clarifying these conditions, we validate to use the rearrangement formula as the response theory for an external field, and we shed light on improving the theory as a nonequilibrium statistical mechanics.

  8. Cell Division Drives Epithelial Cell Rearrangements during Gastrulation in Chick.

    PubMed

    Firmino, Joao; Rocancourt, Didier; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Moreau, Chloe; Gros, Jerome

    2016-02-08

    During early embryonic development, cells are organized as cohesive epithelial sheets that are continuously growing and remodeled without losing their integrity, giving rise to a wide array of tissue shapes. Here, using live imaging in chick embryo, we investigate how epithelial cells rearrange during gastrulation. We find that cell division is a major rearrangement driver that powers dramatic epithelial cell intercalation events. We show that these cell division-mediated intercalations, which represent the majority of epithelial rearrangements within the early embryo, are absolutely necessary for the spatial patterning of gastrulation movements. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these intercalation events result from overall low cortical actomyosin accumulation within the epithelial cells of the embryo, which enables dividing cells to remodel junctions in their vicinity. These findings uncover a role for cell division as coordinator of epithelial growth and remodeling that might underlie various developmental, homeostatic, or pathological processes in amniotes.

  9. Chromosome catastrophes involve replication mechanisms generating complex genomic rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Erez, Ayelet; Nagamani, Sandesh C Sreenath; Dhar, Shweta U; Kołodziejska, Katarzyna E; Dharmadhikari, Avinash V; Cooper, M Lance; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Zhang, Feng; Withers, Marjorie A; Bacino, Carlos A; Campos-Acevedo, Luis Daniel; Delgado, Mauricio R; Freedenberg, Debra; Garnica, Adolfo; Grebe, Theresa A; Hernández-Almaguer, Dolores; Immken, LaDonna; Lalani, Seema R; McLean, Scott D; Northrup, Hope; Scaglia, Fernando; Strathearn, Lane; Trapane, Pamela; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau Wai; Hastings, P J; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Lupski, James R; Bi, Weimin

    2011-09-16

    Complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs) consisting of two or more breakpoint junctions have been observed in genomic disorders. Recently, a chromosome catastrophe phenomenon termed chromothripsis, in which numerous genomic rearrangements are apparently acquired in one single catastrophic event, was described in multiple cancers. Here, we show that constitutionally acquired CGRs share similarities with cancer chromothripsis. In the 17 CGR cases investigated, we observed localization and multiple copy number changes including deletions, duplications, and/or triplications, as well as extensive translocations and inversions. Genomic rearrangements involved varied in size and complexities; in one case, array comparative genomic hybridization revealed 18 copy number changes. Breakpoint sequencing identified characteristic features, including small templated insertions at breakpoints and microhomology at breakpoint junctions, which have been attributed to replicative processes. The resemblance between CGR and chromothripsis suggests similar mechanistic underpinnings. Such chromosome catastrophic events appear to reflect basic DNA metabolism operative throughout an organism's life cycle.

  10. Low-Temperature Cationic Rearrangement in a Bulk Metal Oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Man-Rong; Retuerto, Maria; Stephens, Peter W; Croft, Mark; Sheptyakov, Denis; Pomjakushin, Vladimir; Deng, Zheng; Akamatsu, Hirofumi; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Sánchez-Benítez, Javier; Saouma, Felix O; Jang, Joon I; Walker, David; Greenblatt, Martha

    2016-08-16

    Cationic rearrangement is a compelling strategy for producing desirable physical properties by atomic-scale manipulation. However, activating ionic diffusion typically requires high temperature, and in some cases also high pressure in bulk oxide materials. Herein, we present the cationic rearrangement in bulk Mn2 FeMoO6 at unparalleled low temperatures of 150-300 (o) C. The irreversible ionic motion at ambient pressure, as evidenced by real-time powder synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction, and second harmonic generation, leads to a transition from a Ni3 TeO6 -type to an ordered-ilmenite structure, and dramatic changes of the electrical and magnetic properties. This work demonstrates a remarkable cationic rearrangement, with corresponding large changes in the physical properties in a bulk oxide at unprecedented low temperatures.

  11. Telomerase activation by genomic rearrangements in high-risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Peifer, Martin; Hertwig, Falk; Roels, Frederik; Dreidax, Daniel; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Menon, Roopika; Krämer, Andrea; Roncaioli, Justin L; Sand, Frederik; Heuckmann, Johannes M; Ikram, Fakhera; Schmidt, Rene; Ackermann, Sandra; Engesser, Anne; Kahlert, Yvonne; Vogel, Wenzel; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Mariappan, Aruljothi; Heynck, Stefanie; Mariotti, Erika; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Gloeckner, Christian; Bosco, Graziella; Leuschner, Ivo; Schweiger, Michal R; Savelyeva, Larissa; Watkins, Simon C; Shao, Chunxuan; Bell, Emma; Höfer, Thomas; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Theissen, Jessica; Volland, Ruth; Saadati, Maral; Eggert, Angelika; de Wilde, Bram; Berthold, Frank; Peng, Zhiyu; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Leming; Ortmann, Monika; Büttner, Reinhard; Perner, Sven; Hero, Barbara; Schramm, Alexander; Schulte, Johannes H; Herrmann, Carl; O'Sullivan, Roderick J; Westermann, Frank; Thomas, Roman K; Fischer, Matthias

    2015-10-29

    Neuroblastoma is a malignant paediatric tumour of the sympathetic nervous system. Roughly half of these tumours regress spontaneously or are cured by limited therapy. By contrast, high-risk neuroblastomas have an unfavourable clinical course despite intensive multimodal treatment, and their molecular basis has remained largely elusive. Here we have performed whole-genome sequencing of 56 neuroblastomas (high-risk, n = 39; low-risk, n = 17) and discovered recurrent genomic rearrangements affecting a chromosomal region at 5p15.33 proximal of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT). These rearrangements occurred only in high-risk neuroblastomas (12/39, 31%) in a mutually exclusive fashion with MYCN amplifications and ATRX mutations, which are known genetic events in this tumour type. In an extended case series (n = 217), TERT rearrangements defined a subgroup of high-risk tumours with particularly poor outcome. Despite a large structural diversity of these rearrangements, they all induced massive transcriptional upregulation of TERT. In the remaining high-risk tumours, TERT expression was also elevated in MYCN-amplified tumours, whereas alternative lengthening of telomeres was present in neuroblastomas without TERT or MYCN alterations, suggesting that telomere lengthening represents a central mechanism defining this subtype. The 5p15.33 rearrangements juxtapose the TERT coding sequence to strong enhancer elements, resulting in massive chromatin remodelling and DNA methylation of the affected region. Supporting a functional role of TERT, neuroblastoma cell lines bearing rearrangements or amplified MYCN exhibited both upregulated TERT expression and enzymatic telomerase activity. In summary, our findings show that remodelling of the genomic context abrogates transcriptional silencing of TERT in high-risk neuroblastoma and places telomerase activation in the centre of transformation in a large fraction of these tumours.

  12. The Amadori Rearrangement for Carbohydrate Conjugation: Scope and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Hojnik, Cornelia; Müller, Anne; Gloe, Tobias‐Elias

    2016-01-01

    The Amadori rearrangement was investigated for the synthesis of C‐glycosyl‐type neoglycoconjugates. Various amines including diamines, amino‐functionalized glycosides, lysine derivatives, and peptides were conjugated with two different heptoses to generate non‐natural C‐glycosyl‐type glycoconjugates of the d‐gluco and d‐manno series. With these studies, the scope and limitations of the Amadori rearrangement as a conjugation method have been exemplified with respect to the carbohydrate substrate, as well as the amino components. PMID:27840588

  13. Submillisecond organic synthesis: Outpacing Fries rearrangement through microfluidic rapid mixing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heejin; Min, Kyoung-Ik; Inoue, Keita; Im, Do Jin; Kim, Dong-Pyo; Yoshida, Jun-ichi

    2016-05-06

    In chemical synthesis, rapid intramolecular rearrangements often foil attempts at site-selective bimolecular functionalization. We developed a microfluidic technique that outpaces the very rapid anionic Fries rearrangement to chemoselectively functionalize iodophenyl carbamates at the ortho position. Central to the technique is a chip microreactor of our design, which can deliver a reaction time in the submillisecond range even at cryogenic temperatures. The microreactor was applied to the synthesis of afesal, a bioactive molecule exhibiting anthelmintic activity, to demonstrate its potential for practical synthesis and production.

  14. Rearrangement and evolution of mitochondrial genomes in parrots.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, Jessica R; Wright, Timothy F

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome rearrangements that result in control region duplication have been described for a variety of birds, but the mechanisms leading to their appearance and maintenance remain unclear, and their effect on sequence evolution has not been explored. A recent survey of mitochondrial genomes in the Psittaciformes (parrots) found that control region duplications have arisen independently at least six times across the order. We analyzed complete mitochondrial genome sequences from 20 parrot species, including representatives of each lineage with control region duplications, to document the gene order changes and to examine effects of genome rearrangements on patterns of sequence evolution. The gene order previously reported for Amazona parrots was found for four of the six independently derived genome rearrangements, and a previously undescribed gene order was found in Prioniturus luconensis, representing a fifth clade with rearranged genomes; the gene order resulting from the remaining rearrangement event could not be confirmed. In all rearranged genomes, two copies of the control region are present and are very similar at the sequence level, while duplicates of the other genes involved in the rearrangement show signs of degeneration or have been lost altogether. We compared rates of sequence evolution in genomes with and without control region duplications and did not find a consistent acceleration or deceleration associated with the duplications. This could be due to the fact that most of the genome rearrangement events in parrots are ancient, and additionally, to an effect of body size on evolutionary rate that we found for mitochondrial but not nuclear sequences. Base composition analyses found that relative to other birds, parrots have unusually strong compositional asymmetry (AT- and GC-skew) in their coding sequences, especially at fourfold degenerate sites. Furthermore, we found higher AT skew in species with control region duplications. One

  15. Radical [1,3]-Rearrangements of Breslow Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Alwarsh, Sefat; Xu, Yi; Qian, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Breslow intermediates that bear radical stabilizing N-substituents including benzyl, cinnamyl, and diarylmethyl undergo facile homolytic C-N bond scission under mild conditions to give products of formal [1,3]-rearrangement rather than benzoin condensation. EPR experiments and computational analysis support a radical mechanism. Implications for thiamine based enzymes are discussed. PMID:26553753

  16. Computational Analysis of Stereospecificity in the Cope Rearrangement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glish, Laura; Hanks, Timothy W.

    2007-01-01

    The Cope rearrangement is a highly stereospecific, concerted reaction of considerable synthetic utility. Experimental product distributions from the reaction of disubstituted 1,5-hexadienes can be readily understood by computer modeling of the various possible transitions states. Semi-empirical methods give relative energies of transition states…

  17. Si-free enolate Claisen rearrangements of enamido substrates.

    PubMed

    Harker, Wesley R R; Carswell, Emma L; Carbery, David R

    2012-02-21

    α-Alkyl β-amino esters are available in high diastereoselectivity through a silicon-free Claisen enolate [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of enamide esters. Optimisation studies have probed the crucial role of the initial enolisation and the nature of the enamide N-centre. The demonstration of chirality transfer and the formation of β-proline systems, is also presented.

  18. Gold-catalysed cascade rearrangements of ynamide propargyl esters.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Stephen J; Beddoes, James M; Mahon, Mary F; Hennessy, Alan J; Carbery, David R

    2013-03-21

    The Au(I)-catalysed rearrangement of propargylic esters formed from an ynamide has been studied. The reaction is facile, and when conducted in the presence of a reactive indole nucleophile, leads to a cascade process whereby γ-indolyl α-acyloxyenamides are formed in good yield and excellent E-stereoselectivity.

  19. The Basel Problem as a Rearrangement of Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benko, David; Molokach, John

    2013-01-01

    We give an elementary solution to the famous Basel Problem, originally solved by Euler in 1735. We square the well-known series for arctan(1) due to Leibniz, and use a surprising relation among the re-arranged terms of this squared series.

  20. Stochastic rearrangement of immunoglobulin variable-region genes in chicken B-cell development.

    PubMed

    Benatar, T; Tkalec, L; Ratcliffe, M J

    1992-08-15

    The molecular mechanism by which immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangement occurs is highly conserved between mammalian and avian species. However, in avian species, an equivalent to the mammalian pre-B cell, which has undergone Ig heavy-chain gene rearrangement and expresses mu heavy chains in the absence of Ig light-chain rearrangement, has not been convincingly demonstrated. It is consequently unclear whether an ordered progression of gene rearrangement events leading to functional Ig expression occurs in avian species. To examine the sequence of Ig gene rearrangement events in chicken B-cell development, we transformed day 12 embryo bursal cells with the REV-T(CSV) retrovirus. More than 100 clones were analyzed by Southern blotting and polymerase chain reaction for the presence of Ig gene rearrangements. The majority of these clones contained only germline Ig sequences. Several clones contained complete heavy- and light-chain rearrangements and 13 clones contained only heavy-chain rearrangements analogous to stages of mammalian B-cell development. However, 5 clones contained rearrangements of light-chain genes in the absence of complete heavy-chain rearrangement. Consequently, we conclude that rearrangement of chicken Ig light-chain genes does not require heavy-chain variable-region rearrangement. This observation suggests that chicken Ig gene rearrangement events required for Ig expression occur stochastically rather than sequentially.

  1. Tissue cohesion and the mechanics of cell rearrangement.

    PubMed

    David, Robert; Luu, Olivia; Damm, Erich W; Wen, Jason W H; Nagel, Martina; Winklbauer, Rudolf

    2014-10-01

    Morphogenetic processes often involve the rapid rearrangement of cells held together by mutual adhesion. The dynamic nature of this adhesion endows tissues with liquid-like properties, such that large-scale shape changes appear as tissue flows. Generally, the resistance to flow (tissue viscosity) is expected to depend on the cohesion of a tissue (how strongly its cells adhere to each other), but the exact relationship between these parameters is not known. Here, we analyse the link between cohesion and viscosity to uncover basic mechanical principles of cell rearrangement. We show that for vertebrate and invertebrate tissues, viscosity varies in proportion to cohesion over a 200-fold range of values. We demonstrate that this proportionality is predicted by a cell-based model of tissue viscosity. To do so, we analyse cell adhesion in Xenopus embryonic tissues and determine a number of parameters, including tissue surface tension (as a measure of cohesion), cell contact fluctuation and cortical tension. In the tissues studied, the ratio of surface tension to viscosity, which has the dimension of a velocity, is 1.8 µm/min. This characteristic velocity reflects the rate of cell-cell boundary contraction during rearrangement, and sets a limit to rearrangement rates. Moreover, we propose that, in these tissues, cell movement is maximally efficient. Our approach to cell rearrangement mechanics links adhesion to the resistance of a tissue to plastic deformation, identifies the characteristic velocity of the process, and provides a basis for the comparison of tissues with mechanical properties that may vary by orders of magnitude.

  2. Development of the Ireland-Claisen rearrangement of alkoxy- and aryloxy-substituted allyl glycinates.

    PubMed

    Tellam, James P; Carbery, David R

    2010-11-19

    The Ireland-Claisen rearrangement of 3-alkoxy- and 3-aryloxy-substituted allyl glycinates is presented. This [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement route offers direct access to syn β-alkoxy and β-aryloxy α-amino acid systems. In particular, N,N-diboc glycine esters rearrange with excellent diastereoselectivities (dr > 25:1). The synthesis of substrates, rearrangement optimization, and a discussion of stereoselection are presented.

  3. Nucleotide resolution analysis of TMPRSS2 and ERG rearrangements in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weier, Christopher; Haffner, Michael C.; Mosbruger, Timothy; Esopi, David M.; Hicks, Jessica; Zheng, Qizhi; Fedor, Helen; Isaacs, William B.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Nelson, William G.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangements occur in approximately 50% of prostate cancers and therefore represent one of the most frequently observed structural rearrangements in all cancers. However, little is known about the genomic architecture of such rearrangements. We therefore designed and optimized a pipeline involving target-capture of TMPRSS2 and ERG genomic sequences coupled with paired-end next generation sequencing to resolve genomic rearrangement breakpoints in TMPRSS2 and ERG at nucleotide resolution in a large series of primary prostate cancer specimens (n = 83). This strategy showed >90% sensitivity and specificity in identifying TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangements, and allowed identification of intra- and inter-chromosomal rearrangements involving TMPRSS2 and ERG with known and novel fusion partners. Our results indicate that rearrangement breakpoints show strong clustering in specific intronic regions of TMPRSS2 and ERG. The observed TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangements often exhibited complex chromosomal architecture associated with several intra- and inter-chromosomal rearrangements. Nucleotide resolution analysis of breakpoint junctions revealed that the majority of TMPRSS2 and ERG rearrangements (~88%) occurred at or near regions of microhomology or involved insertions of one or more base pairs. This architecture implicates nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and microhomology mediated end joining (MMEJ) pathways in the generation of such rearrangements. These analyses have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in generating prostate cancer-specific recurrent rearrangements. PMID:23447416

  4. A New 4-Nitrotoluene Degradation Pathway in a Mycobacterium Strain

    PubMed Central

    Spiess, Tilmann; Desiere, Frank; Fischer, Peter; Spain, Jim C.; Knackmuss, Hans-Joachim; Lenke, Hiltrud

    1998-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain HL 4-NT-1, isolated from a mixed soil sample from the Stuttgart area, utilized 4-nitrotoluene as the sole source of nitrogen, carbon, and energy. Under aerobic conditions, resting cells of the Mycobacterium strain metabolized 4-nitrotoluene with concomitant release of small amounts of ammonia; under anaerobic conditions, 4-nitrotoluene was completely converted to 6-amino-m-cresol. 4-Hydroxylaminotoluene was converted to 6-amino-m-cresol by cell extracts and thus could be confirmed as the initial metabolite in the degradative pathway. This enzymatic equivalent to the acid-catalyzed Bamberger rearrangement requires neither cofactors nor oxygen. In the same crucial enzymatic step, the homologous substrate hydroxylaminobenzene was rearranged to 2-aminophenol. Abiotic oxidative dimerization of 6-amino-m-cresol, observed during growth of the Mycobacterium strain, yielded a yellow dihydrophenoxazinone. Another yellow metabolite (λmax, 385 nm) was tentatively identified as 2-amino-5-methylmuconic semialdehyde, formed from 6-amino-m-cresol by meta ring cleavage. PMID:9464378

  5. RNA-Mediated Epigenetic Programming of Genome Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Nowacki, Mariusz; Shetty, Keerthi; Landweber, Laura F.

    2012-01-01

    RNA, normally thought of as a conduit in gene expression, has a novel mode of action in ciliated protozoa. Maternal RNA templates provide both an organizing guide for DNA rearrangements and a template that can transport somatic mutations to the next generation. This opportunity for RNA-mediated genome rearrangement and DNA repair is profound in the ciliate Oxytricha, which deletes 95% of its germline genome during development in a process that severely fragments its chromosomes and then sorts and reorders the hundreds of thousands of pieces remaining. Oxytricha’s somatic nuclear genome is therefore an epigenome formed through RNA templates and signals arising from the previous generation. Furthermore, this mechanism of RNA-mediated epigenetic inheritance can function across multiple generations, and the discovery of maternal template RNA molecules has revealed new biological roles for RNA and has hinted at the power of RNA molecules to sculpt genomic information in cells. PMID:21801022

  6. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas; Westbrook, Carol

    2013-04-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  7. Incremental exposure facilitates adaptation to sensory rearrangement. [vestibular stimulation patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; Lobovits, D. N.

    1978-01-01

    Visual-target pointing experiments were performed on 24 adult volunteers in order to compare the relative effectiveness of incremental (stepwise) and single-step exposure conditions on adaptation to visual rearrangement. The differences between the preexposure and postexposure scores served as an index of the adaptation elicited during the exposure period. It is found that both single-step and stepwise exposure to visual rearrangement elicit compensatory changes in sensorimotor coordination. However, stepwise exposure, when compared to single-step exposur in terms of the average magnitude of visual displacement over the exposure period, clearly enhances the rate of adaptation. It seems possible that the enhancement of adaptation to unusual patterns of sensory stimulation produced by incremental exposure reflects a general principle of sensorimotor function.

  8. Chromosomal rearrangements maintain a polymorphic supergene controlling butterfly mimicry

    PubMed Central

    Joron, Mathieu; Frezal, Lise; Jones, Robert T.; Chamberlain, Nicola L.; Lee, Siu F.; Haag, Christoph R.; Whibley, Annabel; Becuwe, Michel; Baxter, Simon W.; Ferguson, Laura; Wilkinson, Paul A.; Salazar, Camilo; Davidson, Claire; Clark, Richard; Quail, Michael A.; Beasley, Helen; Glithero, Rebecca; Lloyd, Christine; Sims, Sarah; Jones, Matthew C.; Rogers, Jane; Jiggins, Chris D.; ffrench-Constant, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    Supergenes are tight clusters of loci that facilitate the co-segregation of adaptive variation, providing integrated control of complex adaptive phenotypes1. Polymorphic supergenes, in which specific combinations of traits are maintained within a single population, were first described for ‘pin’ and ‘thrum’ floral types in Primula1 and Fagopyrum2, but classic examples are also found in insect mimicry3–5 and snail morphology6. Understanding the evolutionary mechanisms that generate these co-adapted gene sets, as well as the mode of limiting the production of unfit recombinant forms, remains a substantial challenge7–10. Here we show that individual wing-pattern morphs in the polymorphic mimetic butterfly Heliconius numata are associated with different genomic rearrangements at the supergene locus P. These rearrangements tighten the genetic linkage between at least two colour-pattern loci that are known to recombine in closely related species9–11, with complete suppression of recombination being observed in experimental crosses across a 400-kilobase interval containing at least 18 genes. In natural populations, notable patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) are observed across the entire P region. The resulting divergent haplotype clades and inversion breakpoints are found in complete association with wing-pattern morphs. Our results indicate that allelic combinations at known wing-patterning loci have become locked together in a polymorphic rearrangement at the Plocus, forming a supergene that acts as a simple switch between complex adaptive phenotypes found in sympatry. These findings highlight how genomic rearrangements can have a central role in the coexistence of adaptive phenotypes involving several genes acting in concert, by locally limiting recombination and gene flow. PMID:21841803

  9. Recent applications of ring-rearrangement metathesis in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Sambasivarao; Meshram, Milind; Khedkar, Priti; Banerjee, Shaibal; Deodhar, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Ring-rearrangement metathesis (RRM) involves multiple metathesis processes such as ring-opening metathesis (ROM)/ring-closing metathesis (RCM) in a one-pot operation to generate complex targets. RRM delivers complex frameworks that are difficult to assemble by conventional methods. The noteworthy point about this type of protocol is multi-bond formation and it is an atom economic process. In this review, we have covered literature that appeared during the last seven years (2008-2014).

  10. Pyridine to aniline: an exceptional biologically driven rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Arnauld, Thomas; Beaumal, Jean-Yves; Lefoulon, François; Petit, Alain; Renaud, Tristan

    2013-04-01

    During the course of our study on the innovative ligand for nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptors, LNAChR, and in order to assess activity and toxicity profiles of the drug's metabolites, synthesis of the main metabolites was undertaken. This synthesis work was done in parallel by organic chemistry and by biotransformation of LNAChR. Filamentous fungus Aspergillus alliaceus (NRRL 315) neatly afforded three of the main metabolites, one of which arose from a very unexpected and very uncommon rearrangement.

  11. Recent applications of ring-rearrangement metathesis in organic synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Meshram, Milind; Khedkar, Priti; Banerjee, Shaibal; Deodhar, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ring-rearrangement metathesis (RRM) involves multiple metathesis processes such as ring-opening metathesis (ROM)/ring-closing metathesis (RCM) in a one-pot operation to generate complex targets. RRM delivers complex frameworks that are difficult to assemble by conventional methods. The noteworthy point about this type of protocol is multi-bond formation and it is an atom economic process. In this review, we have covered literature that appeared during the last seven years (2008–2014). PMID:26664603

  12. Quantifying stretching and rearrangement in epithelial sheet migration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Rachel M; Kelley, Douglas H; Nordstrom, Kerstin N; Ouellette, Nicholas T; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-02-25

    Although understanding the collective migration of cells, such as that seen in epithelial sheets, is essential for understanding diseases such as metastatic cancer, this motion is not yet as well characterized as individual cell migration. Here we adapt quantitative metrics used to characterize the flow and deformation of soft matter to contrast different types of motion within a migrating sheet of cells. Using a Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) analysis, we find that - in spite of large fluctuations - the flow field of an epithelial cell sheet is not chaotic. Stretching of a sheet of cells (i.e., positive FTLE) is localized at the leading edge of migration and increases when the cells are more highly stimulated. By decomposing the motion of the cells into affine and non-affine components using the metric D(2)min , we quantify local plastic rearrangements and describe the motion of a group of cells in a novel way. We find an increase in plastic rearrangements with increasing cell densities, whereas inanimate systems tend to exhibit less non-affine rearrangements with increasing density.

  13. Rapid identification of chromosomal rearrangements by PRINS technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pellestor, F.; Giradet, A.; Andreo, B.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements contribute significantly to human reproductive failure, malformation/mental retardation syndromes and carcinogenesis. The variety of structural rearrangements is almost infinite and an identification by conventional cytogenetics is often labor intensive and may remain doubtful. Recent advances in molecular cytogenetics have provided new tools for detecting chromosomal abnormalities. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure is actually the most employed technique and has led to numerous clinical applications. However, techniques required to produce suitable probes are time consuming and not accessible to all cytogenetics laboratories. The PRimed In Situ labeling (PRINS) method provides an alternate way for in situ chromosome screening. In this procedure, the chromosomal detection is performed by in situ annealing of a specific primer and subsequent primer extension by a Taq DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides. Application of PRINS in clinical diagnosis is still limited. We have developed a semi-automatic PRINS protocol and used it to identify the origin of several chromosomal abnormalities. We report here the results of studies of three structural rearrangements: a translocation t(21;21), a supernumerary ring marker chromosome 18 and a complex chromosome 13 mosaicism involving a 13;13 Robertsonian translocation and a ring chromosome 13.

  14. Elevated Rate of Genome Rearrangements in Radiation-Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Repar, Jelena; Supek, Fran; Klanjscek, Tin; Warnecke, Tobias; Zahradka, Ksenija; Zahradka, Davor

    2017-01-01

    A number of bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic species are known for their resistance to ionizing radiation. One of the challenges these species face is a potent environmental source of DNA double-strand breaks, potential drivers of genome structure evolution. Efficient and accurate DNA double-strand break repair systems have been demonstrated in several unrelated radiation-resistant species and are putative adaptations to the DNA damaging environment. Such adaptations are expected to compensate for the genome-destabilizing effect of environmental DNA damage and may be expected to result in a more conserved gene order in radiation-resistant species. However, here we show that rates of genome rearrangements, measured as loss of gene order conservation with time, are higher in radiation-resistant species in multiple, phylogenetically independent groups of bacteria. Comparison of indicators of selection for genome organization between radiation-resistant and phylogenetically matched, nonresistant species argues against tolerance to disruption of genome structure as a strategy for radiation resistance. Interestingly, an important mechanism affecting genome rearrangements in prokaryotes, the symmetrical inversions around the origin of DNA replication, shapes genome structure of both radiation-resistant and nonresistant species. In conclusion, the opposing effects of environmental DNA damage and DNA repair result in elevated rates of genome rearrangements in radiation-resistant bacteria. PMID:28188144

  15. Engineering the Drosophila Genome: Chromosome Rearrangements by Design

    PubMed Central

    Golic, K. G.; Golic, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    We show that site-specific recombination can be used to engineer chromosome rearrangements in Drosophila melanogaster. The FLP site-specific recombinase acts on chromosomal target sites located within specially constructed P elements to provide an easy screen for the recovery of rearrangements with breakpoints that can be chosen in advance. Paracentric and pericentric inversions are easily recovered when two elements lie in the same chromosome in opposite orientation. These inversions are readily reversible. Duplications and deficiencies can be recovered by recombination between two elements that lie in the same orientation on the same chromosome or on homologues. We observe that the frequency of recombination between FRTs at ectopic locations decreases as the distance that separates those FRTs increases. We also describe methods to determine the absolute orientation of these P elements within the chromosome. The ability to produce chromosome rearrangements precisely between preselected sites provides a powerful new tool for investigations into the relationships between chromosome arrangement, structure, and function. PMID:8978056

  16. Extended Rearrangement Inequalities and Applications to Some Quantitative Stability Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemou, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we prove a new functional inequality of Hardy-Littlewood type for generalized rearrangements of functions. We then show how this inequality provides quantitative stability results of steady states to evolution systems that essentially preserve the rearrangements and some suitable energy functional, under minimal regularity assumptions on the perturbations. In particular, this inequality yields a quantitative stability result of a large class of steady state solutions to the Vlasov-Poisson systems, and more precisely we derive a quantitative control of the L 1 norm of the perturbation by the relative Hamiltonian (the energy functional) and rearrangements. A general non linear stability result has been obtained by Lemou et al. (Invent Math 187:145-194, 2012) in the gravitational context, however the proof relied in a crucial way on compactness arguments which by construction provides no quantitative control of the perturbation. Our functional inequality is also applied to the context of 2D-Euler systems and also provides quantitative stability results of a large class of steady-states to this system in a natural energy space.

  17. Metalla-cope rearrangements: bridging organic and inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Greer, Edyta M; Hoffmann, Roald

    2010-08-26

    Density functional theory calculations are performed to explore both concerted chairlike and boatlike as well as stepwise mechanisms of the Cope rearrangement of two hypothetical metalladienes. An osma-1,5-hexadiene is designed by substituting CH(2) in 1,5-hexadiene by its isolobal analogue, 16-electron Os(PH(3))(4). The energy of activation corresponding to the rearrangement of osma-1,5-hexadiene involving the chairlike saddle point is computed as 37.4 kcal/mol, 3.9 kcal/mol above the energy barrier of the parent 1,5-hexadiene calculated with the same method and basis set, and is 4.5 kcal/mol below that of the boatlike pathway. In another isolobal replacement, the CH in 1,5-hexadiene is substituted by a 15-electron Re(PH(3))(3) fragment. Now the chairlike rearrangement of the rhenia-1,5-hexadiene has an E(a) value of 23.0 kcal/mol, 10.8 kcal/mol less than the energy barrier of the parent 1,5-hexadiene calculated at the same level of theory. The ring inversion of the chair and osma-chair diradical intermediates of the stepwise reaction pathway is also examined and is found in both cases to proceed through a very flat potential energy surface involving twist intermediates.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA Rearrangement Spectrum in Brain Tissue of Alzheimer’s Disease: Analysis of 13 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yucai; Liu, Changsheng; Parker, William Davis; Chen, Hongyi; Beach, Thomas G.; Liu, Xinhua; Serrano, Geidy E.; Lu, Yanfen; Huang, Jianjun; Yang, Kunfang; Wang, Chunmei

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction may play a central role in the pathologic process of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but there is still a scarcity of data that directly links the pathology of AD with the alteration of mitochondrial DNA. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive assessment of mtDNA rearrangement events in AD brain tissue. Patients and Methods Postmortem frozen human brain cerebral cortex samples were obtained from the Banner Sun Health Research Institute Brain and Body Donation Program, Sun City, AZ. Mitochondria were isolated and direct sequence by using MiSeq®, and analyzed by relative software. Results Three types of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements have been seen in post mortem human brain tissue from patients with AD and age matched control. These observed rearrangements include a deletion, F-type rearrangement, and R-type rearrangement. We detected a high level of mtDNA rearrangement in brain tissue from cognitively normal subjects, as well as the patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The rate of rearrangements was calculated by dividing the number of positive rearrangements by the coverage depth. The rearrangement rate was significantly higher in AD brain tissue than in control brain tissue (17.9%versus 6.7%; p = 0.0052). Of specific types of rearrangement, deletions were markedly increased in AD (9.2% versus 2.3%; p = 0.0005). Conclusions Our data showed that failure of mitochondrial DNA in AD brain might be important etiology of AD pathology. PMID:27299301

  19. Deep cytoplasmic rearrangements in axis-respecified Xenopus embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denegre, J. M.; Danilchik, M. V.

    1993-01-01

    In fertilized eggs of the frog Xenopus, the vegetal yolk mass rotates away from the future dorsal side (J. P. Vincent and J. Gerhart, 1987, Dev. Biol. 123, 526-539), and a major rearrangement of the deep animal hemisphere cytoplasm produces a characteristic swirl in the prospective dorsal side (M. V. Danilchik and J. M. Denegre, 1991, Development 111, 845-856). The relationship between this swirl and determination of the dorsal-ventral axis was further investigated by attempting to experimentally separate the positions of the swirl and the dorsal-ventral axis. Eggs were obliquely oriented in the gravity field to respecify the direction of yolk mass rotation and the position of the dorsal-ventral axis. When yolk mass rotation occurred in the absence of a sperm, as in activated eggs, a swirl pattern formed on the side away from which the yolk mass had rotated. In fertilized eggs tipped with the sperm entry point (SEP) down or to the side, swirl patterns were always found to form on the side away from which the yolk mass was displaced. However, in eggs tipped SEP up, in which the yolk mass was forced to rotate away from the SEP, more complicated rearrangements were observed in addition to the rotation-oriented swirl. Because the direction of yolk mass rotation was found to be influenced by both gravity and the actual position of the SEP in obliquely oriented eggs (SEP to the side), such complicated rearrangement patterns may result from opposing forces generated by both yolk mass rotation and the expanding sperm aster. Thus, except in cases in which the influences of SEP position and unit gravity opposed each other, it was not possible to experimentally separate the position of the deep cytoplasmic swirl from the direction of yolk mass rotation, and therefore the position of the prospective dorsal side.

  20. Precise detection of rearrangement breakpoints in mammalian chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Lemaitre, Claire; Tannier, Eric; Gautier, Christian; Sagot, Marie-France

    2008-01-01

    Background Genomes undergo large structural changes that alter their organisation. The chromosomal regions affected by these rearrangements are called breakpoints, while those which have not been rearranged are called synteny blocks. We developed a method to precisely delimit rearrangement breakpoints on a genome by comparison with the genome of a related species. Contrary to current methods which search for synteny blocks and simply return what remains in the genome as breakpoints, we propose to go further and to investigate the breakpoints themselves in order to refine them. Results Given some reliable and non overlapping synteny blocks, the core of the method consists in refining the regions that are not contained in them. By aligning each breakpoint sequence against its specific orthologous sequences in the other species, we can look for weak similarities inside the breakpoint, thus extending the synteny blocks and narrowing the breakpoints. The identification of the narrowed breakpoints relies on a segmentation algorithm and is statistically assessed. Since this method requires as input synteny blocks with some properties which, though they appear natural, are not verified by current methods for detecting such blocks, we further give a formal definition and provide an algorithm to compute them. The whole method is applied to delimit breakpoints on the human genome when compared to the mouse and dog genomes. Among the 355 human-mouse and 240 human-dog breakpoints, 168 and 146 respectively span less than 50 Kb. We compared the resulting breakpoints with some publicly available ones and show that we achieve a better resolution. Furthermore, we suggest that breakpoints are rarely reduced to a point, and instead consist in often large regions that can be distinguished from the sequences around in terms of segmental duplications, similarity with related species, and transposable elements. Conclusion Our method leads to smaller breakpoints than already published ones

  1. Chromosomal rearrangements detected by FISH and G-banding.

    PubMed

    Hou, J W; Wang, T R

    1996-09-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using chromosome-specific DNA libraries as painting probes, locus-specific unique sequence (cosmid) probes, and Y-specific repetitive sequences was applied in the analysis of eighteen cases of chromosomal rearrangements of undetermined nature. FISH clarified the origin of the extra or translocated chromosome segments in seventeen patients, one with 2q+, two with 4q+, one each with 6p+, 7p+, 9q+, 10p+, 11q+ and 12p+, two with 13q+, and one each with 15q+, 17p+, 18p+, 20p+, 21p+ and Yq+, as well as the nature of a de novo supernumerary chromosome marker in a previously reported case. By G-banding and molecular cytogenetic studies of the family members, six cases were determined to have unbalanced translocations inherited from the carrier parent. The extra translocated genetic material may cause specific trisomic syndromes, including partial 6p21.3-p23, 9q32-q34.3, 13q32-q34, 15q24-q26, and 17p11.2-p13 trisomies in those patients. A translocated 21q segment on 12p was shown by a painting probe in a patient with Down features. A patient with cat cry syndrome resulting from a loss of the terminal segment of the short arm of chromosome 5 was confirmed by a cosmid probe showing de novo reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 5 and 18:t(5;18) (p13.3;p11.31). With FISH, the extra material on the rearranged chromosome could also be identified as duplicated or translocated. The FISH technique thus provides a method for the analysis of extra structurally abnormal chromosomes (especially in de novo cases), recognizable syndromes (contiguous gene syndromes) caused by translocated deletion from parental balanced chromosome rearrangements, and supernumerary marker chromosomes. FISH subsequent to G-banding is also of great help in the confirmation of preliminary abnormal G-banded karyotypes after a modified destaining procedure. In conclusion, the combination of G-banding and FISH is very useful in the accurate diagnosis of chromosomal

  2. [Clonality lymphoid study through rearrangement analysis of antigen receptor].

    PubMed

    Villamizar-Rivera, Nicolás; Olaya, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    As a rule, malignant lymphoid proliferations are clonal. While most of the time the biological potential can be established through routine pathologic examination and auxiliary techniques, some cases are difficult to classify. Moreover, there are situations in which there are dominant clones whose analysis are important, such as occur in autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiency. This paper presents in an understandable way the main techniques for the study of clonality in lymphoid lesions, i.e. the analysis of rearrangements of antigen receptor genes by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based tests.

  3. Controlled order rearrangement encryption for quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Fuguo; Long, G.L.

    2003-10-01

    A technique is devised to perform orthogonal state quantum key distribution. In this scheme, entangled parts of a quantum information carrier are sent from Alice to Bob through two quantum channels. However, before the transmission, the order of the quantum information carrier in one channel is reordered so that Eve cannot steal useful information. At the receiver's end, the order of the quantum information carrier is restored. The order rearrangement operation in both parties is controlled by a prior shared control key which is used repeatedly in a quantum key distribution session.

  4. Somatic engineering of oncogenic chromosomal rearrangements: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Maddalo, Danilo; Ventura, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The ability to engineer specific mutations in mice has proven essential to advancing our understanding of the molecular basis of cancer. Chromosomal rearrangements, a common and clinically relevant class of cancer-causing mutations, have however remained difficult to faithfully recapitulate in vivo. The development of genetic tools for in vivo somatic genome editing has recently overcome this limitation and led to the generation of more sophisticated and accurate preclinical models of human cancers. Here we review the potential applications of these new technologies to the study of tumor biology and discuss their advantages over more conventional strategies, their limitations, and the remaining challenges. PMID:27520450

  5. Investigation of a stereoselective co-mediated rearrangement reaction.

    PubMed

    Carbery, David R; Reignier, Serge; Miller, Neil D; Adams, Harry; Harrity, Joseph P A

    2003-05-30

    A stereocontrolled approach to alpha-alkyl beta-alkynyl cyclohexanones is reported through a Lewis acid mediated rearrangement reaction of enol ethers bearing an Co-alkyne moiety. The reaction proceeds with high levels of stereoselectivity in the presence of Ti- and B-Lewis acids to provide a range of alpha,beta-disubstituted cyclohexanones in high yield although the products are prone to epimerization at the alpha-position in the presence of the B-promoter system. The potential for an enantioselective variant of this process is outlined, and a rationale for the observed stereochemical trends and detailed structural analyses of the ketone products are described.

  6. Thermal rearrangement of novolak resins used in microlithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Ricky; Zampini, Anthony; Monaghan, Michael J.; O'Leary, Michael J.; Cardin, William J.; Eugster, Timothy J.

    1995-06-01

    Changes in phenolic-formaldehyde resin properties are described in terms of thermal exposure. At high temperature, resin molecular weight, dissolution properties and chemical composition change depending on the presence or absence of monomers. Without monomer in the resin melt at 220 degree(s)C, resin molecular weight increases with a corresponding decrease in dissolution rate. In the presence of monomer, molecular weight generally decreases. Dissolution rate may fluctuate depending on the monomer mixture. Three,five- Xylenol and 2,3,5-trimethylphenol co-monomers induced the most extreme changes in resin properties with thermal treatment. Resin degradation-recombination processes suggest a classical Friedel-Craft rearrangement mechanism.

  7. Synthesis of Neoglycoconjugates by the Desulfurative Rearrangement of Allylic Disulfides

    PubMed Central

    Crich, David; Yang, Fan

    2009-01-01

    Two series of neoglucosyl donors are prepared based on connection of the allylic disulfide motif to the anomeric center via either a simple O-glycosyl linkage or N-glycosyl amide unit. Conjugation of both sets of donors to cysteine in peptides is demonstrated through classical disulfide exchange followed by the phosphine-mediated desulfurative allylic rearrangement resulting in neoglycopeptides characterized by a simple thioether spacer. The conjugation reaction functions in the absence of protecting groups on both the neoglycosyl donor and peptide in aqueous media at room temperature. PMID:18729514

  8. Developmental arrest at early stages of Chinese hamster embryos homozygous for chromosomal rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Sonta, S.; Yamada, M.; Iida, T.; Ohashi, H. )

    1991-03-01

    Forty-three Chinese hamster stocks with autosomal rearrangements produced by X-irradiation were used. These rearrangements, 38 reciprocal translocations and 5 inversions, were chromosomally balanced. Heterozygotes for these rearrangements were all fertile and morphologically normal in both sexes except for one line with growth retardation. By crossing male and female heterozygotes for the same rearrangements, homozygotes were obtained in 37 lines. In the remaining 6 lines (5 with reciprocal translocations and 1 with an inversion), no homozygotes were viable. These 6 lines revealed arrested development of homozygous embryos at the two-cell stage, around the eight-cell stage, and after implantation, respectively. The bands of the breakpoints of rearrangements associated with lethality of homozygous embryos were different for each rearrangement. These results suggest that abnormal expression including embryonic lethality in homozygotes may be due to an influence of genes at the breakpoints.

  9. FOXL2 mutations and genomic rearrangements in BPES.

    PubMed

    Beysen, Diane; De Paepe, Anne; De Baere, Elfride

    2009-02-01

    The FOXL2 gene is one of 10 forkhead genes, the mutations of which lead to human developmental disorders, often with ocular manifestations. Mutations in FOXL2 are known to cause blepharophimosis syndrome (BPES), an autosomal dominant eyelid malformation associated (type I) or not (type II) with ovarian dysfunction, leading to premature ovarian failure (POF). In addition, a few mutations have been described in patients with isolated POF. Here, we review all currently described FOXL2 sequence variations and genomic rearrangements in BPES and POF. Using a combined mutation detection approach, it is possible to identify the underlying genetic defect in a major proportion (88%) of typical BPES patients. Of all genetic defects found in our BPES cohort, intragenic mutations represent 81%. They include missense changes, frameshift and nonsense mutations, in-frame deletions, and duplications, that are distributed along the single-exon gene. Genomic rearrangements comprising both deletions encompassing FOXL2 and deletions located outside its transcription unit, represent 12% and 5% of all genetic defects in our BPES cohort, respectively. One of the challenges of genetic testing in BPES is the establishment of genotype-phenotype correlations, mainly with respect to the ovarian phenotype. Genetic testing should be performed in the context of genetic counseling, however, and should be systematically complemented by a multidisciplinary clinical follow-up. Another challenge for health care professionals involved in BPES is the treatment of the eyelid phenotype and the prevention or treatment of POF.

  10. Compositions and methods for detecting gene rearrangements and translocations

    DOEpatents

    Rowley, Janet D.; Diaz, Manuel O.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed is a series of nucleic acid probes for use in diagnosing and monitoring certain types of leukemia using, e.g., Southern and Northern blot analyses and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These probes detect rearrangements, such as translocations involving chromosome band 11q23 with other chromosomes bands, including 4q21, 6q27, 9p22, 19p13.3, in both dividing leukemic cells and interphase nuclei. The breakpoints in all such translocations are clustered within an 8.3 kb BamHI genomic region of the MLL gene. A novel 0.7 kb BamH1 cDNA fragment derived from this gene detects rearrangements on Southern blot analysis with a single BamHI restriction digest in all patients with the common 11q23 translocations and in patients with other 11q23 anomalies. Northern blot analyses are presented demonstrating that the MLL gene has multiple transcripts and that transcript size differentiates leukemic cells from normal cells. Also disclosed are MLL fusion proteins, MLL protein domains and anti-MLL antibodies.

  11. Exploring the Conformational States and Rearrangements of Yarrowia lipolytica Lipase

    PubMed Central

    Bordes, Florence; Barbe, Sophie; Escalier, Pierre; Mourey, Lionel; André, Isabelle; Marty, Alain; Tranier, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    We report the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of the Lip2 lipase from Yarrowia lipolytica in its closed conformation. The Lip2 structure is highly homologous to known structures of the fungal lipase family (Thermomyces lanuginosa, Rhizopus niveus, and Rhizomucor miehei lipases). However, it also presents some unique features that are described and discussed here in detail. Structural differences, in particular in the conformation adopted by the so-called lid subdomain, suggest that the opening mechanism of Lip2 may differ from that of other fungal lipases. Because the catalytic activity of lipases is strongly dependent on structural rearrangement of this mobile subdomain, we focused on elucidating the molecular mechanism of lid motion. Using the x-ray structure of Lip2, we carried out extensive molecular-dynamics simulations in explicit solvent environments (water and water/octane interface) to characterize the major structural rearrangements that the lid undergoes under the influence of solvent or upon substrate binding. Overall, our results suggest a two-step opening mechanism that gives rise first to a semi-open conformation upon adsorption of the protein at the water/organic solvent interface, followed by a further opening of the lid upon substrate binding. PMID:20923657

  12. FASEB Summer Research Conference. Genetic Recombination and Chromosome Rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2002-02-01

    The 2001 meeting entitled ''Genetic Recombination and Genome Rearrangements'' was held July 21-26 in Snowmass, Colorado. The goal of the meeting was to bring together scientists using diverse approaches to study all aspects of genetic recombination. This goal was achieved by integrating talks covering the genetics, biochemistry and structural biology of homologous recombination, site-specific recombination, and nonhomologous recombination. The format of the meeting consisted of a keynote address on the opening evening, two formal plenary sessions on each of the four full meeting days, a single afternoon workshop consisting of short talks chosen from among submitted abstracts, and afternoon poster sessions on each of the four full meeting days. The eight plenary session were entitled: (1) Recombination Mechanisms, (2) Prokaryotic Recombination, (3) Repair and Recombination, (4) Site-specific Recombination and Transposition, (5) Eukaryotic Recombination I, (6) Genome Rearrangements, (7) Meiosis, and (8) Eukaryotic Recombination II. Each session included a mix of genetic, biochemical and structural talks; talks were limited to 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of very lively, general discussion. Much of the data presented in the plenary sessions was unpublished, thus providing attendees with the most up-to-date knowledge of this rapidly-moving field.

  13. Regioselective 1-N-Alkylation and Rearrangement of Adenosine Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Oslovsky, Vladimir E; Drenichev, Mikhail S; Mikhailov, Sergey N

    2015-01-01

    Several methods for the preparation of some N(6)-substituted adenosines based on selective 1-N-alkylation with subsequent Dimroth rearrangement were developed. The proposed methods seem to be effective for the preparation of natural N(6)-isopentenyl- and N(6)-benzyladenosines, which are known to possess pronounced biological activities. Direct 1-N-alkylation of 2',3',5'-tri-O-acetyladenosine and 3',5'-di-O-acetyl-2'-deoxyadenosine with alkyl halides in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) in the presence of BaCO3 and KI gave 1-N-substituted derivatives with quantitative yields, whereas 1-N-alkylation of adenosine was accompanied by significant O-alkylation. Moreover, the reaction of trimethylsilyl derivatives of N(6)-acetyl-2',3',5'-tri-O-acetyladenosine and N(6)-acetyl-3',5'-di-O-acetyl-2'-deoxyadenosine with alkyl halides leads to the formation of the stable 1-N-substituted adenosines. Dimroth rearrangement of 1-N-substituted adenosines in aqueous ammonia yields pure N(6)-substituted adenosines.

  14. Prediction, identification, and artificial selection of DNA rearrangements in Rhizobium: toward a natural genomic design.

    PubMed

    Flores, M; Mavingui, P; Perret, X; Broughton, W J; Romero, D; Hernández, G; Dávila, G; Palacios, R

    2000-08-01

    Based on the DNA sequence of the symbiotic plasmid of Rhizobium strain NGR234, we predicted potential rearrangements generated by homologous recombination. All predicted rearrangements were identified experimentally by using a PCR-based methodology. Thus, the predicted and the actual dynamic maps of the replicon coincide. By using an approach that does not involve the introduction of exogenous genetic elements, derivative populations that are pure for specific rearrangements were obtained. We propose that knowledge of the DNA sequence of a genome offers the possibility of designing pathways of sequential rearrangements leading to alternative genomic structures. An experimental strategy to isolate bacterial populations containing the desired structures is discussed.

  15. A New Genomic Evolutionary Model for Rearrangements, Duplications, and Losses That Applies across Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu; Moret, Bernard M. E.

    Background: Genomic rearrangements have been studied since the beginnings of modern genetics and models for such rearrangements have been the subject of many papers over the last 10 years. However, none of the extant models can predict the evolution of genomic organization into circular unichromosomal genomes (as in most prokaryotes) and linear multichromosomal genomes (as in most eukaryotes). Very few of these models support gene duplications and losses - yet these events may be more common in evolutionary history than rearrangements and themselves cause apparent rearrangements.

  16. Concomitant T-cell receptor alpha and delta gene rearrangements in individual T-cell precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, S D; Pelkonen, J; Hurwitz, J L

    1990-01-01

    A debate has recently surfaced concerning the degree of precommitment attained by alpha beta and gamma delta T-cell precursors prior to T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement. It has been suggested that precursors may be precommitted to rearrange either alpha or delta genes, but not both, thus giving rise to alpha beta- and gamma delta-producing T cells, respectively. Alternatively, the precursors may be flexible with regard to potential TCR gene rearrangements. To address this controversy, the gene rearrangements among a group of T-cell hybridomas from fetal, newborn, and early postnatal mouse thymi were examined. Six probes spanning the delta and alpha loci were used in Southern blot analyses to characterize the rearrangements which occurred on homologous chromosomes in each cell. Although homologous chromosomes often rearranged in synchrony within the alpha locus, a number of hybridomas were found which had retained a delta rearrangement on one chromosome and an alpha rearrangement on the second. Results show that a precommitment by T cells to rearrange delta or alpha genes in a mutually exclusive manner is not an absolute feature of mouse thymocyte development. Images PMID:2164690

  17. Molecular screening of pituitary adenomas for gene mutations and rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, V.; Drazin, N.Z.; Gonskey, R.; Melmed, S. )

    1993-07-01

    Although pituitary tumors arise as benign monoclonal neoplasms, genetic alterations have not readily been identified in these adenomas. The authors studied restriction fragment abnormalities involving the GH gene locus, and mutations in the p53 and H-, K-, and N-ras genes in 22 human GH cell adenomas. Twenty two nonsecretory adenomas were also examined for p53 and ras gene mutations. Seven prolactinoma DNA samples were tested for deletions in the multiple endocrine neoplasia-1 (MEN-1) locus, as well as for rearrangements in the hst gene, a member of the fibroblast growth factor family. In DNA from GH-cell adenomas, identical GH restriction patterns were detected in both pituitary and lymphocyte DNA in all patients and in one patient with a mixed GH-TSH cell adenoma. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single stranded conformation polymorphism analysis, no mutations were detected in exons 5, 6, 7 and 8 of the p53 gene in GH cell adenomas nor in 22 nonsecretory adenomas. Codons 12/13 and 61 of H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras genes were also intact on GH cell adenomas and in nonsecretory adenomas. Site-specific probes for chromosome 11q13 including, PYGM, D11S146, and INT2 were used in 7 sporadic PRL-secreting adenomas to detect deletions of the MEN-1 locus on chromosome 11. One patient was identified with a loss of 11p, and the remaining 6 patients did not demonstrate loss of heterozygosity in the pituitary 11q13 locus, compared to lymphocyte DNA. None of these patients demonstrated hst gene rearrangements which also maps to this locus. These results show that p53 and ras gene mutations are not common events in the pathogenesis of acromegaly and nonsecretory tumors. Although hst gene rearrangements and deletions of 11q13 are not associated with sporadic PRl-cell adenoma formation, a single patient was detected with a partial loss of chromosome 11, including the putative MEN-1 site. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Contribution of canonical nonhomologous end joining to chromosomal rearrangements is enhanced by ATM kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Ragini; Carson, Caree R; Lee, Gabriella; Stark, Jeremy M

    2017-01-24

    A likely mechanism of chromosomal rearrangement formation involves joining the ends from two different chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs). These events could potentially be mediated by either of two end-joining (EJ) repair pathways [canonical nonhomologous end joining (C-NHEJ) or alternative end joining (ALT-EJ)], which cause distinct rearrangement junction patterns. The relative role of these EJ pathways during rearrangement formation has remained controversial. Along these lines, we have tested whether the DNA damage response mediated by the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) kinase may affect the relative influence of C-NHEJ vs. ALT-EJ on rearrangement formation. We developed a reporter in mouse cells for a 0.4-Mbp deletion rearrangement that is formed by EJ between two DSBs induced by the Cas9 endonuclease. We found that disruption of the ATM kinase causes an increase in the frequency of the rearrangement as well as a shift toward rearrangement junctions that show hallmarks of C-NHEJ. Furthermore, ATM suppresses rearrangement formation in an experimental condition, in which C-NHEJ is the predominant EJ repair event (i.e., expression of the 3' exonuclease Trex2). Finally, several C-NHEJ factors are required for the increase in rearrangement frequency caused by inhibition of the ATM kinase. We also examined ATM effectors and found that H2AX shows a similar influence as ATM, whereas the influence of ATM on this rearrangement seems independent of 53BP1. We suggest that the contribution of the C-NHEJ pathway to the formation of a 0.4-Mbp deletion rearrangement is enhanced in ATM-deficient cells.

  19. Highly rearranged mitochondrial genome in Nycteria parasites (Haemosporidia) from bats

    PubMed Central

    Karadjian, Gregory; Hassanin, Alexandre; Saintpierre, Benjamin; Gembu Tungaluna, Guy-Crispin; Ariey, Frederic; Ayala, Francisco J.; Landau, Irene; Duval, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Haemosporidia parasites have mostly and abundantly been described using mitochondrial genes, and in particular cytochrome b (cytb). Failure to amplify the mitochondrial cytb gene of Nycteria parasites isolated from Nycteridae bats has been recently reported. Bats are hosts to a diverse and profuse array of Haemosporidia parasites that remain largely unstudied. There is a need to obtain more molecular data from chiropteran parasites. Such data would help to better understand the evolutionary history of Haemosporidia, which notably include the Plasmodium parasites, malaria’s agents. We use next-generation sequencing to obtain the complete mitochondrial genome of Nycteria parasites from African Nycteris grandis (Nycteridae) and Rhinolophus alcyone (Rhinolophidae) and Asian Megaderma spasma (Megadermatidae). We report four complete mitochondrial genomes, including two rearranged mitochondrial genomes within Haemosporidia. Our results open outlooks into potentially undiscovered Haemosporidian diversity. PMID:27528689

  20. Electronic Structure Rearrangements in Hybrid Ribozyme/Protein Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jiyoung; Kino, Hiori; Field, Martin J.; Tateno, Masaru

    2017-04-01

    We analyzed the electronic structural changes that occur in the reaction cycle of a biological catalyst composed of RNA and protein, and elucidated the dynamical rearrangements of the electronic structure that was obtained from our previous study in which ab initio quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics simulations were performed. Notable results that we obtained include the generation of a reactive HOMO that is responsible for bond formation in the initial stages of the reaction, and the appearance of a reactive LUMO that is involved in the bond rupture that leads to products. We denote these changes as dynamical induction of the reactive HOMO (DIRH) and LUMO (DIRL), respectively. Interestingly, we also find that the induction of the reactive HOMO is enhanced by the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB), which, to the best of our knowledge, represents a novel role for LBHBs in enzymatic systems.

  1. Hydrogen Ion-Molecule Isotopomer Collisions: Charge Transfer and Rearrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. G.; Stancil, P. C.

    A survey of existing data for collisions of isotopes of hydrogen atoms, ions, and molecules is presented. The survey was limited to atom - diatom ionic collisions and to energies generally less than about 10 keV/u. The processes include particle-rearrangement and charge transfer, including both dissociative and non-dissociative channels, with an emphasis on state-to-state (or state-selected) data, where available. Since the last survey (Linder, Janev and Botero 1995), a small number of investigations for deuterium and tritium ion-diatom systems have been performed, with some involving state-resolved data, which include the initial-state-resolved and state-to-state processes. While some progress has been made since the last survey, the database involving hydrogen isotope collisional processes, both total and state- resolved, is far from complete.

  2. Rearrangements of highly polymorphic regions near telomeres of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, H; Thorburn, P; Haber, J E

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the mitotic and meiotic properties of telomeric regions in various laboratory strains of yeast. Using a sequence (Y probe) derived from a cloned yeast telomere (J. Szostak and E. Blackburn, Cell 29:245-255, 1982), we found that various strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae show extensive polymorphisms of restriction endonuclease fragment length. Some of the variation in the lengths of telomeric fragments appears to be under the control of a small number of genes. When DNA from various strains was digested with endonuclease KpnI, nearly all of the fragments homologous to the Y probe were found to be of different size. The pattern of fragments in different strains was extremely variable, with a greater degree of polymorphism than that observed for fragments containing the mobile TY1 element. Tetrad analysis of haploid meiotic segregants from diploids heterozygous for many different Y-homologous KpnI fragments revealed that most of them exhibited Mendelian (2:0) segregation. However, only a small proportion of these fragments displayed the obligate 2:2 parental segregation expected of simple allelic variants at the same chromosome end. From the segregations of these fragments, we concluded that some yeast telomeres lack a Y-homologous sequence and that the chromosome arms containing a Y-homologous sequence are different among various yeast strains. Regions near yeast telomeres frequently undergo rearrangement. Among eight tetrads from three different diploids, we have found three novel Y-homologous restriction fragments that appear to have arisen during meiosis. In all three cases, the appearance of a new fragment was accompanied by the loss of another band. In one of these cases, the rearrangement leading to a novel fragment arose in an isogenic diploid, in which both homologous chromosomes should have been identical. Among these same tetrads we also found examples of apparent mitotic gene conversions and mitotic recombination involving telemetric

  3. Genome rearrangement affects RNA virus adaptability on prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pesko, Kendra; Voigt, Emily A; Swick, Adam; Morley, Valerie J; Timm, Collin; Yin, John; Turner, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    Gene order is often highly conserved within taxonomic groups, such that organisms with rearranged genomes tend to be less fit than wild type gene orders, and suggesting natural selection favors genome architectures that maximize fitness. But it is unclear whether rearranged genomes hinder adaptability: capacity to evolutionarily improve in a new environment. Negative-sense non-segmented RNA viruses (order Mononegavirales) have specific genome architecture: 3' UTR - core protein genes - envelope protein genes - RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase gene - 5' UTR. To test how genome architecture affects RNA virus evolution, we examined vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) variants with the nucleocapsid (N) gene moved sequentially downstream in the genome. Because RNA polymerase stuttering in VSV replication causes greater mRNA production in upstream genes, N gene translocation toward the 5' end leads to stepwise decreases in N transcription, viral replication and progeny production, and also impacts the activation of type 1 interferon mediated antiviral responses. We evolved VSV gene-order variants in two prostate cancer cell lines: LNCap cells deficient in innate immune response to viral infection, and PC-3 cells that mount an IFN stimulated anti-viral response to infection. We observed that gene order affects phenotypic adaptability (reproductive growth; viral suppression of immune function), especially on PC-3 cells that strongly select against virus infection. Overall, populations derived from the least-fit ancestor (most-altered N position architecture) adapted fastest, consistent with theory predicting populations with low initial fitness should improve faster in evolutionary time. Also, we observed correlated responses to selection, where viruses improved across both hosts, rather than suffer fitness trade-offs on unselected hosts. Whole genomics revealed multiple mutations in evolved variants, some of which were conserved across selective environments for a given gene

  4. Synthesis and rearrangements of aminosubstituted ferra- and ruthenatricarbaboranes.

    PubMed

    Holub, Josef; Grüner, Bohumír; Perekalin, Dmitry S; Golovanov, Denis G; Lyssenko, Konstantin A; Petrovskii, Pavel V; Kudinov, Alexander R; Stíbr, Bohumil

    2005-03-21

    A room-temperature reaction between the [7-tBuNH-nido-7,8,9-C3B8H10]- anion (1a) and [Cp*RuCl]4 leads to the ruthenatricarbollide [1-Cp*-12-tBuNH-1,2,4,12-RuC3B8H10] (2) (yield 85%). Analogously, the room-temperature photochemical reaction of 1a with [CpFe(C6H6)]PF6 gives the previously reported iron complex [1-Cp-12-tBuNH-1,2,4,12-FeC3B8H10] (3) (yield 82%). Both reactions are associated with extensive polyhedral rearrangement, which occurs under very mild conditions and brings the carbon atoms to positions of maximum separation within the framework. Compounds 2 and 3 were also surprisingly obtained via complexation of the isomeric [8-tBuNH-nido-7,8,9-C3B8H10]- (1b) anion. Complex 2 rearranges further to [1-Cp*-10-tBuNH-1,2,4,10-RuC3B8H10] (4) upon refluxing in xylene (145 degrees C). Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/SDD level were used to estimate relative stabilities of these metallacarborane isomers. Compounds 2 and 4, along with the 11-vertex closo compounds [1-Cp*-1,2,3,10-RuC3B7H10] (5) and [1-Cp*-10-tBuNH-1,2,3,10-RuC3B7H9] (6), were also isolated from the reaction between [Cp*RuCl2]2 and 1a in boiling xylene. The structure of 2 was established by an X-ray diffraction study, and the constitution of all compounds was determined unambiguously by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and elemental analyses.

  5. Recent applications of the divinylcyclopropane–cycloheptadiene rearrangement in organic synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review summarizes the application of the divinylcyclopropane–cycloheptadiene rearrangement in synthetic organic chemistry. A brief overview of the new mechanistic insights concerning the title reaction is provided as well as a condensed account on the biological relevance of the topic. Heteroatom variants of this rearrangement are covered briefly. PMID:24605138

  6. Stereoselective Synthesis of Quaternary Carbons via the Dianionic Ireland–Claisen Rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A dianionic Ireland–Claisen rearrangement of chiral, nonracemic α-methyl-β-hydroxy allylic esters has been developed that proceeds with high diastereoselectivity and provides products containing three contiguous stereogenic carbons, including a quaternary center. The potential utility of the rearrangement for complex molecule synthesis is also demonstrated. PMID:24735235

  7. Catalytic enantioselective [2,3]-rearrangements of amine N-oxides.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hongli; Qi, Xiangbing; Tambar, Uttam K

    2011-02-09

    The first Pd-catalyzed enantioselective [2,3]-rearrangement of allylic amine N-oxides is described, which formally represents an asymmetric Meisenheimer rearrangement. The mild reaction conditions enable the synthesis of chiral nonracemic aliphatic allylic alcohol derivatives with reactive functional groups. On the basis of preliminary studies, a cyclization-mediated mechanism is proposed.

  8. On the association between chromosomal rearrangements and genic evolution in humans and chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Marques-Bonet, Tomàs; Sànchez-Ruiz, Jesús; Armengol, Lluís; Khaja, Razi; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Lopez-Bigas, Núria; Rocchi, Mariano; Gazave, Elodie; Navarro, Arcadi

    2007-01-01

    Background The role that chromosomal rearrangements might have played in the speciation processes that have separated the lineages of humans and chimpanzees has recently come into the spotlight. To date, however, results are contradictory. Here we revisit this issue by making use of the available human and chimpanzee genome sequence to study the relationship between chromosomal rearrangements and rates of DNA sequence evolution. Results Contrary to previous findings for this pair of species, we show that genes located in the rearranged chromosomes that differentiate the genomes of humans and chimpanzees, especially genes within rearrangements themselves, present lower divergence than genes elsewhere in the genome. Still, there are considerable differences between individual chromosomes. Chromosome 4, in particular, presents higher divergence in genes located within its rearrangement. Conclusion A first conclusion of our analysis is that divergence is lower for genes located in rearranged chromosomes than for those in colinear chromosomes. We also report that non-coding regions within rearranged regions tend to have lower divergence than non-coding regions outside them. These results suggest an association between chromosomal rearrangements and lower non-coding divergence that has not been reported before, even if some chromosomes do not follow this trend and could be potentially associated with a speciation episode. In summary, without excluding it, our results suggest that chromosomal speciation has not been common along the human and chimpanzee lineage. PMID:17971225

  9. Inverted genomic segments and complex triplication rearrangements are mediated by inverted repeats in the human genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We identified complex genomic rearrangements consisting of intermixed duplications and triplications of genomic segments at the MECP2 and PLP1 loci. These complex rearrangements were characterized by a triplicated segment embedded within a duplication in 11 unrelated subjects. Notably, only two brea...

  10. Lecture Capture with Real-Time Rearrangement of Visual Elements: Impact on Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, P.-T.; Wang, B.-Y.; Su, M.-H.

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this study is to create and test a lecture-capture system that can rearrange visual elements while recording is still taking place, in such a way that student performance can be positively influenced. The system we have devised is capable of integrating and rearranging multimedia sources, including learning content, the…

  11. Rearrangement hotspots in the sex chromosome of the Palearctic black fly Simulium bergi (Diptera, Simuliidae)

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Peter H.; Yildirim, Alparslan; Onder, Zuhal; Tasci, G. Taskin; Duzlu, Onder; Arslan, M. Ozkan; Ciloglu, Arif; Sari, Baris; Parmaksizoglu, Nilgun; Inci, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An extreme example of nonrandom rearrangements, especially inversion breaks, is described in the polytene chromosomes of the black fly Simulium bergi Rubtsov, 1956 from Armenia and Turkey. A total of 48 rearrangements was discovered, relative to the standard banding sequence for the subgenus Simulium Latreille, 1802. One rearrangement, an inversion (IIS-C) in the short arm of the second chromosome, was fixed. Six (12.5%) of the rearrangements were autosomal polymorphisms, and the remaining 41 (85.4%) were sex linked. More than 40 X- and Y-linked rearrangements, predominantly inversions, were clustered in the long arm of the second chromosome (IIL), representing about 15% of the total complement. The pattern conforms to a nonrandom model of chromosome breakage, perhaps associated with an underlying molecular mechanism. PMID:27551350

  12. Inverted genomic segments and complex triplication rearrangements are mediated by inverted repeats in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Claudia M. B.; Ramocki, Melissa B.; Pehlivan, Davut; Franco, Luis M.; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Fang, Ping; McCall, Alanna; Pivnick, Eniko Karman; Hines-Dowell, Stacy; Seaver, Laurie; Friehling, Linda; Lee, Sansan; Smith, Rosemarie; del Gaudio, Daniela; Withers, Marjorie; Liu, Pengfei; Cheung, Sau Wai; Belmont, John W.; Zoghbi, Huda Y.; Hastings, P. J.; Lupski, James R.

    2011-01-01

    We identified complex genomic rearrangements consisting of intermixed duplications and triplications of genomic segments at both the MECP2 and PLP1 loci. These complex rearrangements were characterized by a triplicated segment embedded within a duplication in 12 unrelated subjects. Interestingly, only two novel breakpoint junctions were generated during each rearrangement formation. Remarkably, all the complex rearrangement products share the common genomic organization duplication-inverted triplication-duplication (DUP-TRP/INV-DUP) wherein the triplicated segment is inverted and located between directly oriented duplicated genomic segments. We provide evidence that the DUP-TRP/INV-DUP structures are mediated by inverted repeats that can be separated by over 300 kb; a genomic architecture that apparently leads to susceptibility to such complex rearrangements. A similar inverted repeat mediated mechanism may underlie structural variation in many other regions of the human genome. We propose a mechanism that involves both homology driven, via inverted repeats, and microhomologous/nonhomologous events. PMID:21964572

  13. Correlating structural order with structural rearrangement in dusty plasma liquids: can structural rearrangement be predicted by static structural information?

    PubMed

    Su, Yen-Shuo; Liu, Yu-Hsuan; I, Lin

    2012-11-09

    Whether the static microstructural order information is strongly correlated with the subsequent structural rearrangement (SR) and their predicting power for SR are investigated experimentally in the quenched dusty plasma liquid with microheterogeneities. The poor local structural order is found to be a good alarm to identify the soft spot and predict the short term SR. For the site with good structural order, the persistent time for sustaining the structural memory until SR has a large mean value but a broad distribution. The deviation of the local structural order from that averaged over nearest neighbors serves as a good second alarm to further sort out the short time SR sites. It has the similar sorting power to that using the temporal fluctuation of the local structural order over a small time interval.

  14. Spectral karyotyping identifies recurrent complex rearrangements of chromosomes 8, 17, and 20 in osteosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Bayani, Jane; Zielenska, Maria; Pandita, Ajay; Al-Romaih, Khaldoun; Karaskova, Jana; Harrison, Karen; Bridge, Julia A; Sorensen, Poul; Thorner, Paul; Squire, Jeremy A

    2003-01-01

    Conventional cytogenetic studies have shown that osteosarcomas (OSs) are often highly aneuploid, with a large number of both structural and numerical chromosomal alterations. To investigate the complexity of OS karyotypes in detail, we applied spectral karyotyping (SKY) to a series of 14 primary OS tumors and four established OS cell lines. A total of 531 rearrangements were identified by SKY, of which 300 breakpoints could be assigned to a specific chromosome band. There was an average of 38.5 breakpoints identified by SKY per primary tumor. Chromosome 20 was involved in a disproportionately high number of structural rearrangements, with 38 different aberrations being detected. Chromosomal rearrangements between chromosomes 20 and 8 were evident in four tumors. FISH analysis using a 20q13 subtelomeric probe identified frequent involvement of 20q in complex structural rearrangements of OS cell lines. Characterization of the structural aberrations of chromosomes 8 and 17 by use of SKY demonstrated frequent duplication or partial gains of chromosome bands 8q23-24 and 17p11-13. Other chromosomes frequently involved in structural alteration were chromosomes 1 (47 rearrangements) and 6 (38 rearrangements). Centromeric rearrangements often involving chromosomes 1, 6, 13, 14, 17, and 20 were present. Four of the 14 primary OS tumors were characterized by nonclonal changes that included both structural and numerical alterations. In summary, OS tumors have a very high frequency of structural and numerical alterations, compounded by gross changes in ploidy. This intrinsic karyotype instability leads to a diversity of rearrangements and the acquisition of composite chromosomal rearrangements, with the highest frequency of alteration leading to gain of 8q23-24 and 17p11-13 and rearrangement of 20q. These findings suggest that specific sequences mapping to these chromosomal regions will likely have a role in the development and progression of OS.

  15. Detection of ALK rearrangements in lung cancer patients using a homebrew PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Chang, JianHua; Liu, Fang; Wang, Qifeng; Lu, YongMing; Zhang, ZhuanXu; Shen, Jiabing; Zhai, Qing; Meng, Xia; Wang, Jialei; Ye, Xun

    2017-01-31

    Lung cancer patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements are candidates for targeted therapeutics. However, patients must be tested with a companion diagnostic assay to realize their ALK rearrangement status. We analyzed the publicly available E-GEOD-31210 microarray dataset and identified a non-coding RNA, sweyjawbu, which is strongly associated with ALK rearrangements. We validated these results using quantitative real-time PCR in an independent cohort consisting of 4 cell lines and 83 clinical samples. We could differentiate between ALK rearrangement-positive and -negative lung cancer samples by comparing sweyjawbu expression. Additionally, ALK rearrangement status was determined by comparing the expression of the 5' and 3' regions of the ALK transcript or by detecting known ALK hybrid subtypes. Thus, using our homebrew PCR assay, we were able to accurately detect ALK rearrangements, which could be used for diagnostic screening of lung cancer patients. The prototype could potentially be transferred to an automatic multiplex PCR platform (FilmArray) to differentiate between ALK rearrangement-positive and -negative patients in point-of-care settings.

  16. The potential of clofarabine in MLL-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Stumpel, Dominique J P M; Schneider, Pauline; Pieters, Rob; Stam, Ronald W

    2015-09-01

    MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in infants is the most difficult-to-treat type of childhood ALL, displaying a chemotherapy-resistant phenotype, and unique histone modifications, gene expression signatures and DNA methylation patterns. MLL-rearranged infant ALL responds remarkably well to nucleoside analogue drugs in vitro, such as cytarabine and cladribine, and to the demethylating agents decitabine and zebularine as measured by cytotoxicity assays. These observations led to the inclusion of cytarabine into the treatment regimens currently used for infants with ALL. However, survival chances for infants with MLL-rearranged ALL do still not exceed 30-40%. Here we explored the in vitro potential of the novel nucleoside analogue clofarabine for MLL-rearranged infant ALL. Therefore we used both cell line models as well as primary patient cells. Compared with other nucleoside analogues, clofarabine effectively targeted primary MLL-rearranged infant ALL cells at the lowest concentrations, with median LC50 values of ∼25 nM. Interestingly, clofarabine displayed synergistic cytotoxic effects in combination with cytarabine. Furthermore, at concentrations of 5-10nM clofarabine induced demethylation of the promoter region of the tumour suppressor gene FHIT (Fragile Histidine Triad), a gene typically hypermethylated in MLL-rearranged ALL. Demethylation of the FHIT promoter region was accompanied by subtle re-expression of this gene both at the mRNA and protein level. We conclude that clofarabine is an interesting candidate for further studies in MLL-rearranged ALL in infants.

  17. BRCA1 and BRCA2 rearrangements in Brazilian individuals with Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Ingrid Petroni; Cossio, Silvia Liliana; Palmero, Edenir Inez; Pinheiro, Manuela; Nascimento, Ivana Lucia de Oliveira; Machado, Taisa Manuela Bonfim; Sandes, Kiyoko Abe; Toralles, Betânia; Garicochea, Bernardo; Izetti, Patricia; Pereira, Maria Luiza Saraiva; Bock, Hugo; Vargas, Fernando Regla; Moreira, Miguel Ângelo Martins; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 5-10% of breast cancers are caused by germline mutations in high penetrance predisposition genes. Among these, BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are associated with the Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) syndrome, are the most frequently affected genes. Recent studies confirm that gene rearrangements, especially in BRCA1, are responsible for a significant proportion of mutations in certain populations. In this study we determined the prevalence of BRCA rearrangements in 145 unrelated Brazilian individuals at risk for HBOC syndrome who had not been previously tested for BRCA mutations. Using Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) and a specific PCR-based protocol to identify a Portuguese founder BRCA2 mutation, we identified two (1,4%) individuals with germline BRCA1 rearrangements (c.547+240_5193+178del and c.4675+467_5075-990del) and three probands with the c.156_157insAlu founder BRCA2 rearrangement. Furthermore, two families with false positive MLPA results were shown to carry a deleterious point mutation at the probe binding site. This study comprises the largest Brazilian series of HBOC families tested for BRCA1 and BRCA2 rearrangements to date and includes patients from three regions of the country. The overall observed rearrangement frequency of 3.44% indicates that rearrangements are relatively uncommon in the admixed population of Brazil.

  18. BRCA1 and BRCA2 rearrangements in Brazilian individuals with Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Ingrid Petroni; Cossio, Silvia Liliana; Palmero, Edenir Inez; Pinheiro, Manuela; Nascimento, Ivana Lucia de Oliveira; Machado, Taisa Manuela Bonfim; Sandes, Kiyoko Abe; Toralles, Betânia; Garicochea, Bernardo; Izetti, Patricia; Pereira, Maria Luiza Saraiva; Bock, Hugo; Vargas, Fernando Regla; Moreira, Miguel Ângelo Martins; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Approximately 5-10% of breast cancers are caused by germline mutations in high penetrance predisposition genes. Among these, BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are associated with the Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) syndrome, are the most frequently affected genes. Recent studies confirm that gene rearrangements, especially in BRCA1, are responsible for a significant proportion of mutations in certain populations. In this study we determined the prevalence of BRCA rearrangements in 145 unrelated Brazilian individuals at risk for HBOC syndrome who had not been previously tested for BRCA mutations. Using Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) and a specific PCR-based protocol to identify a Portuguese founder BRCA2 mutation, we identified two (1,4%) individuals with germline BRCA1 rearrangements (c.547+240_5193+178del and c.4675+467_5075-990del) and three probands with the c.156_157insAlu founder BRCA2 rearrangement. Furthermore, two families with false positive MLPA results were shown to carry a deleterious point mutation at the probe binding site. This study comprises the largest Brazilian series of HBOC families tested for BRCA1 and BRCA2 rearrangements to date and includes patients from three regions of the country. The overall observed rearrangement frequency of 3.44% indicates that rearrangements are relatively uncommon in the admixed population of Brazil. PMID:27303907

  19. CASSCF Computational Study of Pseudopericyclic Character in Electrocyclic Rearrangements Involving Heteroatoms.

    PubMed

    Bierzynski, Irena R; Settle, Cassandra A; Kreiman, Henry W; Duncan, James A

    2016-01-15

    The Complete Active Space Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) computational method, with the 6-31G* basis set, was used to examine six electrocyclic rearrangements, each involving a 1,2,4,6-heptatetraene skeleton with two variously located oxygen and/or nitrogen heteroatoms, as a way to determine which, if any, are pseudopericyclic as opposed to pericyclic. Primarily through the close examination of the active space orbitals, but also considering transition structure geometries and activation energies, it was concluded that rearrangements 3 → 4, 5 → 6, 7 → 8, and 9 → 10 are pseudopericyclic with two orbital disconnections each, whereas the 13 → 14 and 15 → 16 rearrangements are pericyclic. Our conclusions agreed with those of others in two of the four cases that had been studied previously by density functional theory (3 → 4 and 7 → 8) but ran contrary to the previous conclusions that the 5 → 6 rearrangement is pericyclic and that the 15 → 16 rearrangement is pseudopericyclic. Our results are also compared and contrasted to previous similar ones of ours involving the 3 → 4 electrocyclization (essentially pericyclic), the 11 → 12 [3,3] sigmatropic rearrangement (pseudopericyclic), and similar [3,3] sigmatropic rearrangements (all pericyclic), and detailed rationales for these latest results are provided.

  20. Kinetics of homoallylic/homobenzylic rearrangement reactions under combustion conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Lidong; Zhang, Feng

    2014-08-28

    Homoallylic/homobenzylic radicals refer to typical radicals with the radical site located at the β position from the vinyl/phenyl group. These radicals are largely involved in combustion systems, such as the pyrolysis or oxidation of alkenes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics. The 1,2-vinyl/phenyl migration via two steps (cyclization/fission) is a peculiar reaction type for the homoallylic/homobenzylic radicals, entitled homoallylic/homobenzylic rearrangement, which has been studied by theoretical calculations including the Hirshfeld atomic charge analysis in the present work. With the help of rate constant calculations, the competition between this reaction channel and other possible pathways under combustion temperatures (500-2000 K) were evaluated. Analogous 1,3- and 1,4-vinyl/phenyl migration reactions for similar radicals with the radical sites located at the γ and δ positions from the vinyl/phenyl group were also computed. The results indicate that the 1,2-vinyl/phenyl migration is particularly important for the kinetics of unimolecular reactions of homoallylic radicals under 1500 K; nevertheless, it still has noticeable contribution at higher temperature. For those radicals with the radical site at the γ or δ positions, the respective 1,3- or 1,4-vinyl/phenyl migration channel plays an insignificant role under combustion conditions.

  1. Centrosome centering and decentering by microtubule network rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Letort, Gaëlle; Nedelec, Francois; Blanchoin, Laurent; Théry, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The centrosome is positioned at the cell center by pushing and pulling forces transmitted by microtubules (MTs). Centrosome decentering is often considered to result from asymmetric, cortical pulling forces exerted in particular by molecular motors on MTs and controlled by external cues affecting the cell cortex locally. Here we used numerical simulations to investigate the possibility that it could equally result from the redistribution of pushing forces due to a reorientation of MTs. We first showed that MT gliding along cell edges and pivoting around the centrosome regulate MT rearrangement and thereby direct the spatial distribution of pushing forces, whereas the number, dynamics, and stiffness of MTs determine the magnitude of these forces. By modulating these parameters, we identified different regimes, involving both pushing and pulling forces, characterized by robust centrosome centering, robust off-centering, or “reactive” positioning. In the last-named conditions, weak asymmetric cues can induce a misbalance of pushing and pulling forces, resulting in an abrupt transition from a centered to an off-centered position. Taken together, these results point to the central role played by the configuration of the MTs on the distribution of pushing forces that position the centrosome. We suggest that asymmetric external cues should not be seen as direct driver of centrosome decentering and cell polarization but instead as inducers of an effective reorganization of the MT network, fostering centrosome motion to the cell periphery. PMID:27440925

  2. Effects of structural rearrangements on sorption capacity of coals

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Vyacheslav; Soong, Yee; Warzinski, R.P.; Lynn, R.J.

    2006-09-01

    Recently, the problems in practical application of experimental data and modeling to the sequestration of carbon dioxide in coal seams and the concurrent enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery have underscored the need for new approaches that take into account the ability of coal for structural rearrangements. Areas of interest include plasticization of coal due to CO2 dissolution, the effect of coal swelling on estimation of the capacity of a coal-seam to adsorb CO2 (adsorption isotherm), and the stability of the CO2 saturated phase once formed, especially with respect to how it might be affected by changes in the post-sequestration environment (environmental effects). Coals are organic macromolecular systems well known to imbibe organic liquids and carbon dioxide. CO2 dissolves in coals and swells them. The problems become more prominent in the region of supercritical CO2. We investigated the effects of moisture content and pressure cycling history on temporal changes in the coal sorptive capacity for a set of Argonne premium coals. The samples were tested as received, dried at 80oC for 36 hours, and moisture equilibrated at 96-97% RH and 30oC for 48 hours. The powders were compared to core samples. Additionally, plasticization of coal powders was studied by high pressure dilatometer.

  3. Centrosome centering and decentering by microtubule network rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Letort, Gaëlle; Nedelec, Francois; Blanchoin, Laurent; Théry, Manuel

    2016-09-15

    The centrosome is positioned at the cell center by pushing and pulling forces transmitted by microtubules (MTs). Centrosome decentering is often considered to result from asymmetric, cortical pulling forces exerted in particular by molecular motors on MTs and controlled by external cues affecting the cell cortex locally. Here we used numerical simulations to investigate the possibility that it could equally result from the redistribution of pushing forces due to a reorientation of MTs. We first showed that MT gliding along cell edges and pivoting around the centrosome regulate MT rearrangement and thereby direct the spatial distribution of pushing forces, whereas the number, dynamics, and stiffness of MTs determine the magnitude of these forces. By modulating these parameters, we identified different regimes, involving both pushing and pulling forces, characterized by robust centrosome centering, robust off-centering, or "reactive" positioning. In the last-named conditions, weak asymmetric cues can induce a misbalance of pushing and pulling forces, resulting in an abrupt transition from a centered to an off-centered position. Taken together, these results point to the central role played by the configuration of the MTs on the distribution of pushing forces that position the centrosome. We suggest that asymmetric external cues should not be seen as direct driver of centrosome decentering and cell polarization but instead as inducers of an effective reorganization of the MT network, fostering centrosome motion to the cell periphery.

  4. Ferrier rearrangement promoted by an electrochemically generated zirconium catalyst.

    PubMed

    Stevanović, Dragana; Pejović, Anka; Damljanović, Ivan; Minić, Aleksandra; Bogdanović, Goran A; Vukićević, Mirjana; Radulović, Niko S; Vukićević, Rastko D

    2015-04-30

    In situ generated zirconium catalyst from a sacrificial zirconium anode was successfully applied to promote Ferrier rearrangement of 3,4,5-tri-O-acetyl-D-glucal and 6-deoxy-3,4-di-O-acetyl-L-glucal (3,4-di-O-acetyl-L-rhamnal) in the presence of three thiols and eleven thiophenols as nucleophiles. A simple constant current electrolysis (20 mA, 0.4 F mol(-1)) of an acetonitrile solution of lithium perchlorate (0.1 M) containing the corresponding glycal and S-nucleophiles, using a zirconium anode and a platinum cathode resulted in the successful synthesis of the corresponding 2,3-unsaturated peracetylated thioglycosides (with an average anomer ratio α/β=4.129 in the case of peracetylated D-glucal and 8.740 in the case of L-rhamnal). The same procedure proved to be appropriate in synthesizing dihydropyran derivatives ('C-glycosides') using allyltrimethylsilane as the nucleophile (only 'α-anomers' were obtained). All new compounds were fully characterized by spectral data, whereas single-crystal X-ray analysis was performed for two thioglycosides.

  5. Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements Induced in Vivo by Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Ando, K.; Furusawa, G.; Obe, G.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that the ratio complex/simple exchanges can be used as a biomarker of exposure to high-LET radiation. We tested this hypothesis in vivo, by considering data from several studies that measured complex exchanges in peripheral blood from humans exposed to mixed fields of low- and high-LET radiation. In particular, we studied data from astronauts involved in long-term missions in low-Earth-orbit, and uterus cancer patients treated with accelerated carbon ions. Data from two studies of chromosomal aberrations in astronauts used blood samples obtained before and after space flight, and a third study used blood samples from patients before and after radiotherapy course. Similar methods were used in each study, where lymphocytes were stimulated to grow in vitro, and collected after incubation in either colcemid or calyculin A. Slides were painted with whole-chromosome DNA fluorescent probes (FISH), and complex and simple chromosome exchanges in the painted genome were classified separately. Complex-type exchanges were observed at low frequencies in control subjects, and in our test subjects before the treatment. No statistically significant increase in the yield of complex-type exchanges was induced by the space flight. Radiation therapy induced a high fraction of complex exchanges, but no significant differences could be detected between patients treated with accelerated carbon ions or X-rays. Complex chromosomal rearrangements do not represent a practical biomarker of radiation quality in our test subjects. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Order and disorder control the functional rearrangement of influenza hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xingcheng; Eddy, Nathanial R; Noel, Jeffrey K; Whitford, Paul C; Wang, Qinghua; Ma, Jianpeng; Onuchic, José N

    2014-08-19

    Influenza hemagglutinin (HA), a homotrimeric glycoprotein crucial for membrane fusion, undergoes a large-scale structural rearrangement during viral invasion. X-ray crystallography has shown that the pre- and postfusion configurations of HA2, the membrane-fusion subunit of HA, have disparate secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures, where some regions are displaced by more than 100 Å. To explore structural dynamics during the conformational transition, we studied simulations of a minimally frustrated model based on energy landscape theory. The model combines structural information from both the pre- and postfusion crystallographic configurations of HA2. Rather than a downhill drive toward formation of the central coiled-coil, we discovered an order-disorder transition early in the conformational change as the mechanism for the release of the fusion peptides from their burial sites in the prefusion crystal structure. This disorder quickly leads to a metastable intermediate with a broken threefold symmetry. Finally, kinetic competition between the formation of the extended coiled-coil and C-terminal melting results in two routes from this intermediate to the postfusion structure. Our study reiterates the roles that cracking and disorder can play in functional molecular motions, in contrast to the downhill mechanical interpretations of the "spring-loaded" model proposed for the HA2 conformational transition.

  7. Rearrangement of beta-amino alcohols and application to the synthesis of biologically active compounds.

    PubMed

    Cossy, Janine; Pardo, Domingo Gomez; Dumas, Cécile; Mirguet, Olivier; Déchamps, Ingrid; Métro, Thomas-Xavier; Burger, Benjamin; Roudeau, Rémi; Appenzeller, Jérôme; Cochi, Anne

    2009-10-01

    Beta-amino alcohols derived from natural amino acids have been used extensively as a powerful source of chirality. Transformation of the hydroxy group of these beta-amino alcohols into a good leaving group, by using trifluoroacetic anhydride, led to rearranged beta-amino alcohols in good yields and with high enantiomeric excesses. This rearrangement has allowed the transformation of substituted prolinols to substituted 3-hydroxypiperidines and linear beta-amino alcohols, issued from natural amino acids, to rearranged beta-amino alcohols.

  8. Development of the scope of a co-mediated O-->C rearrangement reaction.

    PubMed

    Meek, Simon J; Pradaux, Fabienne; Carbery, David R; Demont, Emmanuel H; Harrity, Joseph P A

    2005-11-25

    [reaction: see text] In this paper we describe an Al-promoted, Co-mediated O-->C rearrangement reaction of cyclic enol ethers. This process delivers functionalized cyclohexanones with good to excellent levels of diastereocontrol, whereby the product stereochemistry is dependent on the E/Z-stereochemistry of the starting enol ether. The rearrangement process also permits access to highly substituted alpha-spirocyclic cyclohexanones as well as cyclopentanones. The latter rearrangement appears to proceed via an unusual 5-(enolendo)-exo-trig cyclization process.

  9. Aromatic Claisen Rearrangements of O-prenylated tyrosine and model prenyl aryl ethers: Computational study of the role of water on acceleration of Claisen rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Sílvia; Kim, Seonah; Bollot, Guillaume; Houk, K N

    2013-05-01

    LynF, an enzyme from the TruF family, O-prenylates tyrosines in proteins; subsequent Claisen rearrangements give C-prenylated tyrosine products. These reactions in tyrosines and model phenolic systems have been explored with DFT and SCS-MP2 calculations. Various ab initio benchmarks have been computed (CBS-QB3, MP2, SCS-MP2) to examine the accuracy of commonly used density functionals, such as B3LYP and M06-2X. Solvent effects from water were considered using implicit and explicit models. Studies of the ortho-C-prenylation and Claisen rearrangement of tyrosine, and the Claisen rearrangement of α,α-dimethylallyl (prenyl) coumaryl ether establish the energetics of these reactions in the gas phase and in aqueous solution.

  10. Aromatic Claisen Rearrangements of O-prenylated tyrosine and model prenyl aryl ethers: Computational study of the role of water on acceleration of Claisen rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, Sílvia; Kim, Seonah; Bollot, Guillaume; Houk, K. N.

    2013-01-01

    LynF, an enzyme from the TruF family, O-prenylates tyrosines in proteins; subsequent Claisen rearrangements give C-prenylated tyrosine products. These reactions in tyrosines and model phenolic systems have been explored with DFT and SCS-MP2 calculations. Various ab initio benchmarks have been computed (CBS-QB3, MP2, SCS-MP2) to examine the accuracy of commonly used density functionals, such as B3LYP and M06-2X. Solvent effects from water were considered using implicit and explicit models. Studies of the ortho-C-prenylation and Claisen rearrangement of tyrosine, and the Claisen rearrangement of α,α-dimethylallyl (prenyl) coumaryl ether establish the energetics of these reactions in the gas phase and in aqueous solution. PMID:24376368

  11. Complex structural rearrangement features suggesting chromoanagenesis mechanism in a case of 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zanardo, Évelin Aline; Piazzon, Flavia Balbo; Dutra, Roberta Lelis; Dias, Alexandre Torchio; Montenegro, Marília Moreira; Novo-Filho, Gil Monteiro; Costa, Thaís Virgínia Moura Machado; Nascimento, Amom Mendes; Kim, Chong Ae; Kulikowski, Leslie Domenici

    2014-12-01

    Genome rearrangements are caused by the erroneous repair of DNA double-strand breaks, leading to several alterations that result in loss or gain of the structural genomic of a dosage-sensitive genes. However, the mechanisms that promote the complexity of rearrangements of congenital or developmental defects in human disease are unclear. The investigation of complex genomic abnormalities could help to elucidate the mechanisms and causes for the formation and facilitate the understanding of congenital or developmental defects in human disease. We here report one case of a patient with atypical clinical features of the 1p36 syndrome and the use of cytogenomic techniques to characterize the genomic alterations. Analysis by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array revealed a complex rearrangement in the 1p36.3 region with deletions and duplication interspaced by normal sequences. We also suggest that chromoanagenesis could be a possible mechanism involved in the repair and stabilization of this rearrangement.

  12. Synthesis of gamma,delta-unsaturated glycolic acids via sequenced brook and Ireland--claisen rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Daniel C; Johnson, Jeffrey S

    2010-03-05

    Organozinc, -magnesium, and -lithium nucleophiles initiate a Brook/Ireland-Claisen rearrangement sequence of allylic silyl glyoxylates resulting in the formation of gamma,delta-unsaturated alpha-silyloxy acids.

  13. Conversion of allylic alcohols to stereodefined trisubstituted alkenes: a complementary process to the Claisen rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Belardi, Justin K; Micalizio, Glenn C

    2008-12-17

    A stereoselective method for the conversion of allylic alcohols to (Z)-trisubstituted alkenes is presented. Overall, the reaction sequence described is stereochemically complementary to related Claisen rearrangement reactions--processes that typically deliver the stereoisomeric trisubstituted alkene containing products.

  14. Enantioselective synthesis of allenamides via sulfimide [2,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Alan; Emmerson, Daniel P G

    2009-04-02

    Chiral allenamides are prepared with high levels of enantiomeric purity by [2,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of propargylic sulfimides. The required branched propargylic sulfides are prepared by an enantioselective organocatalytic aldehyde alpha-sulfenylation followed by Corey-Fuchs alkynylation.

  15. Extending the algebraic formalism for genome rearrangements to include linear chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Feijão, Pedro; Meidanis, João

    2013-01-01

    Algebraic rearrangement theory, as introduced by Meidanis and Dias, focuses on representing the order in which genes appear in chromosomes, and applies to circular chromosomes only. By shifting our attention to genome adjacencies, we introduce the adjacency algebraic theory, extending the original algebraic theory to linear chromosomes in a very natural way, also allowing the original algebraic distance formula to be used to the general multichromosomal case, with both linear and circular chromosomes. The resulting distance, which we call algebraic distance here, is very similar to, but not quite the same as, double-cut-and-join distance. We present linear time algorithms to compute it and to sort genomes. We show how to compute the rearrangement distance from the adjacency graph, for an easier comparison with other rearrangement distances. A thorough discussion on the relationship between the chromosomal and adjacency representation is also given, and we show how all classic rearrangement operations can be modeled using the algebraic theory.

  16. Rearrangement of 5-trimethylsilylthebaine on treatment with L-selectride: an efficient synthesis of (+)-bractazonine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weibin; Wu, Huifang; Bernard, Denzil; Metcalf, Matthew D; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Flippen-Anderson, Judith L; MacKerell, Alexander D; Coop, Andrew

    2003-03-07

    Treatment of 5-trimethylsilylthebaine with L-Selectride gave rise to a rearrangement to 10-trimethylsilylbractazonine through migration of the phenyl group, whereas treatment of thebaine with strong Lewis acids is known to lead to a similar rearrangement through migration of the alkyl bridge to give, after reduction, (+)-neodihydrothebaine. It is suggested that the rearrangement of the alkyl group of thebaine is favored due to the formation of a tertiary benzylic cation. However, for 5-trimethylsilylthebaine, the lithium ion of L-Selectride acts as the Lewis acid and the beta-silyl effect dominates in the stabilization of any positive charge. This rearrangement provides a clear example of the greater relative migratory aptitude of phenyl groups over alkyl groups, and provides an efficient synthesis of (+)-bractazonine from thebaine.

  17. Massive genomic rearrangement acquired in a single catastrophic event during cancer development.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Philip J; Greenman, Chris D; Fu, Beiyuan; Yang, Fengtang; Bignell, Graham R; Mudie, Laura J; Pleasance, Erin D; Lau, King Wai; Beare, David; Stebbings, Lucy A; McLaren, Stuart; Lin, Meng-Lay; McBride, David J; Varela, Ignacio; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Leroy, Catherine; Jia, Mingming; Menzies, Andrew; Butler, Adam P; Teague, Jon W; Quail, Michael A; Burton, John; Swerdlow, Harold; Carter, Nigel P; Morsberger, Laura A; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Follows, George A; Green, Anthony R; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Stratton, Michael R; Futreal, P Andrew; Campbell, Peter J

    2011-01-07

    Cancer is driven by somatically acquired point mutations and chromosomal rearrangements, conventionally thought to accumulate gradually over time. Using next-generation sequencing, we characterize a phenomenon, which we term chromothripsis, whereby tens to hundreds of genomic rearrangements occur in a one-off cellular crisis. Rearrangements involving one or a few chromosomes crisscross back and forth across involved regions, generating frequent oscillations between two copy number states. These genomic hallmarks are highly improbable if rearrangements accumulate over time and instead imply that nearly all occur during a single cellular catastrophe. The stamp of chromothripsis can be seen in at least 2%-3% of all cancers, across many subtypes, and is present in ∼25% of bone cancers. We find that one, or indeed more than one, cancer-causing lesion can emerge out of the genomic crisis. This phenomenon has important implications for the origins of genomic remodeling and temporal emergence of cancer.

  18. The Globular State of the Single-Stranded RNA: Effect of the Secondary Structure Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryan, Zareh A.; Karapetian, Armen T.

    2015-01-01

    The mutual influence of the slow rearrangements of secondary structure and fast collapse of the long single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) in approximation of coarse-grained model is studied with analytic calculations. It is assumed that the characteristic time of the secondary structure rearrangement is much longer than that for the formation of the tertiary structure. A nonequilibrium phase transition of the 2nd order has been observed. PMID:26345143

  19. Complex chromosomal rearrangements by single catastrophic pathogenesis in NUT midline carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J.-K.; Louzada, S.; An, Y.; Kim, S. Y.; Kim, S.; Youk, J.; Park, S.; Koo, S. H.; Keam, B.; Jeon, Y. K.; Ku, J.-L.; Yang, F.; Kim, T. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Nuclear protein in testis (NUT) midline carcinoma (NMC) is a rare aggressive malignancy often occurring in the tissues of midline anatomical structures. Except for the pathognomonic BRD3/4–NUT rearrangement, the comprehensive landscape of genomic alterations in NMCs has been unexplored. Patients and methods We investigated three NMC cases, including two newly diagnosed NMC patients in Seoul National University Hospital, and a previously reported cell line (Ty-82). Whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing were carried out for these cases, and findings were validated by multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization and using individual fluorescence probes. Results Here, we present the first integrative analysis of whole-genome sequencing, transcriptome sequencing and cytogenetic characterization of NUT midline carcinomas. By whole-genome sequencing, we identified a remarkably similar pattern of highly complex genomic rearrangements (previously denominated as chromoplexy) involving the BRD3/4–NUT oncogenic rearrangements in two newly diagnosed NMC cases. Transcriptome sequencing revealed that these complex rearrangements were transcribed as very simple BRD3/4–NUT fusion transcripts. In Ty-82 cells, we also identified a complex genomic rearrangement involving the BRD4–NUT rearrangement underlying the simple t(15;19) karyotype. Careful inspections of rearrangement breakpoints indicated that these rearrangements were likely attributable to single catastrophic events. Although the NMC genomes had >3000 somatic point mutations, canonical oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes were rarely affected, indicating that they were largely passenger events. Mutational signature analysis showed predominant molecular clock-like signatures in all three cases (accounting for 54%−75% of all base substitutions), suggesting that NMCs may arise from actively proliferating normal cells. Conclusion Taken together, our findings suggest that a single catastrophic event in

  20. Thermal rearrangements in 1,2-poly/1,4-hexadiene/s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    The work described was carried out to study the thermal rearrangements of two unsaturated diene polymers - 1,2-poly(cis-1,4-hexadiene) (CHD) and 1,2-poly(trans-1.4-hexadiene) (THD). It is shown that both CHD and THD have a predominatly 1,8 diene structure and seem to cyclize mainly by the (2 + 2) thermal cycloaddition of double bonds, and to a small extent also by sigmatropic rearrangement with hydrogen shift.

  1. Evidence for Nonstatistical Dynamics in the Wolff Rearrangement of a Carbene

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Two 13C-labeled isomers of the formal Diels−Alder adduct of acetylmethyloxirene to tetramethyl 1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylate have been synthesized. Flash vacuum thermolysis of these adducts leads to various isotopic isomers of acetylmethylketene, the ratios of which have been determined by NMR. The surprising finding that the principal product comes from methylpyruvoyl carbene rather than its more stable isomer diacetylcarbene is explained by MPWB1K density functional calculations, which show that the reactant probably undergoes a unimolecular rearrangement to a norcaradiene derivative prior to its fragmentation. Coupled-cluster calculations on the methylpyruvoyl carbene show that it is capable of undergoing three unimolecular isomerizations. The fastest is 1,2-acetyl migration to give acetylmethylketene directly. The next is rearrangement via acetylmethyloxirene to diacetylcarbene and thence by Wolff rearrangement to acetylmethylketene. The least-favorable reaction is degenerate rearrangement via 1,3-dimethyl-2-oxabicyclo[1.1.0]butan-4-one (the epoxide of dimethylcyclopropenone). The combined experimental and computational results indicate that Wolff rearrangement of the diacetylcarbene occurs with a 2.5:1 ratio of the methyl groups despite the fact that they are related by a twofold axis of symmetry in the carbene. Preliminary molecular dynamics simulations are consistent with this conclusion. Taken together, the results suggest that the Wolff rearrangement is subject to the same kind of nonstatistical dynamical effects detected for other kinds of thermally generated reactive intermediates. PMID:18700757

  2. Chromosomal rearrangements directly cause underdominant F1 pollen sterility in Mimulus lewisii-Mimulus cardinalis hybrids.

    PubMed

    Stathos, Angela; Fishman, Lila

    2014-11-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements can contribute to the evolution of postzygotic reproductive isolation directly, by disrupting meiosis in F1 hybrids, or indirectly, by suppressing recombination among genic incompatibilities. Because direct effects of rearrangements on fertility imply fitness costs during their spread, understanding the mechanism of F1 hybrid sterility is integral to reconstructing the role(s) of rearrangements in speciation. In hybrids between monkeyflowers Mimulus cardinalis and Mimulus lewisii, rearrangements contain all quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for both premating barriers and pollen sterility, suggesting that they may have facilitated speciation in this model system. We used artificial chromosome doubling and comparative mapping to test whether heterozygous rearrangements directly cause underdominant male sterility in M. lewisii-M. cardinalis hybrids. Consistent with a direct chromosomal basis for hybrid sterility, synthetic tetraploid F1 s showed highly restored fertility (83.4% pollen fertility) relative to diploids F1 s (36.0%). Additional mapping with Mimulus parishii-M. cardinalis and M. parishii-M. lewisii hybrids demonstrated that underdominant male sterility is caused by one M. lewisii specific and one M. cardinalis specific reciprocal translocation, but that inversions had no direct effects on fertility. We discuss the importance of translocations as causes of reproductive isolation, and consider models for how underdominant rearrangements spread and fix despite intrinsic fitness costs.

  3. Rearrangement dynamics in colloidal particle packings identified through local structure and machine-learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Zoey S.; Still, Tim; Gratale, Matthew D.; Ma, Xiaoguang; Schoenholz, Samuel S.; Sussman, Daniel M.; Liu, A. J.; Yodh, A. G.

    We explore the connection between measures of local structure and particle rearrangements in soft thermal quasi-two-dimensional colloidal systems employing a machine learning approach. Local structure is characterized by two and three point structure functions that measure radial and angular distributions of particles, and rearrangements are identified by a measure of change in average colloidal particle position. By generating labeled training data, we can extract the features of these functions that contribute to the likelihood of a rearrangement. In particular, we use a machine-learning algorithm to construct a decision function in the form of a scalar field we call softness that with high accuracy labels regions of particles more likely to rearrange. Thus, we can predict dynamic rearrangements from the instantaneous local structure. The softness field remains a good predictor when we vary the packing fraction between training and test data sets. In glassy samples, the softness field can identify aging as particles become less likely to undergo cage rearrangements. We gratefully acknowledge financial support through NSF DMR12-05463, MRSEC DMR11-20901, NASA NNX08AO0G, and DE-FG02-05ER46199.

  4. Delineating Rearrangements in Single Yeast Artificial Chromosomes by Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wu, Jenny; Duell, Thomas

    2009-09-18

    Cloning of large chunks of human genomic DNA in recombinant systems such as yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes has greatly facilitated the construction of physical maps, the positional cloning of disease genes or the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes for diagnostic purposes. For this process to work efficiently, the DNA cloning process and subsequent clone propagation need to maintain stable inserts that are neither deleted nor otherwise rearranged. Some regions of the human genome; however, appear to have a higher propensity than others to rearrange in any host system. Thus, techniques to detect and accurately characterize such rearrangements need to be developed. We developed a technique termed 'Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping (QDFM)' that allows accurate tagging of sequence elements of interest with near kilobase accuracy and optimized it for delineation of rearrangements in recombinant DNA clones. This paper demonstrates the power of this microscopic approach by investigating YAC rearrangements. In our examples, high-resolution physical maps for regions within the immunoglobulin lambda variant gene cluster were constructed for three different YAC clones carrying deletions of 95 kb and more. Rearrangements within YACs could be demonstrated unambiguously by pairwise mapping of cosmids along YAC DNA molecules. When coverage by YAC clones was not available, distances between cosmid clones were estimated by hybridization of cosmids onto DNA fibers prepared from human genomic DNA. In addition, the QDFM technology provides essential information about clone stability facilitating closure of the maps of the human genome as well as those of model organisms.

  5. Advanced lung adenocarcinomas with ROS1-rearrangement frequently show hepatoid cell

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Mei; Zhou, Jianya; Ding, Wei; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Defining distinctive histologic characteristics of ROS1-rearranged non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) may help identify cases that merit molecular testing. However, the majority of previous reports have focused on surgical specimens but only limited studies assessed histomorphology of advanced NSCLCs. In order to identify the clinical and histological characteristics of ROS1-rearranged advanced NSCLCs, we examined five hundred sixteen Chinese patients with advanced NSCLCs using ROS1 fluorescence in situ hybridization and real-time polymerase chain reaction and then analyzed for clinical and pathological features. We performed univariate and multivariate analyses to identify predictive factors associated with ROS1 rearrangement. 19 tumors were identified with ROS1 rearrangement (3.7% of adenocarcinomas). 16 ROS1+ and 122 ROS1- samples with available medical records and enough tumor cells were included for histological analysis. Compared with ROS1-negative advanced NSCLCs, ROS1-rearranged advanced NSCLCs were associated with a younger age at presentation. ROS1 rearrangements were not significantly associated with sex, smoking history, drinking history and metastatic sites. The most common histological pattern was solid growth (12/16), followed by acinar (4/16) growth. 66.7% cases with solid growth pattern showed hepatoid cytology (8/12) and 75% cases with acinar growth pattern showed a cribriform structure (3/4). 18.8% cases were found to have abundant extracellular mucus or signet-ring cells (3/16). Only one case with solid growth pattern showed psammomatous calcifications. In conclusion, age, hepatoid cytology and cribriform structure are the independent predictors for ROS1-rearranged advanced NSCLCs, recognizing these may be helpful in finding candidates for genomic alterations, especially when available tissue samples are limited. PMID:27708233

  6. Simple citric acid-catalyzed surface esterification of cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Ávila Ramírez, Jhon Alejandro; Fortunati, Elena; Kenny, José María; Torre, Luigi; Foresti, María Laura

    2017-02-10

    A simple straightforward route for the surface esterification of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) is herein proposed. CNC obtained from microcrystalline cellulose were acetylated using as catalyst citric acid, a α-hydroxy acid present in citrus fruits and industrially produced by certain molds in sucrose or glucose-containing medium. No additional solvent was added to the system; instead, the acylant (acetic anhydride) was used in sufficient excess to allow CNC dispersion and proper suspension agitation. By tuning the catalyst load, CNC with two different degree of substitution (i.e. DS=0.18 and 0.34) were obtained. Acetylated cellulose nanocrystals were characterized in terms of chemical structure, crystallinity, morphology, thermal decomposition and dispersion in a non-polar solvent. Results illustrated for the first time the suitability of the protocol proposed for the simple surface acetylation of cellulose nanocrystals.

  7. Detoxification of acidic catalyzed hydrolysate of Kappaphycus alvarezii (cottonii).

    PubMed

    Meinita, Maria Dyah Nur; Hong, Yong-Ki; Jeong, Gwi-Taek

    2012-01-01

    Red seaweed, Kappaphycus alvarezii, holds great promise for use in biofuel production due to its high carbohydrate content. In this study, we investigated the effect of fermentation inhibitors to the K. alvarezii hydrolysate on cell growth and ethanol fermentation. In addition, detoxification of fermentation inhibitors was performed to decrease the fermentation inhibitory effect. 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural and levulinic acid, which are liberated from acidic hydrolysis, was also observed in the hydrolysate of K. alvarezii. These compounds inhibited ethanol fermentation. In order to remove these inhibitors, activated charcoal and calcium hydroxide were introduced. The efficiency of activated charcoals was examined and over-liming was used to remove the inhibitors. Activated charcoal was found to be more effective than calcium hydroxide to remove the inhibitors. Detoxification by activated charcoal strongly improved the fermentability of dilute acid hydrolysate in the production of bioethanol from K. alvarezii with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The optimal detoxifying conditions were found to be below an activated charcoal concentration of 5%.

  8. Acid-Catalyzed Enolization of [beta]-Tetralone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewprashad, Brahmadeo; Nesturi, Anthony; Urena, Joel

    2008-01-01

    This experiment allows students to use [to the first power]H NMR to directly compare the relative initial rates of substitution of the benzylic and non-benzylic [alpha] hydrogens of [beta]-tetralone and correlate their findings with the predictions made by resonance theory. The experiment demonstrates that the benzylic hydrogens undergo [alpha]…

  9. Kinetics of acid-catalyzed cleavage of cumene hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Levin, M E; Gonzales, N O; Zimmerman, L W; Yang, J

    2006-03-17

    The cleavage of cumene hydroperoxide, in the presence of sulfuric acid, to form phenol and acetone has been examined by adiabatic calorimetry. As expected, acid can catalyze cumene hydroperoxide reaction at temperatures below that of thermally-induced decomposition. At elevated acid concentrations, reactivity is also observed at or below room temperature. The exhibited reactivity behavior is complex and is significantly affected by the presence of other species (including the products). Several reaction models have been explored to explain the behavior and these are discussed.

  10. Decomposition of peracetic acid catalyzed by vanadium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, A.P.; Gekhman, A.E.; Moiseev, I.I.; Polotryuk, O.Y.

    1986-02-01

    This paper studies the decomposition of peracetic acid (AcOOH) in acetic acid (AcOH) catalyzed by vanadium complexes. It is shown that peractic acid in acetic acid solutions of ammonium anadate decomposes with the predominant formation of 0/sub 2/ and small amounts of CO/sub 2/, the yield of which increases with increasing temperature and peracetic acid concentration. Both reactions proceed without the formation of free radicals in amounts detectable by ESR spectroscopy. The rate of oxygen release under conditions in which the formation of CO/sub 2/ is insignificant obeys a kinetic equation indicating the intermediate formation of a complex between V/sup 5 +/ ions and peracetic acid and the slow conversion of this complex into the observed products.

  11. Some Rearrangements of Free Alkyl Radicals and Alkyl Cations in Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutov, Oleg A.

    1984-03-01

    The results of studies of rearrangement reactions by the author and his co-workers during the last 20 years are described. A rearrangement of the n-propyl free radical in solutions as a result of the hydrogen 1,3-shift has been discovered and its characteristic features have been investigated (using carbon-14, deuterium, and tritium). The reaction involving the formation of organomercury compounds from mercury salts of carboxylic acids and peroxides has been studied and a mechanism has been proposed for it. New skeletal rearrangements in the thermal decomposition of cycloalkyl peroxides in benzene and bromoform have been discovered. It has been shown by the method of double 13C NMR that some of the reactions involve the formation of species which manifest properties intermediate between those of free radicals and carbonium ions. The mechanism of the thermolysis of peroxides is considered. The skeletal rearrangements and hydride shifts in the deamination and solvolysis of alicyclic compounds have been studied and a number of rearrangements with 1,2-migration of the halogen and in particular the isomerisation of acyloxybromopropanes in organic solvents, which takes place particularly readily, have been observed. The bibliography includes 103 references.

  12. Breaking Good: Accounting for Fragility of Genomic Regions in Rearrangement Distance Estimation.

    PubMed

    Biller, Priscila; Guéguen, Laurent; Knibbe, Carole; Tannier, Eric

    2016-05-22

    Models of evolution by genome rearrangements are prone to two types of flaws: One is to ignore the diversity of susceptibility to breakage across genomic regions, and the other is to suppose that susceptibility values are given. Without necessarily supposing their precise localization, we call "solid" the regions that are improbably broken by rearrangements and "fragile" the regions outside solid ones. We propose a model of evolution by inversions where breakage probabilities vary across fragile regions and over time. It contains as a particular case the uniform breakage model on the nucleotidic sequence, where breakage probabilities are proportional to fragile region lengths. This is very different from the frequently used pseudouniform model where all fragile regions have the same probability to break. Estimations of rearrangement distances based on the pseudouniform model completely fail on simulations with the truly uniform model. On pairs of amniote genomes, we show that identifying coding genes with solid regions yields incoherent distance estimations, especially with the pseudouniform model, and to a lesser extent with the truly uniform model. This incoherence is solved when we coestimate the number of fragile regions with the rearrangement distance. The estimated number of fragile regions is surprisingly small, suggesting that a minority of regions are recurrently used by rearrangements. Estimations for several pairs of genomes at different divergence times are in agreement with a slowly evolvable colocalization of active genomic regions in the cell.

  13. Characterization of apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangements from the developmental genome anatomy project.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Anne W; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Bosco, Amy F; Brown, Kerry K; Bruns, Gail A P; Donovan, Diana J; Eisenman, Robert; Fan, Yanli; Farra, Chantal G; Ferguson, Heather L; Gusella, James F; Harris, David J; Herrick, Steven R; Kelly, Chantal; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Kishikawa, Shotaro; Korf, Bruce R; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Lally, Eric; Leach, Natalia T; Lemyre, Emma; Lewis, Janine; Ligon, Azra H; Lu, Weining; Maas, Richard L; MacDonald, Marcy E; Moore, Steven D P; Peters, Roxanna E; Quade, Bradley J; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Saadi, Irfan; Shen, Yiping; Shendure, Jay; Williamson, Robin E; Morton, Cynthia C

    2008-03-01

    Apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangements in individuals with major congenital anomalies represent natural experiments of gene disruption and dysregulation. These individuals can be studied to identify novel genes critical in human development and to annotate further the function of known genes. Identification and characterization of these genes is the goal of the Developmental Genome Anatomy Project (DGAP). DGAP is a multidisciplinary effort that leverages the recent advances resulting from the Human Genome Project to increase our understanding of birth defects and the process of human development. Clinically significant phenotypes of individuals enrolled in DGAP are varied and, in most cases, involve multiple organ systems. Study of these individuals' chromosomal rearrangements has resulted in the mapping of 77 breakpoints from 40 chromosomal rearrangements by FISH with BACs and fosmids, array CGH, Southern-blot hybridization, MLPA, RT-PCR, and suppression PCR. Eighteen chromosomal breakpoints have been cloned and sequenced. Unsuspected genomic imbalances and cryptic rearrangements were detected, but less frequently than has been reported previously. Chromosomal rearrangements, both balanced and unbalanced, in individuals with multiple congenital anomalies continue to be a valuable resource for gene discovery and annotation.

  14. Rearrangement of mitochondrial tRNA genes in flat bugs (Hemiptera: Aradidae)

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fan; Li, Hu; Shao, Renfu; Shi, Aimin; Bai, Xiaoshuan; Zheng, Xiaorong; Heiss, Ernst; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-01-01

    The typical insect mitochondrial (mt) genome organization, which contains a single chromosome with 37 genes, was found in the infraorder Pentatomomorpha (suborder Heteroptera). The arrangement of mt genes in these true bugs is usually the same as the ancestral mt gene arrangement of insects. Rearrangement of transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, however, has been found in two subfamilies of flat bugs (Mezirinae and Calisiinae, family Aradidae). In this study, we sequenced the complete mt genomes of four species from three other subfamilies (Aradinae, Carventinae and Aneurinae). We found tRNA gene rearrangement in all of these four species. All of the rearranged tRNA genes are located between the mitochondrial control region and cox1, indicating this region as a hotspot for gene rearrangement in flat bugs; the rearrangement is likely caused by events of tandem duplication and random deletion of genes. Furthermore, our phylogenetic and dating analyses indicated that the swap of positions between trnQ and trnI occurred ~162 million years ago (MYA) in the most recent common ancestor of the five subfamilies of flat bugs investigated to date, whereas the swap of positions between trnC and trnW occurred later in the lineage leading to Calisiinae, and the translocation of trnC and trnY occurred later than 134 MYA in the lineage leading to Aradinae. PMID:27180804

  15. Rearrangements of archetypal regulatory regions in JC virus genomes from urine.

    PubMed

    Agostini, H T; Ryschkewitsch, C F; Stoner, G L

    1998-01-01

    The regulatory region of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy-type JC virus (JCV) is rearranged in each host by a process of deletion and duplication. Of the more than 40 that have been examined, no two regulatory regions have been rearranged identically in the brain. The substrate for this rearrangement appears to be a highly stable archetypal regulatory region excreted in the urine. Its role as the transmissible form of the virus, although inferred, has never been proven. We have now amplified by PCR and cycle-sequenced the regulatory regions from 48 urinary strains of the virus. We find that the urinary form of the regulatory region is not entirely stable. Short deletions and duplications in the range of 2-16 bp were observed in seven of these strains. One of these, an inverted repeat, is a pattern of rearrangement not yet found in the brain. Two others (#208 and 230) showed a 2-bp deletion at position nos. 221 and 222, and an unusual mutation at position no. 219. These two urines were collected in different states of the USA at different times and analysed months apart. It is very unlikely that these unusual changes represent sample contamination or that they arose independently. This finding indicates that archetypal forms of the JCV regulatory region are infectious, despite their relative inactivity in tissue culture. While changes in the archetypal structure can be found, it is clear that rearrangements in the kidney are rare or rarely infectious.

  16. Limited junctional diversity of V delta 5-J delta 1 rearrangement in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Nowak, J S; Michałowska-Wender, G; Januszkiewicz, D; Wender, M

    1997-01-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) delta gene repertoire, as assessed by V delta-J delta rearrangements, has been analyzed in nine multiple sclerosis (MS) cases and in 30 healthy individuals by seminested PCR technique. Among the V delta-J delta junctional diversities studied, the most striking result has been observed in V delta 5-J delta 1 rearrangement. The detection of repeated V delta 5-J delta 1 nucleotide sequences in all analyzed clones from seven out of nine patients studied proved the monoclonal nature of gamma delta T-cells with V delta 5-J delta 1 rearrangement. The clonal nature of this rearrangement proved by PAGE and sequencing analysis may suggest an antigen-driven expansion of gamma delta T cells and argues for a significant role of gamma delta T-cells with V delta 5-J delta 1 rearrangement in MS pathogenesis. However, it cannot be excluded that clonal expansion of these lymphocytes may represent secondary change to central nervous system damage.

  17. Spectrum of EGFR gene mutations and ALK rearrangements in lung cancer patients in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sag, Sebnem Ozemri; Gorukmez, Ozlem; Ture, Mehmet; Gorukmez, Orhan; Deligonul, Adem; Sahinturk, Serdar; Topak, Ali; Gulten, Tuna; Kurt, Ender; Yakut, Tahsin

    2016-01-01

    The EGFR gene and ALK rearrangements are two genetic drivers of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The frequency of EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangement varies according to not only ethnicity but also gender, smoking status and the histological type of NSCLC. In the present study, we demonstrated the distribution of EGFR mutations in 132 NSCLC patients by using a pyrosequencing technique and the distribution of ALK rearrangements in 51 NSCLC patients by using fluorescent in situ hybridization technique in Turkey. Additionally, we compared the clinicopathological data of NSCLC patients with the mutation status of EGFR in their cancerous tissues. Both EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangements were identified in 19 (14.39 %) and 1 (1.96 %) patients, respectively. We found EGFR mutations in codon 861, 719 and 858 with the ratios of 10.52 % (2/19), 10.52 % (2/19) and 31.58 % (6/19), respectively, and deletion of exon 19 in 47.37 % (9/19) of the patients. We found the frequency of EGFR mutations to be significantly higher in female patients and nonsmokers (p = 0.043, p = 0.027, respectively). Consequently, we found EGFR mutations to be more frequent in female patients and nonsmokers. Future studies on larger patient groups would provide more accurate data to exhibit the relationship between EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangements and the clinicopathological status.

  18. French multicentric validation of ALK rearrangement diagnostic in 547 lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Rouquette, Isabelle; Blons, Hélène; Le Stang, Nolwenn; Ilie, Marius; Begueret, Hugues; Grégoire, Valerie; Hofman, Paul; Gros, Audrey; Garcia, Stephane; Monhoven, Nathalie; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Thivolet, Françoise; Antoine, Martine; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Galateau-Sallé, Françoise; McLeer-Florin, Anne

    2015-07-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements in lung adenocarcinoma result in kinase activity targetable by crizotinib. Although fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) is the reference diagnostic technique, immunohistochemistry (IHC) could be useful for pre-screening. Diagnostic yields of ALK IHC, FISH and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR performed in 14 French pathology/molecular genetics platforms were compared. 547 lung adenocarcinoma specimens were analysed using 5A4 and D5F3 antibodies, two break-apart FISH probes and TaqMan kits. Clinicopathological data were recorded. 140 tumours were ALK rearranged (FISH with ≥15% of rearranged cells) and 400 were ALK FISH negative (<15%). FISH was not interpretable for seven cases. ALK patients were young (p=0.003), mostly females (p=0.007) and light/nonsmokers (p<0.0001). 13 cases were IHC negative but FISH ≥15%, including six cases with FISH between 15% and 20%; eight were IHC positive with FISH between 10% and 14%. Sensitivity and specificity for 5A4 and D5F3 were 87% and 92%, and 89% and 76%, respectively. False-negative IHC, observed in 2.4% of cases, dropped to 1.3% for FISH >20%. Variants were undetected in 36% of ALK tumours. Discordances predominated with FISH ranging from 10% to 20% of rearranged cells and were centre dependent. IHC remains a reliable pre-screening method for ALK rearrangement detection.

  19. Minimal residual disease detection in Tunisian B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on immunoglobulin gene rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Besbes, S.; Hamadou, W.S.; Boulland, M.L.; Youssef, Y.B.; Achour, B.; Regaieg, H.; Khelif, A.; Fest, T.; Soua, Z.

    2017-01-01

    IGH gene rearrangement and IGK-Kde gene deletion can be used as molecular markers for the assessment of B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Minimal residual disease detected based on those markers is currently the most reliable prognosis factor in B-ALL. The aim of this study was to use clonal IGH/IGK-Kde gene rearrangements to confirm B-ALL diagnosis and to evaluate the treatment outcome of Tunisian leukemic patients by monitoring the minimal residual disease (MRD) after induction chemotherapy. Seventeen consecutive newly diagnosed B-ALL patients were investigated by multiplex PCR assay and real time quantitative PCR according to BIOMED 2 conditions. The vast majority of clonal VH-JH rearrangements included VH3 gene. For IGK deletion, clonal VK1f/6-Kde recombinations were mainly identified. These rearrangements were quantified to follow-up seven B-ALL after induction using patient-specific ASO. Four patients had an undetectable level of MRD with a sensitivity of up to 10-5. This molecular approach allowed identification of prognosis risk group and adequate therapeutic decision. The IGK-Kde and IGH gene rearrangements might be used for diagnosis and MRD monitoring of B-ALL, introduced for the first time in Tunisian laboratories. PMID:28099581

  20. The Robustness of a Signaling Complex to Domain Rearrangements Facilitates Network Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Paloma M.; Yoganathan, Kogulan; Jung, Jae H.; Peisajovich, Sergio G.

    2014-01-01

    The rearrangement of protein domains is known to have key roles in the evolution of signaling networks and, consequently, is a major tool used to synthetically rewire networks. However, natural mutational events leading to the creation of proteins with novel domain combinations, such as in frame fusions followed by domain loss, retrotranspositions, or translocations, to name a few, often simultaneously replace pre-existing genes. Thus, while proteins with new domain combinations may establish novel network connections, it is not clear how the concomitant deletions are tolerated. We investigated the mechanisms that enable signaling networks to tolerate domain rearrangement-mediated gene replacements. Using as a model system the yeast mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated mating pathway, we analyzed 92 domain-rearrangement events affecting 11 genes. Our results indicate that, while domain rearrangement events that result in the loss of catalytic activities within the signaling complex are not tolerated, domain rearrangements can drastically alter protein interactions without impairing function. This suggests that signaling complexes can maintain function even when some components are recruited to alternative sites within the complex. Furthermore, we also found that the ability of the complex to tolerate changes in interaction partners does not depend on long disordered linkers that often connect domains. Taken together, our results suggest that some signaling complexes are dynamic ensembles with loose spatial constraints that could be easily re-shaped by evolution and, therefore, are ideal targets for cellular engineering. PMID:25490747

  1. Processes of fungal proteome evolution and gain of function: gene duplication and domain rearrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Gihon, Inbar; Sharan, Roded; Nussinov, Ruth

    2011-06-01

    During evolution, organisms have gained functional complexity mainly by modifying and improving existing functioning systems rather than creating new ones ab initio. Here we explore the interplay between two processes which during evolution have had major roles in the acquisition of new functions: gene duplication and protein domain rearrangements. We consider four possible evolutionary scenarios: gene families that have undergone none of these event types; only gene duplication; only domain rearrangement, or both events. We characterize each of the four evolutionary scenarios by functional attributes. Our analysis of ten fungal genomes indicates that at least for the fungi clade, species significantly appear to gain complexity by gene duplication accompanied by the expansion of existing domain architectures via rearrangements. We show that paralogs gaining new domain architectures via duplication tend to adopt new functions compared to paralogs that preserve their domain architectures. We conclude that evolution of protein families through gene duplication and domain rearrangement is correlated with their functional properties. We suggest that in general, new functions are acquired via the integration of gene duplication and domain rearrangements rather than each process acting independently.

  2. Sequencing human-gibbon breakpoints of synteny reveals mosaic new insertions at rearrangement sites.

    PubMed

    Girirajan, Santhosh; Chen, Lin; Graves, Tina; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Ventura, Mario; Fronick, Catrina; Fulton, Lucinda; Rocchi, Mariano; Fulton, Robert S; Wilson, Richard K; Mardis, Elaine R; Eichler, Evan E

    2009-02-01

    The gibbon genome exhibits extensive karyotypic diversity with an increased rate of chromosomal rearrangements during evolution. In an effort to understand the mechanistic origin and implications of these rearrangement events, we sequenced 24 synteny breakpoint regions in the white-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus leucogenys, NLE) in the form of high-quality BAC insert sequences (4.2 Mbp). While there is a significant deficit of breakpoints in genes, we identified seven human gene structures involved in signaling pathways (DEPDC4, GNG10), phospholipid metabolism (ENPP5, PLSCR2), beta-oxidation (ECH1), cellular structure and transport (HEATR4), and transcription (ZNF461), that have been disrupted in the NLE gibbon lineage. Notably, only three of these genes show the expected evolutionary signatures of pseudogenization. Sequence analysis of the breakpoints suggested both nonclassical nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and replication-based mechanisms of rearrangement. A substantial number (11/24) of human-NLE gibbon breakpoints showed new insertions of gibbon-specific repeats and mosaic structures formed from disparate sequences including segmental duplications, LINE, SINE, and LTR elements. Analysis of these sites provides a model for a replication-dependent repair mechanism for double-strand breaks (DSBs) at rearrangement sites and insights into the structure and formation of primate segmental duplications at sites of genomic rearrangements during evolution.

  3. Rearrangement of mitochondrial tRNA genes in flat bugs (Hemiptera: Aradidae).

    PubMed

    Song, Fan; Li, Hu; Shao, Renfu; Shi, Aimin; Bai, Xiaoshuan; Zheng, Xiaorong; Heiss, Ernst; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-05-16

    The typical insect mitochondrial (mt) genome organization, which contains a single chromosome with 37 genes, was found in the infraorder Pentatomomorpha (suborder Heteroptera). The arrangement of mt genes in these true bugs is usually the same as the ancestral mt gene arrangement of insects. Rearrangement of transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, however, has been found in two subfamilies of flat bugs (Mezirinae and Calisiinae, family Aradidae). In this study, we sequenced the complete mt genomes of four species from three other subfamilies (Aradinae, Carventinae and Aneurinae). We found tRNA gene rearrangement in all of these four species. All of the rearranged tRNA genes are located between the mitochondrial control region and cox1, indicating this region as a hotspot for gene rearrangement in flat bugs; the rearrangement is likely caused by events of tandem duplication and random deletion of genes. Furthermore, our phylogenetic and dating analyses indicated that the swap of positions between trnQ and trnI occurred ~162 million years ago (MYA) in the most recent common ancestor of the five subfamilies of flat bugs investigated to date, whereas the swap of positions between trnC and trnW occurred later in the lineage leading to Calisiinae, and the translocation of trnC and trnY occurred later than 134 MYA in the lineage leading to Aradinae.

  4. Cross Lineage Rearrangement in Feline Enteropathy-Associated T-cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Andrews, C; Operacz, M; Maes, R; Kiupel, M

    2016-05-01

    Feline enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) type II is characterized by infiltration of the small intestinal mucosa with small T-cells with variable epitheliotropism and is often difficult to differentiate from inflammation. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assess antigen receptor rearrangements (PARR) amplifies the T- (T-cell receptor gamma, TCRG) or B-cell (immunoglobulin heavy chain, IGH) antigen receptor genes and is used to differentiate EATL from inflammation. However, PARR does not determine lymphocyte phenotype, and clonal rearrangement of either or both the TCRG or IGH genes may be detected in neoplastic T-cells. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of cross lineage rearrangement in feline EATL type II. Using a diagnostic algorithm combining histology, immunohistochemistry, and PARR testing, 8 of 92 cases diagnosed as EATL type II at Michigan State University between January 2013 and June 2014 showed cross lineage rearrangement (8.7%). PARR for the IGH gene facilitates the diagnosis of cases histologically highly suggestive of EATL type II in which polyclonal rearrangement of the TCRG gene is detected.

  5. Scoliosis and vertebral anomalies: additional abnormal phenotypes associated with chromosome 16p11.2 rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Al-Kateb, Hussam; Khanna, Geetika; Filges, Isabel; Hauser, Natalie; Grange, Dorothy K; Shen, Joseph; Smyser, Christopher D; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Shinawi, Marwan

    2014-05-01

    The typical chromosome 16p11.2 rearrangements are estimated to occur at a frequency of approximately 0.6% of all samples tested clinically and have been identified as a major cause of autism spectrum disorders, developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities, and seizures. Careful examination of patients with these rearrangements revealed association with abnormal head size, obesity, dysmorphism, and congenital abnormalities. In this report, we extend this list of phenotypic abnormalities to include scoliosis and vertebral anomalies. We present detailed characterization of phenotypic and radiological data of 10 new patients, nine with the 16p11.2 deletion and one with the duplication within the coordinates chr16:29,366,195 and 30,306,956 (hg19) with a minimal size of 555 kb. We discuss the phenotypical and radiological findings in our patients and review 5 previously reported patients with 16p11.2 rearrangement and similar skeletal abnormalities. Our data suggest that patients with the recurrent 16p11.2 rearrangement have increased incidence of scoliosis and vertebral anomalies. However, additional studies are required to confirm this observation and to establish the incidence of these anomalies. We discuss the potential implications of our findings on the diagnosis, surveillance and genetic counseling of patients with 16p11.2 rearrangement.

  6. Use of Cancer-Specific Genomic Rearrangements to Quantify Disease Burden in Plasma from Patients with Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    McBride, David J.; Orpana, Arto K.; Sotiriou, Christos; Joensuu, Heikki; Stephens, Philip J.; Mudie, Laura J.; Hämälaïnen, Eija; Stebbings, Lucy A.; Andersson, Leif C.; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Durbecq, Virginie; Ignatiadis, Michail; Kallioniemi, Olli; Heckman, Caroline A.; Alitalo, Kari; Edgren, Henrik; Futreal, P. Andrew; Stratton, Michael R.; Campbell, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Detection of recurrent somatic rearrangements routinely allows monitoring of residual disease burden in leukemias, but is not used for most solid tumors. However, next-generation sequencing now allows rapid identification of patient-specific rearrangements in solid tumors. We mapped genomic rearrangements in three cancers and showed that PCR assays for rearrangements could detect a single copy of the tumor genome in plasma without false positives. Disease status, drug responsiveness, and incipient relapse could be serially assessed. In future, this strategy could be readily established in diagnostic laboratories, with major impact on monitoring of disease status and personalizing treatment of solid tumors. PMID:20725990

  7. Use of cancer-specific genomic rearrangements to quantify disease burden in plasma from patients with solid tumors.

    PubMed

    McBride, David J; Orpana, Arto K; Sotiriou, Christos; Joensuu, Heikki; Stephens, Philip J; Mudie, Laura J; Hämäläinen, Eija; Stebbings, Lucy A; Andersson, Leif C; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Durbecq, Virginie; Ignatiadis, Michail; Kallioniemi, Olli; Heckman, Caroline A; Alitalo, Kari; Edgren, Henrik; Futreal, P Andrew; Stratton, Michael R; Campbell, Peter J

    2010-11-01

    Detection of recurrent somatic rearrangements routinely allows monitoring of residual disease burden in leukemias, but is not used for most solid tumors. However, next-generation sequencing now allows rapid identification of patient-specific rearrangements in solid tumors. We mapped genomic rearrangements in three cancers and showed that PCR assays for rearrangements could detect a single copy of the tumor genome in plasma without false positives. Disease status, drug responsiveness, and incipient relapse could be serially assessed. In future, this strategy could be readily established in diagnostic laboratories, with major impact on monitoring of disease status and personalizing treatment of solid tumors.

  8. Synthesis of 1,2-amino alcohols by sigmatropic rearrangements of 3-(N-tosylamino)allylic alcohol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Barbazanges, Marion; Meyer, Christophe; Cossy, Janine; Turner, Peter

    2011-04-11

    Sigmatropic rearrangements of 3-(N-tosylamino)allylic alcohol derivatives, a particular subclass of functionalized enamides, have been investigated. Whereas the presence of the nitrogen atom alters the stereochemical outcome of Ireland-Claisen rearrangements of glycolates derived from such substrates, [2,3]-Wittig rearrangements of α-allyloxy acetamides or propargylic ethers derivatives provide access to a wide variety of functionalized 1,2-amino alcohols usually with high levels of stereocontrol, as well as to heterocyclic compounds. The stereoselectivity issues of these rearrangements (1,2-diastereoselectivity, auxiliary-induced diastereoselection, chirality transfer, and double stereodifferentiation) were thoroughly investigated.

  9. The systematic approach to describing conformational rearrangements in G-quadruplexes

    PubMed Central

    Tsvetkov, Vladimir; Pozmogova, Galina; Varizhuk, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Conformational changes in DNA G-quadruplex (GQ)-forming regions affect genome function and, thus, compose an interesting research topic. Computer modelling may yield insight into quadruplex folding and rearrangement, particularly molecular dynamics simulations. Here, we show that specific parameters, which are distinct from those commonly used in DNA conformational analyses, must be introduced for adequate interpretation and, most importantly, convenient visual representation of the quadruplex modelling results. We report a set of parameters that comprehensively and systematically describe GQ geometry in dynamics. The parameters include those related to quartet planarity, quadruplex twist, and quartet stacking; they are used to quantitatively characterise various types of quadruplexes and rearrangements, such as quartet distortion/disruption or deviation/bulging of a single nucleotide from the quartet plane. Our approach to describing conformational changes in quadruplexes using the new parameters is exemplified by telomeric quadruplex rearrangement, and the benefits of applying this approach to analyse other structures are discussed. PMID:26017012

  10. Mitochondrial gene rearrangements confirm the parallel evolution of the crab-like form.

    PubMed

    Morrison, C L; Harvey, A W; Lavery, S; Tieu, K; Huang, Y; Cunningham, C W

    2002-02-22

    The repeated appearance of strikingly similar crab-like forms in independent decapod crustacean lineages represents a remarkable case of parallel evolution. Uncertainty surrounding the phylogenetic relationships among crab-like lineages has hampered evolutionary studies. As is often the case, aligned DNA sequences by themselves were unable to fully resolve these relationships. Four nested mitochondrial gene rearrangements--including one of the few reported movements of an arthropod protein-coding gene--are congruent with the DNA phylogeny and help to resolve a crucial node. A phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences, and gene rearrangements, supported five independent origins of the crab-like form, and suggests that the evolution of the crab-like form may be irreversible. This result supports the utility of mitochondrial gene rearrangements in phylogenetic reconstruction.

  11. Synergistic Ion-Binding Catalysis Demonstrated via an Enantioselective, Catalytic [2,3]-Wittig Rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sigmatropic rearrangements number among the most powerful complexity-building transformations in organic synthesis but have remained largely insensitive to enantioselective catalysis due to the diffuse nature of their transition structures. Here, we describe a synergistic ion-binding strategy for asymmetric catalysis of anionic sigmatropic rearrangements. This approach is demonstrated with the enantioselective [2,3]-Wittig rearrangement of α-allyloxy carbonyl compounds to afford highly enantioenriched homoallylic alcohol products. Chiral thiourea catalysts are shown to engage reactive anions and their countercations through a cooperative set of attractive, noncovalent interactions. Catalyst structure–reactivity–selectivity relationship studies and computational analyses provide insight into catalyst–substrate interactions responsible for enantioinduction and allude to the potential generality of this catalytic strategy. PMID:27413786

  12. Chromosomal Rearrangements in Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi Affecting Molecular Typing in Outbreak Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Echeita, M. A.; Usera, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi strains belonging to eight different outbreaks of typhoid fever that occurred in Spain between 1989 and 1994 were analyzed by ribotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. For three outbreaks, two different patterns were detected for each outbreak. The partial digestion analysis by the intron-encoded endonuclease I-CeuI of the two different strains from each outbreak provided an excellent tool for examining the organization of the genomes of epidemiologically related strains. S. enterica serotype Typhi seems to be more susceptible than other serotypes to genetic rearrangements produced by homologous recombinations between rrn operons; these rearrangements do not substantially alter the stability or survival of the bacterium. We conclude that genetic rearrangements can occur during the emergence of an outbreak. PMID:9650981

  13. Homologous recombination restarts blocked replication forks at the expense of genome rearrangements by template exchange.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sarah; Mizuno, Ken'ichi; Blaisonneau, Joël; Martineau, Sylvain; Chanet, Roland; Fréon, Karine; Murray, Johanne M; Carr, Antony M; Baldacci, Giuseppe

    2010-08-13

    Template switching induced by stalled replication forks has recently been proposed to underlie complex genomic rearrangements. However, the resulting models are not supported by robust physical evidence. Here, we analyzed replication and recombination intermediates in a well-defined fission yeast system that blocks replication forks. We show that, in response to fork arrest, chromosomal rearrangements result from Rad52-dependent nascent strand template exchange occurring during fork restart. This template exchange occurs by both Rad51-dependent and -independent mechanisms. We demonstrate that Rqh1, the BLM homolog, limits Rad51-dependent template exchange without affecting fork restart. In contrast, we report that the Srs2 helicase promotes both fork restart and template exchange. Our data demonstrate that template exchange occurs during recombination-dependent fork restart at the expense of genome rearrangements.

  14. Chromosomal Rainbows detect Oncogenic Rearrangements of Signaling Molecules in Thyroid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Benjamin; Jossart, Gregg H.; Ito, Yuko; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Munne, Santiago; Clark, Orlo H.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2010-08-19

    Altered signal transduction can be considered a hallmark of many solid tumors. In thyroid cancers the receptor tyrosine kinase (rtk) genes NTRK1 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man = OMIM *191315, also known as 'TRKA'), RET ('Rearranged during Transfection protooncogene', OMIM *164761) and MET (OMIM *164860) have been reported as activated, rearranged or overexpressed. In many cases, a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques allows elucidation of cellular changes that initiate tumor development and progression. While the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the rtk MET gene remain largely unknown, a variety of chromosomal rearrangements of the RET or NTKR1 gene could be demonstrated in thyroid cancer. Abnormal expressions in these tumors seem to follow a similar pattern: the rearrangement translocates the 3'-end of the rtk gene including the entire catalytic domain to an expressed gene leading to a chimeric RNA and protein with kinase activity. Our research was prompted by an increasing number of reports describing translocations involving ret and previously unknown translocation partners. We developed a high resolution technique based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to allow rapid screening for cytogenetic rearrangements which complements conventional chromosome banding analysis. Our technique applies simultaneous hybridization of numerous probes labeled with different reporter molecules which are distributed along the target chromosome allowing the detection of cytogenetic changes at near megabase-pair (Mbp) resolution. Here, we report our results using a probe set specific for human chromosome 10, which is altered in a significant portion of human thyroid cancers (TC's). While rendering accurate information about the cytogenetic location of rearranged elements, our multi-locus, multi-color analysis was developed primarily to overcome limitations of whole chromosome painting (WCP) and chromosome banding techniques for fine mapping of

  15. A case report of CIC-rearranged undifferentiated small round cell sarcoma in the cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mayumi; Ishikawa, Misawo; Kitajima, Masateru; Narita, Jun; Hattori, Shinya; Endo, Otone; Goto, Keisuke

    2016-10-01

    CIC-rearranged undifferentiated small round cell sarcoma (CIC-rearranged USRCS) is a recently established type of Ewing-like small round cell sarcomas, characterized by CIC gene rearrangement, most commonly CIC-DUX4 fusion. This report presents the second case of CIC-rearranged USRCS arising primarily in the cerebrum. A 64-year-old otherwise healthy woman presented with a 1 × 1 cm sized hemorrhagic subcortical tumor in the left temporo-parietal lobe. The tumor repeatedly recurred, and the patient underwent three surgeries, chemotherapy with doxorubicin and ifosfamide, and radiotherapy, as well as gamma knife surgery. Systemic examination revealed no other extracranial masses. Imprint cytology revealed small to moderate-sized round-to-ovoid tumor cells with mild pleomorphism and variations in size and shape. The nuclei contained finely granular chromatin, and some had easily-recognizable nucleoli. The tumor exhibited a mainly cytoplasmic pattern of CD99 immunostaining, rather than a diffuse membranous pattern. The tumor also exhibited diffuse positivity for calretinin and p16, as well as partial positivity for WT1 (nuclear and cytoplasmic staining pattern) and D2-40. FISH assessment showed CIC split signals. In conclusion, CIC-rearranged USRCSs can occur primarily in the cerebrum. It would be impossible to diagnose them through cytology alone, but cytology would be useful to rule out other small round cell brain tumors including gliomas, lymphomas, carcinomas, and germinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis including tests for CD99, calretinin, and WT1 would help to suggest CIC-rearranged USRCSs and distinguish them from Ewing sarcomas. Additionally, immunohistochemistry for p16 might be useful in the diagnosis. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:828-832. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Chromosomal Rearrangements as Barriers to Genetic Homogenization between Archaic and Modern Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Rebekah L.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements, which shuffle DNA throughout the genome, are an important source of divergence across taxa. Using a paired-end read approach with Illumina sequence data for archaic humans, I identify changes in genome structure that occurred recently in human evolution. Hundreds of rearrangements indicate genomic trafficking between the sex chromosomes and autosomes, raising the possibility of sex-specific changes. Additionally, genes adjacent to genome structure changes in Neanderthals are associated with testis-specific expression, consistent with evolutionary theory that new genes commonly form with expression in the testes. I identify one case of new-gene creation through transposition from the Y chromosome to chromosome 10 that combines the 5′-end of the testis-specific gene Fank1 with previously untranscribed sequence. This new transcript experienced copy number expansion in archaic genomes, indicating rapid genomic change. Among rearrangements identified in Neanderthals, 13% are transposition of selfish genetic elements, whereas 32% appear to be ectopic exchange between repeats. In Denisovan, the pattern is similar but numbers are significantly higher with 18% of rearrangements reflecting transposition and 40% ectopic exchange between distantly related repeats. There is an excess of divergent rearrangements relative to polymorphism in Denisovan, which might result from nonuniform rates of mutation, possibly reflecting a burst of transposable element activity in the lineage that led to Denisovan. Finally, loci containing genome structure changes show diminished rates of introgression from Neanderthals into modern humans, consistent with the hypothesis that rearrangements serve as barriers to gene flow during hybridization. Together, these results suggest that this previously unidentified source of genomic variation has important biological consequences in human evolution. PMID:26399483

  17. Durable Clinical Response to Entrectinib in NTRK1-Rearranged Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Le, Long P.; Zheng, Zongli; Muzikansky, Alona; Drilon, Alexander; Patel, Manish; Bauer, Todd M.; Liu, Stephen V.; Ou, Sai-Hong I.; Jackman, David; Costa, Daniel B.; Multani, Pratik S.; Li, Gary G.; Hornby, Zachary; Chow-Maneval, Edna; Luo, David; Lim, Jonathan E.; Iafrate, Anthony J.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Chromosomal rearrangements involving neurotrophic tyrosine kinase 1 (NTRK1) occur in a subset of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) and other solid tumor malignancies, leading to expression of an oncogenic TrkA fusion protein. Entrectinib (RXDX-101) is an orally available tyrosine kinase inhibitor, including TrkA. We sought to determine the frequency of NTRK1 rearrangements in NSCLC and to assess the clinical activity of entrectinib. Methods: We screened 1378 cases of NSCLC using anchored multiplex polymerase chain reaction (AMP). A patient with an NTRK1 gene rearrangement was enrolled onto a Phase 1 dose escalation study of entrectinib in adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic tumors (NCT02097810). We assessed safety and response to treatment. Results: We identified NTRK1 gene rearrangements at a frequency of 0.1% in this cohort. A patient with stage IV lung adenocrcinoma with an SQSTM1-NTRK1 fusion transcript expression was treated with entrectinib. Entrectinib was well tolerated, with no grade 3–4 adverse events. Within three weeks of starting on treatment, the patient reported resolution of prior dyspnea and pain. Restaging CT scans demonstrated a RECIST partial response (PR) and complete resolution of all brain metastases. This patient has continued on treatment for over 6 months with an ongoing PR. Conclusions: Entrectinib demonstrated significant anti-tumor activity in a patient with NSCLC harboring an SQSTM1-NTRK1 gene rearrangement, indicating that entrectinib may be an effective therapy for tumors with NTRK gene rearrangements, including those with central nervous system metastases. PMID:26565381

  18. MYB-QKI rearrangements in Angiocentric Glioma drive tumorigenicity through a tripartite mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Bandopadhayay, Pratiti; Ramkissoon, Lori A.; Jain, Payal; Bergthold, Guillaume; Wala, Jeremiah; Zeid, Rhamy; Schumacher, Steven E.; Urbanski, Laura; O’Rourke, Ryan; Gibson, William J.; Pelton, Kristine; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Han, Harry J.; Zhu, Yuankun; Choudhari, Namrata; Silva, Amanda; Boucher, Katie; Henn, Rosemary E.; Kang, Yun Jee; Knoff, David; Paolella, Brenton R.; Gladden-Young, Adrianne; Varlet, Pascale; Pages, Melanie; Horowitz, Peleg M.; Federation, Alexander; Malkin, Hayley; Tracy, Adam; Seepo, Sara; Ducar, Matthew; Hummelen, Paul Van; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Scagnet, Mirko; Bowers, Daniel C.; Giannini, Caterina; Puget, Stephanie; Hawkins, Cynthia; Tabori, Uri; Klekner, Almos; Bognar, Laszlo; Burger, Peter C.; Eberhart, Charles; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Hill, D. Ashley; Mueller, Sabine; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Santagata, Sandro; Stiles, Charles D.; Bradner, James E.; Jabado, Nada; Goren, Alon; Grill, Jacques; Ligon, Azra H.; Goumnerova, Liliana; Waanders, Angela J.; Storm, Phillip B.; Kieran, Mark W.; Ligon, Keith L.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Resnick, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    Angiocentric gliomas are pediatric low-grade gliomas (PLGGs) without known recurrent genetic drivers. We performed genomic analysis of new and published data from 249 PLGGs including 19 Angiocentric Gliomas. We identified MYB-QKI fusions as a specific and single candidate driver event in Angiocentric Gliomas. In vitro and in vivo functional studies show MYB-QKI rearrangements promote tumorigenesis through three mechanisms: MYB activation by truncation, enhancer translocation driving aberrant MYB-QKI expression, and hemizygous loss of the tumor suppressor QKI. This represents the first example of a single driver rearrangement simultaneously transforming cells via three genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in a tumor. PMID:26829751

  19. Deciphering the Code of the Cancer Genome: Mechanisms of Chromosome Rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Nicholas A.; Rass, Emilie; Scully, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangement plays a causal role in tumorigenesis by contributing to the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, the dysregulated expression or amplification of oncogenes and the generation of novel gene fusions. Chromosome breaks are important intermediates in this process. How, when and where these breaks arise and the specific mechanisms engaged in their repair strongly influence the resulting patterns of chromosome rearrangement. Here, we review recent progress in understanding how certain distinctive features of the cancer genome, including clustered mutagenesis, tandem segmental duplications, complex breakpoints, chromothripsis, chromoplexy and chromoanasynthesis may arise. PMID:26726318

  20. [3,3]-Sigmatropic rearrangements: recent applications in the total synthesis of natural products†

    PubMed Central

    Ilardi, Elizabeth A.; Stivala, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Among the fundamental chemical transformations in organic synthesis, the [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement occupies a unique position as a powerful, reliable, and well-defined method for the stereoselective construction of carbon–carbon or carbon–heteroatom bonds. While many other reactions can unite two subunits and create a new bond, the strengths of sigmatropic rearrangements derive from their ability to enable structural reorganization with unmatched build-up of complexity. Recent applications that illustrate [3,3]-sigmatropic processes as a key concept in the synthesis of complex natural products are described in this tutorial review, covering literature from about 2001 through early 2009. PMID:19847347

  1. Atypical Carcinoid Tumor with Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Rearrangement Successfully Treated by an ALK Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Masayuki; Uchiyama, Naoki; Shigemasa, Rie; Matsumura, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Ryota; Nomura, Akihiro

    This is the first report in which crizotinib, an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, reduced an atypical carcinoid tumor with ALK rearrangement. A 70-year-old man developed a tumor in the left lung and multiple metastases to the lung and brain. The pathology of transbronchial biopsied specimens demonstrated an atypical carcinoid pattern. Combined with immunohistochemical findings, we diagnosed the tumor as atypical carcinoid. ALK gene rearrangement was observed by both immunohistochemical (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization. He was treated with chemotherapy as first-line therapy, however, the tumor did not respond to chemotherapy. Thereafter, he was treated with crizotinib, which successfully reduced the tumors.

  2. Formal Total Synthesis of (±)-Strictamine by [2,3]-Sigmatropic Stevens Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Eckermann, Ruben; Breunig, Michael; Gaich, Tanja

    2017-01-10

    To date, more than 100 congeners of the akuammiline alkaloid family have been isolated. Their signature structural element is a methanoquinolizidine moiety, a cage-like scaffold structurally related to adamantane. The structural variations of the family members originate from oxidative processes that mostly trigger rearrangements of the methanoquinolizidine motif. The family of the akuammiline alkaloids is best represented by strictamine. It bears the least functionalized carbon skeleton of all family members without lacking the signature structural motifs. Herein, we report the formal synthesis of strictamine through a Stevens [2,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement as a key step and the synthetic pitfalls related with its synthesis.

  3. A new rearranged tricyclic abietane diterpenoid from Salvia chloroleuca Rech. f. & Allen.

    PubMed

    Salimikia, Iraj; Moridi Farimani, Mahdi; Monsef-Esfahani, Hamid Reza; Gohari, Ahmad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the roots of Salvia chloroleuca led to the isolation and identification of a new rearranged abietane diterpenoid (1). Its structure was elucidated by interpretation of the 1D and 2D NMR spectra and completed by the analysis of the HR-ESI-MS data. Compound 1 is the secondly reported compound on a rearranged tricyclic abietane (4,5-seco-5,10-friedo-abietane) diterpenoid with a ketal functionality between C-2 and C-11. A plausible biosynthetic pathway of 1 was also proposed.

  4. Identification of a new complex rearrangement affecting exon 20 of BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, Jesús; Campos, Olga; Velasco, Angela; Darder, Esther; Menéndez, Mireia; Feliubadaló, Lídia; Tornero, Eva; Blanco, Ignacio; Izquierdo, Angel; Brunet, Joan; Capellá, Gabriel; Lázaro, Conxi

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we present a novel complex rearrangement in the BRCA1 gene. The genomic rearrangement was identified using one of the two commercially available MLPA BRCA1 kits but was not confirmed with the other. In this report, we present the full characterization at the DNA and RNA levels of a new partial deletion of exon 20 of BRCA1. This is a complex deletion with four breakpoints which promotes aberrant splicing with partial deletion of exon 20 plus the insertion of a cryptic exon corresponding to a fragment of intron 20. The aberrant splicing generates an abnormal transcript with a frameshift that will result in a truncated BRCA1 protein.

  5. Replication stalling by catalytically impaired Twinkle induces mitochondrial DNA rearrangements in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L O; Goffart, Steffi; Spelbrink, Johannes N

    2011-07-01

    Pathological mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements have been proposed to result from repair of double-strand breaks caused by blockage of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. As mtDNA deletions are seen only in post-mitotic tissues, it has been suggested that they are selected out in actively dividing cells. By electron microscopy we observed rearranged mtDNA molecules in cultured human cells expressing a catalytically impaired helicase. As these molecules were undetectable by PCR, we propose that deleted mtDNA molecules in cultured cells are fragile and sensitive to heating. Further consequences of mtDNA replication stalling are discussed.

  6. The analysis of ALK gene rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization in non-small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Paweł Adam; Ramlau, Rodryg Adam; Szumiło, Justyna; Kozielski, Jerzy; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Bryl, Maciej; Knopik-Dąbrowicz, Alina; Spychalski, Łukasz; Szczęsna, Aleksandra; Rydzik, Ewelina; Milanowski, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction ALK gene rearrangement is observed in a small subset (3–7%) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. The efficacy of crizotinib was shown in lung cancer patients harbouring ALK rearrangement. Nowadays, the analysis of ALK gene rearrangement is added to molecular examination of predictive factors. Aim of the study The frequency of ALK gene rearrangement as well as the type of its irregularity was analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) in tissue samples from NSCLC patients. Material and methods The ALK gene rearrangement was analysed in 71 samples including 53 histological and 18 cytological samples. The analysis could be performed in 56 cases (78.87%), significantly more frequently in histological than in cytological materials. The encountered problem with ALK rearrangement diagnosis resulted from the scarcity of tumour cells in cytological samples, high background fluorescence noises and fragmentation of cell nuclei. Results The normal ALK copy number without gene rearrangement was observed in 26 (36.62%) patients ALK gene polysomy without gene rearrangement was observed in 25 (35.21%) samples while in 3 (4.23%) samples ALK gene amplification was found. ALK gene rearrangement was observed in 2 (2.82%) samples from males, while in the first case the rearrangement coexisted with ALK amplification. In the second case, signet-ring tumour cells were found during histopathological examination and this patient was successfully treated with crizotinib with partial remission lasting 16 months. Conclusions FISH is a useful technique for ALK gene rearrangement analysis which allows us to specify the type of gene irregularities. ALK gene examination could be performed in histological as well as cytological (cellblocks) samples, but obtaining a reliable result in cytological samples depends on the cellularity of examined materials. PMID:24592134

  7. Region-Specific Involvement of Actin Rearrangement-Related Synaptic Structure Alterations in Conditioned Taste Aversion Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bi, Ai-Ling; Wang, Yue; Li, Bo-Qin; Wang, Qian-Qian; Ma, Ling; Yu, Hui; Zhao, Ling; Chen, Zhe-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Actin rearrangement plays an essential role in learning and memory; however, the spatial and temporal regulation of actin dynamics in different phases of associative memory has not been fully understood. Here, using the conditioned taste aversion (CTA) paradigm, we investigated the region-specific involvement of actin rearrangement-related…

  8. Analyzing Somatic Genome Rearrangements in Human Cancers by Using Whole-Exome Sequencing | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Although exome sequencing data are generated primarily to detect single-nucleotide variants and indels, they can also be used to identify a subset of genomic rearrangements whose breakpoints are located in or near exons. Using >4,600 tumor and normal pairs across 15 cancer types, we identified over 9,000 high confidence somatic rearrangements, including a large number of gene fusions.

  9. Isolation of Betulin and Rearrangement to Allobetulin: A Biomimetic Natural Product Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Brian; Bentley, Michael D.; Chung, Bong Y.; Lynch, Nicholas G.; Jensen, Bruce L.

    2007-01-01

    The triterpenes are a diverse class of widely distributed natural products derived from squalene. Various cyclization and subsequent rearrangement reactions produce many complex structural types. These compounds frequently display a wide divergence of biological properties. For example the pentacyclic triterpene, betulin, is isolated from white…

  10. INVESTIGATING THE DEAROMATIVE REARRANGEMENT OF BIARYL PHOSPHINE-LIGATED PD(II) COMPLEXES

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Phillip J.; Maimone, Thomas J.; Su, Mingjuan; Chen, Jiahao; Müller, Peter; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    A series of monoligated L•PdII(Ar)X complexes (L = dialkyl biarylphosphine) have been prepared and studied in an effort to better understand an unusual dearomative rearrangement previously documented in these systems. Experimental and theoretical evidence suggest a concerted process involving the unprecedented PdII-mediated insertion of an aryl group into an unactivated arene. PMID:23153301

  11. ROS1 rearrangements in lung adenocarcinoma: prognostic impact, therapeutic options and genetic variability

    PubMed Central

    Teixido, Cristina; Michels, Sebastian; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Viteri, Santiago; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Fischer, Rieke; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Fassunke, Jana; Sebastian, Martin; Serke, Monika; Kaminsky, Britta; Randerath, Winfried; Gerigk, Ulrich; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Krüger, Stefan; Schnell, Roland; Rothe, Achim; Kropf-Sanchen, Cornelia; Heukamp, Lukas; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Background While recent data show that crizotinib is highly effective in patients with ROS1 rearrangement, few data is available about the prognostic impact, the predictive value for different treatments, and the genetic heterogeneity of ROS1-positive patients. Patients and Methods 1137 patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung were analyzed regarding their ROS1 status. In positive cases, next-generation sequencing (NGS) was performed. Clinical characteristics, treatments and outcome of these patients were assessed. Overall survival (OS) was compared with genetically defined subgroups of ROS1-negative patients. Results 19 patients of 1035 evaluable (1.8%) had ROS1-rearrangement. The median OS has not been reached. Stage IV patients with ROS1-rearrangement had the best OS of all subgroups (36.7 months, p < 0.001). 9 of 14 (64.2%) patients had at least one response to chemotherapy. Estimated mean OS for patients receiving chemotherapy and crizotinib was 5.3 years. Ten patients with ROS1-rearrangement (52.6%) harbored additional aberrations. Conclusion ROS1-rearangement is not only a predictive marker for response to crizotinib, but also seems to be the one of the best prognostic molecular markers in NSCLC reported so far. In stage IV patients, response to chemotherapy was remarkable high and overall survival was significantly better compared to other subgroups including EGFR-mutated and ALK-fusion-positive NSCLC. PMID:25868855

  12. Competition between Different Variegating Rearrangements for Limited Heterochromatic Factors in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, V. K.; Sinclair, D. A.; Grigliatti, T. A.

    1997-01-01

    Position effect variegation (PEV) results from the juxtaposition of a euchromatic gene to heterochromatin. In its new position the gene is inactivated in some cells and not in others. This mosaic expression is consistent with variability in the spread of heterochromatin from cell to cell. As many components of heterochromatin are likely to be produced in limited amounts, the spread of heterochromatin into a normally euchromatic region should be accompanied by a concomitant loss or redistribution of the protein components from other heterochromatic regions. We have shown that this is the case by simultaneously monitoring variegation of a euchromatic and a heterochromatic gene associated with a single chromosome rearrangement. Secondly, if several heterochromatic regions of the genome share limited components of heterochromatin, then some variegating rearrangements should compete for these components. We have examined this hypothesis by testing flies with combinations of two or more different variegating rearrangements. Of the nine combinations of pairs of variegating rearrangements we studied, seven showed nonreciprocal interactions. These results imply that many components of heterochromatin are both shared and present in limited amounts and that they can transfer between chromosomal sites. Consequently, even nonvariegation portions of the genome will be disrupted by re-allocation of heterochromatic proteins associated with PEV. These results have implications for models of PEV. PMID:9093849

  13. Molecular Mechanisms and Diagnosis of Chromosome 22q11.2 Rearrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emanuel, Beverly S.

    2008-01-01

    Several recurrent, constitutional genomic disorders are present on chromosome 22q. These include the translocations and deletions associated with DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndrome and the translocations that give rise to the recurrent t(11;22) supernumerary der(22) syndrome (Emanuel syndrome). The rearrangement breakpoints on 22q cluster…

  14. Rearranging the Traditional Two-Teacher School to Fit the Linear Multiple-Area Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The traditional two-teacher school in Queensland is high-set, providing two classrooms, services room, and verandah upstairs, and a concreted area underneath. This plan re-arranges the traditional two-teacher school to fit a linear multiple-area plan (which can, with minor variations, be adapted to up to a four-teacher school). The plan…

  15. Therapeutic strategies and mechanisms of drug resistance in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK)-rearranged lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Ryohei

    2017-02-06

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene encoding the receptor tyrosine kinase ALK is expressed as a fusion gene in a variety of carcinomas. The expression of ALK is nearly undetectable in adults, and its activation is normally regulated by its ligands, FAM150A/B. However, ALK gene rearrangements result in different ALK fusion proteins that are constitutively expressed via the active promoter of fusion partner genes. ALK fusion proteins dimerize in a ligand-independent manner and lead to the dysregulation of cell proliferation via abnormal constitutive activation of ALK tyrosine kinase. Many ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been developed to date, are three of which are currently in clinical use for the treatment of ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ALK TKIs often achieve marked tumor regression in NSCLC patients with ALK rearrangements; however, ALK TKI-resistant tumors inevitably emerge within a few years in most cases. In this review, we summarize diverse ALK TKI resistance mechanisms identified in NSCLC with ALK rearrangements, and review potential therapeutic strategies to overcome ALK TKI resistance in these patients.

  16. A Girl with Pervasive Developmental Disorder and Complex Chromosome Rearrangement Involving 8p and 10p

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwaigenbaum, L; Sonnenberg, L. K.; Heshka, T.; Eastwood, S.; Xu, J.

    2005-01-01

    We report a 4-year-old girl with a "de novo", apparently balanced complex chromosome rearrangement. She initially presented for assessment of velopharyngeal insufficiency due to hypernasal speech. She has distinctive facial features (long face, broad nasal bridge, and protuberant ears with simplified helices), bifid uvula, strabismus,…

  17. Intergenomic rearrangements after polyploidization of Kengyilia thoroldiana (Poaceae: Triticeae) affected by environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiuxia; Liu, Huitao; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Liu, Weihua; Li, Xiuquan; Li, Lihui

    2012-01-01

    Polyploidization is a major evolutionary process. Approximately 70-75% species of Triticeae (Poaceae) are polyploids, involving 23 genomes. To investigate intergenomic rearrangements after polyploidization of Triticeae species and to determine the effects of environmental factors on them, nine populations of a typical polyploid Triticeae species, Kengyilia thoroldiana (Keng) J.L.Yang et al. (2n = 6x = 42, StStPPYY), collected from different environments, were studied using genome in situ hybridization (GISH). We found that intergenomic rearrangements occurred between the relatively large P genome and the small genomes, St (8.15%) and Y (22.22%), in polyploid species via various types of translocations compared to their diploid progenitors. However, no translocation was found between the relatively small St and Y chromosomes. Environmental factors may affect rearrangements among the three genomes. Chromosome translocations were significantly more frequent in populations from cold alpine and grassland environments than in populations from valley and lake-basin habitats (P<0.05). The relationship between types of chromosome translocations and altitude was significant (r = 0.809, P<0.01). Intergenomic rearrangements associated with environmental factors and genetic differentiation of a single basic genome should be considered as equally important genetic processes during species' ecotype evolution.

  18. Stevens rearrangement as a tool for the structural modification of polyaminopolycarboxylic ligands.

    PubMed

    Giovenzana, Giovanni B; Imperio, Daniela; Lattuada, Luciano; Uggeri, Fulvio

    2011-02-07

    Polyaminopolycarboxylic acids are a well known class of ligands employed for metal ion complexation. Despite the large commercial availability, reports of their use as substrates for direct structural modifications are rare. Herein we report a simple and efficient protocol for the preparation of substituted polyaminopolycarboxylic ligands relying on a one-pot N-alkylation-Stevens rearrangement cascade.

  19. Preadaptation to the stimulus rearrangement of weightlessness: Preliminary studies and concepts for trainer designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.; Reschke, M. F.

    1988-01-01

    An effort to develop preflight adaptation training (PAT) apparatus and procedures to adapt astronauts to the stimulus rearrangement of weightless spaceflight is being pursued. Based on the otolith tilt-translation reinterpretation model of sensory adaptation to weightlessness, two prototype preflight adaptation trainers (PAT) have been developed. These trainers couple pitch movement of the subject with translation of the visual surround. Subjects were exposed to this stimulus rearrangement for periods of 30 m. The hypothesis is that exposure to the rearrangement would attenuate vertical eye movements was supported by two experiments using the Miami University Seesaw (MUS) PAT prototype. The Dynamic Environment Simulator (DES) prototype failed to support this hypothesis; this result is attributed to a pecularity of the DES apparatus. A final experiment demonstrated that changes in vertical eye movements were not a consequence of fixation on an external target during exposure to a control condition. Together these experiments support the view that preflight adaptation training can alter eye movements in a manner consistent with adaptation to weightlessness. Following these initial studies, concepts for development of operational preflight trainers were proposed. The trainers are intended to: demonstrate the stimulus rearrangement of weightlessness; allow astronauts to train in altered sensory environment; modify sensory motor reflexes; and reduce/eliminate space motion sickness symptoms.

  20. Structure of salvioccidentalin, a diterpenoid with a rearranged neo-clerodane skeleton from Salvia occidentalis.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Vasconcelos, Miguel Ángel; Frontana-Uribe, Bernardo Antonio; Morales-Serna, José Antonio; Salmón, Manuel; Cárdenas, Jorge

    2011-10-31

    From the aerial parts of Salvia occidentalis (Labiatae) a new diterpenoid with a rearranged neo-clerodane skeleton was isolated. This new compound was named salvioccidentalin and its structure was established by spectroscopic means. A probable biogenetic relationship with salvigenolide from S. fulgens and salvileucalin A and spiroleucantholide from Salvia leucantha is proposed.

  1. Controlled Dimroth Rearrangement in the Suzuki-Miyaura Cross Coupling of Triazolopyridopyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Champiré, Anthony; Vala, Christine; Laabid, Achraf; Benharref, Ahmed; Marchivie, Mathieu; Plé, Karen; Routier, Sylvain

    2016-12-16

    Polynitrogen heterocycles are often subject to Dimroth rearrangement which consists of ring opening, bond rotation, and ring closure. In this note, we report a synthesis of two new families of triazolopyridopyrimidines. Successful functionalization via a Suzuki-Miyaura coupling was performed with total control of triazole (Dimroth) isomerization based on the judicious choice of reaction conditions.

  2. Intergenomic Rearrangements after Polyploidization of Kengyilia thoroldiana (Poaceae: Triticeae) Affected by Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiuxia; Liu, Huitao; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Liu, Weihua; Li, Xiuquan; Li, Lihui

    2012-01-01

    Polyploidization is a major evolutionary process. Approximately 70–75% species of Triticeae (Poaceae) are polyploids, involving 23 genomes. To investigate intergenomic rearrangements after polyploidization of Triticeae species and to determine the effects of environmental factors on them, nine populations of a typical polyploid Triticeae species, Kengyilia thoroldiana (Keng) J.L.Yang et al. (2n = 6x = 42, StStPPYY), collected from different environments, were studied using genome in situ hybridization (GISH). We found that intergenomic rearrangements occurred between the relatively large P genome and the small genomes, St (8.15%) and Y (22.22%), in polyploid species via various types of translocations compared to their diploid progenitors. However, no translocation was found between the relatively small St and Y chromosomes. Environmental factors may affect rearrangements among the three genomes. Chromosome translocations were significantly more frequent in populations from cold alpine and grassland environments than in populations from valley and lake-basin habitats (P<0.05). The relationship between types of chromosome translocations and altitude was significant (r = 0.809, P<0.01). Intergenomic rearrangements associated with environmental factors and genetic differentiation of a single basic genome should be considered as equally important genetic processes during species' ecotype evolution. PMID:22363542

  3. Copy number gain at Xp22.31 includes complex duplication rearrangements and recurrent triplications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Erez, Ayelet; Nagamani, Sandesh C Sreenath; Bi, Weimin; Carvalho, Claudia M B; Simmons, Alexandra D; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Fang, Ping; Eng, Patricia A; Cooper, M Lance; Sutton, V Reid; Roeder, Elizabeth R; Bodensteiner, John B; Delgado, Mauricio R; Prakash, Siddharth K; Belmont, John W; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Berg, Jonathan S; Shinawi, Marwan; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lupski, James R

    2011-05-15

    Genomic instability is a feature of the human Xp22.31 region wherein deletions are associated with X-linked ichthyosis, mental retardation and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. A putative homologous recombination hotspot motif is enriched in low copy repeats that mediate recurrent deletion at this locus. To date, few efforts have focused on copy number gain at Xp22.31. However, clinical testing revealed a high incidence of duplication of Xp22.31 in subjects ascertained and referred with neurobehavioral phenotypes. We systematically studied 61 unrelated subjects with rearrangements revealing gain in copy number, using multiple molecular assays. We detected not only the anticipated recurrent and simple nonrecurrent duplications, but also unexpectedly identified recurrent triplications and other complex rearrangements. Breakpoint analyses enabled us to surmise the mechanisms for many of these rearrangements. The clinical significance of the recurrent duplications and triplications were assessed using different approaches. We cannot find any evidence to support pathogenicity of the Xp22.31 duplication. However, our data suggest that the Xp22.31 duplication may serve as a risk factor for abnormal phenotypes. Our findings highlight the need for more robust Xp22.31 triplication detection in that such further gain may be more penetrant than the duplications. Our findings reveal the distribution of different mechanisms for genomic duplication rearrangements at a given locus, and provide insights into aspects of strand exchange events between paralogous sequences in the human genome.

  4. Total Synthesis of (±)-Strychnine via a [4+2]-Cycloaddition/Rearrangement Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongjun; Boonsombat, Jutatip

    2008-01-01

    A new strategy for the synthesis of the Strychnos alkaloid (±)-strychnine has been developed and is based on an intramolecular [4+2]-cycloaddition/rearrangement cascade of an indolyl substituted amidofuran. The critical D-ring was assembled by an intramolecular palladium catalyzed enolate-driven cross-coupling of an N-tethered vinyl iodide. PMID:17217284

  5. Bromine radical-mediated sequential radical rearrangement and addition reaction of alkylidenecyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Kippo, Takashi; Hamaoka, Kanako; Ryu, Ilhyong

    2013-01-16

    Bromine radical-mediated cyclopropylcarbinyl-homoallyl rearrangement of alkylidenecyclopropanes was effectively accomplished by C-C bond formation with allylic bromides, which led to the syntheses of 2-bromo-1,6-dienes. A three-component coupling reaction comprising alkylidenecyclopropanes, allylic bromides, and carbon monoxide also proceeded well to give 2-bromo-1,7-dien-5-ones in good yield.

  6. Highly lithium-ion conductive battery separators from thermally rearranged polybenzoxazole.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moon Joo; Kim, Ji Hoon; Lim, Hyung-Seok; Lee, So Young; Yu, Hyung Kyun; Kim, Jong Hun; Lee, Joo Sung; Sun, Yang-Kook; Guiver, Michael D; Suh, Kyung Do; Lee, Young Moo

    2015-02-07

    High power density lithium ion battery (HLIB) separators were fabricated for the first time from thermally rearranged poly(benzoxazole-co-imide) (TR-PBOI) nanofibrous membranes coated with TR-PBOI nanoparticles, which show distinct thermal and dimensional stabilities as well as excellent cycle retention and rate capability.

  7. Searching for large genomic rearrangements of the BRCA1 gene in a Nigerian population.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Fackenthal, James D; Huo, Dezheng; Zheng, Yonglan; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2010-11-01

    BRCA1/2 germline mutations predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) have widened the mutational spectrum of the BRCA1 gene, but the frequencies vary in different populations. In this study, we want to determine the spectrum of LGRs in BRCA1 gene in Nigerian breast cancer patients. The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay was used to screen BRCA1 rearrangements in 352 patients who previously tested negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2 point mutations and small insertions/deletions. Positive MLPA result was confirmed and located by long-range PCR. The breakpoints of the candidate rearrangement were characterized by sequencing. A novel deletion of BRCA1 exon 21 (c.5277 + 480_5332 + 672del) was detected in 1 out of 352 Nigerian breast cancer patients (0.3% occurrence frequency). Further analysis of breakpoints revealed that the deletion involves two Alu-elements: one AluSg in intron 20 and the AluY in intron 21. These data suggest that while BRCA1 genomic rearrangement exists, they do not contribute significantly to BRCA1-associated risk in the Nigerian population.

  8. Iridium-Catalyzed Dynamic Kinetic Isomerization: Expedient Synthesis of Carbohydrates from Achmatowicz Rearrangement Products.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao-Yuan; Yang, Ka; Bennett, Scott R; Guo, Sheng-rong; Tang, Weiping

    2015-07-20

    A highly stereoselective dynamic kinetic isomerization of Achmatowicz rearrangement products was discovered. This new internal redox isomerization provided ready access to key intermediates for the enantio- and diastereoselective synthesis of a series of naturally occurring sugars. The nature of the de novo synthesis also enables the preparation of both enantiomers.

  9. Evolution at the Subgene Level: Domain Rearrangements in the Drosophila Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Chieh; Rasmussen, Matthew D.; Kellis, Manolis

    2012-01-01

    Although the possibility of gene evolution by domain rearrangements has long been appreciated, current methods for reconstructing and systematically analyzing gene family evolution are limited to events such as duplication, loss, and sometimes, horizontal transfer. However, within the Drosophila clade, we find domain rearrangements occur in 35.9% of gene families, and thus, any comprehensive study of gene evolution in these species will need to account for such events. Here, we present a new computational model and algorithm for reconstructing gene evolution at the domain level. We develop a method for detecting homologous domains between genes and present a phylogenetic algorithm for reconstructing maximum parsimony evolutionary histories that include domain generation, duplication, loss, merge (fusion), and split (fission) events. Using this method, we find that genes involved in fusion and fission are enriched in signaling and development, suggesting that domain rearrangements and reuse may be crucial in these processes. We also find that fusion is more abundant than fission, and that fusion and fission events occur predominantly alongside duplication, with 92.5% and 34.3% of fusion and fission events retaining ancestral architectures in the duplicated copies. We provide a catalog of ∼9,000 genes that undergo domain rearrangement across nine sequenced species, along with possible mechanisms for their formation. These results dramatically expand on evolution at the subgene level and offer several insights into how new genes and functions arise between species. PMID:21900599

  10. Transgenic induction of mitochondrial rearrangements for cytoplasmic male sterility in crop plants.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Ajay Pal S; Abdelnoor, Ricardo V; Mackenzie, Sally A

    2007-02-06

    Stability of the mitochondrial genome is controlled by nuclear loci. In plants, nuclear genes suppress mitochondrial DNA rearrangements during development. One nuclear gene involved in this process is Msh1. Msh1 appears to be involved in the suppression of illegitimate recombination in plant mitochondria. To test the hypothesis that Msh1 disruption leads to the type of mitochondrial DNA rearrangements associated with naturally occurring cytoplasmic male sterility in plants, a transgenic approach for RNAi was used to modulate expression of Msh1 in tobacco and tomato. In both species, these experiments resulted in reproducible mitochondrial DNA rearrangements and a condition of male (pollen) sterility. The male sterility was, in each case, heritable, associated with normal female fertility, and apparently maternal in its inheritance. Segregation of the transgene did not reverse the male sterile phenotype, producing stable, nontransgenic male sterility. The reproducible transgenic induction of mitochondrial rearrangements in plants is unprecedented, providing a means to develop novel cytoplasmic male sterile lines for release as non-GMO or transgenic materials.

  11. Acid-catalysed rearrangement of glycosyl trichloroacetimidates: a novel route to glycosylamines.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Kim; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik

    2008-02-04

    A novel route to glycosylamines has been developed. Treatment of glycosyl trichloroacetimidates with TMSOTf under glycosylation conditions, but in the absence of an acceptor, resulted in complete rearrangement of the trichloroacetimidates into the corresponding N-protected-glycosylamines. Reductive cleavage of the trichloroacetyl groups using sodium borohydride provided the desired glycosylamine products.

  12. Rearrangements and Yielding in Concentrated Suspensions of Hard and Soft Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petekidis, Georgios; Carrier, Vincent; Vlassoppoulos, Dimitris; Pusey, Peter; Ballauff, Matthias

    2004-03-01

    The rheology and microscopic particle rearrangements of concentrated colloidal suspensions were studied by a combination of conventional rheology and Light Scattering under shear (LS Echo). In particular we studied the rheological response and the microscopic particle dynamics under shear near and above the glass transitions concentration. Measurements were done in model hard and soft sphere particles (sterically stabilized PMMA and PS-PNIPA microgels respectively) to assess the effect of inter-particle interactions. Creep and recovery measurements and dynamic strain sweeps showed that glasses of hard particles can tolerate surprisingly large strains, up to at least 15probes the extent of irreversible particle rearrangement under oscillatory shear, verified that within their cage particles move reversibly at least up to such a strain. Such a behavior was attributed to 'cage elasticity', the ability of a particle and its neighbors to retain their relative positions within the cage under quite large distortion [1]. The onset of irreversible rearrangements measured by LS echo decreased with decreasing frequency revealing an interplay between shear and Brownian forces. The effects of interparticle interactions were studied using soft thermoreversible migrogel particles where a glass state may be reached either increasing the particle concentration or decreasing the temperature. Here, although particle rearrangements appear to be reversible up to strains as high as 100sweep is observed at much lower strains. [1] G. Petekidis, D. Vlassopoulos and P.N. Pusey, Faraday Discuss., 123, 287 (2003)

  13. Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements in B-Cell Lymphoma: Evidence of Chromoanagenesis? A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Veronica; Chaubey, Alka; Mendiola, Christina; Ehman, William; Vadlamudi, Kumari; Dupont, Barbara; Velagaleti, Gopalrao

    2016-01-01

    Genomic instability is a well-known hallmark of cancer. Recent genome sequencing studies have led to the identification of novel phenomena called chromothripsis and chromoanasynthesis in which complex genomic rearrangements are thought to be derived from a single catastrophic event rather than by several incremental steps. A new term chromoanagenesis or chromosomal rebirth was coined recently to group these two one-step catastrophic events together. These phenomena suggest an evolutionary modality for cancer cells to circumvent individual mutational events with one simultaneous shattering of chromosomes resulting in the random reassembling of segmented genetic material to form complex derivative chromosomes. We report a case of possible chromoanagenesis in a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Chromosome analysis from the biopsy showed a complex karyotype with multiple numerical and structural rearrangements including a translocation of chromosomes 3 and 7 involving the BCL6 gene region, with the derivative chromosome further rearranging with chromosomes 14, 7, and 22 with involvement of the IGH gene region. Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies confirmed these findings. Chromosomal microarray studies showed multiple complex copy number variations including a chromosome 12 abnormality, the complexity of which appears to suggest the phenomenon of chromoanagenesis. Our case further illustrates that lymphomagenesis can be complex and may arise from a catastrophic event resulting in multiple complex chromosome rearrangements. PMID:27108385

  14. Cryptanalysis and improvement of multiparty semiquantum secret sharing based on rearranging orders of qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Aihan; Fu, Fangbo

    2016-12-01

    Recently, a multiparty semiquantum secret sharing scheme based on rearranging orders of qubits was proposed by Gao et al. [Mod. Phys. Lett. B 30 (2016) 1650130]. In this paper, we show that in their scheme the last agent and other agents can illegally get the sender’s secret keys without being detected. Furthermore, an improved scheme is proposed to resist such attack.

  15. Lager yeasts possess dynamic genomes that undergo rearrangements and gene amplification in response to stress.

    PubMed

    James, Tharappel C; Usher, Jane; Campbell, Susan; Bond, Ursula

    2008-03-01

    A long-term goal of the brewing industry is to identify yeast strains with increased tolerance to the stresses experienced during the brewing process. We have characterised the genomes of a number of stress-tolerant mutants, derived from the lager yeast strain CMBS-33, that were selected for tolerance to high temperatures and to growth in high specific gravity wort. Our results indicate that the heat-tolerant strains have undergone a number of gross chromosomal rearrangements when compared to the parental strain. To determine if such rearrangements can spontaneously arise in response to exposure to stress conditions experienced during the brewing process, we examined the chromosome integrity of both the stress-tolerant strains and their parent during a single round of fermentation under a variety of environmental stresses. Our results show that the lager yeast genome shows tremendous plasticity during fermentation, especially when fermentations are carried out in high specific gravity wort and at higher than normal temperatures. Many localised regions of gene amplification were observed especially at the telomeres and at the rRNA gene locus on chromosome XII, and general chromosomal instability was evident. However, gross chromosomal rearrangements were not detected, indicating that continued selection in the stress conditions are required to obtain clonal isolates with stable rearrangements. Taken together, the data suggest that lager yeasts display a high degree of genomic plasticity and undergo genomic changes in response to environmental stress.

  16. Analyzing the CDR3 Repertoire with respect to TCR-Beta Chain V-D-J and V-J Rearrangements in Peripheral T Cells using HTS.

    PubMed

    Ma, Long; Yang, Liwen; Bin Shi; He, Xiaoyan; Peng, Aihua; Li, Yuehong; Zhang, Teng; Sun, Suhong; Ma, Rui; Yao, Xinsheng

    2016-07-12

    V-D-J rearrangement of the TCR-beta chain follows the 12/23 rule and the beyond 12/23 restriction. Currently, the proportion and characteristics of TCR-beta chain V-J rearrangement is unclear. We used high-throughput sequencing to compare and analyze TCR-beta chain V-J rearrangement and V-D-J rearrangement in the CDR3 repertoires of T cells from the PBMCs of six volunteers and six BALB/c mice. The results showed that the percentage of V-J rearrangement of the volunteers was approximately 0.7%, whereas that of the mice was 2.2%. The clonality of mice V-J rearrangement was significantly reduced compared with the V-D-J rearrangement, whereas the clonality of human V-J rearrangement was slightly reduced compared with the V-D-J rearrangement. V-J rearrangement in CDR3 involved the significant usage of N, S, F and L, whereas V-D-J rearrangement in CDR3 involved the significant usage of R and G. The levels of V deletion and J deletion in V-J rearrangement were significantly reduced compared with V-D-J rearrangement. TRBD and TRBJ usage in V-J rearrangement differed from that of V-D-J rearrangement, including dominant usage of TRBV and TRBJ and their pairing. Taken together, these results provide new ideas and technology for studies of V-D-J rearrangement and V-J rearrangement in the CDR3 repertoire.

  17. Search for NTRK1 proto-oncogene rearrangements in human thyroid tumours originated after therapeutic radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bounacer, A; Schlumberger, M; Wicker, R; Du-Villard, J A; Caillou, B; Sarasin, A; Suárez, H G

    2000-01-01

    Rearrangements of NTRK1 proto-oncogene were detected in ‘spontaneous’ papillary thyroid carcinomas with a frequency varying from 5 to 25% in different studies. These rearrangements result in the formation of chimaeric genes composed of the tyrosine kinase domain of NTRK1 fused to 5′ sequences of different genes. To investigate if the NTRK1 gene plays a role in radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis, we looked for the presence of NTRK1 -activating rearrangements in 32 human thyroid tumours (16 follicular adenomas, 14 papillary carcinomas and two lymph-node metastases of papillary thyroid carcinomas) from patients who had received external radiation, using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Southern blot and direct sequencing techniques. These data were compared with those obtained in a series of 28 ‘spontaneous’ benign and malignant thyroid tumours, collected from patients without a history of radiation exposure and four in vitro culture cell lines derived from ‘spontaneous’ thyroid cancers. Our results concerning the radiation-associated tumours showed that only rearrangements between NTRK1 and TPM3 genes (TRK oncogene) were detected in 2/14 papillary carcinomas and in one lymph-node metastasis of one of these papillary thyroid carcinomas. All the radiation-associated adenomas were negative. In the ‘spontaneous’ tumours, only one of the 14 papillary carcinomas and one of the four in vitro culture cell lines, derived from a papillary carcinoma, presented a NTRK1 rearrangement also with the TPM3 gene. Twenty-five of this series of radiation-associated tumours were previously studied for the ras and RET/PTC oncogenes. In conclusion, our data: (a) show that the overall frequency of NTRK1 rearrangements is similar between radiation-associated (2/31: 6%) and ‘spontaneous’ epithelial thyroid tumours (2/32: 6%). The frequency, if we consider exclusively the papillary carcinomas, is in both cases 12%; (b) show that the TRK oncogene

  18. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the lacrimal gland is frequently characterized by MYB rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Chen, T Y; Keeney, M G; Chintakuntlawar, A V; Knutson, D L; Kloft-Nelson, S; Greipp, P T; Garrity, J A; Salomao, D R; Garcia, J J

    2017-01-13

    PurposeAdenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) represents ~10-15% of salivary neoplasms and almost universally exhibits a lethal clinical course. ACC is also known to occur in the lacrimal gland. ACC is characterized by its heterogeneous morphology and may demonstrate tubular, cribriform, and/or solid architectural patterns. Unfortunately, these histopathological features are not specific to ACC and can be seen in other salivary gland-type neoplasms, introducing a diagnostic dilemma. The discovery of fusion transcripts has revolutionized the diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment of epithelial malignancies. In several anatomic subsites ACC is frequently characterized by a fusion transcript involving genes MYB and NFIB; more specifically, t(6;9)(q22-23;p23-24). This study explores the incidence of MYB rearrangement in cases of lacrimal gland ACC using fluorescent in situ hybridization.Materials and methodsRetrospective clinical and histopathological review of 12 cases of lacrimal gland ACC seen at Mayo Clinic over a 25-year period (1990-2015) was performed. Demographic and clinical data were obtained from medical records. Surgical pathology archival material including H&E slides and immunostains was re-examined. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded material was further evaluated using immunohistochemistry when appropriate. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using a MYB break-apart probe was applied to all histologically confirmed cases of ACC and benign salivary gland parenchyma.ResultsThe median patient age was 53.6 years (range 12-64) and distributed equally by gender (six male and six female). Rearrangement of MYB was identified using FISH in seven cases (58%). Twenty-five sections of benign salivary gland parenchyma showed no evidence of MYB rearrangement. Primary surgical resection was most common treatment, and 78% of the patient received adjuvant radiation therapy. Median overall survival (OS) was 11 years. Rearrangement of MYB did not affect OS

  19. Limited pattern of TCR delta chain gene rearrangement on the RNA level in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nowak, J; Januszkiewicz, D; Pernak, M; Hertmanowska, H; Nowicka-Kujawska, K; Rembowska, J; Lewandowski, K; Nowak, T; Wender, M

    2001-01-01

    Susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) is most likely affected by a number of genes, including HLA and T-cell receptor (TCR) genes. T cells expressing gamma/delta receptors seem to contribute to autoagression in MS, as evidenced by their localization in the MS plaques in the brain. The aim of this study was to analyse the TCRdelta chain gene rearrangement at the RNA (cDNA) level and compare to the DNA pattern rearrangement. TCRdelta gene rearrangement was analysed in MS patients and healthy individuals with the use of primers specific for Vdelta1-6 and Jdelta1 genes (at the DNA level) and specific for Vdelta1-6 and Cdelta1 genes (at the cDNA level). The size of PCR products was analysed on agarose gel and by ALF-Express (Pharmacia). Additionally, the lymphocyte surface immunophenotype was studied with specific monoclonal antibodies. At the DNA level a restricted pattern of Vdelta3-Jdelta1 and Vdelta5-Jdelta1 was found only in MS patients. Contrary to DNA, mono-, oligoclonal RNA (cDNA) rearrangements were limited to Vdelta1-Cdelta1, Vdelta2-Cdelta1 and Vdelta3-Cdelta1 only in MS patients as well. Surface immunophenotype analysis revealed in MS a much higher frequency of activated gamma/delta T lymphocytes, i.e. expressing HLA-DR and CD25. An elevated level of CD56 positive cells in MS was recorded. Mono-oligoclonal pattern of TCRdelta gene rearrangement at the RNA level, along with increase in activated gamma/delta T cells, strongly argue for a significant role of gamma/delta T lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of MS.

  20. Spatially rearranged object parts can facilitate perception of intact whole objects

    PubMed Central

    Cacciamani, Laura; Ayars, Alisabeth A.; Peterson, Mary A.

    2014-01-01

    The familiarity of an object depends on the spatial arrangement of its parts; when the parts are spatially rearranged, they form a novel, unrecognizable configuration. Yet the same collection of parts comprises both the familiar and novel configuration. Is it possible that the collection of familiar parts activates a representation of the intact familiar configuration even when they are spatially rearranged? We presented novel configurations as primes before test displays that assayed effects on figure-ground perception from memories of intact familiar objects. In our test displays, two equal-area regions shared a central border; one region depicted a portion of a familiar object. Previous research with such displays has shown that participants are more likely to perceive the region depicting a familiar object as the figure and the abutting region as its ground when the familiar object is depicted in its upright orientation rather than upside down. The novel primes comprised either the same or a different collection of parts as the familiar object in the test display (part-rearranged and control primes, respectively). We found that participants were more likely to perceive the familiar region as figure in upright vs. inverted displays following part-rearranged primes but not control primes. Thus, priming with a novel configuration comprising the same familiar parts as the upcoming figure-ground display facilitated orientation-dependent effects of object memories on figure assignment. Similar results were obtained when the spatially rearranged collection of parts was suggested on the groundside of the prime's border, suggesting that familiar parts in novel configurations access the representation of their corresponding intact whole object before figure assignment. These data demonstrate that familiar parts access memories of familiar objects even when they are arranged in a novel configuration. PMID:24904495

  1. Recurrent Rearrangement during Adaptive Evolution in an Interspecific Yeast Hybrid Suggests a Model for Rapid Introgression

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Barbara; Paulish, Terry; Stanbery, Alison; Piotrowski, Jeff; Koniges, Gregory; Kroll, Evgueny; Louis, Edward J.; Liti, Gianni; Sherlock, Gavin; Rosenzweig, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Genome rearrangements are associated with eukaryotic evolutionary processes ranging from tumorigenesis to speciation. Rearrangements are especially common following interspecific hybridization, and some of these could be expected to have strong selective value. To test this expectation we created de novo interspecific yeast hybrids between two diverged but largely syntenic Saccharomyces species, S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum, then experimentally evolved them under continuous ammonium limitation. We discovered that a characteristic interspecific genome rearrangement arose multiple times in independently evolved populations. We uncovered nine different breakpoints, all occurring in a narrow ∼1-kb region of chromosome 14, and all producing an “interspecific fusion junction” within the MEP2 gene coding sequence, such that the 5′ portion derives from S. cerevisiae and the 3′ portion derives from S. uvarum. In most cases the rearrangements altered both chromosomes, resulting in what can be considered to be an introgression of a several-kb region of S. uvarum into an otherwise intact S. cerevisiae chromosome 14, while the homeologous S. uvarum chromosome 14 experienced an interspecific reciprocal translocation at the same breakpoint within MEP2, yielding a chimaeric chromosome; these events result in the presence in the cell of two MEP2 fusion genes having identical breakpoints. Given that MEP2 encodes for a high-affinity ammonium permease, that MEP2 fusion genes arise repeatedly under ammonium-limitation, and that three independent evolved isolates carrying MEP2 fusion genes are each more fit than their common ancestor, the novel MEP2 fusion genes are very likely adaptive under ammonium limitation. Our results suggest that, when homoploid hybrids form, the admixture of two genomes enables swift and otherwise unavailable evolutionary innovations. Furthermore, the architecture of the MEP2 rearrangement suggests a model for rapid introgression, a phenomenon seen in

  2. Competing rearrangement reactions in small gas-phase ionic complexes: The internal SN2 and nitro-nitrite rearrangements in nitroalkane proton-bound pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Clement; Mayer, Paul M.

    2006-09-01

    The dissociation of metastable proton-bound pairs, (R1NO2)(R2NO2)H+ (R1 and R2 = CH3, CH3CH2, (CH3)2CH and (CH3)3C) have been investigated by mass spectrometry and density functional theory calculations. The proton-bound pairs can dissociate via hydrogen-bond cleavage into protonated and neutral nitroalkanes. Methyl substitution of the nitroalkanes (R1 and R2 = (CH3)2CH, (CH3)3C) permits a rearrangement process to compete with the H-bond cleavage on the microsecond timescale. The rearrangement reaction results in an isomer that then loses nitrous acid and involves an internal SN2-type mechanism in which (R1NO2)(R2NO2)H+ isomerizes to R1NO2...R2NO2H+ via TS1 and then subsequently to R1NO2R2+...HONO via TS2 prior to dissociation. The process is favoured by stabilization of the charge in TS2 by methyl substitution. The stability of the t-butyl ion changes the mechanism in ((CH3)3CNO2)2H+ to one that involves a two-step alkyl cation transfer. An investigation of nitro-nitrite rearrangement in protonated nitroalkanes at the B3-LYP/6-31 + G(d) level of theory found that the rearrangement barrier is lowered to the point that (CH3)3CNO2H+ can easily interconvert into (CH3)3CO(H)NO+ in the gas phase and leads to the conclusion that the proton-bound pairs involving (CH3)3CNO2 are a mixture of nitro-nitro and nitro-nitrite proton-bound pairs. The nitrite isomer can dissociate into protonated t-butyl nitrite and neutral nitroalkane via a simple hydrogen-bond cleavage. A more favourable competing dissociation process leads to the loss of t-butanol to form the ((CH3)3CNO2)(NO)+ complex.

  3. Transient restoration of gene rearrangement at multiple T cell receptor loci in gamma-irradiated scid mice

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The developmental arrest of thymocytes from scid mice, deficient in variable, (diversity), and joining, or V(D)J recombination, can be overcome by sublethal gamma-irradiation. Since previous studies focused on restoration of rearrangement of the T cell receptor (TCR) beta locus, productive rearrangement of which is selected for, we sought to examine to what extent locus specificity and cellular selection contributed to the observed effects. We report here that irradiation of newborn scid mice induces normal V-D-J rearrangements of the TCR delta locus, which like TCR beta, is also actively rearranged in CD(4-)CD(8-) (double negative) thymocytes. In contrast, no complete V-J alpha rearrangements were detected. Instead, we detected substantial levels of hairpin-terminated coding ends at the 5' end of the J alpha locus, demonstrating that TCR alpha rearrangements manifest the effects of the scid mutation. Irradiation, therefore, transiently compensates for the effects of the scid mutation in a locus-nonspecific manner in thymocytes, resulting in a burst of normal TCR beta and delta rearrangements. Irradiation also allows the development of cells that can initiate but fail to complete V(D)J recombination events at the TCR alpha locus, which is normally inaccessible in scid thymocytes. PMID:8760795

  4. Concurrent V(D)J recombination and DNA end instability increase interchromosomal trans-rearrangements in ATM-deficient thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Steven; Wangsa, Darawalee; Ried, Thomas; Livak, Ferenc; Hodes, Richard J

    2013-04-01

    During the CD4(-)CD8(-) (DN) stage of T-cell development, RAG-dependent DNA breaks and V(D)J recombination occur at three T-cell receptor (TCR) loci: TCRβ, TCRγ and TCRδ. During this stage, abnormal trans-rearrangements also take place between TCR loci, occurring at increased frequency in absence of the DNA damage response mediator ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). Here, we use this model of physiologic trans-rearrangement to study factors that predispose to rearrangement and the role of ATM in preventing chromosomal translocations. The frequency of DN thymocytes with DNA damage foci at multiple TCR loci simultaneously is increased 2- to 3-fold in the absence of ATM. However, trans-rearrangement is increased 10 000- to 100 000-fold, indicating that ATM function extends beyond timely resolution of DNA breaks. RAG-mediated synaptic complex formation occurs between recombination signal sequences with unequal 12 and 23 base spacer sequences (12/23 rule). TCR trans-rearrangements violate this rule, as we observed similar frequencies of 12/23 and aberrant 12/12 or 23/23 recombination products. This suggests that trans-rearrangements are not the result of trans-synaptic complex formation, but they are instead because of unstable cis synaptic complexes that form simultaneously at distinct TCR loci. Thus, ATM suppresses trans-rearrangement primarily through stabilization of DNA breaks at TCR loci.

  5. Chromosomal Rearrangements in Post-Chernobyl Papillary Thyroid Carcinomas: Evaluation by Spectral Karyotyping and Automated Interphase FISH

    PubMed Central

    Hieber, Ludwig; Huber, Reinhard; Bauer, Verena; Schäffner, Quirin; Braselmann, Herbert; Thomas, Geraldine; Bogdanova, Tatjana; Zitzelsberger, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Structural genomic rearrangements are frequent findings in human cancers. Therefore, papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs) were investigated for chromosomal aberrations and rearrangements of the RET proto-oncogene. For this purpose, primary cultures from 23 PTC have been established and metaphase preparations were analysed by spectral karyotyping (SKY). In addition, interphase cell preparations of the same cases were investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) for the presence of RET/PTC rearrangements using RET-specific DNA probes. SKY analysis of PTC revealed structural aberrations of chromosome 11 and several numerical aberrations with frequent loss of chromosomes 20, 21, and 22. FISH analysis for RET/PTC rearrangements showed prevalence of this rearrangement in 72% (16 out of 22) of cases. However, only subpopulations of tumour cells exhibited this rearrangement indicating genetic heterogeneity. The comparison of visual and automated scoring of FISH signals revealed concordant results in 19 out of 22 cases (87%) indicating reliable scoring results using the optimised scoring parameter for RET/PTC with the automated Metafer4 system. It can be concluded from this study that genomic rearrangements are frequent in PTC and therefore important events in thyroid carcinogenesis. PMID:21436994

  6. Further delineation of nonhomologous-based recombination and evidence for subtelomeric segmental duplications in 1p36 rearrangements.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Carla S; Gajecka, Marzena; Kim, Chong A; Gentles, Andrew J; Glotzbach, Caron D; Shaffer, Lisa G; Koiffmann, Célia P

    2009-06-01

    The mechanisms involved in the formation of subtelomeric rearrangements are now beginning to be elucidated. Breakpoint sequencing analysis of 1p36 rearrangements has made important contributions to this line of inquiry. Despite the unique architecture of segmental duplications inherent to human subtelomeres, no common mechanism has been identified thus far and different nonexclusive recombination-repair mechanisms seem to predominate. In order to gain further insights into the mechanisms of chromosome breakage, repair, and stabilization mediating subtelomeric rearrangements in humans, we investigated the constitutional rearrangements of 1p36. Cloning of the breakpoint junctions in a complex rearrangement and three non-reciprocal translocations revealed similarities at the junctions, such as microhomology of up to three nucleotides, along with no significant sequence identity in close proximity to the breakpoint regions. All the breakpoints appeared to be unique and their occurrence was limited to non-repetitive, unique DNA sequences. Several recombination- or cleavage-associated motifs that may promote non-homologous recombination were observed in close proximity to the junctions. We conclude that NHEJ is likely the mechanism of DNA repair that generates these rearrangements. Additionally, two apparently pure terminal deletions were also investigated, and the refinement of the breakpoint regions identified two distinct genomic intervals ~25-kb apart, each containing a series of 1p36 specific segmental duplications with 90-98% identity. Segmental duplications can serve as substrates for ectopic homologous recombination or stimulate genomic rearrangements.

  7. High frequency of clonal immunoglobulin or T cell receptor gene rearrangements in acute myelogenous leukemia expressing terminal deoxyribonucleotidyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Ig and T cell receptor rearrangements have been used as irreversible markers of lineage and clonality in the study of B- and T-lymphoid populations. We have addressed the issue of lymphoid lineage specificity of these rearrangements by analyzing a panel of 25 TdT- acute myelogenous leukemias, 13 TdT+ AMLs, and 4 TdT+ undifferentiated leukemias. We report that while gene rearrangements represent extremely rare events in classical TdT- AML (less than 8%), rearrangements of either the Ig or T beta locus or both were detectable in the majority of the TdT+ AMLs (greater than 60%), and rearrangements of both loci were detectable in all of the TdT+ undifferentiated leukemias. These data demonstrate a significant association between TdT expression and Ig or T beta gene rearrangements even outside the lymphoid lineage, further supporting a role for TdT in Ig and T cell receptor gene assembly. These data also indicate that a coordinated program of lymphoid gene expression involving TdT-CD7-expression and Ig/T beta rearrangements can be activated before myeloid commitment. Whether the activation of this program represents a normal, albeit rare, event in early myelopoiesis or a transformation-related event present only in leukemic cells remains to be determined. PMID:3473183

  8. NTRK1 rearrangement in colorectal cancer patients: evidence for actionable target using patient-derived tumor cell line

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Min Eui; Jang, Jiryeon; Yoon, Nara; Ahn, Soo Min; Murphy, Danielle; Christiansen, Jason; Wei, Ge; Hornby, Zachary; Lee, Dong Woo; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Hong, Sung No; Kim, Seok-Hyeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Keunchil; Park, Woong Yang; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Lee, Jeeyun

    2015-01-01

    Background We have investigated the incidence of NTRK1 rearrangements in metastatic gastrointestinal cancer patients and demonstrated the potential for clinical response of these patients to targeted therapy. Methods We prospectively collected tumor tissue specimens for one year and simultaneously generated patient-derived tumor cells (PDCs). Specimens were initially screened for TrkA protein expression using TrkA immunohistochemistry (IHC). In the case of TrkA IHC positive results, samples were further examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and next generation sequencing (NGS) to confirm the presence of NTRK1 rearrangements. Results From January 2014 to December 2014, a total of 74 metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and 66 gastric cancer (GC) patients were initially screened by TrkA IHC. Two of the 74 CRC patients (2.7%) and one of the 66 GC patients (1.5%) were positive for TrkA expression by IHC. All three IHC positive cases had evidence of NTRK1 rearrangements by FISH. NGS was performed on the 3 IHC positive cases and confirmed TPM3-NTRK1 rearrangements in the two CRC cases. One GC patient with TrkA expression by IHC did not harbor an NTRK1 rearrangement. PDCs established from the NTRK1 positive CRC patients were positive for the NTRK1 rearrangement. Entrectinib, a pan-TRK inhibitor, profoundly inhibited cell proliferation of NTRK1-rearranged PDCs with such inhibition associated with inactivation of TrkA, and down-regulation of downstream signaling pathways. Conclusion TrkA IHC is an effective, initial screening method for NTRK1 rearrangement detection in the clinic. Inhibition of the TrkA kinase is a promising targeted therapy for cancer patients whose tumors harbor a NTRK1 rearrangement. PMID:26472021

  9. Provocative pattern of rearrangements of the genes for the. gamma. and. beta. chains of the T-cell receptor in human leukemias

    SciTech Connect

    Goorha, R.; Bunin, N.; Mirro, J. Jr.; Murphy, S.B.; Cross, A.H.; Behm, F.G.; Quertermous, T.; Seidman, J.; Kitchingman, G.R.

    1987-07-01

    To examine the distribution of rearrangements of the ..gamma..- and ..beta..-chain T-cell receptor (TCR) genes in T- and non-T acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs), and potentially to determine which genes rearrange first in ontogeny, the authors analyzed high molecular weight DNA from 102 patients with acute leukemia. Rearranged ..gamma..- and ..beta..-chain genes were found in all T-cell ALLs (22/22) examined. Overall, 27% (18/66) of B-lineage ALLs had ..beta..-chain gene rearrangements, and 41% (24/58) had ..gamma..-chain gene rearrangements, but the distribution of rearranged genes varied according to the stage of B-cell differentiation. The ..gamma..-chain genes were rearranged in 11% (1/9) of the B-lineage patients negative for the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (cALLA) and 50% (23/46) of cALLA/sup -/= ALL patients, while the ..beta..-chain genes were not rearranged in any of the 7 cALLA/sup -/ ALL patients examined but were rearranged in 32% (18/56) of the cALLA/sup +/ patients. Of the 44 cALLA/sup +/ patients in which a direct comparison of ..gamma..- and ..beta..-chain gene rearrangements could be made, 34% had both genes rearranged, 16% had only ..gamma..-chain gene rearrangements, and the remaining 50% had both genes in the germ-line configuration. ..beta..-Chain rearrangements have not been found in the absence of ..gamma..-chain rearrangements, thus supporting a proposed hierarchy of TCR gene rearrangements.

  10. A complex intragenic rearrangement of ERCC8 in Chinese siblings with Cockayne syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hua; Li, Xiaoyan; Peng, Jiping; Chen, Qian; Gao, ZhiJie; Song, Xiaozhen; Li, WeiYu; Xiao, Jianqiu; Li, Caihua; Zhang, Ting; Gusella, James F.; Zhong, Jianmin; Chen, Xiaoli

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder principally characterized by postnatal growth failure and progressive neurological dysfunction, due primarily to mutations in ERCC6 and ERCC8. Here, we report our diagnostic experience for two patients in a Chinese family suspected on clinical grounds to have Cockayne syndrome. Using multiple molecular techniques, including whole exome sequencing, array comparative genomic hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we identified compound heterozygosity for a maternal splicing variant (chr5:60195556, NM_000082:c.618-2A > G) and a paternal complex deletion/inversion/deletion rearrangement removing exon 4 of ERCC8, confirming the suspected pathogenesis in these two subjects. Microhomology (TAA and AGCT) at the breakpoints indicated that microhomology-mediated FoSTeS events were involved in this complex ERCC8 rearrangement. This diagnostic experience illustrates the value of high-throughput genomic technologies combined with detailed phenotypic assessment in clinical genetic diagnosis. PMID:28333167

  11. Rearrangement of the histone H2A C-terminal domain in the nucleosome

    SciTech Connect

    Usachenko, S.I.; Bavykin, S.G.; Gavin, I.M.; Bradbury, M. |

    1994-07-19

    Using zero-length covalent protein-DNA crosslinking, the authors have mapped the histone-DNA contacts in nucleosome core particles from which the C- and N-terminal domains of histone H2A were selectively trimmed by trypsin or clostripain. They found that the flexible trypsin-sensitive C-terminal domain of histone H2A contacts the dyad axis, whereas its globular domain contacts the end of DNA in the nucleosome core particle. The appearance of the histone H2A contact at the dyad axis occurs only in the absence of linker DNA and does not depend on the absence of linker histones. The results show the ability of the histone H2A C-terminal domain to rearrange. This rearrangement might play a biological role in nucleosome disassembly and reassembly and the retention of the H2A-H2B dimer (or the whole octamer) during the passing of polymerases through the nucleosome.

  12. Multiscale modeling of membrane rearrangement, drainage, and rupture in evolving foams.

    PubMed

    Saye, Robert I; Sethian, James A

    2013-05-10

    Modeling the physics of foams and foamlike materials, such as soapy froths, fire retardants, and lightweight crash-absorbent structures, presents challenges, because of the vastly different time and space scales involved. By separating and coupling these disparate scales, we have designed a multiscale framework to model dry foam dynamics. This leads to a predictive and flexible computational methodology linking, with a few simplifying assumptions, foam drainage, rupture, and topological rearrangement, to coupled interface-fluid motion under surface tension, gravity, and incompressible fluid dynamics. Our computed results match theoretical analyses and experimentally observed physical effects, including thin-film drainage and interference, and are used to study bubble rupture cascades and macroscopic rearrangement. The developed multiscale model allows quantitative computation of complex foam evolution phenomena.

  13. Structure of the germline genome of Tetrahymena thermophila and relationship to the massively rearranged somatic genome.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Eileen P; Kapusta, Aurélie; Huvos, Piroska E; Bidwell, Shelby L; Zafar, Nikhat; Tang, Haibao; Hadjithomas, Michalis; Krishnakumar, Vivek; Badger, Jonathan H; Caler, Elisabet V; Russ, Carsten; Zeng, Qiandong; Fan, Lin; Levin, Joshua Z; Shea, Terrance; Young, Sarah K; Hegarty, Ryan; Daza, Riza; Gujja, Sharvari; Wortman, Jennifer R; Birren, Bruce W; Nusbaum, Chad; Thomas, Jainy; Carey, Clayton M; Pritham, Ellen J; Feschotte, Cédric; Noto, Tomoko; Mochizuki, Kazufumi; Papazyan, Romeo; Taverna, Sean D; Dear, Paul H; Cassidy-Hanley, Donna M; Xiong, Jie; Miao, Wei; Orias, Eduardo; Coyne, Robert S

    2016-11-28

    The germline genome of the binucleated ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila undergoes programmed chromosome breakage and massive DNA elimination to generate the somatic genome. Here, we present a complete sequence assembly of the germline genome and analyze multiple features of its structure and its relationship to the somatic genome, shedding light on the mechanisms of genome rearrangement as well as the evolutionary history of this remarkable germline/soma differentiation. Our results strengthen the notion that a complex, dynamic, and ongoing interplay between mobile DNA elements and the host genome have shaped Tetrahymena chromosome structure, locally and globally. Non-standard outcomes of rearrangement events, including the generation of short-lived somatic chromosomes and excision of DNA interrupting protein-coding regions, may represent novel forms of developmental gene regulation. We also compare Tetrahymena's germline/soma differentiation to that of other characterized ciliates, illustrating the wide diversity of adaptations that have occurred within this phylum.

  14. Cyclo-biphenalenyl biradicaloid molecular materials: conformation, rearrangement, magnetism, and thermochromism

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Tian, Yong-Hui; Kertesz, Prof. Miklos

    2010-01-01

    Cyclo-biphenalenyl biradicaloid molecular materials with chair- and boat-conformations are studied by restricted and broken-symmetry DFT using the M06 family of meta-GGA functionals. The global minima of these molecular materials are magnetically silent due to the sigma-bond connecting the two phenalenyls, while the sigma-bond may undergo low-barrier sigmatropic rearrangements via pi-pi bonded paramagnetic intermediates. The validation of theory is performed for the chair-conformation by comparing the sigma-bonded structures and the rearrangement barriers with experimental data. The boat-conformation is then studied using the validated functional. The electronic spectra of both chair- and boat-conformations are calculated and their applications in thermochromism are discussed.

  15. Targeting brain metastases in ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Isabella; Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Palmer, Joshua D; Mehra, Ranee; Lu, Bo

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of brain metastases has increased as a result of improved systemic control and advances in imaging. However, development of novel therapeutics with CNS activity has not advanced at the same rate. Research on molecular markers has revealed many potential targets for antineoplastic agents, and a particularly important aberration is translocation in the ALK gene, identified in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ALK inhibitors have shown systemic efficacy against ALK-rearranged NSCLC in many clinical trials, but the effectiveness of crizotinib in CNS disease is limited by poor blood-brain barrier penetration and acquired drug resistance. In this Review, we discuss potential pathways to target ALK-rearranged brain metastases, including next generation ALK inhibitors with greater CNS penetration and mechanisms to overcome resistance. Other important mechanisms to control CNS disease include targeting pathways downstream of ALK phosphorylation, increasing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, modifying the tumour microenvironment, and adding concurrent radiotherapy.

  16. Increased MLL gene rearrangements in amniocytes from fetuses of mothers who smoke.

    PubMed

    de la Chica, Rosa Ana; Mediano, Carmen; Salido, Marta; Espinet, Blanca; Manresa, Josep Maria; Solé, Francesc

    2011-08-01

    We assess the possible genotoxic effect of maternal smoking on amniotic fluid cells, based on the presence of an increasing of structural abnormality of the 11q23 band bearing the MLL gene rearrangements. In this observational and prospective study cultured amniocytes were obtained from 20 control and 20 women who smoke (>10 cigarettes/day for >10 years and during pregnancy). We performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis in amniocytes. Comparison of FISH data between smoker and control groups showed statistical significance for the MLL gene rearrangements. Epidemiologic studies, including a large series of patients, will be needed to determine whether the offspring of parents who smoke have an increased lifetime risk of leukemia.

  17. Aminated thermoresponsive microgels prepared from the Hofmann rearrangement of amides without side reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuohe; Pelton, Robert

    2014-06-17

    Thermoresponsive microgels bearing primary amine groups were prepared by the Hofmann rearrangement of methacrylamide groups present in cross-linked NIPMAM (N-isopropylmethacrylamide) microgels. Most thermoresponsive microgels are based on NIPAM (N-isopropylacrylamide). By substituting NIPMAM for NIPAM, and methacrylamide for acrylamide, side reactions and the generation of carboxyl groups were prevented during the Hofmann reaction. The Hofmann rearrangement is sufficiently slow under our conditions (1 h for a 51% conversion) to permit fine control of the primary amine contents in the microgels. When starting with PNIPMAM microgels containing both methacrylamide and acrylic acid residues, we prepared a series of amphoteric microgels spanning a range of amine contents, all from a common parent microgel. Therefore, every microgel in the series had the same microstructure, cross-link density, and molecular weight.

  18. DNA Double-Strand Breaks, Chromosomal Rearrangements, and GenomicInstability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, W.F.; Corcoran, J.; Hartmann, A.; Kaplan, M.I.; Limoli,C.L.; Ponnaiya, B.

    1998-03-09

    DNA double-strand breaks can lead to chromosomalrearrangements at the first mitosis after exposure to the DNAstrand-breaking agent. The evidence suggests a number of differentpathways for DNA double-strand break rejoining in mammalian cells, but itis unclear what factors determine the fate of the induced break andwhether or not it will lead to chromosomal rearrangement. If a cell doessurvive and proliferate after DNA cleavage, delayed chromosomalinstability can be observedin the clonal descendants of the exposedcell. Most, but not all DNA double-strand breaking agents are effectiveat inducing this delayed chromosomal instability. In this paper, wereview the evidence for the role of the DNA double-strand break indirectly induced and delayed chromosomal rearrangements. Copyright 1998Elsevier Science B.V.

  19. Aza Cope Rearrangement of Propargyl Enammonium Cations Catalyzed By a Self-Assembled `Nanozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Courntey J.; Fiedler, Dorothea; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-27

    The tetrahedral [Ga{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} assembly (L = N,N-bis(2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl)-1,5-diaminonaphthalene) encapsulates a variety of cations, including propargyl enammonium cations capable of undergoing the aza Cope rearrangement. For propargyl enammonium substrates that are encapsulated in the [Ga{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} assembly, rate accelerations of up to 184 are observed when compared to the background reaction. After rearrangement, the product iminium ion is released into solution and hydrolyzed allowing for catalytic turnover. The activation parameters for the catalyzed and uncatalyzed reaction were determined, revealing that a lowered entropy of activation is responsible for the observed rate enhancements. The catalyzed reaction exhibits saturation kinetics; the rate data obey the Michaelis-Menten model of enzyme kinetics, and competitive inhibition using a non-reactive guest has been demonstrated.

  20. Enantioselective Catalysis of the Aza-Cope Rearrangement by a Chiral Supramolecular Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Casey J.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-07-29

    The chiral supramolecular catalyst Ga{sub 4}L{sub 6} [L = 1,5-bis(2,3-dihydroxybenzoylamino)naphthalene] is a molecular tetrahedron that catalyzes the 3-aza-Cope rearrangement of allyl enammonium cations. This catalysis is accomplished by preorganizing the substrate in a reactive conformation within the host. This work demonstrates that through the use of enantiopure assembly, its chiral cavity is capable of catalyzing the 3-aza-Cope rearrangement enantioselectively, with yields of 21-74% and enantiomeric excesses from 6 to 64% at 50 C. At lower temperatures, the enantioselectivity improved, reaching 78% ee at 5 C. This is the highest enantioselectivity to date induced by the chiral cavity of a supramolecular assembly.

  1. A new human IghV4.21-related pseudogene capable of VDJ rearrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Walters, D.K.; Isaacson, P.J.; Spencer, J.

    1996-09-01

    The IghViv family has been reported to consist of 13 different genes, only one of which is a pseudogene. The IghViv family member IghV4.21 is widely used, and is known to encode immunoglobulin specific for the red blood cell antigens I and i in germline configuration. We have previously reported a rearranged IghV4.21 gene, isolated from the marginal zone of normal human spleen, which has two large deletions in FR1 and FR2/CDR2. We have now identified the same IghV gene sequence rearranged to a different diversity (D) region, in plasma cells of the intestinal lamina propria in a different patient, suggesting that this sequence represents a new IghViv family pseudogene related to IghV4.21. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Formation of beyerene, kaurene, trachylobane, and atiserene diterpenes by rearrangements that avoid secondary carbocations.

    PubMed

    Hong, Young J; Tantillo, Dean J

    2010-04-21

    Quantum chemical calculations on carbocation intermediates encountered during the conversion of ent-copalyl diphosphate to the diterpenes beyerene, kaurene, trachylobane, and atiserene are described. Based on the results of these computations, it is suggested that previously proposed secondary carbocation intermediates are avoided. In some cases, complex rearrangements in which up to three alkyl or hydride shifting events are coupled into concerted processes are predicted to occur instead. The potential effects of electron-rich active site groups on the inherent reactivity of key carbocations are discussed, as are complex rearrangements coupled to deprotonation events. Based on computed electrostatic potential maps, it also is proposed that ammonium ions that were previously designed as mimics of several carbocations are actually better mimics of transition state structures for carbocation deprotonation.

  3. Intraspecific rearrangement of duplicated mitochondrial control regions in the Luzon Tarictic Hornbill Penelopides manillae (Aves: Bucerotidae).

    PubMed

    Sammler, Svenja; Ketmaier, Valerio; Havenstein, Katja; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2013-12-01

    Philippine hornbills of the genera Aceros and Penelopides (Bucerotidae) are known to possess a large tandemly duplicated fragment in their mitochondrial genome, whose paralogous parts largely evolve in concert. In the present study, we surveyed the two distinguishable duplicated control regions in several individuals of the Luzon Tarictic Hornbill Penelopides manillae, compare their characteristics within and across individuals, and report on an intraspecific mitochondrial gene rearrangement found in one single specimen, i.e., an interchange between the two control regions. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of two distinct mitochondrial genome rearrangements within a bird species. We briefly discuss a possible evolutionary mechanism responsible for this pattern, and highlight potential implications for the application of control region sequences as a marker in population genetics and phylogeography.

  4. Analysis of polymerization with photo-Fries rearrangement in liquid crystal displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizusaki, Masanobu; Enomoto, Satoshi; Hara, Yuki; Kikuchi, Hideo; Yamada, Yuichiro

    2013-05-01

    Polymer-sustained-alignment liquid crystal display has high potential for low power consumption, fast response, and low level of image sticking. In this study, we clarified the mechanism for a formation of a polymer layer with polymerization of the monomer 2,6-dimethacryloyl-oxy-naphthalene (2,6-DMANaph) without initiators under UV light exposure. Experimental results revealed that the polymerization of 2,6-DMANaph occurred with the generation of radicals from the monomer as reactive intermediates of a photo-Fries rearrangement. It took about 20 min for 0.5 wt. % of the monomer in the LC to convert to the polymer, indicating that the generation of the radicals derived from the reactive intermediates of the photo-Fries rearrangement is effective for the formation of the polymer layer. Voltage holding ratio of the LC cell having the polymer layer formed from the monomer 2,6-DMANaph was over 99%, which was comparably high value.

  5. Chemoselective Palladium-Catalyzed Deprotonative Arylation/[1,2]-Wittig Rearrangement of Pyridylmethyl Ethers

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Kim, Byeong-Seon

    2015-01-01

    Control of chemoselectivity is one of the most challenging problems facing chemists and is particularly important in the synthesis of bioactive compounds and medications. Herein, the first highly chemoselective tandem C(sp3)–H arylation/[1,2]-Wittig rearrangement of pyridylmethyl ethers is presented. The efficient and operationally simple protocols enable generation of either arylation products or tandem arylation/[1,2]-Wittig rearrangement products with remarkable selectivity and good to excellent yields (60–99%). Choice of base, solvent, and reaction temperature play a pivotal role in tuning the reactivity of intermediates and controlling the relative rates of competing processes. The novel arylation step is catalyzed by a Pd(OAc)2/NIXANTPHOS-based system via a deprotonative cross-coupling process. The method provides rapid access to skeletally diverse aryl(pyridyl)methanol core structures, which are central components of several medications. PMID:27014434

  6. Pt-catalyzed rearrangement of oxaspirohexanes to 3-methylenetetrahydrofurans: scope and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Malapit, Christian A; Chitale, Sampada M; Thakur, Meena S; Taboada, Rosa; Howell, Amy R

    2015-05-15

    A novel Pt-catalyzed rearrangement of oxaspirohexanes to 3-methylenetetrahydrofurans is reported. Mechanistic studies by (13)C-labeling experiments confirm oxidative addition of Pt(II) regioselectively to the least substituted carbon-carbon bond of the cyclopropane to form a platinacyclobutane intermediate. To our knowledge, this is the first alkoxy-substituted platinacyclobutane that has been observed spectroscopically. The scope and a proposed mechanism of this new Pt-catalyzed transformation are described.

  7. Rearrangements of the transcriptional regulatory networks of metabolic pathways in fungi.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Hugo; Hogues, Hervé; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2009-12-01

    Growing evidence suggests that transcriptional regulatory networks in many organisms are highly flexible. Here, we discuss the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks governing the metabolic machinery of sequenced ascomycetes. In particular, recent work has shown that transcriptional rewiring is common in regulons controlling processes such as production of ribosome components and metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. We note that dramatic rearrangements of the transcriptional regulatory components of metabolic functions have occurred among ascomycetes species.

  8. Influence of the dispersity of anthracite on the rearrangement of its structure during heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fialkov, A.S.; Abramov, A.V.; Chuparova, L.D.; Kirilin, N.S.; Semenov, M.V.; Suslina, V.I.; Yurkovskii, I.M.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of the dispersity of anthracite on the rearrangement of its structure and its absorption capacity with respect to a binder has been investigated. It has been shown that a composition based on anthracite with a high degree of ordering of the structure can be obtained if the specific surface of the powder is not less than 14 m/sup 2//g but not more than 20 m/sup 2//g.

  9. Prenatally diagnosed de novo complex chromosome rearrangements: Two new cases and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, C.; Grubs, R.E.; Jewett, T.

    1994-09-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCR) are rare structural rearrangements involving at least three chromosomes with three or more breakpoints. Although there have been numerous reports of individuals with CCR, most have been ascertained through the presence of multiple congenital anomalies, recurrent pregnancy loss, or infertility. Few cases have been ascertained prenatally. We present two new cases of prenatally ascertained CCR. In the first case, an amniocentesis revealed an apparently balanced de novo rearrangement in which chromosomes 5, 6 and 11 were involved in a three-way translocation: 46,XY,t(6;5)(5;11)(q23;p14.3;q15;p13). The pregnancy was unevenful. Recently, at the age of 9 months, a physical and developmental evaluation were normal but, height, weight, and head circumference were below the 5th percentile. In the second case an amniocentesis revealed an unbalanced de novo rearrangement involving separate translocations and an interstitial deletion: 46,XY,del(6)(q25.3q27),t(3;8)(p13;q21.3),t(6;18)(p11.2;q11.2). A meconium plug was present at birth and at 6 months of age surgery for Hirschsprung`s disease was required. Currently, at 10 months of age, the patient has hypotonia and developmental delay. The paucity of information regarding prenatally diagnosed CCR poses a problem in counseling families. Of the four prenatally diagnosed balanced de novo CCR cases, three had abnormal outcomes. In a review of the literature, approximately 70% of the postnatally ascertained balanced de novo CCR cases were associated with congenital anomalies, growth retardation and/or mental retardation. More information regarding the outcome of prenatally ascertained balanced de novo CCR is required for accurate risk assessment.

  10. Origin of a repose angle: kinetics of rearrangement for granular materials.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Anaël

    2002-08-05

    A microstructural theory of dense granular materials is presented, based on two main ideas: first, that macroscopic shear results from activated local rearrangements at a mesoscopic scale; second, that the update frequency of microscopic processes is determined by granular temperature. In a shear cell, the resulting constitutive equations account for Bagnold's scaling and for the existence of a Coulomb criterion. In a granular flow down an inclined plane, they account for the rheology observed in experiments [Phys. Fluids 11, 542 (1999)

  11. A three-sided rearrangeable switching network for a binary fat tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Mao-Hsu; Yu, Chu; Shin, Haw-Yun; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2011-06-01

    A binary fat tree needs an internal node to interconnect the left-children, right-children and parent terminals to each other. In this article, we first propose a three-stage, 3-sided rearrangeable switching network for the implementation of a binary fat tree. The main component of this 3-sided switching network (3SSN) consists of a polygonal switch block (PSB) interconnected by crossbars. With the same size and the same number of switches as our 3SSN, a three-stage, 3-sided clique-based switching network is shown to be not rearrangeable. Also, the effects of the rearrangeable structure and the number of terminals on the network switch-efficiency are explored and a proper set of parameters has been determined to minimise the number of switches. We derive that a rearrangeable 3-sided switching network with switches proportional to N 3/2 is most suitable to interconnect N terminals. Moreover, we propose a new Polygonal Field Programmable Gate Array (PFPGA) that consists of logic blocks interconnected by our 3SSN, such that the logic blocks in this PFPGA can be grouped into clusters to implement different logic functions. Since the programmable switches usually have high resistance and capacitance and occupy a large area, we have to consider the effect of the 3SSN structure and the granularity of its cluster logic blocks on the switch efficiency of PFPGA. Experiments on benchmark circuits show that the switch and speed performances are significantly improved. Based on the experimental results, we can determine the parameters of PFPGA for the VLSI implementation.

  12. Efficacy of crizotinib and pemetrexed-based chemotherapy in Chinese NSCLC patients with ROS1 rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Li, Xuefei; Zhao, Sha; Liu, Xiaozhen; Jia, Yijun; Yang, Hui; Ren, Shengxiang; Zhou, Caicun

    2016-01-01

    Background ROS1 rearrangement is a novel molecular subgroup of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of crizotinib and pemetrexed-based chemotherapy in Chinese NSCLC patients with ROS1 rearrangement. Results A total of 2309 patients received ROS1 fusion detection and 51(2.2%) patients had ROS1 rearrangement. There was no significant difference between ROS1 fusion-positive and fusion-negative cohorts in demographic data. For the ROS1 fusion-positive patients, crizotinb-treated group had a higher overall response rate (ORR, 80.0%), disease control rate (DCR, 90.0%) and longer progression-free survival (PFS, 294 days) compared with the rates in pemetrexed-treated group (ORR, 40.8%; DCR, 71.4%; PFS, 179 days) and non-pemetrexed-treated group (ORR, 25.0%; DCR, 47.7%; PFS, 110 days). Besides, ORR, DCR and PFS were similar in three major ROS1 fusion partners. For the first-line treatment, patients received pemetrexed had a significant longer PFS than those received non-pemetrexed chemotherapy (209 vs. 146 days, P = 0.0107). In pemetrexed-treated cohorts, ROS1-positive patients with low TS expression had a statistically significant longer PFS than those with high TS expression (184 vs. 110 days, P = 0.0105). Materials and methods We retrospectively identified patients with NSCLC who were screened for ROS1 fusion using multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) from October 2013 to February 2016. The thymidylate synthase (TS) mRNA levels were tested using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Conclusions Crizotinib was also highly active at treating Chinese NSCLC patients with ROS1 rearrangement. TS expression could predict the efficacy of pemetrexed-based therapy in ROS1 fusion-positive patients. PMID:27738334

  13. The Role of CHD1 in DNA Rearrangements and Progression of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    number alterations (CNAs) at a number of genes , thereby playing a role in the development and progression of PCa. Specifically, we postulate that 1) loss...of the CHD1 gene is associated with DNA rearrangements at particular locations in the tumor genome of PCa; 2) experimental knockout of Chd1 protein...expression will lead to specific DNA copy number changes at genes that are concurrently altered with the CHD1 gene in PCa tumors; and 3) down

  14. Regioselective hypervalent iodine-induced Favorskii rearrangement of 3-oxo-5β-steroids.

    PubMed

    Viviano-Posadas, Alejandro O; Flores-Álamo, Marcos; Iglesias-Arteaga, Martín A

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of 3-oxo-5β-steroids with diacetoxyiodobenzene/KOH triggered a fast and regioselective Favorskii rearrangement that exclusively led to 3β-methoxycarbonyl-5β-4-norsteroids in good yields. The outcome of the reaction indicates that although both Cyclopropanone and Semi-benzylic pathways are possible, in the case of 3-oxo-5β-steroids, only the last participates. Unambiguous characterization of the products was achieved by NMR and X-ray Diffraction studies.

  15. Preparation and Reactivity of Acyclic Chiral Allylzinc Species by a Zinc-Brook Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Leibeling, Markus; Shurrush, Khriesto A; Werner, Veronika; Perrin, Lionel; Marek, Ilan

    2016-05-10

    The zinc-Brook rearrangement of enantiomerically enriched α-hydroxy allylsilane produces a chiral allylzinc intermediate, which reacts with retention of configuration in the presence of an electrophile. Two remarkable features of this transformation are the stereochemical outcome during the formation of the allylzinc species and the complete stereocontrol in the organized six-membered transition state, which leads to an overall and complete transfer of chirality within the reaction sequence.

  16. Meiotic Recombination Analyses in Pigs Carrying Different Balanced Structural Chromosomal Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Mary, Nicolas; Barasc, Harmonie; Ferchaud, Stéphane; Priet, Aurélia; Calgaro, Anne; Loustau-Dudez, Anne-Marie; Bonnet, Nathalie; Yerle, Martine; Ducos, Alain; Pinton, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Correct pairing, synapsis and recombination between homologous chromosomes are essential for normal meiosis. All these events are strongly regulated, and our knowledge of the mechanisms involved in this regulation is increasing rapidly. Chromosomal rearrangements are known to disturb these processes. In the present paper, synapsis and recombination (number and distribution of MLH1 foci) were studied in three boars (Sus scrofa domestica) carrying different chromosomal rearrangements. One (T34he) was heterozygote for the t(3;4)(p1.3;q1.5) reciprocal translocation, one (T34ho) was homozygote for that translocation, while the third (T34Inv) was heterozygote for both the translocation and a pericentric inversion inv(4)(p1.4;q2.3). All three boars were normal for synapsis and sperm production. This particular situation allowed us to rigorously study the impact of rearrangements on recombination. Overall, the rearrangements induced only minor modifications of the number of MLH1 foci (per spermatocyte or per chromosome) and of the length of synaptonemal complexes for chromosomes 3 and 4. The distribution of MLH1 foci in T34he was comparable to that of the controls. Conversely, the distributions of MLH1 foci on chromosome 4 were strongly modified in boar T34Inv (lack of crossover in the heterosynaptic region of the quadrivalent, and crossover displaced to the chromosome extremities), and also in boar T34ho (two recombination peaks on the q-arms compared with one of higher magnitude in the controls). Analyses of boars T34he and T34Inv showed that the interference was propagated through the breakpoints. A different result was obtained for boar T34ho, in which the breakpoints (transition between SSC3 and SSC4 chromatin on the bivalents) seemed to alter the transmission of the interference signal. Our results suggest that the number of crossovers and crossover interference could be regulated by partially different mechanisms. PMID:27124413

  17. Electrophile-integrating Smiles rearrangement provides previously inaccessible C4'-O-alkyl heptamethine cyanine fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Nani, Roger R; Shaum, James B; Gorka, Alexander P; Schnermann, Martin J

    2015-01-16

    New synthetic methods to rapidly access useful fluorophores are needed to advance modern molecular imaging techniques. A new variant of the classical Smiles rearrangement is reported that enables the efficient synthesis of previously inaccessible C4'-O-alkyl heptamethine cyanines. The key reaction involves N- to O-transposition with selective electrophile incorporation on nitrogen. A representative fluorophore exhibits excellent resistance to thiol nucleophiles, undergoes productive bioconjugation, and can be used in near-IR fluorescence imaging applications.

  18. Breakpoint profiling of 64 cancer genomes reveals numerous complex rearrangements spawned by homology-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Ankit; Lindberg, Michael; Faust, Gregory G.; Leibowitz, Mitchell L.; Clark, Royden A.; Layer, Ryan M.; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Hall, Ira M.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor genomes are generally thought to evolve through a gradual accumulation of mutations, but the observation that extraordinarily complex rearrangements can arise through single mutational events suggests that evolution may be accelerated by punctuated changes in genome architecture. To assess the prevalence and origins of complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs), we mapped 6179 somatic structural variation breakpoints in 64 cancer genomes from seven tumor types and screened for clusters of three or more interconnected breakpoints. We find that complex breakpoint clusters are extremely common: 154 clusters comprise 25% of all somatic breakpoints, and 75% of tumors exhibit at least one complex cluster. Based on copy number state profiling, 63% of breakpoint clusters are consistent with being CGRs that arose through a single mutational event. CGRs have diverse architectures including focal breakpoint clusters, large-scale rearrangements joining clusters from one or more chromosomes, and staggeringly complex chromothripsis events. Notably, chromothripsis has a significantly higher incidence in glioblastoma samples (39%) relative to other tumor types (9%). Chromothripsis breakpoints also show significantly elevated intra-tumor allele frequencies relative to simple SVs, which indicates that they arise early during tumorigenesis or confer selective advantage. Finally, assembly and analysis of 4002 somatic and 6982 germline breakpoint sequences reveal that somatic breakpoints show significantly less microhomology and fewer templated insertions than germline breakpoints, and this effect is stronger at CGRs than at simple variants. These results are inconsistent with replication-based models of CGR genesis and strongly argue that nonhomologous repair of concurrently arising DNA double-strand breaks is the predominant mechanism underlying complex cancer genome rearrangements. PMID:23410887

  19. Product Rearrangement from Altering a Single Residue in the Rice syn-Copalyl Diphosphate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Through site-directed mutagenesis targeted at identification of the catalytic base in the rice (Oryza sativa) syn-copalyl diphosphate synthase OsCPS4, changes to a single residue (H501) were found to induce rearrangement rather than immediate deprotonation of the initially formed bicycle, leading to production of the novel compound syn-halimadienyl diphosphate. These mutational results are combined with quantum chemical calculations to provide insight into the underlying reaction mechanism. PMID:26878189

  20. Genome-Wide Signatures of ‘Rearrangement Hotspots’ within Segmental Duplications in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammed; Sturge, Mitch; Peddle, Lynette; O'Rielly, Darren D.; Rahman, Proton

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to create a genome-wide high resolution map (i.e., >100 bp) of ‘rearrangement hotspots’ which can facilitate the identification of regions capable of mediating de novo deletions or duplications in humans. A hierarchical method was employed to fragment segmental duplications (SDs) into multiple smaller SD units. Combining an end space free pairwise alignment algorithm with a ‘seed and extend’ approach, we have exhaustively searched 409 million alignments to detect complex structural rearrangements within the reference-guided assembly of the NA18507 human genome (18× coverage), including the previously identified novel 4.8 Mb sequence from de novo assembly within this genome. We have identified 1,963 rearrangement hotspots within SDs which encompass 166 genes and display an enrichment of duplicated gene nucleotide variants (DNVs). These regions are correlated with increased non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) event frequency which presumably represents the origin of copy number variations (CNVs) and pathogenic duplications/deletions. Analysis revealed that 20% of the detected hotspots are clustered within the proximal and distal SD breakpoints flanked by the pathogenic deletions/duplications that have been mapped for 24 NAHR-mediated genomic disorders. FISH Validation of selected complex regions revealed 94% concordance with in silico localization of the highly homologous derivatives. Other results from this study indicate that intra-chromosomal recombination is enhanced in genic compared with agenic duplicated regions, and that gene desert regions comprising SDs may represent reservoirs for creation of novel genes. The generation of genome-wide signatures of ‘rearrangement hotspots’, which likely serve as templates for NAHR, may provide a powerful approach towards understanding the underlying mutational mechanism(s) for development of constitutional and acquired diseases. PMID:22194928

  1. Provocative pattern of rearrangements of the genes for the gamma and beta chains of the T-cell receptor in human leukemias.

    PubMed Central

    Goorha, R; Bunin, N; Mirro, J; Murphy, S B; Cross, A H; Behm, F G; Quertermous, T; Seidman, J; Kitchingman, G R

    1987-01-01

    To examine the distribution of rearrangements of the gamma- and beta-chain T-cell receptor (TCR) genes in T- and non-T acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs), and potentially to determine which genes rearrange first in ontogeny, we analyzed high molecular weight DNA from 102 patients with acute leukemia. Rearranged gamma- and beta-chain genes were found in all T-cell ALLs (22/22) examined. Overall, 27% (18/66) of B-lineage ALLs had beta-chain gene rearrangements, and 41% (24/58) had gamma-chain gene rearrangements, but the distribution of rearranged genes varied according to the stage of B-cell differentiation. The gamma-chain genes were rearranged in 11% (1/9) of the B-lineage patients negative for the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (cALLA) and 50% (23/46) of cALLA+ ALL patients, while the beta-chain genes were not rearranged in any of the 7 cALLA- ALL patients examined but were rearranged in 32% (18/56) of the cALLA+ patients. Neither TCR gene was found to be rearranged in acute nonlymphoid leukemia patients (0/12) or in patients with B-cell (surface immunoglobulin-positive) leukemia (0/3). Of the 44 cALLA+ patients in which a direct comparison of gamma- and beta-chain gene rearrangements could be made, 34% had both genes rearranged, 16% had only gamma-chain gene rearrangements, and the remaining 50% had both genes in the germ-line configuration. beta-Chain rearrangements have not been found in the absence of gamma-chain rearrangements, thus supporting a proposed hierarchy of TCR gene rearrangements. A provocative finding was that only a small percentage (11%) of the patients with cALLA- B precursor cell ALLs had rearranged TCR genes, while 50% of the cALLA+ leukemia patients had at least gamma-chain rearrangement, raising a question as to whether indeed cALLA- cells are precursors to cALLA+ cells. Interestingly, 18% (2/11) of the cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg)-positive cALLA+ (pre-B) ALLs involved TCR gene rearrangements, compared to 60% (21/35) of

  2. Automation of ALK gene rearrangement testing with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH): a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Zwaenepoel, Karen; Merkle, Dennis; Cabillic, Florian; Berg, Erica; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Grazioli, Vittorio; Herelle, Olga; Hummel, Michael; Le Calve, Michele; Lenze, Dido; Mende, Stefanie; Pauwels, Patrick; Quilichini, Benoit; Repetti, Elena

    2015-02-01

    In the past several years we have observed a significant increase in our understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive lung cancer. Specifically in the non-small cell lung cancer sub-types, ALK gene rearrangements represent a sub-group of tumors that are targetable by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Crizotinib, resulting in significant reductions in tumor burden. Phase II and III clinical trials were performed using an ALK break-apart FISH probe kit, making FISH the gold standard for identifying ALK rearrangements in patients. FISH is often considered a labor and cost intensive molecular technique, and in this study we aimed to demonstrate feasibility for automation of ALK FISH testing, to improve laboratory workflow and ease of testing. This involved automation of the pre-treatment steps of the ALK assay using various protocols on the VP 2000 instrument, and facilitating automated scanning of the fluorescent FISH specimens for simplified enumeration on various backend scanning and analysis systems. The results indicated that ALK FISH can be automated. Significantly, both the Ikoniscope and BioView system of automated FISH scanning and analysis systems provided a robust analysis algorithm to define ALK rearrangements. In addition, the BioView system facilitated consultation of difficult cases via the internet.

  3. Unusual maternal uniparental isodisomic x chromosome mosaicism with asymmetric y chromosomal rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Lee, B Y; Kim, S Y; Park, J Y; Choi, E Y; Kim, D J; Kim, J W; Ryu, H M; Cho, Y H; Park, S Y; Seo, J T

    2014-01-01

    Infertile men with azoospermia commonly have associated microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF) region of the Y chromosome, sex chromosome mosaicism, or sex chromosome rearrangements. In this study, we describe an unusual 46,XX and 45,X mosaicism with a rare Y chromosome rearrangement in a phenotypically normal male patient. The patient's karyotype was 46,XX[50]/45,X[25]/46,X,der(Y)(pter→q11.222::p11.2→pter)[25]. The derivative Y chromosome had a deletion at Yq11.222 and was duplicated at Yp11.2. Two copies of the SRY gene were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, and complete deletion of the AZFb and AZFc regions was shown by multiplex-PCR for microdeletion analysis. Both X chromosomes of the predominant mosaic cell line (46,XX) were isodisomic and derived from the maternal gamete, as determined by examination of short tandem repeat markers. We postulate that the derivative Y chromosome might have been generated during paternal meiosis or early embryogenesis. Also, we suggest that the very rare mosaicism of isodisomic X chromosomes might be formed during maternal meiosis II or during postzygotic division derived from the 46,X,der(Y)/ 45,X lineage because of the instability of the derivative Y chromosome. To our knowledge, this is the first confirmatory study to verify the origin of a sex chromosome mosaicism with a Y chromosome rearrangement.

  4. Rearrangement of MICU1 multimers for activation of MCU is solely controlled by cytosolic Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Malli, Roland; Parichatikanond, Warisara; Gottschalk, Benjamin; Madreiter-Sokolowski, Corina T.; Klec, Christiane; Rost, Rene; Graier, Wolfgang F.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is a vital process that controls distinct cell and organelle functions. Mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 (MICU1) was identified as key regulator of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU) that together with the essential MCU regulator (EMRE) forms the mitochondrial Ca2+ channel. However, mechanisms by which MICU1 controls MCU/EMRE activity to tune mitochondrial Ca2+ signals remain ambiguous. Here we established a live-cell FRET approach and demonstrate that elevations of cytosolic Ca2+ rearranges MICU1 multimers with an EC50 of 4.4 μM, resulting in activation of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. MICU1 rearrangement essentially requires the EF-hand motifs and strictly correlates with the shape of cytosolic Ca2+ rises. We further show that rearrangements of MICU1 multimers were independent of matrix Ca2+ concentration, mitochondrial membrane potential, and expression levels of MCU and EMRE. Our experiments provide novel details about how MCU/EMRE is regulated by MICU1 and an original approach to investigate MCU/EMRE activation in intact cells. PMID:26489515

  5. ALK gene rearranged lung adenocarcinomas: molecular genetics and morphology in cohort of patients from North India.

    PubMed

    Bal, Amanjit; Singh, Navneet; Agarwal, Parimal; Das, Ashim; Behera, Digambar

    2016-10-01

    ALK gene rearrangement in the lung adenocarcinomas is the second most common (1.6-11.7% of NSCLC) targetable genomic change after EGFR mutations. However, the prevalence and clinicopathological features of ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinomas from North India are lacking. A total of 240 cases of lung adenocarcinoma were screened for EGFR mutations and for ALK expression. Smoking status, TNM stage, and treatment response were recorded in all cases. Out of 240 cases screened, 37 cases were positive for EGFR mutations and 17 cases (7.08%) showed ALK positivity with immunohistochemistry and break-apart FISH. On excluding 37 EGFR mutation-positive cases, the incidence of ALK-positive adenocarcinoma appears to be higher (17/203 cases, 8.03%). Eight were men and nine were women with mean age of 51.7 years. Majority (62.5%) were non-smokers and had unresectable disease (70.6% stage IV, 17.6% IIIB). The morphological patterns noted were solid (12 cases), papillary (four cases), and micropapillary (one case). Signet ring (two cases) and clear cell change (one cases) were noted. Out of five patients who received crizotinib, three had partial response and two had stable disease. ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinomas account for a minor proportion of NSCLC with prevalence similar to that reported in literature. However, as contrast to published data in our series, patients were in older age group and had solid and papillary pattern on morphology with an aggressive course.

  6. Robertsonian chromosomal rearrangements in the short-tailed shrew, Blarina carolinensis, in western Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Qumsiyeh, M B; Coate, J L; Peppers, J A; Kennedy, P K; Kennedy, M L

    1997-01-01

    We report significant heterozygosity for numerous Robertsonian translocations in the southern short-tailed shrew (Blarina carolinensis) in western Tennessee. Eight Robertsonian rearrangements were documented using G-banding techniques that explain the variability in diploid numbers from 46 throughout most of the range of the species to 34-40 in western Tennessee. These fusions resulted in the loss of telomere sequences and were not associated with nucleolar organizer regions. When heterozygocity is considered, the lowest diploid number possibly present would be 30. Four localities with distances of over 180 km apart were sampled, and 80-90% of the collected animals were heterozygous for at least one rearrangement. No putative parental type was found in western Tennessee. Heterozygosity for the same rearrangements was found in these different localities, and no monobrachial fusions were noted. Thus, this is a very wide hybrid zone with rare or absent parental types in the areas sampled or is an evolutionary stage preceding establishment of Robertsonian races. Selective forces, if any, were minimal, as evidenced by the wide area of polymorphism, significant heterozygosity, and the fact that the Robertsonian translocations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The origin of such extensive polymorphism in western Tennessee is discussed, especially in light of putative effects of the New Madrid seismic activity. Similarities and differences are noted between the Blarina model and the well-documented variation in the European common shrew (Sorex araneus) and Mus musculus groups.

  7. Complex Genomic Rearrangements at the PLP1 Locus Include Triplication and Quadruplication

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christine R.; Carvalho, Claudia M. B.; Banser, Linda; Gambin, Tomasz; Stubbolo, Danielle; Yuan, Bo; Sperle, Karen; McCahan, Suzanne M.; Henneke, Marco; Seeman, Pavel; Hobson, Grace M.; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Inverted repeats (IRs) can facilitate structural variation as crucibles of genomic rearrangement. Complex duplication—inverted triplication—duplication (DUP-TRP/INV-DUP) rearrangements that contain breakpoint junctions within IRs have been recently associated with both MECP2 duplication syndrome (MIM#300260) and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD, MIM#312080). We investigated 17 unrelated PMD subjects with copy number gains at the PLP1 locus including triplication and quadruplication of specific genomic intervals—16/17 were found to have a DUP-TRP/INV-DUP rearrangement product. An IR distal to PLP1 facilitates DUP-TRP/INV-DUP formation as well as an inversion structural variation found frequently amongst normal individuals. We show that a homology—or homeology—driven replicative mechanism of DNA repair can apparently mediate template switches within stretches of microhomology. Moreover, we provide evidence that quadruplication and potentially higher order amplification of a genomic interval can occur in a manner consistent with rolling circle amplification as predicted by the microhomology-mediated break induced replication (MMBIR) model. PMID:25749076

  8. Nucleotide composition of CO1 sequences in Chelicerata (Arthropoda): detecting new mitogenomic rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Juliette; Judson, Mark L I; Deharveng, Louis; Lourenço, Wilson R; Cruaud, Corinne; Hassanin, Alexandre

    2012-02-01

    Here we study the evolution of nucleotide composition in third codon-positions of CO1 sequences of Chelicerata, using a phylogenetic framework, based on 180 taxa and three markers (CO1, 18S, and 28S rRNA; 5,218 nt). The analyses of nucleotide composition were also extended to all CO1 sequences of Chelicerata found in GenBank (1,701 taxa). The results show that most species of Chelicerata have a positive strand bias in CO1, i.e., in favor of C nucleotides, including all Amblypygi, Palpigradi, Ricinulei, Solifugae, Uropygi, and Xiphosura. However, several taxa show a negative strand bias, i.e., in favor of G nucleotides: all Scorpiones, Opisthothelae spiders and several taxa within Acari, Opiliones, Pseudoscorpiones, and Pycnogonida. Several reversals of strand-specific bias can be attributed to either a rearrangement of the control region or an inversion of a fragment containing the CO1 gene. Key taxa for which sequencing of complete mitochondrial genomes will be necessary to determine the origin and nature of mtDNA rearrangements involved in the reversals are identified. Acari, Opiliones, Pseudoscorpiones, and Pycnogonida were found to show a strong variability in nucleotide composition. In addition, both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes have been affected by higher substitution rates in Acari and Pseudoscorpiones. The results therefore indicate that these two orders are more liable to fix mutations of all types, including base substitutions, indels, and genomic rearrangements.

  9. Chromosomal rearrangements and karyotype evolution in carnivores revealed by chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Nie, W; Wang, J; Su, W; Wang, D; Tanomtong, A; Perelman, P L; Graphodatsky, A S; Yang, F

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal evolution in carnivores has been revisited extensively using cross-species chromosome painting. Painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of the domestic dog, which has one of the most rearranged karyotypes in mammals and the highest dipoid number (2n=78) in carnivores, are a powerful tool in detecting both evolutionary intra- and inter-chromosomal rearrangements. However, only a few comparative maps have been established between dog and other non-Canidae species. Here, we extended cross-species painting with dog probes to seven more species representing six carnivore families: Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), the stone marten (Martes foina), the small Indian civet (Viverricula indica), the Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphrodites), Javan mongoose (Hepestes javanicas), the raccoon (Procyon lotor) and the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The numbers and positions of intra-chromosomal rearrangements were found to differ among these carnivore species. A comparative map between human and stone marten, and a map among the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis), stone marten and human were also established to facilitate outgroup comparison and to integrate comparative maps between stone marten and other carnivores with such maps between human and other species. These comparative maps give further insight into genome evolution and karyotype phylogenetic relationships among carnivores, and will facilitate the transfer of gene mapping data from human, domestic dog and cat to other species.

  10. High-frequency induction of chromosomal rearrangements in mouse germ cells by the chemotherapeutic agent chlorambucil.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M; Flaherty, L; Russell, L B

    1993-12-01

    Recent mutagenesis studies have demonstrated that the chemotherapeutic agent, chlorambucil (CHL), is highly mutagenic in male germ cells of the mouse. Post-meiotic germ cells, and especially early spermatids, are the most sensitive to the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of this agent. Genetic, cytogenetic and molecular analyses of many induced mutations have shown that, in these germ-cell stages, CHL induces predominantly chromosomal rearrangements (deletions and translocations), and mutation-rate studies show that, in terms of tolerated doses, CHL is perhaps five to ten times more efficient in inducing rearrangements than is radiation exposure. Appropriate breeding protocols, along with knowledge of the advantages and limitations associated with the use of CHL, can be used to expand the current resource of chromosomal rearrangements in the mouse and to provide new phenotype-associated mutations amenable to positional-cloning techniques. The analysis of CHL-induced mutations has also contributed to understanding the factors that affect the yield and nature of chemically induced germline mutations in mammals.

  11. Describing sequencing results of structural chromosome rearrangements with a suggested next-generation cytogenetic nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Ordulu, Zehra; Wong, Kristen E; Currall, Benjamin B; Ivanov, Andrew R; Pereira, Shahrin; Althari, Sara; Gusella, James F; Talkowski, Michael E; Morton, Cynthia C

    2014-05-01

    With recent rapid advances in genomic technologies, precise delineation of structural chromosome rearrangements at the nucleotide level is becoming increasingly feasible. In this era of "next-generation cytogenetics" (i.e., an integration of traditional cytogenetic techniques and next-generation sequencing), a consensus nomenclature is essential for accurate communication and data sharing. Currently, nomenclature for describing the sequencing data of these aberrations is lacking. Herein, we present a system called Next-Gen Cytogenetic Nomenclature, which is concordant with the International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature (2013). This system starts with the alignment of rearrangement sequences by BLAT or BLAST (alignment tools) and arrives at a concise and detailed description of chromosomal changes. To facilitate usage and implementation of this nomenclature, we are developing a program designated BLA(S)T Output Sequence Tool of Nomenclature (BOSToN), a demonstrative version of which is accessible online. A standardized characterization of structural chromosomal rearrangements is essential both for research analyses and for application in the clinical setting.

  12. MLL-Rearranged Leukemias—An Update on Science and Clinical Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Amanda C.; Bernt, Kathrin M.

    2017-01-01

    The mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) gene (now renamed Lysine [K]-specific MethylTransferase 2A or KMT2A) on chromosome 11q23 is disrupted in a unique group of acute leukemias. More than 80 different partner genes in these fusions have been described, although the majority of leukemias result from MLL1 fusions with one of about six common partner genes. Approximately 10% of all leukemias harbor MLL1 translocations. Of these, two patient populations comprise the majority of cases: patients younger than 1 year of age at diagnosis (primarily acute lymphoblastic leukemias) and young- to-middle-aged adults (primarily acute myeloid leukemias). A much rarer subgroup of patients with MLL1 rearrangements develop leukemia that is attributable to prior treatment with certain chemotherapeutic agents—so-called therapy-related leukemias. In general, outcomes for all of these patients remain poor when compared to patients with non-MLL1 rearranged leukemias. In this review, we will discuss the normal biological roles of MLL1 and its fusion partners, how these roles are hypothesized to be dysregulated in the context of MLL1 rearrangements, and the clinical manifestations of this group of leukemias. We will go on to discuss the progress in clinical management and promising new avenues of research, which may lead to more effective targeted therapies for affected patients. PMID:28232907

  13. Quantification of Somatic Chromosomal Rearrangements in Circulating Cell-Free DNA from Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Faye R.; Kovtun, Irina V.; Smadbeck, James; Multinu, Francesco; Jatoi, Aminah; Kosari, Farhad; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Murphy, Stephen J.; Halling, Geoffrey C.; Johnson, Sarah H.; Liu, Minetta C.; Mariani, Andrea; Vasmatzis, George

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the use of a liquid biopsy has shown promise in monitoring tumor burden. While point mutations have been extensively studied, chromosomal rearrangements have demonstrated greater tumor specificity. Such rearrangements can be identified in the tumor and subsequently detected in the plasma of patients using quantitative PCR (qPCR). In this study we used a whole-genome mate-pair protocol to characterize a landscape of genomic rearrangements in the primary tumors of ten ovarian cancer patients. Individualized tumor-specific primer panels of aberrant chromosomal junctions were identified for each case and detected by qPCR within the cell-free DNA. Selected chromosomal junctions were detected in pre-surgically drawn blood in eight of the ten patients. Of these eight, three demonstrated the continued presence of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) post-surgery, consistent with their documented presence of disease, and in five ctDNA was undetectable in the post-surgical blood collection, consistent with their lack of detectable disease. The ctDNA fraction was calculated using a novel algorithm designed for the unique challenges of quantifying ctDNA using qPCR to allow observations of real-time tumor dynamics. In summary, a panel of individualized junctions derived from tumor DNA could be an effective way to monitor cancer patients for relapse and therapeutic efficacy using cfDNA. PMID:27436510

  14. Chromosomal rearrangements and karyotype evolution in carnivores revealed by chromosome painting

    PubMed Central

    Nie, W; Wang, J; Su, W; Wang, D; Tanomtong, A; Perelman, P L; Graphodatsky, A S; Yang, F

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal evolution in carnivores has been revisited extensively using cross-species chromosome painting. Painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of the domestic dog, which has one of the most rearranged karyotypes in mammals and the highest dipoid number (2n=78) in carnivores, are a powerful tool in detecting both evolutionary intra- and inter-chromosomal rearrangements. However, only a few comparative maps have been established between dog and other non-Canidae species. Here, we extended cross-species painting with dog probes to seven more species representing six carnivore families: Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), the stone marten (Martes foina), the small Indian civet (Viverricula indica), the Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphrodites), Javan mongoose (Hepestes javanicas), the raccoon (Procyon lotor) and the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The numbers and positions of intra-chromosomal rearrangements were found to differ among these carnivore species. A comparative map between human and stone marten, and a map among the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis), stone marten and human were also established to facilitate outgroup comparison and to integrate comparative maps between stone marten and other carnivores with such maps between human and other species. These comparative maps give further insight into genome evolution and karyotype phylogenetic relationships among carnivores, and will facilitate the transfer of gene mapping data from human, domestic dog and cat to other species. PMID:22086079

  15. Analyzing Somatic Genome Rearrangements in Human Cancers by Using Whole-Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lixing; Lee, Mi-Sook; Lu, Hengyu; Oh, Doo-Yi; Kim, Yeon Jeong; Park, Donghyun; Park, Gahee; Ren, Xiaojia; Bristow, Christopher A.; Haseley, Psalm S.; Lee, Soohyun; Pantazi, Angeliki; Kucherlapati, Raju; Park, Woong-Yang; Scott, Kenneth L.; Choi, Yoon-La; Park, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Although exome sequencing data are generated primarily to detect single-nucleotide variants and indels, they can also be used to identify a subset of genomic rearrangements whose breakpoints are located in or near exons. Using >4,600 tumor and normal pairs across 15 cancer types, we identified over 9,000 high confidence somatic rearrangements, including a large number of gene fusions. We find that the 5′ fusion partners of functional fusions are often housekeeping genes, whereas the 3′ fusion partners are enriched in tyrosine kinases. We establish the oncogenic potential of ROR1-DNAJC6 and CEP85L-ROS1 fusions by showing that they can promote cell proliferation in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. Furthermore, we found that ∼4% of the samples have massively rearranged chromosomes, many of which are associated with upregulation of oncogenes such as ERBB2 and TERT. Although the sensitivity of detecting structural alterations from exomes is considerably lower than that from whole genomes, this approach will be fruitful for the multitude of exomes that have been and will be generated, both in cancer and in other diseases. PMID:27153396

  16. MLL-Rearranged Leukemias-An Update on Science and Clinical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Winters, Amanda C; Bernt, Kathrin M

    2017-01-01

    The mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) gene (now renamed Lysine [K]-specific MethylTransferase 2A or KMT2A) on chromosome 11q23 is disrupted in a unique group of acute leukemias. More than 80 different partner genes in these fusions have been described, although the majority of leukemias result from MLL1 fusions with one of about six common partner genes. Approximately 10% of all leukemias harbor MLL1 translocations. Of these, two patient populations comprise the majority of cases: patients younger than 1 year of age at diagnosis (primarily acute lymphoblastic leukemias) and young- to-middle-aged adults (primarily acute myeloid leukemias). A much rarer subgroup of patients with MLL1 rearrangements develop leukemia that is attributable to prior treatment with certain chemotherapeutic agents-so-called therapy-related leukemias. In general, outcomes for all of these patients remain poor when compared to patients with non-MLL1 rearranged leukemias. In this review, we will discuss the normal biological roles of MLL1 and its fusion partners, how these roles are hypothesized to be dysregulated in the context of MLL1 rearrangements, and the clinical manifestations of this group of leukemias. We will go on to discuss the progress in clinical management and promising new avenues of research, which may lead to more effective targeted therapies for affected patients.

  17. T-cell receptor analysis in Omenn's syndrome: evidence for defects in gene rearrangement and assembly.

    PubMed

    Brooks, E G; Filipovich, A H; Padgett, J W; Mamlock, R; Goldblum, R M

    1999-01-01

    Patients with Omenn's syndrome have a form of severe immune deficiency that is associated with pathological features of graft-versus-host disease, except for the lack of foreign engraftment. It has been hypothesized that the disease's unique clinical features are mediated by an expanded population of autologous self-reactive T cells of limited clonality. In the current study, an investigation of the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire was undertaken to identify defects in T-cell rearrangement and development. The TCR repertoire in this group of patients was exquisitely restricted in the number of different TCR clonotypes, and some of these clonotypes seemed to have similar recognition motifs in the antigen-binding region, indicating antigen-driven proliferation of T lymphocytes. The TCRs from some patients lacked N- or P-nucleotide insertions and used proximal variable and joining gene segments, suggesting abnormal intrathymic T-cell development. Finally, abnormal assembly of gene segments and truncated rearrangements within nonproductive alleles suggested abnormalities in TCR rearrangement mechanisms. Overall, the findings suggest that inefficient and/or abnormal generation of TCRs may be a consistent feature of this disease.

  18. Low rate of interchromosomal rearrangements during old radiation of gekkotan lizards (Squamata: Gekkota).

    PubMed

    Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Rens, Willem; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2015-06-01

    Gekkotan lizards are a highly specious (∼1600 described species) clade of squamate lizards with nearly cosmopolitan distribution in warmer areas. The clade is primarily nocturnal and forms an ecologically dominant part of the world nocturnal herpetofauna. However, molecular cytogenetic methods to study the evolution of karyotypes have not been widely applied in geckos. Our aim here was to uncover the extent of chromosomal rearrangements across the whole group Gekkota and to search for putative synapomorphies supporting the newly proposed phylogenetic relationships within this clade. We applied cross-species chromosome painting with the recently derived whole-chromosomal probes from the gekkonid species Gekko japonicus to members of the major gekkotan lineages. We included members of the families Diplodactylidae, Carphodactylidae, Pygopodidae, Eublepharidae, Phyllodactylidae and Gekkonidae. Our study demonstrates relatively high chromosome conservatism across the ancient group of gekkotan lizards. We documented that many changes in chromosomal shape across geckos can be attributed to intrachromosomal rearrangements. The documented rearrangements are not totally in agreement with the recently newly erected family Phyllodactylidae. The results also pointed to homoplasy, particularly in the reuse of chromosome breakpoints, in the evolution of gecko karyotypes.

  19. Dissecting the structure and mechanism of a complex duplication-triplication rearrangement in the DMD gene.

    PubMed

    Ishmukhametova, Aliya; Chen, Jian-Min; Bernard, Rafaëlle; de Massy, Bernard; Baudat, Frédéric; Boyer, Amandine; Méchin, Déborah; Thorel, Delphine; Chabrol, Brigitte; Vincent, Marie-Claire; Khau Van Kien, Philippe; Claustres, Mireille; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie

    2013-08-01

    Pathogenic complex genomic rearrangements are being increasingly characterized at the nucleotide level, providing unprecedented opportunities to evaluate the complexities of mutational mechanisms. Here, we report the molecular characterization of a complex duplication-triplication rearrangement involving exons 45-60 of the DMD gene. Inverted repeats facilitated this complex rearrangement, which shares common genomic organization with the recently described duplication-inverted triplication-duplication (DUP-TRP/INV-DUP) events; specifically, a 690-kb region comprising DMD exons from 45 to 60 was duplicated in tandem, and another 46-kb segment containing exon 51 was inserted inversely in between them. Taking into consideration (1) the presence of a predicted PRDM9 binding site in the near vicinity of the junction involving two inverted L1 elements and (2) the inherent properties of X-Y chromosome recombination during male meiosis, we proposed an alternative two-step model for the generation of this X-linked DMD DUP-TRP/INV-DUP event.

  20. Structural rearrangements in the membrane penetration protein of a non-enveloped virus.

    PubMed

    Dormitzer, Philip R; Nason, Emma B; Prasad, B V V; Harrison, Stephen C

    2004-08-26

    Non-enveloped virus particles (those that lack a lipid-bilayer membrane) must breach the membrane of a target host cell to gain access to its cytoplasm. So far, the molecular mechanism of this membrane penetration step has resisted structural analysis. The spike protein VP4 is a principal component in the entry apparatus of rotavirus, a non-enveloped virus that causes gastroenteritis and kills 440,000 children each year. Trypsin cleavage of VP4 primes the virus for entry by triggering a rearrangement that rigidifies the VP4 spikes. We have determined the crystal structure, at 3.2 A resolution, of the main part of VP4 that projects from the virion. The crystal structure reveals a coiled-coil stabilized trimer. Comparison of this structure with the two-fold clustered VP4 spikes in a approximately 12 A resolution image reconstruction from electron cryomicroscopy of trypsin-primed virions shows that VP4 also undergoes a second rearrangement, in which the oligomer reorganizes and each subunit folds back on itself, translocating a potential membrane-interaction peptide from one end of the spike to the other. This rearrangement resembles the conformational transitions of membrane fusion proteins of enveloped viruses.

  1. Structural rearrangements in the membrane penetration protein of a non-enveloped virus

    PubMed Central

    Dormitzer, Philip R.; Nason, Emma B.; Venkataram Prasad, B. V.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2007-01-01

    Non-enveloped virus particles (those that lack a lipid-bilayer membrane) must breach the membrane of a target host cell to gain access to its cytoplasm. So far, the molecular mechanism of this membrane penetration step has resisted structural analysis. The spike protein VP4 is a principal component in the entry apparatus of rotavirus, a non-enveloped virus that causes gastro-enteritis and kills 440,000 children each year1. Trypsin cleavage of VP4 primes the virus for entry by triggering a rearrangement that rigidifies the VP4 spikes2. We have determined the crystal structure, at 3.2 Å resolution, of the main part of VP4 that projects from the virion. The crystal structure reveals a coiled-coil stabilized trimer. Comparison of this structure with the two-fold clustered VP4 spikes in a ~12 Å resolution image reconstruction from electron cryomicroscopy of trypsin-primed virions shows that VP4 also undergoes a second rearrangement, in which the oligomer reorganizes and each subunit folds back on itself, translocating a potential membrane-interaction peptide from one end of the spike to the other. This rearrangement resembles the conformational transitions of membrane fusion proteins of enveloped viruses3–6. PMID:15329727

  2. Extensive coronavirus-induced membrane rearrangements are not a determinant of pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Helena J.; Neuman, Benjamin W.; Bickerton, Erica; Keep, Sarah M.; Alrashedi, Hasan; Hall, Ross; Britton, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Positive-strand RNA (+RNA) viruses rearrange cellular membranes during replication, possibly in order to concentrate and arrange viral replication machinery for efficient viral RNA synthesis. Our previous work showed that in addition to the conserved coronavirus double membrane vesicles (DMVs), Beau-R, an apathogenic strain of avian Gammacoronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), induces regions of ER that are zippered together and tethered open-necked double membrane spherules that resemble replication organelles induced by other +RNA viruses. Here we compared structures induced by Beau-R with the pathogenic lab strain M41 to determine whether membrane rearrangements are strain dependent. Interestingly, M41 was found to have a low spherule phenotype. We then compared a panel of pathogenic, mild and attenuated IBV strains in ex vivo tracheal organ culture (TOC). Although the low spherule phenotype of M41 was conserved in TOCs, each of the other tested IBV strains produced DMVs, zippered ER and spherules. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation for the presence of DMVs with spherules, suggesting that these structures are spatially and temporally linked. Our data indicate that virus induced membrane rearrangements are fundamentally linked to the viral replicative machinery. However, coronavirus replicative apparatus clearly has the plasticity to function in different structural contexts. PMID:27255716

  3. Palindrome-Mediated Translocations in Humans: A New Mechanistic Model for Gross Chromosomal Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Hidehito; Kato, Takema; Tsutsumi, Makiko; Ouchi, Yuya; Ohye, Tamae; Kurahashi, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Palindromic DNA sequences, which can form secondary structures, are widely distributed in the human genome. Although the nature of the secondary structure—single-stranded “hairpin” or double-stranded “cruciform”—has been extensively investigated in vitro, the existence of such unusual non-B DNA in vivo remains controversial. Here, we review palindrome-mediated gross chromosomal rearrangements possibly induced by non-B DNA in humans. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing have not yet overcome the difficulty of palindromic sequence analysis. However, a dozen palindromic AT-rich repeat (PATRR) sequences have been identified at the breakpoints of recurrent or non-recurrent chromosomal translocations in humans. The breakages always occur at the center of the palindrome. Analyses of polymorphisms within the palindromes indicate that the symmetry and length of the palindrome affect the frequency of the de novo occurrence of these palindrome-mediated translocations, suggesting the involvement of non-B DNA. Indeed, experiments using a plasmid-based model system showed that the formation of non-B DNA is likely the key to palindrome-mediated genomic rearrangements. Some evidence implies a new mechanism that cruciform DNAs may come close together first in nucleus and illegitimately joined. Analysis of PATRR-mediated translocations in humans will provide further understanding of gross chromosomal rearrangements in many organisms. PMID:27462347

  4. Arylation and vinylation of alkenes based on unusual sequential semipinacol rearrangement/Grob fragmentation of allylic alcohols.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dao-Yi; Tu, Yong-Qiang; Fan, Chun-An

    2008-10-03

    Alkenes can be stereoselectively arylated and vinylated without transition-metal catalyst under mild conditions through an interesting NBS-promoted semipinacol rearrangement and a subsequent unusual NaOH-mediated Grob fragmentation.

  5. Large genomic rearrangement of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in familial breast cancer patients in Korea.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ja Young; Cho, Dae-Yeon; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Choi, Su-Youn; Shin, Inkyung; Park, Hyun Gyu; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Hee Jeong; Yu, Jong Han; Ko, Beom Seok; Ku, Bo Kyung; Son, Byung Ho

    2014-06-01

    We screened large genomic rearrangements of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in Korean, familial breast cancer patients. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay was used to identify BRCA1 and BRCA2 genomic rearrangements in 226 Korean familial breast cancer patients with risk factors for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, who previously tested negative for point mutations in the two genes. We identified only one large deletion (c.4186-1593_4676-1465del) in BRCA1. No large rearrangements were found in BRCA2. Our result indicates that large genomic rearrangement in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes does not seem like a major determinant of breast cancer susceptibility in the Korean population. A large-scale study needs to validate our result in Korea.

  6. Visual and fluorogenic detection of a nerve agent simulant via a Lossen rearrangement of rhodamine-hydroxamate.

    PubMed

    Han, Shoufa; Xue, Zhongwei; Wang, Zhen; Wen, Ting Bin

    2010-11-28

    A visual and fluorogenic detection method for a nerve agent simulant was developed based on a Lossen rearrangement of rhodamine-hydroxamate, in the presence of diethyl chlorophosphate, under alkaline conditions.

  7. Clonal rearrangement for immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes in systemic Castleman's disease. Association with Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, C. A.; Frizzera, G.; Patton, D. F.; Peterson, B. A.; McClain, K. L.; Gajl-Peczalska, K. J.; Kersey, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Castleman's disease is a morphologically and clinically heterogeneous lymphoproliferative disorder. Both a localized benign variant and an aggressive form with systemic manifestations have been described. To investigate the differences between these variants of Castleman's disease, the authors analyzed lymph node DNA from 4 patients with the localized type and 4 with the systemic type of Castleman's disease for immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. The role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) was also studied by viral genomic DNA probes. They detected clonal rearrangements in 3 of the 4 patients with the systemic variant of Castleman's; no patients with localized disease had rearrangements. Copies of EBV genome were also detected in 2 of the 3 patients with clonal rearrangements. These results suggest that systemic Castleman's disease is a disorder distinct from the classical localized variant in that it may evolve into a clonal lymphoproliferation. Images Figure 1 PMID:2833104

  8. Measurement of correlations between low-frequency vibrational modes and particle rearrangements in quasi-two-dimensional colloidal glasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Manning, M L; Yunker, Peter J; Ellenbroek, Wouter G; Zhang, Zexin; Liu, Andrea J; Yodh, A G

    2011-09-02

    We investigate correlations between low-frequency vibrational modes and rearrangements in two-dimensional colloidal glasses composed of thermosensitive microgel particles, which readily permit variation of the sample packing fraction. At each packing fraction, the particle displacement covariance matrix is measured and used to extract the vibrational spectrum of the "shadow" colloidal glass (i.e., the particle network with the same geometry and interactions as the sample colloid but absent damping). Rearrangements are induced by successive, small reductions in the packing fraction. The experimental results suggest that low-frequency quasilocalized phonon modes in colloidal glasses, i.e., modes that present low energy barriers for system rearrangements, are spatially correlated with rearrangements in this thermal system.

  9. The effects of chromosome rearrangements on the expression of heterochromatic genes in chromosome 2L of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Wakimoto, B.T.; Hearn, M.G. )

    1990-05-01

    The light (lt) gene of Drosophila melanogaster is located at the base of the left arm of chromosome 2, within or very near centromeric heterochromatin (2Lh). Chromosome rearrangements that move the lt{sup +} gene from its normal proximal position and place the gene in distal euchromatin result in mosaic or variegated expression of the gene. The cytogenetic and genetic properties of 17 lt-variegated rearrangements induced by X radiation are described in this report. The authors show that five of the heterochromatic genes adjacent to lt are subject to inactivation by these rearrangements and that the euchromatic loci in proximal 2L are not detectably affected. The properties of the rearrangements suggest that proximity to heterochromatin is an important regulatory requirement for at least six 2Lh genes. They discuss how the properties of the position effects on heterochromatic genes relate to other proximity-dependent phenomena such as transvection.

  10. Complex rearrangements within the human J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus and aberrant recombination between J alpha segments.

    PubMed Central

    Baer, R; Boehm, T; Yssel, H; Spits, H; Rabbitts, T H

    1988-01-01

    We have examined DNA rearrangements within a 120 kb cloned region of the human T cell receptor J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus. Three types of pattern emerge from an analysis of T cell lines and clones. Firstly, cells with two rearrangements within J delta-C delta; secondly, cells with one rearrangement within J delta-C delta and one or more J alpha rearrangements, and finally, cells with rearrangements within J alpha and consequential deletion of the delta locus. Further analysis by cloning of rearrangements within the J alpha locus show that, in addition to V alpha-J alpha joins, J alpha-J alpha aberrant recombinations occur and rearrangement data indicate that such events are frequent. A model is presented to account for such recombinations. Images PMID:2971534

  11. GeneScanning analysis of Ig/TCR gene rearrangements to detect clonality in canine lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, Fabio; Calzolari, Claudia; Turba, Maria E; Bettini, Giuliano; Famigli-Bergamini, Paolo

    2009-01-15

    The diagnosis of canine lymphoma is achieved using morphological and immunological methods. In a certain percentage of cases, difficulties in making a definitive diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders may occur despite extensive immunophenotyping. Therefore, additional diagnostics, such as molecular assessment of Ig/TCR gene rearrangements clonality, may confirm the final diagnosis. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and heteroduplex analysis have already been proven to be suitable for detecting clonality but are cumbersome and labor-intensive. In the present study, GeneScanning analysis of PCR products originating from different primer sets targeting different regions of Ig and TCR was validated in improving sensitivity as well as in reducing the turnaround time of gene rearrangement assays. GeneScanning exploits 5' fluorescently labelled primers for the automated and fast analysis of PCR products either as singleplex or multiplex runs. Initially, the assay was set up using DNA purified from normal tissues (n=6), hyperplastic/reactive tissues (n=10) and a small set of immunophenotyped lymphoma samples (n=12). The optimized methods were then used in a large set of 96 canine lymphoma samples. Normal and hyperplastic/reactive lymphoid tissues showed typically polyclonal or, occasionally, oligoclonal PCR products. Lymphoma samples showed monoclonal peaks arranged as a single or, occasionally, a double narrow base peak sometimes embedded in a polyclonal background. In all immunophenotyped cases, an Ig or TCR clonal finding corresponded to B- and T-cell lymphomas, respectively. Overall, 94/96 (97.9%) samples showed clonal Ig/TCR clonal rearrangements among which clonal Ig was found in 61/96 (63.5%) of samples and clonal TCR in 33/35 Ig negative samples (34.4% of all cases). In one out of ten randomly chosen cases, both Ig and TCR clonal gene rearrangements were found. Among the factors affecting assay accuracy, DNA quality has been shown to be critical and the

  12. progressiveMauve: Multiple Genome Alignment with Gene Gain, Loss and Rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Aaron E.; Mau, Bob; Perna, Nicole T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Multiple genome alignment remains a challenging problem. Effects of recombination including rearrangement, segmental duplication, gain, and loss can create a mosaic pattern of homology even among closely related organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe a new method to align two or more genomes that have undergone rearrangements due to recombination and substantial amounts of segmental gain and loss (flux). We demonstrate that the new method can accurately align regions conserved in some, but not all, of the genomes, an important case not handled by our previous work. The method uses a novel alignment objective score called a sum-of-pairs breakpoint score, which facilitates accurate detection of rearrangement breakpoints when genomes have unequal gene content. We also apply a probabilistic alignment filtering method to remove erroneous alignments of unrelated sequences, which are commonly observed in other genome alignment methods. We describe new metrics for quantifying genome alignment accuracy which measure the quality of rearrangement breakpoint predictions and indel predictions. The new genome alignment algorithm demonstrates high accuracy in situations where genomes have undergone biologically feasible amounts of genome rearrangement, segmental gain and loss. We apply the new algorithm to a set of 23 genomes from the genera Escherichia, Shigella, and Salmonella. Analysis of whole-genome multiple alignments allows us to extend the previously defined concepts of core- and pan-genomes to include not only annotated genes, but also non-coding regions with potential regulatory roles. The 23 enterobacteria have an estimated core-genome of 2.46Mbp conserved among all taxa and a pan-genome of 15.2Mbp. We document substantial population-level variability among these organisms driven by segmental gain and loss. Interestingly, much variability lies in intergenic regions, suggesting that the Enterobacteriacae may exhibit regulatory divergence

  13. Copper-catalyzed extended Pummerer reactions of ketene dithioacetal monoxides with alkynyl sulfides and ynamides with an accompanying oxygen rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kei; Imoto, Junichi; Matsubara, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Suguru; Yorimitsu, Hideki; Oshima, Koichiro

    2013-04-26

    The first examples of metal-catalyzed extended Pummerer reactions through the activation of sulfoxides are described. The copper-catalyzed reactions of ketene dithioacetal monoxides with alkynyl sulfides and ynamides provided a wide variety of γ,γ-disulfanyl-β,γ-unsaturated carbonyl compounds with an accompanying oxygen rearrangement. The products can be easily converted into 1,4-dicarbonyl compounds and substituted heteroaromatics. DFT calculations and mechanistic experiments revealed a new interesting stepwise addition/oxygen rearrangement mechanism.

  14. Remote stereocontrol in [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangements: application to the total synthesis of the immunosuppressant mycestericin G.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, Nathan W G; Mahon, Mary F; Munday, Rachel H; Carbery, David R

    2012-02-03

    The Ireland-Claisen [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement has been used to access biologically important β,β'-dihydroxy α-amino acids. The rearrangement reported is highly stereoselective and offers excellent levels of remote stereocontrol. This strategy has been used to synthesize the natural immunosuppressant mycestericin G and ent-mycestericin G, allowing for a revision of absolute configuration of this natural product.

  15. TP53 intron 1 hotspot rearrangements are specific to sporadic osteosarcoma and can cause Li-Fraumeni syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Edison; Teo, Audrey S.M.; Madan, Babita; Zhang, Kang; Kohlmann, Wendy K.; Yao, Fei; Lee, Wah Heng; Hoi, Qiangze; Cai, Shaojiang; Woo, Xing Yi; Tan, Patrick; Jundt, Gernot; Smida, Jan; Nathrath, Michaela; Sung, Wing-Kin; Schiffman, Joshua D.; Virshup, David M.; Hillmer, Axel M.

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations of TP53 are among the most common in cancer and germline mutations of TP53 (usually missense) can cause Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). Recently, recurrent genomic rearrangements in intron 1 of TP53 have been described in osteosarcoma (OS), a highly malignant neoplasm of bone belonging to the spectrum of LFS tumors. Using whole-genome sequencing of OS, we found features of TP53 intron 1 rearrangements suggesting a unique mechanism correlated with transcription. Screening of 288 OS and 1,090 tumors of other types revealed evidence for TP53 rearrangements in 46 (16%) OS, while none were detected in other tumor types, indicating this rearrangement to be highly specific to OS. We revisited a four-generation LFS family where no TP53 mutation had been identified and found a 445 kb inversion spanning from the TP53 intron 1 towards the centromere. The inversion segregated with tumors in the LFS family. Cancers in this family had loss of heterozygosity, retaining the rearranged allele and resulting in TP53 expression loss. In conclusion, intron 1 rearrangements cause p53-driven malignancies by both germline and somatic mechanisms and provide an important mechanism of TP53 inactivation in LFS, which might in part explain the diagnostic gap of formerly classified “TP53 wild-type” LFS. PMID:25762628

  16. TP53 intron 1 hotspot rearrangements are specific to sporadic osteosarcoma and can cause Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ribi, Sebastian; Baumhoer, Daniel; Lee, Kristy; Edison; Teo, Audrey S M; Madan, Babita; Zhang, Kang; Kohlmann, Wendy K; Yao, Fei; Lee, Wah Heng; Hoi, Qiangze; Cai, Shaojiang; Woo, Xing Yi; Tan, Patrick; Jundt, Gernot; Smida, Jan; Nathrath, Michaela; Sung, Wing-Kin; Schiffman, Joshua D; Virshup, David M; Hillmer, Axel M

    2015-04-10

    Somatic mutations of TP53 are among the most common in cancer and germline mutations of TP53 (usually missense) can cause Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). Recently, recurrent genomic rearrangements in intron 1 of TP53 have been described in osteosarcoma (OS), a highly malignant neoplasm of bone belonging to the spectrum of LFS tumors. Using whole-genome sequencing of OS, we found features of TP53 intron 1 rearrangements suggesting a unique mechanism correlated with transcription. Screening of 288 OS and 1,090 tumors of other types revealed evidence for TP53 rearrangements in 46 (16%) OS, while none were detected in other tumor types, indicating this rearrangement to be highly specific to OS. We revisited a four-generation LFS family where no TP53 mutation had been identified and found a 445 kb inversion spanning from the TP53 intron 1 towards the centromere. The inversion segregated with tumors in the LFS family. Cancers in this family had loss of heterozygosity, retaining the rearranged allele and resulting in TP53 expression loss. In conclusion, intron 1 rearrangements cause p53-driven malignancies by both germline and somatic mechanisms and provide an important mechanism of TP53 inactivation in LFS, which might in part explain the diagnostic gap of formerly classified "TP53 wild-type" LFS.

  17. Subtelomeric rearrangements in Indian children with idiopathic intellectual disability/developmental delay: Frequency estimation & clinical correlation using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Shruthi; Koshy, Teena; Vekatachalam, Perumal; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Yesodharan, Dhanya; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Kumar, Jeevan; Ravichandran, Latha; Joseph, Santhosh; Chandrasekaran, Anupama; Paul, Solomon F. D.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Subtelomeres are prone to deleterious rearrangements owing to their proximity to unique sequences on the one end and telomeric repetitive sequences, which increase their tendency to recombine, on the other end. These subtelomeric rearrangements resulting in segmental aneusomy are reported to contribute to the aetiology of idiopathic intellectual disability/developmental delay (ID/DD). We undertook this study to estimate the frequency of subtelomeric rearrangements in children with ID/DD. Methods: One hundred and twenty seven children with idiopathic ID/DD were tested for subtelomeric rearrangements using karyotyping and FISH. Blood samples were cultured, harvested, fixed and GTG-banded using the standard protocols. Results: Rearrangements involving the subtelomeres were observed in 7.8 per cent of the tested samples. Detection of rearrangements visible at the resolution of the karyotype constituted 2.3 per cent, while those rearrangements detected only with FISH constituted 5.5 per cent. Five deletions and five unbalanced translocations were detected. Analysis of parental samples wherever possible was informative regarding the inheritance of the rearrangement. Interpretation & conclusions: The frequency of subtelomeric rearrangements observed in this study was within the reported range of 0-35 per cent. All abnormal genotypes were clinically correlated. Further analysis with array technologies presents a future prospect. Our results suggest the need to test individuals with ID/DD for subtelomeric rearrangements using sensitive methods such as FISH. PMID:27934799

  18. Reproductive Incompatibility Involving Senegalese Aedes aegypti (L) Is Associated with Chromosome Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Laura B.; Sharakhova, Maria V.; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A.; Fleming, Karen L.; Caspary, Alex; Sylla, Massamba; Black, William C.

    2016-01-01

    was used to identify AT-rich regions, chromomycin A3 following pretreatment with barium hydroxide stained for GC-rich regions and stained the ribosomal RNA locus and YOYO-1 was used to test for differential staining. Chromosome patterns in SenAae strains revealed by these three stains differed from those in IB12. For FISH, 40 BAC clones previously physically mapped on Aaa chromosomes were used to test for chromosome rearrangements in SenAae relative to IB12. Differences in the order of markers identified two chromosomal rearrangements between IB12 and SenAae strains. The first rearrangement involves two overlapping pericentric (containing the centromere) inversions in chromosome 3 or an insertion of a large fragment into the 3q arm. The second rearrangement is close to the centromere on the p arm of chromosome 2. Linkage analysis of the SDL and the white-eye locus identified a likely chromosomal rearrangement on chromosome 1. The reproductive incompatibility observed within SenAae and between SenAae and Aaa may be generally associated with chromosome rearrangements on all three chromosomes and specifically caused by pericentric inversions on chromosomes 2 and 3. PMID:27105225

  19. Reproductive Incompatibility Involving Senegalese Aedes aegypti (L) Is Associated with Chromosome Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Laura B; Sharakhova, Maria V; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A; Fleming, Karen L; Caspary, Alex; Sylla, Massamba; Black, William C

    2016-04-01

    used to identify AT-rich regions, chromomycin A3 following pretreatment with barium hydroxide stained for GC-rich regions and stained the ribosomal RNA locus and YOYO-1 was used to test for differential staining. Chromosome patterns in SenAae strains revealed by these three stains differed from those in IB12. For FISH, 40 BAC clones previously physically mapped on Aaa chromosomes were used to test for chromosome rearrangements in SenAae relative to IB12. Differences in the order of markers identified two chromosomal rearrangements between IB12 and SenAae strains. The first rearrangement involves two overlapping pericentric (containing the centromere) inversions in chromosome 3 or an insertion of a large fragment into the 3q arm. The second rearrangement is close to the centromere on the p arm of chromosome 2. Linkage analysis of the SDL and the white-eye locus identified a likely chromosomal rearrangement on chromosome 1. The reproductive incompatibility observed within SenAae and between SenAae and Aaa may be generally associated with chromosome rearrangements on all three chromosomes and specifically caused by pericentric inversions on chromosomes 2 and 3.

  20. Nucleosome rearrangement in human cells following short patch repair of DNA damaged by bleomycin

    SciTech Connect

    Sidik, K.; Smerdon, M.J. )

    1990-08-14

    We have examined the structure of newly repaired regions of chromatin in intact and permeabilized human cells following exposure to bleomycin (BLM). The average repair patch size (in permeabilized cells) was six to nine bases, following doses of 1-25 micrograms/mL BLM, and greater than 80% of the total repair synthesis was resistant to aphidicolin. In both intact and permeabilized cells, nascent repair patches were initially very sensitive to staphylococcal nuclease, analogous to repair induced by long patch agents, and are nearly absent from isolated nucleosome core DNA. Unlike long patch repair, however, the loss of nuclease sensitivity during subsequent chase periods was very slow in intact cells, or in permeabilized cells treated with a low dose of BLM (1 microgram/mL), and was abolished by treatment with hydroxyurea (HU) or aphidicolin (APC). The rate of repair patch ligation did not correlate with this slow rate of chromatin rearrangement since greater than 95% of the patches were ligated within 6 h after incorporation (even in the presence of HU or APC). In permeabilized cells, repair patches induced by either 5 or 25 micrograms/mL BLM, where significant levels of strand breaks occur in compact regions of chromatin, lost the enhanced nuclease sensitivity at a rate similar to that observed following long patch repair. This rapid rate of rearrangement was not affected by APC. These results indicate that short patch repair in linker regions of nucleosomes, and/or open regions of chromatin, involves much less nucleosome rearrangement than long patch repair or short patch repair in condensed chromatin domains.

  1. Metalloradical Complexes of Manganese and Chromium Featuring an Oxidatively Rearranged Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Çelenligil-Çetin, Remle; Paraskevopoulou, Patrina; Lalioti, Nikolia; Sanakis, Yiannis; Staples, Richard J.; Rath, Nigam P.; Stavropoulos, Pericles

    2009-01-01

    Redox events involving both metal and ligand sites are receiving increased attention since a number of biological processes direct redox equivalents toward functional residues. Metalloradical synthetic analogs remain scarce and require better definition of their mode of formation and subsequent operation. The trisamido-amine ligand [(RNC6H4)3N]3−, where R is the electron-rich 4-t-BuPh, is employed in this study to generate redox active residues in manganese and chromium complexes. Solutions of [(L1)Mn(II)–THF]− in THF are oxidized by dioxygen to afford [(L1re–1)Mn(III)–(O)2–Mn(III)(L1re–1)]2− as the major product. The rare dinuclear manganese (III,III) core is stabilized by a rearranged ligand that has undergone an one-electron oxidative transformation, followed by retention of the oxidation equivalent as a π radical in an o-diiminobenzosemiquinonate moiety. Magnetic studies indicate that the ligand-centered radical is stabilized by means of extended antiferromagnetic coupling between the S = ½ radical and the adjacent S = 2 Mn(III) site, as well as between the two Mn(III) centers via the dioxo bridge. Electrochemical and EPR data suggest that this system can store higher levels of oxidation potency. Entry to the corresponding Cr(III) chemistry is achieved by employing CrCl3 to access both [(L1)Cr(III)–THF] and [(L1re–1)Cr(III)–THF(Cl)], featuring the intact and the oxidatively rearranged ligands, respectively. The latter is generated by ligand-centered oxidation of the former compound. The rearranged ligand is perceived to be the product of an one-electron oxidation of the intact ligand to afford a metal-bound aminyl radical that subsequently mediates a radical 1,4-(N-to-N) aryl migration. PMID:18937446

  2. Salt Bridge Rearrangement (SaBRe) Explains the Dissociation Behavior of Noncovalent Complexes.

    PubMed

    Loo, Rachel R Ogorzalek; Loo, Joseph A

    2016-06-01

    Native electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, with gas-phase activation and solution compositions that partially release subcomplexes, can elucidate topologies of macromolecular assemblies. That so much complexity can be preserved in gas-phase assemblies is remarkable, although a long-standing conundrum has been the differences between their gas- and solution-phase decompositions. Collision-induced dissociation of multimeric noncovalent complexes typically distributes products asymmetrically (i.e., by ejecting a single subunit bearing a large percentage of the excess charge). That unexpected behavior has been rationalized as one subunit "unfolding" to depart with more charge. We present an alternative explanation based on heterolytic ion-pair scission and rearrangement, a mechanism that inherently partitions charge asymmetrically. Excessive barriers to dissociation are circumvented in this manner, when local charge rearrangements access a lower-barrier surface. An implication of this ion pair consideration is that stability differences between high- and low-charge state ions usually attributed to Coulomb repulsion may, alternatively, be conveyed by attractive forces from ion pairs (salt bridges) stabilizing low-charge state ions. Should the number of ion pairs be roughly inversely related to charge, symmetric dissociations would be favored from highly charged complexes, as observed. Correlations between a gas-phase protein's size and charge reflect the quantity of restraining ion pairs. Collisionally-facilitated salt bridge rearrangement (SaBRe) may explain unusual size "contractions" seen for some activated, low charge state complexes. That some low-charged multimers preferentially cleave covalent bonds or shed small ions to disrupting noncovalent associations is also explained by greater ion pairing in low charge state complexes. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Understanding pore rearrangement during mild to hard transition in bilayered porous anodic alumina membranes.

    PubMed

    Santos, Abel; Montero-Moreno, Josep M; Bachmann, Julien; Nielsch, Kornelius; Formentín, Pilar; Ferré-Borrull, Josep; Pallarès, Josep; Marsal, Lluís F

    2011-06-01

    We present a systematic study about the influence of the main anodization parameters (i.e., anodization voltage ramp and hard anodization voltage) on the pore rearrangement in nanoporous anodic alumina during mild to hard anodization regime transition. To cover the ranges between mild and hard regimes, the anodization parameters were each set to three levels (i.e., 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 V s(-1) for the anodization voltage ramp and 80, 110, and 140 V for the hard anodization voltage). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first rigorous study about this phenomenon, which is quantified indirectly by means of a nickel electrodeposition. It is found that pore rearrangement takes place in a relatively random manner. Large areas of pores remain blocked when the anodization regime changes from mild to hard and, under certain anodization conditions, a pore branching takes place based on the self-ordering mechanism at work during anodization. Furthermore, it is statistically demonstrated by means of a design of experiments strategy that the effect of the anodization voltage ramp on the pore rearrangement is practically negligible in contrast to the hard anodization voltage effect. It is expected that this study gives a better understanding of structural changes in nanoporous anodic alumina when anodization is switched from mild to hard regime. Furthermore, the resulting nanostructures could be used to develop a wide range of nanodevices (e.g., waveguides, 1D photonic crystals, Fabry-Pérot interferometers, hybrid mosaic arrays of nanowires).

  4. Differential clustering of sperm subpopulations in infertile males with clinical varicocele and carriers of rearranged genomes.

    PubMed

    García-Peiró, Agustín; Oliver-Bonet, María; Navarro, Joaquima; Abad, Carlos; Amengual, María José; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime; Benet, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Some methods for determining sperm DNA fragmentation, such as the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) and the sperm chromatin dispersion test (SCD), provide additional information about particular subgroups of spermatozoa with specific irregularities. Thus, SCSA recognizes a specific sperm subpopulation, the high-DNA stainability sperm subpopulation (HDS), and SCD recognizes the so-called DNA-degraded sperm (DDS) subpopulation. Although some studies associate the presence of these subpopulations with specific aspects related to infertility, the relationship between both sperm subpopulations and their preponderance in specific clinical groups of infertile males has not been extensively investigated. In this study, HDS and DDS subpopulations were determined in a total of 37 human males: 8 males with proven fertility, 9 infertile males with asthenoteratozoospermia, 10 carriers of chromosomal reorganizations, and 10 infertile males with clinical varicocele. Results showed a significant increase of the DDS subpopulation (P < .001) in both the varicocele patient (16.85 ± 7.24) and carrier of rearranged genome (11.6 ± 5.23) groups, but not in patients with asthenoteratozoospermia (3.88 ± 1.55) or fertile donors (2.62 ± 1.68). No statistical differences were detected for the HDS subpopulation (P = .542), but the highest values were found in the varicocele and rearranged-genome groups. However, no correlation between the HDS and DDS subpopulations were found (r = 0.196; P = .244), suggesting that both represent a different class of sperm subpopulation in the ejaculate. A significant increase in HDS, and especially DDS, can be associated with the presence of varicocele or the rearrangement of chromosomes. Specific diagnostic tests to confirm the diagnosis must be performed in patients with increased DDS and HDS values.

  5. Salt Bridge Rearrangement (SaBRe) Explains the Dissociation Behavior of Noncovalent Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, Rachel R. Ogorzalek; Loo, Joseph A.

    2016-06-01

    Native electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, with gas-phase activation and solution compositions that partially release subcomplexes, can elucidate topologies of macromolecular assemblies. That so much complexity can be preserved in gas-phase assemblies is remarkable, although a long-standing conundrum has been the differences between their gas- and solution-phase decompositions. Collision-induced dissociation of multimeric noncovalent complexes typically distributes products asymmetrically (i.e., by ejecting a single subunit bearing a large percentage of the excess charge). That unexpected behavior has been rationalized as one subunit "unfolding" to depart with more charge. We present an alternative explanation based on heterolytic ion-pair scission and rearrangement, a mechanism that inherently partitions charge asymmetrically. Excessive barriers to dissociation are circumvented in this manner, when local charge rearrangements access a lower-barrier surface. An implication of this ion pair consideration is that stability differences between high- and low-charge state ions usually attributed to Coulomb repulsion may, alternatively, be conveyed by attractive forces from ion pairs (salt bridges) stabilizing low-charge state ions. Should the number of ion pairs be roughly inversely related to charge, symmetric dissociations would be favored from highly charged complexes, as observed. Correlations between a gas-phase protein's size and charge reflect the quantity of restraining ion pairs. Collisionally-facilitated salt bridge rearrangement (SaBRe) may explain unusual size "contractions" seen for some activated, low charge state complexes. That some low-charged multimers preferentially cleave covalent bonds or shed small ions to disrupting noncovalent associations is also explained by greater ion pairing in low charge state complexes.

  6. Genetic rearrangements occurring during a single cycle of murine leukemia virus vector replication: characterization and implications.

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathi, S; Varela-Echavarría, A; Ron, Y; Preston, B D; Dougherty, J P

    1995-01-01

    Retroviruses evolve at rapid rates, which is presumably advantageous for responding to selective pressures. Understanding the basic mutational processes involved during retroviral replication is important for comprehending the ability of retroviruses to escape immunosurveillance and antiviral drug treatment. Moreover, since retroviral vectors are important vehicles for somatic cell gene therapy, knowledge of the mechanism of retroviral variation is critical for anticipating untoward mutational events occurring during retrovirus-medicated gene transfer. The focus of this report is to examine the spectrum of genomic rearrangements arising during a single cycle of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) vector virus replication. An MoMLV vector containing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (tk) gene was constructed. MoMLV vector virus was produced in packaging lines, and target cells were infected. From a total of 224 mutant proviruses analyzed, 114 had gross rearrangements readily detectable by Southern blotting. The remaining proviruses were of parental size. PCR and DNA sequence analysis of 73 of the grossly rearranged mutant proviruses indicated they resulted from deletions, combined with insertions, duplications, and complex mutations that were a result of multiple genomic alterations in the same provirus. Complex hypermutations distinct from those previously described for spleen necrosis virus and human immunodeficiency virus were detected. There was a correlation between the mutation breakpoints and single-stranded regions in the predicted viral RNA secondary structure. The results also confirmed that the tk gene is inactivated at an average rate of about 8.8% per cycle of retroviral replication, which corresponds to a rate of mutation of 3%/kbp. PMID:7494312

  7. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K

    2015-07-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  8. Effects of sulfur-deficient defect and water on rearrangements of formamide on pyrite (100) surface.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huyen Thi; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2014-06-12

    The efficient formation of HCN/HNC from formamide (FM) combining the advantages of water-assistance, self-catalyzed reactions, and the mineral surfaces was investigated. Periodic density functional theory calculations with plane-wave pseudopotential basis sets were performed to study the interaction of FM with pyrite (100) ideal and defect surfaces. Effects of sulfur vacancy defect and water on tautomerization and rearrangement barriers of FM on the (100) surface were evaluated. Calculated results show that FM adsorbs more strongly on the defect surface than on the ideal surface, with the lowest adsorption energy on the defect surface being -22 kcal/mol. The energy barriers for rearrangements of FM on these two surfaces being close to each other suggests that the adsorptions on the surfaces have small effects on the energy barriers. The energy barriers for formimic acid isomer formations are 44.5 and 46.0 kcal/mol, and those of aminohydroxymethylene formations are 72.6 and 71.9 kcal/mol on the ideal and defect surfaces, respectively. A reduction of ∼30 kcal/mol in tautomerization energy barriers is observed in water-assisted process on the defect surface. Because this reduction is close to that of the gas-phase reactions, the catalytic effect is clearly due to the presence of water molecule instead of the interaction with the surface. In this case, the pyrite surfaces with the ability to accumulate reactive species only play the role of connecting bridges between the two steps of the proposed reaction mechanism: the water-assisted rearrangement and the self-catalyzed dehydration.

  9. Immature surface Ig+ B cells can continue to rearrange kappa and lambda L chain gene loci

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Pro and pre B cells possess the long-term capacity to proliferate in vitro on stromal cells and interleukin 7 (IL-7) and can differentiate to surface immunoglobulin (sIg+) cells upon removal of IL-7 from the cultures. A key event in this differentiation is the extensive cell loss due to apoptosis. Because the proto-oncogene bcl-2 can promote cell survival, we established pre-B cell lines from E mu-bcl-2 transgenic mice. These pre-B cells have the same properties as those derived from non-bcl-2 transgenic mice except that they do not die by apoptosis. This allowed us to study the fate of newly formed B cells in vitro for a longer period of time. Here we show that early during the differentiation of pre-B cells, upregulation of RAG-1 and RAG-2 expression go hand in hand with rearrangements of the Ig gene loci. Moreover, the newly formed sIg+ B cells continue to express RAG-1 and RAG-2 and continue to rearrange L chain gene loci, even in the absence of proliferation, in an orderly fashion, so that kappa L+ sIg+ cells can become lambda L+ sIg+ or sIg- cells, whereas lambda L+ sIg+ cells can become sIg-, but not kappa L+ sIg+ cells. Thus, deposition of a complete Ig molecule on the surface of a B cell does not automatically stop the Ig-rearrangement machinery. PMID:8376934

  10. A Consensus Map in Cultivated Hexaploid Oat Reveals Conserved Grass Synteny with Substantial Subgenome Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Chaffin, Ashley S; Huang, Yung-Fen; Smith, Scott; Bekele, Wubishet A; Babiker, Ebrahiem; Gnanesh, Belaghihalli N; Foresman, Bradley J; Blanchard, Steven G; Jay, Jeremy J; Reid, Robert W; Wight, Charlene P; Chao, Shiaoman; Oliver, Rebekah; Islamovic, Emir; Kolb, Frederic L; McCartney, Curt; Mitchell Fetch, Jennifer W; Beattie, Aaron D; Bjørnstad, Åsmund; Bonman, J Michael; Langdon, Tim; Howarth, Catherine J; Brouwer, Cory R; Jellen, Eric N; Klos, Kathy Esvelt; Poland, Jesse A; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Brown, Ryan; Jackson, Eric; Schlueter, Jessica A; Tinker, Nicholas A

    2016-07-01

    Hexaploid oat ( L., 2 = 6 = 42) is a member of the Poaceae family and has a large genome (∼12.5 Gb) containing 21 chromosome pairs from three ancestral genomes. Physical rearrangements among parental genomes have hindered the development of linkage maps in this species. The objective of this work was to develop a single high-density consensus linkage map that is representative of the majority of commonly grown oat varieties. Data from a cDNA-derived single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) were collected from the progeny of 12 biparental recombinant inbred line populations derived from 19 parents representing oat germplasm cultivated primarily in North America. Linkage groups from all mapping populations were compared to identify 21 clusters of conserved collinearity. Linkage groups within each cluster were then merged into 21 consensus chromosomes, generating a framework consensus map of 7202 markers spanning 2843 cM. An additional 9678 markers were placed on this map with a lower degree of certainty. Assignment to physical chromosomes with high confidence was made for nine chromosomes. Comparison of homeologous regions among oat chromosomes and matches to orthologous regions of rice ( L.) reveal that the hexaploid oat genome has been highly rearranged relative to its ancestral diploid genomes as a result of frequent translocations among chromosomes. Heterogeneous chromosome rearrangements among populations were also evident, probably accounting for the failure of some linkage groups to match the consensus. This work contributes to a further understanding of the organization and evolution of hexaploid grass genomes.

  11. Mechanisms for nonrecurrent genomic rearrangements associated with CMT1A or HNPP: rare CNVs as a cause for missing heritability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Seeman, Pavel; Liu, Pengfei; Weterman, Marian A J; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Towne, Charles F; Batish, Sat Dev; De Vriendt, Els; De Jonghe, Peter; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Krause, Klaus-Henning; Khajavi, Mehrdad; Posadka, Jan; Vandenberghe, Antoon; Palau, Francesc; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Baas, Frank; Timmerman, Vincent; Lupski, James R

    2010-06-11

    Genomic rearrangements involving the peripheral myelin protein gene (PMP22) in human chromosome 17p12 are associated with neuropathy: duplications cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), whereas deletions lead to hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). Our previous studies showed that >99% of these rearrangements are recurrent and mediated by nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR). Rare copy number variations (CNVs) generated by nonrecurrent rearrangements also exist in 17p12, but their underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated 21 subjects with rare CNVs associated with CMT1A or HNPP by oligonucleotide-based comparative genomic hybridization microarrays and breakpoint sequence analyses, and we identified 17 unique CNVs, including two genomic deletions, ten genomic duplications, two complex rearrangements, and three small exonic deletions. Each of these CNVs includes either the entire PMP22 gene, or exon(s) only, or ultraconserved potential regulatory sequences upstream of PMP22, further supporting the contention that PMP22 is the critical gene mediating the neuropathy phenotypes associated with 17p12 rearrangements. Breakpoint sequence analysis reveals that, different from the predominant NAHR mechanism in recurrent rearrangement, various molecular mechanisms, including nonhomologous end joining, Alu-Alu-mediated recombination, and replication-based mechanisms (e.g., FoSTeS and/or MMBIR), can generate nonrecurrent 17p12 rearrangements associated with neuropathy. We document a multitude of ways in which gene function can be altered by CNVs. Given the characteristics, including small size, structural complexity, and location outside of coding regions, of selected rare CNVs, their identification remains a challenge for genome analysis. Rare CNVs may potentially represent an important portion of "missing heritability" for human diseases.

  12. RET/PTC rearrangements preferentially occurred in papillary thyroid cancer among atomic bomb survivors exposed to high radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Hamatani, Kiyohiro; Eguchi, Hidetaka; Ito, Reiko; Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Taga, Masataka; Imai, Kazue; Cologne, John; Soda, Midori; Arihiro, Koji; Fujihara, Megumu; Abe, Kuniko; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Nakashima, Masahiro; Sekine, Ichiro; Yasui, Wataru; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei

    2008-09-01

    A major early event in papillary thyroid carcinogenesis is constitutive activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway caused by alterations of a single gene, typically rearrangements of the RET and NTRK1 genes or point mutations in the BRAF and RAS genes. In childhood papillary thyroid cancer, regardless of history of radiation exposure, RET/PTC rearrangements are a major event. Conversely, in adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer among the general population, the most common molecular event is BRAF(V600E) point mutation, not RET/PTC rearrangements. To clarify which gene alteration, chromosome aberration, or point mutation preferentially occurs in radiation-associated adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer, we have performed molecular analyses on RET/PTC rearrangements and BRAF(V600E) mutation in 71 papillary thyroid cancer cases among atomic bomb survivors (including 21 cases not exposed to atomic bomb radiation), in relation to radiation dose as well as time elapsed since atomic bomb radiation exposure. RET/PTC rearrangements showed significantly increased frequency with increased radiation dose (P(trend) = 0.002). In contrast, BRAF(V600E) mutation was less frequent in cases exposed to higher radiation dose (P(trend) < 0.001). Papillary thyroid cancer subjects harboring RET/PTC rearrangements developed this cancer earlier than did cases with BRAF(V600E) mutation (P = 0.03). These findings were confirmed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. These results suggest that RET/PTC rearrangements play an important role in radiation-associated thyroid carcinogenesis.

  13. The Combined C—H Functionalization/Cope Rearrangement: Discovery and Applications in Organic Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Huw M. L.; Lian, Yajing

    2012-01-01

    Conspectus The development of methods for the stereoselective functionalization of sp3 C–H bonds is a challenging undertaking. This Account describes the scope of the combined C–H functionalization/Cope rearrangement (CHCR), a reaction that occurs between rhodium-stabilized vinylcarbenoids and substrates containing allylic C–H bonds. Computational studies have shown that the CHCR reaction is initiated by a hydride transfer to the carbenoid from an allyl site of the substrate, which is then rapidly followed by C–C bond formation between the developing rhodium-bound allyl anion and the allyl cation. In principle, the reaction can proceed through four distinct orientations of the vinylcarbenoid and the approaching substrate. The early examples of the CHCR reaction were all highly diastereoselective, consistent with a reaction proceeding via a chair transition state with the vinylcarbenoid adopting an s-cis conformation. Recent computational studies have revealed that other transition state orientations are energetically accessible, and these results have guided the development of highly stereoselective CHCR reactions that proceed through a boat transition state with the vinylcarbenoid in an s-cis configuration. The CHCR reaction has broad applications in organic synthesis. In some new protocols, the CHCR reaction acts as a surrogate to some of the classic synthetic strategies in organic chemistry. The CHCR reaction has served as a synthetic equivalent of the Michael reaction, the vinylogous Mukaiyama aldol reaction, the tandem Claisen rearrangement/Cope rearrangement, and the tandem aldol reaction/siloxy-Cope rearrangement. In all of these cases, the products are generated with very high diastereocontrol. With a chiral dirhodium tetracarboxylate catalyst such as Rh2(S-DOSP)4 or Rh2(S-PTAD)4, researchers can achieve very high levels of asymmetric induction. Applications of the CHCR reaction include the effective enantiodifferentiation of racemic

  14. The combined C-H functionalization/Cope rearrangement: discovery and applications in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Davies, Huw M L; Lian, Yajing

    2012-06-19

    The development of methods for the stereoselective functionalization of sp(3) C-H bonds is a challenging undertaking. This Account describes the scope of the combined C-H functionalization/Cope rearrangement (CHCR), a reaction that occurs between rhodium-stabilized vinylcarbenoids and substrates containing allylic C-H bonds. Computational studies have shown that the CHCR reaction is initiated by a hydride transfer to the carbenoid from an allyl site on the substrate, which is then rapidly followed by C-C bond formation between the developing rhodium-bound allyl anion and the allyl cation. In principle, the reaction can proceed through four distinct orientations of the vinylcarbenoid and the approaching substrate. The early examples of the CHCR reaction were all highly diastereoselective, consistent with a reaction proceeding via a chair transition state with the vinylcarbenoid adopting an s-cis conformation. Recent computational studies have revealed that other transition state orientations are energetically accessible, and these results have guided the development of highly stereoselective CHCR reactions that proceed through a boat transition state with the vinylcarbenoid in an s-cis configuration. The CHCR reaction has broad applications in organic synthesis. In some new protocols, the CHCR reaction acts as a surrogate to some of the classic synthetic strategies in organic chemistry. The CHCR reaction has served as a synthetic equivalent of the Michael reaction, the vinylogous Mukaiyama aldol reaction, the tandem Claisen rearrangement/Cope rearrangement, and the tandem aldol reaction/siloxy-Cope rearrangement. In all of these cases, the products are generated with very high diastereocontrol. With a chiral dirhodium tetracarboxylate catalyst such as Rh(2)(S-DOSP)(4) or Rh(2)(S-PTAD)(4), researchers can achieve very high levels of asymmetric induction. Applications of the CHCR reaction include the effective enantiodifferentiation of racemic dihydronaphthalenes and

  15. Different proximal and distal rearrangements of chromosome 7q associated with holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed Central

    Benzacken, B; Siffroi, J P; Le Bourhis, C; Krabchi, K; Joyé, N; Maschino, F; Viguié, F; Soulié, J; Gonzales, M; Migné, G; Bucourt, M; Encha-Razavi, F; Carbillon, L; Taillemite, J L

    1997-01-01

    Four new cases of holoprosencephaly are described in fetuses exhibiting abnormal karyotypes with different distal and proximal rearrangements of the long arm of chromosome 7. Three of them showed terminal deletions of chromosome 7q, confirming the importance of the 7q36 region in holoprosencephaly. The karyotype of the fourth fetus showed an apparently balanced de novo translocation, t(7;13) (q21.2;q33), without any visible loss of the distal part of chromosome 7q. The involvement of new genes, different from the human Sonic Hedgehog gene (hShh) responsible for holoprosencephaly, or a positional effect are discussed. Images PMID:9391882

  16. Frequencies and prognostic impact of RAS mutations in MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia in infants

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, Emma M.C.; van Roon, Eddy H.J.; Spijkers-Hagelstein, Jill A.P.; Schneider, Pauline; de Lorenzo, Paola; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Pieters, Rob; Stam, Ronald W.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in infants represents an aggressive malignancy associated with a high incidence (approx. 80%) of translocations involving the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene. Attempts to mimic Mixed Lineage Leukemia fusion driven leukemogenesis in mice raised the question whether these fusion proteins require secondary hits. RAS mutations are suggested as candidates. Earlier results on the incidence of RAS mutations in Mixed Lineage Leukemia-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia are inconclusive. Therefore, we studied frequencies and relation with clinical parameters of RAS mutations in a large cohort of infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Using conventional sequencing analysis, we screened neuroblastoma RAS viral (v-ras) oncogene homolog gene (NRAS), v-Ki-ras Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog gene (KRAS), and v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 gene (BRAF) for mutations in a large cohort (n=109) of infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients and studied the mutations in relation to several clinical parameters, and in relation to Homeobox gene A9 expression and the presence of ALL1 fused gene 4-Mixed Lineage Leukemia (AF4-MLL). Mutations were detected in approximately 14% of all cases, with a higher frequency of approximately 24% in t(4;11)-positive patients (P=0.04). Furthermore, we identified RAS mutations as an independent predictor (P=0.019) for poor outcome in Mixed Lineage Leukemia-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia, with a hazard ratio of 3.194 (95% confidence interval (CI):1.211–8.429). Also, RAS-mutated infants have higher white blood cell counts at diagnosis (P=0.013), and are more resistant to glucocorticoids in vitro (P<0.05). Finally, we demonstrate that RAS mutations, and not the lack of Homeobox gene A9 expression nor the expression of AF4-MLL are associated with poor outcome in t(4;11)-rearranged infants. We conclude that the presence of RAS mutations in Mixed Lineage Leukemia-rearranged

  17. Salvileucalin B, a novel diterpenoid with an unprecedented rearranged neoclerodane skeleton from Salvia leucantha Cav.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Akira; Nakatsugawa, Chihiro; Fukaya, Haruhiko; Takeya, Koichi; Kawauchi, Susumu; Izumi, Hiroshi

    2008-10-16

    Salvileucalin B (2), having an unprecedented rearranged neoclerodane skeleton, was isolated from the aerial parts of Salvia leucantha Cav. (Labiatae) along with salvileucalin A (1). The absolute structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis, X-ray crystallographic analysis, and vibrational circular dichroism. Compound 2 represents a novel neoclerodane, characterized by a tricyclo[3.2.1.0 (2,7)]octane substructure incorporating the exocyclic C-20 methylene of 1. This molecule exerted cytotoxic activity against A549 and HT-29 cells with IC50 values of 5.23 and 1.88 microg/mL, respectively.

  18. Synthesis of icariin from kaempferol through regioselective methylation and para-Claisen–Cope rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Qinggang; Wang, Chun; Zhao, Zhigang; Yuan, Weicheng

    2015-01-01

    Summary The hemisynthesis of the naturally occurring bioactive flavonoid glycoside icariin (1) has been accomplished in eleven steps with 7% overall yield from kaempferol. The 4′-OH methylation of kaempferol, the 8-prenylation of 3-O-methoxymethyl-4′-O-methyl-5-O-prenyl-7-O-benzylkaempferol (8) via para-Claisen–Cope rearrangement catalyzed by Eu(fod)3 in the presence of NaHCO3, and the glycosylation of icaritin (3) are the key steps. PMID:26425179

  19. Extraordinary number of gene rearrangements in the mitochondrial genomes of lice (Phthiraptera: Insecta).

    PubMed

    Covacin, C; Shao, R; Cameron, S; Barker, S C

    2006-02-01

    The arrangement of genes in the mitochondrial (mt) genomes of most insects is the same, or near-identical, to that inferred to be ancestral for insects. We sequenced the entire mt genome of the small pigeon louse, Campanulotes bidentatus compar, and part of the mt genomes of nine other species of lice. These species were from six families and the three main suborders of the order Phthiraptera. There was no variation in gene arrangement among species within a family but there was much variation in gene arrangement among the three suborders of lice. There has been an extraordinary number of gene rearrangements in the mitochondrial genomes of lice!

  20. Mitogenomic sequences and evidence from unique gene rearrangements corroborate evolutionary relationships of myctophiformes (Neoteleostei)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A skewed assemblage of two epi-, meso- and bathypelagic fish families makes up the order Myctophiformes – the blackchins Neoscopelidae and the lanternfishes Myctophidae. The six rare neoscopelids show few morphological specializations whereas the divergent myctophids have evolved into about 250 species, of which many show massive abundances and wide distributions. In fact, Myctophidae is by far the most abundant fish family in the world, with plausible estimates of more than half of the oceans combined fish biomass. Myctophids possess a unique communication system of species-specific photophore patterns and traditional intrafamilial classification has been established to reflect arrangements of photophores. Myctophids present the most diverse array of larval body forms found in fishes although this attribute has both corroborated and confounded phylogenetic hypotheses based on adult morphology. No molecular phylogeny is available for Myctophiformes, despite their importance within all ocean trophic cycles, open-ocean speciation and as an important part of neoteleost divergence. This study attempts to resolve major myctophiform phylogenies from both mitogenomic sequences and corroborating evidence in the form of unique mitochondrial gene order rearrangements. Results Mitogenomic evidence from DNA sequences and unique gene orders are highly congruent concerning phylogenetic resolution on several myctophiform classification levels, corroborating evidence from osteology, larval ontogeny and photophore patterns, although the lack of larval morphological characters within the subfamily Lampanyctinae stands out. Neoscopelidae is resolved as the sister family to myctophids with Solivomer arenidens positioned as a sister taxon to the remaining neoscopelids. The enigmatic Notolychnus valdiviae is placed as a sister taxon to all other myctophids and exhibits an unusual second copy of the tRNA-Met gene – a gene order rearrangement reminiscent of that found in

  1. Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance of newly-arisen chromosome rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Wilby, A S; Parker, J S

    1988-04-01

    Seven centric shifts and three reciprocal interchanges, all newly-arisen in natural populations, have been tested for their inheritance in the dioecious flowering plant Rumex acetosa. In backcrosses between the heterozygote and standard plants transmissions ranged from 0.36 to 0.85 per gamete for the novel chromosome. The inheritance of only four rearrangements correspond to Mendelian expectations while others exhibited either drive or drag. Drive was observed both through the egg and through the pollen indicating heterogeneity of mechanisms in the generation of non-Mendelian patterns of inheritance. This suggests that accumulation may play a significant role in the establishment of chromosomal variants in natural populations.

  2. Molecular Rearrangement of an Aza-Scorpiand Macrocycle Induced by pH: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    De Julián-Ortiz, Jesus Vicente; Verdejo, Begoña; Polo, Víctor; Besalú, Emili; García-España, Enrique

    2016-07-14

    Rearrangements and their control are a hot topic in supramolecular chemistry due to the possibilities that these phenomena open in the design of synthetic receptors and molecular machines. Macrocycle aza-scorpiands constitute an interesting system that can reorganize their spatial structure depending on pH variations or the presence of metal cations. In this study, the relative stabilities of these conformations were predicted computationally by semi-empirical and density functional theory approximations, and the reorganization from closed to open conformations was simulated by using the Monte Carlo multiple minimum method.

  3. Complex internal rearrangement processes triggered by electron transfer to acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limão-Vieira, P.; Meneses, G.; Cunha, T.; Gil, A.; Calhorda, M. J.; García, G.; Ferreira da Silva, F.

    2015-09-01

    We present negative ion formation from collisions of 100 eV neutral potassium atoms with acetic acid (CH3COOH) and its deuterated analogue molecules (CH3COOD, CD3COOH). From the negative ion time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra, OH- is the main fragment detected accounting on average for more than 25% of the total anion yield. The complex internal rearrangement processes triggered by electron transfer to acetic acid have been evaluated with the help of theoretical calculations at the DFT levels explaining the fragmentation channel yielding OH-.

  4. Revealing anelasticity and structural rearrangements in nanoscale metallic glass films using in situ TEM diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Rohit; Ebner, Christian; Izadi, Ehsan; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We used a novel diffraction-based method to extract the local, atomic-level elastic strain in nanoscale amorphous TiAl films during in situ transmission electron microscopy deformation, while simultaneously measuring the macroscopic strain. The complementary strain measurements revealed significant anelastic deformation, which was independently confirmed by strain rate experiments. Furthermore, the distribution of first nearest-neighbor distances became narrower during loading and permanent changes were observed in the atomic structure upon unloading, even in the absence of macroscopic plasticity. The results demonstrate the capability of in situ electron diffraction to probe structural rearrangements and decouple elastic and anelastic deformation in metallic glasses. PMID:28382229

  5. Free electron laser-driven ultrafast rearrangement of the electronic structure in Ti

    PubMed Central

    Principi, E.; Giangrisostomi, E.; Cucini, R.; Bencivenga, F.; Battistoni, A.; Gessini, A.; Mincigrucci, R.; Saito, M.; Di Fonzo, S.; D'Amico, F.; Di Cicco, A.; Gunnella, R.; Filipponi, A.; Giglia, A.; Nannarone, S.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2015-01-01

    High-energy density extreme ultraviolet radiation delivered by the FERMI seeded free-electron laser has been used to create an exotic nonequilibrium state of matter in a titanium sample characterized by a highly excited electron subsystem at temperatures in excess of 10 eV and a cold solid-density ion lattice. The obtained transient state has been investigated through ultrafast absorption spectroscopy across the Ti M2,3-edge revealing a drastic rearrangement of the sample electronic structure around the Fermi level occurring on a time scale of about 100 fs. PMID:26798835

  6. Actin cytoskeleton rearrangements in Arabidopsis roots under stress and during gravitropic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozhvanov, Gregory; Medvedev, Sergei; Suslov, Dmitry; Demidchik, Vadim

    Among environmental factors, gravity vector is the only one which is constant in direction and accompanies the whole plant ontogenesis. That said, gravity vector can be considered as an essential factor for correct development of plants. Gravitropism is a plant growth response against changing its position relative to the gravity vector. It is well estableshed that gravitropism is directed by auxin redistribution across the gravistimulated organ. In addition to auxin, actin cytoskeleton was shown to be involved in gravitropism at different stages: gravity perception, signal transduction and gravitropic bending formation. However, the relationship between IAA and actin is still under discussion. In this work we studied rearrangements of actin cytoskeleton during root gravitropic response. Actin microfilaments were visualized in vivo in GFP-fABD2 transgenic Arabidopsis plants, and their angle distribution was acquired from MicroFilament Analyzer software. The curvature of actin microfilaments in root elongation zone was shown to be increased within 30-60 min of gravistimulation, the fraction of axially oriented microfilaments decreased with a concomitant increase in the fraction of oblique and transversally oriented microfilaments. In particular, the fraction of transversally oriented microfilaments (i.e. parallel to the gravity vector) increased 3-5 times. Under 10 min of sub-lethal salt stress impact, actin microfilament orientations widened from an initial axial orientation to a set of peaks at 15(°) , 45(°) and 90(°) . We conclude that the actin cytoskeleton rearrangements observed are associated with the regulation of basic mechanisms of cell extension growth by which the gravitropic bending is formed. Having common stress-related features, gravity-induced actin cytoskeleton rearrangement is slower but results in higher number of g-vector-parallel microfilaments when compared to salt stress-induced rearrangement. Also, differences in gravistimulated root

  7. Immunoglobulin light chain gene rearrangements in precursor-B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia: characteristics and applicability for the detection of minimal residual disease.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Vincent H J; de Bie, Maaike; van Wering, Elisabeth R; van Dongen, Jacques J M

    2006-05-01

    We analyzed the frequency and characteristics of Vk-Jk and Vlambda-Jlambda rearrangements inpatients with precursor-B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and evaluated the applicability of these rearrangements as targets for minimal residual disease (MRD) detection. Using the BIOMED-2 primer sets, Vk-Jk and Vlambda-Jlambda rearrangements were detected in 30% and 17% of patients, respectively. Vk-Jk rearrangements were particularly frequent in common-ALL, children between 5-10 years, and TEL-AML1-positive patients. Vk-Jk and Vlambda-Jlambda rearrangements showed a good stability between diagnosis and relapse and reached good sensitivities in real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. Our data show that Vk-Jk and Vlambda-Jlambda rearrangements can be successfully applied for MRD detection in a subset of patients with precursor-B-ALL.

  8. Rearranged Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Gene in Adult-Onset Papillary Thyroid Cancer Amongst Atomic Bomb Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously noted that among atomic bomb survivors (ABS), the relative frequency of cases of adult papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) with chromosomal rearrangements (mainly RET/PTC) was significantly greater in those with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. In contrast, the frequency of PTC cases with point mutations (mainly BRAFV600E) was significantly lower in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. We also found that among ABS, the frequency of PTC cases with no detectable gene alterations in RET, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 (NTRK1), BRAF, or RAS was significantly higher in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. However, in ABS with PTC, the relationship between the presence of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fused with other gene partners and radiation exposure has received little study. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the relative frequency of rearranged ALK in ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, would be greater in those having relatively higher radiation exposures. Methods The 105 subjects in the study were drawn from the Life Span Study cohort of ABS of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who were diagnosed with PTC between 1956 and 1993. Seventy-nine were exposed (>0 mGy), and 26 were not exposed to A-bomb radiation. In the 25 ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, we examined archival, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded PTC specimens for rearrangement of ALK using reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5′ RACE). Results We found rearranged ALK in 10 of 19 radiation-exposed PTC cases, but none among 6 patients with PTC with no radiation exposure. In addition, solid/trabecular-like architecture in PTC was closely associated with ALK

  9. Development of a multiplex quantitative fluorescent PCR assay for identification of rearrangements in the AZFb and AZFc regions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Pei-qiong; Yu, Qi-hong; Chen, Hua-yun; Li, Juan; He, Yun-shao

    2008-06-01

    The azoospermia factor b (AZFb) and azoospermia factor c (AZFc) regions in the human Y chromosome consist of five palindromes constructed from six distinct families of amplicons and are prone to rearrangement. Partial deletion and duplication in the region can cause azoospermia or oligozoospermia and male infertility. The aim of the study was to establish a quantitative fluorescent PCR (QF-PCR) assay to classify AZFb and AZFc rearrangements. A single pair of fluorescent primers was designed to amplify simultaneously the amplicon in AZFc and the length-variant homologous sequences outside of the region as control. Since the copy number of the control sequences is fixed in the human genome, dosage of the target could be easily obtained through comparing the height of the fluorescent peaks between the target and the control after amplification with limited PCR cycles. Most types of rearrangements in AZFb and AZFc regions could be classified with QF-PCR containing four such primer pairs. Eleven types of rearrangement in AZFb and AZFc regions were well discriminated with QF-PCR. In conclusion, QF-PCR is a simple and reliable method to detect rearrangements in AZFb and AZFc.

  10. A hotspot of gene order rearrangement by tandem duplication and random loss in the vertebrate mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    San Mauro, Diego; Gower, David J; Zardoya, Rafael; Wilkinson, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Most reported examples of change in vertebrate mitochondrial (mt) gene order could be explained by a tandem duplication followed by random loss of redundant genes (tandem duplication-random loss [TDRL] model). Under this model of evolution, independent loss of genes arising from a single duplication in an ancestral species are predicted, and remnant pseudogenes expected, intermediate states that may remain in rearranged genomes. However, evidence for this is rare and largely scattered across vertebrate lineages. Here, we report new derived mt gene orders in the vertebrate "WANCY" region of four closely related caecilian amphibians. The novel arrangements found in this genomic region (one of them is convergent with the derived arrangement of marsupials), presence of pseudogenes, and positions of intergenic spacers fully satisfy predictions from the TDRL model. Our results, together with comparative data for the available vertebrate complete mt genomes, provide further evidence that the WANCY genomic region is a hotspot for gene order rearrangements and support the view that TDRL is the dominant mechanism of gene order rearrangement in vertebrate mt genomes. Convergent gene rearrangements are not unlikely in hotspots of gene order rearrangement by TDRL.

  11. CRKL mediates EML4-ALK signaling and is a potential therapeutic target for ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Voeller, Donna; Gower, Arjan; Kim, In-Kyu; Zhang, Yu-Wen; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements are oncogenic drivers in a small subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The ALK inhibitors are highly effective in NSCLC patients harboring ALK rearrangements; however, most patients acquire resistance to the therapy following an initial response. Mechanisms of acquired resistance are complex. We used LC-MS/MS-based phosphotyrosine-peptide profiling in the EML4-ALK rearranged H3122 and H2228 cells treated with ALK inhibitors, to identify downstream effectors of ALK. We then used Western blot, siRNA experiments, cell proliferation, viability and migration assays to validate our findings. We identified CRKL as a novel downstream effector of ALK signaling. We demonstrated that CRKL tyrosine phosphorylation was repressed by pharmacological inhibition or small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of ALK in the ALK-rearranged cells. More importantly, CRKL knockdown attenuated their cell proliferation, viability, and migration, but it had no effect on ALK phosphorylation and expression in these cells. Furthermore, CRKL tyrosine phosphorylation was inhibited by dasatinib (an inhibitor of ABL and SRC kinases), which in combination with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib displayed a synergistic inhibitory effect in vitro. In conclusion, our study suggests that CRKL is a key downstream effector of ALK, and combined inhibition of ALK and CRKL may represent an effective strategy for treating ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients. PMID:27078848

  12. Comparative Mitogenomics of the Genus Odontobutis (Perciformes: Gobioidei: Odontobutidae) Revealed Conserved Gene Rearrangement and High Sequence Variations

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhihong; Yang, Xuefen; Bercsenyi, Miklos; Wu, Junjie; Yu, Yongyao; Wei, Kaijian; Fan, Qixue; Yang, Ruibin

    2015-01-01

    To understand the molecular evolution of mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) in the genus Odontobutis, the mitogenome of Odontobutis yaluensis was sequenced and compared with those of another four Odontobutis species. Our results displayed similar mitogenome features among species in genome organization, base composition, codon usage, and gene rearrangement. The identical gene rearrangement of trnS-trnL-trnH tRNA cluster observed in mitogenomes of these five closely related freshwater sleepers suggests that this unique gene order is conserved within Odontobutis. Additionally, the present gene order and the positions of associated intergenic spacers of these Odontobutis mitogenomes indicate that this unusual gene rearrangement results from tandem duplication and random loss of large-scale gene regions. Moreover, these mitogenomes exhibit a high level of sequence variation, mainly due to the differences of corresponding intergenic sequences in gene rearrangement regions and the heterogeneity of tandem repeats in the control regions. Phylogenetic analyses support Odontobutis species with shared gene rearrangement forming a monophyletic group, and the interspecific phylogenetic relationships are associated with structural differences among their mitogenomes. The present study contributes to understanding the evolutionary patterns of Odontobutidae species. PMID:26492246

  13. Homozygous inv(11)(q21q23) and MLL gene rearrangement in two patients with myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Guilin; Lu, Xinyan; Wang, Sa A; Roney, Erin K; Zhang, Liping; Hu, Shimin; Lu, Gary; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Patel, Ankita

    2014-01-01

    Rearrangements of the MLL gene located at chromosome 11q23 are common chromosomal abnormalities associated with acute leukemias. In vast majority of cases with MLL gene rearrangements, only one chromosome 11 or a single MLL allele got involved. We report two very unusual cases of myeloid neoplasms with homozygous inv(11)(q21q23) and biallelic MLL rearrangement. Both patients, a 12-year old boy and a 29-year old woman, presented initially with T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL), achieved complete remission with intensive chemotherapy, then recurred as acute myeloid leukemia in one patient and therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes in the other patient, 24 and 15 months after initial T-ALL diagnosis, respectively. In both cases, biallelic MLL gene rearrangements were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Mastermind like 2 gene was identified as MLL partner gene in one case. To our knowledge, homozygous inv(11)(q21q23) with two MLL genes rearrangement are extremely rare; it is likely a result of acquired uniparental disomy. PMID:25031740

  14. Kinase Expression and Chromosomal Rearrangements in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Tissues: Investigations at the Molecular and Microscopic Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich; Kwan, Johnson; Lu, Chun-Mei; Ito, Yuko; Wang, Mei; Baumgartner, Adolf; Hayward, Simon W.; Weier, Jingly F.; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.

    2009-07-07

    Structural chromosome aberrations are known hallmarks of many solid tumors. In the papillary form of thyroid cancer (PTC), for example, activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) genes, ret or the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type I (NTRK1) by intra- or interchromosomal rearrangements have been suggested as a cause of the disease. The 1986 accident at the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl, USSR, led to the uncontrolled release of high levels of radioisotopes. Ten years later, the incidence of childhood papillary thyroid cancer (chPTC) near Chernobyl had risen by two orders of magnitude. Tumors removed from some of these patients showed aberrant expression of the ret RTK gene due to a ret/PTC1 or ret/PTC3 rearrangement involving chromosome 10. However, many cultured chPTC cells show a normal G-banded karyotype and no ret rearrangement. We hypothesize that the 'ret-negative' tumors inappropriately express a different oncogene or have lost function of a tumor suppressor as a result of chromosomal rearrangements, and decided to apply molecular and cytogenetic methods to search for potentially oncogenic chromosomal rearrangements in Chernobyl chPTC cases. Knowledge of the kind of genetic alterations may facilitate the early detection and staging of chPTC as well as provide guidance for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Computational study of the Curtius-like rearrangements of phosphoryl, phosphinyl, and phosphinoyl azides and their corresponding nitrenes.

    PubMed

    McCulla, Ryan D; Gohar, Gamal A; Hadad, Christopher M; Platz, Matthew S

    2007-12-07

    The free energies of reaction (DeltaG) and activation (DeltaG) were determined for the Curtius-like rearrangement of dimethylphosphinoyl, dimethylphosphinyl, and dimethylphosphoryl azides as well as the corresponding singlet and triplet nitrenes by CBS-QB3 and B3LYP computational methods. From CASSCF calculations, it was established that the closed-shell configuration was the lower energy singlet state for each of these nitrenes. The triplet states of dimethylphosphinyl- and dimethylphosphorylnitrene are the preferred ground states. However, the closed-shell singlet state is the ground state for dimethylphosphinoylnitrene. The CBS-QB3 DeltaG values for the Curtius-like rearrangements of dimethylphosphinyl and dimethylphosphoryl azides were 45.4 and 47.0 kcal mol-1, respectively. For the closed-shell singlet dimethylphosphinyl- and dimethylphosphorylnitrene, the CBS-QB3 DeltaG values for the rate-limiting step of the Curtius-like rearrangement were 22.9 and 18.0 kcal mol-1, respectively. It is unlikely that the nitrenes will undergo a Curtius-like rearrangement because of competing bimolecular reactions that have lower activation barriers. The pharmacology of weaponized organophosphorus compounds can be investigated using phosphorylnitrenes as photoaffinity labels. Dominant bimolecular reactivity is a desirable quality for a photoaffinity label to possess, and thus, the resistance of phosphorylnitrenes to intramolecular Curtius-like rearrangements increases their usefulness as photoaffinity labels.

  16. Comparative Mitogenomics of the Genus Odontobutis (Perciformes: Gobioidei: Odontobutidae) Revealed Conserved Gene Rearrangement and High Sequence Variations.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhihong; Yang, Xuefen; Bercsenyi, Miklos; Wu, Junjie; Yu, Yongyao; Wei, Kaijian; Fan, Qixue; Yang, Ruibin

    2015-10-20

    To understand the molecular evolution of mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) in the genus Odontobutis, the mitogenome of Odontobutis yaluensis was sequenced and compared with those of another four Odontobutis species. Our results displayed similar mitogenome features among species in genome organization, base composition, codon usage, and gene rearrangement. The identical gene rearrangement of trnS-trnL-trnH tRNA cluster observed in mitogenomes of these five closely related freshwater sleepers suggests that this unique gene order is conserved within Odontobutis. Additionally, the present gene order and the positions of associated intergenic spacers of these Odontobutis mitogenomes indicate that this unusual gene rearrangement results from tandem duplication and random loss of large-scale gene regions. Moreover, these mitogenomes exhibit a high level of sequence variation, mainly due to the differences of corresponding intergenic sequences in gene rearrangement regions and the heterogeneity of tandem repeats in the control regions. Phylogenetic analyses support Odontobutis species with shared gene rearrangement forming a monophyletic group, and the interspecific phylogenetic relationships are associated with structural differences among their mitogenomes. The present study contributes to understanding the evolutionary patterns of Odontobutidae species.

  17. Highly rearranged and size-variable chloroplast genomes in conifers II clade (cupressophytes): evolution towards shorter intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Shien; Chaw, Shu-Miaw

    2014-04-01

    Although conifers are of immense ecological and economic value, bioengineering of their chloroplasts remains undeveloped. Understanding the chloroplast genomic organization of conifers can facilitate their bioengineering. Members of the conifer II clade (or cupressophytes) are highly diverse in both morphologic features and chloroplast genomic organization. We compared six cupressophyte chloroplast genomes (cpDNAs) that represent four of the five cupressophyte families, including three genomes that are first reported here (Agathis dammara, Calocedrus formosana and Nageia nagi). The six cupressophyte cpDNAs have lost a pair of large inverted repeats (IRs) and vary greatly in size, organization and tRNA copies. We demonstrate that cupressophyte cpDNAs have evolved towards reduced size, largely due to shrunken intergenic spacers. In cupressophytes, cpDNA rearrangements are capable of extending intergenic spacers, and synonymous mutations are negatively associated with the size and frequency of rearrangements. The variable cpDNA sizes of cupressophytes may have been shaped by mutational burden and genomic rearrangements. On the basis of cpDNA organization, our analyses revealed that in gymnosperms, cpDNA rearrangements are phylogenetically informative, which supports the 'gnepines' clade. In addition, removal of a specific IR influences the minimal rearrangements required for the gnepines and cupressophyte clades, whereby Pinaceae favours the removal of IRB but cupressophytes exclusion of IRA. This result strongly suggests that different IR copies have been lost from conifers I and II. Our data help understand the complexity and evolution of cupressophyte cpDNAs.

  18. A workflow to increase verification rate of chromosomal structural rearrangements using high-throughput next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Quek, Kelly; Nones, Katia; Patch, Ann-Marie; Fink, J Lynn; Newell, Felicity; Cloonan, Nicole; Miller, David; Fadlullah, Muhammad Z H; Kassahn, Karin; Christ, Angelika N; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Manning, Suzanne; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wani, Shivangi; Steptoe, Anita; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Wilson, Peter; Biankin, Andrew V; Pearson, John V; Waddell, Nic; Grimmond, Sean M

    2014-07-01

    Somatic rearrangements, which are commonly found in human cancer genomes, contribute to the progression and maintenance of cancers. Conventionally, the verification of somatic rearrangements comprises many manual steps and Sanger sequencing. This is labor intensive when verifying a large number of rearrangements in a large cohort. To increase the verification throughput, we devised a high-throughput workflow that utilizes benchtop next-generation sequencing and in-house bioinformatics tools to link the laboratory processes. In the proposed workflow, primers are automatically designed. PCR and an optional gel electrophoresis step to confirm the somatic nature of the rearrangements are performed. PCR products of somatic events are pooled for Ion Torrent PGM and/or Illumina MiSeq sequencing, the resulting sequence reads are assembled into consensus contigs by a consensus assembler, and an automated BLAT is used to resolve the breakpoints to base level. We compared sequences and breakpoints of verified somatic rearrangements between the conventional and high-throughput workflow. The results showed that next-generation sequencing methods are comparable to conventional Sanger sequencing. The identified breakpoints obtained from next-generation sequencing methods were highly accurate and reproducible. Furthermore, the proposed workflow allows hundreds of events to be processed in a shorter time frame compared with the conventional workflow.

  19. PDGFRβ-Rearranged Myeloid Neoplasm with Marked Eosinophilia in a 37-Year-Old Man; And a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Andrei, Mirela; Bandarchuk, Andrei; Abdelmalek, Cherif; Kundra, Ajay; Gotlieb, Vladimir; Wang, Jen Chin

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 37 Final Diagnosis: PDGFRβ-rearranged myeloid neoplasm with eosinophilia Symptoms: Night sweats • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Hematology Objective: Rare disease Background: PDGFRβ-positive myeloid neoplasms are rare. Marked leukocytosis (over 100×109/L) with marked eosinophilia (over 10%) has been rarely described in myeloid neoplasms associated with PDGFRβ rearrangement. Case report: We report a case of 37-year-old man with myeloid neoplasm associated with PDGFRβ rearrangement who presented with marked eosinophilia of 13.3% and leukocytosis with WBC count of 189×109/L. He was found to have PDGFRβ locus rearrangement at 5q32-33 by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). He responded very well to low-dose imatinib therapy. To the best of our knowledge this degree of hypereosinophilia and leukocytosis in a young adult was reported only once previously. Using low dose therapy in treating this condition has rarely been reported and has not been clearly defined. Our case demonstrated that low dose imatinib therapy can be as effective as high dose imatinib therapy in treating PDGFRβ-positive myeloid neoplasms. Conclusions: The patient presented with very high WBC and eosinophil count rarely reported in a young adult with PDGFRβ-rearranged myeloid neoplasm. The recognition of this rare presentation as a manifestation of PDGFRβ-gene translocation is important, and equally important that low-dose imatinib (100 mg/day) might have the same effect as higher dose imatinib (400 mg/day). PMID:28209946

  20. Comparative mapping identifies the fusion point of an ancient mammalian X-autosomal rearrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.A.; Watson, J.M.; Spencer, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    Previous comparisons of gene location in the three major groups of mammals (eutherians, marsupials, and monotremes) have suggested that the long arm of the human X represents the ancestral mammalian X chromosome, whereas the short arm represents an autosomal region(s) recently added to the eutherian X chromosome. To identify the fusion point of this ancient X-autosome rearrangement, we have mapped four genes, three of which map near the centromere of the human Xp, in marsupials and in a monotreme. We found that ARAF1, and GATA1 are located on the X chromosome in marsupials, and ALA2 and GATA1 are also located on the X in the platypus. This implies that the proximal short arm of the human X chromosome, including the centromere, was part of the ancestral mammalian X chromosome. The fusion point between the conserved region and the recently added regions therefore maps to human Xp11.23, although gene order on the human X indicates that there has been some rearrangement of this region. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Three-dimensional rearrangement of single atoms using actively controlled optical microtraps.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woojun; Kim, Hyosub; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-05-02

    We propose and demonstrate three-dimensional rearrangements of single atoms. In experiments performed with single 87Rb atoms in optical microtraps actively controlled by a spatial light modulator, we demonstrate various dynamic rearrangements of up to N = 9 atoms including rotation, 2D vacancy filling, guiding, compactification, and 3D shuffling. With the capability of a phase-only Fourier mask to generate arbitrary shapes of the holographic microtraps, it was possible to place single atoms at arbitrary geometries of a few μm size and even continuously reconfigure them by conveying each atom. For this purpose, we loaded a series of computer-generated phase masks in the full frame rate of 60 Hz of the spatial light modulator, so the animation of phase mask transformed the holographic microtraps in real time, driving each atom along the assigned trajectory. Possible applications of this method of transformation of single atoms include preparation of scalable quantum platforms for quantum computation, quantum simulation, and quantum many-body physics.

  2. Fatal Haemoptysis Associated with Dramatic Response to Crizotinib in an ALK-Rearranged Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mussat, Elodie; Giraud, Violaine; Julie, Catherine; Chinet, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The presence of an ALK (Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase) rearrangement is a rare molecular feature in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC), and concerns mainly non- or light smokers, young patients, with adenocarcinoma histological type. These tumours are particularly sensitive to Alk-targeted therapies, as crizotinib. Crizotinib is usually well-tolerated. We report a case of fatal haemoptysis associated with dramatic response to crizotinib in a patient with an ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinoma. The patient presented a mediastinal invasion with tracheal involvement and compression of the right pulmonary artery. The initial evolution under crizotinib was good with tumour response. At 6 weeks of crizotinib the patient presented a massive haemoptysis with a tracheobronchial fistula and pneumomediastinum. She died of acute respiratory failure. Our case is the first to report a fatal effect of crizotinib associated with tumour necrosis and good tumour response on a massive mediastinal infiltration. Precautions are recommended with the use of crizotinib in proximal lung tumours with vascular invasion. PMID:27134984

  3. Coumarin-Induced DNA Ligation, Rearrangement to DNA Interstrand Crosslinks, and Photorelease of Coumarin Moiety.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huabing; Fan, Heli; Eom, Hyeyoung; Peng, Xiaohua

    2016-11-03

    Coumarin moieties react with thymine and cytosine in DNA by photoinduced [2+2] cycloaddition, which allows quantitative DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) formation. Here, we report the application of coumarin analogues for DNA photoligation and the rearrangement of coumarin-induced ligation to ICL products. Both DNA sequences and the linker units at position 4 of the coumarin moieties affected coumarin-induced DNA photoligation. A flexible linker unit favored DNA ICL formation but led to inefficient photoligation, whereas coumarins without linker units greatly increased DNA photoligation efficiency. DNA photoligation induced by the coumarin moiety was photoswitchable. Ligation products were formed between coumarin and dT or dC upon 350 nm irradiation but reverted to the original single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) upon 254 nm irradiation. Rearrangement of ligated ODNs into ICL products occurred during the switchable (350 nm/254 nm) processes. Additionally, photoinduced cleavage of coumarin 3 occurred with dC-3 cycloadducts upon 254 nm irradiation, which was confirmed by mass spectrometry analysis.

  4. Induced mouse chromosomal rearrangements as tools for identifying critical developmental genes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Culiat, C T; Carver, E A; Walkowicz, M; Rinchik, E M; Cacheiro, N L; Russell, L B; Generoso, W M; Stubbs, L

    1997-01-01

    Due to the rapid advances that have been made in molecular and genetic technology during the past decade, the genes associated with a large number of human hereditary diseases have been isolated and analyzed in detail. These cloned genes provide new tools for research geared toward a better understanding of normal human development, and also of the many ways that basic, essential morphologic pathways can be disturbed. Chromosomal rearrangements, especially deletions and translocations, have been especially beneficial in the mapping and isolation of human disease genes because of their visibility on both the cytogenetic and molecular levels. However, these useful types of mutations occur with low frequency in the human population. Chromosomal rearrangements can be induced relatively easily in mice, and several large, independent collections of translocation and deletion mutants have been generated in the course of risk-assessment and mutagenesis studies over the past several decades. Combined with new molecular technologies, these collections of mutant animals provide a means of gaining ready access to genes associated with developmental defects including craniofacial abnormalities, hydrocephaly, skeletal deformities, and complex neurologic disorders. As an illustration of this approach, we briefly review our progress in the study of three mutations associated with defects in palate development, juvenile growth, fitness and sterility, and neurologic development in mice, respectively.

  5. Site-specific deletion and rearrangement of integron insert genes catalyzed by the integron DNA integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Collis, C M; Hall, R M

    1992-01-01

    Deletion of individual antibiotic resistance genes found within the variable region of integrons is demonstrated. Evidence for gene duplications and rearrangements resulting from the insertion of gene units at new locations is also presented. Deletion, duplication, and rearrangement occur only in the presence of the integron-encoded DNA integrase. These events are precise and involve loss or gain of one or more complete insert units or gene cassettes. This confirms the recent definition of gene cassettes as consisting of the gene coding sequences, all except the last 7 bases of the 59-base element found at the 3' end of the gene, and the core site located 5' to the gene (Hall et al., Mol. Microbiol. 5:1941-1959, 1991) and demonstrates that individual gene cassettes are functional units which can be independently mobilized. Both deletions and duplications can be generated by integrase-mediated cointegrate formation followed by integrase-mediated resolution involving a different pair of sites. However, deletion occurs 10 times more frequently than duplication, and we propose that the majority of deletion events are likely to involve integrase-dependent excision of the gene unit to generate a circular gene cassette. The implications of these findings in understanding the evolution of integrons and the spread of antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial populations is discussed. Images PMID:1311297

  6. Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of Multiple Intrachromosomal Rearrangements in Two Representatives of the Genus Turdus (Turdidae, Passeriformes)

    PubMed Central

    Kretschmer, Rafael; Gunski, Ricardo José; Garnero, Analía Del Valle; Furo, Ivanete de Oliveira; O'Brien, Patricia C. M.; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A.; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa

    2014-01-01

    Turdus rufiventris and Turdus albicollis, two songbirds belonging to the family Turdidae (Aves, Passeriformes) were studied by C-banding, 18S rDNA, as well as the use of whole chromosome probes derived from Gallus gallus (GGA) and Leucopternis albicollis (LAL). They showed very similar karyotypes, with 2n = 78 and the same pattern of distribution of heterochromatic blocks and hybridization patterns. However, the analysis of 18/28S rDNA has shown differences in the number of NOR-bearing chromosomes and ribosomal clusters. The hybridization pattern of GGA macrochromosomes was similar to the one found in songbirds studied by Fluorescent in situ hybridization, with fission of GGA 1 and GGA 4 chromosomes. In contrast, LAL chromosome paintings revealed a complex pattern of intrachromosomal rearrangements (paracentric and pericentric inversions) on chromosome 2, which corresponds to GGA1q. The first inversion changed the chromosomal morphology and the second and third inversions changed the order of chromosome segments. Karyotype analysis in Turdus revealed that this genus has derived characteristics in relation to the putative avian ancestral karyotype, highlighting the importance of using new tools for analysis of chromosomal evolution in birds, such as the probes derived from L. albicollis, which make it possible to identify intrachromosomal rearrangements not visible with the use of GGA chromosome painting solely. PMID:25058578

  7. Design of toy proteins capable of rearranging conformations in a mechanical fashion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovinskiy, Alexander L.; Grosberg, Alexander Yu.

    2003-03-01

    We design toy protein mimicking a machinelike function of an enzyme. Using an insight gained by the study of conformation space of compact lattice polymers, we demonstrate the possibility of a large scale conformational rearrangement which occurs (i) without opening a compact state, and (ii) along a linear (one-dimensional) path. We also demonstrate the possibility to extend sequence design method such that it yields a "collective funnel" landscape in which the toy protein (computationally) folds into the valley with rearrangement path at its bottom. Energies of the states along the path can be designed to be about equal, allowing for diffusion along the path. They can also be designed to provide for a significant bias in one certain direction. Together with a toy ligand molecule, our "enzimatic" machine can perform the entire cycle, including conformational relaxation in one direction upon ligand binding and conformational relaxation in the opposite direction upon ligand release. This model, however schematic, should be useful as a test ground for phenomenological theories of machinelike properties of enzymes.

  8. The rearranged mitochondrial genome of Leptopilina boulardi (Hymenoptera: Figitidae), a parasitoid wasp of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Daniel S.; Gomes, Tiago M.F.F.; Loreto, Elgion L.S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The partial mitochondrial genome sequence of Leptopilina boulardi (Hymenoptera: Figitidae) was characterized. Illumina sequencing was used yielding 35,999,679 reads, from which 102,482 were utilized in the assembly. The length of the sequenced region of this partial mitochondrial genome is 15,417 bp, consisting of 13 protein-coding, two rRNA, and 21tRNA genes (the trnaM failed to be sequenced) and a partial A+T-rich region. All protein-coding genes start with ATN codons. Eleven protein-coding genes presented TAA stop codons, whereas ND6 and COII that presented TA, and T nucleotides, respectively. The gene pattern revealed extensive rearrangements compared to the typical pattern generally observed in insects. These rearrangements involve two protein-coding and two ribosomal genes, along with the 16 tRNA genes. This gene order is different from the pattern described for Ibalia leucospoides (Ibaliidae, Cynipoidea), suggesting that this particular gene order can be variable among Cynipoidea superfamily members. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis of the main groups of Apocrita was performed using amino acid sequence of 13 protein-coding genes, showing monophyly for the Cynipoidea superfamily within the Hymenoptera phylogeny. PMID:27648767

  9. Dynamic layer rearrangement during growth of layered oxide films by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Luo, G; Tung, I C; Chang, S H; Luo, Z; Malshe, M; Gadre, M; Bhattacharya, A; Nakhmanson, S M; Eastman, J A; Hong, H; Jellinek, J; Morgan, D; Fong, D D; Freeland, J W

    2014-09-01

    The A(n+1)B(n)O(3n+1) Ruddlesden-Popper homologous series offers a wide variety of functionalities including dielectric, ferroelectric, magnetic and catalytic properties. Unfortunately, the synthesis of such layered oxides has been a major challenge owing to the occurrence of growth defects that result in poor materials behaviour in the higher-order members. To understand the fundamental physics of layered oxide growth, we have developed an oxide molecular beam epitaxy system with in situ synchrotron X-ray scattering capability. We present results demonstrating that layered oxide films can dynamically rearrange during growth, leading to structures that are highly unexpected on the basis of the intended layer sequencing. Theoretical calculations indicate that rearrangement can occur in many layered oxide systems and suggest a general approach that may be essential for the construction of metastable Ruddlesden-Popper phases. We demonstrate the utility of the new-found growth strategy by performing the first atomically controlled synthesis of single-crystalline La3Ni2O7.

  10. Gene Rearrangement Attenuates Expression and Lethality of a Nonsegmented Negative Strand RNA Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams Wertz, Gail; Perepelitsa, Victoria P.; Ball, L. Andrew

    1998-03-01

    The nonsegmented negative strand RNA viruses comprise hundreds of human, animal, insect, and plant pathogens. Gene expression of these viruses is controlled by the highly conserved order of genes relative to the single transcriptional promoter. We utilized this regulatory mechanism to alter gene expression levels of vesicular stomatitis virus by rearranging the gene order. This report documents that gene expression levels and the viral phenotype can be manipulated in a predictable manner. Translocation of the promoter-proximal nucleocapsid protein gene N, whose product is required stoichiometrically for genome replication, to successive positions down the genome reduced N mRNA and protein expression in a stepwise manner. The reduction in N gene expression resulted in a stepwise decrease in genomic RNA replication. Translocation of the N gene also attenuated the viruses to increasing extents for replication in cultured cells and for lethality in mice, without compromising their ability to elicit protective immunity. Because monopartite negative strand RNA viruses have not been reported to undergo homologous recombination, gene rearrangement should be irreversible and may provide a rational strategy for developing stably attenuated live vaccines against this type of virus.

  11. Differences in chromosome number and genome rearrangements in the genus Brucella.

    PubMed

    Jumas-Bilak, E; Michaux-Charachon, S; Bourg, G; O'Callaghan, D; Ramuz, M

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the genomic structure and constructed the SpeI, PacI and I-CeuI restriction maps of the four biovars of the pathogenic bacterium Brucella suis. B. suis biovar 1 has two chromosomes of 2.1 Mb and 1.15 Mb, similar to those of the other Brucella species: B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. ovis and B. neotomae. Two chromosomes were also observed in the genome of B. suis biovars 2 and 4, but with sizes of 1.85 Mb and 1.35 Mb, whereas only one chromosome with a size of 3.1 Mb was found in B. suis biovar 3. We show that the differences in chromosome size and number can be explained by rearrangements at chromosomal regions containing the three rrn genes. The location and orientation of these genes confirmed that these rearrangements are due to homologous recombination at the rrn loci. This observation allows us to propose a scheme for the evolution of the genus Brucella in which the two chromosome-containing strains can emerge from an hypothetical ancestor with a single chromosome, which is probably similar to that of B. suis biovar 3. As the genus Brucella is certainly monospecific, this is the first time that differences in chromosome number have been observed in strains of the same bacterial species.

  12. ETV6 rearrangement in a case of mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of the skin.

    PubMed

    Chang, Michael D; Arthur, Allison K; García, Joaquín J; Sukov, William R; Shon, Wonwoo

    2016-11-01

    Mammary analog secretory carcinoma of salivary glands is a relatively recently recognized entity that harbors the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion transcript. To date, only rare cases of mammary analog secretory carcinoma of the skin have been reported. A 57-year-old man presented with a 6.0 cm cystic mass in the axilla, involving the dermis and superficial subcutis. Microscopically, the tumor exhibited nodular aggregation of tubular and microcystic structures embedded in the dense fibrotic and hyalinized stroma. Characteristic 'colloid-like' eosinophilic secretory material was present within intraluminal spaces. Tumor cells were largely characterized by vesicular nuclei with inconspicuous nucleoli and pink vacuolated cytoplasm. With respect to immunohistochemistry, tumor cells were intensely positive for AE1/AE3, Cam 5.2, and CK7, whereas Ber-EP4 and CEA were completely negative. A dual color break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization probe identified rearrangement of the ETV6 gene locus on chromosome 12. The patient is alive with no evidence of recurrent disease or metastasis 3 years after the initial surgery. In conclusion, we report a rare example of mammary analog secretory carcinoma of the skin with ETV6 rearrangement. Awareness of this unique cutaneous tumor and subsequent reporting of additional cases is necessary for better characterization of its completely clinicopathologic spectrum.

  13. Genomic rearrangement screening of the BRCA1 from seventy Iranian high-risk breast cancer families

    PubMed Central

    Sedghi, Maryam; Esfandiari, Elham; Fazel-Najafabadi, Esmat; Salehi, Mansoor; Salavaty, Abbas; Fattahpour, Shirin; Dehghani, Leila; Nouri, Nayerossadat; Mokarian, Fariborz

    2016-01-01

    Background: The second leading cause of cancer deaths in women is breast cancer. Germline mutations in susceptibility breast cancer gene BRCA1 increase the lifetime risk of breast cancer. Eighty-one large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) have been reported up to date in BRCA1 gene, and evaluation of these rearrangements helps with precise risk assessment in high-risk individuals. In this study, we have investigated LGRs in BRCA1 among Iranian high-risk breast cancer families. Materials and Methods: Seventy patients with breast cancer who were identified negative for point mutations or small deletions/insertions of BRCA1 gene were selected. Deletions and duplications of BRCA1 gene were evaluated using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Results: Two deletions, deletion of exons 1A/1B-2 and exon 24, were detected in two patients with breast cancer. The former alteration was found in a woman with a strong family history of breast cancer while the latter one was detected in a woman with early onset of breast cancer. Conclusion: Although our data confirm that LGRs in BRCA1 comprise a relatively small proportion of mutations in hereditary breast cancer in the Iranian population, MLPA analysis might be considered for screening of LGRs in high-risk individuals. It is worth to note that our results are consistent with previous studies in various Asian and European countries. PMID:28163741

  14. Formation of ring-opened and rearranged products of guanine: mechanisms and biological significance.

    PubMed

    Jena, N R; Mishra, P C

    2012-07-01

    DNA damage by endogenous and exogenous agents is a serious concern, as the damaged products can affect genome integrity severely. Damage to DNA may arise from various factors such as DNA base modifications, strand break, inter- and intrastrand crosslinks, and DNA-protein crosslinks. Among these factors, DNA base modification is a common and important form of DNA damage that has been implicated in mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and many other pathological conditions. Among the four DNA bases, guanine (G) has the smallest oxidation potential, because of which it is frequently modified by reactive species, giving rise to a plethora of lethal lesions. Similarly, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG), an oxidatively damaged guanine lesion, also undergoes various degradation reactions giving rise to several mutagenic species. The various products formed from reactions of G or 8-oxoG with different reactive species are mainly 2,6-diamino-4-oxo-5-formamidopyrimidine, 2,5-diamino-4H-imidazolone, 2,2,4-triamino-5-(2H)-oxazolone, 5-guanidino-4-nitroimidazole, guanidinohydantoin, spiroiminodihydantoin, cyanuric acid, parabanic acid, oxaluric acid, and urea, among others. These products are formed from either ring opening or ring opening and subsequent rearrangement. The main aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of various possible reactions and the mechanisms involved, after which these ring-opened and rearranged products of guanine would be formed in DNA. The biological significance of oxidatively damaged products of G is also discussed.

  15. DNA methylation and genome rearrangement characteristics of phase change in cultured shoots of Sequoia sempervirens.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Chun; Hsiao, Lin-June; Pu, Szu-Yuan; Kuo, Ching-I; Huang, Bau-Lian; Tseng, Tsung-Che; Huang, Hao-Jen; Chen, Yu-Ting

    2012-06-01

    Epigenetic machinery regulates the expression of individual genes and plays a crucial role in globally shaping and maintaining developmental patterning. We studied the extent of DNA methylation in the nucleus, mitochondrion and chloroplast in cultured Sequoia sempervirens (coast redwood) adult, juvenile and rejuvenated shoots by measuring the ratio of methylcytosine to total cytosine using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We also analyzed nuclear DNA (nuDNA) polymorphisms of different shoot types by methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism (MSAP) and Southern blot analysis. The extent of nuDNA methylation was greater in the adult vegetative than juvenile and rejuvenated shoots (8% vs 6.5-7.5%). In contrast, the proportion of methylcytosine was higher in mitochondrial DNA (mDNA) of juvenile and rejuvenated shoots than adult shoots (6.6% vs 7.8-8.2%). MSAP and Southern blot analyses identified three MSAP fragments which could be applied as phase-specific molecular markers. We also found nuclear genome and mtDNA rearrangement may be as important as DNA methylation status during the phase change. Our findings strongly suggest that DNA methylation and genome rearrangement may affect the dynamic tissue- and cell type-specific changes that determine the developmental phase of S. sempervirens shoots.

  16. Control of an Unusual Photo-Claisen Rearrangement in Coumarin Caged Tamoxifen through an Extended Spacer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pamela T; Roberts, Edward W; Tang, Shengzhuang; Mukherjee, Jhindan; Cannon, Jayme; Nip, Alyssa J; Corbin, Kaitlin; Krummel, Matthew F; Choi, Seok Ki

    2017-02-17

    The use of coumarin caged molecules has been well documented in numerous photocaging applications including for the spatiotemporal control of Cre-estrogen receptor (Cre-ERT2) recombinase activity. In this article, we report that 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4OHT) caged with coumarin via a conventional ether linkage led to an unexpected photo-Claisen rearrangement which significantly competed with the release of free 4OHT. The basis for this unwanted reaction appears to be related to the coumarin structure and its radical-based mechanism of uncaging, as it did not occur in ortho-nitrobenzyl (ONB) caged 4OHT that was otherwise linked in the same manner. In an effort to perform design optimization, we introduced a self-immolative linker longer than the ether linkage and identified an optimal linker which allowed rapid 4OHT release by both single-photon and two-photon absorption mechanisms. The ability of this construct to actively control Cre-ERT2 mediated gene modifications was investigated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) in which the expression of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter dependent gene recombination was controlled by 4OHT release and measured by confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. In summary, we report the implications of this photo-Claisen rearrangement in coumarin caged compounds and demonstrate a rational linker strategy for addressing this unwanted side reaction.

  17. Genomic rearrangements and the evolution of clusters of locally adaptive loci

    PubMed Central

    Yeaman, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies of ecological genetics have found that alleles contributing to local adaptation sometimes cluster together, forming “genomic islands of divergence.” Divergence hitchhiking theory posits that these clusters evolve by the preferential establishment of tightly linked locally adapted mutations, because such linkage reduces the rate that recombination breaks up locally favorable combinations of alleles. Here, I use calculations based on previously developed analytical models of divergence hitchhiking to show that very few clustered mutations should be expected in a single bout of adaptation, relative to the number of unlinked mutations, suggesting that divergence hitchhiking theory alone may often be insufficient to explain empirical observations. Using individual-based simulations that allow for the transposition of a single genetic locus from one position on a chromosome to another, I then show that tight clustering of the loci involved in local adaptation tends to evolve on biologically realistic time scales. These results suggest that genomic rearrangements may often be an important component of local adaptation and the evolution of genomic islands of divergence. More generally, these results suggest that genomic architecture and functional neighborhoods of genes may be actively shaped by natural selection in heterogeneous environments. Because small-scale changes in gene order are relatively common in some taxa, comparative genomic studies could be coupled with studies of adaptation to explore how commonly such rearrangements are involved in local adaptation. PMID:23610436

  18. Structure of the germline genome of Tetrahymena thermophila and relationship to the massively rearranged somatic genome

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Eileen P; Kapusta, Aurélie; Huvos, Piroska E; Bidwell, Shelby L; Zafar, Nikhat; Tang, Haibao; Hadjithomas, Michalis; Krishnakumar, Vivek; Badger, Jonathan H; Caler, Elisabet V; Russ, Carsten; Zeng, Qiandong; Fan, Lin; Levin, Joshua Z; Shea, Terrance; Young, Sarah K; Hegarty, Ryan; Daza, Riza; Gujja, Sharvari; Wortman, Jennifer R; Birren, Bruce W; Nusbaum, Chad; Thomas, Jainy; Carey, Clayton M; Pritham, Ellen J; Feschotte, Cédric; Noto, Tomoko; Mochizuki, Kazufumi; Papazyan, Romeo; Taverna, Sean D; Dear, Paul H; Cassidy-Hanley, Donna M; Xiong, Jie; Miao, Wei; Orias, Eduardo; Coyne, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    The germline genome of the binucleated ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila undergoes programmed chromosome breakage and massive DNA elimination to generate the somatic genome. Here, we present a complete sequence assembly of the germline genome and analyze multiple features of its structure and its relationship to the somatic genome, shedding light on the mechanisms of genome rearrangement as well as the evolutionary history of this remarkable germline/soma differentiation. Our results strengthen the notion that a complex, dynamic, and ongoing interplay between mobile DNA elements and the host genome have shaped Tetrahymena chromosome structure, locally and globally. Non-standard outcomes of rearrangement events, including the generation of short-lived somatic chromosomes and excision of DNA interrupting protein-coding regions, may represent novel forms of developmental gene regulation. We also compare Tetrahymena’s germline/soma differentiation to that of other characterized ciliates, illustrating the wide diversity of adaptations that have occurred within this phylum. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19090.001 PMID:27892853

  19. Single-molecule FRET-Rosetta reveals RNA structural rearrangements during human telomerase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Parks, Joseph W; Kappel, Kalli; Das, Rhiju; Stone, Michael D

    2017-02-01

    Maintenance of telomeres by telomerase permits continuous proliferation of rapidly dividing cells, including the majority of human cancers. Despite its direct biomedical significance, the architecture of the human telomerase complex remains unknown. Generating homogeneous telomerase samples has presented a significant barrier to developing improved structural models. Here we pair single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) measurements with Rosetta modeling to map the conformations of the essential telomerase RNA core domain within the active ribonucleoprotein. FRET-guided modeling places the essential pseudoknot fold distal to the active site on a protein surface comprising the C-terminal element, a domain that shares structural homology with canonical polymerase thumb domains. An independently solved medium-resolution structure of Tetrahymena telomerase provides a blind test of our modeling methodology and sheds light on the structural homology of this domain across diverse organisms. Our smFRET-Rosetta models reveal nanometer-scale rearrangements within the RNA core domain during catalysis. Taken together, our FRET data and pseudoatomic molecular models permit us to propose a possible mechanism for how RNA core domain rearrangement is coupled to template hybrid elongation.

  20. Pyranoside-into-furanoside rearrangement: new reaction in carbohydrate chemistry and its application in oligosaccharide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Krylov, Vadim B; Argunov, Dmitry A; Vinnitskiy, Dmitry Z; Verkhnyatskaya, Stella A; Gerbst, Alexey G; Ustyuzhanina, Nadezhda E; Dmitrenok, Andrey S; Huebner, Johannes; Holst, Otto; Siebert, Hans-Christian; Nifantiev, Nikolay E

    2014-12-08

    Great interest in natural furanoside-containing compounds has challenged the development of preparative methods for their synthesis. Herein a novel reaction in carbohydrate chemistry, namely a pyranoside-into-furanoside (PIF) rearrangement permitting the transformation of selectively O-substituted pyranosides into the corresponding furanosides is reported. The discovered process includes acid-promoted sulfation accompanied by rearrangement of the pyranoside ring into a furanoside ring followed by solvolytic O-desulfation. This process, which has no analogy in organic chemistry, was shown to be a very useful tool for the synthesis of furanoside-containing complex oligosaccharides, which was demonstrated by synthesizing disaccharide derivatives α-D-Galp-(1→3)-β-D-Galf-OPr, 3-O-s-lactyl-β-D-Galf-(1→3)-β-D-Glcp-OPr, and α-L-Fucf-(1→4)-β-D-GlcpA-OPr related to polysaccharides from the bacteria Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterococcus faecalis and the brown seaweed Chordaria flagelliformis.

  1. Divergent synthesis and chemical reactivity of bicyclic lactone fragments of complex rearranged spongian diterpenes.

    PubMed

    Schnermann, Martin J; Beaudry, Christopher M; Genung, Nathan E; Canham, Stephen M; Untiedt, Nicholas L; Karanikolas, Breanne D W; Sütterlin, Christine; Overman, Larry E

    2011-11-02

    The synthesis and direct comparison of the chemical reactivity of the two highly oxidized bicyclic lactone fragments found in rearranged spongian diterpenes (8-substituted 6-acetoxy-2,7-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octan-3-one and 6-substituted 7-acetoxy-2,8-dioxabicyclo[3.3.0]octan-3-one) are reported. Details of the first synthesis of the 6-acetoxy-2,7-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octan-3-one ring system, including an examination of several possibilities for the key bridging cyclization reaction, are described. In addition, the first synthesis of 7-acetoxy-2,8-dioxabicyclo[3.3.0]octanones containing quaternary carbon substituents at C6 is disclosed. Aspects of the chemical reactivity and Golgi-modifying properties of these bicyclic lactone analogs of rearranged spongian diterpenes are also reported. Under both acidic and basic conditions, 8-substituted 2,7-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octanones are converted to 6-substituted-2,8-dioxabicyclo[3.3.0]octanones. Moreover, these dioxabicyclic lactones react with primary amines and lysine side chains of lysozyme to form substituted pyrroles, a conjugation that could be responsible for the unique biological properties of these compounds. These studies demonstrate that acetoxylation adjacent to the lactone carbonyl group, in either the bridged or fused series, is required to produce fragmented Golgi membranes in the pericentriolar region that is characteristic of macfarlandin E.

  2. The Liebermann-Burchard reaction: sulfonation, desaturation, and rearrangment of cholesterol in acid.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Quanbo; Wilson, William K; Pang, Jihai

    2007-02-01

    In the Liebermann-Burchard (LB) colorimetric assay, treatment of cholesterol with sulfuric acid, acetic anhydride, and acetic acid elicits a blue color. We studied the reactivity of cholesterol under LB conditions and provide definitive NMR characterization for approximately 20 products, whose structure and distribution suggest the following mechanistic picture. The major reaction pathways do not involve cholestadienes, i-steroids, or cholesterol dimers, as proposed previously. Instead, cholesterol and its acetate and sulfate derivatives undergo sulfonation at a variety of positions, often with skeletal rearrangements. Elimination of an SO(3)H group as H(2)SO(3) generates a new double bond. Repetition of this desaturation process leads to polyenes and ultimately to aromatic steroids. Linearly conjugated polyene cations can appear blue but form too slowly to account for the LB color response, whose chemical origin remains unidentified. Nevertheless, the classical polyene cation model is not excluded for Salkowski conditions (sulfuric acid), which immediately generate considerable amounts of cholesta-3,5-diene. Some rearrangements of cholesterol in H(2)SO(4) resemble the diagenesis pathways of sterols and may furnish useful lipid biomarkers for characterizing geological systems.

  3. Chloroplast genomes of two conifers lack a large inverted repeat and are extensively rearranged.

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, S H; Palmer, J D; Howe, G T; Doerksen, A H

    1988-01-01

    Chloroplast genomes of Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco] and radiata (Monterey) pine [Pinus radiata D. Don], two conifers from the widespread Pinaceae, were mapped and their genomes were compared to other land plants. Douglas-fir and radiata pine lack the large (20-25 kilobases) inverted repeat that characterizes most land plants. To our knowledge, this is only the second recorded loss of this ancient and highly conserved inverted repeat among all lineages of land plants thus far examined. Loss of the repeat largely accounts for the small size of the conifer genome, 120 kilobase, versus 140-160 kilobases in most land plants. Douglas-fir possesses a major inversion of 40-50 kilobases relative to radiata pine and nonconiferous plants. Nucleotide sequence differentiation between Douglas-fir and radiata pine was estimated to be 3.8%. Both conifer genomes possess a number of rearrangements relative to Osmunda, a fern, Ginkgo, a gymnosperm, and Petunia, an angiosperm. Among land plants, structural changes of this degree have occurred primarily within tribes of the legume family (Fabaceae) that have also lost the inverted repeat. These results support the hypothesis that the presence of the large inverted repeat stabilizes the chloroplast genome against major structural rearrangements. PMID:2836862

  4. Regioselective cope rearrangement and prenyl transfers on indole scaffold mimicking fungal and bacterial dimethylallyltryptophan synthases.

    PubMed

    Thandavamurthy, Karthikeyan; Sharma, Deepti; Porwal, Suheel K; Ray, Dale; Viswanathan, Rajesh

    2014-11-07

    Aromatic prenyltransferases are an actively mined enzymatic class whose biosynthetic repertoire is growing. Indole prenyltransferases catalyze the formation of a diverse set of prenylated tryptophan and diketopiperazines, leading to the formation of fungal toxins with prolific biological activities. At a fundamental level, the mechanism of C4-prenylation of l-tryptophan recently has surfaced to engage a debate between a "direct" electrophilic alkylation mechanism (for wt DMATS and FgaPT2) versus an indole C3-C4 "Cope" rearrangement followed by rearomatization (for mutant FgaPT2). Herein we provide the first series of regioselectively tunable conditions for a Cope rearrangement between C3 and C4 positions. Biomimetic conditions are reported that effect a [3,3]-sigmatropic shift whose two-step process is interrogated for intramolecularity and rate-limiting general base-promoted mechanism. Solvent polarity serves a crucial role in changing the regioselectivity, resulting in sole [1,3]-shifts under decalin. An intermolecular variant is also reported that effectively prenylates the C3 position of l-tryptophan, resulting in products that mimic the structures accessed by bacterial indole prenyltransferases. We report an elaborate investigation that includes screening various substituents and measuring steric and electronic effects and stereoselectivity with synthetically useful transformations.

  5. Structural and dynamic insights into the energetics of activation loop rearrangement in FGFR1 kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Tobias; Vajpai, Navratna; Phillips, Jonathan J.; Davies, Gareth; Holdgate, Geoffrey A.; Phillips, Chris; Tucker, Julie A.; Norman, Richard A.; Scott, Andrew D.; Higazi, Daniel R.; Lowe, David; Thompson, Gary S.; Breeze, Alexander L.

    2015-07-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases differ widely in their propensity to undergo rearrangements of the N-terminal Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG) motif of the activation loop, with some, including FGFR1 kinase, appearing refractory to this so-called `DFG flip'. Recent inhibitor-bound structures have unexpectedly revealed FGFR1 for the first time in a `DFG-out' state. Here we use conformationally selective inhibitors as chemical probes for interrogation of the structural and dynamic features that appear to govern the DFG flip in FGFR1. Our detailed structural and biophysical insights identify contributions from altered dynamics in distal elements, including the αH helix, towards the outstanding stability of the DFG-out complex with the inhibitor ponatinib. We conclude that the αC-β4 loop and `molecular brake' regions together impose a high energy barrier for this conformational rearrangement, and that this may have significance for maintaining autoinhibition in the non-phosphorylated basal state of FGFR1.

  6. Formation of rigid organic nanotubes with controlled internal cavity based on frustrated aggregate internal rearrangement mechanism.

    PubMed

    Han, Minwoo; Hyun, Jungin; Sim, Eunji

    2013-06-27

    We introduce frustrated aggregate internal rearrangement (FAIR) mechanism for anisotropic higher-order structure formations, in which the anisotropy arose due to the structural frustration. We demonstrate the FAIR mechanism by investigating the recently observed rigid organic nanotube formations through the self-assembly of building blocks, which include rigid segments and make intermolecular H-bonds, whereas the principle of the FAIR mechanism is general and is not limited to H-bonding building blocks or nanotube formations. Initially, molecules aggregate into sheetlike structures driven by nonspecific and nondirectional intermolecular interactions such as π-π stacking or amphiphilicity. Weak intermolecular H-bonds provide additional stability to the structure. Within the aggregate, however, not all molecules have the right orientation for specific and directional H-bonds whereas collective internal rearrangement of rigid building blocks requires a large amount of energy to overcome kinetically trapped barriers. Consequently, instead of the fully H-bonded global equilibrium structure, self-assembled layers become trapped with partial and disordered H-bonding schemes at various fractions leading to an anisotropic layer that undergoes spontaneous transformation into curved structures. The FAIR mechanism can readily be extended to anisotropic higher-order structures other than nanotubes and to the assembly of diverse building blocks including hybrids such as polymer nanocomposites. Also the reversible transformation from metastable nanotubes into layered sheets is potentially useful for controlling internal cavity size of nanotubes.

  7. Facile Smiles-type rearrangement in radical cations of N-acyl arylsulfonamides and analogs

    PubMed Central

    Irikura, Karl K.; Todua, Nino G.

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE N-Alkylation of sulfonylbenzamides was reported recently to cause a dramatic and surprising change in electron ionization mass spectrometry (EIMS), leading to a closed-shell base peak. Only an incomplete, speculative mechanism was available at that time. The fragmentation mechanism is determined in the present work and set in the context of related compounds. METHODS Candidate reaction mechanisms were evaluated theoretically using modest density-functional calculations. The fragmentation mechanism with the lowest barriers was identified and one of its implications tested successfully by experimental 18O-isotopic substitution. RESULTS The amide oxygen atom attacks the arylsulfonyl group at the ipso position (Smiles-type rearrangement), displacing a molecule of SO2. The resulting carboximidate radical cation has a weak C–O bond that breaks easily. The incipient aryloxyl radical abstracts a proton from the amide nitrogen to form the dominant product ion, but if the molecule is N-alkylated this cannot occur. Instead, the neutral aryloxyl radical is lost and a closed-shell, N-alkyl nitrilium ion is the major product. CONCLUSIONS The Smiles-type ion fragmentation mechanism is facile for the title compounds, despite the necessity for carbonyl oxygen to serve as a nucleophile. This rearrangement probably occurs in many of the mass spectra reported for structurally similar compounds, in which the nucleophile may be a thione, arylthio, imine, methylene, or methine moiety. PMID:24573815

  8. A hypomorphic Artemis human disease allele causes aberrant chromosomal rearrangements and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Cheryl; Huang, Ying; Masud, Tehmina; Lu, William; Westfield, Gerwin; Giblin, William; Sekiguchi, JoAnn M.

    2011-01-01

    The Artemis gene encodes a DNA nuclease that plays important roles in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), a major double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway in mammalian cells. NHEJ factors repair general DSBs as well as programmed breaks generated during the lymphoid-specific DNA rearrangement, V(D)J recombination, which is required for lymphocyte development. Mutations that inactivate Artemis cause a human severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome associated with cellular radiosensitivity. In contrast, hypomorphic Artemis mutations result in combined immunodeficiency syndromes of varying severity, but, in addition, are hypothesized to predispose to lymphoid malignancy. To elucidate the distinct molecular defects caused by hypomorphic compared with inactivating Artemis mutations, we examined tumor predisposition in a mouse model harboring a targeted partial loss-of-function disease allele. We find that, in contrast to Artemis nullizygosity, the hypomorphic mutation leads to increased aberrant intra- and interchromosomal V(D)J joining events. We also observe that dysfunctional Artemis activity combined with p53 inactivation predominantly predisposes to thymic lymphomas harboring clonal translocations distinct from those observed in Artemis nullizygosity. Thus, the Artemis hypomorphic allele results in unique molecular defects, tumor spectrum and oncogenic chromosomal rearrangements. Our findings have significant implications for disease outcomes and treatment of patients with different Artemis mutations. PMID:21147755

  9. RT-PCR is a more accurate diagnostic tool for detection of BCR-ABL rearrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Zehnbauer, B.A.; Allen, A.P.; McGrath, S.D.

    1994-09-01

    Detection of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1) or genomic Southern hybridization for clonal gene rearrangement (GSH-R) has provided very specific identification of BCR-ABL gene rearrangement. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is diagnostic for patterns of BCR-ABL expression which are undetected by GSH-R and/or Ph1 and provides increased sensitivity both at diagnosis and in detection of minimal residual leukemia. Fifty-three specimens (of 150 tested from 119 consecutive leukemia patients) were RT-PCR positive for BCR-ABL gene expression confirmed by hybridization of PCR products with b{sub 3}a{sub 2}, b{sub 2}a{sub 2}, or e{sub 1}a{sub 2} junction-specific oligonucleotides. In 6 cases of CML with GSH-R{sup {minus}}at diagnosis, RT-PCR provided specific BCR-ABL identification. Deletion of BCR regions, low mitotic index, or e{sub 1}a{sub 2} expression caused failure to detect GSH-R or Ph1 translocation.

  10. Novel CAD-ALK gene rearrangement is drugable by entrectinib in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amatu, Alessio; Somaschini, Alessio; Cerea, Giulio; Bosotti, Roberta; Valtorta, Emanuele; Buonandi, Pasquale; Marrapese, Giovanna; Veronese, Silvio; Luo, David; Hornby, Zachary; Multani, Pratik; Murphy, Danielle; Shoemaker, Robert; Lauricella, Calogero; Giannetta, Laura; Maiolani, Martina; Vanzulli, Angelo; Ardini, Elena; Galvani, Arturo; Isacchi, Antonella; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Siena, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Background: Activated anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fusions are recurrent events in a small fraction of colorectal cancers (CRCs), although these events have not yet been exploited as in other malignancies. Methods: We detected ALK protein expression by immunohistochemistry and gene rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridisation in the ALKA-372-001 phase I study of the pan-Trk, ROS1, and ALK inhibitor entrectinib. One out of 487 CRCs showed ALK positivity with a peculiar pattern that prompted further characterisation by targeted sequencing using anchored multiplex PCR. Results: A novel ALK fusion with the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamylase, and dihydroorotase (CAD) gene (CAD-ALK fusion gene) was identified. It resulted from inversion within chromosome 2 and the fusion of exons 1–35 of CAD with exons 20–29 of ALK. After failure of previous standard therapies, treatment of this patient with the ALK inhibitor entrectinib resulted in a durable objective tumour response. Conclusions: We describe the novel CAD-ALK rearrangement as an oncogene and provide the first evidence of its drugability as a new molecular target in CRC. PMID:26633560

  11. Truncation and constitutive activation of the androgen receptor by diverse genomic rearrangements in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Henzler, Christine; Li, Yingming; Yang, Rendong; McBride, Terri; Ho, Yeung; Sprenger, Cynthia; Liu, Gang; Coleman, Ilsa; Lakely, Bryce; Li, Rui; Ma, Shihong; Landman, Sean R; Kumar, Vipin; Hwang, Tae Hyun; Raj, Ganesh V; Higano, Celestia S; Morrissey, Colm; Nelson, Peter S; Plymate, Stephen R; Dehm, Scott M

    2016-11-29

    Molecularly targeted therapies for advanced prostate cancer include castration modalities that suppress ligand-dependent transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR). However, persistent AR signalling undermines therapeutic efficacy and promotes progression to lethal castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), even when patients are treated with potent second-generation AR-targeted therapies abiraterone and enzalutamide. Here we define diverse AR genomic structural rearrangements (AR-GSRs) as a class of molecular alterations occurring in one third of CRPC-stage tumours. AR-GSRs occur in the context of copy-neutral and amplified AR and display heterogeneity in breakpoint location, rearrangement class and sub-clonal enrichment in tumours within and between patients. Despite this heterogeneity, one common outcome in tumours with high sub-clonal enrichment of AR-GSRs is outlier expression of diverse AR variant species lacking the ligand-binding domain and possessing ligand-independent transcriptional activity. Collectively, these findings reveal AR-GSRs as important drivers of persistent AR signalling in CRPC.

  12. Selective Sirt2 inhibition by ligand-induced rearrangement of the active site.

    PubMed

    Rumpf, Tobias; Schiedel, Matthias; Karaman, Berin; Roessler, Claudia; North, Brian J; Lehotzky, Attila; Oláh, Judit; Ladwein, Kathrin I; Schmidtkunz, Karin; Gajer, Markus; Pannek, Martin; Steegborn, Clemens; Sinclair, David A; Gerhardt, Stefan; Ovádi, Judit; Schutkowski, Mike; Sippl, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Jung, Manfred

    2015-02-12

    Sirtuins are a highly conserved class of NAD(+)-dependent lysine deacylases. The human isotype Sirt2 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer, inflammation and neurodegeneration, which makes the modulation of Sirt2 activity a promising strategy for pharmaceutical intervention. A rational basis for the development of optimized Sirt2 inhibitors is lacking so far. Here we present high-resolution structures of human Sirt2 in complex with highly selective drug-like inhibitors that show a unique inhibitory mechanism. Potency and the unprecedented Sirt2 selectivity are based on a ligand-induced structural rearrangement of the active site unveiling a yet-unexploited binding pocket. Application of the most potent Sirtuin-rearranging ligand, termed SirReal2, leads to tubulin hyperacetylation in HeLa cells and induces destabilization of the checkpoint protein BubR1, consistent with Sirt2 inhibition in vivo. Our structural insights into this unique mechanism of selective sirtuin inhibition provide the basis for further inhibitor development and selective tools for sirtuin biology.

  13. Truncation and constitutive activation of the androgen receptor by diverse genomic rearrangements in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Henzler, Christine; Li, Yingming; Yang, Rendong; McBride, Terri; Ho, Yeung; Sprenger, Cynthia; Liu, Gang; Coleman, Ilsa; Lakely, Bryce; Li, Rui; Ma, Shihong; Landman, Sean R.; Kumar, Vipin; Hwang, Tae Hyun; Raj, Ganesh V.; Higano, Celestia S.; Morrissey, Colm; Nelson, Peter S.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Dehm, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapies for advanced prostate cancer include castration modalities that suppress ligand-dependent transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR). However, persistent AR signalling undermines therapeutic efficacy and promotes progression to lethal castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), even when patients are treated with potent second-generation AR-targeted therapies abiraterone and enzalutamide. Here we define diverse AR genomic structural rearrangements (AR-GSRs) as a class of molecular alterations occurring in one third of CRPC-stage tumours. AR-GSRs occur in the context of copy-neutral and amplified AR and display heterogeneity in breakpoint location, rearrangement class and sub-clonal enrichment in tumours within and between patients. Despite this heterogeneity, one common outcome in tumours with high sub-clonal enrichment of AR-GSRs is outlier expression of diverse AR variant species lacking the ligand-binding domain and possessing ligand-independent transcriptional activity. Collectively, these findings reveal AR-GSRs as important drivers of persistent AR signalling in CRPC. PMID:27897170

  14. Chromosomal rearrangements do not seem to affect the gene flow in hybrid zones between karyotypic races of the common shrew (Sorex araneus).

    PubMed

    Horn, Agnès; Basset, Patrick; Yannic, Glenn; Banaszek, Agata; Borodin, Pavel M; Bulatova, Nina S; Jadwiszczak, Katarzyna; Jones, Ross M; Polyakov, Andrei V; Ratkiewicz, Miroslaw; Searle, Jeremy B; Shchipanov, Nikolai A; Zima, Jan; Hausser, Jacques

    2012-03-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are proposed to promote genetic differentiation between chromosomally differentiated taxa and therefore promote speciation. Due to their remarkable karyotypic polymorphism, the shrews of the Sorex araneus group were used to investigate the impact of chromosomal rearrangements on gene flow. Five intraspecific chromosomal hybrid zones characterized by different levels of karyotypic complexity were studied using 16 microsatellites markers. We observed low levels of genetic differentiation even in the hybrid zones with the highest karyotypic complexity. No evidence of restricted gene flow between differently rearranged chromosomes was observed. Contrary to what was observed at the interspecific level, the effect of chromosomal rearrangements on gene flow was undetectable within the S. araneus species.

  15. High frequency of subtelomeric rearrangements in a cohort of 92 patients with severe mental retardation and dysmorphism.

    PubMed

    Novelli, A; Ceccarini, C; Bernardini, L; Zuccarello, D; Caputo, V; Digilio, M C; Mingarelli, R; Dallapiccola, B

    2004-07-01

    About 5-10% of patients with dysmorphisms, severe mental retardation, and normal standard karyotype are affected by subtelomeric chromosome rearrangements. Sequence homology between different chromosomes and variability between homologs make these regions more susceptible to breakage and reunion. We analyzed the telomeric regions of 92 of these patients, selected with strict clinical criteria. Fifteen individuals (16.3%) had subtelomeric rearrangements. Nine had a unique anomaly, which in one case had been inherited from a balanced parent. Six subjects had double segmental imbalances, including three de novo imbalances. This study provides further evidence for the plasticity of subtelomeric regions, which often results in cryptic rearrangements, and recommends stringent criteria for selecting patient candidates to telomere analysis.

  16. Mitochondrial genome sequences of Nematocera (lower Diptera): evidence of rearrangement following a complete genome duplication in a winter crane fly.

    PubMed

    Beckenbach, Andrew T

    2012-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of eight representatives of lower Diptera, suborder Nematocera, along with nearly complete sequences from two other species, are presented. These taxa represent eight families not previously represented by complete mitochondrial DNA sequences. Most of the sequences retain the ancestral dipteran mitochondrial gene arrangement, while one sequence, that of the midge Arachnocampa flava (family Keroplatidae), has an inversion of the trnE gene. The most unusual result is the extensive rearrangement of the mitochondrial genome of a winter crane fly, Paracladura trichoptera (family Trichocera). The pattern of rearrangement indicates that the mechanism of rearrangement involved a tandem duplication of the entire mitochondrial genome, followed by random and nonrandom loss of one copy of each gene. Another winter crane fly retains the ancestral diperan gene arrangement. A preliminary mitochondrial phylogeny of the Diptera is also presented.

  17. Rearrangement of immunoglobulin light chain genes in the chicken occurs prior to colonization of the embryonic bursa of Fabricius.

    PubMed Central

    Mansikka, A; Sandberg, M; Lassila, O; Toivanen, P

    1990-01-01

    We have applied polymerase-chain-reaction-directed immunoglobulin gene analysis to study the embryonic differentiation of chicken B cells. Immunoglobulin light chain DNA segments in the rearranged configuration were amplified from cells of the intraembryonic mesenchyme as early as day 7 of incubation. We showed by sequencing that the rearranged variable region genes in these early B-cell progenitors were not different from the germ-line V lambda 1 gene (the single functional light chain variable region gene in chickens). In the bursal B lymphocytes, on the other hand, clear gene conversion events were first observed at day 15 of embryonic development. The present data indicate that rearrangement of light chain genes in the chicken occurs independently of the bursa of Fabricius and that diversification of the variable region begins only later, when the surface immunoglobulin-positive B cells are proliferating in the bursal follicles. Images PMID:2123557

  18. Arrested rearrangement of TCR V[beta] genes in thymocytes from children with x-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sleasman, J.W.; Harville, T.O.; White, G.B.; Barrett, D.J. ); George, J.F. ); Goodenow, M.M. Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL )

    1994-07-01

    Human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) is an immunodeficiency disorder in which T cell development is arrested in the thymic cortex. B lymphocytes in children with X-linked SCID seem to differentiate normally. X-linked SCID is associated with a mutation in the gene that encodes the IL-2R [gamma]-chain. Because TCR-[beta] gene recombination is a pivotal initial event in T lymphocyte onteogeny within the thymus, the authors hypothesized that a failure to express normal IL-2R[gamma] could lead to impaired TCR-[beta] gene recombination in early thymic development. PCR was used to determine the status of TCR-[beta] gene-segment rearrangements in thymic DNA that had been obtained from children with X-linked SCID. The initial step in TCR-[beta] gene rearrangement, that of D[beta] to J[beta] recombination, was readily detected in all thymus samples from children with X-linked SCID; in contrast, V[beta] to DJ[beta] gene rearrangements were undetectable in the same samples. Both D[beta] to J[beta] and V[beta] to DJ[beta] TCR genes were rearranged in the thymic tissues obtained from immunologically normal children. The authors conclude that TCR[beta]-chain gene rearrangement is arrested in children with X-linked SCID. The results suggest a causative relationship between the failure of TCR [beta]-chain gene arrangements to proceed beyond DJ[beta] rearrangements and the production of a nonfunctional IL-2R [gamma]-chain. 45 refs., 3 figs.

  19. DFT evidence for a stepwise mechanism in the O-neophyl rearrangement of 1,1-diarylalkoxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Massimo; Ercolani, Gianfranco; Salamone, Michela

    2007-06-08

    Hybrid DFT calculations of the potential energy surface (PES) relative to the O-neophyl rearrangement of a series of ring-substituted 1,1-diarylalkoxyl radicals have been carried out at the UB3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. On the basis of the computational data, the rearrangement can be described as a consecutive reaction of the type a <--/--> b --> c (see above graphic), and the steady-state approximation could be applied in all cases to the intermediate b. The first-order rearrangement rate constants [kobs = k1k2/(k-1 + k2)] were thus obtained from the computed activation free-energies and were compared with the experimental rate constants measured previously in MeCN solution by laser flash photolysis. An excellent agreement is observed along the two series, which strongly supports the hypothesis that the O-neophyl rearrangement of 1,1-diarylalkoxyl radicals proceeds through the formation of the reactive 1-oxaspiro [2,5]octadienyl radical intermediate. This is in contrast to previous hypotheses that involve either a long-lived intermediate or the absence of this intermediate along the reaction path. The calculated rearrangement free-energies decrease upon going from the methoxy-substituted radical (Delta G degrees = -16.4 kcal x mol-1) to the nitro-substituted one (Delta G degrees = -21.8 kcal x mol-1), which follows a trend that is similar to the one observed for the CAr-O bond dissociation enthalpies (BDEs) of ring-substituted anisoles. This evidence indicates that in the O-neophyl rearrangement the effect of ring substituents on the strength of the newly formed CAr-O bond plays an important role.

  20. Expression of the Chemokine Receptor Gene, CCR8, is Associated with DUSP22 Rearrangements in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xiaoming; Flotte, Thomas J.; Law, Mark E.; Blahnik, Anthony J.; Chng, Wee-Joo; Huang, Gaofeng; Knudson, Ryan A.; Ketterling, Rhett P.; Porcher, Julie C.; Ansell, Stephen M.; Sidhu, Jagmohan; Dogan, Ahmet; Feldman, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is one of the most common T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas and has two main subtypes: an ALK-positive subtype characterized by ALK gene rearrangements and an ALK-negative subtype that is poorly understood. We recently identified recurrent rearrangements of the DUSP22 locus on 6p25.3 in both primary cutaneous and systemic ALK-negative ALCLs. This study aimed to determine the relationship between these rearrangements and expression of the chemokine receptor gene, CCR8. CCR8 has skin-homing properties, and has been suggested to play a role in limiting extracutaneous spread of primary cutaneous ALCLs. However, overexpression of CCR8 also has been reported in systemic ALK-negative ALCLs. As available antibodies for CCR8 have shown lack of specificity, we examined CCR8 expression using quantitative real-time PCR in frozen tissue and RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) in paraffin tissue. Both approaches showed higher CCR8 expression in ALCLs with DUSP22 rearrangements than in non-rearranged cases (PCR: 19.5-fold increase, p=0.01; ISH: 3.3-fold increase, p=0.0008). CCR8 expression was not associated with cutaneous presentation, cutaneous biopsy site, or cutaneous involvement during the disease course. These findings suggest that CCR8 expression in ALCL is more closely related to the presence of DUSP22 rearrangements than to cutaneous involvement, and that the function of CCR8 may extend beyond its skin-homing properties in this disease. This study also underscores the utility of RNA-ISH as a paraffin-based method for investigating gene expression when reliable antibodies for immunohistochemistry are not available. PMID:25390351

  1. PCR Analysis of IgH and TCR-γ Gene Rearrangements as a Confirmatory Diagnostic Tool for Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Poopak, Behzad; Valeshabad, Ali Kord; Elahi, Fazel; Rezvani, Hamid; Khosravipour, Gelareh; Jahangirpour, Mohammad Ali; Bolouri, Shirin; Golkar, Tolou; Salari, Fatemeh; Shahjahani, Mohammad; Saki, Najmaldin

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates PCR analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) and T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements on paraffin-embedded tissue sections and bone marrow aspirates of patients suspected to have lymphoproliferative disorders but with inconclusive diagnosis in histopathological examination. 130 samples of patients with inconclusive immunohistochemistry results were evaluated for clonal rearrangement of IgH and TCR genes. Based on histopathology examination, the patients were divided into three groups: the first group without any definite diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders (60 cases, 46.2 %), the second group suspected to have a lymphoproliferative disorder but in favor of benign disorders (19 cases, 14.6 %) and the third group suspect to lymphoproliferative disorders but relatively in favor of malignant disorders (51 cases, 39.2 %). After DNA extraction and quality control, semi-nested PCR was performed using consensus primers for amplification of TCR-γ and CDR-3 regions of IgH genes. PCR products were analyzed after heteroduplex analysis using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and were subject to silver staining. Totally, in over half of the cases (55.4 %), a monoclonal pattern was found in IgH or TCR-γ genes rearrangements. Monoclonal IgH gene rearrangement was detected in 48.1 % of patients, whereas monoclonal TCR-γ gene rearrangement was found in 33.6 % of them, which was not statistically significant (P = 0.008). Only in 32 patients (24.6 %) were the results of TCR-γ and IgH gene rearrangements consistent with respect to the presence (2.3 %) or absence (22.3 %) of monoclonality. Finally, PCR analysis of TCR-γ and IgH gene rearrangements led to definite diagnosis in 105 patients (80.8 %), and only 25 cases (19.2 %) remained inconclusive. Our results emphasize the usefulness of gene rearrangement study in cases without a definite diagnosis in immunohistochemistry studies. Multiple PCR analysis results when combined

  2. The mitochondrial genome of Iberobaenia (Coleoptera: Iberobaeniidae): first rearrangement of protein-coding genes in the beetles.

    PubMed

    Andujar, Carmelo; Arribas, Paula; Linard, Benjamin; Kundrata, Robin; Bocak, Ladislav; Vogler, Alfried P

    2017-03-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the recently discovered beetle family Iberobaeniidae is described and compared with known coleopteran mitogenomes. The mitochondrial sequence was obtained by shotgun metagenomic sequencing using the Illumina Miseq technology and resulted in an average coverage of 130 × and a minimum coverage of 35×. The mitochondrial genome of Iberobaeniidae includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs genes, and 1 putative control region, and showed a unique rearrangement of protein-coding genes. This is the first rearrangement affecting the relative position of protein-coding and ribosomal genes reported for the order Coleoptera.

  3. Novel selectfluor and deoxo-fluor-mediated rearrangements. New 5(6)-methyl and phenyl methanopyrrolidine alcohols and fluorides.

    PubMed

    Krow, Grant R; Lin, Guoliang; Moore, Keith P; Thomas, Andrew M; DeBrosse, Charles; Ross, Charles W; Ramjit, Harri G

    2004-05-13

    Stereoselective syntheses of novel 5,6-difunctionalized-2-azabicyclo[2.1.1]hexanes containing 5-anti-fluoro or hydroxyl in one methano bridge and a variety of syn- or anti-chloro, fluoro, hydroxy, methyl, or phenyl substituents in the other methano bridge have been effected. Rearrangements of iodides to alcohols were initiated using Selectfluor. Rearrangement of alcohols to fluorides was initiated using Deoxo-Fluor. Ring opening of 2-azabicyclo[2.2.0]hex-5-ene exo-epoxide with organocopper reagents is regioselective at C(5).

  4. Synthesis of Alkylidene(gem-Difluorocyclopropanes) from Propargyl Glycolates by a One-Pot Difluorocyclopropenation/Ireland-Claisen Rearrangement Sequence.

    PubMed

    Ernouf, Guillaume; Brayer, Jean-Louis; Folléas, Benoît; Demoute, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Christophe; Cossy, Janine

    2017-03-24

    A one-pot difluorocyclopropenation/Ireland-Claisen rearrangement sequence applied to readily available propargyl glycolates was developed as a route toward functionalized alkylidene(gem-difluorocyclopropanes). This strategy conveniently avoids the isolation of the unstable 3,3-difluorocyclopropenylcarbinyl glycolates arising from the difluorocyclopropenation. The Ireland-Claisen rearrangement proceeds with high diastereoselectivity and chirality transfer to afford alkylidene(gem-difluorocyclopropanes) incorporating a quaternary stereocenter and a protected glycolic acid moiety, which are useful building blocks for the preparation of functionalized gem-difluorocyclopropanes.

  5. Solvent effects on the O-neophyl rearrangement of 1,1-diarylalkoxyl radicals. A laser flash photolysis study.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Massimo; Salamone, Michela

    2005-12-09

    [reaction: see text] A laser flash photolysis study has been carried out to assess solvent effects on the O-neophyl rearrangement of 1,1-diarylalkoxyl radicals. The rearrangement rate constant k decreases by increasing solvent polarity and an excellent correlation with negative slope is obtained between log k and the solvent polarity parameter E(T)N. These evidences are in full agreement with the previous indication that the extent of internal charge separation decreases on going from the starting 1,1-diarylalkoxyl radical to the transition state.

  6. Loss-of-function mutations and global rearrangements in GPC3 in patients with Simpson–Golabi–Behmel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shimojima, Keiko; Ondo, Yumiko; Nishi, Eriko; Mizuno, Seiji; Ito, Miharu; Ioi, Aya; Shimizu, Mariko; Sato, Maho; Inoue, Masami; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Simpson–Golabi–Behmel syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome associated with mutations in GPC3, which is located in the Xq26 region. Three new loss-of-function mutations and a global X-chromosome rearrangement involving GPC3 were identified. A female sibling of the patient, who presented with a cleft palate and hepatoblastoma, carries the same chromosomal rearrangement and a paradoxical pattern of X-chromosome inactivation. These findings support variable GPC3 alterations, with a possible mechanism in female patients. PMID:27790374

  7. Cytogenetic, FISH and molecular characterization of 3q27/BCL-6 rearrangements in NHL

    SciTech Connect

    Wiodarska, I.; Styl, M.; Mecucci, C.

    1994-09-01

    Reciprocal translocations involving the chromosomal region 3q27 and one of the immunoglobulin loci at 14q32, 2p12 or 22q11 have been identified as the third most common type of chromosomal abnormality in Non Hodgkin`s lymphomas (NHLs), in addition to t(14;18) and t(8;14). These abnormalities appeared to be strongly associated with a diffuse, large cell subtype of B-cell NHL. Recently, a t(3;14) and t(3;22) have been cloned and a new transcriptional unit at 3q27, designated BCL-5, BCL-6 or LAZ3, has been identified. The gene appears to encode a new zinc finger protein with the putative function of a transcription factor. Rearrangements of the BCL-6 gene have been detected not only in cases with a typical t(3;14), t(2;3) and t(3;22), but also in a few NHL cases carrying 3q27 translocations not involving Ig genes. We report on nine B-NHL cases with a 3q27/BCL-6 rearrangement demonstrated by cytogenetic, FISH, and Southern analysis. Cytogenetic analysis complemented by FISH studies showed the presence of a classical t(3;14) or a t(3;22) in three cases and a variety of chromosomal aberrations involving the 3q27 locus in the remaining cases. Some of these translocations were not previously identified by conventional banding analysis. In three patients chromosome painting demonstrated involvement of both chromosome at the 3q24 band. We conclude: 3q27/BCL-6 rearrangements seem not to be restricted to diffuse large cell lymphoma. We here documented 3q27/BCL-6 abnormalities in Richter syndrome and follicular lymphomas. The variety of 3q27 aberrations at cytogenetic level suggests that, in addition to immunoglobulin genes, a number of other genes spreading over the human genome may deregulate BCL-6 in lymphomas. Chromosome painting is a powerful tool to demonstrate 3q27 abnormalities, not identified by conventional banding analysis.

  8. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K.

    2015-01-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  9. Mitochondrial genomes of acrodont lizards: timing of gene rearrangements and phylogenetic and biogeographic implications

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acrodonta consists of Agamidae and Chamaeleonidae that have the characteristic acrodont dentition. These two families and Iguanidae sensu lato are members of infraorder Iguania. Phylogenetic relationships and historical biogeography of iguanian lizards still remain to be elucidated in spite of a number of morphological and molecular studies. This issue was addressed by sequencing complete mitochondrial genomes from 10 species that represent major lineages of acrodont lizards. This study also provided a good opportunity to compare molecular evolutionary modes of mitogenomes among different iguanian lineages. Results Acrodontan mitogenomes were found to be less conservative than iguanid counterparts with respect to gene arrangement features and rates of sequence evolution. Phylogenetic relationships were constructed with the mitogenomic sequence data and timing of gene rearrangements was inferred on it. The result suggested highly lineage-specific occurrence of several gene rearrangements, except for the translocation of the tRNAPro gene from the 5' to 3' side of the control region, which likely occurred independently in both agamine and chamaeleonid lineages. Phylogenetic analyses strongly suggested the monophyly of Agamidae in relation to Chamaeleonidae and the non-monophyly of traditional genus Chamaeleo within Chamaeleonidae. Uromastyx and Brookesia were suggested to be the earliest shoot-off of Agamidae and Chamaeleonidae, respectively. Together with the results of relaxed-clock dating analyses, our molecular phylogeny was used to infer the origin of Acrodonta and historical biogeography of its descendant lineages. Our molecular data favored Gondwanan origin of Acrodonta, vicariant divergence of Agamidae and Chamaeleonidae in the drifting India-Madagascar landmass, and migration of the Agamidae to Eurasia with the Indian subcontinent, although Laurasian origin of Acrodonta was not strictly ruled out. Conclusions We detected distinct modes of

  10. Immunophenotypic and antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis in T cell neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    The author reviews the immunophenotypic profiles displayed by the major clinicopathologic categories of T cell neoplasia, the immunophenotypic criteria useful in the immunodiagnosis of T cell neoplasia, and the contributions made by antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis to the understanding of T cell neoplasia. Neoplasms belonging to distinct clinicopathologic categories of T cell neoplasia often exhibit characteristic immunophenotypic profiles. Approximately 80% of lymphoblastic lymphomas and 20% of acute lymphoblastic leukemias express phenotypes consistent with prethymic and intrathymic stages of T cell differentiation, including intranuclear terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. Cutaneous T cell lymphomas of mycosis fungoides type usually express pan-T cell antigens CD2, CD5, and CD3, often lack the pan-T cell antigen CD7, and usually express the mature, peripheral helper subset phenotype, CD4+ CD8-. Cutaneous T cell lymphomas of nonmycosis fungoides type and peripheral T cell lymphomas often lack one or more pan-T cell antigens and, in addition, occasionally express the anomalous CD4+ CD8+ or CD4- CD8- phenotypes. T gamma-lymphoproliferative disease is divisable into two broad categories: those cases that are CD3 antigen positive and exhibit clonal T cell receptor beta chain (TCR-beta) gene rearrangements and those cases that are CD3 antigen negative and exhibit the TCR-beta gene germline configuration. Human T cell lymphotropic virus-I (HTLV-I) associated Japanese, Carribean, and sporadic adult T cell leukemia/lymphomas usually express pan-T cell antigens, the CD4+ CD8- phenotype, and various T cell-associated activation antigens, including the interleukin-2 receptor (CD25). Immunophenotypic criteria useful in the immunodiagnosis of T cell neoplasia include, in increasing order of utility, T cell predominance, T cell subset antigen restriction, anomalous T cell subset antigen expression, and deletion of one or more pan-T cell antigens. Only in

  11. Quantum Theory of Rearrangement Collisions with Applications to Elementary Chemical Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Mark Steven

    A three-dimensional, quantum mechanical, coupled channel distorted wave approximation is developed for calculating cross sections for rearrangement collisions between an atom and a diatomic molecule based on the transition (T matrix) formulation of molecular scattering. In this approximation, both entrance and exit channel wave functions are calculated from the inelastic vibrational and rotational close-coupling approximation, and these wave functions are used in the calculation of the T matrix elements for rearrangement. This method allows for the internal states of both the target and product molecule to be dynamically coupled following the motion of the atom, and the wave functions for the exit and entrance channel have the proper asymptotic behavior. Therefore, this method is capable of yielding more accurate results than those from most of the T matrix schemes employed so far. An efficient computational procedure for calculating cross sections is given utilizing parity conservation and by reducing the six-dimensional integral over complex-valued functions to a real-valued three-dimensional integral. Cross sections calculated from this method are presented for the isotopic reactions H+H(,2), D+H(,2), H+H(,2), and Mu+H(,2) using the most accurate available potential surface for energies in the threshold regions of these reactions, and these are compared to other theoretical results when possible. The calculated cross sections for the H+H(,2) reaction are found to be in excellent agreement with the converged close coupling results. Rate constants obtained from the cross sections show the same temperature dependence and are of the same order of magnitude as experimental results; however, the present results are about a factor of 2-3 smaller than the experimental values at lower temperatures for all systems studied. The results of this study indicate that the present method is capable of correctly predicting all reaction attributes of the elementary chemical

  12. Rearrangement of the ETS genes ETV-1, ETV-4, ETV-5, and ELK-4 is a clonal event during prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Braun, Martin; Nikolov, Pavel; Boehm, Diana; Scheble, Veit; Menon, Roopika; Fend, Falko; Kristiansen, Glen; Perner, Sven; Wernert, Nicolas

    2012-11-01

    ETS gene rearrangements are frequently found in prostate cancer. Several studies have assessed the rearrangement status of the most commonly found ETS rearranged gene ERG, and the less frequent genes, ETV-1, ETV-4, ETV-5, and ELK-4 in primary prostate cancer. However, frequency in metastatic disease is not well investigated. Recently, we have assessed the ERG rearrangement status in both primary and corresponding lymph node metastases and observed that ERG rearrangement in primary prostate cancer transfers into lymph node metastases, suggesting it to be a clonal expansion event during prostate cancer progression. As a continuation, we investigated in this study whether this observation is valid for the less frequent ETS rearranged genes. Using dual-color break-apart fluorescent in situ hybridization assays, we evaluated the status of all less frequent ETS gene rearrangements for the first time on tissue microarrays constructed from a large cohort of 86 patients with prostate cancer and composed of primary and corresponding lymph node metastases, as well as in a second cohort composed of 43 distant metastases. ETV-1, ETV-4, ETV-5, and ELK-4 rearrangements were found in 8 (10%) of 81, 5 (6%) of 85, 1 (1%) of 85, and 2 (2%) of 86 of primary prostate cancer, respectively, and in 6 (8%) of 73, 4 (6%) of 72, 1 (1%) of 75, and 1 (1%) of 78 of corresponding lymph node metastases, respectively. ETV-1 and ETV-5 rearrangements were not found in the distant metastases cases, whereas ETV-4 and ELK-4 rearrangements were found in 1 (4%) of 25 and 1 (4%) of 24, respectively. Our findings suggest that rearrangement of the less frequent ETS genes is a clonal event during prostate cancer progression.

  13. Microstructural Rearrangements and their Rheological Implications in a Model Thixotropic Elastoviscoplastic Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Safa; McKinley, Gareth H.; Armstrong, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    We identify the sequence of microstructural changes that characterize the evolution of an attractive particulate gel under flow and discuss their implications on macroscopic rheology. Dissipative particle dynamics is used to monitor shear-driven evolution of a fabric tensor constructed from the ensemble spatial configuration of individual attractive constituents within the gel. By decomposing this tensor into isotropic and nonisotropic components we show that the average coordination number correlates directly with the flow curve of the shear stress versus shear rate, consistent with theoretical predictions for attractive systems. We show that the evolution in nonisotropic local particle rearrangements are primarily responsible for stress overshoots (strain-hardening) at the inception of steady shear flow and also lead, at larger times and longer scales, to microstructural localization phenomena such as shear banding flow-induced structure formation in the vorticity direction.

  14. Quantum scattering theory in light of an exactly solvable model with rearrangement collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, S.; Sudarshan, E.C.

    1996-04-01

    We present an exactly solvable quantum field theory which allows rearrangement collisions. We solve the model in the relevant sectors and demonstrate the orthonormality and completeness of the solutions, and construct the {ital S}-matrix. In light of the exact solutions constructed, we discuss various issues and assumptions in quantum scattering theory, including the isometry of the M{umlt o}ller wave matrix, the normalization and completeness of asymptotic states, and the nonorthogonality of basis states. We show that these common assertions are not obtained in this model. We suggest a general formalism for scattering theory which overcomes these and other shortcomings and limitations of the existing formalisms in the literature. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Analysis of spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements in neuroblasts of genetically unstable mutant lines of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Derzhavets, E.M.; Kim, A.I.; Aslanyan, M.M.

    1988-11-01

    The spectrum and frequency of chromosomal aberrations in the somatic cells of III instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster mutator line were studied using three of its derivatives (sbt, if, and w/sup a/) and line w as control. It has been demonstrated that the frequency of anaphases with bridges and acentric fragments increases in the neuroblast of flies of the mutator line as well as in the neuroblasts of the larvae of the lines sbt, if, and w/sup a/. The metaphase analysis revealed that the mutator line and its derivatives are characterized by higher frequencies of chromosomal aberrations as compared to the control. Chromatid breaks are predominant type of rearrangements. These results, suggest probably presence of the specific mutator factor or factors in the line studied, affecting chromosomal structure and, possibly, activating migration of the mobile genetic elements in the mutator line.

  16. Treatment modalities for advanced ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Ivana; Planchard, David

    2016-04-01

    The ALK gene plays a key role in the pathogenesis of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with NSCLC harboring an ALK-rearrangement represent the second oncogene addiction to be identified in this disease. Crizotinib was the first ALK inhibitor showing pronounced clinical activity, and is now a reference treatment for ALK-positive NSCLC disease. However, despite initial impressive responses to crizotinib, acquired resistance almost invariably develops within 12 months. The pressing need for effective second-line agents has prompted the rapid development of next-generation ALK inhibitors. These agents, notably ceritinib and alectinib as the most developed, have a higher potency against ALK than crizotinib, along with activity against tumors harboring crizotinib-resistant mutations and potentially improved CNS penetration.

  17. A genetic network that suppresses genome rearrangements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and contains defects in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Christopher D.; Srivatsan, Anjana; Nene, Rahul V.; Martinez, Sandra L.; Clotfelter, Sarah P.; Bell, Sara N.; Somach, Steven B.; E.S. de Souza, Jorge; Fonseca, André F.; de Souza, Sandro J.; Kolodner, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs) play an important role in human diseases, including cancer. The identity of all Genome Instability Suppressing (GIS) genes is not currently known. Here multiple Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCR assays and query mutations were crossed into arrays of mutants to identify progeny with increased GCR rates. One hundred eighty two GIS genes were identified that suppressed GCR formation. Another 438 cooperatively acting GIS genes were identified that were not GIS genes, but suppressed the increased genome instability caused by individual query mutations. Analysis of TCGA data using the human genes predicted to act in GIS pathways revealed that a minimum of 93% of ovarian and 66% of colorectal cancer cases had defects affecting one or more predicted GIS gene. These defects included loss-of-function mutations, copy-number changes associated with reduced expression, and silencing. In contrast, acute myeloid leukaemia cases did not appear to have defects affecting the predicted GIS genes. PMID:27071721

  18. Relations between the diffusion anomaly and cooperative rearranging regions in a hydrophobically nanoconfined water monolayer.

    PubMed

    de los Santos, Francisco; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    We simulate liquid water between hydrophobic walls, separated by 0.5 nm, to study how the diffusion constant D(∥) parallel to the walls depends on the microscopic structure of water. At low temperature T, water diffusion can be associated with the number of defects in the hydrogen bond network. However, the number of defects solely does not account for the peculiar diffusion of water, with maxima and minima along isotherms. Here, we calculate a relation that quantitatively reproduces the behavior of D(∥), focusing on the high-T regime. We clarify how the interplay between breaking of hydrogen bonds and cooperative rearranging regions of 1-nm size gives rise to the diffusion extrema in nanoconfined water.

  19. Bromination and accompanying rearrangement of the polycyclic oxetane 2,4-oxytwistane.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Murray G; Billing, Peter; Brecker, Lothar; Brinker, Udo H

    2014-09-19

    Bromination of the polycyclic oxetane 2,4-oxytwistane (rac-(1R,3S,4R,7S,9R,11S)-2-oxatetracyclo[5.3.1.0(3,11).0(4,9)]undecane) was undertaken in order to form 2,4-dibromotwistane. The oxetane was subjected to the mild reagent combination CBr4/Ph3P in a fashion similar to that for the Appel and Corey-Fuchs reactions. NMR spectroscopy revealed that the isomeric dibromo compound 2,8-dibromoisotwistane (2,8-dibromotricyclo[4.3.1.0(3,7)]decane) was inadvertently formed. The conversion was prevented by migration of a C-C bond within the geometrically stressed C10 framework. Computational chemistry was used to model the structure of the polycyclic oxetane and to assess the component of total ring strain energy due to the four-membered heterocycle. Mechanistic aspects behind the skeletal rearrangement are also discussed.

  20. Laser-assisted binary rearrangement collision: e++H-->Ps+p

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu-Min, Li; Zi-Fang, Zhou; Jian-Ge, Zhou; Yao-Yang, Liu

    1993-06-01

    In the first Born approximation, the laser-assisted rearrangement collision between a positron and a hydrogen atom is systematically studied. In solving the dressed wave functions, the A.p gauge is adopted. To overcome the difficulty in the reduction of the S matrix, we have developed the Feynman integration technique. The scattering amplitude is reduced to one-dimensional integrals and analytical expressions. The numerical calculation is greatly simplified, which makes it possible to compute the integral cross sections for Ps formation including multiphoton processes. Our results indicate that when the laser field is presented, the cross sections for Ps formation are remarkably enhanced. This is of great importance in improving this kind of reaction.

  1. An alignment-free method to find and visualise rearrangements between pairs of DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Pratas, Diogo; Silva, Raquel M.; Pinho, Armando J.; Ferreira, Paulo J.S.G.

    2015-01-01

    Species evolution is indirectly registered in their genomic structure. The emergence and advances in sequencing technology provided a way to access genome information, namely to identify and study evolutionary macro-events, as well as chromosome alterations for clinical purposes. This paper describes a completely alignment-free computational method, based on a blind unsupervised approach, to detect large-scale and small-scale genomic rearrangements between pairs of DNA sequences. To illustrate the power and usefulness of the method we give complete chromosomal information maps for the pairs human-chimpanzee and human-orangutan. The tool by means of which these results were obtained has been made publicly available and is described in detail. PMID:25984837

  2. Short communication: rearrangement of rumenic Acid in ruminant fats: a marker of thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Destaillats, F; Japiot, C; Chouinard, P Y; Arul, J; Angers, P

    2005-05-01

    Rumenic (cis-9,trans-11 18:2) acid is the main conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomer in milk and other ruminant fats. Anhydrous regular and high-CLA butterfats were heated at 200 degrees C for 2, 4, and 6 h under atmospheric conditions. [1,5] Sigmatropic isomerization of rumenic acid occurred, resulting in the formation of trans-8,cis-10 18:2 acid, as determined by mass spectrometry of its 4,4-dimethyloxazoline derivative. Rate of isomerization was monitored by gas-liquid chromatography, using a 120-m capillary column coated with 70% equivalent cyanoalkylpolysiloxane polymer, and reaction was of first order. Furthermore, [1,5] sigmatropic rearrangement product analysis can be used as an indicator of heat treatment of natural fats and oils containing CLA.

  3. Variation of magnetic domain structure during martensite variants rearrangement in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingzhe; Li, Fang

    2012-07-01

    Studies of magnetic domain and anisotropy in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMAs) are crucial for both understanding their ferromagnetism and engineering in applications. The experimental measurements showed that magnetization rotations and domain-wall motions exhibit distinct characteristics in the field-preferred variants and stress-preferred variants of FSMAs [Y. W. Lai, N. Scheerbaum, D. Hinz, O. Gutfleisch, R. Schäfer, L. Schultz, and J. McCord, Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 192504 (2007)]. Aiming at characterization of formation and variation of the complex magnetic microstructure in FSMAs, we present an analytical approach based on the energy minimization theory and Boltzmann relation on magnetic domains. The magnetic domain behavior during the martensite variants rearrangement is captured to show a good agreement with the experimental observations.

  4. Chromosomal rearrangements in a Somali wild ass pedigree, Equus africanus somaliensis (Perissodactyla, Equidae).

    PubMed

    Houck, M L; Kumamoto, A T; Cabrera, R M; Benirschke, K

    1998-01-01

    Chromosome analyses were conducted on 15 animals in a pedigree of Somali wild ass, Equus africanus somaliensis. G- and C-banded karyotypes are presented for the first time on this endangered species. The diploid number ranged from 62 to 64. Numerical chromosomal variation was the result of a centric fission which was accompanied by a heterochromatic deletion. The fission polymorphism involved acrocentric elements 19 and 21 as determined by G-banding. These autosomes are homologous to those involved in centric fission/fusion polymorphisms in other equids: E. asinus (domestic donkey), E. hemionus (onager), E. kiang (kiang), and E. burchelli (common zebra). Banding analyses also revealed a paracentric inversion polymorphism in submetacentric chromosome pair 2 of E. a. somaliensis. Both the centric fission and paracentric inversion polymorphisms involved heterochromatic regions. One individual was found to be heterozygous for two de novo chromosomal rearrangements: a centric fission (involving acrocentric elements 19 and 21) and a heterochromatic deletion of chromosome 2.

  5. Toward a Symphony of Reactivity: Cascades Involving Catalysis and Sigmatropic Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Amanda C.; May, Jeremy A.; Sarpong, Richmond; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Catalysis and synthesis are intimately linked in modern organic chemistry. The synthesis of complex molecules is an ever evolving area of science. In many regards, the inherent beauty associated with a synthetic sequence can be linked to a certain combination of the creativity with which a sequence is designed and the overall efficiency with which the ultimate process is performed. In synthesis, as in other endeavors, beauty is very much in the eyes of the beholder.[**] It is with this in mind that we will attempt to review an area of synthesis that has fascinated us and that we find extraordinarily beautiful, namely the combination of catalysis and sigmatropic rearrangements in consecutive and cascade sequences. PMID:24677683

  6. A rapidly rearranging retrotransposon within the miniexon gene locus of Crithidia fasciculata.

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, A; Yen, T J; Schwartz, D C; Smith, C L; Boeke, J D; Sollner-Webb, B; Cleveland, D W

    1990-01-01

    The tandemly arrayed miniexon genes of the trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata are interrupted at specific sites by multiple copies of an inserted element. The element, termed Crithidia retrotransposable element 1 (CRE1), is flanked by 29-base-pair target site duplications and contains a long 3'-terminal poly(dA) stretch. A single 1,140-codon reading frame is similar in sequence to the integrase and reverse transcriptase regions of retroviral pol polyproteins. Cloned lines derived from a stock of C. fasciculata have unique arrangements of CRE1s. In different cloned lines, CRE1s, in association with miniexon genes, are located on multiple chromosomes. By examining the arrangement of CRE1s in subclones, we estimate that the element rearranges at a rate of ca. 1% per generation. These results indicate that the C. fasciculata miniexon locus is the target for a novel retrotransposon. Images PMID:2153919

  7. Cytoskeletal Rearrangements in Synovial Fibroblasts as a Novel Pathophysiological Determinant of Modeled Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Aidinis, Vassilis; Carninci, Piero; Armaka, Maria; Witke, Walter; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Pavelka, Norman; Koczan, Dirk; Argyropoulos, Christos; Thwin, Maung-Maung; Möller, Steffen; Kazunori, Waki; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Kollias, George

    2005-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a high prevalence and substantial socioeconomic burden. Despite intense research efforts, its aetiology and pathogenesis remain poorly understood. To identify novel genes and/or cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, we utilized a well-recognized tumour necrosis factor-driven animal model of this disease and performed high-throughput expression profiling with subtractive cDNA libraries and oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations, coupled with independent statistical analysis. This twin approach was validated by a number of different methods in other animal models of arthritis as well as in human patient samples, thus creating a unique list of disease modifiers of potential therapeutic value. Importantly, and through the integration of genetic linkage analysis and Gene Ontology–assisted functional discovery, we identified the gelsolin-driven synovial fibroblast cytoskeletal rearrangements as a novel pathophysiological determinant of the disease. PMID:16254600

  8. Noninvasive detection of charge rearrangement in a quantum dot in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, C.; Rogge, M. C.; Harke, B.; Reinwald, M.; Wegscheider, W.; Hohls, F.; Haug, R. J.

    2005-11-01

    We demonstrate electron redistribution caused by magnetic field on a single quantum dot measured by means of a quantum point contact as noninvasive detector. Our device, which is fabricated by local anodic oxidation, allows us to control independently the quantum point contact and all tunneling barriers of the quantum dot. Thus we are able to measure both the change of the quantum dot charge and also changes of the electron configuration at constant number of electrons on the quantum dot. We use these features to exploit the quantum dot in a high magnetic field where transport through the quantum dot displays the effects of Landau shells and spin blockade. We confirm the internal rearrangement of electrons as function of the magnetic field for a fixed number of electrons on the quantum dot.

  9. Human ETS2 gene on chromosome 21 is not rearranged in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sacchi, N; Nalbantoglu, J; Sergovich, F R; Papas, T S

    1988-01-01

    The human ETS2 gene, a member of the ETS gene family, with sequence homology with the retroviral ets sequence of the avian erythroblastosis retrovirus E26 is located on chromosome 21. Molecular genetic analysis of Down syndrome (DS) patients with partial trisomy 21 allowed us to reinforce the supposition that ETS2 may be a gene of the minimal DS genetic region. It was originally proposed that a duplication of a portion of the DS region represents the genetic basis of Alzheimer disease, a condition associated also with DS. No evidence of either rearrangements or duplications of ETS2 could be detected in DNA from fibroblasts and brain tissue of Alzheimer disease patients with either the sporadic or the familiar form of the disease. Thus, an altered ETS2 gene dosage does not seem to be a genetic cause or component of Alzheimer disease. Images PMID:2902635

  10. Suppression of gross chromosomal rearrangements by a new alternative replication factor C complex

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Soma; Sikdar, Nilabja; Myung, Kyungjae

    2007-10-26

    Defects in DNA replication fidelity lead to genomic instability. Gross chromosomal rearrangement (GCR), a type of genomic instability, is highly enhanced by various initial mutations affecting DNA replication. Frequent observations of GCRs in many cancers strongly argue the importance of maintaining high fidelity of DNA replication to suppress carcinogenesis. Recent genome wide screens in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identified a new GCR suppressor gene, ELG1, enhanced level of genome instability gene 1. Its physical interaction with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and complex formation with Rfc2-5p proteins suggest that Elg1 functions to load/unload PCNA onto DNA during a certain DNA metabolism. High level of DNA damage accumulation and enhanced phenotypes with mutations in genes involved in cell cycle checkpoints, homologous recombination (HR), or chromatin assembly in the elg1 strain suggest that Elg1p-Rfc2-5p functions in a fundamental DNA metabolism to suppress genomic instability.

  11. Human ETS2 gene on chromosome 21 is not rearranged in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchi, N.; Nalbantoglu, J.; Sergovich, F.R.; Papas, T.S. )

    1988-10-01

    The human ETS2 gene, a member of the ETS gene family, with sequence homology with the retroviral ets sequence of the avian erythroblastosis retrovirus E26 is located on chromosome 21. Molecular genetic analysis of Down syndrome (DS) patients with partial trisomy 21 allowed us to reinforce the supposition that ETS2 may be a gene of the minimal DS genetic region. It was originally proposed that a duplication of a portion of the DS region represents the genetic basis of Alzheimer disease, a condition associated also with DS. No evidence of either rearrangements or duplications of ETS2 could be detected in DNA from fibroblasts and brain tissue of Alzheimer disease patients with either the sporadic or the familiar form of the disease. Thus, an altered ETS2 gene dosage does not seem to be a genetic cause or component of Alzheimer disease.

  12. Rearrangement of repeated DNA sequences during development of macronucleus in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Iwamura, Y; Sakai, M; Muramatsu, M

    1982-01-01

    Three clones of non-repetitive sequences and six clones containing repetitive sequences were obtained from micronuclear DNA of Tetrahymena thermophila. All the non-repetitive and three repetitive sequences had the same organization in micro- and macronuclear DNAs as revealed by blot hybridization. On the other hand, the remaining three clones with repetitive sequences had apparently different organization in the two nuclear DNAs. All these repetitive sequences showed a smear on the blot in addition to a number of discrete bands when micronuclear DNA was digested with EcoR I. In macronuclear DNAs, these sequences invariably became one or two bands and the smear disappeared. We conclude that, when a macronucleus develops from a micronucleus, the non-repetitive sequences amplify by more than 20 times with relatively few rearrangement, whereas some selected portions of repeated and/or repeat-contiguous sequences are amplified with rather extensive reorganization. Images PMID:6289270

  13. A biomimetic molecular switch at work: coupling photoisomerization dynamics to peptide structural rearrangement.

    PubMed

    García-Iriepa, Cristina; Gueye, Moussa; Léonard, Jérémie; Martínez-López, David; Campos, Pedro J; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Sampedro, Diego; Marazzi, Marco

    2016-03-07

    In spite of considerable interest in the design of molecular switches towards photo-controllable (bio)materials, few studies focused on the major influence of the surrounding environment on the switch photoreactivities. We present a combined experimental and computational study of a retinal-like molecular switch linked to a peptide, elucidating the effects on the photoreactivity and on the α-helix secondary structure. Temperature-dependent, femtosecond UV-vis transient absorption spectroscopy and high-level hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods were applied to describe the photoisomerization process and the subsequent peptide rearrangement. It was found that the conformational heterogeneity of the ground state peptide controls the excited state potential energy surface and the thermally activated population decay. Still, a reversible α-helix to α-hairpin conformational change is predicted, paving the way for a fine photocontrol of different secondary structure elements, hence (bio)molecular functions, using retinal-inspired molecular switches.

  14. Is the Beckmann rearrangement a concerted or stepwise reaction? A computational study.

    PubMed

    Yamabe, Shinichi; Tsuchida, Noriko; Yamazaki, Shoko

    2005-12-23

    [reaction: see text] RB3LYP calculations were performed on the Beckman rearrangement by the use of three substrates, acetone oxime (1), acetophenone oxime (2), and cyclohexanone oxime (3). Acidic solvents were modeled by H+ (CH3COOH)3 and H3O+ (H2O)6, and reaction paths were determined precisely. For 1, a two-step process involving a sigma-type cationic complex was obtained. For 2, a three-step process with pi- and sigma-type complexes was found in H+ (CH3COOH)3 and a two-step process involving a sigma-type cationic complex was obtained in H3O+ (H2O)6. However, for 3, a concerted process without pi and sigma complexes was calculated, which leads to the product, epsilon-caprolactam. Three different mechanisms were explained in terms of FMO theory.

  15. Epigenetic and 3-dimensional regulation of V(D)J rearrangement of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Degner-Leisso, Stephanie C; Feeney, Ann J

    2010-12-01

    V(D)J recombination is a crucial component of the adaptive immune response, allowing for the production of a diverse antigen receptor repertoire (Ig and TCR). This review will focus on how epigenetic regulation and 3-dimensional (3D) interactions may control V(D)J recombination at Ig loci. The interplay between transcription factors and post-translational modifications at the Igh, Igκ, and Igλ loci will be highlighted. Furthermore, we propose that the spatial organization and epigenetic boundaries of each Ig loci before and during V(D)J recombination may be influenced in part by the CTCF/cohesin complex. Taken together, the many epigenetic and 3D layers of control ensure that Ig loci are only rearranged at appropriate stages of B cell development.

  16. WRN mutations in Werner syndrome patients: genomic rearrangements, unusual intronic mutations and ethnic-specific alterations.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Katrin; Lee, Lin; Leistritz, Dru F; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Saha, Bidisha; Hisama, Fuki M; Eyman, Daniel K; Lessel, Davor; Nürnberg, Peter; Li, Chumei; Garcia-F-Villalta, María J; Kets, Carolien M; Schmidtke, Joerg; Cruz, Vítor Tedim; Van den Akker, Peter C; Boak, Joseph; Peter, Dincy; Compoginis, Goli; Cefle, Kivanc; Ozturk, Sukru; López, Norberto; Wessel, Theda; Poot, Martin; Ippel, P F; Groff-Kellermann, Birgit; Hoehn, Holger; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2010-07-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by null mutations at the WRN locus, which codes for a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Since 1988, the International Registry of Werner syndrome had enrolled 130 molecularly confirmed WS cases from among 110 worldwide pedigrees. We now report 18 new mutations, including two genomic rearrangements, a deep intronic mutation resulting in a novel exon, a splice consensus mutation leading to utilization of the nearby splice site, and two rare missense mutations. We also review evidence for founder mutations among various ethnic/geographic groups. Founder WRN mutations had been previously reported in Japan and Northern Sardinia. Our Registry now suggests characteristic mutations originated in Morocco, Turkey, The Netherlands and elsewhere.

  17. WRN mutations in Werner syndrome patients: genomic rearrangements, unusual intronic mutations and ethnic-specific alterations

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Katrin; Lee, Lin; Leistritz, Dru F.; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Saha, Bidisha; Hisama, Fuki M.; Eyman, Daniel K.; Lessel, Davor; Nürnberg, Peter; Li, Chumei; Garcia-F-Villalta, María J.; Kets, Carolien M.; Schmidtke, Joerg; Cruz, Vítor Tedim; Van den Akker, Peter C.; Boak, Joseph; Peter, Dincy; Compoginis, Goli; Cefle, Kivanc; Ozturk, Sukru; López, Norberto; Wessel, Theda; Poot, Martin; Ippel, P. F.; Groff-Kellermann, Birgit; Hoehn, Holger; Martin, George M.; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by null mutations at the WRN locus, which codes for a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Since 1988, the International Registry of Werner syndrome had enrolled 130 molecularly confirmed WS cases from among 110 worldwide pedigrees. We now report 18 new mutations, including two genomic rearrangements, a deep intronic mutation resulting in a novel exon, a splice consensus mutation leading to utilization of the nearby splice site, and two rare missense mutations. We also review evidence for founder mutations among various ethnic/geographic groups. Founder WRN mutations had been previously reported in Japan and Northern Sardinia. Our Registry now suggests characteristic mutations originated in Morocco, Turkey, The Netherlands and elsewhere. PMID:20443122

  18. Chromosomal rearrangements and protein globularity changes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Xin Yue

    2016-01-01

    Background Meningitis is a major cause of mortality in tuberculosis (TB). It is not clear what factors promote central nervous system invasion and pathology but it has been reported that certain strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) might have genetic traits associated with neurotropism. Methods In this study, we generated whole genome sequences of eight clinical strains of Mtb that were isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients presenting with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) in Malaysia, and compared them to the genomes of H37Rv and other respiratory Mtb genomes either downloaded from public databases or extracted from local sputum isolates. We aimed to find genomic features that might be distinctly different between CSF-derived and respiratory Mtb. Results Genome-wide comparisons revealed rearrangements (translocations, inversions, insertions and deletions) and non-synonymous SNPs in our CSF-derived strains that were not observed in the respiratory Mtb genomes used for comparison. These rearranged segments were rich in genes for PE (proline-glutamate)/PPE (proline-proline-glutamate), transcriptional and membrane proteins. Similarly, most of the ns SNPs common in CSF strains were noted in genes encoding PE/PPE proteins. Protein globularity differences were observed among mycobacteria from CSF and respiratory sources and in proteins previously reported to be associated with TB meningitis. Transcription factors and other transcription regulators featured prominently in these proteins. Homologs of proteins associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis and Neisseria meningitidis virulence were identified in neuropathogenic as well as respiratory mycobacterial spp. examined in this study. Discussion The occurrence of in silico genetic differences in CSF-derived but not respiratory Mtb suggests their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of TBM. However, overall findings in this comparative analysis support the postulation that TB meningeal

  19. Rearrangement of substrate secondary structure facilitates binding to the Neurospora VS ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Zamel, Ricardo; Collins, Richard A

    2002-12-13

    The Neurospora VS ribozyme differs from other small, naturally occurring ribozymes in that it recognizes for trans cleavage or ligation a substrate that consists largely of a stem-loop structure. We have previously found that cleavage or ligation by the VS ribozyme requires substantial rearrangement of the secondary structure of stem-loop I, which contains the cleavage/ligation site. This rearrangement includes breaking the top base-pair of stem-loop I, allowing formation of a kissing interaction with loop V, and changing the partners of at least three other base-pairs within stem-loop I to adopt a conformation termed shifted. In the work presented, we have designed a binding assay and used mutational analysis to investigate the contribution of each of these structural changes to binding and ligation. We find that the loop I-V kissing interaction is necessary but not sufficient for binding and ligation. Constitutive opening of the top base-pair of stem-loop I has little, if any, effect on either activity. In contrast, the ability to adopt the shifted conformation of stem-loop I is a major determinant of binding: mutants that cannot adopt this conformation bind much more weakly than wild-type and mutants with a constitutively shifted stem-loop I bind much more strongly. These results implicate the adoption of the shifted structure of stem-loop I as an important process at the binding step in the VS ribozyme reaction pathway. Further investigation of features near the cleavage/ligation site revealed that sulphur substitution of the non-bridging phosphate oxygen atoms immediately downstream of the cleavage/ligation site, implicated in a putative metal ion binding site, significantly altered the cleavage/ligation equilibrium but did not perturb substrate binding significantly. This indicates that the substituted oxygen atoms, or an associated metal ion, affect a step that occurs after binding and that they influence the rates of cleavage and ligation differently.

  20. Impact of Transcription Units rearrangement on the evolution of the regulatory network of gamma-proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    González Pérez, Abel D; González González, Evelyn; Espinosa Angarica, Vladimir; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2008-01-01

    Background In the past years, several studies begun to unravel the structure, dynamical properties, and evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks. However, even those comparative studies that focus on a group of closely related organisms are limited by the rather scarce knowledge on regulatory interactions outside a few model organisms, such as E. coli among the prokaryotes. Results In this paper we used the information annotated in Tractor_DB (a database of regulatory networks in gamma-proteobacteria) to calculate a normalized Site Orthology Score (SOS) that quantifies the conservation of a regulatory link across thirty genomes of this subclass. Then we used this SOS to assess how regulatory connections have evolved in this group, and how the variation of basic regulatory connection is reflected on the structure of the chromosome. We found that individual regulatory interactions shift between different organisms, a process that may be described as rewiring the network. At this evolutionary scale (the gamma-proteobacteria subclass) this rewiring process may be an important source of variation of regulatory incoming interactions for individual networks. We also noticed that the regulatory links that form feed forward motifs are conserved in a better correlated manner than triads of random regulatory interactions or pairs of co-regulated genes. Furthermore, the rewiring process that takes place at the most basic level of the regulatory network may be linked to rearrangements of genetic material within bacterial chromosomes, which change the structure of Transcription Units and therefore the regulatory connections between Transcription Factors and structural genes. Conclusion The rearrangements that occur in bacterial chromosomes-mostly inversion or horizontal gene transfer events – are important sources of variation of gene regulation at this evolutionary scale. PMID:18366643