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Sample records for acid-deficient uranyl nitrate

  1. EXTRACTION OF URANYL NITRATE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Furman, N.H.; Mundy, R.J.

    1957-12-10

    An improvement in the process is described for extracting aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions with an organic solvent such as ether. It has been found that the organic phase will extract a larger quantity of uranyl nitrate if the aqueous phase contains in addition to the uranyl nitrate, a quantity of some other soluble nitrate to act as a salting out agent. Mentioned as suitable are the nitrates of lithium, calcium, zinc, bivalent copper, and trivalent iron.

  2. GRAPHITE PRODUCTION UTILIZING URANYL NITRATE HEXAHYDRATE CATALYST

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Armstrong, J.R.; Schell, D.H.

    1964-03-10

    ABS>The graphitizing of a mixture composed of furfuryl alcohol binder and uranyl nitrate hexahydrate hardener and the subsequent curing, baking, and graphitizing with pressure being initially applied prior to curing are described. The pressure step may be carried out by extrusion, methyl cellulose being added to the mixture before the completion of extrusion. Uranium oxide may be added to the graphitizable mixture prior to the heating and pressure steps. The graphitizable mixture may consist of discrete layers of different compositions. (AEC)

  3. SEPARATION OF URANYL NITRATE BY EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Stoughton, R.W.; Steahly, F.L.

    1958-08-26

    A process is presented for obtaining U/sup 233/ from solutions containing Pa/sup 233/. A carrier precipitate, such as MnO/sub 2/, is formed in such solutions and carries with it the Pa/sup 233/ present. This precipitate is then dissolved in nitric acid and the solution is aged to allow decay of the Pa/ sup 233/ into U/sup 233/. After a sufficient length of time the U/sup 233/ bearing solution is made 2.5 to 4.5 Molar in manganese nitrate by addition thereof, and the solution is then treated with ether to obtain uranyl nitrate by solvent extraction techniques.

  4. [Study of the mechanisms of cytotoxic effect of uranyl nitrate].

    PubMed

    Belosludtsev, K N; Garmash, S A; Belosludtseva, N V; Belova, S P; Berezhnov, A V; Gudkov, S V

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of cytotoxic effect of uranyl nitrate were studied. It was shown that uranyl nitrate induced HEp-2 cell death, mainly by necrotic way. In the experiments in vitro, uranyl nitrate caused an appearance of 8-oxoguanine in DNA, indicating the induction of oxidative stress. The experiments with isolated rat liver mitochondria revealed that 1 mM uranyl nitrate decreased the respiration rates of mitochondria in state 3 and DNP-induced respiration. At the same time, uranyl nitrate had no influence on the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and decreased the rate of formation of H2O2 by mitochondria. Possible molecular mechanisms of uranyl-induced necrosis are discussed.

  5. Optimization of a uranyl nitrate passive neutron counter

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Eric Benton; Bracken, David; West, James; Freeman, Corey; Newell, Matthew R; Bourret, Steven C; Rothrock, Richard B; Ladd - Lively, Jennifer L; Schuh, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Safeguarding natural uranium as it enters the fuel cycle has become a priority for the safeguards community in recent years. Uranyl nitrate is a material of interest in this endeavor because it is normally a step in the process from converting uranium ores to more concentrated forms like UO{sub 2} and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. This paper will detail the improvements and design optimizations made for a uranyl nitrate neutron detector. The original design of the detector was based on standard neutron counter designs and featured 2 rings of He-3 tubes fully moderated and shielded from background. Several areas for enhancement were identified after months of testing in three different locations. An operating uranyl nitrate facility was included as one of the test locations. Three significant upgrades to the counter addressed in the redesign were: real time background detection, counter reliability improvements, and optimization of the detector design for the detection of neutrons emitted by the uranyl nitrate flowing through the monitored process pipe. The optimized detector design includes significant electronics upgrades, the ability to detect neutrons (background and signal) with 36 degree spatial resolution around the process pipe for signal and 45 degree spatial resolution for background, inner and outer rings of He-3 tubes for real time background corrections, and notably more reliable cabling. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) modeling was used to optimize the signal (neutrons from uranyl nitrate in the monitored process pipe) to noise (background neutrons from all sources) ratio of the inner ring of He-3 tubes. Additionally, MCNP modeling maximized noise to signal on the outer ring of He-3 tubes. Details of the detector optimization as well as all the additional detector enhancements will be discussed. The neutron counter will be field tested on the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  6. SEPARATION OF BARIUM VALUES FROM URANYL NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Tompkins, E.R.

    1959-02-24

    The separation of radioactive barium values from a uranyl nitrate solution of neutron-irradiated uranium is described. The 10 to 20% uranyl nitrate solution is passed through a flrst column of a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring the adsorption of barium and certain other cations. The loaded resin is first washed with dilute sulfuric acid to remove a portion of the other cations, and then wash with a citric acid solution at pH of 5 to 7 to recover the barium along with a lesser amount of the other cations. The PH of the resulting eluate is adjusted to about 2.3 to 3.5 and diluted prior to passing through a smaller second column of exchange resin. The loaded resin is first washed with a citric acid solution at a pH of 3 to elute undesired cations and then with citric acid solution at a pH of 6 to eluts the barium, which is substantially free of undesired cations.

  7. Influence of Acidity on Uranyl Nitrate Association in Aqueous Solutions: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, Valmor F; Cui, Shengting; Khomami, Bamin; Ye, Xianggui; Smith, Rodney Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Uranyl ion complexation with water and nitrate is a key aspect of the uranium/plutonium extraction process. We have carried out a molecular dynamics simulation study to investigate this complexation process, including the molecular composition of the various complex species, the corresponding structure, and the equilibrium distribution of the complexes. The observed structures of the complexes suggest that in aqueous solution, uranyls are generally hydrated by 5 water molecules in the equatorial plane. When associating with nitrate ions, a water molecule is replaced by a nitrate ion, preserving the five-fold coordination and planar symmetry. Analysis of the pair correlation function between uranyl and nitrate suggests that nitrates bind to uranyl in aqueous solution mainly in a monodentate mode, although a small portion of bidentates occur. Dynamic association and dissociation between uranyls and nitrates take place in aqueous solution with a substantial amount of fluctuation in the number of various uranyl nitrate species. The average number of the uranyl mononitrate complexes shows a dependence on acid concentration consistent with equilibrium-constant analysis, namely, the concentration of [UO2NO3]+ increases with nitric acid concentration.

  8. Some properties of compounds of uranyl nitrate with dimethylformamide

    SciTech Connect

    Bykhovskii, D.N.; Novikov, G.S.; Smirnov, A.N.; Solntseva, L.V.

    1986-05-01

    The authors establish that in the interaction of solutions of uranyl nitrate containing excess HNO/sub 3/ with dimethylformamide, the compound UO/sub 2/(N)/sub 3/)/sub 2/ X 2HCON(CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/ crystallizes. An analysis of the IR spectrum of the salt indicates bidentate coordination of the NO/sup -//sub 3/ ions and a bond of the DMFA molecules to the uranium atom through the oxygen atoms. The interplane distances were calculated according to the x-ray powder patterns. The solubility of the compound was studied as a function of the composition of the liquid phase. The minimum solubility, equal to 0.013 M, is achieved at NHO/sub 3/ concentrations of about 6 M and DMFA 4-6 M. Using the electronic absorption spectra, some data were obtained on the nature of comoplex formation in solution.

  9. Uranyl nitrate source characterization for criticality alarm placement analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.T.; Pevey, R.E.; Angelo, P.L.

    2000-07-01

    This work concerns the development of an equivalent point source to represent the radiation release from a highly enriched uranyl nitrate criticality accident. This source will be used in a subsequent deep penetration criticality alarm placement analysis. It is more efficient to separate the source characterization analysis from the alarm placement analysis because (a) the industry standard tools for doing the two analyses are different (criticality safety code versus deep penetration shielding code), (b) the industry standard libraries commonly used for the two analyses are different (neutron library versus coupled neutron/photon library), and (c) the calculational approaches for the two analyses are different (neutronic critical {kappa}{sub eff} eigenvalue search versus deep penetration dose determination).

  10. Analysis of Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Nested Annular Tank Array

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; James D. Cleaver

    2009-06-01

    Two series of experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory during the 1980s using highly enriched (93%) uranyl nitrate solution in annular tanks. [1, 2] Tanks were of typical sizes found in nuclear production plants. Experiments looked at tanks of varying radii in a co-located set of nested tanks, a 1 by 2 array, and a 1 by 3 array. The co-located set of tanks had been analyzed previously [3] as a benchmark for inclusion within the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. [4] The current study represents the benchmark analysis of the 1 by 3 array of a series of nested annular tanks. Of the seventeen configurations performed in this set of experiments, twelve were evaluated and nine were judged as acceptable benchmarks.

  11. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  12. Renal Toxicogenomic Response to Chronic Uranyl Nitrate Insult in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Taulan, Magali; Paquet, François; Maubert, Christophe; Delissen, Olivia; Demaille, Jacques; Romey, Marie-Catherine

    2004-01-01

    Although the nephrotoxicity of uranium has been established through numerous animal studies, relatively little is known about the effects of long-term environmental uranium exposure. Using a combination of conventional biochemical studies and serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), we examined the renal responses to uranyl nitrate (UN) chronic exposure. Renal uranium levels were significantly increased 4 months after ingestion of uranium in drinking water. Creatinine levels in serum were slightly but significantly increased compared with those in controls. Although no further significant differences in other parameters were noted, substantial molecular changes were observed in toxicogenomic profiles. UN induced dramatic alterations in expression levels of more than 200 genes, mainly up-regulated, including oxidative-response–related genes, genes encoding for cellular metabolism, ribosomal proteins, signal transduction, and solute transporters. Seven differentially expressed transcripts were confirmed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, significantly increased peroxide levels support the implication of oxidative stress in UN toxicant response. This report highlights the potential of SAGE for the discovery of novel toxicant-induced gene expression alterations. Here, we present, for the first time, a comprehensive view of renal molecular events after uranium long-term exposure. PMID:15598614

  13. Solid state interaction studies on binary nitrate mixtures of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate and lanthanum nitrate hexahydrate at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalekar, Bhupesh; Raje, Naina; Reddy, A. V. R.

    2017-02-01

    Interaction behavior of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) and lanthanum nitrate hexahydrate (LaNH) have been investigated on the mixtures in different molar ratios of the two precursors and monitoring the reactions at elevated temperatures with thermoanalytical and X-ray diffraction measurement techniques. During the decomposition of equimolar mixture of LaNH and UNH, formation of lanthanum uranate (U0.5La0.5)O2, was seen by the temperature of 500 °C along with lanthanum oxide (La2O3) and uranium trioxide (UO3). By the temperature of 700 °C, the formation of uranium sesquioxide (U3O8) was observed along with (U0.5La0.5)O2 as end products in uranium rich mixtures. Lanthanum rich compositions decomposed by the temperature of 700 °C to give (U0.5La0.5)O2 and La2O3 as end products.

  14. PROCESS FOR EXTRACTING NEPTUNIUM AND PLUTONIUM FROM NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS OF SAME CONTAINING URANYL NITRATE WITH A TERTIARY AMINE

    DOEpatents

    Sheppard, J.C.

    1962-07-31

    A process of selectively extracting plutonium nitrate and neptunium nitrate with an organic solution of a tertiary amine, away from uranyl nitrate present in an aqueous solution in a maximum concentration of 1M is described. The nitric acid concentration is adjusted to about 4M and nitrous acid is added prior to extraction. (AEC)

  15. The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]-: infrared spectrum and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G. S.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Oomens, Jos; De Jong, Wibe A.; McIIwain, Michael E.

    2011-12-01

    The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]- was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate v3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]- compared to the mono-complex [UO2(NO3)3]-, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (v3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the v3 frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The lowest energy structure predicted by density functional theory (B3LYP functional) calculations was one in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

  16. The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)(2)(NO3)(5)](-): infrared spectrum and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold; Michael J. van Stipdonk; Jos Oomens; Wibe de Jong; Michael E. McIlwain

    2011-12-01

    The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup -} was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate nu3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup -} compared to the mono-complex [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sup -}, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (nu3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the {nu}{sub 3} frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The structure was calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP functional), which produced a structure in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

  17. CONTINUOUS PRECIPITATION METHOD FOR CONVERSION OF URANYL NITRATE TO URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Reinhart, G.M.; Collopy, T.J.

    1962-11-13

    A continuous precipitation process is given for converting a uranyl nitrate solution to uranium tetrafluoride. A stream of the uranyl nitrate solution and a stream of an aqueous ammonium hydroxide solution are continuously introduced into an agitated reaction zone maintained at a pH of 5.0 to 6.5. Flow rates are adjusted to provide a mean residence time of the resulting slurry in the reaction zone of at least 30 minutes. After a startup period of two hours the precipitate is recovered from the effluent stream by filtration and is converted to uranium tetrafluoride by reduction to uranium dioxide with hydrogen and reaction of the uranium dioxide with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. (AEC)

  18. Biochemical and histopathological responses of the Swiss albino mice treated with uranyl nitrate and its recovery.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha Vijayan, P; Rekha, P D; Dinesh, U; Arun, A B

    2016-06-01

    Uranium is a radioactive heavy metal ubiquitous in the natural environment. In its chemical form, it is known to induce nephrotoxicity both in human and in animals. Its toxicity is dose and time dependent, also varies with form of uranium. In the present study, we assessed the nephrotoxicity induced by a single dose of uranyl nitrate (UN) in mice at different time intervals and recovery from its toxicity. Two doses of 2 and 4 mg/kg body weight of uranyl nitrate was injected intraperitoneally and animals were sacrificed after 1, 3, 5, 14, and 28 d of administration. Histopathological and biochemical alterations of post-UN dosing in comparison to control were evaluated. Tubular damage to about 75% was observed after 3 d (4 mg/kg) and the biochemical parameters such as serum creatinine, urea, and blood urea nitrogen levels were also significantly increased. Progression of tubular damage was not found after 5 d. Dose-dependent recovery of uranyl nitrate-treated animals was observed after 14 and 28 d of dosing. The concentration of uranium retained in kidney correlates with biochemical and histopathological analysis.

  19. Water-Reflected 233U Uranyl Nitrate Solutions in Simple Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Elam, K.R.

    2001-08-15

    A number of critical experiments involving {sup 233}U were performed in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Building 9213 Critical Experiments Facility during the years 1952 and 1953. These experiments, reported in Reference 1, were directed toward determining bounding values for the minimum critical mass, minimum critical volume, and maximum safe pipe size of water-moderated solutions of {sup 233}U. Additional information on the critical experiments was found in the experimental logbooks. Two experiments utilizing uranyl nitrate (UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}) solutions in simple geometry are evaluated in this report. Experiment 37 is in a 10.4-inch diameter sphere, and Experiment 39 is in a 10-inch diameter cylinder. The {sup 233}U concentration ranges from 49 to 62 g {sup 233}U/l. Both experiments were reflected by at least 6 inches of water in all directions. Paraffin-reflected uranyl nitrate experiments, also reported in Reference 1, are evaluated elsewhere. Experiments with smaller paraffin reflected 5-, 6-, and 7.5-inch diameter cylinders are evaluated in U233-SOL-THERM-004. Experiments with paraffin reflected 8-, 8.5-, 9-, 10-, and 12-inch diameter cylinders are evaluated in U233-SOL-THERM-002. Later experiments with highly-enriched {sup 235}U uranyl fluoride solution in the same 10.4-inch diameter sphere are reported in HEU-SOL-THERM-010. Both experiments were judged acceptable for use as criticality-safety benchmark experiments.

  20. Dehydration of Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate to Uranyl Nitrate Trihydrate under Ambient Conditions as Observed via Dynamic Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F.; Buck, Edgar C.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2015-05-22

    the hexahydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] (UNH) and the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3] (UNT) forms. Their stabilities depend on both relative humidity and temperature. Both phases have previously been studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy, but the data were limited by both instrumental resolution and the ability to prepare the samples as pellets without desiccating them. We report time-resolved infrared (IR) measurements using an integrating sphere that allow us to observe the transformation from the hexahydrate to the trihydrate simply by flowing dry nitrogen gas over the sample. Hexahydrate samples were prepared and confirmed via known XRD patterns, then measured in reflectance mode. The hexahydrate has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm-1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample dehydrates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a blue edge shoulder but ultimately resulting in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm-1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT since UNT has two non-equivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a morphological and structural change that has the lustrous lime green crystals changing to the dull greenish yellow of the trihydrate. Crystal structures and phase transformation were confirmed theoretically using DFT calculations and experimentally via microscopy methods. Both methods showed a transformation with two distinct sites for the uranyl cation in the trihydrate, as opposed to a single crystallographic site in the hexahydrate.

  1. Studies on the reverse osmosis treatment of uranyl nitrate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhakar, S.; Panicker, S.T.; Misra, B.M.; Ramani, P.S. )

    1992-03-01

    The aqueous effluent generated in uranium processing, particularly in the nuclear fuel fabrication step, contains mainly uranium nitrate. This requires treatment before discharge into the environment to meet stringent standards. This paper presents the performance of cellulose acetate membranes with regard to rejection of uranium under reverse osmotic conditions for feed concentrations up to 200 mg/l of uranium, which corresponds to the levels normally prevalent in the effluents. The use of additives like the disodium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and sodium sulfate for the improvement of reverse osmosis performance of the above membranes was also investigated. In the light of the experimental results, the suitability of reverse osmosis for the decontamination of uranium effluents is discussed.

  2. Uranyl nitrate inhibits lactate gluconeogenesis in isolated human and mouse renal proximal tubules: A {sup 13}C-NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Renault, Sophie; Faiz, Hassan; Gadet, Rudy; Ferrier, Bernard; Martin, Guy; Baverel, Gabriel; Conjard-Duplany, Agnes

    2010-01-01

    As part of a study on uranium nephrotoxicity, we investigated the effect of uranyl nitrate in isolated human and mouse kidney cortex tubules metabolizing the physiological substrate lactate. In the millimolar range, uranyl nitrate reduced lactate removal and gluconeogenesis and the cellular ATP level in a dose-dependent fashion. After incubation in phosphate-free Krebs-Henseleit medium with 5 mM L-[1-{sup 13}C]-, or L-[2-{sup 13}C]-, or L-[3-{sup 13}C]lactate, substrate utilization and product formation were measured by enzymatic and NMR spectroscopic methods. In the presence of 3 mM uranyl nitrate, glucose production and the intracellular ATP content were significantly reduced in both human and mouse tubules. Combination of enzymatic and NMR measurements with a mathematical model of lactate metabolism revealed an inhibition of fluxes through lactate dehydrogenase and the gluconeogenic enzymes in the presence of 3 mM uranyl nitrate; in human and mouse tubules, fluxes were lowered by 20% and 14% (lactate dehydrogenase), 27% and 32% (pyruvate carboxylase), 35% and 36% (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase), and 39% and 45% (glucose-6-phosphatase), respectively. These results indicate that natural uranium is an inhibitor of renal lactate gluconeogenesis in both humans and mice.

  3. Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: Influence of superoxide anion and TNF α mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Orona, N.S.; Tasat, D.R.

    2012-06-15

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5–200 μM). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3} 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO{sub 3}. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup −}). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNFα and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O{sub 2}{sup −} may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O{sub 2}{sup −} may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNFα route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium‐related diseases. -- Highlights: ► Uranyl nitrate effect on cultured macrophages is linked to the doses and independent of its solubility. ► At low doses uranyl nitrate induces generation of superoxide anion. ► At high doses uranyl nitrate provokes secretion of TNFα. ► Uranyl nitrate induces apoptosis through

  4. Clinico-biochemical studies on acute toxic nephropathy in goats due to uranyl nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, P.K.; Joshi, H.C.

    1989-02-01

    Acute toxic nephropathy was produced in 6 healthy goats by injecting intravenously 1% uranyl nitrate (UN) (15 mg/kg body weight). The early painful clinical signs simulating shock progressed with subnormal temperature, slow-shallow respiration and arrhythmic pulse followed by death due to respiratory failure within 96 to 120 hr. All the affected goats had normocytic normochromic anemia, leucocytosis, neutrophilia with left shift eosinopenia, decreased monocytes and presence of 1-2% reticulocytes in the peripheral blood smears. On blood chemical analysis, a uniform and continuous rise was seen in serum creatinine with a concomitant daily increase of serum urea and uric acid. Simultaneous analysis of urine indicated polyuria leading to oliguria, acidic pH, albuminuria, glycosuria with presence of neutrophils, RBC's, epithelial and fatty casts, increase of triple phosphate, and cystine crystals reflecting acute damage of kidneys in the affected goats.

  5. MCNP-DSP calculations of measurements with uranyl nitrate solution system

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.

    1998-09-01

    The {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis method has been used to determine the subcriticality of various configurations of fissile materials. In the past, the application of this method was limited because point-kinetics models had to be used to interpret the data; however, with the development of the Monte Carlo code MCNP-DSP, the measurements can be analyzed using the more general Monte Carlo models. The results of the Monte carlo calculations will be dependent on the ability to model the experiment accurately and on the nuclear data used to perform the calculations. This paper presents a comparison of the measured and calculated ratio of spectral densities for a subset of measurements performed with a uranyl nitrate solution tank filled to various heights. The results presented are for calculations that were performed with both ENDF/B-IV and ENDF/B-V cross-section data sets.

  6. Synthesis of microspheres of triuranium octaoxide by simultaneous water and nitrate extraction from ascorbate-uranyl sols.

    PubMed

    Brykala, M; Deptula, A; Rogowski, M; Lada, W; Olczak, T; Wawszczak, D; Smolinski, T; Wojtowicz, P; Modolo, G

    A new method for synthesis of uranium oxide microspheres (diameter <100 μm) has been developed. It is a variant of our patented Complex Sol-Gel Process, which has been used to synthesize high-quality powders of a wide variety of complex oxides. Starting uranyl-nitrate-ascorbate sols were prepared by addition of ascorbic acid to uranyl nitrate hexahydrate solution and alkalizing by aqueous ammonium hydroxide and then emulsified in 2-ethylhexanol-1 containing 1v/o SPAN-80. Drops of emulsion were firstly gelled by extraction of water by the solvent. Destruction of the microspheres during thermal treatment, owing to highly reactive components in the gels, requires modification of the gelation step by Double Extraction Process-simultaneously extraction of water and nitrates using Primene JMT, which completely eliminates these problem. Final step was calcination in air of obtained microspheres of gels to triuranium octaoxide.

  7. Uranyl nitrate pouring solution for producing nuclear fuel particles and a method for its preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Hein, K.

    1983-05-24

    Sorbitol, or another polyalcohol such as erythritol, dulcitol or xylitol, is added to a solution containing uranyl nitrate which may also contain another heavy metal, such as thorium or plutonium, prior to preneutralization with ammonia in order to provide a highly viscous solution that can be preneutralized to a great extent without premature precipitation of uranium. The high viscosity makes possible the formation of favorably large drops when the solution is dripped into an ammonia containing bath for external gelification of the drops. According to the pouring apparatus used, the particles after washing, drying and sintering have a diameter between 0.6 and 1.5 mm. The polyalcohol is added to a hydrosol containing from 1.5 to 2 moles per liter of heavy metal, the polyalcohol being added until concentration of onethird mole of polyalcohol per mole of heavy metal is reached. In certain cases up to four moles of ammonium nitrate per liter are added. The solution so produced can be preneutralized with up to 90% of the amount of ammonia stoichiometrically necessary for T separation of uranium without the formation of any precipitate, preferably by first adding ammonia gas under strong stirring and then adding ammonium bicarbonate in excess, which decomposes to liberate ammonia to an extent determined by the temperature, which is to be precisely controlled. It is possible to obtain this way a solution of predetermined viscosity from which the excess ammonium bicarbonate can readily be separated.

  8. Critical Parameters of Complex Geometry Intersecting Cylinders Containing Uranyl Nitrate Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, Robert Emil; Briggs, Joseph Blair

    1999-06-01

    About three dozen previously unreported critical configurations are presented for very complex geometries filled with high concentration enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These geometries resemble a tall, thin Central Column (or trunk of a "tree") having long, thin arms (or "branches") extending up to four directions off the column. Arms are equally spaced from one another in vertical planes; and that spacing ranges from arms in contact to quite wide spacings. Both the Central Column and the many different arms are critically safe by themselves when each, alone, is filled with fissile solution; but, in combination, criticality occurs due to the interactions between arms and the column. Such neutronic interactions formed the principal focus of this study. While these results are fresh to the nuclear criticality safety industry and to those seeking novel experiments against which to validate computer codes, the experiments, themselves, are not recent. Over 100 experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory between September, 1967, and February of the following year.

  9. Critical Parameters of Complex Geometries of Intersecting Cylinders Containing Uranyl Nitrate Solution

    SciTech Connect

    J. B. Briggs; R. E. Rothe

    1999-06-14

    About three dozen previously unreported critical configurations are presented for very complex geometries filled with high concentration enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These geometries resemble a tall, thin Central Column (or trunk of a ''tree'') having long, thin arms (or ''branches'') extending up to four directions off the column. Arms are equally spaced from one another in vertical planes, and that spacing ranges from arms in contact to quite wide spacings. Both the Central Column and the many different arms are critically safe by themselves with each, alone, is filled with fissile solution; but, in combination, criticality occurs due to the interactions between arms and the column. Such neutronic interactions formed the principal focus of this study. While these results are fresh to the nuclear criticality safety industry and to those seeking novel experiments against which to validate computer codes, the experiments, themselves, are not recent. Over 100 experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory between September, 1967, and February of the following year.

  10. Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: influence of superoxide anion and TNF α mediators.

    PubMed

    Orona, N S; Tasat, D R

    2012-06-15

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5-200 μM). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO₃ 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO₃. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O₂⁻). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNFα and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O₂⁻ may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O₂⁻ may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNFα route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium-related diseases.

  11. Highly Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Annular Tanks with Concrete Reflection: 1 x 3 Line Array of Nested Pairs of Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    James Cleaver; John D. Bess; Nathan Devine; Fitz Trumble

    2009-09-01

    A series of seven experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory beginning in August, 1980 (References 1 and 2). Highly enriched uranyl nitrate solution was introduced into a 1-3 linear array of nested stainless steel annular tanks. The tanks were inside a concrete enclosure, with various moderator and absorber materials placed inside and/or between the tanks. These moderators and absorbers included boron-free concrete, borated concrete, borated plaster, and cadmium. Two configurations included placing bottles of highly enriched uranyl nitrate between tanks externally. Another experiment involved nested hemispheres of highly enriched uranium placed between tanks externally. These three configurations are not evaluated in this report. The experiments evaluated here are part of a series of experiments, one set of which is evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-033. The experiments in this and HEU-SOL-THERM-033 were performed similarly. They took place in the same room and used the same tanks, some of the same moderators and absorbers, some of the same reflector panels, and uranyl nitrate solution from the same location. There are probably additional similarities that existed that are not identified here. Thus, many of the descriptions in this report are either the same or similar to those in the HEU-SOL-THERM-033 report. Seventeen configurations (sixteen of which were critical) were performed during seven experiments; six of those experiments are evaluated here with thirteen configurations. Two configurations were identical, except for solution height, and were conducted to test repeatability. The solution heights were averaged and the two were evaluated as one configuration, which gives a total of twelve evaluated configurations. One of the seventeen configurations was subcritical. Of the twelve critical configurations evaluated, nine were judged as acceptable as benchmarks.

  12. Uranyl(VI) nitrate salts: modeling thermodynamic properties using the binding mean spherical approximation theory and determination of "fictive" binary data.

    PubMed

    Ruas, Alexandre; Bernard, Olivier; Caniffi, Barbara; Simonin, Jean-Pierre; Turq, Pierre; Blum, Lesser; Moisy, Philippe

    2006-02-23

    This work is aimed at a description of the thermodynamic properties of highly concentrated aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate at 25 degrees C. A new resolution of the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA) theory, taking into account 1-1 and also 1-2 complex formation, is developed and used to reproduce, from a simple procedure, experimental uranyl nitrate osmotic coefficient variation with concentration. For better consistency of the theory, binary uranyl perchlorate and chloride osmotic coefficients are also calculated. Comparison of calculated and experimental values is made. The possibility of regarding the ternary system UO(2)(NO(3))(2)/HNO(3)/H(2)O as a "simple" solution (in the sense of Zdanovskii, Stokes, and Robinson) is examined from water activity and density measurements. Also, an analysis of existing uranyl nitrate binary data is proposed and compared with our obtained data. On the basis of the concept of "simple" solution, values for density and water activity for the binary system UO(2)(NO(3))(2)/H(2)O are proposed in a concentration range on which uranyl nitrate precipitates from measurements on concentrated solutions of the ternary system UO(2)(NO(3))(2)/HNO(3)/H(2)O. This new set of binary data is "fictive" in the sense that the real binary system is not stable chemically. Finally, a new, interesting predictive capability of the BIMSA theory is shown.

  13. Thermal and X-ray diffraction analysis studies during the decomposition of ammonium uranyl nitrate.

    PubMed

    Kim, B H; Lee, Y B; Prelas, M A; Ghosh, T K

    Two types of ammonium uranyl nitrate (NH4)2UO2(NO3)4·2H2O and NH4UO2(NO3)3, were thermally decomposed and reduced in a TG-DTA unit in nitrogen, air, and hydrogen atmospheres. Various intermediate phases produced by the thermal decomposition and reduction process were investigated by an X-ray diffraction analysis and a TG/DTA analysis. Both (NH4)2UO2(NO3)4·2H2O and NH4UO2(NO3)3 decomposed to amorphous UO3 regardless of the atmosphere used. The amorphous UO3 from (NH4)2UO2(NO3)4·2H2O was crystallized to γ-UO3 regardless of the atmosphere used without a change in weight. The amorphous UO3 obtained from decomposition of NH4UO2(NO3)3 was crystallized to α-UO3 under a nitrogen and air atmosphere, and to β-UO3 under a hydrogen atmosphere without a change in weight. Under each atmosphere, the reaction paths of (NH4)2UO2(NO3)4·2H2O and NH4UO2(NO3)3 were as follows: under a nitrogen atmosphere: (NH4)2UO2(NO3)4·2H2O → (NH4)2UO2(NO3)4·H2O → (NH4)2UO2(NO3)4 → NH4UO2(NO3)3 → A-UO3 → γ-UO3 → U3O8, NH4UO2(NO3)3 → A-UO3 → α-UO3 → U3O8; under an air atmosphere: (NH4)2UO2(NO3)4·2H2O → (NH4)2UO2(NO3)4·H2O → (NH4)2UO2(NO3)4 → NH4UO2(NO3)3 → A-UO3 → γ-UO3 → U3O8, NH4UO2(NO3)3 → A-UO3 → α-UO3 → U3O8; and under a hydrogen atmosphere: (NH4)2UO2(NO3)4·2H2O → (NH4)2UO2(NO3)4·H2O → (NH4)2UO2(NO3)4 → NH4UO2(NO3)3 → A-UO3 → γ-UO3 → α-U3O8 → UO2, NH4 UO2(NO3)3 → A-UO3 → β-UO3 → α-U3O8 → UO2.

  14. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-05

    This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials to pure HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend pure HEU UNH with depleted and natural UNH to produce HEU UNH crystals. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU Will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  15. Time-Resolved Infrared Reflectance Studies of the Dehydration-Induced Transformation of Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate to the Trihydrate Form

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F.; Buck, Edgar C.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2015-10-01

    Uranyl nitrate is a key species in the nuclear fuel cycle. However, this species is known to exist in different states of hydration, including the hexahydrate ([UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] often called UNH), the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 or UNT], and in very dry environments the dihydrate form [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)2]. Their relative stabilities depend on both water vapor pressure and temperature. In the 1950s and 1960s the different phases were studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy, but were limited both by instrumental resolution and by the ability to prepare the samples for transmission. We have revisited this problem using time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, which requires no sample preparation and allows dynamic analysis while the sample is exposed to a flow of N2 gas. Samples of known hydration state were prepared and confirmed via X-ray diffraction patterns of known species. In reflectance mode the hexahydrate UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm-1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample desiccates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a shoulder growing in on the blue edge but ultimately results in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm-1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT as UNT has two inequivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a structural and morphological change that has the lustrous lime green UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 crystals changing to the matte greenish yellow of the trihydrate solid. The phase transformation and crystal structures were confirmed by density functional theory calculations and optical microscopy methods, both of which showed a transformation with two distinct sites for the uranyl cation in the trihydrate, with but one in the hexahydrate.

  16. Time-resolved infrared reflectance studies of the dehydration-induced transformation of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate to the trihydrate form

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; ...

    2015-09-08

    Uranyl nitrate is a key species in the nuclear fuel cycle. However, this species is known to exist in different states of hydration, including the hexahydrate ([UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] often called UNH), the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 or UNT], and in very dry environments the dihydrate form [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)2]. Their relative stabilities depend on both water vapor pressure and temperature. In the 1950s and 1960s, the different phases were studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy but were limited both by instrumental resolution and by the ability to prepare the samples for transmission. We have revisited this problem using time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, which requires no sample preparationmore » and allows dynamic analysis while the sample is exposed to a flow of N2 gas. Samples of known hydration state were prepared and confirmed via X-ray diffraction patterns of known species. In reflectance mode the hexahydrate UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm–1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample desiccates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a shoulder growing in on the blue edge but ultimately results in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm–1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT as UNT has two inequivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a structural and morphological change that has the lustrous lime green UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 crystals changing to the matte greenish yellow of the trihydrate solid. As a result, the phase transformation and crystal structures were confirmed by density functional theory calculations and optical microscopy methods, both of which showed a transformation with two distinct sites for the uranyl cation in the trihydrate, with only one in the hexahydrate.« less

  17. A Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Processing Design for Production of Molybdenum-99 with Crystalline Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stange, Gary Michael

    Medical radioisotopes are used in tens of millions of procedures every year to detect and image a wide variety of maladies and conditions in the human body. The most widely-used diagnostic radioisotope is technetium-99m, a metastable isomer of technetium-99 that is generated by the radioactive decay of molybdenum-99. For a number of reasons, the supply of molybdenum-99 has become unreliable and the techniques used to produce it have become unattractive. This has spurred the investigation of new technologies that avoid the use of highly enriched uranium to produce molybdenum-99 in the United States, where approximately half of the demand originates. The first goal of this research is to develop a critical nuclear reactor design powered by solid, discrete pins of low enriched uranium. Analyses of single-pin heat transfer and whole-core neutronics are performed to determine the required specifications. Molybdenum-99 is produced directly in the fuel of this reactor and then extracted through a series of chemical processing steps. After this extraction, the fuel is left in an aqueous state. The second goal of this research is to describe a process by which the uranium may be recovered from this spent fuel solution and reconstituted into the original fuel form. Fuel recovery is achieved through a crystallization step that generates solid uranyl nitrate hexahydrate while leaving the majority of fission products and transuranic isotopes in solution. This report provides background information on molybdenum-99 production and crystallization chemistry. The previously unknown thermal conductivity of the fuel material is measured. Following this is a description of the modeling and calculations used to develop a reactor concept. The operational characteristics of the reactor core model are analyzed and reported. Uranyl nitrate crystallization experiments have also been conducted, and the results of this work are presented here. Finally, a process flow scheme for uranium

  18. Investigation of Uranyl Nitrate Ion Pairs Complexed with Amide Ligands using Electrospray Ionization Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry and Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold; Adriana Dinescu; Michael T. Benson; Garold L. Gresham; Michael J. van Stipdonk

    2011-04-01

    Ion populations formed from electrospray of uranyl nitrate solutions containing different amides vary depending on ligand nucleophilicity and steric crowding at the metal center. The most abundant species were ion pair complexes having the general formula [UO2(NO3)(amide)n=2,3]+, and complexes containing the amide conjugate base, reduced uranyl UO2+, and a 2+ charge were also formed. The formamide experiment produced the greatest diversity of species that stems from weaker amide binding leading to dissociation and subsequent solvent coordination or metal reduction. Experiments using methyl formamide, dimethyl formamide, acetamide, and methyl acetamide produced ion pair and doubly charged complexes that were more abundant, and less abundant complexes containing solvent or reduced uranyl. This pattern is reversed in the dimethylacetamide experiment, which displayed reduced doubly charged complexes and augmented reduced uranyl complexes. DFT investigations of the tris-amide ion pair complexes showed that inter-ligand repulsion distorts the amide ligands out of the uranyl equatorial plane, and that complex stabilities do not increase with increasing amide nucleophilicity. Elimination of an amide ligand largely relieves the interligand repulsion, and the remaining amide ligands become closely aligned with the equatorial plane in the structures of the bis-amide ligands. The studies show that the phenomenological distribution of coordination complexes in a metal-ligand electrospray experiment is a function of both ligand nucleophilicity and interligand repulsion, and that the latter factor begins exerting influence even in the case of relatively small ligands like the substituted methyl-formamide and –acetamide ligands.

  19. Time-resolved infrared reflectance studies of the dehydration-induced transformation of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate to the trihydrate form

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; Edward J. Mausolf; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F.; Buck, Edgar C.; Bruce K. McNamara

    2015-09-08

    Uranyl nitrate is a key species in the nuclear fuel cycle. However, this species is known to exist in different states of hydration, including the hexahydrate ([UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] often called UNH), the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 or UNT], and in very dry environments the dihydrate form [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)2]. Their relative stabilities depend on both water vapor pressure and temperature. In the 1950s and 1960s, the different phases were studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy but were limited both by instrumental resolution and by the ability to prepare the samples for transmission. We have revisited this problem using time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, which requires no sample preparation and allows dynamic analysis while the sample is exposed to a flow of N2 gas. Samples of known hydration state were prepared and confirmed via X-ray diffraction patterns of known species. In reflectance mode the hexahydrate UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm–1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample desiccates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a shoulder growing in on the blue edge but ultimately results in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm–1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT as UNT has two inequivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a structural and morphological change that has the lustrous lime green UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 crystals changing to the matte greenish yellow of the

  20. Preparation of ceramic grade UO 2 powder by atomization from uranyl nitrate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainetti, P.; Riella, H. Gracher

    1991-02-01

    The thermal denitration of a nitrate solution by direct conversion to a ceramic grade uranium dioxide powder, in a furnace that combines atomization nozzle and gas stirred bed, is an attractive method because no liquid waste products are formed and it has relative simplicity. The UO 2 powder characteristics, such as size, shape, specific surface area and sinterability as a function of procedural variables were determined. This technique has been developed in the pelleting pilot plant of the IPEN/CNEN-SP and it appears to be practical and economically feasible for wet recovery of rejected UO 2 powders and pellets from production process, with the recovered powder being directly mixed to the powder from the AUC reduction process.

  1. Tetraalkylammonium uranyl isothiocyanates.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Clare E; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Soderholm, L

    2012-11-05

    Three tetraalkylammonium uranyl isothiocyanates, [(CH(3))(4)N](3)UO(2)(NCS)(5) (1), [(C(2)H(5))(4)N](3)UO(2)(NCS)(5) (2), and [(C(3)H(7))(4)N](3)UO(2)(NCS)(5) (3), have been synthesized from aqueous solution and their structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. All of the compounds consist of the uranyl cation equatorially coordinated to five N-bound thiocyanate ligands, UO(2)(NCS)(5)(3-), and charge-balanced by three tetraalkylammonium cations. Raman spectroscopy data have been collected on compounds 1-3, as well as on solutions of uranyl nitrate with increasing levels of sodium thiocyanate. By tracking the Raman signatures of thiocyanate, the presence of both free and bound thiocyanate is confirmed in solution. The shift in the Raman signal of the uranyl symmetric stretching mode suggests the formation of higher-order uranyl thiocyanate complexes in solution, while the solid-state Raman data support homoleptic isothiocyanate coordination about the uranyl cation. Presented here are the syntheses and crystal structures of 1-3, pertinent Raman spectra, and a discussion regarding the relationship of these isothiocyanates to previously described uranyl halide phases, UO(2)X(4)(2-).

  2. A Dose Distribution Study of Uranyl Nitrate in Zebrafish using Liquid Scintillation and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshammari, Ohud Fhaid

    Standard curves for a Perkin Elmer TriCarb 2800 liquid scintillation detector (LSC) and a Ludlum 3030p Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon detector have been developed and utilized for studying the dose distribution of depleted uranium (DU) within zebrafish. The DU source was crystallized uranyl nitrate (N2O8U•6H2O) solution, normally used for staining in electron microscopy with a manufactured average specific activity of 0.3 uCi/g. Zebrafish, both larvae and adults, were exposed to three different mass concentrations, dissected, dissolved and counted using an LSC. The counts were compared to the standard curve correlating the measured activity to that of the mass absorbed. It was found that the larvae were more tolerant to the toxicity of the DU by almost a factor of 10 showing survival up to 200 ppm where the adults had zero survival when exposed to concentrations above 20 ppm. The absorbed DU was observed to concentrate more heavily in the skeletal structure and the blood containing organs (liver and heart) when comparing the relative mass concentrations observed in each organ compared to that of the whole fish exposed to the same concentration. The highest absorbed dose rate was found in the skeletal system at 3.5 mGy/d followed by the blood containing organs at 2.2 mGy/d when exposed to 20 ppm DU. It was also noted that the bioconcentration factors (BCF) of the adult zebrafish followed the same trend observed in similar studies. As the mass concentration of DU was lowered, the BCF calculated for fish exposed increased with a BCF of 130.6 found for those exposed to 20 ppm U and a BCF of 774.2 for fish exposed to 2 ppm. This method shows to present a suitable way of developing a dose distribution for DU along with similar isotopes which will be instrumental in studying the long term effects of more specific exposures to natural radioactive metals combined with other common environmental exposures.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of a New Carbapenem, DA-1131, after Intravenous Administration to Rats with Uranyl Nitrate-Induced Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So H.; Shim, Hyun J.; Kim, Won B.; Lee, Myung G.

    1998-01-01

    Because the physiological changes that occur in patients with acute renal failure could alter the pharmacokinetics of the drugs used to treat the disease, the pharmacokinetics of DA-1131, a new carbapenem antibiotic, were investigated after 1-min intravenous administration of the drug (50 mg/kg of body weight) to control rats and rats with uranyl nitrate-induced acute renal failure (U-ARF rats). The impaired kidney function was observed in U-ARF rats on the basis of physiological parameters observed by microscopy of the kidney and obtained by chemical analysis of the plasma. After a 1-min intravenous infusion of DA-1131, the concentrations in plasma and the total area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to time infinity increased significantly in U-ARF rats compared with those in control rats (13,000 versus 4,400 μg · min/ml). This was due to the significantly slower total body clearance (CL) of DA-1131 (3.84 versus 11.4 ml/min/kg) from U-ARF rats than from control rats. The significantly slower CL of DA-1131 from U-ARF rats was due to both significantly slower renal clearance (0.000635 versus 4.95 ml/min/kg because of a significant decrease in the 8-h urinary excretion of unchanged DA-1131 [1.54 versus 43.8% of the intravenous dose] due to impaired kidney function, as proved by the significant decrease in creatinine clearance [0.0159 versus 4.29 ml/min/kg]) and significantly slower nonrenal clearance (3.80 versus 6.34 ml/min/kg because of a significant decrease in the metabolism of DA-1131 in the kidney) in U-ARF rats. The amounts of DA-1131 recovered from all tissues studied (except the kidneys) were significantly higher for U-ARF rats than for control rats; however, the ratios of the amount in tissue to the concentration in plasma (except those for the kidney, small intestine, and spleen) were not significantly different between the two groups of rats, indicating that the affinity of DA-1131 for rat tissues was not changed considerably in

  4. Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of the work discussed in this report were to: (1) develop a flow loop that would simulate the purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP); (2) develop a test plan that would simulate normal operation and disturbances that could be anticipated in an NUCP; (3) use the flow loop to test commercially available flowmeters for use as safeguards monitors; and (4) recommend a flowmeter for production-scale testing at an NUCP. There has been interest in safeguarding conversion plants because the intermediate products [uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}), and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6})] are all suitable uranium feedstocks for producing special nuclear materials. Furthermore, if safeguards are not applied virtually any nuclear weapons program can obtain these feedstocks without detection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Historically, IAEA had not implemented safeguards until the purified UF{sub 6} product was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. H. A. Elayat et al. provide a basic definition of a safeguards system: 'The function of a safeguards system on a chemical conversion plant is in general terms to verify that no useful nuclear material is being diverted to use in a nuclear weapons program'. The IAEA now considers all highly purified uranium compounds as candidates for safeguarding. DOE is currently interested in 'developing instruments, tools, strategies, and methods that could be of use to the IAEA in the application of safeguards' for materials found in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle-prior to the production of the uranium hexafluoride or oxides that have been the traditional starting point for IAEA safeguards. Several national laboratories, including Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Brookhaven, have been involved in developing tools or techniques for safeguarding conversion plants. This study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) NA-241, Office of Dismantlement and Transparency.

  5. Behaviors of acrylamide/itaconic acid hydrogels in uptake of uranyl ions from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Karadag, E.; Saraydin, D.; Gueven, O.

    1995-12-01

    In this study, adsorptions of uranyl ions from two different aqueous uranyl solutions by acrylamide-itaconic acid hydrogels were investigated by a spectroscopic method. The hydrogels were prepared by irradiating with {gamma}-radiation. In the experiment of uranyl ions adsorption, Type II adsorption was found. One gram of acrylamide-itaconic acid hydrogels sorbed 178-219 mg uranyl ions from the solutions of uranyl acetate, 42-76 mg uranyl ions from the aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate, while acrylamide hydrogel did not sorb any uranyl ion. For the hydrogel containing 40 mg of itaconic acid and irradiated to 3.73 kGy, swelling of the hydrogels was observed in water (1660%), in the aqueous solution of uranyl acetate (730%), and in the aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate (580%). Diffusions of water onto hydrogels were a non-Fickian type of diffusion, whereas diffusions of uranyl ions were a Fickian type of diffusion.

  6. Mechanistic Features of the TiO2 Heterogeneous Photocatalysis of Arsenic and Uranyl Nitrate in Aqueous Suspensions Studied by the Stopped-Flow Technique.

    PubMed

    Meichtry, Jorge M; Levy, Ivana K; Mohamed, Hanan H; Dillert, Ralf; Bahnemann, Detlef W; Litter, Marta I

    2016-03-16

    The dynamics of the transfer of electrons stored in TiO2 nanoparticles to As(III) , As(V) , and uranyl nitrate in water was investigated by using the stopped-flow technique. Suspensions of TiO2 nanoparticles with stored trapped electrons (etrap (-) ) were mixed with solutions of acceptor species to evaluate the reactivity by following the temporal evolution of etrap (-) by the decrease in the absorbance at λ=600 nm. The results indicate that As(V) and As(III) cannot be reduced by etrap (-) under the reaction conditions. In addition, it was observed that the presence of As(V) and As(III) strongly modified the reaction rate between O2 and etrap (-) : an increase in the rate was observed if As(V) was present and a decrease in the rate was observed in the presence of As(III) . In contrast with the As system, U(VI) was observed to react easily with etrap (-) and U(IV) formation was observed spectroscopically at λ=650 nm. The possible competence of U(VI) and NO3 (-) for their reduction by etrap (-) was analyzed. The inhibition of the U(VI) photocatalytic reduction by O2 could be attributed to the fast oxidation of U(V) and/or U(IV) .

  7. Effect of uranyl ion concentration on structure and dynamics of aqueous uranyl solution: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Manish; Choudhury, Niharendu

    2014-12-11

    The effect of uranyl ion concentration on structure and dynamics of aqueous solutions of uranyl ions is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. In order to get an idea about the effect of concentration of uranyl ions on local structural arrangements of water molecules around the uranyl ion, radial distribution functions of water molecules around the uranyl ion are analyzed for aqueous uranyl solutions of various concentrations. The concentration effect on translational dynamics has also been analyzed by calculating diffusion coefficients of uranyl ion, water, and nitrate ions in solution from their respective mean squared displacements. Mobility of water as well as uranyl ions has been found to decrease with increasing concentration of the uranyl ions. Orientational dynamics of water about different molecular axes of water have also been analyzed and decreasing orientational mobility of water with increasing uranyl concentration has been found. In order to get further insight into origin of slowing down of the translational mobility of water molecules with increasing uranyl ion concentration, two separate effects namely long-range effect of uranyl ions on the dynamics of water molecules beyond the solvation shell and short-range effect involving dynamics of solvation shell water have been analyzed. It is found that long-range effect is responsible for the slowing down of translational dynamics of water molecules in the presence of uranyl ions.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of DA-125, a new anthracycline, after intravenous administration to uranyl nitrate-induced acute renal failure rats or protein-calorie malnutrition rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y G; Yoon, E J; Yoon, W H; Shim, H J; Lee, S D; Kim, W B; Yang, J; Lee, M G

    1996-04-01

    The pharmacokinetics of DA-125 were compared after intravenous (i.v.) administration of the drug, 10 mg kg-1, to control male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 9) and uranyl nitrate-induced acute renal failure (U-ARF, n = 12) rats, or male Sprague-Dawley rats fed on a 23% (control, n = 8) or a 5% (protein-calorie malnutrition, PCM, n = 9) protein diet. After i.v. administration of DA-125, almost 'constant' plasma concentrations of M1, M2, and M4 were maintained from 1-2 h to 8-10 h in all rat groups due to the continuous formation of M2 from M1 and M4 from M3. The plasma concentrations of M3 were the lowest among M1-M4 for all rat groups due to the rapid and almost complete conversion of M3 to M4 and other metabolite(s). The AUCt values of M1 (115 against 82.5 micrograms min mL-1), M2 (33.0 against 23.6 micrograms min mL-1), and M4 (26.3 against 15.1 micrograms min mL-1) were significantly higher in the U-ARF rats than in the control rats. The percentages of i.v. dose excreted in 24 h urine as M1 (under the detection limit against 0.316%), M2 (under the detection limit against 5.58%), and M4 (0.0174 against 0.719%)--expressed in terms of DA-125--were significantly lower in the U-ARF rats than in the control rats, and this could be due to the decreased kidney function in the U-ARF rats. However, the percentages of i.v. dose recovered from the GI tract at 24 h as M1 (0.0532% against under the detection limit), M3 (0.0286% against under the detection limit), and M4 (0.702% against 0.305%)--expressed in terms of DA-125--were significantly greater in the U-ARF rats than in the control rats. All U-ARF rats had ascites, but the concentrations of M1 (0.0320 micrograms mL-1), M2 (0.0265 micrograms mL-1), M3 (under the detection limit), and M4 (0.032 micrograms mL-1) in the ascites from one rat were almost negligible. The plasma concentrations and most of the pharmacokinetic parameters of M1, M2, and M4 were not significantly different between the PCM rats and their control rats.

  9. Liquid-liquid extraction of metal ions by neutral phosphoramides. Part I. Extraction of uranyl ions from nitrate and sulphate media. Examination of extracted species by UV/VIS and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodehueser, L.; Rubini, P.R.; Bokolo, K.; Laakel, N.; Delpuech, J.J.

    1992-09-01

    The extraction of uranyl nitrate and uranyl sulphate from aqueous media by the neutral chelating diphosphoramides CH{sub 3}-N[P(O)(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}]{sub 2} (NIPA) and its less hydrophilic homologs R-N[P(O)(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}]{sub 2} (R = -C{sub 12}H{sub 25} (ODIPA) or -C{sub 16}H{sub 33} (OHDIPA)), diluted in CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2} or toluene, has been studied. In the presence of HNO{sub 3}, NaNO{sub 3}, NaCl, and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} as salting-out agents, extraction is generally excellent. Some of the extracted complex species have been identified by comparing their {sup 31}P NMR and UV/vis spectra with those of pure complexes of known structure. The results are compared with extractions using tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) as the complexing agent. 20 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Method for photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate by tri-N-butyl phosphate and application of this method to nuclear fuel reprocessing

    DOEpatents

    De Poorter, Gerald L.; Rofer-De Poorter, Cheryl K.

    1978-01-01

    Uranyl ion in solution in tri-n-butyl phosphate is readily photochemically reduced to U(IV). The product U(IV) may effectively be used in the Purex process for treating spent nuclear fuels to reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III). The Pu(III) is readily separated from uranium in solution in the tri-n-butyl phosphate by an aqueous strip.

  11. Composition for detecting uranyl

    DOEpatents

    Baylor, Lewis C.; Stephens, Susan M.

    1995-01-01

    A composition for detecting the presence and concentration of a substance such as uranyl, comprising an organohalide covalently bonded to an indicator for said substance. The composition has at least one active OH site for forming a complex with the substance to be detected. The composition is made by reacting equimolar amounts of the indicator and the organohalide in a polar organic solvent. The absorbance spectrum of the composition-uranyl complex is shifted with respect to the absorbance spectrum of the indicator-uranyl complex, to provide better spectral resolution for detecting uranyl.

  12. Uranyl ion coordination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, H.T.

    1963-01-01

    A review of the known crystal structures containing the uranyl ion shows that plane-pentagon coordination is equally as prevalent as plane-square or plane-hexagon. It is suggested that puckered-hexagon configurations of OH - or H2O about the uranyl group will tend to revert to plane-pentagon coordination. The concept of pentagonal coordination is invoked for possible explanations of the complex crystallography of the natural uranyl hydroxides and the unusual behavior of polynuclear ions in hydrolyzed uranyl solutions.

  13. Nitrate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrate ; CASRN 14797 - 55 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  14. FLAME DENITRATION AND REDUCTION OF URANIUM NITRATE TO URANIUM DIOXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Hedley, W.H.; Roehrs, R.J.; Henderson, C.M.

    1962-06-26

    A process is given for converting uranyl nitrate solution to uranium dioxide. The process comprises spraying fine droplets of aqueous uranyl nitrate solution into a hightemperature hydrocarbon flame, said flame being deficient in oxygen approximately 30%, retaining the feed in the flame for a sufficient length of time to reduce the nitrate to the dioxide, and recovering uranium dioxide. (AEC)

  15. Expanding the crystal chemistry of uranyl peroxides: four hybrid uranyl-peroxide structures containing EDTA.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jie; Ling, Jie; Sieradzki, Claire; Nguyen, Kevin; Wylie, Ernest M; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Burns, Peter C

    2014-11-17

    The first four uranyl peroxide compounds containing ethylenediaminetetra-acetate (EDTA) were synthesized and characterized from aqueous uranyl peroxide nitrate solutions with a pH range of 5-7. Raman spectra demonstrated that reaction solutions that crystallized [NaK15[(UO2)8(O2)8(C10H12O10N2)2(C2O4)4]·(H2O)14] (1) and [Li4K6[(UO2)8(O2)6(C10H12O10N2)2(NO3)6]·(H2O)26] (2) contained excess peroxide, and their structures contained oxidized ethylenediaminetetraacetate, EDTAO2(4-). The solutions from which [K4[(UO2)4(O2)2(C10H13O8N2)2(IO3)2]·(H2O)16] (3) and LiK3[(UO2)4(O2)2(C10H12O8N2)2(H2O)2]·(H2O)18 (4) crystallized contained no free peroxide, and the structures incorporated intact EDTA(4-). In contrast to the large family of uranyl peroxide cage clusters, coordination of uranyl peroxide units in 1-4 by EDTA(4-) or EDTAO2(4-) results in isolated tetramers or dimers of uranyl ions that are bridged by bidentate peroxide groups. Two tetramers are bridged by EDTAO2(4-) to form octamers in 1 and 2, and dimers of uranyl polyhedra are linked through iodate groups in 3 and EDTA(4-) in 4, forming chains in both cases. In each structure the U-O2-U dihedral angle is strongly bent, at ∼140°, consistent with the configuration of this linkage in cage clusters and other recently reported uranyl peroxides.

  16. Uranyl complexes of alkyl-bridged ditopic diaminotetraphenol ligands and their use as uranyl ion extractors.

    PubMed

    Riisiö, Antti; Väisänen, Ari; Sillanpää, Reijo

    2013-08-05

    The coordination chemistry of uranyl ions was studied using long n-alkyl chain (n = 5-8) bridged by N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-tert-butylbenzyl)diaminoalkanes (H4L1-H4L4) as ligands. All ligands formed 2:1 (U-to-L ratio) complexes with uranyl ions, but in addition 1:1 complexes could be characterized using ligands H4L2 and H4L3. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopy (IR and NMR), and X-ray diffraction. The 2:1 complexes are of two types: [(UO2)2(H2Lm)(NO3)2(solvent)2] (m = 1 and 2; solvent = ethanol or propanol) or (cation)2[(UO2)2(H2Lm)(NO3)2(anion)2]·xsolvent (m = 2 and 4; cation = triethylammonium, anion = nitrate or thiocyanate, and solvent = dichloromethane and acetonitrile; x = 1 or 2). The 1:1 complexes have the formula [(UO2)2(H2Lm)2] (m = 2 and 3). In the solid state, 2:1 complexes are almost in a linear conformation with the uranyl ion at both ends of the ligand. The 1:1 complexes are cyclic dinuclear molecules. Preliminary studies of the ligands as uranyl ion extractors from water to dichloromethane were also performed. A high extraction efficiency was observed with H4L3 for uranyl ions, and in the presence of Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), and Zn(II) ions, a good extraction selectivity for uranyl ions was found with H4L1.

  17. Uranyl Precipitation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa via Controlled Polyphosphate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Renninger, Neil; Knopp, Roger; Nitsche, Heino; Clark, Douglas S.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2004-01-01

    The polyphosphate kinase gene from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was overexpressed in its native host, resulting in the accumulation of 100 times the polyphosphate seen with control strains. Degradation of this polyphosphate was induced by carbon starvation conditions, resulting in phosphate release into the medium. The mechanism of polyphosphate degradation is not clearly understood, but it appears to be associated with glycogen degradation. Upon suspension of the cells in 1 mM uranyl nitrate, nearly all polyphosphate that had accumulated was degraded within 48 h, resulting in the removal of nearly 80% of the uranyl ion and >95% of lesser-concentrated solutions. Electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) suggest that this removal was due to the precipitation of uranyl phosphate at the cell membrane. TRLFS also indicated that uranyl was initially sorbed to the cell as uranyl hydroxide and was then precipitated as uranyl phosphate as phosphate was released from the cell. Lethal doses of radiation did not halt phosphate secretion from polyphosphate-filled cells under carbon starvation conditions. PMID:15574942

  18. Rapid Self-Assembly of Uranyl Polyhedra into Crown Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C.

    2011-06-22

    Clusters built from 32 uranyl peroxide polyhedra self-assemble and crystallize within 15 min after combining uranyl nitrate, ammonium hydroxide, and hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. These novel crown-shaped clusters are remarkable in that they form so quickly, have extraordinarily low aqueous solubility, form with at least two distinct peroxide to hydroxyl ratios, and form in very high yield. The clusters, which have outer diameters of 23 Å, topologically consist of eight pentagons and four hexagons. Their rapid formation and low solubility in aqueous systems may be useful properties at various stages in an advanced nuclear energy system.

  19. Extraction of local coordination structure in a low-concentration uranyl system by XANES.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linjuan; Zhou, Jing; Zhang, Jianyong; Su, Jing; Zhang, Shuo; Chen, Ning; Jia, Yunpeng; Li, Jiong; Wang, Yu; Wang, Jian Qiang

    2016-05-01

    Obtaining structural information of uranyl species at an atomic/molecular scale is a critical step to control and predict their physical and chemical properties. To obtain such information, experimental and theoretical L3-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra of uranium were studied systematically for uranyl complexes. It was demonstrated that the bond lengths (R) in the uranyl species and relative energy positions (ΔE) of the XANES were determined as follows: ΔE1 = 168.3/R(U-Oax)(2) - 38.5 (for the axial plane) and ΔE2 = 428.4/R(U-Oeq)(2) - 37.1 (for the equatorial plane). These formulae could be used to directly extract the distances between the uranium absorber and oxygen ligand atoms in the axial and equatorial planes of uranyl ions based on the U L3-edge XANES experimental data. In addition, the relative weights were estimated for each configuration derived from the water molecule and nitrate ligand based on the obtained average equatorial coordination bond lengths in a series of uranyl nitrate complexes with progressively varied nitrate concentrations. Results obtained from XANES analysis were identical to that from extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) analysis. XANES analysis is applicable to ubiquitous uranyl-ligand complexes, such as the uranyl-carbonate complex. Most importantly, the XANES research method could be extended to low-concentration uranyl systems, as indicated by the results of the uranyl-amidoximate complex (∼40 p.p.m. uranium). Quantitative XANES analysis, a reliable and straightforward method, provides a simplified approach applied to the structural chemistry of actinides.

  20. Ionothermal synthesis of uranyl compounds that incorporate imidazole derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Wylie, Ernest M.; Dustin, Megan K.; Smith, Jeremy S.; Burns, Peter C.

    2013-01-15

    Ionothermal reactions of uranyl nitrate with various salts in methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids have produced single crystals of three uranyl compounds that incorporate imidazole derivatives as charge-balancing cations. (C{sub 4}H{sub 7}N{sub 2})[(UO{sub 2})(PO{sub 3}F)(F)] (1) crystallizes in space group C2, a=17.952(1) A, b=6.9646(6) A, c=8.5062(7) A, {beta}=112.301(1) Degree-Sign , (C{sub 6}H{sub 11}N{sub 2}){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2})(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}] (2) crystallizes in space group C2/c, a=31.90(1) A, b=9.383(5) A, c=13.770(7) A, {beta}=93.999(7) Degree-Sign and (C{sub 6}H{sub 11}N{sub 2})[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(PO{sub 4})(HPO{sub 4}) (3) crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}/n, a=9.307(2), b=18.067(4), c=9.765(2), {beta}=93.171(2). The U{sup 6+} cations are present as (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl ions coordinated by three O atoms and two F atoms in 1 and five O atoms in 2 and 3 to give pentagonal bipyramids. The structural unit in 1 is composed of F-sharing dimers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids linked into sheets through corner-sharing fluorophosphate tetrahedra. The structural unit in 2 is composed of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids with one chelating sulfate tetrahedron linked into chains by three other corner-sharing sulfate tetrahedra. In 3, the structural unit is composed of chains of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids linked into sheets through edge- and corner-sharing phosphate and hydrogen phosphate tetrahedra. N-methylimidazolium cations occupy the interstitial space between the uranyl fluorophosphate sheets in 1, whereas 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cations link the uranyl sulfate and phosphate units in 2 and 3 into extended structures. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis of uranyl compounds by ionothermal treatment is explored, and provides three novel compounds and insights concerning the role of water in controlling the structural units. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ionothermal syntheses have produced three new uranyl compounds. Black

  1. Density functional theory and molecular dynamics study of the uranyl ion (UO₂)²⁺.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Jeangros, Nicolás; Seminario, Jorge M

    2014-03-01

    The detection of uranium is very important, especially in water and, more importantly, in the form of uranyl ion (UO₂)²⁺, which is one of its most abundant moieties. Here, we report analyses and simulations of uranyl in water using ab initio modified force fields for water with improved parameters and charges of uranyl. We use a TIP4P model, which allows us to obtain accurate water properties such as the boiling point and the second and third shells of water molecules in the radial distribution function thanks to a fictitious charge that corrects the 3-point models by reproducing the exact dipole moment of the water molecule. We also introduced non-bonded interaction parameters for the water-uranyl intermolecular force field. Special care was taken in testing the effect of a range of uranyl charges on the structure of uranyl-water complexes. Atomic charges of the solvated ion in water were obtained using density functional theory (DFT) calculations taking into account the presence of nitrate ions in the solution, forming a neutral ensemble. DFT-based force fields were calculated in such a way that water properties, such as the boiling point or the pair distribution function stand. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations of a water box containing uranyl cations and nitrate anions are performed at room temperature. The three peaks in the oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function for water were found to be kept in the presence of uranyl thanks to the improvement of interaction parameters and charges. Also, we found three shells of water molecules surrounding the uranyl ion instead of two as was previously thought.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation study of distribution and dynamics of aqueous solutions of uranyl ions: the effect of varying temperature and concentration.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Manish; Choudhury, Niharendu

    2015-11-07

    Investigating the characteristics of actinyl ions has been of great interest due to their direct relevance in the nuclear fuel cycle. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to study the orientational structure and dynamics of aqueous solutions of uranyl ions of various concentrations. The orientational structure of water around a uranyl ion has been thoroughly investigated by calculating different orientational probability distributions corresponding to different molecular axes of water. The orientational distribution of water molecules in the first coordination shell of a uranyl ion is found to be markedly different from that in bulk water. Analysis of counterion distribution around the uranyl ion reveals the presence of nitrate ions along with water molecules in the first solvation shell. From the comparison of the number of coordinated water and nitrate ions at various uranyl nitrate concentrations, it is evident that these two species compete for occupying the first solvation shell of the uranyl ion. Orientational dynamics of water molecules about different molecular axes of water in the vicinity of uranyl ions have also been investigated and decreasing orientational mobility of water with increasing uranyl concentration has been found. However, it is observed that the orientational dynamics remains more or less the same whether we consider all the water molecules in the aqueous solution or only the solvation shell water molecules. The effect of temperature on the translational and orientational characteristics of the aqueous uranyl solutions has also been studied in detail.

  3. Pillared and open-framework uranyl diphosphonates

    SciTech Connect

    Adelani, Pius O.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-09-15

    The hydrothermal reactions of uranium trioxide, uranyl acetate, or uranyl nitrate with 1,4-benzenebisphosphonic acid in the presence of very small amount of HF at 200 deg. C results in the formation of three different uranyl diphosphonate compounds, [H{sub 3}O]{sub 2}{l_brace}(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3})(PO{sub 2}OH)]{sub 2}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}]{sub 2}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{r_brace}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (Ubbp-1), [H{sub 3}O]{sub 4}{l_brace}(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}F{sub 4}{r_brace}.H{sub 2}O (Ubbp-2), and {l_brace}(UO{sub 2})[C{sub 6}H{sub 2}F{sub 2}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){r_brace}{sub 2}.H{sub 2}O (Ubbp-3). The crystal structures of these compounds were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction experiments. Ubbp-1 consists of UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged by the phosphonate moieties to form a three-dimensional pillared structure. Ubbp-2 is composed of UO{sub 5}F{sub 2} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged through the phosphonate oxygen atoms into one-dimensional chains that are cross-linked by the phenyl spacers into a pillared structure. The structure of Ubbp-3 is a three-dimensional open-framework with large channels containing water molecules with internal dimensions of approximately 10.9x10.9 A. Ubbp-1 and Ubbp-2 fluoresce at room temperature. - Graphical Abstract: Illustration of the three-dimensional open-framework structure of {l_brace}(UO{sub 2})[C{sub 6}H{sub 2}F{sub 2}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){r_brace}{sub 2}.H{sub 2}O viewed along the c-axis. The structure is constructed from UO{sub 7} units, pentagonal bipyramids=green, oxygen=red, phosphorus=magenta, carbon=black, hydrogen=white. Highlights: > The influence of the uranyl salt anions and pH were critically examined in relation to structural variation. > The acetate and nitrate counter ions of uranyl may be acting as structure directing agents. > The use of rigid phenyl spacer yield

  4. Barium uranyl diphosphonates

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Anna-Gay D.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2012-08-15

    Three Ba{sup 2+}/UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} methylenediphosphonates have been prepared from mild hydrothermal treatment of uranium trioxide, methylendiphosphonic acid (C1P2) with barium hydroxide octahydrate, barium iodate monohydrate, and small aliquots of HF at 200 Degree-Sign C. These compounds, Ba[UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{center_dot}1.4H{sub 2}O (Ba-1), Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2}F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O (Ba-2), and Ba{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2})F{sub 4}]{center_dot}5.75H{sub 2}O (Ba-3) all adopt layered structures based upon linear uranyl groups and disphosphonate molecules. Ba-2 and Ba-3 are similar in that they both have UO{sub 5}F{sub 2} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged and chelated by the diphosphonate moiety into a two-dimensional zigzag anionic sheet (Ba-2) and a one-dimensional ribbon anionic chain (Ba-3). Ba-1, has a single crystallographically unique uranium metal center where the C1P2 ligand solely bridges to form [UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 2-} sheets. The interlayer space of the structures is occupied by Ba{sup 2+}, which, along with the fluoride ion, mediates the structure formed and maintains overall charge balance. - Graphical abstract: Illustration of the stacking of the layers in Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2})F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O viewed along the c-axis. The structure is constructed from UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramidal units, U(1)O{sub 7}=gray, U(2)O{sub 7}=yellow, barium=blue, phosphorus=magenta, fluorine=green, oxygen=red, carbon=black, and hydrogen=light peach. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polymerization of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} sites to form uranyl dimers leads to structural variations in compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Barium cations stitch uranyl diphosphonate anionic layers together, and help mediate structure formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HF acts as both a

  5. Composition for detecting uranyl

    DOEpatents

    Baylor, L.C.; Stephens, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to an indicator composition for use in spectrophotometric detection of a substance in a solution, and a method for making the composition. Useful indicators are sensitive to the particular substance being measured, but are unaffected by the fluid and other chemical species that may be present in the fluid. Optical indicators are used to measure the uranium concentration of process solutions in facilities for extracting uranium from ores, production of nuclear fuels, and reprocessing of irradiated fuels. The composition comprises an organohalide covalently bonded to an indicator for the substance, in such a manner that the product is itself an indicator that provides increased spectral resolution for detecting the substance. The indicator is preferably arsenazo III and the organohalide is preferably cyanuric chloride. These form a composition that is ideally suited for detecting uranyl.

  6. Engineering short peptide sequences for uranyl binding.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Colette; Starck, Matthieu; Gathu, Vicky; Chenavier, Yves; Delangle, Pascale

    2014-12-08

    Peptides are interesting tools to rationalize uranyl-protein interactions, which are relevant to uranium toxicity in vivo. Structured cyclic peptide scaffolds were chosen as promising candidates to coordinate uranyl thanks to four amino acid side chains pre-oriented towards the dioxo cation equatorial plane. The binding of uranyl by a series of decapeptides has been investigated with complementary analytical and spectroscopic methods to determine the key parameters for the formation of stable uranyl-peptide complexes. The molar ellipticity of the uranyl complex at 195 nm is directly correlated to its stability, which demonstrates that the β-sheet structure is optimal for high stability in the peptide series. Cyclodecapeptides with four glutamate residues exhibit the highest affinities for uranyl with log KC =8.0-8.4 and, therefore, appear as good starting points for the design of high-affinity uranyl-chelating peptides.

  7. Uptake of uranyl ions from uranium ores and sludges by means of Spirulina platensis, Porphyridium cruentum and Nostok linckia alga.

    PubMed

    Cecal, Alexandru; Humelnicu, Doina; Rudic, Valeriu; Cepoi, Liliana; Ganju, Dumitru; Cojocari, Angela

    2012-08-01

    In this paper was studied the uranyl ions biosorption on three types of alga: Nostok linckia, Porphyridium cruentum and Spirulina platensis. These ions were supplied either from a pure solution of uranyl nitrate, or after leaching process of uranium ore, or from the sludge resulting in the output of pure UO(2) technology. It was investigated the retention degree versus contact time and afterwards the Langmuir and Freundlich biosorption isotherms of uranyl ions on the three alga types. The retention of UO(2)(2+) ions on alga was proved through FTIR spectra plotted before and after biosorption processes. From the experimental data it was found that regardless of origin of uranyl ions, the retention degree on alga decreased in the series. Spirulina platensis > Porphyridium cruentum ≥ Nostok linckia.

  8. On the Formation of "Hypercoordinated" Uranyl Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Schoendorff, George E.; De Jong, Wibe A.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Gibson, John K.; Rios, Daniel; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2011-09-05

    Recent gas phase experimental studies suggest the presence of hypercoordinated uranyl complexes. Coordination of acetone (Ace) to uranyl to form hypercoordinated species is examined using density functional theory (DFT) with a range of functionals and second order perturbation theory (MP2). Complexes with up to eight acetones were studied. It is shown that no more than six acetones can bind directly to uranium and that the observed uranyl complexes are not hypercoordinated.

  9. Dissecting the cation-cation interaction between two uranyl units.

    PubMed

    Tecmer, Paweł; Hong, Sung W; Boguslawski, Katharina

    2016-07-21

    We present a state-of-the-art computational study of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) cation-cation interactions (dications) in aqueous solution. Reliable electronic structures of two interacting uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) subunits as well as those of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) clusters are presented for the first time. Our theoretical study elucidates the impact of cation-cation interactions on changes in the molecular structure as well as changes in vibrational and UV-Vis spectra of the bare uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) moieties for different total spin-states and total charges of the dications.

  10. A Solution-Based Approach for Mo-99 Production: Considerations for Nitrate versus Sulfate Media

    DOE PAGES

    Youker, Amanda J.; Chemerisov, Sergey D.; Kalensky, Michael; ...

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum-99 is the parent of Technetium-99m, which is used in nearly 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures. The medical community has been plagued by Mo-99 shortages due to aging reactors, such as the NRU (National Research Universal) reactor in Canada. There are currently no US producers of Mo-99, and NRU is scheduled for shutdown in 2016, which means that another Mo-99 shortage is imminent unless a potential domestic Mo-99 producer fills the void. Argonne National Laboratory is assisting two potential domestic suppliers of Mo-99 by examining the effects of a uranyl nitrate versus a uranyl sulfate target solution configuration onmore » Mo-99 production. Uranyl nitrate solutions are easier to prepare and do not generate detectable amounts of peroxide upon irradiation, but a high radiation field can lead to a large increase in pH, which can lead to the precipitation of fission products and uranyl hydroxides. Uranyl sulfate solutions are more difficult to prepare, and enough peroxide is generated during irradiation to cause precipitation of uranyl peroxide, but this can be prevented by adding a catalyst to the solution. A titania sorbent can be used to recover Mo-99 from a highly concentrated uranyl nitrate or uranyl sulfate solution; however, different approaches must be taken to prevent precipitation during Mo-99 production.« less

  11. Metal-organic frameworks based on uranyl and phosphonate ligands.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Bernardo; Fernandes, José A; Pereira, Cláudia C L; Vilela, Sérgio M F; Tomé, João P C; Marçalo, Joaquim; Almeida Paz, Filipe A

    2014-02-01

    Three new crystalline metal-organic frameworks have been prepared from the reaction of uranyl nitrate with nitrilotris(methylphosphonic acid) [H6nmp, N(CH2PO3H2)3], 1,4-phenylenebis(methylene)diphosphonic acid [H4pmd, C6H4(PO3H2)2], and (benzene-1,3,5-triyltris(methylene))triphosphonic acid [H6bmt, C6H3(PO3H2)3]. Compound [(UO2)2F(H3nmp)(H2O)]·4H2O (I) crystallizes in space group C2/c, showing two crystallographically independent uranyl centres with pentagonal bipyramidal coordination geometries. While one metal centre is composed of a {(UO2)O3(μ-F)}2 dimer, the other comprises an isolated {(UO2)O5} polyhedron. Compound [(UO2)(H2pmd)] (II) crystallizes in space group P21/c, showing a centrosymmetric uranyl centre with an octahedral {(UO2)O4} coordination geometry. Compound [(UO2)3(H3bmt)2(H2O)2]·14H2O (III) crystallizes in space group P\\bar 1, showing two crystallographically independent uranyl centres. One uranyl centre is a {(UO2)O5} pentagonal bipyramid similar to that in (I), while the other is a {(UO2)O4} centrosymmetric octahedron similar to that in (II). Compounds (I) and (III) contain solvent-accessible volumes accounting for ca 23.6 and 26.9% of their unit-cell volume, respectively. In (I) the cavity has a columnar shape and is occupied by disordered water molecules, while in (III) the cavity is a two-dimensional layer with more ordered water molecules. All compounds have been studied in the solid state using FT-IR spectroscopy. Topological studies show that compounds (I) and (III) are trinodal, with 3,6,6- and 4,4,6-connected networks, respectively. Compound (II) is instead a 4-connected uninodal network of the type cds.

  12. DFT Study of Uranyl Peroxo Complexes with H₂O, F⁻, OH⁻, CO₃ ²⁻, and NO₃-

    SciTech Connect

    Odoh, Samuel O.; Schreckenbach, Georg

    2013-05-06

    The structural and electronic properties of monomeric uranyl peroxo complexes with aquo, hydroxo, fluoro, carbonate, and nitrate ligands have been studied using DFT calculations with relativistic pseudopotentials. The calculated affinity of the peroxo group for the actinyl moiety far exceeds that of the other ligands tested in this work.

  13. Hybrid uranyl-carboxyphosphonate cage clusters.

    PubMed

    Adelani, Pius O; Ozga, Michael; Wallace, Christine M; Qiu, Jie; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Sigmon, Ginger E; Burns, Peter C

    2013-07-01

    Two new hybrid uranyl-carboxyphosphonate cage clusters built from uranyl peroxide units were crystallized from aqueous solution under ambient conditions in approximately two months. The clusters are built from uranyl hexagonal bipyramids and are connected by employing a secondary metal linker, the 2-carboxyphenylphosphonate ligand. The structure of cluster A is composed of a ten-membered uranyl polyhedral belt that is capped on either end of an elongated cage by five-membered rings of uranyl polyhedra. The structure of cluster B consists of 24 uranyl cations that are arranged into 6 four-membered rings of uranyl polyhedra. Four of the corresponding topological squares are fused together to form a sixteen-membered double uranyl pseudobelt that is capped on either end by 2 topological squares. Cluster A crystallizes over a wide pH range of 4.6-6.8, while cluster B was isolated under narrower pH range of 6.9-7.8. Studies of their fate in aqueous solution upon dissolution of crystals by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) provide evidence for their persistence in solution. The well-established characteristic fingerprint from the absorption spectra of the uranium(VI) cations disappears and becomes a nearly featureless peak; nonetheless, the two compounds fluoresce at room temperature.

  14. Optical apparatus and method for sensing uranyl

    DOEpatents

    Baylor, L.C.; Buchanan, B.R.

    1994-01-01

    An optical sensing device for uranyl and other substances, a method for making an optical sensing device and a method for chemically binding uranyl and other indicators to glass, quartz, cellulose and similar substrates. The indicator, such as arsenazo III, is immobilized on the substrate using a chemical binding process. The immobilized arsenazo III causes uranyl from a fluid sample to bind irreversibly to the substrate at its active sites, thus causing absorption of a portion of light transmitted through the substrate. Determination of the amount of light absorbed, using conventional means, yields the concentration of uranyl present in the sample fluid. The binding of uranyl on the substrate can be reversed by subsequent exposure of the substrate to a solution of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid. The chemical binding process is suitable for similarly binding other indicators, such as bromocresol green.

  15. Fate of uranyl in a quaternary system composed of uranyl, citrate, goethite, and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Bencheikh-Latmani, Rizlan; Leckie, James O; Bargar, John R

    2003-08-15

    This study investigated the partitioning of uranyl within a quaternary system made up of uranyl, citrate, goethite, and the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. In the absence of cells, uranyl was sorbed to goethite as a complex involving surface groups and/or citrate. Measurements of the evolution of CO2 indicated that the addition of bacterial cells lead to the gradual biodegradation of citrate. Throughout the biodegradation process, uranyl remained sorbed to the insoluble fraction comprised of goethite and cells. EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) measurements showed that bacterial cells outcompeted goethite for uranyl under the experimental conditions and caused the repartitioning of uranyl from goethite to cell matter, independently from citrate degradation. Citrate degradation caused further release of uranyl from goethite surfaces, followed by subsequent association of uranyl with cells. At long equilibration times (3 months), cell lysis and phosphate release resulted in the precipitation of an autunite-like phase. This work suggests that bacterial degradation of uranyl-complexing ligands in contaminated subsurface media containing iron oxides should not necessarily lead to an increase in the mobility of uranyl.

  16. Acquired Amino Acid Deficiencies: A Focus on Arginine and Glutamine.

    PubMed

    Morris, Claudia R; Hamilton-Reeves, Jill; Martindale, Robert G; Sarav, Menaka; Ochoa Gautier, Juan B

    2017-04-01

    Nonessential amino acids are synthesized de novo and therefore not diet dependent. In contrast, essential amino acids must be obtained through nutrition since they cannot be synthesized internally. Several nonessential amino acids may become essential under conditions of stress and catabolic states when the capacity of endogenous amino acid synthesis is exceeded. Arginine and glutamine are 2 such conditionally essential amino acids and are the focus of this review. Low arginine bioavailability plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of a growing number of varied diseases, including sickle cell disease, thalassemia, malaria, acute asthma, cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, cardiovascular disease, certain cancers, and trauma, among others. Catabolism of arginine by arginase enzymes is the most common cause of an acquired arginine deficiency syndrome, frequently contributing to endothelial dysfunction and/or T-cell dysfunction, depending on the clinical scenario and disease state. Glutamine, an arginine precursor, is one of the most abundant amino acids in the body and, like arginine, becomes deficient in several conditions of stress, including critical illness, trauma, infection, cancer, and gastrointestinal disorders. At-risk populations are discussed together with therapeutic options that target these specific acquired amino acid deficiencies.

  17. Effects of ascorbic acid deficiency on methyl mercury dicyandiamide toxicosis in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Yamini, B; Sleight, S D

    1984-07-01

    Methylmercury dicyandiamide (MMD) when given intraperitoneally at a dosage of 4 mg/kg of body weight at weekly intervals for 3 weeks resulted in death of guinea pigs fed an ascorbic acid deficient diet. Controls fed an ascorbic acid deficient diet survived during this period as did guinea pigs given MMD and fed an ascorbic acid adequate diet. In a second experiment, guinea pigs fed an ascorbic acid deficient diet containing 22 ppm of MMD died within 26 days and had severe hemorrhagic and ulcerative gastroenteritis and coagulative necrosis of the liver. Ascorbic acid deficient controls died at 34 days. The MMD-containing ascorbic acid adequate diet killed guinea pigs in 150 days. Guinea pigs fed an ascorbic acid deficient diet with 44 ppm of MMD died within 20 days with acute neurologic signs. Pathologic changes were mostly in the gray matter. Guinea pigs fed MMD and a diet with adequate ascorbic acid survived for 38 days whereas the ascorbic acid deficient controls survived for 47 days. Results indicate that ascorbic acid deficiency can be a factor in the location and severity of clinical signs and lesions of MMD.

  18. Crystal Chemistry of the Potassium and Rubidium Uranyl Borate Families Derived from Boric Acid Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2010-07-19

    The reaction of uranyl nitrate with a large excess of molten boric acid in the presence of potassium or rubidium nitrate results in the formation of three new potassium uranyl borates, K{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 12}O{sub 19}(OH){sub 4}]·0.3H{sub 2}O (KUBO-1), K[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 15}(OH){sub 5}] (KUBO-2), and K[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 3}]·0.7H{sub 2}O (KUBO-3) and two new rubidium uranyl borates Rb{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 13}O{sub 20}(OH){sub 5}] (RbUBO-1) and Rb[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 3}]·0.7H{sub 2}O (RbUBO-2). The latter is isotypic with KUBO-3. These compounds share a common structural motif consisting of a linear uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, cation surrounded by BO{sub 3} triangles and BO{sub 4} tetrahedra to create an UO{sub 8} hexagonal bipyramidal environment around uranium. The borate anions bridge between uranyl units to create sheets. Additional BO{sub 3} triangles extend from the polyborate layers and are directed approximately perpendicular to the sheets. All of these compounds adopt layered structures. With the exception of KUBO-1, the structures are all centrosymmetric. All of these compounds fluoresce when irradiated with long-wavelength UV light. The fluorescence spectrum yields well-defined vibronically coupled charge-transfer features.

  19. Synthesis, structure, and spectroscopic characterization of three uranyl phosphates with unique structural units

    SciTech Connect

    Wylie, Ernest M.; Dawes, Colleen M.; Burns, Peter C.

    2012-12-15

    Single crystals of Zn{sub 4}(OH){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2})(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)] (UZnP), Cs[(UO{sub 2})(HPO{sub 4})NO{sub 3}] (UCsP), and In{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}].2H{sub 2}O (UInP) were obtained from hydrothermal reactions and have been structurally and chemically characterized. UZnP crystallizes in space group Pbcn, a=8.8817(7), b=6.6109(5), c=19.569(1) A; UCsP crystallizes in P-1, a=7.015(2), b=7.441(1), c=9.393(2) A, {alpha}=72.974(2), {beta}=74.261(2), {gamma}=79.498(2); and UInP crystallizes in P-1, a=7.9856(5), b=9.159(1), c=9.2398(6) A {alpha}=101.289(1), {beta}=114.642(1), {gamma}=99.203(2). The U{sup 6+} cations are present as (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl ions coordinated by five O atoms to give pentagonal bipyramids. The structural unit in UZnP is a finite cluster containing a uranyl pentagonal bipyramid that shares corners with two phosphate tetrahedra. The structural unit in UCsP is composed of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids with one chelating nitrate group that are linked into chains by three bridging hydrogen phosphate tetrahedra. In UInP, the structural unit contains pairs of edge-sharing uranyl pentagonal bipyramids with two chelating phosphate tetrahedra that are linked into chains through two bridging phosphate tetrahedra. Indium octahedra link these uranyl phosphate chains into a 3-dimensional framework. All three compounds exhibit unique structural units that deviate from the typical layered structures observed in uranyl phosphate solid-state chemistry. - Graphical abstract: Three new uranyl phosphates with unique structural units are reported. Black-Small-Square Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three new uranyl phosphates have been synthesized hydrothermally. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single crystal analyses reveal unique structural units. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dimensionality of these compounds deviate from typical U{sup 6+} layered structures.

  20. FY-15 Progress Report on Cleanup of irradiated SHINE Target Solutions Containing 140g-U/L Uranyl Sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Megan E.; Bowers, Delbert L.; Vandegrift, George F.

    2015-09-01

    During FY 2012 and 2013, a process was developed to convert the SHINE Target Solution (STS) of irradiated uranyl sulfate (140 g U/L) to uranyl nitrate. This process is necessary so that the uranium solution can be processed by the UREX (Uranium Extraction) separation process, which will remove impurities from the uranium so that it can be recycled. The uranyl sulfate solution must contain <0.02 M SO42- so that the uranium will be extractable into the UREXsolvent. In addition, it is desired that the barium content be below 0.0007 M, as this is the limit in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

  1. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W.

    1996-08-01

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 {+-} 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO{sub 4} at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. Studies on the effect of added LiNO{sub 3} or Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF{sub 6} content of WF{sub 6} gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF{sub 6}.

  2. Histopathology of kidney of albino rat poisoned with uranyl nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, K.A.; Garg, V.K.; Garg, V.

    1980-01-01

    Heavy metals input into the media either terrestrial or aquatic is an important aspect of environmental pollution. Heavy metals are known to produce toxic effects on the different tissues of various terrestrial and aquatic animals. Some of these are highly toxic at even very low concentrations and they alter the cellular architecture of many organs including the kidney. Little has been done on the effect of rare earth metals, particularly that of uranium on the kidney of animals. In the present paper histopathological changes produced by uranium on the kidney of albino rats are discussed.

  3. Uranyl and uranyl-3d block cation complexes with 1,3-adamantanedicarboxylate: crystal structures, luminescence, and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Thuéry, Pierre; Rivière, Eric; Harrowfield, Jack

    2015-03-16

    The reaction of 1,3-adamantanedicarboxylic acid (LH2) with uranyl nitrate under solvo-hydrothermal conditions, either alone or in the presence of additional metal cations (Co(2+), Ni(2+), or Cu(2+)) gives a series of nine complexes displaying a wide range of architectures. While [UO2(L)(H2O)]·1.25CH3CN (1) and [UO2(L)(DMF)] (2) are one-dimensional (1D) species analogous to that previously known, [H2NMe2]2[(UO2)2(L)3]·1.5H2O (3), which includes dimethylammonium counterions generated in situ, is a three-dimensional (3D) framework, and [UO2(L)(NMP)] (4) (NMP = N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone) is a braid-shaped 1D polymer. When 3d block metal ions are present and bound to 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) coligands, their role is reduced to that of decorating species attached to uranyl-containing 1D polymers, as in [UO2M(L)2(bipy)2]·0.5H2O with M = Co (5) or Ni (6), and [(UO2)2Cu2(L)3(NO3)2(bipy)2]·0.5H2O (9), or of counterions, as in [Ni(bipy)3][(UO2)4(O)2(L)3]·3H2O (7), in which a two-dimensional (2D) assembly is built from tetranuclear uranyl-containing building units. In contrast, the heterometallic 3D framework [UO2Cu(L)2] (8) can be isolated in the absence of bipy. The emission spectra measured in the solid state display the usual uranyl vibronic fine structure, with various degrees of resolution and quenching, except for that of complex 7, which shows emission from the nickel(II) centers. The magnetic properties of complexes 5, 6, 8, and 9 were investigated, showing, in particular, the presence of zero-field splitting effects in 6 and weak antiferromagnetic interactions in 9.

  4. XPS spectra of uranyl minerals and synthetic uranyl compounds. II: The O 1s spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, M.; Hawthorne, F. C.; Freund, M. S.; Burns, P. C.

    2009-05-01

    The O 1s spectrum is examined for 19 uranyl minerals of different composition and structure. Spectra from single crystals were measured with a Kratos Axis Ultra X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometer with a magnetic-confinement charge-compensation system. Well-resolved spectra with distinct maxima, shoulders and inflections points, in combination with reported and measured binding energies for specific O 2- species and structural data of the uranyl minerals are used to resolve the fine structure of the O 1s envelope. The resolution of the O 1s spectra includes, for the first time, different O 2- bands, which are assigned to O atoms linking uranyl with uranyl polyhedra ( Usbnd Osbnd U) and O atoms of uranyl groups ( Odbnd Udbnd O). The resolved bands in the O 1s spectrum occur at distinct ranges in binding energy: bands for ( Usbnd Osbnd U) occur at 529.6-530.4 eV, bands for ( Odbnd Udbnd O) occur at 530.6-531.4 eV, bands for O 2- in the equatorial plane of the uranyl polyhedra linking uranyl polyhedra with ( TO n) groups ( T = Si, S, C, P, Se) ( Tsbnd O) occur at 530.9-532.2 eV; bands for (OH) groups in the equatorial plane of the uranyl polyhedra ( OH) occur at 532.0-532.5 eV, bands of (H 2O) groups in the interstitial complex of the uranyl minerals ( H2O interst) occur at 533.0-533.8 eV and bands of physisorbed (H 2O) groups on the surface of uranyl minerals ( H2O adsorb) occur at 534.8-535.2 eV. Treatment of uranyl minerals with acidic solutions results in a decrease in Usbnd Osbnd U and an increase in OH. Differences in the ratio of OH : Odbnd Udbnd O between the surface and bulk structure is larger for uranyl minerals with a high number of Usbnd Osbnd U and Tsbnd O species in the bulk structure which is explained by protonation of underbonded Usbnd O, Usbnd Osbnd U and Tsbnd O terminations on the surface. The difference in the ratio of H2O interst : Odbnd Udbnd O between the bulk and surface structures is larger for uranyl minerals with higher percentages of H2O

  5. Uranyl peroxide oxalate cage and core-shell clusters containing 50 and 120 uranyl ions.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jie; Qiu, Jie; Burns, Peter C

    2012-02-20

    Cage clusters built from uranyl hexagonal bipyramids and oxalate ligands crystallize from slightly acidic aqueous solution under ambient conditions, facilitating structure analysis. Each cluster contains uranyl ions coordinated by peroxo ligands in a bidentate configuration. Uranyl ions are bridged by shared peroxo ligands, oxalate ligands, or through hydroxyl groups. U(50)Ox(20) contains 50 uranyl ions and 20 oxalate groups and is a topological derivative of the U(50) cage cluster that has a fullerene topology. U(120)Ox(90) contains 120 uranyl ions and 90 oxalate groups and is the largest and highest mass cluster containing uranyl ions that has been reported. It has a core-shell structure, in which the inner shell (core) consists of a cluster of 60 uranyl ions and 30 oxalate groups, identical to U(60)Ox(30), with a fullerene topology. The outer shell contains 12 identical units that each consist of five uranyl hexagonal bipyramids that are linked to form a ring (topological pentagon), with each uranyl ion also coordinated by a side-on nonbridging oxalate group. The five-membered rings of the inner and outer shells (the topological pentagons) are in correspondence and are linked through K cations. The inner shell topology has therefore templated the location of the outer shell rings, and the K counterions assume a structure-directing role. Small-angle X-ray scattering data demonstrated U(50)Ox(20) remains intact in aqueous solution upon dissolution. In the case of clusters of U(120)Ox(90), the scattering data for dissolved crystals indicates the U(60)Ox(30) core persists in solution, although the outer rings of uranyl bipyramids contained in the U(120)Ox(90) core-shell cluster appear to detach from the cluster when crystals are dissolved in water.

  6. Crystallization characteristics of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) in ammonium carbonate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tae-Joon, Kim; Kyung-Chai, Jeong; Jin-Ho, Park; In-Soon, Chang; Cheong-Song, Choi

    1994-05-01

    Ammonium carbonate solutions with an excessive amount of NH 3 were produced in a commercial AUC (ammonium uranyl carbonate) conversion plant. In this study the AUC crystals, precipitated with uranyl nitrate and ammonium carbonate solutions prepared in the laboratory, were characterized to determine the feasibility of recycling ammonium carbonate solution. The AUC crystals were easily agglomerated with the increasing concentration of CO 32- and mole ratio of {NH 4+}/{CO 32-} in ammonium carbonate solution. Effects of a mixing system for the solution in the AUC crystallizer and the feed location of the solution on the agglomeration of AUC crystals were also studied along with the effects of agglomerated AUC powders on UO 2 powders. Finally, the feasibility of manufacturing UO 2 fuel with a sintered pellet density of 10.52 g/cm 3, using the AUC powders generated in this experiment, was demonstrated.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of uranyl and uranyl carbonate adsorption at aluminosilicate surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kerisit, Sebastien; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-04-01

    Adsorption at mineral surfaces is a critical factor controlling the mobility of uranium(VI) in aqueous environments. Therefore, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate uranyl(VI) adsorption onto two neutral aluminosilicate surfaces, namely, the orthoclase (001) surface and the octahedral aluminum sheet of the kaolinite (001) surface. Although uranyl preferentially adsorbs as a bidentate inner-sphere complex on both surfaces, the free energy of adsorption on the orthoclase surface (-15 kcal mol(-1)) is significantly more favorable than that at the kaolinite surface (-3 kcal mol(-1)), which is attributed to differences in surface functional groups and the ability of the orthoclase surface to release a surface potassium ion upon uranyl adsorption. The structures of the adsorbed complexes compare favorably with X-ray absorption spectroscopy results. Simulations of the adsorption of uranyl complexes with up to three carbonate ligands revealed that uranyl complexes coordinated to up to two carbonate ions are stable on the orthoclase surface whereas uranyl carbonate surface complexes are unfavored at the kaolinite surface. Combining the MD-derived equilibrium adsorption constants for orthoclase with aqueous equilibrium constants for uranyl carbonate species indicates the presence of adsorbed uranium complexes with one or two carbonates under alkaline conditions, in support of current uranium(VI) surface complexation models.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Uranyl and Uranyl Carbonate Adsorption at Alumino-silicate Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-03-03

    Adsorption at mineral surfaces is a critical factor controlling the mobility of uranium(VI) in aqueous environments. Therefore, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate uranyl(VI) adsorption onto two neutral alumino-silicate surfaces, namely the orthoclase (001) surface and the octahedral aluminum sheet of the kaolinite (001) surface. Although uranyl preferentially adsorbed as a bi-dentate innersphere complex on both surfaces, the free energy of adsorption at the orthoclase surface (-15 kcal mol-1) was significantly more favorable than that at the kaolinite surface (-3 kcal mol-1), which was attributed to differences in surface functional groups and to the ability of the orthoclase surface to dissolve a surface potassium ion upon uranyl adsorption. The structures of the adsorbed complexes compared favorably with X-ray absorption spectroscopy results. Simulations of the adsorption of uranyl complexes with up to three carbonate ligands revealed that uranyl complexes coordinated to up to 2 carbonate ions are stable on the orthoclase surface whereas uranyl carbonate surface complexes are unfavored at the kaolinite surface. Combining the MD-derived equilibrium adsorption constants for orthoclase with aqueous equilibrium constants for uranyl carbonate species indicates the presence of adsorbed uranium complexes with one or two carbonates in alkaline conditions, in support of current uranium(VI) surface complexation models.

  9. Uranyl Sequestration: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Uranyl Complexes with a Tetradentate Methylterephthalamide Ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Chengbao; Shuh, David; Raymond, Kenneth

    2011-03-07

    Uranyl complexes of a bis(methylterephthalamide) ligand (LH{sub 4}) have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure is an unexpected [Me{sub 4}N]{sub 8}[L(UO{sub 2})]{sub 4} tetramer, formed via coordination of the two MeTAM units of L to two uranyl moieties. Addition of KOH to the tetramer gave the corresponding monomeric uranyl methoxide species [Me{sub 4}N]K{sub 2}[LUO{sub 2}(OMe)].

  10. Self-assembly of silver nanoparticles as high active surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate for rapid and trace analysis of uranyl(VI) ions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaofei; Jiang, Jiaolai; Wu, Haoxi; Jia, Jianping; Shao, Lang; Tang, Hao; Ren, Yiming; Chu, Mingfu; Wang, Xiaolin

    2017-06-05

    A facile surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate based on the self-assembly of silver nanoparticles on the modified silicon wafer was obtained, and for the first time, an advanced SERS analysis method basing on this as-prepared substrate was established for high sensitive and rapid detection of uranyl ions. Due to the weakened bond strength of OUO resulting from two kinds of adsorption of uranyl species ("strong" and "weak" adsorption) on the substrate, the ν1 symmetric stretch vibration frequency of OUO shifted from 871cm(-1) (normal Raman) to 720cm(-1) and 826cm(-1) (SERS) along with significant Raman enhancement. Effects of the hydrolysis of uranyl ions on SERS were also investigated, and the SERS band at ~826cm(-1) was first used to approximately define the constitution of uranyl species at trace quantity level. Besides, the SERS intensity was proportional to the variable concentrations of uranyl nitrate ranging from 10(-7) to 10(-3)molL(-1) with an excellent linear relation (R(2)=0.998), and the detection limit was ~10(-7)molL(-1). Furthermore, the related SERS approach involves low-cost substrate fabrication, rapid and trace analysis simultaneously, and shows great potential applications for the field assays of uranyl ions in the nuclear fuel cycle and environmental monitoring.

  11. [Risk factors for prevalence of folic acid deficiency in Chinese lactating women in 2013].

    PubMed

    Bi, Y; Duan, Y F; Wang, J; Yu, D M; Yang, X G; Yin, S A; Yang, Z Y

    2016-12-06

    Objective: The study aimed to assess the folic acid status of lactating women in China and to analyze factors related to folic acid deficiency in these subjects. Methods: The data on lactating women were extracted from the Chinese National Nutrition and Health Surveillance in 2013. By a multi-stage stratified cluster random sampling method, 10 331 lactating women were selected for the study. The lactating women, 0-24 months postpartum, were from 55 sites in 30 provinces of China, excluding the Tibet Autonomous Region. A standard questionnaire was used to obtain general information and dietary intake during the previous one month period was collected using a food frequency questionnaire. A total of 20% of the total number of lactating women were randomly selected to analyze serum folic acid. Finally, 1 894 lactating women, with questionnaire results and serum folic acid data, were included in the study. Serum folic acid concentrations were analyzed using an electro-chemiluminescence immunoassay method. Folic acid deficiency was defined as a serum folic acid level <2 ng/ml. A multiple logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the factors associated with folic acid deficiency in these women. Results: After excluding abnormal values, 1 894 lactating women were included in the study. Based on our findings, the prevalence of folate deficiency was 3.0% (56/1 894) in lactating women in China. The prevalence of folic acid deficiency was 0.3% (1/388), 1.3% (7/550), 6.0% (38/639) and 3.2% (10/317) in larger, medium or small cities, general rural counties and poor rural counties, respectively. The prevalence of folic acid deficiency was 6.3% (17/269) and 2.4% (39/1 623) for minority and Han ethnic groups, respectively, and was 6.3% (52/823) and 0.4% (4/1 071) for subjects in northern and southern areas of China, respectively. Binary unconditionally logistic regression was used to analyze the factors associated with folic acid deficiency in the lactating women. The

  12. Infared Spectroscopy of Discrete Uranyl Anion Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G. S.; Gianotto, Anita K.; McIIwain, Michael E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Kullman, Michael; Moore, David T.; Polfer, Nick; Oomens, Jos; Infante, Ivan A.; Visscher, Lucas; Siboulet, Bertrand; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2008-01-24

    The Free-Electron Laser for Infrared Experiments (FELIX) w 1 as used to study the wavelength-resolved multiple photon photodissociation of discrete, gas phase uranyl (UO2 2 2+) complexes containing a single anionic ligand (A), with or without ligated solvent molecules (S). The uranyl antisymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies were measured for complexes with general formula [UO2A(S)n]+, where A was either hydroxide, methoxide, or acetate; S was water, ammonia, acetone, or acetonitrile; and n = 0-3. The values for the antisymmetric stretching frequency for uranyl ligated with only an anion ([UO2A]+) were as low or lower than measurements for [UO2]2+ ligated with as many as five strong neutral donor ligands, and are comparable to solution phase values. This result was surprising because initial DFT calculations predicted values that were 30–40 cm-1 higher, consistent with intuition but not with the data. Modification of the basis sets and use of alternative functionals improved computational accuracy for the methoxide and acetate complexes, but calculated values for the hydroxide were greater than the measurement regardless of the computational method used. Attachment of a neutral donor ligand S to [UO2A]+ produced [UO2AS]+, which produced only very modest changes to the uranyl antisymmetric stretch frequency, and did not universally shift the frequency to lower values. DFT calculations for [UO2AS]+ were in accord with trends in the data, and showed that attachment of the solvent was accommodated by weakening of the U-anion bond as well as the uranyl. When uranyl frequencies were compared for [UO2AS]+ species having different solvent neutrals, values decreased with increasing neutral nucleophilicity.

  13. Uranyl peroxide closed clusters containing topological squares

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Daniel K.; Burtner, Alicia; Pressprich, Laura; Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    Four self-assembling clusters of uranyl peroxide polyhedra have been formed in alkaline aqueous solutions and structurally characterized. These clusters consist of 28, 30, 36 and 44 uranyl polyhedra and exhibit complex new topologies. Each has a structure that contains topological squares, pentagons and hexagons. Analysis of possible topologies within boundary constraints indicates a tendency for adoption of higher symmetry topologies in these cases. Small angle X-ray scattering data demonstrated that crystals of one of these clusters can be dissolved in ultrapure water and that the clusters remain intact for at least several days.

  14. DFT study of uranyl peroxo complexes with H2O, F-, OH-, CO3(2-), and NO3(-).

    PubMed

    Odoh, Samuel O; Schreckenbach, Georg

    2013-05-06

    The structural and electronic properties of monoperoxo and diperoxo uranyl complexes with aquo, fluoride, hydroxo, carbonate, and nitrate ligands have been studied using scalar relativistic density functional theory (DFT). Only the complexes in which the peroxo ligands are coordinated to the uranyl moiety in a bidentate mode were considered. The calculated binding energies confirm that the affinity of the peroxo ligand for the uranyl group far exceeds that of the F(-), OH(-), CO3(2-), NO3(-), and H2O ligands. The formation of the monoperoxo complexes from UO2(H2O)5(2+) and HO2(-) were found to be exothermic in solution. In contrast, the formation of the monouranyl-diperoxo, UO2(O2)2X2(4-) or UO2(O2)2X(4-/3-) (where X is any of F(-), OH(-), CO3(2-), or NO3(-)), complexes were all found to be endothermic in aqueous solution. This suggests that the monoperoxo species are the terminal monouranyl peroxo complexes in solution, in agreement with recent experimental work. Overall, we find that the properties of the uranyl-peroxo complexes conform to well-known trends: the coordination of the peroxo ligand weakens the U-O(yl) bonds, stabilizes the σ(d) orbitals and causes a mixing between the uranyl π- and peroxo σ- and π-orbitals. The weakening of the U-O(yl) bonds upon peroxide coordination results in uranyl stretching vibrational frequencies that are much lower than those obtained after the coordination of carbonato or hydroxo ligands.

  15. Solid-state dynamics of uranyl polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Alam, Todd M; Liao, Zuolei; Zakharov, Lev N; Nyman, May

    2014-07-01

    Understanding fundamental uranyl polyoxometalate (POM) chemistry in solution and the solid state is the first step to defining its future role in the development of new actinide materials and separation processes that are vital to every step of the nuclear fuel cycle. Many solid-state geometries of uranyl POMs have been described, but we are only beginning to understand their chemical behavior, which thus far includes the role of templates in their self-assembly, and the dynamics of encapsulated species in solution. This study provides unprecedented detail into the exchange dynamics of the encapsulated species in the solid state through Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy. Although it was previously recognized that capsule-like molybdate and uranyl POMs exchange encapsulated species when dissolved in water, analogous exchange in the solid state has not been documented, or even considered. Here, we observe the extremely high rate of transport of Li(+) and aqua species across the uranyl shell in the solid state, a process that is affected by both temperature and pore blocking by larger species. These results highlight the untapped potential of emergent f-block element materials and vesicle-like POMs.

  16. Association of low potassium diet and folic acid deficiency in patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Background Most of the folic acid sources are rich also in potassium. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) usually receive a low potassium diet. We investigated the possibility of an association between low potassium diet and folic acid deficiency. Methods In total, 128 CKD patients participated in this cross-sectional study. Sixty-four patients with CKD grades 1 and 2 were on an unrestricted potassium diet when enrolled in the study, and 64 patients with CKD grades 3 and 4 had received instructions to restrict their intake of potassium at least 6 months before enrollment in the study. Subjects were evaluated for daily intake of folic acid (DIFA), daily intake of potassium (DIK), and serum folic acid levels (SFA). Results DIFA correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate, the DIK, and the SFA (P<0.001). SFA correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (P<0.001). Mean DIFA and mean SFA were lower among patients with CKD grades 3 and 4 than among those with CKD grades 1 and 2 (P<0.001). The mean DIFA in patients with folic acid deficiency was lower than that in those with SFA ≥7.1 nmol/L (P<0.001). There was lower SFA and threefold greater frequency of folic acid deficiency among patients with CKD grades 3 and 4 who had received instructions to restrict their intake of potassium than among patients with CKD grades 1 and 2 who were on an unrestricted potassium diet. Conclusion A potassium-restricted diet offered to patients with CKD grades 3 and 4 may be associated with folic acid deficiency. Serum levels of folic acid should be investigated before starting potassium restriction in patients with CKD grades 3 and 4, in order to identify individuals with folic acid deficiency or with marginal serum levels who should receive folic acid replacement therapy. PMID:26056461

  17. Series of mixed uranyl-lanthanide (Ce, Nd) organic coordination polymers with aromatic polycarboxylates linkers.

    PubMed

    Mihalcea, Ionut; Volkringer, Christophe; Henry, Natacha; Loiseau, Thierry

    2012-09-17

    Three series of mixed uranyl-lanthanide (Ce or Nd) carboxylate coordination polymers have been successfully synthesized by means of a hydrothermal route using either conventional or microwave heating methods. These compounds have been prepared from mixtures of uranyl nitrate, lanthanide nitrate together with phthalic acid (1,2), pyromellitic acid (3,4), or mellitic acid (5,6) in aqueous solution. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) single-crystal revealed that the phthalate complex (UO(2))(4)O(2)Ln(H(2)O)(7)(1,2-bdc)(4)·NH(4)·xH(2)O (Ln = Ce(1), Nd(2); x = 1 for 1, x = 0 for 2), is based on the connection of tetranuclear uranyl-centered building blocks linked to discrete monomeric units LnO(2)(H(2)O)(7) via the organic species to generate infinite chains, intercalated by free ammonium cations. The pyromellitate phase (UO(2))(3)Ln(2)(H(2)O)(12)(btec)(3)·5H(2)O (Ce(3), Nd(4)) contains layers of monomeric uranyl-centered hexagonal and pentagonal bipyramids linked via the carboxylate arms of the organic molecules. The three-dimensionality of the structure is ensured by the connection of remaining free carboxylate groups with isolated monomeric units LnO(2)(H(2)O)(7). The network of the third series (UO(2))(2)(OH)Ln(H(2)O)(7)(mel)·5H(2)O (Ce(5), Nd(6)) is built up from dinuclear uranyl units forming layers through connection with the mellitate ligands, which are further linked to each other through discrete monomers LnO(3)(H(2)O)(6). The thermal decomposition of the various coordination complexes led to the formation of mixed uranium-lanthanide oxide, with the fluorite-type structure at 1500 °C (for 1, 2) or 1400 °C for 3-6. Expected U/Ln ratio from the crystal structures were observed for compounds 1-6.

  18. Micro-SHINE Uranyl Sulfate Irradiations at the Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Youker, Amanda J.; Kalensky, Michael; Chemerisov, Sergey; Schneider, John; Byrnes, James; Vandegrift, George F.

    2016-08-01

    Peroxide formation due to water radiolysis in a uranyl sulfate solution is a concern for the SHINE Medical Technologies process in which Mo-99 is generated from the fission of dissolved low enriched uranium. To investigate the effects of power density and fission on peroxide formation and uranyl-peroxide precipitation, uranyl sulfate solutions were irradiated using a 50-MeV electron linac as part of the micro-SHINE experimental setup. Results are given for uranyl sulfate solutions with both high and low enriched uranium irradiated at different linac powers.

  19. Selective Se-for-S substitution in Cs-bearing uranyl compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurzhiy, Vladislav V.; Tyumentseva, Olga S.; Krivovichev, Sergey V.; Tananaev, Ivan G.

    2017-04-01

    Phase formation in the mixed sulfate-selenate aqueous system of uranyl nitrate and cesium nitrate has been investigated. Two types of crystalline compounds have been obtained and characterized using a number of experimental (single crystal XRD, FTIR, SEM) and theoretical (information-based complexity calculations, topological analysis) techniques. No miscibility gaps have been observed for Cs2[(UO2)2(TO4)3] (T= S, Se), which crystallizes in tetragonal system, P-421m, a =9.616(1)-9.856(2), c =8.105(1)-8.159(1) Å, V =749.6(2)-792.5(3) Å3. Nine phases with variable amount of S and Se have been structurally characterized. The structures of the Cs2[(UO2)2(TO4)3] (T= S, Se) compounds are based upon the [(UO2)2(TO4)3]2- layers of corner-sharing uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and TO4 tetrahedra. The layers contain two types of tetrahedral sites: T1 (3-connected, i.e. having three O atoms shared by adjacent uranyl polyhedra) and T2 (4-connected). The Se-for-S substitution in tetrahedral sites is highly selective with smaller S6+ cation showing a strong preference for the more tightly bonded T2 site. Crystallization in the pure Se system starts with the formation of Cs2[(UO2)(SeO4)2(H2O)](H2O) crystals, its subsequent dissolution and formation of Cs2[(UO2)2(SeO4)3]. The information-based structural complexity calculations for these two phases support the rule that more topologically complex structures form at the latest stages of crystallization.

  20. Cyanex based uranyl sensitive polymeric membrane electrodes.

    PubMed

    Badr, Ibrahim H A; Zidan, W I; Akl, Z F

    2014-01-01

    Novel uranyl selective polymeric membrane electrodes were prepared using three different low-cost and commercially available Cyanex extractants namely, bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) phosphinic acid [L1], bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) monothiophosphinic acid [L2] and bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) dithiophosphinic acid [L3]. Optimization and performance characteristics of the developed Cyanex based polymer membrane electrodes were determined. The influence of membrane composition (e.g., amount and type of ionic sites, as well as type of plasticizer) on potentiometric responses of the prepared membrane electrodes was studied. Optimized Cyanex-based membrane electrodes exhibited Nernstian responses for UO₂(2+) ion over wide concentration ranges with fast response times. The optimized membrane electrodes based on L1, L2 and L3 exhibited Nernstian responses towards uranyl ion with slopes of 29.4, 28.0 and 29.3 mV decade(-1), respectively. The optimized membrane electrodes based on L1-L3 showed detection limits of 8.3 × 10(-5), 3.0 × 10(-5) and 3.3 × 10(-6) mol L(-1), respectively. The selectivity studies showed that the optimized membrane electrodes exhibited high selectivity towards UO₂(2+) ion over large number of other cations. Membrane electrodes based on L3 exhibited superior potentiometric response characteristics compared to those based on L1 and L2 (e.g., widest linear range and lowest detection limit). The analytical utility of uranyl membrane electrodes formulated with Cyanex extractant L3 was demonstrated by the analysis of uranyl ion in different real samples for nuclear safeguards verification purposes. The results obtained using direct potentiometry and flow-injection methods were compared with those measured using the standard UV-visible and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopic methods.

  1. Increased intake of water and NaCl solutions in omega-3 fatty acid deficient monkeys.

    PubMed

    Reisbick, S; Neuringer, M; Connor, W E; Iliff-Sizemore, S

    1991-06-01

    We previously reported that long-term omega-3 fatty acid deficiency is associated with increased water intake in rhesus monkeys. To determine whether the increase was specific to water, intakes of salt solutions were measured in 15-minute single-bottle tests. Deficient monkeys drank at least twice as much of all NaCl concentrations as controls. Overall intake decreased as salt concentration increased. In 2-bottle preference tests, deficient monkeys again drank more total fluid but neither preferred nor avoided normal saline compared to controls. When deprived of water, deficient monkeys concentrated urine as well as controls, demonstrating that the increased intake was not a result of renal failure or diabetes insipidus. Omega-3 fatty acids have roles both in neural membrane function and in metabolism of prostaglandins and other eicosanoids. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency may affect drinking through changes in one or both of these functions.

  2. Fish oil prevents essential fatty acid deficiency and enhances growth: clinical and biochemical implications.

    PubMed

    Strijbosch, Robert A M; Lee, Sang; Arsenault, Danielle A; Andersson, Charlotte; Gura, Kathleen M; Bistrian, Bruce R; Puder, Mark

    2008-05-01

    Fish oil, a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids, has never been used as the sole source of lipid in clinical practice for fear of development of essential fatty acid deficiency, as it lacks the believed requisite levels of linoleic acid, an omega-6 fatty acid. The objectives of this study were to establish biochemical standards for fish oil as the sole fat and to test the hypothesis that fish oil contains adequate amounts of omega-6 fatty acids to prevent essential fatty acid deficiency. Forty mice were divided into 2 groups that were either pair fed or allowed to eat ad libitum. In each group, 4 subgroups of 5 mice were fed 1%, 5%, and 10% fish oil diets by weight or a control soybean diet for 9 weeks. Blood was collected at 4 time points, and fatty acid analysis was performed. Food intake and weight status were monitored. All groups but the pair-fed 1% fish oil group gained weight, and the 5% fish oil group showed the highest caloric efficiency in both pair-fed and ad libitum groups. Fatty acid profiles for the 1% fish oil group displayed clear essential fatty acid deficiency, 5% fish oil appeared marginal, and 10% and soybean oil diets were found to prevent essential fatty acid deficiency. Fish oil enhances growth through higher caloric efficiency. We established a total omega-6 fatty acid requirement of between 0.30% and 0.56% of dietary energy, approximately half of the conventionally believed 1% as linoleic acid. This can presumably be attributed to the fact that fish oil contains not only a small amount of linoleic acid, but also arachidonic acid, which has greater efficiency to meet omega-6 fatty acid requirements.

  3. Extended structures and physicochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Xue; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2011-07-19

    The ability of uranium to undergo nuclear fission has been exploited primarily to manufacture nuclear weapons and to generate nuclear power. Outside of its nuclear physics, uranium also exhibits rich chemistry, and it forms various compounds with other elements. Among the uranium-bearing compounds, those with a uranium oxidation state of +6 are most common and a particular structural unit, uranyl UO(2)(2+) is usually involved in these hexavalent uranium compounds. Apart from forming solids with inorganic ions, the uranyl unit also bonds to organic molecules to generate uranyl-organic coordination materials. If appropriate reaction conditions are employed, uranyl-organic extended structures (1-D chains, 2-D layers, and 3-D frameworks) can be obtained. Research on uranyl-organic compounds with extended structures allows for the exploration of their rich structural chemistry, and such studies also point to potential applications such as in materials that could facilitate nuclear waste disposal. In this Account, we describe the structural features of uranyl-organic compounds and efforts to synthesize uranyl-organic compounds with desired structures. We address strategies to construct 3-D uranyl-organic frameworks through rational selection of organic ligands and the incorporation of heteroatoms. The UO(2)(2+) species with inactive U═O double bonds usually form bipyramidal polyhedral structures with ligands coordinated at the equatorial positions, and these polyhedra act as primary building units (PBUs) for the construction of uranyl-organic compounds. The geometry of the uranyl ions and the steric arrangements and functionalities of organic ligands can be exploited in the the design of uranyl--organic extended structures, We also focus on the investigation of the promising physicochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds. Uranyl-organic materials with an extended structure may exhibit attractive properties, such as photoluminescence, photocatalysis

  4. A new chiral uranyl phosphonate framework consisting of achiral building units generated from ionothermal reaction: structure and spectroscopy characterizations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tao; Gao, Yang; Chen, Lanhua; Liu, Zhiyong; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2015-11-07

    The ionothermal reactions of uranyl nitrate and 1,3-pbpH4 (1,3-pbpH4 = 1,3-phenylenebis(phosphonic acid) ligand in ionic liquids of [C4mim][Dbp], [C4mpyr][Br], and [Etpy][Br], respectively, afforded three new uranyl phosphonates, namely [C4mim][(UO2)2(1,3-pbpH)(1,3-pbpH)·Hmim] (1), [UO2(1,3-pbpH2)H2O·mpr] (2), and [Etpy][UO2(1,3-pbpH2)F] (3). Compound 1 exhibits a rare example of a chiral uranyl phosphonate 3D framework structure built from achiral building units of tetragonal bipyramidal uranium polyhedra and 1,3-pbp ligands. The structure adopts a network with channels extending along the b axis, which are filled with C4mim(+) and protonated 1-methylimidazole. In sharp contrast, compounds 2 & 3 both show pillared topology composed of uranyl pentagonal bipyramid polyhedra and phosphonate ligands. The layers are neutral in compound 2 with N-methylpyrrole molecules in the interlayer space, while compound 3 adopts anionic layer, and the charge is compensated with N-ethyl-pyridinium cations between the layers. Although compounds 1, 2, and 3 were synthesized under identical conditions with sole variation of the ionic liquid species, the resulting structures show a rich diversity in the local coordination environment of uranyl ions, the protonation of the phosphonate ligand, the conformation of ionic liquid ions, and the overall arrangement of the structure. All compounds were characterized by absorption, temperature dependent fluorescence, as well as infrared and Raman spectroscopies.

  5. Nitrate reduction

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2000-01-01

    Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

  6. Liquid-liquid extraction of uranyl by an amide ligand: interfacial features studied by MD and PMF simulations.

    PubMed

    Benay, G; Wipff, G

    2013-06-20

    We report a molecular dynamics study of biphasic systems involved in the liquid-liquid extraction of uranyl nitrate by a monoamide ligand (L = N,N-di(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide, DEHiBA) to hexane, from pH neutral or acidic (3 M nitric acid) aqueous solutions. We first describe the neat interfaces simulated with three electrostatic models, one of which including atomic polarizabilities. The free energy profiles for crossing the water/hexane interface by L or its UO2(NO3)2L2 complex are then investigated by PMF (potential of mean force) calculations. They indicate that the free ligand and its complex are surface active. With the polarizable force field, however, the complexes have a lower affinity for the interface than without polarization. When DEHiBA gets more concentrated and in acidic conditions, their surface activity diminishes. Surface activity of UO2(NO3)2L2 complexes is further demonstrated by demixing simulations of randomly mixed DEHiBA, hexane, and neutral or acidic water. Furthermore, demixing of randomly mixed solvents, L molecules, UO2(NO3)2 salts, and nitric acid shows in some cases complexation of L to form UO2(NO3)2L2 and UO2(NO3)2L complexes that adsorb at the aqueous interfaces. These features suggest that uranyl complexation by amide ligands occurs "right at the interface", displaying marked analogies with the liquid-liquid extraction of uranyl by TBP (tri-n-butyl phosphate). Regarding the positive effect of nitric acid on extraction, the simulations point to several facets involving enhanced ion pairing of uranyl nitrate, decreased affinity of the complex for the interface, and finally, stabilization of the complex in the organic phase.

  7. Uranyl and Arsenate Cosorption on Aluminum Oxide Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.; Reeder, R

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of simultaneous adsorption of aqueous arsenate and uranyl onto aluminum oxide over a range of pH and concentration conditions. Arsenate was used as a chemical analog for phosphate, and offers advantages for characterization via X-ray absorption spectroscopy. By combining batch experiments, speciation calculations, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, we investigated the uptake behavior of uranyl, as well as the local and long-range structure of the final sorption products. In the presence of arsenate, uranyl sorption was greatly enhanced in the acidic pH range, and the amount of enhancement is positively correlated to the initial arsenate and uranyl concentrations. At pH 4-6, U L{sub III-} and As K-edge EXAFS results suggest the formation of surface-sorbed uranyl and arsenate species as well as uranyl arsenate surface precipitate(s) that have a structure similar to tr{umlt o}gerite. Uranyl polymeric species or oxyhydroxide precipitate(s) become more important with increasing pH values. Our results provide the basis for predictive models of the uptake of uranyl by aluminum oxide in the presence of arsenate and (by analogy) phosphate, which can be especially important for understanding phosphate-based uranium remediation systems.

  8. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  9. Pro-oxidative, genotoxic and cytotoxic properties of uranyl ions.

    PubMed

    Garmash, S A; Smirnova, V S; Karp, O E; Usacheva, A M; Berezhnov, A V; Ivanov, V E; Chernikov, A V; Bruskov, V I; Gudkov, S V

    2014-01-01

    It is demonstrated that hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide are formed under the action of uranyl ions in aqueous solutions containing no reducing agents. In the presence of uranyl ions, formation of 8-oxoguanine in DNA and long-lived protein radicals are observed in vitro. It is shown that the pro-oxidant properties of uranyl at micromolar concentrations mostly result from the physico-chemical nature of the compound rather than its radioactive decay. Uranyl ions lead to damage in DNA and proteins causing death of HEp-2 cells by necrotic pathway. It is revealed that the uranyl ions enhance radiation-induced oxidative stress and significantly increase a death rate of mice exposed to sublethal doses of X-rays.

  10. Structure-Property Relationships in Lithium, Silver, and Cesium Uranyl Borates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Liu, Guokui; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2010-11-09

    Four new uranyl borates, Li[UO{sub 2}B{sub 5}O{sub 9}]·H{sub 2}O (LiUBO-1), Ag[(UO{sub 2})B{sub 5}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 2}] (AgUBO-1), α-Cs[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 11}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 6}] (CsUBO-1), and β-Cs[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 11}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 6}] (CsUBO-2) were synthesized via the reaction of uranyl nitrate with a large excess of molten boric acid in the presence of lithium, silver, or cesium nitrate. These compounds share a common structural motif consisting of a linear uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, cation surrounded by BO{sub 3} triangles and BO{sub 4} tetrahedra to create an UO{sub 8} hexagonal bipyramidal environment around uranium. The borate anions bridge between uranyl units to create sheets. Additional BO{sub 3} triangles extend from the polyborate layers, and are directed approximately perpendicular to the sheets. In Li[(UO{sub 2})B{sub 5}O{sub 9}]·H{sub 2}O, the additional BO{sub 3} triangles connect these sheets together to form a three-dimensional framework structure. Li[UO{sub 2})B{sub 5}O{sub 9}]·H{sub 2}O and β-Cs[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 11}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 6}] adopt noncentrosymmetric structures, while Ag[(UO{sub 2})B{sub 5}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 2}] and α-Cs[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 11}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 6}] are centrosymmetric. Li[(UO{sub 2})B{sub 5}O{sub 9}]·H{sub 2}O, which can be obtained as pure phase, displays second-harmonic generation of 532 nm light from 1064 nm light. Topological relationships of all actinyl borates are developed.

  11. Nitrate tolerance.

    PubMed

    Parker, J O

    1987-11-16

    The organic nitrates are the most widely used agents in the management of patients with angina pectoris. When initially administered by the oral route, the nitrates produce profound changes in systemic hemodynamics and significant and prolonged improvement in exercise duration. It has been shown that during short periods of regular oral nitrate administration, the hemodynamic, antiischemic and antianginal effects of the nitrates are greatly reduced. Thus, when initially administered, oral isosorbide dinitrate prolongs exercise duration for a period of several hours, but during sustained 4-times-daily therapy, exercise tolerance is improved for only 2 hours after administration. Studies with transdermal preparations of isosorbide dinitrate and nitroglycerin also show improvement during short-term administration for up to 8 hours, but after several days of once-daily therapy, the effects of these agents are similar to placebo. It is apparent that nitrate tolerance is a clinically relevant problem. Although tolerance develops rapidly during nitrate therapy, it is reversed promptly during nitrate-free periods. Oral nitrates maintain their antianginal effects when given 2 or 3 times daily with provision of a nitrate-free period. Studies are currently underway to investigate the effects of intermittent administration schedules with transdermal nitrate preparations.

  12. Charge transfer vibronic transitions in uranyl tetrachloride compounds;

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G. K.; Deifel, N. P.; Cahill, C. L.

    2012-01-01

    The electronic and vibronic interactions of uranyl (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} in three tetrachloride crystals have been investigated with spectroscopic experiments and theoretical modeling. Analysis and simulation of the absorption and photoluminescence spectra have resulted in a quantitative understanding of the charge transfer vibronic transitions of uranyl in the crystals. The spectra obtained at liquid helium temperature consist of extremely narrow zero-phonon lines (ZPL) and vibronic bands. The observed ZPLs are assigned to the first group of the excited states formed by electronic excitation from the 3{sigma} ground state into the f{sub {delta}{phi}}, orbitals of uranyl. The Huang-Rhys theory of vibronic coupling is modified successfully for simulating both the absorption and luminescence spectra. It is shown that only vibronic coupling to the axially symmetric stretching mode is Franck-Condon allowed, whereas other modes are involved through coupling with the symmetric stretching mode. The energies of electronic transitions, vibration frequencies of various local modes, and changes in the O=U=O bond length of uranyl in different electronic states and in different coordination geometries are evaluated in empirical simulations of the optical spectra. Multiple uranyl sites derived from the resolution of a superlattice at low temperature are resolved by crystallographic characterization and time- and energy-resolved spectroscopic studies. The present empirical simulation provides insights into fundamental understanding of uranyl electronic interactions and is useful for quantitative characterization of uranyl coordination.

  13. Charge transfer vibronic transitions in uranyl tetrachloride compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guokui; Deifel, Nicholas P.; Cahill, Christopher L.; Zhurov, Vladimir V.; Pinkerton, A. Alan

    2012-01-01

    The electronic and vibronic interactions of uranyl (UO₂)2+ in three tetrachloride crystals have been investigated with spectroscopic experiments and theoretical modeling. Analysis and simulation of the absorption and photoluminescence spectra have resulted in a quantitative understanding of the charge transfer vibronic transitions of uranyl in the crystals. The spectra obtained at liquid helium temperature consist of extremely narrow zero-phonon lines (ZPL) and vibronic bands. The observed ZPLs are assigned to the first group of the excited states formed by electronic excitation from the 3σ ground state into the fδ,Φ orbitals of uranyl. The Huang–Rhys theory of vibronic coupling is modified successfully for simulating both the absorption and luminescence spectra. It is shown that only vibronic coupling to the axially symmetric stretching mode is Franck–Condon allowed, whereas other modes are involved through coupling with the symmetric stretching mode. The energies of electronic transitions, vibration frequencies of various local modes, and changes in the O=U=O bond length of uranyl in different electronic states and in different coordination geometries are evaluated in empirical simulations of the optical spectra. Multiple uranyl sites derived from the resolution of a superlattice at low temperature are resolved by crystallographic characterization and time- and energy-resolved spectroscopic studies. The present empirical simulation provides insights into fundamental understanding of uranyl electronic interactions and is useful for quantitative characterization of uranyl coordination.

  14. Stability of sulfate complexes of electronically excited uranyl

    SciTech Connect

    Ostakhov, S.S.; Kazakov, V.P.; Afonichev, D.D.

    1995-11-01

    The complex formation of electronically excited uranyl ions with SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}anions in 0.1 M aqueous HClO{sub 4} has been studied by time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. The stability constants of uranyl sulfate complexes (UO{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) (K=870 1 mol{sup -1}) and [UO{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup 2-}](K=47000 1 mol{sup -1}) in excited state have been determined; they are more than an order of magnitude greater than those reported for complex formation of uranyl ions in the ground state. The complex formation of uranyl with sulfate ions is accompanied by the increase of the quantum yield of the uranyl lumenescence. The maxima of luminescence and absorption bands of uranyl ions are shifted with increasing the total concentration of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in solution, which supports the data obtained. The shift of the maxima of luminescence bands is observed at a sulfate concentration that is considerably lower than that causing the same shift of the maxima of the absorption bands. Such effect is consistent with the calculated stability constants of sulfate complexes of excited uranyl ions.

  15. The first uranyl complexes with valerate ions.

    PubMed

    Savchenkov, Anton V; Vologzhanina, Anna V; Serezhkina, Larisa B; Pushkin, Denis V; Serezhkin, Viktor N

    2013-07-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray structure analysis were used to characterize the discrete neutral compound diaquadioxidobis(n-valerato-κ(2)O,O')uranium(VI), [UO2(C4H9COO)2(H2O)2], (I), and the ionic compound potassium dioxidotris(n-valerato-κ(2)O,O')uranium(VI), K[UO2(C4H9COO)3], (II). The U(VI) cation in neutral (I) is at a site of 2/m symmetry. Potassium salt (II) has two U centres and two K(+) cations residing on twofold axes, while a third independent formula unit is on a general position. The ligands in both compounds were found to suffer severe disorder. The FT-IR spectroscopic results agree with the X-ray data. The composition and structure of the ionic potassium uranyl valerate are similar to those of previously reported potassium uranyl complexes with acetate, propionate and butyrate ligands. Progressive lengthening of the alkyl groups in these otherwise similar compounds was found to have an impact on their structures, including on the number of independent U and K(+) sites, on the coordination modes of some of the K(+) centres and on the minimum distances between U atoms. The evolution of the KUO6 frameworks in the four homologous compounds is analysed in detail, revealing a new example of three-dimensional topological isomerism in coordination compounds of U(VI).

  16. Uranyl extraction by N,N-dialkylamide ligands studied using static and dynamic DFT simulations.

    PubMed

    Sieffert, Nicolas; Wipff, Georges

    2015-02-14

    We report DFT static and dynamic studies on uranyl complexes [UO(2)(NO(3))x(H(2)O)(y)L(z)](2-x) involved in the uranyl extraction from water to an "oil" phase (hexane) by an amide ligand L (N,N-dimethylacetamide). Static DFT results "in solution" (continuum SMD models for water and hexane) predict that the stepwise formation of [UO(2)(NO(3))(2)L(2)] from the UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)(2+) species is energetically favourable, and allow us to compare cis/trans isomers of penta- and hexa-coordinated complexes and key intermediates in the two solvents. DFT-MD simulations of [UO(2)(NO(3))(2)L(2)], [UO(2)(NO(3))(2)(H(2)O)L(2)], and [UO(2)(NO(3))(H(2)O)L(2)](+) species in explicit solvent environments (water, hexane, or the water/hexane interface) represented at the MM or full-DFT level reveal a versatile solvent dependent binding mode of nitrates, also evidenced by metadynamics simulations. In water and at the interface, the latter exchange from bi- to monodentate, via in plane rotational motions in some cases. Remarkably, structures of complexes at the interface are more "water-like" than gas phase- or hexane-like. Thus, the order of U-O(NO(3))/U-O(L) bond distances observed in the gas phase (U-O(nit) < U-OL) is inverted at the interface and in water. Overall, the results are consistent with the experimental observation of uranyl extraction from nitric acid solutions by amide analogues (bearing "fatty" substituents), and allow us to propose possible extraction mechanisms, involving complexation of L "right at the interface". They also point to the importance of the solvent environment and the dynamics on the structure and stability of the complexes.

  17. Hydroxy- and alkoxy-bridged dinuclear uranyl-Schiff base complexes: hydrolysis, transamination and extraction studies.

    PubMed

    Bharara, Mohan S; Heflin, Kathryn; Tonks, Stephen; Strawbridge, Kara L; Gorden, Anne E V

    2008-06-14

    The reaction of uranyl nitrate with 1,3-bis(salicylideneamino)-2-propanol (H(3)L1) and 1,3-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylideneamino)-2-propanol (H(3)L2) in the presence of triethylamine (Et(3)N) yielded hydroxy- and alkoxy-bridged dinuclear complexes; [(UO(2))(2)(L1)(OH)(MeOH)(2)].(MeOH)(2) (.(MeOH)(2)) and [(UO(2))(2)(L2)(OH)(MeOH)(2)].(MeOH)(2) (.(MeOH)(2)). The crystal structures of .(DMF)(2) and .(DMF)(2) exhibit an unsymmetrical central U(2)O(2) core involving bridging alkoxy- and hydroxy-oxygen atoms. The geometry around the uranium center in .(DMF)(2) and .(DMF)(2) is that of a distorted pentagonal bipyramid with the solvent molecule occupying the fifth coordination site. The flexible nature of the ligand backbone is more pronounced in .(DMF)(2) compared to .(DMF)(2), yielding two molecules per unit cell in different conformations. Under similar reaction conditions, using ethylenediamine as a base, the respective Salen-based uranyl compounds, [UO(2)(Salen)(MeOH)] () and [UO(2)(Bu(t)(2)-Salen)(MeOH)] () are obtained due to transamination of the ligand backbone. Complexes .(MeOH)(2) and .(MeOH)(2) when reacted with an excess of ethylenediamine failed to yield the respective Salen-based complexes, and , respectively. The new compounds have been characterized using solution (NMR and UV-Vis) and solid-state (IR, X-ray crystallography) techniques. Hydrolysis of .(MeOH)(2) and .(MeOH)(2) in the pH range 1-14 was studied using UV-Vis spectroscopy and compared with the hydrolysis of and [UO(2)(Salophen)(MeOH)] (). A two-phase extraction study suggests quantitative removal of uranyl ions from the aqueous phase at higher pH conditions.

  18. Incorporation of neptunium(VI) into a uranyl selenite.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Nathan A; Polinski, Matthew J; Lin, Jian; Simonetti, Antonio; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2012-10-15

    The incorporation of neptunium(VI) into the layered uranyl selenite Cs[(UO(2))(HSeO(3))(SeO(3))] has yielded the highest level of neptunium uptake in a uranyl compound to date with an average of 12(±3)% substitution of Np(VI) for U(VI). Furthermore, this is the first case in nearly 2 decades of dedicated incorporation studies in which the oxidation state of neptunium has been determined spectroscopically in a doped uranyl compound and also the first time in which neptunium incorporation has resulted in a structural transformation.

  19. METHOD OF INHIBITING CORROSION IN URANYL SULFATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Bohlmann, E.G.; Griess, J.C. Jr.

    1960-08-23

    A method is given for treating a uranyl sulfate solution to inhibit the corrosiveness of the solution and elevate the phase separation temperature of the solution. Lithium sulfate is added to the solution in an amount ranging from 0.25 to 1.3 times the uranyl sulfate concentration. The corrosiveness of the solution with respect to stainless steel is substantially decreased by this means. This treatment also serves to raise the phase separation temperature of the solution (above 250 deg C), at which time the uranyl sulfate solution separates into two liquid phases of unequal uranium concentration and thus becomes unsuitable as nuclear reactor fuel.

  20. An n-3 Fatty Acid Deficient Diet Affects Mouse Spatial Learning in the Barnes Circular Maze

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Irina; Hussein, Nahed; Di Martino, Carmine; Moriguchi, Toru; Hoshiba, Junji; Majchrzak, Sharon; Salem, Norman

    2008-01-01

    Deficiency in n-3 fatty acids has been accomplished through the use of an artificial rearing method in which ICR mouse pups were hand fed a deficient diet starting from the second day of life. There was a 51% loss of total brain DHA in mice with an n-3 fatty acid deficient diet relative to those with a diet sufficient in n-3 fatty acids. N-3 fatty acid adequate and deficient mice did not differ in terms of locomotor activity in the open field test or in anxiety-related behavior in the elevated plus maze. The n-3 fatty acid deficient mice demonstrated impaired learning in the reference-memory version of the Barnes circular maze as they spent more time and made more errors in search of an escape tunnel. No difference in performance between all dietary groups in the cued and working memory version of the Barnes maze was observed. This indicated that motivational, motor and sensory factors did not contribute to the reference memory impairment. PMID:18037280

  1. Synthesis of a uranyl persulfide complex and quantum chemical studies of formation and topologies of hypothetical uranyl persulfide cage clusters.

    PubMed

    Grant, Daniel J; Weng, Zhehui; Jouffret, Laurent J; Burns, Peter C; Gagliardi, Laura

    2012-07-16

    The compound Na(4)[(UO(2))(S(2))(3)](CH(3)OH)(8) was synthesized at room temperature in an oxygen-free environment. It contains a rare example of the [(UO(2))(S(2))(3)](4-) complex in which a uranyl ion is coordinated by three bidentate persulfide groups. We examined the possible linkage of these units to form nanoscale cage clusters analogous to those formed from uranyl peroxide polyhedra. Quantum chemical calculations at the density functional and multiconfigurational wave function levels show that the uranyl-persulfide-uranyl, U-(S(2))-U, dihedral angles of model clusters are bent due to partial covalent interactions. We propose that this bent interaction will favor assembly of uranyl ions through persulfide bridges into curved structures, potentially similar to the family of nanoscale cage clusters built from uranyl peroxide polyhedra. However, the U-(S(2))-U dihedral angles predicted for several model structures may be too tight for them to self-assemble into cage clusters with fullerene topologies in the absence of other uranyl-ion bridges that adopt a flatter configuration. Assembly of species such as [(UO(2))(S(2))(SH)(4)](4-) or [(UO(2))(S(2))(C(2)O(4))(4)](4-) into fullerene topologies with ~60 vertices may be favored by use of large counterions.

  2. Thermodynamic properties of autunite, uranyl hydrogen phosphate, and uranyl orthophosphate from solubility and calorimetric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Shareva, Tatiana; kubatko, Karrie-Ann; burns, Peter; Wellman, Dawn M.; McNamara, Bruce K.; szymanowski, jennifer; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2009-10-01

    In this study, we use solubility and oxide melt solution calorimetry measurements to determine the thermodynamic properties of the uranyl phosphate phases autunite (abbreviated: CaUP), uranyl hydrogen phosphate (HUP), and uranyl orthophosphate (UP). Solubility measurements from both supersaturated and undersaturated conditions, as well as under different pH conditions, rigorously demonstrate attainment of equilibrium and yield well-constrained solubility product values of -48.36 (-0.03 /+ 0.03), -13.17 (-0.11 / +0.07), and -49.36 (-0.04 / +0.02) for CaUP, HUP, and UP, respectively. We use the solubility data to calculate standard state Gibbs free energies of formation for all phases (-7630.61 ± 9.69, -3072.27 ± 4.76, and -6138.95 ± 12.24 kJ mol-1 for CaUP, HUP, and UP, respectively), and calorimetry data to calculate standard state enthalpies of formation of -3223.22 ± 4.00 and -7001.01 ± 15.10 kJ mol-1 for HUP and UP, respectively. Combining these results allows us also to calculate the standard state entropies of formation of -506.54 ± 10.48 and -2893.12 ± 19.44 kJ mol-1 K-1 for HUP and UP phases, respectively. The results from this study are part of a combined effort to develop reliable and internally consistent thermodynamic data for environmentally relevant uranyl minerals. Data such as these are required in order to optimize and quantitatively assess the effect of phosphate amendment remediation technologies for uranium contaminated systems.

  3. Gas Phase Uranyl Activation: Formation of a Uranium Nitrosyl Complex from Uranyl Azide

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; De Jong, Wibe A.; Gibson, John K.

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO22+, was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2– in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2– was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2– resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2–, in which the “inert” uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2– via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2– complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2– complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO3–, suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2– to form UO(NO)Cl2– and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2– and UO2Cl2–. The observation of UO2Cl2– during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss.

  4. Gas phase uranyl activation: formation of a uranium nitrosyl complex from uranyl azide.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; de Jong, Wibe A; Gibson, John K

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO2(2+), was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2(-) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2(-) was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2(-) resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2(-), in which the "inert" uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2(-) via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2(-) complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2(-) complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO(3-), suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2(-) to form UO(NO)Cl2(-) and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2(-) and UO2Cl2(-). The observation of UO2Cl2(-) during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss.

  5. Uranyl carboxyphosphonates that incorporate Cd(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Alsobrook, Andrea N.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-05-15

    The hydrothermal treatment of UO{sub 3}, Cd(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O, and triethyl phosphonoacetate results in the formation of Cd{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}(PO{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CO{sub 2}){sub 3}O{sub 3}(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].16H{sub 2}O (CdUPAA-1), [Cd{sub 3}(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}(PO{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CO{sub 2}){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 13}].6H{sub 2}O (CdUPAA-2), and Cd(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2})(PO{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CO{sub 2})(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2} (CdUPAA-3). CdUPAA-1 adopts a cubic three-dimensional structure constructed from planar uranyl oxide clusters containing both UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramids and UO{sub 8} hexagonal bipyramids that are linked by Cd(II) cations and phosphonoacetate to yield large cavities approximately 16 A across that are filled with disordered water molecules. CdUPAA-2 forms a rhombohedral three-dimensional channel structure that is assembled from UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged by phosphonoacetate. CdUPAA-3 is layered with the hydrated Cd(II) cations incorporated directly into the layers linking one-dimensional uranyl phosphonate substructures together. In this structure, there are complex networks of hydrogen bonds that exist within the sheets, and also stitch the sheets together. -- Graphical abstract: A view of part of the cubic structure of Cd{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}(PO{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CO{sub 2}){sub 3}O{sub 3}(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].16H{sub 2}O. Display Omitted highlights: > High symmetry uranyl compounds. > Three-dimensional structures. > Porous materials. > Heterobimetallic compounds.

  6. Uranyl phthalocyanines show promise in the treatment of brain tumors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigerio, N. A.

    1967-01-01

    Processes synthesize sulfonated and nonsulfonated uranyl phthalocyanines for application in neutron therapy of brain tumors. Tests indicate that the compounds are advantageous over the previously used boron and lithium compounds.

  7. Dynamic interplay between uranyl phosphate precipitation, sorption, and phase evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Munasinghe, P. Sumudu; Elwood Madden, Megan E.; Brooks, Scott C.; ...

    2015-04-17

    We report that natural examples demonstrate uranyl-phosphate minerals can maintain extremely low levels of aqueous uranium in groundwaters due to their low solubility. Thus, greater understanding of the geochemical factors leading to uranyl phosphate precipitation may lead to successful application of phosphate-based remediation methods. However, the solubility of uranyl phosphate phases varies over >3 orders of magnitude, with the most soluble phases typically observed in lab experiments. To understand the role of common soil/sediment mineral surfaces in the nucleation and transformation of uranyl phosphate minerals under environmentally relevant conditions, we carried out batch experiments with goethite and mica at pHmore » 6 in mixed electrolyte solutions ranging from 1–800 μM U and 1–800 μM P. All experiments ended with uranium concentrations below the USEPA MCL for U, but with 2–3 orders of magnitude difference in uranium concentrations.« less

  8. Dynamic interplay between uranyl phosphate precipitation, sorption, and phase evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Munasinghe, P. Sumudu; Elwood Madden, Megan E.; Brooks, Scott C.; Elwood Madden, Andrew S.

    2015-04-17

    We report that natural examples demonstrate uranyl-phosphate minerals can maintain extremely low levels of aqueous uranium in groundwaters due to their low solubility. Thus, greater understanding of the geochemical factors leading to uranyl phosphate precipitation may lead to successful application of phosphate-based remediation methods. However, the solubility of uranyl phosphate phases varies over >3 orders of magnitude, with the most soluble phases typically observed in lab experiments. To understand the role of common soil/sediment mineral surfaces in the nucleation and transformation of uranyl phosphate minerals under environmentally relevant conditions, we carried out batch experiments with goethite and mica at pH 6 in mixed electrolyte solutions ranging from 1–800 μM U and 1–800 μM P. All experiments ended with uranium concentrations below the USEPA MCL for U, but with 2–3 orders of magnitude difference in uranium concentrations.

  9. A Uranyl Peroxide Dimer in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Dau, Phuong D; Dau, Phuong V; Rao, Linfeng; Kovács, Attila; Gibson, John K

    2017-04-03

    The gas-phase uranyl peroxide dimer, [(UO2)2(O2)(L)2](2+) where L = 2,2'-trifluoroethylazanediyl)bis(N,N'-dimethylacetamide), was synthesized by electrospray ionization of a solution of UO2(2+) and L. Collision-induced dissociation of this dimer resulted in endothermic O atom elimination to give [(UO2)2(O)(L)2](2+), which was found to spontaneously react with water via exothermic hydrolytic chemisorption to yield [(UO2)2(OH)2(L)2](2+). Density functional theory computations of the energies for the gas-phase reactions are in accord with observations. The structures of the observed uranyl dimer were computed, with that of the peroxide of particular interest, as a basis to evaluate the formation of condensed phase uranyl peroxides with bent structures. The computed dihedral angle in [(UO2)2(O2)(L)2](2+) is 145°, indicating a substantial deviation from the planar structure with a dihedral angle of 180°. Energies needed to induce bending in the most elementary gas-phase uranyl peroxide complex, [(UO2)2(O2)](2+), were computed. It was found that bending from the lowest-energy planar structure to dihedral angles up to 140° required energies of <10 kJ/mol. The gas-phase results demonstrate the inherent stability of the uranyl peroxide moiety and support the notion that the uranyl-peroxide-uranyl structural unit is intrinsically planar, with only minor energy perturbations needed to form the bent structures found in studtite and uranyl peroxide nanostructures.

  10. Sulfonate complexes of actinide ions: structural diversity in uranyl complexes with 2-sulfobenzoate.

    PubMed

    Thuéry, Pierre

    2013-01-07

    The reaction of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate with 2-sulfobenzoate (SB(2-)) in the presence of various amines gave the series of complexes [UO(2)(SB)(H(2)O)] (1), [UO(2)(SB)(H(2)O)](2)·pyz (2), [2,2'-bipyH](2)[UO(2)(SB)(2)(H(2)O)]·4H(2)O (3), [4,4'-bipyH(2)](2)[UO(2)(SB)(2)](2) (4), [4,4'-bipyH](2)[(UO(2))(2)(SB)(3)(H(2)O)]·4H(2)O (5), [NMe(4)](2)[(UO(2))(2)(SB)(3)(H(2)O)(1.15)]·1.35H(2)O (6), [NMe(4)](2)[(UO(2))(3)(SB)(2)O(2)] (7), and [H(2)DABCO](2)[(UO(2))(5)(SB)(4)O(2)(OH)(2)]·4H(2)O (8), where pyz = pyrazine, bipy = bipyridine, and DABCO = 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane, with all compounds but 5 having been obtained under hydrothermal conditions. The crystal structures of these complexes display a common motif in which uranyl is chelated by the carboxylate and sulfonate groups of SB, giving a seven-membered ring. Structure-directing effects due to the amine and the presence in 7 and 8 of additional μ(3)-oxo or μ(2)-hydroxo bridges result in much structural variety, with different bridging by the carboxylate and sulfonate groups giving rise to zero- (3, 4), one- (1, 5-8), or two-dimensional (2) assemblies. Some unusual uranyl secondary building units are observed, such as the pentanuclear [(UO(2))(5)O(2)(OH)(2)] discrete motif. Addition of 3d-block metal cations (Cu(2+), Ni(2+)) in the presence of nitrogen donors gave the heterometallic molecular complex [UO(2)Cu(SB)(2)(2,2'-bipy)(2)](2)·2H(2)O (9), the heterogeneous compound [Cu(4,4'-bipy)(H(2)O)(3)](2)[UO(2)(SB)(2)](2)·2H(2)O (10), in which molecular uranyl dimers are encompassing copper-containing chains, and the heterometallic one-dimensional polymers [(UO(2))(2)Cu(2)(SB)(4)(bipym)(H(2)O)(4)] (11) and [UO(2)Ni(SB)(2)(bipym)(H(2)O)(2)]·3H(2)O (12), where bipym = bipyrimidine. The latter two complexes display two different arrangements: in 11, bipym bridges two [UO(2)Cu(SB)(2)] chains to give a ladderlike assembly, while the uranyl cations are merely decorating species in 12. In contrast to those of

  11. COGEMA Experience in Uranous Nitrate Preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Tison, E.; Bretault, Ph.

    2006-07-01

    Separation and purification of plutonium by PUREX process is based on a sequence of extraction and back extraction which requires reducing plutonium Pu IV (extractable form) into Pu III (inextractable form) Different reducers can be used to reduce Pu IV into Pu III. Early plants such as that for Magnox fuel at Sellafield used ferrous sulfamate while UP 1 at Marcoule used uranous sulfamate. These reducers are efficient and easy to prepare but generates ferric and/or sulphate ions and so complicates management of the wastes from the plutonium purification cycle. Recent plants such as UP3 and UP2 800 at La Hague, THORP at Sellafield, and RRP at Rokkasho Mura (currently under tests) use uranous nitrate (U IV) stabilized by hydrazinium nitrate (N{sub 2}H{sub 5}NO{sub 3}) and hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN). In the French plants, uranous nitrate is used in U-Pu separation and alpha barrier and HAN is used in Pu purification. Compared to sulfamate, U IV does not generate extraneous chemical species and uranyl nitrate (U VI) generated by reducing Pu IV follows the main uranium stream. More over uranous nitrate is prepared from reprocessed purified uranyl nitrate taken at the outlet of the reprocessing plant. Hydrazine and HAN offer the advantage to be salt-free reagents. Uranous nitrate can be generated either by electrolysis or by catalytic hydrogenation process. Electrolytic process has been implemented in early plant UP 1 at Marcoule (when changing reducer from uranous sulfamate to uranous nitrate) and was used again in UP2 plant at La Hague. However, the electrolytic process presented several disadvantages such as a low conversion rate and problems associated with the use of mercury. Electrolysis cells with no mercury were developed for the Eurochemic plant in Belgium and then implemented in the first Japanese reprocessing plant in Tokai-Mura. But finally, in 1975, the electrolytic process was abandoned in favor of the catalytic hydrogenation process developed at La

  12. Ligand sensitized luminescence of uranyl by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium: a new luminescent uranyl benzoate specie.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satendra; Maji, S; Joseph, M; Sankaran, K

    2015-03-05

    Benzoic acid (BA) is shown to sensitize and enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in acetonitrile medium. Luminescence spectra and especially UV-Vis spectroscopy studies reveal the formation of tri benzoate complex of uranyl i.e. [UO2(C6H5COO)3](-) which is highly luminescent. In particular, three sharp bands at 431, 443, 461nm of absorption spectra provides evidence for tri benzoate specie of uranyl in acetonitrile medium. The luminescence lifetime of uranyl in this complex is 68μs which is much more compared to the lifetime of uncomplexed uranyl (20μs) in acetonitrile medium. In contrary to aqueous medium where uranyl benzoate forms 1:1 and 1:2 species, spectroscopic data reveal formation of 1:3 complex in acetonitrile medium. Addition of water to acetonitrile results in decrease of luminescence intensity of this specie and the luminescence features implode at 20% (v/v) of water content. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the existence of [UO2(C6H5COO)3](-) specie in acetonitrile is reported. Mechanism of luminescence enhancement is discussed.

  13. Surface complexation model of uranyl sorption on Georgia kaolinite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, T.E.; Davis, J.A.; Lumpkin, G.R.; Chisari, R.; Waite, T.D.

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption of uranyl on standard Georgia kaolinites (KGa-1 and KGa-1B) was studied as a function of pH (3-10), total U (1 and 10 ??mol/l), and mass loading of clay (4 and 40 g/l). The uptake of uranyl in air-equilibrated systems increased with pH and reached a maximum in the near-neutral pH range. At higher pH values, the sorption decreased due to the presence of aqueous uranyl carbonate complexes. One kaolinite sample was examined after the uranyl uptake experiments by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to determine the U content. It was found that uranium was preferentially adsorbed by Ti-rich impurity phases (predominantly anatase), which are present in the kaolinite samples. Uranyl sorption on the Georgia kaolinites was simulated with U sorption reactions on both titanol and aluminol sites, using a simple non-electrostatic surface complexation model (SCM). The relative amounts of U-binding >TiOH and >AlOH sites were estimated from the TEM/EDS results. A ternary uranyl carbonate complex on the titanol site improved the fit to the experimental data in the higher pH range. The final model contained only three optimised log K values, and was able to simulate adsorption data across a wide range of experimental conditions. The >TiOH (anatase) sites appear to play an important role in retaining U at low uranyl concentrations. As kaolinite often contains trace TiO2, its presence may need to be taken into account when modelling the results of sorption experiments with radionuclides or trace metals on kaolinite. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The energy landscape of uranyl-peroxide species.

    PubMed

    Tiferet, Eitan; Gil, Adrià; Bo, Carles; Shvareva, Tatiana Y; Nyman, May; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2014-03-24

    Nanoscale uranyl peroxide clusters containing UO2(2+) groups bonded through peroxide bridges to form polynuclear molecular species (polyoxometalates) exist both in solution and in the solid state. There is an extensive family of clusters containing 28 uranium atoms (U28 clusters), with an encapsulated anion in the center, for example, [UO2(O2)(3-x)(OH)(x)(4-)], [Nb(O2)4(3-)], or [Ta(O2)4(3-)]. The negative charge of these clusters is balanced by alkali ions, both encapsulated, and located exterior to the cluster. The present study reports measurement of enthalpy of formation for two such U28 compounds, one of which is uranyl centered and the other is peroxotantalate centered. The [(Ta(O2)4]-centered U28 capsule is energetically more stable than the [(UO2)(O2)3]-centered capsule. These data, along with our prior studies on other uranyl-peroxide solids, are used to explore the energy landscape and define thermochemical trends in alkali-uranyl-peroxide systems. It was suggested that the energetic role of charge-balancing alkali ions and their electrostatic interactions with the negatively charged uranyl-peroxide species is the dominant factor in defining energetic stability. These experimental data were supported by DFT calculations, which agree that the [(Ta(O2)4]-centered U28 capsule is more stable than the uranyl-centered capsule. Moreover, the relative stability is controlled by the interactions of the encapsulated alkalis with the encapsulated anion. Thus, the role of alkali-anion interactions was shown to be important at all length scales of uranyl-peroxide species: in both comparing clusters to clusters; and clusters to monomers or extended solids.

  15. Cation templating and electronic structure effects in uranyl cage clusters probed by the isolation of peroxide-bridged uranyl dimers.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jie; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Jouffret, Laurent; Nguyen, Kevin; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Gagliardi, Laura; Burns, Peter C

    2015-05-04

    The self-assembly of uranyl peroxide polyhedra into a rich family of nanoscale cage clusters is thought to be favored by cation templating effects and the pliability of the intrinsically bent U-O2-U dihedral angle. Herein, the importance of ligand and cationic effects on the U-O2-U dihedral angle were explored by studying a family of peroxide-bridged dimers of uranyl polyhedra. Four chemically distinct peroxide-bridged uranyl dimers were isolated that contain combinations of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate, picolinate, acetate, and oxalate as coordinating ligands. These dimers were synthesized with a variety of counterions, resulting in the crystallographic characterization of 15 different uranyl dimer compounds containing 17 symmetrically distinct dimers. Eleven of the dimers have U-O2-U dihedral angles in the expected range from 134.0 to 156.3°; however, six have 180° U-O2-U dihedral angles, the first time this has been observed for peroxide-bridged uranyl dimers. The influence of crystal packing, countercation linkages, and π-π stacking impact the dihedral angle. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the ligand does not alter the electronic structure of these systems and that the U-O2-U bridge is highly pliable. Less than 3 kcal·mol(-1) is required to bend the U-O2-U bridge from its minimum energy configuration to a dihedral angle of 180°. These results suggest that the energetic advantage of bending the U-O2-U dihedral angle of a peroxide-bridged uranyl dimer is at most a modest factor in favor of cage cluster formation. The role of counterions in stabilizing the formation of rings of uranyl ions, and ultimately their assembly into clusters, is at least as important as the energetic advantage of a bent U-O2-U interaction.

  16. Nutritional stress effects under different nitrogen sources on the genes in microalga Isochrysis zhangjiangensis and the assistance of Alteromonas macleodii in releasing the stress of amino acid deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuang; Zhou, Jiannan; Xin, Yanjuan; Xue, Song

    2015-10-01

    The expressions of nine nitrogen assimilation-associated genes, NRT2, NAR1, NIA2, NIR, GLN2, GLSF, GSN1, GDH, and AAT2, in the microalga Isochrysis zhangjiangensis were investigated to unveil the effects of limitations of various nitrogen sources (NaNO3 , NH4 Cl, NaNO2 , and an amino acid mixture) on the microalgae. The results demonstrated that the NRT2, NAR1, GLN2, GSN1, and AAT2 genes were highly expressed in lipid-rich microalgae under inorganic nitrogen-deficient conditions and they decreased after nitrogen resupply. Significant increases in the expressions of NAR1, GLN2, and GLSF were found in nitrate-depleted microalgae, whereas significant increases in the expressions of NRT2, NAR1, GLN2, and GSN1 were found in nitrite-depleted microalgae. Significant increases in the expressions of only NRT2 and GSN1 were found in ammonium-depleted microalgae (P < 0.05). Except for the NRT2, other genes were expressed at lower levels under amino acid-deficient conditions compared with amino acid-sufficient controls. The expression of the NIA2 gene decreased in nitrogen-depleted microalgae regardless of the initial nitrogen source. However, the results of fatty acid analyses showed that the features of fatty acid profiles followed a similar mode, in which the percentage compositions of C16:0 and C18:1Δ(9) increased in nitrogen-depleted cells and that of C16:1Δ(9) , C18:3Δ(9,12,15) , C18:4Δ(6,9,12,15) , and C18:5Δ(3,6,9,12,15) decreased, regardless of the type of nitrogen source applied. It was also found that the epiphytic bacterium Alteromonas macleodii played a particularly important role in releasing microalgae from the stress of amino acid deficiency. These findings also provide a foundation for regulating microalgal lipid production through manipulation of the nitrogen assimilation-associated genes.

  17. Hydrothermal Phase Relations Among Uranyl Minerals at the Nopal I Analog Site

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, William M.

    2007-07-01

    Uranyl mineral paragenesis at Nopal I is an analog of spent fuel alteration at Yucca Mountain. Petrographic studies suggest a variety of possible hydrothermal conditions for uranium mineralization at Nopal I. Calculated equilibrium phase relations among uranyl minerals show uranophane stability over a broad range of realistic conditions and indicate that uranyl mineral variety reflects persistent chemical potential heterogeneity. (author)

  18. The catalytic role of uranyl in formation of polycatechol complexes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    To better understand the association of contaminant uranium with natural organic matter (NOM) and the fate of uranium in ground water, spectroscopic studies of uranium complexation with catechol were conducted. Catechol provides a model for ubiquitous functional groups present in NOM. Liquid samples were analyzed using Raman, FTIR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Catechol was found to polymerize in presence of uranyl ions. Polymerization in presence of uranyl was compared to reactions in the presence of molybdate, another oxyion, and self polymerization of catechol at high pH. The effect of time and dissolved oxygen were also studied. It was found that oxygen was required for self-polymerization at elevated pH. The potential formation of phenoxy radicals as well as quinones was monitored. The benzene ring was found to be intact after polymerization. No evidence for formation of ether bonds was found, suggesting polymerization was due to formation of C-C bonds between catechol ligands. Uranyl was found to form outer sphere complexes with catechol at initial stages but over time (six months) polycatechol complexes were formed and precipitated from solution (forming humic-like material) while uranyl ions remained in solution. Our studies show that uranyl acts as a catalyst in catechol-polymerization. PMID:21396112

  19. Metal ion as both a cofactor and a probe of metal-binding sites in a uranyl-specific DNAzyme: a uranyl photocleavage study.

    PubMed

    Cepeda-Plaza, Marjorie; Null, Eric L; Lu, Yi

    2013-11-01

    DNAzymes are known to bind metal ions specifically to carry out catalytic functions. Despite many studies since DNAzymes were discovered nearly two decades ago, the metal-binding sites in DNAzymes are not fully understood. Herein, we adopt uranyl photocleavage to probe specific uranyl-binding sites in the 39E DNAzyme with catalytically relevant concentrations of uranyl. The results indicate that uranyl binds between T23 and C25 in the bulge loop, G11 and T12 in the stem loop of the enzyme strand, as well as between T2.4 and G3 close to the cleavage site in the substrate strand. Control experiments using two 39E DNAzyme mutants revealed a different cleavage pattern of the mutated region. Another DNAzyme, the 8-17 DNAzyme, which has a similar secondary structure but shows no activity in the presence of uranyl, indicated a different uranyl-dependent photocleavage as well. In addition, a close correlation between the concentration-dependent photocleavage and enzymatic activities is also demonstrated. Together, these experiments suggest that uranyl photocleavage has been successfully used to probe catalytically relevant uranyl-binding sites in the 39E DNAzyme. As uranyl is the cofactor of the 39E DNAzyme as well as the probe, specific uranyl binding has now been identified without disruption of the structure.

  20. Passage of TBP-uranyl complexes from aqueous-organic interface to the organic phase: insights from molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Pooja; Ali, Sk Musharaf; Shenoy, Kalasanka Trivikram

    2016-08-24

    The present study reports molecular dynamics simulations for biphasic systems comprising tributyl phosphate (TBP) in dodecane and uranyl nitrate in the aqueous phase, which are key chemical species in the well-known Pu-U extraction (PUREX) process. An attempt has been made to understand the nature of interface and mechanism of 'TBP associated uranyl' crossing under neutral and acidic conditions. Results show that the solvent density undergoes large fluctuation near the interface depending on the nature of the aqueous-organic phase. The study provides compelling evidence of experimentally observed reorganization of interfacial complexes at the interface and their structural reformation during extraction. It has been observed that the surface active nature of TBP and their interfacial coverage is modulated by the nature of incorporated solute species and their location with respect to the interface. Also, the TBP structuring near the interface is destroyed when an acidic interface is considered rather than a neutral one which favors the uranyl extraction. With an acidic interface, the water humidity of organic phase was observed to be increased in the experiments. Furthermore, the acid/water solubility in the organic phase was observed to be influenced by selection of acid models and their concentration. Simulations with high acid concentration show water pocket formation in the organic phase. However, in the case of dissociated ions or a mixture of both, no such water pool is observed and the extracted water remains dispersed in the organic phase, having the tendency to be replaced by HNO3 because of preferred TBP·HNO3 complexation over TBP·H2O. Most remarkably, the present study makes evident the TBP-induced charge redistribution of uranyl complexes during migration from the interface to the bulk organic phase, which contributes to drive uranyl complexes such as UO2·NO3·4TBP, UO2·5TBP and UO2·NO3·3TBP·HNO3 in the organic phase, and this was reestablished by

  1. Tetranuclear Uranyl Polyrotaxanes: Preferred Selectivity toward Uranyl Tetramer for Stabilizing a Flexible Polyrotaxane Chain Exhibiting Weakened Supramolecular Inclusion.

    PubMed

    Mei, Lei; Wang, Lin; Liu, Cai-ming; Zhao, Yu-liang; Chai, Zhi-fang; Shi, Wei-qun

    2015-07-06

    Introduction of mechanically interlocked components into actinide-based metal-organic materials such as polyrotaxanes will generate an entirely new type of inorganic-organic hybrid materials showing more supramolecular encapsulation-based dynamics. In this work, tetranuclear uranyl-directed polyrotaxanes (UO2 )4 O2 -C5A3-CB6 (1) and (UO2 )4 O2 -C6A3-CB6 (2), which are the first actinide pseudorotaxanes with high-nuclearity uranium centers, were obtained through systematic extension of the string spacer in pseudorotaxane ligands from 1,4-butylene (C4) to 1,5-pentylene (C5) and 1,6-hexylene (C6). Both of the as-synthesized tetranuclear uranyl polyrotaxanes were structurally characterized and analyzed. Considering the structure of UO2 -C4A3-CB6 and the 1,4-butylene string spacer, the preference for the uranyl tetramer may be related to the configurational inversion of the pseudorotaxane ligands from trans mode to cis mode on coordination to the uranyl center. Detailed structural analysis suggests that the length of the stretched string molecules for CB6-encapsulated pseudorotaxanes has remarkable effect on the supramolecular inclusion interactions and the configurations of pseudorotaxanes, and should be responsible for the configurational inversion of pseudorotaxane spacers and subsequent distinct changes of the uranyl building units and geometric structures.

  2. Non-aqueous chemistry of uranyl complexes with tripodal ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Carol J.; Clark, David L.; Duval, Paul B.; Scott, Brian L.

    2000-07-01

    The trans dioxo uranyl(VI) ion (UO22+) is remarkably stable with respect to the U=O bond, which dominates the stereochemistry of its coordination compounds in both aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. The linear O=U=O unit directs all other ligands to coordinate in an equatorial plane perpendicular to the O=U=O axis. In aqueous solution, uranyl coordination chemistry has been developed with a wide array of weak-field ligands that coordinate in the equatorial plane. In contrast, non-aqueous uranyl chemistry incorporating stronger donor ligands at equatorial sites has been less well developed. In this paper, the use of tripodal ligands with strong amide and alkoxide donors is employed, with an aim towards probing the electronic and steric effects of these cis-directing ligands on the structure and bonding of the trans dioxo unit.

  3. Uranyl peroxide enhanced nuclear fuel corrosion in seawater

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Nyman, May; Shvareva, Tatiana; Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident brought together compromised irradiated fuel and large amounts of seawater in a high radiation field. Based on newly acquired thermochemical data for a series of uranyl peroxide compounds containing charge-balancing alkali cations, here we show that nanoscale cage clusters containing as many as 60 uranyl ions, bonded through peroxide and hydroxide bridges, are likely to form in solution or as precipitates under such conditions. These species will enhance the corrosion of the damaged fuel and, being thermodynamically stable and kinetically persistent in the absence of peroxide, they can potentially transport uranium over long distances. PMID:22308442

  4. Rate theory on water exchange in aqueous uranyl ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Liem X.; Vo, Quynh N.; Nilsson, Mikael; Nguyen, Hung D.

    2017-03-01

    We report a classical rate theory approach to predict the exchange mechanism that occurs between water and aqueous uranyl ion. Using our water and ion-water polarizable force field and molecular dynamics techniques, we computed the potentials of mean force for the uranyl ion-water pair as a function of different pressures at ambient temperature. These potentials of mean force were used to calculate rate constants using transition rate theory; the transmission coefficients also were examined using the reactive flux method and Grote-Hynes approach. The computed activation volumes are positive; thus, the mechanism of this particular water-exchange is a dissociative process.

  5. Insensitive Ammonium Nitrate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    is reduced by replacing the ammonium nitrate with a solid solution of potassium nitrate in form III ammonium nitrate wherein the potassium nitrate...constitutes from more than zero to less than 50 weight percent of the solid solution . (Author)

  6. Binding of oxime group to uranyl ion.

    PubMed

    Tsantis, Sokratis T; Zagoraiou, Eirini; Savvidou, Aikaterini; Raptopoulou, Catherine P; Psycharis, Vassilis; Szyrwiel, Lukasz; Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Perlepes, Spyros P

    2016-05-31

    Currently, the leading approach for extraction of uranium from seawater is selective sorption of UO2(2+) ions onto a poly(acrylamidoxime) fiber. Amidoxime functional groups are the most studied extractant moieties for this application, but are not perfectly selective, and understanding how these groups (and more generally the oxime groups) interact with UO2(2+) and competing ions in seawater is an important step in designing better extractants. We have started a new research programme aiming at in-depth studies of the uranyl-oxime/amidoxime interactions and we report here our first results which cover aspects of the coordination chemistry of 2-pyridyl ketoximes towards UO2(2+). Detailed synthetic investigations of various UO2(2+)/mepaoH and UO2(2+)/phpaoH reaction systems (mepaoH is methyl 2-pyridyl ketoxime and phpaoH is phenyl 2-pyridyl ketoxime) have provided access to the complexes [UO2(mepao)2(MeOH)2]{[UO2(NO3)(mepao)(MeOH)2]}2 (), [UO2(mepao)2(MeOH)2] (), [(UO2)2(O2)(O2CMe)2(mepaoH)2] () and [UO2(phpao)2(MeOH)2] (). The peroxido group in , which was isolated without the addition of external peroxide sources, probably arises from a bis(aquo)- and/or bis(hydroxido)-bridged diuranyl precursor in solution followed by photochemical oxidation of the bridging groups. The U(VI) atom in the [UO2(NO3)(mepao)(MeOH)2] molecules of () is surrounded by one nitrogen and seven oxygen atoms in a very distorted hexagonal bipyramidal geometry; two oxygen atoms from the terminal MeOH ligands, two oxygen atoms from the bidentate chelating nitrato group, and the oxygen and nitrogen atoms from the η(2) oximate group of the 1.110 (Harris notation) mepao(-) ligand define the equatorial plane. This plane consists of two terminal MeOH ligands and two η(2) oximate groups in the [UO2(mepao)2(MeOH)2] molecule () of . The structure of the [UO2(mepao)2(MeOH)2] molecule that is present in is very similar to the structure of the corresponding molecule in . The structure of the dinuclear

  7. Formic acid interaction with the uranyl(VI) ion: structural and photochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Lucks, Christian; Rossberg, André; Tsushima, Satoru; Foerstendorf, Harald; Fahmy, Karim; Bernhard, Gert

    2013-10-07

    Complex formation between the uranyl(VI) ion and formic acid was studied by infrared absorption (IR) and X-ray absorption (EXAFS) spectroscopy as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In contrast to the acetate ion which forms exclusively a bidentate complex with uranyl(VI), the formate ion binds to uranyl(VI) in a unidentate fashion. The photochemistry of the uranyl(VI)-formic acid system was explored by DFT calculations and photoreduction of uranyl(VI) in the presence of formic acid was found to occur via an intermolecular process, that is, hydrogen abstraction from hydrogenformate by the photo-excited uranyl(VI). There is no photo-induced decarboxylation of uranyl(VI) formate via an intramolecular process, presumably due to lack of a C=C double bond.

  8. Optical properties of ammonium uranyl fluoride characterized by photoluminescence and photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Santosh K; Dhobale, A R; Natarajan, V; Godbole, S V

    2014-01-03

    PL and PAS studies were performed on uranyl compounds viz. uranium oxalate, uranium fluoride and ammonium uranyl fluoride. PL and PAS spectrum of ammonium uranyl fluoride is being reported for the first time. Ammonium uranyl fluoride is blue shifted with respect to uranyl fluoride, as a result of ammonium bonding. The vibronic separations were determined in the excited state and the ground state using excitation/PA spectra and emission spectra respectively. Fluorescence decay data could be fitted only with biexponential decay in all of these compounds indicating the presence of two different environments in these compounds. Low temperature luminescence leads to enhancement in emission intensity and lifetime value. The temperature dependence studies of average fluorescence lifetimes of ammonium uranyl are described in this paper. Based on this studies activation energy value for ammonium uranyl fluoride at which (3)∏ and (1)Σ potential surfaces will cross is calculated.

  9. Thermodynamics of Uranyl Minerals: Enthalpies of Formation of Uranyl Oxide Hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    K. Kubatko; K. Helean; A. Navrotsky; P.C. Burns

    2005-05-11

    The enthalpies of formation of seven uranyl oxide hydrate phases and one uranate have been determined using high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry: [(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O(OH){sub 6}](H{sub 2}O){sub 5}, metaschoepite; {beta}-UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}; CaUO{sub 4}; Ca(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}, becquerelite; Ca(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O{sub 3}(OH){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}; Na(UO{sub 2})O(OH), clarkeite; Na{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 7}, the sodium analogue of compreignacite and Pb{sub 3}(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, curite. The enthalpy of formation from the binary oxides, {Delta}H{sub f-ox}, at 298 K was calculated for each compound from the respective drop solution enthalpy, {Delta}H{sub ds}. The standard enthalpies of formation from the elements, {Delta}H{sub f}{sup o}, at 298 K are -1791.0 {+-} 3.2, -1536.2 {+-} 2.8, -2002.0 {+-} 3.2, -11389.2 {+-} 13.5, -6653.1 {+-} 13.8, -1724.7 {+-} 5.1, -10936.4 {+-} 14.5 and -13163.2 {+-} 34.4 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. These values are useful in exploring the stability of uranyl oxide hydrates in auxiliary chemical systems, such as those expected in U-contaminated environments.

  10. Gas Phase Reactions of Ions Derived from Anionic Uranyl Formate and Uranyl Acetate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Perez, Evan; Hanley, Cassandra; Koehler, Stephen; Pestok, Jordan; Polonsky, Nevo; Van Stipdonk, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of uranium are topics of sustained interest because of their importance to the development of nuclear fuel processing methods, and a more complete understanding of the factors that govern the mobility and fate of the element in the environment. Tandem mass spectrometry can be used to examine the intrinsic reactivity (i.e., free from influence of solvent and other condensed phase effects) of a wide range of metal ion complexes in a species-specific fashion. Here, electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation, and gas-phase ion-molecule reactions were used to create and characterize ions derived from precursors composed of uranyl cation (U(VI)O2(2+)) coordinated by formate or acetate ligands. Anionic complexes containing U(VI)O2(2+) and formate ligands fragment by decarboxylation and elimination of CH2=O, ultimately to produce an oxo-hydride species [U(VI)O2(O)(H)](-). Cationic species ultimately dissociate to make [U(VI)O2(OH)](+). Anionic complexes containing acetate ligands exhibit an initial loss of acetyloxyl radical, CH3CO2•, with associated reduction of uranyl to U(V)O2(+). Subsequent CID steps cause elimination of CO2 and CH4, ultimately to produce [U(V)O2(O)](-). Loss of CH4 occurs by an intra-complex H(+) transfer process that leaves U(V)O2(+) coordinated by acetate and acetate enolate ligands. A subsequent dissociation step causes elimination of CH2=C=O to leave [U(V)O2(O)](-). Elimination of CH4 is also observed as a result of hydrolysis caused by ion-molecule reaction with H2O. The reactions of other anionic species with gas-phase H2O create hydroxyl products, presumably through the elimination of H2. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. Gas Phase Reactions of Ions Derived from Anionic Uranyl Formate and Uranyl Acetate Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Evan; Hanley, Cassandra; Koehler, Stephen; Pestok, Jordan; Polonsky, Nevo; Van Stipdonk, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of uranium are topics of sustained interest because of their importance to the development of nuclear fuel processing methods, and a more complete understanding of the factors that govern the mobility and fate of the element in the environment. Tandem mass spectrometry can be used to examine the intrinsic reactivity (i.e., free from influence of solvent and other condensed phase effects) of a wide range of metal ion complexes in a species-specific fashion. Here, electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation, and gas-phase ion-molecule reactions were used to create and characterize ions derived from precursors composed of uranyl cation (UVIO2 2+) coordinated by formate or acetate ligands. Anionic complexes containing UVIO2 2+ and formate ligands fragment by decarboxylation and elimination of CH2=O, ultimately to produce an oxo-hydride species [UVIO2(O)(H)]-. Cationic species ultimately dissociate to make [UVIO2(OH)]+. Anionic complexes containing acetate ligands exhibit an initial loss of acetyloxyl radical, CH3CO2•, with associated reduction of uranyl to UVO2 +. Subsequent CID steps cause elimination of CO2 and CH4, ultimately to produce [UVO2(O)]-. Loss of CH4 occurs by an intra-complex H+ transfer process that leaves UVO2 + coordinated by acetate and acetate enolate ligands. A subsequent dissociation step causes elimination of CH2=C=O to leave [UVO2(O)]-. Elimination of CH4 is also observed as a result of hydrolysis caused by ion-molecule reaction with H2O. The reactions of other anionic species with gas-phase H2O create hydroxyl products, presumably through the elimination of H2.

  12. Detection and treatment of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency in psychiatric practice: Rationale and implementation.

    PubMed

    Messamore, Erik; McNamara, Robert K

    2016-02-10

    A body of translational evidence has implicated dietary deficiency in long-chain omega-3 (LCn-3) fatty acids, including eicosapenaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in the pathophysiology and potentially etiology of different psychiatric disorders. Case-control studies have consistently observed low erythrocyte (red blood cell) EPA and/or DHA levels in patients with major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Low erythrocyte EPA + DHA biostatus can be treated with fish oil-based formulations containing preformed EPA + DHA, and extant evidence suggests that fish oil supplementation is safe and well-tolerated and may have therapeutic benefits. These and other data provide a rationale for screening for and treating LCn-3 fatty acid deficiency in patients with psychiatric illness. To this end, we have implemented a pilot program that routinely measures blood fatty acid levels in psychiatric patients entering a residential inpatient clinic. To date over 130 blood samples, primarily from patients with treatment-refractory mood or anxiety disorders, have been collected and analyzed. Our initial results indicate that the majority (75 %) of patients exhibit whole blood EPA + DHA levels at ≤ 4 percent of total fatty acid composition, a rate that is significantly higher than general population norms (25 %). In a sub-set of cases, corrective treatment with fish oil-based products has resulted in improvements in psychiatric symptoms without notable side effects. In view of the urgent need for improvements in conventional treatment algorithms, these preliminary findings provide important support for expanding this approach in routine psychiatric practice.

  13. Colorimetric peroxidase mimetic assay for uranyl detection in sea water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingyuan; Chen, Zhuo; Omar, Haneen; Deng, Lin; Khashab, Niveen M

    2015-03-04

    Uranyl (UO2(2+)) is a form of uranium in aqueous solution that represents the greatest risk to human health because of its bioavailability. Different sensing techniques have been used with very sensitive detection limits especially the recently reported uranyl-specific DNAzymes systems. However, to the best of our knowledge, few efficient detection methods have been reported for uranyl sensing in seawater. Herein, gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) are employed in an efficient spectroscopic method to detect uranyl ion (UO2(2+)) with a detection limit of 1.86 μM. In the absence of UO2(2+), the BSA-stabilized AuNCs (BSA-AuNCs) showed an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. In the presence of UO2(2+), this activity can be efficiently restrained. The preliminary quenching mechanism and selectivity of UO2(2+) was also investigated and compared with other ions. This design strategy could be useful in understanding the binding affinity of protein-stabilized AuNCs to UO2(2+) and consequently prompt the recycling of UO2(2+) from seawater.

  14. Structure and dynamics of aqueous solution of uranyl ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, Manish; Choudhury, Niharendu

    2014-04-24

    The present work describes a molecular dynamics simulation study of structure and dynamics of aqueous solution of uranyl ions in water. Structural properties of the system in terms of radial distribution functions and dynamical characteristics as obtained through velocity autocorrelation function and mean square displacements have been analyzed. The results for radial distribution functions show the oxygen of water to form the first solvation shell at 2.4 Å around the uranium atom, whereas the hydrogen atoms of water are distributed around the uranium atom with the major peak at around 3.0 Å. Analyses of transport behaviors of ions and water through MSD indicates that the diffusion of the uranyl ion is much less as compared to that of the water molecules. It is also observed that the dynamical behavior of water molecules gets modified due to the presence of uranyl ion. The effect of increase in concentration of uranyl ions on the structure and dynamics of water molecules is also studied.

  15. Multi-scale modelling of uranyl chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Thanh-Nghi; Duvail, Magali Villard, Arnaud; Dufrêche, Jean-François; Molina, John Jairo; Guilbaud, Philippe

    2015-01-14

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations with explicit polarization have been successfully used to determine the structural and thermodynamic properties of binary aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride (UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}). Concentrated aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride have been studied to determine the hydration properties and the ion-ion interactions. The bond distances and the coordination number of the hydrated uranyl are in good agreement with available experimental data. Two stable positions of chloride in the second hydration shell of uranyl have been identified. The UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-Cl{sup −} association constants have also been calculated using a multi-scale approach. First, the ion-ion potential averaged over the solvent configurations at infinite dilution (McMillan-Mayer potential) was calculated to establish the dissociation/association processes of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-Cl{sup −} ion pairs in aqueous solution. Then, the association constant was calculated from this potential. The value we obtained for the association constant is in good agreement with the experimental result (K{sub UO{sub 2Cl{sup +}}} = 1.48 l mol{sup −1}), but the resulting activity coefficient appears to be too low at molar concentration.

  16. Uranyl tungstate and zirconium tungstate in salt melts

    SciTech Connect

    Kryukova, A.I.; Bragina, R.A.; Kazantsev, G.N.; Korshunov, I.A.

    1988-05-01

    The article discusses the preparation, properties, and behavior of uranyl tungstate and zirconium tungstate in salt melts. Procedures for their preparation are presented. The radiographic and IR spectroscopic characteristics, the thermal stability, and solubility and stability in chloride-tungstate melts of different composition have been studied.

  17. 2,6-Diiminopiperidin-1-ol: an overlooked motif relevant to uranyl and transition metal binding on poly(amidoxime) adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Zachary C.; Cardenas, Allan Jay P.; Corbey, Jordan F.; Warner, Marvin G.

    2016-01-01

    Glutardiamidoxime, a structural motif on sorbents used in uranium extraction from seawater, was discovered to cyclize in situ at room temperature to 2,6-diimino-piperidin-1-ol in the presence of uranyl nitrate. The new diimino motif was also generated when exposed to competing transition metals Cu(II) and Ni(II). Multinuclear μ-O bridged U(VI), Cu(II), and Ni(II) complexes featuring bound diimino ligands were isolated. A Cu(II) complex with the historically relevant cyclic imide dioxime motif is also reported for structural comparison to the reported diimino complexes.

  18. Insertion of Trivalent Lanthanides into Uranyl Vanadate Layers and Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaxing; Yin, Xuemiao; Zhao, Yanyan; Gao, Yang; Chen, Lanhua; Liu, Zhiyong; Sheng, Daopeng; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2015-09-08

    Two new uranyl vanadates have been prepared from hydrothermal reactions and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure of (H3O)UO2VO4 (UVO-1) consists of anionic layers containing UO2(2+) pentagonal bipyramids coordinated by edge-sharing VO5 square pyramids, with the charge balanced by interlaminar H3O(+) cations. Vanadium in (UO2)3(VO4)2(H2O)3 (UVO-2) exists as monomeric VO4 tetrahedra coordinating to UO2(2+) pentagonal bipyramids, forming a 3D uranyl(VI) vanadate framework. Similar reactions with the addition of Ln(NO3)3 (Ln = Nd, Eu) afford the three heterobimetallic lanthanide uranyl vanadate frameworks Nd(UO2)3(VO4)3(H2O)11 (NdUVO-1), Eu(UO2)3(VO4)3(H2O)10 (EuUVO-1), and Eu2(UO2)12(VO4)10(H2O)24 (EuUVO-2). In NdUVO-1 and EuUVO-1, Ln(3+) cations are inserted into the interlayer space of UVO-1 substituting for H3O(+) and further bridging adjacent layers into 3D frameworks. Similarly, EuUVO-2 adopts the same sheet topology as UVO-2, with Eu(3+) ions replacing some of the interlayer uranyl ions in UVO-2. Our work has demonstrated that uranyl vanadate extended structures are excellent hosts for further incorporation of trivalent lanthanide/actinide cations and has provided a new way to create new heterobimetallic 4f-5f and 5f-5f compounds.

  19. Folic acid deficiency enhances abeta accumulation in APP/PS1 mice brain and decreases amyloid-associated miRNAs expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Tian, Tian; Qin, Shanchun; Li, Wen; Zhang, Xumei; Wang, Xuan; Gao, Yuxia; Huang, Guowei

    2015-12-01

    Recent efforts have revealed the microRNA (miRNA) pathways in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological studies have revealed an association between folic acid deficiency and AD risk. However, the effects of folic acid deficiency on miRNA expression in AD animals have not been observed. We aimed to find if folic acid deficiency may enhance amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide deposition and regulate amyloid-associated miRNAs and their target genes expression in APP/PS1 mice. APP/PS1 mice and N2a cells were treated with folic acid-deficient diet or medium. Cognitive function of mice was assessed using the Morris water maze. miRNA profile was tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array. Different expressional miRNAs were validated by real-time PCR. The deposition of Aβ plaques was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. APP and BACE1 proteins in mice brain and N2a cells were determined by Western blot. Folic acid deficiency aggravated amyloid pathology in AD mice. The AD+FD group showed shorter time spent in the target zone during the probe test. Analysis of miRNAs predicted to target these genes revealed several miRNA candidates that were differentially modulated by folic acid deficiency. In APP/PS1 mice brains and N2a cells with folic acid-deficient treatment, miR-106a-5p, miR-200b-3p and miR-339-5p were down-regulated, and their target genes APP and BACE1 were up-regulated. In conclusion, folic acid deficiency can enhance Aβ accumulation in APP/PS1 mice brain and decrease amyloid-associated miRNAs expression.

  20. Resistance of essential fatty acid-deficient rats to endotoxin-induced increases in vascular permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Li, E.J.; Cook, J.A.; Spicer, K.M.; Wise, W.C.; Rokach, J.; Halushka, P.V. )

    1990-06-01

    Resistance to endotoxin in essential fatty acid-deficient (EFAD) rats is associated with reduced synthesis of certain arachidonic acid metabolites. It was hypothesized that EFAD rats would manifest decreased vascular permeability changes during endotoxemia as a consequence of reduced arachidonic acid metabolism. To test this hypothesis, changes in hematocrit (HCT) and mesenteric localization rate of technetium-labeled human serum albumin (99mTc-HSA) and red blood cells (99mTc-RBC) were assessed in EFAD and normal rats using gamma-camera imaging. Thirty minutes after Salmonella enteritidis endotoxin, EFAD rats exhibited less hemoconcentration as determined by % HCT than normal rats. Endotoxin caused a less severe change in permeability index in the splanchnic region in EFAD rats than in normal rats (1.2 +/- 0.6 x 10(-3)min-1 vs. 4.9 +/- 1.7 x 10(-3)min-1 respectively, P less than 0.05). In contrast to 99mTc-HSA, mesenteric localization of 99mTc-RBC was not changed by endotoxin in control or EFAD rats. Supplementation with ethyl-arachidonic acid did not enhance susceptibility of EFAD rats to endotoxin-induced splanchnic permeability to 99mTc-HSA. Leukotrienes have been implicated as mediators of increased vascular permeability in endotoxin shock. Since LTC3 formation has been reported to be increased in EFA deficiency, we hypothesized that LTC3 may be less potent than LTC4. Thus the effect of LTC3 on mean arterial pressure and permeability was compared to LTC4 in normal rats. LTC3-induced increases in peak mean arterial pressure were less than LTC4 at 10 micrograms/kg (39 +/- 5 mm Hg vs. 58 +/- 4 mm Hg respectively, P less than 0.05) and at 20 micrograms/kg (56 +/- 4 mm Hg vs. 75 +/- 2 mm Hg respectively, P less than 0.05). LY171883 (30 mg/kg), an LTD4/E4 receptor antagonist, attenuated the pressor effect of LTC4, LTD4, and LTC3.

  1. Insight into the Uranyl Oxyfluoride Topologies through the Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Evidence of a New Oxyfluoride Layer in [(UO2)4F13][Sr3(H2O)8](NO3)·H2O.

    PubMed

    Jouffret, Laurent J; Hiltbrunner, Jean-Michel; Rivenet, Murielle; Sergent, Nicolas; Obbade, Saïd; Avignant, Daniel; Dubois, Marc

    2016-12-05

    A new strontium uranyl oxyfluoride, [(UO2)4F13][Sr3(H2O)8](NO3)·H2O, was synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The single-crystal X-ray structure was determined. This compound crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1̅ (No. 2), with unit cell parameters a = 10.7925(16) Å, b = 10.9183(16) Å, c = 13.231(2) Å, α = 92.570(8)°, β = 109.147(8)°, γ = 92.778(8)°, V = 1468.1(4) Å(3), and Z = 2. The structure is built from uranyl-containing [Formula: see text] chains of tetrameric units of corner-sharing UO2F5 pentagonal bipyramids. These chains are linked through trimeric strontium units to form strontium-uranyl oxyfluoride layers further assembled by nitrate groups. The interlayer space is occupied by free water molecules. This compound was characterized by spectroscopic methods, especially (19)F NMR highlighting the many different fluoride sites. Structural relationships with other uranyl oxyfluorides were investigated through the different F/O ratios, the structural building unit, and the structural arrangement.

  2. Influence of Contact Time on the Extraction of 233Uranyl Spike and Contaminant Uranium From Hanford Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven C.; Szecsody, James E.

    2011-11-01

    In this study 233Uranyl nitrate was added to uranium (U) contaminated Hanford 300 Area sediment and incubated under moist conditions for 1 year. It hypothesized that geochemical transformations and/or physical processes will result in decreased extractability of 233U as the incubation period increases, and eventually the extraction behavior of the 233U spike will be congruent to contaminant U that has been associated with sediment for decades. Following 1 week, 1 month, and 1 year incubation periods, sediment extractions were performed using either batch or dynamic (sediment column flow) chemical extraction techniques. Overall, extraction of U from sediment using batch extraction was less complicated to conduct compared to dynamic extraction, but dynamic extraction could distinguish the range of U forms associated with sediment which are eluted at different times.

  3. Sulfate-Centered Sodium-Icosahedron-Templated Uranyl Peroxide Phosphate Cages with Uranyl Bridged by μ-η(1):η(2) Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jie; Spano, Tyler L; Dembowski, Mateusz; Kokot, Alex M; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Burns, Peter C

    2017-02-20

    Two novel hybrid uranyl peroxide phosphate cage clusters, designated U20P6 and U20P12, contain peroxide bridges between uranyl in an unusual μ-η(1):η(2) configuration, as well as the common μ-η(2):η(2) configuration. These appear to be the only high-nuclearity metal peroxide complexes containing μ-η(1):η(2) peroxide bridges, and they are unique among uranyl peroxide cages. Both clusters contain 20 uranyl polyhedra, and U20P6 and U20P12 contain 6 and 12 phosphate tetrahedra, respectively. The 20 uranyl polyhedra in both cages are arranged on the vertices of distorted topological dodecahedrons (20 vertex fullerenes). Each cage is completed by phosphate tetrahedra and is templated by a sulfate-centered Na12 cluster with the Na cations defining a regular convex isocahedron. Whereas μ-η(2):η(2) peroxides are essential features of uranyl peroxide cages, where they form equatorial edges of uranyl hexagonal bipyramids, the μ-η(1):η(2) peroxide groups in U20P6 and U20P12 are associated with strong distortions of the uranyl polyhedra. Formation of U20P6 and U20P12 is a further demonstration of the pliable nature of uranyl polyhedra, which contributes to the tremendous topological variability of uranyl compounds. Despite the unusual structure and highly distorted polyhedral geometries of U20P6, small-angle X-ray scattering and Raman spectra suggest its stability in the aqueous solution and solid state.

  4. Complex nanoscale cage clusters built from uranyl polyhedra and phosphate tetrahedra

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Daniel K.; Ling, Jie; Qiu, Jie; Pressprich, Laura; Baranay, Melissa; Ward, Matthew; Burns, Peter C.

    2011-06-20

    Five cage clusters that self-assemble in alkaline aqueous solution have been isolated and characterized. Each is built from uranyl hexagonal bipyramids with two or three equatorial edges occupied by peroxide, and three also contain phosphate tetrahedra. These clusters contain 30 uranyl polyhedra; 30 uranyl polyhedra and six pyrophosphate groups; 30 uranyl polyhedra, 12 pyrophosphate groups, and one phosphate tetrahedron; 42 uranyl polyhedra; and 40 uranyl polyhedra and three pyrophosphate groups. These clusters present complex topologies as well as a range of compositions, sizes, and charges. Two adopt fullerene topologies, and the others contain combinations of topological squares, pentagons, and hexagons. An analysis of possible topologies further indicates that higher-symmetry topologies are favored.

  5. Aggregation-induced emission active tetraphenylethene-based sensor for uranyl ion detection.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Huang, Zeng; Hu, Sheng; Li, Shuo; Li, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-11-15

    A novel tetraphenylethene-based fluorescent sensor, TPE-T, was developed for the detection of uranyl ions. The selective binding of TPE-T to uranyl ions resulted in a detectable signal owing to the quenching of its aggregation-induced emission. The developed sensor could be used to visually distinguish UO2(2+) from lanthanides, transition metals, and alkali metals under UV light; the presence of other metal ions did not interfere with the detection of uranyl ions. In addition, TPE-T was successfully used for the detection of uranyl ions in river water, illustrating its potential applications in environmental systems.

  6. Electrochemical uranyl cation biosensor with DNA oligonucleotides as receptor layer.

    PubMed

    Jarczewska, Marta; Ziółkowski, Robert; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2014-04-01

    The present study aims at the further development of the uranyl oligonucleotide-based voltammetric biosensor, which takes advantage of strong interaction between UO2(2+) and phosphate DNA backbone. Herein we report the optimization of working parameters of previously elaborated electrochemical DNA biosensor. It is shown that the sensor sensitivity is highly dependent on the oligonucleotide probe length and the incubation time of sensor in a sample solution. Consequently, the highest sensitivity was obtained for 10-nucleotide sequence and 60 min incubation time. The lower detection limit towards uranyl cation for developed biosensor was 30 nM. The influence of mixed monolayers and the possibility of developing a non-calibration device were also investigated. The selectivity of the proposed biosensor was significantly improved via elimination of adenine nucleobases from the DNA probe. Moreover, the regeneration procedure was elaborated and tested to prolong the use of the same biosensor for 4 subsequent determinations of UO2(2+).

  7. Resonance excitation of photoluminescence in sodium uranyl acetate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Korshunov, V. M.; Voinov, Yu. P.

    2016-12-01

    The photoluminescence spectra of sodium uranyl acetate polycrystals are recorded under excitation by different sources (semiconductor light-emitting diodes, cw lasers, and repetitively pulsed lasers). The excitation wavelengths fall into the absorption band of this solid, which makes it possible to record photoluminescence beginning from an extremely small volume of the material (10-10 cm3) at exposures of 10-3 s.

  8. Structural Phase Transitions and Water Dynamics in Uranyl Fluoride Hydrates

    DOE PAGES

    Miskowiec, Andrew J.; Kirkegaard, Marie C.; Huq, Ashfia; ...

    2015-11-17

    We report a novel production method for uranium oxy uoride [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7] 4H2O, referred to as structure D. Structure D is produced as a product of hydrating anhydrous uranyl uoride, UO2F2, through the gas phase at ambient temperatures fol- lowed by desiccation by equilibration with a dry environment. We follow the structure of [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7] 4H2O through an intermediate, liquid-like phase, wherein the coordination number of the uranyl ion is reduced to 5 (from 6 in the anhydrous struc- ture), and a water molecule binds as an equatorial ligand to the uranyl ion. Quasielas- tic neutron scattering results compare well with previousmore » measurements of mineral hydrates. The two groups of structurally distinct water molecules in D perform re- stricted motion on a length scale commensurate with the O{H bond (r = 0.92 A). The more tightly bound equatorial ligand waters rotate slower (Dr = 2.2 ps-1) than their hydrogen-bonded partners (Dr = 28.7 ps-1).« less

  9. Structural Phase Transitions and Water Dynamics in Uranyl Fluoride Hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Miskowiec, Andrew J.; Kirkegaard, Marie C.; Huq, Ashfia; Mamontov, Eugene; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Trowbridge, Lee D.; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Anderson, Brian B.

    2015-11-17

    We report a novel production method for uranium oxy uoride [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7] 4H2O, referred to as structure D. Structure D is produced as a product of hydrating anhydrous uranyl uoride, UO2F2, through the gas phase at ambient temperatures fol- lowed by desiccation by equilibration with a dry environment. We follow the structure of [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7] 4H2O through an intermediate, liquid-like phase, wherein the coordination number of the uranyl ion is reduced to 5 (from 6 in the anhydrous struc- ture), and a water molecule binds as an equatorial ligand to the uranyl ion. Quasielas- tic neutron scattering results compare well with previous measurements of mineral hydrates. The two groups of structurally distinct water molecules in D perform re- stricted motion on a length scale commensurate with the O{H bond (r = 0.92 A). The more tightly bound equatorial ligand waters rotate slower (Dr = 2.2 ps-1) than their hydrogen-bonded partners (Dr = 28.7 ps-1).

  10. Variable Denticity in Carboxylate Binding to the Uranyl Coordination Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Groenewold; W. A. de Jong; J. Oomens; M. J. van Stipdonk

    2010-05-01

    Tris-carboxylate complexes of the uranyl [UO2]2+ cation with acetate and benzoate were generated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and then isolated in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Wavelength-selective infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) of the tris-acetatouranyl anion resulted in a redox elimination of an acetate radical, which was used to generate an IR spectrum that consisted of six prominent absorption bands. These were interpreted with the aid of density functional theory calculations in terms of a symmetric and antisymmetric –CO2 stretches of both the monodentate and bidentate acetate, CH3 bending and umbrella vibrations, and a uranyl OUO asymmetric stretch. The comparison of the calculated and measured IR spectra indicated that the tris-acetate complex contained two acetate ligands bound in a bidentate fashion, while the third acetate was monodentate. In similar fashion, the tris-benzoate uranyl anion was formed and photodissociated by loss of a benzoate radical, enabling measurement of the infrared spectrum that was in close agreement with that calculated for a structure containing one monodentate, and two bidentate benzoate ligand.

  11. How are Centrosymmetric and Noncentrosymmetric Structures Achieved in Uranyl Borates?

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2010-03-15

    Four uranyl borates, UO{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 4} (UBO-1), α-(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}[B{sub 9}O{sub 14}(OH){sub 4}] (UBO-2), β-(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}[B{sub 9}O{sub 14}(OH){sub 4}] (UBO-3), and (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}[B{sub 13}O{sub 20}(OH){sub 3}]·1.25H{sub 2}O (UBO-4), have been prepared from boric acid fluxes at 190 °C. UBO-3 and UBO-4 are centrosymmetric, whereas UBO-1 and UBO-2 are noncentrosymmetric (chiral and polar). These uranyl borates possess layered structures constructed from UO{sub 8} hexagonal bipyramids, BO{sub 3} triangles, and BO{sub 4} tetrahedra. In the case of UBO-4, clusters of BO{sub 3} triangles link the layers together to form open slabs with a thickness of almost 2 nm. The ability of uranyl borates to use very similar layers to yield both centrosymmetric and noncentrosymmetric layers is detailed in this work.

  12. Predicting Stability Constants for Uranyl Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin P.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.

    2015-04-02

    The ability to predict the equilibrium constants for the formation of 1:1 uranyl:ligand complexes (log K1 values) provides the essential foundation for the rational design of ligands with enhanced uranyl affinity and selectivity. We also use density functional theory (B3LYP) and the IEFPCM continuum solvation model to compute aqueous stability constants for UO22+ complexes with 18 donor ligands. Theoretical calculations permit reasonably good estimates of relative binding strengths, while the absolute log K1 values are significantly overestimated. Accurate predictions of the absolute log K1 values (root mean square deviation from experiment < 1.0 for log K1 values ranging from 0 to 16.8) can be obtained by fitting the experimental data for two groups of mono and divalent negative oxygen donor ligands. The utility of correlations is demonstrated for amidoxime and imide dioxime ligands, providing a useful means of screening for new ligands with strong chelate capability to uranyl.

  13. Predicting Stability Constants for Uranyl Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    DOE PAGES

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin P.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.

    2015-04-02

    The ability to predict the equilibrium constants for the formation of 1:1 uranyl:ligand complexes (log K1 values) provides the essential foundation for the rational design of ligands with enhanced uranyl affinity and selectivity. We also use density functional theory (B3LYP) and the IEFPCM continuum solvation model to compute aqueous stability constants for UO22+ complexes with 18 donor ligands. Theoretical calculations permit reasonably good estimates of relative binding strengths, while the absolute log K1 values are significantly overestimated. Accurate predictions of the absolute log K1 values (root mean square deviation from experiment < 1.0 for log K1 values ranging from 0more » to 16.8) can be obtained by fitting the experimental data for two groups of mono and divalent negative oxygen donor ligands. The utility of correlations is demonstrated for amidoxime and imide dioxime ligands, providing a useful means of screening for new ligands with strong chelate capability to uranyl.« less

  14. Synthesis and characterization of uranyl chromate sheet compounds containing edge-sharing dimers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Daniel K.; Baranay, Michelle; Pressprich, Laura; Stoffer, Megan; Burns, Peter C.

    2012-02-15

    Eight uranyl chromates have been crystallized from aqueous solution and characterized: Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}](H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (1), (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}](H{sub 2}O){sub 3}, Rb{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}](H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (3), Cs[(UO{sub 2})(CrO{sub 4})(OH)]H{sub 2}O (4), Rb[(UO{sub 2})(CrO{sub 4})(OH)]H{sub 2}O (5) Co(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}(Co(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}](H{sub 2}O){sub 4} (6), Li{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 3}](H{sub 2}O){sub 7} (7), and Zn(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 3}](H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (8). The structural units of 1 through 8 each consist of a sheet of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and (Cr(VI)O{sub 4}){sup 2-} tetrahedra. In each case two uranyl pentagonal bipyramids share an equatorial edge, giving a dimer that is linked into the sheet through vertex sharing with (Cr(VI)O{sub 4}){sup 2-} tetrahedra. The sheets are based upon three distinct sheet anion topologies, and the sheets based on a given anion topology can differ in the orientations of the non-bridging O atoms of (CrO{sub 4}){sup 2-} tetrahedra. The interlayers of these compounds contain either monovalent or divalent cations, as well as H{sub 2}O groups that are either bonded to the interlayer cation or are held in place by H bonding only. We explore the relationships between sheet topologies and interlayer configuration in these compounds. - Graphical abstract: Eight uranyl chromate compounds containing sheet structural units built from uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and (CrO{sub 4}){sup 2-} tetrahedra are reported. Relationships between sheet topologies and interstitial constituents is examined. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight uranyl Cr(VI) compounds with sheet structural units are reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Relationships between the topology of the uranyl

  15. Simulation of Uranyl Nitrate Crystallization Process in Linear Crystallizer Using Simsar Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa Bique, A.; Gozhimov, A.; Chursin, Yu; Schmidt, O.

    2016-08-01

    The paper deals with simulation of linear crystallizer work process for the research of technic operating modes and searching the most effective for material's nano-purity achievement. The model is realized by using SimSar software. Importance of device's geometry and process variables are marked. The model was included in the complex's composition of closed nuclear fuel cycle.

  16. SERUM VITAMIN B12, IRON AND FOLIC ACID DEFICIENCIES IN OBESE INDIVIDUALS SUBMITTED TO DIFFERENT BARIATRIC TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    SILVA, Rafaella de Andrade; MALTA, Flávia Monteiro França; CORREIA, Maria Flora Ferreira Sampaio Carvalho; BURGOS, Maria Goretti Pessoa de Araújo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Different surgical techniques to combat obesity combine malabsorption with restrictive procedures and can lead to metabolic problems, such as micronutrient deficiencies. Aim: Assess vitamin B12, iron and folic acid deficiencies associated with the lifestyle of obese individuals having been submitted to different bariatric techniques. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed using the electronic charts of patients submitted to bariatric surgery involving adjustable gastric banding and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass at the São João Hospital Center in the city of Porto, Portugal, between 2005 and 2010. The following data were collected: surgical technique, sex, age, marital status, serum concentrations of vitamin B12, iron and folic acid and postoperative lifestyle. A 5% significance level was used for the statistical analysis (p<0.05). Results: Among 286 individuals evaluated, females accounted for 90.9% of the overall sample (both techniques). Gastric banding was performed more (68.9%), but greater nutrient deficiencies were found following gastric bypass. Iron was the most prevalent deficiency (21.3%), followed by vitamin B12 (16.9%) and folic acid (4.5%). Mild to moderate alcohol intake, adherence to the diet and the use of multivitamins reduced the frequency, but did not avoid micronutrient deficiency. Conclusion: Vitamin B12, iron and folic acid deficiencies were found in the first and second year following the two bariatric techniques analyzed and were more frequent among individuals submitted to gastric bypass. PMID:27683779

  17. Uranyl Ion Complexes with 1,1'-Biphenyl-2,2',6,6'-tetracarboxylic Acid: Structural and Spectroscopic Studies of One- to Three-Dimensional Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Thuéry, Pierre; Harrowfield, Jack

    2015-07-06

    1,1'-Biphenyl-2,2',6,6'-tetracarboxylic acid (H4L) was reacted with uranyl nitrate, either alone or in the presence of additional metal cations (Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Dy(3+)) under (solvo)-hydrothermal conditions, giving six complexes which were characterized by their crystal structure and, in all but one case, their emission spectrum in the solid state. [Ni(bipy)3][UO2(H2L)(H2O)]2(NO3)2·3H2O (1) crystallizes as a one-dimensional (1D), ribbon-like coordination polymer, while the homometallic complex [(UO2)2(L)(H2O)3]·H2O·CH3CN (2) and the heterometallic complexes [UO2Cu(L)(H2O)2]·H2O (3), [UO2Cu(L)(H2O)]·H2O (4), and [(UO2)5Cu4(HL)6(bipy)4]·2H2O (5) display two-dimensional (2D) arrangements. Lastly, the uranyl-lanthanide heterometallic complex [(UO2)8Dy(HL)6(H2O)8](I)·8H2O (6) crystallizes as a three-dimensional (3D) framework. Although these assemblies adopt different topologies, the {4(2).6} linear motif found in 1 is discernible in the structures of 2, 5, and 6, in which the higher dimensionality arises from further bridging of these subunits by uranyl (2), copper (5), or both uranyl and dysprosium (6) cations. The tetracarboxylic/ate ligands have their two aromatic rings nearly perpendicular to one another. No two of them adopt the same coordination mode in this series (except in the similar complexes 3 and 4), but chelation involving one carboxylate group from each ring is nearly ubiquitous, and the ensuing position of the cation favors the formation of planar architectures. The emission spectra of complexes 2-5 measured in the solid state show the usual uranyl vibronic fine structure, although with significant differences in the emission intensity, while complete quenching of the luminescence is observed in 1.

  18. Uranyl ion: A convenient standard for transient molar absorption coefficient measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bakac, A.; Burrows, H.D.

    1997-12-01

    Transient absorption spectra of an aqueous solution of uranyl sulfate have been measured in the ultraviolet and visible spectra. The excited uranyl ion may be a convenient standard for actinometry and photoacoustic calorimetry. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  19. A protein engineered to bind uranyl selectively and with femtomolar affinity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lu; Bosscher, Mike; Zhang, Changsheng; Ozçubukçu, Salih; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Wen; Li, Charles J; Liu, Jianzhao; Jensen, Mark P; Lai, Luhua; He, Chuan

    2014-03-01

    Uranyl (UO2(2+)), the predominant aerobic form of uranium, is present in the ocean at a concentration of ~3.2 parts per 10(9) (13.7 nM); however, the successful enrichment of uranyl from this vast resource has been limited by the high concentrations of metal ions of similar size and charge, which makes it difficult to design a binding motif that is selective for uranyl. Here we report the design and rational development of a uranyl-binding protein using a computational screening process in the initial search for potential uranyl-binding sites. The engineered protein is thermally stable and offers very high affinity and selectivity for uranyl with a Kd of 7.4 femtomolar (fM) and >10,000-fold selectivity over other metal ions. We also demonstrated that the uranyl-binding protein can repeatedly sequester 30-60% of the uranyl in synthetic sea water. The chemical strategy employed here may be applied to engineer other selective metal-binding proteins for biotechnology and remediation applications.

  20. Uranyl adsorption at the muscovite (mica)/water interface studied by second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Saslow Gomez, Sarah A; Jordan, David S; Troiano, Julianne M; Geiger, Franz M

    2012-10-16

    Uranyl adsorption at the muscovite (mica)/water interface was studied by second harmonic generation (SHG). Using the nonresonant χ(3) technique and the Gouy-Chapman model, the initial surface charge density of the mica surface was determined to be -0.022(1) C/m(2) at pH 6 and in the presence of dissolved carbonate. Under these same conditions, uranyl adsorption isotherms collected using nonresonant χ(3) experiments and resonantly enhanced SHG experiments that probe the ligand-to-metal charge transfer bands of the uranyl cation yielded a uranyl binding constant of 3(1) × 10(7) M(-1), corresponding to a Gibbs free energy of adsorption of -52.6(8) kJ/mol, and a maximum surface charge density at monolayer uranyl coverage of 0.028(3) C/m(2). These results suggest favorable adsorption of uranyl ions to the mica interface through strong ion-dipole or hydrogen interactions, with a 1:1 uranyl ion to surface site ratio that is indicative of monovalent cations ((UO(2))(3)(OH)(5)(+), (UO(2))(4)(OH)(7)(+), UO(2)OH(+), UO(2)Cl(+), UO(2)(CH(3)COO(-))(+)) binding at the interface, in addition to neutral uranyl species (UO(2)(OH)(2) and UO(2)CO(3)). This work provides benchmark measurements to be used in the improvement of contaminant transport modeling.

  1. Silver Ion-Mediated Heterometallic Three-Fold Interpenetrating Uranyl-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Mei, Lei; Wu, Qun-yan; An, Shu-wen; Gao, Zeng-qiang; Chai, Zhi-fang; Shi, Wei-qun

    2015-11-16

    A unique case of a uranyl-silver heterometallic 3-fold interpenetrating network (U-Ag-2,6-DCPCA) from a multifunctionalized organic ligand, 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid, in the presence of uranyl and silver ions is reported. It is the first report of a heterometallic uranyl-organic interpenetrating network or framework. Notably, a (4,4)-connected uranyl building unit in U-Ag-2,6-DCPCA, which is available through combined influences of structural halogenation and silver ion additive on uranyl coordination, plays a vital role in the formation of a 3-fold interpenetrating network. Halogen substitution effectively changes structural features and coordination behaviors of isonicotinate ligand and contributes to the control of uranyl coordination. Meanwhile, it exerts influence on the stabilization of 3-fold interpenetrating networks by halogen-halogen interactions. Theoretical calculation suggests that the silver ion should mainly serve as an inductive factor of uranyl species through strong Ag-N binding affinity, directly leading to the formation of a (4,4)-connected uranyl building unit and finally a heterometallic 3-fold interpenetrating network. Related experimental results, especially an interesting postsynthetic metalation, afford further evidence of this induction effect.

  2. SERS detection of uranyl using functionalized gold nanostars promoted by nanoparticle shape and size.

    PubMed

    Lu, Grace; Forbes, Tori Z; Haes, Amanda J

    2016-08-15

    The radius of curvature of gold (Au) nanostar tips but not the overall particle dimensions can be used for understanding the large and quantitative surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal of the uranyl (UO2)(2+) moiety. The engineered roughness of the Au nanostar architecture and the distance between the gold surface and uranyl cations are promoted using carboxylic acid terminated alkanethiols containing 2, 5, and 10 methylene groups. By systematically varying the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) thickness with these molecules, the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectral properties are used to quantify the SAM layer thickness and to promote uranyl coordination to the Au nanostars in neutral aqueous solutions. Successful uranyl detection is demonstrated for all three functionalized Au nanostar samples as indicated by enhanced signals and red-shifts in the symmetric U(vi)-O stretch. Quantitative uranyl detection is achieved by evaluating the integrated area of these bands in the uranyl fingerprint window. By varying the concentration of uranyl, similar free energies of adsorption are observed for the three carboxylic acid terminated functionalized Au nanostar samples indicating similar coordination to uranyl, but the SERS signals scale inversely with the alkanethiol layer thickness. This distance dependence follows previously established models assuming that roughness features associated with the radius of curvature of the tips are considered. These results indicate that SERS signals using functionalized Au nanostar substrates can provide quantitative detection of small molecules and that the tip architecture plays an important role in understanding the resulting SERS intensities.

  3. Production and Characterization of Desmalonichrome Relative Binding Affinity for Uranyl Ions in Relation to Other Siderophores

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Kai-For; Dai, Ziyu; Wunschel, David S.

    2016-06-24

    Siderophores are Fe binding secondary metabolites that have been investigated for their uranium binding properties. Much of the previous work has focused on characterizing hydroxamate types of siderophores, such as desferrioxamine B, for their uranyl binding affinity. Carboxylate forms of these metabolites hold potential to be more efficient chelators of uranyl, yet they have not been widely studied and are more difficult to obtain. Desmalonichrome is a carboxylate siderophore which is not commercially available and so was obtained from the ascomycete fungus Fusarium oxysporum cultivated under Fe depleted conditions. The relative affinity for uranyl binding of desmalonichrome was investigated using a competitive analysis of binding affinities between uranyl acetate and different concentrations of iron(III) chloride using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In addition to desmalonichrome, three other siderophores, including two hydroxamates (desferrioxamine B and desferrichrome) and one carboxylate (desferrichrome A) were studied to understand their relative affinities for the uranyl ion at two pH values. The binding affinities of hydroxymate siderophores to uranyl ion were found to decrease to a greater degree at lower pH as the concentration of Fe (III) ion increases. On the other hand, lowering pH has little impact on the binding affinities between carboxylate siderophores and uranyl ion. Desmalonichrome was shown to have the greatest relative affinity for uranyl at any pH and Fe(III) concentration. These results suggest that acidic functional groups in the ligands are critical for strong chelation with uranium at lower pH.

  4. Catalytic one-electron reduction of uranyl(VI) to Group 1 uranyl(V) complexes via Al(III) coordination.

    PubMed

    Zegke, Markus; Nichol, Gary S; Arnold, Polly L; Love, Jason B

    2015-04-07

    Reactions between the uranyl(VI) Pacman complex [(UO2)(py)(H2L)] of the Schiff-base polypyrrolic macrocycle L and Tebbe's reagent or DIBAL result in the first selective reductive functionalisation of the uranyl oxo by Al to form [(py)(R2AlOUO)(py)(H2L)] (R = Me or (i)Bu). The clean displacement of the oxo-coordinated Al(III) by Group 1 cations has enabled the development of a one-pot, DIBAL-catalysed reduction of the U(VI) uranyl complexes to a series of new, mono-oxo alkali-metal-functionalised uranyl(V) complexes [(py)3(MOUO)(py)(H2L)] (M = Li, Na, K).

  5. A Phosphorylation Tag for Uranyl Mediated Protein Purification and Photo Assisted Tag Removal

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Nielsen, Peter E.; Møllegaard, Niels Erik

    2014-01-01

    Most protein purification procedures include an affinity tag fused to either the N or C-terminal end of the protein of interest as well as a procedure for tag removal. Tag removal is not straightforward and especially tag removal from the C-terminal end is a challenge due to the characteristics of enzymes available for this purpose. In the present study, we demonstrate the utility of the divalent uranyl ion in a new procedure for protein purification and tag removal. By employment of a GFP (green florescence protein) recombinant protein we show that uranyl binding to a phosphorylated C-terminal tag enables target protein purification from an E. coli extract by immobilized uranyl affinity chromatography. Subsequently, the tag can be efficiently removed by UV-irradiation assisted uranyl photocleavage. We therefore suggest that the divalent uranyl ion (UO22+) may provide a dual function in protein purification and subsequent C-terminal tag removal procedures. PMID:24599526

  6. Time-resolved assembly of chiral uranyl peroxo cage clusters containing belts of polyhedra.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jie; Nguyen, Kevin; Jouffret, Laurent; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Burns, Peter C

    2013-01-07

    Two chiral cage clusters built from uranyl polyhedra and (HPO(3))(2-) groups have been synthesized in pure yield and characterized structurally and spectroscopically in the solid state and aqueous solution. Synthesis reactions under ambient conditions in mildly acidic aqueous solutions gave clusters U(22)PO(3) and U(28)PO(3) that contain belts of four uranyl peroxide pentagonal and hexagonal bipyramids, in contrast to earlier reported uranyl peroxide cage clusters that are built from four-, five-, and six-membered rings of uranyl hexagonal bipyramids. U(22)PO(3) and U(28)PO(3) are also the first chiral uranyl-based cage clusters, the first that contain uranyl pentagonal bipyramids that contain no peroxide ligands, and the first that incorporate (HPO(3))(2-) bridges between uranyl ions. They are built from 22 uranyl polyhedra and 20 (HPO(3))(2-) groups, or 28 uranyl polyhedra and 24 (HPO(3))(2-) groups, with the outer and inner surfaces of the cages passivated by the O atoms of uranyl ions. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) profiles demonstrated that U(22)PO(3) clusters formed in solution within 1 h after mixing of reactants, and remained in solution for 2 weeks prior to crystallization. Time-resolved electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and SAXS demonstrated that U(28)PO(3) clusters formed in solution within 1 h of mixing the reactants, and remained in solution 1 month before crystallization. Crystallization of U(22)PO(3) and U(28)PO(3) is accelerated by addition of KNO(3). Clusters of U(22)PO(3) with and without encapsulated cations exhibit markedly different aqueous solubility, reflecting the importance of cluster surface charge in fostering linkages through counterions to form a stable solid.

  7. Effects of aqueous uranyl speciation on the kinetics of microbial uranium reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, Keaton M.; DiChristina, Thomas J.; Van Cappellen, Philippe; Taillefert, Martial

    2015-05-01

    The ability to predict the success of the microbial reduction of soluble U(VI) to highly insoluble U(IV) as an in situ bioremediation strategy is complicated by the wide range of geochemical conditions at contaminated sites and the strong influence of aqueous uranyl speciation on the bioavailability and toxicity of U(VI) to metal-reducing bacteria. To determine the effects of aqueous uranyl speciation on uranium bioreduction kinetics, incubations and viability assays with Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 were conducted over a range of pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), Ca2+, and Mg2+ concentrations. A speciation-dependent kinetic model was developed to reproduce the observed time series of total dissolved uranium concentration over the range of geochemical conditions tested. The kinetic model yielded the highest rate constant for the reduction of uranyl non-carbonate species (i.e., the 'free' hydrated uranyl ion, uranyl hydroxides, and other minor uranyl complexes), indicating that they represent the most readily reducible fraction of U(VI) despite being the least abundant uranyl species in solution. The presence of DIC, Ca2+, and Mg2+ suppressed the formation of more bioavailable uranyl non-carbonate species and resulted in slower bioreduction rates. At high concentrations of bioavailable U(VI), however, uranium toxicity to S. putrefaciens inhibited bioreduction, and viability assays confirmed that the concentration of non-carbonate uranyl species best predicts the degree of toxicity. The effect of uranium toxicity was accounted for by incorporating the free ion activity model of metal toxicity into the bioreduction rate law. Overall, these results demonstrate that, in the absence of competing terminal electron acceptors, uranium bioreduction kinetics can be predicted over a wide range of geochemical conditions based on the bioavailability and toxicity imparted on U(VI) by solution composition. These findings also imply that the concentration of uranyl non

  8. Vibrational Properties of Anhydrous and Partially Hydrated Uranyl Fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian B.; Kirkegaard, Marie C.; Miskowiec, Andrew J.; Steill, Jeffrey D.; Langford, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) is a hygroscopic powder with two main structural phases: an anhydrous crystal and a partially hydrated crystal of the same R¯3m symmetry. The formally closed-shell electron structure of anhydrous UO2F2 is amenable to density functional theory calculations. We use density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) to calculate the vibrational frequencies of the anhydrous crystal structure and employ complementary inelastic neutron scattering and temperature-dependent Raman scattering to validate those frequencies. As a model closed-shell actinide, we investigated the effect of LDA, GGA, and non-local vdW functionals as well as the spherically-averaged Hubbard +U correction on vibrational frequencies, electronic structure, and geometry of anhydrous UO2F2. A particular choice of Ueff = 5.5 eV yields the correct U Oyl bond distance and vibrational frequencies for the characteristic Eg and A1g modes that are within the resolution of experiment. Inelastic neutron scattering and Raman scattering suggest a degree of water coupling to the lattice vibrations in the more experimentally accessible partially hydrated UO2F2 system, with the symmetric O-U-O stretching vibration shifted approximately 47 cm-1 lower in energy compared to the anhydrous structure. Evidence of water interaction with the uranyl ion is present from a two-peak decomposition of the uranyl stretching vibration in the Raman spectra and anion hydrogen stretching vibrations in the inelastic neutron scattering spectra. A first-order dehydration phase transition temperature is definitively identified to be 125 °C using temperature-dependent Raman scattering.

  9. Vibrational Properties of Anhydrous and Partially Hydrated Uranyl Fluoride

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, Brian B.; Kirkegaard, Marie C.; Miskowiec, Andrew J.; ...

    2017-01-01

    Uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) is a hygroscopic powder with two main structural phases: an anhydrous crystal and a partially hydrated crystal of the same R¯3m symmetry. The formally closed-shell electron structure of anhydrous UO2F2 is amenable to density functional theory calculations. We use density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) to calculate the vibrational frequencies of the anhydrous crystal structure and employ complementary inelastic neutron scattering and temperature-dependent Raman scattering to validate those frequencies. As a model closed-shell actinide, we investigated the effect of LDA, GGA, and non-local vdW functionals as well as the spherically-averaged Hubbard +U correction on vibrational frequencies, electronic structure,more » and geometry of anhydrous UO2F2. A particular choice of Ueff = 5.5 eV yields the correct U Oyl bond distance and vibrational frequencies for the characteristic Eg and A1g modes that are within the resolution of experiment. Inelastic neutron scattering and Raman scattering suggest a degree of water coupling to the lattice vibrations in the more experimentally accessible partially hydrated UO2F2 system, with the symmetric O-U-O stretching vibration shifted approximately 47 cm-1 lower in energy compared to the anhydrous structure. Evidence of water interaction with the uranyl ion is present from a two-peak decomposition of the uranyl stretching vibration in the Raman spectra and anion hydrogen stretching vibrations in the inelastic neutron scattering spectra. A first-order dehydration phase transition temperature is definitively identified to be 125 °C using temperature-dependent Raman scattering.« less

  10. Vibrational properties of anhydrous and partially hydrated uranyl fluoride.

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, M C; Langford, J; Steill, J; Anderson, B; Miskowiec, A

    2017-01-14

    Uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) is a hygroscopic powder with two main structural phases: an anhydrous crystal and a partially hydrated crystal of the same R3¯m symmetry. The formally closed-shell electron structure of anhydrous UO2F2 is amenable to density functional theory calculations. We use density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) to calculate the vibrational frequencies of the anhydrous crystal structure and employ complementary inelastic neutron scattering and temperature-dependent Raman scattering to validate those frequencies. As a model closed-shell actinide, we investigated the effect of LDA, GGA, and non-local vdW functionals as well as the spherically averaged Hubbard +U correction on vibrational frequencies, electronic structure, and geometry of anhydrous UO2F2. A particular choice of Ueff=5.5 eV yields the correct U-Oyl bond distance and vibrational frequencies for the characteristic Eg and A1g modes that are within the resolution of experiment. Inelastic neutron scattering and Raman scattering suggest a degree of water coupling to the lattice vibrations in the more experimentally accessible partially hydrated UO2F2 system, with the symmetric stretching vibration shifted approximately 47 cm(-1) lower in energy compared to the anhydrous structure. Evidence of water interaction with the uranyl ion is present from a two-peak decomposition of the uranyl stretching vibration in the Raman spectra and anion-hydrogen stretching vibrations in the inelastic neutron scattering spectra. A first-order dehydration phase transition temperature is definitively identified to be 125 °C using temperature-dependent Raman scattering.

  11. Effects of structure of nitrator on nitration reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Shiying, Yin; Benli, Yin

    1995-12-01

    It is well-known that nitration of dinitrotoluene (DNT) proceeds quite slowly. Unsatisfactory structure of nitrator could cause an incomplete nitration in the nitrator, and nitration continues in the separator. This, in turn, increases the temperature difference between nitrator and separator. It was found that the nitration degree of DNT in nitrator could be estimated by this temperature difference. We investigated the relationship between the nitrator`s structure and the above temperature difference, and based on the research results obtained we could make nitration complete in nitrator, improve the quality of trinitrotoluene (TNT), lower the consumption of raw materials, especially sulfuric acid, and increase the safety of production.

  12. Uranyl complexes of n-alkanediaminotetra-acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, M L; Mota, A M; da Silva, J J

    1984-07-01

    The uranyl complexes of n-propanediaminetetra-acetic acid, n-butanediaminetetra-acetic acid and n-hexanediaminetetra-acetic acid have been studied by potentiometry, with computer evaluation of the titration data by the MINIQUAD program. Stability constants of the 1:1 and 2:1 metal:ligand chelates have been determined as well as the respective hydrolysis and polymerization constants at 25 degrees in 0.10M and 1.00M KNO(3). The influence of the length of the alkane chain of the ligands on the complexes formed is discussed.

  13. Evaluation of the stability of uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex ions in carbonate media at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Wook; Lee, Keun-Young; Chung, Dong-Yong; Lee, Eil-Hee; Moon, Jei-Kwon; Shin, Dong-Woo

    2012-09-30

    This work studied the stability of peroxide in uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions in a carbonate solution with hydrogen peroxide using absorption and Raman spectroscopies, and evaluated the temperature dependence of the decomposition characteristics of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions in the solution. The uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions self-decomposed more rapidly into uranyl tris-carbonato complex ions in higher temperature carbonate solutions. The concentration of peroxide in the solution without free hydrogen peroxide represents the concentration of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions in a mixture of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex and uranyl tris-carbonato complex ions. The self-decomposition of the uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions was a first order reaction, and its activation energy was evaluated to be 7.144×10(3) J mol(-1). The precipitation of sodium uranium oxide hydroxide occurred when the amount of uranyl tris-carbonato complex ions generated from the decomposition of the uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions exceeded the solubility of uranyl tris-carbonato ions in the solution at the solution temperature.

  14. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  15. Construction of Uranyl Selective Electrode Based on Complex of Uranyl Ion with New Ligand Carboxybenzotriazole in PVC Matrix Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Dalo, M. A.; Al-Rawashdeh, N. A. F.; Al-Mheidat, I. R.; Nassory, N. S.

    2015-10-01

    In the present study uranyl selective electrodes in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) matrix membrane were prepared based on a complex of uranyl ion (UO2) with carboxybenzotriazole (CBT) as ligand. The effect of the nature of plasticizer in PVC matrix were evaluated using three different plasticizers, these are dibutyl phthalate (DBP), dioctyl phthalate (DOP) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BHS). The results of this study indicated that the best plasticizer could be used is the DBP, which may be attributed to its lowest viscosity value compared to DOP and BHS. The electrodes with DBP as plasticizer exhibits a Nernstian response with a slope of 28.0 mV/ decade, over a wide range of concentration from 3.0×10-5-6.0×10-2 M and a detection limit of 4.0×10-6 M. It can be used in the pH range of 4.0-10.0 with a response time of less than 10 s for DBP and 25 s for both DOP and BHS. The effects of ions interferences on the electrode response were evaluated. The di- and tri-valent cations were found to interfere less than univalent cations, which was attributed to the high diffusion and the exchange rate between the univalent ions and the uranyl ion solution. The electrodes were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM). The results of the standard addition method were satisfactory with errors less than 7%. The developed electrode was found to be fast, sensitive and reliable indicated its potential use in measuring the uranly ion concentration in the field.

  16. Escherichia coli Response to Uranyl Exposure at Low pH and Associated Protein Regulations

    PubMed Central

    Khemiri, Arbia; Carrière, Marie; Bremond, Nicolas; Ben Mlouka, Mohamed Amine; Coquet, Laurent; Llorens, Isabelle; Chapon, Virginie; Jouenne, Thierry; Cosette, Pascal; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of uranyl toxicity in bacteria is necessary to optimize strains for bioremediation purposes or for using bacteria as biodetectors for bioavailable uranyl. In this study, after different steps of optimization, Escherichia colicells were exposed to uranyl at low pH to minimize uranyl precipitation and to increase its bioavailability. Bacteria were adapted to mid acidic pH before exposure to 50 or 80 µM uranyl acetate for two hours at pH≈3. To evaluate the impact of uranium, growth in these conditions were compared and the same rates of cells survival were observed in control and uranyl exposed cultures. Additionally, this impact was analyzedby two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis proteomics to discover protein actors specifically present or accumulated in contact with uranium.Exposure to uranium resulted in differential accumulation of proteins associated with oxidative stress and in the accumulation of the NADH/quinone oxidoreductase WrbA. This FMN dependent protein performs obligate two-electron reduction of quinones, and may be involved in cells response to oxidative stress. Interestingly, this WrbA protein presents similarities with the chromate reductase from E. coli, which was shown to reduce uranyl in vitro. PMID:24587082

  17. Escherichia coli response to uranyl exposure at low pH and associated protein regulations.

    PubMed

    Khemiri, Arbia; Carrière, Marie; Bremond, Nicolas; Ben Mlouka, Mohamed Amine; Coquet, Laurent; Llorens, Isabelle; Chapon, Virginie; Jouenne, Thierry; Cosette, Pascal; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of uranyl toxicity in bacteria is necessary to optimize strains for bioremediation purposes or for using bacteria as biodetectors for bioavailable uranyl. In this study, after different steps of optimization, Escherichia coli cells were exposed to uranyl at low pH to minimize uranyl precipitation and to increase its bioavailability. Bacteria were adapted to mid acidic pH before exposure to 50 or 80 µM uranyl acetate for two hours at pH≈3. To evaluate the impact of uranium, growth in these conditions were compared and the same rates of cells survival were observed in control and uranyl exposed cultures. Additionally, this impact was analyzed by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis proteomics to discover protein actors specifically present or accumulated in contact with uranium.Exposure to uranium resulted in differential accumulation of proteins associated with oxidative stress and in the accumulation of the NADH/quinone oxidoreductase WrbA. This FMN dependent protein performs obligate two-electron reduction of quinones, and may be involved in cells response to oxidative stress. Interestingly, this WrbA protein presents similarities with the chromate reductase from E. coli, which was shown to reduce uranyl in vitro.

  18. Enhanced adsorption and recovery of uranyl ions by NikR mutant-displaying yeast.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ebisutani, Kazuki; Iida, Katsuya; Nishitani, Takashi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-04-11

    Uranium is one of the most important metal resources, and the technology for the recovery of uranyl ions (UO22+) from aqueous solutions is required to ensure a semi-permanent supply of uranium. The NikR protein is a Ni2+-dependent transcriptional repressor of the nickel-ion uptake system in Escherichia coli, but its mutant protein (NikRm) is able to selectively bind uranyl ions in the interface of the two monomers. In this study, NikRm protein with ability to adsorb uranyl ions was displayed on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To perform the binding of metal ions in the interface of the two monomers, two metal-binding domains (MBDs) of NikRm were tandemly fused via linker peptides and displayed on the yeast cell surface by fusion with the cell wall-anchoring domain of yeast α-agglutinin. The NikRm-MBD-displaying yeast cells with particular linker lengths showed the enhanced adsorption of uranyl ions in comparison to the control strain. By treating cells with citrate buffer (pH 4.3), the uranyl ions adsorbed on the cell surface were recovered. Our results indicate that the adsorption system by yeast cells displaying tandemly fused MBDs of NikRm is effective for simple and concentrated recovery of uranyl ions, as well as adsorption of uranyl ions.

  19. Selective extraction of uranyl ions using ion-imprinted chelating microspheres.

    PubMed

    Monier, M; Elsayed, Nadia H

    2014-06-01

    In this work, uranyl complex with Schiff base derived from condensation of p-aminostyrene and salicyaldehyde (HASS) was synthesized. Both ligand and uranyl complex were characterized using elemental analysis, FTIR, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra. The complex was then copolymerized with styrene and divinylbenzene cross-linker using potassium persulfate free radical initiator through emulsion polymerization technique. The uranyl ions were then leached out from the cross-linked network to finally produce uranyl ion-imprinted microspheres (U-PASS), which were investigated using SEM and FTIR. The effect of various significant parameters such as pH, temperature, contact times and initial uranyl concentration on the removal of uranyl from aqueous solution was examined and the results indicated that the adsorption was exothermic in nature and the kinetics of adsorption fit with the second-order kinetic model. Also, Langmuir adsorption isotherm exhibited the best fit with the experimental results with maximum adsorption capacity 147.8 mg/g. Moreover, the selectivity studies revealed that the ion-imprinted microspheres resin exhibited an obvious affinity toward the uranyl ions in presence of other interfering metal ions compared to the non-imprinted resin.

  20. Understanding the bonding nature of uranyl ion and functionalized graphene: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qun-Yan; Lan, Jian-Hui; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Wei, Yue-Zhou; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2014-03-20

    Studying the bonding nature of uranyl ion and graphene oxide (GO) is very important for understanding the mechanism of the removal of uranium from radioactive wastewater with GO-based materials. We have optimized 22 complexes between uranyl ion and GO applying density functional theory (DFT) combined with quasi-relativistic small-core pseudopotentials. The studied oxygen-containing functional groups include hydroxyl, carboxyl, amido, and dimethylformamide. It is observed that the distances between uranium atoms and oxygen atoms of GO (U-OG) are shorter in the anionic GO complexes (uranyl/GO(-/2-)) compared to the neutral GO ones (uranyl/GO). The formation of hydrogen bonds in the uranyl/GO(-/2-) complexes can enhance the binding ability of anionic GO toward uranyl ions. Furthermore, the thermodynamic calculations show that the changes of the Gibbs free energies in solution are relatively more negative for complexation reactions concerning the hydroxyl and carboxyl functionalized anionic GO complexes. Therefore, both the geometries and thermodynamic energies indicate that the binding abilities of uranyl ions toward GO modified by hydroxyl and carboxyl groups are much stronger compared to those by amido and dimethylformamide groups. This study can provide insights for designing new nanomaterials that can efficiently remove radionuclides from radioactive wastewater.

  1. Enhanced Adsorption and Recovery of Uranyl Ions by NikR Mutant-Displaying Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ebisutani, Kazuki; Iida, Katsuya; Nishitani, Takashi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Uranium is one of the most important metal resources, and the technology for the recovery of uranyl ions (UO22+) from aqueous solutions is required to ensure a semi-permanent supply of uranium. The NikR protein is a Ni2+-dependent transcriptional repressor of the nickel-ion uptake system in Escherichia coli, but its mutant protein (NikRm) is able to selectively bind uranyl ions in the interface of the two monomers. In this study, NikRm protein with ability to adsorb uranyl ions was displayed on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To perform the binding of metal ions in the interface of the two monomers, two metal-binding domains (MBDs) of NikRm were tandemly fused via linker peptides and displayed on the yeast cell surface by fusion with the cell wall-anchoring domain of yeast α-agglutinin. The NikRm-MBD-displaying yeast cells with particular linker lengths showed the enhanced adsorption of uranyl ions in comparison to the control strain. By treating cells with citrate buffer (pH 4.3), the uranyl ions adsorbed on the cell surface were recovered. Our results indicate that the adsorption system by yeast cells displaying tandemly fused MBDs of NikRm is effective for simple and concentrated recovery of uranyl ions, as well as adsorption of uranyl ions. PMID:24970221

  2. Surface complexation modeling of uranyl adsorption on corrensite from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang-Won; Leckie, J.O.; Siegel, M.D.

    1995-09-01

    Corrensite is the dominant clay mineral in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The surface characteristics of corrensite, a mixed chlorite/smectite clay mineral, have been studied. Zeta potential measurements and titration experiments suggest that the corrensite surface contains a mixture of permanent charge sites on the basal plane and SiOH and AlOH sites with a net pH-dependent charge at the edge of the clay platelets. Triple-layer model parameters were determined by the double extrapolation technique for use in chemical speciation calculations of adsorption reactions using the computer program HYDRAQL. Batch adsorption studies showed that corrensite is an effective adsorbent for uranyl. The pH-dependent adsorption behavior indicates that adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Adsorption studies were also conducted in the presence of competing cations and complexing ligands. The cations did not affect uranyl adsorption in the range studied. This observation lends support to the hypothesis that uranyl adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Uranyl adsorption was significantly hindered by carbonate. It is proposed that the formation of carbonate uranyl complexes inhibits uranyl adsorption and that only the carbonate-free species adsorb to the corrensite surface. The presence of the organic complexing agents EDTA and oxine also inhibits uranyl sorption.

  3. Time-dependent water dynamics in hydrated uranyl fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Miskowiec, Andrew J.; Anderson, Brian B.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Huq, Ashfia; Mamontov, Eugene; Rondinone, Adam; Trowbridge, Lee D.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, uranyl fluoride is a three-layer, hexagonal structure with significant stacking disorder in the c-direction. It supports a range of unsolved ‘thermodynamic’ hydrates with 0–2.5 water molecules per uranium atom, and perhaps more. However, the relationship between water, hydrate crystal structures, and thermodynamic results, collectively representing the chemical pathway through these hydrate structures, has not been sufficiently elucidated. We used high-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering to study the dynamics of water in partially hydrated uranyl fluoride powder over the course of 4 weeks under closed conditions. The spectra are composed of two quasielastic components: one is associated with translational diffusive motion of water that is approximately five to six times slower than bulk water, and the other is a slow (on the order of 2–300 ps), spatially bounded water motion. The translational component represents water diffusing between the weakly bonded layers in the crystal, while the bounded component may represent water trapped in subnanometre ‘pockets’ formed by the space between uranium-centred polymerisation units. Complementary neutron diffraction measurements do not show any significant structural changes, suggesting that a chemical conversion of the material does not occur in the thermodynamically isolated system on this timescale.

  4. Hierarchy of Pyrophosphate-Functionalized Uranyl Peroxide Nanocluster Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dembowski, Mateusz; Colla, Christopher A; Hickam, Sarah; Oliveri, Anna F; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Oliver, Allen G; Casey, William H; Burns, Peter C

    2017-04-10

    Herein, we report a new salt of a pyrophosphate-functionalized uranyl peroxide nanocluster {U24Pp12} (1) exhibiting Oh molecular symmetry both in the solid and solution. Study of the system yielding 1 across a wide range of pH by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and a combination of traditional (31)P and diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) NMR affords unprecedented insight into the amphoteric chemistry of this uranyl peroxide system. Key results include formation of a rare binary {U24}·{U24Pp12} (3) system observed under alkaline conditions, and evidence of acid-promoted decomposition of {U24Pp12} (1) followed by spatial rearrangement and condensation of {U4} building blocks into the {U32Pp16} (2) cluster. Furthermore, (31)P DOSY NMR measurements performed on saturated solutions containing crystalline {U32Pp16} show only trace amounts (∼2% relative abundance) of the intact form of this cluster, suggesting a complex interconversion of {U24Pp12}, {U32Pp16}, and {U4Pp4-x} ions.

  5. Time-dependent water dynamics in hydrated uranyl fluoride

    DOE PAGES

    Miskowiec, Andrew J.; Anderson, Brian B.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; ...

    2015-09-15

    In this study, uranyl fluoride is a three-layer, hexagonal structure with significant stacking disorder in the c-direction. It supports a range of unsolved ‘thermodynamic’ hydrates with 0–2.5 water molecules per uranium atom, and perhaps more. However, the relationship between water, hydrate crystal structures, and thermodynamic results, collectively representing the chemical pathway through these hydrate structures, has not been sufficiently elucidated. We used high-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering to study the dynamics of water in partially hydrated uranyl fluoride powder over the course of 4 weeks under closed conditions. The spectra are composed of two quasielastic components: one is associated with translationalmore » diffusive motion of water that is approximately five to six times slower than bulk water, and the other is a slow (on the order of 2–300 ps), spatially bounded water motion. The translational component represents water diffusing between the weakly bonded layers in the crystal, while the bounded component may represent water trapped in subnanometre ‘pockets’ formed by the space between uranium-centred polymerisation units. Complementary neutron diffraction measurements do not show any significant structural changes, suggesting that a chemical conversion of the material does not occur in the thermodynamically isolated system on this timescale.« less

  6. Association between very long chain fatty acids in the meibomian gland and dry eye resulting from n-3 fatty acid deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hideko; Harauma, Akiko; Takimoto, Mao; Moriguchi, Toru

    2015-06-01

    In our previously study, we reported lower tear volume in with an n-3 fatty acid deficient mice and that the docosahexaenoic acid and total n-3 fatty acid levels in these mice are significantly reduced in the meibomian gland, which secretes an oily tear product. Furthermore, we noted very long chain fatty acids (≥25 carbons) in the meibomian gland. To verify the detailed mechanism of the low tear volume in the n-3 fatty acid-deficient mice, we identified the very long chain fatty acids in the meibomian gland, measured the fatty acid composition in the tear product. Very long chain fatty acids were found to exist as monoesters. In particular, very long chain fatty acids with 25-29 carbons existed for the most part as iso or anteiso branched-chain fatty acids. n-3 fatty acid deficiency was decreased the amount of meibum secretion from meibomian gland without change of fatty acid composition. These results suggest that the n-3 fatty acid deficiency causes the enhancement of evaporation of tear film by reducing oily tear secretion along with the decrease of meibomian gland function.

  7. Probing the nature of chemical bonding in uranyl(VI) complexes with quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Vallet, Valérie; Wahlgren, Ulf; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2012-12-20

    To assess the nature of chemical bonds in uranyl(VI) complexes with Lewis base ligands, such as F(-), Cl(-), OH(-), CO(3)(2-), and O(2)(2-), we have used quantum chemical observables, such as the bond distances, the internal symmetric/asymmetric uranyl stretch frequencies, and the electron density with its topology analyzed using the quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules. This analysis confirms that complex formation induces a weakening of the uranium-axial oxygen bond, reflected by the longer U-O(yl) bond distance and reduced uranyl-stretching frequencies. The strength of the ligand-induced effect increases in the order H(2)O < Cl(-) < F(-) < OH(-) < CO(3)(2-) < O(2)(2-). In-depth analysis reveals that the trend across the series does not always reflect an increasing covalent character of the uranyl-ligand bond. By using a point-charge model for the uranyl tetra-fluoride and tetra-chloride complexes, we show that a significant part of the uranyl bond destabilization arises from purely electrostatic interactions, the remaining part corresponding either to charge-transfer from the negatively charged ligands to the uranyl unit or a covalent interaction. The charge-transfer and the covalent interaction are qualitatively different due to the absence of a charge build up in the uranyl-halide bond region in the latter case. In all the charged complexes, the uranyl-ligand bond is best described as an ionic interaction. However, there are covalent contributions in the very stable peroxide complex and, to some extent, also in the carbonate complex. This study demonstrates that it is possible to describe the nature of chemical bond by observables rather than by ad hoc quantities such as atomic populations or molecular orbitals.

  8. Density Functional Studies on the Complexation and Spectroscopy of Uranyl Ligated with Acetonitrile and Acetone Derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Schoendorff, George E.; Windus, Theresa L.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2009-12-12

    The coordination of nitrile (acetonitrile, propionitrile, and benzonitrile) and carbonyl (formaldehyde, ethanal, and acetone) ligands to the uranyl dication (UO22+) has been examined using density functional theory (DFT) utilizing relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs). Complexes containing up to six ligands have been modeled for all ligands except formaldehyde, for which no minimum could be found. A comparison of relative binding energies indicates that five coordinate complexes are predominant while a six coordinate complex involving propionitrile ligands might be possible. Additionally, the relative binding energy and the weakening of the uranyl bond is related to the size of the ligand and, in general, nitriles bind more strongly to uranyl than carbonyls.

  9. Self-Assembly of Uranyl-Peroxide Nanocapsules in Basic Peroxidic Environments.

    PubMed

    Miró, Pere; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Gil, Adria; Burns, Peter C; Nyman, May; Bo, Carles

    2016-06-13

    A wide range of uranyl-peroxide nanocapsules have been synthesized using very simple reactants in basic media; however, little is known about the process to form these species. We have performed a density functional theory study of the speciation of the uranyl ions under different experimental conditions and explored the formation of dimeric species via a ligand exchange mechanism. We shed some light onto the importance of the excess of peroxide and alkali counterions as a thermodynamic driving force towards the formation of larger uranyl-peroxide species.

  10. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources...

  11. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources...

  12. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33 Section 181.33 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions...

  13. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources...

  14. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources...

  15. Salicylic acid deficiency in NahG transgenic lines and sid2 mutants increases seed yield in the annual plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Maria Elizabeth; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2009-01-01

    Salicylic acid-deficient NahG transgenic lines and sid2 mutants were used to evaluate the role of this compound in the development of the short-lived, annual plant Arabidopsis thaliana, with a particular focus on the interplay between salicylic acid and other phytohormones. Low salicylic acid levels led to increased growth, as well as to smaller abscisic acid levels and reduced damage to PSII (as indicated by F(v)/F(m) ratios) during the reproductive stages in rosette leaves of NahG transgenic lines and sid2 mutants, compared with wild-type plants. Furthermore, salicylic acid deficiency highly influenced seed yield and composition. Seed production increased by 4.4-fold and 3.5-fold in NahG transgenic lines and sid2 mutants, respectively, compared to the wild type. Salicylic acid deficiency also improved seed composition in terms of antioxidant vitamin concentrations, seeds of salicylic acid-deficient plants showing higher levels of alpha- and gamma-tocopherol (vitamin E) and beta-carotene (pro-vitamin A) than seeds of wild-type plants. Seeds of salicylic acid-deficient plants also showed higher nitrogen concentrations than seeds of wild-type plants. It is concluded that (i) the sid2 gene, which encodes for isochorismate synthase, plays a central role in salicylic acid biosynthesis during plant development in A. thaliana, (ii) salicylic acid plays a role in the regulation of growth, senescence, and seed production, (iii) there is a cross-talk between salicylic acid and other phytohormones during plant development, and (iv) the concentrations of antioxidant vitamins in seeds may be influenced by the endogenous levels of salicylic acid in plants.

  16. Silver nanoparticle decorated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheet: a platform for SERS based low-level detection of uranyl ion.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Soumen; Ray, Chaiti; Sarkar, Sougata; Pradhan, Mukul; Negishi, Yuichi; Pal, Tarasankar

    2013-09-11

    Herein, a simple wet-chemical pathway has been demonstrated for the synthesis of silver nanoparticle conjugated reduced graphene oxide nanosheets where dimethylformamide (DMF) is judiciously employed as an efficient reducing agent. Altogether, DMF reduces both silver nitrate (AgNO3) and graphene oxide (GO) in the reaction mixture. Additionally, the presence of polyvinylpyrolidone (PVP) assists the nanophasic growth and homogeneous distribution of the plasmonic nanoparticle Ag(0). Reduction of graphene oxide and the presence of aggregated Ag NPs on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets are confirmed from various spectroscopic techniques. Finally, the composite material has been exploited as an intriguing platform for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) based selective detection of uranyl (UO2(2+)) ion. The limit of detection has been achieved to be as low as 10 nM. Here the normal Raman spectral (NRS) band of uranyl acetate (UAc) at 838 cm(-1) shifts to 714 and 730 cm(-1) as SERS bands for pH 5.0 and 12.0, respectively. This distinguished Raman shift of the symmetric stretching mode for UO2(2+) ion is indicative of pronounced charge transfer (CT) effect. This CT effect even supports the higher sensitivity of the protocol toward UO2(2+) over other tested oxo-ions. It is anticipated that rGO nanosheets furnish a convenient compartment to favor the interaction between Ag NPs and UO2(2+) ion through proximity induced adsorption even at low concentration.

  17. Adsorption of uranyl species on hydroxylated titanium carbide nanosheet: A first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Juan; Lan, Jian-Hui; Wang, Lin; Wu, Qun-Yan; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Bo, Tao; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2016-05-05

    In this work, hydroxylated titanium carbide Ti3C2(OH)2, a representative of the two-dimensional transition metal carbides, has been predicted to be an effective adsorbent for uranyl ions in aqueous environments for the first time using density functional theory simulations. The calculations revealed that the uranyl ion can strongly bind with Ti3C2(OH)2 nanosheet in aqueous solution regardless of the presence of anionic ligands such as OH(-), Cl(-) and NO3(-). The bidentate coordination of uranyl to the surface is energetically more favorable than other adsorption configurations, and the uranyl ion prefers to bind with the deprotonated O adsorption site rather than the protonated one on the hydroxylated surface. During the adsorption process, the chemical adsorption as well as the formation of hydrogen bonds is the dominant factor.

  18. Preorganized Peptide Scaffolds as Mimics of Phosphorylated Proteins Binding Sites with a High Affinity for Uranyl.

    PubMed

    Starck, Matthieu; Sisommay, Nathalie; Laporte, Fanny A; Oros, Stéphane; Lebrun, Colette; Delangle, Pascale

    2015-12-07

    Cyclic peptides with two phosphoserines and two glutamic acids were developed to mimic high-affinity binding sites for uranyl found in proteins such as osteopontin, which is believed to be a privileged target of this ion in vivo. These peptides adopt a β-sheet structure that allows the coordination of the latter amino acid side chains in the equatorial plane of the dioxo uranyl cation. Complementary spectroscopic and analytical methods revealed that these cyclic peptides are efficient uranyl chelating peptides with a large contribution from the phosphorylated residues. The conditional affinity constants were measured by following fluorescence tryptophan quenching and are larger than 10(10) at physiological pH. These compounds are therefore promising models for understanding uranyl chelation by proteins, which is relevant to this actinide ion toxicity.

  19. Steric vs electronic effects in binary uranyl alkoxides: A spectroscopic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, David E.; Wilkerson, Marianne P.; Burns, Carol J.; Scott, Brian L.; Wilkerson, Marianne P.; Paine, Robert T.

    2000-07-01

    Recent advances in the non-aqueous alkoxide chemistry of UO22+ have provided the wherewithal to prepare and isolate a broad range of discrete molecular uranyl entities both as solids and in aprotic solvents in which it is possible to tune the ligand basicity and steric encumbrance. Uranyl complexes have been isolated as monomers, dimers, and higher order oligomers. These complexes afford an opportunity to examine in some detail the relative importance of ligand basicity and steric demand in directing structural preferences (monomer vs. dimer, cis vs. trans isomers) and in determining electronic structural properties and relative bond strengths in the "yl" and equatorial bonds. In the present report the electronic and vibrational spectroscopic data for a series of uranyl alkoxides are correlated with molecular structural data to examine trends in electronic structure and bonding and compare these results with existing models based on the more classical uranyl coordination compounds.

  20. Series of Hydrated Heterometallic Uranyl-Cobalt(II) Coordination Polymers with Aromatic Polycarboxylate Ligands: Formation of U═O-Co Bonding upon Dehydration Process.

    PubMed

    Falaise, Clément; Delille, Jason; Volkringer, Christophe; Vezin, Hervé; Rabu, Pierre; Loiseau, Thierry

    2016-10-06

    Five new heterometallic UO2(2+)-Co(2+) coordination polymers have been obtained by hydrothermal reactions of uranyl nitrate and metallic cobalt with aromatic polycarboxylic acids. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction reveals the formation of four 3D frameworks with the mellitate (noted mel) ligand and one 2D network with the isophthalate (noted iso) ligand. The compounds [(UO2(H2O))2Co(H2O)4(mel)]·4H2O (1), [UO2Co(H2O)4(H2mel)]·2H2O (2), and [(UO2(H2O))2Co(H2O)4(mel)] (4) consist of 3D frameworks built up from the connection of mellitate ligands and mononuclear metallic centers. These three compounds exhibit two types of geometry for the uranyl cation: pentagonal bipyramidal environment for 1 and 4, and hexagonal bipyramidal environment for 2. Using the mellitate ligand, the uranyl dinuclear unit is isolated in the compound [(UO2)2(OH)2(Co(H2O)4)2(mel)]·2H2O (3). Due to their 2D framework and the presence of uncoordinated cobalt(II) cations, the compound [(UO2)(iso)3][Co(H2O)6]·3(H2O) (5) is drastically different than the previous one. The thermal behavior of compounds 1, 2, and 3 has been studied by thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray thermodiffraction, and in situ infrared. By heating, the dehydration of compounds 1 and 2 promotes two structural transitions (1 → 1' and 2 → 2'). The crystal structures of [(UO2(H2O))2Co(H2O)2(mel)] (1') and [(UO2)Co(H2mel)] (2') were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction; each of them presents a heterometallic interaction between uranyl bond and the Co(II) center. Due to the rarely reported coordination environment for the cobalt center in compound 2' (square pyramidal configuration), the magnetic properties and EPR characterizations of the compounds 2 and 2' were also investigated.

  1. Evaluation of lanthanide salts as alternative stains to uranyl acetate.

    PubMed

    Hosogi, Naoki; Nishioka, Hideo; Nakakoshi, Masamichi

    2015-12-01

    Uranyl acetate (UAc) has been generally used not only as a superb staining reagent for ultrathin sections of plastic-embedded biological materials, but also as high-contrast negative stains for biological macromolecules such as particles of protein or virus. However, the use and purchase of radioactive UAc have been restricted. In this study, we determine the performance of ytterbium triacetate, lutetium triacetate, samarium triacetate and gadolinium triacetate as new staining reagents for biological electron microscopy. We observed chemically fixed spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves stained with these reagents. Ultrathin sections were stained with these reagents. Some of them were counterstained with lead citrate. The transmission electron microscopy contrast of spinach organelles was evaluated in sections exposed to the conventional stain and new stains. We show acetate salts of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium and lutetium could be excellent substitutes for UAc for thin section staining and for negative staining. In addition, each reagent showed appreciable negative-staining effects.

  2. Giant regular polyhedra from calixarene carboxylates and uranyl

    PubMed Central

    Pasquale, Sara; Sattin, Sara; Escudero-Adán, Eduardo C.; Martínez-Belmonte, Marta; de Mendoza, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembly of large multi-component systems is a common strategy for the bottom-up construction of discrete, well-defined, nanoscopic-sized cages. Icosahedral or pseudospherical viral capsids, built up from hundreds of identical proteins, constitute typical examples of the complexity attained by biological self-assembly. Chemical versions of the so-called 5 Platonic regular or 13 Archimedean semi-regular polyhedra are usually assembled combining molecular platforms with metals with commensurate coordination spheres. Here we report novel, self-assembled cages, using the conical-shaped carboxylic acid derivatives of calix[4]arene and calix[5]arene as ligands, and the uranyl cation UO22+ as a metallic counterpart, which coordinates with three carboxylates at the equatorial plane, giving rise to hexagonal bipyramidal architectures. As a result, octahedral and icosahedral anionic metallocages of nanoscopic dimensions are formed with an unusually small number of components. PMID:22510690

  3. Polarized x-ray-absorption spectroscopy of the uranyl ion: Comparison of experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, E.A.; Allen, P.G.; Terminello, L.J.; Denecke, M.A.; Reich, T.

    1996-07-01

    The x-ray linear dichroism of the uranyl ion (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) in uranium {ital L}{sub 3}-edge extended x-ray-absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and {ital L}{sub 1}- and {ital L}{sub 3}-edge x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES), has been investigated both by experiment and theory. A striking polarization dependence is observed in the experimental XANES and EXAFS for an oriented single crystal of uranyl acetate dihydrate [UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O], with the x-ray polarization vector aligned either parallel or perpendicular to the bond axis of the linear uranyl cation (O-U-O). Single-crystal results are compared to experimental spectra for a polycrystalline uranyl acetate sample and to calculations using the {ital ab} {ital initio} multiple-scattering (MS) code FEFF 6. Theoretical XANES spectra for uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) reproduce all the features of the measured uranyl acetate spectra. By identifying scattering paths which contribute to individual features in the calculated spectrum, a detailed understanding of the {ital L}{sub 1}-edge XANES is obtained. MS paths within the uranyl cation have a notable influence upon the XANES. The measured {ital L}{sub 3}-edge EXAFS is also influenced by MS, especially when the x-ray polarization is parallel to the uranyl species. These MS contributions are extracted from the total EXAFS and compared to calculations. The best agreement with the isolated MS signal is obtained by using nonoverlapped muffin-tin spheres in the FEFF 6 calculation. This contrasts the {ital L}{sub 1}-edge XANES calculations, in which overlapping was required for the best agreement with experiment. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  4. Synthesis, characterization, and crystal structures of uranyl compounds containing mixed chromium oxidation states

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Daniel K.; Quicksall, Andrew; Pressprich, Laura; Stoffer, Megan; Qiu, Jie; Nuzhdin, Kirill; Wu, Weiqiang; Vyushkova, Mariya; Burns, Peter C.

    2012-07-15

    The mixed-valence chromium uranyl compounds Li{sub 5}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(Cr(V)O{sub 5})(Cr(VI)O{sub 4}){sub 4}](H{sub 2}O){sub 17} (1), (Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}){sub 5}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}(Cr(V)O{sub 5}){sub 2}(Cr(VI)O{sub 4}){sub 8}] (2) and (NH{sub 4}){sub 5}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(Cr(V)O{sub 5})(Cr(VI)O{sub 4}){sub 2}]H{sub 2}O{sub 11} (3) have been synthesized and characterized. Each contains an identical sheet of cation-centered polyhedra. Central to the connectivity of the sheet are four uranyl pentagonal bipyramids that share some of their equatorial vertices, giving a four-membered ring. The Cr(V) cation located near the center of this ring is coordinated by O atoms in a square pyramidal arrangement. The Cr(VI) is tetrahedrally coordinated by O atoms, and these tetrahedra link the four-membered rings of bipyramids. The mixed-valence nature of the sheet was verified by XANES, an EPR spectrum, and bond-valence analysis. Low-valence cations and H{sub 2}O groups reside between the sheets of uranyl and chromate polyhedra, where they provide linkages between adjacent sheets. - Graphical abstract: Three uranyl chromate compounds contain both pentavalent and hexavalent chromium. The unusual topology of the uranyl chromate sheet contains unusual pentavalent chromium in a square pyramidal coordination environment. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first uranyl compounds with mixed Cr valences are reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A sheet of uranyl polyhedra stabilizes pentavalent chromium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uranyl and chromate polyhedra form a topologically novel sheet.

  5. Water versus acetonitrile coordination to uranyl. Effect of chloride ligands.

    PubMed

    Bühl, Michael; Sieffert, Nicolas; Chaumont, Alain; Wipff, Georges

    2012-02-06

    Optimizations at the BLYP and B3LYP levels are reported for the mixed uranyl chloro/water/acetonitrile complexes [UO(2)Cl(n)(H(2)O)(x)(MeCN)(5-n-x)](2-n) (n = 1-3) and [UO(2)Cl(n)(H(2)O)(x)(MeCN)(4-n-x)](2-n) (n = 2-4), in both the gas phase and a polarizable continuum modeling acetonitrile. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations have been performed for [UO(2)Cl(2)(H(2)O)(MeCN)(2)] in the gas phase and in a periodic box of liquid acetonitrile. According to population analyses and dipole moments evaluated from maximally localized Wannier function centers, uranium is less Lewis acidic in the neutral UO(2)Cl(2) than in the UO(2)(2+) moiety. In the gas phase the latter binds acetonitrile ligands more strongly than water, whereas in acetonitrile solution, the trend is reversed due to cooperative polarization effects. In the polarizable continuum the chloro complexes have a slight energetic preference for water over acetonitrile ligands, but several mixed complexes are so close in free energy ΔG that they should exist in equilibrium, in accord with previous interpretations of EXAFS data in solution. The binding strengths of the fifth neutral ligands decrease with increasing chloride content, to the extent that the trichlorides should be formulated as four-coordinate [UO(2)Cl(3)L](-) (L = H(2)O, MeCN). Limitations to their accuracy notwithstanding, density functional calculations can offer insights into the speciation of a complex uranyl system in solution, a key feature in the context of nuclear waste partitioning by complexant molecules.

  6. Assessment of CE-ICP/MS hyphenation for the study of uranyl/protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Thi-Ngoc Suong; Bourgeois, Damien; Basset, Christian; Vidaud, Claude; Hagège, Agnès

    2015-06-01

    Identification of uranyl transport proteins is key to develop efficient detoxification approaches. Therefore, analytical approaches have to be developed to cope with the complexity of biological media and allow the analysis of metal speciation. CE-ICP/MS was used to combine the less-intrusive character and high separation efficiency of CE with the sensitive detection of ICP/MS. The method was based on the incubation of samples with uranyl prior to the separation. Electrophoretic buffers were compared to select a 10 mM Tris to 15 mM NaCl buffer, which enabled analyses at pH 7.4 and limited dissociation. This method was applied to the analysis of a serum. Two main fractions were observed. By comparison with synthetic mixtures of proteins, the first one was attributed to fetuin and in a lesser extent to HSA, and the second one to uranyl unbound to proteins. The analysis showed that fetuin was likely to be the main target of uranyl. CE-ICP/MS was also used to investigate the behavior of the fetuin-uranyl complex, in the presence of carbonate, an abundant complexing agent of uranyl in blood. This method enabled association constants determination, suggesting the occurrence of both FETUA(UO2(2+)) and FETUA(UO2(2+))(CO3(2-)) complexes, depending on the carbonate concentration.

  7. Control of oxo-group functionalization and reduction of the uranyl ion.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Polly L; Pécharman, Anne-Frédérique; Lord, Rianne M; Jones, Guy M; Hollis, Emmalina; Nichol, Gary S; Maron, Laurent; Fang, Jian; Davin, Thomas; Love, Jason B

    2015-04-06

    Uranyl complexes of a large, compartmental N8-macrocycle adopt a rigid, "Pacman" geometry that stabilizes the U(V) oxidation state and promotes chemistry at a single uranyl oxo-group. We present here new and straightforward routes to singly reduced and oxo-silylated uranyl Pacman complexes and propose mechanisms that account for the product formation, and the byproduct distributions that are formed using alternative reagents. Uranyl(VI) Pacman complexes in which one oxo-group is functionalized by a single metal cation are activated toward single-electron reduction. As such, the addition of a second equivalent of a Lewis acidic metal complex such as MgN″2 (N″ = N(SiMe3)2) forms a uranyl(V) complex in which both oxo-groups are Mg functionalized as a result of Mg-N bond homolysis. In contrast, reactions with the less Lewis acidic complex [Zn(N″)Cl] favor the formation of weaker U-O-Zn dative interactions, leading to reductive silylation of the uranyl oxo-group in preference to metalation. Spectroscopic, crystallographic, and computational analysis of these reactions and of oxo-metalated products isolated by other routes have allowed us to propose mechanisms that account for pathways to metalation or silylation of the exo-oxo-group.

  8. Adsorption-induced crystallization of U-rich nanocrystals on nano-Mg(OH)(2) and the aqueous uranyl enrichment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Zhuang, Zanyong; Cao, Qing; Pan, Xiaohong; Guan, Xiong; Lin, Zhang

    2014-01-22

    The mechanism of the interaction between nano-Mg(OH)2 adsorbent and uranyl in water was studied. At trace levels, the uranyl is adsorbed as a monolayer on nano-Mg(OH)2, and occupied a small proportion of the adsorption sites. As the uranyl concentration crosses over a threshold, continuous increase of adsorption capacity takes place. It indicates that, by taking the pre-adsorbed uranyl as the nucleation centers, the additional uranyl crystallizes and forms U-rich nanocrystals well-scattered on the surface of nano-Mg(OH)2. A strategy of inducing fast crystal growth of nano-Mg(OH)2 to micrometer-sized Na2Mg(CO3)2 enables the desorption and enrichment of uranyl. The recycling and reuse of nano-Mg(OH)2 can be achieved simultaneously. The finding in this work provides fundamental understanding of the efficient usage of nano-Mg(OH)2 in practical applications.

  9. Modulation of the Structure and Properties of Uranyl Ion Coordination Polymers Derived from 1,3,5-Benzenetriacetate by Incorporation of Ag(I) or Pb(II).

    PubMed

    Thuéry, Pierre; Harrowfield, Jack

    2016-07-05

    Reaction of uranyl nitrate with 1,3,5-benzenetriacetic acid (H3BTA) in the presence of additional species, either organic bases or their conjugate acids or metal cations, has provided 12 new crystalline complexes, all but one obtained under solvo-hydrothermal conditions. The complexes [C(NH2)3][UO2(BTA)]·H2O (1) and [H2NMe2][UO2(BTA)] (2) crystallize as one- or two-dimensional (1D or 2D) assemblies, respectively, both with uranyl tris-chelation by carboxylate groups and hydrogen-bonded counterions but different ligand conformations. One of the bound carboxylate units is replaced by chelating 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) or 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Me4phen) in the complexes [(UO2)3(BTA)2(phen)3]·4H2O (3) and [(UO2)3(BTA)2(Me4phen)3]·NMP·3H2O (4) (NMP = N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone), which are a 2D network with honeycomb topology and a 1D polymer, respectively. With silver(I) cations, [UO2Ag(BTA)] (5), a three-dimensional (3D) framework in which the ligand assumes various chelating/bridging coordination modes, and the aromatic ring is involved in Ag(I) bonding, is obtained. A series of seven heterometallic complexes results when lead(II) cations and N-chelating molecules are both present. The complexes [UO2Pb(BTA)(NO3)(bipy)] (6) and [UO2Pb2(BTA)2(bipy)2]·3H2O (7), where bipy is 2,2'-bipyridine, crystallize from the one solution, as 1D and 2D assemblies, respectively. The two 1D coordination polymers [UO2Pb(BTA)(HCOO)(phen)] (8 and 9), again obtained from the one synthesis, provide an example of coordination isomerism, with the formate anion bound either to lead(II) or to uranyl cations. Another 2D architecture is found in [(UO2)2Pb2(BTA)2(HBTA)(H2O)2(phen)2]·2H2O (10), which provides a possible example of a Pb-oxo(uranyl) "cation-cation" interaction. While [UO2Pb(BTA)(HCOO)0.5(NO3)0.5(Me2phen)] (11), where Me2phen is 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline, is a 1D assembly close to those in 6 and 8, [UO2Pb2(BTA)2(Me4phen)2] (12), obtained together with

  10. Solvation of uranyl-CMPO complexes in dry vs. humid forms of the [BMI][PF6] ionic liquid. A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Chaumont, Alain; Wipff, Georges

    2006-01-28

    The solvation of the [UO(2)(NO(3))(CMPO)](+) and [UO(2)(NO(3))(2)(CMPO)(2)] complexes (CMPO = octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylmethylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide) is investigated by molecular dynamics in the "dry" and "humid" forms of a room temperature ionic liquid (IL) based on the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMI(+)) cation and the hexafluorophosphate (PF(6)(-)) anion. The simulations reveal the importance of the solvent anions in "dry" conditions and of water molecules in the "humid" solvent. For the [UO(2)(NO(3))(CMPO)](+) complex, the monodentate vs. bidentate coordination modes of CMPO are compared, and the first solvation shell of uranyl is completed by 1-3 PF(6)(-) anions in the dry IL and by 2-3 water molecules in the humid IL, leading to a total coordination number close to 5. The energy analysis shows that interactions with the IL stabilize the [UO(2)(NO(3))(bi)(CMPO)(mono)](+) form (with bidentate nitrate and monodentate CMPO) in the dry IL and the [UO(2)(NO(3))(mono)(CMPO)(mono)](+) form (with monodentate nitrate and CMPO) in the humid IL. The extracted compound characterized by EXAFS is thus proposed to be the [UO(2)(NO(3))(mono)(CMPO)(mono)(H(2)O)(3)](+) species. Furthermore we compare the [UO(2)(NO(3))(2)(CMPO)(2)] complex in its associated and dissociated forms ([UO(2)(NO(3))(mono)(CMPO)(mono)](+) + CMPO + NO(3)(-)) and discuss the results in the context of uranyl extraction by CMPO to ionic liquids.

  11. Hydrothermal Crystallization of Uranyl Coordination Polymers Involving an Imidazolium Dicarboxylate Ligand: Effect of pH on the Nuclearity of Uranyl-Centered Subunits.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicolas P; Falaise, Clément; Volkringer, Christophe; Henry, Natacha; Farger, Pierre; Falk, Camille; Delahaye, Emilie; Rabu, Pierre; Loiseau, Thierry

    2016-09-06

    Four uranyl-bearing coordination polymers (1-4) have been hydrothermally synthesized in the presence of the zwitterionic 1,3-bis(carboxymethyl)imidazolium (= imdc) anion as organic linkers after reaction at 150 °C. At low pH (0.8-3.1), the form 1 ((UO2)2(imdc)2(ox)·3H2O; ox stands for oxalate group) has been identified. Its crystal structure (XRD analysis) consists of the 8-fold-coordinated uranyl centers linked to each other through the imdc ligand together with oxalate species coming from the partial decomposition of the imdc molecule. The resulting structure is based on one-dimensional infinite ribbons intercalated by free water molecules. By adding NaOH solution, a second form 2 is observed for pH 1.9-3.9 but in a mixture with phase 1. The pure phase of 2 is obtained after a hydrothermal treatment at 120 °C. It corresponds to a double-layered network (UO2(imdc)2) composed of 7-fold-coordinated uranyl cations linked via the imdc ligands. In the same pH range, a third phase ((UO2)3O2(H2O)(imdc)·H2O, 3) is formed: it is composed of hexanuclear units of 7-fold- and 8-fold-coordinated uranyl cations, connected via the imdc molecules in a layered assembly. At higher pH, the chain-like solid (UO2)3O(OH)3(imdc)·2H2O (4) is observed and composed of the infinite edge-sharing uranyl-centered pentagonal bipyramidal polyhedra. As a function of pH, uranyl nuclearity increases from discrete 8- or 7-fold uranyl centers (1, 2) to hexanuclear bricks (3) and then infinite chains in 4 (built up from the hexameric fragments found in 3). This observation emphasized the influence of the hydrolysis reaction occurring between uranyl centers. The compounds have been further characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, infrared, and luminescence spectroscopy.

  12. ARRAYS OF BOTTLES OF PLUTONIUM NITRATE SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-09-01

    In October and November of 1981 thirteen approaches-to-critical were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas® reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were sponsored by Rockwell Hanford Operations because of the lack of experimental data on the criticality of arrays of bottles of Pu solution such as might be found in storage and handling at the Purex Facility at Hanford. The results of these experiments were used “to provide benchmark data to validate calculational codes used in criticality safety assessments of [the] plant configurations” (Ref. 1). Data for this evaluation were collected from the published report (Ref. 1), the approach to critical logbook, the experimenter’s logbook, and communication with the primary experimenter, B. Michael Durst. Of the 13 experiments preformed 10 were evaluated. One of the experiments was not evaluated because it had been thrown out by the experimenter, one was not evaluated because it was a repeat of another experiment and the third was not evaluated because it reported the critical number of bottles as being greater than 25. Seven of the thirteen evaluated experiments were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments. A similar experiment using uranyl nitrate was benchmarked as U233-SOL-THERM-014.

  13. Cylodextrin Polymer Nitrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosowski, Bernard; Ruebner, Anja; Statton, Gary; Robitelle, Danielle; Meyers, Curtis

    2000-01-01

    The development of the use of cyclodextrin nitrates as possible components of insensitive, high-energy energetics is outlined over a time period of 12 years. Four different types of cyclodextrin polymers were synthesized, nitrated, and evaluated regarding their potential use for the military and aerospace community. The synthesis of these novel cyclodextrin polymers and different nitration techniques are shown and the potential of these new materials is discussed.

  14. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOEpatents

    Cox, John L.; Hallen, Richard T.; Lilga, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrates present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  15. Effects of aqueous uranyl speciation on the kinetics of microbial uranium reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Belli, Keaton M.; DiChristina, Thomas J.; Van Cappellen, Philippe; ...

    2015-02-16

    The ability to predict the success of the microbial reduction of soluble U(VI) to highly insoluble U(IV) as an in situ bioremediation strategy is complicated by the wide range of geochemical conditions at contaminated sites and the strong influence of aqueous uranyl speciation on the bioavailability and toxicity of U(VI) to metal-reducing bacteria. In order to determine the effects of aqueous uranyl speciation on uranium bioreduction kinetics, incubations and viability assays with Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 were conducted over a range of pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), Ca2+, and Mg2+ concentrations. A speciation-dependent kinetic model was developed to reproducemore » the observed time series of total dissolved uranium concentration over the range of geochemical conditions tested. The kinetic model yielded the highest rate constant for the reduction of uranyl non-carbonate species (i.e., the ‘free’ hydrated uranyl ion, uranyl hydroxides, and other minor uranyl complexes), indicating that they represent the most readily reducible fraction of U(VI) despite being the least abundant uranyl species in solution. In the presence of DIC, Ca2+, and Mg2+ is suppressed during the formation of more bioavailable uranyl non-carbonate species and resulted in slower bioreduction rates. At high concentrations of bioavailable U(VI), however, uranium toxicity to S. putrefaciens inhibited bioreduction, and viability assays confirmed that the concentration of non-carbonate uranyl species best predicts the degree of toxicity. The effect of uranium toxicity was accounted for by incorporating the free ion activity model of metal toxicity into the bioreduction rate law. These results demonstrate that, in the absence of competing terminal electron acceptors, uranium bioreduction kinetics can be predicted over a wide range of geochemical conditions based on the bioavailability and toxicity imparted on U(VI) by solution composition. Finally, these findings also imply

  16. Effects of aqueous uranyl speciation on the kinetics of microbial uranium reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Belli, Keaton M.; DiChristina, Thomas J.; Van Cappellen, Philippe; Taillefert, Martial

    2015-02-16

    The ability to predict the success of the microbial reduction of soluble U(VI) to highly insoluble U(IV) as an in situ bioremediation strategy is complicated by the wide range of geochemical conditions at contaminated sites and the strong influence of aqueous uranyl speciation on the bioavailability and toxicity of U(VI) to metal-reducing bacteria. In order to determine the effects of aqueous uranyl speciation on uranium bioreduction kinetics, incubations and viability assays with Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 were conducted over a range of pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), Ca2+, and Mg2+ concentrations. A speciation-dependent kinetic model was developed to reproduce the observed time series of total dissolved uranium concentration over the range of geochemical conditions tested. The kinetic model yielded the highest rate constant for the reduction of uranyl non-carbonate species (i.e., the ‘free’ hydrated uranyl ion, uranyl hydroxides, and other minor uranyl complexes), indicating that they represent the most readily reducible fraction of U(VI) despite being the least abundant uranyl species in solution. In the presence of DIC, Ca2+, and Mg2+ is suppressed during the formation of more bioavailable uranyl non-carbonate species and resulted in slower bioreduction rates. At high concentrations of bioavailable U(VI), however, uranium toxicity to S. putrefaciens inhibited bioreduction, and viability assays confirmed that the concentration of non-carbonate uranyl species best predicts the degree of toxicity. The effect of uranium toxicity was accounted for by incorporating the free ion activity model of metal toxicity into the bioreduction rate law. These results demonstrate that, in the absence of competing terminal electron acceptors, uranium bioreduction kinetics can be predicted over a wide range of geochemical conditions based on the bioavailability and toxicity imparted on U(VI) by solution composition

  17. I. Electroluminescence from Hydrogen Uranyl Phosphate. I. Indium-Substituted Bismuth Copper Oxide Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, Gunnar Rudolph

    1990-01-01

    Chapter 1. A review of the general aspects of solid electrolytes is presented along with a summary of the electrical and optical properties of hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUO_2PO_4 bullet4H_2O, HUP). A review of impedance spectroscopy, as it relates to the determination of ionic conductivities and dielectric constants of solid electrolytes is presented. The final section covers some aspects of gas plasma display devices. Chapter 2. Electroluminescence (EL) cells have been constructed with the ionically conducting solid HUP as the emissive medium. With ac excitation, both uranyl emission and molecular nitrogen plasma emission are observed, with the latter appearing to excite the former. Similar results were obtained with fully-substituted sodium (NaUP), magnesium (Mg_{0.5}UP), and pyridinium (pyHUP) derivatives of HUP. For all of these solids, the dependence of the EL intensity on sample thickness, ac frequency, and applied voltage has been determined. Impedance measurements permitted acquisition of dielectric constants and ionic conductivities for these solids, both of which decrease in the order HUP > NaUP > Mg_{0.5}UP > pyHUP. A model describing the dependence of EL intensity on cell parameters is presented. Chapter 3. The copper oxide superconductors can be structurally classified into five major families, represented by the compositions, (La,Sr)_2CuO _4, YBa_2Cu_3O_7, Pb_2Sr_2(Y,Ca)Cu_3O_8, (TIO)_{m}Ca_{n-1}Ba_2Cu _{n}O_{2n+2}, and Bi_2Sr_2(Ln_{1-x}Ce _{x})_2Cu_2O_{10+y }. All families are linked by a CuO _2 layer, which is crucial for superconductivity. The structural and chemical aspects of each family is covered with emphasis on the bismuth and thallium systems. The effects of substitution and oxygen annealing are also briefly considered. Chapter 4. The attempted substitution of indium into the rm Bi_2(Ca,Sr)_2CuO _6 and Bi_2(Ca,Sr) _3Cu_2O _8 systems is reported. Previously unreported side products, (Ca,Sr)In_2O _4 and Bi-Ca-Sr-O, viz., produced in the

  18. Can prenatal N-3 fatty acid deficiency be completely reversed after birth? Effects on retinal and brain biochemistry and visual function in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gregory J; Neuringer, Martha; Lin, Don S; Connor, William E

    2005-11-01

    Our previous studies of rhesus monkeys showed that combined prenatal and postnatal n-3 fatty acid deficiency resulted in reduced visual acuity, abnormal retinal function, and low retina and brain docosahexaenoic acid content. We now report effects of n-3 fatty acid deficiency during intrauterine development only. Rhesus infants, born to mothers fed an n-3 fatty acid deficient diet throughout pregnancy, were repleted with a diet high in alpha-linolenic acid from birth to 3 y. Fatty acid composition was determined for plasma and erythrocytes at several time points, for prefrontal cerebral cortex biopsies at 15, 30, 45, and 60 wk, and for cerebral cortex and retina at 3 y. Visual acuity was determined behaviorally at 4, 8, and 12 postnatal weeks, and the electroretinogram was recorded at 3-4 mo. Total n-3 fatty acids were reduced by 70-90% in plasma, erythrocytes, and tissues at birth but recovered to control values within 4 wk in plasma, 8 wk in erythrocytes, and 15 wk in cerebral cortex. At 3 y, fatty acid composition was normal in brain phospholipids, but in the retina DHA recovery was incomplete (84% of controls). Visual acuity thresholds did not differ from those of control infants from mothers fed a high linolenic acid diet. However, the repleted group had lower amplitudes of cone and rod ERG a-waves. These data suggest that restriction of n-3 fatty acid intake during the prenatal period may have long-term effects on retinal fatty acid composition and function.

  19. Physicochemical and physiological properties of cholylsarcosine. A potential replacement detergent for bile acid deficiency states in the small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Lillienau, J; Schteingart, C D; Hofmann, A F

    1992-01-01

    The properties of cholylsarcosine (the synthetic N-acyl conjugate of cholic acid with sarcosine [N-methylglycine]) were examined to determine its suitability as a bile acid replacement agent for conditions of bile acid deficiency in the small intestine, which causes fat malabsorption. Previous studies in rodents had shown that the compound was well transported by the liver and ileum and underwent neither deconjugation nor dehydroxylation during enterohepatic cycling. By 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance, cholylsarcosine was found to exist in dilute aqueous solution as an almost equimolar mixture of two geometric isomers--cis and trans (around the amide bond)--in contrast to cholylglycine, which was present entirely in the trans form. The critical micellization concentration was 11 mmol/liter, similar to that of cholylglycine (10 mmol/liter). By nonaqueous titrimetry, the pKa' of cholylsarcosine was 3.7, only slightly lower than that of cholylglycine (3.9). Cholylsarcosine was poorly soluble below pH 3.7, but highly soluble above pH 4. In vitro, cholylsarcosine behaved as cholylglycine with respect to promoting lipolysis by lipase/colipase. There was little difference between cholylsarcosine and cholylglycine in their solubilization of an equimolar mixture of oleic acid, oleate, and monoolein (designed to simulate digestive products of triglyceride) or in their solubilization of monooleyl-glycerol alone. When a [3H]triolein emulsion with either cholylsarcosine or cholyltaurine was infused intraduodenally in biliary fistula rats, recovery of 3H in lymph was 52 +/- 10% (mean +/- SD) for cholylsarcosine and 52 +/- 11% for cholyltaurine. When perfused into the colon of the anesthetized rabbit, cholylsarcosine (5 mmol/liter) did not influence water absorption or permeability to erythritol, in contrast to chenodeoxycholate, which induced vigorous water secretion and caused erythritol loss. We conclude that cholylsarcosine possesses the physicochemical and physiological

  20. A spectroscopic study of uranyl-cytochrome b5/cytochrome c interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mei-Hui; Liu, Shuang-Quan; Du, Ke-Jie; Nie, Chang-Ming; Lin, Ying-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Uranium is harmful to human health due to its radiation damage and the ability of uranyl ion (UO22+) to interact with various proteins and disturb their biological functions. Cytochrome b5 (cyt b5) is a highly negatively charged heme protein and plays a key role in mediating cytochrome c (cyt c) signaling in apoptosis by forming a dynamic cyt b5-cyt c complex. In previous molecular modeling study in combination with UV-Vis studies, we found that UO22+ is capable of binding to cyt b5 at surface residues, Glu37 and Glu43. In this study, we further investigated the structural consequences of cyt b5 and cyt c, as well as cyt b5-cyt c complex, upon uranyl binding, by fluorescence spectroscopic and circular dichroism techniques. Moreover, we proposed a uranyl binding site for cyt c at surface residues, Glu66 and Glu69, by performing a molecular modeling study. It was shown that uranyl binds to cyt b5 (KD = 10 μM), cyt c (KD = 87 μM), and cyt b5-cyt c complex (KD = 30 μM) with a different affinity, which slightly alters the protein conformation and disturbs the interaction of cyt b5-cyt c complex. Additionally, we investigated the functional consequences of uranyl binding to the protein surface, which decreases the inherent peroxidase activity of cyt c. The information of uranyl-cyt b5/cyt c interactions gained in this study likely provides a clue for the mechanism of uranyl toxicity.

  1. pH dependence of uranyl retention in a quartz/solution system: an XPS study.

    PubMed

    Froideval, A; Del Nero, M; Barillon, R; Hommet, J; Mignot, G

    2003-10-15

    We have investigated the pH dependence of U(VI) retention in quartz/10(-4) M uranyl solution systems, under conditions favoring formation of polynuclear aqueous species and of colloids of amorphous schoepite as U(VI) solubility-limiting phases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to gain insights into the coordination environments of sorbed/precipitated uranyl ions in the centrifuged quartz samples. The U4f XPS spectra made it possible to identify unambiguously the presence of two uranyl components. A high binding energy component, whose relative proportion increases with pH, exhibits the U4f lines characteristic of a reference synthetic metaschoepite. Such a high binding energy component is interpreted as a component having a U(VI) oxide hydrate character, either as polynuclear surface oligomers and/or as amorphous schoepite-like (surface) precipitates. Its pH dependence suggests that a binding of polynuclear species at quartz surfaces and/or a formation of amorphous schoepite-like (surface) precipitates is favored when the proportion of aqueous polynuclear species increases. A second surface component exhibits binding energies for the U4f core levels at values significantly lower (DeltaE(b)=1.2 eV) than for metaschoepite, evidencing uranyl ions in a distinct coordination environment. Such a low binding energy component may be attributed to monomeric uranyl surface complexes on the basis of published EXAFS data. Such a hypothesis is supported by a major contribution of the low binding energy component to the U4f XPS spectra of reference samples for uranyl sorbed on quartz from very acidic 10(-3) M uranyl solutions where UO(2)(2+) ions predominate.

  2. A spectroscopic study of uranyl-cytochrome b5/cytochrome c interactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei-Hui; Liu, Shuang-Quan; Du, Ke-Jie; Nie, Chang-Ming; Lin, Ying-Wu

    2014-01-24

    Uranium is harmful to human health due to its radiation damage and the ability of uranyl ion (UO2(2+)) to interact with various proteins and disturb their biological functions. Cytochrome b5 (cyt b5) is a highly negatively charged heme protein and plays a key role in mediating cytochrome c (cyt c) signaling in apoptosis by forming a dynamic cyt b5-cyt c complex. In previous molecular modeling study in combination with UV-Vis studies, we found that UO2(2+) is capable of binding to cyt b5 at surface residues, Glu37 and Glu43. In this study, we further investigated the structural consequences of cyt b5 and cyt c, as well as cyt b5-cyt c complex, upon uranyl binding, by fluorescence spectroscopic and circular dichroism techniques. Moreover, we proposed a uranyl binding site for cyt c at surface residues, Glu66 and Glu69, by performing a molecular modeling study. It was shown that uranyl binds to cyt b5 (KD=10 μM), cyt c (KD=87 μM), and cyt b5-cyt c complex (KD=30 μM) with a different affinity, which slightly alters the protein conformation and disturbs the interaction of cyt b5-cyt c complex. Additionally, we investigated the functional consequences of uranyl binding to the protein surface, which decreases the inherent peroxidase activity of cyt c. The information of uranyl-cyt b5/cyt c interactions gained in this study likely provides a clue for the mechanism of uranyl toxicity.

  3. Is gluconate a good model for isosaccharinate in uranyl(VI) chemistry? A DFT study.

    PubMed

    Birjkumar, Krishna Hassomal; Bryan, Nicholas D; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas

    2012-05-14

    The geometries, relative energies and spectroscopic properties of a range of α-isosaccharinate complexes of uranyl(VI) are studied computationally using ground state and time-dependent density functional theory. The effect of pH is accommodated by varying the number of water and hydroxide ligands accompanying isosaccharinate in the equatorial plane of the uranyl unit. For 1 : 1 complexes, the calculated uranyl ν(asym) stretching frequency decreases as pH increases, in agreement with previous experimental data. Three different isosaccharinate chelating modes are studied. Their relative energies are found to be pH dependent, although the energetic differences between them are not sufficient to exclude the possibility of multiple speciation. At higher pH, the uranyl-ligand interactions are dominated more by the equatorial OH(-) than by the organic ligands. Calculated electronic excitation energies support experiment in finding the lowest energy transitions to be ligand → metal charge transfer. (13)C NMR chemical shifts are calculated for the coordinated isosaccharinate in the high pH mimics, and show good agreement with experimental data, supporting the experimental conclusion that the five-membered chelate ring is favoured at high pH. The effect of increasing the isosaccharinate concentration is modelled by calculating 1 : 2 and 1 : 3 uranyl : α-isosaccharinate complexes. Comparison of the results of the present study with those from our closely related investigation of uranyl(VI)-D-gluconate complexes (Dalton Transactions 40 (2011) 11248) reveals strong similarities in structure, bonding, coordination geometry and electronic excitations, but also differences in ΔG for key ligand replacement reactions, suggesting that caution should be exercised when using gluconate as a thermodynamic model for isosaccharinate in uranyl(vi) chemistry.

  4. Rates and mechanisms of uranyl oxyhydroxide mineral dissolution

    DOE PAGES

    Reinoso-Maset, Estela; Steefel, Carl I.; Um, Wooyong; ...

    2017-03-18

    Uranyl oxyhydroxide minerals are important weathering products in uranium-contaminated surface and subsurface environments that regulate dissolved uranium concentrations. However, dissolution rates for this class of minerals and associated dissolution mechanisms have not been previously reported for circumneutral pH conditions, particularly for the case of flow through porous media. In this paper, the dissolution rates of K- and Na-compreignacite (K2(UO2)6O4(OH)6·8H2O and Na2(UO2)6O4(OH)6·8H2O respectively) were measured using flow-through columns reacted with two simulated background porewater (BPW) solutions of low and high dissolved total carbonate content (ca. 0.2 and 2.8 mmol L-1). Column materials were characterized before and after reaction with electron microscopy,more » bulk chemistry, and EXAFS to identify structural and chemical changes during dissolution and to obtain insight into molecular-scale processes. The reactive transport code CrunchFlow was used to calculate overall dissolution rates while accounting for fluid transport and changes in mineral volume and reactive surface area and results were compared to steady-state dissolution rate calculations. In low carbonate BPW systems, interlayer K and Na were initially leached from both minerals, and in Na-compreignacite, K and minor divalent cations from the input solution were incorporated into the mineral structure. Results of characterization analyses suggested that after reaction both K- and Na-compreignacite resembled a disordered K-compreignacite with altered surfaces. A 10-fold increase in dissolved carbonate concentration and corresponding increase in pH (from 6.65 to 8.40) resulted in a net removal of 58-87% of total uranium mass from the columns, compared to <1% net loss in low carbonate BPW systems. Steady-state release of dissolved uranium was not observed with high carbonate solutions and post-reaction characterizations indicated a lack of development of leached or altered surfaces

  5. Nitrate Leaching Index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Nitrate Leaching Index is a rapid assessment tool that evaluates nitrate (NO3) leaching potential based on basic soil and climate information. It is the basis for many nutrient management planning efforts, but it has considerable limitations because of : 1) an oversimplification of the processes...

  6. Determination of trace uranyl ion by thermoresponsive porphyrin-terminated polymeric sensor.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiaowen; Wang, Yingjie; Zhang, Shuang; Huang, Li; Wang, Shuao; Hua, Daoben

    2015-01-01

    Uranyl ion exists at trace levels in the environment and can cause severe adverse effects to human health. Therefore, it is desirable to develop analytical methods that can determine the trace uranyl ion in aqueous medium. We report here a new method using a thermo-responsive polymeric fluorescent sensor. Specifically, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)-porphyrin terminated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (TCPP-PNIPAM) was synthesized by controlled free radical polymerization for the detection of uranyl ion. The maximum fluorescence intensity at ~ 658 nm of TCPP-PNIPAM increases with molecular weights and is also closely related to the temperature. The polymeric sensor is sensitive to pH (1.0 ~ 5.0) with a fast responsive time (~ 3 min). Under optimized experimental conditions, the sensor exhibits a stable response for uranyl ion with high selectivity over a concentration range from 1.0 × 10(-3) to 1.0 × 10(-7)mol/L. For the trace uranyl ion (such as 1.0 × 10(-8) or 10(-9)mol/L), the determination could be successfully achieved after concentrating 100 times by centrifugation above 32°C. The properties enable the polymeric sensor to have great potential for environmental application.

  7. Structure and Reactivity of X-ray Amorphous Uranyl Peroxide, U2O7.

    PubMed

    Odoh, Samuel O; Shamblin, Jacob; Colla, Christopher A; Hickam, Sarah; Lobeck, Haylie L; Lopez, Rachel A K; Olds, Travis; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Sigmon, Ginger E; Neuefeind, Joerg; Casey, William H; Lang, Maik; Gagliardi, Laura; Burns, Peter C

    2016-04-04

    Recent accidents resulting in worker injury and radioactive contamination occurred due to pressurization of uranium yellowcake drums produced in the western U.S.A. The drums contained an X-ray amorphous reactive form of uranium oxide that may have contributed to the pressurization. Heating hydrated uranyl peroxides produced during in situ mining can produce an amorphous compound, as shown by X-ray powder diffraction of material from impacted drums. Subsequently, studtite, [(UO2)(O2)(H2O)2](H2O)2, was heated in the laboratory. Its thermal decomposition produced a hygroscopic anhydrous uranyl peroxide that reacts with water to release O2 gas and form metaschoepite, a uranyl-oxide hydrate. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that the most stable U2O7 conformer consists of two bent (UO2)(2+) uranyl ions bridged by a peroxide group bidentate and parallel to each uranyl ion, and a μ2-O atom, resulting in charge neutrality. A pair distribution function from neutron total scattering supports this structural model, as do (1)H- and (17)O-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. The reactivity of U2O7 in water and with water in air is higher than that of other uranium oxides, and this can be both hazardous and potentially advantageous in the nuclear fuel cycle.

  8. Binding constant determination of uranyl-citrate complex by ACE using a multi-injection method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiding; Li, Linnan; Huang, Hexiang; Xu, Linnan; Li, Ze; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-04-01

    The binding constant determination of uranyl with small-molecule ligands such as citric acid could provide fundamental knowledge for a better understanding of the study of uranyl complexation, which is of considerable importance for multiple purposes. In this work, the binding constant of uranyl-citrate complex was determined by ACE. Besides the common single-injection method, a multi-injection method to measure the electrophoretic mobility was also applied. The BGEs used contained HClO4 and NaClO4 , with a pH of 1.98 ± 0.02 and ionic strength of 0.050 mol/L, then citric acid was added to reach different concentrations. The electrophoretic mobilities of the uranyl-citrate complex measured by both of the two methods were consistent, and then the binding constant was calculated by nonlinear fitting assuming that the reaction had a 1:1 stoichiometry and the complex was [(UO2 )(Cit)](-) . The binding constant obtained by the multi-injection method was log K = 9.68 ± 0.07, and that obtained by the single-injection method was log K = 9.73 ± 0.02. The results provided additional knowledge of the uranyl-citrate system, and they demonstrated that compared with other methods, ACE using the multi-injection method could be an efficient, fast, and simple way to determine electrophoretic mobilities and to calculate binding constants.

  9. EXAFS determinations of uranium structures: The uranyl ion complexed with tartaric, citric, and malic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.G.; Shuh, D.K.; Bucher, J.J.

    1996-01-31

    Studies of the coordination chemistry of uranium in aqueous solutions are increasingly important for understanding the behavior of uranium in the environment. Actinide speciation information is essential for assessing and developing long-term strategies addressing problems such as migration in nuclear waste repositories or improvements in the processing of nuclear waste and materials. Relative to the latter, one method for removing uranium contamination from soils involves extraction using a chelating agent such as Tiron, or citrate. These types of extractants are quite efficient at binding the uranyl ion and thus are suitable for removing uranium contamination when it is in the hexavalent uranyl ion form. Martell et al. and Markovits et al. have published a series of articles detailing the complexation of the uranyl ion with tartaric, malic, and citric acids as a function of pH. Using the functional dependencies of potentiometric titration results, they showed that, in the pH range 2-4, the uranyl ion forms a 2:2 dimeric species, (UO{sub 2}){sub 2-} (L){sub 2}, where L = tartrate, malate, or citrate ligands. The authors have reinvestigated the solution structures of the uranyl complexes formed in these systems with the structural technique extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy.

  10. Atomistic simulations of calcium uranyl(VI) carbonate adsorption on calcite and stepped-calcite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Doudou, Slimane; Vaughan, David J; Livens, Francis R; Burton, Neil A

    2012-07-17

    Adsorption of actinyl ions onto mineral surfaces is one of the main mechanisms that control the migration of these ions in environmental systems. Here, we present computational classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the behavior of U(VI) in contact with different calcite surfaces. The calcium-uranyl-carbonate [Ca(2)UO(2)(CO(3))(3)] species is shown to display both inner- and outer-sphere adsorption to the flat {101̅4} and the stepped {314̅8} and {31̅2̅16} planes of calcite. Free energy calculations, using the umbrella sampling method, are employed to simulate adsorption paths of the same uranyl species on the different calcite surfaces under aqueous condition. Outer-sphere adsorption is found to dominate over inner-sphere adsorption because of the high free energy barrier of removing a uranyl-carbonate interaction and replacing it with a new uranyl-surface interaction. An important binding mode is proposed involving a single vicinal water monolayer between the surface and the sorbed complex. From the free energy profiles of the different calcite surfaces, the uranyl complex was also found to adsorb preferentially on the acute-stepped {314̅8} face of calcite, in agreement with experiment.

  11. Characterization and Detection of Uranyl Ion Sorption on Silver Surfaces using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Retterer, Scott T; Wells, Sabrina M; Sepaniak, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The study of the chemical behavior of uranyl species and its rapid detection is of primary environmental and non-proliferation concern. Herein we report on a surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic study of uranyl ion (UO22+) sorption onto the thermally vapor deposited silver particle surface. The ability of vibrational spectroscopy to characterize surface phenomenon and the remarkable sensitivity of the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) have been introduced as an appropriate combination for the surface characterization and detection of UO22+ onto the silver surface. The appearance of symmetric stretching frequency of UO22+ around 700 cm-1 and the disappearance of the 854 cm-1 band is attributed to the development of a chemical bond between silver surface and uranyl species. The effects of temperature, solute-surface interaction time, and pH have been studied using silver modified polypropylene filter (PPF) substrates. Results show that under appropriate conditions, the concentration of uranyl ion as low as 20 ng/mL can be easily detected using the discussed SERS approach without any surface modification of silver nanoparticles. Moreover, an alteranative SERS approach of uranyl detection is demonstrated using nano-lithographically fabricated SERS substrates.

  12. Spectrophotometric determination of uranium through uranyl/azide system

    SciTech Connect

    Carmo, D.R. do; Andrade, J.F. de; Guimaraes, O.M.

    1995-07-01

    An alternative method for the determination of uranium has been established by spectrophotometry. The procedure is based on the products of reaction between uranyl and azide ions (excess). This system furnishes yellowish complexes and the reaction was explored in water-acetonitrile medium (60% v/v), at 311 m. The resulting solution has a good stability and precision of measurements about 0.4% (standard deviation). The system obeys the Beer`s law over concentration range from 5.0 to 40 ppm. The molar absorptivity and Sandell`s sensitivity of the complexes are 9.23 x 10{sup 3} 1 mol{sup -1}cm{sup -1} and 0.0292 {mu}g cm{sup -2}, respectively. Effect of some diverse ions has been studied and several anions and cations do not interfere. The method was tested for a natural sample (uraninite), after different carbonate treatments. The results for uranium were compared with a conventional spectrophotometric (arsenazo) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) methods. The possibility of the simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of uranium(VI) and iron(III) was also verified. This methodology showed good accuracy, precision, selectivity and simplicity.

  13. Assessment of accidental intakes of uranyl acetylacetonate (UAA)

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.; Briant, J.K.

    1993-12-01

    Uranyl acetylacetonate (UAA) is an organic complex of uranium used for military applications as a chemical catalyst in high explosives. It is prepared from depleted uranium metal (in lots of 5 kg to 7 kg) by dissolution in nitric acid, neutralization, and complexation with 2,4-pentanedione; the precipitate is dissolved in benzene and recrystallized, dried, ground, and packaged. About six workers at a small chemical company were exposed over a period of time to UAA powders during routine preparation and packaging of the uranium catalyst. The dissolution characteristics of the inhaled material were unknown and could not be determined from the published scientific literature. A 1.05-g sample of UAA powder was obtained from the responsible regulatory authority for further study to determine its chemical composition, and for dissolution in simulated lung fluid. We found the solubility of UAA to be equivalent to a mixture of 52% ICRP class D and 48% ICRP class W material. The annual limit on intake and the derived air concentration for radiological protection were estimated from this result for airborne exposure to UAA. A recycling biokinetic model was used to estimate both material-specific variations in urinary excretion rates and lung retention with time after accidental intakes. This study provides new information for evaluating future exposures to UAA.

  14. Uranyl adsorption and surface speciation at the imogolite-water interface: Self-consistent spectroscopic and surface complexation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Y.; McBeath, M.; Bargar, J.R.; Joye, J.; Davis, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Macro- and molecular-scale knowledge of uranyl (U(VI)) partitioning reactions with soil/sediment mineral components is important in predicting U(VI) transport processes in the vadose zone and aquifers. In this study, U(VI) reactivity and surface speciation on a poorly crystalline aluminosilicate mineral, synthetic imogolite, were investigated using batch adsorption experiments, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and surface complexation modeling. U(VI) uptake on imogolite surfaces was greatest at pH ???7-8 (I = 0.1 M NaNO3 solution, suspension density = 0.4 g/L [U(VI)]i = 0.01-30 ??M, equilibration with air). Uranyl uptake decreased with increasing sodium nitrate concentration in the range from 0.02 to 0.5 M. XAS analyses show that two U(VI) inner-sphere (bidentate mononuclear coordination on outer-wall aluminol groups) and one outer-sphere surface species are present on the imogolite surface, and the distribution of the surface species is pH dependent. At pH 8.8, bis-carbonato inner-sphere and tris-carbonato outer-sphere surface species are present. At pH 7, bis- and non-carbonato inner-sphere surface species co-exist, and the fraction of bis-carbonato species increases slightly with increasing I (0.1-0.5 M). At pH 5.3, U(VI) non-carbonato bidentate mononuclear surface species predominate (69%). A triple layer surface complexation model was developed with surface species that are consistent with the XAS analyses and macroscopic adsorption data. The proton stoichiometry of surface reactions was determined from both the pH dependence of U(VI) adsorption data in pH regions of surface species predominance and from bond-valence calculations. The bis-carbonato species required a distribution of surface charge between the surface and ?? charge planes in order to be consistent with both the spectroscopic and macroscopic adsorption data. This research indicates that U(VI)-carbonato ternary species on poorly crystalline aluminosilicate mineral surfaces may be important in

  15. Chemical equilibria in the binary and ternary uranyl(VI)-hydroxide-peroxide systems.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2012-03-28

    The composition and equilibrium constants of the complexes formed in the binary U(VI)-hydroxide and the ternary U(VI)-hydroxide-peroxide systems have been studied using potentiometric and spectrophotometric data at 25 °C in a 0.100 M tetramethylammonium nitrate medium. The data for the binary U(VI) hydroxide complexes were in good agreement with previous studies. In the ternary system two complexes were identified, [UO(2)(OH)(O(2))](-) and [(UO(2))(2)(OH)(O(2))(2)](-). Under our experimental conditions the former is predominant over a broad p[H(+)] region from 9.5 to 11.5, while the second is found in significant amounts at p[H(+)] < 10.5. The formation of the ternary peroxide complexes results in a strong increase in the molar absorptivity of the test solutions. The absorption spectrum for [(UO(2))(2)(OH)(O(2))(2)](-) was resolved into two components with peaks at 353 and 308 nm with molar absorptivity of 16200 and 20300 M(-1) cm(-1), respectively, suggesting that the electronic transitions are dipole allowed. The molar absorptivity of [(UO(2))(OH)(O(2))](-) at the same wave lengths are significantly lower, but still about one to two orders of magnitude larger than the values for UO(2)(2+)(aq) and the binary uranyl(VI) hydroxide complexes. It is of interest to note that [(UO(2))(OH)(O(2))](-) might be the building block in cluster compounds such as [UO(2)(OH)(O(2))](60)(60-) studied by Burns et al. (P. C. Burns, K. A. Kubatko, G. Sigmon, B. J. Fryer, J. E. Gagnon, M. R. Antonio and L. Soderholm, Angew. Chem. 2005, 117, 2173-2177). Speciation calculations using the known equilibrium constants for the U(vi) hydroxide and peroxide complexes show that the latter are important in alkaline solutions even at very low total concentrations of peroxide, suggesting that they may be involved when the uranium minerals Studtite and meta-Studtite are formed by α-radiolysis of water. Radiolysis will be much larger in repositories for spent nuclear fuel where hydrogen peroxide

  16. The Chilean nitrate deposits.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ericksen, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    The nitrate deposits in the arid Atacama desert of northern Chile consist of saline-cemented surficial material, apparently formed in and near a playa lake that formerly covered the area. Many features of their distribution and chemical composition are unique. The author believes the principal sources of the saline constituents were the volcanic rocks of late Tertiary and Quaternary age in the Andes and that the nitrate is of organic origin. Possible sources of the nitrate, iodate, perchlorate and chromate are discussed. -J.J.Robertson

  17. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOEpatents

    Cox, J.L.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

    1992-06-02

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrites present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200 C to about 600 C, and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  18. Preliminary experiments on the reduction of the uranyl ion to uraninite by carbonaceous substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breger, Irving A.; Moore, Richard T.

    1955-01-01

    An aqueous solution of uranyl sulfate containing a suspension of subbituminous coal has been heated at 210 C for three days. Examination of the coal at the end of the experiment showed it to contain 31.8 percent uranium recognizable as uraninite by a sharp, strong X-ray diffraction pattern. A similar experiment with degraded spruce wood also led to the formation of uraninite but in lesser quantity and with broader lines in the X-ray diffraction pattern. The ability of coal or wood to reduce the uranyl ion is a critical factor in the correlation of studies of uraniferous coals containing the uranyl ion with studies of uraninite-bearing coalified wood from the Colorado Plateau. Although these results are based an preliminary experiments, they are extremely important geochemically and warrant the development of the series of controlled studies that are proposed.

  19. Iron (II) sorption to mineral surfaces in uranyl and silicate rich media

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler A. Sullens; Cynthia-May S. Gong; Kenneth R. Czerwinski

    2006-01-01

    Abstract - The unique composition of the Yucca Mountain repository site, which contains large concentrations of silicate in an oxidative environment, has required extensive research into compound formation involving uranium and iron(II) under such conditions. The possibility of uranium leakage from within the containment vessels into the near-field ground water, as well as iron leaching from the vessel itself, necessitates study of the individual contributions of these elements for compound formation. By mimicking the known silicate concentration found in surrounding ground water and varying concentrations of both uranyl and iron(II), subsequent precipitation of uranyl silicate phases has shown evidence of iron(II) sorption to the available sites on the mineral surface. The mineralization seems to be driven by the formation of uranyl silicate, in contrast to iron(III)-control of precipitation in the oxidated system. We present characterization of this system using ICP-AES/MS, EDAX, XRD, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction.

  20. Copper(I) and copper(II) uranyl heterometallic hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Weng, Zhehui; Zhang, Zhi-hui; Olds, Travis; Sterniczuk, Marcin; Burns, Peter C

    2014-08-04

    Two copper-uranium heterometallic compounds, [(UO2)3Cu(II)O2(C6NO2)5] (1) and [(UO2)Cu(I)(C6NO2)3] (2), have been synthesized by the reaction of uranyl acetate with copper salts in the presence of isonicotinic acid. Both compounds have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, IR, Raman, and UV-vis spectroscopy. In compound 1, interactions between copper and uranium centers occur and result in a three-dimensional pillar layered structure. Compound 1 is also the first example of a heterometallic uranyl organic framework with a trinuclear U3O18 building block. Compound 2 is the first uranyl organic framework that contains monovalent copper, which arises from the reaction of Cu(II) chloride and is assumed to be due to the oxidation of chloride at low pH.

  1. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study of the uranyl behaviour at the gibbsite/water interface.

    PubMed

    Lectez, Sébastien; Roques, Jérôme; Salanne, Mathieu; Simoni, Eric

    2012-10-21

    The uranyl cation UO(2)(2+) adsorption on the basal face of gibbsite is studied via Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics. In a first step, we study the water sorption on a gibbsite surface. Three different sorption modes are observed and their hydrogen bond patterns are, respectively, characterized. Then we investigate the sorption properties of an uranyl cation, in the presence of water. In order to take into account the protonation state of the (001) gibbsite face, both a neutral (001) face and a locally deprotonated (001) face are modeled. In the first case, three adsorbed uranyl complexes (1 outer sphere and 2 inner spheres) with similar stabilities are identified. In the second case, when the gibbsite face is locally deprotonated, two adsorbed complexes (1 inner sphere and 1 outer one) are characterized. The inner sphere complex appears to be the most strongly linked to the gibbsite face.

  2. Bioactivation of organic nitrates and the mechanism of nitrate tolerance.

    PubMed

    Klemenska, Emila; Beresewicz, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin, are commonly used in the therapy of cardiovascular disease. Long-term therapy with these drugs, however, results in the rapid development of nitrate tolerance, limiting their hemodynamic and anti-ischemic efficacy. In addition, nitrate tolerance is associated with the expression of potentially deleterious modifications such as increased oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and sympathetic activation. In this review we discuss current concepts regarding the mechanisms of organic nitrate bioactivation, nitrate tolerance, and nitrate-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. We also examine how hydralazine may prevent nitrate tolerance and related endothelial dysfunction.

  3. Construction of Uranyl Organic Hybrids by Phosphonate and in Situ Generated Carboxyphosphonate Ligands.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Yang, Weiting; Qu, Ning; Li, Lei-Jiao; Pan, Qing-Jiang; Sun, Zhong-Ming

    2017-02-06

    The hydrothermal reaction of uranyl ions with (5-methyl-1,3-phenylene)diphosphonic acid (H4MPDP) in the presence of additives such as nitric acid, N-bearing species, and heterometal ions yielded five new uranyl organic hybrids: (H3O)[(UO2)5(H2O)4(H3DPB)2(H2DPB)(HDPB)]·2H2O (1), (Hphen)(phen)[(UO2)3(H2DPB)(HDPB)] (2), (H2dipy)[(UO2)3(MPDP)2] (3), Zn(bipy)(UO2)(MPDP) (4), and Co(bipy)(UO2)(MPDP)·H2O (5) (H5DPB = 3,5-diphosphonobenzoic acid; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; dipy = 4,4'-bipyridine; bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) demonstrates that 1 and 2 are 3D frameworks constructed of uranyl centers and carboxyphosphonate DPB ligands; the latter were formed via the in situ oxidation of H4MPDP. In the homometallic uranyl diphosphonate 3, less common UO6 square bipyramids connected by MPDP ligands were incorporated to form the 2D assembly. A further introduction of heterometal ions produced two heterobimetallic uranyl phosphonates 4 and 5. Both of them show layered structures, formed by UO6 square bipyramids linked by MPDP ligands with heterometal-centered polyhedra decorated on the sides of the layers. It is found that the pH and heterometal ions have significant effects on the structures of the complexes. In addition to the syntheses and XRD characterization, the spectroscopic properties of these uranyl complexes were also addressed. To complement the experimental results, density functional theory calculations were carried out on several model complexes that feature a homo- or heterobimetallic molecular skeleton. Geometrical/electronic structures, IR spectra, and electronic absorptions were discussed.

  4. Bonding and charge transfer in nitrogen-donor uranyl complexes: insights from NEXAFS spectra.

    PubMed

    Pemmaraju, C D; Copping, Roy; Wang, Shuao; Janousch, Markus; Teat, Simon J; Tyliszcak, Tolek; Canning, Andrew; Shuh, David K; Prendergast, David

    2014-11-03

    We investigate the electronic structure of three newly synthesized nitrogen-donor uranyl complexes [(UO2)(H2bbp)Cl2], [(UO)2(Hbbp)(Py)Cl], and [(UO2)(bbp)(Py)2] using a combination of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy experiments and simulations. The complexes studied feature derivatives of the tunable tridentate N-donor ligand 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazyl)pyridine (bbp) and exhibit discrete chemical differences in uranyl coordination. The sensitivity of the N K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum to local bonding and charge transfer is exploited to systematically investigate the evolution of structural as well as electronic properties across the three complexes. A thorough interpretation of the measured experimental spectra is achieved via ab initio NEXAFS simulations based on the eXcited electron and Core-Hole (XCH) approach and enables the assignment of spectral features to electronic transitions on specific absorbing sites. We find that ligand-uranyl bonding leads to a signature blue shift in the N K-edge absorption onset, resulting from charge displacement toward the uranyl, while changes in the equatorial coordination shell of the uranyl lead to more subtle modulations in the spectral features. Theoretical simulations show that the flexible local chemistry at the nonbinding imidazole-N sites of the bbp ligand is also reflected in the NEXAFS spectra and highlights potential synthesis strategies to improve selectivity. In particular, we find that interactions of the bbp ligand with solvent molecules can lead to changes in ligand-uranyl binding geometry while also modulating the K-edge absorption. Our results suggest that NEXAFS spectroscopy combined with first-principles interpretation can offer insights into the coordination chemistry of analogous functionalized conjugated ligands.

  5. Revision of the biodistribution of uranyl in serum: is fetuin-A the major protein target?

    PubMed

    Basset, Christian; Averseng, Olivier; Ferron, Pierre-Jean; Richaud, Nicolas; Hagège, Agnès; Pible, Olivier; Vidaud, Claude

    2013-05-20

    Uranium is a natural actinide present as uranyl U(VI) species in aqueous environments. Its toxicity is considered to be chemical rather than radiotoxicological. Whatever the route of entry, uranyl reaches the blood, is partly eliminated via the kidneys, and accumulated in the bones. In serum, its speciation mainly involves carbonate and proteins. Direct identification of labile uranyl-protein complexes is extremely difficult because of the complexity of this matrix. Thus, until now the biodistribution of the metal in serum has not been described, and therefore, little is known about the metal transport mechanisms leading to bone accumulation. A rapid screening method based on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique was used to determine the apparent affinities for U(VI) of the major serum proteins. A first biodistribution of uranyl was obtained by ranking the proteins according to the criteria of both their serum concentrations and affinities for this metal. Despite its moderate concentration in serum, fetuin-A (FETUA) was shown to exhibit an apparent affinity within the 30 nM range and to carry more than 80% of the metal. This protein involved in bone mineralization aroused interest in characterizing the U(VI) and FETUA interaction. Using complementary chromatographic and spectroscopic approaches, we demonstrated that the protein can bind 3 U(VI) at different binding sites exhibiting Kd from ∼30 nM to 10 μM. Some structural modifications and functional properties of FETUA upon uranyl complexation were also controlled. To our knowledge, this article presents the first identification of a uranyl carrier involved in bone metabolism along with the characterization of its metal binding sites.

  6. Uranyl-copper(II) heterometallic oxalate complexes: coordination polymers and frameworks.

    PubMed

    Thuéry, Pierre; Rivière, Eric

    2013-08-07

    Five oxalate complexes containing both uranyl and copper(II) ions and 2,2′-bipyridine (bipy), 2,2′-bipyrimidine (bipym) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) as co-ligands have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and their crystal structures were determined. [UO2Cu(C2O4)(NO3)2(bipy)(H2O)] (1) is a molecular complex in which the two cations are connected by the bis-chelating oxalate. A one-dimensional uranyl oxalate ribbon is formed in [UO2Cu(C2O4)2(bipym)(H2O)] (2), with uranyl ions bound to two chelating anions and to a third, monodentate oxalate which holds the decorating [Cu(bipym)(H2O)]2+ groups. Complex [(UO2)2Cu2(C2O4)2(bipym)3(OH)2]·2NO3 (3) is a two-dimensional assembly in which uranyl oxalate chains are linked to one another by [Cu2(bipym)3]4+ dinuclear units through bridging hydroxide ions. Finally, [UO2Cu(C2O4)2(bipy)] (4) and [UO2Cu(C2O4)2(phen)] (5) display identical three-dimensional arrangements containing uranyl oxalate sheets connected to one another by copper oxalate dinuclear units. The magnetic properties of compounds 2 and 4 have been investigated. Weak inter-chain antiferromagnetic interactions between copper(II) atoms are present in 2, while 4 displays strong oxalate-mediated antiferromagnetic exchange (J = -335 cm(-1)). These complexes are the first uranyl-d block metal oxalate complexes to be reported.

  7. Selectivity in ligand binding to uranyl compounds: A synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, John

    2015-01-21

    The uranyl cation (UO₂²⁺) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. It is anticipated that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials. The focus of this study is to synthesize uranyl complexes incorporating amidinate and guanidinate ligands. Both synthetic and computational methods are used to investigate novel equatorial ligand coordination and how this affects the basicity of the oxo ligands. Such an understanding will later apply to designing ligands incorporating functionalities that can bind uranyl both equatorially and axially for highly selective sequestration. Efficient and durable chromatography supports for lanthanide separation will be generated by (1) identifying robust peptoid-based ligands capable of binding different lanthanides with variable affinities, and (2) developing practical synthetic methods for the attachment of these ligands to Dowex ion exchange resins.

  8. Reactivity of Metal Nitrates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-20

    amines, where nitration would not be a competing process. Acetanilide . Despite the complexity encountered with aniline, the corresponding amide... acetanilide , though having an N-hydrogen atom, was nitrated without tar formation, although this was not accomplished efficiently. After reaction for 24 h... acetanilide , in the absence of a N-hydrogen atom. However, the reverse proved to be the case, for after one day at room temperature nearly 60% of starting

  9. Structural correspondence between uranyl chloride complexes in solution and their stability constants.

    PubMed

    Soderholm, L; Skanthakumar, S; Wilson, Richard E

    2011-05-19

    Pair-distribution functions (PDF)s were obtained from high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS) data on a series of uranyl solutions as a function of chloride ion concentration. Analyses reveal that chloride forms only inner-sphere complexes with the uranyl, replacing inner-sphere waters such that the total uranyl coordination number decreases from 4.7 waters at [Cl(-)] = 0 m to 4.4 (1.7 water and 2.7 Cl(-)) at [Cl(-)] = 6.8 m. Some of the second-coordination sphere waters reorient upon uranyl inner-sphere chloride complexation in order to hydrogen bond with the bound anion. Similar data obtained on a series of solutions maintained at constant ionic strength are used to confirm structural assignments through determining stability constants for the addition of chloride to uranyl and comparison with published values. The stability constants, β(1) = 1.5(10) m(-1), β(2) = 0.8(4) m(-2), and β(3) = 0.4(1) m(-3), obtained in a series of solutions with constant ionic strength of 5.3 m, are in reasonable agreement with previously published results determined by solvent extraction. The agreement of stability constants supports our peak assignments for the PDF and thus our structural model for uranyl chloride complexes in solution. Using coordination numbers and speciation determined here as a function of chloride ion concentration, the monochloro species is found to have four coordinating waters in the uranyl equatorial plane, the dichoro species is found to be an equilibrium of three and two coordinating waters, and the trichloro species has only a single water in the equatorial plane. These values correspond to total average coordination numbers of 5, 4.3, and 4 for the mono-, di-, and trichlorouranyl complexes. From the equilibrium value of the dichloro species, it can be further estimated that ΔG = -0.5 kcal/mol for the conversion of five to four coordinate species. Overall, the HEXS data support the assertion that uranyl chloride correlations do exist and the results are

  10. Molecular Simulation of the Diffusion of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2010-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous uranyl carbonate species were carried out with two different potential models to gain molecular-level insight into the hydration properties of these species and evaluate the ability of the two models to reproduce published ab initio and experimental data. The simulation results were used to estimate the self-diffusion coefficients of uranyl carbonate species that often dominate uranyl speciation in groundwater systems. The first potential model was based on a series of shell models developed by Parker and co-workers (including (DE LEEUW and PARKER, 1998; KERISIT and PARKER, 2004; PAVESE et al., 1996). The second potential model was a rigid-ion model based on the flexible SPC water model (TELEMAN et al., 1987), the uranyl model of Guilbaud and Wipff (GUILBAUD and WIPFF, 1996), and the parameters for the carbonate ion given by Greathouse and co-workers (GREATHOUSE and CYGAN, 2005; GREATHOUSE et al., 2002). Analysis of structural (mean interatomic distances and coordination numbers) and dynamical (water residence times in hydration shell and self-diffusion coefficients) properties showed that, overall, the first potential model performed best when compared to published data, although the only major discrepancy with the second model was a misrepresentation of the configuration adopted by the alkaline-earth uranyl carbonate ions. The diffusion coefficients obtained for the alkaline-earth cations and the uranyl ion were compared with three variants of the Stokes-Einstein (SE) equation and it was found that none of the three SE models were able to reproduce both the absolute values and the overall trend determined from the molecular dynamics simulations. However, as would be expected based on the SE equation, a plot of the diffusion coefficients of the uranyl carbonate complexes as a function of the inverse of the equivalent spherical radius showed a general linear dependence with the two models yielding almost identical gradients

  11. Retention of neptunium in uranyl alteration phases formed during spent fuel corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.C.; Finch, R.J.; Finn, P.A.; Bates, J.K.

    1997-09-01

    Uranyl oxide hydrate phases are known to form during contact of oxide spent nuclear fuel with water under oxidizing conditions; however, less is known about the fate of fission and neutron capture products during this alteration. We describe, for the first time, evidence that neptunium can become incorporated into the uranyl secondary phase, dehydrated schoepite (UO{sub 3}.8H{sub 2}O). Based on the long term durability of natural schoepite, the retention of neptunium in this alteration phase may be significant during spent fuel corrosion in an unsaturated geologic repository.

  12. Heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation of methanol over uranyl-anchored nanoporous MCM-41 and MCM-48.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Vidya; Kamble, Valmik S; Gupta, Narendra M; Selvam, Parasuraman

    2006-06-01

    The vapor-phase photodegradation of methanol to carbon dioxide was carried out over uranyl-anchored nanoporous MCM-41 and MCM-48 hosts (designated as UO2(2+)/MCM-41 and UO2(2+)/MCM-48, respectively) under simulated light and ambient conditions. Preliminary results indicate that the photoactivity of the latter is considerably decreased as compared to the former due to the presence of a smaller fraction of photoactive uranyl (UO2(2+)) ions in UO2(2+)/MCM-48.

  13. Removal of uranyl ions by p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arene acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu (Hoştuc), Ioana-Carmen; Petru, Filip; Humelnicu, Ionel; Mateescu, Marina; Militaru, Ecaterina; Humelnicu, Doina

    2014-10-01

    Radioactive pollution is a significant threat for the people’s health. Therefore highly effective radioactive decontamination methods are required. Ion exchange, biotechnologies and phytoremediation in constructed wetlands have been used as radioactive decontamination technologies for uranium contaminated soil and water remediation. Recently, beside those classical methods the calix[n]arenic derivatives’ utilization as radioactive decontaminators has jogged attention. The present work aims to present the preliminary research results of uranyl ion sorption studies on the p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arenic acid. The effect of temperature, contact time, sorbent amount and uranyl concentration variation on sorption efficiency was investigated. Isotherm models revealed that the sorption process fit better Langmuir isotherm.

  14. Thermochemical nitrate reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1992-09-01

    A series of preliminary experiments was conducted directed at thermochemically converting nitrate to nitrogen and water. Nitrates are a major constituent of the waste stored in the underground tanks on the Hanford Site, and the characteristics and effects of nitrate compounds on stabilization techniques must be considered before permanent disposal operations begin. For the thermochemical reduction experiments, six reducing agents (ammonia, formate, urea, glucose, methane, and hydrogen) were mixed separately with {approximately}3 wt% NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} solutions in a buffered aqueous solution at high pH (13); ammonia and formate were also mixed at low pH (4). Reactions were conducted in an aqueous solution in a batch reactor at temperatures of 200{degrees}C to 350{degrees}C and pressures of 600 to 2800 psig. Both gas and liquid samples were analyzed. The specific components analyzed were nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Results of experimental runs showed the following order of nitrate reduction of the six reducing agents in basic solution: formate > glucose > urea > hydrogen > ammonia {approx} methane. Airnmonia was more effective under acidic conditions than basic conditions. Formate was also effective under acidic conditions. A more thorough, fundamental study appears warranted to provide additional data on the mechanism of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, an expanded data base and engineering feasibility study could be used to evaluate conversion conditions for promising reducing agents in more detail and identify new reducing agents with improved performance characteristics.

  15. Surface reactions kinetics between nanocrystalline magnetite and uranyl.

    PubMed

    Missana, Tiziana; Maffiotte, César; García-Gutiérrez, Miguel

    2003-05-01

    Magnetite is the most important end member of iron corrosion products under reducing environment, which is the condition expected in a deep geological high level radioactive waste disposal. Nanocrystalline magnetite was synthesized in the laboratory and its physicochemical properties were analyzed in detail. The kinetics of the adsorption of U(VI) and the kinetics of the actinide reduction to a lower oxidation state, in presence of the oxide, were studied by means of batch sorption techniques and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The results showed that the uranium sorption and reduction processes on the magnetite surface have very fast kinetics (hours), the reduction process being triggered by sorption. XPS measurements showed that the speciation of uranium at the surface does not show significant changes with time (from 1 day to 3 months), as well as the quantity of uranium detected at the surface. The surface speciation depended on the initial pH of the contact solution. Considering that the Eh of equilibrium between magnetite and the solution, under our experimental conditions, is slightly positive (50-100 mV), the uranium reduction would also be thermodynamically possible within the liquid phase. However, the kinetics of reduction in the liquid occur at a much slower rate which, in turn, has to depend on the attainment of the magnetite/solution equilibrium. The decrease of uranium in solution, observed after the uranyl adsorption stage, and particularly at acidic pH, is most probably due to the precipitation of U(IV) formed in the solution.

  16. Syntheses and crystal structures of two novel alkaline uranyl chromates A{sub 2}(UO{sub 2})(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2} (A=Rb, Cs) with bidentate coordination mode of uranyl ions by chromate anions

    SciTech Connect

    Siidra, Oleg I.

    2012-03-15

    Single crystals of Cs{sub 2}(UO{sub 2})(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2} and Rb{sub 2}(UO{sub 2})(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2} were prepared by solid state reactions. The structures are based upon the [(UO{sub 2})(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sup 2-} chains. Within the chains, UrO{sub 5} pentagonal bipyramids (Ur=uranyl) form Ur{sub 2}O{sub 8} dimers, which are linked via CrO{sub 4} tetrahedra into one-dimensional chains. The CrO{sub 4} tetrahedra coordinate uranyl ions in both mono- and bidentate fashion, which is unusual for uranyl chromates. The bidentate coordination has a strong influence upon geometrical parameters of both U and Cr coordination polyhedra. The conformation of the chains in 1 and 2 is different due to the different size of the Cs{sup +} and Rb{sup +} cations. - Graphical abstract: Uranyl chromate chain with monodentate and bidentate coordination mode of uranyl cations by CrO{sub 4} tetrahedra in Cs{sub 2}(UO{sub 2})(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single crystals of novel uranyl chromates were prepared by solid state reactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CrO{sub 4} tetrahedra coordinate uranyl ions in both mono- and bidentate fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The bidentate coordination has a strong influence upon geometrical parameters.

  17. Experimental and theoretical approaches to redox innocence of ligands in uranyl complexes: what is formal oxidation state of uranium in reductant of uranyl(VI)?

    PubMed

    Takao, Koichiro; Tsushima, Satoru; Ogura, Toshinari; Tsubomura, Taro; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2014-06-02

    Redox behavior of [UO2(gha)DMSO](-)/UO2(gha)DMSO couple (gha = glyoxal bis(2-hydroxanil)ate, DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide) in DMSO solution was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and UV-vis-NIR spectroelectrochemical technique, as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations. [UO2(gha)DMSO](-) was found to be formed via one-electron reduction of UO2(gha)DMSO without any successive reactions. The observed absorption spectrum of [UO2(gha)DMSO](-), however, has clearly different characteristics from those of uranyl(V) complexes reported so far. Detailed analysis of molecular orbitals and spin density of the redox couple showed that the gha(2-) ligand in UO2(gha)DMSO is reduced to gha(•3-) to give [UO2(gha)DMSO](-) and the formal oxidation state of U remains unchanged from +6. In contrast, the additional DFT calculations confirmed that the redox reaction certainly occurs at the U center in other uranyl(V/VI) redox couples we found previously. The noninnocence of the Schiff base ligand in the [UO2(gha)DMSO](-)/UO2(gha)DMSO redox couple is due to the lower energy level of LUMO in this ligand relative to those of U 5f orbitals. This is the first example of the noninnocent ligand system in the coordination chemistry of uranyl(VI).

  18. Changes in transepidermal water loss and the composition of epidermal lecithin after applications of pure fatty acid triglycerides to skin of essential fatty acid-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Hartop, P J; Prottey, C

    1976-09-01

    The importance of various unsaturated fatty acid triglycerides to the repair of faulty skin barrier function was studied in essential fatty acid-deficient rats. Following cutaneous application of the pure triglycerides for up to 5 days, the hitherto high rate of transepidermal water loss, characteristic of essential fatty acid deficiency in rats, was reduced by the triglycerides of linoleic and gamma-linolenic acids. Incorporation of the applied fatty acids into the lecithin of the epidermis accompanied these changes in water loss, indicating that cutaneously applied triglycerides may be metabolized by the skin and incorporated into complex lipids. Other fatty acid triglycerides, including alpha-linolenic, dihomo-gamma-linolenic, arachidonic and omega-7-heneicosatrienoic acid, did not lower the rate of transepidermal water loss, although all were incorporated into epidermal structural lipids. The non-essential oleic acid also had no effect upon the rate of transepidermal water loss. These data suggest that of the two main essential fatty acids that occur in skin, linoleic acid and arachidonic acid, the former specifically plays an important role in regulating barrier function whereas the later may have a separate function, such as serving as a precursor of prostaglandins.

  19. Effects of dietary sialic acid in n-3 fatty acid-deficient dams during pregnancy and lactation on the learning abilities of their pups after weaning.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Seiichi; Honma, Hiroyuki; Saitoh, Yoichi; Yasuda, Yuki; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2013-01-01

    The effects of dietary sialic acid in dams on the learning abilities of their pups after weaning were investigated using rats deficient in n-3 fatty acids. Nine-week-old female Wistar rats were fed an n-3 fatty acid-deficient diet for 3 wk and were mated at 12 wk of age. During pregnancy and lactation, the female rats were fed the n-3 fatty acid-deficient diet, and were given water or water containing 1% N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) ad libitum. After weaning, the learning abilities of the pups were evaluated using a novel object recognition test. The recognition index of pups nursed by dams fed on water containing 1% NANA (NANA-intake dams) was significantly higher than that of pups nursed by dams fed only on water (NANA non-intake dams). There were no significant differences in the total sialic acid or docosahexaenoic acid contents in the cerebral cortex or hippocampus of pups nursed by dams fed on either type of water. The total dimethylacetal (DMA, from plasmalogen) level in the cerebral cortex of pups nursed by NANA-intake dams was significantly higher than that of pups nursed by NANA non-intake dams. These results suggest that dietary sialic acid in dams during pregnancy and lactation might be beneficial for the learning abilities of pups after weaning, which may be related to the plasmalogen level in the brain of pups.

  20. Bioremediation of nitrated organics

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, D.A.; Lappin-Scott, H.; Jass, J.

    1994-12-31

    In the manufacture of nitrated aromatic and heterocyclic compounds intermediates are produced as well as the final products, e.g. TNT (trinitrotoluene), and RDX (cyclotri-methylene trinitramine). The red water produced is a dilute effluent containing TNT and other nitrated intermediates. Many of the intermediates are also to be found in contaminated land areas as well as the primary manufacturing products as contaminants in ground adjacent to production and storage areas. Two intermediates included as by-products are p-nitrophenol and resorcinol; both are hydroxylated aromatics and one (the former) is also nitrated. If these rings can be hydroxylated and oxidized by pure or mixed microbial cultures then the notion of using microbes for the detoxification of a wide range of nitrated aromatics and heterocyclics is possible. It is proposed in the study to accelerate this degradative process in the first instance for p-nitrophenol and resorcinol, and secondly for TNT and RDX. The use of microbes to degrade nitroaromatic compounds such as nitrobenzenes, and mono-nitro phenols, have been described. In order to determine how aromatic degrading bacteria can also degrade substituted and nitrated aromatics several pure and mixed cultures have been utilized to demonstrate enzyme adaptation.

  1. Re-Evaluating Neptunium in Uranyl Phases Derived from Corroded Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, Jeffrey A.; Finch, Robert J.; Kropf, A. Jeremy; Cunnane, James C.

    2004-11-15

    Interest in mechanisms that may control radioelement release from corroded commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) has been heightened by the selection of the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as the repository for high-level nuclear waste in the United States. Neptunium is an important radionuclide in repository models owing to its relatively long half-life and its high aqueous mobility as neptunyl [Np(V)O{sub 2}{sup +}]. The possibility of neptunium sequestration into uranyl alteration phases produced by corroding CSNF would suggest a process for lowering neptunium concentration and subsequent migration from a geologic repository. However, there remains little experimental evidence that uranyl compounds will, in fact, serve as long-term host phases for the retention of neptunium under conditions expected in a deep geologic repository. To directly explore this possibility, we examined specimens of uranyl alteration phases derived from humid-air-corroded CSNF by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to better determine neptunium uptake in these phases. Although neptunium fluorescence was readily observed from as-received CSNF, it was not observed from the uranyl alteration rind. We establish upper limits for neptunium incorporation into CSNF alteration phases that are significantly below previously reported concentrations obtained by using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We attribute the discrepancy to a plural-scattering event that creates a spurious EELS peak at the neptunium-M{sub V} energy.

  2. Re-evaluating neptunium in uranyl phases derived from corroded spent fuel.

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, J. A.; Finch, R. J.; Kropf, A. J.; Cunnane, J. C.; Chemical Engineering

    2004-11-01

    Interest in mechanisms that may control radioelement release from corroded commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) has been heightened by the selection of the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as the repository for high-level nuclear waste in the United States. Neptunium is an important radionuclide in repository models owing to its relatively long half-life and its high aqueous mobility as neptunyl [Np(V)O+2]. The possibility of neptunium sequestration into uranyl alteration phases produced by corroding CSNF would suggest-a process for lowering neptunium concentration and subsequent migration from a geologic repository. However, there remains little experimental evidence that uranyl compounds will, in fact, serve as long-term host phases for the retention of neptunium under conditions expected in a deep geologic repository. To directly explore this possibility, we examined specimens of uranyl alteration phases derived from humid-air-corroded CSNF by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to better determine neptunium uptake in these phases. Although neptunium fluorescence was readily observed from as-received CSNF, it was not observed from the uranyl alteration rind. We establish upper limits for neptunium incorporation into CSNF alteration phases that are significantly below previously reported concentrations obtained by using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We attribute the discrepancy to a plural-scattering event that creates a spurious EELS peak at the neptunium-MV energy.

  3. Cyclic Phosphopeptides to Rationalize the Role of Phosphoamino Acids in Uranyl Binding to Biological Targets.

    PubMed

    Starck, Matthieu; Laporte, Fanny A; Oros, Stephane; Sisommay, Nathalie; Gathu, Vicky; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Creff, Gaëlle; Roques, Jérôme; Den Auwer, Christophe; Lebrun, Colette; Delangle, Pascale

    2017-02-05

    The specific molecular interactions responsible for uranium toxicity are not yet understood. The uranyl binding sites in high-affinity target proteins have not been identified yet and the involvement of phosphoamino acids is still an important question. Short cyclic peptide sequences, with three glutamic acids and one phosphoamino acid, are used as simple models to mimic metal binding sites in phosphoproteins and to help understand the mechanisms involved in uranium toxicity. A combination of peptide design and synthesis, analytical chemistry, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and DFT calculations demonstrates the involvement of the phosphate group in the uranyl coordination sphere together with the three carboxylates of the glutamate moieties. The affinity constants measured with a reliable analytical competitive approach at physiological pH are significantly enhanced owing to the presence of the phosphorous moiety. These findings corroborate the importance of phosphoamino acids in uranyl binding in proteins and the relevance of considering phosphoproteins as potential uranyl targets in vivo.

  4. Inhibition Mechanism of Uranyl Reduction Induced by Calcium-Carbonato Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. E.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Uranium mobility in the subsurface is controlled by the redox state and chemical speciation, generally as minimally soluble U(IV) or soluble U(VI) species. In the presence of even low carbonate concentrations the uranyl-carbonato complex quickly becomes the dominant aqueous species; they are, in fact, the primary aqueous species in most groundwaters. Calcium in groundwater leads to ternary calcium-uranyl-carbonato complexes that limit the rate and extent of U(VI) reduction. This decrease in reduction rate has been attributed to surface processes, thermodynamic limitations, and kinetic factors. Here we present a new mechanism for the inhibition of ferrous iron reduction of uranyl-carbonato species in the presence of calcium. A series of experiments under variable Ca conditions were preformed to determine the role of Ca in the inhibition of U reduction by ferrous iron. Calcium ions in the Ca2UO2(CO3)3 complex sterically prevent the interaction of Fe(II) with U(VI), in turn preventing the Fe(II)-U(VI) distance required for electron transfer. The mechanism described here helps to predict U redox transformations in suboxic environments and clarifies the role of Ca in the fate and mobility of U. Electrochemical measurements further show the decrease of the U(VI) to U(V) redox potential of the uranyl-carbonato complex with decreasing pH suggesting the first electron transfer is critical determining the rate and extent of uranium reduction.

  5. Potential New Ligand Systems for Binding Uranyl Ions in Seawater Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, John

    2014-12-13

    Work began this quarter on a new project involving a combined computational and biosynthetic approach to selective recognition of uranyl ion in aqueous solution. This project exploits the results of computational studies to discover new ligand classes. Synthetic studies will follow to generate target systems for uranyl binding and determination of binding constants. The process will be iterative, with results from computation informing synthesis, and vice versa. The theme of the ligand classes to be examined initially will be biologically based. New phosphonate-containing α-amino acid N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) monomers were used recently to prepare well-defined phosphonate-containing poly-peptides and block copolypeptides. Our first approach is to utilize these phosphate- and phosphonate-containing NCAs for the coordination of uranyl. The work includes the laboratory-scale preparation of a series of NCAs and the full thermodynamic and spectroscopic characterization of the resulting uranyl complexes. We are also evaluating the sequestering activity in different physiological and environmental conditions of these copolymers as well as their biodegradability.

  6. Identification of Uranyl Minerals Using Oxygen K-Edge X Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Jesse D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Resch, Charles T.; Smith, Steven C.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Duffin, Andrew M.

    2016-03-01

    Uranium analysis is consistently needed throughout the fuel cycle, from mining to fuel fabrication to environmental monitoring. Although most of the world’s uranium is immobilized as pitchblende or uraninite, there exists a plethora of secondary uranium minerals, nearly all of which contain the uranyl cation. Analysis of uranyl compounds can provide clues as to a sample’s facility of origin and chemical history. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one technique that could enhance our ability to identify uranium minerals. Although there is limited chemical information to be gained from the uranium X-ray absorption edges, recent studies have successfully used ligand NEXAFS to study the physical chemistry of various uranium compounds. This study extends the use of ligand NEXAFS to analyze a suite of uranium minerals. We find that major classes of uranyl compounds (carbonate, oxyhydroxide, silicate, and phosphate) exhibit characteristic lineshapes in the oxygen K-edge absorption spectra. As a result, this work establishes a library of reference spectra that can be used to classify unknown uranyl minerals.

  7. SEPARATION OF URANYL AND RUTHENIUM VALUES BY THE TRIBUTYL PHOSPHATE EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, A.S.

    1961-05-01

    A process is given for separating uranyl values from ruthenium values contained in an aqueous 3 to 4 M nitric acid solution. After the addition of hydrogen peroxide to obtain a concentration of 0.3 M, the uranium is selectively extracted with kerosene-diluted tributyl phosphate.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of uranyl adsorption and structure on the basal surface of muscovite

    SciTech Connect

    Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Cygan, Randall T.

    2014-02-05

    Anthropogenic activities have led to an increased concentration of uranium on the Earth’s surface and potentially in the subsurface with the development of nuclear waste repositories. Uranium is soluble in groundwater, and its mobility is strongly affected by the presence of clay minerals in soils and in subsurface sediments. We use molecular dynamics simulations to probe the adsorption of aqueous uranyl (UO22+) ions onto the basal surface of muscovite, a suitable proxy for typically ultrafine-grained clay phases. Model systems include the competitive adsorption between potassium counterions and aqueous ions (0.1 M and 1.0 M UO2Cl2 , 0.1 M NaCl). We find that for systems with potassium and uranyl ions present, potassium ions dominate the adsorption phenomenon. Potassium ions adsorb entirely as inner-sphere complexes associated with the ditrigonal cavity of the basal surface. Uranyl ions adsorb in two configurations when it is the only ion species present, and in a single configuration in the presence of potassium. Finally, the majority of adsorbed uranyl ions are tilted less than 45° relative to the muscovite surface, and are associated with the Si4Al2 rings near aluminum substitution sites.

  9. Oolong tea extract as a substitute for uranyl acetate in staining of ultrathin sections.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Adachi, A; Sasaki, Y; Ghazizadeh, M

    2008-01-01

    In conventional transmission electron microscopy, uranyl acetate staining is used to enhance the cellular components. However, uranyl acetate is considered a radioactive material that is very toxic if ingested or inhaled and subject to restrictions in many countries. In an attempt to introduce a substitute for uranyl acetate, we evaluated oolong tea extract (OTE) for staining of ultrathin sections. Tissue sections from normal rat liver representing an ideal model organ were processed according to a routine electron microscopic fixation and embedding procedure. Serial ultrathin sections were cut and processed with either routine double electron staining or 0.2% OTE staining for 30-40 min at room temperature followed by lead citrate staining (OTE staining method). Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that all sub-cellular structures in hepatocytes were clearly visible with OTE staining and the quality of staining was highly compatible with those of routine double staining methods. It is suggested that OTE could be used as a non-radioactive and hazard-free substitute for uranyl acetate in transmission electron microscopy staining.

  10. Change in the fluorescence of uranyl ions during the hydrolytic reduction of xenon difluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, B.P.; Afonichev, D.D.; Khamidullina, L.A.; Kuleshov, S.P.

    1987-11-01

    The hydrolytic reduction of xenon difluoride in solutions containing uranyl ions has been studied using iodometric titration and recording of the photoluminescence of UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/. It was found that uranyl ions increase the XeF/sub 2/ hydrolysis rate. A theoretical relationship was found between the uranyl ion photolumuinescence intensity and the F- concentration. It was assumed first that under slow ligand exchange conditions, when the radiative deactivation rate exceeds the ligand substitution rate, the complexes (UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/)aq, UO/sub 2/F/sup +/, and UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ can be considered as independent emitters, and second that instead of the relative luminescence quantum yields the lifetime of the uranyl complexes in the electronically excited state can be used. This relationship is in good agreement with the experimental increase in the photoluminescence intensity of UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ during the hydrolysis of XeF/sub 2/. There was not detectable spectroscopic evidence for the formation of the complex (UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ x XeF/sub 2/). The responses of a fluorine-selective electrode were found to give incorrect results when XeF/sub 2/ was present in solution.

  11. Enrichment and Location of Uranium Precipitates from Uranyl Carbonate Addition to Tank 43

    SciTech Connect

    d'Entremont, P.D.

    2001-06-04

    In order to safety restart the 2H evaporator, plans are to add depleted uranium (DU) as uranyl carbonate to Tank 43 to lower the 235U enrichment in the supernate. This memo examines the enrichment and location of uranium precipitates formed in Tank 43. An assessment of the risks associated with precipitating uranium shows that there is no criticality concern during this operation.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of uranyl adsorption and structure on the basal surface of muscovite

    DOE PAGES

    Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Cygan, Randall T.

    2014-02-05

    Anthropogenic activities have led to an increased concentration of uranium on the Earth’s surface and potentially in the subsurface with the development of nuclear waste repositories. Uranium is soluble in groundwater, and its mobility is strongly affected by the presence of clay minerals in soils and in subsurface sediments. We use molecular dynamics simulations to probe the adsorption of aqueous uranyl (UO22+) ions onto the basal surface of muscovite, a suitable proxy for typically ultrafine-grained clay phases. Model systems include the competitive adsorption between potassium counterions and aqueous ions (0.1 M and 1.0 M UO2Cl2 , 0.1 M NaCl). Wemore » find that for systems with potassium and uranyl ions present, potassium ions dominate the adsorption phenomenon. Potassium ions adsorb entirely as inner-sphere complexes associated with the ditrigonal cavity of the basal surface. Uranyl ions adsorb in two configurations when it is the only ion species present, and in a single configuration in the presence of potassium. Finally, the majority of adsorbed uranyl ions are tilted less than 45° relative to the muscovite surface, and are associated with the Si4Al2 rings near aluminum substitution sites.« less

  13. Influence of dissolved sodium and cesium on uranyl oxide hydrate solubility.

    PubMed

    Giammar, Daniel E; Hering, Janet G

    2004-01-01

    The solubility of uranium-containing minerals can control the mobility of uranium in contaminated soil and groundwater. The identity and solubility of these minerals are strongly influenced by solution composition. The influence of dissolved sodium and cesium on the solubility of uranyl oxide hydrates has been investigated in a series of batch experiments conducted with synthetic metaschoepite ((UO2)8O2(OH)12 x 10H2O). During reaction of metaschoepite in NaNO3, CsNO3, and NaF solutions, an initial increase in the dissolved uranium concentration was followed by a decrease as uranium was incorporated into a secondary solid phase. Given sufficient reaction time, metaschoepite was completely transformed to a clarkeite-like sodium uranyl oxide hydrate or a cesium uranyl oxide hydrate that has not previously been described. These secondary solid phases exhibited X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra that were distinct from those of the original metaschoepite. Dissolved uranium concentrations in equilibrium with the sodium and cesium uranyl oxide hydrates can be more than 2 orders of magnitude lower than those in equilibrium with metaschoepite. Initial changes in metaschoepite solubility may also result from particle growth induced by sodium and cesium incorporation into the solid phase.

  14. On the retention of uranyl and thorium ions from radioactive solution on peat moss.

    PubMed

    Humelnicu, Doina; Bulgariu, Laura; Macoveanu, Matei

    2010-02-15

    The efficiency of the radioactive uranyl and thorium ions on the peat moss from aqueous solutions has been investigated under different experimental conditions. The sorption and desorption of uranyl and thorium ions on three types (unmodified peat moss, peat moss treated with HNO(3) and peat moss treated with NaOH) of peat moss were studied by the static method. Peat moss was selected as it is available in nature, in any amount, as a cheap and accessible sorbent. Study on desorption of such ions led to the conclusion that the most favourable desorptive reagent for the uranyl ions is Na(2)CO(3) 1M while, for the thorium ions is HCl 1M. The results obtained show that the parameters here under investigation exercise a significant effect on the sorption process of the two ions. Also, the investigations performed recommend the peat moss treated with a base as a potential sorbent for the uranyl and thorium ions from a radioactive aqueous solution.

  15. Folic acid deficiency impairs the gill health status associated with the NF-κB, MLCK and Nrf2 signaling pathways in the gills of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary folic acid on fish growth, the immune and barrier functions of fish gills, and the potential mechanisms of these effects. Young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) were fed diets containing graded levels of folic acid at 0.10 (basal diet), 0.47, 1.03, 1.48, 1.88 and 3.12 mg kg(-1) diet for 8 weeks. The results showed that acid phosphatase and lysozyme activities and the complement component 3 content in fish gills decreased with folic acid deficiency (P < 0.05). Folic acid deficiency up-regulated liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide 1, interleukin 1β, interleukin 8, tumor necrosis factor α, nuclear factor κB p65, IκB kinase α (IKK-α), IKK-β and IKK-γ gene expression. Folic acid deficiency down-regulated interleukin 10, transforming growth factor β, IκB and target of rapamycin gene expression in fish gills (P < 0.05). These results showed that limited folic acid decreased fish gill immune status. Furthermore, folic acid deficiency down-regulated claudin-b, claudin-c, claudin-3, occludin and zonula occludens 1 gene expression, whereas folic acid deficiency up-regulated claudin-12, claudin-15, myosin light chain kinase and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase gene expression in fish gills (P < 0.05). These results suggested that folic acid deficiency disrupted tight junction-mediated fish gill barrier function. Additionally, folic acid deficiency increased the content of reactive oxygen species, protein carbonyl and malondialdehyde (MDA); Mn superoxide dismutase activity and gene expression; and Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1a (Keap1a) and Keap1b gene expression (P < 0.05). Conversely, folic acid deficiency decreased Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione s-transferases and glutathione reductase activities and gene expression as well as NF-E2-related factor 2 gene expression in fish gills (P < 0.05). All of these results indicated that folic acid

  16. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Zachara, John M.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous numerical description of multispecies diffusion requires coupling of species, charge, and aqueous and surface complexation reactions that collectively affect diffusive fluxes. The applicability of a fully coupled diffusion model is, however, often constrained by the availability of species self-diffusion coefficients, as well as by computational complication in imposing charge conservation. In this study, several diffusion models with variable complexity in charge and species coupling were formulated and compared to describe reactive multispecies diffusion in groundwater. Diffusion of uranyl [U(VI)] species was used as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the models in describing multispecies diffusion. Numerical simulations found that a diffusion model with a single, common diffusion coefficient for all species was sufficient to describe multispecies U(VI) diffusion under a steady state condition of major chemical composition, but not under transient chemical conditions. Simulations revealed that for multispecies U(VI) diffusion under transient chemical conditions, a fully coupled diffusion model could be well approximated by a component-based diffusion model when the diffusion coefficient for each chemical component was properly selected. The component-based diffusion model considers the difference in diffusion coefficients between chemical components, but not between the species within each chemical component. This treatment significantly enhanced computational efficiency at the expense of minor charge conservation. The charge balance in the component-based diffusion model can be enforced, if necessary, by adding a secondary migration term resulting from model simplification. The effect of ion activity coefficient gradients on multispecies diffusion is also discussed. The diffusion models were applied to describe U(VI) diffusive mass transfer in intragranular domains in two sediments collected from U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford 300A

  17. Nitrate Leaching Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate (NO3) leaching is a significant nitrogen (N) loss process for agriculture that must be managed to minimize NO3 enrichment of groundwater and surface waters. Managing NO3 leaching should involve the application of basic principles of understanding the site’s hydrologic cycle, avoiding excess ...

  18. Nitrates and Nitrites TNC Presentation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Nitrates and Nitrites Presentation gives an overview of nitrates and nitrites in drinking water, why it is important to monitor them and what to do in cases where the results exceed the maximum contaminant level (MCL).

  19. A Mixed-Method Study to Determine the Benefits of Periconceptional Folic Acid Supplementation and Effects of Folic Acid Deficiency in Mothers on Birth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Gudlavalleti Venkata S; Kolli, Sunanda Reddy; Neogi, Sutapa B; Singh, Samiksha; John, Neena; N., Srinivas; Ramani, Sudha; Shamanna, BR; Doyle, Pat; Kinra, Sanjay; Ness, Andy; Pallepogula, Dinesh Raj; Pant, Hira B; Babbar, Smiksha; Reddy, Raghunath; Singh, Rachna

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence from high income countries shows mothers who are supplemented with folic acid in their periconceptional period and early pregnancy have significantly reduced adverse outcomes like birth defects. However, in India there is a paucity of data on association of birth defects and folic acid supplementation. We identified a few important questions to be answered using separate scientific methods and then planned to triangulate the information. Objective In this paper, we describe the protocol of our study that aims to determine the association of folic acid and pregnancy outcomes like neural tube defects (NTDs) and orofacial clefts (OFCs). We decided to fill the gaps in knowledge from India to determine public health consequences of folic acid deficiency and factors influencing dietary and periconceptional consumption of folic acid. Methods The proposed study will be carried out in five stages and will examine the questions related to folic acid deficiency across selected locations in South and North India. The study will be carried out over a period of 4 years through the hierarchical evidence-based approach. At first a systematic review was conducted to pool the current birth prevalence of NTDs and orofacial clefts OFCs in India. To investigate the population prevalence, we plan to use the key informant method to determine prevalence of NTDs and OFCs. To determine the normal serum estimates of folic acid, iron, and vitamin B12 among Indian women (15-35 years), we will conduct a population-based, cross-sectional study. We will further strengthen the evidence of association between OFCs and folic acid by conducting a hospital-based, case-control study across three locations of India. Lastly, using qualitative methods we will understand community and health workers perspective on factors that decide the intake of folic acid supplements. Results This study will provide evidence on the community prevalence of birth defects and prevalence folic acid and

  20. [Some aspects of structural alterations of erythrocyte membranes under the effect of uranyl chloride at low concentrations].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, O G

    2015-01-01

    The influence of nanomolar concentrations of the uranyl ion on the parameters of some membrane structures of rodent erythrocytes (laboratory mice and tundra voles--classical objects of radioecological monitoring) was investigated in vitro. A high sensitivity of the tundra vole red blood cells to the uranyl influence was shown. This fact may be determined by the cross-species difference in the membrane structures of erythrocytes--the low sphingomyelin content in tundra voles. Investigation into the phospholipid composition of the erythrocytes incubated in vitro with uranyl ions demonstrates the absence of the membrane lipid component reactions "typical" for the cells circulating in blood and also the changes pointing to the initial stages of eryptosis. Latent alterations in the membrane structure of red blood cells of both species induced by a short time contact with uranyl ions were confirmed by the increase in their sensitivity to nonionic detergent Triton X-100 and indicate the changes in orderliness of the membrane lipid phase.

  1. Uranyl adsorption at solvated edge surfaces of 2 : 1 smectites. A density functional study.

    PubMed

    Kremleva, Alena; Krüger, Sven; Rösch, Notker

    2015-05-28

    We systematically studied the adsorption of uranyl(vi) on two common edge surfaces, (010) and (110), of 2 : 1 smectite clay minerals, using standard periodic DFT models. To describe various types of permanently charged clay minerals, we introduced charged defects into the initially neutral layer of pyrophyllite, cation substitutions in tetrahedral (beidellitic) and octahedral (montmorillonitic) sheets. Comparing uranyl(vi) species at various sites of these two types of surfaces, we found that structural parameters of such adsorption complexes are essentially determined by the surface chemical groups forming the adsorption site, not by the type of the clay mineral. Even for sites involving a substituted cation we noticed only a weak effect of the substitution on the geometric parameters. Geometry optimization resulted in adsorbed uranyl or uranyl hydroxide, with coordination numbers of 4 or 5. However, in most cases the same species was determined on the same type of site, independent of the substitutions. Optimization of adsorbed uranyl leads to hydrolysis at sites close to a AlOH(-1/2) surface group, resulting in uranyl monohydroxide as adsorbate and protonation of the AlOH(-1/2) group. While most species are equatorially five-coordinated, coordination 4 is preferred when uranyl adsorbs on mixed AlO(H)-SiO(H) sites. Calculated formation energies of surface complexes do not single out a preferred species or site, but point to an equilibrium of several species. Comparison to experiment and consideration of pH conditions suggests AlOHOH and AlOH-SiO sites of (010) surfaces and AlOmOH, SiOOm, and AlOH-SiO sites of (110) surfaces as most probable for uranyl adsorption.

  2. Intestinal absorption, liver uptake, and excretion of /sup 3/H-folic acid in folic acid-deficient, alcohol-consuming nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Blocker, D.E.; Thenen, S.W.

    1987-09-01

    Nonhuman primates fed folic acid-deficient diets +/- 30% kcal ethanol were used to determine alcohol effects on megaloblastic anemia development and folate bioavailability. Lower hemoglobin (Hb) and red blood cell (RBC) counts and higher mean corpuscular volume (MCV) occurred after 13 wk in alcohol-fed monkeys, later in controls. Plasma, RBC, and liver folate declined and urinary formiminoglutamic acid (FIGLU) was elevated in both groups with FIGLU increasing more among alcohol-fed monkeys at 38 wk. After 40 wk, the bioavailability of oral /sup 3/H-folic acid was investigated and showed increased fecal and reduced urinary tritium excretion in alcohol-fed monkeys compared with controls while plasma uptake and liver and whole body tritium retention were similar in both groups. These observations demonstrate that chronic alcohol consumption impairs folate coenzymes, accelerates appearance of hematologic indices of megaloblastic anemia, and causes possible malabsorption of enterohepatically circulated folates in folate deficiency even when other essential nutrients are provided.

  3. Isolation of a Star-Shaped Uranium(V/VI) Cluster from the Anaerobic Photochemical Reduction of Uranyl(VI).

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Lucile; White, Sarah; Scopelliti, Rosario; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2016-11-07

    Actinide oxo clusters are an important class of compounds due to their impact on actinide migration in the environment. The photolytic reduction of uranyl(VI) has potential application in catalysis and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, but the intermediate species involved in this reduction have not yet been elucidated. Here we show that the photolysis of partially hydrated uranyl(VI) in anaerobic conditions leads to the reduction of uranyl(VI), and to the incorporation of the resulting U(V) species into the stable mixed-valent star-shaped U(VI) /U(V) oxo cluster [U(UO2 )5 (μ3 -O)5 (PhCOO)5 (Py)7 ] (1). This cluster is only the second example of a U(VI) /U(V) cluster and the first one associating uranyl groups to a non-uranyl(V) center. The U(V) center in 1 is stable, while the reaction of uranyl(V) iodide with potassium benzoate leads to immediate disproportionation and formation of the U12(IV) U4(V) O24 cluster {[K(Py)2 ]2 [K(Py)]2 [U16 O24 (PhCOO)24 (Py)2 ]} (5).

  4. Study on the interaction of uranyl with sulfated beta-cyclodextrin by affinity capillary electrophoresis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Linnan; Zhang, Yiding; Li, Xianjiang; Shen, Sensen; Huang, Hexiang; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2016-10-01

    The study on sulfated beta-cyclodextrin binding to uranyl ion helps to get a better understanding of uranyl compounds' intermolecular interaction mechanism and facilitates the structure-based design of uranyl binding molecules. Here we investigated the electromigration of the inclusion complex by using affinity capillary electrophoresis in acidic solution. The binding constant was determined to be logK = 2.96 ± 0.02 (R(2) = 0.996) through nonlinear regression approach. The possible configurations and structural features of the inclusion complex were further studied by molecular dynamics simulation. The results suggest the distinctions of coordination environment and hydration compared with bare uranyl ion in aqueous solution. Thus, two water oxygen atoms coordinated with uranyl in the first hydration shell at 2.55 angstrom instead of five in the same distance range. The binding free energy was calculated as -12.10 ± 1.46 kcal/mol by means of thermodynamic perturbation method. The negative value indicates that the process of S-β-CD capture uranyl ion in the aqueous media is spontaneous.

  5. Utilizing bifurcated halogen-bonding interactions with the uranyl oxo group in the assembly of a UO2-3-bromo-5-iodobenzoic acid coordination polymer.

    PubMed

    Kalaj, Mark; Carter, Korey P; Cahill, Christopher L

    2017-04-01

    The synthesis and crystal structure of a new uranyl coordination polymer featuring 3-bromo-5-iodobenzoic acid is described and the luminescent and vibrational properties of the material have been explored. Compound (1), [UO2(C7H3BrIO2)2]n, features dimeric uranyl units chelated and then linked by 3-bromo-5-iodobenzoic acid ligands to form a one-dimensional coordination polymer that is subsequently assembled via bifurcated halogen-bonding interactions with uranyl oxo atoms to form a supramolecular three-dimensional network. The asymmetric, bifurcated halogen-bonding interaction in (1) is notable as it represents the first observation of this synthon in a uranyl hybrid material. Raman and IR spectroscopy showed that halogen-bonding interactions with the uranyl oxo atoms result in small shifts in υ1 and υ3 frequencies, whereas luminescence spectra collected at an excitation wavelength of 420 nm reveal partially resolved uranyl emission.

  6. Treatment tests for ex situ removal of chromate, nitrate, and uranium (VI) from Hanford (100-HR-3) groundwater. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, M.A.; Duncan, J.B.

    1993-11-15

    This report describes batch and anion exchange column laboratory-scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}), and uranium (present as uranyl (uranium [VI]) carbonato anionic species) from contaminated Hanford Site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium, and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium, and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1993). The goal of these tests was to determine the best method to remove selected contaminants to below the concentration of the project performance goals. The raw data and observations made during these tests can be found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) laboratory notebooks (Beck 1992, Herting 1993). The method recommended for future study is anion exchange with Dowex 21K resin.

  7. Prevalence of Vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency in HIV-positive patients and its association with neuropsychiatric symptoms and immunological response

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Prabha M. R.; Chowta, Mukta N.; Ramapuram, John T.; Rao, Satish; Udupa, Karthik; Acharya, Sahana Devdas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deficiency of micronutrients is prevalent even before the development of symptoms of HIV disease and is associated with accelerated HIV disease progression. Aims: This study evaluates the prevalence of folate and Vitamin B12 deficiency in HIV-positive patients with or without tuberculosis (TB) and its association with neuropsychiatric symptoms and immunological response. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional, observational study in an outpatient setting. Patients and Methods: Four groups of HIV-positive patients with TB (Group I), HIV-positive patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms (Group II), HIV-positive patients without neuropsychiatric symptoms or TB (Group III), and HIV-negative controls with neuropsychiatric symptoms (Group IV). Vitamin B12 and folate estimation was done using carbonyl metallo-immunoassay method. Statistical Analysis Used: ANOVA, Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney, Pearson's correlation. Results: The prevalence of folic acid deficiency was 27.1% in the Group I, 31.9% in the Group II, 23.4% in the Group III, and 32% in the Group IV being higher in patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms in both HIV and non-HIV patients. The prevalence of Vitamin B12 deficiency was 18.8% in Group I, 9.1% in Group II, 4.8% in Group III, and 16.7% in Group IV. The patients with folate deficiency had more severe depression and anxiety. Conclusion: Nearly, 30% of the HIV patients had a folic acid deficiency, and about 10% of the HIV patients had Vitamin B12 deficiency. The folate deficiency was highest among neuropsychiatric patients with or without HIV infection and Vitamin B12 deficiency was higher among HIV patients with TB. PMID:27890954

  8. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  9. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  10. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  11. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  12. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  13. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  14. Ammonium nitrate explosive systems

    DOEpatents

    Stinecipher, Mary M.; Coburn, Michael D.

    1981-01-01

    Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

  15. Method and apparatus for producing uranyl peroxide (U0/sub 4/. 2H/sub 2/O) from uranium and uranium alloy pieces

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, E.N.

    1988-12-27

    A method of producing uranyl peroxide (UO/sub 4/ . 2H/sub 2/O) from uranium-bearing metal pieces comprising: dissolving the uranium-bearing metal pieces in a first aqueous solution containing nitric acid and at least 0.5% but no greater than 5.0% fluoboric acid to provide a second aqueous solution which includes uranyl ions (UO/sub 2//sup +2/) and nitric and fluoboric acids; adding hydrogen peroxide to the second aqueous solution to precipitate uranyl peroxide out of the second solution and provide a third aqueous solution containing nitric and fluoboric acids; and separating the uranyl peroxide from the third aqueous solution.

  16. Characterization of the Aqueous Uranyl-Silicate Complex Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Ab Initio Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, M.; Massey, M.; Huang, P.

    2015-12-01

    The speciation of aqueous uranium ions is an important factor in predicting its mobility and fate in the environment. Two major controls on speciation are pH and the presence of complexing ligands. For the case of aqueous uranyl, UO22+(aq), some common complexes include uranyl-hydroxy, uranyl-carbonato, and uranyl-calcium-carbonato complexes, all of which differ in chemical reactivity and mobility. Uranyl-silicate complexes are also known but remain poorly characterized. In this work, we studied uranyl speciation in a series of aqueous solutions of 0.1 mM uranyl and 2 mM silicate with pH ranging from 4 to 7. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra of these samples were recorded at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory). Of particular note are the uranyl and silicate concentrations employed in our experiments, which are lower than conditions in previously reported EXAFS studies and approach conditions in natural groundwater systems. Preliminary analyses of EXAFS data indicate that uranyl speciation changes across the pH range, consistent with published thermodynamic data that suggest uranyl-silicate complexes may be important for pH ~ 5 and below, while uranyl-carbonato complexes become dominant at circumneutral pH. To guide the interpretation of the EXAFS data, molecular-scale simulations were carried out using density functional theory. We considered two classes of models: (i) hydrated clusters, and (ii) ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of 3D-periodic models involving uranyl and silicate in water. These calculations reveal that at pH ~ 5, the uranyl speciation is the [UO2(H2O)4H3SiO4]+ complex formed by the substitution of an equatorial uranyl water with a monodentate silicate ligand. The evidence from experiments and simulations provide a consistent picture for the uranyl-silicate complex, which may be important in the transport of uranyl in acidic, silicate-rich waters.

  17. Nitrate Storage and Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction by Eukaryotic Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Stief, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described. A first compilation of intracellular nitrate inventories in various marine sediments is presented, indicating that intracellular nitrate pools vastly exceed porewater nitrate pools. The relative contribution by foraminifers to total sedimentary denitrification is estimated for different marine settings, suggesting that eukaryotes may rival prokaryotes in terms of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Finally, this review article sketches some evolutionary perspectives of eukaryotic nitrate metabolism and identifies open questions that need to be addressed in future investigations. PMID:26734001

  18. Dehydration-driven evolution of topological complexity in ethylamonium uranyl selenates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurzhiy, Vladislav V.; Krivovichev, Sergey V.; Tananaev, Ivan G.

    2017-03-01

    Single crystals of four novel uranyl selenate and selenite-selenate oxysalts with protonated ethylamine molecules, (C2H8N)2[(UO2)(SeO4)2(H2O)](H2O) (I), (C2H8N)3[(UO2)(SeO4)2(HSeO4)] (II), (C2H8N)[(UO2)(SeO4)(HSeO3)] (III), and (C2H8N)(H3O)[(UO2)(SeO4)2(H2O)] (IV) have been prepared by isothermal evaporation from aqueous solutions. Uranyl-containing 1D and 2D units have been investigated using topological approach and information-based complexity measurements that demonstrate the evolution of structural units and the increase of topological complexity with the decrease of H2O content.

  19. Gas Phase Computational Studies on the Competition Between Nitrile and Water Ligands in Uranyl Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Schoendorff, George E.; De Jong, Wibe A.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2010-08-26

    The formation of uranyl dicationic complexes containing water and nitrile (acetonitrile, propionitrile, and benzonitrile) ligands, [UO2(H2O)n(RCN)m]2+, has been studied using density functional theory (DFT) with a relativistic effective core potential (RECP) to account for scalar relativistic effects on uranium. It is shown that nitrile addition is favored over the addition of water ligands. Decomposition of these complexes to [UO2OH(H2O)n(RCN)m]+ by the loss of either H3O+ or (RCN+H)+ is also examined. It is found that this reaction occurs when the coordination sphere of uranyl is unsaturated. Additionally, this reaction is influenced by the size of the nitrile ligand with reactions involving acetonitrile being the most prevalent.

  20. Correlation of spectroscopic parameters with ligand basicity for uranyl bis(hexafluoroacetylacetonate) adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, R.G.; Kramer, G.M.

    1983-06-22

    The infrared transition frequencies (vapor and solution phases) of the uranyl and hexafluoroacetylacetonate (hfacac) moieties, as well as /sup 13/C and /sup 1/H NMR shifts, correlate linearly with the relative basicity of the neutral bases (B) for 15 UO/sub 2/(hfacac)/sub 2/ adducts. Solvation effects and relative entropy changes appear to be minimal for the base-exchange equilibrium, suggesting that the observed shifts in thes easily measurable spectroscopic properties predominantly reflect the Lewis acid-base relative bond strengths. We interpret the observed shifts in terms of electronic structure perturbations of both the uranyl and hfacac moieties arising from changes in neutral base (L-M) bonding. 6 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Diluent and extractant effects on the enthalpy of extraction of uranium(VI) and americium(III) nitrates by trialkyl phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.; Sood, D.D.

    1998-11-01

    The effect of various diluents such as n-hexane, n-heptane n-octane, isooctane, n-decane, n-undecane, n-dodecane, n-tetradecane, n-hexadecane, cyclohexane, benzene, toluene, p-xylene, mesitylene and o-dichlorobenzene on the enthalpy of extraction of uranyl nitrate by tri-n-amyl phosphate (TAP) over the temperature range 283 K--333 K has been studied. The results indicate that the enthalpy of extraction does not vary significantly with the diluents studied. Also enthalpies of extraction of uranyl nitrate and americium(III) nitrate by neutral organo phosphorous extractants such as tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), tri-n-amyl phosphate (TAP), tri-sec-butyl phosphate (TsBP), tri-isoamyl phosphate (TiAP) and tri-n-hexyl phosphate (THP) have been studied. An attempt has been made to explain the trends, on the basis of the nature of the solvate formed and the different terms which contribute to the overall enthalpy change.

  2. Removal of toxic uranium from synthetic nuclear power reactor effluents using uranyl ion imprinted polymer particles.

    PubMed

    Preetha, Chandrika Ravindran; Gladis, Joseph Mary; Rao, Talasila Prasada; Venkateswaran, Gopala

    2006-05-01

    Major quantities of uranium find use as nuclear fuel in nuclear power reactors. In view of the extreme toxicity of uranium and consequent stringent limits fixed by WHO and various national governments, it is essential to remove uranium from nuclear power reactor effluents before discharge into environment. Ion imprinted polymer (IIP) materials have traditionally been used for the recovery of uranium from dilute aqueous solutions prior to detection or from seawater. We now describe the use of IIP materials for selective removal of uranium from a typical synthetic nuclear power reactor effluent. The IIP materials were prepared for uranyl ion (imprint ion) by forming binary salicylaldoxime (SALO) or 4-vinylpyridine (VP) or ternary SALO-VP complexes in 2-methoxyethanol (porogen) and copolymerizing in the presence of styrene (monomer), divinylbenzene (cross-linking monomer), and 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (initiator). The resulting materials were then ground and sieved to obtain unleached polymer particles. Leached IIP particles were obtained by leaching the imprint ions with 6.0 M HCl. Control polymer particles were also prepared analogously without the imprint ion. The IIP particles obtained with ternary complex alone gave quantitative removal of uranyl ion in the pH range 3.5-5.0 with as low as 0.08 g. The retention capacity of uranyl IIP particles was found to be 98.50 mg/g of polymer. The present study successfully demonstrates the feasibility of removing uranyl ions selectively in the range 5 microg - 300 mg present in 500 mL of synthetic nuclear power reactor effluent containing a host of other inorganic species.

  3. Preparation of low-temperature sintered UO2 nanomaterials by radiolytic reduction of ammonium uranyl tricarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongming; Chen, Qingde; Shen, Xinghai

    2016-10-01

    UO2 nanoparticles were successfully obtained from ammonium uranyl tricarbonate with high efficiency by γ-irradiation. More importantly, the as-prepared nanoparticles were stable in the irradiated mother solution exposed to air atmosphere. The purified UO2 powders could be sintered at 450-600 °C, much lower than the reported values (above 1700 °C) of bulk UO2. These advantages made this method promising in the production of UO2 nuclear fuels.

  4. Water versus acetonitrile coordination to uranyl. Density functional study of cooperative polarization effects in solution.

    PubMed

    Bühl, Michael; Sieffert, Nicolas; Chaumont, Alain; Wipff, Georges

    2011-01-03

    Optimizations at the BLYP and B3LYP levels are reported for mixed uranyl-water/acetonitrile complexes [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5-n)(MeCN)(n)](2+) (n = 0-5), in both the gas phase and a polarizable continuum modeling acetonitrile. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations have been performed for these complexes in the gas phase, and for selected species (n = 0, 1, 3, 5) in a periodic box of liquid acetonitrile. According to structural and energetic data, uranyl has a higher affinity for acetonitrile than for water in the gas phase, in keeping with the higher dipole moment and polarizability of acetonitrile. In acetonitrile solution, however, water is the better ligand because of specific solvation effects. Analysis of the dipole moment of the coordinated water molecule in [UO(2)(H(2)O)(MeCN)(4)](2+) reveals that the interaction with the second-shell solvent molecules (through fairly strong and persistent O-H···N hydrogen bonds) causes a significant increase of this dipole moment (by more than 1 D). This cooperative polarization of water reinforces the uranyl-water bond as well as the water solvation via strengthened (UO(2))OH(2)···NCMe hydrogen bonds. Such cooperativity is essentially absent in the acetonitrile ligands that make much weaker (UO(2))NCMe···NCMe hydrogen bonds. Beyond the uranyl case, this study points to the importance of cooperative polarization effects to enhance the M(n+) ion affinity for water in condensed phases involving M(n+)-OH(2)···A fragments, where A is a H-bond proton acceptor and M(n+) is a hard cation.

  5. U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ powder from uranyl-loaded cation exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1985-01-01

    U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ powder has been produced from uranyl-loaded cation exchange resin with density, particle size distribution, and grain size suitable for powder metallurgy fabrication of reactor fuel tubes with Al-U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ cores. Macroporous sulfonate resin in granular form is used in the process. Resin conversion techniques that were evaluated include batch, rotary, and fluidized bed calcination. 2 refs., 16 figs.

  6. Recuperation of uranyl ions from effluents by means of microbiological collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cecal, A.; Palamaru, I.; Humelnicu, D.; Goanta, M.; Rudic, V.; Salaru, V.V.; Gulea, A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper deals with the study of bioaccumulation of uranyl ions (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) from industrial effluents, using microbiological collectors: Nostoc linkia sp., Tolipotrix sp., Spirulina sp., Porphyridium cruentum and also the glucide extract of P. cruentum. The values of retaining degree of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} on the biomass, for several experimental conditions, were established between 14.22 and 91.99%.

  7. Criticality experiments and analysis of molybdenum reflected cylindrical uranyl fluoride water solution reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieno, D.; Fox, T.; Mueller, R.

    1972-01-01

    Clean criticality data were obtained from molybdenum-reflected cylindrical uranyl-fluoride-water solution reactors. Using ENDF/B molybdenum cross sections, a nine energy group two-dimensional transport calculation of a reflected reactor configuration predicted criticality to within 7 cents of the experimental value. For these reactors, it was necessary to compute the reflector resonance integral by a detailed transport calculation at the core-reflector interface volume in the energy region of the two dominant resonances of natural molybdenum.

  8. Spectroscopic study on uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at the surface layer of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Thomas; Rossberg, Andre; Barkleit, Astrid; Steudtner, Robin; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja; Merroun, Mohamed L

    2015-02-14

    The complexation of U(vi) at the proteinaceous surface layer (S-layer) of the archaeal strain Sulfolobus acidocaldarius was investigated over a pH range from pH 1.5 to 6 at the molecular scale using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and U L(III)-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The S-layer, which represents the interface between the cell and its environment, is very stable against high temperatures, proteases, and detergents. This allowed the isolation and purification of S-layer ghosts (= empty cells) that maintain the size and shape of the cells. In contrast to many other microbial cell envelope compounds the studied S-layer is not phosphorylated, enabling the investigation of uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at microbial surfaces. The latter are usually masked by preferentially formed uranyl phosphate complexes. We demonstrated that at highly acidic conditions (pH 1.5 to 3) no uranium was bound by the S-layer. In contrast to that, at moderate acidic pH conditions (pH 4.5 and 6) a complexation of U(vi) at the S-layer via deprotonated carboxylic groups was stimulated. Titration studies revealed dissociation constants for the carboxylic groups of glutamic and aspartic acid residues of pK(a) = 4.78 and 6.31. The uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at the S-layer did not show luminescence properties at room temperature, but only under cryogenic conditions. The obtained luminescence maxima are similar to those of uranyl acetate. EXAFS spectroscopy demonstrated that U(vi) in these complexes is mainly coordinated to carboxylate groups in a bidentate binding mode. The elucidation of the molecular structure of these complexes was facilitated by the absence of phosphate groups in the studied S-layer protein.

  9. Pair of diastereomeric uranyl salen cavitands displaying opposite enantiodiscrimination of α-amino acid ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Andrea; Amato, Maria E; Ballistreri, Francesco P; Tomaselli, Gaetano A; Toscano, Rosa Maria; Trusso Sfrazzetto, Giuseppe

    2012-09-07

    A pair of diastereomeric salen cavitands and their uranyl complexes combine a chiral (R,R) salen bridge and an inherent chiral tris-bridged quinoxaline cup within the same molecule. Whereas the free ligands show a preference for the same enantiomer of an α-amino acid pair, the corresponding UO(2) complexes display opposite enantiodiscrimination and exceptionally high enantioselectivities (K(D)/K(L) = 26.4).

  10. Determination of uranyl incorporation into biogenic manganese oxides using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scattering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, S.M.; Fuller, C.C.; Tebo, B.M.; Bargar, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides are common and an important source of reactive mineral surfaces in the environment that may be potentially enhanced in bioremediation cases to improve natural attenuation. Experiments were performed in which the uranyl ion, UO22+ (U(VI)), at various concentrations was present during manganese oxide biogenesis. At all concentrations, there was strong uptake of U onto the oxides. Synchrotron-based extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to determine the molecular-scale mechanism by which uranyl is incorporated into the oxide and how this incorporation affects the resulting manganese oxide structure and mineralogy. The EXAFS experiments show that at low concentrations (2 mol % U, >4 ??M U(VI) in solution), the presence of U(VI) affects the stability and structure of the Mn oxide to form poorly ordered Mn oxide tunnel structures, similar to todorokite. EXAFS modeling shows that uranyl is present in these oxides predominantly in the tunnels of the Mn oxide structure in a tridentate complex. Observations by XRD corroborate these results. Structural incorporation may lead to more stable U(VI) sequestration that may be suitable for remediation uses. These observations, combined with the very high uptake capacity of the Mn oxides, imply that Mn-oxidizing bacteria may significantly influence dissolved U(VI) concentrations in impacted waters via sorption and incorporation into Mn oxide biominerals. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  11. Selective colorimetric and fluorescent quenching determination of uranyl ion via its complexation with curcumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing-Hui; Zhao, Xin; Yang, Jidong; Tan, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Shao-Pu; Liu, Zhong-Fang; Hu, Xiao-Li

    2016-04-01

    Under pH 4.0 HAc-NaAc buffer medium, curcumin alone possesses extraordinary weak fluorescence emission. Nevertheless, the introduction of Triton X-100 micelles can largely enhance the fluorescence intensity of curcumin. Uranyl ions can complex with micelles-capped curcumin, along with the slight red shift of curcumin fluorescence (about 1-7 nm), a clear decrement of absorbance (424 nm) and fluorescence (507 nm) intensities, and a distinct color change from bright yellow to orange. The fluorescence decrements (ΔF, 507 nm) are positively correlated to the amount of uranyl ions in the concentration range of 3.7 × 10- 6-1.4 × 10- 5 mol L- 1. The detection limit of this fluorescence quenching methods is 3.7 × 10- 6 mol L- 1, which is nearly 9000 times lower than the maximum allowable level in drinking water proposed by World Health Organization. Good selectivity is achieved because of a majority of co-existing substances (such as Ce4 +, La3 +, and Th4 +) do not affect the detection. The content of uranyl ions in tap water samples was determined by the proposed method with satisfactory results.

  12. XAFS investigation of polyamidoxime-bound uranyl contests the paradigm from small molecule studies

    DOE PAGES

    Mayes, Richard T.; Piechowicz, Marek; Lin, Zekai; ...

    2015-11-12

    In this study, limited resource availability and population growth have motivated interest in harvesting valuable metals from unconventional reserves, but developing selective adsorbents for this task requires structural knowledge of metal binding environments. Amidoxime polymers have been identified as the most promising platform for large-scale extraction of uranium from seawater. However, despite more than 30 years of research, the uranyl coordination environment on these adsorbents has not been positively identified. We report the first XAFS investigation of polyamidoxime-bound uranyl, with EXAFS fits suggesting a cooperative chelating model, rather than the tridentate or η2 motifs proposed by small molecule and computationalmore » studies. Samples exposed to environmental seawater also display a feature consistent with a μ2-oxo-bridged transition metal in the uranyl coordination sphere, suggesting in situ formation of a specific binding site or mineralization of uranium on the polymer surface. These unexpected findings challenge several long-held assumptions and have significant implications for development of polymer adsorbents with high selectivity.« less

  13. XAFS investigation of polyamidoxime-bound uranyl contests the paradigm from small molecule studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, Richard T.; Piechowicz, Marek; Lin, Zekai; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dai, Sheng; Lin, Wenbin; Abney, C. W.; Bryantsev, V. S.

    2015-11-12

    In this study, limited resource availability and population growth have motivated interest in harvesting valuable metals from unconventional reserves, but developing selective adsorbents for this task requires structural knowledge of metal binding environments. Amidoxime polymers have been identified as the most promising platform for large-scale extraction of uranium from seawater. However, despite more than 30 years of research, the uranyl coordination environment on these adsorbents has not been positively identified. We report the first XAFS investigation of polyamidoxime-bound uranyl, with EXAFS fits suggesting a cooperative chelating model, rather than the tridentate or η2 motifs proposed by small molecule and computational studies. Samples exposed to environmental seawater also display a feature consistent with a μ2-oxo-bridged transition metal in the uranyl coordination sphere, suggesting in situ formation of a specific binding site or mineralization of uranium on the polymer surface. These unexpected findings challenge several long-held assumptions and have significant implications for development of polymer adsorbents with high selectivity.

  14. Synthesis and X-ray diffraction study of new uranyl malonate and oxalate complexes with carbamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedkov, Ya. A.; Serezhkina, L. B.; Grigor'ev, M. S.; Serezhkin, V. N.

    2016-05-01

    Two new malonate-containing uranyl complexes with carbamide of the formulas [UO2(C3H2O4)( Urea)2] ( I) and [UO2(C3H2O4)( Urea)3] ( II), where Urea is carbamide, and one uranyl oxalate complex of the formula [UO2(C2O4)( Urea)3] ( III) were synthesized, and their crystals were studied by X-ray diffraction. The main structural units in crystals I are the electroneutral chains [UO2(C3H2O4)( Urea)2]∞ belonging to the crystal-chemical group AT 11 M 2 1 ( A = UO 2 2+ , T 11 = C3H2O 4 2- , M 1 = Urea) of uranyl complexes. Crystals II and III are composed of the molecular complexes [UO2( L)( Urea)3], where L = C3H2O 4 2- or C2O 4 2- , belonging to the crystal-chemical group AB 01 M 3 1 ( A = UO 2 2+ , B 01 = C3H2O 4 2- or C2O 4 2- , M 1 = Urea). The characteristic features of the packing of the uranium-containing complexes are discussed in terms of molecular Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedra. The effect of the Urea: U ratio on the structure of uranium-containing structural units is considered.

  15. Selective colorimetric and fluorescent quenching determination of uranyl ion via its complexation with curcumin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Hui; Zhao, Xin; Yang, Jidong; Tan, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Shao-Pu; Liu, Zhong-Fang; Hu, Xiao-Li

    2016-04-15

    Under pH4.0 HAc-NaAc buffer medium, curcumin alone possesses extraordinary weak fluorescence emission. Nevertheless, the introduction of Triton X-100 micelles can largely enhance the fluorescence intensity of curcumin. Uranyl ions can complex with micelles-capped curcumin, along with the slight red shift of curcumin fluorescence (about 1-7 nm), a clear decrement of absorbance (424 nm) and fluorescence (507 nm) intensities, and a distinct color change from bright yellow to orange. The fluorescence decrements (ΔF, 507 nm) are positively correlated to the amount of uranyl ions in the concentration range of 3.7×10(-6)-1.4×10(-5) mol L(-1). The detection limit of this fluorescence quenching methods is 3.7×10(-6) mol L(-1), which is nearly 9000 times lower than the maximum allowable level in drinking water proposed by World Health Organization. Good selectivity is achieved because of a majority of co-existing substances (such as Ce(4+), La(3+), and Th(4+)) do not affect the detection. The content of uranyl ions in tap water samples was determined by the proposed method with satisfactory results.

  16. Structure, Kinetics, and Thermodynamics of the Aqueous Uranyl(VI) Cation

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2013-08-20

    Molecular simulation techniques are employed to gain insights into the structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic properties of the uranyl(VI) cation (UO22+) in aqueous solution. The simulations make use of an atomistic potential model (force field) derived in this work and based on the model of Guilbaud and Wipff (Guilbaud, P.; Wipff, G. J. Mol. Struct. (THEOCHEM) 1996, 366, 55-63). Reactive flux and thermodynamic integration calculations show that the derived potential model yields predictions for the water exchange rate and free energy of hydration, respectively, that are in agreement with experimental data. The water binding energies, hydration shell structure, and self-diffusion coefficient are also calculated and discussed. Finally, a combination of metadynamics and transition path sampling simulations is employed to probe the mechanisms of water exchange reactions in the first hydration shell of the uranyl ion. These atomistic simulations indicate, based on two-dimensional free energy surfaces, that water exchanges follow an associative interchange mechanism. The nature and structure of the water exchange transition states are also determined. The improved potential model is expected to lead to more accurate predictions of uranyl adsorption energies at mineral surfaces using potential-based molecular dynamics simulations.

  17. Synthesis, characterization, and crystal structures of uranyl compounds containing mixed chromium oxidation states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Daniel K.; Quicksall, Andrew; Pressprich, Laura; Stoffer, Megan; Qiu, Jie; Nuzhdin, Kirill; Wu, Weiqiang; Vyushkova, Mariya; Burns, Peter C.

    2012-07-01

    The mixed-valence chromium uranyl compounds Li5[(UO2)4(Cr(V)O5)(Cr(VI)O4)4](H2O)17 (1), (Mg(H2O)6)5[(UO2)8(Cr(V)O5)2(Cr(VI)O4)8] (2) and (NH4)5[(UO2)4(Cr(V)O5)(Cr(VI)O4)2]H2O11 (3) have been synthesized and characterized. Each contains an identical sheet of cation-centered polyhedra. Central to the connectivity of the sheet are four uranyl pentagonal bipyramids that share some of their equatorial vertices, giving a four-membered ring. The Cr(V) cation located near the center of this ring is coordinated by O atoms in a square pyramidal arrangement. The Cr(VI) is tetrahedrally coordinated by O atoms, and these tetrahedra link the four-membered rings of bipyramids. The mixed-valence nature of the sheet was verified by XANES, an EPR spectrum, and bond-valence analysis. Low-valence cations and H2O groups reside between the sheets of uranyl and chromate polyhedra, where they provide linkages between adjacent sheets.

  18. A cryogenic fluorescence spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate, phosphate, and oxyhydroxide minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Gassman, Paul L.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Clark, Sue B.

    2008-11-03

    In this work we have applied liquid-helium temperature (LHeT) time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLIF) to characterize a series of natural and synthetic minerals of uranium carbonate, phosphate and oxyhydroxides including rutherfordine, zellerite, liebigite, phosphuranylite, meta-autunite, meta-torbernite, uranyl phosphate, sodium-uranyl-phosphate, bequerelite, clarkeite, curite, schoepite and compregnacite, and compared their spectral characteristics among these minerals as well as our previously published data on uranyl silicates. For the carbonate minerals, the fluorescence spectra depend on the stoichiometry of the mineral. For the phosphate minerals the fluorescence spectra closely resemble each other despite the differences in their composition and structure. For all uranium oxyhydroxides, the fluorescence spectra are largely red-shifted as compared with those of the uranium carbonates and phosphates and their vibronic bands are broadened and less resolved. The much enhanced spectra resolution at LHeT allows more accurate calculation of the O=U=O symmetrical stretch frequency, ν1, corresponding to the average spacing of the vibronic peaks of the fluorescence spectra and the spectral origin as reflected by the position of the first vibronic band. It was found that both the average ν1 and λ1 values correlate well with the average basicity of the inorganic anion.

  19. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreases hepatic cytochrome P-450, especially CYP2B1/2B2, and simultaneously induces heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in scurvy-prone ODS rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Misato; Hoshinaga, Yukiko; Miura, Natsuko; Tokuda, Yuki; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Murai, Atsushi; Horio, Fumihiko

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the decrease in hepatic cytochrome P-450 (CYP) content in ascorbic acid deficiency was investigated in scurvy-prone ODS rats. First, male ODS rats were fed a diet containing sufficient ascorbic acid (control) or a diet without ascorbic acid (deficient) for 18 days, with or without the intraperitoneal injection of phenobarbital. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COX) complex IV subunit I protein, and simultaneously increased heme oxygenase-1 protein in microsomes and mitochondria. Next, heme oxygenase-1 inducers, that is lipopolysaccharide and hemin, were administered to phenobaribital-treated ODS rats fed sufficient ascorbic acid. The administration of these inducers decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial COX complex IV subunit I protein. These results suggested that the stimulation of hepatic heme oxygenase-1 expression by ascorbic acid deficiency caused the decrease in CYP content in liver.

  20. Gas-phase reactions of molecular oxygen with uranyl(V) anionic complexes-synthesis and characterization of new superoxides of uranyl(VI).

    PubMed

    Lucena, Ana F; Carretas, José M; Marçalo, Joaquim; Michelini, Maria C; Gong, Yu; Gibson, John K

    2015-04-16

    Gas-phase complexes of uranyl(V) ligated to anions X(-) (X = F, Cl, Br, I, OH, NO3, ClO4, HCO2, CH3CO2, CF3CO2, CH3COS, NCS, N3), [UO2X2](-), were produced by electrospray ionization and reacted with O2 in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer to form uranyl(VI) anionic complexes, [UO2X2(O2)](-), comprising a superoxo ligand. The comparative rates for the oxidation reactions were measured, ranging from relatively fast [UO2(OH)2](-) to slow [UO2I2](-). The reaction rates of [UO2X2](-) ions containing polyatomic ligands were significantly faster than those containing the monatomic halogens, which can be attributed to the greater number of vibrational degrees of freedom in the polyatomic ligands to dissipate the energy of the initial O2-association complexes. The effect of the basicity of the X(-) ligands was also apparent in the relative rates for O2 addition, with a general correlation between increasing ligand basicity and O2-addition efficiency for polyatomic ligands. Collision-induced dissociation of the superoxo complexes showed in all cases loss of O2 to form the [UO2X2](-) anions, indicating weaker binding of the O2(-) ligand compared to the X(-) ligands. Density functional theory computations of the structures and energetics of selected species are in accord with the experimental observations.

  1. Trace level uranyl complexation with phenylphosphonic acid in aqueous solution: direct speciation by high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Catherine; Del Nero, Mirella

    2013-04-15

    The complexation of U(VI) by organic P-containing ligands in humic substances (HS) is an important issue of uranyl mobility in soil. We have investigated the complexation of uranyl by a model ligand for aromatic phosphorus functionalities in HS, phenylphosphonic acid, by using ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The high sensitivity permitted to investigate the complexation of trace level uranyl and to explore directly in the native aqueous solutions the nature of the uranyl-phenylphosphonate complexes. Positive identification of the complexes coexisting in solutions with low pH and varying ligand-to-metal ratio was achieved thanks to the high resolving power, high mass accuracy, and reliability of ion abundance of the technique. The positively charged and neutral uranyl species were detected simultaneously on negative ion mass spectra, evidencing formation of three types of U(VI)-phenylphosphonate complexes. Two complexes with a metal-to-ligand stoichiometry of 1:1 (in the monoprotonated and nonprotonated forms) existed in solutions at pH 3-5, and a 1:2 complex was additionally formed at relatively high ligand-to-metal ratio. A strategy based on the use of uranyl-phosphate solution complexes as internal standards was developed to determine from the ESI(-)MS results the stability constants of the complexes, which were calculated to be log K111 = 3.4 ± 0.2 for UO2(HPhPO3)(+), log K101 = 7.1 ± 0.1 for UO2PhPO3, and log K112 = 7.2 ± 0.2 for UO2(HPhPO3)2. The speciation model presented here suggests that organic P existing at low concentration in HS is involved significantly in binding by humic and fulvic acids of trace level uranyl in soil.

  2. Synergistic cytotoxicity and DNA strand breaks in cells and plasmid DNA exposed to uranyl acetate and ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Janice; Zuniga, Mary C; Yazzie, Filbert; Stearns, Diane M

    2015-04-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has a chemical toxicity that is independent of its radioactivity. The purpose of this study was to explore the photoactivation of uranyl ion by ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a chemical mechanism of uranium genotoxicity. The ability of UVB (302 nm) and UVA (368 nm) radiation to photoactivate uranyl ion to produce single strand breaks was measured in pBR322 plasmid DNA, and the presence of adducts and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites that could be converted to single strand breaks by heat and piperidine was analyzed. Results showed that DNA lesions in plasmid DNA exposed to UVB- or UVA-activated DU were only slightly heat reactive, but were piperidine sensitive. The cytotoxicity of UVB-activated uranyl ion was measured in repair-proficient and repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The cytotoxicity of co-exposures of uranyl ion and UVB radiation was dependent on the order of exposure and was greater than co-exposures of arsenite and UVB radiation. Uranyl ion and UVB radiation were synergistically cytotoxic in cells, and cells exposed to photoactivated DU required different DNA repair pathways than cells exposed to non-photoactivated DU. This study contributes to our understanding of the DNA lesions formed by DU, as well as their repair. Results suggest that excitation of uranyl ion by UV radiation can provide a pathway for uranyl ion to be chemically genotoxic in populations with dermal exposures to uranium and UV radiation, which would make skin an overlooked target organ for uranium exposures.

  3. Synergistic cytotoxicity and DNA strand breaks in cells and plasmid DNA exposed to uranyl acetate and ultraviolet radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Janice; Zuniga, Mary C.; Yazzie, Filbert; Stearns, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has a chemical toxicity that is independent of its radioactivity. The purpose of this study was to explore the photoactivation of uranyl ion by ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a chemical mechanism of uranium genotoxicity. The ability of UVB (302 nm) and UVA (368 nm) radiation to photoactivate uranyl ion to produce single strand breaks was measured in pBR322 plasmid DNA, and the presence of adducts and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites that could be converted to single strand breaks by heat and piperidine was analyzed. Results showed that DNA lesions in plasmid DNA exposed to UVB- or UVA-activated DU were only slightly heat reactive, but were piperidine sensitive. The cytotoxicity of UVB-activated uranyl ion was measured in repair-proficient and repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The cytotoxicity of co-exposures of uranyl ion and UVB radiation was dependent on the order of exposure and was greater than co-exposures of arsenite and UVB radiation. Uranyl ion and UVB radiation were synergistically cytotoxic in cells, and cells exposed to photoactivated DU required different DNA repair pathways than cells exposed to non-photoactivated DU. This study contributes to our understanding of the DNA lesions formed by DU, as well as their repair. Results suggest that excitation of uranyl ion by UV radiation can provide a pathway for uranyl ion to be chemically genotoxic in populations with dermal exposures to uranium and UV radiation, which would make skin an overlooked target organ for uranium exposures. PMID:24832689

  4. Structural evolution of a uranyl peroxide nano-cage fullerene: U60, at elevated pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, K. M.; Lin, Y.; Zhang, F.; McGrail, B.; Burns, P. C.; Mao, W. L.; Ewing, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    U60 is a uranyl peroxide nano-cage that adopts a highly symmetric fullerene topology; it is topologically identical to C60. Several studies on the aqueous-phase of U60 clusters, [UO2(O2)(OH)]6060-, have shown its persistence in complex solutions and over lengthy time scales. Peroxide enhances corrosion of nuclear fuel in a reactor accident-uranyl peroxides often form near contaminated sites. U60 (Fm-3) crystallizes with approximate formula: Li68K12(OH)20[UO2(O2)(OH)]60(H2O)310. Here, we have used the diamond anvil cell (DAC) to examine U60 to understand the stability of this cluster at high pressures. We used a symmetric DAC with 300 μm culet diamonds and two different pressure-transmitting media: a mixture of methanol+ethanol and silicone oil. Using a combination of in situ Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron XRD, and electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) ex situ, we have determined the pressure-induced evolution of U60. Crystalline U60 undergoes an irreversible phase transition to a tetragonal structure at 4.1 GPa, and irreversibly amorphizes at 13 GPa. The amorphous phase likely consists of clusters of U60. Above 15 GPa, the U60 cluster is irreversibly destroyed. ESI-MS shows that this phase consists of species that likely have between 10-20 uranium atoms. Raman spectroscopy complements the diffraction measurements. U60 shows two dominant vibrational modes: a symmetric stretch of the uranyl U-O triple bond (810 cm-1), and a symmetric stretch of the U-O2-U peroxide bond (820 cm-1). As pressure is increased, these modes shift to higher wavenumbers, and overlap at 4 GPa. At 15 GPa, their intensity decreases below detection. These experiments reveal several novel behaviors including a new phase of U60. Notably, the amorphization of U60 occurs before the collapse of its cluster topology. This is different from the behavior of solvated C60 at high pressure, which maintains a hcp structure up to 30 GPa, while the clusters disorder. These results suggest

  5. Mechanism of Attenuation of Uranyl Toxicity by Glutathione in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Obeid, Muhammad H.; Oertel, Jana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms possess mechanisms for the detoxification of heavy metals, and these mechanisms are found among distantly related species. We investigated the role of intracellular glutathione (GSH), which, in a large number of taxa, plays a role in protection against the toxicity of common heavy metals. Anaerobically grown Lactococcus lactis containing an inducible GSH synthesis pathway was used as a model organism. Its physiological condition allowed study of putative GSH-dependent uranyl detoxification mechanisms without interference from additional reactive oxygen species. By microcalorimetric measurements of metabolic heat during cultivation, it was shown that intracellular GSH attenuates the toxicity of uranium at a concentration in the range of 10 to 150 μM. In this concentration range, no effect was observed with copper, which was used as a reference for redox metal toxicity. At higher copper concentrations, GSH aggravated metal toxicity. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed the endothermic binding of U(VI) to the carboxyl group(s) of GSH rather than to the reducing thiol group involved in copper interactions. The data indicate that the primary detoxifying mechanism is the intracellular sequestration of carboxyl-coordinated U(VI) into an insoluble complex with GSH. The opposite effects on uranyl and on copper toxicity can be related to the difference in coordination chemistry of the respective metal-GSH complexes, which cause distinct growth phase-specific effects on enzyme-metal interactions. IMPORTANCE Understanding microbial metal resistance is of particular importance for bioremediation, where microorganisms are employed for the removal of heavy metals from the environment. This strategy is increasingly being considered for uranium. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of uranyl detoxification. Existing studies of different taxa show little systematics but hint at a role of glutathione (GSH

  6. Assimilation of nitrate by yeasts.

    PubMed

    Siverio, José M

    2002-08-01

    Nitrate assimilation has received much attention in filamentous fungi and plants but not so much in yeasts. Recently the availability of classical genetic and molecular biology tools for the yeast Hansenula polymorpha has allowed the advance of the study of this metabolic pathway in yeasts. The genes YNT1, YNR1 and YNI1, encoding respectively nitrate transport, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, have been cloned, as well as two other genes encoding transcriptional regulatory factors. All these genes lie closely together in a cluster. Transcriptional regulation is the main regulatory mechanism that controls the levels of the enzymes involved in nitrate metabolism although other mechanisms may also be operative. The process involved in the sensing and signalling of the presence of nitrate in the medium is not well understood. In this article the current state of the studies of nitrate assimilation in yeasts as well as possible venues for future research are reviewed.

  7. Tubulin nitration in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Gabriella; Di Cristo, Carlo; Monti, Gianluca; Amoresano, Angela; Columbano, Laura; Pucci, Pietro; Cioffi, Fernando A; Di Cosmo, Anna; Palumbo, Anna; d'Ischia, Marco

    2006-02-06

    Immunohistochemical and biochemical investigations showed that significant protein nitration occurs in human gliomas, especially in grade IV glioblastomas at the level of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and neurones. Enhanced alpha-tubulin immunoreactivity was co-present in the same elements in the glioblastomas. Proteomic methodologies were employed to identify a nitrated protein band at 55 kDa as alpha-tubulin. Peptide mass fingerprinting procedures demonstrated that tubulin is nitrated at Tyr224 in grade IV tumour samples but is unmodified in grade I samples and in non-cancerous brain tissue. These results provide the first characterisation of endogenously nitrated tubulin from human tumour samples.

  8. Dynamics of Humic Acid and Its Interaction with Uranyl in the Presence of Hydrophobic Surface Implicated by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tu; Wang, Hui; Liao, Jiali; Yang, Yuanyou; Chai, Zhifang; Liu, Ning; Wang, Dongqi

    2016-10-07

    This work targeted a molecular level of understanding on the dynamics of humic acid (HA) and its interaction with uranyl in the presence of hydrophobic surface mimicked by a carbon nanotube (CNT), which also represents a potential intruder in the environment accompanying with the development of nanotechnology. In aqueous phase, uranyl and HA were observed to build close contact spontaneously, driven by electrostatic interaction, leading to a more compact conformation of HA. The presence of CNT unfolds HA via π-π interactions with the aromatic rings of HA without significant perturbation on the interaction strength between HA and uranyl. These results show that the hydrophilic uranyl and the hydrophobic CNT influence the folding behavior of HA in distinct manners, which represents two fundamental mechanisms that the folding behavior of HA may be modulated in the environment, that is, uranyl enhances the folding of HA via electrostatic interactions, whereas CNT impedes its spontaneous folding via van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The work also provides molecular level of evidence on the transformation of a hydrophobic surface into a hydrophilic one via noncovalent functionalization by HA, which in turn affects the migration of HA and the cations it binds to.

  9. Immunity decreases, antioxidant system damages and tight junction changes in the intestine of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) during folic acid deficiency: Regulation of NF-κB, Nrf2 and MLCK mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-04-01

    This investigation used the same growth trial as the previous study, which showed that folic acid deficiency retarded growth in young grass carp (the percent weight gain of Groups 1-6 were 102.32 ± 3.41%, 137.25 ± 10.48%, 179.78 ± 3.95%, 164.33 ± 3.21%, 143.35 ± 8.12% and 115.28 ± 2.66%) [1]. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary folic acid on the immune response, antioxidant status and tight junctions in the intestine of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). A total of 540 young grass carp were fed diets containing graded levels of folic acid at 0.10, 0.47, 1.03, 1.48, 1.88 and 3.12 mg kg(-1) diet for 8 weeks. The results indicated that acid phosphatase and lysozyme activities, and the complement component 3 content in the proximal intestine (PI), mid intestine (MI) and distal intestine (DI) were decreased with folic acid deficiency (0.1 mg kg(-1)) (P < 0.05). Folic acid deficiency (0.1 mg kg(-1)) up-regulated interleukin 1β, interleukin 8, tumor necrosis factor α, nuclear factor κB p65 (NF-κB p65), IκB kinase α (IKK-α), IKK-β and IKK-γ gene expression, meanwhile down-regulated interleukin 10, transforming growth factor β, IκB and target of rapamycin gene expression in the PI, MI and DI (P < 0.05). These data suggested that folic acid deficiency decreased fish intestinal innate immune function may be partly contributed to the regulation of NF-κB p65 pathway. Moreover, the activities and corresponding gene expression of glutathione content, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione s-transferases and glutathione reductase in fish intestine were depressed by deficient folic acid diet (0.1 mg kg(-1)) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, folic acid deficiency (0.1 mg kg(-1)) down-regulated NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) gene expression, up-regulated Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1a (Keap1a) and Keap1b gene expression in fish intestine (P < 0.05). These data indicated

  10. Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficiency and High Fructose intake in the Development of Metabolic Syndrome Brain, Metabolic Abnormalities, and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Simopoulos, Artemis P.

    2013-01-01

    Western diets are characterized by both dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency and increased fructose intake. The latter found in high amounts in added sugars such as sucrose and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). Both a low intake of omega-3 fatty acids or a high fructose intake contribute to metabolic syndrome, liver steatosis or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), promote brain insulin resistance, and increase the vulnerability to cognitive dysfunction. Insulin resistance is the core perturbation of metabolic syndrome. Multiple cognitive domains are affected by metabolic syndrome in adults and in obese adolescents, with volume losses in the hippocampus and frontal lobe, affecting executive function. Fish oil supplementation maintains proper insulin signaling in the brain, ameliorates NAFLD and decreases the risk to metabolic syndrome suggesting that adequate levels of omega-3 fatty acids in the diet can cope with the metabolic challenges imposed by high fructose intake in Western diets which is of major public health importance. This review presents the current status of the mechanisms involved in the development of the metabolic syndrome, brain insulin resistance, and NAFLD a most promising area of research in Nutrition for the prevention of these conditions, chronic diseases, and improvement of Public Health. PMID:23896654

  11. Differential effects of dietary Oenothera, Zizyphus mistol, and corn oils, and essential fatty acid deficiency on the progression of a murine mammary gland adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, S E; Piegari, M; Guzmán, C A; Eynard, A R

    1999-03-01

    The modulating effect of dietary enrichment in mistol seed oil (MO) containing 25% of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), evening primrose oil (EPO) enriched in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and corn oil (CO) as sources of omega-6 and omega-9 fatty acids on the growth parameters of one transplantable mammary tumor were compared. Mice fed on different lipid formulae were inoculated with a mammary gland adenocarcinoma and different growth development tumor parameters were recorded. Results showed that corn oil feeding slowed down most of the tumor growth parameters, as did the EPO diet. MO also showed antitumor activity. Olein feeding, which induces an essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD), increased the incidence and the multiplicity of metastases when compared with the controls. It may be concluded that a diet enriched in omega-6 fatty acids did not behave as a tumor promoter in this mammary gland tumor model. The antitumor activities of EPO and MO are corroborated in present experiments, suggesting that both oils may be of value in nutritional approaches of mammary gland tumor therapies. In addition, present data add further experimental proof about the proposed protumorigenic proneness induced by the EFAD state.

  12. Absorption and metabolism of ( sup 3 H)arachidonic and ( sup 14 C)linoleic acid in essential fatty acid-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelte, L.; Melin, T.; Nilsson, A.; Strandvik, B. )

    1990-07-01

    ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid (20:4) and ({sup 14}C)linoleic acid (18:2) were fed in a triolein emulsion to essential fatty acid-deficient (EFAD) rats and to age-matched controls. Tissues were analyzed for radioactivity of different lipid classes after 1, 2, and 4 h. As in earlier studies, control rats retained more ({sup 3}H)20:4 than ({sup 14}C)18:2 in all organs except adipose tissue. In EFAD rats, recovery of ({sup 14}C)18:2 was increased in small intestine, liver, heart, and kidneys. In comparison to controls, EFAD rats retained much more ({sup 14}C)18:2 in phospholipids of these organs. The increase in the incorporation of both {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C into phosphatidylethanolamine was particularly pronounced. Another striking feature was the drastic increase in the retention after 4 h of {sup 14}C in cardiolipin, which is specifically located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. In contrast, incorporation of both {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C into phosphatidylinositol was decreased or unchanged in EFAD rats. Although fecal fat excretion was increased there was no evidence for a malabsorption or an increased retention in intestinal triacyglycerol of the radioactive fatty acids in EFAD rats. The proportion of ({sup 14}C)18:2 that had been converted to ({sup 14}C)20:4 was generally low but increased significantly with time in the liver and intestine of EFAD rats.

  13. Brain docosahexaenoic acid status and learning in young rats submitted to dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid deficiency and supplementation limited to lactation.

    PubMed

    García-Calatayud, Salvador; Redondo, Carlos; Martín, Eva; Ruiz, José Ignacio; García-Fuentes, Miguel; Sanjurjo, Pablo

    2005-05-01

    N-3 fatty acid deficiency has been related to decreased docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and increased docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) levels in brain and to learning disadvantages. The influence of n-3 deficiency and supplementation on brain fatty acids and learning were investigated in young rats. Newborn Wistar rats were assigned to three groups of cross-foster mothers. The control group (C) was nursed by mothers that received essential fatty acids during pregnancy and lactation, and the deficient group (D) was nursed by mothers that did not receive those fatty acids. The supplemental group (S) had the same conditions as D, receiving an additional DHA and arachidonic acid supplement during lactation. Cerebral cortex and hippocampus fatty acid composition was examined using thin-layer and capillary column gas chromatography, and learning was measured by passive-avoidance procedure. D brains showed low DHA and high DPA levels, but S brain composition was similar to C. Learning in the S group was unaffected, but in the D group, it was poorer than C. Learning was directly correlated with DHA levels and inversely with DPA levels in brain. Low DHA and high DPA brain levels both were correlated with poor learning. DPA seems not to be a suitable brain functional analogue of DHA, and DHA supplementation reversed both biochemical and learning adverse effects observed in n-3 deficiency.

  14. Selective recognition of uranyl ions from bulk of thorium(iv) and lanthanide(iii) ions by tetraalkyl urea: a combined experimental and quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Vats, Bal Govind; Das, Debasish; Sadhu, Biswajit; Kannan, S; Pius, I C; Noronha, D M; Sundararajan, Mahesh; Kumar, Mukesh

    2016-06-21

    The selective separation of uranyl ions from an aqueous solution is one of the most important criteria for sustainable nuclear energy production. We report herein a known, but unexplored extractant, tetraalkyl urea, which shows supreme selectivity for uranium in the presence of interfering thorium and other lanthanide ions from a nitric acid medium. The structural characterization of the uranyl complex (UO2X2·2L, where X = NO3(-), Cl(-) and Br(-)) by IR, NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction provides insight into the strong interaction between the uranyl ion and the ligand. The origin of this supreme selectivity for uranyl ions is further supported by electronic structure calculations. Uranyl binding with the extractant is thermodynamically more favourable when compared to thorium and the selectivity is achieved through a combination of electronic and steric effects.

  15. Correlation between stabilities of uranyl ion complexes with various monocarboxylic acids and Hammett-Taft substituent constants

    SciTech Connect

    Poluektov, N.S.; Perfil'ev, V.A.; Meshkova, S.B.; Mishchenko, V.T.

    1987-01-01

    A correlation has been observed between the stabilities of uranyl ion complexes (1:1 composition) and the substituent inductive constants in formic and acetic acid derivatives. For substituents which are not directly involved in couples formation the parameters of the Hammett-Taft equation log K/sub 1/ = A + B have the following values: A = 1.311, B = -2.360. For substituents which form a coordination bond with the uranyl ion, A = 7.0077 and B = - 17.321. In the case of complexes formed between the uranyl ion and salicylic acid and its derivatives, there is a correlation between complex stability and sigma/sub m/ and sigma/sub p/ substituent constants for the meta- and para-positions, respectively (A = 12.72, B = -4.41).

  16. Some History of Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Dennis W.

    2003-12-01

    The history of saltpeter is an interesting combination of chemistry, world trade, technology, politics, and warfare. Originally it was obtained from the dirt floors of stables, sheep pens, pigeon houses, caverns, and even peasants' cottages; any place manure and refuse accumulated in soil under dry conditions. When these sources became inadequate to meet demand it was manufactured on saltpeter plantations, located in dry climates, where piles of dirt, limestone, and manure were allowed to stand for three to five years while soil microbes oxidized the nitrogen to nitrate—an example of early bioengineering. Extensive deposits of sodium nitrate were mined in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile from 1830 until the mid 1920s when the mines were displaced by the Haber Ostwald process.

  17. Nitrate reductase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, N L; Cardenas, J

    1982-01-01

    The facultative phototroph Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides DSM158 was incapable of either assimilating or dissimilating nitrate, although the organism could reduce it enzymatically to nitrite either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark. Reduction of nitrate was mediated by a nitrate reductase bound to chromatophores that could be easily solubilized and functioned with chemically reduced viologens or photochemically reduced flavins as electron donors. The enzyme was solubilized, and some of its kinetic and molecular parameters were determined. It seemed to be nonadaptive, ammonia did not repress its synthesis, and its activity underwent a rapid decline when the cells entered the stationary growth phase. Studies with inhibitors and with metal antagonists indicated that molybdenum and possibly iron participate in the enzymatic reduction of nitrate. The conjectural significance of this nitrate reductase in phototrophic bacteria is discussed. PMID:6978883

  18. TREATMENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, T.W.; MacHutchin, J.G.; Yaffe, L.

    1958-06-10

    The treatment of waste solutions obtained in the processing of neutron- irradiated uranium containing fission products and ammonium nitrate is described. The object of this process is to provide a method whereby the ammonium nitrate is destroyed and removed from the solution so as to permit subsequent concentration of the solution.. In accordance with the process the residual nitrate solutions are treated with an excess of alkyl acid anhydride, such as acetic anhydride. Preferably, the residual nitrate solution is added to an excess of the acetic anhydride at such a rate that external heat is not required. The result of this operation is that the ammonium nitrate and acetic anhydride react to form N/sub 2/ O and acetic acid.

  19. High-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal synthesis, characterization, and structural relationships of layered uranyl arsenates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsin-Kuan; Ramachandran, Eswaran; Chen, Yi-Hsin; Chang, Wen-Jung; Lii, Kwang-Hwa

    2014-09-02

    Five new uranyl arsenates, Na14[(UO2)5(AsO4)8]·2H2O (1), K6[(UO2)5O5(AsO4)2] (2a), K4[(UO2)3O2(AsO4)2] (2b), Rb4[(UO2)3O2(AsO4)2] (3), and Cs6[(UO2)5O2(AsO4)4] (4), were synthesized by high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal reactions at about 560 °C and 1440 bar and were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Crystal data for compound 1: triclinic, P1, a = 7.0005(3) Å, b = 12.1324(4) Å, c = 13.7428(5) Å, α = 64.175(2)°, β = 89.092(2)°, γ = 85.548(2)°, V = 1047.26(7) Å(3), Z = 1, R1 = 0.0185; compound 2a: monoclinic, P2₁/c, a = 6.8615(3) Å, b = 24.702(1) Å, c = 7.1269(3) Å, β = 98.749(2)°, V = 1193.89(9) Å(3), Z = 2, R1 = 0.0225; compound 2b: monoclinic, P2₁/c, a = 6.7852(3) Å, b = 17.3640(8) Å, c = 7.1151(3) Å, β = 98.801(3)°, V = 828.42(6) Å(3), Z = 2, R1 = 0.0269; compound 3: monoclinic, P2₁/m, a = 6.9783(3) Å, b = 17.4513(8) Å, c = 7.0867(3) Å, β = 90.808(3)°, V = 862.94(7) Å(3), Z = 2, R1 = 0.0269; compound 4: triclinic, P1, a = 7.7628(3) Å, b = 9.3324(4) Å, c = 11.9336(4) Å, α = 75.611(2)°, β = 73.136(2)°, γ = 86.329(2)°, V = 801.37(5) Å(3), Z = 1, R1 = 0.0336. The five compounds have layer structures consisting of uranyl square, pentagonal, and hexagonal bipyramids as well as AsO4 tetrahedra. Compound 1 contains chains of discrete uranyl square and pentagonal bipyramids, 2a contains three-polyhedron-wide ribbons of edge- and corner-sharing uranyl square and pentagonal bipyramids, 2b and 3 contain dimers of edge-shairing pentagonal bipyramids that share edges with hexagonal bipyramids to form chains, and 4 contains one-polyhedron-wide zigzag chains of edge-sharing uranyl polyhedra. The double sheet structure of 1 is new, but the chain topology has been observed in an organically templated uranyl sulfate. Compound 2b is a new geometrical isomer of the phosphuranylite group. The sheet anion topologies of 2a and 4 can be obtained by

  20. Synthesis and structures of new uranyl malonate complexes with carbamide derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Serezhkina, L. B.; Grigor’ev, M. S.; Medvedkov, Ya. A.; Serezhkin, V. N.

    2015-09-15

    Crystals of new malonate-containing uranyl complexes [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(Imon)(H{sub 2}O)] (I) and [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O4)(Meur){sub 3}] (II), where Imon is imidazolidin-2-one (ethylenecarbamide) and Meur is methyl-carbamide, have been synthesized and studied by X-ray diffraction. Both compounds crystallize in the monoclinic system with the following unit-cell parameters (at 100 K): a = 11.1147(10) Å, b = 6.9900(6) Å, c = 14.4934(12) Å, β = 92.042(2)°, V = 1125.30(17) Å{sup 3}, sp. gr. P2{sub 1}/n, Z = 4, R{sub 1} = 0.0398 (I); a = 16.6613(5) Å, b = 9.5635(3) Å, c = 22.9773(6) Å, β = 103.669(2)°, V = 3557.51(18) Å{sup 3}, sp. gr. C2/c, Z = 8, R{sub 1} = 0.0207 (II). The crystals are composed of electroneutral chains [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(Imon)(H{sub 2}O)] and mononuclear groups [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(Meur){sub 3}] as the structural units belonging to the crystal-chemical groups AT{sup 11}M{sub 2}{sup 1} and AB{sup 01}M{sub 3}{sup 1} (A =UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, T{sup 11} and B{sup 01} = C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, M{sup 1} = Imon, H{sub 2}O, or Meur), respectively, of uranyl complexes. The packing modes of the uranyl-containing complexes were analyzed by the method of molecular Voronoi—Dirichlet polyhedra.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of a uranyl beta-diketiminate complex.

    PubMed

    Hayton, Trevor W; Wu, Guang

    2008-02-13

    Addition of 1 equiv of Li(Ar2nacnac) (Ar2nacnac = (2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3)NC(Me)CHC(Me)N(2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3)) to an Et2O suspension of UO2Cl2(THF)3 generates the uranyl dimer [UO2(Ar2nacnac)Cl]2 (1) in good yield. A second species can be isolated in low yield from the reaction mixtures of 1, namely [Li(OEt2)2][UO2(Ar2nacnac)Cl2] (2). The structures of both 1 and 2 have been confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Complex 1 reacts with Ph3PO to generate UO2(Ar2nacnac)Cl(Ph3PO) (3). In addition, 1 reacts with AgOTf and either 1 equiv of DPPMO2 or 2 equiv of Ph2MePO to provide [UO2(Ar2nacnac)(DPPMO2)][OTf] (4) and [UO2(Ar2nacnac)(Ph2MePO)2][OTf] (5), respectively. Both 4 and 5 have been fully characterized, including analysis by X-ray crystallography and cyclic voltammetry. Reduction of 4 with Cp2Co provides UO2(Ar2nacnac)(CH{Ph2PO}2) (6), a uranyl(VI) complex that is generated by the formal loss of H* from the DPPMO2 ligand. Labeling studies have been performed in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of hydrogen loss. In contrast, reduction of 5 with Cp2Co provides UO2(Ar2nacnac)(Ph2MePO)2 (7), a rare example of a uranyl(V) complex. As expected, the solid-state molecular structure of 7 reveals slightly longer U-O(oxo) bond lengths relative to 5. Furthermore, complex 7 can be converted back into 5 by oxidation with AgOTf in toluene.

  2. Synthesis and structures of new uranyl malonate complexes with carbamide derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serezhkina, L. B.; Grigor'ev, M. S.; Medvedkov, Ya. A.; Serezhkin, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    Crystals of new malonate-containing uranyl complexes [UO2(C3H2O4)( Imon)(H2O)] ( I) and [UO2(C3H2O4)( Meur)3] ( II), where Imon is imidazolidin-2-one (ethylenecarbamide) and Meur is methyl-carbamide, have been synthesized and studied by X-ray diffraction. Both compounds crystallize in the monoclinic system with the following unit-cell parameters (at 100 K): a = 11.1147(10) Å, b = 6.9900(6) Å, c = 14.4934(12) Å, β = 92.042(2)°, V = 1125.30(17) Å3, sp. gr. P21/ n, Z = 4, R 1 = 0.0398 ( I); a = 16.6613(5) Å, b = 9.5635(3) Å, c = 22.9773(6) Å, β = 103.669(2)°, V = 3557.51(18) Å3, sp. gr. C2/ c, Z = 8, R 1 = 0.0207 ( II). The crystals are composed of electroneutral chains [UO2(C3H2O4)( Imon)(H2O)] and mononuclear groups [UO2(C3H2O4)( Meur)3] as the structural units belonging to the crystal-chemical groups AT 11 M {2/1} and AB 01 M {3/1} ( A =UO{2/2+}, T 11 and B 01 = C3H2, M 1 = Imon, H2O, or Meur), respectively, of uranyl complexes. The packing modes of the uranyl-containing complexes were analyzed by the method of molecular Voronoi—Dirichlet polyhedra.

  3. Computer simulation of uranyl uptake by the rough lipopolysaccharide membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lins, Roberto D; Vorpagel, Erich R; Guglielmi, Matteo; Straatsma, T P

    2008-01-01

    Heavy metal environmental contaminants cannot be destroyed but require containment, preferably in concentrated form, in a solid or immobile form for recycling or final disposal. Microorganisms are able to take up and deposit high levels of contaminant metals, including radioactive metals such as uranium and plutonium, into their cell wall. Consequently, these microbial systems are of great interest as the basis for potential environmental bioremediation technologies. The outer membranes of Gram-negative microbes are highly nonsymmetric and exhibit a significant electrostatic potential gradient across the membrane. This gradient has a significant effect on the uptake and transport of charged and dipolar compounds. However, the effectiveness of microbial systems for environmental remediation will depend strongly on specific properties that determine the uptake of targeted contaminants by a particular cell wall. To aid in the design of microbial remediation technologies, knowledge of the factors that determine the affinity of a particular bacterial outer membrane for the most common ionic species found in contaminated soils and groundwater is of great importance. Using our previously developed model for the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, this work presents the potentials of mean force as the estimate of the free energy profile for uptake of sodium, calcium, chloride, uranyl ions, and a water molecule by the bacterial LPS membrane. A compatible classical parameter set for uranyl has been developed and validated. Results show that the uptake of uranyl is energetically a favorable process relative to the other ions studied. At neutral pH, this nuclide is shown to be retained on the surface of the LPS membrane through chelation with the carboxyl and hydroxyl groups located in the outer core.

  4. Transformation of human osteoblast cells to the tumorigenic phenotype by depleted uranium-uranyl chloride.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A C; Blakely, W F; Livengood, D; Whittaker, T; Xu, J; Ejnik, J W; Hamilton, M M; Parlette, E; John, T S; Gerstenberg, H M; Hsu, H

    1998-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a dense heavy metal used primarily in military applications. Although the health effects of occupational uranium exposure are well known, limited data exist regarding the long-term health effects of internalized DU in humans. We established an in vitro cellular model to study DU exposure. Microdosimetric assessment, determined using a Monte Carlo computer simulation based on measured intracellular and extracellular uranium levels, showed that few (0.0014%) cell nuclei were hit by alpha particles. We report the ability of DU-uranyl chloride to transform immortalized human osteoblastic cells (HOS) to the tumorigenic phenotype. DU-uranyl chloride-transformants are characterized by anchorage-independent growth, tumor formation in nude mice, expression of high levels of the k-ras oncogene, reduced production of the Rb tumor-suppressor protein, and elevated levels of sister chromatid exchanges per cell. DU-uranyl chloride treatment resulted in a 9.6 (+/- 2.8)-fold increase in transformation frequency compared to untreated cells. In comparison, nickel sulfate resulted in a 7.1 (+/- 2.1)-fold increase in transformation frequency. This is the first report showing that a DU compound caused human cell transformation to the neoplastic phenotype. Although additional studies are needed to determine if protracted DU exposure produces tumors in vivo, the implication from these in vitro results is that the risk of cancer induction from internalized DU exposure may be comparable to other biologically reactive and carcinogenic heavy-metal compounds (e.g., nickel). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9681973

  5. Intercalation Reactions of the Neptunyl(VI) Dication with Hydrogen Uranyl Phosphate and Hydrogen Neptunyl Phosphate Host Lattices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-17

    Aqueous reactions of HU with U01 an;f72Pwih(U 2 3 P0)U0u and of HNpP with NpO2, lead to hydrated layered solids, (U02 ( 4 )2, UP, and (Np0 2 ) 3 (P04)2...Abstract The hydrated layered solids, hydrogen uranyl phosphate , HUO 2 PO 4 , HUP, and its isostructural neptunyl analog, HNpO2PO4 , HNpP, can be...host-lattice for intercalation chemistry. 1- 3 Among the intercalating species we have employed is the uranyl ion itself. 4 ,5 In these earlier studies we

  6. Spectrophotometric investigation of reaction of uranyl salts with neutral organophosphorus compounds in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Takshin, V.V.; Khokhlova, N.L.

    1985-07-01

    The authors study the reaction of uranyl salts with neutral organophosphorous compounds in aqueous solutions of mineral acids. They show that compounds of the R /SUB n/ P(O)-(OR) /SUB 3-n/ type (n = 0, 1, 2, 3; R = CH/sub 3/, C/sub 2/H/sub 5/) do not form complexes with UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/. In perchlorate solutions U/sub 2//sup 2 +/ forms complex with ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/ N)/sub 3/ PO. The equilibrium constant of this reaction is 6.4 + or - 0.6 mole/sup -1/. liter at 298 degrees K.

  7. Interfacial Interaction of Titania Nanoparticles and Ligated Uranyl Species: A Relativistic DFT Investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Bo; Zheng, Ming; Schreckenbach, Georg; Pan, Qing-Jiang

    2017-03-06

    To understand interfacial behavior of actinides adsorbed onto mineral surfaces and unravel their structure-property relationship, the structures, electronic properties, and energetics of various ligated uranyl species adsorbed onto TiO2 surface nanoparticle clusters (SNCs) were examined using relativistic density functional theory. Rutile (110) and anatase (101) titania surfaces, experimentally known to be stable, were fully optimized. For the former, models studied include clean and water-free Ti27O64H20 (dry), partially hydrated (Ti27O64H20)(H2O)8 (sol) and proton-saturated [(Ti27O64H20)(H2O)8(H)2](2+) (sat), while defect-free and defected anatase SNCs involving more than 38 TiO2 units were considered. The aquouranyl sorption onto rutile SNCs is energetically preferred, with interaction energies of -8.54, -10.36, and -2.39 eV, respectively. Energy decomposition demonstrates that the sorption is dominated by orbital attractive interactions and modified by steric effects. Greater hydrogen-bonding involvement leads to increased orbital interactions (i.e., more negative energy) from dry to sol/sat complexes, while much larger steric interaction in the sat complex significantly reduces the sorption interaction (i.e., more positive energy). For dry SNC, adsorbates were varied from aquo to aquo-carbonato, to carbonato, to hydroxo uranyl species. Longer U-Osurf/U-Ti distances and more positive sorption energies were calculated upon introducing carbonato and hydroxo ligands, indicative of weaker uranyl sorption onto the substrate. This is consistent with experimental observations that the uranyl sorption rate decreases upon raising solution pH value or adding carbon dioxide. Anatase SNCs adsorbing aquouranyl are even more exothermic, because more bonds are formed than in the case of rutile. Moreover, the anatase sorption can be tuned by surface defects as well as its Ti and O stoichiometry. All the aquouranyl-SNC complexes show similar character of molecular orbitals and

  8. Amine templating effect absent in uranyl sulfates synthesized with 1,4-n-butyldiamine

    SciTech Connect

    Jouffret, Laurent J.; Wylie, Ernest M.; Burns, Peter C.

    2013-01-15

    Two new uranyl sulfates, (C{sub 4}H{sub 14}N{sub 2})[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O)]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (NDUS2) and (C{sub 4}H{sub 14}N{sub 2})[(UO{sub 2})(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (NDUS3), were synthesized and their crystal structures determined. NDUS2 was obtained in highly acidic media heat-treated at 373 K and subsequently maintained at 278 K until crystals formed after two months. NDUS3 results from the degradation of NDUS2 over the course of a few days. NDUS2 and NDUS3 crystallize in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/n, a=10.9075(4) A, b=10.4513(4) A, c=17.7881(7) A, {beta}=97.908(2) Degree-Sign , V=2008.52(13) A{sup 3}, Z=4, at 140 K and a=8.8570(4) A, b=7.3299(3) A, c=20.4260(9) A, {beta}=95.140(2) Degree-Sign , V=1320.74(10) A{sup 3}, Z=4, at 140 K, respectively. The compounds contain interlayer 1,4-n-butyldiammonium cations that charge-balance the anionic structural units. - Graphical abstract: Amine templating effect absent in uranyl sulfates synthesized with 1,4-diaminobutane, as shown by the synthesis of two new uranyl sulfates, (C{sub 4}H{sub 14}N{sub 2})[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O)]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (NDUS2) and (C{sub 4}H{sub 14}N{sub 2})[(UO{sub 2})(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (NDUS3). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two layered uranyl sulfates were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amine molecules are located in the interlayers of the compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No templating effect of the amine was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amine molecules are only charge balancing cations in the structures.

  9. U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ powder from uranyl-loaded cation exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1985-01-01

    Large batches of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, suitable for powder metallurgy fabrication of Al-U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ cores for reactor fuel tubes, have been produced by deep-bed calcination of granular uranyl-loaded macroporous sulfonate cation exchange resin at 900 to 950/sup 0/C in air. Deep-bed calcination is the backup process for the reference process of rotary calcination and sintering. These processes are to be used for recycling uranium, and to produce U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ in the Fuel Production Facility to be built at the Savannah River Plant. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and photo luminescence studies of uranyl doped SrBPO{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect

    Rout, Annapurna; Suriyamurthy, N.; Panigrahi, B. S.

    2015-06-24

    SrBPO{sub 5}: UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was synthesized using solid state reaction method and characterized using powder X-ray diffraction. PXRD data showed the formation of single phase confirming successful doping of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. Photo luminescence investigation informed stabilization of Uranium as Uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) in SrBPO{sub 5} matrix. Luminescence decay time data suggested two possible environments for UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} with two different life time values.

  11. Nitrate concentrations under irrigated agriculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaporozec, A.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, considerable interest has been expressed in the nitrate content of water supplies. The most notable toxic effect of nitrate is infant methemoglobinemia. The risk of this disease increases significantly at nitrate-nitrogen levels exceeding 10 mg/l. For this reason, this concentration has been established as a limit for drinking water in many countries. In natural waters, nitrate is a minor ionic constituent and seldom accounts for more than a few percent of the total anions. However, nitrate in a significant concentration may occur in the vicinity of some point sources such as septic tanks, manure pits, and waste-disposal sites. Non-point sources contributing to groundwater pollution are numerous and a majority of them are related to agricultural activities. The largest single anthropogenic input of nitrate into the groundwater is fertilizer. Even though it has not been proven that nitrogen fertilizers are responsible for much of nitrate pollution, they are generally recognized as the main threat to groundwater quality, especially when inefficiently applied to irrigated fields on sandy soils. The biggest challenge facing today's agriculture is to maintain the balance between the enhancement of crop productivity and the risk of groundwater pollution. ?? 1982 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  12. Identification of genes and pathways involved in the synthesis of Mead acid (20:3n-9), an indicator of essential fatty acid deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ichi, Ikuyo; Kono, Nozomu; Arita, Yuka; Haga, Shizuka; Arisawa, Kotoko; Yamano, Misato; Nagase, Mana; Fujiwara, Yoko; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, 5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid (Mead acid, 20:3n-9) is synthesized from oleic acid during a state of essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD). Mead acid is thought to be produced by the same enzymes that synthesize arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, but the genes and the pathways involved in the conversion of oleic acid to Mead acid have not been fully elucidated. The levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in cultured cells are generally very low compared to those in mammalian tissues. In this study, we found that cultured cells, such as NIH3T3 and Hepa1-6 cells, have significant levels of Mead acid, indicating that cells in culture are in an EFAD state under normal culture conditions. We then examined the effect of siRNA-mediated knockdown of fatty acid desaturases and elongases on the level of Mead acid, and found that knockdown of Elovl5, Fads1, or Fads2 decreased the level of Mead acid. This and the measured levels of possible intermediate products for the synthesis of Mead acid such as 18:2n-9, 20:1n-9 and 20:2n-9 in the knocked down cells indicate two pathways for the synthesis of Mead acid: pathway 1) 18:1n-9→(Fads2)→18:2n-9→(Elovl5)→20:2n-9→(Fads1)→20:3n-9 and pathway 2) 18:1n-9→(Elovl5)→20:1n-9→(Fads2)→20:2n-9→(Fads1)→20:3n-9.

  13. Effects of essential amino acid deficiency: down-regulation of KCC2 and the GABAA receptor; disinhibition in the anterior piriform cortex.

    PubMed

    Sharp, James W; Ross-Inta, Catherine M; Baccelli, Irène; Payne, John A; Rudell, John B; Gietzen, Dorothy W

    2013-11-01

    The anterior piriform cortex (APC) is activated by, and is the brain area most sensitive to, essential (indispensable) amino acid (IAA) deficiency. The APC is required for the rapid (20 min) behavioral rejection of IAA deficient diets and increased foraging, both crucial adaptive functions supporting IAA homeostasis in omnivores. The biochemical mechanisms signaling IAA deficiency in the APC block initiation of translation in protein synthesis via uncharged tRNA and the general amino acid control kinase, general control nonderepressing kinase 2. Yet, how inhibition of protein synthesis activates the APC is unknown. The neuronal K(+) Cl(-) cotransporter, neural potassium chloride co-transporter (KCC2), and GABAA receptors are essential inhibitory elements in the APC with short plasmalemmal half-lives that maintain control in this highly excitable circuitry. After a single IAA deficient meal both proteins were reduced (vs. basal diet controls) in western blots of APC (but not neocortex or cerebellum) and in immunohistochemistry of APC. Furthermore, electrophysiological analyses support loss of inhibitory elements such as the GABAA receptor in this model. As the crucial inhibitory function of the GABAA receptor depends on KCC2 and the Cl(-) transmembrane gradient it establishes, these results suggest that loss of such inhibitory elements contributes to disinhibition of the APC in IAA deficiency. The circuitry of the anterior piriform cortex (APC) is finely balanced between excitatory (glutamate, +) and inhibitory (GABA, -) transmission. GABAA receptors use Cl(-), requiring the neural potassium chloride co-transporter (KCC2). Both are rapidly turning-over proteins, dependent on protein synthesis for repletion. In IAA (indispensable amino acid) deficiency, within 20 min, blockade of protein synthesis prevents restoration of these inhibitors; they are diminished; disinhibition ensues. GCN2 = general control non-derepressing kinase 2, eIF2α = α-subunit of the eukaryotic

  14. Synthesis and structure determination of uranyl peroxide nanospheres in the presence of organic structure directing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, T. Z.; Burns, P. C.

    2007-12-01

    Recently, actinyl peroxide nanoclusters containing 20, 24, 28, or 32 actinyl polyhedra have been synthesized and their structures identified with single crystal X-ray diffraction [1]. Most nanomaterials are composed of main group elements or transition metals, therefore, these actinyl nanospheres may display vastly different chemical and physical properties due to the presence of filled f-orbitals. A major goal of our research group is to create novel actinyl materials, focusing on nano- and mesoporous materials. The original nanosphere syntheses were limited to inorganic crystallization agents, such as monovalent cations. Over the last decade, the use of organic compounds and surfactants have received increased attention as structure-directing agents for the generation of novel inorganic materials. Using structure-directing organic amines we have successfully synthesized and determined the structures of uranyl nanospheres containing 40 and 50 uranyl polyhedra. The topology of the skeletal U-50 nanosphere is identical to the C50Cl10 fullerene [2]. The topographical relationship between the actinyl nanospheres and fullerene or fullerene-like material may provide additional insight into stable configurations for lower fullerenes. [1] Burns et al., Actinyl peroxide nanospheres. Angewandte Chemie, International Edition, 2005. 44(14): p. 2135. [2] Xie et al., Capturing the Labile Fullerene[50] as C50Cl10. Science, (2004) 305(5671): p. 699.

  15. Structural elucidation and physicochemical properties of mononuclear Uranyl(VI) complexes incorporating dianionic units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, Mohammad; Velmurugan, Gunasekaran; Wabaidur, Saikh Mohammad; Trzesowska-Kruszynska, Agata; Kruszynski, Rafal; Al-Resayes, Saud I.; Al-Othman, Zeid A.; Venuvanalingam, Ponnambalam

    2016-09-01

    Two derivatives of organouranyl mononuclear complexes [UO2(L)THF] (1) and [UO2(L)Alc] (2), where L = (2,2‧-(1E,1‧E)-(2,2-dimethylpropane-1,3-dyl)bis(azanylylidene, THF = Tetrahydrofuran, Alc = Alcohol), have been prepared. These complexes have been determined by elemental analyses, single crystal X-ray crystallography and various spectroscopic studies. Moreover, the structure of these complexes have also been studied by DFT and time dependent DFT measurements showing that both the complexes have distorted pentagonal bipyramidal environment around uranyl ion. TD-DFT results indicate that the complex 1 displays an intense band at 458.7 nm which is mainly associated to the uranyl centered LMCT, where complex 2 shows a band at 461.8 nm that have significant LMCT character. The bonding has been further analyzed by EDA and NBO. The photocatalytic activity of complexes 1 and 2 for the degradation of rhodamine-B (RhB) and methylene blue (MB) under the irradiation of 500W Xe lamp has been explored, and found more efficient in presence of complex 1 than complex 2 for both dyes. In addition, dye adsorption and photoluminescence properties have also been discussed for both complexes.

  16. Rapid Dissolution of Soluble Uranyl Phases in Arid, Mine-Impacted Catchments near Church Rock, NM

    PubMed Central

    DELEMOS, JAMIE L.; BOSTICK, BENJAMIN C.; QUICKSALL, ANDREW N.; LANDIS, JOSHUA D.; GEORGE, CHRISTINE C.; SLAGOWSKI, NAOMI L.; ROCK, TOMMY; BRUGGE, DOUG; LEWIS, JOHNNYE; DURANT, JOHN L.

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that runoff of uranium-bearing particles from mining waste disposal areas was a significant mechanism for redistribution of uranium in the northeastern part of the Upper Puerco River watershed (New Mexico). However, our results were not consistent with this hypothesis. Analysis of >100 sediment and suspended sediment samples collected adjacent to and downstream from uranium source areas indicated that uranium levels in the majority of the samples were not elevated above background. Samples collected within 50 m of a known waste disposal site were subjected to detailed geochemical characterization. Uranium in these samples was found to be highly soluble; treatment with synthetic pore water for 24 h caused dissolution of 10–50% of total uranium in the samples. Equilibrium uranium concentrations in pore water were >4.0 mg/L and were sustained in repeated wetting events, effectively depleting soluble uranium from the solid phase. The dissolution rate of uranium appeared to be controlled by solid-phase diffusion of uranium from within uranium-bearing mineral particles. X-ray adsorption spectroscopy indicated the presence of a soluble uranyl silicate, and possibly a uranyl phosphate. These phases were exhausted in transported sediment suggesting that uranium was readily mobilized from sediments in the Upper Puerco watershed and transported in the dissolved load. These results could have significance for uranium risk assessment as well as mining waste management and cleanup efforts. PMID:18589950

  17. Structural elucidation and physicochemical properties of mononuclear Uranyl(VI) complexes incorporating dianionic units

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohammad; Velmurugan, Gunasekaran; Wabaidur, Saikh Mohammad; Trzesowska-Kruszynska, Agata; Kruszynski, Rafal; Al-Resayes, Saud I.; Al-Othman, Zeid A.; Venuvanalingam, Ponnambalam

    2016-01-01

    Two derivatives of organouranyl mononuclear complexes [UO2(L)THF] (1) and [UO2(L)Alc] (2), where L = (2,2′-(1E,1′E)-(2,2-dimethylpropane-1,3-dyl)bis(azanylylidene, THF = Tetrahydrofuran, Alc = Alcohol), have been prepared. These complexes have been determined by elemental analyses, single crystal X-ray crystallography and various spectroscopic studies. Moreover, the structure of these complexes have also been studied by DFT and time dependent DFT measurements showing that both the complexes have distorted pentagonal bipyramidal environment around uranyl ion. TD-DFT results indicate that the complex 1 displays an intense band at 458.7 nm which is mainly associated to the uranyl centered LMCT, where complex 2 shows a band at 461.8 nm that have significant LMCT character. The bonding has been further analyzed by EDA and NBO. The photocatalytic activity of complexes 1 and 2 for the degradation of rhodamine-B (RhB) and methylene blue (MB) under the irradiation of 500W Xe lamp has been explored, and found more efficient in presence of complex 1 than complex 2 for both dyes. In addition, dye adsorption and photoluminescence properties have also been discussed for both complexes. PMID:27595801

  18. Impact of pore size on the sorption of uranyl under seawater conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Mayes, Richard T.; Gorka, Joanna; Dai, Sheng

    2016-04-05

    The extraction of uranium from seawater has received significant interest recently, because of the possibility of a near-limitless supply of uranium to fuel the nuclear power industry. While sorbent development has focused primarily on polymeric sorbents, nanomaterials represent a new area that has the potential to surpass the current polymeric sorbents, because of the high surface areas that are possible. Mesoporous carbon materials are a stable, high-surface-area material capable of extracting various chemical species from a variety of environments. Herein, we report the use of a dual templating process to understand the effect of pore size on the adsorption ofmore » uranyl ions from a uranyl brine consisting of seawater-relevant sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate ions. It was found that pore size played a more significant role in the effective use of the grafted polymer, leading to higher uranium capacities than the surface area. Furthermore, the pore size must be tailored to meet the demands of the extraction medium and analyte metal to achieve efficacy as an adsorbent.« less

  19. Uranyl Carboxyphosphonates Derived from Hydrothermal in Situ Ligand Reaction: Syntheses, Structures, and Computational Investigations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dai; Bai, Xiaojing; Tian, Hong-Rui; Yang, Weiting; Li, Zewen; Huang, Qing; Du, Shiyu; Sun, Zhong-Ming

    2015-09-08

    Two uranyl carboxyphosphonates (H2dipy)[(UO2)3(H2O)2(H2DPTP)2]·2H2O (DPTP-U1) and (H2bbi)[(UO2)4(H2O)2(HDPTP)2] (DPTP-U2) [H6DPTP = 2,5-diphosphonoterephthalic acid, dipy = 4,4'-bipyridine, bbi = 1,1'-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(imidazole)] were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The carboxyphosphonate ligand was formed through the in situ oxidation of (2,5-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene)diphosphonic acid mediated by UO2(2+). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that DPTP-U1 possesses uranyl carboxyphosphonate layers that are separated by protonated dipy cations. Whereas DPTP-U2 is in a three-dimensional framework structure with channels filled by protonated bbi cations. The computational investigations give an insight into the nature of bonding interactions between uranium(VI) and carboxyphosphonate ligand. The spectroscopic properties were also studied.

  20. Impact of pore size on the sorption of uranyl under seawater conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, Richard T.; Gorka, Joanna; Dai, Sheng

    2016-04-05

    The extraction of uranium from seawater has received significant interest recently, because of the possibility of a near-limitless supply of uranium to fuel the nuclear power industry. While sorbent development has focused primarily on polymeric sorbents, nanomaterials represent a new area that has the potential to surpass the current polymeric sorbents, because of the high surface areas that are possible. Mesoporous carbon materials are a stable, high-surface-area material capable of extracting various chemical species from a variety of environments. Herein, we report the use of a dual templating process to understand the effect of pore size on the adsorption of uranyl ions from a uranyl brine consisting of seawater-relevant sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate ions. It was found that pore size played a more significant role in the effective use of the grafted polymer, leading to higher uranium capacities than the surface area. Furthermore, the pore size must be tailored to meet the demands of the extraction medium and analyte metal to achieve efficacy as an adsorbent.

  1. The "silver-nitrate-oma".

    PubMed

    McBride, T J; Rand, B; Dhillon, S S

    2012-01-01

    This case report demonstrates and emphasises the unusual radiographic appearance of silver nitrate treatment in a 30-year-old patient, who subsequently underwent excision biopsy of a presumed potentially malignant lesion.

  2. Molten nitrate salt technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, R. W.; Kramer, C. M.; Bradshaw, R. W.; Nissen, D. A.; Goods, S. H.; Mar, R. W.; Munford, J. W.; Karnowsky, M. M.; Biefeld, R. N.; Norem, N. J.

    1981-03-01

    Of the fluids proposed for heat transfer and energy storage, molten nitrate salts offer significant economic advantages. The nitrate salt of most interest is a binary mixture of NaNO3 and KNO3. Although nitrate/nitrite mixtures were used for decades as heat transfer and heat treatment fluids the use was at temperatures of about 4500 C and lower. In solar thermal power systems the salts will experience a temperature range of 350 to 6000 C. Because central receiver applications place more rigorous demands and higher temperatures on nitrate salts a comprehensive experimental program was developed to examine what effects, if any, the new demands and temperatures have on the salts. The experiments include corrosion testing, environmental cracking of containment materials, and determinations of physical properties and decomposition mechanisms.

  3. Cation–cation interactions and cation exchange in a series of isostructural framework uranyl tungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C.

    2014-05-01

    The isotypical compounds (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(H{sub 2}O){sub 5} (1), Ag(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (2), K(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} (3), Rb(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3.5} (4), and Cs(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (5) were synthesized, characterized, and their structures determined. Each crystallizes in space group Cc. (1): a=12.979 (3), b=10.238 (2), c=11.302 (2), β=102.044 (2); (2): a=13.148 (2), b=9.520 (1), c=11.083 (2), β=101.568 (2); (3): a=13.111 (8), b=9.930 (6), c=11.242 (7), β=101.024 (7); (4): a=12.940 (2), b=10.231 (2), c=11.259(2), β=102.205 (2); (5): a=12.983 (3), b=10.191 (3), c=11.263 (4), β=101.661 (4). Compounds 1–5 are a framework of uranyl and tungsten polyhedra containing cation–cation interactions. The framework has three symmetrically distinct U(VI) cations, one tungsten, sixteen to eighteen oxygen atoms, and in 2–5, one monovalent cation. Each atom occupies a general position. Each U(VI) cation is present as a typical (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl ion in an overall pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment. Each pentagonal bipyramid shares two equatorial edges with two other pentagonal bipyramids, forming a trimer. Trimers are connected into chains by edge-sharing with WO{sub 6} octahedra. Chains are linked through cation–cation interactions between two symmetrically independent uranyl ions. This yields a remarkably complex system of intersecting channels that extend along [0 0 1] and [−1 1 0]. The cation exchange properties of 2 and 3 were characterized at room temperature and at 140 °C. - Graphical abstract: Chains of uranium and tungsten polyhedra are connected into a three dimensional framework by cation–cation interactions occurring between two symmetrically independent uranyl pentagonal bipyramids. Monovalent cations present in channels within the structure can be exchanged by room temperature or mild hydrothermal

  4. Vasodilator Therapy: Nitrates and Nicorandil.

    PubMed

    Tarkin, Jason M; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Nitrates have been used to treat symptoms of chronic stable angina for over 135 years. These drugs are known to activate nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine-3',-5'-monophasphate (cGMP) signaling pathways underlying vascular smooth muscle cell relaxation, albeit many questions relating to how nitrates work at the cellular level remain unanswered. Physiologically, the anti-angina effects of nitrates are mostly due to peripheral venous dilatation leading to reduction in preload and therefore left ventricular wall stress, and, to a lesser extent, epicardial coronary artery dilatation and lowering of systemic blood pressure. By counteracting ischemic mechanisms, short-acting nitrates offer rapid relief following an angina attack. Long-acting nitrates, used commonly for angina prophylaxis are recommended second-line, after beta-blockers and calcium channel antagonists. Nicorandil is a balanced vasodilator that acts as both NO donor and arterial K(+) ATP channel opener. Nicorandil might also exhibit cardioprotective properties via mitochondrial ischemic preconditioning. While nitrates and nicorandil are effective pharmacological agents for prevention of angina symptoms, when prescribing these drugs it is important to consider that unwanted and poorly tolerated hemodynamic side-effects such as headache and orthostatic hypotension can often occur owing to systemic vasodilatation. It is also necessary to ensure that a dosing regime is followed that avoids nitrate tolerance, which not only results in loss of drug efficacy, but might also cause endothelial dysfunction and increase long-term cardiovascular risk. Here we provide an update on the pharmacological management of chronic stable angina using nitrates and nicorandil.

  5. Synthesis of thermally stable extra-large pore crystalline materials: a uranyl germanate with 12-ring channels.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Chiang, Ray-Kuang; Lii, Kwang-Hwa

    2009-02-18

    A thermally stable extra-large pore uranyl germanate is synthesized under high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal conditions at 585 degrees C and 150 MPa. The structure contains U(6+)O(6) tetragonal bipyramids which are interconnected by digermanate groups to form a 3D framework with 12-ring pore openings.

  6. Potassium uranyl borate 3D framework compound resulted from temperature directed hydroborate condensation: structure, spectroscopy, and dissolution studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaomei; Liu, Zhiyong; Yang, Shitong; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2016-10-04

    The equatorial coordination nature of the uranyl unit has resulted in only three uranyl borate 3D framework compounds reported so far formed from boric acid flux reactions conducted at 190 °C while all others are 2D layers. Here in this work, by increasing the reaction temperature to 250 °C, a new potassium uranyl borate K[(UO2)B6O10(OH)] (KUBO-4) framework compound is synthesized that shares the same layer topology with the previously reported 2D layered KUBO-1. The 3D structure of KUBO-4 is achieved by interlayer hydroborate condensation. The KUBO-4 was further characterized with single crystal XRD, SHG and fluorescence spectra, and TG/DSC measurements. A deep understanding regarding the dissolution behaviours of uranyl borate is achieved via solubility studies of the KUBO-1 and KUBO-4 performed using a combination of ICP-MS, powder XRD, and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The results confirm the lack of stability of borates in aqueous solutions with the presence of coordinating ligands in the environment regardless of the structure types.

  7. Nitrate transport and signalling.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anthony J; Fan, Xiaorong; Orsel, Mathilde; Smith, Susan J; Wells, Darren M

    2007-01-01

    Physiological measurements of nitrate (NO(3)(-)) uptake by roots have defined two systems of high and low affinity uptake. In Arabidopsis, genes encoding both of these two uptake systems have been identified. Most is known about the high affinity transport system (HATS) and its regulation and yet measurements of soil NO(3)(-) show that it is more often available in the low affinity range above 1 mM concentration. Several different regulatory mechanisms have been identified for AtNRT2.1, one of the membrane transporters encoding HATS; these include feedback regulation of expression, a second component protein requirement for membrane targeting and phosphorylation, possibly leading to degradation of the protein. These various changes in the protein may be important for a second function in sensing NO(3)(-) availability at the surface of the root. Another transporter protein, AtNRT1.1 also has a role in NO(3)(-) sensing that, like AtNRT2.1, is independent of their transport function. From the range of concentrations present in the soil it is proposed that the NO(3)(-)-inducible part of HATS functions chiefly as a sensor for root NO(3)(-) availability. Two other key NO(3)(-) transport steps for efficient nitrogen use by crops, efflux across membranes and vacuolar storage and remobilization, are discussed. Genes encoding vacuolar transporters have been isolated and these are important for manipulating storage pools in crops, but the efflux system is yet to be identified. Consideration is given to how well our molecular and physiological knowledge can be integrated as well to some key questions and opportunities for the future.

  8. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  9. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  10. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  11. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  12. Chemical equilibria in the uranyl(VI)-peroxide-carbonate system; identification of precursors for the formation of poly-peroxometallates.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Szabó, Zoltán; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2012-10-14

    The focus of this study is on the identification of precursors in solution that might act as building blocks when solid uranyl(VI) poly-peroxometallate clusters containing peroxide and hydroxide bridges are formed. The precursors could be identified by using carbonate as an auxiliary ligand that prevented the formation of large clusters, such as the ones found in solids of fullerene type. Using data from potentiometric and NMR ((17)O and (13)C) experiments we identified the following complexes and determined their equilibrium constants: (UO(2))(2)(O(2))(CO(3))(4)(6-), UO(2)(O(2))CO(3)(2-), UO(2)(O(2))(CO(3))(2)(4-), (UO(2))(2)(O(2))(CO(3))(2)(2-), (UO(2))(2)(O(2))(2)(CO(3))(2-) and [UO(2)(O(2))(CO(3))](5)(10-). The NMR spectra of the pentamer show that all uranyl and carbonate sites are equivalent, which is only consistent with a ring structure built from uranyl units linked by peroxide bridges with the carbonate coordinated "outside" the ring; this proposed structure is very similar to [UO(2)(O(2))(oxalate)](5)(10-) identified by Burns et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2009, 131, 16648; Inorg. Chem., 2012, 51, 2403) in K(10)[UO(2)(O(2))(oxalate)](5)·(H(2)O)(13); similar ring structures where oxalate or carbonate has been replaced by hydroxide are important structure elements in solid poly-peroxometallate complexes. The equivalent uranyl sites in (UO(2))(2)(O(2))(2)(CO(3))(2-) suggest that the uranyl-units are linked by the carbonate ion and not by peroxide.

  13. Increase in tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase of bone at the early stage of ascorbic acid deficiency in the ascorbate-requiring Osteogenic Disorder Shionogi (ODS) rat.

    PubMed

    Goto, A; Tsukamoto, I

    2003-08-01

    The effect of ascorbic acid deficiency on bone metabolism was evaluated using the ascorbate-requiring Osteogenic Disorder Shionogi (ODS) rat model. Ascorbic acid (Asc)-deficient rats gained body weight in a manner similar to Asc-supplemented rats (control) during 3 weeks, but began to lose weight during the 4th week of Asc deficiency. The tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity in serum increased to about 2-fold the control value in the rats fed the Asc-free diet for 2, 3, and 4 weeks (AscD2, AscD3, and AscD4), while a decrease in the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was observed only in AscD4 rats. The serum pyridinoline cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) level significantly increased to 1.3-, 1.4-, and 1.9-fold of that in the controls in AscD2, D3, and D4, respectively. The ALP activity in the distal femur was unchanged in AscD1, D2, and D3, but decreased to 50% of the control level in AscD4 rats. The TRAP activity in the distal femur increased to about 2-fold of that in the controls in the AscD2 and D3 and decreased to the control level in the AscD4 rats. The amount of hydroxyproline in the distal femur significantly decreased to about 80%, 70%, and 60% of the control in AscD2, D3, and D4 rats, respectively. These decreases were associated with a similar reduction in the calcium content of the distal femur. Histochemical analysis of the distal femur showed an increase in TRAP-positive cells in AscD2 and AscD3 rats and a decrease in the trabecular bone in AscD2, D3, and D4 rats. These results suggested that a deficiency of Asc stimulated bone resorption at an early stage, followed by a decrease in bone formation in mature ODS rats which already had a well-developed collagen matrix and fully differentiated osteoblasts.

  14. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency does not alter the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on central serotonin turnover or behavior in the forced swim test in female rats.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Robert K; Able, Jessica A; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Lipton, Jack W

    2013-12-01

    While translational evidence suggests that long-chain omega-3 fatty acid status is positively associated with the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs, the neurochemical mechanisms mediating this interaction are not known. Here, we investigated the effects of dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid insufficiency on the neurochemical and behavioral effects of chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Female rats were fed diets with (CON, n=56) or without (DEF, n=40) the n-3 fatty acids during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90), and one half of each group was administered FLX (10mg/kg/day) for 30days (P60-P90) prior to testing. In adulthood (P90), regional brain serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic (5-HIAA) concentrations, presynaptic markers of 5-HT neurotransmission, behavioral responses in the forced swim test (FST), and plasma FLX and norfluoxetine (NFLX) concentrations were investigated. Peri-adolescent n-3 insufficiency led to significant reductions in cortical docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (-25%, p≤0.0001) and DEF+FLX (-28%, p≤0.0001) rats. Untreated DEF rats exhibited significantly lower regional 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios compared with untreated CON rats, but exhibited similar behavioral responses in the FST. In both CON and DEF rats, chronic FLX treatment similarly and significantly decreased 5-HIAA concentrations and the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens, brainstem tryptophan hydroxylase-2 mRNA expression, and immobility in the FST. While the FLX-induced reduction in 5-HIAA concentrations in the prefrontal cortex was significantly blunted in DEF rats, the reduction in the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio was similar to CON rats. Although plasma FLX and NFLX levels were not significantly different in DEF and CON rats, the NFLX/FLX ratio was significantly lower in DEF+FLX rats. These preclinical data demonstrate that n-3 fatty acid deficiency does not significantly reduce the effects of chronic

  15. A new uranyl niobate sheet in the cesium uranyl niobate Cs{sub 9}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 4}(NbO{sub 5})(Nb{sub 2}O{sub 8}){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Saad, S.; Obbade, S. Yagoubi, S.; Renard, C.; Abraham, F.

    2008-04-15

    A new cesium uranyl niobate, Cs{sub 9}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 4}(NbO{sub 5})(Nb{sub 2}O{sub 8}){sub 2}] or Cs{sub 9}U{sub 8}Nb{sub 5}O{sub 41} has been synthesized by high-temperature solid-state reaction, using a mixture of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}. Single crystals were obtained by incongruent melting of a starting mixture with metallic ratio=Cs/U/Nb=1/1/1. The crystal structure of the title compound was determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data, and solved in the monoclinic system with the following crystallographic data: a=16.729(2) A, b=14.933(2) A, c=20.155(2) A{beta}=110.59(1){sup o}, P2{sub 1}/c space group and Z=4. The crystal structure was refined to agreement factors R{sub 1}=0.049 and wR{sub 2}=0.089, calculated for 4660 unique observed reflections with I{>=}2{sigma}(I), collected on a BRUKER AXS diffractometer with MoK{alpha} radiation and a CCD detector. In this structure the UO{sub 7} uranyl pentagonal bipyramids are connected by sharing edges and corners to form a uranyl layer {sub {infinity}}{sup 2}[U{sub 8}O{sub 36}] corresponding to a new anion-sheet topology, and creating triangular, rectangular and square vacant sites. The two last sites are occupied by Nb{sub 2}O{sub 8} entities and NbO{sub 5} square pyramids, respectively, to form infinite uranyl niobate sheets {sub {infinity}}{sup 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 4}(NbO{sub 5})(Nb{sub 2}O{sub 8}){sub 2}]{sup 9-} stacking along the [010] direction. The Nb{sub 2}O{sub 8} entities result from two edge-shared NbO{sub 5} square pyramids. The Cs{sup +} cations are localized between layers and ensured the cohesion of the structure. The cesium cation mobility between the uranyl niobate sheets was studied by electrical measurements. The conductivity obeys the Arrhenius law in all the studied temperature domains. The observed low conductivity values with high activation energy may be explained by the strong connection of the Cs{sup +} cations to the infinite

  16. Nitrate transport is independent of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases in barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) has NADH-specific and NAD(P)H-bispecific nitrate reductase isozymes. Four isogenic lines with different nitrate reductase isozyme combinations were used to determine the role of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases on nitrate transport and assimilation in barley seedlings. Both nitrate reductase isozymes were induced by nitrate and were required for maximum nitrate assimilation in barley seedlings. Genotypes lacking the NADH isozyme (Az12) or the NAD(P)H isozyme (Az70) assimilated 65 or 85%, respectively, as much nitrate as the wild type. Nitrate assimilation by genotype (Az12;Az70) which is deficient in both nitrate reductases, was only 13% of the wild type indicating that the NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductase isozymes are responsible for most of the nitrate reduction in barley seedlings. For all genotypes, nitrate assimilation rates in the dark were about 55% of the rates in light. Hypotheses that nitrate reductase has direct or indirect roles in nitrate uptake were not supported by this study. Induction of nitrate transporters and the kinetics of net nitrate uptake were the same for all four genotypes indicating that neither nitrate reductase isozyme has a direct role in nitrate uptake in barley seedlings.

  17. Reduction of nitrate in Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin Koo; Barua, Sumitra; Reed, SB; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrikson, JK; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, a napDAGHB gene cluster encoding periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) and accessory proteins and an nrfA gene encoding periplasmic nitrite reductase (NrfA) have been identified. These two systems seem to be atypical because the genome lacks genes encoding cytoplasmic membrane electron transport proteins, NapC for NAP and NrfBCD/NrfH for NRF, respectively. Here, we present evidence that reduction of nitrate to ammonium in S. oneidensis is carried out by these atypical systems in a two-step manner. Transcriptional and mutational analyses suggest that CymA, a cytoplasmic membrane electron transport protein, is likely to be the functional replacement of both NapC and NrfH in S. oneidensis. Surprisingly, a strain devoid of napB encoding the small subunit of nitrate reductase exhibited the maximum cell density sooner than the wild type. Further characterization of this strain showed that nitrite was not detected as a free intermediate in its culture and NapB provides a fitness gain for S. oneidensis to compete for nitrate in the environments. On the basis results from mutational analyses of napA, napB, nrfA and napBnrfA in-frame deletion mutants, we propose that NapB is able to favor nitrate reduction by routing electrons to NapA exclusively.

  18. Method and apparatus for producing uranyl peroxide (UO/sub 4/. 2H/sub 2/O) from uranium and uranium alloy pieces

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, E.N.

    1987-10-20

    This patent describes a method of producing uranyl peroxide (UF/sub 4/ . 2H/sub 2/O) from uranium-bearing metal pieces comprising: dissolving the uranium-bearing metal pieces in a first aqueous solution containing nitric acid and at least 0.5% but no more than 2.0% fluoboric acid to provide a second aqueous solution which includes uranyl ions (UO/sub 2//sup +2/) and nitric and fluoboric acids; adding hydrogen peroxide to the second aqueous solution to precipitate uranyl peroxide out of the second solution and provide a third aqueous solution containing nitric and fluoboric acid; and separating the uranyl peroxide from the third aqueous solution.

  19. The Influence of the Linker Geometry in Bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) Ligands on Solution-Phase Uranyl Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Szigethy, Geza; Raymond, Kenneth

    2010-08-12

    Seven water-soluble, tetradentate bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) (bis-Me-3,2-HOPO) ligands were synthesized that vary only in linker geometry and rigidity. Solution phase thermodynamic measurements were conducted between pH 1.6 and pH 9.0 to determine the effects of these variations on proton and uranyl cation affinity. Proton affinity decreases by introduction of the solubilizing triethylene glycol group as compared to un-substituted reference ligands. Uranyl affinity was found to follow no discernable trends with incremental geometric modification. The butyl-linked 4Li-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand exhibited the highest uranyl affinity, consistent with prior in vivo decorporation results. Of the rigidly-linked ligands, the o-phenylene linker imparted the best uranyl affinity to the bis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand platform.

  20. Theoretical exploration of uranyl complexes of a designed polypyrrolic macrocycle: structure/property effects of hinge size on Pacman-shaped complexes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qing-Jiang; Odoh, Samuel O; Schreckenbach, Georg; Arnold, Polly L; Love, Jason B

    2012-08-07

    A polypyrrolic macrocycle with naphthalenyl linkers between the N(4)-donor compartments (L(2)) was designed theoretically according to its experimentally-known analogues with phenylenyl (L(1)) and anthracenyl (L(3)) linkers. The uranyl and bis(uranyl) complexes formed by this L(2) ligand have been examined using scalar-relativistic density functional theory. The calculated structural properties of the mononuclear uranyl-L(2) complexes are similar to those of their L(1) counterparts. The binuclear L(2) complexes exhibit a butterfly-like bis(uranyl) core in which a linear uranyl is coordinated in a side-by-side fashion to a cis-uranyl unit. The calculated U[double bond, length as m-dash]O bond orders in the uranyl-L(2) complexes indicate partial triple bonding character with the only exceptions being the U-O(endo) bonds in the U(2)O(4) core of the butterfly-shaped binuclear complexes. Overall, the bond orders agree with the trends in the calculated U[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretching vibrational frequencies. Regarding the bis(uranyl) L(1), L(2) and L(3) complexes, the phenylenyl-hinge L(1) complexes adopt a butterfly-like and a T-shaped isomer in the oxidation state of U(vi), but only a butterfly-like one in the U(v), which differs from that of the naphthalenyl-hinge L(2) complexes as well as the lateral twisted structure of the anthracenyl-hinge L(3) complexes. The intramolecular cation-cation interactions are found in the L(1) and L(2) complexes, but are absent in the L(3) complexes. Finally, using model uranyl transfer reactions from the L(1) complexes, the formation of the mononuclear L(2) complexes is calculated to be a slightly endothermic process. This suggests that it should be possible to synthesize the L(2) complexes using similar protocols as employed for the L(1) complexes.

  1. Syntheses, structures, characterizations and charge-density matching of novel amino-templated uranyl selenates

    SciTech Connect

    Ling Jie; Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C.

    2009-02-15

    Five hybrid organic-inorganic uranyl selenates have been synthesized, characterized and their structures have been determined. The structure of (C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O)] (EthylAUSe) is monoclinic, P2{sub 1}, a=8.290(1), b=12.349(2), c=11.038(2) A, {beta}=104.439(4){sup o}, V=1094.3(3) A{sup 3}, Z=2, R{sub 1}=0.0425. The structure of (C{sub 7}H{sub 10}N){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]H{sub 2}O (BenzylAUSe) is orthorhombic, Pna2{sub 1}, a=24.221(2), b=11.917(1), c=7.4528(7) A, V=2151.1(3) A{sup 3}, Z=4, R{sub 1}=0.0307. The structure of (C{sub 2}H{sub 10}N{sub 2})[(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)](H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (EDAUSe) is monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/c, a=11.677(2), b=7.908(1), c=15.698(2) A, {beta}=98.813(3){sup o}, V=1432.4(3) A{sup 3}, Z=4, R{sub 1}=0.0371. The structure of (C{sub 6}H{sub 22}N{sub 4})[(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)](H{sub 2}O) (TETAUSe) is monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/n, a=13.002(2), b=7.962(1), c=14.754(2) A, {beta}=114.077(2){sup o}, V=1394.5(3) A{sup 3}, Z=4, R{sub 1}=0.0323. The structure of (C{sub 6}H{sub 21}N{sub 4})[(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(HSeO{sub 4})] (TAEAUSe) is monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/m, a=9.2218(6), b=12.2768(9), c=9.4464(7) A, {beta}=116.1650(10){sup o}, V=959.88(12) A{sup 3}, Z=2, R{sub 1}=0.0322. The inorganic structural units in these compounds are composed of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and selenate tetrahedra. In each case, tetrahedra link bipyramids through vertex-sharing, resulting in chain or sheet topologies. The charge-density matching principle is discussed relative to the orientations of the organic molecules between the inorganic structural units. - Graphical abstract: The structures of five new inorganic-organic hybrid uranyl selenates present new structural topologies based upon chains and sheets of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and selenate tetrahedra.

  2. Roles of Acetone and Diacetone Alcohol in Coordination and Dissociation Reactions of Uranyl Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, Daniel; Schoendorff, George E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.; Gibson, John K.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2012-12-03

    Combined collision-induced dissociation mass-spectrometry experiments and DFT calculations were employed to elucidate the molecular structure of "hypercoordinated" species and the energetics of water-elimination reactions of uranyl acetone complexes observed in earlier work (Rios, D.; Rutkowski, P. X.; Van Stipdonk, M. J.; Gibson, J. K. Inorg. Chem. 2011, 50, 4781). It is shown that the "hypercoordinated" species contain diacetone alcohol ligands bonded in either bidentate or monodentate fashion, which are indistinguishable from (acetone)2 in mass spectrometry. Calculations confirm that four diacetone ligands can form stable complexes, but that the effective number of atoms coordinating with uranium in the equatorial plane does not exceed five. Diacetone alcohol ligands are shown to form mesityl oxide ligands and alkoxide species through the elimination of water, providing an explanation for the observed water-elimination reactions.

  3. The effect of uranyl acetate on human lymphoblastoid cells (RPMI 6410) and HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ghadially, F. N.; Yang-Steppuhn, S. E.; Lalonde, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    RPMI 6410 cells and HeLa cells were exposed to uranyl acetate. In RPMI 6410 cell cultures this produced single-membrane-bound presumably lysosomal bodies (called "uraniosomes") containing electron-dense crystals in the cultured cells and crystalline deposits in extracellular locations. Neither uraniosomes nor extracellular uranium deposits were found in HeLa cell cultures. All uraniosomes and extracellular uranium deposits analysed by electron-probed X-ray analysis were found to contain uranium, potassium and phosphorus. Traces of sulphur were detected in some but not all uraniosomes and extracellular uranium deposits. Traces of calcium were found in all extracellular uranium deposits and in some uraniosomes also. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7093141

  4. Potential remediation approach for uranium-contaminated groundwaters through potassium uranyl vanadate precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, T.K.; Kim, Y.; Wan, J.

    2009-06-01

    Methods for remediating groundwaters contaminated with uranium (U) through precipitation under oxidizing conditions are needed because bioreduction-based approaches require indefinite supply of electron donor. Although strategies based on precipitation of some phosphate minerals within the (meta)autunite group have been considered for this purpose, thermodynamic calculations for K- and Ca-uranyl phopsphates, meta-ankoleite and autunite, predict that U concentrations will exceed the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL = 0.13 {micro}M for U) at any pH and pCO{sub 2}, unless phosphate is maintained at much higher concentrations than the sub-{micro}M levels typically found in groundwaters. We hypothesized that potassium uranyl vanadate will control U(VI) concentrations below regulatory levels in slightly acidic to neutral solutions based on thermodynamic data available for carnotite, K{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}V{sub 2}O8. The calculations indicate that maintaining U concentrations below the MCL through precipitation of carnotite will be sustainable in some oxidizing waters having pH in the range of 5.5 to 7, even when dissolution of this solid phase becomes the sole supply of sub-{micro}M levels of V. Batch experiments were conducted in solutions at pH 6.0 and 7.8, chosen because of their very different predicted extents of U(VI) removal. Conditions were identified where U concentrations dropped below its MCL within 1 to 5 days of contact with oxidizing solutions containing 0.2 to 10 mM K, and 0.1 to 20 {micro}M V(V). This method may also have application in extracting (mining) U and V from groundwaters where they both occur at elevated concentrations.

  5. U(VI) uranyl cation-cation interactions in framework germanates.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica M; Moore-Shay, Laura J; Burns, Peter C

    2011-03-21

    The isomorphous compounds NH(4)[(UO(6))(2)(UO(2))(9)(GeO(4))(GeO(3)(OH))] (1), K[(UO(6))(2)(UO(2))(9)(GeO(4))(GeO(3)(OH))] (2), Li(3)O[(UO(6))(2)(UO(2))(9)(GeO(4))(GeO(3)(OH))] (3), and Ba[(UO(6))(2)(UO(2))(9)(GeO(4))(2)] (4) were synthesized by hydrothermal reaction at 220 °C. The structures were determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction and refined to R(1) = 0.0349 (1), 0.0232 (2), 0.0236 (3), 0.0267 (4). Each are trigonal, P(3)1c. 1: a = 10.2525(5), c = 17.3972(13), V = 1583.69(16) Å(3), Z = 2; 2: a = 10.226(4), c = 17.150(9), V = 1553.1(12) Å(3), Z = 2; 3: a = 10.2668(5), c = 17.0558(11), V = 1556.94(15) Å(3), Z = 2; 4: a = 10.2012(5), c = 17.1570(12), V = 1546.23(15) Å(3), Z = 2. There are three symmetrically independent U sites in each structure, two of which correspond to typical (UO(2))(2+) uranyl ions and the other of which is octahedrally coordinated by six O atoms. One of the uranyl ions donates a cation-cation interaction, and accepts a different cation-cation interaction. The linkages between the U-centered polyhedra result in a relatively dense three-dimensional framework. Ge and low-valence sites are located within cavities in the framework of U-polyhedra. Chemical, thermal, and spectroscopic characterizations are provided.

  6. Synthesis and structural characterization of hydrolysis products within the uranyl iminodiacetate and malate systems.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Daniel K; Gojdas, Kyle; Flores, Erin; Libo, Anna; Forbes, Tori Z

    2013-09-03

    The interplay of hydrolysis and chelation by organic ligands results in the formation of novel uranium species in aqueous solutions. Many of these molecular complexes have been identified by spectroscopic and potentiometric techniques, but a detailed structural understanding of these species is lacking. Identification of possible uranyl hydrolysis products in the presence of organic functional groups has been achieved by the crystallization of molecular species into a solid-state compound, followed by structural and chemical characterization of the material. The structures of three novel molecular complexes containing either iminodiacetate (ida) (Na3[(UO2)3(OH)3(ida)3]·8H2O (1)) or malate (mal) (K(pip)2[(UO2)3O(mal)3]·6H2O (2a) (pip = C4N2H12), (2b) (pip)3[(UO2)3O(mal)3]·H2O, and (pip)6[(UO2)11(O)4(OH)4(mal)6(CO3)2]·23H2O (3)) ligands have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and have been chemically characterized by IR, Raman, and NMR spectroscopies. A major structural component in compounds 1 and 2 is a trimeric 3:3 uranyl ida or mal species, but different bridging groups between the metal centers create variations in the structural topologies of the molecular units. Compound 3 contains a large polynuclear cluster with 11 U atoms, which is composed of trimeric and pentameric building units chelated by mal ligands and linked through hydroxyl groups and carbonate anions. The characterized compounds represent novel structural topologies for U(6+) hydrolysis products that may be important molecular species in near-neutral aqueous systems.

  7. Isolation of Uranyl Dicyanamide Complexes from N-Donor Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Steven P; Rogers, Robin D

    2015-11-02

    An ionic liquid (IL) approach for soft-donor f-element chemistry has been demonstrated by the isolation of several new uranyl dicyanamide complexes through reactions of UO2(NO3)2·6H2O with dicyanamide ([N(CN)2](-))-containing ILs. The [N(CN)2](-) ions are able to rapidly substitute uranium's O-donor ligands, as evidenced by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies on two anhydrous adducts of UO2(NO3)2 with [N(CN)2](-) ILs as well as by IR and NMR spectroscopic studies on solutions of UO2(NO3)2 in these ILs. By contrast, the slow reaction of UO2(OAc)2·2H2O with a nitrile-functionalized imidazolium dicyanamide IL in solvent and the reaction of UO2(NO3)2·6H2O with NaN(CN)2 at elevated temperature resulted in irreversible hydrolysis. The reaction of UO2SO4 with [N(CN)2](-) ions in an acidified aqueous solution resulted in the crystallization of a [UO2](2+) complex with biuret, a N(CN)2](-) hydrolysis product. [N(CN)2](-) ions in the form of ILs react rapidly with [UO2](2+) at room temperature, allowing ligand substitution with [N(CN)2](-) to out-compete the slower hydrolysis reaction, enabling the isolation of uranyl dicyanamide complexes and challenging assumptions regarding the affinity of uranium for O-donors.

  8. X-ray absorption spectroscopy identifies calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexes at environmental concentrations.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Brooks, S. C.; Biosciences Division; ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Current research on bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater focuses on supplying indigenous metal-reducing bacteria with the appropriate metabolic requirements to induce microbiological reduction of soluble uranium(VI) to poorly soluble uranium(IV). Recent studies of uranium(VI) bioreduction in the presence of environmentally relevant levels of calcium revealed limited and slowed uranium(VI) reduction and the formation of a Ca-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complex. However, the stoichiometry of the complex is poorly defined and may be complicated by the presence of a Na-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complex. Such a complex might exist even at high calcium concentrations, as some UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complexes will still be present. The number of calcium and/or sodium atoms coordinated to a uranyl carbonate complex will determine the net charge of the complex. Such a change in aqueous speciation of uranium(VI) in calcareous groundwater may affect the fate and transport properties of uranium. In this paper, we present the results from X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements of a series of solutions containing 50 {micro}M uranium(VI) and 30 mM sodium bicarbonate, with various calcium concentrations of 0-5 mM. Use of the data series reduces the uncertainty in the number of calcium atoms bound to the UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complex to approximately 0.6 and enables spectroscopic identification of the Na-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complex. At nearly neutral pH values, the numbers of sodium and calcium atoms bound to the uranyl triscarbonate species are found to depend on the calcium concentration, as predicted by speciation calculations.

  9. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Identifies Calcium-Uranyl-Carbonate Complexes at Environmental Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Shelly D; Kemner, Kenneth M; Brooks, Scott C

    2007-01-01

    Current research on bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater focuses on supplying indigenous metal-reducing bacteria with the appropriate metabolic requirements to induce microbiological reduction of soluble uranium(VI) to poorly soluble uranium(IV). Recent studies of uranium(VI) bioreduction in the presence of environmentally relevant levels of calcium revealed limited and slowed uranium(VI) reduction and the formation of a Ca-UO2-CO3 complex. However, the stoichiometry of the complex is poorly defined and may be complicated by the presence of a Na-UO2-CO3 complex. Such a complex might exist even at high calcium concentrations, as some UO2-CO3 complexes will still be present. The number of calcium and/or sodium atoms coordinated to a uranyl carbonate complex will determine the net charge of the complex. Such a change in aqueous speciation of uranium(VI) in calcareous groundwater may affect the fate and transport properties of uranium. In this paper, we present the results from X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements of a series of solutions containing 50 lM uranium(VI) and 30 mM sodium bicarbonate, with various calcium concentrations of 0-5 mM. Use of the data series reduces the uncertainty in the number of calcium atoms bound to the UO2-CO3 complex to approximately 0.6 and enables spectroscopic identification of the Na-UO2-CO3 complex. At nearly neutral pH values, the numbers of sodium and calcium atoms bound to the uranyl triscarbonate species are found to depend on the calcium concentration, as predicted by speciation calculations.

  10. Nitrate Trends in Minnesota Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wall, Dave; Christopherson, Dave; Lorenz, Dave; Martin, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess long-term trends (30 to 35 years) of flow-adjusted concentrations of nitrite+nitrate-N (hereinafter referred to as nitrate) in a way that would allow us to discern changing trends. Recognizing that these trends are commonly different from one river to another river and from one part of the state to another, our objective was to examine as many river monitoring sites across the state as possible for which sufficient long term streamflow and concentration data were available.

  11. Exposure to a maternal n-3 fatty acid-deficient diet during brain development provokes excessive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responses to stress and behavioral indices of depression and anxiety in male rat offspring later in life.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Feng; Su, Hui-Min

    2013-01-01

    Brain docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) accumulates rapidly during brain development and is essential for normal neurological function. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether brain development was the critical period in which DHA deficiency leads to dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in response to stress later in life. Rats were exposed to an n-3 fatty acid-deficient diet or the same diet supplemented with fish oil as an n-3 fatty acid-adequate diet either throughout the preweaning period from embryo to weaning at 3 weeks old or during the postweaning period from 3 to 10 weeks old. Exposure to the n-3 fatty acid-deficient diet during the preweaning period resulted, at weaning, in a significant decrease in hypothalamic DHA levels and a reduced male offspring body weight. DHA deficiency during the preweaning period significantly increased and prolonged restraint stress-induced changes in colonic temperature and serum corticosterone levels, caused a significant increase in GABA(A) antagonist-induced heart rate changes and enhanced depressive-like behavior in the forced swimming test and anxiety-like behavior in the plus-maze test in later life. These effects were not seen in male rats fed the n-3 fatty acid-deficient diet during the postweaning period. These results suggest that brain development is the critical period in which DHA deficiency leads to excessive HPA responses to stress and elevated behavioral indices of depression and anxiety in adulthood. We propose that these effects of hypothalamic DHA deficiency during brain development may involve a GABA(A) receptor-mediated mechanism.

  12. Insight into hydrogen bonding of uranyl hydroxide layers and capsules by use of 1H magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy [Insight into the hydrogen bonding for uranyl hydroxides using 1H MAS NMR spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Alam, Todd M.; Liao, Zuolei; Nyman, May; ...

    2016-04-27

    Solid-state 1H magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR was used to investigate local proton environments in anhydrous [UO2(OH)2] (α-UOH) and hydrated uranyl hydroxide [(UO2)4O(OH)6·5H2O (metaschoepite). For the metaschoepite material, proton resonances of the μ2-OH hydroxyl and interlayer waters were resolved, with two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum (DQ) 1H–1H NMR correlation experiments revealing strong dipolar interactions between these different proton species. The experimental NMR results were combined with first-principles CASTEP GIPAW (gauge including projector-augmented wave) chemical shift calculations to develop correlations between hydrogen-bond strength and observed 1H NMR chemical shifts. Furthermore, these NMR correlations allowed characterization of local hydrogen-bond environments in uranyl U24 capsules andmore » of changes in hydrogen bonding that occurred during thermal dehydration of metaschoepite.« less

  13. Nitrate transport and signalling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Krapp, Anne; David, Laure C; Chardin, Camille; Girin, Thomas; Marmagne, Anne; Leprince, Anne-Sophie; Chaillou, Sylvain; Ferrario-Méry, Sylvie; Meyer, Christian; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise

    2014-03-01

    Plants have developed adaptive responses allowing them to cope with nitrogen (N) fluctuation in the soil and maintain growth despite changes in external N availability. Nitrate is the most important N form in temperate soils. Nitrate uptake by roots and its transport at the whole-plant level involves a large panoply of transporters and impacts plant performance. Four families of nitrate-transporting proteins have been identified so far: nitrate transporter 1/peptide transporter family (NPF), nitrate transporter 2 family (NRT2), the chloride channel family (CLC), and slow anion channel-associated homologues (SLAC/SLAH). Nitrate transporters are also involved in the sensing of nitrate. It is now well established that plants are able to sense external nitrate availability, and hence that nitrate also acts as a signal molecule that regulates many aspects of plant intake, metabolism, and gene expression. This review will focus on a global picture of the nitrate transporters so far identified and the recent advances in the molecular knowledge of the so-called primary nitrate response, the rapid regulation of gene expression in response to nitrate. The recent discovery of the NIN-like proteins as master regulators for nitrate signalling has led to a new understanding of the regulation cascade.

  14. Short-term effects of a high nitrate diet on nitrate metabolism in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Liu, Alex H; Croft, Kevin D; Ward, Natalie C; Puddey, Ian B; Woodman, Richard J; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2015-03-12

    Dietary nitrate, through the enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway, can improve blood pressure and arterial stiffness. How long systemic nitrate and nitrite remain elevated following cessation of high nitrate intake is unknown. In 19 healthy men and women, the time for salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite to return to baseline after 7 days increased nitrate intake from green leafy vegetables was determined. Salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite was measured at baseline [D0], end of high nitrate diet [D7], day 9 [+2D], day 14 [+7D] and day 21 [+14D]. Urinary nitrite and nitrate was assessed at D7 and +14D. Increased dietary nitrate for 7 days resulted in a more than fourfold increase in saliva and plasma nitrate and nitrite (p < 0.001) measured at [D7]. At [+2D] plasma nitrite and nitrate had returned to baseline while saliva nitrate and nitrite were more than 1.5 times higher than at baseline levels. By [+7D] all metabolites had returned to baseline levels. The pattern of response was similar between men and women. Urinary nitrate and nitrate was sevenfold higher at D7 compared to +14D. These results suggest that daily ingestion of nitrate may be required to maintain the physiological changes associated with high nitrate intake.

  15. Dietary nitrate and cardiovascular health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahluwalia, A.; Gladwin, M.T.; Harman, Jane L.; Ward, M.H.; Nolan, Bernard T.

    2014-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened this workshop to discuss the results of recent research on the effects of inorganic nitrate and nitrite on the cardiovascular system, possible long term effects of these compounds in the diet and drinking water, and future research needs including population-wide effects examined through epidemiological studies.

  16. Biological denitrification of high concentration nitrate waste

    DOEpatents

    Francis, Chester W.; Brinkley, Frank S.

    1977-01-01

    Biological denitrification of nitrate solutions at concentrations of greater than one kilogram nitrate per cubic meter is accomplished anaerobically in an upflow column having as a packing material a support for denitrifying bacteria.

  17. Periodic density functional theory investigation of the uranyl ion sorption on three mineral surfaces: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Roques, Jérôme; Veilly, Edouard; Simoni, Eric

    2009-06-04

    Canister integrity and radionuclides retention is of prime importance for assessing the long term safety of nuclear waste stored in engineered geologic depositories. A comparative investigation of the interaction of uranyl ion with three different mineral surfaces has thus been undertaken in order to point out the influence of surface composition on the adsorption mechanism(s). Periodic DFT calculations using plane waves basis sets with the GGA formalism were performed on the TiO(2)(110), Al(OH)(3)(001) and Ni(111) surfaces. This study has clearly shown that three parameters play an important role in the uranyl adsorption mechanism: the solvent (H(2)O) distribution at the interface, the nature of the adsorption site and finally, the surface atoms' protonation state.

  18. Actinide-Transition Metal heteronuclear Ions and Their Oxides: {IrUO}+ as an Analogue to Uranyl

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K

    2006-01-01

    Recent theoretical calculations have shown that Ir should behave as a chemical analogue to N, with the result that IrUO{sup +}, like known NUO{sup +}, is predicted to be a stable species isoelectronic with UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, the uranyl dication. The target heterometallic analogue to uranyl has now been prepared by direct laser desorption/ionization of a U/Ir alloy, and by oxidation of UIr{sup +} with N{sub 2}O and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O. Properties of UIr{sup +}, UPt{sup +}, and UAu{sup +} bimetallic ions have been studied. They demonstrate direct actinide-transition metal bonding, and support the concept of autogenic isolobality.

  19. Highly Sensitive and Selective Method for Detecting Ultratrace Levels of Aqueous Uranyl Ions by Strongly Photoluminescent-Responsive Amine-Modified Cadmium Sulfide Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Dutta, R K; Kumar, Ambika

    2016-09-20

    Detection of ultratrace levels of aqueous uranyl ions without using sophisticated analytical instrumentation and a tedious sample preparation method is a challenge for environmental monitoring and mitigation. Here we present a novel yet simple analytical method for highly sensitive and specific detection of uranyl ions via photoluminescence quenching of CdS quantum dots. We have demonstrated a new approach for synthesizing highly water-soluble and strong photoluminescence-emitting CdS quantum dots (i.e., CdS-MAA and CdS-MAA-TU) of sizes less than 3 nm. The structural, morphological, and optical properties of both the batches of CdS quantum dots were thoroughly characterized by XRD, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), zeta potential, UV-visible absorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Compared to the batch of CdS quantum dots prepared by capping with only mercaptoacetic acid (CdS-MAA), the batch prepared by capping with mercaptoacetic acid and thiourea in tandem (CdS-MAA-TU) exhibited higher quantum yield= 16.64 ± 1.02%, and more importantly, CdS-MAA-TU exhibited significantly a higher order of photoluminescence quenching responses when treated with ultratrace concentrations of uranyl ions. Under the optimized conditions, the sensitivity of detecting uranyl ion by CdS-MAA-TU was several folds better (0.316 L/ μg) than that of CdS-MAA (0.0053 (L/μg/), as determined from their respective Stern-Volmer plots. Qualitatively, CdS-MAA-TU probe can be used for visual detection of uranyl ions of concentration greater than 5 μg/L. However, the instrumental method of analysis based on photoluminescence spectroscopy confirmed the feasibility for quantitative analysis of ultratrace concentrations of uranyl ions as implied from a very low limit of detection (LoD = 0.07 μg/L) and limit of quantification (LoQ = and 0.231 μg/L). Systematic studies revealed very high selectivity for uranyl ion detection, though minor interference from Cu(2+), Pb(2

  20. A Novel Chemical Nitrate Destruction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrates represent one of the most significant pollutant discharged to the Baltic Sea by the Sliiamae hydrometallurgical plant. This article contains a brief overview of the existing nitrate destruction technologies followed by the description of a new process developed by the authors. The new chemical process for nitrate destruction is cost effective and simple to operate. It converts the nitrate to nitrogen gas which goes to the atmosphere.

  1. Topologically and geometrically flexible structural units in seven new organically templated uranyl selenates and selenite-selenates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurzhiy, Vladislav V.; Kovrugin, Vadim M.; Tyumentseva, Olga S.; Mikhaylenko, Pavel A.; Krivovichev, Sergey V.; Tananaev, Ivan G.

    2015-09-01

    Single crystals of seven novel uranyl oxysalts of selenium with protonated methylamine molecules, [C2H8N]2[(UO2)(SeO4)2(H2O)] (I), [C2H8N]2[(UO2)2(SeO4)3(H2O)] (II), [C4H15N3][H3O]0.5[(UO2)2(SeO4)2.93(SeO3)0.07(H2O)](NO3)0.5 (III), [C2H8N]3[H5O2][(UO2)2(SeO4)3(H2O)2]2(H2O)5 (IV), [C2H8N]2[H3O][(UO2)3(SeO4)4(HSeO3)(H2O)](H2SeO3)0.2 (V), [C4H12N]3[H3O][(UO2)3(SeO4)5(H2O)] (VI), and [C2H8N]3(C2H7N)[(UO2)3(SeO4)4(HSeO3)(H2O)] (VII) have been prepared by isothermal evaporation from aqueous solutions. Their crystal structures have been solved by direct methods and their uranyl selenate and selenite-selenate units investigated using black-and-white graphs from the viewpoints of topology of interpolyhedral linkages and isomeric variations. The crystal structure of IV is based upon complex layers with unique topology, which has not been observed previously in uranyl selenates. Investigations of the statistics and local distribution of the U-Obr-Se bond angles demonstrates that shorter angles associate with undulations, whereas larger angles correspond to planar areas of the uranyl selenite layers.

  2. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  3. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  4. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  5. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  6. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  7. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  8. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Denitrification beds are being promoted to reduce nitrate concentrations in agricultural drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution in surface water. In this system, water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transfor...

  9. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  10. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  11. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  12. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified foods in accordance with...

  13. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  14. Nitration of Naphthol: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowery, Dwight F.

    1982-01-01

    Products of nitrations, upon distillation or steam distillation, may produce dermatitis in some students. A procedure for nitration of beta-naphthol producing a relatively non-volatile product not purified by steam distillation is described. Nitration of alpha-naphthol by the same procedure yields Martius Yellow dye which dyes wool yellow or…

  15. Method of producing thin cellulose nitrate film

    DOEpatents

    Lupica, S.B.

    1975-12-23

    An improved method for forming a thin nitrocellulose film of reproducible thickness is described. The film is a cellulose nitrate film, 10 to 20 microns in thickness, cast from a solution of cellulose nitrate in tetrahydrofuran, said solution containing from 7 to 15 percent, by weight, of dioctyl phthalate, said cellulose nitrate having a nitrogen content of from 10 to 13 percent.

  16. Efflux Of Nitrate From Hydroponically Grown Wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. C.; Aslam, M.; Ward, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to measure influx, and efflux of nitrate from hydroponically grown wheat seedlings. Ratio between efflux and influx greater in darkness than in light; increased with concentration of nitrate in nutrient solution. On basis of experiments, authors suggest nutrient solution optimized at lowest possible concentration of nitrate.

  17. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a...

  18. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  19. 76 FR 70366 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary 6 CFR Part 31 RIN 1601-AA52 Ammonium Nitrate Security Program AGENCY... ``Ammonium Nitrate Security Program,'' which was published in the Federal Register on August 3, 2011. The... 62311). Under the proposed Ammonium Nitrate Security Program, the DHS will regulate the sale...

  20. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  1. 76 FR 62311 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Office of the Secretary 6 CFR Part 31 RIN 1601-AA52 Ammonium Nitrate Security...), entitled ``Ammonium Nitrate Security Program,'' which was published in the Federal Register on August 3... of ammonium nitrate pursuant to section 563 of the Fiscal Year 2008 Department of Homeland...

  2. 76 FR 11273 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the suspended investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia... investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  3. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a curing agent in the processing of...

  4. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  5. 76 FR 47238 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4249 (August 2011), entitled Ammonium Nitrate from...

  6. Selective preconcentration of uranyl ion by silica gel phases modified with chelating compounds as inorganic polymeric ion exchangers.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mohamed E; Kenawy, Ibrahim M M; Soliman, Ezzat M; Hafez, Medhat A; Akl, Magda A A; Lashein, Rabab R A

    2008-03-01

    Four chemically modified chelating silica gel phases (I - IV) with ion exchange groups were tested for their potential capability to selectively bind, extract and preconcentrate uranyl ions (UO(2)(2+)) from different aqueous solutions as well as ore samples. Factors affecting such determination processes were studied and optimized. These included the pH of the contact solution, the mass of the silica gel phase extractant, the stirring time during the application of a static technique and the eluent concentration for desorption of the surface-bound uranyl ion and interfering anions and cations. All these factors were evaluated on the basis of determinations of the distribution coefficient value (K(d)) and the percent recovery (R%). Percent recovery values of 91% for silica phase (II) and 93% for silica phase (IV) were identified in the optimum conditions. The proposed preconcentration method was further applied to uranium ore samples as well as granite samples. The determined percentage and ppm values are in good agreement with the standard assigned ones. The structure of the synthesized silica gel phases (I - IV) and their uranyl bound complexes were identified and characterized by means of infrared analysis, thermal analysis (TGA) and potentiometric titration.

  7. Impact of uranyl-calcium-carbonato complexes on uranium(VI) adsorption to synthetic and natural sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, B.D.; Mayes, Melanie; Fendorf, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Adsorption on soil and sediment solids may decrease aqueous uranium concentrations and limit its propensity for migration in natural and contaminated settings. Uranium adsorption will be controlled in large part by its aqueous speciation, with a particular dependence on the presence of dissolved calcium and carbonate. Here we quantify the impact of uranyl speciation on adsorption to both goethite and sediments from the Hanford Clastic Dike and Oak Ridge Melton Branch Ridgetop formations. Hanford sediments were preconditioned with sodium acetate and acetic acid to remove carbonate grains, and Ca and carbonate were reintroduced at defined levels to provide a range of aqueous uranyl species. U(VI) adsorption is directly linked to UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} speciation, with the extent of retention decreasing with formation of ternary uranyl-calcium-carbonato species. Adsorption isotherms under the conditions studied are linear, and K{sub d} values decrease from 48 to 17 L kg{sup -1} for goethite, from 64 to 29 L kg{sup -1} for Hanford sediments, and from 95 to 51 L kg{sup -1} for Melton Branch sediments as the Ca concentration increases from 0 to 1 mM at pH 7. Our observations reveal that, in carbonate-bearing waters, neutral to slightly acidic pH values ({approx}5) and limited dissolved calcium are optimal for uranium adsorption.

  8. Resonance light scattering detection of fructose bisphosphates using uranyl-salophen complex-modified gold nanoparticles as optical probe.

    PubMed

    Li, Shijun; Liao, Lifu; Wu, Rurong; Yang, Yanyan; Xu, Li; Xiao, Xilin; Nie, Changming

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we report a resonance light scattering (RLS) method for the determination of fructose bisphosphates (FBPs) in water solution using fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-BP) as a model analyte without the procedure of extracting target analyte. The method used a type of modified gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as optical probe. The modified GNPs are uranyl-salophen-cysteamine-GNPs (U-Sal-Cy-GNPs) which are obtained through the acylation reaction of carboxylated salophen with cysteamine-capped GNPs (Cy-GNPs) to form Sal-Cy-GNPs and then the chelation reaction of uranyl with tetradentate ligand salophen in the Sal-Cy-GNPs. A FBP molecule is used easily to connect two U-Sal-Cy-GNPs to cause the aggregation of the GNPs by utilizing the specific affinity of uranyl-salophen complex to phosphate group, resulting in the production of strong RLS signal from the system. The amount of FBPs can be determined through detecting the RLS intensity change of the system. A linear range was found to be 2.5 to 75 nmol/L with a detection limit of 0.91 nmol/L under optimal conditions. The method has been successfully used to determine FBPs in real samples with the recoveries of 96.5-103.5 %.

  9. SHINE and Mini-SHINE Column Designs for Recovery of Mo from 140 g-U/L Uranyl Sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Stepinski, Dominique C.; Vandegrift, George F.

    2016-09-01

    Argonne is assisting SHINE Medical Technologies (SHINE) in their efforts to develop an accelerator-driven process that utilizes a uranyl-sulfate solution for the production of fission Mo-99. In an effort to design a Mo-recovery system for the SHINE project using low-enriched uranium (LEU), we conducted batch, breakthrough, and pulse tests to determine the Mo isotherm, mass-transfer zone (MTZ), and system parameters for a 130 g-U/L uranyl sulfate solution at pH 1 and 80°C, as described previously. The VERSE program was utilized to calculate the MTZ under various loading times and velocities. The results were then used to design Mo separation and recovery columns employing a pure titania sorbent (110-μm particles, S110, and 60 Å pore size). The plant-scale column designs assume Mo will be separated from 271 L of a 141 g-U/L uranyl sulfate solution, pH 1, containing 0.0023 mM Mo. The VERSE-designed recovery systems have been tested and verified in laboratory-scale experiments, and this approach was found to be very successful.

  10. Oxo-functionalization and reduction of the uranyl ion through lanthanide-element bond homolysis: synthetic, structural, and bonding analysis of a series of singly reduced uranyl-rare earth 5f1-4f(n) complexes.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Polly L; Hollis, Emmalina; Nichol, Gary S; Love, Jason B; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Caciuffo, Roberto; Magnani, Nicola; Maron, Laurent; Castro, Ludovic; Yahia, Ahmed; Odoh, Samuel O; Schreckenbach, Georg

    2013-03-13

    The heterobimetallic complexes [{UO2Ln(py)2(L)}2], combining a singly reduced uranyl cation and a rare-earth trication in a binucleating polypyrrole Schiff-base macrocycle (Pacman) and bridged through a uranyl oxo-group, have been prepared for Ln = Sc, Y, Ce, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Er, Yb, and Lu. These compounds are formed by the single-electron reduction of the Pacman uranyl complex [UO2(py)(H2L)] by the rare-earth complexes Ln(III)(A)3 (A = N(SiMe3)2, OC6H3Bu(t)2-2,6) via homolysis of a Ln-A bond. The complexes are dimeric through mutual uranyl exo-oxo coordination but can be cleaved to form the trimetallic, monouranyl "ate" complexes [(py)3LiOUO(μ-X)Ln(py)(L)] by the addition of lithium halides. X-ray crystallographic structural characterization of many examples reveals very similar features for monomeric and dimeric series, the dimers containing an asymmetric U2O2 diamond core with shorter uranyl U═O distances than in the monomeric complexes. The synthesis by Ln(III)-A homolysis allows [5f(1)-4f(n)]2 and Li[5f(1)-4f(n)] complexes with oxo-bridged metal cations to be made for all possible 4f(n) configurations. Variable-temperature SQUID magnetometry and IR, NIR, and EPR spectroscopies on the complexes are utilized to provide a basis for the better understanding of the electronic structure of f-block complexes and their f-electron exchange interactions. Furthermore, the structures, calculated by restricted-core or all-electron methods, are compared along with the proposed mechanism of formation of the complexes. A strong antiferromagnetic coupling between the metal centers, mediated by the oxo groups, exists in the U(V)Sm(III) monomer, whereas the dimeric U(V)Dy(III) complex was found to show magnetic bistability at 3 K, a property required for the development of single-molecule magnets.

  11. Decomposition and Stability Studies of TAGN (Triaminoguanidium Nitrate)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    and atomic absorption spectroscopy . TAGN (Triaminoquanidinium Nitrate), DAGN (Diaminoquanidinium Nitrate), Thermal analysis, Mass Spectroscopy, RDX (Trinitrotriazacyclohexane), Decomposition chemistry.

  12. Continuous flow nitration in miniaturized devices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review highlights the state of the art in the field of continuous flow nitration with miniaturized devices. Although nitration has been one of the oldest and most important unit reactions, the advent of miniaturized devices has paved the way for new opportunities to reconsider the conventional approach for exothermic and selectivity sensitive nitration reactions. Four different approaches to flow nitration with microreactors are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages, limitations and applicability of the information towards scale-up. Selected recent patents that disclose scale-up methodologies for continuous flow nitration are also briefly reviewed. PMID:24605161

  13. Nitrated fatty acids: synthesis and measurement.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, Steven R; Bonacci, Gustavo; Gelhaus, Stacy L; Schopfer, Francisco J

    2013-06-01

    Nitrated fatty acids are the product of nitrogen dioxide reaction with unsaturated fatty acids. The discovery of peroxynitrite and peroxidase-induced nitration of biomolecules led to the initial reports of endogenous nitrated fatty acids. These species increase during ischemia/reperfusion, but concentrations are often at or near the limits of detection. Here, we describe multiple methods for nitrated fatty acid synthesis and sample extraction from complex biological matrices and a rigorous method of qualitative and quantitative detection of nitrated fatty acids by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. In addition, optimized instrument conditions and caveats regarding data interpretation are discussed.

  14. Nitrated fatty acids: Synthesis and measurement

    PubMed Central

    Woodcock, Steven R.; Bonacci, Gustavo; Gelhaus, Stacy L.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrated fatty acids are the product of nitrogen dioxide reaction with unsaturated fatty acids. The discovery of peroxynitrite and peroxidase-induced nitration of biomolecules led to the initial reports of endogenous nitrated fatty acids. These species increase during ischemia reperfusion, but concentrations are often at or near the limits of detection. Here, we describe multiple methods for nitrated fatty acid synthesis, sample extraction from complex biological matrices, and a rigorous method of qualitative and quantitative detection of nitrated fatty acids by LC-MS. In addition, optimized instrument conditions and caveats regarding data interpretation are discussed. PMID:23200809

  15. Influence of uranyl speciation and iron oxides on uranium biogeochemical redox reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, B.D.; Amos, R.T.; Nico, P.S.; Fendorf, S.

    2010-03-15

    Uranium is a pollutant of concern to both human and ecosystem health. Uranium's redox state often dictates its partitioning between the aqueous- and solid-phases, and thus controls its dissolved concentration and, coupled with groundwater flow, its migration within the environment. In anaerobic environments, the more oxidized and mobile form of uranium (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and associated species) may be reduced, directly or indirectly, by microorganisms to U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO{sub 2}. However, various factors within soils and sediments may limit biological reduction of U(VI), inclusive of alterations in U(VI) speciation and competitive electron acceptors. Here we elucidate the impact of U(VI) speciation on the extent and rate of reduction with specific emphasis on speciation changes induced by dissolved Ca, and we examine the impact of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite and hematite) varying in free energies of formation on U reduction. The amount of uranium removed from solution during 100 h of incubation with S. putrefaciens was 77% with no Ca or ferrihydrite present but only 24% (with ferrihydrite) and 14% (no ferrihydrite) were removed for systems with 0.8 mM Ca. Imparting an important criterion on uranium reduction, goethite and hematite decrease the dissolved concentration of calcium through adsorption and thus tend to diminish the effect of calcium on uranium reduction. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) can proceed through different enzyme pathways, even within a single organism, thus providing a potential second means by which Fe(III) bearing minerals may impact U(VI) reduction. We quantify rate coefficients for simultaneous dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) in systems varying in Ca concentration (0 to 0.8 mM), and using a mathematical construct implemented with the reactive transport code MIN3P, we reveal the predominant influence of uranyl speciation, specifically the formation of uranyl

  16. Molten nitrate salt technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, R. W.

    1981-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of the experimental programs underway in support of the Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) program. The experimental programs are concentrating on molten nitrate salts which have been proposed as heat transfer and energy storage medium. The salt composition of greatest interest is drawsalt, nominally a 50-50 molar mixture of NaNO3 and KNO3 with a melting point of 220 C. Several technical uncertainties have been identified that must be resolved before nitrate based solar plants can be commercialized. Research programs at Sandia National Laboratories, universities, and industrial suppliers have been implemented to resolve these technical uncertainties. The experimental programs involve corrosion, decomposition, physical properties, and environmental cracking. Summaries of each project and how they impact central receiver applications such as the repowering/industrial retrofit and cogeneration program are presented.

  17. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, M.; Yoo, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood -resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 17 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400 °C.

  18. Pollution of drinking water with nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Cabel, B.; Kozicki, R.; Lahl, U.; Podbielshi, A.; Stachel, B.; Struss, S.

    1982-01-01

    The main sources of nitrate in man are food and drinking water. The legislature in West Germany intends to lower the permitted level of nitrate in drinking water from the present 90 mg/l to 50 mg/l in 1982. The European Community has issued a directive that recommends a level of only 25 mg/l, and for babies 10 mg/l nitrate should not be exceeded. At present, nitrate cannot be removed from raw water at an acceptable cost. The problem of high nitrate content is mainly one of drinking water generation from ground water. Several analyses indicate rising concentrations of nitrate in ground water in different regions of West Germany, especially in the last few years. The following sources of nitrate-contamination of ground water aquifers in West are discussed: natural sources; over-manuring of agricultural areas with natural organic fertilizers; over-manuring of agricultural areas with synthetic fertilizers.

  19. Nitrate Utilization by the Diatom Skeletonema costatum

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Juan L.; Llama, Maria J.; Cadenas, Eduardo

    1978-01-01

    Nitrate uptake has been studied in nitrogen-deficient cells of the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum. When these cells are incubated in the presence of nitrate, this ion is quickly taken up from the medium, and nitrite is excreted by the cells. Nitrite is excreted following classical saturation kinetics, its rate being independent of nitrate concentration in the incubation medium for nitrate concentration values higher than 3 micromolar. Nitrate uptake shows mixed-transfer kinetics, which can be attributed to the simultaneous contributions of mediated and diffusion transfer. Cycloheximide and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate inhibit the carrier-mediated contribution to nitrate uptake, without affecting the diffusion component. When cells are preincubated with nitrate, the net nitrogen uptake is increased. PMID:16660652

  20. High performance ammonium nitrate propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, F. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A high performance propellant having greatly reduced hydrogen chloride emission is presented. It is comprised of: (1) a minor amount of hydrocarbon binder (10-15%), (2) at least 85% solids including ammonium nitrate as the primary oxidizer (about 40% to 70%), (3) a significant amount (5-25%) powdered metal fuel, such as aluminum, (4) a small amount (5-25%) of ammonium perchlorate as a supplementary oxidizer, and (5) optionally a small amount (0-20%) of a nitramine.

  1. Molten nitrate salt materials studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, R. M.

    1981-03-01

    An overview of the experimental programs underway in support of the Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) program is presented. The experimental programs are concentrating on molten nitrate salts which were proposed as heat transfer and energy storage medium. The experimental programs involve corrosion, decomposition, physical properties, and environmental cracking. Summaries of each project and how they impact central receiver applications are presented.

  2. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  3. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  4. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  5. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  6. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  7. Catalyzed reduction of nitrate in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P.A.

    1994-08-01

    Sodium nitrate and other nitrate salts in wastes is a major source of difficulty for permanent disposal. Reduction of nitrate using aluminum metal has been demonstrated, but NH{sub 3}, hydrazine, or organic compounds containing oxygen would be advantageous for reduction of nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions. Objective of this seed money study was to determine minimum conditions for reduction. Proposed procedure was batchwise heating of aqueous solutions in closed vessels with monitoring of temperatures and pressures. A simple, convenient apparatus and procedure were demonstrated for observing formation of gaseous products and collecting samples for analyses. The test conditions were 250{degree}C and 1000 psi max. Any useful reduction of sodium nitrate to sodium hydroxide as the primary product was not found. The nitrate present at pHs < 4 as HNO{sub 3} or NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} is easily decomposed, and the effect of nitromethane at these low pHs was confirmed. When acetic acid or formic acid was added, 21 to 56% of the nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions was reduced by methanol or formaldehyde. With hydrazine and acetic acid, 73 % of the nitrate was decomposed to convert NaNO{sub 3} to sodium acetate. With hydrazine and formic acid, 36% of the nitrate was decomposed. If these products are more acceptable for final disposal than sodium nitrate, the reagents are cheap and the conversion conditions would be practical for easy use. Ammonium acetate or formate salts did not significantly reduce nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions.

  8. The Influence of Linker Geometry on Uranyl Complexation by Rigidly-Linked Bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one)

    SciTech Connect

    Szigethy, Geza; Raymond, Kenneth

    2010-04-22

    A series of bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) ligands was synthesized, and their respective uranyl complexes were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. These structures were inspected for high-energy conformations and evaluated using a series of metrics to measure co-planarity of chelating moieties with each other and the uranyl coordination plane, as well as to measure coordinative crowding about the uranyl dication. Both very short (ethyl, 3,4-thiophene and o-phenylene) and very long ({alpha},{alpha}{prime}-m-xylene and 1,8-fluorene) linkers provide optimal ligand geometries about the uranyl cation, resulting in planar, unstrained molecular arrangements. The planarity of the rigid linkers also suggests there is a degree of pre-organization for a planar coordination mode that is ideal for uranyl-selective ligand design. Comparison of intramolecular N{sub amide}-O{sub phenolate} distances and {sup 1}H NMR chemical shifts of amide protons supports earlier results that short linkers provide the optimal geometry for intramolecular hydrogen bonding.

  9. Uranyl-specific binding at a functionalised interface: a chemophotonic fibre optic sensor platform.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Neil W; Tremlett, Clare J; Melfi, Patricia J; Sessler, Jonathon D; Shaw, Andrew M

    2008-05-01

    Detection of radiological materials in the solution phase is restricted by conventional radiation-counting techniques owing to extreme attenuation. Chemical sensing of the resultant radiological species such as uranyl UO(2)(2+) is possible on the surface of a plastic or glass fibre optic. A dihydroxy isoamethryin complex is tethered to the fibre surface which has a large extinction coefficient (119 000 M(-1) cm(-1) at lambda = 439 nm) and changes colour upon binding UO(2)(2+). The spectral changes are greater on the surface than in solution and binding is specific to UO(2)(2+) with small interferences from Gd(3+). Monitoring the spectral response in three detector bands in the red, green and blue enable the optical power change to be measured with sensitivities of 1 mdB, allowing UO(2)(2+) to be detected confidently at 50-100 ppb levels. Real-time kinetic analysis enables discrimination between the target species and possible interferents.

  10. Capture chromatography for Mo-99 recovery from uranyl sulfate solutions: minimum-column-volume design method.

    PubMed

    Ling, Lei; Chung, Pei-Lun; Youker, Amanda; Stepinski, Dominique C; Vandegrift, George F; Wang, Nien-Hwa Linda

    2013-09-27

    Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99), generated from the fission of Uranium-235 (U-235), is the radioactive parent of the most widely used medical isotope, technetium-99m (Tc-99m). An efficient, robust, low-pressure process is developed for recovering Mo-99 from uranyl sulfate solutions. The minimum column volume and the maximum column length for required yield, pressure limit, and loading time are determined using a new graphical method. The method is based on dimensionless groups and intrinsic adsorption and diffusion parameters, which are estimated using a small number of experiments and simulations. The design is tested with bench-scale experiments with titania columns. The results show a high capture yield and a high stripping yield (95±5%). The design can be adapted to changes in design constraints or the variations in feed concentration, feed volume, or material properties. The graph shows clearly how the column utilization is affected by the required yield, loading time, and pressure limit. The cost effectiveness of various sorbent candidates can be evaluated based on the intrinsic parameters. This method can be used more generally for designing other capture chromatography processes.

  11. Improvement of the cloud point extraction of uranyl ions by the addition of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Sun, Taoxiang; Chen, Qingde; Shen, Xinghai

    2013-12-15

    The cloud point extraction (CPE) of uranyl ions by different kinds of extractants in Triton X-114 (TX-114) micellar solution was investigated upon the addition of ionic liquids (ILs) with various anions, i.e., bromide (Br(-)), tetrafluoroborate (BF4(-)), hexafluorophosphate (PF6(-)) and bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide (NTf2(-)). A significant increase of the extraction efficiency was found on the addition of NTf2(-) based ILs when using neutral extractant tri-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO), and the extraction efficiency kept high at both nearly neutral and high acidity. However, the CPE with acidic extractants, e.g., bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) and 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) which are only effective at nearly neutral condition, was not improved by ILs. The results of zeta potential and (19)F NMR measurements indicated that the anion NTf2(-) penetrated into the TX-114 micelles and was enriched in the surfactant-rich phase during the CPE process. Meanwhile, NTf2(-) may act as a counterion in the CPE of UO2(2+) by TOPO. Furthermore, the addition of IL increased the separation factor of UO2(2+) and La(3+), which implied that in the micelle TOPO, NTf2(-) and NO3(-) established a soft template for UO2(2+). Therefore, the combination of CPE and IL provided a supramolecular recognition to concentrate UO2(2+) efficiently and selectively.

  12. Free energies and mechanisms of water exchange around Uranyl from first principles molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Bylaska, Eric J.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2012-02-01

    From density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio (Car-Parrinello) metadynamics, we compute the activation energies and mechanisms of water exchange between the first and second hydration shells of aqueous Uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) using the primary hydration number of U as the reaction coordinate. The free energy and activation barrier of the water dissociation reaction [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) {yields} [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2})4]{sup 2+}(aq) + H{sub 2}O are 0.7 kcal and 4.7 kcal/mol respectively. The free energy is in good agreement with previous theoretical (-2.7 to +1.2 kcal/mol) and experimental (0.5 to 2.2 kcal/mol) data. The associative reaction [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) + H{sub 2}O {yields} [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2})6]{sup 2+}(aq) is short-lived with a free energy and activation barrier of +7.9 kcal/mol and +8.9 kca/mol respectively; it is therefore classified as associative-interchange. On the basis of the free energy differences and activation barriers, we predict that the dominant exchange mechanism between [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) and bulk water is dissociative.

  13. Sorption of strontium on uranyl peroxide: implications for a high-level nuclear waste repository.

    PubMed

    Sureda, Rosa; Martínez-Lladó, Xavier; Rovira, Miquel; de Pablo, Joan; Casas, Ignasi; Giménez, Javier

    2010-09-15

    Strontium-90 is considered the most important radioactive isotope in the environment and one of the most frequently occurring radionuclides in groundwaters at nuclear facilities. The uranyl peroxide studtite (UO2O2 . 4H2O) has been observed to be formed in spent nuclear fuel leaching experiments and seems to have a relatively high sorption capacity for some radionuclides. In this work, the sorption of strontium onto studtite is studied as a function of time, strontium concentration in solution and pH. The main results obtained are (a) sorption is relatively fast although slower than for cesium; (b) strontium seems to be sorbed via a monolayer coverage of the studtite surface, (c) sorption has a strong dependence on ionic strength, is negligible at acidic pH, and increases at neutral to alkaline pH (almost 100% of the strontium in solution is sorbed above pH 10). These results point to uranium secondary solid phase formation on the spent nuclear fuel as an important mechanism for strontium retention in a high-level nuclear waste repository (HLNW).

  14. Effect of nitrate on microbial perchlorate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last decade perchlorate has been recognized as an important emerging water contaminant that poses a significant public health threat. Because of its chemical stability, low ionic charge density, and significant water solubility microbial remediation has been identified as the most feasible method for its in situ attenuation. Our previous studies have demonstrated that dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) capable of the respiratory reduction of perchlorate into innocuous chloride are ubiquitous in soil and sedimentary environments. As part of their metabolism these organisms reduce perchlorate to chlorite which is subsequently dismutated into chloride and molecular oxygen. These initial steps are mediated by the perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase enzymes respectively. Previously we found that the activity of these organisms is dependent on the presence of molybdenum and is inhibited by the presence of oxygen and to different extents nitrate. However, to date, there is little understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of perchlorate reduction by oxygen and nitrate. As a continuation of our studies into the factors that control DPRB activity we investigated these regulatory mechanisms in more detail as a model organism, Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB, transitions from aerobic metabolism through nitrate reduction to perchlorate reduction. In series of growth transition studies where both nitrate and perchlorate were present, preference for nitrate to perchlorate was observed regardless of the nitrate to perchlorate ratio. Even when the organism was pre-grown anaerobically in perchlorate, nitrate was reduced prior to perchlorate. Using non-growth washed cell suspension, perchlorate- grown D. aromatica was capable of reducing both perchlorate and nitrate concomitantly suggesting the preferentially utilization of nitrate was not a result of enzyme functionality. To elucidate the mechanism for preferential utilization of

  15. Fast photolysis of carbonyl nitrates from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jean-Francois; Peeters, Jozef; Stavrakou, Trisevgeni

    2014-05-01

    We show that photolysis is, by far, the major atmospheric sink of isoprene-derived carbonyl nitrates. Empirical evidence from published laboratory studies on the absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of α-nitrooxy ketones suggests that the presence of the nitrate group (i) greatly enhances the absorption cross sections, and (ii) facilitates dissociation to a point that the photolysis quantum yield is close to unity, with O-NO2 dissociation as the likely major channel. On this basis, we provide new recommendations for estimating the cross sections and photolysis rates of carbonyl nitrates. The newly estimated photorates are validated using a chemical box model against measured temporal profiles of carbonyl nitrates in an isoprene oxidation experiment by Paulot et al. (2009). The comparisons for ethanal nitrate and for the sum of methacrolein- and methylvinylketone nitrates strongly supports our assumptions of large cross section enhancements and a near-unit quantum yield for these compounds. These findings have significant atmospheric implications, as carbonyl nitrates constitute an important component of the total organic nitrate pool over vegetated areas: the photorates of key carbonyl nitrates from isoprene are estimated to be typically between ~3 and 20 times higher than their sink due to reaction with OH in relevant atmospheric conditions. Moreover, since the reaction is expected to release NO2, photolysis is especially effective in depleting the total organic nitrate pool.

  16. Extraction and coordination studies of a carbonyl-phosphine oxide scorpionate ligand with uranyl and lanthanide(III) nitrates: structural, spectroscopic and DFT characterization of the complexes.

    PubMed

    Matveeva, Anna G; Vologzhanina, Anna V; Goryunov, Evgenii I; Aysin, Rinat R; Pasechnik, Margarita P; Matveev, Sergey V; Godovikov, Ivan A; Safiulina, Alfiya M; Brel, Valery K

    2016-03-28

    Hybrid scorpionate ligand (OPPh2)2CHCH2C(O)Me (L) was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic methods and X-ray diffraction. The selected coordination chemistry of L with UO2(NO3)2 and Ln(NO3)3 (Ln = La, Nd, Lu) has been evaluated. The isolated mono- and binuclear complexes, namely, [UO2(NO3)2L] (1), [{UO2(NO3)L}2(μ2-O2)]·EtOH (2), [La(NO3)3L2]·2.33MeCN (3), [Nd(NO3)3L2]·3MeCN (4), [Nd(NO3)2L2]+·(NO3)−·EtOH (5) and [Lu(NO3)3L2] (6) have been characterized by IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Single-crystal X-ray structures have been determined for complexes 1-5. Intramolecular intraligand π-stacking interactions between two phenyl fragments of the coordinated ligand(s) were observed in all complexes 1-5. The π-stacking interaction energy was estimated from Bader's AIM theory calculations performed at the DFT level. Solution properties have been examined using IR and multinuclear ((1)H, (13)C, and (31)P) NMR spectroscopy in CD3CN and CDCl3. Coordination modes of L vary with the coordination polyhedron of the metal and solvent nature showing many coordination modes: P(O),P(O), P(O),P(O),C(O), P(O),C(O), and P(O). Preliminary extraction studies of U(VI) and Ln(III) (Ln = La, Nd, Ho, Yb) from 3.75 M HNO3 into CHCl3 show that scorpionate L extracts f-block elements (especially uranium) better than its unmodified prototype (OPPh2)2CH2.

  17. Nitrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... or interactions with other medicines and vitamin or herbal supplements. This information should not be used as medical ... your doctor about every medicine and vitamin or herbal supplement that you are taking, so he or she ...

  18. Alkali-metal ion coordination in uranyl(VI) poly-peroxo complexes in solution, inorganic analogues to crown-ethers. Part 2. Complex formation in the tetramethyl ammonium-, Li(+)-, Na(+)- and K(+)-uranyl(VI)-peroxide-carbonate systems.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Szabó, Zoltán; Vallet, Valerie; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2015-10-07

    The constitution and equilibrium constants of ternary uranyl(vi) peroxide carbonate complexes [(UO2)p(O2)q(CO3)r](2(p-q-r)) have been determined at 0 °C in 0.50 M MNO3, M = Li, K, and TMA (tetramethyl ammonium), ionic media using potentiometric and spectrophotometric data; (17)O NMR data were used to determine the number of complexes present. The formation of cyclic oligomers, "[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]n", n = 4, 5, 6, with different stoichiometries depending on the ionic medium used, suggests that Li(+), Na(+), K(+) and TMA ions act as templates for the formation of uranyl peroxide rings where the uranyl-units are linked by μ-η(2)-η(2) bridged peroxide-ions. The templating effect is due to the coordination of the M(+)-ions to the uranyl oxygen atoms, where the coordination of Li(+) results in the formation of Li[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]4(7-), Na(+) and K(+) in the formation of Na/K[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) complexes, while the large tetramethyl ammonium ion promotes the formation of two oligomers, TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-). The NMR spectra demonstrate that the coordination of Na(+) in the five- and six-membered oligomers is significantly stronger than that of TMA(+); these observations suggest that the templating effect is similar to the one observed in the synthesis of crown-ethers. The NMR experiments also demonstrate that the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is slow on the (17)O chemical shift time-scale, while the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) and Na[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is fast. There was no indication of the presence of large clusters of the type identified by Burns and Nyman (M. Nyman and P. C. Burns, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012, 41, 7314-7367) and possible reasons for this and the implications for the synthesis of large clusters are briefly discussed.

  19. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficient Male Rats Exhibit Abnormal Behavioral Activation in the Forced Swim Test Following Chronic Fluoxetine Treatment: Association with Altered 5-HT1A and Alpha2A Adrenergic Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Able, Jessica A.; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; McNamara, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency during development leads to enduing alterations in central monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain. Here we investigated the effects of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency on behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Male rats were fed diets with (CON, n=34) or without (DEF, n=30) the omega-3 fatty acid precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90). A subset of CON (n=14) and DEF (n=12) rats were administered FLX (10 mg/kg/d) through their drinking water for 30 d beginning on P60. The forced swimming test (FST) was initiated on P90, and regional brain mRNA markers of serotonin and noradrenaline neurotransmission were determined. Dietary ALA depletion led to significant reductions in frontal cortex docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (−26%, p=0.0001) and DEF+FLX (−32%, p=0.0001) rats. Plasma FLX and norfluoxetine concentrations did not different between FLX-treated DEF and CON rats. During the 15-min FST pretest, DEF+FLX rats exhibited significantly greater climbing behavior compared with CON+FLX rats. During the 5-min test trial, FLX treatment reduced immobility and increased swimming in CON and DEF rats, and only DEF+FLX rats exhibited significant elevations in climbing behavior. DEF+FLX rats exhibited greater midbrain, and lower frontal cortex, 5-HT1A mRNA expression compared with all groups including CON+FLX rats. DEF+FLX rats also exhibited greater midbrain alpha2A adrenergic receptor mRNA expression which was positively correlated with climbing behavior in the FST. These preclinical data demonstrate that low omega-3 fatty acid status leads to abnormal behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic FLX treatment in male rats. PMID:24360505

  20. Topologically and geometrically flexible structural units in seven new organically templated uranyl selenates and selenite–selenates

    SciTech Connect

    Gurzhiy, Vladislav V.

    2015-09-15

    Single crystals of seven novel uranyl oxysalts of selenium with protonated methylamine molecules, [C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N]{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)] (I), [C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N]{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O)] (II), [C{sub 4}H{sub 15}N{sub 3}][H{sub 3}O]{sub 0.5}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2.93}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 0.07}(H{sub 2}O)](NO{sub 3}){sub 0.5} (III), [C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N]{sub 3}[H{sub 5}O{sub 2}][(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5} (IV), [C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N]{sub 2}[H{sub 3}O][(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 4}(HSeO{sub 3})(H{sub 2}O)](H{sub 2}SeO{sub 3}){sub 0.2} (V), [C{sub 4}H{sub 12}N]{sub 3}[H{sub 3}O][(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O)] (VI), and [C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N]{sub 3}(C{sub 2}H{sub 7}N)[(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 4}(HSeO{sub 3})(H{sub 2}O)] (VII) have been prepared by isothermal evaporation from aqueous solutions. Their crystal structures have been solved by direct methods and their uranyl selenate and selenite–selenate units investigated using black-and-white graphs from the viewpoints of topology of interpolyhedral linkages and isomeric variations. The crystal structure of IV is based upon complex layers with unique topology, which has not been observed previously in uranyl selenates. Investigations of the statistics and local distribution of the U–O{sub br}–Se bond angles demonstrates that shorter angles associate with undulations, whereas larger angles correspond to planar areas of the uranyl selenite layers. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structures of the seven novel Se-contaning uranyl oxysalts that contain protonated organic molecules as interlayer species have been investigated from the viewpoints of topology of interpolyhedral linkages, isomeric variations and flexibility of structural units. - Highlights: • Single crystals of seven novel uranyl oxysalts were prepared by evaporation method. • The graph theory was used

  1. Groundwater nitrate contamination: factors and indicators.

    PubMed

    Wick, Katharina; Heumesser, Christine; Schmid, Erwin

    2012-11-30

    Identifying significant determinants of groundwater nitrate contamination is critical in order to define sensible agri-environmental indicators that support the design, enforcement, and monitoring of regulatory policies. We use data from approximately 1200 Austrian municipalities to provide a detailed statistical analysis of (1) the factors influencing groundwater nitrate contamination and (2) the predictive capacity of the Gross Nitrogen Balance, one of the most commonly used agri-environmental indicators. We find that the percentage of cropland in a given region correlates positively with nitrate concentration in groundwater. Additionally, environmental characteristics such as temperature and precipitation are important co-factors. Higher average temperatures result in lower nitrate contamination of groundwater, possibly due to increased evapotranspiration. Higher average precipitation dilutes nitrates in the soil, further reducing groundwater nitrate concentration. Finally, we assess whether the Gross Nitrogen Balance is a valid predictor of groundwater nitrate contamination. Our regression analysis reveals that the Gross Nitrogen Balance is a statistically significant predictor for nitrate contamination. We also show that its predictive power can be improved if we account for average regional precipitation. The Gross Nitrogen Balance predicts nitrate contamination in groundwater more precisely in regions with higher average precipitation.

  2. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, T.; Erlandsen, M.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded in decreasing the N surplus by 40% since the mid 1980s while at the same time maintaining crop yields and increasing the animal production of especially pigs. Trend analyses prove that the youngest (0-15 years old) oxic groundwater shows more pronounced significant downward nitrate trends (44%) than the oldest (25-50 years old) oxic groundwater (9%). This amounts to clear evidence of the effect of reduced nitrate leaching on groundwater nitrate concentrations in Denmark. Are the Danish groundwater monitoring strategy obtimal for detection of nitrate trends? Will the nitrate concentrations in Danish groundwater continue to decrease or are the Danish nitrate concentration levels now appropriate according to the Water Framework Directive?

  3. Measurement of isoprene nitrates by GCMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Graham P.; Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn D.; Bew, Sean P.; Reeves, Claire E.

    2016-09-01

    According to atmospheric chemistry models, isoprene nitrates play an important role in determining the ozone production efficiency of isoprene; however this is very poorly constrained through observations as isoprene nitrates have not been widely measured. Measurements have been severely restricted largely due to a limited ability to measure individual isoprene nitrate isomers. An instrument based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GCMS) and the associated calibration methods are described for the speciated measurements of individual isoprene nitrate isomers. Five of the primary isoprene nitrates which formed in the presence of NOx by reaction of isoprene with the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the Master Chemical Mechanism are identified using known isomers on two column phases and are fully separated on the Rtx-200 column. Three primary isoprene nitrates from the reaction of isoprene with the nitrate radical (NO3) are identified after synthesis from the already identified analogous hydroxy nitrate. A Tenax adsorbent-based trapping system allows the analysis of the majority of the known hydroxy and carbonyl primary isoprene nitrates, although not the (1,2)-IN isomer, under field-like levels of humidity and showed no impact from typical ambient concentrations of NOx and ozone.

  4. Fast photolysis of carbonyl nitrates from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, J.-F.; Peeters, J.; Stavrakou, T.

    2013-11-01

    Photolysis is shown to be a major sink for isoprene-derived carbonyl nitrates, which constitute an important component of the total organic nitrate pool over vegetated areas. Empirical evidence from published laboratory studies on the absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of α-nitrooxy ketones suggests that the presence of the nitrate group (i) greatly enhances the absorption cross sections, and (ii) facilitates dissociation to a point that the photolysis quantum yield is close to unity, with O-NO2 dissociation as the likely major channel. On this basis, we provide new recommendations for estimating the cross sections and photolysis rates of carbonyl nitrates. The newly estimated photorates are validated using a chemical box model against measured temporal profiles of carbonyl nitrates in an isoprene oxidation experiment by Paulot et al. (2009). The comparisons for ethanal nitrate and for the sum of methacrolein- and methylvinylketone nitrates strongly supports our assumptions of large cross section enhancements and a near-unit quantum yield for these compounds. These findings have significant atmospheric implications: the photorates of key carbonyl nitrates from isoprene are estimated to be typically between ~3 and 20 times higher than their sink due to reaction with OH in relevant atmospheric conditions. Moreover, since the reaction is expected to release NO2, photolysis is especially effective in depleting the total organic nitrate pool.

  5. Fast photolysis of carbonyl nitrates from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, J.-F.; Peeters, J.; Stavrakou, T.

    2014-03-01

    Photolysis is shown to be a major sink for isoprene-derived carbonyl nitrates, which constitute an important component of the total organic nitrate pool over vegetated areas. Empirical evidence from published laboratory studies on the absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of α-nitrooxy ketones suggests that the presence of the nitrate group (i) greatly enhances the absorption cross sections and (ii) facilitates dissociation to a point that the photolysis quantum yield is close to unity, with O-NO2 dissociation as a likely major channel. On this basis, we provide new recommendations for estimating the cross sections and photolysis rates of carbonyl nitrates. The newly estimated photo rates are validated using a chemical box model against measured temporal profiles of carbonyl nitrates in an isoprene oxidation experiment by Paulot et al. (2009). The comparisons for ethanal nitrate and for the sum of methacrolein- and methyl vinyl ketone nitrates strongly supports our assumptions of large cross-section enhancements and a near-unit quantum yield for these compounds. These findings have significant atmospheric implications: the photorates of key carbonyl nitrates from isoprene are estimated to be typically between ~ 3 and 20 times higher than their sink due to reaction with OH in relevant atmospheric conditions. Moreover, since the reaction is expected to release NO2, photolysis is especially effective in depleting the total organic nitrate pool.

  6. Density Functional Theory Study of the Complexation of the Uranyl Dication with Anionic Phosphate Ligands with and without Water Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Virgil E.; Gutowski, Keith E.; Dixon, David A.

    2013-08-01

    The structures, vibrational frequencies and energetics of anhydrous and hydrated complexes of UO2 2+ with the phosphate anions H2PO4 -, HPO4 2-, and PO4 3- were predicted at the density functional theory (DFT) and MP2 molecular orbital theory levels as isolated gas phase species and in aqueous solution by using self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) calculations with different solvation models. The geometries and vibrational frequencies of the major binding modes for these complexes are compared to experiment where possible and good agreement is found. The uranyl moiety is nonlinear in many of the complexes, and the coordination number (CN) 5 in the equatorial plane is the predominant binding motif. The phosphates are found to bind in both monodentate and bidentate binding modes depending on the charge and the number of water molecules. The SCRF calculations were done with a variety of approaches, and different SCRF approaches were found to be optimal for different reaction types. The acidities of HxPO4 3-x in HxPO4 3-x(H2O)4, x = 0-3 complexes were calculated with different SCRF models and compared to experiment. Phosphate anions can displace water molecules from the first solvation shell at the uranyl exothermically. The addition of water molecules can cause the bonding of H2PO4 - and HPO4 2- to change from bidentate to monodentate exothermically while maintaining CN 5. The addition of water can generate monodentate structures capable of cross-linking to other uranyl phosphates to form the types of structures found in the solid state. [UO2(HPO4)(H2O)3] is predicted to be a strong base in the gas phase and in aqueous solution. It is predicted to be a much weaker acid than H3PO4 in the gas phase and in solution.

  7. Structural characterization of environmentally relevant ternary uranyl citrate complexes present in aqueous solutions and solid state materials.

    PubMed

    Basile, Madeline; Unruh, Daniel K; Flores, Erin; Johns, Adam; Forbes, Tori Z

    2015-02-14

    Organic acids are important metal chelators in environmental systems and tend to form soluble complexes in aqueous solutions, ultimately influencing the transport and bioavailability of contaminants in surface and subsurface waters. This is particularly true for the formation of uranyl citrate complexes, which have been utilized in advanced photo- and bioremediation strategies for soils contaminated with nuclear materials. Given the complexity of environmental systems, the formation of ternary or heterometallic uranyl species in aqueous solutions are also expected, particularly with Al(iii) and Fe(iii) cations. These ternary forms are reported to be more stable in aqueous solutions, potentially enhancing contaminant mobility and uptake by organisms, but the exact coordination geometries of these soluble molecular complexes have not been elucidated. To provide insight into the nature of these species, we have developed a series of geochemical model compounds ([(UO(2))(2)Al(2)(C(6)H(4)O(7))(4)](6-) (U(2)Al(2)), [(UO(2))(2)Fe(2)(C(6)H(4)O(7))(4)](6-) (U(2)Fe(2)-1) and [(UO(2))(2)Fe(2)(C(6)H(4)O(7))(4)(H(2)O)(2)](6-) (U(2)Fe(2)-2) and [(UO(2))(2)Fe(4)(OH)(4)(C(6)H(4)O(7))(4)](8-) (U(2)Fe(4))) that were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy. Mass spectroscopy was then employed to compare the model compounds to species present in aqueous solutions to provide an enhanced understanding of the ternary uranyl citrate complexes that could be relevant in natural systems.

  8. A novel flow injection potentiometric graphite coated ion-selective electrode for the low level determination of uranyl ion.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Mizani, Farhang; Mousavi, Mir Fazlollah; Alizadeh, Naader; Alizadeh, Kamal; Eshghi, Hossein; Karami, Hassan

    2007-04-18

    Solution studies on the binding properties of uranyl ion toward four different recently synthesized benzo-substituted macrocyclic diamides L1-L4 revealed the occurrence of a 1:1 complexation of the ligands with UO(2)(2+) ion, with a stability order of L2>L1>L4>L3. Consequently, L2 was used as a suitable neutral ionophore for the preparation of novel polymeric membrane (PME) and coated graphite (CGE) UO(2)(2+)-selective electrodes. The electrodes exhibit a Nernstian behavior for UO(2)(2+) ions over wide concentration ranges (1.0 x 10(-6) - 1.0 x 10(-1) M for PME and 1.0 x 10(-7) - 1.0 x 10(-1) M for CGE) and very low limits of detection (8.0 x 10(-7) M for PME and 7.3 x 10(-8) M for CGE). The proposed potentiometric sensors manifest advantages of fast response and, most importantly, good selectivity with respect to many alkali, alkaline earth, transition, and heavy metal ions. The potentiometric responses of the electrodes are independent of the pH of the test solution in the pH range 2.9-3.7. The CGE was used in flow injection potentiometry and resulted in well defined peaks for uranyl ions with stable baseline, excellent reproducibility and very high sampling rate of 170 injections per hour. The proposed FIP system was used for the determination of trace uranyl ions in real and synthetic samples.

  9. Designing the Ideal Uranyl Ligand: a Sterically-Induced Speciation Change in Complexes with Thiophene-Bridged Bis(3-hydroxy-N-methylpyridin-2-one)

    SciTech Connect

    Szigethy, Geza; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-09-11

    Structural characterization of a mononuclear uranyl complex with a tetradentate, thiophene-linked bis(3-hydroxy-N-methylpyridin-2-one) ligand reveals the most planar coordination geometry yet observed with this ligand class. The introduction of ethylsulfanyl groups onto the thiophene linker disrupts this planar, conjugated ligand arrangement, resulting in the formation of dimeric (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}L{sub 2} species in which each ligand spans two uranyl centers. Relative energy calculations reveal that this tendency toward dimer formation is the result of steric interference between ethylsulfanyl substituents and linking amides.

  10. Phase Diagram of Ammonium Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-06-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often been subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood - resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety, in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN, in different chemical environments, at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 15 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 673 K. The present study has been supported by the U.S. DHS under Award Number 2008-ST-061-ED0001.

  11. Chemical controls on uranyl citrate speciation and the self-assembly of nanoscale macrocycles and sandwich complexes in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Basile, M; Unruh, D K; Gojdas, K; Flores, E; Streicher, L; Forbes, T Z

    2015-03-28

    Uranyl citrate forms trimeric species at pH > 5.5, but exact structural characteristics of these important oligomers have not previously been reported. Crystallization and structural characterization of the trimers suggests the self-assembly of the 3 : 3 and 3 : 2 U : Cit complexes into larger sandwich and macrocyclic molecules. Raman spectroscopy and ESI-MS have been utilized to investigate the relative abundance of these species in solution under varying pH and citrate concentrations. Additional dynamic light scattering experiments indicate that self-assembly of the larger molecules does occur in aqueous solution.

  12. Interaction between chitosan and uranyl ions. Role of physical and physicochemical parameters on the kinetics of sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Piron, E. |; Accominotti, M.; Domard, A.

    1997-03-19

    This work corresponds to the first part of our studies on the interactions between chitosan particles dispersed in water and uranyl ions. The measurements were obtained by ICP, and we considered the role of various physical and physicochemical parameters related to chitosan. We showed that the crystallinity, the particle dimensions, and the swelling in water of chitosan are parameters which are connected together and govern the kinetic laws of metal diffusion and sorption. The molecular mobility of the polymer chains is then essential parameter. 31 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Uranyl-chlorite sorption/desorption: Evaluation of different U(VI) sequestration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, David M.; Maher, Kate; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.

    2009-10-01

    Sequestration of soluble uranium(VI) in the form of uranyl UO22+ by clay minerals such as chlorite is potentially a major sink for U in U-contaminated environments. We have used batch sorption/desorption experiments combined with U L III-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, synchrotron-based microdiffraction, and surface complexation modeling to investigate the dominant sorption process(es) governing uranyl uptake by chlorite. Uranium(VI) sorption is independent of ionic strength, suggesting dominantly inner-sphere sorption, which was supported by selective chemical extraction results. The maximum sorption loadings were 0.28 μmol U g -1 chlorite (at pH 4) and 6.3 μmol U g -1 chlorite (at pH 6.5 and 10). Uranium(VI) uptake as a function of solution composition followed the trends (at pH 6.5): CO 3-Ca-free system >CO 3-Ca-bearing system >CO 3-bearing system; (at pH 10): CO 3-Ca-bearing system >CO 3-Ca-free system ≈CO 3-bearing system. Desorption experiments based on selective chemical extractions indicated that (1) there is little or no weakly bound U(VI) or U(VI)-bearing precipitates, (2) 60-80% of U(VI) inner-sphere sorption complexes are desorbed following a 0.1 M HCl step over 1 week, and (3) 100% desorption of adsorbed U(VI) is accomplished by a 1.0 M HCl step over 1 week. Fits of the EXAFS spectra of the short-term sorption samples indicate that UO22+ forms inner-sphere sorption complexes with carbonate (when present) at [Fe(O,OH) 6] octahedral sites in a bidentate, edge-sharing manner. EXAFS-derived structural parameters were used to constrain the type(s) of U(VI)-bearing surface species and were combined with observed batch sorption trends as input for a diffuse double-layer surface complexation model (SCM). This model successfully predicts U(VI) sorption over a range of U(VI) concentrations, pH values, and solution

  14. Arabidopsis Nitrate Transporter NRT1.9 Is Important in Phloem Nitrate Transport[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Yun; Tsay, Yi-Fang

    2011-01-01

    This study of the Arabidopsis thaliana nitrate transporter NRT1.9 reveals an important function for a NRT1 family member in phloem nitrate transport. Functional analysis in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that NRT1.9 is a low-affinity nitrate transporter. Green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter analyses indicated that NRT1.9 is a plasma membrane transporter expressed in the companion cells of root phloem. In nrt1.9 mutants, nitrate content in root phloem exudates was decreased, and downward nitrate transport was reduced, suggesting that NRT1.9 may facilitate loading of nitrate into the root phloem and enhance downward nitrate transport in roots. Under high nitrate conditions, the nrt1.9 mutant showed enhanced root-to-shoot nitrate transport and plant growth. We conclude that phloem nitrate transport is facilitated by expression of NRT1.9 in root companion cells. In addition, enhanced root-to-shoot xylem transport of nitrate in nrt1.9 mutants points to a negative correlation between xylem and phloem nitrate transport. PMID:21571952

  15. Challenges with nitrate therapy and nitrate tolerance: prevalence, prevention, and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Thadani, Udho

    2014-08-01

    Nitrate therapy has been an effective treatment for ischemic heart disease for over 100 years. The anti-ischemic and exercise-promoting benefits of sublingually administered nitrates are well established. Nitroglycerin is indicated for the relief of an established attack of angina and for prophylactic use, but its effects are short lived. In an effort to increase the duration of beneficial effects, long-acting orally administered and topical applications of nitrates have been developed; however, following their continued or frequent daily use, patients soon develop tolerance to these long-acting nitrate preparations. Once tolerance develops, patients begin losing the protective effects of the long-acting nitrate therapy. By providing a nitrate-free interval, or declining nitrate levels at night, one can overcome or reduce the development of tolerance, but cannot provide 24-h anti-anginal and anti-ischemic protection. In addition, patients may be vulnerable to occurrence of rebound angina and myocardial ischemia during periods of absent nitrate levels at night and early hours of the morning, and worsening of exercise capacity prior to the morning dose of the medication. This has been a concern with nitroglycerin patches but not with oral formulations of isosorbide-5 mononitrates, and has not been adequately studied with isosorbide dinitrate. This paper describes problems associated with nitrate tolerance, reviews mechanisms by which nitrate tolerance and loss of efficacy develop, and presents strategies to avoid nitrate tolerance and maintain efficacy when using long-acting nitrate formulations.

  16. REDUCTION OF NITRATE THROUGH THE USE OF NITRATE REDUCTASE FOR THE SMARTCHEM AUTOANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The standard method for the determination of nitrate in drinking water, USEPA Method 353.2 “Determination of Nitrate-Nitrite by Automated Colorimetry,” employs cadmium as the reductant for the conversion of nitrate to nitrite. The nitrite is then analyzed colorimetrically by way ...

  17. Platinum blue as an alternative to uranyl acetate for staining in transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Inaga, Sumire; Katsumoto, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Keiichi; Kameie, Toshio; Nakane, Hironobu; Naguro, Tomonori

    2007-04-01

    This paper introduces an aqueous solution of platinum blue (Pt-blue) as an alternative to uranyl acetate (UA) for staining in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Pt-blue was prepared from a reaction of cis-dichlorodiamine-platinum (II) (cis-platin) with thymidine. When Pt-blue was dried on a microgrid and observed by TEM it showed a uniform appearance with tiny particles less than 1 nm in diameter. The effect of Pt-blue as an electron stain was then examined not only for positive staining of conventional ultrathin resin sections and counterstaining of post-embedding immuno-electron microscopy but also for negative staining. In ultrathin sections of the rat liver and renal glomerulus, Pt-blue provided good contrast images, especially in double staining combined with a lead stain (Pb). Almost all cell organelles were clearly observed with high contrast in these sections. Glycogen granules in the hepatic parenchymal cells were particularly electron dense in Pt-blue stained sections compared with those treated with UA. In longitudinal and transverse sections of budding influenza A viruses, a specific arrangement of rod-like structures, which correspond to the ribonucleoprotein complexes, was clearly shown in each virion stained with Pt-blue and Pb. When post-embedding immunoelectron microscopy was performed in ultrathin sections of HeLa cells embedded in Lowicryl K4M, the localization of Ki-67 protein was sufficiently detected even after Pt-blue and Pb staining. The present study also revealed that Pt-blue could be used for the negative staining of E. coli, allowing the visualization of a flagellum. These findings indicate that Pt-blue is a useful, safe, and easily obtainable electron stain that is an alternative to UA for TEM preparations.

  18. Quasielastic neutron scattering with in situ humidity control: Water dynamics in uranyl fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskowiec, A.; Kirkegaard, M. C.; Herwig, K. W.; Trowbridge, L.; Mamontov, E.; Anderson, B.

    2016-03-01

    The structural phase diagram of uranyl fluoride (UO2F2), while incomplete, contains at least one anhydrous crystal structure and a second, zeolite-like structure with the formula [(UO2F2)(H2O)]7 ṡ (H2O)4 that can be produced by adding water to the anhydrous structure. While traditional diffraction measurements can easily differentiate these crystals, additional aqueous structures (in general of the form UO2F2 + xH2O) have been proposed as well. We present results using a novel sample environment setup to intercalate water during a quasielastic neutron scattering measurement over the course of 86 h. Our sample environment allows low-pressure (<2 atm) humid air flow across the sample coupled with a system to control the relative humidity of this air flow between 10% and 70%. The water dynamics in UO2F2 and [(UO2F2)(H2O)]7 ṡ (H2O)4 are sufficiently different to distinguish them, with water in the latter executing a restricted diffusion (D = 2.7 × 10-6 cm2/s) within the structure's accessible pores (r = 3.17 Å) such that the dynamics can be used as a fingerprinting tool. We confirm that water vapor pressure is the driving thermodynamic force for the conversion of the anhydrous structure to [(UO2F2)(H2O)]7 ṡ (H2O)4, and we demonstrate the feasibility of extending this approach to aqueous forms of UO2F2 + xH2O. This method has general applicability to systems in which water content itself is a driving variable for structural or dynamical phase transitions.

  19. Nephrotoxicity of uranyl fluoride in uninephrectomized and sham-operated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zalups, R.K.; Gelein, R.M.; Morrow, P.E.; Diamond, G.L.

    1988-06-15

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the nephrotoxicity of the uranium-containing compound uranyl fluoride (UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/) is enhanced after unilateral nephrectomy. Unilaterally nephrectomized (NPX) and sham-operated (SO) rats were given single intravenous injections of UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ at doses delivering 100 or 250 micrograms U/kg 16 days after surgery. Between the second and third day after the administration of either dose of UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/, the urinary excretion of the cellular enzymes lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and the plasma solute albumin began to increase significantly in both the NPX and SO rats. The urinary excretion of the plasma solute glucose did not begin to increase significantly in the NPX and SO rats until 4 days after the administration of either dose of UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/. During the fifth day following the administration of either dose of UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ (which was also the last day that urinary data were collected) the urinary excretion of LDH, AST, and glucose in the NPX and SO rats was greater than that during any previous day. The urinary excretion of these three compounds during this fifth day was greater in the SO rats than in the NPX rats. Also during the fifth day following the injection of either dose of UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/, the fractional excretion of glucose was higher in the SO rats than in the NPX rats. By the end of the fifth day, the level of histologically demonstrable cellular necrosis in the pars recta of proximal tubules in the renal cortex and outer medulla of the NPX and SO rats was statistically similar. Therefore, the nephropathy in rats induced by UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ is not made more severe as a result of unilateral nephrectomy.

  20. Long-term Kinetics of Uranyl Desorption from Sediments Under Advective Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

    2014-02-15

    Long-term (> 4 months) column experiments were performed to investigate the kinetics of uranyl (U(VI)) desorption in sediments collected from the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford 300 Area. The experimental results were used to evaluate alternative multi-rate surface complexation reaction (SCR) approaches to describe the short- and long-term kinetics of U(VI) desorption under flow conditions. The SCR stoichiometry, equilibrium constants, and multi-rate parameters were independently characterized in batch and stirred flow-cell reactors. Multi-rate SCR models that were either additively constructed using the SCRs for individual size fractions (e.g., Shang et al., 2011), or composite in nature could effectively describe short-term U(VI) desorption under flow conditions. The long-term desorption results, however, revealed that using a labile U concentration measured by carbonate extraction under-estimated desorbable U(VI) and the long-term rate of U(VI) desorption. An alternative modeling approach using total U as the desorbable U(VI) concentration was proposed to overcome this difficulty. This study also found that the gravel size fraction (2-8 mm), which is typically treated as non-reactive in modeling U(VI) reactive transport because of low external surface area, can have an important effect on the U(VI) desorption in the sediment. This study demonstrates an approach to effectively extrapolate U(VI) desorption kinetics for field-scale application, and identifies important parameters and uncertainties affecting model predictions.