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Sample records for acid-derived lipid mediators

  1. Docosapentaenoic acid derived metabolites and mediators - The new world of lipid mediator medicine in a nutshell.

    PubMed

    Weylandt, Karsten-H

    2016-08-15

    Recent years have seen the description and elucidation of a new class of anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid mediators. The arachidonic acid (AA)-derived compounds in this class are called lipoxins and have been described in great detail since their discovery thirty years ago. The new players are mediators derived from fish oil omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), called resolvins, protectins and maresins. Taken together, these mediators are also called specialized pro-resolution mediators (SPMs). As compared to the AA/EPA/DHA-derived compounds, research regarding mediators formed from the n-3 and n-6 docosapentaenoic acids (DPAn-3 and DPAn-6) is sparse. However, mono- di- and trihydroxy derivates of the DPAs have anti-inflammatory properties as well, even though mechanisms of their anti-inflammatory action have not been fully elucidated. This review aims to summarize current knowledge regarding the DPA-derived SPMs and their actions. PMID:26546723

  2. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid-Derived Lipid Mediators and T Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaou, Anna; Mauro, Claudio; Urquhart, Paula; Marelli-Berg, Federica

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are involved in T cell biology both as nutrients important for energy production as well as signaling molecules. In particular, polyunsaturated fatty acids are known to exhibit a range of immunomodulatory properties that progress through T cell mediated events, although the molecular mechanisms of these actions have not yet been fully elucidated. Some of these immune activities are linked to polyunsaturated fatty acid-induced alteration of the composition of cellular membranes and the consequent changes in signaling pathways linked to membrane raft-associated proteins. However, significant aspects of the polyunsaturated fatty acid bioactivities are mediated through their transformation to specific lipid mediators, products of cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, or cytochrome P450 enzymatic reactions. Resulting bioactive metabolites including prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and endocannabinoids are produced by and/or act upon T leukocytes through cell surface receptors and have been shown to alter T cell activation and differentiation, proliferation, cytokine production, motility, and homing events. Detailed appreciation of the mode of action of these lipids presents opportunities for the design and development of therapeutic strategies aimed at regulating T cell function. PMID:24611066

  3. n-3 fatty acid-derived lipid mediators in the brain: new weapons against oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Farooqui, A A

    2012-01-01

    Neuroprotectins, resolvins, and maresins are subfamilies of endogenous oxygenated metabolites derived from n-3 or ω-3 fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids). These metabolites are associated with signal transduction processes involved in downregulation of oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and apoptosis. Eicosapentaenoic acid-derived E-series resolvins (RvE₁ and RvE₂) and docosahexaenoic acid-derived D-series resolvins (RvD₁ and RvD₂) and neuroprotectins have potent anti-inflammatory and proresolution, and antioxidant properties. They not only retard excessive inflammatory process, but also promote resolution by enhancing clearance of apoptotic cells and debris from inflamed brain tissue and vasculature leading to tissue homeostasis. These actions may underlie the beneficial effects of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in normal human health, neurotraumatic and neurodegenerative diseases. Aspirin initiates resolution not only by exerting antithrombotic actions, but also triggering biosynthesis of specific and stereoselective epimers of resolvins, protectins, and maresins. In addition during the onset of resolution, these lipid mediators also display potent protective roles in neural systems, liver, lungs, and eyes. Potent anti-inflammatory actions of resolvins, and protectins in models of chronic human diseases indicate that down-regulation in resolution pathways may contribute to the decrease in the intensity of many chronic neurodegenerative and visceral diseases. PMID:22204329

  4. Metabonomics Reveals Drastic Changes in Anti-Inflammatory/Pro-Resolving Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids-Derived Lipid Mediators in Leprosy Disease

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Julio J.; Antunes, Luis Caetano M.; de Macedo, Cristiana S.; Mattos, Katherine A.; Han, Jun; Pan, Jingxi; Candéa, André L. P.; Henriques, Maria das Graças M. O.; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Borchers, Christoph H.; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Bozza, Patrícia T.; Finlay, B. Brett; Pessolani, Maria Cristina V.

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts over the last decades, our understanding of leprosy pathogenesis remains limited. The complex interplay between pathogens and hosts has profound effects on host metabolism. To explore the metabolic perturbations associated with leprosy, we analyzed the serum metabolome of leprosy patients. Samples collected from lepromatous and tuberculoid patients before and immediately after the conclusion of multidrug therapy (MDT) were subjected to high-throughput metabolic profiling. Our results show marked metabolic alterations during leprosy that subside at the conclusion of MDT. Pathways showing the highest modulation were related to polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolism, with emphasis on anti-inflammatory, pro-resolving omega-3 fatty acids. These results were confirmed by eicosanoid measurements through enzyme-linked immunoassays. Corroborating the repertoire of metabolites altered in sera, metabonomic analysis of skin specimens revealed alterations in the levels of lipids derived from lipase activity, including PUFAs, suggesting a high lipid turnover in highly-infected lesions. Our data suggest that omega-6 and omega-3, PUFA-derived, pro-resolving lipid mediators contribute to reduced tissue damage irrespectively of pathogen burden during leprosy disease. Our results demonstrate the utility of a comprehensive metabonomic approach for identifying potential contributors to disease pathology that may facilitate the development of more targeted treatments for leprosy and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:23967366

  5. Substrate-specific effects of pirinixic acid derivatives on ABCB1-mediated drug transport

    PubMed Central

    Michaelis, Martin; Rothweiler, Florian; Wurglics, Mario; Aniceto, Natália; Dittrich, Michaela; Zettl, Heiko; Wiese, Michael; Wass, Mark; Ghafourian, Taravat; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2016-01-01

    Pirinixic acid derivatives, a new class of drug candidates for a range of diseases, interfere with targets including PPARα, PPARγ, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), and microsomal prostaglandin and E2 synthase-1 (mPGES1). Since 5-LO, mPGES1, PPARα, and PPARγ represent potential anti-cancer drug targets, we here investigated the effects of 39 pirinixic acid derivatives on prostate cancer (PC-3) and neuroblastoma (UKF-NB-3) cell viability and, subsequently, the effects of selected compounds on drug-resistant neuroblastoma cells. Few compounds affected cancer cell viability in low micromolar concentrations but there was no correlation between the anti-cancer effects and the effects on 5-LO, mPGES1, PPARα, or PPARγ. Most strikingly, pirinixic acid derivatives interfered with drug transport by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter ABCB1 in a drug-specific fashion. LP117, the compound that exerted the strongest effect on ABCB1, interfered in the investigated concentrations of up to 2μM with the ABCB1-mediated transport of vincristine, vinorelbine, actinomycin D, paclitaxel, and calcein-AM but not of doxorubicin, rhodamine 123, or JC-1. In silico docking studies identified differences in the interaction profiles of the investigated ABCB1 substrates with the known ABCB1 binding sites that may explain the substrate-specific effects of LP117. Thus, pirinixic acid derivatives may offer potential as drug-specific modulators of ABCB1-mediated drug transport. PMID:26887049

  6. Intercellular Lipid Mediators and GPCR Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Im, Dong-Soon

    2013-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are the largest superfamily of receptors responsible for signaling between cells and tissues, and because they play important physiological roles in homeostasis, they are major drug targets. New technologies have been developed for the identification of new ligands, new GPCR functions, and for drug discovery purposes. In particular, intercellular lipid mediators, such as, lysophosphatidic acid and sphingosine 1-phosphate have attracted much attention for drug discovery and this has resulted in the development of fingolimod (FTY-720) and AM095. The discovery of new intercellular lipid mediators and their GPCRs are discussed from the perspective of drug development. Lipid GPCRs for lysophospholipids, including lysophosphatidylserine, lysophosphatidylinositol, lysophosphatidylcholine, free fatty acids, fatty acid derivatives, and other lipid mediators are reviewed. PMID:24404331

  7. Hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives: a potential class of natural compounds for the management of lipid metabolism and obesity.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Ashraful; Subhan, Nusrat; Hossain, Hemayet; Hossain, Murad; Reza, Hasan Mahmud; Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Ullah, M Obayed

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives are important class of polyphenolic compounds originated from the Mavolanate-Shikimate biosynthesis pathways in plants. Several simple phenolic compounds such as cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, caffeic acid, chlorgenic acid, and rosmarinic acid belong to this class. These phenolic compounds possess potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. These compounds were also showed potential therapeutic benefit in experimental diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Recent evidences also suggest that they may serve as valuable molecule for the treatment of obesity related health complications. In adipose tissues, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives inhibit macrophage infiltration and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation in obese animals. Hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives also reduce the expression of the potent proinflammatory adipokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), and they increase the secretion of an anti-inflammatory agent adiponectin from adipocytes. Furthermore, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives also prevent adipocyte differentiation and lower lipid profile in experimental animals. Through these diverse mechanisms hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives reduce obesity and curtail associated adverse health complications.

  8. Arachidonic acid-derived signaling lipids and functions in impaired healing

    PubMed Central

    Dhall, Sandeep; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan Shanaka; Karim, Zubair A.; Castro, Anthony; Vemana, Hari Priya; Khasawneh, Fadi T.; Chalfant, Charles E.; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Very little is known about lipid function during wound healing, and much less during impaired healing. Such understanding will help identify what roles lipid signaling plays in the development of impaired/chronic wounds. We took a lipidomics approach to study the alterations in lipid profile in the LIGHT−/− mouse model of impaired healing which has characteristics that resemble those of impaired/chronic wounds in humans, including high levels of oxidative stress, excess inflammation, increased extracellular matrix degradation and blood vessels with fibrin cuffs. The latter suggests excess coagulation and potentially increased platelet aggregation. We show here that in these impaired wounds there is an imbalance in the arachidonic acid (AA) derived eicosonoids that mediate or modulate inflammatory reactions and platelet aggregation. In the LIGHT−/− impaired wounds there is a significant increase in enzymatically derived breakdown products of AA. We found that early after injury there was a significant increase in the eicosanoids 11-, 12-, and 15-hydroxyeicosa-tetranoic acid, and the proinflammatory leukotrienes (LTD4 and LTE) and prostaglandins (PGE2 and PGF2α). Some of these eicosanoids also promote platelet aggregation. This led us to examine the levels of other eicosanoids known to be involved in the latter process. We found that thromboxane (TXA2/B2), and prostacyclins 6kPGF1α are elevated shortly after wounding and in some cases during healing. To determine whether they have an impact in platelet aggregation and hemostasis, we tested LIGHT−/− mouse wounds for these two parameters and found that, indeed, platelet aggregation and hemostasis are enhanced in these mice when compared with the control C57BL/6 mice. Understanding lipid signaling in impaired wounds can potentially lead to development of new therapeutics or in using existing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents to help correct the course of healing. PMID:26135854

  9. Bioconversion of volatile fatty acids derived from waste activated sludge into lipids by Cryptococcus curvatus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Jia-Nan; Yuan, Ming; Shen, Zi-Heng; Peng, Kai-Ming; Lu, Li-Jun; Huang, Xiang-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Pure volatile fatty acid (VFA) solution derived from waste activated sludge (WAS) was used to produce microbial lipids as culture medium in this study, which aimed to realize the resource recovery of WAS and provide low-cost feedstock for biodiesel production simultaneously. Cryptococcus curvatus was selected among three oleaginous yeast to produce lipids with VFAs derived from WAS. In batch cultivation, lipid contents increased from 10.2% to 16.8% when carbon to nitrogen ratio increased from about 3.5 to 165 after removal of ammonia nitrogen by struvite precipitation. The lipid content further increased to 39.6% and the biomass increased from 1.56g/L to 4.53g/L after cultivation for five cycles using sequencing batch culture (SBC) strategy. The lipids produced from WAS-derived VFA solution contained nearly 50% of monounsaturated fatty acids, including palmitic acid, heptadecanoic acid, ginkgolic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid, which showed the adequacy of biodiesel production. PMID:27038264

  10. ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids-derived lipid metabolites on angiogenesis, inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weicang; Zhu, Julia; Lyu, Fei; Panigrahy, Dipak; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Hammock, Bruce; Zhang, Guodong

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological and pre-clinical studies support the anti-tumor effects of ω-3 PUFAs; however, the results from human trials are mixed, making it difficult to provide dietary guidelines or recommendations of ω-3 PUFAs for disease prevention or treatment. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which ω-3 PUFAs inhibit cancer could lead to better nutritional paradigms and human trials to clarify their health effects. The ω-3 PUFAs exert their biological activities mainly through the formation of bioactive lipid metabolites. Here we discuss the biology of cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and cytochrome P450 enzymes-derived ω-3-series lipid metabolites on angiogenesis, inflammation and cancer. PMID:25019221

  11. Lipid mediators in the neural cell nucleus: their metabolism, signaling, and association with neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Farooqui, Akhlaq A

    2009-08-01

    Lipid mediators are important endogenous regulators of neural cell proliferation, differentiation, oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. They originate from enzymic degradation of glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and cholesterol by phospholipases, sphingomyelinases, and cytochrome P450 hydroxylases, respectively. Arachidonic acid-derived lipid mediators are called eicosanoids. Eicosanoids have emerged as key regulators of cell proliferation, differentiation, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation. Another arachidonic acid-derived lipid mediator is lipoxin. Eicosanoids have proinflammatory effects, whereas lipoxins produce antiinflammatory effects. The crossponding lipid mediators of docosahexaenoic acid metabolism are named docosanoids. They include resolvins, protectins, and neuroprotectins. Docosanoids produce antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic effects in the brain tissue. Other glycerophospholipid-derived lipid mediators are platelet-activating factor, lysophosphatidic acid, and endocannabinoids. Degradation of sphingolipids also results in the generation of sphingolipid-derived lipid mediators. Sphingolipid-derived lipid mediators are ceramide, ceramide 1-phosphate, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate. They mediate cellular differentiation, cell growth, and apoptosis. Similarly, cholesterol-derived lipid mediators hydroxycholesterol and oxycholesterol produce apoptosis. Most of these mediators originate from the plasma membrane. The nucleus has its own set of enzymes and lipid mediators that originate from the nuclear envelope and matrix. The purpose of this commentary is to describe basic and clinical information on lipid mediators in the nucleus.

  12. Angiotensin II modification by decomposition products of linoleic acid-derived lipid hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryo; Goto, Takaaki; Oe, Tomoyuki; Lee, Seon Hwa

    2015-09-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids are highly susceptible to oxidation induced by reactive oxygen species and enzymes, leading to the formation of lipid hydroperoxides. The linoleic acid (LA)-derived hydroperoxide, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (HPODE) undergoes homolytic decomposition to reactive aldehydes, 4-oxo-2(E)-nonenal (ONE), 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal, trans-4,5-epoxy-2(E)-decenal (EDE), and 4-hydroperoxy-2(E)-nonenal (HPNE), which can covalently modify peptides and proteins. ONE and HNE have been shown to react with angiotensin (Ang) II (DRVYIHPF) and modify the N-terminus, Arg(2), and His(6). ONE-derived pyruvamide-Ang II (Ang P) alters the biological activities of Ang II considerably. The present study revealed that EDE and HPNE preferentially modified the N-terminus and His(6) of Ang II. In addition to the N-substituted pyrrole of [N-C4H2]-Ang II and Michael addition products of [His(6)(EDE)]-Ang II, hydrated forms were detected as major products, suggesting considerable involvement of the vicinal dihydrodiol (formed by epoxide hydration) in EDE-derived protein modification in vivo. Substantial amounts of [N-(EDE-H2O)]-Ang II isomers were also formed and their synthetic pathway might involve the tautomerization of a carbinolamine intermediate, followed by intramolecular cyclization and dehydration. The main HPNE-derived products were [His(6)(HPNE)]-Ang II and [N-(HPNE-H2O)]-Ang II. However, ONE, HNE, and malondialdehyde-derived modifications were dominant, because HPNE is a precursor of these aldehydes. A mixture of 13-HPODE and [(13)C18]-13-HPODE (1:1) was then used to determine the major modifications derived from LA peroxidation. The characteristic doublet (1:1) observed in the mass spectrum and the mass difference of the [M+H](+) doublet aided the identification of Ang P (N-terminal α-ketoamide), [N-ONE]-Ang II (4-ketoamide), [Arg(2)(ONE-H2O)]-Ang II, [His(6)(HNE)]-Ang II (Michael addition product), [N-C4H2]-Ang II (EDE-derived N-substituted pyrrole

  13. Angiotensin II modification by decomposition products of linoleic acid-derived lipid hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryo; Goto, Takaaki; Oe, Tomoyuki; Lee, Seon Hwa

    2015-09-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids are highly susceptible to oxidation induced by reactive oxygen species and enzymes, leading to the formation of lipid hydroperoxides. The linoleic acid (LA)-derived hydroperoxide, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (HPODE) undergoes homolytic decomposition to reactive aldehydes, 4-oxo-2(E)-nonenal (ONE), 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal, trans-4,5-epoxy-2(E)-decenal (EDE), and 4-hydroperoxy-2(E)-nonenal (HPNE), which can covalently modify peptides and proteins. ONE and HNE have been shown to react with angiotensin (Ang) II (DRVYIHPF) and modify the N-terminus, Arg(2), and His(6). ONE-derived pyruvamide-Ang II (Ang P) alters the biological activities of Ang II considerably. The present study revealed that EDE and HPNE preferentially modified the N-terminus and His(6) of Ang II. In addition to the N-substituted pyrrole of [N-C4H2]-Ang II and Michael addition products of [His(6)(EDE)]-Ang II, hydrated forms were detected as major products, suggesting considerable involvement of the vicinal dihydrodiol (formed by epoxide hydration) in EDE-derived protein modification in vivo. Substantial amounts of [N-(EDE-H2O)]-Ang II isomers were also formed and their synthetic pathway might involve the tautomerization of a carbinolamine intermediate, followed by intramolecular cyclization and dehydration. The main HPNE-derived products were [His(6)(HPNE)]-Ang II and [N-(HPNE-H2O)]-Ang II. However, ONE, HNE, and malondialdehyde-derived modifications were dominant, because HPNE is a precursor of these aldehydes. A mixture of 13-HPODE and [(13)C18]-13-HPODE (1:1) was then used to determine the major modifications derived from LA peroxidation. The characteristic doublet (1:1) observed in the mass spectrum and the mass difference of the [M+H](+) doublet aided the identification of Ang P (N-terminal α-ketoamide), [N-ONE]-Ang II (4-ketoamide), [Arg(2)(ONE-H2O)]-Ang II, [His(6)(HNE)]-Ang II (Michael addition product), [N-C4H2]-Ang II (EDE-derived N-substituted pyrrole

  14. Lipid mediators in life science.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    "Lipid mediators" represent a class of bioactive lipids that are produced locally through specific biosynthetic pathways in response to extracellular stimuli. They are exported extracellularly, bind to their cognate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to transmit signals to target cells, and are then sequestered rapidly through specific enzymatic or non-enzymatic processes. Because of these properties, lipid mediators can be regarded as local hormones or autacoids. Unlike proteins, whose information can be readily obtained from the genome, we cannot directly read out the information of lipids from the genome since they are not genome-encoded. However, we can indirectly follow up the dynamics and functions of lipid mediators by manipulating the genes encoding a particular set of proteins that are essential for their biosynthesis (enzymes), transport (transporters), and signal transduction (receptors). Lipid mediators are involved in many physiological processes, and their dysregulations have been often linked to various diseases such as inflammation, infertility, atherosclerosis, ischemia, metabolic syndrome, and cancer. In this article, I will give an overview of the basic knowledge of various lipid mediators, and then provide an example of how research using mice, gene-manipulated for a lipid mediator-biosynthetic enzyme, contributes to life science and clinical applications.

  15. Effects of caffeoylquinic acid derivatives and C-flavonoid from Lychnophora ericoides on in vitro inflammatory mediator production.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Michel David; Chen, Guanjie; Almeida, Maria Camila; Soares, Denis Melo; de Souza, Glória Emília Petto; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Lantz, R Clark

    2010-05-01

    In this study we aimed at evaluating the effect of the major polar constituents of the medicinal plant Lychnophora ericoides on the production of inflammatory mediators produced by LPS-stimulated U-937 cells. The 6,8-di-C-beta-glucosylapigenin (vicenin-2) presented no effect on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha production, but inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the production of prostaglandin (PG) E2 without altering the expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 protein. 3,5-Dicaffeoylquinic acid and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, at lower concentrations, had small but significant effects on reducing PGE2 levels; at higher doses these compounds stimulated PGE2 and also TNF-alpha production by the cells. All the caffeoylquinic acid derivatives, in a dose-dependent fashion, were able to inhibit monocyte chemoattractant protein-3 synthesis/release, with 4,5-DCQ being the most potent at the highest tested concentration. These results add important information on the effects of plant natural polyphenols, namely vicenin-2 and caffeoylquinic acid derivatives, on the production of inflammatory mediators by cultured cells.

  16. Fracture healing and lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, J Patrick; Manigrasso, Michaele B; Kim, Brian D; Subramanian, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Lipid mediators regulate bone regeneration during fracture healing. Prostaglandins and leukotrienes are well-known lipid mediators that regulate inflammation and are synthesized from the Ω-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid. Cyclooxygenase (COX-1 or COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalyze the initial enzymatic steps in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes, respectively. Inhibition or genetic ablation of COX-2 activity impairs fracture healing in animal models. Genetic ablation of COX-1 does not affect the fracture callus strength in mice, suggesting that COX-2 activity is primarily responsible for regulating fracture healing. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is performed clinically to reduce heterotopic ossification, although clinical evidence that NSAID treatment impairs fracture healing remains controversial. In contrast, inhibition or genetic ablation of 5-LO activity accelerates fracture healing in animal models. Even though prostaglandins and leukotrienes regulate inflammation, loss of COX-2 or 5-LO activity appears to primarily affect chondrogenesis during fracture healing. Prostaglandin or prostaglandin analog treatment, prostaglandin-specific synthase inhibition and prostaglandin or leukotriene receptor antagonism also affect callus chondrogenesis. Unlike the Ω-6-derived lipid mediators, lipid mediators derived from Ω-3 fatty acids, such as resolvin E1 (RvE1), have anti-inflammatory activity. In vivo, RvE1 can inhibit osteoclastogenesis and limit bone resorption. Although Ω-6 and Ω-3 lipid mediators have clear-cut effects on inflammation, the role of these lipid mediators in bone regeneration is more complex, with apparent effects on callus chondrogenesis and bone remodeling. PMID:24795811

  17. Lipid mediators in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The implications of lipid lowering drugs in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy have been considered. At the same time, the clinical efficacy of lipid lowering drugs has resulted in improvement in the cardiovascular functions of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with or without diabetes, but no remarkable improvement has been observed in the kidney outcome. Earlier lipid mediators have been shown to cause accumulative effects in diabetic nephropathy (DN). Here, we attempt to analyze the involvement of lipid mediators in DN. The hyperglycemia-induced overproduction of diacyglycerol (DAG) is one of the causes for the activation of protein kinase C (PKCs), which is responsible for the activation of pathways, including the production of VEGF, TGFβ1, PAI-1, NADPH oxidases, and NFҟB signaling, accelerating the development of DN. Additionally, current studies on the role of ceramide are one of the major fields of study in DN. Researchers have reported excessive ceramide formation in the pathobiological conditions of DN. There is less report on the effect of lipid lowering drugs on the reduction of PKC activation and ceramide synthesis. Regulating PKC activation and ceramide biosynthesis could be a protective measure in the therapeutic potential of DN. Lipid lowering drugs also upregulate anti-fibrotic microRNAs, which could hint at the effects of lipid lowering drugs in DN. PMID:25206927

  18. Chemical modulation of chaperone-mediated autophagy by retinoic acid derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Anguiano, Jaime; Garner, Thomas P; Mahalingam, Murugesan; Das, Bhaskar C.; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) contributes to cellular quality control and the cellular response to stress through the selective degradation of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes. Decrease in CMA activity occurs in aging and in age-related disorders (for example, neurodegenerative diseases and diabetes). Although prevention of this age-dependent decline through genetic manipulation in mouse has proven beneficial, chemical modulation of CMA is not currently possible, due in part to the lack of information on the signaling mechanisms that modulate this pathway. In this work, we report that signaling through the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) inhibits CMA and apply structure-based chemical design to develop synthetic derivatives of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) to specifically neutralize this inhibitory effect. We demonstrate that chemical enhancement of CMA protects cells from oxidative stress and from proteotoxicity, supporting a potential therapeutic opportunity when reduced CMA contributes to cellular dysfunction and disease. PMID:23584676

  19. Volatile fatty acids derived from waste organics provide an economical carbon source for microbial lipids/biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Park, Gwon Woo; Fei, Qiang; Jung, Kwonsu; Chang, Ho Nam; Kim, Yeu-Chun; Kim, Nag-jong; Choi, Jin-dal-rae; Kim, Sangyong; Cho, Jaehoon

    2014-12-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) derived from organic waste, were used as a low cost carbon source for high bioreactor productivity and titer. A multi-stage continuous high cell density culture (MSC-HCDC) process was employed for economic assessment of microbial lipids for biodiesel production. In a simulation study we used a lipid yield of 0.3 g/g-VFAs, cell mass yield of 0.5 g/g-glucose or wood hydrolyzates, and employed process variables including lipid contents from 10-90% of cell mass, bioreactor productivity of 0.5-48 g/L/h, and plant capacity of 20000-1000000 metric ton (MT)/year. A production cost of USD 1.048/kg-lipid was predicted with raw material costs of USD 0.2/kg for wood hydrolyzates and USD 0.15/kg for VFAs; 9 g/L/h bioreactor productivity; 100, 000 MT/year production capacity; and 75% lipids content. The variables having the highest impact on microbial lipid production costs were the cost of VFAs and lipid yield, followed by lipid content, fermenter cost, and lipid productivity. The cost of raw materials accounted for 66.25% of total operating costs. This study shows that biodiesel from microbial lipids has the potential to become competitive with diesels from other sources.

  20. IMB-6G, a novel N-substituted sophoridinic acid derivative, induces endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis via activation of IRE1α and PERK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Bi, Chongwen; Liu, Lu; Dou, Yueying; Tang, Sheng; Pang, Weiqiang; Deng, Hongbin; Song, Danqing

    2016-01-01

    Sophoridinic acid derivatives have received considerable attentions for their potencies in cancer therapy. IMB-6G is a novel N-substituted sophoridinic acid derivative with potent cytotoxicity against tumor cells. In the present study, we explored the antitumor abilities of IMB-6G in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and investigated the underlying mechanisms. We found that IMB-6G inhibited cell growth and induced mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in HepG2 and SMMC7721 cells. Analyses of the molecular mechanism of IMB-6G-induced apoptosis indicated IMB-6G induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activation. Incubation of HCC cells with IMB-6G induced increase in Bip and CHOP levels, which precede induction of apoptosis. Further study showed IMB-6G activated IRE1α and PERK pathways but did not stimulated ATF6 pathway in HCC cells. Moreover, silencing of IRE1α dramatically abrogated IMB-6G-induced pro-apoptotic ASK1-JNK signaling. Importantly, interruption of CHOP rendered HCC cells sensitive to IMB-6G-induced apoptosis via inactivation of Bim, PUMA and Bax. Thus, the IRE1α-ASK1 and PERK-CHOP pathways may be a novel molecular mechanism of IMB-6G-induced apoptosis. Collectively, our study demonstrates that IMB-6G induces ER stress-mediated apoptosis by activating IRE1α and PERK pathways. Our findings provide a rationale for the potential application of IMB-6G in HCC therapy. PMID:27009865

  1. Amino acid derivative-mediated detoxification and functionalization of dual cure dental restorative material for dental pulp cell mineralization.

    PubMed

    Minamikawa, Hajime; Yamada, Masahiro; Iwasa, Fuminori; Ueno, Takeshi; Deyama, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Kuniaki; Yawaka, Yasutaka; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2010-10-01

    Current dental restorative materials are only used to fill the defect of hard tissues, such as dentin and enamel, because of their cytotoxicity. Therefore, exposed dental pulp tissues in deep cavities must be first covered by a pulp capping material like calcium hydroxide to form a layer of mineralized tissue. However, this tissue mineralization is based on pathological reaction and triggers long-lasting inflammation, often causing clinical problems. This study tested the ability of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), amino acid derivative, to reduce cytotoxicity and induce mineralized tissue conductivity in resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), a widely used dental restorative material having dual cure mechanism. Rat dental pulp cells were cultured on untreated or NAC-supplemented RMGI. NAC supplementation substantially increased the percentage of viable cells from 46.7 to 73.3% after 24-h incubation. Cell attachment, spreading, proliferative activity, and odontoblast-related gene and protein expressions increased significantly on NAC-supplemented RMGI. The mineralization capability of cells, which was nearly suppressed on untreated RMGI, was induced on NAC-supplemented RMGI. These improved behaviors and functions of dental pulp cells on NAC-supplemented RMGI were associated with a considerable reduction in the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and with the increased level of intracellular glutathione reserves. These results demonstrated that NAC could detoxify and functionalize RMGIs via two different mechanisms involving in situ material detoxification and antioxidant cell protection. We believe that this study provides a new approach for developing dental restorative materials that enables mineralized tissue regeneration.

  2. Induction of apoptosis by a potent caffeic acid derivative, caffeic acid undecyl ester, is mediated by mitochondrial damage in NALM-6 human B cell leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    TOMIZAWA, AYAKO; KANNO, SYU-ICHI; OSANAI, YUU; GOTO, AKANE; SATO, CHIZURU; YOMOGIDA, SHIN; ISHIKAWA, MASAAKI

    2013-01-01

    Caffeic acid esters have various biological activities, and we previously reported that undecyl caffeate (caffeic acid undecyl ester, CAUE), a new caffeic acid derivative, has strong pharmacological activity. The present study investigated the cytotoxicity of both CAUE and its parent compound, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), and characterized the mechanisms by which they induce apoptosis in the human B cell leukemia cell line NALM-6. Treatment with CAUE reduced cell survival in NALM-6 cells but had no significant effect on the survival of normal lymphocytes. When assessing the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for cytotoxicity, CAUE had 10-fold higher activity than CAPE in NALM-6 cells. CAUE treatment resulted in induction of apoptotic features in NALM-6 cells, including cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and activated caspase-3. A caspase inhibitor completely blocked CAUE-induced apoptosis. CAUE treatment resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in both mitochondrial membrane potential and downregulation of Bcl-2 expression. Moreover, CAUE-induced apoptosis was enhanced in the Bcl-2 knockdown condition induced by small interfering RNA. These data suggest that CAUE-induced apoptosis was mediated via an apoptotic intrinsic pathway including mitochondrial damage and was caspase-dependent. These data also suggest that CAUE is a powerful anti-leukemic agent that acts via induction of apoptosis by mitochondrial damage and selective action in leukemia cells. PMID:23229564

  3. Peroxynitrite-mediated formation of free radicals in human plasma: EPR detection of ascorbyl, albumin-thiyl and uric acid-derived free radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez-Vivar, J; Santos, A M; Junqueira, V B; Augusto, O

    1996-01-01

    Formation of peroxynitrite by the fast reaction between nitric oxide and superoxide anion may represent a critical control point in cells producing both species, leading to either down-regulation of the physiological effects of superoxide anion and nitric oxide by forming an inert product, nitrate, or to potentiation of their toxic effects by oxidation of nearby molecules by peroxynitrite. (The term peroxynitrite is used to refer to the sum of all possible forms of peroxynitrite anion and peroxynitrous acid unless otherwise specified.) In this report we demonstrate that, in spite of all the antioxidant defences present in human plasma, its interaction with peroxynitrite leads to generation of free radical intermediates such as (i) the ascorbyl radical, detected by direct EPR, (ii) the albumin-thiyl radical, detected by spin-trapping experiments with both N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), and (iii) a uric acid-derived free radical, detected as the DMPO radical adduct in plasma whose thiol groups were previously blocked with 5,5-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid). The identity of the latter adduct was confirmed by parallel experiments demonstrating that it is not detectable in plasma pretreated with uricase, whereas it is formed in incubations of peroxynitrite with uric acid. Peroxynitrite-mediated oxidations were also followed by oxygen consumption and ascorbate and plasma-thiol depletion. Our results support the view that peroxynitrite-mediated one-electron oxidation of biomolecules may be an important event in its cytotoxic mechanism. In addition, the data have methodological implications by providing support for the use of EPR methodologies for monitoring both free radical reactions and ascorbate concentrations in biological fluids. PMID:8615782

  4. Human inflammatory and resolving lipid mediator responses to resistance exercise and ibuprofen treatment

    PubMed Central

    Markworth, James F.; Vella, Luke; Lingard, Benjamin S.; Tull, Dedreia L.; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W.; Sinclair, Andrew J.; Maddipati, Krishna Rao

    2013-01-01

    Classical proinflammatory eicosanoids, and more recently discovered lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory and proresolving bioactivity, exert a complex role in the initiation, control, and resolution of inflammation. Using a targeted lipidomics approach, we investigated circulating lipid mediator responses to resistance exercise and treatment with the NSAID ibuprofen. Human subjects undertook a single bout of unaccustomed resistance exercise (80% of one repetition maximum) following oral ingestion of ibuprofen (400 mg) or placebo control. Venous blood was collected during early recovery (0–3 h and 24 h postexercise), and serum lipid mediator composition was analyzed by LC-MS-based targeted lipidomics. Postexercise recovery was characterized by elevated levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and 2-derived prostanoids (TXB2, PGE2, PGD2, PGF2α, and PGI2), lipooxygenase (5-LOX, 12-LOX, and 15-LOX)-derived hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), and leukotrienes (e.g., LTB4), and epoxygenase (CYP)-derived epoxy/dihydroxy eicosatrienoic acids (EpETrEs/DiHETrEs). Additionally, we detected elevated levels of bioactive lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory and proresolving properties, including arachidonic acid-derived lipoxins (LXA4 and LXB4), and the EPA (E-series) and DHA (D-series)-derived resolvins (RvD1 and RvE1), and protectins (PD1 isomer 10S, 17S-diHDoHE). Ibuprofen treatment blocked exercise-induced increases in COX-1 and COX-2-derived prostanoids but also resulted in off-target reductions in leukotriene biosynthesis, and a diminished proresolving lipid mediator response. CYP pathway product metabolism was also altered by ibuprofen treatment, as indicated by elevated postexercise serum 5,6-DiHETrE and 8,9-DiHETrE only in those receiving ibuprofen. These findings characterize the blood inflammatory lipid mediator response to unaccustomed resistance exercise in humans and show that acute proinflammatory signals are mechanistically linked to the induction of a

  5. Human inflammatory and resolving lipid mediator responses to resistance exercise and ibuprofen treatment.

    PubMed

    Markworth, James F; Vella, Luke; Lingard, Benjamin S; Tull, Dedreia L; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W; Sinclair, Andrew J; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Cameron-Smith, David

    2013-12-01

    Classical proinflammatory eicosanoids, and more recently discovered lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory and proresolving bioactivity, exert a complex role in the initiation, control, and resolution of inflammation. Using a targeted lipidomics approach, we investigated circulating lipid mediator responses to resistance exercise and treatment with the NSAID ibuprofen. Human subjects undertook a single bout of unaccustomed resistance exercise (80% of one repetition maximum) following oral ingestion of ibuprofen (400 mg) or placebo control. Venous blood was collected during early recovery (0-3 h and 24 h postexercise), and serum lipid mediator composition was analyzed by LC-MS-based targeted lipidomics. Postexercise recovery was characterized by elevated levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and 2-derived prostanoids (TXB2, PGE2, PGD2, PGF2α, and PGI2), lipooxygenase (5-LOX, 12-LOX, and 15-LOX)-derived hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), and leukotrienes (e.g., LTB4), and epoxygenase (CYP)-derived epoxy/dihydroxy eicosatrienoic acids (EpETrEs/DiHETrEs). Additionally, we detected elevated levels of bioactive lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory and proresolving properties, including arachidonic acid-derived lipoxins (LXA4 and LXB4), and the EPA (E-series) and DHA (D-series)-derived resolvins (RvD1 and RvE1), and protectins (PD1 isomer 10S, 17S-diHDoHE). Ibuprofen treatment blocked exercise-induced increases in COX-1 and COX-2-derived prostanoids but also resulted in off-target reductions in leukotriene biosynthesis, and a diminished proresolving lipid mediator response. CYP pathway product metabolism was also altered by ibuprofen treatment, as indicated by elevated postexercise serum 5,6-DiHETrE and 8,9-DiHETrE only in those receiving ibuprofen. These findings characterize the blood inflammatory lipid mediator response to unaccustomed resistance exercise in humans and show that acute proinflammatory signals are mechanistically linked to the induction of a biological

  6. Bicyclic glutamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Udo; Bisel, Philippe; Weckert, Edgar; Frahm, August Wilhelm

    2006-05-15

    For the second-generation asymmetric synthesis of the trans-tris(homoglutamic) acids via Strecker reaction of chiral ketimines, the cyanide addition as the key stereodifferentiating step produces mixtures of diastereomeric alpha-amino nitrile esters the composition of which is independent of the reaction temperature and the type of the solvent, respectively. The subsequent hydrolysis is exclusively achieved with concentrated H(2)SO(4) yielding diastereomeric mixtures of three secondary alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters and two diastereomeric cis-fused angular alpha-carbamoyl gamma-lactams as bicyclic glutamic acid derivatives, gained from in situ stereomer differentiating cyclisation of the secondary cis-alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters. Separation was achieved by CC. The pure secondary trans-alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters cyclise on heating and treatment with concentrated H(2)SO(4), respectively, to diastereomeric cis-fused angular secondary alpha-amino imides. Their hydrogenolysis led to the enantiomeric cis-fused angular primary alpha-amino imides. The configuration of all compounds was completely established by NMR methods, CD-spectra, and by X-ray analyses of the (alphaR,1R,5R)-1-carbamoyl-2-(1-phenylethyl)-2-azabicyclo[3.3.0]octan-3-one and of the trans-alphaS,1S,2R-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-1-(1-phenylethylamino)cyclopentanecarboxamide. PMID:16596563

  7. Lipid mediator profile in vernix caseosa reflects skin barrier development

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Antonio; Holm, Tina; Sjödin, Marcus O. D.; Reinke, Stacey N.; Alm, Johan; Scheynius, Annika; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Vernix caseosa (VC) is a protective layer that covers the skin of most human newborns. This study characterized the VC lipid mediator profile, and examined its relationship to gestational period, gender of the newborn and maternal lifestyle. VC collected at birth from 156 newborns within the ALADDIN birth cohort was analyzed and 3 different groups of lipid mediators (eicosanoids and related oxylipin analogs, endocannabinoids and sphingolipids) were screened using LC-MS/MS. A total of 54 compounds were detected in VC. A number of associations between lipid mediators and the gestational period were observed, including increases in the ceramide to sphingomyelin ratio as well as the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Gender-specific differences in lipid mediator levels were observed for all 3 lipid classes. In addition, levels of the linoleic acid oxidation products 9(10)-epoxy-12Z-octadecenoic and 12(13)-epoxy-9Z-octadecenoic acid (EpOMEs) as well as 12,13-dihydroxy-9Z-octadecenoic acid (DiHOME) were increased in VC of children from mothers with an anthroposophic lifestyle. Accordingly, VC was found to be rich in multiple classes of bioactive lipid mediators, which evidence lifestyle, gender and gestational week dependencies. Levels of lipid mediators in VC may therefore be useful as early stage non-invasive markers of the development of the skin as a protective barrier. PMID:26521946

  8. Regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis by bioactive lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    Clària, Joan

    2006-11-01

    Bioactive lipid mediators are increasingly being recognized as important endogenous regulators of cell activation, signaling, apoptosis and proliferation. Most of these lipid mediators are originated from cleavage of constituents of cellular membranes under the activity of phospholipases and sphingomyelinases. One of the major cascades of bioactive lipid mediator production involves the release of arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids followed by the formation of eicosanoids (i.e. prostaglandins, leukotrienes and lipoxins). These biologically active metabolites of arachidonic acid are emerging as key regulators of cell proliferation and neo-angiogenesis and agents that specifically target these lipid mediators are being investigated as potential anticancer drugs. On the other hand, the lysophospholipid family, which includes members of the sphingomyelin-ceramide-sphingosine-1-phosphate and lysophosphatidic acid subfamilies, has evolved as an important group of lipid signaling molecules implicated in cellular differentiation, cell growth and apoptosis. This article reviews the most recent patents in this field of research, covering the following strategies based on the modulation of bioactive lipid mediators: (1) prostaglandin H synthase-2 inhibitors, (2) lipoxin analogs and aspirin-triggered lipid mediators, and (3) lysophosphatidic acid and other lysophospholipids. PMID:18221047

  9. Distribution of bioactive lipid mediators in human skin.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Alexandra C; Pilkington, Suzanne M; Massey, Karen A; Sassano, Gary; Rhodes, Lesley E; Nicolaou, Anna

    2015-06-01

    The skin produces bioactive lipids that participate in physiological and pathological states, including homeostasis, induction, propagation, and resolution of inflammation. However, comprehension of the cutaneous lipid complement, and contribution to differing roles of the epidermal and dermal compartments, remains incomplete. We assessed the profiles of eicosanoids, endocannabinoids, N-acyl ethanolamides, and sphingolipids, in human dermis, epidermis, and suction blister fluid. We identified 18 prostanoids, 12 hydroxy-fatty acids, 9 endocannabinoids and N-acyl ethanolamides, and 21 non-hydroxylated ceramides and sphingoid bases, several demonstrating significantly different expression in the tissues assayed. The array of dermal and epidermal fatty acids was reflected in the lipid mediators produced, whereas similarities between lipid profiles in blister fluid and epidermis indicated a primarily epidermal origin of suction blister fluid. Supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids ex vivo showed that their action is mediated through perturbation of existing species and formation of other anti-inflammatory lipids. These findings demonstrate the diversity of lipid mediators involved in maintaining tissue homeostasis in resting skin and hint at their contribution to signaling, cross-support, and functions of different skin compartments. Profiling lipid mediators in biopsies and suction blister fluid can support studies investigating cutaneous inflammatory responses, dietary manipulation, and skin diseases lacking biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  10. A mitochondrial pathway for biosynthesis of lipid mediators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Poloyac, Samuel M.; Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Kapralov, Alexander A.; Jiang, Jianfei; Anthonymuthu, Tamil Selvan; Kapralova, Valentina I.; Vikulina, Anna S.; Jung, Mi-Yeon; Epperly, Michael W.; Mohammadyani, Dariush; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Jackson, Travis C.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Pitt, Bruce R.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Vladimirov, Yury A.; Bayır, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2014-06-01

    The central role of mitochondria in metabolic pathways and in cell-death mechanisms requires sophisticated signalling systems. Essential in this signalling process is an array of lipid mediators derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids. However, the molecular machinery for the production of oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids is localized in the cytosol and their biosynthesis has not been identified in mitochondria. Here we report that a range of diversified polyunsaturated molecular species derived from a mitochondria-specific phospholipid, cardiolipin (CL), is oxidized by the intermembrane-space haemoprotein, cytochrome c. We show that a number of oxygenated CL species undergo phospholipase A2-catalysed hydrolysis and thus generate multiple oxygenated fatty acids, including well-known lipid mediators. This represents a new biosynthetic pathway for lipid mediators. We demonstrate that this pathway, which includes the oxidation of polyunsaturated CLs and accumulation of their hydrolysis products (oxygenated linoleic, arachidonic acids and monolysocardiolipins), is activated in vivo after acute tissue injury.

  11. The Regulation of Proresolving Lipid Mediator Profiles in Baboon Pneumonia by Inhaled Carbon Monoxide.

    PubMed

    Dalli, Jesmond; Kraft, Bryan D; Colas, Romain A; Shinohara, Masakazu; Fredenburgh, Laura E; Hess, Dean R; Chiang, Nan; Welty-Wolf, Karen; Choi, Augustine M; Piantadosi, Claude A; Serhan, Charles N

    2015-09-01

    Strategies for the treatment of bacterial pneumonia beyond traditional antimicrobial therapy have been limited. The recently discovered novel genus of lipid mediators, coined "specialized proresolving mediators" (SPMs), which orchestrate clearance of recruited leukocytes and restore epithelial barrier integrity, have offered new insight into the resolution of inflammation. We performed lipid mediator (LM) metabololipidomic profiling and identification of LMs on peripheral blood leukocytes and plasma from a baboon model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. Leukocytes and plasma were isolated from whole blood of S. pneumoniae-infected (n = 5-6 per time point) and control, uninfected baboons (n = 4 per time point) at 0, 24, 48, and 168 hours. In a subset of baboons with pneumonia (n = 3), we administered inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) at 48 hours (200-300 ppm for 60-90 min). Unstimulated leukocytes from control animals produced a proresolving LM signature with elevated resolvins and lipoxins. In contrast, serum-treated, zymosan-stimulated leukocytes and leukocytes from baboons with S. pneumoniae pneumonia produced a proinflammatory LM signature profile with elevated leukotriene B4 and prostaglandins. Plasma from baboons with S. pneumoniae pneumonia also displayed significantly reduced LM-SPM levels, including eicosapentaenoic acid-derived E-series resolvins (RvE) and lipoxins. CO inhalation increased levels of plasma RvE and lipoxins relative to preexposure levels. These results establish the leukocyte and plasma LM profiles biosynthesized during S. pneumoniae pneumonia in baboons and provide evidence for pneumonia-induced dysregulation of these proresolution programs. Moreover, these SPM profiles are partially restored with inhaled low-dose CO and SPM, which may shorten the time to pneumonia resolution.

  12. Lysophosphatidic acid as a lipid mediator with multiple biological actions.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Shizu; Hashimoto, Takafumi; Kano, Kuniyuki; Aoki, Junken

    2015-02-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is one of the simplest glycerophospholipids with one fatty acid chain and a phosphate group as a polar head. Although LPA had been viewed just as a metabolic intermediate in de novo lipid synthetic pathways, it has recently been paid much attention as a lipid mediator. LPA exerts many kinds of cellular processes, such as cell proliferation and smooth muscle contraction, through cognate G protein-coupled receptors. Because lipids are not coded by the genome directly, it is difficult to know their patho- and physiological roles. However, recent studies have identified several key factors mediating the biological roles of LPA, such as receptors and producing enzymes. In addition, studies of transgenic and gene knockout animals for these LPA-related genes, have revealed the biological significance of LPA. In this review we will summarize recent advances in the studies of LPA production and its roles in both physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25500504

  13. Water extract of propolis and its main constituents, caffeoylquinic acid derivatives, exert neuroprotective effects via antioxidant actions.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yoshimi; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Mishima, Satoshi; Hara, Hideaki

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether water extract of Brazilian green propolis (WEP) and its main constituents [caffeoylquinic acid derivatives (3,4-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, chlorogenic acid) and cinnamic acid derivatives (p-coumaric acid, artepillin C, drupanin, baccharin)] exert neuroprotective effects against the retinal damage induced by oxidative stress. Additionally, their neuroprotective effects were compared with their antioxidant effects. WEP, 3,4-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, chlorogenic acid, and p-coumaric acid (but not artepillin C, baccharin, or drupanin) concentration-dependently inhibited oxidative stress-induced neurotoxicity [achieved using L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) to deplete glutathione in combination with glutamate to inhibit cystine uptake] in cultured retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5, a rat ganglion cell line transformed using E1A virus). At their effective concentrations against oxidative stress-induced retinal damage, WEP, 3,4-di-caffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-di-caffeoylquinic acid, and chlorogenic acid (but not cinnamic acid derivatives) inhibited lipid peroxidation (LPO) in mouse forebrain homogenates. Thus, the neuroprotective effects of WEP and caffeoylquinic acid derivatives paralleled those against LPO. These findings indicate that WEP and caffeoylquinic acid derivatives have neuroprotective effects against retinal damage in vitro, and that these effects may be partly mediated via antioxidant effects.

  14. Molecular simulations of lipid-mediated protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    de Meyer, Frédérick Jean-Marie; Venturoli, Maddalena; Smit, Berend

    2008-08-01

    Recent experimental results revealed that lipid-mediated interactions due to hydrophobic forces may be important in determining the protein topology after insertion in the membrane, in regulating the protein activity, in protein aggregation and in signal transduction. To gain insight into the lipid-mediated interactions between two intrinsic membrane proteins, we developed a mesoscopic model of a lipid bilayer with embedded proteins, which we studied with dissipative particle dynamics. Our calculations of the potential of mean force between transmembrane proteins show that hydrophobic forces drive long-range protein-protein interactions and that the nature of these interactions depends on the length of the protein hydrophobic segment, on the three-dimensional structure of the protein and on the properties of the lipid bilayer. To understand the nature of the computed potentials of mean force, the concept of hydrophilic shielding is introduced. The observed protein interactions are interpreted as resulting from the dynamic reorganization of the system to maintain an optimal hydrophilic shielding of the protein and lipid hydrophobic parts, within the constraint of the flexibility of the components. Our results could lead to a better understanding of several membrane processes in which protein interactions are involved. PMID:18487292

  15. Bioactive lipid mediators in skin inflammation and immunity.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Alexandra C; Nicolaou, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The skin is the primary barrier from the outside environment, protecting the host from injury, infectious pathogens, water loss and solar ultraviolet radiation. In this role, it is supported by a highly organized system comprising elements of innate and adaptive immunity, responsive to inflammatory stimuli. The cutaneous immune system is regulated by mediators such as cytokines and bioactive lipids that can initiate rapid immune responses with controlled inflammation, followed by efficient resolution. However, when immune responses are inadequate or mounted against non-infectious agents, these mediators contribute to skin pathologies involving unresolved or chronic inflammation. Skin is characterized by active lipid metabolism and fatty acids play crucial roles both in terms of structural integrity and functionality, in particular when transformed to bioactive mediators. Eicosanoids, endocannabinoids and sphingolipids are such key bioactive lipids, intimately involved in skin biology, inflammation and immunity. We discuss their origins, role and influence over various cells of the epidermis, dermis and cutaneous immune system and examine their function in examples of inflammatory skin conditions. We focus on psoriasis, atopic and contact dermatitis, acne vulgaris, wound healing and photodermatology that demonstrate dysregulation of bioactive lipid metabolism and examine ways of using this insight to inform novel therapeutics.

  16. PPARs Mediate Lipid Signaling in Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Michalik, Liliane; Wahli, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Lipid mediators can trigger physiological responses by activating nuclear hormone receptors, such as the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). PPARs, in turn, control the expression of networks of genes encoding proteins involved in all aspects of lipid metabolism. In addition, PPARs are tumor growth modifiers, via the regulation of cancer cell apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation, and through their action on the tumor cell environment, namely, angiogenesis, inflammation, and immune cell functions. Epidemiological studies have established that tumor progression may be exacerbated by chronic inflammation. Here, we describe the production of the lipids that act as activators of PPARs, and we review the roles of these receptors in inflammation and cancer. Finally, we consider emerging strategies for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19125181

  17. Crosstalk between purinergic receptors and lipid mediators in leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Mariana M; Canetti, Cláudio; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2016-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease affecting millions of people around the world caused by organisms of the genus Leishmania. Parasite escape mechanisms of the immune system confer the possibility of resistance and dissemination of the disease. A group of molecules that has become a target for Leishmania survival strategies are lipid mediators. Among them, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) has been described as a pro-inflammatory molecule capable of activating cells of the immune system to combat Leishmania. In an opposite way, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a lipid mediator described as a deactivator of macrophages and neutrophils. The balance of these two molecules can be generated by extracellular nucleotides, such as adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine (Ado), which activate the purinergic receptors system. Herein, we discuss the role of extracellular nucleotides and the resulting balance of LTB4 and PGE2 in Leishmania fate, survival or death. PMID:27595742

  18. Intravenous fish oil lipid emulsion promotes a shift toward anti-inflammatory proresolving lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    Kalish, Brian T; Le, Hau D; Fitzgerald, Jonathan M; Wang, Samantha; Seamon, Kyle; Gura, Kathleen M; Gronert, Karsten; Puder, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN)-associated liver disease (PNALD) is a life-threatening complication of the administration of PN. The development of PNALD may be partly due to the composition of the lipid emulsion administered with PN: soybean oil-based lipid emulsions (SOLE) are associated with liver disease, while fish oil-based lipid emulsions (FOLE) are associated with prevention and improvement of liver disease. The objective of this study was to determine how the choice of lipid emulsion modified the production of bioactive lipid mediators (LMs). We utilized a mouse model of steatosis to study the differential effect of FOLE and SOLE. We subsequently validated these results in serum samples from a small cohort of human infants transitioning from SOLE to FOLE. In mice, FOLE was associated with production of anti-inflammatory, proresolving LMs; SOLE was associated with increased production of inflammatory LMs. In human infants, the transition from SOLE to FOLE was associated with a shift toward a proresolving lipidome. Together, these results demonstrate that the composition of the lipid emulsion directly modifies inflammatory homeostasis.

  19. Ca-Mediated Electroformation of Cell-Sized Lipid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Fei; Yang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Cell-sized lipid giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are formed when lipid molecules self-assemble to construct a single bilayer compartment with similar morphology to living cells. The physics of self-assembly process is only generally understood and the size distribution of GUVs tends to be very polydisperse. Herein we report a strategy for the production of controlled size distributions of GUVs by a novel mechanism dissecting the mediation ability of calcium (Ca) on the conventional electroformation of GUVs. We finely construct both of the calcium ion (Ca2+) and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) mineral adsorption layers on a lipid film surface respectively during the electroformation of GUVs. It is found that Ca2+ Slip plane polarized by alternating electric field could induce a pattern of electroosmotic flow across the surface, and thus confine the fusion and growth of GUVs to facilitate the formation of uniform GUVs. The model is further improved by directly using CaCO3 that is in situ formed on a lipid film surface, providing a GUV population with narrow polydispersity. The two models deciphers the new biological function of calcium on the birth of cell-like lipid vesicles, and thus might be potentially relevant to the construction of new model to elucidate the cellular development process. PMID:25950604

  20. Lipoprotein mediated lipid uptake in oocytes of polychaetes (Annelida).

    PubMed

    Schenk, Sven; Hoeger, Ulrich

    2009-08-01

    The uptake of the 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labeled sex-unspecific Nereis lipoprotein was investigated in oocytes of the nereidid polychaetes Nereis virens and Platynereis dumerilii. The fluorescence label was first observed in endocytic vesicles (<1 microm diameter), which later fused to larger vesicles (2-3 microm); these were finally incorporated into existing unlabeled yolk granules (5-6 microm). In Platynereis oocytes, the fusion of endocytic vesicles was delayed in oocytes at their final stage of development compared with those at an early stage of development. Lipoprotein double-labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and DiI revealed that both the protein and the lipid moiety remained co-localized during incorporation into the yolk granules of the oocyte. No labeling of the cytoplasmic lipid droplets was observed. In N. virens, unlabeled Nereis lipoprotein was effective as a competitive inhibitor of DiI-labeled Nereis lipoprotein. Ligand blot experiments demonstrated the presence of a lipoprotein receptor with an apparent molecular mass of 120 kDa, which is different from that of the known yolk protein receptor. This indicates the presence, in the polychaete oocyte, of two distinct receptors mediating yolk protein and lipoprotein uptake, respectively. Thus, the sex-unspecific lipoprotein contributes to the lipid supply of the growing oocyte in addition to the known uptake of the yolk-protein-associated lipids. The absence of label in the cytoplasmic lipid droplets, even after prolonged incubation with labeled lipoprotein, suggests that these lipids arise either by the breakdown and resynthesis of lipoprotein-derived lipids and/or by de novo synthesis within the oocyte.

  1. Aspirin and lipid mediators in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Schrör, Karsten; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2015-09-01

    Aspirin is an unique compound because it bears two active moieties within one and the same molecule: a reactive acetyl group and the salicylate metabolite. Salicylate has some effects similar to aspirin, however only at higher concentrations, usually in the millimolar range, which are not obtained at conventional antiplatelet aspirin doses of 100-300 mg/day. Pharmacological actions of aspirin in the cardiovascular system at these doses are largely if not entirely due to target structure acetylation. Several classes of lipid mediators become affected: Best known is the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) in platelets with subsequent inhibition of thromboxane and, possibly, thrombin formation. By this action, aspirin also inhibits paracrine thromboxane functions on other lipid mediators, such as the platelet storage product sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an inflammatory mediator. Acetylation of COX-2 allows for generation of 15-(R)HETE and subsequent formation of "aspirin-triggered lipoxin" (ATL) by interaction with white cell lipoxygenases. In the cardiovascular system, aspirin also acetylates eNOS with subsequent upregulation of NO formation and enhanced expression of the antioxidans heme-oxygenase-1. This action is possibly also COX-2/ATL mediated. Many more acetylation targets have been identified in live cells by quantitative acid-cleavable activity-based protein profiling and might result in discovery of even more aspirin targets in the near future. PMID:26201059

  2. Aspirin and lipid mediators in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Schrör, Karsten; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2015-09-01

    Aspirin is an unique compound because it bears two active moieties within one and the same molecule: a reactive acetyl group and the salicylate metabolite. Salicylate has some effects similar to aspirin, however only at higher concentrations, usually in the millimolar range, which are not obtained at conventional antiplatelet aspirin doses of 100-300 mg/day. Pharmacological actions of aspirin in the cardiovascular system at these doses are largely if not entirely due to target structure acetylation. Several classes of lipid mediators become affected: Best known is the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) in platelets with subsequent inhibition of thromboxane and, possibly, thrombin formation. By this action, aspirin also inhibits paracrine thromboxane functions on other lipid mediators, such as the platelet storage product sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an inflammatory mediator. Acetylation of COX-2 allows for generation of 15-(R)HETE and subsequent formation of "aspirin-triggered lipoxin" (ATL) by interaction with white cell lipoxygenases. In the cardiovascular system, aspirin also acetylates eNOS with subsequent upregulation of NO formation and enhanced expression of the antioxidans heme-oxygenase-1. This action is possibly also COX-2/ATL mediated. Many more acetylation targets have been identified in live cells by quantitative acid-cleavable activity-based protein profiling and might result in discovery of even more aspirin targets in the near future.

  3. Lipid rafts mediate chemotropic guidance of nerve growth cones.

    PubMed

    Guirland, Carmine; Suzuki, Shingo; Kojima, Masami; Lu, Bai; Zheng, James Q

    2004-04-01

    Axon guidance requires signal transduction of extracellular cues through the plasma membrane for directional motility. Here we present evidence that cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) mediate specific guidance responses of nerve growth cones. Disruption of lipid rafts by various approaches targeting cholesterol or gangliosides selectively abolished growth cone attraction and repulsion in BDNF and netrin-1 gradients, respectively, without affecting glutamate-induced attraction. Interestingly, local raft disruption on one side of the growth cone in bath BDNF or netrin-1 produced opposite turning responses to that induced by the gradients. Raft manipulation also blocked Semaphorin 3A-induced growth cone repulsion, inhibition, and collapse. Finally, guidance responses appeared to involve raft-dependent activation of p42/p44 MAPK and ligand-induced receptor recruitment to lipid rafts. Together with the observation of asymmetric receptor-raft associations at the growth cone in guidance gradients, our findings indicate that localized signaling through membrane rafts plays a role in mediating guidance actions of extracellular cues on developing axons. PMID:15066264

  4. Adipose triglyceride lipase acts on neutrophil lipid droplets to regulate substrate availability for lipid mediator synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Schlager, Stefanie; Goeritzer, Madeleine; Jandl, Katharina; Frei, Robert; Vujic, Nemanja; Kolb, Dagmar; Strohmaier, Heimo; Dorow, Juliane; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Rosenberger, Angelika; Wölfler, Albert; Lass, Achim; Kershaw, Erin E.; Ceglarek, Uta; Dichlberger, Andrea; Heinemann, Akos; Kratky, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    In humans, mutations in ATGL lead to TG accumulation in LDs of most tissues and cells, including peripheral blood leukocytes. This pathologic condition is called Jordans’ anomaly, in which functional consequences have not been investigated. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that ATGL plays a role in leukocyte LD metabolism and immune cell function. Similar to humans with loss-of-function mutations in ATGL, we found that global and myeloid-specific Atgl−/− mice exhibit Jordans’ anomaly with increased abundance of intracellular TG-rich LDs in neutrophil granulocytes. In a model of inflammatory peritonitis, lipid accumulation was also observed in monocytes and macrophages but not in eosinophils or lymphocytes. Neutrophils from Atgl−/− mice showed enhanced immune responses in vitro, which were more prominent in cells from global compared with myeloid-specific Atgl−/− mice. Mechanistically, ATGL−/− as well as pharmacological inhibition of ATGL led to an impaired release of lipid mediators from neutrophils. These findings demonstrate that the release of lipid mediators is dependent on the liberation of precursor molecules from the TG-rich pool of LDs by ATGL. Our data provide mechanistic insights into Jordans’ anomaly in neutrophils and suggest that ATGL is a potent regulator of immune cell function and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26109679

  5. Diversity of lipid mediators in human adipose tissue depots

    PubMed Central

    Clària, Joan; Nguyen, Binh T.; Madenci, Arin L.; Ozaki, C. Keith

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a heterogeneous organ with remarkable variations in fat cell metabolism depending on the anatomical location. However, the pattern and distribution of bioactive lipid mediators between different fat depots and their relationships in complex diseases have not been investigated. Using LC-MS/MS-based metabolo-lipidomics, here we report that human subcutaneous (SC) adipose tissues possess a range of specialized proresolving mediators (SPM) including resolvin (Rv) D1, RvD2, protectin (PD) 1, lipoxin (LX) A4, and the monohydroxy biosynthetic pathway markers of RvD1 and PD1 (17-HDHA), RvE1 (18-HEPE), and maresin 1 (14-HDHA). The “classic” eicosanoids prostaglandin (PG) E2, PGD2, PGF2α, leukotriene (LT) B4, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), 12-HETE, and 15-HETE were also identified in SC fat. SC fat from patients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD) exhibited a marked deficit in PD1 and 17-HDHA levels. Compared with SC, perivascular adipose tissue displayed higher SPM levels, suggesting an enhanced resolution capacity in this fat depot. In addition, augmented levels of eicosanoids and SPM were observed in SC fat surrounding foot wounds. Notably, the profile of SC PGF2α differed significantly when patients were grouped by body mass index (BMI). In the case of peri-wound SC fat, BMI negatively correlated with PGE2. In this tissue, proresolving mediators RvD2 and LXA4 were identified in lower levels than the proinflammatory LTB4. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a diverse distribution of bioactive lipid mediators depending on the localization of human fat depots and uncover a specific SPM pattern closely associated with PVD. PMID:23364264

  6. Oxidized lipids and lipid-mediators are involved in cardiovascular injury induced by diesel exhaust particles and ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms by which air pollutants induce cardiac and vascular injuries are unknown. We hypothesized that these injuries involve alterations in'aortic membrane lipids and lipid-mediators. We exposed male Wistar Kyoto rats (12-15 wk old), nose-only to air, ozone (03; 0.5 ppm),...

  7. Direct measurement of DNA-mediated adhesion between lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Shimobayashi, S F; Mognetti, B M; Parolini, L; Orsi, D; Cicuta, P; Di Michele, L

    2015-06-28

    Multivalent interactions between deformable mesoscopic units are ubiquitous in biology, where membrane macromolecules mediate the interactions between neighbouring living cells and between cells and solid substrates. Lately, analogous artificial materials have been synthesised by functionalising the outer surface of compliant Brownian units, for example emulsion droplets and lipid vesicles, with selective linkers, in particular short DNA sequences. This development extended the range of applicability of DNA as a selective glue, originally applied to solid nano and colloidal particles. On very deformable lipid vesicles, the coupling between statistical effects of multivalent interactions and mechanical deformation of the membranes gives rise to complex emergent behaviours, as we recently contributed to demonstrate [Parolini et al., Nat. Commun., 2015, 6, 5948]. Several aspects of the complex phenomenology observed in these systems still lack a quantitative experimental characterisation and a fundamental understanding. Here we focus on the DNA-mediated multivalent interactions of a single liposome adhering to a flat supported bilayer. This simplified geometry enables the estimate of the membrane tension induced by the DNA-mediated adhesive forces acting on the liposome. Our experimental investigation is completed by morphological measurements and the characterisation of the DNA-melting transition, probed by in situ Förster Resonant Energy Transfer spectroscopy. Experimental results are compared with the predictions of an analytical theory that couples the deformation of the vesicle to a full description of the statistical mechanics of mobile linkers. With at most one fitting parameter, our theory is capable of semi-quantitatively matching experimental data, confirming the quality of the underlying assumptions. PMID:25989828

  8. Novel Lipid Mediators and Resolution Mechanisms in Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Serhan, Charles N.

    2010-01-01

    Because inflammation is appreciated as a unifying basis of many widely occurring diseases, the mechanisms involved in its natural resolution are of considerable interest. Using contained, self-limited inflammatory exudates and a systems approach, novel lipid-derived mediators and pathways were uncovered in the resolution of inflammatory exudates. These new families of local mediators control both the duration and magnitude of acute inflammation as well as the return of the site to homeostasis in the process of catabasis. This new genus of specialized proresolving mediators (SPM) includes essential fatty acid–derived lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and, most recently, maresins. These families were named based on their unique structures and potent stereoselective actions. The temporally initiated biosynthesis of SPM and their direct impact on leukocyte trafficking and macrophage-directed clearance mechanisms provide clear evidence that resolution is an active, programmed response at the tissue level. Moreover, SPM that possess anti-inflammatory (ie, limiting PMN infiltration) and proresolving (enhance macrophage uptake and clearance of apoptotic PMN and microbial particles) actions as well as stimulating mucosal antimicrobial responses demonstrate that anti-inflammation and proresolution are different responses of the host and novel defining properties of these molecules. The mapping of new resolution circuits has opened the possibility for understanding mechanisms that lead from acute to chronic inflammation, or to the resolution thereof, as well as to potential, resolution-based immunopharmacological therapies. PMID:20813960

  9. Mitotic lamin disassembly is triggered by lipid-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Mall, Moritz; Walter, Thomas; Gorjánácz, Mátyás; Davidson, Iain F; Nga Ly-Hartig, Thi Bach; Ellenberg, Jan; Mattaj, Iain W

    2012-09-17

    Disassembly of the nuclear lamina is a key step during open mitosis in higher eukaryotes. The activity of several kinases, including CDK1 (cyclin-dependent kinase 1) and protein kinase C (PKC), has been shown to trigger mitotic lamin disassembly, yet their precise contributions are unclear. In this study, we develop a quantitative imaging assay to study mitotic lamin B1 disassembly in living cells. We find that CDK1 and PKC act in concert to mediate phosphorylation-dependent lamin B1 disassembly during mitosis. Using ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi), we showed that diacylglycerol (DAG)-dependent PKCs triggered rate-limiting steps of lamin disassembly. RNAi-mediated depletion or chemical inhibition of lipins, enzymes that produce DAG, delayed lamin disassembly to a similar extent as does PKC inhibition/depletion. Furthermore, the delay of lamin B1 disassembly after lipin depletion could be rescued by the addition of DAG. These findings suggest that lipins activate a PKC-dependent pathway during mitotic lamin disassembly and provide evidence for a lipid-mediated mitotic signaling event.

  10. Topologically-Mediated Membrane Dynamics in Supported Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Sean Fitzpatrick

    2011-12-01

    This thesis is primarily design driven. It describes the development and application of dynamically tunable class of solid-fluid interfaces, which serves as a test-bed configuration for fundamental studies of soft condensed matter in reduced dimension. My specific focus is in developing these interfaces to recapitulate topology-mediated phenomenon in biological lipid membranes. The phenomena that the interfacial topology manifest in diffusional characteristics in model membranes are probed using wide-area epifluorescence microscopy and a semi-quantitative analysis of dynamic recovery following photobleaching. Furthermore, real-time remodeling of the membrane-substrate interface topology is shown to provide fundamental information regarding curvature-dependent molecular sorting and resorting. Specifically our experiments using putative raft composition mixtures confirm the conformation-dependent alignment of liquid-ordered domains and moreover reveal domain-domain interactions for the first time in model bilayers. Ongoing work aimed at delineating these inter-domain interactions in terms of membrane elastic properties is being performed. Future work that includes peptide-driven membrane deformation and sorting, as well large-scale, curvature-driven in vivo sorting of lipids is proposed and discussed.

  11. Cannabinoid and lipid-mediated vasorelaxation in retinal microvasculature.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, Jessica; Dong, Alex; Straiker, Alex; Zhu, Jiequan; Howlett, Susan E; Bagher, Amina; Denovan-Wright, Eileen; Yu, Dao-Yi; Kelly, Melanie E M

    2014-07-15

    The endocannabinoid system plays a role in regulation of vasoactivity in the peripheral vasculature; however, little is known about its role in regulation of the CNS microvasculature. This study investigated the pharmacology of cannabinoids and cannabimimetic lipids in the retinal microvasculature, a CNS vascular bed that is autoregulated. Vessel diameter (edge detector) and calcium transients (fura-2) were recorded from segments of retinal microvasculature isolated from adult, male Fischer 344 rats. Results showed that abnormal cannabidiol (Abn-CBD), an agonist at the putative endothelial cannabinoid receptor, CBe, inhibited endothelin 1 (ET-1) induced vasoconstriction in retinal arterioles. These actions of Abn-CBD were independent of CB1/CB2 receptors and were not mediated by agonists for GPR55 or affected by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition. However, the vasorelaxant effects of Abn-CBD were abolished when the endothelium was removed and were inhibited by the small Ca(2+)-sensitive K channel (SKCa) blocker, apamin. The effects of the endogenous endocannabinoid metabolite, N-arachidonyl glycine (NAGly), a putative agonist for GPR18, were virtually identical to those of Abn-CBD. GPR18 mRNA and protein were present in the retina, and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that GPR18 was localized to the endothelium of retinal vessels. These findings demonstrate that Abn-CBD and NAGly inhibit ET-1 induced vasoconstriction in retinal arterioles by an endothelium-dependent signaling mechanism that involves SKCa channels. The endothelial localization of GPR18 suggests that GPR18 could contribute to cannabinoid and lipid-mediated retinal vasoactivity.

  12. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries as driving force for HIV fusion peptide-mediated fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2016-04-01

    Lipids and proteins are organized in cellular membranes in clusters, often called `lipid rafts'. Although raft-constituent ordered lipid domains are thought to be energetically unfavourable for membrane fusion, rafts have long been implicated in many biological fusion processes. For the case of HIV gp41-mediated membrane fusion, this apparent contradiction can be resolved by recognizing that the interfaces between ordered and disordered lipid domains are the predominant sites of fusion. Here we show that line tension at lipid domain boundaries contributes significant energy to drive gp41-fusion peptide-mediated fusion. This energy, which depends on the hydrophobic mismatch between ordered and disordered lipid domains, may contribute tens of kBT to fusion, that is, it is comparable to the energy required to form a lipid stalk intermediate. Line-active compounds such as vitamin E lower line tension in inhomogeneous membranes, thereby inhibit membrane fusion, and thus may be useful natural viral entry inhibitors.

  13. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries as driving force for HIV fusion peptide-mediated fusion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-01-01

    Lipids and proteins are organized in cellular membranes in clusters, often called 'lipid rafts'. Although raft-constituent ordered lipid domains are thought to be energetically unfavourable for membrane fusion, rafts have long been implicated in many biological fusion processes. For the case of HIV gp41-mediated membrane fusion, this apparent contradiction can be resolved by recognizing that the interfaces between ordered and disordered lipid domains are the predominant sites of fusion. Here we show that line tension at lipid domain boundaries contributes significant energy to drive gp41-fusion peptide-mediated fusion. This energy, which depends on the hydrophobic mismatch between ordered and disordered lipid domains, may contribute tens of kBT to fusion, that is, it is comparable to the energy required to form a lipid stalk intermediate. Line-active compounds such as vitamin E lower line tension in inhomogeneous membranes, thereby inhibit membrane fusion, and thus may be useful natural viral entry inhibitors. PMID:27113279

  14. Effect of dietary alpha-linolenic fatty acid derived from chia when fed as ground seed, whole seed and oil on lipid content and fatty acid composition of rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Ayerza, Ricardo; Coates, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common cause of death in the Western world. In both the USA and the EU it accounts for over 600,000 deaths yearly. Early data showing the benefits n-3 fatty acids provide in preventing CHD disease were obtained using 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 fatty acids derived from fish. Recently, however, it has been shown that reduced risks of CHD and other cardiovascular diseases are found with 18:3n-3 fatty acid as well. To determine if 18:3n-3 fatty acids positively influence plasma composition, 32 male Wistar rats were fed ad libitum four isocaloric diets with the energy derived from corn oil (T(1)), whole chia seed (T(2)), ground chia seed (T(3)), or chia oil (T(4)) for 30 days. At the end of the feeding period the rats were sacrificed, and blood samples were analyzed to determine serum CHOL, HDL, LDL, TG content, hemogram, and fatty acid composition. Chia decreased serum TG content and increased HDL content. Only with the T(2) diet was TG significantly (p < 0.05) lower, and only with the T(3) diet was HDL significantly (p < 0.05) higher, than the control diet. Chia significantly (p < 0.05) increased the 18:3n-3, 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 plasma contents compared to the control diet, with no significant (p < 0.05) difference among chia diets detected. Significant (p < 0.05) improvement in n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio was observed for all chia diets when compared to the control.

  15. Lipid membrane-mediated attraction between curvature inducing objects.

    PubMed

    van der Wel, Casper; Vahid, Afshin; Šarić, Anđela; Idema, Timon; Heinrich, Doris; Kraft, Daniela J

    2016-01-01

    The interplay of membrane proteins is vital for many biological processes, such as cellular transport, cell division, and signal transduction between nerve cells. Theoretical considerations have led to the idea that the membrane itself mediates protein self-organization in these processes through minimization of membrane curvature energy. Here, we present a combined experimental and numerical study in which we quantify these interactions directly for the first time. In our experimental model system we control the deformation of a lipid membrane by adhering colloidal particles. Using confocal microscopy, we establish that these membrane deformations cause an attractive interaction force leading to reversible binding. The attraction extends over 2.5 times the particle diameter and has a strength of three times the thermal energy (-3.3 kBT). Coarse-grained Monte-Carlo simulations of the system are in excellent agreement with the experimental results and prove that the measured interaction is independent of length scale. Our combined experimental and numerical results reveal membrane curvature as a common physical origin for interactions between any membrane-deforming objects, from nanometre-sized proteins to micrometre-sized particles. PMID:27618764

  16. Lipid membrane-mediated attraction between curvature inducing objects

    PubMed Central

    van der Wel, Casper; Vahid, Afshin; Šarić, Anđela; Idema, Timon; Heinrich, Doris; Kraft, Daniela J.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay of membrane proteins is vital for many biological processes, such as cellular transport, cell division, and signal transduction between nerve cells. Theoretical considerations have led to the idea that the membrane itself mediates protein self-organization in these processes through minimization of membrane curvature energy. Here, we present a combined experimental and numerical study in which we quantify these interactions directly for the first time. In our experimental model system we control the deformation of a lipid membrane by adhering colloidal particles. Using confocal microscopy, we establish that these membrane deformations cause an attractive interaction force leading to reversible binding. The attraction extends over 2.5 times the particle diameter and has a strength of three times the thermal energy (−3.3 kBT). Coarse-grained Monte-Carlo simulations of the system are in excellent agreement with the experimental results and prove that the measured interaction is independent of length scale. Our combined experimental and numerical results reveal membrane curvature as a common physical origin for interactions between any membrane-deforming objects, from nanometre-sized proteins to micrometre-sized particles. PMID:27618764

  17. Simultaneous lipidomic analysis of three families of bioactive lipid mediators leukotrienes, resolvins, protectins and related hydroxy-fatty acids by liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Masoodi, Mojgan; Mir, Adnan A.; Petasis, Nicos A.; Serhan, Charles N.; Nicolaou, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Bioactive lipid mediators derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and exhibit a range of tissue and cell-specific activities in many physiological and pathological processes. Electrospray tandem mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography (LC/ESI-MS/MS) is a sensitive, versatile analytical methodology for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of lipid mediators. Here we present an LC/ESI-MS/MS assay for the simultaneous analysis of twenty mono- and poly-hydroxy fatty acid derivatives of linoleic, arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids. The assay was linear over the concentration range 1-100 pg/μL, whilst the limits of detection and quantitation were 10-20 and 20-50 pg respectively. The recovery of the extraction methodology varied from 76-122% depending on the metabolite. This system is useful for profiling a range of biochemically-related potent mediators including the newly discovered resolvins and protectins, and their precursor hydroxy-eicosapentaenoic and hydroxy-docosahexaenoic acids, and, consequently, advance our understanding of the role of PUFA in health and disease. PMID:18059001

  18. In Vivo Availability of Pro-Resolving Lipid Mediators in Oxazolone Induced Dermal Inflammation in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Homann, Julia; Suo, Jing; Schmidt, Mike; de Bruin, Natasja; Scholich, Klaus; Geisslinger, Gerd; Ferreirós, Nerea

    2015-01-01

    The activation and infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) are critical key steps in inflammation. PMN-mediated inflammation is limited by anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving mechanisms, including specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators (SPM). We examined the effects of 15-epi-LXA4 on inflammation and the biosynthesis of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandins, leukotriene B4 and various hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids and SPM, in an oxazolone (OXA)-induced hypersensitivity model for dermal inflammation. 15-epi-LXA4 (100 μM, 5 μL subcutaneously injected) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced inflammation in skin, 24 hours after the OXA challenge, as compared to skin treated with vehicle. No significant influence on the biosynthesis of prostaglandins or leukotriene B4 was observed, whereas the level of 15S-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the skin areas treated with 15-epi-LXA4. In spite of the use of a fully validated analytical procedure, no SPM were detected in the biological samples. To investigate the reason for the lack of analytical signal, we tried to mimic the production of SPM (lipoxins, resolvins, maresin and protectin) by injecting them subcutaneously into the skin of mice and studying the in vivo availability and distribution of the compounds. All analytes showed very little lateral distribution in skin tissue and their levels were markedly decreased (> 95%) 2 hours after injection. However, docosahexaenoic acid derivatives were biologically more stable than SPM derived from arachidonic acid or eicosapentaenoic acid. PMID:26599340

  19. Carrier-mediated ion transport in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Laprade, R; Grenier, F; Pagé-Dansereau, M; Dansereau, J

    1984-08-01

    The electrical properties predicted by a widely accepted model for carrier-mediated ion transport in lipid bilayers are described. The different steps leading to ion transport and their associated rate constants are reaction at the interface between an ion in the aqueous phase and a carrier in the membrane (kRi), followed by translocation of the ion-carrier complex across the membrane interior (kis) and its dissociation at the other interface (kDi) after which the free carrier crosses back the membrane interior (ks). Results on glyceryl monooleate (GMO) membranes for a family of homologue carriers, the macrotetralide actin antibiotics (nonactin, monactin, dinactin, trinactin, and tetranactin) and a variety of ions (Na+, Cs+, Rb+, K+, NH4+, and Tl+) are presented. Internally consistent data obtained from steady-state electrical measurements (zero-current potential and conductance, current-voltage relationship) allow us to obtain the equilibrium permeability ratios for the different ions and show that for a given carrier kRi is relatively invariant from one ion to the other, except for Tl+ (larger), which implies that the ionic selectivity is controlled by the dissociation of the complex. The values of the individual rate constants obtained from current relaxation experiments are also presented and confirm the findings from steady-state measurements, as well as the isostericity concept for complexes of different ions with the same carrier (kis invariant). These also allow us to determine the aqueous phase membrane and torus membrane partition coefficients. Finally, the observed increase in kis from nonactin to tetranactin and, for all homologues, from GMO-decane to solvent-free GMO membranes, together with the concomitant decrease in kDi, can be explained in terms of modifications of electrostatic energy profiles induced by variations in carrier size and membrane thickness.

  20. Counterion-mediated pattern formation in membranes containing anionic lipids

    PubMed Central

    Slochower, David R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Tourdot, Richard W.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Janmey, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Most lipid components of cell membranes are either neutral, like cholesterol, or zwitterionic, like phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. Very few lipids, such as sphingosine, are cationic at physiological pH. These generally interact only transiently with the lipid bilayer, and their synthetic analogs are often designed to destabilize the membrane for drug or DNA delivery. However, anionic lipids are common in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell membranes. The net charge per anionic phospholipid ranges from −1 for the most abundant anionic lipids such has phosphatidylserine, to near −7 for phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5 trisphosphate, although the effective charge depends on many environmental factors. Anionic phospholipids and other negatively charged lipids such as lipopolysaccharides are not randomly distributed in the lipid bilayer, but are highly restricted to specific leaflets of the bilayer and to regions near transmembrane proteins or other organized structures within the plane of the membrane. This review highlights some recent evidence that counterions, in the form of monovalent or divalent metal ions, polyamines, or cationic protein domains, have a large influence of the lateral distribution of anionic lipids within the membrane, and that lateral demixing of anionic lipids has effects on membrane curvature and protein function that are important for biological control. PMID:24556233

  1. Abundant genetic overlap between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases indicates shared molecular genetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Ole A; Desikan, Rahul S; Wang, Yunpeng; Thompson, Wesley K; Schork, Andrew J; Zuber, Verena; Doncheva, Nadezhda T; Ellinghaus, Eva; Albrecht, Mario; Mattingsdal, Morten; Franke, Andre; Lie, Benedicte A; Mills, Ian G; Mills, Ian; Aukrust, Pål; McEvoy, Linda K; Djurovic, Srdjan; Karlsen, Tom H; Dale, Anders M

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases, but the nature of these associations is not well understood. We used genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to investigate shared single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases. We analyzed data from GWAS (n~200,000 individuals), applying new False Discovery Rate (FDR) methods, to investigate genetic overlap between blood lipid levels [triglycerides (TG), low density lipoproteins (LDL), high density lipoproteins (HDL)] and a selection of archetypal immune-mediated diseases (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, psoriasis and sarcoidosis). We found significant polygenic pleiotropy between the blood lipids and all the investigated immune-mediated diseases. We discovered several shared risk loci between the immune-mediated diseases and TG (n = 88), LDL (n = 87) and HDL (n = 52). Three-way analyses differentiated the pattern of pleiotropy among the immune-mediated diseases. The new pleiotropic loci increased the number of functional gene network nodes representing blood lipid loci by 40%. Pathway analyses implicated several novel shared mechanisms for immune pathogenesis and lipid biology, including glycosphingolipid synthesis (e.g. FUT2) and intestinal host-microbe interactions (e.g. ATG16L1). We demonstrate a shared genetic basis for blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases independent of environmental factors. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into dyslipidemia and immune-mediated diseases and may have implications for therapeutic trials involving lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:25853426

  2. Abundant genetic overlap between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases indicates shared molecular genetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Ole A; Desikan, Rahul S; Wang, Yunpeng; Thompson, Wesley K; Schork, Andrew J; Zuber, Verena; Doncheva, Nadezhda T; Ellinghaus, Eva; Albrecht, Mario; Mattingsdal, Morten; Franke, Andre; Lie, Benedicte A; Mills, Ian G; Mills, Ian; Aukrust, Pål; McEvoy, Linda K; Djurovic, Srdjan; Karlsen, Tom H; Dale, Anders M

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases, but the nature of these associations is not well understood. We used genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to investigate shared single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases. We analyzed data from GWAS (n~200,000 individuals), applying new False Discovery Rate (FDR) methods, to investigate genetic overlap between blood lipid levels [triglycerides (TG), low density lipoproteins (LDL), high density lipoproteins (HDL)] and a selection of archetypal immune-mediated diseases (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, psoriasis and sarcoidosis). We found significant polygenic pleiotropy between the blood lipids and all the investigated immune-mediated diseases. We discovered several shared risk loci between the immune-mediated diseases and TG (n = 88), LDL (n = 87) and HDL (n = 52). Three-way analyses differentiated the pattern of pleiotropy among the immune-mediated diseases. The new pleiotropic loci increased the number of functional gene network nodes representing blood lipid loci by 40%. Pathway analyses implicated several novel shared mechanisms for immune pathogenesis and lipid biology, including glycosphingolipid synthesis (e.g. FUT2) and intestinal host-microbe interactions (e.g. ATG16L1). We demonstrate a shared genetic basis for blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases independent of environmental factors. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into dyslipidemia and immune-mediated diseases and may have implications for therapeutic trials involving lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory agents.

  3. Conversion of α-linolenic acid to long-chain omega-3 fatty acid derivatives and alterations of HDL density subfractions and plasma lipids with dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids in Monk parrots (Myiopsitta monachus).

    PubMed

    Petzinger, C; Larner, C; Heatley, J J; Bailey, C A; MacFarlane, R D; Bauer, J E

    2014-04-01

    The effect of α-linolenic acid from a flaxseed (FLX)-enriched diet on plasma lipid and fatty acid metabolism and possible atherosclerosis risk factors was studied in Monk parrots (Myiopsitta monachus). Twenty-four Monk parrots were randomly assigned to diets containing either 10% ground SUNs or 10% ground FLXs. Feed intake was calculated daily. Blood samples, body condition scores and body weights were obtained at -5 weeks, day 0, 7, 14, 28, 42 and 70. Plasma samples were analysed for total cholesterol, free cholesterol, triacylglycerols and lipoproteins. Phospholipid subfraction fatty acid profiles were determined. By day 70, the FLX group had significantly higher plasma phospholipid fatty acids including 18:3n-3 (α-linolenic acid), 20:5n-3 (eicosapentaenoic acid) and 22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid). The sunflower group had significantly higher plasma phospholipid levels of 20:4n-6 (arachidonic acid). By day 70, the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) peak shifted resulting in significantly different HDL peak densities between the two experimental groups (1.097 g/ml FLX group and 1.095 g/ml SUN group, p = 0.028). The plasma fatty acid results indicate that Monk parrots can readily convert α-linolenic acid to the long-chain omega-3 derivatives including docosahexaenoic acid and reduce 20:4n-6 accumulation in plasma phospholipids. The reason for a shift in the HDL peak density is unknown at this time. PMID:23600588

  4. Conversion of α-linolenic acid to long-chain omega-3 fatty acid derivatives and alterations of HDL density subfractions and plasma lipids with dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids in Monk parrots (Myiopsitta monachus).

    PubMed

    Petzinger, C; Larner, C; Heatley, J J; Bailey, C A; MacFarlane, R D; Bauer, J E

    2014-04-01

    The effect of α-linolenic acid from a flaxseed (FLX)-enriched diet on plasma lipid and fatty acid metabolism and possible atherosclerosis risk factors was studied in Monk parrots (Myiopsitta monachus). Twenty-four Monk parrots were randomly assigned to diets containing either 10% ground SUNs or 10% ground FLXs. Feed intake was calculated daily. Blood samples, body condition scores and body weights were obtained at -5 weeks, day 0, 7, 14, 28, 42 and 70. Plasma samples were analysed for total cholesterol, free cholesterol, triacylglycerols and lipoproteins. Phospholipid subfraction fatty acid profiles were determined. By day 70, the FLX group had significantly higher plasma phospholipid fatty acids including 18:3n-3 (α-linolenic acid), 20:5n-3 (eicosapentaenoic acid) and 22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid). The sunflower group had significantly higher plasma phospholipid levels of 20:4n-6 (arachidonic acid). By day 70, the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) peak shifted resulting in significantly different HDL peak densities between the two experimental groups (1.097 g/ml FLX group and 1.095 g/ml SUN group, p = 0.028). The plasma fatty acid results indicate that Monk parrots can readily convert α-linolenic acid to the long-chain omega-3 derivatives including docosahexaenoic acid and reduce 20:4n-6 accumulation in plasma phospholipids. The reason for a shift in the HDL peak density is unknown at this time.

  5. Phloem proteomics reveals new lipid-binding proteins with a putative role in lipid-mediated signaling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barbaglia, Allison M.; Tamot, Banita; Greve, Veronica; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne

    2016-04-28

    Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho-) lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and thatmore » they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012). Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I) a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II) a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III) and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein), a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH), which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while all

  6. Phloem Proteomics Reveals New Lipid-Binding Proteins with a Putative Role in Lipid-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Barbaglia, Allison M.; Tamot, Banita; Greve, Veronica; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho-) lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and that they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012). Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I) a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II) a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III) and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein), a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH), which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while all three

  7. Drosophila Lipophorin Receptors Recruit the Lipoprotein LTP to the Plasma Membrane to Mediate Lipid Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Míriam; Mejía-Morales, John E.; Culi, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    Lipophorin, the main Drosophila lipoprotein, circulates in the hemolymph transporting lipids between organs following routes that must adapt to changing physiological requirements. Lipophorin receptors expressed in developmentally dynamic patterns in tissues such as imaginal discs, oenocytes and ovaries control the timing and tissular distribution of lipid uptake. Using an affinity purification strategy, we identified a novel ligand for the lipophorin receptors, the circulating lipoprotein Lipid Transfer Particle (LTP). We show that specific isoforms of the lipophorin receptors mediate the extracellular accumulation of LTP in imaginal discs and ovaries. The interaction requires the LA-1 module in the lipophorin receptors and is strengthened by a contiguous region of 16 conserved amino acids. Lipophorin receptor variants that do not interact with LTP cannot mediate lipid uptake, revealing an essential role of LTP in the process. In addition, we show that lipophorin associates with the lipophorin receptors and with the extracellular matrix through weak interactions. However, during lipophorin receptor-mediated lipid uptake, LTP is required for a transient stabilization of lipophorin in the basolateral plasma membrane of imaginal disc cells. Together, our data suggests a molecular mechanism by which the lipophorin receptors tether LTP to the plasma membrane in lipid acceptor tissues. LTP would interact with lipophorin particles adsorbed to the extracellular matrix and with the plasma membrane, catalyzing the exchange of lipids between them. PMID:26121667

  8. The TULIP superfamily of eukaryotic lipid-binding proteins as a mediator of lipid sensing and transport.

    PubMed

    Alva, Vikram; Lupas, Andrei N

    2016-08-01

    The tubular lipid-binding (TULIP) superfamily has emerged in recent years as a major mediator of lipid sensing and transport in eukaryotes. It currently encompasses three protein families, SMP-like, BPI-like, and Takeout-like, which share a common fold. This fold consists of a long helix wrapped in a highly curved anti-parallel β-sheet, enclosing a central, lipophilic cavity. The SMP-like proteins, which include subunits of the ERMES complex and the extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts), appear to be mainly located at membrane contacts sites (MCSs) between organelles, mediating inter-organelle lipid exchange. The BPI-like proteins, which include the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), the LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-binding protein (LBP), the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), and the phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), are either involved in innate immunity against bacteria through their ability to sense lipopolysaccharides, as is the case for BPI and LBP, or in lipid exchange between lipoprotein particles, as is the case for CETP and PLTP. The Takeout-like proteins, which are comprised of insect juvenile hormone-binding proteins and arthropod allergens, transport, where known, lipid hormones to target tissues during insect development. In all cases, the activity of these proteins is underpinned by their ability to bind large, hydrophobic ligands in their central cavity and segregate them away from the aqueous environment. Furthermore, where they are involved in lipid exchange, recent structural studies have highlighted their ability to establish lipophilic, tubular channels, either between organelles in the case of SMP domains or between lipoprotein particles in the case of CETP. Here, we review the current knowledge on the structure, versatile functions, and evolution of the TULIP superfamily. We propose a deep evolutionary split in this superfamily, predating the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor, between the SMP-like proteins, which act on

  9. The TULIP superfamily of eukaryotic lipid-binding proteins as a mediator of lipid sensing and transport.

    PubMed

    Alva, Vikram; Lupas, Andrei N

    2016-08-01

    The tubular lipid-binding (TULIP) superfamily has emerged in recent years as a major mediator of lipid sensing and transport in eukaryotes. It currently encompasses three protein families, SMP-like, BPI-like, and Takeout-like, which share a common fold. This fold consists of a long helix wrapped in a highly curved anti-parallel β-sheet, enclosing a central, lipophilic cavity. The SMP-like proteins, which include subunits of the ERMES complex and the extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts), appear to be mainly located at membrane contacts sites (MCSs) between organelles, mediating inter-organelle lipid exchange. The BPI-like proteins, which include the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), the LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-binding protein (LBP), the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), and the phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), are either involved in innate immunity against bacteria through their ability to sense lipopolysaccharides, as is the case for BPI and LBP, or in lipid exchange between lipoprotein particles, as is the case for CETP and PLTP. The Takeout-like proteins, which are comprised of insect juvenile hormone-binding proteins and arthropod allergens, transport, where known, lipid hormones to target tissues during insect development. In all cases, the activity of these proteins is underpinned by their ability to bind large, hydrophobic ligands in their central cavity and segregate them away from the aqueous environment. Furthermore, where they are involved in lipid exchange, recent structural studies have highlighted their ability to establish lipophilic, tubular channels, either between organelles in the case of SMP domains or between lipoprotein particles in the case of CETP. Here, we review the current knowledge on the structure, versatile functions, and evolution of the TULIP superfamily. We propose a deep evolutionary split in this superfamily, predating the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor, between the SMP-like proteins, which act on

  10. Bordetella parapertussis PagP Mediates the Addition of Two Palmitates to the Lipopolysaccharide Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Hittle, L. E.; Jones, J. W.; Hajjar, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica PagP (PagPBB) is a lipid A palmitoyl transferase that is required for resistance to antibody-dependent complement-mediated killing in a murine model of infection. B. parapertussis contains a putative pagP homolog (encoding B. parapertussis PagP [PagPBPa]), but its role in the biosynthesis of lipid A, the membrane anchor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), has not been investigated. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that wild-type B. parapertussis lipid A consists of a heterogeneous mixture of lipid A structures, with penta- and hexa-acylated structures containing one and two palmitates, respectively. Through mutational analysis, we demonstrate that PagPBPa is required for the modification of lipid A with palmitate. While PagPBB transfers a single palmitate to the lipid A C-3′ position, PagPBPa transfers palmitates to the lipid A C-2 and C-3′ positions. The addition of two palmitate acyl chains is unique to B. parapertussis. Mutation of pagPBPa resulted in a mutant strain with increased sensitivity to antimicrobial peptide killing and decreased endotoxicity, as evidenced by reduced proinflammatory responses via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to the hypoacylated LPS. Therefore, PagP-mediated modification of lipid A regulates outer membrane function and may be a means to modify interactions between the bacterium and its human host during infection. PMID:25422302

  11. Bordetella parapertussis PagP mediates the addition of two palmitates to the lipopolysaccharide lipid A.

    PubMed

    Hittle, L E; Jones, J W; Hajjar, A M; Ernst, R K; Preston, A

    2015-02-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica PagP (PagPBB) is a lipid A palmitoyl transferase that is required for resistance to antibody-dependent complement-mediated killing in a murine model of infection. B. parapertussis contains a putative pagP homolog (encoding B. parapertussis PagP [PagPBPa]), but its role in the biosynthesis of lipid A, the membrane anchor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), has not been investigated. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that wild-type B. parapertussis lipid A consists of a heterogeneous mixture of lipid A structures, with penta- and hexa-acylated structures containing one and two palmitates, respectively. Through mutational analysis, we demonstrate that PagPBPa is required for the modification of lipid A with palmitate. While PagPBB transfers a single palmitate to the lipid A C-3' position, PagPBPa transfers palmitates to the lipid A C-2 and C-3' positions. The addition of two palmitate acyl chains is unique to B. parapertussis. Mutation of pagPBPa resulted in a mutant strain with increased sensitivity to antimicrobial peptide killing and decreased endotoxicity, as evidenced by reduced proinflammatory responses via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to the hypoacylated LPS. Therefore, PagP-mediated modification of lipid A regulates outer membrane function and may be a means to modify interactions between the bacterium and its human host during infection. PMID:25422302

  12. Signal integration by lipid-mediated spatial cross talk between Ras nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Liang, Hong; Rodkey, Travis; Ariotti, Nicholas; Parton, Robert G; Hancock, John F

    2014-03-01

    Lipid-anchored Ras GTPases form transient, spatially segregated nanoclusters on the plasma membrane that are essential for high-fidelity signal transmission. The lipid composition of Ras nanoclusters, however, has not previously been investigated. High-resolution spatial mapping shows that different Ras nanoclusters have distinct lipid compositions, indicating that Ras proteins engage in isoform-selective lipid sorting and accounting for different signal outputs from different Ras isoforms. Phosphatidylserine is a common constituent of all Ras nanoclusters but is only an obligate structural component of K-Ras nanoclusters. Segregation of K-Ras and H-Ras into spatially and compositionally distinct lipid assemblies is exquisitely sensitive to plasma membrane phosphatidylserine levels. Phosphatidylserine spatial organization is also modified by Ras nanocluster formation. In consequence, Ras nanoclusters engage in remote lipid-mediated communication, whereby activated H-Ras disrupts the assembly and operation of spatially segregated K-Ras nanoclusters. Computational modeling and experimentation reveal that complex effects of caveolin and cortical actin on Ras nanoclustering are similarly mediated through regulation of phosphatidylserine spatiotemporal dynamics. We conclude that phosphatidylserine maintains the lateral segregation of diverse lipid-based assemblies on the plasma membrane and that lateral connectivity between spatially remote lipid assemblies offers important previously unexplored opportunities for signal integration and signal processing.

  13. Specific lipid mediator signatures of human phagocytes: microparticles stimulate macrophage efferocytosis and pro-resolving mediators

    PubMed Central

    Dalli, Jesmond

    2012-01-01

    Phagocytes orchestrate acute inflammation and host defense. Here we carried out lipid mediator (LM) metabololipidomics profiling distinct phagocytes: neutrophils (PMN), apoptotic PMN, and macrophages. Efferocytosis increased specialized pro-resolving mediator (SPM) biosynthesis, including Resolvin D1 (RvD1), RvD2, and RvE2, which were further elevated by PMN microparticles. Apoptotic PMN gave elevated prostaglandin E2, lipoxin B4 and RvE2, whereas zymosan-stimulated PMN showed predominantly leukotriene B4 and 20-OH-leukotriene B4, as well as lipoxin marker 5,15-diHETE. Using deuterium-labeled precursors (d8-arachidonic acid, d5-eicosapentaenoic acid, and d5-docosahexaenoic acid), we found that apoptotic PMN and microparticles contributed to SPM biosynthesis during efferocytosis. M2 macrophages produced SPM including maresin-1 (299 ± 8 vs 45 ± 6 pg/2.5 × 105 cells; P < .01) and lower amounts of leukotriene B4 and prostaglandin than M1. Apoptotic PMN uptake by both macrophage subtypes led to modulation of their LM profiles. Leukotriene B4 was down-regulated in M2 (668 ± 81 vs 351 ± 39 pg/2.5 × 105 cells; P < .01), whereas SPM including lipoxin A4 (977 ± 173 vs 675 ± 167 pg/2.5 × 105 cells; P < .05) were increased. Conversely, uptake of apoptotic PMN by M2 macrophages reduced (∼ 25%) overall LM. Together, these results establish LM signature profiles of human phagocytes and related subpopulations. Moreover, they provide evidence for microparticle regulation of specific endogenous LM during defined stages of the acute inflammatory process and their dynamic changes in human primary phagocytes. PMID:22904297

  14. Novel cajaninstilbene acid derivatives as antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Geng, Zhi-Zhong; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Lin, Jing; Huang, Mei-Yan; An, Lin-Kun; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Sun, Ping-Hua; Ye, Wen-Cai; Chen, Wei-Min

    2015-07-15

    Discovery of novel antibacterial agents with new structural scaffolds that combat drug-resistant pathogens is an urgent task. Cajaninstilbene acid, which is isolated from pigeonpea leaves, has shown antibacterial activity. In this study, a series of cajaninstilbene acid derivatives were designed and synthesized. The antibacterial activities of these compounds against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, as well as nine strains of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria are evaluated,and the related structure-activity relationships are discussed. Assays suggest that some of the synthetic cajaninstilbene acid derivatives exhibit potent antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacterial strains and MRSA. Among these compounds, 5b, 5c, 5j and 5k show better antibacterial activity than the positive control compounds. The results of MTT assays illustrate the low cytotoxicity of the active compounds.

  15. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries as driving force for HIV fusion peptide-mediated fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2016-01-01

    Lipids and proteins are organized in cellular membranes in clusters, often called ‘lipid rafts'. Although raft-constituent ordered lipid domains are thought to be energetically unfavourable for membrane fusion, rafts have long been implicated in many biological fusion processes. For the case of HIV gp41-mediated membrane fusion, this apparent contradiction can be resolved by recognizing that the interfaces between ordered and disordered lipid domains are the predominant sites of fusion. Here we show that line tension at lipid domain boundaries contributes significant energy to drive gp41-fusion peptide-mediated fusion. This energy, which depends on the hydrophobic mismatch between ordered and disordered lipid domains, may contribute tens of kBT to fusion, that is, it is comparable to the energy required to form a lipid stalk intermediate. Line-active compounds such as vitamin E lower line tension in inhomogeneous membranes, thereby inhibit membrane fusion, and thus may be useful natural viral entry inhibitors. PMID:27113279

  16. Synthesis of Lipid Mediators during UVB-Induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sisignano, Marco; Angioni, Carlo; Ferreiros, Nerea; Schuh, Claus-Dieter; Suo, Jing; Schreiber, Yannick; Dawes, John M.; Antunes-Martins, Ana; Bennett, David L. H.; McMahon, Stephen B.; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral sensitization during inflammatory pain is mediated by a variety of endogenous proalgesic mediators including a number of oxidized lipids, some of which serve endogenous modulators of sensory TRP-channels. These lipids are eicosanoids of the arachidonic acid and linoleic acid pathway, as well as lysophophatidic acids (LPAs). However, their regulation pattern during inflammatory pain and their contribution to peripheral sensitization is still unclear. Here, we used the UVB-model for inflammatory pain to investigate alterations of lipid concentrations at the site of inflammation, the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) as well as the spinal dorsal horn and quantified 21 lipid species from five different lipid families at the peak of inflammation 48 hours post irradiation. We found that known proinflammatory lipids as well as lipids with unknown roles in inflammatory pain to be strongly increased in the skin, whereas surprisingly little changes of lipid levels were seen in DRGs or the dorsal horn. Importantly, although there are profound differences between the number of cytochrome (CYP) genes between mice and rats, CYP-derived lipids were regulated similarly in both species. Since TRPV1 agonists such as LPA 18∶1, 9- and 13-HODE, 5- and 12-HETE were elevated in the skin, they may contribute to thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia during UVB-induced inflammatory pain. These results may explain why some studies show relatively weak analgesic effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors in UVB-induced skin inflammation, as they do not inhibit synthesis of other proalgesic lipids such as LPA 18∶1, 9-and 13-HODE and HETEs. PMID:24349046

  17. Reversal of intramyocellular lipid accumulation by lipophagy and a p62-mediated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lam, T; Harmancey, R; Vasquez, H; Gilbert, B; Patel, N; Hariharan, V; Lee, A; Covey, M; Taegtmeyer, H

    2016-01-01

    We have previously observed the reversal of lipid droplet deposition in skeletal muscle of morbidly obese patients following bariatric surgery. We now investigated whether activation of autophagy is the mechanism underlying this observation. For this purpose, we incubated rat L6 myocytes over a period of 6 days with long-chain fatty acids (an equimolar, 1.0 mM, mixture of oleate and palmitate in the incubation medium). At day 6, the autophagic inhibitor (bafilomycin A1, 200 nM) and the autophagic activator (rapamycin, 1 μM) were added separately or in combination for 48 h. Intracellular triglyceride (TG) accumulation was visualized and quantified colorimetrically. Protein markers of autophagic flux (LC3 and p62) and cell death (caspase-3 cleavage) were measured by immunoblotting. Inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin increased TG accumulation and also increased lipid-mediated cell death. Conversely, activation of autophagy by rapamycin reduced both intracellular lipid accumulation and cell death. Unexpectedly, treatment with both drugs added simultaneously resulted in decreased lipid accumulation. In this treatment group, immunoblotting revealed p62 degradation (autophagic flux), immunofluorescence revealed the colocalization of p62 with lipid droplets, and co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction of p62 with ADRP (adipose differentiation-related protein), a lipid droplet membrane protein. Thus the association of p62 with lipid droplet turnover suggests a novel pathway for the breakdown of lipid droplets in muscle cells. In addition, treatment with rapamycin and bafilomycin together also suggested the export of TG into the extracellular space. We conclude that lipophagy promotes the clearance of lipids from myocytes and switches to an alternative, p62-mediated, lysosomal-independent pathway in the context of chronic lipid overload (*P<0.05, **P<0.01, ***P<0.001, ****P<0.0001). PMID:27625792

  18. Reversal of intramyocellular lipid accumulation by lipophagy and a p62-mediated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lam, T; Harmancey, R; Vasquez, H; Gilbert, B; Patel, N; Hariharan, V; Lee, A; Covey, M; Taegtmeyer, H

    2016-01-01

    We have previously observed the reversal of lipid droplet deposition in skeletal muscle of morbidly obese patients following bariatric surgery. We now investigated whether activation of autophagy is the mechanism underlying this observation. For this purpose, we incubated rat L6 myocytes over a period of 6 days with long-chain fatty acids (an equimolar, 1.0 mM, mixture of oleate and palmitate in the incubation medium). At day 6, the autophagic inhibitor (bafilomycin A1, 200 nM) and the autophagic activator (rapamycin, 1 μM) were added separately or in combination for 48 h. Intracellular triglyceride (TG) accumulation was visualized and quantified colorimetrically. Protein markers of autophagic flux (LC3 and p62) and cell death (caspase-3 cleavage) were measured by immunoblotting. Inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin increased TG accumulation and also increased lipid-mediated cell death. Conversely, activation of autophagy by rapamycin reduced both intracellular lipid accumulation and cell death. Unexpectedly, treatment with both drugs added simultaneously resulted in decreased lipid accumulation. In this treatment group, immunoblotting revealed p62 degradation (autophagic flux), immunofluorescence revealed the colocalization of p62 with lipid droplets, and co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction of p62 with ADRP (adipose differentiation-related protein), a lipid droplet membrane protein. Thus the association of p62 with lipid droplet turnover suggests a novel pathway for the breakdown of lipid droplets in muscle cells. In addition, treatment with rapamycin and bafilomycin together also suggested the export of TG into the extracellular space. We conclude that lipophagy promotes the clearance of lipids from myocytes and switches to an alternative, p62-mediated, lysosomal-independent pathway in the context of chronic lipid overload (*P<0.05, **P<0.01, ***P<0.001, ****P<0.0001).

  19. Reversal of intramyocellular lipid accumulation by lipophagy and a p62-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Lam, T; Harmancey, R; Vasquez, H; Gilbert, B; Patel, N; Hariharan, V; Lee, A; Covey, M; Taegtmeyer, H

    2016-01-01

    We have previously observed the reversal of lipid droplet deposition in skeletal muscle of morbidly obese patients following bariatric surgery. We now investigated whether activation of autophagy is the mechanism underlying this observation. For this purpose, we incubated rat L6 myocytes over a period of 6 days with long-chain fatty acids (an equimolar, 1.0 mM, mixture of oleate and palmitate in the incubation medium). At day 6, the autophagic inhibitor (bafilomycin A1, 200 nM) and the autophagic activator (rapamycin, 1 μM) were added separately or in combination for 48 h. Intracellular triglyceride (TG) accumulation was visualized and quantified colorimetrically. Protein markers of autophagic flux (LC3 and p62) and cell death (caspase-3 cleavage) were measured by immunoblotting. Inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin increased TG accumulation and also increased lipid-mediated cell death. Conversely, activation of autophagy by rapamycin reduced both intracellular lipid accumulation and cell death. Unexpectedly, treatment with both drugs added simultaneously resulted in decreased lipid accumulation. In this treatment group, immunoblotting revealed p62 degradation (autophagic flux), immunofluorescence revealed the colocalization of p62 with lipid droplets, and co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction of p62 with ADRP (adipose differentiation-related protein), a lipid droplet membrane protein. Thus the association of p62 with lipid droplet turnover suggests a novel pathway for the breakdown of lipid droplets in muscle cells. In addition, treatment with rapamycin and bafilomycin together also suggested the export of TG into the extracellular space. We conclude that lipophagy promotes the clearance of lipids from myocytes and switches to an alternative, p62-mediated, lysosomal-independent pathway in the context of chronic lipid overload (*P<0.05, **P<0.01, ***P<0.001, ****P<0.0001). PMID:27625792

  20. The Role of Lipid Competition for Endosymbiont-Mediated Protection against Parasitoid Wasps in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Schüpfer, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Insects commonly harbor facultative bacterial endosymbionts, such as Wolbachia and Spiroplasma species, that are vertically transmitted from mothers to their offspring. These endosymbiontic bacteria increase their propagation by manipulating host reproduction or by protecting their hosts against natural enemies. While an increasing number of studies have reported endosymbiont-mediated protection, little is known about the mechanisms underlying this protection. Here, we analyze the mechanisms underlying protection from parasitoid wasps in Drosophila melanogaster mediated by its facultative endosymbiont Spiroplasma poulsonii. Our results indicate that S. poulsonii exerts protection against two distantly related wasp species, Leptopilina boulardi and Asobara tabida. S. poulsonii-mediated protection against parasitoid wasps takes place at the pupal stage and is not associated with an increased cellular immune response. In this work, we provide three important observations that support the notion that S. poulsonii bacteria and wasp larvae compete for host lipids and that this competition underlies symbiont-mediated protection. First, lipid quantification shows that both S. poulsonii and parasitoid wasps deplete D. melanogaster hemolymph lipids. Second, the depletion of hemolymphatic lipids using the Lpp RNA interference (Lpp RNAi) construct reduces wasp success in larvae that are not infected with S. poulsonii and blocks S. poulsonii growth. Third, we show that the growth of S. poulsonii bacteria is not affected by the presence of the wasps, indicating that when S. poulsonii is present, larval wasps will develop in a lipid-depleted environment. We propose that competition for host lipids may be relevant to endosymbiont-mediated protection in other systems and could explain the broad spectrum of protection provided. PMID:27406568

  1. Biosynthesis of mercapturic acid derivative of the labdane-type diterpene, cyslabdan that potentiates imipenem activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: cyslabdan is generated by mycothiol-mediated xenobiotic detoxification.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Haruo; Shin-Ya, Kazuo; Nagamitsu, Tohru; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    into the MSH-S-conjugate with MSH, which was achieved through a non-enzymatic nucleophilic reaction. The MSH-S-conjugate of 4 generated was further hydrolyzed to generate the mercapturic acid derivative, 1, by MSH-S-conjugate amidase and 1 was excreted from the mycelia.

  2. Lymphoid tissue phospholipase A2 group IID resolves contact hypersensitivity by driving antiinflammatory lipid mediators

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Kei; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Sato, Hiroyasu; Shimo, Kanako; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Ishikawa, Yukio; Ishii, Toshiharu; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo; Kabashima, Kenji; Arita, Makoto; Arai, Hiroyuki; Lambeau, Gérard; Bollinger, James M.; Hara, Shuntaro; Gelb, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Resolution of inflammation is an active process that is mediated in part by antiinflammatory lipid mediators. Although phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes have been implicated in the promotion of inflammation through mobilizing lipid mediators, the molecular entity of PLA2 subtypes acting upstream of antiinflammatory lipid mediators remains unknown. Herein, we show that secreted PLA2 group IID (PLA2G2D) is preferentially expressed in CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages and displays a pro-resolving function. In hapten-induced contact dermatitis, resolution, not propagation, of inflammation was compromised in skin and LNs of PLA2G2D-deficient mice (Pla2g2d−/−), in which the immune balance was shifted toward a proinflammatory state over an antiinflammatory state. Bone marrow-derived DCs from Pla2g2d−/− mice were hyperactivated and elicited skin inflammation after intravenous transfer into mice. Lipidomics analysis revealed that PLA2G2D in the LNs contributed to mobilization of a pool of polyunsaturated fatty acids that could serve as precursors for antiinflammatory/pro-resolving lipid mediators such as resolvin D1 and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2, which reduced Th1 cytokine production and surface MHC class II expression in LN cells or DCs. Altogether, our results highlight PLA2G2D as a “resolving sPLA2” that ameliorates inflammation through mobilizing pro-resolving lipid mediators and points to a potential use of this enzyme for treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:23690440

  3. Phosphatidylthreonine and Lipid-Mediated Control of Parasite Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo-Olarte, Ruben D.; Brouwers, Jos F.; Kuchipudi, Arunakar; Helms, J. Bernd; Biswas, Aindrila; Dunay, Ildiko R.; Lucius, Richard; Gupta, Nishith

    2015-01-01

    The major membrane phospholipid classes, described thus far, include phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho), phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn), phosphatidylserine (PtdSer), and phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns). Here, we demonstrate the natural occurrence and genetic origin of an exclusive and rather abundant lipid, phosphatidylthreonine (PtdThr), in a common eukaryotic model parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. The parasite expresses a novel enzyme PtdThr synthase (TgPTS) to produce this lipid in its endoplasmic reticulum. Genetic disruption of TgPTS abrogates de novo synthesis of PtdThr and impairs the lytic cycle and virulence of T. gondii. The observed phenotype is caused by a reduced gliding motility, which blights the parasite egress and ensuing host cell invasion. Notably, the PTS mutant can prevent acute as well as yet-incurable chronic toxoplasmosis in a mouse model, which endorses its potential clinical utility as a metabolically attenuated vaccine. Together, the work also illustrates the functional speciation of two evolutionarily related membrane phospholipids, i.e., PtdThr and PtdSer. PMID:26565995

  4. Lipid rafts-mediated endocytosis and physiology-based cell membrane traffic models of doxorubicin liposomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinghuan; Gao, Lei; Tan, Xi; Li, Feiyang; Zhao, Ming; Peng, Shiqi

    2016-08-01

    The clathrin-mediated endocytosis is likely a major mechanism of liposomes' internalization. A kinetic approach was used to assess the internalization mechanism of doxorubicin (Dox) loaded cationic liposomes and to establish physiology-based cell membrane traffic mathematic models. Lipid rafts-mediated endocytosis, including dynamin-dependent or -independent endocytosis of noncaveolar structure, was a dominant process. The mathematic models divided Dox loaded liposomes binding lipid rafts (B) into saturable binding (SB) and nonsaturable binding (NSB) followed by energy-driven endocytosis. The intracellular trafficking demonstrated early endosome-late endosome-lysosome or early/late endosome-cytoplasm-nucleus pathways. The three properties of liposome structures, i.e., cationic lipid, fusogenic lipid, and pegylation, were investigated to compare their contributions to cell membrane and intracellular traffic. The results revealed great contribution of cationic lipid DOTAP and fusogenic lipid DOPE to cell membrane binding and internalization. The valid Dox in the nuclei of HepG2 and A375 cells treated with cationic liposomes containing 40mol% of DOPE were 1.2-fold and 1.5-fold higher than that in the nuclei of HepG2 and A375 cells treated with liposomes containing 20mol% of DOPE, respectively, suggesting the dependence of cell type. This tendency was proportional to the increase of cell-associated total liposomal Dox. The mathematic models would be useful to predict intracellular trafficking of liposomal Dox.

  5. Lipid rafts-mediated endocytosis and physiology-based cell membrane traffic models of doxorubicin liposomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinghuan; Gao, Lei; Tan, Xi; Li, Feiyang; Zhao, Ming; Peng, Shiqi

    2016-08-01

    The clathrin-mediated endocytosis is likely a major mechanism of liposomes' internalization. A kinetic approach was used to assess the internalization mechanism of doxorubicin (Dox) loaded cationic liposomes and to establish physiology-based cell membrane traffic mathematic models. Lipid rafts-mediated endocytosis, including dynamin-dependent or -independent endocytosis of noncaveolar structure, was a dominant process. The mathematic models divided Dox loaded liposomes binding lipid rafts (B) into saturable binding (SB) and nonsaturable binding (NSB) followed by energy-driven endocytosis. The intracellular trafficking demonstrated early endosome-late endosome-lysosome or early/late endosome-cytoplasm-nucleus pathways. The three properties of liposome structures, i.e., cationic lipid, fusogenic lipid, and pegylation, were investigated to compare their contributions to cell membrane and intracellular traffic. The results revealed great contribution of cationic lipid DOTAP and fusogenic lipid DOPE to cell membrane binding and internalization. The valid Dox in the nuclei of HepG2 and A375 cells treated with cationic liposomes containing 40mol% of DOPE were 1.2-fold and 1.5-fold higher than that in the nuclei of HepG2 and A375 cells treated with liposomes containing 20mol% of DOPE, respectively, suggesting the dependence of cell type. This tendency was proportional to the increase of cell-associated total liposomal Dox. The mathematic models would be useful to predict intracellular trafficking of liposomal Dox. PMID:27117641

  6. Regulation of the NPC2 protein-mediated cholesterol trafficking by membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Gallala, Hichem D; Breiden, Bernadette; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2011-03-01

    Recycling and turnover of cell membranes play a critical role in cell metabolism. The internalization of membranes through the different processes of endocytosis, phagocytosis, and autophagy deliver a considerable amount of membranes and lipids to the endosomal and lysosomal system which is tasked with its degradation. Its failure to do so leads to severe fatal neurodegenerative diseases. In order to better understand how membranes are degraded, we have to investigate the complex interactions that take place in this compartment between complex membrane lipids, enzymes and lipid binding and transfer proteins involved. To this end, we developed lipid transfer and fusion assays which allow us to quantify these interactions and assess their specificity. The published results of these investigations are summarized in this article. One of our main conclusions is that we have provided evidence for the hypothesis that acid sphingomyelinase stimulates Niemann pick disease protein type 2-mediated cholesterol export substantially by converting sphingomyelin to ceramide in the inner membranes of late endosomes.

  7. 40 CFR 721.6097 - Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphoric acid derivative (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6097 Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... phosphoric acid derivative (PMN P-95-284) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  8. 40 CFR 721.6097 - Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphoric acid derivative (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6097 Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... phosphoric acid derivative (PMN P-95-284) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  9. 40 CFR 721.6097 - Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphoric acid derivative (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6097 Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... phosphoric acid derivative (PMN P-95-284) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  10. 40 CFR 721.6097 - Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphoric acid derivative (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6097 Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... phosphoric acid derivative (PMN P-95-284) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  11. 40 CFR 721.6097 - Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphoric acid derivative (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6097 Phosphoric acid derivative (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... phosphoric acid derivative (PMN P-95-284) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  12. Lipid-Mediated Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in the Pathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, Tahira; Farooqui, Akhlaq A.

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative movement disorder of unknown etiology. PD is characterized by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, depletion of dopamine in the striatum, abnormal mitochondrial and proteasomal functions, and accumulation of α-synuclein that may be closely associated with pathological and clinical abnormalities. Increasing evidence indicates that both oxidative stress and inflammation may play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of PD. Oxidative stress is characterized by increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of glutathione. Lipid mediators for oxidative stress include 4-hydroxynonenal, isoprostanes, isofurans, isoketals, neuroprostanes, and neurofurans. Neuroinflammation is characterized by activated microglial cells that generate proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β. Proinflammatory lipid mediators include prostaglandins and platelet activating factor, together with cytokines may play a prominent role in mediating the progressive neurodegeneration in PD. PMID:21403820

  13. Lipid Vesicle-mediated Affinity Chromatography using Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting (LIMACS): a Novel Method to Analyze Protein-lipid Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bieberich, Erhard

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of lipid protein interaction is difficult because lipids are embedded in cell membranes and therefore, inaccessible to most purification procedures. As an alternative, lipids can be coated on flat surfaces as used for lipid ELISA and Plasmon resonance spectroscopy. However, surface coating lipids do not form microdomain structures, which may be important for the lipid binding properties. Further, these methods do not allow for the purification of larger amounts of proteins binding to their target lipids. To overcome these limitations of testing lipid protein interaction and to purify lipid binding proteins we developed a novel method termed lipid vesicle-mediated affinity chromatography using magnetic-activated cell sorting (LIMACS). In this method, lipid vesicles are prepared with the target lipid and phosphatidylserine as the anchor lipid for Annexin V MACS. Phosphatidylserine is a ubiquitous cell membrane phospholipid that shows high affinity to the protein Annexin V. Using magnetic beads conjugated to Annexin V the phosphatidylserine-containing lipid vesicles will bind to the magnetic beads. When the lipid vesicles are incubated with a cell lysate the protein binding to the target lipid will also be bound to the beads and can be co-purified using MACS. This method can also be used to test if recombinant proteins reconstitute a protein complex binding to the target lipid. We have used this method to show the interaction of atypical PKC (aPKC) with the sphingolipid ceramide and to co-purify prostate apoptosis response 4 (PAR-4), a protein binding to ceramide-associated aPKC. We have also used this method for the reconstitution of a ceramide-associated complex of recombinant aPKC with the cell polarity-related proteins Par6 and Cdc42. Since lipid vesicles can be prepared with a variety of sphingo- or phospholipids, LIMACS offers a versatile test for lipid-protein interaction in a lipid environment that resembles closely that of the cell membrane

  14. Lipid- and adenoviral-mediated gene transfer into AIDS-Kaposi's sarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Campain, J A; Matassa, A A; Felgner, P L; Barnhart, K M; Curiel, D T; Harrison, G S

    1998-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most frequent malignancy occurring in HIV-positive individuals. AIDS-KS is a more aggressive disease than the classical form, frequently having a rapid clinical course with numerous serious complications. Current systemic treatments for KS, such as chemotherapy and the administration of biological modifiers, are complicated by both the drug resistance of the tumor and the dose-limiting toxicity of the reagents. The relative accessibility of many KS lesions makes the disease a particularly attractive candidate for in vivo gene therapy protocols. In this regard, we are interested in delivering conditionally toxic suicide and/or antiangiogenic vectors to accomplish targeted cell death selectively in AIDS-KS cells. To this end, we examined both cationic lipid- and adenoviral-mediated DNA transfection methods. Using the firefly luciferase reporter gene, we optimized numerous variables known to be important in lipid-mediated DNA transfection, including lipid formulation, the amount of lipid and DNA, lipid/DNA ratio, and cell concentration. Under optimal transfection conditions, approximately 5-25% of KS cells expressed the introduced DNA sequences. Adenoviral-mediated DNA delivery was more efficient than lipid delivery in 4 of 5 primary KS cell lines. Two of the lines (RW248 and RW376) were transduced by adenovirus at frequencies approaching 100%; two cell lines (CVU-1 and RW80) gave efficiencies of 20-35%. Two immortalized KS cell lines (KS Y-1 and KS SLK) were poorly infected, giving a transduction efficiency of <5%. These findings demonstrate that gene transfer into AIDS-KS cells is feasible, and suggest that vector strategies may be permissive for translating gene therapy approaches for the disease.

  15. Enzymatic synthesis of cinnamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gia-Sheu; Widjaja, Arief; Ju, Yi-Hsu

    2006-04-01

    Using Novozym 435 as catalyst, the syntheses of ethyl ferulate (EF) from ferulic acid (4-hydroxy 3-methoxy cinnamic acid) and ethanol, and octyl methoxycinnamate (OMC) from p-methoxycinnamic acid and 2-ethyl hexanol were successfully carried out in this study. A conversion of 87% was obtained within 2 days at 75 degrees C for the synthesis of EF. For the synthesis of OMC at 80 degrees C, 90% conversion can be obtained within 1 day. The use of solvent and high reaction temperature resulted in better conversion for the synthesis of cinnamic acid derivatives. Some cinnamic acid esters could also be obtained with higher conversion and shorter reaction times in comparison to other methods reported in the literature. The enzyme can be reused several times before significant activity loss was observed.

  16. Lipoprotein-mediated lipid transport in insects: analogy to the mammalian lipid carrier system and novel concepts for the functioning of LDL receptor family members.

    PubMed

    Rodenburg, Kees W; Van der Horst, Dick J

    2005-09-01

    In all animals, lipoproteins are used to transport lipids through the aqueous circulation. Lipids are delivered to mammalian cells by two different mechanisms: via endocytic uptake of the complete lipoprotein particle mediated by members of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) family, or by selective delivery of lipoprotein-carried lipids at the cell surface, such as lipid uptake following the action of a lipoprotein lipase. Although many structural elements of the lipid transport system of insects are similar to those of mammals, insect lipoprotein-mediated lipid transport was thought to apply only to the latter concept, since the single lipoprotein acts as a reusable lipid shuttle. However, the recent identification of lipoprotein receptors of the LDLR family in insects suggests that lipid transport in these animals may also adopt the first concept. Yet, the endocytic properties of the insect LDLR homologue appear to deviate from those of the mammalian LDLR family members, resulting in the recycling of endocytosed lipoprotein in a transferrin-like manner. This indicates that a hitherto unknown as well as unexpected function can be added to the plethora of functions of LDLR family members. Analysis of the molecular mechanism of the ligand-recycling function of the insect receptor provides also new insight into the possible functioning of the mammalian family members. In the last several years, mammalian and insect lipoprotein-mediated lipid transport systems have been reviewed separately with respect to functioning and lipid delivery. This review, in which new and important developments in the insect field with respect to our understanding of lipid delivery are discussed with a particular focus on the involvement of the LDLR homologue, aims at comparing the two systems, also from an evolutionary biological perspective, and proposes that the two systems are more similar than assumed previously. PMID:16099208

  17. ANGPTL4 mediates shuttling of lipid fuel to brown adipose tissue during sustained cold exposure

    PubMed Central

    Dijk, Wieneke; Heine, Markus; Vergnes, Laurent; Boon, Mariëtte R; Schaart, Gert; Hesselink, Matthijs KC; Reue, Karen; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Rensen, Patrick CN; Heeren, Joerg; Kersten, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) activation via cold exposure is increasingly scrutinized as a potential approach to ameliorate cardio-metabolic risk. Transition to cold temperatures requires changes in the partitioning of energy substrates, re-routing fatty acids to BAT to fuel non-shivering thermogenesis. However, the mechanisms behind the redistribution of energy substrates to BAT remain largely unknown. Angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4), a protein that inhibits lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity, is highly expressed in BAT. Here, we demonstrate that ANGPTL4 is part of a shuttling mechanism that directs fatty acids derived from circulating triglyceride-rich lipoproteins to BAT during cold. Specifically, we show that cold markedly down-regulates ANGPTL4 in BAT, likely via activation of AMPK, enhancing LPL activity and uptake of plasma triglyceride-derived fatty acids. In contrast, cold up-regulates ANGPTL4 in WAT, abolishing a cold-induced increase in LPL activity. Together, our data indicate that ANGPTL4 is an important regulator of plasma lipid partitioning during sustained cold. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08428.001 PMID:26476336

  18. Lipid Raft-Mediated Regulation of Hyaluronan–CD44 Interactions in Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan is a major component of the extracellular matrix and plays pivotal roles in inflammation and cancer. Hyaluronan oligomers are frequently found in these pathological conditions, in which they exert their effects via association with the transmembrane receptor CD44. Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains that may regulate membrane receptors while serving as platforms for transmembrane signaling at the cell surface. This article focuses on the recent discovery that lipid rafts regulate the interaction between CD44 and hyaluronan, which depends largely on hyaluronan’s size. Lipid rafts regulate CD44’s ability to bind hyaluronan in T cells, control the rolling adhesion of lymphocytes on vascular endothelial cells, and regulate hyaluronan- and CD44-mediated cancer cell migration. The implications of these findings for preventing inflammatory disorders and cancer are also discussed. PMID:26347743

  19. Synthesis and comparison of antioxidant properties of indole-based melatonin analogue indole amino Acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Suzen, Sibel; Cihaner, Seyhan Sezen; Coban, Tulay

    2012-01-01

    Increased levels of reactive oxygen species attributed to oxidative stress have been found to be responsible for the development of some vital diseases such as cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases. Recently, it was observed that melatonin is a highly important antioxidant, and melatonin analogues are under investigation to find out improved antioxidant activity. In this study, 14 melatonin -based analogue indole amino acid and N-protected amino acid derivatives were synthesized and elucidated spectrometrically. To investigate the antioxidant activity of the synthesized compounds and to compare with melatonin, butylhydroxytoluene and vitamin E, lipid peroxidation inhibition and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activities were tested. The results indicated that the synthesized new indole amino acid derivatives have similar activities to melatonin in 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activity assay but more potent activities in lipid peroxidation inhibition assay.

  20. Novel Pro-Resolving Lipid Mediators in Inflammation Are Leads for Resolution Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Serhan, Charles N.

    2014-01-01

    Preface Advances on mechanisms in resolution of acute inflammation uncovered a new genus of pro-resolving lipid mediators that include separate families of molecules: lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins, collectively coined specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPM). Synthetic SPM possess potent bioactions when administered in vivo. In animal experiments, SPM evoke anti-inflammatory and novel pro-resolving mechanisms as well as enhance microbial clearance. While identified in inflammation-resolution, SPM are conserved structures with functions also in host defense, pain, organ protection and tissue remodeling. This review covers SPM mechanisms and new omega-3 essential fatty acid pathways that open a path for physiologic functions. PMID:24899309

  1. Oxidative stress is a mediator for increased lipid accumulation in a newly isolated Dunaliella salina strain.

    PubMed

    Yilancioglu, Kaan; Cokol, Murat; Pastirmaci, Inanc; Erman, Batu; Cetiner, Selim

    2014-01-01

    oxidative stress mediates lipid accumulation. Understanding such relationships may provide guidance for efficient production of algal biodiesels.

  2. Oxidative Stress Is a Mediator for Increased Lipid Accumulation in a Newly Isolated Dunaliella salina Strain

    PubMed Central

    Yilancioglu, Kaan; Cokol, Murat; Pastirmaci, Inanc; Erman, Batu; Cetiner, Selim

    2014-01-01

    oxidative stress mediates lipid accumulation. Understanding such relationships may provide guidance for efficient production of algal biodiesels. PMID:24651514

  3. Oxidative stress is a mediator for increased lipid accumulation in a newly isolated Dunaliella salina strain.

    PubMed

    Yilancioglu, Kaan; Cokol, Murat; Pastirmaci, Inanc; Erman, Batu; Cetiner, Selim

    2014-01-01

    oxidative stress mediates lipid accumulation. Understanding such relationships may provide guidance for efficient production of algal biodiesels. PMID:24651514

  4. The role of helper lipids in cationic liposome-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Hui, S W; Langner, M; Zhao, Y L; Ross, P; Hurley, E; Chan, K

    1996-01-01

    In the procedure for cationic liposome-mediated transfection, the cationic lipid is usually mixed with a "helper lipid" to increase its transfection potency. The importance of helper lipids, including dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (dioleoyl PE), DO was examined. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy of DNA:cationic complexes containing the pSV-beta-GAL plasmid DNA, the cationic lipid dioleoyl trimethylammonium propane, and these helper lipids showed that the most efficient mixtures were aggregates of ensheathed DNA and fused liposomes. PE-containing complexes aggregated rapidly when added to culture media containing polyanions, whereas PC-containing complexes did not. However, more granules of PC-containing complexes were formed on cell surfaces after the complexes were added to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in transfection media. Pronase treatment inhibited transfection, whereas dilute poly-L-lysine enhanced transfection, indicating that the attachment of DNA:liposome complexes to cell surfaces was mediated by electrostatic interaction. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies confirmed that more PC-containing complexes than PE-containing complexes were associated with CHO cells, and that more PC-containing complexes were located in a low pH environment (likely to be within endosomes) with time. Cytochalasin-B had a stronger inhibitory effect on PC-containing liposome-mediated than on PE-containing liposome-mediated transfection. Confocal microscopic recording of the fluorescently label lipid and DNA uptake process indicated that many granules of DNA:cationic liposome complexes were internalized as a whole, whereas some DNA aggregates were left out on the cell surfaces after liposomes of the complexes fused with the plasma membranes. For CHO cells, endocytosis seems to be the main uptake pathway of DNA:cationic liposome complexes. More PC-containing granules than PE-containing granules were formed on cell surfaces by cytoskeleton

  5. ILDR2: an endoplasmic reticulum resident molecule mediating hepatic lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuhisa; Watson, Elizabeth; Cremona, Maria Laura; Millings, Elizabeth J; Lefkowitch, Jay H; Fischer, Stuart G; LeDuc, Charles A; Leibel, Rudolph L

    2013-01-01

    Ildr2, a modifier of diabetes susceptibility in obese mice, is expressed in most organs, including islets and hypothalamus, with reduced levels in livers of diabetes-susceptible B6.DBA mice congenic for a 1.8 Mb interval of Chromosome 1. In hepatoma and neuronal cells, ILDR2 is primarily located in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. We used adenovirus vectors that express shRNA or are driven by the CMV promoter, respectively, to knockdown or overexpress Ildr2 in livers of wild type and ob/ob mice. Livers in knockdown mice were steatotic, with increased hepatic and circulating triglycerides and total cholesterol. Increased circulating VLDL, without reduction in triglyceride clearance suggests an effect of reduced hepatic ILDR2 on hepatic cholesterol clearance. In animals that overexpress Ildr2, hepatic triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were reduced, and strikingly so in ob/ob mice. There were no significant changes in body weight, energy expenditure or glucose/insulin homeostasis in knockdown or overexpressing mice. Knockdown mice showed reduced expression of genes mediating synthesis and oxidation of hepatic lipids, suggesting secondary suppression in response to increased hepatic lipid content. In Ildr2-overexpressing ob/ob mice, in association with reduced liver fat content, levels of transcripts related to neutral lipid synthesis and cholesterol were increased, suggesting "relief" of the secondary suppression imposed by lipid accumulation. Considering the fixed location of ILDR2 in the endoplasmic reticulum, we investigated the possible participation of ILDR2 in ER stress responses. In general, Ildr2 overexpression was associated with increases, and knockdown with decreases in levels of expression of molecular components of canonical ER stress pathways. We conclude that manipulation of Ildr2 expression in liver affects both lipid homeostasis and ER stress pathways. Given these reciprocal interactions, and the relatively extended time-course over which

  6. ILDR2: An Endoplasmic Reticulum Resident Molecule Mediating Hepatic Lipid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kazuhisa; Millings, Elizabeth J.; Lefkowitch, Jay H.; Fischer, Stuart G.; LeDuc, Charles A.; Leibel, Rudolph L.

    2013-01-01

    Ildr2, a modifier of diabetes susceptibility in obese mice, is expressed in most organs, including islets and hypothalamus, with reduced levels in livers of diabetes-susceptible B6.DBA mice congenic for a 1.8 Mb interval of Chromosome 1. In hepatoma and neuronal cells, ILDR2 is primarily located in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. We used adenovirus vectors that express shRNA or are driven by the CMV promoter, respectively, to knockdown or overexpress Ildr2 in livers of wild type and ob/ob mice. Livers in knockdown mice were steatotic, with increased hepatic and circulating triglycerides and total cholesterol. Increased circulating VLDL, without reduction in triglyceride clearance suggests an effect of reduced hepatic ILDR2 on hepatic cholesterol clearance. In animals that overexpress Ildr2, hepatic triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were reduced, and strikingly so in ob/ob mice. There were no significant changes in body weight, energy expenditure or glucose/insulin homeostasis in knockdown or overexpressing mice. Knockdown mice showed reduced expression of genes mediating synthesis and oxidation of hepatic lipids, suggesting secondary suppression in response to increased hepatic lipid content. In Ildr2-overexpressing ob/ob mice, in association with reduced liver fat content, levels of transcripts related to neutral lipid synthesis and cholesterol were increased, suggesting “relief” of the secondary suppression imposed by lipid accumulation. Considering the fixed location of ILDR2 in the endoplasmic reticulum, we investigated the possible participation of ILDR2 in ER stress responses. In general, Ildr2 overexpression was associated with increases, and knockdown with decreases in levels of expression of molecular components of canonical ER stress pathways. We conclude that manipulation of Ildr2 expression in liver affects both lipid homeostasis and ER stress pathways. Given these reciprocal interactions, and the relatively extended time-course over

  7. Lipid extraction mediates aggregation of carbon nanospheres in pulmonary surfactant monolayers.

    PubMed

    Yue, Tongtao; Xu, Yan; Li, Shixin; Zhang, Xianren; Huang, Fang

    2016-07-28

    Increasing evidence indicates that carbon nanoparticles (CNPs), which mainly originate from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, have an adverse impact on the respiratory system. Recent in vivo experiments have shown that the pulmonary toxicity of CNPs is attributed to their aggregation in pulmonary surfactant monolayers (PSMs) while the underlying mechanism of aggregation remains unclear. Here, by performing coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate for the first time that the aggregation of carbon nanospheres (CNSs) in PSMs is in fact size-dependent and mediated by lipid extractions. Upon CNS deposition, neighbouring lipid molecules are extracted from PSMs to cover CNSs from the top side. The extracted lipids induce clustering of CNSs to maximize the CNS-lipid interaction, by forming inverse micelles to wrap the aggregated CNSs cooperatively. The formed CNS clusters perturb the molecule structure of the PSM and thus affect its biofunction on respiration. Our simulations show that during the expiration process, CNSs form clusters that perturb the mechanical properties of the PSM in a manner depending on the CNS size. With deep inspiration, a high concentration of large CNSs may induce PSM rupture and thus have a potential impact on its biophysical properties. PMID:27353041

  8. Lipid droplet-mediated ER homeostasis regulates autophagy and cell survival during starvation.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Ariadna P; Tatsuta, Takashi; Ghillebert, Ruben; Drescher, Ingmar; Graef, Martin

    2016-03-14

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are conserved organelles for intracellular neutral lipid storage. Recent studies suggest that LDs function as direct lipid sources for autophagy, a central catabolic process in homeostasis and stress response. Here, we demonstrate that LDs are dispensable as a membrane source for autophagy, but fulfill critical functions for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis linked to autophagy regulation. In the absence of LDs, yeast cells display alterations in their phospholipid composition and fail to buffer de novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis causing chronic stress and morphologic changes in the ER. These defects compromise regulation of autophagy, including formation of multiple aberrant Atg8 puncta and drastically impaired autophagosome biogenesis, leading to severe defects in nutrient stress survival. Importantly, metabolically corrected phospholipid composition and improved FA resistance of LD-deficient cells cure autophagy and cell survival. Together, our findings provide novel insight into the complex interrelation between LD-mediated lipid homeostasis and the regulation of autophagy potentially relevant for neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases.

  9. Administration of pyrene lipids by receptor-mediated endocytosis and their degradation in skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Agmon, V.; Dinur, T.; Cherbu, S.; Dagan, A.; Gatt, S. )

    1991-10-01

    Sphingomyelin and seven glycosphingolipids were labeled with the fluorescent probe pyrene and administered into cultured fibroblasts by receptor-mediated endocytosis. For this purpose pyrene sphingomyelin or mixtures of pyrene glycolipid and unlabeled sphingomyelin were dispersed as small, unilamellar liposomes. Apolipoprotein E was then added and the receptor for this ligand on the cell surface was utilized for uptake of the liposomes and their transport to the lysosomes, where the respective pyrene lipids were degraded. Following incubation with each of the respective pyrene lipids, only the administered compound and the pyrene ceramide were present; intermediate hydrolysis products were not detected. This indicated that, in skin fibroblasts, the lysosomal ceramidase was limiting and controlled the rate of total degradation of the pyrene sphingolipids.

  10. The Mediator Complex MED15 Subunit Mediates Activation of Downstream Lipid-Related Genes by the WRINKLED1 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jung; Jang, In-Cheol; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2016-07-01

    The Mediator complex is known to be a master coordinator of transcription by RNA polymerase II, and this complex is recruited by transcription factors (TFs) to target promoters for gene activation or repression. The plant-specific TF WRINKLED1 (WRI1) activates glycolysis-related and fatty acid biosynthetic genes during embryogenesis. However, no Mediator subunit has yet been identified that mediates WRI1 transcriptional activity. Promoter-β-glucuronidase fusion experiments showed that MEDIATOR15 (MED15) is expressed in the same cells in the embryo as WRI1. We found that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MED15 subunit of the Mediator complex interacts directly with WRI1 in the nucleus. Overexpression of MED15 or WRI1 increased transcript levels of WRI1 target genes involved in glycolysis and fatty acid biosynthesis; these genes were down-regulated in wild-type or WRI1-overexpressing plants by silencing of MED15 However, overexpression of MED15 in the wri1 mutant also increased transcript levels of WRI1 target genes, suggesting that MED15 also may act with other TFs to activate downstream lipid-related genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the association of MED15 with six WRI1 target gene promoters. Additionally, silencing of MED15 resulted in reduced fatty acid content in seedlings and mature seeds, whereas MED15 overexpression increased fatty acid content in both developmental stages. Similar results were found in wri1 mutant and WRI1 overexpression lines. Together, our results indicate that the WRI1/MED15 complex transcriptionally regulates glycolysis-related and fatty acid biosynthetic genes during embryogenesis. PMID:27246098

  11. Effect of phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol on myelin basic protein-mediated binding of actin filaments to lipid bilayers in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boggs, Joan M; Rangaraj, Godha; Dicko, Awa

    2012-09-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) binds to negatively charged lipids on the cytosolic surface of oligodendrocytes and is believed to be responsible for adhesion of these surfaces in the multilayered myelin sheath. It can also assemble actin filaments and tether them to lipid bilayers through electrostatic interactions. Here we investigate the effect of increased negative charge of the lipid bilayer due to phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol (PI) on MBP-mediated binding of actin to the lipid bilayer, by substituting phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate or phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate for PI in phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylglycerol lipid vesicles. Phosphorylation of PI caused dissociation of the MBP/actin complex from the lipid vesicles due to repulsion of the negatively charged complex from the negatively charged membrane surface. An effect of phosphorylation could be detected even if the inositol lipid was only 2mol% of the total lipid. Calcium-calmodulin dissociated actin from the MBP-lipid vesicles and phosphorylation of PI increased the amount dissociated. These results show that changes to the lipid composition of myelin, which could occur during signaling or other physiological events, could regulate the ability of MBP to act as a scaffolding protein and bind actin filaments to the lipid bilayer.

  12. Cell type-specific modulation of lipid mediator's formation in murine adipose tissue by omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kuda, Ondrej; Rombaldova, Martina; Janovska, Petra; Flachs, Pavel; Kopecky, Jan

    2016-01-15

    Mutual interactions between adipocytes and immune cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) are involved in modulation of lipid metabolism in the tissue and also in response to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which counteract adverse effects of obesity. This complex interplay depends in part on in situ formed anti- as well as pro-inflammatory lipid mediators, but cell types engaged in the synthesis of the specific mediators need to be better characterized. We used tissue fractionation and metabolipidomic analysis to identify cells producing lipid mediators in epididymal WAT of mice fed for 5 weeks obesogenic high-fat diet (lipid content 35% wt/wt), which was supplemented or not by omega-3 PUFA (4.3 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 14.7 mg docosahexaenoic acid per g of diet). Our results demonstrate selective increase in levels of anti-inflammatory lipid mediators in WAT in response to omega-3, reflecting either their association with adipocytes (endocannabinoid-related N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine) or with stromal vascular cells (pro-resolving lipid mediator protectin D1). In parallel, tissue levels of obesity-associated pro-inflammatory endocannabinoids were suppressed. Moreover, we show that adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), which could be isolated using magnetic force from the stromal vascular fraction, are not the major producers of protectin D1 and that omega-3 PUFA lowered lipid load in ATMs while promoting their less-inflammatory phenotype. Taken together, these results further document specific roles of various cell types in WAT in control of WAT inflammation and metabolism and they suggest that also other cells but ATMs are engaged in production of pro-resolving lipid mediators in response to omega-3 PUFA. PMID:26707880

  13. Cell type-specific modulation of lipid mediator's formation in murine adipose tissue by omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kuda, Ondrej; Rombaldova, Martina; Janovska, Petra; Flachs, Pavel; Kopecky, Jan

    2016-01-15

    Mutual interactions between adipocytes and immune cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) are involved in modulation of lipid metabolism in the tissue and also in response to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which counteract adverse effects of obesity. This complex interplay depends in part on in situ formed anti- as well as pro-inflammatory lipid mediators, but cell types engaged in the synthesis of the specific mediators need to be better characterized. We used tissue fractionation and metabolipidomic analysis to identify cells producing lipid mediators in epididymal WAT of mice fed for 5 weeks obesogenic high-fat diet (lipid content 35% wt/wt), which was supplemented or not by omega-3 PUFA (4.3 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 14.7 mg docosahexaenoic acid per g of diet). Our results demonstrate selective increase in levels of anti-inflammatory lipid mediators in WAT in response to omega-3, reflecting either their association with adipocytes (endocannabinoid-related N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine) or with stromal vascular cells (pro-resolving lipid mediator protectin D1). In parallel, tissue levels of obesity-associated pro-inflammatory endocannabinoids were suppressed. Moreover, we show that adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), which could be isolated using magnetic force from the stromal vascular fraction, are not the major producers of protectin D1 and that omega-3 PUFA lowered lipid load in ATMs while promoting their less-inflammatory phenotype. Taken together, these results further document specific roles of various cell types in WAT in control of WAT inflammation and metabolism and they suggest that also other cells but ATMs are engaged in production of pro-resolving lipid mediators in response to omega-3 PUFA.

  14. Human serum activates CIDEB-mediated lipid droplet enlargement in hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Singaravelu, Ragunath; Lyn, Rodney K.; Srinivasan, Prashanth; Delcorde, Julie; Steenbergen, Rineke H.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne; Pezacki, John P.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Human serum induced differentiation of hepatoma cells increases cellular lipid droplet (LD) size. •The observed increase in LD size correlates with increased PGC-1α and CIDEB expression. •Induction of CIDEB expression correlates with rescue of VLDL secretion and loss of ADRP. •siRNA knockdown of CIDEB impairs the human serum mediated increase in LD size. •This system represents a cost-efficient model to study CIDEB’s role in lipid biology. -- Abstract: Human hepatocytes constitutively express the lipid droplet (LD) associated protein cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector B (CIDEB). CIDEB mediates LD fusion, as well as very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) maturation. However, there are limited cell culture models readily available to study CIDEB’s role in these biological processes, as hepatoma cell lines express negligible levels of CIDEB. Recent work has highlighted the ability of human serum to differentiate hepatoma cells. Herein, we demonstrate that culturing Huh7.5 cells in media supplemented with human serum activates CIDEB expression. This activation occurs through the induced expression of PGC-1α, a positive transcriptional regulator of CIDEB. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy revealed a correlation between CIDEB levels and LD size in human serum treated Huh7.5 cells. Human serum treatment also resulted in a rapid decrease in the levels of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP). Furthermore, individual overexpression of CIDEB was sufficient to down-regulate ADRP protein levels. siRNA knockdown of CIDEB revealed that the human serum mediated increase in LD size was CIDEB-dependent. Overall, our work highlights CIDEB’s role in LD fusion, and presents a new model system to study the PGC-1α/CIDEB pathway’s role in LD dynamics and the VLDL pathway.

  15. Specialized proresolving lipid mediators in patients with coronary artery disease and their potential for clot remodeling.

    PubMed

    Elajami, Tarec K; Colas, Romain A; Dalli, Jesmond; Chiang, Nan; Serhan, Charles N; Welty, Francine K

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation in arterial walls leads to coronary artery disease (CAD). Because specialized proresolving lipid mediators (SPMs; lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins) stimulate resolution of inflammation in animal models, we tested whether n-3 fatty acids impact SPM profiles in patients with CAD and promote clot remodeling. Six patients with stable CAD were randomly assigned to either treatment with daily 3.36 g Lovaza for 1 yr or without. Targeted lipid mediator-metabololipidomics showed that both groups had absence of resolvin D1 (RvD1), RvD2, RvD3, RvD5 and resolvin E1-all of which are present in healthy patients. Those not taking Lovaza had an absence of aspirin-triggered resolvin D3 (AT-RvD3) and aspirin-triggered lipoxin B4 (AT-LXB4). Lovaza treatment restored AT-RvD3 and AT-LXB4 and gave levels of RvD6 and aspirin-triggered protectin D1 (AT-PD1) twice as high (resolvin E2 ∼5 fold) as well as lower prostaglandins. Principal component analysis indicated positive relationships for patients with CAD who were receiving Lovaza with increased AT-RvD3, RvD6, AT-PD1, and AT-LXB4 SPMs identified in Lovaza-treated patients with CAD enhanced ∼50% at 1 nM macrophage uptake of blood clots. These results indicate that patients with CAD have lower levels and/or absence of specific SPMs that were restored with Lovaza; these SPMs promote macrophage phagocytosis of blood clots. Together, they suggest that low vascular SPMs may enable progression of chronic vascular inflammation predisposing to coronary atherosclerosis and to thrombosis.-Elajami, T. K., Colas, R. A., Dalli, J., Chiang, N., Serhan, C. N., Welty, F. K. Specialized proresolving lipid mediators in patients with coronary artery disease and their potential for clot remodeling. PMID:27121596

  16. Stereoselective synthesis of protectin D1: A potent anti-inflammatory and proresolving lipid mediator

    PubMed Central

    Aursnes, M.; Tungen, J. E.; Vik, A.; Dalli, J.; Hansen, T. V.

    2014-01-01

    A convergent stereoselective synthesis of the potent anti-inflammatory, proresolving and neuroprotective lipid mediator protectin D1 (2) has been achieved in 15% yield over eight steps. The key features were a stereocontrolled Evans-aldol reaction with Nagao’s chiral auxiliary and a highly selective Lindlar reduction of internal alkyne 23, allowing the sensitive conjugated E,E,Z-triene to be introduced late in the preparation of 2. The UV and LC/MS-MS data of synthetic protectin D1 (2) matched those obtained from endogenously produced material PMID:24253202

  17. The Resolution Code of Acute Inflammation: Novel Pro-Resolving Lipid Mediators in Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Serhan, Charles N.; Chiang, Nan; Dalli, Jesmond

    2015-01-01

    Studies into the mechanisms in resolution of self-limited inflammation and acute reperfusion injury have uncovered a new genus of pro-resolving lipid mediators coined specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPM) including lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins that are each temporally produced by resolving-exudates with distinct actions for return to homeostasis. SPM evoke potent anti-inflammatory and novel pro-resolving mechanisms as well as enhance microbial clearance. While born in inflammation-resolution, SPM are conserved structures with functions discovered in microbial defense, pain, organ protection and tissue regeneration, wound healing, cancer, reproduction, and neurobiology-cognition. This review covers these SPM mechanisms and other new omega-3 PUFA pathways that open their path for functions in resolution physiology. PMID:25857211

  18. Physiological lipid composition is vital for homotypic ER membrane fusion mediated by the dynamin-related GTPase Sey1p

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Shintaro; Mima, Joji

    2016-01-01

    Homotypic fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is required for generating and maintaining the characteristic reticular ER membrane structures. This organelle membrane fusion process depends on the ER-bound dynamin-related GTPases, such as atlastins in animals and Sey1p in yeast. Here, to investigate whether specific lipid molecules facilitate GTPase-dependent ER membrane fusion directly, we comprehensively evaluated membrane docking and lipid mixing of reconstituted proteoliposomes bearing purified Sey1p and a set of ER-mimicking lipids, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid, and ergosterol. Remarkably, we revealed that each specific lipid species contributed little to membrane docking mediated by Sey1p. Nevertheless, Sey1p-dependent lipid mixing was strongly reduced by omitting three major acidic lipids from the ER-mimicking set and, moreover, was entirely abolished by omitting either phosphatidylethanolamine or ergosterol. Our reconstitution studies thus established that physiological lipid composition is vital for lipid bilayer rearrangements in GTPase-mediated homotypic ER membrane fusion. PMID:26838333

  19. Motor-mediated cortical versus astral microtubule organization in lipid-monolayered droplets.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Hella; Surrey, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The correct spatial organization of microtubules is of crucial importance for determining the internal architecture of eukaryotic cells. Microtubules are arranged in space by a multitude of biochemical activities and by spatial constraints imposed by the cell boundary. The principles underlying the establishment of distinct intracellular architectures are only poorly understood. Here, we studied the effect of spatial confinement on the self-organization of purified motors and microtubules that are encapsulated in lipid-monolayered droplets in oil, varying in diameter from 5-100 μm, which covers the size range of typical cell bodies. We found that droplet size alone had a major organizing influence. The presence of a microtubule-crosslinking motor protein decreased the number of accessible types of microtubule organizations. Depending on the degree of spatial confinement, the presence of the motor caused either the formation of a cortical array of bent microtubule bundles or the generation of single microtubule asters in the droplets. These are two of the most prominent forms of microtubule arrangements in plant and metazoan cells. Our results provide insights into the combined organizing influence of spatial constraints and cross-linking motor activities determining distinct microtubule architectures in a minimal biomimetic system. In the future, this simple lipid-monolayered droplet system characterized here can be expanded readily to include further biochemical activities or used as the starting point for the investigation of motor-mediated microtubule organization inside liposomes surrounded by a deformable lipid bilayer. PMID:24966327

  20. Motor-mediated Cortical versus Astral Microtubule Organization in Lipid-monolayered Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Hella; Surrey, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The correct spatial organization of microtubules is of crucial importance for determining the internal architecture of eukaryotic cells. Microtubules are arranged in space by a multitude of biochemical activities and by spatial constraints imposed by the cell boundary. The principles underlying the establishment of distinct intracellular architectures are only poorly understood. Here, we studied the effect of spatial confinement on the self-organization of purified motors and microtubules that are encapsulated in lipid-monolayered droplets in oil, varying in diameter from 5–100 μm, which covers the size range of typical cell bodies. We found that droplet size alone had a major organizing influence. The presence of a microtubule-crosslinking motor protein decreased the number of accessible types of microtubule organizations. Depending on the degree of spatial confinement, the presence of the motor caused either the formation of a cortical array of bent microtubule bundles or the generation of single microtubule asters in the droplets. These are two of the most prominent forms of microtubule arrangements in plant and metazoan cells. Our results provide insights into the combined organizing influence of spatial constraints and cross-linking motor activities determining distinct microtubule architectures in a minimal biomimetic system. In the future, this simple lipid-monolayered droplet system characterized here can be expanded readily to include further biochemical activities or used as the starting point for the investigation of motor-mediated microtubule organization inside liposomes surrounded by a deformable lipid bilayer. PMID:24966327

  1. Poly(propylacrylic acid) enhances cationic lipid mediated delivery of antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Li Kim; Williams, Charity L.; Devore, David; Roth, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    The use of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) to inhibit the expression of specific mRNA targets represents a powerful technology for control of gene expression. Cationic lipids and polymers are frequently used to improve the delivery of ODNs to cells, but the resulting complexes often aggregate, bind to serum components, and are trafficked poorly within cells. We show that the addition of a synthetic, pH-sensitive, membrane-disrupting polyanion, poly(propylacrylic acid) (PPAA), improves the in vitro efficiency of the cationic lipid, DOTAP, with regard to oligonucleotide delivery and antisense activity. In characterization studies, ODN complexation with DOTAP/ODN was maintained even when substantial amounts of PPAA were added. The formulation also exhibited partial protection of phosphodiester oligonucleotides against enzymatic digestion. In Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, incorporation of PPAA in DOTAP/ODN complexes improved two- to threefold the cellular uptake of fluorescently tagged oligonucleotides. DOTAP/ODN complexes containing PPAA also maintained high levels of uptake into cells upon exposure to serum. Addition of PPAA to DOTAP/ODN complexes enhanced the antisense activity (using GFP as the target) over a range of PPAA concentrations in both serum-free, and to a lesser extent, serum-containing media. Thus, PPAA is a useful adjunct that improves the lipid-mediated delivery of oligonucleotides. PMID:16677032

  2. Ca(2+)-mediated anionic lipid-plasmid DNA lipoplexes. Electrochemical, structural, and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Barrán-Berdón, Ana L; Yélamos, Belén; Malfois, Marc; Aicart, Emilio; Junquera, Elena

    2014-10-01

    . This fact would be indicating that, nowadays, lipofection via anionic lipids and divalent cations as mediators still needs to enhance transfection levels in order to be considered as a real and plausible alternative to lipofection through improved CLs-based lipoplexes.

  3. Immunopathologic effects of scorpion venom on hepato-renal tissues: Involvement of lipid derived inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Lamraoui, Amal; Adi-Bessalem, Sonia; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima

    2015-10-01

    Scorpion venoms are known to cause different inflammatory disorders through complex mechanisms in various tissues. In the study here, the involvement of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-derived metabolites in hepatic and renal inflammation responses were examined. Mice were envenomed with Androctonus australis hector scorpion venom in the absence or presence of inhibitors that can interfere with lipid inflammatory mediator synthesis, i.e., dexamethasone (PLA2 inhibitor), indomethacin (non-selective COX-1/COX-2 inhibitor), or celecoxib (selective COX-2 inhibitor). The inflammatory response was assessed by evaluating vascular permeability changes, inflammatory cell infiltration, oxidative/nitrosative stress marker levels, and by histologic and functional analyses of the liver and kidney. Results revealed that the venom alone induced an inflammatory response in this tissues marked by increased microvascular permeability and inflammatory cell infiltration, increases in levels of nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation, and decreases in antioxidant defense. Moreover, significant alterations in the histological architecture of these organs were associated with increased serum levels of some metabolic enzymes, as well as urea and uric acid. Pre-treatment of mice with dexamethasone led to significant decreases of the inflammatory disorders in the hepatic parenchyma; celecoxib pre-treatment seemed to be more effective against renal inflammation. Indomethacin pre-treatment only slightly reduced the inflammatory disorders in the tissues. These results suggest that the induced inflammation response in liver was mediated mainly by PLA2 activation, while the renal inflammatory process was mediated by prostaglandin formation by COX-2. These findings provide additional insight toward the understanding of activated pathways and related mechanisms involved in scorpion envenoming syndrome.

  4. Synthesis of Hydroxymethylenebisphosphonic Acid Derivatives in Different Solvents.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Dávid Illés; Grün, Alajos; Garadnay, Sándor; Greiner, István; Keglevich, György

    2016-01-01

    The syntheses of hydroxymethylenebisphosphonic acid derivatives (dronic acid derivatives) starting from the corresponding substituted acetic acids and P-reagents, mainly phosphorus trichloride and phosphorous acid are surveyed according to the solvents applied. The nature of the solvent is a critical point due to the heterogeneity of the reaction mixtures. This review sheds light on the optimum choice and ratio of the P-reactants, and on the optimum conditions. PMID:27529200

  5. Dietary lipids and adipocytes: potential therapeutic targets in cancers.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Hiu Yee; Chao, Xiaojuan; Su, Tao; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Liu, Bin; Tse, Anfernee Kai Wing; Fong, Wang Fun; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2015-04-01

    Lipids play an important role to support the rapid growth of cancer cells, which can be derived from both the endogenous synthesis and exogenous supplies. Enhanced de novo fatty acid synthesis and mobilization of stored lipids in cancer cells promote tumorigenesis. Besides, lipids and fatty acids derived from diet or transferred from neighboring adipocytes also influence the proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. Indeed, the pathogenic roles of adipocytes in the tumor microenvironment have been recognized recently. The adipocyte-derived mediators or the cross talk between adipocytes and cancer cells in the microenvironment is gaining attention. This review will focus on the impacts of lipids on cancers and the pathogenic roles of adipocytes in tumorigenesis and discuss the possible anticancer therapeutic strategies targeting lipids in the cancer cells.

  6. Dysregulation of the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Pathway Is Involved in Lipid Disorder-Mediated Organ Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Ma, Kun Ling; Ruan, Xiong Zhong; Liu, Bi Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) pathway is a negative feedback system that plays important roles in the regulation of plasma and intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. To maintain a cholesterol homeostasis, LDLR expression is tightly regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) and SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) in transcriptional level and by proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) in posttranscriptional level. The dysregulation of LDLR expression results in abnormal lipid accumulation in cells and tissues, such as vascular smooth muscle cells, hepatic cells, renal mesangial cells, renal tubular cells and podocytes. It has been demonstrated that inflammation, renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation, and hyperglycemia induce the disruption of LDLR pathway, which might contribute to lipid disorder-mediated organ injury (atherosclerosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, kidney fibrosis, etc). The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a critical mediator in the disruption of LDLR pathway caused by pathogenic factors. The mTOR complex1 activation upregulates LDLR expression at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels, consequently resulting in lipid deposition. This paper mainly reviews the mechanisms for the dysregulation of LDLR pathway and its roles in lipid disorder-mediated organ injury under various pathogenic conditions. Understanding these mechanisms leading to the abnormality of LDLR expression contributes to find potential new drug targets in lipid disorder-mediated diseases. PMID:27019638

  7. Potential of specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators against rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kosaku

    2016-01-01

      While arachidonic acid (AA), which is classified into n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), has been mainly recognized as a substrate of pro-inflammatory mediators, eicosapentaenoic acid or docosahexaenoic acid, which are classified into n-3 PUFA, is currently identified as substrates of mediators inducing resolution of inflammation, namely pro-resolving mediators (SPM). As with any other pathological conditions, it is gradually elucidated that SPMs contributes a certain effect on joint inflammation. In osteoarthritis (OA), Lipid fractions extracted from adipocytes, especially in infrapatellar fat pad rather than subcutaneous tissue induce T cell skewing for producing IFN-γ or decrease the production of IL-12p40 from macrophages. In synovial tissues form OA, there are some of known receptors for SPM. In the synovial fluid from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), it could be identified and quantified a certain kind of SPMs such as maresin 1, lipoxin A4 and resolvin D5. In murine models of arthritis, some of SPMs are found to have some functions to reduce tissue damage. Correctively, SPMs might have some potential to a novel therapeutic target for arthritis or any other rheumatic diseases.

  8. Influence of lipid composition on physical properties and peg-mediated fusion of curved and uncurved model membrane vesicles: "nature's own" fusogenic lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Haque, M E; McIntosh, T J; Lentz, B R

    2001-04-10

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-mediated fusion of phosphatidylcholine model membranes has been shown to mimic the protein-mediated biomembrane process [Lee, J., and Lentz, B. R. (1998) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 95, 9274-9279]. Unlike the simple model membranes used in this earlier study, the lipid composition of fusogenic biomembranes is quite complex. The purpose of this paper was to examine PEG-mediated fusion of highly curved (SUV) and largely uncurved (LUV) membrane vesicles composed of different lipids in order to identify lipid compositions that produce highly fusogenic membranes. Starting with liposomes composed of five lipids with different physical properties, dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS), bovine brain sphingomyelin (SM), and cholesterol (CH), we systematically varied the composition and tested for the extent of PEG-mediated fusion after 5 min of treatment. We found that a vesicle system composed of four lipids, DOPC/DOPE/SM/CH, fused optimally at a 35/30/15/20 molar ratio. Each lipid seemed to play a part in optimizing the membrane for fusion. PE disrupted outer leaflet packing as demonstrated with TMA-DPH lifetime, C(6)-NBD-PC partitioning, and DPH anisotropy measurements, and thus significantly enhanced fusion and rupture, without significantly altering interbilayer approach (X-ray diffraction). An optimal ratio of PC/PE (35/30) produced a balance between fusion and rupture. CH and SM, when present at an optimal ratio of 3/4 in vesicles containing the optimal PC/PE ratio, reduced rupture without significantly reducing fusion. This optimal CH/SM ratio also enhanced outer leaflet packing, suggesting that fusion is dependent not only on outer leaflet packing but also on the properties of the inner leaflet. Addition of CH without SM enhanced rupture relative to fusion, while SM alone reduced both rupture and fusion. The optimal lipid composition is very close to the natural

  9. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; Johns, Douglas G.; Charles, M. Arthur; Ren, Gang

    2015-03-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.

  10. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; Johns, Douglas G.; Charles, M. Arthur; Ren, Gang

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.

  11. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; et al

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobicmore » environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.« less

  12. Membrane lipid modifications and therapeutic effects mediated by hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid on Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Manuel; Price, Samantha L; Fiol-Deroque, Maria A; Marcilla-Etxenike, Amaia; Ahyayauch, Hasna; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Terés, Silvia; Katsouri, Loukia; Ordinas, Margarita; López, David J; Ibarguren, Maitane; Goñi, Félix M; Busquets, Xavier; Vitorica, Javier; Sastre, Magdalena; Escribá, Pablo V

    2014-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative pathology with relevant unmet therapeutic needs. Both natural aging and AD have been associated with a significant decline in the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and accordingly, administration of DHA has been proposed as a possible treatment for this pathology. However, recent clinical trials in mild-to-moderately affected patients have been inconclusive regarding the real efficacy of DHA in halting this disease. Here, we show that the novel hydroxyl-derivative of DHA (2-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid - OHDHA) has a strong therapeutic potential to treat AD. We demonstrate that OHDHA administration increases DHA levels in the brain of a transgenic mouse model of AD (5xFAD), as well as those of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) species that carry long polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). In 5xFAD mice, administration of OHDHA induced lipid modifications that were paralleled with a reduction in amyloid-β (Αβ) accumulation and full recovery of cognitive scores. OHDHA administration also reduced Aβ levels in cellular models of AD, in association with alterations in the subcellular distribution of secretases and reduced Aβ-induced tau protein phosphorylation as well. Furthermore, OHDHA enhanced the survival of neuron-like differentiated cells exposed to different insults, such as oligomeric Aβ and NMDA-mediated neurotoxicity. These results were supported by model membrane studies in which incorporation of OHDHA into lipid-raft-like vesicles was shown to reduce the binding affinity of oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ to membranes. Finally, the OHDHA concentrations used here did not produce relevant toxicity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. In conclusion, we demonstrate the pleitropic effects of OHDHA that might prove beneficial to treat AD, which suggests that an upstream event, probably the modulation of the membrane lipid composition and structure, influences cellular homeostasis reversing the

  13. PMP22 Is Critical for Actin-Mediated Cellular Functions and for Establishing Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sooyeon; Amici, Stephanie; Tavori, Hagai; Zeng, Waylon M.; Freeland, Steven; Fazio, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, a peripheral nerve lesion induced by minimal trauma or compression. As PMP22 is localized to cholesterol-enriched membrane domains that are closely linked with the underlying actin network, we asked whether the myelin instability associated with PMP22 deficiency could be mediated by involvement of the protein in actin-dependent cellular functions and/or lipid raft integrity. In peripheral nerves and cells from mice with PMP22 deletion, we assessed the organization of filamentous actin (F-actin), and actin-dependent cellular functions. Using in vitro models, we discovered that, in the absence of PMP22, the migration and adhesion capacity of Schwann cells and fibroblasts are similarly impaired. Furthermore, PMP22-deficient Schwann cells produce shortened myelin internodes, and display compressed axial cell length and collapsed lamellipodia. During early postnatal development, F-actin-enriched Schmidt-Lanterman incisures do not form properly in nerves from PMP22−/− mice, and the expression and localization of molecules associated with uncompacted myelin domains and lipid rafts, including flotillin-1, cholesterol, and GM1 ganglioside, are altered. In addition, we identified changes in the levels and distribution of cholesterol and ApoE when PMP22 is absent. Significantly, cholesterol supplementation of the culture medium corrects the elongation and migration deficits of PMP22−/− Schwann cells, suggesting that the observed functional impairments are directly linked with cholesterol deficiency of the plasma membrane. Our findings support a novel role for PMP22 in the linkage of the actin cytoskeleton with the plasma membrane, likely through regulating the cholesterol content of lipid rafts. PMID:25429154

  14. Membrane Lipid Peroxidation in Copper Alloy-Mediated Contact Killing of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Robert; Kang, Tae Y.; Michels, Corinne A.

    2012-01-01

    Copper alloy surfaces are passive antimicrobial sanitizing agents that kill bacteria, fungi, and some viruses. Studies of the mechanism of contact killing in Escherichia coli implicate the membrane as the target, yet the specific component and underlying biochemistry remain unknown. This study explores the hypothesis that nonenzymatic peroxidation of membrane phospholipids is responsible for copper alloy-mediated surface killing. Lipid peroxidation was monitored with the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) assay. Survival, TBARS levels, and DNA degradation were followed in cells exposed to copper alloy surfaces containing 60 to 99.90% copper or in medium containing CuSO4. In all cases, TBARS levels increased with copper exposure levels. Cells exposed to the highest copper content alloys, C11000 and C24000, exhibited novel characteristics. TBARS increased immediately at a very rapid rate but peaked at about 30 min. This peak was associated with the period of most rapid killing, loss in membrane integrity, and DNA degradation. DNA degradation is not the primary cause of copper-mediated surface killing. Cells exposed to the 60% copper alloy for 60 min had fully intact genomic DNA but no viable cells. In a fabR mutant strain with increased levels of unsaturated fatty acids, sensitivity to copper alloy surface-mediated killing increased, TBARS levels peaked earlier, and genomic DNA degradation occurred sooner than in the isogenic parental strain. Taken together, these results suggest that copper alloy surface-mediated killing of E. coli is triggered by nonenzymatic oxidative damage of membrane phospholipids that ultimately results in the loss of membrane integrity and cell death. PMID:22247141

  15. The Regulation of Proresolving Lipid Mediator Profiles in Baboon Pneumonia by Inhaled Carbon Monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Dalli, Jesmond; Kraft, Bryan D.; Colas, Romain A.; Shinohara, Masakazu; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Hess, Dean R.; Chiang, Nan; Welty-Wolf, Karen; Choi, Augustine M.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2015-01-01

    Strategies for the treatment of bacterial pneumonia beyond traditional antimicrobial therapy have been limited. The recently discovered novel genus of lipid mediators, coined “specialized proresolving mediators” (SPMs), which orchestrate clearance of recruited leukocytes and restore epithelial barrier integrity, have offered new insight into the resolution of inflammation. We performed lipid mediator (LM) metabololipidomic profiling and identification of LMs on peripheral blood leukocytes and plasma from a baboon model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. Leukocytes and plasma were isolated from whole blood of S. pneumoniae–infected (n = 5–6 per time point) and control, uninfected baboons (n = 4 per time point) at 0, 24, 48, and 168 hours. In a subset of baboons with pneumonia (n = 3), we administered inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) at 48 hours (200–300 ppm for 60–90 min). Unstimulated leukocytes from control animals produced a proresolving LM signature with elevated resolvins and lipoxins. In contrast, serum-treated, zymosan-stimulated leukocytes and leukocytes from baboons with S. pneumoniae pneumonia produced a proinflammatory LM signature profile with elevated leukotriene B4 and prostaglandins. Plasma from baboons with S. pneumoniae pneumonia also displayed significantly reduced LM–SPM levels, including eicosapentaenoic acid–derived E-series resolvins (RvE) and lipoxins. CO inhalation increased levels of plasma RvE and lipoxins relative to preexposure levels. These results establish the leukocyte and plasma LM profiles biosynthesized during S. pneumoniae pneumonia in baboons and provide evidence for pneumonia-induced dysregulation of these proresolution programs. Moreover, these SPM profiles are partially restored with inhaled low-dose CO and SPM, which may shorten the time to pneumonia resolution. PMID:25568926

  16. Using AFM to probe the complexation of DNA with anionic lipids mediated by Ca(2+): the role of surface pressure.

    PubMed

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Sánchez-Treviño, Alda Yadira; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia

    2014-04-28

    Complexation of DNA with lipids is currently being developed as an alternative to classical vectors based on viruses. Most of the research to date focuses on cationic lipids owing to their spontaneous complexation with DNA. Nonetheless, recent investigations have revealed that cationic lipids induce a large number of adverse effects on DNA delivery. Precisely, the lower cytotoxicity of anionic lipids accounts for their use as a promising alternative. However, the complexation of DNA with anionic lipids (mediated by cations) is still in early stages and is not yet well understood. In order to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the complexation of anionic lipids and DNA we proposed a combined methodology based on the surface pressure-area isotherms, Gibbs elasticity and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). These techniques allow elucidation of the role of the surface pressure in the complexation and visualization of the interfacial aggregates for the first time. We demonstrate that the DNA complexes with negatively charged model monolayers (DPPC/DPPS 4 : 1) only in the presence of Ca(2+), but is expelled at very high surface pressures. Also, according to the Gibbs elasticity plot, the complexation of lipids and DNA implies a whole fluidisation of the monolayer and a completely different phase transition map in the presence of DNA and Ca(2+). AFM imaging allows identification for the first time of specific morphologies associated with different packing densities. At low surface coverage, a branched net like structure is observed whereas at high surface pressure fibers formed of interfacial aggregates appear. In summary, Ca(2+) mediates the interaction between DNA and negatively charged lipids and also the conformation of the ternary system depends on the surface pressure. Such observations are important new generic features of the interaction between DNA and anionic lipids. PMID:24668321

  17. Translocation of cellular prion protein to non-lipid rafts protects human prion-mediated neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Moon, Myung-Hee; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Park, Sang-Youel

    2012-03-01

    Prions are the causative agents of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, such as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Cellular prion proteins (PrPC) connect with cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-rich lipid rafts through association of their glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor with saturated raft lipids and interaction of their N-terminal regions. Our previous study showed that cellular cholesterol enrichment prevented PrP(106-126)-induced neuronal death. We have now studied the influence of membrane cholesterol in PrP(106-126)-mediated neurotoxicity and identified membrane domains involved in this activity. We found that PrPC is normally distributed in lipid rafts, but high membrane cholesterol levels as a result of cholesterol treatment led to the translocation of PrPC from lipid rafts to non-lipid rafts. Moreover, cholesterol-mediated PrPC translocation protects PrP(106-126)-mediated apoptosis and p-38 activation and caspase-3 activation. In a mitochondrial functional assay including mitochondrial transmembrane potential, cholesterol treatment prevented the loss of mitochondrial potential, translocation of Bax and cytochrome c by prion protein fragment. Our results indicate that modulation of the PrPC location appears to protect against neuronal cell death caused by prion peptides. The results of this study suggest that regulation of membrane cholesterol affects the translocation of PrPC, which in turn regulates PrP(106-126)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neurotoxicity.

  18. Lipid rafts and raft-mediated supramolecular entities in the regulation of CD95 death receptor apoptotic signaling.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2015-05-01

    Membrane lipid rafts are highly ordered membrane domains enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides that have the property to segregate and concentrate proteins. Lipid and protein composition of lipid rafts differs from that of the surrounding membrane, thus providing sorting platforms and hubs for signal transduction molecules, including CD95 death receptor-mediated signaling. CD95 can be recruited to rafts in a reversible way through S-palmitoylation following activation of cells with its physiological cognate ligand as well as with a wide variety of inducers, including several antitumor drugs through ligand-independent intracellular mechanisms. CD95 translocation to rafts can be modulated pharmacologically, thus becoming a target for the treatment of apoptosis-defective diseases, such as cancer. CD95-mediated signaling largely depends on protein-protein interactions, and the recruitment and concentration of CD95 and distinct downstream apoptotic molecules in membrane raft domains, forming raft-based supramolecular entities that act as hubs for apoptotic signaling molecules, favors the generation and amplification of apoptotic signals. Efficient CD95-mediated apoptosis involves CD95 and raft internalization, as well as the involvement of different subcellular organelles. In this review, we briefly summarize and discuss the involvement of lipid rafts in the regulation of CD95-mediated apoptosis that may provide a new avenue for cancer therapy.

  19. Maresin 1, a Proresolving Lipid Mediator, Mitigates Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruidong; Wang, Yaxin; Zhao, Ende; Wu, Ke; Li, Wei; Shi, Liang; Wang, Di; Xie, Gengchen; Yin, Yuping; Deng, Meizhou; Zhang, Peng; Tao, Kaixiong

    2016-01-01

    Maresin 1 (MaR 1) was recently reported to have protective properties in several different animal models of acute inflammation by inhibiting inflammatory response. However, its function in acute liver injury is still unknown. To address this question, we induced liver injury in BALB/c mice with intraperitoneal injection of carbon tetrachloride with or without treatment of MaR 1. Our data showed that MaR 1 attenuated hepatic injury, oxidative stress, and lipid peroxidation induced by carbon tetrachloride, as evidenced by increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and reactive oxygen species levels were inhibited by treatment of MaR 1. Furthermore, MaR 1 increased activities of antioxidative mediators in carbon tetrachloride-treated mice liver. MaR 1 decreased indices of inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, monocyte chemotactic protein 1, myeloperoxidase, cyclooxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Administration of MaR 1 inhibited activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κb) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the liver of CCl4 treated mice. In conclusion, these results suggested the antioxidative, anti-inflammatory properties of MaR 1 in CCl4 induced liver injury. The possible mechanism is partly implicated in its abilities to inhibit ROS generation and activation of NF-κb and MAPK pathway. PMID:26881046

  20. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of cinnamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sova, M

    2012-07-01

    Cinnamic acid is an organic acid occurring naturally in plants that has low toxicity and a broad spectrum of biological activities. In the search for novel pharmacologically active compounds, cinnamic acid derivatives are important and promising compounds with high potential for development into drugs. Many cinnamic acid derivatives, especially those with the phenolic hydroxyl group, are well-known antioxidants and are supposed to have several health benefits due to their strong free radical scavenging properties. It is also well known that cinnamic acid has antimicrobial activity. Cinnamic acid derivatives, both isolated from plant material and synthesized, have been reported to have antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal properties. Acids, esters, amides, hydrazides and related derivatives of cinnamic acid with such activities are here reviewed.

  1. Lipid raft-associated β-adducin is required for PSGL-1-mediated neutrophil rolling on P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tingshuang; Liu, Wenai; Yang, Chen; Ba, Xueqing; Wang, Xiaoguang; Jiang, Yong; Zeng, Xianlu

    2015-02-01

    Lipid rafts, a liquid-ordered plasma membrane microdomain, are related to cell-surface receptor function. PSGL-1, a major surface receptor protein for leukocyte, also acts as a signaling receptor in leukocyte rolling. To investigate the role of lipid raft in PSGL-1 signaling in human neutrophils, we quantitatively analyzed lipid raft proteome of human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60 cells and identified a lipid raft-associated protein β-adducin. PSGL-1 ligation induced dissociation of the raft-associated protein β-adducin from lipid rafts and actin, as well as phosphorylation of β-adducin, indicating a transient uncoupling of lipid rafts from the actin cytoskeleton. Knockdown of β-adducin greatly attenuated HL-60 cells rolling on P-selectin. We also showed that Src kinase is crucial for PSGL-1 ligation-induced β-adducin phosphorylation and relocation. Taken together, these results show that β-adducin is a pivotal lipid raft-associated protein in PSGL-1-mediated neutrophil rolling on P-selectin.

  2. Pro-Resolving Lipid Mediators Improve Neuronal Survival and Increase Aβ42 Phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingqin; Wang, Xiuzhe; Hjorth, Erik; Colas, Romain A; Schroeder, Lisa; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Serhan, Charles N; Schultzberg, Marianne

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation in the brain is a prominent feature in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies suggest that chronic inflammation can be a consequence of failure to resolve the inflammation. Resolution of inflammation is mediated by a family of lipid mediators (LMs), and the levels of these specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs) are reduced in the hippocampus of those with AD. In the present study, we combined analysis of LMs in the entorhinal cortex (ENT) from AD patients with in vitro analysis of their direct effects on neurons and microglia. We probed ENT, an area affected early in AD pathogenesis, by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS), and found that the levels of the SPMs maresin 1 (MaR1), protectin D1 (PD1), and resolvin (Rv) D5, were lower in ENT of AD patients as compared to age-matched controls, while levels of the pro-inflammatory prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) were higher in AD. In vitro studies showed that lipoxin A4 (LXA4), MaR1, resolvin D1 (RvD1), and protectin DX (PDX) exerted neuroprotective activity, and that MaR1 and RvD1 down-regulated β-amyloid (Aβ)42-induced inflammation in human microglia. MaR1 exerted a stimulatory effect on microglial uptake of Aβ42. Our findings give further evidence for a disturbance of the resolution pathway in AD, and indicate that stimulating this pathway is a promising treatment strategy for AD. PMID:26650044

  3. Identification and signature profiles for pro-resolving and inflammatory lipid mediators in human tissue

    PubMed Central

    Colas, Romain A.; Shinohara, Masakazu; Dalli, Jesmond; Chiang, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Resolution of acute inflammation is an active process locally controlled by a novel genus of specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPM) that orchestrate key resolution responses. Hence, it is of general interest to identify individual bioactive mediators and profile their biosynthetic pathways with related isomers as well as their relation(s) to classic eicosanoids in mammalian tissues. Lipid mediator (LM)-SPM levels and signature profiles of their biosynthetic pathways were investigated using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS)-based LM metabololipidomics. LM and SPM were identified using ≥6 diagnostic ions and chromatographic behavior matching with both authentic and synthetic materials. This approach was validated using the composite reference plasma (SRM1950) of 100 healthy individuals. Using targeted LM metabololipidomics, we profiled LM and SPM pathways in human peripheral blood (plasma and serum) and lymphoid organs. In these, we identified endogenous SPM metabolomes, namely, the potent lipoxins (LX), resolvins (Rv), protectins (PD), and maresins (MaR). These included RvD1, RvD2, RvD3, MaR1, and NPD1/PD1, which were identified in amounts within their bioactive ranges. In plasma and serum, principal component analysis (PCA) identified signature profiles of eicosanoids and SPM clusters. Plasma-SPM increased with omega-3 and acetylsalicylic acid intake that correlated with increased phagocytosis of Escherichia coli in whole blood. These findings demonstrate an approach for identification of SPM pathways (e.g., resolvins, protectins, and maresins) in human blood and lymphoid tissues that were in amounts commensurate with their pro-resolving, organ protective, and tissue regeneration functions. LM metabololipidomics coupled with calibration tissues and physiological changes documented herein provide a tool for functional phenotypic profiling. PMID:24696140

  4. Activation of autophagy in macrophages by pro-resolving lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Patricia; Rosales-Mendoza, César Eduardo; Terrón, Verónica; Toledano, Víctor; Cuadrado, Antonio; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Bannenberg, Gerard; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Fernández-Velasco, María; Boscá, Lisardo

    2015-01-01

    The resolution of inflammation is an active process driven by specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators, such as 15-epi-LXA4 and resolvin D1 (RvD1), that promote tissue regeneration. Macrophages regulate the innate immune response being key players during the resolution phase to avoid chronic inflammatory pathologies. Their half-life is tightly regulated to accomplish its phagocytic function, allowing the complete cleaning of the affected area. The balance between apoptosis and autophagy appears to be essential to control the survival of these immune cells within the inflammatory context. In the present work, we demonstrate that 15-epi-LXA4 and RvD1 at nanomolar concentrations promote autophagy in murine and human macrophages. Both compounds induced the MAP1LC3-I to MAP1LC3-II processing and the degradation of SQSTM1 as well as the formation of MAP1LC3(+) autophagosomes, a typical signature of autophagy. Furthermore, 15-epi-LXA4 and RvD1 treatment favored the fusion of the autophagosomes with lysosomes, allowing the final processing of the autophagic vesicles. This autophagic response involves the activation of MAPK1 and NFE2L2 pathways, but by an MTOR-independent mechanism. Moreover, these pro-resolving lipids improved the phagocytic activity of macrophages via NFE2L2. Therefore, 15-epi-LXA4 and RvD1 improved both survival and functionality of macrophages, which likely supports the recovery of tissue homeostasis and avoiding chronic inflammatory diseases.

  5. Activation of autophagy in macrophages by pro-resolving lipid mediators

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Patricia; Rosales-Mendoza, César Eduardo; Terrón, Verónica; Toledano, Víctor; Cuadrado, Antonio; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Bannenberg, Gerard; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Fernández-Velasco, María; Boscá, Lisardo

    2015-01-01

    The resolution of inflammation is an active process driven by specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators, such as 15-epi-LXA4 and resolvin D1 (RvD1), that promote tissue regeneration. Macrophages regulate the innate immune response being key players during the resolution phase to avoid chronic inflammatory pathologies. Their half-life is tightly regulated to accomplish its phagocytic function, allowing the complete cleaning of the affected area. The balance between apoptosis and autophagy appears to be essential to control the survival of these immune cells within the inflammatory context. In the present work, we demonstrate that 15-epi-LXA4 and RvD1 at nanomolar concentrations promote autophagy in murine and human macrophages. Both compounds induced the MAP1LC3-I to MAP1LC3-II processing and the degradation of SQSTM1 as well as the formation of MAP1LC3+ autophagosomes, a typical signature of autophagy. Furthermore, 15-epi-LXA4 and RvD1 treatment favored the fusion of the autophagosomes with lysosomes, allowing the final processing of the autophagic vesicles. This autophagic response involves the activation of MAPK1 and NFE2L2 pathways, but by an MTOR-independent mechanism. Moreover, these pro-resolving lipids improved the phagocytic activity of macrophages via NFE2L2. Therefore, 15-epi-LXA4 and RvD1 improved both survival and functionality of macrophages, which likely supports the recovery of tissue homeostasis and avoiding chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26506892

  6. Ex Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Selected Medicinal Plants against Fenton Reaction-Mediated Oxidation of Biological Lipid Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha; Urooj, Asna

    2015-01-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidation is often linked to various degenerative diseases. Biological substrates with lipids as major components are susceptible to oxygen-derived lipid peroxidation due to their composition. Lipid peroxide products act as biomarkers in evaluating the antioxidant potential of various plants and functional foods. The study focused on evaluation of the antioxidant potential of two extracts (methanol and 80% methanol) of four medicinal plants, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, against Fenton reaction-mediated oxidation of three biological lipid substrates; cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain homogenate. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method. Also, the correlation between the polyphenol, flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity in biological substrates was analyzed. Results indicated highest antioxidant potential by 80% methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (97.55%), methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata (72.15%), and methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (49.55%) in cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain, respectively. The polyphenol and flavonoid contents of methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata in cholesterol (r = 0.816) and low-density lipoprotein (r = 0.948) and Costus speciosus in brain (r = 0.977, polyphenols, and r = 0.949, flavonoids) correlated well with the antioxidant activity. The findings prove the antioxidant potential of the selected medicinal plants against Fenton reaction in biological lipid substrates. PMID:26933511

  7. MmpL transporter-mediated export of cell-wall associated lipids and siderophores in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Chalut, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacteria produce a large variety of surface-exposed lipids with unusual structures. Some of these compounds are ubiquitously present in mycobacteria and play an important role in the structural organization of the cell envelope, while others are species-specific. The biosynthesis of most of these lipids requires modular polyketide synthases (PKS) or non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) that are intracellular, suggesting that the assembly of these compounds takes place in the cytosolic compartment or near the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. The molecular mechanisms that mediate the export of these lipid components across the cell envelope remain poorly understood. Mycobacterial membrane protein Large (MmpL) transporters, a subclass of Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division (RND) transporters, appear to play a major role in this process, acting as scaffold proteins that couple lipid synthesis and transport. Recent studies have shown that this family of transporters also contributes to siderophore secretion in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The goal of this review is to provide the most recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in lipid and siderophore transport mediated by MmpL transporters. PMID:27553408

  8. Caffeic Acid Derivatives in Dried Lamiaceae and Echinacea purpurea Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concentrations of caffeic acid derivatives within Lamiaceae and Echinacea (herb, spice, tea, and dietary supplement forms) readily available in the U.S. marketplace (n=72) were determined. After the first identification of chicoric acid in Ocimum basilicum (basil), the extent to which chicoric a...

  9. Endogenous anti-inflammatory neuropeptides and pro-resolving lipid mediators: a new therapeutic approach for immune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Per; Delgado, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Identification of the factors that regulate the immune tolerance and control the appearance of exacerbated inflammatory conditions is crucial for the development of new therapies of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Although much is known about the molecular basis of initiating signals and pro-inflammatory chemical mediators in inflammation, it has only recently become apparent that endogenous stop signals are critical at early checkpoints within the temporal events of inflammation. Some neuropeptides and lipid mediators that are produced during the ongoing inflammatory response have emerged as endogenous anti-inflammatory agents that participate in the regulation of the processes that ensure self-tolerance and/or inflammation resolution. Here we examine the latest research findings, which indicate that neuropeptides participate in maintaining immune tolerance in two distinct ways: by regulating the balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory factors, and by inducing the emergence of regulatory T cells with suppressive activity against autoreactive T-cell effectors. On the other hand, we also focus on lipid mediators biosynthesized from ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty-acids in inflammatory exudates that promote the resolution phase of acute inflammation by regulating leucocyte influx to and efflux from local inflamed sites. Both anti-inflammatory neuropeptides and pro-resolving lipid mediators have shown therapeutic potential for a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders and could be used as biotemplates for the development of novel pharmacologic agents. PMID:18554314

  10. Proresolution Lipid Mediators in Multiple Sclerosis — Differential, Disease Severity-Dependent Synthesis — A Clinical Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brommer, Benedikt; Wengert, Oliver; Gronert, Karsten; Schwab, Jan M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The severity and longevity of inflammation is controlled by endogenous counter-regulatory signals. Among them are long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-derived lipid mediators, which promote the resolution of inflammation, an active process for returning to tissue homeostasis. Objective To determine whether endogenous production of lipid-derived resolution agonists is regulated differentially in patients with highly active and less active multiple sclerosis (MS). Design Matched-pairs study in University hospital Neurology department. Patients Based on clinical (relapse frequency) and paraclinical (MRI lesions, contrast enhancement) criteria, 10 pairs of age- and sex-matched patients with relapsing-remitting MS were assigned either to a group with highly active or less active MS. Lipid mediators were quantified in serum and cerebrospinal fluid using LC-MS/MS-based lipidomics. Results Levels of the key arachidonic (ω-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (ω-6)-derived mediators prostaglandins (PG), leukotrienes, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETE) and resolution agonists lipoxin A4 (LXA4), resolvin D1 (RvD1) and neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1) were quantified. In the patient group with highly active MS, 15-HETE and PGE2 were increased, which are products of the 15-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. The proresolution mediator RvD1 was significantly upregulated and NPD1 was detected in the highly active group only. LXA4 levels were not increased in patients with highly active MS. Conclusions Lipid mediator pathways are regulated differentially in the cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients, depending on disease severity. Non-exhaustive or possibly ‘delayed’ resolution pathways may suggest a defective resolution program in patients with highly active MS. Longitudinal analyses are required to hetero-typify this differential resolution capacity, which may be associated with disease progression, longevity and eventual termination. PMID:23409068

  11. Central mechanisms mediating the hypophagic effects of oleoylethanolamide and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines: different lipid signals?

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Adele; Tempesta, Bianca; Provensi, Gustavo; Passani, Maria B.; Gaetani, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    The spread of “obesity epidemic” and the poor efficacy of many anti-obesity therapies in the long-term highlight the need to develop novel efficacious therapy. This necessity stimulates a large research effort to find novel mechanisms controlling feeding and energy balance. Among these mechanisms a great deal of attention has been attracted by a family of phospholipid-derived signaling molecules that play an important role in the regulation of food-intake. They include N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines (NAPEs). NAPEs have been considered for a long time simply as phospholipid precursors of the lipid mediator NAEs, but increasing body of evidence suggest a role in many physiological processes including the regulation of feeding behavior. Several observations demonstrated that among NAEs, oleoylethanolamide (OEA) acts as a satiety signal, which is generated in the intestine, upon the ingestion of fat, and signals to the central nervous system. At this level different neuronal pathways, including oxytocinergic, noradrenergic, and histaminergic neurons, seem to mediate its hypophagic action. Similarly to NAEs, NAPE (with particular reference to the N16:0 species) levels were shown to be regulated by the fed state and this finding was initially interpreted as fluctuations of NAE precursors. However, the observation that exogenously administered NAPEs are able to inhibit food intake, not only in normal rats and mice but also in mice lacking the enzyme that converts NAPEs into NAEs, supported the hypothesis of a role of NAPE in the regulation of feeding behavior. Indirect observations suggest that the hypophagic action of NAPEs might involve central mechanisms, although the molecular target remains unknown. The present paper reviews the role that OEA and NAPEs play in the mechanisms that control food intake, further supporting this group of phospholipids as optimal candidate for the development of novel anti-obesity treatments. PMID

  12. RNA is an Adjuvanticity Mediator for the Lipid-Based Mucosal Adjuvant, Endocine.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masayuki; Aoshi, Taiki; Ozasa, Koji; Kusakabe, Takato; Momota, Masatoshi; Haseda, Yasunari; Kobari, Shingo; Kuroda, Etsushi; Kobiyama, Kouji; Coban, Cevayir; Ishii, Ken J

    2016-01-01

    Nasal vaccination has the potential to elicit systemic and mucosal immunity against pathogens. However, split and subunit vaccines lack potency at stimulating mucosal immunity, and an adjuvant is indispensable for eliciting potent mucosal immune response to nasal vaccines. Endocine, a lipid-based mucosal adjuvant, potentiates both systemic and mucosal immune responses. Although Endocine has shown efficacy and tolerability in animal and clinical studies, its mechanism of action remains unknown. It has been reported recently that endogenous danger signals are essential for the effects of some adjuvants such as alum or MF59. However, the contribution of danger signals to the adjuvanticity of Endocine has not been explored. Here, we show that RNA is likely to be an important mediator for the adjuvanticity of Endocine. Administration of Endocine generated nucleic acids release, and activated dendritic cells (DCs) in draining lymph nodes in vivo. These results suggest the possibility that Endocine indirectly activates DCs via damage-associated molecular patterns. Moreover, the adjuvanticity of Endocine disappeared in mice lacking TANK-binding kinase 1 (Tbk1), which is a downstream molecule of nucleic acid sensing signal pathway. Furthermore, co-administration of RNase A reduced the adjuvanticity of Endocine. These data suggest that RNA is important for the adjuvanticity of Endocine. PMID:27374884

  13. RNA is an Adjuvanticity Mediator for the Lipid-Based Mucosal Adjuvant, Endocine

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Masayuki; Aoshi, Taiki; Ozasa, Koji; Kusakabe, Takato; Momota, Masatoshi; Haseda, Yasunari; Kobari, Shingo; Kuroda, Etsushi; Kobiyama, Kouji; Coban, Cevayir; Ishii, Ken J.

    2016-01-01

    Nasal vaccination has the potential to elicit systemic and mucosal immunity against pathogens. However, split and subunit vaccines lack potency at stimulating mucosal immunity, and an adjuvant is indispensable for eliciting potent mucosal immune response to nasal vaccines. Endocine, a lipid-based mucosal adjuvant, potentiates both systemic and mucosal immune responses. Although Endocine has shown efficacy and tolerability in animal and clinical studies, its mechanism of action remains unknown. It has been reported recently that endogenous danger signals are essential for the effects of some adjuvants such as alum or MF59. However, the contribution of danger signals to the adjuvanticity of Endocine has not been explored. Here, we show that RNA is likely to be an important mediator for the adjuvanticity of Endocine. Administration of Endocine generated nucleic acids release, and activated dendritic cells (DCs) in draining lymph nodes in vivo. These results suggest the possibility that Endocine indirectly activates DCs via damage-associated molecular patterns. Moreover, the adjuvanticity of Endocine disappeared in mice lacking TANK-binding kinase 1 (Tbk1), which is a downstream molecule of nucleic acid sensing signal pathway. Furthermore, co-administration of RNase A reduced the adjuvanticity of Endocine. These data suggest that RNA is important for the adjuvanticity of Endocine. PMID:27374884

  14. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jun; Ren, Pingping; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xing Li; Chen, Li; Shen, Ying H.

    2010-02-26

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.

  15. Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced TXNIP Drives Fructose-Mediated Hepatic Inflammation and Lipid Accumulation Through NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xian; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Yang; Hu, Qing-Hua; Wang, Ming-Xing; Jin, Rui; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Wang, Wei; Wang, Rong; Kang, Lin-Lin; Li, Jin-Sheng; Li, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Increased fructose consumption predisposes the liver to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but the mechanisms are elusive. Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) links oxidative stress to NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation and this signaling axis may be involved in fructose-induced NAFLD. Here, we explore the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced TXNIP overexpression in fructose-mediated hepatic NLRP3 inflammasome activation, inflammation, and lipid accumulation. Results: Rats were fed a 10% fructose diet for 8 weeks and treated with allopurinol and quercetin during the last 4 weeks. Five millimolars of fructose-exposed hepatocytes (primary rat hepatocytes, rat hepatic parenchymal cells [RHPCs], HLO2, HepG2) were co-incubated with antioxidants or caspase-1 inhibitor or subjected to TXNIP or NLRP3 siRNA interference. Fructose induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, janus-activated kinase 2/signal transducers and activators of transcription 3-mediated inflammatory signaling, and expression alteration of lipid metabolism-related genes in cultured hepatocytes and rat livers. NLRP3 silencing and caspase-1 suppression blocked these effects in primary rat hepatocytes and RHPCs, confirming that inflammasome activation alters hepatocyte lipid metabolism. Hepatocellular ROS and TXNIP were increased in animal and cell models. TXNIP silencing blocked NLRP3 inflammasome activation, inflammation, and lipid metabolism perturbations but not ROS induction in fructose-exposed hepatocytes, whereas antioxidants addition abrogated TXNIP induction and diminished the detrimental effects in fructose-exposed hepatocytes and rat livers. Innovation and Conclusions: This study provides a novel mechanism for fructose-induced NAFLD pathogenesis by which the ROS-TXNIP pathway mediates hepatocellular NLRP3 inflammasome activation, inflammation and lipid accumulation. Antioxidant

  16. The Interaction of ApoA-I and ABCA1 Triggers Signal Transduction Pathways to Mediate Efflux of Cellular Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guo-Jun; Yin, Kai; Fu, Yu-chang; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2012-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) has been characterized as a crucial step for antiatherosclerosis, which is initiated by ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1) to mediate the efflux of cellular phospholipids and cholesterol to lipid-free apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I). However, the mechanisms underlying apoA-I/ABCA1 interaction to lead to the lipidation of apoA-I are poorly understood. There are several models proposed for the interaction of apoA-I with ABCA1 as well as the lipidation of apoA-I mediated by ABCA1. ApoA-I increases the levels of ABCA1 protein markedly. In turn, ABCA1 can stabilize apoA-I. The interaction of apoA-I with ABCA1 could activate signaling molecules that modulate posttranslational ABCA1 activity or lipid transport activity. The key signaling molecules in these processes include protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), Rho GTPases and Ca2+, and many factors also could influence the interaction of apoA-I with ABCA1. This review will summarize these mechanisms for the apoA-I interaction with ABCA1 as well as the signal transduction pathways involved in these processes. PMID:22064972

  17. High levels of endogenous lipid mediators (N-acylethanolamines) in women with chronic widespread pain during acute tissue trauma

    PubMed Central

    Ghafouri, Bijar; Ghafouri, Nazdar; Gerdle, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Although chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain is a significant health problem, the molecular mechanisms involved in developing and maintaining chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain are poorly understood. Central sensitization mechanisms maintained by stimuli from peripheral tissues such as muscle have been suggested. Lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory characteristics such as endogenous ligands of peroxisome proliferator activating receptor-α, oleoylethanolamide, and palmitoylethanolamide are suggested to regulate nociceptive transmission from peripheral locations on route towards the central nervous system. This case–control study investigates the levels of anti-inflammatory lipids in microdialysis samples collected during the first 2 h after microdialysis probe insertion and explores the association of these lipids with different pain characteristics in women with chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain (n = 17) and female healthy controls (n = 19). The levels of oleoylethanolamide, palmitoylethanolamide, and stearoylethanolamide were determined. During sampling of dialysate, pain ratings were conducted using a numeric rating scale. Pain thresholds were registered from upper and lower parts of the body. Oleoylethanolamide and stearoylethanolamide levels were significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) in chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain at all time points. Numeric rating scale correlated with levels of stearoylethanolamide in chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain. Higher levels of lipid mediators could reflect an altered tissue reactivity in response to microdialysis probe insertion in chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain. PMID:27531672

  18. CALCIUM-INDUCED LIPID PEROXIDATION IS MEDIATED BY RHODNIUS HEME-BINDING PROTEIN (RHBP) AND PREVENTED BY VITELLIN.

    PubMed

    Paes, Marcia C; Silveira, Alan B; Ventura-Martins, Guilherme; Luciano, Monalisa; Coelho, Marsen G P; Todeschini, Adriane R; Bianconi, M Lucia; Atella, Georgia C; Silva-Neto, Mário A C

    2015-10-01

    Lipid peroxidation is promoted by the quasi-lipoxygenase (QL) activity of heme proteins and enhanced by the presence of free calcium. Unlike mammalian plasma, the hemolymph of Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of Chagas disease, contains both a free heme-binding protein (RHBP) and circulating lipoproteins. RHBP binds and prevents the heme groups of the proteins from participating in lipid peroxidation reactions. Herein, we show that despite being bound to RHBP, heme groups promote lipid peroxidation through a calcium-dependent QL reaction. This reaction is readily inhibited by the presence of ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA), the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene or micromolar levels of the main yolk phosphoprotein vitellin (Vt). The inhibition of lipid peroxidation is eliminated by the in vitro dephosphorylation of Vt, indicating that this reaction depends on the interaction of free calcium ions with negatively charged phosphoamino acids. Our results demonstrate that calcium chelation mediated by phosphoproteins occurs via an antioxidant mechanism that protects living organisms from lipid peroxidation. PMID:26111116

  19. Cinnamic acid derivatives as anticancer agents-a review.

    PubMed

    De, P; Baltas, M; Bedos-Belval, F

    2011-01-01

    Cinnamic acid and its phenolic analogues are natural substances. Chemically, in cinnamic acids the 3-phenyl acrylic acid functionality offers three main reactive sites; substitution at the phenyl ring, addition at the α,β- unsaturation and the reactions of the carboxylic acid functionality. Owing to these chemical aspects cinnamic acid derivatives received much attention in medicinal research as traditional as well as recent synthetic antitumor agents. We observed that in spite of their rich medicinal tradition, cinnamic acid derivatives and their anticancer potentials remained underutilized for several decades since the first published clinical use in 1905. In last two decades, there has been huge attention towards various cinnamoyl derivatives and their antitumor efficacy. This review provides a comprehensive and unprecedented literature compilation concerning the synthesis and biological evaluation of various cinnamoyl acids, esters, amides, hydrazides and related derivatives in anticancer research. We envisage that our effort in this review contributes a much needed and timely addition to the literature of medicinal research.

  20. Bioconversion of cinnamic acid derivatives by Schizophyllum commune.

    PubMed

    Nimura, Yoshifumi; Tsujiyama, Sho-ichi; Ueno, Masayoshi

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the production of useful phenols from plant resources, we examined the metabolism of cinnamic acid derivatives by a wood-rotting fungus, Schizophyllum commune. Four cinnamic acid derivatives (cinnamic, p-coumaric, ferulic, and sinapic acids) were tested as substrates. Two main reactions, reduction and cleavage of the side chain, were observed. Reduction of the side chain was confirmed in cinnamic acid and p-coumaric acid metabolism. The side chain cleavage occurred in p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid metabolism but the initial reactions of these acids differed. Sinapic acid was not metabolized by S. commune. p-Hydroxybenzaldehyde accumulation was observed in the culture to which p-coumaric acid was added. This suggests that S. commune is a useful agent for transforming p-coumaric acid into p-hydroxybenzaldehyde.

  1. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory properties of some benzoic acid derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, Melike; Kiliç, Deryanur; Ünver, Yaǧmur; Şentürk, Murat; Askin, Hakan; Küfrevioǧlu, Ömer Irfan

    2016-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) hydrolyses the neurotransmitter acetylcholine to acetic acid and choline. AChE inhibitors are used in treatment of several neurodegeneartive disorder and Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, inhibition of AChE with some benzoic acid derivatives were investigated. 3-Chloro-benzoic acid (1), 2-hydroxy-5-sulfobenzoic acid (2), 2-(sulfooxy) benzoic acid (3), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (4), 2,3-dimethoxybenzoic (5), and 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic (6) were calculated IC50 values AChE enzyme. Kinetic investigations showed that similarly to AChE inhibitors. Benzoic acid derivatives (1-6) investigated are encouraging agents which may be used as lead molecules in order to derivative novel AChE inhibitors that might be useful in medical applications.

  2. [Cardioprotective properties of new glutamic acid derivative under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Perfilova, V N; Sadikova, N V; Berestovitskaia, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2014-01-01

    The effect of new glutamic acid derivative on the cardiac ino- and chronotropic functions has been studied in experiments on rats exposed to 24-hour immobilization-and-pain stress. It is established that glutamic acid derivative RGPU-238 (glufimet) at a dose of 28.7 mg/kg increases the increment of myocardial contractility and relaxation rates and left ventricular pressure in stress-tested animals by 13 1,1, 72.4, and 118.6%, respectively, as compared to the control group during the test for adrenoreactivity. Compound RGPU-238 increases the increment of the maximum intensity of myocardium functioning by 196.5 % at 30 sec of isometric workload as compared to the control group. The cardioprotective effect of compound RGPU-238 is 1.5 - 2 times higher than that of the reference drug phenibut.

  3. Beneath the Minerals, a Layer of Round Lipid Particles Was Identified to Mediate Collagen Calcification in Compact Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shaohua; Yu, Jianqing J.

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts lose 1–2% of their bone minerals per month during space flights. A systematic search for a countermeasure relies on a good understanding of the mechanism of bone formation at the molecular level. How collagen fibers, the dominant matrix protein in bones, are mineralized remains mysterious. Atomic force microscopy was carried out, in combination with immunostaining and Western blotting, on bovine tibia to identify unrecognized building blocks involved in bone formation and for an elucidation of the process of collagen calcification in bone formation. Before demineralization, tiles of hydroxyapatite crystals were found stacked along bundles of collagen fibers. These tiles were homogeneous in size and shape with dimensions 0.69 × 0.77 × 0.2 μm3. Demineralization dissolved these tiles and revealed small spheres with an apparent diameter around 145 nm. These spheres appeared to be lipid particles since organic solvents dissolved them. The parallel collagen bundles had widths mostly <2 μm. Composition analysis of compact bones indicated a high content of apolar lipids, including triglycerides and cholesterol esters. Apolar lipids are known to form lipid droplets or lipoproteins, and these spheres are unlikely to be matrix vesicles as reported for collagen calcification in epiphyseal cartilages. Results from this study suggest that the layer of round lipid particles on collagen fibers mediates the mineral deposition onto the fibers. The homogeneous size of these lipid particles and the presence of apolipoprotein in demineralized bone tissue suggest the possibility that these particles might be of lipoprotein origin. More studies are needed to verify the last claim and to exclude the possibility that they are secreted lipid droplets. PMID:16980361

  4. Historical aspects and applications of barbituric acid derivatives. A review.

    PubMed

    Guillén Sans, R; Guzmán Chozas, M

    1988-12-01

    This review considers the pharmacological and other applications of barbituric and 2-thiobarbituric acid derivatives. A chronological description about the discovery, structural studies and first clinical assays are given. Therapeutic expectations as anticonvulsant, antimicrobial, spasmolytic, antiinflammatory, antitumoral and some other effects of 5,5-disubstituted barbituric acids and alkylidene- or arylidenebarbituric acids are overviewed. A considerable amount of these types of compounds have been proposed as industrial dyes and pigments, photosensitizers and thermosensitive materials. PMID:3073393

  5. Citric-acid-derived photo-cross-linked biodegradable elastomers.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Dipendra; Tran, Richard T; Guleserian, Kristine J; Tang, Liping; Yang, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Citric-acid-derived thermally cross-linked biodegradable elastomers (CABEs) have recently received significant attention in various biomedical applications, including tissue-engineering orthopedic devices, bioimaging and implant coatings. However, citric-acid-derived photo-cross-linked biodegradable elastomers are rarely reported. Herein, we report a novel photo-cross-linked biodegradable elastomer, referred to as poly(octamethylene maleate citrate) (POMC), which preserves pendant hydroxyl and carboxylic functionalities after cross-linking for the potential conjugation of biologically active molecules. Pre-POMC is a low-molecular-mass pre-polymer with an average molecular mass between 701 and 1291 Da. POMC networks are soft and elastic with an initial modulus of 0.07 to 1.3 MPa and an elongation-at-break between 38 and 382%. FT-IR-ATR results confirmed the successful surface immobilization of type-I collagen onto POMC films, which enhanced in vitro cellular attachment and proliferation. Photo-polymerized POMC films implanted subcutaneously into Sprague-Dawley rats demonstrated minimal in vivo inflammatory responses. The development of POMC enriches the family of citric-acid-derived biodegradable elastomers and expands the available biodegradable polymers for versatile needs in biomedical applications.

  6. Citric-Acid-Derived Photo-cross-Linked Biodegradable Elastomers

    PubMed Central

    Gyawali, Dipendra; Tran, Richard T.; Guleserian, Kristine J.; Tang, Liping; Yang, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Citric-acid-derived thermally cross-linked biodegradable elastomers (CABEs) have recently received significant attention in various biomedical applications, including tissue-engineering orthopedic devices, bioimaging and implant coatings. However, citric-acid-derived photo-cross-linked biodegradable elastomers are rarely reported. Herein, we report a novel photo-cross-linked biodegradable elastomer, referred to as poly(octamethylene maleate citrate) (POMC), which preserves pendant hydroxyl and carboxylic functionalities after cross-linking for the potential conjugation of biologically active molecules. POMC is a low-molecular-mass pre-polymer with a molecular mass average between 701 and 1291 Da. POMC networks are soft and elastic with an initial modulus of 0.07 to 1.3 MPa and an elongation at break between 38 and 382%. FT-IR–ATR results confirmed the successful surface immobilization of type-I collagen onto POMC films, which enhanced in vitro cellular attachment and proliferation. Photo-polymerized POMC films implanted subcutaneously into Sprague–Dawley rats demonstrated minimal in vivo inflammatory responses. The development of POMC enriches the family of citric-acid-derived biodegradable elastomers and expands the available biodegradable polymers for versatile needs in biomedical applications. PMID:20557687

  7. Proresolving lipid mediators resolvin D1, resolvin D2, and maresin 1 are critical in modulating T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Chiurchiù, Valerio; Leuti, Alessandro; Dalli, Jesmond; Jacobsson, Anders; Battistini, Luca; Maccarrone, Mauro; Serhan, Charles N

    2016-08-24

    Resolution of inflammation is a finely regulated process mediated by specialized proresolving lipid mediators (SPMs), including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-derived resolvins and maresins. The immunomodulatory role of SPMs in adaptive immune cells is of interest. We report that D-series resolvins (resolvin D1 and resolvin D2) and maresin 1 modulate adaptive immune responses in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. These lipid mediators reduce cytokine production by activated CD8(+) T cells and CD4(+) T helper 1 (TH1) and TH17 cells but do not modulate T cell inhibitory receptors or abrogate their capacity to proliferate. Moreover, these SPMs prevented naïve CD4(+) T cell differentiation into TH1 and TH17 by down-regulating their signature transcription factors, T-bet and Rorc, in a mechanism mediated by the GPR32 and ALX/FPR2 receptors; they concomitantly enhanced de novo generation and function of Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells via the GPR32 receptor. These results were also supported in vivo in a mouse deficient for DHA synthesis (Elovl2(-/-)) that showed an increase in TH1/TH17 cells and a decrease in Treg cells compared to wild-type mice. Additionally, either DHA supplementation in Elovl2(-/-) mice or in vivo administration of resolvin D1 significantly reduced cytokine production upon specific stimulation of T cells. These findings demonstrate actions of specific SPMs on adaptive immunity and provide a new avenue for SPM-based approaches to modulate chronic inflammation. PMID:27559094

  8. Lipid transport mediated by Arabidopsis TGD proteins is unidirectional from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plastid

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Moellering, E. R., Muthan, B.; Fan, J.; Benning, C.

    2010-06-01

    The transfer of lipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plastid in Arabidopsis involves the TRIGALACTOSYLDIACYLGLYCEROL (TGD) proteins. Lipid exchange is thought to be bidirectional based on the presence of specific lipid molecular species in Arabidopsis mutants impaired in the desaturation of fatty acids of membrane lipids in the ER and plastid. However, it was unclear whether TGD proteins were required for lipid trafficking in both directions. This question was addressed through the analysis of double mutants of tgd1-1 or tgd4-3 in genetic mutant backgrounds leading to a defect in lipid fatty acid desaturation either in the ER (fad2) or the plastid (fad6). The fad6 tgd1-1 and fad6 tgd4-3 double mutants showed drastic reductions in the relative levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and of galactolipids. The growth of these plants and the development of photosynthetic membrane systems were severely compromised, suggesting a disruption in the import of polyunsaturated fatty acid-containing lipid species from the ER. Furthermore, a forward-genetic screen in the tgd1-2 dgd1 mutant background led to the isolation of a new fad6-2 allele with a marked reduction in the amount of digalactosyldiacylglycerol. In contrast, the introduction of fad2, affecting fatty acid desaturation of lipids in the ER, into the two tgd mutant backgrounds did not further decrease the level of fatty acid desaturation in lipids of extraplastidic membranes. These results suggest that the role of TGD proteins is limited to plastid lipid import, but does not extend to lipid export from the plastid to extraplastidic membranes.

  9. Formation of functional cell membrane domains: the interplay of lipid- and protein-mediated interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Numerous cell membrane associated processes, including signal transduction, membrane sorting, protein processing and virus trafficking take place in membrane subdomains. Protein-protein interactions provide the frameworks necessary to generate biologically functional membrane domains. For example, coat proteins define membrane areas destined for sorting processes, viral proteins self-assemble to generate a budding virus, and adapter molecules organize multimolecular signalling assemblies, which catalyse downstream reactions. The concept of raft lipid-based membrane domains provides a different principle for compartmentalization and segregation of membrane constituents. Accordingly, rafts are defined by the physical properties of the lipid bilayer and function by selective partitioning of membrane lipids and proteins into membrane domains of specific phase behaviour and lipid packing. Here, I will discuss the interplay of these independent principles of protein scaffolds and raft lipid microdomains leading to the generation of biologically functional membrane domains. PMID:12803918

  10. Ts6 and Ts2 from Tityus serrulatus venom induce inflammation by mechanisms dependent on lipid mediators and cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Zoccal, Karina Furlani; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva; Sorgi, Carlos Artério; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Sampaio, Suely Vilela; Arantes, Eliane Candiani; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators are thought to be involved in the systemic and local immune response induced by the Tityus serrulatus scorpion envenomation. New functional aspects of lipid mediators have recently been described. Here, we examine the unreported role of lipid mediators in cell recruitment to the peritoneal cavity after an injection with Ts2 or Ts6 toxins isolated from the T. serrulatus scorpion venom. In this report, we demonstrate that following a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of Ts2 or Ts6 (250 μg/kg) in mice, there was an induction of leukocytosis with a predominance of neutrophils observed at 4, 24, 48 and 96 h. Moreover, total protein, leukotriene (LT)B(4), prostaglandin (PG)E(2) and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels were increased. We also observed an increase of regulatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-10, after the Ts2 injection. Finally, we observed that Ts2 or Ts6 injection in 5-lipoxygenase (LO) deficient mice and in wild type (WT) 129sv mice pre-treated with LTs and PGs inhibitors (MK-886 and celecoxib, respectively) a reduction the influx of leukocytes occurs in comparison to WT. The recruitment of these cells demonstrated a phenotype characteristic of neutrophils, macrophages, CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes expressing GR1+, F4/80+, CD3+/CD4+ and CD3+/CD8+, respectively. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that Ts2 and Ts6 induce inflammation by mechanisms dependent on lipid mediators and cytokine production. Ts2 may play a regulatory role whereas Ts6 exhibits pro-inflammatory activity exclusively. PMID:23085190

  11. Increased levels of palmitoylethanolamide and other bioactive lipid mediators and enhanced local mast cell proliferation in canine atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the precise pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) is unknown, an immune dysregulation that causes Th2-predominant inflammation and an intrinsic defect in skin barrier function are currently the two major hypotheses, according to the so-called outside-inside-outside model. Mast cells (MCs) are involved in AD both by releasing Th2 polarizing cytokines and generating pruritus symptoms through release of histamine and tryptase. A link between MCs and skin barrier defects was recently uncovered, with histamine being found to profoundly contribute to the skin barrier defects. Palmitoylethanolamide and related lipid mediators are endogenous bioactive compounds, considered to play a protective homeostatic role in many tissues: evidence collected so far shows that the anti-inflammatory effect of palmitoylethanolamide depends on the down-modulation of MC degranulation. Based on this background, the purpose of the present study was twofold: (a) to determine if the endogenous levels of palmitoylethanolamide and other bioactive lipid mediators are changed in the skin of AD dogs compared to healthy animals; (b) to examine if MC number is increased in the skin of AD dogs and, if so, whether it depends on MC in-situ proliferation. Results The amount of lipid extract expressed as percent of biopsy tissue weight was significantly reduced in AD skin while the levels of all analyzed bioactive lipid mediators were significantly elevated, with palmitoylethanolamide showing the highest increase. In dogs with AD, the number of MCs was significantly increased in both the subepidermal and the perifollicular compartments and their granule content was significantly decreased in the latter. Also, in situ proliferation of MCs was documented. Conclusions The levels of palmitoylethanolamide and other bioactive lipid mediators were shown to increase in AD skin compared to healthy samples, leading to the hypothesis that they may be part of the body’s innate mechanisms to

  12. Lipid Nanoparticle-mediated siRNA Transfer Against PCTAIRE1/PCTK1/Cdk16 Inhibits In Vivo Cancer Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yanagi, Teruki; Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel; Hishiki, Asami; Nagai, Ko; Toyonaga, Ellen; Chivukula, Pad; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi

    2016-01-01

    PCTAIRE1/CDK16/PCTK1 plays critical roles in cancer cell proliferation and antiapoptosis. To advance our previously published in vitro results with PCTAIRE1 silencing, we examined the in vivo therapeutic potential of this approach by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) encapsulated by lipid nanoparticles. Therapy experiments of PCTAIRE1 siRNA were performed using human HCT116 colorectal cancer cells and human A2058 melanoma cells. A single dose of PCTAIRE1 siRNA-lipid nanoparticles was found to be highly effective in reducing in vivo PCTAIRE1 expression for up to 4 days as assayed by immunoblotting. Therapy experiments were started 4 days after subcutaneous injection of cancer cells. Treatment with PCTAIRE1 siRNA-lipid nanoparticles (0.5 mg/kg RNA, twice a week) reduced tumor volume and weight significantly compared with the scramble-control group. Histopathological analysis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling) showed increased apoptosis of tumor cells treated with PCTAIRE1-siRNA. Overall, our results demonstrate that siRNA treatment targeting PCTAIRE1 is effective in vivo, suggesting that PCTAIRE1 siRNA-lipid nanoparticles might be a novel therapeutic approach against cancer cells. PMID:27351680

  13. Keratin impact on PKCδ- and ASMase-mediated regulation of hepatocyte lipid raft size - implication for FasR-associated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Stéphane; Loranger, Anne; Omary, M Bishr; Marceau, Normand

    2016-09-01

    Keratins are epithelial cell intermediate filament (IF) proteins that are expressed as pairs in a cell-differentiation-regulated manner. Hepatocytes express the keratin 8 and 18 pair (denoted K8/K18) of IFs, and a loss of K8 or K18, as in K8-null mice, leads to degradation of the keratin partner. We have previously reported that a K8/K18 loss in hepatocytes leads to altered cell surface lipid raft distribution and more efficient Fas receptor (FasR, also known as TNFRSF6)-mediated apoptosis. We demonstrate here that the absence of K8 or transgenic expression of the K8 G62C mutant in mouse hepatocytes reduces lipid raft size. Mechanistically, we find that the lipid raft size is dependent on acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, also known as SMPD1) enzyme activity, which is reduced in absence of K8/K18. Notably, the reduction of ASMase activity appears to be caused by a less efficient redistribution of surface membrane PKCδ toward lysosomes. Moreover, we delineate the lipid raft volume range that is required for an optimal FasR-mediated apoptosis. Hence, K8/K18-dependent PKCδ- and ASMase-mediated modulation of lipid raft size can explain the more prominent FasR-mediated signaling resulting from K8/K18 loss. The fine-tuning of ASMase-mediated regulation of lipid rafts might provide a therapeutic target for death-receptor-related liver diseases. PMID:27422101

  14. Keratin impact on PKCδ- and ASMase-mediated regulation of hepatocyte lipid raft size - implication for FasR-associated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Stéphane; Loranger, Anne; Omary, M Bishr; Marceau, Normand

    2016-09-01

    Keratins are epithelial cell intermediate filament (IF) proteins that are expressed as pairs in a cell-differentiation-regulated manner. Hepatocytes express the keratin 8 and 18 pair (denoted K8/K18) of IFs, and a loss of K8 or K18, as in K8-null mice, leads to degradation of the keratin partner. We have previously reported that a K8/K18 loss in hepatocytes leads to altered cell surface lipid raft distribution and more efficient Fas receptor (FasR, also known as TNFRSF6)-mediated apoptosis. We demonstrate here that the absence of K8 or transgenic expression of the K8 G62C mutant in mouse hepatocytes reduces lipid raft size. Mechanistically, we find that the lipid raft size is dependent on acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, also known as SMPD1) enzyme activity, which is reduced in absence of K8/K18. Notably, the reduction of ASMase activity appears to be caused by a less efficient redistribution of surface membrane PKCδ toward lysosomes. Moreover, we delineate the lipid raft volume range that is required for an optimal FasR-mediated apoptosis. Hence, K8/K18-dependent PKCδ- and ASMase-mediated modulation of lipid raft size can explain the more prominent FasR-mediated signaling resulting from K8/K18 loss. The fine-tuning of ASMase-mediated regulation of lipid rafts might provide a therapeutic target for death-receptor-related liver diseases.

  15. Synthesis, antimicrobial evaluation and QSAR studies of stearic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tahlan, S; Kumar, P; Narasimhan, B

    2014-02-01

    A series of Schiff bases (1-17) and esters (18-28) of stearic acid was synthesized and characterized by physicochemical as well as spectral means. The synthesized compounds were evaluated in vitro for their antimicrobial activity by tube dilution method. The antimicrobial screening results indicated that the compounds having electron releasing groups on benzylidene nucleus were found to be more active against bacterial strains and compounds having electron withdrawing groups on benzylidene nucleus were found to be more active against fungal strains. QSAR studies demonstrated that electronic parameters dipole moment (µ) and total energy (Te) were the most important descriptors in describing the antimicrobial activity of synthesized stearic acid derivatives.

  16. Modulation of Innate Immune Signalling by Lipid-Mediated MAVS Transmembrane Domain Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Ron, David; Volmer, Romain

    2015-01-01

    RIG-I-like receptors detect viral RNA in infected cells and promote oligomerization of the outer mitochondrial membrane protein MAVS to induce innate immunity to viral infection through type I interferon production. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) have been shown to enhance anti-viral MAVS signalling, but the mechanisms have remained obscure. Using a biochemical oligomerization-reporter fused to the transmembrane domain of MAVS, we found that mROS inducers promoted lipid-dependent MAVS transmembrane domain oligomerization in the plane of the outer mitochondrial membrane. These events were mirrored by Sendai virus infection, which similarly induced lipid peroxidation and promoted lipid-dependent MAVS transmembrane domain oligomerization. Our observations point to a role for mROS-induced changes in lipid bilayer properties in modulating antiviral innate signalling by favouring the oligomerization of MAVS transmembrane domain in the outer-mitochondrial membrane. PMID:26317833

  17. Influence of lipid bilayer properties on nanodisc formation mediated by styrene/maleic acid copolymers.

    PubMed

    Cuevas Arenas, Rodrigo; Klingler, Johannes; Vargas, Carolyn; Keller, Sandro

    2016-08-11

    Copolymers of styrene and maleic acid (SMA) have gained great attention as alternatives to conventional detergents, as they offer decisive advantages for studying membrane proteins and lipids in vitro. These polymers self-insert into artificial and biological membranes and, at sufficiently high concentrations, solubilise them into disc-shaped nanostructures containing a lipid bilayer core surrounded by a polymer belt. We have used (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering to systematically study the solubilisation of vesicles composed of saturated or unsaturated phospholipids by an SMA copolymer with a 3 : 1 styrene/maleic acid molar ratio at different temperatures. Solubilisation was thermodynamically rationalised in terms of a three-stage model that treats various lipid/polymer aggregates as pseudophases. The solubilising capacity of SMA(3 : 1) towards a saturated lipid is higher in the gel than in the liquid-crystalline state of the membrane even though solubilisation is slower. Although the solubilisation of mixed fluid membranes is non-selective, the presence of a non-bilayer phospholipid lowers the threshold at which the membrane becomes saturated with SMA(3 : 1) but raises the polymer concentration required for complete solubilisation. Both of these trends can be explained by considering the vesicle-to-nanodisc transfer free energies of the lipid and the polymer. On the basis of the phase diagrams thus obtained, re-association of polymer-solubilised lipids with vesicles is possible under mild conditions, which has implications for the reconstitution of proteins and lipids from nanodiscs into vesicular membranes. Finally, the phase diagrams provide evidence for the absence of free SMA(3 : 1) in vesicular lipid suspensions. PMID:27471007

  18. 21 CFR 172.862 - Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.862 Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids. The food additive oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids may be safely used in food and...

  19. 21 CFR 172.862 - Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.862 Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids. The food additive oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids may be safely used in food and...

  20. 21 CFR 172.862 - Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.862 Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids. The food additive oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids may be safely used in food and...

  1. 21 CFR 172.862 - Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.862 Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids. The food additive oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids may be safely used in food and...

  2. Lipid raft-mediated Fas/CD95 apoptotic signaling in leukemic cells and normal leukocytes and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2015-11-01

    Plasma membrane is now recognized to contain tightly packed cholesterol/sphingolipid-rich domains, known as lipid or membrane rafts, which are more ordered than the surrounding lipid bilayer. Lipid rafts are crucial for the compartmentalization of signaling processes in the membrane, mostly involved in cell survival and immune response. However, in the last 15 years, a large body of evidence has also identified raft platforms as scaffolds for the recruitment and clustering of death receptor Fas/CD95 and downstream signaling molecules, leading to the concept of death-promoting lipid rafts. This raft-Fas/CD95 coclustering was first described at the early 2000s as the underlying mechanism for the proapoptotic action of the alkylphospholipid analog edelfosine in leukemic cells, hence facilitating protein-protein interactions and conveying apoptotic signals independently of Fas/CD95 ligand. Edelfosine induces apoptosis in hematologic cancer cells and activated T-lymphocytes. Fas/CD95 raft coclustering is also promoted by Fas/CD95 ligand, agonistic Fas/CD95 antibodies, and additional antitumor drugs. Thus, death receptor recruitment in rafts is a physiologic process leading to cell demise that can be pharmacologically modulated. This redistribution and local accumulation of apoptotic molecules in membrane rafts, which are usually accompanied by displacement of survival signaling molecules, highlight how alterations in the apoptosis/survival signaling balance in specialized membrane regions modulate cell fate. Membrane rafts might also modulate apoptotic and nonapoptotic death receptor signaling. Here, we discuss the role of lipid rafts in Fas/CD95-mediated apoptotic cell signaling in hematologic cancer cells and normal leukocytes, with a special emphasis on their involvement as putative therapeutic targets in cancer and autoimmune diseases.

  3. Biarylalkyl Carboxylic Acid Derivatives as Novel Antischistosomal Agents.

    PubMed

    Mäder, Patrick; Blohm, Ariane S; Quack, Thomas; Lange-Grünweller, Kerstin; Grünweller, Arnold; Hartmann, Roland K; Grevelding, Christoph G; Schlitzer, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Parasitic platyhelminths are responsible for serious infectious diseases, such as schistosomiasis, which affect humans as well as animals across vast regions of the world. The drug arsenal available for the treatment of these diseases is limited; for example, praziquantel is the only drug currently used to treat ≥240 million people each year infected with Schistosoma spp., and there is justified concern about the emergence of drug resistance. In this study, we screened biarylalkyl carboxylic acid derivatives for their antischistosomal activity against S. mansoni. These compounds showed significant influence on egg production, pairing stability, and vitality. Tegumental lesions or gut dilatation was also observed. Substitution of the terminal phenyl residue in the biaryl scaffold with a 3-hydroxy moiety and derivatization of the terminal carboxylic acid scaffold with carboxamides yielded compounds that displayed significant antischistosomal activity at concentrations as low as 10 μm with satisfying cytotoxicity values. The present study provides detailed insight into the structure-activity relationships of biarylalkyl carboxylic acid derivatives and thereby paves the way for a new drug-hit moiety for fighting schistosomiasis. PMID:27159334

  4. Plant amino acid-derived vitamins: biosynthesis and function.

    PubMed

    Miret, Javier A; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-04-01

    Vitamins are essential organic compounds for humans, having lost the ability to de novo synthesize them. Hence, they represent dietary requirements, which are covered by plants as the main dietary source of most vitamins (through food or livestock's feed). Most vitamins synthesized by plants present amino acids as precursors (B1, B2, B3, B5, B7, B9 and E) and are therefore linked to plant nitrogen metabolism. Amino acids play different roles in their biosynthesis and metabolism, either incorporated into the backbone of the vitamin or as amino, sulfur or one-carbon group donors. There is a high natural variation in vitamin contents in crops and its exploitation through breeding, metabolic engineering and agronomic practices can enhance their nutritional quality. While the underlying biochemical roles of vitamins as cosubstrates or cofactors are usually common for most eukaryotes, the impact of vitamins B and E in metabolism and physiology can be quite different on plants and animals. Here, we first aim at giving an overview of the biosynthesis of amino acid-derived vitamins in plants, with a particular focus on how this knowledge can be exploited to increase vitamin contents in crops. Second, we will focus on the functions of these vitamins in both plants and animals (and humans in particular), to unravel common and specific roles for vitamins in evolutionary distant organisms, in which these amino acid-derived vitamins play, however, an essential role.

  5. Lipid-mediated regulation of SKN-1/Nrf in response to germ cell absence

    PubMed Central

    Steinbaugh, Michael J; Narasimhan, Sri Devi; Robida-Stubbs, Stacey; Moronetti Mazzeo, Lorenza E; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M; Hourihan, John M; Raghavan, Prashant; Operaña, Theresa N; Esmaillie, Reza; Blackwell, T Keith

    2015-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, ablation of germline stem cells (GSCs) extends lifespan, but also increases fat accumulation and alters lipid metabolism, raising the intriguing question of how these effects might be related. Here, we show that a lack of GSCs results in a broad transcriptional reprogramming in which the conserved detoxification regulator SKN-1/Nrf increases stress resistance, proteasome activity, and longevity. SKN-1 also activates diverse lipid metabolism genes and reduces fat storage, thereby alleviating the increased fat accumulation caused by GSC absence. Surprisingly, SKN-1 is activated by signals from this fat, which appears to derive from unconsumed yolk that was produced for reproduction. We conclude that SKN-1 plays a direct role in maintaining lipid homeostasis in which it is activated by lipids. This SKN-1 function may explain the importance of mammalian Nrf proteins in fatty liver disease and suggest that particular endogenous or dietary lipids might promote health through SKN-1/Nrf. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07836.001 PMID:26196144

  6. Conserved Amphipathic Helices Mediate Lipid Droplet Targeting of Perilipins 1–3*

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Emily R.; Mimmack, Michael L.; Barbosa, Antonio D.; Haider, Afreen; Isaac, Iona; Ouberai, Myriam M.; Thiam, Abdou Rachid; Patel, Satish; Saudek, Vladimir; Siniossoglou, Symeon; Savage, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Perilipins (PLINs) play a key role in energy storage by orchestrating the activity of lipases on the surface of lipid droplets. Failure of this activity results in severe metabolic disease in humans. Unlike all other lipid droplet-associated proteins, PLINs localize almost exclusively to the phospholipid monolayer surrounding the droplet. To understand how they sense and associate with the unique topology of the droplet surface, we studied the localization of human PLINs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, demonstrating that the targeting mechanism is highly conserved and that 11-mer repeat regions are sufficient for droplet targeting. Mutations designed to disrupt folding of this region into amphipathic helices (AHs) significantly decreased lipid droplet targeting in vivo and in vitro. Finally, we demonstrated a substantial increase in the helicity of this region in the presence of detergent micelles, which was prevented by an AH-disrupting missense mutation. We conclude that highly conserved 11-mer repeat regions of PLINs target lipid droplets by folding into AHs on the droplet surface, thus enabling PLINs to regulate the interface between the hydrophobic lipid core and its surrounding hydrophilic environment. PMID:26742848

  7. Lipid peroxidation and haemoglobin degradation in red blood cells exposed to t-butyl hydroperoxide. Effects of the hexose monophosphate shunt as mediated by glutathione and ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Trotta, R J; Sullivan, S G; Stern, A

    1982-05-15

    Lipid peroxidation and haemoglobin degradation were the two extremes of a spectrum of oxidative damage in red cells exposed to t-butyl hydroperoxide. The exact position in this spectrum depended on the availability of glucose and the ligand state of haemoglobin. In red cells containing oxy- or carbonmono-oxy-haemoglobin, hexose monophosphate-shunt activity was mainly responsible for metabolism of t-butyl hydroperoxide; haem groups were the main scavengers in red cells containing methaemoglobin. Glutathione, via glutathione peroxidase, accounted for nearly all of the hydroperoxide metabolizing activity of the hexose monophosphate shunt. Glucose protection against lipid peroxidation was almost entirely mediated by glutathione, whereas glucose protection of haemoglobin was only partly mediated by glutathione. Physiological concentrations of intracellular or extracellular ascorbate had no effect on consumption of t-butyl hydroperoxide or oxidation of haemoglobin. Ascorbate was mainly involved in scavenging chain-propagating species involved in lipid peroxidation. The protective effect of intracellular ascorbate against lipid peroxidation was about 100% glucose-dependent and about 50% glutathione-dependent. Extracellular ascorbate functioned largely without a requirement for glucose metabolism, although some synergistic effects between extracellular ascorbate and glutathione were observed. Lipid peroxidation was not dependent on the rate or completion of t-butyl hydroperoxide consumption but rather on the route of consumption. Lipid peroxidation appears to depend on the balance between the presence of initiators of lipid peroxidation (oxyhaemoglobin and low concentrations of methaemoglobin) and terminators of lipid peroxidation (glutathione, ascorbate, high concentrations of methaemoglobin).

  8. Cholesterol as a natural probe for free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation in biological membranes and lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Girotti, Albert W; Korytowski, Witold

    2016-04-15

    We describe a relatively convenient and reliable procedure for assessing the magnitude of free radical-mediated (chain) lipid peroxidation in biological systems. The approach is based on use of radiolabeled cholesterol ([(14)C]Ch) as a probe and determination of well-resolved oxidation intermediates/products ([(14)C]ChOX species), using high performance thin layer chromatography with phorphorimaging detection (HPTLC-PI). In a lipid hydroperoxide-primed liposomal test system treated with ascorbate and a lipophilic iron chelate, the following well-resolved [(14)C]ChOX are detected and quantified: 7α/7β-OOH, 7α/7β-OH, and 5,6-epoxide, their levels increasing with incubation time at 37°C. [(14)C]Ch also serves as an excellent probe for lipid peroxidation in lipoproteins and plasma membranes of mammalian cells. Because this approach utilizes Ch as a natural in situ probe, it eliminates potential artifacts associated with artificial probes such as spin traps and fluorophores. PMID:26778710

  9. β Common Receptor Mediates Erythropoietin-Conferred Protection on OxLDL-Induced Lipid Accumulation and Inflammation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kuo-Yun; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Tsai, Feng-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO), the key factor for erythropoiesis, also protects macrophage foam cells from lipid accumulation, yet the definitive mechanisms are not fully understood. β common receptor (βCR) plays a crucial role in the nonhematopoietic effects of EPO. In the current study, we investigated the role of βCR in EPO-mediated protection in macrophages against oxidized low-density lipoprotein- (oxLDL-) induced deregulation of lipid metabolism and inflammation. Here, we show that βCR expression was mainly in foamy macrophages of atherosclerotic aortas from apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. Results of confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that βCR was colocalized and interacted with EPO receptor (EPOR) in macrophages. Inhibition of βCR activation by neutralizing antibody or small interfering RNA (siRNA) abolished the EPO-conferred protection in oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation. Furthermore, EPO-promoted cholesterol efflux and upregulation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 were prevented by pretreatment with βCR neutralizing antibody or βCR siRNA. Additionally, blockage of βCR abrogated the EPO-conferred anti-inflammatory action on oxLDL-induced production of macrophage inflammatory protein-2. Collectively, our findings suggest that βCR may play an important role in the beneficial effects of EPO against oxLDL-elicited dysfunction of macrophage foam cells. PMID:26101463

  10. Ultrasound-mediated destruction of oxygen and paclitaxel loaded lipid microbubbles for combination therapy in hypoxic ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiangchuan; Yin, Mingyue; Zhu, Shenyin; Liu, Li; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Ronald X; Chang, Shufang

    2016-01-01

    We synthesized oxygen and paclitaxel (PTX) loaded lipid microbubbles (OPLMBs) for ultrasound mediated combination therapy in hypoxic ovarian cancer cells. Our experiments successfully demonstrated that ultrasound induced OPLMBs destruction significantly enhanced the local oxygen release. We also demonstrated that OPLMBs in combination with ultrasound (300 kHz, 0.5 W/cm(2), 15s) yielded anti-proliferative activities of 52.8 ± 2.75% and cell apoptosis ratio of 35.25 ± 0.17% in hypoxic cells at 24h after the treatment, superior to other treatment groups such as PTX only and PTX-loaded MBs (PLMBs) with or without ultrasound mediation. RT-PCR and Western blot tests further confirmed the reduced expression of HIF-1α and MDR-1/P-gp after ultrasound mediation of OPLMBs. Our experiment suggests that ultrasound mediation of oxygen and drug-loaded MBs may be a useful method to overcome chemoresistance in the hypoxic ovarian cancer cells.

  11. The Mediator Complex MED15 Subunit Mediates Activation of Downstream Lipid-Related Genes by the WRINKLED1 Transcription Factor1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Jung

    2016-01-01

    The Mediator complex is known to be a master coordinator of transcription by RNA polymerase II, and this complex is recruited by transcription factors (TFs) to target promoters for gene activation or repression. The plant-specific TF WRINKLED1 (WRI1) activates glycolysis-related and fatty acid biosynthetic genes during embryogenesis. However, no Mediator subunit has yet been identified that mediates WRI1 transcriptional activity. Promoter-β-glucuronidase fusion experiments showed that MEDIATOR15 (MED15) is expressed in the same cells in the embryo as WRI1. We found that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MED15 subunit of the Mediator complex interacts directly with WRI1 in the nucleus. Overexpression of MED15 or WRI1 increased transcript levels of WRI1 target genes involved in glycolysis and fatty acid biosynthesis; these genes were down-regulated in wild-type or WRI1-overexpressing plants by silencing of MED15. However, overexpression of MED15 in the wri1 mutant also increased transcript levels of WRI1 target genes, suggesting that MED15 also may act with other TFs to activate downstream lipid-related genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the association of MED15 with six WRI1 target gene promoters. Additionally, silencing of MED15 resulted in reduced fatty acid content in seedlings and mature seeds, whereas MED15 overexpression increased fatty acid content in both developmental stages. Similar results were found in wri1 mutant and WRI1 overexpression lines. Together, our results indicate that the WRI1/MED15 complex transcriptionally regulates glycolysis-related and fatty acid biosynthetic genes during embryogenesis. PMID:27246098

  12. Experimental and theoretical study on benzoic acid derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świsłocka, R.; Regulska, E.; Samsonowicz, M.; Lewandowski, W.

    2013-07-01

    Benzoic (BA), p-hydroxybenzoic (HBA), m-methoxybenzoic (MBA), vanillic (VA) and syringic (SGA) acids were studied using both experimental and theoretical tools. The vibrational (FT-IR, FT-Raman) and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of benzoic acid derivatives were recorded. Characteristic shifts and changes in intensities of bands along the studied series were observed. The changes of chemical shifts of protons (1H NMR) and carbons (13C NMR) in the series of studied compounds were observed too. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were obtained by B3LYP method using 6-31++G**, 6-311+G** and 6-311++G** basis sets. Aromaticity indices, atomic charges, dipole moments and energies were calculated. The theoretical chemical shifts in 1H and 13C NMR spectra and theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR and Raman spectra were determined. The calculated parameters were compared to experimental characteristic of studied compounds.

  13. Synthesis and properties of synthetic fulvic acid derived from hematoxylin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, Valentina A.; Minaev, Boris F.; Baryshnikov, Gleb V.

    2015-04-01

    A model fulvic acid (FA) was synthesized from a natural dye, hematoxylin, in a slow oxidative polymerization/condensation reaction catalysed by OH- at pH ca. 12. The resulting dark-brown product, acidified to pH ca. 2, did not precipitate from the reaction solution. It was isolated and purified by cation-exchange resin. Its physicochemical and spectroscopic properties, as determined by means of elemental analysis, molecular weight analyses, Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, showed a close resemblance to natural FA. The similarity and differences between synthetic fulvic acids derived from hematoxylin and the natural fulvic acids substances are discussed. Quantum-chemical calculations of the supposed primary oxidation products of hematoxylin are performed and compared with observations.

  14. Microbial production of fatty acid-derived fuels and chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Lennen, Rebecca M; Pfleger, Brian F

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid metabolism is an attractive route to produce liquid transportation fuels and commodity oleochemicals from renewable feedstocks. Recently, genes and enzymes, which comprise metabolic pathways for producing fatty acid-derived compounds (e.g. esters, alkanes, olefins, ketones, alcohols, polyesters) have been elucidated and used in engineered microbial hosts. The resulting strains often generate products at low percentages of maximum theoretical yields, leaving significant room for metabolic engineering. Economically viable processes will require strains to approach theoretical yields, particularly for replacement of petroleum-derived fuels. This review will describe recent progress toward this goal, highlighting the scientific discoveries of each pathway, ongoing biochemical studies to understand each enzyme, and metabolic engineering strategies that are being used to improve strain performance. PMID:23541503

  15. Membrane extraction with thermodynamically unstable diphosphonic acid derivatives

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, Earl Philip; Gatrone, Ralph Carl; Nash, Kenneth LaVerne

    1997-01-01

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulphur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described.

  16. Frustrated smectic liquid crystalline phases in lactic acid derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glogarová, M.; Novotná, V.

    2016-08-01

    We have prepared and studied a series of compounds with different types of molecular core and lactate unit in the chiral terminal chain. We draw a survey and comparison of their mesomorphic properties with respect to the occurrence of twist grain boundary (TGB) phases. The materials exhibit extremely wide TGBA phase more than 60K broad, unique TGBA-TGBC-SmC*-SmCA* phase sequence and unique re-entrant TGBA phase below the SmA phase. TGB phases have been induced in binary mixtures of molecules with different molecular shape and chirality (chiral lactic acid derivative and non-chiral hockey-stick mesogen). Unique effect is observed for compounds with TGBA phase, where the applied electric field transforms the planar texture into the homeotropic one, homogeneously dark in crossed polarizers. The process is analogy of the Frederiks transition so far known only for nematics. This effect, changing the bright state to the dark one, is promising for applications.

  17. The RNA binding of protein A from Wuhan nodavirus is mediated by mitochondrial membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yang; Miao, Meng; Wang, Zhaowei; Liu, Yongxiang; Yang, Jie; Xia, Hongjie; Li, Xiao-Feng; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2014-08-01

    RNA replication of positive-strand (+)RNA viruses requires the lipids present in intracellular membranes, the sites of which viral replicases associate with. However, the direct effects of membrane lipids on viral replicases are still poorly understood. Wuhan nodavirus (WhNV) protein A, which associates with mitochondrial membranes, is the sole replicase required for RNA replication. Here, we report that WhNV protein A binds to RNA1 in a cooperative manner. Moreover, mitochondrial membrane lipids (MMLs) stimulated the RNA binding activity and cooperativity of protein A, and such stimulations exhibited strong selectivity for distinct phospholipids. Interestingly, MMLs stimulated the RNA-binding cooperativity only at higher protein A concentrations. Further investigation showed that MMLs stimulate the RNA binding of protein A by promoting its self-interaction. Finally, manipulating MML metabolism affected the protein A-induced RNA1 recruitment in cells. Together, our findings reveal the direct effects of membrane lipids on the RNA binding activity of a nodaviral replicase. PMID:25092456

  18. Arabidopsis D6PK is a lipid domain-dependent mediator of root epidermal planar polarity.

    PubMed

    Stanislas, Thomas; Hüser, Anke; Barbosa, Inês C R; Kiefer, Christian S; Brackmann, Klaus; Pietra, Stefano; Gustavsson, Anna; Zourelidou, Melina; Schwechheimer, Claus; Grebe, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Development of diverse multicellular organisms relies on coordination of single-cell polarities within the plane of the tissue layer (planar polarity). Cell polarity often involves plasma membrane heterogeneity generated by accumulation of specific lipids and proteins into membrane subdomains. Coordinated hair positioning along Arabidopsis root epidermal cells provides a planar polarity model in plants, but knowledge about the functions of proteo-lipid domains in planar polarity signalling remains limited. Here we show that Rho-of-plant (ROP) 2 and 6, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase 3 (PIP5K3), DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN (DRP) 1A and DRP2B accumulate in a sterol-enriched, polar membrane domain during root hair initiation. DRP1A, DRP2B, PIP5K3 and sterols are required for planar polarity and the AGCVIII kinase D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) is a modulator of this process. D6PK undergoes phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate- and sterol-dependent basal-to-planar polarity switching into the polar, lipid-enriched domain just before hair formation, unravelling lipid-dependent D6PK localization during late planar polarity signalling.

  19. Enhancing radiotherapy by lipid nanocapsule-mediated delivery of amphiphilic gold nanoparticles to intracellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Sang; Carney, Randy P; Stellacci, Francesco; Irvine, Darrell J

    2014-09-23

    Amphiphilic gold nanoparticles (amph-NPs), composed of gold cores surrounded by an amphiphilic mixed organic ligand shell, are capable of embedding within and traversing lipid membranes. Here we describe a strategy using crosslink-stabilized lipid nanocapsules (NCs) as carriers to transport such membrane-penetrating particles into tumor cells and promote their transfer to intracellular membranes for enhanced radiotherapy of cancer. We synthesized and characterized interbilayer-crosslinked multilamellar lipid vesicles (ICMVs) carrying amph-NPs embedded in the capsule walls, forming Au-NCs. Confocal and electron microscopies revealed that the intracellular distribution of amph-NPs within melanoma and breast tumor cells following uptake of free particles vs Au-NCs was quite distinct and that amph-NPs initially delivered into endosomes by Au-NCs transferred over a period of hours to intracellular membranes through tumor cells, with greater intracellular spread in melanoma cells than breast carcinoma cells. Clonogenic assays revealed that Au-NCs enhanced radiotherapeutic killing of melanoma cells. Thus, multilamellar lipid capsules may serve as an effective carrier to deliver amphiphilic gold nanoparticles to tumors, where the membrane-penetrating properties of these materials can significantly enhance the efficacy of frontline radiotherapy treatments.

  20. Nitrogen Substituent Polarity Influences Dithiocarbamate-Mediated Lipid Oxidation, Nerve Copper Accumulation, and Myelin Injury

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Holly L.; Viquez, Olga M.; Amarnath, Kalyani; Amarnath, Venkataraman; Zyskowski, Justin; Kassa, Endalkachew N.; Valentine, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates have a wide spectrum of applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine, with new applications being investigated. Past studies have suggested that the neurotoxicity of some dithiocarbamates may result from copper accumulation, protein oxidative damage, and lipid oxidation. The polarity of a dithiocarbamate’s nitrogen substituents influences the lipophilicity of the copper complexes it generates and thus potentially determines its ability to promote copper accumulation within nerve and induce myelin injury. In the current study, a series of dithiocarbamate-copper complexes differing in their lipophilicity were evaluated for their relative abilities to promote lipid peroxidation determined by malondialdehyde levels generated in an ethyl arachidonate oil-in-water emulsion. In a second component of this study, rats were exposed to either N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate or sarcosine dithiocarbamate; both generate dithiocarbamate-copper complexes that are lipid and water soluble, respectively. Following the exposures, brain, tibial nerve, spinal cord and liver tissue copper levels were measured by inductively coupled mass spectroscopy to assess the relative abilities of these two dithiocarbamates to promote copper accumulation. Peripheral nerve injury was evaluated using grip strengths, nerve conduction velocities and morphologic changes at the light microscope level. Additionally, the protein expression levels of glutathione transferase alpha and heme-oxygenase-1 in nerve were determined and the quantity of protein carbonyls measured to assess levels of oxidative stress and injury. The data provide evidence that dithiocarbamate-copper complexes are redox active; and that the ability of dithiocarbamate complexes to promote lipid peroxidation is correlated to the lipophilicity of the complex. Consistent with neurotoxicity requiring the formation of a lipid soluble copper complex, significant increases in copper accumulation, oxidative stress and myelin

  1. Lipid-mediated DNA and siRNA Transfection Efficiency Depends on Peptide Headgroup.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiang; Lamanna, Caroline M; Kohman, Richie E; McIntosh, Thomas J; Han, Xue; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2013-05-01

    A series of amphiphiles with differing cationic tri- and di- peptide headgroups, designed and synthesized based on lysine (K), ornithine (O), arginine (R), and glycine (G), have been characterized and evaluated for DNA and siRNA delivery. DNA-lipoplexes formed from the tri- and di- lipopeptides possessed lipid:nucleic acid charge ratios of 7:1 to 10:1, diameters of ~200 nm to 375 nm, zeta potentials of 23 mV to 41 mV, melting temperatures of 12 °C to 46 °C, and lamellar repeat periods of 6 nm to 8 nm. These lipid-DNA complexes formed supramolecular structures in which DNA is entrapped at the surface between multilamellar liposomal vesicles. Compared to their DNA counterparts, siRNA-lipoplexes formed slightly larger complexes (348 nm to 424 nm) and required higher charge ratios to form stable structures. Additionally, it was observed that lipids with multivalent, tripeptide headgroups (i.e., KGG, OGG, and RGG) were successful at transfecting DNA in vitro, whereas DNA transfection with the dipeptide lipids proved ineffective. Cellular uptake of DNA was more effective with the KGG compared to the KG lipopeptide. In siRNA knockdown experiments, both tri- and di- peptide lipids (i.e., RGG, GGG, KG, OG, RG, GG) showed some efficacy, but total cellular uptake of siRNA complexes was not indicative of knockdown outcomes and suggested that the intracellular fate of lipoplexes may be a factor. Overall, this lipopeptide study expands the library of efficient DNA transfection vectors available for use, introduces new vectors for siRNA delivery, and begins to address the structure-activity relationships which influence delivery and transfection efficacy. PMID:24391676

  2. Lipid-mediated DNA and siRNA Transfection Efficiency Depends on Peptide Headgroup

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiang; LaManna, Caroline M.; Kohman, Richie E.; McIntosh, Thomas J.; Han, Xue; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    A series of amphiphiles with differing cationic tri- and di- peptide headgroups, designed and synthesized based on lysine (K), ornithine (O), arginine (R), and glycine (G), have been characterized and evaluated for DNA and siRNA delivery. DNA-lipoplexes formed from the tri- and di- lipopeptides possessed lipid:nucleic acid charge ratios of 7:1 to 10:1, diameters of ~200 nm to 375 nm, zeta potentials of 23 mV to 41 mV, melting temperatures of 12 °C to 46 °C, and lamellar repeat periods of 6 nm to 8 nm. These lipid-DNA complexes formed supramolecular structures in which DNA is entrapped at the surface between multilamellar liposomal vesicles. Compared to their DNA counterparts, siRNA-lipoplexes formed slightly larger complexes (348 nm to 424 nm) and required higher charge ratios to form stable structures. Additionally, it was observed that lipids with multivalent, tripeptide headgroups (i.e., KGG, OGG, and RGG) were successful at transfecting DNA in vitro, whereas DNA transfection with the dipeptide lipids proved ineffective. Cellular uptake of DNA was more effective with the KGG compared to the KG lipopeptide. In siRNA knockdown experiments, both tri- and di- peptide lipids (i.e., RGG, GGG, KG, OG, RG, GG) showed some efficacy, but total cellular uptake of siRNA complexes was not indicative of knockdown outcomes and suggested that the intracellular fate of lipoplexes may be a factor. Overall, this lipopeptide study expands the library of efficient DNA transfection vectors available for use, introduces new vectors for siRNA delivery, and begins to address the structure-activity relationships which influence delivery and transfection efficacy. PMID:24391676

  3. Cross-Linking Mast Cell Specific Gangliosides Stimulates the Release of Newly Formed Lipid Mediators and Newly Synthesized Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Filho, Edismauro Garcia Freitas; da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Zanotto, Camila Ziliotto; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are immunoregulatory cells that participate in inflammatory processes. Cross-linking mast cell specific GD1b derived gangliosides by mAbAA4 results in partial activation of mast cells without the release of preformed mediators. The present study examines the release of newly formed and newly synthesized mediators following ganglioside cross-linking. Cross-linking the gangliosides with mAbAA4 released the newly formed lipid mediators, prostaglandins D2 and E2, without release of leukotrienes B4 and C4. The effect of cross-linking these gangliosides on the activation of enzymes in the arachidonate cascade was then investigated. Ganglioside cross-linking resulted in phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 and increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2. Translocation of 5-lipoxygenase from the cytosol to the nucleus was not induced by ganglioside cross-linking. Cross-linking of GD1b derived gangliosides also resulted in the release of the newly synthesized mediators, interleukin-4, interleukin-6, and TNF-α. The effect of cross-linking the gangliosides on the MAP kinase pathway was then investigated. Cross-linking the gangliosides induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and p38 as well as activating both NFκB and NFAT in a Syk-dependent manner. Therefore, cross-linking the mast cell specific GD1b derived gangliosides results in the activation of signaling pathways that culminate with the release of newly formed and newly synthesized mediators. PMID:27578923

  4. Cross-Linking Mast Cell Specific Gangliosides Stimulates the Release of Newly Formed Lipid Mediators and Newly Synthesized Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zanotto, Camila Ziliotto

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are immunoregulatory cells that participate in inflammatory processes. Cross-linking mast cell specific GD1b derived gangliosides by mAbAA4 results in partial activation of mast cells without the release of preformed mediators. The present study examines the release of newly formed and newly synthesized mediators following ganglioside cross-linking. Cross-linking the gangliosides with mAbAA4 released the newly formed lipid mediators, prostaglandins D2 and E2, without release of leukotrienes B4 and C4. The effect of cross-linking these gangliosides on the activation of enzymes in the arachidonate cascade was then investigated. Ganglioside cross-linking resulted in phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 and increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2. Translocation of 5-lipoxygenase from the cytosol to the nucleus was not induced by ganglioside cross-linking. Cross-linking of GD1b derived gangliosides also resulted in the release of the newly synthesized mediators, interleukin-4, interleukin-6, and TNF-α. The effect of cross-linking the gangliosides on the MAP kinase pathway was then investigated. Cross-linking the gangliosides induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and p38 as well as activating both NFκB and NFAT in a Syk-dependent manner. Therefore, cross-linking the mast cell specific GD1b derived gangliosides results in the activation of signaling pathways that culminate with the release of newly formed and newly synthesized mediators. PMID:27578923

  5. Lipofection: a highly efficient, lipid-mediated DNA-transfection procedure.

    PubMed Central

    Felgner, P L; Gadek, T R; Holm, M; Roman, R; Chan, H W; Wenz, M; Northrop, J P; Ringold, G M; Danielsen, M

    1987-01-01

    A DNA-transfection protocol has been developed that makes use of a synthetic cationic lipid, N-[1-(2,3-dioleyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride (DOTMA). Small unilamellar liposomes containing DOTMA interact spontaneously with DNA to form lipid-DNA complexes with 100% entrapment of the DNA, DOTMA facilitates fusion of the complex with the plasma membrane of tissue culture cells, resulting in both uptake and expression of the DNA. The technique is simple, highly reproducible, and effective for both transient and stable expression of transfected DNA. Depending upon the cell line, lipofection is from 5- to greater than 100-fold more effective than either the calcium phosphate or the DEAE-dextran transfection technique. Images PMID:2823261

  6. Lipofection: A Highly Efficient, Lipid-Mediated DNA-Transfection Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felgner, Philip L.; Gadek, Thomas R.; Holm, Marilyn; Roman, Richard; Chan, Hardy W.; Wenz, Michael; Northrop, Jeffrey P.; Ringold, Gordon M.; Danielsen, Mark

    1987-11-01

    A DNA-transfection protocol has been developed that makes use of a synthetic cationic lipid, N-[1-(2,3-dioleyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride (DOTMA). Small unilamellar liposomes containing DOTMA interact spontaneously with DNA to form lipid-DNA complexes with 100% entrapment of the DNA. DOTMA facilitates fusion of the complex with the plasma membrane of tissue culture cells, resulting in both uptake and expression of the DNA. The technique is simple, highly reproducible, and effective for both transient and stable expression of transfected DNA. Depending upon the cell line, lipofection is from 5- to >100-fold more effective than either the calcium phosphate or the DEAE-dextran transfection technique.

  7. Ferromagnetic filled carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles: synthesis and lipid-mediated delivery into human tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mönch, I.; Meye, A.; Leonhardt, A.; Krämer, K.; Kozhuharova, R.; Gemming, T.; Wirth, M. P.; Büchner, B.

    2005-04-01

    We describe the synthesis and the properties of Fe-filled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and nanoparticles (NP) produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). We have employed ferrocene as a starting substance and oxidized Si-wafers as substrates. The magnetic properties and the interaction of the material with bladder cancer cells were determined. After the addition of NP suspensions to cultured cells, no adhesion of the nanoparticles/nanotubes (NT/NP) to the cell membrane and also no cellular uptake were observed. However, the preincubation of the (NT/NP) suspension with cationic lipid caused an efficient delivery of the lipid-nanostructure complexes into the cytoplasm within 2 h after adding to the culture medium.

  8. Vanadium-mediated lipid peroxidation in microsomes from human term placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Byczkowski, J.Z.; Wan, B.; Kulkarni, A.P.

    1988-11-01

    Vanadium is considered an essential element present in living organisms in trace amounts but it is toxic when introduced in excessive doses to animals and humans. Vanadium compounds are extensively used in modern industry and occupational exposure to high doses of vanadium is quite common. In pregnant mice, vanadium accumulates preferentially in the placenta and to lower extent in fetal skeleton and mammary gland during exposure to radioactive vanadium. Accumulation of vanadium in fetoplacental unit may present threat to the fetus by interacting with enzymes and ion-transporting systems in membranes. It is also possible that accumulation of vanadium with its concomitant reduction to vanadyl may lead to lipid peroxidation, followed by damage to biological membranes, lysosomal enzymes release and destruction of placental tissue. To explore some of these possibilities the authors decided to examine whether vanadate can undergo redox cycling in microsomes from human term placenta (HTP) that can lead to lipid peroxidation.

  9. The role of iron metabolism as a mediator of macrophage inflammation and lipid handling in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Habib, Anwer; Finn, Aloke V

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential mineral needed for normal physiologic processes. While its function in oxygen transport and other important physiologic processes is well known, less is understood about its role in inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Existing paradigms suggest iron as a driver of atherosclerosis through its actions as a pro-oxidant capable of causing lipid oxidation and tissue damage. Recently we and others have identified hemoglobin (Hb) derived iron as an important factor in determining macrophage differentiation and function in areas of intraplaque hemorrhage within human atherosclerosis. Hb associated macrophages, M(Hb), are distinct from traditional macrophage foam cells because they do not contain large amounts of lipid or inflammatory cytokines, are characterized by high levels of expression of mannose receptor (CD206) and CD163 in addition to producing anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10. Despite the well-known role of iron as an catalyst capable of producing lipid peroxidation through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydroxyl radical, we and others have shown that macrophages in areas of intraplaque hemorrhage demonstrate reduced intracellular iron and ROS which triggers production of anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as genes involved in cholesterol efflux. These data suggest that manipulation of macrophage iron itself may be a promising pharmacologic target for atherosclerosis prevention through its effects on macrophage inflammation and lipid metabolism. In this review we will summarize the current understanding of iron as it relates to plaque inflammation and discuss how further exploration of this subject may lead to new therapies for atherosclerosis.

  10. Lipid-mediated Protein-protein Interactions Modulate Respiration-driven ATP Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Tobias; Lundin, Camilla Rydström; Nordlund, Gustav; Ädelroth, Pia; von Ballmoos, Christoph; Brzezinski, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Energy conversion in biological systems is underpinned by membrane-bound proton transporters that generate and maintain a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane which used, e.g. for generation of ATP by the ATP synthase. Here, we have co-reconstituted the proton pump cytochrome bo3 (ubiquinol oxidase) together with ATP synthase in liposomes and studied the effect of changing the lipid composition on the ATP synthesis activity driven by proton pumping. We found that for 100 nm liposomes, containing 5 of each proteins, the ATP synthesis rates decreased significantly with increasing fractions of DOPA, DOPE, DOPG or cardiolipin added to liposomes made of DOPC; with e.g. 5% DOPG, we observed an almost 50% decrease in the ATP synthesis rate. However, upon increasing the average distance between the proton pumps and ATP synthases, the ATP synthesis rate dropped and the lipid dependence of this activity vanished. The data indicate that protons are transferred along the membrane, between cytochrome bo3 and the ATP synthase, but only at sufficiently high protein densities. We also argue that the local protein density may be modulated by lipid-dependent changes in interactions between the two proteins complexes, which points to a mechanism by which the cell may regulate the overall activity of the respiratory chain. PMID:27063297

  11. Retardation of myoglobin and haemoglobin-mediated lipid oxidation in washed bighead carp by phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Thiansilakul, Yaowapa; Benjakul, Soottawat; Grunwald, Eric W; Richards, Mark P

    2012-09-15

    Antioxidative activities of phenolic compounds (caffeic acid, gallic acid and tannic acid; 200 ppm) in washed mince (pH 6), with added myoglobin (Mb) and haemoglobin (Hb), from bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis), during 9 days of iced storage, were studied. Tannic acid exhibited the preventive effect on discolouration of washed mince containing Mb or Hb during storage (P<0.05). High peroxide value (PV) was found and large amount of, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and hexanal were formed in washed mince containing haem proteins, especially Hb. As determined by apo Streptococcal haem-associated protein, Hb had the lower haem affinity than Mb. Phenolic compounds, especially caffeic acid and gallic acid, could lower lipid oxidation induced by Mb or Hb throughout storage (P<0.05). Prevention of haem release, as well as inhibition of lipid oxidation induced by haem proteins with selected phenolic compounds, should be an alternative means in lowering discolouration and lipid oxidation in fish muscle. PMID:23107692

  12. Simulation of fusion-mediated nanoemulsion interactions with model lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Joo; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2012-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon-based nanoemulsion particles have become promising platforms for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents to specific target cells in a non-invasive manner. A “contact-facilitated” delivery mechanism has been proposed wherein the emulsifying phospholipid monolayer on the nanoemulsion surface contacts and forms a lipid complex with the outer monolayer of target cell plasma membrane, allowing cargo to diffuse to the surface of target cell. While this mechanism is supported by experimental evidence, its molecular details are unknown. The present study develops a coarse-grained model of nanoemulsion particles that are compatible with the MARTINI force field. Simulations using this coarse-grained model have demonstrated multiple fusion events between the particles and a model vesicular lipid bilayer. The fusion proceeds in the following sequence: dehydration at the interface, close apposition of the particles, protrusion of hydrophobic molecules to the particle surface, transient lipid complex formation, absorption of nanoemulsion into the liposome. The initial monolayer disruption acts as a rate-limiting step and is strongly influenced by particle size as well as by the presence of phospholipids supporting negative spontaneous curvature. The core-forming perfluorocarbons play critical roles in initiating the fusion process by facilitating protrusion of hydrophobic moieties into the interface between the two particles. This study directly supports the hypothesized nanoemulsion delivery mechanism and provides the underlying molecular details that enable engineering of nanoemulsions for a variety of medical applications. PMID:22712024

  13. Lipid-mediated Protein-protein Interactions Modulate Respiration-driven ATP Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Tobias; Lundin, Camilla Rydström; Nordlund, Gustav; Ädelroth, Pia; von Ballmoos, Christoph; Brzezinski, Peter

    2016-04-11

    Energy conversion in biological systems is underpinned by membrane-bound proton transporters that generate and maintain a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane which used, e.g. for generation of ATP by the ATP synthase. Here, we have co-reconstituted the proton pump cytochrome bo3 (ubiquinol oxidase) together with ATP synthase in liposomes and studied the effect of changing the lipid composition on the ATP synthesis activity driven by proton pumping. We found that for 100 nm liposomes, containing 5 of each proteins, the ATP synthesis rates decreased significantly with increasing fractions of DOPA, DOPE, DOPG or cardiolipin added to liposomes made of DOPC; with e.g. 5% DOPG, we observed an almost 50% decrease in the ATP synthesis rate. However, upon increasing the average distance between the proton pumps and ATP synthases, the ATP synthesis rate dropped and the lipid dependence of this activity vanished. The data indicate that protons are transferred along the membrane, between cytochrome bo3 and the ATP synthase, but only at sufficiently high protein densities. We also argue that the local protein density may be modulated by lipid-dependent changes in interactions between the two proteins complexes, which points to a mechanism by which the cell may regulate the overall activity of the respiratory chain.

  14. FGF21 mediates the lipid metabolism response to amino acid starvation

    PubMed Central

    De Sousa-Coelho, Ana Luísa; Relat, Joana; Hondares, Elayne; Pérez-Martí, Albert; Ribas, Francesc; Villarroya, Francesc; Marrero, Pedro F.; Haro, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Lipogenic gene expression in liver is repressed in mice upon leucine deprivation. The hormone fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), which is critical to the adaptive metabolic response to starvation, is also induced under amino acid deprivation. Upon leucine deprivation, we found that FGF21 is needed to repress expression of lipogenic genes in liver and white adipose tissue, and stimulate phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase in white adipose tissue. The increased expression of Ucp1 in brown adipose tissue under these circumstances is also impaired in FGF21-deficient mice. Our results demonstrate the important role of FGF21 in the regulation of lipid metabolism during amino acid starvation. PMID:23661803

  15. Interactions of salicylic acid derivatives with calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Ukrainczyk, Marko; Gredičak, Matija; Jerić, Ivanka; Kralj, Damir

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of basic interactions between the active pharmaceutical compounds and calcium carbonates is of great importance because of the possibility to use the carbonates as a mineral carrier in drug delivery systems. In this study the mode and extent of interactions of salicylic acid and its amino acid derivates, chosen as pharmaceutically relevant model compounds, with calcite crystals are described. Therefore, the crystal growth kinetics of well defined rhombohedral calcite seed crystals in the systems containing salicylic acid (SA), 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA), N-salicyloil-l-aspartic acid (N-Sal-Asp) or N-salicyloil-l-glutamic acid (N-Sal-Glu), were investigated. The precipitation systems were of relatively low initial supersaturation and of apparently neutral pH. The data on the crystal growth rate reductions in the presence of the applied salicylate molecules were analyzed by means of Cabrera & Vermileya's, and Kubota & Mullin's models of interactions of the dissolved additives and crystal surfaces. The crystal growth kinetic experiments were additionally supported with the appropriate electrokinetic, spectroscopic and adsorption measurements. The Langmuir adsorption constants were determined and they were found to be in a good correlation with values obtained from crystal growth kinetic analyses. The results indicated that salicylate molecules preferentially adsorb along the steps on the growing calcite surfaces. The values of average spacing between the adjacent salicylate adsorption active sites and the average distance between the neighboring adsorbed salicylate molecules were also estimated. PMID:21963207

  16. Antiherbivore prenylated benzoic acid derivatives from Piper kelleyi.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, Christopher S; Leonard, Michael D; Glassmire, Andrea E; Dodson, Craig D; Richards, Lora A; Kato, Massuo J; Dyer, Lee A

    2014-01-24

    The known prenylated benzoic acid derivative 3-geranyl-4-hydroxy-5-(3″,3″-dimethylallyl)benzoic acid (1) and two new chromane natural products were isolated from the methanolic extract of the leaves of Piper kelleyi Tepe (Piperaceae), a midcanopy tropical shrub that grows in lower montane rain forests in Ecuador and Peru. Structure determination using 1D and 2D NMR analysis led to the structure of the chromene 2 and to the reassignment of the structure of cumanensic acid as 4, an isomeric chromene previously isolated from Piper gaudichaudianum. The structure and relative configuration of new chromane 3 was determined using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis and was found to be racemic by ECD spectropolarimetry. The biological activity of 1-3 was evaluated against a lab colony of the generalist caterpillar Spodoptera exigua (Noctuidae), and low concentrations of 2 and 3 were found to significantly reduce fitness. Further consideration of the biosynthetic relationship of the three compounds led to the proposal that 1 is converted to 2 via an oxidative process, whereas 3 is produced through hetero-[4+2] dimerization of a quinone methide derived from the chromene 2.

  17. Interactions of salicylic acid derivatives with calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Ukrainczyk, Marko; Gredičak, Matija; Jerić, Ivanka; Kralj, Damir

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of basic interactions between the active pharmaceutical compounds and calcium carbonates is of great importance because of the possibility to use the carbonates as a mineral carrier in drug delivery systems. In this study the mode and extent of interactions of salicylic acid and its amino acid derivates, chosen as pharmaceutically relevant model compounds, with calcite crystals are described. Therefore, the crystal growth kinetics of well defined rhombohedral calcite seed crystals in the systems containing salicylic acid (SA), 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA), N-salicyloil-l-aspartic acid (N-Sal-Asp) or N-salicyloil-l-glutamic acid (N-Sal-Glu), were investigated. The precipitation systems were of relatively low initial supersaturation and of apparently neutral pH. The data on the crystal growth rate reductions in the presence of the applied salicylate molecules were analyzed by means of Cabrera & Vermileya's, and Kubota & Mullin's models of interactions of the dissolved additives and crystal surfaces. The crystal growth kinetic experiments were additionally supported with the appropriate electrokinetic, spectroscopic and adsorption measurements. The Langmuir adsorption constants were determined and they were found to be in a good correlation with values obtained from crystal growth kinetic analyses. The results indicated that salicylate molecules preferentially adsorb along the steps on the growing calcite surfaces. The values of average spacing between the adjacent salicylate adsorption active sites and the average distance between the neighboring adsorbed salicylate molecules were also estimated.

  18. Antiherbivore prenylated benzoic acid derivatives from Piper kelleyi.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, Christopher S; Leonard, Michael D; Glassmire, Andrea E; Dodson, Craig D; Richards, Lora A; Kato, Massuo J; Dyer, Lee A

    2014-01-24

    The known prenylated benzoic acid derivative 3-geranyl-4-hydroxy-5-(3″,3″-dimethylallyl)benzoic acid (1) and two new chromane natural products were isolated from the methanolic extract of the leaves of Piper kelleyi Tepe (Piperaceae), a midcanopy tropical shrub that grows in lower montane rain forests in Ecuador and Peru. Structure determination using 1D and 2D NMR analysis led to the structure of the chromene 2 and to the reassignment of the structure of cumanensic acid as 4, an isomeric chromene previously isolated from Piper gaudichaudianum. The structure and relative configuration of new chromane 3 was determined using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis and was found to be racemic by ECD spectropolarimetry. The biological activity of 1-3 was evaluated against a lab colony of the generalist caterpillar Spodoptera exigua (Noctuidae), and low concentrations of 2 and 3 were found to significantly reduce fitness. Further consideration of the biosynthetic relationship of the three compounds led to the proposal that 1 is converted to 2 via an oxidative process, whereas 3 is produced through hetero-[4+2] dimerization of a quinone methide derived from the chromene 2. PMID:24422717

  19. Urease inhibitory activities of β-boswellic acid derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Boswellia carterii have been used in traditional medicine for many years for management different gastrointestinal disorders. In this study, we wish to report urease inhibitory activity of four isolated compound of boswellic acid derivative. Methods 4 pentacyclic triterpenoid acids were isolated from Boswellia carterii and identified by NMR and Mass spectroscopic analysis (compounds 1, 3-O-acetyl-9,11-dehydro-β-boswellic acid; 2, 3-O-acetyl-11-hydroxy-β-boswellic acid; 3. 3-O- acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid and 4, 11-keto-β-boswellic acid. Their inhibitory activity on Jack bean urease were evaluated. Docking and pharmacophore analysis using AutoDock 4.2 and Ligandscout 3.03 programs were also performed to explain possible mechanism of interaction between isolated compounds and urease enzyme. Results It was found that compound 1 has the strongest inhibitory activity against Jack bean urease (IC50 = 6.27 ± 0.03 μM), compared with thiourea as a standard inhibitor (IC50 = 21.1 ± 0.3 μM). Conclusion The inhibition potency is probably due to the formation of appropriate hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions between the investigated compounds and urease enzyme active site and confirms its traditional usage. PMID:23351363

  20. Electrogenic and nonelectrogenic ion fluxes across lipid and mitochondrial membranes mediated by monensin and monensin ethyl ester.

    PubMed

    Antonenko, Yuri N; Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Huczyński, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Monensin is a carrier of cations through lipid membranes capable of exchanging sodium (potassium) cations for protons by an electroneutral mechanism, whereas its ethyl ester derivative ethyl-monensin is supposed to transport sodium (potassium) cations in an electrogenic manner. To elucidate mechanistic details of the ionophoric activity, ion fluxes mediated by monensin and ethyl-monensin were measured on planar bilayer lipid membranes, liposomes, and mitochondria. In particular, generation of membrane potential on liposomes was studied via the measurements of rhodamine 6G uptake by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. In mitochondria, swelling experiments were expounded by the additional measurements of respiration, membrane potential, and matrix pH. It can be concluded that both monensin and ethyl-monensin can perform nonelectrogenic exchange of potassium (sodium) ions for protons and serve as electrogenic potassium ion carriers similar to valinomycin. The results obtained are in line with the predictions based on the crystal structures of the monensin complexes with sodium ions and protons (Huczyński et al., Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 1818 (2012) pp. 2108-2119). The functional activity observed for artificial membranes and mitochondria can be applied to explain the activity of ionophores in living systems. It can also be important for studying the antitumor activity of monensin.

  1. Lipid solvation effects contribute to the affinity of Gly-xxx-Gly motif-mediated helix-helix interactions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rachel M; Rath, Arianna; Melnyk, Roman A; Deber, Charles M

    2006-07-18

    Interactions between transmembrane helices are mediated by the concave Gly-xxx-Gly motif surface. Whether Gly residues per se are sufficient for selection of this motif has not been established. Here, we used the in vivo TOXCAT assay to measure the relative affinities of all 18 combinations of Gly, Ala, and Ser "small-xxx-small" mutations in glycophorin A (GpA) and bacteriophage M13 major coat protein (MCP) homodimers. Affinity values were compared with the accessibility to a methylene-sized probe of the total surface area of each helix monomer as a measure of solvation by membrane components. A strong inverse correlation was found between nonpolar-group lipid accessibility and dimer affinity (R = 0.75 for GpA, p = 0.013, and R = 0.81 for MCP, p = 0.004), suggesting that lipid as a poor membrane protein solvent, conceptually analogous to water in soluble protein folding, can contribute to dimer stability and help to define helix-helix interfaces.

  2. Receptor-mediated membrane adhesion of lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenlong; Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2014-12-01

    Lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles represent a novel class of targeted drug delivery platforms that combine the advantages of liposomes and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles. However, the molecular details of the interaction between LPHs and their target cell membranes remain poorly understood. We have investigated the receptor-mediated membrane adhesion process of a ligand-tethered LPH nanoparticle using extensive dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. We found that the spontaneous adhesion process follows a first-order kinetics characterized by two distinct stages: a rapid nanoparticle-membrane engagement, followed by a slow growth in the number of ligand-receptor pairs coupled with structural re-organization of both the nanoparticle and the membrane. The number of ligand-receptor pairs increases with the dynamic segregation of ligands and receptors toward the adhesion zone causing an out-of-plane deformation of the membrane. Moreover, the fluidity of the lipid shell allows for strong nanoparticle-membrane interactions to occur even when the ligand density is low. The LPH-membrane avidity is enhanced by the increased stability of each receptor-ligand pair due to the geometric confinement and the cooperative effect arising from multiple binding events. Thus, our results reveal the unique advantages of LPH nanoparticles as active cell-targeting nanocarriers and provide some general principles governing nanoparticle-cell interactions that may aid future design of LPHs with improved affinity and specificity for a given target of interest.

  3. Transferrin-PEG-PE modified dexamethasone conjugated cationic lipid carrier mediated gene delivery system for tumor-targeted transfection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Fang; Ge, Linfu; Liu, Ximin; Kong, Fansheng

    2012-01-01

    Background The main barriers to non-viral gene delivery include cellular and nuclear membranes. As such, the aim of this study was to develop a type of vector that can target cells through receptor-mediated pathways and by using nuclear localization signal (NLS) to increase the nuclear uptake of genetic materials. Methods A dexamethasone (Dexa)-conjugated lipid was synthesized as the material of the solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), and transferrin (Tf) was linked onto polyethylene glycol-phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE) to obtain Tf-PEG-PE ligands for the surface modification of the carriers. The in vitro transfection efficiency of the novel modified vectors was evaluated in human hepatoma carcinoma cell lines, and in vivo effects were observed in an animal model. Results Tf-PEG-PE modified SLNs/enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid (pEGFP) had a particle size of 222 nm and a gene loading quantity of 90%. Tf-PEG-PE-modified SLNs/pEGFP (Tf-SLNs/pEGFP) displayed remarkably higher transfection efficiency than non-modified SLNs/pEGFP and the vectors not containing Dexa, both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion It can be concluded that Tf and Dexa could function as an excellent active targeting ligand to improve the cell targeting and nuclear targeting ability of the carriers, and the resulting nanomedicine could be a promising active targeting drug/gene delivery system. PMID:22679364

  4. Receptor-mediated membrane adhesion of lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenlong; Gorfe, Alemayehu A

    2015-01-14

    Lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles represent a novel class of targeted drug delivery platforms that combine the advantages of liposomes and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles. However, the molecular details of the interaction between LPHs and their target cell membranes remain poorly understood. We have investigated the receptor-mediated membrane adhesion process of a ligand-tethered LPH nanoparticle using extensive dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. We found that the spontaneous adhesion process follows a first-order kinetics characterized by two distinct stages: a rapid nanoparticle-membrane engagement, followed by a slow growth in the number of ligand-receptor pairs coupled with structural re-organization of both the nanoparticle and the membrane. The number of ligand-receptor pairs increases with the dynamic segregation of ligands and receptors toward the adhesion zone causing an out-of-plane deformation of the membrane. Moreover, the fluidity of the lipid shell allows for strong nanoparticle-membrane interactions to occur even when the ligand density is low. The LPH-membrane avidity is enhanced by the increased stability of each receptor-ligand pair due to the geometric confinement and the cooperative effect arising from multiple binding events. Thus, our results reveal the unique advantages of LPH nanoparticles as active cell-targeting nanocarriers and provide some general principles governing nanoparticle-cell interactions that may aid future design of LPHs with improved affinity and specificity for a given target of interest.

  5. Group X Phospholipase A2 Stimulates the Proliferation of Colon Cancer Cells by Producing Various Lipid Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Surrel, Fanny; Jemel, Ikram; Boilard, Eric; Bollinger, James G.; Payré, Christine; Mounier, Carine M.; Talvinen, Kati A.; Laine, Veli J. O.; Nevalainen, Timo J.; Gelb, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Among mammalian secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2s), the group X enzyme has the most potent hydrolyzing capacity toward phosphatidylcholine, the major phospholipid of cell membrane and lipoproteins. This enzyme has recently been implicated in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis and asthma and may also play a role in colon tumorigenesis. We show here that group X sPLA2 [mouse (m)GX] is one of the most highly expressed PLA2 in the mouse colon and that recombinant mouse and human enzymes stimulate proliferation and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation of various colon cell lines, including Colon-26 cancer cells. Among various recombinant sPLA2s, mGX is the most potent enzyme to stimulate cell proliferation. Based on the use of sPLA2 inhibitors, catalytic site mutants, and small interfering RNA silencing of cytosolic PLA2α and M-type sPLA2 receptor, we demonstrate that mGX promotes cell proliferation independently of the receptor and via its intrinsic catalytic activity and production of free arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids, which are mitogenic by themselves. mGX can also elicit the production of large amounts of prostaglandin E2 and other eicosanoids from Colon-26 cells, but these lipid mediators do not play a role in mGX-induced cell proliferation because inhibitors of cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases do not prevent sPLA2 mitogenic effects. Together, our results indicate that group X sPLA2 may play an important role in colon tumorigenesis by promoting cancer cell proliferation and releasing various lipid mediators involved in other key events in cancer progression. PMID:19602573

  6. Sequential release of cytokines, lipid mediators and nitric oxide in experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Keuskamp, Z. J.; Wilson, J. H. P.; Zijlstra, F. J.

    1995-01-01

    The object of this study was to establish whether different pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators were formed in colonic tissue from experimental colitis depending on the course of the disease. Concentrations of mediators of inflammation were examined in colonic tissue in dextran induced colitis in mice. Initial inflammation was produced by 5 days treatment of 10% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water, followed by a further 9 day period of 2% DSS in an attempt to produce a milder chronic inflammation. The degree of inflammation was scored by a standardized macroscopic and histological examination. Initially, a 60% maximum inflammation score was observed at day 4. At this time inflammation was associated with the release of interleukin-lβ (IL-1β) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα), whereas both prostaglandins 6kPGF1α and PGE2 and nitric oxide (NO) markedly decreased. Then a 25% inflammation score was reached which coincided with an increased production of platelet-activating factor (PAF). No significant changes were observed in leukotriene B4 and C4 formation. In conclusion, pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNFα are considered to be primary mediators, whereas PAF, eicosanoids and NO may reflect secondary mediators in experimental colitis. PMID:18475637

  7. TPL-2 Regulates Macrophage Lipid Metabolism and M2 Differentiation to Control TH2-Mediated Immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Entwistle, Lewis J.; Khoury, Hania; Papoutsopoulou, Stamatia; Mahmood, Radma; Mansour, Nuha R.; Ching-Cheng Huang, Stanley; Pearce, Edward J.; Pedro S. de Carvalho, Luiz; Ley, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent TH2 cytokine responses following chronic helminth infections can often lead to the development of tissue pathology and fibrotic scarring. Despite a good understanding of the cellular mechanisms involved in fibrogenesis, there are very few therapeutic options available, highlighting a significant medical need and gap in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of TH2-mediated immunopathology. In this study, we found that the Map3 kinase, TPL-2 (Map3k8; Cot) regulated TH2-mediated intestinal, hepatic and pulmonary immunopathology following Schistosoma mansoni infection or S. mansoni egg injection. Elevated inflammation, TH2 cell responses and exacerbated fibrosis in Map3k8–/–mice was observed in mice with myeloid cell-specific (LysM) deletion of Map3k8, but not CD4 cell-specific deletion of Map3k8, indicating that TPL-2 regulated myeloid cell function to limit TH2-mediated immunopathology. Transcriptional and metabolic assays of Map3k8–/–M2 macrophages identified that TPL-2 was required for lipolysis, M2 macrophage activation and the expression of a variety of genes involved in immuno-regulatory and pro-fibrotic pathways. Taken together this study identified that TPL-2 regulated TH2-mediated inflammation by supporting lipolysis and M2 macrophage activation, preventing TH2 cell expansion and downstream immunopathology and fibrosis. PMID:27487182

  8. TPL-2 Regulates Macrophage Lipid Metabolism and M2 Differentiation to Control TH2-Mediated Immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Yashaswini; Perez-Lloret, Jimena; Li, Yanda; Entwistle, Lewis J; Khoury, Hania; Papoutsopoulou, Stamatia; Mahmood, Radma; Mansour, Nuha R; Ching-Cheng Huang, Stanley; Pearce, Edward J; Pedro S de Carvalho, Luiz; Ley, Steven C; Wilson, Mark S

    2016-08-01

    Persistent TH2 cytokine responses following chronic helminth infections can often lead to the development of tissue pathology and fibrotic scarring. Despite a good understanding of the cellular mechanisms involved in fibrogenesis, there are very few therapeutic options available, highlighting a significant medical need and gap in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of TH2-mediated immunopathology. In this study, we found that the Map3 kinase, TPL-2 (Map3k8; Cot) regulated TH2-mediated intestinal, hepatic and pulmonary immunopathology following Schistosoma mansoni infection or S. mansoni egg injection. Elevated inflammation, TH2 cell responses and exacerbated fibrosis in Map3k8-/-mice was observed in mice with myeloid cell-specific (LysM) deletion of Map3k8, but not CD4 cell-specific deletion of Map3k8, indicating that TPL-2 regulated myeloid cell function to limit TH2-mediated immunopathology. Transcriptional and metabolic assays of Map3k8-/-M2 macrophages identified that TPL-2 was required for lipolysis, M2 macrophage activation and the expression of a variety of genes involved in immuno-regulatory and pro-fibrotic pathways. Taken together this study identified that TPL-2 regulated TH2-mediated inflammation by supporting lipolysis and M2 macrophage activation, preventing TH2 cell expansion and downstream immunopathology and fibrosis. PMID:27487182

  9. DHEA-mediated inhibition of the pentose phosphate pathway alters oocyte lipid metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Patricia T; Frolova, Antonina I; Chi, Maggie M; Grindler, Natalia M; Willcockson, Alexandra R; Reynolds, Kasey A; Zhao, Quihong; Moley, Kelle H

    2013-12-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and hyperandrogenism have altered hormone levels and suffer from ovarian dysfunction leading to subfertility. We have attempted to generate a model of hyperandrogenism by feeding mice chow supplemented with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), an androgen precursor that is often elevated in women with PCOS. Treated mice had polycystic ovaries, low ovulation rates, disrupted estrous cycles, and altered hormone levels. Because DHEA is an inhibitor of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway, we tested the hypothesis that oocytes from DHEA-exposed mice would have metabolic disruptions. Citrate levels, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, and lipid content in denuded oocytes from these mice were significantly lower than controls, suggesting abnormal tricarboxylic acid and pentose phosphate pathway metabolism. The lipid and citrate effects were reversible by supplementation with nicotinic acid, a precursor for reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. These findings suggest that elevations in systemic DHEA can have a negative impact on oocyte metabolism and may contribute to poor pregnancy outcomes in women with hyperandrogenism and PCOS.

  10. Microtubule-Mediated Inositol Lipid Signaling Plays Critical Roles in Regulation of Blebbing

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Tatsuroh; Pramanik, Md. Kamruzzaman; Yumura, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    Cells migrate by extending pseudopods such as lamellipodia and blebs. Although the signals leading to lamellipodia extension have been extensively investigated, those for bleb extension remain unclear. Here, we investigated signals for blebbing in Dictyostelium cells using a newly developed assay to induce blebbing. When cells were cut into two pieces with a microneedle, the anucleate fragments vigorously extended blebs. This assay enabled us to induce blebbing reproducibly, and analyses of knockout mutants and specific inhibitors identified candidate molecules that regulate blebbing. Blebs were also induced in anucleate fragments of leukocytes, indicating that this assay is generally applicable to animal cells. After cutting, microtubules in the anucleate fragments promptly depolymerized, followed by the extension of blebs. Furthermore, when intact cells were treated with a microtubule inhibitor, they frequently extended blebs. The depolymerization of microtubules induced the delocalization of inositol lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate from the cell membrane. PI3 kinase-null cells frequently extended blebs, whereas PTEN-null cells extended fewer blebs. From these observations, we propose a model in which microtubules play a critical role in bleb regulation via inositol lipid metabolism. PMID:26317626

  11. DHEA-Mediated Inhibition of the Pentose Phosphate Pathway Alters Oocyte Lipid Metabolism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Patricia T.; Frolova, Antonina I.; Chi, Maggie M.; Grindler, Natalia M.; Willcockson, Alexandra R.; Reynolds, Kasey A.; Zhao, Quihong

    2013-01-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and hyperandrogenism have altered hormone levels and suffer from ovarian dysfunction leading to subfertility. We have attempted to generate a model of hyperandrogenism by feeding mice chow supplemented with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), an androgen precursor that is often elevated in women with PCOS. Treated mice had polycystic ovaries, low ovulation rates, disrupted estrous cycles, and altered hormone levels. Because DHEA is an inhibitor of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway, we tested the hypothesis that oocytes from DHEA-exposed mice would have metabolic disruptions. Citrate levels, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, and lipid content in denuded oocytes from these mice were significantly lower than controls, suggesting abnormal tricarboxylic acid and pentose phosphate pathway metabolism. The lipid and citrate effects were reversible by supplementation with nicotinic acid, a precursor for reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. These findings suggest that elevations in systemic DHEA can have a negative impact on oocyte metabolism and may contribute to poor pregnancy outcomes in women with hyperandrogenism and PCOS. PMID:24036000

  12. Fucoidan improves serum lipid levels and atherosclerosis through hepatic SREBP-2-mediated regulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinhee; Yeom, Mijung; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Hyperlipidemia is associated with increased risk of the development of cardiovascular diseases. Although a great deal of attention has been paid to the hypolipidemic activity of fucoidan, complex polysaccharides from brown seaweeds, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. This study was performed to investigate whether and how fucoidan has lipid-lowering potential in poloxamer-407 (P407)-induced hyperlipidemic mice. Fucoidan treatment 2 h after acute administration of P407 in these mice significantly reduced serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL cholesterol levels, but increased the levels of HDL cholesterol. In HepG2 hepatocytes and the liver, fucoidan decreased the expression of FAS and ACC mRNA with no or only a moderate inhibitory effect on SREBP-1c mRNA expression. Furthermore, fucoidan attenuated the hepatic expression of mature SREBP-2 protein with a subsequent decrease in hepatic HMG-CoA reductase mRNA expression and an increase in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA expression. In addition, atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta of chronically P407-treated mice were also reduced by fucoidan. These findings indicate that fucoidan improves serum lipid levels by regulating the expression of key enzymes of cholesterol and triglyceride syntheses in the liver through modulation of SREBP-2.

  13. Tempol protects blood proteins and lipids against peroxynitrite-mediated oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ayman G; Bani-Ahmad, Mohammad A; Jaradat, Ahmad Q

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is characterized by excessive production of various free radicals and reactive species among which, peroxynitrite is most frequently produced in several pathological conditions. Peroxynitrite is the product of the superoxide anion reaction with nitric oxide, which is reported to take place in the intravascular compartment. Several studies have reported that peroxynitrite targets red blood cells, platelets and plasma proteins, and induces various forms of oxidative damage. This in vitro study was designed to further characterize the types of oxidative damage induced in platelets and plasma proteins by peroxynitrite. This study also determined the ability of tempol to protect blood plasma and platelets against peroxynitrite-induced oxidative damage. The ability of various concentrations of tempol (25, 50, 75, and 100 µM) to antagonize peroxynitrite-induced oxidation was evaluated by measuring the levels of protein carbonyl groups and thiobarbituric-acid-reactive substances in experimental groups. Exposure of platelets and plasma to 100 µM peroxynitrite resulted in an increased levels of carbonyl groups and lipid peroxidation (P < 0.05). Tempol significantly inhibited carbonyl group formation in plasma and platelet proteins (P < 0.05). In addition, tempol significantly reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation in both plasma and platelet samples (P < 0.05). Thus, tempol has antioxidative properties against peroxynitrite-induced oxidative damage in blood plasma and platelets. PMID:25107897

  14. Nanoparticle-mediated intracellular lipid accumulation during C2C12 cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Haniu, Hisao

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} HTT2800 has a significant effect on intracellular lipid accumulation. {yields} HTT2800 reduced muscle-specific genes and led to the emergence of adipocyte-related genes. {yields} HT2800 converts the differentiation pathway of C2C12 myoblasts to that of adipoblast-like cells. -- Abstract: In this report, we sought to elucidate whether multiwall carbon nanotubes are involved in the modulation of the proliferation and differentiation of the skeletal muscle cell line C2C12. Skeletal muscle is a major mass peripheral tissue that accounts for 40% of total body weight and 50% of energy consumption. We focused on the differentiation pathway of myoblasts after exposure to a vapor-grown carbon fiber, HTT2800, which is one of the most highly purified carbon nanotubes. This treatment leads in parallel to the expression of a typical adipose differentiation program. We found that HTT2800 stimulated intracellular lipid accumulation in C2C12 cells. We have also shown by quantified PCR analysis that the expression of adipose-related genes was markedly upregulated during HTT2800 exposure. Taken together, these results suggest that HTT2800 specifically converts the differentiation pathway of C2C12 myoblasts to that of adipoblast-like cells.

  15. Isolation and characterization of a tomato non-specific lipid transfer protein involved in polygalacturonase-mediated pectin degradation.

    PubMed

    Tomassen, Monic M M; Barrett, Diane M; van der Valk, Henry C P M; Woltering, Ernst J

    2007-01-01

    An important aspect of the ripening process of tomato fruit is softening. Softening is accompanied by hydrolysis of the pectin in the cell wall by pectinases, causing loss of cell adhesion in the middle lamella. One of the most significant pectin-degrading enzymes is polygalacturonase (PG). Previous reports have shown that PG in tomato may exist in different forms (PG1, PG2a, PG2b, and PGx) commonly referred to as PG isoenzymes. The gene product PG2 is differentially glycosylated and is thought to associate with other proteins to form PG1 and PGx. This association is thought to modulate its pectin-degrading activity in planta. An 8 kDa protein that is part of the tomato PG1 multiprotein complex has been isolated, purified, and functionally characterized. This protein, designated 'activator' (ACT), belongs to the class of non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs). ACT is capable of 'converting' the gene product PG2 into a more active and heat-stable form, which increases PG-mediated pectin degradation in vitro and stimulates PG-mediated tissue breakdown in planta. This finding suggests a new, not previously identified, function for nsLTPs in the modification of hydrolytic enzyme activity. It is proposed that ACT plays a role in the modulation of PG activity during tomato fruit softening.

  16. Ultrasound-Mediated Destruction of LHRHa Targeted and Paclitaxel Loaded Lipid Microbubbles for the Treatment of Intraperitoneal Ovarian Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shufang; Liu, Hongxia; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Ronald X.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) is a promising technique to facilitate the delivery of chemotherapy in cancer treatment. However, the process typically uses non-specific microbubbles, leading to low tumor-to-normal tissue uptake ratio and adverse side effects. In this study, we synthesized the LHRH receptor targeted and paclitaxel (PTX) loaded lipid microbubbles (TPLMBs) for tumor-specific binding and enhanced therapeutic effect at the tumor site. An ovarian cancer xenograft model was established by injecting A2780/DDP cells intraperitoneally in BALB/c nude mice. Microscopic imaging of tumor sections after intraperitoneal injection of TPLMBs showed effective binding of the microbubbles with cancer cells. Ultrasound mediated destruction of the intraperitoneally injected TPLMBs yielded a superior therapeutic outcome in comparison with other treatment options. Immunohistochemical analyses of the dissected tumor tissue further confirmed the increased tumor apoptosis and reduced angiogenesis. Our experiment suggests that ultrasound mediated intraperitoneal administration of the targeted drug-loaded microbubbles may be a useful method for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:24237050

  17. Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates angiotensin II-induced lipid raft clustering in mesenteric endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei-Qing; Chen, Wen-Dong; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Jian-Jun; Wu, Yong-Jie; Gao, Ping-Jin

    2016-04-01

    It has been reported that intracellular Ca2+ is involved in lysosome fusion and membrane repair in skeletal cells. Given that angiotensin II (Ang II) elicits an increase in intracellular Ca2+ and that lysosome fusion is a crucial mediator of lipid raft (LR) clustering, we hypothesized that Ang II induces lysosome fusion and activates LR formation in rat mesenteric endothelial cells (MECs). We found that Ang II acutely increased intracellular Ca2+ content, an effect that was inhibited by the extracellular Ca2+ chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-induced Ca2+ release inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). Further study showed that EGTA almost completely blocked Ang II-induced lysosome fusion, the translocation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) to LR clusters, ASMase activation and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase activation. In contrast, 2-APB had a slight inhibitory effect. Functionally, both the lysosome inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and the ASMase inhibitor amitriptyline reversed Ang II-induced impairment of vasodilation. We conclude that Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates the Ang II-induced regulation of the LR-redox signaling pathway and mesenteric endothelial dysfunction.

  18. [Gene transfer system mediated by PEI-cholesterol lipopolymer with lipid microbubbles].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yong-Nan; Mo, Hong-Ying; Chen, Jian-Hai

    2010-05-01

    The properties of polyethyleneimine-cholesterol cationic lipopolymer (PEI-Chol) as gene carries and its gene transfer efficiency in vitro with lipid microbubbles were presented in this paper. PEI-Chol lipopolymer was synthesized by linking cholesterol chloroformate to the amino groups of branched poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) of 1 800. The structure and molecular weight of PEI-Chol were confirmed by IR, 1H NMR and MADI-TOF-MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry), respectively. The average molecular weight of PEI-Chol was approximately 2 000. The gene delivery system of bubble/PEI-Chol/DNA was constructed by mixed PEI-Chol/pDNA (N/P 10:1) complexes with lipid microbubbles (2-8 microm) which were prepared by DPPC, DSPE-PEG2000 and perfluoropropane with the reverse phase evaporation technique. pEGFP-Cl (enhanced green fluorescent protein) was used as report gene to investigate the DNA condensing ability of PEI-Chol lipopolymer by agarose gel electrophoresis. And their cytotoxicity and in vitro transfer efficiency of different complexes were compared with each other in A549 and MCF-7. The results indicated PEI-Chol lipopolymer can condense plasmid DNA when N/P ratio upto 4, PEI-Chol complexes and bubble/PEI-Chol/DNA complexes were nontoxic to A549 and MCF-7 when formulated at the N/P ratio of 10/1 as determined by MTT assay. This bubble/PEI-Chol/DNA delivery system provided good transfer efficiency with other desirable characteristics such as against-precipitation of plasma proteins. In conclusion, bubble/PEI-Chol/DNA complex is a novel non-viral gene delivery system.

  19. Lipid Flippase Subunit Cdc50 Mediates Drug Resistance and Virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Liao, Guojian; Baker, Gregory M.; Wang, Yina; Lau, Richard; Paderu, Padmaja; Perlin, David S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a human fungal pathogen and a major cause of fungal meningitis in immunocompromised individuals. Treatment options for cryptococcosis are limited. Of the two major antifungal drug classes, azoles are active against C. neoformans but exert a fungistatic effect, necessitating long treatment regimens and leaving open an avenue for emergence of azole resistance. Drugs of the echinocandin class, which target the glucan synthase and are fungicidal against a number of other fungal pathogens, such as Candida species, are ineffective against C. neoformans. Despite the sensitivity of the target enzyme to the drug, the reasons for the innate resistance of C. neoformans to echinocandins remain unknown. To understand the mechanism of echinocandin resistance in C. neoformans, we screened gene disruption and gene deletion libraries for mutants sensitive to the echinocandin-class drug caspofungin and identified a mutation of CDC50, which encodes the β-subunit of membrane lipid flippase. We found that the Cdc50 protein localized to membranes and that its absence led to plasma membrane defects and enhanced caspofungin penetration into the cell, potentially explaining the increased caspofungin sensitivity. Loss of CDC50 also led to hypersensitivity to the azole-class drug fluconazole. Interestingly, in addition to functioning in drug resistance, CDC50 was also essential for fungal resistance to macrophage killing and for virulence in a murine model of cryptococcosis. Furthermore, the surface of cdc50Δ cells contained increased levels of phosphatidylserine, which has been proposed to act as a macrophage recognition signal. Together, these results reveal a previously unappreciated role of membrane lipid flippase in C. neoformans drug resistance and virulence. PMID:27165800

  20. AN EMERGING ROLE FOR THE LIPID MEDIATOR SPHINGOSINE-1-PHOSPHATE IN MAST CELL EFFECTOR FUNCTION AND ALLERGIC DISEASE*

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, Ana; Rivera, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays important roles regulating functions of diverse biological systems, including the immune system. S1P affects immune cell function mostly by acting through its receptors at the cell membrane but it can also induce S1P receptor-independent responses in the cells where it is generated. S1P produced in allergically stimulated mast cells mediates degranulation, cytokine and lipid mediator production, and migration of mast cells towards antigen by mechanisms that are both S1P receptor-dependent and independent. Even in the absence of an antigen challenge, the differentiation and responsiveness of mast cells can be affected by chronic exposure to elevated S1P from a non-mast cell source, which may occur under pathophysiological conditions, potentially leading to the hyper-responsiveness of mast cells. The role of S1P extends beyond the regulation of the function of mast cells to the regulation of the surrounding or distal environment. S1P is exported out of antigen-stimulated mast cells and into the extracellular space and the resulting S1P gradient within the tissue may influence diverse surrounding tissue cells and several aspects of the allergic disease, such as inflammation or tissue remodeling. Furthermore, recent findings indicate that vasoactive mediators released systemically by mast cells induce the production of S1P in non-hematopoietic compartments, where it plays a role in regulating the vascular tone and reducing the hypotension characteristic of the anaphylactic shock and thus helping the recovery. The dual actions of S1P, promoting the immediate response of mast cells, while controlling the systemic consequences of mast cell activity will be discussed in detail. PMID:21713655

  1. 40 CFR 721.10045 - Diazotized substituted heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). 721.10045... derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject... heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (PMN P-02-737)...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10045 - Diazotized substituted heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). 721.10045... derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject... heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (PMN P-02-737)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10045 - Diazotized substituted heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). 721.10045... derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject... heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (PMN P-02-737)...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10045 - Diazotized substituted heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). 721.10045... derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject... heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (PMN P-02-737)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10045 - Diazotized substituted heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). 721.10045... derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject... heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (PMN P-02-737)...

  6. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical... as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No. P-92-692) is subject to reporting...

  7. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical... as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No. P-92-692) is subject to reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical... as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No. P-92-692) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical... as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No. P-92-692) is subject to reporting...

  10. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical... as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No. P-92-692) is subject to reporting...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10039 - Diethoxybenzenamine derivative, diazotized, coupled with aminonaphthalenesulfonic acid derivative...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., diazotized, coupled with aminonaphthalenesulfonic acid derivative, ammonium salt (generic). 721.10039 Section... derivative, ammonium salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1... with aminonaphthalenesulfonic acid derivative, ammonium salt (PMN P-02-514) is subject to...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10039 - Diethoxybenzenamine derivative, diazotized, coupled with aminonaphthalenesulfonic acid derivative...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., diazotized, coupled with aminonaphthalenesulfonic acid derivative, ammonium salt (generic). 721.10039 Section... derivative, ammonium salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1... with aminonaphthalenesulfonic acid derivative, ammonium salt (PMN P-02-514) is subject to...

  13. Polyelectrolyte-Mediated Transport of Doxorubicin Through the Bilayer Lipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroslavov, Alexander A.; Kitaeva, Marina V.; Melik-Nubarov, Nikolay S.; Menger, Frederic M.

    A model is developed for the effect of ionic polymers on the transport of doxorubicin, an antitumor drug, through a bilayer membrane. Accordingly, a protonated (cationic) form of doxorubicin binds to an anionic polymer, poly(acrylic acid), the resulting complex being several hundred nanometers in size. Nevertheless, large complex species associate with neutral egg lecithin liposomes by means of hydrophobic attraction between the doxorubicin and the liposome bilayer. Then, the doxorubicin enters the liposome interior which has been imparted with an acidic buffer to protonate the doxorubicin. The rate of transmembrane Dox permeation decreases when elevating the polyacid-to-doxorubicin ratio. A cationic polymer, polylysine, being coupled with liposomes containing the negative lipid cardiolipin, accelerates membrane transport of doxorubicin with the maximum rate at a complete neutralization of the membrane charge by an interacting polycation. The effect of a polycation on doxorubicin transport becomes more pronounced as small negative liposomes (60-80 nm in diameter) are changed to larger ones (approx. 600 nm in diameter). An opportunity thus opens up for the manipulation of the kinetics of drug uptake by cells and, ultimately, the control of the pharmaceutical action of drugs.

  14. Fucose decorated solid-lipid nanocarriers mediate efficient delivery of methotrexate in breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Garg, Neeraj K; Singh, Bhupinder; Jain, Ashay; Nirbhavane, Pradip; Sharma, Rajeev; Tyagi, Rajeev K; Kushwah, Varun; Jain, Sanyog; Katare, Om Prakash

    2016-10-01

    The present study is designed to engineer fucose anchored methotrexate loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) to target breast cancer. The developed nano-carriers were characterized with respect to particle size, PDI, zeta potential, drug loading and entrapment, in-vitro release etc. The characterized formulations were used to comparatively assess cellular uptake, cell-viability, apoptosis, lysosomal membrane permeability, bioavailability, biodistribution, changes in tumor volume and animal survival. The ex-vivo results showed greater cellular uptake and better cytotoxicity at lower IC50 of methotrexate in breast cancer cells. Further, we observed increased programmed cell death (apoptosis) with altered lysosomal membrane permeability and better rate of degradation of lysosomal membrane in-vitro. On the other hand, in-vivo evaluation showed maximum bioavailability and tumor targeting efficiency with minimum secondary drug distribution in various organs with formulated and anchored nano-carrier when compared with free drug. Moreover, sizeable reduction in tumor burden was estimated with fucose decorated SLNs as compared to that seen with free MTX and SLNs-MTX. Fucose decorated SLNs showed promising results to develop therapeutic interventions for breast cancer, and paved a way to explore this promising and novel nano-carrier which enables to address breast cancer. PMID:27268228

  15. Fucose decorated solid-lipid nanocarriers mediate efficient delivery of methotrexate in breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Garg, Neeraj K; Singh, Bhupinder; Jain, Ashay; Nirbhavane, Pradip; Sharma, Rajeev; Tyagi, Rajeev K; Kushwah, Varun; Jain, Sanyog; Katare, Om Prakash

    2016-10-01

    The present study is designed to engineer fucose anchored methotrexate loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) to target breast cancer. The developed nano-carriers were characterized with respect to particle size, PDI, zeta potential, drug loading and entrapment, in-vitro release etc. The characterized formulations were used to comparatively assess cellular uptake, cell-viability, apoptosis, lysosomal membrane permeability, bioavailability, biodistribution, changes in tumor volume and animal survival. The ex-vivo results showed greater cellular uptake and better cytotoxicity at lower IC50 of methotrexate in breast cancer cells. Further, we observed increased programmed cell death (apoptosis) with altered lysosomal membrane permeability and better rate of degradation of lysosomal membrane in-vitro. On the other hand, in-vivo evaluation showed maximum bioavailability and tumor targeting efficiency with minimum secondary drug distribution in various organs with formulated and anchored nano-carrier when compared with free drug. Moreover, sizeable reduction in tumor burden was estimated with fucose decorated SLNs as compared to that seen with free MTX and SLNs-MTX. Fucose decorated SLNs showed promising results to develop therapeutic interventions for breast cancer, and paved a way to explore this promising and novel nano-carrier which enables to address breast cancer.

  16. Four New Dicaffeoylquinic Acid Derivatives from Glasswort (Salicornia herbacea L.) and Their Antioxidative Activity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jeong-Yong; Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Yu Geon; Lee, Hyoung Jae; Shim, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Ji Hye; Kim, Seon-Jae; Ham, Kyung-Sik; Moon, Jae-Hak

    2016-01-01

    Four new dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives and two known 3-caffeoylquinic acid derivatives were isolated from methanol extracts using the aerial parts of Salicornia herbacea. The four new dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives were established as 3-caffeoyl-5-dihydrocaffeoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-5-dihydrocaffeoylquinic acid methyl ester, 3-caffeoyl-4-dihydrocaffeoylquinic acid methyl ester, and 3,5-di-dihydrocaffeoylquinic acid methyl ester. Their chemical structures were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance and electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (LC-ESI-MS). In addition, the presence of dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives in this plant was reconfirmed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. The isolated compounds strongly scavenged 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals and inhibited cholesteryl ester hydroperoxide formation during rat blood plasma oxidation induced by copper ions. These results indicate that the caffeoylquinic acid derivatives may partially contribute to the antioxidative effect of S. herbacea. PMID:27556430

  17. Four New Dicaffeoylquinic Acid Derivatives from Glasswort (Salicornia herbacea L.) and Their Antioxidative Activity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jeong-Yong; Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Yu Geon; Lee, Hyoung Jae; Shim, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Ji Hye; Kim, Seon-Jae; Ham, Kyung-Sik; Moon, Jae-Hak

    2016-08-20

    Four new dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives and two known 3-caffeoylquinic acid derivatives were isolated from methanol extracts using the aerial parts of Salicornia herbacea. The four new dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives were established as 3-caffeoyl-5-dihydrocaffeoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-5-dihydrocaffeoylquinic acid methyl ester, 3-caffeoyl-4-dihydrocaffeoylquinic acid methyl ester, and 3,5-di-dihydrocaffeoylquinic acid methyl ester. Their chemical structures were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance and electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (LC-ESI-MS). In addition, the presence of dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives in this plant was reconfirmed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. The isolated compounds strongly scavenged 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals and inhibited cholesteryl ester hydroperoxide formation during rat blood plasma oxidation induced by copper ions. These results indicate that the caffeoylquinic acid derivatives may partially contribute to the antioxidative effect of S. herbacea.

  18. Membrane protein complexes catalyze both 4- and 3-hydroxylation of cinnamic acid derivatives in monolignol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsi-Chuan; Li, Quanzi; Shuford, Christopher M; Liu, Jie; Muddiman, David C; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L

    2011-12-27

    The hydroxylation of 4- and 3-ring carbons of cinnamic acid derivatives during monolignol biosynthesis are key steps that determine the structure and properties of lignin. Individual enzymes have been thought to catalyze these reactions. In stem differentiating xylem (SDX) of Populus trichocarpa, two cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylases (PtrC4H1 and PtrC4H2) and a p-coumaroyl ester 3-hydroxylase (PtrC3H3) are the enzymes involved in these reactions. Here we present evidence that these hydroxylases interact, forming heterodimeric (PtrC4H1/C4H2, PtrC4H1/C3H3, and PtrC4H2/C3H3) and heterotrimeric (PtrC4H1/C4H2/C3H3) membrane protein complexes. Enzyme kinetics using yeast recombinant proteins demonstrated that the enzymatic efficiency (V(max)/k(m)) for any of the complexes is 70-6,500 times greater than that of the individual proteins. The highest increase in efficiency was found for the PtrC4H1/C4H2/C3H3-mediated p-coumaroyl ester 3-hydroxylation. Affinity purification-quantitative mass spectrometry, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, chemical cross-linking, and reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation provide further evidence for these multiprotein complexes. The activities of the recombinant and SDX plant proteins demonstrate two protein-complex-mediated 3-hydroxylation paths in monolignol biosynthesis in P. trichocarpa SDX; one converts p-coumaric acid to caffeic acid and the other converts p-coumaroyl shikimic acid to caffeoyl shikimic acid. Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylation is also mediated by the same protein complexes. These results provide direct evidence for functional involvement of membrane protein complexes in monolignol biosynthesis.

  19. The novel chlamydial adhesin CPn0473 mediates the lipid raft‐dependent uptake of Chlamydia pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Fechtner, Tim; Galle, Jan N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Chlamydiae are Gram‐negative, obligate intracellular pathogens that pose a serious threat to public health worldwide. Chlamydial surface molecules are essential for host cell invasion. The first interaction with the host cell is thereby accomplished by the Outer membrane complex protein B (OmcB) binding to heparan sulfate moieties on the host cell surface, followed by the interaction of the chlamydial polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps) with host cell receptors. Specifically, the interaction of the Pmp21 adhesin and invasin with its human interaction partner, the epidermal growth factor receptor, results in receptor activation, down‐stream signalling and finally internalization of the bacteria. Blocking both, the OmcB and Pmp21 adhesion pathways, did not completely abolish infection, suggesting the presence of additional factors relevant for host cell invasion. Here, we show that the novel surface protein CPn0473 of Chlamydia pneumoniae contributes to the binding and invasion of infectious chlamydial particles. CPn0473 is expressed late in the infection cycle and located on the infectious chlamydial cell surface. Soluble recombinant CPn0473 as well as rCPn0473‐coupled fluorescent latex beads adhere to human epithelial HEp‐2 cells. Interestingly, in classical infection blocking experiments pretreatment of HEp‐2 cells with rCPn0473 does not attenuate adhesion but promotes dose‐dependently internalization by C. pneumoniae suggesting an unusual mode of action for this adhesin. This CPn0473‐dependent promotion of infection by C. pneumoniae depends on two different domains within the protein and requires intact lipid rafts. Thus, inhibition of the interaction of CPn0473 with the host cell could provide a way to reduce the virulence of C. pneumoniae. PMID:26780295

  20. The novel chlamydial adhesin CPn0473 mediates the lipid raft-dependent uptake of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Fechtner, Tim; Galle, Jan N; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2016-08-01

    Chlamydiae are Gram-negative, obligate intracellular pathogens that pose a serious threat to public health worldwide. Chlamydial surface molecules are essential for host cell invasion. The first interaction with the host cell is thereby accomplished by the Outer membrane complex protein B (OmcB) binding to heparan sulfate moieties on the host cell surface, followed by the interaction of the chlamydial polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps) with host cell receptors. Specifically, the interaction of the Pmp21 adhesin and invasin with its human interaction partner, the epidermal growth factor receptor, results in receptor activation, down-stream signalling and finally internalization of the bacteria. Blocking both, the OmcB and Pmp21 adhesion pathways, did not completely abolish infection, suggesting the presence of additional factors relevant for host cell invasion. Here, we show that the novel surface protein CPn0473 of Chlamydia pneumoniae contributes to the binding and invasion of infectious chlamydial particles. CPn0473 is expressed late in the infection cycle and located on the infectious chlamydial cell surface. Soluble recombinant CPn0473 as well as rCPn0473-coupled fluorescent latex beads adhere to human epithelial HEp-2 cells. Interestingly, in classical infection blocking experiments pretreatment of HEp-2 cells with rCPn0473 does not attenuate adhesion but promotes dose-dependently internalization by C. pneumoniae suggesting an unusual mode of action for this adhesin. This CPn0473-dependent promotion of infection by C. pneumoniae depends on two different domains within the protein and requires intact lipid rafts. Thus, inhibition of the interaction of CPn0473 with the host cell could provide a way to reduce the virulence of C. pneumoniae.

  1. Lipid Raft-Mediated Membrane Tethering and Delivery of Hydrophobic Cargos from Liquid Crystal-Based Nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Nag, Okhil K; Naciri, Jawad; Oh, Eunkeu; Spillmann, Christopher M; Delehanty, James B

    2016-04-20

    A main goal of bionanotechnology and nanoparticle (NP)-mediated drug delivery (NMDD) continues to be the development of novel biomaterials that can controllably modulate the activity of the NP-associated therapeutic cargo. One of the desired subcellular locations for targeted delivery in NMDD is the plasma membrane. However, the controlled delivery of hydrophobic cargos to the membrane bilayer poses significant challenges including cargo precipitation and lack of specificity. Here, we employ a liquid crystal NP (LCNP)-based delivery system for the controlled partitioning of a model dye cargo from within the NP core into the plasma membrane bilayer. During synthesis of the NPs, the water-insoluble model dye cargo, 3,3'-dioctadecyloxacarbocyanine perchlorate (DiO), was efficiently incorporated into the hydrophobic LCNP core as confirmed by multiple spectroscopic analyses. Conjugation of a PEGylated cholesterol derivative to the NP surface (DiO-LCNP-PEG-Chol) facilitated the localization of the dye-loaded NPs to lipid raft microdomains in the plasma membrane in HEK 293T/17 cell. Analysis of DiO cellular internalization kinetics revealed that when delivered as a LCNP-PEG-Chol NP, the half-life of DiO membrane residence time (30 min) was twice that of free DiO (DiO(free)) (15 min) delivered from bulk solution. Time-resolved laser scanning confocal microscopy was employed to visualize the passive efflux of DiO from the LCNP core and its insertion into the plasma membrane bilayer as confirmed by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging. Finally, the delivery of DiO as a LCNP-PEG-Chol complex resulted in the attenuation of its cytotoxicity; the NP form of DiO exhibited ∼30-40% less toxicity compared to DiO(free). Our data demonstrate the utility of the LCNP platform as an efficient vehicle for the combined membrane-targeted delivery and physicochemical modulation of molecular cargos using lipid raft-mediated tethering.

  2. Influence of lipids with hydroxyl-containing head groups on Fe2+ (Cu2+)/H2O2-mediated transformation of phospholipids in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Olshyk, Viktoriya N; Melsitova, Inna V; Yurkova, Irina L

    2014-01-01

    Under condition of ROS formation in lipid membranes, free radical reactions can proceed in both hydrophobic (peroxidation of lipids, POL) and polar (free radical fragmentation) parts of the bilayer. Free-radical fragmentation is typical for the lipids containing a hydroxyl group in β-position with respect to an ester or amide bond. The present study has been undertaken to investigate free-radical transformations of phospholipids in model membranes containing lipids able to undergo fragmentation in their polar part. Liposomes from egg yolk lecithin containing saturated or monounsaturated glycero- and sphingolipids were subjected to the action of an HO* - generating system - Fe(2+)(Cu(2+))/H2O2/Asc, and the POL products were investigated. In parallel with this, the effects of monoacylglycerols and scavengers of reactive species on Fe(2+)(Cu(2+))/H2O2/Asc - mediated free-radical fragmentation of phosphatidylglycerols were studied. Hydroxyl-containing sphingolipids and glycerolipids, which undergo free-radical fragmentation under such conditions, manifested antioxidant properties in the model membranes. In the absence of HO groups in the lipid structure, the effect was either pro-oxidant or neutral. Monoacylglycerols slowed down the rate of both peroxidation in the hydrophobic part and free-radical fragmentation in the hydrophilic part of phospholipid membrane. Scavengers of reactive species inhibited the fragmentation of phosphatidylglycerol substantially. Thus, the ability of hydroxyl-containing lipids to undergo free-radical fragmentation in polar part apparently makes a substantial contribution to the mechanism of their protector action. PMID:24189590

  3. Influence of lipids with hydroxyl-containing head groups on Fe2+ (Cu2+)/H2O2-mediated transformation of phospholipids in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Olshyk, Viktoriya N; Melsitova, Inna V; Yurkova, Irina L

    2014-01-01

    Under condition of ROS formation in lipid membranes, free radical reactions can proceed in both hydrophobic (peroxidation of lipids, POL) and polar (free radical fragmentation) parts of the bilayer. Free-radical fragmentation is typical for the lipids containing a hydroxyl group in β-position with respect to an ester or amide bond. The present study has been undertaken to investigate free-radical transformations of phospholipids in model membranes containing lipids able to undergo fragmentation in their polar part. Liposomes from egg yolk lecithin containing saturated or monounsaturated glycero- and sphingolipids were subjected to the action of an HO* - generating system - Fe(2+)(Cu(2+))/H2O2/Asc, and the POL products were investigated. In parallel with this, the effects of monoacylglycerols and scavengers of reactive species on Fe(2+)(Cu(2+))/H2O2/Asc - mediated free-radical fragmentation of phosphatidylglycerols were studied. Hydroxyl-containing sphingolipids and glycerolipids, which undergo free-radical fragmentation under such conditions, manifested antioxidant properties in the model membranes. In the absence of HO groups in the lipid structure, the effect was either pro-oxidant or neutral. Monoacylglycerols slowed down the rate of both peroxidation in the hydrophobic part and free-radical fragmentation in the hydrophilic part of phospholipid membrane. Scavengers of reactive species inhibited the fragmentation of phosphatidylglycerol substantially. Thus, the ability of hydroxyl-containing lipids to undergo free-radical fragmentation in polar part apparently makes a substantial contribution to the mechanism of their protector action.

  4. Protective effect of selenium on hemoglobin mediated lipid peroxidation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Simoni, J; Simoni, G; Garcia, E L; Prien, S D; Tran, R M; Feola, M; Shires, G T

    1995-01-01

    The toxicity of hemoglobin (Hb) solutions is related, at least in part, to the generation of oxygen free radicals with consequent induction of lipid peroxidation. The present study was designed to examine whether selenium (Se) may prevent the oxidative damage observed after Hb administration. Three groups of rats were compared; (I) the negative control group receiving autotransfusion; (II) the positive control group with replacement of 40% total blood volume (TBV) with modified bovine Hb solution; and (III) the experimental group which received dietary supplemented selenium (Na2SeO3) in daily doses of 5 micrograms.kg body wt-1 in drinking water, 4 days before and 3 days after administration of Hb solution in the same volume as in group II. Three days after Hb injection, all animals were sacrificed. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring conjugated dienes (CD) and thiobarbituric acid reactants (MDA) in homogenates of the perfused liver, heart, lungs, kidney, brain and plasma. Additionally, the 45k x g supernatants of the organs homogenates and plasma were assayed for the antioxidant enzymes activity: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and the intracellular level of reduced glutathione (GSH). Also, a measurement of nonprotein bound intracellular free iron (Fe) and tissue Se concentrations was performed. Simultaneously, injury dysfunction of vital organs was assessed by the measurement of plasma LDH, SGPT, creatinine, blood PaO2 and by histopathological studies. Results indicate that the exchange transfusion with Hb solution introduced significant increases in CD and MDA formation, particularly in the liver and heart tissues, and in plasma. While the values of the SOD and CAT in the liver and heart tissue were generally altered, the SOD/CAT ratio was also increased. After the Hb injection, activity of GSH-Px remained unchanged and was associated with significant depletion of GSH. The plasma levels of SGPT and LDH were

  5. How a lipid mediates tumour suppression. Delivered on 29 June 2010 at the 35th FEBS Congress in Gothenburg, Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Stenmark, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylated derivatives of the membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), known as phosphoinositides (PIs), regulate membrane-proximal cellular processes by recruiting specific protein effectors involved in cell signalling, membrane trafficking and cytoskeletal dynamics. Two PIs that are generated through the activities of distinct PI 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are of special interest in cancer research. PtdIns(3,4,5)P3, generated by class I PI3Ks, functions as tumour promotor by recruiting effectors involved in cell survival, proliferation, growth and motility. Conversely, there is evidence that PtdIns3P, generated by class III PI3K, functions in tumour suppression. Three subunits of the class III PI3K complex (Beclin 1, UVRAG and BIF-1) have been independently identified as tumour suppressors in mice and humans, and their mechanism of action in this context has been proposed to entail activation of autophagy, a catabolic pathway that is considered to mediate tumour suppression by scavenging damaged organelles that would otherwise cause DNA instability through the production of reactive oxygen species. Recent studies have revealed two additional functions of PtdIns3P that might contribute to its tumour suppressor activity. The first involves endosomal sorting and lysosomal downregulation of mitogenic receptors. The second involves regulation of cytokinesis, which is the final stage of cell division. Further elucidation of the mechanisms of tumour suppression mediated by class III PI3K and PtdIns3P will identify novel Achilles’ heels of the cell’s defence against tumourigenesis and will be useful in the search for prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers in cancer. PMID:20977678

  6. Receptor-mediated membrane adhesion of lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lipid–polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles represent a novel class of targeted drug delivery platforms that combine the advantages of liposomes and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles. However, the molecular details of the interaction between LPHs and their target cell membranes remain poorly understood. We have investigated the receptor-mediated membrane adhesion process of a ligand-tethered LPH nanoparticle using extensive dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. We found that the spontaneous adhesion process follows a first-order kinetics characterized by two distinct stages: a rapid nanoparticle–membrane engagement, followed by a slow growth in the number of ligand–receptor pairs coupled with structural re-organization of both the nanoparticle and the membrane. The number of ligand–receptor pairs increases with the dynamic segregation of ligands and receptors toward the adhesion zone causing an out-of-plane deformation of the membrane. Moreover, the fluidity of the lipid shell allows for strong nanoparticle–membrane interactions to occur even when the ligand density is low. The LPH–membrane avidity is enhanced by the increased stability of each receptor–ligand pair due to the geometric confinement and the cooperative effect arising from multiple binding events. Thus, our results reveal the unique advantages of LPH nanoparticles as active cell-targeting nanocarriers and provide some general principles governing nanoparticle–cell interactions that may aid future design of LPHs with improved affinity and specificity for a given target of interest. PMID:25438167

  7. An imbalance between specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators and pro-inflammatory leukotrienes promotes instability of atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Fredman, Gabrielle; Hellmann, Jason; Proto, Jonathan D.; Kuriakose, George; Colas, Romain A.; Dorweiler, Bernhard; Connolly, E. Sander; Solomon, Robert; Jones, David M.; Heyer, Eric J.; Spite, Matthew; Tabas, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Chronic unresolved inflammation plays a causal role in the development of advanced atherosclerosis, but the mechanisms that prevent resolution in atherosclerosis remain unclear. Here, we use targeted mass spectrometry to identify specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators (SPM) in histologically-defined stable and vulnerable regions of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques. The levels of SPMs, particularly resolvin D1 (RvD1), and the ratio of SPMs to pro-inflammatory leukotriene B4 (LTB4), are significantly decreased in the vulnerable regions. SPMs are also decreased in advanced plaques of fat-fed Ldlr−/− mice. Administration of RvD1 to these mice during plaque progression restores the RvD1:LTB4 ratio to that of less advanced lesions and promotes plaque stability, including decreased lesional oxidative stress and necrosis, improved lesional efferocytosis, and thicker fibrous caps. These findings provide molecular support for the concept that defective inflammation resolution contributes to the formation of clinically dangerous plaques and offer a mechanistic rationale for SPM therapy to promote plaque stability. PMID:27659679

  8. Flagella interact with ionic plant lipids to mediate adherence of pathogenic Escherichia coli to fresh produce plants.

    PubMed

    Rossez, Yannick; Holmes, Ashleigh; Wolfson, Eliza B; Gally, David L; Mahajan, Arvind; Pedersen, Henriette L; Willats, William G T; Toth, Ian K; Holden, Nicola J

    2014-07-01

    Bacterial attachment to plant and animal surfaces is generally thought to constitute the initial step in colonization, requiring adherence factors such as flagella and fimbriae. We describe the molecular mechanism underpinning flagella-mediated adherence to plant tissue for the foodborne pathogen, enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Escherichia coli H7 flagella interacted with a sulphated carbohydrate (carrageenan) on a glycan array, which occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Adherence of E. coli O157 : H-expressing flagella of serotype H7, H6 or H48 to plants associated with outbreaks from fresh produce and to Arabidopsis thaliana, was dependent on flagella interactions with phospholipids and sulpholipids in plasma membranes. Adherence of purified H7 and H48 flagella to carrageenan was reduced at higher concentrations of KH2 PO4 or KCl, showing an ionic basis to the interactions. Purified H7 flagella were observed to physically interact with plasma membranes in spinach plants and in A.thaliana. The results show a specific interaction between E. coli H7, H6 and H48 flagella and ionic lipids in plant plasma membranes. The work extends our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning E.coli flagella targeting of plant hosts and suggests a generic mechanism of recognition common in eukaryotic hosts belonging to different biological kingdoms.

  9. Effects of Acidification and Alkalinization on the Lipid Emulsion-Mediated Reversal of Toxic Dose Levobupivacaine-Induced Vasodilation in the Isolated Rat Aorta.

    PubMed

    Ok, Seong-Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Yu, Jongsun; Lee, Youngju; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Lim, Dong Hoon; Hwang, Yeran; Kim, Yeon A; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the effects of pre-acidification and pre-akalinization on the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of toxic dose levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in isolated rat aorta. Isolated aortic rings with and without the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) were exposed to four types of Krebs solution (pH 7.0, 7.2, 7.4, and 7.6), followed by the addition of 60 mM potassium chloride. When the toxic dose of levobupivacaine (3 × 10(-4) M) produced a stable and sustained vasodilation in the isolated aortic rings that were precontracted with 60 mM potassium chloride, increasing lipid emulsion concentrations (SMOFlipid(®): 0.24, 0.48, 0.95 and 1.39%) were added to generate concentration-response curves. The effects of mild pre-acidification alone and mild pre-acidification in combination with a lipid emulsion on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells were investigated by Western blotting. Mild pre-acidification caused by the pH 7.2 Krebs solution enhanced the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in isolated endothelium-intact aortic rings, whereas mild pre-acidification caused by the pH 7.2 Krebs solution did not significantly alter the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of the levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in isolated endothelium-denuded aortic rings or endothelium-intact aortic rings with L-NAME. A lipid emulsion attenuated the increased eNOS phosphorylation induced by the pH 7.2 Krebs solution. Taken together, these results suggest that mild pre-acidification enhances the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of toxic dose levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in the endothelium-intact aorta via the inhibition of nitric oxide.

  10. Effects of Acidification and Alkalinization on the Lipid Emulsion-Mediated Reversal of Toxic Dose Levobupivacaine-Induced Vasodilation in the Isolated Rat Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Ok, Seong-Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Yu, Jongsun; Lee, Youngju; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Lim, Dong Hoon; Hwang, Yeran; Kim, Yeon A; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the effects of pre-acidification and pre-akalinization on the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of toxic dose levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in isolated rat aorta. Isolated aortic rings with and without the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) were exposed to four types of Krebs solution (pH 7.0, 7.2, 7.4, and 7.6), followed by the addition of 60 mM potassium chloride. When the toxic dose of levobupivacaine (3 × 10-4 M) produced a stable and sustained vasodilation in the isolated aortic rings that were precontracted with 60 mM potassium chloride, increasing lipid emulsion concentrations (SMOFlipid®: 0.24, 0.48, 0.95 and 1.39%) were added to generate concentration-response curves. The effects of mild pre-acidification alone and mild pre-acidification in combination with a lipid emulsion on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells were investigated by Western blotting. Mild pre-acidification caused by the pH 7.2 Krebs solution enhanced the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in isolated endothelium-intact aortic rings, whereas mild pre-acidification caused by the pH 7.2 Krebs solution did not significantly alter the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of the levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in isolated endothelium-denuded aortic rings or endothelium-intact aortic rings with L-NAME. A lipid emulsion attenuated the increased eNOS phosphorylation induced by the pH 7.2 Krebs solution. Taken together, these results suggest that mild pre-acidification enhances the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of toxic dose levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in the endothelium-intact aorta via the inhibition of nitric oxide. PMID:26917987

  11. Metabolic engineering of yeast to produce fatty acid-derived biofuels: bottlenecks and solutions.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Feng, Xueyang

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid-derived biofuels can be a better solution than bioethanol to replace petroleum fuel, since they have similar energy content and combustion properties as current transportation fuels. The environmentally friendly microbial fermentation process has been used to synthesize advanced biofuels from renewable feedstock. Due to their robustness as well as the high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors and phage contamination, yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica have attracted tremendous attention in recent studies regarding the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, including fatty acids, fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and fatty alkanes. However, the native yeast strains cannot produce fatty acids and fatty acid-derived biofuels in large quantities. To this end, we have summarized recent publications in this review on metabolic engineering of yeast strains to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, identified the bottlenecks that limit the productivity of biofuels, and categorized the appropriate approaches to overcome these obstacles. PMID:26106371

  12. Metabolic engineering of yeast to produce fatty acid-derived biofuels: bottlenecks and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Feng, Xueyang

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid-derived biofuels can be a better solution than bioethanol to replace petroleum fuel, since they have similar energy content and combustion properties as current transportation fuels. The environmentally friendly microbial fermentation process has been used to synthesize advanced biofuels from renewable feedstock. Due to their robustness as well as the high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors and phage contamination, yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica have attracted tremendous attention in recent studies regarding the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, including fatty acids, fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and fatty alkanes. However, the native yeast strains cannot produce fatty acids and fatty acid-derived biofuels in large quantities. To this end, we have summarized recent publications in this review on metabolic engineering of yeast strains to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, identified the bottlenecks that limit the productivity of biofuels, and categorized the appropriate approaches to overcome these obstacles. PMID:26106371

  13. Calcium-mediated binding of DNA to 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine-containing mixed lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Dabkowska, Aleksandra P; Barlow, David J; Clifton, Luke A; Hughes, Arwel V; Webster, John R P; Green, Rebecca J; Quinn, Peter J; Lawrence, M Jayne

    2014-03-21

    The calcium-mediated interaction of DNA with monolayers of the non-toxic, zwitterionic phospholipid, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine when mixed with 50 mol% of a second lipid, either the zwitteronic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine or neutral cholesterol was investigated using a combination of surface pressure-area isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy, external reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and specular neutron reflectivity in combination with contrast variation. When calcium and DNA were both present in the aqueous subphase, changes were observed in the compression isotherms as well as the surface morphologies of the mixed lipid monolayers. In the presence of calcium and DNA, specular neutron reflectivity showed that directly underneath the head groups of the lipids comprising the monolayers, DNA occupied a layer comprising approximately 13 and 18% v/v DNA for the 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine and cholesterol-containing monolayers, respectively. The volume of the corresponding layer for 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine only containing monolayers was ∼15% v/v DNA. Furthermore regardless of the presence and nature of the second lipid and the surface pressure of the monolayer, the specular neutron reflectivity experiments showed that the DNA-containing layer was 20-27 Å thick, suggesting the presence of a well-hydrated layer of double-stranded DNA. External reflectance Fourier transform infrared studies confirmed the presence of double stranded DNA, and indicated that the strands are in the B-form conformation. The results shed light on the interaction between lipids and nucleic acid cargo as well as the role of a second lipid in lipid-based carriers for drug delivery. PMID:24652078

  14. Catalytic asymmetric protonation of lithium enolates using amino acid derivatives as chiral proton sources.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Kaori; Ito, Rie; Arai, Takayoshi; Yanagisawa, Akira

    2006-04-13

    [reaction: see text] Asymmetric protonation of lithium enolates was examined using commercially available amino acid derivatives as chiral proton sources. Among the amino acid derivatives tested, Nbeta-l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine methyl ester was found to cause significant asymmetric induction in the protonation of lithium enolates. The enantiomeric excess (up to 88% ee) of the products obtained in the presence of a catalytic amount of the chiral proton source was higher than those obtained in the stoichiometric reaction. PMID:16597150

  15. Catalytic asymmetric protonation of lithium enolates using amino acid derivatives as chiral proton sources.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Kaori; Ito, Rie; Arai, Takayoshi; Yanagisawa, Akira

    2006-04-13

    [reaction: see text] Asymmetric protonation of lithium enolates was examined using commercially available amino acid derivatives as chiral proton sources. Among the amino acid derivatives tested, Nbeta-l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine methyl ester was found to cause significant asymmetric induction in the protonation of lithium enolates. The enantiomeric excess (up to 88% ee) of the products obtained in the presence of a catalytic amount of the chiral proton source was higher than those obtained in the stoichiometric reaction.

  16. The role of porous nanostructure in controlling lipase-mediated digestion of lipid loaded into silica particles.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Paul; Tan, Angel; Whitby, Catherine P; Prestidge, Clive A

    2014-03-18

    The rate and extent of lipolysis, the breakdown of fat into molecules that can be absorbed into the bloodstream, depend on the interfacial composition and structure of lipid (fat) particles. A novel method for controlling the interfacial properties is to load the lipid into porous colloidal particles. We report on the role of pore nanostructure and surface coverage in controlling the digestion kinetics of medium-chain and long-chain triglycerides loaded into porous silica powders of different particle size, porosity, and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity. An in vitro lipolysis model was used to measure digestion kinetics of lipid by pancreatic lipase, a digestive enzyme. The rate and extent of lipid digestion were significantly enhanced when a partial monolayer of lipid was loaded in porous hydrophilic silica particles compared to a submicrometer lipid-in-water emulsion or a coarse emulsion. The inhibitory effect of digestion products was clearly evident for digestion from a submicrometer emulsion and coarse emulsion. This effect was minimal, however, in the two silica-lipid systems. Lipase action was inhibited for lipid loaded in the hydrophobic silica and considered due to the orientation of lipase adsorption on the methylated silica surface. Thus, hydrophilic silica promotes enhanced digestion kinetics, whereas hydrophobic silica exerts an inhibitory effect on hydrolysis. Evaluation of digestion kinetics enabled the mechanism for enhanced rate of lipolysis in silica-lipid systems to be derived and detailed. These investigations provide valuable insights for the optimization of smart food microparticles and lipid-based drug delivery systems based on lipid excipients and porous nanoparticles. PMID:24552363

  17. Troxerutin improves hepatic lipid homeostasis by restoring NAD(+)-depletion-mediated dysfunction of lipin 1 signaling in high-fat diet-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Feng; Fan, Shao-Hua; Zheng, Yuan-Lin; Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-Mei; Shan, Qun; Hu, Bin

    2014-09-01

    Recent evidences suggest that NAD(+) depletion leads to abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); however, the contributing mechanism is not well understood. Our previous study showed that troxerutin, a trihydroxyethylated derivative of natural bioflavonoid rutin, effectively inhibited obesity, and normalized hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia in high-cholesterol diet-induced diabetic mice. Here we investigated whether troxerutin improved hepatic lipid metabolism via preventing NAD(+) depletion in HFD-induced NAFLD mouse model and the mechanisms underlying these effects. Our results showed that troxerutin markedly prevented obesity, liver steatosis and injury in HFD-fed mice. Troxerutin largely suppressed oxidative stress-mediated NAD(+)-depletion by increasing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) protein expression and decreasing poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) protein expression and activity in HFD-treated mouse livers. Consequently, troxerutin remarkably restored Silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog1 (SirT1) protein expression and activity in HFD-treated mouse livers. Therefore, troxerutin promoted SirT1-mediated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation to inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, which enhanced nuclear lipin 1 localization, lowered cytoplasmic lipin 1 localization and the ratio of hepatic Lpin 1β/α. Ultimately, troxerutin improved lipid homeostasis by enhancing fatty acid oxidation and triglyceride secretion, and suppressing lipogenesis in HFD-fed mouse livers. In conclusion, troxerutin displayed beneficial effects on hepatic lipid homeostasis in HFD-induced NAFLD by blocking oxidative stress to restore NAD(+)-depletion-mediated dysfunction of lipin 1 signaling. This study provides novel mechanistic insights into NAFLD pathogenesis and indicates that troxerutin is a candidate for pharmacological intervention of NAFLD

  18. Non-Viral, Lipid-Mediated DNA and mRNA Gene Therapy of the Central Nervous System (CNS): Chemical-Based Transfection.

    PubMed

    Hecker, James G

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate gene delivery systems are essential for successful gene therapy in clinical medicine. Cationic lipid-mediated delivery is an alternative to viral vector-mediated gene delivery. Lipid-mediated delivery of DNA or mRNA is usually more rapid than viral-mediated delivery, offers a larger payload, and has a nearly zero risk of incorporation. Lipid-mediated delivery of DNA or RNA is therefore preferable to viral DNA delivery in those clinical applications that do not require long-term expression for chronic conditions. Delivery of RNA may be preferable to non-viral DNA delivery in some clinical applications, because transit across the nuclear membrane is not necessary and onset of expression with RNA is therefore even faster than with DNA, although both are faster than most viral vectors. Here, we describe techniques for cationic lipid-mediated delivery of nucleic acids encoding reporter genes in a variety of cell lines. We describe optimized formulations and transfection procedures that we previously assessed by bioluminescence and flow cytometry. RNA transfection demonstrates increased efficiency relative to DNA transfection in non-dividing cells. Delivery of mRNA results in onset of expression within 1 h after transfection and a peak in expression 5-7 h after transfection. Duration of expression in eukaryotic cells after mRNA transcript delivery depends on multiple factors, including transcript stability, protein turnover, and cell type. Delivery of DNA results in onset of expression within 5 h after transfection, a peak in expression 24-48 h after transfection, and a return to baseline that can be as long as several weeks after transfection. In vitro results are consistent with our in vivo delivery results, techniques for which are described as well. RNA delivery is suitable for short-term transient gene expression due to its rapid onset, short duration of expression and greater efficiency, particularly in non-dividing cells, while the longer duration and

  19. Mitofusion-2-mediated alleviation of insulin resistance in rats through reduction in lipid intermediate accumulation in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased lipid accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction within skeletal muscle have been shown to be strongly associated with insulin resistance. However, the role of mitofusion-2 (MFN2), a key factor in mitochondrial function and energy metabolism, in skeletal muscle lipid intermediate accumulation remains to be elucidated. Results A high-fat diet resulted in insulin resistance as well as accumulation of cytosolic lipid intermediates and down-regulation of MFN2 and CPT1 in skeletal muscle in rats, while MFN2 overexpression improved insulin sensitivity and reduced lipid intermediates in muscle, possibly by upregulation of CPT1 expression. Conclusions MFN2 overexpression can rescue insulin resistance, possibly by upregulating CPT1 expression leading to reduction in the accumulation of lipid intermediates in skeletal muscle. These observations contribute to the investigations of new diabetes therapies. PMID:23815800

  20. Interaction of cinnamic acid derivatives with commercial hypoglycemic drugs on 2-deoxyglucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Pranav Kumar; Doble, Mukesh

    2011-09-28

    Hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives are naturally occurring substances found in fruits, vegetables, and flowers and are consumed as dietary phenolic compounds. The effect of cinnamic acid, ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, eugenol, chlorogenic acid, and caffeic acid, alone and in combination with two commercial oral hypoglycemic drugs (OHD), namely, thiazolidinedione (THZ) and metformin, on the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) by 3T3-L1 adipocytes is studied. All of the phytochemicals other than cinnamic acid show synergistic interaction in 2DG uptake with both of the OHDs. THZ (20 μM) in combination with ferulic acid (25 μM) or p-coumaric acid (25 μM) increases 2DG uptake by 7- or 6.34-fold, respectively, with respect to control, whereas metformin (20 μM), along with ferulic acid (25 μM) or cinnamic acid (25 μM), increases 2DG uptake by 6.45- or 5.87-fold, respectively, when compared to control. Chlorogenic and cinnamic acids increased the expression of PPARγ, whereas other hydroxycinnamic acids enhanced the expression of PI3K, indicating different mechanisms of action between these compounds. These phytochemicals were able to reduce the expressions of the fatty acid synthase and HMG CoA reductase genes, indicating that they may be able to reduce the secondary complications caused by the accumulation of lipids. These studies suggest that hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives may be beneficial for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. They may act as a supplement with commercial drugs and may reduce the secondary complications caused by OHDs.

  1. The Regulation of Lipid Deposition by Insulin in Goose Liver Cells Is Mediated by the PI3K-AKT-mTOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chunchun; Wei, Shouhai; He, Fang; Liu, Dandan; Wan, Huofu; Liu, Hehe; Li, Liang; Xu, Hongyong; Du, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background We previously showed that the fatty liver formations observed in overfed geese are accompanied by the activation of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway and an increase in plasma insulin concentrations. Recent studies have suggested a crucial role for the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway in regulating lipid metabolism; therefore, we hypothesized that insulin affects goose hepatocellular lipid metabolism through the PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling pathway. Methods Goose primary hepatocytes were isolated and treated with serum-free media supplemented with PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway inhibitors (LY294002, rapamycin, and NVP-BEZ235, respectively) and 50 or 150 nmol/L insulin. Results Insulin induced strong effects on lipid accumulation as well as the mRNA and protein levels of genes involved in lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and VLDL-TG assembly and secretion in primary goose hepatocytes. The stimulatory effect of insulin on lipogenesis was significantly decreased by treatment with PI3K-Akt-mTOR inhibitors. These inhibitors also rescued the insulin-induced down-regulation of fatty acid oxidation and VLDL-TG assembly and secretion. Conclusion These findings suggest that the stimulatory effect of insulin on lipid deposition is mediated by PI3K-Akt-mTOR regulation of lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and VLDL-TG assembly and secretion in goose hepatocytes. PMID:25945932

  2. Phosphoethanolamine substitution of lipid A and resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to cationic antimicrobial peptides and complement-mediated killing by normal human serum.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Lisa A; Choudhury, Biswa; Balthazar, Jacqueline T; Martin, Larry E; Ram, Sanjay; Rice, Peter A; Stephens, David S; Carlson, Russell; Shafer, William M

    2009-03-01

    The capacity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to cause disseminated gonococcal infection requires that such strains resist the bactericidal action of normal human serum. The bactericidal action of normal human serum against N. gonorrhoeae is mediated by the classical complement pathway through an antibody-dependent mechanism. The mechanism(s) by which certain strains of gonococci resist normal human serum is not fully understood, but alterations in lipooligosaccharide structure can affect such resistance. During an investigation of the biological significance of phosphoethanolamine extensions from lipooligosaccharide, we found that phosphoethanolamine substitutions from the heptose II group of the lipooligosaccharide beta-chain did not impact levels of gonococcal (strain FA19) resistance to normal human serum or polymyxin B. However, loss of phosphoethanolamine substitution from the lipid A component of lipooligosaccharide, due to insertional inactivation of lptA, resulted in increased gonococcal susceptibility to polymyxin B, as reported previously for Neisseria meningitidis. In contrast to previous reports with N. meningitidis, loss of phosphoethanolamine attached to lipid A rendered strain FA19 susceptible to complement killing. Serum killing of the lptA mutant occurred through the classical complement pathway. Both serum and polymyxin B resistance as well as phosphoethanolamine decoration of lipid A were restored in the lptA-null mutant by complementation with wild-type lptA. Our results support a role for lipid A phosphoethanolamine substitutions in resistance of this strict human pathogen to innate host defenses. PMID:19114544

  3. Activation of integrin α5 mediated by flow requires its translocation to membrane lipid rafts in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoli; Fu, Yi; Gu, Mingxia; Zhang, Lu; Li, Dan; Li, Hongliang; Chien, Shu; Shyy, John Y-J; Zhu, Yi

    2016-01-19

    Local flow patterns determine the uneven distribution of atherosclerotic lesions. Membrane lipid rafts and integrins are crucial for shear stress-regulated endothelial function. In this study, we investigate the role of lipid rafts and integrin α5 in regulating the inflammatory response in endothelial cells (ECs) under atheroprone versus atheroprotective flow. Lipid raft proteins were isolated from ECs exposed to oscillatory shear stress (OS) or pulsatile shear stress, and then analyzed by quantitative proteomics. Among 396 proteins redistributed in lipid rafts, integrin α5 was the most significantly elevated in lipid rafts under OS. In addition, OS increased the level of activated integrin α5 in lipid rafts through the regulation of membrane cholesterol and fluidity. Disruption of F-actin-based cytoskeleton and knockdown of caveolin-1 prevented the OS-induced integrin α5 translocation and activation. In vivo, integrin α5 activation and EC dysfunction were observed in the atheroprone areas of low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice, and knockdown of integrin α5 markedly attenuated EC dysfunction in partially ligated carotid arteries. Consistent with these findings, mice with haploinsufficency of integrin α5 exhibited a reduction of atherosclerotic lesions in the regions under atheroprone flow. The present study has revealed an integrin- and membrane lipid raft-dependent mechanotransduction mechanism by which atheroprone flow causes endothelial dysfunction.

  4. Polarized release of lipid mediators derived from phospholipase A2 activity in a human bronchial cell line.

    PubMed

    Madden, M C; Smith, J P; Dailey, L A; Friedman, M

    1994-09-01

    The release of arachidonic acid (AA) and platelet activating factor (PAF) from airway epithelial cells may be an important mediating factor in lung physiological and inflammatory processes. The type of lung response may be determined by the directional release of AA and PAF. We used the human bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS2B (S6 subclone; BEAS), to investigate the polarized release of AA and PAF from lung epithelial cells. BEAS, grown on Transwell filters, were prelabeled with either 3H-AA or 3H-lyso-PAF. 3H-AA products and 3H-PAF were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography and thin layer chromatography, respectively. BEAS incubated with melittin (2-4 micrograms/ml for 15 min) had an increased release (compared to vehicle-incubated cells) of both free 3H-AA and 3H-PAF into the apical compartment but not into the basolateral compartment. Treatment of the BEAS cells with the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor mepacrine (1 mM) prior to, and during, incubation with melittin inhibited the increase in 3H-AA and 3H-PAF release into the apical compartment by 65% and 100%, respectively. Exposure of BEAS cells to ozone (O3; 1.0 ppm for 15 min) increased the release of polar 3H-AA products as well as 3H-PAF into both the apical and basolateral compartments. Mepacrine did not significantly inhibit the O3-induced release of polar 3H-AA products or 3H-PAF into either the apical or basolateral compartments. These data suggest the direction of the release of 3H-AA (or 3H-AA products) and 3H-PAF is stimulus-specific and that PLA2 involvement in the release of the lipids is also dependent on the stimulus. The directional release of AA, AA products, and PAF may be important in the airways responses to various agonists and oxidants.

  5. Receptor-Mediated Uptake and Intracellular Sorting of Multivalent Lipid Nanoparticles Against the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and the Human EGFR 2 (HER2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, David Tu

    In the area of receptor-targeted lipid nanoparticles for drug delivery, efficiency has been mainly focused on cell-specificity, endocytosis, and subsequently effects on bioactivity such as cell growth inhibition. Aspects of targeted liposomal uptake and intracellular sorting are not well defined. This dissertation assessed a series of ligands as targeted functional groups against HER2 and EGFR for liposomal drug delivery. Receptor-mediated uptake, both mono-targeted and dual-targeted to multiple receptors of different ligand valence, and the intracellular sorting of lipid nanoparticles were investigated to improve the delivery of drugs to cancer cells. Lipid nanoparticles were functionalized through a new sequential micelle transfer---conjugation method, while the micelle transfer method was extended to growth factors. Through a combination of both techniques, anti-HER2 and anti-EGFR dual-targeted immunoliposomes with different combinations of ligand valence were developed for comparative studies. With the array of lipid nanoparticles, the uptake and cytotoxicity of lipid nanoparticles in relationship to ligand valence, both mono-targeting and dual-targeting, were evaluated on a small panel of breast cancer cell lines that express HER2 and EGFR of varying levels. Comparable uptake ratios of ligand to expressed receptor and apparent cooperativity were observed. For cell lines that express both receptors, additive dose-uptake effects were also observed with dual-targeted immunoliposomes, which translated to marginal improvements in cell growth inhibition with doxorubicin delivery. Colocalization analysis revealed that ligand-conjugated lipid nanoparticles settle to endosomal compartments similar to their attached ligands. Pathway transregulation and pathway saturation were also observed to affect trafficking. In the end, liposomes routed to the recycling endosomes were never observed to traffic beyond the endosomes nor to be exocytose like recycled ligands. Based on

  6. Suppression of 2,3-oxidosqualene cyclase by high fat diet contributes to liver X receptor-alpha-mediated improvement of hepatic lipid profile.

    PubMed

    Dang, Huaixin; Liu, Yan; Pang, Wei; Li, Chenghong; Wang, Nanping; Shyy, John Y-J; Zhu, Yi

    2009-03-01

    The liver X receptors (LXRs) sense oxysterols and regulate genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. Synthetic agonists of LXRs are potent stimulators of fatty acid synthesis, which is mediated largely by sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). Paradoxically, an improved hepatic lipid profile by LXR was observed in mice fed a Western high fat (HF) diet. To explore the underlying mechanism, we administered mice normal chow or an HF diet and overexpressed LXRalpha in the liver. The HF diet with tail-vein injection of adenovirus of LXRalpha increased the expression of LXR-targeted genes involved in cholesterol reverse transport but not those involved in fatty acid synthesis. A similar effect was also observed with the use of 22R-hydroxycholesterol, an LXR ligand, in cultured hepatocytes. Consequently, SREBP-1c maturation was inhibited by the HF diet, which resulted from the induction of Insig-2a. Importantly, increased cholesterol level suppressed the expression of 2,3-oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC), which led to an increase in endogenous LXR ligand(s). Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of OSC expression enhanced LXR activity and selectively up-regulated LXR-targeted genes involved in cholesterol reverse transport. Thus, down-regulation of OSC may account for a novel mechanism underlying the LXR-mediated lipid metabolism in the liver of mice fed an HF diet.

  7. Dynamin2, Clathrin, and Lipid Rafts Mediate Endocytosis of the Apical Na/K/2Cl Cotransporter NKCC2 in Thick Ascending Limbs*

    PubMed Central

    Ares, Gustavo R.; Ortiz, Pablo A.

    2012-01-01

    Steady-state surface levels of the apical Na/K/2Cl cotransporter NKCC2 regulate NaCl reabsorption by epithelial cells of the renal thick ascending limb (THAL). We reported that constitutive endocytosis of NKCC2 controls NaCl absorption in native THALs; however, the pathways involved in NKCC2 endocytosis are unknown. We hypothesized that NKCC2 endocytosis at the apical surface depends on dynamin-2 and clathrin. Measurements of steady-state surface NKCC2 and the rate of NKCC2 endocytosis in freshly isolated rat THALs showed that inhibition of endogenous dynamin-2 with dynasore blunted NKCC2 endocytosis by 56 ± 11% and increased steady-state surface NKCC2 by 67 ± 27% (p < 0.05). Expression of the dominant negative Dyn2K44A in THALs slowed the rate of NKCC2 endocytosis by 38 ± 8% and increased steady-state surface NKCC2 by 37 ± 8%, without changing total NKCC2 expression. Inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis with chlorpromazine blunted NKCC2 endocytosis by 54 ± 6%, while preventing clathrin from interacting with synaptojanin also blunted NKCC2 endocytosis by 52 ± 5%. Disruption of lipid rafts blunted NKCC2 endocytosis by 39 ± 4% and silencing caveolin-1 by 29 ± 4%. Simultaneous inhibition of clathrin- and lipid raft-mediated endocytosis completely blocked NKCC2 internalization. We concluded that dynamin-2, clathrin, and lipid rafts mediate NKCC2 endocytosis and maintain steady-state apical surface NKCC2 in native THALs. These are the first data identifying the endocytic pathway for apical NKCC2 endocytosis. PMID:22977238

  8. Enzymatic production of caffeic acid by koji from plant resources containing caffeoylquinic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Makoto; Kurata-Azuma, Rie; Fujii, Makoto; Hou, De-Xing; Ikeda, Kohji; Yoshidome, Tomohisa; Osako, Miho

    2005-09-01

    The effect of a koji (Aspergillus awamori mut.) extract on the caffeoylquinic acid derivatives purified from sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) leaves was examined to develop the mass production of caffeic acid. A koji extract hydrolyzed the caffeoylquinic acid derivatives, chlorogenic acid, 3,4-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid and 3,4,5-tri-O-caffeoylquinic acid, to caffeic acid. Furthermore, the koji extract also converted the major polyphenolic components from sweetpotato, burdock (Arctium lappa L.), and mugwort (Artemisia indica var. maximowiczii) leaves to caffeic acid. These results suggest that the production of caffeic acid from plant resources containing caffeoylquinic acid derivatives is possible.

  9. Synthesis of amino-acid derivatives and dipeptides with an original peptidase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Auriol, D; Paul, F; Yoshpe, I; Gripon, J C; Monsan, P

    1991-01-01

    A peptidase from the non pathogenic Staphylococcus sp. strain BEC 299 was purified to a final specific activity of 84,400 U/mg protein. Its molecular weight is 450 kDa and optimum pH 10.0. This enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of dipeptides (aspartame) and alpha-amino acid derivatives (N-L-malyl-L-tyrosine ethyl ester). The influence of cosolvents and pH on dipeptides and alpha-amino acid derivative synthesis is described. Finally, we detail the use of the peptidase as a reagent in protease-catalyzed peptide synthesis.

  10. Inhibitory effects of indole α-lipoic acid derivatives on nitric oxide production in LPS/IFNγ activated RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Karabay, Arzu Zeynep; Koc, Aslı; Gurkan-Alp, A Selen; Buyukbingol, Zeliha; Buyukbingol, Erdem

    2015-04-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (α-lipoic acid) is a potent antioxidant compound that has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory effects. RAW 264.7 macrophages produce various inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-alpha upon activation with LPS (Lipopolysaccharide) and IFNγ (interferon gamma). In this study, the effect of 12 synthetic indole α-lipoic acid derivatives on nitric oxide production and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) protein expression in LPS/IFNγ activated RAW 264.7 macrophages was determined. Cell proliferation, nitric oxide levels and iNOS protein expression were examined with thiazolyl blue tetrazolium blue test, griess assay and western blot, respectively. Our results showed that all of the indole α-lipoic acid derivatives showed significant inhibitory effects on nitric oxide production and iNOS protein levels (p < 0.05). The most active compounds were identified as compound I-4b, I-4e and II-3b. In conclusion, these indole α-lipoic acid derivatives may have the potential for treatment of inflammatory conditions related with high nitric oxide production.

  11. Lipids in plant-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Siebers, Meike; Brands, Mathias; Wewer, Vera; Duan, Yanjiao; Hölzl, Georg; Dörmann, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria and fungi can undergo symbiotic or pathogenic interactions with plants. Membrane lipids and lipid-derived molecules from the plant or the microbial organism play important roles during the infection process. For example, lipids (phospholipids, glycolipids, sphingolipids, sterol lipids) are involved in establishing the membrane interface between the two organisms. Furthermore, lipid-derived molecules are crucial for intracellular signaling in the plant cell, and lipids serve as signals during plant-microbial communication. These signal lipids include phosphatidic acid, diacylglycerol, lysophospholipids, and free fatty acids derived from phospholipase activity, apocarotenoids, and sphingolipid breakdown products such as ceramide, ceramide-phosphate, long chain base, and long chain base-phosphate. Fatty acids are the precursors for oxylipins, including jasmonic acid, and for azelaic acid, which together with glycerol-3-phosphate are crucial for the regulation of systemic acquired resistance. This article is part of a Special Issue titled "Plant Lipid Biology," guest editors Kent Chapman and Ivo Feussner.

  12. Lipids in plant-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Siebers, Meike; Brands, Mathias; Wewer, Vera; Duan, Yanjiao; Hölzl, Georg; Dörmann, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria and fungi can undergo symbiotic or pathogenic interactions with plants. Membrane lipids and lipid-derived molecules from the plant or the microbial organism play important roles during the infection process. For example, lipids (phospholipids, glycolipids, sphingolipids, sterol lipids) are involved in establishing the membrane interface between the two organisms. Furthermore, lipid-derived molecules are crucial for intracellular signaling in the plant cell, and lipids serve as signals during plant-microbial communication. These signal lipids include phosphatidic acid, diacylglycerol, lysophospholipids, and free fatty acids derived from phospholipase activity, apocarotenoids, and sphingolipid breakdown products such as ceramide, ceramide-phosphate, long chain base, and long chain base-phosphate. Fatty acids are the precursors for oxylipins, including jasmonic acid, and for azelaic acid, which together with glycerol-3-phosphate are crucial for the regulation of systemic acquired resistance. This article is part of a Special Issue titled "Plant Lipid Biology," guest editors Kent Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:26928590

  13. Possible Protective Effect of Membrane Lipid Rafts against Interleukin-1β-Mediated Anti-Proliferative Effect in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chentouf, Myriam; Guzman, Caroline; Hamze, Moustafa; Gross, René; Lajoix, Anne Dominique; Peraldi-Roux, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that pancreatic islets from pre-diabetic rats undergo an inflammatory process in which IL-1β takes part and controls β-cell function. In the present study, using the INS-1 rat pancreatic β-cell line, we investigated the potential involvement of membrane-associated cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts in IL-1β signaling and biological effects on insulin secretion, β-cell proliferation and apoptosis. We show that, INS-1 cells exposure to increasing concentrations of IL-1β leads to a progressive inhibition of insulin release, an increase in the number of apoptotic cells and a dose-dependent decrease in pancreatic β-cell proliferation. Disruption of membrane lipid rafts markedly reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion but did not affect either cell apoptosis or proliferation rate, demonstrating that membrane lipid raft integrity is essential for β-cell secretory function. In the same conditions, IL-1β treatment of INS-1 cells led to a slight further decrease in insulin secretion for low concentrations of the cytokine, and a more marked one, similar to that observed in normal cells for higher concentrations. These effects occurred together with an increase in iNOS expression and surprisingly with an upregulation of tryptophane hydroxylase and protein Kinase C in membrane lipid rafts suggesting that compensatory mechanisms develop to counteract IL-1β inhibitory effects. We also demonstrate that disruption of membrane lipid rafts did not prevent cytokine-induced cell death recorded after exposure to high IL-1β concentrations. Finally, concerning cell proliferation, we bring strong evidence that membrane lipid rafts exert a protective effect against IL-1β anti-proliferative effect, possibly mediated at least partly by modifications in ERK and PKB expression/activities. Our results 1) demonstrate that IL-1β deleterious effects do not require a cholesterol-dependent plasma membrane compartmentalization of IL-1R1 signaling and 2) confer to

  14. Cytomegalovirus Restructures Lipid Rafts via a US28/CDC42-Mediated Pathway, Enhancing Cholesterol Efflux from Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Low, Hann; Mukhamedova, Nigora; Cui, Huanhuan L; McSharry, Brian P; Avdic, Selmir; Hoang, Anh; Ditiatkovski, Michael; Liu, Yingying; Fu, Ying; Meikle, Peter J; Blomberg, Martin; Polyzos, Konstantinos A; Miller, William E; Religa, Piotr; Bukrinsky, Michael; Soderberg-Naucler, Cecilia; Slobedman, Barry; Sviridov, Dmitri

    2016-06-28

    Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) contains cholesterol, but how HCMV interacts with host cholesterol metabolism is unknown. We found that, in human fibroblasts, HCMV infection increased the efflux of cellular cholesterol, despite reducing the abundance of ABCA1. Mechanistically, viral protein US28 was acting through CDC42, rearranging actin microfilaments, causing association of actin with lipid rafts, and leading to a dramatic change in the abundance and/or structure of lipid rafts. These changes displaced ABCA1 from the cell surface but created new binding sites for apolipoprotein A-I, resulting in enhanced cholesterol efflux. The changes also reduced the inflammatory response in macrophages. HCMV infection modified the host lipidome profile and expression of several genes and microRNAs involved in cholesterol metabolism. In mice, murine CMV infection elevated plasma triglycerides but did not affect the level and functionality of high-density lipoprotein. Thus, HCMV, through its protein US28, reorganizes lipid rafts and disturbs cell cholesterol metabolism.

  15. Revealing the mechanism of passive transport in lipid bilayers via phonon-mediated nanometre-scale density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Bolmatov, Dima; Soloviov, Dmitry; Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P.; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Bosak, Alexey; Cai, Yong Q.

    2016-05-01

    The passive transport of molecules through a cell membrane relies on thermal motions of the lipids. However, the nature of transmembrane transport and the precise mechanism remain elusive and call for a comprehensive study of phonon excitations. Here we report a high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering study of the in-plane phonon excitations in 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine above and below the main transition temperature. In the gel phase, for the first time, we observe low-frequency transverse modes, which exhibit a phonon gap when the lipid transitions into the fluid phase. We argue that the phonon gap signifies the formation of short-lived nanometre-scale lipid clusters and transient pores, which facilitate the passive molecular transport across the bilayer plane. Our findings suggest that the phononic motion of the hydrocarbon tails provides an effective mechanism of passive transport, and illustrate the importance of the collective dynamics of biomembranes.

  16. Revealing the mechanism of passive transport in lipid bilayers via phonon-mediated nanometre-scale density fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Bolmatov, Dima; Soloviov, Dmitry; Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P.; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Bosak, Alexey; Cai, Yong Q.

    2016-01-01

    The passive transport of molecules through a cell membrane relies on thermal motions of the lipids. However, the nature of transmembrane transport and the precise mechanism remain elusive and call for a comprehensive study of phonon excitations. Here we report a high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering study of the in-plane phonon excitations in 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine above and below the main transition temperature. In the gel phase, for the first time, we observe low-frequency transverse modes, which exhibit a phonon gap when the lipid transitions into the fluid phase. We argue that the phonon gap signifies the formation of short-lived nanometre-scale lipid clusters and transient pores, which facilitate the passive molecular transport across the bilayer plane. Our findings suggest that the phononic motion of the hydrocarbon tails provides an effective mechanism of passive transport, and illustrate the importance of the collective dynamics of biomembranes. PMID:27175859

  17. Quantitative Evaluation of DNA Dissociation from Liposome Carriers and DNA Escape from Endosomes During Lipid-Mediated Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Salomé; Duarte, Sofia; Monteiro, Gabriel A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nonviral vectors are highly attractive for gene therapy from a clinical point of view, and cationic lipid nanoparticles in particular have generated considerable interest. However, despite considerable recent advances, problems associated with low transfection efficiencies remain to be resolved to fully meet the potential of these vectors. The trafficking of plasmid DNA (pDNA) from the extracellular space up to the nucleus is prevented by several barriers, including liposome/pDNA dissociation within the endosome and pDNA escape into the cytosol. The aim of this work was to develop and optimize a tool that could offer simultaneous quantitative information both on the intracellular dissociation of oligonucleotides from lipid nanoparticles, and on the DNA escape from endocytic compartments. The ability to follow in real time both of these processes simultaneously (in a quantitative manner) is expected to be of high value in the rationalization and conception of new lipid nanoparticle vectors for gene delivery for therapeutic purposes. To this effect, a combination of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and colocalization microscopy was employed. We show that it is possible to distinguish between liposome/pDNA dissociation and depletion of DNA within endosomes, providing resolution for the detection of intermediate species between endocytic particles with intact lipoplexes and endosomes devoid of DNA because of DNA escape or degradation. We demonstrate that after endocytosis, exceptionally few endocytic particles are found to exhibit simultaneously DNA/lipid colocalization and low FRET (DNA/lipid dissociation). These results clearly point to an extremely short-lived state for free plasmid within endosomes, which either escapes at once to the cytosol or is degraded within the endocytic compartment (because of exposure of DNA). It is possible that this limitation greatly contributes to reduction in probability of successful gene delivery through cationic

  18. Activation of Histidine Kinase SpaK Is Mediated by the N-Terminal Portion of Subtilin-Like Lantibiotics and Is Independent of Lipid II.

    PubMed

    Spieß, Tobias; Korn, Sophie Marianne; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2015-08-15

    The biosynthesis of the lantibiotic subtilin is autoinduced in a quorum-sensing mechanism via histidine kinase SpaK. Subtilin-like lantibiotics, such as entianin, ericin S, and subtilin, specifically activated SpaK in a comparable manner, whereas the structurally similar nisin did not provide the signal for SpaK activation at nontoxic concentrations. Surprisingly, nevertheless, nisin if applied together with entianin partly quenched SpaK activation. The N-terminal entianin1-20 fragment (comprising N-terminal amino acids 1 to 20) was sufficient for SpaK activation, although higher concentrations were needed. The N-terminal nisin1-20 fragment also interfered with entianin-mediated activation of SpaK and, remarkably, at extremely high concentrations also activated SpaK. Our data show that the N-terminal entianin1-20 fragment is sufficient for SpaK activation. However, if present, the C-terminal part of the molecule further strongly enhances the activation, possibly by its interference with the cellular membrane. As shown by using lipid II-interfering substances and a lipid II-deficient mutant strain, lipid II is not needed for the sensing mechanism. PMID:26025904

  19. Activation of Histidine Kinase SpaK Is Mediated by the N-Terminal Portion of Subtilin-Like Lantibiotics and Is Independent of Lipid II

    PubMed Central

    Spieß, Tobias; Korn, Sophie Marianne

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the lantibiotic subtilin is autoinduced in a quorum-sensing mechanism via histidine kinase SpaK. Subtilin-like lantibiotics, such as entianin, ericin S, and subtilin, specifically activated SpaK in a comparable manner, whereas the structurally similar nisin did not provide the signal for SpaK activation at nontoxic concentrations. Surprisingly, nevertheless, nisin if applied together with entianin partly quenched SpaK activation. The N-terminal entianin1–20 fragment (comprising N-terminal amino acids 1 to 20) was sufficient for SpaK activation, although higher concentrations were needed. The N-terminal nisin1–20 fragment also interfered with entianin-mediated activation of SpaK and, remarkably, at extremely high concentrations also activated SpaK. Our data show that the N-terminal entianin1–20 fragment is sufficient for SpaK activation. However, if present, the C-terminal part of the molecule further strongly enhances the activation, possibly by its interference with the cellular membrane. As shown by using lipid II-interfering substances and a lipid II-deficient mutant strain, lipid II is not needed for the sensing mechanism. PMID:26025904

  20. Total Synthesis of the Lipid Mediator PD1n-3 DPA: Configurational Assignments and Anti-inflammatory and Pro-resolving Actions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The polyunsaturated lipid mediator PD1n-3 DPA (5) was recently isolated from self-resolving inflammatory exudates of 5 and human macrophages. Herein, the first total synthesis of PD1n-3 DPA (5) is reported in 10 steps and 9% overall yield. These efforts, together with NMR data of its methyl ester 6, confirmed the structure of 5 to be (7Z,10R,11E,13E,15Z,17S,19Z)-10,17-dihydroxydocosa-7,11,13,15,19-pentaenoic acid. The proposed biosynthetic pathway, with the involvement of an epoxide intermediate, was supported by results from trapping experiments. In addition, LC-MS/MS data of the free acid 5, obtained from hydrolysis of the synthetic methyl ester 6, matched data for the endogenously produced biological material. The natural product PD1n-3 DPA (5) demonstrated potent anti-inflammatory properties together with pro-resolving actions stimulating human macrophage phagocytosis and efferocytosis. These results contribute new knowledge on the n-3 DPA structure–function of the growing numbers of specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators and pathways. PMID:24576195

  1. Vibrio vulnificus VvpE inhibits mucin 2 expression by hypermethylation via lipid raft-mediated ROS signaling in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S-J; Jung, Y H; Oh, S Y; Jang, K K; Lee, H S; Choi, S H; Han, H J

    2015-01-01

    Mucin is an important physical barrier against enteric pathogens. VvpE is an elastase encoded by Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio vulnificus; however, the functional role of VvpE in intestinal mucin (Muc) production is yet to be elucidated. The recombinant protein (r) VvpE significantly reduced the level of Muc2 in human mucus-secreting HT29-MTX cells. The repression of Muc2 induced by rVvpE was highly susceptible to the knockdown of intelectin-1b (ITLN) and sequestration of cholesterol by methyl-β-cyclodextrin. We found that rVvpE induces the recruitment of NADPH oxidase 2 and neutrophil cytosolic factor 1 into the membrane lipid rafts coupled with ITLN to facilitate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The bacterial signaling of rVvpE through ROS production is uniquely mediated by the phosphorylation of ERK, which was downregulated by the silencing of the PKCδ. Moreover, rVvpE induced region-specific methylation in the Muc2 promoter to promote the transcriptional repression of Muc2. In two mouse models of V. vulnificus infection, the mutation of the vvpE gene from V. vulnificus exhibited an increased survival rate and maintained the level of Muc2 expression in intestine. These results demonstrate that VvpE inhibits Muc2 expression by hypermethylation via lipid raft-mediated ROS signaling in the intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26086960

  2. Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of anti-α,β-Diamino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Sanae; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Takemoto, Yoshiji

    2016-02-19

    A novel approach to chiral anti-α,β-diamino acid derivatives through tandem orthogonal organocatalysis has been developed. Chiral phosphoric acid catalysts control the chemo-, regio-, and stereoselective addition of hydroxylamines to alkylideneoxazolones, while a phosphine catalyst promotes the isomerization of Z- alkylideneoxazolones to the more reactive E- alkylideneoxazolones.

  3. Cinnamic acid derivatives induce cell cycle arrest in carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sova, Matej; Žižak, Željko; Stanković, Jelena A Antic; Prijatelj, Matevž; Turk, Samo; Juranić, Zorica D; Mlinarič-Raščan, Irena; Gobec, Stanislav

    2013-08-01

    Cinnamic acid derivatives can be found in plant material, and they possess a remarkable variety of biological effects. In the present study, we have investigated the cytotoxic effects of representative cinnamic acid esters and amides. The cytotoxicity was determined by MTT test on human cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa), myelogenous leukemia (K562), malignant melanoma (Fem-x), and estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer (MCF-7) cells, versus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) without or with the addition of the plant lectin phytohemaglutinin (PHA). The compounds tested showed significant cytotoxicity (IC50s between 42 and 166 µM) and furthermore selectivity of these cytotoxic effects on the malignant cell lines versus the PBMCs was also seen, especially when electron-withdrawing groups, such as a cyano group (compound 5), were present on the aromatic rings of the alcohol or amine parts of the cinnamic acid derivatives. The additional study on cell cycle phase distribution indicated that novel cinnamic acid derivatives inhibit cell growth by induction of cell death. Thus, cinnamic acids derivatives represent important lead compounds for further development of antineoplastic agents.

  4. A new helvolic acid derivative from an endophytic Fusarium sp. of Ficus carica.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xi-Ai; Ma, Yang-Min; Zhang, Hong-Chi; Liu, Rui

    2016-11-01

    A new helvolic acid derivative named helvolic acid methyl ester (1), together with two known helvolic acid compounds, helvolic acid (2) and hydrohelvolic acid (3), were isolated from the fermentation of endophytic fungus Fusarium sp. in Ficus carica leaves. Their structures were elucidated and identified by spectroscopic methods. Compounds 1-3 showed potent antifungal and antibacterial activities. PMID:27265219

  5. Correlation between chemical structure and rodent repellency of benzoic acid derivatives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fearn, J.E.; DeWitt, J.B.

    1965-01-01

    Sixty-five benzoic acid derivatives were either prepared or obtained from commercial concerns, tested for rat repellency, and their indices of repellency computed. The data from these tests were considered analytically for any correlation between chemical structure and rat repellency. The results suggest a qualitative relationship which is useful in deciding probability of repellency in other compounds.

  6. Benzoic acid derivatives from Piper species and their fungitoxic activity against Cladosporium cladosporioides and C. sphaerospermum.

    PubMed

    Lago, João Henrique G; Ramos, Clécio Sousa; Casanova, Diego Campos C; Morandim, Andreia de A; Bergamo, Debora Cristina B; Cavalheiro, Alberto J; Bolzani, Vanderlan da S; Furlan, Maysa; Guimarães, Elsie F; Young, Maria Claudia M; Kato, Massuo J

    2004-11-01

    Piper crassinervium, P. aduncum, P. hostmannianum, and P. gaudichaudianum contain the new benzoic acid derivatives crassinervic acid (1), aduncumene (8), hostmaniane (18), and gaudichaudianic acid (20), respectively, as major secondary metabolites. Additionally, 19 known compounds such as benzoic acids, chromenes, and flavonoids were isolated and identified. The antifungal activity of these compounds was evaluated by bioautographic TLC assay against Cladosporium cladosporioides and C. sphaerospermum.

  7. Synthesis and Anti-microbial Activity of Novel Phosphatidylethanolamine-N-amino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Vijeetha, Tadla; Balakrishna, Marrapu; Karuna, Mallampalli Sri Lakshmi; Surya Koppeswara Rao, Bhamidipati Venkata; Prasad, Rachapudi Badari Narayana; Kumar, Koochana Pranay; Surya Narayana Murthy, Upadyaula

    2015-01-01

    The study involved synthesis of five novel amino acid derivatives of phosphatidylethanolamine isolated from egg yolk lecithin employing a three step procedure i) N-protection of L-amino acids with BOC anhydride in alkaline medium ii) condensation of - CO2H group of N-protected amino acid with free -NH2 of PE by a peptide linkage and iii) deprotection of N-protected group of amino acids to obtain phosphatidylethanolamine-N-amino acid derivatives in 60-75% yield. The five L-amino acids used were L glycine, L-valine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine and L-phenylalanine. The amino acid derivatives were screened for anti-baterial activity against B. subtilis, S. aureus, P. aeroginosa and E. coli taking Streptomycin as reference compound and anti-fungal activity against C. albicans, S. cervisiae, A. niger taking AmphotericinB as reference compound. All the amino acid derivatives exhibited extraordinary anti-bacterial activities about 3 folds or comparable to Streptomycin and moderate or no anti-fungal activity against Amphotericin-B.

  8. A novel trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid derivative from Meyer lemon (Citrus meyeri).

    PubMed

    Miyake, Yoshiaki; Ito, Chihiro; Itoigawa, Masataka

    2012-12-15

    Isolation and structural elucidation of a new trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid derivative from Meyer lemon (Citrus meyeri hort. ex Y. Tanaka) was carried out. The derivative exhibited the antioxidative activity by ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) assay and was found in the flavedo and alvedo of Meyer lemon peel.

  9. Identification of cytochrome CYP2E1 as critical mediator of synergistic effects of alcohol and cellular lipid accumulation in hepatocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mahli, Abdo; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Patsenker, Eleonora; Müller, Sebastian; Stickel, Felix; Müller, Martina; Seitz, Helmut K.; Cederbaum, Arthur I.; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies propose a causative link between the consumption of alcohol and the development and progression of liver disease in obese individuals. However, it is incompletely understood how alcohol and obesity interact and whether the combined effects are additive or synergistic. In this study, we developed an in vitro model to address this question. Lipid accumulation in primary human hepatocytes was induced by incubation with oleic acid. Subsequently, steatotic and control hepatocytes were incubated with up to 50 mM alcohol. This alcohol concentration on its own revealed only minimal effects but significantly enhanced oleate-induced lipogenesis and cellular triglyceride content compared to control cells. Similarly, lipid peroxidation, oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory gene expression as well as CYP2E1 levels and activity were synergistically induced by alcohol and steatosis. CYP2E1 inhibition blunted these synergistic pathological effects. Notably, alcohol and cellular steatosis also induced autophagy in a synergistic manner, and also this was mediated via CYP2E1. Further induction of autophagy ameliorated the joint effects of alcohol and oleic acid on hepatocellular lipid accumulation and inflammatory gene expression while inhibition of autophagy further enhanced the dual pathological effects. Further analyses revealed that the joint synergistic effect of alcohol and steatosis on autophagy was mediated via activation of the JNK-pathway. In summary, our data indicate that alcohol induces not only pathological but also protective mechanisms in steatotic hepatocytes via CYP2E1. These findings may have important implications on the prognosis and treatment of alcoholic liver disease particularly in obese individuals. PMID:26497211

  10. Marine ecosystem connectivity mediated by migrant-resident interactions and the concomitant cross-system flux of lipids.

    PubMed

    van Deurs, Mikael; Persson, Anders; Lindegren, Martin; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Neuenfeldt, Stefan; Jørgensen, Christian; Nilsson, P Anders

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating research argues that migrants influence the functioning and productivity of local habitats and ecosystems along migration routes and potentially drive cross-system energy fluxes of considerable magnitude, yet empirical documentation of local ecological effects and descriptions of the underlying mechanisms are surprisingly rare. In this study, we discovered migrant-resident interactions and substantial cross-system lipid transportation in the transition zone between the Baltic Sea and the North Sea where a resident cod population (predators) was found to interact with a herring population (prey) on a seasonal basis. We traced the lipids, using fatty acid trophic markers (FATM), from the herring feeding grounds in the North Sea to the cod livers in the Western Baltic Sea. Time series analysis of population dynamics indicated that population-level production of cod is positively affected by the herring subsidies. However, the underlying mechanisms were more complicated than anticipated. During the herring season, large cod received most of its dietary lipids from the herring, whereas smaller cod were prevented from accessing the lipid pool due to a mismatch in predator-prey size ratio. Furthermore, while the herring were extremely rich in bulk energy, they were surprisingly poor in a specific functional fatty acid. Hence, our study was the first to illustrate how the magnitude cross-system fluxes of subsidies in migrant-resident systems are potentially constrained by the size structure of the resident predator population and the nutritional quality of the migrants. PMID:27516865

  11. Archaeosomes varying in lipid composition differ in receptor-mediated endocytosis and differentially adjuvant immune responses to entrapped antigen

    PubMed Central

    Sprott, G. Dennis; Sad, Subash; Fleming, L. Perry; DiCaire, Chantal J.; Patel, Girishchandra B.; Krishnan, Lakshmi

    2003-01-01

    Archaeosomes prepared from total polar lipids extracted from six archaeal species with divergent lipid compositions had the capacity to deliver antigen for presentation via both MHC class I and class II pathways. Lipid extracts from Halobacterium halobium and from Halococcus morrhuae strains 14039 and 16008 contained archaetidylglycerol methylphosphate and sulfated glycolipids rich in mannose residues, and lacked archaetidylserine, whereas the opposite was found in Methanobrevibacter smithii, Methanosarcina mazei and Methanococcus jannaschii. Annexin V labeling revealed a surface orientation of phosphoserine head groups in M. smithii, M. mazei and M. jannaschii archaeosomes. Uptake of rhodamine-labeled M. smithii or M. jannaschii archaeosomes by murine peritoneal macrophages was inhibited by unlabeled liposomes containing phosphatidylserine, by the sulfhydryl inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide, and by ATP depletion using azide plus fluoride, but not by H. halobium archaeosomes. In contrast, N-ethylmaleimide failed to inhibit uptake of the four other rhodamine-labeled archaeosome types, and azide plus fluoride did not inhibit uptake of H. halobium or H. morrhuae archaeosomes. These results suggest endocytosis ofarchaeosomes rich in surface-exposed phosphoserine head groups via a phosphatidylserine receptor, and energy-independent surface adsorption of certain other archaeosome composition classes. Lipid composition affected not only the endocytic mechanism, but also served to differentially modulate the activation of dendritic cells. The induction of IL-12 secretion from dendritic cells exposed to H. morrhuae 14039 archaeosomes was striking compared with cells exposed to archaeosomes from 16008. Thus, archaeosome types uniquely modulate antigen delivery and dendritic cell activation. PMID:15803661

  12. Sucrose Production Mediated by Lipid Metabolism Suppresses the Physical Interaction of Peroxisomes and Oil Bodies during Germination of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Cui, Songkui; Hayashi, Yasuko; Otomo, Masayoshi; Mano, Shoji; Oikawa, Kazusato; Hayashi, Makoto; Nishimura, Mikio

    2016-09-16

    Physical interaction between organelles is a flexible event and essential for cells to adapt rapidly to environmental stimuli. Germinating plants utilize oil bodies and peroxisomes to mobilize storage lipids for the generation of sucrose as the main energy source. Although membrane interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes has been widely observed, its underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here we present genetic evidence for control of the physical interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes. We identified alleles of the sdp1 mutant altered in oil body morphology. This mutant accumulates bigger and more oil body aggregates compared with the wild type and showed defects in lipid mobilization during germination. SUGAR DEPENDENT 1 (SDP1) encodes major triacylglycerol lipase in Arabidopsis Interestingly, sdp1 seedlings show enhanced physical interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes compared with the wild type, whereas exogenous sucrose supplementation greatly suppresses the interaction. The same phenomenon occurs in the peroxisomal defective 1 (ped1) mutant, defective in lipid mobilization because of impaired peroxisomal β-oxidation, indicating that sucrose production is a key factor for oil body-peroxisomal dissociation. Peroxisomal dissociation and subsequent release from oil bodies is dependent on actin filaments. We also show that a peroxisomal ATP binding cassette transporter, PED3, is the potential anchor protein to the membranes of these organelles. Our results provide novel components linking lipid metabolism and oil body-peroxisome interaction whereby sucrose may act as a negative signal for the interaction of oil bodies and peroxisomes to fine-tune lipolysis.

  13. Sucrose Production Mediated by Lipid Metabolism Suppresses the Physical Interaction of Peroxisomes and Oil Bodies during Germination of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Cui, Songkui; Hayashi, Yasuko; Otomo, Masayoshi; Mano, Shoji; Oikawa, Kazusato; Hayashi, Makoto; Nishimura, Mikio

    2016-09-16

    Physical interaction between organelles is a flexible event and essential for cells to adapt rapidly to environmental stimuli. Germinating plants utilize oil bodies and peroxisomes to mobilize storage lipids for the generation of sucrose as the main energy source. Although membrane interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes has been widely observed, its underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here we present genetic evidence for control of the physical interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes. We identified alleles of the sdp1 mutant altered in oil body morphology. This mutant accumulates bigger and more oil body aggregates compared with the wild type and showed defects in lipid mobilization during germination. SUGAR DEPENDENT 1 (SDP1) encodes major triacylglycerol lipase in Arabidopsis Interestingly, sdp1 seedlings show enhanced physical interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes compared with the wild type, whereas exogenous sucrose supplementation greatly suppresses the interaction. The same phenomenon occurs in the peroxisomal defective 1 (ped1) mutant, defective in lipid mobilization because of impaired peroxisomal β-oxidation, indicating that sucrose production is a key factor for oil body-peroxisomal dissociation. Peroxisomal dissociation and subsequent release from oil bodies is dependent on actin filaments. We also show that a peroxisomal ATP binding cassette transporter, PED3, is the potential anchor protein to the membranes of these organelles. Our results provide novel components linking lipid metabolism and oil body-peroxisome interaction whereby sucrose may act as a negative signal for the interaction of oil bodies and peroxisomes to fine-tune lipolysis. PMID:27466365

  14. RNA:DNA Ratio and Other Nucleic Acid Derived Indices in Marine Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Chícharo, Maria Alexandra; Chícharo, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Some of most used indicators in marine ecology are nucleic acid-derived indices. They can be divided by target levels in three groups: 1) at the organism level as ecophysiologic indicators, indicators such as RNA:DNA ratios, DNA:dry weight and RNA:protein, 2) at the population level, indicators such as growth rate, starvation incidence or fisheries impact indicators, and 3) at the community level, indicators such as trophic interactions, exergy indices and prey identification. The nucleic acids derived indices, especially RNA:DNA ratio, have been applied with success as indicators of nutritional condition, well been and growth in marine organisms. They are also useful as indicators of natural or anthropogenic impacts in marine population and communities, such as upwelling or dredge fisheries, respectively. They can help in understanding important issues of marine ecology such as trophic interactions in marine environment, fish and invertebrate recruitment failure and biodiversity changes, without laborious work of counting, measuring and identification of small marine organisms. Besides the objective of integrate nucleic acid derived indices across levels of organization, the paper will also include a general characterization of most used nucleic acid derived indices in marine ecology and also advantages and limitations of them. We can conclude that using indicators, such RNA:DNA ratios and other nucleic acids derived indices concomitantly with organism and ecosystems measures of responses to climate change (distribution, abundance, activity, metabolic rate, survival) will allow for the development of more rigorous and realistic predictions of the effects of anthropogenic climate change on marine systems. PMID:19325815

  15. Involvement of inducible nitric oxide synthase in hydroxyl radical-mediated lipid peroxidation in streptozotocin-induced diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Krisztian; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Dallas, Shannon; Jiang, JinJie; Radi, Rafael; Mason, Ronald P.; Kadiiska, Maria B.

    2008-01-01

    Free radical production is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, where several pathways and different mechanisms were suggested in the pathophysiology of the complications. In this study, we used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy combined with in vivo spin-trapping techniques to investigate the sources and mechanisms of free radical formation in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Free radical production was directly detected in the diabetic bile, which correlated with lipid peroxidation in the liver and kidney. EPR spectra showed the trapping of a lipid-derived radical. Such radicals were demonstrated to be induced by hydroxyl radical through isotope labeling experiments. Multiple enzymes and metabolic pathways were examined as the potential source of the hydroxyl radicals using specific inhibitors. Neither xanthine oxidase, cytochrome P450s, the Fenton reaction, nor macrophage activation were required for the production of radical adducts. Interestingly, inducible nitric oxide synthase (apparently uncoupled) was identified as the major source of radical generation. The specific iNOS inhibitor 1400W as well as l-arginine pretreatment reduced the EPR signals to baseline levels, implicating peroxynitrite as the source of hydroxyl radical production. Applying immunological techniques, we localized iNOS overexpression in the liver and kidney of diabetic animals, which was closely correlated with the lipid radical generation and 4-hydroxynonenal-adducted protein formation, indicating lipid peroxidation. In addition, protein oxidation to protein free radicals occurred in the diabetic target organs. Taken together, our studies support inducible nitric oxide synthase as a significant source of EPR-detectable reactive intermediates, which leads to lipid peroxidation and may contribute to disease progression as well. PMID:18620046

  16. Ultrasound-mediated destruction of paclitaxel and oxygen loaded lipid microbubbles for combination therapy in ovarian cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Chang, Shufang; Sun, Jiangchuan; Zhu, Shenyin; Yin, Minyue; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Ronald X

    2015-05-28

    We have synthesized multifunctional oxygen and paclitaxel loaded microbubbles (OPLMBs) for ultrasound mediated delivery of combination therapy in an ovarian cancer xenograft model. In comparison with other therapeutic options, intravenous injection of OPLMBs followed by ultrasound mediation yielded a superior therapeutic outcome. Immunohistochemical analyses of the dissected tumor tissue confirmed the increased tumor apoptosis and the reduced VEGF expression after treatment. Western Blot tests further confirmed the decreased expressions of HIF-1α and P-gp. Our experiment suggests that ultrasound mediation of OPLMBs may provide a promising drug delivery strategy for the combination treatment of ovarian cancer.

  17. PERK Utilizes Intrinsic Lipid Kinase Activity To Generate Phosphatidic Acid, Mediate Akt Activation, and Promote Adipocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bobrovnikova-Marjon, Ekaterina; Pytel, Dariusz; Riese, Matthew J.; Vaites, Laura Pontano; Singh, Nickpreet; Koretzky, Gary A.; Witze, Eric S.

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident PKR-like kinase (PERK) is necessary for Akt activation in response to ER stress. We demonstrate that PERK harbors intrinsic lipid kinase, favoring diacylglycerol (DAG) as a substrate and generating phosphatidic acid (PA). This activity of PERK correlates with activation of mTOR and phosphorylation of Akt on Ser473. PERK lipid kinase activity is regulated in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) p85α-dependent manner. Moreover, PERK activity is essential during adipocyte differentiation. Because PA and Akt regulate many cellular functions, including cellular survival, proliferation, migratory responses, and metabolic adaptation, our findings suggest that PERK has a more extensive role in insulin signaling, insulin resistance, obesity, and tumorigenesis than previously thought. PMID:22493067

  18. PERK utilizes intrinsic lipid kinase activity to generate phosphatidic acid, mediate Akt activation, and promote adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bobrovnikova-Marjon, Ekaterina; Pytel, Dariusz; Riese, Matthew J; Vaites, Laura Pontano; Singh, Nickpreet; Koretzky, Gary A; Witze, Eric S; Diehl, J Alan

    2012-06-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident PKR-like kinase (PERK) is necessary for Akt activation in response to ER stress. We demonstrate that PERK harbors intrinsic lipid kinase, favoring diacylglycerol (DAG) as a substrate and generating phosphatidic acid (PA). This activity of PERK correlates with activation of mTOR and phosphorylation of Akt on Ser473. PERK lipid kinase activity is regulated in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) p85α-dependent manner. Moreover, PERK activity is essential during adipocyte differentiation. Because PA and Akt regulate many cellular functions, including cellular survival, proliferation, migratory responses, and metabolic adaptation, our findings suggest that PERK has a more extensive role in insulin signaling, insulin resistance, obesity, and tumorigenesis than previously thought.

  19. Surface-mediated enzymatic reactions: simulations of tissue factor activation of factor X on a lipid surface.

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, R; Ye, L; Nemerson, Y

    1995-01-01

    Blood coagulation proceeds via reactions in which zymogen coagulation factors are activated to proteases. An essential step is the activation of factor X by a complex of tissue factor and factor VIIa. This complex usually is studied using phospholipid vesicles into which tissue factor is inserted. Because factor X exists free in solution and bound to the lipid-surface, it is difficult to establish experimentally the kinetic contribution of surfaces. We therefore developed a stochastic model to simulate such reactions and generate initial velocity data from which Michaelis-Menten parameters are estimated. Simulated Km values decrease slightly when substrate binding to lipid is increased and by a factor of four when the rates of surface diffusion are increased to that of fluid phase-diffusion. Simulations with various size planar surfaces established an enzyme capture radius of 32-64 nm. Simulations with different modes of enzyme-substrate complex assembly show that if the true substrate is lipid-bound, under certain conditions, the true Kcat is not measured; rather, the product "leaving rate" from the complex is the rate-limiting step that is measured as substrate is taken to infinity. This model is applicable to any surface-bound enzyme reaction. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:8527649

  20. The primary role of iron-mediated lipid peroxidation in the differential cytotoxicity caused by two varieties of talc nanoparticles on A549 cells and lipid peroxidation inhibitory effect exerted by ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Kumar, Sudhir; Murthy, Ramesh Chandra; Ashquin, Mohd; Khan, Mohd Imran; Patil, Govil; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2010-06-01

    Talc particles, the basic ingredient in different kinds of talc-based cosmetic and pharmaceutical products, pose a health risk to pulmonary and ovarian systems due to domestic and occupational exposures. Two types of talc nanoparticles depending on the source of geographical origin - indigenous- and commercial talc nanoparticles were assessed for their potential in vitro toxicity on A(549) cells; along with indigenous conventionally used microtalc particles. Cell viability, determined through live/dead staining and 3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, decreased as a function of concentration, origin and size of particles. Both varieties of talc nanoparticles differentially induced lipid peroxidation (LPO), which was correlated with the pattern of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and glutathione (GSH) depletion. Relatively higher cytotoxicity of indigenous nanotalc could be attributed to its higher content of iron as compared to commercial nanotalc. The known scavenger of ROS, l-ascorbic acid significantly inhibited LPO induction due to talc particles. Data suggest that nanotalc toxicity on A(549) cells was mediated through oxidative stress, wherein role of iron-mediated LPO was much pronounced in differential cytotoxicity.

  1. Synthesis and preliminary biological evaluations of (+)-isocampholenic acid-derived amides.

    PubMed

    Grošelj, Uroš; Golobič, Amalija; Knez, Damijan; Hrast, Martina; Gobec, Stanislav; Ričko, Sebastijan; Svete, Jurij

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of two novel (+)-isocampholenic acid-derived amines has been realized starting from commercially available (1S)-(+)-10-camphorsulfonic acid. The novel amines as well as (+)-isocampholenic acid have been used as building blocks in the construction of a library of amides using various aliphatic, aromatic, and amino acid-derived coupling partners using BPC and CDI as activating agents. Amide derivatives have been assayed against several enzymes that hold potential for the development of new drugs to battle bacterial infections and Alzheimer's disease. Compounds 20c and 20e showed promising selective sub-micromolar inhibition of human butyrylcholinesterase [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text] values [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively). PMID:27017352

  2. Supramolecular chiral host-guest nanoarchitecture induced by the selective assembly of barbituric acid derivative enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaonan; Silly, Fabien; Maurel, Francois; Dong, Changzhi

    2016-10-21

    Barbituric acid derivatives are prochiral molecules, i.e. they are chiral upon adsorption on surfaces. Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals that barbituric acid derivatives self-assemble into a chiral guest-host supramolecular architecture at the solid-liquid interface on graphite. The host nanoarchitecture has a sophisticated wavy shape pattern and paired guest molecules are nested insides the cavities of the host structure. Each unit cell of the host structure is composed of both enantiomers with a ratio of 1:1. Furthermore, the wavy patterns of the nanoarchitecture are formed from alternative appearance of left- and right-handed chiral building blocks, which makes the network heterochiral. The functional guest-host nanoarchitecture is the result of two-dimensional chiral amplification from single enantiomers to organizational heterochiral supramolecular self-assembly. PMID:27623155

  3. Search for novel histone deacetylase inhibitors. Part II: design and synthesis of novel isoferulic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wen; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Tao; Dong, Jinyun; Gao, Hongping; Su, Ping; Shi, Yaling; Zhang, Jie

    2014-05-01

    Previously, we described the discovery of potent ferulic acid-based histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) with halogeno-acetanilide as novel surface recognition moiety (SRM). In order to improve the affinity and activity of these HDACIs, twenty seven isoferulic acid derivatives were described herein. The majority of title compounds displayed potent HDAC inhibitory activity. In particular, IF5 and IF6 exhibited significant enzymatic inhibitory activities, with IC50 values of 0.73 ± 0.08 and 0.57 ± 0.16 μM, respectively. Furthermore, these compounds showed moderate antiproliferative activity against human cancer cells. Especially, IF6 displayed promising profile as an antitumor candidate with IC50 value of 3.91 ± 0.97 μM against HeLa cells. The results indicated that these isoferulic acid derivatives could serve as promising lead compounds for further optimization. PMID:24702857

  4. Supramolecular chiral host-guest nanoarchitecture induced by the selective assembly of barbituric acid derivative enantiomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaonan; Silly, Fabien; Maurel, Francois; Dong, Changzhi

    2016-10-01

    Barbituric acid derivatives are prochiral molecules, i.e. they are chiral upon adsorption on surfaces. Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals that barbituric acid derivatives self-assemble into a chiral guest-host supramolecular architecture at the solid-liquid interface on graphite. The host nanoarchitecture has a sophisticated wavy shape pattern and paired guest molecules are nested insides the cavities of the host structure. Each unit cell of the host structure is composed of both enantiomers with a ratio of 1:1. Furthermore, the wavy patterns of the nanoarchitecture are formed from alternative appearance of left- and right-handed chiral building blocks, which makes the network heterochiral. The functional guest-host nanoarchitecture is the result of two-dimensional chiral amplification from single enantiomers to organizational heterochiral supramolecular self-assembly.

  5. Synthesis of sulfonic acid derivatives by oxidative deprotection of thiols using tert-butyl hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Joyard, Yoann; Papamicaël, Cyril; Bohn, Pierre; Bischoff, Laurent

    2013-05-01

    Starting from alkyl halides or Michael acceptors, thioacetates were prepared in situ and further treated with t-BuOCl, affording the corresponding sulfonyl chlorides which were trapped with nucleophiles such as water, alcohol, or amines. The three steps can be achieved in a one-pot procedure. Oxidative deprotection also proved to be efficient with S-trityl and S-tert-butyl groups, making it a convenient route toward cysteic acid derivatives.

  6. Additive-free decarboxylative coupling of cinnamic acid derivatives in water: synthesis of allyl amines.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyungho; Lee, Sunwoo

    2015-03-01

    The first example of an additive-free decarboxylative coupling of cinnamic acid derivatives with formaldehyde and amines to afford the corresponding allyl amines is reported. This reaction is highly environmentally friendly because it was conducted in H2O and without any additives, releasing only CO2 and H2O as byproducts. This reaction showed a broad substrate scope including cyclic and acyclic amines and high functional group tolerance. Moreover, phenyl dienoic acid participated in this type of decarboxylative coupling reaction.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of aminophosphinic acid derivatives as inhibitors of renal dipeptidase.

    PubMed

    Gurulingappa, Hallur; Buckhalts, Phillip; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Khan, Saeed R

    2004-07-01

    Renal dipeptidase (RDP) is an enzyme overexpressed in benign and malignant colorectal tumors. In an effort to identify potent inhibitors of this enzyme, a series of aminophosphinic acid derivatives were synthesized. Compounds 3a and 3c in which the phenyl ring was para substituted with F and Br and olefin with Z geometry, showed better inhibitory activity against RDP enzyme (IC50 = 5-6 nM).

  8. Heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis for the hydrogenation of carboxylic acid derivatives: history, advances and future directions.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, James; Filonenko, Georgy A; van Putten, Robbert; Hensen, Emiel J M; Pidko, Evgeny A

    2015-06-01

    The catalytic reduction of carboxylic acid derivatives has witnessed a rapid development in recent years. These reactions, involving molecular hydrogen as the reducing agent, can be promoted by heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysts. The milestone achievements and recent results by both approaches are discussed in this Review. In particular, we focus on the mechanistic aspects of the catalytic hydrogenation and highlight the bifunctional nature of the mechanism that is preferred for supported metal catalysts as well as homogeneous transition metal complexes.

  9. Antimicrobial screening and quantitative determination of benzoic acid derivative of Gomphrena celosioides by TLC-densitometry.

    PubMed

    de Moura, Rute Mendonça Xavier; Pereira, Paulo Sérgio; Januário, Ana Helena; França, Suzelei de Castro; Dias, Diones Aparecida

    2004-11-01

    The antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extract and pure compounds of Gomphrena celosioides have been screened by Kirby-Bauer method. Quantitative determination of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzoic acid in stems, leaves, flowers and roots was established by TLC-densitometry. Results showed significant activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella typhi. There were no significant differences in the determined benzoic acid derivative. PMID:15516759

  10. Novel long chain fatty acid derivatives of quercetin-3-O-glucoside reduce cytotoxicity induced by cigarette smoke toxicants in human fetal lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Warnakulasuriya, Sumudu N; Ziaullah; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2016-06-15

    Smoking has become a global health concern due to its association with many disease conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and cancer. Flavonoids are plant polyphenolic compounds, studied extensively for their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic properties. Quercetin-3-O-glucoside (Q3G) is a flavonoid which is widely found in plants. Six novel long chain fatty acid [stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] derivatives of Q3G were evaluated for their potential in protecting human lung fibroblasts against cytotoxicity induced by selected cigarette smoke toxicants: 4-(methylnitrosoamino)-1-(3-pyridinyl)-1-butanone (NNK), benzo-α-pyrene (BaP), nicotine and chromium (Cr[VI]). Nicotine and Cr[VI] induced toxicity in fibroblasts and reduced the percentage of viable cells, while BaP and NNK did not affect cell viability. The fatty acid derivatives of Q3G provided protection against nicotine- and Cr[VI]-induced cell death and membrane lipid peroxidation. Based on the evaluation of inflammatory markers of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), the fatty acid derivatives of Q3G were found to be effective in lowering the inflammatory response. Overall, these novel fatty acid esters of Q3G warrant further investigation as potential cytoprotective agents. PMID:27071958

  11. Divalent cation-mediated interaction between cerebroside sulfate and cerebrosides: an investigation of the effect of structural variations of lipids by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, K M; Wang, J; Boggs, J M

    1999-01-01

    Divalent cations mediate a carbohydrate-carbohydrate association between the two major glycolipids, galactosylceramide (GalCer) and its sulfated form, cerebroside sulfate (CBS), of the myelin sheath. We have suggested that interaction between these glycolipids on apposed extracellular surfaces of myelin may be involved in the stability or function of this multilayered structure. A mutant mouse lacking galactolipids because of a disruption in the gene that encodes a galactosyltransferase forms myelin that initially appears relatively normal but is unstable. This myelin contains glucosylceramide (GlcCer) instead of GalCer. To better understand the role of GlcCer in myelin in this mutant, we have compared the ability of divalent cations to complex CBS (galactosyl form) with GlcCer or GalCer in methanol solution by using positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Because both the alpha-hydroxylated fatty acid species (HFA) and the nonhydroxylated fatty acid species (NFA) of these lipids occur in myelin, we have also compared the HFA and NFA species. In addition to monomeric Ca2+ complexes of all three lipids and oligomeric Ca2+ complexes of both GalCer and GlcCer, Ca2+ also caused heterotypic complexation of CBS to both GalCer and GlcCer. The heterotypic complexes had the greatest stability of all oligomers formed and survived better at high declustering potentials. Complexes of CBS with GlcCer were less stable than those with GalCer. This was confirmed by using the free sugars and glycosides making up the carbohydrate headgroups of these lipids. HFA species of CBS and GalCer formed more stable complexes than NFA species, but hydroxylation of the fatty acid of GlcCer had no effect. The ability of GlcCer to also complex with CBS, albeit with lower stability, may allow GlcCer to partially compensate for the absence of GalCer in the mouse mutant. PMID:10388759

  12. MicroRNA-130b and microRNA-374b mediate the effect of maternal dietary protein on offspring lipid metabolism in Meishan pigs.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shifeng; Zheng, Yating; Zhao, Ruqian; Yang, Xiaojing

    2013-05-28

    To investigate whether the effect of maternal dietary protein on offspring lipid metabolism is mediated by microRNA (miRNA), fourteen Meishan sows were fed either low-protein (LP, half of standard protein (SP) level, n 7) or SP (n 7) diets throughout gestation and lactation periods. PPAR-γ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-β (C/EBP-β) protein expression was evaluated. The expression of miRNA predicted to directly target PPAR-γ and C/EBP-β in the subcutaneous fat of offspring at weaning age was determined, and the functions of these potential miRNA were verified. The results showed that piglet body weight and back fat thickness were significantly decreased in the LP group compared with the SP group (P<0·05). The protein level of PPAR-γ was significantly decreased and C/EBP-β protein expression was also decreased, though not significantly (P=0·056), in the subcutaneous fat of the LP group. Furthermore, miRNA expression analysis showed that miR-130b, targeting the PPAR-γ 3'-untranslated region (UTR), and miR-374b, targeting the C/EBP-β 3'-UTR, were significantly increased in the LP group compared with the SP group; other candidate regulatory miRNA were expressed similarly in both groups. Dual luciferase activity assay results indicated that miR-130b directly recognised and bound to the 3'-UTR of PPAR-γ and thereby suppressed PPAR-γ gene expression. Similar results were found for miR-374b and the 3'-UTR of C/EBP-β. The present study showed that miR-130b and miR-374b are involved in the effect of maternal dietary protein on offspring lipid metabolism in pigs. These results shed new light on our understanding of the maternal effect on offspring lipid deposition. PMID:22958366

  13. Pd(II)-catalysed meta-C–H functionalizations of benzoic acid derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shangda; Cai, Lei; Ji, Huafang; Yang, Long; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Benzoic acids are highly important structural motifs in drug molecules and natural products. Selective C–H bond functionalization of benzoic acids will provide synthetically useful tools for step-economical organic synthesis. Although direct ortho-C–H functionalizations of benzoic acids or their derivatives have been intensely studied, the ability to activate meta-C–H bond of benzoic acids or their derivatives in a general manner via transition-metal catalysis has been largely unsuccessful. Although chelation-assisted meta-C–H functionalization of electron-rich arenes was reported, chelation-assisted meta-C–H activation of electron-poor arenes such as benzoic acid derivatives remains a formidable challenge. Herein, we report a general protocol for meta-C–H olefination of benzoic acid derivatives using a nitrile-based sulfonamide template. A broad range of benzoic acid derivatives are meta-selectively olefinated using molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant. The meta-C–H acetoxylation, product of which is further transformed at the meta-position, is also reported. PMID:26813919

  14. Induction of hepatocyte growth factor production in human dermal fibroblasts by caffeic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kurisu, Manami; Nakasone, Rie; Miyamae, Yusaku; Matsuura, Daisuke; Kanatani, Hirotoshi; Yano, Shingo; Shigemori, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has mitogenic, motogenic, and morphogenic activities in epithelial cells. Induction of HGF production may be involved in organ regeneration, wound healing and embryogenesis. In this study, we examined the effects of caffeic acid derivatives including 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (1) and acteoside (2) on HGF production in Neonatal Normal Human Dermal Fibroblasts (NHDF). Both 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (1) and acteoside (2) significantly induced HGF production dose-dependent manner. To know the important substructure for HGF production activity, we next investigated the effect of the partial structure of these caffeic acid derivatives. From the results, caffeic acid (3) showed strong activity on the promotion of HGF production, while hydroxytyrosol (4) and quinic acid (5) didn't show any activity. Our findings suggest that the caffeoyl moiety of caffeic acid derivatives is essential for accelerated production of HGF. The compound which has the caffeoyl moiety may be useful for the treatment of some intractable organ disease.

  15. Production of Fatty Acid-derived valuable chemicals in synthetic microbes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ai-Qun; Pratomo Juwono, Nina Kurniasih; Leong, Susanna Su Jan; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid derivatives, such as hydroxy fatty acids, fatty alcohols, fatty acid methyl/ethyl esters, and fatty alka(e)nes, have a wide range of industrial applications including plastics, lubricants, and fuels. Currently, these chemicals are obtained mainly through chemical synthesis, which is complex and costly, and their availability from natural biological sources is extremely limited. Metabolic engineering of microorganisms has provided a platform for effective production of these valuable biochemicals. Notably, synthetic biology-based metabolic engineering strategies have been extensively applied to refactor microorganisms for improved biochemical production. Here, we reviewed: (i) the current status of metabolic engineering of microbes that produce fatty acid-derived valuable chemicals, and (ii) the recent progress of synthetic biology approaches that assist metabolic engineering, such as mRNA secondary structure engineering, sensor-regulator system, regulatable expression system, ultrasensitive input/output control system, and computer science-based design of complex gene circuits. Furthermore, key challenges and strategies were discussed. Finally, we concluded that synthetic biology provides useful metabolic engineering strategies for economically viable production of fatty acid-derived valuable chemicals in engineered microbes.

  16. Production of Fatty Acid-Derived Valuable Chemicals in Synthetic Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ai-Qun; Pratomo Juwono, Nina Kurniasih; Leong, Susanna Su Jan; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid derivatives, such as hydroxy fatty acids, fatty alcohols, fatty acid methyl/ethyl esters, and fatty alka(e)nes, have a wide range of industrial applications including plastics, lubricants, and fuels. Currently, these chemicals are obtained mainly through chemical synthesis, which is complex and costly, and their availability from natural biological sources is extremely limited. Metabolic engineering of microorganisms has provided a platform for effective production of these valuable biochemicals. Notably, synthetic biology-based metabolic engineering strategies have been extensively applied to refactor microorganisms for improved biochemical production. Here, we reviewed: (i) the current status of metabolic engineering of microbes that produce fatty acid-derived valuable chemicals, and (ii) the recent progress of synthetic biology approaches that assist metabolic engineering, such as mRNA secondary structure engineering, sensor-regulator system, regulatable expression system, ultrasensitive input/output control system, and computer science-based design of complex gene circuits. Furthermore, key challenges and strategies were discussed. Finally, we concluded that synthetic biology provides useful metabolic engineering strategies for economically viable production of fatty acid-derived valuable chemicals in engineered microbes. PMID:25566540

  17. Lovastatin enhances adenovirus-mediated TRAIL induced apoptosis by depleting cholesterol of lipid rafts and affecting CAR and death receptor expression of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Youhong; Chen, Lin; Gong, Zhicheng; Shen, Liangfang; Kao, Chinghai; Hock, Janet M; Sun, Lunquan; Li, Xiong

    2015-02-20

    Oncolytic adenovirus and apoptosis inducer TRAIL are promising cancer therapies. Their antitumor efficacy, when used as single agents, is limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have low infection activity, and cancer cells develop resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we explored combining prostate-restricted replication competent adenovirus-mediated TRAIL (PRRA-TRAIL) with lovastatin, a commonly used cholesterol-lowering drug, as a potential therapy for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Lovastatin significantly enhanced the efficacy of PRRA-TRAIL by promoting the in vivo tumor suppression, and the in vitro cell killing and apoptosis induction, via integration of multiple molecular mechanisms. Lovastatin enhanced PRRA replication and virus-delivered transgene expression by increasing the expression levels of CAR and integrins, which are critical for adenovirus 5 binding and internalization. Lovastatin enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by increasing death receptor DR4 expression. These multiple effects of lovastatin on CAR, integrins and DR4 expression were closely associated with cholesterol-depletion in lipid rafts. These studies, for the first time, show correlations between cholesterol/lipid rafts, oncolytic adenovirus infection efficiency and the antitumor efficacy of TRAIL at the cellular level. This work enhances our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that support use of lovastatin, in combination with PRRA-TRAIL, as a candidate strategy to treat human refractory prostate cancer in the future. PMID:25605010

  18. Phospholipid-modified polyethylenimine-based nanopreparations for siRNA–mediated gene silencing: Implications for transfection and the role of lipid components

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Gemma; Essex, Sean; Sawant, Rupa R.; Biswas, Swati; Nagesha, Dattatri; Sridhar, Srinivas; de ILarduya, Conchita Tros; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    The clinical application of gene silencing mediated by small interfering RNA (siRNA) has been limited by the lack of efficient and safe carriers. Phospholipid modification of low molecular weight polyethylenimine (PEI 1.8 kDa) dramatically increased its gene down-regulation capacity while keeping cytotoxicity levels low. The silencing efficacy was highly dependent on the nature of the lipid grafted to PEI and the polymer/siRNA ratio employed. Phosphoethanolamine (DOPE and DPPE) and phosphocholine (PC) conjugation did not change the physicochemical properties and siRNA binding capacity of PEI complexes but had a large impact on their transfection and ability to downregulate Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) expression (60%, 30% and 5% decrease of GFP expression respectively). We found that the micelle-forming structure of DOPE and DPPE-PEI dramatically changed PEI’s interaction with cell membranes and played a key role in promoting PEI 1.8 kDa transfection, completely ineffective in the absence of the lipid modification. PMID:23928214

  19. Acetylsalicylic Acid reduces the severity of dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and increases the formation of anti-inflammatory lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    Köhnke, Thomas; Gomolka, Beate; Bilal, Süleyman; Zhou, Xiangzhi; Sun, Yanping; Rothe, Michael; Baumgart, Daniel C; Weylandt, Karsten H

    2013-01-01

    The role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in inflammatory bowel disease is controversial, as they have been implicated in disease aggravation. Different from other cyclooxygenase inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) enhances the formation of anti-inflammatory and proresolution lipoxins derived from arachidonic acid as well as resolvins from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). In this study, we examined the effect of ASA on murine dextran sodium sulfate colitis. A mouse magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol and post mortem assessment were used to assess disease severity, and lipid metabolites were measured using liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometry. Decreased colitis activity was demonstrated by phenotype and MRI assessment in mice treated with ASA, and confirmed in postmortem analysis. Analysis of lipid mediators showed sustained formation of lipoxin A4 and an increase of DHA-derived 17-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA) after treatment with ASA. Furthermore, in vitro experiments in RAW264.7 murine macrophages demonstrated significantly increased phagocytosis activity after incubation with 17-HDHA, supporting its proresolution effect. These results show a protective effect of ASA in a murine colitis model and could give a rationale for a careful reassessment of ASA therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and particularly ulcerative colitis, possibly combined with DHA supplementation.

  20. Benzo-fused lactams from a diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) library as inhibitors of scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI)-mediated lipid uptake.

    PubMed

    Dockendorff, Chris; Faloon, Patrick W; Pu, Jun; Yu, Miao; Johnston, Stephen; Bennion, Melissa; Penman, Marsha; Nieland, Thomas J F; Dandapani, Sivaraman; Perez, José R; Munoz, Benito; Palmer, Michelle A; Schreiber, Stuart L; Krieger, Monty

    2015-01-01

    We report a new series of 8-membered benzo-fused lactams that inhibit cellular lipid uptake from HDL particles mediated by Scavenger Receptor, Class B, Type I (SR-BI). The series was identified via a high-throughput screen of the National Institutes of Health Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (NIH MLSMR), measuring the transfer of the fluorescent lipid DiI from HDL particles to CHO cells overexpressing SR-BI. The series is part of a previously reported diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) library prepared via a build-couple-pair approach. Detailed structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies were performed with a selection of the original library, as well as additional analogs prepared via solution phase synthesis. These studies demonstrate that the orientation of the substituents on the aliphatic ring have a critical effect on activity. Additionally, a lipophilic group is required at the western end of the molecule, and a northern hydroxyl group and a southern sulfonamide substituent also proved to be optimal. Compound 2p was found to possess a superior combination of potency (av IC50=0.10μM) and solubility (79μM in PBS), and it was designated as probe ML312. PMID:25900219

  1. Acetylsalicylic Acid reduces the severity of dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and increases the formation of anti-inflammatory lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    Köhnke, Thomas; Gomolka, Beate; Bilal, Süleyman; Zhou, Xiangzhi; Sun, Yanping; Rothe, Michael; Baumgart, Daniel C; Weylandt, Karsten H

    2013-01-01

    The role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in inflammatory bowel disease is controversial, as they have been implicated in disease aggravation. Different from other cyclooxygenase inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) enhances the formation of anti-inflammatory and proresolution lipoxins derived from arachidonic acid as well as resolvins from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). In this study, we examined the effect of ASA on murine dextran sodium sulfate colitis. A mouse magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol and post mortem assessment were used to assess disease severity, and lipid metabolites were measured using liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometry. Decreased colitis activity was demonstrated by phenotype and MRI assessment in mice treated with ASA, and confirmed in postmortem analysis. Analysis of lipid mediators showed sustained formation of lipoxin A4 and an increase of DHA-derived 17-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA) after treatment with ASA. Furthermore, in vitro experiments in RAW264.7 murine macrophages demonstrated significantly increased phagocytosis activity after incubation with 17-HDHA, supporting its proresolution effect. These results show a protective effect of ASA in a murine colitis model and could give a rationale for a careful reassessment of ASA therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and particularly ulcerative colitis, possibly combined with DHA supplementation. PMID:24083240

  2. L-plastin is involved in NKG2D recruitment into lipid rafts and NKG2D-mediated NK cell migration.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Pertierra, Esther; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Brdička, Tomáš; Hoøejši, Václav; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    Membrane rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane that have multiple biological functions. The involvement of these structures in the biology of T cells, namely in signal transduction by the TCR, has been widely studied. However, the role of membrane rafts in immunoreceptor signaling in NK cells is less well known. We studied the distribution of the activating NKG2D receptor in lipid rafts by isolating DRMs in a sucrose density gradient or by raft fractionation by β-OG-selective solubility in the NKL cell line. We found that the NKG2D-DAP10 complex and pVav are recruited into rafts upon receptor stimulation. Qualitative proteomic analysis of these fractions showed that the actin cytoskeleton is involved in this process. In particular, we found that the actin-bundling protein L-plastin plays an important role in the clustering of NKG2D into lipid rafts. Moreover, coengagement of the inhibitory receptor NKG2A partially disrupted NKG2D recruitment into rafts. Furthermore, we demonstrated that L-plastin participates in NKG2D-mediated inhibition of NK cell chemotaxis.

  3. Lipid Peroxide-Derived Short-Chain Carbonyls Mediate Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced and Salt-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Md. Sanaullah; Mano, Jun’ichi

    2015-01-01

    Lipid peroxide-derived toxic carbonyl compounds (oxylipin carbonyls), produced downstream of reactive oxygen species (ROS), were recently revealed to mediate abiotic stress-induced damage of plants. Here, we investigated how oxylipin carbonyls cause cell death. When tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, several species of short-chain oxylipin carbonyls [i.e. 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal and acrolein] accumulated and the cells underwent programmed cell death (PCD), as judged based on DNA fragmentation, an increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive nuclei, and cytoplasm retraction. These oxylipin carbonyls caused PCD in BY-2 cells and roots of tobacco and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). To test the possibility that oxylipin carbonyls mediate an oxidative signal to cause PCD, we performed pharmacological and genetic experiments. Carnosine and hydralazine, having distinct chemistry for scavenging carbonyls, significantly suppressed the increase in oxylipin carbonyls and blocked PCD in BY-2 cells and Arabidopsis roots, but they did not affect the levels of ROS and lipid peroxides. A transgenic tobacco line that overproduces 2-alkenal reductase, an Arabidopsis enzyme to detoxify α,β-unsaturated carbonyls, suffered less PCD in root epidermis after hydrogen peroxide or salt treatment than did the wild type, whereas the ROS level increases due to the stress treatments were not different between the lines. From these results, we conclude that oxylipin carbonyls are involved in the PCD process in oxidatively stressed cells. Our comparison of the ability of distinct carbonyls to induce PCD in BY-2 cells revealed that acrolein and 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal are the most potent carbonyls. The physiological relevance and possible mechanisms of the carbonyl-induced PCD are discussed. PMID:26025050

  4. Lipid Peroxide-Derived Short-Chain Carbonyls Mediate Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced and Salt-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Plants.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Md Sanaullah; Mano, Jun'ichi

    2015-07-01

    Lipid peroxide-derived toxic carbonyl compounds (oxylipin carbonyls), produced downstream of reactive oxygen species (ROS), were recently revealed to mediate abiotic stress-induced damage of plants. Here, we investigated how oxylipin carbonyls cause cell death. When tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, several species of short-chain oxylipin carbonyls [i.e. 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal and acrolein] accumulated and the cells underwent programmed cell death (PCD), as judged based on DNA fragmentation, an increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive nuclei, and cytoplasm retraction. These oxylipin carbonyls caused PCD in BY-2 cells and roots of tobacco and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). To test the possibility that oxylipin carbonyls mediate an oxidative signal to cause PCD, we performed pharmacological and genetic experiments. Carnosine and hydralazine, having distinct chemistry for scavenging carbonyls, significantly suppressed the increase in oxylipin carbonyls and blocked PCD in BY-2 cells and Arabidopsis roots, but they did not affect the levels of ROS and lipid peroxides. A transgenic tobacco line that overproduces 2-alkenal reductase, an Arabidopsis enzyme to detoxify α,β-unsaturated carbonyls, suffered less PCD in root epidermis after hydrogen peroxide or salt treatment than did the wild type, whereas the ROS level increases due to the stress treatments were not different between the lines. From these results, we conclude that oxylipin carbonyls are involved in the PCD process in oxidatively stressed cells. Our comparison of the ability of distinct carbonyls to induce PCD in BY-2 cells revealed that acrolein and 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal are the most potent carbonyls. The physiological relevance and possible mechanisms of the carbonyl-induced PCD are discussed.

  5. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-mediated alterations in cell permeability, lipid and protein profiles of steroid-transforming Arthrobacter simplex.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanbing; Liang, Jingting; Li, Huanan; Wang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) enhances steroid 1-dehydrogenation biotransformation by Arthrobacter simplex. In this work, HP-β-CD-induced improvement of A. simplex CPCC 140451 cell envelope permeability which had positive effects on the steroid bioconversion was confirmed by a comparative investigation which showed a lower dehydrogenase activity and higher cell permeability of the cells after being incubated with HP-β-CD. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy micrographs showed that HP-β-CD altered the size, sharpness, and surface structure of the cell envelope. The analysis of lipid composition revealed that the proportion of extractable lipids decreased and the fatty acids profile was considerably altered. The contents of unsaturated fatty acids and long-chain fatty acids were reduced by 11.77 and 14.98%, respectively. The total leakage of protein level increased to 8%. Proteins belonging to the ATP-binding cassette superfamily and major facilitator superfamily were observed outside the cell. These alterations can explain the change of permeability on the molecular level under HP-β-CD treatment. Results showed the material basis and mechanisms underlying the cellular changes, thus most likely contributing to the conversion rate in addition to cyclodextrins known effects on substrate solubility. PMID:25277411

  6. Identification of cinnamic acid derivatives as novel antagonists of the prokaryotic proton-gated ion channel GLIC.

    PubMed

    Prevost, Marie S; Delarue-Cochin, Sandrine; Marteaux, Justine; Colas, Claire; Van Renterghem, Catherine; Blondel, Arnaud; Malliavin, Thérèse; Corringer, Pierre-Jean; Joseph, Delphine

    2013-06-13

    Pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs) mediate signal transduction. The binding of an extracellular ligand is coupled to the transmembrane channel opening. So far, all known agonists bind at the interface between subunits in a topologically conserved "orthosteric site" whose amino acid composition defines the pharmacological specificity of pLGIC subtypes. A striking exception is the bacterial proton-activated GLIC protein, exhibiting an uncommon orthosteric binding site in terms of sequence and local architecture. Among a library of Gloeobacter violaceus metabolites, we identified a series of cinnamic acid derivatives, which antagonize the GLIC proton-elicited response. Structure-activity analysis shows a key contribution of the carboxylate moiety to GLIC inhibition. Molecular docking coupled to site-directed mutagenesis support that the binding pocket is located below the classical orthosteric site. These antagonists provide new tools to modulate conformation of GLIC, currently used as a prototypic pLGIC, and opens new avenues to study the signal transduction mechanism.

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and dysregulation of calcium homeostasis mediate Cu-induced alteration in hepatic lipid metabolism of javelin goby Synechogobius hasta.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu-Feng; Huang, Chao; Shi, Xi; Pan, Ya-Xiong; Liu, Xu; Luo, Zhi

    2016-06-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of Cu exposure on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and Ca(2+) homeostasis, and also explore the underlying mechanism of the ER stress and Ca(2+) homeostasis in the Cu-induced change of hepatic lipid metabolism in javelin goby Synechogobius hasta. To this end, four experiments were conducted. In experiment 1, the full-length cDNA sequences of two ER molecular chaperones [glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and calreticulin (CRT)] and three ER stress sensors [PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), inositol requiring enzyme (IRE)-1α, and activating transcription factor (ATF)-6α] cDNAs were firstly characterized from S. hasta. The predicted amino acid sequences for the S. hasta GRP78, CRT, PERK, IRE-1α and ATF-6α revealed that the proteins contained all of the structural features characteristic in other species. mRNAs of the five genes were expressed in various tissues, but their mRNA levels varied among tissues. In experiment 2, S. hasta were exposed to four waterborne Cu concentrations (control, 19μg/l, 38μg/l, and 57μg/l, respectively) for 60days. Cu exposure evoked ER stress in liver of S. hasta in a time- and concentration-course change. In experiment 3, specific inhibitors, 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate (2-APB) and dantrolene, were used to explore whether Ca(2+) release from ER was involved in the Cu-induced ER stress change. Dantrolene and 2-APB prevented Cu-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevation, which demonstrated the release of Ca(2+) from the ER was mediated by both RyR and IP3R. In experiment 4, a chemical chaperone, 4-phenyl butyric acid (4-PBA), was used to demonstrate whether Cu-induced alteration in lipid metabolism was suppressed through the attenuation of ER stress. Cu exposure evoked ER stress and sterol-regulator element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) activation in hepatocytes of S. hasta, resulting in dysregulation of hepatic lipid metabolism. 4-PBA attenuated the Cu-induced elevation of m

  8. Pathway Markers for Pro-resolving Lipid Mediators in Maternal and Umbilical Cord Blood: A Secondary Analysis of the Mothers, Omega-3, and Mental Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Mozurkewich, Ellen L.; Greenwood, Matthew; Clinton, Chelsea; Berman, Deborah; Romero, Vivian; Djuric, Zora; Qualls, Clifford; Gronert, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    The omega-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are precursors to immune regulatory and specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPM) of inflammation termed resolvins, maresins, and protectins. Evidence for lipid mediator formation in vivo can be gained through evaluation of their 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) and 15-LOX metabolic pathway precursors and downstream metabolites. We performed a secondary blood sample analysis from 60 participants in the Mothers, Omega-3, and Mental Health study to determine whether SPM and SPM precursors are augmented by dietary EPA- and DHA-rich fish oil supplementation compared to soy oil placebo. We also aimed to study whether SPM and their precursors differ in early and late pregnancy or between maternal and umbilical cord blood. We found that compared to placebo supplementation, EPA- and DHA-rich fish oil supplementation increased SPM precursor 17-hydroxy docosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA) concentrations in maternal and umbilical cord blood (P = 0.02). We found that the D-series resolvin pathway marker 17-HDHA increased significantly between enrollment and late pregnancy (P = 0.049). Levels of both 14-HDHA, a maresin pathway marker, and 17-HDHA were significantly greater in umbilical cord blood than in maternal blood (P < 0.001, both). PMID:27656142

  9. Pathway Markers for Pro-resolving Lipid Mediators in Maternal and Umbilical Cord Blood: A Secondary Analysis of the Mothers, Omega-3, and Mental Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Mozurkewich, Ellen L.; Greenwood, Matthew; Clinton, Chelsea; Berman, Deborah; Romero, Vivian; Djuric, Zora; Qualls, Clifford; Gronert, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    The omega-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are precursors to immune regulatory and specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPM) of inflammation termed resolvins, maresins, and protectins. Evidence for lipid mediator formation in vivo can be gained through evaluation of their 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) and 15-LOX metabolic pathway precursors and downstream metabolites. We performed a secondary blood sample analysis from 60 participants in the Mothers, Omega-3, and Mental Health study to determine whether SPM and SPM precursors are augmented by dietary EPA- and DHA-rich fish oil supplementation compared to soy oil placebo. We also aimed to study whether SPM and their precursors differ in early and late pregnancy or between maternal and umbilical cord blood. We found that compared to placebo supplementation, EPA- and DHA-rich fish oil supplementation increased SPM precursor 17-hydroxy docosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA) concentrations in maternal and umbilical cord blood (P = 0.02). We found that the D-series resolvin pathway marker 17-HDHA increased significantly between enrollment and late pregnancy (P = 0.049). Levels of both 14-HDHA, a maresin pathway marker, and 17-HDHA were significantly greater in umbilical cord blood than in maternal blood (P < 0.001, both).

  10. Pathway Markers for Pro-resolving Lipid Mediators in Maternal and Umbilical Cord Blood: A Secondary Analysis of the Mothers, Omega-3, and Mental Health Study.

    PubMed

    Mozurkewich, Ellen L; Greenwood, Matthew; Clinton, Chelsea; Berman, Deborah; Romero, Vivian; Djuric, Zora; Qualls, Clifford; Gronert, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    The omega-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are precursors to immune regulatory and specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPM) of inflammation termed resolvins, maresins, and protectins. Evidence for lipid mediator formation in vivo can be gained through evaluation of their 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) and 15-LOX metabolic pathway precursors and downstream metabolites. We performed a secondary blood sample analysis from 60 participants in the Mothers, Omega-3, and Mental Health study to determine whether SPM and SPM precursors are augmented by dietary EPA- and DHA-rich fish oil supplementation compared to soy oil placebo. We also aimed to study whether SPM and their precursors differ in early and late pregnancy or between maternal and umbilical cord blood. We found that compared to placebo supplementation, EPA- and DHA-rich fish oil supplementation increased SPM precursor 17-hydroxy docosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA) concentrations in maternal and umbilical cord blood (P = 0.02). We found that the D-series resolvin pathway marker 17-HDHA increased significantly between enrollment and late pregnancy (P = 0.049). Levels of both 14-HDHA, a maresin pathway marker, and 17-HDHA were significantly greater in umbilical cord blood than in maternal blood (P < 0.001, both). PMID:27656142

  11. Pathway Markers for Pro-resolving Lipid Mediators in Maternal and Umbilical Cord Blood: A Secondary Analysis of the Mothers, Omega-3, and Mental Health Study.

    PubMed

    Mozurkewich, Ellen L; Greenwood, Matthew; Clinton, Chelsea; Berman, Deborah; Romero, Vivian; Djuric, Zora; Qualls, Clifford; Gronert, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    The omega-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are precursors to immune regulatory and specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPM) of inflammation termed resolvins, maresins, and protectins. Evidence for lipid mediator formation in vivo can be gained through evaluation of their 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) and 15-LOX metabolic pathway precursors and downstream metabolites. We performed a secondary blood sample analysis from 60 participants in the Mothers, Omega-3, and Mental Health study to determine whether SPM and SPM precursors are augmented by dietary EPA- and DHA-rich fish oil supplementation compared to soy oil placebo. We also aimed to study whether SPM and their precursors differ in early and late pregnancy or between maternal and umbilical cord blood. We found that compared to placebo supplementation, EPA- and DHA-rich fish oil supplementation increased SPM precursor 17-hydroxy docosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA) concentrations in maternal and umbilical cord blood (P = 0.02). We found that the D-series resolvin pathway marker 17-HDHA increased significantly between enrollment and late pregnancy (P = 0.049). Levels of both 14-HDHA, a maresin pathway marker, and 17-HDHA were significantly greater in umbilical cord blood than in maternal blood (P < 0.001, both).

  12. Effects of antisense-mediated inhibition of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 on hepatic lipid metabolism[S

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guoping; Hernandez-Ono, Antonio; Crooke, Rosanne M.; Graham, Mark J.; Ginsberg, Henry N.

    2011-01-01

    11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1) converts inactive 11-keto derivatives to active glucocorticoids within tissues and may play a role in the metabolic syndrome (MS). We used an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) to knock down 11β-HSD1 in livers of C57BL/6J mice consuming a Western-type diet (WTD). 11β-HSD1 ASO-treated mice consumed less food, so we compared them to ad libitum-fed mice and to food-matched mice receiving control ASO. Knockdown of 11β-HSD1 directly protected mice from WTD-induced steatosis and dyslipidemia by reducing synthesis and secretion of triglyceride (TG) and increasing hepatic fatty acid oxidation. These changes in hepatic and plasma lipids were not associated with reductions in genes involved in de novo lipogenesis. However, protein levels of both sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) 1 and fatty acid synthase were significantly reduced in mice treated with 11β-HSD1 ASO. There was no change in hepatic secretion of apolipoprotein (apo)B, indicating assembly and secretion of smaller apoB-containing lipoproteins by the liver in the 11β-HSD1-treated mice. Our results indicate that inhibition of 11β-HSD1 by ASO treatment of WTD-fed mice resulted in improved plasma and hepatic lipid levels, reduced lipogenesis by posttranslational regulation, and secretion of similar numbers of apoB-containing lipoproteins containing less TG per particle. PMID:21364201

  13. The linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA selectively activates PKC-epsilon, possibly binding to the phosphatidylserine binding site.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Yaguchi, Takahiro; Hi, Rika; Mukasa, Takeshi; Fujikawa, Hirokazu; Nagata, Tetsu; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2006-06-01

    This study examined the effect of 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA), a newly synthesized linoleic acid derivative with cyclopropane rings instead of cis-double bonds, on protein kinase C (PKC) activity. In the in situ PKC assay with reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, DCP-LA significantly activated PKC in PC-12 cells in a concentration-dependent (10 nM-100 microM) manner, with the maximal effect at 100 nM, and the DCP-LA effect was blocked by GF109203X, a PKC inhibitor, or a selective inhibitor peptide of the novel PKC isozyme PKC-epsilon. Furthermore, DCP-LA activated PKC in HEK-293 cells that was inhibited by the small, interfering RNA against PKC-epsilon. In the cell-free PKC assay, of the nine isozymes examined here, DCP-LA most strongly activated PKC-epsilon, with >7-fold potency over other PKC isozymes, in the absence of dioleoyl-phosphatidylserine and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol; instead, the DCP-LA action was inhibited by dioleoyl-phosphatidylserine. DCP-LA also activated PKC-gamma, a conventional PKC, but to a much lesser extent compared with that for PKC-epsilon, by a mechanism distinct from PKC-epsilon activation. Thus, DCP-LA serves as a selective activator of PKC-epsilon, possibly by binding to the phosphatidylserine binding site on PKC-epsilon. These results may provide fresh insight into lipid signaling in PKC activation.

  14. Insight into the Modification of Polymeric Micellar and Liposomal Nanocarriers by Fluorescein-Labeled Lipids and Uptake-Mediating Lipopeptides.

    PubMed

    Draffehn, Sören; Eichhorst, Jenny; Wiesner, Burkhard; Kumke, Michael U

    2016-07-12

    Encapsulation of diagnostic and therapeutic compounds in transporters improves their delivery to the point of need. An even more efficient treatment of diseases can be achieved using carriers with targeting or protecting moieties. In the present work, we investigated micellar and liposomal nanocarriers modified with fluorescein, peptides, and polymers that are covalently bound to fatty acids or phospholipids to ensure a self-driven incorporation into the micelles or liposomes. First, we characterized the photophysics of the fluorescent probes in the absence and in the presence of nanocarriers. Changes in the fluorescence decay time, quantum yield, and intensity of a fluorescein-labeled fatty acid (fluorescein-labeled palmitic acid [fPA]) and a fluorescein-labeled lipopeptide (P2fA2) were found. By exploiting these changes, we investigated a lipopeptide (P2A2 as an uptake-mediating unit) in combination with different nanocarriers (micelles and liposomes) and determined the corresponding association constant Kass values, which were found to be very high. In addition, the mobility of fPA was exploited using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and fluorescence depolarization (FD) experiments to characterize the nanocarriers. Cellular uptake experiments with mouse brain endothelial cells provided information on the uptake behavior of liposomes modified by uptake-mediating P2A2 and revealed differences in the uptake behavior between pH-sensitive and pH-insensitive liposomes.

  15. HYPERSENSITIVITY TO PENICILLENIC ACID DERIVATIVES IN HUMAN BEINGS WITH PENICILLIN ALLERGY

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Charles W.; Shapiro, Jack; Kern, Milton; Eisen, Herman N.

    1962-01-01

    Multifunctional derivatives of penicillenic acid are effective elicitors of wheal-and-erythema skin responses in humans allergic to penicillin. Of the effective derivatives, penicilloyl-polylysines are particularly attractive as skin test reagents because they appear to be incapable of inducing antibody formation. The skin responses are specifically inhibitable in most instances by homologous unifunctional haptens. The penicillenic acid derivatives which appear to be determinants of human allergic reactions to penicillin are: penicilloyl, penicillenate, and groups of the penamaldate-penilloaldehyde type. Of these, the most significant appears to be the penicilloyl-lysyl determinant. PMID:14483916

  16. Potential antibacterial activity of coumarin and coumarin-3-acetic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chattha, Fauzia Anjum; Munawar, Munawar Ali; Nisa, Mehrun; Ashraf, Mohammad; Kousar, Samina; Arshad, Shafia

    2015-05-01

    Coumarin and coumarin-3-acetic acid derivatives were synthesized by reacting phenols with malic acid, ethyl acetoacetate and ethyl acetylsuccinate in appropriate reaction conditions. All synthesized compounds were subjected to test for their antimicrobial activities against variety of gram positive (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus) and gram negative bacterial stains (Shigella sonnei, Escherichia coli) by agar dilution method. Several of them exhibited appreciable good antibacterial activity against the different strains of gram positive and gram negative bacteria. These findings suggest a great potential of these compounds for screening and use as antibacterial agents for further studies with a battery of bacteria.

  17. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine protects cardiomyocytes against ischemic apoptosis via lipid raft/PTEN/Akt1/mTOR mediated autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hong-Wei; Liu, Jing; Liu, Ping-Ping; Li, Wen-Jing; Chang, Fen; Miao, Jun-Ying; Zhao, Jing

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy, evoked by diverse stresses including myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), profoundly affects the development of heart failure. However, the specific molecular basis of autophagy remains to be elucidated. Here we report that sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), a bioactive sphingolipid, significantly suppressed apoptosis and induced autophagy in cardiomyocytes. Blocking this SPC evoked autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3MA)-sensitized cardiomyocytes to serum deprivation-induced apoptosis. Subsequent studies revealed that SPC downregulated the phosphorylation of p70S6K and 4EBP1 (two substrates of mTOR) but enhanced that of JNK when inducing autophagy. We identified SPC as a switch for the activity of Akt1, a supposed upstream modulator of both mTOR and JNK. Furthermore, β-cyclodextrin, which destroys membrane cholesterol, abolished the SPC-reduced phosphorylation of both Akt and PTEN, thus inhibiting SPC-induced autophagy. In conclusion, SPC is a novel molecule protecting cardiomyocytes against apoptosis by promoting autophagy. The lipid raft/PTEN/Akt1/mTOR signal pathway is the underlying mechanism and might provide novel targets for cardiac failure therapy.

  18. Kinetics of carrier-mediated ion transport in two new types of solvent-free lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, J Y; Laprade, R

    1982-08-01

    In contrast with the usual glyceryl-monooleate/decane (GMO-D) bilayer lipid membranes, new membranes, formed from a mixture of GMO in squalene (GMO-S) or from a mixture of GMO in triolein (GMO-T), seem to be almost solvent free. Our results from voltage-jump relaxation studies, using these "solvent-free" membranes with the homologue carriers, nonactin, monactin, dinactin, trinactin, and tetranactin, are compared with the corresponding ones for GMO-D membranes. With all homologues, solvent-free membranes show an increase of the free carrier translocation rate, ks, by a factor of 2.5, a decrease in the dissociation rate constant of the complex, kDi, by a factor of 1.5 and no significant change in its formation rate constant, kRi. However, the principal effect of the absence of solvent in these membranes is an increase by a factor of approximately 10 of the translocation rate constant for moving the complex across the membrane, kis. This increase varies regularly from a factor of 7-15 with decreasing carrier size, and is always larger for GMO-T than for GMO-S membranes. These solvent-free effects are interpreted in terms of modifications of electrostatic and hydrophobic energy profiles in the membrane.

  19. Kinetics of carrier-mediated ion transport in two new types of solvent-free lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Lapointe, J Y; Laprade, R

    1982-01-01

    In contrast with the usual glyceryl-monooleate/decane (GMO-D) bilayer lipid membranes, new membranes, formed from a mixture of GMO in squalene (GMO-S) or from a mixture of GMO in triolein (GMO-T), seem to be almost solvent free. Our results from voltage-jump relaxation studies, using these "solvent-free" membranes with the homologue carriers, nonactin, monactin, dinactin, trinactin, and tetranactin, are compared with the corresponding ones for GMO-D membranes. With all homologues, solvent-free membranes show an increase of the free carrier translocation rate, ks, by a factor of 2.5, a decrease in the dissociation rate constant of the complex, kDi, by a factor of 1.5 and no significant change in its formation rate constant, kRi. However, the principal effect of the absence of solvent in these membranes is an increase by a factor of approximately 10 of the translocation rate constant for moving the complex across the membrane, kis. This increase varies regularly from a factor of 7-15 with decreasing carrier size, and is always larger for GMO-T than for GMO-S membranes. These solvent-free effects are interpreted in terms of modifications of electrostatic and hydrophobic energy profiles in the membrane. PMID:6896832

  20. Quantitation of flavanols, proanthocyanidins, isoflavones, flavanones, dihydrochalcones, stilbenes, and benzoic Acid derivatives after identification by LC-MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A general method was developed for the systematic quantitation of catechins, proanthocyanidins, isoflavones, flavanones, dihydrochalcones, stilbenes, and hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives (mainly hydrolyzable tannins) using the UV relative mole response factors (MRRF) of the reference standard from ea...

  1. Salacia oblonga root improves cardiac lipid metabolism in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: modulation of cardiac PPAR-alpha-mediated transcription of fatty acid metabolic genes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tom Hsun-Wei; Yang, Qinglin; Harada, Masaki; Uberai, Jasna; Radford, Jane; Li, George Q; Yamahara, Johji; Roufogalis, Basil D; Li, Yuhao

    2006-01-01

    Excess cardiac triglyceride accumulation in diabetes and obesity induces lipotoxicity, which predisposes the myocytes to death. On the other hand, increased cardiac fatty acid (FA) oxidation plays a role in the development of myocardial dysfunction in diabetes. PPAR-alpha plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis of lipid metabolism. We have previously demonstrated that the extract from Salacia oblonga root (SOE), an Ayurvedic anti-diabetic and anti-obesity medicine, improves hyperlipidemia in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats (a genetic model of type 2 diabetes and obesity) and possesses PPAR-alpha activating properties. Here we demonstrate that chronic oral administration of SOE reduces cardiac triglyceride and FA contents and decreases the Oil red O-stained area in the myocardium of ZDF rats, which parallels the effects on plasma triglyceride and FA levels. Furthermore, the treatment suppressed cardiac overexpression of both FA transporter protein-1 mRNA and protein in ZDF rats, suggesting inhibition of increased cardiac FA uptake as the basis for decreased cardiac FA levels. Additionally, the treatment also inhibited overexpression in ZDF rat heart of PPAR-alpha mRNA and protein and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, acyl-CoA oxidase and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase mRNAs and restored the downregulated acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA. These results suggest that SOE inhibits cardiac FA oxidation in ZDF rats. Thus, our findings suggest that improvement by SOE of excess cardiac lipid accumulation and increased cardiac FA oxidation in diabetes and obesity occurs by reduction of cardiac FA uptake, thereby modulating cardiac PPAR-alpha-mediated FA metabolic gene transcription. PMID:16129467

  2. A Copper-Mediated Disulfiram-Loaded pH-Triggered PEG-Shedding TAT Peptide-Modified Lipid Nanocapsules for Use in Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Tian, Bin; Li, Yi; Lei, Tian; Meng, Jia; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Fen; Zhang, Haotian; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Yu; Tang, Xing

    2015-11-18

    Disulfiram, which exhibits marked tumor inhibition mediated by copper, was encapsulated in lipid nanocapsules modified with TAT peptide (TATp) and pH-triggered sheddable PEG to target cancer cells on the basis of tumor environmental specificity. PEG-shedding lipid nanocapsules (S-LNCs) were fabricated from LNCs by decorating short PEG chains with TATp (HS-PEG(1k)-TATp) to form TATp-LNCs and then covered by pH-sensitive graft copolymers of long PEG chains (PGA-g-PEG(2k)). The DSF-S-LNCs had sizes in the range of 60-90 nm and were stable in the presence of 50% plasma. DSF-S-LNCs exhibited higher intracellular uptake and antitumor activity at pH 6.5 than at pH 7.4. The preincubation of Cu showed that the DSF cytotoxicity was based on the accumulation of Cu in Hep G2 cells. Pharmacokinetic studies showed the markedly improved pharmacokinetic profiles of DSF-S-LNCs (AUC= 3921.391 μg/L·h, t(1/2z) = 1.294 h) compared with free DSF (AUC = 907.724 μg/L·h, t(1/2z) = 0.252 h). The in vivo distribution of S-LNCs was investigated using Cy5.5 as a fluorescent probe. In tumor-bearing mice, the delivery efficiency of S-LNCs was found to be 496.5% higher than that of free Cy5.5 and 74.5% higher than that of LNCs in tumors. In conclusion, DSF-S-LNCs increased both the stability and tumor internalization and further increased the cytotoxicity because of the higher copper content.

  3. A Copper-Mediated Disulfiram-Loaded pH-Triggered PEG-Shedding TAT Peptide-Modified Lipid Nanocapsules for Use in Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Tian, Bin; Li, Yi; Lei, Tian; Meng, Jia; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Fen; Zhang, Haotian; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Yu; Tang, Xing

    2015-11-18

    Disulfiram, which exhibits marked tumor inhibition mediated by copper, was encapsulated in lipid nanocapsules modified with TAT peptide (TATp) and pH-triggered sheddable PEG to target cancer cells on the basis of tumor environmental specificity. PEG-shedding lipid nanocapsules (S-LNCs) were fabricated from LNCs by decorating short PEG chains with TATp (HS-PEG(1k)-TATp) to form TATp-LNCs and then covered by pH-sensitive graft copolymers of long PEG chains (PGA-g-PEG(2k)). The DSF-S-LNCs had sizes in the range of 60-90 nm and were stable in the presence of 50% plasma. DSF-S-LNCs exhibited higher intracellular uptake and antitumor activity at pH 6.5 than at pH 7.4. The preincubation of Cu showed that the DSF cytotoxicity was based on the accumulation of Cu in Hep G2 cells. Pharmacokinetic studies showed the markedly improved pharmacokinetic profiles of DSF-S-LNCs (AUC= 3921.391 μg/L·h, t(1/2z) = 1.294 h) compared with free DSF (AUC = 907.724 μg/L·h, t(1/2z) = 0.252 h). The in vivo distribution of S-LNCs was investigated using Cy5.5 as a fluorescent probe. In tumor-bearing mice, the delivery efficiency of S-LNCs was found to be 496.5% higher than that of free Cy5.5 and 74.5% higher than that of LNCs in tumors. In conclusion, DSF-S-LNCs increased both the stability and tumor internalization and further increased the cytotoxicity because of the higher copper content. PMID:26501354

  4. Nanostructured lipid carrier mediates effective delivery of methotrexate to induce apoptosis of rheumatoid arthritis via NF-κB and FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Garg, Neeraj K; Tyagi, Rajeev K; Singh, Bhupinder; Sharma, Gajanand; Nirbhavane, Pradip; Kushwah, Varun; Jain, Sanyog; Katare, Om Prakash

    2016-02-29

    Present study was designed to develop novel nano-structured lipid carriers (NLCs) formulated by lipid mixture and chemical permeation enhancer-based hydrogel for an effective transdermal delivery of methotrexate (MTX). The prepared NLCs were optimized with different preparative variables such as particle size <200 nm, poly-dispersity index (PDI) <0.2, and entrapment efficiency ∼85%. The drug incorporated into NLCs-gel base showed excellent spread ability without any grittiness during rheological behavior and texture profile analysis. The in vitro release showed biphasic release pattern with initial fast release of drug (>50%) in 8h followed by sustained release (up to 85%) by the end of 48thh. NLCs showed greater uptake in human hyper-proliferative keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). NLCs showed increased expression of inflammatory mediators as well asapoptosis in U937 monocytic cells. The greater expression of pro-apoptotic gene Bim regulated by NF-κB-IkB and FOXO1 is supported by fold regulations calculated for various apoptotic and pro-inflammatory biomarkers carried out by RT-PCR. The immunocytochemistry to detect IL-6 expression and immunofluorescence assay suggested that induced apoptosis occurs in experimentally induced in vitro arthritis model treated with NLCs-MTX. We saw reduced inflammation and triggered apoptosis through NF-κB & FOXO1 pathways induced by MTX loaded NLCs in rheumatoid arthritic cells. In addition, formulated NLCs exhibit better skin permeation with higher permeation flux & enhancement ratio as shown by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Moreover, histopathological examinations of skin are suggestive of safety potential of NLCs. PMID:26768725

  5. Salacia oblonga root improves cardiac lipid metabolism in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: Modulation of cardiac PPAR-{alpha}-mediated transcription of fatty acid metabolic genes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tom H.-W.; Yang Qinglin; Harada, Masaki; Uberai, Jasna; Radford, Jane; Li, George Q.; Yamahara, Johji; Roufogalis, Basil D.; Li Yuhao . E-mail: yuhao@pharm.usyd.edu.au

    2006-01-15

    Excess cardiac triglyceride accumulation in diabetes and obesity induces lipotoxicity, which predisposes the myocytes to death. On the other hand, increased cardiac fatty acid (FA) oxidation plays a role in the development of myocardial dysfunction in diabetes. PPAR-{alpha} plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis of lipid metabolism. We have previously demonstrated that the extract from Salacia oblonga root (SOE), an Ayurvedic anti-diabetic and anti-obesity medicine, improves hyperlipidemia in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats (a genetic model of type 2 diabetes and obesity) and possesses PPAR-{alpha} activating properties. Here we demonstrate that chronic oral administration of SOE reduces cardiac triglyceride and FA contents and decreases the Oil red O-stained area in the myocardium of ZDF rats, which parallels the effects on plasma triglyceride and FA levels. Furthermore, the treatment suppressed cardiac overexpression of both FA transporter protein-1 mRNA and protein in ZDF rats, suggesting inhibition of increased cardiac FA uptake as the basis for decreased cardiac FA levels. Additionally, the treatment also inhibited overexpression in ZDF rat heart of PPAR-{alpha} mRNA and protein and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, acyl-CoA oxidase and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase mRNAs and restored the downregulated acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA. These results suggest that SOE inhibits cardiac FA oxidation in ZDF rats. Thus, our findings suggest that improvement by SOE of excess cardiac lipid accumulation and increased cardiac FA oxidation in diabetes and obesity occurs by reduction of cardiac FA uptake, thereby modulating cardiac PPAR-{alpha}-mediated FA metabolic gene transcription.

  6. Steric hindrance of 2,6-disubstituted benzoic acid derivatives on the uptake via monocarboxylic acid transporters from the apical membranes of Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Tsukagoshi, Kensuke; Kimura, Osamu; Endo, Tetsuya

    2014-05-01

    Benzoic acid is a typical substrate for monocarboxylic acid transporters (MCTs), and easily taken up from the apical membranes of Caco-2 cells by MCTs. However, some benzoic acid derivatives were sparingly taken up by Caco-2 cells. To elucidate the mechanism of lower uptake of the derivatives, we investigated the effect of substitution of benzene ring on the uptake by MCTs using Caco-2 cells. Among the benzoic acid derivatives tested, the uptake of 2,6-disubstituted benzoic acids was markedly lower than that of other benzoic acids. Co-incubation of the 2,6-disubstituted derivatives with benzoic acid did not decrease the uptake of benzoic acid, while co-incubation with other derivatives significantly decreased the uptake of benzoic acid. Kinetic analyses elucidated that the uptake of 2,6-dichlorobenzoic acid and 2,3,6-trichlorobenzoic acid did not involve the carrier-mediated process. The 2,6-disubstitution of benzoic acid may prevent the access of carboxylic acid group to MCTs expressed on the apical membranes of Caco-2 cells. PMID:24861932

  7. Possible involvement of membrane lipids peroxidation and oxidation of catalytically essential thiols of the cerebral transmembrane sodium pump as component mechanisms of iron-mediated oxidative stress-linked dysfunction of the pump's activity

    PubMed Central

    Omotayo, T.I.; Akinyemi, G.S.; Omololu, P.A.; Ajayi, B.O.; Akindahunsi, A.A.; Rocha, J.B.T.; Kade, I.J.

    2014-01-01

    The precise molecular events defining the complex role of oxidative stress in the inactivation of the cerebral sodium pump in radical-induced neurodegenerative diseases is yet to be fully clarified and thus still open. Herein we investigated the modulation of the activity of the cerebral transmembrane electrogenic enzyme in Fe2+-mediated in vitro oxidative stress model. The results show that Fe2+ inhibited the transmembrane enzyme in a concentration dependent manner and this effect was accompanied by a biphasic generation of aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation. While dithiothreitol prevented both Fe2+ inhibitory effect on the pump and lipid peroxidation, vitamin E prevented only lipid peroxidation but not inhibition of the pump. Besides, malondialdehyde (MDA) inhibited the pump by a mechanism not related to oxidation of its critical thiols. Apparently, the low activity of the pump in degenerative diseases mediated by Fe2+ may involve complex multi-component mechanisms which may partly involve an initial oxidation of the critical thiols of the enzyme directly mediated by Fe2+ and during severe progression of such diseases; aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation such as MDA may further exacerbate this inhibitory effect by a mechanism that is likely not related to the oxidation of the catalytically essential thiols of the ouabain-sensitive cerebral electrogenic pump. PMID:25618580

  8. Lipids in salicylic acid-mediated defense in plants: focusing on the roles of phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiong; Xiao, Shunyuan

    2015-01-01

    Plants have evolved effective defense strategies to protect themselves from various pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) is an essential signaling molecule that mediates pathogen-triggered signals perceived by different immune receptors to induce downstream defense responses. While many proteins play essential roles in regulating SA signaling, increasing evidence also supports important roles for signaling phospholipids in this process. In this review, we collate the experimental evidence in support of the regulatory roles of two phospholipids, phosphatidic acid (PA), and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P), and their metabolizing enzymes in plant defense, and examine the possible mechanistic interaction between phospholipid signaling and SA-dependent immunity with a particular focus on the immunity-stimulated biphasic PA production that is reminiscent of and perhaps mechanistically connected to the biphasic reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and SA accumulation during defense activation. PMID:26074946

  9. Insulin Resistance: A Proinflammatory State Mediated by Lipid-Induced Signaling Dysfunction and Involved in Atherosclerotic Plaque Instability

    PubMed Central

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Steffens, Sabine; Mach, François

    2008-01-01

    The dysregulation of the insulin-glucose axis represents the crucial event in insulin resistance syndrome. Insulin resistance increases atherogenesis and atherosclerotic plaque instability by inducing proinflammatory activities on vascular and immune cells. This condition characterizes several diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and other endocrinopathies, but also cancer. Recent studies suggest that the pathophysiology of insulin resistance is closely related to interferences with insulin-mediated intracellular signaling on skeletal muscle cells, hepatocytes, and adipocytes. Strong evidence supports the role of free fatty acids (FFAs) in promoting insulin resistance. The FFA-induced activation of protein kinase C (PKC) delta, inhibitor kappaB kinase (IKK), or c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) modulates insulin-triggered intracellular pathway (classically known as PI3-K-dependent). Therefore, reduction of FFA levels represents a selective target for modulating insulin resistance. PMID:18604303

  10. Elucidating the structure-activity relationships of the vasorelaxation and antioxidation properties of thionicotinic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Wongsawatkul, Orapin; Worachartcheewan, Apilak; Nantasenamat, Chanin; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2010-01-06

    Nicotinic acid, known as vitamin B(3), is an effective lipid lowering drug and intense cutaneous vasodilator. This study reports the effect of 2-(1-adamantylthio)nicotinic acid (6) and its amide 7 and nitrile analog 8 on phenylephrine-induced contraction of rat thoracic aorta as well as antioxidative activity. It was found that the tested thionicotinic acid analogs 6-8 exerted maximal vasorelaxation in a dose-dependent manner, but their effects were less than acetylcholine (ACh)-induced nitric oxide (NO) vasorelaxation. The vasorelaxations were reduced, apparently, in both N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and indomethacin (INDO). Synergistic effects were observed in the presence of L-NAME plus INDO, leading to loss of vasorelaxation of both the ACh and the tested nicotinic acids. Complete loss of the vasorelaxation was noted under removal of endothelial cells. This infers that the vasorelaxations are mediated partially by endothelium-induced NO and prostacyclin. The thionicotinic acid analogs all exhibited antioxidant properties in both 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) assays. Significantly, the thionicotinic acid 6 is the most potent vasorelaxant with ED(50) of 21.3 nM and is the most potent antioxidant (as discerned from DPPH assay). Molecular modeling was also used to provide mechanistic insights into the vasorelaxant and antioxidative activities. The findings reveal that the thionicotinic acid analogs are a novel class of vasorelaxant and antioxidant compounds which have potential to be further developed as promising therapeutics.

  11. Biotechnological production of caffeic acid derivatives from cell and organ cultures of Echinacea species.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Hosakatte Niranjana; Kim, Yun-Soo; Park, So-Young; Paek, Kee-Yoeup

    2014-09-01

    Caffeic acid derivatives (CADs) are a group of bioactive compounds which are produced in Echinacea species especially Echinacea purpurea, Echinacea angustifolia, and Echinacea pallida. Echinacea is a popular herbal medicine used in the treatment of common cold and it is also a prominent dietary supplement used throughout the world. Caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid (5-O-caffeoylquinic acid), caftaric acid (2-O-caffeoyltartaric acid), cichoric acid (2, 3-O-dicaffeoyltartaric acid), cynarin, and echinacoside are some of the important CADs which have varied pharmacological activities. The concentrations of these bioactive compounds are species specific and also they vary considerably with the cultivated Echinacea species due to geographical location, stage of development, time of harvest, and growth conditions. Due to these reasons, plant cell and organ cultures have become attractive alternative for the production of biomass and caffeic acid derivatives. Adventitious and hairy roots have been induced in E. pupurea and E. angustifolia, and suspension cultures have been established from flask to bioreactor scale for the production of biomass and CADs. Tremendous progress has been made in this area; various bioprocess methods and strategies have been developed for constant high-quality productivity of biomass and secondary products. This review is aimed to discuss biotechnological methods and approaches employed for the sustainable production of CADs.

  12. In vitro effects of cinnamic acid derivatives on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Adisakwattana, Sirichai; Pongsuwan, Jirawan; Wungcharoen, Chompunut; Yibchok-anun, Sirintorn

    2013-10-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a major negative regulator of insulin signaling pathways. Finding selective PTP1B inhibitors from natural sources has been widely recognized as a potential drug target for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and obesity. In the present study, we evaluated the inhibitory activity of cinnamic acid derivatives against PTP1B in vitro. Among 14 cinnamic acid derivatives and related compounds, the most potent inhibitor PTP1Bs were o-hydroxycinnamic acid and p-hydroxycinnamic acid, which had IC50 values of 137.67 ± 13.37 and 181.60 ± 9.34 µM, respectively. The kinetics analysis revealed that PTP1B was inhibited by o-hydroxycinnamic acid and p-hydroxycinnamic acid in a non-competitive manner. o-Hydroxycinnamic acid (25 μM) and p-hydroxycinnamic acid (25 μM), in combination with sodium orthovanadate (0.0125 μM), demonstrated a synergistic effect to inhibit PTP1B activity. In conclusion, the findings provide a new insight into naturally occurring PTP1B inhibitors that could be useful for treatment of diabetes and obesity.

  13. Combined anticalcification treatment of bovine pericardium with decellularization and hyaluronic acid derivative.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Deyi; Jin, Liqiang; Wang, Xuemei; Xu, Li; Liu, Tianqi

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of decellularization and hyaluronic acid derivative on the improvement of anticalcification of glutaraldehyde fixed bovine pericardium (GFBP) using a rat subcutaneous implantation model A cell extraction process was employed to remove the cells and cellular components from bovine pericardium (BP), leaving a framework of largely insoluble collagen. Then acellular BP was cross-linked by glutaraldehyde solution and treated with hyaluronic acid derivative (HA-ADH) which was obtained by coupling adipic dihydrazide (ADH) on-COOH of hyaluronic acid (HA). The results of in vivo calcification tests showed that the calcium content was decreased dramatically by decellularization alone (from 28.07 ± 18.87 to 2.44 ± 0.55 μg Ca/mg dry tissue after 8 weeks' implantation), and even less concentration was shown by the combination of HA derivative treatment and decellularization (GFaBP-HA group) (0.25 ± 0.08 μg Ca/mg dry tissue after 8 weeks' implantation). In addition, GFaBP-HA group not only presented a lower degree of calcification, but also showed lower ratios of Ca/P molar, which corresponded to amorphous calcium phosphates. The obtained results indicated that GFaBP-HA was a potential candidate for the manufacture of anticalcification bioprostheses. PMID:24211959

  14. Teratogenicity of benzoic acid derivatives of retinoic acid in cultured mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Goulding, E H; Jetten, A M; Abbott, B D; Pratt, R M

    1988-01-01

    Isotretinoin (13-cis-RA) is a human teratogen and mouse embryos exposed to 13-cis-RA in vivo exhibit many of the same defects as humans. Early postimplantation mouse embryos exposed to 13-cis-RA in culture exhibit developmental alterations of the visceral arches, similar to those seen after in vivo exposure. Certain benzoic acid derivatives of retinoic acid have been shown to possess activity equal to or greater than retinoic acid in several in vitro systems. This study examines the teratogenic effects of some of these retinoids on mouse embryos in vitro. Day 8 CD-1 mouse embryos were cultured for 48 hours in the presence of these benzoic acid derivatives. With the exception of Ro-15-0778, all compounds produced visceral arch malformations similar to those seen in embryos exposed to 13-cis-RA, but at dramatically different effective concentrations. Extremely low concentrations of the retinoic acid-related compounds tested appear to have detrimental effects on embryonic development and these compounds may be poor candidates for therapeutic use.

  15. Visualization of lipid metabolism in the zebrafish intestine reveals a relationship between NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol uptake and dietary fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Walters, James W; Anderson, Jennifer L; Bittman, Robert; Pack, Michael; Farber, Steven A

    2012-07-27

    The small intestine is the primary site of dietary lipid absorption in mammals. The balance of nutrients, microorganisms, bile, and mucus that determine intestinal luminal environment cannot be recapitulated ex vivo, thus complicating studies of lipid absorption. We show that fluorescently labeled lipids can be used to visualize and study lipid absorption in live zebrafish larvae. We demonstrate that the addition of a BODIPY-fatty acid to a diet high in atherogenic lipids enables imaging of enterocyte lipid droplet dynamics in real time. We find that a lipid-rich meal promotes BODIPY-cholesterol absorption into an endosomal compartment distinguishable from lipid droplets. We also show that dietary fatty acids promote intestinal cholesterol absorption by rapid re-localization of NPC1L1 to the intestinal brush border. These data illustrate the power of the zebrafish system to address longstanding questions in vertebrate digestive physiology.

  16. Visualization of lipid metabolism in the larval zebrafish intestine reveals a relationship between NPC1L1 mediated cholesterol uptake and dietary fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Walters, James W.; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Bittman, Robert; Pack, Michael; Farber, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The small intestine is the primary site of dietary lipid absorption in mammals. The balance of nutrients, microorganisms, bile, and mucus that determine intestinal luminal environment cannot be recapitulated ex vivo, thus complicating studies of lipid absorption. We show that fluorescently labeled lipids can be used to visualize and study lipid absorption in live zebrafish larvae. We demonstrate that the addition of BODIPY-fatty acid to a diet high in atherogenic lipids enables imaging of enterocyte lipid droplet dynamics in real time. We find that a lipid-rich meal promotes BODIPY-cholesterol absorption into an endosomal compartment distinguishable from lipid droplets. We also show that dietary fatty acids promote intestinal cholesterol absorption by rapid relocalization of NPC1L1 to intestinal brush border. These data illustrate the power of the zebrafish system to address longstanding questions in vertebrate digestive physiology. PMID:22749558

  17. iNOS null MRL+/+ mice show attenuation of trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity: contribution of reactive nitrogen species and lipid-derived reactive aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gangduo; Wakamiya, Maki; Wang, Jianling; Ansari, G A S; Firoze Khan, M

    2015-12-01

    Earlier studies from our laboratory in MRL+/+ mice suggest that free radicals, especially overproduction of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and lipid-derived reactive aldehydes (LDRAs), are associated with trichloroethene (TCE)-mediated autoimmune response. The current study was undertaken to further assess the contribution of RNS and LDRAs in TCE-mediated autoimmunity by using iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice. iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were obtained by backcrossing iNOS-null mice (B6.129P2-Nos2(tm1Lau)/J) to MRL +/+ mice. Female MRL+/+ and iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were given TCE (10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4(th) day) for 6 weeks; their respective controls received corn oil only. TCE exposure led to significantly increased iNOS mRNA in livers, iNOS protein in livers and sera, increased nitrotyrosine (NT) formation in both livers and sera, induction of MDA-/HNE-protein adducts in livers and their respective antibodies in sera along with significant increases in serum antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and anti-dsDNA in MRL+/+ mice. Even though in iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice, the iNOS and NT levels were negligible in both TCE-treated and untreated groups, TCE treatment still led to significant increases in MDA-/HNE-protein adducts and their respective antibodies along with increases in serum ANA and anti-dsDNA compared to controls. Most remarkably, the increases in serum ANA and anti-dsDNA induced by TCE in the iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were significantly less pronounced compared to that in MRL+/+ mice. Our results provide further evidence that both RNS and LDRAs contribute to TCE-induced autoimmunity in MRL+/+ mice, and iNOS deficiency attenuates this autoimmune response.

  18. Stimulation of Microbially Mediated Arsenic Release in Bangladesh Aquifers by Young Carbon Indicated by Radiocarbon Analysis of Sedimentary Bacterial Lipids.

    PubMed

    Whaley-Martin, K J; Mailloux, B J; van Geen, A; Bostick, B C; Silvern, R F; Kim, C; Ahmed, K M; Choudhury, I; Slater, G F

    2016-07-19

    The sources of reduced carbon driving the microbially mediated release of arsenic to shallow groundwater in Bangladesh remain poorly understood. Using radiocarbon analysis of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and potential carbon pools, the abundance and carbon sources of the active, sediment-associated, in situ bacterial communities inhabiting shallow aquifers (<30 m) at two sites in Araihazar, Bangladesh, were investigated. At both sites, sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) Δ(14)C signatures of -631 ± 54‰ (n = 12) were significantly depleted relative to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of +24 ± 30‰ and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of -230 ± 100‰. Sediment-associated PLFA Δ(14)C signatures (n = 10) at Site F (-167‰ to +20‰) and Site B (-163‰ to +21‰) were highly consistent and indicated utilization of carbon sources younger than the SOC, likely from the DOC pool. Sediment-associated PLFA Δ(14)C signatures were consistent with previously determined Δ(14)C signatures of microbial DNA sampled from groundwater at Site F indicating that the carbon source for these two components of the subsurface microbial community is consistent and is temporally stable over the two years between studies. These results demonstrate that the utilization of relatively young carbon sources by the subsurface microbial community occurs at sites with varying hydrology. Further they indicate that these young carbon sources drive the metabolism of the more abundant sediment-associated microbial communities that are presumably more capable of Fe reduction and associated release of As. This implies that an introduction of younger carbon to as of yet unaffected sediments (such as those comprising the deeper Pleistocene aquifer) could stimulate microbial communities and result in arsenic release.

  19. Stimulation of Microbially Mediated Arsenic Release in Bangladesh Aquifers by Young Carbon Indicated by Radiocarbon Analysis of Sedimentary Bacterial Lipids.

    PubMed

    Whaley-Martin, K J; Mailloux, B J; van Geen, A; Bostick, B C; Silvern, R F; Kim, C; Ahmed, K M; Choudhury, I; Slater, G F

    2016-07-19

    The sources of reduced carbon driving the microbially mediated release of arsenic to shallow groundwater in Bangladesh remain poorly understood. Using radiocarbon analysis of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and potential carbon pools, the abundance and carbon sources of the active, sediment-associated, in situ bacterial communities inhabiting shallow aquifers (<30 m) at two sites in Araihazar, Bangladesh, were investigated. At both sites, sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) Δ(14)C signatures of -631 ± 54‰ (n = 12) were significantly depleted relative to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of +24 ± 30‰ and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of -230 ± 100‰. Sediment-associated PLFA Δ(14)C signatures (n = 10) at Site F (-167‰ to +20‰) and Site B (-163‰ to +21‰) were highly consistent and indicated utilization of carbon sources younger than the SOC, likely from the DOC pool. Sediment-associated PLFA Δ(14)C signatures were consistent with previously determined Δ(14)C signatures of microbial DNA sampled from groundwater at Site F indicating that the carbon source for these two components of the subsurface microbial community is consistent and is temporally stable over the two years between studies. These results demonstrate that the utilization of relatively young carbon sources by the subsurface microbial community occurs at sites with varying hydrology. Further they indicate that these young carbon sources drive the metabolism of the more abundant sediment-associated microbial communities that are presumably more capable of Fe reduction and associated release of As. This implies that an introduction of younger carbon to as of yet unaffected sediments (such as those comprising the deeper Pleistocene aquifer) could stimulate microbial communities and result in arsenic release. PMID:27333443

  20. Endiandric Acid Derivatives and Other Constituents of Plants from the Genera Beilschmiedia and Endiandra (Lauraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ndjakou Lenta, Bruno; Chouna, Jean Rodolphe; Nkeng-Efouet, Pepin Alango; Sewald, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Plants of the Lauraceae family are widely used in traditional medicine and are sources of various classes of secondary metabolites. Two genera of this family, Beilschmiedia and Endiandra, have been the subject of numerous investigations over the past decades because of their application in traditional medicine. They are the only source of bioactive endiandric acid derivatives. Noteworthy is that their biosynthesis contains two consecutive non-enzymatic electrocyclic reactions. Several interesting biological activities for this specific class of secondary metabolites and other constituents of the two genera have been reported, including antimicrobial, enzymes inhibitory and cytotoxic properties. This review compiles information on the structures of the compounds described between January 1960 and March 2015, their biological activities and information on endiandric acid biosynthesis, with 104 references being cited. PMID:26117852

  1. Synthesis, spectroscopic and conformational analysis of 1,4-dihydroisonicotinic acid derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goba, Inguna; Turovska, Baiba; Belyakov, Sergey; Liepinsh, Edvards

    2014-09-01

    Structural and conformational properties of 1,4-dihydroisonicotinic acid derivatives, characterized by ester, ketone or cyano functions at positions 3 and 5 in solid and liquid states have been investigated by X-ray analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance and supported by quantum chemical calculations. The dihydropyridine ring in each of the compounds exists in flattened boat-type conformation. The observed ring distortions around the C(4) and N(1) atoms are interrelated. The substituent at N(1) has great influence on nitrogen atom pyramidality. The 1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shifts and coupling constants are discussed in terms of their relationship to structural features such as character and position of the substituent in heterocycle, N-alkyl substitution and nitrogen lone pair delocalization within the conjugated system.

  2. Comparative analysis of the anxiolytic effects of 3-hydroxypyridine and succinic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Volchegorskii, I A; Miroshnichenko, I Yu; Rassokhina, L M; Faizullin, R M; Malkin, M P; Pryakhina, K E; Kalugina, A V

    2015-04-01

    Threefold administration of 3-hydroxypyridine derivatives emoxipine and mexidol in optimal doses corresponding to the therapeutic dose range for humans produced an anxiolytic effect and stimulated risk behavior in the elevated plus maze test in rats. These effects were most pronounced after injection of 3-hydroxypyridine derivative emoxipine. Combination of 3-hydroxypyridine cation and succinate anion in the mexidol structure led to attenuation of the anxiolytic effect and less pronounced stimulation of the risk behavior. By the anxiolytic effect and induction of risk behavior, emoxipine and mexidol were close to the reference substance amitriptyline. Reamberin, a succinic acid derivative, had no pronounced tranquilizing properties, but risk behavior induction was similar to that produced by mexidol. In contrast to other test agents, the reference substance α-lipoic acid produced anxiogenic effects and suppressed risk behavior. The obtained results suggest that Russian-made 3-hydroxypyridine derivatives emoxipine and mexidol are promising preparations for the treatment of anxiety disorders. PMID:25894772

  3. Synthesis of Aminoboronic Acid Derivatives from Amines and Amphoteric Boryl Carbonyl Compounds.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Diego B; Scully, Conor C G; Liew, Sean K; Adachi, Shinya; Trinchera, Piera; St Denis, Jeffrey D; Yudin, Andrei K

    2016-10-01

    Herein, we demonstrate the use of α-boryl aldehydes and acyl boronates in the synthesis of aminoboronic acid derivatives. This work highlights the untapped potential of boron-substituted iminium ions and offers insights into the behavior of N-methyliminodiacetyl (MIDA) boronates during condensation and tautomerization processes. The preparative value of this contribution lies in the demonstration that various amines, including linear and cyclic peptides, can be readily conjugated with boron-containing fragments. A mild deprotection of amino MIDA-boronates enables access to α- and β-aminoboronic acids in high chemical yields. This simple process should be applicable to the synthesis of a wide range of bioactive molecules as well as precursors for cross-coupling reactions. PMID:27584917

  4. Oxidation of cinnamic acid derivatives: A pulse radiolysis and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Pooja; Mohan, Hari; Maity, Dilip Kumar; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H.; Rao, B. S. Madhav

    2008-07-01

    Second order rate constants in the range of ( k = 1.6-4.5) × 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 were obtained for the rad OH induced oxidation of nitro- and methoxycinnamic acid derivatives in neutral solutions using pulse radiolysis. The transient absorption spectra exhibited a broad peak around 360-410 nm in o-methoxy, o- and p-nitrocinnamates or two peaks around 310-330 and 370-410 nm in other isomers. Quantum chemical calculations revealed that addition of rad OH to olefinic moiety yielded considerably more stable structures than ring addition products and the para system among the latter is the most stable. Spin density analysis suggested that olefinic adducts retained the aromaticity in contrast to its loss in ring rad OH adducts. An excellent linear correlation between the relative stabilities of the rad OH adducts (after accounting for the aromatic stabilization in olefinic adducts) and the maximum Sd values is also obtained.

  5. Crystal engineering: co-crystals of cinnamic acid derivatives with a pyridyl derivative co-crystallizer.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Daniel A; Forrest, Sebastian J K; Sparkes, Hazel A

    2016-02-01

    A number of hydrogen-bonded co-crystals, consisting of a cinnamic acid derivative and a pyridyl co-crystallizer, have been synthesized and their properties investigated by X-ray diffraction. Samples were prepared by recrystallization or solvent drop grinding of trans-cinnamic acid (1), 4-methylcinnamic acid (2), 4-methoxy cinnamic acid (3) or 3,4-methoxy cinnamic acid (4), with 4,4-dipyridyl (A), iso-nicotinamide (B) or nicotinamide (C). The X-ray single-crystal structures of seven novel co-crystals, obtained through recrystallization, are examined and the hydrogen-bonding interactions discussed. Consistent hydrogen-bonding motifs were observed for samples prepared when using 4,4-dipyridyl (A) or iso-nicotinamide (B) as the co-crystallizing agent. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis of the samples prepared by solvent drop grinding suggests the formation of ten co-crystals.

  6. Hydroxamic acid derivatives: a promising scaffold for rational compound optimization in Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Dayanne da Rocha; Calvet, Claudia Magalhães; Rodrigues, Giseli Capaci; de Souza Pereira, Mirian Claudia; Almeida, Igor Rodrigues; de Aguiar, Alcino Palermo; Supuran, Claudiu T; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2016-12-01

    This work describes the antitrypanocidal activity of two hydroxamic acid derivatives containing o-ethoxy (HAD1) and p-ethoxy (HAD2) as substituent in the aromatic ring linked to the isoxazoline ring. HAD1 and HAD2 induced a significant reduction in the number of intracellular parasites and consequently showed activity on the multiplication of the parasite. Treatment of cardiomyocytes and macrophages with the compounds revealed no significant loss in cell viability. Ultrastructural alterations after treatment of cardiomyocytes or macrophages infected by Trypanosoma cruzi with the IC50 value of HAD1 revealed alterations to amastigotes, showing initial damage seen as swelling of the kinetoplast. This gave a good indication of the ability of the drug to permeate through the host cell membrane as well as its selectivity to the parasite target. Both compounds HAD1 and 2 were able to reduce the cysteine peptidases and decrease the activity of metallopeptidases.

  7. Design, synthesis and antitumor activity of novel D-glucuronic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    el-Nezhawy, Ahmed O H; Adly, Frady G; Eweas, Ahmed F; Hanna, Atef G; el-Kholy, Yehya M; el-Syed, Shahenaz H; el-Naggar, Tarek B A

    2011-11-01

    A series of D-glucuronic acid derivatives were chemically synthesized including acetylated and deacetylated glucuronamides, as well as N-glucuronides starting from the D-glucuronic acid itself by means of protection/deprotection, activation and condensation protocols. Structure elucidation of all products along with optimization of the synthetic steps is described. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antitumor activity against MCF-7, TK-10 and UACC-62 cell lines. The compounds 4, 5, 7, 8, 14, 16 and 18 were the most active against TK-10 cell line. On the other hand, the most active compounds against the MCF-7 cell line were 9, 18 and 20. However, compounds 7-10 13-15 and 17 were the most active against the UACC-62 cell line.

  8. Synthesis, evaluation and molecular docking studies of amino acid derived N-glycoconjugates as antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Baig, Noorullah; Singh, Rajnish Prakash; Chander, Subhash; Jha, Prabhat Nath; Murugesan, Sankaranarayanan; Sah, Ajay K

    2015-12-01

    Six amino acid derived N-glycoconjugates of d-glucose were synthesized, characterized and tested for antibacterial activity against G(+)ve (Bacillus cereus) as well as G(-)ve (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) bacterial strains. All the tested compounds exhibited moderate to good antibacterial activity against these bacterial strains. The results were compared with the antibacterial activity of standard drug Chloramphenicol, where results of A5 (Tryptophan derived glycoconjugates) against E. coli and A4 (Isoleucine derived glycoconjugates) against K. pneumoniae bacterial strains are comparable with the standard drug molecule. In silico docking studies were also performed in order to understand the mode of action and binding interactions of these molecules. The docking studies revealed that, occupation of compound A5 at the ATP binding site of subunit GyrB (DNA gyrase, PDB ID: 3TTZ) via hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions may be the reason for its significant in vitro antibacterial activity.

  9. Linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA improves learning impairment in SAMP8.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Takahiro; Nagata, Tetsu; Mukasa, Takeshi; Fujikawa, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Iso, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2006-01-23

    In the water-maze test, the linoleic acid derivative, 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), significantly shortened the prolonged latency for accelerated-senescence-prone mice 8 (SAMP8), reaching a level similar to the latency for accelerated-senescence-resistant mice 1 (SAMR1) as control. In the open-field test to assess motor activity, it was confirmed that the DCP-LA effect is not due to increased motor activity. In the passive avoidance test to assess fear memory, DCP-LA had no effect on the latency of acquisition and retention for SAMP8. The results of the present study, thus, suggest that DCP-LA could improve age-related learning impairment by enhancing cognitive functions.

  10. Development of novel ferulic acid derivatives as potent histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Lu, Wen; Zhang, Tao; Dong, Jinyun; Gao, Hongping; Li, Pengfei; Wang, Sicen; Zhang, Jie

    2013-11-15

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) offer a promising strategy for cancer therapy. The discovery of potent ferulic acid-based HDACIs with hydroxamic acid or 2-aminobenzamide group as zinc binding group was reported. The halogeno-acetanilide was introduced as novel surface recognition moiety (SRM). The majority of title compounds displayed potent HDAC inhibitory activity. In particular, FA6 and FA16 exhibited significant enzymatic inhibitory activities, with IC50 values of 3.94 and 2.82 μM, respectively. Furthermore, these compounds showed moderate antiproliferative activity against a panel of human cancer cells. FA17 displayed promising profile as an antitumor candidate. The results indicated that these ferulic acid derivatives could serve as promising lead compounds for further optimization. PMID:24095016

  11. Hydroxycinnamic acid-derived polymers constitute the polyaromatic domain of suberin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernards, M. A.; Lopez, M. L.; Zajicek, J.; Lewis, N. G.

    1995-01-01

    Suberin is an abundant, complex, intractable, plant cell wall polymeric network that forms both protective and wound-healing layers. Its function is, therefore, critical to the survival of all vascular plants. Its chemical structure and biosynthesis are poorly defined, although it is known to consist of both aromatic and aliphatic domains. While the composition of the aliphatic component has been fairly well characterized, that of the phenolic component has not. Using a combination of specific carbon-13 labeling techniques, and in situ solid state 13C NMR spectroscopic analysis, we now provide the first direct evidence for the nature of the phenolic domain of suberin and report here that it is almost exclusively comprised of a covalently linked, hydroxycinnamic acid-derived polymeric matrix.

  12. Two glucosylated abscisic acid derivates from avocado seeds (Persea americana Mill. Lauraceae cv. Hass).

    PubMed

    del Refugio Ramos, María; Jerz, Gerold; Villanueva, Socorro; López-Dellamary, Fernando; Waibel, Reiner; Winterhalter, Peter

    2004-04-01

    Phytochemical investigation of avocado seed material (Persea americana Mill., Lauraceae) resulted in the isolation of two glucosylated abscisic acid derivates. One of these was not known as a natural product and can be regarded as a potential 'missing link' in abscisic acid metabolism in plants. After fractionation by high-speed countercurrent chromatography, and multiple steps of column chromatography, structures were elucidated by 1D-, 2D-NMR, electrospray-MS to be the novel beta-d-glucoside of (1'S,6'R)-8'-hydroxyabscisic acid, and (1'R,3'R,5'R,8'S)-epi-dihydrophaseic acid beta-d-glucoside. Absolute configuration was determined by circulardichroism, optical rotation, and by NOE experiments.

  13. Pyrimidinyl-arylpropionic acid derivatives: viable resources in the development of new antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xishan; Wang, Li; Ye, Yangliang; Fu, Lili; Chen, Minli; Wang, Qingyi; Liu, Moyan; Tang, Jing; Dai, Bing; Shen, Jianhua; Mei, Changlin

    2010-08-01

    Numerous studies have documented that various naturally derived ligands or synthetic non-thiazolidinediones (TZD) as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonists have shown moderate or potent antitumor activities, which is PPARgamma independent or partially dependent. However, the PPARgamma agonistic or glucose-lowering activity is ranked first more often than antitumor activity to determine promising novel PPARgamma agonists for potential clinical use. In this study, we hypothesized that there might exist some compounds with less PPARgamma agonistic activity but potent antitumor activity. Thereafter, we evaluated the PPARgamma agonistic and antitumor activity of a novel series of alpha-aryloxy-alpha-methylhydrocinnamic acid derivatives synthesized with the initial aim of developing novel PPARgamma agonists as hypoglycemic agents. MTT assay results revealed that several compounds were able to inhibit cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner with IC(50) 12.7-29.7 microM, better than that of rosiglitazone (45.9-141 microM), although the PPARgamma agonistic activity of most compounds is much lower than rosiglitazone. Some compounds induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis tested by Flow Cytometry. Oral administration of DH9 (100 mg/kg/d) for 21 days to BALB/c nude mice bearing xenografts including MGC-803, NCI-H460, HT-29 and OS-RC-2 cells significantly retarded tumor growth. DG8 and DJ5 showed benefits in some of the above four xenografts. Our findings demonstrate that these compounds have potent antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo and pyrimidinyl-arylpropionic acid derivatives might be viable resources in the development of new antineoplastic agents.

  14. Insulin-releasing properties of a series of cinnamic acid derivatives in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Adisakwattana, Sirichai; Moonsan, Preecha; Yibchok-Anun, Sirintorn

    2008-09-10

    Cinnamic acid derivatives are naturally occurring substances found in fruits, vegetables, and flowers and are consumed as dietary phenolic compounds. In the present study, cinnamic acid and its derivatives were evaluated for insulin secreting activity in perfused rat pancreas and pancreatic beta-cells (INS-1) as well as an increase in [Ca(2+)]i in vitro. The presence of m-hydroxy or p-methoxy residues on cinnamic acid was a significantly important substituent as an effective insulin releasing agent. The introduction of p-hydroxy and m-methoxy-substituted groups in cinnamic acid structure (ferulic acid) displayed the most potent insulin secreting agent among those of cinnamic acid derivatives. In particular, the stimulatory insulin secreting activities of test compounds were associated with a rise of [Ca(2+)]i in INS-1. In perfused rat pancreas, m-hydroxycinnamic acid, p-methoxycinnamic acid, and ferulic acid (100 microM) significantly stimulated insulin secretion during 10 min of administration. The onset time of insulin secretion of those compounds was less than 1 min and reached its peak at 4 min that was about 2.8-, 3.3-, and 3.4-fold of the baseline level, respectively. Intravenous administration of p-methoxycinnamic acid and ferulic acid (5 mg/kg) significantly decreased plasma glucose and increased insulin concentration in normal rats and maintained its level for 15 min until the end of experiment. Meanwhile, m-hydroxycinnamic acid induced a significant lowering of plasma glucose after 6 min, but the effects were transient with plasma glucose concentration, rapidly returning to basal levels. Our findings suggested that p-methoxycinnamic acid and ferulic acid may be beneficial for the treatment of diabetes mellitus because they regulated blood glucose level by stimulating insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells.

  15. In vitro inhibition of salicylic acid derivatives on human cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isozymes I and II.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Esra; Senturk, Murat; Kufrevioglu, O Irfan; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2008-10-15

    The inhibition of two human cytosolic carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isozymes, hCA I and II, with a series of salicylic acid derivatives was investigated by using the esterase method with 4-nitrophenyl acetate as substrate. IC(50) values for sulfasalazine, diflunisal, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, dinitrosalicylic acid, 4-aminosalicylic acid, 4-sulfosalicylic acid, 5-sulfosalicylic acid, salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and 3-metylsalicylic acid were of 3.04 microM, 3.38 microM, 4.07 microM, 7.64 microM, 0.13 mM, 0.29 mM, 0.42 mM, 0.56 mM, 2.71 mM and 3.07 mM for hCA I and of 4.49 microM, 2.70 microM, 0.72 microM, 2.80 microM, 0.75 mM, 0.72 mM, 0.29 mM, 0.68 mM, 1.16 mM and 4.70 mM for hCA II, respectively. Lineweaver-Burk plots were also used for the determination of the inhibition mechanism of these substituted phenols, most of which were noncompetitive inhibitors with this substrate. Some salicylic acid derivatives investigated here showed effective hCA I and II inhibitory activity, and might be used as leads for generating enzyme inhibitors eventually targeting other isoforms which have not been assayed yet for their interactions with such agents.

  16. Isolation, modification, and aldose reductase inhibitory activity of rosmarinic acid derivatives from the roots of Salvia grandifolia.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jie; Tang, Yanbo; Liu, Quan; Guo, Nan; Zhang, Jian; Xiao, Zhiyan; Chen, Ruoyun; Shen, Zhufang

    2016-07-01

    To find aldose reductase inhibitors, two previously unreported compounds, grandifolias H and I, and five known compounds, including rosmarinic acid and rosmarinic acid derivatives, were isolated from the roots of Salvia grandifolia. A series of rosmarinic acid derivatives was obtained from rosmarinic acid using simple synthetic methods. The aldose reductase inhibitory activity of the isolated and synthesized compounds was assessed. Seven of the tested compounds showed moderate aldose reductase inhibition (IC50=0.06-0.30μM). The structure-activity relationship of aldose reductase inhibitory activity of rosmarinic acid derivatives was discussed for the first time. This study provided useful information that will facilitate the development of aldose reductase inhibitors. PMID:27233987

  17. Ion transport mediated by the valinomycin analogue cyclo(L-Lac-L-Val-D- Pro-D-Val)3 in lipid bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Cyclo(L-Lac-L-Val-D-Pro-D-Val)3 (PV-Lac) a structural analogue of the ion-carrier valinomycin, increases the cation permeability of lipid bilayer membranes by forming a 1:1 ion-carrier complex. The selectively sequence for PV-Lac is identical to that of valinomycin; i.e., Rb+ greater than K+ greater than Cs+ greater than or equal to NH+4 greater than Na+ greater than Li+. The steady-state zero-voltage conductance, G(0), is a saturating function of KCl concentration. A similar behavior was found for Rb+, Cs+, and NH+4. However, the ion concentration at which G(0) reaches a plateau strongly depends on membrane composition. The current-voltage curves present saturating characteristics, except at low ion concentrations of Rb+, K+, or Cs+. The ion concentration at which the saturating characteristics appear depends on membrane composition. These and other results presented in this paper agree with a model that assumes complexation between carrier and ion at the membrane-water interface. Current relaxation after voltage-jump studies were also performed for PV-Lac. Both the time constant and the amplitude of the current after a voltage jump strongly depend on ion concentration and membrane composition. These results, together with the stationary conductance data, were used to evaluate the rate constants of the PV-Lac-mediated K+ transport. In glycerolmonooleate they are: association rate constant, 2 x 10(6) M-1 s-1; dissociation rate constant, 4 x 10(5) s-1; translocation rate constant for complex, 5 x 10(4) s-1; and the rate of translocation of the free carrier (ks), 55 s-1. ks is much smaller for PV-Lac than for valinomycin and thus limits the efficiency with which the carrier is able to translocate cations across the membrane. PMID:7241088

  18. Ether lipid generating enzyme AGPS alters the balance of structural and signaling lipids to fuel cancer pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Daniel I; Cozzo, Alyssa; Ji, Xiaodan; Roberts, Lindsay S; Louie, Sharon M; Mulvihill, Melinda M; Luo, Kunxin; Nomura, Daniel K

    2013-09-10

    Aberrant lipid metabolism is an established hallmark of cancer cells. In particular, ether lipid levels have been shown to be elevated in tumors, but their specific function in cancer remains elusive. We show here that the metabolic enzyme alkylglyceronephosphate synthase (AGPS), a critical step in the synthesis of ether lipids, is up-regulated across multiple types of aggressive human cancer cells and primary tumors. We demonstrate that ablation of AGPS in cancer cells results in reduced cell survival, cancer aggressiveness, and tumor growth through altering the balance of ether lipid, fatty acid, eicosanoid, and fatty acid-derived glycerophospholipid metabolism, resulting in an overall reduction in the levels of several oncogenic signaling lipids. Taken together, our results reveal that AGPS, in addition to maintaining ether lipids, also controls cellular utilization of fatty acids, favoring the generation of signaling lipids necessary for promoting the aggressive features of cancer. PMID:23980144

  19. Nonvesicular Lipid Transfer from the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Lev, Sima

    2012-01-01

    The transport of lipids from their synthesis site at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to different target membranes could be mediated by both vesicular and nonvesicular transport mechanisms. Nonvesicular lipid transport appears to be the major transport route of certain lipid species, and could be mediated by either spontaneous lipid transport or by lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs). Although nonvesicular lipid transport has been extensively studied for more than four decades, its underlying mechanism, advantage and regulation, have not been fully explored. In particular, the function of LTPs and their involvement in intracellular lipid movement remain largely controversial. In this article, we describe the pathways by which lipids are synthesized at the ER and delivered to different cellular membranes, and discuss the role of LTPs in lipid transport both in vitro and in intact cells. PMID:23028121

  20. Discovery of a novel activator of 5-lipoxygenase from an anacardic acid derived compound collection

    PubMed Central

    Wisastra, Rosalina; Kok, Petra A.M; Eleftheriadis, Nikolaos; Baumgartner, Matthew P.; Camacho, Carlos J.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Dekker, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) and cyclooxygenases (COXs) metabolize poly-unsaturated fatty acids into inflammatory signaling molecules. Modulation of the activity of these enzymes may provide new approaches for therapy of inflammatory diseases. In this study, we screened novel anacardic acid derivatives as modulators of human 5-LOX and COX-2 activity. Interestingly, a novel salicylate derivative 23a was identified as a surprisingly potent activator of human 5-LOX. This compound showed both non-competitive activation towards the human 5-LOX activator adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and non-essential mixed type activation against the substrate linoleic acid, while having no effect on the conversion of the substrate arachidonic acid. The kinetic analysis demonstrated a non-essential activation of the linoleic acid conversion with a KA of 8.65 μM, αKA of 0.38 μM and a β value of 1.76. It is also of interest that a comparable derivative 23d showed a mixed type inhibition for linoleic acid conversion. These observations indicate the presence of an allosteric binding site in human 5-LOX distinct from the ATP binding site. The activatory and inhibitory behavior of 23a and 23d on the conversion of linoleic compared to arachidonic acid are rationalized by docking studies, which suggest that the activator 23a stabilizes linoleic acid, whereas the larger inhibitor 23d blocks the enzyme active site. PMID:24231650

  1. Changes in caffeic acid derivatives in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) during cooking and processing.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Makiko; Nanayama, Kazuko; Isobe, Seiichiro; Murata, Masatsune

    2006-01-01

    There was an obvious decrease in caffeic acid derivatives during the boiling of cube-shaped blocks of sweet potatoes. They also decreased in a mixture of freeze-dried sweet-potato powder and water maintained at room temperature. Ascorbic acid prevented the decrease, supporting the occurrence of an enzyme reaction with polyphenol oxidase (PPO). 5-O-Caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA, "3-O-caffeoylquinic acid" as a trivial name) and 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (3,5-CQA), major phenolic compounds of sweet potato, did not change when they were separately heated in boiling water. When the mixture of powdered sweet potato and water was heated at 100 degrees C, there was only a negligible decrease in the total amount of phenolic compounds, and portions of 5-CQA and 3,5-CQA were found to be isomerized to 3-CQA, 4-CQA, 3,4-CQA, and 4,5-CQA. The content and composition of the phenolic compounds in sweet potatoes differed between fresh and long-stored ones, as did their response to heating.

  2. Hydroxamic acid derivatives of mycophenolic acid inhibit histone deacetylase at the cellular level.

    PubMed

    Batovska, Daniela I; Kim, Dong Hoon; Mitsuhashi, Shinya; Cho, Yoon Sun; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Ubukata, Makoto

    2008-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA, 1), an inhibitor of IMP-dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and a latent PPARgamma agonist, is used as an effective immunosuppressant for clinical transplantation and recently entered clinical trials in advanced multiple myeloma patients. On the other hand, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a non-specific histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, has been approved for treating cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. MPA seemed to bear a cap, a linker, and a weak metal-binding site as a latent inhibitor of HDAC. Therefore, the hydroxamic acid derivatives of mycophenolic acid having an effective metal-binding site, mycophenolic hydroxamic acid (MPHA, 2), 7-O-acetyl mycophenolic acid (7-O-Ac MPHA, 3), and 7-O-lauroyl mycophenolic hydroxamic acid (7-O-L MPHA, 4) were designed and synthesized. All these compounds inhibited histone deacetylase with IC50 values of 1, 0.9 and 0.5 microM, and cell proliferation at concentrations of 2, 1.5 and 1 microM, respectively. PMID:18838793

  3. Free and bound cinnamic acid derivatives in corsica sweet blond oranges.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Eric; El Kebir, Mohamed Vall Ould; Jacquemond, Camille; Luro, François; Lozano, Yves; Gaydou, Emile M

    2010-03-01

    Total determination of cinnamic acids (CA), including hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives is generally not accurate since, during hydrolysis, a possible degradation of dihydroxy CA such as caffeic acid could occur. Evaluations of CA (ferulic, p-coumaric, sinapic, cinnamic and caffeic acids) before and after hydrolysis have been undertaken using standards and either with or without addition of ascorbic acid and EDTA. The method was then applied to the determination of free and bound CA in five blond cultivars (Navelina, Washington navel, Pera, Salustiana and Valencia late) of sweet oranges [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osb.]. Four parts of the fruits (peel juice, flavedo, albedo and juice) have been investigated. Results show that CA are mainly bound (86% up to 92%) in the four fruit parts. The mean of total CA contents was found to be higher in peel juice (1.5 g kg(-1)) in comparison with flavedo (0.7 g kg(-1)), albedo (0.1 g kg(-1)) and juice (0.6 g kg(-1)). Free and bound ferulic acid represented 55-70% of CA in juices, followed by p-coumaric acid (20%), sinapic acid (10%) and caffeic acid (9%). Total contents of each CA in the four fruit parts are discussed and show the potential interest in orange peel wastes. PMID:20420324

  4. Usnic Acid Derivatives with Cytotoxic and Antifungal Activities from the Lichen Usnea longissima.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuelong; Guo, Qiang; Su, Guozhu; Yang, Ailin; Hu, Zhongdong; Qu, Changhai; Wan, Zhe; Li, Ruoyu; Tu, Pengfei; Chai, Xingyun

    2016-05-27

    Eight usnic acid derivatives, that is, usenamines A-F (1-6), usone (7), and isousone (8), together with the known (+)-usnic acid (9), were isolated from the lichen Usnea longissima. Their structures were elucidated using 1D and 2D NMR and MS data, and the absolute configurations of compounds 1 and 2 were defined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Compounds 1, 2, and 8 showed inhibitory effects on the growth of human hepatoma HepG2 cells with IC50 values of 6.0-53.3 μM compared with methotrexate as the positive control, which had an IC50 value of 15.8 μM. Furthermore, 1 induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations of 0-15.0 μM. The isolated compounds were also evaluated for their antifungal and antibacterial activities, with 7 and 8 exhibiting weak inhibitory effects on fungal Trichophyton rubrum spp. with an MIC value of 41.0 μM. PMID:27186821

  5. Modification of the cellulosic component of hemp fibers using sulfonic acid derivatives: Surface and thermal characterization.

    PubMed

    George, Michael; Mussone, Paolo G; Bressler, David C

    2015-12-10

    The aim of this study was to characterize the surface, morphological, and thermal properties of hemp fibers treated with two commercially available, inexpensive, and water soluble sulfonic acid derivatives. Specifically, the cellulosic component of the fibers were targeted, because cellulose is not easily removed during chemical treatment. These acids have the potential to selectively transform the surfaces of natural fibers for composite applications. The proposed method proceeds in the absence of conventional organic solvents and high reaction temperatures. Surface chemical composition and signature were measured using gravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). XPS data from the treated hemp fibers were characterized by measuring the reduction in O/C ratio and an increase in abundance of the C-C-O signature. FTIR confirmed the reaction with the emergence of peaks characteristic of disubstituted benzene and amino groups. Grafting of the sulfonic derivatives resulted in lower surface polarity. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed that treated fibers were characterized by lower percent degradation between 200 and 300 °C, and a higher initial degradation temperature.

  6. Interaction of cinnamic acid derivatives with β-cyclodextrin in water: experimental and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Benguo; Zeng, Jie; Chen, Chen; Liu, Yonglan; Ma, Hanjun; Mo, Haizhen; Liang, Guizhao

    2016-03-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) can be used to improve the solubility and stability of cinnamic acid derivatives (CAs). However, there was no detailed report about understanding the effects of the substituent groups in the benzene ring on the inclusion behavior between CAs and CDs in aqueous solution. Here, the interaction of β-CD with CAs, including caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and p-coumaric acid, in water was investigated by phase-solubility method, UV, fluorescence, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, together with ONIOM (our Own N-layer Integrated Orbital molecular Mechanics)-based QM/MM (Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics) calculations. Experimental results demonstrated that CAs could form 1:1 stoichiometric inclusion complex with β-CD by non-covalent bonds, and that the maximum apparent stability constants were found in caffeic acid (176M(-1)) followed by p-coumaric acid (160M(-1)) and ferulic acid (133M(-1)). Moreover, our calculations reasonably illustrated the binding orientations of β-CD with CAs determined by experimental observations.

  7. Novel cinnamic acid derivatives as antioxidant and anticancer agents: design, synthesis and modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Pontiki, Eleni; Hadjipavlou-Litina, Dimitra; Litinas, Konstantinos; Geromichalos, George

    2014-07-07

    Cinnamic acids have been identified as interesting compounds with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic properties. In the present study, simple cinnamic acids were synthesized by Knoevenagel condensation reactions and evaluated for the above biological activities. Compound 4ii proved to be the most potent LOX inhibitor. Phenyl- substituted acids showed better inhibitory activity against soybean LOX, and it must be noted that compounds 4i and 3i with higher lipophilicity values resulted less active than compounds 2i and 1i. The compounds have shown very good activity in different antioxidant assays. The antitumor properties of these derivatives have been assessed by their 1/IC50 inhibitory values in the proliferation of HT-29, A-549, OAW-42, MDA-MB-231, HeLa and MRC-5 normal cell lines. The compounds presented low antitumor activity considering the IC50 values attained for the cell lines, with the exception of compound 4ii. Molecular docking studies were carried out on cinnamic acid derivative 4ii and were found to be in accordance with our experimental biological results.

  8. Photochemistry and proton transfer reaction chemistry of selected cinnamic acid derivatives in hydrogen bonded environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Russell, David H.

    1998-05-01

    Proton transfer reactions between cinnamic acid derivatives (MH) and ammonia are studied using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer equipped with a supersonic nozzle to entrain neutral species formed by 337 nm laser desorption. The supersonic nozzle is used to form clusters of the type MH(NH3)n where n ranges to numbers greater than 20. Multimeric clusters of MH, e.g. MH2(NH3)n are not detected in this experiment or are of low abundance. Photoexcitation of MH(NH3)n clusters by using 355 nm photons yields ionic species that correspond to direct multiphoton ionization, e.g. MH+[middle dot](NH3)n, and proton transfer reactions, e.g. H+(NH3)n. Analogous product ions are formed by photoexcitation of the methylamine, MH(CH3NH2)n, and ammonia/methanol, MH(NH3)(CH3OH)n, clusters. Detailed analysis of energetics data suggests that proton transfer occurs through neutral excited stare species, and a mechanism analogous to one proposed previously is used to rationalize the data. The energetics of proton transfer via a radical cation form of the cinnarnic acid dimer is also consistent with the data. The relevance of this work to fundamental studies of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) is discussed. In particular, the role of excited state proton transfer (ESPT) in MALDI is discussed.

  9. Isolation of a new bioactive cinnamic acid derivative from the whole plant of Viola betonicifolia.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Naveed; Saeed, Muhammad; Adhikari, Achyut; Khan, Khalid Muhammad; Khan, Haroon

    2013-10-01

    A new cinnamic acid derivative was isolated from the whole plant of Viola betonicifolia as off white needle. On the basis of various modern spectroscopic techniques including HREI-MS and 1D and 2D NMR, its structure was elucidated as 2,4-dihydroxy, 5-methoxy-cinnamic acid. It showed marked inhibition against DPPH (diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl) free radicals with IC50 = 124 ± 5.76 µM. The antioxidant property of the compound was compared with α-tocopherole and vitamin C having IC50 values 96 ± 0.46 and 90 ± 0.56 µM, respectively. In case of antiglycation assay, the compound exhibited moderate activity (IC50 = 355 ± 7.56 µM) similar to standard compound, rutin (IC50 = 294 ± 0.56 µM). However, it was non-toxic to PC-3 cell line. It is concluded that 2,4-dihydroxy, 5-methoxy-cinnamic acid has antiglycation potential which was further augmented by its antioxidant activity and thus offered an ideal natural therapeutic option for the effective management of diabetes.

  10. Hydroxycinnamic Acid Derivatives Obtained from a Commercial Crataegus Extract and from Authentic Crataegus spp.§

    PubMed Central

    Kuczkowiak, Ulrich; Petereit, Frank; Nahrstedt, Adolf

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Eleven hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives were isolated from a 70% methanolic Crataegus extract (Crataegi folium cum flore) and partly verified and quantified for individual Crataegus species (C. laevigata, C. monogyna, C. nigra, C. pentagyna) by HPLC: 3-O-(E)-p-coumaroylquinic acid (1), 5-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl-quinic acid (2), 4-O-(E)-p-coumaroylquinic acid (3), 3-O-(E)-caffeoylquinic acid (4), 4-O-(E)-caffeoylquinic acid (5), 5-O-(E)-caffeoylquinic acid (6), 3,5-di-O-(E)-caffeoylquinic acid (7), 4,5-di-O-(E)-caffeoylquinic acid (8), (-)-2-O-(E)-caffeoyl-L-threonic acid (9), (-)-4-O-(E)-caffeoyl-L-threonic acid (10), and (-)-4-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl-L-threonic acid (11). Further, (-)-2-O-(E)-caffeoyl-D-malic acid (12) was isolated from C. submollis and also identified for C. pentagyna and C. nigra by co-chromatography. The isolates 10 and 11 were not found in the authentic fresh specimen, indicating that they may be formed during extraction by acyl migration from the 2-O-acylderivatives. Also, 9 and 11 are described here for the first time. All structures were assigned on the basis of their spectroscopic data (1H-, 13C-NMR, MS, optical rotation). PMID:26171328

  11. Novel biomarkers of the metabolism of caffeic acid derivatives in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rechner, A R; Spencer, J P; Kuhnle, G; Hahn, U; Rice-Evans, C A

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate biomarkers of the bioavailability and metabolism of hydroxycinnamate derivatives through the determination of the pharmacokinetics of their urinary elimination and identification of the metabolites excreted. Coffee was used as a rich source of caffeic acid derivatives and human supplementation was undertaken. The results show a highly significant increase in the excretion of ferulic, isoferulic, dihydroferulic acid (3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-propionic acid), and vanillic acid postsupplementation relative to the levels presupplementation. Thus, ferulic, isoferulic, and dihydroferulic acids are specific biomarkers for the bioavailability and metabolism of dietary caffeic acid esters. Isoferulic acid is a unique biomarker as it is not a dietary component, however, dihydroferulic acid may well derive from other flavonoids with a structurally related B-ring. 3-Hydroxyhippuric acid has also been identified as an indicator for bioavailability and metabolism of phenolic compounds, and shows a highly significant excretion increase postsupplementation. The results reveal isoferulic acid (and possibly dihydroferulic acid) as novel markers of caffeoyl quinic acid metabolism.

  12. Production of fatty acid-derived oleochemicals and biofuels by synthetic yeast cell factories.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongjin J; Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhu, Zhiwei; Qin, Jiufu; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable production of oleochemicals requires establishment of cell factory platform strains. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive cell factory as new strains can be rapidly implemented into existing infrastructures such as bioethanol production plants. Here we show high-level production of free fatty acids (FFAs) in a yeast cell factory, and the production of alkanes and fatty alcohols from its descendants. The engineered strain produces up to 10.4 g l(-1) of FFAs, which is the highest reported titre to date. Furthermore, through screening of specific pathway enzymes, endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and aldehyde reductases, we reconstruct efficient pathways for conversion of fatty acids to alkanes (0.8 mg l(-1)) and fatty alcohols (1.5 g l(-1)), to our knowledge the highest titres reported in S. cerevisiae. This should facilitate the construction of yeast cell factories for production of fatty acids derived products and even aldehyde-derived chemicals of high value.

  13. Production of fatty acid-derived oleochemicals and biofuels by synthetic yeast cell factories.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongjin J; Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhu, Zhiwei; Qin, Jiufu; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable production of oleochemicals requires establishment of cell factory platform strains. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive cell factory as new strains can be rapidly implemented into existing infrastructures such as bioethanol production plants. Here we show high-level production of free fatty acids (FFAs) in a yeast cell factory, and the production of alkanes and fatty alcohols from its descendants. The engineered strain produces up to 10.4 g l(-1) of FFAs, which is the highest reported titre to date. Furthermore, through screening of specific pathway enzymes, endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and aldehyde reductases, we reconstruct efficient pathways for conversion of fatty acids to alkanes (0.8 mg l(-1)) and fatty alcohols (1.5 g l(-1)), to our knowledge the highest titres reported in S. cerevisiae. This should facilitate the construction of yeast cell factories for production of fatty acids derived products and even aldehyde-derived chemicals of high value. PMID:27222209

  14. Synthesis, structural characterization and quantum chemical studies of silicon-containing benzoic acid derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaltariov, Mirela-Fernanda; Cojocaru, Corneliu; Shova, Sergiu; Sacarescu, Liviu; Cazacu, Maria

    2016-09-01

    The present paper is concerned with the synthesis and molecular structure investigation of two new benzoic acid derivatives having trimethylsilyl tails, 4-((trimethylsilyl)methoxy) and 4-(3-(trimethylsilyl)propoxy)benzoic acids. The structures of the novel compounds have been confirmed by X-ray crystallography, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H and 13C NMR). The theoretical studies of molecules were conducted by using the quantum chemical methods, such as Density Functional Theory (DFT B3LYP/6-31 + G**), Hartree-Fock (HF/6-31 + G**) and semiempirical computations (PM3, PM6 and PM7). The optimized molecular geometries have been found to be in good agreement with experimental structures resulted from the X-ray diffraction. The maximum electronic absorption bands observed at 272-287 nm (UV-vis spectra) have been assigned to π → π* transitions, which were in reasonable agreement with the time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. The computed vibrational frequencies by DFT method were assigned and compared with the experimental FTIR spectra. The mapped electrostatic potentials revealed the reactive sites, which corroborated the observation of the dimer supramolecular structures formed in the crystals by hydrogen-bonding. The energies of frontier molecular orbitals (HOMO and LUMO), energy gap, dipole moment and molecular descriptors for the new compounds were calculated and discussed.

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of enantiomerically pure glyceric acid derivatives as LpxC inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tangherlini, Giovanni; Torregrossa, Tullio; Agoglitta, Oriana; Köhler, Jens; Melesina, Jelena; Sippl, Wolfgang; Holl, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    Inhibitors of the UDP-3-O-[(R)-3-hydroxymyristoyl]-N-acetylglucosamine deacetylase (LpxC) represent a promising class of novel antibiotics, selectively combating Gram-negative bacteria. In order to elucidate the impact of the hydroxymethyl groups of diol (S,S)-4 on the inhibitory activity against LpxC, glyceric acid ethers (R)-7a, (S)-7a, (R)-7b, and (S)-7b, lacking the hydroxymethyl group in benzylic position, were synthesized. The compounds were obtained in enantiomerically pure form by a chiral pool synthesis and a lipase-catalyzed enantioselective desymmetrization, respectively. The enantiomeric hydroxamic acids (R)-7b (Ki=230nM) and (S)-7b (Ki=390nM) show promising enzyme inhibition. However, their inhibitory activities do not substantially differ from each other leading to a low eudismic ratio. Generally, the synthesized glyceric acid derivatives 7 show antibacterial activities against two Escherichia coli strains exceeding the ones of their respective regioisomes 6.

  16. Identification and quantitation of new glutamic acid derivatives in soy sauce by UPLC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Frerot, Eric; Chen, Ting

    2013-10-01

    Glutamic acid is an abundant amino acid that lends a characteristic umami taste to foods. In fermented foods, glutamic acid can be found as a free amino acid formed by proteolysis or as a non-proteolytic derivative formed by microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to identify different structures of glutamic acid derivatives in a typical fermented protein-based food product, soy sauce. An acidic fraction was prepared with anion-exchange solid-phase extraction (SPE) and analyzed by UPLC/MS/MS and UPLC/TOF-MS. α-Glutamyl, γ-glutamyl, and pyroglutamyl dipeptides, as well as lactoyl amino acids, were identified in the acidic fraction of soy sauce. They were chemically synthesized for confirmation of their occurrence and quantified in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. Pyroglutamyl dipeptides accounted for 770 mg/kg of soy sauce, followed by lactoyl amino acids (135 mg/kg) and γ-glutamyl dipeptides (70 mg/kg). In addition, N-succinoylglutamic acid was identified for the first time in food as a minor compound in soy sauce (5 mg/kg).

  17. Production of fatty acid-derived oleochemicals and biofuels by synthetic yeast cell factories

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yongjin J.; Buijs, Nicolaas A.; Zhu, Zhiwei; Qin, Jiufu; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable production of oleochemicals requires establishment of cell factory platform strains. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive cell factory as new strains can be rapidly implemented into existing infrastructures such as bioethanol production plants. Here we show high-level production of free fatty acids (FFAs) in a yeast cell factory, and the production of alkanes and fatty alcohols from its descendants. The engineered strain produces up to 10.4 g l−1 of FFAs, which is the highest reported titre to date. Furthermore, through screening of specific pathway enzymes, endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and aldehyde reductases, we reconstruct efficient pathways for conversion of fatty acids to alkanes (0.8 mg l−1) and fatty alcohols (1.5 g l−1), to our knowledge the highest titres reported in S. cerevisiae. This should facilitate the construction of yeast cell factories for production of fatty acids derived products and even aldehyde-derived chemicals of high value. PMID:27222209

  18. Green Synthesis and Urease Inhibitory Activity of Spiro-Pyrimidinethiones/Spiro-Pyrimidinones-Barbituric Acid Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi Ziarani, Ghodsi; Asadi, Shima; Faramarzi, Sakineh; Amanlou, Massoud

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonic acid functionalized SBA-15 (SBA-Pr-SO3H) with pore size 6 nm as an efficient heterogeneous nanoporous solid acid catalyst exhibited good catalytic activity in the Biginelli-like reaction in the synthesis of spiroheterobicyclic rings with good yield and good recyclability. Spiro-pyrimidinethiones/spiro-pyrimidinones-barbituric acid derivatives were synthesized in a simple and efficient method using the one-pot three-component reaction of a cyclic 1,3- dicarbonyl compounds (barbituric acid), an aromatic aldehyde and urea or thiourea in the presence of nanoporous silica SBA-Pr-SO3H under solvent free conditions. Urease inhibitory activity of spiro compounds were tested against Jack bean urease using Berthelot alkaline phenol–hypochlorite method. Five of 13 compounds were inhibitor and two of them were enzyme activators. Analysis of the docking results showed that, in most of the spiro molecules, one of the carbonyl groups is coordinated with both nickel atoms, while the other one is involved in the formation of hydrogen bonds with important active-site residues. The effect of inserting two methyl groups on N atoms of barbiturate ring, S substituted, ortho, meta and para substituted compounds were investigated too. PMID:26664377

  19. Dehydroabietic Acid Derivative QC2 Induces Oncosis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guang; Jiang, Chunping; Wang, Zhongxia; Chen, Weibo; Gu, Wen; Ding, Yitao

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Rosin, the traditional Chinese medicine, is reported to be able to inhibit skin cancer cell lines. In this report, we investigate the inhibitory effect against HCC cells of QC2, the derivative of rosin's main components dehydroabietic acid. Methods. MTT assay was used to determine the cytotoxicity of QC2. Morphological changes were observed by time-lapse microscopy and transmission electron microscopy and the cytoskeleton changes were observed by laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Cytomembrane integrity and organelles damage were confirmed by detection of the reactive oxygen (ROS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm). The underlying mechanism was manifested by Western blotting. The oncotic cell death was further confirmed by detection of oncosis related protein calpain. Results. Swelling cell type and destroyed cytoskeleton were observed in QC2-treated HCC cells. Organelle damage was visualized by transmission electron microscopy. The detection of ROS accumulation, increased LDH release, and decreased ATP and Δψm confirmed the cell death. The oncotic related protein calpain was found to increase time-dependently in QC2-treated HCC cells, while its inhibitor PD150606 attenuated the cytotoxicity. Conclusions. Dehydroabietic acid derivative QC2 activated oncosis related protein calpain to induce the damage of cytomembrane and organelles which finally lead to oncosis in HCC cells. PMID:25110686

  20. Enzyme inhibition as a possible mechanism of the mutagenicity of dithiocarbamic acid derivatives in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Rannug, A; Rannug, U

    1984-05-01

    In recent years data have accumulated regarding genotoxic properties of dithiocarbamic acid derivatives. The results from the present work indicate that the mutagenicity of these compounds depends on an indirect effect via oxygen radicals. Mutagenicity of tetramethylthiuram disulfide ( TMTD ), that was used as a model substance, was established with both frameshift and base substitution sensitive strains of Salmonella typhimurium. Addition of copper ions resulted in a decreased survival at low dithiocarbamate doses. The dose response curves seem to correlate with the formation of two types of metal dithiocarbamate complexes. At low doses charged complexes are formed, while the formation of uncharged complexes is favoured at higher dosages. The data suggest that this formation of uncharged metal complexes implies a decreased toxicity but at the same time an increased mutagenicity. The mutagenicity of both TMTD and its ethyl analogue TETD was enhanced by oxygen. Furthermore, TMTD potentiates the mutagenic action of menadione, a substance that produces O(2) and H2O2 by redox cycling with molecular oxygen. Interaction of uncharged metal dithiocarbamate complexes with both production and detoxification of reactive forms of oxygen is suggested to be responsible for the direct mutagenic effects via oxidative damage to DNA. A further enhancement of the oxygen radical content of the cells by adding microsomes that produce oxygen radicals via autoxidation of cytochrome P-450 is proposed as the mechanism for the 'metabolic activation of TMTD '.

  1. Tetramic acid derivatives and polyphenols from sponge-derived fungus and their biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Feng; Qin, Xiaochu; Xu, Fu-Quan; Zhang, Tianyu; Liao, Shengrong; Lin, Xiuping; Yang, Bin; Liu, Juan; Wang, Lishu; Tu, Zhengchao; Liu, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen compounds, including two tetramic acid derivatives, penicillenol A1 (1) and penicillenol A2 (2), six polyphenols containing both phenolic bisabolane sesquiterpenoid and diphenyl ether units, expansols A-F (3-8), together with six phenolic bisabolane sesquiterpenoids (9-14) and diorcinol (15), were isolated from the fermentation broth of the marine-derived fungus ZSDS1-F11 isolated from the sponge Phakellia fusca Thiele collected in the Yongxing island of Xisha. Their structures were elucidated mainly by using extensive NMR spectroscopic and mass spectrometric analyses. Compounds 3-5, 7 and 8 showed potent COX-1 inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 5.3, 16.2, 30.2, 41.0 and 56.8 μM, respectively. Meanwhile, compounds 3-8 showed potent COX-2 inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 3.1, 5.6, 3.0, 5.1, 3.2 and 3.7 μM, respectively. In addition, compound 1 exhibited antituberculosis activity with 96.1% inhibition at concentration of 10 μM.

  2. Synthetic Bichalcone TSWU-BR23 Induces Apoptosis of Human Colon Cancer HT-29 Cells by p53-Mediated Mitochondrial Oligomerization of BAX/BAK and Lipid Raft Localization of CD95/FADD.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Liang; Chen, Shih-Shun; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2015-10-01

    A synthetic bichalcone analog, (E)-1-(3-((4-(4-acetylphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)methyl)-4-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)-3-(pyridin-3-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (TSWU-BR23), has been shown to induce apoptosis in human colon cancer HT-29 cells involving the induction of CD95 and FAS-associated protein death domain (FADD), but its precise mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated. Using cell-surface biotinylation and sucrose density-gradient-based membrane flotation techniques, we showed that the disruption of TSWU-BR23-induced lipid raft localization of CD95/FADD by cholesterol-depleting agent (methyl-β-cyclodextrin) was reversed by cholesterol replenishment. Blockade of p53 expression by short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) suppressed oligomeric Bcl-2-associated x protein (BAX)/Bcl-2 antagonist killer 1 (BAK)-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis but did not inhibit lipid raft localization of CD95/FADD and pro-caspase-8 cleavage induced by TSWU-BR23. Co-expression of p53 shRNA and dominant-negative mutant of FADD completely inhibited TSWU-BR32-induced mitochondrial apoptotic cell death. Collectively, these data demonstrate that TSWU-BR23 leads to HT-29 cell apoptosis by inducing p53-mediated mitochondrial oligomerization of BAX/BAK and the localization of CD95/FADD with lipid rafts at the cell surface.

  3. Engineering alfalfa to accumulate useful caffeic acid derivatives and characterization of hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA transferases from legumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some forages crops, such as red clover, accumulate high levels of caffeic acid derivatives. Oxidation of these o-diphenols to quinones by endogenous polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) and the subsequent reactions of these quinones (probably with endogenous plant proteases) result in a significant reduction ...

  4. A general approach to quantification of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and flavones, flavonols, and their glycosides by UV spectrophotometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A general method was developed for the quantification of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and flavones, flavonols, and their glycosides based on the UV molar relative response factors (MRRF) of the standards. Each of these phenolic compounds contains a cinnamoyl structure and has a maximum absorban...

  5. Amphipathic β2,2-Amino Acid Derivatives Suppress Infectivity and Disrupt the Intracellular Replication Cycle of Chlamydia pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Tiirola, Terttu M.; Strøm, Morten B.; Vuorela, Pia M.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate in the current work that small cationic antimicrobial β2,2-amino acid derivatives (Mw < 500 Da) are highly potent against Chlamydia pneumoniae at clinical relevant concentrations (< 5 μM, i.e. < 3.4 μg/mL). C. pneumoniae is an atypical respiratory pathogen associated with frequent treatment failures and persistent infections. This gram-negative bacterium has a biphasic life cycle as infectious elementary bodies and proliferating reticulate bodies, and efficient treatment is challenging because of its long and obligate intracellular replication cycle within specialized inclusion vacuoles. Chlamydicidal effect of the β2,2-amino acid derivatives in infected human epithelial cells was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Images of infected host cells treated with our lead derivative A2 revealed affected chlamydial inclusion vacuoles 24 hours post infection. Only remnants of elementary and reticulate bodies were detected at later time points. Neither the EM studies nor resazurin-based cell viability assays showed toxic effects on uninfected host cells or cell organelles after A2 treatment. Besides the effects on early intracellular inclusion vacuoles, the ability of these β2,2-amino acid derivatives to suppress Chlamydia pneumoniae infectivity upon treatment of elementary bodies suggested also a direct interaction with bacterial membranes. Synthetic β2,2-amino acid derivatives that target C. pneumoniae represent promising lead molecules for development of antimicrobial agents against this hard-to-treat intracellular pathogen. PMID:27280777

  6. Plant regeneration and biochemical accumulation of hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives in Hypoxis hemerocallidea organ and callus cultures.

    PubMed

    Moyo, Mack; Amoo, Stephen O; Aremu, Adeyemi O; Gruz, Jiří; Subrtová, Michaela; Doležal, Karel; Van Staden, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    Micropropagation of Hypoxis hemerocallidea Fisch. and C.A. Mey was used as a model system to study the influence of cytokinins (CKs) on plant regeneration and biochemical accumulation of hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives in organ and callus cultures and their antioxidant activity. Fourteen free phenolic acids were detected using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) while antioxidant activity was evaluated using oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity. Cytokinins had a significant effect on the biochemical accumulation of hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives in H. hemerocallidea organ cultures. In particular, meta-topolin-treated organ cultures produced high concentrations of gallic, protocatechuic, gentisic, p-hydroxybenzoic, m-hydroxybenzoic, salicylic, chlorogenic and trans-cinnamic acids. The isoprenoid CK, N(6)-(2-isopentenyl)-adenine significantly increased the accumulation of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives, namely, caffeic, p-coumaric, sinapic and ferulic acids. Cytokinin-treated organ cultures exhibited a significant increase in antioxidant activity, particularly in the ORAC model. In callus cultures, CKs decreased the concentrations of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and antioxidant activity when compared to the control. Overall, both CK type and concentration had a significant effect on plant regeneration, callus proliferation, biochemical accumulation of free phenolic acids and antioxidant activity of the resultant extracts.

  7. Indium metal-organic frameworks as high-performance heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of amino acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing; Xu, Jianing; Fan, Yong; Song, Tianyou; Wang, Li; Zheng, Jifu

    2014-10-01

    Indium metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) were first used as recyclable heterogeneous Lewis acid catalysts for the synthesis of amino acid derivatives with excellent conversion yields. Moreover, exposed ether groups (Lewis basic sites) on the pore walls of In-MOF 2 could activate trimethylsilyl cyanide, forming hypervalent silicate intermediates, as proven by (29)Si NMR.

  8. Synthesis and biological activity evaluation of novel amino acid derivatives as potential elicitors against Tomato yellow leaf curl virus.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yufang; He, Shun; Geng, Qianqian; Duan, Yongheng; Guo, Mingcheng; Li, Jianqiang; Cao, Yongsong

    2015-12-01

    Disease caused by Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) brings serious production losses of cultivated tomato worldwide. In our previous study, two novel amino acid derivatives exerted satisfactory antiviral activities against TYLCV. In this study, the variation of TYLCV, the transcriptional expression level of Ty-1 and the enzyme activities of POD and PPO in tomato were monitored after treatment with two amino acid derivatives to illustrate the antiviral mechanism. The results showed the symptom severity caused by TYLCV was reduced significantly by two compounds and was associated with the inhibition of viral DNA level at the early stage. Among three levels of concentration, the highest inhibition rate of CNBF-His was 40.66% at 1000 mg/L, for CNBF-Asn, the highest inhibition rate was 36.26% at 2000 mg/L 30 days post-inoculation. Two compounds could also enhance the activities of PPO and POD and the transcriptional expression level of Ty-1 which correlates with plant resistance in tomato. In the field test, two compounds increased the yields of tomato and the maximum increase of yield was 37.66%. This is the first report of novel amino acid derivatives inducing resistance in tomato plant against TYLCV. It is suggested that amino acid derivatives have the potential to be an effective approach against TYLCV in tomato plant.

  9. Synthesis and biological activity evaluation of novel amino acid derivatives as potential elicitors against Tomato yellow leaf curl virus.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yufang; He, Shun; Geng, Qianqian; Duan, Yongheng; Guo, Mingcheng; Li, Jianqiang; Cao, Yongsong

    2015-12-01

    Disease caused by Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) brings serious production losses of cultivated tomato worldwide. In our previous study, two novel amino acid derivatives exerted satisfactory antiviral activities against TYLCV. In this study, the variation of TYLCV, the transcriptional expression level of Ty-1 and the enzyme activities of POD and PPO in tomato were monitored after treatment with two amino acid derivatives to illustrate the antiviral mechanism. The results showed the symptom severity caused by TYLCV was reduced significantly by two compounds and was associated with the inhibition of viral DNA level at the early stage. Among three levels of concentration, the highest inhibition rate of CNBF-His was 40.66% at 1000 mg/L, for CNBF-Asn, the highest inhibition rate was 36.26% at 2000 mg/L 30 days post-inoculation. Two compounds could also enhance the activities of PPO and POD and the transcriptional expression level of Ty-1 which correlates with plant resistance in tomato. In the field test, two compounds increased the yields of tomato and the maximum increase of yield was 37.66%. This is the first report of novel amino acid derivatives inducing resistance in tomato plant against TYLCV. It is suggested that amino acid derivatives have the potential to be an effective approach against TYLCV in tomato plant. PMID:26162434

  10. Efficient conversion of biomass into lipids by using the simultaneous saccharification and enhanced lipid production process

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    improve the efficiency of microbial lipid technology, which in turn, promote the biotechnological production of fatty acid-derived products from lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:23497564

  11. Microbial engineering for the production of fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives

    DOEpatents

    Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Abidi, Syed Hussain Imam

    2014-07-01

    Some aspects of this invention relate to methods useful for the conversion of a carbon source to a biofuel or biofuel precursor using engineered microbes. Some aspects of this invention relate to the discovery of a key regulator of lipid metabolism in microbes. Some aspects of this invention relate to engineered microbes for biofuel or biofuel precursor production.

  12. Protective effect of panax notoginseng saponins on acute ethanol-induced liver injury is associated with ameliorating hepatic lipid accumulation and reducing ethanol-mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ren-Bo; Tian, Ke; Cao, Yi-Wei; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Wang, Meng; He, Chengwei; Hu, Yuanjia; Su, Huanxing; Wan, Jian-Bo

    2015-03-11

    The aim of present study was to evaluate the effects of Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS) against acute ethanol-induced liver injury and further to elucidate its probable mechanisms. Mice were treated with PNS (100 or 300 mg/kg) once daily for seven consecutive days priors to ethanol gavage (4.7 g/kg) every 12 h for a total of three doses. Acute alcohol gavage dramatically significantly increased serum activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (23.4 ± 5.0 IU/L vs 11.7 ± 4.1 IU/L) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (52.6 ± 14.9 IU/L vs 31.1 ± 12.9 IU/L), and hepatic triglyceride level (4.04 ± 0.64 mg/g vs 1.92 ± 0.34 mg/g), these elevations were significantly diminished by pretreatment with PNS at dose of 100 mg/kg or 300 mg/kg. Alcohol exposure markedly induced the lipolysis of white adipose tissue (WAT), up-regulated protein expression of the phosphorylated hormone-sensitive lipase (p-HSL, p < 0.01), and total HSL (p < 0.01), and enhanced fatty acid uptake capacity in liver as indicated by increasing hepatic CD36 expression (p < 0.01), these effects were attenuated by PNS treatment. Additionally, PNS suppressed the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and malondialdehyde (MDA) content, reduced TNF-α and IL-6 levels, restored glutathione (GSH) level, enhanced the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in liver, and abrogated cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) induction. These data demonstrated that pretreatment with PNS protected against acute ethanol-induced liver injury, possibly through ameliorating hepatic lipid accumulation and reducing CYP2E1-mediated oxidative stress. Our findings also suggested that PNS may be potential to be developed as an effective agent for acute ethanol-induced liver injury. PMID:25665731

  13. Super-Resolution Imaging and Quantitative Analysis of Membrane Protein/Lipid Raft Clustering Mediated by Cell-Surface Self-Assembly of Hybrid Nanoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Jonathan M; Chu, Te-Wei; Peterson, Eric M; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Jiyuan; Harris, Joel; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2015-08-17

    Super-resolution imaging was used to quantify organizational changes in the plasma membrane after treatment with hybrid nanoconjugates. The nanoconjugates crosslinked CD20 on the surface of malignant B cells, thereby inducing apoptosis. Super-resolution images were analyzed by using pair-correlation analysis to determine cluster size and to count the average number of molecules in the clusters. The role of lipid rafts was investigated by pre-treating cells with a cholesterol chelator and actin destabilizer to prevent lipid raft formation. Lipid raft cluster size correlated with apoptosis induction after treatment with the nanoconjugates. Lipid raft clusters had radii of ∼ 200 nm in cells treated with the hybrid nanoconjugates. Super-resolution images provided precise molecule location coordinates that could be used to determine density of bound conjugates, cluster size, and number of molecules per cluster.

  14. Amino Acid Derivatives as Bitter Taste Receptor (T2R) Blockers*

    PubMed Central

    Pydi, Sai P.; Sobotkiewicz, Tyler; Billakanti, Rohini; Bhullar, Rajinder P.; Loewen, Michele C.; Chelikani, Prashen

    2014-01-01

    In humans, the 25 bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) are activated by hundreds of structurally diverse bitter compounds. However, only five antagonists or bitter blockers are known. In this study, using molecular modeling guided site-directed mutagenesis, we elucidated the ligand-binding pocket of T2R4. We found seven amino acids located in the extracellular side of transmembrane 3 (TM3), TM4, extracellular loop 2 (ECL2), and ECL3 to be involved in T2R4 binding to its agonist quinine. ECL2 residues Asn-173 and Thr-174 are essential for quinine binding. Guided by a molecular model of T2R4, a number of amino acid derivatives were screened for their ability to bind to T2R4. These predictions were tested by calcium imaging assays that led to identification of γ-aminobutryic acid (GABA) and Nα,Nα-bis(carboxymethyl)-l-lysine (BCML) as competitive inhibitors of quinine-activated T2R4 with an IC50 of 3.2 ± 0.3 μm and 59 ± 18 nm, respectively. Interestingly, pharmacological characterization using a constitutively active mutant of T2R4 reveals that GABA acts as an antagonist, whereas BCML acts as an inverse agonist on T2R4. Site-directed mutagenesis confirms that the two novel bitter blockers share the same orthosteric site as the agonist quinine. The signature residues Ala-90 and Lys-270 play important roles in interacting with BCML and GABA, respectively. This is the first report to characterize a T2R endogenous antagonist and an inverse agonist. The novel bitter blockers will facilitate physiological studies focused on understanding the roles of T2Rs in extraoral tissues. PMID:25059668

  15. Urolithins, ellagic acid-derived metabolites produced by human colonic microflora, exhibit estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities.

    PubMed

    Larrosa, Mar; González-Sarrías, Antonio; García-Conesa, María Teresa; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2006-03-01

    Urolithins A and B (hydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one derivatives) are colonic microflora metabolites recently proposed as biomarkers of human exposure to dietary ellagic acid derivatives. Molecular models suggest that urolithins could display estrogenic and/or antiestrogenic activity. To this purpose, both urolithins and other known phytoestrogens (genistein, daidzein, resveratrol, and enterolactone) were assayed to evaluate the capacity to induce cell proliferation on the estrogen-sensitive human breast cancer MCF-7 cells as well as the ability to bind to alpha- and beta-estrogen receptors. Both urolithins A and B showed estrogenic activity in a dose-dependent manner even at high concentrations (40 microM), without antiproliferative or toxic effects, whereas the other phytoestrogens inhibited cell proliferation at high concentrations. Overall, urolithins showed weaker estrogenic activity than the other phytoestrogens. However, both urolithins displayed slightly higher antiestrogenic activity (antagonized the growth promotion effect of 17-beta-estradiol in a dose-dependent manner) than the other phytoestrogens. The IC(50) values for the ERalpha and ERbeta binding assays were 0.4 and 0.75 microM for urolithin A; 20 and 11 microM for urolithin B; 3 and 0.02 for genistein; and 2.3 and 1 for daidzein, respectively; no binding was detected for resveratrol and enterolactone. Urolithins A and B entered into MCF-7 cells and were metabolized to yield mainly urolithin-sulfate derivatives. These results, together with previous studies regarding absorption and metabolism of dietary ellagitannins and ellagic acid in humans, suggest that the gut microflora metabolites urolithins are potential endocrine-disrupting molecules, which could resemble other described "enterophytoestrogens" (microflora-derived metabolites with estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity). Further research is warranted to evaluate the possible role of ellagitannins and ellagic acid as dietary "pro-phytoestrogens".

  16. A crystallographic fragment screen identifies cinnamic acid derivatives as starting points for potent Pim-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Michèle N; Fanghänel, Jörg; Schäfer, Martina; Badock, Volker; Briem, Hans; Boemer, Ulf; Nguyen, Duy; Husemann, Manfred; Hillig, Roman C

    2011-03-01

    A crystallographic fragment screen was carried out to identify starting points for the development of inhibitors of protein kinase Pim-1, a potential target for tumour therapy. All fragment hits identified via soaking in this study turned out to bind to the unusually hydrophobic pocket at the hinge region. The most potent fragments, two cinnamic acid derivatives (with a best IC(50) of 130 µM), additionally form a well defined hydrogen bond. The balance between hydrophobic and polar interactions makes these molecules good starting points for further optimization. Pim-2 inhibitors from a recently reported high-throughput screening campaign also feature a cinnamic acid moiety. Two of these Pim-2 inhibitors were synthesized, their potencies against Pim-1 were determined and their cocrystal structures were elucidated in order to determine to what degree the binding modes identified by fragment screening are conserved in optimized inhibitors. The structures show that the cinnamic acid moieties indeed adopt the same binding mode. Fragment screening thus correctly identified binding modes which are maintained when fragments are grown into larger and higher affinity inhibitors. The high-throughput screening-derived compound (E)-3-{3-[6-(4-aminocyclohexylamino)-pyrazin-2-yl]phenyl}acrylic acid (compound 1) is the most potent inhibitor of the cinnamic acid series for which the three-dimensional binding mode is known (IC(50) = 17 nM, K(d) = 28 nM). The structure reveals the molecular basis for the large gain in potency between the initial fragment hit and this optimized inhibitor.

  17. Cinnamic Acid Derivatives as Inhibitors of Oncogenic Protein Kinases--Structure, Mechanisms and Biomedical Effects.

    PubMed

    Mielecki, Marcin; Lesyng, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamic acid belongs to phenolic-acid class of polyphenols, one of the most abundant plant secondary metabolites. These substances are widely studied because of plethora of their biological activities. In particular, their inhibition of protein kinases contributes to the pleiotropic effects in the cell. Protein kinases are essential in controlling cell signaling networks. Selective targeting of oncogenic protein kinases increases clinical anticancer efficacy. Cinnamic acid and related compounds have inspired researchers in the design of numerous synthetic and semisynthetic inhibitors of oncogenic protein kinases for the past three decades. Interest in cinnamoyl-scaffold-containing compounds revived in recent years, which was stimulated by modern drug design and discovery methodologies such as in vitro and in silico HTS. This review presents cinnamic acid derivatives and analogs for which direct inhibition of protein kinases was identified. We also summarize significance of the above protein kinase families - validated or promising targets for anticancer therapies. The inhibition mode may vary from ATP-competitive, through bisubstrate-competitive and mixedcompetitive, to non-competitive one. Kinase selectivity is often correlated with subtle chemical modifications, and may also be steered by an additional non-cinnamoyl fragment of the inhibitor. Specific cinnamic acid congeners may synergize their effects in the cell by a wider range of activities, like suppression of additional enzymes, e.g. deubiquitinases, influencing the same signaling pathways (e.g. JAK2/STAT). Cinnamic acid, due to its biological and physicochemical properties, provides nature-inspired ideas leading to novel inhibitors of oncogenic protein kinases and related enzymes, capable to target a variety of cancer cells.

  18. Protective effect of bile acid derivatives in phalloidin-induced rat liver toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Herraez, Elisa; Macias, Rocio I.R.; Vazquez-Tato, Jose; Hierro, Carlos; Monte, Maria J.; Marin, Jose J.G.

    2009-08-15

    Phalloidin causes severe liver damage characterized by marked cholestasis, which is due in part to irreversible polymerization of actin filaments. Liver uptake of this toxin through the transporter OATP1B1 is inhibited by the bile acid derivative BALU-1, which does not inhibit the sodium-dependent bile acid transporter NTCP. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether BALU-1 prevents liver uptake of phalloidin without impairing endogenous bile acid handling and hence may have protective effects against the hepatotoxicity induced by this toxin. In anaesthetized rats, i.v. administration of BALU-1 increased bile flow more than taurocholic acid (TCA). Phalloidin administration decreased basal (- 60%) and TCA-stimulated bile flow (- 55%) without impairing bile acid output. Phalloidin-induced cholestasis was accompanied by liver necrosis, nephrotoxicity and haematuria. In BALU-1-treated animals, phalloidin-induced cholestasis was partially prevented. Moreover haematuria was not observed, which was consistent with histological evidences of BALU-1-prevented injury of liver and kidney tissue. HPLC-MS/MS analysis revealed that BALU-1 was secreted in bile mainly in non-conjugated form, although a small proportion (< 5%) of tauro-BALU-1 was detected. BALU-1 did not inhibit the biliary secretion of endogenous bile acids. When highly choleretic bile acids, - ursodeoxycholic (UDCA) and dehydrocholic acid (DHCA) - were administered, they were found less efficient than BALU-1 in preventing phalloidin-induced cholestasis. Biliary phalloidin elimination was low but it was increased by BALU-1 > TCA > DHCA > UDCA. In conclusion, BALU-1 is able to protect against phalloidin-induced hepatotoxicity, probably due to an inhibition of the liver uptake and an enhanced biliary secretion of this toxin.

  19. Lipophilic caffeic and ferulic acid derivatives presenting cytotoxicity against human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Serafim, Teresa L; Carvalho, Filipa S; Marques, Maria P M; Calheiros, Rita; Silva, Tiago; Garrido, Jorge; Milhazes, Nuno; Borges, Fernanda; Roleira, Fernanda; Silva, Elisiaario T; Holy, Jon; Oliveira, Paulo J

    2011-05-16

    In the present work, lipophilic caffeic and ferulic acid derivatives were synthesized, and their cytotoxicity on cultured breast cancer cells was compared. A total of six compounds were initially evaluated: caffeic acid (CA), hexyl caffeate (HC), caffeoylhexylamide (HCA), ferulic acid (FA), hexyl ferulate (HF), and feruloylhexylamide (HFA). Cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptotic signaling were investigated in three human breast cancer cell lines, including estrogen-sensitive (MCF-7) and insensitive (MDA-MB-231 and HS578T). Furthermore, direct mitochondrial effects of parent and modified compounds were investigated by using isolated liver mitochondria. The results indicated that although the parent compounds presented no cytotoxicity, the new compounds inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell cycle alterations and cell death, with a predominant effect on MCF-7 cells. Interestingly, cell cycle data indicates that effects on nontumor BJ fibroblasts were predominantly cytostatic and not cytotoxic. The parent compounds and derivatives also promoted direct alterations on hepatic mitochondrial bioenergetics, although the most unexpected and never before reported one was that FA induces the mitochondrial permeability transition. The results show that the new caffeic and ferulic acid lipophilic derivatives show increased cytotoxicity toward human breast cancer cell lines, although the magnitude and type of effects appear to be dependent on the cell type. Mitochondrial data had no direct correspondence with effects on intact cells suggesting that this organelle may not be a critical component of the cellular effects observed. The data provide a rational approach to the design of effective cytotoxic lipophilic hydroxycinnamic derivatives that in the future could be profitably applied for chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic purposes.

  20. Hypolipidaemic and antiplatelet activity of phenoxyacetic acid derivatives related to alpha-asarone.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pastén, Ricardo; García, Rosa Virginia; Garduño, Leticia; Reyes, Elba; Labarrios, Fernando; Tamariz, Joaquín; Chamorro, Germán

    2006-10-01

    The phenoxyacetic acid derivatives 1-6 [2-methoxy-4-(2-propenyl)phenoxyacetic acid (1); 2-methoxy-5-nitro-4-(2-propenyl)phenoxyacetic acid (2); methyl 2-methoxy-4-(2-propenyl)phenoxyacetate (3); ethyl 2-methoxy-4-(2-propenyl)phenoxyacetate (4); methyl 2-methoxy-5-nitro-4-(2-propenyl)phenoxyacetate (5); ethyl 2-methoxy-5-nitro-4-(2-propenyl)phenoxyacetate (6)] related to alpha-asarone have been reported previously as hypolipidaemic agents in diet-induced hyperlipidaemic mice. We have aimed to expand the pharmacological profile of these derivatives by investigating their hypolipidaemic activity in rats and mice under different experimental conditions. The antiplatelet activity was tested also in-vitro from blood derived from consenting healthy volunteers. In normolipidaemic rats, compounds 2, 3 and 5 at oral doses of 40 and 80 mg kg(-1) significantly decreased total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels. Moreover, analogues 3 and 5 administered to hypercholesterolaemic rats at the same doses for seven days also produced a reduction in the content of these same lipoproteins. In neither case were the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations affected. However, practically all tested compounds were found to be hypocholesterolaemic agents, and were shown to effectively lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels in Triton-induced hyperlipidaemic mice at oral doses of 50 and 100 mg kg(-1). In all tests, all animals appeared to be healthy throughout the experimental period in their therapeutic ranges. Triton-induced hypercholesterolaemic mice appeared to be a desirable model for this class of hypolipidaemic drugs. On the other hand, compounds 1, 2, 4 and 5 significantly inhibited ADP-induced aggregation in-vitro. These findings indicated that all of these compounds appeared to be promising for the treatment of human hyperlipidaemia and thrombotic diseases. PMID:17034657

  1. Structural Investigation for Optimization of Anthranilic Acid Derivatives as Partial FXR Agonists by in Silico Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meimei; Yang, Xuemei; Lai, Xinmei; Kang, Jie; Gan, Huijuan; Gao, Yuxing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a three level in silico approach was applied to investigate some important structural and physicochemical aspects of a series of anthranilic acid derivatives (AAD) newly identified as potent partial farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists. Initially, both two and three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (2D- and 3D-QSAR) studies were performed based on such AAD by a stepwise technology combined with multiple linear regression and comparative molecular field analysis. The obtained 2D-QSAR model gave a high predictive ability (R2train = 0.935, R2test = 0.902, Q2LOO = 0.899). It also uncovered that number of rotatable single bonds (b_rotN), relative negative partial charges (RPC−), oprea's lead-like (opr_leadlike), subdivided van der Waal’s surface area (SlogP_VSA2) and accessible surface area (ASA) were important features in defining activity. Additionally, the derived3D-QSAR model presented a higher predictive ability (R2train = 0.944, R2test = 0.892, Q2LOO = 0.802). Meanwhile, the derived contour maps from the 3D-QSAR model revealed the significant structural features (steric and electronic effects) required for improving FXR agonist activity. Finally, nine newly designed AAD with higher predicted EC50 values than the known template compound were docked into the FXR active site. The excellent molecular binding patterns of these molecules also suggested that they can be robust and potent partial FXR agonists in agreement with the QSAR results. Overall, these derived models may help to identify and design novel AAD with better FXR agonist activity. PMID:27070594

  2. The effect of dietary lipids on the thermotropic behaviour of rat liver and heart mitochondrial membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    McMurchie, E J; Abeywardena, M Y; Charnock, J S; Gibson, R A

    1983-09-21

    Diets supplemented with relatively high levels of either saturated fatty acids derived from sheep kidney fat (sheep kidney fat diet) or unsaturated fatty acids derived from sunflower seed oil (sunflower seed oil diet) were fed to rats for a period of 16 weeks and changes in the thermotropic behaviour of liver and heart mitochondrial lipids were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The diets induced similar changes in the fatty acid composition in both liver and heart mitochondrial lipids, the major change being the omega 6 to omega 3 unsaturated fatty acid ratio, which was elevated in mitochondria from animals on the sunflower seed oil diet and lowered with the mitochondria from the sheep kidney fat dietary animals. When examined by DSC, aqueous buffer dispersions of liver and heart mitochondrial lipids exhibited two independent, reversible phase transitions and in some instances a third highly unstable transition. The dietary lipid treatments had their major effect of the temperature at which the lower phase transition occurred, there being an inverse relationship between the transition temperature and the omega 6 to omega 3 unsaturated fatty acid ratio. No significant effect was observed for the temperature of the higher phase transition. These results indicate that certain domains of mitochondrial lipids, probably containing some relatively higher melting-point lipids, independently undergo formation of the solidus or gel phase and this phenomenon is not greatly influenced by the lipid composition of the mitochondrial membranes. Conversely, other domains, representing the bulk of the membrane lipids and which probably contain the relatively lower melting point lipids, undergo solidus phase formation at temperatures which reflect changes in the membrane lipid composition which are in turn, a reflection of the nature of the dietary lipid intake. These lipid phase transitions do not appear to correlate directly with those events considered

  3. Rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric addition of arylboronic acids to cyclic N-sulfonyl ketimines towards the synthesis of α,α-diaryl-α-amino acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Takechi, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Takahiro

    2015-05-01

    Rhodium/chiral diene complex-catalyzed asymmetric addition of arylboronic acids to cyclic ketimines having an ester group proceeded to give the corresponding α-amino acid derivatives in high yields with high enantioselectivity. The cyclic amino acid derivative was transformed into a linear α,α-diaryl-substituted α-N-methylamino acid ester.

  4. Synthesis, cytotoxic evaluation and in silico pharmacokinetic prediction of some benzo[a]phenazine-5-sulfonic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hari Narayana Moorthy, N S; Karthikeyan, C; Trivedi, Piyush

    2009-11-01

    Cancer is one of the life threatening diseases and the development of novel anticancer molecules is limited by many reasons. In the present investigation, some novel benzo[a]phenazine-5-sulfonic acid derivatives as DNA intercalator was designed with optimized pharmacokinetic features for cancer treatment. The compounds with desired pharmacokinetic profile were synthesized and structurally characterized. Cytotoxic activity study against HL-60 tumor cell lines shows that 10-dimethyl carboxamido derivative of benzo[a]phenazine-5-sulfonic acid is found to be the most active in the series with cytotoxic activity (IC(50) = 19 microM) comparable to cisplatin (IC(50) = 7 microM). The study concluded that the novel benzo[a]phenazine-5-sulfonic acid derivatives were found to have enhanced DNA binding affinity and exhibited significant activity in vitro against HL-60 cell lines. This work will also guide for further development of effective DNA intercalators for cancer treatment.

  5. Use of humic acids derived from peat and lignite as phenanthrene sorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofikitis, Elias; Giannouli, Andriana; Kalaitzidis, Stavros; Christanis, Kimon; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Papanicolaou, Cassiani

    2015-04-01

    A broad range of materials is being applied for environmental remediation of water, among them sorbents such as humic acids. Being natural substances, the extraction and purification of humic acids might be cheaper than the production of synthetic sorbents. Having higher absorbing capacity than most of the sorbents used to date, humic acids have a competitive advantage against commonly used sorbents such as active charcoals and biochar. Humic acids are "complex colloidal super-mixtures" that are characterized by their functional groups. Therefore, composition and molecular formula can vary depending on the properties of the parent material. The aim of this project was (a) to study the sorption capacity of humic acids derived from peat and lignite samples picked up from deposits spread throughout Greece and (b) to compare the results with these of the parent materials. This comparison provides an insight to which matrix samples are suitable for further chemical treatment for the isolation of humic acids to be used as sorbents. The selected model pollutant was phenanthrene, which is a PAH that consists of three fused benzene rings. Humic acids were extracted according to the methodology proposed by the IHSS, slightly modified, in order to fit better to the properties of organic sediments. Sorption experiments were conducted by mixing 0.004 g of the sorbent (peat or lignite or humic acid) with aqueous solutions of phenanthrene at different concentrations of 30, 50, 100, 300, and 500 μg/L. The results show that phenanthrene sorption is higher for the humic acid than for the original lignite and peat samples. The original samples display higher sorption at the lower phenanthere solutions (30 μg/L; Kd ranges from 15,000 to 47,000 L/kg) than at the higher one (500 μg/L; Kd ranges from 4,100 to 13,000 L/Kg) suggesting non-linear sorption. The humic acids display mainly linear isotherms with Kd ranges from 6,600 to 120,000 L/kg. Concerning the suitability of the studied

  6. Oxymetazoline inhibits proinflammatory reactions: effect on arachidonic acid-derived metabolites.

    PubMed

    Beck-Speier, Ingrid; Dayal, Niru; Karg, Erwin; Maier, Konrad L; Schumann, Gabriele; Semmler, Manuela; Koelsch, Stephan M

    2006-02-01

    The nasal decongestant oxymetazoline effectively reduces rhinitis symptoms. We hypothesized that oxymetazoline affects arachidonic acid-derived metabolites concerning inflammatory and oxidative stress-dependent reactions. The ability of oxymetazoline to model pro- and anti-inflammatory and oxidative stress responses was evaluated in cell-free systems, including 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) as proinflammatory, 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO) as anti-inflammatory enzymes, and oxidation of methionine by agglomerates of ultrafine carbon particles (UCPs), indicating oxidative stress. In a cellular approach using canine alveolar macrophages (AMs), the impact of oxymetazoline on phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) activity, respiratory burst and synthesis of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), 15(S)-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)), and 8-isoprostane was measured in the absence and presence of UCP or opsonized zymosan as particulate stimulants. In cell-free systems, oxymetazoline (0.4-1 mM) inhibited 5-LO but not 15-LO activity and did not alter UCP-induced oxidation of methionine. In AMs, oxymetazoline induced PLA(2) activity and 15-HETE at 1 mM, enhanced PGE(2) at 0.1 mM, strongly inhibited LTB(4) and respiratory burst at 0.4/0.1 mM (p < 0.05), but did not affect 8-isoprostane formation. In contrast, oxymetazoline did not alter UCP-induced PLA(2) activity and PGE(2) and 15-HETE formation in AMs but inhibited UCP-induced LTB(4) formation and respiratory burst at 0.1 mM and 8-isoprostane formation at 0.001 mM (p < 0.05). In opsonized zymosan-stimulated AMs, oxymetazoline inhibited LTB(4) formation and respiratory burst at 0.1 mM (p < 0.05). In conclusion, in canine AMs, oxymetazoline suppressed proinflammatory reactions including 5-LO activity, LTB(4) formation, and respiratory burst and prevented particle-induced oxidative stress, whereas PLA(2) activity and synthesis of immune-modulating PGE(2) and 15-HETE were not affected.

  7. Radioiodinated Phenylalkyl Malonic Acid Derivatives as pH-Sensitive SPECT Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Bauwens, Matthias; De Saint-Hubert, Marijke; Cleynhens, Jan; Brams, Laura; Devos, Ellen; Mottaghy, Felix M.; Verbruggen, Alfons

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In vivo pH imaging has been a field of interest for molecular imaging for many years. This is especially important for determining tumor acidity, an important driving force of tumor invasion and metastasis formation, but also in the process of apoptosis. Methods 2-(4-[123I]iodophenethyl)-2-methylmalonic acid (IPMM), 2-(4-[123I]iodophenethyl)-malonic acid (IPM), 2-(4-[123I]iodobenzyl)-malonic acid (IBMM) and 4-[123I]iodophthalic acid (IP) were radiolabeled via the Cu+ isotopic nucleophilic exchange method. All tracers were tested in vitro in buffer systems to assess pH driven cell uptake. In vivo biodistribution of [123I]IPMM and [123I]IPM was determined in healthy mice and the pH targeting efficacy in vivo of [123I]IPM was evaluated in an anti-Fas monoclonal antibody (mAb) apoptosis model. In addition a mouse RIF-1 tumor model was explored in which tumor pH was decreased from 7.0 to 6.5 by means of induction of hyperglycemia in combination with administration of meta-iodobenzylguanidine. Results Radiosynthesis resulted in 15–20% for iodo-bromo exchange and 50–60% yield for iodo-iodo exchange while in vitro experiments showed a pH-sensitive uptake for all tracers. Shelf-life stability and in vivo stability was excellent for all tracers. [123I]IPMM and [123I]IPM showed a moderately fast predominantly biliary clearance while a high retention was observed in blood. The biodistribution profile of [123I]IPM was found to be most favorable in view of pH-specific imaging. [123I]IPM showed a clear pH-related uptake pattern in the RIF-1 tumor model. Conclusion Iodine-123 labeled malonic acid derivates such as [123I]IPM show a clearly pH dependent uptake in tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo which allows to visualize regional acidosis. However, these compounds are not suitable for detection of apoptosis due to a poor acidosis effect. PMID:22719886

  8. Sulfotanone, a new alkyl sulfonic acid derivative from Streptomyces sp. IFM 11694 with TRAIL resistance-overcoming activity.

    PubMed

    Abdelfattah, Mohamed S; Ishikawa, Naoki; Karmakar, Utpal K; Ishibashi, Masami

    2016-04-01

    One new alkyl sulfonic acid derivative, sulfotanone (1), and the known panosialin wA (2) were isolated from the methanolic extract of mycelium of Streptomyces sp. 11694. The structure of the new compound (1) was established by a combination of spectroscopic techniques, including HRESIMS, IR, 1D and 2D NMR measurements. Compound 1 (40 µM) in combination with TRAIL showed synergistic activity in sensitizing TRAIL-resistance in human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines.

  9. Facile synthesis of enantioenriched Cγ-tetrasubstituted α-amino acid derivatives via an asymmetric nucleophilic addition/protonation cascade.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shu-Wen; An, Jing; Chen, Jia-Rong; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2011-05-01

    An asymmetric nucleophilic addition/protonation reaction of 3-substituted oxindoles and ethyl 2-phthalimidoacrylate has been described. This strategy can give direct access to C(γ)-tetrasubstituted α-amino acid derivatives bearing 1,3-nonadjacent stereocenters with up to 98% yield, 94:6 dr, and >99% ee. Dual activation is proposed in the transition state, and the opposite enantiomers can be obtained simply by changing cinchonidine-derived catalyst to the cinchonine analogue.

  10. Arachidonic Acid Derivatives and Their Role in Peripheral Nerve Degeneration and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Camara-Lemarroy, Carlos Rodrigo; Gonzalez-Moreno, Emmanuel Irineo; Guzman-de la Garza, Francisco Javier; Fernandez-Garza, Nancy Esthela

    2012-01-01

    After peripheral nerve injury, a process of axonal degradation, debris clearance, and subsequent regeneration is initiated by complex local signaling, called Wallerian degeneration (WD). This process is in part mediated by neuroglia as well as infiltrating inflammatory cells and regulated by inflammatory mediators such as cytokines, chemokines, and the activation of transcription factors also related to the inflammatory response. Part of this neuroimmune signaling is mediated by the innate immune system, including arachidonic acid (AA) derivatives such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes. The enzymes responsible for their production, cyclooxygenases and lipooxygenases, also participate in nerve degeneration and regeneration. The interactions between signals for nerve regeneration and neuroinflammation go all the way down to the molecular level. In this paper, we discuss the role that AA derivatives might play during WD and nerve regeneration, and the therapeutic possibilities that arise. PMID:22997489

  11. Graphene-sensitized microporous membrane/solvent microextraction for the preconcentration of cinnamic acid derivatives in Rhizoma Typhonii.

    PubMed

    Xing, Rongrong; Hu, Shuang; Chen, Xuan; Bai, Xiaohong

    2014-09-01

    A novel graphene-sensitized microporous membrane/solvent microextraction method named microporous membrane/graphene/solvent synergistic microextraction, coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography and UV detection, was developed and introduced for the extraction and determination of three cinnamic acid derivatives in Rhizoma Typhonii. Several factors affecting performance were investigated and optimized, including the types of graphene and extraction solvent, concentration of graphene dispersed in octanol, sample phase pH, ionic strength, stirring rate, extraction time, extraction temperature, and sample volume. Under optimized conditions, the enrichment factors of cinnamic acid derivatives ranged from 75 to 269. Good linearities were obtained from 0.01 to 10 μg/mL for all analytes with regression coefficients between 0.9927 and 0.9994. The limits of quantification were <1 ng/mL, and satisfactory recoveries (99-104%) and precision (1.1-10.8%) were also achieved. The synergistic microextraction mechanism based on graphene sensitization was analyzed and described. The experimental results showed that the method was simple, sensitive, practical, and effective for the preconcentration and determination of cinnamic acid derivatives in Rhizoma Typhonii.

  12. An Expeditious Synthesis of Sialic Acid Derivatives by Copper(I)-Catalyzed Stereodivergent Propargylation of Unprotected Aldoses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We developed a copper(I)-catalyzed stereodivergent anomeric propargylation of unprotected aldoses as a facile synthetic pathway to a broad variety of sialic acid derivatives. The soft allenylcopper(I) species, catalytically generated from stable allenylboronic acid pinacolate (2), is unusually inert to protonolysis by the multiple hydroxy groups of the substrates and thereby functions as a carbon nucleophile. The key additive B(OMe)3 facilitated ring-opening of the nonelectrophilic cyclic hemiacetal forms of aldoses to the reactive aldehyde forms. The chirality of the catalyst, and not the internal stereogenic centers of substrates, predominantly controlled the stereochemistry of the propargylation step; i.e., the diastereoselectivity was switched simply by changing the catalyst chirality. This is the first nonenzyme catalyst-controlled stereodivergent C–C bond elongation at the anomeric center of unprotected aldoses, which contain multiple protic functional groups and stereogenic centers. The propargylation products can be expeditiously transformed into naturally occurring and synthetic sialic acid derivatives in a simple three-step sequence. This synthetic method, which requires no protecting groups, can be performed on a gram-scale and thus offers general and practical access to various sialic acid derivatives from unprotected aldoses. PMID:27163022

  13. Effect of processing and storage on the antioxidant ellagic acid derivatives and flavonoids of red raspberry (Rubus idaeus) jams.

    PubMed

    Zafrilla, P; Ferreres, F; Tomás-Barberán, F A

    2001-08-01

    From red raspberries, ellagic acid, its 4-arabinoside, its 4' (4' '-acetyl) arabinoside, and its 4' (4' '-acetyl)xyloside, as well as quercetin and kaempferol 3-glucosides, were identified. In addition, two unidentified ellagic acid derivatives were detected. The free radical scavenging activity of the ellagic acid derivatives was evaluated by using the DPPH method and compared to that of Trolox. All of the isolated compounds showed antioxidant activity. The effect of processing to obtain jams on raspberry phenolics was evaluated. The flavonol content decreased slightly with processing and more markedly during storage of the jams. The ellagic acid derivatives, with the exception of ellagic acid itself, remained quite stable with processing and during 6 months of jam storage. The content of free ellagic acid increased 3-fold during the storage period. The initial content (10 mg/kg of fresh weight of raspberries) increased 2-fold with processing, and it continued increasing up to 35 mg/kg after 1 month of storage of the jam. Then a slight decrease was observed until 6 months of storage had elapsed. The increase observed in ellagic acid could be explained by a release of ellagic acid from ellagitannins with the thermal treatment.

  14. An Expeditious Synthesis of Sialic Acid Derivatives by Copper(I)-Catalyzed Stereodivergent Propargylation of Unprotected Aldoses.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Feng; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2016-01-27

    We developed a copper(I)-catalyzed stereodivergent anomeric propargylation of unprotected aldoses as a facile synthetic pathway to a broad variety of sialic acid derivatives. The soft allenylcopper(I) species, catalytically generated from stable allenylboronic acid pinacolate (2), is unusually inert to protonolysis by the multiple hydroxy groups of the substrates and thereby functions as a carbon nucleophile. The key additive B(OMe)3 facilitated ring-opening of the nonelectrophilic cyclic hemiacetal forms of aldoses to the reactive aldehyde forms. The chirality of the catalyst, and not the internal stereogenic centers of substrates, predominantly controlled the stereochemistry of the propargylation step; i.e., the diastereoselectivity was switched simply by changing the catalyst chirality. This is the first nonenzyme catalyst-controlled stereodivergent C-C bond elongation at the anomeric center of unprotected aldoses, which contain multiple protic functional groups and stereogenic centers. The propargylation products can be expeditiously transformed into naturally occurring and synthetic sialic acid derivatives in a simple three-step sequence. This synthetic method, which requires no protecting groups, can be performed on a gram-scale and thus offers general and practical access to various sialic acid derivatives from unprotected aldoses. PMID:27163022

  15. Cattle bile but not bear bile or pig bile induces lipid profile changes and fatty liver injury in mice: mediation by cholic acid.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shiro; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2012-02-01

    Three types of animal bile preparation, bear bile (BB), cattle bile (CB) and pig bile (PB) differ in bile acid composition and are supposed to exert different pharmacotoxicological actions. Dietary supplementation with CB at 1% (w/w) for 4 weeks decreased triacylglycerol (TAG) level but increased total cholesterol (CHO) level in serum, which were associated with fatty liver injury in mice. The increased levels of cholesterol esters (CE) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in the serum and liver were observed in the mice fed the CB-supplemented diet. Lipid abnormalities and fatty liver injury observed in the mice fed the CB diet were not induced by the supplementation with BB and PB. The supplementation with cholic acid (CA), the most abundant bile acid in CB, could induce lipid abnormalities and fatty liver injury, which were indistinguishable from those induced by CB supplementation. CB and CA supplementation induced similar changes in the expression levels of mRNAs in the liver. Thus, CB induced lipid abnormalities and fatty liver injury, which can be attributed to the actions of CA contained in CB. The inabilities of BB and PB to induce lipid abnormalities and fatty liver injury are supposed to be due to their limited contents of CA.

  16. Lipid Metabolism, Apoptosis and Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunfa; Freter, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, and generates a variety of bioactive lipid molecules. These bioactive lipid molecules known as signaling molecules, such as fatty acid, eicosanoids, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, lysophophatidic acid, ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and cholesterol, are involved in the activation or regulation of different signaling pathways. Lipid metabolism participates in the regulation of many cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, survival, apoptosis, inflammation, motility, membrane homeostasis, chemotherapy response, and drug resistance. Bioactive lipid molecules promote apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by modulating mitochondrial membrane permeability and activating different enzymes including caspases. In this review, we discuss recent data in the fields of lipid metabolism, lipid-mediated apoptosis, and cancer therapy. In conclusion, understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of lipid metabolism and the function of different lipid molecules could provide the basis for cancer cell death rationale, discover novel and potential targets, and develop new anticancer drugs for cancer therapy. PMID:25561239

  17. Linker for activation of T-cell family member2 (LAT2) a lipid raft adaptor protein for AKT signaling, is an early mediator of alkylphospholipid anti-leukemic activity.

    PubMed

    Thomé, Carolina H; dos Santos, Guilherme A; Ferreira, Germano A; Scheucher, Priscila S; Izumi, Clarice; Leopoldino, Andreia M; Simão, Ana Maria; Ciancaglini, Pietro; de Oliveira, Kleber T; Chin, Alice; Hanash, Samir M; Falcão, Roberto P; Rego, Eduardo M; Greene, Lewis J; Faça, Vitor M

    2012-12-01

    Lipid rafts are highly ordered membrane domains rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids that provide a scaffold for signal transduction proteins; altered raft structure has also been implicated in cancer progression. We have shown that 25 μm 10-(octyloxy) decyl-2-(trimethylammonium) ethyl phosphate (ODPC), an alkylphospholipid, targets high cholesterol domains in model membranes and induces apoptosis in leukemia cells but spares normal hematopoietic and epithelial cells under the same conditions. We performed a quantitative (SILAC) proteomic screening of ODPC targets in a lipid-raft-enriched fraction of leukemic cells to identify early events prior to the initiation of apoptosis. Six proteins, three with demonstrated palmitoylation sites, were reduced in abundance. One, the linker for activation of T-cell family member 2 (LAT2), is an adaptor protein associated with lipid rafts in its palmitoylated form and is specifically expressed in B lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Interestingly, LAT2 is not expressed in K562, a cell line more resistant to ODPC-induced apoptosis. There was an early loss of LAT2 in the lipid-raft-enriched fraction of NB4 cells within 3 h following treatment with 25 μm ODPC. Subsequent degradation of LAT2 by proteasomes was observed. Twenty-five μm ODPC inhibited AKT activation via myeloid growth factors, and LAT2 knockdown in NB4 cells by shRNA reproduced this effect. LAT2 knockdown in NB4 cells also decreased cell proliferation and increased cell sensitivity to ODPC (7.5×), perifosine (3×), and arsenic trioxide (8.5×). Taken together, these data indicate that LAT2 is an early mediator of the anti-leukemic activity of alkylphospholipids and arsenic trioxide. Thus, LAT2 may be used as a target for the design of drugs for cancer therapy.

  18. Linker for Activation of T-cell Family Member2 (LAT2) a Lipid Raft Adaptor Protein for AKT Signaling, Is an Early Mediator of Alkylphospholipid Anti-leukemic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Thomé, Carolina H.; dos Santos, Guilherme A.; Ferreira, Germano A.; Scheucher, Priscila S.; Izumi, Clarice; Leopoldino, Andreia M.; Simão, Ana Maria; Ciancaglini, Pietro; de Oliveira, Kleber T.; Chin, Alice; Hanash, Samir M.; Falcão, Roberto P.; Rego, Eduardo M.; Greene, Lewis J.; Faça, Vitor M.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid rafts are highly ordered membrane domains rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids that provide a scaffold for signal transduction proteins; altered raft structure has also been implicated in cancer progression. We have shown that 25 μm 10-(octyloxy) decyl-2-(trimethylammonium) ethyl phosphate (ODPC), an alkylphospholipid, targets high cholesterol domains in model membranes and induces apoptosis in leukemia cells but spares normal hematopoietic and epithelial cells under the same conditions. We performed a quantitative (SILAC) proteomic screening of ODPC targets in a lipid-raft-enriched fraction of leukemic cells to identify early events prior to the initiation of apoptosis. Six proteins, three with demonstrated palmitoylation sites, were reduced in abundance. One, the linker for activation of T-cell family member 2 (LAT2), is an adaptor protein associated with lipid rafts in its palmitoylated form and is specifically expressed in B lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Interestingly, LAT2 is not expressed in K562, a cell line more resistant to ODPC-induced apoptosis. There was an early loss of LAT2 in the lipid-raft-enriched fraction of NB4 cells within 3 h following treatment with 25 μm ODPC. Subsequent degradation of LAT2 by proteasomes was observed. Twenty-five μm ODPC inhibited AKT activation via myeloid growth factors, and LAT2 knockdown in NB4 cells by shRNA reproduced this effect. LAT2 knockdown in NB4 cells also decreased cell proliferation and increased cell sensitivity to ODPC (7.5×), perifosine (3×), and arsenic trioxide (8.5×). Taken together, these data indicate that LAT2 is an early mediator of the anti-leukemic activity of alkylphospholipids and arsenic trioxide. Thus, LAT2 may be used as a target for the design of drugs for cancer therapy. PMID:23001822

  19. The iA{beta}5p {beta}-breaker peptide regulates the A{beta}(25-35) interaction with lipid bilayers through a cholesterol-mediated mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Vitiello, Giuseppe; Grimaldi, Manuela; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; D'Errico, Gerardino

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer iA{beta}5p shows a significant tendency to deeply penetrates the hydrophobic core of lipid membrane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}(25-35) locates in the external region of the membrane causing a re-positioning of CHOL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer iA{beta}5p withholds cholesterol in the inner hydrophobic core of the lipid membrane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer iA{beta}5p prevents the A{beta}(25-35) release from the lipid membrane. -- Abstract: Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the deposition of aggregates of the {beta}-amyloid peptide (A{beta}) in the brain. A potential therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease is the use of synthetic {beta}-sheet breaker peptides, which are capable of binding A{beta} but unable to become part of a {beta}-sheet structure, thus inhibiting the peptide aggregation. Many studies suggest that membranes play a key role in the A{beta} aggregation; consequently, it is strategic to investigate the interplay between {beta}-sheet breaker peptides and A{beta} in the presence of lipid bilayers. In this work, we focused on the effect of the {beta}-sheet breaker peptide acetyl-LPFFD-amide, iA{beta}5p, on the interaction of the A{beta}(25-35) fragment with lipid membranes, studied by Electron Spin Resonance spectroscopy, using spin-labeled membrane components (either phospholipids or cholesterol). The ESR results show that iA{beta}5p influences the A{beta}(25-35) interaction with the bilayer through a cholesterol-mediated mechanism: iA{beta}5p withholds cholesterol in the inner hydrophobic core of the bilayer, making the interfacial region more fluid and capable to accommodate A{beta}(25-35). As a consequence, iA{beta}5p prevents the A{beta}(25-35) release from the lipid membrane, which is the first step of the {beta}-amyloid aggregation process.

  20. D77, one benzoic acid derivative, functions as a novel anti-HIV-1 inhibitor targeting the interaction between integrase and cellular LEDGF/p75

    SciTech Connect

    Du Li; Zhao Yaxue; Chen, Jing; Yang Liumeng; Zheng Yongtang; Tang Yun Shen Xu Jiang Hualiang

    2008-10-10

    Integration of viral-DNA into host chromosome mediated by the viral protein HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential step in the HIV-1 life cycle. In this process, Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is discovered to function as a cellular co-factor for integration. Since LEDGF/p75 plays an important role in HIV integration, disruption of the LEDGF/p75 interaction with IN has provided a special interest for anti-HIV agent discovery. In this work, we reported that a benzoic acid derivative, 4-[(5-bromo-4-{l_brace}[2,4-dioxo-3-(2-oxo-2-phenylethyl) -1,3-thiazolidin-5-ylidene]methyl{r_brace}-2-ethoxyphenoxy)methyl]benzoic acid (D77) could potently inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction and affect the HIV-1 IN nuclear distribution thus exhibiting antiretroviral activity. Molecular docking with site-directed mutagenesis analysis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding assays has clarified possible binding mode of D77 against HIV-1 integrase. As the firstly discovered small molecular compound targeting HIV-1 integrase interaction with LEDGF/p75, D77 might supply useful structural information for further anti-HIV agent discovery.

  1. Intake of farmed Atlantic salmon fed soybean oil increases hepatic levels of arachidonic acid-derived oxylipins and ceramides in mice.

    PubMed

    Midtbø, Lisa Kolden; Borkowska, Alison G; Bernhard, Annette; Rønnevik, Alexander Krokedal; Lock, Erik-Jan; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Torstensen, Bente E; Liaset, Bjørn; Brattelid, Trond; Pedersen, Theresa L; Newman, John W; Kristiansen, Karsten; Madsen, Lise

    2015-06-01

    Introduction of vegetable ingredients in fish feed has affected the fatty acid composition in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L). Here we investigated how changes in fish feed affected the metabolism of mice fed diets containing fillets from such farmed salmon. We demonstrate that replacement of fish oil with rapeseed oil or soybean oil in fish feed had distinct spillover effects in mice fed western diets containing the salmon. A reduced ratio of n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the fish feed, reflected in the salmon, and hence also in the mice diets, led to a selectively increased abundance of arachidonic acid in the phospholipid pool in the livers of the mice. This was accompanied by increased levels of hepatic ceramides and arachidonic acid-derived pro-inflammatory mediators and a reduced abundance of oxylipins derived from eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. These changes were associated with increased whole body insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. Our data suggest that an increased ratio between n-6 and n-3-derived oxylipins may underlie the observed marked metabolic differences between mice fed the different types of farmed salmon. These findings underpin the need for carefully considering the type of oil used for feed production in relation to salmon farming.

  2. Inhibition of transforming growth factor-beta-induced liver fibrosis by a retinoic acid derivative via the suppression of Col 1A2 promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun-Lin; Chang, Wen-Teng; Hung, Kuo-Chen; Li, Eric I C; Chuang, Chia-Chang

    2008-08-22

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) mediates expression of collagen 1A2 (Col 1A2) gene via a synergistic cooperation between Smad2/Smad3 and Sp1, both act on the Col 1A2 gene promoter. In our previous study, we reported that a retinoic acid derivative obtained from Phellinus linteus (designated PL) antagonizes TGF-beta-induced liver fibrosis through regulation of ROS and calcium influx. In this continuing study we seek further the effect of PL on the Smad signaling pathway. We used a Col 1A2 promoter-luciferase construct to study the action of PL on Smad through TGF-beta. We found that PL decreases the promoter activity of Col 1A2, hinders the translocalization of phosphorylated Smad2/3-Smad 4 complex from cytosol into nucleus and inhibits Sp1 binding activity. These results suggest that PL inhibits TGF-beta1-induced Col 1A2 promoter activity through blocking ROS and calcium influx as well as impeding Sp1 binding and translocalization of pSmad 2/3-Smad4 complex into nucleus.

  3. Ectopic lipid storage in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is not mediated by impaired mitochondrial oxidative capacity in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Irwin, Andrew; Sprung, Victoria S; Jones, Helen; Pugh, Christopher J A; Daousi, Christina; Adams, Valerie L; Bimson, William E; Shojaee-Moradie, Fariba; Richardson, Paul; Umpleby, A Margot; Wilding, John P; Kemp, Graham J

    2014-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), characterized by lipid deposition within the liver [intrahepatocellular lipid (IHCL)], is associated with insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome (MS). It has been suggested that impaired skeletal muscle mitochondrial function may contribute to ectopic lipid deposition, and the associated MS, by altering post-prandial energy storage. To test this hypothesis, we performed a cross-sectional study of 17 patients with NAFLD [mean±S.D.; age, 45±11 years; body mass index (BMI), 31.6±3.4 kg/m2] and 18 age- and BMI-matched healthy controls (age, 44±11 years; BMI, 30.5±5.2 kg/m2). We determined body composition by MRI, IHCL and intramyocellular (soleus and tibialis anterior) lipids (IMCLs) by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function by dynamic phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) of quadriceps muscle. Although matched for BMI and total adiposity, after statistical adjustment for gender, patients with NAFLD (defined by IHCL ≥ 5.5%) had higher IHCLs (25±16% compared with 2±2%; P<0.0005) and a higher prevalence of the MS (76% compared with 28%) compared with healthy controls. Despite this, the visceral fat/subcutaneous fat ratio, IMCLs and muscle mitochondrial function were similar between the NAFLD and control groups, with no significant difference in the rate constants of post-exercise phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery (1.55±0.4 compared with 1.51±0.4 min-1), a measure of muscle mitochondrial function. In conclusion, impaired muscle mitochondrial function does not seem to underlie ectopic lipid deposition, or the accompanying features of the MS, in patients with NAFLD. PMID:24738611

  4. Novel 1,3-diacylamidopropane-2-[bis-(2-dimethylaminoethane)] carbamate pH-sensitive lipids for cationic liposome-mediated transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spelios, Michael G.

    A novel series of 1,3-diacylamidopropane-2-[bis(2-dimethylaminoethane)] carbamate analogs (1,3lb) were designed for cationic lipid-assisted transfection (lipofection). First, their physicochemical properties in self-assemblies with and without plasmid DNA (pDNA) were evaluated to examine the effects of hydrophobic tail length and degree of saturation on gene delivery and expression. Significant in vitro lipofection was induced at a nitrogen:phosphate ratio (N:P) of 4:1 by the dimyristoyl, dipalmitoyl, and dioleoyl analogs 1,3lb2, 1,3lb3, and 1,3lb5, respectively, without inclusion of neutral "lipofection enhancing" co-lipids in the cationic lipid formulations. Lipofection was reduced in the presence of co-lipids except for 1,3lb5 which maintained reporter gene expression levels at N:P 4:1 and yielded increased bioactivity at a lower NP of 2:1. Physicochemical characterization of the bioactive transfection agents (cytofectins) revealed: high hydration and in-plane elasticity of lipid monolayers by Langmuir film balance measurements; fluid lipid bilayers, with gel---liquid crystalline phase transitions below physiological temperature, by fluorescence anisotropy; lipid mixing with biomembrane-mimicking vesicles by fluorescence resonance energy transfer; efficient pDNA binding and compaction by ethidium bromide displacement; cationic liposome---nucleic acid complexes (lipoplexes) with large particle sizes (mean diameter ≥ 500 nm) and zeta potentials of positive values by dynamic light scattering and electrophoretic mobility, respectively. The results suggest that well hydrated and elastic cationic lipids forming fluid lamellar assemblies are extremely potent and minimally toxic cytofectins. Second, a comparison was made between 1,3lb2 and two derivatives, one an isomer with a shorter space between the myristoyl chains and the other the monovalent form, in an effort to delineate the biological effects of interchain distance and pH-induced polar headgroup expandability

  5. The Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Inhibits Adipose Triglyceride Lipase (ATGL)-mediated Lipid Mobilization and Enhances the ATGL Interaction with Comparative Gene Identification 58 (CGI-58) and Lipid Droplets*

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Gregory; Schweiger, Martina; Herker, Eva; Harris, Charles; Kondratowicz, Andrew S.; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Farese, Robert V.; Herath, Kithsiri; Previs, Stephen F.; Roddy, Thomas P.; Pinto, Shirly; Zechner, Rudolf; Ott, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Liver steatosis is a common health problem associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and an important risk factor for the development of liver fibrosis and cancer. Steatosis is caused by triglycerides (TG) accumulating in lipid droplets (LDs), cellular organelles composed of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids. The HCV nucleocapsid core localizes to the surface of LDs and induces steatosis in cultured cells and mouse livers by decreasing intracellular TG degradation (lipolysis). Here we report that core at the surface of LDs interferes with the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the key lipolytic enzyme in the first step of TG breakdown. Expressing core in livers or mouse embryonic fibroblasts of ATGL−/− mice no longer decreases TG degradation as observed in LDs from wild-type mice, supporting the model that core reduces lipolysis by engaging ATGL. Core must localize at LDs to inhibit lipolysis, as ex vivo TG hydrolysis is impaired in purified LDs coated with core but not when free core is added to LDs. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that core does not directly interact with the ATGL complex but, unexpectedly, increased the interaction between ATGL and its activator CGI-58 as well as the recruitment of both proteins to LDs. These data link the anti-lipolytic activity of the HCV core protein with altered ATGL binding to CGI-58 and the enhanced association of both proteins with LDs. PMID:25381252

  6. The hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL)-mediated lipid mobilization and enhances the ATGL interaction with comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58) and lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Camus, Gregory; Schweiger, Martina; Herker, Eva; Harris, Charles; Kondratowicz, Andrew S; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Farese, Robert V; Herath, Kithsiri; Previs, Stephen F; Roddy, Thomas P; Pinto, Shirly; Zechner, Rudolf; Ott, Melanie

    2014-12-26

    Liver steatosis is a common health problem associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and an important risk factor for the development of liver fibrosis and cancer. Steatosis is caused by triglycerides (TG) accumulating in lipid droplets (LDs), cellular organelles composed of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids. The HCV nucleocapsid core localizes to the surface of LDs and induces steatosis in cultured cells and mouse livers by decreasing intracellular TG degradation (lipolysis). Here we report that core at the surface of LDs interferes with the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the key lipolytic enzyme in the first step of TG breakdown. Expressing core in livers or mouse embryonic fibroblasts of ATGL(-/-) mice no longer decreases TG degradation as observed in LDs from wild-type mice, supporting the model that core reduces lipolysis by engaging ATGL. Core must localize at LDs to inhibit lipolysis, as ex vivo TG hydrolysis is impaired in purified LDs coated with core but not when free core is added to LDs. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that core does not directly interact with the ATGL complex but, unexpectedly, increased the interaction between ATGL and its activator CGI-58 as well as the recruitment of both proteins to LDs. These data link the anti-lipolytic activity of the HCV core protein with altered ATGL binding to CGI-58 and the enhanced association of both proteins with LDs. PMID:25381252

  7. The hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL)-mediated lipid mobilization and enhances the ATGL interaction with comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58) and lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Camus, Gregory; Schweiger, Martina; Herker, Eva; Harris, Charles; Kondratowicz, Andrew S; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Farese, Robert V; Herath, Kithsiri; Previs, Stephen F; Roddy, Thomas P; Pinto, Shirly; Zechner, Rudolf; Ott, Melanie

    2014-12-26

    Liver steatosis is a common health problem associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and an important risk factor for the development of liver fibrosis and cancer. Steatosis is caused by triglycerides (TG) accumulating in lipid droplets (LDs), cellular organelles composed of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids. The HCV nucleocapsid core localizes to the surface of LDs and induces steatosis in cultured cells and mouse livers by decreasing intracellular TG degradation (lipolysis). Here we report that core at the surface of LDs interferes with the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the key lipolytic enzyme in the first step of TG breakdown. Expressing core in livers or mouse embryonic fibroblasts of ATGL(-/-) mice no longer decreases TG degradation as observed in LDs from wild-type mice, supporting the model that core reduces lipolysis by engaging ATGL. Core must localize at LDs to inhibit lipolysis, as ex vivo TG hydrolysis is impaired in purified LDs coated with core but not when free core is added to LDs. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that core does not directly interact with the ATGL complex but, unexpectedly, increased the interaction between ATGL and its activator CGI-58 as well as the recruitment of both proteins to LDs. These data link the anti-lipolytic activity of the HCV core protein with altered ATGL binding to CGI-58 and the enhanced association of both proteins with LDs.

  8. Development of Poly Unsaturated Fatty Acid Derivatives of Aspirin for Inhibition of Platelet Function.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jahnabi; Adili, Reheman; Kulmacz, Richard; Holinstat, Michael; Das, Aditi

    2016-10-01

    The inhibition of platelet aggregation is key to preventing conditions such as myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. Aspirin is the most widely used drug to inhibit platelet aggregation. Aspirin absorption can be improved further to increase its permeability across biologic membranes via esterification or converting the carboxylic acid to an anhydride. There are several reports indicating that ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids such as linoleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) separately inhibit platelet aggregation. Herein, we synthesize anhydride conjugates of aspirin with linoleic acid, EPA, and DHA to form aspirin anhydrides that are expected to have higher permeability across cellular membranes. These aspirin-fatty acid anhydrides inhibited platelet aggregation in washed human platelets and platelet-rich plasma in a dose-dependent manner. In particular, the aspirin-DHA anhydride displayed similar effectiveness to aspirin. Platelet aggregation studies conducted in the presence of various platelet agonists indicated that the aspirin-lipid conjugates act through inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX)-thromboxane synthase (TXAS) pathway. Hence, we performed detailed biochemical studies using purified COX-1 as well as TXAS stabilized in nanoscale lipid bilayers of nanodiscs to confirm results from the platelet aggregation studies. We show that although all of the aspirin conjugates act through the COX-TXAS pathway by inhibiting COX-1, the parent fatty acids do not act via this pathway. Finally, we studied the hydrolysis of these compounds in buffer and human plasma, and we demonstrate that all of the aspirin-fatty acid conjugates hydrolyze to the parent molecules aspirin and fatty acid in a controlled manner. PMID:27488919

  9. Apolipoprotein A-I Attenuates Palmitate-Mediated NF-κB Activation by Reducing Toll-Like Receptor-4 Recruitment into Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Tateya, Sanshiro; Schwartz, Jay; Tang, Chongren; Mitra, Poulami; Oram, John F.; Chait, Alan; Kim, Francis

    2012-01-01

    While high-density lipoprotein (HDL) is known to protect against a wide range of inflammatory stimuli, its anti-inflammatory mechanisms are not well understood. Furthermore, HDL's protective effects against saturated dietary fats have not been previously described. In this study, we used endothelial cells to demonstrate that while palmitic acid activates NF-κB signaling, apolipoprotein A–I, (apoA-I), the major protein component of HDL, attenuates palmitate-induced NF-κB activation. Further, vascular NF-κB signaling (IL-6, MCP-1, TNF-α) and macrophage markers (CD68, CD11c) induced by 24 weeks of a diabetogenic diet containing cholesterol (DDC) is reduced in human apoA-I overexpressing transgenic C57BL/6 mice compared to age-matched WT controls. Moreover, WT mice on DDC compared to a chow diet display increased gene expression of lipid raft markers such as Caveolin-1 and Flotillin-1, and inflammatory Toll-like receptors (TLRs) (TLR2, TLR4) in the vasculature. However apoA-I transgenic mice on DDC show markedly reduced expression of these genes. Finally, we show that in endothelial cells TLR4 is recruited into lipid rafts in response to palmitate, and that apoA-I prevents palmitate-induced TLR4 trafficking into lipid rafts, thereby blocking NF-κB activation. Thus, apoA-I overexpression might be a useful therapeutic tool against vascular inflammation. PMID:22479476

  10. Biliary lipid secretion.

    PubMed

    Hişmioğullari, Adnan Adil; Bozdayi, A Mithat; Rahman, Khalid

    2007-06-01

    The liver has many biochemical functions, of which one of the most important is bile formation. Bile is both a secretory and an excretory fluid and two of its most important functions are the delivery to the intestinal tract of: (i) bile acids to assist in fat digestion and absorption; and (ii) liver-derived metabolites of potentially toxic materials prior to their elimination from the body in the feces. Bile contains numerous solutes, including bile acids, phospholipids and cholesterol. Biliary lipids mainly consist of cholesterol and phospholipids and their secretion into bile is affected by the secretion of bile acids. Phospholipids and cholesterol are synthesized in the hepatocytes and are thought to be transferred via vesicle- and non-vesicle-mediated mechanisms into the bile canaliculus. Hepatocytes acquire biliary lipid by three pathways, which are biosynthesis, lipoproteins and existing molecules drawn from intracellular membranes, with the newly synthesized biliary lipid accounting for less than 20% of the total lipids. The hepatic determinants of biliary cholesterol elimination are not limited to total cholesterol homeostasis, but also concern biliary disease conditions, since excess biliary cholesterol secretion is involved in cholesterol gallstone formation, as well as being a major risk factor for gallbladder cancer. The purpose of this review was to highlight some of the major mechanisms involved in biliary lipid secretion.

  11. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 mediates hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte lipid accumulation by reducing the DNA binding activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}/retinoid X receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, Adam J.; Luo Zhengyu; Vincent, Karen A.; Akita, Geoffrey Y.; Cheng, Seng H.; Gregory, Richard J.; Jiang Canwen

    2007-12-21

    In response to cellular hypoxia, cardiomyocytes adapt to consume less oxygen by shifting ATP production from mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation to glycolysis. The transcriptional activation of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes by hypoxia is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). In this study, we examined whether HIF-1 was involved in the suppression of mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. We showed that either hypoxia or adenovirus-mediated expression of a constitutively stable hybrid form (HIF-1{alpha}/VP16) suppressed mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism, as indicated by an accumulation of intracellular neutral lipid. Both treatments also reduced the mRNA levels of muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase I which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the mitochondrial import of fatty acids for {beta}-oxidation. Furthermore, adenovirus-mediated expression of HIF-1{alpha}/VP16 in cardiomyocytes under normoxic conditions also mimicked the reduction in the DNA binding activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha})/retinoid X receptor (RXR), in the presence or absence of a PPAR{alpha} ligand. These results suggest that HIF-1 may be involved in hypoxia-induced suppression of fatty acid metabolism in cardiomyocytes by reducing the DNA binding activity of PPAR{alpha}/RXR.

  12. Inhibitory effects of resveratrol on foam cell formation are mediated through monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and lipid metabolism-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenpeng; Wang, Xianyue; Bi, Shenghui; Pan, Zhiguo; Liu, Shenxi; Yu, Hao; Lu, Hua; Lin, Xi; Wang, Xiaowu; Ma, Tao; Zhang, Weida

    2014-05-01

    Resveratrol has been shown to exert anti-atherosclerotic effects. 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) play key roles in foam cell formation, which is considered as the initiation of atherosclerosis. Thus, in this study, we investigated whether resveratrol inhibits foam cell formation by regulating lipid accumulation and inflammation. For this purpose, THP-1 cells were treated with 100 nM phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to induce their differentiation into macrophages. The macrophages were then pre-treated with 2.5 µM resveratrol and subsequently with serum-free (SF) medium alone or SF medium containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 ng/ml) and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL; 50 µg/ml) for 24 h to detect foam cell formation. To detect the expression of lipid accumulation-related proteins, the macrophages were treated with resveratrol. For the detection MCP-1 expression, the macrophages were treated with LPS and resveratrol, or with resveratrol alone. We incubated the THP-1-derived macrophages in resveratrol (2.5 µM) for 6 h in the presence or absence of 30 µM compound C for 4 h to detect the influence of compound C on the effects of resveratrol. The foam cells were examined using Red O staining. Gene expression levels were determined by qRT-PCR, western blot analysis and ELISA; lipid analysis was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results revealed that resveratrol effectively suppressed foam cell formation induced by LPS. Resveratrol also suppressed lipid accumulation and downregulated the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ and PPARα, but had no effect on the expression of PPARβ/δ. Resveratrol also upregulated the expression of AMPK and Silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1). However, the effects of resveratrol on SIRT1, PPARγ and PPARα expression and lipid accumulation were reversed when the cells were pre-treated with compound C

  13. Inhibitory effects of resveratrol on foam cell formation are mediated through monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and lipid metabolism-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenpeng; Wang, Xianyue; Bi, Shenghui; Pan, Zhiguo; Liu, Shenxi; Yu, Hao; Lu, Hua; Lin, Xi; Wang, Xiaowu; Ma, Tao; Zhang, Weida

    2014-05-01

    Resveratrol has been shown to exert anti-atherosclerotic effects. 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) play key roles in foam cell formation, which is considered as the initiation of atherosclerosis. Thus, in this study, we investigated whether resveratrol inhibits foam cell formation by regulating lipid accumulation and inflammation. For this purpose, THP-1 cells were treated with 100 nM phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to induce their differentiation into macrophages. The macrophages were then pre-treated with 2.5 µM resveratrol and subsequently with serum-free (SF) medium alone or SF medium containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 ng/ml) and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL; 50 µg/ml) for 24 h to detect foam cell formation. To detect the expression of lipid accumulation-related proteins, the macrophages were treated with resveratrol. For the detection MCP-1 expression, the macrophages were treated with LPS and resveratrol, or with resveratrol alone. We incubated the THP-1-derived macrophages in resveratrol (2.5 µM) for 6 h in the presence or absence of 30 µM compound C for 4 h to detect the influence of compound C on the effects of resveratrol. The foam cells were examined using Red O staining. Gene expression levels were determined by qRT-PCR, western blot analysis and ELISA; lipid analysis was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results revealed that resveratrol effectively suppressed foam cell formation induced by LPS. Resveratrol also suppressed lipid accumulation and downregulated the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ and PPARα, but had no effect on the expression of PPARβ/δ. Resveratrol also upregulated the expression of AMPK and Silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1). However, the effects of resveratrol on SIRT1, PPARγ and PPARα expression and lipid accumulation were reversed when the cells were pre-treated with compound C

  14. Treatment of acne vulgaris with the retinoic acid derivative Ro 11-1430. A controlled clinical trial against retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, J; Holm, P; Reymann, F

    1976-01-01

    In a double-blind, randomized, group-comparative clinical trial, 31 patients with acne vulgaris received topical treatment for 6-8 weeks with a lotion containing either 0.05% retinoic acid or 0.1% of the retinoic acid derivative Ro 11-1430. The side-effects erythema, desquamation and burning were significantly less frequent with Ro 11-1430 than with retinoic acid. The treatments appeared to be approximately equally effective in reducing the number of acne elements, but due to the limited number of patients studied, the trial was admittedly not sufficient to detect differences with regard to therapeutic efficacy.

  15. Kinetic study of electrochemically induced michael reactions of o-quinones with Meldrum's acid derivatives. Synthesis of highly oxygenated catechols.

    PubMed

    Nematollahi, D; Shayani-jam, H

    2008-05-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of catechols has been studied in the presence of Meldrum's acid derivatives as nucleophiles in aqueous solution, by means of cyclic voltammetry and controlled-potential coulometry. Catechols in the Michael addition reaction react with Meldrum's acids to form adducts that can undergo electrooxidation. Such products were obtained in good yields as confirmed by controlled potential electrosynthesis. Such products can be generated in aqueous solutions by means of electrosynthesis, using a carbon electrode in an undivided cell. Furthermore, the homogeneous rate constants of the chemical reaction interposed between electron transfers were estimated by comparing the experimental cyclic voltammetric curves with the digitally simulated ones.

  16. Benzoic acid derivatives with improved antifungal activity: Design, synthesis, structure-activity relationship (SAR) and CYP53 docking studies.

    PubMed

    Berne, Sabina; Kovačič, Lidija; Sova, Matej; Kraševec, Nada; Gobec, Stanislav; Križaj, Igor; Komel, Radovan

    2015-08-01

    Previously, we identified CYP53 as a fungal-specific target of natural phenolic antifungal compounds and discovered several inhibitors with antifungal properties. In this study, we performed similarity-based virtual screening and synthesis to obtain benzoic acid-derived compounds and assessed their antifungal activity against Cochliobolus lunatus, Aspergillus niger and Pleurotus ostreatus. In addition, we generated structural models of CYP53 enzyme and used them in docking trials with 40 selected compounds. Finally, we explored CYP53-ligand interactions and identified structural elements conferring increased antifungal activity to facilitate the development of potential new antifungal agents that specifically target CYP53 enzymes of animal and plant pathogenic fungi. PMID:26154240

  17. Synthetic amphibian peptides and short amino-acids derivatives against planktonic cells and mature biofilm of Providencia stuartii clinical strains.

    PubMed

    Ostrowska, Kinga; Kamysz, Wojciech; Dawgul, Małgorzata; Różalski, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, the growing number of multidrug resistant strains limits the use of many of the currently available chemotherapeutic agents. Furthermore, bacterial biofilm, due to its complex structure, constitutes an effective barrier to conventional antibiotics. The in vitro activities of naturally occurring peptide (Citropin 1.1), chemically engineered analogue (Pexiganan), newly-designed, short amino-acid derivatives (Pal-KK-NH2, Pal-KKK-NH2, Pal-RRR-NH2) and six clinically used antimicrobial agents (Gatifloxacin, Ampicilin, Cefotaxime, Ceftriaxone, Cefuroxime and Cefalexin) were investigated against planktonic cells and mature biofilm of multidrug-resistant Providencia stuartii strains, isolated from urological catheters. The MICs, MBCs values were determined by broth microdilution technique. Inhibition of biofilm formation by antimicrobial agents as well as biofilm susceptibility assay were tested using a surrogate model based on the Crystal Violet method. The antimicrobial activity of amino-acids derivatives and synthetic peptides was compared to that of clinically used antibiotics. For planktonic cells, MICs of peptides and antibiotics ranged between 1 and 256 μg/ml and 256 and ≥ 2048 μg/ml, respectively. The MBCs values of Pexiganan, Citropin 1.1 and amino-acids derivatives were between 16 and 256 μg/ml, 64 and 256 μg/ml and 16 and 512 μg/ml, respectively. For clinically used antibiotics the MBCs values were above 2048 μg/ml. All of the tested peptides and amino-acids derivatives, showed inhibitory activity against P. stuartii biofilm formation, in relation to their concentrations. Pexiganan and Citropin 1.1 in concentration range 32 and 256 μg/ml caused both strong and complete suppression of biofilm formation. None of the antibiotics caused complete inhibition of biofilm formation process. The biofilm susceptibility assay verified the extremely poor antibiofilm activity of conventional antibiotics compared to synthetic peptides. The

  18. Synthetic amphibian peptides and short amino-acids derivatives against planktonic cells and mature biofilm of Providencia stuartii clinical strains.

    PubMed

    Ostrowska, Kinga; Kamysz, Wojciech; Dawgul, Małgorzata; Różalski, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, the growing number of multidrug resistant strains limits the use of many of the currently available chemotherapeutic agents. Furthermore, bacterial biofilm, due to its complex structure, constitutes an effective barrier to conventional antibiotics. The in vitro activities of naturally occurring peptide (Citropin 1.1), chemically engineered analogue (Pexiganan), newly-designed, short amino-acid derivatives (Pal-KK-NH2, Pal-KKK-NH2, Pal-RRR-NH2) and six clinically used antimicrobial agents (Gatifloxacin, Ampicilin, Cefotaxime, Ceftriaxone, Cefuroxime and Cefalexin) were investigated against planktonic cells and mature biofilm of multidrug-resistant Providencia stuartii strains, isolated from urological catheters. The MICs, MBCs values were determined by broth microdilution technique. Inhibition of biofilm formation by antimicrobial agents as well as biofilm susceptibility assay were tested using a surrogate model based on the Crystal Violet method. The antimicrobial activity of amino-acids derivatives and synthetic peptides was compared to that of clinically used antibiotics. For planktonic cells, MICs of peptides and antibiotics ranged between 1 and 256 μg/ml and 256 and ≥ 2048 μg/ml, respectively. The MBCs values of Pexiganan, Citropin 1.1 and amino-acids derivatives were between 16 and 256 μg/ml, 64 and 256 μg/ml and 16 and 512 μg/ml, respectively. For clinically used antibiotics the MBCs values were above 2048 μg/ml. All of the tested peptides and amino-acids derivatives, showed inhibitory activity against P. stuartii biofilm formation, in relation to their concentrations. Pexiganan and Citropin 1.1 in concentration range 32 and 256 μg/ml caused both strong and complete suppression of biofilm formation. None of the antibiotics caused complete inhibition of biofilm formation process. The biofilm susceptibility assay verified the extremely poor antibiofilm activity of conventional antibiotics compared to synthetic peptides. The

  19. Effects of a New Glutamic Acid Derivative on Myocardial Contractility of Stressed Animals under Conditions of Nitric Oxide Synthesis Blockade.

    PubMed

    Tyurenkov, I N; Perfilova, V N; Sadikova, N V; Berestovitskaya, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2015-07-01

    Glufimet (glutamic acid derivative) in a dose of 28.7 mg/kg limited the reduction of the cardiac functional reserve in animals subjected to 24-h stress under conditions of nonselective NO synthase blockade with L-NAME (10 mg/kg). Adrenoreactivity and increased afterload tests showed that the increment of myocardial contraction/relaxation rates, left-ventricular pressure, and HR were significantly higher in glufimet-treated stressed animals with NO synthesis blockade than in animals which received no glufimet. The efficiency of glufimet was higher than that of phenibut (the reference drug).

  20. Gastroprotective mechanisms of action of semisynthetic carnosic acid derivatives in human cells.

    PubMed

    Theoduloz, Cristina; Pertino, Mariano Walter; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2014-01-06

    Carnosic acid (CA) and its semisynthetic derivatives display relevant gastroprotective effects on HCl/ethanol induced gastric lesions in mice. However, little is known on the mechanisms of action of the new compounds. The aim of the present work was to assess the gastroprotective action mechanisms of CA and its derivatives using human cell culture models. A human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (AGS) and lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) were used to reveal the possible mechanisms involved. The ability of the compounds to protect cells against sodium taurocholate (NaT)-induced damage, and to increase the cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) content was determined using AGS cells. Stimulation of cell proliferation was studied employing MRC-5 fibroblasts. Carnosic acid and its derivatives 10-18 raised GSH levels in AGS cells. While CA did not increase the PGE2 content in AGS cells, all derivatives significantly stimulated PGE2 synthesis, the best effect being found for the 12-O-indolebutyrylmethylcarnosate 13. A significant increase in MRC-5 fibroblast proliferation was observed for the derivatives 7 and 16-18. The antioxidant effect of the compounds was assessed by the inhibition of lipid peroxidation in human erythrocyte membranes, scavenging of superoxide anion and DPPH discoloration assay. The new CA derivatives showed gastroprotective effects by different mechanisms, including protection against cell damage induced by NaT, increase in GSH content, stimulation of PGE2 synthesis and cell proliferation.

  1. Gastroprotective mechanisms of action of semisynthetic carnosic acid derivatives in human cells.

    PubMed

    Theoduloz, Cristina; Pertino, Mariano Walter; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Carnosic acid (CA)