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Sample records for acid-deficient uranyl nitrate

  1. EXTRACTION OF URANYL NITRATE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Furman, N.H.; Mundy, R.J.

    1957-12-10

    An improvement in the process is described for extracting aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions with an organic solvent such as ether. It has been found that the organic phase will extract a larger quantity of uranyl nitrate if the aqueous phase contains in addition to the uranyl nitrate, a quantity of some other soluble nitrate to act as a salting out agent. Mentioned as suitable are the nitrates of lithium, calcium, zinc, bivalent copper, and trivalent iron.

  2. Photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, W.K.

    1993-10-20

    The photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate solutions to tetravalent uranium was investigated as a means of producing uranium dioxide feed for the saltless direct oxide reduction (SDOR) process. At high uranium concentrations, reoxidation of U{sup +4} occurs rapidly. The kinetics of the nitric oxidation of tetravalent uranium depend on the concentrations of hydrogen ion, nitrate ion, nitrous acid, and tetravalent uranium in the same manner as was reported elsewhere for the nitrate oxidation of PU{sup +3}. Reaction rate data were successfully correlated with a mechanism in which nitrogen dioxide is the reactive intermediate. Addition of a nitrous acid scavenger suppresses the reoxidation reaction. An immersion reactor employing a mercury vapor lamp gave reduction times fast enough for routine production usage. Precipitation techniques for conversion of aqueous U(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} to hydrous UO{sub 2} were evaluated. Prolonged dewatering times tended to make the process time consuming. Use of 3- to 4-M aqueous NaOH gave the best dewatering times observed. Reoxidation of the UO{sub 2} by water of hydration was encountered, which required the drying process to be carried out under a reducing atmosphere.

  3. GRAPHITE PRODUCTION UTILIZING URANYL NITRATE HEXAHYDRATE CATALYST

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Armstrong, J.R.; Schell, D.H.

    1964-03-10

    ABS>The graphitizing of a mixture composed of furfuryl alcohol binder and uranyl nitrate hexahydrate hardener and the subsequent curing, baking, and graphitizing with pressure being initially applied prior to curing are described. The pressure step may be carried out by extrusion, methyl cellulose being added to the mixture before the completion of extrusion. Uranium oxide may be added to the graphitizable mixture prior to the heating and pressure steps. The graphitizable mixture may consist of discrete layers of different compositions. (AEC)

  4. SEPARATION OF URANYL NITRATE BY EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Stoughton, R.W.; Steahly, F.L.

    1958-08-26

    A process is presented for obtaining U/sup 233/ from solutions containing Pa/sup 233/. A carrier precipitate, such as MnO/sub 2/, is formed in such solutions and carries with it the Pa/sup 233/ present. This precipitate is then dissolved in nitric acid and the solution is aged to allow decay of the Pa/ sup 233/ into U/sup 233/. After a sufficient length of time the U/sup 233/ bearing solution is made 2.5 to 4.5 Molar in manganese nitrate by addition thereof, and the solution is then treated with ether to obtain uranyl nitrate by solvent extraction techniques.

  5. Analysis of High Enriched Uranyl Nitrate Solution Containing Cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    S. S. Kim

    2006-09-01

    A benchmark evaluation has been performed for a set of twenty-one critical experiments involving high enriched uranyl nitrate solution with and without cadmium nitrate as a soluble neutron absorber. The critical experiments analyzed include two types of cylindrical vessels with 24.18 and 29.16 cm in diameters. The vessels were reflected with water and in some cases with water containing dissolved cadmium nitrate. The uranium concentration ranged from 482 to 529 g/l, and cadmium concentration in the uranyl nitrate solution ranged from 0.0 to 11.31 g/l. The cadmium concentration in the reflector solution ranged from 0.0 to 15.16 g/l. Using MCNP and KENO-V.a, complete three-dimensional models were created for the two vessels filled with the uranyl nitrate solution and reflector solution. A series of criticality calculations were performed with KENO-V.a, MCNP4b, and MCNP5. In general, good agreement between KENO-V.a and MCNP4b was observed. However, MCNP5 results show consistently lower values compared with MCNP4b results with the maximum difference of 1.2 %. This ICSBEP supported evaluation provides valuable data for the effect of soluble neutron absorber (cadmium nitrate) on the criticality safety of high-enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These data can also be used in determining critical controls and for validation of the calculation methods.

  6. Optimization of a uranyl nitrate passive neutron counter

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Eric Benton; Bracken, David; West, James; Freeman, Corey; Newell, Matthew R; Bourret, Steven C; Rothrock, Richard B; Ladd - Lively, Jennifer L; Schuh, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Safeguarding natural uranium as it enters the fuel cycle has become a priority for the safeguards community in recent years. Uranyl nitrate is a material of interest in this endeavor because it is normally a step in the process from converting uranium ores to more concentrated forms like UO{sub 2} and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. This paper will detail the improvements and design optimizations made for a uranyl nitrate neutron detector. The original design of the detector was based on standard neutron counter designs and featured 2 rings of He-3 tubes fully moderated and shielded from background. Several areas for enhancement were identified after months of testing in three different locations. An operating uranyl nitrate facility was included as one of the test locations. Three significant upgrades to the counter addressed in the redesign were: real time background detection, counter reliability improvements, and optimization of the detector design for the detection of neutrons emitted by the uranyl nitrate flowing through the monitored process pipe. The optimized detector design includes significant electronics upgrades, the ability to detect neutrons (background and signal) with 36 degree spatial resolution around the process pipe for signal and 45 degree spatial resolution for background, inner and outer rings of He-3 tubes for real time background corrections, and notably more reliable cabling. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) modeling was used to optimize the signal (neutrons from uranyl nitrate in the monitored process pipe) to noise (background neutrons from all sources) ratio of the inner ring of He-3 tubes. Additionally, MCNP modeling maximized noise to signal on the outer ring of He-3 tubes. Details of the detector optimization as well as all the additional detector enhancements will be discussed. The neutron counter will be field tested on the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  7. Intrinsic Hydration of Uranyl-Hydroxide, -Nitrate and -Acetate Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Winnie Chien; Dorothy Hanna; Victor Anbalagan; Garold Gresham; Gary Groenewold; Michael Van Stipdonk

    2004-06-01

    The intrinsic hydration of three monopositive uranyl-anion complexes (UO2A)+ (where A = acetate, nitrate, or hydroxide) was investigated using ion-trap mass spectrometry (IT-MS). The relative rates for the formation of the monohydrates [(UO2A)(H2O)]+, with respect to the anion, followed the trend: Acetate = nitrate >> hydroxide. This finding was rationalized in terms of the donation of electron density by the strongly basic OH- to the uranyl metal center, thereby reducing the Lewis acidity of U and its propensity to react with incoming nucleophiles, viz., H2O. An alternative explanation is that the more complex acetate and nitrate anions provide increased degrees of freedom that could accommodate excess energy from the hydration reaction. The monohydrates also reacted with water, forming dihydrates and then trihydrates. The rates for formation of the nitrate and acetate dihydrates [(UO2A)(H2O)2]+ were very similar to the rates for formation of the monohydrates; the presence of the first H2O ligand had no influence on the addition of the second. In contrast, formation of the [(UO2OH)(H2O)2]+ was nearly three times faster than the formation of the monohydrate.

  8. SEPARATION OF BARIUM VALUES FROM URANYL NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Tompkins, E.R.

    1959-02-24

    The separation of radioactive barium values from a uranyl nitrate solution of neutron-irradiated uranium is described. The 10 to 20% uranyl nitrate solution is passed through a flrst column of a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring the adsorption of barium and certain other cations. The loaded resin is first washed with dilute sulfuric acid to remove a portion of the other cations, and then wash with a citric acid solution at pH of 5 to 7 to recover the barium along with a lesser amount of the other cations. The PH of the resulting eluate is adjusted to about 2.3 to 3.5 and diluted prior to passing through a smaller second column of exchange resin. The loaded resin is first washed with a citric acid solution at a pH of 3 to elute undesired cations and then with citric acid solution at a pH of 6 to eluts the barium, which is substantially free of undesired cations.

  9. Influence of Acidity on Uranyl Nitrate Association in Aqueous Solutions: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, Valmor F; Cui, Shengting; Khomami, Bamin; Ye, Xianggui; Smith, Rodney Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Uranyl ion complexation with water and nitrate is a key aspect of the uranium/plutonium extraction process. We have carried out a molecular dynamics simulation study to investigate this complexation process, including the molecular composition of the various complex species, the corresponding structure, and the equilibrium distribution of the complexes. The observed structures of the complexes suggest that in aqueous solution, uranyls are generally hydrated by 5 water molecules in the equatorial plane. When associating with nitrate ions, a water molecule is replaced by a nitrate ion, preserving the five-fold coordination and planar symmetry. Analysis of the pair correlation function between uranyl and nitrate suggests that nitrates bind to uranyl in aqueous solution mainly in a monodentate mode, although a small portion of bidentates occur. Dynamic association and dissociation between uranyls and nitrates take place in aqueous solution with a substantial amount of fluctuation in the number of various uranyl nitrate species. The average number of the uranyl mononitrate complexes shows a dependence on acid concentration consistent with equilibrium-constant analysis, namely, the concentration of [UO2NO3]+ increases with nitric acid concentration.

  10. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  11. Analysis of Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Nested Annular Tank Array

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; James D. Cleaver

    2009-06-01

    Two series of experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory during the 1980s using highly enriched (93%) uranyl nitrate solution in annular tanks. [1, 2] Tanks were of typical sizes found in nuclear production plants. Experiments looked at tanks of varying radii in a co-located set of nested tanks, a 1 by 2 array, and a 1 by 3 array. The co-located set of tanks had been analyzed previously [3] as a benchmark for inclusion within the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. [4] The current study represents the benchmark analysis of the 1 by 3 array of a series of nested annular tanks. Of the seventeen configurations performed in this set of experiments, twelve were evaluated and nine were judged as acceptable benchmarks.

  12. ABSORPTION AND BIOKINETICS OF U IN RATS FOLLOWING AN ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF URANYL NITRATE SOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The absorption of Uranyl (U) within the male Wistar rat was determined following oral gavage with uranyl nitrate solutions at seven different dosages. Gavage levels ranged from 0.003 to 45 mg U per kilogram body weight. Uranium tissue burdens were determined at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4...

  13. Status Update: Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    The successful completion of a field trial of safeguards monitoring equipment at a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP) demonstrated the need for a facility in which to perform full-scale equipment testing under controlled conditions prior to field deployment of safeguards systems at additional plants. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions for a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process conducted in an NUCP. In addition to calibrating instruments such as the neutron detector developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, UNCLE will be used to test other in-line instruments (mass and volumetric flowmeters, spectrophotometers, etc.). UNCLE will be able to test commercially available equipment, such as the Endress+Hauser Promass 83F Coriolis meter that was used in the field test and other equipment that is presently under development. UNCLE is designed to accommodate different pipe sizes, flow rates, solution concentrations, and other variables of interest. Construction is expected to be completed by the end of September 2008 with initial testing beginning later that year. The design and current status of UNCLE will be presented, along with the capabilities of the facility and the proposed test plans.

  14. Continuous process for the production of powdered uranium dioxide from uranyl nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Divins, L.A.; Runion, H.L.

    1987-04-07

    A method is described of producing uranium dioxide powder for the fabrication of nuclear fuel from acidic solutions containing uranyl nitrate, comprising the sequence of steps of: (a) continuously reacting an acidic aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate with ammonium hydroxide added in less than stoichiometric amount for complete uranium precipitation, neutralizing any free acid and precipitating a portion of the uranium content of the solution as ammonium uranate solids; (b) continuously aging the product resulting from reacting the uranyl nitrate of the solution with less than a stoichiometric amount of ammonium hydroxide, including the precipitated ammonium uranate solids while maintaining the solids substantially suspended in the medium of the aqueous solution; (c) thereafter continuously reacting the aged product comprising uranyl nitrate and precipitated ammonium uranate with additional added ammonium hydroxide in amount at least sufficient to complete the precipitation of the uranium of the solution as ammonium uranate solids; and (e) calcining the dewatered ammonium uranate solids in a reducing atmosphere and thereby converting the ammonium uranate solids in a reducing atmosphere and thereby converting the ammonium uranate to uranium dioxide powder.

  15. PROCESS FOR EXTRACTING NEPTUNIUM AND PLUTONIUM FROM NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS OF SAME CONTAINING URANYL NITRATE WITH A TERTIARY AMINE

    DOEpatents

    Sheppard, J.C.

    1962-07-31

    A process of selectively extracting plutonium nitrate and neptunium nitrate with an organic solution of a tertiary amine, away from uranyl nitrate present in an aqueous solution in a maximum concentration of 1M is described. The nitric acid concentration is adjusted to about 4M and nitrous acid is added prior to extraction. (AEC)

  16. CONTINUOUS PRECIPITATION METHOD FOR CONVERSION OF URANYL NITRATE TO URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Reinhart, G.M.; Collopy, T.J.

    1962-11-13

    A continuous precipitation process is given for converting a uranyl nitrate solution to uranium tetrafluoride. A stream of the uranyl nitrate solution and a stream of an aqueous ammonium hydroxide solution are continuously introduced into an agitated reaction zone maintained at a pH of 5.0 to 6.5. Flow rates are adjusted to provide a mean residence time of the resulting slurry in the reaction zone of at least 30 minutes. After a startup period of two hours the precipitate is recovered from the effluent stream by filtration and is converted to uranium tetrafluoride by reduction to uranium dioxide with hydrogen and reaction of the uranium dioxide with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. (AEC)

  17. Polymerization of acrylamide at acid pH using uranyl nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, V.V.; Bodhe, A.M.; Pawar, H.S.; Vartak, H.G.

    1986-03-01

    A new photopolymerizing reagent, uranyl nitrate, is used for the polymerization of acrylamide gels at low pH. The amount of uranyl nitrate (0.2 mg/ml) required for the polymerization of gels at pH 3.0 is considerably less than that of persulfate (7 mg/ml). Use of this reagent obviates the need for the removal of excess of persulfate by preelectrophoresis. The electrophoretic separation of basic proteins in uranium-polymerized gels showed faster movement and better resolution of proteins and proved the gels to be versatile, uniform, and reproducible. Electrophoresis of trypsin in these gels does not affect the enzymatic activity. The catalyst can also be used for the polymerization of gels containing 3 M urea.

  18. The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)(2)(NO3)(5)](-): infrared spectrum and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold; Michael J. van Stipdonk; Jos Oomens; Wibe de Jong; Michael E. McIlwain

    2011-12-01

    The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup -} was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate nu3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup -} compared to the mono-complex [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sup -}, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (nu3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the {nu}{sub 3} frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The structure was calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP functional), which produced a structure in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

  19. The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]-: infrared spectrum and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G. S.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Oomens, Jos; De Jong, Wibe A.; McIIwain, Michael E.

    2011-12-01

    The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]- was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate v3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]- compared to the mono-complex [UO2(NO3)3]-, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (v3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the v3 frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The lowest energy structure predicted by density functional theory (B3LYP functional) calculations was one in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

  20. Biochemical and histopathological responses of the Swiss albino mice treated with uranyl nitrate and its recovery.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha Vijayan, P; Rekha, P D; Dinesh, U; Arun, A B

    2016-06-01

    Uranium is a radioactive heavy metal ubiquitous in the natural environment. In its chemical form, it is known to induce nephrotoxicity both in human and in animals. Its toxicity is dose and time dependent, also varies with form of uranium. In the present study, we assessed the nephrotoxicity induced by a single dose of uranyl nitrate (UN) in mice at different time intervals and recovery from its toxicity. Two doses of 2 and 4 mg/kg body weight of uranyl nitrate was injected intraperitoneally and animals were sacrificed after 1, 3, 5, 14, and 28 d of administration. Histopathological and biochemical alterations of post-UN dosing in comparison to control were evaluated. Tubular damage to about 75% was observed after 3 d (4 mg/kg) and the biochemical parameters such as serum creatinine, urea, and blood urea nitrogen levels were also significantly increased. Progression of tubular damage was not found after 5 d. Dose-dependent recovery of uranyl nitrate-treated animals was observed after 14 and 28 d of dosing. The concentration of uranium retained in kidney correlates with biochemical and histopathological analysis. PMID:26984368

  1. Dehydration of Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate to Uranyl Nitrate Trihydrate under Ambient Conditions as Observed via Dynamic Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F.; Buck, Edgar C.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2015-05-22

    the hexahydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] (UNH) and the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3] (UNT) forms. Their stabilities depend on both relative humidity and temperature. Both phases have previously been studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy, but the data were limited by both instrumental resolution and the ability to prepare the samples as pellets without desiccating them. We report time-resolved infrared (IR) measurements using an integrating sphere that allow us to observe the transformation from the hexahydrate to the trihydrate simply by flowing dry nitrogen gas over the sample. Hexahydrate samples were prepared and confirmed via known XRD patterns, then measured in reflectance mode. The hexahydrate has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm-1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample dehydrates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a blue edge shoulder but ultimately resulting in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm-1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT since UNT has two non-equivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a morphological and structural change that has the lustrous lime green crystals changing to the dull greenish yellow of the trihydrate. Crystal structures and phase transformation were confirmed theoretically using DFT calculations and experimentally via microscopy methods. Both methods showed a transformation with two distinct sites for the uranyl cation in the trihydrate, as opposed to a single crystallographic site in the hexahydrate.

  2. Determination of uranium in uranium metal, uranium oxides, and uranyl nitrate solutions by potentiometric titration

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, H.L.; McElhaney, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    A simple, fast method for the determination of uranium in uranium metal, uranium oxides, and uranyl nitrate solutions has been adapted from the Davies-Gray volumetric method to meet the needs of Y-12. One-gram duplicate aliquots of uranium metal or uranium oxide are dissolved in 1:1 HNO/sub 3/ and concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ to sulfur trioxide fumes, and then diluted to 100-mL volume. Duplicate aliquots are then weighed for analysis. For uranyl nitrate samples, duplicate aliquots containing between 50 and 150 mg of U are weighed and analyzed directly. The weighed aliquot is transferred to a Berzelius beaker; 1.5 M sulfamic acid is added, followed in order by concentrated phosphoric acid, 1 M ferrous sulfate, and (after a 30-second interval) the oxidizing reagent. After a timed 3-minute waiting period, 100 mL of the 0.1% vanadyl sulfate-sulfuric acid mixture is added. The sample is then titrated past its endpoint with standard potassium dichromate, and the endpoint is determined by second derivative techniques on a mV/weight basis.

  3. Uranyl nitrate inhibits lactate gluconeogenesis in isolated human and mouse renal proximal tubules: A {sup 13}C-NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Renault, Sophie; Faiz, Hassan; Gadet, Rudy; Ferrier, Bernard; Martin, Guy; Baverel, Gabriel; Conjard-Duplany, Agnes

    2010-01-01

    As part of a study on uranium nephrotoxicity, we investigated the effect of uranyl nitrate in isolated human and mouse kidney cortex tubules metabolizing the physiological substrate lactate. In the millimolar range, uranyl nitrate reduced lactate removal and gluconeogenesis and the cellular ATP level in a dose-dependent fashion. After incubation in phosphate-free Krebs-Henseleit medium with 5 mM L-[1-{sup 13}C]-, or L-[2-{sup 13}C]-, or L-[3-{sup 13}C]lactate, substrate utilization and product formation were measured by enzymatic and NMR spectroscopic methods. In the presence of 3 mM uranyl nitrate, glucose production and the intracellular ATP content were significantly reduced in both human and mouse tubules. Combination of enzymatic and NMR measurements with a mathematical model of lactate metabolism revealed an inhibition of fluxes through lactate dehydrogenase and the gluconeogenic enzymes in the presence of 3 mM uranyl nitrate; in human and mouse tubules, fluxes were lowered by 20% and 14% (lactate dehydrogenase), 27% and 32% (pyruvate carboxylase), 35% and 36% (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase), and 39% and 45% (glucose-6-phosphatase), respectively. These results indicate that natural uranium is an inhibitor of renal lactate gluconeogenesis in both humans and mice.

  4. Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: Influence of superoxide anion and TNF α mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Orona, N.S.; Tasat, D.R.

    2012-06-15

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5–200 μM). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3} 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO{sub 3}. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup −}). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNFα and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O{sub 2}{sup −} may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O{sub 2}{sup −} may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNFα route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium‐related diseases. -- Highlights: ► Uranyl nitrate effect on cultured macrophages is linked to the doses and independent of its solubility. ► At low doses uranyl nitrate induces generation of superoxide anion. ► At high doses uranyl nitrate provokes secretion of TNFα. ► Uranyl nitrate induces apoptosis through

  5. MCNP-DSP calculations of measurements with uranyl nitrate solution system

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.

    1998-09-01

    The {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis method has been used to determine the subcriticality of various configurations of fissile materials. In the past, the application of this method was limited because point-kinetics models had to be used to interpret the data; however, with the development of the Monte Carlo code MCNP-DSP, the measurements can be analyzed using the more general Monte Carlo models. The results of the Monte carlo calculations will be dependent on the ability to model the experiment accurately and on the nuclear data used to perform the calculations. This paper presents a comparison of the measured and calculated ratio of spectral densities for a subset of measurements performed with a uranyl nitrate solution tank filled to various heights. The results presented are for calculations that were performed with both ENDF/B-IV and ENDF/B-V cross-section data sets.

  6. The extraction of water, nitric acid, and uranyl nitrate by di-2-ethylhexyl sulfoxide in dodecane

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, B.A.; Baes, C.F. Jr.; McDowell, W.J.; Caley, C.E.; Case, G.N. )

    1989-01-01

    The extraction of water, nitric acid, and uranyl nitrate by di-2-ethylhexyl sulfoxide (DEHSO) in dodecane has been measured. Using the program SXLSQA, the data were modeled with correction for nonideality effects (treatments of Hildebrand and Scott and of Pitzer) in terms of the organic-phase species (DEHSO)(H{sub 2}O), (DEHSO){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O), (DEHSO)(HNO{sub 3}), (DEHSO){sub 2}(HNO{sub 3})(H{sub 2}O), (DEHSO)(HNO{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O), and UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(DEHSO){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub w}. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Uranyl nitrate pouring solution for producing nuclear fuel particles and a method for its preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Hein, K.

    1983-05-24

    Sorbitol, or another polyalcohol such as erythritol, dulcitol or xylitol, is added to a solution containing uranyl nitrate which may also contain another heavy metal, such as thorium or plutonium, prior to preneutralization with ammonia in order to provide a highly viscous solution that can be preneutralized to a great extent without premature precipitation of uranium. The high viscosity makes possible the formation of favorably large drops when the solution is dripped into an ammonia containing bath for external gelification of the drops. According to the pouring apparatus used, the particles after washing, drying and sintering have a diameter between 0.6 and 1.5 mm. The polyalcohol is added to a hydrosol containing from 1.5 to 2 moles per liter of heavy metal, the polyalcohol being added until concentration of onethird mole of polyalcohol per mole of heavy metal is reached. In certain cases up to four moles of ammonium nitrate per liter are added. The solution so produced can be preneutralized with up to 90% of the amount of ammonia stoichiometrically necessary for T separation of uranium without the formation of any precipitate, preferably by first adding ammonia gas under strong stirring and then adding ammonium bicarbonate in excess, which decomposes to liberate ammonia to an extent determined by the temperature, which is to be precisely controlled. It is possible to obtain this way a solution of predetermined viscosity from which the excess ammonium bicarbonate can readily be separated.

  8. Critical Parameters of Complex Geometry Intersecting Cylinders Containing Uranyl Nitrate Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, Robert Emil; Briggs, Joseph Blair

    1999-06-01

    About three dozen previously unreported critical configurations are presented for very complex geometries filled with high concentration enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These geometries resemble a tall, thin Central Column (or trunk of a "tree") having long, thin arms (or "branches") extending up to four directions off the column. Arms are equally spaced from one another in vertical planes; and that spacing ranges from arms in contact to quite wide spacings. Both the Central Column and the many different arms are critically safe by themselves when each, alone, is filled with fissile solution; but, in combination, criticality occurs due to the interactions between arms and the column. Such neutronic interactions formed the principal focus of this study. While these results are fresh to the nuclear criticality safety industry and to those seeking novel experiments against which to validate computer codes, the experiments, themselves, are not recent. Over 100 experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory between September, 1967, and February of the following year.

  9. Critical Parameters of Complex Geometries of Intersecting Cylinders Containing Uranyl Nitrate Solution

    SciTech Connect

    J. B. Briggs; R. E. Rothe

    1999-06-14

    About three dozen previously unreported critical configurations are presented for very complex geometries filled with high concentration enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These geometries resemble a tall, thin Central Column (or trunk of a ''tree'') having long, thin arms (or ''branches'') extending up to four directions off the column. Arms are equally spaced from one another in vertical planes, and that spacing ranges from arms in contact to quite wide spacings. Both the Central Column and the many different arms are critically safe by themselves with each, alone, is filled with fissile solution; but, in combination, criticality occurs due to the interactions between arms and the column. Such neutronic interactions formed the principal focus of this study. While these results are fresh to the nuclear criticality safety industry and to those seeking novel experiments against which to validate computer codes, the experiments, themselves, are not recent. Over 100 experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory between September, 1967, and February of the following year.

  10. Chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The standard covers analytical procedures to determine compliance of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to specifications. The following methods are described in detail: uranium by ferrous sulfate reduction-potassium dichromate titrimetry and by ignition gravimetry; specific gravity by pycnometry; free acid by oxalate complexation; thorium by the Arsenazo(III) (photometric) method; chromium by the diphenylcarbazide (photometric) method; molybdenum by the thiocyanate (photometric) method; halogens separation by steam distillation; fluorine by specific ion electrode; halogen distillate analysis: chloride, bromide and iodide by amperometric microtitrimetry; bromine by the fluorescein (photometric) method; sulfate sulfur by (photometric) turbidimetry; phosphorus by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; silicon by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; carbon by persulfate oxidation-acid titrimetry; nonvolatile impurities by spectrography; volatile impurities by rotating-disk spark spectrography; boron by emission spectrography; impurity elements by spark source mass spectrography; isotopic composition by multiple filament surface-ionization mass spectrometry; uranium-232 by alpha spectrometry; total alpha activity by direct alpha counting; fission product activity by beta and gamma counting; entrained organic matter by infrared spectrophotometry. (JMT)

  11. Early effects of uranyl nitrate on respiration and K sup + transport in rabbit proximal tubule

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, H.R.; Kone, B.C.; Brenner, R.M.; Gullans, S.R. )

    1989-07-01

    The mechanisms by which uranyl nitrate (UN) is toxic to the proximal tubule are incompletely understood. To define these further we studied potassium (K+) transport and oxygen consumption (QO2) in rabbit proximal tubule suspensions in vitro immediately after exposure to UN using extracellular O2- and K+-sensitive electrodes. UN caused a cumulative dose-dependent inhibition of proximal tubule QO2, with a threshold concentration of 5 x 10(-5) M. Kinetic analysis suggested two patterns of cell injury: a higher affinity inhibition of QO2 with a Ki of 5 x 10(-4) M, and a lower affinity inhibition of QO2 with a Ki of 10 mM. QO2 was studied in detail in the presence of these Ki concentrations of UN to define the initial cellular events. The results indicated that different cellular processes displayed different sensitivities to UN. At submillimolar concentrations UN caused progressive selective inhibition of ouabain-insensitive QO2 (15% inhibition at 2 minutes). Ouabain-sensitive QO2 and nystatin-stimulated QO2 were not affected, suggesting that Na+,K+-ATPase activity and its coupling to mitochondrial ATP synthesis were intact. Direct measurement of proximal tubule net K+ flux confirmed that Na+,K+-ATPase activity was unchanged. Similarly, UN did not inhibit basal (state 4) or ADP-stimulated (state 3) mitochondrial QO2 in digitonin-permeabilized tubules, confirming that the mitochondria were intact. In contrast, higher concentrations of UN (greater than or equal to 1 mM) caused rapid inhibition of QO2 and net K+ efflux, due to inhibition of Na+,K+-ATPase activity and mitochondrial injury.

  12. Highly Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Annular Tanks with Concrete Reflection: 1 x 3 Line Array of Nested Pairs of Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    James Cleaver; John D. Bess; Nathan Devine; Fitz Trumble

    2009-09-01

    A series of seven experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory beginning in August, 1980 (References 1 and 2). Highly enriched uranyl nitrate solution was introduced into a 1-3 linear array of nested stainless steel annular tanks. The tanks were inside a concrete enclosure, with various moderator and absorber materials placed inside and/or between the tanks. These moderators and absorbers included boron-free concrete, borated concrete, borated plaster, and cadmium. Two configurations included placing bottles of highly enriched uranyl nitrate between tanks externally. Another experiment involved nested hemispheres of highly enriched uranium placed between tanks externally. These three configurations are not evaluated in this report. The experiments evaluated here are part of a series of experiments, one set of which is evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-033. The experiments in this and HEU-SOL-THERM-033 were performed similarly. They took place in the same room and used the same tanks, some of the same moderators and absorbers, some of the same reflector panels, and uranyl nitrate solution from the same location. There are probably additional similarities that existed that are not identified here. Thus, many of the descriptions in this report are either the same or similar to those in the HEU-SOL-THERM-033 report. Seventeen configurations (sixteen of which were critical) were performed during seven experiments; six of those experiments are evaluated here with thirteen configurations. Two configurations were identical, except for solution height, and were conducted to test repeatability. The solution heights were averaged and the two were evaluated as one configuration, which gives a total of twelve evaluated configurations. One of the seventeen configurations was subcritical. Of the twelve critical configurations evaluated, nine were judged as acceptable as benchmarks.

  13. Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: influence of superoxide anion and TNF α mediators.

    PubMed

    Orona, N S; Tasat, D R

    2012-06-15

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5-200 μM). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO₃ 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO₃. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O₂⁻). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNFα and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O₂⁻ may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O₂⁻ may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNFα route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium-related diseases. PMID:22561334

  14. Morphologic changes in uranyl nitrate-induced acute renal failure in saline- and water-drinking rats

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, D.P.

    1982-02-01

    The sequential changes in renal morphology that occurred for 5 subsequent days after a subcutaneous injection of uranyl nitrate (10 mg. per kg.) were examined in saline- and water-drinking rats using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The cortical proximal tubule exhibited diffuse focal brush border loss and increased vacuolization by 1 hour after administration of the nephrotoxin. By 5 days, the P2 and P3 segments were completely necrotic. Cells of P1 segments accumulated large vacuoles throughout their cytoplasm, and distal nephron segments exhibited considerable cellular swelling and vacuolization. Scanning electron microscopy revealed abnormalities in glomerular epithelial cells similar to those seen in humans with chronic renal disease and in experimental animal models characterized by proteinuria. There was essentially no difference in the morphologic response of saline- and water-drinking rats. Although uranyl nitrate administered at this dosage resulted in the relatively slow development of tubular necrosis, changes in renal morphology could be seen within an hour and progressed insidiously throughout the study with little evidence of regeneration.

  15. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-05

    This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials to pure HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend pure HEU UNH with depleted and natural UNH to produce HEU UNH crystals. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU Will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  16. Time-resolved infrared reflectance studies of the dehydration-induced transformation of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate to the trihydrate form

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; Edward J. Mausolf; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F.; Buck, Edgar C.; Bruce K. McNamara

    2015-09-08

    Uranyl nitrate is a key species in the nuclear fuel cycle. However, this species is known to exist in different states of hydration, including the hexahydrate ([UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] often called UNH), the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 or UNT], and in very dry environments the dihydrate form [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)2]. Their relative stabilities depend on both water vapor pressure and temperature. In the 1950s and 1960s, the different phases were studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy but were limited both by instrumental resolution and by the ability to prepare the samples for transmission. We have revisited this problem using time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, which requires no sample preparationmore » and allows dynamic analysis while the sample is exposed to a flow of N2 gas. Samples of known hydration state were prepared and confirmed via X-ray diffraction patterns of known species. In reflectance mode the hexahydrate UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm–1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample desiccates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a shoulder growing in on the blue edge but ultimately results in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm–1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT as UNT has two inequivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a structural and morphological change that has the lustrous lime green UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 crystals changing to the matte greenish yellow of the trihydrate solid. As a result, the phase transformation and crystal structures were confirmed by density functional theory calculations and optical microscopy methods, both of which showed a transformation with two distinct sites for the uranyl cation in the trihydrate, with only one in the hexahydrate.« less

  17. Time-Resolved Infrared Reflectance Studies of the Dehydration-Induced Transformation of Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate to the Trihydrate Form

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F.; Buck, Edgar C.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2015-10-01

    Uranyl nitrate is a key species in the nuclear fuel cycle. However, this species is known to exist in different states of hydration, including the hexahydrate ([UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] often called UNH), the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 or UNT], and in very dry environments the dihydrate form [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)2]. Their relative stabilities depend on both water vapor pressure and temperature. In the 1950s and 1960s the different phases were studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy, but were limited both by instrumental resolution and by the ability to prepare the samples for transmission. We have revisited this problem using time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, which requires no sample preparation and allows dynamic analysis while the sample is exposed to a flow of N2 gas. Samples of known hydration state were prepared and confirmed via X-ray diffraction patterns of known species. In reflectance mode the hexahydrate UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm-1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample desiccates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a shoulder growing in on the blue edge but ultimately results in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm-1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT as UNT has two inequivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a structural and morphological change that has the lustrous lime green UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 crystals changing to the matte greenish yellow of the trihydrate solid. The phase transformation and crystal structures were confirmed by density functional theory calculations and optical microscopy methods, both of which showed a transformation with two distinct sites for the uranyl cation in the trihydrate, with but one in the hexahydrate.

  18. Determination of technetium-99, neptunium-237 and isotopes of thorium in uranyl nitrate solutions from a reprocessing plant, using double-focusing ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Mitterrand, B.; Leprovost, P.; Delaunay, J.; Vian, A.M.

    1998-12-31

    The determination of some radionuclides in uranyl nitrate solutions from a reprocessing plant through chemical or radiochemical methods may be tedious, with poor precision. Quadrupole ICP-MS and, more recently, double-focusing ICP-MS, with high resolution capabilities, have proved to be very efficient tools for such determinations. These improvements will be illustrated by the examples of Technetium-99, Neptunium-237 and Thorium.

  19. Time-resolved infrared reflectance studies of the dehydration-induced transformation of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate to the trihydrate form

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; Edward J. Mausolf; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F.; Buck, Edgar C.; Bruce K. McNamara

    2015-09-08

    Uranyl nitrate is a key species in the nuclear fuel cycle. However, this species is known to exist in different states of hydration, including the hexahydrate ([UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] often called UNH), the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 or UNT], and in very dry environments the dihydrate form [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)2]. Their relative stabilities depend on both water vapor pressure and temperature. In the 1950s and 1960s, the different phases were studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy but were limited both by instrumental resolution and by the ability to prepare the samples for transmission. We have revisited this problem using time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, which requires no sample preparation and allows dynamic analysis while the sample is exposed to a flow of N2 gas. Samples of known hydration state were prepared and confirmed via X-ray diffraction patterns of known species. In reflectance mode the hexahydrate UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm–1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample desiccates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a shoulder growing in on the blue edge but ultimately results in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm–1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT as UNT has two inequivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a structural and morphological change that has the lustrous lime green UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 crystals changing to the matte greenish yellow of the

  20. Renal handling of drugs in renal failure. I: Differential effects of uranyl nitrate- and glycerol-induced acute renal failure on renal excretion of TEAB and PAH in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.H.; Lin, T.H.

    1988-09-01

    Two etiologically different models of experimental acute renal failure were induced in rats by administration of either glycerol or uranyl nitrate. Both compounds caused a substantial decrease in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the net tubular secretion of tetraethylammonium bromide (TEAB) and para-aminohippuric acid (PAH). The degree of renal impairment induced by uranyl nitrate and glycerol appeared to be dose related. Deprivation of drinking water 24 hr before the administration of glycerol potentiated the renal damage. In uranyl nitrate-induced renal failure, the decline of the net tubular secretion for TEAB and PAH was not proportional to the decrease in GFR; the secretion process deteriorated faster than the GFR. For example, when 0.5 mg/kg uranyl nitrate was administered, GFR fell to approximately 65% of normal, whereas the net tubular secretion was decreased to 30% of normal. These results suggest that the tubular transport was preferentially affected by uranyl nitrate. In contrast, in glycerol-induced renal failure, the decline of TEAB secretion fell in a parallel fashion with the GFR, suggesting that the glomeruli and the proximal tubules were equally damaged by glycerol. However, in this latter model, the decline of PAH secretion did not parallel the decrease in GFR, contradicting the proposal that glycerol affects equally the glomeruli and the proximal tubules. This discrepancy may be due to the selective competitive inhibition of PAH secretion by the accumulation of naturally occurring organic acids.

  1. Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of the work discussed in this report were to: (1) develop a flow loop that would simulate the purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP); (2) develop a test plan that would simulate normal operation and disturbances that could be anticipated in an NUCP; (3) use the flow loop to test commercially available flowmeters for use as safeguards monitors; and (4) recommend a flowmeter for production-scale testing at an NUCP. There has been interest in safeguarding conversion plants because the intermediate products [uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}), and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6})] are all suitable uranium feedstocks for producing special nuclear materials. Furthermore, if safeguards are not applied virtually any nuclear weapons program can obtain these feedstocks without detection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Historically, IAEA had not implemented safeguards until the purified UF{sub 6} product was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. H. A. Elayat et al. provide a basic definition of a safeguards system: 'The function of a safeguards system on a chemical conversion plant is in general terms to verify that no useful nuclear material is being diverted to use in a nuclear weapons program'. The IAEA now considers all highly purified uranium compounds as candidates for safeguarding. DOE is currently interested in 'developing instruments, tools, strategies, and methods that could be of use to the IAEA in the application of safeguards' for materials found in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle-prior to the production of the uranium hexafluoride or oxides that have been the traditional starting point for IAEA safeguards. Several national laboratories, including Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Brookhaven, have been involved in developing tools or techniques for safeguarding conversion plants. This study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) NA-241, Office of Dismantlement and Transparency.

  2. Tetraalkylammonium uranyl isothiocyanates.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Clare E; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Soderholm, L

    2012-11-01

    Three tetraalkylammonium uranyl isothiocyanates, [(CH(3))(4)N](3)UO(2)(NCS)(5) (1), [(C(2)H(5))(4)N](3)UO(2)(NCS)(5) (2), and [(C(3)H(7))(4)N](3)UO(2)(NCS)(5) (3), have been synthesized from aqueous solution and their structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. All of the compounds consist of the uranyl cation equatorially coordinated to five N-bound thiocyanate ligands, UO(2)(NCS)(5)(3-), and charge-balanced by three tetraalkylammonium cations. Raman spectroscopy data have been collected on compounds 1-3, as well as on solutions of uranyl nitrate with increasing levels of sodium thiocyanate. By tracking the Raman signatures of thiocyanate, the presence of both free and bound thiocyanate is confirmed in solution. The shift in the Raman signal of the uranyl symmetric stretching mode suggests the formation of higher-order uranyl thiocyanate complexes in solution, while the solid-state Raman data support homoleptic isothiocyanate coordination about the uranyl cation. Presented here are the syntheses and crystal structures of 1-3, pertinent Raman spectra, and a discussion regarding the relationship of these isothiocyanates to previously described uranyl halide phases, UO(2)X(4)(2-). PMID:23072277

  3. Hybrid uranyl-vanadium nano-wheels.

    PubMed

    Senchyk, G A; Wylie, E M; Prizio, S; Szymanowski, J E S; Sigmon, G E; Burns, P C

    2015-06-25

    Hybrid uranyl-vanadium oxide clusters intermediate between transition metal polyoxometalates and uranyl peroxide cage clusters were obtained by dissolving uranyl nitrate in the ionic liquid 3-ethyl-1-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate mixed with an aqueous solution containing vanadium. Where sulfate was present, wheel-shaped {U20V20} crystallized and contains ten sulfate tetrahedra, and in the absence of added sulfate, {U2V16}, a derivative of {V18}, was obtained. PMID:26008125

  4. Mechanistic Features of the TiO2 Heterogeneous Photocatalysis of Arsenic and Uranyl Nitrate in Aqueous Suspensions Studied by the Stopped-Flow Technique.

    PubMed

    Meichtry, Jorge M; Levy, Ivana K; Mohamed, Hanan H; Dillert, Ralf; Bahnemann, Detlef W; Litter, Marta I

    2016-03-16

    The dynamics of the transfer of electrons stored in TiO2 nanoparticles to As(III) , As(V) , and uranyl nitrate in water was investigated by using the stopped-flow technique. Suspensions of TiO2 nanoparticles with stored trapped electrons (etrap (-) ) were mixed with solutions of acceptor species to evaluate the reactivity by following the temporal evolution of etrap (-) by the decrease in the absorbance at λ=600 nm. The results indicate that As(V) and As(III) cannot be reduced by etrap (-) under the reaction conditions. In addition, it was observed that the presence of As(V) and As(III) strongly modified the reaction rate between O2 and etrap (-) : an increase in the rate was observed if As(V) was present and a decrease in the rate was observed in the presence of As(III) . In contrast with the As system, U(VI) was observed to react easily with etrap (-) and U(IV) formation was observed spectroscopically at λ=650 nm. The possible competence of U(VI) and NO3 (-) for their reduction by etrap (-) was analyzed. The inhibition of the U(VI) photocatalytic reduction by O2 could be attributed to the fast oxidation of U(V) and/or U(IV) . PMID:26710930

  5. Behaviors of acrylamide/itaconic acid hydrogels in uptake of uranyl ions from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Karadag, E.; Saraydin, D.; Gueven, O.

    1995-12-01

    In this study, adsorptions of uranyl ions from two different aqueous uranyl solutions by acrylamide-itaconic acid hydrogels were investigated by a spectroscopic method. The hydrogels were prepared by irradiating with {gamma}-radiation. In the experiment of uranyl ions adsorption, Type II adsorption was found. One gram of acrylamide-itaconic acid hydrogels sorbed 178-219 mg uranyl ions from the solutions of uranyl acetate, 42-76 mg uranyl ions from the aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate, while acrylamide hydrogel did not sorb any uranyl ion. For the hydrogel containing 40 mg of itaconic acid and irradiated to 3.73 kGy, swelling of the hydrogels was observed in water (1660%), in the aqueous solution of uranyl acetate (730%), and in the aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate (580%). Diffusions of water onto hydrogels were a non-Fickian type of diffusion, whereas diffusions of uranyl ions were a Fickian type of diffusion.

  6. Method for photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate by tri-N-butyl phosphate and application of this method to nuclear fuel reprocessing

    DOEpatents

    De Poorter, Gerald L.; Rofer-De Poorter, Cheryl K.

    1978-01-01

    Uranyl ion in solution in tri-n-butyl phosphate is readily photochemically reduced to U(IV). The product U(IV) may effectively be used in the Purex process for treating spent nuclear fuels to reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III). The Pu(III) is readily separated from uranium in solution in the tri-n-butyl phosphate by an aqueous strip.

  7. Nitrate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrate ; CASRN 14797 - 55 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  8. Parametric investigation of laser-induced fluorescence of solid-state uranyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangjun; Su, Yi; Monts, David L

    2008-10-23

    The combination of remote/standoff sensing and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy shows potential for detection of uranyl (UO2(2+)) compounds. Uranyl compounds exhibit characteristic emission in the 450-600 nm (22,200 to 16,700 cm(-1)) spectral region when excited by wavelengths in the ultraviolet or in the short-wavelength portion of the visible spectrum. We report a parametric study of the effects of excitation wavelength [including 532 nm (18,797 cm(-1)), 355 nm (28,169 cm(-1)), and 266 nm (37,594 cm(-1))] and excitation laser power on solid-state uranium compounds. The uranium compounds investigated include uranyl nitrate, uranyl sulfate, uranyl oxalate, uranium dioxide, triuranium octaoxide, uranyl acetate, uranyl formate, zinc uranyl acetate, and uranyl phosphate. We observed the characteristic uranyl fluorescence spectrum from the uranium compounds except for uranium oxide compounds (which do not contain the uranyl moiety) and for uranyl formate, which has a low fluorescence quantum yield. Relative uranyl fluorescence intensity is greatest for 355 nm excitation, and the order of decreasing fluorescence intensity with excitation wavelength (relative intensity/laser output) is 355 nm > 266 nm > 532 nm. For 532 nm excitation, the emission spectrum is produced by two-photon excitation. Uranyl fluorescence intensity increases linearly with increasing laser power, but the rate of fluorescence intensity increase is different for different emission bands. PMID:18823105

  9. FLAME DENITRATION AND REDUCTION OF URANIUM NITRATE TO URANIUM DIOXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Hedley, W.H.; Roehrs, R.J.; Henderson, C.M.

    1962-06-26

    A process is given for converting uranyl nitrate solution to uranium dioxide. The process comprises spraying fine droplets of aqueous uranyl nitrate solution into a hightemperature hydrocarbon flame, said flame being deficient in oxygen approximately 30%, retaining the feed in the flame for a sufficient length of time to reduce the nitrate to the dioxide, and recovering uranium dioxide. (AEC)

  10. Composition for detecting uranyl

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L.C.; Stephens, S.M.

    1995-06-13

    A composition for detecting the presence and concentration of a substance, such as uranyl, comprises an organohalide covalently bonded to an indicator for said substance. The composition has at least one active OH site for forming a complex with the substance to be detected. The composition is made by reacting equimolar amounts of the indicator and the organohalide in a polar organic solvent. The absorbance spectrum of the composition-uranyl complex is shifted with respect to the absorbance spectrum of the indicator-uranyl complex, to provide better spectral resolution for detecting uranyl. 6 figs.

  11. Composition for detecting uranyl

    DOEpatents

    Baylor, Lewis C.; Stephens, Susan M.

    1995-01-01

    A composition for detecting the presence and concentration of a substance such as uranyl, comprising an organohalide covalently bonded to an indicator for said substance. The composition has at least one active OH site for forming a complex with the substance to be detected. The composition is made by reacting equimolar amounts of the indicator and the organohalide in a polar organic solvent. The absorbance spectrum of the composition-uranyl complex is shifted with respect to the absorbance spectrum of the indicator-uranyl complex, to provide better spectral resolution for detecting uranyl.

  12. Expanding the crystal chemistry of uranyl peroxides: four hybrid uranyl-peroxide structures containing EDTA.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jie; Ling, Jie; Sieradzki, Claire; Nguyen, Kevin; Wylie, Ernest M; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Burns, Peter C

    2014-11-17

    The first four uranyl peroxide compounds containing ethylenediaminetetra-acetate (EDTA) were synthesized and characterized from aqueous uranyl peroxide nitrate solutions with a pH range of 5-7. Raman spectra demonstrated that reaction solutions that crystallized [NaK15[(UO2)8(O2)8(C10H12O10N2)2(C2O4)4]·(H2O)14] (1) and [Li4K6[(UO2)8(O2)6(C10H12O10N2)2(NO3)6]·(H2O)26] (2) contained excess peroxide, and their structures contained oxidized ethylenediaminetetraacetate, EDTAO2(4-). The solutions from which [K4[(UO2)4(O2)2(C10H13O8N2)2(IO3)2]·(H2O)16] (3) and LiK3[(UO2)4(O2)2(C10H12O8N2)2(H2O)2]·(H2O)18 (4) crystallized contained no free peroxide, and the structures incorporated intact EDTA(4-). In contrast to the large family of uranyl peroxide cage clusters, coordination of uranyl peroxide units in 1-4 by EDTA(4-) or EDTAO2(4-) results in isolated tetramers or dimers of uranyl ions that are bridged by bidentate peroxide groups. Two tetramers are bridged by EDTAO2(4-) to form octamers in 1 and 2, and dimers of uranyl polyhedra are linked through iodate groups in 3 and EDTA(4-) in 4, forming chains in both cases. In each structure the U-O2-U dihedral angle is strongly bent, at ∼140°, consistent with the configuration of this linkage in cage clusters and other recently reported uranyl peroxides. PMID:25350361

  13. Uranyl Precipitation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa via Controlled Polyphosphate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Renninger, Neil; Knopp, Roger; Nitsche, Heino; Clark, Douglas S.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2004-01-01

    The polyphosphate kinase gene from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was overexpressed in its native host, resulting in the accumulation of 100 times the polyphosphate seen with control strains. Degradation of this polyphosphate was induced by carbon starvation conditions, resulting in phosphate release into the medium. The mechanism of polyphosphate degradation is not clearly understood, but it appears to be associated with glycogen degradation. Upon suspension of the cells in 1 mM uranyl nitrate, nearly all polyphosphate that had accumulated was degraded within 48 h, resulting in the removal of nearly 80% of the uranyl ion and >95% of lesser-concentrated solutions. Electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) suggest that this removal was due to the precipitation of uranyl phosphate at the cell membrane. TRLFS also indicated that uranyl was initially sorbed to the cell as uranyl hydroxide and was then precipitated as uranyl phosphate as phosphate was released from the cell. Lethal doses of radiation did not halt phosphate secretion from polyphosphate-filled cells under carbon starvation conditions. PMID:15574942

  14. Ionothermal synthesis of uranyl compounds that incorporate imidazole derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylie, Ernest M.; Dustin, Megan K.; Smith, Jeremy S.; Burns, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Ionothermal reactions of uranyl nitrate with various salts in methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids have produced single crystals of three uranyl compounds that incorporate imidazole derivatives as charge-balancing cations. (C4H7N2)[(UO2)(PO3F)(F)] (1) crystallizes in space group C2, a=17.952(1) Å, b=6.9646(6) Å, c=8.5062(7) Å, β=112.301(1)°, (C6H11N2)2[(UO2)(SO4)2] (2) crystallizes in space group C2/c, a=31.90(1) Å, b=9.383(5) Å, c=13.770(7) Å, β=93.999(7)° and (C6H11N2)[(UO2)2(PO4)(HPO4) (3) crystallizes in space group P21/n, a=9.307(2), b=18.067(4), c=9.765(2), β=93.171(2). The U6+ cations are present as (UO2)2+ uranyl ions coordinated by three O atoms and two F atoms in 1 and five O atoms in 2 and 3 to give pentagonal bipyramids. The structural unit in 1 is composed of F-sharing dimers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids linked into sheets through corner-sharing fluorophosphate tetrahedra. The structural unit in 2 is composed of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids with one chelating sulfate tetrahedron linked into chains by three other corner-sharing sulfate tetrahedra. In 3, the structural unit is composed of chains of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids linked into sheets through edge- and corner-sharing phosphate and hydrogen phosphate tetrahedra. N-methylimidazolium cations occupy the interstitial space between the uranyl fluorophosphate sheets in 1, whereas 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cations link the uranyl sulfate and phosphate units in 2 and 3 into extended structures.

  15. Rapid Self-Assembly of Uranyl Polyhedra into Crown Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C.

    2011-06-22

    Clusters built from 32 uranyl peroxide polyhedra self-assemble and crystallize within 15 min after combining uranyl nitrate, ammonium hydroxide, and hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. These novel crown-shaped clusters are remarkable in that they form so quickly, have extraordinarily low aqueous solubility, form with at least two distinct peroxide to hydroxyl ratios, and form in very high yield. The clusters, which have outer diameters of 23 Å, topologically consist of eight pentagons and four hexagons. Their rapid formation and low solubility in aqueous systems may be useful properties at various stages in an advanced nuclear energy system.

  16. Extraction of local coordination structure in a low-concentration uranyl system by XANES.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linjuan; Zhou, Jing; Zhang, Jianyong; Su, Jing; Zhang, Shuo; Chen, Ning; Jia, Yunpeng; Li, Jiong; Wang, Yu; Wang, Jian Qiang

    2016-05-01

    Obtaining structural information of uranyl species at an atomic/molecular scale is a critical step to control and predict their physical and chemical properties. To obtain such information, experimental and theoretical L3-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra of uranium were studied systematically for uranyl complexes. It was demonstrated that the bond lengths (R) in the uranyl species and relative energy positions (ΔE) of the XANES were determined as follows: ΔE1 = 168.3/R(U-Oax)(2) - 38.5 (for the axial plane) and ΔE2 = 428.4/R(U-Oeq)(2) - 37.1 (for the equatorial plane). These formulae could be used to directly extract the distances between the uranium absorber and oxygen ligand atoms in the axial and equatorial planes of uranyl ions based on the U L3-edge XANES experimental data. In addition, the relative weights were estimated for each configuration derived from the water molecule and nitrate ligand based on the obtained average equatorial coordination bond lengths in a series of uranyl nitrate complexes with progressively varied nitrate concentrations. Results obtained from XANES analysis were identical to that from extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) analysis. XANES analysis is applicable to ubiquitous uranyl-ligand complexes, such as the uranyl-carbonate complex. Most importantly, the XANES research method could be extended to low-concentration uranyl systems, as indicated by the results of the uranyl-amidoximate complex (∼40 p.p.m. uranium). Quantitative XANES analysis, a reliable and straightforward method, provides a simplified approach applied to the structural chemistry of actinides. PMID:27140156

  17. Uranyl incorporation in natural calcite.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, S. D.; Newville, M. G.; Cheng, L.; Kemner, K. M.; Sutton, S. R.; Fenter, P.; Sturchio, N. C.; Spotl, C.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Illiois at Chicago; Univ. of Innsbruck

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of trace amounts of uranyl in natural calcite has posed a long-standing problem in crystal chemistry because of speculation that the size and shape of the uranyl ion may preclude its incorporation in a stable lattice position in calcite. This also defines an important environmental problem because of its bearing on the transport and sequestration of uranyl released from nuclear facilities and uranium mining operations. Calcite is a nearly ubiquitous mineral in soils and groundwater aquifers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence microprobe studies of uranium in relatively U-rich {approx}13700-year-old calcite from a speleothem in northernmost Italy indicate substitution of uranyl for a calcium and two adjacent carbonate ions in calcite. These new data imply that uranyl has a stable lattice position in natural calcite, indicating that it may be reliably sequestered in calcite over long time scales.

  18. Density functional theory and molecular dynamics study of the uranyl ion (UO₂)²⁺.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Jeangros, Nicolás; Seminario, Jorge M

    2014-03-01

    The detection of uranium is very important, especially in water and, more importantly, in the form of uranyl ion (UO₂)²⁺, which is one of its most abundant moieties. Here, we report analyses and simulations of uranyl in water using ab initio modified force fields for water with improved parameters and charges of uranyl. We use a TIP4P model, which allows us to obtain accurate water properties such as the boiling point and the second and third shells of water molecules in the radial distribution function thanks to a fictitious charge that corrects the 3-point models by reproducing the exact dipole moment of the water molecule. We also introduced non-bonded interaction parameters for the water-uranyl intermolecular force field. Special care was taken in testing the effect of a range of uranyl charges on the structure of uranyl-water complexes. Atomic charges of the solvated ion in water were obtained using density functional theory (DFT) calculations taking into account the presence of nitrate ions in the solution, forming a neutral ensemble. DFT-based force fields were calculated in such a way that water properties, such as the boiling point or the pair distribution function stand. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations of a water box containing uranyl cations and nitrate anions are performed at room temperature. The three peaks in the oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function for water were found to be kept in the presence of uranyl thanks to the improvement of interaction parameters and charges. Also, we found three shells of water molecules surrounding the uranyl ion instead of two as was previously thought. PMID:24573498

  19. Pillared and open-framework uranyl diphosphonates

    SciTech Connect

    Adelani, Pius O.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-09-15

    The hydrothermal reactions of uranium trioxide, uranyl acetate, or uranyl nitrate with 1,4-benzenebisphosphonic acid in the presence of very small amount of HF at 200 deg. C results in the formation of three different uranyl diphosphonate compounds, [H{sub 3}O]{sub 2}{l_brace}(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3})(PO{sub 2}OH)]{sub 2}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}]{sub 2}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{r_brace}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (Ubbp-1), [H{sub 3}O]{sub 4}{l_brace}(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}F{sub 4}{r_brace}.H{sub 2}O (Ubbp-2), and {l_brace}(UO{sub 2})[C{sub 6}H{sub 2}F{sub 2}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){r_brace}{sub 2}.H{sub 2}O (Ubbp-3). The crystal structures of these compounds were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction experiments. Ubbp-1 consists of UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged by the phosphonate moieties to form a three-dimensional pillared structure. Ubbp-2 is composed of UO{sub 5}F{sub 2} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged through the phosphonate oxygen atoms into one-dimensional chains that are cross-linked by the phenyl spacers into a pillared structure. The structure of Ubbp-3 is a three-dimensional open-framework with large channels containing water molecules with internal dimensions of approximately 10.9x10.9 A. Ubbp-1 and Ubbp-2 fluoresce at room temperature. - Graphical Abstract: Illustration of the three-dimensional open-framework structure of {l_brace}(UO{sub 2})[C{sub 6}H{sub 2}F{sub 2}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){r_brace}{sub 2}.H{sub 2}O viewed along the c-axis. The structure is constructed from UO{sub 7} units, pentagonal bipyramids=green, oxygen=red, phosphorus=magenta, carbon=black, hydrogen=white. Highlights: > The influence of the uranyl salt anions and pH were critically examined in relation to structural variation. > The acetate and nitrate counter ions of uranyl may be acting as structure directing agents. > The use of rigid phenyl spacer yield

  20. Barium uranyl diphosphonates

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Anna-Gay D.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2012-08-15

    Three Ba{sup 2+}/UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} methylenediphosphonates have been prepared from mild hydrothermal treatment of uranium trioxide, methylendiphosphonic acid (C1P2) with barium hydroxide octahydrate, barium iodate monohydrate, and small aliquots of HF at 200 Degree-Sign C. These compounds, Ba[UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{center_dot}1.4H{sub 2}O (Ba-1), Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2}F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O (Ba-2), and Ba{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2})F{sub 4}]{center_dot}5.75H{sub 2}O (Ba-3) all adopt layered structures based upon linear uranyl groups and disphosphonate molecules. Ba-2 and Ba-3 are similar in that they both have UO{sub 5}F{sub 2} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged and chelated by the diphosphonate moiety into a two-dimensional zigzag anionic sheet (Ba-2) and a one-dimensional ribbon anionic chain (Ba-3). Ba-1, has a single crystallographically unique uranium metal center where the C1P2 ligand solely bridges to form [UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 2-} sheets. The interlayer space of the structures is occupied by Ba{sup 2+}, which, along with the fluoride ion, mediates the structure formed and maintains overall charge balance. - Graphical abstract: Illustration of the stacking of the layers in Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2})F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O viewed along the c-axis. The structure is constructed from UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramidal units, U(1)O{sub 7}=gray, U(2)O{sub 7}=yellow, barium=blue, phosphorus=magenta, fluorine=green, oxygen=red, carbon=black, and hydrogen=light peach. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polymerization of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} sites to form uranyl dimers leads to structural variations in compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Barium cations stitch uranyl diphosphonate anionic layers together, and help mediate structure formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HF acts as both a

  1. Composition for detecting uranyl

    DOEpatents

    Baylor, L.C.; Stephens, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to an indicator composition for use in spectrophotometric detection of a substance in a solution, and a method for making the composition. Useful indicators are sensitive to the particular substance being measured, but are unaffected by the fluid and other chemical species that may be present in the fluid. Optical indicators are used to measure the uranium concentration of process solutions in facilities for extracting uranium from ores, production of nuclear fuels, and reprocessing of irradiated fuels. The composition comprises an organohalide covalently bonded to an indicator for the substance, in such a manner that the product is itself an indicator that provides increased spectral resolution for detecting the substance. The indicator is preferably arsenazo III and the organohalide is preferably cyanuric chloride. These form a composition that is ideally suited for detecting uranyl.

  2. Uranyl ion uptake capacity of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide/maleic acid) copolymeric hydrogels prepared by gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, Erol; Taşdelen, Betul; Osmanlioglu, A. Erdal

    2012-06-01

    The effect of gel composition, absorbed dose and pH of the solution on the uranyl ion uptake capacity of N-isopropylacrylamide/maleic acid copolymeric hydrogels containing 0-3 mol% of maleic acid at 48 kGy have been investigated. Uranyl uptake capacity of hydrogels are found to increase from 18.5 to 94.8 mg [UO22+]/g dry gel as the mole % of maleic acid content in the gel structure increased from 0 to 3. The percent swelling, equilibrium swelling and diffusion coefficient values have been evaluated for poly(N-isopropylacrylamide/maleic acid) hydrogels at 500 ppm of uranyl nitrate solution.

  3. Barium uranyl diphosphonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Anna-Gay D.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2012-08-01

    Three Ba2+/UO22+ methylenediphosphonates have been prepared from mild hydrothermal treatment of uranium trioxide, methylendiphosphonic acid (C1P2) with barium hydroxide octahydrate, barium iodate monohydrate, and small aliquots of HF at 200 °C. These compounds, Ba[UO2[CH2(PO3)2]·1.4H2O (Ba-1), Ba3[(UO2)4(CH2(PO3)2)2F6]·6H2O (Ba-2), and Ba2[(UO2)2(CH2(PO3)2)F4]·5.75H2O (Ba-3) all adopt layered structures based upon linear uranyl groups and disphosphonate molecules. Ba-2 and Ba-3 are similar in that they both have UO5F2 pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged and chelated by the diphosphonate moiety into a two-dimensional zigzag anionic sheet (Ba-2) and a one-dimensional ribbon anionic chain (Ba-3). Ba-1, has a single crystallographically unique uranium metal center where the C1P2 ligand solely bridges to form [UO2[CH2(PO3)2]2- sheets. The interlayer space of the structures is occupied by Ba2+, which, along with the fluoride ion, mediates the structure formed and maintains overall charge balance.

  4. Association of low potassium diet and folic acid deficiency in patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Background Most of the folic acid sources are rich also in potassium. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) usually receive a low potassium diet. We investigated the possibility of an association between low potassium diet and folic acid deficiency. Methods In total, 128 CKD patients participated in this cross-sectional study. Sixty-four patients with CKD grades 1 and 2 were on an unrestricted potassium diet when enrolled in the study, and 64 patients with CKD grades 3 and 4 had received instructions to restrict their intake of potassium at least 6 months before enrollment in the study. Subjects were evaluated for daily intake of folic acid (DIFA), daily intake of potassium (DIK), and serum folic acid levels (SFA). Results DIFA correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate, the DIK, and the SFA (P<0.001). SFA correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (P<0.001). Mean DIFA and mean SFA were lower among patients with CKD grades 3 and 4 than among those with CKD grades 1 and 2 (P<0.001). The mean DIFA in patients with folic acid deficiency was lower than that in those with SFA ≥7.1 nmol/L (P<0.001). There was lower SFA and threefold greater frequency of folic acid deficiency among patients with CKD grades 3 and 4 who had received instructions to restrict their intake of potassium than among patients with CKD grades 1 and 2 who were on an unrestricted potassium diet. Conclusion A potassium-restricted diet offered to patients with CKD grades 3 and 4 may be associated with folic acid deficiency. Serum levels of folic acid should be investigated before starting potassium restriction in patients with CKD grades 3 and 4, in order to identify individuals with folic acid deficiency or with marginal serum levels who should receive folic acid replacement therapy. PMID:26056461

  5. A Solution-Based Approach for Mo-99 Production: Considerations for Nitrate versus Sulfate Media

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Youker, Amanda J.; Chemerisov, Sergey D.; Kalensky, Michael; Tkac, Peter; Bowers, Delbert L.; Vandegrift, George F.

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum-99 is the parent of Technetium-99m, which is used in nearly 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures. The medical community has been plagued by Mo-99 shortages due to aging reactors, such as the NRU (National Research Universal) reactor in Canada. There are currently no US producers of Mo-99, and NRU is scheduled for shutdown in 2016, which means that another Mo-99 shortage is imminent unless a potential domestic Mo-99 producer fills the void. Argonne National Laboratory is assisting two potential domestic suppliers of Mo-99 by examining the effects of a uranyl nitrate versus a uranyl sulfate target solution configuration onmore » Mo-99 production. Uranyl nitrate solutions are easier to prepare and do not generate detectable amounts of peroxide upon irradiation, but a high radiation field can lead to a large increase in pH, which can lead to the precipitation of fission products and uranyl hydroxides. Uranyl sulfate solutions are more difficult to prepare, and enough peroxide is generated during irradiation to cause precipitation of uranyl peroxide, but this can be prevented by adding a catalyst to the solution. A titania sorbent can be used to recover Mo-99 from a highly concentrated uranyl nitrate or uranyl sulfate solution; however, different approaches must be taken to prevent precipitation during Mo-99 production.« less

  6. Mechanisms of lipid malabsorption in Cystic Fibrosis: the impact of essential fatty acids deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Peretti, N; Marcil, V; Drouin, E; Levy, E

    2005-01-01

    Transport mechanisms, whereby alimentary lipids are digested and packaged into small emulsion particles that enter intestinal cells to be translocated to the plasma in the form of chylomicrons, are impaired in cystic fibrosis. The purpose of this paper is to focus on defects that are related to intraluminal and intracellular events in this life-limiting genetic disorder. Specific evidence is presented to highlight the relationship between fat malabsorption and essential fatty acid deficiency commonly found in patients with cystic fibrosis that are often related to the genotype. Given the interdependency of pulmonary disease, pancreatic insufficiency and nutritional status, greater attention should be paid to the optimal correction of fat malabsorption and essential fatty acid deficiency in order to improve the quality of life and extend the life span of patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:15869703

  7. DFT Study of Uranyl Peroxo Complexes with H₂O, F⁻, OH⁻, CO₃ ²⁻, and NO₃-

    SciTech Connect

    Odoh, Samuel O.; Schreckenbach, Georg

    2013-05-06

    The structural and electronic properties of monomeric uranyl peroxo complexes with aquo, hydroxo, fluoro, carbonate, and nitrate ligands have been studied using DFT calculations with relativistic pseudopotentials. The calculated affinity of the peroxo group for the actinyl moiety far exceeds that of the other ligands tested in this work.

  8. Hybrid uranyl-carboxyphosphonate cage clusters.

    PubMed

    Adelani, Pius O; Ozga, Michael; Wallace, Christine M; Qiu, Jie; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Sigmon, Ginger E; Burns, Peter C

    2013-07-01

    Two new hybrid uranyl-carboxyphosphonate cage clusters built from uranyl peroxide units were crystallized from aqueous solution under ambient conditions in approximately two months. The clusters are built from uranyl hexagonal bipyramids and are connected by employing a secondary metal linker, the 2-carboxyphenylphosphonate ligand. The structure of cluster A is composed of a ten-membered uranyl polyhedral belt that is capped on either end of an elongated cage by five-membered rings of uranyl polyhedra. The structure of cluster B consists of 24 uranyl cations that are arranged into 6 four-membered rings of uranyl polyhedra. Four of the corresponding topological squares are fused together to form a sixteen-membered double uranyl pseudobelt that is capped on either end by 2 topological squares. Cluster A crystallizes over a wide pH range of 4.6-6.8, while cluster B was isolated under narrower pH range of 6.9-7.8. Studies of their fate in aqueous solution upon dissolution of crystals by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) provide evidence for their persistence in solution. The well-established characteristic fingerprint from the absorption spectra of the uranium(VI) cations disappears and becomes a nearly featureless peak; nonetheless, the two compounds fluoresce at room temperature. PMID:23763595

  9. The Uranyl Cation as a Visible-Light Photocatalyst for C(sp(3) )-H Fluorination.

    PubMed

    West, Julian G; Bedell, T Aaron; Sorensen, Erik J

    2016-07-25

    The fluorination of unactivated C(sp(3) )-H bonds remains a desirable and challenging transformation for pharmaceutical, agricultural, and materials scientists. Previous methods for this transformation have used bench-stable fluorine atom sources; however, many still rely on the use of UV-active photocatalysts for the requisite high-energy hydrogen atom abstraction event. Uranyl nitrate hexahydrate is described as a convenient, hydrogen atom abstraction catalyst that can mediate fluorinations of certain alkanes upon activation with visible light. PMID:27320442

  10. Optical apparatus and method for sensing uranyl

    DOEpatents

    Baylor, L.C.; Buchanan, B.R.

    1994-01-01

    An optical sensing device for uranyl and other substances, a method for making an optical sensing device and a method for chemically binding uranyl and other indicators to glass, quartz, cellulose and similar substrates. The indicator, such as arsenazo III, is immobilized on the substrate using a chemical binding process. The immobilized arsenazo III causes uranyl from a fluid sample to bind irreversibly to the substrate at its active sites, thus causing absorption of a portion of light transmitted through the substrate. Determination of the amount of light absorbed, using conventional means, yields the concentration of uranyl present in the sample fluid. The binding of uranyl on the substrate can be reversed by subsequent exposure of the substrate to a solution of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid. The chemical binding process is suitable for similarly binding other indicators, such as bromocresol green.

  11. Crystal Chemistry of the Potassium and Rubidium Uranyl Borate Families Derived from Boric Acid Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2010-07-19

    The reaction of uranyl nitrate with a large excess of molten boric acid in the presence of potassium or rubidium nitrate results in the formation of three new potassium uranyl borates, K{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 12}O{sub 19}(OH){sub 4}]·0.3H{sub 2}O (KUBO-1), K[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 15}(OH){sub 5}] (KUBO-2), and K[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 3}]·0.7H{sub 2}O (KUBO-3) and two new rubidium uranyl borates Rb{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 13}O{sub 20}(OH){sub 5}] (RbUBO-1) and Rb[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 3}]·0.7H{sub 2}O (RbUBO-2). The latter is isotypic with KUBO-3. These compounds share a common structural motif consisting of a linear uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, cation surrounded by BO{sub 3} triangles and BO{sub 4} tetrahedra to create an UO{sub 8} hexagonal bipyramidal environment around uranium. The borate anions bridge between uranyl units to create sheets. Additional BO{sub 3} triangles extend from the polyborate layers and are directed approximately perpendicular to the sheets. All of these compounds adopt layered structures. With the exception of KUBO-1, the structures are all centrosymmetric. All of these compounds fluoresce when irradiated with long-wavelength UV light. The fluorescence spectrum yields well-defined vibronically coupled charge-transfer features.

  12. Synthesis, structure, and spectroscopic characterization of three uranyl phosphates with unique structural units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylie, Ernest M.; Dawes, Colleen M.; Burns, Peter C.

    2012-12-01

    Single crystals of Zn4(OH)2[(UO2)(PO4)2(OH)2(H2O)] (UZnP), Cs[(UO2)(HPO4)NO3] (UCsP), and In3[(UO2)2(PO4)4OH(H2O)6].2H2O (UInP) were obtained from hydrothermal reactions and have been structurally and chemically characterized. UZnP crystallizes in space group Pbcn, a=8.8817(7), b=6.6109(5), c=19.569(1) Å; UCsP crystallizes in P-1, a=7.015(2), b=7.441(1), c=9.393(2) Å, α=72.974(2), β=74.261(2), γ=79.498(2); and UInP crystallizes in P-1, a=7.9856(5), b=9.159(1), c=9.2398(6) Å α=101.289(1), β=114.642(1), γ=99.203(2). The U6+ cations are present as (UO2)2+ uranyl ions coordinated by five O atoms to give pentagonal bipyramids. The structural unit in UZnP is a finite cluster containing a uranyl pentagonal bipyramid that shares corners with two phosphate tetrahedra. The structural unit in UCsP is composed of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids with one chelating nitrate group that are linked into chains by three bridging hydrogen phosphate tetrahedra. In UInP, the structural unit contains pairs of edge-sharing uranyl pentagonal bipyramids with two chelating phosphate tetrahedra that are linked into chains through two bridging phosphate tetrahedra. Indium octahedra link these uranyl phosphate chains into a 3-dimensional framework. All three compounds exhibit unique structural units that deviate from the typical layered structures observed in uranyl phosphate solid-state chemistry.

  13. Essential fatty acid deficiency in patients with lesions of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Wapnick, Simon; Norden, Daphne A.; Venturas, Dawn J.

    1974-01-01

    The relative amounts of unsaturated fatty acids in the serum lipids of 14 patients who have undergone small bowel resection have been investigated. These results are compared with those from control subjects and also from patients suffering from cancer of the oesophagus. Both groups of patients showed patterns of unsaturated fatty acids suggesting essential fatty acid deficiency. In the resection patients there was no correlation between the extent of intestinal removal and the extent of the change in the unsaturated fatty acid pattern. PMID:18668845

  14. Three new silver uranyl diphosphonates: structures and properties.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Anna-Gay D; Rak, Zsolt; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Becker, Udo; Ewing, Rodney C

    2014-03-17

    The hydrothermal reaction of uranium trioxide and methylenediphosphonic acid in the presence of silver nitrate resulted in the formation of three new uranyl coordination polymers: AgUO2[CH2(PO3)(PO3H)] (Ag-1), [Ag2(H2O)1.5]{(UO2)2[CH2(PO3)2]F2}·(H2O)0.5 (Ag-2), and Ag2UO2[CH2(PO3)2] (Ag-3). All consist of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids that form two-dimensional layered structures. Ag-1 and Ag-3 possess the same structural building unit, but the structures are different; Ag-3 is formed through edge-sharing of F atoms to form UO5F2 dimers. The pH and silver cation have significant effects on the structure that is synthesized. Raman spectra of single crystals of Ag-1, Ag-2, and Ag-3 reveal v1 UO2(2+) symmetric stretches of 816 and 829, 822, and 802 cm(-1), respectively. Electronic structure calculations were performed using the projector augmented wave (PAW) method with density functional theory (DFT) to gain insight into the nature of bonding and electronic characteristics of the synthesized compounds. Herein, we report the syntheses, crystal structures, Raman spectroscopy, and luminescent behavior of these three compounds. PMID:24524249

  15. Effect of long-term administration of arachidonic acid on n-3 fatty acid deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Harauma, Akiko; Tomita, Makiko; Muto, Daiki; Moriguchi, Toru

    2015-04-01

    The effect of long-term oral administration of arachidonic acid (ARA, 240 mg/kg/day) on brain function was assessed for mice maintained on an n-3 fatty acid adequate or deficient diet. The administration of ARA for 13 weeks resulted in an elevation of spontaneous motor activity, or the tendency thereof, in both the n-3 fatty acid adequate and deficient groups. However, the n-3 fatty acid deficient mice that were administered with ARA revealed marked deterioration in motor function in a motor coordination test. In the experiment to investigate changes over time, the motor activity of the ARA-administered group continued to increase mildly in n-3 deficient mice, although that of the control group showed a decrease involving habituation for both diet groups from the second week. The fatty acid composition of the brain at the end of the behavioral experiments indicated an increase in the levels of ARA and other n-6 fatty acids, as well as a decrease in the levels of docosahexaenoic acid. These results suggest that long-term administration of ARA causes an increase of futile spontaneous motor activity and the diminution of motor function by aggravation of n-3 fatty acid deficiency. PMID:25650363

  16. FY-15 Progress Report on Cleanup of irradiated SHINE Target Solutions Containing 140g-U/L Uranyl Sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Megan E.; Bowers, Delbert L.; Vandegrift, George F.

    2015-09-01

    During FY 2012 and 2013, a process was developed to convert the SHINE Target Solution (STS) of irradiated uranyl sulfate (140 g U/L) to uranyl nitrate. This process is necessary so that the uranium solution can be processed by the UREX (Uranium Extraction) separation process, which will remove impurities from the uranium so that it can be recycled. The uranyl sulfate solution must contain <0.02 M SO42- so that the uranium will be extractable into the UREXsolvent. In addition, it is desired that the barium content be below 0.0007 M, as this is the limit in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

  17. Uranyl sensitization of samarium (III) luminescence in a two-dimensional coordination polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Knope, Karah E.; de Lill, Daniel T.; Rowland, Clare E.; Cantos, Paula M.; de Bettencourt-Dias, Ana; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2012-01-02

    Heterometallic carboxyphosphonates UO₂2+/Ln3+ have been prepared from the hydrothermal reaction of uranyl nitrate, lanthanide nitrate (Ln = Sm, Tb, Er, Yb), and phosphonoacetic acid (H₃PPA). Compound 1, (UO₂)₂(PPA)(HPPA)₂Sm(H₂O)·2H₂O (1) adopts a two-dimensional structure in which the UO₂2+ metal ions bind exclusively to the phosphonate moiety, whereas the Ln3+ ions are coordinated by both phosphonate and carboxylate functionalities. Luminescence studies of 1 show very bright visible and near-IR samarium(III)-centered emission upon direct excitation of the uranyl moiety. The Sm3+ emissive state exhibits a double-exponential decay with lifetimes of 67.2 ± 6.5 and 9.0 ± 1.3 μs as measured at 594 nm, after excitation at both 365 and 420 nm. No emission is observed in the region typical of the uranyl cation, indicating that all energy is either transferred to the Sm3+ center or lost to nonradiative processes. Herein we report the synthesis, crystal structure, and luminescent behavior of 1, as well as those of the isostructural terbium, erbium, and ytterbium analogues.

  18. Adaptational modification of serine and threonine metabolism in the liver to essential amino acid deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Kenji; Bannai, Makoto; Seki, Shinobu; Mori, Masato; Takahashi, Michio

    2009-03-01

    It is known that plasma serine and threonine concentrations are elevated in rats chronically fed an essential amino acid deficient diet, but the underlying mechanisms including related gene expressions or serine and threonine concentrations in liver remained to be elucidated. We fed rats lysine or valine deficient diet for 4 weeks and examined the mRNA expressions of serine synthesising (3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, PHGDH) and serine/threonine degrading enzymes (serine dehydratase, SDS) in the liver. Dietary deficiency induced marked elevation of hepatic serine and threonine levels associated with enhancement of PHGDH mRNA expression and repression of SDS mRNA expression. Increases in plasma serine and threonine levels due to essential amino acid deficiency in diet were caused by marked increases in hepatic serine and threonine levels. Proteolytic responses to the amino acid deficiency may be lessened by storing amino radicals as serine and inducing anorexia through elevation of threonine. PMID:18584286

  19. Staphylococcal dermatitis in quail with a parakeratotic hyperkeratotic dermatosis suggestive of pantothenic acid deficiency.

    PubMed

    Raidal, S R

    1995-09-01

    This report describes an outbreak of Staphylococcal dermatitis which occurred in commercial Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) with a history and clinico-pathological evidence suggestive of pantothenic acid deficiency. The flock had a low hatchability rate (40 to 43%) and a high percentage (50%) of dead-in-shell embryos. Approximately 5 to 15% of the grower flock developed crusty facial scabs and conjunctivitis from 4 days of age. Culture of eyelid skin yielded pure growths of non-haemolytic, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. Histological examination revealed a generalised hyperkeratosis and parakeratosis of feathers, feather follicles and non-follicular skin. There was invasion of feather follicles by cocci and focal areas of suppurative exudative dermatitis and subcutaneous abscesses particularly in the eyelids and commissures of the beak. Clinical signs were alleviated by treatment with amoxycillin and a change in ration formulation. PMID:18645814

  20. Nitrate reduction

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2000-01-01

    Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

  1. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  2. Dissecting the cation-cation interaction between two uranyl units.

    PubMed

    Tecmer, Paweł; Hong, Sung W; Boguslawski, Katharina

    2016-07-21

    We present a state-of-the-art computational study of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) cation-cation interactions (dications) in aqueous solution. Reliable electronic structures of two interacting uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) subunits as well as those of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) clusters are presented for the first time. Our theoretical study elucidates the impact of cation-cation interactions on changes in the molecular structure as well as changes in vibrational and UV-Vis spectra of the bare uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) moieties for different total spin-states and total charges of the dications. PMID:27335229

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Uranyl and Uranyl Carbonate Adsorption at Alumino-silicate Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-03-03

    Adsorption at mineral surfaces is a critical factor controlling the mobility of uranium(VI) in aqueous environments. Therefore, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate uranyl(VI) adsorption onto two neutral alumino-silicate surfaces, namely the orthoclase (001) surface and the octahedral aluminum sheet of the kaolinite (001) surface. Although uranyl preferentially adsorbed as a bi-dentate innersphere complex on both surfaces, the free energy of adsorption at the orthoclase surface (-15 kcal mol-1) was significantly more favorable than that at the kaolinite surface (-3 kcal mol-1), which was attributed to differences in surface functional groups and to the ability of the orthoclase surface to dissolve a surface potassium ion upon uranyl adsorption. The structures of the adsorbed complexes compared favorably with X-ray absorption spectroscopy results. Simulations of the adsorption of uranyl complexes with up to three carbonate ligands revealed that uranyl complexes coordinated to up to 2 carbonate ions are stable on the orthoclase surface whereas uranyl carbonate surface complexes are unfavored at the kaolinite surface. Combining the MD-derived equilibrium adsorption constants for orthoclase with aqueous equilibrium constants for uranyl carbonate species indicates the presence of adsorbed uranium complexes with one or two carbonates in alkaline conditions, in support of current uranium(VI) surface complexation models.

  4. Effect of ascorbic acid deficiency on primary and reparative dentinogenesis in non-ascorbate-synthesizing ODS rats.

    PubMed

    Ogawara, M; Aoki, K; Okiji, T; Suda, H

    1997-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is essential to the biosynthesis of collagen, the major organic matrix component of dentine. The ODS rat is a mutant strain of Wistar rat characterized by hereditary lack of L-gulono-gamma-lactone oxidase and thus is unable to synthesize ascorbic acid. ODS rats were given an ascorbic acid-free diet to investigate how ascorbic acid deficiency affects dentine formation in vivo. Histomorphometric analysis on their growing molars and incisors showed a significant reduction in both size and mineral apposition rate of dentine, as revealed by contact microradiography and fluorescent time-marking, respectively. A similar reduction in bone formation was simultaneously demonstrated in the mandible, confirming the previously reported osteopathic effects of ascorbic acid deficiency. When pulp inflammation was induced in lower first molars by making unsealed pulp exposures, specimens from control animals showed continuous deposition of an osteodentine-like tissue in the radicular pulp chamber; this type of mineralized tissue formation was greatly reduced in ascorbic acid-deprived animals. These results indicate that ascorbic acid deficiency hampers dentine formation under both physiological and pathological conditions of the dentine/pulp complex. ODS rats could be useful in investigating in vivo effects of ascorbic acid deficiency on the formation of dentine and other dental mineralized tissues. PMID:9447259

  5. Uranyl Sequestration: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Uranyl Complexes with a Tetradentate Methylterephthalamide Ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Chengbao; Shuh, David; Raymond, Kenneth

    2011-03-07

    Uranyl complexes of a bis(methylterephthalamide) ligand (LH{sub 4}) have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure is an unexpected [Me{sub 4}N]{sub 8}[L(UO{sub 2})]{sub 4} tetramer, formed via coordination of the two MeTAM units of L to two uranyl moieties. Addition of KOH to the tetramer gave the corresponding monomeric uranyl methoxide species [Me{sub 4}N]K{sub 2}[LUO{sub 2}(OMe)].

  6. Uranyl peroxide closed clusters containing topological squares

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Daniel K.; Burtner, Alicia; Pressprich, Laura; Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    Four self-assembling clusters of uranyl peroxide polyhedra have been formed in alkaline aqueous solutions and structurally characterized. These clusters consist of 28, 30, 36 and 44 uranyl polyhedra and exhibit complex new topologies. Each has a structure that contains topological squares, pentagons and hexagons. Analysis of possible topologies within boundary constraints indicates a tendency for adoption of higher symmetry topologies in these cases. Small angle X-ray scattering data demonstrated that crystals of one of these clusters can be dissolved in ultrapure water and that the clusters remain intact for at least several days.

  7. Neodymium uranyl peroxide synthesis by ion exchange on ammonium uranyl peroxide nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, F; Ellart, M; Rivenet, M; Vigier, N; Hablot, I; Morel, B; Grandjean, S; Abraham, F

    2016-03-11

    This study demonstrates the ability of ammonium uranyl peroxide nanoclusters U32R-NH4 to undergo exchange in between NH4(+) and trivalent (Nd(3+)) or tetravalent (Th(4+)) cations in the solid state. It paves the way for new promising routes for the synthesis of mixed uranyl peroxides. The exchange ability may also be considered for solution decontamination and synthesis of new mixed actinide-oxide precursors. Both of these applications could be used in the nuclear industry. PMID:26879486

  8. Detection and treatment of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency in psychiatric practice: Rationale and implementation.

    PubMed

    Messamore, Erik; McNamara, Robert K

    2016-01-01

    A body of translational evidence has implicated dietary deficiency in long-chain omega-3 (LCn-3) fatty acids, including eicosapenaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in the pathophysiology and potentially etiology of different psychiatric disorders. Case-control studies have consistently observed low erythrocyte (red blood cell) EPA and/or DHA levels in patients with major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Low erythrocyte EPA + DHA biostatus can be treated with fish oil-based formulations containing preformed EPA + DHA, and extant evidence suggests that fish oil supplementation is safe and well-tolerated and may have therapeutic benefits. These and other data provide a rationale for screening for and treating LCn-3 fatty acid deficiency in patients with psychiatric illness. To this end, we have implemented a pilot program that routinely measures blood fatty acid levels in psychiatric patients entering a residential inpatient clinic. To date over 130 blood samples, primarily from patients with treatment-refractory mood or anxiety disorders, have been collected and analyzed. Our initial results indicate that the majority (75 %) of patients exhibit whole blood EPA + DHA levels at ≤ 4 percent of total fatty acid composition, a rate that is significantly higher than general population norms (25 %). In a sub-set of cases, corrective treatment with fish oil-based products has resulted in improvements in psychiatric symptoms without notable side effects. In view of the urgent need for improvements in conventional treatment algorithms, these preliminary findings provide important support for expanding this approach in routine psychiatric practice. PMID:26860589

  9. Stability of peroxide-containing uranyl minerals.

    PubMed

    Kubatko, Karrie-Ann Hughes; Helean, Katheryn B; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Burns, Peter C

    2003-11-14

    Minerals containing peroxide are limited to studtite, (UO2)O2(H2O)4, and metastudtite, (UO2)O2(H2O)2. High-temperature oxide-melt solution calorimetry and solubility measurements for studtite (standard enthalpy of formation at 298 kelvin is -2344.7 +/- 4.0 kilojoules per mole from the elements) establishes that these phases are stable in peroxide-bearing environments, even at low H2O2 concentrations. Natural radioactivity in a uranium deposit, or the radioactivity of nuclear waste, can create sufficient H2O2 by alpha radiolysis of water for studtite formation. Studtite and metastudtite may be important alteration phases of nuclear waste in a geological repository and of spent fuel under any long-term storage, possibly at the expense of the commonly expected uranyl oxide hydrates and uranyl silicates. PMID:14615533

  10. Folic acid deficiency enhances abeta accumulation in APP/PS1 mice brain and decreases amyloid-associated miRNAs expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Tian, Tian; Qin, Shanchun; Li, Wen; Zhang, Xumei; Wang, Xuan; Gao, Yuxia; Huang, Guowei

    2015-12-01

    Recent efforts have revealed the microRNA (miRNA) pathways in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological studies have revealed an association between folic acid deficiency and AD risk. However, the effects of folic acid deficiency on miRNA expression in AD animals have not been observed. We aimed to find if folic acid deficiency may enhance amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide deposition and regulate amyloid-associated miRNAs and their target genes expression in APP/PS1 mice. APP/PS1 mice and N2a cells were treated with folic acid-deficient diet or medium. Cognitive function of mice was assessed using the Morris water maze. miRNA profile was tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array. Different expressional miRNAs were validated by real-time PCR. The deposition of Aβ plaques was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. APP and BACE1 proteins in mice brain and N2a cells were determined by Western blot. Folic acid deficiency aggravated amyloid pathology in AD mice. The AD+FD group showed shorter time spent in the target zone during the probe test. Analysis of miRNAs predicted to target these genes revealed several miRNA candidates that were differentially modulated by folic acid deficiency. In APP/PS1 mice brains and N2a cells with folic acid-deficient treatment, miR-106a-5p, miR-200b-3p and miR-339-5p were down-regulated, and their target genes APP and BACE1 were up-regulated. In conclusion, folic acid deficiency can enhance Aβ accumulation in APP/PS1 mice brain and decrease amyloid-associated miRNAs expression. PMID:26345540

  11. Resistance of essential fatty acid-deficient rats to endotoxin-induced increases in vascular permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Li, E.J.; Cook, J.A.; Spicer, K.M.; Wise, W.C.; Rokach, J.; Halushka, P.V. )

    1990-06-01

    Resistance to endotoxin in essential fatty acid-deficient (EFAD) rats is associated with reduced synthesis of certain arachidonic acid metabolites. It was hypothesized that EFAD rats would manifest decreased vascular permeability changes during endotoxemia as a consequence of reduced arachidonic acid metabolism. To test this hypothesis, changes in hematocrit (HCT) and mesenteric localization rate of technetium-labeled human serum albumin (99mTc-HSA) and red blood cells (99mTc-RBC) were assessed in EFAD and normal rats using gamma-camera imaging. Thirty minutes after Salmonella enteritidis endotoxin, EFAD rats exhibited less hemoconcentration as determined by % HCT than normal rats. Endotoxin caused a less severe change in permeability index in the splanchnic region in EFAD rats than in normal rats (1.2 +/- 0.6 x 10(-3)min-1 vs. 4.9 +/- 1.7 x 10(-3)min-1 respectively, P less than 0.05). In contrast to 99mTc-HSA, mesenteric localization of 99mTc-RBC was not changed by endotoxin in control or EFAD rats. Supplementation with ethyl-arachidonic acid did not enhance susceptibility of EFAD rats to endotoxin-induced splanchnic permeability to 99mTc-HSA. Leukotrienes have been implicated as mediators of increased vascular permeability in endotoxin shock. Since LTC3 formation has been reported to be increased in EFA deficiency, we hypothesized that LTC3 may be less potent than LTC4. Thus the effect of LTC3 on mean arterial pressure and permeability was compared to LTC4 in normal rats. LTC3-induced increases in peak mean arterial pressure were less than LTC4 at 10 micrograms/kg (39 +/- 5 mm Hg vs. 58 +/- 4 mm Hg respectively, P less than 0.05) and at 20 micrograms/kg (56 +/- 4 mm Hg vs. 75 +/- 2 mm Hg respectively, P less than 0.05). LY171883 (30 mg/kg), an LTD4/E4 receptor antagonist, attenuated the pressor effect of LTC4, LTD4, and LTC3.

  12. A new chiral uranyl phosphonate framework consisting of achiral building units generated from ionothermal reaction: structure and spectroscopy characterizations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tao; Gao, Yang; Chen, Lanhua; Liu, Zhiyong; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2015-11-01

    The ionothermal reactions of uranyl nitrate and 1,3-pbpH4 (1,3-pbpH4 = 1,3-phenylenebis(phosphonic acid) ligand in ionic liquids of [C4mim][Dbp], [C4mpyr][Br], and [Etpy][Br], respectively, afforded three new uranyl phosphonates, namely [C4mim][(UO2)2(1,3-pbpH)(1,3-pbpH)·Hmim] (1), [UO2(1,3-pbpH2)H2O·mpr] (2), and [Etpy][UO2(1,3-pbpH2)F] (3). Compound 1 exhibits a rare example of a chiral uranyl phosphonate 3D framework structure built from achiral building units of tetragonal bipyramidal uranium polyhedra and 1,3-pbp ligands. The structure adopts a network with channels extending along the b axis, which are filled with C4mim(+) and protonated 1-methylimidazole. In sharp contrast, compounds 2 & 3 both show pillared topology composed of uranyl pentagonal bipyramid polyhedra and phosphonate ligands. The layers are neutral in compound 2 with N-methylpyrrole molecules in the interlayer space, while compound 3 adopts anionic layer, and the charge is compensated with N-ethyl-pyridinium cations between the layers. Although compounds 1, 2, and 3 were synthesized under identical conditions with sole variation of the ionic liquid species, the resulting structures show a rich diversity in the local coordination environment of uranyl ions, the protonation of the phosphonate ligand, the conformation of ionic liquid ions, and the overall arrangement of the structure. All compounds were characterized by absorption, temperature dependent fluorescence, as well as infrared and Raman spectroscopies. PMID:26419426

  13. Extended structures and physicochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Xue; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2011-07-19

    The ability of uranium to undergo nuclear fission has been exploited primarily to manufacture nuclear weapons and to generate nuclear power. Outside of its nuclear physics, uranium also exhibits rich chemistry, and it forms various compounds with other elements. Among the uranium-bearing compounds, those with a uranium oxidation state of +6 are most common and a particular structural unit, uranyl UO(2)(2+) is usually involved in these hexavalent uranium compounds. Apart from forming solids with inorganic ions, the uranyl unit also bonds to organic molecules to generate uranyl-organic coordination materials. If appropriate reaction conditions are employed, uranyl-organic extended structures (1-D chains, 2-D layers, and 3-D frameworks) can be obtained. Research on uranyl-organic compounds with extended structures allows for the exploration of their rich structural chemistry, and such studies also point to potential applications such as in materials that could facilitate nuclear waste disposal. In this Account, we describe the structural features of uranyl-organic compounds and efforts to synthesize uranyl-organic compounds with desired structures. We address strategies to construct 3-D uranyl-organic frameworks through rational selection of organic ligands and the incorporation of heteroatoms. The UO(2)(2+) species with inactive U═O double bonds usually form bipyramidal polyhedral structures with ligands coordinated at the equatorial positions, and these polyhedra act as primary building units (PBUs) for the construction of uranyl-organic compounds. The geometry of the uranyl ions and the steric arrangements and functionalities of organic ligands can be exploited in the the design of uranyl--organic extended structures, We also focus on the investigation of the promising physicochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds. Uranyl-organic materials with an extended structure may exhibit attractive properties, such as photoluminescence, photocatalysis

  14. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Organically Templated Uranyl Diphosphonates

    SciTech Connect

    Adelani, Pius O.; Oliver, Allen G.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-03-09

    The hydrothermal treatment of uranyl nitrate and 1,4-benzenebisphosphonic acid with a variety of aliphatic amines (tetramethylammonium hydroxide, tetraethylammonium hydroxide, and diethyldimethylammonium hydroxide) and small quantities of hydrofluoric acid at 200 °C results in the crystallization of a series of layered uranyl diphosphonate compounds, [(CH3)4N][(UO2)3(O3PC6H4PO3H)2F(H2O)]·0.5H2O (Me4Ubbp), [(CH3CH2)4N](UO2)[C6H4(PO3H)(PO3H1.5)]2(H2O) (Et4Ubbp), and [(CH3CH2)2N(CH3)2][(UO2)3(O3PC6H4PO3H)2F(H2O)] (Et2Me2Ubbp). All these new compounds have layered structures, but the structures of Me4Ubbp and Et2Me2Ubbp are similar in that they both contain UO6F and UO7 pentagonal bipyramids within dimers that are bridged by the phosphonate into a three-dimensional structure. The structure of Et4Ubbp contains a single crystallographically unique UO7 unit. The edge-sharing pentagonal bipyramids are linked into chains formulated as (UO2)[C6H4(PO3H)(PO3H1.5)]2(H2O)1-. The voids in these structures are filled with the organic templates so that the overall charge balance is maintained. Intense fluorescence was observed from these compounds at room temperature.

  15. COGEMA Experience in Uranous Nitrate Preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Tison, E.; Bretault, Ph.

    2006-07-01

    Separation and purification of plutonium by PUREX process is based on a sequence of extraction and back extraction which requires reducing plutonium Pu IV (extractable form) into Pu III (inextractable form) Different reducers can be used to reduce Pu IV into Pu III. Early plants such as that for Magnox fuel at Sellafield used ferrous sulfamate while UP 1 at Marcoule used uranous sulfamate. These reducers are efficient and easy to prepare but generates ferric and/or sulphate ions and so complicates management of the wastes from the plutonium purification cycle. Recent plants such as UP3 and UP2 800 at La Hague, THORP at Sellafield, and RRP at Rokkasho Mura (currently under tests) use uranous nitrate (U IV) stabilized by hydrazinium nitrate (N{sub 2}H{sub 5}NO{sub 3}) and hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN). In the French plants, uranous nitrate is used in U-Pu separation and alpha barrier and HAN is used in Pu purification. Compared to sulfamate, U IV does not generate extraneous chemical species and uranyl nitrate (U VI) generated by reducing Pu IV follows the main uranium stream. More over uranous nitrate is prepared from reprocessed purified uranyl nitrate taken at the outlet of the reprocessing plant. Hydrazine and HAN offer the advantage to be salt-free reagents. Uranous nitrate can be generated either by electrolysis or by catalytic hydrogenation process. Electrolytic process has been implemented in early plant UP 1 at Marcoule (when changing reducer from uranous sulfamate to uranous nitrate) and was used again in UP2 plant at La Hague. However, the electrolytic process presented several disadvantages such as a low conversion rate and problems associated with the use of mercury. Electrolysis cells with no mercury were developed for the Eurochemic plant in Belgium and then implemented in the first Japanese reprocessing plant in Tokai-Mura. But finally, in 1975, the electrolytic process was abandoned in favor of the catalytic hydrogenation process developed at La

  16. Structure-Property Relationships in Lithium, Silver, and Cesium Uranyl Borates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Liu, Guokui; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2010-11-09

    Four new uranyl borates, Li[UO{sub 2}B{sub 5}O{sub 9}]·H{sub 2}O (LiUBO-1), Ag[(UO{sub 2})B{sub 5}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 2}] (AgUBO-1), α-Cs[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 11}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 6}] (CsUBO-1), and β-Cs[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 11}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 6}] (CsUBO-2) were synthesized via the reaction of uranyl nitrate with a large excess of molten boric acid in the presence of lithium, silver, or cesium nitrate. These compounds share a common structural motif consisting of a linear uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, cation surrounded by BO{sub 3} triangles and BO{sub 4} tetrahedra to create an UO{sub 8} hexagonal bipyramidal environment around uranium. The borate anions bridge between uranyl units to create sheets. Additional BO{sub 3} triangles extend from the polyborate layers, and are directed approximately perpendicular to the sheets. In Li[(UO{sub 2})B{sub 5}O{sub 9}]·H{sub 2}O, the additional BO{sub 3} triangles connect these sheets together to form a three-dimensional framework structure. Li[UO{sub 2})B{sub 5}O{sub 9}]·H{sub 2}O and β-Cs[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 11}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 6}] adopt noncentrosymmetric structures, while Ag[(UO{sub 2})B{sub 5}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 2}] and α-Cs[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 11}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 6}] are centrosymmetric. Li[(UO{sub 2})B{sub 5}O{sub 9}]·H{sub 2}O, which can be obtained as pure phase, displays second-harmonic generation of 532 nm light from 1064 nm light. Topological relationships of all actinyl borates are developed.

  17. Thermochromic properties of low-melting ionic uranyl isothiocyanate complexes.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Noboru; Shimojo, Kojiro; Brooks, Neil R; Nagaishi, Ryuji; Naganawa, Hirochika; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Meervelt, Luc; Binnemans, Koen; Kimura, Takaumi

    2011-04-21

    Temperature-dependent yellow-to-red colour changes of uranyl thiocyanate complexes with 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations have been studied by different spectroscopic methods and this phenomenon is attributed to changes in the local environment of the uranyl ion, including the coordination number, as well as to cation-anion interactions. PMID:21399798

  18. 2,6-Diiminopiperidin-1-ol: an overlooked motif relevant to uranyl and transition metal binding on poly(amidoxime) adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Zachary C; Cardenas, Allan Jay P; Corbey, Jordan F; Warner, Marvin G

    2016-07-01

    Glutardiamidoxime, a structural motif on sorbents used in uranium extraction from seawater, was discovered to cyclize in situ at room temperature to 2,6-diimino-piperidin-1-ol in the presence of uranyl nitrate. The new diimino motif was also generated when exposed to competing transition metals Cu(ii) and Ni(ii). Multinuclear μ-O bridged U(vi), Cu(ii), and Ni(ii) complexes featuring bound diimino ligands were isolated. PMID:27292161

  19. Specific capture of uranyl protein targets by metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Basset, Christian; Dedieu, Alain; Guérin, Philippe; Quéméneur, Eric; Meyer, Daniel; Vidaud, Claude

    2008-03-28

    To improve general understanding of biochemical mechanisms in the field of uranium toxicology, the identification of protein targets needs to be intensified. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been widely developed as a powerful tool for capturing metal binding proteins from biological extracts. However uranyl cations (UO2(2+)) have particular physico-chemical characteristics which prevent them from being immobilized on classical metal chelating supports. We report here on the first development of an immobilized uranyl affinity chromatography method, based on the cation-exchange properties of aminophosphonate groups for uranyl binding. The cation distribution coefficient and loading capacity on the support were determined. Then the stability of the uranyl-bonded phase under our chromatographic conditions was optimized to promote affinity mechanisms. The successful enrichment of uranyl binding proteins from human serum was then proven using proteomic and mass spectral analysis. PMID:18308325

  20. Pro-oxidative, genotoxic and cytotoxic properties of uranyl ions.

    PubMed

    Garmash, S A; Smirnova, V S; Karp, O E; Usacheva, A M; Berezhnov, A V; Ivanov, V E; Chernikov, A V; Bruskov, V I; Gudkov, S V

    2014-01-01

    It is demonstrated that hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide are formed under the action of uranyl ions in aqueous solutions containing no reducing agents. In the presence of uranyl ions, formation of 8-oxoguanine in DNA and long-lived protein radicals are observed in vitro. It is shown that the pro-oxidant properties of uranyl at micromolar concentrations mostly result from the physico-chemical nature of the compound rather than its radioactive decay. Uranyl ions lead to damage in DNA and proteins causing death of HEp-2 cells by necrotic pathway. It is revealed that the uranyl ions enhance radiation-induced oxidative stress and significantly increase a death rate of mice exposed to sublethal doses of X-rays. PMID:23312590

  1. Uranyl extraction by N,N-dialkylamide ligands studied using static and dynamic DFT simulations.

    PubMed

    Sieffert, Nicolas; Wipff, Georges

    2015-02-14

    We report DFT static and dynamic studies on uranyl complexes [UO(2)(NO(3))x(H(2)O)(y)L(z)](2-x) involved in the uranyl extraction from water to an "oil" phase (hexane) by an amide ligand L (N,N-dimethylacetamide). Static DFT results "in solution" (continuum SMD models for water and hexane) predict that the stepwise formation of [UO(2)(NO(3))(2)L(2)] from the UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)(2+) species is energetically favourable, and allow us to compare cis/trans isomers of penta- and hexa-coordinated complexes and key intermediates in the two solvents. DFT-MD simulations of [UO(2)(NO(3))(2)L(2)], [UO(2)(NO(3))(2)(H(2)O)L(2)], and [UO(2)(NO(3))(H(2)O)L(2)](+) species in explicit solvent environments (water, hexane, or the water/hexane interface) represented at the MM or full-DFT level reveal a versatile solvent dependent binding mode of nitrates, also evidenced by metadynamics simulations. In water and at the interface, the latter exchange from bi- to monodentate, via in plane rotational motions in some cases. Remarkably, structures of complexes at the interface are more "water-like" than gas phase- or hexane-like. Thus, the order of U-O(NO(3))/U-O(L) bond distances observed in the gas phase (U-O(nit) < U-OL) is inverted at the interface and in water. Overall, the results are consistent with the experimental observation of uranyl extraction from nitric acid solutions by amide analogues (bearing "fatty" substituents), and allow us to propose possible extraction mechanisms, involving complexation of L "right at the interface". They also point to the importance of the solvent environment and the dynamics on the structure and stability of the complexes. PMID:25412447

  2. Charge transfer vibronic transitions in uranyl tetrachloride compounds;

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G. K.; Deifel, N. P.; Cahill, C. L.

    2012-01-01

    The electronic and vibronic interactions of uranyl (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} in three tetrachloride crystals have been investigated with spectroscopic experiments and theoretical modeling. Analysis and simulation of the absorption and photoluminescence spectra have resulted in a quantitative understanding of the charge transfer vibronic transitions of uranyl in the crystals. The spectra obtained at liquid helium temperature consist of extremely narrow zero-phonon lines (ZPL) and vibronic bands. The observed ZPLs are assigned to the first group of the excited states formed by electronic excitation from the 3{sigma} ground state into the f{sub {delta}{phi}}, orbitals of uranyl. The Huang-Rhys theory of vibronic coupling is modified successfully for simulating both the absorption and luminescence spectra. It is shown that only vibronic coupling to the axially symmetric stretching mode is Franck-Condon allowed, whereas other modes are involved through coupling with the symmetric stretching mode. The energies of electronic transitions, vibration frequencies of various local modes, and changes in the O=U=O bond length of uranyl in different electronic states and in different coordination geometries are evaluated in empirical simulations of the optical spectra. Multiple uranyl sites derived from the resolution of a superlattice at low temperature are resolved by crystallographic characterization and time- and energy-resolved spectroscopic studies. The present empirical simulation provides insights into fundamental understanding of uranyl electronic interactions and is useful for quantitative characterization of uranyl coordination.

  3. Charge transfer vibronic transitions in uranyl tetrachloride compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guokui; Deifel, Nicholas P.; Cahill, Christopher L.; Zhurov, Vladimir V.; Pinkerton, A. Alan

    2012-01-01

    The electronic and vibronic interactions of uranyl (UO₂)2+ in three tetrachloride crystals have been investigated with spectroscopic experiments and theoretical modeling. Analysis and simulation of the absorption and photoluminescence spectra have resulted in a quantitative understanding of the charge transfer vibronic transitions of uranyl in the crystals. The spectra obtained at liquid helium temperature consist of extremely narrow zero-phonon lines (ZPL) and vibronic bands. The observed ZPLs are assigned to the first group of the excited states formed by electronic excitation from the 3σ ground state into the fδ,Φ orbitals of uranyl. The Huang–Rhys theory of vibronic coupling is modified successfully for simulating both the absorption and luminescence spectra. It is shown that only vibronic coupling to the axially symmetric stretching mode is Franck–Condon allowed, whereas other modes are involved through coupling with the symmetric stretching mode. The energies of electronic transitions, vibration frequencies of various local modes, and changes in the O=U=O bond length of uranyl in different electronic states and in different coordination geometries are evaluated in empirical simulations of the optical spectra. Multiple uranyl sites derived from the resolution of a superlattice at low temperature are resolved by crystallographic characterization and time- and energy-resolved spectroscopic studies. The present empirical simulation provides insights into fundamental understanding of uranyl electronic interactions and is useful for quantitative characterization of uranyl coordination.

  4. METHOD OF INHIBITING CORROSION IN URANYL SULFATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Bohlmann, E.G.; Griess, J.C. Jr.

    1960-08-23

    A method is given for treating a uranyl sulfate solution to inhibit the corrosiveness of the solution and elevate the phase separation temperature of the solution. Lithium sulfate is added to the solution in an amount ranging from 0.25 to 1.3 times the uranyl sulfate concentration. The corrosiveness of the solution with respect to stainless steel is substantially decreased by this means. This treatment also serves to raise the phase separation temperature of the solution (above 250 deg C), at which time the uranyl sulfate solution separates into two liquid phases of unequal uranium concentration and thus becomes unsuitable as nuclear reactor fuel.

  5. Incorporation of neptunium(VI) into a uranyl selenite.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Nathan A; Polinski, Matthew J; Lin, Jian; Simonetti, Antonio; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2012-10-15

    The incorporation of neptunium(VI) into the layered uranyl selenite Cs[(UO(2))(HSeO(3))(SeO(3))] has yielded the highest level of neptunium uptake in a uranyl compound to date with an average of 12(±3)% substitution of Np(VI) for U(VI). Furthermore, this is the first case in nearly 2 decades of dedicated incorporation studies in which the oxidation state of neptunium has been determined spectroscopically in a doped uranyl compound and also the first time in which neptunium incorporation has resulted in a structural transformation. PMID:23030830

  6. Thermodynamic properties of autunite, uranyl hydrogen phosphate, and uranyl orthophosphate from solubility and calorimetric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Shareva, Tatiana; kubatko, Karrie-Ann; burns, Peter; Wellman, Dawn M.; McNamara, Bruce K.; szymanowski, jennifer; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2009-10-01

    In this study, we use solubility and oxide melt solution calorimetry measurements to determine the thermodynamic properties of the uranyl phosphate phases autunite (abbreviated: CaUP), uranyl hydrogen phosphate (HUP), and uranyl orthophosphate (UP). Solubility measurements from both supersaturated and undersaturated conditions, as well as under different pH conditions, rigorously demonstrate attainment of equilibrium and yield well-constrained solubility product values of -48.36 (-0.03 /+ 0.03), -13.17 (-0.11 / +0.07), and -49.36 (-0.04 / +0.02) for CaUP, HUP, and UP, respectively. We use the solubility data to calculate standard state Gibbs free energies of formation for all phases (-7630.61 ± 9.69, -3072.27 ± 4.76, and -6138.95 ± 12.24 kJ mol-1 for CaUP, HUP, and UP, respectively), and calorimetry data to calculate standard state enthalpies of formation of -3223.22 ± 4.00 and -7001.01 ± 15.10 kJ mol-1 for HUP and UP, respectively. Combining these results allows us also to calculate the standard state entropies of formation of -506.54 ± 10.48 and -2893.12 ± 19.44 kJ mol-1 K-1 for HUP and UP phases, respectively. The results from this study are part of a combined effort to develop reliable and internally consistent thermodynamic data for environmentally relevant uranyl minerals. Data such as these are required in order to optimize and quantitatively assess the effect of phosphate amendment remediation technologies for uranium contaminated systems.

  7. Gas Phase Uranyl Activation: Formation of a Uranium Nitrosyl Complex from Uranyl Azide

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; De Jong, Wibe A.; Gibson, John K.

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO22+, was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2– in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2– was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2– resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2–, in which the “inert” uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2– via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2– complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2– complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO3–, suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2– to form UO(NO)Cl2– and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2– and UO2Cl2–. The observation of UO2Cl2– during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss.

  8. Gas phase uranyl activation: formation of a uranium nitrosyl complex from uranyl azide.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; de Jong, Wibe A; Gibson, John K

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO2(2+), was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2(-) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2(-) was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2(-) resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2(-), in which the "inert" uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2(-) via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2(-) complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2(-) complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO(3-), suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2(-) to form UO(NO)Cl2(-) and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2(-) and UO2Cl2(-). The observation of UO2Cl2(-) during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss. PMID:25906363

  9. Potential of essential fatty acid deficiency with extremely low fat diet in lipoprotein lipase deficiency during pregnancy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Elaine C; Brown, Judy A; Veldee, Megan Y; Anderson, Gregory J; Chait, Alan; Brunzell, John D

    2004-01-01

    Background Pregnancy in patients with lipoprotein lipase deficiency is associated with high risk of maternal pancreatitis and fetal death. A very low fat diet (< 10% of calories) is the primary treatment modality for the prevention of acute pancreatitis, a rare but potentially serious complication of severe hypertriglyceridemia. Since pregnancy can exacerbate hypertriglyceridemia in the genetic absence of lipoprotein lipase, a further reduction of dietary fat intake to < 1–2% of total caloric intake may be required during the pregnancy, along with the administration of a fibrate. It is uncertain if essential fatty acid deficiency will develop in the mother and fetus with this extremely low fat diet, or whether fibrates will cross the placenta and concentrate in the fetus. Case presentation A 23 year-old gravida 1 woman with primary lipoprotein lipase deficiency was seen at 7 weeks of gestation in the Lipid Clinic for management of severe hypertriglyceridemia that had worsened with pregnancy. While on her habitual fat intake of 10% of total calories, her pregnancy resulted in an exacerbation of the hypertriglyceridemia, which prompted further restriction of fat intake to < 2% of total calories, as well as administration of gemfibrozil at a lower than average dose. The level of gemfibrozil, as the active metabolite, in the venous and arterial fetal cord blood was within the expected therapeutic range for adults. The clinical signs and a biomarker of essential fatty acid deficiency, namely the ratio of 20:3 [n-9] to 20:4 [n-6] fatty acids, were closely monitored throughout her pregnancy. Despite her extremely low fat diet, the levels of essential fatty acids measured in the mother and in the fetal blood immediately postpartum were normal. Normal essential fatty acid levels may have been achieved by the topical application of sunflower oil. Conclusions An extremely low fat diet in combination with topical sunflower oil and gemfibrozil administration was safely

  10. Effect of sex and gonadal hormones on rat plasma lipids during the development of an essential fatty acid deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lyman, R. L.; Ostwald, Rosemarie; Bouchard, Pauline; Shannon, Angela

    1966-01-01

    1. Male, female and castrated rats treated with oestradiol (30μg./week) or testosterone (2mg./week) were given an essential fatty acid-deficient diet containing 10% of hydrogenated coconut oil for 9 weeks. The concentrations and fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides were determined. 2. Between the second and third weeks of the deficiency, concentrations of plasma cholesteryl esters, phospholipids and triglycerides decreased, then remained relatively constant. There were no significant differences between males and females, but oestradiol caused a significant rise in plasma phospholipids and triglycerides as compared with testosterone-treated animals. 3. During the first 2 weeks of the deficiency, linoleic acid in the plasma lipids of all groups decreased to low concentrations and changed very little thereafter. 4. Female rats maintained higher percentages and concentrations of arachidonic acid and stearic acid in plasma phospholipids and arachidonic acid in cholesteryl esters than did males. Males had higher proportions of eicosatrienoic acid and oleic acid. There was no sex difference in the fatty acid composition of plasma triglycerides. 5. Oestradiol-treated rats had concentrations of cholesteryl and phospholipid arachidonate comparable with those of female rats and higher than the testosterone-treated group. Eicosatrienoic acid in the oestradiol–treated rats was high and resembled that of the male rats, apparently because of the higher concentration of plasma phospho lipids in this group. 6. Supplementation of the essential fatty acid-deficient rats with linoleate restored plasma cholesteryl and phospholipid linoleate and arachidonate nearly to normal concentrations in a single day. The increase in arachidonic acid in these fractions was accompanied by a similar quantitative decrease in eicosatrienoic acid. 7. These sex differences appear to be related to the smaller size of the female rat and to a more direct

  11. Dynamic interplay between uranyl phosphate precipitation, sorption, and phase evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Munasinghe, P. Sumudu; Elwood Madden, Megan E.; Brooks, Scott C.; Elwood Madden, Andrew S.

    2015-04-17

    We report that natural examples demonstrate uranyl-phosphate minerals can maintain extremely low levels of aqueous uranium in groundwaters due to their low solubility. Thus, greater understanding of the geochemical factors leading to uranyl phosphate precipitation may lead to successful application of phosphate-based remediation methods. However, the solubility of uranyl phosphate phases varies over >3 orders of magnitude, with the most soluble phases typically observed in lab experiments. To understand the role of common soil/sediment mineral surfaces in the nucleation and transformation of uranyl phosphate minerals under environmentally relevant conditions, we carried out batch experiments with goethite and mica at pH 6 in mixed electrolyte solutions ranging from 1–800 μM U and 1–800 μM P. All experiments ended with uranium concentrations below the USEPA MCL for U, but with 2–3 orders of magnitude difference in uranium concentrations.

  12. Dynamic interplay between uranyl phosphate precipitation, sorption, and phase evolution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Munasinghe, P. Sumudu; Elwood Madden, Megan E.; Brooks, Scott C.; Elwood Madden, Andrew S.

    2015-04-17

    We report that natural examples demonstrate uranyl-phosphate minerals can maintain extremely low levels of aqueous uranium in groundwaters due to their low solubility. Thus, greater understanding of the geochemical factors leading to uranyl phosphate precipitation may lead to successful application of phosphate-based remediation methods. However, the solubility of uranyl phosphate phases varies over >3 orders of magnitude, with the most soluble phases typically observed in lab experiments. To understand the role of common soil/sediment mineral surfaces in the nucleation and transformation of uranyl phosphate minerals under environmentally relevant conditions, we carried out batch experiments with goethite and mica at pHmore » 6 in mixed electrolyte solutions ranging from 1–800 μM U and 1–800 μM P. All experiments ended with uranium concentrations below the USEPA MCL for U, but with 2–3 orders of magnitude difference in uranium concentrations.« less

  13. Uranyl phthalocyanines show promise in the treatment of brain tumors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigerio, N. A.

    1967-01-01

    Processes synthesize sulfonated and nonsulfonated uranyl phthalocyanines for application in neutron therapy of brain tumors. Tests indicate that the compounds are advantageous over the previously used boron and lithium compounds.

  14. Structures and syntheses of layered and framework amine-bearing uranyl phosphate and uranyl arsenates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locock, Andrew J.; Burns, Peter C.

    2004-08-01

    Two hydrated uranyl arsenates and a uranyl phosphate were synthesized by hydrothermal methods in the presence of amine structure-directing agents and their structures determined: (N 2C 6H 14)[(UO 2)(AsO 4)] 2(H 2O) 3, DabcoUAs, {NH(C 2H 5) 3}[(UO 2) 2(AsO 4)(AsO 3OH)], TriethUAs, and (N 2C 4H 12)(UO 2)[(UO 2)(PO 4)] 4(H 2O) 2, PiperUP. Intensity data were collected at room temperature using Mo Kα X-radiation and a CCD-based area detector. The crystal structures were refined by full-matrix least-squares techniques on the basis of F2 to agreement indices ( DabcoUAs, TriethUAs, PiperUP) w R2=5.6%, 8.3%, 7.2% for all data, and R1=2.9%, 3.3%, 4.0%, calculated for 1777, 5822, 9119 unique observed reflections (| Fo|⩾4 σF), respectively. DabcoUAs is monoclinic, space group C2/ m, Z=2, a=18.581(1), b=7.1897(4), c=7.1909(4) Å, β=102.886(1)°, V=936.43(9) Å 3, Dcalc=3.50 g/cm 3. TriethUAs is monoclinic, space group P2 1/ n, Z=4, a=9.6359(4), b=18.4678(7), c=10.0708(4) Å, β=92.282(1)°, V=1790.7(1) Å 3, Dcalc=3.41 g/cm 3. PiperUP is monoclinic, space group Pn, Z=2, a=9.3278(4), b=15.5529(7), c=9.6474(5) Å, β=93.266(1)°, V=1397.3(1) Å 3, Dcalc=4.41 g/cm 3. The structure of DabcoUAs contains the autunite-type sheet formed by the sharing of vertices between uranyl square bipyramids and arsenate tetrahedra. The triethylenediammonium cations are located in the interlayer along with two H 2O groups and are disordered. Both TriethUAs and PiperUP contain sheets formed of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and tetrahedra (arsenate and phosphate, respectively) with the uranophane sheet-anion topology. In TriethUAs, triethlyammonium cations are located in the interlayer. In PiperUP, the sheets are connected by a uranyl pentagonal bipyramid that shares corners with phosphate tetrahedra of adjacent sheets, resulting in a framework with piperazinium cations and H 2O groups in the cavities of the structure.

  15. Association of uranyl with the cell wall of Pseudomonas fluorescens inhibits metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencheikh-Latmani, Rizlan; Leckie, James O.

    2003-11-01

    Citric acid is found along with uranyl in the subsurface of former nuclear facilities because of its use as a decontamination agent in the nuclear industry. Citrate's metal chelating properties affect the mobility of uranyl in the subsurface and consequently, citrate biodegradation may significantly impact uranyl fate and transport. Under the non-growth conditions considered, low (micromolar) uranyl concentrations inhibit the biodegradation of citrate by Pseudomonas fluorescens, a common subsurface denitrifying bacterium. Additionally, uranyl is found readily associated with the cell envelope of P. fluorescens. The observed inhibition appears to be linked to the binding of uranyl to the cell surface and is reversible by desorbing cell-bound uranyl. This study establishes a link between uranyl association with the cell surface and the observed inhibitory effect of uranyl on cell metabolism.

  16. EXAFS Study of Uranyl Complexation at Pseudomonas fluorescens Cell Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencheikh, R.; Bargar, J. R.; Tebo, B. M.

    2002-12-01

    Little is known about the roles of microbial biomass as a sink and source for uranium in contaminated aquifers, nor of the impact of bacterial biochemistry on uranium speciation in the subsurface. A significant role is implied by the high affinities of both Gram positive and Gram negative cells for binding uranyl (UO2{ 2+}). In the present study, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was used to identify membrane functional groups involved in uranyl binding to the Gram negative bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens from pH 3 to pH 8. Throughout this pH-range, EXAFS spectra can be described primarily in terms of coordination of carboxylic groups to uranyl. U-C distances characteristic of 4-, 5- and 8- membered rings were observed, as well as the possibility of phosphato groups. Both shell-by-shell fits and principle component analyses indicate that the functional groups involved in binding of uranyl to the cell surface do not vary systematically across the pH range investigated. This result contrasts with EXAFS results of uranyl sorbed to Gram positive bacteria, and suggests an important role for long-chain carboxylate-terminated membrane functional groups in binding uranyl.

  17. Ligand sensitized luminescence of uranyl by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium: A new luminescent uranyl benzoate specie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Satendra; Maji, S.; Joseph, M.; Sankaran, K.

    2015-03-01

    Benzoic acid (BA) is shown to sensitize and enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in acetonitrile medium. Luminescence spectra and especially UV-Vis spectroscopy studies reveal the formation of tri benzoate complex of uranyl i.e. [UO2(C6H5COO)3]- which is highly luminescent. In particular, three sharp bands at 431, 443, 461 nm of absorption spectra provides evidence for tri benzoate specie of uranyl in acetonitrile medium. The luminescence lifetime of uranyl in this complex is 68 μs which is much more compared to the lifetime of uncomplexed uranyl (20 μs) in acetonitrile medium. In contrary to aqueous medium where uranyl benzoate forms 1:1 and 1:2 species, spectroscopic data reveal formation of 1:3 complex in acetonitrile medium. Addition of water to acetonitrile results in decrease of luminescence intensity of this specie and the luminescence features implode at 20% (v/v) of water content. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the existence of [UO2(C6H5COO)3]- specie in acetonitrile is reported. Mechanism of luminescence enhancement is discussed.

  18. Ligand sensitized luminescence of uranyl by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium: a new luminescent uranyl benzoate specie.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satendra; Maji, S; Joseph, M; Sankaran, K

    2015-03-01

    Benzoic acid (BA) is shown to sensitize and enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in acetonitrile medium. Luminescence spectra and especially UV-Vis spectroscopy studies reveal the formation of tri benzoate complex of uranyl i.e. [UO2(C6H5COO)3](-) which is highly luminescent. In particular, three sharp bands at 431, 443, 461nm of absorption spectra provides evidence for tri benzoate specie of uranyl in acetonitrile medium. The luminescence lifetime of uranyl in this complex is 68μs which is much more compared to the lifetime of uncomplexed uranyl (20μs) in acetonitrile medium. In contrary to aqueous medium where uranyl benzoate forms 1:1 and 1:2 species, spectroscopic data reveal formation of 1:3 complex in acetonitrile medium. Addition of water to acetonitrile results in decrease of luminescence intensity of this specie and the luminescence features implode at 20% (v/v) of water content. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the existence of [UO2(C6H5COO)3](-) specie in acetonitrile is reported. Mechanism of luminescence enhancement is discussed. PMID:25528510

  19. Surface complexation model of uranyl sorption on Georgia kaolinite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, T.E.; Davis, J.A.; Lumpkin, G.R.; Chisari, R.; Waite, T.D.

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption of uranyl on standard Georgia kaolinites (KGa-1 and KGa-1B) was studied as a function of pH (3-10), total U (1 and 10 ??mol/l), and mass loading of clay (4 and 40 g/l). The uptake of uranyl in air-equilibrated systems increased with pH and reached a maximum in the near-neutral pH range. At higher pH values, the sorption decreased due to the presence of aqueous uranyl carbonate complexes. One kaolinite sample was examined after the uranyl uptake experiments by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to determine the U content. It was found that uranium was preferentially adsorbed by Ti-rich impurity phases (predominantly anatase), which are present in the kaolinite samples. Uranyl sorption on the Georgia kaolinites was simulated with U sorption reactions on both titanol and aluminol sites, using a simple non-electrostatic surface complexation model (SCM). The relative amounts of U-binding >TiOH and >AlOH sites were estimated from the TEM/EDS results. A ternary uranyl carbonate complex on the titanol site improved the fit to the experimental data in the higher pH range. The final model contained only three optimised log K values, and was able to simulate adsorption data across a wide range of experimental conditions. The >TiOH (anatase) sites appear to play an important role in retaining U at low uranyl concentrations. As kaolinite often contains trace TiO2, its presence may need to be taken into account when modelling the results of sorption experiments with radionuclides or trace metals on kaolinite. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Passage of TBP-uranyl complexes from aqueous-organic interface to the organic phase: insights from molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Pooja; Ali, Sk Musharaf; Shenoy, Kalasanka Trivikram

    2016-08-24

    The present study reports molecular dynamics simulations for biphasic systems comprising tributyl phosphate (TBP) in dodecane and uranyl nitrate in the aqueous phase, which are key chemical species in the well-known Pu-U extraction (PUREX) process. An attempt has been made to understand the nature of interface and mechanism of 'TBP associated uranyl' crossing under neutral and acidic conditions. Results show that the solvent density undergoes large fluctuation near the interface depending on the nature of the aqueous-organic phase. The study provides compelling evidence of experimentally observed reorganization of interfacial complexes at the interface and their structural reformation during extraction. It has been observed that the surface active nature of TBP and their interfacial coverage is modulated by the nature of incorporated solute species and their location with respect to the interface. Also, the TBP structuring near the interface is destroyed when an acidic interface is considered rather than a neutral one which favors the uranyl extraction. With an acidic interface, the water humidity of organic phase was observed to be increased in the experiments. Furthermore, the acid/water solubility in the organic phase was observed to be influenced by selection of acid models and their concentration. Simulations with high acid concentration show water pocket formation in the organic phase. However, in the case of dissociated ions or a mixture of both, no such water pool is observed and the extracted water remains dispersed in the organic phase, having the tendency to be replaced by HNO3 because of preferred TBP·HNO3 complexation over TBP·H2O. Most remarkably, the present study makes evident the TBP-induced charge redistribution of uranyl complexes during migration from the interface to the bulk organic phase, which contributes to drive uranyl complexes such as UO2·NO3·4TBP, UO2·5TBP and UO2·NO3·3TBP·HNO3 in the organic phase, and this was reestablished by

  1. Solid state and aqueous behavior of uranyl peroxide cage clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Kristi Lynn

    Uranyl peroxide cage clusters include a large family of more than 50 published clusters of a variety of sizes, which can incorporate various ligands including pyrophosphate and oxalate. Previous studies have reported that uranyl clusters can be used as a method to separate uranium from a solid matrix, with potential applications in reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel. Because of the potential applications of these novel structures in an advanced nuclear fuel cycle and their likely presence in areas of contamination, it is important to understand their behavior in both solid state and aqueous systems, including complex environments where other ions are present. In this thesis, I examine the aqueous behavior of U24Pp 12, as well as aqueous cluster systems with added mono-, di-, and trivalent cations. The resulting solutions were analyzed using dynamic light scattering and ultra-small angle X-ray scattering to evaluate the species in solution. Precipitates of these systems were analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and Raman spectroscopy. The results of these analyses demonstrate the importance of cation size, charge, and concentration of added cations on the aqueous behavior of uranium macroions. Specifically, aggregates of various sizes and shapes form rapidly upon addition of cations, and in some cases these aggregates appear to precipitate into an X-ray amorphous material that still contains U24Pp12 clusters. In addition, I probe aggregation of U24Pp12 and U60, another uranyl peroxide cage cluster, in mixed solvent water-alcohol systems. The aggregation of uranyl clusters in water-alcohol systems is a result of hydrogen bonding with polar organic molecules and the reduction of the dielectric constant of the system. Studies of aggregation of uranyl clusters also allow for comparison between the newer uranyl polyoxometalate family and century-old transition metal polyoxometalates. To complement the solution studies of uranyl

  2. The catalytic role of uranyl in formation of polycatechol complexes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    To better understand the association of contaminant uranium with natural organic matter (NOM) and the fate of uranium in ground water, spectroscopic studies of uranium complexation with catechol were conducted. Catechol provides a model for ubiquitous functional groups present in NOM. Liquid samples were analyzed using Raman, FTIR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Catechol was found to polymerize in presence of uranyl ions. Polymerization in presence of uranyl was compared to reactions in the presence of molybdate, another oxyion, and self polymerization of catechol at high pH. The effect of time and dissolved oxygen were also studied. It was found that oxygen was required for self-polymerization at elevated pH. The potential formation of phenoxy radicals as well as quinones was monitored. The benzene ring was found to be intact after polymerization. No evidence for formation of ether bonds was found, suggesting polymerization was due to formation of C-C bonds between catechol ligands. Uranyl was found to form outer sphere complexes with catechol at initial stages but over time (six months) polycatechol complexes were formed and precipitated from solution (forming humic-like material) while uranyl ions remained in solution. Our studies show that uranyl acts as a catalyst in catechol-polymerization. PMID:21396112

  3. Early development of essential fatty acid deficiency in rats: Fat-free vs. hydrogenated coconut oil diet

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Pei-Ra; De Leon, Charlotte E.; Le, Hau; Puder, Mark; Bistrian, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of feeding an essential fatty acid deficient (EFAD) diet either without fat or with added hydrogenated coconut oil (HCO) on fatty acid profiles in rats. Both diets induced equivalent biochemical evidence of EFAD reflected by the triene/tetraene ratio in plasma phospholipids within 2 weeks. However, the HCO diet led to larger increases of 16:1n7 and 18:1n9 in muscle but smaller increases in fat tissue and plasma triglycerides than the fat-free diet, suggesting greater increases in hepatic de novo lipogenesis with the latter. In addition, the HCO diet led to larger decreases of some 18:3n3 metabolites, particularly 22:6n3, in muscle, fat and brain tissues than the fat-free diet, presumably related to lesser stimulation of elongation and desaturation. Thus, these secondary effects of an EFAD diet on fatty acid metabolism can be modified by the saturated fat in the diet while the primary impact of both diets on development of EFAD is unaffected. PMID:20675109

  4. Hydrothermal Phase Relations Among Uranyl Minerals at the Nopal I Analog Site

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, William M.

    2007-07-01

    Uranyl mineral paragenesis at Nopal I is an analog of spent fuel alteration at Yucca Mountain. Petrographic studies suggest a variety of possible hydrothermal conditions for uranium mineralization at Nopal I. Calculated equilibrium phase relations among uranyl minerals show uranophane stability over a broad range of realistic conditions and indicate that uranyl mineral variety reflects persistent chemical potential heterogeneity. (author)

  5. Tetranuclear Uranyl Polyrotaxanes: Preferred Selectivity toward Uranyl Tetramer for Stabilizing a Flexible Polyrotaxane Chain Exhibiting Weakened Supramolecular Inclusion.

    PubMed

    Mei, Lei; Wang, Lin; Liu, Cai-ming; Zhao, Yu-liang; Chai, Zhi-fang; Shi, Wei-qun

    2015-07-01

    Introduction of mechanically interlocked components into actinide-based metal-organic materials such as polyrotaxanes will generate an entirely new type of inorganic-organic hybrid materials showing more supramolecular encapsulation-based dynamics. In this work, tetranuclear uranyl-directed polyrotaxanes (UO2 )4 O2 -C5A3-CB6 (1) and (UO2 )4 O2 -C6A3-CB6 (2), which are the first actinide pseudorotaxanes with high-nuclearity uranium centers, were obtained through systematic extension of the string spacer in pseudorotaxane ligands from 1,4-butylene (C4) to 1,5-pentylene (C5) and 1,6-hexylene (C6). Both of the as-synthesized tetranuclear uranyl polyrotaxanes were structurally characterized and analyzed. Considering the structure of UO2 -C4A3-CB6 and the 1,4-butylene string spacer, the preference for the uranyl tetramer may be related to the configurational inversion of the pseudorotaxane ligands from trans mode to cis mode on coordination to the uranyl center. Detailed structural analysis suggests that the length of the stretched string molecules for CB6-encapsulated pseudorotaxanes has remarkable effect on the supramolecular inclusion interactions and the configurations of pseudorotaxanes, and should be responsible for the configurational inversion of pseudorotaxane spacers and subsequent distinct changes of the uranyl building units and geometric structures. PMID:26036243

  6. Uranyl peroxide enhanced nuclear fuel corrosion in seawater

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Nyman, May; Shvareva, Tatiana; Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident brought together compromised irradiated fuel and large amounts of seawater in a high radiation field. Based on newly acquired thermochemical data for a series of uranyl peroxide compounds containing charge-balancing alkali cations, here we show that nanoscale cage clusters containing as many as 60 uranyl ions, bonded through peroxide and hydroxide bridges, are likely to form in solution or as precipitates under such conditions. These species will enhance the corrosion of the damaged fuel and, being thermodynamically stable and kinetically persistent in the absence of peroxide, they can potentially transport uranium over long distances. PMID:22308442

  7. Binding of oxime group to uranyl ion.

    PubMed

    Tsantis, Sokratis T; Zagoraiou, Eirini; Savvidou, Aikaterini; Raptopoulou, Catherine P; Psycharis, Vassilis; Szyrwiel, Lukasz; Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Perlepes, Spyros P

    2016-05-31

    Currently, the leading approach for extraction of uranium from seawater is selective sorption of UO2(2+) ions onto a poly(acrylamidoxime) fiber. Amidoxime functional groups are the most studied extractant moieties for this application, but are not perfectly selective, and understanding how these groups (and more generally the oxime groups) interact with UO2(2+) and competing ions in seawater is an important step in designing better extractants. We have started a new research programme aiming at in-depth studies of the uranyl-oxime/amidoxime interactions and we report here our first results which cover aspects of the coordination chemistry of 2-pyridyl ketoximes towards UO2(2+). Detailed synthetic investigations of various UO2(2+)/mepaoH and UO2(2+)/phpaoH reaction systems (mepaoH is methyl 2-pyridyl ketoxime and phpaoH is phenyl 2-pyridyl ketoxime) have provided access to the complexes [UO2(mepao)2(MeOH)2]{[UO2(NO3)(mepao)(MeOH)2]}2 (), [UO2(mepao)2(MeOH)2] (), [(UO2)2(O2)(O2CMe)2(mepaoH)2] () and [UO2(phpao)2(MeOH)2] (). The peroxido group in , which was isolated without the addition of external peroxide sources, probably arises from a bis(aquo)- and/or bis(hydroxido)-bridged diuranyl precursor in solution followed by photochemical oxidation of the bridging groups. The U(VI) atom in the [UO2(NO3)(mepao)(MeOH)2] molecules of () is surrounded by one nitrogen and seven oxygen atoms in a very distorted hexagonal bipyramidal geometry; two oxygen atoms from the terminal MeOH ligands, two oxygen atoms from the bidentate chelating nitrato group, and the oxygen and nitrogen atoms from the η(2) oximate group of the 1.110 (Harris notation) mepao(-) ligand define the equatorial plane. This plane consists of two terminal MeOH ligands and two η(2) oximate groups in the [UO2(mepao)2(MeOH)2] molecule () of . The structure of the [UO2(mepao)2(MeOH)2] molecule that is present in is very similar to the structure of the corresponding molecule in . The structure of the dinuclear

  8. Long-term effects of perinatal essential fatty acid deficiency on anxiety-related behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Palsdottir, Vilborg; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Blomqvist, Maria; Egecioglu, Emil; Olsson, Bob

    2012-04-01

    Dietary essential fatty acids have been shown to regulate behavioral and cognitive functions in rodents. However, the long-term effect on behavior, besides memory and learning, of essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD), i.e., lack of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids, during the perinatal period has not been investigated. Therefore, pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were given either an EFAD or an isoenergetic control diet from gestational day 16 and throughout lactation. The female offspring were given standard chow from 3 weeks of age, and at 12 to 14 weeks of age, open-field, object recognition, light-dark transition, elevated plus maze, and social interaction tests were performed. The brain glycerophospholipid fatty acid composition was investigated in 3-week-old and adult offspring by gas chromatography. The differences observed in behavior were indicative of lower anxiety in the EFAD mice compared to controls illustrated by more time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze (+ 41%, p < .05) and in the light compartment in the light-dark transition test (+ 63%, p < .05). The proportion of total n-3 fatty acids, especially 22:6n-3 in the brain, was lower with a compensatory increase in the proportion of total n-6 fatty acids, foremost 22:5n-6, in the EFAD mice compared to controls at 3 weeks of age. In the adult brains the fatty acid composition was normalized. In conclusion, our data show that EFAD during the perinatal period results in short-term alterations of fatty acid composition in brain and decreased anxiety in adult life. PMID:22352789

  9. Physicochemical and physiological properties of cholylsarcosine. A potential replacement detergent for bile acid deficiency states in the small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Lillienau, J; Schteingart, C D; Hofmann, A F

    1992-01-01

    The properties of cholylsarcosine (the synthetic N-acyl conjugate of cholic acid with sarcosine [N-methylglycine]) were examined to determine its suitability as a bile acid replacement agent for conditions of bile acid deficiency in the small intestine, which causes fat malabsorption. Previous studies in rodents had shown that the compound was well transported by the liver and ileum and underwent neither deconjugation nor dehydroxylation during enterohepatic cycling. By 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance, cholylsarcosine was found to exist in dilute aqueous solution as an almost equimolar mixture of two geometric isomers--cis and trans (around the amide bond)--in contrast to cholylglycine, which was present entirely in the trans form. The critical micellization concentration was 11 mmol/liter, similar to that of cholylglycine (10 mmol/liter). By nonaqueous titrimetry, the pKa' of cholylsarcosine was 3.7, only slightly lower than that of cholylglycine (3.9). Cholylsarcosine was poorly soluble below pH 3.7, but highly soluble above pH 4. In vitro, cholylsarcosine behaved as cholylglycine with respect to promoting lipolysis by lipase/colipase. There was little difference between cholylsarcosine and cholylglycine in their solubilization of an equimolar mixture of oleic acid, oleate, and monoolein (designed to simulate digestive products of triglyceride) or in their solubilization of monooleyl-glycerol alone. When a [3H]triolein emulsion with either cholylsarcosine or cholyltaurine was infused intraduodenally in biliary fistula rats, recovery of 3H in lymph was 52 +/- 10% (mean +/- SD) for cholylsarcosine and 52 +/- 11% for cholyltaurine. When perfused into the colon of the anesthetized rabbit, cholylsarcosine (5 mmol/liter) did not influence water absorption or permeability to erythritol, in contrast to chenodeoxycholate, which induced vigorous water secretion and caused erythritol loss. We conclude that cholylsarcosine possesses the physicochemical and physiological

  10. Thermodynamics of Uranyl Minerals: Enthalpies of Formation of Uranyl Oxide Hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    K. Kubatko; K. Helean; A. Navrotsky; P.C. Burns

    2005-05-11

    The enthalpies of formation of seven uranyl oxide hydrate phases and one uranate have been determined using high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry: [(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O(OH){sub 6}](H{sub 2}O){sub 5}, metaschoepite; {beta}-UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}; CaUO{sub 4}; Ca(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}, becquerelite; Ca(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O{sub 3}(OH){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}; Na(UO{sub 2})O(OH), clarkeite; Na{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 7}, the sodium analogue of compreignacite and Pb{sub 3}(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, curite. The enthalpy of formation from the binary oxides, {Delta}H{sub f-ox}, at 298 K was calculated for each compound from the respective drop solution enthalpy, {Delta}H{sub ds}. The standard enthalpies of formation from the elements, {Delta}H{sub f}{sup o}, at 298 K are -1791.0 {+-} 3.2, -1536.2 {+-} 2.8, -2002.0 {+-} 3.2, -11389.2 {+-} 13.5, -6653.1 {+-} 13.8, -1724.7 {+-} 5.1, -10936.4 {+-} 14.5 and -13163.2 {+-} 34.4 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. These values are useful in exploring the stability of uranyl oxide hydrates in auxiliary chemical systems, such as those expected in U-contaminated environments.

  11. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  12. Structure and dynamics of aqueous solution of uranyl ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, Manish; Choudhury, Niharendu

    2014-04-24

    The present work describes a molecular dynamics simulation study of structure and dynamics of aqueous solution of uranyl ions in water. Structural properties of the system in terms of radial distribution functions and dynamical characteristics as obtained through velocity autocorrelation function and mean square displacements have been analyzed. The results for radial distribution functions show the oxygen of water to form the first solvation shell at 2.4 Å around the uranium atom, whereas the hydrogen atoms of water are distributed around the uranium atom with the major peak at around 3.0 Å. Analyses of transport behaviors of ions and water through MSD indicates that the diffusion of the uranyl ion is much less as compared to that of the water molecules. It is also observed that the dynamical behavior of water molecules gets modified due to the presence of uranyl ion. The effect of increase in concentration of uranyl ions on the structure and dynamics of water molecules is also studied.

  13. Colorimetric peroxidase mimetic assay for uranyl detection in sea water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingyuan; Chen, Zhuo; Omar, Haneen; Deng, Lin; Khashab, Niveen M

    2015-03-01

    Uranyl (UO2(2+)) is a form of uranium in aqueous solution that represents the greatest risk to human health because of its bioavailability. Different sensing techniques have been used with very sensitive detection limits especially the recently reported uranyl-specific DNAzymes systems. However, to the best of our knowledge, few efficient detection methods have been reported for uranyl sensing in seawater. Herein, gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) are employed in an efficient spectroscopic method to detect uranyl ion (UO2(2+)) with a detection limit of 1.86 μM. In the absence of UO2(2+), the BSA-stabilized AuNCs (BSA-AuNCs) showed an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. In the presence of UO2(2+), this activity can be efficiently restrained. The preliminary quenching mechanism and selectivity of UO2(2+) was also investigated and compared with other ions. This design strategy could be useful in understanding the binding affinity of protein-stabilized AuNCs to UO2(2+) and consequently prompt the recycling of UO2(2+) from seawater. PMID:25658750

  14. Multi-scale modelling of uranyl chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Thanh-Nghi; Duvail, Magali Villard, Arnaud; Dufrêche, Jean-François; Molina, John Jairo; Guilbaud, Philippe

    2015-01-14

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations with explicit polarization have been successfully used to determine the structural and thermodynamic properties of binary aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride (UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}). Concentrated aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride have been studied to determine the hydration properties and the ion-ion interactions. The bond distances and the coordination number of the hydrated uranyl are in good agreement with available experimental data. Two stable positions of chloride in the second hydration shell of uranyl have been identified. The UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-Cl{sup −} association constants have also been calculated using a multi-scale approach. First, the ion-ion potential averaged over the solvent configurations at infinite dilution (McMillan-Mayer potential) was calculated to establish the dissociation/association processes of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-Cl{sup −} ion pairs in aqueous solution. Then, the association constant was calculated from this potential. The value we obtained for the association constant is in good agreement with the experimental result (K{sub UO{sub 2Cl{sup +}}} = 1.48 l mol{sup −1}), but the resulting activity coefficient appears to be too low at molar concentration.

  15. Insertion of Trivalent Lanthanides into Uranyl Vanadate Layers and Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaxing; Yin, Xuemiao; Zhao, Yanyan; Gao, Yang; Chen, Lanhua; Liu, Zhiyong; Sheng, Daopeng; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2015-09-01

    Two new uranyl vanadates have been prepared from hydrothermal reactions and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure of (H3O)UO2VO4 (UVO-1) consists of anionic layers containing UO2(2+) pentagonal bipyramids coordinated by edge-sharing VO5 square pyramids, with the charge balanced by interlaminar H3O(+) cations. Vanadium in (UO2)3(VO4)2(H2O)3 (UVO-2) exists as monomeric VO4 tetrahedra coordinating to UO2(2+) pentagonal bipyramids, forming a 3D uranyl(VI) vanadate framework. Similar reactions with the addition of Ln(NO3)3 (Ln = Nd, Eu) afford the three heterobimetallic lanthanide uranyl vanadate frameworks Nd(UO2)3(VO4)3(H2O)11 (NdUVO-1), Eu(UO2)3(VO4)3(H2O)10 (EuUVO-1), and Eu2(UO2)12(VO4)10(H2O)24 (EuUVO-2). In NdUVO-1 and EuUVO-1, Ln(3+) cations are inserted into the interlayer space of UVO-1 substituting for H3O(+) and further bridging adjacent layers into 3D frameworks. Similarly, EuUVO-2 adopts the same sheet topology as UVO-2, with Eu(3+) ions replacing some of the interlayer uranyl ions in UVO-2. Our work has demonstrated that uranyl vanadate extended structures are excellent hosts for further incorporation of trivalent lanthanide/actinide cations and has provided a new way to create new heterobimetallic 4f-5f and 5f-5f compounds. PMID:26292148

  16. Radiolysis of hexavalent plutonium in solutions of uranyl nitrate containing fission product simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rance, Peter J. W.; Zilberman, B. Ya.; Akopov, G. A.

    2000-07-01

    The effect of the inherent radioactivity on the chemical state of plutonium ions in solution was recognized very shortly after the first macroscopic amounts of plutonium became available and early studies were conducted as part of the Manhattan Project. However, the behavior of plutonium ions, in nitric acid especially, has been found to be somewhat complex, so much so that a relatively modern summary paper included the comment that, "The vast amount of work carried out in nitric acid solutions can not be adequately summarized. Suffice it to say results in these solutions are plagued with irreproducibility and induction periods…" Needless to say, the presence of other ions in solution, as occurs when irradiated nuclear fuel is dissolved, further complicates matters. The purpose of the work described below was to add to the rather small amount of qualitative data available relating to the radiolytic behavior of plutonium in solutions of irradiated nuclear fuel.

  17. Tetracycline in uranyl nitrate intoxication: Its action on renal damage and U retention in bone

    SciTech Connect

    Guglielmotti, M.B.; Ubios, A.M.; Larumbe, J.; Cabrini, R.L. )

    1989-09-01

    In acute intoxication, uranium (U) not only inhibits bone formation but its excretion in urine also causes renal damage. The former effect is ameliorated by tetracycline (TC), probably due to its chelation property, which might also prevent U deposition in bone. Chemical determination of U incorporated in bone and a histological study of the kidneys were performed on animals injected with U and then treated with TC. The results showed that TC was unable to prevent the binding of U to bone while it exacerbated U-induced renal damage.

  18. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33... nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued... potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products and cured poultry products....

  19. Influence of Contact Time on the Extraction of 233Uranyl Spike and Contaminant Uranium From Hanford Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven C.; Szecsody, James E.

    2011-11-01

    In this study 233Uranyl nitrate was added to uranium (U) contaminated Hanford 300 Area sediment and incubated under moist conditions for 1 year. It hypothesized that geochemical transformations and/or physical processes will result in decreased extractability of 233U as the incubation period increases, and eventually the extraction behavior of the 233U spike will be congruent to contaminant U that has been associated with sediment for decades. Following 1 week, 1 month, and 1 year incubation periods, sediment extractions were performed using either batch or dynamic (sediment column flow) chemical extraction techniques. Overall, extraction of U from sediment using batch extraction was less complicated to conduct compared to dynamic extraction, but dynamic extraction could distinguish the range of U forms associated with sediment which are eluted at different times.

  20. Self-assembly of Alkali-uranyl-peroxide Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, May; Rodriquez, Mark A.; Campana, Charles F.

    2010-08-11

    The hexavalent uranium specie, uranyl triperoxide, UO2(O2)34-, has been shown recently to behave like high oxidation-state d0 transition-metals, self-assembling into polyoxometalate-like clusters that contain up to 60 uranyl cations bridged by peroxide ligands. There has been much less focus on synthesis and structural characterization of salts of the monomeric UO2(O2)34- building block of these clusters. However, these could serve as water-soluble uranyl precursors for both clusters and materials, and also be used as simple models to study aqueous behavior by experiment and modeling. The countercation is of utmost importance to the assembly of these clusters, and Li+ has proven useful for the crystallization of many of the known cluster geometries to date. We present in this paper synthesis and structural characterization of two monomeric lithium uranyl-peroxide salts, Li4[UO2(O2)3]·10H2O (1) and [UO2(O2)3]12[(UO2(OH)4)Li16(H2O)28]3·Li6[H2O]26 (2). They were obtained from aqueous-alcohol solutions rather than the analogous aqueous solutions from which lithium uranyl-peroxide clusters are crystallized. Rapid introduction of the alcohol gives the structure of (1) whereas slow diffusion of alcohol results in crystallization of (2). (2) is an unusual structure featuring uranyl-centered alkali clusters that are linked into ring and spherical arrangements via [UO2(O2)3] anions. Furthermore, partial substitution of Rb or Cs into the synthesis results in formation of (2) with substitution of these larger alkalis into the uranyl-centered clusters. We surmise that the slow crystallization allows for direct bonding of alkali metals to the

  1. New three-dimensional inorganic frameworks based on the uranophane-type sheet in monoamine templated uranyl-vanadates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouffret, Laurent; Shao, Zhenmian; Rivenet, Murielle; Abraham, Francis

    2010-10-01

    Seven new uranyl vanadates with mono-protonated amine or tetramethylammonium used as structure directing cations, (C 2NH 8) 2{[(UO 2)(H 2O)][(UO 2)(VO 4)] 4}·H 2O ( DMetU5V4) (C 2NH 8){[(UO 2)(H 2O) 2][(UO 2)(VO 4)] 3}·H 2O ( DMetU4V3), (C 5NH 6) 2{[(UO 2)(H 2O)][(UO 2)(VO 4)] 4}·H 2O ( PyrU5V4), (C 3NH 10){[(UO 2)(H 2O) 2][(UO 2)(VO 4)] 3}·H 2O ( isoPrU4V3), (N(CH 3) 4){[(UO 2)(H 2O) 2][(UO 2)(VO 4)] 3}·H 2O ( TMetU4V3), (C 6NH 14){[(UO 2)(H 2O) 2][(UO 2)(VO 4)] 3}·H 2O ( CHexU4V3), and (C 4NH 12){[(UO 2)(H 2O)][(UO 2)(VO 4)] 3} ( TButU4V3) were prepared from mild-hydrothermal reactions using dimethylamine, pyridine, isopropylamine, tetramethylammonium hydroxide, cyclohexylamine and tertiobutylamine, respectively, with uranyl nitrate and vanadium oxide in acidic medium. The structures were solved using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. The compounds exhibit three-dimensional uranyl-vanadate inorganic frameworks built from uranophane-type uranyl-vanadate layers pillared by uranyl polyhedra with cavities in between occupied by protonated organic moieties. In the uranyl-vanadate layers the orientations of the vanadate tetrahedra give new geometrical isomers leading to unprecedented pillared systems and new inorganic frameworks with U/V=4/3. Crystallographic data: ( DMetU5V4) orthorhombic, Cmc2 1 space group, a=15.6276(4), b=14.1341(4), c=13.6040(4) Å; ( DMetU4V3) monoclinic, P2 1/ n space group, a=10.2312(4), b=13.5661(7), c=17.5291(7) Å, β=96.966(2); ( PyrU5V4), triclinic, P1 space group, a=9.6981(3), b=9.9966(2), c=10.5523(2) Å, α=117.194(1), β=113.551(1), γ=92.216(1)°; ( isoPrU4V3) monoclinic, P2 1/ n space group, a=10.3507(1), b=13.6500(2), c=17.3035(2) Å, β=97.551(1)°; ( TMetU4V3) orthorhombic, Pbca space group, a=17.1819(2), b=13.6931(1), c=21.4826(2) Å; ( CHexU4V3), triclinic P-1 space group, a=9.8273(6), b=11.0294(7), c=12.7506(8) Å, α=98.461(3), β=96.437(3), γ=105.955(3)°; ( TButU4V3), monoclinic, P2 1/ m space group, a=9

  2. Complex nanoscale cage clusters built from uranyl polyhedra and phosphate tetrahedra

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Daniel K.; Ling, Jie; Qiu, Jie; Pressprich, Laura; Baranay, Melissa; Ward, Matthew; Burns, Peter C.

    2011-06-20

    Five cage clusters that self-assemble in alkaline aqueous solution have been isolated and characterized. Each is built from uranyl hexagonal bipyramids with two or three equatorial edges occupied by peroxide, and three also contain phosphate tetrahedra. These clusters contain 30 uranyl polyhedra; 30 uranyl polyhedra and six pyrophosphate groups; 30 uranyl polyhedra, 12 pyrophosphate groups, and one phosphate tetrahedron; 42 uranyl polyhedra; and 40 uranyl polyhedra and three pyrophosphate groups. These clusters present complex topologies as well as a range of compositions, sizes, and charges. Two adopt fullerene topologies, and the others contain combinations of topological squares, pentagons, and hexagons. An analysis of possible topologies further indicates that higher-symmetry topologies are favored.

  3. Influence of sex and gonadal hormones on rat-liver and carcass lipids during the development of an essential fatty acid deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ostwald, Rosemarie; Bouchard, Pauline; Miljanich, P.; Lyman, R. L.

    1965-01-01

    1. Groups of intact male and female rats and castrated rats injected with oestradiol or testosterone were given a diet containing hydrogenated coconut oil for 9 weeks, and at intervals the amounts and fatty acid compositions of the carcass and liver lipids were determined. 2. Male rats grew faster and larger, and exhibited typical external essential fatty acid deficiency symptoms sooner than did females. Testosterone-treated castrated male rats were similar to males, and oestradiol-injected castrated male rats resembled females. 3. Intact females maintained a higher linoleic acid concentration in their carcass than did males. Total amounts of carcass linoleic acid remained similar for all groups, only 200mg. being removed in 9 weeks regardless of body size. 4. The amounts of total cholesteryl esters were independent of liver size. They were higher in males and testosterone-treated castrated male rats than in females and oestrogen-treated castrated male rats. 5. Phospholipids represented about 80% of the liver lipids. The total amounts of the phospholipid linoleic acid and arachidonic acid were similar for all groups regardless of liver size, and were not affected appreciably by the deficiency. Females and oestrogen-treated castrated male rats maintained a higher proportion of phospholipid arachidonic acid for longer periods than did their male counterparts. Both the total amounts and the proportions of eicosatrienoic acid and palmitic acid were higher in males than in females. 6. Supplementation of the essential fatty acid-deficient diet with linoleic acid caused a rapid loss of eicosatrienoic acid and palmitic acid with a concomitant increase in stearic acid and arachidonic acid. 7. There were no obvious differences in the way that the essential fatty acids were metabolized or mobilized from adipose tissue of male or female rats during essential fatty acid deficiency. 8. The results indicated that the greater growth rate of the male rats caused them to require and

  4. A calorimetric study of the hydrolysis and peroxide complex formation of the uranyl(VI) ion.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2014-02-14

    The enthalpies of reaction for the formation of uranyl(vi) hydroxide {[(UO2)2(OH)2](2+), [(UO2)3(OH)4](2+), [(UO2)3(OH)5](+), [(UO2)3(OH)6](aq), [(UO2)3(OH)7](-), [(UO2)3(OH)8](2-), [(UO2)(OH)3](-), [(UO2)(OH)4](2-)} and peroxide complexes {[UO2(O2)(OH)](-) and [(UO2)2(O2)2(OH)](-)} have been determined from calorimetric titrations at 25 °C in a 0.100 M tetramethyl ammonium nitrate ionic medium. The hydroxide data have been used to test the consistency of the extensive thermodynamic database published by the Nuclear Energy Agency (I. Grenthe, J. Fuger, R. J. M. Konings, R. J. Lemire, A. B. Mueller, C. Nguyen-Trung and H. Wanner, Chemical Thermodynamics of Uranium, North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1992 and R. Guillaumont, T. Fanghänel, J. Fuger, I. Grenthe, V. Neck, D. J. Palmer and M. R. Rand, Update on the Chemical Thermodynamics of Uranium, Neptunium, Plutonium, Americium and Technetium, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2003). A brief discussion is given about a possible structural relationship between the trinuclear complexes [(UO2)3(OH)n](6-n), n = 4-8. PMID:24301256

  5. Uranyl sorption by smectites: spectroscopic assessment of thermodynamic modeling.

    PubMed

    Chisholm-Brause, C J; Berg, J M; Little, K M; Matzner, R A; Morris, D E

    2004-09-15

    Batch sorption experiments and thermodynamic modeling of the interaction of UO2(2+) and its hydrolysis products with two smectitic clay minerals, the reference material SWy-1 [McKinley et al., Clays Clay Miner. 43 (1995) 586] and the soil isolate LK-1 [Turner et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 30 (1996) 3399], have established a conceptual framework for uranyl/smectite surface complexation based on general reactions between aqueous uranyl species and the reactive sites on the mineral surfaces. In this report, we have formulated and spectroscopically tested a set of hypotheses based on this conceptual framework using samples prepared under similar or identical conditions to evaluate the agreement between surface complexation/speciation as enumerated by spectroscopic characterization and that elaborated by the surface complexation model. Both steady-state and time-resolved optical emission spectral data are presented for uranyl on both smectite minerals as well as on the analogue phases SiO2 and Al(OH)3 spanning the pH range from approximately 4 to 8 and the background electrolyte concentrations from approximately 0.001 to 0.1 M. The spectral data enable the explicit identification of an outer-sphere exchange-site population of the hydrated cation [UO2(OH2)5(2+) ] in SWy-1. Spectral data also clearly establish the existence of inner-sphere surface complexes on the analogue phases and on the amphoteric clay crystallite edge sites [aluminol (>Al-OH) and silanol (>Si-OH)]. Based on the spectral characteristics of these uranyl edge-site populations, it is possible to readily infer for the SiO2, Al(OH)3, and SWy-1 samples the evolution in surface speciation with increasing pH to more hydrolyzed uranyl-surface complexes consistent with the conceptual model. The spectral domain characteristics of the edge-site populations on LK-1 with increasing pH suggest that there is no change in the hydrolysis of the uranyl-surface species. However, emission lifetime data are interpreted

  6. Electrochemical uranyl cation biosensor with DNA oligonucleotides as receptor layer.

    PubMed

    Jarczewska, Marta; Ziółkowski, Robert; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2014-04-01

    The present study aims at the further development of the uranyl oligonucleotide-based voltammetric biosensor, which takes advantage of strong interaction between UO2(2+) and phosphate DNA backbone. Herein we report the optimization of working parameters of previously elaborated electrochemical DNA biosensor. It is shown that the sensor sensitivity is highly dependent on the oligonucleotide probe length and the incubation time of sensor in a sample solution. Consequently, the highest sensitivity was obtained for 10-nucleotide sequence and 60 min incubation time. The lower detection limit towards uranyl cation for developed biosensor was 30 nM. The influence of mixed monolayers and the possibility of developing a non-calibration device were also investigated. The selectivity of the proposed biosensor was significantly improved via elimination of adenine nucleobases from the DNA probe. Moreover, the regeneration procedure was elaborated and tested to prolong the use of the same biosensor for 4 subsequent determinations of UO2(2+). PMID:24334186

  7. Photoactivated uranyl ion produces single strand breaks in plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    George, Shannon A; Whittaker, Aaron M; Stearns, Diane M

    2011-11-21

    Uranium is an important emerging toxicant whose use has outpaced the rate at which we are learning about its health effects. One unexplored pathway for uranium toxicity involves the photoactivation of uranyl ion by UV light to produce U(5+) and oxygen radicals. The purpose of this study was to provide proof of principle data by testing the hypothesis that coexposures of DNA to uranyl acetate and UVB irradiation should produce more DNA strand breaks than individual exposures. Results supported the hypothesis and suggest that investigations of uranium toxicity be expanded to include skin as a potential target organ for carcinogenesis, especially in populations with high uranium and high UV radiation exposures. PMID:22013951

  8. Tritium gettering from air with hydrogen uranyl phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P.C.; Uribe, F.S.; Stevens, C.G.; Tsugawa, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUP), a solid proton electrolyte, getters tritium gas and water vapor from air by DC electrical action. We have reduced the formation of residual tritiated water to less than 2%, and demonstrated that HUP can clean a 5.5 m/sup 3/ working glove box. Data are presented to illustrate the parameters of the gettering and a model is derived. Two other tritium gettering electrolytes have been discovered. 9 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Aggregation-induced emission active tetraphenylethene-based sensor for uranyl ion detection.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Huang, Zeng; Hu, Sheng; Li, Shuo; Li, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-11-15

    A novel tetraphenylethene-based fluorescent sensor, TPE-T, was developed for the detection of uranyl ions. The selective binding of TPE-T to uranyl ions resulted in a detectable signal owing to the quenching of its aggregation-induced emission. The developed sensor could be used to visually distinguish UO2(2+) from lanthanides, transition metals, and alkali metals under UV light; the presence of other metal ions did not interfere with the detection of uranyl ions. In addition, TPE-T was successfully used for the detection of uranyl ions in river water, illustrating its potential applications in environmental systems. PMID:27439180

  10. Incorporation of Cerium and Neodymium in Uranyl Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C W.; Wronkiewicz, David J.; Finch, R J.; Buck, Edgar C.

    2006-07-15

    The potential for incorporating rare earth elements (REE) into/onto crystalline compounds has been evaluated by precipitating uranyl phases from aqueous solutions containing either cerium or neodymium. These REEs serve both as monitors for evaluating the potential repository behavior of REE radionuclides, and as surrogate elements for actinides (e.g., Ce4 and Nd3 for Pu4 and Am3, respectively). The present experiments examined the behavior of REE in the presence of ianthinite Formula Not Shown, becquerelite (Ca(UO2)6O4(OH)6(H2O)8), and other uranyl hydroxide compounds commonly noted as alteration products during the corrosion of UO2, spent nuclear fuel, and naturally occurring uraninite. The results of these experiments demonstrate that significant quantities of both cerium (Kd=1020) and neodymium (Kd=840) are incorporated within the uranium alteration phases and suggest that ionic substitution and/or adsorption to the uranyl phases can play a key role in the limiting the mobility of REE (and by analogy, actinide elements) in a nuclear waste repository.

  11. How are Centrosymmetric and Noncentrosymmetric Structures Achieved in Uranyl Borates?

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2010-03-15

    Four uranyl borates, UO{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 4} (UBO-1), α-(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}[B{sub 9}O{sub 14}(OH){sub 4}] (UBO-2), β-(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}[B{sub 9}O{sub 14}(OH){sub 4}] (UBO-3), and (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}[B{sub 13}O{sub 20}(OH){sub 3}]·1.25H{sub 2}O (UBO-4), have been prepared from boric acid fluxes at 190 °C. UBO-3 and UBO-4 are centrosymmetric, whereas UBO-1 and UBO-2 are noncentrosymmetric (chiral and polar). These uranyl borates possess layered structures constructed from UO{sub 8} hexagonal bipyramids, BO{sub 3} triangles, and BO{sub 4} tetrahedra. In the case of UBO-4, clusters of BO{sub 3} triangles link the layers together to form open slabs with a thickness of almost 2 nm. The ability of uranyl borates to use very similar layers to yield both centrosymmetric and noncentrosymmetric layers is detailed in this work.

  12. Structural Phase Transitions and Water Dynamics in Uranyl Fluoride Hydrates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miskowiec, Andrew J.; Kirkegaard, Marie C.; Huq, Ashfia; Mamontov, Eugene; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Trowbridge, Lee D.; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Anderson, Brian B.

    2015-11-17

    We report a novel production method for uranium oxy uoride [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7] 4H2O, referred to as structure D. Structure D is produced as a product of hydrating anhydrous uranyl uoride, UO2F2, through the gas phase at ambient temperatures fol- lowed by desiccation by equilibration with a dry environment. We follow the structure of [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7] 4H2O through an intermediate, liquid-like phase, wherein the coordination number of the uranyl ion is reduced to 5 (from 6 in the anhydrous struc- ture), and a water molecule binds as an equatorial ligand to the uranyl ion. Quasielas- tic neutron scattering results compare well with previousmore » measurements of mineral hydrates. The two groups of structurally distinct water molecules in D perform re- stricted motion on a length scale commensurate with the O{H bond (r = 0.92 A). The more tightly bound equatorial ligand waters rotate slower (Dr = 2.2 ps-1) than their hydrogen-bonded partners (Dr = 28.7 ps-1).« less

  13. Electroluminescence cells based on the lamellar solid hydrogen uranyl phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckmann, G.R.,; Ellis, A.B.; Hellstrom, E.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Electroluminescence (EL) cells have been constructed with the layered, ionically conducting solid, hydrogen uranyl phosphate, HUO{sub 2}PO{sub 4} {center dot} 4H{sub 2}O (HUP), as the emissive medium. With ac excitation, both uranyl emission and molecular nitrogen plasma emission are observed, with the latter appearing to excite the former; the uranyl EL spectrum matches the photoluminescence spectrum of the solid. Similar results were obtained with fully substituted sodium (NaUP), magnesium (Mg{sub 0.5}UP), and pyridinium (pyHUP) derivatives of HUP. For all of these solids, the dependence of the EL intensity on sample thickness, ac frequency, and applied voltage has been determined. Typical operating conditions are 1.5--3.0 kV at 0.2--4 kHz. Impedance measurements permitted acquisition of dielectric constants and ionic conductivities for these solids, both of which decrease in the order HUP {gt} NaUP {gt} Mg{sub 0.5}UP {gt} pyHUP. A model describing the dependence of EL intensity on cell parameters is presented.

  14. Variable Denticity in Carboxylate Binding to the Uranyl Coordination Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Groenewold; W. A. de Jong; J. Oomens; M. J. van Stipdonk

    2010-05-01

    Tris-carboxylate complexes of the uranyl [UO2]2+ cation with acetate and benzoate were generated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and then isolated in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Wavelength-selective infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) of the tris-acetatouranyl anion resulted in a redox elimination of an acetate radical, which was used to generate an IR spectrum that consisted of six prominent absorption bands. These were interpreted with the aid of density functional theory calculations in terms of a symmetric and antisymmetric –CO2 stretches of both the monodentate and bidentate acetate, CH3 bending and umbrella vibrations, and a uranyl OUO asymmetric stretch. The comparison of the calculated and measured IR spectra indicated that the tris-acetate complex contained two acetate ligands bound in a bidentate fashion, while the third acetate was monodentate. In similar fashion, the tris-benzoate uranyl anion was formed and photodissociated by loss of a benzoate radical, enabling measurement of the infrared spectrum that was in close agreement with that calculated for a structure containing one monodentate, and two bidentate benzoate ligand.

  15. Structural Phase Transitions and Water Dynamics in Uranyl Fluoride Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Miskowiec, Andrew; Kirkegaard, Marie C; Huq, Ashfia; Mamontov, Eugene; Herwig, Kenneth W; Trowbridge, Lee; Rondinone, Adam; Anderson, Brian

    2015-12-10

    We report a novel production method for uranium oxyfluoride [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7]·4H2O, referred to as structure D. Structure D is produced as a product of hydrating anhydrous uranyl fluoride, UO2F2, through the gas phase at ambient temperatures followed by desiccation by equilibration with a dry environment. We follow the structure of [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7]·4H2O through an intermediate, liquid-like phase, wherein the coordination number of the uranyl ion is reduced to 5 (from 6 in the anhydrous structure), and a water molecule binds as an equatorial ligand to the uranyl ion. Quasielastic neutron scattering results compare well with previous measurements of mineral hydrates. The two groups of structurally distinct water molecules in D perform restricted motion on a length scale commensurate with the O-H bond (r = 0.92 Å). The more tightly bound equatorial ligand waters rotate slower (Dr = 2.2 ps(-1)) than their hydrogen-bonded partners (Dr = 28.7 ps(-1)). PMID:26575434

  16. Predicting Stability Constants for Uranyl Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin P.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.

    2015-04-02

    The ability to predict the equilibrium constants for the formation of 1:1 uranyl:ligand complexes (log K1 values) provides the essential foundation for the rational design of ligands with enhanced uranyl affinity and selectivity. We also use density functional theory (B3LYP) and the IEFPCM continuum solvation model to compute aqueous stability constants for UO22+ complexes with 18 donor ligands. Theoretical calculations permit reasonably good estimates of relative binding strengths, while the absolute log K1 values are significantly overestimated. Accurate predictions of the absolute log K1 values (root mean square deviation from experiment < 1.0 for log K1 values ranging from 0 to 16.8) can be obtained by fitting the experimental data for two groups of mono and divalent negative oxygen donor ligands. The utility of correlations is demonstrated for amidoxime and imide dioxime ligands, providing a useful means of screening for new ligands with strong chelate capability to uranyl.

  17. Predicting Stability Constants for Uranyl Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin P.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.

    2015-04-02

    The ability to predict the equilibrium constants for the formation of 1:1 uranyl:ligand complexes (log K1 values) provides the essential foundation for the rational design of ligands with enhanced uranyl affinity and selectivity. We also use density functional theory (B3LYP) and the IEFPCM continuum solvation model to compute aqueous stability constants for UO22+ complexes with 18 donor ligands. Theoretical calculations permit reasonably good estimates of relative binding strengths, while the absolute log K1 values are significantly overestimated. Accurate predictions of the absolute log K1 values (root mean square deviation from experiment < 1.0 for log K1 values ranging from 0more » to 16.8) can be obtained by fitting the experimental data for two groups of mono and divalent negative oxygen donor ligands. The utility of correlations is demonstrated for amidoxime and imide dioxime ligands, providing a useful means of screening for new ligands with strong chelate capability to uranyl.« less

  18. Structural Phase Transitions and Water Dynamics in Uranyl Fluoride Hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Miskowiec, Andrew J.; Kirkegaard, Marie C.; Huq, Ashfia; Mamontov, Eugene; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Trowbridge, Lee D.; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Anderson, Brian B.

    2015-11-17

    We report a novel production method for uranium oxy uoride [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7] 4H2O, referred to as structure D. Structure D is produced as a product of hydrating anhydrous uranyl uoride, UO2F2, through the gas phase at ambient temperatures fol- lowed by desiccation by equilibration with a dry environment. We follow the structure of [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7] 4H2O through an intermediate, liquid-like phase, wherein the coordination number of the uranyl ion is reduced to 5 (from 6 in the anhydrous struc- ture), and a water molecule binds as an equatorial ligand to the uranyl ion. Quasielas- tic neutron scattering results compare well with previous measurements of mineral hydrates. The two groups of structurally distinct water molecules in D perform re- stricted motion on a length scale commensurate with the O{H bond (r = 0.92 A). The more tightly bound equatorial ligand waters rotate slower (Dr = 2.2 ps-1) than their hydrogen-bonded partners (Dr = 28.7 ps-1).

  19. Predicting stability constants for uranyl complexes using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin P; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S

    2015-04-20

    The ability to predict the equilibrium constants for the formation of 1:1 uranyl/ligand complexes (log K1 values) provides the essential foundation for the rational design of ligands with enhanced uranyl affinity and selectivity. We use density functional theory (B3LYP) and the integral equation formalism polarizable continuum model (IEF-PCM) to compute aqueous stability constants for UO2(2+) complexes with 18 donor ligands. Theoretical calculations permit reasonably good estimates of relative binding strengths, while the absolute log K1 values are significantly overestimated. Accurate predictions of the absolute log K1 values (root-mean-square deviation from experiment <1.0 for log K1 values ranging from 0 to 16.8) can be obtained by fitting the experimental data for two groups of mono- and divalent negative oxygen donor ligands. The utility of correlations is demonstrated for amidoxime and imide dioxime ligands, providing a useful means of screening for new ligands with strong chelating capability to uranyl. PMID:25835578

  20. Structure and bonding in crystalline cesium uranyl tetrachloride under pressure.

    PubMed

    Osman, Hussien H; Pertierra, Pilar; Salvadó, Miguel A; Izquierdo-Ruiz, F; Recio, J M

    2016-07-21

    A thorough investigation of pressure effects on the structural properties of crystalline cesium uranyl chloride was performed by means of first-principles calculations within the density functional theory framework. Total energies, equilibrium geometries and vibrational frequencies were computed at selected pressures up to 50 GPa. Zero pressure results present good agreement with available experimental and theoretical data. Our calculated equation of state parameters reveal that Cs2UO2Cl4 is a high compressible material, similar to other ionic compounds with cesium cations, and displays a structural anisotropic behavior guided by the uranyl moiety. An unexpected variation of the U-O bond length, dUO, is detected as pressure is applied. It leads to a dUO-stretching frequency relationship that cannot be described by the traditional Badger's rule. Interestingly enough, it can be explained in terms of a change in the main factor controlling dUO. At low pressure, the charge transferred to the uranyl cation induces an increase of the bond length and a red shift of the stretching frequencies, whereas it is the mechanical effect of the applied pressure above 10 GPa that is the dominant factor that leads to a shortening of dUO and a blue shift of the stretching frequencies. PMID:27340008

  1. Electron transfer dissociation of dipositive uranyl and plutonyl coordination complexes.

    PubMed

    Rios, Daniel; Rutkowski, Philip X; Shuh, David K; Bray, Travis H; Gibson, John K; Van Stipdonk, Michael J

    2011-12-01

    Reported here is a comparison of electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) of solvent-coordinated dipositive uranyl and plutonyl ions generated by electrospray ionization. Fundamental differences between the ETD and CID processes are apparent, as are differences between the intrinsic chemistries of uranyl and plutonyl. Reduction of both charge and oxidation state, which is inherent in ETD activation of [An(VI) O(2) (CH(3) COCH(3) )(4) ](2+) , [An(VI) O(2) (CH(3) CN)(4) ](2) , [U(VI) O(2) (CH(3) COCH(3) )(5) ](2+) and [U(VI) O(2) (CH(3) CN)(5) ](2+) (An = U or Pu), is accompanied by ligand loss. Resulting low-coordinate uranyl(V) complexes add O(2) , whereas plutonyl(V) complexes do not. In contrast, CID of the same complexes generates predominantly doubly-charged products through loss of coordinating ligands. Singly-charged CID products of [U(VI) O(2) (CH(3) COCH(3) )(4,5) ](2+) , [U(VI) O(2) (CH(3) CN)(4,5) ](2+) and [Pu(VI) O(2) (CH(3) CN)(4) ](2+) retain the hexavalent metal oxidation state with the addition of hydroxide or acetone enolate anion ligands. However, CID of [Pu(VI) O(2) (CH(3) COCH(3) )(4) ](2+) generates monopositive plutonyl(V) complexes, reflecting relatively more facile reduction of Pu(VI) to Pu(V). PMID:22223415

  2. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products...

  3. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products...

  4. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products...

  5. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products...

  6. Cylodextrin Polymer Nitrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosowski, Bernard; Ruebner, Anja; Statton, Gary; Robitelle, Danielle; Meyers, Curtis

    2000-01-01

    The development of the use of cyclodextrin nitrates as possible components of insensitive, high-energy energetics is outlined over a time period of 12 years. Four different types of cyclodextrin polymers were synthesized, nitrated, and evaluated regarding their potential use for the military and aerospace community. The synthesis of these novel cyclodextrin polymers and different nitration techniques are shown and the potential of these new materials is discussed.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of uranyl chromate sheet compounds containing edge-sharing dimers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Daniel K.; Baranay, Michelle; Pressprich, Laura; Stoffer, Megan; Burns, Peter C.

    2012-02-15

    Eight uranyl chromates have been crystallized from aqueous solution and characterized: Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}](H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (1), (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}](H{sub 2}O){sub 3}, Rb{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}](H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (3), Cs[(UO{sub 2})(CrO{sub 4})(OH)]H{sub 2}O (4), Rb[(UO{sub 2})(CrO{sub 4})(OH)]H{sub 2}O (5) Co(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}(Co(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}](H{sub 2}O){sub 4} (6), Li{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 3}](H{sub 2}O){sub 7} (7), and Zn(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 3}](H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (8). The structural units of 1 through 8 each consist of a sheet of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and (Cr(VI)O{sub 4}){sup 2-} tetrahedra. In each case two uranyl pentagonal bipyramids share an equatorial edge, giving a dimer that is linked into the sheet through vertex sharing with (Cr(VI)O{sub 4}){sup 2-} tetrahedra. The sheets are based upon three distinct sheet anion topologies, and the sheets based on a given anion topology can differ in the orientations of the non-bridging O atoms of (CrO{sub 4}){sup 2-} tetrahedra. The interlayers of these compounds contain either monovalent or divalent cations, as well as H{sub 2}O groups that are either bonded to the interlayer cation or are held in place by H bonding only. We explore the relationships between sheet topologies and interlayer configuration in these compounds. - Graphical abstract: Eight uranyl chromate compounds containing sheet structural units built from uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and (CrO{sub 4}){sup 2-} tetrahedra are reported. Relationships between sheet topologies and interstitial constituents is examined. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight uranyl Cr(VI) compounds with sheet structural units are reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Relationships between the topology of the uranyl

  8. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOEpatents

    Cox, John L.; Hallen, Richard T.; Lilga, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrates present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  9. Field determination of nitrate using nitrate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, E.R.; Corrigan, J.S.; Campbell, W.H.

    1997-12-31

    Nitrate is routinely measured in a variety of substrates - water, tissues, soils, and foods - both in the field and in laboratory settings. The most commonly used nitrate test methods involve the reduction of nitrate to nitrite via a copper-cadmium reagent, followed by reaction of the nitrite with the Griess dye reagents. The resulting color is translated into a nitrate concentration by comparison with a calibrated color chart or comparator, or by reading the absorbance in a spectrophotometer. This basic method is reliable and sufficiently sensitive for many applications. However, the cadmium reagent is quite toxic. The trend today is for continued increase in concern for worker health and safety; in addition, there are increasing costs and logistical problems associated with regulatory constraints on transport and disposal of hazardous materials. Some suppliers have substituted a zinc-based reagent powder for the cadmium in an effort to reduce toxicity. We describe here an enzyme-based nitrate detection method as an improvement on the basic Griess method that demonstrates equal or superior sensitivity, superior selectivity, and is more environmentally benign. Comparisons between the enzyme-based method and some standard field test kits being used today are made.

  10. Polarity and Chirality in Uranyl Borates: Insights into Understanding the Vitrification of Nuclear Waste and the Development of Nonlinear Optical Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Ling, Jie; Liu, Guokui; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2010-03-23

    Four new sodium uranyl borates, α-Na[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 15}(OH){sub 5})] (NaUBO-1), β-Na[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 15}(OH){sub 5}] (NaUBO-2), Na[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 15}(OH){sub 5}]·3H{sub 2}O (NaUBO-3), and Na[(UO{sub 2})B{sub 6}O{sub 10}(OH)]·2H{sub 2}O (NaUBO-4), and four new thallium uranyl borates, α-Tl{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 11}O{sub 18}(OH){sub 3}] (TlUBO-1), β-Tl{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 11}O{sub 18}(OH){sub 3}] (TlUBO-2), Tl[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 3}] (TlUBO-3), and Tl{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 11}O{sub 19}(OH)] (TlUBO-4), have been prepared via the reaction of sodium nitrate or thallium nitrate, uranyl nitrate, and excess boric acid at 190 °C. These compounds share a common structural motif consisting of a linear uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, cation surrounded by BO{sub 3} triangles and BO{sub 4} tetrahedra to create a UO{sub 8} hexagonal bipyramidal environment around uranium. The borate anions bridge between uranyl units to create sheets. Additional BO{sub 3} triangles extend from the polyborate layers and are directed approximately perpendicular to the sheets. In some compounds, these units can link the layers together to yield three-dimensional networks with large pores to house the Na{sup +} or Tl{sup+} cations and water molecules. The structures are all noncentrosymmetric and are either polar or chiral. While the uranyl borate layers are noncentrosymmetric in and of themselves, there is also twisting of the interlayer BO{sub 3} groups to reduce the interlayer spacing, producing helical features in some structures. Na[(UO{sub 2})B{sub 6}O{sub 10}(OH)]·2H{sub 2}O and β-Tl{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 11}O{sub 18}(OH){sub 3}], which can be obtained as pure phases, display second-harmonic generation of 532 nm light from 1064 nm light.

  11. Enhanced environmental detection of uranyl compounds based on luminescence characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Jean Dennis

    Uranium (U) contamination can be introduced to the environment as a result of mining and manufacturing activities related to nuclear power, detonation of U-containing munitions (DoD), or nuclear weapons production/processing (DOE facilities). In oxidizing environments such as surface soils, U predominantly exists as U(VI), which is highly water soluble and very mobile in soils. U(VI) compounds typically contain the UO22+ group (uranyl compounds). The uniquely structured and long-lived green luminescence (fluorescence) of the uranyl ion (under UV radiation) has been studied and remained a strong topic of interest for two centuries. The presented research is distinct in its objective of improving capabilities for remotely sensing U contamination by understanding what environmental conditions are ideal for detection and need to be taken into consideration. Specific focuses include: (1) the accumulation and fluorescence enhancement of uranyl compounds at soil surfaces using distributed silica gel, and (2) environmental factors capable of influencing the luminescence response, directly or indirectly. In a complex environmental system, matrix effects co-exist from key soil parameters including moisture content (affected by evaporation, temperature and humidity), soil texture, pH, CEC, organic matter and iron content. Chapter 1 is a review of pertinent background information and provides justification for the selected key environmental parameters. Chapter 2 presents empirical investigations related to the fluorescence detection and characterization of uranyl compounds in soil and aqueous samples. An integrative experimental design was employed, testing different soils, generating steady-state fluorescence spectra, and building a comprehensive dataset which was then utilized to simultaneously test three hypotheses: The fluorescence detection of uranyl compounds is dependent upon (1) the key soil parameters, (2) the concentration of U contamination, and (3) time of analysis

  12. Uranyl Ion Complexes with 1,1'-Biphenyl-2,2',6,6'-tetracarboxylic Acid: Structural and Spectroscopic Studies of One- to Three-Dimensional Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Thuéry, Pierre; Harrowfield, Jack

    2015-07-01

    1,1'-Biphenyl-2,2',6,6'-tetracarboxylic acid (H4L) was reacted with uranyl nitrate, either alone or in the presence of additional metal cations (Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Dy(3+)) under (solvo)-hydrothermal conditions, giving six complexes which were characterized by their crystal structure and, in all but one case, their emission spectrum in the solid state. [Ni(bipy)3][UO2(H2L)(H2O)]2(NO3)2·3H2O (1) crystallizes as a one-dimensional (1D), ribbon-like coordination polymer, while the homometallic complex [(UO2)2(L)(H2O)3]·H2O·CH3CN (2) and the heterometallic complexes [UO2Cu(L)(H2O)2]·H2O (3), [UO2Cu(L)(H2O)]·H2O (4), and [(UO2)5Cu4(HL)6(bipy)4]·2H2O (5) display two-dimensional (2D) arrangements. Lastly, the uranyl-lanthanide heterometallic complex [(UO2)8Dy(HL)6(H2O)8](I)·8H2O (6) crystallizes as a three-dimensional (3D) framework. Although these assemblies adopt different topologies, the {4(2).6} linear motif found in 1 is discernible in the structures of 2, 5, and 6, in which the higher dimensionality arises from further bridging of these subunits by uranyl (2), copper (5), or both uranyl and dysprosium (6) cations. The tetracarboxylic/ate ligands have their two aromatic rings nearly perpendicular to one another. No two of them adopt the same coordination mode in this series (except in the similar complexes 3 and 4), but chelation involving one carboxylate group from each ring is nearly ubiquitous, and the ensuing position of the cation favors the formation of planar architectures. The emission spectra of complexes 2-5 measured in the solid state show the usual uranyl vibronic fine structure, although with significant differences in the emission intensity, while complete quenching of the luminescence is observed in 1. PMID:26102315

  13. ARRAYS OF BOTTLES OF PLUTONIUM NITRATE SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-09-01

    In October and November of 1981 thirteen approaches-to-critical were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas® reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were sponsored by Rockwell Hanford Operations because of the lack of experimental data on the criticality of arrays of bottles of Pu solution such as might be found in storage and handling at the Purex Facility at Hanford. The results of these experiments were used “to provide benchmark data to validate calculational codes used in criticality safety assessments of [the] plant configurations” (Ref. 1). Data for this evaluation were collected from the published report (Ref. 1), the approach to critical logbook, the experimenter’s logbook, and communication with the primary experimenter, B. Michael Durst. Of the 13 experiments preformed 10 were evaluated. One of the experiments was not evaluated because it had been thrown out by the experimenter, one was not evaluated because it was a repeat of another experiment and the third was not evaluated because it reported the critical number of bottles as being greater than 25. Seven of the thirteen evaluated experiments were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments. A similar experiment using uranyl nitrate was benchmarked as U233-SOL-THERM-014.

  14. Silver Ion-Mediated Heterometallic Three-Fold Interpenetrating Uranyl-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Mei, Lei; Wu, Qun-yan; An, Shu-wen; Gao, Zeng-qiang; Chai, Zhi-fang; Shi, Wei-qun

    2015-11-16

    A unique case of a uranyl-silver heterometallic 3-fold interpenetrating network (U-Ag-2,6-DCPCA) from a multifunctionalized organic ligand, 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid, in the presence of uranyl and silver ions is reported. It is the first report of a heterometallic uranyl-organic interpenetrating network or framework. Notably, a (4,4)-connected uranyl building unit in U-Ag-2,6-DCPCA, which is available through combined influences of structural halogenation and silver ion additive on uranyl coordination, plays a vital role in the formation of a 3-fold interpenetrating network. Halogen substitution effectively changes structural features and coordination behaviors of isonicotinate ligand and contributes to the control of uranyl coordination. Meanwhile, it exerts influence on the stabilization of 3-fold interpenetrating networks by halogen-halogen interactions. Theoretical calculation suggests that the silver ion should mainly serve as an inductive factor of uranyl species through strong Ag-N binding affinity, directly leading to the formation of a (4,4)-connected uranyl building unit and finally a heterometallic 3-fold interpenetrating network. Related experimental results, especially an interesting postsynthetic metalation, afford further evidence of this induction effect. PMID:26491817

  15. A protein engineered to bind uranyl selectively and with femtomolar affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lu; Bosscher, Mike; Zhang, Changsheng; Özçubukçu, Salih; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Wen; Li, Charles J.; Liu, Jianzhao; Jensen, Mark P.; Lai, Luhua; He, Chuan

    2014-03-01

    Uranyl (UO22+), the predominant aerobic form of uranium, is present in the ocean at a concentration of ~3.2 parts per 109 (13.7 nM) however, the successful enrichment of uranyl from this vast resource has been limited by the high concentrations of metal ions of similar size and charge, which makes it difficult to design a binding motif that is selective for uranyl. Here we report the design and rational development of a uranyl-binding protein using a computational screening process in the initial search for potential uranyl-binding sites. The engineered protein is thermally stable and offers very high affinity and selectivity for uranyl with a Kd of 7.4 femtomolar (fM) and >10,000-fold selectivity over other metal ions. We also demonstrated that the uranyl-binding protein can repeatedly sequester 30-60% of the uranyl in synthetic sea water. The chemical strategy employed here may be applied to engineer other selective metal-binding proteins for biotechnology and remediation applications.

  16. A protein engineered to bind uranyl selectively and with femtomolar affinity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lu; Bosscher, Mike; Zhang, Changsheng; Ozçubukçu, Salih; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Wen; Li, Charles J; Liu, Jianzhao; Jensen, Mark P; Lai, Luhua; He, Chuan

    2014-03-01

    Uranyl (UO2(2+)), the predominant aerobic form of uranium, is present in the ocean at a concentration of ~3.2 parts per 10(9) (13.7 nM); however, the successful enrichment of uranyl from this vast resource has been limited by the high concentrations of metal ions of similar size and charge, which makes it difficult to design a binding motif that is selective for uranyl. Here we report the design and rational development of a uranyl-binding protein using a computational screening process in the initial search for potential uranyl-binding sites. The engineered protein is thermally stable and offers very high affinity and selectivity for uranyl with a Kd of 7.4 femtomolar (fM) and >10,000-fold selectivity over other metal ions. We also demonstrated that the uranyl-binding protein can repeatedly sequester 30-60% of the uranyl in synthetic sea water. The chemical strategy employed here may be applied to engineer other selective metal-binding proteins for biotechnology and remediation applications. PMID:24557139

  17. SERS detection of uranyl using functionalized gold nanostars promoted by nanoparticle shape and size.

    PubMed

    Lu, Grace; Forbes, Tori Z; Haes, Amanda J

    2016-08-15

    The radius of curvature of gold (Au) nanostar tips but not the overall particle dimensions can be used for understanding the large and quantitative surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal of the uranyl (UO2)(2+) moiety. The engineered roughness of the Au nanostar architecture and the distance between the gold surface and uranyl cations are promoted using carboxylic acid terminated alkanethiols containing 2, 5, and 10 methylene groups. By systematically varying the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) thickness with these molecules, the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectral properties are used to quantify the SAM layer thickness and to promote uranyl coordination to the Au nanostars in neutral aqueous solutions. Successful uranyl detection is demonstrated for all three functionalized Au nanostar samples as indicated by enhanced signals and red-shifts in the symmetric U(vi)-O stretch. Quantitative uranyl detection is achieved by evaluating the integrated area of these bands in the uranyl fingerprint window. By varying the concentration of uranyl, similar free energies of adsorption are observed for the three carboxylic acid terminated functionalized Au nanostar samples indicating similar coordination to uranyl, but the SERS signals scale inversely with the alkanethiol layer thickness. This distance dependence follows previously established models assuming that roughness features associated with the radius of curvature of the tips are considered. These results indicate that SERS signals using functionalized Au nanostar substrates can provide quantitative detection of small molecules and that the tip architecture plays an important role in understanding the resulting SERS intensities. PMID:27326897

  18. A Mixed-Method Study to Determine the Benefits of Periconceptional Folic Acid Supplementation and Effects of Folic Acid Deficiency in Mothers on Birth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Gudlavalleti Venkata S; Kolli, Sunanda Reddy; Neogi, Sutapa B; Singh, Samiksha; John, Neena; N., Srinivas; Ramani, Sudha; Shamanna, BR; Doyle, Pat; Kinra, Sanjay; Ness, Andy; Pallepogula, Dinesh Raj; Pant, Hira B; Babbar, Smiksha; Reddy, Raghunath; Singh, Rachna

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence from high income countries shows mothers who are supplemented with folic acid in their periconceptional period and early pregnancy have significantly reduced adverse outcomes like birth defects. However, in India there is a paucity of data on association of birth defects and folic acid supplementation. We identified a few important questions to be answered using separate scientific methods and then planned to triangulate the information. Objective In this paper, we describe the protocol of our study that aims to determine the association of folic acid and pregnancy outcomes like neural tube defects (NTDs) and orofacial clefts (OFCs). We decided to fill the gaps in knowledge from India to determine public health consequences of folic acid deficiency and factors influencing dietary and periconceptional consumption of folic acid. Methods The proposed study will be carried out in five stages and will examine the questions related to folic acid deficiency across selected locations in South and North India. The study will be carried out over a period of 4 years through the hierarchical evidence-based approach. At first a systematic review was conducted to pool the current birth prevalence of NTDs and orofacial clefts OFCs in India. To investigate the population prevalence, we plan to use the key informant method to determine prevalence of NTDs and OFCs. To determine the normal serum estimates of folic acid, iron, and vitamin B12 among Indian women (15-35 years), we will conduct a population-based, cross-sectional study. We will further strengthen the evidence of association between OFCs and folic acid by conducting a hospital-based, case-control study across three locations of India. Lastly, using qualitative methods we will understand community and health workers perspective on factors that decide the intake of folic acid supplements. Results This study will provide evidence on the community prevalence of birth defects and prevalence folic acid and

  19. Raman spectroscopic and ESI-MS characterization of uranyl peroxide cage clusters.

    PubMed

    McGrail, Brendan T; Sigmon, Ginger E; Jouffret, Laurent J; Andrews, Christopher R; Burns, Peter C

    2014-02-01

    Strategies for interpreting mass spectrometric and Raman spectroscopic data have been developed to study the structure and reactivity of uranyl peroxide cage clusters in aqueous solution. We demonstrate the efficacy of these methods using the three best-characterized uranyl peroxide clusters, {U24}, {U28}, and {U60}. Specifically, we show a correlation between uranyl-peroxo-uranyl dihedral bond angles and the position of the Raman band of the symmetric stretching mode of the peroxo ligand, develop methods for the assignment of the ESI mass spectra of uranyl peroxide cage clusters, and show that these methods are generally applicable for detecting these clusters in the solid state and solution and for extracting information about their bonding and composition without crystallization. PMID:24422479

  20. Effects of aqueous uranyl speciation on the kinetics of microbial uranium reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, Keaton M.; DiChristina, Thomas J.; Van Cappellen, Philippe; Taillefert, Martial

    2015-05-01

    The ability to predict the success of the microbial reduction of soluble U(VI) to highly insoluble U(IV) as an in situ bioremediation strategy is complicated by the wide range of geochemical conditions at contaminated sites and the strong influence of aqueous uranyl speciation on the bioavailability and toxicity of U(VI) to metal-reducing bacteria. To determine the effects of aqueous uranyl speciation on uranium bioreduction kinetics, incubations and viability assays with Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 were conducted over a range of pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), Ca2+, and Mg2+ concentrations. A speciation-dependent kinetic model was developed to reproduce the observed time series of total dissolved uranium concentration over the range of geochemical conditions tested. The kinetic model yielded the highest rate constant for the reduction of uranyl non-carbonate species (i.e., the 'free' hydrated uranyl ion, uranyl hydroxides, and other minor uranyl complexes), indicating that they represent the most readily reducible fraction of U(VI) despite being the least abundant uranyl species in solution. The presence of DIC, Ca2+, and Mg2+ suppressed the formation of more bioavailable uranyl non-carbonate species and resulted in slower bioreduction rates. At high concentrations of bioavailable U(VI), however, uranium toxicity to S. putrefaciens inhibited bioreduction, and viability assays confirmed that the concentration of non-carbonate uranyl species best predicts the degree of toxicity. The effect of uranium toxicity was accounted for by incorporating the free ion activity model of metal toxicity into the bioreduction rate law. Overall, these results demonstrate that, in the absence of competing terminal electron acceptors, uranium bioreduction kinetics can be predicted over a wide range of geochemical conditions based on the bioavailability and toxicity imparted on U(VI) by solution composition. These findings also imply that the concentration of uranyl non

  1. Conversion of actinide and RE oxides into nitrates and their recovery into fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Bondin, V.V.; Bychkov, S.I.; Efremov, I.G.; Revenko, Y.A.; Babain, V.A.; Murzin, A.A.; Romanovsky, V.N; Fedorov, Y.S.; Shadrin, A.Y.; Ryabkova, N.V.; Li, E.N.

    2007-07-01

    The conditions for uranium oxides completely convert into uranyl nitrate hexahydrate in nitrogen tetra-oxide media (75 deg. C, 0,5-3,0 MPa, [UO{sub x}]:[H{sub 2}O]:[NO{sub 2}]=1:8:6) were found out. The conversion of Pu contained simulator of oxide spent nuclear fuel of thermal reactors was successfully demonstrated. The possibility of uranium recovery up to 95% from TR SNF without plutonium separation from FP is practically showed, what corresponds with Non-proliferation Treaty. (authors)

  2. Crystal Structures of Three Framework Alkali Metal Uranyl Phosphate Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locock, Andrew J.; Burns, Peter C.

    2002-08-01

    Three homeotypic hydrated alkali metal uranyl phosphates, A2(UO 2)[(UO 2)(PO 4)] 4(H 2O) 2, A=Cs ( CsUP), Rb ( RbUP), K ( KUP), were synthesized by hydrothermal methods. Intensity data were collected at room temperature using Mo Kα radiation and a CCD-based area detector. Their crystal structures were solved by Patterson ( CsUP) and direct ( RbUP, KUP) methods and refined by full-matrix least-squares techniques to agreement indices ( CsUP, RbUP, KUP) w R2=0.048, 0.230, 0.072 for all data, and R1=0.023, 0.078, 0.038 calculated for 5338, 4738, 4514 unique observed reflections (∣ Fo∣≥4 σF), respectively. The compound CsUP is orthorhombic, space group Cmc2 1, Z=4, a=14.854(1), b=13.879(1), c=12.987(1) Å, V=2677.5(3) Å 3. Both RbUP and KUP are monoclinic, space group Cm, but are presented in the unconventional pseudo-orthorhombic space group Fm11 to facilitate comparison with CsUP and to allow a model for RbUP that includes the effects of pseudo-merohedral twinning. RbUP is monoclinic, space group Fm11, Z=4, a=15.72(2), b=13.84(1), c=13.05(1) Å, α=90.39°(2), V=2839(5) Å 3; KUP is monoclinic, space group Fm11, Z=4, a=15.257(1), b=13.831(1), c=13.007(1) Å, α=91.760°(1), V=2743.4(3) Å 3. The structures consist of sheets of phosphate tetrahedra and uranyl pentagonal bipyramids, with composition [(UO 2)(PO 4)] -, that are topologically identical to the uranyl silicate sheets in uranophane-beta. These sheets are connected by a uranyl pentagonal bipyramid in the interlayer that shares corners with two phosphate tetrahedra on each of two adjacent sheets and whose fifth equatorial vertex is an H 2O group, resulting in an open framework with alkali metal cations in the larger cavities of the structures. Where CsUP and RbUP have two alkali metal positions and a H 2O group in these cavities, KUP has four K atoms and two H 2O groups, all of which are partially occupied, in the interstitial sites.

  3. Spectroscopy and Photochemistry in Single Crystals of Uranyl Formate Monohydrate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Jack Neal

    1982-03-01

    UO(,2)CH(OO)(,2)(.)H(,2)O, (UFM) is an orthorhombic crystal (Fdd2, C(,2v)('19)) with two uranyls per unit cell. Above 210(DEGREES)K, when uranyl is excited by visible light, a two-step reaction occurs. The primary photochemical step is. U(VI)O(,2)('++) + HCOO('-) (--->) U(V) + (HCOO(.) or CO(,2)('-)). (1). A study of UFM in the oriented solid explores one of the most basic chemical reactions--the redox reaction. High resolution, polarized absorption and excitation specta were taken on single crystals at liquid helium temperatures. Eight electronic origins are identified, each split into doublets by factor group interactions. Uranyl (a)symmetric stretch vibronic progressions (do not) preserve the factor group splittings and polarizations of their origins. The spectrum of UFM lies closer to the (omega)-(omega) limit, as opposed to Russell-Saunders, than Cs(,2)UO(,2)Cl(,4). Low site symmetry depolarizes the B-symmetry components of the origins. Below 2(DEGREES)K, where UFM exhibits non-single exponential luminescence decay, migration to traps is limited. By 20(DEGREES)K, where the curves become single exponential and drop tenfold in the value of the lifetime, emission is occurring from UFM in thermal equilibrium with a population of killer traps. Above 70(DEGREES)K, the lifetime slowly rises. It peaks at 135(DEGREES)K, and then drops steeply, falling below detectability by 210(DEGREES)K. The drop is accompanied by the onset of photoreactivity. The rise in emission is attributed either to a decrease in trapping efficiency or to a hindered migration to traps due to a thermal population of bound (DELTA)(,g) excitons. ESR studies show that a signal at g = 2.0 observed at 77(DEGREES)K is from surface radicals. Below 20(DEGREES)K, a signal near g = 2.1 is due to organic radicals in the bulk generated by the photochemical step. Studies on a single crystal resolve these signals into components that reflect the crystallographic symmetry elements. A signal near g = 3.4 is

  4. Structural observations of heterometallic uranyl copper(II) carboxylates and their solid-state topotactic transformation upon dehydration.

    PubMed

    Olchowka, Jakub; Falaise, Clément; Volkringer, Christophe; Henry, Natacha; Loiseau, Thierry

    2013-02-01

    The hydrothermal reactions of uranyl nitrate and metallic copper with aromatic polycarboxylic acids gave rise to the formation of five heterometallic UO(2)(2+)-Cu(2+) coordination polymers: (UO(2))Cu(H(2)O)(2)(1,2-bdc)(2) (1; 1,2-bdc = phthalate), (UO(2))Cu(H(2)O)(2)(btec)⋅4 H(2)O (2) and (UO(2))Cu(btec) (2'; btec = pyromellitate), (UO(2))(2)Cu(H(2)O)(4)(mel) (3; mel = mellitate), and (UO(2))(2)O(OH)(2)Cu(H(2)O)(2)(1,3-bdc)⋅H(2)O (4; 1,3-bdc = isophthlalate). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of compound 1 revealed 2D layers of chains of UO(8) and CuO(4)(H(2)O)(2) units that were connected through the phthalate ligands. In compound 2, these sheets were connected to each other through the two additional carboxylate arms of the pyromellitate, thus resulting in a 3D open-framework with 1D channels that trapped water molecules. Upon heating, free and bonded water species (from Cu-OH(2)) were evacuated from the structure. This thermal transition was followed by in situ XRD and IR spectroscopy. Heating induced a solid-state topotactic transformation with the formation of a new set of Cu-O interactions in the crystalline anhydrous structure (2'), in order to keep the square-planar environment around the copper centers. The structure of compound 3 was built up from trinuclear motifs, in which one copper center, CuO(4)(OH(2))(2), was linked to two uranium units, UO(5)(H(2)O)(2). The assembly of this trimer, "U(2)Cu", with the mellitate generated a 3D network. Complex 4 contained a tetranuclear uranyl core of UO(5)(OH)(2) and UO(6)(OH) units that were linked to two copper centers, CuO(OH)(2)(H(2)O)(2), which were then connected to each other through isophthalate ligands and U=O-Cu interactions to create a 3D structure. The common structural feature of these different compounds is a bridging oxo group of U=O-Cu type, which is reflected by apical Cu-O distances in the range 2.350(3)-2.745(5) Å. In the case of a shorter Cu-O distance, a slight lengthening

  5. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOEpatents

    Cox, J.L.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

    1992-06-02

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrites present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200 C to about 600 C, and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  6. The Chilean nitrate deposits.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ericksen, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    The nitrate deposits in the arid Atacama desert of northern Chile consist of saline-cemented surficial material, apparently formed in and near a playa lake that formerly covered the area. Many features of their distribution and chemical composition are unique. The author believes the principal sources of the saline constituents were the volcanic rocks of late Tertiary and Quaternary age in the Andes and that the nitrate is of organic origin. Possible sources of the nitrate, iodate, perchlorate and chromate are discussed. -J.J.Robertson

  7. General Control Nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) Kinase Protects Oligodendrocytes and White Matter during Branched-chain Amino Acid Deficiency in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    She, Pengxiang; Bunpo, Piyawan; Cundiff, Judy K.; Wek, Ronald C.; Harris, Robert A.; Anthony, Tracy G.

    2013-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolism is regulated by branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase, an enzyme complex that is inhibited when phosphorylated by its kinase (BDK). Loss of BDK function in mice and humans causes BCAA deficiency and epilepsy with autistic features. In response to amino acid deficiency, phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2∼P) by general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) activates the amino acid stress response. We hypothesized that GCN2 functions to protect the brain during chronic BCAA deficiency. To test this idea, we generated mice lacking both Gcn2 and Bdk (GBDK) and examined the development of progeny. GBDK mice appeared normal at birth, but they soon stopped growing, developed severe ataxia, tremor, and anorexia, and died by postnatal day 15. BCAA levels in brain were diminished in both Bdk−/− and GBDK pups. Brains from Bdk−/− pups exhibited robust eIF2∼P and amino acid stress response induction, whereas these responses were absent in GBDK mouse brains. Instead, myelin deficiency and diminished expression of myelin basic protein were noted in GBDK brains. Genetic markers of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes were also reduced in GBDK brains in association with apoptotic cell death in white matter regions of the brain. GBDK brains further demonstrated reduced Sod2 and Cat mRNA and increased Tnfα mRNA expression. The data are consistent with the idea that loss of GCN2 during BCAA deficiency compromises glial cell defenses to oxidative and inflammatory stress. We conclude that GCN2 protects the brain from developing a lethal leukodystrophy in response to amino acid deficiencies. PMID:24019515

  8. General control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) kinase protects oligodendrocytes and white matter during branched-chain amino acid deficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    She, Pengxiang; Bunpo, Piyawan; Cundiff, Judy K; Wek, Ronald C; Harris, Robert A; Anthony, Tracy G

    2013-10-25

    Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolism is regulated by branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase, an enzyme complex that is inhibited when phosphorylated by its kinase (BDK). Loss of BDK function in mice and humans causes BCAA deficiency and epilepsy with autistic features. In response to amino acid deficiency, phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2∼P) by general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) activates the amino acid stress response. We hypothesized that GCN2 functions to protect the brain during chronic BCAA deficiency. To test this idea, we generated mice lacking both Gcn2 and Bdk (GBDK) and examined the development of progeny. GBDK mice appeared normal at birth, but they soon stopped growing, developed severe ataxia, tremor, and anorexia, and died by postnatal day 15. BCAA levels in brain were diminished in both Bdk(-/-) and GBDK pups. Brains from Bdk(-/-) pups exhibited robust eIF2∼P and amino acid stress response induction, whereas these responses were absent in GBDK mouse brains. Instead, myelin deficiency and diminished expression of myelin basic protein were noted in GBDK brains. Genetic markers of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes were also reduced in GBDK brains in association with apoptotic cell death in white matter regions of the brain. GBDK brains further demonstrated reduced Sod2 and Cat mRNA and increased Tnfα mRNA expression. The data are consistent with the idea that loss of GCN2 during BCAA deficiency compromises glial cell defenses to oxidative and inflammatory stress. We conclude that GCN2 protects the brain from developing a lethal leukodystrophy in response to amino acid deficiencies. PMID:24019515

  9. An in vitro model for essential fatty acid deficiency: HepG2 cells permanently maintained in lipid-free medium.

    PubMed

    Furth, E E; Sprecher, H; Fisher, E A; Fleishman, H D; Laposata, M

    1992-11-01

    A stable essential fatty acid-deficient cell type, known as HepG2-EFD, was derived from the lipoprotein-producing human hepatoma cell line HepG2. These cells are particularly useful for quantitative studies involving essential fatty acids (n-6 and n-3 fatty acids) in secreted lipoproteins. Radiolabeled essential fatty acids can be delivered to these cells without altering the specific activity of the fatty acids, since the deficient cells contain no endogenous essential fatty acids. Using these cells, radioactivity data (dpm) from metabolic studies can be converted directly to mass, and masses as low as a few pmoles can be accurately measured. HepG2-EFD cell cultures were established by growing HepG2 cells in medium containing delipidated serum. After 10 days of growth in delipidated medium, HepG2 cells were completely depleted of all essential fatty acids. Compensatory increases in nonessential fatty acids (n-9 and n-7 fatty acids) including 20:3n-9 (the Mead acid), which is the hallmark fatty acid of essential fatty acid deficiency, were also observed in HepG2-EFD cells. Despite the lack of exogenous fatty acids in the medium and the lack of essential fatty acids in the cells, export of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-associated apolipoprotein B by HepG2-EFD was the same as observed for parent HepG2 cells. However, the activity of beta-oxidation of fatty acids in HepG2-EFD cells was much lower than in the parent cell line.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1464755

  10. Construction of Uranyl Selective Electrode Based on Complex of Uranyl Ion with New Ligand Carboxybenzotriazole in PVC Matrix Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Dalo, M. A.; Al-Rawashdeh, N. A. F.; Al-Mheidat, I. R.; Nassory, N. S.

    2015-10-01

    In the present study uranyl selective electrodes in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) matrix membrane were prepared based on a complex of uranyl ion (UO2) with carboxybenzotriazole (CBT) as ligand. The effect of the nature of plasticizer in PVC matrix were evaluated using three different plasticizers, these are dibutyl phthalate (DBP), dioctyl phthalate (DOP) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BHS). The results of this study indicated that the best plasticizer could be used is the DBP, which may be attributed to its lowest viscosity value compared to DOP and BHS. The electrodes with DBP as plasticizer exhibits a Nernstian response with a slope of 28.0 mV/ decade, over a wide range of concentration from 3.0×10-5-6.0×10-2 M and a detection limit of 4.0×10-6 M. It can be used in the pH range of 4.0-10.0 with a response time of less than 10 s for DBP and 25 s for both DOP and BHS. The effects of ions interferences on the electrode response were evaluated. The di- and tri-valent cations were found to interfere less than univalent cations, which was attributed to the high diffusion and the exchange rate between the univalent ions and the uranyl ion solution. The electrodes were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM). The results of the standard addition method were satisfactory with errors less than 7%. The developed electrode was found to be fast, sensitive and reliable indicated its potential use in measuring the uranly ion concentration in the field.

  11. Liquid-liquid extraction of uranyl by TBP: the TBP and ions models and related interfacial features revisited by MD and PMF simulations.

    PubMed

    Benay, G; Wipff, G

    2014-03-20

    We report a molecular dynamics (MD) study of biphasic systems involved in the liquid-liquid extraction of uranyl nitrate by tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) to hexane, from "pH neutral" or acidic (3 M nitric acid) aqueous solutions, to assess the model dependence of the surface activity and partitioning of TBP alone, of its UO2(NO3)2(TBP)2 complex, and of UO2(NO3)2 or UO2(2+) uncomplexed. For this purpose, we first compare several electrostatic representations of TBP with regards to its polarity and conformational properties, its interactions with H2O, HNO3, and UO2(NO3)2 species, its relative free energies of solvation in water or oil environments, the properties of the pure TBP liquid and of the pure-TBP/water interface. The free energies of transfer of TBP, UO2(NO3)2, UO2(2+), and the UO2(NO3)2(TBP)2 complex across the water/oil interface are then investigated by potential of mean force (PMF) calculations, comparing different TBP models and two charge models of uranyl nitrate. Describing uranyl and nitrate ions with integer charges (+2 and -1, respectively) is shown to exaggerate the hydrophilicity and surface activity of the UO2(NO3)2(TBP)2 complex. With more appropriate ESP charges, mimicking charge transfer and polarization effects in the UO2(NO3)2 moiety or in the whole complex, the latter is no more surface active. This feature is confirmed by MD, PMF, and mixing-demixing simulations with or without polarization. Furthermore, with ESP charges, pulling the UO2(NO3)2 species to the TBP phase affords the formation of UO2(NO3)2(TBP)2 at the interface, followed by its energetically favorable extraction. The neutral complexes should therefore not accumulate at the interface during the extraction process, but diffuse to the oil phase. A similar feature is found for an UO2(NO3)2(Amide)2 neutral complex with fatty amide extracting ligands, calling for further simulations and experimental studies (e.g., time evolution of the nonlinear spectroscopic signature and of surface

  12. Time-dependent water dynamics in hydrated uranyl fluoride

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miskowiec, Andrew J.; Anderson, Brian B.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Huq, Ashfia; Mamontov, Eugene; Rondinone, Adam; Trowbridge, Lee D.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, uranyl fluoride is a three-layer, hexagonal structure with significant stacking disorder in the c-direction. It supports a range of unsolved ‘thermodynamic’ hydrates with 0–2.5 water molecules per uranium atom, and perhaps more. However, the relationship between water, hydrate crystal structures, and thermodynamic results, collectively representing the chemical pathway through these hydrate structures, has not been sufficiently elucidated. We used high-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering to study the dynamics of water in partially hydrated uranyl fluoride powder over the course of 4 weeks under closed conditions. The spectra are composed of two quasielastic components: one is associated with translationalmore » diffusive motion of water that is approximately five to six times slower than bulk water, and the other is a slow (on the order of 2–300 ps), spatially bounded water motion. The translational component represents water diffusing between the weakly bonded layers in the crystal, while the bounded component may represent water trapped in subnanometre ‘pockets’ formed by the space between uranium-centred polymerisation units. Complementary neutron diffraction measurements do not show any significant structural changes, suggesting that a chemical conversion of the material does not occur in the thermodynamically isolated system on this timescale.« less

  13. Time-dependent water dynamics in hydrated uranyl fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Miskowiec, Andrew J.; Anderson, Brian B.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Huq, Ashfia; Mamontov, Eugene; Rondinone, Adam; Trowbridge, Lee D.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, uranyl fluoride is a three-layer, hexagonal structure with significant stacking disorder in the c-direction. It supports a range of unsolved ‘thermodynamic’ hydrates with 0–2.5 water molecules per uranium atom, and perhaps more. However, the relationship between water, hydrate crystal structures, and thermodynamic results, collectively representing the chemical pathway through these hydrate structures, has not been sufficiently elucidated. We used high-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering to study the dynamics of water in partially hydrated uranyl fluoride powder over the course of 4 weeks under closed conditions. The spectra are composed of two quasielastic components: one is associated with translational diffusive motion of water that is approximately five to six times slower than bulk water, and the other is a slow (on the order of 2–300 ps), spatially bounded water motion. The translational component represents water diffusing between the weakly bonded layers in the crystal, while the bounded component may represent water trapped in subnanometre ‘pockets’ formed by the space between uranium-centred polymerisation units. Complementary neutron diffraction measurements do not show any significant structural changes, suggesting that a chemical conversion of the material does not occur in the thermodynamically isolated system on this timescale.

  14. Surface complexation modeling of uranyl adsorption on corrensite from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang-Won; Leckie, J.O.; Siegel, M.D.

    1995-09-01

    Corrensite is the dominant clay mineral in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The surface characteristics of corrensite, a mixed chlorite/smectite clay mineral, have been studied. Zeta potential measurements and titration experiments suggest that the corrensite surface contains a mixture of permanent charge sites on the basal plane and SiOH and AlOH sites with a net pH-dependent charge at the edge of the clay platelets. Triple-layer model parameters were determined by the double extrapolation technique for use in chemical speciation calculations of adsorption reactions using the computer program HYDRAQL. Batch adsorption studies showed that corrensite is an effective adsorbent for uranyl. The pH-dependent adsorption behavior indicates that adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Adsorption studies were also conducted in the presence of competing cations and complexing ligands. The cations did not affect uranyl adsorption in the range studied. This observation lends support to the hypothesis that uranyl adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Uranyl adsorption was significantly hindered by carbonate. It is proposed that the formation of carbonate uranyl complexes inhibits uranyl adsorption and that only the carbonate-free species adsorb to the corrensite surface. The presence of the organic complexing agents EDTA and oxine also inhibits uranyl sorption.

  15. Escherichia coli Response to Uranyl Exposure at Low pH and Associated Protein Regulations

    PubMed Central

    Khemiri, Arbia; Carrière, Marie; Bremond, Nicolas; Ben Mlouka, Mohamed Amine; Coquet, Laurent; Llorens, Isabelle; Chapon, Virginie; Jouenne, Thierry; Cosette, Pascal; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of uranyl toxicity in bacteria is necessary to optimize strains for bioremediation purposes or for using bacteria as biodetectors for bioavailable uranyl. In this study, after different steps of optimization, Escherichia colicells were exposed to uranyl at low pH to minimize uranyl precipitation and to increase its bioavailability. Bacteria were adapted to mid acidic pH before exposure to 50 or 80 µM uranyl acetate for two hours at pH≈3. To evaluate the impact of uranium, growth in these conditions were compared and the same rates of cells survival were observed in control and uranyl exposed cultures. Additionally, this impact was analyzedby two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis proteomics to discover protein actors specifically present or accumulated in contact with uranium.Exposure to uranium resulted in differential accumulation of proteins associated with oxidative stress and in the accumulation of the NADH/quinone oxidoreductase WrbA. This FMN dependent protein performs obligate two-electron reduction of quinones, and may be involved in cells response to oxidative stress. Interestingly, this WrbA protein presents similarities with the chromate reductase from E. coli, which was shown to reduce uranyl in vitro. PMID:24587082

  16. Understanding the bonding nature of uranyl ion and functionalized graphene: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qun-Yan; Lan, Jian-Hui; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Wei, Yue-Zhou; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2014-03-20

    Studying the bonding nature of uranyl ion and graphene oxide (GO) is very important for understanding the mechanism of the removal of uranium from radioactive wastewater with GO-based materials. We have optimized 22 complexes between uranyl ion and GO applying density functional theory (DFT) combined with quasi-relativistic small-core pseudopotentials. The studied oxygen-containing functional groups include hydroxyl, carboxyl, amido, and dimethylformamide. It is observed that the distances between uranium atoms and oxygen atoms of GO (U-OG) are shorter in the anionic GO complexes (uranyl/GO(-/2-)) compared to the neutral GO ones (uranyl/GO). The formation of hydrogen bonds in the uranyl/GO(-/2-) complexes can enhance the binding ability of anionic GO toward uranyl ions. Furthermore, the thermodynamic calculations show that the changes of the Gibbs free energies in solution are relatively more negative for complexation reactions concerning the hydroxyl and carboxyl functionalized anionic GO complexes. Therefore, both the geometries and thermodynamic energies indicate that the binding abilities of uranyl ions toward GO modified by hydroxyl and carboxyl groups are much stronger compared to those by amido and dimethylformamide groups. This study can provide insights for designing new nanomaterials that can efficiently remove radionuclides from radioactive wastewater. PMID:24592814

  17. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreases hepatic cytochrome P-450, especially CYP2B1/2B2, and simultaneously induces heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in scurvy-prone ODS rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Misato; Hoshinaga, Yukiko; Miura, Natsuko; Tokuda, Yuki; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Murai, Atsushi; Horio, Fumihiko

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the decrease in hepatic cytochrome P-450 (CYP) content in ascorbic acid deficiency was investigated in scurvy-prone ODS rats. First, male ODS rats were fed a diet containing sufficient ascorbic acid (control) or a diet without ascorbic acid (deficient) for 18 days, with or without the intraperitoneal injection of phenobarbital. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COX) complex IV subunit I protein, and simultaneously increased heme oxygenase-1 protein in microsomes and mitochondria. Next, heme oxygenase-1 inducers, that is lipopolysaccharide and hemin, were administered to phenobaribital-treated ODS rats fed sufficient ascorbic acid. The administration of these inducers decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial COX complex IV subunit I protein. These results suggested that the stimulation of hepatic heme oxygenase-1 expression by ascorbic acid deficiency caused the decrease in CYP content in liver. PMID:25036135

  18. Identification of uranyl binding proteins from human kidney-2 cell extracts by immobilized uranyl affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dedieu, Alain; Bérenguer, Frédéric; Basset, Christian; Prat, Odette; Quéméneur, Eric; Pible, Olivier; Vidaud, Claude

    2009-07-10

    To improve our knowledge on protein targets of uranyl ion (UO(2)(2+)), we set up a proteomic strategy based on immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC). The successful enrichment of UO(2)(2+)-interacting proteins from human kidney-2 (HK-2) soluble cell extracts was obtained using an ion-exchange chromatography followed by a dedicated IMAC process previously described and designed for the uranyl ion. By mass spectrometry analysis we identified 64 proteins displaying varied functions. The use of a computational screening algorithm along with the particular ligand-based properties of the UO(2)(2+) ion allowed the analysis and categorization of the protein collection. This profitable approach demonstrated that most of these proteins fulfill criteria which could rationalize their binding to the UO(2)(2+)-loaded phase. The obtained results enable us to focus on some targets for more in-depth studies and open new insights on its toxicity mechanisms at molecular level. PMID:19501829

  19. Density Functional Studies on the Complexation and Spectroscopy of Uranyl Ligated with Acetonitrile and Acetone Derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Schoendorff, George E.; Windus, Theresa L.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2009-12-12

    The coordination of nitrile (acetonitrile, propionitrile, and benzonitrile) and carbonyl (formaldehyde, ethanal, and acetone) ligands to the uranyl dication (UO22+) has been examined using density functional theory (DFT) utilizing relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs). Complexes containing up to six ligands have been modeled for all ligands except formaldehyde, for which no minimum could be found. A comparison of relative binding energies indicates that five coordinate complexes are predominant while a six coordinate complex involving propionitrile ligands might be possible. Additionally, the relative binding energy and the weakening of the uranyl bond is related to the size of the ligand and, in general, nitriles bind more strongly to uranyl than carbonyls.

  20. Self-Assembly of Uranyl-Peroxide Nanocapsules in Basic Peroxidic Environments.

    PubMed

    Miró, Pere; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Gil, Adria; Burns, Peter C; Nyman, May; Bo, Carles

    2016-06-13

    A wide range of uranyl-peroxide nanocapsules have been synthesized using very simple reactants in basic media; however, little is known about the process to form these species. We have performed a density functional theory study of the speciation of the uranyl ions under different experimental conditions and explored the formation of dimeric species via a ligand exchange mechanism. We shed some light onto the importance of the excess of peroxide and alkali counterions as a thermodynamic driving force towards the formation of larger uranyl-peroxide species. PMID:27165671

  1. Uranyl acetate induces gel phase formation in model lipid and biological membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, M; Morris, S J; Feigenson, G W

    1987-01-01

    The effect of uranyl acetate on the mesomorphic phase state of lipids in model membranes as well as in isolated biological membranes has been examined. As little as 0.8 mM (0.03% [wt/vol]) uranyl acetate induces a liquid crystal-to-gel phase transformation in egg phosphatidic acid, bovine brain phosphatidylserine, and in lysed chromaffin granule membranes. These results along with others in the literature indicate that the uranyl acetate used in samples for electron microscopy could alter membrane morphology. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 1 FIGURE 1 PMID:3651563

  2. Application of lanthanum and uranyl salts as tracers to demonstrate apoplastic pathways for transport in glands of the carnivorous plant Utricularia monanthos.

    PubMed

    Fineran, B A; Gilbertson, J M

    1980-12-01

    Lanthanum nitrate and uranyl acetate were used as opaque tracers in electron microscopy to demonstrate an apoplastic pathway within external and internal glands in the trap of the bladderwort Utricularia monanthos. Deposits of the tracers occurred in the cell walls but not in the protoplasts of intact cells. Cytochemical staining for polysaccharides showed that the tracers were confined to the non-impregnated regions of the wall. Only in the arms of quadrifids and bifids and the terminal cell of external glands an apoplastic pathway, extending from the external medium through the walls of the terminal cells and into the wall ingrowths of the pedestal cell, was demonstrated by the penetration of the tracers. The lateral cell wall of the pedestal cell is impermeable to the movement of tracers where it is completely impregnated. The routes that these apoplastic pathways might provide for water transport during the resetting of the trap are discussed. PMID:7460969

  3. New three-dimensional inorganic frameworks based on the uranophane-type sheet in monoamine templated uranyl-vanadates

    SciTech Connect

    Jouffret, Laurent; Shao Zhenmian

    2010-10-15

    Seven new uranyl vanadates with mono-protonated amine or tetramethylammonium used as structure directing cations, (C{sub 2}NH{sub 8}){sub 2{l_brace}}[(UO{sub 2})(H{sub 2}O)][(UO{sub 2})(VO{sub 4})]{sub 4{r_brace}}.H{sub 2}O (DMetU5V4) (C{sub 2}NH{sub 8}){l_brace}[(UO{sub 2})(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][(UO{sub 2})(VO{sub 4})]{sub 3{r_brace}}.H{sub 2}O (DMetU4V3), (C{sub 5}NH{sub 6}){sub 2{l_brace}}[(UO{sub 2})(H{sub 2}O)][(UO{sub 2})(VO{sub 4})]{sub 4{r_brace}}.H{sub 2}O (PyrU5V4), (C{sub 3}NH{sub 10}){l_brace}[(UO{sub 2})(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][(UO{sub 2})(VO{sub 4})]{sub 3{r_brace}}.H{sub 2}O (isoPrU4V3), (N(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}){l_brace}[(UO{sub 2})(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][(UO{sub 2})(VO{sub 4})]{sub 3{r_brace}}.H{sub 2}O (TMetU4V3), (C{sub 6}NH{sub 14}){l_brace}[(UO{sub 2})(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][(UO{sub 2})(VO{sub 4})]{sub 3{r_brace}}.H{sub 2}O (CHexU4V3), and (C{sub 4}NH{sub 12}){l_brace}[(UO{sub 2})(H{sub 2}O)][(UO{sub 2})(VO{sub 4})]{sub 3{r_brace}} (TButU4V3) were prepared from mild-hydrothermal reactions using dimethylamine, pyridine, isopropylamine, tetramethylammonium hydroxide, cyclohexylamine and tertiobutylamine, respectively, with uranyl nitrate and vanadium oxide in acidic medium. The structures were solved using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. The compounds exhibit three-dimensional uranyl-vanadate inorganic frameworks built from uranophane-type uranyl-vanadate layers pillared by uranyl polyhedra with cavities in between occupied by protonated organic moieties. In the uranyl-vanadate layers the orientations of the vanadate tetrahedra give new geometrical isomers leading to unprecedented pillared systems and new inorganic frameworks with U/V=4/3. Crystallographic data: (DMetU5V4) orthorhombic, Cmc2{sub 1} space group, a=15.6276(4), b=14.1341(4), c=13.6040(4) A; (DMetU4V3) monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/n space group, a=10.2312(4), b=13.5661(7), c=17.5291(7) A, {beta}=96.966(2); (PyrU5V4), triclinic, P1 space group, a=9.6981(3), b=9.9966(2), c=10.5523(2) A, {alpha}=117

  4. A density functional theory study of uranium(VI) nitrate monoamide complexes.

    PubMed

    Prestianni, Antonio; Joubert, Laurent; Chagnes, Alexandre; Cote, Gérard; Adamo, Carlo

    2011-11-21

    Density functional theory calculations were performed on uranyl complexed with nitrate and monoamide ligands (L) [UO(2)(NO(3))(2)·2L]. The obtained results show that the complex stability is mainly governed by two factors: (i) the maximization of the polarizability of the coordinating ligand and (ii) the minimization of the steric hindrance effects. Furthermore, the electrostatic interaction between ligands and uranium(vi) was found to be a crucial parameter for the complex stability. These results pave the way to the definition of (quantitative) property/structure relationships for the in silico screening of monoamide ligands with improved extraction efficiency of uranium(vi) in nitrate acidic solution. PMID:21952360

  5. Effects of folic acid deficiency and MTHFR C677T polymorphism on spontaneous and radiation-induced micronuclei in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Leopardi, Paola; Marcon, Francesca; Caiola, Stefania; Cafolla, Arturo; Siniscalchi, Ester; Zijno, Andrea; Crebelli, Riccardo

    2006-09-01

    Folic acid plays a key role in the maintenance of genomic stability, providing methyl groups for the conversion of uracil to thymine and for DNA methylation. Besides dietary habits, folic acid metabolism is influenced by genetic polymorphism. The C677T polymorphism of the methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene is associated with a reduction of catalytic activity and is suggested to modify cancer risk differently depending on folate status. In this work the effect of folic acid deficiency on genome stability and radiosensitivity has been investigated in cultured lymphocytes of 12 subjects with different MTHFR genotype (four for each genotype). Cells were grown for 9 days with 12, 24 and 120 nM folic acid and analyzed in a comprehensive micronucleus test coupled with centromere characterization by CREST immunostaining. In other experiments, cells were grown with various folic acid concentrations, irradiated with 0.5 Gy of gamma rays and analyzed in the micronucleus test. The results obtained indicate that folic acid deficiency induces to a comparable extent chromosome loss and breakage, irrespective of the MTHFR genotype. The effect of folic acid was highly significant (P < 0.001) and explained >50% of variance of both types of micronuclei. Also nucleoplasmic bridges and buds were significantly increased under low folate supply; the increase in bridges was mainly observed in TT cells, highlighting a significant effect of the MTHFR genotype (P = 0.006) on this biomarker. Folic acid concentration significantly affected radiation-induced micronuclei (P < 0.001): the increased incidence of radiation-induced micronuclei with low folic acid was mainly accounted for by carriers of the variant MTHFR allele (both homozygotes and heterozygotes), but the overall effect of genotype did not attain statistical significance. Treatment with ionizing radiations also increased the frequency of nucleoplasmic bridges. The effect of folic acid level on this end-point was

  6. Giant regular polyhedra from calixarene carboxylates and uranyl

    PubMed Central

    Pasquale, Sara; Sattin, Sara; Escudero-Adán, Eduardo C.; Martínez-Belmonte, Marta; de Mendoza, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembly of large multi-component systems is a common strategy for the bottom-up construction of discrete, well-defined, nanoscopic-sized cages. Icosahedral or pseudospherical viral capsids, built up from hundreds of identical proteins, constitute typical examples of the complexity attained by biological self-assembly. Chemical versions of the so-called 5 Platonic regular or 13 Archimedean semi-regular polyhedra are usually assembled combining molecular platforms with metals with commensurate coordination spheres. Here we report novel, self-assembled cages, using the conical-shaped carboxylic acid derivatives of calix[4]arene and calix[5]arene as ligands, and the uranyl cation UO22+ as a metallic counterpart, which coordinates with three carboxylates at the equatorial plane, giving rise to hexagonal bipyramidal architectures. As a result, octahedral and icosahedral anionic metallocages of nanoscopic dimensions are formed with an unusually small number of components. PMID:22510690

  7. Complex formation between uranyl and various thiosemicarbazide derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Chuguryan, D.G.; Dzyubenko, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    Complex formation between hexavalent uranium and salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/L), salicylaldehyde S-methyl-isothiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/Q), S-methyl-N/sub 1/,N/sub 4/-bis(salicylidene)isothiosemicarbazide(H/sub 2/Z), and thiosemicarbazidodiacetic acid (H/sub 2/R) has been studied spectrophotometrically in solution. Stability constants for complexes having the composition UO/sub 2/A have been calculated. Solid uranyl derivatives having the composition UO/sub 2/L x 2H/sub 2/O, UO/sub 2/Q x 2H/sub 2/O, UO/sub 2/Z x 2H/sub 2/O, and UO/sub 2/R x 2H/sub 2/O have been obtained. These derivatives were isolated and their IR spectroscopic behavior and thermal properties were investigated.

  8. Evaluation of lanthanide salts as alternative stains to uranyl acetate.

    PubMed

    Hosogi, Naoki; Nishioka, Hideo; Nakakoshi, Masamichi

    2015-12-01

    Uranyl acetate (UAc) has been generally used not only as a superb staining reagent for ultrathin sections of plastic-embedded biological materials, but also as high-contrast negative stains for biological macromolecules such as particles of protein or virus. However, the use and purchase of radioactive UAc have been restricted. In this study, we determine the performance of ytterbium triacetate, lutetium triacetate, samarium triacetate and gadolinium triacetate as new staining reagents for biological electron microscopy. We observed chemically fixed spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves stained with these reagents. Ultrathin sections were stained with these reagents. Some of them were counterstained with lead citrate. The transmission electron microscopy contrast of spinach organelles was evaluated in sections exposed to the conventional stain and new stains. We show acetate salts of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium and lutetium could be excellent substitutes for UAc for thin section staining and for negative staining. In addition, each reagent showed appreciable negative-staining effects. PMID:26374081

  9. Structural features of two polymorphs of ammonium uranyl crotonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenkov, A. V.; Peresypkina, E. V.; Pushkin, D. V.; Virovets, A. V.; Serezhkina, L. B.; Serezhkin, V. N.

    2014-09-01

    X-ray crystallography, FTIR spectroscopy and thermal analysis were conducted for crystals of two polymorphs of NH4UO2(C3H5COO)3, which are the first examples of uranyl tricarboxylate complexes with ions of unsaturated aliphatic monocarboxylic acid. The main structural units of both polymorphs are anionic complexes [UO2(C3H5COO)3]-. Uranium atoms adopt hexagonal bipyramidal coordination polyhedron, and crotonate ions realize bidentate cyclic type of coordination. Due to different packing of ammonium ions and [UO2(C3H5COO)3]- complexes triclinic crystals of α-polymorph have layer structure and cubic crystals of β-polymorph have three dimensional structure. Features of three dimensional packing of R+ ions and [UO2L3]- complexes in structures of 25 known R[UO2L3] compounds are discussed.

  10. Adsorption of uranyl species on hydroxylated titanium carbide nanosheet: A first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Juan; Lan, Jian-Hui; Wang, Lin; Wu, Qun-Yan; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Bo, Tao; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2016-05-01

    In this work, hydroxylated titanium carbide Ti3C2(OH)2, a representative of the two-dimensional transition metal carbides, has been predicted to be an effective adsorbent for uranyl ions in aqueous environments for the first time using density functional theory simulations. The calculations revealed that the uranyl ion can strongly bind with Ti3C2(OH)2 nanosheet in aqueous solution regardless of the presence of anionic ligands such as OH(-), Cl(-) and NO3(-). The bidentate coordination of uranyl to the surface is energetically more favorable than other adsorption configurations, and the uranyl ion prefers to bind with the deprotonated O adsorption site rather than the protonated one on the hydroxylated surface. During the adsorption process, the chemical adsorption as well as the formation of hydrogen bonds is the dominant factor. PMID:26859616

  11. The formation, transformation, and stability of environmentally relevant uranyl mineral phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowder, Andrew Gene

    Characterization of contaminated soils and sediments has identified discrete uranyl minerals as important source terms, controlling the environmental transport and biological uptake of uranium. Fundamental kinetic and thermodynamic data describing the formation, transformation, and stability of uranyl minerals in the environment are incomplete or lacking. This work examines the fate of the uranyl oxide hydrate schoepite (UOL·2H2O) in calcium, phosphate, and silicate bearing systems. Transformation of schoepite to uranyl phosphate phases was rapid and extensive, even at room temperature. The calcium uranyl phosphate autunite (Ca[(UO2)(PO4)]2·xH2O) was the chief alteration product in Ca-PO4 bearing systems. Becquerelite (Ca[(UO2)6O4(OH)6]·8H 2O) was identified as an important metastable weathering product in the presence of calcium and formed in parallel with autunite in certain systems. Uranyl silicates were not observed. Instead, the presence of dissolved silica inhibited the transformation of schoepite to becquerelite. Reaction pathways for the transformation of schoepite to becquerelite and autunite were deduced from structural and topological arguments and from experimental observations. Schoepite transforms to becquerelite via a solid state reaction without dissolution of its sheet structure. In contrast, the formation of autunite requires the complete dissolution of schoepite. Kinetic dissolution studies were conducted to determine the relative impact of four minerals (schoepite, becquerelite, chernikovite, and meta-autunite) on the environmental availability of uranium. Significant variations were observed in the rate and extent of dissolution among the mineral-treatment combinations examined. The uranyl phosphates, chernikovite and meta-autunite, proved to be far more resistant to dissolution than the uranyl oxide hydrates, schoepite and becquerelite. Exceptions to this rule, however, indicate the importance of specific mineral dissolution kinetics in

  12. Synthesis, characterization, and crystal structures of uranyl compounds containing mixed chromium oxidation states

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Daniel K.; Quicksall, Andrew; Pressprich, Laura; Stoffer, Megan; Qiu, Jie; Nuzhdin, Kirill; Wu, Weiqiang; Vyushkova, Mariya; Burns, Peter C.

    2012-07-15

    The mixed-valence chromium uranyl compounds Li{sub 5}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(Cr(V)O{sub 5})(Cr(VI)O{sub 4}){sub 4}](H{sub 2}O){sub 17} (1), (Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}){sub 5}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}(Cr(V)O{sub 5}){sub 2}(Cr(VI)O{sub 4}){sub 8}] (2) and (NH{sub 4}){sub 5}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(Cr(V)O{sub 5})(Cr(VI)O{sub 4}){sub 2}]H{sub 2}O{sub 11} (3) have been synthesized and characterized. Each contains an identical sheet of cation-centered polyhedra. Central to the connectivity of the sheet are four uranyl pentagonal bipyramids that share some of their equatorial vertices, giving a four-membered ring. The Cr(V) cation located near the center of this ring is coordinated by O atoms in a square pyramidal arrangement. The Cr(VI) is tetrahedrally coordinated by O atoms, and these tetrahedra link the four-membered rings of bipyramids. The mixed-valence nature of the sheet was verified by XANES, an EPR spectrum, and bond-valence analysis. Low-valence cations and H{sub 2}O groups reside between the sheets of uranyl and chromate polyhedra, where they provide linkages between adjacent sheets. - Graphical abstract: Three uranyl chromate compounds contain both pentavalent and hexavalent chromium. The unusual topology of the uranyl chromate sheet contains unusual pentavalent chromium in a square pyramidal coordination environment. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first uranyl compounds with mixed Cr valences are reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A sheet of uranyl polyhedra stabilizes pentavalent chromium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uranyl and chromate polyhedra form a topologically novel sheet.

  13. Polarized x-ray-absorption spectroscopy of the uranyl ion: Comparison of experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, E.A.; Allen, P.G.; Terminello, L.J.; Denecke, M.A.; Reich, T.

    1996-07-01

    The x-ray linear dichroism of the uranyl ion (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) in uranium {ital L}{sub 3}-edge extended x-ray-absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and {ital L}{sub 1}- and {ital L}{sub 3}-edge x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES), has been investigated both by experiment and theory. A striking polarization dependence is observed in the experimental XANES and EXAFS for an oriented single crystal of uranyl acetate dihydrate [UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O], with the x-ray polarization vector aligned either parallel or perpendicular to the bond axis of the linear uranyl cation (O-U-O). Single-crystal results are compared to experimental spectra for a polycrystalline uranyl acetate sample and to calculations using the {ital ab} {ital initio} multiple-scattering (MS) code FEFF 6. Theoretical XANES spectra for uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) reproduce all the features of the measured uranyl acetate spectra. By identifying scattering paths which contribute to individual features in the calculated spectrum, a detailed understanding of the {ital L}{sub 1}-edge XANES is obtained. MS paths within the uranyl cation have a notable influence upon the XANES. The measured {ital L}{sub 3}-edge EXAFS is also influenced by MS, especially when the x-ray polarization is parallel to the uranyl species. These MS contributions are extracted from the total EXAFS and compared to calculations. The best agreement with the isolated MS signal is obtained by using nonoverlapped muffin-tin spheres in the FEFF 6 calculation. This contrasts the {ital L}{sub 1}-edge XANES calculations, in which overlapping was required for the best agreement with experiment. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. Polarized x-ray-absorption spectroscopy of the uranyl ion: Comparison of experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, E. A.; Allen, P. G.; Terminello, L. J.; Denecke, M. A.; Reich, T.

    1996-07-01

    The x-ray linear dichroism of the uranyl ion (UO2+2) in uranium L3-edge extended x-ray-absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and L1- and L3-edge x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES), has been investigated both by experiment and theory. A striking polarization dependence is observed in the experimental XANES and EXAFS for an oriented single crystal of uranyl acetate dihydrate [UO2(CH3CO2)2.2H2O], with the x-ray polarization vector aligned either parallel or perpendicular to the bond axis of the linear uranyl cation (O-U-O). Single-crystal results are compared to experimental spectra for a polycrystalline uranyl acetate sample and to calculations using the ab initio multiple-scattering (MS) code FEFF 6. Theoretical XANES spectra for uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) reproduce all the features of the measured uranyl acetate spectra. By identifying scattering paths which contribute to individual features in the calculated spectrum, a detailed understanding of the L1-edge XANES is obtained. MS paths within the uranyl cation have a notable influence upon the XANES. The measured L3-edge EXAFS is also influenced by MS, especially when the x-ray polarization is parallel to the uranyl species. These MS contributions are extracted from the total EXAFS and compared to calculations. The best agreement with the isolated MS signal is obtained by using nonoverlapped muffin-tin spheres in the FEFF 6 calculation. This contrasts the L1-edge XANES calculations, in which overlapping was required for the best agreement with experiment.

  15. Modulation of the Structure and Properties of Uranyl Ion Coordination Polymers Derived from 1,3,5-Benzenetriacetate by Incorporation of Ag(I) or Pb(II).

    PubMed

    Thuéry, Pierre; Harrowfield, Jack

    2016-07-01

    Reaction of uranyl nitrate with 1,3,5-benzenetriacetic acid (H3BTA) in the presence of additional species, either organic bases or their conjugate acids or metal cations, has provided 12 new crystalline complexes, all but one obtained under solvo-hydrothermal conditions. The complexes [C(NH2)3][UO2(BTA)]·H2O (1) and [H2NMe2][UO2(BTA)] (2) crystallize as one- or two-dimensional (1D or 2D) assemblies, respectively, both with uranyl tris-chelation by carboxylate groups and hydrogen-bonded counterions but different ligand conformations. One of the bound carboxylate units is replaced by chelating 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) or 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Me4phen) in the complexes [(UO2)3(BTA)2(phen)3]·4H2O (3) and [(UO2)3(BTA)2(Me4phen)3]·NMP·3H2O (4) (NMP = N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone), which are a 2D network with honeycomb topology and a 1D polymer, respectively. With silver(I) cations, [UO2Ag(BTA)] (5), a three-dimensional (3D) framework in which the ligand assumes various chelating/bridging coordination modes, and the aromatic ring is involved in Ag(I) bonding, is obtained. A series of seven heterometallic complexes results when lead(II) cations and N-chelating molecules are both present. The complexes [UO2Pb(BTA)(NO3)(bipy)] (6) and [UO2Pb2(BTA)2(bipy)2]·3H2O (7), where bipy is 2,2'-bipyridine, crystallize from the one solution, as 1D and 2D assemblies, respectively. The two 1D coordination polymers [UO2Pb(BTA)(HCOO)(phen)] (8 and 9), again obtained from the one synthesis, provide an example of coordination isomerism, with the formate anion bound either to lead(II) or to uranyl cations. Another 2D architecture is found in [(UO2)2Pb2(BTA)2(HBTA)(H2O)2(phen)2]·2H2O (10), which provides a possible example of a Pb-oxo(uranyl) "cation-cation" interaction. While [UO2Pb(BTA)(HCOO)0.5(NO3)0.5(Me2phen)] (11), where Me2phen is 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline, is a 1D assembly close to those in 6 and 8, [UO2Pb2(BTA)2(Me4phen)2] (12), obtained together with

  16. Control of oxo-group functionalization and reduction of the uranyl ion.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Polly L; Pécharman, Anne-Frédérique; Lord, Rianne M; Jones, Guy M; Hollis, Emmalina; Nichol, Gary S; Maron, Laurent; Fang, Jian; Davin, Thomas; Love, Jason B

    2015-04-01

    Uranyl complexes of a large, compartmental N8-macrocycle adopt a rigid, "Pacman" geometry that stabilizes the U(V) oxidation state and promotes chemistry at a single uranyl oxo-group. We present here new and straightforward routes to singly reduced and oxo-silylated uranyl Pacman complexes and propose mechanisms that account for the product formation, and the byproduct distributions that are formed using alternative reagents. Uranyl(VI) Pacman complexes in which one oxo-group is functionalized by a single metal cation are activated toward single-electron reduction. As such, the addition of a second equivalent of a Lewis acidic metal complex such as MgN″2 (N″ = N(SiMe3)2) forms a uranyl(V) complex in which both oxo-groups are Mg functionalized as a result of Mg-N bond homolysis. In contrast, reactions with the less Lewis acidic complex [Zn(N″)Cl] favor the formation of weaker U-O-Zn dative interactions, leading to reductive silylation of the uranyl oxo-group in preference to metalation. Spectroscopic, crystallographic, and computational analysis of these reactions and of oxo-metalated products isolated by other routes have allowed us to propose mechanisms that account for pathways to metalation or silylation of the exo-oxo-group. PMID:25799215

  17. Assessment of CE-ICP/MS hyphenation for the study of uranyl/protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Thi-Ngoc Suong; Bourgeois, Damien; Basset, Christian; Vidaud, Claude; Hagège, Agnès

    2015-06-01

    Identification of uranyl transport proteins is key to develop efficient detoxification approaches. Therefore, analytical approaches have to be developed to cope with the complexity of biological media and allow the analysis of metal speciation. CE-ICP/MS was used to combine the less-intrusive character and high separation efficiency of CE with the sensitive detection of ICP/MS. The method was based on the incubation of samples with uranyl prior to the separation. Electrophoretic buffers were compared to select a 10 mM Tris to 15 mM NaCl buffer, which enabled analyses at pH 7.4 and limited dissociation. This method was applied to the analysis of a serum. Two main fractions were observed. By comparison with synthetic mixtures of proteins, the first one was attributed to fetuin and in a lesser extent to HSA, and the second one to uranyl unbound to proteins. The analysis showed that fetuin was likely to be the main target of uranyl. CE-ICP/MS was also used to investigate the behavior of the fetuin-uranyl complex, in the presence of carbonate, an abundant complexing agent of uranyl in blood. This method enabled association constants determination, suggesting the occurrence of both FETUA(UO2(2+)) and FETUA(UO2(2+))(CO3(2-)) complexes, depending on the carbonate concentration. PMID:25630637

  18. The potential of the essential fatty acid-deficient hairless rat as a psoriasis screening model for topical anti-proliferative drugs.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Monika; Groth, Lotte; Hølmer, Gunhild; Hansen, Harald S; Fullerton, Ann

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD) in hairless rats and investigate the potential of this model as a psoriasis screening model by testing the effects of calcipotriol and dithranol on differentiation and proliferation in the epidermis. Hairless rats were fed with a fat-free diet lacking linoleic acid. The EFAD condition was established within 8 weeks. In order to ensure that this condition had been established, several parameters were measured and observed, i.e. animal weight, water consumption, transepidermal water loss, clinical skin symptoms, histology of the epidermis and fatty acid analysis of serum and skin. Immediately after the EFAD condition had been established, the animals were treated with dithranol ointment or different concentrations of calcipotriol solution. A reduction in epidermal thickness of 15-20% was seen after the treatment with calcipotriol. Dithranol and its coal tar-containing vehicle also showed a reductive effect on epidermal thickness. EFAD hairless rats possess various histological changes resembling psoriasis. These histological changes normalise during treatment with anti-psoriatic drugs as calcipotriol, dithranol and coal tar. The results of the present study indicate that the EFAD rat may be a useful model for studies of anti-psoriatic drugs affecting cell proliferation. PMID:12476014

  19. Hydrothermal Crystallization of Uranyl Coordination Polymers Involving an Imidazolium Dicarboxylate Ligand: Effect of pH on the Nuclearity of Uranyl-Centered Subunits.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicolas P; Falaise, Clément; Volkringer, Christophe; Henry, Natacha; Farger, Pierre; Falk, Camille; Delahaye, Emilie; Rabu, Pierre; Loiseau, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Four uranyl-bearing coordination polymers (1-4) have been hydrothermally synthesized in the presence of the zwitterionic 1,3-bis(carboxymethyl)imidazolium (= imdc) anion as organic linkers after reaction at 150 °C. At low pH (0.8-3.1), the form 1 ((UO2)2(imdc)2(ox)·3H2O; ox stands for oxalate group) has been identified. Its crystal structure (XRD analysis) consists of the 8-fold-coordinated uranyl centers linked to each other through the imdc ligand together with oxalate species coming from the partial decomposition of the imdc molecule. The resulting structure is based on one-dimensional infinite ribbons intercalated by free water molecules. By adding NaOH solution, a second form 2 is observed for pH 1.9-3.9 but in a mixture with phase 1. The pure phase of 2 is obtained after a hydrothermal treatment at 120 °C. It corresponds to a double-layered network (UO2(imdc)2) composed of 7-fold-coordinated uranyl cations linked via the imdc ligands. In the same pH range, a third phase ((UO2)3O2(H2O)(imdc)·H2O, 3) is formed: it is composed of hexanuclear units of 7-fold- and 8-fold-coordinated uranyl cations, connected via the imdc molecules in a layered assembly. At higher pH, the chain-like solid (UO2)3O(OH)3(imdc)·2H2O (4) is observed and composed of the infinite edge-sharing uranyl-centered pentagonal bipyramidal polyhedra. As a function of pH, uranyl nuclearity increases from discrete 8- or 7-fold uranyl centers (1, 2) to hexanuclear bricks (3) and then infinite chains in 4 (built up from the hexameric fragments found in 3). This observation emphasized the influence of the hydrolysis reaction occurring between uranyl centers. The compounds have been further characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, infrared, and luminescence spectroscopy. PMID:27509393

  20. I. Electroluminescence from Hydrogen Uranyl Phosphate. I. Indium-Substituted Bismuth Copper Oxide Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, Gunnar Rudolph

    1990-01-01

    Chapter 1. A review of the general aspects of solid electrolytes is presented along with a summary of the electrical and optical properties of hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUO_2PO_4 bullet4H_2O, HUP). A review of impedance spectroscopy, as it relates to the determination of ionic conductivities and dielectric constants of solid electrolytes is presented. The final section covers some aspects of gas plasma display devices. Chapter 2. Electroluminescence (EL) cells have been constructed with the ionically conducting solid HUP as the emissive medium. With ac excitation, both uranyl emission and molecular nitrogen plasma emission are observed, with the latter appearing to excite the former. Similar results were obtained with fully-substituted sodium (NaUP), magnesium (Mg_{0.5}UP), and pyridinium (pyHUP) derivatives of HUP. For all of these solids, the dependence of the EL intensity on sample thickness, ac frequency, and applied voltage has been determined. Impedance measurements permitted acquisition of dielectric constants and ionic conductivities for these solids, both of which decrease in the order HUP > NaUP > Mg_{0.5}UP > pyHUP. A model describing the dependence of EL intensity on cell parameters is presented. Chapter 3. The copper oxide superconductors can be structurally classified into five major families, represented by the compositions, (La,Sr)_2CuO _4, YBa_2Cu_3O_7, Pb_2Sr_2(Y,Ca)Cu_3O_8, (TIO)_{m}Ca_{n-1}Ba_2Cu _{n}O_{2n+2}, and Bi_2Sr_2(Ln_{1-x}Ce _{x})_2Cu_2O_{10+y }. All families are linked by a CuO _2 layer, which is crucial for superconductivity. The structural and chemical aspects of each family is covered with emphasis on the bismuth and thallium systems. The effects of substitution and oxygen annealing are also briefly considered. Chapter 4. The attempted substitution of indium into the rm Bi_2(Ca,Sr)_2CuO _6 and Bi_2(Ca,Sr) _3Cu_2O _8 systems is reported. Previously unreported side products, (Ca,Sr)In_2O _4 and Bi-Ca-Sr-O, viz., produced in the

  1. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., described and defined as an oxidizer by the regulations of 49 CFR part 173 is handled, stored, stowed...) must be eliminated or plugged. Note: See 49 CFR 176.415 for permit requirements for nitro carbo nitrate... nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section...

  2. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., described and defined as an oxidizer by the regulations of 49 CFR part 173 is handled, stored, stowed...) must be eliminated or plugged. Note: See 49 CFR 176.415 for permit requirements for nitro carbo nitrate... nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section...

  3. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., described and defined as an oxidizer by the regulations of 49 CFR part 173 is handled, stored, stowed...) must be eliminated or plugged. Note: See 49 CFR 176.415 for permit requirements for nitro carbo nitrate... nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section...

  4. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., described and defined as an oxidizer by the regulations of 49 CFR part 173 is handled, stored, stowed...) must be eliminated or plugged. Note: See 49 CFR 176.415 for permit requirements for nitro carbo nitrate... nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section...

  5. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., described and defined as an oxidizer by the regulations of 49 CFR part 173 is handled, stored, stowed...) must be eliminated or plugged. Note: See 49 CFR 176.415 for permit requirements for nitro carbo nitrate... nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section...

  6. A spectroscopic study of uranyl-cytochrome b5/cytochrome c interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mei-Hui; Liu, Shuang-Quan; Du, Ke-Jie; Nie, Chang-Ming; Lin, Ying-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Uranium is harmful to human health due to its radiation damage and the ability of uranyl ion (UO22+) to interact with various proteins and disturb their biological functions. Cytochrome b5 (cyt b5) is a highly negatively charged heme protein and plays a key role in mediating cytochrome c (cyt c) signaling in apoptosis by forming a dynamic cyt b5-cyt c complex. In previous molecular modeling study in combination with UV-Vis studies, we found that UO22+ is capable of binding to cyt b5 at surface residues, Glu37 and Glu43. In this study, we further investigated the structural consequences of cyt b5 and cyt c, as well as cyt b5-cyt c complex, upon uranyl binding, by fluorescence spectroscopic and circular dichroism techniques. Moreover, we proposed a uranyl binding site for cyt c at surface residues, Glu66 and Glu69, by performing a molecular modeling study. It was shown that uranyl binds to cyt b5 (KD = 10 μM), cyt c (KD = 87 μM), and cyt b5-cyt c complex (KD = 30 μM) with a different affinity, which slightly alters the protein conformation and disturbs the interaction of cyt b5-cyt c complex. Additionally, we investigated the functional consequences of uranyl binding to the protein surface, which decreases the inherent peroxidase activity of cyt c. The information of uranyl-cyt b5/cyt c interactions gained in this study likely provides a clue for the mechanism of uranyl toxicity.

  7. Uranyl photoprobing of a four-way DNA junction: evidence for specific metal ion binding.

    PubMed Central

    Møllegaard, N E; Murchie, A I; Lilley, D M; Nielsen, P E

    1994-01-01

    Metal ions are very important in mediating the folding of nucleic acids, as exemplified by the folding of the four-way DNA junction into the stacked X-conformation. Uranyl ion-mediated photocleavage provides a method for the localization of high-affinity ion binding sites in nucleic acids, and we have applied this to the four-way DNA junction. We have made the following observations. (i) Uranyl ions (UO2(2+)) suppressed the reactivity of junction thymine bases against attack by osmium tetroxide, indicating that the uranyl ion induces folding of the junction into a stacked conformation. (ii) DNA located immediately at the point of strand exchange on the two exchanging strands was hypersensitive to uranyl photocleavage. The relative hypersensitivity was considerably accentuated when the photocleavage was carried out in the presence of citrate ions. This suggests the presence of a tight binding site for the uranyl ion in the junction. (iii) The same positions were significantly protected from uranyl cleavage by the presence of hexamminecobalt (III) or spermidine. These ions are known to induce the folded conformation of the four-way junction with high efficiency, suggesting a direct competition between the ions. By contrast, magnesium ions failed to generate a similar protection against photocleavage. These results suggest that the uranyl, hexamminecobalt (III) and spermidine ions compete for the same high affinity binding site on the junction. This site is located at the centre of the junction, at the point where the exchanging strands pass between the stacked helices. We believe that we have observed the first known example of a metal ion 'footprint' on a folded nucleic acid structure. Images PMID:8156988

  8. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  9. Ammonium nitrate explosive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Coburn, M.D.; Stinecipher, M.M.

    1981-11-17

    Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

  10. Ammonium nitrate explosive systems

    DOEpatents

    Stinecipher, Mary M.; Coburn, Michael D.

    1981-01-01

    Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

  11. Nitrate Storage and Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction by Eukaryotic Microbes.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Stief, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described. A first compilation of intracellular nitrate inventories in various marine sediments is presented, indicating that intracellular nitrate pools vastly exceed porewater nitrate pools. The relative contribution by foraminifers to total sedimentary denitrification is estimated for different marine settings, suggesting that eukaryotes may rival prokaryotes in terms of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Finally, this review article sketches some evolutionary perspectives of eukaryotic nitrate metabolism and identifies open questions that need to be addressed in future investigations. PMID:26734001

  12. Nitrate Storage and Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction by Eukaryotic Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Stief, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described. A first compilation of intracellular nitrate inventories in various marine sediments is presented, indicating that intracellular nitrate pools vastly exceed porewater nitrate pools. The relative contribution by foraminifers to total sedimentary denitrification is estimated for different marine settings, suggesting that eukaryotes may rival prokaryotes in terms of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Finally, this review article sketches some evolutionary perspectives of eukaryotic nitrate metabolism and identifies open questions that need to be addressed in future investigations. PMID:26734001

  13. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency selectively up-regulates delta6-desaturase expression and activity indices in rat liver: prevention by normalization of omega-3 fatty acid status.

    PubMed

    Hofacer, Rylon; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Magrisso, I Jack; Benoit, Stephen C; McNamara, Robert K

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of perinatal dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid depletion and subsequent repletion on the expression of genes that regulate long-chain (LC) polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in rat liver and brain. It was hypothesized that chronic n-3 fatty acid deficiency would increase liver Fads1 and Fads2 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression/activity and that n-3 fatty acid repletion would normalize this response. Adult rats fed the n-3-free diet during perinatal development exhibited significantly lower erythrocyte, liver, and frontal cortex LCn-3 fatty acid composition and reciprocal elevations in LC omega-6 (n-6) fatty acid composition compared with controls (CONs) and repleted rats. Liver Fads2, but not Fads1, Elovl2, or Elovl5, mRNA expression was significantly greater in n-3-deficient (DEF) rats compared with CONs and was partially normalized in repleted rats. The liver 18:3n-6/18:2n-6 ratio, an index of delta6-desturase activity, was significantly greater in DEF rats compared with CON and repleted rats and was positively correlated with Fads2 mRNA expression among all rats. The liver 18:3n-6/18:2n-6 ratio, but not Fads2 mRNA expression, was also positively correlated with erythrocyte and frontal cortex LCn-6 fatty acid compositions. Neither Fads1 or Fads2 mRNA expression was altered in brain cortex of DEF rats. These results confirm previous findings that liver, but not brain, delta6-desaturase expression and activity indices are negatively regulated by dietary n-3 fatty acids. PMID:22024496

  14. Identification of genes and pathways involved in the synthesis of Mead acid (20:3n-9), an indicator of essential fatty acid deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ichi, Ikuyo; Kono, Nozomu; Arita, Yuka; Haga, Shizuka; Arisawa, Kotoko; Yamano, Misato; Nagase, Mana; Fujiwara, Yoko; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, 5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid (Mead acid, 20:3n-9) is synthesized from oleic acid during a state of essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD). Mead acid is thought to be produced by the same enzymes that synthesize arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, but the genes and the pathways involved in the conversion of oleic acid to Mead acid have not been fully elucidated. The levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in cultured cells are generally very low compared to those in mammalian tissues. In this study, we found that cultured cells, such as NIH3T3 and Hepa1-6 cells, have significant levels of Mead acid, indicating that cells in culture are in an EFAD state under normal culture conditions. We then examined the effect of siRNA-mediated knockdown of fatty acid desaturases and elongases on the level of Mead acid, and found that knockdown of Elovl5, Fads1, or Fads2 decreased the level of Mead acid. This and the measured levels of possible intermediate products for the synthesis of Mead acid such as 18:2n-9, 20:1n-9 and 20:2n-9 in the knocked down cells indicate two pathways for the synthesis of Mead acid: pathway 1) 18:1n-9→(Fads2)→18:2n-9→(Elovl5)→20:2n-9→(Fads1)→20:3n-9 and pathway 2) 18:1n-9→(Elovl5)→20:1n-9→(Fads2)→20:2n-9→(Fads1)→20:3n-9. PMID:24184513

  15. Chemical equilibria in the binary and ternary uranyl(VI)-hydroxide-peroxide systems.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2012-03-28

    The composition and equilibrium constants of the complexes formed in the binary U(VI)-hydroxide and the ternary U(VI)-hydroxide-peroxide systems have been studied using potentiometric and spectrophotometric data at 25 °C in a 0.100 M tetramethylammonium nitrate medium. The data for the binary U(VI) hydroxide complexes were in good agreement with previous studies. In the ternary system two complexes were identified, [UO(2)(OH)(O(2))](-) and [(UO(2))(2)(OH)(O(2))(2)](-). Under our experimental conditions the former is predominant over a broad p[H(+)] region from 9.5 to 11.5, while the second is found in significant amounts at p[H(+)] < 10.5. The formation of the ternary peroxide complexes results in a strong increase in the molar absorptivity of the test solutions. The absorption spectrum for [(UO(2))(2)(OH)(O(2))(2)](-) was resolved into two components with peaks at 353 and 308 nm with molar absorptivity of 16200 and 20300 M(-1) cm(-1), respectively, suggesting that the electronic transitions are dipole allowed. The molar absorptivity of [(UO(2))(OH)(O(2))](-) at the same wave lengths are significantly lower, but still about one to two orders of magnitude larger than the values for UO(2)(2+)(aq) and the binary uranyl(VI) hydroxide complexes. It is of interest to note that [(UO(2))(OH)(O(2))](-) might be the building block in cluster compounds such as [UO(2)(OH)(O(2))](60)(60-) studied by Burns et al. (P. C. Burns, K. A. Kubatko, G. Sigmon, B. J. Fryer, J. E. Gagnon, M. R. Antonio and L. Soderholm, Angew. Chem. 2005, 117, 2173-2177). Speciation calculations using the known equilibrium constants for the U(vi) hydroxide and peroxide complexes show that the latter are important in alkaline solutions even at very low total concentrations of peroxide, suggesting that they may be involved when the uranium minerals Studtite and meta-Studtite are formed by α-radiolysis of water. Radiolysis will be much larger in repositories for spent nuclear fuel where hydrogen peroxide

  16. Assessment of accidental intakes of uranyl acetylacetonate (UAA)

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.; Briant, J.K.

    1993-12-01

    Uranyl acetylacetonate (UAA) is an organic complex of uranium used for military applications as a chemical catalyst in high explosives. It is prepared from depleted uranium metal (in lots of 5 kg to 7 kg) by dissolution in nitric acid, neutralization, and complexation with 2,4-pentanedione; the precipitate is dissolved in benzene and recrystallized, dried, ground, and packaged. About six workers at a small chemical company were exposed over a period of time to UAA powders during routine preparation and packaging of the uranium catalyst. The dissolution characteristics of the inhaled material were unknown and could not be determined from the published scientific literature. A 1.05-g sample of UAA powder was obtained from the responsible regulatory authority for further study to determine its chemical composition, and for dissolution in simulated lung fluid. We found the solubility of UAA to be equivalent to a mixture of 52% ICRP class D and 48% ICRP class W material. The annual limit on intake and the derived air concentration for radiological protection were estimated from this result for airborne exposure to UAA. A recycling biokinetic model was used to estimate both material-specific variations in urinary excretion rates and lung retention with time after accidental intakes. This study provides new information for evaluating future exposures to UAA.

  17. Characterization and Detection of Uranyl Ion Sorption on Silver Surfaces using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Retterer, Scott T; Wells, Sabrina M; Sepaniak, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The study of the chemical behavior of uranyl species and its rapid detection is of primary environmental and non-proliferation concern. Herein we report on a surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic study of uranyl ion (UO22+) sorption onto the thermally vapor deposited silver particle surface. The ability of vibrational spectroscopy to characterize surface phenomenon and the remarkable sensitivity of the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) have been introduced as an appropriate combination for the surface characterization and detection of UO22+ onto the silver surface. The appearance of symmetric stretching frequency of UO22+ around 700 cm-1 and the disappearance of the 854 cm-1 band is attributed to the development of a chemical bond between silver surface and uranyl species. The effects of temperature, solute-surface interaction time, and pH have been studied using silver modified polypropylene filter (PPF) substrates. Results show that under appropriate conditions, the concentration of uranyl ion as low as 20 ng/mL can be easily detected using the discussed SERS approach without any surface modification of silver nanoparticles. Moreover, an alteranative SERS approach of uranyl detection is demonstrated using nano-lithographically fabricated SERS substrates.

  18. EXAFS determinations of uranium structures: The uranyl ion complexed with tartaric, citric, and malic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.G.; Shuh, D.K.; Bucher, J.J.

    1996-01-31

    Studies of the coordination chemistry of uranium in aqueous solutions are increasingly important for understanding the behavior of uranium in the environment. Actinide speciation information is essential for assessing and developing long-term strategies addressing problems such as migration in nuclear waste repositories or improvements in the processing of nuclear waste and materials. Relative to the latter, one method for removing uranium contamination from soils involves extraction using a chelating agent such as Tiron, or citrate. These types of extractants are quite efficient at binding the uranyl ion and thus are suitable for removing uranium contamination when it is in the hexavalent uranyl ion form. Martell et al. and Markovits et al. have published a series of articles detailing the complexation of the uranyl ion with tartaric, malic, and citric acids as a function of pH. Using the functional dependencies of potentiometric titration results, they showed that, in the pH range 2-4, the uranyl ion forms a 2:2 dimeric species, (UO{sub 2}){sub 2-} (L){sub 2}, where L = tartrate, malate, or citrate ligands. The authors have reinvestigated the solution structures of the uranyl complexes formed in these systems with the structural technique extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy.

  19. Determination of trace uranyl ion by thermoresponsive porphyrin-terminated polymeric sensor.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiaowen; Wang, Yingjie; Zhang, Shuang; Huang, Li; Wang, Shuao; Hua, Daoben

    2015-01-01

    Uranyl ion exists at trace levels in the environment and can cause severe adverse effects to human health. Therefore, it is desirable to develop analytical methods that can determine the trace uranyl ion in aqueous medium. We report here a new method using a thermo-responsive polymeric fluorescent sensor. Specifically, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)-porphyrin terminated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (TCPP-PNIPAM) was synthesized by controlled free radical polymerization for the detection of uranyl ion. The maximum fluorescence intensity at ~ 658 nm of TCPP-PNIPAM increases with molecular weights and is also closely related to the temperature. The polymeric sensor is sensitive to pH (1.0 ~ 5.0) with a fast responsive time (~ 3 min). Under optimized experimental conditions, the sensor exhibits a stable response for uranyl ion with high selectivity over a concentration range from 1.0 × 10(-3) to 1.0 × 10(-7)mol/L. For the trace uranyl ion (such as 1.0 × 10(-8) or 10(-9)mol/L), the determination could be successfully achieved after concentrating 100 times by centrifugation above 32°C. The properties enable the polymeric sensor to have great potential for environmental application. PMID:25281093

  20. Binding constant determination of uranyl-citrate complex by ACE using a multi-injection method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiding; Li, Linnan; Huang, Hexiang; Xu, Linnan; Li, Ze; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-04-01

    The binding constant determination of uranyl with small-molecule ligands such as citric acid could provide fundamental knowledge for a better understanding of the study of uranyl complexation, which is of considerable importance for multiple purposes. In this work, the binding constant of uranyl-citrate complex was determined by ACE. Besides the common single-injection method, a multi-injection method to measure the electrophoretic mobility was also applied. The BGEs used contained HClO4 and NaClO4 , with a pH of 1.98 ± 0.02 and ionic strength of 0.050 mol/L, then citric acid was added to reach different concentrations. The electrophoretic mobilities of the uranyl-citrate complex measured by both of the two methods were consistent, and then the binding constant was calculated by nonlinear fitting assuming that the reaction had a 1:1 stoichiometry and the complex was [(UO2 )(Cit)](-) . The binding constant obtained by the multi-injection method was log K = 9.68 ± 0.07, and that obtained by the single-injection method was log K = 9.73 ± 0.02. The results provided additional knowledge of the uranyl-citrate system, and they demonstrated that compared with other methods, ACE using the multi-injection method could be an efficient, fast, and simple way to determine electrophoretic mobilities and to calculate binding constants. PMID:25598434

  1. Structure and Reactivity of X-ray Amorphous Uranyl Peroxide, U2O7.

    PubMed

    Odoh, Samuel O; Shamblin, Jacob; Colla, Christopher A; Hickam, Sarah; Lobeck, Haylie L; Lopez, Rachel A K; Olds, Travis; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Sigmon, Ginger E; Neuefeind, Joerg; Casey, William H; Lang, Maik; Gagliardi, Laura; Burns, Peter C

    2016-04-01

    Recent accidents resulting in worker injury and radioactive contamination occurred due to pressurization of uranium yellowcake drums produced in the western U.S.A. The drums contained an X-ray amorphous reactive form of uranium oxide that may have contributed to the pressurization. Heating hydrated uranyl peroxides produced during in situ mining can produce an amorphous compound, as shown by X-ray powder diffraction of material from impacted drums. Subsequently, studtite, [(UO2)(O2)(H2O)2](H2O)2, was heated in the laboratory. Its thermal decomposition produced a hygroscopic anhydrous uranyl peroxide that reacts with water to release O2 gas and form metaschoepite, a uranyl-oxide hydrate. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that the most stable U2O7 conformer consists of two bent (UO2)(2+) uranyl ions bridged by a peroxide group bidentate and parallel to each uranyl ion, and a μ2-O atom, resulting in charge neutrality. A pair distribution function from neutron total scattering supports this structural model, as do (1)H- and (17)O-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. The reactivity of U2O7 in water and with water in air is higher than that of other uranium oxides, and this can be both hazardous and potentially advantageous in the nuclear fuel cycle. PMID:26974702

  2. Nitrate biosensors and biological methods for nitrate determination.

    PubMed

    Sohail, Manzar; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2016-06-01

    The inorganic nitrate (NO3‾) anion is present under a variety of both natural and artificial environmental conditions. Nitrate is ubiquitous within the environment, food, industrial and physiological systems and is mostly present as hydrated anion of a corresponding dissolved salt. Due to the significant environmental and toxicological effects of nitrate, its determination and monitoring in environmental and industrial waters are often necessary. A wide range of analytical techniques are available for nitrate determination in various sample matrices. This review discusses biosensors available for nitrate determination using the enzyme nitrate reductase (NaR). We conclude that nitrate determination using biosensors is an excellent non-toxic alternative to all other available analytical methods. Over the last fifteen years biosensing technology for nitrate analysis has progressed very well, however, there is a need to expedite the development of nitrate biosensors as a suitable alternative to non-enzymatic techniques through the use of different polymers, nanostructures, mediators and strategies to overcome oxygen interference. PMID:27130094

  3. Aqueous uranyl complexes. 3. Potentiometric measurements of the hydrolysis of uranyl(VI) ion at 25{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.A.; Nguyen-Trung, C.

    1995-12-01

    Potentiometric titrations of uranyl(VI) solutions were conducted using a standard glass/calomel electrode combination over the pH range 3 to 12 at 0.1 mol-kg{sup {minus}1} ionic strength with tetramethylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate as the supporting electrolyte. The electrodes were calibrated directly on the hydrogen ion concentration scale during the initial stage of each titration. The species, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}{sup 2+}, (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(OH){sub 5}{sup +}, (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(OH){sub 7}{sup {minus}}, (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(OH){sub 8}{sup 2-}, and (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(OH){sub 10}{sup 4-} identified in an earlier Raman study were compatible with the analysis of the titration data. Based on this analysis and application of the extended Debye-Hueckel treatment, the polynuclear species indicated above were assigned overall formation constants at 25{degrees}C and at infinite dilution of -5.51{plus_minus}0.04, -15.3{plus_minus}0.1, -27.77{plus_minus}0.09, -37.65{plus_minus}0.14, and -62.4{plus_minus}0.3, respectively. The results are discussed in reference to hydrolysis quotients reported in the literature for the first three species. Formation quotients for the last two species have not been reported previously.

  4. vapor pressure of uranyl beta-diketonates. IV. effect of adduct formation on volatility of uranyl pivaloyltrifluoroacetonate

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorenko, G.V.; Suglobov, D.N.

    1986-07-01

    Gas-phase adduct formation of uranyl pivaloyltrifluoroacetonate (I) with donor active materials such as trimethyl phosphate (TMP), pyridine (Py), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and ethanol (EtOH) was demonstrated by IR spectroscopy. Vapor pressure of the I-TMF adduct was measured by the flow method. The volatility of I was studied in a stream of helium saturated with vapors of donor-active materials: Py, THF, diethyl ether (Et/sub 2/O), EtOH, and acetonitrile. The temperature dependence of the pressure of saturated I.TMP and I vapor in a stream of neutral ligand vapor is described by log p (Pa) = -A/T + B. Following are, respectively, neutral ligand, T range (degreeK), and coefficiencts A, B: TMP 383453, 4648 +/- 48, 12.06 +/- 0.18; Py, 383-463, 5277 +/- 87, 13.36 +/- 0.21; THF, 363453, 4662 +/- 69, 12.66 +/- 0.17; Et/sub 2/O, 353-423, 4864 +/- 110, 13.29 +/- 0.28; EtOH, 363-443, 4509 +/- 89, 12.18 +/- 0.22. Adduct formation with these neutral ligands decreases the volatility of I significantly. A tendency to increase of adduct volatility was observed when the donor properties of the neutral ligand decrease.

  5. Nitrate therapy in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Alpert, J S

    1990-06-01

    Changes in the heart and blood vessels with age alter the response of the cardiovascular system to pharmacologic agents. Nitrate plasma half-life is longer and volume of distribution is larger in older persons. Apparently, these pharmacokinetic differences in older persons lead to increased venous smooth muscle responsivity to nitrates which, in turn, leads to greater reductions in central venous and pulmonary arterial pressures after nitrate administration. This is probably the explanation for the greater frequency of nitrate-induced severe hypotension and bradycardia in elderly patients with myocardial infarction compared with younger patients. Clinicians should be cognizant of the changes in the cardiovascular system which occur with age that sensitize the elderly patient to the action of organic nitrates. Initial dosages of nitrates should accordingly be less than in younger patients. PMID:2112335

  6. COMPARISON OF MUTAGENIC ACTIVITIES OF SEVERAL PEROXYACL NITRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salmonella typhimurium, strain TA100 was exposed to a series of peroxyacyl nitrates including peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), peroxypropionyl nitrate (PPN), peroxybutyryl nitrate (PBN), peroxybenzoyl nitrate (PBzN), and chloroperoxyacetyl nitrate (CPAN). as-phase concentrations for t...

  7. COMPARISON OF MUTAGENIC ACTIVITIES OF SEVERAL PEROXYACYL NITRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100 was exposed to a series of peroxyacyl nitrates including peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), peroxypropionyl nitrate peroxybutyryl nitrate (PBN), peroxybenzoyl nitrate (PBzN), and chlororoxyacetyl nitrate (CPAN). as phase concentrations for the individ...

  8. Designing novel materials through functionalization of carbon nanotubes for application in nuclear waste management: speciation of uranyl.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, Mahesh; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2011-06-23

    Understanding the behavior of radioactive nuclide elements in different environmental conditions is an active area of research. In this work, we have investigated the possible interaction mechanism between carbon nanotubes and uranyl using density functional theory. It is shown that functionalized carbon nanotubes can be used to bind uranyl ions much more efficiently as compared to their unfunctionalized counterpart. The uranyl binding energies are sensitive to the nature of the functional groups rather than the carbon nanotube itself. The binding takes place preferably at the functionalized sites, although pH could determine the strength of uranyl binding. Our predicted results correlate well with the recent experimental uranyl sorption studies on carbon nanotubes. These finding are new and can open up a new era for actinide speciation and separation chemistry using carbon nanotubes. PMID:21598919

  9. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study of the uranyl behaviour at the gibbsite/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lectez, Sébastien; Roques, Jérôme; Salanne, Mathieu; Simoni, Eric

    2012-10-01

    The uranyl cation UO22+ adsorption on the basal face of gibbsite is studied via Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics. In a first step, we study the water sorption on a gibbsite surface. Three different sorption modes are observed and their hydrogen bond patterns are, respectively, characterized. Then we investigate the sorption properties of an uranyl cation, in the presence of water. In order to take into account the protonation state of the (001) gibbsite face, both a neutral (001) face and a locally deprotonated (001) face are modeled. In the first case, three adsorbed uranyl complexes (1 outer sphere and 2 inner spheres) with similar stabilities are identified. In the second case, when the gibbsite face is locally deprotonated, two adsorbed complexes (1 inner sphere and 1 outer one) are characterized. The inner sphere complex appears to be the most strongly linked to the gibbsite face.

  10. Activation of gas-phase uranyl: from an oxo to a nitrido complex.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Vallet, Valérie; Michelini, Maria del Carmen; Rios, Daniel; Gibson, John K

    2014-01-01

    The uranyl moiety, UO2(2+), is ubiquitous in the chemistry of uranium, the most prevalent actinide. Replacing the strong uranium-oxygen bonds in uranyl with other ligands is very challenging, having met with only limited success. We report here uranyl oxo bond activation in the gas phase to form a terminal nitrido complex, a previously elusive transformation. Collision induced dissociation of gas-phase UO2(NCO)Cl2(-) in an ion trap produced the nitrido oxo complex, NUOCl2(-), and CO2. NUOCl2(-) was computed by DFT to have Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. The computed bond length and order indicate a triple U-N bond. Endothermic activation of UO2(NCO)Cl2(-) to produce NUOCl2(-) and neutral CO2 was computed to be thermodynamically more favorable than NCO ligand loss. Complete reaction pathways for the CO2 elimination process were computed at the DFT level. PMID:24354492

  11. Copper(I) and copper(II) uranyl heterometallic hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Weng, Zhehui; Zhang, Zhi-hui; Olds, Travis; Sterniczuk, Marcin; Burns, Peter C

    2014-08-01

    Two copper-uranium heterometallic compounds, [(UO2)3Cu(II)O2(C6NO2)5] (1) and [(UO2)Cu(I)(C6NO2)3] (2), have been synthesized by the reaction of uranyl acetate with copper salts in the presence of isonicotinic acid. Both compounds have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, IR, Raman, and UV-vis spectroscopy. In compound 1, interactions between copper and uranium centers occur and result in a three-dimensional pillar layered structure. Compound 1 is also the first example of a heterometallic uranyl organic framework with a trinuclear U3O18 building block. Compound 2 is the first uranyl organic framework that contains monovalent copper, which arises from the reaction of Cu(II) chloride and is assumed to be due to the oxidation of chloride at low pH. PMID:25029287

  12. Energy Landscape of Chelated Uranyl: Antibody Interactions by Dynamic Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Odorico, Michael; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Bessou, Thérèse; Vidaud, Claude; Bellanger, Laurent; Chen, Shu-wen W.; Quéméneur, Éric; Parot, Pierre; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    We used dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to explore the energy landscape of interactions between a chelated uranyl compound and a monoclonal antibody raised against the uranyl-dicarboxy-phenanthroline complex. We estimated the potential energy barrier widths and the relevant thermodynamic rate constants along the dissociation coordinate. Using atomic force microscopy, four different experimental setups with or without the uranyl ion in the chelate ligand, we have distinguished specific and nonspecific binding in the binding affinity of the uranyl compound to the antibody. The force loading rates for our system were measured from 15 to 26,400 pN/s. The results showed two regimes in the plot of the most probable unbinding force versus the logarithm of the loading rate, revealing the presence of two (at least) activation barriers. Analyses of DFS suggest parallel multivalent binding present in either regime. We have also built a molecular model for the variable fragment of the antibody and used computational graphics to dock the chelated uranyl ion into the binding pocket. The structural analysis led us to hypothesize that the two regimes originate from two interaction modes: the first one corresponds to an energy barrier with a very narrow width of 0.5 ± 0.2 Å, inferring dissociation of the uranyl ion from its first coordination shell (Asp residue); the second one with a broader energy barrier width (3.9 ± 0.3 Å) infers the entire chelate compound dissociated from the antibody. Our study highlights the sensitivity of DFS experiments to dissect protein-metal compound interactions. PMID:17449661

  13. Selectivity in ligand binding to uranyl compounds: A synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, John

    2015-01-21

    The uranyl cation (UO₂²⁺) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. It is anticipated that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials. The focus of this study is to synthesize uranyl complexes incorporating amidinate and guanidinate ligands. Both synthetic and computational methods are used to investigate novel equatorial ligand coordination and how this affects the basicity of the oxo ligands. Such an understanding will later apply to designing ligands incorporating functionalities that can bind uranyl both equatorially and axially for highly selective sequestration. Efficient and durable chromatography supports for lanthanide separation will be generated by (1) identifying robust peptoid-based ligands capable of binding different lanthanides with variable affinities, and (2) developing practical synthetic methods for the attachment of these ligands to Dowex ion exchange resins.

  14. Revision of the biodistribution of uranyl in serum: is fetuin-A the major protein target?

    PubMed

    Basset, Christian; Averseng, Olivier; Ferron, Pierre-Jean; Richaud, Nicolas; Hagège, Agnès; Pible, Olivier; Vidaud, Claude

    2013-05-20

    Uranium is a natural actinide present as uranyl U(VI) species in aqueous environments. Its toxicity is considered to be chemical rather than radiotoxicological. Whatever the route of entry, uranyl reaches the blood, is partly eliminated via the kidneys, and accumulated in the bones. In serum, its speciation mainly involves carbonate and proteins. Direct identification of labile uranyl-protein complexes is extremely difficult because of the complexity of this matrix. Thus, until now the biodistribution of the metal in serum has not been described, and therefore, little is known about the metal transport mechanisms leading to bone accumulation. A rapid screening method based on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique was used to determine the apparent affinities for U(VI) of the major serum proteins. A first biodistribution of uranyl was obtained by ranking the proteins according to the criteria of both their serum concentrations and affinities for this metal. Despite its moderate concentration in serum, fetuin-A (FETUA) was shown to exhibit an apparent affinity within the 30 nM range and to carry more than 80% of the metal. This protein involved in bone mineralization aroused interest in characterizing the U(VI) and FETUA interaction. Using complementary chromatographic and spectroscopic approaches, we demonstrated that the protein can bind 3 U(VI) at different binding sites exhibiting Kd from ∼30 nM to 10 μM. Some structural modifications and functional properties of FETUA upon uranyl complexation were also controlled. To our knowledge, this article presents the first identification of a uranyl carrier involved in bone metabolism along with the characterization of its metal binding sites. PMID:23527557

  15. Bonding and charge transfer in nitrogen-donor uranyl complexes: insights from NEXAFS spectra.

    PubMed

    Pemmaraju, C D; Copping, Roy; Wang, Shuao; Janousch, Markus; Teat, Simon J; Tyliszcak, Tolek; Canning, Andrew; Shuh, David K; Prendergast, David

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the electronic structure of three newly synthesized nitrogen-donor uranyl complexes [(UO2)(H2bbp)Cl2], [(UO)2(Hbbp)(Py)Cl], and [(UO2)(bbp)(Py)2] using a combination of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy experiments and simulations. The complexes studied feature derivatives of the tunable tridentate N-donor ligand 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazyl)pyridine (bbp) and exhibit discrete chemical differences in uranyl coordination. The sensitivity of the N K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum to local bonding and charge transfer is exploited to systematically investigate the evolution of structural as well as electronic properties across the three complexes. A thorough interpretation of the measured experimental spectra is achieved via ab initio NEXAFS simulations based on the eXcited electron and Core-Hole (XCH) approach and enables the assignment of spectral features to electronic transitions on specific absorbing sites. We find that ligand-uranyl bonding leads to a signature blue shift in the N K-edge absorption onset, resulting from charge displacement toward the uranyl, while changes in the equatorial coordination shell of the uranyl lead to more subtle modulations in the spectral features. Theoretical simulations show that the flexible local chemistry at the nonbinding imidazole-N sites of the bbp ligand is also reflected in the NEXAFS spectra and highlights potential synthesis strategies to improve selectivity. In particular, we find that interactions of the bbp ligand with solvent molecules can lead to changes in ligand-uranyl binding geometry while also modulating the K-edge absorption. Our results suggest that NEXAFS spectroscopy combined with first-principles interpretation can offer insights into the coordination chemistry of analogous functionalized conjugated ligands. PMID:25330350

  16. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficiency Does Not Alter the Effects of Chronic Fluoxetine Treatment on Central Serotonin Turnover or Behavior in the Forced Swim Test in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Robert K.; Able, Jessica A.; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Lipton, Jack W.

    2013-01-01

    While translational evidence suggests that long-chain omega-3 fatty acid status is positively associated with the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs, the neurochemical mechanisms mediating this interaction are not known. Here we investigated the effects of dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid insufficiency on the neurochemical and behavioral effects of chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Female rats were fed diets with (CON, n=56) or without (DEF, n=40) the n-3 fatty acids during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90), and one half of each group were administered FLX (10 mg/kg/d) for 30 d (P60-P90) prior to testing. In adulthood (P90), regional brain serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic (5-HIAA) concentrations, presynaptic markers of 5-HT neurotransmission, behavioral responses in the forced swim test (FST), and plasma FLX and norfluoxetine (NFLX) concentrations were investigated. Peri-adolescent n-3 insufficiency led to significant reductions in cortical docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (−25%, p≤0.0001) and DEF+FLX (−28%, p≤0.0001) rats. Untreated DEF rats exhibited significantly lower regional 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios compared with untreated CON rats, but exhibited similar behavioral responses in the FST. In both CON and DEF rats, chronic FLX treatment similarly and significantly decreased 5-HIAA concentrations and the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens, brainstem tryptophan hydroxylase-2 mRNA expression, and immobility in the FST. While the FLX-induced reduction in 5-HIAA concentrations in the prefrontal cortex was significantly blunted in DEF rats, the reduction in the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio was similar to CON rats. Although plasma FLX and NFLX levels were not significantly different in DEF and CON rats, the NFLX/FLX ratio was significantly lower in DEF+FLX rats. These preclinical data demonstrate that n-3 fatty acid deficiency does not significantly reduce the effects of chronic

  17. Treatment tests for ex situ removal of chromate, nitrate, and uranium (VI) from Hanford (100-HR-3) groundwater. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, M.A.; Duncan, J.B.

    1993-11-15

    This report describes batch and anion exchange column laboratory-scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}), and uranium (present as uranyl (uranium [VI]) carbonato anionic species) from contaminated Hanford Site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium, and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium, and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1993). The goal of these tests was to determine the best method to remove selected contaminants to below the concentration of the project performance goals. The raw data and observations made during these tests can be found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) laboratory notebooks (Beck 1992, Herting 1993). The method recommended for future study is anion exchange with Dowex 21K resin.

  18. Removal of uranyl ions by p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arene acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu (Hoştuc), Ioana-Carmen; Petru, Filip; Humelnicu, Ionel; Mateescu, Marina; Militaru, Ecaterina; Humelnicu, Doina

    2014-10-01

    Radioactive pollution is a significant threat for the people’s health. Therefore highly effective radioactive decontamination methods are required. Ion exchange, biotechnologies and phytoremediation in constructed wetlands have been used as radioactive decontamination technologies for uranium contaminated soil and water remediation. Recently, beside those classical methods the calix[n]arenic derivatives’ utilization as radioactive decontaminators has jogged attention. The present work aims to present the preliminary research results of uranyl ion sorption studies on the p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arenic acid. The effect of temperature, contact time, sorbent amount and uranyl concentration variation on sorption efficiency was investigated. Isotherm models revealed that the sorption process fit better Langmuir isotherm.

  19. K8(K5F)U6Si8O40: An Intergrowth Uranyl Silicate.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Gregory; Tran, T Thao; Halasyamani, P Shiv; Zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2016-04-01

    Single crystals of K8(K5F)U6Si8O40 were grown from a mixed alkali halide flux. K8(K5F)U6Si8O40 is the first intergrowth uranyl silicate, being composed of alternating slabs related to two previously reported uranyl silicates: Cs2USiO6 and [Na9F2][(UO2)(UO2)2(Si2O7)2]. It exhibits intense luminescence, which is influenced by the [(UO2)2O] dimers present in the structure. PMID:26974872

  20. Molecular Simulation of the Diffusion of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2010-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous uranyl carbonate species were carried out with two different potential models to gain molecular-level insight into the hydration properties of these species and evaluate the ability of the two models to reproduce published ab initio and experimental data. The simulation results were used to estimate the self-diffusion coefficients of uranyl carbonate species that often dominate uranyl speciation in groundwater systems. The first potential model was based on a series of shell models developed by Parker and co-workers (including (DE LEEUW and PARKER, 1998; KERISIT and PARKER, 2004; PAVESE et al., 1996). The second potential model was a rigid-ion model based on the flexible SPC water model (TELEMAN et al., 1987), the uranyl model of Guilbaud and Wipff (GUILBAUD and WIPFF, 1996), and the parameters for the carbonate ion given by Greathouse and co-workers (GREATHOUSE and CYGAN, 2005; GREATHOUSE et al., 2002). Analysis of structural (mean interatomic distances and coordination numbers) and dynamical (water residence times in hydration shell and self-diffusion coefficients) properties showed that, overall, the first potential model performed best when compared to published data, although the only major discrepancy with the second model was a misrepresentation of the configuration adopted by the alkaline-earth uranyl carbonate ions. The diffusion coefficients obtained for the alkaline-earth cations and the uranyl ion were compared with three variants of the Stokes-Einstein (SE) equation and it was found that none of the three SE models were able to reproduce both the absolute values and the overall trend determined from the molecular dynamics simulations. However, as would be expected based on the SE equation, a plot of the diffusion coefficients of the uranyl carbonate complexes as a function of the inverse of the equivalent spherical radius showed a general linear dependence with the two models yielding almost identical gradients

  1. Sorption of uranyl ions from various acido systems by amphoteric epoxy amine ion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Rychkov, V.N.; Radionov, B.K.; Molochnikov, L.S.

    1995-03-01

    Sorption of uranyl ions by epoxy amine ampholytes with N-monomethylenephosphonic acid groups modified with pyridine or quaternary ammonium groups was studied under dynamic conditions. Heterocyclic nitrogen favors sorption of uranyl ion from fluoride, sulfate, and fluoride-sulfate solutions. The ESR studies of mono- and bimetallic forms of nitrogen-containing ampholytes with copper(II) as paramagnetic marker revealed the characteristics of uranium(VI) interaction with cation- and anion-exchange groups and its dependence on the fluoride content in solution.

  2. Syntheses and crystal structures of two novel alkaline uranyl chromates A{sub 2}(UO{sub 2})(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2} (A=Rb, Cs) with bidentate coordination mode of uranyl ions by chromate anions

    SciTech Connect

    Siidra, Oleg I.

    2012-03-15

    Single crystals of Cs{sub 2}(UO{sub 2})(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2} and Rb{sub 2}(UO{sub 2})(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2} were prepared by solid state reactions. The structures are based upon the [(UO{sub 2})(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sup 2-} chains. Within the chains, UrO{sub 5} pentagonal bipyramids (Ur=uranyl) form Ur{sub 2}O{sub 8} dimers, which are linked via CrO{sub 4} tetrahedra into one-dimensional chains. The CrO{sub 4} tetrahedra coordinate uranyl ions in both mono- and bidentate fashion, which is unusual for uranyl chromates. The bidentate coordination has a strong influence upon geometrical parameters of both U and Cr coordination polyhedra. The conformation of the chains in 1 and 2 is different due to the different size of the Cs{sup +} and Rb{sup +} cations. - Graphical abstract: Uranyl chromate chain with monodentate and bidentate coordination mode of uranyl cations by CrO{sub 4} tetrahedra in Cs{sub 2}(UO{sub 2})(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single crystals of novel uranyl chromates were prepared by solid state reactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CrO{sub 4} tetrahedra coordinate uranyl ions in both mono- and bidentate fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The bidentate coordination has a strong influence upon geometrical parameters.

  3. TREATMENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, T.W.; MacHutchin, J.G.; Yaffe, L.

    1958-06-10

    The treatment of waste solutions obtained in the processing of neutron- irradiated uranium containing fission products and ammonium nitrate is described. The object of this process is to provide a method whereby the ammonium nitrate is destroyed and removed from the solution so as to permit subsequent concentration of the solution.. In accordance with the process the residual nitrate solutions are treated with an excess of alkyl acid anhydride, such as acetic anhydride. Preferably, the residual nitrate solution is added to an excess of the acetic anhydride at such a rate that external heat is not required. The result of this operation is that the ammonium nitrate and acetic anhydride react to form N/sub 2/ O and acetic acid.

  4. Some History of Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Dennis W.

    2003-12-01

    The history of saltpeter is an interesting combination of chemistry, world trade, technology, politics, and warfare. Originally it was obtained from the dirt floors of stables, sheep pens, pigeon houses, caverns, and even peasants' cottages; any place manure and refuse accumulated in soil under dry conditions. When these sources became inadequate to meet demand it was manufactured on saltpeter plantations, located in dry climates, where piles of dirt, limestone, and manure were allowed to stand for three to five years while soil microbes oxidized the nitrogen to nitrate—an example of early bioengineering. Extensive deposits of sodium nitrate were mined in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile from 1830 until the mid 1920s when the mines were displaced by the Haber Ostwald process.

  5. Mortality of nitrate fertiliser workers.

    PubMed

    Al-Dabbagh, S; Forman, D; Bryson, D; Stratton, I; Doll, R

    1986-08-01

    An epidemiological cohort study was conducted to investigate the mortality patterns among a group of workers engaged in the production of nitrate based fertilisers. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that individuals exposed to high concentrations of nitrates might be at increased risk of developing cancers, particularly gastric cancer. A total of 1327 male workers who had been employed in the production of fertilisers between 1946 and 1981 and who had been occupationally exposed to nitrates for at least one year were followed up until 1 March 1981. In total, 304 deaths were observed in this group and these were compared with expected numbers calculated from mortality rates in the northern region of England, where the factory was located. Analysis was also carried out separately for a subgroup of the cohort who had been heavily exposed to nitrates--that is, working in an environment likely to contain more than 10 mg nitrate/m3 for a year or longer. In neither the entire cohort nor the subgroup was any significant excess observed for all causes of mortality or for mortality from any of five broad categories of cause or from four specific types of cancer. A small excess of lung cancer was noted more than 20 years after first exposure in men heavily exposed for more than 10 years. That men were exposed to high concentrations of nitrate was confirmed by comparing concentrations of nitrates in the saliva of a sample of currently employed men with control men, employed at the same factory but not in fertiliser production. The men exposed to nitrate had substantially raised concentrations of nitrate in their saliva compared with both controls within the industry and with men in the general population and resident nearby. The results of this study therefore weight against the idea that exposure to nitrates in the environment leads to the formation in vivo of material amounts of carcinogens. PMID:3015194

  6. A Novel Uranyl Sulfate Cluster in the Structure of Na 6(UO 2)(SO 4) 4(H 2O) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Leslie A.; Burns, Peter C.

    2002-01-01

    The sodium uranyl sulfate hydrate, Na6(UO2)(SO4)4(H2O)2, has been synthesized and the crystal structure has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure crystallizes in space group Poverline1, a=5.5503(5), b=11.2456(9), and c=14.256(1) Å, α=91.483(2), β=92.583(2), and γ=97.588(2)°, V=880.6(2) Å3, Z=2, and has been refined on the basis of F2 for all unique data collected with monochromatic MoKα X-radiation and a CCD-based detector to an agreement factor (R1) of 3.38%, calculated using 5617 unique observed reflections (∣Fo∣≥4σF). The structure contains a novel uranyl sulfate cluster with composition [(UO2)(SO4)4]6- that is composed of a uranyl pentagonal bipyramid and four sulfate tetrahedra. Three sulfate tetrahedra are linked to the uranyl pentagonal bipyramid by the sharing of vertices, and the other shares an equatorial edge of the uranyl pentagonal bipyramid. This is the second structure known to involve the sharing of an edge of a uranyl polyhedron with a tetrahedron containing a hexavalent cation. The uranyl sulfate clusters are linked through bonds to Na cations, and by H bonding.

  7. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Zachara, John M.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous numerical description of multispecies diffusion requires coupling of species, charge, and aqueous and surface complexation reactions that collectively affect diffusive fluxes. The applicability of a fully coupled diffusion model is, however, often constrained by the availability of species self-diffusion coefficients, as well as by computational complication in imposing charge conservation. In this study, several diffusion models with variable complexity in charge and species coupling were formulated and compared to describe reactive multispecies diffusion in groundwater. Diffusion of uranyl [U(VI)] species was used as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the models in describing multispecies diffusion. Numerical simulations found that a diffusion model with a single, common diffusion coefficient for all species was sufficient to describe multispecies U(VI) diffusion under a steady state condition of major chemical composition, but not under transient chemical conditions. Simulations revealed that for multispecies U(VI) diffusion under transient chemical conditions, a fully coupled diffusion model could be well approximated by a component-based diffusion model when the diffusion coefficient for each chemical component was properly selected. The component-based diffusion model considers the difference in diffusion coefficients between chemical components, but not between the species within each chemical component. This treatment significantly enhanced computational efficiency at the expense of minor charge conservation. The charge balance in the component-based diffusion model can be enforced, if necessary, by adding a secondary migration term resulting from model simplification. The effect of ion activity coefficient gradients on multispecies diffusion is also discussed. The diffusion models were applied to describe U(VI) diffusive mass transfer in intragranular domains in two sediments collected from U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford 300A

  8. Formation of Uranyl-Silicate Nanoparticles at Ambient Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, K. L.; Sturchio, N. C.; Klie, R. F.; Skanthakumar, S.; Soderholm, L.

    2008-12-01

    Uranium(VI)-silicates are the dominant crystalline form of U(VI) at and near Earth's surface, but are difficult to form as pure phases under ambient conditions because of slow reaction kinetics aided by similar thermodynamic stabilities of the many possible minerals. We have investigated the effects of pH (2 to 11) and time (1 to 10 days) on the formation of U(VI)-silicates from initial solutions with U = 0.05 M and a fixed molar ratio of U:Si = 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:5 using high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and solution thermodynamic modeling. Previously, we used HEXS to identify from solutions with U:Si = 1:2 at pH 5 to 9, aged for one day, a trimeric U-silicate structural unit, or synthon, approximately one nanometer in dimension with U-U correlation lengths of about 0.4 nm. This synthon is a structural building block in uranyl silicate minerals such as soddyite, boltwoodite, and weeksite. ATR-FTIR results on the full set of samples show systematic changes in peak positions along with appearance and disappearance of vibrational modes that occurred with reaction time, pH and/or U:Si ratio; whereas, XRD indicated only a crystalline Na-boltwoodite-like phase at pH 11 and without the correlation length-scale resolution of HEXS. HRTEM results show few particles in a matrix of material containing areas having the lower correlation length visible in HEXS data. The data show clearly different mixtures of solids, including silica, and precipitate sizes under all conditions that transform over the 1 to 10 day aging period. The experimental reactions simulate conditions in the subsurface at sites contaminated with uranium, and the results are relevant to processes of uranium adsorption and colloid formation. [This work is supported by DOE's Environmental Remediation Science Program].

  9. First Cationic Uranyl-Organic Framework with Anion-Exchange Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhuanling; Wang, Yanlong; Li, Yuxiang; Liu, Wei; Chen, Lanhua; Sheng, Daopeng; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2016-07-01

    By controlling the extent of hydrolysis during the self-assembly process of a zwitterionic-based ligand with uranyl cations, we observed a structural evolution from the neutral uranyl-organic framework [(UO2)2(TTTPC)(OH)O(COOH)]·1.5DMF·7H2O (SCU-6) to the first cationic uranyl-organic framework with the formula of [(UO2)(HTTTPC)(OH)]Br·1.5DMF·4H2O (SCU-7). The crystal structures of SCU-6 and SCU-7 are layers built with tetranuclear and dinuclear uranyl clusters, respectively. Exchangeable halide anions are present in the interlaminar spaces balancing the positive charge of layers in SCU-7. Therefore, SCU-7 is able to effectively remove perrhenate anions from aqueous solution. Meanwhile, the H2PO4(-)-exchanged SCU-7 material exhibits a moderate proton conductivity of 8.70 × 10(-5) S cm(-1) at 50 °C and 90% relative humidity, representing nearly 80 times enhancement compared to the original material. PMID:27310580

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of uranyl adsorption and structure on the basal surface of muscovite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Cygan, Randall T.

    2014-02-05

    Anthropogenic activities have led to an increased concentration of uranium on the Earth’s surface and potentially in the subsurface with the development of nuclear waste repositories. Uranium is soluble in groundwater, and its mobility is strongly affected by the presence of clay minerals in soils and in subsurface sediments. We use molecular dynamics simulations to probe the adsorption of aqueous uranyl (UO22+) ions onto the basal surface of muscovite, a suitable proxy for typically ultrafine-grained clay phases. Model systems include the competitive adsorption between potassium counterions and aqueous ions (0.1 M and 1.0 M UO2Cl2 , 0.1 M NaCl). Wemore » find that for systems with potassium and uranyl ions present, potassium ions dominate the adsorption phenomenon. Potassium ions adsorb entirely as inner-sphere complexes associated with the ditrigonal cavity of the basal surface. Uranyl ions adsorb in two configurations when it is the only ion species present, and in a single configuration in the presence of potassium. Finally, the majority of adsorbed uranyl ions are tilted less than 45° relative to the muscovite surface, and are associated with the Si4Al2 rings near aluminum substitution sites.« less

  11. SEPARATION OF URANYL AND RUTHENIUM VALUES BY THE TRIBUTYL PHOSPHATE EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, A.S.

    1961-05-01

    A process is given for separating uranyl values from ruthenium values contained in an aqueous 3 to 4 M nitric acid solution. After the addition of hydrogen peroxide to obtain a concentration of 0.3 M, the uranium is selectively extracted with kerosene-diluted tributyl phosphate.

  12. Electrochemical determination of low levels of uranyl by a vibrating gold microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Peled, Y; Krent, E; Tal, N; Tobias, H; Mandler, D

    2015-01-01

    In this work we report the sensitive electroanalytical detection of uranium(VI) in aqueous solutions. Uranium commonly exists in aqueous solutions in the form of its oxo ion, uranyl (U(VI)O2(2+)). The detection of uranyl has been accomplished by us through its deposition upon reduction by two electrons to the insoluble UO2 using a bare disk gold macroelectrode and anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). This gave an unsatisfactory detection limit of ca. 1 × 10(-5) M uranyl. Moreover, the evolution of hydrogen bubbles blocked the electrode surface as a result of water reduction at negative deposition potential (-0.7 V vs Ag/AgCl). The application of a 25 μm diameter Au microwire electrode on which UO2 precipitated at negative potential (-1.2 V) improved substantially the detection limit. Further improvement was accomplished by vibrating the microwire working electrode, which increased the amounts of UO2 deposition due to decreasing the diffusion layer. The effect of the vibrating amplitude and frequency on the electroanalytical response was studied and optimized. Eventually, a detection limit of ca. 1 × 10(-9) M uranyl was achieved using a 5 min deposition time, -1.2 V deposition potential, and vibrating the electrode at frequency of 250 Hz and amplitude of 6 V. PMID:25437433

  13. Re-evaluating neptunium in uranyl phases derived from corroded spent fuel.

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, J. A.; Finch, R. J.; Kropf, A. J.; Cunnane, J. C.; Chemical Engineering

    2004-11-01

    Interest in mechanisms that may control radioelement release from corroded commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) has been heightened by the selection of the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as the repository for high-level nuclear waste in the United States. Neptunium is an important radionuclide in repository models owing to its relatively long half-life and its high aqueous mobility as neptunyl [Np(V)O+2]. The possibility of neptunium sequestration into uranyl alteration phases produced by corroding CSNF would suggest-a process for lowering neptunium concentration and subsequent migration from a geologic repository. However, there remains little experimental evidence that uranyl compounds will, in fact, serve as long-term host phases for the retention of neptunium under conditions expected in a deep geologic repository. To directly explore this possibility, we examined specimens of uranyl alteration phases derived from humid-air-corroded CSNF by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to better determine neptunium uptake in these phases. Although neptunium fluorescence was readily observed from as-received CSNF, it was not observed from the uranyl alteration rind. We establish upper limits for neptunium incorporation into CSNF alteration phases that are significantly below previously reported concentrations obtained by using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We attribute the discrepancy to a plural-scattering event that creates a spurious EELS peak at the neptunium-MV energy.

  14. Re-Evaluating Neptunium in Uranyl Phases Derived from Corroded Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, Jeffrey A.; Finch, Robert J.; Kropf, A. Jeremy; Cunnane, James C.

    2004-11-15

    Interest in mechanisms that may control radioelement release from corroded commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) has been heightened by the selection of the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as the repository for high-level nuclear waste in the United States. Neptunium is an important radionuclide in repository models owing to its relatively long half-life and its high aqueous mobility as neptunyl [Np(V)O{sub 2}{sup +}]. The possibility of neptunium sequestration into uranyl alteration phases produced by corroding CSNF would suggest a process for lowering neptunium concentration and subsequent migration from a geologic repository. However, there remains little experimental evidence that uranyl compounds will, in fact, serve as long-term host phases for the retention of neptunium under conditions expected in a deep geologic repository. To directly explore this possibility, we examined specimens of uranyl alteration phases derived from humid-air-corroded CSNF by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to better determine neptunium uptake in these phases. Although neptunium fluorescence was readily observed from as-received CSNF, it was not observed from the uranyl alteration rind. We establish upper limits for neptunium incorporation into CSNF alteration phases that are significantly below previously reported concentrations obtained by using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We attribute the discrepancy to a plural-scattering event that creates a spurious EELS peak at the neptunium-M{sub V} energy.

  15. Uranyl photochemistry with alkenes: Distinguishing between H-atom abstraction and electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    McCleskey, T.M.; Burns, C.J.; Tumas, W.

    1999-12-13

    Recent studies with the uranyl ion (UO{sub 2{sup 2+}}) have shown that it has the potential to photocatalytically oxidize organic substrates in the presence of air. The excited-state UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}* is a potent oxidant (E{degree} = 2.6 V), and is quenched by a variety of organic substrates. The resulting U(V) species can then be oxidized back to UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in the presence of oxygen. Previous studies with alcohols have shown, through kinetic isotope effects, that the quenching of the uranyl excited state occurs by hydrogen atom abstraction to give UO{sub 2}H{sup +} and an organic radical. The mechanism of quenching with alkenes has not been definitely determined. Proposals for quenching mechanisms with alkenes have included exciplex formation, H-atom abstraction, and electron transfer. The authors report here on a series of quenching studies between uranyl and a variety of alkene substrates that unequivocally demonstrate quenching of the uranyl excited state with alkenes occurs by electron transfer.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of uranyl adsorption and structure on the basal surface of muscovite

    SciTech Connect

    Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Cygan, Randall T.

    2014-02-05

    Anthropogenic activities have led to an increased concentration of uranium on the Earth’s surface and potentially in the subsurface with the development of nuclear waste repositories. Uranium is soluble in groundwater, and its mobility is strongly affected by the presence of clay minerals in soils and in subsurface sediments. We use molecular dynamics simulations to probe the adsorption of aqueous uranyl (UO22+) ions onto the basal surface of muscovite, a suitable proxy for typically ultrafine-grained clay phases. Model systems include the competitive adsorption between potassium counterions and aqueous ions (0.1 M and 1.0 M UO2Cl2 , 0.1 M NaCl). We find that for systems with potassium and uranyl ions present, potassium ions dominate the adsorption phenomenon. Potassium ions adsorb entirely as inner-sphere complexes associated with the ditrigonal cavity of the basal surface. Uranyl ions adsorb in two configurations when it is the only ion species present, and in a single configuration in the presence of potassium. Finally, the majority of adsorbed uranyl ions are tilted less than 45° relative to the muscovite surface, and are associated with the Si4Al2 rings near aluminum substitution sites.

  17. Near-infrared-induced electron transfer of an uranyl macrocyclic complex without energy transfer to dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christina M; Ohkubo, Kei; Ho, I-Ting; Zhang, Zhan; Ishida, Masatoshi; Fang, Yuanyuan; Lynch, Vincent M; Kadish, Karl M; Sessler, Jonathan L; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-04-21

    Photoexcitation of dichloromethane solutions of an uranyl macrocyclic complex with cyclo[1]furan[1]pyridine[4]-pyrrole () at the near-infrared (NIR) band (1177 nm) in the presence of electron donors and acceptors resulted in NIR-induced electron transfer without producing singlet oxygen via energy transfer. PMID:25791126

  18. Immobilization of selenate by iron in aqueous solution under anoxic conditions and the influence of uranyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puranen, Anders; Jonsson, Mats; Dähn, Rainer; Cui, Daqing

    2009-08-01

    In proposed high level radioactive waste repositories a large part of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) canisters are commonly composed of iron. Selenium is present in spent nuclear fuel as a long lived fission product. This study investigates the influence of iron on the uptake of dissolved selenium in the form of selenate and the effect of the presence of dissolved uranyl on the above interaction of selenate. The iron oxide, and selenium speciation on the surfaces was investigated by Raman spectroscopy. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy was used to determine the oxidation state of the selenium and uranium on the surfaces. Under the simulated groundwater conditions (10 mM NaCl, 2 mM NaHCO 3, <0.1 ppm O 2) the immobilized selenate was found to be reduced to oxidation states close to zero or lower and uranyl was found to be largely reduced to U(IV). The near simultaneous reduction of uranyl was found to greatly enhance the rate of selenate reduction. These findings suggest that the presence of uranyl being reduced by an iron surface could substantially enhance the rate of reduction of selenate under anoxic conditions relevant for a repository.

  19. Adsorption of uranyl on hydroxylated α-SiO₂(001): a first-principle study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Dongqi

    2015-01-28

    The adsorption of [UO2(H2O)5](2+) on a hydroxylated α-SiO2(001) surface was studied by periodic density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation. The effects of pH, CO2, aqua solution and anionic ligands (OH(-), NO3(-) and Cl(-)) on the adsorption geometry and stability were investigated. The results show that the adsorption of uranyl on a hydroxylated α-SiO2(001) surface leads to the formation of inner-sphere complexes, in which the bidentate complex at the double deprotonated site is most favored. The binding strengths of bidentate and monodentate complexes at the same site are similar, and they become weaker as the number of protons increases at the adsorption site, indicating an enhancement of the adsorption strength at higher pH values within a certain range. Strong chemical interaction plays an important role in all inner-sphere complexes. The hydrogen bonds are formed between uranyl and the hydroxylated surface in all inner- and outer-sphere complexes. The presence of CO2 weakens the adsorption of uranyl on the surface by forming uranyl carbonate (CO3(2-), HCO3(-)) complexes. The effect of the anion ligands depends on their charged state and their concentration in solutions. The explicit treatment of water environment in the models has a slight effect on the adsorption configuration. These results are consistent with the experimental observations. PMID:25437449

  20. Elucidation of selectivity for uranyl ions with an ICT organosilane-modified fluorescent receptor.

    PubMed

    Karagöz, Fehmi; Güney, Orhan

    2014-05-01

    A fluorescent receptor, isocyanatopropyl trimethoxysilane grafted 9-amino acridine (AcI), was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. Photophysical properties and pH-dependent fluorescence behavior of AcI were investigated and its complex stoichiometry with uranyl ion was elucidated. Change in fluorescence emission of AcI with pH of the solution was observed and pKa value was determined by using integrated emission intensity versus pH. It was found that AcI exhibited fluorescence enhancement, which can be attributed to an internal charge transfer (ICT) mechanism, upon titration with uranyl ions in mixture of ethanol-buffer solution while the fluorescence emission of AcI was not affected by addition of other divalent transition metal ions except mercury (II) ions. On the other hand, the both fluorescence and UV-vis titration measurements revealed unique selectivity for uranyl ions over the interfering mercury (II) ions. The spectrofluorometric titration clarified that uranyl interacted with AcI to form AcI 2(UO2(2 +))3 (2:3) complex structure with an apparent association constant of K = 7.41 × 10(6) M(-2/3). The interference effect of some cations on fluorescence enhancement exhibited by complex was also tested. PMID:24407892

  1. Nitrate concentrations under irrigated agriculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaporozec, A.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, considerable interest has been expressed in the nitrate content of water supplies. The most notable toxic effect of nitrate is infant methemoglobinemia. The risk of this disease increases significantly at nitrate-nitrogen levels exceeding 10 mg/l. For this reason, this concentration has been established as a limit for drinking water in many countries. In natural waters, nitrate is a minor ionic constituent and seldom accounts for more than a few percent of the total anions. However, nitrate in a significant concentration may occur in the vicinity of some point sources such as septic tanks, manure pits, and waste-disposal sites. Non-point sources contributing to groundwater pollution are numerous and a majority of them are related to agricultural activities. The largest single anthropogenic input of nitrate into the groundwater is fertilizer. Even though it has not been proven that nitrogen fertilizers are responsible for much of nitrate pollution, they are generally recognized as the main threat to groundwater quality, especially when inefficiently applied to irrigated fields on sandy soils. The biggest challenge facing today's agriculture is to maintain the balance between the enhancement of crop productivity and the risk of groundwater pollution. ?? 1982 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  2. Role of citrate as a complexing ligand which permits enzymically-mediated uranyl ion bioaccumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, P.; Macaskie, L.E.

    1995-06-01

    Microorganisms can be used to remove toxic heavy metals from liquid industrial wastes. One potentially useful system utilizes the enzymically-mediated biomineralization of heavy metals at the surface of bacterial cells. This well-documented system harnesses a metal-resistant phosphatase enzyme overproduced by a Citrobacter sp.; metal uptake is mediated by the activity of this enzyme, which persists in non-growing cells, to liberate HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} from glycerol 2-phosphate with stoichiometric deposition of heavy metals(M) as cell-bound MHPO{sub 4}. Recent attention has focused on the treatment of wastes from nuclear power and nuclear fuel reprocessing activities, together with discharges of native uranium in mining wastes. Previous investigations using the Citrobacter sp. demonstrated removal of uranium and the transuranic elements, plutonium and americium. Although uranium is inhibitory to the growth of the Citrobacter strain, and the activity of the cellular phosphatase, uranyl phosphate accumulates as polycrystalline HUO{sub 2}PO{sub 4} at the cell surface. The rate of uranyl removal into the growing crystal is primarily dependent on the rate of phosphate release by the enzyme catalysed reaction. This is inconsistent with the reported toxicity of uranyl ion to the mediating phosphatase; however, in the presence of an excess of substrate, the rapid rate of phosphate release facilitated metal precipitation without toxic effect. Under substrate-limiting conditions uranyl toxicity was seen. The present investigation shows the inhibition of Citrobacter sp. phosphatase is related to the concentration of uranyl ion, and that citrate buffer can protect against this toxicity, and permit metal bioaccumulation. The toxicity pattern is dependent upon the substrate used; possible reasons for these effects, and environmental implications are discussed. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Uranyl acetate causes DNA single strand breaks in vitro in the presence of ascorbate (vitamin C).

    PubMed

    Yazzie, Monica; Gamble, Shania L; Civitello, Edgar R; Stearns, Diane M

    2003-04-01

    Uranium is a radioactive heavy metal with isotopes that decay on the geological time scale. People are exposed to uranium through uranium mining, processing, the resulting mine tailings, and the use of depleted uranium in the military. Acute exposures to uranium are chemically toxic to the kidney; however, little is known about chronic exposures, for example, if there is a direct chemical genotoxicity of uranium. The hypothesis that is being tested in the current work is that hexavalent uranium, as uranyl ion, may have a chemical genotoxicity similar to that of hexavalent chromium. In the current study, reactions of uranyl acetate (UA) and ascorbate (vitamin C) were observed to produce plasmid relaxation in pBluescript DNA. DNA strand breaks increased with increasing concentrations of a 1:1 reaction of UA and ascorbate but were not affected by increasing the ratio of ascorbate. Plasmid relaxation was inhibited by coincubation of reactions with catalase but not by coincubation with the radical scavengers mannitol, sodium azide, or 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide. Reactions of UA and ascorbate monitored by (1)H NMR spectroscopy showed formation of a uranyl ascorbate complex, with no evidence of a dehydroascorbate product. A previous study inferred that hydroxyl radical formation was responsible for oxidative DNA damage in the presence of reactions of uranyl ion, hydrogen peroxide, and ascorbate [Miller et al. (2002) J. Bioinorg. Chem. 91, 246-252]. Current results, in the absence of added hydrogen peroxide, were not completely consistent with the interpretation that strand breaks were produced by a Fenton type generation of reactive oxygen species. Data were also consistent with the interpretation that a uranyl ascorbate complex was catalyzing hydrolysis of the DNA-phosphate backbone, in a manner similar to that known for the lanthanides. These data suggest that uranium may be directly genotoxic and may, like chromium, react with DNA by more than one pathway. PMID

  4. Observation of Radiolytic Field Alteration of the Uranyl Cation in Bicarbonate Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Lanee A.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Cho, Herman M.; Friese, Judah I.

    2006-12-01

    In previous work we demonstrated that radiolysis of uranyl tris carbonate in near neutral pH to alkaline carbonate solutions, could be followed by 13C NMR. Radiolysis of the complex produced novel uranyl peroxo carbonate solution state species, whose structures depended on the pH and radiolytic dose rate. In this work, we investigate speciation of the uranyl carbonate trimer which is predominant in bicarbonate solution near pH 5.9. We observe radiolytically derived speciation to different mixed peroxy carbonate species than seen in the higher pH solutions. Auto radiolysis of uranium (VI) carbonate solutions between pH 5.9 and 7.2 is shown to alter the uranium speciation over relatively short periods of time and was followed by 13C NMR and visible spectrophotometry, using dissolved 233(UO2)3(CO3)6 6- both as the radiolysis source (D= 14.9 Gy/hr) and as a trap for the newly formed hydrogen peroxide. Direct addition of hydrogen peroxide to solutions of the uranyl-carbonate trimer is shown to reproduce the 13 C NMR signatures of the complexe(s) formed by radiolysis, but additionally a variety of new complexes are revealed. Ratios of H2O2/trimer < 1.5 produced a uranyl peroxo carbonate adduct, that is shown to be common to the radiolytically produced species. Ratios of H2O2/ trimer >1 resulted in formation of stable higher order peroxo carbonate complexes. The 13C NMR signatures and visible spectra of these complexes are described here. Rigorous characterization of the species is an ongoing effort.

  5. Nitrates in Wisconsin ground water.

    PubMed

    Schuknecht, B; Lawton, G W; Steinka, P; Delfino, J J

    1975-01-01

    Nitrate analyses were performed on ground water well samples originating from sources throughout Wisconsin. The data ranged from below the analytical detection limit up to 140 mg NO3-N/1. Over nine percent of all wells sampled has nitrate concentrations in excess of 10 mg NO3-N/1. Six individual counties had more than 10 mg NO3-N/1 in at least twenty percent of the wells covered in this survey. However, data reported for over eight thousand new wells driven in 1971-1972 showed only slightly more than two percent with nitrate levels above 10 mg NO3-N/1. This reflected the trend toward drilling deeper wells which are influenced less by nitrate seepage as well as adherence to new and stricter well construction codes. PMID:1183417

  6. Thermal decomposition of isooctyl nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, H.O.

    1989-03-01

    The diesel ignition improver DII-3, made by Ethyl Corporation, also known as isooctyl nitrate, is a mixture whose principal constituent (about 95%) is 2-ethyl hexyl nitrate. This note describes an investigation of the thermal decomposition that is not exhaustive, but that is intended to provide sufficient information on the rate and the mechanism so as to make possible the educated guesses needed for modeling the effect of isooctyl nitrate on the diesel ignition process. As is the case with other alkyl nitrates, the decomposition of the neat material is a complex one giving a complicated pressure versus time curve, unsuitable for a quick derivation of the rate constant. However, in the presence of toluene, whose intended purpose is to trap reactive free radicals and thereby simplify the overall mechanism, the pressure rises approximately exponentially to a limit; thus, on the assumption that the reaction is homogeneous and of first order, the rate constants can be determined from the half-life.

  7. Uranyl adsorption at solvated edge surfaces of 2 : 1 smectites. A density functional study.

    PubMed

    Kremleva, Alena; Krüger, Sven; Rösch, Notker

    2015-05-28

    We systematically studied the adsorption of uranyl(vi) on two common edge surfaces, (010) and (110), of 2 : 1 smectite clay minerals, using standard periodic DFT models. To describe various types of permanently charged clay minerals, we introduced charged defects into the initially neutral layer of pyrophyllite, cation substitutions in tetrahedral (beidellitic) and octahedral (montmorillonitic) sheets. Comparing uranyl(vi) species at various sites of these two types of surfaces, we found that structural parameters of such adsorption complexes are essentially determined by the surface chemical groups forming the adsorption site, not by the type of the clay mineral. Even for sites involving a substituted cation we noticed only a weak effect of the substitution on the geometric parameters. Geometry optimization resulted in adsorbed uranyl or uranyl hydroxide, with coordination numbers of 4 or 5. However, in most cases the same species was determined on the same type of site, independent of the substitutions. Optimization of adsorbed uranyl leads to hydrolysis at sites close to a AlOH(-1/2) surface group, resulting in uranyl monohydroxide as adsorbate and protonation of the AlOH(-1/2) group. While most species are equatorially five-coordinated, coordination 4 is preferred when uranyl adsorbs on mixed AlO(H)-SiO(H) sites. Calculated formation energies of surface complexes do not single out a preferred species or site, but point to an equilibrium of several species. Comparison to experiment and consideration of pH conditions suggests AlOHOH and AlOH-SiO sites of (010) surfaces and AlOmOH, SiOOm, and AlOH-SiO sites of (110) surfaces as most probable for uranyl adsorption. PMID:25941904

  8. Supramolecular inclusion-based molecular integral rigidity: a feasible strategy for controlling the structural connectivity of uranyl polyrotaxane networks.

    PubMed

    Mei, Lei; Wang, Lin; Yuan, Li-yong; An, Shu-wen; Zhao, Yu-liang; Chai, Zhi-fang; Burns, Peter C; Shi, Wei-qun

    2015-08-01

    The assembly of two-dimensional (2D) large channel uranyl-organic polyrotaxane networks as well as structural regulation of uranyl-bearing units using jointed cucurbit[6]uril-based pseudorotaxanes with integral rigidity based on supramolecular inclusion is presented for the first time. This construction strategy concerning controlling molecular integral rigidity based on supramolecular inclusion may afford an entirely new methodology for coordination chemistry. PMID:26121567

  9. INCORPORATION OF PENTAVALENT NEPTUNIUM INTO URANYL PHASES THAT MAY FORM AS ALTERATION PRODUCTS OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2005-06-21

    Laboratory-scale simulations and studies of natural analogues have shown that alteration of spent nuclear fuel in a moist, oxidizing environment results in the formation of a variety of uranyl phases. Neptunium-237 has a half-life of 2.14 million years, and the pentavalent oxidation state is soluble in groundwater. Release of Np-237 from spent nuclear fuel in a geological repository may significantly impact the long-term performance of such a repository. Incorporation of Np, in the pentavalent oxidation state, into uranyl phases by substitution for hexavalent U is likely because of the similarity of the coordination environments of these two cations, but a charge-balance mechanism is required for substitution. A preliminary study has shown incorporation of pentavalent Np into powders of the uranyl silicate uranophane, and Na-compreignacite, a uranyl oxyhydrate [1]. Using synthesis experiments under mild hydrothermal conditions, we are examining the incorporation of pentavalent Np into selected uranyl oxyhydrates and silicates as a function of temperature and the pH of the mother solution. Analyses of powders of these uranyl phases has demonstrated both temperature and pH dependences for incorporation. Experiments are underway directed at the synthesis of single crystals of uranyl phases in the presence of 500-750 ppm pentavalent Np. The intent is to develop a basic understanding of the crystallographic and crystal chemical factors that impact incorporation of pentavalent Np into uranyl phases. Following synthesis, crystals are analyzed for Np using laser ablation ICP-MS. Preliminary results for Na-substituted metaschoepite indicate significant Np has been incorporated into the crystals. Additional phases under study include compreignacite, becquerelite, soddyite, zippeite, and (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}.

  10. MCNP5 CALCULATIONS REPLICATING ARH-600 NITRATE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    FINFROCK SH

    2011-10-25

    This report serves to extend the previous document: 'MCNP Calculations Replicating ARH-600 Data' by replicating the nitrate curves found in ARH-600. This report includes the MCNP models used, the calculated critical dimension for each analyzed parameter set, and the resulting data libraries for use with the CritView code. As with the ARH-600 data, this report is not meant to replace the analysis of the fissile systems by qualified criticality personnel. The M CNP data is presented without accounting for the statistical uncertainty (although this is typically less than 0.001) or bias and, as such, the application of a reasonable safety margin is required. The data that follows pertains to the uranyl nitrate and plutonium nitrate spheres, infinite cylinders, and infinite slabs of varying isotopic composition, reflector thickness, and molarity. Each of the cases was modeled in MCNP (version 5.1.40), using the ENDF/B-VI cross section set. Given a molarity, isotopic composition, and reflector thickness, the fissile concentration and diameter (or thicknesses in the case of the slab geometries) were varied. The diameter for which k-effective equals 1.00 for a given concentration could then be calculated and graphed. These graphs are included in this report. The pages that follow describe the regions modeled, formulas for calculating the various parameters, a list of cross-sections used in the calculations, a description of the automation routine and data, and finally the data output. The data of most interest are the critical dimensions of the various systems analyzed. This is presented graphically, and in table format, in Appendix B. Appendix C provides a text listing of the same data in a format that is compatible with the CritView code. Appendices D and E provide listing of example Template files and MCNP input files (these are discussed further in Section 4). Appendix F is a complete listing of all of the output data (i.e., all of the analyzed dimensions and the

  11. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  12. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  13. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  14. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  15. Nitrate transport is independent of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases in barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) has NADH-specific and NAD(P)H-bispecific nitrate reductase isozymes. Four isogenic lines with different nitrate reductase isozyme combinations were used to determine the role of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases on nitrate transport and assimilation in barley seedlings. Both nitrate reductase isozymes were induced by nitrate and were required for maximum nitrate assimilation in barley seedlings. Genotypes lacking the NADH isozyme (Az12) or the NAD(P)H isozyme (Az70) assimilated 65 or 85%, respectively, as much nitrate as the wild type. Nitrate assimilation by genotype (Az12;Az70) which is deficient in both nitrate reductases, was only 13% of the wild type indicating that the NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductase isozymes are responsible for most of the nitrate reduction in barley seedlings. For all genotypes, nitrate assimilation rates in the dark were about 55% of the rates in light. Hypotheses that nitrate reductase has direct or indirect roles in nitrate uptake were not supported by this study. Induction of nitrate transporters and the kinetics of net nitrate uptake were the same for all four genotypes indicating that neither nitrate reductase isozyme has a direct role in nitrate uptake in barley seedlings.

  16. New three-fold interpenetrated uranyl organic framework constructed by terephthalic acid and imidazole derivative.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Wang, Cong-zhi; Li, Zi-jie; Lan, Jian-hui; Ji, Yan-qin; Chai, Zhi-fang

    2015-04-20

    A new 3-fold interpenetrated uranyl organic framework, UO2(bdc)(dmpi), was hydrothermally synthesized using 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid (H2bdc) and 1-(4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-2,5-dimethylphenyl)-1H-imidazole (dmpi). This framework, which was determined by synchrotron radiation X-ray, exhibited a new 3-fold interpenetrated (2,4)-connected topology with the Schläfli symbol of (12(6))(12)2. Additionally, large incurvation happened to the bond angle of [O=U=O](2+), which was always arranged in a rigorous line. Computational results based on density functional theory (DFT) indicated that the bent geometry of uranyl in UO2(bdc)(dmpi) was mainly due to the higher charge populations in the valence 6d shells of uranium, rendered by the electronegative imidazoles. PMID:25835754

  17. Role of the Uranyl Oxo Group as a Hydrogen Bond Acceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Lori A; Hay, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to evaluate the geometries and energetics of interactions between a number of uranyl complexes and hydrogen bond donor groups. The results reveal that although traditional hydrogen bond donors are repelled by the oxo group in the [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+} species, they are attracted to the oxo groups in [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 0}, [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sup -}, and [UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}]{sup 2-} species. Hydrogen bond strength depends on the equatorial ligation and can exceed 15 kcal mol{sup -1}. The results also reveal the existence of directionality at the uranyl oxo acceptor, with a weak preference for linear U=O---H angles.

  18. Synthesis and investigation of uranyl molybdate UO2MoO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Takayuki; Sato, Nobuaki; Kitawaki, Shin-ichi; Uehara, Akihiro; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Yamana, Hajimu; Myochin, Munetaka

    2013-02-01

    In order to examine easily synthetic conditions of uranyl molybdate, UO2MoO4, used for the reprocessing process study of spent nuclear oxide fuels in alkaline molybdate melts, the uranium molybdate compounds were produced from U3O8 powder and anhydrous MoO3 reagent. The results of having investigated them in solid state by using X-ray diffractometry and Raman spectrometry, it was confirmed that UO2MoO4 could be synthesized by heating mixed powder of U3O8 and MoO3 with stoichiometric mole ratio at 770 °C for 4 h under air atmosphere. Moreover, adding this UO2MoO4 into Li2MoO4sbnd Na2MoO4 eutectic melt, most of the dissolved uranium species in the melt were observed as hexa-valent uranyl ions by absorption spectrophotometry.

  19. Biosensing for the Environment and Defence: Aqueous Uranyl Detection Using Bacterial Surface Layer Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, David J.R.; Millner, Paul A.; Stewart, Douglas I.; Pollmann, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    The fabrication of novel uranyl (UO22+) binding protein based sensors is reported. The new biosensor responds to picomolar levels of aqueous uranyl ions within minutes using Lysinibacillus sphaericus JG-A12 S-layer protein tethered to gold electrodes. In comparison to traditional self assembled monolayer based biosensors the porous bioconjugated layer gave greater stability, longer electrode life span and a denser protein layer. Biosensors responded specifically to UO22+ ions and showed minor interference from Ni2+, Cs+, Cd2+ and Co2+. Chemical modification of JG-A12 protein phosphate and carboxyl groups prevented UO22+ binding, showing that both moieties are involved in the recognition to UO22+. PMID:22399904

  20. Reduction of nitrate in Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin Koo; Barua, Sumitra; Reed, SB; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrikson, JK; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, a napDAGHB gene cluster encoding periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) and accessory proteins and an nrfA gene encoding periplasmic nitrite reductase (NrfA) have been identified. These two systems seem to be atypical because the genome lacks genes encoding cytoplasmic membrane electron transport proteins, NapC for NAP and NrfBCD/NrfH for NRF, respectively. Here, we present evidence that reduction of nitrate to ammonium in S. oneidensis is carried out by these atypical systems in a two-step manner. Transcriptional and mutational analyses suggest that CymA, a cytoplasmic membrane electron transport protein, is likely to be the functional replacement of both NapC and NrfH in S. oneidensis. Surprisingly, a strain devoid of napB encoding the small subunit of nitrate reductase exhibited the maximum cell density sooner than the wild type. Further characterization of this strain showed that nitrite was not detected as a free intermediate in its culture and NapB provides a fitness gain for S. oneidensis to compete for nitrate in the environments. On the basis results from mutational analyses of napA, napB, nrfA and napBnrfA in-frame deletion mutants, we propose that NapB is able to favor nitrate reduction by routing electrons to NapA exclusively.

  1. Anion recognition in water with use of a neutral uranyl-salophen receptor.

    PubMed

    Dalla Cort, Antonella; Forte, Gianpiero; Schiaffino, Luca

    2011-09-16

    A new water-soluble uranyl-salophen complex incorporating two glucose units has been synthesized. This neutral derivative shows noteworthy binding affinity for fluoride in water thanks to the Lewis acid-base interaction occurring between the metal and the anion. Such interaction is strong enough to overcome the high hydration enthalpy of fluoride. Moreover this complex effectively binds hydrogen phosphate and exhibits remarkably strong association for nucleotide polyanions ADP(3-) and ATP(4-). PMID:21812437

  2. Uranyl Solvation by a Three-Dimensional Reference Interaction Site Model.

    PubMed

    Matveev, Alexei; Li, Bo; Rösch, Notker

    2015-08-13

    We report an implementation of the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D RISM) that in particular addresses the treatment of the long-range Coulomb field of charged species, represented by point charges and/or a distributed charge density. A comparison of 1D and 3D results for atomic ions demonstrates a reasonable accuracy, even for a moderate size of the unit cell and a moderate grid resolution. In an application to uranyl complexes with 4-6 explicit aqua ligands and an implicit bulk solvent modeled by RISM, we show that the 3D technique is not susceptible to the deficiencies of the 1D technique exposed in our previous work [Li, Matveev, Krüger, Rösch, Comp. Theor. Chem. 2015, 1051, 151]. The 3D method eliminates the artificial superposition of explicit aqua ligands and the RISM medium and predicts essentially the same values for uranyl and uranyl-water bond lengths as a state-of-the-art polarizable continuum model. With the first solvation shell treated explicitly, the observables are nearly independent of the order of the closure relationship used when solving the set of integral equations for the various distribution functions. Furthermore, we calculated the activation barrier of water exchange with a hybrid approach that combines the 3D RISM model for the bulk aqueous solvent and a quantum mechanical description (at the level of electronic density functional theory) of uranyl interacting with explicitly represented water molecules. The calculated result agrees very well with experiment and the best theoretical estimates. PMID:26167741

  3. Recuperation of uranyl ions from effluents by means of microbiological collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cecal, A.; Palamaru, I.; Humelnicu, D.; Goanta, M.; Rudic, V.; Salaru, V.V.; Gulea, A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper deals with the study of bioaccumulation of uranyl ions (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) from industrial effluents, using microbiological collectors: Nostoc linkia sp., Tolipotrix sp., Spirulina sp., Porphyridium cruentum and also the glucide extract of P. cruentum. The values of retaining degree of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} on the biomass, for several experimental conditions, were established between 14.22 and 91.99%.

  4. Spectroscopic study on uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at the surface layer of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Thomas; Rossberg, Andre; Barkleit, Astrid; Steudtner, Robin; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja; Merroun, Mohamed L

    2015-02-14

    The complexation of U(vi) at the proteinaceous surface layer (S-layer) of the archaeal strain Sulfolobus acidocaldarius was investigated over a pH range from pH 1.5 to 6 at the molecular scale using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and U L(III)-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The S-layer, which represents the interface between the cell and its environment, is very stable against high temperatures, proteases, and detergents. This allowed the isolation and purification of S-layer ghosts (= empty cells) that maintain the size and shape of the cells. In contrast to many other microbial cell envelope compounds the studied S-layer is not phosphorylated, enabling the investigation of uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at microbial surfaces. The latter are usually masked by preferentially formed uranyl phosphate complexes. We demonstrated that at highly acidic conditions (pH 1.5 to 3) no uranium was bound by the S-layer. In contrast to that, at moderate acidic pH conditions (pH 4.5 and 6) a complexation of U(vi) at the S-layer via deprotonated carboxylic groups was stimulated. Titration studies revealed dissociation constants for the carboxylic groups of glutamic and aspartic acid residues of pK(a) = 4.78 and 6.31. The uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at the S-layer did not show luminescence properties at room temperature, but only under cryogenic conditions. The obtained luminescence maxima are similar to those of uranyl acetate. EXAFS spectroscopy demonstrated that U(vi) in these complexes is mainly coordinated to carboxylate groups in a bidentate binding mode. The elucidation of the molecular structure of these complexes was facilitated by the absence of phosphate groups in the studied S-layer protein. PMID:25387060

  5. Criticality experiments and analysis of molybdenum reflected cylindrical uranyl fluoride water solution reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieno, D.; Fox, T.; Mueller, R.

    1972-01-01

    Clean criticality data were obtained from molybdenum-reflected cylindrical uranyl-fluoride-water solution reactors. Using ENDF/B molybdenum cross sections, a nine energy group two-dimensional transport calculation of a reflected reactor configuration predicted criticality to within 7 cents of the experimental value. For these reactors, it was necessary to compute the reflector resonance integral by a detailed transport calculation at the core-reflector interface volume in the energy region of the two dominant resonances of natural molybdenum.

  6. Characterization of the Aqueous Uranyl-Silicate Complex Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Ab Initio Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, M.; Massey, M.; Huang, P.

    2015-12-01

    The speciation of aqueous uranium ions is an important factor in predicting its mobility and fate in the environment. Two major controls on speciation are pH and the presence of complexing ligands. For the case of aqueous uranyl, UO22+(aq), some common complexes include uranyl-hydroxy, uranyl-carbonato, and uranyl-calcium-carbonato complexes, all of which differ in chemical reactivity and mobility. Uranyl-silicate complexes are also known but remain poorly characterized. In this work, we studied uranyl speciation in a series of aqueous solutions of 0.1 mM uranyl and 2 mM silicate with pH ranging from 4 to 7. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra of these samples were recorded at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory). Of particular note are the uranyl and silicate concentrations employed in our experiments, which are lower than conditions in previously reported EXAFS studies and approach conditions in natural groundwater systems. Preliminary analyses of EXAFS data indicate that uranyl speciation changes across the pH range, consistent with published thermodynamic data that suggest uranyl-silicate complexes may be important for pH ~ 5 and below, while uranyl-carbonato complexes become dominant at circumneutral pH. To guide the interpretation of the EXAFS data, molecular-scale simulations were carried out using density functional theory. We considered two classes of models: (i) hydrated clusters, and (ii) ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of 3D-periodic models involving uranyl and silicate in water. These calculations reveal that at pH ~ 5, the uranyl speciation is the [UO2(H2O)4H3SiO4]+ complex formed by the substitution of an equatorial uranyl water with a monodentate silicate ligand. The evidence from experiments and simulations provide a consistent picture for the uranyl-silicate complex, which may be important in the transport of uranyl in acidic, silicate-rich waters.

  7. Selective detection of uranium by laser-induced fluorescence: a potential remote-sensing technique. 1: Optical characteristics of uranyl geologic targets.

    PubMed

    Deneufville, J P; Kasdan, A; Chimenti, R J

    1981-04-15

    The remote sensing of laser-induced uranyl ion fluorescence is examined as a potential indicator of uranium occurring in geologic materials at the earth's surface. The lifetime and brightness of the fluorescence from a wide variety of rocks, minerals, and soils are reported. The distinctive characteristics of uranyl ion absorption and fluorescence were observed in diverse geologic materials such as chalcedonies and opals containing 15-3000 ppm of uranium and in surface coatings of uranyl minerals such as metaautunite, liebigite, and an-dersonite. The conditions which permit the excitation and selective detection of uranyl ion fluorescence from such targets are described. PMID:20309303

  8. Kinetic analysis of the thermal decomposition of pristine and gamma-irradiated zinc uranyl acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Muhaimid, T. I. A.; Al-Qunaibit, M. H.; Al-Farhan, K. A.; Mahfouz, R. M.

    2004-11-01

    Thermal decomposition of pristine and gamma-irradiated zinc uranyl acetate was investigated in air using isothermal and dynamic thermogravimetric techniques. The decomposition proceeded via one major process with the formation of triuranates ZnU3O10 as solid residues. Kinetic analysis of isothermal data, when compared with various solid-state reaction models, showed that the decomposition reaction is best fitted by the phase-boundary model. Kinetic analysis of the cynamic TG curves was discussed with reference to integral methods of modified Coats and Redfern equations. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated and evaluated. IR spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction techniques were employed to follow the chemical composition of solid residue at different calcination temperatures. The results display that the triuranate ZnU3O10 starts forming by calcination of zinc uranyl acetate at temperatures >300 degrees C and undergoes decomposition at higher temperatures (>600 degrees C) with the formation Of U3O8. The results were evaluated regarding the utilization of zinc uranyl acetate as an important source of diuranates and triuranates.

  9. XAFS investigation of polyamidoxime-bound uranyl contests the paradigm from small molecule studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, Richard T.; Piechowicz, Marek; Lin, Zekai; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dai, Sheng; Lin, Wenbin; Abney, C. W.; Bryantsev, V. S.

    2015-11-12

    In this study, limited resource availability and population growth have motivated interest in harvesting valuable metals from unconventional reserves, but developing selective adsorbents for this task requires structural knowledge of metal binding environments. Amidoxime polymers have been identified as the most promising platform for large-scale extraction of uranium from seawater. However, despite more than 30 years of research, the uranyl coordination environment on these adsorbents has not been positively identified. We report the first XAFS investigation of polyamidoxime-bound uranyl, with EXAFS fits suggesting a cooperative chelating model, rather than the tridentate or η2 motifs proposed by small molecule and computational studies. Samples exposed to environmental seawater also display a feature consistent with a μ2-oxo-bridged transition metal in the uranyl coordination sphere, suggesting in situ formation of a specific binding site or mineralization of uranium on the polymer surface. These unexpected findings challenge several long-held assumptions and have significant implications for development of polymer adsorbents with high selectivity.

  10. XAFS investigation of polyamidoxime-bound uranyl contests the paradigm from small molecule studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mayes, Richard T.; Piechowicz, Marek; Lin, Zekai; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dai, Sheng; Lin, Wenbin; Abney, C. W.; Bryantsev, V. S.

    2015-11-12

    In this study, limited resource availability and population growth have motivated interest in harvesting valuable metals from unconventional reserves, but developing selective adsorbents for this task requires structural knowledge of metal binding environments. Amidoxime polymers have been identified as the most promising platform for large-scale extraction of uranium from seawater. However, despite more than 30 years of research, the uranyl coordination environment on these adsorbents has not been positively identified. We report the first XAFS investigation of polyamidoxime-bound uranyl, with EXAFS fits suggesting a cooperative chelating model, rather than the tridentate or η2 motifs proposed by small molecule and computationalmore » studies. Samples exposed to environmental seawater also display a feature consistent with a μ2-oxo-bridged transition metal in the uranyl coordination sphere, suggesting in situ formation of a specific binding site or mineralization of uranium on the polymer surface. These unexpected findings challenge several long-held assumptions and have significant implications for development of polymer adsorbents with high selectivity.« less

  11. Selective colorimetric and fluorescent quenching determination of uranyl ion via its complexation with curcumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing-Hui; Zhao, Xin; Yang, Jidong; Tan, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Shao-Pu; Liu, Zhong-Fang; Hu, Xiao-Li

    2016-04-01

    Under pH 4.0 HAc-NaAc buffer medium, curcumin alone possesses extraordinary weak fluorescence emission. Nevertheless, the introduction of Triton X-100 micelles can largely enhance the fluorescence intensity of curcumin. Uranyl ions can complex with micelles-capped curcumin, along with the slight red shift of curcumin fluorescence (about 1-7 nm), a clear decrement of absorbance (424 nm) and fluorescence (507 nm) intensities, and a distinct color change from bright yellow to orange. The fluorescence decrements (ΔF, 507 nm) are positively correlated to the amount of uranyl ions in the concentration range of 3.7 × 10- 6-1.4 × 10- 5 mol L- 1. The detection limit of this fluorescence quenching methods is 3.7 × 10- 6 mol L- 1, which is nearly 9000 times lower than the maximum allowable level in drinking water proposed by World Health Organization. Good selectivity is achieved because of a majority of co-existing substances (such as Ce4 +, La3 +, and Th4 +) do not affect the detection. The content of uranyl ions in tap water samples was determined by the proposed method with satisfactory results.

  12. Structure, Kinetics, and Thermodynamics of the Aqueous Uranyl(VI) Cation

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2013-08-20

    Molecular simulation techniques are employed to gain insights into the structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic properties of the uranyl(VI) cation (UO22+) in aqueous solution. The simulations make use of an atomistic potential model (force field) derived in this work and based on the model of Guilbaud and Wipff (Guilbaud, P.; Wipff, G. J. Mol. Struct. (THEOCHEM) 1996, 366, 55-63). Reactive flux and thermodynamic integration calculations show that the derived potential model yields predictions for the water exchange rate and free energy of hydration, respectively, that are in agreement with experimental data. The water binding energies, hydration shell structure, and self-diffusion coefficient are also calculated and discussed. Finally, a combination of metadynamics and transition path sampling simulations is employed to probe the mechanisms of water exchange reactions in the first hydration shell of the uranyl ion. These atomistic simulations indicate, based on two-dimensional free energy surfaces, that water exchanges follow an associative interchange mechanism. The nature and structure of the water exchange transition states are also determined. The improved potential model is expected to lead to more accurate predictions of uranyl adsorption energies at mineral surfaces using potential-based molecular dynamics simulations.

  13. A cryogenic fluorescence spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate, phosphate, and oxyhydroxide minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Gassman, Paul L.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Clark, Sue B.

    2008-11-03

    In this work we have applied liquid-helium temperature (LHeT) time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLIF) to characterize a series of natural and synthetic minerals of uranium carbonate, phosphate and oxyhydroxides including rutherfordine, zellerite, liebigite, phosphuranylite, meta-autunite, meta-torbernite, uranyl phosphate, sodium-uranyl-phosphate, bequerelite, clarkeite, curite, schoepite and compregnacite, and compared their spectral characteristics among these minerals as well as our previously published data on uranyl silicates. For the carbonate minerals, the fluorescence spectra depend on the stoichiometry of the mineral. For the phosphate minerals the fluorescence spectra closely resemble each other despite the differences in their composition and structure. For all uranium oxyhydroxides, the fluorescence spectra are largely red-shifted as compared with those of the uranium carbonates and phosphates and their vibronic bands are broadened and less resolved. The much enhanced spectra resolution at LHeT allows more accurate calculation of the O=U=O symmetrical stretch frequency, ν1, corresponding to the average spacing of the vibronic peaks of the fluorescence spectra and the spectral origin as reflected by the position of the first vibronic band. It was found that both the average ν1 and λ1 values correlate well with the average basicity of the inorganic anion.

  14. Observation of Radiolytic Field Alteration of the Uranyl Cation in Bicarbonate Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Lanee; McNamara, Bruce; Sinkov, Sergei; Cho, Herman; Friese, Judah

    2007-07-01

    Auto radiolysis of uranium (VI) carbonate solutions between pH 5.9 and 7.2 is shown to alter the uranium speciation over relatively short periods of time and was followed by {sup 13}C NMR and visible spectrophotometry, using dissolved [({sup 233}UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 6-} both as the radiolysis source (D 14.9 Gy/hr) and as a trap for the newly formed hydrogen peroxide. The speciation is different than the uranyl mixed peroxy carbonate species that have been reported for higher pH carbonate solutions. Direct addition of hydrogen peroxide to solutions of the uranyl-carbonate trimer is shown to reproduce the {sup 13}C, {sup 17}O NMR signatures of the complex(es) formed by radiolysis, but additionally a variety of new complexes are revealed. Ratios of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/trimer <1.5 produced uranyl peroxo carbonate adducts that are shown to be common to the radiolytically produced species. Ratios of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/trimer >1.5 resulted in formation of stable higher order peroxo carbonate complexes. The {sup 13}C, {sup 17}O NMR signatures and visible spectra of these complexes are described here. Rigorous characterization of the species is an ongoing effort. (authors)

  15. Selective colorimetric and fluorescent quenching determination of uranyl ion via its complexation with curcumin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Hui; Zhao, Xin; Yang, Jidong; Tan, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Shao-Pu; Liu, Zhong-Fang; Hu, Xiao-Li

    2016-04-15

    Under pH4.0 HAc-NaAc buffer medium, curcumin alone possesses extraordinary weak fluorescence emission. Nevertheless, the introduction of Triton X-100 micelles can largely enhance the fluorescence intensity of curcumin. Uranyl ions can complex with micelles-capped curcumin, along with the slight red shift of curcumin fluorescence (about 1-7 nm), a clear decrement of absorbance (424 nm) and fluorescence (507 nm) intensities, and a distinct color change from bright yellow to orange. The fluorescence decrements (ΔF, 507 nm) are positively correlated to the amount of uranyl ions in the concentration range of 3.7×10(-6)-1.4×10(-5) mol L(-1). The detection limit of this fluorescence quenching methods is 3.7×10(-6) mol L(-1), which is nearly 9000 times lower than the maximum allowable level in drinking water proposed by World Health Organization. Good selectivity is achieved because of a majority of co-existing substances (such as Ce(4+), La(3+), and Th(4+)) do not affect the detection. The content of uranyl ions in tap water samples was determined by the proposed method with satisfactory results. PMID:26845580

  16. Determination of uranyl incorporation into biogenic manganese oxides using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scattering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, S.M.; Fuller, C.C.; Tebo, B.M.; Bargar, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides are common and an important source of reactive mineral surfaces in the environment that may be potentially enhanced in bioremediation cases to improve natural attenuation. Experiments were performed in which the uranyl ion, UO22+ (U(VI)), at various concentrations was present during manganese oxide biogenesis. At all concentrations, there was strong uptake of U onto the oxides. Synchrotron-based extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to determine the molecular-scale mechanism by which uranyl is incorporated into the oxide and how this incorporation affects the resulting manganese oxide structure and mineralogy. The EXAFS experiments show that at low concentrations (2 mol % U, >4 ??M U(VI) in solution), the presence of U(VI) affects the stability and structure of the Mn oxide to form poorly ordered Mn oxide tunnel structures, similar to todorokite. EXAFS modeling shows that uranyl is present in these oxides predominantly in the tunnels of the Mn oxide structure in a tridentate complex. Observations by XRD corroborate these results. Structural incorporation may lead to more stable U(VI) sequestration that may be suitable for remediation uses. These observations, combined with the very high uptake capacity of the Mn oxides, imply that Mn-oxidizing bacteria may significantly influence dissolved U(VI) concentrations in impacted waters via sorption and incorporation into Mn oxide biominerals. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  17. Synthesis and X-ray diffraction study of new uranyl malonate and oxalate complexes with carbamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedkov, Ya. A.; Serezhkina, L. B.; Grigor'ev, M. S.; Serezhkin, V. N.

    2016-05-01

    Two new malonate-containing uranyl complexes with carbamide of the formulas [UO2(C3H2O4)( Urea)2] ( I) and [UO2(C3H2O4)( Urea)3] ( II), where Urea is carbamide, and one uranyl oxalate complex of the formula [UO2(C2O4)( Urea)3] ( III) were synthesized, and their crystals were studied by X-ray diffraction. The main structural units in crystals I are the electroneutral chains [UO2(C3H2O4)( Urea)2]∞ belonging to the crystal-chemical group AT 11 M 2 1 ( A = UO 2 2+ , T 11 = C3H2O 4 2- , M 1 = Urea) of uranyl complexes. Crystals II and III are composed of the molecular complexes [UO2( L)( Urea)3], where L = C3H2O 4 2- or C2O 4 2- , belonging to the crystal-chemical group AB 01 M 3 1 ( A = UO 2 2+ , B 01 = C3H2O 4 2- or C2O 4 2- , M 1 = Urea). The characteristic features of the packing of the uranium-containing complexes are discussed in terms of molecular Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedra. The effect of the Urea: U ratio on the structure of uranium-containing structural units is considered.

  18. Evidence of a stable uranyl site in ancient organic-rich calcite.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Shelly D; Rasbury, E Troy; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Kropf, A Jeremy; Kemner, Kenneth M

    2006-04-01

    The mechanism of uranium (U) incorporation into calcite (calcium carbonate) is of fundamental importance to the fate and transport of U at the surface and in the shallow subsurface and has implications for (a) the accuracy of U-Pb and U-series isotope ratio methods used to determine the ages of ancient deposits and (b) potential remediation strategies based on sequestration of U in the subsurface. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy is uniquely suited to the study of U-calcite systems. The sensitivity of the EXAFS spectrum to the local atomic Ca coordination about U(VI) in the calcite structure results in an increase in the number and amplitude of Ca signals as the U(VI) becomes more ordered within the crystal structure. Our X-ray microprobe (10-microm) measurements of an ancient 298 million-year-old organic-rich calcite (calcrete) clearly revealed three coordination shells of Ca atoms, defining a well-ordered calcite structure about uranyl to a distance of approximately 6.5 angstroms. These results indicate that uranyl is incorporated at the Ca2+ site in calcite and that the uranyl environment may evolve over long time scales, becoming more calcite-like and more stable for long-term sequestration of uranium. These results therefore validate U-related dating methods and show that calcite can be effective at sequestering U in vadose zone sediments. PMID:16646462

  19. Gas-phase reactions of molecular oxygen with uranyl(V) anionic complexes-synthesis and characterization of new superoxides of uranyl(VI).

    PubMed

    Lucena, Ana F; Carretas, José M; Marçalo, Joaquim; Michelini, Maria C; Gong, Yu; Gibson, John K

    2015-04-16

    Gas-phase complexes of uranyl(V) ligated to anions X(-) (X = F, Cl, Br, I, OH, NO3, ClO4, HCO2, CH3CO2, CF3CO2, CH3COS, NCS, N3), [UO2X2](-), were produced by electrospray ionization and reacted with O2 in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer to form uranyl(VI) anionic complexes, [UO2X2(O2)](-), comprising a superoxo ligand. The comparative rates for the oxidation reactions were measured, ranging from relatively fast [UO2(OH)2](-) to slow [UO2I2](-). The reaction rates of [UO2X2](-) ions containing polyatomic ligands were significantly faster than those containing the monatomic halogens, which can be attributed to the greater number of vibrational degrees of freedom in the polyatomic ligands to dissipate the energy of the initial O2-association complexes. The effect of the basicity of the X(-) ligands was also apparent in the relative rates for O2 addition, with a general correlation between increasing ligand basicity and O2-addition efficiency for polyatomic ligands. Collision-induced dissociation of the superoxo complexes showed in all cases loss of O2 to form the [UO2X2](-) anions, indicating weaker binding of the O2(-) ligand compared to the X(-) ligands. Density functional theory computations of the structures and energetics of selected species are in accord with the experimental observations. PMID:25807358

  20. Synergistic cytotoxicity and DNA strand breaks in cells and plasmid DNA exposed to uranyl acetate and ultraviolet radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Janice; Zuniga, Mary C.; Yazzie, Filbert; Stearns, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has a chemical toxicity that is independent of its radioactivity. The purpose of this study was to explore the photoactivation of uranyl ion by ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a chemical mechanism of uranium genotoxicity. The ability of UVB (302 nm) and UVA (368 nm) radiation to photoactivate uranyl ion to produce single strand breaks was measured in pBR322 plasmid DNA, and the presence of adducts and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites that could be converted to single strand breaks by heat and piperidine was analyzed. Results showed that DNA lesions in plasmid DNA exposed to UVB- or UVA-activated DU were only slightly heat reactive, but were piperidine sensitive. The cytotoxicity of UVB-activated uranyl ion was measured in repair-proficient and repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The cytotoxicity of co-exposures of uranyl ion and UVB radiation was dependent on the order of exposure and was greater than co-exposures of arsenite and UVB radiation. Uranyl ion and UVB radiation were synergistically cytotoxic in cells, and cells exposed to photoactivated DU required different DNA repair pathways than cells exposed to non-photoactivated DU. This study contributes to our understanding of the DNA lesions formed by DU, as well as their repair. Results suggest that excitation of uranyl ion by UV radiation can provide a pathway for uranyl ion to be chemically genotoxic in populations with dermal exposures to uranium and UV radiation, which would make skin an overlooked target organ for uranium exposures. PMID:24832689

  1. Synergistic cytotoxicity and DNA strand breaks in cells and plasmid DNA exposed to uranyl acetate and ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Janice; Zuniga, Mary C; Yazzie, Filbert; Stearns, Diane M

    2015-04-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has a chemical toxicity that is independent of its radioactivity. The purpose of this study was to explore the photoactivation of uranyl ion by ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a chemical mechanism of uranium genotoxicity. The ability of UVB (302 nm) and UVA (368 nm) radiation to photoactivate uranyl ion to produce single strand breaks was measured in pBR322 plasmid DNA, and the presence of adducts and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites that could be converted to single strand breaks by heat and piperidine was analyzed. Results showed that DNA lesions in plasmid DNA exposed to UVB- or UVA-activated DU were only slightly heat reactive, but were piperidine sensitive. The cytotoxicity of UVB-activated uranyl ion was measured in repair-proficient and repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The cytotoxicity of co-exposures of uranyl ion and UVB radiation was dependent on the order of exposure and was greater than co-exposures of arsenite and UVB radiation. Uranyl ion and UVB radiation were synergistically cytotoxic in cells, and cells exposed to photoactivated DU required different DNA repair pathways than cells exposed to non-photoactivated DU. This study contributes to our understanding of the DNA lesions formed by DU, as well as their repair. Results suggest that excitation of uranyl ion by UV radiation can provide a pathway for uranyl ion to be chemically genotoxic in populations with dermal exposures to uranium and UV radiation, which would make skin an overlooked target organ for uranium exposures. PMID:24832689

  2. The structures of two sodium uranyl compounds relevant to nuclear waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yaping; Burns, Peter C.

    2001-12-01

    Single crystals of two sodium uranyl phases, Na 2[(UO 2) 3O 3(OH) 2] and Na 4(UO 2) 2(Si 4O 10) 2(H 2O) 4 (designated NAUOH and NAURSI, respectively), were hydrothermally synthesized. Na uranyl oxyhydroxide (NAUOH) is monoclinic, space group P2 1/ n, a=0.70476(3) nm, b=1.14126(6) nm, c=1.20274(6) nm, β=90.563(1)°, V=0.96733(8) nm3. The structure of NAUOH was solved by direct methods and refined on the basis of F2 for 4027 unique reflections measuring using Mo Kα X-radiation and a CCD-based Smart APEX detector. The agreement index ( R1) is 2.7%, calculated using 2955 unique observed reflections (| Fo|⩾4 σF), and the goodness-of-fit is 0.68. The structure contains uranyl pentagonal bipyramids that share vertices and edges, forming sheets parallel to (0 1 0). The sheets are linked by double chains of Na polyhedra located in the interlayer. NAUOH is a Na analogue of the mineral compreignacite, and may correspond to the Na uranyl oxide hydrate formed in studies of the oxidative dissolution of spent nuclear fuel. The phase Na 4(UO 2) 2(Si 4O 10) 2(H 2O) 4 (NAURSI) is the Na analogue of KNa 3(UO 2) 2(Si 4O 10) 2(H 2O) 4, which was found as an alteration phase on hydrothermally treated actinide-bearing borosilicate waste glass. It is monoclinic, space group C2/ m, a=1.2770(1) nm, b=1.3610(1) nm, c=0.82440(8) nm, β=119.248(2)°, V=1.2501(2) nm3. The structure of NAURSI was solved by direct methods and refined on the basis of F2 for 1483 unique reflections measured with Mo Kα X-radiation and a CCD-based Smart 1 K detector. The agreement index ( R1) is 1.9%, calculated using 1333 unique observed reflections (| Fo|⩾4 σF), and the goodness-of-fit is 1.08. The structure is based on a uranyl silicate framework, with Na cations and H 2O groups located in interstitial sites. The structure is closely related to that of KNa 3(UO 2) 2(Si 4O 10) 2(H 2O) 4.

  3. Structural evolution of a uranyl peroxide nano-cage fullerene: U60, at elevated pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, K. M.; Lin, Y.; Zhang, F.; McGrail, B.; Burns, P. C.; Mao, W. L.; Ewing, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    U60 is a uranyl peroxide nano-cage that adopts a highly symmetric fullerene topology; it is topologically identical to C60. Several studies on the aqueous-phase of U60 clusters, [UO2(O2)(OH)]6060-, have shown its persistence in complex solutions and over lengthy time scales. Peroxide enhances corrosion of nuclear fuel in a reactor accident-uranyl peroxides often form near contaminated sites. U60 (Fm-3) crystallizes with approximate formula: Li68K12(OH)20[UO2(O2)(OH)]60(H2O)310. Here, we have used the diamond anvil cell (DAC) to examine U60 to understand the stability of this cluster at high pressures. We used a symmetric DAC with 300 μm culet diamonds and two different pressure-transmitting media: a mixture of methanol+ethanol and silicone oil. Using a combination of in situ Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron XRD, and electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) ex situ, we have determined the pressure-induced evolution of U60. Crystalline U60 undergoes an irreversible phase transition to a tetragonal structure at 4.1 GPa, and irreversibly amorphizes at 13 GPa. The amorphous phase likely consists of clusters of U60. Above 15 GPa, the U60 cluster is irreversibly destroyed. ESI-MS shows that this phase consists of species that likely have between 10-20 uranium atoms. Raman spectroscopy complements the diffraction measurements. U60 shows two dominant vibrational modes: a symmetric stretch of the uranyl U-O triple bond (810 cm-1), and a symmetric stretch of the U-O2-U peroxide bond (820 cm-1). As pressure is increased, these modes shift to higher wavenumbers, and overlap at 4 GPa. At 15 GPa, their intensity decreases below detection. These experiments reveal several novel behaviors including a new phase of U60. Notably, the amorphization of U60 occurs before the collapse of its cluster topology. This is different from the behavior of solvated C60 at high pressure, which maintains a hcp structure up to 30 GPa, while the clusters disorder. These results suggest

  4. A biological source of oceanic alkyl nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, E. E.; Lewis, C. B.; Velasco, F. L.; Escobar, C.; Kellogg, D.; Velcamp, M.

    2013-12-01

    Alkyl nitrates are an important component of reactive nitrogen in the troposphere. The oceans are a source of alkyl nitrates to the atmosphere, however the source of alkyl nitrates in the oceans is unknown. It has been demonstrated that the reaction of alkyl peroxy radicals (ROO) with nitric oxide (NO) produces alkyl nitrates in the aqueous phase. We hypothesize that alkyl nitrates may be formed by organisms through the same reaction and therefore biological production could be a source of alkyl nitrates to the troposphere. This work focuses on the production of alkyl nitrates by the diatoms Chaetoceros muelleri and Thalassiosira weisfloggi. Using chemostats, we measure alkyl nitrates formed under nitrate limited conditions. We also use triggers and inhibitors of nitric oxide formation to determine if alkyl nitrate formation is affected by changes in NO production. To date, the rates of production of alkyl nitrates in our cultures, lead us to estimate a production rate on the order of femtomolar/day for C1-C3 alkyl nitrates by diatom species in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. This suggests that diatoms may contribute to the overall ocean source of alkyl nitrates; however, it is possible that other types of phytoplankton, such as cyanobacteria, that are more abundant in the open ocean, may contribute to a greater extent.

  5. Short-Term Effects of a High Nitrate Diet on Nitrate Metabolism in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bondonno, Catherine P.; Liu, Alex H.; Croft, Kevin D.; Ward, Natalie C.; Puddey, Ian B.; Woodman, Richard J.; Hodgson, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary nitrate, through the enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway, can improve blood pressure and arterial stiffness. How long systemic nitrate and nitrite remain elevated following cessation of high nitrate intake is unknown. In 19 healthy men and women, the time for salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite to return to baseline after 7 days increased nitrate intake from green leafy vegetables was determined. Salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite was measured at baseline [D0], end of high nitrate diet [D7], day 9 [+2D], day 14 [+7D] and day 21 [+14D]. Urinary nitrite and nitrate was assessed at D7 and +14D. Increased dietary nitrate for 7 days resulted in a more than fourfold increase in saliva and plasma nitrate and nitrite (p < 0.001) measured at [D7]. At [+2D] plasma nitrite and nitrate had returned to baseline while saliva nitrate and nitrite were more than 1.5 times higher than at baseline levels. By [+7D] all metabolites had returned to baseline levels. The pattern of response was similar between men and women. Urinary nitrate and nitrate was sevenfold higher at D7 compared to +14D. These results suggest that daily ingestion of nitrate may be required to maintain the physiological changes associated with high nitrate intake. PMID:25774606

  6. Dietary nitrate and cardiovascular health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahluwalia, A.; Gladwin, M.T.; Harman, Jane L.; Ward, M.H.; Nolan, Bernard T.

    2014-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened this workshop to discuss the results of recent research on the effects of inorganic nitrate and nitrite on the cardiovascular system, possible long term effects of these compounds in the diet and drinking water, and future research needs including population-wide effects examined through epidemiological studies.

  7. Biological denitrification of high concentration nitrate waste

    DOEpatents

    Francis, Chester W.; Brinkley, Frank S.

    1977-01-01

    Biological denitrification of nitrate solutions at concentrations of greater than one kilogram nitrate per cubic meter is accomplished anaerobically in an upflow column having as a packing material a support for denitrifying bacteria.

  8. A Novel Chemical Nitrate Destruction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrates represent one of the most significant pollutant discharged to the Baltic Sea by the Sliiamae hydrometallurgical plant. This article contains a brief overview of the existing nitrate destruction technologies followed by the description of a new process developed by the authors. The new chemical process for nitrate destruction is cost effective and simple to operate. It converts the nitrate to nitrogen gas which goes to the atmosphere.

  9. Nitrate reduction in sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Marietou, Angeliki

    2016-08-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) gain their energy by coupling the oxidation of organic substrate to the reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Several SRBs are able to use alternative terminal electron acceptors to sulfate such as nitrate. Nitrate-reducing SRBs have been isolated from a diverse range of environments. In order to be able to understand the significance of nitrate reduction in SRBs, we need to examine the ecology and physiology of the nitrate-reducing SRB isolates. PMID:27364687

  10. Plasma nitrate and nitrite are increased by a high nitrate supplement, but not by high nitrate foods in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Gary D.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Dove, Robin W.; Beavers, Daniel; Presley, Tennille; Helms, Christine; Bechtold, Erika; King, S. Bruce; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of dietary nitrate on the nitrate/nitrite/NO (nitric oxide) cycle in older adults. We examined the effect of a 3-day control diet vs. high nitrate diet, with and without a high nitrate supplement (beetroot juice), on plasma nitrate and nitrite kinetics, and blood pressure using a randomized four period cross-over controlled design. We hypothesized that the high nitrate diet would show higher levels of plasma nitrate/nitrite and blood pressure compared to the control diet, which would be potentiated by the supplement. Participants were eight normotensive older men and women (5 female, 3 male, 72.5±4.7 yrs) with no overt disease or medications that affect NO metabolism. Plasma nitrate and nitrite levels and blood pressure were measured prior to and hourly for 3 hours after each meal. The mean daily changes in plasma nitrate and nitrite were significantly different from baseline for both control diet+supplement (p<0.001 and =0.017 for nitrate and nitrite, respectively) and high nitrate diet+supplement (p=0.001 and 0.002), but not for control diet (p=0.713 and 0.741) or high nitrate diet (p=0.852 and 0.500). Blood pressure decreased from the morning baseline measure to the three 2 hr post-meal follow-up time-points for all treatments, but there was no main effect for treatment. In healthy older adults, a high nitrate supplement consumed at breakfast elevated plasma nitrate and nitrite levels throughout the day. This observation may have practical utility for the timing of intake of a nitrate supplement with physical activity for older adults with vascular dysfunction. PMID:22464802

  11. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  12. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  13. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  14. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  15. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  16. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Denitrification beds are being promoted to reduce nitrate concentrations in agricultural drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution in surface water. In this system, water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transfor...

  17. Efflux Of Nitrate From Hydroponically Grown Wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. C.; Aslam, M.; Ward, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to measure influx, and efflux of nitrate from hydroponically grown wheat seedlings. Ratio between efflux and influx greater in darkness than in light; increased with concentration of nitrate in nutrient solution. On basis of experiments, authors suggest nutrient solution optimized at lowest possible concentration of nitrate.

  18. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  19. Nitration of Naphthol: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowery, Dwight F.

    1982-01-01

    Products of nitrations, upon distillation or steam distillation, may produce dermatitis in some students. A procedure for nitration of beta-naphthol producing a relatively non-volatile product not purified by steam distillation is described. Nitration of alpha-naphthol by the same procedure yields Martius Yellow dye which dyes wool yellow or…

  20. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a...

  1. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food... ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a curing agent in the processing of...

  2. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  3. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  4. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  5. Method of producing thin cellulose nitrate film

    DOEpatents

    Lupica, S.B.

    1975-12-23

    An improved method for forming a thin nitrocellulose film of reproducible thickness is described. The film is a cellulose nitrate film, 10 to 20 microns in thickness, cast from a solution of cellulose nitrate in tetrahydrofuran, said solution containing from 7 to 15 percent, by weight, of dioctyl phthalate, said cellulose nitrate having a nitrogen content of from 10 to 13 percent.

  6. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  7. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  8. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified foods in accordance with...

  9. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  10. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  11. Protective effect of salivary nitrate and microbial nitrate reductase activity against caries.

    PubMed

    Doel, J J; Hector, M P; Amirtham, C V; Al-Anzan, L A; Benjamin, N; Allaker, R P

    2004-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that a combination of high salivary nitrate and high nitrate-reducing capacity are protective against dental caries, 209 children attending the Dental Institute, Barts and The London NHS Trust were examined. Salivary nitrate and nitrite levels, counts of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp., and caries experience were recorded. Compared with control subjects, a significant reduction in caries experience was found in patients with high salivary nitrate and high nitrate-reducing ability. Production of nitrite from salivary nitrate by commensal nitrate-reducing bacteria may limit the growth of cariogenic bacteria as a result of the production of antimicrobial oxides of nitrogen, including nitric oxide. PMID:15458501

  12. Selective recognition of uranyl ions from bulk of thorium(iv) and lanthanide(iii) ions by tetraalkyl urea: a combined experimental and quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Vats, Bal Govind; Das, Debasish; Sadhu, Biswajit; Kannan, S; Pius, I C; Noronha, D M; Sundararajan, Mahesh; Kumar, Mukesh

    2016-06-21

    The selective separation of uranyl ions from an aqueous solution is one of the most important criteria for sustainable nuclear energy production. We report herein a known, but unexplored extractant, tetraalkyl urea, which shows supreme selectivity for uranium in the presence of interfering thorium and other lanthanide ions from a nitric acid medium. The structural characterization of the uranyl complex (UO2X2·2L, where X = NO3(-), Cl(-) and Br(-)) by IR, NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction provides insight into the strong interaction between the uranyl ion and the ligand. The origin of this supreme selectivity for uranyl ions is further supported by electronic structure calculations. Uranyl binding with the extractant is thermodynamically more favourable when compared to thorium and the selectivity is achieved through a combination of electronic and steric effects. PMID:27241102

  13. Correlation between stabilities of uranyl ion complexes with various monocarboxylic acids and Hammett-Taft substituent constants

    SciTech Connect

    Poluektov, N.S.; Perfil'ev, V.A.; Meshkova, S.B.; Mishchenko, V.T.

    1987-01-01

    A correlation has been observed between the stabilities of uranyl ion complexes (1:1 composition) and the substituent inductive constants in formic and acetic acid derivatives. For substituents which are not directly involved in couples formation the parameters of the Hammett-Taft equation log K/sub 1/ = A + B have the following values: A = 1.311, B = -2.360. For substituents which form a coordination bond with the uranyl ion, A = 7.0077 and B = - 17.321. In the case of complexes formed between the uranyl ion and salicylic acid and its derivatives, there is a correlation between complex stability and sigma/sub m/ and sigma/sub p/ substituent constants for the meta- and para-positions, respectively (A = 12.72, B = -4.41).

  14. Nitrated fatty acids: Synthesis and measurement

    PubMed Central

    Woodcock, Steven R.; Bonacci, Gustavo; Gelhaus, Stacy L.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrated fatty acids are the product of nitrogen dioxide reaction with unsaturated fatty acids. The discovery of peroxynitrite and peroxidase-induced nitration of biomolecules led to the initial reports of endogenous nitrated fatty acids. These species increase during ischemia reperfusion, but concentrations are often at or near the limits of detection. Here, we describe multiple methods for nitrated fatty acid synthesis, sample extraction from complex biological matrices, and a rigorous method of qualitative and quantitative detection of nitrated fatty acids by LC-MS. In addition, optimized instrument conditions and caveats regarding data interpretation are discussed. PMID:23200809

  15. Continuous flow nitration in miniaturized devices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review highlights the state of the art in the field of continuous flow nitration with miniaturized devices. Although nitration has been one of the oldest and most important unit reactions, the advent of miniaturized devices has paved the way for new opportunities to reconsider the conventional approach for exothermic and selectivity sensitive nitration reactions. Four different approaches to flow nitration with microreactors are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages, limitations and applicability of the information towards scale-up. Selected recent patents that disclose scale-up methodologies for continuous flow nitration are also briefly reviewed. PMID:24605161

  16. High-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal synthesis, characterization, and structural relationships of layered uranyl arsenates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsin-Kuan; Ramachandran, Eswaran; Chen, Yi-Hsin; Chang, Wen-Jung; Lii, Kwang-Hwa

    2014-09-01

    Five new uranyl arsenates, Na14[(UO2)5(AsO4)8]·2H2O (1), K6[(UO2)5O5(AsO4)2] (2a), K4[(UO2)3O2(AsO4)2] (2b), Rb4[(UO2)3O2(AsO4)2] (3), and Cs6[(UO2)5O2(AsO4)4] (4), were synthesized by high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal reactions at about 560 °C and 1440 bar and were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Crystal data for compound 1: triclinic, P1, a = 7.0005(3) Å, b = 12.1324(4) Å, c = 13.7428(5) Å, α = 64.175(2)°, β = 89.092(2)°, γ = 85.548(2)°, V = 1047.26(7) Å(3), Z = 1, R1 = 0.0185; compound 2a: monoclinic, P2₁/c, a = 6.8615(3) Å, b = 24.702(1) Å, c = 7.1269(3) Å, β = 98.749(2)°, V = 1193.89(9) Å(3), Z = 2, R1 = 0.0225; compound 2b: monoclinic, P2₁/c, a = 6.7852(3) Å, b = 17.3640(8) Å, c = 7.1151(3) Å, β = 98.801(3)°, V = 828.42(6) Å(3), Z = 2, R1 = 0.0269; compound 3: monoclinic, P2₁/m, a = 6.9783(3) Å, b = 17.4513(8) Å, c = 7.0867(3) Å, β = 90.808(3)°, V = 862.94(7) Å(3), Z = 2, R1 = 0.0269; compound 4: triclinic, P1, a = 7.7628(3) Å, b = 9.3324(4) Å, c = 11.9336(4) Å, α = 75.611(2)°, β = 73.136(2)°, γ = 86.329(2)°, V = 801.37(5) Å(3), Z = 1, R1 = 0.0336. The five compounds have layer structures consisting of uranyl square, pentagonal, and hexagonal bipyramids as well as AsO4 tetrahedra. Compound 1 contains chains of discrete uranyl square and pentagonal bipyramids, 2a contains three-polyhedron-wide ribbons of edge- and corner-sharing uranyl square and pentagonal bipyramids, 2b and 3 contain dimers of edge-shairing pentagonal bipyramids that share edges with hexagonal bipyramids to form chains, and 4 contains one-polyhedron-wide zigzag chains of edge-sharing uranyl polyhedra. The double sheet structure of 1 is new, but the chain topology has been observed in an organically templated uranyl sulfate. Compound 2b is a new geometrical isomer of the phosphuranylite group. The sheet anion topologies of 2a and 4 can be obtained by

  17. Deconstructing nitrate isotope dynamics in aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, J.

    2012-12-01

    The natural abundance N and O stable isotope ratios of nitrate provide an invaluable tool to differentiate N sources to the environment, track their dispersal, and monitor their attenuation by biological transformations. The interpretation of patterns in isotope abundances relies on knowledge of the isotope ratios of the source end-members, as well as on constraints on the isotope discrimination imposed on nitrate by respective biological processes. Emergent observations from mono-culture experiments of denitrifying bacteria reveal nitrate fractionation trends that appear at odds with trends ascribed to denitrification in soils and aquifers. This discrepancy raises the possibility that additional biological N transformations may be acting in tandem with denitrification. Here, the N and O isotope enrichments associated with nitrate removal by denitrification in aquifers are posited to bear evidence of coincident biological nitrate production - from nitrification and/or from anammox. Simulations are presented from a simple time-dependent one-box model of a groundwater mass ageing that is subject to net nitrate loss by denitrification with coincident nitrate production by nitrification or anammox. Within boundary conditions characteristic of freshwater aquifers, the apparent slope of the parallel enrichments in nitrate N and O isotopes associated with net N loss to denitrification can vary in proportion to the nitrate added simultaneous by oxidative processes. Pertinent observations from nitrate plumes in suboxic to anoxic aquifers are examined to validate this premise. In this perspective, nitrate isotope distributions suggest that we may be missing important N fluxes inherent to most aquifers.

  18. Synthesis and structures of new uranyl malonate complexes with carbamide derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Serezhkina, L. B.; Grigor’ev, M. S.; Medvedkov, Ya. A.; Serezhkin, V. N.

    2015-09-15

    Crystals of new malonate-containing uranyl complexes [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(Imon)(H{sub 2}O)] (I) and [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O4)(Meur){sub 3}] (II), where Imon is imidazolidin-2-one (ethylenecarbamide) and Meur is methyl-carbamide, have been synthesized and studied by X-ray diffraction. Both compounds crystallize in the monoclinic system with the following unit-cell parameters (at 100 K): a = 11.1147(10) Å, b = 6.9900(6) Å, c = 14.4934(12) Å, β = 92.042(2)°, V = 1125.30(17) Å{sup 3}, sp. gr. P2{sub 1}/n, Z = 4, R{sub 1} = 0.0398 (I); a = 16.6613(5) Å, b = 9.5635(3) Å, c = 22.9773(6) Å, β = 103.669(2)°, V = 3557.51(18) Å{sup 3}, sp. gr. C2/c, Z = 8, R{sub 1} = 0.0207 (II). The crystals are composed of electroneutral chains [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(Imon)(H{sub 2}O)] and mononuclear groups [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(Meur){sub 3}] as the structural units belonging to the crystal-chemical groups AT{sup 11}M{sub 2}{sup 1} and AB{sup 01}M{sub 3}{sup 1} (A =UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, T{sup 11} and B{sup 01} = C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, M{sup 1} = Imon, H{sub 2}O, or Meur), respectively, of uranyl complexes. The packing modes of the uranyl-containing complexes were analyzed by the method of molecular Voronoi—Dirichlet polyhedra.

  19. Computer simulation of uranyl uptake by the rough lipopolysaccharide membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lins, Roberto D; Vorpagel, Erich R; Guglielmi, Matteo; Straatsma, T P

    2008-01-01

    Heavy metal environmental contaminants cannot be destroyed but require containment, preferably in concentrated form, in a solid or immobile form for recycling or final disposal. Microorganisms are able to take up and deposit high levels of contaminant metals, including radioactive metals such as uranium and plutonium, into their cell wall. Consequently, these microbial systems are of great interest as the basis for potential environmental bioremediation technologies. The outer membranes of Gram-negative microbes are highly nonsymmetric and exhibit a significant electrostatic potential gradient across the membrane. This gradient has a significant effect on the uptake and transport of charged and dipolar compounds. However, the effectiveness of microbial systems for environmental remediation will depend strongly on specific properties that determine the uptake of targeted contaminants by a particular cell wall. To aid in the design of microbial remediation technologies, knowledge of the factors that determine the affinity of a particular bacterial outer membrane for the most common ionic species found in contaminated soils and groundwater is of great importance. Using our previously developed model for the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, this work presents the potentials of mean force as the estimate of the free energy profile for uptake of sodium, calcium, chloride, uranyl ions, and a water molecule by the bacterial LPS membrane. A compatible classical parameter set for uranyl has been developed and validated. Results show that the uptake of uranyl is energetically a favorable process relative to the other ions studied. At neutral pH, this nuclide is shown to be retained on the surface of the LPS membrane through chelation with the carboxyl and hydroxyl groups located in the outer core. PMID:18067253

  20. Transformation of human osteoblast cells to the tumorigenic phenotype by depleted uranium-uranyl chloride.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A C; Blakely, W F; Livengood, D; Whittaker, T; Xu, J; Ejnik, J W; Hamilton, M M; Parlette, E; John, T S; Gerstenberg, H M; Hsu, H

    1998-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a dense heavy metal used primarily in military applications. Although the health effects of occupational uranium exposure are well known, limited data exist regarding the long-term health effects of internalized DU in humans. We established an in vitro cellular model to study DU exposure. Microdosimetric assessment, determined using a Monte Carlo computer simulation based on measured intracellular and extracellular uranium levels, showed that few (0.0014%) cell nuclei were hit by alpha particles. We report the ability of DU-uranyl chloride to transform immortalized human osteoblastic cells (HOS) to the tumorigenic phenotype. DU-uranyl chloride-transformants are characterized by anchorage-independent growth, tumor formation in nude mice, expression of high levels of the k-ras oncogene, reduced production of the Rb tumor-suppressor protein, and elevated levels of sister chromatid exchanges per cell. DU-uranyl chloride treatment resulted in a 9.6 (+/- 2.8)-fold increase in transformation frequency compared to untreated cells. In comparison, nickel sulfate resulted in a 7.1 (+/- 2.1)-fold increase in transformation frequency. This is the first report showing that a DU compound caused human cell transformation to the neoplastic phenotype. Although additional studies are needed to determine if protracted DU exposure produces tumors in vivo, the implication from these in vitro results is that the risk of cancer induction from internalized DU exposure may be comparable to other biologically reactive and carcinogenic heavy-metal compounds (e.g., nickel). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9681973

  1. Computer Simulation of Uranyl Uptake by the Rough Lipopolysaccharide Membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Lins, Roberto D.; Vorpagel, Erich R.; Guglielmi, Matteo; Straatsma, TP

    2008-01-01

    Heavy metal environmental contaminants cannot be destroyed but require containment, preferably in concentrated form, in a solid or immobile form for recycling or final disposal. Microorganisms are able to take up and deposit high levels of contaminant metals, including radioactive metals such as uranium and plutonium, into their cell wall. Consequently, these microbial systems are of great interest as the basis for potential environmental bioremediation technologies. The outer membranes of Gram-negative microbes are highly non-symmetric and exhibit a significant electrostatic potential gradient across the membrane. This gradient has a significant effect on the uptake and transport of charged and dipolar compounds. However, the effectiveness of microbial systems for environmental remediation will depend strongly on specific properties that determine the uptake of targeted contaminants by a particular cell wall. To aid in the design of microbial remediation technologies, knowledge of the factors that determine the affinity of a particular bacterial outer membrane for the most common ionic species found in contaminated soils and groundwater is of great importance. Using our previously developed model for the lipopolisaccharide (LPS) membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, this work presents the potentials of mean force as the estimate of the free energy profile for uptake of sodium, calcium, chloride, uranyl ions and a water molecule by the bacterial LPS membrane. A compatible classical parameter set for uranyl has been developed and validated. Results show that the uptake of uranyl is energetically a favorable process relative to the other ions studied. At neutral pH, this nuclide is shown to be retained on the surface of the LPS membrane through chelation with the carboxyl and hydroxyl groups located in the outer-core.

  2. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, M.; Yoo, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood -resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 17 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400 °C.

  3. Dietary nitrate supplementation and exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew M

    2014-05-01

    Dietary nitrate is growing in popularity as a sports nutrition supplement. This article reviews the evidence base for the potential of inorganic nitrate to enhance sports and exercise performance. Inorganic nitrate is present in numerous foodstuffs and is abundant in green leafy vegetables and beetroot. Following ingestion, nitrate is converted in the body to nitrite and stored and circulated in the blood. In conditions of low oxygen availability, nitrite can be converted into nitric oxide, which is known to play a number of important roles in vascular and metabolic control. Dietary nitrate supplementation increases plasma nitrite concentration and reduces resting blood pressure. Intriguingly, nitrate supplementation also reduces the oxygen cost of submaximal exercise and can, in some circumstances, enhance exercise tolerance and performance. The mechanisms that may be responsible for these effects are reviewed and practical guidelines for safe and efficacious dietary nitrate supplementation are provided. PMID:24791915

  4. Nitration of sym-trichlorobenzene

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlin, W.T.

    1981-02-01

    Basic thermal and kinetic data were obtained for the nitration of 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene to trichlorotrinitrobenzene in the presence of oleum/nitric acid. A limiting specific production rate of 5.4 kg/l/hr was determined for the addition of the first two nitro groups at 130 C and a rate of 0.16 kg/l/hr was obtained at 150 C for the addition of the third nitro group.

  5. High performance ammonium nitrate propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, F. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A high performance propellant having greatly reduced hydrogen chloride emission is presented. It is comprised of: (1) a minor amount of hydrocarbon binder (10-15%), (2) at least 85% solids including ammonium nitrate as the primary oxidizer (about 40% to 70%), (3) a significant amount (5-25%) powdered metal fuel, such as aluminum, (4) a small amount (5-25%) of ammonium perchlorate as a supplementary oxidizer, and (5) optionally a small amount (0-20%) of a nitramine.

  6. Atypical temperature-dependence of symmetry transformation observed in a uranyl phosphonate.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tao; Gao, Yang; Gui, Daxiang; Chen, Lanhua; Sheng, Daopeng; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2016-05-31

    The example of phase transformation from a centrosymmetric space group at low temperature (LT) to a chiral space group at high temperature (HT) is reported, which was clearly resolved in a single-crystal-to-single-crystal manner in a 3D uranyl(vi) phosphonate compound [TMA][(UO2)2(1,3-pbpH)(1,3-pbpH2)] () (TMA(+) = tetramethylammonium cation; 1,3-pbpH4 = 1,3-phenylenebis(phosphonic acid)). PMID:27184289

  7. Synthesis, characterization and photo luminescence studies of uranyl doped SrBPO{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect

    Rout, Annapurna; Suriyamurthy, N.; Panigrahi, B. S.

    2015-06-24

    SrBPO{sub 5}: UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was synthesized using solid state reaction method and characterized using powder X-ray diffraction. PXRD data showed the formation of single phase confirming successful doping of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. Photo luminescence investigation informed stabilization of Uranium as Uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) in SrBPO{sub 5} matrix. Luminescence decay time data suggested two possible environments for UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} with two different life time values.

  8. Uranyl p-toluenesulphonate and its crystal hydrates. Synthesis and dehydration-hydration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, A. V.; Mityakhina, V. S.; Bogachev, S. V.; Suglobova, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    Lowest hydrates of uranyl p-toluenesulphonate (UPTS) and anhydrous salt were synthesised. The dehydration-hydration processes were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis. It has been established that the hydrate shell of UPTS has a layered structure. The IR spectra of UPTS and its hydrates were recorded. It was found that the IR spectra of UPTS crystal hydrates of the same composition, produced in dehydration-hydration, noticeably differ in the range of water vibrations and are the same in the range corresponding to vibrations of sulphonate groups.

  9. Synthesis of New Bis(3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone) Ligands as Chelating Agents for Uranyl Complexation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Bo; Zheng, Rongzong; Peng, Rufang; Chu, Shijin

    2016-01-01

    Five new bis(3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone) tetradentate chelators were synthesized in this study. The structures of these tetradentate chelators were characterized by ¹H-NMR, (13)C-NMR, FT-IR, UV-vis, and mass spectral analyses. The binding abilities of these tetradentate chelators for uranyl ion at pH 7.4 were also determined by UV spectrophotometry in aqueous media. Results showed that the efficiencies of these chelating agents are dependent on the linker length. Ligand 4b is the best chelator and suitable for further studies. PMID:27005598

  10. The Complexes of Bisphosphonate and Magnetite Nanoparticles to Remove Uranyl Ions from Aqueous Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Yang, Z.; Gao, J.; Xu, K.; Gu, H.; Xu, B.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, X.

    2007-03-20

    Using tetraethyl-3-amino-propane-1,1-bisphosphonate (BP) as the functional molecule, we functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles via dopamine (DA) linkage to create a system with an Fe3O4-DA-BP nanostructure, which possesses high specificity for removing uranyl ions from water or blood. This work demonstrates that magnetic nanoparticles, combined with specific receptor-ligand interactions, promise a sensitive and rapid platform for the detection, recovery, and decorporation of radioactive metal toxins from biological environment.

  11. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  12. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  13. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  14. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  15. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  16. Catalyzed reduction of nitrate in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P.A.

    1994-08-01

    Sodium nitrate and other nitrate salts in wastes is a major source of difficulty for permanent disposal. Reduction of nitrate using aluminum metal has been demonstrated, but NH{sub 3}, hydrazine, or organic compounds containing oxygen would be advantageous for reduction of nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions. Objective of this seed money study was to determine minimum conditions for reduction. Proposed procedure was batchwise heating of aqueous solutions in closed vessels with monitoring of temperatures and pressures. A simple, convenient apparatus and procedure were demonstrated for observing formation of gaseous products and collecting samples for analyses. The test conditions were 250{degree}C and 1000 psi max. Any useful reduction of sodium nitrate to sodium hydroxide as the primary product was not found. The nitrate present at pHs < 4 as HNO{sub 3} or NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} is easily decomposed, and the effect of nitromethane at these low pHs was confirmed. When acetic acid or formic acid was added, 21 to 56% of the nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions was reduced by methanol or formaldehyde. With hydrazine and acetic acid, 73 % of the nitrate was decomposed to convert NaNO{sub 3} to sodium acetate. With hydrazine and formic acid, 36% of the nitrate was decomposed. If these products are more acceptable for final disposal than sodium nitrate, the reagents are cheap and the conversion conditions would be practical for easy use. Ammonium acetate or formate salts did not significantly reduce nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions.

  17. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulot, F.; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; Donner, L. J.; Fan, S.; Lin, M.; Mao, J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2015-09-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 %) or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %). Our best estimate for present-day fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm is 0.006 (0.005-0.008). We only find a modest increase of nitrate optical depth (< 30 %) in response to the projected changes in the emissions of SO2 (-40 %) and ammonia (+38 %) from 2010 to 2050. Nitrate burden is projected to increase in the tropics and in the free troposphere, but to decrease at the surface in the midlatitudes because of lower nitric acid concentrations. Our results suggest that better constraints on the heterogeneous chemistry of nitric acid on dust, on tropical ammonia emissions, and on the transport of ammonia to the free troposphere are needed to improve projections of aerosol optical depth.

  18. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulot, F.; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; Donner, L. J.; Fan, S.; Lin, M.-Y.; Mao, J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2016-02-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 %) or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %). Our best estimate for fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm in 2010 is 0.006 (0.005-0.008). In wintertime, nitrate aerosols are simulated to account for over 30 % of the aerosol optical depth over western Europe and North America. Simulated nitrate optical depth increases by less than 30 % (0.0061-0.010) in response to projected changes in anthropogenic emissions from 2010 to 2050 (e.g., -40 % for SO2 and +38 % for ammonia). This increase is primarily driven by greater concentrations of nitrate in the free troposphere, while surface nitrate concentrations decrease in the midlatitudes following lower concentrations of nitric acid. With the projected increase of ammonia emissions, we show that better constraints on the vertical distribution of ammonia (e.g., convective transport and biomass burning injection) and on the sources and sinks of nitric acid (e.g., heterogeneous reaction on dust) are needed to improve estimates of future nitrate optical depth.

  19. Effect of nitrate on microbial perchlorate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last decade perchlorate has been recognized as an important emerging water contaminant that poses a significant public health threat. Because of its chemical stability, low ionic charge density, and significant water solubility microbial remediation has been identified as the most feasible method for its in situ attenuation. Our previous studies have demonstrated that dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) capable of the respiratory reduction of perchlorate into innocuous chloride are ubiquitous in soil and sedimentary environments. As part of their metabolism these organisms reduce perchlorate to chlorite which is subsequently dismutated into chloride and molecular oxygen. These initial steps are mediated by the perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase enzymes respectively. Previously we found that the activity of these organisms is dependent on the presence of molybdenum and is inhibited by the presence of oxygen and to different extents nitrate. However, to date, there is little understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of perchlorate reduction by oxygen and nitrate. As a continuation of our studies into the factors that control DPRB activity we investigated these regulatory mechanisms in more detail as a model organism, Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB, transitions from aerobic metabolism through nitrate reduction to perchlorate reduction. In series of growth transition studies where both nitrate and perchlorate were present, preference for nitrate to perchlorate was observed regardless of the nitrate to perchlorate ratio. Even when the organism was pre-grown anaerobically in perchlorate, nitrate was reduced prior to perchlorate. Using non-growth washed cell suspension, perchlorate- grown D. aromatica was capable of reducing both perchlorate and nitrate concomitantly suggesting the preferentially utilization of nitrate was not a result of enzyme functionality. To elucidate the mechanism for preferential utilization of

  20. Fast photolysis of carbonyl nitrates from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jean-Francois; Peeters, Jozef; Stavrakou, Trisevgeni

    2014-05-01

    We show that photolysis is, by far, the major atmospheric sink of isoprene-derived carbonyl nitrates. Empirical evidence from published laboratory studies on the absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of α-nitrooxy ketones suggests that the presence of the nitrate group (i) greatly enhances the absorption cross sections, and (ii) facilitates dissociation to a point that the photolysis quantum yield is close to unity, with O-NO2 dissociation as the likely major channel. On this basis, we provide new recommendations for estimating the cross sections and photolysis rates of carbonyl nitrates. The newly estimated photorates are validated using a chemical box model against measured temporal profiles of carbonyl nitrates in an isoprene oxidation experiment by Paulot et al. (2009). The comparisons for ethanal nitrate and for the sum of methacrolein- and methylvinylketone nitrates strongly supports our assumptions of large cross section enhancements and a near-unit quantum yield for these compounds. These findings have significant atmospheric implications, as carbonyl nitrates constitute an important component of the total organic nitrate pool over vegetated areas: the photorates of key carbonyl nitrates from isoprene are estimated to be typically between ~3 and 20 times higher than their sink due to reaction with OH in relevant atmospheric conditions. Moreover, since the reaction is expected to release NO2, photolysis is especially effective in depleting the total organic nitrate pool.

  1. Skeletal muscle as an endogenous nitrate reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Piknova, Barbora; Park, Ji Won; Swanson, Kathryn M.; Dey, Soumyadeep; Noguchi, Constance Tom; Schechter, Alan N

    2015-01-01

    The nitric oxide synthase (NOS) family of enzymes form nitric oxide (NO) from arginine in the presence of oxygen. At reduced oxygen availability NO is also generated from nitrate in a two step process by bacterial and mammalian molybdopterin proteins, and also directly from nitrite by a variety of five-coordinated ferrous hemoproteins. The mammalian NO cycle also involves direct oxidation of NO to nitrite, and both NO and nitrite to nitrate by oxy-ferrous hemoproteins. The liver and blood are considered the sites of active mammalian NO metabolism and nitrite and nitrate concentrations in the liver and blood of several mammalian species, including human, have been determined. However, the large tissue mass of skeletal muscle had not been generally considered in the analysis of the NO cycle, in spite of its long-known presence of significant levels of active neuronal NOS (nNOS or NOS1). We hypothesized that skeletal muscle participates in the NO cycle and, due to its NO oxidizing heme protein, oxymyoglobin, has high concentrations of nitrate ions. We measured nitrite and nitrate concentrations in rat and mouse leg skeletal muscle and found unusually high concentrations of nitrate but similar levels of nitrite, when compared to the liver. The nitrate reservoir in muscle is easily accessible via the bloodstream and therefore nitrate is available for transport to internal organs where it can be reduced to nitrite and NO. Nitrate levels in skeletal muscle and blood in nNOS−/− mice were dramatically lower when compared with controls, which support further our hypothesis. Although the nitrate reductase activity of xanthine oxidoreductase in muscle is less than that of liver, the residual activity in muscle could be very important in view of its total mass and the high basal level of nitrate. We suggest that skeletal muscle participates in overall NO metabolism, serving as a nitrate reservoir, for direct formation of nitrite and NO, and for determining levels of nitrate

  2. Removal of uranyl ions in aquatic mediums by using a new material: gallocyanine grafted hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Halil İbrahim; Simşek, Selçuk

    2013-06-15

    A new material containing gallocyanine (GC) grafted polyacyril amide (PAA) was synthesized and its adsorption ability was examined for the removal of uranyl ions from aqueous media. The new developed adsorbent was characterized by FTIR, SEM, and PZC analysis. Adsorption of UO₂(2+) ions from aqueous solution as a function of ion concentration, pH, ionic strength, temperature, and reusability of adsorbent was investigated in detail. The adsorption data were analyzed by using the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) models. The adsorption of UO₂(2+) increased with pH and reached a plateau value in the pH range 5-6. The adsorption of UO₂(2+) ions were not affected by increasing ionic strength. The adsorption mechanism followed an endothermic and spontaneous process with increased disorderliness at adsorbate/adsorbent interface. The adsorption process followed a pseudo-second-order kinetics. The new developed material is a potential adsorbent for effective removal of uranyl ions from aquatic solutions. PMID:23669652

  3. Impact of pore size on the sorption of uranyl under seawater conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mayes, Richard T.; Gorka, Joanna; Dai, Sheng

    2016-04-05

    The extraction of uranium from seawater has received significant interest recently, because of the possibility of a near-limitless supply of uranium to fuel the nuclear power industry. While sorbent development has focused primarily on polymeric sorbents, nanomaterials represent a new area that has the potential to surpass the current polymeric sorbents, because of the high surface areas that are possible. Mesoporous carbon materials are a stable, high-surface-area material capable of extracting various chemical species from a variety of environments. Herein, we report the use of a dual templating process to understand the effect of pore size on the adsorption ofmore » uranyl ions from a uranyl brine consisting of seawater-relevant sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate ions. It was found that pore size played a more significant role in the effective use of the grafted polymer, leading to higher uranium capacities than the surface area. Furthermore, the pore size must be tailored to meet the demands of the extraction medium and analyte metal to achieve efficacy as an adsorbent.« less

  4. Structural elucidation and physicochemical properties of mononuclear Uranyl(VI) complexes incorporating dianionic units.

    PubMed

    Azam, Mohammad; Velmurugan, Gunasekaran; Wabaidur, Saikh Mohammad; Trzesowska-Kruszynska, Agata; Kruszynski, Rafal; Al-Resayes, Saud I; Al-Othman, Zeid A; Venuvanalingam, Ponnambalam

    2016-01-01

    Two derivatives of organouranyl mononuclear complexes [UO2(L)THF] (1) and [UO2(L)Alc] (2), where L = (2,2'-(1E,1'E)-(2,2-dimethylpropane-1,3-dyl)bis(azanylylidene, THF = Tetrahydrofuran, Alc = Alcohol), have been prepared. These complexes have been determined by elemental analyses, single crystal X-ray crystallography and various spectroscopic studies. Moreover, the structure of these complexes have also been studied by DFT and time dependent DFT measurements showing that both the complexes have distorted pentagonal bipyramidal environment around uranyl ion. TD-DFT results indicate that the complex 1 displays an intense band at 458.7 nm which is mainly associated to the uranyl centered LMCT, where complex 2 shows a band at 461.8 nm that have significant LMCT character. The bonding has been further analyzed by EDA and NBO. The photocatalytic activity of complexes 1 and 2 for the degradation of rhodamine-B (RhB) and methylene blue (MB) under the irradiation of 500W Xe lamp has been explored, and found more efficient in presence of complex 1 than complex 2 for both dyes. In addition, dye adsorption and photoluminescence properties have also been discussed for both complexes. PMID:27595801

  5. Uranyl complexation with acetate studied by means of affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sladkov, Vladimir

    2013-05-10

    The interaction of uranyl with acetate is studied by affinity capillary electrophoresis in aqueous acid solutions at the pH values 2.0 and 2.5. The use of data on metal ion mobilities at different pHs allows to establish the ligand species interacting with metal ion and complex species formed. The formation of two complex species UO2CH3COO(+) and UO2(CH3COO)2 is observed (acetic acid concentration is up to 0.8M). In the case of uranyl-acetic acid system, the viscosity of solution is significantly changed with an increase of acid concentration. For calculation of ion mobilities the viscosity changes are taken into account. The stability constants are calculated at the ionic strengths 0.02 and 0.05 mol L(-1). The logarithms of the thermodynamic stability constants (β°) calculated with Davies equation for the activity coefficients of the ions are log β1(°)=2.94±0.08 and log β2(°)=5.50±0.15 at 25 °C. Obtained values are compared with literature data. PMID:23570853

  6. Structural elucidation and physicochemical properties of mononuclear Uranyl(VI) complexes incorporating dianionic units

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohammad; Velmurugan, Gunasekaran; Wabaidur, Saikh Mohammad; Trzesowska-Kruszynska, Agata; Kruszynski, Rafal; Al-Resayes, Saud I.; Al-Othman, Zeid A.; Venuvanalingam, Ponnambalam

    2016-01-01

    Two derivatives of organouranyl mononuclear complexes [UO2(L)THF] (1) and [UO2(L)Alc] (2), where L = (2,2′-(1E,1′E)-(2,2-dimethylpropane-1,3-dyl)bis(azanylylidene, THF = Tetrahydrofuran, Alc = Alcohol), have been prepared. These complexes have been determined by elemental analyses, single crystal X-ray crystallography and various spectroscopic studies. Moreover, the structure of these complexes have also been studied by DFT and time dependent DFT measurements showing that both the complexes have distorted pentagonal bipyramidal environment around uranyl ion. TD-DFT results indicate that the complex 1 displays an intense band at 458.7 nm which is mainly associated to the uranyl centered LMCT, where complex 2 shows a band at 461.8 nm that have significant LMCT character. The bonding has been further analyzed by EDA and NBO. The photocatalytic activity of complexes 1 and 2 for the degradation of rhodamine-B (RhB) and methylene blue (MB) under the irradiation of 500W Xe lamp has been explored, and found more efficient in presence of complex 1 than complex 2 for both dyes. In addition, dye adsorption and photoluminescence properties have also been discussed for both complexes. PMID:27595801

  7. Rapid Dissolution of Soluble Uranyl Phases in Arid, Mine-Impacted Catchments Near Church Rock, NM

    SciTech Connect

    deLemos, J.L.; Bostick, B.C.; Quicksall, A.N.; Landis, J.D.; George, C.; Slagowski, N.L.; Rock, T.; Brugge, D.; Lewis, J.; Durant, J.L.

    2009-05-14

    We tested the hypothesis that runoff of uranium-bearing particles from mining waste disposal areas was a significant mechanism for redistribution of uranium in the northeastern part of the Upper Puerco River watershed (New Mexico). However, our results were not consistent with this hypothesis. Analysis of >100 sediment and suspended sediment samples collected adjacent to and downstream from uranium source areas indicated that uranium levels in the majority of the samples were not elevated above background. Samples collected within 50 m of a known waste disposal site were subjected to detailed geochemical characterization. Uranium in these samples was found to be highly soluble; treatment with synthetic pore water for 24 h caused dissolution of 10-50% of total uranium in the samples. Equilibrium uranium concentrations in pore water were >4.0 mg/L and were sustained in repeated wetting events, effectively depleting soluble uranium from the solid phase. The dissolution rate of uranium appeared to be controlled by solid-phase diffusion of uranium from within uranium-bearing mineral particles. X-ray adsorption spectroscopy indicated the presence of a soluble uranyl silicate, and possibly a uranyl phosphate. These phases were exhausted in transported sediment suggesting that uranium was readily mobilized from sediments in the Upper Puerco watershed and transported in the dissolved load. These results could have significance for uranium risk assessment as well as mining waste management and cleanup efforts.

  8. Rapid Dissolution of Soluble Uranyl Phases in Arid, Mine-Impacted Catchments near Church Rock, NM

    PubMed Central

    DELEMOS, JAMIE L.; BOSTICK, BENJAMIN C.; QUICKSALL, ANDREW N.; LANDIS, JOSHUA D.; GEORGE, CHRISTINE C.; SLAGOWSKI, NAOMI L.; ROCK, TOMMY; BRUGGE, DOUG; LEWIS, JOHNNYE; DURANT, JOHN L.

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that runoff of uranium-bearing particles from mining waste disposal areas was a significant mechanism for redistribution of uranium in the northeastern part of the Upper Puerco River watershed (New Mexico). However, our results were not consistent with this hypothesis. Analysis of >100 sediment and suspended sediment samples collected adjacent to and downstream from uranium source areas indicated that uranium levels in the majority of the samples were not elevated above background. Samples collected within 50 m of a known waste disposal site were subjected to detailed geochemical characterization. Uranium in these samples was found to be highly soluble; treatment with synthetic pore water for 24 h caused dissolution of 10–50% of total uranium in the samples. Equilibrium uranium concentrations in pore water were >4.0 mg/L and were sustained in repeated wetting events, effectively depleting soluble uranium from the solid phase. The dissolution rate of uranium appeared to be controlled by solid-phase diffusion of uranium from within uranium-bearing mineral particles. X-ray adsorption spectroscopy indicated the presence of a soluble uranyl silicate, and possibly a uranyl phosphate. These phases were exhausted in transported sediment suggesting that uranium was readily mobilized from sediments in the Upper Puerco watershed and transported in the dissolved load. These results could have significance for uranium risk assessment as well as mining waste management and cleanup efforts. PMID:18589950

  9. Coordination of N-donor ligands to a uranyl(V) beta-diketiminate complex.

    PubMed

    Schettini, Michael F; Wu, Guang; Hayton, Trevor W

    2009-12-21

    Addition of 2 equiv of AgOTf to [UO(2)(Ar(2)nacnac)Cl](2) (Ar(2)nacnac = {(2,6-Pr(i)(2)C(6)H(3))NC(Me)}(2)CH) in the presence of excess pyridine, followed by addition of Cp(2)Co, generates the uranyl(V) complex UO(2)(Ar(2)nacnac)(py)(2) (2), in moderate yield. Complex 2 has proven to be an excellent precursor for the synthesis of other U(V) complexes. Thus, addition of 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), TMEDA, or 1-methylimidazole (MeIm) to 2 provides UO(2)(Ar(2)nacnac)(bipy) (3), UO(2)(Ar(2)nacnac)(phen) (4), UO(2)(Ar(2)nacnac)(TMEDA) (5), and UO(2)(Ar(2)nacnac)(MeIm)(2) (6), respectively. Complexes 2-6 have been fully characterized and their structures confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Attempts to form the analogous hexavalent uranyl complexes of bipy, phen, and TMEDA have not been successful. However, reaction of [UO(2)(Ar(2)nacnac)Cl](2) with AgOTf and 2 equiv of MeIm leads to the isolation of [UO(2)(Ar(2)nacnac)(MeIm)(2)][OTf] (7), which has been fully characterized. Attempts to ligate sulfur donor ligands to either the UO(2)(Ar(2)nacnac) or the [UO(2)(Ar(2)nacnac)](+) fragments were unsuccessful. PMID:19947577

  10. Deciphering the energy landscape of the interaction uranyl-DCP with antibodies using dynamic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Odorico, Michael; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2008-11-15

    Previous studies on molecular recognition of uranyl-DCP (dicarboxy-phenanthroline chelator) compound by two distinct monoclonal antibodies (Mabs U04S and U08S) clearly showed the presence of a biphasic shape in Bell-Evans' plots and an accentuated difference in slopes at the high loading rates. To further explore the basis in the slope difference, we have performed complementary experiments using antibody PHE03S, raised against uranyl-DCP but, presenting a strong cross-reactivity toward the DCP chelator. This work allowed us to obtain a reallocation of the respective contributions of the metal ion itself and that of the chelator. Results led us to propose a 2D schematic model representing two energy barriers observed in the systems Mabs U04S- and U08S-[UO(2)-DCP] where the outer barrier characterizes the interaction between UO(2) and Mab whereas the inner barrier characterizes the interaction between DCP and Mab. Using dynamic force spectroscopy, it is thus possible to dissect molecular interactions during the unbinding between proteins and ligands. PMID:18790844

  11. Deciphering the Energy Landscape of the Interaction Uranyl-DCP with Antibodies Using Dynamic Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Odorico, Michael; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies on molecular recognition of uranyl-DCP (dicarboxy-phenanthroline chelator) compound by two distinct monoclonal antibodies (Mabs U04S and U08S) clearly showed the presence of a biphasic shape in Bell-Evans' plots and an accentuated difference in slopes at the high loading rates. To further explore the basis in the slope difference, we have performed complementary experiments using antibody PHE03S, raised against uranyl-DCP but, presenting a strong cross-reactivity toward the DCP chelator. This work allowed us to obtain a reallocation of the respective contributions of the metal ion itself and that of the chelator. Results led us to propose a 2D schematic model representing two energy barriers observed in the systems Mabs U04S- and U08S-[UO2-DCP] where the outer barrier characterizes the interaction between UO2 and Mab whereas the inner barrier characterizes the interaction between DCP and Mab. Using dynamic force spectroscopy, it is thus possible to dissect molecular interactions during the unbinding between proteins and ligands. PMID:18790844

  12. Adsorption of Uranyl on Gibbsite: A Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Hyun-shik; Korshin, Gregory V.; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

    2006-02-15

    Uranyl adsorbed on gibbsite at pH 4.0-8.0 and ionic strengths (ISs) 0.001-0.4 M (NaClO4) in the absence of carbonate was studied using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLIFS) under cryogenic conditions. TRLIFS data showed the presence of several distinct emission components. Their contributions were determined using the evolving factor analysis approach. Four components denoted as species A, B, C, and D were discerned. Each of them was characterized by a characteristic response to pH and IS changes and also by a unique combination of the values of the fundamental transition energy E0,0, vibronic spacing E, and half-width of the vibronic lines W. Species A and B were major contributors to the overall emission. They were mainly affected by the pH and predominated below and above pH 5.0, respectively. In contrast with that, the contribution of species C was noticeable only at IS = 0.001 M, while it was suppressed or absent at high IS values. It was concluded that species A and B are likely to correspond to inner-sphere surface aluminol complexes AlO-(UO2)+ and AlO-(UO2)OH, while species C was hypothesized to correspond to electrostatically bound uranyl complexes (predominantly [UO2(OH)3]-).

  13. Elucidating self-assembly mechanisms of uranyl-peroxide capsules from monomers.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zuolei; Deb, Tapash; Nyman, May

    2014-10-01

    Self-assembly of uranyl peroxide polyoxometalates (POMs) in alkaline peroxide solutions has been known for almost a decade, but in these dynamic solutions that contain high concentrations of base and peroxide the reaction pathway could never be discerned, mixed species are obtained, and reproducibility is sometimes a challenge. Here we elucidate the reaction mechanisms utilizing self-assembly of the U24 cluster, [UO2(O2)(OH)]24(24-), from monomers as a model system. Using Raman as our main spectroscopic probe, we learned that the monomeric species is persistent in water at room temperature indefinitely. However, if a redox-active transition metal catalyst (copper (Cu(2+)) or cobalt (Co(2+))) is added, self-assembly is accelerated in a significant manner, forming U24 peroxide clusters in several hours, which is a good time scale for studying reaction mechanisms. From semiquantitative treatment of the spectroscopic data, we elucidate reaction mechanisms that are consistent with prior structural and computational studies that suggest uranyl peroxide rings templated by alkalis are the building units of clusters. By understanding aqueous speciation and processes, we are moving toward assuming control over cluster self-assembly that has been mastered for decades now in the analogous transition-metal POM systems. PMID:25238533

  14. Roles of acetone and diacetone alcohol in coordination and dissociation reactions of uranyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Rios, Daniel; Schoendorff, George; Van Stipdonk, Michael J; Gordon, Mark S; Windus, Theresa L; Gibson, John K; de Jong, Wibe A

    2012-12-01

    Combined collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry experiments with DFT and MP2 calculations were employed to elucidate the molecular structures and energetics of dissociation reactions of uranyl species containing acetone and diacetone alcohol ligands. It is shown that solutions containing diacetone alcohol ligands can produce species with more than five oxygen atoms available for coordination. Calculations confirm that complexes with up to four diacetone alcohol ligands can be energetically stable but that the effective number of atoms coordinating with uranium in the equatorial plane does not exceed five. Water elimination reactions of diacetone alcohol ligands are shown to have two coordination-dependent reaction channels, through formation of mesityl oxide ligands or formation of alkoxide and protonated mesityl oxide species. The present results provide an explanation for the implausible observation of "[UO(2)(ACO)(6,7,8)](2+)" in and observed water-elimination reactions from purportedly uranyl-acetone complexes (Rios, D.; Rutkowski, P. X.; Van Stipdonk, M. J.; Gibson, J. K. Inorg. Chem. 2011, 50, 4781). PMID:23146003

  15. Strongly coupled binuclear uranium-oxo complexes from uranyl oxo rearrangement and reductive silylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Polly L.; Jones, Guy M.; Odoh, Samuel O.; Schreckenbach, Georg; Magnani, Nicola; Love, Jason B.

    2012-03-01

    The most common motif in uranium chemistry is the d0f0 uranyl ion [UO2]2+ in which the oxo groups are rigorously linear and inert. Alternative geometries, such as the cis-uranyl, have been identified theoretically and implicated in oxo-atom transfer reactions that are relevant to environmental speciation and nuclear waste remediation. Single electron reduction is now known to impart greater oxo-group reactivity, but with retention of the linear OUO motif, and reactions of the oxo groups to form new covalent bonds remain rare. Here, we describe the synthesis, structure, reactivity and magnetic properties of a binuclear uranium-oxo complex. Formed through a combination of reduction and oxo-silylation and migration from a trans to a cis position, the new butterfly-shaped Si-OUO2UO-Si molecule shows remarkably strong UV-UV coupling and chemical inertness, suggesting that this rearranged uranium oxo motif might exist for other actinide species in the environment, and have relevance to the aggregation of actinide oxide clusters.

  16. Strongly coupled binuclear uranium-oxo complexes from uranyl oxo rearrangement and reductive silylation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Polly L; Jones, Guy M; Odoh, Samuel O; Schreckenbach, Georg; Magnani, Nicola; Love, Jason B

    2012-03-01

    The most common motif in uranium chemistry is the d(0)f(0) uranyl ion [UO(2)](2+) in which the oxo groups are rigorously linear and inert. Alternative geometries, such as the cis-uranyl, have been identified theoretically and implicated in oxo-atom transfer reactions that are relevant to environmental speciation and nuclear waste remediation. Single electron reduction is now known to impart greater oxo-group reactivity, but with retention of the linear OUO motif, and reactions of the oxo groups to form new covalent bonds remain rare. Here, we describe the synthesis, structure, reactivity and magnetic properties of a binuclear uranium-oxo complex. Formed through a combination of reduction and oxo-silylation and migration from a trans to a cis position, the new butterfly-shaped Si-OUO(2)UO-Si molecule shows remarkably strong U(V)-U(V) coupling and chemical inertness, suggesting that this rearranged uranium oxo motif might exist for other actinide species in the environment, and have relevance to the aggregation of actinide oxide clusters. PMID:22354437

  17. Synthesis and characterization of uranyl ion-imprinted microspheres based on amidoximated modified alginate.

    PubMed

    Monier, M; Abdel-Latif, D A; Mohammed, Hassan A

    2015-04-01

    Surface ion-imprinting technique was utilized for the preparation of surface ion-imprinted chelating microspheres based on amidoximated modified alginate (U-AOX) in presence of uranyl ions as a template and glutaraldehyde cross-linker. Different instrumental techniques such as elemental analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM), FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction spectra were employed for full investigation of the manufactured materials. The synthesized microspheres displayed a higher ability for selective extraction of UO2(2+) when compared to the non-imprinted microspheres (NI-AOX). In addition, the essential parameters such as pH, temperature, time and initial uranyl ion concentration were evaluated in order to optimize the conditions of the adsorption process. The results indicated that pH 5 was the best for the UO2(2+) removal, also, the adsorption was endothermic in nature, follows the second-order kinetics and the adsorption isotherm showed the best fit with Langmuir model with maximum adsorption capacity of 155 ± 1 and 64 ± 1 mg/g for both U-AOX and NI-AOX respectively. Desorption and regeneration had been carried out using 0.5M HNO3 solution and the results indicated that the microspheres maintained about 96% of its original efficiency after five consecutive adsorption-desorption cycles. PMID:25592844

  18. Resistance to Botrytis cinerea in sitiens, an Abscisic Acid-Deficient Tomato Mutant, Involves Timely Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and Cell Wall Modifications in the Epidermis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Asselbergh, Bob; Curvers, Katrien; França, Soraya C.; Audenaert, Kris; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Van Breusegem, Frank; Höfte, Monica

    2007-01-01

    Plant defense mechanisms against necrotrophic pathogens, such as Botrytis cinerea, are considered to be complex and to differ from those that are effective against biotrophs. In the abscisic acid-deficient sitiens tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant, which is highly resistant to B. cinerea, accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was earlier and stronger than in the susceptible wild type at the site of infection. In sitiens, H2O2 accumulation was observed from 4 h postinoculation (hpi), specifically in the leaf epidermal cell walls, where it caused modification by protein cross-linking and incorporation of phenolic compounds. In wild-type tomato plants, H2O2 started to accumulate 24 hpi in the mesophyll layer and was associated with spreading cell death. Transcript-profiling analysis using TOM1 microarrays revealed that defense-related transcript accumulation prior to infection was higher in sitiens than in wild type. Moreover, further elevation of sitiens defense gene expression was stronger than in wild type 8 hpi both in number of genes and in their expression levels and confirmed a role for cell wall modification in the resistant reaction. Although, in general, plant defense-related reactive oxygen species formation facilitates necrotrophic colonization, these data indicate that timely hyperinduction of H2O2-dependent defenses in the epidermal cell wall can effectively block early development of B. cinerea. PMID:17573540

  19. Molecular Simulations of the Diffusion of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized Mineral Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerisit, S.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-01

    Uranium is a major groundwater contaminant at uranium processing and mining sites as a result of intentional and accidental discharges of uranium-containing waste products into subsurface environments. Recent characterization has shown that uranium preferentially associates with intragrain and intra-aggregate domains in some of the uranium-contaminated sediments collected from the US Department of Energy Hanford Site [1, 2]. In these sediments, uranium existed as precipitated and/or adsorbed phases in grain micropores with nano- to microscale sizes. Desorption and diffusion characterization studies and continuum-scale modeling indicated that ion diffusion in the microfractures is a major mechanism that led to preferential uranium concentration in the microfracture regions and will control the future mobility of uranium in the subsurface sediments [1, 3-4]. However, the diffusion properties of uranyl species in the intragrain regions, especially at the solid-liquid interface, are still poorly understood. Therefore, a general aim of this work is to provide atomic-level insights into the contribution of microscopic surface effects to the slow diffusion process of uranyl species in porous media with nano- to microsized fractures. In this presentation, we will first present molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of feldspar-water interfaces to investigate their interfacial structure and dynamics and establish a theoretical framework for subsequent simulations of water and ion diffusion at these interfaces [5]. We will then report on MD simulations carried out to probe the effects of confinement and of the presence of the mineral surface on the diffusion of water and electrolyte ions in nanosized feldspar fractures [6]. Several properties of the mineral-water interface were varied, such as the fracture width, the ionic strength of the contacting solution, and the surface charge. Our calculations reveal a 2.0-2.5 nm interfacial region within which the diffusion properties of

  20. Cation–cation interactions and cation exchange in a series of isostructural framework uranyl tungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C.

    2014-05-01

    The isotypical compounds (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(H{sub 2}O){sub 5} (1), Ag(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (2), K(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} (3), Rb(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3.5} (4), and Cs(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (5) were synthesized, characterized, and their structures determined. Each crystallizes in space group Cc. (1): a=12.979 (3), b=10.238 (2), c=11.302 (2), β=102.044 (2); (2): a=13.148 (2), b=9.520 (1), c=11.083 (2), β=101.568 (2); (3): a=13.111 (8), b=9.930 (6), c=11.242 (7), β=101.024 (7); (4): a=12.940 (2), b=10.231 (2), c=11.259(2), β=102.205 (2); (5): a=12.983 (3), b=10.191 (3), c=11.263 (4), β=101.661 (4). Compounds 1–5 are a framework of uranyl and tungsten polyhedra containing cation–cation interactions. The framework has three symmetrically distinct U(VI) cations, one tungsten, sixteen to eighteen oxygen atoms, and in 2–5, one monovalent cation. Each atom occupies a general position. Each U(VI) cation is present as a typical (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl ion in an overall pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment. Each pentagonal bipyramid shares two equatorial edges with two other pentagonal bipyramids, forming a trimer. Trimers are connected into chains by edge-sharing with WO{sub 6} octahedra. Chains are linked through cation–cation interactions between two symmetrically independent uranyl ions. This yields a remarkably complex system of intersecting channels that extend along [0 0 1] and [−1 1 0]. The cation exchange properties of 2 and 3 were characterized at room temperature and at 140 °C. - Graphical abstract: Chains of uranium and tungsten polyhedra are connected into a three dimensional framework by cation–cation interactions occurring between two symmetrically independent uranyl pentagonal bipyramids. Monovalent cations present in channels within the structure can be exchanged by room temperature or mild hydrothermal

  1. Nitrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... or interactions with other medicines and vitamin or herbal supplements. This information should not be used as medical ... your doctor about every medicine and vitamin or herbal supplement that you are taking, so he or she ...

  2. Solution interactions between the uranyl cation [UO2(2+)] and histidine, N-acetyl-histidine, tyrosine, and N-acetyl-tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Badawi, Ahmed; Huang, Huan; Van Horn, J David

    2009-01-01

    Complexes of the uranyl cation [UO(2)(2+)] with histidine (His), N-acetyl-histidine (NAH), tyrosine (Tyr), and N-acetyl-tyrosine (NAT) were studied by UV-visible and NMR spectroscopy, and by potentiometric titration. Protonation constants for each ligand are reported, as are cumulative formation constants for uranyl-amino acid complexes. Coupling constant data (J(CH)) for uranyl-histidine complexes indicate that inner-sphere solution interactions between histidine and uranyl cation are solely at the carboxylate site. At 25 degrees C the major uranyl-histidine complex has a cumulative formation constant of logbeta(110)=8.53, and a proposed formula of [UO(2)HisH(2)(OH)(2)](+); the stepwise formation constant, logK(UL), is estimated to be 5.6 ( approximately 8.53-(-6.1)-(-6.1)-15.15). Outer-sphere interactions, H-bonding or electrostatic interactions, are proposed as contributing a significant portion of the stability to the ternary uranyl-hydroxo-amino acid complexes. The temperature dependent protonation constants of histidine and formation constants between uranyl cation and histidine are reported from 10 to 35 degrees C; at 25 degrees C, DeltaG=-43.3 kJ/mol. PMID:18947879

  3. Phylogenomics of Mycobacterium Nitrate Reductase Operon.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinqin; Abdalla, Abualgasim Elgaili; Xie, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    NarGHJI operon encodes a nitrate reductase that can reduce nitrate to nitrite. This process enhances bacterial survival by nitrate respiration under anaerobic conditions. NarGHJI operon exists in many bacteria, especially saprophytic bacteria living in soil which play a key role in the nitrogen cycle. Most actinomycetes, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, possess NarGHJI operons. M. tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that expands in macrophages and has the ability to persist in a non-replicative form in granuloma lifelong. Nitrogen and nitrogen compounds play crucial roles in the struggle between M. tuberculosis and host. M. tuberculosis can use nitrate as a final electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions to enhance its survival. In this article, we reviewed the mechanisms regulating nitrate reductase expression and affecting its activity. Potential genes involved in regulating the nitrate reductase expression in M. tuberculosis were identified. The conserved NarG might be an alternative mycobacterium taxonomic marker. PMID:25980349

  4. Challenging conventional f-element separation chemistry--reversing uranyl(VI)/lanthanide(III) solvent extraction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, C A; Bustillos, C G; Copping, R; Scott, B L; May, I; Nilsson, M

    2014-08-14

    The water soluble tetradentate Schiff base, N,N'-bis(5-sulfonatosalicylidene)-diaminoethane (H2salen-SO3), will readily coordinate to the uranyl(VI) cation, but not to the same extent to trivalent lanthanide cations. This allows for the reversal of conventional solvent extraction properties and opens the possibility for novel separation processes. PMID:24958394

  5. An Unprecedented Two-Fold Nested Super-Polyrotaxane: Sulfate-Directed Hierarchical Polythreading Assembly of Uranyl Polyrotaxane Moieties.

    PubMed

    Mei, Lei; Wu, Qun-Yan; Yuan, Li-Yong; Wang, Lin; An, Shu-Wen; Xie, Zhen-Ni; Hu, Kong-Qiu; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Burns, Peter C; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2016-08-01

    The hierarchical assembly of well-organized submoieties could lead to more complicated superstructures with intriguing properties. We describe herein an unprecedented polyrotaxane polythreading framework containing a two-fold nested super-polyrotaxane substructure, which was synthesized through a uranyl-directed hierarchical polythreading assembly of one-dimensional polyrotaxane chains and two-dimensional polyrotaxane networks. This special assembly mode actually affords a new way of supramolecular chemistry instead of covalently linked bulky stoppers to construct stable interlocked rotaxane moieties. An investigation of the synthesis condition shows that sulfate can assume a vital role in mediating the formation of different uranyl species, especially the unique trinuclear uranyl moiety [(UO2 )3 O(OH)2 ](2+) , involving a notable bent [O=U=O] bond with a bond angle of 172.0(9)°. Detailed analysis of the coordination features, the thermal stability as well as a fluorescence, and electrochemical characterization demonstrate that the uniqueness of this super-polyrotaxane structure is mainly closely related to the trinuclear uranyl moiety, which is confirmed by quantum chemical calculations. PMID:27389048

  6. A literature review on the chemical and physical properties of uranyl fluoride (UO sub 2 F sub 2 )

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.L. Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-08-01

    This report reviews the preparation and properties of uranyl fluoride. Data are given on the crystal structure, solubility in water, specific gravity, density, specific heat, enthalpy, entropy, acidity, corrosion properties, and refractive indices. Empirical formulas are given to calculate specific gravity, density of aqueous solutions, molal volume, and refractive indices. 13 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. Ultrasensitive detection of uranyl by graphene oxide-based background reduction and RCDzyme-based enzyme strand recycling signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Hui; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Cao, Jin-Xiu; Chen, Si-Han; Tang, Xian; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Yu-Feng; Huang, Yan-Qin

    2015-10-15

    We proposed a novel strategy which combines graphene oxide-based background reduction with RCDzyme-based enzyme strand recycling amplification for ultrahigh sensitive detection of uranyl. The RCDzyme is designed to contain a guanine (G)-rich sequence that replaces the partial sequence in an uranyl-specific DNAzyme. This multifunctional probe can act as the target recognition element, DNAzyme and the primer of signal amplification. The presence of UO2(2+) can induce the cleavage of the substrate strands in RCDzyme. Then, each released enzyme strand can hybridize with another substrate strands to trigger many cycles of the cleavage by binding uranyl, leading to the formation of more G-quadruplexes by split guanine-rich oligonucleotide fragments. The resulting G-quadruplexes could bind to N-methyl-mesoporphyrin IX (NMM), causing an amplified detection signal for the target uranyl. Next, graphene oxide-based background reduction strategy was further employed for adsorbing free ssDNA and NMM, thereby providing a proximalis zero-background signal. The combination of RCDzyme signal amplification and proximalis zero-background signal remarkably improves the sensitivity of this method, achieving a dynamic range of two orders of magnitude and giving a detection limit down to 86 pM, which is much lower than those of related literature reports. These achievements might be helpful in the design of highly sensitive analytical platform for wide applications in environmental and biomedical fields. PMID:26000462

  8. Photochemistry of nitrate ion in acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meera, N.; Ramamurthy, P.

    1988-12-01

    The photochemistry of cobalt(II) nitrate in acetonitrile is investigated using steady-state and flash photolysis techniques. Formation of NO 3• radical has been observed as an intermediate by direct photolysis of nitrate ion and the reaction of the nitrate radical with the solvent is observed as a transient absorption around 600 nm in air-equilibrated acetonitrile. Nitrite ion forms as a product through a collision electron transfer complex intermediate.

  9. Structural Variations in the Uranyl/4,4'-Biphenyldicarboxylate System. Rare Examples of 2D → 3D Polycatenated Uranyl-Organic Networks.

    PubMed

    Thuéry, Pierre; Harrowfield, Jack

    2015-08-17

    4,4'-Biphenyldicarboxylic acid (H2L) was reacted with uranyl ions under solvo-hydrothermal conditions with variations in the experimental procedure (organic cosolvent, presence of additional 3d-block metal cations, and N-donor species), thus giving six complexes of the fully deprotonated acid that were characterized by their crystal structure and, in most cases, their emission spectrum. The three complexes [UO2(L)(DMA)] (1), [UO2(L)(NMP)] (2), and [UO2(L)(NMP)] (3) include the cosolvent as a coligand, and they crystallize as two-dimensional (2D) assemblies, with different combinations of the chelating and bridging-bidentate carboxylate coordination modes, resulting in two different topologies. Complex 4, [Ni(bipy)3][(UO2)2(L)2(C2O4)]·H2O, includes oxalate coligands generated in situ and contains an anionic planar two-dimensional (2D) assembly with a {6(3)} honeycomb topology. The same hexagonal geometry is found in the homoleptic complexes [Ni(bipy)3][(UO2)2(L)3]·6H2O (5) and [Ni(phen)3][(UO2)2(L)3]·4H2O (6), but the large size of the hexagonal rings in these cases (∼27 Å in the longest dimension) allows 2D → three-dimensional (3D) inclined polycatenation to occur, with the two families of networks either orthogonal in tetragonal complex 5 or at an angle of 73.4° in orthorhombic complex 6. The parallel networks are arranged in closely spaced groups of two, with possible π···π stacking interactions, and as many as four rods from four parallel nets pass through each ring of the inclined family of nets, an unusually high degree of catenation. These are the second cases only of 2D → 3D inclined polycatenation in uranyl-organic species. Emission spectra measured in the solid state show the usual vibronic fine structure, with variations in intensity and positions of maxima that are not simply connected with the number of equatorial donors and the presence of additional metal cations. PMID:26241368

  10. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, T.; Erlandsen, M.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded in decreasing the N surplus by 40% since the mid 1980s while at the same time maintaining crop yields and increasing the animal production of especially pigs. Trend analyses prove that the youngest (0-15 years old) oxic groundwater shows more pronounced significant downward nitrate trends (44%) than the oldest (25-50 years old) oxic groundwater (9%). This amounts to clear evidence of the effect of reduced nitrate leaching on groundwater nitrate concentrations in Denmark. Are the Danish groundwater monitoring strategy obtimal for detection of nitrate trends? Will the nitrate concentrations in Danish groundwater continue to decrease or are the Danish nitrate concentration levels now appropriate according to the Water Framework Directive?

  11. Groundwater nitrate contamination: Factors and indicators

    PubMed Central

    Wick, Katharina; Heumesser, Christine; Schmid, Erwin

    2012-01-01

    Identifying significant determinants of groundwater nitrate contamination is critical in order to define sensible agri-environmental indicators that support the design, enforcement, and monitoring of regulatory policies. We use data from approximately 1200 Austrian municipalities to provide a detailed statistical analysis of (1) the factors influencing groundwater nitrate contamination and (2) the predictive capacity of the Gross Nitrogen Balance, one of the most commonly used agri-environmental indicators. We find that the percentage of cropland in a given region correlates positively with nitrate concentration in groundwater. Additionally, environmental characteristics such as temperature and precipitation are important co-factors. Higher average temperatures result in lower nitrate contamination of groundwater, possibly due to increased evapotranspiration. Higher average precipitation dilutes nitrates in the soil, further reducing groundwater nitrate concentration. Finally, we assess whether the Gross Nitrogen Balance is a valid predictor of groundwater nitrate contamination. Our regression analysis reveals that the Gross Nitrogen Balance is a statistically significant predictor for nitrate contamination. We also show that its predictive power can be improved if we account for average regional precipitation. The Gross Nitrogen Balance predicts nitrate contamination in groundwater more precisely in regions with higher average precipitation. PMID:22906701

  12. Fast photolysis of carbonyl nitrates from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, J.-F.; Peeters, J.; Stavrakou, T.

    2014-03-01

    Photolysis is shown to be a major sink for isoprene-derived carbonyl nitrates, which constitute an important component of the total organic nitrate pool over vegetated areas. Empirical evidence from published laboratory studies on the absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of α-nitrooxy ketones suggests that the presence of the nitrate group (i) greatly enhances the absorption cross sections and (ii) facilitates dissociation to a point that the photolysis quantum yield is close to unity, with O-NO2 dissociation as a likely major channel. On this basis, we provide new recommendations for estimating the cross sections and photolysis rates of carbonyl nitrates. The newly estimated photo rates are validated using a chemical box model against measured temporal profiles of carbonyl nitrates in an isoprene oxidation experiment by Paulot et al. (2009). The comparisons for ethanal nitrate and for the sum of methacrolein- and methyl vinyl ketone nitrates strongly supports our assumptions of large cross-section enhancements and a near-unit quantum yield for these compounds. These findings have significant atmospheric implications: the photorates of key carbonyl nitrates from isoprene are estimated to be typically between ~ 3 and 20 times higher than their sink due to reaction with OH in relevant atmospheric conditions. Moreover, since the reaction is expected to release NO2, photolysis is especially effective in depleting the total organic nitrate pool.

  13. Fast photolysis of carbonyl nitrates from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, J.-F.; Peeters, J.; Stavrakou, T.

    2013-11-01

    Photolysis is shown to be a major sink for isoprene-derived carbonyl nitrates, which constitute an important component of the total organic nitrate pool over vegetated areas. Empirical evidence from published laboratory studies on the absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of α-nitrooxy ketones suggests that the presence of the nitrate group (i) greatly enhances the absorption cross sections, and (ii) facilitates dissociation to a point that the photolysis quantum yield is close to unity, with O-NO2 dissociation as the likely major channel. On this basis, we provide new recommendations for estimating the cross sections and photolysis rates of carbonyl nitrates. The newly estimated photorates are validated using a chemical box model against measured temporal profiles of carbonyl nitrates in an isoprene oxidation experiment by Paulot et al. (2009). The comparisons for ethanal nitrate and for the sum of methacrolein- and methylvinylketone nitrates strongly supports our assumptions of large cross section enhancements and a near-unit quantum yield for these compounds. These findings have significant atmospheric implications: the photorates of key carbonyl nitrates from isoprene are estimated to be typically between ~3 and 20 times higher than their sink due to reaction with OH in relevant atmospheric conditions. Moreover, since the reaction is expected to release NO2, photolysis is especially effective in depleting the total organic nitrate pool.

  14. Sampling of nitrates in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, B. R.; Tokiwa, Y.; Haik, M.

    Methods for the measurement of nitric acid, particulate nitrate and total inorganic nitrate (i.e. HNO 3 plus particulate nitrate) are compared using atmospheric samples from the Los Angeles Basin. Nitric acid was measured by (1) the nitrate collected on nylon or NaCl-impregnated cellulose filters after removal of particulate matter with Teflon prefilters, (2) long-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) performed by a collaborating investigator, and (3) the difference between total inorganic nitrate (TIN) and particulate nitrate (PN). TIN was measured by the sum of the nitrate collected with a Teflon prefilter and nylon or NaCl-impregnated after-filter. PN was measured by the nitrate able to penetrate a diffusion dénuder coated to remove acidic gases (e.g. HNO 3). Losses of nitrate from Teflon prefilters were determined by comparing the nitrate retained by these filters to the nitrate penetrating the acid gas denuder. TIN and the nitrate collected with glass fiber filters were compared to assess the origin of the artifact particulate nitrate on the latter. Nitric acid measurements using nylon or NaCl-impregnated after-filters were substantially higher than those by the difference technique. This correlated with losses of nitrate from the Teflon prefilters, which exceeded 50 % at high ambient temperature and low relative humidity. Nitric acid by the difference method exceeded that by FTIR by, on average, 20 %. Thus errors inferred in HNO 3 measurements by comparison to the difference measurements are considered minimum values. The high values for HNO 3 by the difference method are consistent with the partial loss of PN in the acid gas denuder. However, no loss of 0.1 μm to 3 μm diameter NH 4NO 3 particles was observed. Thus, if significant, such loss is restricted to coarse particulate nitrate. Heating the filter samplers was shown to increase sampling errors. Nitrate results obtained in short-term, low volume sampling with Gelman A glass fiber

  15. Photochemistry of Nitrate Adsorbed on Mineral Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gankanda, A.; Grassian, V. H.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral dust particles in the atmosphere are often associated with adsorbed nitrate from heterogeneous reactions with nitrogen oxides including HNO3 and NO2. Although nitrate ion is a well-studied chromophore in natural waters, the photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on mineral dust particles is yet to be fully explored. In this study, wavelength dependence of the photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on different model components of mineral dust aerosol has been investigated using transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Al2O3, TiO2 and NaY zeolite were used as model systems to represent non-photoactive oxides, photoactive semiconductor oxides and porous materials respectively, present in mineral dust aerosol. In this study, adsorbed nitrate is irradiated with 254 nm, 310 nm and 350 nm narrow band light. In the irradiation with narrow band light, NO2 is the only detectable gas-phase product formed from nitrate adsorbed on Al2O3 and TiO2. The NO2 yield is highest at 310 nm for both Al2O3 and TiO2. Unlike Al2O3 and TiO2, in zeolite, adsorbed nitrate photolysis to nitrite is observed only at 310 nm during narrow band irradiation. Moreover gas phase products were not detected during nitrate photolysis in zeolite at all three wavelengths. The significance of these differences as related to nitrate photochemistry on different mineral dust components will be highlighted.

  16. Nitrate-Dependent Regulation of Acetate Biosynthesis and Nitrate Respiration by Clostridium thermoaceticum

    PubMed Central

    Arendsen, Alexander F.; Soliman, Mohsin Q.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    1999-01-01

    Nitrate has been shown to shunt the electron flow in Clostridium thermoaceticum from CO2 to nitrate, but it did not influence the levels of enzymes involved in the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway (J. M. Fröstl, C. Seifritz, and H. L. Drake, J. Bacteriol. 178:4597–4603, 1996). Here we show that under some growth conditions, nitrate does in fact repress proteins involved in the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. The CO oxidation activity in crude extracts of nitrate (30 mM)–supplemented cultures was fivefold less than that of nitrate-free cultures, while the H2 oxidation activity was six- to sevenfold lower. The decrease in CO oxidation activity paralleled a decrease in CO dehydrogenase (CODH) protein level, as confirmed by Western blot analysis. Protein levels of CODH in nitrate-supplemented cultures were 50% lower than those in nitrate-free cultures. Western blots analyses showed that nitrate also decreased the levels of the corrinoid iron-sulfur protein (60%) and methyltransferase (70%). Surprisingly, the decrease in activity and protein levels upon nitrate supplementation was observed only when cultures were continuously sparged. Northern blot analysis indicates that the regulation of the proteins involved in the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway by nitrate is at the transcriptional level. At least a 10-fold decrease in levels of cytochrome b was observed with nitrate supplementation whether the cultures were sparged or stoppered. We also detected nitrate-inducible nitrate reductase activity (2 to 39 nmol min−1 mg−1) in crude extracts of C. thermoaceticum. Our results indicate that nitrate coordinately represses genes encoding enzymes and electron transport proteins in the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway and activates transcription of nitrate respiratory proteins. CO2 also appears to induce expression of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway genes and repress nitrate reductase activity. PMID:10049380

  17. Phase Diagram of Ammonium Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-06-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often been subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood - resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety, in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN, in different chemical environments, at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 15 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 673 K. The present study has been supported by the U.S. DHS under Award Number 2008-ST-061-ED0001.

  18. Chemical equilibria in the uranyl(VI)-peroxide-carbonate system; identification of precursors for the formation of poly-peroxometallates.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Szabó, Zoltán; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2012-10-14

    The focus of this study is on the identification of precursors in solution that might act as building blocks when solid uranyl(VI) poly-peroxometallate clusters containing peroxide and hydroxide bridges are formed. The precursors could be identified by using carbonate as an auxiliary ligand that prevented the formation of large clusters, such as the ones found in solids of fullerene type. Using data from potentiometric and NMR ((17)O and (13)C) experiments we identified the following complexes and determined their equilibrium constants: (UO(2))(2)(O(2))(CO(3))(4)(6-), UO(2)(O(2))CO(3)(2-), UO(2)(O(2))(CO(3))(2)(4-), (UO(2))(2)(O(2))(CO(3))(2)(2-), (UO(2))(2)(O(2))(2)(CO(3))(2-) and [UO(2)(O(2))(CO(3))](5)(10-). The NMR spectra of the pentamer show that all uranyl and carbonate sites are equivalent, which is only consistent with a ring structure built from uranyl units linked by peroxide bridges with the carbonate coordinated "outside" the ring; this proposed structure is very similar to [UO(2)(O(2))(oxalate)](5)(10-) identified by Burns et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2009, 131, 16648; Inorg. Chem., 2012, 51, 2403) in K(10)[UO(2)(O(2))(oxalate)](5)·(H(2)O)(13); similar ring structures where oxalate or carbonate has been replaced by hydroxide are important structure elements in solid poly-peroxometallate complexes. The equivalent uranyl sites in (UO(2))(2)(O(2))(2)(CO(3))(2-) suggest that the uranyl-units are linked by the carbonate ion and not by peroxide. PMID:22858588

  19. Peroxyacetyl nitrate and peroxypropionyl nitrate in Porto Alegre, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosjean, Eric; Grosjean, Daniel; Woodhouse, Luis F.; Yang, Yueh-Jiun

    For 41 days between 25 May 1996 and 27 March 1997, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and peroxypropionyl nitrate (PPN) have been measured by electron capture gas chromatography at Santa Rita near Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, where light-duty vehicles used either ethanol or a gasoline-MTBE blend. Daily maximum concentrations ranged from 0.19 to 6.67 ppb for PAN and 0.06 to 0.72 ppb for PPN. Linear regression of maximum PPN vs. maximum PAN yielded a slope of 0.105±0.004 ( R2=0.974). Diurnal variations of ambient PAN often followed those of ozone with respect to time of day but not with respect to amplitude. This was reflected in the large relative standard deviations associated with the study-averaged PAN/ozone concentration ratio, 0.037±0.105 (ppb/ppb, n=789) and the maximum PAN/maximum ozone concentration ratio, 0.028±0.015 (ppb/ppb, range 0.005-0.078, n=41). On several days PAN accounted for large fractions of the total ambient NO x in the late morning and afternoon hours, e.g., PAN/NO x⩽0.58 and PAN/(NO x-NO) ⩽0.76 on 27 March 1997. The amount of PAN lost by thermal decomposition (TPAN) was comparable in magnitude to that present in ambient air. The ratios TPAN/(PAN+TPAN) were up to 0.53, 0.67 and 0.64 during the warm afternoons of 25, 26 and 27 March 1997, respectively. The highest calculated value of TPAN was 5.6 ppb on 27 March 1997. On that day the 24 h-averaged value of TPAN (1.01 ppb) was nearly the same as that of PAN (1.09 ppb). Using computer kinetic modeling (SAPRC 97 chemical mechanism) and sensitivity analysis of VOC incremental reactivity, we ranked VOC present in Porto Alegre ambient air for their importance as precursors to PAN and to PPN. Using as input data the averages of VOC concentrations measured in downtown Porto Alegre during the ca. 1 yr period March 1996-April 1997, we calculated that the most important precursors to PAN and PPN were the SAPRC 97 model species ARO2 (which includes the aromatics xylenes, trimethylbenzenes, ethyltoluenes, etc

  20. Removal of Nitrate from Groundwater by Cyanobacteria: Quantitative Assessment of Factors Influencing Nitrate Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qiang; Westerhoff, Paul; Vermaas, Wim

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of biologically removing nitrate from groundwater was tested by using cyanobacterial cultures in batch mode under laboratory conditions. Results demonstrated that nitrate-contaminated groundwater, when supplemented with phosphate and some trace elements, can be used as growth medium supporting vigorous growth of several strains of cyanobacteria. As cyanobacteria grew, nitrate was removed from the water. Of three species tested, Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 displayed the highest nitrate uptake rate, but all species showed rapid removal of nitrate from groundwater. The nitrate uptake rate increased proportionally with increasing light intensity up to 100 μmol of photons m−2 s−1, which parallels photosynthetic activity. The nitrate uptake rate was affected by inoculum size (i.e., cell density), fixed-nitrogen level in the cells in the inoculum, and aeration rate, with vigorously aerated, nitrate-sufficient cells in mid-logarithmic phase having the highest long-term nitrate uptake rate. Average nitrate uptake rates up to 0.05 mM NO3− h−1 could be achieved at a culture optical density at 730 nm of 0.5 to 1.0 over a 2-day culture period. This result compares favorably with those reported for nitrate removal by other cyanobacteria and algae, and therefore effective nitrate removal from groundwater using this organism could be anticipated on large-scale operations. PMID:10618214

  1. REDUCTION OF NITRATE THROUGH THE USE OF NITRATE REDUCTASE FOR THE SMARTCHEM AUTOANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The standard method for the determination of nitrate in drinking water, USEPA Method 353.2 “Determination of Nitrate-Nitrite by Automated Colorimetry,” employs cadmium as the reductant for the conversion of nitrate to nitrite. The nitrite is then analyzed colorimetrically by way ...

  2. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Nitric Acid, Nitrates, and Nitro Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretherick, Leslie

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are the potential hazards associated with nitric acid, inorganic and organic nitrate salts, alkyl nitrates, acyl nitrates, aliphatic nitro compounds, aromatic nitro compounds, and nitration reactions. (CW)

  3. Cation-cation interactions and cation exchange in a series of isostructural framework uranyl tungstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C.

    2014-05-01

    The isotypical compounds (UO2)3(WO6)(H2O)5 (1), Ag(UO2)3(WO6)(OH)(H2O)3 (2), K(UO2)3(WO6)OH(H2O)4 (3), Rb(UO2)3(WO6)(OH)(H2O)3.5 (4), and Cs(UO2)3(WO6)OH(H2O)3 (5) were synthesized, characterized, and their structures determined. Each crystallizes in space group Cc. (1): a=12.979 (3), b=10.238 (2), c=11.302 (2), β=102.044 (2); (2): a=13.148 (2), b=9.520 (1), c=11.083 (2), β=101.568 (2); (3): a=13.111 (8), b=9.930 (6), c=11.242 (7), β=101.024 (7); (4): a=12.940 (2), b=10.231 (2), c=11.259(2), β=102.205 (2); (5): a=12.983 (3), b=10.191 (3), c=11.263 (4), β=101.661 (4). Compounds 1-5 are a framework of uranyl and tungsten polyhedra containing cation-cation interactions. The framework has three symmetrically distinct U(VI) cations, one tungsten, sixteen to eighteen oxygen atoms, and in 2-5, one monovalent cation. Each atom occupies a general position. Each U(VI) cation is present as a typical (UO2)2+ uranyl ion in an overall pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment. Each pentagonal bipyramid shares two equatorial edges with two other pentagonal bipyramids, forming a trimer. Trimers are connected into chains by edge-sharing with WO6 octahedra. Chains are linked through cation-cation interactions between two symmetrically independent uranyl ions. This yields a remarkably complex system of intersecting channels that extend along [0 0 1] and [-1 1 0]. The cation exchange properties of 2 and 3 were characterized at room temperature and at 140 °C.

  4. A new uranyl niobate sheet in the cesium uranyl niobate Cs{sub 9}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 4}(NbO{sub 5})(Nb{sub 2}O{sub 8}){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Saad, S.; Obbade, S. Yagoubi, S.; Renard, C.; Abraham, F.

    2008-04-15

    A new cesium uranyl niobate, Cs{sub 9}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 4}(NbO{sub 5})(Nb{sub 2}O{sub 8}){sub 2}] or Cs{sub 9}U{sub 8}Nb{sub 5}O{sub 41} has been synthesized by high-temperature solid-state reaction, using a mixture of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}. Single crystals were obtained by incongruent melting of a starting mixture with metallic ratio=Cs/U/Nb=1/1/1. The crystal structure of the title compound was determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data, and solved in the monoclinic system with the following crystallographic data: a=16.729(2) A, b=14.933(2) A, c=20.155(2) A{beta}=110.59(1){sup o}, P2{sub 1}/c space group and Z=4. The crystal structure was refined to agreement factors R{sub 1}=0.049 and wR{sub 2}=0.089, calculated for 4660 unique observed reflections with I{>=}2{sigma}(I), collected on a BRUKER AXS diffractometer with MoK{alpha} radiation and a CCD detector. In this structure the UO{sub 7} uranyl pentagonal bipyramids are connected by sharing edges and corners to form a uranyl layer {sub {infinity}}{sup 2}[U{sub 8}O{sub 36}] corresponding to a new anion-sheet topology, and creating triangular, rectangular and square vacant sites. The two last sites are occupied by Nb{sub 2}O{sub 8} entities and NbO{sub 5} square pyramids, respectively, to form infinite uranyl niobate sheets {sub {infinity}}{sup 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 4}(NbO{sub 5})(Nb{sub 2}O{sub 8}){sub 2}]{sup 9-} stacking along the [010] direction. The Nb{sub 2}O{sub 8} entities result from two edge-shared NbO{sub 5} square pyramids. The Cs{sup +} cations are localized between layers and ensured the cohesion of the structure. The cesium cation mobility between the uranyl niobate sheets was studied by electrical measurements. The conductivity obeys the Arrhenius law in all the studied temperature domains. The observed low conductivity values with high activation energy may be explained by the strong connection of the Cs{sup +} cations to the infinite

  5. Nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase distribution and their relation to proton release in five nodulated grain legumes.

    PubMed

    Fan, X H; Tang, C; Rengel, Z

    2002-09-01

    Nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase activity (NRA) and net proton release were compared in five grain legumes grown at 0.2 and 2 mM nitrate in nutrient solution. Nitrate treatments, imposed on 22-d-old, fully nodulated plants, lasted for 21 d. Increasing nitrate supply did not significantly influence the growth of any of the species during the treatment, but yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus) had a higher growth rate than the other species examined. At 0.2 mM nitrate supply, nitrate uptake rates ranged from 0.6 to 1.5 mg N g(-1) d(-1) in the order: yellow lupin > field pea (Pisum sativum) > chickpea (Cicer arietinum) > narrow-leafed lupin (L angustifolius) > white lupin (L albus). At 2 mM nitrate supply, nitrate uptake ranged from 1.7 to 8.2 mg N g(-1) d(-1) in the order: field pea > chickpea > white lupin > yellow lupin > narrow-leafed lupin. Nitrate reductase activity increased with increased nitrate supply, with the majority of NRA being present in shoots. Field pea and chickpea had much higher shoot NRA than the three lupin species. When 0.2 mM nitrate was supplied, narrow-leafed lupinreleased the most H+ per unit root biomass per day, followed by yellow lupin, white lupin, field pea and chickpea. At 2 mM nitrate, narrow-leafed lupin and yellow lupin showed net proton release, whereas the other species, especially field pea, showed net OH- release. Irrespective of legume species and nitrate supply, proton release was negatively correlated with nitrate uptake and NRA in shoots, but not with NRA in roots. PMID:12234143

  6. Nitrate Reduction Functional Genes and Nitrate Reduction Potentials Persist in Deeper Estuarine Sediments. Why?

    PubMed Central

    Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Smith, Cindy J.; Dong, Liang F.; Whitby, Corinne; Dumbrell, Alex J.; Nedwell, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the sediment column. This

  7. HEALTH EFFECTS OF NITRATES IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multi faceted study of the health effects of nitrate in drinking water using epidemiological and toxicological techniques is reported. The results of the epidemiological studies indicate that infants consuming appreciable amounts of water high in nitrates in the form of powdere...

  8. 76 FR 46907 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ...This proposed rule would implement anti-terrorism measures to better secure the homeland. The Department of Homeland Security would regulate the sale and transfer of ammonium nitrate pursuant to section 563 of the Fiscal Year 2008 Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act with the purpose of preventing the use of ammonium nitrate in an act of terrorism. This proposed rule seeks......

  9. Intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Brian D.; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Ziegelmann, Matthew J.; Joyce, Daniel D.; Linder, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hemorrhagic cystitis is a challenging clinical entity with limited evidence available to guide treatment. The use of intravesical silver nitrate has been reported, though supporting literature is sparse. Here, we sought to assess outcomes of patients treated with intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis. Material and methods We identified nine patients with refractory hemorrhagic cystitis treated at our institution with intravesical silver nitrate between 2000–2015. All patients had failed previous continuous bladder irrigation with normal saline and clot evacuation. Treatment success was defined as requiring no additional therapy beyond normal saline irrigation after silver nitrate instillation prior to hospital discharge. Results Median patient age was 80 years (IQR 73, 82). Radiation was the most common etiology for hemorrhagic cystitis 89% (8/9). Two patients underwent high dose (0.1%–0.4%) silver nitrate under anesthesia, while the remaining seven were treated with doses from 0.01% to 0.1% via continuous bladder irrigation for a median of 3 days (range 2–4). All nine patients (100%) had persistent hematuria despite intravesical silver nitrate therapy, requiring additional interventions and red blood cell transfusion during the hospitalization. There were no identified complications related to intravesical silver nitrate instillation. Conclusion Although well tolerated, we found that intravesical silver nitrate was ineffective for bleeding control, suggesting a limited role for this agent in the management of patients with hemorrhagic cystitis.

  10. 76 FR 62311 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... FR 64280 (advance notice of proposed rulemaking); 76 FR 46908 (notice of proposed rulemaking... Program Web site in mid-October at http://www.dhs.gov/ files/ ] programs/ammonium-nitrate-security-program...; ] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Office of the Secretary 6 CFR Part 31 RIN 1601-AA52 Ammonium Nitrate...

  11. Dietary Nitrate, Nitric Oxide, and Cardiovascular Health.

    PubMed

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Croft, Kevin D; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence strongly suggests that dietary nitrate, derived in the diet primarily from vegetables, could contribute to cardiovascular health via effects on nitric oxide (NO) status. NO plays an essential role in cardiovascular health. It is produced via the classical L-arginine-NO-synthase pathway and the recently discovered enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. The discovery of this alternate pathway has highlighted dietary nitrate as a candidate for the cardioprotective effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Clinical trials with dietary nitrate have observed improvements in blood pressure, endothelial function, ischemia-reperfusion injury, arterial stiffness, platelet function, and exercise performance with a concomitant augmentation of markers of NO status. While these results are indicative of cardiovascular benefits with dietary nitrate intake, there is still a lingering concern about nitrate in relation to methemoglobinemia, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. It is the purpose of this review to present an overview of NO and its critical role in cardiovascular health; to detail the observed vascular benefits of dietary nitrate intake through effects on NO status as well as to discuss the controversy surrounding the possible toxic effects of nitrate. PMID:25976309

  12. Intermittent nitrate therapy in angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Reichek, N

    1989-05-01

    The rationale for intermittent nitrate therapy is based on the pathophysiology of nitroglycerin tolerance and the diurnal pattern of symptoms encountered in patients with chronic stable angina. Nitrate tolerance was first observed as tolerance to headache in industrial toxicology. When long-acting nitrates for chronic stable angina became available, similar tolerance was observed but not thought to indicate tolerance to a haemodynamic or therapeutic effect. Subsequently, Needleman and coworkers (J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1973; 187: 324) defined in vitro the phenomenology of vascular smooth muscle tolerance to nitroglycerin-induced relaxation and reversibility was demonstrated. More recently, a potential molecular explanation for nitrate tolerance has been proposed: sulfhydryl group depletion in smooth muscle cells resulting in reduced formation of S-nitrosothiols on nitrate exposure with resultant reduced activation of cyclic GMP. In vivo, other mechanisms, including fluid retention and neurohumoral responses to vasodilation may also be important. The first demonstration that nitrate tolerance affected the therapeutic efficacy of long-acting nitrates was reported by Parker and coworkers in 1982 (Circulation 1987; 76: 572-6). This landmark study was not given much credence at the time because it appeared to be in conflict with earlier reports. However, in the past 6 years development of tolerance has been demonstrated with a variety of oral nitrates, transdermal nitroglycerin and intravenous nitroglycerin. When plasma concentrations are held constant, tolerance to antianginal effects is demonstrable within 24h, but varies markedly in severity from individual to individual.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2501096

  13. COMPARTMENTAL MODEL OF NITRATE RETENTION IN STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A compartmental modeling approach is presented to route nitrate retention along a cascade of stream reach sections. A process transfer function is used for transient storage equations with first order reaction terms to represent nitrate uptake in the free stream, and denitrifica...

  14. The contributions of nitrate uptake and efflux to isotope fractionation during algal nitrate assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsh, K. L.; Trull, T. W.; Sigman, D. M.; Thompson, P. A.; Granger, J.

    2014-05-01

    In order to strengthen environmental application of nitrate N and O isotopes, we measured the N and O isotopic fractionation associated with cellular nitrate uptake and efflux in the nitrate-assimilating marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii. We isolated nitrate uptake and efflux from nitrate reduction by growing the cells in the presence of tungsten, which substitutes for molybdenum in assimilatory nitrate reductase, yielding an inactive enzyme. After growth on ammonium and then N starvation, cells were exposed to nitrate. Numerical models fit to the evolution of intracellular nitrate concentration and N and O isotopic composition yielded distinct N isotope effects (15ɛ) for nitrate uptake and nitrate efflux (2.0 ± 0.3‰ and 1.2 ± 0.4‰, respectively). The O isotope effects (18ɛ) for nitrate uptake and nitrate efflux were indistinguishable (2.8 ± 0.6‰), yielding a ratio of O to N isotopic fractionation for uptake of 1.4 ± 0.4 and for efflux of 2.3 ± 0.9. The 15ɛ for nitrate uptake can account for at most 40% of the organism-level N isotope effect (15ɛorg) measured in laboratory studies of T. weissflogii and in the open ocean (typically 5‰ or greater). This observation supports previous evidence that most isotope fractionation during nitrate assimilation is due to intracellular nitrate reduction, with nitrate efflux allowing the signal to be communicated to the environment. An O to N fractionation ratio (18ɛorg:15ɛorg) of ˜1 has been measured for nitrate assimilation in algal cultures and linked to the N and O isotope effects of nitrate reductase. Our results suggest that the ratios of O to N fractionation for both nitrate uptake and efflux may be distinct from a ratio of 1, to a degree that could cause the net 18ɛorg:15ɛorg to rise appreciably above 1 when 15ɛorg is low (e.g., yielding a ratio of 1.1 when 15ɛorg is 5‰). However, field and culture studies have consistently measured nearly equivalent fractionation of N and O isotopes in

  15. Resonance light scattering determination of uranyl based on labeled DNAzyme-gold nanoparticle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Shi, Lin-Fei; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Yang, Hui-Xian; Xue, Jin-Hua; Liu, Lu; Wang, Yong-Song; Yin, Ji-Cheng; Wang, Jia-Cheng

    2013-06-01

    A resonance light scattering (RLS) method has been developed using a uranyl (UO22+) specific DNAzyme and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In this strategy, the cleavage of the substrate strand (SDNA) of DNAzyme results in releasing a shorter duplex in the presence of UO22+, leading to the aggregation of AuNPs and the increase of RLS intensity. The response signals linearly correlated with the concentration of UO22+ over the range of 1.36 × 10-8-1.50 × 10-7 mol L-1. The limit of detection (LOD) is 4.09 × 10-9 mol L-1. The method has excellent selectivity and higher sensitivity. It could provide a promising potential for the detection of metal ions, and be benefit to extend the application of RLS method.

  16. Roles of Acetone and Diacetone Alcohol in Coordination and Dissociation Reactions of Uranyl Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, Daniel; Schoendorff, George E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.; Gibson, John K.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2012-12-03

    Combined collision-induced dissociation mass-spectrometry experiments and DFT calculations were employed to elucidate the molecular structure of "hypercoordinated" species and the energetics of water-elimination reactions of uranyl acetone complexes observed in earlier work (Rios, D.; Rutkowski, P. X.; Van Stipdonk, M. J.; Gibson, J. K. Inorg. Chem. 2011, 50, 4781). It is shown that the "hypercoordinated" species contain diacetone alcohol ligands bonded in either bidentate or monodentate fashion, which are indistinguishable from (acetone)2 in mass spectrometry. Calculations confirm that four diacetone ligands can form stable complexes, but that the effective number of atoms coordinating with uranium in the equatorial plane does not exceed five. Diacetone alcohol ligands are shown to form mesityl oxide ligands and alkoxide species through the elimination of water, providing an explanation for the observed water-elimination reactions.

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis, structure and thermal stability of diamine templated layered uranyl-vanadates

    SciTech Connect

    Rivenet, Murielle Vigier, Nicolas; Roussel, Pascal; Abraham, Francis

    2007-02-15

    Six new layered uranyl vanadates (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 8}] (1), (H{sub 2}EN)[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 8}] (2), (H{sub 2}DAP)[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 8}] (3), (H{sub 2}PIP)[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(VO{sub 4}){sub 2}].0,8H{sub 2}O (4), (H{sub 2}DMPIP)[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 8}] (5), (H{sub 2}DABCO)[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(VO{sub 4}){sub 2}] (6) were prepared from mild-hydrothermal reactions using 1,2-ethylenediamine (EN); 1,3-diaminopropane (DAP); piperazine (PIP); 1-methylpiperazine (MPIP); 1,4-diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane (DABCO). The structures of 1, 4, 5 and 6 were solved using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data while the structural models of 2 and 3 were established from powder X-ray diffraction data. In compounds 1, 2, 3 and 5, the uranyl-vanadate layers are built from dimers of edge-shared UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramids and dimers of edge-shared VO{sub 5} square pyramids further connected through edge-sharing. In 1 and 3, the layers are identical to that occurring in the carnotite group of uranyl-vanadates. In 2 and 5, the V{sub 2}O{sub 8} dimers differ in orientation leading to a new type of layer. The layers of compound 4 and 6 are built from chains of edge-shared UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramids connected by VO{sub 4} tetrahedra and are of uranophane-type anion topology. For the six compounds, the ammonium or organoammonium cation resides in the space between the inorganic layers. Crystallographic data: 1 monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/c with a=6.894(2), b=8.384(3), c=10.473(4) A and {beta}=106.066(5){sup o}, 2 monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/a with a=13.9816(6), b=8.6165(3), c=10.4237(3) A and {gamma}=93.125(3){sup o}, 3 orthorhombic, space group Pmcn with a=14.7363(8), b=8.6379(4) and c=10.4385(4) A, 4 monoclinic, space group C2/m with a=15.619(2), b=7.1802(8), c=6.9157(8) A and {beta}=101.500(2){sup o}, 5 monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/b with a=9.315(2), b=8.617(2), c=10.5246(2) A and {gamma}=114

  18. The effect of uranyl acetate on human lymphoblastoid cells (RPMI 6410) and HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ghadially, F. N.; Yang-Steppuhn, S. E.; Lalonde, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    RPMI 6410 cells and HeLa cells were exposed to uranyl acetate. In RPMI 6410 cell cultures this produced single-membrane-bound presumably lysosomal bodies (called "uraniosomes") containing electron-dense crystals in the cultured cells and crystalline deposits in extracellular locations. Neither uraniosomes nor extracellular uranium deposits were found in HeLa cell cultures. All uraniosomes and extracellular uranium deposits analysed by electron-probed X-ray analysis were found to contain uranium, potassium and phosphorus. Traces of sulphur were detected in some but not all uraniosomes and extracellular uranium deposits. Traces of calcium were found in all extracellular uranium deposits and in some uraniosomes also. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7093141

  19. A closed loop system for the conversion of uranium turnings to uranyl oxy-hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, T.M.; Sauer, N.N.; Smith, W.H.; Ogden, G.

    1997-12-31

    The machine shops at Los Alamos National Laboratory generate up to 5 Kgs of uranium turnings daily. Presently, the turnings are packed in diesel fuel in 55 gallon drums and shipped off site for treatment and disposal. In response to a request for an in-situ generator treatment plan, a three-part closed loop system has been designed to dissolve the turnings and leave them in a non-reactive form for either storage or disposal. The system uses electrochemically generated sodium hypochlorite to dissolve the turnings, converting them to uranyl oxy-hydroxide precipitate. The precipitate is continually centrifuged to separate the liquids from solids. The supernant, spent hypochlorite, feeds into the electrochemical cell, the hypochlorite is regenerated and pumped back into the dissolution reactor. This closed loop system accomplishes both conversion of the uranium turnings to an acceptable form and minimizes the treatment wastestream.

  20. Syntheses, structures, characterizations and charge-density matching of novel amino-templated uranyl selenates

    SciTech Connect

    Ling Jie; Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C.

    2009-02-15

    Five hybrid organic-inorganic uranyl selenates have been synthesized, characterized and their structures have been determined. The structure of (C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O)] (EthylAUSe) is monoclinic, P2{sub 1}, a=8.290(1), b=12.349(2), c=11.038(2) A, {beta}=104.439(4){sup o}, V=1094.3(3) A{sup 3}, Z=2, R{sub 1}=0.0425. The structure of (C{sub 7}H{sub 10}N){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]H{sub 2}O (BenzylAUSe) is orthorhombic, Pna2{sub 1}, a=24.221(2), b=11.917(1), c=7.4528(7) A, V=2151.1(3) A{sup 3}, Z=4, R{sub 1}=0.0307. The structure of (C{sub 2}H{sub 10}N{sub 2})[(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)](H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (EDAUSe) is monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/c, a=11.677(2), b=7.908(1), c=15.698(2) A, {beta}=98.813(3){sup o}, V=1432.4(3) A{sup 3}, Z=4, R{sub 1}=0.0371. The structure of (C{sub 6}H{sub 22}N{sub 4})[(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)](H{sub 2}O) (TETAUSe) is monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/n, a=13.002(2), b=7.962(1), c=14.754(2) A, {beta}=114.077(2){sup o}, V=1394.5(3) A{sup 3}, Z=4, R{sub 1}=0.0323. The structure of (C{sub 6}H{sub 21}N{sub 4})[(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(HSeO{sub 4})] (TAEAUSe) is monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/m, a=9.2218(6), b=12.2768(9), c=9.4464(7) A, {beta}=116.1650(10){sup o}, V=959.88(12) A{sup 3}, Z=2, R{sub 1}=0.0322. The inorganic structural units in these compounds are composed of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and selenate tetrahedra. In each case, tetrahedra link bipyramids through vertex-sharing, resulting in chain or sheet topologies. The charge-density matching principle is discussed relative to the orientations of the organic molecules between the inorganic structural units. - Graphical abstract: The structures of five new inorganic-organic hybrid uranyl selenates present new structural topologies based upon chains and sheets of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and selenate tetrahedra.

  1. Cluster-Models for Uranyl(VI) Adsorption on alpha-Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2011-02-24

    Aqueous complexation, adsorption and redox chemistry of actinide species at mineral surfaces have significant impact on their transport and reactive behaviour in chemically and physically heterogeneous environments. The adsorption configurations and energies of micro-solvated uranyl dication, UO2 2+, on fully hydroxylated and H-deficient a-alumina (0001)-like finite cluster models were studied. The significant size of the models provides faithful representations of features that have emerged from periodic calculations, but most importantly, they afford us a systematic study of the preferred adsorption configurations, effect of secondary solvation shells and explicit treatment of the total charge. The energetics computed from the difference between the optimized structures and the appropriate reference states, point at a preference for inner sphere type complex.

  2. New mechanism for the ring-opening polymerization of lactones? Uranyl aryloxide-induced intermolecular catalysis.

    PubMed

    Walshe, Aurora; Fang, Jian; Maron, Laurent; Baker, Robert J

    2013-08-01

    The uranyl aryloxide [UO2(OAr)2(THF)2] (Ar = 2,6-(t)Bu2-C6H2) is an active catalyst for the ring-opening cyclo-oligomerization of ε-caprolactone and δ-valerolactone but not for β-butyrolactone, γ-butyrolactone, and rac-lactide. (1)H EXSY measurements give the thermodynamic parameters for exchange of monomer and coordinated THF, and rates of polymerization have been determined. A comprehensive theoretical examination of the mechanism is discussed. From both experiment and theory, the initiation step is intramolecular and in keeping with the accepted mechanism, while computational studies indicate that propagation can go via an intermolecular pathway, which is the first time this has been observed. The lack of polymerization for the inactive monomers has been investigated theoretically and C-H···π interactions stabilize the coordination of the less rigid monomers. PMID:23879703

  3. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations of uranyl ion interaction at the water/rutile TiO2(110) interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebbari, K.; Roques, J.; Simoni, E.; Domain, C.; Perron, H.; Catalette, H.

    2012-08-01

    The effects of temperature and solvation on uranyl ion adsorption at the water/rutile TiO2(110) interface are investigated by Density Functional Theory (DFT) in both static and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics approaches. According to experimental observations, uranyl ion can form two surface complexes in a pH range from 1.5 to 4.5. Based on these observations, the structures of the complexes at 293 K are first calculated in agreement with vacuum static calculations. Then, an increase in temperature (293 to 425 K) induces the reinforcement of uranyl ion adsorption due to the release of water molecules from the solvation shell of uranyl ion. Finally, temperature can modify the nature of the surface species.

  4. The Influence of the Linker Geometry in Bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) Ligands on Solution-Phase Uranyl Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Szigethy, Geza; Raymond, Kenneth

    2010-08-12

    Seven water-soluble, tetradentate bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) (bis-Me-3,2-HOPO) ligands were synthesized that vary only in linker geometry and rigidity. Solution phase thermodynamic measurements were conducted between pH 1.6 and pH 9.0 to determine the effects of these variations on proton and uranyl cation affinity. Proton affinity decreases by introduction of the solubilizing triethylene glycol group as compared to un-substituted reference ligands. Uranyl affinity was found to follow no discernable trends with incremental geometric modification. The butyl-linked 4Li-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand exhibited the highest uranyl affinity, consistent with prior in vivo decorporation results. Of the rigidly-linked ligands, the o-phenylene linker imparted the best uranyl affinity to the bis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand platform.

  5. Nitrate removal from drinking water -- Review

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, A.; Viraraghavan, T.

    1997-04-01

    Nitrate concentrations in surface water and especially in ground water have increased in Canada, the US, Europe, and other areas of the world. This trend has raised concern because nitrates cause methemoglobiinemia in infants. Several treatment processes including ion exchange, biological denitrification, chemical denitrification, reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, and catalytic denitrification can remove nitrates from water with varying degrees of efficiency, cost, and ease of operation. Available technical data, experience, and economics indicate that ion exchange and biological denitrification are more acceptable for nitrate removal than reverse osmosis. Ion exchange is more viable for ground water while biological denitrification is the preferred alternative for surface water. This paper reviews the developments in the field of nitrate removal processes.

  6. PREPARATION OF DIBASIC ALUMINUM NITRATE

    DOEpatents

    Gresky, A.T.; Nurmi, E.O.; Foster, D.L.; Wischow, R.P.; Savolainen, J.E.

    1960-04-01

    A method is given for the preparation and recovery of basic aluminum nltrates having an OH: Al ratio of at least two, comprising two steps. First, metallic aluminum is dissolved in aqueous Al(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, in the presence of a small quantity of elemental or ionic mercury, to increase its Al: NO/sub 3/ ratio into the range 1 to 1.2. The resulting aqueous solution is then added to an excess of a special organic solvent, typically a mixture of five parts methanol and six parts diethyl ether, whereupon the basic aluminum nitrate, e.g. Al/sub 6/(OH)/sub 13/-(NO/sub 3/)/sub 5/, recoverably precipitates.

  7. 70. INTERIOR VIEW OF AMMONIUM NITRATE HOUSE, LOOKING AT AMMONIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. INTERIOR VIEW OF AMMONIUM NITRATE HOUSE, LOOKING AT AMMONIUM NITRATE IN STORAGE. APRIL 18, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  8. Efficient syntheses of climate relevant isoprene nitrates and (1R,5S)-(-)-myrtenol nitrate.

    PubMed

    Bew, Sean P; Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn D; Mills, Graham P; Reeves, Claire E

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the chemoselective synthesis of several important, climate relevant isoprene nitrates using silver nitrate to mediate a 'halide for nitrate' substitution. Employing readily available starting materials, reagents and Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons chemistry the synthesis of easily separable, synthetically versatile 'key building blocks' (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-chlorobut-2-en-1-ol as well as (E)- and (Z)-1-((2-methyl-4-bromobut-2-enyloxy)methyl)-4-methoxybenzene has been achieved using cheap, 'off the shelf' materials. Exploiting their reactivity we have studied their ability to undergo an 'allylic halide for allylic nitrate' substitution reaction which we demonstrate generates (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrate, and (E)- and (Z)-2-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrates ('isoprene nitrates') in 66-80% overall yields. Using NOESY experiments the elucidation of the carbon-carbon double bond configuration within the purified isoprene nitrates has been established. Further exemplifying our 'halide for nitrate' substitution chemistry we outline the straightforward transformation of (1R,2S)-(-)-myrtenol bromide into the previously unknown monoterpene nitrate (1R,2S)-(-)-myrtenol nitrate. PMID:27340495

  9. Thermodynamics of lanthanide and uranyl complexes with tetrahydrofuran-2,3,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA).

    SciTech Connect

    Morss, L. R.; Nash, K. L.; Tennessee Technological Univ.

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of an investigation of the thermochemistry of the complexation of La{sup 3+} Nd{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}, and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} by tetrahydrofuran-2,3,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA). This predisposed structural analog to oxydiacetic acid (ODA) has been previously shown both to exhibit greater sensitivity to lanthanide cation radius than complexes with the unconstrained ODA and to form anomalously weak complexes with UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. Our purpose is to interpret these observations in terms of the balance between enthalpy and entropy contributions to the overall complexation thermodynamics. Enthalpies have been calculated from titration calorimetry experiments both for the protonation of the free ligand and for the formation of selected 1:1 and 1:2 complexes in pH 2-3 acidic media (I = 0.1 M). The complexation entropies for the lanthanide complexes have been calculated using the previously reported stability constants for the MH{sub 2}L{sup +}, MHL, and M(H{sub 2}L){sup 2-}. The stability constants for the uranyl complexes have been determined by potentiometric titration and these values used to calculate the thermodynamic parameters. Complexation enthalpies for the 1:1 lanthanide-THFTCA complexes (MH{sub 2}L{sup +} species) are nearly identical to those of the lanthanide ODA complexes. Therefore, the size-selectivity observed in the lanthanide-THFTCA complexes arises from the complexation entropy. The comparative weakness of the uranyl complexes with THFTCA also is accounted for thermodynamically in the entropy term. Calculations based on an electrostatic model for complexation entropy and molecular mechanics modeling are used to help interpret the experimental results.

  10. Pore-Scale Evaluation of Uranyl Phosphate Precipitation in a Model Groundwater System

    SciTech Connect

    Fanizza, Michael F.; Yoon, Hongkyu; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Hess, Nancy J.; Bowden, Mark E.; Strathmann, Timothy J.; Finneran, Kevin T.; Werth, Charles J.

    2013-02-01

    The abiotic precipitation of uranium (U(VI)) was evaluated in a microfluidic pore network (i.e. micromodel) to assess the efficacy of using a phosphate amendment to immobilize uranium in groundwater. U(VI) was mixed transverse to the direction of flow with hydrogen phosphate (HPO42-), in the presence or absence of calcium (Ca2+) or sulfate (SO42-), in order to identify precipitation rates, morphology and types of minerals formed, and effects of mineral precipitates on pore blockage. Precipitation occurred over the time scale of hours to days. Relative to when only U(VI) and HPO42- were present, precipitation rates were 2.3X slower when SO42- was present, and 1.4X faster when Ca2+ was present; larger crystals formed in the presence of SO42-. Raman backscattering spectroscopy and micro X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) results both showed that the only mineral precipitated was chernikovite, UO2HPO4•4H2O; energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy results indicate that Ca and S are not incorporated into the chernikovite lattice. A pore scale model was developed, and simulation results of saturation ratio (SR=Q/Ksp) suggest that chernikovite is the least thermodynamically favored mineral to precipitate (0uranyl hydrogen phosphate and Na-Autunite (13uranyl orthophosphate and Ca-autunite (when Ca2+ is present) (SR>105). Fluorescent tracer studies and laser confocal microscopy images showed that densely aggregated precipitates blocked pores and reduced permeability. The results suggest that uranium precipitation with phosphate as chernikovite is rapid on the time scale of remediation for the conditions considered, and can block pores, alter fluid flow paths, and potentially limit mixing and precipitation.

  11. Precipitation and Dissolution of Uranyl Phosphates in a Microfluidic Pore Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werth, C. J.; Fanizza, M.; Strathmann, T.; Finneran, K.; Oostrom, M.; Zhang, C.; Wietsma, T. W.; Hess, N. J.

    2011-12-01

    The abiotic precipitation of uranium (U(VI)) was evaluated in a microfluidic pore structure (i.e. micromodel) to assess the efficacy of using a phosphate amendment to immobilize uranium in groundwater and mitigate the risk of this contaminant to potential down-gradient receptor sites. U(VI) was mixed transverse to the direction of flow with hydrogen phosphate (HPO42-), in the presence or absence of calcium (Ca2+) or sulfate (SO42-), in order to identify precipitation rates, the morphology and types of minerals formed, and the stability of these minerals to dissolution with and without bicarbonate (HCO3-) present. Raman backscattering spectroscopy and micro X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) results both showed that the only mineral precipitated was chernikovite (also known as hydrogen uranyl phosphate; UO2HPO4), even though the formation of other minerals were thermodynamically favored depending on the experimental conditions. Precipitation and dissolution rates varied with influent conditions. Relative to when only U(VI) and HPO42- were present, precipitation rates were 2.3 times slower when SO42- was present, and 1.4 times faster when Ca2+ was present. These rates were inversely related to the size of crystals formed during precipitation. Dissolution rates for chernikovite increased with increasing HCO3- concentrations, consistent with formation of uranyl carbonate complexes in aqueous solution, and they were the fastest for chernikovite formed in the presence of SO42-, and slowest for the chernikovite formed in the presence of Ca2+. These rates are related to the ratios of mineral-water interfacial area to mineral volume. Fluorescent tracer studies and laser confocal microscopy images showed that densely aggregated precipitates blocked pores and reduced permeability. The results suggest that changes in the solute conditions evaluated affect precipitation rates, crystal morphology, and crystal stability, but not mineral type.

  12. Raman spectroscopic characterization of a synthetic, non-stoichiometric Cu-Ba uranyl phosphate.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Pinto, André J; Astilleros, José Manuel; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes; Gonçalves, Mário A

    2013-09-01

    Crystals of phases belonging to the autunite group (general formula X(2+)(UO2)2(X(5+)O4)2·nH2O), specifically the uranyl phosphates (X(5+)=P) metauranocircite (X(2+)=Ba(2+)), metatorbernite (X(2+)=Cu(2+)) and a barian metatorbenite phase (X(2+)=Cu(2+)/Ba(2+)), have been synthesized in a silica gel medium and characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra showed bands in the range 750-1100 cm(-1), which were attributed to the ν1 and ν3 (PO(4))(3-) and (UO(2))(2+) stretching vibrations. By using the wavenumbers of the most intense and well defined ν1 (UO(2))(2+) vibration, the U-O bonds lengths were calculated for the three uranyl phosphate minerals. The results are in good agreement with previous single crystal structure analysis data. Bands in the spectra from 350 to 700 cm(-1) were attributed to the (PO(4))(3-) bending modes. Moreover, in the range 70-350 cm(-1), two groups of bands could be defined. The first group, with vibrations at lower wavenumbers, was attributed to the lattice modes and the second group, from 150 to 350 cm(-1), was assigned to the ν2 (UO(2))(2+) bending mode. Finally, in the case of the barian metatorbernite, bands in the range 1500-3800 cm(-1) were assigned to the OH stretching and the ν2 bending vibrations of water molecules. In this phase, all the vibrations show bandshifts when compared to the vibrations in metatorbernite. These bandshifts can be related to transitional Cu-O and Ba-O bond lengths. PMID:23727673

  13. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Identifies Calcium-Uranyl-Carbonate Complexes at Environmental Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Shelly D; Kemner, Kenneth M; Brooks, Scott C

    2007-01-01

    Current research on bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater focuses on supplying indigenous metal-reducing bacteria with the appropriate metabolic requirements to induce microbiological reduction of soluble uranium(VI) to poorly soluble uranium(IV). Recent studies of uranium(VI) bioreduction in the presence of environmentally relevant levels of calcium revealed limited and slowed uranium(VI) reduction and the formation of a Ca-UO2-CO3 complex. However, the stoichiometry of the complex is poorly defined and may be complicated by the presence of a Na-UO2-CO3 complex. Such a complex might exist even at high calcium concentrations, as some UO2-CO3 complexes will still be present. The number of calcium and/or sodium atoms coordinated to a uranyl carbonate complex will determine the net charge of the complex. Such a change in aqueous speciation of uranium(VI) in calcareous groundwater may affect the fate and transport properties of uranium. In this paper, we present the results from X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements of a series of solutions containing 50 lM uranium(VI) and 30 mM sodium bicarbonate, with various calcium concentrations of 0-5 mM. Use of the data series reduces the uncertainty in the number of calcium atoms bound to the UO2-CO3 complex to approximately 0.6 and enables spectroscopic identification of the Na-UO2-CO3 complex. At nearly neutral pH values, the numbers of sodium and calcium atoms bound to the uranyl triscarbonate species are found to depend on the calcium concentration, as predicted by speciation calculations.

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopy identifies calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexes at environmental concentrations.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Brooks, S. C.; Biosciences Division; ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Current research on bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater focuses on supplying indigenous metal-reducing bacteria with the appropriate metabolic requirements to induce microbiological reduction of soluble uranium(VI) to poorly soluble uranium(IV). Recent studies of uranium(VI) bioreduction in the presence of environmentally relevant levels of calcium revealed limited and slowed uranium(VI) reduction and the formation of a Ca-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complex. However, the stoichiometry of the complex is poorly defined and may be complicated by the presence of a Na-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complex. Such a complex might exist even at high calcium concentrations, as some UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complexes will still be present. The number of calcium and/or sodium atoms coordinated to a uranyl carbonate complex will determine the net charge of the complex. Such a change in aqueous speciation of uranium(VI) in calcareous groundwater may affect the fate and transport properties of uranium. In this paper, we present the results from X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements of a series of solutions containing 50 {micro}M uranium(VI) and 30 mM sodium bicarbonate, with various calcium concentrations of 0-5 mM. Use of the data series reduces the uncertainty in the number of calcium atoms bound to the UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complex to approximately 0.6 and enables spectroscopic identification of the Na-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complex. At nearly neutral pH values, the numbers of sodium and calcium atoms bound to the uranyl triscarbonate species are found to depend on the calcium concentration, as predicted by speciation calculations.

  15. Potential remediation approach for uranium-contaminated groundwaters through potassium uranyl vanadate precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, T.K.; Kim, Y.; Wan, J.

    2009-06-01

    Methods for remediating groundwaters contaminated with uranium (U) through precipitation under oxidizing conditions are needed because bioreduction-based approaches require indefinite supply of electron donor. Although strategies based on precipitation of some phosphate minerals within the (meta)autunite group have been considered for this purpose, thermodynamic calculations for K- and Ca-uranyl phopsphates, meta-ankoleite and autunite, predict that U concentrations will exceed the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL = 0.13 {micro}M for U) at any pH and pCO{sub 2}, unless phosphate is maintained at much higher concentrations than the sub-{micro}M levels typically found in groundwaters. We hypothesized that potassium uranyl vanadate will control U(VI) concentrations below regulatory levels in slightly acidic to neutral solutions based on thermodynamic data available for carnotite, K{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}V{sub 2}O8. The calculations indicate that maintaining U concentrations below the MCL through precipitation of carnotite will be sustainable in some oxidizing waters having pH in the range of 5.5 to 7, even when dissolution of this solid phase becomes the sole supply of sub-{micro}M levels of V. Batch experiments were conducted in solutions at pH 6.0 and 7.8, chosen because of their very different predicted extents of U(VI) removal. Conditions were identified where U concentrations dropped below its MCL within 1 to 5 days of contact with oxidizing solutions containing 0.2 to 10 mM K, and 0.1 to 20 {micro}M V(V). This method may also have application in extracting (mining) U and V from groundwaters where they both occur at elevated concentrations.

  16. Nitrate Transport, Sensing, and Responses in Plants.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, José A; Vega, Andrea; Bouguyon, Eléonore; Krouk, Gabriel; Gojon, Alain; Coruzzi, Gloria; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential macronutrient that affects plant growth and development. N is an important component of chlorophyll, amino acids, nucleic acids, and secondary metabolites. Nitrate is one of the most abundant N sources in the soil. Because nitrate and other N nutrients are often limiting, plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to ensure adequate supply of nutrients in a variable environment. Nitrate is absorbed in the root and mobilized to other organs by nitrate transporters. Nitrate sensing activates signaling pathways that impinge upon molecular, metabolic, physiological, and developmental responses locally and at the whole plant level. With the advent of genomics technologies and genetic tools, important advances in our understanding of nitrate and other N nutrient responses have been achieved in the past decade. Furthermore, techniques that take advantage of natural polymorphisms present in divergent individuals from a single species have been essential in uncovering new components. However, there are still gaps in our understanding of how nitrate signaling affects biological processes in plants. Moreover, we still lack an integrated view of how all the regulatory factors identified interact or crosstalk to orchestrate the myriad N responses plants typically exhibit. In this review, we provide an updated overview of mechanisms by which nitrate is sensed and transported throughout the plant. We discuss signaling components and how nitrate sensing crosstalks with hormonal pathways for developmental responses locally and globally in the plant. Understanding how nitrate impacts on plant metabolism, physiology, and growth and development in plants is key to improving crops for sustainable agriculture. PMID:27212387

  17. The neurology of folic acid deficiency.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, E H

    2014-01-01

    The metabolism of folic acid and the metabolism of vitamin B12 are intimately linked such that deficiency of either vitamin leads to an identical megaloblastic anemia. The neurologic manifestations of folate deficiency overlap with those of vitamin B12 deficiency and include cognitive impairment, dementia, depression, and, less commonly, peripheral neuropathy and subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord. In both deficiency states there is often dissociation between the neuropsychiatric and the hematologic complications. There is a similar overlap and dissociation between neurologic and hematologic manifestations of inborn errors of folate and vitamin B12 metabolism. Low folate and raised homocysteine levels are risk factors for dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, and depression. Even when folate deficiency is secondary to psychiatric illness due to apathy or poor diet it may eventually aggravate the underlying disorder in a vicious circle effect. Clinical responses to treatment with folates are usually slow over weeks and months, probably due to the efficient blood-brain barrier mechanism for the vitamin, perhaps in turn related to the experimentally demonstrated excitatory properties of folate derivatives. The inappropriate administration of folic acid in the presence of vitamin B12 deficiency may lead to both neurologic and, later, hematologic relapse. Impaired maternal folate intake and status increases the risk of neural tube defects. Periconceptual prophylactic administration of the vitamin reduces, but does not eliminate the risk of neural tube defects even in the absence of folate deficiency. Folates and vitamin B12 have fundamental roles in central nervous system function at all ages, especially in purine, thymidine, neucleotide, and DNA synthesis, genomic and nongenomic methylation and, therefore, in tissue growth, differentiation and repair. There is interest in the potential role of both vitamins in the prevention of disorders of central nervous system development, mood, dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, and aging. PMID:24365361

  18. Ascorbic acid deficiency in liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, A D; Sherlock, S

    1976-01-01

    Leucocyte ascorbic acid (LAA) levels were measured in 138 patients with liver disease. Significantly reduced levels were found in 37 patients with alcoholic liver disease (P less than 0-01) and 25 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (P less than 0-05). In the primary biliary cirrhosis patients, cholestyramine therapy was associated with significantly lower levels of the vitamin (P less than 0-05). Liver ascorbic acid measured in Menghini needle biopsies in 20 patients was significantly correlated with LAA (r=0-807, P less than 0-001). No significant correlation was found between LAA and haematological indices, conventional liver function tests, or cholesterol levels in any group of patients. Patients with LAA levels below 100 nM/10(8) WBC had significantly higher antipyrine half-lives (mean=28-3 h) than patients with LAA levels above this level (mean=18-6 h) (P less than 0-05). Delayed drug metabolism related to low LAA should be considered when drugs metabolised by the liver are prescribed for patients with alcoholic liver disease or primary biliary cirrhosis. PMID:976794

  19. Selective detection of uranium by laser-induced fluorescence: a potential remote-sensing technique. 2: Experimental assessment of the remote sensing of uranyl geologic targets.

    PubMed

    Kasdan, A; Chimenti, R J; Deneufville, J P

    1981-04-15

    An analysis is presented of a method to detect selectively uranyl ion fluorescence from geologic targets. Limitations to the sensitivity which are imposed by system parameters and noise sources are discussed. A ground-based laser system designed and constructed as part of this study is described, and data obtained with this system are presented. Finally the operating criteria of a conceptual airborne system for regional mapping of uranyl fluorescence anomalies are considered. PMID:20309304

  20. Pseudo-constitutivity of nitrate-responsive genes in nitrate reductase mutants

    PubMed Central

    Schinko, Thorsten; Gallmetzer, Andreas; Amillis, Sotiris; Strauss, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    In fungi, transcriptional activation of genes involved in NO3- assimilation requires the presence of an inducer (nitrate or nitrite) and low intracellular concentrations of the pathway products ammonium or glutamine. In Aspergillus nidulans, the two transcription factors NirA and AreA act synergistically to mediate nitrate/nitrite induction and nitrogen metabolite derepression, respectively. In all studied fungi and in plants, mutants lacking nitrate reductase (NR) activity express nitrate-metabolizing enzymes constitutively without the addition of inducer molecules. Based on their work in A. nidulans, Cove and Pateman proposed an “autoregulation control” model for the synthesis of nitrate metabolizing enzymes in which the functional nitrate reductase molecule would act as co-repressor in the absence and as co-inducer in the presence of nitrate. However, NR mutants could simply show “pseudo-constitutivity” due to induction by nitrate which accumulates over time in NR-deficient strains. Here we examined this possibility using strains which lack flavohemoglobins (fhbs), and are thus unable to generate nitrate internally, in combination with nitrate transporter mutations (nrtA, nrtB) and a GFP-labeled NirA protein. Using different combinations of genotypes we demonstrate that nitrate transporters are functional also in NR null mutants and show that the constitutive phenotype of NR mutants is not due to nitrate accumulation from intracellular sources but depends on the activity of nitrate transporters. However, these transporters are not required for nitrate signaling because addition of external nitrate (10 mM) leads to standard induction of nitrate assimilatory genes in the nitrate transporter double mutants. We finally show that NR does not regulate NirA localization and activity, and thus the autoregulation model, in which NR would act as a co-repressor of NirA in the absence of nitrate, is unlikely to be correct. Results from this study instead suggest

  1. Hydrothermal syntheses and structures of the uranyl tellurates AgUO 2(HTeO 5) and Pb 2UO 2(TeO 6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Jie; Ward, Matthew; Burns, Peter C.

    2011-02-01

    Two uranyl tellurates, AgUO 2(HTeO 5) ( 1) and Pb 2UO 2(TeO 6) ( 2), were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and were structurally, chemically, and spectroscopically characterized. 1 crystallizes in space group Pbca, a=7.085(2) Å, b=11.986(3) Å, c=13.913(4) Å, V=1181.5(5) Å 3, Z=8; 2 is in P2(1)/ c, a=5.742(1) Å, b=7.789(2) Å, c=7.928(2) Å, V=90.703(2) Å 3, and Z=2. These are the first structures reported for uranyl compounds containing tellurate. The U 6+ cations are present as (UO 2) 2+ uranyl ions that are coordinated by O atoms to give pentagonal and square bipyramids in compounds 1 and 2, respectively. The structural unit in 1 is a sheet consisting of chains of edge-sharing uranyl pentagonal bipyramids that are one bipyramid wide, linked through the dimers of TeO 6 octahedra. In 2, uranyl square bipyramids share each of their equatorial vertices with different TeO 6 octahedra, giving a sheet with the autunite-type topology. Sheets in 1 and 2 are connected through the low-valence cations that are located in the interlayer region. The structures of 1 and 2 are compared to those of uranyl compounds containing octahedrally coordinated cations.

  2. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed.

    PubMed

    Ghane, Ehsan; Fausey, Norman R; Brown, Larry C

    2015-03-15

    Denitrification beds are promoted to reduce nitrate load in agricultural subsurface drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution of surface water. In this system, drainage water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transformed into nitrogen gas under anaerobic conditions. The main objectives of this study were to model a denitrification bed treating drainage water and evaluate its adverse greenhouse gas emissions. Field experiments were conducted at an existing denitrification bed. Evaluations showed very low greenhouse gas emissions (mean N2O emission of 0.12 μg N m(-2) min(-1)) from the denitrification bed surface. Field experiments indicated that nitrate removal rate was described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with the Michaelis-Menten constant of 7.2 mg N L(-1). We developed a novel denitrification bed model based on the governing equations for water flow and nitrate removal kinetics. The model evaluation statistics showed satisfactory prediction of bed outflow nitrate concentration during subsurface drainage flow. The model can be used to design denitrification beds with efficient nitrate removal which in turn leads to enhanced drainage water quality. PMID:25638338

  3. Microbial Uranium Immobilization Independent of Nitrate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, Andrew; Smith, April; Balkwill, Dr. David; Fagan, Lisa Anne; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2007-01-01

    At many uranium processing and handling facilities, including sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex, high levels of nitrate are present as co-contamination with uranium in groundwater. The daunting prospect of complete nitrate removal prior to the reduction of uranium provides a strong incentive to explore bioremediation strategies that allow for uranium bioreduction and stabilization in the presence of nitrate. Typical in-situ strategies involving the stimulation of metal-reducing bacteria are hindered by low pH environments at this study site and require that the persistent nitrate must first and continuously be removed or transformed prior to uranium being a preferred electron acceptor. This project investigates the possibility of stimulating nitrate-indifferent, pH-tolerant microorganisms to achieve bioreduction of U(VI) despite nitrate persistence. Successful enrichments from U-contaminated sediments demonstrated nearly complete reduction of uranium with very little loss of nitrate from pH 4.9-5.6 using methanol or glycerol as a carbon source. Higher pH enrichments also demonstrated similar U reduction capacity with 5-30% nitrate loss within one week. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified from uranium-reducing enrichments (pH 5.7-6.7) and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses classified the clone sequences into four distinct clusters. Data from sequencing and T-RFLP profiles indicated that the majority of the microorganisms stimulated by these enrichment conditions consisted of low G+C Gram-positive bacteria most closely related to Clostridium and Clostridium-like organisms. This research demonstrates that the stimulation of a natural microbial community to immobilize U through bioreduction is possible without the removal of nitrate.

  4. Extraction and coordination studies of a carbonyl-phosphine oxide scorpionate ligand with uranyl and lanthanide(III) nitrates: structural, spectroscopic and DFT characterization of the complexes.

    PubMed

    Matveeva, Anna G; Vologzhanina, Anna V; Goryunov, Evgenii I; Aysin, Rinat R; Pasechnik, Margarita P; Matveev, Sergey V; Godovikov, Ivan A; Safiulina, Alfiya M; Brel, Valery K

    2016-03-28

    Hybrid scorpionate ligand (OPPh2)2CHCH2C(O)Me (L) was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic methods and X-ray diffraction. The selected coordination chemistry of L with UO2(NO3)2 and Ln(NO3)3 (Ln = La, Nd, Lu) has been evaluated. The isolated mono- and binuclear complexes, namely, [UO2(NO3)2L] (1), [{UO2(NO3)L}2(μ2-O2)]·EtOH (2), [La(NO3)3L2]·2.33MeCN (3), [Nd(NO3)3L2]·3MeCN (4), [Nd(NO3)2L2]+·(NO3)−·EtOH (5) and [Lu(NO3)3L2] (6) have been characterized by IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Single-crystal X-ray structures have been determined for complexes 1-5. Intramolecular intraligand π-stacking interactions between two phenyl fragments of the coordinated ligand(s) were observed in all complexes 1-5. The π-stacking interaction energy was estimated from Bader's AIM theory calculations performed at the DFT level. Solution properties have been examined using IR and multinuclear ((1)H, (13)C, and (31)P) NMR spectroscopy in CD3CN and CDCl3. Coordination modes of L vary with the coordination polyhedron of the metal and solvent nature showing many coordination modes: P(O),P(O), P(O),P(O),C(O), P(O),C(O), and P(O). Preliminary extraction studies of U(VI) and Ln(III) (Ln = La, Nd, Ho, Yb) from 3.75 M HNO3 into CHCl3 show that scorpionate L extracts f-block elements (especially uranium) better than its unmodified prototype (OPPh2)2CH2. PMID:26888745

  5. Measurement and Chemistry of Atmospheric Organic Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhr, Martin Patrick

    1990-01-01

    Organic nitrates are important reservoir species for NO_{rm x} (NO + NO_2) in the atmosphere. Typically formed in and around urban areas, the organic nitrates sequester NO_{rm x} and allow it to be transported to rural and remote regions, wherein it may be released into the atmosphere and participate in catalytic cycles leading to the formation of ozone. The research described in this work focusses on two problems related to our understanding of the atmospheric chemistry of the organic nitrates, (1) measuring the organic nitrates contributions to total reactive nitrogen (NO_ {rm y}) in the atmosphere, and (2) determining the conditions under which the organic nitrates release NO_{rm x} into the atmosphere and thereby participate in ozone formation. The work performed included development of measurement methods for the organic nitrates, ambient measurements of several organic nitrates made under a variety of conditions, and data interpretation using a combination of bivariate and multivariate analysis. The instrument development that was performed centered around incorporation of capillary column technology in a gas chromatographic method. Use of a capillary column resulted in improved chromatographic resolution and instrument sensitivity. In addition to the work on the chromatographic separation of the organic nitrates, some work was done regarding the sensitivity of the electron capture detector (ECD) as a function of electrical mode of operation. Ambient measurements of several of the organic nitrates were made during three field experiments in conjunction with NOAA's Aeronomy laboratory, including PAN rm CH_3C(O)O_2NO_2), PPN rm (C_2H_5C(O)O_2NO _2), and the C_1-C _5 alkyl nitrates (RONO_2 ). The measurements were made in conjunction with a wide variety of other chemical and physical parameters. Data interpretation was performed using bivariate analysis in order to understand the diurnal variation of the concentrations of the organic nitrates and their

  6. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Cui; Qu Ruijuan; Liang Jinyan; Yang Xi

    2010-11-24

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  7. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Cui; Qu, Ruijuan; Liang, Jinyan; Yang, Xi

    2010-11-01

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  8. Periodic Density Functional Theory Investigation of the Uranyl Ion Sorption on Three Mineral Surfaces: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Roques, Jérôme; Veilly, Edouard; Simoni, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Canister integrity and radionuclides retention is of prime importance for assessing the long term safety of nuclear waste stored in engineered geologic depositories. A comparative investigation of the interaction of uranyl ion with three different mineral surfaces has thus been undertaken in order to point out the influence of surface composition on the adsorption mechanism(s). Periodic DFT calculations using plane waves basis sets with the GGA formalism were performed on the TiO2(110), Al(OH)3(001) and Ni(111) surfaces. This study has clearly shown that three parameters play an important role in the uranyl adsorption mechanism: the solvent (H2O) distribution at the interface, the nature of the adsorption site and finally, the surface atoms’ protonation state. PMID:19582222

  9. Facile reduction of a uranyl(VI) β-ketoiminate complex to U(IV) upon oxo silylation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jessie L; Mokhtarzadeh, Charles C; Lever, Jeremie M; Wu, Guang; Hayton, Trevor W

    2011-06-01

    Reaction of the uranyl β-ketoiminate complex UO(2)((tBu)acnac)(2) (1) ((tBu)acnac = (t)BuNC(Ph)CHC(Ph)O) with Me(3)SiI, in the presence of Ph(3)P, results in the reductive silylation of the uranyl moiety and formation of the U(V) bis-silyloxide complex [Ph(3)PI][U(OSiMe(3))(2)I(4)] (2). Subsequent reaction of 2 with Lewis bases, such as 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), and tetrahydrofuran (THF), results in a further reduction of the metal center and isolation of the U(IV) complexes U(OSiMe(3))(2)I(2)(bipy)(2) (3), U(OSiMe(3))(2)I(2)(phen)(2) (4), and [U(OSiMe(3))(2)I(THF)(4)][I(3)] (5), respectively. PMID:21545129

  10. Analysis of Novel Soluble Chromate and Uranyl Reductases and Generation of an Improved Enzyme by Directed Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Barak,Y.; Ackerley, D.; Dodge, C.; Banwari, L.; Alex, C.; Francis, A.; Matin, A.

    2006-01-01

    Most polluted sites contain mixed waste. This is especially true of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites which hold a complex mixture of heavy metals, radionuclides, and organic solvents. In such environments enzymes that can remediate multiple pollutants are advantageous. We report here evolution of an enzyme, ChrR6 (formerly referred to as Y6), which shows a markedly enhanced capacity for remediating two of the most serious and prevalent DOE contaminants, chromate and uranyl. ChrR6 is a soluble enzyme and reduces chromate and uranyl intracellularly. Thus, the reduced product is at least partially sequestered and nucleated, minimizing the chances of reoxidation. Only one amino acid change, Tyr128Asn, was responsible for the observed improvement. We show here that ChrR6 makes Pseudomonas putida and Escherichia coli more efficient agents for bioremediation if the cellular permeability barrier to the metals is decreased.

  11. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-12-07

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO–AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV{sup ′} transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C.

  12. Electrophilic and free radical nitration of benzene and toluene with various nitrating agents*

    PubMed Central

    Olah, George A.; Lin, Henry C.; Olah, Judith A.; Narang, Subhash C.

    1978-01-01

    Electrophilic nitration of toluene and benzene was studied under various conditions with several nitrating systems. It was found that high orthopara regioselectivity is prevalent in all reactions and is independent of the reactivity of the nitrating agent. The methyl group of toluene is predominantly ortho-para directing under all reaction conditions. Steric factors are considered to be important but not the sole reason for the variation in the ortho/para ratio. The results reinforce our earlier views that, in electrophilic aromatic nitrations with reactive nitrating agents, substrate and positional selectivities are determined in two separate steps. The first step involves a π-aromatic-NO2+ ion complex or encounter pair, whereas the subsequent step is of arenium ion nature (separate for the ortho, meta, and para positions). The former determines substrate selectivity, whereas the latter determines regioselectivity. Thermal free radical nitration of benzene and toluene with tetranitromethane in sharp contrast gave nearly statistical product distributions. PMID:16592503

  13. Impact of uranyl-calcium-carbonato complexes on uranium(VI) adsorption to synthetic and natural sediments.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Brandy D; Mayes, Melanie A; Fendorf, Scott

    2010-02-01

    Adsorption on soil and sediment solids may decrease aqueous uranium concentrations and limit its propensity for migration in natural and contaminated settings. Uranium adsorption will be controlled in large part by its aqueous speciation, with a particular dependence on the presence of dissolved calcium and carbonate. Here we quantify the impact of uranyl speciation on adsorption to both goethite and sediments from the Hanford Clastic Dike and Oak Ridge Melton Branch Ridgetop formations. Hanford sediments were preconditioned with sodium acetate and acetic acid to remove carbonate grains, and Ca and carbonate were reintroduced at defined levels to provide a range of aqueous uranyl species. U(VI) adsorption is directly linked to UO(2)(2+) speciation, with the extent of retention decreasing with formation of ternary uranyl-calcium-carbonato species. Adsorption isotherms under the conditions studied are linear, and K(d) values decrease from 48 to 17 L kg(-1) for goethite, from 64 to 29 L kg (-1) for Hanford sediments, and from 95 to 51 L kg(-1) for Melton Branch sediments as the Ca concentration increases from 0 to 1 mM at pH 7. Our observations reveal that, in carbonate-bearing waters, neutral to slightly acidic pH values ( approximately 5) and limited dissolved calcium are optimal for uranium adsorption. PMID:20058915

  14. Interaction of lanthanide cations and uranyl ion with the calcium/proton antiport system in Mycobacterium phlei.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, N; Kalra, V K

    1983-01-19

    Uranyl ions (UO2+(2)) and lanthanide cations (La3+, Nd3+, Sm3+, Eu3+, Tb3+ and Dy3+) at 100-200 microM concentration inhibited active transport of Ca2+, mediated by respiratory linked substrates as well as by ATP hydrolysis, without affecting respiration and membrane-bound ATPase activity, in inside-out membrane vesicles of Mycobacterium phlei. The extent of inhibition in the uptake of Ca2+, mediated by ATP hydrolysis, increased with increase in ionic radii of these cations. Lanthanide cations did not dissipate the formation of a proton gradient, as measured by determining the effect either on the uptake of [14C]methylamine or energy-linked quenching of the fluorescence of 9-aminoacridine. However, uranyl ion (UO2+(2+)) caused reversal of the energy-linked quenching of 9-aminoacridine. UO2+(2)) concentration yielding 50% of Vmax (S0.5) was approx. 15 microM. Kinetic studies revealed that inhibition in the uptake of Ca2+ was competitive with UO2+(2) while non-competitive with rare-earth metals. It is proposed that inhibition in the uptake of Ca2+ by uranyl ion occurs as a result of UO2+(2) transport into the interior of vesicles in exchange for protons, while lanthanide cations are not being transported but affect the binding of Ca2+ to the membrane, presumably to the Ca2+/H+ antiporter. PMID:6838872

  15. Influence of Microscopic Diffusive Process on Uranyl Precipitation and Dissolution in Subsurface Sediments at Hanford Site, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M.; McKinley, James P.; Wang, Zheming; Majors, Paul D.

    2004-03-29

    Uranium in DOE Hanford sediments was found to be distributed as uranyl silicate precipitates almost exclusively within interiors of sediment grains. The precipitates were minute, generally 1-3 {micro}m across in either radiating or parallel arrays in intraparticle microfractures of a few microns width and variable connectivity to particle surfaces. Grain-scale porosity, tortuosity and diffusivity of tracer (H2O) and U(VI) were measured and imaged using various spectroscopic techniques. Simulations using a microscopic reactive diffusion model suggested that diffusion-limited mass transport generated a favorable thermodynamic condition within the grain microfractures for precipitation and concentration of uranium from waste plumes. The rate and extent of uranyl precipitate dissolution were studied in various electrolytes with variable pH under ambient CO2 pressure. Uranium speciation and distribution before and after dissolution were monitored by spectroscopic and imaging techniques . Experimental, spectroscopic and modeling results collectively indicated that dissolution of uranyl precipitates was controlled by diffusion-limited dissolution kinetics.

  16. Assessing covalency in equatorial U-N bonds: density based measures of bonding in BTP and isoamethyrin complexes of uranyl.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Poppy; Kerridge, Andrew

    2016-06-22

    Calculations performed at the density functional level of theory have been used to investigate complexes of uranyl with the expanded porphyrin isoamethyrin and the bis-triazinyl-pyridine (BTP) ligands, the latter of which is well-known to be effective in the separation of trivalent lanthanides and actinides. Analysis has been performed using a range of density-based techniques, including the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM), the Electron Localisation Function (ELF) and the reduced density gradient (RDG). The effects of peripheral alkyl substituents on UO2-isoamethyrin, known to be vital for proper replication of the experimental geometry, are considered. Evidence for comparable amounts of covalent character has been found in the largely ionic U-N bonds of UO2-isoamethyrin and [UO2(BTP)2](2+) and examination of the variation in the electronic characteristics of the uranyl unit upon complexation in both of these cases reveal striking similarities in the nature of the U-N bonding and the effect of this bonding on the U-Oyl interaction, as well as evidence of donation into the U-N bonding region from the uranyl unit itself. PMID:27279271

  17. Oxidation of 2-propanol ligands during collision-induced dissociation of a gas-phase uranyl complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Chien, Winnie; Anbalagan, Victor; Gresham, Garold L.; Groenewold, Gary S.

    2004-10-01

    We demonstrate, by way of multi-stage tandem mass spectrometry and extensive deuterium labeling, that 2-propanol is converted to acetone, and 2-propoxide to acetaldehyde, when monopositive 2-propanol-coordinated uranyl-ligand cations are subjected to collision-induced dissociation in the gas-phase environment of an ion trap mass spectrometer. A species with formula [(UO2OCH(CH3)2)(HOCH(CH3)2)]+, derived from dissociation of the gas-phase precursor [(UO2NO3)(HOCH(CH3)2)3]+ eliminates two H atoms and CH3 in consecutive stages to generate a monopositive complex composed of the U(V) species UO2+ coordinated by acetone and acetaldehyde, i.e. [UO2+(OC(CH3)2)(OC(H)CH3)]. Dissociation of this latter ion resulted in elimination of the two coordinating carbonyl ligands in two consecutive dissociation stages to leave UO2+. Analogous reactions were not observed for uranyl complexes containing 1-propanol or 2-methyl-2-propanol, or for cationic complexes with divalent metals such as Ni2+, Co2+, Pb2+ and Ca2+. One explanation for these reactions is bond insertion by the metal center in the bis-ligated uranyl complex, which would be expected to have an LUMO consisting of unoccupied 6d-orbitals that would confer transition metal-like behavior on the complex.

  18. Does thiosemicarbazide lead nitrate crystal exist?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Royle; Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R.

    2016-06-01

    The authors of a recent paper (Optik 125 (2014) 2022-2025) claim to have grown a so called thiosemicarbazide lead nitrate (TSLN) crystal by the slow evaporation method. In this comment we prove that TSLN is actually thiosemicarbazide.

  19. Qualitative Determination of Nitrate with Triphenylbenzylphosphonium Chloride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Donna A.; Cole, Jerry J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two procedures for the identification of nitrate, the standard test ("Brown Ring" test) and a new procedure using triphenylbenzylphosphonium chloride (TPBPC). Effectiveness of both procedures is compared, with the TPBPC test proving to be more sensitive and accurate. (JM)

  20. Hydrothermal synthesis, structure and thermal stability of diamine templated layered uranyl-vanadates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivenet, Murielle; Vigier, Nicolas; Roussel, Pascal; Abraham, Francis

    2007-02-01

    Six new layered uranyl vanadates (NH 4) 2[(UO 2) 2V 2O 8] ( 1), (H 2EN)[(UO 2) 2V 2O 8] ( 2), (H 2DAP)[(UO 2) 2V 2O 8] ( 3), (H 2PIP)[(UO 2) 2(VO 4) 2].0,8H 2O ( 4), (H 2DMPIP)[(UO 2) 2V 2O 8] ( 5), (H 2DABCO)[(UO 2) 2(VO 4) 2] ( 6) were prepared from mild-hydrothermal reactions using 1,2-ethylenediamine (EN); 1,3-diaminopropane (DAP); piperazine (PIP); 1-methylpiperazine (MPIP); 1,4-diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane (DABCO). The structures of 1, 4, 5 and 6 were solved using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data while the structural models of 2 and 3 were established from powder X-ray diffraction data. In compounds 1, 2, 3 and 5, the uranyl-vanadate layers are built from dimers of edge-shared UO 7 pentagonal bipyramids and dimers of edge-shared VO 5 square pyramids further connected through edge-sharing. In 1 and 3, the layers are identical to that occurring in the carnotite group of uranyl-vanadates. In 2 and 5, the V 2O 8 dimers differ in orientation leading to a new type of layer. The layers of compound 4 and 6 are built from chains of edge-shared UO 7 pentagonal bipyramids connected by VO 4 tetrahedra and are of uranophane-type anion topology. For the six compounds, the ammonium or organoammonium cation resides in the space between the inorganic layers. Crystallographic data: 1 monoclinic, space group P2 1/ c with a=6.894(2), b=8.384(3), c=10.473(4) Å and β=106.066(5)°, 2 monoclinic, space group P2 1/ a with a=13.9816(6), b=8.6165(3), c=10.4237(3) Å and γ=93.125(3)°, 3 orthorhombic, space group Pmcn with a=14.7363(8), b=8.6379(4) and c=10.4385(4) Å, 4 monoclinic, space group C2/ m with a=15.619(2), b=7.1802(8), c=6.9157(8) Å and β=101.500(2)°, 5 monoclinic, space group P2 1/ b with a=9.315(2), b=8.617(2), c=10.5246(2) Å and γ=114.776(2)°, 6 monoclinic, space group C2/ m with a=17.440(2), b=7.1904(9), c=6.8990(8) Å and β=98.196(2)°.

  1. The UK Nitrate Time Bomb (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, R.; Wang, L.; Stuart, M.; Bloomfield, J.; Gooddy, D.; Lewis, M.; McKenzie, A.

    2013-12-01

    The developed world has benefitted enormously from the intensification of agriculture and the increased availability and use of synthetic fertilizers during the last century. However there has also been unintended adverse impact on the natural environment (water and ecosystems) with nitrate the most significant cause of water pollution and ecosystem damage . Many countries have introduced controls on nitrate, e.g. the European Union's Water Framework and Nitrate Directives, but despite this are continuing to see a serious decline in water quality. The purpose of our research is to investigate and quantify the importance of the unsaturated (vadose) zone pathway and groundwater in contributing to the decline. Understanding nutrient behaviour in the sub-surface environment and, in particular, the time lag between action and improvement is critical to effective management and remediation of nutrient pollution. A readily-transferable process-based model has been used to predict temporal loading of nitrate at the water table across the UK. A time-varying nitrate input function has been developed based on nitrate usage since 1925. Depth to the water table has been calculated from groundwater levels based on regional-scale observations in-filled by interpolated river base levels and vertical unsaturated zone velocities estimated from hydrogeological properties and mapping. The model has been validated using the results of more than 300 unsaturated zone nitrate profiles. Results show that for about 60% of the Chalk - the principal aquifer in the UK - peak nitrate input has yet to reach the water table and concentrations will continue to rise over the next 60 years. The implications are hugely significant especially where environmental objectives must be achieved in much shorter timescales. Current environmental and regulatory management strategies rarely take lag times into account and as a result will be poorly informed, leading to inappropriate controls and conflicts

  2. Microbial uranium immobilization independent of nitrate reduction.

    PubMed

    Madden, Andrew S; Smith, April C; Balkwill, David L; Fagan, Lisa A; Phelps, Tommy J

    2007-09-01

    At many uranium processing and handling facilities, including sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex, high levels of nitrate are present as co-contamination with uranium in groundwater. The daunting prospect of complete nitrate removal prior to the reduction of uranium provides a strong incentive to explore bioremediation strategies that allow for uranium bioreduction and stabilization in the presence of nitrate. Typical in situ strategies involving the stimulation of metal-reducing bacteria are hindered by low-pH environments and require that the persistent nitrate must first and continuously be removed or transformed prior to uranium being a preferred electron acceptor. This work investigated the possibility of stimulating nitrate-indifferent, pH-tolerant microorganisms to achieve bioreduction of U(VI) despite nitrate persistence. Enrichments from U-contaminated sediments demonstrated nearly complete reduction of uranium with very little loss of nitrate from pH 5.7-6.2 using methanol or glycerol as a carbon source. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified from uranium-reducing enrichments (pH 5.7-6.2) and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses classified the clone sequences into four distinct clusters. Data from sequencing and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles indicated that the majority of the microorganisms stimulated by these enrichment conditions consisted of low G+C Gram-positive bacteria most closely related to Clostridium and Clostridium-like organisms. This research demonstrates that the stimulation of a natural microbial community to immobilize U through bioreduction is possible without the removal of nitrate. PMID:17686028

  3. Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, David E

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

  4. Nitrate distribution in Mojave Desert soils

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, R.B.; Romney, E.M.; Wallace, A.

    1982-07-01

    Extensive sampling shows high variability in nitrate concentration within profiles of Mojave Desert soils. This high variability greatly complicates studies of desert soil N and its ecological role. Patterns in nitrate distribution suggest effects of litter decomposition under shrubs, surface leaching in bare areas, and plant uptake in the root zone. Two mechanisms proposed to explain high concentrations found at seemingly random depths are concentration at drying fronts and distribution along water potential gradients.

  5. Preformed Nitrate in the Glacial North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homola, K.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S.; Estes, E. R.; Insua, T. L.; McKinley, C. C.; Murray, R. W.; Pockalny, R. A.; Robinson, R. S.; Sauvage, J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 abundances are highly correlated with global temperature variations over the past 800,000 years. Consequently, understanding the feedbacks between climate and CO2 is important for predictions of future climate. Leading hypotheses to explain this feedback invoke changes in ocean biology, circulation, chemistry, and/or gas exchange rates to trap CO2 in the deep ocean, thereby reducing the greenhouse effect of CO2 in the atmosphere. To test these hypotheses, we use sediment pore water profiles of dissolved nitrate and oxygen to reconstruct paleo-preformed nitrate concentrations at two deep-water sites in the western North Atlantic (23°N 57°W, 5557 m water depth; 30°N 58°W, 5367 m water depth). Preformed nitrate increases down-core to 22.7 μM (25.6 m core depth) at the northern site, and to 28.5 μM (27.8 m core depth) at the southern site. The large preformed nitrate gradient between these sites reveals a paleo-boundary between a southern water source high in preformed nitrate and a northern water source with lower concentrations, similar to today's ocean. However, the boundary between these water masses occurs north of where their modern counterparts meet, indicating that Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) extended farther north during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In addition, the southern source had a higher preformed nitrate concentration than today's AABW (25 μM), contradicting hypotheses that nutrient utilization was more efficient in the Southern Ocean deep-water formation regions during the LGM. Comparison to our previous Pacific data reveals that the average preformed nitrate concentration of the deep ocean was slightly higher during the LGM than today. This result implies that the CO2-climate feedback was not principally due to more efficient nitrate utilization.

  6. Is beetroot juice more effective than sodium nitrate? The effects of equimolar nitrate dosages of nitrate-rich beetroot juice and sodium nitrate on oxygen consumption during exercise.

    PubMed

    Flueck, Joelle Leonie; Bogdanova, Anna; Mettler, Samuel; Perret, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Dietary nitrate has been reported to lower oxygen consumption in moderate- and severe-intensity exercise. To date, it is unproven that sodium nitrate (NaNO3(-); NIT) and nitrate-rich beetroot juice (BR) have the same effects on oxygen consumption, blood pressure, and plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations or not. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different dosages of NIT and BR on oxygen consumption in male athletes. Twelve healthy, well-trained men (median [minimum; maximum]; peak oxygen consumption: 59.4 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1) [40.5; 67.0]) performed 7 trials on different days, ingesting different nitrate dosages and placebo (PLC). Dosages were 3, 6, and 12 mmol nitrate as concentrated BR or NIT dissolved in plain water. Plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations were measured before, 3 h after ingestion, and postexercise. Participants cycled for 5 min at moderate intensity and further 8 min at severe intensity. End-exercise oxygen consumption at moderate intensity was not significantly different between the 7 trials (p = 0.08). At severe-intensity exercise, end-exercise oxygen consumption was ~4% lower in the 6-mmol BR trial compared with the 6-mmol NIT (p = 0.003) trial as well as compared with PLC (p = 0.010). Plasma nitrite and nitrate concentrations were significantly increased after the ingestion of BR and NIT with the highest concentrations in the 12-mmol trials. Plasma nitrite concentration between NIT and BR did not significantly differ in the 6-mmol (p = 0.27) and in the 12-mmol (p = 0.75) trials. In conclusion, BR might reduce oxygen consumption to a greater extent compared with NIT. PMID:26988767

  7. Nitrate inhibition of legume nodule growth and activity. II. Short term studies with high nitrate supply

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.

    1985-02-01

    Soybean plants (Glycine max (L.) Merr) were grown in sand culture with 2 millimolar nitrate for 37 days and then supplied with 15 millimolar nitrate for 7 days. Control plants received 2 millimolar nitrate and 13 millimolar chloride and, after the 7-day treatment period, all plants were supplied with nil nitrate. The temporary treatment with high nitrate inhibited nitrogenase (acetylene reduction) activity by 80% whether or not Rhizobium japonicum bacteroids had nitrate reductase (NR) activity. The pattern of nitrite accumulation in nodules formed by NR/sup +/ rhizobia was inversely related to the decrease and recovery of nitrogenase activity. However, nitrite concentration in nodules formed by NR/sup -/ rhizobia appeared to be too low to explain the inhibition of nitrogenase. Nodules on plants treated with 15 millimolar nitrate contained higher concentrations of amino N and, especially, ureide N than control nodules and, after withdrawal of nitrate, reduced N content of treated and control nodules returned to similar levels. The accumulation of N/sub 2/ fixation products in nodules in response to high nitrate treatment was observed with three R. japonicum strains, two NR/sup +/ and one NR/sup -/.

  8. Groundwater nitrate pollution in intensively farmed regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-12-01

    Intensified agricultural practices that have developed during the past century have helped improve food security for many people but have also added to nitrate pollution in water supply. Balancing the water needs for agriculture with the need for clean groundwater for drinking requires understanding factors such as the routes by which nitrate enters the water supply and how long nitrate remains in the water. The Thames River catchment provides a good study example because the water quality in the river, which supplies drinking water to millions of people, has been monitored for the past 140 years, and the region has undergone significant agricultural development over the past century. Howden et al. studied nitrate transport from agricultural land to water in the Thames basin using a simple model that considers an estimate of the amount of nitrate that could leach the groundwater based on land use practices along with an algorithm that determines the route nitrate would take to reach surface water or groundwater from agricultural areas.

  9. Characterization of Atmospheric Organic Nitrates in Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, E. A.; Alexander, M. L.; Perraud, V.; Yu, Y.; Ezell, M.; Johnson, S. N.; Zellenyuk, A.; Imre, D.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere significantly affect climate, human health and visibility. Knowledge of aerosol composition is necessary to understand and then predict the specific impacts of aerosols in the atmosphere. It is known that organic nitrates are present in particles, but there is limited knowledge of the individual compounds and quantity. This is in part due to the lack of a wide variety of proven analytical techniques for particulate organic nitrates. In this study, several known organic nitrates, as well as those present in complex mixtures formed from oxidation of "Ñ-pinene, were studied using a variety of techniques. These include Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of samples collected by impaction on ZnSe discs. Samples were also collected on quartz fiber filters and the extracts analyzed by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI- MS), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS), HPLC-UV, LC-MS and GC-MS. In addition, real-time analysis was provided by SPLAT-II and aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS). FTIR analysis of particles collected on ZnSe discs provides information on the ratio of organic nitrate to total organic content, while the analysis of filter extracts allows identification of specific organic nitrates. These are compared to the particle mass spectrometry data and the implications for detecting and measuring particulate organic nitrate in air is discussed.

  10. Suppression of erythropoiesis by dietary nitrate.

    PubMed

    Ashmore, Tom; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Evans, Colin E; Huang, Yun; Branco-Price, Cristina; Griffin, Julian L; Johnson, Randall S; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew J

    2015-03-01

    In mammals, hypoxia-triggered erythropoietin release increases red blood cell mass to meet tissue oxygen demands. Using male Wistar rats, we unmask a previously unrecognized regulatory pathway of erythropoiesis involving suppressor control by the NO metabolite and ubiquitous dietary component nitrate. We find that circulating hemoglobin levels are modulated by nitrate at concentrations achievable by dietary intervention under normoxic and hypoxic conditions; a moderate dose of nitrate administered via the drinking water (7 mg NaNO3/kg body weight/d) lowered hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit after 6 d compared with nonsupplemented/NaCl-supplemented controls. The underlying mechanism is suppression of hepatic erythropoietin expression associated with the downregulation of tissue hypoxia markers, suggesting increased pO2. At higher nitrate doses, however, a partial reversal of this effect occurred; this was accompanied by increased renal erythropoietin expression and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors, likely brought about by the relative anemia. Thus, hepatic and renal hypoxia-sensing pathways act in concert to modulate hemoglobin in response to nitrate, converging at an optimal minimal hemoglobin concentration appropriate to the environmental/physiologic situation. Suppression of hepatic erythropoietin expression by nitrate may thus act to decrease blood viscosity while matching oxygen supply to demand, whereas renal oxygen sensing could act as a brake, averting a potentially detrimental fall in hematocrit. PMID:25422368

  11. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. {yields} Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. {yields} Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  12. Process for decomposing nitrates in aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a process for decomposing ammonium nitrate and/or selected metal nitrates in an aqueous solution at an elevated temperature and pressure. Where the compound to be decomposed is a metal nitrate (e.g., a nuclear-fuel metal nitrate), a hydroxylated organic reducing agent therefor is provided in the solution. In accordance with the invention, an effective proportion of both nitromethane and nitric acid is incorporated in the solution to accelerate decomposition of the ammonium nitrate and/or selected metal nitrate. As a result, decomposition can be effected at significantly lower temperatures and pressures, permitting the use of system components composed of off-the-shelf materials, such as stainless steel, rather than more costly materials of construction. Preferably, the process is conducted on a continuous basis. Fluid can be automatically vented from the reaction zone as required to maintain the operating temperature at a moderate value--e.g., at a value in the range of from about 130.degree.-200.degree. C.

  13. Influence of uranyl speciation and iron oxides on uranium biogeochemical redox reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, B.D.; Amos, R.T.; Nico, P.S.; Fendorf, S.

    2010-03-15

    Uranium is a pollutant of concern to both human and ecosystem health. Uranium's redox state often dictates its partitioning between the aqueous- and solid-phases, and thus controls its dissolved concentration and, coupled with groundwater flow, its migration within the environment. In anaerobic environments, the more oxidized and mobile form of uranium (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and associated species) may be reduced, directly or indirectly, by microorganisms to U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO{sub 2}. However, various factors within soils and sediments may limit biological reduction of U(VI), inclusive of alterations in U(VI) speciation and competitive electron acceptors. Here we elucidate the impact of U(VI) speciation on the extent and rate of reduction with specific emphasis on speciation changes induced by dissolved Ca, and we examine the impact of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite and hematite) varying in free energies of formation on U reduction. The amount of uranium removed from solution during 100 h of incubation with S. putrefaciens was 77% with no Ca or ferrihydrite present but only 24% (with ferrihydrite) and 14% (no ferrihydrite) were removed for systems with 0.8 mM Ca. Imparting an important criterion on uranium reduction, goethite and hematite decrease the dissolved concentration of calcium through adsorption and thus tend to diminish the effect of calcium on uranium reduction. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) can proceed through different enzyme pathways, even within a single organism, thus providing a potential second means by which Fe(III) bearing minerals may impact U(VI) reduction. We quantify rate coefficients for simultaneous dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) in systems varying in Ca concentration (0 to 0.8 mM), and using a mathematical construct implemented with the reactive transport code MIN3P, we reveal the predominant influence of uranyl speciation, specifically the formation of uranyl

  14. Organic Nitrate Therapy, Nitrate Tolerance, and Nitrate-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Emphasis on Redox Biology and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin (GTN), isosorbide-5-mononitrate and isosorbide dinitrate, and pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), when given acutely, have potent vasodilator effects improving symptoms in patients with acute and chronic congestive heart failure, stable coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, or arterial hypertension. The mechanisms underlying vasodilation include the release of •NO or a related compound in response to intracellular bioactivation (for GTN, the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase [ALDH-2]) and activation of the enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase. Increasing cyclic guanosine-3′,-5′-monophosphate (cGMP) levels lead to an activation of the cGMP-dependent kinase I, thereby causing the relaxation of the vascular smooth muscle by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations. The hemodynamic and anti-ischemic effects of organic nitrates are rapidly lost upon long-term (low-dose) administration due to the rapid development of tolerance and endothelial dysfunction, which is in most cases linked to increased intracellular oxidative stress. Enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species under nitrate therapy include mitochondria, NADPH oxidases, and an uncoupled •NO synthase. Acute high-dose challenges with organic nitrates cause a similar loss of potency (tachyphylaxis), but with distinct pathomechanism. The differences among organic nitrates are highlighted regarding their potency to induce oxidative stress and subsequent tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. We also address pleiotropic effects of organic nitrates, for example, their capacity to stimulate antioxidant pathways like those demonstrated for PETN, all of which may prevent adverse effects in response to long-term therapy. Based on these considerations, we will discuss and present some preclinical data on how the nitrate of the future should be designed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 899–942. PMID:26261901

  15. Historical Tracking of Nitrate in Contrasting Vineyard Using Water Isotopes and Nitrate Depth Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprenger, M.; Erhardt, M.; Riedel, M.; Weiler, M.

    2015-12-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (EWFD) aims to achieve a good chemical status for the groundwater bodies in Europe by the year 2015. Despite the effort to reduce the nitrate pollution from agriculture within the last two decades, there are still many groundwater aquifers that exceed nitrate concentrations above the EWFD threshold of 50 mg/l. Viticulture is seen as a major contributor of nitrate leaching and sowing of a green cover was shown to have a positive effect on lowering the nitrate loads in the upper 90 cm of the soil. However, the consequences for nitrate leaching into the subsoil were not yet tested. We analyzed the nitrate concentrations and pore water stable isotope composition to a depth of 380 cm in soil profiles under an old vineyard and a young vineyard with either soil tillage or permanent green cover in between the grapevines. The pore water stable isotopes were used to calibrate a soil physical model, which was then used to infer the age of the soil water at different depths. This way, we could relate elevated nitrate concentrations below an old vineyard to tillage processes that took place during the winter two years before the sampling. We further showed that the elevated nitrate concentration in the subsoil of a young vineyard can be related to the soil tillage prior to the planting of the new vineyard. If the soil is kept bare due to tillage, a nitrate concentration of 200 kg NO3--N/ha is found in 290 to 380 cm depth 2.5 years after the installation of the vineyard. The amount of nitrate leaching is considerably reduced due to a seeded green cover between the grapevines that takes up a high share of the mobilized nitrate reducing a potential contamination of the groundwater.

  16. In vitro induction and proteomics characterisation of a uranyl-protein interaction network in bovine serum.

    PubMed

    Szyrwiel, Łukasz; Liauchuk, Viktoryia; Chavatte, Laurent; Lobinski, Ryszard

    2015-12-01

    Uranyl ions (UO2(2+)) were shown to interact with a number of foetal serum proteins, leading to the formation of a complex that could be isolated by ultracentrifugation. The molecular weight of the complex was estimated based on size-exclusion chromatography as 650 000 Da. Online ICP AES detection indicated that UO2(2+) in the complex co-eluted with minor amounts of calcium and phosphorous, but not with magnesium. A 1D gel electrophoresis of the U-complex produced more than 10 bands of similar intensity compared with only 2-3 intense bands corresponding to the main serum proteins in the control serum, indicative of the specific interaction of UO2(2+) with minor proteins. A proteomics approach allowed for the identification of 74 proteins in the complex. Analysis of the protein-protein interaction network in the UO2(2+) complex identified 32 proteins responsible for protein-protein complex formation and 34 with demonstrated ion-binding function, suggesting that UO2(2+) stimulates the formation of protein functional networks rather than using a particular molecule as its target. PMID:26506398

  17. Free energies and mechanisms of water exchange around Uranyl from first principles molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Bylaska, Eric J.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2012-02-01

    From density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio (Car-Parrinello) metadynamics, we compute the activation energies and mechanisms of water exchange between the first and second hydration shells of aqueous Uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) using the primary hydration number of U as the reaction coordinate. The free energy and activation barrier of the water dissociation reaction [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) {yields} [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2})4]{sup 2+}(aq) + H{sub 2}O are 0.7 kcal and 4.7 kcal/mol respectively. The free energy is in good agreement with previous theoretical (-2.7 to +1.2 kcal/mol) and experimental (0.5 to 2.2 kcal/mol) data. The associative reaction [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) + H{sub 2}O {yields} [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2})6]{sup 2+}(aq) is short-lived with a free energy and activation barrier of +7.9 kcal/mol and +8.9 kca/mol respectively; it is therefore classified as associative-interchange. On the basis of the free energy differences and activation barriers, we predict that the dominant exchange mechanism between [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) and bulk water is dissociative.

  18. Sorption of strontium on uranyl peroxide: implications for a high-level nuclear waste repository.

    PubMed

    Sureda, Rosa; Martínez-Lladó, Xavier; Rovira, Miquel; de Pablo, Joan; Casas, Ignasi; Giménez, Javier

    2010-09-15

    Strontium-90 is considered the most important radioactive isotope in the environment and one of the most frequently occurring radionuclides in groundwaters at nuclear facilities. The uranyl peroxide studtite (UO2O2 . 4H2O) has been observed to be formed in spent nuclear fuel leaching experiments and seems to have a relatively high sorption capacity for some radionuclides. In this work, the sorption of strontium onto studtite is studied as a function of time, strontium concentration in solution and pH. The main results obtained are (a) sorption is relatively fast although slower than for cesium; (b) strontium seems to be sorbed via a monolayer coverage of the studtite surface, (c) sorption has a strong dependence on ionic strength, is negligible at acidic pH, and increases at neutral to alkaline pH (almost 100% of the strontium in solution is sorbed above pH 10). These results point to uranium secondary solid phase formation on the spent nuclear fuel as an important mechanism for strontium retention in a high-level nuclear waste repository (HLNW). PMID:20638966

  19. Glomerular alterations in uranyl acetate-induced acute renal failure in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, S.; Nagase, M.; Honda, N.; Hishida, A.

    1984-12-01

    The study was performed to elucidate the progression and regression of superficial and inner glomerular alterations in uranyl acetate-induced renal failure in rabbits. Fifteen hours after the drug injection, creatinine clearance (CCr) decreased to 55% of controls with slightly elevated plasma creatinine concentration (initiation stage). After 5 days, urine flow and CCr decreased to approximately zero, with severe azotemia (maintenance stage). Scanning electron microscopic observations in these stages revealed a flattening and spreading of podocyte cell bodies associated with loss of epithelial foot processes, and reduction in the density of endothelial fenestrae. These changes were more advanced in the maintenance stage. Glomerular and fenestral diameters did not significantly change in the initiation stage but increased in the maintenance stage. There was no significant difference in these morphologic alterations, however, between the superficial and inner glomeruli. Glomerular alterations reverted to normal within 14 days, with good recovery of glomerular function. The findings show no significant difference in the progression or regression of the glomerular changes between the superficial and deep cortex. These morphologic changes may play a role in the reduction of CCr observed in this model.

  20. Uranyl (VI) and neptunyl (V) incorporation in carbonate and sulfate minerals: Insight from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Sarah M.; Becker, Udo

    2015-07-01

    The incorporation of radionuclides into low-temperature mineral hosts may strongly influence the concentration and migration of radioactive contaminants in the subsurface. One difficulty in evaluating the thermodynamics of incorporation is that experiments are often performed at high supersaturations and typically do not reach equilibrium. An alternative way to obtain the equilibrium thermodynamics is the quantum-mechanical analysis of the mineral host and the incorporated species before and after incorporation. In this contribution, density functional theory is used to calculate the energetics, resulting structures, and electronic configuration of uranyl (UO22+) and neptunyl (NpO2+) incorporation into sulfate and carbonate minerals. In each host mineral, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O), anhydrite (CaSO4), anglesite (PbSO4), celestine (SrSO4), barite (BaSO4), calcite (CaCO3), aragonite (CaCO3), cerussite (PbCO3), strontianite (SrCO3), and witherite (BaCO3), a divalent cation is replaced with either UO22+ or NpO2+ (in the case of neptunyl, charge balance is maintained with an additional hydrogen ion). The source of the actinyl ion and the sink for the host cation are modeled as both solid and aqueous phases, the latter of which requires an expansion of previous descriptions of incorporation. By combining periodic and cluster computational methods, this newly-developed approach enables the quantum-mechanical simulation of reactions between charged, aqueous molecular species and solid mineral phases.