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Sample records for acid-gas removal system

  1. Optimize acid gas removal

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, D.M.; Wilkins, J.T.

    1983-09-01

    Innovative design of physical solvent plants for acid gas removal can materially reduce both installation and operating costs. A review of the design considerations for one physical solvent process (Selexol) points to numerous arrangements for potential improvement. These are evaluated for a specific case in four combinations that identify an optimum for the case in question but, more importantly, illustrate the mechanism for use for such optimization elsewhere.

  2. Survey and Down-Selection of Acid Gas Removal Systems for the Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass to Ethanol with a Detailed Analysis of an MDEA System

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant, Inc., San Francisco, California

    2011-05-01

    The first section (Task 1) of this report by Nexant includes a survey and screening of various acid gas removal processes in order to evaluate their capability to meet the specific design requirements for thermochemical ethanol synthesis in NREL's thermochemical ethanol design report (Phillips et al. 2007, NREL/TP-510-41168). MDEA and selexol were short-listed as the most promising acid-gas removal agents based on work described in Task 1. The second report section (Task 2) describes a detailed design of an MDEA (methyl diethanol amine) based acid gas removal system for removing CO2 and H2S from biomass-derived syngas. Only MDEA was chosen for detailed study because of the available resources.

  3. Process gas chromatography study of a Selexol acid gas removal system. Final report Mar-Sep 82

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    The report gives results of continuous compositional monitoring by process gas chromatography (GC) for three gas streams associated with the Selexol acid gas removal system at the Bi-Gas pilot plant in Homer City, PA. Data were obtained from the inlet and outlet streams of the Selexol system during tests in April and May 1982. Product gas composition data were logged for 55 hours of plant operation. The Bi-Gas pilot plant, utilizing a two-stage, entrained-bed, high-pressure slagging gasifier, produces a product gas that is low in tars and heavy oils. This gas stream required very little cleanup prior to instrumental analysis. However, some problems were encountered in the analysis of the Selexol acid gas stream due to the presence of high levels of naphthalene. The process gas chromatographs performed well and remained very stable during the tests. Material balances based on GC analyses and process flow rate data show a high degree of material accountability. The H/sub 2/S removal efficiency of the Selexol absorber was about 99% during the tests.

  4. An acid-gas removal system for upgrading subquality natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Palla, N.; Lee, A.L.; Leppin, D.; Shoemaker, H.D.; Hooper, H.M.; Emmrich, G.; Moore, T.F.

    1996-09-01

    The objective of this project is to develop systems to reduce the cost of treating subquality natural gas. Based on over 1,000 laboratory experiments on vapor-liquid equilibria and mass transfer and simulation studies, the use of N-Formyl Morpholine as a solvent together with structured packings has the following advantages: high capacity for H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} removal; little or no refrigeration required; less loss of hydrocarbons (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}-C{sub 6}); and dehydration potential. To verify these findings and to obtain additional data base for scale-up, a field test unit capable of processing 1MMSCF/d of natural gas has been installed at the Shell Western E and P Inc. (SWEPI) Fandango processing plant site. The results of the testing at the Fandango site will be presented when available.

  5. Optimal control system design of an acid gas removal unit for an IGCC power plants with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Future IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture should be operated optimally in the face of disturbances without violating operational and environmental constraints. To achieve this goal, a systematic approach is taken in this work to design the control system of a selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for a commercial-scale integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The control system design is performed in two stages with the objective of minimizing the auxiliary power while satisfying operational and environmental constraints in the presence of measured and unmeasured disturbances. In the first stage of the control system design, a top-down analysis is used to analyze degrees of freedom, define an operational objective, identify important disturbances and operational/environmental constraints, and select the control variables. With the degrees of freedom, the process is optimized with relation to the operational objective at nominal operation as well as under the disturbances identified. Operational and environmental constraints active at all operations are chosen as control variables. From the results of the optimization studies, self-optimizing control variables are identified for further examination. Several methods are explored in this work for the selection of these self-optimizing control variables. Modifications made to the existing methods will be discussed in this presentation. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for control variables and due to the complexity of the underlying optimization problem, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel Computing® toolbox from Mathworks®. The second stage is a bottom-up design of the control layers used for the operation of the process. First, the regulatory control layer is

  6. CNG acid gas removal process. Technical progress report No. 5, November 1, 1981-January 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, R.J.; Auyang, L.; Brown, W.R.; Cook, W.J.; Liu, Y.C.; Petrik, M.

    1982-11-01

    Three tasks were active during the fifth quarter of the CNG Acid Gas Removal project: Subtask 1.3 design and construction of a bench-scale triple-point crystallizer; Subtask 2.4 slurry pumping; and Task 4 fate of trace components. Within Subtask 1.3, safety considerations for the present CNG triple-point crystallizer system are summarized. These include: (1) building safety features, (2) crystallizer safety features, and (3) personnel safety features. Within Subtask 2.4, the minimum net positive suction head required for a MicroPump gear pump to successfully pump slurries of solid carbon dioxide in an organic liquid carrier solvent has been determined. Task 4, determination of the fate of trace contaminants in the CNG acid gas removal process, is complete. Trace contaminants anticipated in the crude gas entering acid gas removal are removed to acceptably low levels by the CNG process and rejected with the acid gases. With the possible exception of benzene, no recycle loops or accumulation of contaminants occur in the CNG process. Combinations of feed gas pressure and benzene contamination which may cause deposition of solid benzene are defined. 21 references, 10 figures, 6 tables.

  7. CNG process, a new approach to physical-absorption acid-gas removal

    SciTech Connect

    Hise, R.E.; Massey, L.G.; Adler, R.J.; Brosilow, C.B.; Gardner, N.C.; Brown, W.R.; Cook, W.J.; Petrik, M.

    1982-01-01

    The CNG acid gas removal process embodies three novel features: (1) scrubbing with liquid carbon dioxide to remove all sulfurous molecules and other trace contaminants; (2) triple-point crystallization of carbon dioxide to concentrate sulfurous molecules and produce pure carbon dioxide; and (3) absorption of carbon dioxide with a slurry of solid carbon dioxide in organic carrier liquid. The CNG process is discussed and contrasted with existing acid gas removal technology as represented by the Benfield, Rectisol, and Selexol acid gas removal processes.

  8. Selection of an acid-gas removal process for an LNG plant

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.B.; Jones, G.N.; Denton, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    Acid gas contaminants, such as, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and mercaptans, must be removed to a very low level from a feed natural gas before it is liquefied. CO{sub 2} is typically removed to a level of about 100 ppm to prevent freezing during LNG processing. Sulfur compounds are removed to levels required by the eventual consumer of the gas. Acid-gas removal processes can be broadly classified as: solvent-based, adsorption, cryogenic or physical separation. The advantages and disadvantages of these processes will be discussed along with design and operating considerations. This paper will also discuss the important considerations affecting the choice of the best acid-gas removal process for LNG plants. Some of these considerations are: the remoteness of the LNG plant from the resource; the cost of the feed gas and the economics of minimizing capital expenditures; the ultimate disposition of the acid gas; potential for energy integration; and the composition, including LPG and conditions of the feed gas. The example of the selection of the acid-gas removal process for an LNG plant.

  9. Effects of particulates, heavy metals and acid gas on the removals of NO and PAHs by V2O5-WO3 catalysts in waste incineration system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Feng-Yim; Chen, Jyh-Cherng; Wey, Ming-Yen; Tsai, Shih-An

    2009-10-15

    This study investigated the activities of prepared and commercial V(2)O(5)-WO(3) catalysts for simultaneous removals of NO and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the influences of particulates, heavy metals, SO(2), and HCl on the performances of catalysts. The experiments were carried out in a laboratory-scale waste incineration system equipped with a catalyst reactor. The DREs of PAHs by prepared and commercial V(2)O(5)-WO(3) catalysts were 64% and 72%, respectively. Increasing the particulate concentrations in flue gas suppressed the DRE of PAHs, but increasing the carbon content on surface of catalysts promotes the NO conversions. The DRE of PAHs by the catalysts was significantly decreased by the increased concentrations of heavy metal Cd, but was promoted by high concentration of Pb. The influence level of SO(2) was higher than HCl on the performances of V(2)O(5)-WO(3) catalysts for PAHs removal, but was lower than HCl for NO removal. Prepared and commercial V(2)O(5)-WO(3) catalysts have similar trends on the effects of particulates, heavy metals, SO(2), and HCl. The results of ESCA analysis reveal that the presence of these pollutants on the surface of catalysts did not change the chemical state of V and W.

  10. TECHNICAL AND OPERATING SUPPORT FOR PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF MORPHYSORB ACID GAS REMOVAL PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaraju Palla; Dennis Leppin

    2003-06-30

    GTI and Krupp Uhde have been jointly developing advanced technology for removing high concentrations of acid gas from high-pressure natural gas for over a decade. This technology, the Morphysorb{reg_sign} process, based on N-formyl and N-acetyl morpholine mixtures, has now been tested in a large-scale facility and this paper presents preliminary results from acceptance testing at that facility. Earlier publications have discussed the bench-scale and pilot plant work that led up to this important milestone. The site was Duke Energy's new Kwoen sour gas upgrader near Chetwynd B.C., Canada. This facility has a nameplate capacity of 300 MMscfd of sour natural gas. The objective of the Morphysorb process at this site was to remove 33 MMscfd of acid gas (H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}) for reinjection downhole. This represents about half the acid gas present in the feed to the plant. In so doing, proportionately more of the plant ''sales'' gas, which is sent for final processing at the nearby Pine River plant, can be sent down the line without coming up against the sulfur removal capacity limits of Pine River plant, than could with other solvents that were evaluated. Other benefits include less loss of methane downhole with the rejected acid gas and lower circulation and recycle compression horsepower than with competitive solvents. On the downside, the process is expected to have higher solvent vaporization losses than competitive solvents, but this is a comparatively minor drawback when weighed against the value of the benefits. These benefits (and drawbacks) were developed into quantitative ''acceptance'' criteria, which will determine if the solvent will continue to be used at the site and for award of monetary bonuses to the process developer (GTI).

  11. TECHNICAL AND OPERATING SUPPORT FOR PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF MORPHYSORB ACID GAS REMOVAL PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaraju Palla; Dennis Leppin

    2003-09-30

    GTI and Krupp Uhde have been jointly developing advanced technology for removing high concentrations of acid gas from high-pressure natural gas for over a decade. This technology, the Morphysorb{reg_sign} process, based on N-formyl and N-acetyl morpholine mixtures, has now been tested in a large-scale facility and this paper presents preliminary results from acceptance testing at that facility. Earlier publications have discussed the bench-scale and pilot plant work that led up to this important milestone. The site was Duke Energy's new Kwoen sour gas upgrader near Chetwynd B.C., Canada. This facility has a nameplate capacity of 300 MMscfd of sour natural gas. The objective of the Morphysorb process at this site was to remove 33 MMscfd of acid gas (H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}) for reinjection downhole. This represents about half the acid gas present in the feed to the plant. In so doing, proportionately more of the plant ''sales'' gas, which is sent for final processing at the nearby Pine River plant, can be sent down the line without coming up against the sulfur removal capacity limits of Pine River plant, than could with other solvents that were evaluated. Other benefits include less loss of methane downhole with the rejected acid gas and lower circulation and recycle compression horsepower than with competitive solvents. On the downside, the process is expected to have higher solvent vaporization losses than competitive solvents, but this is a comparatively minor drawback when weighed against the value of the benefits. These benefits (and drawbacks) were developed into quantitative ''acceptance'' criteria, which will determine if the solvent will continue to be used at the site and for award of monetary bonuses to the process developer (GTI).

  12. TECHNICAL AND OPERATING SUPPORT FOR PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF MORPHYSORB ACID GAS REMOVAL PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaraju Palla; Dennis Leppin

    2004-02-01

    Over the past 14 years, the Gas Technology Institute and jointly with Uhde since 1997 developing Morphysorb{reg_sign} a new physical solvent-based acid gas removal process. Based on extensive laboratory, bench, pilot-plant scale experiments and computer simulations, DEGT Gas Transmission Company, Canada (DEGT) has chosen the process for use at its Kwoen processing facility near Chetwynd, British Columbia, Canada as the first commercial application for the Morphysorb process. DOE co-funded the development of the Morphysorb process in various stages of development. DOE funded the production of this report to ensure that the results of the work would be readily available to potential users of the process in the United States. The Kwoen Plant is designed to process 300 MMscfd of raw natural gas at 1,080-psia pressure. The sour natural gas contains 20 to 25 percent H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}. The plant reduces the acid gas content by about 50% and injects the removed H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} into an injection well. The Kwoen plant has been operating since August 2002. Morphysorb{reg_sign} is a physical solvent-based process used for the bulk removal of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}S from natural gas and other gaseous streams. The solvent consists of N-Formyl morpholine and other morpholine derivatives. This process is particularly effective for high-pressure and high acid-gas applications and offers substantial savings in investment and operating cost compared to competitive physical solvent-based processes. GTI and DEGT first entered into an agreement in 2002 to test the Morphysorb process at their Kwoen Gas Treating Plant in northern BC. The process is operating successfully without any solvent related problems and has between DEGTC and GTI. As of December 2003, about 90 Bcf of sour gas was processed. Of this about 8 Bcf of acid gas containing mainly H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} was injected back into the depleted reservoir and 82 Bcf sent for further processing at DEGTC's Pine

  13. Acidic gas capture by diamines

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary; Hilliard, Marcus

    2011-05-10

    Compositions and methods related to the removal of acidic gas. In particular, the present disclosure relates to a composition and method for the removal of acidic gas from a gas mixture using a solvent comprising a diamine (e.g., piperazine) and carbon dioxide. One example of a method may involve a method for removing acidic gas comprising contacting a gas mixture having an acidic gas with a solvent, wherein the solvent comprises piperazine in an amount of from about 4 to about 20 moles/kg of water, and carbon dioxide in an amount of from about 0.3 to about 0.9 moles per mole of piperazine.

  14. State estimation of an acid gas removal (AGR) plant as part of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    An accurate estimation of process state variables not only can increase the effectiveness and reliability of process measurement technology, but can also enhance plant efficiency, improve control system performance, and increase plant availability. Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO2 capture will have to satisfy stricter operational and environmental constraints. To operate the IGCC plant without violating stringent environmental emission standards requires accurate estimation of the relevant process state variables, outputs, and disturbances. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured at all, while some of them can be measured, but with low precision, low reliability, or low signal-to-noise ratio. As a result, accurate estimation of the process variables is of great importance to avoid the inherent difficulties associated with the inaccuracy of the data. Motivated by this, the current paper focuses on the state estimation of an acid gas removal (AGR) process as part of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture. This process has extensive heat and mass integration and therefore is very suitable for testing the efficiency of the designed estimators in the presence of complex interactions between process variables. The traditional Kalman filter (KF) (Kalman, 1960) algorithm has been used as a state estimator which resembles that of a predictor-corrector algorithm for solving numerical problems. In traditional KF implementation, good guesses for the process noise covariance matrix (Q) and the measurement noise covariance matrix (R) are required to obtain satisfactory filter performance. However, in the real world, these matrices are unknown and it is difficult to generate good guesses for them. In this paper, use of an adaptive KF will be presented that adapts Q and R at every time step of the algorithm. Results show that very accurate estimations of the desired process states, outputs or disturbances can be

  15. Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics® (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel

  16. Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasifiction combined sycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics® (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel

  17. Removal of HCl, SO₂, and NO by treatment of acid gas with Mg-Al oxide slurry.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohito; Uchiyama, Naoya; Yoshioka, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Although effective treatment of acid gases such as HCl, SO(x), and NO(x) is essential for preventing air pollution, current methods pose other environmental problems such as CaCl₂ leaching, reduced landfill lifetimes, and solid waste production. Here we show that acid gases can be treated simply with a Mg-Al oxide slurry. The contribution of Mg-Al oxide to HCl and SO₂ removal increased as a function of the quantity and temperature of Mg-Al oxide. HCl was removed by the reconstruction of Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (Mg-Al LDH) intercalated with Cl⁻ dissociated from HCl in the slurry. SO₂ was oxidized into SO₃ by oxygen in the air flow, dissolved in an aqueous solution, and removed by the reconstruction of Mg-Al LDH intercalated with dissociated SO₄²⁻. Although less pronounced because of surface adsorption, NO was nonetheless removed by Mg-Al oxide. Our results suggest that simultaneous removal of HCl, SO₂, and NO using a Mg-Al oxide slurry may be possible without the concomitant problems of conventional treatment methods.

  18. Collection of VLE data for acid gas-alkanolamine systems using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Frazier, R.E.

    1991-09-01

    The industrial standard process for the purification of natural gas is to remove acid gases, mainly hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide, by the absorption and reaction of these gases with alkanolamines. Inadequate data for vapor -- liquid equilibrium (VLE) hinder the industry from converting operations to more energy efficient amine mixtures and conserving energy. Some energy reductions have been realized in the past decade by applying such amine systems as hindered'' amines, methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and MDEA based amine mixtures. However, the lack of reliable and accurate fundamental VLE data impedes the commercial application of these more efficient alkanolamine systems. The first project objective is to improve the accuracy of vapor -- liquid equilibrium measurements at low hydrogen sulfide concentrations. The second project objective is to measure the VLE for amine mixtures. By improving the accuracy of the VLE measurements on MDEA and mixtures with other amines, energy saving can be quickly and confidently implemented in the many existing absorption units already in use. If about 25% of the existing 95.3 billion SCFD gas purification capacity is converted to these new amine systems, the energy savings are estimated to be about 3 {times} 10{sup 14} BTU/yr.

  19. Hollow fiber gas-liquid membrane contactors for acid gas capture: a review.

    PubMed

    Mansourizadeh, A; Ismail, A F

    2009-11-15

    Membrane contactors using microporous membranes for acid gas removal have been extensively reviewed and discussed. The microporous membrane acts as a fixed interface between the gas and the liquid phase without dispersing one phase into another that offers a flexible modular and energy efficient device. The gas absorption process can offer a high selectivity and a high driving force for transport even at low concentrations. Using hollow fiber gas-liquid membrane contactors is a promising alternative to conventional gas absorption systems for acid gas capture from gas streams. Important aspects of membrane contactor as an efficient energy devise for acid gas removal including liquid absorbents, membrane characteristics, combination of membrane and absorbent, mass transfer, membrane modules, model development, advantages and disadvantages were critically discussed. In addition, current status and future potential in research and development of gas-liquid membrane contactors for acid gas removal were also briefly discussed.

  20. CNG acid-gas-removal process. Technical progress report 4 for the period 1 August 1981-31 October 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, R.J.; Auyang, L.; Brown, W.R.; Cook, W.J.; Keyvani, M.; Liu, Y.C.

    1981-12-01

    Four tasks were active: design and construction of a bench-scale triple-point crystallizer; equilibrium data acquisition, crystallizer separation factors for several sulfur-containing molecules and trace contaminants, and slurry pumping. A new design for the CNG crystallizer has been completed. A control scheme was devised for the new design. Equipment sizing, selection, and procurement is in progress. Equilibrium data acquisition has been completed. Five component vapor-liquid equilibrium data for gas mixtures representative of BCR Bi-Gas and Exxon catalytic gasifier crude gases were measured. The experimental data agree very well with the equilibrium data estimated by computer calculations. Separation factors were determined for the binary systems carbon dioxide/hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide/carbonyl sulfide, carbon dioxide/ethane, carbon dioxide/ethylene, and carbon dioxide/methyl mercaptan. For each system, sharp separation was observed in one stage of crystallization. In the slurry pumping project the height of liquid leg between the free flashing surface and the pump centerline is being varied to determine the minimum suction head needed for pumping slurry. The pump in current use is a MICROPUMP gear pump.

  1. CO2-binding Organic Liquids, an Integrated Acid Gas Capture System

    SciTech Connect

    Heldebrant, David J; Koech, Phillip K; Rainbolt, James E; Zheng, Feng

    2011-04-01

    Amine systems are effective for CO2 capture, but they are still inefficient because the solvent regeneration energy is largely defined by the amount of water in the process. Most amines form heat-stable salts with SO2 and COS resulting in parasitic solvent loss and degradation. Stripping the CO2-rich solvent is energy intensive it requires temperatures above 100 °C due to the high specific heat and heat of vaporization of water. CO2-capture processes could be much more energy efficient in a water free amine process. In addition, if the capture-material is chemically compatible with other acid gases, less solvent would be lost to heat-stable salts and the process economics would be further improved. One such system that can address these concerns is Binding Organic Liquids (BOLs), a class of switchable ionic liquids.

  2. Collection of VLE data for acid gas - alkanolamine systems using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Final report, September 29, 1990--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Rogers, W.J.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes research from September 29, 1990 through September 30, 1996, involving the development a novel Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic apparatus and method for measuring vapor - liquid equilibrium (VLE) systems of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide with aqueous alkanolamine solutions. The original apparatus was developed and modified as it was used to collect VLE data on acid gas systems. Vapor and liquid calibrations were performed for spectral measurements of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide in the vapor and in solution with aqueous diethanolamine (DEA) and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA). VLE measurements were made of systems of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide in 20 wt % DEA at 50{degrees}C and 40{degrees}C. VLE measurements were made of systems of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide in 50 wt% and 23 wt% MDEA at 40{degrees}C and in 23 wt% MDEA at 50{degrees}C. VLE measurements were made of systems of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide in 35 wt% MDEA + 5 wt% DEA and in 35 wt% MDEA + 10 wt% DEA at 40{degrees}C and 50{degrees}C. Measurements were made of residual amounts of carbon dioxide in each VLE system. The new FTIR spectrometer is now a consistently working and performing apparatus.

  3. Hot Spot Removal System: System description

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Hazardous wastes contaminated with radionuclides, chemicals, and explosives exist across the Department of Energy complex and need to be remediated due to environmental concerns. Currently, an opportunity is being developed to dramatically reduce remediation costs and to assist in the acceleration of schedules associated with these wastes by deploying a Hot Spot Removal System. Removing the hot spot from the waste site will remove risk driver(s) and enable another, more cost effective process/option/remedial alternative (i.e., capping) to be applied to the remainder of the site. The Hot Spot Removal System consists of a suite of technologies that will be utilized to locate and remove source terms. Components of the system can also be used in a variety of other cleanup activities. This Hot Spot Removal System Description document presents technologies that were considered for possible inclusion in the Hot Spot Removal System, technologies made available to the Hot Spot Removal System, industrial interest in the Hot Spot Removal System`s subsystems, the schedule required for the Hot Spot Removal System, the evaluation of the relevant technologies, and the recommendations for equipment and technologies as stated in the Plan section.

  4. Capture and release of acid-gasses with acid-gas binding organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Heldebrant, David J; Yonker, Clement R; Koech, Phillip K

    2015-03-17

    A system and method for acid-gas capture wherein organic acid-gas capture materials form hetero-atom analogs of alkyl-carbonate when contacted with an acid gas. These organic-acid gas capture materials include combinations of a weak acid and a base, or zwitterionic liquids. This invention allows for reversible acid-gas binding to these organic binding materials thus allowing for the capture and release of one or more acid gases. These acid-gas binding organic compounds can be regenerated to release the captured acid gasses and enable these organic acid-gas binding materials to be reused. This enables transport of the liquid capture compounds and the release of the acid gases from the organic liquid with significant energy savings compared to current aqueous systems.

  5. BENCH-SCALE EVALUATION OF CALCIUM SORBENTS FOR ACID GAS EMISSION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Calcium sorbents for acid gas emission control were evaluated for effectiveness in removing SO2/HCl and SO2/NO from simulated incinerator and boiler flue gases. All tests were conducted in a bench-scale reactor (fixed-bed) simulating fabric filter conditions in an acid gas remova...

  6. System for Removing Pollutants from Incinerator Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickham, David t.; Bahr, James; Dubovik, Rita; Gebhard, Steven C.; Lind, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    A system for removing pollutants -- primarily sulfur dioxide and mixed oxides of nitrogen (NOx) -- from incinerator exhaust has been demonstrated. The system is also designed secondarily to remove particles, hydrocarbons, and CO. The system is intended for use in an enclosed environment, for which a prior NOx-and-SO2-removal system designed for industrial settings would not be suitable.

  7. Space Station trash removal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A trash removal system for space stations is described. The system is comprised of a disposable trash bag member and an attached, compacted large, lightweight inflatable balloon element. When the trash bag member is filled, the astronaut places the bag member into space through an airlock. Once in the vacuum of space, the balloon element inflates. Due to the large cross-sectional area of the balloon element relative to its mass, the combined balloon element and the trash bag member are slowed by atmospheric drag to a much greater extent than the Space Station's. The balloon element and bag member lose altitude and re-enter the atmosphere, and the elements and contents are destroyed by aerodynamic heating. The novelty of this system is in the unique method of using the vacuum of space and aerodynamic heating to dispose of waste material with a minimum of increase in orbital debris.

  8. High removal rate laser-based coating removal system

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Dennis L.; Celliers, Peter M.; Hackel, Lloyd; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Dane, C. Brent; Mrowka, Stanley

    1999-11-16

    A compact laser system that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1000 ft.sup.2 /hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

  9. Designing Bioretention Systems to Improve Nitrogen Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioretention systems effectively remove many stormwater stressors, including oil/grease, heavy metals, phosphorus, and ammonium. However, reported nitrate removal performance is highly variable. Bioretention media is typically coarse-grained with low organic matter content, which...

  10. Collection of VLE data for acid gas-alkanolamine systems using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Phase 1, September 29, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Frazier, R.E.

    1991-09-01

    The industrial standard process for the purification of natural gas is to remove acid gases, mainly hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide, by the absorption and reaction of these gases with alkanolamines. Inadequate data for vapor -- liquid equilibrium (VLE) hinder the industry from converting operations to more energy efficient amine mixtures and conserving energy. Some energy reductions have been realized in the past decade by applying such amine systems as ``hindered`` amines, methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and MDEA based amine mixtures. However, the lack of reliable and accurate fundamental VLE data impedes the commercial application of these more efficient alkanolamine systems. The first project objective is to improve the accuracy of vapor -- liquid equilibrium measurements at low hydrogen sulfide concentrations. The second project objective is to measure the VLE for amine mixtures. By improving the accuracy of the VLE measurements on MDEA and mixtures with other amines, energy saving can be quickly and confidently implemented in the many existing absorption units already in use. If about 25% of the existing 95.3 billion SCFD gas purification capacity is converted to these new amine systems, the energy savings are estimated to be about 3 {times} 10{sup 14} BTU/yr.

  11. Collection of VLE data for acid gas-alkanolamine systems using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Technical report, October 1, 1994--July 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Rogers, W.J.

    1995-08-01

    The industrial standard process for the purification of natural gas is to remove acid gases, mainly hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide, by the absorption and reaction of these gases with alkanolamines. The natural gas industry requires vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data to develop more energy efficient amine mixtures. Some energy reductions have been realized in the past decade by applying such amine systems as hindered amines, methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and MDEA based amine mixtures. However, the lack of reliable and accurate VLE data impedes the commercial application of these more efficient alkanolamine systems. The first objective of this project is to improve the accuracy of vapor-liquid equilibrium measurements at low hydrogen sulfide concentrations. The second objective is to make VLE measurements for amine mixtures. By improving the accuracy of the VLE data on MDEA and other amines, energy savings can be implemented in the many existing absorption units already in use. If about 25% of the existing 95.3 billion SCFD gas purification capacity is converted to these new amine systems, the energy saved is estimated to be 3 {times} 10{sup 14} BTU/yr. 14 refs., 31 figs., 12 tabs.

  12. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  13. Removable Window System for Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, James P. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A window system for a platform comprising a window pane, a retention frame, and a biasing system. The window pane may be configured to contact a sealing system. The retention frame may be configured to contact the sealing system and hold the window pane against the support frame. The biasing system may be configured to bias the retention frame toward the support frame while the support frame and the retention frame are in a configuration that holds the window pane. Removal of the biasing system may cause the retention frame and the window pane to be removable.

  14. Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for Clean Power and Syngas Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Amy, Fabrice; Hufton, Jeffrey; Bhadra, Shubhra; Weist, Edward; Lau, Garret; Jonas, Gordon

    2015-06-30

    Air Products has developed an acid gas removal technology based on adsorption (Sour PSA) that favorably compares with incumbent AGR technologies. During this DOE-sponsored study, Air Products has been able to increase the Sour PSA technology readiness level by successfully operating a two-bed test system on coal-derived sour syngas at the NCCC, validating the lifetime and performance of the adsorbent material. Both proprietary simulation and data obtained during the testing at NCCC were used to further refine the estimate of the performance of the Sour PSA technology when expanded to a commercial scale. In-house experiments on sweet syngas combined with simulation work allowed Air Products to develop new PSA cycles that allowed for further reduction in capital expenditure. Finally our techno economic analysis of the use the Sour PSA technology for both IGCC and coal-to-methanol applications suggests significant improvement of the unit cost of electricity and methanol compared to incumbent AGR technologies.

  15. Toxic Acid Gas Absorber Design Considerations for Air Pollution Control in Process Industries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manyele, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the design parameters for an absorber used for removal of toxic acid gas (in particular sulfur dioxide) from a process gas stream for environmental health protection purposes. Starting from the equilibrium data, Henry's law constant was determined from the slope of the y-x diagram. Based on mass balances across the absorber,…

  16. Robotic Laser Coating Removal System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    completion of this evaluation a 6 kW CO2 laser from Rofin -Sinar was selected for use in the RLCRS. This laser provided the highest quality laser ...DATA AND ASSUMPTIONS................................................................B-1 iii LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1. Six kW CO2 laser ...for proposal (RFP) that was distributed throughout the laser industry. In response to this RFP, 15 laser systems (nine CO2 , three Nd:YAG, and three

  17. System for removal of arsenic from water

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2004-11-23

    Systems for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical systems for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A system for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a system for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  18. ASBESTOS PIPE-INSULATION REMOVAL ROBOT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-09-15

    This final topical report details the development, experimentation and field-testing activities for a robotic asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system developed for use within the DOE's weapon complex as part of their ER and WM program, as well as in industrial abatement. The engineering development, regulatory compliance, cost-benefit and field-trial experiences gathered through this program are summarized.

  19. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  20. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  1. Pegasus International, Inc. coating removal systems

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The Pegasus Coating Removal System (PCRS) was demonstrated at Florida International University (FIU) where it was being evaluated for efficiency and cost. In conjunction with the FIU testing demonstration, a human factors assessment was conducted to assess the hazards and associated safety and health issues of concern for workers utilizing this technology. The PCRS is a chemical paste that is applied to the surface using a brush, roller, or airless sprayer. After the type of PCRS, thickness, and dwell time have been determined, a laminated backed material is placed on top of the chemical paste to slow down the drying process and to provide a mechanism to strip-off the chemical. After the dwell time is reached, the chemical substrate can be removed. Scrapers may be used to break-loose the layers as necessary or to break-loose the layers that are not removed when the laminated paper is picked up. Residue may also be cleaned off of the surface with a damp sponge with an agitating motion, absorbent sponges, or a vacuum, as needed. The paint and removal agent is then placed in drums for disposal at a later time. During the assessment sampling was conducted for organic vapors and general observational techniques were conducted for ergonomics. Recommendations for improved worker safety and health during application and removal of the PCRS include: (1) work practices that reflect avoidance of exposure or reducing the risk of exposure; (2) assuring all PPE and equipment are compatible with the chemicals being used; (3) work practices that reduce the worker`s need to walk on the slippery surface caused by the chemical or the use of special anti-slip soles; (4) careful control of overspray (if a spray application is used); and (5) the use of ergonomically designed long-handled tools to apply and remove the chemical (to alleviate some of the ergonomic concerns).

  2. West Valley waste removal system study

    SciTech Connect

    Janicek, G P

    1981-04-01

    This study addresses the specific task of removing high-level wastes from underground tanks at Western New York Nuclear Center and delivering them to an onsite waste solidification plant. It begins with a review of the design and construction features of the waste storage tanks pertinent to the waste removal task with particular emphasis on the unique and complex tank internals which severely complicate the task of removal. It follows with a review of tank cleaning techniques used and under study at both Hanford and Savannah River and previous studies proposing the use of these techniques at West Valley. It concludes from these reviews that existing techniques are not directly transferable to West Valley and that a new approach is required utilizing selected feature and attributes from existing methodology. The study also concludes, from an investigation of the constraints imposed by the processing facility, that waste removal will be intermittent, requiring batch transfer over the anticipated 3 years of processing operations. Based on these reviews and conclusions, the study proposes that the acid waste be processed first and that one of the 15,000-gallon acid tanks then be used for batch feeding the neutralized waste. The proposed system would employ commercially available pumping equipment to transfer the wastes from the batch tank to processing via existing process piping. A commercially available mixed-flow pump and eight turbine pumps would homogenize the neutralized waste in conjunction with eight custom-fabricated sluicers for periodic transfer to the batch tank.

  3. Biocathodic nitrous oxide removal in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Desloover, Joachim; Puig, Sebastià; Virdis, Bernardino; Clauwaert, Peter; Boeckx, Pascal; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2011-12-15

    Anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions represent up to 40% of the global N(2)O emission and are constantly increasing. Mitigation of these emissions is warranted since N(2)O is a strong greenhouse gas and important ozone-depleting compound. Until now, only physicochemical technologies have been applied to mitigate point sources of N(2)O, and no biological treatment technology has been developed so far. In this study, a bioelectrochemical system (BES) with an autotrophic denitrifying biocathode was considered for the removal of N(2)O. The high N(2)O removal rates obtained ranged between 0.76 and 1.83 kg N m(-3) net cathodic compartment (NCC) d(-1) and were proportional to the current production, resulting in cathodic coulombic efficiencies near 100%. Furthermore, our experiments suggested the active involvement of microorganisms as the catalyst for the reduction of N(2)O to N(2), and the optimal cathode potential ranged from -200 to 0 mV vs standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) in order to obtain high conversion rates. Successful operation of the system for more than 115 days with N(2)O as the sole cathodic electron acceptor strongly indicated that N(2)O respiration yielded enough energy to maintain the biological process. To our knowledge, this study provides for the first time proof of concept of biocathodic N(2)O removal at long-term without the need for high temperatures and expensive catalysts.

  4. Nitrogen removal in recirculated duckweed ponds system.

    PubMed

    Benjawan, L; Koottatep, T

    2007-01-01

    Duckweed-based ponds (DWBPs) have the potential for nitrogen (N) removal from wastewater; however, operational problems such as duckweed die-off regularly occur. In this study, effluent recirculation was applied to the DWBPs to solve the above problem as well as to investigate N removal mechanisms. Two pilot scale recirculated DWBPs were employed to treat municipal wastewater. The average removal efficiencies for TN, TKN and NH4-N were 75%, 89% and 92%, respectively at TN loading of 1.3 g/m2.d and were 73%, 74% and 76%, respectively at TN loading of 3.3 g/m2.d. The effluent of the system under both operational conditions had stable quality and met the effluent standard. Duckweed die-off was not observed during the study, which proves the system stability and effluent recirculation which is thought to be a reason. N-mass balance revealed that nitrification-denitrification and duckweed uptake play major roles in these recirculated DWBPs. The rates of nitrification-denitrification were increased as TN loading was higher, which might be an influence from an abundance of N and a suitable condition. The rates of N uptake by duckweed were found similar and did not depend on the higher TN loading applied, as the duckweed has limited capacity to assimilate it.

  5. Regeneration of an aqueous solution from an acid gas absorption process by matrix stripping

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary T.; Oyenekan, Babatunde A.

    2011-03-08

    Carbon dioxide and other acid gases are removed from gaseous streams using aqueous absorption and stripping processes. By replacing the conventional stripper used to regenerate the aqueous solvent and capture the acid gas with a matrix stripping configuration, less energy is consumed. The matrix stripping configuration uses two or more reboiled strippers at different pressures. The rich feed from the absorption equipment is split among the strippers, and partially regenerated solvent from the highest pressure stripper flows to the middle of sequentially lower pressure strippers in a "matrix" pattern. By selecting certain parameters of the matrix stripping configuration such that the total energy required by the strippers to achieve a desired percentage of acid gas removal from the gaseous stream is minimized, further energy savings can be realized.

  6. Reversible Acid Gas Capture Using CO2-Binding Organic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Yonker, Clement R.; Rainbolt, James E.; Zheng, Feng

    2010-08-31

    Acid gas scrubbing technology is predominantly aqueous alkanolamine based. Of the acid gases, CO2, H2S and SO2 have been shown to be reversible, however there are serious disadvantages with corrosion and high regeneration costs. The primary scrubbing system composed of monoethanolamine is limited to 30% by weight because of the highly corrosive solution. This gravimetric limitation limits the CO2 volumetric (≤108 g/L) and gravimetric capacity (≤7 wt%) of the system. Furthermore the scrubbing system has a large energy penalty from pumping and heating the excess water required to dissolve the MEA bicarbonate salt. Considering the high specific heat of water (4 j/g-1K-1), low capacities and the high corrosion we set out to design a fully organic solvent that can chemically bind all acid gases i.e. CO2 as reversible alkylcarbonate ionic liquids or analogues thereof. Having a liquid acid gas carrier improves process economics because there is no need for excess solvent to pump and to heat. We have demonstrated illustrated in Figure 1, that CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) have a high CO2 solubility paired with a much lower specific heat (<1.5 J/g-1K-1) than aqueous systems. CO2BOLs are a subsection of a larger class of materials known as Binding Organic Liquids (BOLs). Our BOLs have been shown to reversibly bind and release COS, CS2, and SO2, which we denote COSBOLS, CS2BOLs and SO2BOLs. Our BOLs are highly tunable and can be designed for post or pre-combustion gas capture. The design and testing of the next generation zwitterionic CO2BOLs and SO2BOLs are presented.

  7. BOA: Pipe asbestos insulation removal robot system

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.; Schnorr, W.

    1995-12-31

    The BOA system is a mobile pipe-external robotic crawler used to remotely strip and bag asbestos-containing lagging and insulation materials (ACLIM) from various diameter pipes in (primarily) industrial installations. Steam and process lines within the DOE weapons complex warrant the use of a remote device due to the high labor costs and high level of radioactive contamination, making manual removal extremely costly and highly inefficient. Currently targeted facilities for demonstration and remediation are Fernald in Ohio and Oak Ridge in Tennessee.

  8. Improved sulfur removal processes evaluated for IGCC

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    An inherent advantage of Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) electric power generation is the ability to easily remove and recover sulfur. During the last several years, a number of new, improved sulfur removal and recovery processes have been commercialized. An assessment is given of alternative sulfur removal processes for IGCC based on the Texaco coal gasifier. The Selexol acid gas removal system, Claus sulfur recovery, and SCOT tail gas treating are currently used in Texaco-based IGCC. Other processes considered are: Purisol, Sulfinol-M, Selefning, 50% MDEA, Sulften, and LO-CAT. 2 tables.

  9. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

    2009-11-16

    This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent

  10. Density, phase behavior keys to acid gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.J.; Lui, D.W.

    1997-06-23

    Acid gas injection requires an understanding of the complexities of gas phase behavior and physical properties. Injected acid gas streams typically come from the top of the regenerator reflux accumulator of an amine unit. Thus, they are composed mainly of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with significant amounts of methane and lesser amounts of other hydrocarbons. The stream is also saturated with water. The stream from the amine plant has a low pressure and must be compressed to a higher pressure for injection into a disposal well. This article summarizes the available research on acid gas phase behavior and density calculations.

  11. Expert systems guide biological phosphorus removal

    SciTech Connect

    Krichten, D.J.; Wilson, K.D.; Tracy, K.D. )

    1991-10-01

    There is a large body of knowledge regarding optimum control strategies for new secondary wastewater treatment technology using an anaerobic selector to provide biological phosphorus removal. However, because the selector technology is new and the concepts differ somewhat from those used in conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment, a method of communicating this knowledge to plant operators is needed. Traditional methods such as classroom training and operating manuals are of limited effectiveness. The commonplace availability and low cost of the personal computer (PC) makes it practical to use a computer program to communicate the type of information required to control a wastewater treatment plant. Knowledge-based systems technology, commonly referred to as expert systems (ES) technology, is easy to use, provides useful information regarding a consistent control strategy, relieves the anxiety associated with learning a new process,' and provides instruction for inexperienced personnel. ES technology does not require special formatted input and is therefore easily accessible. All information required by the program is readily available through routine laboratory analysis, common plant instrumentation, or direct user observation. The program was designed for all levels of computer users and will run on all IBM-compatible or Apple MacIntosh systems.

  12. Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect

    Kloosterman, Jeff

    2012-12-31

    Air Products has developed a potentially ground-breaking technology – Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) – to replace the solvent-based acid gas removal (AGR) systems currently employed to separate sulfur containing species, along with CO{sub 2} and other impurities, from gasifier syngas streams. The Sour PSA technology is based on adsorption processes that utilize pressure swing or temperature swing regeneration methods. Sour PSA technology has already been shown with higher rank coals to provide a significant reduction in the cost of CO{sub 2} capture for power generation, which should translate to a reduction in cost of electricity (COE), compared to baseline CO{sub 2} capture plant design. The objective of this project is to test the performance and capability of the adsorbents in handling tar and other impurities using a gaseous mixture generated from the gasification of lower rank, lignite coal. The results of this testing are used to generate a high-level pilot process design, and to prepare a techno-economic assessment evaluating the applicability of the technology to plants utilizing these coals.

  13. Passive shut-down heat removal system

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv; Sharbaugh, John E.

    1988-01-01

    An improved shut-down heat removal system for a liquid metal nuclear reactor of the type having a vessel for holding hot and cold pools of liquid sodium is disclosed herein. Generally, the improved system comprises a redan or barrier within the reactor vessel which allows an auxiliary heat exchanger to become immersed in liquid sodium from the hot pool whenever the reactor pump fails to generate a metal-circulating pressure differential between the hot and cold pools of sodium. This redan also defines an alternative circulation path between the hot and cold pools of sodium in order to equilibrate the distribution of the decay heat from the reactor core. The invention may take the form of a redan or barrier that circumscribes the inner wall of the reactor vessel, thereby defining an annular space therebetween. In this embodiment, the bottom of the annular space communicates with the cold pool of sodium, and the auxiliary heat exchanger is placed in this annular space just above the drawn-down level that the liquid sodium assumes during normal operating conditions. Alternatively, the redan of the invention may include a pair of vertically oriented, concentrically disposed standpipes having a piston member disposed between them that operates somewhat like a pressure-sensitive valve. In both embodiments, the cessation of the pressure differential that is normally created by the reactor pump causes the auxiliary heat exchanger to be immersed in liquid sodium from the hot pool. Additionally, the redan in both embodiments forms a circulation flow path between the hot and cold pools so that the decay heat from the nuclear core is uniformly distributed within the vessel.

  14. Low-Quality Natural Gas Sulfur Removal/Recovery System

    SciTech Connect

    Lokhandwala, K.A.; Ringer, M.; Wijams, H.; Baker, R.W.

    1997-10-01

    Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. Much raw gas is `subquality`, that is, it exceeds the pipeline specifications for nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and/or hydrogen sulfide content, and much of this low-quality natural gas cannot be produced economically with present processing technology. Against this background, a number of industry-wide trends are affecting the natural gas industry. Despite the current low price of natural gas, long-term demand is expected to outstrip supply, requiring new gas fields to be developed. Several important consequences will result. First, gas fields not being used because of low-quality products will have to be tapped. In the future, the proportion of the gas supply that must be treated to remove impurities prior to delivery to the pipeline will increase substantially. The extent of treatment required to bring the gas up to specification will also increase. Gas Research Institute studies have shown that a substantial capital investment in facilities is likely to occur over the next decade. The estimated overall investment for all gas processing facilities up to the year 2000 alone is approximates $1.2 Billion, of which acid gas removal and sulfur recovery are a significant part in terms of invested capital. This large market size and the known shortcomings of conventional processing techniques will encourage development and commercialization of newer technologies such as membrane processes. Second, much of today`s gas production is from large, readily accessible fields. As new reserves are exploited, more gas will be produced from smaller fields in remote or offshore locations. The result is an increasing need for technology able to treat small-scale gas streams.

  15. Some problems associated with trace contaminant removal systems for spacecabins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.

    1985-01-01

    Potential problems associated with acid gas sorbents, activated charcoal beds and the catalytic oxidizer proposed for spacecabin trace contaminant control are discussed. The need for further research on atmospheric trace contaminant control methods is noted.

  16. Prototype demonstration of dual sorbent injection for acid gas control on municipal solid waste combustion units

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    This report gathered and evaluated emissions and operations data associated with furnace injection of dry hydrated lime and duct injection of dry sodium bicarbonate at a commercial, 1500 ton per day, waste-to-energy facility. The information compiled during the project sheds light on these sorbents to affect acid gas emissions from municipal solid waste combustors. The information assesses the capability of these systems to meet the 1990 Clean Air Act and 1991 EPA Emission Guidelines.

  17. Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Schenone, C.E.; Rosinski, J.

    1984-02-28

    In a fluidized bed gasification system, an ash removal system is disclosed to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

  18. Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal system

    DOEpatents

    Schenone, Carl E.; Rosinski, Joseph

    1984-02-28

    In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

  19. Wash water solids removal system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    During wash water purification, surfactants tend to precipitate and foul the RO membranes, causing water flux decline and loss of salt rejection. The use of 165 to 190 ppm ferric chloride and optionally 0.25 to 1.0 ppm polymeric flocculate precipitates 92 to 96 percent of the surfactant from an Olive Leaf Soap based wash water. Crossflow filtration and pressure filtration yield good soap rejection at high water flux rates. Post-treatment of the chemically pretreated and filtered wash water with activated charcoal removes the residual soap down to an undetectable level.

  20. Development of Carbon Dioxide Removal Systems for Advanced Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.; Trinh, Diep; Gostowski, Rudy; King, Eric; Mattox, Emily M.; Watson, David; Thomas, John

    2012-01-01

    "NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is pioneering new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities, and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit" (NASA 2012). These forays beyond the confines of earth's gravity will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must not only blast out of earth's gravity well as during the Apollo moon missions, but also launch the supplies needed to sustain a crew over longer periods for exploration missions beyond earth's moon. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. Current efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art systems utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, evaluating structured sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. These development efforts combine testing of sub-scale systems and multi-physics computer simulations to evaluate candidate approaches, select the best performing options, and optimize the configuration of the selected approach, which is then implemented in a full-scale integrated atmosphere revitalization test. This paper describes the carbon dioxide (CO2) removal hardware design and sorbent screening and characterization effort in support of the Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project within the AES program. A companion paper discusses development of atmosphere revitalization models and simulations for this project.

  1. Treatment System for Removing Halogenated Compounds from Contaminated Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jacqueline W. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian A. (Inventor); Yestrebsky, Cherie L. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A treatment system and a method for removal of at least one halogenated compound, such as PCBs, found in contaminated systems are provided. The treatment system includes a polymer blanket for receiving at least one non-polar solvent. The halogenated compound permeates into or through a wall of the polymer blanket where it is solubilized with at least one non-polar solvent received by said polymer blanket forming a halogenated solvent mixture. This treatment system and method provides for the in situ removal of halogenated compounds from the contaminated system. In one embodiment, the halogenated solvent mixture is subjected to subsequent processes which destroy and/or degrade the halogenated compound.

  2. Nutrients removal and recovery in bioelectrochemical systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patrick T; He, Zhen

    2014-02-01

    Nutrient removal and recovery has received less attention during the development of bioelectrochemical systems (BES) for energy efficient wastewater treatment, but it is a critical issue for sustainable wastewater treatment. Both nitrogen and phosphorus can be removed and/or recovered in a BES through involving biological processes such as nitrification and bioelectrochemical denitrification, the NH4(+)/NH3 couple affected by the electrolyte pH, or precipitating phosphorus compounds in the high-pH zone adjacent a cathode electrode. This paper has reviewed the nutrients removal and recovery in various BES including microbial fuel cells and microbial electrolysis cells, discussed the influence factors and potential problems, and identified the key challenges for nitrogen and phosphorus removal/recovery in a BES. It expects to give an informative overview of the current development, and to encourage more thinking and investigation towards further development of efficient processes for nutrient removal and recovery in a BES.

  3. Acid gas scrubbing by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

    1988-04-12

    A composite immobilized liquid membrane suitable for acid gas scrubbing is disclosed. The membrane is a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous polymeric support, the solvent being selected from a class of highly polar solvents containing at least one atom selected from nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a solubility parameter of from about 7.5 to about 13.5 (cal/cm[sup 3]-atm)[sup 1/2]. Such solvents are homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. Also disclosed are methods of acid gas scrubbing of high- and low-Btu gas effluents with such solvent-swollen membranes. 3 figs.

  4. Acid gas scrubbing by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Stephen L.; Lee, Eric K. L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Kelly, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    A composite immobilized liquid membrane suitable for acid gas scrubbing is disclosed. The membrane is a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous polymeric support, the solvent being selected from a class of highly polar solvents containing at least one atom selected from nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous and sulfur, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a solubility parameter of from about 7.5 to about 13.5 (cal/cm.sup.3 -atm).sup.1/2. Such solvents are homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. Also disclosed are methods of acid gas scrubbing of high- and low-Btu gas effluents with such solvent-swollen membranes.

  5. Orbital debris removal and salvage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Four Texas A&M University projects are discussed. The first project is a design to eliminate a majority of orbital debris. The Orbital Debris and Salvage System will push the smaller particles into lower orbits where their orbits will decay at a higher rate. This will be done by momentum transfer via laser. The salvageable satellites will be delivered to the Space Station by an Orbital Transfer Vehicle. The rest of the debris will be collected by Salvage I. The second project is the design of a space based satellite system to prevent the depletion of atmospheric ozone. The focus is on ozone depletion in the Antarctic. The plan is to use an orbiting solar array system designed to transmit microwaves at a frequency of 22 GHz over the region in order to dissipate polar stratospheric clouds that form during the months beginning in August and ending in October. The third project, Project Poseidon, involves a conceptual design of a space based hurricane control system consisting of a network of 21 low-orbiting laser platforms arranged in three rings designed to heat the upper atmosphere of a developing tropical depression. Fusion power plants are proposed to provide power for the lasers. The fourth project, Project Donatello, involves a proposed Mars exploration initiative for the year 2050. The project is a conceptual design for a futuristic superfreighter that will transport large numbers of people and supplies to Mars for the construction of a full scale scientific and manufacturing complex.

  6. Laser Systems for Orbital Debris Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, A. M.; Barty, C. P. J.; Beach, R. J.; Erlandson, A. C.; Caird, J. A.

    2010-10-08

    The use of a ground based laser for space debris cleaning was investigated by the ORION project in 1996. Since that study the greatest technological advance in the development of high energy pulsed laser systems has taken place within the NIF project at LLNL. The proposed next laser system to follow the NIF at LLNL will be a high rep rate version of the NIF based on diode-pumping rather than flashlamp excitation; the so called 'LIFE' laser system. Because a single 'LIFE' beamline could be built up in a few year time frame, and has performance characteristics relevant to the space debris clearing problem, such a beamline could enable a near term demonstration of space debris cleaning. Moreover, the specifics of debris cleaning make it possible to simplify the LIFE laser beyond what is required for a fusion drive laser, and so substantially reduce its cost. Starting with the requirements for laser intensity on the target, and then considering beam delivery, we will flow back the laser requirements needed for space debris cleaning. Using these derived requirements we will then optimize the pulse duration, the operational regime, and the output pulse energy of the laser with a focus of simplifying its overall design. Anticipated simplifications include operation in the heat capacity regime, eliminating cooling requirements on the laser gain slabs, and relaxing B-integral and birefrigence requirements.

  7. Laser Systems for Orbital Debris Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, A M; Barty, C P; Beach, R J; Erlandson, A C; Caird, J A

    2010-02-05

    The use of a ground based laser for space debris cleaning was investigated by the ORION project in 1996. Since that study the greatest technological advance in the development of high energy pulsed laser systems has taken place within the NIF project at LLNL. The proposed next laser system to follow the NIF at LLNL will be a high rep rate version of the NIF based on diode-pumping rather than flashlamp excitation; the so called 'LIFE' laser system. Because a single 'LIFE' beamline could be built up in a few year time frame, and has performance characteristics relevant to the space debris clearing problem, such a beamline could enable a near term demonstration of space debris cleaning. Moreover, the specifics of debris cleaning make it possible to simplify the LIFE laser beyond what is required for a fusion drive laser, and so substantially reduce its cost. Starting with the requirements for laser intensity on the target, and then considering beam delivery, we will flow back the laser requirements needed for space debris cleaning. Using these derived requirements we will then optimize the pulse duration, the operational regime, and the output pulse energy of the laser with a focus of simplifying its overall design. Anticipated simplifications include operation in the heat capacity regime, eliminating cooling requirements on the laser gain slabs, and relaxing B-integral and birefrigence requirements.

  8. Operability test procedure [Tank] 241-SY-101 equipment removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, J.C.

    1994-12-08

    The 241-SY-101 equipment removal system (ERS) consists of components, equipment, instrumentation and procedures that will provide the means to disconnect, retrieve, contain, load and transport the Mitigation Pump Assembly (MPA) from waste Tank 241-SY-101 to the Central Waste Complex (CWC). The Operability Test Procedure (OTP) will test the interfaces between ERS components and will rehearse the procedure for MPA removal and transportation to the extent they can be mocked-up at the CTF (Cold Test Facility). At the conclusion of the OTP, the ERS components and equipment will be removed from the CTF, entered into the Component Based Recall System (CBRS), and stored until needed for actual MPA removal and transportation.

  9. Experimental and analytical studies of passive shutdown heat removal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, D.; Tessier, J.; Heineman, J.; Stewart, R.; Anderson, T.; August, C.; Chawla, T.; Cheung, F.B.; Despe, O.; Haupt, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    Using a naturally circulating air stream to remove shutdown decay heat from a nuclear reactor vessel is a key feature of advanced liquid metal reactor (LMR) concepts developed by potential vendors selected by the Department of Energy. General Electric and Rockwell International continue to develop innovative design concepts aimed at improving safety, lowering plant costs, simplifying plant operation, reducing construction times, and most of all, enhancing plant licensability. The reactor program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) provides technical support to both organizations. The method of shutdown heat removal proposed employs a totally passive cooling system that rejects heat from the reactor by radiation and natural convection to air. The system is inherently reliable since it is not subject failure modes associated with active decay cooling systems. The system is designed to assure adequate cooling of the reactor under abnormal operating conditions associated with loss of heat removal through other heat transport paths.

  10. Elastomeric impression materials and cleaning systems for residue removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, T. M.

    1983-01-01

    A materials evaluation program was conducted to characterize castable resin compounds as suitable dimensional inspection aids. A fast curing dimethylsilicone based compound was selected as the best performer of the eleven compounds tested. Evaluation of physical properties revealed an inherent problem of particle adherence to metal surfaces tested. A cleaning study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the solvent systems in removing particulate matter from test surfaces. Silicon residues which can adversely affect bonding characteristics of the metals were identified in cleaning study tests. One solvent system composed of alkylarylsulfonic acids, toluene, and dichloromethane, gave superior results in breaking down and removing these polymerized compounds.

  11. Designing Bioretention Systems to Improve Nitrogen Removal - poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rain gardens, also referred to as bioretention systems, are designed primarily to infiltrate stormwater flow and reduce surface runoff and peak flows to receiving streams. Additionally, they are known to remove stressors from urban stormwater runoff, including oil and grease, pho...

  12. Crewmember repairing the Regenerative Carbon Dioxide Removal System wiring.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mission Pilot Ken Bowersox, busy at work on the wiring harness for the Regenerative Carbon Dioxide Removal System located under the mid deck floor. Photo shows Bowersox splicing wires together to 'fool' a faulty sensor that caused the 'air conditioner' to shut down.

  13. BOA: Pipe-asbestos insulation removal robot system

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.; Mutschler, E.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the BOA system, a mobile pipe-external crawler used to remotely strip and bag (possibly contaminated) asbestos-containing lagging and insulation materials (ACLIM) from various diameter pipes in (primarily) industrial installations across the DOE weapons complex. The mechanical removal of ACLIM is very cost-effective due to the relatively low productivity and high cost involved in human removal scenarios. BOA, a mechanical system capable of removing most forms of lagging (paper, plaster, aluminum sheet, clamps, screws and chicken-wire), and insulation (paper, tar, asbestos fiber, mag-block) uses a circular cutter and compression paddles to cut and strip the insulation off the pipe through compression, while a HEPA-filter and encapsulant system maintain a certifiable vacuum and moisture content inside the system and on the pipe, respectively. The crawler system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. Key design parameters and performance parameters are developed and used in performance testing. Since the current system is a testbed, we also discuss future enhancements and outline two deployment scenarios (robotic and manual) for the final system to be designed and completed by the end of FY `95. An on-site demonstration is currently planned for Fernald in Ohio and Oak Ridge in Tennessee.

  14. System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors

    DOEpatents

    Weidner, J.R.; Downs, W.C.; Kaser, T.G.; Hall, H.J.

    1997-12-16

    A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources. 4 figs.

  15. System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors

    DOEpatents

    Weidner, Jerry R.; Downs, Wayne C.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Hall, H. James

    1997-01-01

    A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources.

  16. An alternative circulating fluid bed bottom ash removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Barsin, J.A.; Carrea, A.

    1999-07-01

    Circulating fluid beds pose two challenges for the removal of spent or unreacted calcined limestone and coal ash from the bottom of the bed. The furnace operates under a positive pressure and thus a seal must be maintained between the ambient and the furnace and secondly the bottom ash is discharged at about 1600 F and must be cooled down before transported into a storage silo. In the higher bottom ash-loaded units (firing lignite or anthracite culm) this cooling represents a significant portion of the latent heat lost to the stream generator, thus affecting the overall heat rate. Also the material is abrasive traditionally which has had a negative effect upon the removal system life and maintenance costs. Now there is an alternative to the existing present water screw or auxiliary bed cooler systems applied in the past. This presentation reviews the successful application of a dry bottom ash removal system to pulverized coal (PC) fired units, the experimental and commercial scale developmental work to determine if that PC concept is applicable to Circulating Fluid Bed Units, and projected savings that might be realized if heat recovery, carbon recovery, reduction in parasitic power and maintenance costs all could be improved. The power generation industry typically demands at minimum a commercial demonstration of new technology prior to application and therefore a host site for dry bottom ash removal technology is sought.

  17. An alternative circulating fluid bed bottom ash removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Barsin, J.A.; Carrea, A.

    1999-11-01

    Circulating fluid beds pose two challenges for the removal of spent or unreacted calcined limestone and coal ash from the bottom of the bed. The furnace operates under a positive pressure and thus a seal must be maintained between the ambient and the furnace and secondly the bottom ash is discharged at about 1600 F and must be cooled down before transported into a storage silo. In the higher bottom ash-loaded units (firing lignite or anthracite culm) this cooling represents a significant portion of the latent heat lost to the steam generator, thus affecting the overall heat rate. Also the material is abrasive traditionally which has had a negative effect upon the removal system life and maintenance costs. Now there is an alternative to the existing present water screw or auxiliary bed cooler systems applied in the past. This presentation reviews the successful application of a dry bottom ash removal system to pulverized coal (PC) fired units, the experimental and commercial scale developmental work to determine if that PC concept is applicable to Circulating Fluid Bed Units, and projected savings that might be realized if heat recovery, carbon recovery, reduction in parasitic power and maintenance costs all could be improved. The power generation industry typically demands at minimum a commercial demonstration of new technology prior to application and therefore a host site for dry bottom ash removal technology is sought.

  18. Removal of Cryptosporidium parvum in bank filtration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harter, T.; Atwill, E. R.; Hou, L. L.

    2003-04-01

    The protozoan pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum is a leading cause of waterborne disease. Many surface water systems therefore depend on filtration systems, including bank filtration systems, for the removal of the pathogenic oocysts. To better understand the effectiveness, e.g., of bank filtration systems, we have implemented a series of columns studies under various environmental conditions (column length: 10 cm - 60 cm, flow rates: 0.7 m/d - 30 m/d, ionic strength: 0.01 - 100 mM, filter grain size: 0.2 - 2 mm, various solution chemistry). We show that classic colloid filtration theory is a reasonable tool for predicting the initial breakthrough of C. parvum in pulsed injections of the oocyst through sand columns, although the model does not account for the significant tailing that occurs in C. parvum transport. Application of colloid filtration theory to bank filtration system is further limited by the intrinsic heterogeneity of the geologic systems used for bank filtration. We couple filtration theory with a stochastic subsurface transport approach and with percolation theory to account for the effects of intrinsic heterogeneity. We find that a 1-log removal can be achieved even under relatively adverse conditions (low collision efficiency, high velocity) if 85% - 90% of the sedimentary hydrofacies located within the bank filtration system or of the coarsest known hydrofacies connecting the riverbed with the extraction system has a grain-size distribution with a 10% passing diameter equal to 1 mm. One millimeter is a standard sieve size in sediment analysis.

  19. Assessment of DFT methods for studying acid gas capture by ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    García, Gregorio; Atilhan, Mert; Aparicio, Santiago

    2015-10-28

    For the first time, this work reports an analysis of the performance of Density Functional methods for studying acid gas capture (CO2 and SO2) by ionic liquids (ILs). The considered functionals were selected as representatives of the available families: pure GGA (PBE and BLYP), hybrid (PBE0 and B3LYP), hybrid meta-GGA (M06, M06-2X and M06-HF), long range corrected (LC-PBEPBE, CAM-B3LYP, ωB97X) and dispersion corrected (PBE-D2, B3LYP-D2 and ωB97XD). Likewise, HF and MP2 were also applied. Binding energies of cation-anion interacting pairs as well as IL-CO2 and IL-SO2 systems were calculated for a set of 54 ILs and compared against MP2/aug-cc-pvDZ. Unlike previously reported DFT benchmarks on ILs, which calculated binding energies through single point calculations on fixed geometries, properties in this work were calculated for geometries optimized at each theoretical level. DFT functionals that are suitable for describing ion-ion and ion-gas interactions were identified, considering both Coulombic forces and dispersion interactions. The reported results allowed us to infer relationships to the rational design of ILs for acid gas capture.

  20. Benzene removal by PAC in jet flocculation system

    SciTech Connect

    Sobrinho, J.A.H.; Thiem, L.T.; Alkhatib, E.A.

    1997-10-01

    A jet flocculator/powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption pilot plant was designed, built, and operated in order to evaluate a water treatment process capable of simultaneous adsorption of benzene and flocculation of PAC and silica clay particles. The jet flocculation/PAC system successfully combined, in the same reactor, flocculation of suspended solids by using jet mixing, solids retention using pall rings, and benzene removal by PAC adsorption. The advantages of this process included operational simplicity, reliability, and low energy consumption. The jet flocculator/PAC adsorption system was able to achieve suspended solids and benzene removals of approximately 80 and 95%, respectively, from an influent containing 70 mg/L of suspended solids (silica clay and PAC) and 100 {micro}g/L of benzene.

  1. Optimization of contaminant removal for heterogeneous systems by soil venting

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.C.; Casey, D.; Anker, C.; LeMone, D.

    1996-12-31

    The efficiency of remediation of vadose zone organic compounds can be enhanced by refinement of methods for soil venting and bioventing in complex heterogeneous systems. This can be accomplished by (a) identification of physical and chemical conditions (e.g., soil temperature, moisture content, flow rates) required for rapid contaminant removal rates, (b) precise engineering control of identified parameters in the subsurface, and (c) development of knowledge-based operational strategies providing greater removal efficiencies at low cost. One method with promise is to moderately heat and humidify the input/replacement air during venting. Initial calculations indicate that this strategy may be quite effective in enhancing remediation of heterogeneous systems with diffusional control of cleanup time.

  2. Removable, hermetically-sealing, filter attachment system for hostile environments

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Glenn L [Richland, WA

    1983-01-01

    A removable and reusable filter attachment system. A filter medium is fixed o, and surrounded by, a filter frame having a coaxial, longitudinally extending, annular rim. The rim engages an annular groove which surrounds the opening of a filter housing. The annular groove contains a fusible material and a heating mechanism for melting the fusible material. Upon resolidifying, the fusible material forms a hermetic bond with the rim and groove. Remelting allows detachment and replacement of the filter frame.

  3. BOA II: pipe-asbestos insulation removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.; Mutschler; Boehmke, S.; Chemel, B.; Piepgras, C.

    1996-12-31

    BOA system is a mobile pipe-external robotic crawler used to remotely strip and bag asbestos-containing lagging and insulation materials from various diameter pipes in (primarily) industrial installations. Steam and process lines within the DOE weapons complex warrant the use of a remote device due to high labor costs and high level of radioactive contamination, making manual removal costly and inefficient. Currently targeted facilities for demonstration and remediation are Fernald in Ohio and Oak Ridge in Tennessee.

  4. Reversing the antilock braking system theory for suture removal.

    PubMed

    Mangus, D J

    1987-06-01

    A simple and extremely practical technique for removal of long subcuticular sutures is possible by simply interposing a rubber band between the suture and the traction source. We have likened the technique in a reverse manner to the pulsing application of brakes in the antilock braking system now commonly found in modern automobiles. We also suggest with this paper that Prolene at this time be tried as the suture of choice in pullout repairs of all types.

  5. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek metal coating removal system consists of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER(R), and VAC-PAC(R). The system is designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M ROTO-PEEN tungsten carbide cutters, while the CORNER-CUTTER(R) uses solid needles for descaling activities. These are used with the VAC-PAC(R) vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure was minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended, since the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place may skew the results. It is feasible that dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment. Other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  6. Microbial Removals by a Novel Biofilter Water Treatment System

    PubMed Central

    Wendt, Christopher; Ives, Rebecca; Hoyt, Anne L.; Conrad, Ken E.; Longstaff, Stephanie; Kuennen, Roy W.; Rose, Joan B.

    2015-01-01

    Two point-of-use drinking water treatment systems designed using a carbon filter and foam material as a possible alternative to traditional biosand systems were evaluated for removal of bacteria, protozoa, and viruses. Two configurations were tested: the foam material was positioned vertically around the carbon filter in the sleeve unit or horizontally in the disk unit. The filtration systems were challenged with Cryptosporidium parvum, Raoultella terrigena, and bacteriophages P22 and MS2 before and after biofilm development to determine average log reduction (ALR) for each organism and the role of the biofilm. There was no significant difference in performance between the two designs, and both designs showed significant levels of removal (at least 4 log10 reduction in viruses, 6 log10 for protozoa, and 8 log10 for bacteria). Removal levels meet or exceeded Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for microbial purifiers. Exploratory test results suggested that mature biofilm formation contributed 1–2 log10 reductions. Future work is recommended to determine field viability. PMID:25758649

  7. Space debris removal system using a small satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Shin-Ichiro; Kawamoto, Satomi; Okawa, Yasushi; Terui, Fuyuto; Kitamura, Shoji

    2009-07-01

    Since the number of satellites in Earth orbit is steadily increasing, space debris will eventually pose a serious problem to near-Earth space activities if left unchecked, and so effective measures to mitigate it are becoming urgent. Equipping new satellites with an end-of-life de-orbit or orbital lifetime reduction capability could be an effective means of reducing the amount of debris by reducing the probability of the collisions between objects. On the other hand, the active removal of space debris and the retrieval of failed satellites by spacecraft are other possible measures. The Institute of Aerospace Technology, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), is studying a micro-satellite system for active space debris removal, and is examining the applicability of electro-dynamic tether (EDT) technology as its high efficiency orbital transfer system. A small EDT package provides a possible means for lowering the orbits of objects without the need for propellant. Capture is indispensable for the retrieval of large space debris objects, and we propose a flexible robot arm for this purpose. This paper discusses a space debris removal satellite system and describes the development status of prototypes of the EDT package and a new robot arm for capturing non-cooperative targets.

  8. System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module

    DOEpatents

    Matchett, R.L.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Bacvinsicas, W.S.; Roof, D.R.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1988-07-28

    A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system. 7 figs.

  9. System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module

    DOEpatents

    Matchett, Richard L.; Roof, David R.; Kikta, Thomas J.; Wilczynski, Rosemarie; Nilsen, Roy J.; Bacvinskas, William S.; Fodor, George

    1990-01-01

    A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system.

  10. System Study: Residual Heat Removal 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-02-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the residual heat removal (RHR) system in two modes of operation (low-pressure injection in response to a large loss-of-coolant accident and post-trip shutdown-cooling) at 104 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant trends were identified in the RHR results.

  11. Emergency heat removal system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Dunckel, Thomas L.

    1976-01-01

    A heat removal system for nuclear reactors serving as a supplement to an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) during a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) comprises a plurality of heat pipes having one end in heat transfer relationship with either the reactor pressure vessel, the core support grid structure or other in-core components and the opposite end located in heat transfer relationship with a heat exchanger having heat transfer fluid therein. The heat exchanger is located external to the pressure vessel whereby excessive core heat is transferred from the above reactor components and dissipated within the heat exchanger fluid.

  12. Satellite refrigerator compressors with the oil and moisture removal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Satti, J.A.

    1983-08-01

    There are twenty-eight compressors installed around the Main Accelerator Ring in seven locations. Drawing 9140-ME-129720 shows the piping and the components schematic for four Mycom compressor skids per building with each having an independent oil and moisture removal system. The Mycom skids each consist of an oil injected screw compressor of 750 SCFM capacity with a 350 hp motor, oil pump, oil cooler, and oil separator. Helium gas returning from the heat exchanger train is compressed from 1 atm to 20 atm in the compressor. The compressed gas is then passed through the three coalescer de-mister where oil mist is separated from the helium gas. The helium gas then flows through the charcoal adsorber and molecular sieve where any residual oil vapor and water vapor are removed. The final stage of purification is the final filter which removes any remaining particulates from the compressed helium gas. The end product of this system is compressed and purified helium gas ready to be cooled down to cryogenic temperatures.

  13. One active debris removal control system design and error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weilin; Chen, Lei; Li, Kebo; Lei, Yongjun

    2016-11-01

    The increasing expansion of debris presents a significant challenge to space safety and sustainability. To address it, active debris removal, usually involving a chaser performing autonomous rendezvous with targeted debris to be removed is a feasible solution. In this paper, we explore a mid-range autonomous rendezvous control system based on augmented proportional navigation (APN), establishing a three-dimensional kinematic equation set constructed in a rotating coordinate system. In APN, feedback control is applied in the direction of line of sight (LOS), thus analytical solutions of LOS rate and relative motion are expectedly obtained. To evaluate the effectiveness of the control system, we adopt Zero-Effort-Miss (ZEM) in this research as the index, the uncertainty of which is directly determined by that of LOS rate. Accordingly, we apply covariance analysis (CA) method to analyze the propagation of LOS rate uncertainty. Consequently, we find that the accuracy of the control system can be verified even with uncertainty and the CA method is drastically more computationally efficient compared with nonlinear Monte-Carlo method. Additionally, to justify the superiority of the system, we further discuss more simulation cases to show the robustness and feasibility of APN proposed in the paper.

  14. BOA: Asbestos pipe insulation removal robot system. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.E.

    1995-02-01

    The project described in this report targets the development of a mechanized system for safe, cost-efficient and automated abatement of asbestos containing materials used as pipe insulation. Based on several key design criteria and site visits, a proof-of-concept prototype robot system, dubbed BOA, was designed and built, which automatically strips the lagging and insulation from the pipes, and encapsulates them under complete vacuum operation. The system can operate on straight runs of piping in horizontal or vertical orientations. Currently we are limited to four-inch diameter piping without obstacles as well as a somewhat laborious emplacement and removal procedure -- restrictions to be alleviated through continued development. BOA removed asbestos at a rate of 4-5 ft./h compared to 3 ft./h for manual removal of asbestos with a 3-person crew. The containment and vacuum system on BOA was able to achieve the regulatory requirement for airborne fiber emissions of 0.01 fibers/ccm/ 8-hr. shift. This program consists of two phases. The first phase was completed and a demonstration was given to a review panel, consisting of DOE headquarters and site representatives as well as commercial abatement industry representatives. Based on the technical and programmatic recommendations drafted, presented and discussed during the review meeting, a new plan for the Phase II effort of this project was developed. Phase 11 will consist of a 26-month effort, with an up-front 4-month site-, market-, cost/benefit and regulatory study before the next BOA robot (14 months) is built, and then deployed and demonstrated (3 months) at a DOE site (such as Fernald or Oak Ridge) by the beginning of FY`97.

  15. Systems analysis of electricity production from coal using fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    Gasifiers, heat transfer, gas stability, quench, water-gas shift reaction, reforming-methanation, other catalytic reactions, compressors and expanders, acid-gas removal, the fuel cell, and catalytic combustors are described. System pressure drops, efficiency of rotating power equipment, heat exchangers, chemical reactions, steam systems, and the fuel cell subsystems are discussed.

  16. Final design of a space debris removal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Erika; Casali, Steve; Chambers, Don; Geissler, Garner; Lalich, Andrew; Leipold, Manfred; Mach, Richard; Parry, John; Weems, Foley

    1990-01-01

    The objective is the removal of medium sized orbital debris in low Earth orbits. The design incorporates a transfer vehicle and a netting vehicle to capture the medium size debris. The system is based near an operational space station located at 28.5 degrees inclination and 400 km altitude. The system uses ground based tracking to determine the location of a satellite breakup or debris cloud. This data is unloaded to the transfer vehicle, and the transfer vehicle proceeds to rendezvous with the debris at a lower altitude parking orbit. Next, the netting vehicle is deployed, tracks the targeted debris, and captures it. After expending the available nets, the netting vehicle returns to the transfer vehicle for a new netting module and continues to capture more debris in the target area. Once all the netting modules are expended, the transfer vehicle returns to the space station's orbit, where it is resupplied with new netting modules from a space shuttle load. The new modules are launched by the shuttle from the ground, and the expended modules are taken back to Earth for removal of the captured debris, refueling, and repacking of the nets. Once the netting modules are refurbished, they are taken back into orbit for reuse. In a typical mission, the system has the ability to capture 50 pieces of orbital debris. One mission will take about six months. The system is designed to allow for a 30 degree inclination change on the outgoing and incoming trips of the transfer vehicle.

  17. VecLoader HEPA Vacuum Insulation Removal System

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective remediation technologies for use in the deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. To this end, the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE’s Office of Science and Technology sponsors Large-Scale Demonstration Projects (LSDPs) at which developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to DOE’s projects and to others in the D&D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, decreased costs and shortened schedules. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project’s (FEMP’s) Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Plan requires that interior and exterior walls of buildings that are being demolished be disassembled and all insulating materials removed prior to demolition. This report provides a comparative analysis of the baseline manual insulation removal technique currently employed at the FEMP, with an innovative vacuum insulation removal system.

  18. Ornamental plants for micropollutant removal in wetland systems.

    PubMed

    Macci, Cristina; Peruzzi, Eleonora; Doni, Serena; Iannelli, Renato; Masciandaro, Grazia

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate the efficiency of micropollutant removal, such as Cu, Zn, carbamazepine, and linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS), through the use of a subsurface vertical flow constructed wetland system with ornamental plants. Zantedeschia aethiopica, Canna indica, Carex hirta, Miscanthus sinensis, and Phragmites australis were selected and planted in lysimeters filled up with gravel. The lysimeters were completely saturated with synthetic wastewater (N 280 mg L(-1), P 30 mg L(-1), Cu 3.6 mg L(-1), Zn 9 mg L(-1), carbamazepine 5 μg L(-1), linear alkylbenzene sulfonates 14 mg L(-1)), and the leaching water was collected for analysis after 15, 30, and 60 days in winter-spring and spring-summer periods. Nutrients (N and P) and heavy metals decreased greatly due to both plant activity and adsorption. C. indica and P. australis showed the highest metal content in their tissues and also the greatest carbamazepine and LAS removal. In these plants, the adsorption/degradation processes led to particularly high oxidative stress, as evidenced by the significantly high levels of ascorbate peroxidase activity detected. Conversely, Z. aethiopica was the less efficient plant in metal and organic compound removal and was also less stressed in terms of ascorbate peroxidase activity.

  19. Synthesis and development of processes for the recovery of sulfur from acid gases. Part 1, Development of a high-temperature process for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gas using limestone -- thermodynamic and kinetic considerations; Part 2, Development of a zero-emissions process for recovery of sulfur from acid gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Towler, G.P.; Lynn, S.

    1993-05-01

    Limestone can be used more effectively as a sorbent for H{sub 2}S in high-temperature gas-cleaning applications if it is prevented from undergoing calcination. Sorption of H{sub 2}S by limestone is impeded by sintering of the product CaS layer. Sintering of CaS is catalyzed by CO{sub 2}, but is not affected by N{sub 2} or H{sub 2}. The kinetics of CaS sintering was determined for the temperature range 750--900{degrees}C. When hydrogen sulfide is heated above 600{degrees}C in the presence of carbon dioxide elemental sulfur is formed. The rate-limiting step of elemental sulfur formation is thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}S. Part of the hydrogen thereby produced reacts with CO{sub 2}, forming CO via the water-gas-shift reaction. The equilibrium of H{sub 2}S decomposition is therefore shifted to favor the formation of elemental sulfur. The main byproduct is COS, formed by a reaction between CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S that is analogous to the water-gas-shift reaction. Smaller amounts of SO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} also form. Molybdenum disulfide is a strong catalyst for H{sub 2}S decomposition in the presence of CO{sub 2}. A process for recovery of sulfur from H{sub 2}S using this chemistry is as follows: Hydrogen sulfide is heated in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of CO{sub 2} and a suitable catalyst. The primary products of the overall reaction are S{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture to roughly 600{degrees}C prevents loss Of S{sub 2} during cooling. Carbonyl sulfide is removed from the product gas by hydrolysis back to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Unreacted CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H{sub 2} and CO, which recovers the hydrogen value from the H{sub 2}S. This process is economically favorable compared to the existing sulfur-recovery technology and allows emissions of sulfur-containing gases to be controlled to very low levels.

  20. System and method for removal of buried objects

    DOEpatents

    Alexander, Robert G.; Crass, Dennis; Grams, William; Phillips, Steven J.; Riess, Mark

    2008-06-03

    The present invention is a system and method for removal of buried objects. According to one embodiment of the invention, a crane with a vibrator casing driver is used to lift and suspend a large diameter steel casing over the buried object. Then the casing is driven into the ground by the vibratory driver until the casing surrounds the buried object. Then the open bottom of the casing is sealed shut by injecting grout into the ground within the casing near its bottom. When the seal has cured and hardened, the top of the casing is lifted to retrieve the casing, with the buried object inside, from the ground.

  1. System, Apparatus, and Method for Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, Sr., Anthony D. (Inventor); Kohli, Rajiv (Inventor); Burns, Susan H. (Inventor); Damico, Stephen J. (Inventor); Gruber, David J. (Inventor); Hickey, Christopher J. (Inventor); Lee, David E. (Inventor); Robinson, Travis M. (Inventor); Smith, Jason T. (Inventor); Spehar, Peter T. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Systems, apparatuses, and methods for removal of orbital debris are provided. In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a spacecraft control unit configured to guide and navigate the apparatus to a target. The apparatus also includes a dynamic object characterization unit configured to characterize movement, and a capture feature, of the target. The apparatus further includes a capture and release unit configured to capture a target and deorbit or release the target. The collection of these apparatuses is then employed as multiple, independent and individually operated vehicles launched from a single launch vehicle for the purpose of disposing of multiple debris objects.

  2. BOA: Pipe-asbestos insulation removal robot system

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.; Schnorr, W.

    1995-10-01

    The BOA system is a mobile pipe-external robotic crawler used to remotely strip and bag asbestos-containing lagging and insulation materials (ACLIM) from various diameter pipes in (primarily) industrial installations. Steam and process lines within the DOE weapons complex warrant the use of a remote device due to the high labor costs and high level of radioactive contamination, making manual removal extremely costly and highly inefficient. Currently targeted facilities for demonstration and remediation are Fernald in Ohio and Oak Ridge in Tennessee.

  3. Closed-Loop System Removes Contaminants From Inert Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.

    1995-01-01

    Concentration of oxygen in this closed-loop system kept low by use of heated catalytic sorbent bed in cartridge. Proposed to keep concentration of water vapor low by use of predried zeolite sorbent bed in another cartridge, and to remove particles smaller than 0.1 micrometer by use of porous metal filters. In specific application, chamber is one in which semiconducting materials processed. By virtue of closed-loop operation, limited supply of inert gas adequate to provide atmosphere for industrial processing of semiconductors.

  4. Nitrogen removal using a vertically moving biofilm system.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, M; Burke, D

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this laboratory study was to establish the efficacy of a new experimental biofilm system for the removal of nitrogen from synthetic wastewater. The system consisted of six reactors in series: one anaerobic, one anoxic and four aerobic reactors. In both the anaerobic and anoxic reactors, a plastic cuboid module was repeatedly moved up and down in the wastewater, while being totally submerged at all times. In each of the aerobic reactors, an identical module to that used in the anaerobic and anoxic reactors was intermittently and repeatedly immersed in and lifted out of the wastewater. All the individual reactors had a bulk fluid volume of 28.2 litres and the average temperature of the wastewater was about 10 degrees C. Each module consisted of crossflow corrugated plastic sheets with a surface area of 1.824 m2. The nitrate recycle flow from the fourth aerobic tank to the anoxic tank was twice the inflow to that tank. In the anoxic reactor, filtered COD was removed at an average rate of 2.22 kg COD/m3 x d and nitrate-nitrogen was denitrified at a rate of 0.42 kg NO3-N/m3 x d. The average nitrification rate in the second aerobic reactor was 0.12 kg NH4-N/m3 x d. The new biofilm system was simple to construct and operate.

  5. Process and system for removing impurities from a gas

    SciTech Connect

    Henningsen, Gunnar; Knowlton, Teddy Merrill; Findlay, John George; Schlather, Jerry Neal; Turk, Brian S

    2014-04-15

    A fluidized reactor system for removing impurities from a gas and an associated process are provided. The system includes a fluidized absorber for contacting a feed gas with a sorbent stream to reduce the impurity content of the feed gas; a fluidized solids regenerator for contacting an impurity loaded sorbent stream with a regeneration gas to reduce the impurity content of the sorbent stream; a first non-mechanical gas seal forming solids transfer device adapted to receive an impurity loaded sorbent stream from the absorber and transport the impurity loaded sorbent stream to the regenerator at a controllable flow rate in response to an aeration gas; and a second non-mechanical gas seal forming solids transfer device adapted to receive a sorbent stream of reduced impurity content from the regenerator and transfer the sorbent stream of reduced impurity content to the absorber without changing the flow rate of the sorbent stream.

  6. System Study: Residual Heat Removal 1998-2014

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the residual heat removal (RHR) system in two modes of operation (low-pressure injection in response to a large loss-of-coolant accident and post-trip shutdown-cooling) at 104 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing trends were identified in the RHR results. A highly statistically significant decreasing trend was observed for the RHR injection mode start-only unreliability. Statistically significant decreasing trends were observed for RHR shutdown cooling mode start-only unreliability and RHR shutdown cooling model 24-hour unreliability.

  7. Dynamic simulation of sulfur-removal systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.H.; Blake, T.R.; Brownell, D.H. Jr.; Henline, W.D.; Wilkins, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    A generalized computer simulation has been developed to predict the dynamic response of alternate gas absorption systems for selective removal of sulfur compounds or ammonia from fuel gas or synthesis gas produced from coal or other fossil fuels. The models use numerical methods based upon finite difference techniques to determine the spatial distribution of process variables within both the absorption and regeneration columns of such gas cleanup processes. The simulator may be applied to systems for selective gas absorption based on either chemical or physical principles. Examples of such systems include the Benfield process based on absorption by chemical reaction with an activated alkali carbonate solvent, and the Allied SELEXOL Solvent Process based on physical absorption as a result of partial pressure differences of the gas components above an organic solvent system. Simulations of either individual process units or an entire integrated plant can be performed. This computer program has specifically been structured to permit convenient flow sheet modification, as well as addition of new units. This research has emphasized the development of a general theoretical structure which can be easily modified by substituting alternate sets of data on the physicochemical properties of the appropriate liquid solvent. This model has been applied to Selexol Solvent Processes using both published and proprietary data on solvent properties. Test calculations have been performed to simulate open loop response of individual scrubber towers, and the complete system, to input composition and flow rate transients.

  8. Tank waste removal using a high pressure waterjet system

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, J.D.; Rinker, M.W.; Summers, D.

    1996-10-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has several tank wastes that are currently stored in inactive tanks constructed of gunite concrete. A remediation program at ORNL and a development program at PNL and UMR are collaborating to develop a system that will utilize high pressure waterjet technology for cutting and dislodging sludge beds, and for conveyance of those materials to a treatment tank. This technology for waste removal has two major advantages. First, sludge will be retrieved from one or more high risk tanks, that is tanks with a high degree of uncertainty for failure, to a single treatment tank with lower risk. Second, sludges of similar nature will be consolidated for volume reduction. ORNL and PNL are currently pursuing this technology for waste removal and transport to a single immobilization treatment facility. The ORNL remediation program is known as the Gunite And Associated Tanks Treatability Study. The PNL development program is known as Retrieval Process Development and Enhancement. UMR is developing the waste dislodging/cutting tool. This paper will describe the waterjet technology for waste dislodging and conveyance of ORNL sludges from underground storage tanks.

  9. Evaluation of levonorgestrel intrauterine system upon presumed nonintact removal.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Josh; Rogers, Anna; Cansino, Catherine

    2014-12-01

    A 51 year old woman presented for removal of her expired levonorgestrel intrauterine device (IUD). The IUD arms appeared absent upon IUD removal. Further examination of the device revealed that the arms were concealed inside the hormonal cylinder. Recognizing abnormal presentations of the levonorgestrel IUD upon removal can avoid unnecessary procedures.

  10. Process screening study of alternative gas treating and sulfur removal systems for IGCC (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) power plant applications: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Biasca, F.E.; Korens, N.; Schulman, B.L.; Simbeck, D.R.

    1987-12-01

    One of the inherent advantages of the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle plant (IGCC) over other coal-based electric generation technologies is that the sulfur in the coal is converted into a form which can be removed and recovered. Extremely low sulfur oxide emissions can result. Gas treating and sulfur recovery processes for the control of sulfur emissions are an integral part of the overall IGCC plant design. There is a wide range of commercially proven technologies which are highly efficient for sulfur control. In addition, there are many developing technologies and new concepts for applying established technologies which offer potential improvements in both technical and economic performance. SFA Pacific, Inc. has completed a screening study to compare several alternative methods of removing sulfur from the gas streams generated by the Texaco coal gasification process for use in an IGCC plant. The study considered cleaning the gas made from high and low sulfur coals to produce a low sulfur fuel gas and a severely desulfurized synthesis gas (suitable for methanol synthesis), while maintaining a range of low levels of total sulfur emissions. The general approach was to compare the technical performance of the various processes in meeting the desulfurization specifications laid out in EPRI's design basis for the study. The processing scheme being tested at the Cool Water IGCC facility incorporates the Selexol acid gas removal process which is used in combination with a Claus sulfur plant and a SCOT tailgas treating unit. The study has identified several commercial systems, as well as some unusual applications, which can provide efficient removal of sulfur from the fuel gas and also produce extremely low sulfur emissions - so as to meet very stringent sulfur emissions standards. 29 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. Conceptual design of an aircraft automated coating removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.E.; Draper, J.V.; Pin, F.G.; Primm, A.H.; Shekhar, S.

    1996-05-01

    Paint stripping of the U.S. Air Force`s large transport aircrafts is currently a labor-intensive, manual process. Significant reductions in costs, personnel and turnaround time can be accomplished by the judicious use of automation in some process tasks. This paper presents the conceptual design of a coating removal systems for the tail surfaces of the C-5 plane. Emphasis is placed on the technology selection to optimize human-automation synergy with respect to overall costs, throughput, quality, safety, and reliability. Trade- offs between field-proven vs. research-requiring technologies, and between expected gain vs. cost and complexity, have led to a conceptual design which is semi-autonomous (relying on the human for task specification and disturbance handling) yet incorporates sensor- based automation (for sweep path generation and tracking, surface following, stripping quality control and tape/breach handling).

  12. Using Wet-FGD systems for mercury removal.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Somoano, Mercedes; Unterberger, Sven; Hein, Klaus R G

    2005-09-01

    A plan to control mercury emissions to the atmosphere and to establish mercury emission limits has recently been elaborated by the European Commission, making it necessary to devise an efficient and cost effective mercury removal technology. Towards this end wet flue gas desulfurization units appear as a promising option for multi-pollutant control. However, more investigation on mercury removal and a greater mercury removal efficiency are required to achieve this objective. In the present work scrubber chemistry and the application of various solid additives to enhance mercury removal in wet scrubbers is evaluated. The results obtained show a significant correlation between mercury removal efficiency and the pH of the scrubber slurry and SO2 concentration. A weaker correlation was observed between oxygen or slurry concentration and removal efficiency. Finally several solid oxides were found to be effective additives for enhancing mercury capture in wet scrubbers.

  13. Biological phosphorus removal inhibition by roxarsone in batch culture systems.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingfeng; Liu, Li; Hu, Zhenhu; Chen, Guowei

    2013-06-01

    Roxarsone has been extensively used in the feed of animals, which is usually excreted unchanged in the manure and eventually enter into animal wastewater, challenging the biological phosphorus removal processes. Knowledge of its inhibition effect is key for guiding treatment of roxarsone-contaminated wastewater, and is unfortunately keeping unclear. We study the inhibition of roxarsone on biological phosphorus removal processes for roxarsone-contaminated wastewater treatment, in terms of the removal and rates of chemical oxygen demand (COD), phosphate. Results showed that presence of roxarsone considerably limited the COD removals, especially at roxarsone concentration exceeding 40 mg L(-1). Additionally, roxarsone inhibited both phosphorus release and uptake processes, consistent with the phosphate profiles during the biological phosphorus removal processes; whereas, roxarsone is more toxic to phosphorus uptake process, than release function. The results indicated that it is roxarsone itself, rather than the inorganic arsenics, inhibit biological phosphorus removal processes within both aerobic and anaerobic roxarsone-contaminated wastewater treatment.

  14. ROGER a potential orbital space debris removal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, Juergen; Bischof, Bernd; Foth, W.-O.; -J., J.; Günther

    The previous activities in the field of On Orbit Servicing studied in the 1990's included in partic-ular the capability of vehicles in GEO to capture and support satellites (mainly communication satellites) to enable repair and continuation of operations, and finally the controlled transfer the target into a permanent graveyard orbit. The specific capture tools for these applications were mostly based on robotic systems to capture and fix the target under specific dynamic constraints (e.g. slowly tumbling target) without damage, and to allow the stabilization, re-orientation and potential repair of the target and subsequent release or transport to the final disposal orbit. Due to the drastically increasing number of debris particularly in the Low Earth Orbits (SSO) the active debris removal is now necessary to counteract to the predicted debris production cascade (Kessler Syndrome), which means the pollution of the total sphere in low earth orbit and not only the SSO area. In most of the debris congresses it was recommended to start removal with the still integrated systems as soon as possible. In the case of large debris objects, the soft capture system can be replaced by a simpler and robust system able to operate from a safe distance to the target and flexible enough to capture and hold different types of targets such as deactivated and/or defective satellites, upper stages and big fragments. These nominally non -cooperative targets might be partially destroyed by the capture process, but the production of additional debris shall be avoided. A major argument for the commercial applications is a multi-target mission potential, which is possible at GEO because the transfer propellant requirement to the disposal orbit and the return to the orbit of the next potential target is relative low (orbits with similar inclination and altitude). The proposed ROGER system is designed as a spacecraft with rendezvous capabilities including inspection in the vicinity of the

  15. Dynamic simulation models for selective sulfur removal in coal gasification systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vysniauskas, T.; Sim, W.D.

    1985-07-01

    A study was conducted, under EPRI Agreement RP1038-6, to investigate the feasibility of using computer simulation models to predict the steady-state and transient behavior of selective acid gas treating units. One of the prime objectives was to determine whether these models could be used to simulate the acid gas absorption units in coal gasification-combined cycle (GCC) power plants. Two dynamic simulation models were investigated; one model was developed by S-Cubed (formerly Systems, Science and Software) and the other was an in-house program developed by Hyprotech Ltd. These models were tailored specifically for the Norton Co. SELEXOL process for this study and incorporated an empirically fitted property package to represent the solvent. Both models used the same property package and were tested against SELEXOL plant data provided from the Bi-Gas pilot plant in Homer City, Pennsylvania, the Texaco pilot plant in Montebello, California and the TVA pilot plant in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. The results of this study are presented in this report. Although there were inconsistencies in some of the plant data, the models appeared to compare favorably with the plant data. The S-Cubed and Hyprotech model yielded nearly identical results when tested against the Bi-Gas plant data. Overall, the Hyprotech model proved to be faster than the S-Cubed version by about an order of magnitude and therefore offered the more attractive option for general simulation applications. However, further work is still needed to improve the solvent property predictions in the model. 7 refs.

  16. Removal of organic micropollutants in an artificial recharge system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valhondo, C.; Nödler, K.; Köck-Schulmeyer, M.; Hernandez, M.; Licha, T.; Ayora, C.; Carrera, J.

    2012-04-01

    Emerging contaminants including pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), personal care products (PCPs) and pesticides are increasingly being identified in the environment. Emerging pollutants and their transformation products show low concentration in the environment (ng/L), but the effects of the mixtures and lifelong exposure to humans are currently unknown. Many of these contaminants are removed under aerobic conditions in water treatment plants. However, several pharmaceuticals and metabolites present in wastewater are not eliminated by conventional treatment processes. Several lab studies, however, show that the behaviour of many of these micropollutants is affected by the dominant redox conditions. However, data from field experiments are limited and sometimes contradictory. Artificial recharge is a widespread technology to increase the groundwater resources. In this study we propose a design to enhance the natural remediation potential of the aquifer with the installation of a reactive layer at the bottom of the infiltration pond. This layer is a mixture of compost, aquifer material, clay and iron oxide. This layer is intended to provide an extra amount of DOC to the recharge water and to promote biodegradation by means of the development of different redox zones along the travel path through the unsaturated zone and within the aquifer. Moreover, compost, clay and iron oxide of the layer are assumed to increase sorption surfaces for neutral, cationic and anionic compounds, respectively. The infiltration system is sited in Sant Vicenç dels Horts (Barcelona, Spain). It consists of a decantation pond, receiving raw water from the Llobregat River (highly affected from treatment plant effluents), and an infiltration pond (5600 m2). The infiltration rate is around 1 m3/m2/day. The system is equipped with a network of piezometers, suction cups and tensiometers. Infiltration periods have been performed before and after the installation of the reactive layer

  17. Costs of Arsenic Removal Technologies for Small Water Systems: U.S. EPA Arsenic Removal Technology Demonstration Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Arsenic Rule Implementation Research Program, between July 2003 and July 2011, the U.S. environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted 50 full-scale demonstration projects on treatment systems removing arsenic from drinking water in 26 states throughout the U.S. ...

  18. Assessment of sulfur removal processes for advanced fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorton, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    The performance characteristics of potential sulfur removal processes were evaluated and four of these processes, the Selexol process, the Benfield process, the Sulfinol process, and the Rectisol process, were selected for detailed technical and economic comparison. The process designs were based on a consistent set of technical criteria for a grass roots facility with a capacity of 10,000 tons per day of Illinois No. 6 coal. Two raw gas compositions, based on oxygen blown and air blown Texaco gasification, were used. The bulk of the sulfur was removed in the sulfur removal unit, leaving a small amount of sulfur compounds in the gas. The remaining sulfur compounds were removed by reaction with zinc oxide in the sulfur polishing unit. The impact of COS hydrolysis pretreatment on sulfur removal was evaluated. Comprehensive capital and O and M cost estimates for each of the process schemes were developed.

  19. Method for removing tilt control in adaptive optics systems

    DOEpatents

    Salmon, Joseph Thaddeus

    1998-01-01

    A new adaptive optics system and method of operation, whereby the method removes tilt control, and includes the steps of using a steering mirror to steer a wavefront in the desired direction, for aiming an impinging aberrated light beam in the direction of a deformable mirror. The deformable mirror has its surface deformed selectively by means of a plurality of actuators, and compensates, at least partially, for existing aberrations in the light beam. The light beam is split into an output beam and a sample beam, and the sample beam is sampled using a wavefront sensor. The sampled signals are converted into corresponding electrical signals for driving a controller, which, in turn, drives the deformable mirror in a feedback loop in response to the sampled signals, for compensating for aberrations in the wavefront. To this purpose, a displacement error (gradient) of the wavefront is measured, and adjusted by a modified gain matrix, which satisfies the following equation: G'=(I-X(X.sup.T X).sup.-1 X.sup.T)G(I-A)

  20. Method for removing tilt control in adaptive optics systems

    DOEpatents

    Salmon, J.T.

    1998-04-28

    A new adaptive optics system and method of operation are disclosed, whereby the method removes tilt control, and includes the steps of using a steering mirror to steer a wavefront in the desired direction, for aiming an impinging aberrated light beam in the direction of a deformable mirror. The deformable mirror has its surface deformed selectively by means of a plurality of actuators, and compensates, at least partially, for existing aberrations in the light beam. The light beam is split into an output beam and a sample beam, and the sample beam is sampled using a wavefront sensor. The sampled signals are converted into corresponding electrical signals for driving a controller, which, in turn, drives the deformable mirror in a feedback loop in response to the sampled signals, for compensating for aberrations in the wavefront. To this purpose, a displacement error (gradient) of the wavefront is measured, and adjusted by a modified gain matrix, which satisfies the following equation: G{prime} = (I{minus}X(X{sup T} X){sup {minus}1}X{sup T})G(I{minus}A). 3 figs.

  1. Functions & Requirements for Debris Removal System Project A-2

    SciTech Connect

    PRECECHTEL, D.R.

    1999-12-29

    This revision of the Functions and Requirements Document updates the approved Functions and Requirements for Debris Removal Subproject WHC-SD-SNF-FRD-009, Rev. 0. It has been revised in its entirety to reflect the current scope of work for Debris Removal as canisters and lids under the K Basin Projects work breakdown structure (WBS). In this revision the canisters and lids will be consider debris and a new set of Functions and Requirements have been developed to remove the canisters and lids from the basin.

  2. Development of Vapor-Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael; Fisher, John; Kiss, Mark; Borchers, Bruce; Tleimat, Badawi; Tleimat, Maher; Quinn, Gregory; Fort, James; Nalette, Tim; Baker, Gale; Genovese, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    A report describes recent accomplishments of a continuing effort to develop the vapor-phase catalytic ammonia removal (VPCAR) process for recycling wastewater for consumption by humans aboard a spacecraft in transit to Mars.

  3. Laser balancing system for high material removal rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Georgalas, G.; Ortiz, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    A laser technique to remove material in excess of 10 mg/sec from a spinning rotor is described. This material removal rate is 20 times greater than previously reported for a surface speed of 30 m/sec. Material removal enhancement was achieved by steering a focused laser beam with moving optics to increase the time of laser energy interaction with a particular location on the circumferential surface of a spinning rotor. A neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) pulse laser was used in this work to evaluate material removal for carbon steel, 347 stainless steel, Inconal 718, and titanium 6-4. This technique is applicable to dynamic laser balancing.

  4. A novel membrane distillation-thermophilic bioreactor system: biological stability and trace organic compound removal.

    PubMed

    Wijekoon, Kaushalya C; Hai, Faisal I; Kang, Jinguo; Price, William E; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Hao H; Cath, Tzahi Y; Nghiem, Long D

    2014-05-01

    The removal of trace organic compounds (TrOCs) by a novel membrane distillation-thermophilic bioreactor (MDBR) system was examined. Salinity build-up and the thermophilic conditions to some extent adversely impacted the performance of the bioreactor, particularly the removal of total nitrogen and recalcitrant TrOCs. While most TrOCs were well removed by the thermophilic bioreactor, compounds containing electron withdrawing functional groups in their molecular structure were recalcitrant to biological treatment and their removal efficiency by the thermophilic bioreactor was low (0-53%). However, the overall performance of the novel MDBR system with respect to the removal of total organic carbon, total nitrogen, and TrOCs was high and was not significantly affected by the conditions of the bioreactor. All TrOCs investigated here were highly removed (>95%) by the MDBR system. Biodegradation, sludge adsorption, and rejection by MD contribute to the removal of TrOCs by MDBR treatment.

  5. Video requirements plan for the HMT equipment removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, G.F. Jr.

    1995-02-01

    This document is the plan defining the video coverage requirements for the equipment removal event of the Hydrogen Mitigation Test (HMT) mixer pump currently installed in high level nuclear waste storage Tank 241-SY-101. When the mixer pump fails the removal and installation of a spare pump will be a time critical event. Since the success of the HMT mixer pump has resolved the DOE safety issue it is absolutely essential that mixing be restored to the tank in a short as time possible. Therefore, the removal of the failed pump and the installation of the spare pump must be anticipated and planned well in advance. The removal, containment, transporting, and storage of the failed pump is a very complex and hazardous task. The successful completion of this task will require careful planning and monitoring. Certain events, during the removal and subsequent installation of the new pump, will require video observation and storage for safety, documenting, training, and promotional use. Furthermore, certain events will require close monitoring and observation by the event directors and key supervisory personnel for the execution of specific tasks during the equipment removal event.

  6. Biologically-based signal processing system applied to noise removal for signal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    2004-07-13

    The method and system described herein use a biologically-based signal processing system for noise removal for signal extraction. A wavelet transform may be used in conjunction with a neural network to imitate a biological system. The neural network may be trained using ideal data derived from physical principles or noiseless signals to determine to remove noise from the signal.

  7. Assessment of sulfur removal processes for advanced fuel cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lorton, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study consisted of a technical evaluation and economic comparison of sulfur removal processes for integration into a coal gasification-molten carbonate (CGMC) fuel cell power plant. Initially, the performance characteristics of potential sulfur removal processes were evaluated and screened for conformance to the conditions and requirements expected in commercial CGMC power plants. Four of these processes, the Selexol process, the Benfield process, the Sulfinol process, and the Rectisol process, were selected for detailed technical and economic comparison. The process designs were based on a consistent set of technical criteria for a grass roots facility with a capacity of 10,000 tons per day of Illinois No. 6 coal. Two raw gas compositions, based on oxygen-blown and air-blown Texaco gasification, were used. The bulk of the sulfur was removed in the sulfur removal unit, leaving a small amount of sulfur compounds in the gas (1 ppMv or 25 ppMv). The remaining sulfur compounds were removed by reaction with zinc oxide in the sulfur polishing unit. The impact of COS hydrolysis pretreatment on sulfur removal was evaluated. Comprehensive capital and O and M cost estimates for each of the process schemes were developed for the essentially complete removal of sulfur compounds. The impact on the overall plant performance was also determined. The total capital requirement for sulfur removal schemes ranged from $59.4/kW to $84.8/kW for the oxygen-blown cases and from $89.5/kW to $133/kW for the air-blown cases. The O and M costs for sulfur removal for 70% plant capacity factor ranged from 0.82 mills/kWh to 2.76 mills/kWh for the oxygen-blown cases and from 1.77 mills/kWh to 4.88 mills/kWh for the air-blown cases. The Selexol process benefitted the most from the addition of COS hydrolysis pretreatment.

  8. Mobile system for microwave removal of concrete surfaces

    DOEpatents

    White, Terry L.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Schaich, Charles R.; Foster, Jr., Don

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the microwave removal of contaminated concrete surfaces. The apparatus comprises a housing adapted to pass over a support surface. The housing includes a waveguide for directing microwave energy to the surface at an angle maximizing absorption of microwave energy by the surface. The apparatus is further provided with a source of microwave energy operably associated with the waveguide, wherein the microwave energy has a frequency of between about 10.6 GHz and about 24 GHz and acts to remove the uppermost layer from the surface. The apparatus further includes a debris containment assembly comprising a vacuum assembly operably associated with the housing. The vacuum assembly is adapted to remove debris from the area adjacent the surface.

  9. Mobile system for microwave removal of concrete surfaces

    DOEpatents

    White, T.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Schaich, C.R.; Foster, D. Jr.

    1997-06-03

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microwave removal of contaminated concrete surfaces. The apparatus comprises a housing adapted to pass over a support surface. The housing includes a waveguide for directing microwave energy to the surface at an angle maximizing absorption of microwave energy by the surface. The apparatus is further provided with a source of microwave energy operably associated with the waveguide, wherein the microwave energy has a frequency of between about 10.6 GHz and about 24 GHz and acts to remove the uppermost layer from the surface. The apparatus further includes a debris containment assembly comprising a vacuum assembly operably associated with the housing. The vacuum assembly is adapted to remove debris from the area adjacent the surface. 7 figs.

  10. Human motion capturing system with MEMS accelerometers (notice of removal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Baoping; Xu, Chang; Xu, Lijun; Ouyang, Shuigeng

    2007-11-01

    This paper (672413) was removed from the SPIE Digital Library on 13 April 2010 to discovery of plagiarism. As stated in the SPIE Guidelines for Professional Conduct and Publishing Ethics, SPIE defines plagiarism as the reuse of someone else's prior ideas, processes, results, or words without explicit attribution of the original author and source, or falsely representing someone else's work as one's own. SPIE considers plagiarism in any form, at any level, to be unacceptable and a serious breach of professional conduct. It is SPIE policy to remove such papers and to take appropriate corrective or disciplinary action against the offending author(s).

  11. Evaluation of a liquid chemical scrubber system for styrene removal

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, L.; Merritt, R.; Williamson, A.

    1994-12-01

    The report gives results of a study of the styrene removal efficiency of a pilot-scale version of the QUAD Chemtact scrubber, quantified by continuously measuring the total hydrocarbon (THC) content of spray booth exhaust air entering and exiting the device with THC analyzers and, for some tests, by collecting EPA Method 18 samples (adsorption tube procedure) at the inlet and exit of the device. Average styrene removal efficiencies approached but were never >55%. The test was carried out at a facility (Eljer Plumbingware in Wilson, NC) that manufactures polyester bathtubs and shower stalls by spraying styrene-based resins onto molds in vented, open spray booths. A side stream of air, exhausted from one of the spray booths in the gel coating part of the process, was used for the test.

  12. Alternatives Generation Analysis Long Length Contaminated Equipment Removal System Storage

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-08-13

    The long length contaminated equipment was designed and built to aid in the remote removal and transport of highly radioactive, contaminated equipment from various locations in the tank farms to disposal. The equipment has been stored in an open lay-down yard area, exposed to the elements for the past year and a half. The possible alternatives available to provide shelter for the equipment are investigated.

  13. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system particle removal system development

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, M.

    1994-03-01

    Solar Turbines developed a direct coal-fueled turbine system (DCFT) and tested each component in subscale facilities and the combustion system was tested at full-scale. The combustion system was comprised of a two-stage slagging combustor with an impact separator between the two combustors. Greater than 90 percent of the native ash in the coal was removed as liquid slag with this system. In the first combustor, coal water slurry mixture (CWM) was injected into a combustion chamber which was operated loan to suppress NO{sub x} formation. The slurry was introduced through four fuel injectors that created a toroidal vortex because of the combustor geometry and angle of orientation of the injectors. The liquid slag that was formed was directed downward toward an impaction plate made of a refractory material. Sixty to seventy percent of the coal-borne ash was collected in this fashion. An impact separator was used to remove additional slag that had escaped the primary combustor. The combined particulate collection efficiency from both combustors was above 95 percent. Unfortunately, a great deal of the original sulfur from the coal still remained in the gas stream and needed to be separated. To accomplish this, dolomite or hydrated lime were injected in the secondary combustor to react with the sulfur dioxide and form calcium sulfite and sulfates. This solution for the sulfur problem increased the dust concentrations to as much as 6000 ppmw. A downstream particulate control system was required, and one that could operate at 150 psia, 1850-1900{degrees}F and with low pressure drop. Solar designed and tested a particulate rejection system to remove essentially all particulate from the high temperature, high pressure gas stream. A thorough research and development program was aimed at identifying candidate technologies and testing them with Solar`s coal-fired system. This topical report summarizes these activities over a period beginning in 1987 and ending in 1992.

  14. Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Richard Paul [Allentown, PA; Makitka, III, Alexander; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA

    2012-04-03

    An oxygen ion transport membrane process wherein a heated oxygen-containing gas having one or more contaminants is contacted with a reactive solid material to remove the one or more contaminants. The reactive solid material is provided as a deposit on a support. The one or more contaminant compounds in the heated oxygen-containing gas react with the reactive solid material. The contaminant-depleted oxygen-containing gas is contacted with a membrane, and oxygen is transported through the membrane to provide transported oxygen.

  15. Modelling Cr(VI) removal by a combined carbon-activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Orozco, A Micaela Ferro; Contreras, Edgardo M; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2008-01-15

    The combined carbon-activated sludge process has been proposed as an alternative to protect the biomass against toxic substances in wastewaters; however, the information about the effect of powdered-activated carbon (PAC) addition in activated sludge reactors for the treatment of wastewaters containing Cr(VI) is limited. The objectives of the present study were: (a) to evaluate the removal of hexavalent chromium by (i) activated sludge microorganisms in aerobic batch reactors, (ii) powdered-activated carbon, and (iii) the combined action of powdered-activated carbon and biomass; (b) to propose mathematical models that interpret the experimental results. Different Cr(VI) removal systems were tested: (S1) biomass (activated sludge), (S2) PAC, and (S3) the combined activated carbon-biomass system. A Monod-based mathematical model was used to describe the kinetics of Cr(VI) removal in the system S1. A first-order kinetics with respect to Cr(VI) and PAC respectively, was proposed to model the removal of Cr(VI) in the system S2. Cr(VI) removal in the combined carbon-biomass system (S3) was faster than both Cr(VI) removal using PAC or activated sludge individually. Results showed that the removal of Cr(VI) using the activated carbon-biomass system (S3) was adequately described by combining the kinetic equations proposed for the systems S1 and S2.

  16. BOA II: Asbestos Pipe-Insulation Removal Robot System. Innovative Technology Summary Report.

    SciTech Connect

    2001-09-01

    The objective of this task is to develop and demonstrate a mechanical, asbestos-removal system that can be remotely operated without a containment area. The technology, known as BOA, consists of a pipe-crawler removal head and a boom vehicle system with dual robots. BOA's removal head can be remotely placed on the outside of the pipe and can crawl along the pipe, removing lagging and insulation. The lagging and insulation is cut using a hybrid endmill water-jet cutter and then diced into 2-inch cube sections of ACM. These ACM sections are then removed from the pipe using a set of blasting fan- spray nozzles, vacuumed off through a vacuum hose, and bagged. Careful attention to vacuum and entrapment air flow ensures that the system can operate without a containment area while meeting local and federal standards for fiber count.

  17. Enhanced fermentation systems with continuous removal of inhibitory products

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, B.H.; Kaufman, E.N.

    1994-06-01

    A variety of advanced bioreactors are being developed to improve production of fuels, solvents, organic acids, and other fermentation products. A major limitation of microbial fermentations is the dilute aqueous product streams that result, largely due to inhibition of the microbes by the desired products. If these inhibitory products can be removed during the ongoing fermentation, the overall rates, yields, and net product formation may be increased. Simultaneous fermentation and separation have been tested with different separation techniques, such as adsorption, liquid extraction, pervaporation, membrane separations, distillation, and others. These separations can occur directly in situ within the fermentor or indirectly using a sidestream separator with recycle of the unused substrate. These approaches are briefly reviewed. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), we have investigated two modified immobilized-cell fluidized-bed bioreactors (FBRs) to remove the inhibitory product directly from the continuous fermentation. One involves the separation by adsorption of tactic acid, and the other uses liquid solvent extraction for the production of butanol. Keywords: extractive fermentation, in situ separation, adsorption, tactic acid, butanol.

  18. Phosphate reduction in a hydroxyapatite fluoride removal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egner, A.

    2012-12-01

    Fluorosis is a widespread disease that occurs as a result of excess fluoride consumption and can cause severe tooth and bone deformations. To combat fluorosis, several previous studies have examined the potential to replace traditional bone char filters with synthetic hydroxyapatite. Calcite particles with a synthetic hydroxyapatite coating have been shown to effectively removed fluoride, yet the low-cost method for forming these particles leaves high amounts of phosphate both in synthesis waste-water and in filter effluent. High phosphate in filter effluent is problematic because consumption of extremely high phosphate can leach calcium from bones, further exacerbating the fluoride effect. This study examines ways of reducing and reusing waste. In particular, a method of fluoride removal is explored in which fluorapatite coatings may be formed directly. In preliminary studies, batches of 4.1g of Florida limestone (<710 μm) were equilibrated with 100 mL of 10ppm fluoride. In a control batch containing lime but no added phosphate, 14% treatment was achieved, but with added phosphate, 100% treatment was achieved in all batches. Batches with lower levels of phosphate took longer to reach 100% treatment, ranging from less than 24 hours in the highest phosphate batches to approximately 42 hours in the lowest batches. The lower levels tested were well within reasonable levels for drinking water and reached 0ppm fluoride in 42 hours or less.

  19. Capital and Operating Cost of Small Arsenic Removal System and their Most Frequent Maintenance Problems

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will first summarize the capital and operating cost of treatment systems by type and size of the systems. The treatment systems include adsorptive media (AM) systems, iron removal (IR), coagulation/filtration (CF), ion exchange (IX) systems, and point-of-use rev...

  20. Predictable Therma-fil removal technique using the system-B heat source.

    PubMed

    Guess, Garrett M

    2004-01-01

    A clinical tip is suggested to assist in the removal of Therma-fil obturators during conventional endodontic retreatment. Using a heat source such as the System-B, the plastic carriers that are normally an obstacle to retreatment can be efficiently removed using the technique described.

  1. Acid Gas Capture Using CO2-Binding Organic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Rainbolt, James E.; Zheng, Feng

    2010-11-10

    Current chemical CO2 scrubbing technology is primarily aqueous alkanolamine based. These systems rapidly bind CO2 (forming water-soluble carbamate and bicarbonate salts) however, the process has serious disadvantages. The concentration of monoethanolamine rarely exceeds 30 wt % due to the corrosive nature of the solution, and this reduces the maximum CO2 volumetric (≤108 g/L) and gravimetric capacity (≤7 wt%) of the CO2 scrubber. The ≤30 wt % loading of ethanolamine also means that a large excess of water must be pumped and heated during CO2 capture and release, and this greatly increases the energy requirements especially considering the high specific heat of water (4 j/g-1K-1). Our approach is to switch to organic systems that chemically bind CO2 as liquid alkylcarbonate salts. Our CO2-binding organic liquids have higher CO2 solubility, lower specific heats, potential for less corrosion and lower binding energies for CO2 than aqueous systems. CO2BOLs also reversibly bind and release mixed sulfur oxides. Furthermore the CO2BOL system can be direct solvent replacements for any solvent based CO2 capture systems because they are commercially available reagents and because they are fluids they would not require extensive process re-engineering.

  2. 300 GPM Solids Removal System A True Replacement for Back Flushable Powdered Filter Systems - 13607

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, Mark R.; Lewis, Mark

    2013-07-01

    The EnergySolutions Solids Removal System (SRS) utilizes stainless steel cross-flow ultra-filtration (XUF) technology which allows it to reliably remove suspended solids greater than one (1) micron from liquid radwaste streams. The SRS is designed as a pre-treatment step for solids separation prior to processing through other technologies such as Ion Exchange Resin (IER) and/or Reverse Osmosis (RO), etc. Utilizing this pre-treatment approach ensures successful production of reactor grade water while 1) decreasing the amount of radioactive water being discharged to the environment; and 2) decreasing the amount of radioactive waste that must ultimately be disposed of due to the elimination of spent powdered filter media. (authors)

  3. Active Debris Removal System Based on Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzitelli, Federico; Valdatta, Marcelo; Bellini, Niccolo; Candini Gian, Paolo; Rastelli, Davide; Romei, Fedrico; Locarini, Alfredo; Spadanuda, Antonio; Bagassi, Sara

    2013-08-01

    Space debris is an increasing problem. The exponential increase of satellite launches in the last 50 years has determined the problem of space debris especially in LEO. The remains of past missions are dangerous for both operative satellites and human activity in space. But not only: it has been shown that uncontrolled impacts between space objects can lead to a potentially dangerous situation for civil people on Earth. It is possible to reach a situation of instability where the big amount of debris could cause a cascade of collisions, the so called Kessler syndrome, resulting in the infeasibility of new space missions for many generations. Currently new technologies for the mitigation of space debris are under study: for what concerning the removal of debris the use of laser to give a little impulse to the object and push it in a graveyard orbit or to be destroyed in the atmosphere. Another solution is the use of a satellite to rendezvous with the space junk and then use a net to capture it and destroy it in the reentry phase. In a parallel way the research is addressed to the study of deorbiting solutions to prevent the formation of new space junk. The project presented in this paper faces the problem of how to deorbit an existing debris, applying the studies about the use of polyurethane foam developed by Space Robotic Group of University of Bologna. The research is started with the Redemption experiment part of last ESA Rexus program. The foam is composed by two liquid components that, once properly mixed, trig an expansive reaction leading to an increase of volume whose entity depends on the chemical composition of the two starting components. It is possible to perform two kind of mission: 1) Not controlled removal: the two components are designed to react producing a low density, high expanded, spongy foam that incorporates the debris. The A/m ratio of the debris is increased and in this way also the ballistic parameter. As a consequence, the effect of

  4. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: A CROSS-FLOW PERVAPORATION SYSTEM FOR REMOVAL OF VOCS FROM CONTAMINATED WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation is a process for removing volatile organic compounds (VOC) from contaminated water. The performance of the cross-flow pervaporation system increases with temperature, with an equipment limitation of 35 degrees Celsius. Permeable membranes that preferentially adsor...

  5. ETV REPORT: REMOVAL OF ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER - PALL CORPORATION MICROZA. MICROFILTRATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Pall Corporation Microza. Microfiltration System for arsenic removal was conducted at the Oakland County Drain Commissioner (OCDC) Plum Creek Development well station located in Oakland County, Michigan from August 19 through October 8, 2004. The sourc...

  6. Passive decay heat removal system for water-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1991-01-01

    A passive decay-heat removal system for a water-cooled nuclear reactor employs a closed heat transfer loop having heat-exchanging coils inside an open-topped, insulated box located inside the reactor vessel, below its normal water level, in communication with a condenser located outside of containment and exposed to the atmosphere. The heat transfer loop is located such that the evaporator is in a position where, when the water level drops in the reactor, it will become exposed to steam. Vapor produced in the evaporator passes upward to the condenser above the normal water level. In operation, condensation in the condenser removes heat from the system, and the condensed liquid is returned to the evaporator. The system is disposed such that during normal reactor operations where the water level is at its usual position, very little heat will be removed from the system, but during emergency, low water level conditions, substantial amounts of decay heat will be removed.

  7. Fish Assemblage Response to a Small Dam Removal in the Eightmile River System, Connecticut, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulos, Helen M.; Miller, Kate E.; Kraczkowski, Michelle L.; Welchel, Adam W.; Heineman, Ross; Chernoff, Barry

    2014-11-01

    We examined the effects of the Zemko Dam removal on the Eightmile River system in Salem, Connecticut, USA. The objective of this research was to quantify spatiotemporal variation in fish community composition in response to small dam removal. We sampled fish abundance over a 6-year period (2005-2010) to quantify changes in fish assemblages prior to dam removal, during drawdown, and for three years following dam removal. Fish population dynamics were examined above the dam, below the dam, and at two reference sites by indicator species analysis, mixed models, non-metric multidimensional scaling, and analysis of similarity. We observed significant shifts in fish relative abundance over time in response to dam removal. Changes in fish species composition were variable, and they occurred within 1 year of drawdown. A complete shift from lentic to lotic fishes failed to occur within 3 years after the dam was removed. However, we did observe increases in fluvial and transition (i.e., pool head, pool tail, or run) specialist fishes both upstream and downstream from the former dam site. Our results demonstrate the importance of dam removal for restoring river connectivity for fish movement. While the long-term effects of dam removal remain uncertain, we conclude that dam removals can have positive benefits on fish assemblages by enhancing river connectivity and fluvial habitat availability.

  8. Fish assemblage response to a small dam removal in the Eightmile River system, Connecticut, USA.

    PubMed

    Poulos, Helen M; Miller, Kate E; Kraczkowski, Michelle L; Welchel, Adam W; Heineman, Ross; Chernoff, Barry

    2014-11-01

    We examined the effects of the Zemko Dam removal on the Eightmile River system in Salem, Connecticut, USA. The objective of this research was to quantify spatiotemporal variation in fish community composition in response to small dam removal. We sampled fish abundance over a 6-year period (2005-2010) to quantify changes in fish assemblages prior to dam removal, during drawdown, and for three years following dam removal. Fish population dynamics were examined above the dam, below the dam, and at two reference sites by indicator species analysis, mixed models, non-metric multidimensional scaling, and analysis of similarity. We observed significant shifts in fish relative abundance over time in response to dam removal. Changes in fish species composition were variable, and they occurred within 1 year of drawdown. A complete shift from lentic to lotic fishes failed to occur within 3 years after the dam was removed. However, we did observe increases in fluvial and transition (i.e., pool head, pool tail, or run) specialist fishes both upstream and downstream from the former dam site. Our results demonstrate the importance of dam removal for restoring river connectivity for fish movement. While the long-term effects of dam removal remain uncertain, we conclude that dam removals can have positive benefits on fish assemblages by enhancing river connectivity and fluvial habitat availability.

  9. Prioritizing removal of dams for passage of diadromous fishes on a major river system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocovsky, P.M.; Ross, R.M.; Dropkin, D.S.

    2009-01-01

    Native diadromous fishes have been extirpated from much of the Susquehanna River system for nearly a century. Recent restoration efforts have focused on removal of dams, but there are hundreds of dams and presently there is no biologically based system to assist in prioritizing their removal. We present a new method that uses existing habitat suitability index models (HSI) for American shad Alosa sapidissima, alewife A. pseudoharengus, blueback herring A. aestivalis, and American eel Anguilla rostrata to prioritize the removal of non-hydropower dams within the Susquehanna River system. We ranked HSI scores for each of the four species, association between a landscape-scale factor and HSIs, length of river opened by removing a dam, and distance from the mouth at Chesapeake Bay for each dam and then calculated a mean rank prioritization for dam removal by averaging the ranks for the seven criteria. This prioritization method is resistant to outliers, is not strongly affected by somewhat arbitrary decisions on metrics included in the analysis, and provides a biologically based prioritization for dam removal that can be easily amended to include other metrics or adapted to other river systems and that complements other social and economic considerations that must be included in decisions to remove dams.

  10. [Possibilities and limitations of Caridex System as an alternative to conventional caries removal].

    PubMed

    Scheutzel, P

    1989-08-01

    Exclusive use of chemo-mechanical Caridex-Caries removal system allows only in a few cases sufficient removal of caries. In histological investigation 108 of 120 cavities (90%) treated with the Caridex-system showed residual caries. In 92 cavities (77%) remaining bacteria could be observed. Whereas if combination of Caridex and spoon excavator was used in 25% respectively 23% a better caries removal as in case of using a spoon-excavator alone respectively a round bur was obtained. Scanning microscope examination of cavity wall after treatment with Caridex showed an increased roughness of the dentin surface. Therefore a superior shear bond strength of bonding and composite materials can be expected.

  11. Water treatment process and system for metals removal using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DOEpatents

    Krauter, Paula A. W.; Krauter, Gordon W.

    2002-01-01

    A process and a system for removal of metals from ground water or from soil by bioreducing or bioaccumulating the metals using metal tolerant microorganisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is tolerant to the metals, able to bioreduce the metals to the less toxic state and to accumulate them. The process and the system is useful for removal or substantial reduction of levels of chromium, molybdenum, cobalt, zinc, nickel, calcium, strontium, mercury and copper in water.

  12. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water Small Systems Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Power Point presentation will summarize some of the results from Arsenic Demonstration Program with the main focus on the adsorptive media systems used by small systems. The presentation will also describe the results of recent regeneration studies conducted on the arsenic ...

  13. Options for transpiration water removal in a crop growth system under zero gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, C. C.; Kliss, M.; Yendler, B.; Borchers, B.; Yendler, Boris S.; Nguyen, Thoi K.; Waleh, Ahmad

    1991-01-01

    The operation of a microgravity crop-growth system is a critical feature of NASA's Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) development program. Transpiration-evolved water must be removed from the air that is recirculated in such a system, perhaps supplying potable water in the process. The present consideration of candidate systems for CELSS water removal gives attention to energy considerations and to a mechanical, inertial-operation water-separation system that was chosen due to the depth of current understanding of its operation.

  14. Robotized system for removal of slime from the bottom of steam generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherenko, O. V.; Shvarov, V. A.

    2014-02-01

    Reliability of steam generators depends not only on the main technical characteristics and correctness of the operational mode but also on the cleanliness of the heat-exchange surface and the presence of slime precipitated on the bottom. To provide the cleanliness, chemical methods of cleaning the heatexchange surfaces are used. In this article, we consider the process of removal of sediments that are formed precisely on the bottom of the steam generator from its volume. Possible mechanical methods for removal of sediments are presented. The consideration of variants of cleaning approved for acting steam generators showed the efficiency and applicability of the developed installation for the slime removal from steam generators. The main principles of construction of the system for slime removal from the steam generator bottom and constructive features of the installation, which make it possible to implement the stated tasks on the slime removal from the steam generator bottom, are given.

  15. Removal of a mixture of pesticides by a Streptomyces consortium: Influence of different soil systems.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, María S; Raimondo, Enzo E; Amoroso, María J; Benimeli, Claudia S

    2017-04-01

    Although the use of organochlorine pesticides (OPs) is restricted or banned in most countries, they continue posing environmental and health concerns, so it is imperative to develop methods for removing them from the environment. This work is aimed to investigate the simultaneous removal of three OPs (lindane, chlordane and methoxychlor) from diverse types of systems by employing a native Streptomyces consortium. In liquid systems, a satisfactory microbial growth was observed accompanied by removal of lindane (40.4%), methoxychlor (99.5%) and chlordane (99.8%). In sterile soil microcosms, the consortium was able to grow without significant differences in the different textured soils (clay silty loam, sandy and loam), both contaminated or not contaminated with the OPs-mixture. The Streptomyces consortium was able to remove all the OPs in sterile soil microcosm (removal order: clay silty loam > loam > sandy). So, clay silty loam soil (CSLS) was selected for next assays. In non-sterile CSLS microcosms, chlordane removal was only about 5%, nonetheless, higher rates was observed for lindane (11%) and methoxychlor (20%). In CSLS slurries, the consortium exhibited similar growth levels, in the presence of or in the absence of the OPs-mixture. Not all pesticides were removed in the same way; the order of pesticide dissipation was: methoxychlor (26%)>lindane (12.5%)>chlordane (10%). The outlines of microbial growth and pesticides removal provide information about using actinobacteria consortium as strategies for bioremediation of OPs-mixture in diverse soil systems. Texture of soils and assay conditions (sterility, slurry formulation) were determining factors influencing the removal of each pesticide of the mixture.

  16. Full System Modeling and Validation of the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert; Knox, James; Gauto, Hernando; Gomez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project was initiated in September of 2011 as part of the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. Under the ARREM project, testing of sub-scale and full-scale systems has been combined with multiphysics computer simulations for evaluation and optimization of subsystem approaches. In particular, this paper describes the testing and modeling of various subsystems of the carbon dioxide removal assembly (CDRA). The goal is a full system predictive model of CDRA to guide system optimization and development. The development of the CO2 removal and associated air-drying subsystem hardware under the ARREM project is discussed in a companion paper.

  17. Contaminant removal and hydraulic conductivity of laboratory rain garden systems for stormwater treatment.

    PubMed

    Good, J F; O'Sullivan, A D; Wicke, D; Cochrane, T A

    2012-01-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of substrate composition on stormwater treatment and hydraulic effectiveness, mesocosm-scale (180 L, 0.17 m(2)) laboratory rain gardens were established. Saturated (constant head) hydraulic conductivity was determined before and after contaminant (Cu, Zn, Pb and nutrients) removal experiments on three rain garden systems with various proportions of organic topsoil. The system with only topsoil had the lowest saturated hydraulic conductivity (160-164 mm/h) and poorest metal removal efficiency (Cu ≤ 69.0% and Zn ≤ 71.4%). Systems with sand and a sand-topsoil mix demonstrated good metal removal (Cu up to 83.3%, Zn up to 94.5%, Pb up to 97.3%) with adequate hydraulic conductivity (sand: 800-805 mm/h, sand-topsoil: 290-302 mm/h). Total metal amounts in the effluent were <50% of influent amounts for all experiments, with the exception of Cu removal in the topsoil-only system, which was negligible due to high dissolved fraction. Metal removal was greater when effluent pH was elevated (up to 7.38) provided by the calcareous sand in two of the systems, whereas the topsoil-only system lacked an alkaline source. Organic topsoil, a typical component in rain garden systems, influenced pH, resulting in poorer treatment due to higher dissolved metal fractions.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations of the pressure dependence of the water-acid gas interfacial tensions.

    PubMed

    Biscay, F; Ghoufi, A; Lachet, V; Malfreyt, P

    2009-10-29

    We report two-phase Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the binary water-acid gas mixtures at high temperature and high pressure. Simulations are performed in the Np(N)AT ensemble in order to reproduce the pressure dependence of the interfacial tensions of the water-CO(2) and water-H(2)S mixtures. The interfacial tension of the binary water-CO(2) mixture is determined from 5 to 45 MPa along the isotherm T = 383 K. Water-H(2)S interfacial tensions are computed along one supercritical isotherm (T = 393 K) in a pressure range of 1-15 MPa. The temperature and pressure conditions investigated here by the MC simulations are typical of the geological storage conditions of these acid gases. The coexisting densities and the compositions of the water-rich and acid-gas-rich phases are compared with experiments and with data calculated from Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo (GEMC) simulations.

  19. Removal of an acid fume system contaminated with perchlorates located within hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, K.E.; Henslee, S.P.; Vroman, W.R.; Krsul, J.R.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Knighton, G.C.

    1992-09-01

    An add scrubbing system located within the confines of a highly radioactive hot cell at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was remotely removed. The acid scrubbing system was routinely used for the dissolution of irradiated reactor fuel samples and structural materials. Perchloric acid was one of the acids used in the dissolution process and remained in the system with its inherent risks. Personnel could not enter the hot cell to perform the dismantling of the acid scabbing system due to the high radiation field and the explosion potential associated with the perchlorates. A robot was designed and built at ANL-W and used to dismantle the system without the need for personnel entry into the hot cell. The robot was also used for size reduction of removed components and loading of the removed components into waste containers.

  20. Evidence that the DNA mismatch repair system removes 1-nucleotide Okazaki fragment flaps.

    PubMed

    Kadyrova, Lyudmila Y; Dahal, Basanta K; Kadyrov, Farid A

    2015-10-02

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system plays a major role in promoting genome stability and suppressing carcinogenesis. In this work, we investigated whether the MMR system is involved in Okazaki fragment maturation. We found that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the MMR system and the flap endonuclease Rad27 act in overlapping pathways that protect the nuclear genome from 1-bp insertions. In addition, we determined that purified yeast and human MutSα proteins recognize 1-nucleotide DNA and RNA flaps. In reconstituted human systems, MutSα, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and replication factor C activate MutLα endonuclease to remove the flaps. ATPase and endonuclease mutants of MutLα are defective in the flap removal. These results suggest that the MMR system contributes to the removal of 1-nucleotide Okazaki fragment flaps.

  1. Jet pump-drive system for heat removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, James R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The invention does away with the necessity of moving parts such as a check valve in a nuclear reactor cooling system. Instead, a jet pump, in combination with a TEMP, is employed to assure safe cooling of a nuclear reactor after shutdown. A main flow exists for a reactor coolant. A point of withdrawal is provided for a secondary flow. A TEMP, responsive to the heat from said coolant in the secondary flow path, automatically pumps said withdrawn coolant to a higher pressure and thus higher velocity compared to the main flow. The high velocity coolant is applied as a driver flow for the jet pump which has a main flow chamber located in the main flow circulation pump. Upon nuclear shutdown and loss of power for the main reactor pumping system, the TEMP/jet pump combination continues to boost the coolant flow in the direction it is already circulating. During the decay time for the nuclear reactor, the jet pump keeps running until the coolant temperature drops to a lower and safe temperature where the heat is no longer a problem. At this lower temperature, the TEMP/jet pump combination ceases its circulation boosting operation. When the nuclear reactor is restarted and the coolant again exceeds the lower temperature setting, the TEMP/jet pump automatically resumes operation. The TEMP/jet pump combination is thus automatic, self-regulating and provides an emergency pumping system free of moving parts.

  2. Time dependence of NO{sub x} removal rate by a corona radical shower system

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, Toshikazu; Kanazawa, Seiji; Nomoto, Yukiharu; Adachi, Takayoshi; Chang, J.S.

    1996-09-01

    In this paper, the effects of the flue gas flow rate and seed gas on the dynamics of corona discharge current-voltage characteristics and NO{sub x} removal characteristics are experimentally investigated for a corona radical shower system. The corona discharge current-voltage characteristics have two operating modes which have a significant influence on NO{sub x} removal characteristics, where the threshold value of the treatment gas to seed gas flow rate ratio is about 8. The hysteresis of corona current-voltage characteristics is observed in this system. For longer operational time, corona current and NO{sub x} removal rate significantly changes with time. When the operation of the apparatus starts at relatively low applied voltage, the corona current under constant applied voltage increases with time to reach a maximum value, then decreasing with time to reach a steady state. At this condition, high NO{sub x} removal efficiency can be achieved.

  3. Nitrogen removal and nitrate leaching for two perennial, sod-based forage systems receiving dairy effluent.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Kenneth R; French, Edwin C; Sweat, Lewin A; Graetz, Donald A; Sollenberger, Lynn E; Macoon, Bisoondat; Portier, Kenneth M; Rymph, Stuart J; Wade, Brett L; Prine, Gordon M; Van Horn, Harold H

    2003-01-01

    In northern Florida, year-round forage systems are used in dairy effluent sprayfields to reduce nitrate leaching. Our purpose was to quantify forage N removal and monitor nitrate N (NO3(-)-N) concentration below the rooting zone for two perennial, sod-based, triple-cropping systems over four 12-mo cycles (1996-2000). The soil is an excessively drained Kershaw sand (thermic, uncoated Typic Quartzip-samment). Effluent N rates were 500, 690, and 910 kg ha(-1) per cycle. Differences in N removal between a corn (Zea mays L.)-bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.)-rye (Secale cereale L.) system (CBR) and corn-perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.)-rye system (CPR) were primarily related to the performance of the perennial forages. Nitrogen removal of corn (125-170 kg ha(-1)) and rye (62-90 kg ha(-1)) was relatively stable between systems and among cycles. The greatest N removal was measured for CBR in the first cycle (408 kg ha(-1)), with the bermudagrass removing an average of 191 kg N ha(-1). In later cycles, N removal for bermudagrass declined because dry matter (DM) yield declined. Yield and N removal of perennial peanut increased over the four cycles. Nitrate N concentrations below the rooting zone were lower for CBR than CPR in the first two cycles, but differences were inconsistent in the latter two. The CBR system maintained low NO3(-)-N leaching in the first cycle when the bermudagrass was the most productive; however, it was not a sustainable system for long-term prevention of NO3(-)-N leaching due to declining bermudagrass yield in subsequent cycles. For CPR, effluent N rates > or = 500 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) have the potential to negatively affect ground water quality.

  4. A novel decomposition technique of friable asbestos by CHClF2-decomposed acidic gas.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Kazumichi; Kozawa, Takahiro; Onda, Ayumu; Kanazawa, Masazumi; Shinohara, Junichi; Takanami, Tetsuro; Shiraishi, Masatsugu

    2009-04-30

    Asbestos was widely used in numerous materials and building products due to their desirable properties. It is, however, well known that asbestos inhalation causes health damage and its inexpensive decomposition technique is necessary to be developed for pollution prevention. We report here an innovative decomposition technique of friable asbestos by acidic gas (HF and HCl) generated from the decomposition of CHClF(2) by the reaction with superheated steam at 800 degrees C. Chrysotile-asbestos fibers were completely decomposed to sellaite and magnesium silicofluoride hexahydrate by the reaction with CHClF(2)-decomposed acidic gas at 150 degrees C for 30 min. At high temperatures beyond 400 degrees C, sellaite and hematite were detected in the decomposed product. In addition, crocidolite containing wastes and amosite containing wastes were decomposed at 500 degrees C and 600 degrees C for 30 min, respectively, by CHClF(2)-decomposed acidic gas. The observation of the reaction products by phase-contrast microscopy (PCM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed that the resulting products did not contain any asbestos.

  5. Jet pump-drive system for heat removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, J. R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A jet pump, in combination with a TEMP, is employed to assure safe cooling of a nuclear reactor after shutdown. A TEMP, responsive to the heat from the coolant in the secondary flow path, automatically pumps the withdrawn coolant to a higher pressure and thus higher velocity compared to the main flow. The high velocity coolant is applied as a driver flow for the jet pump which has a main flow chamber located in the main flow circulation pump. Upon nuclear shutdown and loss of power for the main reactor pumping system, the TEMP/jet pump combination continues to boost the coolant flow in the direction it is already circulating. During the decay time for the nuclear reactor, the jet pump keeps running until the coolant temperature drops to a lower and safe temperature. At this lower temperature, the TEMP/jet jump combination ceases its circulation boosting operation. The TEMP/jet pump combination is automatic, self-regulating and provides an emergency pumping system free of moving parts.

  6. K Basins sludge removal temporary sludge storage tank system

    SciTech Connect

    Mclean, M.A.

    1997-06-12

    Shipment of sludge from the K Basins to a disposal site is now targeted for August 2000. The current path forward for sludge disposal is shipment to Tank AW-105 in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). Significant issues of the feasibility of this path exist primarily due to criticality concerns and the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) in the sludge at levels that trigger regulation under the Toxic Substance Control Act. Introduction of PCBs into the TWRS processes could potentially involve significant design and operational impacts to both the Spent Nuclear Fuel and TWRS projects if technical and regulatory issues related to PCB treatment cannot be satisfactorily resolved. Concerns of meeting the TWRS acceptance criteria have evolved such that new storage tanks for the K Basins sludge may be the best option for storage prior to vitrification of the sludge. A reconunendation for the final disposition of the sludge is scheduled for June 30, 1997. To support this decision process, this project was developed. This project provides a preconceptual design package including preconceptual designs and cost estimates for the temporary sludge storage tanks. Development of cost estimates for the design and construction of sludge storage systems is required to help evaluate a recommendation for the final disposition of the K Basin sludge.

  7. Alternate particle removal technologies for the Airborne Activity Confinement System at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, J.E.; Adkins, C.L.J.; Gelbard, F.

    1991-09-01

    This report presents a review of the filtration technologies available for the removal of particulate material from a gas stream. It was undertaken to identify alternate filtration technologies that may be employed in the Airborne Activity Confinement System (AACS) at the Savannah River Plant. This report is organized into six sections: (1) a discussion of the aerosol source term and its definition, (2) a short discussion of particle and gaseous contaminant removal mechanisms, (3) a brief overview of particle removal technologies, (4) a discussion of the existing AACS and its potential shortcomings, (5) an enumeration of issues to be addressed in upgrading the AACS, and, (6) a detailed discussion of the identified technologies. The purpose of this report is to identity available options to the existing particle removal system. This system is in continuous operation during routine operation of the reactor. As will be seen, there are a number of options and the selection of any technology or combination of technologies will depend on the design aerosol source term (yet to be appropriately defined) as well as the flow requirements and configuration. This report does not select a specific technology. It focuses on particulate removal and qualitatively on the removal of radio-iodine and mist elimination. Candidate technologies have been selected from industrial and nuclear gas cleaning applications.

  8. Hydrologic and pollutant removal performance of stormwater biofiltration systems at the field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatt, Belinda E.; Fletcher, Tim D.; Deletic, Ana

    2009-02-01

    SummaryBiofiltration systems are a recommended and increasingly popular technology for stormwater management; however there is a general lack of performance data for these systems, particularly at the field scale. The objective of this study was to investigate the hydrologic and pollutant removal performance of three field-scale biofiltration systems in two different climates. Biofilters were shown to effectively attenuate peak runoff flow rates by at least 80%. Performance assessment of a lined biofilter demonstrated that retention of inflow volumes by the filter media, for subsequent loss via evapotranspiration, reduced runoff volumes by 33% on average. Retention of water was found to be most influenced by inflow volumes, although only small to medium storms could be assessed. Vegetation was shown to be important for maintaining hydraulic capacity, because root growth and senescence countered compaction and clogging. Suspended solids and heavy metals were effectively removed, irrespective of the design configuration, with load reductions generally in excess of 90%. In contrast, nutrient retention was variable, and ranged from consistent leaching to effective and reliable removal, depending on the design. To ensure effective removal of phosphorus, a filter medium with a low phosphorus content should be selected. Nitrogen is more difficult to remove because it is highly soluble and strongly influenced by the variable wetting and drying regime that is inherent in biofilter operation. The results of this research suggest that reconfiguration of biofilter design to manage the deleterious effects of drying on biological activity is necessary to ensure long term nitrogen removal.

  9. Apparatus and method for removing solvent from carbon dioxide in resin recycling system

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2009-01-06

    A two-step resin recycling system and method solvent that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material. The system and method includes one or more solvent wash vessels to expose resin particles to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles in the one or more solvent wash vessels to substantially remove contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is provided to separate the solvent from the resin particles after removal from the one or more solvent wash vessels. The resin particles are next exposed to carbon dioxide in a closed loop carbon dioxide system. The closed loop system includes a carbon dioxide vessel where the carbon dioxide is exposed to the resin, substantially removing any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation. A separation vessel is also provided to separate the solvent from the solvent laden carbon dioxide. Both the carbon dioxide and the solvent are reused after separation in the separation vessel.

  10. Development of design information for molecular-sieve type regenerative CO2-removal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, R. M.; Ruder, J. M.; Dunn, V. B.; Hwang, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental and analytic studies were conducted with molecular sieve sorbents to provide basic design information, and to develop a system design technique for regenerable CO2-removal systems for manned spacecraft. Single sorbate equilibrium data were obtained over a wide range of conditions for CO2, water, nitrogen, and oxygen on several molecular sieve and silica gel sorbents. The coadsorption of CO2 with water preloads, and with oxygen and nitrogen was experimentally evaluated. Mass-transfer, and some limited heat-transfer performance evaluations were accomplished under representative operating conditions, including the coadsorption of CO2 and water. CO2-removal system performance prediction capability was derived.

  11. Cathode scraper system and method of using the same for removing uranium

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, Mark A; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2015-02-03

    Embodiments include a cathode scraper system and/or method of using the same for removing uranium. The cathode scraper system includes a plurality of cathode assemblies. Each cathode assembly includes a plurality of cathode rods. The cathode scraper system also includes a cathode scraper assembly configured to remove purified uranium deposited on the plurality of cathode rods. The cathode scraper assembly includes a plurality of scrapers arranged in a lattice, and each scraper of the plurality of scrapers is arranged to correspond to a different cathode rod.

  12. [Review on the main microorganisms and their metabolic mechanisms in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) systems].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue; Zhu, Wei-Jing; Wang, Liang; Wu, Wei-Xiang

    2014-03-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process is applied widely for removing phosphorus from wastewater. Studies on functional microorganisms and their metabolic mechanisms are fundamental to effective regulation for stable operation and performance improvement of EBPR process. Two main types of microorganisms in EBPR systems, polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) were selected to summarize their metabolic mechanisms such as substrate uptake mechanisms, glycogen degradation pathways, extent of TCA cycle involvement and metabolic similarity between PAOs and GAOs. Application of molecular biology techniques in microbiology and metabolic mechanisms involved in the EBPR system was evaluated. Potential future research areas for the EBPR system and process optimization were also proposed.

  13. Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system

    DOEpatents

    Corletti, Michael M.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1993-01-01

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path.

  14. Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system

    DOEpatents

    Corletti, M.M.; Schulz, T.L.

    1993-12-07

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path. 2 figures.

  15. Mathematical modeling based evaluation and simulation of boron removal in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Ping, Qingyun; Abu-Reesh, Ibrahim M; He, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Boron removal is an arising issue in desalination plants due to boron's toxicity. As an emerging treatment concept, bioelectrochemical systems (BES) can achieve potentially cost-effective boron removal by taking advantage of cathodic-produced alkali. Prior studies have demonstrated successful removal of boron in microbial desalination cells (MDCs) and microbial fuel cells (MFCs), both of which are representative BES. Herein, mathematical models were developed to further evaluate boron removal by different BES and understand the key operating factors. The models delivered very good prediction of the boron concentration in the MDC integrated with Donnan Dialysis (DD) system with the lowest relative root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 0.00%; the predication of the MFC performance generated the highest RMSE of 18.55%. The model results of salt concentration, solution pH, and current generation were well fitted with experimental data for RMSE values mostly below 10%. The long term simulation of the MDC-DD system suggests that the accumulation of salt in the catholyte/stripping solution could have a positive impact on the removal of boron due to osmosis-driven convection. The current generation in the MDC may have little influence on the boron removal, while in the MFC the current-driven electromigration can contribute up to 40% of boron removal. Osmosis-induced convection transport of boron could be the major driving force for boron removal to a low level <2mgL(-1). The ratio between the anolyte and the catholyte flow rates should be kept >22.2 in order to avoid boron accumulation in the anolyte effluent.

  16. Defective removal of ribonucleotides from DNA promotes systemic autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Claudia; Kind, Barbara; Reijns, Martin A.M.; Berndt, Nicole; Martinez-Bueno, Manuel; Wolf, Christine; Tüngler, Victoria; Chara, Osvaldo; Lee, Young Ae; Hübner, Norbert; Bicknell, Louise; Blum, Sophia; Krug, Claudia; Schmidt, Franziska; Kretschmer, Stefanie; Koss, Sarah; Astell, Katy R.; Ramantani, Georgia; Bauerfeind, Anja; Morris, David L.; Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S.; Bubeck, Doryen; Leitch, Andrea; Ralston, Stuart H.; Blackburn, Elizabeth A.; Gahr, Manfred; Witte, Torsten; Vyse, Timothy J.; Melchers, Inga; Mangold, Elisabeth; Nöthen, Markus M.; Aringer, Martin; Kuhn, Annegret; Lüthke, Kirsten; Unger, Leonore; Bley, Annette; Lorenzi, Alice; Isaacs, John D.; Alexopoulou, Dimitra; Conrad, Karsten; Dahl, Andreas; Roers, Axel; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2014-01-01

    Genome integrity is continuously challenged by the DNA damage that arises during normal cell metabolism. Biallelic mutations in the genes encoding the genome surveillance enzyme ribonuclease H2 (RNase H2) cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS), a pediatric disorder that shares features with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we determined that heterozygous parents of AGS patients exhibit an intermediate autoimmune phenotype and demonstrated a genetic association between rare RNASEH2 sequence variants and SLE. Evaluation of patient cells revealed that SLE- and AGS-associated mutations impair RNase H2 function and result in accumulation of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA. The ensuing chronic low level of DNA damage triggered a DNA damage response characterized by constitutive p53 phosphorylation and senescence. Patient fibroblasts exhibited constitutive upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes and an enhanced type I IFN response to the immunostimulatory nucleic acid polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and UV light irradiation, linking RNase H2 deficiency to potentiation of innate immune signaling. Moreover, UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation was markedly enhanced in ribonucleotide-containing DNA, providing a mechanism for photosensitivity in RNase H2–associated SLE. Collectively, our findings implicate RNase H2 in the pathogenesis of SLE and suggest a role of DNA damage–associated pathways in the initiation of autoimmunity. PMID:25500883

  17. Development of Carbon Dioxide Removal Systems for Advanced Exploration Systems 2014-2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.; Coker, Robert; Huff, Timothy L.; Gatens, Robyn; Miller, Lee A.; Stanley, Christine

    2015-01-01

    A long-term goal for NASA is to enable crewed missions to Mars: first to the vicinity of Mars, and then to the Mars surface. These missions present new challenges for all aspects of spacecraft design in comparison with the International Space Station, as resupply is unavailable in the transit phase, and early return is not possible. Additionally, mass, power, and volume must be minimized for all phases to reduce propulsion needs. Mass reduction is particularly crucial for Mars surface landing and liftoff due to the challenges inherent in these operations for even much smaller payloads. In this paper we describe current and planned developments in the area of carbon dioxide removal to support future crewed Mars missions. Activities are also described that apply to both the resolution of anomalies observed in the ISS CDRA and the design of life support systems for future missions.

  18. Development of Carbon Dioxide Removal Systems for Advanced Exploration Systems 2015-2016

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.; Coker, Robert; Howard, David; Peters, Warren; Watson, David; Cmarik, Gregory; Miller, Lee A.

    2016-01-01

    A long-term goal for NASA is to enable crewed missions to Mars: first to the vicinity of Mars, and then to the Mars surface. These missions present new challenges for all aspects of spacecraft design in comparison with the International Space Station, as resupply is unavailable in the transit phase, and early return is not possible. Additionally, mass, power, and volume must be minimized for all phases to reduce propulsion needs. Mass reduction is particularly crucial for Mars surface landing and liftoff due to the challenges inherent in these operations for even much smaller payloads. In this paper we describe current and planned developments in the area of carbon dioxide removal to support future crewed Mars missions. Activities are also described that apply to both the resolution of anomalies observed in the ISS CDRA and the design of life support systems for future missions.

  19. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  20. Removal of NOx and CO from a burner system.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Mohammad Nazri Mohd; Ishak, Mohd Shaiful Ashrul; Saharin, Sanisah

    2010-04-15

    This paper presents the development of an emissions-controlling technique for oil burners aimed especially to reduce oxides of nitrogen (NOx). Another emission of interest is carbon monoxide (CO). In this research, a liquid fuel burner is used. In the first part, five different radial air swirler blade angles, 30 degrees , 40 degrees , 45 degrees , 50 degrees , and 60 degrees , respectively, have been investigated using a combustor with 163 mm inside diameter and 280 mm length. Tests were conducted using kerosene as fuel. Fuel was injected at the back plate of the swirler outlet. The swirler blade angles and equivalence ratios were varied. A NOx reduction of more than 28% and CO emissions reduction of more than 40% were achieved for blade angle of 60 degrees compared to the 30 degrees blade angle. The second part of this paper presents the insertion of an orifice plate at the exit plane of the air swirler outlet. Three different orifice plate diameters of 35, 40, and 45 mm were used with a 45 degrees radial air swirler vane angle. The fuel flow rates and orifice plate's sizes were varied. NOx reduction of more than 30% and CO emissions reduction of more than 25% were obtained using the 25 mm diameter orifice plate compared to the test configuration without the orifice plate. The last part of this paper presents tests conducted using the air-staging method. An industrial oil burner system was investigated using the air staging method in order to reduce emission, especially NOx. Emissions reduction of 30% and 16.7% were obtained for NOx and CO emissions, respectively, when using air staging compared to the non-air-staging tests.

  1. Manned Mission Planning Considerations when Using a Non-Regenerable CO2 Removal System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeSimpelaere, Edward

    2011-01-01

    As the commercial spacecraft industry increases in size, there will be a corresponding increase in the number of manned spacecraft built and operationally flown each year. Industry teams for these new spacecraft will have multiple design and operational choices to make for each of these spacecraft s subsystems. The carbon dioxide (CO2) removal subsystem of the environmental control and life support system is one that presents such challenges. This paper seeks to aid industry in making design and operations choices by providing a document containing lessons learned by the Space Shuttle Program s Operations team, with specific focus given to the non-regenerable CO2 removal system currently used by the Space Shuttle. Carbon dioxide, one of the key byproducts of respiration, can lead to injury and death if allowed to build up in a spacecraft s habitable environment. Therefore, any spacecraft s environmental control and life support system must contain a method for removing this hazard. These removal systems can either be non-regenerable or regenerable. While this paper defines the difference between these types and presents a generic comparison of their capabilities, the focus is specifically on the Space Shuttle s CO2 removal systems. This will include a short discussion of the Space Shuttle s regenerable amine solid absorption system that was part of the Extended Duration Orbiter (EDO) modification, however, emphasis is given to the non-regenerable Lithium Hydroxide canister system used as the prime removal method employed by the Space Shuttle, including a discussion on why this method was chosen over a regenerable system. A full exposition is given on all of the considerations required for mission planning when using a non-regenerable CO2 removal system. Key discussion items include: airflow lessons learned, recent physiological issues related to short term and long term exposure and how lower levels may be more harmful than previously thought, lithium hydroxide

  2. CO2 Removal and Atmosphere Revitalization Systems for Next Generation Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, Bernadette; Mulloth, Lila M.; Varghese, Mini M.; Hogan, John Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Removal of metabolic CO2 from breathing air is a vital process for life support in all crewed space missions. A CO2 removal processor called the Low Power CO2 Removal (LPCOR) system is being developed in the Bioengineering Branch at NASA Ames Research Center. LPCOR utilizes advanced adsorption and membrane gas separation processes to achieve substantial power and mass reduction when compared to the state-of-the-art carbon dioxide removal assembly (CORA) of the US segment of the International Space Station (ISS). LPCOR is an attractive alternative for use in commercial spacecraft for short-duration missions and can easily be adapted for closed-loop life support applications. NASA envisions a next-generation closed-loop atmosphere revitalization system that integrates advanced CO2 removal, O2 recovery, and trace contaminant control processes to improve overall system efficiency. LPCOR will serve as the front end to such a system. LPCOR is a reliable air revitalization technology that can serve both the near-term and long-term human space flight needs of NASA and its commercial partners.

  3. Effect of operational cycle time length on nitrogen removal in an alternating oxidation ditch system.

    PubMed

    Mantziaras, I D; Stamou, A; Katsiri, A

    2011-06-01

    This paper refers to nitrogen removal optimization of an alternating oxidation ditch system through the use of a mathematical model and pilot testing. The pilot system where measurements have been made has a total volume of 120 m(3) and consists of two ditches operating in four phases during one cycle and performs carbon oxidation, nitrification, denitrification and settling. The mathematical model consists of one-dimensional mass balance (convection-dispersion) equations based on the IAWPRC ASM 1 model. After the calibration and verification of the model, simulation system performance was made. Optimization is achieved by testing operational cycles and phases with different time lengths. The limits of EU directive 91/271 for nitrogen removal have been used for comparison. The findings show that operational cycles with smaller time lengths can achieve higher nitrogen removals and that an "equilibrium" between phase time percentages in the whole cycle, for a given inflow, must be achieved.

  4. Demonstration [sic] of a System for Removing Malachite Green : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Marking, Leif L.

    1989-04-01

    Activated carbon has been used effectively to remove tastes, odors, and contaminants from public water supplies. The adsorption efficiency is influenced by the size of carbon granules, flow rate, column depth, and retention time. A study was designed to (1) determine the type of filter and kind of carbon that was most efficient and (2) demonstrate that carbon filters can be used to remove malachite green from water used for egg incubation or to hold adult salmon before spawning. Minicolumn simulation studies showed that 8 /times/ 30 mesh granular carbon manufactured from bituminous coal was effective for continuously removing malachite green from water for 230 days at a flow rate of 500 gpm and for 62 days at a flow rate of 1000 gpm. The removal capacity at the slower flow rate was 69 mg of malachite green per gram of carbon. A filter system that contained 20,000 pounds of activated carbon in each of two chambers was effective for removal of malachite green from treated water in adult salmon holding ponds at flows of 500 gpm and greater. The removal efficiency was 99.8% after 105 hours of operation, and the adsorption capacity of the system was projected to be 20 or more years of routine hatchery operation. A filter system that contained 2000 pounds of activated carbon in each of two chambers was effective for removal of malachite green from treated water in salmon egg incubation units at the designated flow rate of 50 gpm and also at faster flow rates. 14 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Natural Organic Matter Removal and Fouling in a Low Pressure Hybrid Membrane Systems

    PubMed Central

    Uyak, Vedat; Akdagli, Muge; Cakmakci, Mehmet; Koyuncu, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate powdered activated carbon (PAC) contribution to natural organic matter (NOM) removal by a submerged MF and UF hybrid systems. It was found that filtration of surface waters by a bare MF and UF membranes removed negligible TOC; by contrast, significant amounts of TOC were removed when daily added PAC particles were predeposited on the membrane surfaces. These results support the assumption that the membranes surface properties and PAC layer structure might have considerably influential factor on NOM removal. Moreover, it was concluded that the dominant removal mechanism of hybrid membrane system is adsorption of NOM within PAC layer rather than size exclusion of NOM by both of membrane pores. Transmembrane pressure (TMP) increases with PAC membrane systems support the view that PAC adsorption pretreatment will not prevent the development of membrane pressure; on the contrary, PAC particles themselves caused membrane fouling by blocking the entrance of pores of MF and UF membranes. Although all three source waters have similar HPI content, it appears that the PAC interaction with the entrance of membrane pores was responsible for offsetting the NOM fractional effects on membrane fouling for these source waters. PMID:24523651

  6. Removal of copper in an integrated sulfate reducing bioreactor-crystallization reactor system.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Hollingsworth, Jeremy; Zhou, Michael S

    2007-02-15

    Removal of copper was investigated using an innovative water treatment system integrating a sulfidogenic bioreactor with a fluidized-bed crystallization reactor containing fine sand to facilitate the recovery of copper as a purified copper-sulfide mineral. The performance of the system was tested using a simulated semiconductor manufacturing wastewater containing high levels of Cu2+ (4-66 mg/L), sulfate, and a mixture of citrate, isopropanol, and polyethylene glycol (Mn 300). Soluble copper removal efficiencies exceeding 99% and effluent copper concentrations averaging 89 micog/L were demonstrated in the two-stage system, with near complete metal removal occurring in the crystallizer. Copper crystals deposited on sand grains were identified as covellite (CuS). The removal of organic constituents did not exceed 70% of the initial chemical oxygen demand due to incomplete degradation of isopropanol and its breakdown product (acetone). Taken as a whole, these results indicate the potential of this novel reactor configuration for the simultaneous removal of heavy metals and organic constituents. The ability of this process to recover heavy metals in a purified form makes it particularly attractive for the treatment of contaminated aqueous streams, including industrial wastewaters and acid mine drainage.

  7. Removal of emerging contaminants from municipal wastewater with an integrated membrane system, MBR-RO.

    PubMed

    Dolar, Davor; Gros, Meritxell; Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; Moreno, Jordi; Comas, Joaquim; Rodriguez-Roda, Ignasi; Barceló, Damià

    2012-11-15

    The presence of emerging contaminants in the aquatic environment and their potential effects on living organisms has become an issue of growing concern. Among emerging contaminants, pharmaceuticals may enter the aquatic environment due to their high consumption and their incomplete removal in conventional municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The main goal of this study was the assessment of the removal efficiency of pharmaceuticals found in municipal wastewater of a coastal WWTP (Castell-Platja d'Aro, Spain) using an integrated pilot scale membrane system (MBR-RO). Twenty multiple-class pharmaceuticals (including psychiatric drugs, macrolide antibiotics, β-blockers, sulfonamide and fluoroquinolone antibiotics, histamine H2 receptor antagonists, anti-inflammatories, nitroimidazole, β-agonist and antiplatelet agent) were measured in real influent with the lowest average concentration for psychiatric drugs (0.017 μg L(-1)) to the highest for macrolide antibiotics (2.02 μg L(-1)). Although some contaminants were in relatively high concentrations (even up to 2.90 μg L(-1) in the case of ofloxacin). The combination of MBR and RO treatment showed excellent overall removal of target emerging contaminants with removal rates above 99% for all of them. For some compounds (metronidazole, hydrocodone, codein, ranitidine) MBR provided high removal efficiency (up to 95%). Additionally RO membrane showed removal rates always higher than 99%.

  8. Removal of bacteria, protozoa and viruses through a multiple-barrier household water disinfection system.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-García, A C; Díaz-Ávalos, C; Solano-Ortiz, R; Tapia-Palacios, M A; Vázquez-Salvador, N; Espinosa-García, S; Sarmiento-Silva, R E; Mazari-Hiriart, M

    2014-03-01

    Municipal water disinfection systems in some areas are not always able to meet water consumer needs, such as ensuring distributed water quality, because household water management can be a contributing factor in water re-contamination. This fact is related to the storage options that are common in places where water is scarce or is distributed over limited time periods. The aim of this study is to assess the removal capacity of a multiple-barrier water disinfection device for protozoa, bacteria, and viruses. Water samples were taken from households in Mexico City and spiked with a known amount of protozoa (Giardia cyst, Cryptosporidium oocyst), bacteria (Escherichia coli), and viruses (rotavirus, adenovirus, F-specific ribonucleic acid (FRNA) coliphage). Each inoculated sample was processed through a multiple-barrier device. The efficiency of the multiple-barrier device to remove E. coli was close to 100%, and more than 87% of Cryptosporidium oocysts and more than 98% of Giardia cysts were removed. Close to 100% of coliphages were removed, 99.6% of the adenovirus was removed, and the rotavirus was almost totally removed. An effect of site by zone was detected; this observation is important because the water characteristics could indicate the efficiency of the multiple-barrier disinfection device.

  9. Nitrate removal from groundwater driven by electricity generation and heterotrophic denitrification in a bioelectrochemical system.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yiran; He, Zhen

    2013-11-15

    This research aims to develop a new approach for in situ nitrate removal from groundwater by using a bioelectrochemical system (BES). The BES employs bioelectricity generated from organic compounds to drive nitrate moving from groundwater into the anode and reduces nitrate to nitrogen gas by heterotrophic denitrification. This laboratory study of a bench-scale BES demonstrated effective nitrate removal from both synthetic and actual groundwater. It was found that applying an electrical potential improved the nitrate removal and the highest nitrate removal rate of 208.2 ± 13.3g NO3(-)-Nm(-3) d(-1) was achieved at 0.8 V. Although the open circuit condition (no electricity generation) still resulted in a nitrate removal rate of 158.5 ± 4.2 gm(-3) d(-1) due to ion exchange, electricity production could inhibit ion exchange and prevent introducing other undesired ions into groundwater. The nitrate removal rate exhibited a linear relationship with the initial nitrate concentration in groundwater. The BES produced a higher current density of 33.4 Am(-3) and a higher total coulomb of 244.7 ± 9.1C from the actual groundwater than the synthetic groundwater, likely because other ions in the actual groundwater promoted ion movement to assist electricity generation. Further development of this BES will need to address several key challenges in anode feeding solution, ion competition, and long-term stability.

  10. Cyclic electrowinning/precipitation (CEP) system for the removal of heavy metal mixtures from aqueous solutions

    PubMed Central

    Grimshaw, Pengpeng; Calo, Joseph M.; Hradil, George

    2011-01-01

    The description and operation of a novel cyclic electrowinning/precipitation (CEP) system for the simultaneous removal of mixtures of heavy metals from aqueous solutions are presented. CEP combines the advantages of electrowinning in a spouted particulate electrode (SPE) with that of chemical precipitation and redissolution, to remove heavy metals at low concentrations as solid metal deposits on particulate cathode particles without exporting toxic metal precipitate sludges from the process. The overall result is very large volume reduction of the heavy metal contaminants as a solid metal deposit on particles that can either be safely discarded as such, or further processed to recover particular metals. The performance of this system is demonstrated with data on the removal of mixtures of copper, nickel, and cadmium from aqueous solutions. PMID:22102792

  11. Development of a carbon filter system for removing malachite green from hatchery effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Marking, L.L. ); Leith, D. ); Davis, J. )

    1990-04-01

    The US Fish and Wildlife Service was granted an investigational New Animal Drug permit by the US Food and Drug Administration for the use of malachite green as a fungicide at selected state and federal fish hatcheries. However, the permit required that the fungicide be removed from all treated water after March 1989. A study was designed to (1) determine the type of filter and kind of carbon that was most efficient for removal of malachite green and (2) demonstrate that carbon filters can be used to remove malachite green from water used for egg incubation or to hold adult salmon before spawning. Minicolumn simulation studies showed that 8 {times} 30-mesh granular carbon was effective for continuously removing malachite green from water for 230 d at a flow rate of 500 gal/min and for only 62 d at a flow rate of 1,000 gal/min. The removal capacity at the slower flow rate was 1.1 oz of malachite green per pound of carbon. A filter system that contained 20,000 lb of activated carbon in each of two chambers was effective for removal of malachite green from treated water in adult salmon holding ponds at flows of 500 gal/min (6.4 gal/min per ft{sup 2}) and greater. The removal efficiency was 99.8% after 105 h of operation, and the adsorption capacity of the system was projected to be sufficient for 20 or more years of routine hatchery operation. A filter system that contained 2,000 lb of activated carbon in each of two chambers was effective for removal of malachite green from treated water in salmon egg incubation units at the designated flow rate of 50 gal/min (4.0 gal/min per ft{sup 2}) and also at faster flow rates. Removal efficiency decreased only slightly for faster flows in both filter systems, and the efficiency improved when treated water was passed through two filter chambers in series.

  12. Ammonium nitrogen removal from wastewater with a three-dimensional electrochemical oxidation system.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jing; Zhao, Qing-Liang; Wei, Liang-Liang; Chen, Yang; Shu, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Ammonium-containing wastewater could cause the promotion of eutrophication and a hindrance to the disinfection of water supplies. In this study, the feasibility of removing low-concentration ammonium nitrogen from synthetic and real wastewater by electrochemical oxidation was investigated. Using laboratory-scale electrochemical systems, the effects of chloride concentration, current density, anode materials, cathode materials, electrode gap, initial ammonium concentration and three-dimensional particles on the removal of ammonium nitrogen and current efficiency (CE) were evaluated. Ammonium nitrogen removal was mainly dependent upon anode materials and current density. The performance of two- and three-dimensional electrochemical oxidation systems was comparatively discussed. Both particle electrodes could enhance ammonium nitrogen removal and increase CE. However, the mechanism of the process seemed to be different. Moreover, the interaction of zeolites adsorption and electrochemical oxidation on the anode in a three-dimensional system could favor the regeneration of zeolites. Surface morphology of the used Ru-Ir-Sn/Ti anode revealed its longer working life of electrocatalysis. The result of ammonium degradation for a real wastewater treatment plant effluent showed the degradation rates in a three-dimensional system increased by 1.4 times those in a two-dimensional system.

  13. Dissolved nutrients and atrazine removal by column-scale monophasic and biphasic rain garden model systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hanbae; McCoy, Edward L; Grewal, Parwinder S; Dick, Warren A

    2010-08-01

    Rain gardens are bioretention systems that have the potential to reduce peak runoff flow and improve water quality in a natural and aesthetically pleasing manner. We compared hydraulic performance and removal efficiencies of nutrients and atrazine in a monophasic rain garden design versus a biphasic design at a column-scale using simulated runoff. The biphasic rain garden was designed to increase retention time and removal efficiency of runoff pollutants by creating a sequence of water saturated to unsaturated conditions. We also evaluated the effect of C substrate availability on pollutant removal efficiency in the biphasic rain garden. Five simulated runoff events with various concentrations of runoff pollutants (i.e. nitrate, phosphate, and atrazine) were applied to the monophasic and biphasic rain gardens once every 5d. Hydraulic performance was consistent over the five simulated runoff events. Peak flow was reduced by approximately 56% for the monophasic design and 80% for the biphasic design. Both rain garden systems showed excellent removal efficiency of phosphate (89-100%) and atrazine (84-100%). However, significantly (p<0.001) higher removal of nitrate was observed in the biphasic (42-63%) compared to the monophasic rain garden (29-39%). Addition of C substrate in the form of glucose increased removal efficiency of nitrate significantly (p<0.001), achieving up to 87% removal at a treatment C/N ratio of 2.0. This study demonstrates the importance of retention time, environmental conditions (i.e. saturated/unsaturated conditions), and availability of C substrate for bioremediation of pollutants, especially nitrates, in rain gardens.

  14. Plant traits that enhance pollutant removal from stormwater in biofiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Read, Jennifer; Fletcher, Tim D; Wevill, Tricia; Deletic, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Plants species have been shown to improve the performance of stormwater biofiltration systems, particularly in removal of N and P. Recent research has shown that plants vary in their contribution to pollutant removal but little is known about the type of plant that is best suited to use in biofilters in terms of survival, growth rate, and performance. In this study, growth responses of 20 species to applications of semi-synthetic stormwater were measured, and the roles of key plant traits in removal of N, P, and several metals were investigated. There was no evidence of negative effects of stormwater application on plant growth, and plant traits, particularly root traits, were strongly correlated negatively with N and P concentrations of effluent stormwater. The most common and strong contributors to N and P removal appeared to be the length of the longest root, rooting depth, total root length, and root mass. The plants that made the strongest contribution to pollutant removal, e.g, Carex appressa, combined these traits with high growth rates. Investigation of other plant traits (e.g, physiology), causal mechanisms, and effects of more complex planting environments (e.g, species mixtures) should further guide the selection of plants to enhance performance of biofiltration systems.

  15. Automated system for removal and pneumatic transport of fly ash from electric precipitator hoppers

    SciTech Connect

    V.K. Konovalov; O.V. Yashkin; V.V. Ermakov

    2008-03-15

    A system for removal and pneumatic transport of fly ash is examined, in which air pulses act on batches (pistons) of ash formed in a duct. Studies are made of the effect of several physical parameters on the force required to displace a piston of ash and these serve as a basis for choosing a system for removal and pneumatic transport of ash simultaneously from several hoppers of an electric precipitator. This makes it possible to separate the ash particles according to size without introducing additional components. Formulas are given for calculating the structural and dynamic parameters of this system and measurements of indirect dynamic parameters are used to calculate the input-output characteristics of the system. In order to optimize the system, configurations for summing several ducts into a single transport duct for pneumatic ash transport are proposed. Some variants of dry ash utilization and the advantages of producing of size-separated particles are considered.

  16. BOA: Asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system, Phase 2. Topical report, January--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.E.

    1995-06-01

    This report explored the regulatory impact and cost-benefit of a robotic thermal asbestos pipe-insulation removal system over the current manual abatement work practice. The authors are currently in the second phase of a two-phase program to develop a robotic asbestos abatement system, comprised of a ground-based support system (including vacuum, fluid delivery, computing/electronics/power, and other subsystems) and several on-pipe removal units, each sized to handle pipes within a given diameter range. The intent of this study was to (i) aid in developing design and operational criteria for the overall system to maximize cost-efficiency, and (ii) to determine the commercial potential of a robotic pipe-insulation abatement system.

  17. Passive decay heat removal system for water-cooled nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Forseberg, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    This document describes passive decay-heat removal system for a water-cooled nuclear reactor which employs a closed heat transfer loop having heat-exchanging coils inside an open-topped, insulated evaporator located inside the reactor vessel, below its normal water level, in communication with a condenser located outside of containment and exposed to the atmosphere. The heat transfer loop is located such that the evaporator is in a position where, when the water level drops in the reactor, it will become exposed to steam. Vapor produced in the evaporator passes upward to the condenser above the normal water level. In operation, condensation in the condenser removes heat from the system, and the condensed liquid is returned to the evaporator. The system is disposed such that during normal reactor operations where the water level is at its usual position, very little heat will be removed from the system, but during emergency, low water level conditions, substantial amounts of decay heat will be removed.

  18. Integrated nitrogen removal biofilter system with ceramic membrane for advanced post-treatment of municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Son, Dong-Jin; Yun, Chan-Young; Kim, Woo-Yeol; Zhang, Xing-Ya; Kim, Dae-Gun; Chang, Duk; Sunwoo, Young; Hong, Ki-Ho

    2016-12-01

    The pre-denitrification biofilm process for nitrogen removal was combined with ceramic membrane with pore sizes of 0.05-0.1 µm as a system for advanced post-treatment of municipal wastewater. The system was operated under an empty bed hydraulic retention time of 7.8 h, recirculation ratio of 3, and transmembrane pressure of 0.47 bar. The system showed average removals of organics, total nitrogen, and solids as high as 93%, 80%, and 100%, respectively. Rapid nitrification could be achieved and denitrification was performed in the anoxic filter without external carbon supplements. The residual particulate organics and nitrogen in effluent from biofilm process could be also removed successfully through membrane filtration and the removal of total coliform was noticeably improved after membrane filtration. Thus, a system composed of the pre-denitrification biofilm process with ceramic membrane would be a compact and flexible option for advanced post-treatment of municipal wastewater.

  19. History of SO2 removal system at the Meramec plant of union electric.

    PubMed

    Dreifke, G E; McLaughlin, J F; Smith, J D

    1975-01-01

    In line with the then emerging air pollution control regulations Union Electric installed a limestone injection wet scrubber sulfur dioxide removal system on an intermediate size coal-fired utility boiler at its Meramec Power Plant on an experimental basis in September, 1968. Approximately 3 years of operation many difficulties were encountered with plugging and scaling of various system components by calcium sulphate. As a result of this experience along with related experiences by other utilities employing similar systems, the experiment was terminated in June, 1971. As a result of the experiences gained, however, second generation experiments in sulfur dioxide removal have been initiated elsewhere with the hope of improved performance. A number of experimental projects are still under tests. Costs in resources, reliability, and disposal of residual by-products are matters of great concern. The ture cost of sulfur dioxide removal systems in dollars and resources is not well known and perhaps a reevaluation of current and future SO2 removal projects is in order at this time before additional resources are committed.

  20. URANIUM REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER USING A SMALL FULL-SCALE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents background and history of water quality, the basis for design and nine months of actual operating data for a small, full-scale strong-base ion exchange system that is used to remove uranium from a water supply serving a school in Jefferson County, CO. Informa...

  1. Microbial community profile of a lead service line removed from a drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    White, Colin; Tancos, Matthew; Lytle, Darren A

    2011-08-01

    A corroded lead service line was removed from a drinking water distribution system, and the microbial community was profiled using 16S rRNA gene techniques. This is the first report of the characterization of a biofilm on the surface of a corroded lead drinking water service line. The majority of phylotypes have been linked to heavy-metal-contaminated environments.

  2. Solids removal from a coldwater recirculating system - comparison of swirl separator and radial-flow settlers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solids removal across two settling devices, i.e., a swirl separator and a radial-flow settler, and across a microscreen drum filter was evaluated in a fully recirculating system containing a single 150 m3 'Cornell-type' dual-drain tank during the production of food-size Arctic char and rainbow trout...

  3. [Effect of magnesium ion content on the biological phosphorus removal system in SBR].

    PubMed

    Li, Xing; Gao, Da-Wen; Liu, Lin

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of magnesium iron content on the enhanced biological phosphorus removal system, which performed differently at magnesium content of 0 mg/L, 8 mg/L and 24 mg/L (R1-R3). The results indicated appropriate Mg addition could enrich phosphorus accumulating organisms and keep stable running. During the steady state period, phosphorus removal rate declined to below 50% gradually, moreover, the system tended to deteriorate with the shortage of magnesium in R1. However, the system with appropriate magnesium kept the higher phosphorus removal rate (more than 90%). The statistical analysis of the experimental data also showed a strong correlation between Mg and phosphorus concentrations in R2 and R3, the ratios of Mg and P were 0.29-0.59 and 0.25-0.54 in two reactors respectively. In the anaerobic phase of EBPR, the magnesium content, the absolute value of ORP and the phosphates release had a correlation. Meanwhile, magnesium was released together with phosphates in the anaerobic phase, and that would uptake under aerobic conditions. Thus it was obvious that magnesium played a key role on the biological phosphorus removal system.

  4. Microbial Community Profile of a Lead Service Line Removed from a Drinking Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A corroded lead water pipe was removed from a drinking water distribution system and the microbial community was profiled using 16S rDNA techniques. This is the first report of the characterization of biofilm on a surface of a corroded lead drinking water pipe. The majority of ...

  5. Capital and Operating Costs of Small Arsenic Removal Adsorptive Media Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted 50 full-scale demonstration projects on treatment systems removing arsenic from drinking water in 26 states throughout the U.S. The projects were conducted to evaluate the performance, reliability, and cost of arsenic remo...

  6. REMOVAL OF ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: ARS CFU-50 APC ELECTROFLOCCULATION AND FILTRATION WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETV testing of the ARS CFU-50 APC Electroflocculation and Filtration Water Treatment System (ARS CFU-50 APC) for arsenic removal was conducted at the Town of Bernalillo Well #3 site from April 18 through May 2, 2006. The source water was chlorinated groundwater from two supply w...

  7. Five year-round forage systems in a dairy effluent sprayfield: phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Kenneth R; Sollenberger, Lynn E; Sweat, Lewin A; Graetz, Donald A; Rymph, Stuart J; Joo, Yongsung

    2007-01-01

    In northern Florida, forages are grown in dairy effluent sprayfields to recover excess P. Our purpose was to evaluate five year-round forage systems for their capacity to remove P from a dairy sprayfield. The soil is a Kershaw sand (thermic, uncoated Typic Quartzipsamment). Systems included bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.)-rye (Secale cereale L.) (BR), perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.)-rye (PR), corn (Zea mays L.)-forage sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]-rye (CSR), corn-bermudagrass-rye (CBR), and corn-perennial peanut-rye (CPR). Forages were grown for five 12-mo cycles. Effluent P rates were 80, 120, and 165 kg ha-1 cycle-1. The 5-cycle P removal was 67 kg ha-1 cycle-1 for BR, 54 kg ha-1 for CBR, 52 kg for CSR, 45 kg for PR, and 43 for CPR. Removal of P by winter rye was low. There were differences in system rankings among cycles primarily due to changes in the performance of perennial forages. In the first two cycles, BR had the greatest P removal (91 kg ha-1 cycle-1) due to high bermudagrass yield and P concentration. In the first cycle, P removal was lowest for PR (36 kg ha-1) because perennial peanut was slow to establish. In later cycles, P removal for BR declined because bermudagrass yield and P concentration declined. It increased for PR because peanut yield increased. The yield of corn in CBR, CPR, and CSR was consistently high but P concentration was modest (avg. 2.2 g kg-1). Sorghum produced moderate but stable yield and had low P levels (avg. 1.8 g kg-1). Effluent rate marginally affected the performance of most grasses. For P recovery in dairy sprayfields in northern Florida, the best warm-season forage would likely be a high yielding, persistent bermudagrass.

  8. Numerical modeling analysis of VOC removal processes in different aerobic vertical flow systems for groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    De Biase, Cecilia; Carminati, Andrea; Oswald, Sascha E; Thullner, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Vertical flow systems filled with porous medium have been shown to efficiently remove volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater. To apply this semi-natural remediation strategy it is however necessary to distinguish between removal due to biodegradation and due to volatile losses to the atmosphere. Especially for (potentially) toxic VOCs, the latter needs to be minimized to limit atmospheric emissions. In this study, numerical simulation was used to investigate quantitatively the removal of volatile organic compounds in two pilot-scale water treatment systems: an unplanted vertical flow filter and a planted one, which could also be called a vertical flow constructed wetland, both used for the treatment of contaminated groundwater. These systems were intermittently loaded with contaminated water containing benzene and MTBE as main VOCs. The highly dynamic but permanently unsaturated conditions in the porous medium facilitated aerobic biodegradation but could lead to volatile emissions of the contaminants. Experimental data from porous material analyses, flow rate measurements, solute tracer and gas tracer test, as well as contaminant concentration measurements at the boundaries of the systems were used to constrain a numerical reactive transport modeling approach. Numerical simulations considered unsaturated water flow, transport of species in the aqueous and the gas phase as well as aerobic degradation processes, which made it possible to quantify the rates of biodegradation and volatile emissions and calculating their contribution to total contaminant removal. A range of degradation rates was determined using experimental results of both systems under two operation modes and validated by field data obtained at different operation modes applied to the filters. For both filters, simulations and experimental data point to high biodegradation rates, if the flow filters have had time to build up their removal capacity. For this case volatile

  9. Pre-Conceptual Design for Northstar ⁹⁹Mo Process Tritium Removal System

    SciTech Connect

    Nobile, Arthur; Reichert, Heidi; Hollis, William Kirk; Taylor, Craig Michael; Gordon, John Cameron; Dale, Gregory E.

    2016-01-12

    In this report we describe a preliminary concept for a Tritium Removal System (TRS) to remove tritium that is generated in the ⁹⁹Mo production process. Preliminary calculations have been performed to evaluate an approximate size for the system. The concept described utilizes well-established detritiation technology based on catalytic oxidation of tritium and tritiated hydrocarbons to water in a high temperature (400 °C) reactor and capture of water in a molecular sieve bed. The TRS concept involves use of a single system that would cycle through each of the seven online target systems and remove tritium that has been accumulated after one week’s run time. The TRS would perform cleanup operations on each target system for a period of approximately 24 hours. This would occur while the system is still online and just prior to target replacement, so tritium levels would at their minimum values for target replacement. In the concept, during normal operation a small fraction (1%) of the helium recirculating in the system would be diverted through the TRS and returned to the flow loop. With this approach sufficient levels of detritiation can be accomplished in a 24 hour period. In the study it was found that because of the need to maintain low oxygen levels in the system (<100 ppm) this increases the size of the catalytic reactor. As a result of this finding, consideration should be given to other methods for removing tritium from the system. Other methods such as catalytic exchange of tritium with an unsaturated organic compound and subsequent trapping on activated carbon or molecular sieve could offer advantages of reducing reactor size and operation at lower reactor temperature. However the most significant advantage of such an approach would be the ability to operate in very low oxygen environments, which would eliminate any concerns for oxidation of the target.

  10. Computer Simulation and Modeling of CO2 Removal Systems for Exploration 2013-2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, R.; Knox, J.; Gomez, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project was initiated in September of 2011 as part of the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. Under the ARREM project and the follow-on Life Support Systems (LSS) project, testing of sub-scale and full-scale systems has been combined with multiphysics computer simulations for evaluation and optimization of subsystem approaches. In particular, this paper will describes the testing and 1-D modeling of the combined water desiccant and carbon dioxide sorbent subsystems of the carbon dioxide removal assembly (CDRA). The goal is a full system predictive model of CDRA to guide system optimization and development.

  11. Removal of ammonia from urine vapor by a dual-catalyst system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of removing ammonia from urine vapor by a low-temperature dual-catalyst system has been demonstrated. The process is based on the catalytic oxidation of ammonia to a mixture of nitrogen, nitrous oxide, and water, followed by a catalytic decomposition of the nitrous oxide into its elements. Potential ammonia oxidation and nitrous oxide decomposition catalysts were first screened with artificial gas mixtures, then tested with the actual urine vapor produced by boiling untreated urine. A suitable dual-catalyst bed arrangement was found that achieved the removal of ammonia and also organic carbon, and recovered water of good quality from urine vapor.

  12. Pilot scale test of a produced water-treatment system for initial removal of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Enid J; Kwon, Soondong; Katz, Lynn; Kinney, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    A pilot-scale test to remove polar and non-polar organics from produced water was performed at a disposal facility in Farmington NM. We used surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorbent beds and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) in combination to reduce the organic carbon content of produced water prior to reverse osmosis (RO). Reduction of total influent organic carbon (TOC) to 5 mg/L or less is desirable for efficient RO system operation. Most water disposed at the facility is from coal-bed gas production, with oil production waters intermixed. Up to 20 gal/d of produced water was cycled through two SMZ adsorbent units to remove volatile organic compounds (BTEX, acetone) and semivolatile organic compounds (e.g., napthalene). Output water from the SMZ units was sent to the MBR for removal of the organic acid component of TOC. Removal of inorganic (Mn and Fe oxide) particulates by the SMZ system was observed. The SMZ columns removed up to 40% of the influent TOC (600 mg/L). BTEX concentrations were reduced from the initial input of 70 mg/L to 5 mg/L by the SMZ and to an average of 2 mg/L after the MBR. Removal rates of acetate (input 120-170 mg/L) and TOC (input up to 45 mg/L) were up to 100% and 92%, respectively. The water pH rose from 8.5 to 8.8 following organic acid removal in the MBR; this relatively high pH was likely responsible for observed scaling of the MBR internal membrane. Additional laboratory studies showed the scaling can be reduced by metered addition of acid to reduce the pH. Significantly, organic removal in the MBR was accomplished with a very low biomass concentration of 1 g/L throughout the field trial. An earlier engineering evaluation shows produced water treatment by the SMZ/MBR/RO system would cost from $0.13 to $0.20 per bbl at up to 40 gpm. Current estimated disposal costs for produced water are $1.75 to $4.91 per bbl when transportation costs are included, with even higher rates in some regions. Our results suggest that treatment by an SMZ

  13. Cascade air-stripping system for removal of low and semi-volatile organic contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Won.

    1989-01-01

    Many hazardous waste sites have been known to have groundwaters contaminated with low volatile, hazardous compounds such as bromoform 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP), napthalene, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In addition, a large number of public water supplies have been reported to have taste and odor problems in drinking water, which are attributed primarily to naturally occurring compounds, such as 2-methylisoborneol (MIB), geosmin, etc. These classes of compounds have very low Henry's Constant, H{sub c}, in the range of 1 to 50 atm. Air-stripping in countercurrent packed towers is a well accepted treatment process for removing volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) from water. The USEPA has identified packed countercurrent air-stripping as not only the least-cost, but also one of the best available technologies for the removal of VOCs. However, the economic viability of this process is limited to volatile compounds of H{sub c} value greater than SO atm. A novel modification of the conventional countercurrent air-stripping process, introduced as cascade air-stripping was proposed for cost effective removal of these classes of compounds from water and at hazardous waste spill-sites. The main objectives of this study were to demonstrate the concept of cascade air-stripping; to compare cascade air-stripping with conventional air-stripping under identical conditions; and to verify the hypothesis that the cascade system is superior to the conventional system at the pilot and prototype scales. Results of the pilot and prototype study showed that the cascade airstrip ping system was a viable and economical approach to remove low and semi-volatile organic compounds from water. The cascade system consistently showed higher removals than the conventional system for both pilot and prototype scale study.

  14. The Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor: Report on Safety System Design for Decay Heat Removal

    SciTech Connect

    K. D. Weaver; T. Marshall; T. Y. C. Wei; E. E. Feldman; M. J. Driscoll; H. Ludewig

    2003-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radiotoxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. This report addresses/discusses the decay heat removal options available to the GFR, and the current solutions. While it is possible to design a GFR with complete passive safety (i.e., reliance solely on conductive and radiative heat transfer for decay heat removal), it has been shown that the low power density results in unacceptable fuel cycle costs for the GFR. However, increasing power density results in higher decay heat rates, and the attendant temperature increase in the fuel and core. Use of active movers, or blowers/fans, is possible during accident conditions, which only requires 3% of nominal flow to remove the decay heat. Unfortunately, this requires reliance on active systems. In order to incorporate passive systems, innovative designs have been studied, and a mix of passive and active systems appears to meet the requirements for decay heat removal during accident conditions.

  15. Design Strategies and Preliminary Prototype for a Low-Cost Arsenic Removal System for Rural Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Qazi, Shefah; Agogino, Alice M.

    2009-09-14

    Researchers have invented a material called ARUBA -- Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash -- that effectively and affordably removes arsenic from Bangladesh groundwater. Through analysis of studies across a range of disciplines, observations, and informal interviews conducted over three trips to Bangladesh, we have applied mechanical engineering design methodology to develop eight key design strategies, which were used in the development of a low-cost, community-scale water treatment system that uses ARUBA to removearsenic from drinking water. We have constructed, tested, and analysed a scale version of the system. Experiments have shown that the system is capable of reducing high levels of arsenic (nearly 600 ppb) to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb, while remaining affordable to people living on less than US$2/day. The system could be sustainably implemented as a public-private partnership in rural Bangladesh.

  16. Sorbent Structural Impacts Due to Humidity on Carbon Dioxide Removal Sorbents for Advanced Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, David; Knox, James C.; West, Phillip; Stanley, Christine M.; Bush, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Life Support Systems Project (LSSP) under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program builds upon the work performed under the AES Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project focusing on the numerous technology development areas. The CO2 removal and associated air drying development efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art system on the International Space Station (ISS) utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, evaluating structured sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. A component of the CO2 removal effort encompasses structural stability testing of existing and emerging sorbents. Testing will be performed on dry sorbents and sorbents that have been conditioned to three humidity levels. This paper describes the sorbent structural stability screening efforts in support of the LSS Project within the AES Program.

  17. The ability of biologically based wastewater treatment systems to remove emerging organic contaminants--a review.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rodríguez, Aida; Matamoros, Víctor; Fontàs, Clàudia; Salvadó, Victòria

    2014-10-01

    Biologically based wastewater treatment systems are considered a sustainable, cost-effective alternative to conventional wastewater treatment systems. These systems have been used and studied for the treatment of urban sewage from small communities, and recently, it has been reported that they can also effectively remove emerging organic contaminants (EOCs). EOCs are a new group of unregulated contaminants which include pharmaceutical and personal care products, some pesticides, veterinary products, and industrial compounds among others that are thought to have long-term adverse effects on human health and ecosystems. This review is focused on reporting the ability of biologically based wastewater treatment systems to remove EOCs and the main elimination mechanisms and degradation processes (i.e., biodegradation, photodegradation, phytoremediation, and sorption) taking place in constructed wetlands, ponds, and Daphnia and fungal reactors.

  18. Oxygen Limited Bioreactors System For Nitrogen Removal Using Immobilized Mix Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, B. K.; Sumino, T.; Saiki, Y.; Kazama, F.

    2005-12-01

    Recently nutrients concentrations especially nitrogen in natural water is alarming in the world wide. Most of the effort is being done on the removal of high concentration of nitrogen especially from the wastewater treatment plants. The removal efficiency is targeted in all considering the effluent discharge standard set by the national environment agency. In many cases, it does not meet the required standard and receiving water is being polluted. Eutrophication in natural water bodies has been reported even if the nitrogen concentration is low and self purification of natural systems itself is not sufficient to remove the nitrogen due to complex phenomenon. In order to recover the pristine water environment, it is very essential to explore bioreactor systems for natural water systems using immobilized mix culture. Microorganism were entrapped in Polyethylene glycol (PEG) prepolymer gel and cut into 3mm cubic immobilized pellets. Four laboratory scale micro bio-reactors having 0.1 L volumes were packed with immobilized pellets with 50% compact ratio. RUN1, RUN2, RUN3 and RUN4 were packed with immobilized pellets from reservoirs sediments, activated sludge (AS), mixed of AS, AG and biodegradable plastic and anaerobic granules (AG) respectively. Water from Shiokawa Reservoirs was feed to all reactors with supplemental ammonia and nitrite nitrogen as specified in the results and discussions. The reactors were operated dark incubated room in continuous flow mode with hydraulic retention time of 12 hours under oxygen limiting condition. Ammonium, nitrate nitrite nitrogen and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations were measured as described in APWA and AWWA (1998). Laboratory scale four bioreactors containing different combination of immobilized cell were monitored for 218 days. Influent NH4+-N and NO2--N concentration were 2.27±0.43 and 2.05±0.41 mg/l respectively. Average dissolved oxygen concentration and pH in the reactors were 0.40-2.5 mg/l and pH 6

  19. Reclaim System Design of Indium Tin Oxide Thin-Film Removal from Color Filters of Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pa, Pai-Shan

    2008-09-01

    A newly design precision reclaim system using electrochemical machining as an etching process for indium tin oxide (ITO) thin-film removal from the color filter surface of a displays is presented. Through the ultra precise etching of the nanostructure, the semiconductor industry can effectively recycle defective products, thereby reducing production costs. A large gyration diameter of a cathode combined with a small gap width between the cathode and a workpiece takes less time for the same amount of ITO removed. An adequate feed rate of color filters combined with a sufficient electric power produces fast machining. Pulsed direct current and higher rotational speed of the cathode can improve the effects of dregs discharge and are advantageous to be combined with a high feed rate of workpieces. Electrochemical machining only requires a short time to easily and cleanly remove ITO films.

  20. Development of a Scalable Process Control System for Chemical Soil Washing to Remove Uranyl Oxide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    is reactive, oxidizing once it has been deposited into soil. The recovery process needs a variety of measurement systems for precisely locating the...medical imaging material, etc.), toxic or hazardous materials such as pesticides or asbestos , consumer products such as refrigerators or...2012), the soil fines remain contaminated by tightly bound DU oxides. The leaching system removes uranium from these soil fines and deposits the

  1. Frequency estimation for optical coherent M-QAM system without removing modulated data phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Song; Cao, Yinwen; Leng, Haijun; Wu, Guohua; Gu, Wanyi

    2012-08-01

    For optical coherent M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (M-QAM) system, the frequency offset can be extracted directly by applying Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to the signal's argument, without removing the modulated data phase. By categorizing the constellation points and rotating some constellation points by π/4, this algorithm is robust to extract the frequency offset against the noise. Numerical simulations of 16-QAM and 256-QAM coherent systems are presented to demonstrate this algorithm.

  2. Sorbent Structural Testing on Carbon Dioxide Removal Sorbents for Advanced Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, David; Knox, James C.; West, Phillip; Bush, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Long term space missions require carbon dioxide removal systems that can function with minimal downtime required for maintenance, low power consumption and maximum efficiency for CO2 removal. A major component of such a system are the sorbents used for the CO2 and desiccant beds. Sorbents must not only have adequate CO2 and H2O removal properties, but they must have the mechanical strength to prevent structural breakdown due to pressure and temperature changes during operation and regeneration, as well as resistance to breakdown due to moisture in the system from cabin air. As part of the studies used to select future CO2 sorbent materials, mechanical tests are performed on various zeolite sorbents to determine mechanical performance while dry and at various humidified states. Tests include single pellet crush, bulk crush and attrition tests. We have established a protocol for testing sorbents under dry and humid conditions, and previously tested the sorbents used on the International Space Station carbon dioxide removal assembly. This paper reports on the testing of a series of commercial sorbents considered as candidates for use on future exploration missions.

  3. Nitrogen removal in an upflow sludge blanket (USB) reactor combined by aerobic biofiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Jun, H B; Park, S M; Park, J K; Choi, C O; Lee, J S

    2004-01-01

    A new nitrogen removal process (up-flow sludge blanket and aerobic filter, USB-AF) was proposed and tested with real sewage. In the USB reactor, the larger part of influent organic and nitrogen matters were removed, and ammonia was effectively oxidized in the subsequent aerobic filter. The role of the aerobic filter was to convert ammonia into nitrate, an electron acceptor that could convert soluble organic matters into volatile suspended solid (VSS) in the USB. The accumulated as well as influent VSS in the USB was finally degraded to fermented products that were another good carbon source for denitrification. Total COD, settleable COD and soluble COD in the raw sewage were 325, 80 and 140 mg/l, respectively. Most unsettleable COD as well as some SCOD in the influent was successfully removed in the USB. TCOD removal in the anoxic filter was by denitrification with the recycled nitrate. Low COD input to the aerobic filter could increase nitrification efficiency, reduce the start-up period and save the aeration energy in the USB-AF system. About 95% of ammonia was nitrified in the aerobic filter with no relation to the influent ammonia concentration. Denitrification efficiency of the recycled nitrate in the anoxic filter was about 85, 83, and 72% at recycle ratios of 100, 200, and 300%, respectively. T-N removal efficiency was 70% at recycle ratio of 300%.

  4. Surface-modified biochar in a bioretention system for Escherichia coli removal from stormwater.

    PubMed

    Lau, Abbe Y T; Tsang, Daniel C W; Graham, Nigel J D; Ok, Yong Sik; Yang, Xin; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-02-01

    Bioretention systems have been recommended as one of the best management practices for low impact development for water recycling/reuse systems. Although improvement of the stormwater quality has been reported regarding pollutants eliminations such as suspended solids and heavy metals, a substantial removal of indicator bacteria is required for possible non-potable reuse. This study investigated the efficiency of wood biochar with H2SO4-, H3PO4-, KOH-, and amino-modifications for E. coli removal from synthetic stormwater under intermittent flow. The H2SO4-modified biochar showed a specific surface area of 234.7 m(2) g(-1) (approximately double the area of original biochar), whereas a substantial reduction in surface area was found with amino-modified biochar. The E. coli removal (initial concentration of 0.3-3.2 × 10(6) CFU mL(-1)) by modified biochars as filter media was very promising with, for example, over 98% removal efficiency in the first 20 pore volumes of stormwater infiltration and over 92% removal by the end of the second infiltration cycle. Only a small portion of E. coli attached on the modified biochars (<0.3%, except KOH- and amino-modified biochars) was remobilized during the drainage phase of intermittent flow. The high removal capacity and stability against drainage were attributed to the high surface area, porous structure, and surface characteristics (e.g. hydrophobicity and O-containing functional groups) of the biochars. Thus, the H2SO4-modified biochar appeared to give the best treatment performance.

  5. Removal of pamidronate from bone in rats using systemic and local chelation

    PubMed Central

    Howie, R. Nicole; Bhattacharyya, Maryka; Salama, Mohamed; El Refaey, Mona; Isales, Carlos; Borke, James; Daoudi, Asma; Medani, Fardous; Elsalanty, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Bisphosphonates become adsorbed on hydroxyapatite crystals in the bone matrix. In case of side-effects, stopping the treatment would not affect the bisphosphonates already deposited in bone. This study tests the feasibility of in-vivo targeted removal of bisphosphonates from bone using chelating agents. Design 32 Sprague Dawley rats were given an injection of fluorescent pamidronate (OsteoSense EX; 0.16 nmol/g). They were treated with either systemic (cadmium) or local [ethylenediaminetetraacetic (EDTA) or citric acid (CA)] chelating agents to induce the removal of the bisphosphonate from bone. We evaluated the decrease in fluorescence in the alveolar bone, femur, tibia, and vertebrae. We also analyzed the systemic effects of treatment. Results Systemic chelation reduced the pamidronate signal universally. However, the maximum reduction was observed in the alveolar bone and femur (22% and 21%, p values 0.008 and 0.028, respectively). Systemic chelation did not impair calcium homeostasis. The chelation effect was not due to a systemic toxic effect on the liver or kidney. On the other hand local chelation at the extraction site significantly (p=0.011) decreased the pamidronate signal at bony surfaces of the socket. Conclusions Systemic and local chelating agents can remove bisphosphonate from bone. This study establishes a new concept for the prevention of side effects of bisphosphonates during high-risk situations. PMID:26431826

  6. An Improved Design for Air Removal from Aerospace Fluid Loop Coolant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, Stephen M. C.; Holladay, Jon B.; Holt, J. Mike; Clark, Dallas W.

    2003-01-01

    Aerospace applications with requirements for large capacity heat removal (launch vehicles, platforms, payloads, etc.) typically utilize a liquid coolant fluid as a transport media to increase efficiency and flexibility in the vehicle design. An issue with these systems however, is susceptibility to the presence of noncondensable gas (NCG) or air. The presence of air in a coolant loop can have numerous negative consequences, including loss of centrifugal pump prime, interference with sensor readings, inhibition of heat transfer, and coolant blockage to remote systems. Hardware ground processing to remove this air is also cumbersome and time consuming which continuously drives recurring costs. Current systems for maintaining the system free of air are tailored and have demonstrated only moderate success. An obvious solution to these problems is the development and advancement of a passive gas removal device, or gas trap, that would be installed in the flight cooling system simplifying the initial coolant fill procedure and also maintaining the system during operations. The proposed device would utilize commercially available membranes thus increasing reliability and reducing cost while also addressing both current and anticipated applications. In addition, it maintains current pressure drop, water loss, and size restrictions while increasing tolerance for pressure increases due to gas build-up in the trap.

  7. Laboratory and field evaluation of a pretreatment system for removing organics from produced water.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soondong; Sullivan, Enid J; Katz, Lynn E; Bowman, Robert S; Kinney, Kerry A

    2011-09-01

    Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. This "produced water" is characterized by saline water containing a variety of pollutants, including water soluble and immiscible organics and many inorganic species. To reuse produced water, removal of both the inorganic dissolved solids and organic compounds is necessary. In this research, the effectiveness of a pretreatment system consisting of surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorption followed by a membrane bioreactor (MBR) was evaluated for simultaneous removal of carboxylates and hazardous substances, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from saline-produced water. A laboratory-scale MBR, operated at a 9.6-hour hydraulic residence time, degraded 92% of the carboxylates present in synthetic produced water. When BTEX was introduced simultaneously to the MBR system with the carboxylates, the system achieved 80 to 95% removal of BTEX via biodegradation. These results suggest that simultaneous biodegradation of both BTEX and carboxylate constituents found in produced water is possible. A field test conducted at a produced water disposal facility in Farmington, New Mexico confirmed the laboratory-scale results for the MBR and demonstrated enhanced removal of BTEX using a treatment train consisting of SMZ columns followed by the MBR. While most of the BTEX constituents of the produced water adsorbed onto the SMZ adsorption system, approximately 95% of the BTEX that penetrated the SMZ and entered the MBR was biodegraded in the MBR. Removal rates of acetate (influent concentrations of 120 to 170 mg/L) ranged from 91 to 100%, and total organic carbon (influent concentrations as high as 580 mg/L) ranged from 74 to 92%, respectively. Organic removal in the MBR was accomplished at a low biomass concentration of 1 g/L throughout the field trial. While the transmembrane pressure during the laboratory-scale tests was well-controlled, it rose

  8. Impact of Cr(VI) on P removal performance in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) system based on the anaerobic and aerobic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jing; Sun, Pei-de; Xu, Shao-juan; Luo, Tao; Lou, Ju-qing; Han, Jing-yi; Song, Ying-qi

    2012-10-01

    Influence of Cr(VI) on P removal in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) system was investigated with respect to the composition of poly-phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) and glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs), the transformation of poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates (PHA) and glycogen, enzymes' activities, and the intracellular Cr. Whether EBPR system could revive after Cr(VI) shock was also explored. Results showed P removal performance was completely inhibited by Cr(VI) with the concentration more than 5 mg L(-1). PAOs were more sensitive to Cr(VI) than GAOs and the other bacteria were. PHA consumption, glycogen synthesis and adenylate kinase's activity had been inhibited by 5 mg L(-1) Cr(VI). Both adenylate kinase's activity and P removal efficiency were negatively correlated with the intracellular Cr. Recovery experiments revealed that P removal performance with 5 mg L(-1) Cr(VI) shock could revive after a 2-day recovery treatment, while systems with high level Cr(VI) (20 and 60 mg L(-1)) shock could not.

  9. Interaction between common antibiotics and a Shewanella strain isolated from an enhanced biological phosphorus removal activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hang; Yang, Yongkui; Ge, Yanhui; Zhao, Lin; Long, Sha; Zhang, Ruochun

    2016-12-01

    With increasing production and consumption, more antibiotics are discharged into wastewater treatment plants and generally cannot be sufficiently removed. Because of the complexities of biological treatment processes, the fates of antibiotics and their effects on microorganisms, particularly those involved in the phosphorus removal system, are still unclear. Here, a Shewanella strain was isolated from an enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) system and was found to have the ability to remove phosphorus (P) and chemical oxygen demand (CODcr). Antibiotics affected the Shewanella strain through metabolism of the three main intracellular polymers, altering the ability of the strain to remove P and CODcr. These effects varied with the structure and concentration of the antibiotics. The Shewanella strain removed cefalexin and amoxicillin by degradation or adsorption, producing 2-hydroxy-3-phenyl pyrazine from cefalexin. This study enabled the recognition of the effect and removal of antibiotics during wastewater treatment.

  10. Method and device for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a groundwater system

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Brian B.; Rossabi, Joseph; Riha, Brian D.

    2002-01-01

    A device for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a groundwater system includes a generally cylindrical push-rod defining an internal recess therein. The push-rod includes first and second end portions and an external liquid collection surface. A liquid collection member is detachably connected to the push-rod at one of the first and second end portions thereof. The method of the present invention for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a contaminated groundwater system includes providing a lance including an external hydrophobic liquid collection surface, an internal recess, and a collection chamber at the bottom end thereof. The lance is extended into the groundwater system such that the top end thereof remains above the ground surface. The liquid is then allowed to collect on the liquid collection surface, and flow downwardly by gravity into the collection chamber to be pumped upwardly through the internal recess in the lance.

  11. Comparison of four aquatic plant treatment systems for nutrient removal from eutrophied water.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihua; Yang, Xiaoying; Wang, Zhengfang; Shan, Ying; Zheng, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Nutrient removal behaviors of four aquatic plant treatment systems (Oenanthe javanica, Iris pseudacorus L., Canna lily, and Potamogeton crispus) were systematically examined and compared. The kinetics of nutrient uptake were conducted with the standard depletion method. All four aquatic species exhibited a strong preference of ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) over nitrate nitrogen (NO3(-)-N) and nitrite nitrogen (NO2(-)-N). Main pathways of nutrient removal in the aquatic plant treatment system were examined in details. It was estimated that direct assimilation by plants accounted for 28.2-34.5% of N reduction and 25.2-33.4% of P reduction while substrate absorption accounted for 7.2-25.5% of N reduction and 7.3-25.0% of P reduction. The activity of urease and phosphatase in the substrates could indicate the aquatic plant treatment system's capability for reducing TN and soluble P load.

  12. Optimization of cryogenic and heat removal system of space borne magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musicki, Z.; Hilal, M. A.; McIntosh, G. E.

    Space-based superconducting magnets require a refrigerator system to maintain operating temperature at the design value. The magnets use helium gas cooled shields and multilayer insulation. Refrigerator power is determined based on the heat leak to the shields and to the magnet winding, as well as current leads and charging losses. Electric power is supplied by a power source such as an SP-100-type reactor or solar panels. Cryogenic and heat removal system masses included in the optimization are: the insulation and shields, the refrigerator, the power supply and the heat removal panel. The system is optimized to determine the optimum radiator temperature, superinsulation thickness, helium mass flow rate and helium inlet temperature to the shields.

  13. Final Report on NASA Portable Laser Coating Removal Systems Field Demonstrations and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothgeb, Matthew J; McLaughlin, Russell L.

    2008-01-01

    Processes currently used throughout the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to remove corrosion and coatings from structures, ground service equipment, small parts and flight components result in waste streams consisting of toxic chemicals, spent media blast materials, and waste water. When chemicals are used in these processes they are typically high in volatile organic compounds (VOC) and are considered hazardous air pollutants (HAP). When blast media is used, the volume of hazardous waste generated is increased significantly. Many of the coatings historically used within NASA contain toxic metals such as hexavalent chromium, and lead. These materials are highly regulated and restrictions on worker exposure continue to increase. Most recently the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reduced the permissible exposure limit (PEL) for hexavalent chromium (CrVI) from 52 to 5 micrograms per cubic meter of air as an 8-hour time-weighted average. Hexavalent chromium is found in numerous pretreatment and primer coatings used within the Space Shuttle Program. In response to the need to continue to protect assets within the agency and the growing concern over these new regulations, NASA is researching different ways to continue the required maintenance of both facility and flight equipment in a safe, efficient, and environmentally preferable manner. The use of laser energy to prepare surfaces for a variety of processes, such as corrosion and coating removal, weld preparation, and non destructive evaluation (NDE) is a relatively new application of the technology that has been proven to be environmentally preferable and in many cases less labor intensive than currently used removal methods. The novel process eliminates VOCs and blast media and captures the removed coatings with an integrated vacuum system. This means that the only waste generated are the coatings that are removed, resulting in an overall cleaner process. The development of a

  14. Intensified nitrogen and phosphorus removal in a novel electrolysis-integrated tidal flow constructed wetland system.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xinxin; Wu, Shubiao; Zhang, Yansheng; Dong, Renjie

    2014-08-01

    A novel electrolysis-integrated tidal flow constructed wetland (CW) system was developed in this study. The dynamics of intensified nitrogen and phosphorus removal and that of hydrogen sulphide control were evaluated. Ammonium removal of up to 80% was achieved with an inflow concentration of 60 mg/L in wetland systems with and without electrolysis integration. Effluent nitrate concentration decreased from 2 mg/L to less than 0.5 mg/L with the decrease in current intensity from 1.5 mA/cm(2) to 0.57 mA/cm(2) in the electrolysis-integrated wetland system, thus indicating that the current intensity of electrolysis plays an important role in nitrogen transformations. Phosphorus removal was significantly enhanced, exceeding 95% in the electrolysis-integrated CW system because of the in-situ formation of a ferric iron coagulant through the electro-dissolution of a sacrificial iron anode. Moreover, the electrolyzed wetland system effectively inhibits sulphide accumulation as a result of a sulphide precipitation coupled with ferrous-iron electro-dissolution and/or an inhibition of bacterial sulphate reduction under increased aerobic conditions.

  15. Ammonium Removal by the Oxygen-Limited Autotrophic Nitrification-Denitrification System

    PubMed Central

    Kuai, Linping; Verstraete, Willy

    1998-01-01

    The present lab-scale research reveals the potential of implementation of an oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification-denitrification (OLAND) system with normal nitrifying sludge as the biocatalyst for the removal of nitrogen from nitrogen-rich wastewater in one step. In a sequential batch reactor, synthetic wastewater containing 1 g of NH4+-N liter−1 and minerals was treated. Oxygen supply to the reactor was double-controlled with a pH controller and a timer. At a volumetric loading rate (Bv) of 0.13 g of NH4+-N liter−1 day−1, about 22% of the fed NH4+-N was converted to NO2−-N or NO3−-N, 38% remained as NH4+-N, and the other 40% was removed mainly as N2. The specific removal rate of nitrogen was on the order of 50 mg of N liter−1 day−1, corresponding to 16 mg of N g of volatile suspended solids−1 day−1. The microorganisms which catalyzed the OLAND process are assumed to be normal nitrifiers dominated by ammonium oxidizers. The loss of nitrogen in the OLAND system is presumed to occur via the oxidation of NH4+ to N2 with NO2− as the electron acceptor. Hydroxylamine stimulated the removal of NH4+ and NO2−. Hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) or an HAO-related enzyme might be responsible for the loss of nitrogen. PMID:9797314

  16. Assessing the feasibility of two hybrid MBR systems using PAC for removing macro and micropollutants.

    PubMed

    Alvarino, T; Torregrosa, N; Omil, F; Lema, J M; Suarez, S

    2016-03-24

    The removal of 10 organic micropollutants (OMPs) was studied in two MBRs using different types of membrane (flat sheet microfiltration, MF, and hollow fiber ultrafiltration, UF) operated under aerobic conditions with direct dosing of powdered activated carbon (PAC) in the mixed liquor. In both reactors high COD degradation and nitrification were achieved (>95%), while nitrate removal was only observed after PAC addition. The adsorbent improved the operation of both systems (sludge properties and microbial diversity) which resulted in an enhancement of the quality of the final effluent. The operation with both types of membrane was feasible being the UF system slightly better in terms of the quality of the final effluent. The strategy of 250 mg/L of PAC additions every 35 days was validated according to the results obtained for the removal of the most recalcitrant OMPs, such as diclofenac and carbamazepine. Concerning the type of membrane, only significant differences were observed for diclofenac and roxithromycin, which were better removed in the UF configuration. These differences were attributed to sorption and/or further biotransformation processes occurring in the cake layer.

  17. Efficient taste and odour removal by water treatment plants around the Han River water supply system.

    PubMed

    Ahn, H; Chae, S; Kim, S; Wang, C; Summers, R S

    2007-01-01

    Seven major water treatment plants in Seoul Metropolitan Area, which are under Korea Water Resources Corporation (KOWACO)'s management, take water from the Paldang Reservoir in the Han River System for drinking water supply. There are taste and odour (T&O) problems in the finished water because the conventional treatment processes do not efficiently remove the T&O compounds. This study evaluated T&O removal by ozonation, granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment, powder activated carbon (PAC) and an advanced oxidation process in a pilot-scale treatment plant and bench-scale laboratory experiments. During T&O episodes, PAC alone was not adequate, but as a pretreatment together with GAC it could be a useful option. The optimal range of ozone dose was 1 to 2 mg/L at a contact time of 10 min. However, with ozone alone it was difficult to meet the T&O target of 3 TON and 15 ng/L of MIB or geosmin. The GAC adsorption capacity for DOC in the three GAC systems (F/A, GAC and O3 + GAC) at an EBCT of 14 min is mostly exhausted after 9 months. However, substantial TON removal continued for more than 2 years (>90,000 bed volumes). GAC was found to be effective for T&O control and the main removal mechanisms were adsorption capacity and biodegradation.

  18. Removal of manganese from water using combined chelation/membrane separation systems.

    PubMed

    Han, S C; Choo, K H; Choi, S J; Benjamin, M M

    2005-01-01

    The addition of the chelating polymer polyacrylic acid (PAA) to assist in the removal of manganese from groundwater by membranes was investigated using membranes with different pore sizes under various operating conditions. Negligible manganese removal was achieved with the UF and NF membranes at acidic pH values, but removals exceeding 90% could be achieved at elevated pH (pH 9), presumably due to the formation of manganese hydroxides. Mn removal increased substantially when PAA was added to the feed solution, due to chelation of Mn by the PAA and rejection of the chelates by the membranes. The chelate could be broken at acidic pH, releasing free PAA that could then be separated from the Mn ions and reused. Smaller PAA molecules were lost in the first regeneration cycle, but negligible PAA was lost in subsequent cycles. In the systems with PAA, nitrate ions were rejected more efficiently than in the PAA-free systems, presumably because of electrical repulsion between nitrate ions and PAA sorbed on the membrane surface. With increasing PAA dose, the volumetric flux first decreased and then increased; the latter result was accompanied by a change in the physical-chemical form of the polymers, as indicated by an increase in turbidity.

  19. Removal of nitrogen by a layered soil infiltration system during intermittent storm events.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kang Woo; Song, Kyung Guen; Cho, Jin Woo; Kim, Tae Gyun; Ahn, Kyu Hong

    2009-07-01

    The fates of various nitrogen species were investigated in a layered biological infiltration system under an intermittently wetting regime. The layered system consisted of a mulch layer, coarse soil layer (CSL), and fine soil layer (FSL). The effects of soil texture were assessed focusing on the infiltration rate and the removal of inorganic nitrogen species. The infiltration rate drastically decreased when the uniformity coefficient was larger than four. The ammonium in the synthetic runoff was shown to be removed via adsorption during the stormwater dosing and nitrification during subsequent dry days. Stable ammonium adsorption was observed when the silt and clay content of CSL was greater than 3%. This study revealed that the nitrate leaching was caused by nitrification during dry days. Various patterns of nitrate flushing were observed depending on the soil configuration. The washout of nitrate was more severe as the silt/clay content of the CSL was greater. However, proper layering of soil proved to enhance the nitrate removal. Consequently, a strictly sandy CSL over FSL with a silt and clay content of 10% was the best configuration for the removal of ammonium and nitrate.

  20. BOA: Asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system. Phase I. Topical report, November 1993--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    Based on several key design criteria and site visits, we developed a Robot design and built a system which automatically strips the lagging and insulation from the pipes, and encapsulates them under complete vacuum operation. The system can operate on straight runs of piping in horizontal or vertical orientations. Currently we are limited to four-inch diameter piping without obstacles as well as a somewhat laborious emplacement and removal procedure. Experimental results indicated that the current robotic abatement process is sound yet needs to be further expanded and modified. One of the main discoveries was that a longitudinal cut to fully allow the paddles to dig in and compress the insulation off the pipe is essential. Furthermore, a different cutting method might be explored to alleviate the need for a deeper cut and to enable a combination of certain functions such as compression and cutting. Unfortunately due to a damaged mechanism caused by extensive testing, we were unable to perform vertical piping abatement experiments, but foresee no trouble in implementing them in the next proposed Phase. Other encouraging results have BOA removing asbestos at a rate of 4-5 ft./h compared to 3 ft./h for manual removal of asbestos with a 3-person crew. However, we feel confident that we can double the asbestos removal rate by improving cutting speed, and increasing the length of the BOA robot. The containment and vacuum system on BOA is able to achieve the regulatory requirement for airborne fiber emissions of 0.01 fibers/ccm/8-hr. shift. Currently, BOA weighs about 117 pounds which is more than a human is permitted to lift overhead under OSHA requirements (i.e., 25 pounds). We are considering designing the robot into two components (i.e., locomotor section and cutter/removal section) to aid human installation as well as incorporating composite materials. A more detailed list of all the technical modifications is given in this topical report.

  1. Nitrogen removal and nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria quantification in a stormwater bioretention system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaolu; Peltier, Edward; Sturm, Belinda S M; Young, C Bryan

    2013-03-15

    In this study, we examine the biological processes involved in ammonia and nitrate removal in a bioretention system characterized by low infiltration rates and long drainage times. The system removed 33% of influent nitrate and 56% of influent total nitrogen. While influent ammonia concentrations were low (<0.3 mg/L), the bioretention cell also removed ammonia produced within the treatment system. Soil cores collected from the bioretention cell were analyzed for total 16S rDNA and both nitrification and denitrification genes (amoA, nirS, nirK, norB, and nosZ) using quantitative PCR. Total bacterial 16S rDNA levels in the surface layer were similar to those in very sandy soils. Gene counts for both nitrification and denitrification genes decreased as a function of depth in the media, and corresponded to similar changes in total 16S rDNA. The abundance of denitrification genes was also positively correlated with the average inundation time at each sampling location, as determined by modeling of stormwater data from a three-year period. These results suggest that both nitrification and denitrification can occur in bioretention media. Time of saturation, filter medium, and organic carbon content can all affect the extent of denitrification in bioretention systems.

  2. GEOMETRY, HEAT REMOVAL AND KINETICS SCOPING MODELS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, B

    2007-11-16

    It is recognized that detailed models of proposed hydrogen storage systems are essential to gain insight into the complex processes occurring during the charging and discharging processes. Such insight is an invaluable asset for both assessing the viability of a particular system and/or for improving its design. The detailed models, however, require time to develop and run. Clearly, it is much more efficient to begin a modeling effort with a good system design and to progress from that point. To facilitate this approach, it is useful to have simplified models that can quickly estimate optimal loading and discharge kinetics, effective hydrogen capacities, system dimensions and heat removal requirements. Parameters obtained from these models can then be input to the detailed models to obtain an accurate assessment of system performance that includes more complete integration of the physical processes. This report describes three scoping models that assess preliminary system design prior to invoking a more detailed finite element analysis. The three models address the kinetics, the scaling and heat removal parameters of the system, respectively. The kinetics model is used to evaluate the effect of temperature and hydrogen pressure on the loading and discharge kinetics. As part of the kinetics calculations, the model also determines the mass of stored hydrogen per mass of hydride (in a particular reference form). As such, the model can determine the optimal loading and discharge rates for a particular hydride and the maximum achievable loading (over an infinite period of time). The kinetics model developed with the Mathcad{reg_sign} solver, runs in a mater of seconds and can quickly be used to identify the optimal temperature and pressure for either the loading or discharge processes. The geometry scoping model is used to calculate the size of the system, the optimal placement of heat transfer elements, and the gravimetric and volumetric capacities for a particular

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, REMOVAL OF ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: DELTA INDUSTRIAL SERVICES, INC., CAMPWATER PORTA-5 SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CampWater system uses ozonation followed by cartridge filtration to remove arsenic via co-precipitation. The system utilizes ozone to oxidize iron and arsenic (III) to arsenic (V). The arsenic bound to the iron precipitates is then removed by cartridge filtration. No additi...

  4. Final Report on Portable Laser Coating Removal Systems Field Demonstrations and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothgeb, Matthew J.; McLaughlin, Russell L.

    2008-01-01

    Processes currently used throughout the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to remove corrosion and coatings from structures, ground service equipment and small components results in waste streams consisting of toxic chemicals, spent media blast materials, and waste water. When chemicals are used in these processes they are typically high in volatile organic compounds (VOC) and are considered hazardous air pollutants (HAP). When blast media is used, the volume of hazardous waste generated is increased significantly. Many of the coatings historically used within NASA contain toxic metals such as hexavalent chromium, and lead. These materials are highly regulated and restrictions on worker exposure continue to increase. Most recently the EPA reduced the permissible exposure limit (PEL) for hexavalent chromium. The new standard lowers OSHA's PEL for hexavalent chromium from 52 to 5 micrograms of Cr(V1) per cubic meter of air as an 8-hour time-weighted average. Hexavalent chromium is found in the pretreatment and primer coatings used within the Shuttle Program. In response to the need to continue to protect assets within the agency and the growing concern over these new regulations, NASA is researching different ways to continue the required maintenance of both facility and flight equipment in a safe, efficient and environmentally preferable manner. The use of laser energy to remove prepare surfaces for a variety of processes, such as corrosion and coating removal, weld preparation and non destructive evaluation is a relatively new technology that has shown itself to be environmentally preferable and in many cases less labor intensive than currently used removal methods. The development of a Portable Laser Coating Removal System (PLCRS) started as the goal of a Joint Group on Pollution Prevention (JG-PP) project, led by the Air Force, where several types of lasers in several configurations were thoroughly evaluated. Following this project, NASA decided

  5. Cooling system for removing metabolic heat from an hermetically sealed spacesuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, B. W.; Vykukal, H. C.; Williams, B. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved cooling and ventilating system is described for removing metabolic heat, waste gases and water vapor generated by a wearer of an hermetically sealed spacesuit. The cooling system was characterized by a body suit, having a first circuit for simultaneously establishing a cooling flow of water through the thorax and head sections of the body suit. Circulation patches were included mounted in the thorax section and head section of the body suit. A second circuit for discharing a flow of gas throughout the spacesuit and a disconnect unit for coupling the circuits with a life support system externally related to the spacesuit were provided.

  6. Application of vascular aquatic plants for pollution removal, energy and food production in a biological system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, B. C.; Barlow, R. M.; Mcdonald, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Vascular aquatic plants such as water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes) (Mart.) Solms and alligator weeds (Alternanthera philoxeroides) (Mart.) Griesb., when utilized in a controlled biological system (including a regular program of harvesting to achieve maximum growth and pollution removal efficiency), may represent a remarkably efficient and inexpensive filtration and disposal system for toxic materials and sewage released into waters near urban and industrial areas. The harvested and processed plant materials are sources of energy, fertilizer, animal feed, and human food. Such a system has industrial, municipal, and agricultural applications.

  7. MBBR system performance improvement for petroleum hydrocarbon removal using modified media with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Sayyahzadeh, Amir Hossein; Ganjidoust, Hossein; Ayati, Bita

    2016-01-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) system has a successful operation in the treatment of different types of wastewater. Since the media, i.e. the place of growth and formation of biofilm, play the main role in the treatment in this system, MBBR systems were operated in the present research with modified Bee-cell media. Activated carbon granules of almond or walnut shells were placed in media pores to improve the treatment of refinery oil wastewater and their operation with MBBR system was compared with the conventional Bee-cell media. In these experiments, the effects of organic loading rate, hydraulic retention time (HRT), media filling ratio (MFR), and activated carbon concentration (ACC) used in the media were investigated on the operation of MBBR systems. The analysis of results estimated the optimal values of HRT, MFR, and ACC used in the media between the studied levels, being equal to 22 h, 50%, and 7.5 g/L, respectively. Under these conditions, total petroleum hydrocarbons removal efficiencies for MBBR systems using Bee-cell media with carbon of almond, carbon of walnut shells, and a carbon-free system were 95 ± 1.17%, 91 ± 1.11%, and 57 ± 1.7%, respectively, which confirms the adsorption ability of systems with the media containing activated carbon in the removal of petroleum compounds from wastewater.

  8. Simulation and applications of a novel modified SBR system for biological nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Timpany, P; Dawson, B

    2001-01-01

    Dynamic simulation and applications of a novel, continuous-fed, constant level modified sequencing batch reactor for biological nutrient removal are presented. The underlying mathematical model and practical applications of the simulation are discussed. Case studies are presented to illustrate the applications as well as the flexibility of the system in meeting different wastewater treatment requirements. Operation experience from full-scale wastewater treatment plant demonstrates the reliability, ease of operation and high efficiency of the system. Average BOD5, total nitrogen, total phosphorus and TSS removals of 97, 81, 88 and 94% are achieved respectively on an annual basis with little operator attention. Consistently high waste activated sludge concentrations are demonstrated, averaging approximately 20,000 mg/L.

  9. Anode shroud for off-gas capture and removal from electrolytic oxide reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, James L.; Barnes, Laurel A.; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G.; Williamson, Mark A.; Willit, James L.

    2014-07-08

    An electrolytic oxide reduction system according to a non-limiting embodiment of the present invention may include a plurality of anode assemblies and an anode shroud for each of the anode assemblies. The anode shroud may be used to dilute, cool, and/or remove off-gas from the electrolytic oxide reduction system. The anode shroud may include a body portion having a tapered upper section that includes an apex. The body portion may have an inner wall that defines an off-gas collection cavity. A chimney structure may extend from the apex of the upper section and be connected to the off-gas collection cavity of the body portion. The chimney structure may include an inner tube within an outer tube. Accordingly, a sweep gas/cooling gas may be supplied down the annular space between the inner and outer tubes, while the off-gas may be removed through an exit path defined by the inner tube.

  10. Occurrence and removal of microbial indicators from municipal wastewaters by nine different MBR systems.

    PubMed

    Hirani, Zakir M; Decarolis, James F; Lehman, Geno; Adham, Samer S; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2012-01-01

    Nine different membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems with different process configurations (submerged and external), membrane geometries (hollow-fiber, flat-sheet, and tubular), membrane materials (polyethersulfone (PES), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) and membrane nominal pore sizes (0.03-0.2 μm) were evaluated to assess the impact of influent microbial concentration, membrane pore size and membrane material and geometries on removal of microbial indicators by MBR technology. The log removal values (LRVs) for microbial indicators increased as the influent concentrations increased. Among the wide range of MBR systems evaluated, the total and fecal coliform bacteria and indigenous MS-2 coliphage were detected in 32, 9 and 15% of the samples, respectively; the 50th percentile LRVs were measured at 6.6, 5.9 and 4.5 logs, respectively. The nominal pore sizes of the membranes, membrane materials and geometries did not show a strong correlation with the LRVs.

  11. Nitrogen removal from the surface runoff of a field scale greenhouse vegetable production system.

    PubMed

    Min, Ju; Lu, Kouping; Zhao, Xu; Sun, Haijun; Zhang, Hailin; Shi, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient losses from greenhouse vegetable production systems may impair water quality in the Taihu Lake Region of China. We studied the characteristics of nitrogen (N) lost via runoff from greenhouse vegetable systems and strategies for minimizing N entering water bodies. A two-year experiment at a field scale was conducted to monitor N surface runoff. An eco-ditch (148 m(2)) and a low N input paddy field (135 kg N ha⁻¹, 550 m²) were designed to remove N from the surface runoff of a 25 × 50 m greenhouse vegetable field. The greenhouse was not covered from late June to mid-October each year, and runoff occurred multiple times during this period. Annual total N loss in runoff from the greenhouse vegetable site was 25.3 and 33.5 kg ha⁻¹ in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Nitrate-N was the major form of N lost in the runoff. The average runoff volume was 289 mm (varied from 221 to 357 mm), which contained 15.7 (varied from 3.3 to 39.2 mg L⁻¹) mg L⁻¹ total N. The eco-ditch system and the wetland paddy field (WPF) effectively reduced total N discharge; the removal rates reached 49.9% and 58.7% and the average removal capacities were 12.4 g N m⁻² and 4.1 g N m⁻² in 2010 and 2011, respectively. The combined system of the ecological ditch-WPF removed almost 79% total N in the runoff. Ecological ditch or paddy wetland can be a water management option available to growers in this region to economically reduce pollutants in agricultural runoff.

  12. A Residual Chlorine Removal Method to Allow Drinking Water Monitoring by Biological Early Warning Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-18

    Aquatic Biomonitor Diagram Page 6 Figure 3. Dechlorinator System Page 9 Figure 4. Sodium Bisulfite Response Data Page 12 Table 1. Size of Fish Used in... sodium bisulfite into chlorinated water containing 1.5 to 2.0 mg/L TRC was effective in removing TRC-related toxicity during a nine month evaluation of...Fredericksburg, VA. Because of 2.3 Dechlorinator Testing the low toxicity of sodium bisulfite and This section describes the procedures the high concentrations

  13. Tritium Removal System for Airtight Room in High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor (HANARO) - 12110

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, Sung Paal; Lee, Jung Hee; Kim, Hyung-Kyoo; Jung, Hoan Sung; Lee, Cheo Kyung; Yoo, Sun Kyun

    2012-07-01

    An Airtight room was installed to prevent the diffusion of tritium from the instrument room to other areas in HANARO. It was isolated by a robust structure and the inside was closed tightly. A Tritium removal system located outside the instrument room was connected to the airtight room to lower the tritium concentration when the workers enter the room for maintenance of the instruments. The tritium concentration and the dew point in the airtight room were continuously measured during the operation of the tritium removal system. The data were analyzed by using a model. There was a difference between the measured tritium concentration and the one obtained by the model. It is believed that the difference is due to the change of the generation rate of tritium which would increase as the dew point becomes lower. Based on this assumption, the previous equation was revised to better express the performance of the tritium removal system. It was re-estimated that the change of tritium concentration in an airtight room could be predicted well by using a model and equation proposed in the previous study. It was confirmed that there was a definite difference between the measured tritium concentration and the one obtained by equation from the model. It is believed that the difference is due to the change of the generation rate of tritium which would increase as the dew point becomes lower. Based on this assumption, the generation rate of tritium was controlled to have higher value and the change of tritium concentration in airtight room could be more correctly predicted. By using the revised equation, the tritium removal system would be operated more effectively. (authors)

  14. Low temperature biological phosphorus removal and partial nitrification in a pilot sequencing batch reactor system.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qiuyan; Oleszkiewicz, Jan A

    2011-01-01

    Partial nitrification and biological phosphorus removal appear to hold promise of a cost-effective and sustainable biological nutrient removal process. Pilot sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated under anaerobic/aerobic configuration for 8 months. It was found that biological phosphorus removal can be achieved in an SBR system, along with the partial nitrification process. Sufficient volatile fatty acids supply was the key for enhanced biological phosphorus removal. This experiment demonstrated that partial nitrification can be achieved even at low temperature with high dissolved oxygen (>3 mg/L) concentration. Shorter solid retention time (SRT) for nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) than for ammonia oxidizing bacteria due to the nitrite substrate limitation at the beginning of the aeration cycle was the reason that caused NOB wash-out. Controlling SRT should be the strategy for an SBR operated in cold climate to achieve partial nitrification. It was also found that the aerobic phosphorus accumulating organisms' P-uptake was more sensitive to nitrite inhibition than the process of anaerobic P-release.

  15. Impact of butyrate on microbial selection in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    PubMed

    Begum, Shamim A; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2014-01-01

    Microbial selection in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal system was investigated in a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor fed exclusively with butyrate as a carbon source. As reported in the few previous studies, butyrate uptake was slow and phosphorus (P) release occurred during the entire anaerobic period. Polyphosphate-accumulating organism (PAO), i.e. Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (named as Accumulibacter), glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs), i.e. Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis (named as Competibacter) and Defluviicoccus-related, tetrad-forming alphaproteobacteria (named as Defluviicoccus) were identified using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The results show that Accumulibacter and Defluviicoccus were selected in the butyrate-fed reactor, whereas Competibacter was not selected. P removal was efficient at the beginning of the experiment with an increasing percentage relative abundance (% RA) of PAOs. The % RA of Accumulibacter and Defluviicoccus increased from 13% to 50% and 8% to 16%, respectively, and the % RA of Competibacter decreased from 8% to 2% during the experiment. After 6 weeks, P removal deteriorated with the poor correlation between the percentage of P removal and % RA of GAOs.

  16. Impacts of carbon source addition on denitrification and phosphorus uptake in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    PubMed

    Begum, Shamim A; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2013-01-01

    In this study, simultaneous denitrification and phosphorus (P) removal were investigated in batch tests using nitrified mixed liquor and secondary wastewater influent from a full-scale treatment plant and different levels of acetate and propionate as supplemental carbon sources. Without supplemental carbon source, denitrification occurred at low rate and P release and P uptake was negatively affected (i.e., P removal of only 59.7%). When acetate and propionate were supplied, denitrification and P release occurred simultaneously under anoxic conditions. For acetate and propionate at a C/N stoichiometric ratio of 7.6, P release was negatively affected by denitrification. For acetate, the percent P removal and denitrification were very similar for C/N ratios of 22 (5X stoichiometric) and 59 (10X stoichiometric). For propionate, both percent P removal and denitrification deteriorated for C/N ratios of 22 (5X stoichiometric) and 45 (10X stoichiometric). It was observed that carbon source added in excess to stoichiometric ratio was consumed in the aerobic zone, but P was not taken up. This implies that PAO bacteria may utilize the excess carbon source in the aerobic zone rather than their polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) reserves, thereby promoting deterioration of the system.

  17. Assessment of full-scale biological nutrient removal systems upgraded with physico-chemical processes for the removal of emerging pollutants present in wastewaters from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Arriaga, Edson Baltazar; Cortés-Muñoz, Juana Enriqueta; González-Herrera, Arturo; Calderón-Mólgora, César Guillermo; de Lourdes Rivera-Huerta, Ma; Ramírez-Camperos, Esperanza; Montellano-Palacios, Leticia; Gelover-Santiago, Silvia Lucila; Pérez-Castrejón, Sara; Cardoso-Vigueros, Lina; Martín-Domínguez, Alejandra; García-Sánchez, Liliana

    2016-11-15

    Two full-scale biological nutrient removal systems upgraded with three physico-chemical processes (coagulation, chemical precipitation, and neutral Fenton) were evaluated in order to determine the removal of emerging pollutants (EPs) present in municipal wastewater from Mexico. Between 41 and 55 EPs were detected in the influents of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), including personal care products (PPCPs), antibiotics, analgesics, antiepileptics, antilipidemics, antihypertensives, antiseptics, stimulants, and hormones. Emerging pollutants were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.69ng/L to 94,600ng/L. High concentrations of emerging pollutants were found during dry season. WWTP 1, integrated by oxidation ditches and UV light lamps, showed removal efficiencies of EPs between 20% and 22%. On the other hand, WWTP 2 consisted of anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic tanks coupled with two disinfection processes; chlorine dioxide and UV light lamps, for which the removal of EPs was significant (up to 80%). The concentrations of emerging pollutants in WWTP 1 effluent was found within a rangeremovals, compared to those of WWTP 1, due to a greater activity of the simultaneous nitrification-denitrification processes, hydraulic retention time, and solids retention time. The compounds that were more persistent with removals below 50% in both effluents were: carbamazepine, dehydronifedipine, meprobamate, sertraline, propranolol, propoxyphene, norverapamil, diazepam, alprazolam, sulfamethoxazole, metoprolol, ofloxacin, norfloxacin, fluoxetine, erythromycin-H2O, diphenhydramine, dehydronifedipine, clarithromycin, hydrochlorothiazide, and albuterol. The application of neutral Fenton reaction as post-treatment for the two effluents from the WWTPs is promising for the removal of emerging pollutants (up to 100

  18. Nitrogen removal in a combined system: vertical vegetated bed over horizontal flow sand bed.

    PubMed

    Kantawanichkul, S; Neamkam, P; Shutes, R B

    2001-01-01

    Pig farm wastewater creates various problems in many areas throughout Thailand. Constructed wetland systems are an appropriate, low cost treatment option for tropical countries such as Thailand. In this study, a combined system (a vertical flow bed planted with Cyperus flabelliformis over a horizontal flow sand bed without plants) was used to treat settled pig farm wastewater. This system is suitable for using in farms where land is limited. The average COD and nitrogen loading rate of the vegetated vertical flow bed were 105 g/m2 x d and 11 g/m2 x d respectively. The wastewater was fed intermittently at intervals of 4 hours with a hydraulic loading rate of 3.7 cm/d. The recirculation of the effluent increased total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency from 71% to 85%. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) removal efficiencies were 95% and 98%. Nitrification was significant in vertical flow Cyperus bed, and the concentration of nitrate increased by a factor of 140. The horizontal flow sand bed enhanced COD removal and nitrate reduction was 60%. Plant uptake of nitrogen was 1.1 g N/m2 x d or dry biomass production was 2.8 kg/m2 over 100 days.

  19. System Analysis for Decay Heat Removal in Lead-Bismuth Cooled Natural Circulated Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Takaaki Sakai; Yasuhiro Enuma; Takashi Iwasaki; Kazuhiro Ohyama

    2002-07-01

    Decay heat removal analyses for lead-bismuth cooled natural circulation reactors are described in this paper. A combined multi-dimensional plant dynamics code (MSG-COPD) has been developed to conduct the system analysis for the natural circulation reactors. For the preliminary study, transient analysis has been performed for a 100 MWe lead-bismuth-cooled reactor designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). In addition, decay heat removal characteristics of a 400 MWe lead-bismuth-cooled natural circulation reactor designed by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has been evaluated by using MSG-COPD. PRACS (Primary Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System) is prepared for the JNC's concept to get sufficient heat removal capacity. During 2000 sec after the transient, the outlet temperature shows increasing tendency up to the maximum temperature of 430 Centigrade, because the buoyancy force in a primary circulation path is temporary reduced. However, the natural circulation is recovered by the PRACS system and the out let temperature decreases successfully. (authors)

  20. System Analysis for Decay Heat Removal in Lead-Bismuth-Cooled Natural-Circulation Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Takaaki; Enuma, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Takashi

    2004-03-15

    Decay heat removal analyses for lead-bismuth-cooled natural-circulation reactors are described in this paper. A combined multidimensional plant dynamics code (MSG-COPD) has been developed to conduct the system analysis for the natural-circulation reactors. For the preliminary study, transient analysis has been performed for a 300-MW(thermal) lead-bismuth-cooled reactor designed by Argonne National Laboratory. In addition, decay heat removal characteristics of a 400-MW(electric) lead-bismuth-cooled natural-circulation reactor designed by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has been evaluated by using MSG-COPD. The primary reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) is prepared for the JNC concept to get sufficient heat removal capacity. During 2000 s after the transient, the outlet temperature shows increasing tendency up to the maximum temperature of 430 deg. C because the buoyancy force in a primary circulation path is temporarily reduced. However, the natural circulation is recovered by the PRACS system, and the outlet temperature decreases successfully.

  1. Integration and optimization of the gas removal system for hybrid-cycle OTEC power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rabas, T.J.; Panchal, C.B.; Stevens, H.C. )

    1990-02-01

    A preliminary design of the noncondensible gas removal system for a 10 mWe, land-based hybrid-cycle OTEC power plant has been developed and is presented herein. This gas removal system is very different from that used for conventional power plants because of the substantially larger and continuous noncondensible gas flow rates and lower condenser pressure levels which predicate the need for higher-efficiency components. Previous OTEC studies discussed the need for multiple high-efficiency compressors with intercoolers; however, no previous design effort was devoted to the details of the intercoolers, integration and optimization of the intercoolers with the compressors, and the practical design constraints and feasibility issues of these components. The resulting gas removal system design uses centrifugal (radial) compressors with matrix-type crossflow aluminum heat exchangers as intercoolers. Once-through boiling of ammonia is used as the heat sink for the cooling and condensing of the steam-gas mixture. A computerized calculation method was developed for the performance analysis and subsystem optimization. For a specific number of compressor units and the stream arrangement, the method is used to calculate the dimensions, speeds, power requirements, and costs of all the components.

  2. Microbial selection on enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems fed exclusively with glucose.

    PubMed

    Begum, Shamim A; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2012-05-01

    The microbial selection on an enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) system was investigated in a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor fed exclusively with glucose as the carbon source. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization analysis was performed to target two polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) (i.e., Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis and Microlunatus phosphovorus) and two glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) (i.e., Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis and Micropruina glycogenica). The results show that glucose might not select for Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis. However, Microlunatus phosphovorus, Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis, and Micropruina glycogenica might be selected. The highest percent relative abundance (% RA) of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis was about 42%; this occurred at the beginning of the experimental period when phosphorus removal was efficient. However, the % RA of these bacteria decreased, reaching below 4% at the end of the run. The maximum % RA of Microlunatus phosphovorus, Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis, and Micropruina glycogenica was about 21, 37, 17%, respectively. It appears that a higher glucose concentration might be detrimental for Microlunatus phosphovorus and Micropruina glycogenica. Results also indicate a dominance of GAOs over PAOs when EBPR systems are fed with glucose. It is possible that the GAOs outcompete the PAOs at low pH values; it has been reported that at low pH, GAOs use glycogen as the energy source to uptake glucose. As a result, P-removal deteriorated. Therefore, glucose is not a strong candidate as a carbon source to supplement EBPR systems that do not contain sufficient volatile fatty acids.

  3. Acid gas treating by aqueous alkanolamines. Annual report, January-December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sandall, O.C.; Rinker, E.B.; Ashour, S.

    1994-12-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the simulateneous absorption or desorption of CO2 and H2S into and from a mixed aqueous amine solvent consisting of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and diethanolamine (DEA). In work completed this year the authors have measured the density, viscosity and surface tension of pure MDEA and DEA over a range in temperatures. The diffusivity of N2O was measured in aqueous blends of MDEA and DEA at 50 wt% total amine for various ratios of DEA to MDEA over the temperature range 20 to 80 deg. C. A theoretically-based model has been developed for the correlation of the physical solubility of N2O in aqueous amine solutions. A penetration theory type model which was developed to describe acid gas absorption in aqueous amine solutions was used to carry out a sensitivity analysis for the various parameters affecting the rate of absorption of CO2 in MDEA solutions.

  4. Comorbid depression/anxiety and teeth removed: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2010

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, RC; Wiener, MA; McNeil, DW

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the association between participants 1) who reported having had clinical diagnoses of depression and anxiety with 6+ teeth removed and 2) who reported having had clinical diagnoses of depression and anxiety with edentulism. Methods The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Survey 2010 was used for the study. Analyses involved using SAS 9.3 to determine variable frequencies, Rao–Scott chi-square bivariate analyses, and Proc Surveylogistic for the logistic regressions on complex survey designs. Participants eligibility included being 18 years or older and having complete data on depression, anxiety, and number of teeth removed. Results There were 76 292 eligible participants; 13.4% reported an anxiety diagnosis, 16.7% reported a depression diagnosis, and 8.6% reported comorbid depression and anxiety. The adjusted logistic regression models were significant for anxiety and depression alone and in combination for 6+ teeth removed (AOR: anxiety 1.23; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.38; P = 0.0773; AOR: depression 1.23; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.37; P = 0.0275; P < 0.0001; and AOR: comorbid depression and anxiety 1.30; 95% CI: 1.14, 1.49; P = 0.0001). However, the adjusted models with edentulism as the outcome failed to reach significance. Conclusions Comorbid depression and anxiety are associated independently with 6+ teeth removed compared with 0–5 teeth removed in a national study conducted in United States. Comorbid depression and anxiety were not shown to be associated with edentulism as compared with any teeth present. PMID:25970143

  5. High-efficiency SO{sub 2} removal in utility FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.L.; Gray, S.; Dekraker, D.

    1995-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have contracted with Radian Corporation to conduct full-scale testing, process modeling, and economic evaluations of six existing utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project objective is to evaluate low capital cost upgrades for achieving up to 98% sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal efficiency in a variety of FGD system types. The systems include dual-loop, packed absorbers at Tampa Electric Company`s Big Bend Station; cocurrent, packed absorbers at Hoosier Energy`s Merom Station; dual-loop absorbers with perforated-plate trays at Southwestern Electric Power Company`s Pirkey Station; horizontal spray absorbers at PSI Energy`s Gibson Station; venturi scrubbers at Duquesne Light`s Elrama Station; and open stray absorbers at New york State Electric and Gas Corporations`s (NYSEG`s) Kintigh Station. All operate in an inhibited-oxidation mode except the system at Big Bend (forced oxidation), and all use limestone reagent except the Elrama system (Mg-lime). The program was conducted to demonstrate that upgrades such as performance additives and/or mechanical modifications can increase system SO{sub 2} removal at low cost. The cost effectiveness of each upgrade has been evaluated on the basis of test results and/or process model predictions for upgraded performance and utility-specific operating and maintenance costs. Results from this upgraded performance and utility-specific operating and maintenance costs. Results from this program may lead some utilities to use SO{sub 2} removal upgrades as an approach for compliance with phase 2 of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. This paper summarizes the results of testing, modeling, and economic evaluations that have been completed since July, 1994.

  6. Arsenic removal via ZVI in a hybrid spouted vessel/fixed bed filter system

    PubMed Central

    Calo, Joseph M.; Madhavan, Lakshmi; Kirchner, Johannes; Bain, Euan J.

    2012-01-01

    The description and operation of a novel, hybrid spouted vessel/fixed bed filter system for the removal of arsenic from water are presented. The system utilizes zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles circulating in a spouted vessel that continuously generates active colloidal iron corrosion products via the “self-polishing” action between ZVI source particles rolling in the moving bed that forms on the conical bottom of the spouted vessel. This action also serves as a “surface renewal” mechanism for the particles that provides for maximum utilization of the ZVI material. (Results of batch experiments conducted to examine this mechanism are also presented.) The colloidal material produced in this fashion is continuously captured and concentrated in a fixed bed filter located within the spouted vessel reservoir wherein arsenic complexation occurs. It is demonstrated that this system is very effective for arsenic removal in the microgram per liter arsenic concentration (i.e., drinking water treatment) range, reducing 100 μg/L of arsenic to below detectable levels (≪10 μg/L) in less than an hour. A mechanistic analysis of arsenic behavior in the system is presented, identifying the principal components of the population of active colloidal material for arsenic removal that explains the experimental observations and working principles of the system. It is concluded that the apparent kinetic behavior of arsenic in systems where colloidal (i.e., micro/nano) iron corrosion products are dominant can be complex and may not be explained by simple first or zeroth order kinetics. PMID:22539917

  7. Enhanced removal of organic matter and ammoniacal-nitrogen in a column experiment of tidal flow constructed wetland system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guangzhi; Zhao, Yaqian; Allen, Stephen

    2005-01-26

    A tidal flow constructed wetland system was investigated for the removal of organic matter and ammoniacal-nitrogen from diluted piggery wastewater. The results demonstrated that the operation of tidal flow enhanced the transfer of oxygen into wetland matrices. The supply of oxygen by the operation (473 gO2/m2d) matched the demand for wastewater treatment. The overall oxygen consumption rate in the system was considerably higher than the typical rate obtainable in conventional wetlands; most oxygen being used for the decomposition of organic matter. Compared with conventional systems, the tidal flow system demonstrated greater efficiency in the removal of organic matter. Significant nitrification did not take place, although 27-48% ammonia was removed from the wastewater. Immobilization by microbial cells and adsorption were the likely routes to remove ammonia under the specific experiment conditions. Percentage removals of BOD5, NH4-N and SS increased after effluent recirculation at a ratio of 1:1 was employed.

  8. A portable system for acquiring and removing motion artefact from ECG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, A.; Das, A.; Fernandes, B.; Gaydecki, P.

    2007-07-01

    A novel electrocardiograph (ECG) signal acquisition and display system is under development. It is designed for patients ranging from the elderly to athletes. The signals are obtained from electrodes integrated into a vest, amplified, digitally processed and transmitted via Bluetooth to a PC with a Labview ® interface. Digital signal processing is performed to remove movement artefact and electromyographic (EMG) noise, which severely distorts signal morphology and complicates clinical diagnosis. Independent component analysis (ICA) is also used to improve the signal quality. The complete system will integrate the electronics into a single module which will be embedded in the vest.

  9. SULFUR REMOVAL FROM PIPE LINE NATURAL GAS FUEL: APPLICATION TO FUEL CELL POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    King, David L.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2003-11-21

    Pipeline natural gas is being considered as the fuel of choice for utilization in fuel cell-based distributed generation systems because of its abundant supply and the existing supply infrastructure (1). For effective utilization in fuel cells, pipeline gas requires efficient removal of sulfur impurities (naturally occurring sulfur compounds or sulfur bearing odorants) to prevent the electrical performance degradation of the fuel cell system. Sulfur odorants such as thiols and sulfides are added to pipeline natural gas and to LPG to ensure safe handling during transportation and utilization. The odorants allow the detection of minute gas line leaks, thereby minimizing the potential for explosions or fires.

  10. Application of the selective equipment removal system to D&D tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Noakes, M.W.; Hamel, W.R.; Dixon, W.E.

    1995-02-01

    The Selective Equipment Removal System has been designed as a generic and reconfigurable remote manipulation platform to demonstrate and evaluate mobile telerobotic concepts suitable for performing selective decontamination and dismantlement functions. Both radioactive and hazardous chemical environments dictate that human presence should be minimized in many of these activities. In addition, robotic deployment of large and heavy tools should improve safety of operation by limiting human proximity to tooling. Monotonous, repetitive, and high precision activities should also benefit by robotic completion. This paper discusses the development of the Selective Equipment Retrieval System and its remote manipulation platform, the Dual Arm Work Module, applicable tooling, and application to various decontamination and dismantlement tasks.

  11. Experimental evaluation of a breadboard heat and product-water removal system for a space-power fuel cell designed with static water removal and evaporative cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.; Prokipius, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    A test program was conducted to evaluate the design of a heat and product-water removal system to be used with fuel cell having static water removal and evaporative cooling. The program, which was conducted on a breadboard version of the system, provided a general assessment of the design in terms of operational integrity and transient stability. This assessment showed that, on the whole, the concept appears to be inherently sound but that in refining this design, several facets will require additional study. These involve interactions between pressure regulators in the pumping loop that occur when they are not correctly matched and the question of whether an ejector is necessary in the system.

  12. Passive removal of silicone oil through 23 gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy system

    PubMed Central

    Siyal, Nisar Ahmed; Hargun, Lakhani Das; Wahab, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the outcomes of passive removal of silicone oil by 23 Gauge Transconjunctival Sutureless Vitrectomy System. Methods: This prospective, consecutive case series study was conducted at Ophthalmology Department Unit I, Dow University of Health Sciences, Civil Hospital Karachi from January 2011 to December 2014. Only psuedophakic eyes with silicone oil temponade were selected. Main outcome measures were intra ocular pressure, time taken for removal of silicone oil, per operative and post operative complications. Pre and post operative IOP was compared by using two-tailed paired t-test and mean values with standard deviation were computed using difference of 95% confidence interval. Chi square test was applied for correlation of different variables. P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Out of 79 patients who underwent passive ROSO, 38 (48.1%) were males. Mean age of patients was 47.5±7.1 (sd) years. Mean time taken for passive ROSO was 7.31±2.41 (sd) minutes. Pre and post operative intra ocular pressure shows statistically significant (p=0.000) decrease in IOP. Retinal redetachment found in 13 (16.5%) cases during follow up period. Conclusion: Passive removal of silicone oil with 23 G suture less vitrectomy system is safe and effective in terms of less per operative and post operative complications. In this simple technique, there is less tissue trauma and little time consumed so it provides more comfort to patients and surgeons as well. PMID:27375708

  13. Effectiveness of different oxidizing agents for removing sodium dodecylbenzenesulphonate in aqueous systems.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Díaz, J D; Sánchez-Polo, M; Rivera-Utrilla, J; Bautista-Toledo, M I

    2009-04-01

    The present study investigates the efficacy of various oxidizing treatments (ClO(-), ClO(2), KMnO(4), O(3), O(3)/H(2)O(2), O(3)/activated carbon) to remove from waters sodium dodecylbenzenesulphonate (SDBS), considered as model surfactant. Results obtained show that the use of ClO(-) and ClO(2) does not cause appreciable SDBS degradation. Additionally, in the case of ClO(-), trihalomethanes are generated, increasing system toxicity. Because the reaction kinetics between SDBS and KMnO(4) is very slow, a decrease in contaminant concentration is not observed, even at very acid pH values. SDBS reactivity with ozone is very low, with a kinetic constant (k(O)(3)) of 3.68 M(-1)s(-1), but its reactivity with HO() radicals is very high (k(OH)=1.16 x 10(10)M(-1)s(-1)), therefore O(3)/H(2)O(2) and O(3)/activated carbon, which can also generate HO(), appear as promising advanced oxidation processes to remove this contaminant from waters. The method based on ozone and activated carbon was the only process studied that produced both an increase in SDBS removal rate (due to the generation of HO() radicals in the O(3)-PAC or O(3)-GAC interaction) and a considerable reduction in the concentration of dissolved organic carbon in the system due to the PAC adsorbent properties.

  14. Submerged membrane adsorption hybrid system using four adsorbents to remove nitrate from water.

    PubMed

    Kalaruban, Mahatheva; Loganathan, Paripurnanda; Kandasamy, Jaya; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu

    2017-04-05

    Nitrate contamination of ground and surface waters causes environmental pollution and human health problems in many parts of the world. This study tests the nitrate removal efficiencies of two ion exchange resins (Dowex 21K XLT and iron-modified Dowex 21K XLT (Dowex-Fe)) and two chemically modified bio-adsorbents (amine-grafted corn cob (AG corn cob) and amine-grafted coconut copra (AG coconut copra)) using a dynamic adsorption treatment system. A submerged membrane (microfiltration) adsorption hybrid system (SMAHS) was used for the continuous removal of nitrate with a minimal amount of adsorbents. The efficiency of membrane filtration flux and replacement rate of adsorbent were studied to determine suitable operating conditions to maintain the effluent nitrate concentration below the WHO drinking standard limit of 11.3 mg N/L. The volume of water treated and the amount of nitrate adsorbed per gramme of adsorbent for all four flux tested were in the order Dowex-Fe > Dowex > AG coconut copra > AG corn cob. The volumes of water treated (L/g adsorbent) were 0.91 and 1.85, and the amount of nitrate removed (mg N/g adsorbent) were 9.8 and 22.2 for AG corn cob and Dowex-Fe, respectively, at a flux of 15 L/(m(2)/h).

  15. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Jankura, B. J.; Kudlac, G. A.; Bailey, R. T.

    1998-06-01

    The Integrated Flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) system is a new concept whereby a Teflon ® covered condensing heat exchanger is adapted to remove certain flue gas constituents, both particulate and gaseous, while recovering low level heat. The pollutant removal performance and durability of this device is the subject of a USDOE sponsored program to develop this technology. The program was conducted under contract to the United States Department of Energy's Fossil Energy Technology Center (DOE-FETC) and was supported by the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) within the Ohio Department of Development, the Electric Power Research Institute's Environmental Control Technology Center (EPRI-ECTC) and Babcock and Wilcox - a McDermott Company (B&W). This report covers the results of the first phase of this program. This Phase I project has been a two year effort. Phase I includes two experimental tasks. One task dealt principally with the pollutant removal capabilities of the IFGT at a scale of about 1.2MWt. The other task studied the durability of the Teflon ® covering to withstand the rigors of abrasive wear by fly ash emitted as a result of coal combustion. The pollutant removal characteristics of the IFGT system were measured over a wide range of operating conditions. The coals tested included high, medium and low-sulfur coals. The flue gas pollutants studied included ammonia, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, particulate, sulfur dioxide, gas phase and particle phase mercury and gas phase and particle phase trace elements. The particulate removal efficiency and size distribution was investigated. These test results demonstrated that the IFGT system is an effective device for both acid gas absorption and fine particulate collection. Although soda ash was shown to be the most effective reagent for acid gas absorption, comparative cost analyses suggested that magnesium enhanced lime was the most promising avenue for future study. The durability of the Teflon

  16. A comparison of the accuracy of two removable die systems with intact working casts.

    PubMed

    Aramouni, P; Millstein, P

    1993-01-01

    This study evaluated the reproducibility of die position using two removable die systems and two die stones. Poly(vinyl siloxane) impressions were made of a stainless steel, U-shaped arch with four evenly spaced abutments. Six groups were evaluated: Zeiser system/Fuji Rock; Zeiser system/Die Keen; solid cast/Fuji Rock; solid cast/Die Keen; Fuji Rock/Pindex; and Die Keen/Pindex. An optical comparator was used to measure the height of each abutment, the distance between the anterior abutments, and the distance between the posterior abutments. The Zeiser system with either Fuji Rock or Die Keen yielded the greatest accuracy. Die Keen exhibited more linear expansion than Fuji Rock, and solid casts had less distortion than the Pindex system.

  17. Dynamics analysis and GNC design of flexible systems for space debris active removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuto, Riccardo; Salvi, Samuele; Lavagna, Michèle

    2015-05-01

    Active debris removal is one of current hot spots in space research, necessary for space exploitation durability. Different techniques have been proposed for this challenging task, among them the use of throw-nets and tow-tethers seems promising: that opens new challenges for Guidance Navigation and Control (GNC) design, especially whenever flexible connections are involved. Via numerical simulations using a multi-body dynamics simulation tool developed at Politecnico di Milano - Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, this paper shows that tethered-net systems are a promising technology to capture and remove space debris and discusses the main difficulties that are likely to take place during capture and disposal phases, particularly from a GNC point of view.

  18. Disposable and removable nucleic acid extraction and purification cartridges for automated flow-through systems

    DOEpatents

    Regan, John Frederick

    2014-09-09

    Removable cartridges are used on automated flow-through systems for the purpose of extracting and purifying genetic material from complex matrices. Different types of cartridges are paired with specific automated protocols to concentrate, extract, and purifying pathogenic or human genetic material. Their flow-through nature allows large quantities sample to be processed. Matrices may be filtered using size exclusion and/or affinity filters to concentrate the pathogen of interest. Lysed material is ultimately passed through a filter to remove the insoluble material before the soluble genetic material is delivered past a silica-like membrane that binds the genetic material, where it is washed, dried, and eluted. Cartridges are inserted into the housing areas of flow-through automated instruments, which are equipped with sensors to ensure proper placement and usage of the cartridges. Properly inserted cartridges create fluid- and air-tight seals with the flow lines of an automated instrument.

  19. How can liver toxins be removed? Filtration and adsorption with the Prometheus system.

    PubMed

    Vienken, Joerg; Christmann, Horst

    2006-04-01

    The application of extracorporeal blood circuits in liver failure therapy has its roots in the two functions of the liver, first as a detoxifying and second as a synthetizing organ. In contrast to hydrophilic uremic toxins, most liver toxins are hydrophobic and bind preferentially to blood proteins. Consequently, the majority of these compounds cannot be removed by hemodialysis or similar dialytic procedures. Current systems use albumin as a transport vehicle for hydrophobic compounds across high flux membranes (e.g. albumin-dialysis, molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS)). In contrast to these devices, the Prometheus system (Fresenius Medical Care, Bad Homburg, Germany) applies filtration across highly permeable membranes with a molecular weight cut-off of >300.000. These membranes facilitate a direct filtration of most of the toxin-bearing proteins. In a secondary circuit these toxins are then removed by adsorber beads assembled in specially designed cartridges. The protein-containing toxin-free solution returns to the primary circuit. Clinical testing of the Prometheus system's safety and efficacy parameters showed that cell counts and coagulation factors were not significantly affected. Total bilirubin-, bile acid- and plasma ammonia-levels were reduced in vivo by -21%, -43% and -40%, respectively. First successful therapeutic results have been obtained for patients treated for drug abuse and for patients waiting for transplantation. Thus, a combination of plasma fractionation with highly permeable membranes followed by a secondary circuit with adsorber cartridges proves to be the most effective method of removing toxic waste in liver failure. Further investigations will follow in order to extend the application of the Prometheus system to larger cohorts of patients.

  20. Integrated photo-bioelectrochemical system for contaminants removal and bioenergy production.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li; Young, Erica B; Berges, John A; He, Zhen

    2012-10-16

    An integrated photobioelectrochemical (IPB) system was developed by installing a microbial fuel cell (MFC) inside an algal bioreactor. This system achieves the simultaneous removal from a synthetic solution of organics (in the MFC) and nutrients (in the algal bioreactor), and the production of bioenergy in electricity and algal biomass through bioelectrochemical and microbiological processes. During the one-year operation, the IPB system removed more than 92% of chemical oxygen demand, 98% of ammonium nitrogen, and 82% of phosphate and produced a maximum power density of 2.2 W/m(3) and 128 mg/L of algal biomass. The algal growth provided dissolved oxygen to the cathode reaction of the MFC, whereas electrochemical oxygen reduction on the MFC cathode buffered the pH of the algal growth medium (which was also the catholyte). The system performance was affected by illumination and dissolved oxygen. Initial energy analysis showed that the IPB system could theoretically produce enough energy to cover its consumption; however, further improvement of electricity production is desired. An analysis of the attached and suspended microbes in the cathode revealed diverse bacterial taxa typical of aquatic and soil bacterial communities with functional roles in contaminant degradation and nutrient cycling.

  1. Portable life support system regenerative carbon dioxide and water vapor removal by metal oxide absorbents preprototype hardware development and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Joan M.; Borghese, Joseph B.; Chang, Craig H.; Cusick, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Johnson has acquired a preprototype/full-scale metal oxide CO2 and humidity remover (MOCHR), together with its regeneration module. Tests conducted prior to delivery by the MOCHR's manufacturer have demonstrated the concurrent removal of H2O and CO2 at rates, and under conditions, that are applicable to EVA Portable Life Support Systems.

  2. Comparison of hydraulics and particle removal efficiencies in a mixed cell raceway and burrows pond rearing system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We compared the hydrodynamics of replicate experimental mixed cell and replicate standard Burrows pond rearing systems at the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, ID, in an effort to identify methods for improved solids removal. We measured and compared the hydraulic residence time, particle removal eff...

  3. Small Community and Household Water Systems Research on Removal of Metals and Pesticides from Drinking Water Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation entitled “Small Community and Household Water Systems Research on Removal of Metals and Pesticides from Drinking Water Sources” provides treatment alternatives for removal of metals and pesticides from surface and ground waters before human consumption. The pres...

  4. A three-stage system to remove mercury and dioxins in flue gases.

    PubMed

    Hylander, Lars D; Sollenberg, Hans; Westas, Håkan

    2003-03-20

    Mercury (Hg) from combustion of fossil fuels and waste is the dominant source of anthropogenic Hg emissions, globally amounting to more than 1500 t Hgyear(-1). These emissions must decrease substantially in order to counteract increasing environmental levels of Hg and reduce future toxic effects. Uppsala Energi AB, nowadays (May, 2002) Vattenfall Värme Uppsala AB, an energy company in Uppsala, Sweden, has invested in equipments for air and water pollution control of their three waste fired steam boilers. The flue gases are cleaned in three stages in series to meet the strict Swedish regulation. Electrostatic precipitators remove most dust in the first stage, wet scrubbers remove most water-soluble gases, and in the last stage a Filsorption unit removes most remaining impurities in particulate as well as gaseous form. The Filsorption process includes additives injection, sorption, and chemical reaction in a reactor and filtration with a fabric filter. The aim with this article is to evaluate the efficiency of the system to recover Hg in flue gases from boilers in routine operation. Flue gases, ashes, and water were sampled yearly for 21 years and analysed for Hg, dioxin, and other potential contaminants received at waste incineration. The results clearly demonstrate the decreasing use of Hg in society the last two decades as influenced by governmental policy regarding Hg. The results also indicate that the equipment efficiently removed Hg and dioxins from the flue gases to a final concentration of approximately 3.5 microg Hgm(-3) n and 0.01 ng dioxinsm(-3) n, corresponding to more than 97 and 99.9% reduction of Hg and dioxins, respectively, by cleaning in three stages. The electrostatic precipitators and Filsorption stages alone, with the scrubber in bypass, removed 90% of Hg in flue gases. Using the scrubber is motivated to remove acid components and additional Hg, but call for water separated after the condensers to be neutralised and cleaned, so that less than 5

  5. A robot system for evaluating plaque removal efficiency of toothbrushes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ernst, C P; Willershausen, B; Driesen, G; Warren, P R; Hilfinger, P

    1997-07-01

    A robot system simulating three-dimensional brushing motions as a function of time has been developed. In association with a typodont and either artificial plaque or chromogenic stain, the robot system can be used to assess the plaque removal efficiency or the cleaning effectiveness of toothbrushes. In particular, the influence of different brush head designs of powered toothbrushes was examined. The study compared the plaque removal efficiency of a cup-shaped brush head (Braun Oral-B EB 5) and a modified brush head (Braun Oral-B EB 9) that incorporates longer filaments on the outer ring, designed for additional interdental penetration. A specially designed artificial plaque was applied to the plastic teeth of typodonts. Artificial teeth were cleaned by the robot system for a 2-minute period with a wet brush head without a dentifrice. The remaining plaque was assessed visually by two independent examiners, with a modification of the global Plaque Index. In comparison to the EB 5, the new brush head significantly reduced artificial plaque overall. In vitro data demonstrated the ability of the robot system to reveal reproducible significant differences of the cleaning effectiveness of powered toothbrushes.

  6. Dust Removal Technolgy for a Mars In Situ Resource Utilization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, C. I.; Johansen, M. R.; Williams, B. S.; Hogue, M. D.; Mackey, P. J.; Clements, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Several In Situ Resource Utilization (lSRU) systems being considered to enable future manned exploration of Mars require capture of Martian atmospheric gas to extract oxygen and other commodities. However, the Martian atmosphere contains relatively large amounts of dust which must be removed in tbe collection systems of the ISRU chambers. The amount of atmospheric dust varies largely with the presence of daily dust devils and the less frequent but much more powerful global dust storms. A common and mature dust removal technology for terrestrial systems is the electrostatic precipitator. With this technology, dust particles being captured are imparted an electrostatic charge by means of a corona discharge. Charged dust particles are then driven to a region of high electric field which forces the particles onto a collector for capture. Several difficulties appear when this technology is adapted to the Martian atmospheric environment At the low atmospheric pressure of Mars, electrical breakdown occurs at much lower voltages than on Earth and corona discharge is difficult to sustain. In this paper, we report on our efforts to obtain a steady corona/glow discharge in a simulated Martian atmosphere of carbon dioxide at 9 millibars of pressure. We also present results on the design of a dust capture system under these atmospheric conditions.

  7. Could nitrite/free nitrous acid favour GAOs over PAOs in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems?

    PubMed

    Pijuan, M; Ye, L; Yuan, Z

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) normally occurs together with nitrogen removal in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In recent years, efforts have been devoted to remove nitrogen via the nitrite pathway (oxidation of ammonia to nitrite and reduction of nitrite to nitrogen gas without going through nitrate), reducing the requirement for carbon and oxygen in the plant. However nitrite and free nitrous acid (FNA), the protonated species of nitrite, have been shown to cause EBPR deterioration under certain concentrations. This study provides a direct comparison between the different levels of FNA inhibition in the aerobic processes of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) by reviewing the studies published in this area. Also, new data is presented assessing the FNA effect on the anaerobic metabolism of these two groups of bacteria. Overall, FNA has shown inhibitory effects on most of the processes involved in the metabolism of PAOs and GAOs. However, the inhibition-initiation levels are different between different processes and, even more importantly between the two groups. In general, PAOs appear to be more affected than GAOs at the same level of FNA, thus giving GAOs competitive advantage over PAOs in EBPR systems when nitrite is present.

  8. Effect of COD/N ratio on removal performances in two subsurface wastewater infiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Fei Jing Pan Deli Tong Linli Huang Long Yu Yafei Sun Shiyue Qi Yaoyao Huang, Hexin

    2017-01-24

    Dissolved oxygen (DO), removal of COD, TP and nitrogen in subsurface wastewater infiltration systems (SWISs)with/without intermittent aeration under different influent COD/N ratios were investigated. Aerobic conditions were effectively developed in 50 cm depth of the matrix and anoxic or anaerobic conditions were not changed in 80 and 110 cm depth by intermittent aeration, which encouraged nitrification. Increased influent COD/N ratio led to lower COD and nitrogen removal in conventional SWISs. Sufficient carbon source in high COD/N ratio influent promoted denitrification with intermittent aeration. High removal rates of COD (95.68±0.21%), TP (92.02±0.28%), NH4+-N (99.33±0.05%) and TN (89.65±0.6%) were obtained with influent COD/N ratio of 12 in aerated SWISs. Under the COD/N ratio of 12 and 18, intermittent aeration boosted the growth and reproduction of nitrifying bacteria and denitrifying bacteria. Meanwhile, nitrate and nitrite reductase activities with intermittent aeration were higher than that without aeration in 80 and 110 cm depth.

  9. Removal of heavy metals from fly ash leachate using combined bioelectrochemical systems and electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hu-Chun; Lei, Tao; Shi, Gang; Sun, Xiao-Nan; Wei, Xue-Yan; Zhang, Li-Juan; Wu, Wei-Min

    2014-01-15

    Based on environmental and energetic analysis, a novel combined approach using bioelectrochemical systems (BES) followed by electrolysis reactors (ER) was tested for heavy metals removal from fly ash leachate, which contained high detectable levels of Zn, Pb and Cu according to X-ray diffraction analysis. Acetic acid was used as the fly ash leaching agent and tested under various leaching conditions. A favorable condition for the leaching process was identified to be liquid/solid ratio of 14:1 (w/w) and leaching duration 10h at initial pH 1.0. It was confirmed that the removal of heavy metals from fly ash leachate with the combination of BESs and ER is feasible. The metal removal efficiency was achieved at 98.5%, 95.4% and 98.1% for Cu(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II), respectively. Results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) indicated that Cu(II) was reduced and recovered mainly as metal Cu on cathodes related to power production, while Zn(II) and Pb(II) were not spontaneously reduced in BESs without applied voltage and basically electrolyzed in the electrolysis reactors.

  10. Phosphorus removal coupled to bioenergy production by three cyanobacterial isolates in a biofilm dynamic growth system.

    PubMed

    Gismondi, Alessandra; Pippo, Francesca Di; Bruno, Laura; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Congestri, Roberta

    2016-09-01

    In the present study a closed incubator, designed for biofilm growth on artificial substrata, was used to grow three isolates of biofilm-forming heterocytous cyanobacteria using an artificial wastewater secondary effluent as the culture medium. We evaluated biofilm efficiency in removing phosphorus, by simulating biofilm-based tertiary wastewater treatment and coupled this process with biodiesel production from the developed biomass. The three strains were able to grow in the synthetic medium and remove phosphorus in percentages, between 6 and 43%, which varied between strains and also among each strain according to the biofilm growth phase. Calothrix sp. biofilm turned out to be a good candidate for tertiary treatment, showing phosphorus reducing capacity (during the exponential biofilm growth) at the regulatory level for the treated effluent water being discharged into natural water systems. Besides phosphorus removal, the three cyanobacterial biofilms produced high quality lipids, whose profile showed promising chemical stability and combustion behavior. Further integration of the proposed processes could include the integration of oil extracted from these cyanobacterial biofilms with microalgal oil known for high monounsaturated fatty acids content, in order to enhance biodiesel cold flow characteristics.

  11. Microbial nitrogen removal pathways in integrated vertical-flow constructed wetland systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun; He, Feng; Ma, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Zhenbin

    2016-05-01

    Microbial nitrogen (N) removal pathways in planted (Canna indica L.) and unplanted integrated vertical-flow constructed wetland systems (IVCWs) were investigated. Results of, molecular biological and isotope pairing experiments showed that nitrifying, anammox, and denitrifying bacteria were distributed in both down-flow and up-flow columns of the IVCWs. Further, the N transforming bacteria in the planted IVCWs were significantly higher than that in the unplanted ones (p<0.05). Moreover, the potential nitrification, anammox, and denitrification rates were highest (18.90, 11.75, and 7.84nmolNg(-1)h(-1), respectively) in the down-flow column of the planted IVCWs. Significant correlations between these potential rates and the absolute abundance of N transformation genes further confirmed the existence of simultaneous nitrification, anammox, and denitrification (SNAD) processes in the IVCWs. The anammox process was the major N removal pathway (55.6-60.0%) in the IVCWs. The results will further our understanding of the microbial N removal mechanisms in IVCWs.

  12. Hollow-Fiber Cartridges: Model Systems for Virus Removal from Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobitz, Frank; Menon, Jeevan

    2005-11-01

    Aethlon Medical is developing a hollow-fiber hemodialysis device designed to remove viruses and toxins from blood. Possible target viruses include HIV and pox-viruses. The filter could reduce virus and viral toxin concentration in the patient's blood, delaying illness so the patient's immune system can fight off the virus. In order to optimize the design of such a filter, the fluid mechanics of the device is both modeled analytically and investigated experimentally. The flow configuration of the proposed device is that of Starling flow. Polysulfone hollow-fiber dialysis cartridges were used. The cartridges are charged with water as a model fluid for blood and fluorescent latex beads are used in the experiments as a model for viruses. In the experiments, properties of the flow through the cartridge are determined through pressure and volume flow rate measurements of water. The removal of latex beads, which are captured in the porous walls of the fibers, was measured spectrophotometrically. Experimentally derived coefficients derived from these experiments are used in the analytical model of the flow and removal predictions from the model are compared to those obtained from the experiments.

  13. Hydraulic and pollutant removal performance of fine media stormwater filtration systems.

    PubMed

    Hatt, Belinda E; Fletcher, Tim D; Deletic, Ana

    2008-04-01

    Stormwater runoff from urban areas has multiple negative hydrologic and ecological impacts for receiving waters. Fine media stormwater filtration systems have the potential to mitigate these effects, through flow attenuation and pollutant removal. This work provides an overall assessment of the hydraulic and pollutant removal behavior of sand- and soil-based stormwater filters at the laboratory scale. The influence of time, cumulative inflow sediment, cumulative water volume, wetting and drying, and compaction on hydraulic capacity was investigated. The results suggested that the primary cause of hydraulic failure was formation of a clogging layer at the filter surface. Loads of sediment and heavy metals were effectively retained; however,the soil-based filters leached nitrogen and phosphorus for the duration of the experimental period. Media pollutant profiles revealed significant accumulation of all pollutants in the top 20% of the filter profile, suggesting that elevated discharges of nutrients was due to leaching of native material, rather than failure to remove incoming pollutants. It is recommended that the top 2-5 cm of the filter surface be scraped off every two years to prevent hydraulic failure; this will also avoid excessive accumulation of heavy metals, which may otherwise have been of concern.

  14. Contaminant Removal from Oxygen Production Systems for In Situ Resource Utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, Stephen M.; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Captain, James G.; Pawate, Ashtamurthy S.; Kenis, Paul J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project has been developing technologies to produce oxygen from lunar regolith to provide consumables to a lunar outpost. The processes developed reduce metal oxides in the regolith to produce water, which is then electrolyzed to produce oxygen. Hydrochloic and hydrofluoric acids are byproducts of the reduction processes, as halide minerals are also reduced at oxide reduction conditions. Because of the stringent water quality requirements for electrolysis, there is a need for a contaminant removal process. The Contaminant Removal from Oxygen Production Systems (CROPS) team has been developing a separation process to remove these contaminants in the gas and liquid phase that eliminates the need for consumables. CROPS has been using Nafion, a highly water selective polymeric proton exchange membrane, to recover pure water from the contaminated solution. Membrane thickness, product stream flow rate, and acid solution temperature and concentration were varied with the goal of maximizing water permeation and acid rejection. The results show that water permeation increases with increasing solution temperature and product stream flow rate, while acid rejection increases with decreasing solution temperature and concentration. Thinner membranes allowed for higher water flux and acid rejection than thicker ones. These results were used in the development of the hardware built for the most recent Mars ISRU demonstration project.

  15. Horizontal Heat Exchanger Design and Analysis for Passive Heat Removal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vierow, Karen

    2005-08-29

    This report describes a three-year project to investigate the major factors of horizontal heat exchanger performance in passive containment heat removal from a light water reactor following a design basis accident LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident). The heat exchanger studied in this work may be used in advanced and innovative reactors, in which passive heat removal systems are adopted to improve safety and reliability The application of horizontal tube-bundle condensers to passive containment heat removal is new. In order to show the feasibility of horizontal heat exchangers for passive containment cooling, the following aspects were investigated: 1. the condensation heat transfer characteristics when the incoming fluid contains noncondensable gases 2. the effectiveness of condensate draining in the horizontal orientation 3. the conditions that may lead to unstable condenser operation or highly degraded performance 4. multi-tube behavior with the associated secondary-side effects This project consisted of two experimental investigations and analytical model development for incorporation into industry safety codes such as TRAC and RELAP. A physical understanding of the flow and heat transfer phenomena was obtained and reflected in the analysis models. Two gradute students (one funded by the program) and seven undergraduate students obtained research experience as a part of this program.

  16. Application of bacteriophages to selectively remove Pseudomonas aeruginosa in water and wastewater filtration systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Hunt, Heather K; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2013-09-01

    Water and wastewater filtration systems often house pathogenic bacteria, which must be removed to ensure clean, safe water. Here, we determine the persistence of the model bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa in two types of filtration systems, and use P. aeruginosa bacteriophages to determine their ability to selectively remove P. aeruginosa. These systems used beds of either anthracite or granular activated carbon (GAC), which were operated at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 45 min. The clean bed filtration systems were loaded with an instantaneous dose of P. aeruginosa at a total cell number of 2.3 (± 0.1 [standard deviation]) × 10(7) cells. An immediate dose of P. aeruginosa phages (1 mL of phage stock at the concentration of 2.7 × 10(7) PFU (Plaque Forming Units)/mL) resulted in a reduction of 50% (± 9%) and >99.9% in the effluent P. aeruginosa concentrations in the clean anthracite and GAC filters, respectively. To further evaluate the effects of P. aeruginosa phages, synthetic stormwater was run through anthracite and GAC biofilters where mixed-culture biofilms were present. Eighty five days after an instantaneous dose of P. aeruginosa (2.3 × 10(7) cells per filter) on day 1, 7.5 (± 2.8) × 10(7) and 1.1 (± 0.5) × 10(7) P. aeruginosa cells/g filter media were detected in the top layer (close to the influent port) of the anthracite and GAC biofilters, respectively, demonstrating the growth and persistence of pathogenic bacteria in the biofilters. A subsequent 1-h dose of phages, at the concentration of 5.1 × 10(6) PFU/mL and flow rate of 1.6 mL/min, removed the P. aeruginosa inside the GAC biofilters and the anthracite biofilters by 70% (± 5%) and 56% (± 1%), respectively, with no P. aeruginosa detected in the effluent, while not affecting ammonia oxidation or the ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community inside the biofilters. These results suggest that phage treatment can selectively remove pathogenic bacteria with minimal impact on beneficial

  17. Enhanced Cr(VI) removal from groundwater by Fe(0)-H2O system with bio-amended iron corrosion.

    PubMed

    Yin, Weizhao; Li, Yongtao; Wu, Jinhua; Chen, Guocai; Jiang, Gangbiao; Li, Ping; Gu, Jingjing; Liang, Hao; Liu, Chuansheng

    2017-02-27

    A one-pot bio-iron system was established to investigate synergetic abiotic and biotic effects between iron and microorganisms on Cr(VI) removal. More diverse iron corrosion and reactive solids, such as green rusts, lepidocrocite and magnetite were found in the bio-iron system than in the Fe(0)-H2O system, leading to 4.3 times higher Cr(VI) removal efficiency in the bio-iron system than in the Fe(0)-H2O system. The cycling experiment also showed that the Cr(VI) removal capacity of Fe(0) in the bio-iron system was 12.4 times higher than that in the Fe(0)-H2O system. A 62days of life-span could be achieved in the bio-iron system, while the Fe(0)-H2O system lost its efficacy after 30days. Enhanced effects of extra Fe(2+) on Cr(VI) removal was observed, largely contributed to the adsorbed Fe(2+) on iron surface, which could function as an extra reductant for Cr(VI) and promote the electron transfer on the solid phase. The results also showed that the reduction of Cr(VI) by microorganisms was insignificant, indicating the adsorption/co-precipitation of Cr by iron oxides on iron surface was responsible for the overall Cr(VI) removal. Our study demonstrated that the bio-amended iron corrosion could improve the performance of Fe(0) for Cr(VI) removal from groundwater.

  18. Electrophilic acid gas-reactive fluid, proppant, and process for enhanced fracturing and recovery of energy producing materials

    DOEpatents

    Fernandez, Carlos A.; Heldebrant, David J.; Bonneville, Alain H. R.; Jung, Hun Bok; Carroll, Kenneth

    2016-09-20

    An electrophilic acid gas-reactive fracturing and recovery fluid, proppant, and process are detailed. The fluid expands in volume to provide rapid and controlled increases in pressure that enhances fracturing in subterranean bedrock for recovery of energy-producing materials. Proppants stabilize openings in fractures and fissures following fracturing.

  19. Experimental Investigations of the Effects of Acid Gas (H2S/CO2) Exposure under Geological Sequestration Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawthorne, S. B.; Miller, D.; Kutchko, B. G.; Strazisar, B. R.

    2009-12-01

    Acid gas (mixed CO2 and H2S) injection into geological formations is increasingly used as a disposal option. In contrast to pure CO2 injection, there is little understanding of the possible effects of acid gases under geological sequestration conditions on exposed materials ranging from reactions with reservoir minerals to the stability of proppants injected to improve oil recovery to the possible failure of well-bore cements. The number of laboratory studies investigating effects of acid gas has been limited by safety concerns and the difficulty in preparing and maintaining single-phase H2S/CO2 mixtures under the experimental pressures and temperatures required. We have developed approaches using conventional syringe pumps and reactor vessels to prepare and maintain H2S/CO2 mixtures under relevant sequestration conditions of temperature, pressure, and exposure to water and dissolved salts. These methods have been used to investigate and compare the effects of acid gas with those of pure CO2 on several materials including reservoir cores, oil recovery proppants, and well-bore cements, as well as to investigate the rates of model reactions such as the conversion of Fe3O4 to pyrite. The apparatus and methods used to perform acid gas exposures and representative results from the various exposed materials will be presented.

  20. Potential for water salvage by removal of non-native woody vegetation from dryland river systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doody, T.M.; Nagler, P.L.; Glenn, E.P.; Moore, G.W.; Morino, K.; Hultine, K.R.; Benyon, R.G.

    2011-01-01

    Globally, expansion of non-native woody vegetation across floodplains has raised concern of increased evapotranspiration (ET) water loss with consequent reduced river flows and groundwater supplies. Water salvage programs, established to meet water supply demands by removing introduced species, show little documented evidence of program effectiveness. We use two case studies in the USA and Australia to illustrate factors that contribute to water salvage feasibility for a given ecological setting. In the USA, saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) has become widespread on western rivers, with water salvage programs attempted over a 50-year period. Some studies document riparian transpiration or ET reduction after saltcedar removal, but detectable increases in river base flow are not conclusively shown. Furthermore, measurements of riparian vegetation ET in natural settings show saltcedar ET overlaps the range measured for native riparian species, thereby constraining the possibility of water salvage by replacing saltcedar with native vegetation. In Australia, introduced willows (Salix spp.) have become widespread in riparian systems in the Murray-Darling Basin. Although large-scale removal projects have been undertaken, no attempts have been made to quantify increases in base flows. Recent studies of ET indicate that willows growing in permanently inundated stream beds have high transpiration rates, indicating water savings could be achieved from removal. In contrast, native Eucalyptus trees and willows growing on stream banks show similar ET rates with no net water salvage from replacing willows with native trees. We conclude that water salvage feasibility is highly dependent on the ecohydrological setting in which the non-native trees occur. We provide an overview of conditions favorable to water salvage. Copyright ?? 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Natural circulation decay heat removal from an SP-100, 550 kWe power system for a lunar outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Xue, Huimin

    1992-01-01

    This research investigated the decay heat removal from the SP-100 reactor core of a 550-kWe power system for a lunar outpost by natural circulation of lithium coolant. A transient model that simulates the decay heat removal loop (DHRL) of the power system was developed and used to assess the system's decay heat removal capability. The effects of the surface area of the decay heat rejection radiator, the dimensions of the decay heat exchanger (DHE) flow duct, the elevation of the DHE, and the diameter of the rise and down pipes in the DHRL on the decay heat removal capability were examined. Also, to determine the applicability of test results at earth gravity to actual system performance on the lunar surface, the effect of the gravity constant (1 g and 1/6 g) on the thermal behavior of the system after shutdown was investigated.

  2. Coupled BAS and anoxic USB system to remove urea and formaldehyde from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Campos, J L; Sánchez, M; Mosquera-Corral, A; Méndez, R; Lema, J M

    2003-08-01

    Wastewater containing formaldehyde and urea was treated using a coupled system consisting of a biofilm airlift suspension (BAS) reactor and an anoxic upflow sludge blanket (USB) reactor. The anoxic USB reactor was used to carry out denitrification and urea hydrolysis, while the BAS reactor was used to carry out nitrification. In a first step, individual experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of both compounds on the nitrifying and denitrifying biomass. The BAS reactor was fed with a synthetic medium containing 500 mg N-NH4(+)l(-1) and 100mg N-urea l(-1), that were added continuously to this medium. Neither urea hydrolysis nor inhibition of nitrification was observed. Nitrification efficiency decreased when formaldehyde was fed during shocks at concentrations of 40, 80 and 120 mg C-formaldehyde l(-1). The anoxic USB reactor was fed with a synthetic medium containing nitrate, formaldehyde and urea. Concentrations of formaldehyde in the reactor of 100-120 mg C-formaldehyde l(-1) caused a decrease in the denitrification and urea hydrolysis rates. In a second step, the coupled system was operated at recycling ratios (R) of 3 and 9. Fed C/N ratios of 0.58, 1.0 and 1.5 g C-formaldehyde g(-1) N-NH4(+) were used for every recycling ratio. The maximum nitrogen removal percentages were achieved at a C/N ratio of 1.0 g C-formaldehyde g(-1) N-NH4(+) for both recycling ratios. A fed C/N ratio of 1.5 g C-formaldehyde g(-1) N-NH4(+) caused a decrease in the efficiency of the system with respect to nitrogen removal, due to the presence of formaldehyde in the BAS reactor, which decreased the nitrification. Formaldehyde was completely removed in the BAS reactor and a heterotrophic layer formed around the nitrifying biofilm.

  3. Nitrogen removal during leachate treatment: comparison of simple and sophisticated systems.

    PubMed

    Vasel, J L; Jupsin, H; Annachhatre, A P

    2004-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBR) have become common in treating municipal wastewaters. Applied to leachates treatment MBR were also successful with pilot scale experiments and full-scale facilities as well. We succeeded previously in designing an efficient nitrification-denitrification process with an ethylene glycol byproduct as carbon source for denitrification. Moreover, an unexpectedly high inert COD removal efficiency was also observed in the full-scale MBR facility thereby making it possible to increase the operating time of the final GAC (Granulated Activated Carbon) adsorber. Since MBR are very sophisticated systems. Simpler and "lower" cost systems can also be considered. For example it is possible to nitrify leachates from sanitary landfill using a simple infiltration-percolation technique with a low energy cost. To validate previously published laboratory experiments, a semi industrial-scale pilot installation was installed at the Montzen landfill site (Belgium). The process is based on infiltration-percolation through a granular bed. This well known process was modified to increase the load, notably by changing the support medium, adding an electric fan that is run intermittently and maintaining temperatures greater than 15 degrees C. The new material is a type of granular calcium carbonate with a large specific surface area. These technical improvements enabled the system to nitrify up to 0.4 kg NH4+-N/m3 of reactor bed per day at a hydraulic load of 0.35 m.d(-1), with an ammonia removal rate in the range of 80 to 95%. Despite the high ammonia nitrogen inlet concentrations, this system exhibits remarkable nitrification efficiency. Moreover, these performances are achieved in a batch mode system without recirculation or dilution processes. If complete nitrification is needed, it can be obtained in a second in series of bioreactors. The system can be classified as a low cost process. An international patent is pending. Possible performances of those systems

  4. Motion artifact removal algorithm by ICA for e-bra: a women ECG measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeokjun; Oh, Sechang; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2013-04-01

    Wearable ECG(ElectroCardioGram) measurement systems have increasingly been developing for people who suffer from CVD(CardioVascular Disease) and have very active lifestyles. Especially, in the case of female CVD patients, several abnormal CVD symptoms are accompanied with CVDs. Therefore, monitoring women's ECG signal is a significant diagnostic method to prevent from sudden heart attack. The E-bra ECG measurement system from our previous work provides more convenient option for women than Holter monitor system. The e-bra system was developed with a motion artifact removal algorithm by using an adaptive filter with LMS(least mean square) and a wandering noise baseline detection algorithm. In this paper, ICA(independent component analysis) algorithms are suggested to remove motion artifact factor for the e-bra system. Firstly, the ICA algorithms are developed with two kinds of statistical theories: Kurtosis, Endropy and evaluated by performing simulations with a ECG signal created by sgolayfilt function of MATLAB, a noise signal including 0.4Hz, 1.1Hz and 1.9Hz, and a weighed vector W estimated by kurtosis or entropy. A correlation value is shown as the degree of similarity between the created ECG signal and the estimated new ECG signal. In the real time E-Bra system, two pseudo signals are extracted by multiplying with a random weighted vector W, the measured ECG signal from E-bra system, and the noise component signal by noise extraction algorithm from our previous work. The suggested ICA algorithm basing on kurtosis or entropy is used to estimate the new ECG signal Y without noise component.

  5. Arsenic removal by discontinuous ZVI two steps system for drinking water production at household scale.

    PubMed

    Casentini, Barbara; Falcione, Fabiano Teo; Amalfitano, Stefano; Fazi, Stefano; Rossetti, Simona

    2016-12-01

    Different countries in Europe still suffer of elevated arsenic (As) concentration in groundwaters used for human consumption. In the case of households not connected to the distribution system, decentralized water supply systems, such as Point of Use (POU) and Point of Entry (POE), offer a direct benefit for the consumers. Field scale ex-situ treatment systems based on metallic iron (ZVI) are already available for the production of reduced volumes of drinking water in remote areas (village scale). To address drinking water needs at larger scale, we designed a pilot unit able to produce an elevated daily volume of water for human consumption. We tested the long-term As removal efficiency of a two steps ZVI treatment unit for the production of 400 L/day clean water based on the combination of ZVI corrosion process with sedimentation and retention of freshly formed Fe precipitates. The system treated 100 μg/L As(V)-contaminated oxic groundwater in a discontinuous operation mode at a flow rate of 1 L/min for 31 days. Final removal was 77-96% and the most performing step was aeration/sedimentation (A/S) tank with a 60-94% efficiency. Arsenic in the outflow slightly exceeded the drinking water limit of 10 μg/L only after 6000 L treated and Fe concentration was always below 0.2 mg/L. Under proposed operating conditions ZVI passivation readily occurred and, as a consequence, Fe production sharply decreased. Arsenic mobility attached to particulate was 13-60% after ZVI column and 37-100% after A/S tank. Uniform amorphous cluster of Fe nanoparticles (100 nm) formed during aeration drove As removal process with an adsorption capacity corresponding to 20.5 mgAs/gFe. Research studies often focus only on chemico-physical aspects disregarding the importance of biological processes that may co-occur and interfere with ZVI corrosion, As removal and safe water production. We explored the microbial transport dynamics by flow cytometry, proved as a suitable tool to monitor

  6. Test plan for valveless ash removal from pressurized fluid bed combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hauserman, W.B.

    1989-07-01

    This is a test plan to demonstrate a method of ash removal from pressurized fluid bed combustion (PFBC) systems through small beds of crushed rock rather than conventional pressure let-down valves and lock hoppers. The economic advantage of such a method is that process-inherent erosive damage will be inflicted upon the cheaply replaceable crushed rock, rather than upon expensive, fabricated valve trim components. The concept to be tested is an extension of the gravel bucket'' principle in which an erosive, high pressure slurry stream passes through a bed of crushed rock with an adjustable flow path and cross-section. The original gravel bucket concept was inspired by the costly valve erosion problems projected for coal liquefaction plants. This project extends the same approach to systems where solids are to be removed from PFBC systems, with more limited possibilities of application to some coal gasification processes. If proven successful, a hot-gas gravel bucket could offer an economic alternative to a lock hopper plus a pair of expensive block valves. 6 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Ultra-accuracy parallel electronic datum optical metrology system of systems (notice of removal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiang-Wen; Bear, Wynn L.; Roth, John T.; Schoen, Marco P.

    2008-03-01

    This paper (SPIE Paper 682925) was removed from the SPIE Digital Library on 19 August 2008 upon learning that two individuals listed as additional co-authors on the manuscript had no prior knowledge of the paper, did not contribute to it, and did not consent to having their names included as co-authors. The names of these two individuals have been or will be deleted from this and all other bibliographic records as far as possible since they have no connection to this paper. Additionally, the remaining names associated with this publication record, Xiang-Wen Xiong and Wynn L. Bear, are actually the same individual and not two different authors. This is not sanctioned by SPIE. As stated in the SPIE Guidelines for Professional Conduct and Publishing Ethics, "SPIE considers it the professional responsibility of all authors to ensure that the authorship of submitted papers properly reflects the contributions and consent of all authors." A serious violation of these guidelines is evident in this case. It is SPIE policy to remove papers from the SPIE Digital Library where serious professional misconduct has occurred and to impose additional sanctions as appropriate.

  8. Removal of trace organic contaminants by a membrane bioreactor-granular activated carbon (MBR-GAC) system.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Luong N; Hai, Faisal I; Kang, Jinguo; Price, William E; Nghiem, Long D

    2012-06-01

    The removal of trace organics by a membrane bioreactor-granular activated carbon (MBR-GAC) integrated system were investigated. The results confirmed that MBR treatment can be effective for the removal of hydrophobic (log D>3.2) and readily biodegradable trace organics. The data also highlighted the limitation of MBR in removing hydrophilic and persistent compounds (e.g. carbamazepine, diclofenac, and fenoprop) and that GAC could complement MBR very well as a post-treatment process. The MBR-GAC system showed high removal of all selected trace organics including those that are hydrophilic and persistent to biological degradation at up to 406 bed volumes (BV). However, over an extended period, breakthrough of diclofenac was observed after 7320 BV. This suggests that strict monitoring should be applied over the lifetime of the GAC column to detect the breakthrough of hydrophilic and persistent compounds which have low removal by MBR treatment.

  9. Effects of aeration position on organics, nitrogen and phosphorus removal in combined oxidation pond-constructed wetland systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoou; Tian, Yimei; Zhao, Xinhua; Peng, Sen; Wu, Qing; Yan, Lijian

    2015-12-01

    Given that few studies investigated the effects of aeration position (AP) on the performance of aerated constructed wetlands, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of AP on organics, nitrogen and phosphorus removal in lab-scale combined oxidation pond-constructed wetland (OP-CW) systems. Results showed that middle aeration allowed the CW to possess more uniform oxygen distribution and to achieve greater removals of COD and NH3-N, while the CW under bottom aeration and surface aeration demonstrated more distinct stratification of oxygen distribution and surface aeration brought about better TN removal capacity for the OP-CW system. However, no significant influence of artificial aeration or AP on TP removal was observed. Overall, AP could significantly affect the spatial distribution of dissolved oxygen by influencing the oxygen diffusion paths in aerated CWs, thereby influencing the removal of pollutants, especially organics and nitrogen, which offers a reference for the design of aerated CWs.

  10. A new reactor for denitrification and micro-particle removal in recirculated aquaculture systems.

    PubMed

    Boley, A; Korshun, G; Boley, S; Jung-Schroers, V; Adamek, M; Steinhagen, D; Richter, S

    2017-03-01

    A 'membrane-denitrification' reactor (MDR) was developed and tested in a semi-technical recirculation aquaculture system in comparison to a double - without MDR - as reference system. The MDR consisted of a reactor with an ultrafiltration membrane unit for removal of micro-particles (e.g. sludge flocs, bacteria and parasites). Specific carrier material provided surfaces for biofilm growth in a fluidized bed reactor with ethanol as carbon source for denitrification. The continuous motion of these carriers cleaned the membrane surface. With online and laboratory measurements of water parameters and operational data the feasibility of the concept was verified. An advantage is that no chemicals are needed to clean the membranes. Examinations of the fish and water analyses proved an MDR can positively influence cortisol, as a stress marker, and the microflora of the aquatic system.

  11. Sixty Percent Conceptual Design Report: Enterprise Accountability System for Classified Removable Electronic Media

    SciTech Connect

    B. Gardiner; L.Graton; J.Longo; T.Marks, Jr.; B.Martinez; R. Strittmatter; C.Woods; J. Joshua

    2003-05-03

    Classified removable electronic media (CREM) are tracked in several different ways at the Laboratory. To ensure greater security for CREM, we are creating a single, Laboratory-wide system to track CREM. We are researching technology that can be used to electronically tag and detect CREM, designing a database to track the movement of CREM, and planning to test the system at several locations around the Laboratory. We focus on affixing ''smart tags'' to items we want to track and installing gates at pedestrian portals to detect the entry or exit of tagged items. By means of an enterprise database, the system will track the entry and exit of tagged items into and from CREM storage vaults, vault-type rooms, access corridors, or boundaries of secure areas, as well as the identity of the person carrying an item. We are considering several options for tracking items that can give greater security, but at greater expense.

  12. Geological Modeling and Fluid Flow Simulation of Acid Gas Storage, Nugget Sandstone, Moxa Arch, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, X.; Du, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Moxa Arch Anticline is a regional-scale northwest-trending uplift in western Wyoming where geological storage of acid gases (CO2, CH4, N2, H2S, He) from ExxonMobile's Shute Creek Gas Plant is under consideration. The Nugget Sandstone, a deep saline aquifer at depths exceeding 17,170 ft, is a candidate formation for acid gas storage. As part of a larger goal of determining site suitability, this study builds three-dimensional local to regional scale geological and fluid flow models for the Nugget Sandstone, its caprock (Twin Creek Limestone), and an underlying aquifer (Ankareh Sandstone), or together, the ``Nugget Suite''. For an area of 3000 square miles, geological and engineering data were assembled, screened for accuracy, and digitized, covering an average formation thickness of ~1700 feet. The data include 900 public-domain well logs (SP, Gamma Ray, Neutron Porosity, Density, Sonic, shallow and deep Resistivity, Lithology, Deviated well logs), 784 feet of core measurements (porosity and permeability), 4 regional geological cross sections, and 3 isopach maps. Data were interpreted and correlated for geological formations and facies, the later categorized using both Neural Network and Gaussian Hierarchical Clustering algorithms. Well log porosities were calibrated with core measurements, those of permeability estimated using formation-specific porosity-permeability transforms. Using conditional geostatistical simulations (first indicator simulation of facies, then sequential Gaussian simulation of facies-specific porosity), data were integrated at the regional-scale to create a geological model from which a local-scale simulation model surrounding the Shute Creek injection site was extracted. Based on this model, full compositional multiphase flow simulations were conducted with which we explore (1) an appropriate grid resolution for accurate acid gas predictions (pressure, saturation, and mass balance); (2) sensitivity of key geological and engineering

  13. A region finding method to remove the noise from the images of the human hand gesture recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Muhammad Jibran; Mahmood, Waqas

    2015-12-01

    The performance of the human hand gesture recognition systems depends on the quality of the images presented to the system. Since these systems work in real time environment the images may be corrupted by some environmental noise. By removing the noise the performance of the system can be enhanced. So far different noise removal methods have been presented in many researches to eliminate the noise but all have its own limitations. We have presented a region finding method to deal with the environmental noise that gives better results and enhances the performance of the human hand gesture recognition systems so that the recognition rate of the system can be improved.

  14. Breadboard wash water renovation system. [using ferric chloride and ion exchange resins to remove soap and dissolved salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A total wash water renovation system concept was developed for removing objectionable materials from spacecraft wash water in order to make the water reusable. The breadboard model system described provides for pretreatment with ferric chloride to remove soap by chemical precipitation, carbon adsorption to remove trace dissolved organics, and ion exchange for removal of dissolved salts. The entire system was put into continuous operation and carefully monitored to assess overall efficiency and equipment maintenance problems that could be expected in actual use. In addition, the capacity of the carbon adsorbers and the ion-exchange resin was calculated and taken into consideration in the final evaluation of the system adequacy. The product water produced was well within the Tentative Wash Water Standards with regard to total organic carbon, conductivity, urea content, sodium chloride content, color, odor, and clarity.

  15. ETV REPORT: REMOVAL OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER — PALL/KINETICO PUREFECTA DRINKING WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pall/Kinetico Purefecta™ POU drinking water treatment system was tested for removal of aldicarb, benzene, cadmium, carbofuran, cesium, chloroform, dichlorvos, dicrotophos, fenamiphos, mercury, mevinphos, oxamyl, strontium, and strychnine. The Purefecta™ employs several compon...

  16. The Development of a Parameterized Scatter Removal Algorithm for Nuclear Materials Identification System Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, Brandon Robert

    2010-03-01

    This dissertation presents a novel method for removing scattering effects from Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) imaging. The NMIS uses fast neutron radiography to generate images of the internal structure of objects non-intrusively. If the correct attenuation through the object is measured, the positions and macroscopic cross-sections of features inside the object can be determined. The cross sections can then be used to identify the materials and a 3D map of the interior of the object can be reconstructed. Unfortunately, the measured attenuation values are always too low because scattered neutrons contribute to the unattenuated neutron signal. Previous efforts to remove the scatter from NMIS imaging have focused on minimizing the fraction of scattered neutrons which are misidentified as directly transmitted by electronically collimating and time tagging the source neutrons. The parameterized scatter removal algorithm (PSRA) approaches the problem from an entirely new direction by using Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the point scatter functions (PScFs) produced by neutrons scattering in the object. PScFs have been used to remove scattering successfully in other applications, but only with simple 2D detector models. This work represents the first time PScFs have ever been applied to an imaging detector geometry as complicated as the NMIS. By fitting the PScFs using a Gaussian function, they can be parameterized and the proper scatter for a given problem can be removed without the need for rerunning the simulations each time. In order to model the PScFs, an entirely new method for simulating NMIS measurements was developed for this work. The development of the new models and the codes required to simulate them are presented in detail. The PSRA was used on several simulated and experimental measurements and chi-squared goodness of fit tests were used to compare the corrected values to the ideal values that would be expected with no scattering. Using

  17. THE DEVELOPMENT OF A PARAMETERIZED SCATTER REMOVAL ALGORITHM FOR NUCLEAR MATERIALS IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, Brandon R

    2010-05-01

    This report presents a novel method for removing scattering effects from Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) imaging. The NMIS uses fast neutron radiography to generate images of the internal structure of objects nonintrusively. If the correct attenuation through the object is measured, the positions and macroscopic cross sections of features inside the object can be determined. The cross sections can then be used to identify the materials, and a 3D map of the interior of the object can be reconstructed. Unfortunately, the measured attenuation values are always too low because scattered neutrons contribute to the unattenuated neutron signal. Previous efforts to remove the scatter from NMIS imaging have focused on minimizing the fraction of scattered neutrons that are misidentified as directly transmitted by electronically collimating and time tagging the source neutrons. The parameterized scatter removal algorithm (PSRA) approaches the problem from an entirely new direction by using Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the point scatter functions (PScFs) produced by neutrons scattering in the object. PScFs have been used to remove scattering successfully in other applications, but only with simple 2D detector models. This work represents the first time PScFs have ever been applied to an imaging detector geometry as complicated as the NMIS. By fitting the PScFs using a Gaussian function, they can be parameterized, and the proper scatter for a given problem can be removed without the need for rerunning the simulations each time. In order to model the PScFs, an entirely new method for simulating NMIS measurements was developed for this work. The development of the new models and the codes required to simulate them are presented in detail. The PSRA was used on several simulated and experimental measurements, and chi-squared goodness of fit tests were used to compare the corrected values to the ideal values that would be expected with no scattering. Using the

  18. The Use of Reactive Materials in Septic Systems for Pathogens and Nitrate Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhogusoff, A. V.; Hirata, R.; Aravena, R.; Stimson, J.; Robertson, W.

    2009-05-01

    The developing countries have an urgent need for cheap and efficient techniques for the improvement of sanitary conditions in areas without public water supply and sewerage system, especially in suburban regions or irregular occupation areas, where there is a great lack of social assistance. In this type of situations, the inhabitants use dug wells for water use and cesspits for disposal of sewage, which usually contaminates the groundwater with nitrate and microorganisms. As part of a study aiming to develop new sewage treatment systems in an irregular occupation area located at the District of Barragem, south region of the municipality of São Paulo (Brazil), a conventional cesspit (named as "Control") and an alternative septic system were constructed and monitored for a year. The design of the alternative septic system included a 1m thickness reactive barrier constituted by BOF (Budget Oxygen Furnace - a byproduct of the steel-making industry) for pathogens removal, then 1m sand package where the wastewater is oxidized and at the bottom the wastewater is in contact with a 0,5m thickness reactive barrier constituted by sawdust (carbon source), where redox conditions are very reducing and denitrification and even methanogenesis can take place. The chemical and biological data collected in the alternative septic system showed complete removal of the pathogens in the BOF barrier, then nitrification occurred between the BOF and the bottom of sand package. However denitrification in the sawdust barrier was incomplete because of the high pH caused by the BOF materials, which can reduced the number of denitrifiers bacteria present in the sawdust barrier. Isotope analyses that are been carried out in the residual nitrate will provided more information about the extent of the denitrification reaction in the alternative septic system. In case of the control cesspit, it was observed the occurrence of high concentration of ammonium, dissolved organic carbon, CO2, CH4 and low

  19. Nitrate and ammonium ions removal from groundwater by a hybrid system of zero-valent iron combined with adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Ji, Min-Kyu; Park, Won-Bae; Khan, Moonis Ali; Abou-Shanab, Reda A I; Kim, Yongje; Cho, Yunchul; Choi, Jaeyoung; Song, Hocheol; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2012-04-01

    Nitrate (NO(3)(-)) is a commonly found contaminant in groundwater and surface water. It has created a major water quality problem worldwide. The laboratory batch experiments were conducted to investigate the feasibility of HCl-treated zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) combined with different adsorbents as hybrid systems for simultaneous removal of nitrate (NO(3)(-)) and ammonium (NH(4)(+)) ions from aqueous solution. The maximum NO(3)(-) removal in combined Fe(0)-granular activated carbon (GAC), Fe(0)-filtralite and Fe(0)-sepiolite systems was 86, 96 and 99%, respectively, at 45 °C for 24 h reaction time. The NO(3)(-) removal rate increased with the increase in initial NO(3)(-) concentration. The NO(3)(-) removal efficiency by hybrid systems was in the order of sepiolite > filtralite > GAC. The NH(4)(+) produced during the denitrification process by Fe(0) was successfully removed by the adsorbents, with the removal efficiency in the order of GAC > sepiolite > filtralite. Results of the present study suggest that the use of a hybrid system could be a promising technology for achieving simultaneous removal of NO(3)(-) and NH(4)(+) ions from aqueous solution.

  20. Including Life Cycle Assessment for decision-making in controlling wastewater nutrient removal systems.

    PubMed

    Corominas, Lluís; Larsen, Henrik F; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2013-10-15

    This paper focuses on the use of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to evaluate the performance of seventeen control strategies in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). It tackles the importance of using site-specific factors for nutrient enrichment when decision-makers have to select best operating strategies. Therefore, the LCA evaluation is repeated for three different scenarios depending on the limitation of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), or both, when evaluating the nutrient enrichment impact in water bodies. The LCA results indicate that for treated effluent discharged into N-deficient aquatic systems (e.g. open coastal areas) the most eco-friendly strategies differ from the ones dealing with discharging into P-deficient (e.g. lakes and rivers) and N&P-deficient systems (e.g. coastal zones). More particularly, the results suggest that strategies that promote increased nutrient removal and/or energy savings present an environmental benefit for N&P and P-deficient systems. This is not the case when addressing N-deficient systems for which the use of chemicals (even for improving N removal efficiencies) is not always beneficial for the environment. A sensitivity analysis on using weighting of the impact categories is conducted to assess how value choices (policy decisions) may affect the management of WWTPs. For the scenarios with only N-limitation, the LCA-based ranking of the control strategies is sensitive to the choice of weighting factors, whereas this is not the case for N&P or P-deficient aquatic systems.

  1. Adsorptive removal of naphthalene induced by structurally different Gemini surfactants in a soil-water system.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jia; Li, Jun; Huang, Guohe; Wang, Xiujie; Chen, Guanghui; Zhao, Baihang

    2016-09-01

    A new generation of surfactant, Gemini surfactants, have been synthesized and have attracted the attention of various industrial and academic research groups. This study focused on the use of symmetric and dissymmetric quaternary ammonium Gemini surfactants to immobilize naphthalene onto soil particles, and is used as an example of an innovative application to remove HOC in situ using the surfactant-enhanced sorption zone. The sorption capacity of modified soils by Gemini surfactant and natural soils was compared and the naphthalene sorption efficiency, in the absence and presence of Gemini surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths, was investigated in the soil-water system. The results have shown that the increased added Gemini surfactant formed admicelles at the interface of soil/water having superior capability to retard contaminant. Symmetric and dissymmetric Gemini surfactants have opposite effect on the aspect of removing of PAH attributing to their solubilization and sorption behavior in soil-water system. Compared with the natural soil, sorption of naphthalene by Gemini-modified soil is noticeably enhanced following the order of C12-2-16 < C12-2-12 < C12-2-8. However, the symmetric Gemini surfactant C12-2-12 is the optimized one for in situ barrier remediation, which is not only has relative high retention ability but also low dosage.

  2. Biological removal of the xenobiotic trichloroethylene (TCE) through cometabolism in nitrifying systems.

    PubMed

    Kocamemi, B Alpaslan; Ceçen, F

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, cometabolic TCE degradation was evaluated using NH(4)-N as the growth-substrate. At initial TCE concentrations up to 845 microg/L, TCE degradation followed first-order kinetics. The increase in ammonium utilization rate favored the degradation of TCE. This ensured that biological transformation of TCE in nitrifying systems is accomplished through a cometabolic pathway by the catalysis of non-specific ammonia oxygenase enzyme of nitrifiers. The transformation yield (T(y)) of TCE, the amount of TCE degraded per unit mass of NH(4)-N, strongly depended on the initial NH(4)-N and TCE concentrations. In order to allow a rough estimation of TCE removal and nitrification at different influent TCE and NH(4)-N concentrations, a linear relationship was developed between 1/T(y) and the initial NH(4)-N/TCE ratio. The estimated T(y) values lead to the conclusion that nitrifying systems are promising candidates for biological removal of TCE through cometabolism.

  3. Calcium effect on the metabolic pathway of phosphorus accumulating organisms in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ling; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Fang, Wei; Wang, Yong-Peng; Fang, Cai-Yun; Shao, Li-Min; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-11-01

    Phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) have been found to act as glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs) under certain conditions, thus, the deterioration in the performance of enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems is not always attributed to the proliferation of GAOs. In this work, the effects of calcium on the metabolic pathway of PAOs were explored. It was found that when the influent Ca(2+) concentration was elevated, the tendency and extent of extracellular calcium phosphate precipitation increased, and the intracellular inert Ca-bound polyphosphate was synthesized, while the microbial population remained almost unchanged. The changes in the ratios of phosphorus released/acetate uptaken, the glycogen degraded/acetate uptaken and the poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates synthesized/acetate uptaken during the anaerobic period confirm that, as the influent Ca(2+) concentration was increased, the polyphosphate-accumulating metabolism was partially shifted to the glycogen-accumulating metabolism. At an influent Ca(2+) around 50 mg/L, in addition to the extracellular calcium phosphate precipitation, the intracellular inert Ca-bound polyphosphate synthesis might also be involved in the metabolic change of PAOs. The results of the present work would be beneficial to better understand the biochemical metabolism of PAOs in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

  4. Centrifugal accelerator, system and method for removing unwanted layers from a surface

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Christopher A.; Fisher, Paul W.

    1995-01-01

    A cryoblasting process having a centrifugal accelerator for accelerating frozen pellets of argon or carbon dioxide toward a target area utilizes an accelerator throw wheel designed to induce, during operation, the creation of a low-friction gas bearing within internal passages of the wheel which would otherwise retard acceleration of the pellets as they move through the passages. An associated system and method for removing paint from a surface with cryoblasting techniques involves the treating, such as a preheating, of the painted surface to soften the paint prior to the impacting of frozen pellets thereagainst to increase the rate of paint removal. A system and method for producing large quantities of frozen pellets from a liquid material, such as liquid argon or carbon dioxide, for use in a cryoblasting process utilizes a chamber into which the liquid material is introduced in the form of a jet which disintegrates into droplets. A non-condensible gas, such as inert helium or air, is injected into the chamber at a controlled rate so that the droplets freeze into bodies of relatively high density.

  5. Optimizing Techology to Reduce Mercury and Acid Gas Emissions from Electric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

    2004-01-31

    More than 56,000 coal quality data records from five public data sets have been selected for use in this project. These data will be used to create maps showing where coals with low mercury and acid-gas emissions might be found for power plants classified by air-pollution controls. Average coal quality values, calculated for 51,156 commercial coals by U.S. county-of-origin, are listed in the appendix. Coal moisture values are calculated for commercially shipped coal from 163 U.S. counties, where the raw assay data (including mercury and chlorine values) are reported on a dry basis. The calculated moisture values are verified by comparison with observed moisture values in commercial coal. Moisture in commercial U.S. coal shows provincial variation. For example, high volatile C bituminous rank coal from the Interior province has 3% to 4% more moisture than equivalent Rocky Mountain province coal. Mott-Spooner difference values are calculated for 4,957 data records for coals collected from coal mines and exploration drill holes. About 90% of the records have Mott-Spooner difference values within {+-}250 Btu/lb.

  6. A Pilot-scale Benthic Microbial Electrochemical System (BMES) for Enhanced Organic Removal in Sediment Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Henan; Tian, Yan; Qu, Youpeng; Qiu, Ye; Liu, Jia; Feng, Yujie

    2017-01-01

    A benthic microbial electrochemical systems (BMES) of 195 L (120 cm long, 25 cm wide and 65 cm height) was constructed for sediment organic removal. Sediment from a natural river (Ashi River) was used as test sediments in the present research. Three-dimensional anode (Tri-DSA) with honeycomb structure composed of carbon cloth and supporting skeleton was employed in this research for the first time. The results demonstrated that BMES performed good in organic-matter degradation and energy generation from sediment and could be considered for river sediments in situ restoration as novel method. Community analysis from the soil and anode using 16S rDNA gene sequencing showed that more electrogenic functional bacteria was accumulated in anode area when circuit connected than control system.

  7. A Pilot-scale Benthic Microbial Electrochemical System (BMES) for Enhanced Organic Removal in Sediment Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Henan; Tian, Yan; Qu, Youpeng; Qiu, Ye; Liu, Jia; Feng, Yujie

    2017-01-01

    A benthic microbial electrochemical systems (BMES) of 195 L (120 cm long, 25 cm wide and 65 cm height) was constructed for sediment organic removal. Sediment from a natural river (Ashi River) was used as test sediments in the present research. Three-dimensional anode (Tri-DSA) with honeycomb structure composed of carbon cloth and supporting skeleton was employed in this research for the first time. The results demonstrated that BMES performed good in organic-matter degradation and energy generation from sediment and could be considered for river sediments in situ restoration as novel method. Community analysis from the soil and anode using 16S rDNA gene sequencing showed that more electrogenic functional bacteria was accumulated in anode area when circuit connected than control system. PMID:28059105

  8. Fate and effect of benzalkonium chlorides in a continuous-flow biological nitrogen removal system treating poultry processing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hajaya, Malek G; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2012-08-01

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are used for sanitation in many poultry processing facilities. This work investigated the fate and effect of a mixture of benzalkonium chlorides (BACs), a class of QACs widely used in commercial antimicrobial formulations, on the biological nitrogen removal (BNR) processes. A laboratory-scale BNR system was operated continuously for 670 days, fed with poultry processing wastewater amended with a mixture of BACs. Initially, the nitrogen removal efficiency deteriorated at a BAC feed concentration of 5 mg/L due to the complete inhibition of nitrification. However, after 27 days of operation, the system recovered and achieved 100% ammonia removal. High nitrogen removal efficiency was achieved even after the feed BAC concentration was stepwise increased up to 120 mg/L. Batch nitrification assays performed before, during, and after BAC exposure, showed that rapid microbial acclimation and BAC biodegradation contributed to the recovery of nitrification achieving efficient and stable long-term BNR system operation.

  9. Effect of collagen removal on shear bond strength of two single-bottle adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Saboia, V P; Rodrigues, A L; Pimenta, L A

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of collagen removal on the shear bond strength for two single-bottle adhesive systems. The ultrastructure of the dentin after treatments and the dentin-resin interface were examined under SEM. The buccal and lingual surfaces of 80 extracted human third molars were ground to expose dentin. Teeth were randomly assigned to four groups and received the following treatments: Group 1(P&B 2.1), Prime & Bond 2.1 adhesive was applied according to the manufacturer's directions and Restorative Z100 composite resin was bonded to the dentin surface; Group 2 (P&B 2.1/NaOCl), the same procedures were followed as for Group 1 except that the surfaces were treated with 10% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for one minute after acid conditioning; Group 3 (SB), Single Bond (3M) was applied according to the manufacturer's recommendations; Group 4 (SB/NaOCl), the same procedure was followed for Group 2, using Single Bond. The specimens were stored in humidity at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and tested in a shear mode at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The Kruskal-Wallis test and Multiple Comparisons were used for statistical analysis of the data. A one-minute exposure of dentin to 10% NaOCl following acid conditioning resulted in a significant increase of the dentin shear bond strength for Prime & Bond 2.1. The same treatment for Single Bond resulted in a significant reduction in bond strength. Groups 1 and 3 were not statistically different from each other. The presence of a collagen layer resulted in the formation of a hybrid layer and similar values of adhesion for both adhesive systems. The results may suggest that collagen removal improves the bond strength for this acetone-based adhesive system but several such systems would need to be investigated.

  10. Rapid Cycling CO2 and H2O Removal System for EMU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alptekin, Gokhan; Cates, Matthew; Dubovik, Margarita; Gershanovich, Yevgenia; Paul, Heather; Thomas, Gretchen

    2006-01-01

    NASA's planned future missions set stringent demands on the design of the Portable Life Support Systems (PLSS), requiring dramatic reductions in weight, decreased reliance on supplies and greater flexibility on the types of missions. Use of regenerable systems that reduce weight and volume of the EMU is of critical importance to NASA, both for low orbit operations and for long duration manned missions. The CO2 and humidity control unit in the existing PLSS design is relatively large, since it has to remove 8 hours worth of CO2. If the sorbent regeneration can be carried out during the extravehicular activity (EVA) with a relatively high regeneration frequency, the size of the sorbent canister and weight can be significantly reduced. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) is developing a compact, regenerable sorbent-based system to control CO2 and humidity in the space suit ventilation loop. The sorbent can be regenerated using space vacuum during the EVA, eliminating all duration-limiting elements in the life support system. This paper summarizes the results of the sorbent development and testing, and evaluation efforts. The results of a preliminary system analysis are also included, showing the size and volume reductions provided by the new system.

  11. Removal of phenol in a constructed wetland system and the relative contribution of plant roots, microbial activity and porous bed.

    PubMed

    Kurzbaum, E; Zimmels, Y; Kirzhner, F; Armon, R

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of a low organic load constructed wetland (CW) system was performed in order to understand the relative role of its various components contribution in phenol removal (100 mg/L) under controlled plant biomass/gravel/water experimental ratios (50 g/450 g/100 mL). The results [expressed as phenol50/time (hours) required to remove 50% of the initial phenol concentration] showed that the highest phenol removal occurred by combined biofilms from roots and gravel attached (phenol50=19), followed by gravel biofilm (phenol50=105) and planktonic (suspended in water) bacteria (phenol50=>200). An in depth analysis revealed that plants contribution alone (antibiotics sterilized) was minor (phenol50=>89) while roots supported biofilm resulted in a significant phenol removal (phenol50=15). Therefore in this type of CW, the main phenol removal active fraction could be attributed to plant roots' biofilm bacteria.

  12. Metal oxide absorbents for regenerative carbon dioxide and water vapor removal for advanced portable life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Joan M.; Borghese, Joseph B.; Chang, Craig H.; Stonesifer, Greg T.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies of Allied Signal metal oxide based absorbents demonstrated that these absorbents offer a unique capability to regeneratively remove both metabolic carbon dioxide and water vapor from breathing air; previously, metal oxides were considered only for the removal of CO2. The concurrent removal of CO2 and H2O vapor can simplify the astronaut Portable Life Support System (PLSS) by combining the CO2 and humidity control functions into one regenerative component. The use of metal oxide absorbents for removal of both CO2 ad H2O vapor in the PLSS is the focus of an ongoing program. The full scale Metal Oxide Carbon dioxide and Humidity Remover (MOCHR) and regeneration unit is described.

  13. Simultaneous removal of COD and ammonium from landfill leachate using an anaerobic-aerobic moving-bed biofilm reactor system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Sun, Dezhi; Chung, Jong-Shik

    2008-01-01

    The performance of a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) system with an anaerobic-aerobic arrangement was investigated to treat landfill leachate for simultaneous removal of COD and ammonium. It was found that the anaerobic MBBR played a major role in COD removal due to methanogenesis, and the aerobic MBBR acted as COD-polishing and ammonium removal step. The contribution of the anaerobic MBBR to total COD removal efficiency reached 91% at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 4.08 kgCOD/(m3d), and gradually decreased to 86% when feed OLR was increased to 15.70 kgCOD/(m3d). Because of the complementary function of the aerobic reactor, the total COD removal efficiency of the system had a slight decrease from 94% to 92% even though the feed OLR was increased from 4.08 to 15.70 kgCOD/(m3d). Hydraulic retention time (HRT) had a significant effect on NH+4-N removal; more than 97% of the total NH+4-N removal efficiency could be achieved when the HRT of the aerobic MBBR was more than 1.25 days. The anaerobic-aerobic system had a strong tolerance to shock loading. A decrease in COD removal efficiency of only 7% was observed when the OLR was increased by four times and shock duration was 24 h, and the system could recover the original removal efficiency in 3 days. The average sludge yield of the anaerobic reactor was estimated to be 0.0538 gVSS/gCOD rem.

  14. A high loading overland flow system: Impacts on soil characteristics, grass constituents, yields and nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Wen, C G; Chen, T H; Hsu, F H; Lu, C H; Lin, J B; Chang, C H; Chang, S P; Lee, C S

    2007-04-01

    The objectives of this paper are to determine effects of different grass species and their harvests on pollutant removal, elucidate impacts on soil characteristics and grass constituents, observe grass yield and quantify nutrient uptake by vegetation in an overland flow system (OLFS). Polluted creek water was applied to eight channels in the OLFS, which were planted with Paragrass, Nilegrass, Cattail, and Vetiver, with each two channels being randomly planted with a given grass species. The grass in one channel was harvested while that in the other channel was not. At a high rate of 27.8 m d(-1) hydraulic loading, the removal efficiencies of conventional pollutants such as BOD, COD, suspended solids (SS), and total coliforms in wastewater are not affected by the type of the grasses species, but those of nitrogen and phosphorus are affected by different species. Overall average removal efficiencies of BOD, COD, SS, ammonia, total nitrogen, total phosphorus and total coliforms through the OLFS are 42%, 48%, 78%, 47%, 40%, 33% and 89%, respectively. The concentration of nitrate, however, increases due to nitrification. Soil characteristics in OLFS have been changed significantly; specific conductivity, organic matter, exchangeable magnesium, extractable copper and zinc in soils all increase with time while pHs decrease. During the winter season, there is a significant accumulation of nitrate in grass with the subsequent reduction during the active growing season (Spring). The contents of nitrate and phosphorus in grass tissue are higher than those of grass in general pastureland, probably due to nutrient luxury uptake by grass. The overall grass yield, growth rate and nutrient uptake are quantified and implication of such high rate OLFS discussed.

  15. An artificially constructed Syngonium podophyllum-Aspergillus niger combinate system for removal of uranium from wastewater.

    PubMed

    He, Jia-dong; Wang, Yong-dong; Hu, Nan; Ding, Dexin; Sun, Jing; Deng, Qin-wen; Li, Chang-wu; Xu, Fei

    2015-12-01

    Aspergillus niger was inoculated to the roots of five plants, and the Syngonium podophyllum-A. niger combinate system (SPANCS) was found to be the most effective in removing uranium from hydroponic liquid with initial uranium concentration of 5 mg L(-1). Furthermore, the hydroponic experiments on the removal of uranium from the hydroponic liquids with initial uranium concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mg L(-1) by the SPANCS were conducted, the inhibitory effect of A. niger on the growth of S. podophyllum in the SPANCS was studied, the accumulation characteristics of uranium by S. podophyllum in the SPANCS were analyzed, and the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra were measured. The results show that the removal of uranium by the SPANCS from the hydroponic liquids with initial uranium concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mg L(-1) reached 98.20, 97.90, and 98.50%, respectively, after 37 days of accumulation of uranium; that the uranium concentrations in the hydroponic liquids decreased to 0.009, 0.021, and 0.045 mg L(-1), respectively, which are lower than the stipulated concentration for discharge of 0.050 mg L(-1) by the People's Republic of China; that A. niger helped to generate more groups in the root of S. podophyllum which can improve the complexing capability of S. podophyllum for uranium; and that the uranium accumulated in the root of S. podophyllum was in the form of phosphate uranyl and carboxylic uranyl.

  16. Applications of porous electrodes to metal-ion removal and the design of battery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Trost, G.G.

    1983-09-01

    This dissertation treats the use of porous electrodes as electrochemical reactors for the removal of dilute metal ions. A methodology for the scale-up of porous electrodes used in battery applications is given. Removal of 4 ..mu..g Pb/cc in 1 M sulfuric acid was investigated in atmospheric and high-pressure, flow-through porous reactors. The atmospheric reactor used a reticulated vitreous carbon porous bed coated in situ with a mercury film. Best results show 98% removal of lead from the feed stream. Results are summarized in a dimensionless plot of Sherwood number vs Peclet number. High-pressure, porous-electrode experiments were performed to investigate the effect of pressure on the current efficiency. Pressures were varied up to 120 bar on electrode beds of copper or lead-coated spheres. The copper spheres showed high hydrogen evolution rates which inhibited lead deposition, even at high cathodic overpotentials. Use of lead spheres inhibited hydrogen evolution but often resulted in the formation of lead sulfate layers; these layers were difficult to reduce back to lead. Experimental data of one-dimensional porous battery electrodes are combined with a model for the current collector and cell connectors to predict ultimate specific energy and maximum specific power for complete battery systems. Discharge behavior of the plate as a whole is first presented as a function of depth of discharge. These results are combined with the voltage and weight penalties of the interconnecting bus and post, positive and negative active material, cell container, etc. to give specific results for the lithium-aluminum/iron sulfide high-temperature battery. Subject to variation is the number of positive electrodes, grid conductivity, minimum current-collector weight, and total delivered capacity. The battery can be optimized for maximum energy or power, or a compromise design may be selected.

  17. Enhanced removal of petroleum hydrocarbons using a bioelectrochemical remediation system with pre-cultured anodes.

    PubMed

    Venkidusamy, Krishnaveni; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Marzorati, Massimo; Lockington, Robin; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical remediation (BER) systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have recently emerged as a green technology for the effective remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminants (PH) coupled with simultaneous energy recovery. Recent research has shown that biofilms previously enriched for substrate degrading bacteria resulted in excellent performance in terms of substrate removal and electricity generation but the effects on hydrocarbon contaminant degradation were not examined. Here we investigate the differences between enriched biofilm anodes and freshly inoculated new anodes in diesel fed single chamber mediatorless microbial fuel cells (DMFC) using various techniques for the enhancement of PH contaminant remediation with concomitant electricity generation. An anodophilic microbial consortium previously selected for over a year through continuous culturing with a diesel concentration of about 800mgl(-1) and which now showed complete removal of this concentration of diesel within 30days was compared to that of a freshly inoculated new anode MFC (showing 83.4% removal of diesel) with a simultaneous power generation of 90.81mW/m(2) and 15.04mW/m(2) respectively. The behaviour of pre-cultured anodes at a higher concentration of PH (8000mgl(-1)) was also investigated. Scanning electron microscopy observation revealed a thick biofilm covering the pre-cultured anodic electrode but not the anode from the freshly inoculated MFC. High resolution imaging showed the presence of thin 60nm diametre pilus-like projections emanating from the cells. Anodic microbial community profiling confirmed that the selection for diesel degrading exoelectrogenic bacteria had occurred. Identification of a biodegradative gene (alkB) provided strong evidence of the catabolic pathway used for diesel degradation in the DMFCs.

  18. PHYSICAL REMOVAL OF MICROBIAL CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER – WATTS PREMIER INC. WP-4V DRINKING WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Watts Premier WP-4V four-stage POU RO system was tested for removal of bacteria and viruses at NSF’s Drinking Water Treatment Systems Laboratory. Five systems were challenged with the bacteriophage viruses fr and MS2, and the bacteria Brevundimonas diminutaEM. The ...

  19. Design of multiplexed fiber optic chemical sensing system using clad-removable optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Chang-Yong; Dhital, Dipesh; Lee, Jung-Ryul; Park, Gyuhae; Kwon, Il-Bum

    2012-02-01

    To prevent possible threats to public safety and economic loss from chemical leakage accidents, novel chemical sensing techniques for regular monitoring and leakage detection have been developed for various fields. We propose a fiber optic liquid chemical sensor (FOCS) system using specialty optical fibers and an optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR), and is based on the leaky wave mode sensing principle. OTDR enables simple multiplexing where individual sensor nodes along the fiber length could be interrogated by a common OTDR. The sensor node in the optical fiber is prepared by removing the desired length of a protective layer using mechanical stripping and chemical etching techniques. A novel laser stripping technique with superior capability to fabricate quasi-distributed dense sensor nodes is devised as well. The FOCS system is further analyzed to characterize the sensor response behavior in relation to the sensor node length and possible environmental and chemical temperature effect. Under the condition satisfying the leaky wave mode principle and within the minimum acceptable refractive index (RI) range by the system, this FOCS system could monitor numerous liquid chemicals with variable refractive indices and has been tested with positive results. In addition, the system shows the possibility for multi-point detection and is further expanded into a hybrid technique capable of estimating the refractive index range of the detected chemical.

  20. Selenium removal and mass balance in a constructed flow-through wetland system.

    PubMed

    Gao, S; Tanji, K K; Lin, Z Q; Terry, N; Peters, D W

    2003-01-01

    A field study on the removal of Se from agricultural subsurface drainage was conducted from May 1997 to February 2001 in the Tulare Lake Drainage District (TLDD) of San Joaquin Valley, California. A flow-through wetland system was constructed consisting of ten 15- x 76-m unlined cells that were continuously flooded and planted with either a monotype or combination of plants, including sturdy bulrush [Schoenoplectus robustus (Pursh) M.T. Strong], baltic rush (Juncus balticus Willd.), smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora Loisel.), rabbitsfoot grass [Polypogon monspeliensis (L.) Desf.], salt-grass lDistichlis spicata (L.) Greene], cattail (Typha latifolia L.), tule [Schoenoplectus acutus (Muhl. ex Bigelow) A. Löve & D. Löve], and widgeon grass (Ruppia maritima L.). One cell had no vegetation planted. The objectives of this research were to evaluate Se removal efficiency of each wetland cell and to carry out a mass balance on Se. The inflow drainage water to the cells had average annual Se concentrations of 19 to 22 microg L(-1) dominated by selenate [Se(VI), 95%]. Average weekly water residence time varied from about 3 to 15 d for Cells 1 through 7 (target 7 d), 19 to 33 d for Cells 8 and 9 (target 21 d), and 13 to 18 d for Cell 10 (target 14 d). Average weekly Se concentration ratios of outflow to inflow ranged from 0.45 to 0.79 and mass ratio (concentration x water volume) from 0.24 to 0.52 for year 2000, that is, 21 to 55% reduction in Se concentration and 48 to 76% Se removal in mass by the wetland, respectively. The nonvegetated cell showed the least Se removal both in concentration and in mass. The global mass balance showed that on the average about 59% of the total inflow Se was retained within the cells and Se outputs were outflow (35%), seepage (4%), and volatilization (2%). Independent measurements of the Se retained in the cells totaled 53% of the total Se inflow: 33% in the surface (0-20 cm) sediment, 18% in the organic detrital layer above the

  1. System for continuously and catalytically removing arsenic from shale oil and regenerating the catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, S.K.

    1989-04-25

    A system is described for producing and upgrading shale oil, comprising: (a) an oil shale retort for liberating a gaseous effluent stream containing hydrocarbons, residual amounts of arsenic and retort water vapor; (b) means connected to the retort for receiving the effluent stream, and recovering a liquid containing shale oil, arsenic and retort water; (c) separator means connected to the liquid recovery means for receiving the liquid and separating the shale oil arsenic from the retort water; (d) retort water purification means connected to the separator means for receiving and substantially purifying the retort water; (e) a first guard bed containing an arsenic-removing absorber; (f) a second guard bed containing an arsenic-removing absorber; (g) a first means interconnecting the separator means with each of the guard beds and having a first valve means for alternately directing a flow of the shale oil and arsenic through each of the guard beds; (h) a second means interconnecting the retort water purification means with each of the guard beds and having a second value means for alternately directing a flow of the purified retort water through each of the guard beds in opposite phase relationship to the flow of shade oil and arsenic through each of the guard beds.

  2. Removal of nalidixic acid and its degradation products by an integrated MBR-ozonation system.

    PubMed

    Pollice, A; Laera, G; Cassano, D; Diomede, S; Pinto, A; Lopez, A; Mascolo, G

    2012-02-15

    Chemical-biological degradation of a widely spread antibacterial (nalidixic acid) was successfully obtained by an integrated membrane bioreactor (MBR)-ozonation process. The composition of the treated solution simulated the wastewater from the production of the target pharmaceutical, featuring high salinity and a relevant concentration of sodium acetate. Aim of treatment integration was to exploit the synergistic effects of chemical oxidation and bioprocesses, by adopting the latter to remove most of the COD and the ozonation biodegradable products. Integration was achieved by placing ozonation in the recirculation stream of the bioreactor effluent. The recirculation flow rate was three-fold the MBR feed, and the performance of the integrated system was compared to the standard polishing configuration (single ozonation step after the MBR). Results showed that the introduction of the ozonation step did not cause relevant drawbacks to both biological and filtration processes. nalidixic acid passed undegraded through the MBR and was completely removed in the ozonation step. Complete degradation of most of the detected ozonation products was better achieved with the integrated MBR-ozonation process than using the sequential treatment configuration, i.e. ozone polishing after MBR, given the same ozone dosage.

  3. [Nitrate removal from recirculating aquaculture system using polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate as carbon source ].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanhe; Liu, Lili; Qiu, Tianlei; Gao, Min; Han, Meilin; Yuan, Ding; Wang, Xuming

    2014-09-04

    [ OBJECTIVE] Polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) was used as solid carbon source and biofilm carrier to remove nitrate from recirculating aquaculture system (RAS). Dynamics of microbial community structure in biofilm coating on carbon source packed into denitrification reactor were investigated. [METHODS] Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was used to analyze the microbial community in biofilm from denitrifiation reactor. Bacteria degrading PHBV were isolated from the reactor using pure culture method. [RESULTS] Nitrate decreased remarkably in the RAS connected with dentrification reactor. In contrast, Nitrate increased continuously in the conventional RAS without dentrification reactor. According to the phylogenetic analysis, the microbes in the biofilm samples from denitrification reactor were divided into Proteobacteria ( p-proteobacteria, γ-proteobacteria and δ- proteobacteria) , Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. The major advantageous populations were Acidovorax and Bacillus in the 40-day reactor. The advantageous populations in the 150-day reactor were in order of Clostridium, Desulfitobacterium, Dechloromonas, Pseudoxanthomonas and Flavobacterium. Pure cultures of bacteria degrading PHBV isolated from denitrification reactor were classified into Acidovorax, Methylibium, Pseudoxanthomonas and Dechloromonas. [CONCLUSION] Nitrate could be removed effectively from RAS using PHBV as carbon source. Advantageous bacteria and their dynamic changes were ascertained in biofilm from denitrification reactor packed with PHBV.

  4. Electrical Stimulation Improves Microbial Salinity Resistance and Organofluorine Removal in Bioelectrochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Huajun; Zhang, Xueqin; Guo, Kun; Vaiopoulou, Eleni; Shen, Dongsheng; Long, Yuyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Fed batch bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) based on electrical stimulation were used to treat p-fluoronitrobenzene (p-FNB) wastewater at high salinities. At a NaCl concentration of 40 g/liter, p-FNB was removed 100% in 96 h in the BES, whereas in the biotic control (BC) (absence of current), p-FNB removal was only 10%. By increasing NaCl concentrations from 0 g/liter to 40 g/liter, defluorination efficiency decreased around 40% in the BES, and in the BC it was completely ceased. p-FNB was mineralized by 30% in the BES and hardly in the BC. Microorganisms were able to store 3.8 and 0.7 times more K+ and Na+ intracellularly in the BES than in the BC. Following the same trend, the ratio of protein to soluble polysaccharide increased from 3.1 to 7.8 as the NaCl increased from 0 to 40 g/liter. Both trends raise speculation that an electrical stimulation drives microbial preference toward K+ and protein accumulation to tolerate salinity. These findings are in accordance with an enrichment of halophilic organisms in the BES. Halobacterium dominated in the BES by 56.8% at a NaCl concentration of 40 g/liter, while its abundance was found as low as 17.5% in the BC. These findings propose a new method of electrical stimulation to improve microbial salinity resistance. PMID:25819966

  5. System dynamics modeling of nitrogen removal in a stormwater infiltration basin with biosorption-activated media.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Zhemin; Chang, Ni-Bin; Wanielista, Martin P; Williams, Evan Shane

    2013-07-01

    Stormwater infiltration basins, one of the typical stormwater best management practices, are commonly constructed for surface water pollution control, flood mitigation, and groundwater restoration in rural or residential areas. These basins have soils with better infiltration capacity than the native soil; however, the ever-increasing contribution of nutrients to groundwater from stormwater due to urban expansion makes existing infiltration basins unable to meet groundwater quality criteria related to environmental sustainability and public health. This issue requires retrofitting current infiltration basins for flood control as well as nutrient control before the stormwater enters the groundwater. An existing stormwater infiltration basin in north-central Florida was selected, retrofitted, and monitored to identify subsurface physiochemical and biological processes during 2007-2010 to investigate nutrient control processes. This implementation in the nexus of contaminant hydrology and ecological engineering adopted amended soil layers packed with biosorption activated media (BAM; tire crumb, silt, clay, and sand) to perform nutrient removal in a partitioned forebay using a berm. This study presents an infiltration basin-nitrogen removal (IBNR) model, a system dynamics model that simulates nitrogen cycling in this BAM-based stormwater infiltration basin with respect to changing hydrologic conditions and varying dissolved nitrogen concentrations. Modeling outputs of IBNR indicate that denitrification is the biogeochemical indicator in the BAM layer that accounted for a loss of about one third of the total dissolved nitrogen mass input.

  6. Simulation of integrated pollutant removal (IPR) water-treatment system using ASPEN Plus

    SciTech Connect

    Harendra, Sivaram; Oryshcyhn, Danylo [U.S. DOE Ochs, Thomas [U.S. DOE Gerdemann, Stephen; Clark, John

    2013-01-01

    Capturing CO2 from fossil fuel combustion provides an opportunity for tapping a significant water source which can be used as service water for a capture-ready power plant and its peripherals. Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have patented a process—Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR®)—that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO2 stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Water condensed from oxy-combustion flue gas via the IPR system has been analyzed for composition and an approach for its treatment—for in-process reuse and for release—has been outlined. A computer simulation model in ASPEN Plus has been developed to simulate water treatment of flue gas derived wastewater from IPR systems. At the field installation, water condensed in the IPR process contains fly ash particles, sodium (largely from spray-tower buffering) and sulfur species as well as heavy metals, cations, and anions. An IPR wastewater treatment system was modeled using unit operations such as equalization, coagulation and flocculation, reverse osmosis, lime softening, crystallization, and pH correction. According to the model results, 70% (by mass) of the inlet stream can be treated as pure water, the other 20% yields as saleable products such as gypsum (CaSO4) and salt (NaCl) and the remaining portion is the waste. More than 99% of fly ash particles are removed in the coagulation and flocculation unit and these solids can be used as filler materials in various applications with further treatment. Results discussed relate to a slipstream IPR installation and are verified experimentally in the coagulation/flocculation step.

  7. Mechanistic characterization of the thioredoxin system in the removal of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Pannala, Venkat R; Dash, Ranjan K

    2015-01-01

    The thioredoxin system, which consists of a family of proteins, including thioredoxin (Trx), peroxiredoxin (Prx), and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), plays a critical role in the defense against oxidative stress by removing harmful hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Specifically, Trx donates electrons to Prx to remove H2O2 and then TrxR maintains the reduced Trx concentration with NADPH as the cofactor. Despite a great deal of kinetic information gathered on the removal of H2O2 by the Trx system from various sources/species, a mechanistic understanding of the associated enzymes is still not available. We address this issue by developing a thermodynamically consistent mathematical model of the Trx system which entails mechanistic details and provides quantitative insights into the kinetics of the TrxR and Prx enzymes. Consistent with experimental studies, the model analyses of the available data show that both enzymes operate by a ping-pong mechanism. The proposed mechanism for TrxR, which incorporates substrate inhibition by NADPH and intermediate protonation states, well describes the available data and accurately predicts the bell-shaped behavior of the effect of pH on the TrxR activity. Most importantly, the model also predicts the inhibitory effects of the reaction products (NADP(+) and Trx(SH)2) on the TrxR activity for which suitable experimental data are not available. The model analyses of the available data on the kinetics of Prx from mammalian sources reveal that Prx operates at very low H2O2 concentrations compared to their human parasite counterparts. Furthermore, the model is able to predict the dynamic overoxidation of Prx at high H2O2 concentrations, consistent with the available data. The integrated Prx-TrxR model simulations well describe the NADPH and H2O2 degradation dynamics and also show that the coupling of TrxR- and Prx-dependent reduction of H2O2 allowed ultrasensitive changes in the Trx concentration in response to changes in the TrxR concentration at

  8. An Integrated Model for Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. Muth; K. M. Bryden

    2003-12-01

    Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion from wind and water and in maintaining soil organic carbon. Because of this, multiple factors must be considered when assessing sustainable residue harvest limits. Validated and accepted modeling tools for assessing these impacts include the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation Version 2 (RUSLE2), the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS), and the Soil Conditioning Index. Currently, these models do not work together as a single integrated model. Rather, use of these models requires manual interaction and data transfer. As a result, it is currently not feasible to use these computational tools to perform detailed sustainable agricultural residue availability assessments across large spatial domains or to consider a broad range of land management practices. This paper presents an integrated modeling strategy that couples existing datasets with the RUSLE2 water erosion, WEPS wind erosion, and Soil Conditioning Index soil carbon modeling tools to create a single integrated residue removal modeling system. This enables the exploration of the detailed sustainable residue harvest scenarios needed to establish sustainable residue availability. Using this computational tool, an assessment study of residue availability for the state of Iowa was performed. This study included all soil types in the state of Iowa, four representative crop rotation schemes, variable crop yields, three tillage management methods, and five residue removal methods. The key conclusions of this study are that under current management practices and crop yields nearly 26.5 million Mg of agricultural residue are sustainably accessible in the state of Iowa, and that through the adoption of no till practices residue removal could sustainably approach 40

  9. RS-34 Phoenix In-Space Propulsion System Applied to Active Debris Removal Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esther, Elizabeth A.; Burnside, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    In-space propulsion is a high percentage of the cost when considering Active Debris Removal mission. For this reason it is desired to research if existing designs with slight modification would meet mission requirements to aid in reducing cost of the overall mission. Such a system capable of rendezvous, close proximity operations, and de-orbit of Envisat class resident space objects has been identified in the existing RS-34 Phoenix. RS-34 propulsion system is a remaining asset from the de-commissioned United States Air Force Peacekeeper program; specifically the pressure-fed storable bi-propellant Stage IV Post Boost Propulsion System. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) gained experience with the RS-34 propulsion system on the successful Ares I-X flight test program flown in the Ares I-X Roll control system (RoCS). The heritage hardware proved extremely robust and reliable and sparked interest for further utilization on other potential in-space applications. Subsequently, MSFC has obtained permission from the USAF to obtain all the remaining RS-34 stages for re-use opportunities. The MSFC Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) was commissioned to lead a study for evaluation of the Rocketdyne produced RS-34 propulsion system as it applies to an active debris removal design reference mission for resident space object targets including Envisat. Originally designed, the RS-34 Phoenix provided in-space six-degrees-of freedom operational maneuvering to deploy payloads at multiple orbital locations. The RS-34 Concept Study lead by sought to further understand application for a similar orbital debris design reference mission to provide propulsive capability for rendezvous, close proximity operations to support the capture phase of the mission, and deorbit of single or multiple large class resident space objects. Multiple configurations varying the degree of modification were identified to trade for dry mass optimization and

  10. Comparison of adsorption and photo-Fenton processes for phenol and paracetamol removing from aqueous solutions: single and binary systems.

    PubMed

    Rad, Leila Roshanfekr; Haririan, Ismaeil; Divsar, Faten

    2015-02-05

    In the present study, adsorption and photo-Fenton processes have been compared for the removal of phenol and paracetamol from aqueous solutions in a single and binary systems. NaX nanozeolites and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were used during adsorption and photo-Fenton processes, respectively. Both nanoparticles were synthesized using microwave heating method. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) analysis. Based on results, more than 99% removing percentages of phenol and paracetamol were obtained during photo-Fenton process at initial concentrations of 10, 20, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of phenol and paracetamol. Moreover, the complete removing of phenol and paracetamol was only achieved at lower initial concentrations than 10 mg/L for phenol and paracetamol during adsorption process. The results showed a significant dependence of the phenol and paracetamol removing on the initial concentrations of phenol and paracetamol for selection of process. The photo-Fenton process could be considered an alternative method in higher initial concentrations of phenol and paracetamol. However, the adsorption process due to economical issue was preferred for phenol and paracetamol removing at lower initial concentrations. The kinetic data of photo-Fenton and adsorption processes were well described using first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The results of phenol and paracetamol removing in a binary system confirmed the obtained results of single removing of phenol and paracetamol in selection of process.

  11. Comparison of adsorption and photo-Fenton processes for phenol and paracetamol removing from aqueous solutions: Single and binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rad, Leila Roshanfekr; Haririan, Ismaeil; Divsar, Faten

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, adsorption and photo-Fenton processes have been compared for the removal of phenol and paracetamol from aqueous solutions in a single and binary systems. NaX nanozeolites and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were used during adsorption and photo-Fenton processes, respectively. Both nanoparticles were synthesized using microwave heating method. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) analysis. Based on results, more than 99% removing percentages of phenol and paracetamol were obtained during photo-Fenton process at initial concentrations of 10, 20, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of phenol and paracetamol. Moreover, the complete removing of phenol and paracetamol was only achieved at lower initial concentrations than 10 mg/L for phenol and paracetamol during adsorption process. The results showed a significant dependence of the phenol and paracetamol removing on the initial concentrations of phenol and paracetamol for selection of process. The photo-Fenton process could be considered an alternative method in higher initial concentrations of phenol and paracetamol. However, the adsorption process due to economical issue was preferred for phenol and paracetamol removing at lower initial concentrations. The kinetic data of photo-Fenton and adsorption processes were well described using first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The results of phenol and paracetamol removing in a binary system confirmed the obtained results of single removing of phenol and paracetamol in selection of process.

  12. Complications of Transfemoral Removal of Percutaneous Transfemorally Implanted Port-Catheter Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yahiro, Yoshiyuki; Toyota, Naoyuki Kakizawa, Hideaki; Hieda, Masashi; Hirai, Nobuhiko; Naito, Akira; Ito, Katsuhide

    2006-10-15

    Our purpose is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of the withdrawal procedure of percutaneous transfemorally implanted port-catheter systems. Thirty-seven patients (17.7%) underwent the withdrawal procedure of this port-catheter system among 209 patients. The reasons for withdrawal were as follows: termination of intra-arterial chemotherapy (n = 7), obstruction of hepatic artery (n = 5), port infection (n = 4), catheter infection (n = 4), catheter obstruction (n = 4), lower-limb palsy and pain (n = 2), exposure of the port due to skin defect (n = 2), patient's desire (n = 2), side effect of chemotherapy (n = 1), no effectiveness of chemotherapy (n = 1), hematoma at the puncture site (n = 1), duodenum perforation by the catheter (n = 1), intermittent claudication due to severe stenosis of right common iliac artery (n = 1), dissection of common hepatic artery (n = 1), and broken catheter (n = 1). In thirty-four of the 37 cases, the port-catheter system was successfully withdrawn without any complications. Clinical success rate was 91.9%. Complications occurred in three cases (8.1%), which were a pseudoaneurysm, thromboembolism of the right common iliac artery, and continuous bleeding from the subcutaneous pocket where the port system was placed for 1 month. In 15 cases, correction of the catheter tip or exchange for dislocation of the tip had to be done without withdrawal. It is not rare to withdraw port-catheter systems in cases of infection or hematoma around the system. Although withdrawal of a percutaneous transfemorally implanted port-catheter system is a relatively safe procedure, the port-catheter system should not be removed unless absolutely indicated.

  13. Effect of basic operating parameters on biological phosphorus removal in a continuous-flow anaerobic-anoxic activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Kapagiannidis, A G; Zafiriadis, I; Aivasidis, A

    2012-03-01

    A continuous-flow anaerobic-anoxic (A2) activated sludge system was operated for efficient enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). Because of the system configuration with no aeration zones, phosphorus (P) uptake takes place solely under anoxic conditions with simultaneous denitrification. Basic operating conditions, namely biomass concentration, influent carbon to phosphorus ratio and anaerobic retention time were chosen as variables in order to assess their impact on the system performance. The experimental results indicated that maintenance of biomass concentration above 2,500 mg MLVSS/L resulted in the complete phosphate removal from the influent (i.e. 15 mg PO(4) (3-)-P/L) for a mean hydraulic residence time (HRT) of 15 h. Additionally, by increasing the influent COD/P ratio from 10 to 20 g/g, the system P removal efficiency was improved although the experimental results indicated a possible enhancement of the competition between phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) and other microbial populations without phosphorus uptake ability. Moreover, because of the use of acetate (i.e. easily biodegradable substrate) as the sole carbon source in the system feed, application of anaerobic retention times greater than 2 h resulted in no significant release of additional P in the anaerobic zone and no further amelioration of the system P removal efficiency. The application of anoxic P removal resulted in more than 50% reduction of the organic carbon necessitated for nitrogen and phosphorus removal when compared to a conventional EBPR system incorporating aerobic phosphorus removal.

  14. A Study on the Development of a Robot-Assisted Automatic Laser Hair Removal System

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyoung-woo; Park, Sungwoo; Noh, Seungwoo; Lee, Dong-Hun; Yoon, Chiyul; Koh, Wooseok; Kim, Youdan; Chung, Jin Ho; Kim, Hee Chan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background and Objective: The robot-assisted automatic laser hair removal (LHR) system is developed to automatically detect any arbitrary shape of the desired LHR treatment area and to provide uniform laser irradiation to the designated skin area. Methods: For uniform delivery of laser energy, a unit of a commercial LHR device, a laser distance sensor, and a high-resolution webcam are attached at the six axis industrial robot's end-effector, which can be easily controlled using a graphical user interface (GUI). During the treatment, the system provides real-time treatment progress as well as the total number of “pick and place” automatically. Results: During the test, it was demonstrated that the arbitrary shapes were detected, and that the laser was delivered uniformly. The localization error test and the area-per-spot test produced satisfactory outcome averages of 1.04 mm error and 38.22 mm2/spot, respectively. Conclusions: Results showed that the system successfully demonstrated accuracy and effectiveness. The proposed system is expected to become a promising device in LHR treatment. PMID:25343281

  15. The effect of free nitrous acid on key anaerobic processes in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    PubMed

    Ye, Liu; Pijuan, Maite; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the effect of nitrite/FNA on the anaerobic metabolism of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) is investigated. The results clearly show that FNA has a detrimental effect on the acetate uptake rate by both PAOs and GAOs, but this adverse effect is much stronger on PAOs than on GAOs. Also, when FNA was increased, phosphate release to acetate uptake ratio by PAOs increased substantially (250-300% compared to control), which was accompanied by decreases (40-60%) in glycogen degradation and PHA production to VFA uptake. In contrast, these ratios for GAOs remained constant or increased slightly towards the highest FNA concentration applied. These results indicate that the anaerobic metabolism of PAOs is more adversely affected than that of GAOs when FNA is present. This might provide a competitive advantage to GAOs over PAOs in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems when nitrite is present.

  16. Prediction of intracellular storage polymers using quantitative image analysis in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Daniela P; Leal, Cristiano; Cunha, Jorge R; Oehmen, Adrian; Amaral, A Luís; Reis, Maria A M; Ferreira, Eugénio C

    2013-04-03

    The present study focuses on predicting the concentration of intracellular storage polymers in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) systems. For that purpose, quantitative image analysis techniques were developed for determining the intracellular concentrations of PHA (PHB and PHV) with Nile blue and glycogen with aniline blue staining. Partial least squares (PLS) were used to predict the standard analytical values of these polymers by the proposed methodology. Identification of the aerobic and anaerobic stages proved to be crucial for improving the assessment of PHA, PHB and PHV intracellular concentrations. Current Nile blue based methodology can be seen as a feasible starting point for further enhancement. Glycogen detection based on the developed aniline blue staining methodology combined with the image analysis data proved to be a promising technique, toward the elimination of the need for analytical off-line measurements.

  17. Process and system for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gaseous streams

    DOEpatents

    Basu, Arunabha [Aurora, IL; Meyer, Howard S [Hoffman Estates, IL; Lynn, Scott [Pleasant Hill, CA; Leppin, Dennis [Chicago, IL; Wangerow, James R [Medinah, IL

    2012-08-14

    A multi-stage UCSRP process and system for removal of sulfur from a gaseous stream in which the gaseous stream, which contains a first amount of H.sub.2S, is provided to a first stage UCSRP reactor vessel operating in an excess SO.sub.2 mode at a first amount of SO.sub.2, producing an effluent gas having a reduced amount of SO.sub.2, and in which the effluent gas is provided to a second stage UCSRP reactor vessel operating in an excess H.sub.2S mode, producing a product gas having an amount of H.sub.2S less than said first amount of H.sub.2S.

  18. Rapid removal of nitrobenzene in a three-phase ozone loaded system with gas-liquid-liquid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Shiyin; Zhu, Jiangpeng; Wang, Guoxiang; Ni, Lixiao; Zhang, Yong; Green, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the removal rate of nitrobenzene (NB) using a new gas-liquid-liquid (G-L-L) three-phase ozone loaded system consisting of a gaseous ozone, an aqueous solvent phase, and a fluorinated solvent phase (perfluorodecalin, or FDC). The removal rate of NB was quantified in relation to six factors including 1) initial pH, 2) initial NB dosage, 3) gaseous ozone dosage, 4) free radical scavenger, 5) FDC pre-aerated gaseous ozone, and 6) reuse of FDC. The NB removal rate is positively affected by the first three factors. Compared with the conventional gas-liquid (water) (G-L) two-phase ozonation system, the free radical scavenger (tertiary butyl alcohol) has much less influence on the removal rate of NB in the G-L-L system. The FDC loaded ozone acts as an ozone reservoir and serves as the main reactive phase in the G-L-L three-phase system. The reuse of FDC has little influence on the removal rate of NB. These experimental results suggest that the oxidation efficiency of ozonation in the G-L-L three-phase system is better than that in the conventional G-L two-phase system.

  19. Laboratory tests in support of the MSRE reactive gas removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, J.C.; Del Cul, G.D.; Caja, J.; Toth, L.M.; Williams, D.F.; Thomas, K.S.; Clark, D.E.

    1997-07-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since December 1969, at which time the molten salt mixture of LiF-BeF{sub 2}-ZrF{sub 4}-{sup 233}UF{sub 4} (64.5-30.3-5.0-0.13 mol%) was transferred to fuel salt drain tanks for storage. In the late 1980s, increased radiation in one of the gas lines from the drain tank was attributed to {sup 233}UF{sub 6}. In 1994 two gas samples were withdraw (from a gas line in the Vent House connecting to the drain tanks) and analyzed. Surprisingly, 350 mm Hg of F{sub 2}, 70 mm Hg of UF{sub 6}, and smaller amounts of other gases were found in both of the samples. To remote this gas from above the drain tanks and all of the associated piping, the reactive gas removal system (RGRS) was designed. This report details the laboratory testing of the RGRS, using natural uranium, prior to its implementation at the MSRE facility. The testing was performed to ensure that the equipment functioned properly and was sufficient to perform the task while minimizing exposure to personnel. In addition, the laboratory work provided the research and development effort necessary to maximize the performance of the system. Throughout this work technicians and staff who were to be involved in RGRS operation at the MSRE site worked directly with the research staff in completing the laboratory testing phase. Consequently, at the end of the laboratory work, the personnel who were to be involved in the actual operations had acquired all of the training and experience necessary to continue with the process of reactive gas removal.

  20. Removal efficiency and balance of nitrogen in a recirculating aquaculture system integrated with constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Fei; Liang, Wei; Yu, Tao; Cheng, Shui P; He, Feng; Wu, Zhen B

    2011-01-01

    The nitrogen (N) balance for aquaculture is an important aspect, especially in China, and it is attributed to the eutrophication in many freshwater bodies. In recent years, constructed wetlands (CWs) have been widely used in wastewater treatment and ecosystem restoration. A recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) consisting of CWs and 4 fish ponds was set up in Wuhan, China. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fingerlings were fed for satiation daily for 168 days with 2 diets containing 5.49 % and 6.53 % nitrogen, respectively. The objectives of this study were to investigate the N budget in the RAS, and try to find out the feasibility of controlling N accumulation in the fish pond. It is expected that the study can provide a mass balance for the fate of N in the eco-friendly treatment system to avoid eutrophication. The results showed that the removal rates of ammonia (NH(+)(4)-N), sum of nitrate & nitrite (NO(-)(X)-N), and total nitrogen (TN) by the CWs were 20-55%, 38-84 % and 39-57 %, respectively. Denitrification in the CWs was the main pathway of nitrogen loss (41.67 %). Nitrogen accumulation in pond water and sediment accounted for 3.39 % and 12.65 % of total nitrogen loss, respectively. The nitrogen removal efficiency and budget showed that the CW could be used to control excessive nitrogen accumulation in fish ponds. From the viewpoint of the nitrogen pollution control, the RAS combined with the constructed wetland can be applied to ensure the sustainable development for aquaculture.

  1. Long-term effect of low concentration Cr(VI) on P removal in granule-based enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) system.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jing; Su, Bin; Sun, Peide; Lou, Juqing; Han, Jingyi

    2015-02-01

    In light of the fact that most wastewater in China contained both industrial and domestic wastewater, a 52-d systematical investigation was conducted on the long-term effect of low concentration Cr(VI) (0.3-0.8 mg L(-1)) on P removal performance of granule-based EBPR system in this study. The mechanisms were likewise discussed. Results showed that high Cr(VI) concentration (⩾0.5 mg L(-1)) could significantly inhibit P removal, while this phenomenon was not found when Cr(VI) concentration was less than (or equal to) 0.4 mg L(-1). Most of the granules was disintegrated and filamentous bacteria overgrew inducing sludge bulking occurred at 0.7 mg L(-1) Cr(VI). During the exposure test, the abundance of poly-phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) significantly decreased while the populations of glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) and other bacteria increased. Both production and degradation of poly-β-hydroxyakanoates (PHAs) were apparently inhibited. An improved polysaccharide/protein (PS/PN) ratio was observed with the increasing Cr(VI) concentration, implying excessive polysaccharide was secreted by microorganisms to support its resistance to the toxicity of Cr(VI). Besides, good linear regression between PS/PN ratio and the granule size (R(2)=-0.86, p<0.01) was obtained, indicating that high PS/PN was adverse to granule stability. Correlation analysis indicated that the accumulation of granules intracellular Cr was directly responsible for the observed inhibitory effect on P removal process. The long-term Cr(VI) treatment had irreversible effects on granule-based EBPR system as it could not revive after a 16-d recovery process.

  2. Removal of chemical oxygen demand and dissolved nutrients by a sunken lawn infiltration system during intermittent storm events.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lizhu; Yang, Huan; Li, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Urban surface water runoff typically contains high but varying amounts of organic matter and nutrients that require removal before reuse. Infiltration systems such as sunken lawns can improve water quality. However, there is currently insufficient information describing the treatment efficiency of lawn-based infiltration systems. In this study, novel sunken lawn infiltration systems (SLISs) were designed and their pollutant removal effectiveness was assessed. The results revealed that SLISs with Poa pratensis and Lolium perenne effectively removed most chemical oxygen demand (CODCr) and dissolved nutrients. Average CODCr, total nitrogen (TN), ammonium-nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations were reduced by 78.93, 66.64, 71.86 and 75.83%, respectively, and the corresponding effluent concentrations met the standard for urban miscellaneous water consumption in China. The NH4(+)-N in the synthetic runoff was shown to be removed by adsorption during the stormwater dosing and nitrification during subsequent dry days, as well as through uptake by plants. Phosphorus was mainly removed by adsorption and chemical precipitation. The NH4(+)-N and phosphorus Langmuir isotherm model fitted the clay loam soil adsorption process better than the Freundlich model. Overall, these results indicate that an SLIS provides an alternative means of removing runoff pollutants owing to its efficiency, easy operation and maintenance.

  3. A comparison between the theory and reality of full-scale step-feed nutrient removal systems.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B R; Goodwin, S; Daigger, G T; Crawford, G V

    2005-01-01

    Capacity enhancement and volume reduction benefits of step-feeding fully aerobic bioreactors has been well documented. Application of step-feed technology to biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems, particularly those removing nitrogen alone or both nitrogen and phosphorus, is relatively new to the industry. In recent years, a number of full-scale step-feed facilities have been brought into service. This paper reviews nine full-scale step-feed biological nutrient removal systems--both nitrogen removal alone, and nitrogen and phosphorus removal. The objective is to compare the theoretical benefits of such systems with their actual operation. The predicted benefits of reduced bioreactor volume or increased process capacity, reduced energy usage, more robust nitrification performance, and the flexibility to tune (or de-tune) nitrification efficiency were verified in full-scale systems. Equations are also presented that may be used in the prediction of step-feed benefits. There are two primary drivers for considering a step-feed biological reactor system: 1. Reduced bioreactor volume for a defined capacity or performance or increased process capacity given a fixed bioreactor volume. 2. More robust nitrification performance. Full-scale operation of these step-feed nutrient removal systems provides a real world basis for the claimed benefits of step-feed operation. These systems have uniformly shown additional capacity. A number of them have also exhibited more robust performance, especially during storms. Where possible, side-by-side comparisons of full-scale step-feed systems with non-step-feed systems have exhibited greater process reliability and flexibility.

  4. Persistent Spinal Headache After Removal of Intrathecal Drug Delivery System: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kurnutala, Lakshmi N.; Kim, David; Sayeed, Huma; Sibai, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To report and discuss the spinal headache following insertion and removal of intrathecal drug delivery system in patients with chronic pain disorders. Case Presentation: Intrathecal drug delivery system (IDDS) was initially used for the management of chronic malignant pain; it has since been used to manage pain from other nonmalignant conditions as well. Spinal headache is one of the complications during the trial, permanent placement and after removal of intrathecal drug delivery catheter systems. A 48-year-male patient with chronic pain disorder developed a refractory spinal headache after removing the intrathecal drug delivery system requiring a surgical intervention to resolve the problem. Conclusions: Conservative management is successful in the vast majority of patients with spinal headache. Interventional procedures are required in a small fraction of patients for symptomatic relief. PMID:26587409

  5. Evaluation of three state-of-the-art water-jet systems for cutting/removing concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, C. E.

    1982-09-01

    This report documents a demonstration project to evaluate the capability of three waterjet systems for cutting or removing concrete or both. The Corps of Engineers is interested in the potential of this technology for such applications as rapid cutting of bomb-damaged selection of airfield pavement and removing of deteriorated sections of concrete structures at Civil Works projects. Because water-jet systems are capable of transmitting, without mechanical constraint, all of the available horsepower of their power sources into the concrete cutting/removing operation, they may prove to be an extremely efficient means of conducting such operations. The low-pressure water jets were able to cut a 6-in. slot in the concrete for a distance of 1-1/2 ft. in a period of 24 minutes (a rate of 6.4 ft. per hour). The relatively high-pressure water jet cut at rates of 9.6 ft. per hour for shallow cuts (less than 5 in.) and 3 ft. per hour for deeper cuts (greater than 5 in.). In addition, one of the low-pressure systems was used to remove some surface concrete. The results of this evaluation indicate that, although these water-jet systems did not demonstrate a capability for efficiently cutting concrete airfield pavements, the technology has potential. The low-pressure system demonstrated a capability for removing surface concrete efficiently.

  6. Enhanced azo dye removal through anode biofilm acclimation to toxicity in single-chamber biocatalyzed electrolysis system.

    PubMed

    Wang, You-Zhao; Wang, Ai-Jie; Liu, Wen-Zong; Sun, Qian

    2013-08-01

    Azo dye is widely used in printing and dyeing process as one of refractory wastewaters for its high chroma, stable chemical property and toxicity for aquatic organism. Biocatalyzed electrolysis system (BES) is a new developed technology to degrade organic waste in bioanode and recover recalcitrant contaminants in cathode with effective decoloration. The ion exchange membrane (IEM) separate anode and cathode for biofilm formation protection. Azo removal efficiency was up to 60.8%, but decreased to 20.5% when IEM was removed. However, expensive ion exchange membrane (IEM) not suitable for further practical application, bioelectrochemical activity of bioanode is sensitive to the toxicity of azo dye. A gradient increase of azo dye concentration was used to acclimate anode biofilm to pollutant toxicity. The azo removal efficiency can be enhanced to 73.3% in 10h reaction period after acclimation. The highest removal efficiency reached 83.7% and removal rates were increased to 8.37 from 3.04 g/h/L of dual-chamber. That indicated the feasibility for azo dye removal by single-chamber BES. The IEM cancellation not only decreased the internal resistance, but increased the current density and azo dye removal.

  7. Evaluation of acrylamide-removing properties of two Lactobacillus strains under simulated gastrointestinal conditions using a dynamic system.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Jimenez, L; Ramírez-Ortiz, K; González-Córdova, A F; Vallejo-Cordoba, B; Garcia, H S; Hernandez-Mendoza, A

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of Lactobacillus reuteri NRRL 14171 and Lactobacillus casei Shirota to remove dietary acrylamide (AA) under simulated gastrointestinal conditions using a dynamic system. The effects of different AA levels or bacteria concentration on toxin removal by Lactobacillus strains were assessed. Thereafter, AA-removing capability of bacteria strains under either fasting or postprandial simulated gastrointestinal conditions was evaluated. Commercial potato chips were analyzed for their AA content, and then used as a food model. Average AA content (34,162μg/kg) in potato chips exceeded by ca. 34-fold the indicative values recommended by the EU. Toxin removal ability was dependent on AA content and bacterial cell concentration. A reduction on bacterial viability was observed in the food model and at the end of both digestive processes evaluated. However, bacteria survived in enough concentrations to remove part of the toxin (32-73%). Both bacterial strains were able to remove AA under different simulated gastrointestinal conditions, being L. casei Shirota the most effective (ca. 70% removal). These findings confirmed the risk of potato chips as dietary AA exposure for consumers, and that strains of the genus Lactobacillus could be employed to reduce the bioavailability of dietary AA.

  8. Reliability and Maintainability Analysis for the Amine Swingbed Carbon Dioxide Removal System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    I have performed a reliability & maintainability analysis for the Amine Swingbed payload system. The Amine Swingbed is a carbon dioxide removal technology that has gone through 2,400 hours of International Space Station on-orbit use between 2013 and 2016. While the Amine Swingbed is currently an experimental payload system, the Amine Swingbed may be converted to system hardware. If the Amine Swingbed becomes system hardware, it will supplement the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) as the primary CO2 removal technology on the International Space Station. NASA is also considering using the Amine Swingbed as the primary carbon dioxide removal technology for future extravehicular mobility units and for the Orion, which will be used for the Asteroid Redirect and Journey to Mars missions. The qualitative component of the reliability and maintainability analysis is a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA). In the FMEA, I have investigated how individual components in the Amine Swingbed may fail, and what the worst case scenario is should a failure occur. The significant failure effects are the loss of ability to remove carbon dioxide, the formation of ammonia due to chemical degradation of the amine, and loss of atmosphere because the Amine Swingbed uses the vacuum of space to regenerate the Amine Swingbed. In the quantitative component of the reliability and maintainability analysis, I have assumed a constant failure rate for both electronic and nonelectronic parts. Using this data, I have created a Poisson distribution to predict the failure rate of the Amine Swingbed as a whole. I have determined a mean time to failure for the Amine Swingbed to be approximately 1,400 hours. The observed mean time to failure for the system is between 600 and 1,200 hours. This range includes initial testing of the Amine Swingbed, as well as software faults that are understood to be non-critical. If many of the commercial parts were switched to military-grade parts, the expected

  9. The lid of the container for the Mobile Base System, part of the Canadian arm, is prepared for remov

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, workers prepare to remove the lid of a container holding the Mobile Base System (MBS). The MBS is part of the Canadian Space Agency's Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), which is part of the payload on mission STS-100 to the International Space Station.

  10. REMOVAL OF MICROBIAL CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER: KOCH MEMBRANE SYSTEMS, HF-82-35-PMPW™ ULTRAFILTRATION MEMBRANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two Koch Membrane Systems HF-82-35-PMPW ultrafiltration membrane cartridges were tested for removal of viruses, bacteria, and protozoan cysts at NSF’s Drinking Water Treatment Systems Laboratory. The ETV testing was conducted as part of a series of evaluations of the Expeditiona...

  11. Radiotherapy planning of the pelvis using distortion corrected MR images: the removal of system distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, S. F.; Finnigan, D. J.; Khoo, V. S.; Mayles, P.; Dearnaley, D. P.; Leach, M. O.

    2000-08-01

    Image distortion is an important consideration in the use of magnetic resonance (MR) images for radiotherapy planning. The distortion is a consequence of system distortion (arising from main magnetic field inhomogeneity and nonlinearities in the applied magnetic field gradients) and of effects arising from the object/patient being imaged. A two-stage protocol has been developed to correct both system- and object-induced distortion in pelvic images which incorporates measures to maintain the quality, accuracy and consistency of the imaging and correction procedures. The first stage of the correction procedure is described here and involves the removal of system distortion. Object- (patient-) induced effects will be described in a subsequent work. Images are acquired with the patient lying on a flat rigid bed, which reproduces treatment conditions. A frame of marker tubes surrounding the patient and attached to the bed provides quality assurance data in each image. System distortions in the three orthogonal planes are mapped using a separate phantom, which fits closely within the quality control frame. Software has been written which automates the measurement and checking of the many marker positions which the test objects generate and which ensures that patient data are acquired using a consistent imaging protocol. Results are presented which show that the scanner and the phantoms used in measuring distortion give highly reproducible results with mean changes of the order of 0.1 mm between repeated measurements of marker positions in the same imaging session. Effective correction for in-plane components of system distortion is demonstrated.

  12. Removal of metal ions by Phormidium bigranulatum (cyanobacteria)-dominated mat in batch and continuous flow systems.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dhananjay; Rai, Jyoti; Gaur, J P

    2012-01-01

    Live Phormidium bigranulatum-dominated mat successfully removed Pb(II), Cu(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solution. Percent metal removal approached equilibrium within 4h, independent of mat thickness (0.2-1.6 mm), in batch system. But % metal removal increased with increase in mat thickness due to enhancement of biomass, which provided more metal binding sites. Metal accumulation decreased with increase in mat thickness due to lessened metal availability vis-à-vis biomass. Metal removal (%) increased with increasing mat area, but decreased with increasing metal concentration in the solution. In continuous flow system, metal accumulation increased with increasing volume of single or multi-metal solution passed over the mat. The mat removed all the tested metals from the multi-metal solution with almost the same efficiency. The maximum removal of the test metals occurred at the lowest tested flow rate. Raceway type ponds can be employed for large-scale use of Phormidium mat in bioremediation of metalliferous wastewaters.

  13. Removal performance of nitrogen and endocrine-disrupting pesticides simultaneously in the enhanced biofilm system for polluted source water pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li-Juan; Yang, Guang-Feng; Zhu, Liang; Xu, Xiang-Yang

    2014-10-01

    The removal performances of nitrogen and trace levels of endocrine-disrupting pesticides (cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos) were studied in the enhanced biofilm pretreatment system at various substrates concentrations and dissolve oxygen (DO) niches. No significant change of EDPs removal occurred with the increased feed of ammonia nitrogen in aerobic batch tests or nitrate in anaerobic batch reactors, but significantly enhanced via reed addition both in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Simultaneously enhanced denitrification and EDPs removal were achieved in the anoxic niche with reed addition. The results of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) indicated that new bands appeared, and some bands became more intense with the reed addition. Sequences analysis showed that the dominant species belonged to Methylophilaceae, Hyphomicrobium, Bacillus and Thauera, which were related to the nitrogen or EDPs removals. In addition, the growth of functional heterotrophic microbes may be promoted via reed addition.

  14. In Vitro Evaluation of a Rheolytic Thrombectomy System for Clot Removal from Five Different Temporary Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, Arno; Neuerburg, Joerg; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Vorwerk, Dierk; Guenther, Rolf W.

    1997-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of thrombus removal from temporary vena cava filters using a rheolytic thrombectomy device and to assess the embolization rate of this procedure. Methods: Five temporary vena cava filters together with porcine thrombi were placed in a vena cava flow model (semitranslucent silicone tube of 23 mm diameter, pulsatile flow at a mean flow rate of 4 L/min). A rheolytic thrombectomy system (Hydrolyser) was used with a 9 Fr guiding catheter to remove the clots. The effluent was passed through filters of different size and the amount of embolized particles as well as the remaining thrombus were measured. Results: Thrombus removal rates ranged from 85% to 100%. Embolization rates between 47% and 60% were calculated for the different filters. Conclusion: The Hydrolyser is able to remove sufficiently high amounts of thrombus from temporary vena cava filters. However, the amount of embolized particles makes it impossible to utilize this method without special precautions against embolization.

  15. Mechanistic Determination of Nitrogen Removal By Advanced Soil-Based Wastewater Treatment Systems Using 15n Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J.; Loomis, G.; Kalen, D.; Boving, T. B.; Morales, I.; Amador, J.

    2014-12-01

    Current levels of nitrogen removal by onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS) are inadequate, with release of N from OWTS contributing to environmental N pollution, especially in coastal zones where aquatic ecosystems are sensitive to eutrophication. Current mechanistic understand of N removal are limited and mainly attributed to denitrification in the drainfield. Loss of N from N2O production during nitrification, a sparsely researched topic, may be a significant mechanism in advanced OWTS systems that enhance O2 diffusion by sand filter pre-treatment, shallow placement of infiltrative areas and timed dosing controls to prevent drainfield saturation. Replicate (n=3) intact soil mesocosms were used with 15N isotope to evaluate the effectiveness and mechanisms of N removal in drainfields with a conventional wastewater delivery (pipe-and-stone, P&S) compared to two advanced types of drainfields, pressurized shallow narrow drainfield (SND) and Geomat (GEO), a variation of a SND drainfield. Over the 11 day experiment, dissolved O2 was 1.6 mg/L for P&S and 3.0 mg/L for SND and GEO. Removal of total N was 13.5% for P&S, 4.8% for SND and 5.4% for GEO. 15NH4 labeled nitrogen inputs to drainfields were transformed primarily to 15NO3 in all outputs. Consistent low 15N2O levels were present in P&S, with increasing levels of N2 peaking 48h after 15NH4 injection, suggesting denitrification dominated N removal. By contrast, SND and GEO 15N2O levels rose quickly, peaking 8h after 15NH4 injection, suggesting N loss by nitrification. When the whole system is considered, including sand filter removal, 26 - 27% of total N was removed by the SND and GEO systems, whereas 14% of total N was removed in the P&S system. Our results suggest the SND and GEO systems as a whole are capable of removing a greater mass of N than the P&S system.

  16. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 9, Removal action system design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

  17. Virtual wall-based haptic-guided teleoperated surgical robotic system for single-port brain tumor removal surgery.

    PubMed

    Seung, Sungmin; Choi, Hongseok; Jang, Jongseong; Kim, Young Soo; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho; Ko, Seong Young

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a haptic-guided teleoperation for a tumor removal surgical robotic system, so-called a SIROMAN system. The system was developed in our previous work to make it possible to access tumor tissue, even those that seat deeply inside the brain, and to remove the tissue with full maneuverability. For a safe and accurate operation to remove only tumor tissue completely while minimizing damage to the normal tissue, a virtual wall-based haptic guidance together with a medical image-guided control is proposed and developed. The virtual wall is extracted from preoperative medical images, and the robot is controlled to restrict its motion within the virtual wall using haptic feedback. Coordinate transformation between sub-systems, a collision detection algorithm, and a haptic-guided teleoperation using a virtual wall are described in the context of using SIROMAN. A series of experiments using a simplified virtual wall are performed to evaluate the performance of virtual wall-based haptic-guided teleoperation. With haptic guidance, the accuracy of the robotic manipulator's trajectory is improved by 57% compared to one without. The tissue removal performance is also improved by 21% ( p < 0.05). The experiments show that virtual wall-based haptic guidance provides safer and more accurate tissue removal for single-port brain surgery.

  18. Study on nitrogen removal enhanced by shunt distributing wastewater in a constructed subsurface infiltration system under intermittent operation mode.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinghua; Li, Haibo; Sun, Tieheng; Wang, Xin

    2011-05-15

    Subsurface wastewater infiltration system is an efficient and economic technology in treating small scattered sewage. The removal rates are generally satisfactory in terms of COD, BOD(5), TP and SS removal; while nitrogen removal is deficient in most of the present operating SWIS due to the different requirements for the presence of oxygen for nitrification and denitrification processes. To study the enhanced nitrogen removal technologies, two pilot subsurface wastewater infiltration systems were constructed in a village in Shenyang, China. The filled matrix was a mixture of 5% activated sludge, 65% brown soil and 30% coal slag in volume ratio for both systems. Intermittent operation mode was applied in to supply sufficient oxygen to accomplish the nitrification; meanwhile sewage was supplemented as the carbon source to the lower part in to denitrify. The constructed subsurface wastewater infiltration systems worked successfully under wetting-drying ratio of 1:1 with hydraulic loading of 0.081 m(3)/(m(2)d) for over 4 months. Carbon source was supplemented with shunt ratio of 1:1 and shunt position at the depth of 0.5m. The experimental results showed that intermittent operation mode and carbon source supplementation could significantly enhance the nitrogen removal efficiency with little influence on COD and TP removal. The average removal efficiencies for NH(3)-N and TN were 87.7 ± 1.4 and 70.1 ± 1.0%, increased by 12.5 ± 1.0 and 8.6 ± 0.7%, respectively.

  19. Long term operation of continuous-flow system with enhanced biological phosphorus removal granules at different COD loading.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Lv, Yufeng; Zeng, Huiping; Zhang, Jie

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a continuous-flow system with enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) granules was operated at different COD concentrations (200, 300 and 400mgL(-)(1)) to investigate the effect of COD loading on this system. The results showed that when the COD concentration in influent was increased to 400mgL(-)(1), the anaerobic COD removal efficiency and total phosphorus removal efficiency reduced obviously and the settling ability of granules deteriorated due to the proliferation of filamentous bacteria. Moreover, high COD loading inhibited the EPS secretion and destroyed the stability of granules. Results of high-through pyrosequencing indicated that filamentous bacteria had a competitive advantage over polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) at high COD loading. The performance of system, settling ability of granules and proportion of PAOs gradually recovered to the initial level after the COD concentration was reduced to 200mgL(-)(1) on day 81.

  20. Systemic effects of geoengineering by terrestrial carbon dioxide removal on carbon related planetary boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, Vera; Donges, Jonathan; Lucht, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    The planetary boundaries framework as proposed by Rockström et al. (2009) provides guidelines for ecological boundaries, the transgression of which is likely to result in a shift of Earth system functioning away from the relatively stable Holocene state. As the climate change boundary is already close to be transgressed, several geoengineering (GE) methods are discussed, aiming at a reduction of atmospheric carbon concentrations to control the Earth's energy balance. One of the proposed GE methods is carbon extraction from the atmosphere via biological carbon sequestration. In case mitigation efforts fail to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions, this form of GE could act as potential measure to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. We here study the possible influences of human interactions in the Earth system on carbon related planetary boundaries in the form of geoengineering (terrestrial carbon dioxide removal). We use a conceptual model specifically designed to investigate fundamental carbon feedbacks between land, ocean and atmosphere (Anderies et al., 2013) and modify it to include an additional geoengineering component. With that we analyze the existence and stability of a safe operating space for humanity, which is here conceptualized in three of the 9 proposed dimensions, namely climate change, ocean acidification and land-use. References: J. M. Anderies et al., The topology of non-linear global carbon dynamics: from tipping points to planetary boundaries. Environ. Res. Lett., 8(4):044048 (2013) J. Rockström et al., A safe operating space for humanity. Nature 461 (7263), 472-475 (2009)

  1. Removal of humic and tannic acids by adsorption-coagulation combined systems with activated biochar.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chanil; Phal, Narong; Oh, Jeill; Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Jang, Min; Yoon, Yeomin

    2015-12-30

    Despite recent interest in transforming biomass into bio-oil and syngas, there is inadequate information on the compatibility of byproducts (e.g., biochar) with agriculture and water purification infrastructures. A pyrolysis at 300°C yields efficient production of biochar, and its physicochemical properties can be improved by chemical activation, resulting in a suitable adsorbent for the removal of natural organic matter (NOM), including hydrophobic and hydrophilic substances, such as humic acids (HA) and tannic acids (TA), respectively. In this study, the adsorption affinities of different HA and TA combinations in NOM solutions were evaluated, and higher adsorption affinity of TA onto activated biochar (AB) produced in the laboratory was observed due to its superior chemisorption tendencies and size-exclusion effects compared with that of HA, whereas hydrophobic interactions between adsorbent and adsorbate were deficient. Assessment of the AB role in an adsorption-coagulation hybrid system as nuclei for coagulation in the presence of aluminum sulfate (alum) showed a synergistic effect in a HA-dominated NOM solution. An AB-alum hybrid system with a high proportion of HA in the NOM solution may be applicable as an end-of-pipe solution.

  2. Monitoring intracellular polyphosphate accumulation in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems by quantitative image analysis.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Daniela P; Amaral, A Luís; Leal, Cristiano; Carvalheira, Mónica; Cunha, Jorge R; Oehmen, Adrian; Reis, Maria A M; Ferreira, Eugénio C

    2014-01-01

    A rapid methodology for intracellular storage polyphosphate (poly-P) identification and monitoring in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) systems is proposed based on quantitative image analysis (QIA). In EBPR systems, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) is usually combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to evaluate the microbial community. The proposed monitoring technique is based on a QIA procedure specifically developed for determining poly-P inclusions within a biomass suspension using solely DAPI by epifluorescence microscopy. Due to contradictory literature regarding DAPI concentrations used for poly-P detection, the present work assessed the optimal DAPI concentration for samples acquired at the end of the EBPR aerobic stage when the accumulation occurred. Digital images were then acquired and processed by means of image processing and analysis. A correlation was found between average poly-P intensity values and the analytical determination. The proposed methodology can be seen as a promising alternative procedure for quantifying intracellular poly-P accumulation in a faster and less labour-intensive way.

  3. Carbon dioxide removal system for closed loop atmosphere revitalization, candidate sorbents screening and test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattox, E. M.; Knox, J. C.; Bardot, D. M.

    2013-05-01

    Due to the difficulty and expense it costs to resupply manned-spacecraft habitats, a goal is to create a closed loop atmosphere revitalization system, in which precious commodities such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water are continuously recycled. Our aim is to test other sorbents for their capacity for future spacecraft missions, such as on the Orion spacecraft, or possibly lunar or Mars mission habitats to see if they would be better than the zeolite sorbents on the 4-bed molecular sieve. Some of the materials being tested are currently used for other industry applications. Studying these sorbents for their specific spacecraft application is different from that for applications on earth because in space, there are certain power, mass, and volume limitations that are not as critical on Earth. In manned-spaceflight missions, the sorbents are exposed to a much lower volume fraction of CO2 (0.6% volume CO2) than on Earth. LiLSX was tested for its CO2 capacity in an atmosphere like that of the ISS. Breakthrough tests were run to establish the capacities of these materials at a partial pressure of CO2 that is seen on the ISS. This paper discusses experimental results from benchmark materials, such as results previously obtained from tests on Grade 522, and the forementioned candidate materials for the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) system.

  4. Thermophysiological responses induced by a body heat removal system with Peltier devices in a hot environment.

    PubMed

    Suzurikawa, Jun; Fujimoto, Sho; Mikami, Kousei; Jonai, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takenobu

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injuries often experience thermoregulation disorders as well as sensory and motor disabilities. In order to prevent such individuals from becoming hyperthermic, we developed a body heat removal system (BHRS) with thermoelectric devices. Our BHRS comprises four Peltier devices mounted on a wheelchair backrest and continuously transfers body heat through the contacting interface to the external environment. Here, we characterized thermophysiological responses induced by this novel contact-type cooling system. A cooling experiment in a hot environment with five able-bodied subjects demonstrated that sweating and systolic blood pressure in the back-cooling (BC) trial were significantly suppressed compared with those in no-cooling (NC) trial, while no difference was found in oral and skin temperatures. A correlation was observed between chest skin temperature and blood flow in the NC trial; this was not observed in the BC trial. These results suggest that BHRS modulates normal thermoregulatory responses, including sweating and vascular dilation and has the capability to partly replace these functions.

  5. Performance of the active sidewall boundary-layer removal system for the Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishna, S.; Kilgore, W. Allen; Murthy, A. V.

    1989-01-01

    A performance evaluation of an active sidewall boundary-layer removal system for the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) was evaluated in 1988. This system uses a compressor and two throttling digital valves to control the boundary-layer mass flow removal from the tunnel. The compressor operates near the maximum pressure ratio for all conditions. The system uses a surge prevention and flow recirculation scheme. A microprocessor based controller is used to provide the necessary mass flow and compressor pressure ratio control. Initial tests on the system indicated problems in realizing smooth mass flow control while running the compressor at high speed and high pressure ratios. An alternate method has been conceived to realize boundary-layer mass flow control which avoids the recirculation of the compressor mass flow and operation near the compressor surge point. This scheme is based on varying the speed of the compressor for a sufficient pressure ratio to provide needed mass flow removal. The system has a mass flow removal capability of about 10 percent of test section flow at M = 0.3 and 4 percent at M = 0.8. The system performance has been evaluated in the form of the compressor map, and compressor tunnel interface characteristics covering most of the 0.3-m TCT operational envelope.

  6. Test report for K Basin MK I lid removal and replacement system

    SciTech Connect

    Omberg, R.P.; Roe, N.R.

    1996-08-21

    This report provides the results of acceptance testing of sampling equipment for use in the Hanford K Basin. The equipment, MK I Lid Removal/Replacement Tools, were designed to remove/replace MK I Spent Fuel Canister lids so that other equipment may be used to sample the canister contents. The tools were determined to be acceptable for their intended use.

  7. EVALUATING SURROGATES FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIUM REMOVAL IN POINT-OF-USE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium oocysts are resistant to chlorination and are particularly difficult to remove from drinking water by filtration due to their small size (4 µm to 6 µm). Filters with nominal pore sizes of 1 µm are recommended to assure effective removals. Properly designed and o...

  8. pH-dependent ammonia removal pathways in microbial fuel cell system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; An, Junyeong; Lee, Hyeryeong; Jang, Jae Kyung; Chang, In Seop

    2016-09-01

    In this work, ammonia removal paths in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) under different initial pH conditions (pH 7.0, 8.0, and 8.6) were investigated. At a neutral pH condition (pH 7.0), MFC used an electrical energy of 27.4% and removed 23.3% of total ammonia by electrochemical pathway for 192h. At the identical pH condition, 36.1% of the total ammonia was also removed by the biological path suspected to be biological ammonia oxidation process (e.g., Anammox). With the initial pH increased, the electrochemical removal efficiency decreased to less than 5.0%, while the biological removal efficiency highly increased to 61.8%. In this study, a neutral pH should be maintained in the anode to utilize MFCs for ammonia recovery via electrochemical pathways from wastewater stream.

  9. Method and apparatus for removing non-condensible gas from a working fluid in a binary power system

    DOEpatents

    Mohr, Charles M.; Mines, Gregory L.; Bloomfield, K. Kit

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus for removing non-condensible gas from a working fluid utilized in a thermodynamic system comprises a membrane having an upstream side operatively connected to the thermodynamic system so that the upstream side of the membrane receives a portion of the working fluid. The first membrane separates the non-condensible gas from the working fluid. A pump operatively associated with the membrane causes the portion of the working fluid to contact the membrane and to be returned to the thermodynamic system.

  10. Autotrophic nitrogen removal from domestic sewage in MBR-CANON system and the biodiversity of functional microbes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Li, Dong; Liang, Yuhai; He, Yongping; Zhang, Yulong; Zhang, Jie

    2013-12-01

    The feasibility of completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process for treating domestic sewage was investigated in membrane bioreactor (MBR), for which conventional activated sludge was seeded at ambient temperature. By gradually decreasing hydraulic retention time under the oxygen-limited condition, CANON was successfully started-up for 78 days. Finally the MBR-CANON system was adopted for treating domestic sewage, nitrogen and COD removal achieved to 0.97 kg m(-3) d(-1), 80%, respectively, with the effluent turbidity below 1.0 NTU. DGGE profiles showed a distinct community shift of the functional bacteria after seeded to the reactor, and phylogenetic results indicated the predominance of Nitrosomonas and Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis for nitrogen removal in the reactor. FISH results showed the predominance of aerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AerAOB) and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) in the system, both of whose proportion reduced when treated domestic sewage.

  11. Effects of floc aluminum on activated sludge characteristics and removal of 17-alpha-ethinylestradiol in wastewater systems.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul; Fang, Yuan; Murthy, Sudhir N; Novak, John T

    2010-03-01

    The effects of floc aluminum (Al) on activated sludge performance and 17-alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2) removal were studied using bench-scale activated sludge systems. The results showed that higher Al-fed activated sludge led to better settling, dewatering, and effluent quality with better EE2 removal. EE2 concentrations in the effluent revealed correlations with effluent suspended solids and large particulate/colloidal effluent biopolymer (protein+polysaccharide). Furthermore, a significant correlation existed between effluent proteins and EE2 for all size fractions, indicating that hydrophobic proteinaceous colloids provide binding sites for EE2 and washout together into the effluent. These results suggest that aluminum plays a crucial role in bioflocculation of activated sludge and the efficacy of flocculation influences the removal of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) from wastewater treatment systems.

  12. Removal of ethylene and bioaerosol by chlorine dioxide using a chemical scrubbing system in a fruit and vegetable storage facility.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tsu-Hua; Wu, Li-Chun; You, Ya-Ting; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2009-02-15

    Ethylene (C2H4) and bioaerosol are commonly present in the inside atmosphere of postharvest fruit and vegetable storage facilities, which may affect the aging of postharvest fruit and human health. We have assessed the feasibility of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as the scrubbing solution in a chemical scrubbing tower for simultaneously removing C2H4 and bioaerosol emissions from a gas stream. Parameters such as the ClO2concentration, contact time, and liquid-to-gas (L/G) ratio were examined with the aim of determining the optimal operating conditions. Using the system reported here, the optimal C2H4 removal efficiency was 99.5% when 500 ppm ClO2 was used at a reaction time of 30-60 s under a continuous non-recycle ClO2 flow mode. In terms of C2H4 removal, a greater L/G resulted in a higher C2H4 removal efficiency up to the optimal ratio of 12.5. In terms of the simultaneous removal of C2H4 and bioaerosol, the removal efficiency of C2H4 was 99.2% and those for the bioaersols of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were 99.92 and 99.10%, respectively, under a continuous non-recycle flow mode. Our results also indicate that oxidation reduction potential (ORP) can be a valuable indicator for the timing of the replacement of the scrubbing solution in the system under a continuous recycle flow mode. Additional confirmation of the feasibility of the ORP as an indicator of C2H4 and bioaerosol removal in situ was obtained in a 3-month test of our system in continuous recycle flow mode with the periodical replacement of scrubbing solution, ClO2. The removal efficiencies for C2H4, bacterial and fungus aerosol, and total hydrocarbon compounds (THC) were 83.4, 96.8, 96.1, and 76.5%, respectively. Our results prove that ClO2 is an excellent scrubbing solution in the chemical scrubbing tower for the removal of C2H4 emissions and bioaerosol. We demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of this system in a fruit and vegetable storage facility.

  13. Coupling of a bioelectrochemical system for p-nitrophenol removal in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jinyou; Xu, Xiaopeng; Jiang, Xinbai; Hua, Congxin; Zhang, Libin; Sun, Xiuyun; Li, Jiansheng; Mu, Yang; Wang, Lianjun

    2014-12-15

    Coupling of a bioelectrochemical system (BES) into the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) was developed for enhanced p-nitrophenol (PNP) removal in this study. Compared to the control UASB reactor, both PNP removal and the formation of its final reductive product p-aminophenol (PAP) were notably improved in the UASB-BES system. With the increase of current density from 0 to 4.71 A m(-3), the rates of PNP removal and PAP formation increased from 6.16 ± 0.11 and 4.21 ± 0.29 to 6.77 ± 0.00 and 6.11 ± 0.28 mol m(-3) d(-1), respectively. More importantly, the required dosage of organic cosubstrate was significantly reduced in the UASB-BES system than that in the UASB reactor. Organic carbon flux analysis suggested that biogas production from organic cosubstrate was seriously suppressed while direct anaerobic reduction of PNP was not remarkably affected by current input in the UASB-BES system. This study demonstrated that the UASB-BES coupling system had a promising potential for the removal of nitrophenol-containing wastewaters especially without adequate organic cosubstrates inside.

  14. Assessment of selexolVAcid gas removal powers for use with Lurgi gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, A.J.; Fein, H.L.

    1981-01-01

    Selexol acid gas removal as used with entrained-bed gasification is less expensive than the Rectisol process configuration generally used with Lurgi gasification. The objective of this study was to determine whether cost savings could be derived from using the Selexol process with Lurgi gasification or whether the Lurgi gas composition required use of a Rectisol clean-up unit. 5 refs.

  15. Optimization of Biosorptive Removal of Dye from Aqueous System by Cone Shell of Calabrian Pine

    PubMed Central

    Deniz, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    The biosorption performance of raw cone shell of Calabrian pine for C.I. Basic Red 46 as a model azo dye from aqueous system was optimized using Taguchi experimental design methodology. L9 (33) orthogonal array was used to optimize the dye biosorption by the pine cone shell. The selected factors and their levels were biosorbent particle size, dye concentration, and contact time. The predicted dye biosorption capacity for the pine cone shell from Taguchi design was obtained as 71.770 mg g−1 under optimized biosorption conditions. This experimental design provided reasonable predictive performance of dye biosorption by the biosorbent (R 2: 0.9961). Langmuir model fitted better to the biosorption equilibrium data than Freundlich model. This displayed the monolayer coverage of dye molecules on the biosorbent surface. Dubinin-Radushkevich model and the standard Gibbs free energy change proposed physical biosorption for predominant mechanism. The logistic function presented the best fit to the data of biosorption kinetics. The kinetic parameters reflecting biosorption performance were also evaluated. The optimization study revealed that the pine cone shell can be an effective and economically feasible biosorbent for the removal of dye. PMID:25405213

  16. Optimization of biosorptive removal of dye from aqueous system by cone shell of Calabrian pine.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    The biosorption performance of raw cone shell of Calabrian pine for C.I. Basic Red 46 as a model azo dye from aqueous system was optimized using Taguchi experimental design methodology. L9 (3(3)) orthogonal array was used to optimize the dye biosorption by the pine cone shell. The selected factors and their levels were biosorbent particle size, dye concentration, and contact time. The predicted dye biosorption capacity for the pine cone shell from Taguchi design was obtained as 71.770 mg g(-1) under optimized biosorption conditions. This experimental design provided reasonable predictive performance of dye biosorption by the biosorbent (R (2): 0.9961). Langmuir model fitted better to the biosorption equilibrium data than Freundlich model. This displayed the monolayer coverage of dye molecules on the biosorbent surface. Dubinin-Radushkevich model and the standard Gibbs free energy change proposed physical biosorption for predominant mechanism. The logistic function presented the best fit to the data of biosorption kinetics. The kinetic parameters reflecting biosorption performance were also evaluated. The optimization study revealed that the pine cone shell can be an effective and economically feasible biosorbent for the removal of dye.

  17. Study of solar photo-Fenton system applied to removal of phenol from water.

    PubMed

    Freire, Layla F A; da Fonseca, Fabiana Valéria; Yokoyama, Lidia; Teixeira, Luiz Alberto Cesar

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of a Fenton's reaction in a falling film solar reactor (FFR), as a possible advanced oxidation process for the mineralization of the organic compound phenol in water. Preliminary tests were carried out to evaluate phenol degradation by photolysis and to select the optimal residence time in which to carry out the process using a solar photo-Fenton system. The variables studied were the initial phenol concentration (100 to 300 mg L(-1)), the [Phenol]:[H2O2] mass ratio (1.0 to 2.0) and the [H2O2]/[Fe2+] molar ratio (5 to 10). Phenol degradation of 99% and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of 97% were obtained under the following reaction conditions: phenol concentration=200 mg L(-1), mass ratio [Phenol]:[H2O2]=1.5 and molar ratio [H2O2]/[Fe2+]=7.5. Overall mineralization was achieved using the solar photo-Fenton process to destroy phenol and COD. The solar photo-Fenton process using a FFR appears to be a viable method for removing phenols in wastewaters on an industrial scale.

  18. Thermalhydraulic aspects of decay heat removal by natural circulation in fast reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, C.M.; Hetsroni, G.; Banerjee, S.

    1990-01-01

    Natural convection in enclosures have been studied numerically to provide insight into the scaling laws existing for removal of decay heat in Liquid Metal Fast Reactors (LMFR). Specifically, 3-D simulations have been carried out for natural circulation in a cylinder with small aspect ratio (of the order of 0.5). These results have been compared to the results of an experiment conducted by UCSB, in collaboration with GE, to provide benchmark data for code validation. Parametric studies have been conducted to establish the validity of a 3-D Finite difference code that uses body-fitted grids for simulations of complex geometries. Further, numerical simulations have been carried out to demonstrate the importance of 3-D computer codes as tools in the design and scale-up of prototype LMFRs. It has been shown that the geometry of the passive safety systems is key to safe operation of LMFRs under shutdown conditions. The key phenomena that occur in such situations have bee studied and the available experimental studies have been identified. The future direction for modeling of natural convection recirculating flows in confined enclosures has been proposed. 31 refs.

  19. Thermalhydraulic aspects of decay heat removal by natural circulation in fast reactor systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, C.M.; Hetsroni, G.; Banerjee, S.

    1990-12-31

    Natural convection in enclosures have been studied numerically to provide insight into the scaling laws existing for removal of decay heat in Liquid Metal Fast Reactors (LMFR). Specifically, 3-D simulations have been carried out for natural circulation in a cylinder with small aspect ratio (of the order of 0.5). These results have been compared to the results of an experiment conducted by UCSB, in collaboration with GE, to provide benchmark data for code validation. Parametric studies have been conducted to establish the validity of a 3-D Finite difference code that uses body-fitted grids for simulations of complex geometries. Further, numerical simulations have been carried out to demonstrate the importance of 3-D computer codes as tools in the design and scale-up of prototype LMFRs. It has been shown that the geometry of the passive safety systems is key to safe operation of LMFRs under shutdown conditions. The key phenomena that occur in such situations have bee studied and the available experimental studies have been identified. The future direction for modeling of natural convection recirculating flows in confined enclosures has been proposed. 31 refs.

  20. Efficiency of bioaugmentation in the removal of organic matter in aquaculture systems.

    PubMed

    Lopes, R B; Olinda, R A; Souza, B A I; Cyrino, J E P; Dias, C T S; Queiroz, J F; Tavares, L H S

    2011-05-01

    Several techniques are currently used to treat effluents. Bioaugmentation is a new bioremediation strategy and has been employed to improve effluent quality by treating the water during the production process. This technology consists basically of the addition of microorganisms able to degrade or remove polluting compounds, especially organic matter and nutrients. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of bioaugmentation on some parameters of organic matter and on the performance of juvenile tilapias in an intensive aquaculture production system. The combination of two bacterial consortiums in a complete randomized design was employed in a factorial analysis with two factors. Statistical differences between treatments were analyzed by the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey test at the 5% level. One of the treatments, heterotrophic bacterial supplementation, was able to reduce biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) by 23%, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by 83.7% and phytoplanktonic biomass by 43%. On the other hand, no damage was done to either the physical-chemical indicators of water quality or to the growth performance of juvenile tilapias assessed in this study.

  1. Initial Field Deployment Results of Green PCB Removal from Sediment Systems (GPRSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVor, Robert William

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this task order was to complete optimization and development of the Green PCB Remediation from Sediment Systems(GPRSSs) technology, culminating in the production of functioning demonstration test units which would be deployed at a suitable demonstration location. This location would be selected in conjunction with Toxicological & Ecological Associates who have entered into a SAA with NASA to partner with and further develop this technology. The GPRSSs technology was initially developed under ESC Task Order 83 with the purpose of providing a green remediation technology capable of in-situ removal and remediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from contaminated sediments. The core concept of the technology, a polymeric blanket capable of absorbing PCBs when in contact with contaminated sediments was then transitioned to Task Order 165 where the primary objective was to fully design and optimize a functioning test unit capable of testing the theoretical and laboratory scale concepts in a real world situation. Results from both task orders are included in this report for completeness, although Task Order 165 focused on the blanket design and the small scale field demonstration in which is currently still ongoing in Altavista, VA.

  2. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological Systems; Adsorption and Application

    SciTech Connect

    Yantasee, Wassana; Rutledge, Ryan D.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Orr, Galya; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Wiacek, Robert J.; Timchalk, Charles; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2010-10-01

    Functionalized nanoporous silica, often referred to as self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS) have previously demonstrated the ability to serve as very effective heavy metal sorbents in a range of aquatic and environmental systems suggesting they may be advantageously utilized for biomedical applications such as chelation therapy. Herein we evaluate surface chemistries for heavy metal capture from biological fluids, various facets of the materials biocompatibility and the suitability of these materials as potential therapeutics. Of the materials tested, thiol-functionalized SAMMS proved most capable of removing selected heavy metals from biological solutions (i.e. blood, urine, etc.) As a result, thiol SAMMS was further analyzed to assess the material’s performance under a number of different biologically relevant conditions (i.e. variable pH and ionic strength) as well to gauge any potentially negative cellular effects resulting from interaction with the sorbent, such as cellular toxicity or possible chelation of essential minerals. Additionally, cellular uptake studies demonstrated no cell membrane permeation by the silica-based materials generally highlighting their ability to remain cellularly inert and thus non-toxic. As a result, it has been determined that organic ligand-functionalized nanoporous silica materials could be a valuable material for detoxification therapeutics and potentially other biomedical applications as needed.

  3. Nitrate removal from polluted water by using a vegetated floating system.

    PubMed

    Bartucca, Maria Luce; Mimmo, Tanja; Cesco, Stefano; Del Buono, Daniele

    2016-01-15

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) water pollution is one of the most prevailing and relevant ecological issues. For instance, the wide presence of this pollutant in the environment is dramatically altering the quality of superficial and underground waters. Therefore, we set up a floating bed vegetated with a terrestrial herbaceous species (Italian ryegrass) with the aim to remediate hydroponic solutions polluted with NO3(-). The floating bed allowed the plants to grow and achieve an adequate development. Ryegrass was not affected by the treatments. On the contrary, plant biomass production and total nitrogen content (N-K) increased proportionally to the amount of NO3(-) applied. Regarding to the water cleaning experiments, the vegetated floating beds permitted to remove almost completely all the NO3(-) added from the hydroponic solutions with an initial concentration of 50, 100 and 150 mg L(-1). Furthermore, the calculation of the bioconcentration factor (BCF) indicated this species as successfully applicable for the remediation of solutions polluted by NO3(-). In conclusion, the results highlight that the combination of ryegrass and the floating bed system resulted to be effective in the remediation of aqueous solutions polluted by NO3(-).

  4. Understanding the role of extracellular polymeric substances in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal granular sludge system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Randeng; Peng, Yongzhen; Cheng, Zhanli; Ren, Nanqi

    2014-10-01

    The role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process was investigated in a P-accumulating granular sludge system by analyzing the distribution and transfer of P, K(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) in the sludge phase, EPS, and the bulk liquid. In the sludge phase, about 30% P, 44.7% K(+), 27.7% Mg(2+), 28% Ca(2+) accumulated in the EPS at the end of aeration. The rate of P, K(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) released from the EPS matrix into the bulk liquid in the anaerobic phase was faster than the rate they were adsorbed from the bulk liquid into the EPS in the aerobic phase. P, K(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) were retained in EPS before transferring into the phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs). These results suggest that EPS play a critical role in facilitating the accumulation and transfer of P, K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) between PAO cells and bulk liquid.

  5. Space Shuttle reaction control system thruster metal nitrate removal and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, R. L.; Mccartney, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Shuttle hypergolic primary reaction control system (PRCS) thrusters continue to fail-leak or fail-off at a rate of approximately 1.5 per flight, attributed primarily to metal nitrate formation in the nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) pilot operated valves (POV's). The failures have continued despite ground support equipment (GSE) and subsystem operational improvements. As a result, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) performed a study to characterize the contamination in the N204 valves. This study prompted the development and implementation of a highly successful flushing technique using deionized (DI) water and gaseous nitrogen (GN2) to remove the contamination while minimizing Teflon seat damage. Following flushing a comprehensive acceptance test is performed before the thruster is deemed recovered. Between the time WSTF was certified to process flight thrusters (March 1992) and September 1993, a 68 percent thruster recovery rate was achieved. The contamination flushed from these thrusters was analyzed and has provided insight into the corrosion process, which is reported in this publication. Additionally, the long-term performance of 24 flushed thrusters installed in the WSTF Fleet Leader Shuttle reaction control subsystem (RCS) test articles is being assessed. WSTF continues to flush flight and test article thrusters and compile data to investigate metal nitrate formation characteristics in leaking and nonleaking valves.

  6. Removal of soft deposits from the distribution system improves the drinking water quality.

    PubMed

    Lehtola, Markku J; Nissinen, Tarja K; Miettinen, Ilkka T; Martikainen, Pertti J; Vartiainen, Terttu

    2004-02-01

    Deterioration in drinking water quality in distribution networks represents a problem in drinking water distribution. These can be an increase in microbial numbers, an elevated concentration of iron or increased turbidity, all of which affect taste, odor and color in the drinking water. We studied if pipe cleaning would improve the drinking water quality in pipelines. Cleaning was arranged by flushing the pipes with compressed air and water. The numbers of bacteria and the concentrations of iron and turbidity in drinking water were highest at 9 p.m., when the water consumption was highest. Soft deposits inside the pipeline were occasionally released to bulk water, increasing the concentrations of iron, bacteria, microbially available organic carbon and phosphorus in drinking water. The cleaning of the pipeline decreased the diurnal variation in drinking water quality. With respect to iron, only short-term positive effects were obtained. However, removing of the nutrient-rich soft deposits did decrease the microbial growth in the distribution system during summer when there were favorable warm temperatures for microbial growth. No Norwalk-like viruses or coliform bacteria were detected in the soft deposits, in contrast to the high numbers of heterotrophic bacteria.

  7. Comparison of hydraulics and particle removal efficiencies in a mixed cell raceway and Burrows pond rearing system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffitt, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    We compared the hydrodynamics of replicate experimental mixed cell and replicate standard Burrows pond rearing systems at the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, ID, in an effort to identify methods for improved solids removal. We measured and compared the hydraulic residence time, particle removal efficiency, and measures of velocity using several tools. Computational fluid dynamics was used first to characterize hydraulics in the proposed retrofit that included removal of the traditional Burrows pond dividing wall and establishment of four counter rotating cells with appropriate drains and inlet water jets. Hydraulic residence time was subsequently established in the four full scale test tanks using measures of conductivity of a salt tracer introduced into the systems both with and without fish present. Vertical and horizontal velocities were also measured with acoustic Doppler velocimetry in transects across each of the rearing systems. Finally, we introduced ABS sinking beads that simulated fish solids then followed the kinetics of their removal via the drains to establish relative purge rates. The mixed cell raceway provided higher mean velocities and a more uniform velocity distribution than did the Burrows pond. Vectors revealed well-defined, counter-rotating cells in the mixed cell raceway, and were likely contributing factors in achieving a relatively high particle removal efficiency-88.6% versus 8.0% during the test period. We speculate retrofits of rearing ponds to mixed cell systems will improve both the rearing environments for the fish and solids removal, improving the efficiency and bio-security of fish culture. We recommend further testing in hatchery production trials to evaluate fish physiology and growth.

  8. Field Testing of a Prototype Filter System for the Removal of the Human Pathogen Giardia intestinales from Ground Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, C.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Bowman, R.; Meier, D.

    2005-12-01

    Pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and protozoans tend to be negatively charged in the pH range of most ground waters. Thus, naturally occurring and modified materials such as surfactant-modified zeolites (SMZ), which have net positive surface charges and hydrophobic properties, are suitable as barriers to impede pathogen migration in aquifer systems. In our experiments SMZ has been used to remove E. coli and the bacteriophage MS-2 from sewage water with a high success rate ( E. coli 100%, MS-2 > 90%). Testing was conducted both in the laboratory and the field. Laboratory experiments were conducted to test the removal efficiency of SMZ for Giardia intestinales using the Giardia cysts and microsphere analogs. The SMZ was effective at removing Giardia intestinales cysts from the groundwater, but removal rates were not as high as for bacteria and viruses in the earlier experiments. The removal efficiency varied with the particular formulation of the SMZ used. The most effective SMZ formulation is being further tested at our field site using water amended with microspheres to simulate Giardia behavior. The field site is an existing multiple well site at the University of Idaho in Moscow. The wells are completed in the Lolo Basalt Formation; a highly heterogeneous and anisotropic fractured basalt aquifer system typical of the subsurface of most of eastern Washington and northeastern Oregon. The SMZ pathogen filter is installed directly in the well bore and the concentrations of microsphere-amended ground water are measured before and after filtration. Pumping over an extended period is continuing in order to test the lifetime of our prototype filter system. Our tests and results are targeted at developing a prototype filter system for removing a multitude of human pathogens in drinking water.

  9. Nitrogen removal from synthetic wastewater using single and mixed culture systems of denitrifying fungi, bacteria, and actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenfeng; Cao, Lixiang; Tan, Hongming; Zhang, Renduo

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of single and mixed culture of denitrifying fungi, bacteria, and actinobacteria on nitrogen removal and N2O emission in treatment of wastewater. Denitrifying endophytes of Pseudomonas sp. B2, Streptomyces sp. A9, and Fusarium sp. F3 isolated from rice plants were utilized for treatment of synthetic wastewater containing nitrate and nitrite. Experiments were conducted under shaking and static conditions. Results showed that under the static condition, more than 97 % of nitrate removal efficiencies were reached in all the treatments containing B2. The nitrate removal rates within the first 12 h in the treatments of B2, B2+A9, B2+F3, and B2+A9+F3 were 7.3, 9.8, 11, and 11 mg L(-1) h(-1), respectively. Under the shaking condition, 100 % of nitrite was removed in all the treatments containing B2. The presence of A9 and F3 with B2 increased the nitrite removal rates under both the shaking and static conditions. Compared to the B2 system, the mixed systems of B2+A9, B2+F3, and B2+A9+F3 reduced N2O emission (78.4 vs. 19.4, 1.80, and 0.03 μM in 4 weeks, respectively). Our results suggested that B2 is an important strain that enhances nitrogen removal from wastewater. Mixed cultures of B2 with A9 and F3 can remove more nitrate and nitrite from wastewater and reduce nitrite accumulation and N2O emission in the denitrification process.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, PHYSICAL REMOVAL OF MICROBIAL CONTAMINATION AGENTS IN DRINKING WATER, ECOWATER SYSTEMS, INC., SEARS KENMORE ULTRAFILTER 500 DRINKING WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM (POU)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Sears Kenmore Ultrafilter 500 RO system was tested for removal of bacteria and viruses at NSF International's Drinking Water Treatment Systems Laboratory. EcoWater Systems submitted ten units for testing, which were split into two groups of five. One group received 25 days ...

  11. Method and system for the removal of oxides of nitrogen and sulfur from combustion processes

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, John V.

    1987-12-15

    A process for removing oxide contaminants from combustion gas, and employing a solid electrolyte reactor, includes: (a) flowing the combustion gas into a zone containing a solid electrolyte and applying a voltage and at elevated temperature to thereby separate oxygen via the solid electrolyte, (b) removing oxygen from that zone in a first stream and removing hot effluent gas from that zone in a second stream, the effluent gas containing contaminant, (c) and pre-heating the combustion gas flowing to that zone by passing it in heat exchange relation with the hot effluent gas.

  12. Evaluation of a Combined Cyclone and Gas Filtration System for Particulate Removal in the Gasification Process

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Jeffrey J.

    2010-04-30

    cyclonefiltration hybrid unit in the E-Gas (TM) gasification process. These reductions would help to keep the E-Gas (TM) technology competitive among other coal-fired power generation technologies. The Wabash combined cyclone and gas filtration slipstream test program was developed to provide design information, equipment specification and process control parameters of a hybrid cyclone and candle filter particulate removal system in the E-Gas (TM) gasification process that would provide the optimum performance and reliability for future commercial use. The test program objectives were as follows: 1. Evaluate the use of various cyclone materials of construction; 2. Establish the optimal cyclone efficiency that provides stable long term gas filter operation; 3. Determine the particle size distribution of the char separated by both the cyclone and candle filters. This will provide insight into cyclone efficiency and potential future plant design; 4. Determine the optimum filter media size requirements for the cyclone-filtration hybrid unit; 5. Determine the appropriate char transfer rates for both the cyclone and filtration portions of the hybrid unit; 6. Develop operating procedures for the cyclone-filtration hybrid unit; and, 7. Compare the installed capital cost of a scaled-up commercial cyclone-filtration hybrid unit to the current gas filtration design without a cyclone unit, such as currently exists at the Wabash facility.

  13. Effect of temperature on removal of trace organic chemicals in managed aquifer recharge systems.

    PubMed

    Alidina, Mazahirali; Shewchuk, Justin; Drewes, Jörg E

    2015-03-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether changes in temperature experienced in MAR systems affect attenuation of trace organic chemicals (TOrCs). A set of laboratory-scale soil columns were placed in a temperature-controlled environmental chamber and operated at five different temperature set-points (30, 20, 10, 8 and 4°C) covering the range of typical groundwater temperatures in cold, moderate and arid climate regions. Removal of bulk organic carbon both in the infiltration zone as well as during deeper infiltration was independent of temperature. Of the 22 TOrCs investigated, only six chemicals exhibited changes in attenuation as a function of temperature. Attenuation of four of the compounds (diclofenac, gemfibrozil, ketoprofen and naproxen) decreased as the temperature was reduced from 30°C to 4°C, likely due to decreased microbial activity at lower temperatures. As the temperature was decreased, however, attenuation of oxybenzone and trimethoprim were noted to increase. This increased attenuation was likely due to more efficient sorption at lower temperatures, though possible changes in the microbial composition as the temperature decreased may also have contributed to this change. Changes in rate constants of attenuation (ka) for the biotransformed TOrCs with temperature suggested the existence of a critical temperature at 10°C for three of the four TOrCs, where significant changes to rates of attenuation occurred. Results from this study indicated that for most TOrCs, changes in temperature do not impact their attenuation. Thus, seasonal changes in temperature are not considered to be a major concern for attenuation of most TOrCs in MAR systems.

  14. Advanced phosphorus recovery using a novel SBR system with granular sludge in simultaneous nitrification, denitrification and phosphorus removal process.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong-Ze; Wang, Hou-Feng; Kotsopoulos, Thomas A; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a novel process for phosphorus (P) recovery without excess sludge production from granular sludge in simultaneous nitrification-denitrification and P removal (SNDPR) system is presented. Aerobic microbial granules were successfully cultivated in an alternating aerobic-anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for removing P and nitrogen (N). Dense and stable granular sludge was created, and the SBR system showed good performance in terms of P and N removal. The removal efficiency was approximately 65.22 % for N, and P was completely removed under stable operating conditions. Afterward, new operating conditions were applied in order to enhance P recovering without excess sludge production. The initial SBR system was equipped with a batch reactor and a non-woven cloth filter, and 1.37 g of CH3COONa·3H2O was added to the batch reactor after mixing it with 1 L of sludge derived from the SBR reactor to enhance P release in the liquid fraction, this comprises the new system configuration. Under the new operating conditions, 93.19 % of the P contained in wastewater was released in the liquid fraction as concentrated orthophosphate from part of granular sludge. This amount of P could be efficiently recovered in the form of struvite. Meanwhile, a deterioration of the denitrification efficiency was observed and the granules were disintegrated into smaller particles. The biomass concentration in the system increased firstly and then maintained at 4.0 ± 0.15 gVSS/L afterward. These results indicate that this P recovery operating (PRO) mode is a promising method to recover P in a SNDPR system with granular sludge. In addition, new insights into the granule transformation when confronted with high chemical oxygen demand (COD) load were provided.

  15. Highly efficient removal of chromium(VI) by Fe/Ni bimetallic nanoparticles in an ultrasound-assisted system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaobin; Jing, Guohua; Lv, Bihong; Zhou, Zuoming; Zhu, Runliang

    2016-10-01

    Highly active Fe/Ni bimetallic nanocomposites were prepared by using the liquid-phase reduction method, and they were proven to be effective for Cr(VI) removal coupled with US irradiation. The US-assisted Fe/Ni bimetallic system could maintain a good performance for Cr(VI) removal at a wide pH range of 3-9. Based on the characterization of the Fe/Ni nanoparticles before and after reaction, the high efficiency of the mixed system could attribute to the synergistic effects of the catalysis of Ni(0) and US cavitation. Ni(0) could facilitate the Cr(VI) reduction through electron transfer and catalytic hydrogenation. Meanwhile, US could fluidize the Fe/Ni nanoparticles to increase the actual reactive surface area and clean off the co-precipitated Fe(III)-Cr(III) hydroxides to maintain the active sites on the surface of the Fe/Ni nanoparticles. Thus, compared with shaking, the US-assisted Fe/Ni system was more efficient on Cr(VI) removal, which achieved 94.7% removal efficiency of Cr(VI) within 10 min. The pseudo-first-order rate constant (kobs) in US-assisted Fe/Ni system (0.5075 min(-1)) was over 5 times higher than that under shaking (0.0972 min(-1)). Moreover, the Fe/Ni nanoparticles still have a good performance under US irradiation after 26 days aging as well as regeneration.

  16. Small System Use of a Solid Arsenic Oxidizing Media in Place of Chemical Oxidation to Enhance Arsenic Removals

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the USEPA Arsenic Demonstration Program, an arsenic removal adsorptive media treatment system (10 gpm) was installed at Head Start School in Buckeye Lake, Ohio on June 28, 2006. The source water (ground water) contained around 20 µg/L of arsenic, existing predominatel...

  17. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2002-01-01

    Low power EM waves are used to detect motions of vocal tract tissues of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech. A voiced excitation function is derived. The excitation function provides speech production information to enhance speech characterization and to enable noise removal from human speech.

  18. ETV REPORT: REMOVAL OF ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER ORCA WATER TECHNOLOGIES KEMLOOP 1000 COAGULATION AND FILTRATION WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the ORCA Water Technologies KemLoop 1000 Coagulation and Filtration Water Treatment System for arsenic removal was conducted at the St. Louis Center located in Washtenaw County, Michigan, from March 23 through April 6, 2005. The source water was groundwate...

  19. Enzyme-catalyzed O2 removal system for electrochemical analysis under ambient air: application in an amperometric nitrate biosensor.

    PubMed

    Plumeré, Nicolas; Henig, Jörg; Campbell, Wilbur H

    2012-03-06

    Electroanalytical procedures are often subjected to oxygen interferences. However, achieving anaerobic conditions in field analytical chemistry is difficult. In this work, novel enzymatic systems were designed to maintain oxygen-free solutions in open, small volume electrochemical cells and implemented under field conditions. The oxygen removal system consists of an oxidase enzyme, an oxidase-specific substrate, and catalase for dismutation of hydrogen peroxide generated in the enzyme catalyzed oxygen removal reaction. Using cyclic voltammetry, three oxidase enzyme/substrate combinations with catalase were analyzed: glucose oxidase with glucose, galactose oxidase with galactose, and pyranose 2-oxidase with glucose. Each system completely removed oxygen for 1 h or more in unstirred open vessels. Reagents, catalysts, reaction intermediates, and products involved in the oxygen reduction reaction were not detected electrochemically. To evaluate the oxygen removal systems in a field sensing device, a model nitrate biosensor based on recombinant eukaryotic nitrate reductase was implemented in commercial screen-printed electrochemical cells with 200 μL volumes. The products of the aldohexose oxidation catalyzed by glucose oxidase and galactose oxidase deactivate nitrate reductase and must be quenched for biosensor applications. For general application, the optimum catalyst is pyranose 2-oxidase since the oxidation product does not interfere with the biorecognition element.

  20. ETV REPORT: REMOVAL OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER – WATTS PREMIER INC. WP-4V DRINKING WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Watts Premier WP-4V POU drinking water treatment system was tested for removal of aldicarb, benzene, cadmium, carbofuran, cesium, chloroform, dichlorvos, dicrotophos, fenamiphos, mercury, mevinphos, oxamyl, strontium, and strychnine. The WP-4V employs a reverse osmosis (RO) m...

  1. Using a Solid Oxidizing Media to Enhance Arsenic (As[III]) Removal at a Very Small System

    EPA Science Inventory

    An adsorptive media system at the LEADS Head Start School (LHSS) Building in Buckeye Lake, OH, one of the 50 U.S. EPA Arsenic Removal Technology Demonstration sites, was relocated, after modifications, to Plainview Christian School in Plain City, OH to help bring the non-transien...

  2. New Hydrophilic, Composite Membranes for Air Removal from Water Coolant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, Stephen M. C.; Luo, Qiang; Curtis, Salina S.; Holladay, Jon B.; Clark, Dallas W.

    2004-01-01

    Liquid coolants are commonly used as thermal transport media to increase efficiency and flexibility in aerospace vehicle design. The introduction of gas bubbles into the coolant can have negative consequences, including: loss of centrifugal pump prime, irregular sensor readings, and blockage of coolant flow to remote systems. One solution to mitigate these problems is the development of a passive gas removal device, or gas trap, installed in the flight cooling system. In this study, a new hydrophilic, composite membrane has been developed for passage of the coolant fluid and retention of gas bubbles. The trapped bubbles are subsequently vented from the system by a thin, hydrophobic, microporous membrane. The original design for this work employed a homogeneous membrane that was susceptible to fouling and pore plugging. Spare gas traps of this variety have degraded during storage, and recreation of the membranes has been complicated due to problems with polymer duplication and property variations in the final membranes. In this work, replacements have been developed based on deposition of a hydrophilic polymer on the bore-side of a porous polyethylene (PE) tube. The tube provides excellent chemical and mechanical stability, and the hydrophilic layer provides retention of gas bubbles. Preliminary results have shown that intimate contact is required between the deposited layer and the substrate to overcome material differences. This has been accomplished by presoaking the membrane tube in the solvent to raise its surface energy. Polymer solutions of various concentrations have been used to promote penetration of the polymer layer into the porous substrate and to control separation layer thickness. The resulting composite membranes have shown repeatable decrease in nitrogen permeability, which is indicative of a decrease in membrane pore size. Studies with water permeation have yielded similar results. We have observed some swelling of the added polymer layer, which

  3. Multibody dynamics driving GNC and system design in tethered nets for active debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuto, Riccardo; Lavagna, Michèle; Salvi, Samuele

    2016-07-01

    Debris removal in Earth orbits is an urgent issue to be faced for space exploitation durability. Among different techniques, tethered-nets present appealing benefits and some open points to fix. Former and latter are discussed in the paper, supported by the exploitation of a multibody dynamics tool. With respect to other proposed capture mechanisms, tethered-net solutions are characterised by a safer capturing distance, a passive angular momentum damping effect and the highest flexibility to unknown shape, material and attitude of the target to interface with. They also allow not considering the centre of gravity alignment with thrust axis as a constraint, as it is for any rigid link solution. Furthermore, the introduction of a closing thread around the net perimeter ensures safer and more reliable grasping and holding. In the paper, a six degrees of freedom multibody dynamics simulator is presented: it was developed at Politecnico di Milano - Department of Aerospace Science and Technologies - and it is able to describe the orbital and attitude dynamics of tethered-nets systems and end-bodies during different phases, with great flexibility in dealing with different topologies and configurations. Critical phases as impact and wrapping are analysed by simulation to address the tethered-stack controllability. It is shown how the role of contact modelling is fundamental to describe the coupled dynamics: it is demonstrated, as a major novel contribution, how friction between the net and a tumbling target allows reducing its angular motion, stabilizing the system and allowing safer towing operations. Moreover, the so-called tethered space tug is analysed: after capture, the two objects, one passive and one active, are connected by the tethered-net flexible link, the motion of the system being excited by the active spacecraft thrusters. The critical modes prevention during this phase, by means of a closed-loop control synthesis is shown. Finally, the connection between

  4. In vitro evaluation of efficacy of different rotary instrument systems for gutta percha removal during root canal retreatment

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Mercy; Malhotra, Amit; Rao, Murali; Sharma, Abhimanyu; Talwar, Sangeeta

    2016-01-01

    Background Complete removal of old filling material during root canal retreatment is fundamental for predictable cleaning and shaping of canal anatomy. Most of the retreatment methods tested in earlier studies have shown inability to achieve complete removal of root canal filling. Therefore the aim of this investigation was to assess the efficacy of three different rotary nickel titanium retreatment systems and Hedstrom files in removing filling material from root canals. Material and Methods Sixty extracted mandibular premolars were decoronated to leave 15 mm root. Specimen were hand instrumented and obturated using gutta percha and AH plus root canal sealer. After storage period of two weeks, roots were retreated with three (Protaper retreatment files, Mtwo retreatment files, NRT GPR) rotary retreatment instrument systems and Hedstroem files. Subsequently, samples were sectioned longitudinally and examined under stereomicroscope. Digital images were recorded and evaluated using Digital Image Analysing Software. The retreatment time was recorded for each tooth using a stopwatch. The area of canal and the residual filling material was recorded in mm2 and the percentage of remaining filling material on canal walls was calculated. Data was analysed using ANOVA test. Results Significantly less amount of residual filling material was present in protaper and Mtwo instrumented teeth (p < 0.05) compared to NRT GPR and Hedstrom files group. Protaper instruments also required lesser time during removal of filling material followed by Mtwo instruments, NRT GPR files and Hedstrom files. Conclusions None of the instruments were able to remove the filling material completely from root canal. Protaper universal retreatment system and Mtwo retreatment files were more efficient and faster compared to NRT GPR fles and Hedstrom files. Key words:Gutta-percha removal, nickel titanium, root canal retreatment, rotary instruments. PMID:27703601

  5. Zero-Valent Metallic Treatment System and Its Application for Removal and Remediation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (Pcbs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jacqueline W. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian A. (Inventor); Geiger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen B. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    PCBs are removed from contaminated media using a treatment system including zero-valent metal particles and an organic hydrogen donating solvent. The treatment system may include a weak acid in order to eliminate the need for a coating of catalytic noble metal on the zero-valent metal particles. If catalyzed zero-valent metal particles are used, the treatment system may include an organic hydrogen donating solvent that is a non-water solvent. The treatment system may be provided as a "paste-like" system that is preferably applied to natural media and ex-situ structures to eliminate PCBs.

  6. Assessing the removal potential of soil-aquifer treatment systems for bulk organic matter.

    PubMed

    Rauch, T; Drewes, J E

    2004-01-01

    The fate of effluent organic matter (EfOM) during groundwater recharge was investigated by studying the removal behavior of four bulk organic carbon fractions isolated from a secondary effluent: Hydrophilic organic matter (HPI), hydrophobic acids (HPO-A), colloidal organic matter (OM), and soluble microbial products (SMPs). Short-term removal of the bulk organic fractions during soil infiltration was simulated in biologically active soil columns. Results revealed that the four organic fractions showed a significantly different behavior with respect to biological removal. HPI and colloidal OM were prone to biological removal during initial soil infiltration (0-30 cm) and supported soil microbial biomass growth in the infiltrative surface. Additionally, colloidal OM was partly removed by physical adsorption or filtration. HPO-A and SMPs reacted recalcitrant towards biological degradation as indicated by low soil biomass activity responses. Adsorbability assessment of the biologically refractory portions of the fractions onto powered activated carbon (PAC) indicated that physical removal is not likely to play a significantly role in further diminishing recalcitrant HPO-A, HPI and SMPs during longer travel times in the subsurface.

  7. Effects of unilateral and bilateral cochlea removal on 2-deoxyglucose patterns in the chick auditory system.

    PubMed

    Heil, P; Scheich, H

    1986-10-15

    The 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) method was used to map functional activity in the auditory system of chicks that had been subjected to unilateral or bilateral cochlea removal. Following survival times of 1 day to 4 weeks, chicks were exposed to continuous white noise in the 2DG experiments. In monaural subjects nucleus angularis and nucleus magnocellularis showed faint 2DG uptake on the side contralateral to the intact ear. In the binaural nucleus laminaris, the asymmetrical and almost mirror-imaged labeling pattern (Lippe, Stewart, and Rubel: Brain Res. 196:43-58, '80) was produced. The superior olive (OS) was strongly labeled on the ipsilateral side, whereas the contralateral OS showed only a slight 2DG uptake at its medial border. The lateral lemniscus and nucleus lemnisci lateralis, pars ventralis (LLv) showed stronger activation on the contralateral side. Both Nissl stains and 2DG patterns provide evidence that nucleus ventralis lemnisci lateralis (VLV) can be subdivided into an anterior (VLVa) and a posterior (VLVp) part. Whereas VLVp is labeled only contralaterally, VLVa is labeled on both sides with similar intensity. Nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis, pars dorsalis (MLD) is strongly labeled throughout contralaterally. The ipsilateral MLD shows a defined ventral portion of high 2DG uptake. Intensity of labeling here is symmetrical to the corresponding area of the contralateral MLD. These symmetrical patterns were related to the tonotopic organization of MLD, which was mapped in intact animals by using tone stimuli. Assuming that symmetrical 2DG uptake in monaural animals indicates excitatory input from both ears (EE-cells), it appears that these EE-cells occupy a sector of each isofrequency plane in MLD. Nucleus ovoidalis (Ov) generally was stronger labeled on the contralateral side. The columnar organization of field L as seen in monaural chicks has already been described (Scheich, Exp. Brain Res. 51:199-205, '83). In bilaterally deafened chicks, MLD, Ov, and

  8. Bimetallic Treatment System (BTS) for Removal and Remediation of Polychlorinated Biphenyl from Marshall Space Flight Center's 4696 Fl Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    This Office of Space Flight (OSF)-funded project sought to demonstrate the application of a Bi-metallic Treatment System (BTS) to remove and degrade PCBs found on NASA facilities. The project initiated with the collection of PCB-containing materials from various MSFC and KSC structures, followed by laboratory evaluation of the BTS' PCB-removal efficiency, and concluded with a field demonstration at MSFC. The project evaluated the optimum formulation required to remove PCBs from aged and weathered paint with the goal of achieving final PCB concentrations less than 50 mg/Kg or 50 percent reduction where PCB starting levels were already below the 50 mg/Kg levels. Using lessons learned from this study, it was anticipated that the research team would be better able to make further recommendation on application strategies for future use of BTS for the treatment of PCB laden coatings on structures.

  9. Novel use of the AngioVac® system to remove thrombus during simultaneous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation life support.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Kevin E; Jenkins, Eric; Copenhaver, William; Williams, David M

    2016-03-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was introduced to clinical medicine over 40 years ago. While initially used as a treatment for acute respiratory failure in infants, the use of ECMO has grown to include respiratory and circulatory failure in both children and adults, cardiogenic shock, pulmonary embolism, sepsis, trauma, malignancy, pulmonary hemorrhage and as a treatment for hypothermic drowning.(1) Recent technological improvements in ECMO circuitry make it possible to minimize anticoagulation of the ECMO patient, decreasing the incidence of bleeding. Thrombus deposition within the ECMO circuit can be a life-threating complication. ECMO circuit thrombus can be contained in the circuit, adherent to cannula and deposited within the patient. The ability to remove thrombus while the patient remains on ECMO support could be a life-saving measure for some patients. The present case report outlines use of the AngioVac(®) thrombus removal system in concert with ECMO to remove a large thrombus adherent to an ECMO cannula.

  10. Hair removal.

    PubMed

    Haedersdal, Merete; Haak, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    Hair removal with optical devices has become a popular mainstream treatment that today is considered the most efficient method for the reduction of unwanted hair. Photothermal destruction of hair follicles constitutes the fundamental concept of hair removal with red and near-infrared wavelengths suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair, white skin, and a normal hormonal status. Currently, no method of lifelong permanent hair eradication is available, and it is important that patients have realistic expectations. Substantial evidence has been found for short-term hair removal efficacy of up to 6 months after treatment with the available systems. Evidence has been found for long-term hair removal efficacy beyond 6 months after repetitive treatments with alexandrite, diode, and long-pulse Nd:YAG lasers, whereas the current long-term evidence is sparse for IPL devices. Treatment parameters must be adjusted to patient skin type and chromophore. Longer wavelengths and cooling are safer for patients with darker skin types. Hair removal with lasers and IPL sources are generally safe treatment procedures when performed by properly educated operators. However, safety issues must be addressed since burns and adverse events do occur. New treatment procedures are evolving. Consumer-based treatments with portable home devices are rapidly evolving, and presently include low-level diode lasers and IPL devices.

  11. Removal of Trace Pharmaceuticals from Water using coagulation and powdered activated carbon as pretreatment to ultrafiltration membrane system.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chenguang; Nnanna, A G Agwu; Liu, Yanghe; Vargo, John D

    2016-04-15

    In this study, the efficacy of water treatment technologies: ultra-filtration (UF), powdered activated carbon (PAC), coagulation (COA) and a combination of these technologies (PAC/UF and COA/UF) to remove target pharmaceuticals (Acetaminophen, Bezafibrate, Caffeine, Carbamazepine, Cotinine, Diclofenac, Gemfibrozil, Ibuprofen, Metoprolol, Naproxen, Sulfadimethoxine, Sulfamethazine, Sulfamethoxazole, Sulfathiazole, Triclosan and Trimethoprim) was investigated. Samples of wastewater from municipal WWTPs were analyzed using direct aqueous injection High Performance Liquid Chromatography with Tandem Quadrupole Mass Spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) detection. On concentration basis, results showed an average removal efficiency of 29%, 50%, and 7%, respectively, for the UF, PAC dosage of 50ppm, and COA dosage of 10ppm. When PAC dosage of 100ppm was used as pretreatment to the combined PAC and UF in-line membrane system, a 90.3% removal efficiency was achieved. The removal efficiency of UF in tandem with COA was 33%, an increase of 4% compared with the single UF treatment. The adsorption effect of PAC combined with the physical separation process of UF revealed the best treatment strategy for removing pharmaceutical contaminant from water.

  12. Removal of Nitrogen Pollutant during River Bank Filtration System Recharged by Reclaimed Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, W.; Huang, G., Sr.; Huang, Q.; Xiong, Y.; Xu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen contained in reclaimed water could be removed by River Bank Filtration (RBF). A field experiment at the Qingyang River replenished by reclaimed water was carried out to investigate the capability of nitrogen removal rate of RBF. Water samples from the river, the riverbed sediment, the unsaturated zone, and groundwater sampling points along a monitoring section were analyzed for NO3-N and NH4-N in this study. The migration and attenuation of NO3-N and NH4-N during river bank filtration were investigated. The quality of river water in the monitoring section showed a seasonal variation, with the highest NO3-N concentration 18.7 mg/L during autumn season. The results also indicated that NO3-N removal mainly occurred in the riverbed sediment during river filtration into the saturated zone, with a removal rate approximately 73%. While an evident NH4-N accumulation was found in the riverbed sediment pore water. The average NO3-N concentration decreased to 1.2 mg/L in the saturated aquifer, and the removal rate was approximately 88%. It showed that NO3-N in the reclaimed water can be effectively removed by denitrification during the filtration process. While, NH4-N concentration in river bank filtration was found to slightly increase from 0.18 mg/L to 0.31mg/L, thus showed a potential threat to groundwater pollution. Temperature played an important role in performance of RBF. Temperature of higher than 25℃ in river water improved NO3-N removal.

  13. Operation of a breadboard liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor system for removing carbon dioxide and water vapor from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, Scott B.; Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Millard, Douglas L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Foerg, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Processes to remove and recover carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor from air are essential for successful long-duration space missions. This paper presents results of a developmental program focused on the use of a liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor (LSMC) system for removal of CO2 and water vapor from air. In this system, air from the spacecraft cabin atmosphere is circulated through one side of a hollow-fiber membrane contactor. On the other side of the membrane contactor is flowed a liquid sorbent, which absorbs the CO2 and water vapor from the feed air. The liquid sorbent is then heated to desorb the CO2 and water vapor. The CO2 is subsequently removed from the system as a concentrated gas stream, whereas the water vapor is condensed, producing a water stream. A breadboard system based on this technology was designed and constructed. Tests showed that the LSMC breadboard system can produce a CO2 stream and a liquid-water stream. Details are presented on the operation of the system, as well as the effects on performance of variations in feed conditions.

  14. Effectiveness of photocatalytic filter for removing volatile organic compounds in the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kuo-Pin; Lee, Grace Whei-May; Huang, Wei-Ming; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Lou, Chia-ling; Yang, Shinhao

    2006-05-01

    Nowadays, the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system has been an important facility for maintaining indoor air quality. However, the primary function of typical HVAC systems is to control the temperature and humidity of the supply air. Most indoor air pollutants, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), cannot be removed by typical HVAC systems. Thus, some air handling units for removing VOCs should be added in typical HVAC systems. Among all of the air cleaning techniques used to remove indoor VOCs, photocatalytic oxidation is an attractive alternative technique for indoor air purification and deodorization. The objective of this research is to investigate the VOC removal efficiency of the photocatalytic filter in a HVAC system. Toluene and formaldehyde were chosen as the target pollutants. The experiments were conducted in a stainless steel chamber equipped with a simplified HVAC system. A mechanical filter coated with Degussa P25 titania photocatalyst and two commercial photocatalytic filters were used as the photocatalytic filters in this simplified HVAC system. The total air change rates were controlled at 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 hr(-1), and the relative humidity (RH) was controlled at 30%, 50%, and 70%. The ultraviolet lamp used was a 4-W, ultraviolet-C (central wavelength at 254 nm) strip light bulb. The first-order decay constant of toluene and formaldehyde found in this study ranged from 0.381 to 1.01 hr(-1) under different total air change rates, from 0.34 to 0.433 hr(-1) under different RH, and from 0.381 to 0.433 hr(-1) for different photocatalytic filters.

  15. Activated sludge systems removal efficiency of veterinary pharmaceuticals from slaughterhouse wastewater.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Pedro N; Pirra, António; Basto, M Clara P; Almeida, C Marisa R

    2013-12-01

    The knowledge on the efficiency of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) from animal food production industry for the removal of both hormones and antibiotics of veterinary application is still very limited. These compounds have already been reported in different environmental compartments at levels that could have potential impacts on the ecosystems. This work aimed to evaluate the role of activated sludge in the removal of commonly used veterinary drugs, enrofloxacin (ENR), tetracycline (TET), and ceftiofur, from wastewater during a conventional treatment process. For that, a series of laboratory-controlled experiments using activated sludge were carried out in batch reactors. Sludge reactors with 100 μg/L initial drug charge presented removal rates of 68 % for ENR and 77 % for TET from the aqueous phase. Results indicated that sorption to sludge and to the wastewater organic matter was responsible for a significant percentage of drugs removal. Nevertheless, these removal rates still result in considerable concentrations in the aqueous phase that will pass through the WWTP to the receiving environment. Measuring only the dissolved fraction of pharmaceuticals in the WWTP effluents may underestimate the loading and risks to the aquatic environment.

  16. ETV REPORT: REMOVAL OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER — ECOWATER SYSTEMS, INC. ERO-R450E WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EcoWater Systems ERO-R450E POU drinking water treatment system was tested for removal of aldicarb, benzene, cadmium, carbofuran, cesium, chloroform, dichlorvos, dicrotophos, fenamiphos, mercury, mevinphos, oxamyl, strontium, and strychnine. The ERO-R450E employs a reverse os...

  17. Comparison of metal oxide absorbents for regenerative carbon dioxide and water vapor removal for advanced portable life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonesifer, Greg T.; Chang, Craig H.; Cusick, Robert J.; Hart, Joan M.

    1991-01-01

    Metal-oxide absorbents (MOAs) have a demonstrated capability for removal of both metabolic CO2 and H2O from breathing atmospheres, simplifying portable life support system (PLSS) design and affording reversible operation for regeneration. Attention is presently given to the comparative performance levels obtained by silver-oxide-based and silver/zinc-oxide-based systems, which also proved to be longer-lasting than the silver oxide-absorber system. The silver/zinc system is found to substantially simplify the ventilation loop of a prospective Space Station Freedom PLSS.

  18. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-02-14

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  19. System And Method For Characterizing Voiced Excitations Of Speech And Acoustic Signals, Removing Acoustic Noise From Speech, And Synthesizi

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-04-25

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  20. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  1. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-08-08

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  2. Removal of traces of toluene and p-xylene in indoor air using biofiltration and a hybrid system (biofiltration + adsorption).

    PubMed

    Luengas, Angela Tatiana; Hort, Cécile; Platel, Vincent; Elias, Ana; Barona, Astrid; Moynault, Laurent

    2017-03-11

    Biofiltration technology and the hybrid system combining biofiltration and adsorption (onto activated carbon) were compared as possible methods to toluene and p-xylene at parts per million concentration levels (2-45 and 1-33 ppb, respectively). An organic material was used as packing material for the biofiltration process. Even at low empty bed residence times (EBRTs) and concentrations, toluene removal efficiency reached 100% and p-xylene showed an increasing trend on their removal efficiency over the time using biofiltration. The assessment of by-products and particle generation by the biofilter and the hybrid system were taken into account. Acetone and acetic acid were identified as by-products of the biofilter. Particle emissions in the range of 0.03 to 10 μm were recorded for both systems.

  3. CBCT Assessment of Root Dentine Removal by Gates-Glidden Drills and Two Engine-Driven Root Preparation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Harandi, Azade; Mohammadpour Maleki, Fatemeh; Moudi, Ehsan; Ehsani, Maryam; Khafri, Soraya

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the dentine removing efficacy of Gates-Glidden drills with hand files, ProTaper and OneShape single-instrument system using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: A total of 39 extracted bifurcated maxillary first premolars were divided into 3 groups (n=13) and were prepared using either Gates-Glidden drills and hand instruments, ProTaper and OneShape systems. Pre- and post-instrumentation CBCT images were obtained. The dentin thickness of canals was measured at furcation, and 1 and 2 mm from the furcation area in buccal, palatal, mesial and distal walls. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test. Tukey’s post hoc tests were used for two-by-two comparisons. Results: Gates-Glidden drills with hand files removed significantly more (P<0.001) dentine than the engine-driven systems in all canal walls (buccal, palatal, mesial and distal). There were no significant differences between OneShape and ProTaper rotary systems (P>0.05). Conclusion: The total cervical dentine removal during canal instrumentation was significantly less with engine-driven file systems compared to Gates-Glidden drills. There were no significant differences between residual dentine thicknesses left between the various canal walls. PMID:28179920

  4. Removal performance of heavy metals in MBR systems and their influence in water reuse.

    PubMed

    Arévalo, Juan; Ruiz, Luz Marina; Pérez, Jorge; Moreno, Begoña; Gómez, Miguel Ángel

    2013-01-01

    The removal performance of heavy metals by two experimental full-scale membrane bioreactors (microfiltration and ultrafiltration) and the influence of activated sludge total suspended solid (TSS) concentration were studied under real operational conditions. Influent and effluent Be, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Cd, Ba, Sn, Sb, Pb and U concentrations were analysed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. An average contamination rate for most of the analysed heavy metals was observed in raw wastewater, resulting in effluents without limitation for reuse in agricultural destinations according to Spanish law. Removal efficiencies up to 80% were obtained regardless of whether microfiltration or ultrafiltration membranes were used, except for As, Mo and Sb. The removal yields of different heavy metals can be strengthened by increasing the activated sludge TSS concentration, mainly at concentrations above 10 g/L.

  5. Effects of Dam Removal on Fish Community Interactions and Stability in the Eightmile River System, Connecticut, USA.

    PubMed

    Poulos, Helen M; Chernoff, Barry

    2017-02-01

    New multivariate time-series methods have the potential to provide important insights into the effects of ecosystem restoration activities. To this end, we examined the temporal effects of dam removal on fish community interactions using multivariate autoregressive models to understand changes in fish community structure in the Eightmile River System, Connecticut, USA. We sampled fish for 6 years during the growing season; 1 year prior to, 2 years during, and for 3 years after a small dam removal event. The multivariate autoregressive analysis revealed that the site above the dam was the most reactive and least resilient sample site, followed in order by the below-dam and nearby reference site. Even 3 years after the dam removal event, the stream was still in a recovery stage that had failed to approximate the community structure of the reference site. This suggests that the reorganization of fish communities following dam removals, with the goal of ecological restoration, may take decades to centuries for the restored sites to approximate the community structure of nearby undisturbed sites. Results from this study also highlight the utility of multivariate autoregressive modeling for examining temporal interactions among species in response to adaptive management activities both in aquatic systems and elsewhere.

  6. Simultaneous organic carbon and nitrogen removal in an anoxic-oxic activated sludge system under various operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Kashif; Ahn, Dae Hee; Lee, Dae Sung

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated a bench-scale anoxic-oxic activated sludge system for integrated removal of COD and nitrogen. The experimental unit includes four chambers and continuous feeding in first chamber without recycle of nitrified liquid from aerobic to anoxic chamber unlike the conventional anoxic-oxic process. Recycled excessive sludge was used for the purpose of recycling nitrified mixed liquor. Synthetic wastewater with average loading rates of 0.53 kg COD/m(3)/d and 0.067 kg NH4(+)-N/m(3)/d was fed to the reactor system at hydraulic residence times (HRT) of 24 and 18 h. The results of 100 days operation showed high removal efficiencies of organic matter of about 97% as total COD and more than 99% removal of ammonia-nitrogen. In anoxic-oxic operation phase, total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) removal was about 66% by pre-denitrification. Moreover, the solid liquid separation through final clarifier was excellent without any suspended solid in the effluent.

  7. Peroxymonosulfate-Co(II) oxidation system for the removal of the non-ionic surfactant Brij 35 from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Michele; Volpe, Angela; Mascolo, Giuseppe; Lopez, Antonio; Locaputo, Vito; Ciannarella, Ruggiero

    2012-01-01

    The non-ionic surfactant Brij 35 was effectively removed from concentrated aqueous solution by the peroxymonosulfate/Co(II) system, using oxone (2KHSO(5)·KHSO(4)·K(2)SO(4)) as a source of peroxymonosulfate. At pH=2.3 and initial Brij 35 concentration in the range 680-2410 mg L(-1), 86-94% removal was achieved after 24 h, using Co(II)=15 μM and oxone=5.9 mM. The effectiveness of removal did not change when initial pH was in the range 2.3-8.2. After five subsequent additions of Co(II) and oxone to the solution, COD and TOC removals increased up to 64% and 33%, respectively. Radical quenching tests confirmed that sulfate radical was the dominant radical species in the system. The main identified by-products from surfactant degradation were: (a) low molecular weight organic acids; (b) aldehydes and formates with shorter ethoxy chain than Brij 35; (c) alcohol ethoxylates carrying hydroxyl groups bonded to ethoxy chain. By-products identification allowed to hypothesize the pathways of Brij 35 degradation.

  8. Effects of Dam Removal on Fish Community Interactions and Stability in the Eightmile River System, Connecticut, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulos, Helen M.; Chernoff, Barry

    2017-02-01

    New multivariate time-series methods have the potential to provide important insights into the effects of ecosystem restoration activities. To this end, we examined the temporal effects of dam removal on fish community interactions using multivariate autoregressive models to understand changes in fish community structure in the Eightmile River System, Connecticut, USA. We sampled fish for 6 years during the growing season; 1 year prior to, 2 years during, and for 3 years after a small dam removal event. The multivariate autoregressive analysis revealed that the site above the dam was the most reactive and least resilient sample site, followed in order by the below-dam and nearby reference site. Even 3 years after the dam removal event, the stream was still in a recovery stage that had failed to approximate the community structure of the reference site. This suggests that the reorganization of fish communities following dam removals, with the goal of ecological restoration, may take decades to centuries for the restored sites to approximate the community structure of nearby undisturbed sites. Results from this study also highlight the utility of multivariate autoregressive modeling for examining temporal interactions among species in response to adaptive management activities both in aquatic systems and elsewhere.

  9. Aerobic and anoxic growth and nitrate removal capacity of a marine denitrifying bacterium isolated from a recirculation aquaculture system.

    PubMed

    Borges, Maria-Teresa; Sousa, André; De Marco, Paolo; Matos, Ana; Hönigová, Petra; Castro, Paula M L

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial biofilters used in marine recirculation aquaculture systems need improvements to enhance nitrogen removal efficiency. Relatively little is known about biofilter autochthonous population structure and function. The present study was aimed at isolating and characterizing an autochthonous denitrifying bacterium from a marine biofilter installed at a recirculation aquaculture system. Colonization of four different media in a marine fish farm was followed by isolation of various denitrifying strains and molecular classification of the most promising one, strain T2, as a novel member of the Pseudomonas fluorescens cluster. This strain exhibits high metabolic versatility regarding N and C source utilization and environmental conditions for growth. It removed nitrate through aerobic assimilatory metabolism at a specific rate of 116.2 mg NO(3)-N g dw(-1) h(-1). Dissimilatory NO(3)-N removal was observed under oxic conditions at a limited rate, where transient NO(2)-N formed represented 22% (0.17 mg L(-1)) of the maximum transient NO(2)-N observed under anoxic conditions. Dissimilatory NO(3)-N removal under anoxic conditions occurred at a specific rate of 53.5 mg NO(3)-N g dw(-1) h(-1). The isolated denitrifying strain was able to colonize different materials, such as granular activated carbon (GAC), Filtralite and Bioflow plastic rings, which allow the development of a prototype bioreactor for strain characterization under dynamic conditions and mimicking fish-farm operating conditions.

  10. Removal of disinfection by-products in raw water using a biological powder-activated carbon system.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jie C; Tseng, Wei B; Wu, Ming C; Han, Jia Y; Chen, Bi H

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the removal efficiency of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in raw water at a water treatment plant using a biological powder-activated carbon system (BPACS). The presence of an excessive amount of DBPs has a large impact on the water quality of drinking water treated from the purification process. This study collected rapidly filtered water from an advanced water treatment plant for use in experiments on raw water. The removal efficiency of the trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) and haloacetic acids formation potential (HAAFP) was studied under various hydraulic retention times and under organic DOC loadings. The results showed that the BPACS lowered the average concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), UV(254) and the SUVA value (equivalent to UV(254)/DOC) in raw water. The system efficiently removed the THMFP and HAAFP during the treatment of the three primary organic carbon items. These results highlight the importance of the BPACS for efficiently treating disinfection by-products. These discoveries provide important information on biological degradation behaviors that can remove excessive amounts of disinfection by-products from drinking water.

  11. Development of a Method to Determine the Effectiveness of Cleaning Agents in Removal of Biofilm Derived Spores in Milking System

    PubMed Central

    Ostrov, Ievgeniia; Harel, Avraham; Bernstein, Solange; Steinberg, Doron; Shemesh, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Microbial damages caused by biofilm forming bacteria in the dairy industry are a fundamental threat to safety and quality of dairy products. In order to ensure the optimal level of equipment hygiene in the dairy industry, it is necessary to determine the biofilm removal efficiency of cleaning agents used for cleaning-in-place (CIP) procedures. However, currently there is no standard method available for evaluating and comparing cleaning agents for use in CIP procedures in the dairy industry under realistic conditions. The present study aims to establish a CIP model system to evaluate the effectiveness of cleaning agents in removal of biofilm derived spores from the surfaces of stainless steel which is the predominant substrate in milking equipment on dairy farms. The system is based on Bacillus subtilis spores surrounded with exopolymeric substances produced by bacteria during biofilm formation. The spores applied on sampling plates were mounted on T-junctions protruding 1.5–11-times the milk pipe diameter from the main loop to resemble different levels of cleaning difficulty. The cleaning tests were conducted using commercial alkaline detergents and caustic soda at conditions which are relevant to actual farm environment. The spores removal effect was evaluated by comparing the number of viable spores (attached to sampling plates) before and after cleaning. Evaluation of the cleaning and disinfecting effect of cleaning agents toward biofilm derived spores was further performed, which indicates whether spores elimination effect of an agent is due to killing the spores or removing them from the surfaces of dairy equipment. Moreover, it was established that the presence of extracellular matrix is an important factor responsible for high level of cleaning difficulty characteristic for surface attached spores. In overall, the results of this study suggest that the developed model system simulates actual farm conditions for quantitative evaluation of the effectiveness

  12. Effects of salinity on the microbial removal of nitrate under varying nitrogen inputs within the marshland upwelling system.

    PubMed

    Putnam Duhon, Lorna A; Gambrell, Robert P; Rusch, Kelly A; White, John R

    2012-01-01

    The marshland upwelling system (MUS) utilizes the natural properties of wetland soils to treat domestic wastewater injected into the marsh subsurface as the wastewater moves upwards and outwards from the injection site. The system is different from coarse media based wetland treatment systems common in Europe, though it relies on the same principles. A laboratory study was designed to simulate field conditions in order to investigate and quantify the removal of nitrogen from the wastewater by pumping wastewater into the bottom of cores and observing the changes as the wastewater moved upward to the surface. Two nitrogen treatments (100 mg NH(4)-N L(-1) and 80 mg NH(4)-N L(-1)/20 mg NO(3)-N L(-1)) and two salinities (2 and 20‰) for each N treatment were studied. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) demonstrated a removal efficiency of 90%, while NO(3)-N had a removal efficiency of > 99% throughout the 84 days of the study. Higher salinity had a temporary, significant lower removal of DOC, while nitrate removal was high and consistent over time. Microbial biomass C (MBC) and denitrification enzyme activity (DEA) were measured to determine the role of microbial processes within the MUS. Wastewater introduction increased microbial growth at the column surface, which led to increases in denitrification/nitrification coupling and net N loss, as estimated by DEA. Salinity and organic matter were found to have significant negative and positive impacts, respectively, on DEA rates and MBC. An understanding of the impacts of salinity on specific microbially-mediated N transformations is critical for improving the efficiency of the MUS in coastal environments to determine the long-term sustainability.

  13. Development of a Method to Determine the Effectiveness of Cleaning Agents in Removal of Biofilm Derived Spores in Milking System.

    PubMed

    Ostrov, Ievgeniia; Harel, Avraham; Bernstein, Solange; Steinberg, Doron; Shemesh, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Microbial damages caused by biofilm forming bacteria in the dairy industry are a fundamental threat to safety and quality of dairy products. In order to ensure the optimal level of equipment hygiene in the dairy industry, it is necessary to determine the biofilm removal efficiency of cleaning agents used for cleaning-in-place (CIP) procedures. However, currently there is no standard method available for evaluating and comparing cleaning agents for use in CIP procedures in the dairy industry under realistic conditions. The present study aims to establish a CIP model system to evaluate the effectiveness of cleaning agents in removal of biofilm derived spores from the surfaces of stainless steel which is the predominant substrate in milking equipment on dairy farms. The system is based on Bacillus subtilis spores surrounded with exopolymeric substances produced by bacteria during biofilm formation. The spores applied on sampling plates were mounted on T-junctions protruding 1.5-11-times the milk pipe diameter from the main loop to resemble different levels of cleaning difficulty. The cleaning tests were conducted using commercial alkaline detergents and caustic soda at conditions which are relevant to actual farm environment. The spores removal effect was evaluated by comparing the number of viable spores (attached to sampling plates) before and after cleaning. Evaluation of the cleaning and disinfecting effect of cleaning agents toward biofilm derived spores was further performed, which indicates whether spores elimination effect of an agent is due to killing the spores or removing them from the surfaces of dairy equipment. Moreover, it was established that the presence of extracellular matrix is an important factor responsible for high level of cleaning difficulty characteristic for surface attached spores. In overall, the results of this study suggest that the developed model system simulates actual farm conditions for quantitative evaluation of the effectiveness

  14. Neuron network training system for Robot responding intelligently to input light stimuli (notice of removal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Baoping; Xu, Chang; Xu, Lijun; Luo, Qinhua

    2007-11-01

    This paper (672414) was removed from the SPIE Digital Library on 13 April 2010 to discovery of plagiarism. As stated in the SPIE Guidelines for Professional Conduct and Publishing Ethics, SPIE defines plagiarism as the reuse of someone else's prior ideas, processes, results, or words without explicit attribution of the original author and source, or falsely representing someone else's work as one's own. SPIE considers plagiarism in any form, at any level, to be unacceptable and a serious breach of professional conduct. It is SPIE policy to remove such papers and to take appropriate corrective or disciplinary action against the offending author(s).

  15. H sub 2 S removal system shows promise over iron sponge

    SciTech Connect

    Samuels, A. )

    1990-02-01

    This article describes use of a new material as a replacement product for iron sponge (wood chips) for H{sub 2}S removal has been introduced at two production facilities in Michigan. At one facility, operating costs between March and August 1989 were reduced by 13% over the same period for 1988. The trademarked material is named Sulfa Treat. It is a dry, free-flowing material being used in patented and patent-pending processes for selective removal of up to 2,800 ppm of H{sub 2}S.

  16. Research on a real-time scanning tunneling microscope data acquisition system (notice of removal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chang; Xiao, Baoping; Xu, Lijun

    2007-11-01

    This paper (67233A) was removed from the SPIE Digital Library on 13 April 2010 to discovery of plagiarism. As stated in the SPIE Guidelines for Professional Conduct and Publishing Ethics, SPIE defines plagiarism as the reuse of someone else's prior ideas, processes, results, or words without explicit attribution of the original author and source, or falsely representing someone else's work as one's own. SPIE considers plagiarism in any form, at any level, to be unacceptable and a serious breach of professional conduct. It is SPIE policy to remove such papers and to take appropriate corrective or disciplinary action against the offending author(s).

  17. RVACS/RACS (reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system/reactor air cooling system) shutdown heat removal in a modular sized LMR (liquid metal reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, F.E.; Wigeland, R.A.; Lo, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    Shutdown heat removal by a RVACS for an unprotected loss of flow case in a modular sized LMR has been analyzed with the SASSYS-1 LMR systems analysis code. For this case it was assumed that all power was lost to the primary and intermediate sodium pumps, and feedwater flow to the steam generators was lost. The control rods failed to scram, but reactivity feedback shut down the power to decay heat levels. The only heat removal was by sodium natural circulation from the core to the vessel wall and by cooling of the vessel wall by radiation and air natural circulation in the Reactor Air Cooling System. The case was run until the system temperatures peaked when the decay heat power level dropped below the heat removal rate.

  18. Adenoid removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... This does not cause problems most of the time. Alternative Names Adenoidectomy; Removal of adenoid glands Images Adenoid removal - series References Wetmore RF. Tonsils and adenoids. In: Kliegman ...

  19. Regenerable metallic oxide systems for removal of carbon dioxide: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. G.; Heimlich, P. F.; Tepper, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Design concepts for portable canisters for removal of carbon dioxide are described. One is screen pack configuration consisting of brazed rectangular canister with four metal oxide packs inserted. Other is radial flow canister with perforated central tube. Methods of production and operating principles are presented.

  20. Removal of bisphenol A (BPA) in a nitrifying system with immobilized biomass.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Bernat, Katarzyna; Bułkowska, Katarzyna; Wojnowska-Baryła, Irena

    2014-11-01

    The potential for bisphenol A (BPA) removal by mixed consortia of immobilized microorganisms with high nitrification activity was investigated with BPA concentrations in the influent from 2.5 to 10.0 mg/L. The presence of BPA limited ammonium oxidation; nitrification efficiency decreased from 91.2±1.3% in the control series to 47.4±9.4% when BPA concentration in wastewater was the highest. The efficiency of BPA removal rose from 87.1±5.5% to 92.9±2.9% with increased BPA concentration in the influent. Measurement of oxygen uptake rates by biomass exposed to BPA showed that BPA was mainly removed by heterotrophic bacteria. A strong negative correlation between the BPA removal efficiency and nitrification efficiency indicated the limited contribution of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to BPA biodegradation. Exposure of biomass to BPA changed the quantity and diversity of AOB in the biomass as shown by real-time PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

  1. Heavy metal removal from multicomponent system by sulfate reducing bacteria: Mechanism and cell surface characterization.

    PubMed

    Kiran, M Gopi; Pakshirajan, Kannan; Das, Gopal

    2017-02-15

    This study evaluated the combined effect of Cd(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Fe(III), Pb(II) and Zn(II) on each other removal by anaerobic biomass under sulfate reducing condition. Statistically valid Plackett-Burman design of experiments was employed to carry out this mixture study. The results obtained showed a maximum removal of Cu(II) (98.9%), followed by Ni(II) (97%), Cd(II) (94.8%), Zn(II) (94.6%), Pb(II) (94.4%) and Fe(III) (93.9%). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the sulfate and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction revealed that the effect due to copper was highly significant (P value<0.05) on sulfate and COD removal. To establish the role of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in the metal removal process, surface morphology and composition of the metal loaded biomass were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) integrated with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The results obtained revealed that the metal precipitates are associated with the outer and inner cell surface of the SRB as a result of the sulfide generated by SRB.

  2. 75 FR 78918 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Removal of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... experimental animals. Specifically, the listing was based on increased ] incidence of bladder tumors in experimental animals, especially male rats, when they were fed sodium saccharin. However, saccharin was removed....'' The animal studies in rats with sodium saccharin did show urinary bladder tumors in the...

  3. 75 FR 20942 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Removal of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... by the Calorie Control Council (CCC), to remove saccharin and its salts from the above lists. EPA is... Carcinogen Assessment Group CBI Confidential Business Information CCC Calorie Control Council CERCLA... This Rule? EPA is proposing to grant a petition submitted by the Calorie Control Council (CCC) under...

  4. Corn stover removal affects on soil carbon in an irrigated system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn stover has been proposed as a possible feedstock for cellulosic ethanol production and this experiment was initiated to investigate the effects of removing corn stover on the soil resource. Corn stover has been harvested every year after grain harvest at three levels (approximately 0, 50, and 1...

  5. A novel enzyme-based acidizing system: Matrix acidizing and drilling fluid damage removal

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.E.; McKay, D.M.; Moses, V.

    1995-12-31

    A novel acidizing process is used to increase the permeability of carbonate rock cores in the laboratory and to remove drilling fluid damage from cores and wafers. Field results show the benefits of the technology as applied both to injector and producer wells.

  6. RADON REMOVAL BY POINT-OF-ENTRY GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON SYSTEMS: DESIGN PERFORMANCE AND COST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes previous research conducted by Lowry Engineering, Inc. (LEI), the Maine Department of Human Services, Division of Health Engineering, and the University of Maine, Department of Civil Engineering, on the removal of Rn from drinking water supplies using granul...

  7. Drift Removal for Improving the Accuracy of Gait Parameters Using Wearable Sensor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Ryo; Lisco, Giulia; Fujisawa, Tadashi; Gastaldi, Laura; Tohyama, Harukazu; Tadano, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Accumulated signal noise will cause the integrated values to drift from the true value when measuring orientation angles of wearable sensors. This work proposes a novel method to reduce the effect of this drift to accurately measure human gait using wearable sensors. Firstly, an infinite impulse response (IIR) digital 4th order Butterworth filter was implemented to remove the noise from the raw gyro sensor data. Secondly, the mode value of the static state gyro sensor data was subtracted from the measured data to remove offset values. Thirdly, a robust double derivative and integration method was introduced to remove any remaining drift error from the data. Lastly, sensor attachment errors were minimized by establishing the gravitational acceleration vector from the acceleration data at standing upright and sitting posture. These improvements proposed allowed for removing the drift effect, and showed an average of 2.1°, 33.3°, 15.6° difference for the hip knee and ankle joint flexion/extension angle, when compared to without implementation. Kinematic and spatio-temporal gait parameters were also calculated from the heel-contact and toe-off timing of the foot. The data provided in this work showed potential of using wearable sensors in clinical evaluation of patients with gait-related diseases. PMID:25490587

  8. Cleaning efficacy of reciprocal and rotary systems in the removal of root canal filling material

    PubMed Central

    Koçak, Mustafa Murat; Koçak, Sibel; Türker, Sevinç Aktemur; Sağlam, Baran Can

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of hand file, nickel titanium rotary instrument, and two reciprocating instruments for removing gutta-percha and sealer from the root canals. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight mandibular premolar teeth were used. The root canals were shaped and filled with gutta-percha and a resin-based sealer. The specimens were divided into four groups according to the technique by which the root filling material was removed: Group 1 — Wave One; Group 2 — Reciproc; Group 3 — ProTaper; and Group 4 — Gates-Glidden burs and stainless steel hand file. Then teeth were split longitudinally and photographed. The images were transferred to a computer. The ratio of remaining filling material to the root canal periphery was calculated with the aid of ImageJ software. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: A significant difference was found among all groups (P < 0.001). The WaveOne group demonstrated significantly less remaining filling material. The greatest amount of filling material was found in specimens where gutta-percha was removed with Gates-Glidden burs and stainless steel hand file. Conclusion: The reciprocating files were found to be significantly more effective in removing the filling material from the canal walls compared to the rotational file and hand file. PMID:27099429

  9. Nitrate removal in a restored riparian groundwater system: functioning and importance of individual riparian zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, S.; Rechsteiner, R.; Lehmann, M. F.; Brankatschk, R.; Vogt, T.; Diem, S.; Wehrli, B.; Tockner, K.; Durisch-Kaiser, E.

    2012-06-01

    For the design and the assessment of river restoration projects, it is important to know to what extent the elimination of reactive nitrogen (N) can be improved in the riparian groundwater. We investigated the effectiveness of different riparian zones, characterized by a riparian vegetation succession, on nitrate (NO3-) removal from infiltrating river water in a restored and a still channelized section of the River Thur, Switzerland. Functional genes of denitrification (nirS and nosZ) were relatively abundant in groundwater from willow bush and mixed forest dominated zones, where oxygen concentrations remained low compared to the main channel and other riparian zones. After flood events, a substantial decline in NO3- concentration (>50 %) was observed in the willow bush zone, but not in the other riparian zones closer to the river. In addition, the characteristic enrichment of 15N and 18O in the residual NO3- pool (by up to 22 ‰ for δ15N and up to 12 ‰ for δ18O) provides qualitative evidence that the willow bush and forest zones were sites of active denitrification and, to a lesser extent, NO3- removal by plant uptake. Particularly in the willow bush zone, during a period of water table elevation after a flooding event, substantial input of organic carbon into the groundwater occurred, thereby fostering post-flood denitrification activity that reduced NO3- concentration with a rate of ~21 μmol N l-1 d-1. Nitrogen removal in the forest zone was not sensitive to flood pluses, and overall NO3- removal rates were lower (~6 μmol l-1 d-1). Hence, discharge-modulated vegetation-soil-groundwater coupling was found to be a~key driver for riparian NO3- removal. We estimated that, despite higher rates in the fairly constrained willow bush hot spot, total NO3- removal from the groundwater is lower than in the extended forest area. Overall, the aquifer in the restored section was more effective and removed ~20 % more NO3- than the channelized section.

  10. Nitrate removal in a restored riparian groundwater system: functioning and importance of individual riparian zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, S.; Rechsteiner, R.; Lehmann, M. F.; Brankatschk, R.; Vogt, T.; Diem, S.; Wehrli, B.; Tockner, K.; Durisch-Kaiser, E.

    2012-11-01

    For the design and the assessment of river restoration projects, it is important to know to what extent the elimination of reactive nitrogen (N) can be improved in the riparian groundwater. We investigated the effectiveness of different riparian zones, characterized by a riparian vegetation succession, for nitrate (NO3-) removal from infiltrating river water in a restored and a still channelized section of the river Thur, Switzerland. Functional genes of denitrification (nirS and nosZ) were relatively abundant in groundwater from willow bush and mixed forest dominated zones, where oxygen concentrations remained low compared to the main channel and other riparian zones. After flood events, a substantial decline in NO3- concentration (> 50%) was observed in the willow bush zone but not in the other riparian zones closer to the river. In addition, the characteristic enrichment of 15N and 18O in the residual NO3- pool (by up to 22‰ for δ15N and up to 12‰ for δ18O) provides qualitative evidence that the willow bush and forest zones were sites of active denitrification and, to a lesser extent, NO3- removal by plant uptake. Particularly in the willow bush zone during a period of water table elevation after a flooding event, substantial input of organic carbon into the groundwater occurred, thereby fostering post-flood denitrification activity that reduced NO3- concentration with a rate of ~21 μmol N l-1 d-1. Nitrogen removal in the forest zone was not sensitive to flood pulses, and overall NO3- removal rates were lower (~6 μmol l-1 d-1). Hence, discharge-modulated vegetation-soil-groundwater coupling was found to be a key driver for riparian NO3- removal. We estimated that, despite higher rates in the fairly constrained willow bush hot spot, total NO3- removal from the groundwater is lower than in the extended forest area. Overall, the aquifer in the restored section was more effective and removed ~20% more NO3- than the channelized section.

  11. ETV STATEMENT - PHYSICAL REMOVAL OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS AND GIARDIA CYSTS IN DRINKING WATER - ZENON ZEEWEED ZW500 ULTRAFILTRATION MEMBRANE SYSTEM AT PITTSBURGH, PA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the ZENON Environmental Inc. ZeeWeed ZW500 UF Drinking Water System was conducted from 2/6-3/7/99. The treatment system underwent Giardia and Cryptosporidium removal challenge testing on 3/2/99 and demonstrated a 5.3 log10 removal of Giardia cysts and a 6...

  12. Work Plan for Bioventing System Removal and Well Abandonment at Sites 204.1, 228, and 510.8, Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Utah

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This letter includes a brief work plan for bioventing system removal and the abandonment of vent wells (VWs), groundwater monitoring wells (MWs), and...vapor monitoring points (VMPs) at Sites 204.1, 228, and 510.8. The bioventing system at Site 924 has already been removed and is not included in this scope of work.

  13. Evaluation of the Effect of Silicone Contamination on Various Bond Systems and the Feasibility of Removing the Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Stephanie D.

    2008-01-01

    Silicone is a contaminant that can cause catastrophic failure of a bond system depending on the materials and processes used to fabricate the bond system, Unfortunately, more and more materials are fabricated using silicone. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate which bond systems are sensitive to silicone contamination and whether or not a cleaning process could be utilized to remove the silicone to bring the bond system performance back to baseline. Due to the extensive nature of the testing attempts will be made to generalize the understanding within classes of substrates, bond systems, and surface preparation and cleaning methods. This study was done by contaminating various meta! (steel, inconel, and aluminum), phenolic (carbon cloth phenolic and glass cloth phenolic), and rubber (natural rubber, asbestos-silicone dioxide filled natural butyldiene rubber, silica-filled ethylene propylenediene monomer, and carbon-filled ethylene propylenediene monomer) substrates which were then bonded using various adhesives and coatings (epoxy-based adhesives, paints, ablative compounds, and Chemlok adhesives) to determine the effect silicone contamination has on a given bond system's performance. The test configurations depended on the bond system being evaluated. The study also evaluated the feasibility of removing the silicone contamination by cleaning the contaminated substrate prior to bonding. The cleaning processes also varied depending on bond system.

  14. Evaluation of the Effect of Silicone Contamination on Various Bond Systems and the Feasibility of Removing the Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Stephanie D.

    2008-01-01

    Silicone is a contaminant that can cause catastrophic failure of a bond system depending on the materials and processes used to fabricate the bond system. Unfortunately, more and more materials are fabricated using silicone. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate which bond systems are sensitive to silicone contamination and whether or not a cleaning process could be utilized to remove the silicone to bring the bond system performance back to baseline. Due to the extensive nature of the testing, attempts will be made to generalize the understanding within classes of substrates, bond systems, and surface preparation and cleaning methods. This study was done by contaminating various metal (steel, Inconel, and aluminum), phenolic (carbon-cloth phenolic [CCP] and glass-cloth phenolic [GCP]), and rubber (natural rubber, asbestos-silicone dioxide filled natural butyldiene rubber [ASNBR]; silica-filled ethylene propylenediene monomer [SFEPDM], and carbon-filled ethylene propylenediene monomer [CFEPDM]) substrates which were then bonded using various adhesives and coatings (epoxy-based adhesives, paints, ablative compounds, and Chemlok adhesives) to determine the effect silicone contamination has on a given bond system's performance. The test configurations depended on the bond system being evaluated. The study also evaluated the feasibility of removing the silicone contamination by cleaning the contaminated substrate prior to bonding. The cleaning processes also varied depending on bond system.

  15. Removal of cyanobacterial bloom from a biopond-wetland system and the associated response of zoobenthic diversity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yonghong; Kerr, Philip G; Hu, Zhengyi; Yang, Linzhang

    2010-06-01

    Harmful cyanobacterial bloom in water bodies frequently occurs due to eutrophication, leading to the excessive growth of cyanobacteria which in turn may lead to a decrease in biodiversity. A biopond-wetland system to control cyanobacterial bloom and stabilize or even increase biodiversity is proposed and applied in a pond, Kunming, western China where cyanobacterial blooms frequently break out. The biopond-wetland system examined includes three main parts: filter-feeding fish, replanted pond macrophytes, and a terminal artificial wetland. When the hydraulic load of the biopond-wetland system was 500m(3)/d on non-rainy days, the system successfully decreased the level of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a). The declining levels of total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP) and ammonia in the water after establishing the biopond-wetland system also coincided with the disappearance of the cyanobacterial bloom. In the second summer, when the biopond-wetland system was in a relatively steady-state condition, the overall average nutrient removal efficiencies were as follows, Chl-a (83%), TN (57%), TP (70%) and ammonia (66%), while in the second winter, the overall average removal efficiencies were Chl-a (66%), TN (40%), TP (53%) and ammonia (49%). Simpson's diversity index of zoobenthos indicated that the system increased the zoobenthic diversity and improved the growth conditions of the zoobenthos habitat. The results demonstrated that the biopond-wetland system could control cyanobacterial blooms.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation-based feasibility study of novel indirect flat panel detector system for removing scatter radiation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yongsu; Morishita, Junji; Park, MinSeok; Kim, Hyunji; Kim, Kihyun; Kim, Jungmin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a novel indirect flat panel detector (FPD) system for removing scatter radiation. The substrate layer of our FPD system has a Pb net-like structure that matches the ineffective area and blocks the scatter radiation such that only primary X-rays reach the effective area on a thin-film transistor. To evaluate the performance of the proposed system, we used Monte Carlo simulations to derive the scatter fraction and contrast. The scatter fraction of the proposed system is lower than that of a parallel grid system, and the contrast is superior to that of a system without a grid. If the structure of the proposed FPD system is optimized with respect to the specifications of a specific detector, the purpose of the examination, and the energy range used, the FPD can be useful in diagnostic radiology.

  17. Improving nitrogen removal using a fuzzy neural network-based control system in the anoxic/oxic process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingzhi; Ma, Yongwen; Wan, Jinquan; Wang, Yan; Chen, Yangmei; Yoo, Changkyoo

    2014-10-01

    Due to the inherent complexity, uncertainty, and posterity in operating a biological wastewater treatment process, it is difficult to control nitrogen removal in the biological wastewater treatment process. In order to cope with this problem and perform a cost-effective operation, an integrated neural-fuzzy control system including a fuzzy neural network (FNN) predicted model for forecasting the nitrate concentration of the last anoxic zone and a FNN controller were developed to control the nitrate recirculation flow and realize nitrogen removal in an anoxic/oxic (A/O) process. In order to improve the network performance, a self-learning ability embedded in the FNN model was emphasized for improving the rule extraction performance. The results indicate that reasonable forecasting and control performances had been achieved through the developed control system. The effluent COD, TN, and the operation cost were reduced by about 14, 10.5, and 17 %, respectively.

  18. Implementation of a miniaturised navigation system in head and neck surgery for the detection and removal of foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, K J; Böckers, A; Fassnacht, U; Wilde, F; Wegener, M

    2017-01-01

    The removal of embedded blast-generated fragments from soft tissue is very difficult, especially in the head and neck regions. First, because many retained foreign materials are non-metallic and can, therefore, not be detected by fluoroscopy, and second, because a broad exploration of the soft tissue is not possible in the facial area for functional and cosmetic reasons. Intraoperative navigation computer-assisted surgery (CAS) may facilitate the retrieval of foreign bodies and reduce exploration trauma. In a blind trial, five test specimens of different materials (glass, metal, wood, plastic, and stone) were inserted on the left and right sides of the head and neck of ten body donors through an intraoral incision. A second physician then detected and removed the foreign bodies from one side of the body without and from the other side of the body with navigation. We measured the duration of surgery, the extent of tissue trauma caused during surgery, the time it took to remove the foreign bodies, and the subjective evaluation of the usefulness of navigation. With the aid of the navigation system, the various foreign bodies were detected after an average of 26.7 (±35.1) s (p < 0.0001) and removed after an average of 79.1 (±66.2) s (p = 0.0239), with an average incision length of 10.0 (±3.5) mm. Without the navigation system, the foreign bodies were located after an average of 86.5 (±77.7) s and removed after an average of 74.1 (±45.9) s, with an average incision length of 13.0 mm (±3.6) mm (=0.0007). Intraoperative navigation systems are a valuable tool for removing foreign bodies from the soft tissue of the face and neck. Both the duration of surgery and the incision length can be reduced using navigation systems. Depending on the material of the foreign bodies and the signal intensity in the CT/MRI scanner, however, the detection reliability varies. All in all, navigation is considered to be a useful tool.

  19. Impact Analysis on the Removal of Filter/Monitors from USN/USMC Helicopter in Flight Refueling Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-26

    filters were being removed from service. The investigation by the USAF following the incident indicated that the super absorbent polymer ( SAP ) used in...incidents. In response to these events, the Navy Fuels Team initiated an investigation into the migration of SAP downstream of filter/monitors, and the...monitors containing SAP in helicopter in flight refueling (HIFR) systems. The utilization of monitors in HIFR applications is significantly different

  20. Simultaneous effective carbon and nitrogen removals and phosphorus recovery in an intermittently aerated membrane bioreactor integrated system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun-Kun; Pan, Xin-Rong; Geng, Yi-Kun; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Recovering nutrients, especially phosphate resource, from wastewater have attracted increasing interest recently. Herein, an intermittently aerated membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a mesh filter was developed for simultaneous chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN) and phosphorous removal, followed by phosphorus recovery from the phosphorus-rich sludge. This integrated system showed enhanced performances in nitrification and denitrification and phosphorous removal without excess sludge discharged. The removal of COD, TN and total phosphorus (TP) in a modified MBR were averaged at 94.4 ± 2.5%, 94.2 ± 5.7% and 53.3 ± 29.7%, respectively. The removed TP was stored in biomass, and 68.7% of the stored phosphorous in the sludge could be recovered as concentrated phosphate solution with a concentration of phosphate above 350 mg/L. The sludge after phosphorus release could be returned back to the MBR for phosphorus uptake, and 83.8% of its capacity could be recovered. PMID:26541793

  1. A modified BAF system configuring synergistic denitrification and chemical phosphorus precipitation: Examination on pollutants removal and clogging development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjie; Dong, Wengyi; Li, Ting; Liu, Tongzhou

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a BAF system configuring simultaneous chemical phosphorus precipitation in the pre-denitrification stage was examined using a continuously operated setup to treat real domestic wastewater. The effects of using no chemical, dosing sole Fe(2+), and dosing combined Fe(2+), PAM, and NaHCO3 in the pre-denitrification tank were assessed by monitoring COD, nitrogen, and phosphorus removal and hydraulic headloss development in the BAF column. Though dosing sole Fe(2+) significantly enhanced phosphorus removal, it would consume alkalinity through hydrolysis and form smaller-sized sludge flocs in the pre-denitrification tank, and hence resulted in affected NH4(+)-N, insoluble COD, and SS removal in the BAF. Dosing combined Fe(2+), PAM, and NaHCO3 can enhance sludge flocculation to form larger flocs and compensate alkalinity consumption. It exhibited sound performance on COD, nitrogen, and phosphorus removal, and led to less frequent BAF backwashing by slowing clogging development in the BAF filter layer.

  2. Evaluation of a photocatalytic reactor membrane pilot system for the removal of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds from water.

    PubMed

    Benotti, Mark J; Stanford, Benjamin D; Wert, Eric C; Snyder, Shane A

    2009-04-01

    A photocatalytic reactor membrane pilot system, employing UV/TiO(2) photocatalysis, was evaluated for its ability to remove thirty-two pharmaceuticals, endocrine disrupting compounds, and estrogenic activity from water. Concentrations of all compounds decreased following treatment, and removal followed pseudo-first-order kinetics as a function of the amount of treatment. Twenty-nine of the targeted compounds in addition to total estrogenic activity were greater than 70% removed while only three compounds were less than 50% removed following the highest level of treatment (4.24 kW h/m(3)). No estrogenically active transformation products were formed during treatment. Additionally, the unit was operated in photolytic mode (UV only) and photolytic plus H(2)O(2) mode (UV/H(2)O(2)) to determine the relative amount of energy required. Based on the electrical energy per order (EEO), the unit achieved the greatest efficiency when operated in photolytic plus H(2)O(2) mode for the conditions tested.

  3. Nutrient removal of a floating plant system receiving low- pollution wastewater: Effects of plant species and influent concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, J. J.; Zhao, J. N.; Xue, L. H.; Yang, L. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Plant floating bed was adopted in this study to compare the purification effect of four plant species (Oenanthe javanica, Ipomoea aquatica, Hydrocotyle vulgaris, and Iris sibirica) receiving high and low treated domestic sewage. The experiment was conducted for eight months during the low temperature season. The results indicated that the average removal rates of TN and NH4+-N in I. aquatica floating bed were relatively high both under high and low influent concentration during the first stage of the experiment. During the second stage, H. vulgaris showed the best performance for nitrogen treatment, and the average removal rates of TN were 70.7% and 87.7% under high and low influent concentration, while the average removal rates of NH4 +-N were as high as 98.9% and 98.9%, accordingly. Moreover, H. vulgaris contributed most for plant assimilation to nitrogen removal among different plant floating systems. It was also found that the existence of hydrophytes effectively controlled the rise of water pH value and algae growth and reproduction, which helped to improve the aquatic environment. The results provide engineering parameters for the future design of an ecological remediation technology for low-pollution wastewater purification.

  4. Energy-positive nitrogen removal from reject water using a tide-type biocathode microbial electrochemical system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiman; Liu, Jia; He, Weihua; Qu, Youpeng; Li, Da; Feng, Yujie

    2016-12-01

    A tide-type biocathode microbial electrochemical system (TBMES) employing intermittent air accessible method was constructed for simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal. The nitrification and denitrification processes occurred in cathode chamber were enhanced by raising frequency of catholyte feeding-draining process and lowering external resistance. At external resistance of 5Ω and frequency of 8cph, the TBMES removed 99.3±0.3% of COD and 57.7±1.1% of total nitrogen when treating synthetic medium with COD/N ratio of 3.0, concomitantly, a maximum power density of 10.6Wm(-3) was achieved. Comparable performances were obtained for reject water treatment with a relatively lower COD/N ratio of 2.5, which were 88.6±1.3%, 53.2±3.8% and 8.9±0.2Wm(-3) for COD removal, total nitrogen removal and maximum power density. The feeding-draining process consumed 14.3% of the total energy produced, and thus obviated energy-intensive aeration and achieved net energy output.

  5. Nitric oxide removal by combined urea and Fe(II)EDTA reaction systems.

    PubMed

    He, Feiqiang; Deng, Xianhe; Chen, Min

    2017-02-01

    (NH2)2CO as well as Fe(II)EDTA is an absorbent for simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification. However, they have their own drawbacks, like the oxidation of Fe(II)EDTA and the low solubility of NO in urea solution. To overcome these defects, A mixed absorbent containing both (NH2)2CO and Fe(II)EDTA was employed. The effects of various operating parameters (urea and Fe(II)EDTA concentration, temperature, inlet oxygen concentration, pH value) on NO removal were examined in the packed tower. The results indicated that the NO removal efficiency increased with the decrease of oxygen concentration as well as the increase of Fe(II)EDTA concentration. The NO removal efficiency had little change with a range of 25-45 °C, and sharply decreased at the temperature of above 55 °C. The NO removal efficiency initially increases up to the maximum value and then decreases with the increase of pH value as well as the raise of urea concentration. In addition, the synergistic mechanism of (NH2)2CO and Fe(II)EDTA on NO removal was investigated. Results showed that urea could react with Fe(II)EDTA-NO to produce Fe(II)EDTA, N2, and CO2, and hinder oxidation of Fe(II)EDTA. Finally, to evaluate the effect of SO3(2-) on NO removal, a mixed absorbent containing Fe(II)EDTA, urea, and Na2SO3 was employed to absorb NO. The mixed absorbent could maintain more than 78% for 80 min at 25 °C, pH = 7.0, (NH2)2CO concentration of 5 wt%, Fe(II)EDTA concentration of 0.02 M, O2 concentration of 7% (v/v), and Na2SO3 concentration of 0.2 M.

  6. Removal of COD, phenols and ammonium from Lurgi coal gasification wastewater using A2O-MBR system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zixing; Xu, Xiaochen; Gong, Zheng; Yang, Fenglin

    2012-10-15

    As a typical industrial wastewater, coal gasification wastewater has poor biodegradability and high toxicity. In this paper, a laboratory-scale anaerobic-anoxic-oxic membrane reactor (A(2)O-MBR) system was developed to investigate the treatment ability of coal gasification wastewater. The removal capacity of each pollutants used in this system were determined at different hydraulic residence times (HRT) and mixed liquor recycle ratios (R). The experimental results showed that this system could effectively deal with COD and phenol removal and remain in a stable level when the operational parameters altered, while the nitrification was sensitive to operational conditions. The best performance was obtained at HRT of 48 h and R of 3. The maximum removal efficiencies of COD, NH(4)(+)-N and phenols were 97.4%, 92.8% and 99.7%, with final concentrations in the effluent of 71 mg/L, 9.6 mg/L and 3 mg/L, respectively. Organics degradation and transformation were analyzed by GC/MS and it was found that anaerobic process played an important role in degradation of refractory compounds.

  7. Phosphorus metabolism and population dynamics in a biological phosphate-removal system with simultaneous anaerobic phosphate stripping.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing-hua; Yuan, Lin-jiang; Chen, Xi; Liu, Lun; Luo, Da-cheng

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the metabolism of phosphorus and changes in population dynamics were investigated via simultaneous chemical stripping in sidestream in an acetate-fed sequencing batch reactor. The synthesized intracellular polyphosphate (poly-P) by polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) gradually decreased when the biomass was subjected to 83 d of P stripping. Initially, the P removal efficiency of the system improved from 94.3% to 96.9%. Thereafter, a relatively high level of P in effluent was observed, during which time the stoichiometric ratios of Prelease/HAcuptake decreased, Glycogendegraded/HAcuptake and poly-β-hydroxyvalerate/PHA increased. The results revealed that a metabolic shift from polyphosphate-accumulating metabolism to glycogen-accumulating metabolism. Correspondingly, PAOs declined to less than 1% of the population, glycogen-accumulating organisms proliferated to almost 20% instead. The results of PCR–DGGE also indicated that the microbial community structure considerably changed in response to the gradually decreasing poly-P content. These findings imply that intracellular poly-P level is important for the stable of P removal system. Furthermore, it suggests that it is not a stable and effective way for P recycling from anaerobic stage of the biological P removal system in sidestream.

  8. Method for removal of random noise in eddy-current testing system

    DOEpatents

    Levy, Arthur J.

    1995-01-01

    Eddy-current response voltages, generated during inspection of metallic structures for anomalies, are often replete with noise. Therefore, analysis of the inspection data and results is difficult or near impossible, resulting in inconsistent or unreliable evaluation of the structure. This invention processes the eddy-current response voltage, removing the effect of random noise, to allow proper identification of anomalies within and associated with the structure.

  9. Initial Field Deployment Results of Green PCB Removal from Sediment Systems (GPRSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devor, Robert; Captain, James; Weis, Kyle; Maloney, Phillip; Booth, Greg; Quinn, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Study: (a) Develop/optimize technology capable of removing PCBs from contaminated sediments; (b) Develop design for functional GPRSS unit; (c) Produce and prove functionality of prototype units in a laboratory settings; (d) Produce fully-functional GPRSS units for testing at a demonstration site in Altavista, VA; and (e) Evaluate efficacy of GPRSS technology for the remediation of PCB-contaminated sediments.

  10. Field Evaluation of Ultra-High Pressure Water Systems for Runway Rubber Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    21 4.5.3 Post-rubber removal pavement surface effects measurements ............................ 21 4.5.4 Data analysis procedure... materials when in contact with each other. Figure 3 illustrates the adhesional and hysteresis friction components. 2.2 Tire- pavement friction...an indication of pavement macrotexture (ASTM E 2157(American Society for Testing and Materials International 2009c)). The CT meter has integrated

  11. Removal of vanadium from industrial wastewater using iron sorbents in batch and continuous flow pilot systems.

    PubMed

    Leiviskä, Tiina; Khalid, Muhammad Kamran; Sarpola, Arja; Tanskanen, Juha

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the removal of vanadium from real industrial wastewater by using six iron materials: commercial iron sorbent (CFH-12), commercial mineral sorbent (AQM), blast furnace sludge (BFS), steel converter sludge (SCS), ferrochrome slag (FeCr) and slag from a steel foundry (OKTO). Batch tests revealed that CFH-12 (ferric oxyhydroxide) removed vanadium most efficiently, which was explained by its high iron content and the amorphous form of the iron, and that the sorption followed the Langmuir isotherm. With a dosage of 10 g/l and an initial vanadium concentration of 58.2 mg/l, 91-94% removal rates for vanadium were achieved in the studied pH range (3-9). Other sorbents showed significantly lower efficiency than CFH-12, with the exception of BFS at acidic pH (93%). Based on the batch test results, CFH-12 was selected for a pilot study made on site. The pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of CFH-12 to remove vanadium at high temperature (80 °C) from concentrated industrial wastewater with fluctuating water quality (vanadium concentration varied from 51 to 83 mg/l, pH about 9 (at 25 °C)). Leaching of impurities (mainly S, Ca, Mg and K) into the effluent occurred during the first day, but subsequently good quality effluent was produced (e.g. <0.1 mg/l V). During the pilot study, the amorphous iron material of CFH-12 was crystallized into a hematite-like phase (Fe1.67 H0.99 O3), and goethite (FeO(OH)) with a higher average pore diameter, probably due to the hot process conditions to which CFH-12 was exposed for over five days.

  12. Reactive Transport Modeling of Subsurface Arsenic Removal Systems in Rural Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, M.; Rahman, M. M.; van Breukelen, B. M.; Ahmed, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic (As) in the groundwater of the shallow aquifers of Bangladesh are a major public health concern. Subsurface Arsenic Removal (SAR) is a relatively new treatment option that can potentially be a cost effective method for arsenic removal for community-based drinking water supplies. The basic idea of SAR is to extract water, aerate it, and re-inject it, after which groundwater with reduced arsenic concentrations may be extracted. The main process for As reduction is sorption to Hydrous Ferric Oxides (HFO) that forms after injection of the aerated water. The purpose of this poster is to investigate the major geochemical processes responsible for the (im)mobilization of As during SAR operation. SAR was applied at a test site in Muradnagar upazila in Comilla district about 100 km southeast of Dhaka in Bangladesh. Multiple extraction/aeration/re-injection cycles were performed and water samples were analyzed. A PHREEQC reactive transport model (RTM) was used in a radial flow setting to try to reproduce the measurements. Kinetic oxidation/dissolution reactions, cation exchange, and surface complexation were simulated. The simulation of different reactions enables the possibility to discern the reaction parameters involved in the im(mobilization) of As. The model fit has reasonable agreement with the observed data for major ions and trace elements. The model suggests an increasing sorption capacity due to the gradual development of HFO precipitates resulting from the injection phases. Modeled breakthrough curves of As, Fe(II), and Mn, match the measured increase of As, Fe(II), and Mn removal with successive cycles. The model illustrates that the pH of groundwater during SAR operation has a great impact on As sorption in the subsurface. The surface complexation modeling suggests that competitive displacement of As by H4SiO4 is an important factor limiting As removal during SAR operation.

  13. Cadmium Removal from Aqueous Systems Using Opuntia albicarpa L. Scheinvar as Biosorbent

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán-Hernández, Rosa Icela; Juárez-Santillán, Luis Felipe; Martínez-Ugalde, Ivan; Coronel-Olivares, Claudia; Lucho-Constantino, Carlos Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the use of a natural adsorbent like nopal (Opuntia albicarpa L. Scheinvar) for removing cadmium from aqueous solutions with low concentrations of this metal. Two treatments were applied to the cladodes: a dehydration to get dehydrated nopal (DHN) and heating up to 90°C to obtain a thermally treated nopal (TN). After examining the effect of various pH values (2–7), the capacity of each biosorbent was examined in batch sorption tests at different dosages (0, 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, and 3000 mg L−1). The results indicated that adsorption of cadmium to biomass of DHN and TN was highly dependent on pH and biosorbent dosage. The best removal of cadmium (53.3%, corresponding to qe of 0.155 mg g−1) was obtained at pH 4.0 by using the TN sorbent. Infrared and Raman spectra confirmed that cadmium removal occurred via adsorption to –OH functional groups. PMID:26783531

  14. Cadmium Removal from Aqueous Systems Using Opuntia albicarpa L. Scheinvar as Biosorbent.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Hernández, Rosa Icela; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Gabriela Alejandra; Juárez-Santillán, Luis Felipe; Martínez-Ugalde, Ivan; Coronel-Olivares, Claudia; Lucho-Constantino, Carlos Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the use of a natural adsorbent like nopal (Opuntia albicarpa L. Scheinvar) for removing cadmium from aqueous solutions with low concentrations of this metal. Two treatments were applied to the cladodes: a dehydration to get dehydrated nopal (DHN) and heating up to 90°C to obtain a thermally treated nopal (TN). After examining the effect of various pH values (2-7), the capacity of each biosorbent was examined in batch sorption tests at different dosages (0, 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, and 3000 mg L(-1)). The results indicated that adsorption of cadmium to biomass of DHN and TN was highly dependent on pH and biosorbent dosage. The best removal of cadmium (53.3%, corresponding to q e of 0.155 mg g(-1)) was obtained at pH 4.0 by using the TN sorbent. Infrared and Raman spectra confirmed that cadmium removal occurred via adsorption to -OH functional groups.

  15. Efectiveness of the waveone and ProTaper D systems for removing gutta-percha with or without a solvent.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Ana Pm; Fontana, Carlos E; Godoy, Aline; De Martin, Alexandre S; Kato, Augusto S; Rocha, Daniel Gp; Pelegrine, Rina A; Bueno, Carlos Es

    2016-12-01

    Endodontic retreatment requires complete removal of the filling material and access to the apical foramen. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Wave One reciprocating system and compare it to the ProTaper D rotarysystem, with or without the use of a solvent, in removing filling material from root canals. The time required for each filling removal technique employed was also determined and compared. Forty extracted human mandibular premolars with a single, straight, flattened canal were prepared and filled. They were divided into four groups (n = 10): Group 1: ProTaper D Ni Ti rotary instruments; Group 2: ProTaper D Ni Tirotary instruments, with a solvent; Group 3: Wave One primary instrument; and Group 4: Wave One primary instrument, with a solvent. The teeth were then split along their long axis and photographed using an operating microscope with 5Xmagnification. The amount of remaining filling material was assessed with Image Tool software. The results were compared using the Kruskal Wallis test (p <0.05). There was no significant difference between groups regarding the amount of residual filling material (p > 0.05). Operative time was significantly longer in Group 3 than in groups 1, 2 and 4 (p <0.05). The Wave One system and the ProTaper D system were equally effective, with or without a solvent. The time required to remove the filling material from the canals was significantly longer in Group 3 than in the other groups.

  16. Method for removing acid gases from a gaseous stream

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett; Zielke, Clyde W.

    1981-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking a heavy aromatic polynuclear carbonaceous feedstock containing reactive alkaline constituents to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels boiling below about 475.degree. C. at atmospheric pressure by contacting the feedstock with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst, thereafter separating a gaseous stream containing hydrogen, at least a portion of the hydrocarbon fuels and acid gases from the molten metal halide and regenerating the molten metal halide, thereby producing a purified molten metal halide stream for recycle to the hydrocracking zone, an improvement comprising; contacting the gaseous acid gas, hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels-containing stream with the feedstock containing reactive alkaline constituents to remove acid gases from the acid gas containing stream. Optionally at least a portion of the hydrocarbon fuels are separated from gaseous stream containing hydrogen, hydrocarbon fuels and acid gases prior to contacting the gaseous stream with the feedstock.

  17. Combined organic matter and nitrogen removal from a chemical industry wastewater in a two-stage MBBR system.

    PubMed

    Cao, S M S; Fontoura, G A T; Dezotti, M; Bassin, J P

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide-producing factories generate highly polluting wastewaters containing toxic and hazardous compounds which should be reduced to acceptable levels before discharge. In this study, a chemical industry wastewater was treated in a pre-denitrification moving-bed biofilm reactor system subjected to an increasing internal mixed liquor recycle ratio from 2 to 4. Although the influent wastewater characteristics substantially varied over time, the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and dissolved organic carbon was quite stable and mostly higher than 90%. The highest fraction of the incoming organic matter was removed anoxically, favouring a low COD/N environment in the subsequent aerobic nitrifying tank and thus ensuring stable ammonium removal (90-95%). However, during pH and salt shock periods, nitrifiers were severely inhibited but gradually restored their full nitrifying capability as non-stressing conditions were reestablished. Besides promoting an increase in the maximum nitrification potential of the aerobic attached biomass from 0.34 to 0.63 mg [Formula: see text], the increase in the internal recycle ratio was accompanied by an increase in nitrogen removal (60-78%) and maximum specific denitrification rate (2.7-3.3 mg NOx(-)--N). Total polysaccharides (PS) and protein (PT) concentrations of attached biomass were observed to be directly influenced by the influent organic loading rate, while the PS/PT ratio mainly ranged from 0.3 to 0.5. Results of Microtox tests showed that no toxicity was found in the effluent of both the anoxic and aerobic reactors, indicating that the biological process was effective in removing residual substances which might adversely affect the receiving waters' ecosystem.

  18. Temporary storage or permanent removal? The division of nitrogen between biotic assimilation and denitrification in stormwater biofiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Payne, Emily G I; Fletcher, Tim D; Russell, Douglas G; Grace, Michael R; Cavagnaro, Timothy R; Evrard, Victor; Deletic, Ana; Hatt, Belinda E; Cook, Perran L M

    2014-01-01

    The long-term efficacy of stormwater treatment systems requires continuous pollutant removal without substantial re-release. Hence, the division of incoming pollutants between temporary and permanent removal pathways is fundamental. This is pertinent to nitrogen, a critical water body pollutant, which on a broad level may be assimilated by plants or microbes and temporarily stored, or transformed by bacteria to gaseous forms and permanently lost via denitrification. Biofiltration systems have demonstrated effective removal of nitrogen from urban stormwater runoff, but to date studies have been limited to a 'black-box' approach. The lack of understanding on internal nitrogen processes constrains future design and threatens the reliability of long-term system performance. While nitrogen processes have been thoroughly studied in other environments, including wastewater treatment wetlands, biofiltration systems differ fundamentally in design and the composition and hydrology of stormwater inflows, with intermittent inundation and prolonged dry periods. Two mesocosm experiments were conducted to investigate biofilter nitrogen processes using the stable isotope tracer 15NO3(-) (nitrate) over the course of one inflow event. The immediate partitioning of 15NO3(-) between biotic assimilation and denitrification were investigated for a range of different inflow concentrations and plant species. Assimilation was the primary fate for NO3(-) under typical stormwater concentrations (∼1-2 mg N/L), contributing an average 89-99% of 15NO3(-) processing in biofilter columns containing the most effective plant species, while only 0-3% was denitrified and 0-8% remained in the pore water. Denitrification played a greater role for columns containing less effective species, processing up to 8% of 15NO3(-), and increased further with nitrate loading. This study uniquely applied isotope tracing to biofiltration systems and revealed the dominance of assimilation in stormwater biofilters

  19. Enhanced reduction of excess sludge and nutrient removal in a pilot-scale A2O-MBR-TAD system.

    PubMed

    Ventura, J S; Seo, S; Chung, I; Yeom, I; Kim, H; Oh, Y; Jahng, D

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a pilot scale anaerobic-anoxic-oxic (A2O) process with submerged membrane (MBR) in the oxic tank was coupled with thermophilic aerobic digestion (TAD) reactor and was operated for longer than 600 days to treat real domestic wastewater. Regardless of the varying conditions of the system, the A2O-MBR-TAD process removed MLSS, TCOD, BOD, TN, TP, and E. coli about 99%, 96%, 96%, 70%, 83%, and 99%, respectively. The additional TP removal of the system was due to the precipitating agent directly added in the oxic reactor, without which TP removal was about 56%. In the TAD reactor, receiving MLSS from the oxic tank (MBR), about 25% of TSS and VSS were solubilized during 2 days of retention. The effluent of the TAD reactor was recycled into the anoxic tank of A2O-MBR to provide organic carbon for denitrification and cryptic growth. By controlling the flowrate of wasting stream from the MBR, sludge production decreased to almost zero. From these results, it was concluded that the A2O-MBR-TAD process could be a reliable option for excellent effluent quality and near zero-sludge production.

  20. Biogas recirculation for simultaneous calcium removal and biogas purification within an expanded granular sludge bed system treating leachate.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinghuan; Lu, Xueqin; Liu, Jianyong; Qian, Guangren; Lu, Yongsheng

    2014-12-01

    Biogas, generated from an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor treating municipal solid waste (MSW) leachate, was recirculated for calcium removal from the leachate via a carbonation process with simultaneous biogas purification. Batch trials were performed to optimize the solution pH and imported biogas (CO2) for CaCO3 precipitation. With applicable pH of 10-11 obtained, continuous trials achieved final calcium concentrations of 181-375 mg/L (removal efficiencies≈92.8-96.5%) in the leachate and methane contents of 87.1-91.4% (purification efficiencies≈65.4-82.2%) in the biogas. Calcium-balance study indicates that 23-986 mg Ca/d was released from the bio-system under the carbonized condition where CaCO3 precipitating was moved outside the bioreactor, whereas 7918-9517 mg Ca/d was trapped into the system for the controlled one. These findings demonstrate that carbonation removal of calcium by biogas recirculation could be a promising alternative to pretreat calcium-rich MSW leachate and synergistically to improve methane content.