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Sample records for acid-etched control samples

  1. Rolled-Up Nanotech: Illumination-Controlled Hydrofluoric Acid Etching of AlAs Sacrificial Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costescu, Ruxandra M.; Deneke, Christoph; Thurmer, Dominic J.; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2009-12-01

    The effect of illumination on the hydrofluoric acid etching of AlAs sacrificial layers with systematically varied thicknesses in order to release and roll up InGaAs/GaAs bilayers was studied. For thicknesses of AlAs below 10 nm, there were two etching regimes for the area under illumination: one at low illumination intensities, in which the etching and releasing proceeds as expected and one at higher intensities in which the etching and any releasing are completely suppressed. The “etch suppression” area is well defined by the illumination spot, a feature that can be used to create heterogeneously etched regions with a high degree of control, shown here on patterned samples. Together with the studied self-limitation effect, the technique offers a way to determine the position of rolled-up micro- and nanotubes independently from the predefined lithographic pattern.

  2. Comparative Evaluation of Tensile – Bond Strength of An Orthodontic Adhesive with and without Fluoride Application, After Acid Etching -An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Yugandhar, G; Ramana, I Venkata; Srinivas, K; Yadav, S. Sarjeev Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background Fixed appliances hinder the effective control of plaque accumulation and white spot lesions may develop under the ill fitting bands or adjacent to the stainless steel brackets during orthodontic treatment particularly the etching process. Aims and Objectives Comparative study of tensile bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive with and without fluoride application after acid etching to know the effect of fluoride on bond strength. Materials and Methods This study is carried out on 90 non carious human premolar teeth, and divided in 6 groups with each group of 15 specimens. In those Groups I and IV were control group acid etch treatment, Group II and V is 1.23% APF gel (acid etch plus APF gel treatment,) and group III and VI is 8% SnF2 (acid etch plus SnF2 treatment). Samples of Group I, II and III bond strength were tested after 24 h and groups IV, V and VI after one month on microtechtensometer machine. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigation was carried out for the 2 specimens for the control group after acid etch and 4 specimens after acid etch with fluoride application for fluoride groups. Results Control and SnF2 treated groups was found to be nearly similar to the control group whereas APF treated group showed less focal holes than the other 2 groups. Conclusion Fluoride application after acid etching without having an adverse effect on bond strength but we can prevent the white spot lesions and caries. PMID:26023648

  3. Effect of acid etching duration on tensile bond strength of composite resin bonded to erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser-prepared dentine. Preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Chousterman, M; Heysselaer, D; Dridi, S M; Bayet, F; Misset, B; Lamard, L; Peremans, A; Nyssen-Behets, C; Nammour, S

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of composite resin bonded to erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) laser-prepared dentine after different durations of acid etching. The occlusal third of 68 human third molars was removed in order to expose the dentine surface. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups: group B (control group), prepared with bur and total etch system with 15 s acid etching [37% orthophosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4))]; group L15, laser photo-ablated dentine (200 mJ) (laser irradiation conditions: pulse duration 100 micros, air-water spray, fluence 31.45 J/ cm(2), 10 Hz, non-contact hand pieces, beam spot size 0.9 mm, irradiation speed 3 mm/s, and total irradiation time 2 x 40 s); group L30, laser prepared, laser conditioned and 30 s acid etching; group L60, laser prepared, laser conditioned and 60 s acid etching; group L90, laser prepared, laser conditioned and 90 s acid etching. A plot of composite resin was bonded onto each exposed dentine and then tested for tensile bond strength. The values obtained were statistically analysed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) coupled with the Tukey-Kramer test at the 95% level. A 90 s acid etching before bonding showed the best bonding value (P < 0.05) when compared with all the other groups including the control group. There is no significance difference between other groups, nor within each group and the control group. There was a significant increase in tensile bond strength of the samples acid etched for 90 s.

  4. Effects of fluoride treatment on phosphoric acid-etching in primary teeth: an AFM observation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Samjin; Rhee, Yeri; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Lee, Gi-Ja; Kim, Kyung-Sook; Park, Jae-Hong; Park, Young-Guk; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of fluoride application on 37% phosphoric acid-etching by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in primary tooth samples based on a clinical protocol used in a pediatric dental hospital. Enamel samples were prepared from 36 exfoliated and non-carious primary teeth. Primary tooth samples were randomly assigned to one of the four groups based on the timing of acid-etching with 37% phosphoric acid after an acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) pre-treatment. Group 1 received no fluoride application, Group 2 was pre-treated with fluoride and then received acid-etching 2 weeks later. One week separated the fluoride treatment and the acid-etching in Group 3, while Group 4 received acid-etching immediately after the fluoride treatment. The vestibular enamel surfaces of each primary tooth sample were scanned in air at a resolution of 512 x 512 pixels and a scan speed of 0.8 line/s. On the enamel surfaces of the primary teeth after APF pre-treatment, debris were observed although the teeth were smoother than they were prior to APF. As a result, it was concluded that APF treatment is responsible for decreased primary tooth surface roughness. The enamel surfaces etched for 20s showed that acid-etching was effective not only in removing scratches and debris, but also for evaluating enamel rod characteristics. Primary tooth enamel surfaces after etching showed minute structures caused by the decreased hydroxyapatite nanoparticle space, compared to those before etching. Also, acid-etching showed significantly increased roughness effects (p<0.0001, n=9). Finally, as more time elapsed after APF pre-treatment, the roughness was decreased to a lesser degree (p=0.005, n=9). We suggest that primary teeth etching 2 weeks after APF pre-treatment used clinically in pediatric hospitals may be effective to obtain properly etched enamel surfaces.

  5. Comparative Evaluation of the Etching Pattern of Er,Cr:YSGG & Acid Etching on Extracted Human Teeth-An ESEM Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mazumdar, Dibyendu; Ranjan, Shashi; Krishna, Naveen Kumar; Kole, Ravindra; Singh, Priyankar; Lakiang, Deirimika; Jayam, Chiranjeevi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Etching of enamel and dentin surfaces increases the surface area of the substrate for better bonding of the tooth colored restorative materials. Acid etching is the most commonly used method. Recently, hard tissue lasers have been used for this purpose. Aim The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the etching pattern of Er,Cr:YSGG and conventional etching on extracted human enamel and dentin specimens. Materials and Methods Total 40 extracted non-diseased teeth were selected, 20 anterior and 20 posterior teeth each for enamel and dentin specimens respectively. The sectioned samples were polished by 400 grit Silicon Carbide (SiC) paper to a thickness of 1.0 ± 0.5 mm. The enamel and dentin specimens were grouped as: GrE1 & GrD1 as control specimens, GrE2 & GrD2 were acid etched and GrE3 & GrD3 were lased. Acid etching was done using Conditioner 36 (37 % phosphoric acid) according to manufacturer instructions. Laser etching was done using Er,Cr:YSGG (Erbium, Chromium : Ytrium Scandium Gallium Garnet) at power settings of 3W, air 70% and water 20%. After surface treatment with assigned agents the specimens were analyzed under ESEM (Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope) at X1000 and X5000 magnification. Results Chi Square and Student “t” statistical analysis was used to compare smear layer removal and etching patterns between GrE2-GrE3. GrD2 and GrD3 were compared for smear layer removal and diameter of dentinal tubule opening using the same statistical analysis. Chi-square test for removal of smear layer in any of the treated surfaces i.e., GrE2-E3 and GrD2-D3 did not differ significantly (p>0.05). While GrE2 showed predominantly type I etching pattern (Chi-square=2.78, 0.05

    0.10) and GrE3 showed type III etching (Chi-square=4.50, p<0.05). The tubule diameters were measured using GSA (Gesellschaft fur Softwareentwicklung und Analytik, Germany) image analyzer and the ‘t’ value of student ‘t’ test was 18.10 which was a

  6. Ultrastructure of the surface of dental enamel with molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) with and without acid etching.

    PubMed

    Bozal, Carola B; Kaplan, Andrea; Ortolani, Andrea; Cortese, Silvina G; Biondi, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to analyze the ultrastructure and mineral composition of the surface of the enamel on a molar with MIH, with and without acid etching. A permanent tooth without clinical MIH lesions (control) and a tooth with clinical diagnosis of mild and moderate MIH, with indication for extraction, were processed with and without acid etching (H3PO4 37%, 20") for observation with scanning electron microscope (SEM) ZEISS (Supra 40) and mineral composition analysis with an EDS detector (Oxford Instruments). The control enamel showed normal prismatic surface and etching pattern. The clinically healthy enamel on the tooth with MIH revealed partial loss of prismatic pattern. The mild lesion was porous with occasional cracks. The moderate lesion was more porous, with larger cracks and many scales. The mineral composition of the affected surfaces had lower Ca and P content and higher O and C. On the tooth with MIH, even on normal looking enamel, the demineralization does not correspond to an etching pattern, and exhibits exposure of crystals with rods with rounded ends and less demineralization in the inter-prismatic spaces. Acid etching increased the presence of cracks and deep pores in the adamantine structure of the enamel with lesion. In moderate lesions, the mineral composition had higher content of Ca, P and Cl. Enamel with MIH, even on clinically intact adamantine surfaces, shows severe alterations in the ultrastructure and changes in ionic composition, which affect the acid etching pattern and may interfere with adhesion.

  7. Investigation of acid-etched CO2 laser ablated enamel surfaces using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahm, Byung J.; Kang, Hobin; Chan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser operating at the highly absorbed wavelength of 9.3μm with a pulse duration of 10-15μs is ideally suited for caries removal and caries prevention. The enamel thermally modified by the laser has enhanced resistance to acid dissolution. This is an obvious advantage for caries prevention; however, it is often necessary to etch the enamel surface to increase adhesion to composite restorative materials and such surfaces may be more resistant to etching. The purpose of the study was to non-destructively measure the susceptibility of laser-ablated enamel surfaces to acid dissolution before and after acid-etching using Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT). PS-OCT was used to acquire images of bovine enamel surfaces after exposure to laser irradiation at ablative fluence, acid-etching, and a surface softened dissolution model. The integrated reflectivity from lesion and the lesion depth were measured using PS-OCT. Samples were also sectioned for examination by Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM). PS-OCT images showed that acid-etching greatly accelerated the formation of subsurface lesions on both laser-irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces (P<0.05). A 37.5% phosphoric acid etch removed the laser modified enamel layer after 5-10 seconds.

  8. Improvement of enamel bond strengths for conventional and resin-modified glass ionomers: acid-etching vs. conditioning*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Tang, Tian; Zhang, Zhen-liang; Liang, Bing; Wang, Xiao-miao; Fu, Bai-ping

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study deals with the effect of phosphoric acid etching and conditioning on enamel micro-tensile bond strengths (μTBSs) of conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GICs/RMGICs). Methods: Forty-eight bovine incisors were prepared into rectangular blocks. Highly-polished labial enamel surfaces were either acid-etched, conditioned with liquids of cements, or not further treated (control). Subsequently, two matching pre-treated enamel surfaces were cemented together with one of four cements [two GICs: Fuji I (GC), Ketac Cem Easymix (3M ESPE); two RMGICs: Fuji Plus (GC), RelyX Luting (3M ESPE)] in preparation for μTBS tests. Pre-treated enamel surfaces and cement-enamel interfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Phosphoric acid etching significantly increased the enamel μTBS of GICs/RMGICs. Conditioning with the liquids of the cements produced significantly weaker or equivalent enamel μTBS compared to the control. Regardless of etching, RMGICs yielded stronger enamel μTBS than GICs. A visible hybrid layer was found at certain enamel-cement interfaces of the etched enamels. Conclusions: Phosphoric acid etching significantly increased the enamel μTBSs of GICs/RMGICs. Phosphoric acid etching should be recommended to etch the enamel margins before the cementation of the prostheses such as inlays and onlays, using GICs/RMGICs to improve the bond strengths. RMGICs provided stronger enamel bond strength than GICs and conditioning did not increase enamel bond strength. PMID:24190447

  9. Acid-etched microtexture for enhancement of bone growth into porous-coated implants.

    PubMed

    Hacking, S A; Harvey, E J; Tanzer, M; Krygier, J J; Bobyn, J D

    2003-11-01

    We designed an in vivo study to determine if the superimposition of a microtexture on the surface of sintered titanium beads affected the extent of bone ingrowth. Cylindrical titanium intramedullary implants were coated with titanium beads to form a porous finish using commercial sintering techniques. A control group of implants was left in the as-sintered condition. The test group was etched in a boiling acidic solution to create an irregular surface over the entire porous coating. Six experimental dogs underwent simultaneous bilateral femoral intramedullary implantation of a control implant and an acid etched implant. At 12 weeks, the implants were harvested in situ and the femora processed for undecalcified, histological examination. Eight transverse serial sections for each implant were analysed by backscattered electron microscopy and the extent of bone ingrowth was quantified by computer-aided image analysis. The extent of bone ingrowth into the control implants was 15.8% while the extent of bone ingrowth into the etched implants was 25.3%, a difference of 60% that was statistically significant. These results are consistent with other research that documents the positive effect of microtextured surfaces on bone formation at an implant surface. The acid etching process developed for this study represents a simple method for enhancing the potential of commonly available porous coatings for biological fixation.

  10. Surface characterization of alkali- and heat-treated Ti with or without prior acid etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Sang-Hyun; Matsumoto, Takuya; Miyajima, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Jun-Ichi; Narayanan, Ramaswamy; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2012-03-01

    Titanium and its alloys are used as implant materials in dental and orthopaedic applications. The material affinities to host bone tissue greatly concern with the recovery period and good prognosis. To obtain a material surface having excellent affinity to bone, acid etching prior to alkali- and heat-treatment of Ti was conducted. The surface characteristics of the prepared sample indicated that the roughness as well as the wettability increased by pre-etching. Bone-like apatite was formed on pre-etched, alkali- and heat-treated Ti surface in simulated body fluid (SBF) within 3 days, while it takes 5 days on the solely alkali- and heat-treated surface. Osteoblastic cells showed better compatibility on the per-etched surface compared to the pure Ti surface or alkali- and heat-treated surface. Moreover, the pre-etched surface showed better pull-off tensile adhesion strength against the deposited apatite. Thus, acid etching prior to alkali- and heat-treatment would be a promising method for enhancing the affinity of Ti to host bone tissue.

  11. Cell adhesion and in vivo osseointegration of sandblasted/acid etched/anodized dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mu-Hyon; Park, Kyeongsoon; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Se Eun; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-05-06

    The authors describe a new type of titanium (Ti) implant as a Modi-anodized (ANO) Ti implant, the surface of which was treated by sandblasting, acid etching (SLA), and anodized techniques. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the adhesion of MG-63 cells to Modi-ANO surface treated Ti in vitro and to investigate its osseointegration characteristics in vivo. Four different types of Ti implants were examined, that is, machined Ti (control), SLA, anodized, and Modi-ANO Ti. In the cell adhesion study, Modi-ANO Ti showed higher initial MG-63 cell adhesion and induced greater filopodia growth than other groups. In vivo study in a beagle model revealed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) of Modi-ANO Ti (74.20%±10.89%) was much greater than those of machined (33.58%±8.63%), SLA (58.47%±12.89), or ANO Ti (59.62%±18.30%). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Modi-ANO Ti implants produced by sandblasting, acid etching, and anodizing improve cell adhesion and bone ongrowth as compared with machined, SLA, or ANO Ti implants. These findings suggest that the application of Modi-ANO surface treatment could improve the osseointegration of dental implant.

  12. Comparative Study of the Effect of Acid Etching on Enamel Surface Roughness between Pumiced and Non-pumiced Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Lucas Guimarães; Paiva, Saul Martins; Pretti, Henrique; Lages, Elizabeth Maria Bastos; Júnior, João Batista Novães; Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective was to perform a comparative analysis of the effect of acid etching on enamel roughness between pumiced and non-pumiced teeth. Materials and Methods: The sample was composed of 32 dental surfaces divided into two groups: Group 1-16 surfaces having received pumice prophylaxis; and Group 2-16 surfaces not having received pumice prophylaxis. The teeth were kept in saline until the first record of surface roughness prior to etching. For each surface, a roughness graph was obtained through trials using a surface roughness tester. This procedure was repeated two more times at different locations for a total of three readings which, later, were converted in a mean value. The teeth were then acid etched with a 37% phosphoric acid for 60 s, rinsed with water, air dried, and tested with the roughness tester again using the same protocol described for baseline. The Quantikov image analysis program was used to measure the length of the graphs. The average value of the lengths was recorded for each surface before and after etching. The increase in roughness caused by acid etching was calculated and compared between groups. Results: The mean increase in roughness caused by the etching was 301 µm (11.37%) in Group 1 and 214 µm (8.33%) in Group 2. No statistically significant difference was found between samples with and without pumice prophylaxis (P = 0.283). Conclusion: The present study showed that the effect of acid etching on enamel roughness was not significantly affected by prior pumice prophylaxis. PMID:26435607

  13. Histological and immunohistochemical evaluation of the peri-implant soft tissues around machined and acid-etched titanium healing abutments: a prospective randomised study.

    PubMed

    Degidi, Marco; Artese, Luciano; Piattelli, Adriano; Scarano, Antonio; Shibli, Jamil A; Piccirilli, Marcello; Perrotti, Vittoria; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2012-06-01

    A close spatial correlation has been described between the roughness of intraoral materials and the rate of bacterial colonisation. The aim of the present study in man was to conduct a comparative immunohistochemical evaluation of the inflammatory infiltrate, microvessel density, the nitric oxide synthases 1 and 3 and the vascular endothelial growth factor expression, the proliferative activity, and the B and T lymphocyte and histiocyte positivity in the peri-implant soft tissues around machined and acid-etched titanium healing caps. Ten patients participated in this study. The patients were enrolled consecutively. All patients received dental implants left to heal in a non-submerged mode. Healing caps were inserted in all implants. Half of the implants were supplied randomly with machined caps of titanium (control), while the other half were provided randomly with acid-etched titanium caps (test). After a 6-month healing period, a gingival biopsy was performed with a circular scalpel around the healing caps of both groups. The inflammatory infiltrate was mostly present in test specimens. Their extension was much larger than that of the control samples. A higher number of T and B lymphocytes were observed in test specimens. Higher values of microvessel density and a higher expression of vascular endothelial growth factor intensity were observed in the test samples. Furthermore, the Ki-67, NOS1 and NOS3 expression was significantly higher in the test specimens. All these results showed that the tissues around test healing caps underwent a higher rate of restorative processes, most probably correlated to the higher inflammation processes observed in these tissues.

  14. Comparison of shear bond strength of reattached incisor fragment using Er,Cr:YSGG laser etching and conventional acid etching: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gyanendra; Goswami, Mridula; Dhillon, Jatinder Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this invitro study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of reattached fractured incisor fragments using Er,Cr:YSGG laser and conventional acid etching without additional tooth preparation. Materials and methods: Forty extracted human teeth were divided in two groups of 20 each (Groups A and B). In Group A, fractured surface was treated by an Er, Cr: YSGG laser system (Waterlase MD, Biolase Technology Inc., San Clemente, CA, USA) operating at a wavelength of 2,780 nm and frequency of 20 Hz. In Group B, fractured surface was etched using 37% phosphoric acid (Scotchbond, 3M). In both the groups, further subdivision with 10 sample each was made based on horizontal and oblique fracture. After laser or acid etching, all the samples were reattached using flowable composite resin and light cured. The samples were tested for shear bond strength. Results: Mean shear bond strength for Group A (94.70±39.158) was lower as compared to Group B (121.25±49.937), although the difference was not statistically significant(p value=0.121). Similarly no statistical significant difference was observed amongst the subgroups. (p>0.05) Conclusion: Er,Cr:YSGG laser etching in reattachment of fractured incisor fragment is a good alternative to conventional acid etching. Er,Cr:YSGG showed comparable efficiency in rebonding of fractured teeth fragment as acid etching. PMID:27721563

  15. Shear bond strength of resin cement to an acid etched and a laser irradiated ceramic surface

    PubMed Central

    Motro, Pelin Fatma Karagoz; Yurdaguven, Haktan

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid etching and Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of resin cement to lithium disilicate ceramic. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty-five ceramic blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 2 mm) were fabricated and embedded in acrylic resin. Their surfaces were finished with 1000-grit silicon carbide paper. The blocks were assigned to five groups: 1) 9.5% hydrofluoric-acid etching for 60 s; 2-4), 1.5-, 2.5-, and 6-W Er,Cr:YSGG laser applications for 60 seconds, respectively; and 5) no treatment (control). One specimen from each group was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Ceramic primer (Rely X ceramic primer) and adhesive (Adper Single Bond) were applied to the ceramic surfaces, followed by resin cement to bond the composite cylinders, and light curing. Bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours. Shear bond strengths were determined by a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α=0.05). RESULTS Adhesion was significantly stronger in Group 2 (3.88 ± 1.94 MPa) and Group 3 (3.65 ± 1.87 MPa) than in Control group (1.95 ± 1.06 MPa), in which bonding values were lowest (P<.01). No significant difference was observed between Group 4 (3.59 ± 1.19 MPa) and Control group. Shear bond strength was highest in Group 1 (8.42 ± 1.86 MPa; P<.01). CONCLUSION Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation at 1.5 and 2.5 W increased shear bond strengths between ceramic and resin cement compared with untreated ceramic surfaces. Irradiation at 6 W may not be an efficient ceramic surface treatment technique. PMID:23755333

  16. The Effect of Hydrofluoric Acid Etching Duration on the Surface Micromorphology, Roughness, and Wettability of Dental Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnaiah, Ravikumar; Alkheraif, Abdulaziz A.; Divakar, Darshan Devang; Matinlinna, Jukka P.; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    2016-01-01

    The current laboratory study is evaluating the effect of hydrofluoric acid etching duration on the surface characteristics of five silica-based glass ceramics. Changes in the pore pattern, crystal structure, roughness, and wettability were compared and evaluated. Seventy-five rectangularly shaped specimens were cut from each material (IPS e-max™, Dentsply Celtra™, Vita Suprinity™, Vita mark II™, and Vita Suprinity FC™); the sectioned samples were finished, polished, and ultrasonically cleaned. Specimens were randomly assigned into study groups: control (no etching) and four experimental groups (20, 40, 80 and 160 s of etching). The etched surfaces’ microstructure including crystal structure, pore pattern, pore depth, and pore width was studied under a scanning electron microscope, and the surface roughness and wettability were analyzed using a non-contact surface profilometer and a contact angle measuring device, respectively. The results were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the post hoc Tukey’s test. The results showed a significant change in the pore number, pore pattern, crystal structure, surface roughness, and wettability with increased etching duration. Etching for a short time resulted in small pores, and etching for longer times resulted in wider, irregular grooves. A significant increase in the surface roughness and wettability was observed with an increase in the etching duration. The findings also suggested a strong association between the surface roughness and wettability. PMID:27240353

  17. The Effect of Hydrofluoric Acid Etching Duration on the Surface Micromorphology, Roughness, and Wettability of Dental Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnaiah, Ravikumar; Alkheraif, Abdulaziz A; Divakar, Darshan Devang; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-05-27

    The current laboratory study is evaluating the effect of hydrofluoric acid etching duration on the surface characteristics of five silica-based glass ceramics. Changes in the pore pattern, crystal structure, roughness, and wettability were compared and evaluated. Seventy-five rectangularly shaped specimens were cut from each material (IPS e-max™, Dentsply Celtra™, Vita Suprinity™, Vita mark II™, and Vita Suprinity FC™); the sectioned samples were finished, polished, and ultrasonically cleaned. Specimens were randomly assigned into study groups: control (no etching) and four experimental groups (20, 40, 80 and 160 s of etching). The etched surfaces' microstructure including crystal structure, pore pattern, pore depth, and pore width was studied under a scanning electron microscope, and the surface roughness and wettability were analyzed using a non-contact surface profilometer and a contact angle measuring device, respectively. The results were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the post hoc Tukey's test. The results showed a significant change in the pore number, pore pattern, crystal structure, surface roughness, and wettability with increased etching duration. Etching for a short time resulted in small pores, and etching for longer times resulted in wider, irregular grooves. A significant increase in the surface roughness and wettability was observed with an increase in the etching duration. The findings also suggested a strong association between the surface roughness and wettability.

  18. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  19. An In Vitro Comparison of the Bond Strength of Composite to Superficial and Deep Dentin, Treated With Er:YAG Laser Irradiation or Acid-Etching.

    PubMed

    Alaghehmand, Homayoon; Nezhad Nasrollah, Fatemeh; Nokhbatolfoghahaei, Hanieh; Fekrazad, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin on superficial and deep dentin after conditioning with phosphoric acid and Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Methods: Thirty human molars were selected, roots were removed and crowns were bisected to provide a total of 60 half-crowns. Specimens were ground to expose superficial and deep dentin. Samples were assigned to six groups: (1) AS (acid etching of superficial dentin); (2) AD (acid etching of deep dentin); (3) LS (Er:YAG laser irradiation on superficial dentin); (4) LD (Er:YAG laser irradiation on deep dentin); (5) LAS (Er:YAG laser irradiation on superficial dentin followed by acid etching); (6) LAD (Er:YAG laser irradiation on deep dentin followed by acid etching) The adhesive protocol was performed. Samples were thermocycled and micro-shear bond strength was tested to failure. The data were submitted to statistical analysis with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc test. Results: The AS group, demonstrated the greatest amount of micro-shear bond strength. Statistical analysis showed a decrease in bond strength in laser-treated groups which was more significant for deep dentin. Conclusion: Preparation of dentin with laser did not improve bonding to superficial and deep dentin.

  20. An In Vitro Comparison of the Bond Strength of Composite to Superficial and Deep Dentin, Treated With Er:YAG Laser Irradiation or Acid-Etching

    PubMed Central

    Alaghehmand, Homayoon; Nezhad Nasrollah, Fatemeh; Nokhbatolfoghahaei, Hanieh; Fekrazad, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin on superficial and deep dentin after conditioning with phosphoric acid and Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Methods: Thirty human molars were selected, roots were removed and crowns were bisected to provide a total of 60 half-crowns. Specimens were ground to expose superficial and deep dentin. Samples were assigned to six groups: (1) AS (acid etching of superficial dentin); (2) AD (acid etching of deep dentin); (3) LS (Er:YAG laser irradiation on superficial dentin); (4) LD (Er:YAG laser irradiation on deep dentin); (5) LAS (Er:YAG laser irradiation on superficial dentin followed by acid etching); (6) LAD (Er:YAG laser irradiation on deep dentin followed by acid etching) The adhesive protocol was performed. Samples were thermocycled and micro-shear bond strength was tested to failure. The data were submitted to statistical analysis with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc test. Results: The AS group, demonstrated the greatest amount of micro-shear bond strength. Statistical analysis showed a decrease in bond strength in laser-treated groups which was more significant for deep dentin. Conclusion: Preparation of dentin with laser did not improve bonding to superficial and deep dentin. PMID:28144437

  1. Effects of laser and acid etching and air abrasion on mineral content of dentin.

    PubMed

    Malkoc, Meral Arslan; Taşdemir, Serife Tuba; Ozturk, A Nilgun; Ozturk, Bora; Berk, Gizem

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mineral content of dentin prepared using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser at four different power settings, acid etching, and air abrasion. The study teeth comprised 35 molars which were randomly divided into seven equal groups. The occlusal third of the crowns were cut with a slow-speed diamond saw. The groups were as follows: group A, control group; group B, dentin etched with 35% buffered phosphoric acid for 30 s; group C, dentin abraded at 60 psi with 50-µm aluminium oxide for 1 s; groups D-G, dentin irradiated with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 1.50 W (group D), 2.25 W (group E), 3.00 W (group F), and 3.50 W (group G). The levels of Mg, P, Ca, K and Na in each dentin slab were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Data were analysed by one way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests. There were no significant differences between the groups in the levels of Ca, P and Na, and the Ca/P ratio (p>0.05); however, there were significant differences in the levels of K (p<0.001) and Mg (p=0.13). In addition, the levels of Mg in the air abrasion group were higher than in the other groups (p<0.01). Etching with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser system, air abrasion and acid etching did not affect the levels of Ca, P and Na, or the Ca/P ratio, in the dentin surface.

  2. Resin Adaptation of Radicular Dentin Tubules after Endodontic Instrumentation and Acid Etching.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    the manuscript. DISCLAIMERS The statements, opinions, and advertisements in the Journal of Endodontics are solely those of the individual authors...I RD-Ai26 872 RESIN ADAPTATION OF RADICULAR DENTIN TUBULES AFTER / I ENDODONTIC INSTRUMENTATION AND ACID ETCHING(U) WALTER I REED ARMY INST OF...Adaptation to Radicular Dentin Tubules SbisoofpeAfter Endodontic Instrumentation and Acid Etching 1982-1983 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORTNUMBER -, AUTHOR(a) S

  3. Noble Gases and Nitrogen Released from a Lunar Soil Pyroxene Separate by Acid Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rider, P. E.

    1993-07-01

    We report initial results from a series of experiments designed to measure recently implanted solar wind (SW) ions in lunar soil mineral grains [1]. An acid-etching technique similar to the CSSE method developed at ETH Zurich was used to make abundance and isotope measurements of the SW noble gas and nitrogen compositions. Among the samples examined was a pyroxene separate from soil 75081. It was first washed with H2O to remove contamination from the sample finger walls and grain surfaces. H2O also acted as a weak acid, releasing gases from near-surface sites. Treatment with H2SO3 followed the water washes. Acid pH (~1.8 to ~1.0) and temperature (~23 degrees C to ~90 degrees C) and duration of acid attack (several minutes to several days) were varied from step to step. Finally, the sample was pyrolyzed in several steps to remove the remaining gases, culminating with a high-temperature pyrolysis at 1200 degrees C. Measurements of the light noble gases were mostly consistent with those from previous CSSE experiments performed on pyroxene [2,3]. It should be noted, however, that the Zurich SEP component was not easily distinguishable in the steps where it was expected to be observed. We suspect our experimental protocol masked the SEP reservoir, preventing us from seeing its distinctive signature. The most interesting results from this sample are its Kr and Xe isotopic and elemental compositions. Pyroxene apparently retains heavy noble gases as well as ilmenite (and plagioclase [4]). The heavy noble gas element ratios from this sample along with those previously reported [5,6] are, however, considerably heavier than the theoretically determined "solar system" values [7,8]. Explanations for the difference include the possibility that the derivations are incorrect, that there is another component of lunar origin mixing with the solar component, or that some type of loss mechanism is altering the noble gas reservoirs of the grains. The Kr and Xe isotopic compositions for

  4. Bonding durability of single-step adhesives to previously acid-etched dentin.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Masahiko; Tsubota, Keishi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Yoshida, Takeshi; Miyazaki, Masashi; Platt, Jeffrey A

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of phosphoric acid etching on the dentin bond strength of five single-step self-etch adhesive systems; Absolute, Clearfil tri-S Bond, Fluoro Bond Shake One, G-Bond and One-Up Bond F Plus. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin and the facial surfaces were wet ground with #600 SiC paper. Adhesives were applied on the prepared dentin surfaces with and without prior phosphoric acid etching and light irradiated. Resin composite was condensed into a mold (ø4x2 mm), light irradiated and stored in water at 37 degrees C. Four groups (n=10) were made per adhesive system: with and without prior acid etching and with and without thermal cycling between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C for 10,000 cycles. The specimens were tested in a shear mode at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. Two-way ANOVA, Student t-test and Tukey HSD test at a level of 0.05 were done. For specimens without prior acid etching, the mean bond strengths to bovine dentin ranged from 12.8 to 17.1 MPa and ranged from 6.7 to 13.3 MPa for specimens with prior acid etching after 24 hours storage in water. When the specimens were subjected to thermal cycling, the mean bond strengths ranged from 10.7 to 24.8 MPa for the specimens without prior acid etching and 4.6 to 13.9 MPa for the specimens with prior acid etching. The changes in dentin bond strength were different among the adhesive systems tested. Failure modes were commonly adhesive failure associated with mixed failure for specimens with prior acid etching. For specimens without prior acid etching, failures in composite and dentin were increased. From the results of this in vitro study, prior acid etching might be not acceptable for increasing the dentin bond strengths of single-step self-etch adhesive systems.

  5. The effect of topical fluorides, after acid etching of enamel, on the bond strength of directly bonded orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Hirce, J D; Sather, A H; Chao, E Y

    1980-10-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that the beneficial effects of topical fluoride can be realized without reducing the bond strength of the resin adhesive. Twenty-eight groups of four teeth (third molars and premolars) were extracted from twenty-eight patients and stored in distilled water. Twin brackets on Ormesh pads were bonded to all teeth with Endur adhesive. One tooth from each group was bonded according to the manufacturer's instructions. These teeth, Subgroup I, served as controls. Subgroup II teeth were etched for 4 minutes with 50% phosphoric acid containing 2 percent sodium fluoride. Subgroup III teeth received a 3-minute application of a basic phosphate fluoride solution (10(-2)M NA3PO4, 10(3) ppm F) after 1 minute of etching with 50 percent phosphoric acid. Subgroup IV teeth received a 4-minute application of 8 percent stannous fluoride solution after 1 minute of etching with 50 percent phosphoric acid. Each tooth was mounted in a block of improved dental stone; guide wires were used to reproduce bracket orientation. The M.T.S. materials-testing apparatus was used to generate a torsional moment on the bracket at a rate of 1 degree per second. Fluoride uptake by enamel has been shown to be greater in an acid medium or after acid etching. The application of directly bonded orthodontic brackets and pit-and-fissure sealants requires acid etching of the enamel surface. This study supports the use of topical fluoride after acid etching, a procedure that achieves the benefits of increased fluoride uptake without changing the bond strength of the resin adhesive.

  6. Effect of prior acid etching on bonding durability of single-step adhesives.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Tsubota, Keishi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu; Rikuta, Akitomo; Ando, Susumu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of prior phosphoric acid etching on the enamel bond strength of five single-step self-etch adhesive systems: Absolute, Clearfil tri-S Bond, Fluoro Bond Shake One, G-Bond and One-Up Bond F Plus. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin, and the facial surfaces were wet ground with #600 silicon carbide paper. Adhesives were applied to the enamel surfaces with or without prior phosphoric-acid etching and light irradiated. The resin composites were condensed into a mold and light irradiated. In total, 40 specimens were tested per adhesive system with and without prior acid etching and were further divided into two groups: those stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours without cycling and those stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours followed by thermal cycling between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C with 10,000 repeats. After storage under each set of conditions, the specimens were tested in shear mode at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. Two-way analysis of variance, the Student's t-test and the Tukey HSD test were used to analyze the data at a significance level of 0.05. For the specimens without prior acid etching, the mean bond strengths to enamel ranged from 11.0 to 14.6 MPa after 24-hour storage in water, while the corresponding values for specimens with prior acid etching ranged from 15.2 to 19.3 MPa. When these specimens were subjected to thermal cycling, the mean bond strengths ranged from 11.3 to 17.0 MPa without prior acid etching and from 12.3 to 23.2 MPa with prior acid etching. The changes in enamel bond strengths differed among the adhesive systems tested. After 24-hour storage in water, the most common failure modes were adhesive failure and mixed failure for specimens with and without prior acid etching, respectively. Thus, through a careful choice of adhesive system, prior acid etching can increase the bond strengths of single-step self-etch adhesive systems.

  7. Comparison of Self-Etch Primers with Conventional Acid Etching System on Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Zope, Amit; Zope-Khalekar, Yogita; Chitko, Shrikant S.; Kerudi, Veerendra V.; Patil, Harshal Ashok; Jaltare, Pratik; Dolas, Siddhesh G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The self-etching primer system consists of etchant and primer dispersed in a single unit. The etching and priming are merged as a single step leading to fewer stages in bonding procedure and reduction in the number of steps that also reduces the chance of introduction of error, resulting in saving time for the clinician. It also results in smaller extent of enamel decalcification. Aim To compare the Shear Bond Strength (SBS) of orthodontic bracket bonded with Self-Etch Primers (SEP) and conventional acid etching system and to study the surface appearance of teeth after debonding; etching with conventional acid etch and self-etch priming, using stereomicroscope. Materials and Methods Five Groups (n=20) were created randomly from a total of 100 extracted premolars. In a control Group A, etching of enamel was done with 37% phosphoric acid and bonding of stainless steel brackets with Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, California). Enamel conditioning in left over four Groups was done with self-etching primers and adhesives as follows: Group B-Transbond Plus (3M Unitek), Group C Xeno V+ (Dentsply), Group D-G-Bond (GC), Group E-One-Coat (Coltene). The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) score was also evaluated. Additionally, the surface roughness using profilometer were observed. Results Mean SBS of Group A was 18.26±7.5MPa, Group B was 10.93±4.02MPa, Group C was 6.88±2.91MPa while of Group D was 7.78±4.13MPa and Group E was 10.39±5.22MPa respectively. In conventional group ARI scores shows that over half of the adhesive was remaining on the surface of tooth (score 1 to 3). In self-etching primer groups ARI scores show that there was no or minor amount of adhesive remaining on the surface of tooth (score 4 and 5). SEP produces a lesser surface roughness on the enamel than conventional etching. However, statistical analysis shows significant correlation (p<0.001) of bond strength with surface roughness of enamel. Conclusion All groups might show clinically

  8. Surface Topographical Changes of a Failing Acid-Etched Long-Term in Function Retrieved Dental Implant.

    PubMed

    Monje, Alberto; González-García, Raúl; Fernández-Calderón, María Coronada; Hierro-Oliva, Margarita; González-Martín, María Luisa; Del Amo, Fernando Suarez-Lopez; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Wang, Hom-Lay; Monje, Florencio

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to report the main topographical and chemical changes of a failing 18-year in function retrieved acid-etching implant in the micro- and nanoscales. A partially edentulous 45 year old rehabilitated with a dental implant at 18 years of age exhibited mobility. After careful examination, a 3.25 × 13-mm press-fit dental implant was retrieved. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis was carried out to study topographical changes of the retrieved implant compared with an unused implant with similar topographical characteristics. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was used to study the surface composition of the retrieved failing implant. Clear changes related to the dual dioxide layer are present as visible in ≥×500 magnification. In addition, it was found that, for the retrieved implant, the surface composition consisted mainly of Ti2p, O1s, C1s, and Al2p. Also, a meaningful decrease of N and C was noticed, whereas the peaks of Ti2p, Al2p, and O1s increased when analyzing deeper (up to ×2000s) in the sample. It was shown that the superficial surface of a retrieved press-fit dual acid-etched implant 18 years after placement is impaired. However, the causes and consequences for these changes cannot be determined.

  9. Influence of previous acid etching on bond strength of universal adhesives to enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Zanatta, Rayssa Ferreira; Silva, Tatiane Josefa; Huhtala, Maria Filomena Rocha Lima; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of acid pretreatment on the bond strength of composite resin bonded to enamel and dentin with 2 different universal self-etching adhesives. The null hypothesis was that the acid treatment performed prior to adhesive application would not significantly change the bond strength to enamel or dentin for either universal adhesive tested. A sample of 112 bovine incisors were selected and embedded in acrylic resin. Half were ground until a flat enamel surface was obtained, and the other half were polished until a 6 × 6-mm area of dentin was exposed, resulting into 2 groups (n = 56). The enamel and dentin groups were divided into 2 subgroups according to the adhesive system applied: Futurabond U or Scotchbond Universal. Each of these subgroups was divided into 2 additional subgroups (n = 14); 1 subgroup received phosphoric acid pretreatment, and 1 subgroup did not. The bond strength was assessed with a microtensile test. Data from enamel and dentin specimens were analyzed separately using 1-way analysis of variance. The acid pretreatment did not significantly change the bond strength of the adhesives tested, either to enamel (P = 0.4161) or to dentin (P = 0.4857). The acid etching pretreatment did not affect the bond strength to dentin and enamel when the tested universal multipurpose adhesive systems were used.

  10. Evaluating EDTA as a substitute for phosphoric acid-etching of enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Imbery, Terence A; Kennedy, Matthew; Janus, Charles; Moon, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are proteolytic enzymes released when dentin is acid-etched. The enzymes are capable of destroying unprotected collagen fibrils that are not encapsulated by the dentin adhesive. Chlorhexidine applied after etching inhibits the activation of released MMPs, whereas neutral ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) prevents the release of MMPs. The purpose of this study was to determine if conditioning enamel and dentin with EDTA can be a substitute for treating acid-etching enamel and dentin with chlorhexidine. A column of composite resin was bonded to enamel and dentin after conditioning. Shear bond strengths were evaluated after 48 hours and after accelerated aging for three hours in 12% sodium hypochlorite. Shear bond strengths ranged from 15.6 MP a for accelerated aged EDTA enamel specimens to 26.8 MPa for dentin conditioned with EDTA and tested after 48 hours. A three-way ANOVA and a Tukey HSD test found statistically significant differences among the eight groups and the three independent variables (P < 0.05). EDTA was successfully substituted for phosphoric acid-etched enamel and dentin treated with chlorhexidine. Interactions of conditioning agent and aging were significant for dentin but not for enamel. In an effort to reduce the detrimental effects of MMPs, conditioning enamel and dentin with EDTA is an alternative to treating acid-etched dentin and enamel with chlorhexidine.

  11. Effect of acid etching of glass ionomer cement surface on the microleakage of sandwich restorations.

    PubMed

    Bona, Alvaro Della; Pinzetta, Caroline; Rosa, Vinícius

    2007-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the sealing ability of different glass ionomer cements (GICs) used for sandwich restorations and to assess the effect of acid etching of GIC on microleakage at GIC-resin composite interface. Forty cavities were prepared on the proximal surfaces of 20 permanent human premolars (2 cavities per tooth), assigned to 4 groups (n=10) and restored as follows: Group CIE - conventional GIC (CI) was applied onto the axial and cervical cavity walls, allowed setting for 5 min and acid etched (E) along the cavity margins with 35% phosphoric acid for 15 s, washed for 30 s and water was blotted; the adhesive system was applied and light cured for 10 s, completing the restoration with composite resin light cured for 40 s; Group CIN - same as Group CIE, except for acid etching of the CI surface; Group RME - same as CIE, but using a resin modified GIC (RMGIC); Group RMN - same as Group RME, except for acid etching of the RMGIC surface. Specimens were soaked in 1% methylene blue dye solution at 24 degrees C for 24 h, rinsed under running water for 1 h, bisected longitudinally and dye penetration was measured following the ISO/TS 11405-2003 standard. Results were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and chi-square tests (a=0.05). Dye penetration scores were as follow: CIE - 2.5; CIN - 2.5; RME - 0.9; and RMN - 0.6. The results suggest that phosphoric acid etching of GIC prior to the placement of composite resin does not improve the sealing ability of sandwich restorations. The RMGIC was more effective in preventing dye penetration at the GIC-resin composite-dentin interfaces than CI.

  12. Effect of fluoride on the morphology of calcium phosphate crystals grown on acid-etched human enamel.

    PubMed

    Fan, Y; Sun, Z; Moradian-Oldak, J

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of fluoride ion concentration on the morphology of calcium phosphate crystals grown on acid-etched enamel as a model for tooth enamel erosion. Samples were immersed in calcification solution for 16 h and changes in crystal morphology were monitored by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Without fluoride, plate-like octacalcium phosphate crystals (20 nm thick, 2-10 microm wide) were formed. With 1-10 mg/l fluoride, arrays of denser needle-like nanocrystals (20-30 nm wide, >500 nm in length) were formed. We conclude that there is a minimal fluoride concentration (1 mg/l) that dramatically affects the morphology of calcium phosphate crystals grown on etched enamel in vitro.

  13. Effect of Fluoride on the Morphology of Calcium Phosphate Crystals Grown on Acid-Etched Human Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Y.; Sun, Z.; Moradian-Oldak, J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of fluoride ion concentration on the morphology of calcium phosphate crystals grown on acid-etched enamel as a model for tooth enamel erosion. Samples were immersed in calcification solution for 16 h and changes in crystal morphology were monitored by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Without fluoride, plate-like octacalcium phosphate crystals (20 nm thick, 2–10 μm wide) were formed. With 1–10 mg/l fluoride, arrays of denser needle-like nanocrystals (20–30 nm wide, >500 nm in length) were formed. We conclude that there is a minimal fluoride concentration (1 mg/l) that dramatically affects the morphology of calcium phosphate crystals grown on etched enamel in vitro. PMID:19321991

  14. Changes in the surface of bone and acid-etched and sandblasted implants following implantation and removal

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Cennet Neslihan; Ertugrul, Abdullah Seckin; Eskitascioglu, Murat; Eskitascioglu, Gurcan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether there are any changes in the surface of bone or implant structures following the removal of a screwed dental implant. Materials and Methods: For this, six individual samples of acid-etched and sandblasted implants from three different manufacturers’ implant systems were used. They were screwed in a D1 bovine bone, and they were removed after primary stabilization. The bone and implant surfaces are evaluated with scanning electron microscope. Results: Through examination of the surfaces of the bone prior to implantation and of the used and unused implant surfaces, it was found that inhomogeneity in the implant surface can cause microcracking in the bone. Conclusions: This is attributed to the stress induced during the implantation of self-tapping implants and suggests that a tap drill may be required in some instances to protect the implant surface. PMID:27011744

  15. Instrumentation With Ultrasonic Scalers Facilitates Cleaning of the Sandblasted and Acid-Etched Titanium Implants.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Beom; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Kim, NamRyang; Park, Seojin; Jin, Seong-Ho; Choi, Bong-Kyu; Kim, Kack-Kyun; Ko, Youngkyung

    2015-08-01

    Mechanical instrumentation is widely used to debride dental implants, but this may alter the surface properties of titanium, which in turn may influence bacterial adhesion and make it more difficult to remove the biofilm. This in vitro study was performed (1) to assess the amount of biofilm formation on a sand-blasted and acid-etched titanium fixture treated with ultrasonic scalers with metal, plastic, and carbon tips and (2) to evaluate how this treatment of titanium surfaces affects implant cleaning by brushing with dentifrice. The titanium fixtures were treated with various ultrasonic scaler tips, and surface roughness parameters were measured by confocal microscopy. Biofilm was formed on the treated fixtures by using pooled saliva from 10 subjects, and the quantity of the adherent bacteria was compared with crystal violet assay. The fixture surfaces with biofilm were brushed for total of 30 seconds with a toothbrush with dentifrice. The bacteria remaining on the brushed fixture surfaces were quantified by scanning electron microscopy. Surface changes were evident, and the changes of the surfaces were more discernible when metal tips were used. A statistically significant decrease in roughness value (arithmetic mean height of the surface) was seen in the 2 metal-tip groups and the single plastic-tip group. After brushing with dentifrice, the treated surfaces in all the treatment groups showed significantly fewer bacteria compared with the untreated surfaces in the control group, and the parts of the surfaces left untreated in the test groups. Within the limits of this study, treatment of titanium fixture surfaces with ultrasonic metal, plastic, or carbon tips significantly enhanced the bacterial removal efficacy of brushing. Thorough instrumentation that smooths the whole exposed surface may facilitate maintenance of the implants.

  16. Inactivation of Matrix-bound MMPs by Cross-linking Agents in Acid Etched Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Scheffel, Débora Lopes Salles; Hebling, Josimeri; Scheffel, Régis Henke; Agee, Kelly A.; Turco, Gianluca; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Pashley, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Published TEM analysis of in vivo resin-dentin bonds shows that in 44 months almost 70% of collagen fibrils from the hybrid layer disappear. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an important role in that process and are thought to be the main factor responsible for the solubitization of dentin collagen. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the inactivation of matrix-bound MMPs by carbodiimide (EDC) or proanthocyanidin (PA) both cross-linking agents, or the MMP-inhibitor, chlorhexidine (CHX), on acid-etched dentin using a simplified MMP assay method. Methods Dentin beams (1×1×6mm) were obtained from mid-coronal dentin of sound third molars and randomly divided into 6 groups (G) according to the dentin treatment: G1: Deionized water (control), G2: 0.1M EDC, G3: 0.5M EDC, G4: 0.5M EDC+35% HEMA, G5: 5% Proanthocyanidin (PA) and G6: 2% CHX. The beams were etched for 15s with 37% phosphoric acid, rinsed and then immersed for 60s in one of the treatment solutions. The total MMP activity of dentin was analyzed for 1 h by colorimetric assay (Sensolyte). Data were submitted to Wilcoxon non-parametric test and Mann-Whitney tests (p>0.05). Results All experimental cross-linking solutions significantly reduced MMP activity compared to control, except 0.1M EDC (53.6% ±16.1). No difference was observed between cross-linking agents and 2% CHX 0.5M EDC + 35% HEMA (92.3% ±8.0) was similar to 0.5M EDC (89.1% ±6.4), 5% PA (100.8% ±10.9) and 2% CHX (83.4% ±10.9). Conclusion Dentin treatment with cross-linking agents is effective to significantly reduce MMP activity. Mixing 0.5M EDC and 35% HEMA did not influence EDC inhibitor potential. PMID:23786610

  17. Evaluation of modifying the bonding protocol of a new acid-etch primer on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Ajlouni, Raed; Bishara, Samir E; Oonsombat, Charuphan; Denehy, Gerald E

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets when light curing both the self-etch primer and the adhesive in one step. Fourty eight teeth were bonded with self-etch primer Angel I (3M/ESPE, St Paul, Minn) and divided into three groups. In group I (control), 16 teeth were stored in deionized water for 24 hours before debonding. In group II, 16 teeth were debonded within half-an-hour to simulate when the initial archwires were ligated. In group III, 16 additional teeth were bonded using exactly the same procedure as in groups I and II, but the light cure used for 10 seconds after applying the acid-etch primer was eliminated, and the light cure used for 20 seconds after the precoated bracket was placed over the tooth. This saved at least two minutes of the total time of the bonding procedure. The teeth in this group were also debonded within half-an-hour from the time of initial bonding. The teeth debonded after 24 hours of water storage at 37 degrees C had a mean shear bond strength of 6.0 +/- 3.5 MPa, the group that was debonded within half-an-hour of two light exposures had a mean shear bond strength of 5.9 +/- 2.7 MPa, and the mean for the group with only one light cure exposure was 4.3 +/- 2.6 MPa. Light curing the acid-etch primer together with the adhesive after placing the orthodontic bracket did not significantly diminish the shear bond strength as compared with light curing the acid-etch primer and the adhesive separately.

  18. Strength determination of periodontal splints fabricated from acid-etched retained materials.

    PubMed

    Compton, F H; Beagrie, G S; Chernecky, R

    1977-07-01

    Six systems (one polycarboxylate, one polymethyl methacrylate, one unfilled BIS-GMA resin, two combinations of methyl cyanoacrylate and polymethyl methacrylate, and one combination of unfilled BIS-GMA and filled composite resin) were evaluated for in vitro retention to acid-etched human enamel. Also tested were one unfilled-filled resin combination backed by perforated orthodontic band metal and another unfilled resin backed by stainless steel wire mesh. Significant differences in retention were found. Results show that retention depends pril surface and to resist subsequent chemical degradation.

  19. Early bone response to sandblasted, dual acid-etched and H2O2/HCl treated titanium implants: an experimental study in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    He, F M; Yang, G L; Li, Y N; Wang, X X; Zhao, S F

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a roughened H(2)O(2)/HCl heat-treated titanium surface on peri-implant bone formation at an early stage in vivo. 24 Ti(6)Al(4)V alloy implants were used; half were treated by sandblasted and dual acid-etched treatments (control group), while the others were treated by sandblasted, dual acid-etched and H(2)O(2)/HCl heat treatments (test group). The morphology and roughness were analyzed by field emission SEM and atomic force microscopy. The implants were inserted into the femora of 12 adult white rabbits. After 2 and 4 weeks, femora block specimens were prepared for histological and histomorphometric analysis. SEM micrographs showed that multilevel and different sized pits were formed on both surfaces. New bone formation was observed on both implant surfaces. Test implants demonstrated a greater mean percentage of bone-implant contact as compared with controls at 2 (46.84 vs. 41.81, p=0.000) and 4 weeks (49.43 vs. 44.87, p=0.006) of healing. It is concluded that the H(2)O(2)/HCl heat-treated rough titanium surface promoted enhanced bone apposition during the early stages of new bone formation around the implant.

  20. In Vitro Evaluation of Microleakage Around Orthodontic Brackets Using Laser Etching and Acid Etching Methods

    PubMed Central

    Toodehzaeim, Mohammad Hossein; Yassaei, Sogra; Karandish, Maryam; Farzaneh, Sedigeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: path of microleakage between the enamel and adhesive potentially allows microbial ingress that may consequently cause enamel decalcification. The aim of this study was to compare microleakage of brackets bonded either by laser or acid etching techniques. Materials and Method: The specimens were 33 extracted premolars that were divided into three groups as the acid etching group (group 1), laser etching with Er:YAG at 100 mJ and 15 Hz for 15s (group 2), and laser etching with Er:YAG at 140 mJ and 15 Hz for 15s (group 3). After photo polymerization, the teeth were subjected to 500 thermal cycles. Then the specimens were sealed with nail varnish, stained with 2% methylen blue for 24hs, sectioned, and examined under a stereomicroscope. They were scored for marginal microleakage that occurred between the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces from the occlusal and gingival margins. Data were analyzed with the Kruskal- Wallis test. Results: For the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive surfaces, significant differences were not observed between the three groups. Conclusion: According to this study, the Er:YAG laser with 1.5 and 2.1 watt settings may be used as an adjunctive for preparing the surface for orthodontic bracket bonding. PMID:25628661

  1. In vitro remineralization of acid-etched human enamel with Ca 3SiO 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhihong; Chang, Jiang; Deng, Yan; Joiner, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    Bioactive and inductive silicate-based bioceramics play an important role in hard tissue prosthetics such as bone and teeth. In the present study, a model was established to study the acid-etched enamel remineralization with tricalcium silicate (Ca 3SiO 5, C 3S) paste in vitro. After soaking in simulated oral fluid (SOF), Ca-P precipitation layer was formed on the enamel surface, with the prolonged soaking time, apatite layer turned into density and uniformity and thickness increasingly from 250 to 350 nm for 1 day to 1.7-1.9 μm for 7 days. Structure of apatite crystals was similar to that of hydroxyapatite (HAp). At the same time, surface smoothness of the remineralized layer is favorable for the oral hygiene. These results suggested that C 3S treated the acid-etched enamel can induce apatite formation, indicating the biomimic mineralization ability, and C 3S could be used as an agent of inductive biomineralization for the enamel prosthesis and protection.

  2. Hydrogen content in titanium and a titanium-zirconium alloy after acid etching.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias J; Walter, Martin S; Lyngstadaas, S Petter; Wintermantel, Erich; Haugen, Håvard J

    2013-04-01

    Dental implant alloys made from titanium and zirconium are known for their high mechanical strength, fracture toughness and corrosion resistance in comparison with commercially pure titanium. The aim of the study was to investigate possible differences in the surface chemistry and/or surface topography of titanium and titanium-zirconium surfaces after sand blasting and acid etching. The two surfaces were compared by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and profilometry. The 1.9 times greater surface hydrogen concentration of titanium zirconium compared to titanium was found to be the major difference between the two materials. Zirconium appeared to enhance hydride formation on titanium alloys when etched in acid. Surface topography revealed significant differences on the micro and nanoscale. Surface roughness was increased significantly (p<0.01) on the titanium-zirconium alloy. High-resolution images showed nanostructures only present on titanium zirconium.

  3. Effect of Acid Etching, Silane and Thermal Cycling on the Bond Strength of Metallic Brackets to Ceramic.

    PubMed

    Matos, Natália Regina Santos de; Costa, Ana Rosa; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia; Santamaria, Milton; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silanes, thermal cycling and acid etching on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metallic brackets to feldspathic ceramic. Feldspathic ceramic cylinders (Groups 1, 2, 5 and 6) were etched for 60 s with 10% hydrofluoric acid and Groups 3, 4, 7 and 8, without acid etching. Two layers of silane Clearfil Ceramic Primer (CCP, Groups 1 to 4) and two layers of RelyX Ceramic Primer (RCP, groups 5 to 8) were applied and dried for 60 s. Brackets were bonded to the cylinders with Transbond XT and light-activated for 40 s with Bluephase G2. All specimens were stored in deionized water at 37 °C for 24 h, and the specimens of groups 1, 3, 5 and 7 were submitted to 7,000 thermal cycles (5 °C/55 °C). After storage, the SBS test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were subjected to three-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (α=0.05). The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was evaluated at 8x magnification. The SBS of CCP was significantly greater than of RCP (p<0.05), with or without thermal cycling. Thermal cycling significantly reduced the SBS (p<0.05). The groups submitted to acid etching showed significantly higher SBS than those without acid etching (p<0.05). In conclusion, thermal cycling reduced SBS for all groups. The best ceramic surface treatment for bracket bonding was achieved by acid etching and CCP silane. The ARI results showed predominance of score 0 for all groups.

  4. Fabrication, characterization, and biological assessment of multilayer DNA coatings on sandblasted-dual acid etched titanium surface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Song, Li-Na; Yang, Guo-Li; Zhao, Shi-Fang; He, Fu-Ming

    2011-06-01

    As local gene therapy has received attention, immobilizing functional gene onto irregular oral implant surface has become an advanced challenge. Electrostatic layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly technique could achieve this goal and allow local and efficient administration of genes to the target cells. In this study, multilayers of cationic lipid/plasmid DNA (pEGFP-C1) complex (LDc) and anionic hyaluronic acid were assembled onto sandblasted-dual acid etched titanium disks by the LBL technique. Surface characteristics of the coatings were performed by x-ray photospectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurements, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cell biological characteristics of the coatings were evaluated by in vitro experiments. SEM results demonstrated that the porous titanium surface was gradually flattened with the increase of the multilayer. The XPS survey indicated that the N element was found from the coating. The coating degradation and pEGFP-C1 releasing kinetics showed that the more assembled layer numbers were, the larger the amount of DNA released in the first 30 h. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured directly on the DNA-loaded surface. Higher enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression efficiency was achieved by increasing the number of layers when cells were cultured after 24 or 72 h. The MC3T3-E1 cell viability on the surface of multilayer DNA coatings was significantly higher than that on control porous titanium surface. It was concluded that the approach established by the LBL technique had great potential in immobilizing gene coatings onto the porous titanium surface and subsequently influenced the function of the cultured cell.

  5. Effect of Hydrofluoric Acid Etching Time on Titanium Topography, Chemistry, Wettability, and Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Zahran, R.; Rosales Leal, J. I.; Rodríguez Valverde, M. A.; Cabrerizo Vílchez, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Titanium implant surface etching has proven an effective method to enhance cell attachment. Despite the frequent use of hydrofluoric (HF) acid, many questions remain unresolved, including the optimal etching time and its effect on surface and biological properties. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of HF acid etching time on Ti topography, surface chemistry, wettability, and cell adhesion. These data are useful to design improved acid treatment and obtain an improved cell response. The surface topography, chemistry, dynamic wetting, and cell adhesiveness of polished Ti surfaces were evaluated after treatment with HF acid solution for 0, 2; 3, 5, 7, or 10 min, revealing a time-dependent effect of HF acid on their topography, chemistry, and wetting. Roughness and wetting increased with longer etching time except at 10 min, when roughness increased but wetness decreased. Skewness became negative after etching and kurtosis tended to 3 with longer etching time. Highest cell adhesion was achieved after 5–7 min of etching time. Wetting and cell adhesion were reduced on the highly rough surfaces obtained after 10-min etching time. PMID:27824875

  6. Effect of acid-etching on remineralization of enamel white spot lesions.

    PubMed

    Al-Khateeb, S; Exterkate, R; Angmar-Månsson, B; ten Cate, J M; ten Cate, B

    2000-02-01

    This in vitro study aimed at investigating whether full remineralization would occur in white spot lesions when the surface porosity was increased by acid-etching. The effect of fluoride was also investigated. Enamel blocks with in vitro produced white spot lesions were used. Group A was exposed to a remineralizing solution only. In group B, the lesions were etched with 35% phosphoric acid for 30 s, then treated as in group A. Group C was treated as group A + daily treatment with a fluoride toothpaste slurry (1,000 ppm) for 5 min. Group D was treated as group B + the daily fluoride treatment of group C. The remineralization was measured weekly with Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence during the experimental period. After 10 weeks of remineralization, mineral profiles were assessed with transverse microradiography. The enamel fluorescence was partly regained. There were significant differences in the lesion depth, mineral content at the surface layer, and integrated mineral loss between the groups. Addition of fluoride accelerated the remineralization only in the beginning; in later stages the process leveled out and even reached a plateau in all the groups. It was concluded that full remineralization was not achieved by etching, by the addition of fluoride, nor by the combination of both treatments in this in vitro study.

  7. Sampled-data controller implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Leduc, Ryan J.

    2012-09-01

    The setting of this article is the implementation of timed discrete-event systems (TDES) as sampled-data (SD) controllers. An SD controller is driven by a periodic clock and sees the system as a series of inputs and outputs. On each clock edge (tick event), it samples its inputs, changes states and updates its outputs. In this article, we establish a formal representation of an SD controller as a Moore synchronous finite state machine (FSM). We describe how to translate a TDES supervisor to an FSM, as well as necessary properties to be able to do so. We discuss how to construct a single centralised controller as well as a set of modular controllers, and show that they will produce equivalent output. We briefly discuss how the recently introduced SD controllability definition relates to our translation method. SD controllability is an extension of TDES controllability which captures several new properties that are useful in dealing with concurrency issues, as well as make it easier to translate a TDES supervisor into an SD controller. We next discuss the application of SD controllability to a small flexible manufacturing system (FMS) from the literature. The example demonstrates the successful application of the new SD properties. We describe the design of the system in detail to illustrate the new conditions and to provide designers with guidance on how to apply the properties. We also present some FSM translation issues encountered, as well as the FSM version of the system's supervisors.

  8. Rapid formation of AgnX(X = S, Cl, PO4, C2O4) nanotubes via an acid-etching anion exchange reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingjing; Yang, Wenlong; Ning, Jiqiang; Zhong, Yijun; Hu, Yong

    2014-05-01

    This work presents a rapid nanotube fabrication method for a series of silver compounds AgnX, such as Ag2S, AgCl, Ag3PO4, and Ag2C2O4, from pregrown Ag2CO3 nanorod templates. The anion exchange process involved takes place in non-aqueous solutions just at room temperature and completes within 10 minutes. An acid-etching anion exchange reaction mechanism has been proved underneath the transformation process from Ag2CO3 nanorods to AgnX nanotubes by the observation of an intermediate yolk-shell nanostructure. It has been found that the final structure of the products can be conveniently controlled by simply varying the concentration of HnX acids, and the organic solvents employed play a vital role in the formation of the nanotubes by effectively controlling the diffusion rates of different species of reacting ions. As a demonstration, the as-prepared AgCl and Ag3PO4 nanotubes exhibit enhanced photocatalytic activity and favorable recyclability for the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under visible-light irradiation.This work presents a rapid nanotube fabrication method for a series of silver compounds AgnX, such as Ag2S, AgCl, Ag3PO4, and Ag2C2O4, from pregrown Ag2CO3 nanorod templates. The anion exchange process involved takes place in non-aqueous solutions just at room temperature and completes within 10 minutes. An acid-etching anion exchange reaction mechanism has been proved underneath the transformation process from Ag2CO3 nanorods to AgnX nanotubes by the observation of an intermediate yolk-shell nanostructure. It has been found that the final structure of the products can be conveniently controlled by simply varying the concentration of HnX acids, and the organic solvents employed play a vital role in the formation of the nanotubes by effectively controlling the diffusion rates of different species of reacting ions. As a demonstration, the as-prepared AgCl and Ag3PO4 nanotubes exhibit enhanced photocatalytic activity and favorable recyclability for the

  9. In vitro evaluation of microleakage under orthodontic brackets using two different laser etching, self etching and acid etching methods.

    PubMed

    Hamamci, Nihal; Akkurt, Atilim; Başaran, Güvenç

    2010-11-01

    This study evaluated the microleakage of brackets bonded by four different enamel etching techniques. Forty freshly extracted human premolars were divided randomly into four equal groups and received the following treatment: group 1, acid etching; group 2, self-etching primer (SEP); group 3, erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser etching; and group 4, erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser etching. After photopolymerization, the teeth were kept in distilled water for 1 month and then subjected to 500 thermal cycles. Then, the specimens were sealed with nail varnish, stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 h, sectioned, and examined under a stereomicroscope. In addition, they were scored for marginal microleakage at the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces from the incisal and gingival margins. Statistical analyses consisted of the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann-Whitney U test with Bonferroni correction. Microleakage occurred between the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces in all groups. For the adhesive-enamel surface, a significant difference was observed between group 1 and groups 2 (P = 0.011), 3 (P = 0.002), and 4 (P = 0.000) on the gingival side. Overall, significant differences were observed between group 1 and groups 3 (P = 0.003) and 4 (P = 0.000). In dental bonding procedures, acid etching was found to result in the least microleakage. Since etching with a laser decreases the risk of caries and is time-saving, it may serve as an alternative to acid etching.

  10. Effects of rhBMP-2 on Sandblasted and Acid Etched Titanium Implant Surfaces on Bone Regeneration and Osseointegration: Spilt-Mouth Designed Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Ho; Lee, So-Hyoun; Ryu, Jae-Jun; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate effects of rhBMP-2 applied at different concentrations to sandblasted and acid etched (SLA) implants on osseointegration and bone regeneration in a bone defect of beagle dogs as pilot study using split-mouth design. Methods. For experimental groups, SLA implants were coated with different concentrations of rhBMP-2 (0.1, 0.5, and 1 mg/mL). After assessment of surface characteristics and rhBMP-2 releasing profile, the experimental groups and untreated control groups (n = 6 in each group, two animals in each group) were placed in split-mouth designed animal models with buccal open defect. At 8 weeks after implant placement, implant stability quotients (ISQ) values were recorded and vertical bone height (VBH, mm), bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC, %), and bone volume (BV, %) in the upper 3 mm defect areas were measured. Results. The ISQ values were highest in the 1.0 group. Mean values of VBH (mm), BIC (%), and BV (%) were greater in the 0.5 mg/mL and 1.0 mg/mL groups than those in 0.1 and control groups in buccal defect areas. Conclusion. In the open defect area surrounding the SLA implant, coating with 0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL concentrations of rhBMP-2 was more effective, compared with untreated group, in promoting bone regeneration and osseointegration. PMID:26504807

  11. Rapid formation of Ag(n)X(X = S, Cl, PO4, C2O4) nanotubes via an acid-etching anion exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Yang, Wenlong; Ning, Jiqiang; Zhong, Yijun; Hu, Yong

    2014-06-07

    This work presents a rapid nanotube fabrication method for a series of silver compounds AgnX, such as Ag2S, AgCl, Ag3PO4, and Ag2C2O4, from pregrown Ag2CO3 nanorod templates. The anion exchange process involved takes place in non-aqueous solutions just at room temperature and completes within 10 minutes. An acid-etching anion exchange reaction mechanism has been proved underneath the transformation process from Ag2CO3 nanorods to AgnX nanotubes by the observation of an intermediate yolk-shell nanostructure. It has been found that the final structure of the products can be conveniently controlled by simply varying the concentration of HnX acids, and the organic solvents employed play a vital role in the formation of the nanotubes by effectively controlling the diffusion rates of different species of reacting ions. As a demonstration, the as-prepared AgCl and Ag3PO4 nanotubes exhibit enhanced photocatalytic activity and favorable recyclability for the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under visible-light irradiation.

  12. Comparison of shear bond strength and surface structure between conventional acid etching and air-abrasion of human enamel.

    PubMed

    Olsen, M E; Bishara, S E; Damon, P; Jakobsen, J R

    1997-11-01

    Recently, air-abrasion technology has been examined for potential applications within dentistry, including the field of orthodontics. The purpose of this study was to compare the traditional acid-etch technique with an air-abrasion surface preparation technique, with two different sizes of abrading particles. The following parameters were evaluated: (a) shear bond strength, (b) bond failure location, and (c) enamel surface preparation, as viewed through a scanning electron microscope. Sixty extracted human third molars were pumiced and divided into three groups of 20. The first group was etched with a 37% phosphoric acid gel for 30 seconds, rinsed for 30 seconds, and dried for 20 seconds. The second and third groups were air-abraded with (a) a 50 microm particle and (b) a 90 microm particle of aluminum oxide, with the Micro-etcher microabrasion machine (Danville Engineering Inc.). All three groups had molar stainless steel orthodontic brackets bonded to the buccal surface of each tooth with Transbond XT bonding system (3M Unitek). A Zwick Universal Testing Machine (Calitek Corp.) was used to determine shear bond strengths. The analysis of variance was used to compare the three groups. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was used to evaluate the residual adhesive on the enamel after bracket removal. The chi square test was used to evaluate differences in the ARI scores among the groups. The significance for all tests was predetermined at p < or = 0.05. The results indicated that there was a significant difference in shear bond strength among the three groups (p = 0.0001). The Duncan Multiple Range test showed a significant decrease in shear bond strength in the air-abraded groups. The chi square test revealed significant differences among the ARI scores of the acid-etched group and the air-abraded groups (chi(2) = 0.0001), indicating no adhesive remained on the enamel surface after debonding when air-abrasion was used. In conclusion, the current findings indicate that

  13. Comparison of alkaline phosphatase activity of MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on different Ti surfaces: modified sandblasted with large grit and acid-etched (MSLA), laser-treated, and laser and acid-treated Ti surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin-Jie; Kim, So-Nam

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE In this study, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of implant surface treatment on cell differentiation of osteoblast cells. For this purpose, three surfaces were compared: (1) a modified SLA (MSLA: sand-blasted with large grit, acid-etched, and immersed in 0.9% NaCl), (2) a laser treatment (LT: laser treatment) titanium surface and (3) a laser and acid-treated (LAT: laser treatment, acid-etched) titanium surface. MATERIALS AND METHODS The MSLA surfaces were considered as the control group, and LT and LAT surfaces as test groups. Alkaline phosphatase expression (ALP) was used to quantify osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cell. Surface roughness was evaluated by a contact profilometer (URFPAK-SV; Mitutoyo, Kawasaki, Japan) and characterized by two parameters: mean roughness (Ra) and maximum peak-to-valley height (Rt). RESULTS Scanning electron microscope revealed that MSLA (control group) surface was not as rough as LT, LAT surface (test groups). Alkaline phosphatase expression, the measure of osteoblastic differentiation, and total ALP expression by surface-adherent cells were found to be highest at 21 days for all three surfaces tested (P<.05). Furthermore, ALP expression levels of MSLA and LAT surfaces were significantly higher than expression levels of LT surface-adherent cells at 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively (P<.05). However, ALP expression levels between MSLA and LAT surface were equal at 7, 14, and 21 days (P>.05). CONCLUSION This study suggested that MSLA and LAT surfaces exhibited more favorable environment for osteoblast differentiation when compared with LT surface, the results that are important for implant surface modification studies. PMID:27350860

  14. Color Stability of Enamel following Different Acid Etching and Color Exposure Times

    PubMed Central

    Jahanbin, Arezoo; Basafa, Mohammad; Moazzami, Mostafa; Basafa, Behnoush; Eslami, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different etching times on enamel color stability after immediate versus delayed exposure to colored artificial saliva (CAS). Materials and methods. Human first premolars were divided into five groups of twenty. A colorimeter was used according to the CIE system on the mid-buccal and mid-lingual surfaces to evaluate initial tooth color. Samples in group A remained unetched. In groups B to E, buccal and lingual surfaces were initially etched with phosphoric acid for 15 and 60 seconds, respectively. Then, the samples in groups A and C were immersed in colored artificial saliva (cola+saliva). In group B, the teeth were immersed in simple artificial saliva (AS). Samples in groups D and E were immersed in AS for 24 and 72 hours, respectively before being immersed in colored AS. The teeth were immersed for one month in each solution before color measurement. During the test period, the teeth were retrieved from the staining solution and stored in AS for five minutes. This was repeated 60 times. Color changes of buccal and lingual surfaces were calculated. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests were used for statistical analysis (α ≤0.05). Results. There were no significant differences between the groups in term of ΔE of buccal (P = 0.148) and lingual surfaces (P = 0.73). Conclusion. Extended time of etching did not result in significant enamel color change. Immediate and delayed exposure of etched enamel to staining solutions did not result in clinically detectable tooth color changes. PMID:25093048

  15. Rock sampling. [apparatus for controlling particle size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, P. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    An apparatus for sampling rock and other brittle materials and for controlling resultant particle sizes is described. The device includes grinding means for cutting grooves in the rock surface and to provide a grouping of thin, shallow, parallel ridges and cutter means to reduce these ridges to a powder specimen. Collection means is provided for the powder. The invention relates to rock grinding and particularly to the sampling of rock specimens with good size control.

  16. Noninvasive Quality Control of Cryopreserved Samples.

    PubMed

    Dörr, Daniel; Stracke, Frank; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2012-12-01

    We present a novel noninvasive technology for quality control in biobanking. We implemented a contactless optical in situ method with a remote detection unit. The method detects physical and chemical changes by emission spectroscopy. In the present study, ice formation in a vitrified sample is revealed by Raman scattering. The technology allows us to monitor sample quality during cold storage and to assess the sample state after preservation, storage, or transport without the need for thawing.

  17. The effects of acid etching time on surface mechanical properties of dental hard tissues.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Ahmed, Naseer

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of etching time on the surface properties of dental hard tissues including enamel and dentin. For this purpose, samples were prepared using extracted human teeth and treated with 37% phosphoric acid for various length of time using the set protocol. The effects of etching time on surface roughness were assessed using non-contact surface roughness profilometer and surface hardness was measured using nanoindentation technique. All results were analyzed statistically using SPSS computer software. Within the limitation of this study, it was concluded that etching time influences on the surface properties of dental hard tissues particularly the enamel. Enamel surface properties such as roughness and hardness can be altered remarkable as a matter of few seconds. Prolonged etching time than recommended is likely to increase the surface roughness and decrease surface hardness; compromising the bond strength of adhesive materials in clinical applications.

  18. From acid etching treatments to tribocorrosive properties of dental implants: do some experimental results on surface treatments have an influence on the tribocorrosion behaviour of dental implants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geringer, Jean; Demanget, Nicolas; Pellier, Julie

    2013-10-01

    Surface treatments of dental implants aim at promoting osseointegration, i.e. the anchorage of the metallic part. Titanium-, grade II-V, based material is used as a bulk material for dental implants. For promoting the anchorage of this metallic biomaterial in human jaw, some strategies have been applied for improving the surface state, i.e. roughness, topography and coatings. A case study, experimental study, is described with the method of acid etching on titanium grade 4, CpTi. The main goal is to find the right proportion in a mixture of two acids in order to obtain the best surface state. Finally, a pure theoretical prediction is quite impossible and some experimental investigations are necessary to improve the surface state. The described acid etching is compared with some other acid etching treatments and some coatings available on dental implants. Thus, the discussion is focused on the tribocorrosion behaviour of titanium-based materials. The purpose of the coating is that the lifetime under tribocorrosion is limited. Moreover, the surgery related to the implantation has a huge impact on the stability of dental implants. Thus, the performance of dental implants depends on factors related to surgery (implantation) that are difficult to predict from the biomaterial characteristics. From the tribocorrosion point of view, i.e. during the mastication step, the titanium material is submitted to some deleterious factors that cause the performance of dental implants to decrease.

  19. In vitro short-term bonding performance of zirconia treated with hot acid etching and primer conditioning etching and primer conditioning.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haifeng; Chen, Chen; Dai, Wenyong; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Feimin

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate and compare the resin bond strengths of zirconia conditioned as follows: alumina sandblasting; alumina sandblasting+application of 10-MDP-containing primer; alumina sandblasting+application of Z-Prime Plus or Metal/Zirconia Primer (new zirconia primers); tribochemical silica coating+silanization; hot acid etching in three different combinations [H2SO4/(NH4)2SO4, HF/HNO3, H2SO4/HF/HNO3]+application of 10-MDP-containing primer. Shear bond strengths (SBS) after water storage for 24 h and 40 days were measured to assess resin bonding performance. Surface and chemical properties of conditioned zirconia surfaces and primers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Surface roughness ranked in descending order was: hot acid etching > tribochemical silica coating > alumina sandblasting. Combination of tribochemical silica coating and silanization showed the highest initial SBS (12.46±2.13 MPa) (P<0.01). Etching with H2SO4/(NH4)2SO4 (13.15±3.24 MPa) and HF/HNO3 (13.48±2.15 MPa) showed significantly better bond durability (P<0.01). Hot acid etching seemed to be a promising surface roughening treatment to improve resin-zirconia bonding.

  20. Synthesis of anatase titanium dioxide nanocaps via hydrofluoric acid etching towards enhanced photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Kun; Wang, Dan; Yang, Ping; Cheng, Xin

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocaps prepared by HF-assisted chemical etching method exhibit enhanced photocatalytic activity compared with commercial P25 because of HF served as an etching agent to remove doped impurities. - Highlights: • Anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocaps were synthesized by HF etching process. • The optimal conditions of experiment are 700 °C calcination and 0.2 mL HF solution. • The photocatalytic properties was studied upon UV and Visible irradiation. • The unique TiO{sub 2} nanocaps structure shows excellent photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Anatase titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanocaps were created via a four-step process including the preparation of SiO{sub 2} spheres, the deposition of a TiO{sub 2} layer to fabricate SiO{sub 2}@TiO{sub 2} composite spheres, the calcination for obtaining the crystal structure of anatase phase, and hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching to dissolve SiO{sub 2} cores. The SiO{sub 2}@TiO{sub 2} spheres calcined at 700 °C revealed fine photocatalytic activity. Interestingly, most of samples transformed into TiO{sub 2} nanocaps via HF etching, and TiO{sub 2} nanocaps prepared using optimal conditions exhibited quick degradation (k is 0.052 min{sup −1}) compared with commercial P25 (k is 0.030 min{sup −1}) and the TiO{sub 2} nanostructures etched by a NaOH solution. The excellent photocatalytic performance is attributed to its unique hollow hemispherical nanocaps structure, which is in favor of making full use of incident light. The photocatalysis phenomenon in visible light was also observed after depositing Au nanoparticles on anantase TiO{sub 2} nanocaps.

  1. Adaptive Importance Sampling for Control and Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappen, H. J.; Ruiz, H. C.

    2016-03-01

    Path integral (PI) control problems are a restricted class of non-linear control problems that can be solved formally as a Feynman-Kac PI and can be estimated using Monte Carlo sampling. In this contribution we review PI control theory in the finite horizon case. We subsequently focus on the problem how to compute and represent control solutions. We review the most commonly used methods in robotics and control. Within the PI theory, the question of how to compute becomes the question of importance sampling. Efficient importance samplers are state feedback controllers and the use of these requires an efficient representation. Learning and representing effective state-feedback controllers for non-linear stochastic control problems is a very challenging, and largely unsolved, problem. We show how to learn and represent such controllers using ideas from the cross entropy method. We derive a gradient descent method that allows to learn feed-back controllers using an arbitrary parametrisation. We refer to this method as the path integral cross entropy method or PICE. We illustrate this method for some simple examples. The PI control methods can be used to estimate the posterior distribution in latent state models. In neuroscience these problems arise when estimating connectivity from neural recording data using EM. We demonstrate the PI control method as an accurate alternative to particle filtering.

  2. Effect of Lactic Acid Etching on Bonding Effectiveness of Orthodontic Bracket after Water Storage

    PubMed Central

    Alsulaimani, Fahad F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effect of lactic acid at various concentrations on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with the resin adhesive system before and after water storage. Materials and Methods. Hundred extracted human premolars were divided into 5 treatment groups and etched for 30 seconds with one of the following agents: lactic acid solution with (A) 10%, (B) 20%, (C) 30%, and (D) 50%; group E, 37% phosphoric acid (control). Metal brackets were bonded using a Transbond XT. Bonding effectiveness was assessed by shear bond strength after 24 hours and 6 months of water storage at 37°C. The data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test (α = .001). Results. Lactic acid concentration and water storage resulted in significant differences for brackets bond strength (P < .001). 20% lactic acid had significantly higher mean bond strength values (SD) for all conditions: 24 hours [12.2 (.7) MPa] and 6 months [10.1 (.6) MPa] of water storage. 37% phosphoric acid had intermediate bond strength values for all conditions: 24 hours [8.2 (.6) MPa] and 6 months [6.2 (.6) MPa] of water storage. Also, there were differences in bond strength between storage time, with a reduction in values from 24 hours and 6 months for all experimental groups (P < .001). Conclusion. Lactic acid could be used in place of phosphoric acid as an enamel etchant for bonding of orthodontic brackets. PMID:25006465

  3. Characterization and adsorption properties of diatomaceous earth modified by hydrofluoric acid etching.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Lai, Chi-Wei; Hsien, Kuo-Jong

    2006-05-15

    This work was a study of the chemical modification of diatomaceous earth (DE) using hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution. Under the experimental conditions investigated, it was found that HF under controlled conditions significantly etched inward into the interior of the existing pore structure in the clay mineral due to its high content of silica, leaving a framework possessing a larger BET surface area (ca. 10 m2 g(-1)) in comparison with that (ca. 4 m2 g(-1)) of its precursor (i.e., DE). Further, the results indicated that the HF concentration is a more determining factor in creating more open pores than other process parameters (temperature, holding time, and solid/liquid ratio). This observation was also in close agreement with the examinations by the silicon analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The adsorption kinetics and the adsorption isotherm of methylene blue onto the resulting clay adsorbent can be well described by a pseudo-second-order reaction model and the Freundlich model, respectively.

  4. Sample-Clock Phase-Control Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    To demodulate a communication signal, a receiver must recover and synchronize to the symbol timing of a received waveform. In a system that utilizes digital sampling, the fidelity of synchronization is limited by the time between the symbol boundary and closest sample time location. To reduce this error, one typically uses a sample clock in excess of the symbol rate in order to provide multiple samples per symbol, thereby lowering the error limit to a fraction of a symbol time. For systems with a large modulation bandwidth, the required sample clock rate is prohibitive due to current technological barriers and processing complexity. With precise control of the phase of the sample clock, one can sample the received signal at times arbitrarily close to the symbol boundary, thus obviating the need, from a synchronization perspective, for multiple samples per symbol. Sample-clock phase-control feedback was developed for use in the demodulation of an optical communication signal, where multi-GHz modulation bandwidths would require prohibitively large sample clock frequencies for rates in excess of the symbol rate. A custom mixedsignal (RF/digital) offset phase-locked loop circuit was developed to control the phase of the 6.4-GHz clock that samples the photon-counting detector output. The offset phase-locked loop is driven by a feedback mechanism that continuously corrects for variation in the symbol time due to motion between the transmitter and receiver as well as oscillator instability. This innovation will allow significant improvements in receiver throughput; for example, the throughput of a pulse-position modulation (PPM) with 16 slots can increase from 188 Mb/s to 1.5 Gb/s.

  5. Surface Properties and Osteoblastic Cytocompatibility of Two Blasted and Acid-Etched Titanium Implant Systems with Distinct Microtopography

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Pedro; Gomes, Pedro de Sousa; Sampaio, Paula; Juodzbalys, Gintaras; Afonso, Américo

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The aim of this study is to compare two commercially available screw-type sandblasted and acid-etched (SLA) Ti implant systems from Eckermann Laboratorium S.L., with similar geometry and distinct microtopography, regarding surface properties and osteoblastic cytocompatibility. Material and Methods Implant I (referred as a conventional SLA system) and Implant II (a system patented as Eckcyte®) were characterized for macro and microtopograpphy, surface roughness and chemical composition. For the cytocompatibility studies, human bone marrow osteoblastic cells were seeded over the implants' surface, and the cell response was assessed for cell adhesion and proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and matrix mineralization. Results Implant I presented a rough surface with irregularly shaped and sized cavities among flatter-appearing areas, whereas Implant II exhibited a homogeneous rough microporous surface. Compared to Implant I, Implant II presented higher Ra values (0.8 [SD 0.008] μm and 1.21 [SD 0.15] μm, respectively, P < 0.05) and also increased values of Rz, Rt and Rsm, a more negative value of Rsk, and similar RKu values. XPS showed the expected presence of Ti, O, C and N; Al, Si, F, P and Ca were detected in low concentrations. Implant II exhibited significantly lower Al levels. Both implants supported the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic cells. Implant II showed a thicker fibrilar cell layer and an earlier onset and more abundant matrix mineralization. Conclusions The homogeneous rough and microporous surface of Implant II is most probably a main contributor for its improved cell response. PMID:24422006

  6. Mixed matrix membranes with HF acid etched ZSM-5 for ethanol/water separation: Preparation and pervaporation performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Xia; Lu, Juan; Tan, Tingting; Li, Jiding

    2012-10-01

    The mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) were prepared from crosslinked PDMS incorporated with HF acid etched ZSM-5. ZSM-5 zeolite was etched with a series of HF aqueous-acetone solution and characterized by SEM, BET, XRD and FT-IR. It was found that HF etching process was very effective for removing organic impurities in zeolite and micro-pores were observed out of the surface of zeolite particles, which enhanced the hydrophobicity and surface roughness of ZSM-5 successfully. Both tensile strength and swelling resistance of ZSM-5/PDMS MMMs increased with the rising concentration of HF solution, which can mainly be attributed to the improved zeolite-PDMS interfacial adhesion resulted from the intrusion of PDMS into micro-pores out of the ZSM-5 surface. Subsequently, the sorption experiment was performed with the results suggesting preferential sorption of ethanol by MMMs. Moreover, the sorption selectivity of ZSM-5/PDMS MMMs increased notably as the concentration of HF solution increased. The pervaporation performance of ethanol/water mixtures using MMMs was also investigated in detail. The MMMs filled with etched ZSM-5 showed much better selectivity than that filled with non-etched ones, with a little expense of permeability. It was found that with the same zeolite loading, increasing the HF acid concentration in etching process enhanced the zeolite-PDMS interfacial adhesion which promoted the ethanol selectivity of MMMs, while depressed the total permeation flux a little. In addition, both ethanol permeation and the selectivity increased with an increase of the zeolite loading from 10% to 30%. Nevertheless, excessive zeolite loading or decreasing thickness of selective layer led to the poor selectivity to ethanol. A decline of the ethanol selectivity was also observed as the feed ethanol concentration as well as feed temperature increased.

  7. Calibrators and control samples for bilirubinometers.

    PubMed

    Blijenberg, B G; Brügmann, G; Geilenkeuser, W J; Kusyschyn, R; Röhle, G; Schlebusch, H; Schneider, C

    1993-06-01

    The different matrix properties of neonatal serum and commercial control samples can lead to considerable errors in the calibration and control of bilirubinometers. These difficulties can be avoided by calibration with serum from healthy adults which is supplemented with unconjugated bilirubin. But this procedure is impracticable for most routine laboratories. Under certain preconditions, control samples, with bilirubin concentrations determined with correctly calibrated bilirubinometers or spectrophotometers, are also suitable as calibrators. This was established by determination of the bilirubin concentration of 16 different control samples, using both the reference method and correctly calibrated bilirubinometers or spectrophotometers in three or four specialist laboratories. This was also confirmed in several interlaboratory surveys, some involving up to 72 laboratories. The results of these investigations show that a control sample should be used for the calibration of a bilirubinometer only if it meets the following preconditions: 1. There should be no significant difference between the bilirubin values determined with the reference method and with a correctly calibrated spectrophotometer or bilirubinometer. 2. The bilirubin concentration should lie in the range 230-300 mumol/l. The photometric response of bilirubinometers has a limited linear range, so that analytical results greater than 300 mumol/l must be rated as basically unreliable.

  8. Controlling Growth Rates of Protein Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, Frederick T.; Herren, Blair J.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus enables control of humidity in chamber to control rates of growth of crystalline samples of protein. Size of drop of solution from which protein is grown made larger or smaller by condensation or evaporation of water. Situated between desiccant and water source, drop of protein solution shrinks or swells, according to which valve operator opens. Growing protein crystal viewed through polarizing film. Readily adapted to automation.

  9. Hydraulically controlled discrete sampling from open boreholes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater sampling from open boreholes in fractured-rock aquifers is particularly challenging because of mixing and dilution of fluid within the borehole from multiple fractures. This note presents an alternative to traditional sampling in open boreholes with packer assemblies. The alternative system called ZONFLO (zonal flow) is based on hydraulic control of borehole flow conditions. Fluid from discrete fractures zones are hydraulically isolated allowing for the collection of representative samples. In rough-faced open boreholes and formations with less competent rock, hydraulic containment may offer an attractive alternative to physical containment with packers. Preliminary test results indicate a discrete zone can be effectively hydraulically isolated from other zones within a borehole for the purpose of groundwater sampling using this new method.

  10. Getting DNA copy numbers without control samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The selection of the reference to scale the data in a copy number analysis has paramount importance to achieve accurate estimates. Usually this reference is generated using control samples included in the study. However, these control samples are not always available and in these cases, an artificial reference must be created. A proper generation of this signal is crucial in terms of both noise and bias. We propose NSA (Normality Search Algorithm), a scaling method that works with and without control samples. It is based on the assumption that genomic regions enriched in SNPs with identical copy numbers in both alleles are likely to be normal. These normal regions are predicted for each sample individually and used to calculate the final reference signal. NSA can be applied to any CN data regardless the microarray technology and preprocessing method. It also finds an optimal weighting of the samples minimizing possible batch effects. Results Five human datasets (a subset of HapMap samples, Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), Ovarian, Prostate and Lung Cancer experiments) have been analyzed. It is shown that using only tumoral samples, NSA is able to remove the bias in the copy number estimation, to reduce the noise and therefore, to increase the ability to detect copy number aberrations (CNAs). These improvements allow NSA to also detect recurrent aberrations more accurately than other state of the art methods. Conclusions NSA provides a robust and accurate reference for scaling probe signals data to CN values without the need of control samples. It minimizes the problems of bias, noise and batch effects in the estimation of CNs. Therefore, NSA scaling approach helps to better detect recurrent CNAs than current methods. The automatic selection of references makes it useful to perform bulk analysis of many GEO or ArrayExpress experiments without the need of developing a parser to find the normal samples or possible batches within the data. The method is

  11. Multiphoton cryo microscope with sample temperature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2013-02-01

    We present a multiphoton microscope system which combines the advantages of multiphoton imaging with precise control of the sample temperature. The microscope provides online insight in temperature-induced changes and effects in plant tissue and animal cells with subcellular resolution during cooling and thawing processes. Image contrast is based on multiphoton fluorescence intensity or fluorescence lifetime in the range from liquid nitrogen temperature up to +600°C. In addition, micro spectra from the imaged regions can be recorded. We present measurement results from plant leaf samples as well as Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  12. Effect of adhesive hydrophilicity and curing-time on the permeability of resins bonded to water vs. ethanol-saturated acid-etched dentin

    PubMed Central

    Cadenaro, Milena; Breschi, Lorenzo; Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Agee, Kelli; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Carrilho, Marcela; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study examined the ability of five comonomer blends (R1-R5) of methacrylate-based experimental dental adhesives solvated with 10 mass% ethanol, at reducing the permeability of acid-etched dentin. The resins were light-cured for 20, 40 or 60 s. The acid-etched dentin was saturated with water or 100% ethanol. Method Human unerupted third molars were converted into crown segments by removing the occlusal enamel and roots. The resulting crown segments were attached to plastic plates connected to a fluid-filled system for quantifying fluid flow across smear layer-covered dentin, acid-etched dentin and resin-bonded dentin. The degree of conversion of the resins was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Result Application of the most hydrophobic comonomer blend (R1) to water-saturated dentin produced the smallest reductions in dentin permeability (31.9, 44.1 and 61.1% after light-curing for 20, 40 or 60 s respectively). Application of the same blend to ethanol-saturated dentin reduced permeability of 74.1, 78.4 and 81.2%, respectively (p<0.05). Although more hydrophilic resins produced larger reductions in permeability, the same trend of significantly greater reductions in ethanol-saturated dentin over that of water-saturated dentin remained. This result can be explained by the higher solubility of resins in ethanol vs. water. Significance The largest reductions in permeability produced by resins were equivalent but not superior, to those produced by smear layers. Resin sealing of dentin remains a technique-sensitive step in bonding etch-and-rinse adhesives to dentin. PMID:18571228

  13. A comparative study of shear bond strength of orthodontic bracket after acid-etched and Er:YAG treatment on enamel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leão, Juliana C.; Mota, Cláudia C. B. O.; Cassimiro-silva, Patricia F.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of teeth prepared for orthodontic bracket bonding with 37% phosphoric acid and Er:YAG laser. Forty bovine incisors were divided into two groups. In Group I, the teeth were conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid and brackets were bonded with Transbond XT; in Group II, the teeth were irradiated with Er:YAG and bonding with Transbond XT. After SBS test, the adhesive remnant index was determined. Adhesion to dental hard tissues after Er:YAG laser etching was inferior to that obtained after acid etching but exceeded what is believed to be clinically sufficient strength, and therefore can be used in patients.

  14. Effects of dextrose and lipopolysaccharide on the corrosion behavior of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy with a smooth surface or treated with double-acid-etching.

    PubMed

    Faverani, Leonardo P; Assunção, Wirley G; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio P; Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Sukotjo, Cortino; Mathew, Mathew T; Barao, Valentim A

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes and infections are associated with a high risk of implant failure. However, the effects of such conditions on the electrochemical stability of titanium materials remain unclear. This study evaluated the corrosion behavior of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy, with a smooth surface or conditioned by double-acid-etching, in simulated body fluid with different concentrations of dextrose and lipopolysaccharide. For the electrochemical assay, the open-circuit-potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic test were used. The disc surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Their surface roughness and Vickers microhardness were also tested. The quantitative data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation and independent t-tests (α = 0.05). In the corrosion parameters, there was a strong lipopolysaccharide correlation with the Ipass (passivation current density), Cdl (double-layer capacitance), and Rp (polarization resistance) values (p<0.05) for the Ti-6Al-4V alloy with surface treatment by double-acid-etching. The combination of dextrose and lipopolysaccharide was correlated with the Icorr (corrosion current density) and Ipass (p<0.05). The acid-treated groups showed a significant increase in Cdl values and reduced Rp values (p<0.05, t-test). According to the topography, there was an increase in surface roughness (R2 = 0.726, p<0.0001 for the smooth surface; R2 = 0.405, p = 0.036 for the double-acid-etching-treated surface). The microhardness of the smooth Ti-6Al-4V alloy decreased (p<0.05) and that of the treated Ti-6Al-4V alloy increased (p<0.0001). Atomic force microscopy showed changes in the microstructure of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy by increasing the surface thickness mainly in the group associated with dextrose and lipopolysaccharide. The combination of dextrose and lipopolysaccharide affected the corrosion behavior of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy surface treated with double-acid-etching. However, no

  15. Human dental implants with a sandblasted, acid-etched surface retrieved after 5 and 10 years: a light and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of two cases.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Carlo; Perrotti, Vittoria; Raspanti, Mario; Mangano, Francesco; Luongo, Giuseppe; Piattelli, Adriano; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was a light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluation of the peri-implant tissues around sandblasted, acid-etched implants, retrieved from man, after a loading period of 5 and 10 years, respectively. Two implants (Leone Implant System) had been retrieved for a fracture of the prosthetic superstructure respectively after 5 and 10 years of loading. Both implants were stable before retrieval and had been retrieved using a 5-mm trephine bur. One implant was treated to obtain thin ground sections, while the other underwent evaluation under SEM. Compact, mature lamellar bone was present over most of the implant perimeter in close contact with the implant surface and with many remodeling areas. Under SEM, small concavities, completely filled by mineralized bone, were present on the implant surface. The present histologic results showed that these implants were well integrated over the long term, and the peri-implant bone was undergoing continuous remodeling at the interface.

  16. Shear bond strength and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with conventional acid-etch and self-etch primer systems: An in-vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Sharghi, Reza; Shirazi, Samaneh; Moghimi, Mahsan; Shahrbaf, Shirin

    2016-01-01

    Background Different in-vitro studies have reported various results regarding shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets when SEP technique is compared to conventional system. This in-vivo study was designed to compare the effect of conventional acid-etching and self-etching primer adhesive (SEP) systems on SBS and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. Material and Methods 120 intact first maxillary and mandibular premolars of 30 orthodontic patients were selected and bonded with metal and ceramic brackets using conventional acid-etch or self-etch primer system. The bonded brackets were incorporated into the wire during the study period to simulate the real orthodontic treatment condition. The teeth were extracted and debonded after 30 days. The SBS, debonding characteristics and adhesive remnant indices (ARI) were determined in all groups. Results The mean SBS of metal brackets was 10.63±1.42 MPa in conventional and 9.38±1.53 MPa in SEP system, (P=0.004). No statistically significant difference was noted between conventional and SEP systems in ceramic brackets. The frequency of 1, 2 and 3 ARI scores and debonding within the adhesive were the most common among all groups. No statistically significant difference was observed regarding ARI or failure mode of debonded specimens in different brackets or bonding systems. Conclusions The SBS of metal brackets bonded using conventional system was significantly higher than SEP system, although the SBS of SEP system was clinically acceptable. No significant difference was found between conventional and SEP systems used with ceramic brackets. Total SBS of metal brackets was significantly higher than ceramic brackets. Due to adequate SBS of SEP system in bonding the metal brackets, it can be used as an alternative for conventional system. Key words:Shear bond strength, Orthodontic brackets, Adhesive remnant index, self-etch. PMID:26855704

  17. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Enamel Prepared By Er:YAG Laser and Conventional Acid-Etching

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, M.H.; Namvar, F.; Chalipa, J.; Saber, K.; Chiniforush, N.; Sarmadi, S.; Mirhashemi, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to enamel prepared by Er:YAG laser with two different powers and conventional acid-etching. Materials and Methods: Forty-five human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were randomly assigned to three groups based on conditioning method: Group 1- conventional etching with 37% phosphoric acid; Group 2- irradiation with Er:YAG laser at 1 W; and Group 3- irradiation with Er:YAG laser at 1.5 W. Metal brackets were bonded on prepared enamel using a light-cured composite. All groups were subjected to thermocycling process. Then, the specimens mounted in auto-cure acryle and shear bond strength were measured using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm per second. After debonding, the amount of resin remaining on the teeth was determined using the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scored 1 to 5. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare shear bond strengths and the Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to evaluate differences in the ARI for different etching types. Results: The mean and standard deviation of conventional acid-etch group, 1W laser group and 1.5W laser group was 3.82 ± 1.16, 6.97 ± 3.64 and 6.93 ± 4.87, respectively. Conclusion: The mean SBS obtained with an Er:YAG laser operated at 1W or 1.5W is approximately similar to that of conventional etching. However, the high variability of values in bond strength of irradiated enamel should be considered to find the appropriate parameters for applying Er:YAG laser as a favorable alternative for surface conditioning. PMID:22924098

  18. Force-Control Algorithm for Surface Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Quadrelli, Marco B.; Phan, Linh

    2008-01-01

    A G-FCON algorithm is designed for small-body surface sampling. It has a linearization component and a feedback component to enhance performance. The algorithm regulates the contact force between the tip of a robotic arm attached to a spacecraft and a surface during sampling.

  19. Common Control by Compound Samples in Conditional Discriminations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Gonzalez, Luis Antonio; Alonso-Alvarez, Benigno

    2008-01-01

    We tested whether teaching control by single stimulus samples in conditional discriminations would result in common control of two-stimuli compound samples, and vice versa. In Experiment 1, 5 participants were first taught four single-sample conditional discriminations. The first conditional discrimination was as follows: given sample stimulus P1,…

  20. Quality Control in Clinical Laboratory Samples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    misalignment are important aspects to observing shifting L-J charts and adjustments of accuracy over time. Continuous monitoring of quality control testing...calibration misalignment are important aspects to observing shifting L-J charts and 1 adjustments of accuracy over time. Continuous monitoring of...2673rd MDSS, SGSL, Elmendorf AFB, 99506-3702, AK 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES

  1. Airborne Particulate Sampling in Environmental Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-15

    2, 5654, 37, JS) REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is...display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 15-07-2009 2. REPORT...OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON De-Ling Liu 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) (310)336-0062 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std

  2. Choosing a sample rate for prime mover digital control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schade, J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper explains the reasons and consequences of sample rate selection for gas turbine and steam turbine controls. Sample rate theory is important because there is often confusion about how to select the sample rate for different applications. Full-load rejection offspeeds, a common prime mover performance issue, will be used as an example. The effect of different sample rates will be shown.

  3. Ultrasonic recovery of copper and iron through the simultaneous utilization of Printed Circuit Boards (PCB) spent acid etching solution and PCB waste sludge.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiyuan; Xie, Fengchun; Ma, Yang

    2011-01-15

    A method was developed to recover the copper and iron from Printed Circuit Boards (PCB) manufacturing generated spent acid etching solution and waste sludge with ultrasonic energy at laboratory scale. It demonstrated that copper-containing PCB spent etching solution could be utilized as a leaching solution to leach copper from copper contained PCB waste sludge. It also indicated that lime could be used as an alkaline precipitating agent in this method to precipitate iron from the mixture of acidic PCB spent etching solution and waste sludge. This method provided an effective technique for the recovery of copper and iron through simultaneous use of PCB spent acid solution and waste sludge. The leaching rates of copper and iron enhanced with ultrasound energy were reached at 93.76% and 2.07% respectively and effectively separated copper from iron. Followed by applying lime to precipitate copper from the mixture of leachate and rinsing water produced by the copper and iron separation, about 99.99% and 1.29% of soluble copper and calcium were settled as the solids respectively. Furthermore the settled copper could be made as commercial rate copper. The process performance parameters studied were pH, ultrasonic power, and temperature. This method provided a simple and reliable technique to recover copper and iron from waste streams generated by PCB manufacturing, and would significantly reduce the cost of chemicals used in the recovery.

  4. Effect of acid etching on marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate to apical dentin: microcomputed tomography and scanning electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Fouzan, Khalid; Al-Garawi, Ziad; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Javed, Fawad; Al-Shalan, Thakib; Rotstein, Ilan

    2012-12-01

    The present investigation assessed the effect of acid etching on marginal adaptation of white- and gray-colored mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) to apical dentin using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sixty-four extracted single-rooted human maxillary teeth were used. Following root-end resection and apical preparation, the teeth were equally divided into four groups according to the following root end filling materials: (i) white-colored MTA (WMTA), (ii) etched WMTA (EWMTA), (iii) gray-colored MTA (GMTA) and (iv) etched GMTA (EGMTA). After 48 h, the interface between root-end filling materials and the dentinal walls was assessed using micro-CT and SEM. Data were statistically analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests. Micro-CT analysis revealed gap volumes between the apical cavity dentin walls and EGMTA, GMTA, EWMTA and WMTA of (0.007 1±0.004) mm(3), (0.053±0.002) mm(3), (0.003 6±0.001) mm(3) and (0.005 9±0.002) mm(3) respectively. SEM analysis revealed gap sizes for EGMTA, WMTA, EWMTA and GMTA to be (492.3±13.8) µm, (594.5±17.12) µm, (543.1±15.33) µm and (910.7±26.2) µm respectively. A significant difference in gap size between root end preparations filled with GMTA and EGMTA was found (P<0.05). No significance difference in gap size between WMTA and EWMTA were found in either SEM or micro-CT analysis. In conclusion, pre-etching of apical dentin can provide a better seal for GMTA but not for WMTA.

  5. Micro-shear bond strength and surface micromorphology of a feldspathic ceramic treated with different cleaning methods after hydrofluoric acid etching

    PubMed Central

    STEINHAUSER, Henrique Caballero; TURSSI, Cecília Pedroso; FRANÇA, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; do AMARAL, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; BASTING, Roberta Tarkany

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of feldspathic ceramic surface cleaning on micro-shear bond strength and ceramic surface morphology. Material and Methods Forty discs of feldspathic ceramic were prepared and etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 2 minutes. The discs were randomly distributed into five groups (n=8): C: no treatment, S: water spray + air drying for 1 minute, US: immersion in ultrasonic bath for 5 minutes, F: etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 1 minute, followed by 1-minute rinse, F+US: etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 1 minute, 1-minute rinse and ultrasonic bath for 5 minutes. Composite cylinders were bonded to the discs following application of silane and hydrophobic adhesive for micro-shear bond strength testing in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until failure. Stereomicroscopy was used to classify failure type. Surface micromorphology of each treatment type was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy at 500 and 2,500 times magnification. Results One-way ANOVA test showed no significant difference between treatments (p=0.3197) and the most common failure types were cohesive resin cohesion followed by adhesive failure. Micro-shear bond strength of the feldspathic ceramic substrate to the adhesive system was not influenced by the different surface cleaning techniques. Absence of or less residue was observed after etching with hydrofluoric acid for the groups US and F+US. Conclusions Combining ceramic cleaning techniques with hydrofluoric acid etching did not affect ceramic bond strength, whereas, when cleaning was associated with ultrasound, less residue was observed. PMID:24676577

  6. Monitoring of Extraction Efficiency by a Sample Process Control Virus Added Immediately Upon Sample Receipt.

    PubMed

    Ruhanya, Vurayai; Diez-Valcarce, Marta; D'Agostino, Martin; Cook, Nigel; Hernández, Marta; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David

    2015-12-01

    When analysing food samples for enteric viruses, a sample process control virus (SPCV) must be added at the commencement of the analytical procedure, to verify that the analysis has been performed correctly. Samples can on occasion arrive at the laboratory late in the working day or week. The analyst may consequently have insufficient time to commence and complete the complex procedure, and the samples must consequently be stored. To maintain the validity of the analytical result, it will be necessary to consider storage as part of the process, and the analytical procedure as commencing on sample receipt. The aim of this study was to verify that an SPCV can be recovered after sample storage, and thus indicate the effective recovery of enteric viruses. Two types of samples (fresh and frozen raspberries) and two types of storage (refrigerated and frozen) were studied using Mengovirus vMC0 as SPCV. SPCV recovery was not significantly different (P > 0.5) regardless of sample type or duration of storage (up to 14 days at -20 °C). Accordingly, samples can be stored without a significant effect on the performance of the analysis. The results of this study should assist the analyst by demonstrating that they can verify that viruses can be extracted from food samples even if samples have been stored.

  7. Sampled-Data State Feedback Stabilization of Boolean Control Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Jinde; Sun, Liangjie; Lu, Jianquan

    2016-04-01

    In this letter, we investigate the sampled-data state feedback control (SDSFC) problem of Boolean control networks (BCNs). Some necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained for the global stabilization of BCNs by SDSFC. Different from conventional state feedback controls, new phenomena observed the study of SDSFC. Based on the controllability matrix, we derive some necessary and sufficient conditions under which the trajectories of BCNs can be stabilized to a fixed point by piecewise constant control (PCC). It is proved that the global stabilization of BCNs under SDSFC is equivalent to that by PCC. Moreover, algorithms are given to construct the sampled-data state feedback controllers. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the efficiency of the obtained results.

  8. Common Control by Compound Samples in Conditional Discriminations

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-González, Luis Antonio; Alonso-Álvarez, Benigno

    2008-01-01

    We tested whether teaching control by single stimulus samples in conditional discriminations would result in common control of two-stimuli compound samples, and vice versa. In Experiment 1, 5 participants were first taught four single-sample conditional discriminations. The first conditional discrimination was as follows: given sample stimulus P1, select comparison stimulus A1 and not A2; given sample P2 select comparison A2 and not A1. The second conditional discrimination was as follows: given sample P1 select comparison B1 and not B2; given sample P2 select B2 and not B1. Different sample stimuli (Q1 and Q2) were used in the third and fourth conditional discriminations. Moreover, A1 and B1 were presented together as comparisons, such that, if Q1 was presented as the sample, A1 was correct and B1 was incorrect; and if Q2 was presented as the sample, B1 was correct and A1 was incorrect. A2 and B2 were also presented as comparisons. When Q1 was presented, A2 was correct and when Q2 was presented B2 was correct. After training with these four single stimulus sample discriminations, participants were tested with compound PQ samples presented with A1, A2, B1, and B2 as comparisons. If common control were established by the PQ stimuli, a participant would select A1 when P1Q1 was presented, A2 when P2Q1 was presented, B1 when P1Q2 was presented, and B2 when P2Q2 was presented. Such common control by PQ samples occurred in 4 of 5 participants. In Experiment 2, 4 participants were given reverse training. They were first taught to select the A1, A2, B1, and B2 stimuli in response to the appropriate PQ combinations and then probed on the single stimulus sample discriminations. All 4 participants were successful on this probe. Experiments 3 and 4 investigated the effects of teaching additional conditional discriminations with novel stimuli on subsequent transfer from the single-sample discriminations to performance on the compound-sample conditional discrimination. PMID

  9. Sample Stimulus Control Shaping and Restricted Stimulus Control in Capuchin Monkeys: A Methodological Note

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brino, Ana Leda F., Barros, Romariz S., Galvao, Ol; Garotti, M.; Da Cruz, Ilara R. N.; Santos, Jose R.; Dube, William V.; McIlvane, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports use of sample stimulus control shaping procedures to teach arbitrary matching-to-sample to 2 capuchin monkeys ("Cebus apella"). The procedures started with identity matching-to-sample. During shaping, stimulus features of the sample were altered gradually, rendering samples and comparisons increasingly physically dissimilar. The…

  10. Randomly Sampled-Data Control Systems. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kuoruey

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to solve the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) problem with random time sampling. Such a sampling scheme may arise from imperfect instrumentation as in the case of sampling jitter. It can also model the stochastic information exchange among decentralized controllers to name just a few. A practical suboptimal controller is proposed with the nice property of mean square stability. The proposed controller is suboptimal in the sense that the control structure is limited to be linear. Because of i. i. d. assumption, this does not seem unreasonable. Once the control structure is fixed, the stochastic discrete optimal control problem is transformed into an equivalent deterministic optimal control problem with dynamics described by the matrix difference equation. The N-horizon control problem is solved using the Lagrange's multiplier method. The infinite horizon control problem is formulated as a classical minimization problem. Assuming existence of solution to the minimization problem, the total system is shown to be mean square stable under certain observability conditions. Computer simulations are performed to illustrate these conditions.

  11. Selection of sampling rate for digital control of aircrafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, P.; Powell, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    The considerations in selecting the sample rates for digital control of aircrafts are identified and evaluated using the optimal discrete method. A high performance aircraft model which includes a bending mode and wind gusts was studied. The following factors which influence the selection of the sampling rates were identified: (1) the time and roughness response to control inputs; (2) the response to external disturbances; and (3) the sensitivity to variations of parameters. It was found that the time response to a control input and the response to external disturbances limit the selection of the sampling rate. The optimal discrete regulator, the steady state Kalman filter, and the mean response to external disturbances are calculated.

  12. Sampling and Control Circuit Board for an Inertial Measurement Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David T (Inventor); Powis, Richard T., Jr. (Inventor); Sands, Obed (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A circuit board that serves as a control and sampling interface to an inertial measurement unit ("IMU") is provided. The circuit board is also configured to interface with a local oscillator and an external trigger pulse. The circuit board is further configured to receive the external trigger pulse from an external source that time aligns the local oscillator and initiates sampling of the inertial measurement device for data at precise time intervals based on pulses from the local oscillator. The sampled data may be synchronized by the circuit board with other sensors of a navigation system via the trigger pulse.

  13. Sample size considerations for historical control studies with survival outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Song; Ahn, Chul

    2016-01-01

    Historical control trials (HCTs) are frequently conducted to compare an experimental treatment with a control treatment from a previous study, when they are applicable and favored over a randomized clinical trial (RCT) due to feasibility, ethics and cost concerns. Makuch and Simon developed a sample size formula for historical control (HC) studies with binary outcomes, assuming that the observed response rate in the HC group is the true response rate. This method was extended by Dixon and Simon to specify sample size for HC studies comparing survival outcomes. For HC studies with binary and continuous outcomes, many researchers have shown that the popular Makuch and Simon method does not preserve the nominal power and type I error, and suggested alternative approaches. For HC studies with survival outcomes, we reveal through simulation that the conditional power and type I error over all the random realizations of the HC data have highly skewed distributions. Therefore, the sampling variability of the HC data needs to be appropriately accounted for in determining sample size. A flexible sample size formula that controls arbitrary percentiles, instead of means, of the conditional power and type I error, is derived. Although an explicit sample size formula with survival outcomes is not available, the computation is straightforward. Simulations demonstrate that the proposed method preserves the operational characteristics in a more realistic scenario where the true hazard rate of the HC group is unknown. A real data application of an advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) clinical trial is presented to illustrate sample size considerations for HC studies in comparison of survival outcomes.

  14. Sample size considerations for historical control studies with survival outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Song; Ahn, Chul

    2015-01-01

    Historical control trials (HCTs) are frequently conducted to compare an experimental treatment with a control treatment from a previous study, when they are applicable and favored over a randomized clinical trial (RCT) due to feasibility, ethics and cost concerns. Makuch and Simon developed a sample size formula for historical control (HC) studies with binary outcomes, assuming that the observed response rate in the HC group is the true response rate. This method was extended by Dixon and Simon to specify sample size for HC studies comparing survival outcomes. For HC studies with binary and continuous outcomes, many researchers have shown that the popular Makuch and Simon method does not preserve the nominal power and type I error, and suggested alternative approaches. For HC studies with survival outcomes, we reveal through simulation that the conditional power and type I error over all the random realizations of the HC data have highly skewed distributions. Therefore, the sampling variability of the HC data needs to be appropriately accounted for in determining sample size. A flexible sample size formula that controls arbitrary percentiles, instead of means, of the conditional power and type I error, is derived. Although an explicit sample size formula with survival outcomes is not available, the computation is straightforward. Simulations demonstrate that the proposed method preserves the operational characteristics in a more realistic scenario where the true hazard rate of the HC group is unknown. A real data application of an advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) clinical trial is presented to illustrate sample size considerations for HC studies in comparison of survival outcomes. PMID:26098200

  15. Rock sampling. [method for controlling particle size distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, P. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A method for sampling rock and other brittle materials and for controlling resultant particle sizes is described. The method involves cutting grooves in the rock surface to provide a grouping of parallel ridges and subsequently machining the ridges to provide a powder specimen. The machining step may comprise milling, drilling, lathe cutting or the like; but a planing step is advantageous. Control of the particle size distribution is effected primarily by changing the height and width of these ridges. This control exceeds that obtainable by conventional grinding.

  16. Controlling aliased dynamics in motion systems? An identification for sampled-data control approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oomen, Tom

    2014-07-01

    Sampled-data control systems occasionally exhibit aliased resonance phenomena within the control bandwidth. The aim of this paper is to investigate the aspect of these aliased dynamics with application to a high performance industrial nano-positioning machine. This necessitates a full sampled-data control design approach, since these aliased dynamics endanger both the at-sample performance and the intersample behaviour. The proposed framework comprises both system identification and sampled-data control. In particular, the sampled-data control objective necessitates models that encompass the intersample behaviour, i.e., ideally continuous time models. Application of the proposed approach on an industrial wafer stage system provides a thorough insight and new control design guidelines for controlling aliased dynamics.

  17. Predictors of social anxiety in an opioid dependent sample and a control sample.

    PubMed

    Shand, Fiona L; Degenhardt, Louisa; Nelson, Elliot C; Mattick, Richard P

    2010-01-01

    Compared to other mental health problems, social anxiety is under-acknowledged amongst opioid dependent populations. This study aimed to assess levels of social anxiety and identify its predictors in an opioid dependent sample and a matched control group. Opioid dependent participants (n=1385) and controls (n=417) completed the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS), the Social Phobia Scale (SPS) and a diagnostic interview. Regression analyses were used to test a range of predictors of social anxiety. Opioid dependent cases had higher mean scores on both scales compared to controls. Predictors of social anxiety centred on emotional rejection in childhood, either by parents or peers. For opioid dependent cases, but not controls, lifetime non-opioid substance dependence (cannabis, sedatives, and tobacco) was associated with higher levels of social anxiety. However, much of the variance in social anxiety remains unexplained for this population.

  18. Controlled samples for silicon defect and impurity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1995-08-01

    Because of the diverse defects and impurities that are present in any given sample of silicon material, it can be extremely difficult to conduct a controlled experiment to study the influence of any particular defect or impurity on photovoltaic properties such as minority charge carrier lifetime {tau} or solar cell efficiency q. For example, the influence of iron may be different if boron is present, or the influence of silicon self interstitial clusters may be different if oxygen is present. It thus becomes important to conduct such studies on controlled samples where the influence of secondary effects is minimized. At NREL, over the past several years, we have focused on using the high-purity float-zone (FZ) growth method to obtain controlled samples. Because the silicon melt is not in contact with a container, and no heated components are in the growth region, very high purities and low defect levels can be achieved in baseline material. The baseline can be controllably perturbed by introduction of specific defects or impurities. The chart shown below lists some of the types of defect and impurity. combinations that can be studied in this way. The boxes marked with an {open_quotes}x{close_quotes} represent combinations we have studied to some extent.

  19. Remotely Controlled Mixers for Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Colloid Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurk, Michael A. (Andy)

    2015-01-01

    Developed by NASA Glenn Research Center, the LMM aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is enabling multiple biomedical science experiments. Techshot, Inc., has developed a series of colloid specialty cell systems (C-SPECS) for use in the colloid science experiment module on the LMM. These low-volume mixing devices will enable uniform particle density and remotely controlled repetition of LMM colloid experiments. By automating the experiment process, C-SPECS allow colloid samples to be processed more quickly. In addition, C-SPECS will minimize the time the crew will need to spend on colloid experiments as well as eliminate the need for multiple and costly colloid samples, which are expended after a single examination. This high-throughput capability will lead to more efficient and productive use of the LMM. As commercial launch vehicles begin routine visits to the ISS, C-SPECS could become a significant means to process larger quantities of high-value materials for commercial customers.

  20. Observing Atoms at Work by Controlling Beam-Sample Interactions.

    PubMed

    Kisielowski, Christian

    2015-10-14

    Functional behavior can be initiated and captured in series of images with previously unknown details using a successful effort to effectively control beam-sample interactions in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The approach uses tunable electron dose rates that can be chosen to be as low as attoamperes per square-Ångstrom to delay sample degradation to an unexplored end. Dose rates can be systematically increased to stimulate and observe dynamic object responses. Observations can be made in real time with deep sub-Ångstrom resolution and single-atom sensitivity, even if radiation-sensitive matter is probed and either pressure or temperature is raised in the electron microscope.

  1. Sample Stimulus Control Shaping and Restricted Stimulus Control in Capuchin Monkeys: A Methodological Note

    PubMed Central

    Brino, Ana Leda F; Barros, Romariz S; Galvão, Olavo F; Garotti, M; da Cruz, Ilara R. N; Santos, José R; Dube, William V; McIlvane, William J

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports use of sample stimulus control shaping procedures to teach arbitrary matching-to-sample to 2 capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella). The procedures started with identity matching-to-sample. During shaping, stimulus features of the sample were altered gradually, rendering samples and comparisons increasingly physically dissimilar. The objective was to transform identity matching into arbitrary matching (i.e., matching not based on common physical features of the sample and comparison stimuli). Experiment 1 used a two-comparison procedure. The shaping procedure was ultimately effective, but occasional high error rates at certain program steps inspired a follow-up study. Experiment 2 used the same basic approach, but with a three-comparison matching task. During shaping, the monkey performed accurately until the final steps of the program. Subsequent experimentation tested the hypothesis that the decrease in accuracy was due to restricted stimulus control by sample stimulus features that had not yet been changed in the shaping program. Results were consistent with this hypothesis, thus suggesting a new approach that may transform the sample stimulus control shaping procedure from a sometimes useful laboratory tool to a more general approach to teaching the first instance of arbitrary matching performances to participants who show protracted difficulties in learning such performances. PMID:21547073

  2. Sample stimulus control shaping and restricted stimulus control in capuchin monkeys: a methodological note.

    PubMed

    Brino, Ana Leda F; Barros, Romariz S; Galvão, Olavo F; Garotti, M; da Cruz, Ilara R N; Santos, José R; Dube, William V; McIlvane, William J

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports use of sample stimulus control shaping procedures to teach arbitrary matching-to-sample to 2 capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella). The procedures started with identity matching-to-sample. During shaping, stimulus features of the sample were altered gradually, rendering samples and comparisons increasingly physically dissimilar. The objective was to transform identity matching into arbitrary matching (i.e., matching not based on common physical features of the sample and comparison stimuli). Experiment 1 used a two-comparison procedure. The shaping procedure was ultimately effective, but occasional high error rates at certain program steps inspired a follow-up study. Experiment 2 used the same basic approach, but with a three-comparison matching task. During shaping, the monkey performed accurately until the final steps of the program. Subsequent experimentation tested the hypothesis that the decrease in accuracy was due to restricted stimulus control by sample stimulus features that had not yet been changed in the shaping program. Results were consistent with this hypothesis, thus suggesting a new approach that may transform the sample stimulus control shaping procedure from a sometimes useful laboratory tool to a more general approach to teaching the first instance of arbitrary matching performances to participants who show protracted difficulties in learning such performances.

  3. A Framework for Distributed Rover Control and Three Sample Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Steve

    2001-01-01

    In order to develop quality control software for multiple robots, a common interface is required. By developing components in a modular fashion with well-defined boundaries, roboticists can write code to program a generic rover, and only require very simple modifications to run on any robot with a properly implemented framework. The proposed framework advances a Generic Rover that could be any rover, from Real World Interface's All Terrain Robot Vehicle Jr. series to the Fido-class rovers from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to any other research robot. Using these generic hardware interfaces, software designers and engineers can concentrate on the actual code, and not have to worry about hardware details. In addition to the hardware support framework, three sample applications have been developed to demonstrate the flexibility and extensibility of the framework.

  4. Robust reliable control design for networked control system with sampling communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, R.; Santra, Srimanta; Mathiyalagan, K.; Su, Hongye

    2015-12-01

    In this article, the problem of robust exponential stability and reliable stabilisation for a class of continuous-time networked control systems (NCSs) with a sample-data controller and unknown time-varying sampling rate is considered. The analysis is based on average dwell-time, Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and linear matrix inequality (LMI) technique. The delay-dependent criteria are developed for ensuring the robust exponential stability of the considered NCSs. The obtained conditions are formulated in terms of LMIs that can easily be solved by using standard software packages. Furthermore, the result is extended to study the robust stabilisation for NCS with parameter uncertainties. A state feedback controller is constructed in terms of the solution to a set of LMIs, which guarantee the robust exponential stabilisation of NCS and the controller. Finally, numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  5. Glass sample characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Anees

    1990-01-01

    The development of in-house integrated optical performance modelling capability at MSFC is described. This performance model will take into account the effects of structural and thermal distortions, as well as metrology errors in optical surfaces to predict the performance of large an complex optical systems, such as Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility. The necessary hardware and software were identified to implement an integrated optical performance model. A number of design, development, and testing tasks were supported to identify the debonded mirror pad, and rebuilding of the Technology Mirror Assembly. Over 300 samples of Zerodur were prepared in different sizes and shapes for acid etching, coating, and polishing experiments to characterize the subsurface damage and stresses produced by the grinding and polishing operations.

  6. Surface sampling concentration and reaction probe with controller to adjust sampling position

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; ElNaggar, Mariam S.

    2016-07-19

    A method of analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen is described. The method can include providing a probe comprising an outer capillary tube and an inner capillary tube disposed co-axially within the outer capillary tube, where the inner and outer capillary tubes define a solvent capillary and a sampling capillary in fluid communication with one another at a distal end of the probe; contacting a target site on a surface of a specimen with a solvent in fluid communication with the probe; maintaining a plug volume proximate a solvent-specimen interface, wherein the plug volume is in fluid communication with the probe; draining plug sampling fluid from the plug volume through the sampling capillary; and analyzing a chemical composition of the plug sampling fluid with an analytical instrument. A system for performing the method is also described.

  7. Coolant-Control Valves For Fluid-Sampling Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Donald F.

    1989-01-01

    Small built-in leaks prevent overheating. Downstream flow-control globe valve replaced with modified gate valve. Modification consists of drilling small hole through valve gate, so valve never turned completely off. This "leaky" valve provides enough flow of coolant to prevent overheating causing probe to fail. Principle also applied to automatic control system by installing small bypass line around control valve.

  8. Optimization of sample size in controlled experiments: the CLAST rule.

    PubMed

    Botella, Juan; Ximénez, Carmen; Revuelta, Javier; Suero, Manuel

    2006-02-01

    Sequential rules are explored in the context of null hypothesis significance testing. Several studies have demonstrated that the fixed-sample stopping rule, in which the sample size used by researchers is determined in advance, is less practical and less efficient than sequential stopping rules. It is proposed that a sequential stopping rule called CLAST (composite limited adaptive sequential test) is a superior variant of COAST (composite open adaptive sequential test), a sequential rule proposed by Frick (1998). Simulation studies are conducted to test the efficiency of the proposed rule in terms of sample size and power. Two statistical tests are used: the one-tailed t test of mean differences with two matched samples, and the chi-square independence test for twofold contingency tables. The results show that the CLAST rule is more efficient than the COAST rule and reflects more realistically the practice of experimental psychology researchers.

  9. Chapter 5: Quality assurance/quality control in stormwater sampling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sampling the quality of stormwater presents unique challenges because stormwater flow is relatively short-lived with drastic variability. Furthermore, storm events often occur with little advance warning, outside conventional work hours, and under adverse weather conditions. Therefore, most stormwat...

  10. Application of Sampling Based Model Predictive Control to an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    55 Application of Sampling Based Model Predictive Control to an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) can be utilized...the vehicle can feasibly traverse. As a result, Sampling- Based Model Predictive Control (SBMPC) is proposed to simultaneously generate control...inputs and system trajectories for an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). The algorithm combines the benefits of sampling- based motion planning with

  11. 7 CFR 58.929 - Frequency of sampling for quality control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Frequency of sampling for quality control. 58.929... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.929 Frequency of sampling for quality control. (a... to control composition. On continuous production runs, enough samples shall be taken throughout...

  12. 7 CFR 58.929 - Frequency of sampling for quality control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Frequency of sampling for quality control. 58.929... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.929 Frequency of sampling for quality control. (a... to control composition. On continuous production runs, enough samples shall be taken throughout...

  13. 7 CFR 58.929 - Frequency of sampling for quality control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Frequency of sampling for quality control. 58.929... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.929 Frequency of sampling for quality control. (a... to control composition. On continuous production runs, enough samples shall be taken throughout...

  14. 7 CFR 58.929 - Frequency of sampling for quality control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Frequency of sampling for quality control. 58.929... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.929 Frequency of sampling for quality control. (a... to control composition. On continuous production runs, enough samples shall be taken throughout...

  15. 46 CFR 56.50-97 - Piping for instruments, control, and sampling (modifies 122.3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Piping for instruments, control, and sampling (modifies... § 56.50-97 Piping for instruments, control, and sampling (modifies 122.3). (a) Piping for instruments, control, and sampling must comply with paragraph 122.3 of ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see...

  16. 46 CFR 56.50-97 - Piping for instruments, control, and sampling (modifies 122.3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piping for instruments, control, and sampling (modifies... § 56.50-97 Piping for instruments, control, and sampling (modifies 122.3). (a) Piping for instruments, control, and sampling must comply with paragraph 122.3 of ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see...

  17. 46 CFR 56.50-97 - Piping for instruments, control, and sampling (modifies 122.3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Piping for instruments, control, and sampling (modifies... § 56.50-97 Piping for instruments, control, and sampling (modifies 122.3). (a) Piping for instruments, control, and sampling must comply with paragraph 122.3 of ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see...

  18. 46 CFR 56.50-97 - Piping for instruments, control, and sampling (modifies 122.3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Piping for instruments, control, and sampling (modifies... § 56.50-97 Piping for instruments, control, and sampling (modifies 122.3). (a) Piping for instruments, control, and sampling must comply with paragraph 122.3 of ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see...

  19. 46 CFR 56.50-97 - Piping for instruments, control, and sampling (modifies 122.3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Piping for instruments, control, and sampling (modifies... § 56.50-97 Piping for instruments, control, and sampling (modifies 122.3). (a) Piping for instruments, control, and sampling must comply with paragraph 122.3 of ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see...

  20. Robust reliable sampled-data control for switched systems with application to flight control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, R.; Joby, Maya; Shi, P.; Mathiyalagan, K.

    2016-11-01

    This paper addresses the robust reliable stabilisation problem for a class of uncertain switched systems with random delays and norm bounded uncertainties. The main aim of this paper is to obtain the reliable robust sampled-data control design which involves random time delay with an appropriate gain control matrix for achieving the robust exponential stabilisation for uncertain switched system against actuator failures. In particular, the involved delays are assumed to be randomly time-varying which obeys certain mutually uncorrelated Bernoulli distributed white noise sequences. By constructing an appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) and employing an average-dwell time approach, a new set of criteria is derived for ensuring the robust exponential stability of the closed-loop switched system. More precisely, the Schur complement and Jensen's integral inequality are used in derivation of stabilisation criteria. By considering the relationship among the random time-varying delay and its lower and upper bounds, a new set of sufficient condition is established for the existence of reliable robust sampled-data control in terms of solution to linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Finally, an illustrative example based on the F-18 aircraft model is provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed design procedures.

  1. 40 CFR 53.57 - Test for filter temperature control during sampling and post-sampling periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test for filter temperature control... Class I and Class II Equivalent Methods for PM 2.5 or PM 10-2,5 § 53.57 Test for filter temperature... temperature during a 4-hour period of active sampling as well as during a subsequent 4-hour non-sampling...

  2. Urinary human chorionic gonadotropin isoform concentrations in doping control samples.

    PubMed

    Butch, Anthony W; Woldemariam, Getachew A

    2016-11-01

    Anti-doping laboratories routinely use immunoassays to measure urinary concentrations of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). To minimize immunoassay differences and false positive screen results from inactive isoforms (free β-subunit (hCGβ), β-subunit core fragment (hCGβcf)) laboratories now use intact hCG instead of total hCG immunoassays to measure hCG. To determine the distribution of hCG isoforms in urine, we determined the concentrations of intact hCG, hCGβ, and hCGβcf in male urine samples based on immunoassay total hCG concentrations using a sequential immunoextraction and a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. hCG was isolated using antibody-conjugated magnetic beads and unique tryptic peptides were quantified by LC-MS/MS. Negative samples with detectable but low total hCG concentrations (1.2-3.5 pmol/L) had intact and hCGβ concentrations <1.2 pmol/L, and hCGβcf concentrations <2.3 pmol/L by LC-MS/MS. Urine samples from an athlete receiving hCG had intact hCG concentrations ranging from 18.8 to 57.6 pmol/L, hCGβ concentrations <0.7 pmol/L, and hCGβcf concentrations ranging from 94 to 243% of the intact hCG concentration. In 27 atypical samples with total hCG concentrations ranging from 16.7 to 412.7 pmol/L with intact hCG <2.7 pmol/L by immunoassay, all samples had intact hCG concentrations <3.8 pmol/L and hCGβ concentrations <6.2 pmol/L by LC-MS/MS. hCGβcf concentrations by LC-MS/MS varied widely and ranged from 1.03 to 21.9 pmol/L. In summary, total hCG immunoassays significantly overestimate hCG concentrations and can produce false positive results. Although the intact hCG immunoassay slightly overestimates hCG concentrations compared to LC-MS/MS, it can distinguish between cases of hCG use and atypical cases with elevated total hCG concentrations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. DSP based lunar sampling control system for the coiling-type sampler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yun; Song, Aiguo; Lu, Wei

    2011-12-01

    The paper develops a control system based on DSP28334 for lunar sampling, and provides the main structure of it. The critical hardware and software design of the system are introduced in detail. The emphasis is placed on the design and realization of the vibration control of the coiling-type sampler in the process of lunar sampling. A control strategy which combines manual-control and local autonomous control is applied for the lunar sampling control. And the sampling mechanism being controlled can realizes multi-motor units working at time-sharing, which reduces the power comsumption and increases the stability of the sampling system greatly. The practical application of the control strategy used for the coiling-type sampler is verified by the finite element analysis. The experiments results show that the system works with low power consumption and high efficiency, and the proposed strategy enables greater depth and better efficiency during sampling.

  4. Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Laug, Matthew T.; Lambert, John D. B.; Herzog, James P.

    1997-01-01

    A method and system for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod.

  5. Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.; Lambert, J.B.; Herzog, J.P.

    1997-02-11

    A method and system are disclosed for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod. 12 figs.

  6. Using lot quality-assurance sampling and area sampling to identify priority areas for trachoma control: Viet Nam.

    PubMed Central

    Myatt, Mark; Mai, Nguyen Phuong; Quynh, Nguyen Quang; Nga, Nguyen Huy; Tai, Ha Huy; Long, Nguyen Hung; Minh, Tran Hung; Limburg, Hans

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report on the use of lot quality-assurance sampling (LQAS) surveys undertaken within an area-sampling framework to identify priority areas for intervention with trachoma control activities in Viet Nam. METHODS: The LQAS survey method for the rapid assessment of the prevalence of active trachoma was adapted for use in Viet Nam with the aim of classifying individual communes by the prevalence of active trachoma among children in primary school. School-based sampling was used; school sites to be sampled were selected using an area-sampling approach. A total of 719 communes in 41 districts in 18 provinces were surveyed. FINDINGS: Survey staff found the LQAS survey method both simple and rapid to use after initial problems with area-sampling methods were identified and remedied. The method yielded a finer spatial resolution of prevalence than had been previously achieved in Viet Nam using semiquantitative rapid assessment surveys and multistage cluster-sampled surveys. CONCLUSION: When used with area-sampling techniques, the LQAS survey method has the potential to form the basis of survey instruments that can be used to efficiently target resources for interventions against active trachoma. With additional work, such methods could provide a generally applicable tool for effective programme planning and for the certification of the elimination of trachoma as a blinding disease. PMID:16283052

  7. 40 CFR 53.57 - Test for filter temperature control during sampling and post-sampling periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... energy distribution and permitted tolerances specified in table E-2 of this subpart. The solar radiation... sequential sample operation. (3) The solar radiant energy source shall be installed in the test chamber such... temperature control system or by the radiant energy from the solar radiation source that may be present...

  8. 40 CFR 53.57 - Test for filter temperature control during sampling and post-sampling periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... energy distribution and permitted tolerances specified in table E-2 of this subpart. The solar radiation... sequential sample operation. (3) The solar radiant energy source shall be installed in the test chamber such... temperature control system or by the radiant energy from the solar radiation source that may be present...

  9. 40 CFR 53.57 - Test for filter temperature control during sampling and post-sampling periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... energy distribution and permitted tolerances specified in table E-2 of this subpart. The solar radiation... sequential sample operation. (3) The solar radiant energy source shall be installed in the test chamber such... temperature control system or by the radiant energy from the solar radiation source that may be present...

  10. 40 CFR 53.57 - Test for filter temperature control during sampling and post-sampling periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... energy distribution and permitted tolerances specified in table E-2 of this subpart. The solar radiation... sequential sample operation. (3) The solar radiant energy source shall be installed in the test chamber such... temperature control system or by the radiant energy from the solar radiation source that may be present...

  11. Spontaneous rereading within sentences: Eye movement control and visual sampling.

    PubMed

    White, Sarah J; Lantz, Laura M T; Paterson, Kevin B

    2017-02-01

    Three experiments examine the role of previously read text in sentence comprehension and the control of eye movements during spontaneous rereading. Spontaneous rereading begins with a regressive saccade and involves reinspection of previously read text. All 3 experiments employed the gaze-contingent change technique to modulate the availability of previously read text. In Experiment 1, previously read text was permanently masked either immediately to the left of the fixated word (beyond wordn) or more than 1 word to the left (beyond wordn-1). The results of Experiment 1 indicate that the availability of the word immediately to the left (wordn-1) is important for comprehension. Experiments 2 and 3 further explored the role of previously read text beyond wordn-1. In these studies, text beyond wordn-1 was replaced, retaining only word length information, or word length and shape information. Following a regression back within a sentence, meaningful text either reappeared or remained unavailable during rereading. The experiments show that the visual format of text beyond wordn-1 (the parafoveal postview) is important for triggering regressions. The results also indicate that, as least for more complex sentences, the availability of meaningful text is important in driving eye movement control during rereading. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. 27 CFR 27.75 - Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. 27.75 Section 27.75 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... DISTILLED SPIRITS, WINES, AND BEER General Requirements Exemptions § 27.75 Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer in...

  13. 27 CFR 27.75 - Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. 27.75 Section 27.75 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... DISTILLED SPIRITS, WINES, AND BEER General Requirements Exemptions § 27.75 Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer in...

  14. 27 CFR 27.75 - Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. 27.75 Section 27.75 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... DISTILLED SPIRITS, WINES, AND BEER General Requirements Exemptions § 27.75 Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer in...

  15. 27 CFR 27.75 - Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. 27.75 Section 27.75 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... DISTILLED SPIRITS, WINES, AND BEER General Requirements Exemptions § 27.75 Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer in...

  16. 27 CFR 27.75 - Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. 27.75 Section 27.75 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... DISTILLED SPIRITS, WINES, AND BEER General Requirements Exemptions § 27.75 Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer in...

  17. [Several common biases and control measures during sampling survey of eye diseases in China].

    PubMed

    Guan, Huai-jin

    2008-06-01

    Bias is a common artificial error during sampling survey in eye diseases, and is a major impact factor for validity and reliability of the survey. The causes and the control measures of several biases regarding current sampling survey of eye diseases in China were analyzed and discussed, including the sampling bias, non-respondent bias, and diagnostic bias. This review emphasizes that controlling bias is the key to ensure quality of sampling survey. Random sampling, sufficient sample quantity, careful examination and taking history, improving examination rate, accurate diagnosis, strict training and preliminary study, as well as quality control can eliminate or minimize biases and improve the sampling survey quality of eye diseases in China

  18. New multirate sampled-data control law structure and synthesis algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Martin C.; Mason, Gregory S.; Yang, Gen-Sheng

    1992-01-01

    A new multirate sampled-data control law structure is defined and a new parameter-optimization-based synthesis algorithm for that structure is introduced. The synthesis algorithm can be applied to multirate, multiple-input/multiple-output, sampled-data control laws having a prescribed dynamic order and structure, and a priori specified sampling/update rates for all sensors, processor states, and control inputs. The synthesis algorithm is applied to design two-input, two-output tip position controllers of various dynamic orders for a sixth-order, two-link robot arm model.

  19. A new multirate sampled-data control law structure and synthesis algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Martin C.; Mason, Gregory S.; Yang, Gen-Sheng

    1991-01-01

    A new multirate sampled-data control law structure is defined and a new parameter-optimization-based synthesis algorithm for that structure is introduced. The synthesis algorithm can be applied to multirate, multiple-input multiple-output, sampled-data control laws having a prescribed dynamic order and structure, and a priori specified sampling/update rates for all sensors, processor states, and control inputs. The synthesis algorithm is applied to design two-input, two-output tip position controllers of various dynamic orders for a sixth-order, two-link robot arm model.

  20. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Subramanian, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-07-15

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging.

  1. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Subramanian, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-07-01

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging.

  2. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, V; Subramanian, V; Baskaran, R; Venkatraman, B

    2015-07-01

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging.

  3. Adaptive sampling rate control for networked systems based on statistical characteristics of packet disordering.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Na; Er, Meng-Joo; Tan, Yen-Kheng; Yu, Hai-Bin; Zeng, Peng

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates an adaptive sampling rate control scheme for networked control systems (NCSs) subject to packet disordering. The main objectives of the proposed scheme are (a) to avoid heavy packet disordering existing in communication networks and (b) to stabilize NCSs with packet disordering, transmission delay and packet loss. First, a novel sampling rate control algorithm based on statistical characteristics of disordering entropy is proposed; secondly, an augmented closed-loop NCS that consists of a plant, a sampler and a state-feedback controller is transformed into an uncertain and stochastic system, which facilitates the controller design. Then, a sufficient condition for stochastic stability in terms of Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMIs) is given. Moreover, an adaptive tracking controller is designed such that the sampling period tracks a desired sampling period, which represents a significant contribution. Finally, experimental results are given to illustrate the effectiveness and advantages of the proposed scheme.

  4. A non-IQ sampling controller in low level RF system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Cheng-Ke; Dai, Zhi-Min; Liu, Jian-Fei; Zhao, Yu-Bin; Zhang, Tong-Xuan; Fu, Ze-Chuan; Liu, Wei-Qing

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes a non-IQ controller for digital Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback control. Based on this non-IQ sampling method, arbitrary frequency relationship between ADC/DAC sampling clocks and IF signals can be employed. The nonlinearity in digital conversion can be reduced and the system dynamic performance improved. This paper analyzes the nonlinearity in conventional IQ sampling, gives the state variable description of the non-IQ algorithm, presents an implementation and its synchronization, and compares its performances with IQ sampling. Supported by SSRF Project

  5. Exponential stabilization for sampled-data neural-network-based control systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zheng-Guang; Shi, Peng; Su, Hongye; Chu, Jian

    2014-12-01

    This paper investigates the problem of sampled-data stabilization for neural-network-based control systems with an optimal guaranteed cost. Using time-dependent Lyapunov functional approach, some novel conditions are proposed to guarantee the closed-loop systems exponentially stable, which fully use the available information about the actual sampling pattern. Based on the derived conditions, the design methods of the desired sampled-data three-layer fully connected feedforward neural-network-based controller are established to obtain the largest sampling interval and the smallest upper bound of the cost function. A practical example is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed techniques.

  6. Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) Sampling in Infrared Spectroscopy of Heterogeneous Materials Requires Reproducible Pressure Control.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenyu; Cassidy, Brianna M; DeJong, Stephanie A; Belliveau, Raymond G; Myrick, Michael L; Morgan, Stephen L

    2017-01-01

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy, in which the sample is pressed against an internal reflection element, is a popular technique for rapid IR spectral collection. However, depending on the accessory design, the pressure applied to the sample is not always well controlled. While collecting data from fabrics with heterogeneous coatings, we have observed systematic pressure-dependent changes in spectra that can be eliminated by more reproducible pressure control. We also described a pressure sensor adapted to work with an ATR tower to enable more precise control of pressure during ATR sampling.

  7. Development of a new multiple sampling trawl with autonomous opening/closing net control system for sampling juvenile pelagic fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oozeki, Yoshioki; Hu, Fuxiang; Tomatsu, Chiaki; Kubota, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    A new multiple layer sampling trawl with an autonomous net opening/closing control system was developed to sample pelagic juvenile fish quantitatively. The new trawl system, based on the Matsuda-Oozeki-Hu Trawl (MOHT), has a rigid-frame 3.3 m high and 2.35 m wide and five nets of 11.0 m length with a rectangular mouth of 2.22 m×1.81 m (4 m2 mouth area; large-scale prototype). A cambered V-shape depressor is hung below the frame and two bridles are attached at the midpoint of the side frames. A net-release controller is used, which not only controls the net release mechanism but also records the net depth, temperature and flow rate during net towing. The controller sends stored command signals to the net release mechanism as depth settings and/or time settings and does not require any commands from the surface through a conducting cable or by acoustic signals. Two other models were constructed before the construction of the large-scale prototype, which are a small-scale prototype (2 m2 mouth area) for testing the net release mechanism and a 1/4-scale model of the large-scale prototype for flume tank tests. Flume tank tests with the 1/4-scale model showed that the frame leaned forward at a tilt angle from 5 to 15 degrees at towing speeds from 0.8 to 1.4 m s-1. Opened nets closed smoothly and sequentially nets were completely opened when the trigger was released by the command. Net depth rarely changed even during changes in towing speed. Sea trials both by the small-scale and the large-scale prototype demonstrated the same towing characteristics expected from the flume tank tests. The newly developed multiple layer opening/closing MOHT (MOC-MOHT) is considered to be suitable for quantitative layer sampling of juvenile fish.

  8. Social Self-control, Sensation Seeking and Substance Use in Samples of US and Russian Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pokhrel, Pallav; Sussman, Steve; Sun, Ping; Kniazer, Vadim; Masagutov, Radik

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the relations of social self-control and sensation seeking with substance use across samples of US and Russian adolescents. Methods Cross-sectional data were obtained from 362 tenth-graders from Ufa, Russia, and 965 tenth-graders from California. Results Lack of social self-control was significantly related with higher alcohol and hard drug use in the Russian sample and higher cigarette use in the US sample. Higher sensation-seeking showed significant associations with higher cigarette and alcohol use in the Russian sample and higher alcohol, marijuana, and hard drug use in the US sample. Conclusion As with US adolescents, prevention programs for Russian adolescents may also benefit from being tailored to higher sensation-seekers and including self-control skills training. PMID:20001194

  9. Finite-time quantised feedback asynchronously switched control of sampled-data switched linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ronghao; Xing, Jianchun; Li, Juelong; Xiang, Zhengrong

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies the problem of stabilising a sampled-data switched linear system by quantised feedback asynchronously switched controllers. The idea of a quantised feedback asynchronously switched control strategy originates in earlier work reflecting actual system characteristic of switching and quantising, respectively. A quantised scheme is designed depending on switching time using dynamic quantiser. When sampling time, system switching time and controller switching time are all not uniform, the proposed switching controllers guarantee the system to be finite-time stable by a piecewise Lyapunov function and the average dwell-time method. Simulation examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the developed results.

  10. Flexible Time-Triggered Sampling in Smart Sensor-Based Wireless Control Systems

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Feng; Zhao, Wenhong

    2007-01-01

    Wireless control systems (WCSs) often have to operate in dynamic environments where the network traffic load may vary unpredictably over time. The sampling in sensors is conventionally time triggered with fixed periods. In this context, only worse-than-possible quality of control (QoC) can be achieved when the network is underloaded, while overloaded conditions may significantly degrade the QoC, even causing system instability. This is particularly true when the bandwidth of the wireless network is limited and shared by multiple control loops. To address these problems, a flexible time-triggered sampling scheme is presented in this work. Smart sensors are used to facilitate dynamic adjustment of sampling periods, which enhances the flexibility and resource efficiency of the system based on time-triggered sampling. Feedback control technology is exploited for adapting sampling periods in a periodic manner. The deadline miss ratio in each control loop is maintained at/around a desired level, regardless of workload variations. Simulation results show that the proposed sampling scheme is able to deal with dynamic and unpredictable variations in network traffic load. Compared to conventional time-triggered sampling, it leads to much better QoC in WCSs operating in dynamic environments.

  11. Varieties of Stimulus Control in Matching-to-Sample: A Kernel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Lanny; Garruto, Michelle; Watanabe, Mari

    2010-01-01

    Conditional discrimination or matching-to-sample procedures have been used to study a wide range of complex psychological phenomena with infrahuman and human subjects. In most studies, the percentage of trials in which a subject selects the comparison stimulus that is related to the sample stimulus is used to index the control exerted by the…

  12. Preparation and analysis of standardized waste samples for Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, J. L.; Browner, R.

    1982-01-01

    The preparation and analysis of standardized waste samples for controlled ecological life support systems (CELSS) are considered. Analysis of samples from wet oxidation experiments, the development of ion chromatographic techniques utilizing conventional high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipment, and an investigation of techniques for interfacing an ion chromatograph (IC) with an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICPOES) are discussed.

  13. Sampling technologies and air pollution control devices for gaseous and particulate arsenic: a review.

    PubMed

    Helsen, Lieve

    2005-09-01

    Direct measurement of arsenic release requires a good sampling and analysis procedure in order to capture and detect the total amount of metals emitted. The literature is extensively reviewed in order to evaluate the efficiency of full field-scale and laboratory scale techniques for capturing particulate and gaseous emissions of arsenic from the thermo-chemical treatment of different sources of arsenic. Furthermore, trace arsenic concentrations in ambient air, national standard sampling methods and arsenic analysis methods are considered. Besides sampling techniques, the use of sorbents is also reviewed with respect to both approaches (1) to prevent the metals from exiting with the flue gas and (2) to react or combine with the metals in order to be collected in air pollution control systems. The most important conclusion is that submicron arsenic fumes are difficult to control in conventional air pollution control devices. Complete capture of the arsenic species requires a combination of particle control and vapour control devices.

  14. Recrystallization of commercial carbamazepine samples-a strategy to control dissolution variability.

    PubMed

    Flicker, Felicia; Eberle, Veronika A; Betz, Gabriele

    2012-01-13

    Physical properties of commercial carbamazepine (CBZ) samples can significantly influence drug release and thereby jeopardize bioequivalence of the final dosage form. The aim of this study was to reduce variability in commercial CBZ samples by recrystallization. CBZ samples of four different suppliers were recrystallized in ethanol solution containing 1% polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). CBZ samples were analyzed by disk intrinsic dissolution rate (DIDR), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Recrystallized CBZ samples showed strongly reduced variability in DIDR compared to the untreated CBZ samples. Moreover, transformation process to CBZ dihydrate was inhibited; no dihydrate crystals were visible on compact surfaces after 8 h intrinsic dissolution measurement. Recrystallized CBZ samples showed no change in polymorphic form, however, particle size and shape was inhomogenous. In binary mixtures with microcrystalline cellulose, recrystallized CBZ samples again showed difference in drug release. This difference was associated with the inhomogenous particle size in the recrystallized CBZ samples. The results show that a controlled grinding step is required after recrystallization. We suggest the recrystallization in presence of 1% PVP followed by a controlled grinding step as a strategy to reduce dissolution variability in commercial CBZ samples.

  15. Computer graphics for quality control in the INAA of geological samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grossman, J.N.; Baedecker, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    A data reduction system for the routine instrumental activation analysis of samples is described, with particular emphasis on interactive graphics capabilities for evaluating analytical quality. Graphics procedures have been developed to interactively control the analysis of selected photopeaks during spectral analysis, and to evaluate detector performance during a given counting cycle. Graphics algorithms are also used to compare the data on reference samples with accepted values, to prepare quality control charts to evaluate long term precision and to search for systematic variations in data on reference samples as a function of time. ?? 1987 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  16. A Design Method of a Full Closed Loop Sampled Servo Control for Hard Disk Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Takashi; Atsumi, Takenori

    This paper presents a design methodology for fast and precise positioning using a full closed loop sampled servo control system. A servo control of hard disk drive (HDD) achieves 3-4 ms fast access and nanoscale positioning accuracy. To achieve the nanoscale precise positioning, a full closed loop feedback control is a key structure. From control theory viewpoint, the full closed loop is an ideal method, but it is difficult to take this method in industries due to sensor allocation. In HDD, this full closed loop feedback control has been applied for last 20 years. The full closed loop sometimes brings drawbacks to the servo control design. In HDD case, that is a limited sampling rate selection. In this paper, based on these two features which are the full closed loop and a sampled servo, uniquely developed servo design methods for HDD are presented, which include two-degrees-of-freedom (TDOF) controller with multi-rate sampling, reference trajectory design not to excite higher order mechanical resonances, settling servo to compensate for tracking error near the target, phase stabilized design of feedback control to have better sensitivity, and multi-rate filter design to suppress disturbances above the Nyquist frequency.

  17. 7 CFR 58.336 - Frequency of sampling for quality control of cream, butter and related products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Frequency of sampling for quality control of cream... of sampling for quality control of cream, butter and related products. (a) Microbiological. Samples... churnings or batches from samples taken from the cream as often as is necessary to aid in the control...

  18. An error criterion for determining sampling rates in closed-loop control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brecher, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    The determination of an error criterion which will give a sampling rate for adequate performance of linear, time-invariant closed-loop, discrete-data control systems was studied. The proper modelling of the closed-loop control system for characterization of the error behavior, and the determination of an absolute error definition for performance of the two commonly used holding devices are discussed. The definition of an adequate relative error criterion as a function of the sampling rate and the parameters characterizing the system is established along with the determination of sampling rates. The validity of the expressions for the sampling interval was confirmed by computer simulations. Their application solves the problem of making a first choice in the selection of sampling rates.

  19. Sample size reassessment for a two-stage design controlling the false discovery rate

    PubMed Central

    Zehetmayer, Sonja; Graf, Alexandra C.; Posch, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Sample size calculations for gene expression microarray and NGS-RNA-Seq experiments are challenging because the overall power depends on unknown quantities as the proportion of true null hypotheses and the distribution of the effect sizes under the alternative. We propose a two-stage design with an adaptive interim analysis where these quantities are estimated from the interim data. The second stage sample size is chosen based on these estimates to achieve a specific overall power. The proposed procedure controls the power in all considered scenarios except for very low first stage sample sizes. The false discovery rate (FDR) is controlled despite of the data dependent choice of sample size. The two-stage design can be a useful tool to determine the sample size of high-dimensional studies if in the planning phase there is high uncertainty regarding the expected effect sizes and variability. PMID:26461844

  20. Using heat to control the sample spinning speed in MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Mihaliuk, Eugene; Gullion, Terry

    2011-10-01

    A new approach using temperature to control the spinning speed of a sample rotor in magic-angle spinning NMR is presented. Instead of an electro-mechanical valve that regulates the flow of drive gas to control the spinning speed in traditional MAS NMR systems, we use a small heater wire located directly in the stator. The sample spinning speed is controlled very accurately with a surprisingly low heating power of 1 W. Results on a benchtop unit demonstrate the capability of the system.

  1. Reducing sample size in experiments with animals: historical controls and related strategies.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Matthew; Font, Enrique

    2017-02-01

    Reducing the number of animal subjects used in biomedical experiments is desirable for ethical and practical reasons. Previous reviews of the benefits of reducing sample sizes have focused on improving experimental designs and methods of statistical analysis, but reducing the size of control groups has been considered rarely. We discuss how the number of current control animals can be reduced, without loss of statistical power, by incorporating information from historical controls, i.e. subjects used as controls in similar previous experiments. Using example data from published reports, we describe how to incorporate information from historical controls under a range of assumptions that might be made in biomedical experiments. Assuming more similarities between historical and current controls yields higher savings and allows the use of smaller current control groups. We conducted simulations, based on typical designs and sample sizes, to quantify how different assumptions about historical controls affect the power of statistical tests. We show that, under our simulation conditions, the number of current control subjects can be reduced by more than half by including historical controls in the analyses. In other experimental scenarios, control groups may be unnecessary. Paying attention to both the function and to the statistical requirements of control groups would result in reducing the total number of animals used in experiments, saving time, effort and money, and bringing research with animals within ethically acceptable bounds.

  2. Design of output feedback consensus controllers for nonlinear sampled-data multi-agent systems of strict-feedback form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Hitoshi

    2014-09-01

    Design of reduced-order observer-based output feedback consensus controllers for nonlinear sampled-data multi-agent systems of strict-feedback form is considered based on nonlinear sampled-data control and consensus control theories. As a practical application of the proposed design method, output feedback consensus control for sampled-data fully actuated ships is also discussed.

  3. Research study on stabilization and control: Modern sampled data control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, B. C.; Singh, G.; Yackel, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    A numerical analysis of spacecraft stability parameters was conducted. The analysis is based on a digital approximation by point by point state comparison. The technique used is that of approximating a continuous data system by a sampled data model by comparison of the states of the two systems. Application of the method to the digital redesign of the simplified one axis dynamics of the Skylab is presented.

  4. Stabilization of Neural-Network-Based Control Systems via Event-Triggered Control With Nonperiodic Sampled Data.

    PubMed

    Hu, Songlin; Yue, Dong; Xie, Xiangpeng; Ma, Yong; Yin, Xiuxia

    2016-12-26

    This paper focuses on a problem of event-triggered stabilization for a class of nonuniformly sampled neural-network-based control systems (NNBCSs). First, a new event-triggered data transmission mechanism is designed based on the nonperiodic sampled data. Different from the previous works, the proposed triggering scheme enables the NNBCSs design to enjoy the advantages of both nonuniform and event-triggered sampling schemes. Second, under the nonperiodic event-triggered data transmission scheme, the nonperiodic sampled-data three-layer fully connected feedforward neural-network (TLFCFFNN)-based event-triggered controller is constructed, and the resulting closed-loop TLFCFFNN-based event-triggered control system is modeled as a state delay system based on time-delay system modeling approach. Then, the stability criteria for the closed-loop system is formulated using Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional approach. Third, the sufficient conditions for the codesign of the TLFCFFNN-based controller and triggering parameters are given in terms of solvability of matrix inequalities to guarantee the asymptotical stability of the closed-loop system and an upper bound on the given cost function while reducing the updates of the controller. Finally, three numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness and benefits of the proposed results.

  5. Output-feedback sampled-data control design for linear parameter-varying systems with delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezanifar, Amin; Mohammadpour, Javad; Grigoriadis, Karolos M.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we address the sampled-data output-feedback control design problem for continuous-time linear parameter-varying systems with time-varying delay in the system states. Due to the combination of the plant's continuous-time dynamics and the controller's discrete-time dynamics connected through A/D and D/A converter devices, the closed-loop system is a hybrid system. In order to analyse this hybrid system from stability and performance perspectives we use the input-delay approach to map the closed-loop system into the continuous-time domain with delay in the states. This results in a closed-loop system containing two types of delays, the system internal delay and the one imposed by the mapping. Next, we use delay-dependent conditions for analysis of stability and ?-norm performance which result in a sampled-data control synthesis procedure. The proposed output-feedback sampled-data controller is obtained based on the solution to a linear matrix inequality optimisation problem using a set of appropriately defined slack variables. A numerical example of a milling machine is presented to demonstrate the viability of the proposed sampled-data control design method to satisfy the stability and performance objectives even with a varying sampling rate.

  6. Control of adolescents' arbitrary matching-to-sample by positive and negative stimulus relations.

    PubMed Central

    Stromer, R; Osborne, J G

    1982-01-01

    In Experiment 1, four developmentally delayed adolescents were taught an A-B matching-to-sample task with nonidentical stimuli: given Sample A1, select Comparison B1; given A2, select B2. During nonreinforced test trials, appropriate matching occurred when B stimuli appeared as samples and A stimuli as comparisons, i.e., the sample and comparison functions were symmetrical (B-A matching). During A-B or B-A matching test trials in which familiar samples and correct comparisons were presented along with novel comparisons, the subjects selected the correct comparisons. In tests with familiar samples and both incorrect and novel comparisons, subjects selected the novel comparisons, demonstrating control by both positive ("matching") and negative ("nonmatching") stimulus relations in A-B and B-A arrays. In Experiment 2, 12 developmentally delayed subjects were taught a two-stage arbitrary-matching task (e.g., A-B, C-B matching). Test sessions showed sample-comparison symmetry (e.g., B-A, B-C matching) and derived sample-comparison relations (e.g., A-C, C-A matching) for 11 subjects. These subjects also demonstrated control by positive and negative stimulus relations in the derived relations. PMID:6178786

  7. Control of tip-to-sample distance in atomic force microscopy: A dual-actuator tip-motion control scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Younkoo; Jayanth, G. R.; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2007-09-01

    The control of tip-to-sample distance in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is achieved through controlling the vertical tip position of the AFM cantilever. In the vertical tip-position control, the required z motion is commanded by laser reading of the vertical tip position in real time and might contain high frequency components depending on the lateral scanning rate and topographical variations of the sample. This paper presents a dual-actuator tip-motion control scheme that enables the AFM tip to track abrupt topographical variations. In the dual-actuator scheme, an additional magnetic mode actuator is employed to achieve high bandwidth tip-motion control while the regular z scanner provides the necessary motion range. This added actuator serves to make the entire cantilever bandwidth available for tip positioning, and thus controls the tip-to-sample distance. A fast programmable electronics board was employed to realize the proposed dual-actuator control scheme, in which model cancellation algorithms were implemented to enlarge the bandwidth of the magnetic actuation and to compensate the lightly damped dynamics of the cantilever. Experiments were conducted to illustrate the capabilities of the proposed dual-actuator tip-motion control in terms of response speed and travel range. It was shown that while the bandwidth of the regular z scanner was merely a small fraction of the cantilever's bandwidth, the dual-actuator control scheme led to a tip-motion control system, the bandwidth of which was comparable to that of the cantilever, where the dynamics overdamped, and the motion range comparable to that of the z scanner.

  8. Differences between blood donors and a population sample: implications for case–control studies

    PubMed Central

    Golding, Jean; Northstone, Kate; Miller, Laura L; Davey Smith, George; Pembrey, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Background Selecting appropriate controls for studies of genetic variation in case series is important. The two major candidates involve the use of blood donors or a random sample of the population. Methods We compare and contrast the two different populations of controls for studies of genetic variation using data from parents enrolled in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). In addition we compute different biases using a series of hypothetical assumptions. Results The study subjects who had been blood donors differed markedly from the general population in social, health-related, anthropometric, and personality-related variables. Using theoretical examples, we show that blood donors are a poor control group for non-genetic studies of diseases related to environmentally, behaviourally, or socially patterned exposures. However, we show that if blood donors are used as controls in genetic studies, these factors are unlikely to make a major difference in detecting true associations with relatively rare disorders (cumulative incidence through life of <10%). Nevertheless, for more common disorders, the reduction in accuracy resulting from the inclusion in any control population of individuals who have or will develop the disease in question can create a greater bias than can socially patterned factors. Conclusions Information about the medical history of a control and the parents of the control (as a proxy for whether the control will develop the disease) is more important with regard to the choice of controls than whether the controls are a random population sample or blood donors. PMID:23825379

  9. Highly simplified lateral flow-based nucleic acid sample preparation and passive fluid flow control

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, Robert E.

    2015-12-08

    Highly simplified lateral flow chromatographic nucleic acid sample preparation methods, devices, and integrated systems are provided for the efficient concentration of trace samples and the removal of nucleic acid amplification inhibitors. Methods for capturing and reducing inhibitors of nucleic acid amplification reactions, such as humic acid, using polyvinylpyrrolidone treated elements of the lateral flow device are also provided. Further provided are passive fluid control methods and systems for use in lateral flow assays.

  10. Multiple sample characterization of coals and other substances by controlled-atmosphere programmed temperature oxidation

    DOEpatents

    LaCount, Robert B.

    1993-01-01

    A furnace with two hot zones holds multiple analysis tubes. Each tube has a separable sample-packing section positioned in the first hot zone and a catalyst-packing section positioned in the second hot zone. A mass flow controller is connected to an inlet of each sample tube, and gas is supplied to the mass flow controller. Oxygen is supplied through a mass flow controller to each tube to either or both of an inlet of the first tube and an intermediate portion between the tube sections to intermingle with and oxidize the entrained gases evolved from the sample. Oxidation of those gases is completed in the catalyst in each second tube section. A thermocouple within a sample reduces furnace temperature when an exothermic condition is sensed within the sample. Oxidized gases flow from outlets of the tubes to individual gas cells. The cells are sequentially aligned with an infrared detector, which senses the composition and quantities of the gas components. Each elongated cell is tapered inward toward the center from cell windows at the ends. Volume is reduced from a conventional cell, while permitting maximum interaction of gas with the light beam. Reduced volume and angulation of the cell inlets provide rapid purgings of the cell, providing shorter cycles between detections. For coal and other high molecular weight samples, from 50% to 100% oxygen is introduced to the tubes.

  11. Rotorcraft flight dynamics and control in wind for autonomous sampling of spatiotemporal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydney, Nitin

    In recent years, there has been significant effort put into the design and use small, autonomous, multi-agent, aerial teams for a variety of military and commercial applications. In particular, small multi-rotor systems have been shown to be especially useful for carrying sensors as they have the ability to rapidly transit between locations as well as hover in place. This dissertation seeks to use multi-agent teams of autonomous rotorcraft to sample spatiotemporal fields in windy conditions. For many sampling objectives, there is the problem of how to accomplish the sampling objective in the presence of strong wind fields caused by external means or by other rotorcraft flying in close proximity. This dissertation develops several flight control strategies for both wind compensation, using nonlinear control techniques, and wind avoidance, using artificial potential-based control. To showcase the utility of teams of unmanned rotorcraft for spatiotemporal sampling, optimal algorithms are developed for two sampling objectives: (1) sampling continuous spatiotemporal fields modeled as Gaussian processes, and (2) optimal motion planning for coordinated target detection, which is an example of a discrete spatiotemporal field. All algorithms are tested in simulation and several are tested in a motion capture based experimental testbed.

  12. FBXL21 Association With Schizophrenia in Irish Family and Case–Control Samples

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangning; Wang, Xu; Sun, Cuie; Chen, Qi; O’Neill, F. Anthony; Walsh, Dermot; Fanous, Ayman; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2010-01-01

    FBXL21 gene encodes an F-box containing protein functioning in the SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. The role of the F-box protein is to recruit proteins designated for degradation to the ligase complex so they would be ubiquitinated. Using both family and case–control samples, we found consistent associations in and around FBXL21 gene. In the family sample (Irish study of high density schizophrenia families, ISHDSF, 1,350 subjects from 273 families), a minimal PDT P-value of 0.0011 was observed at rs31555. In the case–control sample (Irish case–control study of schizophrenia, ICCSS, 814 cases and 625 controls), significant associations were observed at two markers (rs1859427 P = 0.0197, and rs6861170 P = 0.0197). In haplotype analyses, haplotype 1-1 (C-T) of rs1859427–rs6861170 was overtransmitted in the ISHDSF (P = 0.0437) and was over-represented in the ICCSS (P = 0.0177). For both samples, the associated alleles and haplotypes were identical. These data suggested that FBXL21 may be associated with schizophrenia in the Irish samples. PMID:18404645

  13. Versatile, low-cost, computer-controlled, sample positioning system for vacuum applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas-Aburto, Carlos; Liff, Dale R.

    1991-01-01

    A versatile, low-cost, easy to implement, microprocessor-based motorized positioning system (MPS) suitable for accurate sample manipulation in a Second Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) system, and for other ultra-high vacuum (UHV) applications was designed and built at NASA LeRC. The system can be operated manually or under computer control. In the latter case, local, as well as remote operation is possible via the IEEE-488 bus. The position of the sample can be controlled in three linear orthogonal and one angular coordinates.

  14. Effect of sampling rate and record length on the determination of stability and control derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, M. J.; Iliff, K. W.; Whitman, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    Flight data from five aircraft were used to assess the effects of sampling rate and record length reductions on estimates of stability and control derivatives produced by a maximum likelihood estimation method. Derivatives could be extracted from flight data with the maximum likelihood estimation method even if there were considerable reductions in sampling rate and/or record length. Small amplitude pulse maneuvers showed greater degradation of the derivative maneuvers than large amplitude pulse maneuvers when these reductions were made. Reducing the sampling rate was found to be more desirable than reducing the record length as a method of lessening the total computation time required without greatly degrading the quantity of the estimates.

  15. A Robust Variable Sampling Time BLDC Motor Control Design Based upon μ-Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Jia-Yush

    2013-01-01

    The variable sampling rate system is encountered in many applications. When the speed information is derived from the position marks along the trajectory, one would have a speed dependent sampling rate system. The conventional fixed or multisampling rate system theory may not work in these cases because the system dynamics include the uncertainties which resulted from the variable sampling rate. This paper derived a convenient expression for the speed dependent sampling rate system. The varying sampling rate effect is then translated into multiplicative uncertainties to the system. The design then uses the popular μ-synthesis process to achieve a robust performance controller design. The implementation on a BLDC motor demonstrates the effectiveness of the design approach. PMID:24327804

  16. A robust variable sampling time BLDC motor control design based upon μ-synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chung-Wen; Yen, Jia-Yush

    2013-01-01

    The variable sampling rate system is encountered in many applications. When the speed information is derived from the position marks along the trajectory, one would have a speed dependent sampling rate system. The conventional fixed or multisampling rate system theory may not work in these cases because the system dynamics include the uncertainties which resulted from the variable sampling rate. This paper derived a convenient expression for the speed dependent sampling rate system. The varying sampling rate effect is then translated into multiplicative uncertainties to the system. The design then uses the popular μ-synthesis process to achieve a robust performance controller design. The implementation on a BLDC motor demonstrates the effectiveness of the design approach.

  17. Fast, efficient, and quality-controlled phosphopeptide enrichment from minute sample amounts using titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Dickhut, Clarissa; Radau, Sonja; Zahedi, René P

    2014-01-01

    Bottom-up mass spectrometry (MS) is still the method of choice for analyzing protein phosphorylation. However, the low stoichiometry of phosphorylation, especially in highly complex samples, renders the specific enrichment of phosphopeptides prior to analysis inevitable. In recent years, specific phosphopeptide enrichment strategies combined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS (LC-MS) provided researchers deeper insights into the phosphorylation networks of biological systems.Here, we describe two protocols for the enrichment of phosphopeptides from biological samples using titanium dioxide (TiO2) resins, enabling the handling of small sample amounts (<20 μg of protein) as well as larger sample amounts (up to the milligram range), depending on the scientific issue to be solved.Furthermore, we imply quality control steps during sample preparation to ensure the reproducibility and reliability of the phosphoproteomic findings.

  18. Hair analysis of anabolic steroids in connection with doping control-results from horse samples.

    PubMed

    Anielski, P

    2008-07-01

    Doping control of anabolic substances is normally carried out with urine samples taken from athletes and horses. Investigation of alternative specimens, e.g. hair samples, is restricted to special cases, but can also be worthwhile, in addition to urine analysis. Moreover, hair material is preferred in cases of limited availability or complicated collection of urine samples, e.g. from horses. In this work, possible ways of interpretation of analytical results in hair samples are discussed and illustrated by practical experiences. The results demonstrate the applicability of hair analysis to detect anabolic steroids and also to obtain further information about previous abuse. Moreover, the process of incorporation of steroids into hairs is described and the consequences on interpretation are discussed, e.g. on the retrospective estimation of the application date. The chosen examples deal with the detection of the anabolic agent testosterone propionate. Hair samples of an application study, as well as a control sample taken from a racing horse, were referred to. Hair material was investigated by a screening procedure including testosterone, nandrolone and several esters (testosterone propionate, phenylpropionate, decanoate, undecanoate, cypionate; nandrolone decanoate, dodecanoate and phenylpropionate; limits of detection (LODs) between 0.1 and 5.0 pg/mg). Confirmation of testosterone propionate (LOD 0.1 pg/mg) was carried out by an optimised sample preparation. Trimethylsilyl (TMS) and tert-butyl dimethylsilyl derivatives were detected by gas chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS).

  19. Event detection and control co-design of sampled-data systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangyu; Chen, Tongwen

    2014-04-01

    This paper proposes event detector and controller co-design criteria for sampled-data systems in which static or dynamic output feedback controllers are used. The resulting criteria provide sufficient conditions to ensure the asymptotic stability of the closed-loop system with reduced communication rates among sensors, controllers, and actuators. The transmissions are mediated by event detectors at both sensor and controller nodes. For static output feedback control, the sufficient condition is given in terms of the feasibility of bilinear matrix inequalities (BMIs). The BMI feasibility problem is converted into a nonlinear optimisation problem involving linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), which is solved via the complementarity linearisation algorithm. For dynamic output feedback control, the sufficient condition is formulated into an LMI feasibility problem, which is readily solved with existing tools. Numerical examples are included to show the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  20. A comparison between screened NIMH and clinically interviewed control samples on neuroticism and extraversion

    PubMed Central

    Talati, A; Fyer, AJ; Weissman, MM

    2010-01-01

    The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has supported the collection of DNA samples on over 4000 subjects for use primarily as controls in psychiatric genetic studies. These subjects, though screened online, were not directly interviewed or assessed on family history. We compared this sample to one that was directly interviewed using structured diagnostic assessments on comparable measures of neuroticism and extraversion. The screened sample completed an online self-report based on the Composite International Diagnostic Instrument Short-Form (CIDI-SF). The interviewed sample was assessed by clinically trained personnel using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (SADS-LA-IV) and Family History Screen; final diagnoses were made blind to trait scores by a clinician using the best-estimate procedure. Neuroticism and extraversion were assessed on the NEO five-factor inventory (NEO-FFI) and the revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire short form (EPQ-R). We found that subjects in the NIMH-screened sample who did not report any psychiatric symptoms on the self-report were indistinguishable from interviewed diagnosis free and family history negative controls on neuroticism and extraversion. Subjects in the screened sample who screened positive for anxiety disorders, however, deviated significantly on these measures both from the screened subjects with no self-reported symptoms, as well as from subjects in the interviewed sample diagnosed with comparable disorders. These findings suggest that control groups generated from the NIMH sample should ideally be restricted to subjects free of any self-reported symptoms, regardless of the disorder being addressed, in order to maximize their reflection of diagnosis-free populations. PMID:17938631

  1. Power analysis for case–control association studies of samples with known family histories

    PubMed Central

    Li, Biao; Han, Younghun; Amos, Christopher I.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide case–control studies have been widely used to identify genetic variants that predispose to human diseases. Such studies are powerful in detecting common genetic variants with moderate effects, but quickly lose power as allele frequency and genotype relative risk decrease. Because patients with one or more affected relatives are more likely to inherit disease-predisposing alleles of a genetic disease than patients without family histories of the disease, sampling patients with affected relatives almost always increases the frequency of disease predisposing alleles in cases and improves the power of case–control association studies. This paper evaluates the power of case–control studies that select cases and/or controls according to their family histories of disease. Our results showed that this study design can dramatically increase the power of a case–control association study for a wide range of disease types. Because each additional affected relative of a patient reduces the required sample size roughly by a pair of case and control, inclusion of cases with affected relatives can dramatically decrease the required sample size and thus the cost of such studies. PMID:20383776

  2. On Stabilization of Quantized Sampled-Data Neural-Network-Based Control Systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueying; Shen, Hao; Duan, Dengping

    2016-06-28

    This paper investigates the problem of stabilization of sampled-data neural-network-based systems with state quantization. Different with previous works, the communication limitation of state quantization is considered for the first time. More specifically, it is assumed that the sampled state measurements from sensor to the controller are quantized via a quantizer. To reduce conservativeness, a novel piecewise Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) is constructed by introducing a line-integral type Lyapunov function and some useful terms that take full advantage of the available information about the actual sampling pattern. Based on the new LKF, much less conservative stabilization conditions are derived to obtain the maximal sampling period and the minimal guaranteed cost control performance. The desired quantized sampled-data three-layer fully connected feedforward neural-network-based controllers are designed by a linear matrix inequality approach. A search algorithm is given to find the optimal values of tuning parameters. The effectiveness and advantage of proposed method are demonstrated by the numerical simulation of an inverted pendulum.

  3. Emergence of Complex Conditional Discriminations by Joint Control of Compound Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso-Alvarez, Benigno; Perez-Gonzalez, Luis Antonio

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to explore the emergence of verbal behavior resulting from the joint control of two antecedent stimuli that are presented together for the first time. Conditional discriminations were used for teaching and for probing. Four stimuli PI, P2, 0 1 , and 02 were samples and four stimuli Al, A2, BI, and B2 were the…

  4. Glycemic Control in a Clinic-Based Sample of Diabetics in M'Bour Senegal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BeLue, Rhonda; Ndiaye, Khadidiatou; NDao, Fatou; Ba, Fatou Niass Niang; Diaw, Mor

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) including Senegal is faced with a significant and increasing burden of type 2 diabetes. However, little information is available about diabetes management among Senegalese diabetics. Purpose: The current study aims to describe the level of glycemic control among a convenience sample of diabetics who receive…

  5. [The quality control of preanalytical variations for the determination of lead in samples of human origin].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Kun; Wang, Wei; He, Falin; Wang, Zhiguo

    2015-02-01

    The aims of this article was to provide the quality control requirements of preanalytical variation for the determination of lead in samples of human origin, reduce the influence of preanalytical variation on the test results. According to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute documents, control of preanalytical variation in trace element determinations, analytical procedures for the determination of lead in blood and urine and other references and guidelines, the methods of quality control of lead determination had been made, including: the factors needed to be considered before collection, preservation, transportation and other preanalytical factors, the abilities and considerations of laboratory staff, etc.

  6. Observers and output feedback stabilising controllers for nonlinear strict-feedback systems with sampled observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Hitoshi

    2016-02-01

    The design of observers and output feedback stabilising controllers for continuous-time strict-feedback systems with sampled observation is considered. First two types of observers are designed. One is a discrete-time semiglobal and practical reduced-order observer for the exact model and the other is a continuous-time semiglobal and practical full-order observer for continuous-time strict feedback systems with sampled observation. Then by combining the designed continuous-time observers and continuous-time state feedback laws that are continuous, zero at the origin, and uniformly globally asymptotically stabilise continuous-time systems, output feedback semiglobally practically uniformly asymptotically stabilising controllers are constructed. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the proposed design of observers and output feedback controllers.

  7. Comparing U.S. Army suicide cases to a control sample: initial data and methodological lessons.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Cynthia L; Reger, Mark A; Smolenski, Derek J; Fullerton, Nicole R

    2014-10-01

    Identification of risk and protective factors for suicide is a priority for the United States military, especially in light of the recent steady increase in military suicide rates. The Department of Defense Suicide Event Report contains comprehensive data on suicides for active duty military personnel, but no analogous control data is available to permit identification of factors that differentially determine suicide risk. This proof-of-concept study was conducted to determine the feasibility of collecting such control data. The study employed a prospective case-control design in which control cases were randomly selected from a large Army installation at a rate of four control participants for every qualifying Army suicide. Although 111 Army suicides were confirmed during the study period, just 27 control soldiers completed the study. Despite the small control sample, preliminary analyses comparing suicide cases to controls identified several factors more frequently reported for suicide cases, including recent failed intimate relationships, outpatient mental health history, mood disorder diagnosis, substance abuse history, and prior self-injury. No deployment-related risk factors were found. These data are consistent with existing literature and form a foundation for larger control studies. Methodological lessons learned regarding study design and recruitment are discussed to inform future studies.

  8. Bayesian sample sizes for exploratory clinical trials comparing multiple experimental treatments with a control.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, John; Cleary, Faye; Turner, Amanda

    2015-05-30

    In this paper, a Bayesian approach is developed for simultaneously comparing multiple experimental treatments with a common control treatment in an exploratory clinical trial. The sample size is set to ensure that, at the end of the study, there will be at least one treatment for which the investigators have a strong belief that it is better than control, or else they have a strong belief that none of the experimental treatments are substantially better than control. This criterion bears a direct relationship with conventional frequentist power requirements, while allowing prior opinion to feature in the analysis with a consequent reduction in sample size. If it is concluded that at least one of the experimental treatments shows promise, then it is envisaged that one or more of these promising treatments will be developed further in a definitive phase III trial. The approach is developed in the context of normally distributed responses sharing a common standard deviation regardless of treatment. To begin with, the standard deviation will be assumed known when the sample size is calculated. The final analysis will not rely upon this assumption, although the intended properties of the design may not be achieved if the anticipated standard deviation turns out to be inappropriate. Methods that formally allow for uncertainty about the standard deviation, expressed in the form of a Bayesian prior, are then explored. Illustrations of the sample sizes computed from the new method are presented, and comparisons are made with frequentist methods devised for the same situation.

  9. Temperature-controlled neutron reflectometry sample cell suitable for study of photoactive thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Yager, Kevin G.; Tanchak, Oleh M.; Barrett, Christopher J.; Watson, Mike J.; Fritzsche, Helmut

    2006-04-15

    We describe a novel cell design intended for the study of photoactive materials using neutron reflectometry. The cell can maintain sample temperature and control of ambient atmospheric environment. Critically, the cell is built with an optical port, enabling light irradiation or light probing of the sample, simultaneous with neutron reflectivity measurements. The ability to measure neutron reflectivity with simultaneous temperature ramping and/or light illumination presents unique opportunities for measuring photoactive materials. To validate the cell design, we present preliminary results measuring the photoexpansion of thin films of azobenzene polymer.

  10. Discretisation and control of polytopic systems with uncertain sampling rates and network-induced delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Márcio F.; Morais, Cecília F.; Tognetti, Eduardo S.; Oliveira, Ricardo C. L. F.; Peres, Pedro L. D.

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the problems of uncertain sampling rate discretisation and the networked control of uncertain time-invariant continuous-time linear systems in polytopic domains. The sampling period is assumed to be unknown but belonging to a given interval. To avoid the difficulty of dealing with the exponential of uncertain matrices, a discrete-time model is obtained by applying a Taylor series expansion of degree ℓ to the original system. The resulting discrete-time model is composed of homogeneous polynomial matrices with parameters lying in the Cartesian product of simplexes, called a multi-simplex, plus an additive norm-bounded term representing the discretisation residual error. The original continuous-time system is controlled through a communication network that introduces a time delay in the process. Linear matrix inequality relaxations that include a scalar parameter search are proposed for the design of a digital robust state feedback controller that guarantees the closed-loop stability of the networked control system. Numerical experiments are presented to illustrate the versatility of the proposed method, which can be applied to a more general class of networked control problems than the existing approaches in the literature.

  11. Stabilisation analysis for switched neutral systems based on sampled-data control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnasamy, R.; Balasubramaniam, P.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the problem of stabilisation analysis for switched neutral systems based on sampled-data control and average dwell time approach is investigated. Delay-dependent stabilisation results are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities by constructing piecewise Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional based on the Wirtinger's inequality. Also, the controller gain matrix is designed by applying an input-delay approach. Further convex combination technique and some integral inequalities are used to derive less conservative results. The effectiveness of the derived results is validated through numerical examples.

  12. A new method for tuning PI controllers with symmetric send-on-delta sampling strategy.

    PubMed

    Romero Pérez, Julio Ariel; Sanchis Llopis, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present a new method for tuning PI controllers with symmetric send-on-delta (SSOD) sampling strategy. First we analyze the conditions that produce oscillations in event based systems considering SSOD sampling strategy. The Describing Function is the tool used to address the problem. Once the conditions for oscillations are established, a new robustness to oscillation performance measure is introduced which entails with the concept of phase margin, one of the most traditional measures of relative stability in closed-loop control systems. Therefore, the application of the proposed robustness measure is easy and intuitive. The method is tested by both simulations and experiments. Additionally, a Java application has been developed to aid in the design according to the results presented in the paper.

  13. Spectral pattern recognition of controlled substances in street samples using artificial neural network system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poryvkina, Larisa; Aleksejev, Valeri; Babichenko, Sergey M.; Ivkina, Tatjana

    2011-04-01

    The NarTest fluorescent technique is aimed at the detection of analyte of interest in street samples by recognition of its specific spectral patterns in 3-dimentional Spectral Fluorescent Signatures (SFS) measured with NTX2000 analyzer without chromatographic or other separation of controlled substances from a mixture with cutting agents. The illicit drugs have their own characteristic SFS features which can be used for detection and identification of narcotics, however typical street sample consists of a mixture with cutting agents: adulterants and diluents. Many of them interfere the spectral shape of SFS. The expert system based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) has been developed and applied for such pattern recognition in SFS of street samples of illicit drugs.

  14. Stability Analysis of Networked Control Systems With Aperiodic Sampling and Time-Varying Delay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Meng, Su; Sun, Jian

    2016-12-01

    This paper addresses the stability of networked control systems with aperiodic sampling and time-varying network-induced delay. The sampling intervals are assumed to vary within a known interval. The transmission delay is assumed to belong to a given interval. The closed-loop system is first converted to a discrete-time system with multiple time-varying delays and norm-bounded uncertainties resulting from the variation of the sampling intervals. And then, it is transformed into a delay-free system being form of an interconnection of two subsystems. By utilizing scaled small gain theorem, an asymptotic stability criterion for the closed-loop system is proposed in terms of linear matrix inequality. Finally, numerical examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method and its advantages over existing methods.

  15. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Makowska, Małgorzata G.; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N.; Lauridsen, Erik M.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; Kabra, Saurabh; Strobl, Markus

    2015-12-15

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. This paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 °C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. This covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.

  16. Variable sampling approach to mitigate instability in networked control systems with delays.

    PubMed

    López-Echeverría, Daniel; Magaña, Mario E

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes a new alternative approach to compensate for the effects of time delays on a dynamic networked control system (NCS). The approach is based on the use of time-delay-predicted values as the sampling times of the NCS. We use a one-step-ahead prediction algorithm based on an adaptive time delay neural network. The application of pole placement and linear quadratic regulator methods to compute the feedback gains taking into account the estimated time delays is investigated.

  17. Enhanced procedural blank control for organic geochemical studies of critical sample material.

    PubMed

    Leider, A; Schumacher, T C; Hallmann, C

    2016-09-01

    Organic contamination of sedimentary rocks can produce artefacts in studies of hydrocarbon composition, and this can have significant negative consequences for interpretations of the geobiological record. False positives - that is cases of non-syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarkers - are common in Precambrian studies, and significant challenges persist despite the intensive effort devoted to these studies. Efforts to standardize the 'burden of proof' for distinguishing between contamination and syngenetic material have to date failed to yield a simple or universal protocol, yet the need remains great, as both bitumen-lean rocks and bitumen-rich samples can be vulnerable to the accumulation of false-positive signals. In an effort to determine the best approach to quality control, we tested the capability of different blank materials to collect ambient contamination by assessing their capacity to adsorb hydrocarbons during storage in plastic bags and found that commonly used Quartz sand does not provide an adequate measure of storage- or laboratory-induced contamination. Brick blanks, having the advantage that they can parallel rock samples even during the sawing process, are characterized by similar poor adsorption properties. Primarily steered by mineralogy, organic carbon content and surface area, model-black shales can adsorb up to 20 times more contaminants than sand blanks and up to 200 times more contaminants than organic-free model-carbonates. This observation provides an explanation for reports and observations of seemingly systematic stratigraphic variation of contaminants, but mostly should raise awareness for the evaluation of procedural blanks, in particular of sample-to-blank ratios, when studying bitumen-lean rock samples of varying lithologies. Additionally, differences between the hydrocarbon profiles in plastic bags and the hydrocarbon signatures transferred to blank materials emphasize difficulties in the unequivocal detection of contamination sources

  18. On the repeated measures designs and sample sizes for randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Tango, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    For the analysis of longitudinal or repeated measures data, generalized linear mixed-effects models provide a flexible and powerful tool to deal with heterogeneity among subject response profiles. However, the typical statistical design adopted in usual randomized controlled trials is an analysis of covariance type analysis using a pre-defined pair of "pre-post" data, in which pre-(baseline) data are used as a covariate for adjustment together with other covariates. Then, the major design issue is to calculate the sample size or the number of subjects allocated to each treatment group. In this paper, we propose a new repeated measures design and sample size calculations combined with generalized linear mixed-effects models that depend not only on the number of subjects but on the number of repeated measures before and after randomization per subject used for the analysis. The main advantages of the proposed design combined with the generalized linear mixed-effects models are (1) it can easily handle missing data by applying the likelihood-based ignorable analyses under the missing at random assumption and (2) it may lead to a reduction in sample size, compared with the simple pre-post design. The proposed designs and the sample size calculations are illustrated with real data arising from randomized controlled trials.

  19. LOCAL CASE-CONTROL SAMPLING: EFFICIENT SUBSAMPLING IN IMBALANCED DATA SETS

    PubMed Central

    Fithian, William; Hastie, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    For classification problems with significant class imbalance, subsampling can reduce computational costs at the price of inflated variance in estimating model parameters. We propose a method for subsampling efficiently for logistic regression by adjusting the class balance locally in feature space via an accept–reject scheme. Our method generalizes standard case-control sampling, using a pilot estimate to preferentially select examples whose responses are conditionally rare given their features. The biased subsampling is corrected by a post-hoc analytic adjustment to the parameters. The method is simple and requires one parallelizable scan over the full data set. Standard case-control sampling is inconsistent under model misspecification for the population risk-minimizing coefficients θ*. By contrast, our estimator is consistent for θ* provided that the pilot estimate is. Moreover, under correct specification and with a consistent, independent pilot estimate, our estimator has exactly twice the asymptotic variance of the full-sample MLE—even if the selected subsample comprises a miniscule fraction of the full data set, as happens when the original data are severely imbalanced. The factor of two improves to 1+1c if we multiply the baseline acceptance probabilities by c > 1 (and weight points with acceptance probability greater than 1), taking roughly 1+c2 times as many data points into the subsample. Experiments on simulated and real data show that our method can substantially outperform standard case-control subsampling. PMID:25492979

  20. Hybrid state-space self-tuning control using dual-rate sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, Leang S.; Zhao, Xiao M.; Sunkel, John W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a hybrid state-space self-tuning control scheme using dual-rate sampling for suboptimal digital adaptive control of linear time-invariant continuous-time multivariable stochastic systems with unknown parameters. An equivalent fast-rate discrete-time state-space innovation model (with estimated states) of the continuous-time system is constructed by using the estimated system parameters and Kalman gain. To utilize the existing optimal regional-pole assignment method developed in the continuous-time domain, the constructed fast-rate discrete-time model is converted into an equivalent continuous-time model for the development of a state-feedback optimal control law with pole placement in a specific region. The developed analog optimal control law is then converted into an equivalent pseudo-slow-rate digital control law via the proposed digital redesign technique, which can be realized via slow-rate digital electronics. The proposed method enables the development of a digitally implementable advanced control algorithm for digital adaptive control of continuous-time multivariable stochastic systems which may be unstable and/or have nonminimum phase.

  1. Calorimeters for precision power dissipation measurements on controlled-temperature superconducting radiofrequency samples.

    PubMed

    Xiao, B P; Reece, C E; Phillips, H L; Kelley, M J

    2012-12-01

    Two calorimeters, with stainless steel and Cu as the thermal path material for high precision and high power versions, respectively, have been designed and commissioned for the 7.5 GHz surface impedance characterization system at Jefferson Lab to provide low temperature control and measurement for CW power up to 22 W on a 5 cm diameter disk sample which is thermally isolated from the radiofrequency (RF) portion of the system. A power compensation method has been developed to measure the RF induced power on the sample. Simulation and experimental results show that with these two calorimeters, the whole thermal range of interest for superconducting radiofrequency materials has been covered. The power measurement error in the interested power range is within 1.2% and 2.7% for the high precision and high power versions, respectively. Temperature distributions on the sample surface for both versions have been simulated and the accuracy of sample temperature measurements have been analyzed. Both versions have the ability to accept bulk superconductors and thin film superconducting samples with a variety of substrate materials such as Al, Al(2)O(3), Cu, MgO, Nb, and Si.

  2. Stabilization of human urine doping control samples: II. microbial degradation of steroids.

    PubMed

    Tsivou, M; Livadara, D; Georgakopoulos, D G; Koupparis, M A; Atta-Politou, J; Georgakopoulos, C G

    2009-05-01

    The transportation of urine samples, collected for doping control analysis, does not always meet ideal conditions of storage and prompt delivery to the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) accredited laboratories. Because sample collection is not conducted under sterile conditions, microbial activity may cause changes to the endogenous steroid profiles of samples. In the current work, funded by WADA, a chemical mixture consisting of antibiotics, antimycotic substances and protease inhibitors was applied in urine aliquots fortified with conjugated and deuterated steroids and inoculated with nine representative microorganisms. Aliquots with and without the chemical mixture were incubated at 37 degrees C for 7 days to simulate the transportation period, whereas another series of aliquots was stored at -20 degrees C as reference. Microbial growth was assessed immediately after inoculation and at the end of the incubation period. Variations in pH and specific gravity values were recorded. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis was performed for the detection of steroids in the free, glucuronide, and sulfate fractions. The addition of the chemical stabilization mixture to urine samples inhibited microorganism growth and prevented steroid degradation at 37 degrees C. On the other hand, four of the nine microorganisms induced alterations in the steroid profile of the unstabilized samples incubated at 37 degrees C.

  3. Calorimeters for Precision Power Dissipation Measurements on Controlled-Temperature Superconducting Radiofrequency Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Binping P.; Kelley, Michael J.; Reece, Charles E.; Phillips, H. L.

    2012-12-01

    Two calorimeters, with stainless steel and Cu as the thermal path material for high precision and high power versions, respectively, have been designed and commissioned for the surface impedance characterization (SIC) system at Jefferson Lab to provide low temperature control and measurement for CW power up to 22 W on a 5 cm dia. disk sample which is thermally isolated from the RF portion of the system. A power compensation method has been developed to measure the RF induced power on the sample. Simulation and experimental results show that with these two calorimeters, the whole thermal range of interest for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) materials has been covered. The power measurement error in the interested power range is within 1.2% and 2.7% for the high precision and high power versions, respectively. Temperature distributions on the sample surface for both versions have been simulated and the accuracy of sample temperature measurements have been analysed. Both versions have the ability to accept bulk superconductors and thin film superconducting samples with a variety of substrate materials such as Al, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cu, MgO, Nb and Si.

  4. Advanced overlay: sampling and modeling for optimized run-to-run control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramany, Lokesh; Chung, WoongJae; Samudrala, Pavan; Gao, Haiyong; Aung, Nyan; Gomez, Juan Manuel; Gutjahr, Karsten; Park, DongSuk; Snow, Patrick; Garcia-Medina, Miguel; Yap, Lipkong; Demirer, Onur Nihat; Pierson, Bill; Robinson, John C.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years overlay (OVL) control schemes have become more complicated in order to meet the ever shrinking margins of advanced technology nodes. As a result, this brings up new challenges to be addressed for effective run-to- run OVL control. This work addresses two of these challenges by new advanced analysis techniques: (1) sampling optimization for run-to-run control and (2) bias-variance tradeoff in modeling. The first challenge in a high order OVL control strategy is to optimize the number of measurements and the locations on the wafer, so that the "sample plan" of measurements provides high quality information about the OVL signature on the wafer with acceptable metrology throughput. We solve this tradeoff between accuracy and throughput by using a smart sampling scheme which utilizes various design-based and data-based metrics to increase model accuracy and reduce model uncertainty while avoiding wafer to wafer and within wafer measurement noise caused by metrology, scanner or process. This sort of sampling scheme, combined with an advanced field by field extrapolated modeling algorithm helps to maximize model stability and minimize on product overlay (OPO). Second, the use of higher order overlay models means more degrees of freedom, which enables increased capability to correct for complicated overlay signatures, but also increases sensitivity to process or metrology induced noise. This is also known as the bias-variance trade-off. A high order model that minimizes the bias between the modeled and raw overlay signature on a single wafer will also have a higher variation from wafer to wafer or lot to lot, that is unless an advanced modeling approach is used. In this paper, we characterize the bias-variance trade off to find the optimal scheme. The sampling and modeling solutions proposed in this study are validated by advanced process control (APC) simulations to estimate run-to-run performance, lot-to-lot and wafer-to- wafer model term monitoring to

  5. Sampled-Data Techniques Applied to a Digital Controller for an Altitude Autopilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Stanley F.; Harper, Eleanor V.

    1959-01-01

    Sampled-data theory, using the Z transformation, is applied to the design of a digital controller for an aircraft-altitude autopilot. Particular attention is focused on the sensitivity of the design to parameter variations and the abruptness of the response, that is, the normal acceleration required to carry out a transient maneuver. Consideration of these two characteristics of the system has shown that the finite settling time design method produces an unacceptable system, primarily because of the high sensitivity of the response to parameter variations, although abruptness can be controlled by increasing the sampling period. Also demonstrated is the importance of having well-damped poles or zeros if cancellation is attempted in the design methods. A different method of smoothing the response and obtaining a design which is not excessively sensitive is proposed, and examples are carried through to demonstrate the validity of the procedure. This method is based on design concepts of continuous systems, and it is shown that if no pole-zero cancellations are allowed in the design, one can obtain a response which is not too abrupt, is relatively insensitive to parameter variations, and is not sensitive to practical limits on control-surface rate. This particular design also has the simplest possible pulse transfer function for the digital controller. Simulation techniques and root loci are used for the verification of the design philosophy.

  6. Laboratory-scale controlled-atmosphere chamber for use with premium coal samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filla, B. James; Callanan, Jane E.

    1985-04-01

    The recent availability of premium coal samples makes it desirable to have the capability for working with these materials, in one's own laboratory, in an atmosphere which can be controlled. A controlled-atmosphere chamber, large enough to allow for processing samples yet small enough to fit easily in an ordinary laboratory, has been designed and fabricated. The overall cost of this controlled-atmosphere chamber was competitive with commercially available systems. The major advantages of this specific system include: convenient size and reversible design for use in a limited work space; incorporation of a full vacuum antechamber that minimizes loss of the working chamber purified atmosphere; and a recirculating system with a bypass valve arrangement allowing separate or combined operation of oxygen and moisture removal systems. The design features were combined to create a unique apparatus capable of both the specific use for which it was intended and general controlled-atmosphere chamber applications. Compatible modular-design work chambers could have been purchased from commercial vendors; however, it still would have been necessary to custom fabricate both the antechamber and recirculation system to meet the requirements of the anticipated experimental work.

  7. Synchronization of Hierarchical Time-Varying Neural Networks Based on Asynchronous and Intermittent Sampled-Data Control.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wenjun; Patel, Ragini; Cao, Jinde; Zheng, Wei Xing

    2016-09-22

    In this brief, our purpose is to apply asynchronous and intermittent sampled-data control methods to achieve the synchronization of hierarchical time-varying neural networks. The asynchronous and intermittent sampled-data controllers are proposed for two reasons: 1) the controllers may not transmit the control information simultaneously and 2) the controllers cannot always exist at any time t. The synchronization is then discussed for a kind of hierarchical time-varying neural networks based on the asynchronous and intermittent sampled-data controllers. Finally, the simulation results are given to illustrate the usefulness of the developed criteria.

  8. Time and frequency domain analysis of sampled data controllers via mixed operation equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1981-01-01

    Specification of the mathematical equations required to define the dynamic response of a linear continuous plant, subject to sampled data control, is complicated by the fact that the digital components of the control system cannot be modeled via linear ordinary differential equations. This complication can be overcome by introducing two new mathematical operations; namely, the operation of zero order hold and digial delay. It is shown that by direct utilization of these operations, a set of linear mixed operation equations can be written and used to define the dynamic response characteristics of the controlled system. It also is shown how these linear mixed operation equations lead, in an automatable manner, directly to a set of finite difference equations which are in a format compatible with follow on time and frequency domain analysis methods.

  9. The use of age-clustered pooled faecal samples for monitoring worm control in horses.

    PubMed

    Eysker, M; Bakker, J; van den Berg, M; van Doorn, D C K; Ploeger, H W

    2008-02-14

    A study was performed on two horse farms to evaluate the use of age-clustered pooled faecal samples for monitoring worm control in horses. In total 109 horses, 57 on farm A and 52 on farm B, were monitored at weekly intervals between 6 and 14 weeks after ivermectin treatment. This was performed through pooled faecal samples of pools of up to 10 horses of the groups 'yearlings' (both farms), '2-year-old' (two pools in farm A), '3-year-old' (farm A) and adult horses (four pools on farm A and five pools on farm B), which were compared with the mean individual faecal egg counts of the same pools. A very high correlation between the faecal egg counts in pooled samples and the mean faecal egg counts was seen and also between the faecal egg counts in pooled samples and larval counts from pooled faecal larval cultures. Faecal egg counts increased more rapidly in yearlings and 2-year-old horses than in older horses. This implied that in these groups of young animals faecal egg counts of more than 200 EPG were reached at or just after the egg reappearance period (ERP) of 8 weeks that is usually indicated for ivermectin. This probably means that, certainly under intensive conditions, repeated treatment at this ERP is warranted in these young animals, with or without monitoring through faecal examination. A different situation is seen in adult animals. Based on the mean faecal egg counts on both farms and on the results of pooled samples in farm A, using 100 EPG as threshold, no justification for treatment was seen throughout the experimental period. However, on farm B values of 100 EPG were seen at 9 and 11, 13 and 14 and 14 weeks after ivermectin treatment in pools 10, 12 and 13, respectively. This coincided with the presence of one or two horses with egg counts above 200 EPG. The conclusion is that random pooled faecal samples of 10 adult horses from a larger herd, starting at the ERP and repeating it at, for instance, 4-week intervals, could be used for decisions on worm

  10. Mendelian Randomization Studies for a Continuous Exposure Under Case-Control Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Dai, James Y.; Zhang, Xinyi Cindy

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we assess the impact of case-control sampling on mendelian randomization analyses with a dichotomous disease outcome and a continuous exposure. The 2-stage instrumental variables (2SIV) method uses the prediction of the exposure given genotypes in the logistic regression for the outcome and provides a valid test and an approximation of the causal effect. Under case-control sampling, however, the first stage of the 2SIV procedure becomes a secondary trait association, which requires proper adjustment for the biased sampling. Through theoretical development and simulations, we compare the naïve estimator, the inverse probability weighted estimator, and the maximum likelihood estimator for the first-stage association and, more importantly, the resulting 2SIV estimates of the causal effect. We also include in our comparison the causal odds ratio estimate derived from structural mean models by double-logistic regression. Our results suggest that the naïve estimator is substantially biased under the alternative, yet it remains unbiased under the null hypothesis of no causal effect; the maximum likelihood estimator yields smaller variance and mean squared error than other estimators; and the structural mean models estimator delivers the smallest bias, though generally incurring a larger variance and sometimes having issues in algorithm stability and convergence. PMID:25713335

  11. Bayesian sample size determination for case-control studies when exposure may be misclassified.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Lawrence; Bélisle, Patrick

    2013-12-01

    Odds ratios are frequently used for estimating the effect of an exposure on the probability of disease in case-control studies. In planning such studies, methods for sample size determination are required to ensure sufficient accuracy in estimating odds ratios once the data are collected. Often, the exposure used in epidemiologic studies is not perfectly ascertained. This can arise from recall bias, the use of a proxy exposure measurement, uncertain work exposure history, and laboratory or other errors. The resulting misclassification can have large impacts on the accuracy and precision of estimators, and specialized estimation techniques have been developed to adjust for these biases. However, much less work has been done to account for the anticipated decrease in the precision of estimators at the design stage. Here, we develop methods for sample size determination for odds ratios in the presence of exposure misclassification by using several interval-based Bayesian criteria. By using a series of prototypical examples, we compare sample size requirements after adjustment for misclassification with those required when this problem is ignored. We illustrate the methods by planning a case-control study of the effect of late introduction of peanut to the diet of children to the subsequent development of peanut allergy.

  12. Air and smear sample calculational tool for Fluor Hanford Radiological control

    SciTech Connect

    BAUMANN, B.L.

    2003-07-11

    A spreadsheet calculation tool was developed to automate the calculations performed for determining the concentration of airborne radioactivity and smear counting as outlined in HNF-13536, Section 5.2.7, ''Analyzing Air and Smear Samples''. This document reports on the design and testing of the calculation tool. Radiological Control Technicians (RCTs) will save time and reduce hand written and calculation errors by using an electronic form for documenting and calculating work place air samples. Current expectations are RCTs will perform an air sample and collect the filter or perform a smear for surface contamination. RCTs will then survey the filter for gross alpha and beta/gamma radioactivity and with the gross counts utilize either hand calculation method or a calculator to determine activity on the filter. The electronic form will allow the RCT with a few key strokes to document the individual's name, payroll, gross counts, instrument identifiers; produce an error free record. This productivity gain is realized by the enhanced ability to perform mathematical calculations electronically (reducing errors) and at the same time, documenting the air sample.

  13. Sampling: the weak link in the sanitary quality control system of agricultural products.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Michel

    2006-05-01

    To ensure a high level of consumer protection, the European Union has in the past years published several regulations setting very low limits for a given number of food contaminants (pesticides, mycotoxins, heavy metals) in many agricultural products (cereals, oilseeds, dry fruits, coffee, spices, etc). These new regulations regarding the sanitary quality of agricultural products, compel both economic operators and officials of different EU member states to set up sampling plans and rigorous analyses aimed at checking whether a product lot complies with the required standards prior to its release on the market. While the laboratory analysis management today is outstanding thanks to the validated and efficient detection methods and procedures available for quality assurance in laboratories (accreditation), this is not necessarily true of the sampling operation, which seems to be the weak link in the sanitary control system for agricultural products. The sampling operation is often the main source of error when assessing the sanitary quality of a lot of agricultural commodities, with both commercial (downgrading of the product) and sanitary (marketing of a product which poses a health risk for the consumer) consequences. Therefore, it is essential for the operators involved to be aware of the significance and difficulties of the sampling operation, which requires important equipment and human resources. Furthermore, drawing up specific standards and guidelines, as well as setting up quality assurance procedures, at the level in charge of carrying out this delicate and important operation, are necessary.

  14. Delay-dependent resilient-robust stabilisation of uncertain networked control systems with variable sampling intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Feisheng; Zhang, Huaguang; Liu, Zhenwei; Li, Ranran

    2014-03-01

    This work is concerned with the robust resilient control problem for uncertain networked control systems (NCSs) with variable sampling intervals, variant-induced delays and possible data dropouts, which is seldom considered in current literature. It is mainly based on the continuous time-varying-delay system approach. Followed by the nominal case, delay-dependent resilient robust stabilising conditions for the closed-loop NCS against controller gain variations are derived by employing a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional which makes good use of the information of both lower and upper bounds on the varying input delay, and the upper bound on the variable sampling interval as well. A feasible solution of the obtained criterion formulated as linear matrix inequalities can be gotten. A tighter bounding technique is presented for acquiring the time derivative of the functional so as to utilise many more useful elements, meanwhile neither slack variable nor correlated augmented item is introduced to reduce overall computational burden. Two examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Multivariate multidistance tests for high-dimensional low sample size case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Marozzi, Marco

    2015-04-30

    A class of multivariate tests for case-control studies with high-dimensional low sample size data and with complex dependence structure, which are common in medical imaging and molecular biology, is proposed. The tests can be applied when the number of variables is much larger than the number of subjects and when the underlying population distributions are heavy-tailed or skewed. As a motivating application, we consider a case-control study where phase-contrast cinematic cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has been used to compare many cardiovascular characteristics of young healthy smokers and young healthy non-smokers. The tests are based on the combination of tests on interpoint distances. It is theoretically proved that the tests are exact, unbiased and consistent. It is shown that the tests are very powerful under normal, heavy-tailed and skewed distributions. The tests can also be applied to case-control studies with high-dimensional low sample size data from other medical imaging techniques (like computed tomography or X-ray radiography), chemometrics and microarray data (proteomics and transcriptomics).

  16. Control and role of pH in peptide-lipid interactions in oriented membrane samples.

    PubMed

    Misiewicz, Julia; Afonin, Sergii; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-03-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms of amphiphilic membrane-active peptides, one needs to study their interactions with lipid bilayers under ambient conditions. However, it is difficult to control the pH of the sample in biophysical experiments that make use of mechanically aligned multilamellar membrane stacks on solid supports. HPLC-purified peptides tend to be acidic and can change the pH in the sample significantly. Here, we have systematically studied the influence of pH on the lipid interactions of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa embedded in oriented DMPC/DMPG bilayers. Using solid-state NMR (31P, 2H, 19F), both the lipid and peptide components were characterized independently, though in the same oriented samples under typical conditions of maximum hydration. The observed changes in lipid polymorphism were supported by DSC on multilamellar liposome suspensions. On this basis, we can present an optimized sample preparation protocol and discuss the challenges of performing solid-state NMR experiments under controlled pH. DMPC/DMPG bilayers show a significant up-field shift and broadening of the main lipid phase transition temperature when lowering the pH from 10.0 to 2.6. Both, strongly acidic and basic pH, cause a significant degree of lipid hydrolysis, which is exacerbated by the presence of PGLa. The characteristic re-alignment of PGLa from a surface-bound to a tilted state is not affected between pH of 7 to 4 in fluid bilayers. On the other hand, in gel-phase bilayers the peptide remains isotropically mobile under acidic conditions, displays various co-existing orientational states at pH7, and adopts an unknown structural state at basic pH.

  17. Controlled antibody release from gelatin for on-chip sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xichen; Wasserberg, Dorothee; Breukers, Christian; Terstappen, Leon W M M; Beck, Markus

    2016-05-10

    A practical way to realize on-chip sample preparation for point-of-care diagnostics is to store the required reagents on a microfluidic device and release them in a controlled manner upon contact with the sample. For the development of such diagnostic devices, a fundamental understanding of the release kinetics of reagents from suitable materials in microfluidic chips is therefore essential. Here, we study the release kinetics of fluorophore-conjugated antibodies from (sub-) μm thick gelatin layers and several ways to control the release time. The observed antibody release is well-described by a diffusion model. Release times ranging from ∼20 s to ∼650 s were determined for layers with thicknesses (in the dry state) between 0.25 μm and 1.5 μm, corresponding to a diffusivity of 0.65 μm(2) s(-1) (in the swollen state) for our standard layer preparation conditions. By modifying the preparation conditions, we can influence the properties of gelatin to realize faster or slower release. Faster drying at increased temperatures leads to shorter release times, whereas slower drying at increased humidity yields slower release. As expected in a diffusive process, the release time increases with the size of the antibody. Moreover, the ionic strength of the release medium has a significant impact on the release kinetics. Applying these findings to cell counting chambers with on-chip sample preparation, we can tune the release to control the antibody distribution after inflow of blood in order to achieve homogeneous cell staining.

  18. Fault Isolation Filter for Networked Control System with Event-Triggered Sampling Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanbin; Sauter, Dominique; Xu, Bugong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the sensor data is transmitted only when the absolute value of difference between the current sensor value and the previously transmitted one is greater than the given threshold value. Based on this send-on-delta scheme which is one of the event-triggered sampling strategies, a modified fault isolation filter for a discrete-time networked control system with multiple faults is then implemented by a particular form of the Kalman filter. The proposed fault isolation filter improves the resource utilization with graceful fault estimation performance degradation. An illustrative example is given to show the efficiency of the proposed method. PMID:22346590

  19. Fault isolation filter for networked control system with event-triggered sampling scheme.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanbin; Sauter, Dominique; Xu, Bugong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the sensor data is transmitted only when the absolute value of difference between the current sensor value and the previously transmitted one is greater than the given threshold value. Based on this send-on-delta scheme which is one of the event-triggered sampling strategies, a modified fault isolation filter for a discrete-time networked control system with multiple faults is then implemented by a particular form of the Kalman filter. The proposed fault isolation filter improves the resource utilization with graceful fault estimation performance degradation. An illustrative example is given to show the efficiency of the proposed method.

  20. Reliable Sampled-Data Control of Fuzzy Markovian Systems with Partly Known Transition Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, R.; Kaviarasan, B.; Kwon, O. M.; Rathika, M.

    2016-08-01

    This article presents a fuzzy dynamic reliable sampled-data control design for nonlinear Markovian jump systems, where the nonlinear plant is represented by a Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model and the transition probability matrix for Markov process is permitted to be partially known. In addition, a generalised as well as more practical consideration of the real-world actuator fault model which consists of both linear and nonlinear fault terms is proposed to the above-addressed system. Then, based on the construction of an appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and the employment of convex combination technique together with free-weighting matrices method, some sufficient conditions that promising the robust stochastic stability of system under consideration and the existence of the proposed controller are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities, which can be easily solved by any of the available standard numerical softwares. Finally, a numerical example is provided to illustrate the validity of the proposed methodology.

  1. Sequence analysis of the canine mitochondrial DNA control region from shed hair samples in criminal investigations.

    PubMed

    Berger, C; Berger, B; Parson, W

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, evidence from domestic dogs has increasingly been analyzed by forensic DNA testing. Especially, canine hairs have proved most suitable and practical due to the high rate of hair transfer occurring between dogs and humans. Starting with the description of a contamination-free sample handling procedure, we give a detailed workflow for sequencing hypervariable segments (HVS) of the mtDNA control region from canine evidence. After the hair material is lysed and the DNA extracted by Phenol/Chloroform, the amplification and sequencing strategy comprises the HVS I and II of the canine control region and is optimized for DNA of medium-to-low quality and quantity. The sequencing procedure is based on the Sanger Big-dye deoxy-terminator method and the separation of the sequencing reaction products is performed on a conventional multicolor fluorescence detection capillary electrophoresis platform. Finally, software-aided base calling and sequence interpretation are addressed exemplarily.

  2. 7 CFR 58.336 - Frequency of sampling for quality control of cream, butter and related products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., butter and related products. 58.336 Section 58.336 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... of sampling for quality control of cream, butter and related products. (a) Microbiological. Samples... from the butter as often as is necessary to aid in the control of lipase activity. (d) Other...

  3. Statistical Power and Optimum Sample Allocation Ratio for Treatment and Control Having Unequal Costs Per Unit of Randomization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaofeng

    2003-01-01

    This article considers optimal sample allocation between the treatment and control condition in multilevel designs when the costs per sampling unit vary due to treatment assignment. Optimal unequal allocation may reduce the cost from that of a balanced design without sacrificing any power. The optimum sample allocation ratio depends only on the…

  4. IPUMS-International Statistical Disclosure Controls: 159 Census Microdata Samples in Dissemination, 100+ in Preparation

    PubMed Central

    McCaa, Robert; Ruggles, Steven; Sobek, Matt

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, a revolution has occurred in access to census microdata for social and behavioral research. More than 325 million person records (55 countries, 159 samples) representing two-thirds of the world’s population are now readily available to bona fide researchers from the IPUMS-International website: www.ipums.org/international hosted by the Minnesota Population Center. Confidentialized extracts are disseminated on a restricted access basis at no cost to bona fide researchers. Over the next five years, from the microdata already entrusted by National Statistical Office-owners, the database will encompass more than 80 percent of the world’s population (85 countries, ~100 additional datasets) with priority given to samples from the 2010 round of censuses. A profile of the most frequently used samples and variables is described from 64,248 requests for microdata extracts. The development of privacy protection standards by National Statistical Offices, international organizations and academic experts is fundamental to eliciting world-wide cooperation and, thus, to the success of the IPUMS initiative. This paper summarizes the legal, administrative and technical underpinnings of the project, including statistical disclosure controls, as well as the conclusions of a lengthy on-site review by the former Australian Statistician, Mr. Dennis Trewin.

  5. Surge Block Method for Controlling Well Clogging and Sampling Sediment during Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei-min; Watson, David B; Luo, Jian; Carley, Jack M; Mehlhorn, Tonia L; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Jardine, Philip; Criddle, Craig

    2013-01-01

    A surge block treatment method (i.e. inserting a solid rod plunger with a flat seal that closely fits the casing interior into a well and stocking it up and down) was performed for the rehabilitation of wells clogged with biomass and for the collection of time series sediment samples during in situ bioremediation tests for U(VI) immobilization at a the U.S. Department of Energy site in Oak Ridge, TN. The clogging caused by biomass growth had been controlled by using routine surge block treatment for18 times over a nearly four year test period. The treatment frequency was dependent of the dosage of electron donor injection and microbial community developed in the subsurface. Hydraulic tests showed that the apparent aquifer transmissivity at a clogged well with an inner diameter (ID) of 10.16 cm was increased by 8 13 times after the rehabilitation, indicating the effectiveness of the rehabilitation. Simultaneously with the rehabilitation, the surge block method was successfully used for collecting time series sediment samples composed of fine particles (clay and silt) from wells with ID 1.9 10.16 cm for the analysis of mineralogical and geochemical composition and microbial community during the same period. Our results demonstrated that the surge block method provided a cost-effective approach for both well rehabilitation and frequent solid sampling at the same location.

  6. Monitoring malaria vector control interventions: effectiveness of five different adult mosquito sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Shirley A; Kitron, Uriel; Mungai, Peter; Muchiri, Eric M; Kokwaro, Elizabeth; King, Charles H; Mutuku, Francis M

    2013-09-01

    Long-term success of ongoing malaria control efforts based on mosquito bed nets (long-lasting insecticidal net) and indoor residual spraying is dependent on continuous monitoring of mosquito vectors, and thus on effective mosquito sampling tools. The objective of our study was to identify the most efficient mosquito sampling tool(s) for routine vector surveillance for malaria and lymphatic filariasis transmission in coastal Kenya. We evaluated relative efficacy of five collection methods--light traps associated with a person sleeping under a net, pyrethrum spray catches, Prokopack aspirator, clay pots, and urine-baited traps--in four villages representing three ecological settings along the south coast of Kenya. Of the five methods, light traps were the most efficient for collecting female Anopheles gambiae s.l. (Giles) (Diptera: Culicidae) and Anopheles funestus (Giles) (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes, whereas the Prokopack aspirator was most efficient in collecting Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) (Diptera: Culicidae) and other culicines. With the low vector densities here, and across much of sub-Saharan Africa, wherever malaria interventions, long-lasting insecticidal nets, and/or indoor residual spraying are in place, the use of a single mosquito collection method will not be sufficient to achieve a representative sample of mosquito population structure. Light traps will remain a relevant tool for host-seeking mosquitoes, especially in the absence of human landing catches. For a fair representation of the indoor mosquito population, light traps will have to be supplemented with aspirator use, which has potential for routine monitoring of indoor resting mosquitoes, and can substitute the more labor-intensive and intrusive pyrethrum spray catches. There are still no sufficiently efficient mosquito collection methods for sampling outdoor mosquitoes, particularly those that are bloodfed.

  7. Monitoring Malaria Vector Control Interventions: Effectiveness of Five Different Adult Mosquito Sampling Methods

    PubMed Central

    Onyango, Shirley A.; Kitron, Uriel; Mungai, Peter; Muchiri, Eric M.; Kokwaro, Elizabeth; King, Charles H.; Mutuku, Francis M.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term success of ongoing malaria control efforts based on mosquito bed nets (long-lasting insecticidal net) and indoor residual spraying is dependent on continuous monitoring of mosquito vectors, and thus on effective mosquito sampling tools. The objective of our study was to identify the most efficient mosquito sampling tool(s) for routine vector surveillance for malaria and lymphatic filariasis transmission in coastal Kenya. We evaluated relative efficacy of five collection methods—light traps associated with a person sleeping under a net, pyrethrum spray catches, Prokopack aspirator, clay pots, and urine-baited traps—in four villages representing three ecological settings along the south coast of Kenya. Of the five methods, light traps were the most efficient for collecting female Anopheles gambiae s.l. (Giles) (Diptera: Culicidae) and Anopheles funestus (Giles) (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes, whereas the Prokopack aspirator was most efficient in collecting Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) (Diptera: Culicidae) and other culicines. With the low vector densities here, and across much of sub-Saharan Africa, wherever malaria interventions, long-lasting insecticidal nets, and/or indoor residual spraying are in place, the use of a single mosquito collection method will not be sufficient to achieve a representative sample of mosquito population structure. Light traps will remain a relevant tool for host-seeking mosquitoes, especially in the absence of human landing catches. For a fair representation of the indoor mosquito population, light traps will have to be supplemented with aspirator use, which has potential for routine monitoring of indoor resting mosquitoes, and can substitute the more labor-intensive and intrusive pyrethrum spray catches. There are still no sufficiently efficient mosquito collection methods for sampling outdoor mosquitoes, particularly those that are bloodfed. PMID:24180120

  8. Epistatic Module Detection for Case-Control Studies: A Bayesian Model with a Gibbs Sampling Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wanwan; Wu, Xuebing; Jiang, Rui; Li, Yanda

    2009-01-01

    The detection of epistatic interactive effects of multiple genetic variants on the susceptibility of human complex diseases is a great challenge in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Although methods have been proposed to identify such interactions, the lack of an explicit definition of epistatic effects, together with computational difficulties, makes the development of new methods indispensable. In this paper, we introduce epistatic modules to describe epistatic interactive effects of multiple loci on diseases. On the basis of this notion, we put forward a Bayesian marker partition model to explain observed case-control data, and we develop a Gibbs sampling strategy to facilitate the detection of epistatic modules. Comparisons of the proposed approach with three existing methods on seven simulated disease models demonstrate the superior performance of our approach. When applied to a genome-wide case-control data set for Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), the proposed approach successfully identifies two known susceptible loci and suggests that a combination of two other loci—one in the gene SGCD and the other in SCAPER—is associated with the disease. Further functional analysis supports the speculation that the interaction of these two genetic variants may be responsible for the susceptibility of AMD. When applied to a genome-wide case-control data set for Parkinson's disease, the proposed method identifies seven suspicious loci that may contribute independently to the disease. PMID:19412524

  9. Development of laboratory control samples for the ICP-ES determination of nutrient elements in rat tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolnik, Karen A.; Rader, Jeanne I.; Gaston, Cynthia M.; Fricke, Fred L.

    Laboratory control samples have been prepared from rabbit bones and duodenum and from bovine kidney and spleen for use in quality control and development of methodology for the inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP-ES) determination of 9 elements in weanling rat tissues. Analysis by ICP-ES following wet acid digestion was used to characterize these control samples with respect to mineral content and homogeneity. Results of the investigation of alternative pretreatment techniques are included.

  10. Quantifying cobalt in doping control urine samples--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Krug, Oliver; Kutscher, Daniel; Piper, Thomas; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Since first reports on the impact of metals such as manganese and cobalt on erythropoiesis were published in the late 1920s, cobaltous chloride became a viable though not widespread means for the treatment of anaemic conditions. Today, its use is de facto eliminated from clinical practice; however, its (mis)use in human as well as animal sport as an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent has been discussed frequently. In order to assess possible analytical options and to provide relevant information on the prevalence of cobalt use/misuse among athletes, urinary cobalt concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) from four groups of subjects. The cohorts consisted of (1) a reference population with specimens of 100 non-elite athletes (not being part of the doping control system), (2) a total of 96 doping control samples from endurance sport athletes, (3) elimination study urine samples collected from six individuals having ingested cobaltous chloride (500 µg/day) through dietary supplements, and (4) samples from people supplementing vitamin B12 (cobalamin) at 500 µg/day, accounting for approximately 22 µg of cobalt. The obtained results demonstrated that urinary cobalt concentrations of the reference population as well as the group of elite athletes were within normal ranges (0.1-2.2 ng/mL). A modest but significant difference between these two groups was observed (Wilcoxon rank sum test, p < 0.01) with the athletes' samples presenting slightly higher urinary cobalt levels. The elimination study urine specimens yielded cobalt concentrations between 40 and 318 ng/mL during the first 6 h post-administration, and levels remained elevated (>22 ng/mL) up to 33 h. Oral supplementation of 500 µg of cobalamin did not result in urinary cobalt concentrations > 2 ng/mL. Based on these pilot study data it is concluded that measuring the urinary concentration of cobalt can provide information indicating the use

  11. Experience Sampling-Based Personalized Feedback and Positive Affect: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Depressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Jessica A.; Wichers, Marieke; Menne-Lothmann, Claudia; Kramer, Ingrid; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Peeters, Frenk; Schruers, Koen R. J.; van Bemmel, Alex L.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Delespaul, Philippe; van Os, Jim; Simons, Claudia J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Positive affect (PA) plays a crucial role in the development, course, and recovery of depression. Recently, we showed that a therapeutic application of the experience sampling method (ESM), consisting of feedback focusing on PA in daily life, was associated with a decrease in depressive symptoms. The present study investigated whether the experience of PA increased during the course of this intervention. Design Multicentre parallel randomized controlled trial. An electronic random sequence generator was used to allocate treatments. Settings University, two local mental health care institutions, one local hospital. Participants 102 pharmacologically treated outpatients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of major depressive disorder, randomized over three treatment arms. Intervention Six weeks of ESM self-monitoring combined with weekly PA-focused feedback sessions (experimental group); six weeks of ESM self-monitoring combined with six weekly sessions without feedback (pseudo-experimental group); or treatment as usual (control group). Main outcome The interaction between treatment allocation and time in predicting positive and negative affect (NA) was investigated in multilevel regression models. Results 102 patients were randomized (mean age 48.0, SD 10.2) of which 81 finished the entire study protocol. All 102 patients were included in the analyses. The experimental group did not show a significant larger increase in momentary PA during or shortly after the intervention compared to the pseudo-experimental or control groups (χ2 (2) =0.33, p=.846). The pseudo-experimental group showed a larger decrease in NA compared to the control group (χ2 (1) =6.29, p=.012). Conclusion PA-focused feedback did not significantly impact daily life PA during or shortly after the intervention. As the previously reported reduction in depressive symptoms associated with the feedback unveiled itself only after weeks, it is conceivable that the effects on daily life PA also evolve

  12. Quantifying indicatively living phytoplankton cells in ballast water samples--recommendations for Port State Control.

    PubMed

    Gollasch, Stephan; David, Matej; Francé, Janja; Mozetič, Patricija

    2015-12-30

    Different phytoplankton analysis methods (pulse-amplitude modulated fluorometry (PAM) and microscopy) were compared in preparation for compliance monitoring and enforcement with ballast water discharge standards. The key objective was to practically evaluate the performance of different new methods and tools to identify indicatively living phytoplankton cells of the size <50 μm in minimum dimension and ≥ 10 μm in minimum dimension as addressed by the Ballast Water Performance Standard (Regulation D-2, International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004). Four different PAM instruments were selected for the tests based upon knowledge and experience gained in different ballast water sample processing studies. The measurements of the PAM instruments were compared with epifluorescence microscope algae cell counts using fluorescein diacetate as viability stain. It was concluded that PAM fluorometry is a suitable method for indicative phytoplankton analysis of ballast water and the most accurate PAM instruments were identified.

  13. Targeting prohibited substances in doping control blood samples by means of chromatographic-mass spectrometric methods.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Thomas, Andreas; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2013-12-01

    Urine samples have been the predominant matrix for doping controls for several decades. However, owing to the complementary information provided by blood (as well as serum or plasma and dried blood spots (DBS)), the benefits of its analysis have resulted in continuously increasing appreciation by anti-doping authorities. On the one hand, blood samples allow for the detection of various different methods of blood doping and the abuse of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) via the Athlete Biological Passport; on the other hand, targeted and non-targeted drug detection by means of chromatographic-mass spectrometric methods represents an important tool to increase doping control frequencies out-of-competition and to determine drug concentrations particularly in in-competition scenarios. Moreover, blood analysis seldom requires in-depth knowledge of drug metabolism, and the intact substance rather than potentially unknown or assumed metabolic products can be targeted. In this review, the recent developments in human sports drug testing concerning mass spectrometry-based techniques for qualitative and quantitative analyses of therapeutics and emerging drug candidates are summarized and reviewed. The analytical methods include both low and high molecular mass compounds (e.g., anabolic agents, stimulants, metabolic modulators, peptide hormones, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)) determined from serum, plasma, and DBS using state-of-the-art instrumentation such as liquid chromatography (LC)-high resolution/high accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS), LC-low resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

  14. Post-Flight Sampling and Loading Characterization of Trace Contaminant Control Subassembly Charcoal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.; Cole, H. E.; Cramblitt, E. L.; El-Lessy, H. N.; Manuel, S.; Tucker, C. D.

    2003-01-01

    Trace chemical contaminants produced by equipment offgassing and human metabolic processes are removed from the atmosphere of the International Space Station s U.S. Segment by a trace contaminant control subassembly (TCCS). The TCCS employs a combination of physical adsorption, thermal catalytic oxidation, and chemical adsorption processes to accomplish its task. A large bed of granular activated charcoal is a primary component of the TCCS. The charcoal contained in this bed, known as the charcoal bed assembly (CBA), is expendable and must be replaced periodically. Pre-flight engineering analyses based upon TCCS performance testing results established a service life estimate of 1 year. After nearly 1 year of cumulative in-flight operations, the first CBA was returned for refurbishment. Charcoal samples were collected and analyzed for loading to determine the best estimate for the CBAs service life. A history of in-flight TCCS operations is presented as well as a discussion of the charcoal sampling procedures and chemical analysis results. A projected service life derived from the observed charcoal loading is provided. Recommendations for better managing TCCS resources are presented.

  15. Nasal swab samples and real-time polymerase chain reaction assays in community-based, longitudinal studies of respiratory viruses: the importance of sample integrity and quality control

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carefully conducted, community-based, longitudinal studies are required to gain further understanding of the nature and timing of respiratory viruses causing infections in the population. However, such studies pose unique challenges for field specimen collection, including as we have observed the appearance of mould in some nasal swab specimens. We therefore investigated the impact of sample collection quality and the presence of visible mould in samples upon respiratory virus detection by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Methods Anterior nasal swab samples were collected from infants participating in an ongoing community-based, longitudinal, dynamic birth cohort study. The samples were first collected from each infant shortly after birth and weekly thereafter. They were then mailed to the laboratory where they were catalogued, stored at -80°C and later screened by PCR for 17 respiratory viruses. The quality of specimen collection was assessed by screening for human deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) using endogenous retrovirus 3 (ERV3). The impact of ERV3 load upon respiratory virus detection and the impact of visible mould observed in a subset of swabs reaching the laboratory upon both ERV3 loads and respiratory virus detection was determined. Results In total, 4933 nasal swabs were received in the laboratory. ERV3 load in nasal swabs was associated with respiratory virus detection. Reduced respiratory virus detection (odds ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.27-0.44) was observed in samples where the ERV3 could not be identified. Mould was associated with increased time of samples reaching the laboratory and reduced ERV3 loads and respiratory virus detection. Conclusion Suboptimal sample collection and high levels of visible mould can impact negatively upon sample quality. Quality control measures, including monitoring human DNA loads using ERV3 as a marker for epithelial cell components in samples should be undertaken to optimize the

  16. Control of the positional relationship between a sample collection instrument and a surface to be analyzed during a sampling procedure with image analysis

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2011-08-09

    A system and method utilizes an image analysis approach for controlling the collection instrument-to-surface distance in a sampling system for use, for example, with mass spectrometric detection. Such an approach involves the capturing of an image of the collection instrument or the shadow thereof cast across the surface and the utilization of line average brightness (LAB) techniques to determine the actual distance between the collection instrument and the surface. The actual distance is subsequently compared to a target distance for re-optimization, as necessary, of the collection instrument-to-surface during an automated surface sampling operation.

  17. Conditional Sampling of Ammonia at Livestock Operations Using Robotically Controlled Diffusive Samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, J. M.; Williams, C.; Stratton, J. J.; Borch, T.

    2011-12-01

    Diffusive/passive samplers can be used to measure the spatial variations in ammonia and other trace gases near livestock operations, but results are often confounded by changing weather conditions during extended deployment periods (e.g., 1 to 2 weeks). A new type of conditional sampler was developed that only exposes the passive samplers when a user-defined set of wind and weather conditions are met. The samplers were housed in air-tight tubes that could be opened and closed with a motorized actuator controlled by datalogger. Samplers were deployed on portable tripods and linked via a wireless network. Multiple tripods, equipped with Radiello diffusive NH3 samplers, were deployed near cattle feedlots and dairies and programmed to only expose the passive samplers when the upwind source area represented a specific zone of the operation. A base-station with an anemometer, wind vane, thermometer, and humidity sensor controlled sampling at all tripods. This new methodology allows improved detection of spatial variation in emissions near livestock operations and provides more accurate measurements of downwind gradients. Data could be used in inverse models to approximate site specific emissions factors for ammonia.

  18. Correlates of weight concern and control in a Hispanic college student sample.

    PubMed

    Blow, Julie A; Taylor, Thom; Cooper, Theodore V; Redfearn, Christopher K

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between weight concern and control and theoretically and empirically relevant correlates in a Hispanic college student sample. Participants were 163 Hispanic college students who completed measures assessing demographics, willingness to put health at risk to lose weight, unhealthy weight loss methods, acculturation, body weight and fitness happiness and importance, and sociocultural attitudes toward appearance. Body mass index was also assessed. Females internalized sociocultural attitudes toward appearance more and found personal attractiveness more important than males, while males were less happy with their personal attractiveness. Internalization of sociocultural attitudes toward appearance and BMI predicted the degree to which individuals were willing to put their health at risk to lose weight. The previous factors, as well as the importance of body weight and fitness and being female, were significant predictors of number of unhealthy weight loss methods employed to lose weight. These data indicate that within a Hispanic college student population, weight concern and control issues are relevant considerations for future studies and the development and assessment of weight loss interventions.

  19. Review of bioaerosols in indoor environment with special reference to sampling, analysis and control mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Bipasha; Lal, Himanshu; Srivastava, Arun

    2015-12-01

    Several tiny organisms of various size ranges present in air are called airborne particles or bioaerosol which mainly includes live or dead fungi and bacteria, their secondary metabolites, viruses, pollens, etc. which have been related to health issues of human beings and other life stocks. Bio-terror attacks in 2001 as well as pandemic outbreak of flue due to influenza A H1N1 virus in 2009 have alarmed us about the importance of bioaerosol research. Hence characterization i.e. identification and quantification of different airborne microorganisms in various indoor environments is necessary to identify the associated risks and to establish exposure threshold. Along with the bioaerosol sampling and their analytical techniques, various literatures revealing the concentration levels of bioaerosol have been mentioned in this review thereby contributing to the knowledge of identification and quantification of bioaerosols and their different constituents in various indoor environments (both occupational and non-occupational sections). Apart from recognition of bioaerosol, developments of their control mechanisms also play an important role. Hence several control methods have also been briefly reviewed. However, several individual levels of efforts such as periodic cleaning operations, maintenance activities and proper ventilation system also serve in their best way to improve indoor air quality.

  20. Microstructure analysis of dental castings used in fixed dental prostheses--a simple method for quality control.

    PubMed

    Mehl, Christian; Lang, Björn; Kappert, Heinrich; Kern, Matthias

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microstructural quality of noble alloy castings from commercial dental laboratories using the wiping-etching method as a simple method for quality control. In total, 240 castings from two noble alloys (AuAgCuPt and AuPtZn) were taken from a day's production of five different dental laboratories. The casting quality was evaluated by determining the grain size and by assessing the number and size of shrinkage cavities after acidic etching of the alloy surfaces. The AuAgCuPt alloy castings showed an acceptable quality in the microstructural analysis. The results of AuPtZn castings, however, were not satisfactory because 50.8% of the samples showed a remarkably poorer quality compared to the specifications made by the manufacturer. The proportion of the employed reclaimed alloy had no influence on the casting quality when AuAgCuPt alloy was used, but was influential when casting restorations with AuPtZn alloy. When determining the quantity and size of shrinkage cavities, none of the evaluated castings was of such a poor quality that a replacement of the castings had to be considered. The differences in grain size and quantity of shrinkage cavities were reflecting the individual laboratory process rather than the admixture of new/reclaimed alloy. The presented analysis can be used as a simple method for quality control of dental castings.

  1. Field assessments of control agents for lesser mealworm (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) using litter sampling.

    PubMed

    Lambkin, Trevor A; Swain, Anthony J; Rice, Steven J; Bartlett, Justin S; Zalucki, Myron P

    2012-06-01

    Spinosad, diatomaceous earth, and cyfluthrin were assessed on two broiler farms at Gleneagle and Gatton in southeastern Queensland, Australia in 2004-2005 and 2007-2009, respectively to determine their effectiveness in controlling lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). Insecticide treatments were applied mostly to earth or 'hard' cement floors of broiler houses before the placement of new bedding. Efficacy of each agent was assessed by regular sampling of litter and counting of immature stages and adult beetles, and comparing insect counts in treatments to counts in untreated houses. Generally, the lowest numbers of lesser mealworm were recorded in the house with hard floors, these numbers equalling the most effective spinosad applications. The most effective treatment was a strategic application of spinosad under feed supply lines on a hard floor. In compacted earth floor houses, mean numbers of lesser mealworms for two under-feed-line spinosad treatments (i.e., 2-m-wide application at 0.18 g of active insecticide (g [AI]) in 100-ml water/m2, and 1-m-wide application at 0.11 g ([AI] in 33-ml water/m2), and an entire floor spinosad treatment (0.07 g [AI] in 86-ml water/m2) were significantly lower (i.e., better control) than those numbers for cyfluthrin, and no treatment (controls). The 1-m-wide under-feed-line treatment was the most cost-effective dose, providing similar control to the other two most effective spinosad treatments, but using less than half the active component per broiler house. No efficacy was demonstrated when spinosad was applied to the surface of bedding in relatively large volumes of water. All applications of diatomaceous earth, applied with and without spinosad, and cyfluthrin at the label rate of 0.02 g (AI)/100-ml water/m2 showed no effect, with insect counts not significantly different to untreated controls. Overall, the results of this field assessment indicate that cyfluthrin (the Australian

  2. Use of field-applied quality control samples to monitor performance of a Goulden large-sample extractor/GC-MS method for pesticides in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foreman, W.T.; Gates, Paul M.; Foster, G.D.; Rinella, F.A.; McKenzie, S.W.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1985, the Goulden large-sample extractor (GLSE) has been used to isolate a broad array of trace-organic contaminants from large volumes of water. In this study, field-applied quality control measures, including matrix and surrogate spikes and blanks, were used to monitor method performance from GLSE extraction through GC-MS analysis. The method was applied to the determination of multiple classes of pesticides isolated from 4- to 112-L filtered surface-water samples. Average recoveries of six surrogate compounds ranged from 84 ?? 18% for [2H10]diazinon to 15 ?? 13% for 4,4'-[2H8]DDT, the low recoveries for which were largely a result of unmonitored breakdown of this surrogate by the GC injection system. Field-matrix-spike samples were prepared by fortifying 10-L, 35-L, and 110-L filtered surface-water samples with 68 pesticides to amended concentrations of 11- to 50-ng/L each. Recoveries ranged from not detected to greater than 100%. Variability in pesticide recoveries from triplicate 10-L water samples collected at one site averaged 5.7% relative standard deviation and did not exceed 19%.Since 1985, the Goulden large-sample extractor (GLSE) has been used to isolate a broad array of trace-organic contaminants from large volumes of water. In this study, field-applied quality control measures, including matrix and surrogate spikes and blanks, were used to monitor method performance from GLSE extraction through GC-MS analysis. The method was applied to the determination of multiple classes of pesticides isolated from 4- to 112-L filtered surface-water samples. Average recoveries of six surrogate compounds ranged from 84 ?? 18% for [2H10]diazinon to 15 ?? 13% for 4,4???-[2H8]DDT, the low recoveries for which were largely a result of unmonitored breakdown of this surrogate by the GC injection system. Field-matrix-spike samples were prepared by fortifying 10-L, 35-L, and 110-L filtered surface-water samples with 68 pesticides to amended concentrations of 11- to 50

  3. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of recombinant human erythropoietin in athletes. Blood sampling and doping control

    PubMed Central

    SOUILLARD, AGNES; AUDRAN, MICHEL; BRESSOLLE, FRANÇOISE; GAREAU, RAYNALD; DUVALLET, ALAIN; CHANAL, JEAN-LOUIS

    1996-01-01

    1The pharmacokinetics of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) were initially determined in two healthy volunteers after a single subcutaneous dose (50 u kg−1). Twenty subjects then received repeated subcutaneous administrations of high dose (200 u kg−1) rHuEpo and 10 subjects received placebo. An immunoradiometric assay was used to measure the concentrations of erythropoietin (Epo) in serum and urine. 2Serum Epo concentration-time profiles were best described by a one-compartment open model with zero-order input. The mean elimination half-life (±s.d.) was 42.0±34.2 h. Clearance, uncorrected for bioavailability, was 0.05±0.01 l h−1 kg& minus;1. Erythropoietin concentrations returned to normal values in serum and urine, 7 and 4 days after the last administration, respectively. 3The recombinant hormone was well tolerated. Significant changes in reticulocytes and red blood cells, haemoglobin concentrations and haematocrit were observed after administration of rHuEpo. In the control group, these parameters remained unchanged. 4The change in reticulocytes was used as an index of the therapeutic effect of rHuEpo. The concentration-effect relationship was best described by an exponential model. 5These data show the limitations of the measurement of Epo concentrations in blood and urine samples, collected in athletes during competition, for antidoping control. Epo doping can be detected only during or within 4 to 7 days of ending, a course of rHuEpo. PMID:8877027

  4. Method validation for control determination of mercury in fresh fish and shrimp samples by solid sampling thermal decomposition/amalgamation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Torres, Daiane Placido; Martins-Teixeira, Maristela Braga; Cadore, Solange; Queiroz, Helena Müller

    2015-01-01

    A method for the determination of total mercury in fresh fish and shrimp samples by solid sampling thermal decomposition/amalgamation atomic absorption spectrometry (TDA AAS) has been validated following international foodstuff protocols in order to fulfill the Brazilian National Residue Control Plan. The experimental parameters have been previously studied and optimized according to specific legislation on validation and inorganic contaminants in foodstuff. Linearity, sensitivity, specificity, detection and quantification limits, precision (repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility), robustness as well as accuracy of the method have been evaluated. Linearity of response was satisfactory for the two range concentrations available on the TDA AAS equipment, between approximately 25.0 and 200.0 μg kg(-1) (square regression) and 250.0 and 2000.0 μg kg(-1) (linear regression) of mercury. The residues for both ranges were homoscedastic and independent, with normal distribution. Correlation coefficients obtained for these ranges were higher than 0.995. Limits of quantification (LOQ) and of detection of the method (LDM), based on signal standard deviation (SD) for a low-in-mercury sample, were 3.0 and 1.0 μg kg(-1), respectively. Repeatability of the method was better than 4%. Within-laboratory reproducibility achieved a relative SD better than 6%. Robustness of the current method was evaluated and pointed sample mass as a significant factor. Accuracy (assessed as the analyte recovery) was calculated on basis of the repeatability, and ranged from 89% to 99%. The obtained results showed the suitability of the present method for direct mercury measurement in fresh fish and shrimp samples and the importance of monitoring the analysis conditions for food control purposes. Additionally, the competence of this method was recognized by accreditation under the standard ISO/IEC 17025.

  5. Exploring dimensionality of effortful control using hot and cool tasks in a sample of preschool children.

    PubMed

    Allan, Nicholas P; Lonigan, Christopher J

    2014-06-01

    Effortful control (EC) is an important developmental construct associated with academic performance, socioemotional growth, and psychopathology. EC, defined as the ability to inhibit or delay a prepotent response typically in favor of a subdominant response, undergoes rapid development during children's preschool years. Research involving EC in preschool children can be aided by ensuring that the measured model of EC matches the latent structure of EC. Extant research indicates that EC may be multidimensional, consisting of hot (affectively salient) and cool (affectively neutral) dimensions. However, there are several untested assumptions regarding the defining features of hot EC. Confirmatory factor analysis was used in a sample of 281 preschool children (Mage=55.92months, SD=4.16; 46.6% male and 53.4% female) to compare a multidimensional model composed of hot and cool EC factors with a unidimensional model. Hot tasks were created by adding affective salience to cool tasks so that hot and cool tasks varied only by this aspect of the tasks. Tasks measuring EC were best described by a single factor and not distinct hot and cool factors, indicating that affective salience alone does not differentiate between hot and cool EC. EC shared gender-invariant associations with academic skills and externalizing behavior problems.

  6. Controlling sources of preanalytical variability in doping samples: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Mattiuzzi, Camilla; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    The use of illicit substances and methods contravenes the ethics of sports and may be associated with side effects. Antidoping testing is an essential tool for preventing or limiting the consequences of cheating in sports. As for conventional laboratory testing, major emphasis has been placed on analytical quality, overlooking the inherent risks that may arise from analysis of unsuitable doping samples. The adherence to scrupulous criteria for collection, handling, transportation and storage of samples, especially blood and urine samples, is essential. The leading preanalytical variables that influence doping sample quality include biological variability, sample collection, venous stasis, spurious hemolysis and presence of other interfering substances, sample manipulation and degradation, and inappropriate conditions for transportation and storage. This article provides a personal overview about the current challenges in preanalytical management of doping samples, as well as potential solutions for preventing the negative impact of preanalytical variables on sample quality and test results.

  7. Analysis of tank 4 (FTF-4-15-22, 23) surface and subsurface supernatant samples in support of enrichment control, corrosion control and evaporator feed qualification programs

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.

    2015-09-09

    This report provides the results of analyses on Savannah River Site Tank 4 surface and subsurface supernatant liquid samples in support of the Enrichment Control Program (ECP), the Corrosion Control Program (CCP) and the Evaporator Feed Qualification (EFQ) Program. The purpose of the ECP sample taken from Tank 4 in August 2015 was to determine if the supernatant liquid would be “acceptable feed” to the 2H and 3H evaporator systems.

  8. On the Application of Different Event-Based Sampling Strategies to the Control of a Simple Industrial Process

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, José; Guarnes, Miguel Ángel; Dormido, Sebastián

    2009-01-01

    This paper is an experimental study of the utilization of different event-based strategies for the automatic control of a simple but very representative industrial process: the level control of a tank. In an event-based control approach it is the triggering of a specific event, and not the time, that instructs the sensor to send the current state of the process to the controller, and the controller to compute a new control action and send it to the actuator. In the document, five control strategies based on different event-based sampling techniques are described, compared, and contrasted with a classical time-based control approach and a hybrid one. The common denominator in the time, the hybrid, and the event-based control approaches is the controller: a proportional-integral algorithm with adaptations depending on the selected control approach. To compare and contrast each one of the hybrid and the pure event-based control algorithms with the time-based counterpart, the two tasks that a control strategy must achieve (set-point following and disturbance rejection) are independently analyzed. The experimental study provides new proof concerning the ability of event-based control strategies to minimize the data exchange among the control agents (sensors, controllers, actuators) when an error-free control of the process is not a hard requirement. PMID:22399975

  9. Quality Control for Ambient Sampling of PCDD/PCDF from Open Combustion Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both long duration (> 6 h) and high temperature (up to 139o C) sampling efforts were conducted using ambient air sampling methods to determine if either high volume throughput or higher than ambient sampling temperatures resulted in loss of target polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/d...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.545 - Validation of proportional flow control for batch sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... outliers: (a) For any pair of flow meters, use recorded sample and total flow rates, where total flow rate means the raw exhaust flow rate for raw exhaust sampling and the dilute exhaust flow rate for CVS... of the estimate, SEE, of the sample flow rate versus the total flow rate. For each test...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.545 - Validation of proportional flow control for batch sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... outliers: (a) For any pair of flow meters, use recorded sample and total flow rates, where total flow rate means the raw exhaust flow rate for raw exhaust sampling and the dilute exhaust flow rate for CVS... of the estimate, SEE, of the sample flow rate versus the total flow rate. For each test...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.545 - Verification of proportional flow control for batch sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... outliers: (a) For any pair of flow rates, use recorded sample and total flow rates, where total flow rate means the raw exhaust flow rate for raw exhaust sampling and the dilute exhaust flow rate for CVS... of the estimate, SEE, of the sample flow rate versus the total flow rate. For each test...

  13. 40 CFR 1065.545 - Validation of proportional flow control for batch sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... outliers: (a) For any pair of flow meters, use recorded sample and total flow rates, where total flow rate means the raw exhaust flow rate for raw exhaust sampling and the dilute exhaust flow rate for CVS... of the estimate, SEE, of the sample flow rate versus the total flow rate. For each test...

  14. Research study on stabilization and control modern sampled-data control theory. Design of the Large Space Telescope system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, B. C.; Singh, G.

    1974-01-01

    The numerical technique is applied to the prediction of self-sustained oscillations in a two-axis model of the nonlinear system with sampled data. The sampled-data two-axis LST system model, and its stability equation are analyzed along with the exact solution of the stability equation by numerical-iterative techniques.

  15. Control of the positional relationship between a sample collection instrument and a surface to be analyzed during a sampling procedure using a laser sensor

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J [Clinton, TN; Kertesz, Vilmos [Knoxville, TN

    2012-02-21

    A system and method utilizes distance-measuring equipment including a laser sensor for controlling the collection instrument-to-surface distance during a sample collection process for use, for example, with mass spectrometric detection. The laser sensor is arranged in a fixed positional relationship with the collection instrument, and a signal is generated by way of the laser sensor which corresponds to the actual distance between the laser sensor and the surface. The actual distance between the laser sensor and the surface is compared to a target distance between the laser sensor and the surface when the collection instrument is arranged at a desired distance from the surface for sample collecting purposes, and adjustments are made, if necessary, so that the actual distance approaches the target distance.

  16. Continuous quality control of the blood sampling procedure using a structured observation scheme

    PubMed Central

    Seemann, Tine Lindberg; Nybo, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An observational study was conducted using a structured observation scheme to assess compliance with the local phlebotomy guideline, to identify necessary focus items, and to investigate whether adherence to the phlebotomy guideline improved. Materials and methods The questionnaire from the EFLM Working Group for the Preanalytical Phase was adapted to local procedures. A pilot study of three months duration was conducted. Based on this, corrective actions were implemented and a follow-up study was conducted. All phlebotomists at the Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Pharmacology were observed. Three blood collections by each phlebotomist were observed at each session conducted at the phlebotomy ward and the hospital wards, respectively. Error frequencies were calculated for the phlebotomy ward and the hospital wards and for the two study phases. Results A total of 126 blood drawings by 39 phlebotomists were observed in the pilot study, while 84 blood drawings by 34 phlebotomists were observed in the follow-up study. In the pilot study, the three major error items were hand hygiene (42% error), mixing of samples (22%), and order of draw (21%). Minor significant differences were found between the two settings. After focus on the major aspects, the follow-up study showed significant improvement for all three items at both settings (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, and P = 0.01, respectively). Conclusion Continuous quality control of the phlebotomy procedure revealed a number of items not conducted in compliance with the local phlebotomy guideline. It supported significant improvements in the adherence to the recommended phlebotomy procedures and facilitated documentation of the phlebotomy quality. PMID:27812302

  17. Validation of boar taint detection by sensory quality control: relationship between sample size and uncertainty of performance indicators.

    PubMed

    Mörlein, Daniel; Christensen, Rune Haubo Bojesen; Gertheiss, Jan

    2015-02-01

    To prevent impaired consumer acceptance due to insensitive sensory quality control, it is of primary importance to periodically validate the performance of the assessors. This communication show cases how the uncertainty of sensitivity and specificity estimates is influenced by the total number of assessed samples and the prevalence of positive (here: boar tainted) samples. Furthermore, a statistically sound approach to determining the sample size that is necessary for performance validation is provided. Results show that a small sample size is associated with large uncertainty, i.e., confidence intervals and thus compromising the point estimates for assessor sensitivity. In turn, to reliably identify sensitive assessors with sufficient test power, a large sample size is needed given a certain level of confidence. Easy-to-use tables for sample size estimations are provided.

  18. Remote robot manipulator coupled with remote-controlled guide vehicle for soil sampling in hazardous waste sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kiho

    The important initial step for remediation of hazardous waste is contaminant analysis since the cleanup operation can not begin until the contaminants in hazardous waste sites have been clearly identified. Ames Laboratory, one of the U.S. Department of Energy sites, has developed a robotic sampling system for automation of real-time contaminant analysis in situ which will provide the advantage of lowering the cost per sample, eliminating personnel exposure to hazardous environments, and allowing quicker results. Successful accomplishment of real-time contaminant analysis will require a remote manipulator to perform the sampling tasks in remote and unstructured surroundings, and a remote-controlled guide vehicle to move a remote manipulator into the desired sampling location. This thesis focuses on the design and construction of a remote-controlled guide vehicle to move the robotic sampling system into the contaminated field to obtain soil samples at the desired locations, the development of an integrated dynamic model of a remote manipulator, the identification of dynamic parameters in the integrated dynamic model, and the design of a mobile robotic sampling system. A four-wheeled vehicle prototype has been constructed and its performance tested manually in the field to verify the design requirements. To remotely control the vehicle, mechanical requirements to activate the brake, throttle, transmission, and steering linkages were determined based on experimental results. A teleoperated control utilizing hundred feet long umbilical cords was first employed to remotely control the vehicle. Next, the vehicle was modified to remotely operate in the field by radio control without the aid of long umbilical cords, satisfying all the design specifications. To reduce modeling error in the robotic system, the integrated dynamic system comprised of a remote manipulator (located on a trailer pulled by the remote-controlled guide vehicle) and its drive system has been modeled

  19. Factors controlling elevated lead concentrations in water samples from aquifer systems in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, B.G.; Berndt, M.P.; Bullen, T.D.; Hansard, P.

    1999-07-01

    This report presents results of detailed statistical analyses of total and dissolved Pb concentrations in water samples collected from the major aquifer systems in Florida for the FGWQMN [Florida Ground Water Quality Monitoring Network] to determine the influence of anthropogenic factors on elevated Pb concentrations. In addition, Pb isotopic data are presented for water samples collected from a subset of 13 wells in the monitoring network, samples of aquifer material, rainfall, and Pb counterweights. The Pb-isotope data provide a better understanding of the relative contributions of anthropogenic and natural sources of Pb in ground water samples from Florida`s major aquifer systems.

  20. News media tracking of tobacco control: a review of sampling methodologies.

    PubMed

    Evans, W Douglas; Ulasevich, Alec

    2005-01-01

    News media tracking can be used to understand the content of news coverage and quantify its influence on public opinion and the social environment. We hypothesize that a parsimonious sampling of public health news coverage can gather statistically equivalent information to capture a census of coverage. We tested two general approaches to sampling. First, we randomly selected articles within a timeframe. Second, we randomly selected dates during 2000. None of these strategies showed a substantial deviation from the 2000 census of articles. We conclude that sampling coverage can produce estimates statistically equivalent to a census. Researchers should utilize coverage sampling.

  1. Design and evaluation of a new Peltier-cooled laser ablation cell with on-sample temperature control.

    PubMed

    Konz, Ioana; Fernández, Beatriz; Fernández, M Luisa; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2014-01-27

    A new custom-built Peltier-cooled laser ablation cell is described. The proposed cryogenic cell combines a small internal volume (20 cm(3)) with a unique and reliable on-sample temperature control. The use of a flexible temperature sensor, directly located on the sample surface, ensures a rigorous sample temperature control throughout the entire analysis time and allows instant response to any possible fluctuation. In this way sample integrity and, therefore, reproducibility can be guaranteed during the ablation. The refrigeration of the proposed cryogenic cell combines an internal refrigeration system, controlled by a sensitive thermocouple, with an external refrigeration system. Cooling of the sample is directly carried out by 8 small (1 cm×1 cm) Peltier elements placed in a circular arrangement in the base of the cell. These Peltier elements are located below a copper plate where the sample is placed. Due to the small size of the cooling electronics and their circular allocation it was possible to maintain a peephole under the sample for illumination allowing a much better visualization of the sample, a factor especially important when working with structurally complex tissue sections. The analytical performance of the cryogenic cell was studied using a glass reference material (SRM NIST 612) at room temperature and at -20°C. The proposed cell design shows a reasonable signal washout (signal decay within less than 10 s to background level), high sensitivity and good signal stability (in the range 6.6-11.7%). Furthermore, high precision (0.4-2.6%) and accuracy (0.3-3.9%) in the isotope ratio measurements were also observed operating the cell both at room temperature and at -20°C. Finally, experimental results obtained for the cell application to qualitative elemental imaging of structurally complex tissue samples (e.g. eye sections from a native frozen porcine eye and fresh flower leaves) demonstrate that working in cryogenic conditions is critical in such

  2. A rapid sample screening method for authenticity control of whiskey using capillary electrophoresis with online preconcentration.

    PubMed

    Heller, Melina; Vitali, Luciano; Oliveira, Marcone Augusto Leal; Costa, Ana Carolina O; Micke, Gustavo Amadeu

    2011-07-13

    The present study aimed to develop a methodology using capillary electrophoresis for the determination of sinapaldehyde, syringaldehyde, coniferaldehyde, and vanillin in whiskey samples. The main objective was to obtain a screening method to differentiate authentic samples from seized samples suspected of being false using the phenolic aldehydes as chemical markers. The optimized background electrolyte was composed of 20 mmol L(-1) sodium tetraborate with 10% MeOH at pH 9.3. The study examined two kinds of sample stacking, using a long-end injection mode: normal sample stacking (NSM) and sample stacking with matrix removal (SWMR). In SWMR, the optimized injection time of the samples was 42 s (SWMR42); at this time, no matrix effects were observed. Values of r were >0.99 for the both methods. The LOD and LOQ were better than 100 and 330 mg mL(-1) for NSM and better than 22 and 73 mg L(-1) for SWMR. The CE-UV reliability in the aldehyde analysis in the real sample was compared statistically with LC-MS/MS methodology, and no significant differences were found, with a 95% confidence interval between the methodologies.

  3. Identification of control parameters for the sulfur gas storability with bag sampling methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Air samples containing sulfur compounds are often collected and stored in sample bags prior to analyses. The storage stability of six gaseous sulfur compounds (H2S, CH3SH, DMS, CS2, DMDS and SO2) was compared between two different bag materials (polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) and polyester aluminum (PEA))...

  4. A separation theorem for the stochastic sampled-data LQG problem. [control of continuous linear plant disturbed by white noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, N.; Caglayan, A. K.

    1976-01-01

    This paper considers the control of a continuous linear plant disturbed by white plant noise when the control is constrained to be a piecewise constant function of time; i.e. a stochastic sampled-data system. The cost function is the integral of quadratic error terms in the state and control, thus penalizing errors at every instant of time while the plant noise disturbs the system continuously. The problem is solved by reducing the constrained continuous problem to an unconstrained discrete one. It is shown that the separation principle for estimation and control still holds for this problem when the plant disturbance and measurement noise are Gaussian.

  5. A thermocouple-based remote temperature controller of an electrically floated sample to study plasma CVD growth of carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Takuya; Xie, Wei; Yanase, Takashi; Nagahama, Taro; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2015-09-01

    Plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is now gathering attention from a novel viewpoint, because it is easy to combine plasma processes and electrochemistry by applying a bias voltage to the sample. In order to explore electrochemistry during the plasma CVD, the temperature of the sample must be controlled precisely. In traditional equipment, the sample temperature is measured by a radiation thermometer. Since emissivity of the sample surface changes in the course of the CVD growth, it is difficult to measure the exact temperature using the radiation thermometer. In this work, we developed new equipment to control the temperature of electrically floated samples by thermocouple with Wi-Fi transmission. The growth of the CNT was investigated using our plasma CVD equipment. We examined the temperature accuracy and stability controlled by the thermocouple with monitoring the radiation thermometer. We noticed that the thermocouple readings were stable, whereas the readings of the radiation thermometer changes significantly (20 °C) during plasma CVD. This result clearly shows that the sample temperature should be measured with direct connection. On the result of CVD experiment, different structures of carbon including CNT were obtained by changing the bias voltages.

  6. Report on the audit of the Savannah River Site`s quality control program for groundwater sampling

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-20

    The Savannah River Site`s groundwater remediation program was managed by the Department of Energy`s (Department) management and operating contractor for the site, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse). One component of the remediation program was the quality control program. The goal of the groundwater quality control program was to ensure that the results of laboratory analyses of groundwater samples were accurate and precise so that they could be relied upon for making remediation decisions. The objective of this audit was to determine whether Westinghouse acquired the minimal number of laboratory analyses required to ensure that groundwater sampling results met this criteria.

  7. Effects of cesium ions and cesium vapor on selected ATS-F samples. [thermal control coating degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, R. F.; Beynon, J. C.; Hall, D. F.; Luedke, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Thermal control coating samples were subjected to cesium ion beam and vapor exposures. Degradation of solar absorptance and infrared emittance were measured. Solar cells and samples selected from surfaces on the ATS-F spacecraft likely to experience ion or vapor impingement were bombarded by 10-volt cesium ions. Other samples were subjected to high levels of cesium vapor. Aluminum and white paint were backsputtered by 550-volt cesium ions onto selected samples. For direct bombardment, the threshold for ion-induced property changes was above five-thousand trillion ions/sq cm. With material sputtered from a 450-sq cm target onto samples 36 cm distant, the threshold for noticeable effects was above 5 times 10 to the 17-th power ions/sq cm.

  8. Injection molding of iPP samples in controlled conditions and resulting morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Sessa, Nino De Santis, Felice Pantani, Roberto

    2015-12-17

    Injection molded parts are driven down in size and weight especially for electronic applications. In this work, an investigation was carried out on the process of injection molding of thin iPP samples and on the morphology of these parts. Melt flow in the mold cavity was analyzed and described with a mathematical model. Influence of mold temperature and injection pressure was analyzed. Samples orientation was studied using optical microscopy.

  9. Validation of Internal Controls for Extraction and Amplification of Nucleic Acids from Enteric Viruses in Water Samples ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Akihiko; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Kitajima, Masaaki; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan; Nol, Chea; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitors that reduce viral nucleic acid extraction efficiency and interfere with cDNA synthesis and/or polymerase activity affect the molecular detection of viruses in aquatic environments. To overcome these significant problems, we developed a methodology for assessing nucleic acid yields and DNA amplification efficiencies for environmental water samples. This involved adding particles of adenovirus type 5 and murine norovirus and newly developed primer-sharing controls, which are amplified with the same primer pairs and result in the same amplicon sizes as the targets, to these samples. We found that nucleic acid loss during the extraction process, rather than reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) inhibition, more significantly attributed to underestimation of the presence of viral genomes in the environmental water samples tested in this study. Our success rate for satisfactorily amplifying viral RNAs and DNAs by RT-PCR was higher than that for obtaining adequate nucleic acid preparations. We found that inhibitory properties were greatest when we used larger sample volumes. A magnetic silica bead-based RNA extraction method effectively removed inhibitors that interfere with viral nucleic acid extraction and RT-PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the inhibitory properties of environmental water samples by using both control virus particles and primer-sharing controls. PMID:21602369

  10. Estimation of calcium, magnesium, cadmium, and lead in biological samples from paralyzed quality control and production steel mill workers.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Talpur, Farah Naz; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Kazi, Naveed; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Shah, Faheem

    2015-06-01

    The determination of trace and toxic metals in the biological samples of human beings is an important clinical screening procedure. The aim of the present study was to compare the level of essential trace and toxic elements cadmium (Cd), calcium (Ca), lead (Pb), and magnesium (Mg) in biological samples (whole blood, urine, and scalp hair) of male paralyzed production (PPW) and quality control workers (PQW) of a steel mill, age ranged (35-55 years). For comparison purposes, healthy age-matched exposed referent subjects (EC), working in steel mill and control subjects (NEC), who were not working in industries and lived far away from the industrial areas, were selected as control subjects. The concentrations of electrolytes and toxic elements in biological samples were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked using certified reference materials. The results of this study showed that the mean values of Cd and Pb were significantly higher in scalp hair, blood, and urine samples of PPW and PQW as compared to NEC and EC (p < 0.001), whereas the concentrations of Ca and Mg were found to be lower in the scalp hair and blood but higher in the urine samples of PPW and PQW. The results show the need for immediate improvements in workplace, ventilation, and industrial hygiene practices.

  11. Effective diffraction gratings via acidic etching of thermally poled glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenskii, A. N.; Reduto, I. V.; Petrikov, V. D.; Lipovskii, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Relief diffraction gratings are formed via acidic chemical etching of a periodically poled soda-lime glass. The thermal poling under 1000 V DC is performed at 325 °C using a thermally stable glassy-carbon anodic electrode with periodic grooves, the depth of the grooves being of ∼650 nm. Poling-induced modification of the glass results in deepening the glass anodic surface in the regions under the ribs of the anodic electrode due to volume relaxation and in increasing chemical durability of these regions in acidic media comparatively to the virgin glass. Chemical etching of the poled glass in NH4F:8H2O solution allows additional to the thermal poling shaping of the glass surface via faster dissolution of unpoled/less poled glass regions. The morphology of the glass surface before and after the etching is characterized with atomic force and scanning electron microscopy. About 30 min etching provides the formation of ∼0.9 μm in height relief diffraction gratings with the diffraction efficiency close to the theoretically achievable ∼30% for multi-order diffraction. In vivo measuring of the diffraction efficiency in the course of the etching allows precise fabrication of the gratings.

  12. Investigating the factorial structure and availability of work time control in a representative sample of the Swedish working population

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Sophie C.; Kecklund, Göran; Tucker, Philip; Leineweber, Constanze

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Past research has often neglected the sub-dimensions of work time control (WTC). Moreover, differences in levels of WTC with respect to work and demographic characteristics have not yet been examined in a representative sample. We investigated these matters in a recent sample of the Swedish working population. Methods: The study was based on the 2014 data collection of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. We assessed the structure of the WTC measure using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Differences in WTC by work and demographic characteristics were examined with independent sample t-tests, one-way ANOVAs and gender-stratified logistic regressions. Results: Best model fit was found for a two-factor structure that distinguished between control over daily hours and control over time off (root mean square error of approximation = 0.06; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.09; Comparative Fit Index (CFI) = 0.99). Women, shift and public-sector workers reported lower control in relation to both factors. Age showed small associations with WTC, while a stronger link was suggested for civil status and family situation. Night, roster and rotating shift work seemed to be the most influential factors on reporting low control over daily hours and time off. Conclusions: Our data confirm the two-dimensional structure underlying WTC, namely the components ‘control over daily hours’ and ‘control over time off’. Women, public-sector and shift workers reported lower levels of control. Future research should examine the public health implications of WTC, in particular whether increased control over daily hours and time off can reduce health problems associated with difficult working-time arrangements. PMID:26620363

  13. Everything under control? The effects of age, gender, and education on trajectories of perceived control in a nationally representative German sample.

    PubMed

    Specht, Jule; Egloff, Boris; Schmukle, Stefan C

    2013-02-01

    Perceived control is an important variable for various demands involved in successful aging. However, perceived control is not set in stone but rather changes throughout the life course. The aim of this study was to identify cross-sectional age differences and longitudinal mean-level changes as well as rank-order changes in perceived control with respect to gender and education. Furthermore, changes in income and health were analyzed to explain trajectories of perceived control. In a large and representative sample of Germans across all of adulthood, 9,484 individuals gave information about their perceived control twice over a period of 6 years. Using locally weighted smoothing (LOESS) curves and latent structural equation modeling, four main findings were revealed: (a) Perceived control increased until ages 30-40, then decreased until about age 60, and increased slightly afterwards. (b) The rank order of individuals in perceived control was relatively unstable, especially in young adulthood, and reached a plateau at about age 40. (c) Men perceived that they had more control than did women, but there were no gender differences in the development of perceived control. (d) Individuals with more education perceived that they had more control than those with less education, and there were slight differences in the development of perceived control dependent on education. Taken together, these findings offer important insights into the development of perceived control across the life span.

  14. Electrokinetic injection of samples into a short electrophoretic capillary controlled by piezoelectric micropumps.

    PubMed

    Opekar, František; Nesměrák, Karel; Tůma, Petr

    2016-02-01

    Electrokinetic sample injection using two piezoelectric micropumps has been proposed for electrophoresis in short capillaries. The sample is brought to the injection end of the capillary using one of them. Then, the high-voltage source is turned on and the sample is injected electrokinetically for a defined time. The injection is terminated by removal of the sample zone by the flowing separation electrolyte pumped by the second piezoelectric micropump. The RSD value, expressing the repeatability of the injection, does not exceed 4%. The injection apparatus does not contain any mobile mechanical components, there is no movement of the capillary and both its ends remain constantly in the solution during both the sample injection and separation. Thus, the micropumps replace the six-way injection valve and linear pump in similar types of injection apparatuses. The injection was tested in the separation and determination of ammonium and potassium ions in two samples of mineral fertilizers. The separation was performed in background electrolyte containing 500 mM of acetic acid + 20 mM Tris + 2 mM 18-crown-6 (pH 3.3) in a capillary with id 50 μm and total length/length to the contactless conductivity detector of 10.5/8 cm. The injection and separation took place at a voltage of 5 kV and the separation time equaled 20 s. The measured values of the analyte contents corresponded to the value declared by the manufacturer within the reliability interval, where RSD equaled between 3.5 and 4.7%.

  15. Relations among Perceived Control over Anxiety-Related Events, Worry, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder in a Sample of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frala, Jamie L.; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W.; Blumenthal, Heidemarie; Barreto, Carolina C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the associations among perceived control over anxiety-related events, worry, and both symptoms and diagnoses of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The sample was comprised of 140 adolescents (60 girls) between the ages of 10 and 17 years (M[subscript age] = 14.6 years; SD = 2.25) recruited from the general community. Findings…

  16. Adolescent Temperament and Parental Control in the Development of the Adolescent Decision Making in a Chilean Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, J. Carola; Cumsille, Patricio

    2012-01-01

    The study analyzes the way in which adolescents' temperamental characteristics interact with parental control to shape adolescent decision making development. A sample of high-school Chilean adolescents (N = 391) answered a self-report questionnaire that included measures of behavioral autonomy (the extent to which adolescents make decisions in…

  17. Doubly-Latent Models of School Contextual Effects: Integrating Multilevel and Structural Equation Approaches to Control Measurement and Sampling Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Herbert W.; Ludtke, Oliver; Robitzsch, Alexander; Trautwein, Ulrich; Asparouhov, Tihomir; Muthen, Bengt; Nagengast, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    This article is a methodological-substantive synergy. Methodologically, we demonstrate latent-variable contextual models that integrate structural equation models (with multiple indicators) and multilevel models. These models simultaneously control for and unconfound measurement error due to sampling of items at the individual (L1) and group (L2)…

  18. Correlation of Arsenic Levels in Smokeless Tobacco Products and Biological Samples of Oral Cancer Patients and Control Consumers.

    PubMed

    Arain, Sadaf S; Kazi, Tasneem G; Afridi, Hassan I; Talpur, Farah N; Kazi, Atif G; Brahman, Kapil D; Naeemullah; Panhwar, Abdul H; Kamboh, Muhammad A

    2015-12-01

    It has been extensively reported that chewing of smokeless tobacco (SLT) can lead to cancers of oral cavity. In present study, the relationship between arsenic (As) exposure via chewing/inhaling different SLT products in oral cancer patients have or/not consumed SLT products was studied. The As in different types of SLT products (gutkha, mainpuri, and snuff) and biological (scalp hair and blood) samples of different types of oral cancer patients and controls were analyzed. Both controls and oral cancer patients have same age group (ranged 30-60 years), socio-economic status, localities, and dietary habits. The concentrations of As in SLT products and biological samples were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometer after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked by certified reference materials. The resulted data of present study indicates that the concentration of As was significantly higher in scalp hair and blood samples of oral cancer patients than those of controls (p<0.001). It was also observed that the values of As were two- to threefolds higher in biological samples of controls subjects, consuming SLT products as compared to those have none of these habits (p>0.01). The intake of As via consuming different SLT may have synergistic effects, in addition to other risk factors associated with oral cancer.

  19. Costs of simultaneous coping with emotional dissonance and self-control demands at work: results from two German samples.

    PubMed

    Diestel, Stefan; Schmidt, Klaus-Helmut

    2011-05-01

    In the present study, we examine interactive effects of emotional dissonance (ED) and self-control demands (SCDs; impulse control, resisting distractions, and overcoming inner resistances) on emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, depressive symptoms, and absenteeism. We derived the prediction of interactive effects from the well-founded theoretical argument that both sources of work stress draw on and compete for a common limited regulatory resource. On the basis of 2 German samples (1 cross-sectional and 1 longitudinal sample; NTOTAL = 367), 7 of the 8 interactions tested were found to explain significant proportions of variance in all 4 outcomes considered over and beyond that accounted for by demographic characteristics, outcome stability (longitudinal sample), and main effects. Consistent with our hypotheses, the positive relations of 1 of both stressors (ED or SCDs) to psychological strain and absenteeism were amplified as a function of the other stressor. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  20. Dynamics of multirate sampled data control systems. [for space shuttle boost vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naylor, J. R.; Hynes, R. J.; Molnar, D. O.

    1974-01-01

    The effect was investigated of the synthesis approach (single or multirate) on the machine requirements for a digital control system for the space shuttle boost vehicle. The study encompassed four major work areas: synthesis approach trades, machine requirements trades, design analysis requirements and multirate adaptive control techniques. The primary results are two multirate autopilot designs for the low Q and maximum Q flight conditions that exhibits equal or better performance than the analog and single rate system designs. Also, a preferred technique for analyzing and synthesizing multirate digital control systems is included.

  1. Unmarried Black Adolescent Fathers and Their Controls: The Washington, D.C. Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendricks, Leo E.

    This document is the final report of a study of Black, unmarried adolescent fathers and matched counterparts designed to identify and describe quantitatively the difficulties they faced and their methods for solving the problems. The data were secured through a nonprobability sample of 38 fathers and 35 non-fathers in Washington, D.C. Data were…

  2. Intertrial Sources of Stimulus Control and Delayed Matching-to-Sample Performance in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Dean C.; Johnston, Mark D.; Saunders, Kathryn J.

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments compared delayed matching-to-sample (DMTS) accuracy under 2 procedures in adults with mental retardation. In the trial-unique procedure, every trial in a session contained different stimuli. Thus, comparison stimuli that were correct on one trial were never incorrect on other trials in that session (or vice versa). In the 2-sample…

  3. Factors controlling elevated lead concentrations in water samples from aquifer systems in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, B.G.; Bullen, M.P.; Bullen, T.D.; Hansard, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of total lead (Pb) and dissolved Pb exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency action level of 15 micrograms per liter (mg/L) in approximately 19 percent and 1.3 percent, respectively, of ground-water samples collected during 1991-96 from a statewide network of monitoring wells designed to delineate background water quality of Florida's major aquifer systems. Differences in total Pb concentrations among aquifer systems reflect the combined influence of anthropogenic sources and chemical conditions in each system. A highly significant (p<0.001) difference in median total Pb concentrations was found for water samples from wells with water-level recording devices that contain Pb-counterweights (14 mg/L) compared to non-recorder wells (2 mg/L). Differences between total Pb concentrations for recorder and non-recorder wells are even more pronounced when compared for each aquifer system. The largest differences for recorder status are found for the surficial aquifer system, where median total Pb concentrations are 44 and 2.4 mg/L for recorder wells and non-recorder wells, respectively. Leaching of Pb from metal casing materials is another potential source of Pb in ground water samples. Median total Pb concentrations in water samples from the surficial, intermediate, and Floridan aquifer systems are higher from recorder wells cased with black iron than for recorder wells with steel and PVC casing material. Stable isotopes of Pb were used in this study to distinguish between anthropogenic and natural sources of Pb in ground water, as Pb retains the isotopic signature of the source from which it is derived. Based on similarities between slopes and intercepts of trend lines for various sample types (plots of 206Pb/204Pb versus 208Pb/204Pb and 207Pb/204Pb versus 208Pb/204Pb) the predominant source of total Pb in water samples from the surficial aquifer system is corrosion of Pb counterweights. It is likely that only ground-water samples, not the aquifer

  4. Sample Federal Facility Land Use Control ROD Checklist and Suggested Language (LUC Checklist)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The LUC Checklist provides direction on describing and documenting land use controls (LUCs) in federal facility actrions under CERCLA in Records of Decision (RODs), remedial designs (RDs), and remedial action work plans (RAWPs).

  5. Experimental Control As A Sampling Problem In Counseling And Therapy Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Merton S.

    1972-01-01

    This study dealt with the nature of experimental control and the types and consequences of its errors or compromises in executing an experimental design for research on counseling or therapy. (Author)

  6. EVALUATION OF COMPUTER-CONTROLLED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY APPLIED TO AN AMBIENT URBAN AEROSOL SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concerns about the environmental and public health effects of particulate matter (PM) have stimulated interest in analytical techniques capable of measuring the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSE...

  7. Analysis of apoB gene polymorphism in control sample and group of patients with coronary heart disease from Moscow

    SciTech Connect

    Slominsky, P.A.; Shadrina, M.I.; Pogoda, T.V.

    1994-09-01

    We have analyzed two polymorphic regions of the apo B gene (5{prime} (CA)n microsatellite and insertion/deletion polymorphisms) in a random control sample and coronary heart disease (CHD) patients from Moscow. For this purpose we have used PCR technique followed by high-resolution PAGE. In the control sample only 3 different allelic variants of the 5{prime} minisatellite existed with 14 (frequency 70,7%), 15 (26,8%) and 16 (2.5%) CA repeats. In the patient`s group, allelic variants were also found with 13 CA repeats, but the frequency was very low (2.5%). However, we did not reveal any significant differences in allele and genotype distributions of insertion/deletion polymorphisms in the control group and the group of CHD patients (insertion frequency 67.9% and 62.5%, respectively).

  8. Pitfalls in reporting sample size calculation in randomized controlled trials published in leading anaesthesia journals: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Abdulatif, M; Mukhtar, A; Obayah, G

    2015-11-01

    We have evaluated the pitfalls in reporting sample size calculation in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the 10 highest impact factor anaesthesia journals.Superiority RCTs published in 2013 were identified and checked for the basic components required for sample size calculation and replication. The difference between the reported and replicated sample size was estimated. The sources used for estimating the expected effect size (Δ) were identified, and the difference between the expected and observed effect sizes (Δ gap) was estimated.We enrolled 194 RCTs. Sample size calculation was reported in 91.7% of studies. Replication of sample size calculation was possible in 80.3% of studies. The original and replicated sample sizes were identical in 67.8% of studies. The difference between the replicated and reported sample sizes exceeded 10% in 28.7% of studies. The expected and observed effect sizes were comparable in RCTs with positive outcomes (P=0.1). Studies with negative outcome tended to overestimate the effect size (Δ gap 42%, 95% confidence interval 32-51%), P<0.001. Post hoc power of negative studies was 20.2% (95% confidence interval 13.4-27.1%). Studies using data derived from pilot studies for sample size calculation were associated with the smallest Δ gaps (P=0.008).Sample size calculation is frequently reported in anaesthesia journals, but the details of basic elements for calculation are not consistently provided. In almost one-third of RCTs, the reported and replicated sample sizes were not identical and the assumptions for the expected effect size and variance were not supported by relevant literature or pilot studies.

  9. Planetary protection and back contamination control for a Mars rover sample return mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D.

    1989-01-01

    A commitment to avoid the harmful contamination of outer space and avoid adverse changes in the environment of the earth has been long reflected in NASA's Planetary Protection policy. Working under guidelines developed by the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR), NASA has implemented the policy in an interactive process that has included the recommendations of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. Measures taken to prevent the contamination of earth during the Apollo missions were perhaps the most visible manifestations of this policy, and provided numerous lessons for future sample return opportunities. This paper presents the current status of planetary protection policy within NASA, and a prospectus on how planetary protection issues might be addressed in relation to a Mars Rover Sample Return mission.

  10. Adaptive pulse width control and sampling for low power pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Gubbi, Sagar Venkatesh; Amrutur, Bharadwaj

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing of physiological parameters could be a cost effective approach to improving health care, and low-power sensors are essential for remote sensing because these sensors are often energy constrained. This paper presents a power optimized photoplethysmographic sensor interface to sense arterial oxygen saturation, a technique to dynamically trade off SNR for power during sensor operation, and a simple algorithm to choose when to acquire samples in photoplethysmography. A prototype of the proposed pulse oximeter built using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components is tested on 10 adults. The dynamic adaptation techniques described reduce power consumption considerably compared to our reference implementation, and our approach is competitive to state-of-the-art implementations. The techniques presented in this paper may be applied to low-power sensor interface designs where acquiring samples is expensive in terms of power as epitomized by pulse oximetry.

  11. Continuous standalone controllable aerosol/cloud droplet dryer for atmospheric sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjogren, S.; Frank, G. P.; Berghof, M. I. A.; Martinsson, B. G.

    2012-08-01

    We describe a general-purpose dryer designed for continuous sampling of atmospheric aerosol, where a specified relative humidity (RH) of the sample flow (lower than the atmospheric humidity) is required. It is often prescribed to measure the properties of dried aerosol, for instance for monitoring networks. The specific purpose of our dryer is to dry highly charged cloud droplets (maximum diameter approximately 25 μm) with minimum losses from the droplet size distribution entering the dryer as well as on the residual dry particle size distribution exiting the dryer. This is achieved by using a straight vertical downwards path from the aerosol inlet mounted above the dryer, and removing humidity to a dry closed loop airflow on the other side of a semi-permeable GORE-TEX membrane (total area 0.134 m2). The water vapour transfer coefficient, k, was measured to 4.6 × 10-7 kg m-2 s-1% RH-1 in the laboratory and is used for design purposes. A net water vapour transfer rate of up to 1.2 × 10-6 kg s-1 was achieved in the field. This corresponds to drying a 5.7 L min-1 (0.35 m3 h-1) aerosol sample flow from 100% RH to 27% RH at 293 K (with a drying air total flow of 8.7 L min-1). The system was used outdoors from 9 May until 20 October 2010, on the mountain Brocken (51.80° N, 10.67° E, 1142 m a.s.l.) in the Harz region in central Germany. Sample air relative humidity of less than 30% was obtained 72% of the time period. The total availability of the measurement system was > 94% during these five months.

  12. Continuous stand-alone controllable aerosol/cloud droplet dryer for atmospheric sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjogren, S.; Frank, G. P.; Berghof, M. I. A.; Martinsson, B. G.

    2013-02-01

    We describe a general-purpose dryer designed for continuous sampling of atmospheric aerosol, where a specified relative humidity (RH) of the sample flow (lower than the atmospheric humidity) is required. It is often prescribed to measure the properties of dried aerosol, for instance for monitoring networks. The specific purpose of our dryer is to dry cloud droplets (maximum diameter approximately 25 μm, highly charged, up to 5 × 102 charges). One criterion is to minimise losses from the droplet size distribution entering the dryer as well as on the residual dry particle size distribution exiting the dryer. This is achieved by using a straight vertical downwards path from the aerosol inlet mounted above the dryer, and removing humidity to a dry, closed loop airflow on the other side of a semi-permeable GORE-TEX membrane (total area 0.134 m2). The water vapour transfer coefficient, k, was measured to be 4.6 × 10-7 kg m-2 s-1% RH-1 in the laboratory (temperature 294 K) and is used for design purposes. A net water vapour transfer rate of up to 1.2 × 10-6 kg s-1 was achieved in the field. This corresponds to drying a 5.7 L min-1 (0.35 m3 h-1) aerosol sample flow from 100% RH to 27% RH at 293 K (with a drying air total flow of 8.7 L min-1). The system was used outdoors from 9 May until 20 October 2010, on the mountain Brocken (51.80° N, 10.67° E, 1142 m a.s.l.) in the Harz region in central Germany. Sample air relative humidity of less than 30% was obtained 72% of the time period. The total availability of the measurement system was >94% during these five months.

  13. Archaeological Test Sampling of Sites within the La Quinta Flood Control Channel Easement,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    cluster associated with five fire- affected rocks forms Locus C. The bones are extremely small al- though many small mammal vertebrae were noted... mammal , fish) were identified whenever possible. Despite the large sample of coprolites found elsewhere (e.g., Myoma Dunes) in the region, none were... vertebrae and a small amount of shell fragments were found. This depth corresponds to the highest surface elevation of Locus A and most likely represents

  14. Random Photon Absorption Model Elucidates How Early Gain Control in Fly Photoreceptors Arises from Quantal Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhuoyi; Zhou, Yu; Juusola, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Many diurnal photoreceptors encode vast real-world light changes effectively, but how this performance originates from photon sampling is unclear. A 4-module biophysically-realistic fly photoreceptor model, in which information capture is limited by the number of its sampling units (microvilli) and their photon-hit recovery time (refractoriness), can accurately simulate real recordings and their information content. However, sublinear summation in quantum bump production (quantum-gain-nonlinearity) may also cause adaptation by reducing the bump/photon gain when multiple photons hit the same microvillus simultaneously. Here, we use a Random Photon Absorption Model (RandPAM), which is the 1st module of the 4-module fly photoreceptor model, to quantify the contribution of quantum-gain-nonlinearity in light adaptation. We show how quantum-gain-nonlinearity already results from photon sampling alone. In the extreme case, when two or more simultaneous photon-hits reduce to a single sublinear value, quantum-gain-nonlinearity is preset before the phototransduction reactions adapt the quantum bump waveform. However, the contribution of quantum-gain-nonlinearity in light adaptation depends upon the likelihood of multi-photon-hits, which is strictly determined by the number of microvilli and light intensity. Specifically, its contribution to light-adaptation is marginal (≤ 1%) in fly photoreceptors with many thousands of microvilli, because the probability of simultaneous multi-photon-hits on any one microvillus is low even during daylight conditions. However, in cells with fewer sampling units, the impact of quantum-gain-nonlinearity increases with brightening light. PMID:27445779

  15. Design, analysis, and interpretation of field quality-control data for water-sampling projects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David K.; Schertz, Terry L.; Martin, Jeffrey D.; Sandstrom, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    The report provides extensive information about statistical methods used to analyze quality-control data in order to estimate potential bias and variability in environmental data. These methods include construction of confidence intervals on various statistical measures, such as the mean, percentiles and percentages, and standard deviation. The methods are used to compare quality-control results with the larger set of environmental data in order to determine whether the effects of bias and variability might interfere with interpretation of these data. Examples from published reports are presented to illustrate how the methods are applied, how bias and variability are reported, and how the interpretation of environmental data can be qualified based on the quality-control analysis.

  16. Pilot studies for the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project - Site selection, sampling protocols, analytical methods, and quality control protocols

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.B.; Woodruff, L.G.; O'Leary, R. M.; Cannon, W.F.; Garrett, R.G.; Kilburn, J.E.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the Geological Survey of Canada sampled and chemically analyzed soils along two transects across Canada and the USA in preparation for a planned soil geochemical survey of North America. This effort was a pilot study to test and refine sampling protocols, analytical methods, quality control protocols, and field logistics for the continental survey. A total of 220 sample sites were selected at approximately 40-km intervals along the two transects. The ideal sampling protocol at each site called for a sample from a depth of 0-5 cm and a composite of each of the O, A, and C horizons. The <2-mm fraction of each sample was analyzed for Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, S, Ti, Ag, As, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Ga, In, La, Li, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sn, Sr, Te, Th, Tl, U, V, W, Y, and Zn by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry following a near-total digestion in a mixture of HCl, HNO3, HClO4, and HF. Separate methods were used for Hg, Se, total C, and carbonate-C on this same size fraction. Only Ag, In, and Te had a large percentage of concentrations below the detection limit. Quality control (QC) of the analyses was monitored at three levels: the laboratory performing the analysis, the USGS QC officer, and the principal investigator for the study. This level of review resulted in an average of one QC sample for every 20 field samples, which proved to be minimally adequate for such a large-scale survey. Additional QC samples should be added to monitor within-batch quality to the extent that no more than 10 samples are analyzed between a QC sample. Only Cr (77%), Y (82%), and Sb (80%) fell outside the acceptable limits of accuracy (% recovery between 85 and 115%) because of likely residence in mineral phases resistant to the acid digestion. A separate sample of 0-5-cm material was collected at each site for determination of organic compounds. A subset

  17. Enclosed chambers for humidity control and sample containment in fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.; Kendall, A.; Tanaka, M.; Weissman, J.S.; Stubbs, G.

    2008-11-03

    A chamber and stretch frame for making fibers for diffraction is described. The chamber is made from a simple plastic cuvette with silicon nitride windows. It is suitable for maintaining constant humidity during fiber drying and data collection, and allows stretching of the fiber and exposure to magnetic fields during sample preparation. If necessary, it provides primary containment for toxic and infectious biological materials. The chamber has been used in fiber diffraction experiments with filamentous plant viruses and a yeast prion protein, and is shown to produce excellent orientation and to maintain hydration and order at the molecular level.

  18. Enclosed Chambers for Humidity Control And Sample Containment in Fiber Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.; Kendall, A.; Tanaka, M.; Weissman, J.S.; Stubbs, G.

    2009-05-26

    A chamber and stretch frame for making fibers for diffraction is described. The chamber is made from a simple plastic cuvette with silicon nitride windows. It is suitable for maintaining constant humidity during fiber drying and data collection, and allows stretching of the fiber and exposure to magnetic fields during sample preparation. If necessary, it provides primary containment for toxic and infectious biological materials. The chamber has been used in fiber diffraction experiments with filamentous plant viruses and a yeast prion protein, and is shown to produce excellent orientation and to maintain hydration and order at the molecular level.

  19. Quality assurance and quality control for thermal/optical analysis of aerosol samples for organic and elemental carbon.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Robles, Jerome; Wang, Xiaoliang; Chen, L-W Antony; Trimble, Dana L; Kohl, Steven D; Tropp, Richard J; Fung, Kochy K

    2011-12-01

    Accurate, precise, and valid organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC, respectively) measurements require more effort than the routine analysis of ambient aerosol and source samples. This paper documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) procedures that should be implemented to ensure consistency of OC and EC measurements. Prior to field sampling, the appropriate filter substrate must be selected and tested for sampling effectiveness. Unexposed filters are pre-fired to remove contaminants and acceptance tested. After sampling, filters must be stored in the laboratory in clean, labeled containers under refrigeration (<4 °C) to minimize loss of semi-volatile OC. QA activities include participation in laboratory accreditation programs, external system audits, and interlaboratory comparisons. For thermal/optical carbon analyses, periodic QC tests include calibration of the flame ionization detector with different types of carbon standards, thermogram inspection, replicate analyses, quantification of trace oxygen concentrations (<100 ppmv) in the helium atmosphere, and calibration of the sample temperature sensor. These established QA/QC procedures are applicable to aerosol sampling and analysis for carbon and other chemical components.

  20. XRF in waste glass analysis and vitrification process control, Part 1: Sample preparation and measurement precision

    SciTech Connect

    Resce, J.L.; Ragsdale, R.G.; Overcamp, T.J.; Jurgensen, A.; Cicero, C.; Bickford, D.F.

    1994-12-31

    The analysis of several waste glasses has been carried out by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry in an attempt to develop a simple, rapid, and consistent procedure for specimen preparation. Glass disk specimens, suitable for XRF analysis, can be prepared by casting the melt directly into a preheated graphite mold followed by annealing for 30 minutes at 500{degrees}C. With this technique specimens could be available for analysis within 45 minutes. Element x-ray intensities, measured from replicate specimens, were found to be highly reproducible, with relative standard deviations typically less than one percent. This XRF analysis is much more rapid and may afford greater accuracy than conventional wet chemical techniques in waste glass analysis. Furthermore, this XRF analysis may be used in vitrification process control by permitting on-site monitoring of glass composition. A product control strategy is discussed.

  1. Direct discrete-time design approach to robust ? sampled-data observer-based output-feedback fuzzy control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Wan; Lee, Ho Jae

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses a direct discrete-time design methodology for a robust ? sampled-data observer-based output-feedback stabilisation problem for a class of non-linear systems suffering from parametric uncertainties and disturbances that is identically modelled as a Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy model at least locally. The primary features in the current development are that (1) we are based on an exact (rather than approximate) discrete-time model in an integral (rather than closed) form while (2) the ? control performance is characterised with respect to an ? (rather than l2) norm. It is shown that the uncertain sampled-data non-linear control system is robustly asymptotically stable if the employed discrete-time model is so. Design conditions are investigated in the discrete-time Lyapunov sense and concretised in the format of linear matrix inequalities.

  2. Formation-containment control of second-order multi-agent systems with only sampled position data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Baojie; Mu, Xiaowu

    2016-11-01

    This paper studies the formation-containment control problem of second-order multi-agent systems with only sampled position data. It is assumed that there exist interactions among leaders and the leaders' neighbours are only leaders. Two different control protocols with only sampled position information are proposed for followers and leaders, respectively. By the algebraic graph theory and matrix theory, sufficient conditions are given to guarantee that the leaders achieve a desired formation and the followers asymptotically converge into the convex hull formed by the corresponding states of the leaders, i.e. the multi-agent systems achieve formation-containment. Moreover, an explicit expression of the formation position function is given for each leader. Finally, a numerical simulation is provided to illustrate the effectiveness of theoretical results.

  3. Detection of African Swine Fever Antibodies in Experimental and Field Samples from the Russian Federation: Implications for Control.

    PubMed

    Mur, L; Igolkin, A; Varentsova, A; Pershin, A; Remyga, S; Shevchenko, I; Zhukov, I; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2016-10-01

    African swine fever (ASF) re-entered in Europe in 2007 by Georgia rapidly affecting neighbouring countries. Since then, ASF has caused severe problems to the Russian Federation (RF) and spread to Northern and Western regions, including Ukraine (2012 and 2014) and Belarus (2013). At the beginning of 2014, dead wild boars were found in Lithuania and Poland. Several outbreaks have been later notified in the European Union(EU), affecting domestic pigs and wild boar of Latvia, Lithuania and Poland, and also wild boar in Estonia, causing major problems for the EU pig sector. Some studies have been performed with this ASFV isolate, revealing that it belongs to genotype II and causes an acute form of the disease. However, few data are available about the presence of antibodies in field and experimental samples from the affected area. This study analysed samples from experimental infections with ASFV isolated from the RF in 2013 (74 sera and 3 tissue exudates), and field samples from the RF from 2013 to 2014 (266 samples, including 32 and 7 tissue exudates from domestic pigs and wild boar, respectively). All samples were tested by a commercial ELISA and, some of them (79), also by immunochromatographic tests. Positive and doubtful samples were confirmed by immunoblotting test. Positive results were found in experimental and field samples, which confirm the presence of antibodies against ASFV in the RF. Antibodies were detected in animals inoculated with three different ASFV isolates, with some differences found among them. Only a small percentage of field samples was positive for ASF antibodies (3.7%), in agreement with other observations that reported a high virulence for the ASFV isolates in the area. These results confirm the potential presence of survivor animals that should be considered in affected areas to help design effective control and eradication plans against ASF.

  4. Analysis of tank 7 surface supernatant sample (FTF-7-15-26) in support of corrosion control program

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N

    2015-10-01

    This report provides the results of analyses on Savannah River Site Tank 7 surface supernatant liquid sample in support of the Corrosion Control Program (CCP). The measured nitrate, nitrite and free-hydroxide concentrations for the Tank 7 surface sample averaged, 3.74E-01 ± 1.88E-03, 4.17E-01 ± 9.01E-03 and 0.602 ± 0.005 M, respectively. The Tank 7 surface cesium-137, sodium and silicon concentrations were, respectively, 3.99E+08, ± 3.25E+06 dpm/mL, 2.78 M and <3.10 mg/L. The measured aluminum concentration in the Tank 7 surface sample averaged 0.11 M.

  5. Fabrication of a good-quality single grain YBCO sample through the control of seed crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.J.; Hong, G.W.; Jee, Y.A.; Han, Y.H.; Han, S.C.; Sung, T.H.

    1999-09-01

    The authors investigated the growth mode of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}y} (Y123) grains and its effect on the levitation forces and trapped magnetic field of top-seeded melt processed YBCO samples. When a slab-like Sm-seed was used, undesirable subsidiary Y123 grains were formed, while the formation of the subsidiary Y123 grains was suppressed and a nearly single Y123 grain grew when a thick and wide seed was used. The formation of the subsidiary Y123 grains decreased the levitation forces and trapped magnetic field, due to the presence of grain boundaries with weak link characteristics.

  6. Control and diagnosis of temperature, density, and uniformity in x-ray heated iron/magnesium samples for opacity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G.; Hansen, S. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Mancini, R. C.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I.

    2014-05-15

    Experimental tests are in progress to evaluate the accuracy of the modeled iron opacity at solar interior conditions, in particular to better constrain the solar abundance problem [S. Basu and H. M. Antia, Phys. Rep. 457, 217 (2008)]. Here, we describe measurements addressing three of the key requirements for reliable opacity experiments: control of sample conditions, independent sample condition diagnostics, and verification of sample condition uniformity. The opacity samples consist of iron/magnesium layers tamped by plastic. By changing the plastic thicknesses, we have controlled the iron plasma conditions to reach (1) T{sub e} = 167 ± 3 eV and n{sub e} = (7.1 ± 1.5)× 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3}, (2) T{sub e} = 170 ± 2 eV and n{sub e} = (2.0 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 22} cm{sup −3}, and (3) T{sub e} = 196 ± 6 eV and n{sub e} = (3.8 ± 0.8) × 10{sup 22} cm{sup −3}, which were measured by magnesium tracer K-shell spectroscopy. The opacity sample non-uniformity was directly measured by a separate experiment where Al is mixed into the side of the sample facing the radiation source and Mg into the other side. The iron condition was confirmed to be uniform within their measurement uncertainties by Al and Mg K-shell spectroscopy. The conditions are suitable for testing opacity calculations needed for modeling the solar interior, other stars, and high energy density plasmas.

  7. Sampled-data-based consensus and containment control of multiple harmonic oscillators: A motion-planning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yongfang; Zhao, Yu; Chen, Guanrong

    2016-11-01

    This paper studies the distributed consensus and containment problems for a group of harmonic oscillators with a directed communication topology. First, for consensus without a leader, a class of distributed consensus protocols is designed by using motion planning and Pontryagin's principle. The proposed protocol only requires relative information measurements at the sampling instants, without requiring information exchange over the sampled interval. By using stability theory and the properties of stochastic matrices, it is proved that the distributed consensus problem can be solved in the motion planning framework. Second, for the case with multiple leaders, a class of distributed containment protocols is developed for followers such that their positions and velocities can ultimately converge to the convex hull formed by those of the leaders. Compared with the existing consensus algorithms, a remarkable advantage of the proposed sampled-data-based protocols is that the sampling periods, communication topologies and control gains are all decoupled and can be separately designed, which relaxes many restrictions in controllers design. Finally, some numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the analytical results.

  8. Sampled-data-based consensus and containment control of multiple harmonic oscillators: A motion-planning approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongfang; Zhao, Yu; Chen, Guanrong

    2016-11-01

    This paper studies the distributed consensus and containment problems for a group of harmonic oscillators with a directed communication topology. First, for consensus without a leader, a class of distributed consensus protocols is designed by using motion planning and Pontryagin's principle. The proposed protocol only requires relative information measurements at the sampling instants, without requiring information exchange over the sampled interval. By using stability theory and the properties of stochastic matrices, it is proved that the distributed consensus problem can be solved in the motion planning framework. Second, for the case with multiple leaders, a class of distributed containment protocols is developed for followers such that their positions and velocities can ultimately converge to the convex hull formed by those of the leaders. Compared with the existing consensus algorithms, a remarkable advantage of the proposed sampled-data-based protocols is that the sampling periods, communication topologies and control gains are all decoupled and can be separately designed, which relaxes many restrictions in controllers design. Finally, some numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the analytical results.

  9. Mutation screening of NOS1AP gene in a large sample of psychiatric patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The gene encoding carboxyl-terminal PDZ ligand of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1AP) is located on chromosome 1q23.3, a candidate region for schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Previous genetic and functional studies explored the role of NOS1AP in these psychiatric conditions, but only a limited number explored the sequence variability of NOS1AP. Methods We analyzed the coding sequence of NOS1AP in a large population (n = 280), including patients with schizophrenia (n = 72), ASD (n = 81) or OCD (n = 34), and in healthy volunteers controlled for the absence of personal or familial history of psychiatric disorders (n = 93). Results Two non-synonymous variations, V37I and D423N were identified in two families, one with two siblings with OCD and the other with two brothers with ASD. These rare variations apparently segregate with the presence of psychiatric conditions. Conclusions Coding variations of NOS1AP are relatively rare in patients and controls. Nevertheless, we report the first non-synonymous variations within the human NOS1AP gene that warrant further genetic and functional investigations to ascertain their roles in the susceptibility to psychiatric disorders. PMID:20602773

  10. Physical activity, glycemic control, and diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a national sample.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Hager, Kathy K; Ramulu, Pradeep Y

    2014-01-01

    To determine if physical activity and/or blood glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) are associated with the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy (PN) in a representative population of diabetics. Three hundred thirty-nine diabetic participants (40-85 yrs) taking part in 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were studied. Participants were defined as having peripheral neuropathy if examination determined ≥1 insensate area in either foot. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was objectively-measured using accelerometry. After adjustments, MVPA was not significantly associated with PN (OR=1.16; 95% CI: 0.48-2.78), nor was HbA1c (OR=0.55; 95% CI: 0.28-1.04). However, there was evidence of statistical interaction (OR=0.24; 95% CI: 0.06-0.87) between MVPA and HbA1c status, showing that diabetics engaging in higher levels of MVPA and having normal HgbA1c levels were less likely to have PN than what would be expected based on the individual effects of MVPA and HbA1c alone. Although MVPA was not directly associated with PN, these findings suggest that proper physical activity, coupled with good glycemic control, is associated with less neuropathy. Future longitudinal studies are required to evaluate whether physical activity and improved glycemic control may help prevent or slow the progression of diabetic end-organ damage, particularly diabetic neuropathy.

  11. Hybrid suboptimal control of multi-rate multi-loop sampled-data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, Leang S.; Chen, Gwangchywan; Tsai, Jason S. H.

    1992-01-01

    A hybrid state-space controller is developed for suboptimal digital control of multirate multiloop multivariable continuous-time systems. First, an LQR is designed for a continuous-time subsystem which has a large bandwidth and is connnected in the inner loop of the overall system. The designed LQR would optimally place the eigenvalues of a closed-loop subsystem in the common region of an open sector bounded by sector angles + or - pi/2k for k = 2 or 3 from the negative real axis and the left-hand side of a vertical line on the negative real axis in the s-plane. Then, the developed continuous-time state-feedback gain is converted into an equivalent fast-rate discrete-time state-feedback gain via a digital redesign technique (Tsai et al. 1989, Shieh et al. 1990) reviewed here. A real state reconstructor is redeveloped utilizing the fast-rate input-output data of the system of interest. The design procedure of multiloop multivariable systems using multirate samplers is shown, and a terminal homing missile system example is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Performance assessment of refractory samples in the Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, D.A.; Borduin, L.C.; Koenig, R.A.; Vavruska, J.S.; Warner, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    A refractory evaluation project was initiated in 1979 to study the performance of six selected refractory materials within the Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI). Determining refractory resistance to thermal shock, chemical attack, and plutonium uptake was of particular interest. The experimental refractories were subjected to a variety of waste materials, including transuranic (TRU) contaminated wastes, highly chlorinated compounds and alkaline metal salts of perchlorate, chlorate, nitrate and oxylate, over the six year period of this study. Results of this study to date indicate that the use of high alumina, and possibly specialty plastic refractories, is advisable for the lining of incinerators used for the thermal destruction of diverse chemical compounds. 12 refs., 4 tabs.

  13. Low cost optical tweezers systems using double coil driving stepping motor to controlling sample stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laowattanatham, N.; Cheamanunkul, N.; Plaipichit, S.; Buranasiri, P.; Nuansri, R.

    2013-06-01

    In this research, the low cost optical tweezers systems using X-Y stage has been developed by using 5-phase stepping motor. By using sequential double coil driving, we can obtain the driving torque larger than using the single coil driving. The moving scale is fine resolution at 0.2 micrometer. The overall systems based on microcontroller PIC18F458 and joystick controller with LabView® graphical user interface (GUI). The mechanical damping has been included in the system for decreasing the vibrational noise. By using this method, our optical tweezers system is cheaper than the other commercial system that has been used the piezoelectric driving, and still has the same efficiency.

  14. Optimizing the Power of Genome-Wide Association Studies by Using Publicly Available Reference Samples to Expand the Control Group

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Joanna J; Zondervan, Krina; Nyberg, Fredrik; Harbron, Chris; Jawaid, Ansar; Cardon, Lon R; Barratt, Bryan J; Morris, Andrew P

    2010-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have proved extremely successful in identifying novel genetic loci contributing effects to complex human diseases. In doing so, they have highlighted the fact that many potential loci of modest effect remain undetected, partly due to the need for samples consisting of many thousands of individuals. Large-scale international initiatives, such as the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium, the Genetic Association Information Network, and the database of genetic and phenotypic information, aim to facilitate discovery of modest-effect genes by making genome-wide data publicly available, allowing information to be combined for the purpose of pooled analysis. In principle, disease or control samples from these studies could be used to increase the power of any GWA study via judicious use as “genetically matched controls” for other traits. Here, we present the biological motivation for the problem and the theoretical potential for expanding the control group with publicly available disease or reference samples. We demonstrate that a naïve application of this strategy can greatly inflate the false-positive error rate in the presence of population structure. As a remedy, we make use of genome-wide data and model selection techniques to identify “axes” of genetic variation which are associated with disease. These axes are then included as covariates in association analysis to correct for population structure, which can result in increases in power over standard analysis of genetic information from the samples in the original GWA study. Genet. Epidemiol. 34: 319–326, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20088020

  15. Stochastic sampled-data control for synchronization of complex dynamical networks with control packet loss and additive time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Rakkiyappan, R; Sakthivel, N; Cao, Jinde

    2015-06-01

    This study examines the exponential synchronization of complex dynamical networks with control packet loss and additive time-varying delays. Additionally, sampled-data controller with time-varying sampling period is considered and is assumed to switch between m different values in a random way with given probability. Then, a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) with triple integral terms is constructed and by using Jensen's inequality and reciprocally convex approach, sufficient conditions under which the dynamical network is exponentially mean-square stable are derived. When applying Jensen's inequality to partition double integral terms in the derivation of linear matrix inequality (LMI) conditions, a new kind of linear combination of positive functions weighted by the inverses of squared convex parameters appears. In order to handle such a combination, an effective method is introduced by extending the lower bound lemma. To design the sampled-data controller, the synchronization error system is represented as a switched system. Based on the derived LMI conditions and average dwell-time method, sufficient conditions for the synchronization of switched error system are derived in terms of LMIs. Finally, numerical example is employed to show the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  16. Relations of Children's Effortful Control and Teacher-Child Relationship Quality to School Attitudes in a Low-Income Sample.

    PubMed

    Silva, Kassondra M; Spinrad, Tracy L; Eisenberg, Nancy; Sulik, Michael J; Valiente, Carlos; Huerta, Snjezana; Edwards, Alison; Eggum, Natalie D; Kupfer, Anne S; Lonigan, Christopher J; Phillips, Beth M; Wilson, Shauna B; Clancy-Menchetti, Jeanine; Landry, Susan H; Swank, Paul R; Assel, Michael A; Taylor, Heather B

    2011-01-01

    RESEARCH FINDINGS: The purpose of this study was to examine the relations of children's effortful control and quality of relationships with teachers to school attitudes longitudinally in an ethnically diverse and economically disadvantaged sample. Data were collected as part of a larger intervention project during mid-fall, winter, and late spring (ns = 823, 722, and 758, respectively) for 2 cohorts of 3- to 5-year-olds (collected during 2 different school years). Children's effortful control was assessed in the fall with parents' and teachers' reports and 2 behavioral measures. Teacher-child relationship quality was assessed mid-year with teachers' reports of closeness and conflict. Attitudes toward school were assessed in late spring using teachers' and students' reports of school avoidance and liking. Effortful control, in general, was positively correlated with teacher-child closeness and school liking and negatively correlated with conflict and school avoidance. Using structural equation modeling and controlling for sex and ethnicity, we found that effortful control was positively related to teacher-child relationship quality, which in turn was positively related to school attitudes. Furthermore, the relation of effortful control to school attitudes was mediated by teacher-child relationship quality. PRACTICE OR POLICY: Results provide evidence for the importance of relational processes that take place within the classroom context and have implications for teachers and clinicians working to increase school success in ethnic minority and low-income children.

  17. Development of a flow controller for long-term sampling of gases and vapors using evacuated canisters.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Alan; Farant, Jean Pierre; Simon, Philippe; Wick, David P

    2002-11-15

    Anthropogenic activities contribute to the release of a wide variety of volatile organic compounds (VOC) into microenvironments. Developing and implementing new air sampling technologies that allow for the characterization of exposures to VOC can be useful for evaluating environmental and health concerns arising from such occurrences. A novel air sampler based on the use of a capillary flow controller connected to evacuated canisters (300 mL, 1 and 6 L) was designed and tested. The capillary tube, used to control the flow of air, is a variation on a sharp-edge orifice flow controller. It essentially controls the velocity of the fluid (air) as a function of the properties of the fluid, tube diameter and length. A model to predict flow rate in this dynamic system was developed. The mathematical model presented here was developed using the Hagen-Poiseuille equation and the ideal gas law to predict flow into the canisters used to sample for long periods of time. The Hagen-Poiseuille equation shows the relationship between flow rate, pressure gradient, capillary resistance, fluid viscosity, capillary length and diameter. The flow rates evaluated were extremely low, ranging from 0.05 to 1 mL min(-1). The model was compared with experimental results and was shown to overestimate the flow rate. Empirical equations were developed to more accurately predict flow for the 300 mL, 1 and 6 L canisters used for sampling periods ranging from several hours to one month. The theoretical and observed flow rates for different capillary geometries were evaluated. Each capillary flow controller geometry that was tested was found to generate very reproducible results, RSD < 2%. Also, the empirical formulas developed to predict flow rate given a specified diameter and capillary length were found to predict flow rate within 6% of the experimental data. The samplers were exposed to a variety of airborne vapors that allowed for comparison of the effectiveness of capillary flow controllers to

  18. Doubly-Latent Models of School Contextual Effects: Integrating Multilevel and Structural Equation Approaches to Control Measurement and Sampling Error.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Herbert W; Lüdtke, Oliver; Robitzsch, Alexander; Trautwein, Ulrich; Asparouhov, Tihomir; Muthén, Bengt; Nagengast, Benjamin

    2009-11-30

    This article is a methodological-substantive synergy. Methodologically, we demonstrate latent-variable contextual models that integrate structural equation models (with multiple indicators) and multilevel models. These models simultaneously control for and unconfound measurement error due to sampling of items at the individual (L1) and group (L2) levels and sampling error due the sampling of persons in the aggregation of L1 characteristics to form L2 constructs. We consider a set of models that are latent or manifest in relation to sampling items (measurement error) and sampling of persons (sampling error) and discuss when different models might be most useful. We demonstrate the flexibility of these 4 core models by extending them to include random slopes, latent (single-level or cross-level) interactions, and latent quadratic effects. Substantively we use these models to test the big-fish-little-pond effect (BFLPE), showing that individual student levels of academic self-concept (L1-ASC) are positively associated with individual level achievement (L1-ACH) and negatively associated with school-average achievement (L2-ACH)-a finding with important policy implications for the way schools are structured. Extending tests of the BFLPE in new directions, we show that the nonlinear effects of the L1-ACH (a latent quadratic effect) and the interaction between gender and L1-ACH (an L1 × L1 latent interaction) are not significant. Although random-slope models show no significant school-to-school variation in relations between L1-ACH and L1-ASC, the negative effects of L2-ACH (the BFLPE) do vary somewhat with individual L1-ACH. We conclude with implications for diverse applications of the set of latent contextual models, including recommendations about their implementation, effect size estimates (and confidence intervals) appropriate to multilevel models, and directions for further research in contextual effect analysis.

  19. Multimodal optical analysis discriminates freshly extracted human sample of gliomas, metastases and meningiomas from their appropriate controls

    PubMed Central

    Zanello, Marc; Poulon, Fanny; Pallud, Johan; Varlet, Pascale; Hamzeh, H.; Abi Lahoud, Georges; Andreiuolo, Felipe; Ibrahim, Ali; Pages, Mélanie; Chretien, Fabrice; Di Rocco, Federico; Dezamis, Edouard; Nataf, François; Turak, Baris; Devaux, Bertrand; Abi Haidar, Darine

    2017-01-01

    Delineating tumor margins as accurately as possible is of primordial importance in surgical oncology: extent of resection is associated with survival but respect of healthy surrounding tissue is necessary for preserved quality of life. The real-time analysis of the endogeneous fluorescence signal of brain tissues is a promising tool for defining margins of brain tumors. The present study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of multimodal optical analysis to discriminate fresh samples of gliomas, metastases and meningiomas from their appropriate controls. Tumor samples were studied on an optical fibered endoscope using spectral and fluorescence lifetime analysis and then on a multimodal set-up for acquiring spectral, one and two-photon fluorescence images, second harmonic generation signals and two-photon fluorescence lifetime datasets. The obtained data allowed us to differentiate healthy samples from tumor samples. These results confirmed the possible clinical relevance of this real-time multimodal optical analysis. This technique can be easily applied to neurosurgical procedures for a better delineation of surgical margins. PMID:28150726

  20. Multimodal optical analysis discriminates freshly extracted human sample of gliomas, metastases and meningiomas from their appropriate controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanello, Marc; Poulon, Fanny; Pallud, Johan; Varlet, Pascale; Hamzeh, H.; Abi Lahoud, Georges; Andreiuolo, Felipe; Ibrahim, Ali; Pages, Mélanie; Chretien, Fabrice; di Rocco, Federico; Dezamis, Edouard; Nataf, François; Turak, Baris; Devaux, Bertrand; Abi Haidar, Darine

    2017-02-01

    Delineating tumor margins as accurately as possible is of primordial importance in surgical oncology: extent of resection is associated with survival but respect of healthy surrounding tissue is necessary for preserved quality of life. The real-time analysis of the endogeneous fluorescence signal of brain tissues is a promising tool for defining margins of brain tumors. The present study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of multimodal optical analysis to discriminate fresh samples of gliomas, metastases and meningiomas from their appropriate controls. Tumor samples were studied on an optical fibered endoscope using spectral and fluorescence lifetime analysis and then on a multimodal set-up for acquiring spectral, one and two-photon fluorescence images, second harmonic generation signals and two-photon fluorescence lifetime datasets. The obtained data allowed us to differentiate healthy samples from tumor samples. These results confirmed the possible clinical relevance of this real-time multimodal optical analysis. This technique can be easily applied to neurosurgical procedures for a better delineation of surgical margins.

  1. Multimodal optical analysis discriminates freshly extracted human sample of gliomas, metastases and meningiomas from their appropriate controls.

    PubMed

    Zanello, Marc; Poulon, Fanny; Pallud, Johan; Varlet, Pascale; Hamzeh, H; Abi Lahoud, Georges; Andreiuolo, Felipe; Ibrahim, Ali; Pages, Mélanie; Chretien, Fabrice; Di Rocco, Federico; Dezamis, Edouard; Nataf, François; Turak, Baris; Devaux, Bertrand; Abi Haidar, Darine

    2017-02-02

    Delineating tumor margins as accurately as possible is of primordial importance in surgical oncology: extent of resection is associated with survival but respect of healthy surrounding tissue is necessary for preserved quality of life. The real-time analysis of the endogeneous fluorescence signal of brain tissues is a promising tool for defining margins of brain tumors. The present study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of multimodal optical analysis to discriminate fresh samples of gliomas, metastases and meningiomas from their appropriate controls. Tumor samples were studied on an optical fibered endoscope using spectral and fluorescence lifetime analysis and then on a multimodal set-up for acquiring spectral, one and two-photon fluorescence images, second harmonic generation signals and two-photon fluorescence lifetime datasets. The obtained data allowed us to differentiate healthy samples from tumor samples. These results confirmed the possible clinical relevance of this real-time multimodal optical analysis. This technique can be easily applied to neurosurgical procedures for a better delineation of surgical margins.

  2. Utility of bag segment and cryovial samples for quality control and confirmatory HLA typing in umbilical cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Solves, P; Planelles, D; Mirabet, V; Blasco, I; Carbonell-Uberos, F; Soler, M A; Roig, R J

    2004-12-01

    Many cord blood (CB) banks have been established worldwide as a response to the increasing number of CB transplantations. In this study, we describe a quality control program in which the utility of an integral bag segment and cryovial containing aliquots of cryopreserved product as haematopoietic content control and HLA typing confirmation for CB units has been evaluated. For this purpose, every month one stored CB unit and its satellite cryovials were thawed and washed. Nucleated cell counts, viability and clonogenic assays were performed from the bag and cryovial before washing. After washing, total nucleated cell, CD34+ counts, viability, and clonogenic assays were performed from the bag. In order to assure the ability of bag segments to confirm hematopoietic potential of CB units, clonogenic assays and viability were performed from attached segments of 10 CB units and the results were compared with those from bags and cryovials. When comparing all variables between thawed bag and cryovial samples, they showed similar results. Mean colony-forming unit (CFU) content of segment samples was 118.8 +/- 93.72 x 10(4) that resulted similar to bags and cryovials haematopoietic content. In conclusion, the quality control system described in this paper demonstrates that CB units are processed preserving the quantity and quality of the progenitor cells. The contiguous segment haematopoietic content is representative of the final product.

  3. Obsessive-Compulsive Symptomatology, Religiosity Levels and the Illusion-of-Control Paradigm in a Non-Clinical Undergraduate Sample.

    PubMed

    Vassiliou, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    The present research employed the illusion-of-control paradigm to investigate the relationships between Obsessive-Compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms, religiosity levels, and illusory sense of control (SC). An opportunistic sample of 60 undergraduate students was presented with a pre-programmed series of neutral visual stimuli (i.e. lines) and was expected to try to control the sequence through the use of keyboard presses. Participants assessed their perceived level of control twice throughout the computerised task. In addition, the study was interested at examining the relationship between religiosity and OC behaviour and the Santa Clara Strength of Religious Faith Questionnaire (SCSRF) was employed. In proportion to predictions, OCD symptoms were correlated with higher illusory SC; furthermore, religiosity levels were related to some degree to OCD symptoms. The essential role of mental control in OCD is discussed, particularly the significant clinical implications of such an association. Furthermore, the possible contribution of religious affiliations to the maintenance of OC behaviour is further discussed.

  4. Robotic Arm Manipulator Using Active Control for Sample Acquisition and Transfer, and Passive Mode for Surface Compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jun; Underhill, Michael L.; Trease, Brian P.; Lindemann, Randel A.

    2010-01-01

    A robotic arm that consists of three joints with four degrees of freedom (DOF) has been developed. It can carry an end-effector to acquire and transfer samples by using active control and comply with surface topology in a passive mode during a brief surface contact. The three joints are arranged in such a way that one joint of two DOFs is located at the shoulder, one joint of one DOF is located at the elbow, and one joint of one DOF is located at the wrist. Operationally, three DOFs are moved in the same plane, and the remaining one on the shoulder is moved perpendicular to the other three for better compliance with ground surface and more flexibility of sample handling. Three out of four joints are backdriveable, making the mechanism less complex and more cost effective

  5. Examples of Optical Assessment of Surface Cleanliness of Genesis Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Melissa C.; Allton, J. H.; Burkett, P. J.; Gonzalez, C. P.

    2013-01-01

    Optical microscope assessment of Genesis solar wind collector surfaces is a coordinated part of the effort to obtain an assessed clean subset of flown wafer material for the scientific community. Microscopic survey is typically done at 50X magnification at selected approximately 1 square millimeter areas on the fragment surface. This survey is performed each time a principle investigator (PI) returns a sample to JSC for documentation as part of the established cleaning plan. The cleaning plan encompasses sample handling and analysis by Genesis science team members, and optical survey is done at each step in the process. Sample surface cleaning is performed at JSC (ultrapure water [1] and UV ozone cleaning [2]) and experimentally by other science team members (acid etch [3], acetate replica peels [4], CO2 snow [5], etc.). The documentation of each cleaning method can potentially be assessed with optical observation utilizing Image Pro Plus software [6]. Differences in particle counts can be studied and discussed within analysis groups. Approximately 25 samples have been identified as part of the cleaning matrix effort to date.

  6. Precise in situ etch depth control of multilayered III−V semiconductor samples with reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) equipment

    PubMed Central

    Kleinschmidt, Ann-Kathrin; Barzen, Lars; Strassner, Johannes; Doering, Christoph; Bock, Wolfgang; Wahl, Michael; Kopnarski, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) equipment is applied to monitor dry-etch processes (here specifically reactive ion etching (RIE)) of monocrystalline multilayered III–V semiconductors in situ. The related accuracy of etch depth control is better than 16 nm. Comparison with results of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) reveals a deviation of only about 4 nm in optimal cases. To illustrate the applicability of the reported method in every day settings for the first time the highly etch depth sensitive lithographic process to form a film lens on the waveguide ridge of a broad area laser (BAL) is presented. This example elucidates the benefits of the method in semiconductor device fabrication and also suggests how to fulfill design requirements for the sample in order to make RAS control possible. PMID:28144528

  7. The ORGANIC experiment on EXPOSE-R on the ISS: Flight sample preparation and ground control spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, K. L.; Peeters, Z.; Salama, F.; Foing, B.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Ricco, A. J.; Jessberger, E.; Bischoff, A.; Breitfellner, M.; Schmidt, W.; Robert, F.

    2011-12-01

    In March of 2009, the ORGANIC experiment integrated into the European multi-user facility EXPOSE-R, containing experiments dedicated to Astrobiology, was mounted through Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) externally on the International Space Station (ISS). The experiment exposed organic samples of astronomical interest for a duration of 97 weeks (˜22 months) to the space environment. The samples that were returned to Earth in spring 2011, received a total UV radiation dose during their exposure including direct solar irradiation of >2500 h, exceeding the limits of laboratory simulations. We report flight sample preparation and pre-flight ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) characterization of the ORGANIC samples, which include 11 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and three fullerenes. The corresponding time-dependent ground control monitoring experiments for ORGANIC measured over ˜19 months are presented and the results anticipated upon return of the samples are discussed. We present the first UV-Vis spectrum of solid circobiphenyl (C 38H 16). Further, we present the first published UV-Vis spectra of diphenanthro[9,10-b',10'-d]thiophene (C 28H 16S), dinaphtho[8,1,2-abc,2',1',8'-klm]coronene (C 36H 16), tetrabenzo[de,no,st,c'd']heptacene (C 42H 22), and dibenzo[jk,a'b']octacene (C 40H 22) in solid phase and in solution. The results of the ORGANIC experiment are expected to enhance our knowledge of the evolution and degradation of large carbon-containing molecules in space environments.

  8. SAMPLING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Hannaford, B.A.; Rosenberg, R.; Segaser, C.L.; Terry, C.L.

    1961-01-17

    An apparatus is given for the batch sampling of radioactive liquids such as slurries from a system by remote control, while providing shielding for protection of operating personnel from the harmful effects of radiation.

  9. Sampled-data synchronisation of coupled harmonic oscillators with communication and input delays subject to controller failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liyun; Zhou, Jin; Wu, Quanjun

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the sampled-data synchronisation problems of coupled harmonic oscillators with communication and input delays subject to controller failure. A synchronisation protocol is proposed for such oscillator systems over directed network topology, and then some general algebraic criteria on exponential convergence for the proposed protocol are established. The main features of the present investigation include: (1) both the communication and input delays are simultaneously addressed, and the directed network topology is firstly considered and (2) the effects of time delays on synchronisation performance are theoretically and numerically investigated. It is shown that in the absence of communication delays, coupled harmonic oscillators can achieve synchronisation oscillatory motion. Whereas if communication delays are nonzero at infinite multiple sampled-data instants, its synchronisation (or consensus) state is zero. This conclusion can be used as an effective control strategy to stabilise coupled harmonic oscillators in practical applications. Furthermore, it is interesting to find that increasing either communication or input delays will enhance the synchronisation performance of coupled harmonic oscillators. Subsequently, numerical examples illustrate and visualise theoretical results.

  10. Rapid sample screening method for authenticity controlling vanilla flavors using a CE microchip approach with electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Avila, Mónica; González, María Cristina; Zougagh, Mohammed; Escarpa, Alberto; Ríos, Angel

    2007-11-01

    Five vanilla-related flavors of food significance, vanillic alcohol (VOH), ethyl maltol (EMA), maltol (MAL), ethyl vanillin (EVA) and vanillin (VAN), were separated using CE microchips with electrochemical detection (CE-ED microchips). A +2 kV driving voltage for both injection and separation operation steps, using a borate buffer (pH 9.5, 20 mM) and 1 M nitric acid in the detection reservoir allowed the selective and sensitive detection of the target analytes in less than 200 s with reproducible control of EOF (RSD(migration times)<3%). The analysis in selected real vanilla samples was focusing on VAN and EVA because VAN is a basic fragrance compound of the vanilla aroma, whereas EVA is an unequivocal proof of adulteration of vanilla flavors. Fast detection of all relevant flavors (200 s) with an acceptable resolution (R(s) >1.5) and a high accuracy (recoveries higher than 90%) were obtained with independence of the matrices and samples examined. These results showed the reliability of the method and the potential use of CE microchips in the food control field for fraudulent purposes.

  11. An Efficient Silent Data Corruption Detection Method with Error-Feedback Control and Even Sampling for HPC Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Di, Sheng; Berrocal, Eduardo; Cappello, Franck

    2015-01-01

    The silent data corruption (SDC) problem is attracting more and more attentions because it is expected to have a great impact on exascale HPC applications. SDC faults are hazardous in that they pass unnoticed by hardware and can lead to wrong computation results. In this work, we formulate SDC detection as a runtime one-step-ahead prediction method, leveraging multiple linear prediction methods in order to improve the detection results. The contributions are twofold: (1) we propose an error feedback control model that can reduce the prediction errors for different linear prediction methods, and (2) we propose a spatial-data-based even-sampling method to minimize the detection overheads (including memory and computation cost). We implement our algorithms in the fault tolerance interface, a fault tolerance library with multiple checkpoint levels, such that users can conveniently protect their HPC applications against both SDC errors and fail-stop errors. We evaluate our approach by using large-scale traces from well-known, large-scale HPC applications, as well as by running those HPC applications on a real cluster environment. Experiments show that our error feedback control model can improve detection sensitivity by 34-189% for bit-flip memory errors injected with the bit positions in the range [20,30], without any degradation on detection accuracy. Furthermore, memory size can be reduced by 33% with our spatial-data even-sampling method, with only a slight and graceful degradation in the detection sensitivity.

  12. Assessing genetic diversity of wild and hatchery samples of the Chinese sucker (Myxocyprinus asiaticus) by the mitochondrial DNA control region.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiayun; Wu, Bo; Hou, Feixia; Chen, Yongbai; Li, Chong; Song, Zhaobin

    2016-01-01

    To restore the natural populations of Chinese sucker (Myxocyprinus asiaticus), a hatchery release program has been underway for nearly 10 years. Using DNA sequences of the mitochondrial control region, we assessed the genetic diversity and genetic structure among samples collected from three sites of the wild population as well as from three hatcheries. The haplotype diversity of the wild samples (h = 0.899-0.975) was significantly higher than that of the hatchery ones (h = 0.296-0.666), but the nucleotide diversity was almost identical between them (π = 0.0170-0.0280). Relatively high gene flow was detected between the hatchery and wild samples. Analysis of effective population size indicated that M. asiaticus living in the Yangtze River has been expanding following a bottleneck in the recent past. Our results suggest the hatchery release programs for M. asiaticus have not reduced the genetic diversity, but have influenced the genetic structure of the species in the upper Yangtze River.

  13. Amelogenin-based sex identification as a strategy to control the identity of DNA samples in genetic association studies.

    PubMed

    Tzvetkov, Mladen Vassilev; Meineke, Ingolf; Sehrt, Daniel; Vormfelde, Stefan Viktor; Brockmöller, Jürgen

    2010-03-01

    Misassignment between DNA samples and clinical or epidemiological data may compromise the results of genetic association studies. Genotyping in replicates or controlling for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium cannot identify misassignments caused by sample mix-ups. DNA-based sex identification (sex typing) is currently the best strategy to identify mix-ups. Here we review the available methods and present validated protocols for sex typing. The protocols are based on single-nucleotide differences between the human amelogenin genes, AMELX and AMELY, and are optimized for real-time PCR (TaqMan), primer-extension (SNaPshot) and PCR-RFLP genotyping platforms. In addition, we review the limitations of the sex-typing strategy, including a limited ability to identify single sample mix-ups, the dependence of the power of this approach on the sex distribution in the study population, and rare genetic conditions. Alternative strategies for mix-up identification and possible consequences of mix-up identification are also discussed.

  14. Evaluation of toxic elements in scalp hair samples of myocardial infarction patients at different stages as related to controls.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Kazi, Naveed; Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Shah, Abdul Qadir; Jamali, Mohammad Khan; Arain, Mohammad Balal

    2010-04-01

    In the present study, the association of arsenic, cadmium, lead, and nickel between scalp hair samples and mortality from myocardial infarction (MI) patients at first, second, and third heart attack was studied. The biological samples of 130 MI patients (77 male and 53 female) age ranged (45-60 years), were collected and 61 healthy persons of same age group (33 male and 28 female) was selected as control subjects. The toxic elements (TEs) in biological samples were assessed by the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry prior to microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity of methodology was checked by the certified human hair reference material (BCR 397). It was observed during the study that 78% of 32 patients of the third MI, age >50 years were expired. In these subjects, the level of As, Cd, Ni, and Pb were increased by 10.6%, 19.5%, 15.7%, and 9.8% in the scalp hair as compared to those who tolerated third MI attack (p = 0.12). The high level of toxic metals may play a role in the development of heart disease in the subjects of this study.

  15. A multi-scale study of Orthoptera species richness and human population size controlling for sampling effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantarello, Elena; Steck, Claude E.; Fontana, Paolo; Fontaneto, Diego; Marini, Lorenzo; Pautasso, Marco

    2010-03-01

    Recent large-scale studies have shown that biodiversity-rich regions also tend to be densely populated areas. The most obvious explanation is that biodiversity and human beings tend to match the distribution of energy availability, environmental stability and/or habitat heterogeneity. However, the species-people correlation can also be an artefact, as more populated regions could show more species because of a more thorough sampling. Few studies have tested this sampling bias hypothesis. Using a newly collated dataset, we studied whether Orthoptera species richness is related to human population size in Italy’s regions (average area 15,000 km2) and provinces (2,900 km2). As expected, the observed number of species increases significantly with increasing human population size for both grain sizes, although the proportion of variance explained is minimal at the provincial level. However, variations in observed Orthoptera species richness are primarily associated with the available number of records, which is in turn well correlated with human population size (at least at the regional level). Estimated Orthoptera species richness (Chao2 and Jackknife) also increases with human population size both for regions and provinces. Both for regions and provinces, this increase is not significant when controlling for variation in area and number of records. Our study confirms the hypothesis that broad-scale human population-biodiversity correlations can in some cases be artefactual. More systematic sampling of less studied taxa such as invertebrates is necessary to ascertain whether biogeographical patterns persist when sampling effort is kept constant or included in models.

  16. Genes involved in pruning and inflammation are enriched in a large mega-sample of patients affected by Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder and controls.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Marco; Marco, Calabrò; Drago, Antonio; Antonio, Drago; Sidoti, Antonina; Antonina, Sidoti; Serretti, Alessandro; Alessandro, Serretti; Crisafulli, Concetta; Concetta, Crisafulli

    2015-08-30

    A molecular pathway analysis has been performed in order to complement previous genetic investigations on Schizophrenia. 4486 Schizophrenic patients and 4477 controls served as the investigation sample. 3521 Bipolar patients and 3195 controls served as replication sample. A molecular pathway associated with the neuronal pruning activity was found to be enriched in subjects with Schizophrenia compared to controls. HLA-C and HLA-DRA had more SNPs associated with both Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder than expected by chance.

  17. Replication of association between schizophrenia and ZNF804A in the Irish Case Control Study of Schizophrenia (ICCSS) sample

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Brien; Thiselton, Dawn; Maher, Brion S.; Bigdeli, Tim; Wormley, Brandon; McMichael, G. Omari; Fanous, Ayman H.; Vladimirov, Vladimir; O’Neill, F. Anthony; Walsh, Dermot; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01

    A recent genomewide association study reported association between schizophrenia and the ZNF804A gene on chromosome 2q32.1. We attempted to replicate these findings in our Irish Case-Control Study of Schizophrenia (ICCSS) sample (N=1021 cases, 626 controls). Following consultation with the original investigators we genotyped 3 of the most promising SNPs from the Cardiff study. We replicate association with rs1344706 (trend test one tailed p=0.0113 with the previously associated A allele) in ZNF804A. We detect no evidence of association with rs6490121 in NOS1 (one tailed p=0.21), and only a trend with rs9922369 in RGRIP1L (one tailed p=0.0515). Based on these results, we completed genotyping of 11 additional LD-tagging SNPs in ZNF804A. Of 12 SNPs genotyped, 11 pass QC criteria and 4 are nominally associated, with our most significant evidence of association at rs7597593 (p=0.0013) followed by rs1344706. We observe no evidence of differential association in ZNF804A based on family history or sex of case. The associated SNP rs1344706 lies in ~30 bp of conserved mammalian sequence and the associated A allele is predicted to maintain binding sites for the brain-expressed transcription factors MYT1L and POU3F1/OCT-6. In controls, expression is significantly increased from the A allele of rs1344706 compared to the C allele. Expression is increased in schizophrenic cases compared to controls, but this difference does not achieve statistical significance. This study replicates the original reported association of ZNF804A with schizophrenia and suggests that there is a consistent link between the the A allele of rs1344706, increased expression of ZNF804A and risk for schizophrenia. PMID:19844207

  18. A Feedfordward Adaptive Controller to Reduce the Imaging Time of Large-Sized Biological Samples with a SPM-Based Multiprobe Station

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Jorge; Guerrero, Hector; Gonzalez, Laura; Puig-Vidal, Manel

    2012-01-01

    The time required to image large samples is an important limiting factor in SPM-based systems. In multiprobe setups, especially when working with biological samples, this drawback can make impossible to conduct certain experiments. In this work, we present a feedfordward controller based on bang-bang and adaptive controls. The controls are based in the difference between the maximum speeds that can be used for imaging depending on the flatness of the sample zone. Topographic images of Escherichia coli bacteria samples were acquired using the implemented controllers. Results show that to go faster in the flat zones, rather than using a constant scanning speed for the whole image, speeds up the imaging process of large samples by up to a 4× factor. PMID:22368491

  19. Analysis of Tank 38H (HTF-38-14-150, 151) and Tank 43H (HTF- 43-14-152, 53) Surface and Subsurface Supernatant Samples in Support of Enrichment Control, Corrosion Control and Sodium Aluminosilicate Formation Potential Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.

    2015-01-14

    This report provides the results of analyses on Tanks 38H and 43H surface and subsurface supernatant liquid samples in support of the Enrichment Control Program (ECP), the Corrosion Control Program and Sodium Aluminosilicate Formation Potential in the Evaporator.

  20. Application of video-cameras for quality control and sampling optimisation of hydrological and erosion measurements in a catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora-Millán, Julio S.; Taguas, Encarnacion V.; Gomez, Jose A.; Perez, Rafael

    2014-05-01

    Long term soil erosion studies imply substantial efforts, particularly when there is the need to maintain continuous measurements. There are high costs associated to maintenance of field equipment keeping and quality control of data collection. Energy supply and/or electronic failures, vandalism and burglary are common causes of gaps in datasets, reducing their reach in many cases. In this work, a system of three video-cameras, a recorder and a transmission modem (3G technology) has been set up in a gauging station where rainfall, runoff flow and sediment concentration are monitored. The gauging station is located in the outlet of an olive orchard catchment of 6.4 ha. Rainfall is measured with one automatic raingauge that records intensity at one minute intervals. The discharge is measured by a flume of critical flow depth, where the water is recorded by an ultrasonic sensor. When the water level rises to a predetermined level, the automatic sampler turns on and fills a bottle at different intervals according to a program depending on the antecedent precipitation. A data logger controls the instruments' functions and records the data. The purpose of the video-camera system is to improve the quality of the dataset by i) the visual analysis of the measurement conditions of flow into the flume; ii) the optimisation of the sampling programs. The cameras are positioned to record the flow at the approximation and the gorge of the flume. In order to contrast the values of ultrasonic sensor, there is a third camera recording the flow level close to a measure tape. This system is activated when the ultrasonic sensor detects a height threshold, equivalent to an electric intensity level. Thus, only when there is enough flow, video-cameras record the event. This simplifies post-processing and reduces the cost of download of recordings. The preliminary contrast analysis will be presented as well as the main improvements in the sample program.

  1. Bacterial Diversity in Oral Samples of Children in Niger with Acute Noma, Acute Necrotizing Gingivitis, and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Stadelmann, Benoît; Baratti-Mayer, Denise; Gizard, Yann; Mombelli, Andrea; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background Noma is a gangrenous disease that leads to severe disfigurement of the face with high morbidity and mortality, but its etiology remains unknown. Young children in developing countries are almost exclusively affected. The purpose of the study was to record and compare bacterial diversity in oral samples from children with or without acute noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis from a defined geographical region in Niger by culture-independent molecular methods. Methods and Principal Findings Gingival samples from 23 healthy children, nine children with acute necrotizing gingivitis, and 23 children with acute noma (both healthy and diseased oral sites) were amplified using “universal” PCR primers for the 16 S rRNA gene and pooled according to category (noma, healthy, or acute necrotizing gingivitis), gender, and site status (diseased or control site). Seven libraries were generated. A total of 1237 partial 16 S rRNA sequences representing 339 bacterial species or phylotypes at a 98–99% identity level were obtained. Analysis of bacterial composition and frequency showed that diseased (noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis) and healthy site bacterial communities are composed of similar bacteria, but differ in the prevalence of a limited group of phylotypes. Large increases in counts of Prevotella intermedia and members of the Peptostreptococcus genus are associated with disease. In contrast, no clear-cut differences were found between noma and non-noma libraries. Conclusions Similarities between acute necrotizing gingivitis and noma samples support the hypothesis that the disease could evolve from acute necrotizing gingivitis in certain children for reasons still to be elucidated. This study revealed oral microbiological patterns associated with noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis, but no evidence was found for a specific infection-triggering agent. PMID:22413030

  2. Shear Bond Strength of an Etch-and-rinse Adhesive to Er:YAG Laser- and/or Phosphoric Acid-treated Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Davari, Abdolrahim; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Bakhshi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Er:YAG laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin; therefore, it has been proposed as an alternative to acid etching. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the shear bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to dentin surfaces following Er:YAG laser and/or phosphoric acid etching. Materials and methods. The roots of 75 sound maxillary premolars were sectioned below the CEJ and the crowns were embedded in auto-polymerizing acrylic resin with the buccal surfaces facing up. The buccal surfaces were ground using a diamond bur and polished until the dentin was exposed; the samples were randomly divided into five groups (n=15) according to the surface treatment: (1) acid etching; (2) laser etching; (3) laser etching followed by acid etching; (4) acid etching followed by laser etching and (5) no acid etching and no laser etching (control group). Composite resin rods (Point 4, Kerr Co) were bonded to treated dentin surfaces with an etch-and-rise adhesive system (Optibond FL, Kerr Co) and light-cured.After storage for two weeks at 37°C and 100% humidity and then thermocycling, bond strength was measured with a Zwick Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed using parametric and non-parametric tests (P<0.05). Results. Mean shear bond strength for acid etching (20.1±1.8 MPa) and acid+laser (15.6±3.5 MPa) groups were significantly higher than those for laser+acid (15.6±3.5 MPa), laser etching (14.1±3.4 MPa) and control (8.1±2.1 MPa) groups. However, there were no significant differences between acid etching and acid+laser groups, and between laser+acid and laser groups. Conclusion. When the cavity is prepared by bur, it is not necessary to etch the dentin surface by Er:YAG laser following acid etching and acid etching after laser etching. PMID:23875083

  3. The importance of quality control in validating concentrations of contaminants of emerging concern in source and treated drinking water samples.

    PubMed

    Batt, Angela L; Furlong, Edward T; Mash, Heath E; Glassmeyer, Susan T; Kolpin, Dana W

    2017-02-01

    A national-scale survey of 247 contaminants of emerging concern (CECs), including organic and inorganic chemical compounds, and microbial contaminants, was conducted in source and treated drinking water samples from 25 treatment plants across the United States. Multiple methods were used to determine these CECs, including six analytical methods to measure 174 pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and pesticides. A three-component quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program was designed for the subset of 174 CECs which allowed us to assess and compare performances of the methods used. The three components included: 1) a common field QA/QC protocol and sample design, 2) individual investigator-developed method-specific QA/QC protocols, and 3) a suite of 46 method comparison analytes that were determined in two or more analytical methods. Overall method performance for the 174 organic chemical CECs was assessed by comparing spiked recoveries in reagent, source, and treated water over a two-year period. In addition to the 247 CECs reported in the larger drinking water study, another 48 pharmaceutical compounds measured did not consistently meet predetermined quality standards. Methodologies that did not seem suitable for these analytes are overviewed. The need to exclude analytes based on method performance demonstrates the importance of additional QA/QC protocols.

  4. Direct observation of spatiotemporal dependence of anomalous diffusion in inhomogeneous fluid by sampling-volume-controlled fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Akiko; Ushida, Kiminori; Okamoto, Takayuki

    2005-12-01

    The direct observation of a spatiotemporal behavior of anomalous diffusion in aqueous polymer [hyaluronan (HA)] solution was achieved by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) using a modified instrument, enabling continuous change of the confocal volume of a microscope, namely, sampling-volume-controlled (SVC) FCS (SVC-FCS). Since HA chains form a mesh structure with a pore size of about 10-40nm , the observed diffusion coefficient (Dobs) is markedly dependent on the diffusion distance (L) . By SVC-FCS, the curve of the distance dependence of diffusion coefficient was directly obtained as a continuous profile in L=245-600nm showing evidence of anomalous diffusion. On plotting Dobs against either of the sampling time (τobs) or the diffusion distance (L) , Dobs turnover was observed near the anomalous diffusion area. The appearance of this turnover is attributed to the nonuniform mesh structure that can be observed only by a fast observation and that should be dynamically averaged by polymer motions with large τobs . This behavior is similar to that revealed in glass, colloidal systems, and gel solutions using dynamic light scattering, neutron scattering, and other techniques.

  5. Porous Hollow Fe3O4 Nanoparticles for Targeted Delivery and Controlled Release of Cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kai; Peng, Sheng; Xu, Chenjie; Sun, Shouheng

    2009-01-01

    We report a new approach to cisplatin storage and release using porous hollow nanoparticles (PHNPs) of Fe3O4. We prepared the PHNPs by controlled oxidation of Fe NPs at 250°C followed by acid etching. The opening pores (~2–4 nm) facilitated the cisplatin diffusion into the cavity of the hollow structure. The porous shell was stable in neutral or basic physiological conditions and cisplatin escape from the cavity through the same pores was diffusion-controlled slow process with t1/2 = 16 hrs. But in low pH (< 6) conditions, the pores were subject to acidic etching, resulting in wider pore gaps and faster release of cisplatin with t1/2 < 4 hrs. Once coupled with Herceptin to the surface, the cisplatin-loaded hollow NPs could target to breast cancer SK-BR-3 cells with IC50 reaching 2.9 μM, much lower than 6.8 μM needed for free cisplatin. Our model experiments indicate that the low pH-responsive PHNPs of Fe3O4 can be exploited as a cisplatin delivery vehicle for target-specific therapeutic applications. PMID:19722635

  6. Interim results of quality-control sampling of surface water for the Upper Colorado River National Water-Quality Assessment Study Unit, water years 1995-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spahr, N.E.; Boulger, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Quality-control samples provide part of the information needed to estimate the bias and variability that result from sample collection, processing, and analysis. Quality-control samples of surface water collected for the Upper Colorado River National Water-Quality Assessment study unit for water years 1995?96 are presented and analyzed in this report. The types of quality-control samples collected include pre-processing split replicates, concurrent replicates, sequential replicates, post-processing split replicates, and field blanks. Analysis of the pre-processing split replicates, concurrent replicates, sequential replicates, and post-processing split replicates is based on differences between analytical results of the environmental samples and analytical results of the quality-control samples. Results of these comparisons indicate that variability introduced by sample collection, processing, and handling is low and will not affect interpretation of the environmental data. The differences for most water-quality constituents is on the order of plus or minus 1 or 2 lowest rounding units. A lowest rounding unit is equivalent to the magnitude of the least significant figure reported for analytical results. The use of lowest rounding units avoids some of the difficulty in comparing differences between pairs of samples when concentrations span orders of magnitude and provides a measure of the practical significance of the effect of variability. Analysis of field-blank quality-control samples indicates that with the exception of chloride and silica, no systematic contamination of samples is apparent. Chloride contamination probably was the result of incomplete rinsing of the dilute cleaning solution from the outlet ports of the decaport sample splitter. Silica contamination seems to have been introduced by the blank water. Sampling and processing procedures for water year 1997 have been modified as a result of these analyses.

  7. Recommendations for choosing an analysis method that controls Type I error for unbalanced cluster sample designs with Gaussian outcomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jacqueline L; Kreidler, Sarah M; Catellier, Diane J; Murray, David M; Muller, Keith E; Glueck, Deborah H

    2015-11-30

    We used theoretical and simulation-based approaches to study Type I error rates for one-stage and two-stage analytic methods for cluster-randomized designs. The one-stage approach uses the observed data as outcomes and accounts for within-cluster correlation using a general linear mixed model. The two-stage model uses the cluster specific means as the outcomes in a general linear univariate model. We demonstrate analytically that both one-stage and two-stage models achieve exact Type I error rates when cluster sizes are equal. With unbalanced data, an exact size α test does not exist, and Type I error inflation may occur. Via simulation, we compare the Type I error rates for four one-stage and six two-stage hypothesis testing approaches for unbalanced data. With unbalanced data, the two-stage model, weighted by the inverse of the estimated theoretical variance of the cluster means, and with variance constrained to be positive, provided the best Type I error control for studies having at least six clusters per arm. The one-stage model with Kenward-Roger degrees of freedom and unconstrained variance performed well for studies having at least 14 clusters per arm. The popular analytic method of using a one-stage model with denominator degrees of freedom appropriate for balanced data performed poorly for small sample sizes and low intracluster correlation. Because small sample sizes and low intracluster correlation are common features of cluster-randomized trials, the Kenward-Roger method is the preferred one-stage approach.

  8. Analysis of tank 51H (HTF-51-15-77) subsurface supernatant sample in support of enrichment and corrosion control programs

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.

    2015-08-18

    This report provides the results of analyses on Tank 51H subsurface supernatant liquid sample in support of the Enrichment Control Program (ECP) and the Corrosion Control Program (CCP). The purpose of the ECP sample taken from Tank 51H in early June was to determine if the later decants would be “acceptable feed” to the 2H and 3H evaporator systems.

  9. Analysis of tank 51H (HTF-51-15-77) subsurface supernatant sample in support of enrichment and corrosion control programs

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.

    2015-08-18

    This report provides the results of analyses on Tank 51H subsurface supernatant liquid sample in support of the Enrichment Control Program (ECP) and the Corrosion Control Program (CCP).The purpose of the ECP sample taken from Tank 51H in early June was to determine if the later decants would be “acceptable feed” to the 2H and 3H evaporator systems.

  10. Genes involved in pruning and inflammation are enriched in a large mega-sample of patients affected by Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder and controls

    PubMed Central

    Marco, Calabrò; Antonio, Drago; Antonina, Sidoti; Alessandro, Serretti; Concetta, Crisafulli

    2015-01-01

    A molecular pathway analysis has been performed in order to complement previous genetic investigations on Schizophrenia. 4,486 Schizophrenic patients and 4,477 controls served as the investigation sample. 3,521 Bipolar patients and 3,195 controls served as replication sample. A molecular pathway associated with the neuronal pruning activity was found to be enriched in subjects with Schizophrenia compared to controls. HLA-C and HLA-DRA had more SNPs associated with both Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder than expected by chance. PMID:26160200

  11. Rationale, design, methodology and sample characteristics for the family partners for health study: a cluster randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Young children who are overweight are at increased risk of becoming obese and developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease later in life. Therefore, early intervention is critical. This paper describes the rationale, design, methodology, and sample characteristics of a 5-year cluster randomized controlled trial being conducted in eight elementary schools in rural North Carolina, United States. Methods/Design The first aim of the trial is to examine the effects of a two-phased intervention on weight status, adiposity, nutrition and exercise health behaviors, and self-efficacy in overweight or obese 2nd, 3 rd, and 4th grade children and their overweight or obese parents. The primary outcome in children is stabilization of BMI percentile trajectory from baseline to 18 months. The primary outcome in parents is a decrease in BMI from baseline to 18 months. Secondary outcomes for both children and parents include adiposity, nutrition and exercise health behaviors, and self-efficacy from baseline to 18 months. A secondary aim of the trial is to examine in the experimental group, the relationships between parents and children's changes in weight status, adiposity, nutrition and exercise health behaviors, and self-efficacy. An exploratory aim is to determine whether African American, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white children and parents in the experimental group benefit differently from the intervention in weight status, adiposity, health behaviors, and self-efficacy. A total of 358 African American, non-Hispanic white, and bilingual Hispanic children with a BMI ≥ 85th percentile and 358 parents with a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 have been inducted over 3 1/2 years and randomized by cohort to either an experimental or a wait-listed control group. The experimental group receives a 12-week intensive intervention of nutrition and exercise education, coping skills training and exercise (Phase I), 9 months of continued monthly contact (Phase II) and then 6 months

  12. Multi-domain computerized cognitive training program improves performance of bookkeeping tasks: a matched-sampling active-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lampit, Amit; Ebster, Claus; Valenzuela, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive skills are important predictors of job performance, but the extent to which computerized cognitive training (CCT) can improve job performance in healthy adults is unclear. We report, for the first time, that a CCT program aimed at attention, memory, reasoning and visuo-spatial abilities can enhance productivity in healthy younger adults on bookkeeping tasks with high relevance to real-world job performance. 44 business students (77.3% female, mean age 21.4 ± 2.6 years) were assigned to either (a) 20 h of CCT, or (b) 20 h of computerized arithmetic training (active control) by a matched sampling procedure. Both interventions were conducted over a period of 6 weeks, 3–4 1-h sessions per week. Transfer of skills to performance on a 60-min paper-based bookkeeping task was measured at three time points—baseline, after 10 h and after 20 h of training. Repeated measures ANOVA found a significant Group X Time effect on productivity (F = 7.033, df = 1.745; 73.273, p = 0.003) with a significant interaction at both the 10-h (Relative Cohen's effect size = 0.38, p = 0.014) and 20-h time points (Relative Cohen's effect size = 0.40, p = 0.003). No significant effects were found on accuracy or on Conners' Continuous Performance Test, a measure of sustained attention. The results are discussed in reference to previous findings on the relationship between brain plasticity and job performance. Generalization of results requires further study. PMID:25120510

  13. Reinforcer Control by Comparison-Stimulus Color and Location in a Delayed Matching-to-Sample Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsop, Brent; Jones, B. Max

    2008-01-01

    Six pigeons were trained in a delayed matching-to-sample task involving bright- and dim-yellow samples on a central key, a five-peck response requirement to either sample, a constant 1.5-s delay, and the presentation of comparison stimuli composed of red on the left key and green on the right key or vice versa. Green-key responses were…

  14. Analysis of industry-generated data. Part 2: Risk-based sampling plan for efficient self-control of aflatoxin M₁ contamination in raw milk.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Zsuzsa; Trevisani, Marcello; Horváth, Zsuzsanna; Serraino, Andrea; Szabó, István J; Kerekes, Kata; Szeitzné-Szabó, Mária; Ambrus, Arpád

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin M₁ (AFM1) contamination in 21,969 milk samples taken in Italy during 2005-08 and 2010 provided the basis for designing an early warning self-control plan. Additionally, 4148 AFM1 data points from the mycotoxin crisis (2003-04) represented the worst case. No parametric function provided a good fit for the skewed and scattered AFM1 concentrations. The acceptable reference values, reflecting the combined uncertainty of AFM1 measured in consignments consisting of milk from one to six farms, ranged from 40 to 16.7 ng kg(-1), respectively. Asymmetric control charts with these reference values, 40 and 50 ng kg(-1) warning and action limits are recommended to assess immediately the distribution of AFM1 concentration in incoming consignments. The moving window method, presented as a worked example including 5 days with five samples/day, enabled verification of compliance of production with the legal limit in 98% of the consignments at a 94% probability level. The sampling plan developed assumes consecutive analyses of samples taken from individual farms, which makes early detection of contamination possible and also immediate corrective actions if the AFM1 concentration in a consignment exceeds the reference value. In the latter case different control plans with increased sampling frequency should be applied depending on the level and frequency of contamination. As aflatoxin B₁ increases in feed at about the same time, therefore a coordinated sampling programme performed by the milk processing plants operating in a confined geographic area is more effective and economical then the individual ones. The applicability of the sample size calculation based on binomial theorem and the fast response rate resulting from the recommended sampling plan were verified by taking 1000-10,000 random samples with replacement from the experimental databases representing the normal, moderately and highly contaminated periods. The efficiency of the control plan could be

  15. Relative Effects of Social Self-Control, Sensation Seeking, and Impulsivity on Future Cigarette Use in a Sample of High-Risk Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pokhrel, Pallav; Sussman, Steve; Stacy, Alan

    2016-01-01

    We used confirmatory factor analysis to compare convergence/divergence across self-report measures of social self-control, sensation seeking, and impulsivity in a sample of high-risk adolescents. In addition, we tested baseline social self-control as a predictor of cigarette use one year later, controlling for baseline cigarette use, impulsivity/sensation seeking, and demographic. variables. Data were collected in 2004–2005 from 821 adolescents (M age = 16.3; SD = 1.36) enrolled in 14 continuation high schools in Southern California. Of the baseline sample, 566 students participated in a follow-up survey one year later. Results indicated that social self-control represents a unique dimension of self-control and is a salient predictor of future cigarette use. PMID:24093522

  16. Relative effects of social self-control, sensation seeking, and impulsivity on future cigarette use in a sample of high-risk adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Pallav; Sussman, Steve; Stacy, Alan

    2014-03-01

    We used confirmatory factor analysis to compare convergence/divergence across self-report measures of social self-control, sensation seeking, and impulsivity in a sample of high-risk adolescents. In addition, we tested baseline social self-control as a predictor of cigarette use one year later, controlling for baseline cigarette use, impulsivity/sensation seeking, and demographic variables. Data were collected in 2004-2005 from 821 adolescents (M age = 16.3; SD = 1.36) enrolled in 14 continuation high schools in Southern California. Of the baseline sample, 566 students participated in a follow-up survey one year later. Results indicated that social self-control represents a unique dimension of self-control and is a salient predictor of future cigarette use.

  17. Differences in the expression of five senescence markers in oral cancer, oral leukoplakia and control samples in humans

    PubMed Central

    BASCONES-MARTÍNEZ, ANTONIO; LÓPEZ-DURÁN, MERCEDES; CANO-SÁNCHEZ, JORGE; SÁNCHEZ-VERDE, LYDIA; DÍEZ-RODRÍGUEZ, ANA; AGUIRRE-ECHEBARRÍA, PABLO; ÁLVAREZ-FERNÁNDEZ, EMILIO; GONZÁLEZ-MOLES, MIGUEL ANGEL; BASCONES-ILUNDAIN, JAIME; MUZIO, LORENZO LO; CAMPO-TRAPERO, JULIÁN

    2012-01-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) may be a response to oncogenic activation, acting as a natural barrier against carcinogenesis at a premalignant stage. Thus, numerous cells in premalignant lesions enter senescence, but none or few in malignant tumours. This event could be due to the loss of senescence pathway effectors, including p16 (INK4a)-pRb or ARF-p53. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare the expression of certain senescent markers between oral precancer and cancer tissue samples. The expression of cyclin D1, Rb, maspin, p53 and mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) was analyzed in 20 paraffin-embedded tissue samples of normal oral mucosa (NOM), 14 samples of oral leukoplakia without dysplasia (OLD−), 11 samples of leukoplakia with dysplasia (OLD+) and 15 samples of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) by immunohistochemistry in tissue arrays. The expression of p16-pRb pathway markers, cyclin D1, maspin and Rb, was more frequent in OLD+ samples than in OSCC samples, although a statistical significance was only observed for maspin (P=0.036). Cyclin D1 expression was also significantly more frequent in OLD− samples vs. NOM samples. For the ARF-p53 pathway, the expression of p53 and MDM2 was significantly more frequent in the OLD− samples compared to in the NOM ones. These findings may indicate a role for cellular senescence in oral carcinogenesis, considering maspin as a reliable senescence marker and prognostic factor in oral premalignant lesions. PMID:22783442

  18. Analysis of Tank 38H (HTF-38-16-26, 27) and Tank 43H (HTF-43-16-28, 29) Samples for Support of the Enrichment Control and Corrosion Control Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M. S.

    2016-05-23

    Savannah River National Laboratory analyzed samples from Tank 38H and Tank 43H to support Enrichment Control Program and Corrosion Control Program. The total uranium in the Tank 38H samples ranged from 20.5 to 34.0 mg/L while the Tank 43H samples ranged from 47.6 to 50.6 mg/L. The U-235 percentage ranged from 0.62% to 0.64% over the four samples. The total uranium and percent U-235 results appear consistent with previous Tank 38H and Tank 43H uranium measurements. The Tank 38H plutonium results show a large difference between the surface and sub-surface sample concentrations and a somewhat higher concentration than previous sub-surface samples. The two Tank 43H samples show similar plutonium concentrations and are within the range of values measured on previous samples. The plutonium results may be biased high due to the presence of plutonium contamination in the blank samples from the cell sample preparations. The four samples analyzed show silicon concentrations ranging from 47.9 to 105 mg/L.

  19. Parasitological diagnosis combining an internally controlled real-time PCR assay for the detection of four protozoa in stool samples with a testing algorithm for microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, L E S; Wallinga, J A; Ruijs, G J H M; Bruins, M J; Verweij, J J

    2009-09-01

    Molecular detection of gastrointestinal protozoa is more sensitive and more specific than microscopy but, to date, has not routinely replaced time-consuming microscopic analysis. Two internally controlled real-time PCR assays for the combined detection of Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium spp. and Dientamoeba fragilis in single faecal samples were compared with Triple Faeces Test (TFT) microscopy results from 397 patient samples. Additionally, an algorithm for complete parasitological diagnosis was created. Real-time PCR revealed 152 (38.3%) positive cases, 18 of which were double infections: one (0.3%) sample was positive for E. histolytica, 44 (11.1%) samples were positive for G. lamblia, 122 (30.7%) samples were positive for D. fragilis, and three (0.8%) samples were positive for Cryptosporidium. TFT microscopy yielded 96 (24.2%) positive cases, including five double infections: one sample was positive for E. histolytica/Entamoeba dispar, 29 (7.3%) samples were positive for G. lamblia, 69 (17.4%) samples were positive for D. fragilis, and two (0.5%) samples were positive for Cryptosporidium hominis/Cryptosporidium parvum. Retrospective analysis of the clinical patient information of 2887 TFT sets showed that eosinophilia, elevated IgE levels, adoption and travelling to (sub)tropical areas are predisposing factors for infection with non-protozoal gastrointestinal parasites. The proposed diagnostic algorithm includes application of real-time PCR to all samples, with the addition of microscopy on an unpreserved faecal sample in cases of a predisposing factor, or a repeat request for parasitological examination. Application of real-time PCR improved the diagnostic yield by 18%. A single stool sample is sufficient for complete parasitological diagnosis when an algorithm based on clinical information is applied.

  20. Linear Averaged and Sampled Data Models for Large Signal Control of High Power Factor AC-DC Converters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    design a digital controller for the outer trol schemes for high power factor ac to dc converters, loop, including PI control , and presents simulation re...design of an analog control (e.g. PI control ) for by the current loop. If kin] is too large, then the inductor tam el (3) Isnoar ts ee lin at tne. Fcorl...with PI Control 6 mm am I m mmmmimmm~mmml r .14 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ O .12 SM .16 .p N 17 .6 Is , TV 240 6 F tic .04 113 .02 a I I ’ 190 0 0.973 I • 0

  1. Humidity-controlled preparation of frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2012-05-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy (CXDM) has the potential to visualize the structures of micro- to sub-micrometer-sized biological particles, such as cells and organelles, at high resolution. Toward advancing structural studies on the functional states of such particles, here, we developed a system for the preparation of frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic CXDM experiments. The system, which comprised a moist air generator, microscope, micro-injector mounted on a micromanipulator, custom-made sample preparation chamber, and flash-cooling device, allowed for the manipulation of sample particles in the relative humidity range of 20%-94%rh at 293 K to maintain their hydrated and functional states. Here, we report the details of the system and the operation procedure, including its application to the preparation of a frozen-hydrated chloroplast sample. Sample quality was evaluated through a cryogenic CXDM experiment conducted at BL29XUL of SPring-8. Taking the performance of the system and the quality of the sample, the system was suitable to prepare frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic CXDM experiments.

  2. Planetary protection on international waters: An onboard protocol for capsule retrieval and biosafety control in sample return mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Yoshinori; Yano, Hajime; Sekine, Yasuhito; Funase, Ryu; Takai, Ken

    2014-04-01

    Planetary protection has been recognized as one of the most important issues in sample return missions that may host certain living forms and biotic signatures in a returned sample. This paper proposes an initiative of sample capsule retrieval and onboard biosafety protocol in international waters for future biological and organic constituent missions to bring samples from possible habitable bodies in the solar system. We suggest the advantages of international waters being outside of national jurisdiction and active regions of human and traffic affairs on the condition that we accept the Outer Space Treaty. The scheme of onboard biological quarantine definitely reduces the potential risk of back-contamination of extraterrestrial materials to the Earth.

  3. Individual differences in components of impulsivity and effortful control moderate the relation between borderline personality disorder traits and emotion recognition in a sample of university students.

    PubMed

    Preti, Emanuele; Richetin, Juliette; Suttora, Chiara; Pisani, Alberto

    2016-04-30

    Dysfunctions in social cognition characterize personality disorders. However, mixed results emerged from literature on emotion processing. Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) traits are either associated with enhanced emotion recognition, impairments, or equal functioning compared to controls. These apparent contradictions might result from the complexity of emotion recognition tasks used and from individual differences in impulsivity and effortful control. We conducted a study in a sample of undergraduate students (n=80), assessing BPD traits, using an emotion recognition task that requires the processing of only visual information or both visual and acoustic information. We also measured individual differences in impulsivity and effortful control. Results demonstrated the moderating role of some components of impulsivity and effortful control on the capability of BPD traits in predicting anger and happiness recognition. We organized the discussion around the interaction between different components of regulatory functioning and task complexity for a better understanding of emotion recognition in BPD samples.

  4. Clenbuterol storage stability in the bovine urine and liver samples used for European official control in the azores islands (portugal).

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Isabel; Jesuino, Bruno; Barbosa, Jorge; Ferreira, Humberto; Ramos, Fernando; Matos, José; da Silveira, Maria Irene Noronha

    2009-02-11

    Clenbuterol is a well-known growth promoter, illegally used in farm animals, especially in cattle. Samples collected for the screening of beta(2)-agonist residues in Portuguese Azores Islands must travel through all the nine islands until they reach Azores Central Laboratory. If any suspicious sample is detected, it must be further transported to the National Reference Laboratory in Lisbon for confirmation. As a consequence of these circumstances, samples are submitted to different transport and storage times, as well as different temperature conditions and in some cases successive freezing and thawing cycles. As clenbuterol is the most detected beta(2)-agonist growth promoter in the Portuguese Residue Monitoring Plan, studies were conducted on the stability of this compound in incurred samples (bovine liver and urine) at +4, -20 and -60 degrees C over time. Samples kept at -20 degrees C were also analyzed over time after successive freezing and thawing cycles. The analyses of clenbuterol over time were performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with selected ion monitoring (SIM). Clenbuterol in incurred urine and liver samples was significantly stable up to 20 weeks at -20 and -60 degrees C and after, at least, six consecutive freezings and thawings. At +4 degrees C, clenbuterol remained stable, at least until 12 weeks in urine and up to 20 weeks in liver.

  5. Everything under Control? The Effects of Age, Gender, and Education on Trajectories of Perceived Control in a Nationally Representative German Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Specht, Jule; Egloff, Boris; Schmukle, Stefan C.

    2013-01-01

    Perceived control is an important variable for various demands involved in successful aging. However, perceived control is not set in stone but rather changes throughout the life course. The aim of this study was to identify cross-sectional age differences and longitudinal mean-level changes as well as rank-order changes in perceived control with…

  6. Inhibitory Control in Preschool Predicts Early Math Skills in First Grade: Evidence from an Ethnically Diverse Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Florrie Fei-Yin; Tamis-LeMonda, Catherine; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Sze, Irene Nga-Lam

    2015-01-01

    Preschoolers' inhibitory control and early math skills were concurrently and longitudinally examined in 255 Chinese, African American, Dominican, and Mexican 4-year-olds in the United States. Inhibitory control at age 4, assessed with a peg-tapping task, was associated with early math skills at age 4 and predicted growth in such skills from age 4…

  7. Linking Childhood Poverty and Cognition: Environmental Mediators of Non-Verbal Executive Control in an Argentine Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipina, Sebastián; Segretin, Soledad; Hermida, Julia; Prats, Lucía; Fracchia, Carolina; Camelo, Jorge López; Colombo, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Tests of attentional control, working memory, and planning were administered to compare the non-verbal executive control performance of healthy children from different socioeconomic backgrounds. In addition, mediations of several sociodemographic variables, identified in the literature as part of the experience of child poverty, between…

  8. Controlled implant/soft tissue interaction by nanoscale surface modifications of 3D porous titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Elisabeth; Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Salou, Laetitia; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Helene; Layrolle, Pierre; Debry, Christian; Lavalle, Philippe; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2015-06-07

    Porous titanium implants are widely employed in the orthopaedics field to ensure good bone fixation. Recently, the use of porous titanium implants has also been investigated in artificial larynx development in a clinical setting. Such uses necessitate a better understanding of the interaction of soft tissues with porous titanium structures. Moreover, surface treatments of titanium have been generally evaluated in planar structures, while the porous titanium implants have complex 3 dimensional (3D) architectures. In this study, the determining factors for soft tissue integration of 3D porous titanium implants were investigated as a function of surface treatments via quantification of the interaction of serum proteins and cells with single titanium microbeads (300-500 μm in diameter). Samples were either acid etched or nanostructured by anodization. When the samples are used in 3D configuration (porous titanium discs of 2 mm thickness) in vivo (in subcutis of rats for 2 weeks), a better integration was observed for both anodized and acid etched samples compared to the non-treated implants. If the implants were also pre-treated with rat serum before implantation, the integration was further facilitated. In order to understand the underlying reasons for this effect, human fibroblast cell culture tests under several conditions (directly on beads, beads in suspension, beads encapsulated in gelatin hydrogels) were conducted to mimic the different interactions of cells with Ti implants in vivo. Physical characterization showed that surface treatments increased hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and roughness. Surface treatments also resulted in improved adsorption of serum albumin which in turn facilitated the adsorption of other proteins such as apolipoprotein as quantified by protein sequencing. The cellular response to the beads showed considerable difference with respect to the cell culture configuration. When the titanium microbeads were entrapped in cell

  9. Microfabrication of controlled-geometry samples for the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell using focused ion beam technology.

    PubMed

    Pigott, Jeffrey S; Reaman, Daniel M; Panero, Wendy R

    2011-11-01

    The pioneering of x-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating in the diamond-anvil cell has revolutionized the field of high-pressure mineral physics, expanding the ability to determine high-pressure, high-temperature phase boundaries and equations of state. Accurate determination of high-pressure, high-temperature phases and densities in the diamond-anvil cell rely upon collinearity of the x-ray beam with the center of the laser-heated spot. We present the development of microfabricated samples that, by nature of their design, will have the sample of interest in the hottest portion of the sample. We report initial successes with a simplified design using a Pt sample with dimensions smaller than the synchrotron-based x-ray spot such that it is the only part of the sample that absorbs the heating laser ensuring that the x-rayed volume is at the peak hotspot temperature. Microfabricated samples, synthesized using methods developed at The Ohio State University's Mineral Physics Laboratory and Campus Electron Optics Facility, were tested at high P-T conditions in the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell at beamline 16 ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source. Pt layer thicknesses of ≤0.8 μm absorb the laser and produce accurate measurements on the relative equations of state of Pt and PtC. These methods combined with high-purity nanofabrication techniques will allow for extension by the diamond-anvil cell community to multiple materials for high-precision high-pressure, high-temperature phase relations, equations of state, melting curves, and transport properties.

  10. A Research Methodology for Future Summative Evaluation Studies: Incorporating the Component of Multiple Sets of Matched Samples into the Statistical Control Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yuan H.; Modarresi, Shahpar; Yang, Yu N.

    2006-01-01

    Summative evaluations have often been undertaken to determine the impact of educational programs on student academic achievement employing a quasi-experimental design. The summative finding is expected to be less misleading if a statistical model is performed on a dataset including a sound matched sample as a control group. This is because an…

  11. Analysis of tank 39H (HTF-39-15-61, 62) surface and subsurface supernatant samples in support of corrosion control program

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.

    2015-08-19

    This report provides the results of analyses on Tanks 39H surface and subsurface supernatant liquid samples in support of the Corrosion Control Program. Analyses included warm acid strike preparation followed by analysis for silicon, aluminum, and sodium and water dilution preparation followed by analysis for anions. Other reported analytical results include analyses results for uranium, Pu-241 and Pu-239.

  12. Towards a Better Understanding of the Relationship between Executive Control and Theory of Mind: An Intra-Cultural Comparison of Three Diverse Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahaeian, Ameneh; Henry, Julie D.; Razmjoee, Maryam; Teymoori, Ali; Wang, Cen

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has consistently indicated that theory of mind (ToM) is associated with executive control in the preschool years. However, interpretation of this literature is limited by the fact that most studies have focused exclusively on urbanized Western cultural samples. Consequently, it is not clear whether the association between ToM and…

  13. The importance of quality control in validating concentrations of contaminants of emerging concern in source and treated drinking water samples.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A national-scale survey of 247 contaminants of emerging concern (CECs), including organic and inorganic chemical compounds, and microbial contaminants, was conducted in source and treated drinking water samples from 25 treatment plants across the United States. Multiple methods w...

  14. 7 CFR 58.336 - Frequency of sampling for quality control of cream, butter and related products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946... meeting grade standards and contract specifications. (e) Weight or volume control. Representative...

  15. Broadly reactive nested reverse transcription-PCR using an internal RNA standard control for detection of noroviruses in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Medici, Maria Cristina; Martinelli, Monica; Ruggeri, Franco Maria; Abelli, Laura Anna; Bosco, Simona; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Pinardi, Federica; De Conto, Flora; Calderaro, Adriana; Chezzi, Carlo; Dettori, Giuseppe

    2005-08-01

    We developed a nested reverse transcription-PCR (nRT-PCR) for the detection of noroviruses in stools, using random primers for RT, the JV12/JV13 primer pair in the first round of nPCR, and a set of nine inner primers for the second, comprising the reverse sequences of primers SR46, SR48, SR50, and SR52, and five novel oligonucleotide sequences (113-1, 113-2, 115-1, 115-2, and 115-3). The specificity of the nRT-PCR was confirmed by testing 61 stools containing enteric viruses other than noroviruses. In comparative assays on either stools or RNA dilutions from two genogroup I and three genogroup II (GII) norovirus-positive samples, nRT-PCR was always at least as sensitive as RT-PCR and Southern hybridization. With some of the samples tested, the increase in sensitivity was 10-fold or higher. For GII viruses, the detectable range of nRT-PCR was estimated to be 8.4 x 10(4) to 2 RNA viral particles. When used on 85 stools from pediatric patients with acute gastroenteritis negative for viruses by electron microscopy and cell culture, the nRT-PCR detected norovirus in 19 samples (22.3%), while it failed to detect one reference RT-PCR-positive sample containing a Desert Shield strain. Sixteen of the 19 nRT-PCR-positive samples gave concordant results with reference RT-PCR and Southern hybridization, and all with sequence analysis. Partial sequencing of the polymerase region revealed that from January to April 2000 all GII strains except two (Rotterdam- and Leeds-like viruses) formed a tight cluster related to Hawaii virus. The nRT-PCR described could prove suitable for large epidemiological studies and for specialized clinical laboratories performing routine molecular testing.

  16. Broadly Reactive Nested Reverse Transcription-PCR Using an Internal RNA Standard Control for Detection of Noroviruses in Stool Samples

    PubMed Central

    Medici, Maria Cristina; Martinelli, Monica; Ruggeri, Franco Maria; Abelli, Laura Anna; Bosco, Simona; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Pinardi, Federica; De Conto, Flora; Calderaro, Adriana; Chezzi, Carlo; Dettori, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    We developed a nested reverse transcription-PCR (nRT-PCR) for the detection of noroviruses in stools, using random primers for RT, the JV12/JV13 primer pair in the first round of nPCR, and a set of nine inner primers for the second, comprising the reverse sequences of primers SR46, SR48, SR50, and SR52, and five novel oligonucleotide sequences (113-1, 113-2, 115-1, 115-2, and 115-3). The specificity of the nRT-PCR was confirmed by testing 61 stools containing enteric viruses other than noroviruses. In comparative assays on either stools or RNA dilutions from two genogroup I and three genogroup II (GII) norovirus-positive samples, nRT-PCR was always at least as sensitive as RT-PCR and Southern hybridization. With some of the samples tested, the increase in sensitivity was 10-fold or higher. For GII viruses, the detectable range of nRT-PCR was estimated to be 8.4 × 104 to 2 RNA viral particles. When used on 85 stools from pediatric patients with acute gastroenteritis negative for viruses by electron microscopy and cell culture, the nRT-PCR detected norovirus in 19 samples (22.3%), while it failed to detect one reference RT-PCR-positive sample containing a Desert Shield strain. Sixteen of the 19 nRT-PCR-positive samples gave concordant results with reference RT-PCR and Southern hybridization, and all with sequence analysis. Partial sequencing of the polymerase region revealed that from January to April 2000 all GII strains except two (Rotterdam- and Leeds-like viruses) formed a tight cluster related to Hawaii virus. The nRT-PCR described could prove suitable for large epidemiological studies and for specialized clinical laboratories performing routine molecular testing. PMID:16081909

  17. Maternal control, cognitive style, and childhood anxiety: a test of a theoretical model in a multi-ethnic sample.

    PubMed

    Creveling, C Christiane; Varela, R Enrique; Weems, Carl F; Corey, David M

    2010-08-01

    This study tested a theoretical model of the interrelations among controlling parenting, negative cognitive styles, children's anxiety, and race/ethnicity. The model suggests that, in general, cognitive style mediates the relation between maternal control and child anxiety but that the set of associations may differ as a function of ethnicity. African American (n = 235), Latin American (n = 56), and European American (n = 136) children completed measures of their anxiety, cognitive schemas reflecting impaired autonomy/performance and disconnection/rejection domains, and maternal control. Results indicated that a disconnection/rejection negative cognitive style mediated the effect of perceived maternal control on childhood anxiety only for the European American group. Maternal control was associated with the impaired autonomy/performance cognitive style for each of the three ethnic groups and with a disconnection/rejection cognitive style only for the European American and Latin American groups. Maternal control had an indirect effect on anxiety through the disconnection/rejection cognitive style for the Latin American group. The results are discussed in terms of how the model presented extends current theories of anxiety problems to African American and Latin American children by noting that significant cultural variations may exist in how parenting practices and cognitive styles relate to children's anxiety levels.

  18. Neuroanatomical bases of effortful control: evidence from a large sample of young healthy adults using voxel-based morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Nouchi, Rui; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Effortful control (EC) is a base of individuality in cognition and psychological adjustment. EC is defined as a capacity to control responses and behaviors. We investigated associations between individual differences of EC and regional gray and white matter volume (rGMV/rGMV) in 374 men and 306 women (age, 20.61 ± 1.82 years) using Japanese version of Effortful control scale (J-ECS). J-ECS consists of three subscales such as inhibitory control (IC), activation control (ACTC), and attentional control (ATC). Results showed that (a) IC was associated with larger rGMV in the dorsal part of anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), the supplementary motor area (SMA) and the pre SMA and larger rWMV in the dACC, (b) ACTC was correlated with smaller rGMV in the insula and the putamen, and (c) ATC was associated with larger rWMV in the inferior frontal gyrus, orbital frontal gyrus, ACC, and insula. Our study revealed key neuroanatomical correlations between EC and rGMV and rWMV. PMID:27503843

  19. Analysis of tank 39H (HTF-39-15-61, 62) surface and subsurface supernatant samples in support of corrosion control program

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.

    2015-08-01

    This report provides the results of analyses on Tanks 39H surface and subsurface supernatant liquid samples in support of the Corrosion Control Program. Analyses included warm acid strike preparation followed by analysis for silicon, aluminum, and sodium and water dilution preparation followed by analysis for anions. Other reported analytical results include analyses results for uranium, Pu-241 and Pu-239. The measured sodium concentration averaged, respectively, 4.28E+00 ± 9.30E-02 M and 4.32E+00 ± 1.076E-01 M in the Tank 39H surface sample and Tank 39H subsurface sample. In general, the nitrate, nitrite, free-OH and specific gravity of the Tank 39H surface and subsurface samples were all about the same in magnitude, respectively, averaging 1.98 M, 0.314 M, 1.26 M and 1.24. The measured silicon concentration for the Tank 39H surface and subsurface samples were, respectively, 3.84E+01± 5.51E+00 and 4.14E+01± 1.17E+00 mg/L. Based on the uranium, Pu-241 and Pu-239 concentrations, the calculated U-235 equivalent is 21.41 wt% for the surface sample and 21.32 wt% for the subsurface sample.

  20. Results of quality-control sampling of water, bed sediment, and tissue in the Western Lake Michigan Drainages study unit of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzgerald, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains the quality control results of the Western Lake Michigan Drainages study unit of the National Water Quality Assessment Program. Quality control samples were collected in the same manner and contemporaneously with environmental samples during the first highintensity study phase in the unit (1992 through 1995) and amounted to approximately 15 percent of all samples collected. The accuracy and precision of hundreds of chemical analyses of surface and ground-water, bed sediment, and tissue was determined through the collection and analysis of field blanks, field replicates and splits, matrix spikes, and surrogates. Despite the several detections of analytes in the field blanks, the concentrations of most constituents in the environmental samples will likely be an order of magnitude or higher than those in the blanks. However, frequent detections, and high concentrations, of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in several surface and ground-water blanks are probably significant with respect to commonly measured environmental concentrations, and the environmental data will have to be qualified accordingly. The precision of sampling of water on a percent basis, as determined from replicates and splits, was generally proportional to the concentration of the constituents, with constituents present in relatively high concentrations generally having less sampling variability than those with relatively low concentrations. In general, analytes with relatively high variability between replicates were present at concentrations near the reporting limit or were associated with relatively small absolute concentration differences, or both. Precision of replicates compared to that for splits in bed sediment samples was similar, thus eliminating sampling as a major source of variability in analyte concentrations. In the case the phthalates in bed sediment, contamination in either the field or laboratory could have caused the relatively large variability between replicate

  1. Assessing Self-Control and Geosocial Networking App Behavior Among an Online Sample of Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    PubMed

    Beymer, Matthew R; Rossi, Aimee Drolet; Shu, Suzanne B

    2016-08-01

    Geosocial networking phone applications (GSN apps) used to meet sexual partners have become popular in the men who have sex with men (MSM) communities of the USA since 2009. Previous studies have shown greater incidence of gonorrhea and chlamydia and lower testing frequency for HIV testing among GSN app users when compared to non-users. The present study aims to determine the type, number, and frequency of apps used, as well as the association between dispositional self-control and health-related behaviors. Participants (n = 146) were recruited from Amazon's Mechanical Turk program to respond to a brief GSN app marketing survey. Multivariate regression was used to determine differences in app priorities, length of app use, and number of sexual partners between high self-control and low self-control participants. A majority of the participants reported using Grindr (78 %) followed by Scruff (19 %), Growlr (12 %), and Jack'd (12 %). Most individuals used one app only (58 %), but a significant proportion reported using two apps (28 %) or three or more apps (14 %). Respondents with low self-control were more likely to report a higher number of hours using GSN apps and a higher number of sexual partners, controlling for race/ethnicity, education, employment, and HIV status. Given the popularity of this burgeoning communication medium, these findings have important implications for developing prevention resources for different segments of GSN app users.

  2. Effect of lidocaine spray in pain management during office-based endometrial sampling: A randomised placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, H; Aksoy, U; Ozyurt, S; Acmaz, G; Babayigit, M A; Yücel, B; Aydin, T

    2016-01-01

    Office-based endometrial sampling is the most frequently performed gynaecological procedure. The procedure is usually associated with pain and discomfort. Several anaesthetic and analgesic techniques (e.g., non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, paracervical block, misoprostol and topical anaesthetics) are used for pain management during endometrial sampling. There is no comprehensive study using lidocaine in spray form; we sought to investigate the analgesic efficacy of 10% lidocaine spray in patients undergoing office-based endometrial biopsy. We conducted a prospective, randomised (lidocaine spray (n = 60) and placebo (n = 60), respectively), double-blind study. The mean pain score during procedure was 3.51 ± 1.51 in the lidocaine spray group and 5.11 ± 1.66 in the placebo group. Lidocaine spray treatment significantly lowered the pain scores compared with placebo (p < 0.001). Lidocaine spray can be accepted as a non-invasive, easy to apply and more comfortable anaesthetic method for office-based endometrial sampling.

  3. Quinolones control in milk and eggs samples by liquid chromatography using a surfactant-mediated mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Rambla-Alegre, M; Collado-Sánchez, M A; Esteve-Romero, J; Carda-Broch, S

    2011-05-01

    Four quinolones (danofloxacin, difloxacin, flumequine and marbofloxacin) were determined in milk and egg samples by a simplified high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure using a micellar mobile phase. No extraction was needed to precipitate the proteins from the matrices since they were solubilised in micelles. The only pretreatment steps required were homogenisation, dilution and filtration before injecting the sample into the chromatographic system. An adequate resolution of the quinolones was achieved by a chemometrics approach where retention was modelled as a first step using the retention factors in only five mobile phases. Afterwards, an optimisation criterion was applied to consider the position and shape of the chromatographic peaks. Analytical separation involved a C18 reversed-phase column, a hybrid micellar mobile phase of 0.05 M sodium dodecyl sulphate, 10% (v/v) butanol and 0.5% (v/v) triethylamine buffered at pH 3 and fluorimetric detection. Quinolones were eluted in less than 15 min without the protein band or other endogenous compounds from the food matrices interfering. The calculated relevant validation parameters, e.g., decision limit (CC(α)), detection capability (CC(β)), repeatability, within-laboratory reproducibility, recoveries and robustness, were acceptable and complied with European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Finally, the proposed method was successfully employed in quantifying the four quinolones in spiked egg and milk samples.

  4. Quality assurance and quality control in light stable isotope laboratories: A case study of Rio Grande, Texas, water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Qi, H.

    2009-01-01

    New isotope laboratories can achieve the goal of reporting the same isotopic composition within analytical uncertainty for the same material analysed decades apart by (1) writing their own acceptance testing procedures and putting them into their mass spectrometric or laser-based isotope-ratio equipment procurement contract, (2) requiring a manufacturer to demonstrate acceptable performance using all sample ports provided with the instrumentation, (3) for each medium to be analysed, prepare two local reference materials substantially different in isotopic composition to encompass the range in isotopic composition expected in the laboratory and calibrated them with isotopic reference materials available from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) or the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), (4) using the optimum storage containers (for water samples, sealing in glass ampoules that are sterilised after sealing is satisfactory), (5) interspersing among sample unknowns local laboratory isotopic reference materials daily (internationally distributed isotopic reference materials can be ordered at three-year intervals, and can be used for elemental analyser analyses and other analyses that consume less than 1 mg of material) - this process applies to H, C, N, O, and S isotope ratios, (6) calculating isotopic compositions of unknowns by normalising isotopic data to that of local reference materials, which have been calibrated to internationally distributed isotopic reference materials, (7) reporting results on scales normalised to internationally distributed isotopic reference materials (where they are available) and providing to sample submitters the isotopic compositions of internationally distributed isotopic reference materials of the same substance had they been analysed with unknowns, (8) providing an audit trail in the laboratory for analytical results - this trail commonly will be in electronic format and might include a laboratory

  5. Quality assurance and quality control in light stable isotope laboratories: a case study of Rio Grande, Texas, water samples.

    PubMed

    Coplen, Tyler B; Qi, Haiping

    2009-06-01

    New isotope laboratories can achieve the goal of reporting the same isotopic composition within analytical uncertainty for the same material analysed decades apart by (1) writing their own acceptance testing procedures and putting them into their mass spectrometric or laser-based isotope-ratio equipment procurement contract, (2) requiring a manufacturer to demonstrate acceptable performance using all sample ports provided with the instrumentation, (3) for each medium to be analysed, prepare two local reference materials substantially different in isotopic composition to encompass the range in isotopic composition expected in the laboratory and calibrated them with isotopic reference materials available from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) or the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), (4) using the optimum storage containers (for water samples, sealing in glass ampoules that are sterilised after sealing is satisfactory), (5) interspersing among sample unknowns local laboratory isotopic reference materials daily (internationally distributed isotopic reference materials can be ordered at three-year intervals, and can be used for elemental analyser analyses and other analyses that consume less than 1 mg of material) - this process applies to H, C, N, O, and S isotope ratios, (6) calculating isotopic compositions of unknowns by normalising isotopic data to that of local reference materials, which have been calibrated to internationally distributed isotopic reference materials, (7) reporting results on scales normalised to internationally distributed isotopic reference materials (where they are available) and providing to sample submitters the isotopic compositions of internationally distributed isotopic reference materials of the same substance had they been analysed with unknowns, (8) providing an audit trail in the laboratory for analytical results - this trail commonly will be in electronic format and might include a laboratory

  6. Influence of the sample toxic profile on the suitability of a high performance liquid chromatography method for official paralytic shellfish toxins control.

    PubMed

    Ben-Gigirey, B; Rodríguez-Velasco, M L; Villar-González, A; Botana, L M

    2007-01-26

    An HPLC-FLD method, involving pre-chromatographic oxidation of the PSP toxins with hydrogen peroxide and periodate, has been AOAC validated through a collaborative trial and adopted as AOAC Official Method. This method could be a candidate for replacing the mouse bioassay (MBA) for the Official Control of PSP toxins at European level, once accepted by the legislation. An interlaboratory exercise has been organized by the CRLMB to evaluate its "fitness for purpose" for the Official Control of PSP toxins in the EU laboratories. Eighteen EU laboratories took part in the study and had to analyze six bivalve mollusc samples with several PSP toxic profiles. The performance of the participant laboratories in the application of this method was compared with that obtained at the collaborative trial. Information on problems/drawbacks encountered by participants in the application of this method was also sought. The HPLC validated method is only applicable for Official PSP Control for certain samples. This depends on sample PSP toxic profile. Results obtained for samples where only GTX2,3 and STX were present were satisfactory and in agreement with MBA results. Results obtained for a sample with a toxic profile dominated by GTX6 and suspected to contain also C1,2 and C3,4 were not satisfactory. GTX5 and dc-STX could be quantified, although the results achieved (total toxicity) were lower than those obtained by MBA. It can be also useful as a screening method, complementary to MBA, helping in the reduction of the animals used. However, the lack of several PSP standards, the fact that the method is not validated for all the PSP toxins, and several drawbacks found in its application are a handicap to fully implement it for Official PSP Control as a viable replacement for bioassay.

  7. Brief Report: The Go/No-Go Task Online: Inhibitory Control Deficits in Autism in a Large Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzefovsky, F.; Allison, C.; Smith, P.; Baron-Cohen, S.

    2016-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC, also referred to as Autism Spectrum Disorders) entail difficulties with inhibition: inhibiting action, inhibiting one's own point of view, and inhibiting distractions that may interfere with a response set. However, the association between inhibitory control (IC) and ASC, especially in adulthood, is unclear. The…

  8. Signficance of Science-Tactical Liaison Role in Mission Control for the Krash Lunar Analogue Sample Return Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Aly, S.; Mader, M. M.; McCullough, E.; Preston, L. J.; Moore, J.; Tornebene, L. L.; Osinski, G. R.; Ilsr Team

    2012-03-01

    Our team carried out an analogue mission at the Mistastin Lake. Mission Control was divided into a tactical team and a science team. The science liaison is responsible for relaying the aims and motivations of the science room to the tactical room.

  9. No direct association among respiratory function, disease control and family functioning in a sample of Mexican children with intermittent asthma.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain Raimundo; Núñez-Tapia, Rosa María; Ramírez-Silva, Armando; Gómez-Alonso, Carlos

    2013-05-15

    Asthma has been linked to family disfunctioning and poor control of the disease.This study was conducted to analyze the interactions between the level of intermittent asthma control, family functioning and respiratory function and between quality of life of asthmatic patients and their caregivers.7 to 15 years old children with intermittent asthma were included. Asthma Control Test Questionnaire, Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ) test, and flowmetry were applied to children and Pediatric Asthma Caregiver´s Quatily of Life Questionnaire (PAQCLQ) and the Family Functioning Perception Test (FF-SIL) were applied to their parents.The most affected areas of family functioning in dysfunctional families were adaptability and permeability. A medium to high strength of association was founded between the emotional function of parents and the emotional function of children, R2=0.552. The most remarkable associations were among parents' limitation of activities and parents' emotional function (r=0.837), parents' limitation of activities and child's emotional function (r=0.722), parents' emotional role and limitation of activities (r=0.837), parents' emotional role and emotional functioning of children with asthma (r=0.743) and the limitation of activities of children with asthma and the emotional function of children with asthma (r=0.870).No direct associations were founded among respiratory function, disease control and family functioning in Mexican children with intermittent asthma and emotional function of parents and children were associated in both groups.

  10. Predicting Participation in Group Parenting Education in an Australian Sample: The Role of Attitudes, Norms, and Control Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Katherine M.; Wellington, Larne

    2009-01-01

    We examined the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in predicting intentions to participate in group parenting education. One hundred and seventy-six parents (138 mothers and 38 fathers) with a child under 12 years completed TPB items assessing attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control (PBC), and two additional social influence…

  11. A Multifaceted Sampling Approach to Better Understanding Biogeochemical and Hydrogeological Controls on Uranium Mobility at a Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Riverton, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam, W. L.; Johnson, R. H.; Campbell, S.; Bone, S. E.; Noel, V.; Bargar, J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding uranium mobility in subsurface environments is not trivial. Obtaining sufficient data to accurately represent soil and aquifer characteristics can require unique approaches that evolve with added site knowledge. At Riverton, the primary source of uranium mill tailings remaining from ore processing was removed but contaminant plumes have persisted longer than predicted by groundwater modeling. What are the primary mechanisms controlling plume persistence? DOE is conducting new characterization studies to assist our understanding of underlying biogeochemical and hydrogeological mechanisms affecting secondary sources. A variety of field sampling techniques are being sequentially employed including augering, trenching, pore water sampling, and installing multi-level wells. In August 2012, vadose zone soil samples from 34 locations and groundwater from 103 boreholes were collected with Geoprobe ® direct push rods. Lower than expected uranium concentrations in composited shallow soils indicated the need for more focused and deeper samples. In May 2014, soil samples containing evaporites were collected along the bank of the Little Wind River; elevated uranium concentrations in evaporite minerals correlated with plume configurations and reflect contaminated groundwater discharge at the river. In September 2014, hand anger samples collected by the river and oxbow lake also indicated the presence of organic rich zones containing elevated uranium (>50 mg/kg). Subsequent samples collected from five backhoe trenches in May 2015 revealed a highly heterogeneous vadose zone composed of clay, silt, sand and cobbles containing evaporites and organic rich zones which may interact with groundwater plumes.Plans for August 2015 include sonic drilling to obtain continuous cores from the surface down to the base of the surficial aquifer with multi-level monitoring wells constructed in each borehole to assess vertical variation in groundwater chemistry. Temporary well

  12. Effects of Multisensory Stimulation on a Sample of Institutionalized Elderly People With Dementia Diagnosis: A Controlled Longitudinal Trial.

    PubMed

    Maseda, Ana; Sánchez, Alba; Marante, M Pilar; González-Abraldes, Isabel; Buján, Ana; Millán-Calenti, José Carlos

    2014-08-01

    Long-term effects of multisensory stimulation were assessed using a "Snoezelen" room on older residents with dementia. Thirty patients were randomly assigned to 3 groups: multisensory stimulation environment (MSSE) group, individualized activities (activity) group, and control group. The MSSE and activity groups participated in two 30-minute weekly individualized intervention sessions over 16 weeks. Pre-, mid-, posttrial, and 8-week follow-up behavior, mood, cognitive, and functional impairment in basic activities of daily living were registered. Items included in the physically nonaggressive behavior factor improved significantly in post- versus pretrial in the MSSE group compared to the activity group, with no significant differences between MSSE and control groups. The MSSE and activity groups demonstrated behavior improvements and higher scores on the Cohen-Mansfield agitation inventory, verbal agitated behavior factor, and Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Nursing Home, with no significant differences between groups. The MSSE could have long-term positive effects on such neuropsychiatric symptoms in older people with dementia.

  13. /sup 45/Ca uptake from water by snails (Lymnaea vulgaris) in control and detergent-polluted samples

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, V.; Lal, H.; Viswanathan, P.N.; Murti, C.R.

    1984-02-01

    A biostatic assay method involving /sup 45/Ca uptake into shells and tissues of snails (Lymnaea vulgaris) in 72 hr was developed to follow the effect of detergent-polluted water on ecosystems. There was a marked decrease in the /sup 45/Ca uptake by shells and tissues of linear alkyl benzene sulfonate-exposed animals as compared to controls. No change in /sup 45/Ca uptake was observed in dead shells, thereby excluding the possibility of passive exchange.

  14. Microfinance Participation, Control Over Resources, and Justification of IPV: Results From a Nationally Representative Sample of Women.

    PubMed

    Murshid, Nadine Shaanta

    2016-04-13

    A high percentage of men and women are purported to justify intimate partner violence (IPV) in countries that are steeped in patriarchy even in the presence of programs such as microfinance that aim to address gender equity. This article examines two assertions that emerge from the literature on microfinance and its potential for positive outcomes for women who participate in it: (a) Microfinance participation is associated with reduced justification of IPV, and (b) microfinance participants with control over their own resources are less likely to justify IPV when compared with microfinance participants who do not have control over their resources. Couples data from a nationally representative survey, the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey, were used in the present study. Propensity score matching and logistic regression analyses were conducted to reveal that (a) microfinance participation was not associated with justification of IPV and that (b) women who participated in microfinance were less likely to justify IPV when they had no control over their resources. Implications for practitioners and policymakers are discussed.

  15. Stochastic asymptotical synchronization of chaotic Markovian jumping fuzzy cellular neural networks with mixed delays and the Wiener process based on sampled-data control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalpana, M.; Balasubramaniam, P.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the stochastic asymptotical synchronization of chaotic Markovian jumping fuzzy cellular neural networks (MJFCNNs) with discrete, unbounded distributed delays, and the Wiener process based on sampled-data control using the linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach. The Lyapunov—Krasovskii functional combined with the input delay approach as well as the free-weighting matrix approach is employed to derive several sufficient criteria in terms of LMIs to ensure that the delayed MJFCNNs with the Wiener process is stochastic asymptotical synchronous. Restrictions (e.g., time derivative is smaller than one) are removed to obtain a proposed sampled-data controller. Finally, a numerical example is provided to demonstrate the reliability of the derived results.

  16. Distributed observer design for bounded tracking control of leader-follower multi-agent systems in a sampled-data setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yongli; Xie, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the observer-based bounded tracking control problem of second-order multi-agent systems in a disturbance environment via sampled-data control. Two sampled-data protocols are introduced under the assumption that the dynamic leader is only available to a portion of agents and distributed observers are designed to estimate the velocity of the active leader. For the fixed communication topology case, necessary and sufficient conditions of bounded consensus tracking are obtained by using the matrix analysis method. For the switching communication topology case, we prove that system can achieve bounded tracking by applying the common Lyapunov function and perturbation theory. Simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of our results.

  17. [Sample Quality Control through the Depository and Distribution of Cancer-Related Human Materials: Experience of Kanagawa Cancer Research & Information Association (KCRIA)].

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Yohei

    2015-01-01

    Kanagawa Prefecture and its department of hospital business established the Kanagawa Cancer Research and Information Association (KCRIA) in 2006, and the Kanagawa Cancer Center (KCC) and related institutes have started to collect and distribute patient-derived cancer-related biomaterials to researchers. The tumor tissue center of KCC is collecting frozen tumor tissues, formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor tissues, serum of patients before treatment, and genomic DNA of peripheral white blood cells. Corresponding normal tissues are also collected if possible. Clinical information on patients is annotated in each sample as accurately as possible under linkable anonymization to follow the prognosis. We are evaluating the quality of tumor samples with two indices: the RNA Integrity Number (RIN) of extracted total RNAs from randomly chosen frozen tissues examined with the 2100 Bioanalyzer (Agilent Technologies, Inc., Santa Clara, CA, USA), and the histopathological examination of parts of all frozen tissues prepared in the Optimal Cutting Temperature (OTC) compound and evaluation of the contents of tumor cells. Management of the sample quality is an important issue for any biomaterial repository. The quality of samples is influenced by the procedures of sample collection and storage, and also by the storage duration. The quality could be periodically examined by monitoring analyte stability and integrity, such as RIN of frozen cancer tissues. However, the best way to collect and store RNA might not always be the same for different analytes. Therefore, sample quality control at biomaterial repositories that are preparing samples for future studies on undefined analytes is a very difficult problem. At least the standard sample operation procedure (SOP) should be available for users.

  18. The impact of exposure-biased sampling designs on detection of gene-environment interactions in case-control studies with potential exposure misclassification.

    PubMed

    Stenzel, Stephanie L; Ahn, Jaeil; Boonstra, Philip S; Gruber, Stephen B; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2015-05-01

    With limited funding and biological specimen availability, choosing an optimal sampling design to maximize power for detecting gene-by-environment (G-E) interactions is critical. Exposure-enriched sampling is often used to select subjects with rare exposures for genotyping to enhance power for tests of G-E effects. However, exposure misclassification (MC) combined with biased sampling can affect characteristics of tests for G-E interaction and joint tests for marginal association and G-E interaction. Here, we characterize the impact of exposure-biased sampling under conditions of perfect exposure information and exposure MC on properties of several methods for conducting inference. We assess the Type I error, power, bias, and mean squared error properties of case-only, case-control, and empirical Bayes methods for testing/estimating G-E interaction and a joint test for marginal G (or E) effect and G-E interaction across three biased sampling schemes. Properties are evaluated via empirical simulation studies. With perfect exposure information, exposure-enriched sampling schemes enhance power as compared to random selection of subjects irrespective of exposure prevalence but yield bias in estimation of the G-E interaction and marginal E parameters. Exposure MC modifies the relative performance of sampling designs when compared to the case of perfect exposure information. Those conducting G-E interaction studies should be aware of exposure MC properties and the prevalence of exposure when choosing an ideal sampling scheme and method for characterizing G-E interactions and joint effects.

  19. Sample Delivery and Computer Control Systems for Detecting Leaks in the Main Engines of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Timothy P.; Naylor, Guy R.; Hritz, Richard J.; Barrett, Carolyn A.

    1997-01-01

    The main engines of the Space Shuttle use hydrogen and oxygen as the fuel and oxidant. The explosive and fire hazards associated with these two components pose a serious danger to personnel and equipment. Therefore prior to use the main engines undergo extensive leak tests. Instead of using hazardous gases there tests utilize helium as the tracer element. This results in a need to monitor helium in the ppm level continuously for hours. The major challenge in developing such a low level gas monitor is the sample delivery system. This paper discuss a system developed to meet the requirements while also being mobile. Also shown is the calibration technique, stability, and accuracy results for the system.

  20. Isolation of Bdellovibrio sp. from soil samples in Mexico and their potential applications in control of pathogens.

    PubMed

    Oyedara, Omotayo Opemipo; De Luna-Santillana, Erick de Jesus; Olguin-Rodriguez, Omar; Guo, Xianwu; Mendoza-Villa, Marco Antonio; Menchaca-Arredondo, Jorge Luis; Elufisan, Temidayo Oluyomi; Garza-Hernandez, Javier Alfonso; Garcia Leon, Israel; Rodriguez-Perez, Mario Alberto

    2016-12-01

    In this study, two strains of Bdellovibrio were isolated from soil samples using the culture-dependent technique and two members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (Klebsiella sp. and Salmonella sp.) as prey. The Bdellovibrio strains were bacteriolytic, plaque-forming, and highly motile gram-negative bacteria. We identified and confirmed the Bdellovibrio strains using microscopy, PCR amplification, and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. They were observed to be different strains based on hit locus and prey range analyses. Here, the first report on Bdellovibrio strains isolated from soil in Mexico corroborates earlier report indicating that populations of Bdellovibrio found in soil are heterogeneous thereby the need to identify the various strains.

  1. The effects of quercetin supplementation on cognitive functioning in a community sample: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Canu, Will H.; Trout, Krystal L.; Nieman, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of quercetin supplementation on neurocognitive functioning. Methods: A large community sample (n = 941) completed a 12-week supplementation protocol, and participants were randomly assigned to receive 500 mg/day or 1000 mg/day quercetin, or placebo. Results: Results failed to indicate significant effects of quercetin on memory, psychomotor speed, reaction time, attention, or cognitive flexibility, despite large increases in plasma quercetin levels among the quercetin treatment groups. Discussion: Consistent with recent research, this study raises concerns regarding the generalizability of positive findings of in vitro and animal quercetin research, and provides evidence that quercetin may not have an ergogenic effect on neurocognitive functioning in humans. PMID:23983966

  2. Extraction and RP-HPLC determination of taxol in rat plasma, cell culture and quality control samples

    PubMed Central

    Tekade, Rakesh Kumar; D'Emanuele, Antony; Elhissi, Abdelbary; Agrawal, Ashish; Jain, Anurekha; Arafat, Basel Tawfiq; Jain, Narendra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, selective and validated reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method for the estimation of paclitaxel in micro-sample of rat plasma and in culture of cancer cells was performed in this study. The mobile phase consisted of an optimized mixture of methanol:water: trifluroacetic acid (80: 20: 0.1, v/v/v). Column elution at a flow rate of 1 mL/minute with UV detection at 225 nm at room temperature was used. The RP-HPLC method was successfully applied for the determination of paclitaxel in plasma samples and in culture of cancer cells with nano-quantity of estimation. The validation studies were performed in accordance with the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines. The intra- and inter-day precision showed that the coefficients of variation ranged from 1.07% to 4.27% at different levels of concentrations. To the best of our knowledge, this study also reported for the first time the optimization of different solvents for effective extraction of paclitaxel wherein tert.-butyl methyl ether (TBME): diethyl ether (DEE) in 50: 50 v/v composition was found most efficient with extraction efficiency ranging between 77.99% and 91.74% and between 76.14 and 93.66% in the plasma and cell culture, respectively. This proposed method was successfully applied to study the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel and the influence of verapamil and all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) on paclitaxel pharmacokinetics in rat models. This proposed method might emerge as a valuable aid in the laboratory monitoring of paclitaxel in a variety of in vitro as well as in vivo scenarios. PMID:24086173

  3. Levels of heavy metals and essential minerals in hair samples of children with autism in Oman: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Al-Farsi, Yahya M; Waly, Mostafa I; Al-Sharbati, Marwan M; Al-Shafaee, Mohammed A; Al-Farsi, Omar A; Al-Khaduri, Maha M; Gupta, Ishita; Ouhtit, Allal; Al-Adawi, Samir; Al-Said, Mona F; Deth, Richard C

    2013-02-01

    Toxic levels of heavy metals and low levels of essential minerals have been suggested to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This study documents the levels of heavy metals and essential minerals in hair samples of children with ASD in Muscat, the urbanized capital of Oman, Muscat. The study included 27 children with ASD and 27 matched non-ASD controls. Parental interviews were held and dietary intake questionnaires completed in conjunction with the collection of hair samples. Analysis of heavy metals and essential minerals was carried out by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Chi-square analysis and non-parametric Fisher's exact tests were used to assess statistical significance. Children with ASD had significantly higher levels of all 11 analyzed heavy metals in their hair samples (P < 0.05), ranging from 150 to 365 % of control levels. ASD children also had significantly higher levels of essential minerals sulfur, sodium, magnesium, potassium, zinc, and iron, but lower levels of calcium and copper in their hair samples. This study corroborates data from previous studies in different parts of the world indicating the presence of elevated levels of heavy metals and selective depletion of essential minerals in the hair of children with ASD.

  4. An extraction technique for analytical sample preparation in aqueous solution based on controlling dispersion of ionic surfactant assemblies in isotachophoretic migration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianlin; Qin, Yexin; He, Haibo; Lv, Jun; Fan, Yong

    2011-01-07

    An extraction technique for analytical sample preparation in aqueous solution has been developed based on controlling dispersion of ionic surfactant assemblies. An extraction technique was realized based on controlling dispersion of the ionic surfactant assemblies in their isotachophoretic migration during the extraction by arranging the solutions of leading electrolyte, ionic surfactant and terminating electrolyte in order and applying voltage. Potential of the technique for analytical sample preparation in aqueous solution has been demonstrated by extracting a model sample of four alkylphenones, which were analyzed by HPLC after the extraction. The extraction showed concentration effects on all the four alkylphenones of butyrophenone, valerophenone, hexanophenone and heptanophenone in the model sample. The enrichment factors were 5.29, 7.70, 7.25 and 7.49 for the four alkylphenones of butyrophenone, valerophenone, hexanophenone and heptanophenone, respectively. Linear relationship was obtained with all the four alkylphenones between their chromatographic peak areas before and after the extraction in the range of concentration from 0.05 ppm to 1.5 ppm. The RSD of the chromatographic peak areas in triplicate extractions was 7.97%, 3.75%, 2.91% and 4.45% for butyrophenone, valerophenone, hexanophenone and heptanophenone, respectively. Advantages of the extraction technique developed include ease of operation, low reagent cost, no consumption of organic solvents and no requirement for additional phase separation.

  5. Awareness of tobacco advertising, perceived harms of smoking, and beliefs about tobacco control among a sample of Shanghainese in China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, PinPin; Qian, Haihong; Wang, Fan; Sun, Shaojing; Nehl, Eric J; Wong, Frank Y

    2013-10-01

    This study aims to examine beliefs among residents of Shanghai, China concerning tobacco advertising and control policies concurrent with new restrictions on tobacco use and advertising in the city. A total of 518 residents of Shanghai completed a telephone interview survey. We found that 51% of participants had seen or heard of the Zhonghua cigarette brand's 'Love China' tobacco ad campaign in the past 2 years, 59% believed that the campaign would influence people to buy this specific cigarette brand as a gift, and 30% believed that it would encourage smoking. More than 75% of respondents would support legislation banning tobacco advertising in all public places, and 88% would support legislation prohibiting smoking in all public places. Multivariate analyses indicated that those who were female, more than 50 years, have accepted college and above education, and perceived greater benefits to smoking cessation were more likely to support banning tobacco advertising and prohibiting smoking in public places. Non-smokers were more likely to support prohibiting smoking in public places. The findings suggest that although tobacco advertising is widely prevalent in Shanghai, it is disliked by the public. Respondents showed high levels of support for tobacco control policies.

  6. Family constellation seminars improve psychological functioning in a general population sample: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Weinhold, Jan; Hunger, Christina; Bornhäuser, Annette; Link, Leoni; Rochon, Justine; Wild, Beate; Schweitzer, Jochen

    2013-10-01

    The study examined the efficacy of nonrecurring family constellation seminars on psychological health. We conducted a monocentric, single-blind, stratified, and balanced randomized controlled trial (RCT). After choosing their roles for participating in a family constellation seminar as either active participant (AP) or observing participant (OP), 208 adults (M = 48 years, SD = 10; 79% women) from the general population were randomly allocated to the intervention group (IG; 3-day family constellation seminar; 64 AP, 40 OP) or a wait-list control group (WLG; 64 AP, 40 OP). It was predicted that family constellation seminars would improve psychological functioning (Outcome Questionnaire OQ-45.2) at 2-week and 4-month follow-ups. In addition, we assessed the impact of family constellation seminars on psychological distress and motivational incongruence. The IG showed significantly improved psychological functioning (d = 0.45 at 2-week follow-up, p = .003; d = 0.46 at 4-month follow-up, p = .003). Results were confirmed for psychological distress and motivational incongruence. No adverse events were reported. This RCT provides evidence for the efficacy of family constellation in a nonclinical population. The implications of the findings are discussed.

  7. Mapping transmission risk of Lassa fever in West Africa: the importance of quality control, sampling bias, and error weighting.

    PubMed

    Peterson, A Townsend; Moses, Lina M; Bausch, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    Lassa fever is a disease that has been reported from sites across West Africa; it is caused by an arenavirus that is hosted by the rodent M. natalensis. Although it is confined to West Africa, and has been documented in detail in some well-studied areas, the details of the distribution of risk of Lassa virus infection remain poorly known at the level of the broader region. In this paper, we explored the effects of certainty of diagnosis, oversampling in well-studied region, and error balance on results of mapping exercises. Each of the three factors assessed in this study had clear and consistent influences on model results, overestimating risk in southern, humid zones in West Africa, and underestimating risk in drier and more northern areas. The final, adjusted risk map indicates broad risk areas across much of West Africa. Although risk maps are increasingly easy to develop from disease occurrence data and raster data sets summarizing aspects of environments and landscapes, this process is highly sensitive to issues of data quality, sampling design, and design of analysis, with macrogeographic implications of each of these issues and the potential for misrepresenting real patterns of risk.

  8. High-Pressure, High-Temperature Equations of State Using Fabricated Controlled-Geometry Ni/SiO2 Double Hot-Plate Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigott, J. S.; Ditmer, D. A.; Fischer, R. A.; Reaman, D. M.; Davis, R. J.; Panero, W. R.

    2014-12-01

    To model and predict the structure, dynamics, and composition of Earth's deep interior, accurate and precise measurements of thermal expansion and compressibility are required. The laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (LHDAC) coupled with synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction (XRD) is a powerful tool to determine pressure-volume-temperature (P-V-T) relationships. However, LHDAC experiments may be hampered by non-uniform heating caused by the mixing of transparent materials with opaque laser absorbers. Additionally, radial temperature gradients are exacerbated by small misalignments (1-3 µm) of the x-ray beam with respect to the center of the laser-heated hotspot. We have fabricated three-dimensional, controlled-geometry, double hot-plate samples. In this double hot-plate arrangement, a transparent oxide layer (SiO2) is sandwiched between two laser absorbing layers (Ni) in a single, cohesive sample. These samples were mass manufactured (>105 samples) using a combination of physical vapor deposition, photolithography, wet etching, and plasma etching. The double hot-plate arrangement coupled with the chemical and spatial homogeneity of the laser absorbing layers addresses problems caused by mixtures of transparent and opaque samples. The controlled-geometry samples have dimensions of 50 μm x 50 μm x 1.4 μm. The dimensions of the samples are much larger than the synchrotron x-ray beam. With a heating laser FWHM of ~50 μm, the radial temperature gradients within the volume probed by the x-ray are reduced. We conducted XRD experiments to P > 50 GPa and T > 2200 K at beamline 16-ID-B (HPCAT) of the Advanced Photon Source. Here we present relevant thermal modeling of the LHDAC environment along with Ni and SiO2 P-V-T equations of state. Our photolithography method of sample fabrication can be extended to different materials including but not limited to Fe and MgO.

  9. A Mission Control Architecture for robotic lunar sample return as field tested in an analogue deployment to the sudbury impact structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, John E.; Francis, Raymond; Mader, Marianne; Osinski, G. R.; Barfoot, T.; Barry, N.; Basic, G.; Battler, M.; Beauchamp, M.; Blain, S.; Bondy, M.; Capitan, R.-D.; Chanou, A.; Clayton, J.; Cloutis, E.; Daly, M.; Dickinson, C.; Dong, H.; Flemming, R.; Furgale, P.; Gammel, J.; Gharfoor, N.; Hussein, M.; Grieve, R.; Henrys, H.; Jaziobedski, P.; Lambert, A.; Leung, K.; Marion, C.; McCullough, E.; McManus, C.; Neish, C. D.; Ng, H. K.; Ozaruk, A.; Pickersgill, A.; Preston, L. J.; Redman, D.; Sapers, H.; Shankar, B.; Singleton, A.; Souders, K.; Stenning, B.; Stooke, P.; Sylvester, P.; Tornabene, L.

    2012-12-01

    A Mission Control Architecture is presented for a Robotic Lunar Sample Return Mission which builds upon the experience of the landed missions of the NASA Mars Exploration Program. This architecture consists of four separate processes working in parallel at Mission Control and achieving buy-in for plans sequentially instead of simultaneously from all members of the team. These four processes were: science processing, science interpretation, planning and mission evaluation. science processing was responsible for creating products from data downlinked from the field and is organized by instrument. Science Interpretation was responsible for determining whether or not science goals are being met and what measurements need to be taken to satisfy these goals. The Planning process, responsible for scheduling and sequencing observations, and the Evaluation process that fostered inter-process communications, reporting and documentation assisted these processes. This organization is advantageous for its flexibility as shown by the ability of the structure to produce plans for the rover every two hours, for the rapidity with which Mission Control team members may be trained and for the relatively small size of each individual team. This architecture was tested in an analogue mission to the Sudbury impact structure from June 6-17, 2011. A rover was used which was capable of developing a network of locations that could be revisited using a teach and repeat method. This allowed the science team to process several different outcrops in parallel, downselecting at each stage to ensure that the samples selected for caching were the most representative of the site. Over the course of 10 days, 18 rock samples were collected from 5 different outcrops, 182 individual field activities - such as roving or acquiring an image mosaic or other data product - were completed within 43 command cycles, and the rover travelled over 2200 m. Data transfer from communications passes were filled to 74

  10. Assessment and Control of Organic and Other Contaminants Associated with the Stardust Sample Return from Comet 81P/Wild 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, S.; Bajt, S; Clemett, S; Cody, G; Cooper, G; Degregorio, B; DeVera, V; Dworkin, J; Elsila, J; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous potential sources of organic contaminants could have greatly complicated the interpretation of the organic portions of the samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft. Measures were taken to control and assess potential organic (and other) contaminants during the design, construction, and flight of the spacecraft, and during and after recovery of the sample return capsule. Studies of controls and the returned samples suggest that many of these potential sources did not contribute any significant material to the collectors. In particular, contamination from soils at the recovery site and materials associated with the ablation of the heatshield do not appear to be significant problems. The largest source of concern is associated with the C present in the original aerogel. The relative abundance of this carbon can vary between aerogel tiles and even within individual tiles. This C was fortunately not distributed among a complex mixture of organics, but was instead largely present in a few simple forms (mostly as Si-CH{sub 3} groups). In most cases, the signature of returned cometary organics can be readily distinguished from contaminants through their different compositions, nonterrestrial isotopic ratios, and/or association with other cometary materials. However, some conversion of the carbon indigenous to the flight aerogel appears to have happened during particle impact, and some open issues remain regarding how this C may be processed into new forms during the hypervelocity impact collection of the comet dust.

  11. Assessment and Control of Organic and other Contaminants Associated with the Stardust Sample Return from Comet 81P/Wild 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sandford, S.; Bajt, S; Clemett, S; Cody, G; Cooper, G; Degregorio, B; de Vera, V; Dworkin, J; Flynn, G; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous potential sources of organic contaminants could have greatly complicated the interpretation of the organic portions of the samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft. Measures were taken to control and assess potential organic (and other) contaminants during the design, construction, and flight of the spacecraft, and during and after recovery of the sample return capsule. Studies of controls and the returned samples suggest that many of these potential sources did not contribute any significant material to the collectors. In particular, contamination from soils at the recovery site and materials associated with the ablation of the heatshield do not appear to be significant problems. The largest source of concern is associated with the C present in the original aerogel. The relative abundance of this carbon can vary between aerogel tiles and even within individual tiles. This C was fortunately not distributed among a complex mixture of organics, but was instead largely present in a few simple forms (mostly as Si-CH{sub 3} groups). In most cases, the signature of returned cometary organics can be readily distinguished from contaminants through their different compositions, nonterrestrial isotopic ratios, and/or association with other cometary materials. However, some conversion of the carbon indigenous to the flight aerogel appears to have happened during particle impact, and some open issues remain regarding how this C may be processed into new forms during the hypervelocity impact collection of the comet dust.

  12. Towards a better understanding of the relationship between executive control and theory of mind: an intra-cultural comparison of three diverse samples.

    PubMed

    Shahaeian, Ameneh; Henry, Julie D; Razmjoee, Maryam; Teymoori, Ali; Wang, Cen

    2015-09-01

    Previous research has consistently indicated that theory of mind (ToM) is associated with executive control in the preschool years. However, interpretation of this literature is limited by the fact that most studies have focused exclusively on urbanized Western cultural samples. Consequently, it is not clear whether the association between ToM and executive control reflects the specific features of this particular cohort or instead reflects a universal pattern. The present study provides the first empirical assessment of these two constructs in three diverse groups of Iranian children. Participants were 142 preschoolers (4-5 years old) from high-socioeconomic status (SES) urban (n = 33), low-SES urban (n = 37) and rural villages (n = 77). The results show that there is a robust association between ToM and executive control in all three groups, and that executive control contributes significant unique variance to ToM understanding, even after controlling for a range of variables that have been proposed as potential confounders of this relationship. However, although the three groups were equated in ToM, significant differences in executive control were evident. Moreover, cluster analysis identified three distinct clusters that were relatively homogeneous with respect to executive control and SES. One of these clusters was characterized by both low SES and low executive functioning, and showed little evidence of ToM understanding. Taken together, these findings provide possibly the clearest evidence to date that the association between ToM and executive control is not dependent on children's previous experiences on the tasks, or their family and cultural background.

  13. Distribution of U and REE on colloids in granitic groundwater and quality-controlled sampling at the Mizunami underground research laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munemoto, Takashi; Ohmori, Kazuaki; Iwatsuki, Teruki

    2014-12-01

    Colloids and their association with analogue elements, uranium, and rare earth elements (REEs), in deep granitic groundwater were investigated at the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU). Groundwater was sampled from underground boreholes and gallery walls, and the colloids were separated by size-fractionated ultrafiltration (pore sizes, 0.2 μm, 10 kDa, and 1 kDa). For the groundwater sampled from fractures in excavation walls, the size-fractionated concentrations of the colloid-forming elements were approximately constant relative to different size fractions (0.2 μm, 200 kDa, 50 kDa, and 10 kDa). The contamination of Fe- and Al-bearing materials was insignificant in the filtered groundwater from fracture seepages. Changes in the concentrations of U in the groundwater sampled from boreholes and excavation walls were associated with the Al-bearing colloids, Fe-bearing colloids, and organic matter. The REE-bearing material(s) that were >0.2 μm in size were mobile in the deep granitic groundwater, rather than occurring in association with Al-bearing, Fe-bearing colloids, and organic matter. It is suggested that sampling from water-conducting fractures in host rock and colloid elimination in borehole are important components of water quality control in geochemical investigations.

  14. Helena, the hidden beauty: Resolving the most common West Eurasian mtDNA control region haplotype by massively parallel sequencing an Italian population sample.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Martin; Iuvaro, Alessandra; Strobl, Christina; Nagl, Simone; Huber, Gabriela; Pelotti, Susi; Pettener, Davide; Luiselli, Donata; Parson, Walther

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of mitochondrial (mt)DNA is a powerful tool in forensic genetics when nuclear markers fail to give results or maternal relatedness is investigated. The mtDNA control region (CR) contains highly condensed variation and is therefore routinely typed. Some samples exhibit an identical haplotype in this restricted range. Thus, they convey only weak evidence in forensic queries and limited phylogenetic information. However, a CR match does not imply that also the mtDNA coding regions are identical or samples belong to the same phylogenetic lineage. This is especially the case for the most frequent West Eurasian CR haplotype 263G 315.1C 16519C, which is observed in various clades within haplogroup H and occurs at a frequency of 3-4% in many European populations. In this study, we investigated the power of massively parallel complete mtGenome sequencing in 29 Italian samples displaying the most common West Eurasian CR haplotype - and found an unexpected high diversity. Twenty-eight different haplotypes falling into 19 described sub-clades of haplogroup H were revealed in the samples with identical CR sequences. This study demonstrates the benefit of complete mtGenome sequencing for forensic applications to enforce maximum discrimination, more comprehensive heteroplasmy detection, as well as highest phylogenetic resolution.

  15. Analysis of Tank 38H (HTF-38-15-47, 49) and Tank 43H (HTF-43-15-51, 53) surface and subsurface supernatant samples in support of enrichment and corrosion control programs

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.

    2015-06-30

    This report provides the results of analyses on Tanks 38H and 43H surface and subsurface supernatant liquid samples in support of the Enrichment Control Program (ECP) and the Corrosion Control Program (CCP).

  16. Controlled implant/soft tissue interaction by nanoscale surface modifications of 3D porous titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Elisabeth; Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Salou, Laetitia; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Helene; Layrolle, Pierre; Debry, Christian; Lavalle, Philippe; Engin Vrana, Nihal

    2015-05-01

    Porous titanium implants are widely employed in the orthopaedics field to ensure good bone fixation. Recently, the use of porous titanium implants has also been investigated in artificial larynx development in a clinical setting. Such uses necessitate a better understanding of the interaction of soft tissues with porous titanium structures. Moreover, surface treatments of titanium have been generally evaluated in planar structures, while the porous titanium implants have complex 3 dimensional (3D) architectures. In this study, the determining factors for soft tissue integration of 3D porous titanium implants were investigated as a function of surface treatments via quantification of the interaction of serum proteins and cells with single titanium microbeads (300-500 μm in diameter). Samples were either acid etched or nanostructured by anodization. When the samples are used in 3D configuration (porous titanium discs of 2 mm thickness) in vivo (in subcutis of rats for 2 weeks), a better integration was observed for both anodized and acid etched samples compared to the non-treated implants. If the implants were also pre-treated with rat serum before implantation, the integration was further facilitated. In order to understand the underlying reasons for this effect, human fibroblast cell culture tests under several conditions (directly on beads, beads in suspension, beads encapsulated in gelatin hydrogels) were conducted to mimic the different interactions of cells with Ti implants in vivo. Physical characterization showed that surface treatments increased hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and roughness. Surface treatments also resulted in improved adsorption of serum albumin which in turn facilitated the adsorption of other proteins such as apolipoprotein as quantified by protein sequencing. The cellular response to the beads showed considerable difference with respect to the cell culture configuration. When the titanium microbeads were entrapped in cell

  17. Capillary sample

    MedlinePlus

    ... repeat the test with blood drawn from a vein. Alternative Names Blood sample - capillary; Fingerstick; Heelstick Images Phenylketonuria test Phenylketonuria test Capillary sample References Garza ...

  18. Temperature-controlled micro-TLC: a versatile green chemistry and fast analytical tool for separation and preliminary screening of steroids fraction from biological and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Zarzycki, Paweł K; Slączka, Magdalena M; Zarzycka, Magdalena B; Bartoszuk, Małgorzata A; Włodarczyk, Elżbieta; Baran, Michał J

    2011-11-01

    This paper is a continuation of our previous research focusing on development of micro-TLC methodology under temperature-controlled conditions. The main goal of present paper is to demonstrate separation and detection capability of micro-TLC technique involving simple analytical protocols without multi-steps sample pre-purification. One of the advantages of planar chromatography over its column counterpart is that each TLC run can be performed using non-previously used stationary phase. Therefore, it is possible to fractionate or separate complex samples characterized by heavy biological matrix loading. In present studies components of interest, mainly steroids, were isolated from biological samples like fish bile using single pre-treatment steps involving direct organic liquid extraction and/or deproteinization by freeze-drying method. Low-molecular mass compounds with polarity ranging from estetrol to progesterone derived from the environmental samples (lake water, untreated and treated sewage waters) were concentrated using optimized solid-phase extraction (SPE). Specific bands patterns for samples derived from surface water of the Middle Pomerania in northern part of Poland can be easily observed on obtained micro-TLC chromatograms. This approach can be useful as simple and non-expensive complementary method for fast control and screening of treated sewage water discharged by the municipal wastewater treatment plants. Moreover, our experimental results show the potential of micro-TLC as an efficient tool for retention measurements of a wide range of steroids under reversed-phase (RP) chromatographic conditions. These data can be used for further optimalization of SPE or HPLC systems working under RP conditions. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that micro-TLC based analytical approach can be applied as an effective method for the internal standard (IS) substance search. Generally, described methodology can be applied for fast fractionation or screening of the

  19. Giving Students Control over Their Learning; from Self-guided Museum Visits and Field Trips to Using Scanning Technology to Link Content to Earth Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, K. C.; Phipps, M.

    2011-12-01

    While it may seem counterintuitive, sometimes stepping back is one of the more effective pedagogical approaches instructors can make. On museum visits, an instructor's presence fundamentally alters students' experiences and can curtail student learning by limiting questions or discouraging students from exploring their own interests. Students often rely on the instructor and become passive observers, rather than engaged learners. As an alternative to instructor-led visits, self-guided student explorations of museum exhibits proved to be both popular and pedagogically effective. On pre-instruction and post-instruction surveys, these ungraded, self-guided explorations match or exceed the efficacy of traditional graded lab instruction and completely eclipse gains normally achieved by traditional lecture instruction. In addition, these explorations achieve the remarkable goal of integrating undergraduate earth science instruction into students' social lives. Based on the success of the self-guided museum explorations, this fall saw the debut of an attempt to expand this concept to field experiences. A self-guided student field exploration of Saint Anthony Falls focuses on the intersections of geological processes with human history. Students explore the waterfalls' evolution, its early interpretation by 18th and 19th century Dakota and Euro-America societies, and its subsequent social and economic impacts on Upper Midwest societies. Self-guided explorations allow students to explore field settings on their own or with friends and family in a more relaxed manner. At the same time, these explorations give students control over, and responsibility for, their own learning - a powerful pedagogical approach. Student control over their learning is also the goal of an initiative to use scanning technologies, such as linear bar codes, 2D barcodes and radio-frequency identification (RFID), to revolutionize sample identification and study. Scanning technology allows students to

  20. Comparative field evaluation of the Mbita trap, the Centers for Disease Control light trap, and the human landing catch for sampling of malaria vectors in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mathenge, Evan M; Omweri, George O; Irungu, Lucy W; Ndegwa, Paul N; Walczak, Elizabeth; Smith, Tom A; Killeen, Gerry F; Knols, Bart G J

    2004-01-01

    The mosquito sampling efficiency of a new bed net trap (the Mbita trap) was compared with that of the Centers for Disease Control miniature light trap (hung adjacent to an occupied bed net) and the human landing catch in western Kenya. Overall, the Mbita trap caught 48.7 +/- 4.8% (mean +/- SEM) the number of Anopheles gambiae Giles sensu lato caught in the human landing catch and 27.4 +/- 8.2% of the number caught by the light trap. The corresponding figures for Anopheles funestus Giles were 74.6 +/- 1.3% and 39.2 +/- 1.9%, respectively. Despite the clear differences in the numbers of mosquitoes caught by each method, both the Mbita trap and light trap catches were directly proportional to human landing catches regardless of mosquito density. No significant differences in parity or sporozoite incidence were observed between mosquitoes caught by the three methods for either An. gambiae s.l. or An. funestus. Identification of the sibling species of the An. gambiae complex by a polymerase chain reaction indicated that the ratio of An. gambiae Giles sensu stricto to An. arabiensis Patton did not vary according to the sampling method used. It is concluded that the Mbita trap is a promising tool for sampling malaria vector populations since its catch can be readily converted into equivalent human biting catch, it can be applied more intensively, it requires neither expensive equipment nor skilled personnel, and it samples mosquitoes in an exposure-free manner. Such intensive sampling capability will allow cost-effective surveillance of malaria transmission at much finer spatial and temporal resolution than has been previously possible.

  1. Environmental factors controlling the distribution of rhodoliths: An integrated study based on seafloor sampling, ROV and side scan sonar data, offshore the W-Pontine Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sañé, E.; Chiocci, F. L.; Basso, D.; Martorelli, E.

    2016-10-01

    The effects of different environmental factors controlling the distribution of different morphologies, sizes and growth forms of rhodoliths in the western Pontine Archipelago have been studied. The analysis of 231 grab samples has been integrated with 68 remotely operated vehicle (ROV) videos (22 h) and a high resolution (<1 m) side scan sonar mosaic of the seafloor surrounding the Archipelago, covering an area of approximately 460 km2. Living rhodoliths were collected in approximately 10% of the grab samples and observed in approximately 30% of the ROV dives. The combination of sediment sampling, video surveys and acoustic facies mapping suggested that the presence of rhodoliths can be associated to the dishomogeneous high backscatter sonar facies and high backscatter facies. Both pralines and unattached branches were found to be the most abundant morphological groups (50% and 41% of samples, respectively), whereas boxwork rhodoliths were less common, accounting only for less than 10% of the total number of samples. Pralines and boxwork rhodoliths were almost equally distributed among large (28%), medium (36%) and small sizes (36%). Pralines generally presented a fruticose growth form (49% of pralines) even if pralines with encrusting-warty (36% of pralines) or lumpy (15% of pralines) growth forms were also present. Morphologies, sizes and growth forms vary mainly along the depth gradient. Large rhodoliths with a boxwork morphology are abundant at depth, whereas unattached branches and, in general, rhodoliths with a high protuberance degree are abundant in shallow waters. The exposure to storm waves and bottom currents related to geostrofic circulation could explain the absence of rhodoliths off the eastern side of the three islands forming the Archipelago.

  2. Glass sample preparation and performance investigations. [solar x-ray imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1992-01-01

    This final report details the work performed under this delivery order from April 1991 through April 1992. The currently available capabilities for integrated optical performance modeling at MSFC for large and complex systems such as AXAF were investigated. The Integrated Structural Modeling (ISM) program developed by Boeing for the U.S. Air Force was obtained and installed on two DECstations 5000 at MSFC. The structural, thermal and optical analysis programs available in ISM were evaluated. As part of the optomechanical engineering activities, technical support was provided in the design of support structure, mirror assembly, filter wheel assembly and material selection for the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program. As part of the fabrication activities, a large number of zerodur glass samples were prepared in different sizes and shapes for acid etching, coating and polishing experiments to characterize the subsurface damage and stresses produced by the grinding and polishing operations. Various optical components for AXAF video microscope and the x-ray test facility were also fabricated. A number of glass fabrication and test instruments such as a scatter plate interferometer, a gravity feed saw and some phenolic cutting blades were fabricated, integrated and tested.

  3. Optimal control of objects on the micro- and nano-scale by electrokinetic and electromagnetic manipulation: For bio-sample preparation, quantum information devices and magnetic drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, Roland

    In this thesis I show achievements for precision feedback control of objects inside micro-fluidic systems and for magnetically guided ferrofluids. Essentially, this is about doing flow control, but flow control on the microscale, and further even to nanoscale accuracy, to precisely and robustly manipulate micro and nano-objects (i.e. cells and quantum dots). Target applications include methods to miniaturize the operations of a biological laboratory (lab-on-a-chip), i.e. presenting pathogens to on-chip sensing cells or extracting cells from messy bio-samples such as saliva, urine, or blood; as well as non-biological applications such as deterministically placing quantum dots on photonic crystals to make multi-dot quantum information systems. The particles are steered by creating an electrokinetic fluid flow that carries all the particles from where they are to where they should be at each time step. The control loop comprises sensing, computation, and actuation to steer particles along trajectories. Particle locations are identified in real-time by an optical system and transferred to a control algorithm that then determines the electrode voltages necessary to create a flow field to carry all the particles to their next desired locations. The process repeats at the next time instant. I address following aspects of this technology. First I explain control and vision algorithms for steering single and multiple particles, and show extensions of these algorithms for steering in three dimensional (3D) spaces. Then I show algorithms for calculating power minimum paths for steering multiple particles in actuation constrained environments. With this microfluidic system I steer biological cells and nano particles (quantum dots) to nano meter precision. In the last part of the thesis I develop and experimentally demonstrate two dimensional (2D) manipulation of a single droplet of ferrofluid by feedback control of 4 external electromagnets, with a view towards enabling

  4. Evidence for schizophrenia susceptibility alleles in the Indian population: An association of neurodevelopmental genes in case-control and familial samples.

    PubMed

    Jajodia, Ajay; Kaur, Harpreet; Kumari, Kalpana; Gupta, Meenal; Baghel, Ruchi; Srivastava, Ankit; Sood, Mamta; Chadda, Rakesh Kumar; Jain, Sanjeev; Kukreti, Ritushree

    2015-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder with lifetime prevalence of ~1% worldwide. A genotyping study was conducted using a custom panel of Illumina 1536 SNPs in 840 schizophrenia cases and 876 controls (351 patients and 385 controls from North India; and 436 patients, 401 controls and 143 familial samples with 53 probands containing 37 complete and 16 incomplete trios from South India). Meta-analysis of this population of Indo-European and Dravidian ancestry identified three strongly associated variants with schizophrenia: STT3A (rs548181, p=1.47×10(-5)), NRG1 (rs17603876, p=8.66×10(-5)) and GRM7 (rs3864075, p=4.06×10(-3)). Finally, a meta-analysis was conducted comparing our data with data from the Schizophrenia Psychiatric Genome-Wide Association Study Consortium (PGC-SCZ) that supported rs548181 (p=1.39×10(-7)). In addition, combined analysis of sporadic case-control association and a transmission disequilibrium test in familial samples from South Indian population identified three associations: rs1062613 (p=3.12×10(-3)), a functional promoter variant of HTR3A; rs6710782 (p=3.50×10(-3)), an intronic variant of ERBB4; and rs891903 (p=1.05×10(-2)), an intronic variant of EBF1. The results support the risk variants observed in the earlier published work and suggest a potential role of neurodevelopmental genes in the schizophrenia pathogenesis.

  5. Analysis of Tank 13H (HTF-13-14-156, 157) Surface and Subsurface Supernatant Samples in Support of Enrichment Control, Corrosion Control and Sodium Aluminosilicate Formation Potential Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.

    2015-02-18

    The 2H Evaporator system includes mainly Tank 43H (feed tank) and Tank 38H (drop tank) with Tank 22H acting as the DWPF recycle receipt tank. The Tank 13H is being characterized to ensure that it can be transferred to the 2H evaporator. This report provides the results of analyses on Tanks 13H surface and subsurface supernatant liquid samples to ensure compliance with the Enrichment Control Program (ECP), the Corrosion Control Program and Sodium Aluminosilicate Formation Potential in the Evaporator. The U-235 mass divided by the total uranium averaged 0.00799 (0.799 % uranium enrichment) for both the surface and subsurface Tank 13H samples. This enrichment is slightly above the enrichment for Tanks 38H and 43H, where the enrichment normally ranges from 0.59 to 0.7 wt%. The U-235 concentration in Tank 13H samples ranged from 2.01E-02 to 2.63E-02 mg/L, while the U-238 concentration in Tank 13H ranged from 2.47E+00 to 3.21E+00 mg/L. Thus, the U-235/total uranium ratio is in line with the prior 2H-evaporator ECP samples. Measured sodium and silicon concentrations averaged, respectively, 2.46 M and 1.42E-04 M (3.98 mg/L) in the Tank 13H subsurface sample. The measured aluminum concentration in Tanks 13H subsurface samples averaged 2.01E-01 M.

  6. On designing stochastic sampled-data controller for master-slave synchronization of chaotic Lur'e system via a novel integral inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Kaibo; Liu, Xinzhi; Zhu, Hong; Zhong, Shouming

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the problem of designing stochastic sampled-data controller for master-slave synchronization of chaotic Lur'e systems (CLSs) via a novel approach. Specially, first, we assume that the occurrence probabilities of the sampling intervals are fixed constants and satisfy a Bernoulli distribution. In order to take full advantage of the sawtooth structure characteristics of the sampling input delay, we construct a newly augmented Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) based on the extended Wirtinger inequality. Second, by using a novel free-matrix-based integral inequality (FMBII) including well-known integral inequalities as special cases, an exponentially mean-square synchronization criterion is proposed for analyzing the corresponding synchronization error system. Third, the desired estimator gain can be designed in terms of the solution to linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) which can be solved effectively by using available software. Finally, three numerical simulation examples of Chua's circuit and neural network are given to illustrate the effectiveness and superiorities of the proposed method.

  7. Temperature controlled ionic liquid-based dispersive micro-extraction using two ligands, for determination of aluminium in scalp hair samples of Alzheimer's patients: A multivariate study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arain, Mariam S.; Arain, Salma A.; Kazi, Tasneem G.; Afridi, Hassan I.; Ali, Jamshaid; Naeemulllah; Arain, Sadaf S.; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Mughal, Moina Akhtar

    2015-02-01

    A green and sensitive temperature controlled dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (TIL-DLLME) methodology based on the application of ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, [C4mim][PF6], as an extractant solvent was proposed for the preconcentration of trace levels of aluminium (Al3+) in scalp hair samples of Alzheimer's (AD) patients, prior to analyzing by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The Al3+ was complexed with 8-hydrooxyquinoline (oxine) (L1) and 3,5,7,2‧-4‧ pentahydroxy flavone (morin) (L2) separately and then extracted by IL at temperature (50 ± 2.0 °C). Some effective factors that influence the TIL-DLLME efficiency such as pH, ligands concentrations, volume of IL, ionic strength, and incubation time were investigated and optimized by multivariate analysis. In the optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection (3 s) and enhancement factor were 0.56 μg L-1, 0.64 μg L-1 and 85, 73 for both ligands, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for six replicate determinations of 100 μg L-1 Al3+ complexed with oxine and morin were found to be 3.88% and 4.74%, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference material of human hair (NCSZC81002).and applied satisfactorily to the determination of Al3+ in acid digested scalp hair samples of AD patients and healthy controls. The resulted data shows significant higher level in scalp hair samples of AD male patients with related to referents of same age and socioeconomic status.

  8. Temperature controlled ionic liquid-based dispersive micro-extraction using two ligands, for determination of aluminium in scalp hair samples of Alzheimer's patients: a multivariate study.

    PubMed

    Arain, Mariam S; Arain, Salma A; Kazi, Tasneem G; Afridi, Hassan I; Ali, Jamshaid; Naeemulllah; Arain, Sadaf S; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Mughal, Moina Akhtar

    2015-02-25

    A green and sensitive temperature controlled dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (TIL-DLLME) methodology based on the application of ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, [C4mim][PF6], as an extractant solvent was proposed for the preconcentration of trace levels of aluminium (Al(3+)) in scalp hair samples of Alzheimer's (AD) patients, prior to analyzing by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The Al(3+) was complexed with 8-hydrooxyquinoline (oxine) (L1) and 3,5,7,2'-4' pentahydroxy flavone (morin) (L2) separately and then extracted by IL at temperature (50±2.0°C). Some effective factors that influence the TIL-DLLME efficiency such as pH, ligands concentrations, volume of IL, ionic strength, and incubation time were investigated and optimized by multivariate analysis. In the optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection (3s) and enhancement factor were 0.56 μg L(-1), 0.64 μg L(-1) and 85, 73 for both ligands, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for six replicate determinations of 100 μg L(-1) Al(3+) complexed with oxine and morin were found to be 3.88% and 4.74%, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference material of human hair (NCSZC81002).and applied satisfactorily to the determination of Al(3+) in acid digested scalp hair samples of AD patients and healthy controls. The resulted data shows significant higher level in scalp hair samples of AD male patients with related to referents of same age and socioeconomic status.

  9. Total Effective Xenoestrogen Burden in Serum Samples and Risk for Breast Cancer in a Population-Based Multicase–Control Study in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Fernández, Mariana F.; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Whelan, Denis; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Llorca, Javier; Villanueva, Cristina M.; Guevara, Marcela; Molina-Molina, José-Manuel; Artacho-Cordón, Francisco; Barriuso-Lapresa, Laura; Tusquets, Ignasi; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Aragonés, Nuria; Olea, Nicolás; Kogevinas, Manolis; Pollán, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most studies on endocrine-disrupting chemicals and breast cancer have focused on single compounds and have produced inconclusive findings. Objectives: We assessed the combined estrogenic effects of mixtures of xenoestrogens in serum and their relationship to breast cancer risk. Methods: A total of 186 incident pretreatment breast cancer cases and 196 frequency-matched controls were randomly sampled from a large population-based multicase–control study in Spain. The total effective xenoestrogen burden attributable to organohalogenated xenoestrogens (TEXB-α) and endogenous hormones and more polar xenoestrogens (TEXB-β) was determined in serum samples using high-performance liquid chromatography and E-Screen bioassay. Odds ratios for breast cancer comparing tertiles of serum TEXB-α and TEXB-β were estimated using logistic models, and smooth risk trends were obtained using spline models. Results: Cases had higher geometric mean TEXB-α and TEXB-β levels (8.32 and 9.94 Eeq pM/mL, respectively) than controls (2.99 and 5.96 Eeq pM/mL, respectively). The fully adjusted odds ratios for breast cancer (95% confidence intervals) comparing the second and third tertiles of TEXB-α with the first tertile were 1.77 (0.76, 4.10) and 3.45 (1.50, 7.97), respectively, and those for TEXB-β were 2.35 (1.10, 5.03) and 4.01 (1.88, 8.56), respectively. A steady increase in risk was evident across all detected TEXB-α levels and a sigmoidal trend was observed for TEXB-β. Individual xenoestrogens showed weak and opposing associations with breast cancer risk. Conclusions: This is the first study to show a strong positive association between serum total xenoestrogen burden and breast cancer risk, highlighting the importance of evaluating xenoestrogen mixtures, rather than single compounds, when studying hormone-related cancers. Citation: Pastor-Barriuso R, Fernández MF, Castaño-Vinyals G, Whelan D, Pérez-Gómez B, Llorca J, Villanueva CM, Guevara M, Molina-Molina JM

  10. CERAMIC: Case-Control Association Testing in Samples with Related Individuals, Based on Retrospective Mixed Model Analysis with Adjustment for Covariates

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Sheng; McPeek, Mary Sara

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of genetic association testing of a binary trait in a sample that contains related individuals, where we adjust for relevant covariates and allow for missing data. We propose CERAMIC, an estimating equation approach that can be viewed as a hybrid of logistic regression and linear mixed-effects model (LMM) approaches. CERAMIC extends the recently proposed CARAT method to allow samples with related individuals and to incorporate partially missing data. In simulations, we show that CERAMIC outperforms existing LMM and generalized LMM approaches, maintaining high power and correct type 1 error across a wider range of scenarios. CERAMIC results in a particularly large power increase over existing methods when the sample includes related individuals with some missing data (e.g., when some individuals with phenotype and covariate information have missing genotype), because CERAMIC is able to make use of the relationship information to incorporate partially missing data in the analysis while correcting for dependence. Because CERAMIC is based on a retrospective analysis, it is robust to misspecification of the phenotype model, resulting in better control of type 1 error and higher power than that of prospective methods, such as GMMAT, when the phenotype model is misspecified. CERAMIC is computationally efficient for genomewide analysis in samples of related individuals of almost any configuration, including small families, unrelated individuals and even large, complex pedigrees. We apply CERAMIC to data on type 2 diabetes (T2D) from the Framingham Heart Study. In a genome scan, 9 of the 10 smallest CERAMIC p-values occur in or near either known T2D susceptibility loci or plausible candidates, verifying that CERAMIC is able to home in on the important loci in a genome scan. PMID:27695091

  11. Venous Sampling

    MedlinePlus

    ... parts of the body, including: Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) , in which blood samples are taken from the ... for a few days before the procedure. For AVS, you will be asked to stop taking certain ...

  12. Construction and evaluation of a microbiological positive process internal control for PCR-based examination of food samples for Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Murphy, N M; McLauchlin, J; Ohai, C; Grant, K A

    2007-11-30

    PCR assays for food-borne pathogens are widely available but have had more limited application to food testing compared with their use in clinical laboratories. When testing food samples, false negative PCR results can occur and may be due to interference with target-cell lysis necessary for nucleic acid extraction, nucleic acid degradation and/or direct inhibition of the PCR. Therefore, it is essential to include appropriate controls for the application of PCR to the detection of pathogens in food samples. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a novel internal control (IC), capable of monitoring the complete detection procedure, from DNA extraction through to amplification and detection. A 'positive process' IC was developed for the reliable application of real-time PCR assays for the detection of Salmonella enterica or Listeria monocytogenes in enrichment broths. Two novel real-time 5' nuclease PCR assays for the detection of a 77 bp fragment of the green fluorescent protein (gfp) gene and a 91 bp fragment of the iroB gene of S. enterica were developed. These assays were specific and had detection limits of 5+/-0.88 and 15+/-1.03 CFU per PCR for the gfp and iroB genes respectively. The gfp PCR assay was combined with the iroB PCR assay, and also with a previously published real-time 5' nuclease PCR assay for the detection of the hlyA gene of L. monocytogenes. Duplexed assays were optimised such that the target genes were simultaneously amplified at similar sensitivities to single reactions. The gfp gene was cloned into the chromosome of a non-pathogenic strain of Escherichia coli and the modified strain successfully encapsulated in LENTICULE discs. A single disc was added to 1 ml of standard enrichment broths immediately prior to DNA extraction, and used as an IC for the detection of L. monocytogenes and S. enterica by PCR. This method was evaluated using 393 naturally contaminated food or environmental samples, 267 for the detection of Salmonella

  13. Laser sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatenko, A. A.; Revina, E. I.

    2015-10-01

    The review is devoted to the major advances in laser sampling. The advantages and drawbacks of the technique are considered. Specific features of combinations of laser sampling with various instrumental analytical methods, primarily inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, are discussed. Examples of practical implementation of hybrid methods involving laser sampling as well as corresponding analytical characteristics are presented. The bibliography includes 78 references.

  14. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Danny A.; Tomich, Stanley D.; Glover, Donald W.; Allen, Errol V.; Hales, Jeremy M.; Dana, Marshall T.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  15. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  16. Stardust Sample: Investigator's Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carl

    2006-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust spacecraft returned the first in situ collection of samples from a comet, and the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust. Stardust is the first US sample return mission from a planetary body since Apollo, and the first ever from beyond the moon. This handbook is a basic reference source for allocation procedures and policies for Stardust samples. These samples consist of particles and particle residues in aerogel collectors, in aluminum foil, and in spacecraft components. Contamination control samples and unflown collection media are also available for allocation.

  17. Comparison of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-backpack and insectazooka aspirators for sampling Aedes polynesiensis in French Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Hapairai, Limb K; Sang, Michel A Cheong; Bossin, Hervé C

    2014-06-01

    The efficiency of the recently developed handheld InsectaZooka (IZ) aspirator was compared to that of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Backpack (CDC-BP) aspirator by conducting human bait collections on 2 islets (locally called motus) of the atoll of Tetiaroa, French Polynesia. Abundance of mosquitoes was compared between the wind-exposed and wind-protected sides of each motu to measure the effect of wind on mosquito distribution. The number of host-seeking Aedes polynesiensis mosquitoes collected on the 2 motus with either sampling device was not significantly different. Collection of male mosquitoes was low irrespective of the type of aspirator used. Wind had an effect on mosquito distribution, as females were more abundant on the protected sides of both motus. The IZ aspirator is a lighter and equally efficient alternative to the CDC-BP aspirator for collecting Ae. polynesiensis.

  18. Traditional Chinese medicine and sports drug testing: identification of natural steroid administration in doping control urine samples resulting from musk (pod) extracts.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Geyer, Hans; Thieme, Detlef; Grosse, Joachim; Rautenberg, Claudia; Flenker, Ulrich; Beuck, Simon; Thomas, Andreas; Holland, Ruben; Dvorak, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    The administration of musk extract, that is, ingredients obtained by extraction of the liquid secreted from the preputial gland or resulting grains of the male musk deer (eg, Moschus moschiferus), has been recommended in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) applications and was listed in the Japanese pharmacopoeia for various indications requiring cardiovascular stimulation, anti-inflammatory medication or androgenic hormone therapy. Numerous steroidal components including cholesterol, 5α-androstane-3,17-dione, 5β-androstane-3,17-dione, androsterone, etiocholanolone, epiandrosterone, 3β-hydroxy-androst-5-en-17-one, androst-4-ene-3,17-dione and the corresponding urea adduct 3α-ureido-androst-4-en-17-one were characterised as natural ingredients of musk over several decades, implicating an issue concerning doping controls if used for the treatment of elite athletes. In the present study, the impact of musk extract administration on sports drug testing results of five females competing in an international sporting event is reported. In the course of routine doping controls, adverse analytical findings concerning the athletes' steroid profile, corroborated by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) data, were obtained. The athletes' medical advisors admitted the prescription of TCM-based musk pod preparations and provided musk pod samples for comparison purposes to clarify the antidoping rule violation. Steroid profiles, IRMS results, literature data and a musk sample obtained from a living musk deer of a local zoo conclusively demonstrated the use of musk pod extracts in all cases which, however, represented a doping offence as prohibited anabolic-androgenic steroids were administered.

  19. Temperature-controlled ultrasound- and vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction combined with GC for the determination of the concentrations of organophosphorus pesticides in beverage samples.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tong; Zhao, Wenting; Yang, Zhonghua; Gao, Haixiang; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work was to develop temperature-controlled ultrasound- and vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction as a fast and efficient approach for the extraction of nine organophosphorus pesticides in beverage samples followed by GC with flame photometric detection analysis. The combination of ultrasonication and vortexing were used to assist the microextraction, and the use of a dispersion solvent was avoided. Several variables that could potentially affect the extraction efficiency, namely, the type and volume of extraction solvent, sequence, and time of ultrasonication and vortexing, ultrasonication bath temperature and ionic strength were optimized. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graphs were linear over the range of 0.5-200 μg/L. The LOD (S/N = 3) was between 0.01 and 0.05. The optimized method exhibited a good precision level with RSD values between 4.5 and 9.8%. The enrichment factors for the nine organophosphorus pesticides were between 224 and 339. Four beverage samples were successfully analyzed using the proposed method.

  20. The interprocess NIR sampling as an alternative approach to multivariate statistical process control for identifying sources of product-quality variability.

    PubMed

    Marković, Snežana; Kerč, Janez; Horvat, Matej

    2017-03-01

    We are presenting a new approach of identifying sources of variability within a manufacturing process by NIR measurements of samples of intermediate material after each consecutive unit operation (interprocess NIR sampling technique). In addition, we summarize the development of a multivariate statistical process control (MSPC) model for the production of enteric-coated pellet product of the proton-pump inhibitor class. By developing provisional NIR calibration models, the identification of critical process points yields comparable results to the established MSPC modeling procedure. Both approaches are shown to lead to the same conclusion, identifying parameters of extrusion/spheronization and characteristics of lactose that have the greatest influence on the end-product's enteric coating performance. The proposed approach enables quicker and easier identification of variability sources during manufacturing process, especially in cases when historical process data is not straightforwardly available. In the presented case the changes of lactose characteristics are influencing the performance of the extrusion/spheronization process step. The pellet cores produced by using one (considered as less suitable) lactose source were on average larger and more fragile, leading to consequent breakage of the cores during subsequent fluid bed operations. These results were confirmed by additional experimental analyses illuminating the underlying mechanism of fracture of oblong pellets during the pellet coating process leading to compromised film coating.

  1. Lunar Sample Quarantine & Sample Curation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, Judith H.

    2000-01-01

    The main goal of this presentation is to discuss some of the responsibility of the lunar sample quarantine project. The responsibilities are: flying the mission safely, and on schedule, protect the Earth from biohazard, and preserve scientific integrity of samples.

  2. A sequencing-based survey of functional APAF1 alleles in a large sample of individuals with affective illness and population controls.

    PubMed

    Amin, Zenab; Kanarek, Katarzyna; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Walderhaug, Espen; Ilomäki, Risto; Blumberg, Hilary; Price, Lawrence H; Bhagwagar, Zubin; Carpenter, Linda L; Tyrka, Audrey R; Magnusson, Andres; Landrø, Nils Inge; Zvartau, Edwin; Gelernter, Joel; Epperson, C Neill; Räsänen, Pirkko; Siironen, Jari; Lappalainen, Jaakko

    2010-01-05

    Rare apoptosis-promoting functional variants in the apoptosis protease activating factor 1 (APAF1) gene were recently reported to co-segregate with major depression in male members of families from Utah. In order to estimate the impact of these variants on risk for major depressive disorder (MDD) in the general population, we surveyed the frequency of the APAF1 putative MDD risk alleles using re-sequencing in a large sample of northern European and European-American subjects, including a large number of males with MDD. The E777K and N782T APAF1 variants previously described by Harlan et al. [Harlan et al. (2006) Mol Psychiatry 11(1):76-85] were found at low frequencies in affected individuals and population controls. The C450W and Q465R variants were not detected in any of the 632 subjects sequenced. These results show that the APAF1 variants associated with risk for MDD in the Utah pedigrees are very rare in Northern European and European-American populations. In addition, the E777K and N782T variants were found at low frequencies both in patients and population controls, suggesting that these variants have limited impact on risk for MDD.

  3. Community-randomised controlled trial embedded in the Anishinaabek Cervical Cancer Screening Study: human papillomavirus self-sampling versus Papanicolaou cytology

    PubMed Central

    Zehbe, Ingeborg; Jackson, Robert; Wood, Brianne; Weaver, Bruce; Escott, Nicholas; Severini, Alberto; Krajden, Mel; Bishop, Lisa; Morrisseau, Kyla; Ogilvie, Gina; Burchell, Ann N; Little, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The incidence of cervical cancer is up to 20-fold higher among First Nations women in Canada than the general population, probably due to lower participation in screening. Offering human papillomavirus (HPV) self-sampling in place of Papanicolaou (Pap) testing may eventually increase screening participation and reduce cervical cancer rates in this population. Design A community-randomised controlled screening trial. Setting First Nations communities in Northwest Ontario, Canada. Participants Women aged between 25 and 69, living in Robinson Superior Treaty First Nations. The community was the unit of randomisation. Interventions Women were asked to complete a questionnaire and have screening by HPV self-sampling (arm A) or Pap testing (arm B). Primary outcome measures The number of women who participated in cervical screening. Randomisation Community clusters were randomised to include approximately equivalent numbers of women in each arm. Results 6 communities were randomised to arm A and 5 to arm B. One community withdrew, leaving 5 communities in each group (834 eligible women). Participation was <25%. Using clustered intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis, initial and cumulative averaged uptakes in arm A were 1.4-fold (20% vs 14.3%, p=0.628) and 1.3-fold (20.6% vs 16%, p=0.694) higher compared to arm B, respectively. Corresponding per protocol (PP) analysis indicates 2.2-fold (22.9% vs 10.6%, p=0.305) and 1.6-fold (22.9% vs 14.1%, p=0.448) higher uptakes in arm A compared to arm B. Screening uptake varied between communities (range 0–62.1%). Among women who completed a questionnaire (18.3% in arm A, 21.7% in arm B), the screening uptake was 1.8-fold (ITT; p=0.1132) or 3-fold (PP; p<0.01) higher in arm A versus arm B. Conclusions Pap and HPV self-sampling were compared in a marginalised, Canadian population. Results indicated a preference for self-sampling. More research on how to reach underscreened Indigenous women is necessary. Trial registration

  4. Altered Expression Patterns of Inflammation-Associated and Trophic Molecules in Substantia Nigra and Striatum Brain Samples from Parkinson's Disease, Incidental Lewy Body Disease and Normal Control Cases

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Douglas G.; Lue, Lih-Fen; Serrano, Geidy; Adler, Charles H.; Caviness, John N.; Sue, Lucia I.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of inflammation has been consistently associated with pathology in Parkinson's disease (PD)-affected brains, and has been suggested as a causative factor. Dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) pars compacta, whose loss results in the clinical symptoms associated with PD, are particularly susceptible to inflammatory damage and oxidative stress. Inflammation in the striatum, where SN dopaminergic neurons project, is also a feature of PD brains. It is not known whether inflammatory changes occur first in striatum or SN. Many animal models of PD have implicated certain inflammatory molecules with dopaminergic cell neuronal loss; however, there have been few studies to validate these findings by measuring the levels of these and other inflammatory factors in human PD brain samples. This study also included samples from incidental Lewy body disease (ILBD) cases, since ILBD is considered a non-symptomatic precursor to PD, with subjects having significant loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-producing neurons. We hypothesized that there may be a progressive change in key inflammatory factors in ILBD samples intermediate between neurologically normal and PD. To address this, we used a quantitative antibody-array platform (Raybiotech-Quantibody arrays) to measure the levels of 160 different inflammation-associated cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and related molecules in extracts of SN and striatum from clinically and neuropathologically characterized PD, ILBD, and normal control cases. Patterns of changes in inflammation and related molecules were distinctly different between SN and striatum. Our results showed significantly different levels of interleukin (IL)-5, IL-15, monokine induced by gamma interferon, and IL-6 soluble receptor in SN between disease groups. A different panel of 13 proteins with significant changes in striatum, with IL-15 as the common feature, was identified. Although the ability to detect some proteins was limited by sensitivity

  5. Cytokine Patterns in Tuberculosis Infection; IL-1ra, IL-2 and IP-10 Differentiate Borderline QuantiFERON-TB Samples from Uninfected Controls

    PubMed Central

    Wergeland, Ida; Assmus, Jörg; Dyrhol-Riise, Anne Ma

    2016-01-01

    Background Interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) do not discriminate between active tuberculosis (TB) and latent TB infection (LTBI), which limit their use in TB endemic areas. Subjects with QuantiFERON-TB (QFT) results around the diagnostic cut-off more likely show inconsistent results on serial testing which makes the interpretation of the assay difficult. We have studied potential biomarkers in patients with various stages of TB infection and with borderline QFT tests compared to those with higher values. Methods 27 soluble biomarkers were analysed in QFT supernatants from patients with active TB (n = 18), individuals with LTBI (n = 48) and from QFT negative controls (n = 16) by the Multiplex bead assay. The LTBI group was classified into two groups according to QFT IFN-γ levels; QFT borderline (0.35–0.70 IU/mL, n = 11) or QFT high (>0.70 IU/mL, n = 36). Results The levels of IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-13, IL-15, IFN-γ, IP-10 and MCP-1 in background corrected TB antigen stimulated supernatants (TBAg-Nil) significantly distinguished both active TB and LTBI QFT high groups from the QFT negative controls (p≤0.004). In addition, IL-1ra, IL-2 and IP-10 significantly differentiated the QFT borderline group from the controls (p≤0.001). Still, in the QFT borderline group the IL-1ra and IP-10 levels were not significant different from neither the QFT high nor the active TB group, whereas the IL-2 levels were lower (p≤0.003). The level of IP-10 showed the best separation between the QFT borderline group and the QFT negative controls (AUC 0.92) and offered 100% sensitivity for active TB. Conclusion IL-1ra, IL-2 and IP-10 differentiate QFT borderline samples from uninfected controls and the majority of QFT borderline subjects were classified as LTBI by these markers. Still, inconsistency was seen, and further studies are needed to examine the performance of alternative markers before concluded if they could be used as diagnostics tools. PMID:27685462

  6. The Mental Health Impact of Computer and Internet Training on a Multi-ethnic Sample of Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Results of a Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Laganá, Luciana; García, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We preliminarily explored the effects of computer and internet training in older age and attempted to address the diversity gap in the ethnogeriatric literature, given that, in our study’s sample, only one-third of the participants self-identified as White. The aim of this investigation was to compare two groups - the control and the experimental conditions - regarding theme 1) computer attitudes and related self-efficacy, and theme 2) self-esteem and depressive symptomatology. Methods: Sixty non-institutionalized residents of Los Angeles County (mean age ± SD: 69.12 ± 10.37 years; age range: 51-92) were randomly assigned to either the experimental group (n=30) or the waitlist/control group (n=30). The experimental group was involved in 6 weeks of one-on-one computer and internet training for one 2-hour session per week. The same training was administered to the control participants after their post-test. Outcome measures included the four variables, organized into the two aforementioned themes. Results: There were no significant between-group differences in either post-test computer attitudes or self-esteem. However, findings revealed that the experimental group reported greater computer self-efficacy, compared to the waitlist/control group, at post-test/follow-up [F(1,56)=28.89, p=0.001, η2=0.01]. Additionally, at the end of the computer and internet training, there was a substantial and statistically significant decrease in depression scores among those in the experimental group when compared to the waitlist/control group [F(1,55)=9.06, p<0.004, η2=0.02]. Conclusions: There were significant improvements in favour of the experimental group in computer self-efficacy and, of noteworthy clinical relevance, in depression, as evidenced by a decreased percentage of significantly depressed experimental subjects from 36.7% at baseline to 16.7% at the end of our intervention. PMID:24151452

  7. Sampling Development

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of the enterprise. This article discusses how to sample development in order to accurately discern the shape of developmental change. The ideal solution is daunting: to summarize behavior over 24-hour intervals and collect daily samples over the critical periods of change. We discuss the magnitude of errors due to undersampling, and the risks associated with oversampling. When daily sampling is not feasible, we offer suggestions for sampling methods that can provide preliminary reference points and provisional sketches of the general shape of a developmental trajectory. Denser sampling then can be applied strategically during periods of enhanced variability, inflections in the rate of developmental change, or in relation to key events or processes that may affect the course of change. Despite the challenges of dense repeated sampling, researchers must take seriously the problem of sampling on a developmental time scale if we are to know the true shape of developmental change. PMID:22140355

  8. Fluid sampling pump

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.V.; Nimberger, M.; Ward, R.L.

    1991-12-24

    This patent describes a fluid sampling pump for withdrawing pressurized sample fluid from a flow line and for pumping a preselected quantity of sample fluid with each pump driving stroke from the pump to a sample vessel, the sampling pump including a pump body defining a pump bore therein having a central axis, a piston slideably moveable within the pump bore and having a fluid inlet end and an opposing operator end, a fluid sample inlet port open to sample fluid in the flow line, a fluid sample outlet port for transmitting fluid from the pump bore to the sample vessel, and a line pressure port in fluid pressure sample fluid in the flow line, an inlet valve for selectively controlling sample fluid flow from the flow line through the fluid sample inlet port, an operator unit for periodically reciprocating the piston within the pump bore, and a controller for regulating the stroke of the piston within the pump bore, and thereby the quantity of fluid pumped with each pump driving stroke. It comprises a balanced check valve seat; a balanced check valve seal; a compression member; and a central plunger.

  9. Sampling Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of…

  10. Risk Factors for HIV Diagnosis Among Men Who Have Sex with Men: Results of a Case-Control Study in One Sample of Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhongrong; Huang, Zhaohui; Dong, Zhengquan; Li, Jing; Zhang, Sichao; Wu, Nanping; Jin, Meihua

    2016-12-01

    Substantial increases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been reported worldwide in recent years, particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM). We conducted a matched case-control study to examine the factors associated with HIV diagnosis among MSM in one sample of eastern China. Between February 2012 and December 2014, we used surveillance records to identify MSM diagnosed with HIV (case participants); we also recruited MSM who did not have HIV (controls) and then matched them (2:1) with control cases in terms of age (±3 years). Multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess the factors associated with HIV diagnosis. According to a multivariate analysis using logistic regression model involving 101 cases and 202 matched controls, a lack of comprehensive knowledge of HIV (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.40; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.18, 0.89), a monthly income of ≥4,000 RMB (adjusted OR = 2.99; 95% CI = 1.45, 6.16), having at least two male sexual partners in the past 6 months (adjusted OR = 2.85; 95% CI = 1.28, 6.31), participating in at least four anal sex experiences with a man in the past month (adjusted OR = 3.56; 95% CI = 1.64, 7.73), and having a current syphilis infection (adjusted OR = 3.30; 95% CI = 1.06, 10.25) were associated with an increased risk for HIV diagnosis. MSM with a comprehensive knowledge of HIV were at reduced risk of HIV diagnosis, whereas those with more male sexual partners, more male anal sexual experiences (including receptive or/and insertive anal intercourse, rimming, and fisting), and a current syphilis infection were at increased risk of HIV diagnosis. Focus on protection and safer sex behaviors during male sexual activity (i.e., consistent condom use, pre-exposure prophylaxis, closed sexual networks among MSM) would likely be effective for reducing the HIV transmission rate.

  11. Effect of acid etching on bond strength of nanoionomer as an orthodontic bonding adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saba; Verma, Sanjeev K.; Maheshwari, Sandhya

    2015-01-01

    Aims: A new Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement known as nanoionomer containing nanofillers of fluoroaluminosilicate glass and nanofiller 'clusters' has been introduced. An in-vitro study aimed at evaluating shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of nanoionomer under etching/unetched condition for use as an orthodontic bonding agent. Material and Methods: A total of 75 extracted premolars were used, which were divided into three equal groups of 25 each: 1-Conventional adhesive (Enlight Light Cure, SDS, Ormco, CA, USA) was used after and etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s, followed by Ortho Solo application 2-nanoionomer (Ketac™ N100, 3M, ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) was used after etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s 3-nanoionomer was used without etching. The SBS testing was performed using a digital universal testing machine (UTM-G-410B, Shanta Engineering). Evaluation of ARI was done using scanning electron microscopy. The SBS were compared using ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey test for intergroup comparisons and ARI scores were compared with Chi-square test. Results: ANOVA (SBS, F = 104.75) and Chi-square (ARI, Chi-square = 30.71) tests revealed significant differences between groups (P < 0.01). The mean (SD) SBS achieved with conventional light cure adhesive was significantly higher (P < 0.05) (10.59 ± 2.03 Mpa, 95% CI, 9.74-11.41) than the nanoionomer groups (unetched 4.13 ± 0.88 Mpa, 95% CI, 3.79-4.47 and etched 9.32 ± 1.87 Mpa, 95% CI, 8.58-10.06). However, nanoionomer with etching, registered SBS in the clinically acceptable range of 5.9–7.8 MPa, as suggested by Reynolds (1975). The nanoionomer groups gave significantly lower ARI values than the conventional adhesive group. Conclusion: Based on this in-vitro study, nanoionomer with etching can be successfully used as an orthodontic bonding agent leaving less adhesive remnant on enamel surface, making cleaning easier. However, in-vivo studies are needed to confirm the validity of present findings. PMID:26955629

  12. Interaction morphology and bond strength of nanofilled simplified-step adhesives to acid etched dentin

    PubMed Central

    Di Hipólito, Vinicius; Reis, André Figueiredo; Mitra, Sumita B.; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of nanofillers incorporated into adhesives on the microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) and interfacial micromorphology to dentin. Methods: The occlusal enamel of 5 human molars was removed and each tooth sectioned into four quarters. The exposed dentin was treated with one of the following adhesives: Adper Single Bond (SB-unfilled), OptiBond Solo Plus (OS-barium aluminoborosilicate, 400nm Ø), Prime & Bond NT (NT-colloidal silica, 7–40 nm Ø) and Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2-colloidal silica, 5nm Ø). Cylinders of resin-based composite were constructed on the adhesive layers. After 24-hour storage, the restored tooth-quadrants were sectioned to obtain stick-shaped specimens (0.8 mm2, cross-sectional area) and submitted to μ-TBS at a cross-speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (alpha = .05). Twenty-eight additional teeth were used for interfacial micro-morphologic analysis by SEM (16-teeth) and TEM (12-teeth). The dentin surfaces of 32 discs were treated with the adhesives (8 discs for adhesive) and laminated to form disc-pairs using a flowable resin composite for SEM/EDS analysis. For TEM, 90nm-thick nondemineralized unstained sections were processed. Results: SB2 showed significant higher bond strength than SB, OS and NT. The SEM/EDS and TEM analysis revealed nanofillers infiltrated within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer. Fillers were concentrated around patent tubular orifices and in the adhesive layer for OS and NT. Conclusion: The presence of nanofillers within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer suggests its importance in the improvement of the μ-TBS. PMID:23077413

  13. Temperature Rise Induced by Light Curing Unit Can Shorten Enamel Acid-Etching Time

    PubMed Central

    Najafi Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Sheikh-Al-Eslamian, Seyedeh Mahsa; Panahandeh, Narges

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this in-vitro study was to assess the thermal effect of light emitting diode (LED) light curing unit on the enamel etching time. Materials and Methods: Three treatment groups with 15 enamel specimens each were used in this study: G1: Fifteen seconds of etching, G2: Five seconds of etching, G3: Five seconds of etching plus LED light irradiation (simultaneously). The micro shear bond strength (μSBS) of composite resin to enamel was measured. Results: The mean μSBS values ± standard deviation were 51.28±2.35, 40.47±2.75 and 50.00±2.59 MPa in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. There was a significant difference between groups 1 and 2 (P=0.013) and between groups 2 and 3 (P=0.032) in this respect, while there was no difference between groups 1 and 3 (P=0.932). Conclusion: Simultaneous application of phosphoric acid gel over enamel surface and light irradiation using a LED light curing unit decreased enamel etching time to five seconds without compromising the μSBS. PMID:27559352

  14. Elevating sampling

    PubMed Central

    Labuz, Joseph M.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    Sampling – the process of collecting, preparing, and introducing an appropriate volume element (voxel) into a system – is often under appreciated and pushed behind the scenes in lab-on-a-chip research. What often stands in the way between proof-of-principle demonstrations of potentially exciting technology and its broader dissemination and actual use, however, is the effectiveness of sample collection and preparation. The power of micro- and nanofluidics to improve reactions, sensing, separation, and cell culture cannot be accessed if sampling is not equally efficient and reliable. This perspective will highlight recent successes as well as assess current challenges and opportunities in this area. PMID:24781100

  15. Sample positioning in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, Govind (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Repulsion forces arising from laser beams are provided to produce mild positioning forces on a sample in microgravity vacuum environments. The system of the preferred embodiment positions samples using a plurality of pulsed lasers providing opposing repulsion forces. The lasers are positioned around the periphery of a confinement area and expanded to create a confinement zone. The grouped laser configuration, in coordination with position sensing devices, creates a feedback servo whereby stable position control of a sample within microgravity environment can be achieved.

  16. Self-help interventions for adjustment disorder problems: a randomized waiting-list controlled study in a sample of burglary victims.

    PubMed

    Bachem, Rahel; Maercker, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Adjustment disorders (AjD) are among the most frequent mental disorders yet often remain untreated. The high prevalence, comparatively mild symptom impairment, and transient nature make AjD a promising target for low-threshold self-help interventions. Bibliotherapy represents a potential treatment for AjD problems. This study investigates the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral self-help manual specifically directed at alleviating AjD symptoms in a homogenous sample of burglary victims. Participants with clinical or subclinical AjD symptoms following experience of burglary were randomized to an intervention group (n = 30) or waiting-list control group (n = 24). The new explicit stress response syndrome model for diagnosing AjD was applied. Participants received no therapist support and assessments took place at baseline, after the one-month intervention, and at three-month follow-up. Based on completer analyses, group by time interactions indicated that the intervention group showed more improvement in AjD symptoms of preoccupation and in post-traumatic stress symptoms. Post-intervention between-group effect sizes ranged from Cohen's d = .17 to .67 and the proportion of participants showing reliable change was consistently higher in the intervention group than in the control group. Engagement with the self-help manual was high: 87% of participants had worked through at least half the manual. This is the first published RCT of a bibliotherapeutic self-help intervention for AjD problems. The findings provide evidence that a low-threshold self-help intervention without therapist contact is a feasible and effective treatment for symptoms of AjD.

  17. The dopamine transporter gene and the impulsivity phenotype in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a case-control association study in a Korean sample.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-won; Kim, Boong-nyun; Cho, Soo-churl

    2006-12-01

    The dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) has been extensively studied as one of the candidate genes in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Several studies have reported on the association between the DAT1 10-repeat allele and cognitive variables in ADHD. However, few studies have been designed to ascertain the association between DAT1 genotypes other than the 10-repeat allele and cognitive endophenotypes in ADHD. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the DAT1 genotypes and the candidate endophenotypes, inattention and impulsivity symptoms, as measured by the continuous performance test (CPT), in a Korean sample of 85 children diagnosed with DSM-IV ADHD. Compared to the normal control group, the frequencies of the 9/10 genotype were significantly higher in the ADHD probands (chi(2)=13.45, p=0.02, OR=4.12, 95% CI: 2.21-12.34) and parents of probands (chi(2)=11.60, p=0.03). The 9-repeat allele frequencies were significantly higher in the ADHD probands (chi(2)=11.55, p=0.03, OR=4.43, 95% CI: 1.55-11.78) and parents of probands (chi(2)=12.70,p=0.03) than the normal control group. Compared to the ADHD probands without the 9-repeat allele (n=74), the mean T-score, with regard to the commission errors of the CPT, was significantly higher (p<0.05) in the ADHD probands with the 9-repeat allele (n=11). Compared to the ADHD probands with other DAT1 genotypes, the mean T-score, with respect to the commission errors of the CPT, was significantly higher in the ADHD probands with the 9/10 genotype (p<0.05). The results of this study suggest the possibility of an association between the DAT1 9-repeat allele and the impulsivity phenotype of ADHD.

  18. Nanostructured conducting molecularly imprinted polymer for selective extraction of salicylate from urine and serum samples by electrochemically controlled solid-phase micro-extraction.

    PubMed

    Ameli, Akram; Alizadeh, Naader

    2011-11-30

    Overoxidized polypyrrole (OPPy) films templated with salicylate (SA) have been utilized as conducting molecular imprinted polymers (CMIPs) for potential-induced selective solid-phase micro-extraction processes. Various important fabrication factors for controlling the performance of the OPPy films have been investigated using fluorescence spectrometry. Several key parameters such as applied potential for uptake, release, pH of uptake and release solution were varied to achieve the optimum micro-extraction procedure. The film template with SA exhibited excellent selectivity over some interference. The calibration graphs were linear in the ranges of 5×10(-8) to 5×10(-4) and 1.2×10(-6) to 5×10(-4)mol mL(-1) and the detection limit was 4×10(-8) mol L(-1). The OPPy film as the solid-phase micro-extraction absorbent has been applied for the selective clean-up and quantification of trace amounts of SA from physiological samples. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have confirmed the nano-structure morphologies of the films.

  19. Classification and phylogeny of sika deer (Cervus nippon) subspecies based on the mitochondrial control region DNA sequence using an extended sample set.

    PubMed

    Ba, Hengxing; Yang, Fuhe; Xing, Xiumei; Li, Chunyi

    2015-06-01

    To further refine the classification and phylogeny of sika deer subspecies, the well-annotated sequences of the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of 13 sika deer subspecies from GenBank were downloaded, aligned and analyzed in this study. By reconstructing the phylogenetic tree with an extended sample set, the results revealed a split between Northern and Southern Mainland Asia/Taiwan lineages, and moreover, two subspecies, C.n.mantchuricus and C.n.hortulorum, were existed in Northern Mainland Asia. Unexpectedly, Dybowskii's sika deer that was thought to originate from Northern Mainland Asia joins the Southern Mainland Asia/Taiwan lineage. The genetic divergences were ranged from 2.1% to 4.7% between Dybowskii's sika deer and all the other established subspecies at the mtDNA sequence level, which suggests that the maternal lineage of uncertain sika subspecies in Europe had been maintained until today. This study also provides a better understanding for the classification, phylogeny and phylogeographic history of sika deer subspecies.

  20. Improved Sampling Method Reduces Isokinetic Sampling Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karels, Gale G.

    The particulate sampling system currently in use by the Bay Area Air Pollution Control District, San Francisco, California is described in this presentation for the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971. The method represents a practical, inexpensive tool that can…

  1. Volunteer Bias in Recruitment, Retention, and Blood Sample Donation in a Randomised Controlled Trial Involving Mothers and Their Children at Six Months and Two Years: A Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Sue; Watkins, Alan; Storey, Mel; Allen, Steven J.; Brooks, Caroline J.; Garaiova, Iveta; Heaven, Martin L.; Jones, Ruth; Plummer, Sue F.; Russell, Ian T.; Thornton, Catherine A.; Morgan, Gareth

    2013-01-01

    Background The vulnerability of clinical trials to volunteer bias is under-reported. Volunteer bias is systematic error due to differences between those who choose to participate in studies and those who do not. Methods and Results This paper extends the applications of the concept of volunteer bias by using data from a trial of probiotic supplementation for childhood atopy in healthy dyads to explore 1) differences between a) trial participants and aggregated data from publicly available databases b) participants and non-participants as the trial progressed 2) impact on trial findings of weighting data according to deprivation (Townsend) fifths in the sample and target populations. 1) a) Recruits (n = 454) were less deprived than the target population, matched for area of residence and delivery dates (n = 6,893) (mean [SD] deprivation scores 0.09[4.21] and 0.79[4.08], t = 3.44, df = 511, p<0.001). b) i)As the trial progressed, representation of the most deprived decreased. These participants and smokers were less likely to be retained at 6 months (n = 430[95%]) (OR 0.29,0.13–0.67 and 0.20,0.09–0.46), and 2 years (n = 380[84%]) (aOR 0.68,0.50–0.93 and 0.55,0.28–1.09), and consent to infant blood sample donation (n = 220[48%]) (aOR 0.72,0.57–0.92 and 0.43,0.22–0.83). ii)Mothers interested in probiotics or research or reporting infants’ adverse events or rashes were more likely to attend research clinics and consent to skin-prick testing. Mothers participating to help children were more likely to consent to infant blood sample donation. 2) In one trial outcome, atopic eczema, the intervention had a positive effect only in the over-represented, least deprived group. Here, data weighting attenuated risk reduction from 6.9%(0.9–13.1%) to 4.6%(−1.4–+10.5%), and OR from 0.40(0.18–0.91) to 0.56(0.26–1.21). Other findings were unchanged. Conclusions Potential for volunteer bias intensified during the trial, due to non

  2. Evaluation of a Minimally Invasive Cell Sampling Device Coupled with Assessment of Trefoil Factor 3 Expression for Diagnosing Barrett's Esophagus: A Multi-Center Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ross-Innes, Caryn S.; Debiram-Beecham, Irene; O'Donovan, Maria; Walker, Elaine; Varghese, Sibu; Lao-Sirieix, Pierre; Lovat, Laurence; Griffin, Michael; Ragunath, Krish; Haidry, Rehan; Sami, Sarmed S.; Kaye, Philip; Novelli, Marco; Disep, Babett; Ostler, Richard; Aigret, Benoit; North, Bernard V.; Bhandari, Pradeep; Haycock, Adam; Morris, Danielle; Attwood, Stephen; Dhar, Anjan; Rees, Colin; Rutter, Matthew D. D.; Sasieni, Peter D.; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a commonly undiagnosed condition that predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma. Routine endoscopic screening for BE is not recommended because of the burden this would impose on the health care system. The objective of this study was to determine whether a novel approach using a minimally invasive cell sampling device, the Cytosponge, coupled with immunohistochemical staining for the biomarker Trefoil Factor 3 (TFF3), could be used to identify patients who warrant endoscopy to diagnose BE. Methods and Findings A case–control study was performed across 11 UK hospitals between July 2011 and December 2013. In total, 1,110 individuals comprising 463 controls with dyspepsia and reflux symptoms and 647 BE cases swallowed a Cytosponge prior to endoscopy. The primary outcome measures were to evaluate the safety, acceptability, and accuracy of the Cytosponge-TFF3 test compared with endoscopy and biopsy. In all, 1,042 (93.9%) patients successfully swallowed the Cytosponge, and no serious adverse events were attributed to the device. The Cytosponge was rated favorably, using a visual analogue scale, compared with endoscopy (p < 0.001), and patients who were not sedated for endoscopy were more likely to rate the Cytosponge higher than endoscopy (Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.001). The overall sensitivity of the test was 79.9% (95% CI 76.4%–83.0%), increasing to 87.2% (95% CI 83.0%–90.6%) for patients with ≥3 cm of circumferential BE, known to confer a higher cancer risk. The sensitivity increased to 89.7% (95% CI 82.3%–94.8%) in 107 patients who swallowed the device twice during the study course. There was no loss of sensitivity in patients with dysplasia. The specificity for diagnosing BE was 92.4% (95% CI 89.5%–94.7%). The case–control design of the study means that the results are not generalizable to a primary care population. Another limitation is that the acceptability data were limited to a single measure. Conclusions The

  3. Asymmetrical booster ascent guidance and control system design study. Volume 4: Sampled data stability analysis program (SADSAP) user's guide. [space shuttle development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A users guide to the Sampled Data Stability Analysis Program (SADSAP) is provided. This program is a general purpose sampled data Stability Analysis Program capable of providing frequency response on root locus data.

  4. Sample Proficiency Test exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

    2006-02-05

    The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

  5. Baby knows best? The impact of weaning style on food preferences and body mass index in early childhood in a case–controlled sample

    PubMed Central

    Pitchford, Nicola J

    2012-01-01

    Objective The impact of different weaning methods on food preferences and body mass index (BMI) in early childhood is not known. Here, we examine if weaning method—baby-led weaning versus traditional spoon feeding—influences food preferences and health-related outcomes. Design, setting and participants Parents (n=155) recruited through the Nottingham Toddler laboratory and relevant internet sites completed a questionnaire concerning (1) infant feeding and weaning style (baby-led=92, spoon-fed=63, age range 20–78 months), (2) their child's preference for 151 foods (analysed by common food categories, eg, carbohydrates, proteins, dairy) and (3) exposure (frequency of consumption). Food preference and exposure data were analysed using a case–controlled matched sample to account for the effect of age on food preference. All other analyses were conducted with the whole sample. Main outcome measures The primary outcome measures were food preferences, exposure and weaning style. The secondary outcome measures were BMI and picky eating. Results Compared to the spoon-fed group, the baby-led group demonstrated (1) significantly increased liking for carbohydrates (no other differences in preference were found) and (2) carbohydrates to be their most preferred foods (compared to sweet foods for the spoon-fed group). Preference and exposure ratings were not influenced by socially desirable responding or socioeconomic status, although an increased liking for vegetables was associated with higher social class. There was an increased incidence of (1) underweight in the baby-led group and (2) obesity in the spoon-fed group. No difference in picky eating was found between the two weaning groups. Conclusions Weaning style impacts on food preferences and health in early childhood. Our results suggest that infants weaned through the baby-led approach learn to regulate their food intake in a manner, which leads to a lower BMI and a preference for healthy foods like

  6. Effectiveness of Housing First with Intensive Case Management in an Ethnically Diverse Sample of Homeless Adults with Mental Illness: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Gozdzik, Agnes; Misir, Vachan; Skosireva, Anna; Connelly, Jo; Sarang, Aseefa; Whisler, Adam; Hwang, Stephen W.; O’Campo, Patricia; McKenzie, Kwame

    2015-01-01

    experiencing problems due to alcohol use among foreign-born (vs. Canadian-born) HF participants at 24 months (ratio of rate ratios = 0.19 95% 0.04 to 0.88), relative to baseline. Compared to usual care, HF with ICM can improve housing stability and community functioning and reduce the days of alcohol related problems in an ethnically diverse sample of homeless adults with mental illness within 2-years. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN42520374. PMID:26176621

  7. Replication of bipolar disorder susceptibility alleles and identification of 2 novel genome-wide significant associations in a new bipolar disorder case-control sample

    PubMed Central

    Green, Elaine K; Hamshere, Marian; Forty, Liz; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Fraser, Christine; Russell, Elen; Grozeva, Detelina; Kirov, George; Holmans, Peter; Moran, Jennifer L; Purcell, Shaun; Sklar, Pamela; Owen, Michael J; O’Donovan, Michael C; Jones, Lisa; Jones, Ian R; Craddock, Nick

    2014-01-01

    We have conducted a genotyping study using a custom Illumina Infinium HD genotyping array, the ImmunoChip, in a new UK sample of 1,218 bipolar disorder cases and 2,913 controls that have not been used in any studies previously reported independently or in meta-analyses. The ImmunoChip was designed prior to the publication of the Psychiatric GWAS Consortium Bipolar Disorder Working Group (PGC-BD) meta-analysis data. As such 3106 SNPs with a P value less than 1×10−3 from the bipolar disorder meta-analysis by Ferreira et al., 2008 were genotyped. We report support for two of the three most strongly associated chromosomal regions in the Ferreira study, CACNA1C (rs1006737, p=4.09×10−4) and 15q14 (rs2172835, p=0.043) but not ANK3 (rs10994336, p=0.912). We have combined our ImmunoChip data (569 quasi-independent SNPs from the 3016 SNPs genotyped) with the recently published PGC-BD meta-analysis data, using either the PGC-BD combined discovery and replication data where available or just the discovery data where the SNP was not typed in a replication sample in PGC-BD. Our data provide support for two regions, at ODZ4 and CACNA1C, with prior evidence for genome-wide significant association in PGC-BD meta-analysis. In addition, the combined analysis shows two novel genome-wide significant associations. First, rs7296288 (P = 8.97 × 10−9, OR = 0.9), an intergenic polymorphism on chromosome 12 located between RHEBL1 and DHH. Secondly, rs3818253 (P = 3.88 × 10−8, OR = 1.16), an intronic SNP on chromosome 20q11.2 in the gene TRPC4AP which lies in a high linkage disequilibrium region along with the genes GSS and MYH7B. PMID:23070075

  8. SAMPLING OSCILLOSCOPE

    DOEpatents

    Sugarman, R.M.

    1960-08-30

    An oscilloscope is designed for displaying transient signal waveforms having random time and amplitude distributions. The oscilloscopc is a sampling device that selects for display a portion of only those waveforms having a particular range of amplitudes. For this purpose a pulse-height analyzer is provided to screen the pulses. A variable voltage-level shifter and a time-scale rampvoltage generator take the pulse height relative to the start of the waveform. The variable voltage shifter produces a voltage level raised one step for each sequential signal waveform to be sampled and this results in an unsmeared record of input signal waveforms. Appropriate delay devices permit each sample waveform to pass its peak amplitude before the circuit selects it for display.

  9. Sampling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, N.R.; King, L.L.; Jackson, P.O.; Zulich, A.W.

    1989-07-18

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface. 15 figs.

  10. Sampling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Norman R.; King, Lloyd L.; Jackson, Peter O.; Zulich, Alan W.

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface.

  11. Sample Manipulation System for Sample Analysis at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumm, Erik; Kennedy, Tom; Carlson, Lee; Roberts, Dustyn

    2008-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument will analyze Martian samples collected by the Mars Science Laboratory Rover with a suite of spectrometers. This paper discusses the driving requirements, design, and lessons learned in the development of the Sample Manipulation System (SMS) within SAM. The SMS stores and manipulates 74 sample cups to be used for solid sample pyrolysis experiments. Focus is given to the unique mechanism architecture developed to deliver a high packing density of sample cups in a reliable, fault tolerant manner while minimizing system mass and control complexity. Lessons learned are presented on contamination control, launch restraint mechanisms for fragile sample cups, and mechanism test data.

  12. Chain Sampling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-08-01

    35609 Advanced Techniques Branch Plans and Programs Analysis Division Directorate for Product Assurance U. S. Army Missile Command Redstone Arsenal...Ray Heathcock Advanced Techniques Branch Plans and Programs Analysis Division Directorate for Product Assurance U. S. Army Missile Command...for Product Assurance has established a rather unique computer program for handling a variety of chain sampling schemes and is available for

  13. Prevalence of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci in Fecal Samples from Hospitalized Patients and Nonhospitalized Controls in a Cattle-Rearing Area of France

    PubMed Central

    Gambarotto, Karine; Ploy, Marie-Cécile; Turlure, Pascal; Grélaud, Carole; Martin, Christian; Bordessoule, Dominique; Denis, Francois

    2000-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have emerged as nosocomial pathogens over the last decade, but little is known about their epidemiology. We report on the prevalence of VRE fecal colonization on the basis of a prospective study among patients hospitalized in a hematology intensive care unit and among nonhospitalized subjects living in the local community. A total of 243 rectal swabs from hematology patients and 169 stool samples from the control group were inoculated onto bile-esculin agar plates with and without 6 mg of vancomycin per liter and into an enrichment bile-esculin broth supplemented with 4 mg of vancomycin per liter. A total of 37% of the hospitalized patients and 11.8% of the subjects from the community were found to be VRE carriers. A total of 65 VRE strains were isolated: 12 (18.5%) E. faecium, 46 (70.7%) E. gallinarum, and 7 (10.8%) E. casseliflavus strains. No E. faecalis strains were detected. All the E. faecium strains were of the vanA genotype. Molecular typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed a different pattern for each vanA VRE strain that originated from an individual subject. To our knowledge, this is the first study to be carried out in a cattle-rearing region of France. It reports a higher VRE prevalence than that reported in previous European or U.S. studies. A partial explanation is the use of an enrichment broth step which enabled detection of strains which would otherwise have been missed, but the fact that subjects and patients were recruited from a predominantly agricultural area where vancomycin-related antibiotics have recently been used in animal husbandry could also contribute to the high levels of VRE in patients and subjects alike. PMID:10655356

  14. Thyroid Function in Women after Multimodal Treatment for Breast Cancer Stage II/III: Comparison With Controls From a Population Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Reinertsen, Kristin Valborg; Cvancarova, Milada; Wist, Erik; Bjoro, Trine; Dahl, Alv A.; Danielsen, Turi; Fossa, Sophie D.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: A possible association between thyroid diseases (TD) and breast cancer (BC) has been debated. We examined prevalence and development of TD in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC compared with women from a general population. Secondarily, we explored the impact of two different radiotherapy (RT) techniques (standardized field arrangements vs. computed tomography [CT]-based dose planning) on TD in BC patients examined 35-120 months after primary BC treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 403 BC patients completed a questionnaire about TD and had blood samples taken for analyses of thyroid function. All had undergone postoperative RT with or without (2%) adjuvant systemic treatment. The results in the BC patients were compared with a cancer-free, age-matched control group from a general population (CGr). Results: There was higher prevalence of self-reported hypothyroidism in the BC patients as compared with the CGr (18% vs. 6%, p < 0.001). The raised prevalence was predominantly due to a substantial increase in the development of hypothyroidism after BC diagnosis, whereas the prevalence of hypothyroidism before BC diagnosis was similar to that observed in the CGr. Patients treated with CT-based RT showed a trend for increased post-BC development of hypothyroidism as compared with those treated with standardized field arrangements (p = 0.08). Conclusions: Hypothyroidism is significantly increased in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC. Radiation to the thyroid gland may be a contributing factor. BC patients should be routinely screened for hypothyroidism.

  15. Electrochemical Genosensor To Detect Pathogenic Bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7) As Applied in Real Food Samples (Fresh Beef) To Improve Food Safety and Quality Control.

    PubMed

    Abdalhai, Mandour H; Fernandes, António Maximiano; Xia, Xiaofeng; Musa, Abubakr; Ji, Jian; Sun, Xiulan

    2015-05-27

    The electrochemical genosensor is one of the most promising methods for the rapid and reliable detection of pathogenic bacteria. In a previous work, we performed an efficient electrochemical genosensor detection of Staphylococcus aureus by using lead sulfide nanoparticles (PbSNPs). As a continuation of this study, in the present work, the electrochemical genosensor was used to detect Escherichia coli O157:H7. The primer and probes were designed using NCBI database and Sigma-Aldrich primer and probe software. The capture and signalizing probes were modified by thiol (SH) and amine (NH2), respectively. Then, the signalizing probe was connected using cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdSNPs), which showed well-defined peaks after electrochemical detection. The genosensor was prepared by immobilization of complementary DNA on the gold electrode surface, which hybridizes with a specific fragment gene from pathogenic to make a sandwich structure. The conductivity and sensitivity of the sensor were increased by using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) that had been modified using chitosan deposited as a thin layer on the glass carbon electrode (GCE) surface, followed by a deposit of bismuth. The peak currents of E. coli O157:H7 correlated in a linear fashion with the concentration of tDNA. The detection limit was 1.97 × 10(-14) M, and the correlation coefficient was 0.989. A poorly defined current response was observed as the negative control and baseline. Our results showed high sensitivity and selectivity of the electrochemical DNA biosensor to the pathogenic bacteria E. coli O157:H7. The biosensor was also used to evaluate the detection of pathogen in real beef samples contaminated artificially. Compared with other electrochemical DNA biosensors, we conclude that this genosensor provides for very efficient detection of pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, this method may have potential application in food safety and related fields.

  16. Mass spectrometric studies on the in vivo metabolism and excretion of SIRT1 activating drugs in rat urine, dried blood spots, and plasma samples for doping control purposes.

    PubMed

    Höppner, Sebastian; Delahaut, Philippe; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The NAD(+) depending enzyme SIRT1 regulates the mitochondrial biogenesis, fat and glucose metabolism through catalyzing the deacetylation of several metabolism-related protein-substrates. Recently, synthetic activators of SIRT1 referred to as STACs (Sirtuin activating compounds, e.g. SRT2104) were identified and tested in clinical studies for the treatment of aging-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's and obesity. Although the mechanism of SIRT1 activation by small molecules has caused considerable controversy, STACs demonstrated a significant performance enhancement in mice experiments including an improvement of endurance, muscle strength, and locomotor behavior. Due to their potential to increase exercise tolerance in healthy individuals, SIRT1 activators are currently being monitored by anti-doping authorities. In the present study, the in vivo metabolic clearance of three SIRT1 activators was investigated in rats by the collection of urine, DBS (dried blood spots) and plasma samples following a single oral administration. The resulting metabolic products were studied by positive electrospray ionization - (tandem) mass spectrometry and confirmed by the comparison with in vitro generated metabolites using human and rat liver microsomal preparations. Subsequently, a screening procedure for five SIRT1 activators and the metabolite M1-SRT1720 in DBS specimens was developed. Liquid-liquid-extraction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was employed based on diagnostic ion transitions recorded in multiple reaction monitoring mode and two deuterated internal standards namely d8-SRT1720 and d8-M1-SRT1720 were utilized. The doping control assay was characterized with regard to specificity, limit of detection (10-50ng/ml), recovery (65-83%) and imprecision (7-20%) and ion suppression/enhancement effects (<10%), demonstrating its fitness-for-purpose for sports drug testing applications.

  17. Studies and testing of antireflective (AR) coatings for soda-lime glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastirik, E. M.; Sparks, T. G.; Coleman, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    Processes for producing antireflection films on glass are concentrated in three areas: acid etching of glass, plasma etching of glass, and acid development of sodium silicate films on glass. The best transmission was achieved through the acid etching technique, while the most durable films were produced from development of sodium silicate films. Control of the acid etching technique is presently inadequate for production implementation. While films having excellent antireflective properties were fabricated by plasma etching techniques, all were water soluble.

  18. Sampling Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Three locations to the right of the test dig area are identified for the first samples to be delivered to the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA), the Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL), and the Optical Microscope (OM) on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. These sampling areas are informally labeled 'Baby Bear', 'Mama Bear', and 'Papa Bear' respectively. This image was taken on the seventh day of the Mars mission, or Sol 7 (June 1, 2008) by the Surface Stereo Imager aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Instructions for borehole sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, K.D.; Lindsey, K.A.

    1994-11-11

    Geologic systems generally are complex with physical properties and trends that can be difficult to predict. Subsurface geology exerts a fundamental control on groundwater flow and contaminant transport. The primary source for direct observation of subsurface geologic information is a borehole. However, direct observations from a borehole essentially are limited to the diameter and spacing of boreholes and the quality of the information derived from the drilling. Because it is impractical to drill a borehole every few feet to obtain data, it is necessary to maximize the data gathered during limited drilling operations. A technically defensible balance between the customer`s data quality objectives and control of drilling costs through limited drilling can be achieved with proper conduct of operations. This report presents the minimum criteria for geologic and hydrologic characterization and sampling that must be met during drilling. It outlines the sampling goals that need to be addressed when drilling boreholes, and the types of drilling techniques that work best to achieve these goals under the geologic conditions found at Hanford. This report provides general guidelines for: (1) how sampling methods are controlled by data needs, (2) how minimum sampling requirements change as knowledge and needs change, and (3) when drilling and sampling parameters need to be closely controlled with respect to the specific data needs. Consequently, the report is divided into two sections that center on: (1) a discussion of basic categories of subsurface characterization, sampling, and sampling techniques, and (2) guidelines for determining which drilling and sampling techniques meet required characterization and sampling objectives.

  20. Analysis of Tank 38H (HTF-38-16-80, 81) and Tank 43H (HTF-43-16-82, 83) Samples for Support of the Enrichment Control and Corrosion Control Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.

    2016-10-24

    SRNL analyzed samples from Tank 38H and Tank 43H to support ECP and CCP. The total uranium in the Tank 38H surface sample was 57.6 mg/L, while the sub-surface sample was 106 mg/L. The Tank 43H samples ranged from 50.0 to 51.9 mg/L total uranium. The U-235 percentage was consistent for all four samples at 0.62%. The total uranium and percent U-235 results appear consistent with recent Tank 38H and Tank 43H uranium measurements. The Tank 38H plutonium results show a large difference between the surface and sub-surface sample concentrations and somewhat higher concentrations than previous samples. The Pu-238 concentration is more than forty times higher in the Tank 38H sub-surface sample than the surface sample. The surface and sub-surface Tank 43H samples contain similar plutonium concentrations and are within the range of values measured on previous samples. The four samples analyzed show silicon concentrations somewhat higher than the previous sample with values ranging from 104 to 213 mg/L.

  1. Instrumentation of a PLC-regulated temperature cycler with a PID control unit and its use for miniaturized PCR systems with reduced volumes of aqueous sample droplets isolated in oil phase in a microwell.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Masahiko; Torii, Masayuki; Yoshida, Kazuma; Noda, Keiichi; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a temperature cycler for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a microwell fabricated on a polymer/glass chip. The entire system consisted of three subsystems, which included (1) a thermal conditioner, (2) a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control signal conditioner and (3) a data acquisition subsystem. The subsystems were regulated coordinately by a ladder logic program written for the programmable logic control (PLC) so that an actual sample temperature could be timed, changed and maintained according to the programmed temperature cycles. The present temperature control system showed high accuracy, stability and minimum overshoot with reduced heating and cooling transition rates. Applicability of the temperature controller to the miniaturized PCR system with reduced volumes of aqueous sample droplets isolated in an oil phase was confirmed by successful amplifications of a target DNA sequence in the microwell.

  2. Brass Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Researchers have found that as melted metals and alloys (combinations of metals) solidify, they can form with different arrangements of atoms, called microstructures. These microstructures depend on the shape of the interface (boundary) between the melted metal and the solid crystal it is forming. There are generally three shapes that the interface can take: planar, or flat; cellular, which looks like the cells of a beehive; and dendritic, which resembles tiny fir trees. Convection at this interface can affect the interface shape and hide the other phenomena (physical events). To reduce the effects of convection, researchers conduct experiments that examine and control conditions at the interface in microgravity. Microgravity also helps in the study of alloys composed of two metals that do not mix. On Earth, the liquid mixtures of these alloys settle into different layers due to gravity. In microgravity, the liquid metals do not settle, and a solid more uniform mixture of both metals can be formed.

  3. Detachment of Tertiary Dendrite Arms during Controlled Directional Solidification in Aluminum - 7 wt Percent Silicon Alloys: Observations from Ground-based and Microgravity Processed Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Erdman, Robert; Van Hoose, James R.; Tewari, Surendra; Poirier, David

    2012-01-01

    Electron Back Scattered Diffraction results from cross-sections of directionally solidified aluminum 7wt% silicon alloys unexpectedly revealed tertiary dendrite arms that were detached and mis-oriented from their parent arm. More surprisingly, the same phenomenon was observed in a sample similarly processed in the quiescent microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in support of the joint US-European MICAST investigation. The work presented here includes a brief introduction to MICAST and the directional solidification facilities, and their capabilities, available aboard the ISS. Results from the ground-based and microgravity processed samples are compared and possible mechanisms for the observed tertiary arm detachment are suggested.

  4. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  5. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, Loren L.

    1987-01-01

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  6. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - Processing, Taxonomy, and Quality Control of Benthic Macroinvertebrate Samples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Only a portion of colonial organisms, such as Bryozoa or Porifera , is sorted to document its presence in the sample. Verte- brates, exuviae...Standard Taxonomic Assessment Taxon Level of identification Taxon Level of identification Porifera Family Corduliidae Genus/Species Cnidaria Family...individual taxonomists. The Taxon Level of identification Porifera Family Cnidaria Family Platyhelminthes Class Nematoda Phylum Nemertea Genus

  7. Using the Multiple-Matched-Sample and Statistical Controls to Examine the Effects of Magnet School Programs on the Reading and Mathematics Performance of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yu N.; Li, Yuan H.; Tompkins, Leroy J.; Modarresi, Shahpar

    2005-01-01

    This summative evaluation of magnet programs employed a quasi-experimental design to investigate whether or not students enrolled in magnet programs gained any achievement advantage over students who were not enrolled in a magnet program. Researchers used Zero-One Linear Programming to draw multiple sets of matched samples from the non-magnet…

  8. Optimal Unified Approach for Rare-Variant Association Testing with Application to Small-Sample Case-Control Whole-Exome Sequencing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seunggeun; Emond, Mary J.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Rieder, Mark J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Christiani, David C.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Lin, Xihong

    2012-01-01

    We propose in this paper a unified approach for testing the association between rare variants and phenotypes in sequencing association studies. This approach maximizes power by adaptively using the data to optimally combine the burden test and the nonburden sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Burden tests are more powerful when most variants in a region are causal and the effects are in the same direction, whereas SKAT is more powerful when a large fraction of the variants in a region are noncausal or the effects of causal variants are in different directions. The proposed unified test maintains the power in both scenarios. We show that the unified test corresponds to the optimal test in an extended family of SKAT tests, which we refer to as SKAT-O. The second goal of this paper is to develop a small-sample adjustment procedure for the proposed methods for the correction of conservative type I error rates of SKAT family tests when the trait of interest is dichotomous and the sample size is small. Both small-sample-adjusted SKAT and the optimal unified test (SKAT-O) are computationally efficient and can easily be applied to genome-wide sequencing association studies. We evaluate the finite sample performance of the proposed methods using extensive simulation studies and illustrate their application using the acute-lung-injury exome-sequencing data of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Exome Sequencing Project. PMID:22863193

  9. Assessment of Supportive, Conflicted, and Controlling Dimensions of Family Functioning: A Principal Components Analysis of Family Environment Scale Subscales in a College Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronenberger, William G.; Thompson, Robert J., Jr.; Morrow, Catherine

    1997-01-01

    A principal components analysis of the Family Environment Scale (FES) (R. Moos and B. Moos, 1994) was performed using 113 undergraduates. Research supported 3 broad components encompassing the 10 FES subscales. These results supported previous research and the generalization of the FES to college samples. (SLD)

  10. Method development for the control determination of mercury in seafood by solid-sampling thermal decomposition amalgamation atomic absorption spectrometry (TDA AAS).

    PubMed

    Torres, D P; Martins-Teixeira, M B; Silva, E F; Queiroz, H M

    2012-01-01

    A very simple and rapid method for the determination of total mercury in fish samples using the Direct Mercury Analyser DMA-80 was developed. In this system, a previously weighted portion of fresh fish is combusted and the released mercury is selectively trapped in a gold amalgamator. Upon heating, mercury is desorbed from the amalgamator, an atomic absorption measurement is performed and the mercury concentration is calculated. Some experimental parameters have been studied and optimised. In this study the sample mass was about 100.0 mg. The relative standard deviation was lower than 8.0% for all measurements of solid samples. Two calibration curves against aqueous standard solutions were prepared through the low linear range from 2.5 to 20.0 ng of Hg, and the high linear range from 25.0 to 200.0 ng of Hg, for which a correlation coefficient better than 0.997 was achieved, as well as a normal distribution of the residuals. Mercury reference solutions were prepared in 5.0% v/v nitric acid medium. Lyophilised fish tissues were also analysed; however, the additional procedure had no advantage over the direct analysis of the fresh fish, and additionally increased the total analytical process time. A fish tissue reference material, IAEA-407, was analysed and the mercury concentration was in agreement with the certified value, according to the t-test at a 95% confidence level. The limit of quantification (LOQ), based on a mercury-free sample, was 3.0 µg kg(-1). This LOQ is in accordance with performance criteria required by the Commission Regulation No. 333/2007. Simplicity and high efficiency, without the need for any sample preparation procedure, are some of the qualities of the proposed method.

  11. A simple and practical control of the authenticity of organic sugarcane samples based on the use of machine-learning algorithms and trace elements determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Rommel M; Batista, Bruno L; Barião, Camila V; Varrique, Renan M; Coelho, Vinicius A; Campiglia, Andres D; Barbosa, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    A practical and easy control of the authenticity of organic sugarcane samples based on the use of machine-learning algorithms and trace elements determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is proposed. Reference ranges for 32 chemical elements in 22 samples of sugarcane (13 organic and 9 non organic) were established and then two algorithms, Naive Bayes (NB) and Random Forest (RF), were evaluated to classify the samples. Accurate results (>90%) were obtained when using all variables (i.e., 32 elements). However, accuracy was improved (95.4% for NB) when only eight minerals (Rb, U, Al, Sr, Dy, Nb, Ta, Mo), chosen by a feature selection algorithm, were employed. Thus, the use of a fingerprint based on trace element levels associated with classification machine learning algorithms may be used as a simple alternative for authenticity evaluation of organic sugarcane samples.

  12. Analysis Of Tank 38H (HTF-38-14-6, 7) And Tank 43H (HTF-43-14-8, 9) Samples For Support Of The Enrichment Control And Corrosion Control Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C. J.

    2014-02-27

    SRNL performed analysis on Tanks 38H and 43H surface and subsurface supernate samples to support ECP and CCP. The U-235 mass divided by the total U mass ranged from 0.0059 to 0.0060. Uranium concentration ranged from 53.1 mg/L in the Tank 43H surface sample to the 85.1 mg/L in the Tank 38H subsurface sample. The U-235/U and uranium concentration are in line with the prior 2H-Evaporator System ECP samples.

  13. Bone mesenchymal stem cell functions on the hierarchical micro/nanotopographies of the Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Nan; Zhang, Shuyin; Li, Yongfeng; Shen, Shuning; Niu, Qiang; Zhao, Yimin; Kong, Liang

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the response of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) placed on the titanium-6aluminium-7niobiuim (Ti-6Al-7Nb) alloy modified by hydrofluoric acid etch combined with subsequent anodic oxidation. Pure titanium (Ti) discs and Ti-6Al-7Nb discs were treated by hydrofluoric acid etch and anodic oxidation, and polished pure Ti discs and Ti-6Al-7Nb discs without surface modification served as controls (n=35 in each group). Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and radiographic photoelectron spectroscopy assays were used to detect the properties of the samples' surface. The morphology, adhesion, proliferation, and alkaline phosphatase activity of BMSC were examined using various techniques of microscopic and biological characterisation. The results showed that both Ti-6Al-7Nb samples and the pure Ti samples showed hierarchical micro/nanotopographies, and fluorine emerged on the surfaces of the samples after modification. The hierarchical micro/nanotopographies significantly increased the spreading, adhesion, and proliferation of BMSC and activity of alkaline phosphatase. In addition, modified samples of Ti-6Al-7Nb showed significantly higher alkaline phosphatase activity than modified pure Ti samples (p<0.05). The experiment successfully confirmed that Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy with hierarchical micro/nanotopographies treated by hydrofluoric acid etch and anodic oxidation possessed good biocompatibility, and may be a promising candidate for dental implants.

  14. Expeditious method to determine uranium in the process control samples of chemical plant separating (233)U from thoria irradiated in power reactors.

    PubMed

    Kedari, C S; Kharwandikar, B K; Banerjee, K

    2016-11-01

    Analysis of U in the samples containing a significant proportion of (232)U and high concentration of Th is of great concern. Transmutation of Th in the nuclear power reactor produces a notable quantity of (232)U (half life 68.9 years) along with fissile isotope (233)U. The decay series of (232)U is initiated with (228)Th (half life 1.9 year) and it is followed by several short lived α emitting progenies, (224)Ra, (220)Rn, (216)Po, (212)Bi and (212)Po. Even at the smallest contamination of (228)Th in the sample, a very high pulse rate of α emission is obtained, which is to be counted for the radiometric determination of [U]. A commercially available anionic type of extractant Alamine®336 is used to obtain the selective extraction of U from other alpha active elements and fission products present in the sample. Experimental conditions of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) are optimized for obtaining maximum decontamination and recovery of U in the organic phase. The effect of some interfering ionic impurities in the sample on the process of separation is investigated. Depending on the level of the concentration of U in the samples, spectrophotometry or radiometry methods are adopted for its determination after separation by LLE. Under optimized experimental conditions, i.e. 5.5M HCl in the aqueous phase and 0.27M Alamin®336 in the organic phase, the recovery of U is about 100%, the decontamination factor with respect to Th is >2000 and the extraction of fission products like (90)Sr, (144)Ce and (134,137)Cs is negligible. The detection limit for [U] using α radiometry is 10mg/L, even in presence of >100g/L of Th in the sample. Accuracy and precision for the determination of U is also assessed. Reproducibility of results is within 5%. This method shows very good agreement with the results obtained by mass spectrometry.

  15. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.

    1991-02-05

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

  16. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.

    1991-01-01

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allow an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds.

  17. Statistical tests against systematic errors in data sets based on the equality of residual means and variances from control samples: theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Henn, Julian; Meindl, Kathrin

    2015-03-01

    Statistical tests are applied for the detection of systematic errors in data sets from least-squares refinements or other residual-based reconstruction processes. Samples of the residuals of the data are tested against the hypothesis that they belong to the same distribution. For this it is necessary that they show the same mean values and variances within the limits given by statistical fluctuations. When the samples differ significantly from each other, they are not from the same distribution within the limits set by the significance level. Therefore they cannot originate from a single Gaussian function in this case. It is shown that a significance cutoff results in exactly this case. Significance cutoffs are still frequently used in charge-density studies. The tests are applied to artificial data with and without systematic errors and to experimental data from the literature.

  18. Implementation of Cell Samples as Controls in National Proficiency Testing for Clopidogrel Therapy-Related CYP2C19 Genotyping in China: A Novel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kuo; Wang, Lunan; Zhang, Rui; Xie, Jiehong; Li, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Laboratories are increasingly requested to perform CYP2C19 genetic testing when managing clopidogrel therapy, especially in patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. To ensure high quality molecular testing and ascertain that the referring clinician has the correct information for CYP2C19 genotype–directed antiplatelet therapy, a proficiency testing scheme was set up to evaluate the laboratory performance for the entire testing process. Proficiency panels of 10 cell samples encompassing the common CYP2C19 genetic polymorphisms were distributed to 62 participating laboratories for routine molecular testing and the responses were analyzed for accuracy of genotyping and the reporting of results. Data including the number of samples tested, the accreditation/certification status, and test methodology of each individual laboratory were also reviewed. Fifty-seven of the 62 participants correctly identified the CYP2C19 variants in all samples. There were six genotyping errors, with a corresponding analytical sensitivity of 98.5% (333/338 challenges; 95% confidence interval: 96.5–99.5%) and an analytic specificity of 99.6% (281/282; 95% confidence interval: 98.0–99.9%). Reports of the CYP2C19 genotyping results often lacked essential information. In conclusion, clinical laboratories demonstrated good analytical sensitivity and specificity; however, the pharmacogenetic testing community requires additional education regarding the correct reporting of CYP2C19 genetic test results. PMID:26218263

  19. Metabolic control in a nationally representative diabetic elderly sample in Costa Rica: patients at community health centers vs. patients at other health care settings

    PubMed Central

    Brenes-Camacho, Gilbert; Rosero-Bixby, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Background Costa Rica, like other developing countries, is experiencing an increasing burden of chronic conditions such as diabetes mellitus (DM), especially among its elderly population. This article has two goals: (1) to assess the level of metabolic control among the diabetic population age ≥ 60 years old in Costa Rica, and (2) to test whether diabetic elderly patients of community health centers differ from patients in other health care settings in terms of the level of metabolic control. Methods Data come from the project CRELES, a nationally representative study of people aged 60 and over in Costa Rica. This article analyzes a subsample of 542 participants in CRELES with self-reported diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Odds ratios of poor levels of metabolic control at different health care settings are computed using logistic regres