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Sample records for acid-independent bile formation

  1. Sodium Taurocholate Modifies the Bile Acid-Independent Fraction of Canalicular Bile Flow in the Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Alfred L.; Wood, R. A. B.; Moossa, A. R.; Boyer, James L.

    1979-01-01

    Bile acid-independent secretion and the choleretic response to taurocholate were determined in rhesus monkeys fitted with indwelling silastic cannulas in the common bile ducts. Bile acids were infused intravenously in random order at 3.5, 7.0, or 10.5 μmol/min for 1.5 h each. When data were analyzed with a single regression line, bile flow increased in proportion to the level of bile acid secretion, although the y-intercepts (the conventional measurement of bile acid-independent secretion) varied widely (77.9±40.9 ml/24 h). The variation in y-intercepts was observed between animals and with repeated studies in the same animal and could not be explained by sex differences or the effects of the indwelling silastic cannulas, but seemed to be related to the order of bile acid infusion. With only two taurocholic acid infusion rates (7.0 and 3.5 μmol/min), [14C]erythritol clearance was greater per mole of secreted bile acid when the initial bile acid infusion was at the high level, but approached zero at low bile acid secretion rates, which suggests that so-called bile acid-independent canalicular flow is closely related to bile acid secretion or is small in size. The augmentation in [14C]erythritol clearance when the high infusion rate was given first was also associated with an increase in biliary clearance of [3H]inulin, which indicates that the premeability to inulin was also enhanced. Identical experiments which substituted equimolar infusions of a nonmicelle-forming bile acid (taurodehydrocholate) for taurocholate failed to demonstrate any difference in choleretic response or biliary clearance of [3H]inulin with the order of bile acid infusion. These experiments demonstrate that a micelleforming bile acid, taurocholate, can increase the permeability of the biliary system to large molecular weight solutes and simultaneously modify the y-intercept and the volume of bile secreted in response to the transported bile acid. Taurocholate may, therefore, modify its own

  2. Effects of ion substitution on bile acid-dependent and -independent bile formation by rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyke, R W; Stephens, J E; Scharschmidt, B F

    1982-01-01

    To characterize the transport mechanisms responsible for formation of canalicular bile, we have examined the effects of ion substitution on bile acid-dependent and bile acid-independent bile formation by the isolated perfused rat liver. Complete replacement of perfusate sodium with choline and lithium abolished taurocholate-induced choleresis and reduced biliary taurocholate output by greater than 70%. Partial replacement of perfusate sodium (25 of 128 mM) by choline reduced bile acid-independent bile formation by 30% and replacement of the remaining sodium (103 mM) by choline reduced bile acid-independent bile formation by an additional 64%. In contrast, replacement of the remaining sodium (103 mM) by lithium reduced bile acid-independent bile formation by only an additional 20%, while complete replacement of sodium (128 mM) by lithium reduced bile formation by only 17%, and lithium replaced sodium as the predominant biliary cation. Replacement of perfusate bicarbonate by Tricine, a zwitterionic amino acid buffer, decreased bile acid-independent bile formation by greater than or equal to 50% and decreased biliary bicarbonate output by approximately 60%, regardless of the accompanying cation. In separate experiments, replacement of sodium by lithium essentially abolished Na,K-ATPase activity measured either as ouabain-suppressible ATP hydrolysis in rat liver or kidney homogenates, or as ouabain-suppressible 86Rb uptake by cultured rat hepatocytes. These studies indicate that bile acid(taurocholate)-dependent bile formation by rat liver exhibits a specific requirement for sodium, a finding probably attributable to the role(s) of sodium in hepatic sodium-coupled taurocholate uptake and/or in maintenance of Na,K-ATPase activity. The surprising finding that bile acid-independent bile formation was substantially unaltered by complete replacement of sodium with the permeant cation lithium does not appear to be explained by Na,K-ATPase-mediated lithium transport. Although

  3. Bile Formation and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Bile is a unique and vital aqueous secretion of the liver that is formed by the hepatocyte and modified down stream by absorptive and secretory properties of the bile duct epithelium. Approximately 5% of bile consists of organic and inorganic solutes of considerable complexity. The bile-secretory unit consists of a canalicular network which is formed by the apical membrane of adjacent hepatocytes and sealed by tight junctions. The bile canaliculi (~1 μm in diameter) conduct the flow of bile countercurrent to the direction of portal blood flow and connect with the canal of Hering and bile ducts which progressively increase in diameter and complexity prior to the entry of bile into the gallbladder, common bile duct, and intestine. Canalicular bile secretion is determined by both bile salt-dependent and independent transport systems which are localized at the apical membrane of the hepatocyte and largely consist of a series of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transport proteins that function as export pumps for bile salts and other organic solutes. These transporters create osmotic gradients within the bile canalicular lumen that provide the driving force for movement of fluid into the lumen via aquaporins. Species vary with respect to the relative amounts of bile salt-dependent and independent canalicular flow and cholangiocyte secretion which is highly regulated by hormones, second messengers, and signal transduction pathways. Most determinants of bile secretion are now characterized at the molecular level in animal models and in man. Genetic mutations serve to illuminate many of their functions. PMID:23897680

  4. Physiological and molecular biochemical mechanisms of bile formation

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich

    2013-01-01

    This review considers the physiological and molecular biochemical mechanisms of bile formation. The composition of bile and structure of a bile canaliculus, biosynthesis and conjugation of bile acids, bile phospholipids, formation of bile micellar structures, and enterohepatic circulation of bile acids are described. In general, the review focuses on the molecular physiology of the transporting systems of the hepatocyte sinusoidal and apical membranes. Knowledge of physiological and biochemical basis of bile formation has implications for understanding the mechanisms of development of pathological processes, associated with diseases of the liver and biliary tract. PMID:24259965

  5. History of Hepatic Bile Formation: Old Problems, New Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javitt, Norman B.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of hepatic bile formation reported in 1958 established that it was an osmotically generated water flow. Intravenous infusion of sodium taurocholate established a high correlation between hepatic bile flow and bile acid excretion. Secretin, a hormone that stimulates bicarbonate secretion, was also found to increase hepatic bile flow. The…

  6. Enhanced bile formation induced by experimental dicrocoeliosis in the hamster.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Campos, S; Tuñón, M J; González, P; Marín, J J; González-Gallego, J

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of experimental dicrocoeliosis on bile formation in the hamster. Studies were carried out at 120 days after infection with an oral dose of 40 metacercariae of Dicrocoelium dendriticum. A significant elevation in bile flow (+20%) and in the biliary output of glutathione (+34%), bile acid (+59%), cholesterol (+108%), phospholipids (+99%) and alkaline phosphatase (+36%) was observed in the infected animals. The bile-to-plasma [14C] mannitol ratio increased to values greater than 1 and there was a reduced contribution (-26%) of biliary tree to bile formation. Those data suggest that enhancement in choleresis had a canalicular origin. The presence of oxidative stress, evidenced by the increased oxidized/reduced glutathione ratio and TBARS concentrations, may contribute to the elevated glutathione efflux into bile. Enhancement in bile acid output was not due to qualitative or quantitative changes in bile acid metabolism, as indicated by the absence of significant modification in liver cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase activity and bile acid profile in bile. Increase in the ability of the canalicular membrane to export bile acids was not involved, since maximal secretion rate for exogenously administered taurocholate was decreased. When bile flow, bile acid and biliary lipid secretion was determined in colchicine-pretreated animals differences between control and infected animals were abolished, suggesting that stimulation of the transcytotic vesicle pathway plays an important role in the alteration of the biliary function caused by dicrocoeliosis.

  7. Bile

    MedlinePlus

    ... the digestive tract. Bile contains mostly cholesterol, bile acids (also called bile salts), and bilirubin (a breakdown product of red blood cells). It also contains: Water Body salts (such as potassium and sodium) Copper ...

  8. Physical chemistry of biliary lipids during bile formation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D E; Carey, M C

    1990-09-01

    Present concepts suggest that the canalicular secretion of bile salts is monomeric, which in turn drives the hepatic secretion of lecithin and cholesterol presumably as unilamellar vesicles into bile. As biliary lipids are concentrated within the biliary tree and gallbladder, bile salts structurally alter lecithin-cholesterol vesicles to form a variety of metastable aggregates whose structures and phase transformations are predicted by phase equilibria considerations. These structural transformations ultimately result in the dispersion of biliary lipids as thermodynamically stable micelles or micelles plus thermodynamically unstable vesicles in common duct and gallbladder biles. The experiments reviewed herein represent experimental simulations of these processes. We used pure aqueous lipid systems to model the putative stages of biliary lipid aggregation on the basis of interactions of small unilamellar vesicles of lecithin-cholesterol with bile salts as the latter's concentrations were varied from below to well above the critical micellar concentration. With submicellar bile salt concentrations likely to be found within hepatocytes, vesicle structures are not appreciably altered. However, perimicellar bile salt concentrations possibly occurring in canaliculi and bile ductules induce the formation of a hexagonal rodlike phase. On further increases in bile salt concentration, the hexagonal rods (formed from lecithin-rich and cholesterol-poor vesicles) are dissolved into mixed micelles as bile salt concentrations exceed their critical micellar concentrations. In slightly cholesterol-"supersaturated" biles, the rapid dissolution of this intermediate phase results in the formation of cholesterol-supersaturated mixed micelles that, in time, give rise to a new population of cholesterol-rich vesicles that coexist with saturated micelles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Effects of taurodihydrofusidate, a bile salt analogue, on bile formation and biliary lipid secretion in the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed Central

    Beaudoin, M; Carey, M C; Small, D M

    1975-01-01

    Bile salts play a major role in bile formation and biliary lipid secretion. Sodium taurodihydrofusidate (TDHF), a derivative of the antibiotic fusidic acid, closely resembles bile salts in terms of structure, micellar characteristics, and capacity ot solubilize otherwise insolbule lipids. We have therefore studied the biliary secretion of this bile salt analogue and its influence on bile formation and biliary lipid secretion in primates. Alert, unanesthetized female rhesus monkeys prepared with a total biliary fistula were allowed to reach a steady bile salt secretion rate before each study. In three animals (group I),[14C]TDHF was infused intravenously. Most of the compound was secreted rapidly in bile chemically unchanged. The biliary secretion of this drug produced a twofold increase in bile flow; however, the bile salt output was markedly reduced during the infusion. In spite of this reduction, the phospholipid output remained essentially unchanged whereas the cholesterol output increased almost twofold. In five other animals (group II), the effect of TDHF on the bile salt secretion was further investigated by an intravenous infusion of [14C]taurocholate followed by a combined infusion of [14C]taurocholate and TDHF. When TDHF was added to the infusate, a reduction in the [14C]taurocholate output and a progressive rise in the plasma [14C]taurocholate concentration were observed in each animal. An analysis of the data in both groups indicates that (a) the most likely explanation to account for the decreased bile salt output is that the bile salt analogue, TDHF, interfered with bile salt secretion into the biliary canaliculi; (b) TDHF induces a greater secretion of biliary water than was observed with bile salts, an effect consistent with a stimulation of the bile salt-independent canalicular flow; (c) at similar 3alpha-hydroxysteroid secretion rates TDHF caused a significant increase in cholesterol secretion compared to that induced by bile salt. This finding

  10. Solvent isotope effect on bile formation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Elsing, C; Hirlinger, A; Renner, E L; Lauterburg, B H; Meier, P J; Reichen, J

    1995-01-01

    2H2O affects many membrane transport processes by solvent and kinetic isotope effects. Since bile formation is a process of osmotic filtration where such effects could be important, we investigated the effects of 2H2O on bile formation in the in situ perfused rat liver. Dose finding experiments showed that at high concentrations, 2H2O increased vascular resistance and induced cholestasis; at 60% 2H2O however, a clear dissociation between the vascular and biliary effects was observed. Therefore, further experiments were carried out at this concentration. The main finding was a reduction in bile salt-independent bile flow from 0.99 +/- 0.04 to 0.66 +/- 0.04 microliters.min-1.g-1 (P < 0.001). This was associated with a 40% reduction in biliary bicarbonate concentration (P < 0.001). Choleretic response to neither taurocholate nor ursodeoxycholate was altered by 2H2O; in particular, there was a similar stimulation of bicarbonate secretion by ursodeoxycholate in the presence of 60% 2H2O. To further elucidate this phenomenon, the effect of 2H2O on three proteins potentially involved in biliary bicarbonate secretion was studied in vitro. 2H2O slightly inhibited cytosolic carboanhydrase and leukocyte Na+/H(+)-exchange, these effects reached statistical significance at 100% 2H2O only, however. In contrast, Cl-/HCO(3-)-exchange in canalicular membrane vesicles was already inhibited by 50% (P < 0.001) at 60% 2H2O. Finally, there was a slight reduction in biliary glutathione secretion while that of the disulphide was not affected. Our results are compatible with an inhibition of canalicular Cl-/HCO(3-)-exchange by 2H2O. Whether this is due to altered hydration of the exchanger and/or of the transported bicarbonate remains to be determined. PMID:7717973

  11. Solvent isotope effect on bile formation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Elsing, C; Hirlinger, A; Renner, E L; Lauterburg, B H; Meier, P J; Reichen, J

    1995-04-01

    2H2O affects many membrane transport processes by solvent and kinetic isotope effects. Since bile formation is a process of osmotic filtration where such effects could be important, we investigated the effects of 2H2O on bile formation in the in situ perfused rat liver. Dose finding experiments showed that at high concentrations, 2H2O increased vascular resistance and induced cholestasis; at 60% 2H2O however, a clear dissociation between the vascular and biliary effects was observed. Therefore, further experiments were carried out at this concentration. The main finding was a reduction in bile salt-independent bile flow from 0.99 +/- 0.04 to 0.66 +/- 0.04 microliters.min-1.g-1 (P < 0.001). This was associated with a 40% reduction in biliary bicarbonate concentration (P < 0.001). Choleretic response to neither taurocholate nor ursodeoxycholate was altered by 2H2O; in particular, there was a similar stimulation of bicarbonate secretion by ursodeoxycholate in the presence of 60% 2H2O. To further elucidate this phenomenon, the effect of 2H2O on three proteins potentially involved in biliary bicarbonate secretion was studied in vitro. 2H2O slightly inhibited cytosolic carboanhydrase and leukocyte Na+/H(+)-exchange, these effects reached statistical significance at 100% 2H2O only, however. In contrast, Cl-/HCO(3-)-exchange in canalicular membrane vesicles was already inhibited by 50% (P < 0.001) at 60% 2H2O. Finally, there was a slight reduction in biliary glutathione secretion while that of the disulphide was not affected. Our results are compatible with an inhibition of canalicular Cl-/HCO(3-)-exchange by 2H2O. Whether this is due to altered hydration of the exchanger and/or of the transported bicarbonate remains to be determined. PMID:7717973

  12. Mechanical compaction directly modulates the dynamics of bile canaliculi formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Toh, Yi-Chin; Li, Qiushi; Nugraha, Bramasta; Zheng, Baixue; Lu, Thong Beng; Gao, Yi; Ng, Mary Mah Lee; Yu, Hanry

    2013-02-01

    Homeostatic pressure-driven compaction is a ubiquitous mechanical force in multicellular organisms and is proposed to be important in the maintenance of multicellular tissue integrity and function. Previous cell-free biochemical models have demonstrated that there are cross-talks between compaction forces and tissue structural functions, such as cell-cell adhesion. However, its involvement in physiological tissue function has yet to be directly demonstrated. Here, we use the bile canaliculus (BC) as a physiological example of a multicellular functional structure in the liver, and employ a novel 3D microfluidic hepatocyte culture system to provide an unprecedented opportunity to experimentally modulate the compaction states of primary hepatocyte aggregates in a 3D physiological-mimicking environment. Mechanical compaction alters the physical attributes of the hepatocyte aggregates, including cell shape, cell packing density and cell-cell contact area, but does not impair the hepatocytes' remodeling and functional capabilities. Characterization of structural and functional polarity shows that BC formation in compact hepatocyte aggregates is accelerated to as early as 12 hours post-seeding; whereas non-compact control requires 48 hours for functional BC formation. Further dynamic immunofluorescence imaging and gene expression profiling reveal that compaction accelerated BC formation is accompanied by changes in actin cytoskeleton remodeling dynamics and transcriptional levels of hepatic nuclear factor 4α and Annexin A2. Our report not only provides a novel strategy of modeling BC formation for in vitro hepatology research, but also shows a first instance that homeostatic pressure-driven compaction force is directly coupled to the higher-order multicellular functions. PMID:23233209

  13. Effects of iatrogenic hypercortisolism on gallbladder sludge formation and biochemical bile constituents in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kook, P H; Schellenberg, S; Rentsch, K M; Reusch, C E; Glaus, T M

    2012-02-01

    An association between gallbladder mucoceles and hypercortisolism (HC) was recently described in dogs. Because the formation of a mucocele from clear bile without the transitional formation of microprecipitates appears unlikely, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of iatrogenic HC on sludge formation and changes in the biochemical composition of bile. Bile samples from 6 dogs obtained by percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystocentesis before (day 0), during (days 28, 56, and 84), and after (days 28p, 56p, and 84p) oral administration of hydrocortisone (8 mg/kg every 12 h) were analysed for calcium, cholesterol and bilirubin concentrations and pH. In addition the gallbladder was examined ultrasonographically for sludge. Six dogs receiving a placebo served as controls. Although gallbladder sludge was observed in all treated dogs at day 56, it was also noted in 50% of control dogs, and no significant differences were seen between groups at any sampling time. Bilirubin and cholesterol concentrations decreased significantly and reversibly during treatment, and calcium concentration showed a similar trend. Bile pH was consistently slightly alkaline during iatrogenic HC, whereas it was slightly acidic in control animals. A 3-month period of iatrogenic HC does not lead to ultrasonographically detectable gallbladder sludge or to an increase in bile constituents that are commonly implicated in sludge formation in humans.

  14. Formation of drug-bearing vesicles in mixed colloids of bile salts and phosphatidylcholine

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelm, R.P.; Mang, J.; Hofmann, A.F.; Schteingart, C.; Alkan-Onyuksel, H.; Ayd, S.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors used small-angle neutron scattering to study drug interactions with mixed colloids of bile salt and phosphatidylcholine. Because the mixed colloids form liposomes spontaneously, this system is a model for drug-bile interactions that are important in understanding the efficacy of oral drug formulations and in advanced applications for liposome drug delivery systems. The authors studied particle formation in incorporation of enzymatic products formed in the gut and the effects of cholesteric drugs and taxol on vesicle formation. The studies show that particle morphology is not affected by inclusion of most cholesteric drugs and taxol, and is not affected by incorporation of the products of enzymatic action. The findings suggest that particle form is important for the physiological function of bile and they are beginning to show which drugs affect liposome formation.

  15. Quantitative assessment of canalicular bile formation in isolated hepatocyte couplets using microscopic optical planimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, A; Ng, O C; Strazzabosco, M; Boyer, J L

    1989-01-01

    Isolated rat hepatocyte couplets (IRHC) are primary units of bile secretion that accumulate fluid in an enclosed canalicular space with time in culture. We have quantitated the rate of canalicular secretion in IRHC cultured for 4-8 h by measuring the change in canalicular space volume by video-microscopic optical planimetry using high resolution Nomarski optics. Electron microscopic morphometric studies revealed significant increases in canalicular membrane area after 4-6 h in culture. Canalicular secretion in basal L-15 medium (3.8 +/- 1.3 fl/min) increased significantly with the choleretic bile salts (10 microM), taurocholate, and ursodeoxycholate (14 +/- 7 fl/min each). Secretion rates after exposure to bile acids correlated directly with the canalicular surface area before stimulation. In contrast, expansion times after stimulation varied inversely with initial canalicular volumes. Ursodeoxycholic acid failed to produce a hypercholeresis at 10-, 100-, or 200-microM concentrations compared with taurocholate, either in normal or taurine-depleted IRHC. The present findings establish that rates of canalicular bile secretion can be quantitated in IRHC by serial optical planimetry, both in the basal state and after stimulation with bile acids. Furthermore, ursodeoxycholate does not acutely induce hypercholeresis at the canalicular level in this model. Rather, both taurocholic and ursodeoxycholic acids induced secretion in proportion to the surface area of the canalicular membrane. The IRHC are a useful model to identify canalicular choleretics and for studies of canalicular bile formation. Images PMID:2913052

  16. Biofilm Formation and Detachment in Gram-Negative Pathogens Is Modulated by Select Bile Acids.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Laura M; Cheng, Andrew T; Warner, Christopher J A; Townsley, Loni; Peach, Kelly C; Navarro, Gabriel; Shikuma, Nicholas J; Bray, Walter M; Riener, Romina M; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Linington, Roger G

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a ubiquitous feature of microbial community structure in both natural and host environments; they enhance transmission and infectivity of pathogens and provide protection from human defense mechanisms and antibiotics. However, few natural products are known that impact biofilm formation or persistence for either environmental or pathogenic bacteria. Using the combination of a novel natural products library from the fish microbiome and an image-based screen for biofilm inhibition, we describe the identification of taurine-conjugated bile acids as inhibitors of biofilm formation against both Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taurocholic acid (1) was isolated from the fermentation broth of the fish microbiome-derived strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis and identified using standard NMR and MS methods. Screening of the twelve predominant human steroidal bile acid components revealed that a subset of these compounds can inhibit biofilm formation, induce detachment of preformed biofilms under static conditions, and that these compounds display distinct structure-activity relationships against V. cholerae and P. aeruginosa. Our findings highlight the significance of distinct bile acid components in the regulation of biofilm formation and dispersion in two different clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, and suggest that the bile acids, which are endogenous mammalian metabolites used to solubilize dietary fats, may also play a role in maintaining host health against bacterial infection.

  17. Biofilm Formation and Detachment in Gram-Negative Pathogens Is Modulated by Select Bile Acids

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Loni; Peach, Kelly C.; Navarro, Gabriel; Shikuma, Nicholas J.; Bray, Walter M.; Riener, Romina M.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.; Linington, Roger G.

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a ubiquitous feature of microbial community structure in both natural and host environments; they enhance transmission and infectivity of pathogens and provide protection from human defense mechanisms and antibiotics. However, few natural products are known that impact biofilm formation or persistence for either environmental or pathogenic bacteria. Using the combination of a novel natural products library from the fish microbiome and an image-based screen for biofilm inhibition, we describe the identification of taurine-conjugated bile acids as inhibitors of biofilm formation against both Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taurocholic acid (1) was isolated from the fermentation broth of the fish microbiome-derived strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis and identified using standard NMR and MS methods. Screening of the twelve predominant human steroidal bile acid components revealed that a subset of these compounds can inhibit biofilm formation, induce detachment of preformed biofilms under static conditions, and that these compounds display distinct structure-activity relationships against V. cholerae and P. aeruginosa. Our findings highlight the significance of distinct bile acid components in the regulation of biofilm formation and dispersion in two different clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, and suggest that the bile acids, which are endogenous mammalian metabolites used to solubilize dietary fats, may also play a role in maintaining host health against bacterial infection. PMID:26992172

  18. Biofilm Formation and Detachment in Gram-Negative Pathogens Is Modulated by Select Bile Acids.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Laura M; Cheng, Andrew T; Warner, Christopher J A; Townsley, Loni; Peach, Kelly C; Navarro, Gabriel; Shikuma, Nicholas J; Bray, Walter M; Riener, Romina M; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Linington, Roger G

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a ubiquitous feature of microbial community structure in both natural and host environments; they enhance transmission and infectivity of pathogens and provide protection from human defense mechanisms and antibiotics. However, few natural products are known that impact biofilm formation or persistence for either environmental or pathogenic bacteria. Using the combination of a novel natural products library from the fish microbiome and an image-based screen for biofilm inhibition, we describe the identification of taurine-conjugated bile acids as inhibitors of biofilm formation against both Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taurocholic acid (1) was isolated from the fermentation broth of the fish microbiome-derived strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis and identified using standard NMR and MS methods. Screening of the twelve predominant human steroidal bile acid components revealed that a subset of these compounds can inhibit biofilm formation, induce detachment of preformed biofilms under static conditions, and that these compounds display distinct structure-activity relationships against V. cholerae and P. aeruginosa. Our findings highlight the significance of distinct bile acid components in the regulation of biofilm formation and dispersion in two different clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, and suggest that the bile acids, which are endogenous mammalian metabolites used to solubilize dietary fats, may also play a role in maintaining host health against bacterial infection. PMID:26992172

  19. Presence or absence of inhibitors of crystal growth in bile. 1. Effect of bile on the formation of calcium phosphate, a constituent of gallstones.

    PubMed

    Sutor, D J; Percival, J M

    1976-07-01

    When calcium and phosphate ions were mixed so that their final concentration was 4 mmol/1 and the pH was kept at 7-0, an amorphous precipitate immediately formed and this changed into crystalline material with an apatite-like structure after a period of time. The formation of either or both types of precipitate could be slowed down or prevented by adding to the crystallising medium trace amounts of pyrophosphate or citrate which are known inhibitors of the formation of calcium phosphate, or large quantities of sodium chloride which increased the ionic strength of the solution and hence the solubility of calcium phosphate, Both common duct and gallbladder bile from patients with gallstones composed of cholesterol and/or calcium carbonate had a very pronounced inhibitory action on the formation of these precipitates. Only very small amounts of bile were necessary to produce these effects, which therefore were not due to an increase in ionic strength. Ultrafiltration of bile showed that material with a molecular weight greater than 10 000 was mainly responsible for this activity. Because the inhibitor was present in both common duct and gallbladder bile, the liver is the likely source of origin. The possible identity of this material is examined. The powerful inhibitory effect of bile on the crystallisation of calcium phosphate is probably a contributory factor to the rare occurrence of the calcium phosphates, apatite and whitlockite, in gallstones. PMID:9338

  20. Effect of side chain length on bile acid conjugation: glucuronidation, sulfation and coenzyme A formation of nor-bile acids and their natural C24 homologs by human and rat liver fractions.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, R B; Green, M D; Hagey, L R; Hofmann, A F; Tephly, T R

    1988-01-01

    The effect of side chain length on bile acid conjugation by human and rat liver fractions was examined. The rate of conjugation with glucuronic acid, sulfate and coenzyme A of several natural (C24) bile acids was compared with that of their corresponding nor-bile acids. The rate of coenzyme A ester formation by nor-bile acids was much lower than that of the natural bile acids. In human liver microsomes, the rate of coenzyme A formation was less than 8% of the rate for the corresponding C24 bile acid. Rat liver microsomes formed the coenzyme A ester of nor-bile acids less than 20% of the rate of their corresponding C24 homologs. Glucuronidation rates were greater than sulfation rates in both species. With human liver microsomes, nor-bile acids were glucuronidated more rapidly than their corresponding C24 homologs, whereas with rat liver microsomes the reverse was true. Purified 3 alpha-OH androgen UDP-glucuronyltransferase catalyzed the glucuronidation of both nor-bile acids and bile acids. Human liver cytosol sulfated nor-bile acids more slowly than the corresponding bile acids. Rat liver cytosol, however, sulfated nor-bile acids more rapidly than the corresponding bile acids. The highest rate was seen with lithocholylglycine. The results indicate that the novel biotransformation of nor-bile acids seen in vivo--sulfation and glucuronidation rather than amidation--is most likely explained as a consequent of defective amidation, to which the rate of coenzyme A formation contributes. Thus, side chain and nuclear structures as well as species differences in conjugating enzyme activity are determinants of the pattern of bile acid biotransformation by the mammalian liver.

  1. Piezoelectric extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for bile duct stone formation after choledochal cyst excision.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yasuhiro; Miyamoto, Masatoshi; Yamazaki, Toru; Motoi, Isamu; Kuribayashi, Masato; Kodama, Koichi

    2007-04-01

    We report a case of bile duct stones in which piezoelectric extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) was highly effective for the clearance of stones. A 16-year-old girl, who had undergone excision of a choledochal cyst when she was 3 years old, presented a spiking fever and colic abdominal pain. Radiological investigations showed two large stones incarcerating to the proximal end of hepatico-jejunostomy anastomosis. Massive debris was also present in intrahepatic bile duct proximal to the anastomosis. She underwent piezoelectric ESWL with an EDAP LT02 lithotripter. An average of 40 min ESWL session was repeated at intervals of 2 or 3 days. Neither anesthetic nor sedative treatment was required. By the end of the sixth session, the stones incarcerated were fragmented and the debris in the intrahepatic bile duct was completely eliminated. We conclude that piezoelectric ESWL is a less invasive, effective and repeatable method, therefore, it could be a treatment of choice for bile duct stone formation after choledochal cyst excision.

  2. Transport systems in cholangiocytes: their role in bile formation and cholestasis.

    PubMed Central

    Strazzabosco, M.

    1997-01-01

    Formation of bile requires the coordinated function of two epithelial cell types: hepatocytes, that are responsible for secretion of the major osmolytes and biliary constituents and cholangiocytes that regulate the fluidity and alkalinity of bile through secretion of osmolytes such as Cl- and HCO3- Studies in isolated cholangiocyte preparations have elucidated the basic transport mechanisms involved in constitutive and stimulated secretory activities in the biliary epithelium. Basolateral Na+/H+ exchanger and Na+:HCO3- symporter mediate HCO3- uptake, while an apical cAMP-activated Cl-/HCO3- exchanger secretes bicarbonate into the lumen. Cholangiocytes also possess a cAMP-stimulated Cl- conductance (CFTR) and a Ca-activated Cl- channel, both likely located at the apical membrane. Cholangiocyte secretory functions are regulated by a complex network of hormones mainly acting via the cAMP system. In addition, recent data indicate that part of the regulation of ductular secretion may take place at the apical membrane of the cholangiocyte through factors present into the bile, such as ATP, bile acids and glutathione. Primary damage to the biliary epithelium is the cause of several chronic cholestatic disorders (cholangiopathies). From a pathophysiological point of view, common to all cholangiopathies is the coexistance of cholangiocyte death and proliferation and various degrees of portal inflammation and fibrosis. Cholestasis dominates the clinical picture and, pathophysiologically, may initiate or worsen the process. Alterations in biliary electrolyte transport could contribute to the pathogenesis of cholestasis in primary bile duct diseases. Cystic Fibrosis-related liver disease represents an example of biliary cirrhosis secondary to a derangement of cholangiocyte ion transport. Most primary cholangiopaties recognize an immune-mediated pathogenesis. Cytokines, chemokines, and proinflammatory mediators released in the portal spaces or produced by the cholangiocyte

  3. Bile canaliculi formation and biliary transport in 3D sandwich-cultured hepatocytes in dependence of the extracellular matrix composition.

    PubMed

    Deharde, Daniela; Schneider, Christin; Hiller, Thomas; Fischer, Nicolas; Kegel, Victoria; Lübberstedt, Marc; Freyer, Nora; Hengstler, Jan G; Andersson, Tommy B; Seehofer, Daniel; Pratschke, Johann; Zeilinger, Katrin; Damm, Georg

    2016-10-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are still considered as gold standard for investigation of in vitro metabolism and hepatotoxicity in pharmaceutical research. It has been shown that the three-dimensional (3D) cultivation of PHH in a sandwich configuration between two layers of extracellular matrix (ECM) enables the hepatocytes to adhere three dimensionally leading to formation of in vivo like cell-cell contacts and cell-matrix interactions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of different ECM compositions on morphology, cellular arrangement and bile canaliculi formation as well as bile excretion processes in PHH sandwich cultures systematically. Freshly isolated PHH were cultured for 6 days between two ECM layers made of collagen and/or Matrigel in four different combinations. The cultures were investigated by phase contrast microscopy and immunofluorescence analysis with respect to cell-cell connections, repolarization as well as bile canaliculi formation. The influence of the ECM composition on cell activity and viability was measured using the XTT assay and a fluorescent dead or alive assay. Finally, the bile canalicular transport was analyzed by live cell imaging to monitor the secretion and accumulation of the fluorescent substance CDF in bile canaliculi. Using collagen and Matrigel in different compositions in sandwich cultures of hepatocytes, we observed differences in morphology, cellular arrangement and cell activity of PHH in dependence of the ECM composition. Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes with an underlay of collagen seem to represent the best in vivo tissue architecture in terms of formation of trabecular cell arrangement. Cultures overlaid with collagen were characterized by the formation of abundant bile canaliculi, while the bile canaliculi network in hepatocytes cultured on a layer of Matrigel and overlaid with collagen showed the most branched and stable canalicular network. All cultures showed a time-dependent leakage of

  4. The physical chemistry of cholesterol solubility in bile. Relationship to gallstone formation and dissolution in man.

    PubMed Central

    Carey, M C; Small, D M

    1978-01-01

    We determined the maximum solubilities of cholesterol in aqueous conjugated bile salt-egg lecithin-cholesterol systems as a function of several physical-chemical variables including those of physiological importance employing phase equilibria techniques. Equilibration rates are influenced by time and the method of sample preparation in that metastable supersaturation is readily induced at high bile salt: lecithin ratios, and equilibrium saturation by dissolution is achieved sluggisly at low bile salt:lecithin ratios. Equilibrium values for cholesterol saturation vary with the bile salt species, bile salt: lecithin ratio, temperature, ionic strength, and, in particular, with the total concentration of biliary lipids. Within physiological bile salt:lecithin ratios at 37 degreesC the influence of bile salt type and ionic strength is small, whereas the effects of bile salt:lecithin ratio and the total lipid concentration are major factors. We plotted on triangular coordinates a family of cholesterol solubility curves for each total lipid concentration (0.30--30 g/dl) and computed fifth-degree polynomial equations for each curve. With both the curves and the polynomial equations the "per cent cholesterol saturation" of fasting gallbladder and hepatic biles from patients with and without gallstones was calculated and both methods gave similar values. These results deomonstrate that by employing cholesterol saturation values appropriate to the total lipid concentration (range 0.2--24.9 g/dl) of individual biles, all cholesterol stone patients have supersaturated gallbladder biles, (mean, 132% [normal weight individuals], and 199% [morbidly obese individuals]). With controls and pigment stone patients the mean values were 95 and 98%, respectively, and in both approximately 50% of biles were supersaturated. Fasting hepatic biles were significantly more supersaturated than gallbladder biles (means 228--273%). Cholesterol monohydrate crystals were found in the majority of

  5. The role of intestinal bacteria in gallstone formation in animal model. A study on biliary lipid composition and bile acid profiles in bile, small intestinal contents and feces of clostridium butyricum Miyairi No. 588 monocontaminated mice.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, M; Tanida, N; Shimoyama, T

    1982-01-01

    Contradictory results in the studies on experimental gallstone formation using conventional and germfree mice have been reported. To study the role of bacteria in gallstone formation in the animal model JCL:ICR male germfree mice were monocontaminated with Clostridium butyricum MIYAIRI No. 588. Gallstone formation, biliary lipid composition and bile acid profiles in the bile, small intestinal contents and feces were analyzed after feeding the diet containing cholesterol and cholic acid. The rate of gallstone formation in the monocontaminated mice (38%) was less than that in the germfree mice (100%). The relative concentrations of biliary lipids of the two groups were located out of the micellar zone on the triangular co-ordinates by Admirand and Small. The bile acid concentrations in the small intestine and fecal excretions in the monocontaminated mice were higher than in the germfree mice. The composition as well as the mode of conjugation of the bile acids did not differ significantly between the two groups. The infestation of bacteria in the intestine enhanced the excretion of bile acids and inhibited the gallstone formation in mice, in which direct metabolic activity by bacterial enzymes on bile acid did not seem necessary to exert such effect.

  6. Inhibition of bile canalicular network formation in rat sandwich cultured hepatocytes by drugs associated with risk of severe liver injury.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Akinori; Izaki, Aya; Sekine, Shuichi; Ito, Kousei

    2016-09-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury is a clinical concern with serious consequences. Although many preclinical screening methods have been proposed, it remains difficult to identify compounds associated with this rare but potentially fatal liver condition. Here, we propose a novel assay system to assess the risk of liver injury. Rat primary hepatocytes were cultured in a sandwich configuration, which enables the formation of a typical bile canalicular network. From day 2 to 3, test drugs, mostly selected from a list of cholestatic drugs, were administered, and the length of the network was semi-quantitatively measured by immunofluorescence. Liver injury risk information was collected from drug labels and was compared with in vitro measurements. Of 23 test drugs examined, 15 exhibited potent inhibition of bile canalicular network formation (<60% of control). Effects on cell viability were negligible or minimal as confirmed by lactate dehydrogenase leakage and cellular ATP content assays. For the potent 15 drugs, IC50 values were determined. Finally, maximum daily dose divided by the inhibition constant gave good separation of the highest risk of severe liver toxicity drugs such as troglitazone, benzbromarone, flutamide, and amiodarone from lower risk drugs. In conclusion, inhibitory effect on the bile canalicular network formation observed in in vitro sandwich cultured hepatocytes evaluates a new aspect of drug toxicity, particularly associated with aggravation of liver injury. PMID:27256767

  7. Bile-pigment formation from different leghaemoglobins. Methine-bridge specificity of coupled oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Lehtovaara, Päivi; Perttilä, Ulla

    1978-01-01

    The coupled oxidation of leghaemoglobins with O2 and ascorbate yielded oxyleghaemoglobin in the first reaction step, and the second step was the degradation of haem characterized by an A675 increase. Leghaemoglobins were degraded to biliverdin isomers specifically, depending on the structure of the protein. The main leghaemoglobin components of Glycine (soya bean) and Phaseolus (kidney bean) were degraded to biliverdin mixtures containing about 50% of the β-form, about 30% of the α-form and about 20% of the δ-isomer, whereas the leghaemoglobin I components of Vicia (broad bean) and Pisum (pea) were degraded almost exclusively to the β-isomer, with traces of the α-isomer. The amino acid sequences of Glycine and Phaseolus leghaemoglobins resemble each other, as do those of Vicia and Pisum. The site specificity of bile-pigment formation from leghaemoglobins can be tentatively explained by specific differences in the amino acid sequences at those regions of the polypeptide chain that are in the vicinity of the appropriate methine bridges. The ligand-binding site in different leghaemoglobins may be outlined on the basis of the present results, supposing that the haem is degraded when a reduction product of haem-bound O2 reacts with a methine bridge of the haem, and that the bridge specificity is regulated by hindering amino acid residues that determine the location of the bound O2. The residue phenylalanine-CD1 appears to be further away from the haem plane or in a markedly more flexible position in leghaemoglobins than in mammalian globins. The haem-bound oxygen atom B, in Fe–O(A)–O(B), seems to be free to rotate in all directions except that of the γ-bridge in Glycine and Phaseolus leghaemoglobins, but its position in Vicia and Pisum leghaemoglobin I might be restricted to the direction of the β-methine bridge. PMID:743244

  8. Mucin-vesicle interactions in model bile: evidence for vesicle aggregation and fusion before cholesterol crystal formation.

    PubMed

    Afdhal, N H; Niu, N; Nunes, D P; Bansil, R; Cao, X X; Gantz, D; Small, D M; Offner, G D

    1995-09-01

    Nucleation of cholesterol monohydrate crystals from bile is a critical step in the formation of cholesterol gallstones. Measurement of nucleation in model bile system and the characteristics of the initial nucleus have proven elusive. In this study we have used three separate physical chemical techniques to examine vesicle aggregation and fusion, including dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and fluorescent biochemical assays. These assays enabled us to quantify the effect of biliary proteins, such as gallbladder mucin, on vesicle fusion and aggregation. In the absence of mucin, fusion is a relatively slow process occurring over 24 hours, whereas physiological concentrations of mucin are able to accelerate almost complete fusion of vesicles within 6 hours. Vesicle fusion and aggregation as characterized by TEM result in the formation of aggregates of multilamellar vesicles and giant fusion bodies associated with a background of mucin. These mucin-vesicle aggregate bodies may represent true nuclei and precede cholesterol monohydrate crystal nucleation. In future studies, these vesicle fusion assays can be used to quantitatively examine the effect of putative pro- and anti-nucleating proteins on the earliest steps of cholesterol crystal nucleation.

  9. Bile salt-induced intermolecular disulfide bond formation activates Vibrio cholerae virulence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Menghua; Liu, Zhi; Hughes, Chambers; Stern, Andrew M; Wang, Hui; Zhong, Zengtao; Kan, Biao; Fenical, William; Zhu, Jun

    2013-02-01

    To be successful pathogens, bacteria must often restrict the expression of virulence genes to host environments. This requires a physical or chemical marker of the host environment as well as a cognate bacterial system for sensing the presence of a host to appropriately time the activation of virulence. However, there have been remarkably few such signal-sensor pairs identified, and the molecular mechanisms for host-sensing are virtually unknown. By directly applying a reporter strain of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, to a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate containing mouse intestinal extracts, we found two host signals that activate virulence gene transcription. One of these was revealed to be the bile salt taurocholate. We then show that a set of bile salts cause dimerization of the transmembrane transcription factor TcpP by inducing intermolecular disulfide bonds between cysteine (C)-207 residues in its periplasmic domain. Various genetic and biochemical analyses led us to propose a model in which the other cysteine in the periplasmic domain, C218, forms an inhibitory intramolecular disulfide bond with C207 that must be isomerized to form the active C207-C207 intermolecular bond. We then found bile salt-dependent effects of these cysteine mutations on survival in vivo, correlating to our in vitro model. Our results are a demonstration of a mechanism for direct activation of the V. cholerae virulence cascade by a host signal molecule. They further provide a paradigm for recognition of the host environment in pathogenic bacteria through periplasmic cysteine oxidation.

  10. Metastable and equilibrium phase diagrams of unconjugated bilirubin IXα as functions of pH in model bile systems: Implications for pigment gallstone formation.

    PubMed

    Berman, Marvin D; Carey, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    Metastable and equilibrium phase diagrams for unconjugated bilirubin IXα (UCB) in bile are yet to be determined for understanding the physical chemistry of pigment gallstone formation. Also, UCB is a molecule of considerable biomedical importance because it is a potent antioxidant and an inhibitor of atherogenesis. We employed principally a titrimetric approach to obtain metastable and equilibrium UCB solubilities in model bile systems composed of taurine-conjugated bile salts, egg yolk lecithin (mixed long-chain phosphatidylcholines), and cholesterol as functions of total lipid concentration, biliary pH values, and CaCl2 plus NaCl concentrations. Metastable and equilibrium precipitation pH values were obtained, and average pKa values of the two carboxyl groups of UCB were calculated. Added lecithin and increased temperature decreased UCB solubility markedly, whereas increases in bile salt concentrations and molar levels of urea augmented solubility. A wide range of NaCl and cholesterol concentrations resulted in no specific effects, whereas added CaCl2 produced large decreases in UCB solubilities at alkaline pH values only. UV-visible absorption spectra were consistent with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between UCB and bile salts that were strongly influenced by pH. Reliable literature values for UCB compositions of native gallbladder biles revealed that biles from hemolytic mice and humans with black pigment gallstones are markedly supersaturated with UCB and exhibit more acidic pH values, whereas biles from nonstone control animals and patients with cholesterol gallstone are unsaturated with UCB.

  11. Structural alterations in lecithin-cholesterol vesicles following interactions with monomeric and micellar bile salts: physical-chemical basis for subselection of biliary lecithin species and aggregative states of biliary lipids during bile formation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D E; Angelico, M; Carey, M C

    1990-01-01

    Using complementary physical-chemical methods including turbidimetry, quasielastic light scattering, gel filtration, and phase analysis, we examined the interactions between dilute concentrations of the common bile salt, taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDC), and uni- and multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) composed of defined molecular species of lecithin (L) and varying contents of cholesterol (Ch). Dissolution rates of MLVs with micellar TCDC, as assessed by turbidimetry, were more rapid with vesicles composed of sn-1 palmitoyl species, typical of biliary L, compared with those composed of the more hydrophobic sn-1 stearoyl species. Incorporation of Ch retarded MLV dissolution rates in proportion to the Ch content, and only at high Ch contents were dissolution rates appreciably influenced by the sn-2 fatty acid composition of L. When MLVs contained Ch in amounts characteristic of intracellular membranes (Ch/L approximately 0.1), the dissolution rates of the individual L species by TCDC accurately predicted the steady state L composition of human bile. TCDC interacted with small unilamellar L/Ch vesicles (SUVs) at concentrations well below, as well as appreciably above, its critical micellar concentration. In accordance with the TCDC-egg yolk L-H2O phase diagram, perimicellar concentrations of TCDC interacted with SUVs to form aggregates that were approximately twice the size of the SUVs. These were consistent with the formation of a dispersed hexagonal (rod-like) phase, which co-existed with aqueous bile salt (BS) monomers and either micellar or unilamellar SUV phases. Micellar TCDC completely solubilized SUVs as mixed micelles, putatively via this transient hexagonal phase. With modest Ch-supersaturation, dissolution was followed by the reemergence of a new vesicle population that coexisted metastably with mixed micelles. With high Ch supersaturation, TCDC extracted L and Ch molecules from SUVs in different proportions to form Ch-supersaturated mixed micelles and Ch

  12. Formation of bile pigments by coupled oxidation of cobalt-substituted haemoglobin and myoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, D I; Brown, S B

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of cobalt-substituted haemoglobin and myoglobin with ascorbate and molecular O2 (coupled oxidation) resulted in biliverdin formation from the cobalt(II) derivatives but not from the cobalt(III) derivatives. This was apparently due to the inability of ascorbate to reduce cobalt(III) haemoproteins. Isomer analysis of the biliverdins produced from coupled oxidation of cobalt(II) oxyhaemoglobin suggested that the orientation of the cobalt protoporphyrin IX in the haem pocket differed slightly from that of the haem in native haemoglobin. PMID:6497839

  13. Bile secretion in rats with indomethacin-induced intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Hoshino, M; Hayakawa, T; Kamiya, Y; Ohhara, H; Mizuno, K; Yamada, H; Nakazawa, T; Inagaki, T; Uchida, A; Miyaji, M; Takeuchi, T

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the bile secretion, including the composition of biliary bile acids, bile salt pool size, and transcytotic vesicle transport, in a rat model of subacute intestinal inflammation induced by indomethacin. Indomethacin treatment significantly decreased bile acid-independent bile flow and biliary secretion of bile acid and cholesterol, while increasing biliary phospholipid output in vivo. Although indomethacin treatment did not change the bile salt pool size in vivo, alpha- and beta-muricholic acids were significantly deceased and hyodeoxycholic and deoxycholic acids were increased in bile. Bile flow and the transport maximum of taurocholate did not decrease, and biliary horseradish peroxidase output was significantly enhanced in isolated perfused livers from indomethacin-treated rats. Endotoxin in the portal blood was significantly increased in rats treated with indomethacin. Clindamycin slightly reduced intestinal inflammation but significantly prevented decreases in bile flow, bile acid output, and transport maximum of taurocholate. We conclude that, although biliary secretory function was apparently decreased in vivo, that of hepatocyte function was maintained in this model.

  14. Kupffer cell-independent acute hepatocellular oxidative stress and decreased bile formation in post-cold-ischemic rat liver.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Y; Suematsu, M; Shimazu, M; Kato, Y; Sano, T; Makino, N; Hirano, K I; Naito, M; Wakabayashi, G; Ishimura, Y; Kitajima, M

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine distribution and time history of oxidative stress during the hyperacute period of reperfusion in the liver grafts undergoing cold ischemia and to investigate roles of Kupffer cells as a potential oxidant source. Rat livers were harvested at 4 degrees C in University of Wisconsin solution and followed by reperfusion with Krebs-Henseleit buffer under monitoring bile excretion. To investigate oxidative changes, laser-confocal microfluorography was performed in reperfused livers preloaded with dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester, a fluorescence precursor sensing intracellular hydroperoxide generation. Livers undergoing the 16-hour cold storage displayed an impaired recovery of bile acid-dependent bile output concurrent with a marked increase in hydroperoxide generation in hepatocytes, which occurred as early as 5 minutes after the onset of reperfusion, whereas the status of lobular perfusion was well maintained. Pretreatment with liposome-encapsulated dichloromethylene diphosphonate, a Kupffer cell-depleting reagent, did neither alter the reperfusion-induced periportal oxidative changes nor improve the recovery of bile output in the graft. On the other hand, EPCK, a hepatotropic antioxidant composed of vitamin E phosphate ester bound to vitamin C, not only diminished the oxidative changes but also improved the reduction of bile acid-dependent bile output. Furthermore, the reagent was capable of inhibiting H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress in cultured hepatocytes. These results suggest that hepatocytes constitute a major site of the oxidative insult triggered through Kupffer cell-independent mechanisms and serve as an important cellular component to be protected by antioxidant therapeutics.

  15. Colchicine does not inhibit secretin-induced choleresis in rats exhibiting hyperplasia of bile ductules: evidence against a pivotal role of exocytic vesicle insertion.

    PubMed

    Dällenbach, A; Renner, E L

    1995-03-01

    Based on studies in the pig, secretin choleresis has been proposed to be initiated by colchicine-inhibitable, exocytic insertion into the basolateral cholangiocyte membrane of intracytoplasmatic vesicles containing a H+ ATPase. Formal proof of this hypothesis in the intact liver of other species, however, is lacking. The effect of the microtubule inhibitor colchicine on the ductular bile formation and HCO3- secretion induced by secretin was, therefore, explored in a secretin-responsive rat model characterized by marked hyperplasia of bile ductules. While colchicine pretreatment significantly decreased basal bile flow from 142.1 +/- 8.8 to 83.4 +/- 8.2 microliters.min-1.kg-1 (p < 0.001) and basal biliary erythritol clearance from 112.7 +/- 6.3 to 69.9 +/- 7.0 microliters.min-1.kg-1 (p < 0.05), it did not significantly affect basal biliary [HCO3-], nor basal biliary bile acid output. Moreover, colchicine did not alter the effects of secretin. Thus, the secretin-induced increments in bile flow, biliary [HCO3-] and biliary HCO3- output averaged 58.2 +/- 13.6 microliters.min-1.kg-1, 16.6 +/- 3.1 mM and 5.3 +/- 1.4 mumol.min-1.kg-1 in vehicle-pretreated controls and 78.4 +/- 12.0 microliters.min-1.kg-1, 16.1 +/- 2.7 mM and 5.1 +/- 0.5 mumol.min-1.kg-1 in colchicine-pretreated animals (all p values = n.s.), respectively. This suggests that, at least in the rat model used, microtubule-dependent mechanisms are involved in basal, bile acid independent canalicular, but not in secretin-induced ductular, bile formation. Inasmuch as microtubule-dependent mechanisms are required for vesicle movement, this argues strongly against an absolute requirement for exocytic vesicle insertion in the ductular choleresis induced by secretin.

  16. A study of the fractal structure of the precipitate and the mechanism of its formation from the gallbladder bile of a patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Kong, X.; Xie, A.; Shen, Y.; Zhu, J.; Li, C.; Zhang, Q.

    2007-12-01

    The precipitation of three kinds of structures from gallbladder bile of a patient, fractal structure, regular crystal structure, and small disperse granules, was observed in the same sample using Field Emission Gun-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FEG-SEM). The results indicated that there was a transition from a linear equilibrium system to a nonlinear and nonequilibrium system, which was discussed using the theory of entropy. The chemical compositions of these three different kinds of precipitates were determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). This experimental result revealed that Na and Cl played important roles in the formation of the fractal and crystal structures. Besides, the Aggregation-Diffusion-Fractal (ADF) model was used to explain the growth mechanism of the fractal.

  17. Bile duct obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... the liver. It contains cholesterol, bile salts, and waste products such as bilirubin . Bile salts help your ... can lead to life-threatening infection and a dangerous buildup of bilirubin. If the blockage lasts a ...

  18. Analysis of Bile Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjövall, Jan; Griffiths, William J.; Setchell, Kenneth D. R.; Mano, Nariyasu; Goto, Junichi

    Bile acids constitute a large family of steroids in vertebrates, normally formed from cholesterol and carrying a carboxyl group in a side-chain of variable length. Bile alcohols, also formed from cholesterol, have similar structures as bile acids, except for the absence of a carboxyl group in the steroid skeleton. The conversion of cholesterol to bile acids and/or bile alcohols is of major importance for maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis, both from quantitative and regulatory points of view (Chiang, 2004; Kalaany and Mangelsdorf, 2006; Moore, Kato, Xie, et al., 2006; Scotti, Gilardi, Godio, et al., 2007). Appropriately conjugated bile acids and bile alcohols (also referred to as bile salts) are secreted in bile and serve vital functions in the absorption of lipids and lipid-soluble compounds (Hofmann, 2007). Reliable analytical methods are required for studies of the functions and pathophysiological importance of the variety of bile acids and bile alcohols present in living organisms. When combined with genetic and proteomic studies, analysis of these small molecules (in today's terminology: metabolomics, steroidomics, sterolomics, cholanoidomics, etc.) will lead to a deeper understanding of the integrated metabolic processes in lipid metabolism.

  19. Bile acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    In liver and intestine, transporters play a critical role in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation and bile acid homeostasis. Over the past two decades, there has been significant progress toward identifying the individual membrane transporters and unraveling their complex regulation. In the liver, bile acids are efficiently transported across the sinusoidal membrane by the Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide with assistance by members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide family. The bile acids are then secreted in an ATP-dependent fashion across the canalicular membrane by the bile salt export pump. Following their movement with bile into the lumen of the small intestine, bile acids are almost quantitatively reclaimed in the ileum by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter. The bile acids are shuttled across the enterocyte to the basolateral membrane and effluxed into the portal circulation by the recently indentified heteromeric organic solute transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. In addition to the hepatocyte and enterocyte, subgroups of these bile acid transporters are expressed by the biliary, renal, and colonic epithelium where they contribute to maintaining bile acid homeostasis and play important cytoprotective roles. This article will review our current understanding of the physiological role and regulation of these important carriers. PMID:19498215

  20. Bile duct stricture

    MedlinePlus

    ... bile duct Damage or scarring after gallbladder removal Pancreatitis Primary sclerosing cholangitis ... your health care provider if symptoms recur after pancreatitis, cholecystectomy , or other biliary surgery.

  1. Urinary excretion of bile acid glucosides and glucuronides in extrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Wietholtz, H; Marschall, H U; Reuschenbach, R; Matern, H; Matern, S

    1991-04-01

    Recently the formation of bile acid glucosides has been described as a novel conjugation mechanism in vitro and in vivo. In 10 patients with extrahepatic cholestasis caused by carcinoma of the head of the pancreas we investigated excretion rates and profiles of urinary bile acid glucosides. Urinary bile acid glucosides and, for comparison, bile acid glucuronides were extracted and characterized according to established methods. In controls total urinary bile acid glucoside excretion was 0.22 +/- 0.03 mumol/24 hr (mean +/- S.E.M.)-in the range of bile acid glucuronide excretion (0.41 +/- 0.06 mumol/24 hr; mean +/- S.E.M.). A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-characterized trihydroxy bile acid glucoside of still-unknown hydroxyl positions accounted for 65% of total urinary bile acid glucosides. In extrahepatic cholestasis total urinary bile acid glucoside excretion was 0.52 +/- 0.13 mumol/24 hr (mean +/- SEM), yet significantly lower than bile acid glucuronide excretion (1.53 +/- 0.13 mumol/24 hr; mean +/- SEM; p less than 0.001). In cholestasis the primary bile acid derivatives cholic and chenodeoxycholic acid glucosides amounted to 90%, whereas the trihydroxy bile acid glucoside had decreased to 5% of total bile acid glucoside excretion, indicating its alteration during enterohepatic circulation. The data establish the composition and quantity of urinary bile acid glucosides in healthy controls and cholestasis and constitute a quantitative comparison with another glycosidic conjugation reaction, bile acid glucuronidation.

  2. Respiratory Pathogens Adopt a Chronic Lifestyle in Response to Bile

    PubMed Central

    Reen, F. Jerry; Woods, David F.; Mooij, Marlies J.; Adams, Claire; O'Gara, Fergal

    2012-01-01

    Chronic respiratory infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality, most particularly in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. The recent finding that gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) frequently occurs in CF patients led us to investigate the impact of bile on the behaviour of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other CF-associated respiratory pathogens. Bile increased biofilm formation, Type Six Secretion, and quorum sensing in P. aeruginosa, all of which are associated with the switch from acute to persistent infection. Furthermore, bile negatively influenced Type Three Secretion and swarming motility in P. aeruginosa, phenotypes associated with acute infection. Bile also modulated biofilm formation in a range of other CF-associated respiratory pathogens, including Burkholderia cepacia and Staphylococcus aureus. Therefore, our results suggest that GER-derived bile may be a host determinant contributing to chronic respiratory infection. PMID:23049911

  3. Bile acids: analysis in biological fluids and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, William J.; Sjövall, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The formation of bile acids/bile alcohols is of major importance for the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. Besides their functions in lipid absorption, bile acids/bile alcohols are regulatory molecules for a number of metabolic processes. Their effects are structure-dependent, and numerous metabolic conversions result in a complex mixture of biologically active and inactive forms. Advanced methods are required to characterize and quantify individual bile acids in these mixtures. A combination of such analyses with analyses of the proteome will be required for a better understanding of mechanisms of action and nature of endogenous ligands. Mass spectrometry is the basic detection technique for effluents from chromatographic columns. Capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization provides the highest sensitivity in metabolome analysis. Classical gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is less sensitive but offers extensive structure-dependent fragmentation increasing the specificity in analyses of isobaric isomers of unconjugated bile acids. Depending on the nature of the bile acid/bile alcohol mixture and the range of concentration of individuals, different sample preparation sequences, from simple extractions to group separations and derivatizations, are applicable. We review the methods currently available for the analysis of bile acids in biological fluids and tissues, with emphasis on the combination of liquid and gas phase chromatography with mass spectrometry. PMID:20008121

  4. Postnatal development of bile secretory physiology in the dog

    SciTech Connect

    Tavoloni, N.; Jones, M.J.; Berk, P.D.

    1985-04-01

    To determine whether bile formation in the dog is an immature process at birth, several determinants of bile secretion were studied in anesthetized, bile duct-cannulated puppies of 0-42 days of age and adult dogs. Basal canalicular bile flow rate, estimated by /sup 14/C-erythritol biliary clearance, averaged 0.182 microliter/min/g liver in 0-3 day-old puppies and increased to 0.324 and 0.461 microliter/min/g in puppies 7-21 and 28-42 days of age, respectively. Calculated ductular bile water reabsorption (/sup 14/C-erythritol biliary clearance-bile flow) was virtually absent in 0-3 day-old puppies, and averaged 0.017 and 0.092 microliter/min/g in puppies of 7-21 and 28-42 days of age, respectively. In adult dogs, ductular bile water reabsorption was 0.132 microliter/min/g. These functional deficiencies of the newborn dog were associated with an increased biliary permeability to /sup 3/H-inulin which could not be accounted for solely by an increased solute diffusion due to the lower rate of canalicular bile flow. Administration of taurocholate up to 2000 nmol/min/kg produced in all animals a similar increase in canalicular bile flow and bile acid excretion, and was not associated with changes in ductular bile water reabsorption rate. These findings are interpreted to indicate that, in the dog, bile secretory function is immature at birth and develops during postnatal life.

  5. Modern management of common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, James

    2013-04-01

    It is imperative for gastroenterologists to understand the different formations of bile duct stones and the various medical treatments available. To minimize the complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), it is critical to appropriately assess the risk of bile duct stones before intervention. Biliary endoscopists should be comfortable with the basic techniques of stone removal, including sphincterotomy, mechanical lithotripsy, and stent placement. It is important to be aware of advanced options, including laser and electrohydraulic stone fragmentation, and papillary dilatation for problematic cases. The timing and need for ERCP in those who require a cholecystectomy is also a consideration. PMID:23540960

  6. [Iatrogenic bile duct injuries].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Gómez, Francisco; Ramia Ángel, José Manuel; García-Parreño Jofré, Jorge; Figueras, Joan

    2010-10-01

    Bile duct injuries can be caused by different reasons, with Iatrogenic Bile Duct Injuries (IBDI) being the most common factor. IBDI is a complex situation produced in apparently healthy patients and is associated with a high rate of morbidity and a low rate of mortality. A multidisciplinary approach between surgeons, radiologist and endoscopist offers the best chances for an initial diagnosis, therapeutic options, management and follow up of complications for the patient. The aim of this review is to describe the current medical literature with reference to IBDI, and discuss our therapeutic algorithm.

  7. [Bile acids in the bile in diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Slivka, O Ia; Zelinskiĭ, B A; Zelinskiĭ, S Ts

    1979-01-01

    Hepatic and gall bladder bile of healthy persons (8) and of patients with severe form of diabetes mellitus (17) was studied. Paer chromatography was applied for determination of cholic, chenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic bile acids and their conjugates with glycin and taurine. An absolute content and percentage of glycodeoxycholic and glycochenodeoxycholic bile acids were increased, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid content and taurates proportion were decreased in the gall bladder and hepatic bile of diabetic patients. The data obtained pointed to disturbed hepatic function in severe diabetes mellitus; it was expressed in suppression of bile acids synthesis and conjugation, and also in depression of transformation of deoxycholic into cholic acid.

  8. The bile acid composition of crane gallbladder bile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    1. 1. The biliary bile acids of the whooping crane (Grus americana) and the Florida sandhill crane (G. canadensis pratensis) have been examined. 2. 2. Cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDOCA) and lithocholic acid were found in bile from both species of these North American cranes. 3. 3. CDOCA and CA were the primary bile acids in both species, together constituting 70% or more of the bile acids by weight. 4. 4. The primary bile acids of cranes appear to be the same as those that have been identified in other avian species.

  9. Salmonella L-forms: formation in human bile in vitro and isolation culture from patients' gallbladder samples by a non-high osmotic isolation technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, D N; Wu, W J; Wang, T; Pan, Y Z; Tang, K L; She, X L; Ding, W J; Wang, H

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial L-forms have always been considered as osmotic-pressure-sensitive cell-wall-deficient bacteria and isolation culture of L-forms must use media with high osmotic pressure. However, isolation culture of stable L-forms formed in humans and animals is very difficult because they have adapted to the physiological osmotic pressure condition of the host. We use a non-high osmotic isolation technique to isolate stable L-forms of Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A from bile-inducer cultures in vitro and from patients' gallbladder specimens. Multiplex PCR assay for Salmonella-specific genes and nucleotide sequencing are used to identify the Salmonella L-forms in stable L-form isolates. Using this method, we confirmed that Salmonella Paratyphi A and Salmonella Typhi cannot be isolated from bile-inducer cultures cultured for 6 h or 48 h, but the L-forms can be isolated from 1 h to 45 days. In the 524 gallbladder samples, the positive rate for bacterial forms was 19.7% and the positive rate for Salmonella spp. was 0.6% by routine bacteriological methods. The positive rate for bacterial L-forms was 75.4% using non-high osmotic isolation culture. In the L-form isolates, the positive rate of Salmonella invA gene was 3.1%. In these invA-positive L-form isolates, four were positive for the invA and flic-d genes of Salmonella Typhi, and ten were positive for the invA and flic-a genes of Salmonella Paratyphi A.

  10. Hydroxylation, conjugation and sulfation of bile acids in primary monolayer cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Princen, H.M.; Meijer, P.

    1988-08-15

    Hydroxylation of lithocholic, chenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic and cholic acids was studied in monolayers of rat hepatocytes cultured for 76 h. The majority of added lithocholic and chenodeoxycholic acids was metabolized to beta-muricholic acid (56-76%). A small part of these bile acids (9%), however, and a considerable amount of deoxycholic and cholic acids (21%) were converted into metabolites more polar than cholic acid in the first culture period. Formation of these compounds decreased during the last day of culture. Bile acids synthesized after addition of (4-/sup 14/C)-cholesterol were almost entirely (97%) sulfated and/or conjugated, predominantly with taurine (54-66%), during culture. Sulfated bile acids were mainly composed of free bile acids. The ability of hepatocytes to sulfurylate bile acids declined with culture age. Thus, rat hepatocytes in primary monolayer culture are capable to sulfurylate bile acids and to hydroxylate trihydroxylated bile acids, suggesting formation of polyhydroxylated metabolites.

  11. Bile acid interactions with cholangiocytes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xuefeng; Francis, Heather; Glaser, Shannon; Alpini, Gianfranco; LeSage, Gene

    2006-06-14

    Cholangiocytes are exposed to high concentrations of bile acids at their apical membrane. A selective transporter for bile acids, the Apical Sodium Bile Acid Cotransporter (ASBT) (also referred to as Ibat; gene name Slc10a2) is localized on the cholangiocyte apical membrane. On the basolateral membrane, four transport systems have been identified (t-ASBT, multidrug resistance (MDR)3, an unidentified anion exchanger system and organic solute transporter (Ost) heteromeric transporter, Ostalpha-Ostbeta. Together, these transporters unidirectionally move bile acids from ductal bile to the circulation. Bile acids absorbed by cholangiocytes recycle via the peribiliary plexus back to hepatocytes for re-secretion into bile. This recycling of bile acids between hepatocytes and cholangiocytes is referred to as the cholehepatic shunt pathway. Recent studies suggest that the cholehepatic shunt pathway may contribute in overall hepatobiliary transport of bile acids and to the adaptation to chronic cholestasis due to extrahepatic obstruction. ASBT is acutely regulated by an adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent translocation to the apical membrane and by phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination and proteasome degradation. ASBT is chronically regulated by changes in gene expression in response to biliary bile acid concentration and inflammatory cytokines. Another potential function of cholangiocyte ASBT is to allow cholangiocytes to sample biliary bile acids in order to activate intracellular signaling pathways. Bile acids trigger changes in intracellular calcium, protein kinase C (PKC), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) intracellular signals. Bile acids significantly alter cholangiocyte secretion, proliferation and survival. Different bile acids have differential effects on cholangiocyte intracellular signals, and in some instances trigger opposing effects on cholangiocyte

  12. Bile acid interactions with cholangiocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xuefeng; Francis, Heather; Glaser, Shannon; Alpini, Gianfranco; LeSage, Gene

    2006-01-01

    Cholangiocytes are exposed to high concentrations of bile acids at their apical membrane. A selective transporter for bile acids, the Apical Sodium Bile Acid Cotransporter (ASBT) (also referred to as Ibat; gene name Slc10a2) is localized on the cholangiocyte apical membrane. On the basolateral membrane, four transport systems have been identified (t-ASBT, multidrug resistance (MDR)3, an unidentified anion exchanger system and organic solute transporter (Ost) heteromeric transporter, Ostα-Ostβ. Together, these transporters unidirectionally move bile acids from ductal bile to the circulation. Bile acids absorbed by cholangiocytes recycle via the peribiliary plexus back to hepatocytes for re-secretion into bile. This recycling of bile acids between hepatocytes and cholangiocytes is referred to as the cholehepatic shunt pathway. Recent studies suggest that the cholehepatic shunt pathway may contribute in overall hepatobiliary transport of bile acids and to the adaptation to chronic cholestasis due to extrahepatic obstruction. ASBT is acutely regulated by an adenosine 3', 5’-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent translocation to the apical membrane and by phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination and proteasome degradation. ASBT is chronically regulated by changes in gene expression in response to biliary bile acid concentration and inflammatory cytokines. Another potential function of cholangiocyte ASBT is to allow cholangiocytes to sample biliary bile acids in order to activate intracellular signaling pathways. Bile acids trigger changes in intracellular calcium, protein kinase C (PKC), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) intracellular signals. Bile acids significantly alter cholangiocyte secretion, proliferation and survival. Different bile acids have differential effects on cholangiocyte intracellular signals, and in some instances trigger opposing effects on cholangiocyte

  13. Amylase activity in human bile.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, L A; Joffe, S N; McIntosh, W; Brodie, M J

    1979-03-01

    The mean amylase level in 42 human bile samples was 154 IU/l and there was no significant difference in the amylase activity of 32 paired serum and bile samples. Estimation of the amylase thermolability of bile showed it to be similar to that of serum. This suggests that the amylase activity in bile may have filtered through the liver from the hepatic circulation rather than refluxed from the pancreatic duct. The presence of amylase in human bile provides further evidence that the liver might have a role in the regulation of serum amylase.

  14. In vivo and vitro studies on formation of bile acids in patients with Zellweger syndrome. Evidence that peroxisomes are of importance in the normal biosynthesis of both cholic and chenodeoxycholic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Kase, B F; Pedersen, J I; Strandvik, B; Björkhem, I

    1985-01-01

    The last step in bile acid formation involves conversion of 3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholestanoic acid (THCA) into cholic acid and 3 alpha,7 alpha-dihydroxy-5 beta-cholestanoic acid (DHCA) into chenodeoxycholic acid. The peroxisomal fraction of rat and human liver has the highest capacity to catalyze these reactions. Infants with Zellweger syndrome lack liver peroxisomes, and accumulate 5 beta-cholestanoic acids in bile and serum. We recently showed that such an infant had reduced capacity to convert a cholic acid precursor, 5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha-triol into cholic acid. 7 alpha-Hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one is a common precursor for both cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid. Intravenous administration of [3H]7 alpha-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one to an infant with Zellweger syndrome led to a rapid incorporation of 3H into biliary THCA but only 10% of 3H was incorporated into cholic acid after 48 h. The incorporation of 3H into DHCA was only 25% of that into THCA and the incorporation into chenodeoxycholic acid approximately 50% of that in cholic acid. The conversion of intravenously administered [3H]THCA into cholic acid in another infant with Zellweger syndrome was only 7%. There was a slow conversion of THCA into 3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-C29-dicarboxylic acid. The pool size of both cholic- and chenodeoxycholic acid was markedly reduced. Preparations of liver from two patients with Zellweger syndrome had no capacity to catalyze conversion of THCA into cholic acid. There was, however, a small conversion of DHCA into chenodeoxycholic acid and into THCA. It is concluded that liver peroxisomes are important both for the conversion of THCA into cholic acid and DHCA into chenodeoxycholic acid. PMID:4077985

  15. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  16. Bile Acid Metabolism and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, John Y. L.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are important physiological agents for intestinal nutrient absorption and biliary secretion of lipids, toxic metabolites, and xenobiotics. Bile acids also are signaling molecules and metabolic regulators that activate nuclear receptors and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling to regulate hepatic lipid, glucose, and energy homeostasis and maintain metabolic homeostasis. Conversion of cholesterol to bile acids is critical for maintaining cholesterol homeostasis and preventing accumulation of cholesterol, triglycerides, and toxic metabolites, and injury in the liver and other organs. Enterohepatic circulation of bile acids from the liver to intestine and back to the liver plays a central role in nutrient absorption and distribution, and metabolic regulation and homeostasis. This physiological process is regulated by a complex membrane transport system in the liver and intestine regulated by nuclear receptors. Toxic bile acids may cause inflammation, apoptosis, and cell death. On the other hand, bile acid-activated nuclear and GPCR signaling protects against inflammation in liver, intestine, and macrophages. Disorders in bile acid metabolism cause cholestatic liver diseases, dyslipidemia, fatty liver diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Bile acids, bile acid derivatives, and bile acid sequestrants are therapeutic agents for treating chronic liver diseases, obesity, and diabetes in humans. PMID:23897684

  17. Bile acids: emerging role in management of liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Asgharpour, Amon; Kumar, Divya

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids are well known for their effects on cholesterol homeostasis and lipid digestion. Since the discovery of bile acid receptors, of which there are farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor, and the plasma membrane G-protein receptor, as well as Takeda G-protein coupled receptor clone 5, further roles have been elucidated for bile acids including glucose and lipid metabolism as well as inflammation. Additionally, treatment with bile acid receptor agonists has shown a decrease in the amount of atherosclerosis plaque formation and decreased portal vascular resistance and portal hypotension in animal models. Furthermore, rodent models have demonstrated antifibrotic activity using bile acid receptor agonists. Early human data using a FXR agonist, obeticholic acid, have shown promising results with improvement of histological activity and even a reduction of fibrosis. Human studies are ongoing and will provide further information on bile acid receptor agonist therapies. Thus, bile acids and their derivatives have the potential for management of liver diseases and potentially other disease states including diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26320013

  18. Boldine enhances bile production in rats via osmotic and Farnesoid X receptor dependent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Cermanova, Jolana; Kadova, Zuzana; Zagorova, Marie; Hroch, Milos; Tomsik, Pavel; Nachtigal, Petr; Kudlackova, Zdenka; Pavek, Petr; Dubecka, Michaela; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek; Laho, Tomas; Micuda, Stanislav

    2015-05-15

    Boldine, the major alkaloid from the Chilean Boldo tree, is used in traditional medicine to support bile production, but evidence to support this function is controversial. We analyzed the choleretic potential of boldine, including its molecular background. The acute- and long-term effects of boldine were evaluated in rats either during intravenous infusion or after 28-day oral treatment. Infusion of boldine instantly increased the bile flow 1.4-fold in healthy rats as well as in animals with Mrp2 deficiency or ethinylestradiol induced cholestasis. This effect was not associated with a corresponding increase in bile acid or glutathione biliary excretion, indicating that the effect is not related to stimulation of either bile acid dependent or independent mechanisms of bile formation and points to the osmotic activity of boldine itself. We subsequently analyzed bile production under conditions of changing biliary excretion of boldine after bolus intravenous administration and found strong correlations between both parameters. HPLC analysis showed that bile concentrations of boldine above 10 μM were required for induction of choleresis. Importantly, long-term pretreatment, when the bile collection study was performed 24-h after the last administration of boldine, also accelerated bile formation despite undetectable levels of the compound in bile. The effect paralleled upregulation of the Bsep transporter and increased biliary clearance of its substrates, bile acids. We consequently confirmed the ability of boldine to stimulate the Bsep transcriptional regulator, FXR receptor. In conclusion, our study clarified the mechanisms and circumstances surrounding the choleretic activity of boldine. - Highlights: • Boldine may increase bile production by direct as well as indirect mechanisms. • Biliary concentrations of boldine above 10 μM directly stimulate bile production. • Long-term oral boldine administration increases bile acid (BA) biliary secretion. • Boldine

  19. Therapeutic targeting of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Gores, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    The first objectives of this article are to review the structure, chemistry, and physiology of bile acids and the types of bile acid malabsorption observed in clinical practice. The second major theme addresses the classical or known properties of bile acids, such as the role of bile acid sequestration in the treatment of hyperlipidemia; the use of ursodeoxycholic acid in therapeutics, from traditional oriental medicine to being, until recently, the drug of choice in cholestatic liver diseases; and the potential for normalizing diverse bowel dysfunctions in irritable bowel syndrome, either by sequestering intraluminal bile acids for diarrhea or by delivering more bile acids to the colon to relieve constipation. The final objective addresses novel concepts and therapeutic opportunities such as the interaction of bile acids and the microbiome to control colonic infections, as in Clostridium difficile-associated colitis, and bile acid targeting of the farnesoid X receptor and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 with consequent effects on energy expenditure, fat metabolism, and glycemic control. PMID:26138466

  20. Biosynthesis and Trafficking of the Bile Salt Export Pump, BSEP: Therapeutic Implications of BSEP Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Soroka, Carol J.; Boyer, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP, ABCB11) is the primary transporter of bile acids from the hepatocyte to the biliary system. This rate-limiting step in bile formation is essential to the formation of bile salt dependent bile flow, the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and the digestion of dietary fats. Mutations in BSEP are associated with cholestatic diseases such as progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (PFIC2), benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (BRIC2), drug-induced cholestasis, and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Development of clinical therapies for these conditions necessitates a clear understanding of the cell biology of biosynthesis, trafficking, and transcriptional and translational regulation of BSEP. This chapter will focus on the molecular and cell biological aspects of this critical hepatic membrane transporter. PMID:23685087

  1. Quasielastic light scattering studies of aqueous biliary lipid systems and native bile.

    PubMed

    Mazer, N A

    1990-09-01

    During the past 15 yr, the technique of quasielastic light scattering has been used by a number of laboratories to systematically investigate the aggregative behavior of model bile systems and more recently to characterize particles present in native bile. Quasielastic light scattering investigations of aqueous bile salt solutions have indicated important similarities and differences between the various bile salt species and have led to a quantitative model for the formation of globular and rodlike micelles, based on Small and Ekwall's primary-secondary micelle hypothesis. Studies of aqueous bile salt-lecithin systems have indicated three important aggregation regimens dependent on the lecithin/bile salt molar ratio and total solute concentration. Region I of the phase diagram, which includes the lecithin/bile salt and total solute concentration values found in most mammalian biles, corresponds to a population of "simple" bile salt micelles coexisting in equilibrium with a population of mixed bile salt-lecithin micelles. Region II contains only mixed micelles, whose apparent size and shape vary with lecithin/bile salt and total solute concentration in a manner consistent with a "mixed disc" model. In this model, bile salts not only coat the perimeter of the disc (as proposed in Small's original model) but are also incorporated within the lecithin bilayer, possibly as hydrogen-bonded dimers. Finally, in region III, where total solute concentration values are typically less than the critical micelle concentration of the pure bile salt, the systems contain mixed vesicles (spherical bilayer shells) whose size (approximately 130 to 500A) depends on lecithin/bile salt and total solute concentration in accordance with a simple partition equilibrium that determines the composition of the mixed vesicle bilayer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Intrahepatic Transposition of Bile Ducts

    PubMed Central

    Delić, Jasmin; Savković, Admedina; Isaković, Eldar; Marković, Sergije; Bajtarevic, Alma; Denjalić, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To describe the intrahepatic bile duct transposition (anatomical variation occurring in intrahepatic ducts) and to determine the frequency of this variation. Material and Methods. The researches were performed randomly on 100 livers of adults, both sexes. Main research methods were anatomical macrodissection. As a criterion for determination of variations in some parts of bile tree, we used the classification of Segmentatio hepatis according to Couinaud (1957) according to Terminologia Anatomica, Thieme Stuugart: Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology, 1988. Results. Intrahepatic transposition of bile ducts was found in two cases (2%), out of total examined cases (100): right-left transposition (right segmental bile duct, originating from the segment VIII, joins the left liver duct-ductus hepaticus sinister) and left-right intrahepatic transposition (left segmental bile duct originating from the segment IV ends in right liver duct-ductus hepaticus dexter). Conclusion. Safety and success in liver transplantation to great extent depends on knowledge of anatomy and some common embryological anomalies in bile tree. Variations in bile tree were found in 24–43% of cases, out of which 1–22% are the variations of intrahepatic bile ducts. Therefore, good knowledge on ductal anatomy enables good planning, safe performance of therapeutic and operative procedures, and decreases the risk of intraoperative and postoperative complications. PMID:22550601

  3. Cholestasis‐induced adaptive remodeling of interlobular bile ducts

    PubMed Central

    Damle‐Vartak, Amruta; Richter, Beate; Dirsch, Olaf; Dahmen, Uta; Hammad, Seddik

    2016-01-01

    Cholestasis is a common complication in liver diseases that triggers a proliferative response of the biliary tree. Bile duct ligation (BDL) is a frequently used model of cholestasis in rodents. To determine which changes occur in the three‐dimensional (3D) architecture of the interlobular bile duct during cholestasis, we used 3D confocal imaging, surface reconstructions, and automated image quantification covering a period up to 28 days after BDL. We show a highly reproducible sequence of interlobular duct remodeling, where cholangiocyte proliferation initially causes corrugation of the luminal duct surface, leading to an approximately five‐fold increase in surface area. This is analogous to the function of villi in the intestine or sulci in the brain, where an expansion of area is achieved within a restricted volume. The increase in surface area is further enhanced by duct branching, branch elongation, and loop formation through self‐joining, whereby an initially relatively sparse mesh surrounding the portal vein becomes five‐fold denser through elongation, corrugation, and ramification. The number of connections between the bile duct and the lobular bile canalicular network by the canals of Hering decreases proportionally to the increase in bile duct length, suggesting that no novel connections are established. The diameter of the interlobular bile duct remains constant after BDL, a response that is qualitatively distinct from that of large bile ducts, which tend to enlarge their diameters. Therefore, volume enhancement is only due to net elongation of the ducts. Because curvature and tortuosity of the bile duct are unaltered, this enlargement of the biliary tree is caused by branching and not by convolution. Conclusion: BDL causes adaptive remodeling that aims at optimizing the intraluminal surface area by way of corrugation and branching. (Hepatology 2016;63:951–964) PMID:26610202

  4. Dynamic laser light scattering studies of the micelle to vesicle transition in model and native bile.

    PubMed

    Schurtenberger, P; Mazer, N A; Känzig, W

    1984-01-01

    Using quasielastic light scattering, we investigated the formation of vesicles produced spontaneously by diluting a mixed micellar solution of bile salt and lecithin beyond the micellar phase boundary. The vesicles were nearly monodisperse, and their size varied between 120 to 500 A depending upon the dilution conditions. A systematic study of the dependence of the vesicle size upon the bile salt and lecithin concentration was made and interpreted in terms of a simple equilibrium model. Likewise, the particle size distribution in native bile obtained from the dog was studied. A comparison of the dilution effect on native bile and on model bile of identical biliary lipid composition provides unambiguous evidence for micellar aggregates and the occurrence of a micelle to vesicle transition in native bile.

  5. Gelation of self-assembed bile acid-PEG conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandman, Satu; Le Devedec, Frantz; Zhu, X. X.

    2012-02-01

    The aggregation of macromolecules and low-molar-mass compounds into elongated self-assemblies such as wormlike micelles, fibers, or tubules increases the viscosity of the solutions and often leads to gelation due to network formation, even in organic solvents. Such one-dimensional nanostructures are promising candidates for drug delivery vehicles, packing materials for separation, templates for metal nanowires, biocides, and photo- or biocatalysis. An interesting group of compounds capable of this type of self-organization are bile acids, which are endogeneous steroids known to form gels at high concentrations and appropriate pH conditions. Grafting poly(ethylene oxide) on bile acids via anionic polymerization brings along thermoresponsiveness represented by lower critical solution temperature (LCST), while self-assembling occurs below another threshold temperature leading to a gelation at high concentrations, as shown by rheological experiments. The latter transition is assigned to the nanotube formation of pegylated bile acids, visualized by electron microscopy.

  6. CT evaluation of intracholecystic bile

    SciTech Connect

    Rebner, M.; Ruggieri, P.M.; Gross, B.H.; Glazer, G.M.

    1985-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used to detect a variety of gallbladder abnormalities, but the accuracy of routine abdominal CT in evaluating intracholecystic bile has not been established. Forty-six patients were identified in whom abdominal CT and sonography were performed within 1 week of each other. Using sonographic results as the standard, sensitivity specificity, and accuracy of CT gallbladder evaluation were calculated; both initial CT interpretations and retrospective review of scans were used for this analysis. In the retrospective review, visual interpretation of gallbladder images and measurement of intracholecystic bile attenuation were analyzed. The most common cause of high-attenuation bile in the series was sludge, a cause not previously reported. It was concluded that intracholecystic bile is poorly evaluated on routine abdominal CT, particularly because of low sensitivity in disease detection.

  7. Bile acids as metabolic regulators

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y. L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Small molecule ligands that target to TGR5 and FXR have shown promise in treating various metabolic and inflammation-related human diseases. New insights into the mechanisms underlying the bariatric surgery and bile acid sequestrant treatment suggest that targeting the enterohepatic circulation to modulate gut-liver bile acid signaling, incretin production and microbiota represents a new strategy to treat obesity and type-2 diabetes. PMID:25584736

  8. [Bile acids in coronary arteriosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Malaia, L T; Shelest, A N; Volkov, V I; Cherevatov, B G

    1984-10-01

    Seventy-six patients with chronic coronary heart disease of the atherosclerotic genesis were examined using clinical laboratory and instrumental research methods. The blood serum levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, lipoproteins and bile acids were measured throughout the course of treatment. When hyperlipoproteinemias were divided according to phenotypes, type II hyperlipoproteinemia proved to be most commonly occurring (65.8%). The patients exhibited lower blood serum levels of bile acids as compared to control.

  9. Role of vesicle-mediated transport pathways in hepatocellular bile secretion.

    PubMed

    Crawford, J M

    1996-05-01

    Bile formation by hepatocytes involves the secretion of organic and inorganic solutes derived from a number of intracellular sources. Plasma-to-bile trafficking of bile salts and proteins, in particular, is a major route for solute movement through the hepatocyte. Intracellular vesicle trafficking is the primary pathway for delivery of plasma proteins to bile, via either fluid-phase or receptor-mediated endocytosis. In contrast, bile salts do not appear to traffic via vesicles. Rather, bile salts appear to promote the insertion of vesicles containing the apical transport proteins into the hepatocyte canalicular membrane. Lysosomal protein also is released into bile by fusion of vesicles or possibly of tubular lysosomes with the canalicular membrane. Structural phospholipid is presumably delivered to the canalicular membrane as part of vesicular traffic, but biliary phosphatidylcholine molecules are more likely delivered via binding to cytosolic transfer proteins. Cholesterol may be delivered either via cystolic proteins or via vesicular trafficking, the latter in conjunction with sphingomyelin recycling to and from the canalicular membrane. Lastly, the primary mechanism for phospholipid secretion into bile appears to be the budding of phospholipid vesicles from the exoplasmic hemileaflet of the hepatocyte canalicular membrane. Thus, vesicle-mediated pathways play a major role in a number of bile secretory mechanisms.

  10. COMPLEX EVOLUTION OF BILE SALTS IN BIRDS.

    PubMed

    Hagey, Lee R; Vidal, Nicolas; Hofmann, Alan F; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2010-10-01

    Bile salts are the major end-metabolites of cholesterol and are important in lipid digestion and shaping of the gut microflora. There have been limited studies of bile-salt variation in birds. The purpose of our study was to determine bile-salt variation among birds and relate this variation to current avian phylogenies and hypotheses on the evolution of bile salt pathways. We determined the biliary bile-salt composition of 405 phylogenetically diverse bird species, including 7 paleognath species. Bile salt profiles were generally stable within bird families. Complex bile-salt profiles were more common in omnivores and herbivores than in carnivores. The structural variation of bile salts in birds is extensive and comparable to that seen in surveys of bile salts in reptiles and mammals. Birds produce many of the bile salts found throughout nonavian vertebrates and some previously uncharacterized bile salts. One difference between birds and other vertebrates is extensive hydroxylation of carbon-16 of bile salts in bird species. Comparison of our data set of bird bile salts with that of other vertebrates, especially reptiles, allowed us to infer evolutionary changes in the bile salt synthetic pathway.

  11. COMPLEX EVOLUTION OF BILE SALTS IN BIRDS

    PubMed Central

    Hagey, Lee R.; Vidal, Nicolas; Hofmann, Alan F.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    Bile salts are the major end-metabolites of cholesterol and are important in lipid digestion and shaping of the gut microflora. There have been limited studies of bile-salt variation in birds. The purpose of our study was to determine bile-salt variation among birds and relate this variation to current avian phylogenies and hypotheses on the evolution of bile salt pathways. We determined the biliary bile-salt composition of 405 phylogenetically diverse bird species, including 7 paleognath species. Bile salt profiles were generally stable within bird families. Complex bile-salt profiles were more common in omnivores and herbivores than in carnivores. The structural variation of bile salts in birds is extensive and comparable to that seen in surveys of bile salts in reptiles and mammals. Birds produce many of the bile salts found throughout nonavian vertebrates and some previously uncharacterized bile salts. One difference between birds and other vertebrates is extensive hydroxylation of carbon-16 of bile salts in bird species. Comparison of our data set of bird bile salts with that of other vertebrates, especially reptiles, allowed us to infer evolutionary changes in the bile salt synthetic pathway. PMID:21113274

  12. Boldine enhances bile production in rats via osmotic and farnesoid X receptor dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cermanova, Jolana; Kadova, Zuzana; Zagorova, Marie; Hroch, Milos; Tomsik, Pavel; Nachtigal, Petr; Kudlackova, Zdenka; Pavek, Petr; Dubecka, Michaela; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek; Laho, Tomas; Micuda, Stanislav

    2015-05-15

    Boldine, the major alkaloid from the Chilean Boldo tree, is used in traditional medicine to support bile production, but evidence to support this function is controversial. We analyzed the choleretic potential of boldine, including its molecular background. The acute- and long-term effects of boldine were evaluated in rats either during intravenous infusion or after 28-day oral treatment. Infusion of boldine instantly increased the bile flow 1.4-fold in healthy rats as well as in animals with Mrp2 deficiency or ethinylestradiol induced cholestasis. This effect was not associated with a corresponding increase in bile acid or glutathione biliary excretion, indicating that the effect is not related to stimulation of either bile acid dependent or independent mechanisms of bile formation and points to the osmotic activity of boldine itself. We subsequently analyzed bile production under conditions of changing biliary excretion of boldine after bolus intravenous administration and found strong correlations between both parameters. HPLC analysis showed that bile concentrations of boldine above 10 μM were required for induction of choleresis. Importantly, long-term pretreatment, when the bile collection study was performed 24-h after the last administration of boldine, also accelerated bile formation despite undetectable levels of the compound in bile. The effect paralleled upregulation of the Bsep transporter and increased biliary clearance of its substrates, bile acids. We consequently confirmed the ability of boldine to stimulate the Bsep transcriptional regulator, FXR receptor. In conclusion, our study clarified the mechanisms and circumstances surrounding the choleretic activity of boldine. PMID:25771127

  13. Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Rosario; MacFadyen, Bruce V

    2002-04-01

    In recent years, laparoscopic common bile duct exploration has become the procedure of choice in the management of choledocholithiasis in several laparoscopic centers. The increasing interest for this laparoscopic approach is due to the development of instrumentation and technique, allowing the procedure to be performed safely, and it is also the result of the revised role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, which has been questioned because of its cost, risk of complications and effectiveness. Many surgeons, however, are still not familiar with this technique. In this article we discuss the technique and results of laparoscopic common bile duct exploration. Both the laparoscopic transcystic approach and choledochotomy are discussed, together with the results given in the literature. When one considers the costs, morbidity, mortality and the time required before the patient can return to work, it would appear that laparoscopic cholecystectomy with common bile duct exploration is more favorable than open surgery or laparoscopic cholecystectomy with preoperative or postoperative endoscopic sphincterotomy. However, the technique requires advanced laparoscopic skills, including suturing, knot tying, the use of a choledochoscope, guidewire, dilators and balloon stone extractor. Although laparoscopic common bile duct exploration appears to be the most cost-effective method to treat common bile duct stones, it should be emphasized that this procedure is very challenging, and it should be performed by well-trained laparoscopic surgeons with experience in biliary surgery. PMID:11981684

  14. Fifty years with bile acids and steroids in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Sjövall, Jan

    2004-08-01

    Cholesterol and its metabolites, e.g., steroid hormones and bile acids, constitute a class of compounds of great biological importance. Their chemistry, biochemistry, and regulation in the body have been intensely studied for more than two centuries. The author has studied aspects of the biochemistry and clinical chemistry of steroids and bile acids for more than 50 years, and this paper, which is an extended version of the Schroepfer Medal Award lecture, reviews and discusses part of this work. Development and application of analytical methods based on chromatography and mass spectrometry (MS) have been a central part of many projects, aiming at detailed characterization and quantification of metabolic profiles of steroids and bile acids under different conditions. In present terminology, much of the work may be termed steroidomics and cholanoidomics. Topics discussed are bile acids in human bile and feces, bile acid production, bacterial dehydroxylation of bile acids and steroids during the enterohepatic circulation, profiles of steroid sulfates in plasma of humans and other primates, development of neutral and ion-exchanging lipophilic derivatives of Sephadex for sample preparation and group separation of steroid and bile acid conjugates, profiles of steroids and bile acids in human urine under different conditions, hydroxylation of bile acids in liver disease, effects of alcohol-induced redox changes on steroid synthesis and metabolism, alcohol-induced changes of bile acid biosynthesis, compartmentation of bile acid synthesis studied with 3H-labeled ethanol, formation and metabolism of sulfated metabolites of progesterone in human pregnancy, abnormal patterns of these in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy corrected by ursodeoxycholic acid, inherited and acquired defects of bile acid biosynthesis and their treatment, conjugation of bile acids and steroids with N-acetylglucosamine, sulfate-glucuronide double conjugates of hydroxycholesterols

  15. What's New in Bile Duct Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for bile duct cancer What’s new in bile duct cancer research and treatment? Bile ... is tumor blood vessels. Bile duct tumors need new blood vessels to grow beyond a certain size. ...

  16. General Information about Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bile Duct Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bile Duct Cancer Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  17. Serum bile acids in hepatobiliary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bouchier, I A; Pennington, C R

    1978-01-01

    We review the estimation of total and individual serum bile acids to detect the presence and nature of hepatobiliary disease. The different methods for measuring serum bile acids are discussed. PMID:355064

  18. Bile salt metabolism in tropical sprue.

    PubMed

    Bevan, G; Engert, R; Klipstein, F A; Maldonado, N; Rubulis, A; Turner, M D

    1974-04-01

    Mean and peak jejunal bile salt concentrations during digestion of a standard fat meal were found to be significantly lower in six Puerto Rican patients with untreated tropical sprue, all of whom had steatorrhoea, than in six asymptomatic subjects who had normal fat absorption. Bile salt pool size and turnover time did not differ significantly in the two groups.It is suggested that bile salt concentrations may be reduced in the proximal small intestine of patients with tropical sprue as a result of excessive dilution by intestinal fluid. The finding of low bile salt concentrations in two asymptomatic subjects indicates that bile salt lack alone may not be sufficient to produce steatorrhoea.

  19. The metabolism of primary, 7-oxo, and 7 beta-hydroxy bile acids by Clostridium absonum.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, J D; Macdonald, I A

    1982-07-01

    Clostridium absonum was shown to metabolize primary bile acids to give rise to both 7-oxo bile acids and 7 beta-hydroxy (urso) bile acids. At relatively low redox potential (Eh) values, high yields of urso bile acids were achieved (60-75%). If, however, the Eh value of the culture was allowed to rise above approximately -100 mv, the 7-oxo bile acid would tend to predominate (more than 75%) and the "death phase" was accelerated. Growth of C. absonum in sterile graduated cylinders instead of in conventional Erlenmeyer flasks was effective in delaying the rise in Eh value with time (which appears largely due to diffusion of atmospheric oxygen into the medium) and in preserving a higher viable count of organisms. It is proposed that the formation of excess amounts of 7-oxo bile acid is a manifestation of oxygen toxicity and that it could be mediated by an increasing intracellular NADP:NADPH ratio. Additionally, the reaction: primary bile acid in equilibrium oxo bile acid in equilibrium urso bile acid was shown to be partially reversible. When the organisms were grown with [24-(14)C]chenodeoxycholic, -cholic, or -7-keto-lithocholic acid, this reaction could be clearly demonstrated. The addition of an equimolar concentration of deoxycholic acid (which itself is not metabolized) effectively enhanced the rate of bioconversion of cholate and 7-keto-lithocholic, but not chenodeoxycholate (whose rate of bioconversion was the fastest of the three). When the organisms were grown with urso bile acids (ursocholic or ursodeoxycholic) or with 7-keto-deoxycholic acid, very little metabolism occurred unless deoxycholic acid was added which induced formation of primary and keto bile acids. In all cases, formation of oxo bile acid from primary or urso bile acid occurred as the Eh value of the medium rose with time and could thus be delayed by the use of a cylinder instead of a flask for growing the culture. These results were rationalized by demonstrating that induction of 7 alpha- and

  20. Bile salts as semiochemicals in fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchinger, Tyler J.; Li, Weiming; Johnson, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    Bile salts are potent olfactory stimuli in fishes; however the biological functions driving such sensitivity remain poorly understood. We provide an integrative review of bile salts as semiochemicals in fish. First, we present characteristics of bile salt structure, metabolism, and function that are particularly relevant to chemical communication. Bile salts display a systematic pattern of structural variation across taxa, are efficiently synthesized, and are stable in the environment. Bile salts are released into the water via the intestine, urinary tract, or gills, and are highly water soluble. Second, we consider the potential role of bile salts as semiochemicals in the contexts of detecting nearby fish, foraging, assessing risk, migrating, and spawning. Lastly, we suggest future studies on bile salts as semiochemicals further characterize release into the environment, behavioral responses by receivers, and directly test the biological contexts underlying olfactory sensitivity.

  1. Light-scattering spectroscopy of native bile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prygun, Natalya P.; Korolevich, Alexander N.

    1995-01-01

    Light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) was used to measure particle sizes in fresh human gallbladder bile of patients with gallstones. The recent experiments suggest the presence of a novel, bile salt-independent, mode of cholesterol transport in saturated human bile. Cholesterol is carried in large phospholipid vesicles with approximate diameter of 75 nm. It was shown that under experimental conditions these vesicles were able to dissolve up to 80% of the biliary cholesterol at low bile salt concentrations. A lecithin lamellar phase has already been suggested as a cholesterol carrier and recently vesicles were reported in model bile solutions and in native bile. Due to its nonperturbing nature, the technique of LLS has in recent years become widely applied to the study of micellar systems and, in particular, has been used to systematically investigate aqueous biliary lipid systems. LSS was employed to characterize the size, shape thermodynamics and interactions of bile salts micelle.

  2. Potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for cholangiocarcinoma in serum and bile.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Chen, Liang; Chang, Hao-Teng

    2016-06-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a devastating malignancy that is difficult to treat because of its insensitivity to conventional therapies and the inability to detect early tumor formation. Novel molecular techniques have enabled the use of serum and bile markers for CCA diagnosis and prognosis. Herein, we summarize the principal characteristics of serum and bile markers of CCA. Biomarkers such as interleukin-6, matrix metalloproteinases, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) and bile acids have shown promise for improving CCA diagnosis. Several markers such as CYFRA 21-1, MK-1 and C-reactive protein were recently shown to be effective for CCA prognosis. PMID:27232281

  3. Intestinal GPS: bile and bicarbonate control cyclic di-GMP to provide Vibrio cholerae spatial cues within the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Koestler, Benjamin J; Waters, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates numerous phenotypes in response to environmental stimuli to enable bacteria to transition between different lifestyles. Here we discuss our recent findings that the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae recognizes 2 host-specific signals, bile and bicarbonate, to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP. We have demonstrated that bile acids increase intracellular c-di-GMP to promote biofilm formation. We have also shown that this bile-mediated increase of intracellular c-di-GMP is negated by bicarbonate, and that this interaction is dependent on pH, suggesting that V. cholerae uses these 2 environmental cues to sense and adapt to its relative location in the small intestine. Increased intracellular c-di-GMP by bile is attributed to increased c-di-GMP synthesis by 3 diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and decreased expression of one phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the presence of bile. The molecular mechanisms by which bile controls the activity of the 3 DGCs and the regulators of bile-mediated transcriptional repression of the PDE are not yet known. Moreover, the impact of varying concentrations of bile and bicarbonate at different locations within the small intestine and the response of V. cholerae to these cues remains unclear. The native microbiome and pharmaceuticals, such as omeprazole, can impact bile and pH within the small intestine, suggesting these are potential unappreciated factors that may alter V. cholerae pathogenesis. PMID:25621620

  4. Intestinal GPS: bile and bicarbonate control cyclic di-GMP to provide Vibrio cholerae spatial cues within the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Koestler, Benjamin J; Waters, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates numerous phenotypes in response to environmental stimuli to enable bacteria to transition between different lifestyles. Here we discuss our recent findings that the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae recognizes 2 host-specific signals, bile and bicarbonate, to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP. We have demonstrated that bile acids increase intracellular c-di-GMP to promote biofilm formation. We have also shown that this bile-mediated increase of intracellular c-di-GMP is negated by bicarbonate, and that this interaction is dependent on pH, suggesting that V. cholerae uses these 2 environmental cues to sense and adapt to its relative location in the small intestine. Increased intracellular c-di-GMP by bile is attributed to increased c-di-GMP synthesis by 3 diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and decreased expression of one phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the presence of bile. The molecular mechanisms by which bile controls the activity of the 3 DGCs and the regulators of bile-mediated transcriptional repression of the PDE are not yet known. Moreover, the impact of varying concentrations of bile and bicarbonate at different locations within the small intestine and the response of V. cholerae to these cues remains unclear. The native microbiome and pharmaceuticals, such as omeprazole, can impact bile and pH within the small intestine, suggesting these are potential unappreciated factors that may alter V. cholerae pathogenesis. PMID:25621620

  5. Intestinal transport and metabolism of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Karpen, Saul J.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their classical roles as detergents to aid in the process of digestion, bile acids have been identified as important signaling molecules that function through various nuclear and G protein-coupled receptors to regulate a myriad of cellular and molecular functions across both metabolic and nonmetabolic pathways. Signaling via these pathways will vary depending on the tissue and the concentration and chemical structure of the bile acid species. Important determinants of the size and composition of the bile acid pool are their efficient enterohepatic recirculation, their host and microbial metabolism, and the homeostatic feedback mechanisms connecting hepatocytes, enterocytes, and the luminal microbiota. This review focuses on the mammalian intestine, discussing the physiology of bile acid transport, the metabolism of bile acids in the gut, and new developments in our understanding of how intestinal metabolism, particularly by the gut microbiota, affects bile acid signaling. PMID:25210150

  6. [Bile leakage in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Authors' experience].

    PubMed

    Sperlongano, P; Pisaniello, D; Corsale, I; Cozza, G

    1999-01-01

    The Authors report their experience of two patients with bile leakage following videocholecystectomy (VLC) among a series of 163 cases. Reviewing the Literature, they analyze possible causes and mechanisms of bile spillage occurring after VCL. They also suggest some guidelines for a safe VLC, stressing the importance of the routinary placement of the sub-hepatic drainage to remove 48 hours to early detect possible bile leakages after surgery.

  7. Less hydrophobic phosphatidylcholine species simplify biliary vesicle morphology, but induce bile metastability with a broad spectrum of crystal forms.

    PubMed Central

    Sakomoto, Minoru; Tazuma, Susumu; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2002-01-01

    Cholesterol crystallization in bile is affected by phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) hydrophobicity. The aim of the present study was to determine whether PtdCho species modulate the metastable-labile limit and equilibrium solubility of cholesterol in the micellar phase of bile, thereby altering the distribution of cholesterol to biliary lipid carriers and thus influencing cholesterol crystallization. Supersaturated model bile (with a cholesterol saturation index of 2.0 and a total lipid concentration of 10 g/dl) was prepared with various PtdCho/(bile salt+PtdCho) ratios (0.1-0.5) using egg yolk or soya bean PtdCho. Subsequently, the following features were determined: metastable-labile limit, equilibrium solubility of cholesterol, metastable zone, and cholesterol crystallization process. Less hydrophobic PtdCho species destabilized bile cholesterol to induce rapid crystallization, because of a broad integrated metastable zone, whereas more hydrophobic species stabilized bile cholesterol with a less integrated metastable zone and thus retarded cholesterol crystallization. Cholesterol crystallization was accelerated by a decrease in the PtdCho/(bile salt+PtdCho) ratio, whereas the final nucleated crystal mass was increased by an increase in this ratio. With decreasing hydrophobicity of the PtdCho species, the intermixed micellar/vesicular concentration of bile salts decreased in association with less formation of vesicles and increased formation of micelles, and a variety of crystal forms were detected. In conclusion, PtdCho species directly influenced the cholesterol crystallization process in model bile by remodelling the bile mesophase, and also had an indirect influence by altering the balance between bile salt micelles and vesicles. PMID:11829745

  8. Less hydrophobic phosphatidylcholine species simplify biliary vesicle morphology, but induce bile metastability with a broad spectrum of crystal forms.

    PubMed

    Sakomoto, Minoru; Tazuma, Susumu; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2002-02-15

    Cholesterol crystallization in bile is affected by phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) hydrophobicity. The aim of the present study was to determine whether PtdCho species modulate the metastable-labile limit and equilibrium solubility of cholesterol in the micellar phase of bile, thereby altering the distribution of cholesterol to biliary lipid carriers and thus influencing cholesterol crystallization. Supersaturated model bile (with a cholesterol saturation index of 2.0 and a total lipid concentration of 10 g/dl) was prepared with various PtdCho/(bile salt+PtdCho) ratios (0.1-0.5) using egg yolk or soya bean PtdCho. Subsequently, the following features were determined: metastable-labile limit, equilibrium solubility of cholesterol, metastable zone, and cholesterol crystallization process. Less hydrophobic PtdCho species destabilized bile cholesterol to induce rapid crystallization, because of a broad integrated metastable zone, whereas more hydrophobic species stabilized bile cholesterol with a less integrated metastable zone and thus retarded cholesterol crystallization. Cholesterol crystallization was accelerated by a decrease in the PtdCho/(bile salt+PtdCho) ratio, whereas the final nucleated crystal mass was increased by an increase in this ratio. With decreasing hydrophobicity of the PtdCho species, the intermixed micellar/vesicular concentration of bile salts decreased in association with less formation of vesicles and increased formation of micelles, and a variety of crystal forms were detected. In conclusion, PtdCho species directly influenced the cholesterol crystallization process in model bile by remodelling the bile mesophase, and also had an indirect influence by altering the balance between bile salt micelles and vesicles.

  9. Serum bile acids in patients with hyperlipidaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, C R; Ross, P E; Bateson, M C; Bouchier, I A

    1978-01-01

    Individual serum bile acids were analysed by an improved gas liquid chromatography method in 12 patients with primary hyperlipidaemia. Total serum bile acid concentrations were raised in 10 subjects. Ursodeoxycholic acid was found in all 12 patients. It was present in significantly greater concentrations, accounted for a greater proportion of the total serum bile acids, and occurred more frequently than in patients with various forms of hepatobiliary disease. Patients with hyperlipidaemia had proportionately less deoxycholic acid than controls but more than patients with liver disease. There was proportionately less chenodeoxycholic acid in patients with hypercholesterolaemia, in whom the primary bile acid ratio was raised. PMID:627619

  10. The role of bile carcinoembryonic antigen in diagnosing bile duct cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Kwang Ro; Kim, Do Ha; Park, Jong Ho; Bang, Sung-Jo; Shin, Jung Woo; Park, Neung Hwa; Park, Jae Hoo

    2003-01-01

    It is known that the fluids bathing tumors might contain a higher level of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) than those found in the blood. Therefore, we evaluated the role of bile CEA in diagnosing bile duct cancer. One hundred and thirty two patients were prospectively studied. The patients were divided into 3 groups: the bile duct cancer (n=32), pancreatic cancer (n=16), and benign biliary diseases (n=84) groups. Bile samples were obtained on the next day of the biliary drainage procedures. The mean bile CEA level in those with bile duct cancer (120.6 +/- 156.9 ng/mL) was significantly higher than those with pancreatic cancer and benign biliary diseases (32.0 +/- 28.5 ng/mL, 29.3 +/- 56.3 ng/mL). Using the level of 20 ng/mL, the sensitivity and specificity of bile CEA in the diagnosis of bile duct cancer from benign biliary diseases were 65.6% and 66.7%, respectively. Both the bile CEA and total bilirubin level were found to be an independent factor linked to bile duct cancer. This study result suggests that bile CEA level is a useful supplementary test for diagnosing bile duct cancer. PMID:14676443

  11. CDDO-9,11-dihydro-trifluoroethyl amide (CDDO-dhTFEA) induces hepatic cytoprotective genes and increases bile flow in rats.

    PubMed

    Reisman, Scott A; Ward, Keith W; Klaassen, Curtis D; Meyer, Colin J

    2013-07-01

    1. The transcription factor Nrf2 is important for hepatoprotection against oxidative stress, as it regulates many cytoprotective genes, including several important for glutathione (GSH) homeostasis. In addition to being an important endogenous antioxidant, GSH is also critical for the maintenance of bile acid-independent bile flow. While it has been well-established that synthetic oleanane triterpenoids pharmacologically activate Nrf2, their effects on bile flow and hepatic cytoprotective capacity have not been fully explored. 2. The present studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of a compound in this class, CDDO-9,11-dihydro-trifluoroethyl amide (CDDO-dhTFEA), on these parameters. CDDO-dhTFEA at 3, 10 or 30 mg/kg was orally administered to bile duct-cannulated rats once daily for 7 days, with bile collected 5 h after each dose for 1 h. Livers were harvested after the final bile collection for the evaluation of histology and Nrf2 targets. 3. CDDO-dhTFEA did not affect liver histology. CDDO-dhTFEA markedly and dose-dependently increased bile flow, as well as the biliary excretion of GSH, cholesterol and phospholipids without affecting biliary excretion of bile acids. This was accompanied by dose-dependent increases in mRNA expression and/or enzyme activity of a broad panel of cytoprotective Nrf2 target genes, including NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1), thioredoxin reductase (Txnrd), sulfiredoxin 1(Srxn1), glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic and modifier subunits (Gclc and Gclm), glutathione reductase (Gsr), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase 1 (Ggt1), heme oxygenase-1 (Ho-1) and epoxide hydrolase-1 (Eh-1). 4. These data further demonstrate the important hepatobiliary attributes of oleanane synthetic triterpenoids and support their continued investigation for liver diseases. PMID:23244591

  12. Molecular interactions between lecithin and bile salts/acids in oils and their effects on reverse micellization.

    PubMed

    Njauw, Ching-Wei; Cheng, Chih-Yang; Ivanov, Viktor A; Khokhlov, Alexei R; Tung, Shih-Huang

    2013-03-26

    It has been known that the addition of bile salts to lecithin organosols induces the formation of reverse wormlike micelles and that the worms are similar to long polymer chains that entangle each other to form viscoelastic solutions. In this study, we further investigated the effects of different bile salts and bile acids on the growth of lecithin reverse worms in cyclohexane and n-decane. We utilized rheological and small-angle scattering techniques to analyze the properties and structures of the reverse micelles. All of the bile salts can transform the originally spherical lecithin reverse micelles into wormlike micelles and their rheological behaviors can be described by the single-relaxation-time Maxwell model. However, their efficiencies to induce the worms are different. In contrast, before phase separation, bile acids can induce only short cylindrical micelles that are not long enough to impart viscoelasticity. We used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to investigate the interactions between lecithin and bile salts/acids and found that different bile salts/acids employ different functional groups to form hydrogen bonds with lecithin. Such effects determine the relative positions of the bile salts/acids in the headgroups of lecithin, thus resulting in varying efficiencies to alter the effective critical packing parameter for the formation of wormlike micelles. This work highlights the importance of intermolecular interactions in molecular self-assembly.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... bile acid synthesis defect type 1 congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1 Enable Javascript to view ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1 is a disorder characterized ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2

    MedlinePlus

    ... bile acid synthesis defect type 2 congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2 Enable Javascript to view ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2 is a disorder characterized ...

  15. Bile salt hydrophobicity controls vesicle secretion rates and transformations in native bile.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D E; Leighton, L S; Carey, M C

    1992-09-01

    After drainage of the bile salt pool, we infused unanesthetized bile fistula prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) intravenously with taurine-conjugated chenodeoxycholate (TCDC), cholate (TC), ursodeoxycholate (TUDC), and ursocholate (TUC) in concentrations that attained greater than 94% enrichment of biliary bile salts. With decreases in bile salt hydrophobicity, maximum steady state lecithin and to a lesser extent cholesterol secretion rates decreased in the rank order, TCDC greater than TC greater than TUDC greater than TUC. By phase analysis, TCDC-rich and TC-rich biles plotted inside their respective micellar zones, whereas TUDC-rich and TUC-rich biles plotted outside and were so-called "supersaturated" with cholesterol. Quasi-elastic light scattering and electron microscopy, when performed within 30 min of collection, revealed unilamellar vesicles in all biles. By 24 h, vesicles in TCDC-rich and TC-rich biles had dissolved into mixed micelles, whereas vesicles in TUDC-rich biles formed mixed micelles plus multilamellar liquid crystals, and vesicles in TUC-rich biles formed multilamellar liquid crystals exclusively. Because cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratios of multilamellar liquid crystals were less than or equal to 1, cholesterol monohydrate crystals did not form in these biles. We conclude that, despite drastic alterations in bile salt detergency, unilamellar vesicles are the final common pathway for lecithin and cholesterol secretion into bile. During equilibration of bile, the fate of unilamellar vesicles may be micellar, micellar plus liquid crystalline, or liquid crystalline only depending on the detergency (i.e., hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance) of the secreted bile salt.

  16. Mixtures of lecithin and bile salt can form highly viscous wormlike micellar solutions in water.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Yang; Oh, Hyuntaek; Wang, Ting-Yu; Raghavan, Srinivasa R; Tung, Shih-Huang

    2014-09-01

    The self-assembly of biological surfactants in water is an important topic for study because of its relevance to physiological processes. Two common types of biosurfactants are lecithin (phosphatidylcholine) and bile salts, which are both present in bile and involved in digestion. Previous studies on lecithin-bile salt mixtures have reported the formation of short, rodlike micelles. Here, we show that lecithin-bile salt micelles can be further induced to grow into long, flexible wormlike structures. The formation of long worms and their resultant entanglement into transient networks is reflected in the rheology: the fluids become viscoelastic and exhibit Maxwellian behavior, and their zero-shear viscosity can be up to a 1000-fold higher than that of water. The presence of worms is further confirmed by data from small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering and from cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). We find that micellar growth peaks at a specific molar ratio (near equimolar) of bile salt:lecithin, which suggests a strong binding interaction between the two species. In addition, micellar growth also requires a sufficient concentration of background electrolyte such as NaCl or sodium citrate that serves to screen the electrostatic repulsion of the amphiphiles and to "salt out" the amphiphiles. We postulate a mechanism based on changes in the molecular geometry caused by bile salts and electrolytes to explain the micellar growth.

  17. Primary sclerosing cholangitis – The arteriosclerosis of the bile duct?

    PubMed Central

    Fickert, Peter; Moustafa, Tarek; Trauner, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown aetiology affecting the large bile ducts and characterized by periductal fibrosis and stricture formation, which ultimately result in biliary cirrhosis and liver failure. Arteriosclerosis involves the accumulation of altered lipids and lipoproteins in large arteries; this drives inflammation and fibrosis and ultimately leads to narrowing of the arteries and hypoperfusion of dependent organs and tissues. Knowledge of the causative factors is crucial to the understanding of disease mechanisms and the development of specific treatment. Based on pathogenetic similarities between PSC and arteriosclerosis, we hypothesize that PSC represents "arteriosclerosis of the bile duct" initiated by toxic biliary lipids. This hypothesis is based on common molecular, cellular, and morphological features providing the conceptual framework for a deeper understanding of their pathogenesis. This hypothesis should stimulate translational research to facilitate the search for novel treatment strategies for both diseases. PMID:17254334

  18. Circadian dysregulation disrupts bile acid homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bile acids are potentially toxic compounds and their levels of hepatic production, uptake, and export are tightly regulated by many inputs, including circadian rhythm. We tested the impact of disrupting the peripheral circadian clock on integral steps of bile acid homeostasis. Both restricted feedi...

  19. Inhibition of methanogenesis by human bile.

    PubMed Central

    Florin, T H; Woods, H J

    1995-01-01

    The factors that regulate methanogenesis in humans have not been established. The presence of bile acid, which is lost into the colon from the small intestine, may be an important regulatory factor of methanogenesis. To examine this possibility, the effect of human bile on methane production by faecal cultures, and the in vivo effect of biliary diversion on breath methane excretion in a methanogenic choledochostomy patient, were investigated. Faecal suspensions (0.1%) from five methanogenic humans were incubated anaerobically with bile (0.3-30%) from three choledochostomy patients, and headspace methane measured by gas chromatography. All biles inhibited headspace methane. Inhibition of methanogenesis was dose dependent, plateaued at 10-30% bile concentration, and was abolished by 0.6% cholestyramine. The maximum inhibition by bile, median (range), was 38 (0.9-56)% of control methane values. Reversal of the bile fistula in the fourth choledochostomy patient converted that subject from methanogenic to 'non-methanogenic' status, It is concluded that inhibition of methanogens in the caecum by bile acid could significantly reduce the number of methanogens in the colon. This and the effect of transit time could explain much of the known epidemiology of 'non-methanogenesis', which has been related to obesity, (comparatively) fast colonic transit in healthy persons, and to small intestinal Crohn's disease. PMID:7590441

  20. Stimulation of bile and pancreatic secretion by duodenal perfusion with Na-taurocholate in the cat compared with jejunal and ileal perfusion.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, W; Hotz, J; Ormai, S; Aufgebauer, J; Schneider, F; Goebell, H

    1980-01-01

    In the anesthetized cat duodenal perfusion with Na-taurocholate (TC, 0.2 M, pH 6.1, 290 mosmol, 45 ml x h-1) stimulated pancreatic volume (0 to 326 +/- 236 mg x 10 min-1) and bicarbonate secretion (0 to 34.2 +/- 4.1 mumol x 10 min-1), whereas pancreatic enzyme output was sparse. Simultaneously with the pancreatic response, bile flow increased from 139 +/- 74 mg to 484 +/- 146 mg x 15 min-1 (p < 0.05). During perfusion of the upper jejunum both pancreatic and biliary responses were significantly lower than the responses to duodenal TC perfusion (p < 0.05). During TC perfusion of the terminal ileum there was no response from the pancreas, whereas the increase in bile flow accounted only for an increase in the bile-acid-dependent fraction. The concomitant stimulation of both the hydrokinetic function of the pancreas and the bile-acid-independent bile flow might be mediated by a release of secretin.

  1. Stimulation of bile and pancreatic secretion by duodenal perfusion with Na-taurocholate in the cat compared with jejunal and ileal perfusion.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, W; Hotz, J; Ormai, S; Aufgebauer, J; Schneider, F; Goebell, H

    1980-01-01

    In the anesthetized cat duodenal perfusion with Na-taurocholate (TC, 0.2 M, pH 6.1, 290 mosmol, 45 ml x h-1) stimulated pancreatic volume (0 to 326 +/- 236 mg x 10 min-1) and bicarbonate secretion (0 to 34.2 +/- 4.1 mumol x 10 min-1), whereas pancreatic enzyme output was sparse. Simultaneously with the pancreatic response, bile flow increased from 139 +/- 74 mg to 484 +/- 146 mg x 15 min-1 (p < 0.05). During perfusion of the upper jejunum both pancreatic and biliary responses were significantly lower than the responses to duodenal TC perfusion (p < 0.05). During TC perfusion of the terminal ileum there was no response from the pancreas, whereas the increase in bile flow accounted only for an increase in the bile-acid-dependent fraction. The concomitant stimulation of both the hydrokinetic function of the pancreas and the bile-acid-independent bile flow might be mediated by a release of secretin. PMID:7433905

  2. Acute bile nephropathy secondary to anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Alkhunaizi, Ahmed M; ElTigani, Mohamed A; Rabah, Rola S; Nasr, Samih H

    2016-02-01

    Renal dysfunction in cholestatic liver disease is multifactorial. Acute kidney injury may develop secondary to renal vasoconstriction in the setting of peripheral vasodilation and relative hypovolemia, tubular obstruction by bile casts, and direct tubular toxicity from bile. Anabolic steroids are frequently used by athletes to boost endurance and increase muscle mass. These agents are a recently recognized cause of hepatotoxicity and jaundice and may lead to acute kidney injury. To increase awareness about this growing problem and to characterize the pathology of acute kidney injury in this setting, we report on a young male who developed acute kidney injury in the setting of severe cholestatic jaundice related to ingestion of anabolic steroids used for bodybuilding. Kidney biopsy showed bile casts within distal tubular lumina, filamentous bile inclusions within tubular cells, and signs of acute tubular injury. This report supports the recently re-emerged concept of bile nephropathy cholemic nephrosis.

  3. Bile salt metabolism in tropical sprue

    PubMed Central

    Bevan, G.; Engert, R.; Klipstein, F. A.; Maldonado, N.; Rubulis, A.; Turner, M. D.

    1974-01-01

    Mean and peak jejunal bile salt concentrations during digestion of a standard fat meal were found to be significantly lower in six Puerto Rican patients with untreated tropical sprue, all of whom had steatorrhoea, than in six asymptomatic subjects who had normal fat absorption. Bile salt pool size and turnover time did not differ significantly in the two groups. It is suggested that bile salt concentrations may be reduced in the proximal small intestine of patients with tropical sprue as a result of excessive dilution by intestinal fluid. The finding of low bile salt concentrations in two asymptomatic subjects indicates that bile salt lack alone may not be sufficient to produce steatorrhoea. PMID:4834549

  4. Spontaneous rupture of the common bile duct.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S; Bayer, I; Chaimoff, C

    1986-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the common bile duct in adults is very rare. The authors report only the 14th case in the Western literature. A 25-year-old woman had signs of peritonitis suggestive of a perforated appendix, but at operation the appendix appeared normal and a large amount of bile was found in the peritoneal cavity. A 2-mm tear was found on the anterior wall of the common bile duct. The patient recovered without complications after T-tube drainage and cholecystectomy. In this patient none of the factors thought to cause spontaneous rupture of the common bile duct were present, so the authors conclude that the case may be classified as idiopathic spontaneous rupture of the common bile duct. PMID:3940592

  5. Synthesis of sulfonate analogs of bile acids.

    PubMed

    Kihira, K; Mikami, T; Ikawa, S; Okamoto, A; Yoshii, M; Miki, S; Mosbach, E H; Hoshita, T

    1992-04-01

    Sulfonate analogs of C23 and C24 bile acids were synthesized from norcholic, norchenodeoxycholic, norursodeoxycholic, nordeoxycholic, norhyodeoxycholic, cholic, deoxycholic, hyodeoxycholic, and lithocholic acids. The principal reactions used were (1) reduction of the bile acids with NaBH4 to the corresponding bile alcohols, (2) selective tosylation of the terminal hydroxyl group, (3) iodination of the tosyl esters with NaI, and (4) treatment of the iodides with Na2SO3 to form the sulfonate analogs of the bile acids. The sulfonate analogs showed polarity similar to that of taurine-conjugated bile acids on thin-layer chromatography. The carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectral data for the sulfonate analogs were tabulated.

  6. Acute bile nephropathy secondary to anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Alkhunaizi, Ahmed M; ElTigani, Mohamed A; Rabah, Rola S; Nasr, Samih H

    2016-02-01

    Renal dysfunction in cholestatic liver disease is multifactorial. Acute kidney injury may develop secondary to renal vasoconstriction in the setting of peripheral vasodilation and relative hypovolemia, tubular obstruction by bile casts, and direct tubular toxicity from bile. Anabolic steroids are frequently used by athletes to boost endurance and increase muscle mass. These agents are a recently recognized cause of hepatotoxicity and jaundice and may lead to acute kidney injury. To increase awareness about this growing problem and to characterize the pathology of acute kidney injury in this setting, we report on a young male who developed acute kidney injury in the setting of severe cholestatic jaundice related to ingestion of anabolic steroids used for bodybuilding. Kidney biopsy showed bile casts within distal tubular lumina, filamentous bile inclusions within tubular cells, and signs of acute tubular injury. This report supports the recently re-emerged concept of bile nephropathy cholemic nephrosis. PMID:26587777

  7. Salicylic acid-independent induction of pathogenesis-related protein transcripts by sugars is dependent on leaf developmental stage.

    PubMed

    Herbers, K; Meuwly, P; Métraux, J P; Sonnewald, U

    1996-11-18

    Soluble sugars have been found to regulate a number of genes involved in functions associated with sink metabolism, defense reactions and photosynthesis. As viruses and pathogens induce the expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) protein genes and have also been reported to lead to localized sugar accumulation in leaves, it was investigated whether a salicylic acid-independent but sugar-dependent pathway for PR-protein gene induction may exist in plant cells. Leaf discs of tobacco plants were floated on different sugar solutions, transcript accumulation and salicylic acid (SA) levels were subsequently determined. PR-Q and PAR-1 transcripts were found to be inducible by glucose, fructose and sucrose. No significant change in SA content could be detected, following incubation. On the other hand, SAR8.2 transcripts were repressed by elevated levels of soluble sugars and sorbitol, respectively, suggesting sensitivity to turgor pressure. Since leaves undergo sink to source transition during growth, sugar responsiveness was investigated in leaves of different developmental stages. Interestingly, induction of PR-Q and PAR-1 by soluble sugars was essentially restricted to fully expanded leaves and was independent of plant age. Induction by salicylate was not confined to the source capacity of a leaf but was dependent on the age of the respective leaf. Repression of transcripts encoding photosynthetic genes (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rbcS) and chlorophyll a/b binding protein (cab) by soluble sugars were largely independent from the leaf developmental state. These findings hint to the possibility of salicylic acid-independent defense reactions of plants against pathogens by induction of a set of PR proteins in source leaves. Furthermore, the data suggest different mechanisms for the induction of PR-protein genes and the repression of photosynthetic genes by soluble sugars.

  8. Bile resistance mechanisms in Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Lorena; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. Most of the probiotic bacteria currently available in the market belong to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, and specific health-promoting activities, such as treatment of diarrhea or amelioration of gastrointestinal discomfort, have been attributed to them. In order to be able to survive the gastrointestinal transit and transiently colonize our gut, these bacteria must be able to counteract the deleterious action of bile salts, which are the main components of bile. Bile salts are detergent-like biological substances synthesized in the liver from cholesterol. Host enzymes conjugate the newly synthesized free bile acids in the liver with the amino acids glycine or taurine, generating conjugated bile salts. These compounds are stored in the gall bladder and they are released into the duodenum during digestion to perform their physiological function, which is the solubilization of fat coming from diet. These bile salts possess strong antimicrobial activity, since they are able to disorganize the structure of the cell membrane, as well as trigger DNA damage. This means that bacteria inhabiting our intestinal tract must have intrinsic resistance mechanisms to cope with bile salts. To do that, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium display a variety of proteins devoted to the efflux of bile salts or protons, to modify sugar metabolism or to prevent protein misfolding. In this manuscript, we review and discuss specific bile resistance mechanisms, as well as the processes responsible for the adaptation of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli to bile. PMID:24399996

  9. Effect of dietary garlic and onion on biliary proteins and lipid peroxidation which influence cholesterol nucleation in bile.

    PubMed

    Vidyashankar, Satyakumar; Sambaiah, Kari; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2010-03-01

    Formation of cholesterol gallstones in gallbladder is controlled by procrystallizing and anticrystallizing factors present in bile. Dietary garlic and onion have been recently observed to possess anti-lithogenic potential in experimental mice. In this investigation, the role of biliary proteins from rats fed lithogenic diet or garlic/onion-containing diet in the formation of cholesterol gallstones in model bile was studied. Cholesterol nucleation time of the bile from lithogenic diet group was prolonged when mixed with bile from garlic or onion groups. High molecular weight proteins of bile from garlic and onion groups delayed cholesterol crystal growth in model bile. Low molecular weight (LMW) proteins from the bile of lithogenic diet group promoted cholesterol crystal growth in model bile, while LMW protein fraction isolated from the bile of garlic and onion groups delayed the same. Biliary LMW protein fraction was subjected to affinity chromatography using Con-A and the lectin-bound and unbound fractions were studied for their influence on cholesterol nucleation time in model bile. Major portion of biliary LMW proteins in lithogenic diet group was bound to Con-A, and this protein fraction promoted cholesterol nucleation time and increased cholesterol crystal growth rate, whereas Con-A unbound fraction delayed the onset of cholesterol crystallization. Biliary protein from garlic/onion group delayed the crystallization and interfered with pronucleating activity of Con-A bound protein fraction. These data suggest that apart from the beneficial modulation of biliary cholesterol saturation index, these Allium spices also influence cholesterol nucleating and antinucleating protein factors that contribute to their anti-lithogenic potential.

  10. Dissection of the hierarchy and synergism of the bile derived signal on Cryptosporidium parvum excystation and infectivity.

    PubMed

    King, B J; Keegan, A R; Phillips, R; Fanok, S; Monis, P T

    2012-10-01

    Bile salts have been identified as an important trigger for excystation of Cryptosporidium oocysts but the hierarchy or synergism of this signal in relation to other triggers involved in excystation is poorly understood. In addition to excystation, bile salts have also been reported to increase the invasiveness of sporozoites within in vitro culture, possibly by affecting the secretory pathway via modification of intracellular calcium signalling. Nevertheless, incorporation of bile or bile salts into in vitro assays is not universal, with recent reports of negative effects on parasite growth. Here we report that bile and sodium taurocholate significantly affect both excystation rate and parasite in vitro growth. We demonstrate that their effect on excystation is dose, time and pre-treatment temperature dependent, while increases in parasite replication appear to be associated with modulation of parasite intracellular calcium and increased host cell susceptibility to infection. Notably, we illustrate that bile has a significant effect on host cells and can be cytotoxic at concentrations not much higher than those currently used for in vitro assays. This work should assist with more rational design of in vitro culture systems, with significant considerations for assay format when incorporating bile or bile salts as an excystation trigger. PMID:22894830

  11. Protection of dried probiotic bacteria from bile using bile adsorbent resins.

    PubMed

    Mahbubani, Krishnaa T; Slater, Nigel K H; Edwards, Alexander D

    2014-01-25

    Enteric coated oral tablets or capsules can deliver dried live cells directly into the intestine. Previously, we found that a live attenuated bacterial vaccine acquired sensitivity to intestinal bile when dried, raising the possibility that although gastric acid can be bypassed, significant loss of viability might occur on release from an enteric coated oral formulations. Here we demonstrate that some food-grade lyophilised preparations of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus salivarius also show temporary bile sensitivity that can be rapidly reversed by rehydration. To protect dried bacterial cells from temporary bile sensitivity, we propose using bile acid adsorbing resins, such as cholestyramine, which are bile acid binding agents, historically used to lower cholesterol levels. Vcaps™ HPMC capsules alone provided up to 830-fold protection from bile. The inclusion of 50% w/w cholestyramine in Vcaps™ HPMC capsules resulted in release of up to 1700-fold more live Lactobacillus casei into simulated intestinal fluid containing 1% bile, when compared to dried cells added directly to bile. We conclude that delivery of dried live probiotic organisms to the intestine may be improved by providing protection from bile by addition of bile adsorbing resins and the use of HPMC capsules. PMID:24080386

  12. Influence of dietary tender cluster beans (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) on biliary proteins, bile acid synthesis and cholesterol crystal growth in rat bile.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, Chikkanna K; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2015-02-01

    Tender cluster beans (CBs; Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) are observed to possess anti-lithogenic potential in experimental mice. Formation of cholesterol gallstones in gallbladder is controlled by procrystallizing and anticrystallizing factors present in bile in addition to supersaturation of cholesterol. This study aimed at evaluating the influence of CB on biliary glycoproteins, low molecular weight (LMW) and high molecular weight (HMW) proteins, cholesterol nucleation time, and cholesterol crystal growth in rat hepatic bile. Groups of rats were fed for 10 weeks with 0.5% cholesterol to render the bile lithogenic. Experimental dietary interventions were: 10% freeze-dried CB, 1% garlic powder or their combination. Incorporation of CB into HCD decreased the cholesterol saturation index in bile, increased bile flow and biliary glycoproteins. Dietary CB prolonged cholesterol nucleation time in bile. Electrophoresis of biliary proteins showed the presence of high concentration of 27 kDa protein which might be responsible for the prolongation of cholesterol nucleation time in the CB fed group. Proteins of 20 kDa and 18 kDa were higher in CB treated animals, while the same were less expressed in HCD group. Biliary proteins from CB fed animals reduced cholesterol crystal growth index which was elevated in the presence of proteins from HCD group. Cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase and cholesterol-27-hydroxylase mRNA expression was increased in CB treated animals contributing to the bile acid synthesis. Thus, the beneficial anti-lithogenic effect of dietary CB which primarily is due to reduced cholesterol saturation index was additionally affected through a modulation of the nucleating and anti-nucleating proteins that affect cholesterol crystallization. PMID:25534812

  13. Separation by thin-layer chromatography and structure elucidation of bilirubin conjugates isolated from dog bile.

    PubMed Central

    Heirwegh, K P; Fevery, J; Michiels, R; van Hees, G P; Compernolle, F

    1975-01-01

    1. A system for separation of bile pigments by t.l.c. and for their structure elucidation is presented. Separated bile pigments are characterized by t.l.c. of derived dipyrrolic azopigments. 2. At the tetrapyrrolic stage hydrolysis in strongly alkaline medium followed by t.l.c. demonstrates the presence of bilirubin-IIIalpha, -IXalpha and -XIIIalpha and allows assessment of their relative amounts. 3. Most structural information is derived from analysis of dipyrrolic azopigments. Such derivatives, obtained by treatment of separated bile pigments with diazotized ethyl anthranilate, were separated and purified by t.l.c. Micro methods showed (a) the nature of the dipyrrolic aglycone, (b) the nature of the bonds connecting aglycone to a conjugating group, (c) the ratio of vinyl/isovinyl isomers present in the aglycone and, (d) the nature of the conjugating groups (by suitable derivative formation and t.l.c. with reference to known compounds). 4. In bile of normal dogs at least 20 tetrapyrrolic, diazo-positive bile pigments could be recognized. Except for two pigments the tetrapyrrolic nucleus corresponded predominantly to bilirubin-IXalpha. All conjugated pigments had their conjugating groups connected in ester linkage to the tetrapyrrolic aglycone, Apart from bilirubin-IXalpha, monoconjugates and homogeneous and mixed diconjugates of bilirubin were demonstrated; conjugating groups of major importance were xylose, glucose and glucuronic acid. 5. Bilirubin isomer determination on native bile and isolated bile pigments, and dipyrrole-exchange assays with [14C8]bilirubin indicated (a) that the conjugates pre-exist in bile, and (b) that no significant dipyrrole exchange occurs during isolation of the pigments. PMID:1156357

  14. Structure of plant bile pigments

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenleber, R.W.

    1983-12-01

    Selective peptide cleavage has provided a general procedure for the study of the structure, including stereochemistry, of plant bile pigments. The information derived from the synthesis and spectral analysis of a series of 2,3-dihydrodioxobilins allows the determination of the trans relative stereochemistry for ring A of the ..beta../sub 1/-phycocyanobilin from C-phycocyanin as well as for ring A of phytochrome. A complete structure proof of the five phycoerythrobilins attached to the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of B-phycoerythrin is described. One of these tetrapyrroles is doubly-peptide linked to a single peptide chain through two thioethers at the C-3' and C-18' positions. The four remaining phycoerythrobilins are singly-linked to the protein through thioethers at the C-3' position and all possess the probable stereochemistry C-2(R), C-3(R), C-3'(R), and C-16(R).

  15. Chylomicrons enhance endotoxin excretion in bile.

    PubMed Central

    Read, T E; Harris, H W; Grunfeld, C; Feingold, K R; Calhoun, M C; Kane, J P; Rapp, J H

    1993-01-01

    Chylomicrons prevent endotoxin toxicity and increase endotoxin uptake by hepatocytes. As a consequence, less endotoxin is available to activate macrophages, thereby reducing tumor necrosis factor secretion. To determine whether the chylomicron-mediated increase in hepatocellular uptake of endotoxin results in increased endotoxin excretion into bile, we examined bile after endotoxin administration. A sublethal dose (7 micrograms/kg) of 125I-endotoxin was incubated with either rat mesenteric lymph containing nascent chylomicrons (500 mg of chylomicron triglyceride per kg of body weight) or an equal volume of normal saline (controls) for 3 h and then infused into male Sprague-Dawley rats. Bile samples were collected via a common bile duct catheter for 24 h. Infusion of endotoxin incubated with chylomicrons increased biliary excretion of endotoxin by 67% at 3 h (P < or = 0.006) and by 20% at 24 h (P < or = 0.01) compared with infusion of endotoxin incubated in saline. Endotoxin activity, as measured by the Limulus assay, was not detected in the bile of test animals. However, endotoxin activity was detected after hot phenol-water extraction of bile, demonstrating that endotoxin is inactive in the presence of bile but retains bioactivity after hepatic processing. Since the majority of an intravenous endotoxin load has been shown to be cleared by the liver, acceleration of hepatocyte clearance and biliary excretion of endotoxin may represent a component of the mechanism by which chylomicrons protect against endotoxin-induced lethality. PMID:8335381

  16. Bile acids of snakes of the subfamily Viperinae and the biosynthesis of C-23-hydroxylated bile acids in liver homogenate fractions from the adder, Vipera berus (Linn.).

    PubMed Central

    Ikawa, S; Tammar, A R

    1976-01-01

    1. Analysis of bile salts of four snakes of the subfamily Viperinae showed that their bile acids consisted mainly of C-23-hydroxylated bile acids. 2. Incubations of 14C-labelled sodium cholate (3 alpha, 7 alpha, 12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholan-24-oate) and deoxycholate (3 alpha, 12 alpha-dihydroxy-5 beta-cholan-24-oate) with whole and fractionated adder liver homogenates were carried out in the presence of molecular oxygen and NADPH or an NADPH-generating system. The formation of C-23-hydroxylated bile acids, namely bitocholic acid (3 alpha, 12 alpha, 23xi-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholan-24-oic acid) and 3 alpha, 7 alpha, 12 alpha, 23 xi-tetrahydroxy-cholanic acid (3 alpha, 7 alpha, 12 alpha, 23 xi-tetrahydroxy-5 beta-cholan-24-oic acid), was observed mainly in the microsomal fraction and partly in the mitochondrial fraction. 3. Biosynthetic pathways of C-23-hydroxylated bile acids are discussed. PMID:6007

  17. Novel naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium compound pellets based on acid-independent mechanism: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Kan, Shuling; Zhao, Yi; Zhang, Wenli; Liu, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop the novel naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium compound pellets (novel-NAP/EMZ) depending on EMZ acid-independent mechanism which has been proved to be predominate in the mechanism of co-therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. The novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets, composed of NAP colon-specific pellets (NAP-CSPs) and EMZ modified-release pellets (EMZ-MRPs), were prepared by fluid-bed coating technology with desired in vitro release profiles. The resulting pellets were filled into hard gelatin capsules for in vivo evaluation in rats and compared with the reference compound pellets, consisted of NAP enteric-coated pellets (NAP-ECPs) and EMZ immediate-release pellets (EMZ-IRPs). The reference compound pellets were prepared simulating the drug delivery system of VIMOVO(®). In vivo pharmacokinetics, EMZ-MRPs had significantly larger AUC0-t (p < 0.01), 1.67 times more than that of EMZ-IRPs, and prolonged mean residence time (7.55 ± 0.12 h) than that of IRPs (1.46 ± 0.39 h). NAP-CSPs and NAP-ECPs showed similar AUC0-t. Compared to the reference compound pellets, the novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets did not show distinct differences in histological mucosal morphology. However, biochemical tests exhibited enhanced total antioxidant capacity, increased nitric oxide content and reduced malondialdehyde level for novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets, indicating that the acid-independent action took effect. The gastric pH values of novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets were at a low and stable level, which could ensure normal physiological range of human gastric pH. As a result, the novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets may be a more suitable formulation with potential advantages by improving bioavailability of drug and further reducing undesirable gastrointestinal damages. PMID:26902772

  18. Novel naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium compound pellets based on acid-independent mechanism: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Kan, Shuling; Zhao, Yi; Zhang, Wenli; Liu, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop the novel naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium compound pellets (novel-NAP/EMZ) depending on EMZ acid-independent mechanism which has been proved to be predominate in the mechanism of co-therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. The novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets, composed of NAP colon-specific pellets (NAP-CSPs) and EMZ modified-release pellets (EMZ-MRPs), were prepared by fluid-bed coating technology with desired in vitro release profiles. The resulting pellets were filled into hard gelatin capsules for in vivo evaluation in rats and compared with the reference compound pellets, consisted of NAP enteric-coated pellets (NAP-ECPs) and EMZ immediate-release pellets (EMZ-IRPs). The reference compound pellets were prepared simulating the drug delivery system of VIMOVO(®). In vivo pharmacokinetics, EMZ-MRPs had significantly larger AUC0-t (p < 0.01), 1.67 times more than that of EMZ-IRPs, and prolonged mean residence time (7.55 ± 0.12 h) than that of IRPs (1.46 ± 0.39 h). NAP-CSPs and NAP-ECPs showed similar AUC0-t. Compared to the reference compound pellets, the novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets did not show distinct differences in histological mucosal morphology. However, biochemical tests exhibited enhanced total antioxidant capacity, increased nitric oxide content and reduced malondialdehyde level for novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets, indicating that the acid-independent action took effect. The gastric pH values of novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets were at a low and stable level, which could ensure normal physiological range of human gastric pH. As a result, the novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets may be a more suitable formulation with potential advantages by improving bioavailability of drug and further reducing undesirable gastrointestinal damages.

  19. Bile canalicular changes and defective bile secretion in Opisthorchis viverrini-infected hamsters.

    PubMed

    Charoensuk, Lakhanawan; Pinlaor, Porntip; Laothong, Umawadee; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Nawa, Yukifumi; Pinlaor, Somchai

    2014-12-01

    Infection with the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini (Digenea) (Poirier, 1886) causes bile duct injury and periductal fibrosis by chronic overproduction of inflammatory-mediators and eventually results in cholangiocarcinoma development. While extensive research works have been done on O. viverrini infection-associated changes of bile ducts and periductal fibrosis, little attention was paid on morphological and biochemical changes of the bile canaliculi (BC), the origin of bile flow. We aimed to investigate the morphological and functional alterations of BC in the liver of hamsters infected with O. viverrini at one and three months post-infection. Ultrastructural changes of BC showed dilatation of BC and significant reduction of the density of microvilli as early as at one month post-infection. Immunohistochemistry revealed that CD10, a BC marker, expression was reduced early as one month post-infection. The mRNA expression of the genes encoding molecules related to bile secretion including bile acid uptake transporters (slc10a1 and slco1a1), bile acid dependent (abcb11) and independent (abcc2) bile flow and bile acid biosynthesis (cyp7a1 and cyp27a1) were significantly decreased at one month post-infection in association with the reduction of bile volume. In contrast, the expression of the mRNA of bile acid regulatory genes (fxr and shp-1) was significantly increased. These changes essentially persisted up to three months post-infection. In conclusion, O. viverrini infection induces morphological and functional changes of BC in association with the decrease of bile volume. PMID:25651692

  20. The ulcerogenic effect of bile and bile acid in rats during immobilization stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisener, J.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of different concentrations of oxen bile and individual bile acids or their sodium salts on the gastric mucosa of rats was investigated in combination with immobilization stress. A statistically significant higher frequency of ulcers was only determined in the application of 10% oxen bile. Dosages on 10% sodium glycocholic acid demonstrated strong toxic damage with atonic dilation of the stomach and extensive mucosal bleeding.

  1. Acetic Acid Sclerotherapy for Treatment of a Bile Leak from an Isolated Bile Duct After Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Gibok Eun, Choong Ki; Choi, HyunWook

    2011-02-15

    Bile leak after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not uncommon, and it mainly occurs from the cystic duct stump and can be easily treated by endoscopic techniques. However, treatment for leakage from an isolated bile duct can be troublesome. We report a successful case of acetic acid sclerotherapy for bile leak from an isolated bile duct after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  2. How Is Bile Duct Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... line through which a different kind of contrast dye (IV contrast) is injected. This helps better outline ... common bile duct. A small amount of contrast dye is injected through the tube to help outline ...

  3. Cholangiographic evaluation of bile duct carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, D.A.; MacCarty, R.L.; Gaffey, T.A.

    1983-12-01

    Cholangiograms and clinical histories of 82 patients with biopsy-proved bile duct carcinoma were reviewed. The carcinomas were classified according to morphologic findings and clinical outcome. Ulcerative colitis and antecedent inflammatory disease of the biliary tree, particularly primary sclerosing cholangitis, seem to predispose to the development of bile duct carcinoma. Focal stenotic lesions were the most common morphologic type (62/82). Polypoid carcinomas and diffuse sclerosing carcinomas were less common and of about equal frequency. Prognosis was best for patients with polypoid carcinomas and worst for those with diffuse sclerosing carcinomas. In 69 cases (84%), the tumors involved the intrahepatic or proximal extrahepatic ducts, makin curative resection difficult or impossible. Patients with carcinomas limited to the more distal extrahepatic bile ducts had a longer average survival and a higher probability of surgical cure. Proper management of patients with bile duct carcinoma requires a complete and accurate cholangiographic evaluation of the morphology, location, and extent of the disease.

  4. Treatment Options for Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... checked to measure the amounts of bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase released into the blood by the liver. ... which a stent (a thin, flexible tube or metal tube) is placed in the bile duct to ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... checked to measure the amounts of bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase released into the blood by the liver. ... which a stent (a thin, flexible tube or metal tube) is placed in the bile duct to ...

  6. Stages of Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... checked to measure the amounts of bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase released into the blood by the liver. ... which a stent (a thin, flexible tube or metal tube) is placed in the bile duct to ...

  7. Bile Duct (Cholangiocarcinoma) Cancer: Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... form of radiation for bile duct cancer. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) This type of radiation therapy ... determine the correct angles for aiming the radiation beams and the proper dose of radiation. The treatment ...

  8. The excretion of cefuroxime in human bile.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M H; Dash, C H; Burnand, K G; Woodyer, A B

    1981-04-01

    Cefuroxime is a broad spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic. An intravenous injection of cefuroxime 1.5 g was administered to 25 patients after induction of anaesthesia for cholecystectomy. Concentrations of antibiotic were measured and the mean levels in microgram/ml found to be: serum 120.5, common bile duct bile 42.8, gallbladder bile 5.4, gallbladder wall 39.2. The drug levels exceeded the minimum inhibitory concentrations for most organisms commonly encountered in the biliary tract. There was no difference in cefuroxime levels in bile from functioning or non-functioning gallbladders. It is suggested that the diffusion of antibiotic into and out of the inflamed gallbladder is similar to that in abscesses and in experimental tissue cages. No side effects, toxicity or wound infections occurred.

  9. The role of peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidation in bile acid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, H.; Miwa, A. )

    1989-11-01

    The physiological role of the peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidizing system (FAOS) is not yet established. We speculated that there might be a relationship between peroxisomal degradation of long-chain fatty acids in the liver and the biosynthesis of bile acids. This was investigated using (1-{sup 14}C)butyric acid and (1-{sup 14}C)lignoceric acid as substrates of FAOS in mitochondria and peroxisomes, respectively. The incorporation of ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid into primary bile acids was approximately four times higher than that of ({sup 14}C)butyric acid (in terms of C-2 units). The pools of these two fatty acids in the liver were exceedingly small. The incorporations of radioactivity into the primary bile acids were strongly inhibited by administration of aminotriazole, which is a specific inhibitor of peroxisomal FAOS in vivo. Aminotriazole inhibited preferentially the formation of cholate, the major primary bile acid, from both ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid and ({sup 14}C)butyric acid, rather than the formation of chenodeoxycholate. The former inhibition was about 70% and the latter was approximately 40-50%. In view of reports that cholate is biosynthesized from endogenous cholesterol, the above results indicate that peroxisomal FAOS may have an anabolic function, supplying acetyl CoA for bile acid biosynthesis.

  10. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of bile duct calculi].

    PubMed

    Greiner, L; Jakobeit, C

    1993-08-01

    Shockwave therapy of bile duct stones is not dependent on difficult preconditions concerning stone-volume and -composition or subsequent lythic therapy. Its main indication is failure of endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST). Shockwave lithotripsy of bile duct stones--which may even be carried out even instead of EST in specific cases--is with a success rate of 80 to 95% as effective as shockwave lithotripsy in urology.

  11. Ablating L-FABP in SCP-2/SCP-x null mice impairs bile acid metabolism and biliary HDL-cholesterol secretion.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gregory G; Atshaves, Barbara P; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Storey, Stephen M; Howles, Philip N; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2014-12-01

    On the basis of their abilities to bind bile acids and/or cholesterol, the physiological role(s) of liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) and sterol carrier protein (SCP) 2/SCP-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) gene products in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation was examined in gene-ablated male mice. L-FABP (LKO) or L-FABP/SCP-2/SCP-x [triple-knockout (TKO)] ablation markedly decreased hepatic bile acid concentration, while SCP-2/SCP-x [double-knockout (DKO)] ablation alone had no effect. In contrast, LKO increased biliary bile acid, while DKO and TKO had no effect on biliary bile acid levels. LKO and DKO also altered biliary bile acid composition to increase bile acid hydrophobicity. Furthermore, LKO and TKO decreased hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived 22-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol), while DKO alone had no effect. Finally, LKO and, to a lesser extent, DKO decreased most indexes contributing to cholesterol solubility in biliary bile. These results suggest different, but complementary, roles for L-FABP and SCP-2/SCP-x in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation. L-FABP appears to function more in hepatic retention of bile acids as well as hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. Conversely, SCP-2/SCP-x may function more in formation and biliary secretion of bile acid, with less impact on hepatic uptake or biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol.

  12. Future Treatment of Common Bile Duct Stones.

    PubMed

    Johnson; Hunter

    1997-03-01

    Management options for patients found to have common bile duct stones have expanded as a function of improved instrumentation and radiographic support. Technological advances initially lead to increased costs but eventually result in improved quality for patients. Controversy exists for patients with either soft clinical findings or stones found at the time of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. As laparoscopic common duct exploration becomes more widespread the need for perioperative ERCP will likely decrease; however, this will depend on the experience of the surgeons at a given institution. Common bile duct stones found at the time of laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be approached in a variety of different ways. The most commonly used methods are laparoscopic transcystic common bile duct exploration, laparoscopic choledochotomy with common bile duct exploration, open common bile duct exploration, laparoscopic antegrade sphincterotomy, and postoperative ERCP. In the future, the treatment goal of biliary lithiasis will be to accomplish cholecystectomy and removal of bile duct stones in a single stage. Advances in fiberoptic technology will make transcystic duct exploration more effective, but it is likely that sphincterotomy (antegrade or retrograde) will be used preferentially for the distally impacted stone.

  13. Ion pairing with bile salts modulates intestinal permeability and contributes to food-drug interaction of BCS class III compound trospium chloride.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Christian A; Reuss, Stefan; Amidon, Gordon L; Langguth, Peter

    2013-11-01

    In the current study the involvement of ion pair formation between bile salts and trospium chloride (TC), a positively charged Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) class III substance, showing a decrease in bioavailability upon coadministration with food (negative food effect) was investigated. Isothermal titration calorimetry provided evidence of a reaction between TC and bile acids. An effect of ion pair formation on the apparent partition coefficient (APC) was examined using (3)H-trospium. The addition of bovine bile and bile extract porcine led to a significant increase of the APC. In vitro permeability studies of trospium were performed across Caco-2-monolayers and excised segments of rat jejunum in a modified Ussing chamber. The addition of bile acids led to an increase of trospium permeation across Caco-2-monolayers and rat excised segments by approximately a factor of 1.5. The addition of glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDC) was less effective than taurodeoxycholate (TDOC). In the presence of an olive oil emulsion, a complete extinction of the permeation increasing effects of bile salts was observed. Thus, although there are more bile acids in the intestine in the fed state compared to the fasted state, these are not able to form ion pairs with trospium in fed state, because they are involved in the emulsification of dietary fats. In conclusion, the formation of ion pairs between trospium and bile acids can partially explain its negative food effect. Our results are presumably transferable to other organic cations showing a negative food effect.

  14. Pharmacology of bile acid receptors: Evolution of bile acids from simple detergents to complex signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Copple, Bryan L; Li, Tiangang

    2016-02-01

    For many years, bile acids were thought to only function as detergents which solubilize fats and facilitate the uptake of fat-soluble vitamins in the intestine. Many early observations; however, demonstrated that bile acids regulate more complex processes, such as bile acids synthesis and immune cell function through activation of signal transduction pathways. These studies were the first to suggest that receptors may exist for bile acids. Ultimately, seminal studies by many investigators led to the discovery of several bile acid-activated receptors including the farnesoid X receptor, the vitamin D receptor, the pregnane X receptor, TGR5, α5 β1 integrin, and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2. Several of these receptors are expressed outside of the gastrointestinal system, indicating that bile acids may have diverse functions throughout the body. Characterization of the functions of these receptors over the last two decades has identified many important roles for these receptors in regulation of bile acid synthesis, transport, and detoxification; regulation of glucose utilization; regulation of fatty acid synthesis and oxidation; regulation of immune cell function; regulation of energy expenditure; and regulation of neural processes such as gastric motility. Through these many functions, bile acids regulate many aspects of digestion ranging from uptake of essential vitamins to proper utilization of nutrients. Accordingly, within a short time period, bile acids moved beyond simple detergents and into the realm of complex signaling molecules. Because of the important processes that bile acids regulate through activation of receptors, drugs that target these receptors are under development for the treatment of several diseases, including cholestatic liver disease and metabolic syndrome. In this review, we will describe the various bile acid receptors, the signal transduction pathways activated by these receptors, and briefly discuss the physiological processes that

  15. Importance of bicarbonate in bile salt independent fraction of bile flow.

    PubMed

    Hardison, W G; Wood, C A

    1978-08-01

    The bile salt independent fraction (BSIF) of canalicular bile flow from the isolated rat liver perfused with bicarbonate-free perfusate is 50% of that from the liver perfused with bicarbonate-containing perfusate. HCO3-excretion is nearly eliminated and Na+ and Cl- excretion is reduced 50%. Replacement of HCO3- into perfusate increased bile flow by 0.3 microliter/g.min without changing bile acid excretion rate. 5.5-Dimethyl-2,4-oxazolidinedione (DMO) produced a similar effect. DMO was passively distributed between bile and plasma. The data indicate that a bicarbonate transport mechanism is responsible for production of up to 50% of the BSIF. Another weak acid, N-5[5-(2-methoxyethoxy)-2-pyrimidinyl]sulfamoylbenzene (glymidine), was rapidly excreted into bile and increased bile flow by over 2.0 microliter/g.min. Glymidine is probably excreted by an independent organic anion transport mechanism, and any effect on the bicarbonate transport mechanism is obscured. Canaliculus-enriched hepatocyte membrane fractions contained no HCO3-stimulated ATPase activity. Either this enzyme is unimportant in hepatocyte bicarbonate transport or transport occurs across membranes other than the bile canalicular membrane. PMID:150796

  16. Role of the Intestinal Bile Acid Transporters in Bile Acid and Drug Disposition

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane transporters expressed by the hepatocyte and enterocyte play critical roles in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, an effective recycling and conservation mechanism that largely restricts these potentially cytotoxic detergents to the intestinal and hepatobiliary compartments. In doing so, the hepatic and enterocyte transport systems ensure a continuous supply of bile acids to be used repeatedly during the digestion of multiple meals throughout the day. Absorption of bile acids from the intestinal lumen and export into the portal circulation is mediated by a series of transporters expressed on the enterocyte apical and basolateral membranes. The ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid cotransporter (abbreviated ASBT; gene symbol, SLC10A2) is responsible for the initial uptake of bile acids across the enterocyte brush border membrane. The bile acids are then efficiently shuttled across the cell and exported across the basolateral membrane by the heteromeric Organic Solute Transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. This chapter briefly reviews the tissue expression, physiology, genetics, pathophysiology, and transport properties of the ASBT and OSTα-OSTα. In addition, the chapter discusses the relationship between the intestinal bile acid transporters and drug metabolism, including development of ASBT inhibitors as novel hypocholesterolemic or hepatoprotective agents, prodrug targeting of the ASBT to increase oral bioavailability, and involvement of the intestinal bile acid transporters in drug absorption and drug-drug interactions. PMID:21103970

  17. THE EFFECT OF BILE DUCT LIGATION AND BILE DIVERSION ON FK506 PHARMACOKINETICS IN DOGS1

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Hiroyoki; Imventarza, Oscar; Venkataramanan, Raman; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Zhu, Yue; Warty, Vijay S.; Fung, John; Todo, Satoru; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Mongrel or beagle dogs were submitted to bile duct ligation, or to extraenteric biliary diversion by means of choledochoureterostomy. The kinetics of intravenously administered FK506 was not changed from control status two weeks after bile duct ligation, but the bioavailability of orally administered FK506 was nearly quadrupled. Following oral administration, the absorption of FK508 was highly variable. The results indicate that in dogs FK506 is absorbed from the intestine just as efficiently in the absence of enteric bile and in presence of exogenous bile salt supplement when compared with its absorption in presence of normal bile drainage. These findings with FK506 are different from those with cyclosporine after biliary obstruction or diversion and will have important practical as well as experimental ramifications. PMID:1373531

  18. Studies of feedback suppression of bile salt synthesis in the bile-fistula rat.

    PubMed

    Duane, W C; McHale, A P; Hamilton, J N

    1988-02-01

    We have previously reported that intravenous infusion of taurocholate at 10 mumol (100 g.hr) into bile-fistula rats suppressed bile salt synthesis by 85% (Pries et al. 1983. J. Lipid Res. 24: 141-146). Recently, however, infusion rates twice this high have been reported not to suppress synthesis (Davis et al. 1984. Falk Symposium 42. MTP Press Ltd., Boston. 37-45). Because the only major difference in design of these two studies was supplementation with sodium bicarbonate to replace biliary losses induced by bile salt choleresis, we have repeated our studies with and without bicarbonate supplementation. Without bicarbonate, as before, we found suppression of synthesis during infusion of taurocholate at 10 mumol/(100 g.hr). With bicarbonate, no suppression of synthesis occurred at these infusion rates. These data indicate that bicarbonate supplementation is essential when testing physiological effects of infused bile salt in the bile-fistula rat. PMID:2835417

  19. Omeprazole induces altered bile acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, K; Machida, M; Fukumura, M; Koide, K; Yamazaki, R

    1998-01-01

    Background—It has been reported that the acidity of gastric contents could be an important factor in regulating jejunal flora. 
Aims—To investigate the effects of omeprazole induced changes in gastric pH on jejunal flora and bile acid metabolism. 
Methods—Twenty one patients with gastric ulcer and 19 healthy volunteers were studied. Deconjugation of bile acids was detected using a bile acid breath test. Jejunal fluid was aspirated using a double lumen tube with a rubber cover on the tip and deconjugation was examined using thin layer chromatography. Fat malabsorption was detected by a triolein breath test. 
Results—In the bile acid breath test, expired breath samples from all patients and healthy volunteers showed significantly greater 14CO2 specific activity after omeprazole treatment (20 mg/day) than before treatment. Bacterial overgrowth was found in the jejunal fluid and gastric juice of both ulcer patients and healthy volunteers after omeprazole treatment. The following species were identified: Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, enterococcus, Lactobacillus bifidus, Bacteroides vulgatus, B uniformis, Eubacterium lentum, Eu parvum, and Corynebacterium granulosum. All of these species, except E coli and C albicans, deconjugate bile acids. There was a significant correlation between 14CO2 activity and gastric pH, both before and after omeprazole treatment in both groups. The triolein breath test revealed impaired fat absorption in both groups after omeprazole treatment. 
Conclusions—Both patients with gastric ulcer and healthy volunteers exhibited increased deconjugation of bile acids caused by bacterial overgrowth in the jejunum and fat malabsorption after omeprazole treatment. The bacterial overgrowth consisted of both anaerobes and aerobes with deconjugation ability and was probably associated with an omeprazole induced shift to neutral pH in the gastric juice. 

 Keywords: omeprazole; bacterial overgrowth; deconjugation; bile acid breath

  20. The Bile Response Repressor BreR Regulates Expression of the Vibrio cholerae breAB Efflux System Operon▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cerda-Maira, Francisca A.; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2008-01-01

    Enteric pathogens have developed several resistance mechanisms to survive the antimicrobial action of bile. We investigated the transcriptional profile of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strain C6706 under virulence gene-inducing conditions in the presence and absence of bile. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of 119 genes was affected by bile. The mRNA levels of genes encoding proteins involved in transport were increased in the presence of bile, whereas the mRNA levels of genes encoding proteins involved in pathogenesis and chemotaxis were decreased. This study identified genes encoding transcriptional regulators from the TetR family (vexR and breR) and multidrug efflux pumps from the resistance-nodulation-cell division superfamily (vexB and vexD [herein renamed breB]) that were induced in response to bile. Further analysis regarding vexAB and breAB expression in the presence of various antimicrobial compounds established that vexAB was induced in the presence of bile, sodium dodecyl sulfate, or novobiocin and that the induction of breAB was specific to bile. BreR is a direct repressor of the breAB promoter and is able to regulate its own expression, as demonstrated by transcriptional and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). The expression of breR and breAB is induced in the presence of the bile salts cholate, deoxycholate, and chenodeoxycholate, and EMSA showed that deoxycholate is able to abolish the formation of BreR-PbreR complexes. We propose that deoxycholate is able to interact with BreR and induce a conformational change that interferes with the DNA binding ability of BreR, resulting in breAB and breR expression. These results provide new insight into a transcriptional regulator and a transport system that likely play essential roles in the ability of V. cholerae to resist the action of bile in the host. PMID:18776020

  1. Advances in bile acid medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R; Long, A; Gilmer, J F

    2011-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are a family of steroidal molecules derived from cholesterol and biosynthesised in the pericentral hepatocytes of the liver. Structurally they may be regarded as consisting of two components, a rigid steroid nucleus and a short aliphatic side chain terminating in an alcohol or carboxyl group. Traditionally BAs are known for their ability to act as solubilising agents in the gut, aiding in the absorption of dietary lipids through the formation of mixed micelles. However the identification of BAs as ligands of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) has lead to the realisation that these molecules have a wider range of biological effects. BAs regulate lipid and glucose homeostasis through activation of the FXR and the G-protein coupled receptor, TGR5. They can activate apoptotic, inflammatory and carcinogenic signalling pathways. BAs have also been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects. Interestingly, BAs are not restricted to the hepatic-intestinal system. Plasma BAs regulate BA synthesis and metabolism. BAs have recently been identified in cerebrospinal fluid. The BA, ursodeoxycholic acid has a potential role as a neuroprotectant in Huntington's disease and its taurine conjugate exhibits neuro-protective effects in vitro that may be relevant to Alzheimer's disease. This renaissance in BA biology has lead to the development of numerous medicinal chemistry programmes with different therapeutic targets, using BAs as lead structures. BA derivatives with increased efficacy and potency for FXR and TGR5 hold significant promise for the treatment of metabolic disorders. The peculiar effects of BAs on cell viability have been exploited for the design of selective cytocidal agents for treatment of various cancers. BA derivatives have also been screened with much success for anti-microbial and antifungal properties. Other targets include carbonic anhydrase for treatment of glaucoma and the glucocorticoid receptor for antiinflammatory effects. In this review

  2. Aminoalkylmethacrylate copolymer E improves oral bioavailability of YM466 by suppressing drug-bile interaction.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Shigeo; Kondo, Hiromu; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Sako, Kazuhiro; Ogawara, Ken-Ichi; Higaki, Kazutaka

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to find out polymeric compounds that can inhibit the interaction between YM466, a novel anticoagulant, and bile to improve its oral bioavailability. In vitro ultrafiltration method using extract gall powder was useful to detect the formation of insoluble complex of YM466 with bile and also used to select a polymer that can inhibit the interaction between YM466 and bile. The in vitro studies revealed that aminoalkylmethacrylate (AAM) copolymer E, a polymethacrylate, dose-dependently inhibited the interaction between YM466 and bile and that this polymer could interact with bile salt, but not with YM466, possibly by electrostatic and/or hydrophobic interactions. The coadministration of AAM copolymer E with YM466 to rats dose-dependently increased the plasma concentration of YM466 and it was found that the oral dose of the polymer three times of YM466 (polymer to drug ratio in weight, P-D ratio, 3) significantly increased AUC0-1 h of YM466 to 2.6-fold of that of YM466 alone. Considering the condition of therapeutic use of YM466 and the maximum tolerated dose of the polymer, the formulation of P-D ratio 3 would be clinically practical and promising from the viewpoint of safety.

  3. Analysis of the Bile Salt Export Pump (ABCB11) Interactome Employing Complementary Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Przybylla, Susanne; Stindt, Jan; Kleinschrodt, Diana; Schulte am Esch, Jan; Häussinger, Dieter; Keitel, Verena; Smits, Sander H.; Schmitt, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP, ABCB11) plays an essential role in the formation of bile. In hepatocytes, BSEP is localized within the apical (canalicular) membrane and a deficiency of canalicular BSEP function is associated with severe forms of cholestasis. Regulation of correct trafficking to the canalicular membrane and of activity is essential to ensure BSEP functionality and thus normal bile flow. However, little is known about the identity of interaction partners regulating function and localization of BSEP. In our study, interaction partners of BSEP were identified in a complementary approach: Firstly, BSEP interaction partners were co-immunoprecipitated from human liver samples and identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Secondly, a membrane yeast two-hybrid (MYTH) assay was used to determine protein interaction partners using a human liver cDNA library. A selection of interaction partners identified both by MYTH and MS were verified by in vitro interaction studies using purified proteins. By these complementary approaches, a set of ten novel BSEP interaction partners was identified. With the exception of radixin, all other interaction partners were integral or membrane-associated proteins including proteins of the early secretory pathway and the bile acyl-CoA synthetase, the second to last, ER-associated enzyme of bile salt synthesis. PMID:27472061

  4. Analysis of the Bile Salt Export Pump (ABCB11) Interactome Employing Complementary Approaches.

    PubMed

    Przybylla, Susanne; Stindt, Jan; Kleinschrodt, Diana; Schulte Am Esch, Jan; Häussinger, Dieter; Keitel, Verena; Smits, Sander H; Schmitt, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP, ABCB11) plays an essential role in the formation of bile. In hepatocytes, BSEP is localized within the apical (canalicular) membrane and a deficiency of canalicular BSEP function is associated with severe forms of cholestasis. Regulation of correct trafficking to the canalicular membrane and of activity is essential to ensure BSEP functionality and thus normal bile flow. However, little is known about the identity of interaction partners regulating function and localization of BSEP. In our study, interaction partners of BSEP were identified in a complementary approach: Firstly, BSEP interaction partners were co-immunoprecipitated from human liver samples and identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Secondly, a membrane yeast two-hybrid (MYTH) assay was used to determine protein interaction partners using a human liver cDNA library. A selection of interaction partners identified both by MYTH and MS were verified by in vitro interaction studies using purified proteins. By these complementary approaches, a set of ten novel BSEP interaction partners was identified. With the exception of radixin, all other interaction partners were integral or membrane-associated proteins including proteins of the early secretory pathway and the bile acyl-CoA synthetase, the second to last, ER-associated enzyme of bile salt synthesis. PMID:27472061

  5. Direct Measurement of the Thermodynamics of Chiral Recognition in Bile Salt Micelles.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Shauna L; Rovnyak, David; Strein, Timothy G

    2016-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is shown to be a sensitive reporter of bile salt micellization and chiral recognition. Detailed ITC characterization of bile micelle formation as well as the chiral recognition capabilities of sodium cholate (NaC), deoxycholate (NaDC), and taurodeoxycholate (NaTDC) micelle systems are reported. The ΔH(demic) of these bile salt micelle systems is directly observable and is strongly temperature-dependent, allowing also for the determination of ΔCp(demic). Using the pseudo-phase separation model, ΔG(demic) and TΔS(demic) were also calculated. Chirally selective guest-host binding of model racemic compounds 1,1'-bi-2-napthol (BN) and 1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diylhydrogenphosphate (BNDHP) to bile salt micelles was then investigated. The S-isomer was shown to bind more tightly to the bile salt micelles in all cases. A model was developed that allows for the quantitative determination of the enthalpic difference in binding affinity that corresponds to chiral selectivity, which is on the order of 1 kJ mol(-1).

  6. Common bile duct obstruction due to candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Domagk, D; Bisping, G; Poremba, C; Fegeler, W; Domschke, W; Menzel, J

    2001-04-01

    Biliary obstruction with its wide range of potential causes (e.g. neoplastic lesions, gallstones and inflammatory processes) is a common disease in gastroenterology. Although infections with Candida and other fungal species have increasingly been recognized in patients with certain predispositions, fungal involvement of the biliary tract is extremely rare. We report the case of a male patient with a past history of long-time mechanical ventilation and who was referred to our department with cholangitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) of the septic patient revealed a high-degree stenosis of the distal common bile duct with a prestenotic dilation which was strongly suspicious of an underlying malignancy. Control ERCP revealed a beads-like deformation of the intra- and extrahepatic bile duct system which was compatible with chronic secondary sclerosing cholangitis. Examining the bile duct system with a balloon catheter, a long tubular. filamentous structure with several branches at its sides could be extracted and was assessed histologically to be a Candida conglomerate. Candida colonization of the bile duct was confirmed by microbiological analysis of aspirated bile.

  7. Bile acid metabolism and signaling in cholestasis, inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver. Some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in bile acid synthesis. Bile acids are physiological detergent molecules, so are highly cytotoxic. They undergo enterohepatic circulation and play important roles in generating bile flow and facilitating biliary secretion of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics and intestinal absorption of dietary fats and lipid soluble vitamins. Bile acid synthesis, transport and pool size are therefore tightly regulated under physiological conditions. In cholestasis, impaired bile flow leads to accumulation of bile acids in the liver, causing hepatocyte and biliary injury and inflammation. Chronic cholestasis is associated with fibrosis, cirrhosis and eventually liver failure. Chronic cholestasis also increases the risk of developing hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinomas. Extensive research in the last two decades has shown that bile acids act as signaling molecules that regulate various cellular processes. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcriptional factors that play critical roles in the regulation of bile acid, drug and xenobiotic metabolism. In cholestasis, these bile acid-activated receptors regulate a network of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, conjugation, transport and metabolism to alleviate bile acid-induced inflammation and injury. Additionally, bile acids are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation, and altered bile acid levels in diseased conditions have been implicated in liver injury/regeneration and tumorigenesis. We will cover the mechanisms that regulate bile acid homeostasis and detoxification during cholestasis, and the roles of bile acids in the initiation and regulation of hepatic inflammation, regeneration and carcinogenesis. PMID:26233910

  8. The effect of Macrotyloma uniflorum seed on bile lithogenicity against diet induced cholelithiasis on mice

    PubMed Central

    Bigoniya, Papiya; Bais, Sourabh; Sirohi, Brijesh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The seeds of Macrotyloma uniflorum Lam. (Family Fabaceae) contain extractable total and tannins with reported hepatoprotective, hypocholesterolemic and antioxidant activity. In this study, dietary M. uniflorum seed, methanolic and acetone extracts (ME and AE) were examined for their bile-antilithogenic potential. Materials and Methods: Mice fed with 1% cholesterol and 0.5% cholic acid lithogenic (LG) diet for 8 weeks resulted in cholesterol super saturation in gallbladder bile, which promotes the formation of cholesterol gallstones (CGSs). Results: AE reduced the CGS incidence by 60.21%, and serum total cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), very low density lipoprotein (LDL) and LDL compared to control animals. Seed extracts at 300 mg/kg dose markedly reduced biliary cholesterol (BC) and decreased bile salt content. The ratio of BC to phospholipid which was 2.64 in the LG diet group was reduced to 1.57–1.35 in the M. uniflorum seed extracts treated groups. Liver cholesterol and TG were decreased significantly by feeding of ME and AE at 300 mg/kg dose. AE significantly reversed the changes in apolipoproteins A-I and C-II level disturbed by LG diet. Conclusions: M. uniflorum seed exerted antilithogenic influence by decreasing the cholesterol hyper-secretion into bile and increasing the bile acid output, thus decreasing the formation of LG bile in mice. The effect was maximum in the AE as it also reduced papillary proliferation of gallbladder and fatty degeneration of the liver. The potential antilithogenic effect of the AE of M. uniflorum may be due to antioxidant property of its rich total polyphenol and tannins content. PMID:25593405

  9. Laserlithotripsy of common bile duct stones.

    PubMed Central

    Ell, C; Lux, G; Hochberger, J; Müller, D; Demling, L

    1988-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde laser lithotripsy of common bile duct stones is a new technique which can be carried out through the endoscope without anaesthesia using ordinary endoscopic equipment. In the method described here a flashlamp pulsed Neodymium YAG laser (wave length 1064 nm) was used. Light energy was transmitted along a highly flexible quartz fibre with a diameter of 0.2 mm. This new technique was used in nine patients with concrements in the common bile duct, which could not be removed with the established endoscopic techniques. In eight of the nine the concrements (maximum diameter 4.7 x 3.1 cm) could be fragmented and in six the fragments could be extracted from the common bile duct. The total energy required was 80-300 J; complications were not observed. Images Figs 3 and 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Figs 8 and 9 PMID:2898421

  10. Liquid crystals and cholesterol nucleation during equilibration in supersaturated bile analogs.

    PubMed

    Holzbach, R T; Corbusier, C

    1978-03-30

    In recent work, apparent liquid crystal agglomeration to form typical solid cholesterol microcrystals was frequently observed photomicrographically in bile samples from prairie dogs fed a cholesterol-enriched diet, prior to solid crystal formation. We therefore have conducted a systematic study of time-course lipid compositional changes in the mesophase and micellar phase constituents of bile analog solutions while undergoing cholesterol nucleation during equilibration. On the basis of these studies, we conclude that the nucleation process for microcrystal formation most likely occurs within the mesophase component which is only the first of a two-step transition in a sequential series of physical ordering processes. We deduce that mesophase formation must have a lower kinetic energy requirement and that the second step (microcrystal formation) must be rate limiting. In keeping with theoretical considerations, structural evidence for increased hydration is demonstrable near the point of complete equilibration when the mesophase is dissolving.

  11. Consequences of bile salt biotransformations by intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ridlon, Jason M; Harris, Spencer C; Bhowmik, Shiva; Kang, Dae-Joong; Hylemon, Phillip B

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence strongly suggest that the human "microbiome" plays an important role in both health and disease. Bile acids function both as detergents molecules promoting nutrient absorption in the intestines and as hormones regulating nutrient metabolism. Bile acids regulate metabolism via activation of specific nuclear receptors (NR) and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). The circulating bile acid pool composition consists of primary bile acids produced from cholesterol in the liver, and secondary bile acids formed by specific gut bacteria. The various biotransformation of bile acids carried out by gut bacteria appear to regulate the structure of the gut microbiome and host physiology. Increased levels of secondary bile acids are associated with specific diseases of the GI system. Elucidating methods to control the gut microbiome and bile acid pool composition in humans may lead to a reduction in some of the major diseases of the liver, gall bladder and colon. PMID:26939849

  12. Do We Know What Causes Bile Duct Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... duct cancer be prevented? Do we know what causes bile duct cancer? We don’t know the exact cause of ... to top » Guide Topics What Is Bile Duct Cancer? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and ...

  13. Solubility of calcium salts of unconjugated and conjugated natural bile acids.

    PubMed

    Gu, J J; Hofmann, A F; Ton-Nu, H T; Schteingart, C D; Mysels, K J

    1992-05-01

    The approximate solubility products of the calcium salts of ten unconjugated bile acids and several taurine conjugated bile acids were determined. The formation of micelles, gels, and/or precipitates in relation to Ca2+,Na+, and bile salt concentration was summarized by "phase maps." Because the ratio of Ca2+ to bile salt in the precipitates was ca. 1:2, and the activity of Ca2+ but not that of bile salt (BA-) could be measured, the ion product of aCa2+ [BA-]2 was calculated. The ion product (= Ksp) ranged over nine orders of magnitude and the solubility thus ranged over three orders of magnitude; its value depended on the number and orientation of the hydroxyl groups in the bile acid. Ion products (in units of 10(-9) mol/l)3 were as follows: cholic (3 alpha OH,7 alpha OH,12 alpha OH) 640; ursocholic (3 alpha OH,7 beta OH,12 alpha OH) 2300; hyocholic (3 alpha OH,6 alpha OH,7 alpha OH) 11; ursodeoxycholic (3 alpha OH,7 beta OH) 91; chenodeoxycholic (3 alpha OH,7 alpha OH) 10; deoxycholic (3 alpha OH,12 alpha OH) 1.5; 12-epideoxycholic (lagodeoxycholic, 3 alpha OH,12 beta OH) 2.2; hyodeoxycholic (3 alpha OH,6 alpha OH) 0.7; and lithocholic (3 alpha OH) 0.00005. The critical micellization temperature of the sodium salt of murideoxycholic acid (3 alpha OH,6 beta OH) was greater than 100 degrees C, and its Ca2+ salt was likely to be very insoluble. Taurine conjugates were much more soluble than their corresponding unconjugated derivatives: chenodeoxycholyltaurine, 384; deoxycholyltaurine, 117; and cholyltaurine, greater than 10,000. Calcium salts of unconjugated bile acids precipitated rapidly in contrast to those of glycine conjugates which were metastable for months. Thus, hepatic conjugation of bile acids with taurine or glycine not only enhances solubility at acidic pH, but also at Ca2+ ion concentrations present in bile and intestinal content.

  14. Recent classifications of the common bile duct injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is now a gold standard treatment modality for gallstone diseases. However, the incidence rate of bile duct injury has not been changed for many years. From initial classification published by Bismuth, there have been many classifications of common bile duct injury. The initial classification, levels and types of bile duct injury, and currently combined vascular injuries are reviewed here. PMID:26155253

  15. Alteration of Bile Canalicular Enzymes in Cholestasis. A POSSIBLE CAUSE OF BILE SECRETORY FAILURE

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Francis R.; Arias, Irwin M.

    1973-01-01

    Bile secretory failure (cholestasis) may result from several possible mechanisms involved in bile secretion. We have examined the possibility that abnormalities in enzyme content, composition, and turnover of liver plasma membrane constituents are altered in cholestasis. Severe and mild cholestasis were produced by 5 days of bile duct ligation and ethinyl estradiol administration, respectively. Bile duct ligation but not ethinyl estradiol treatments was associated with elevations of the serum bilirubin level and 5′-nucleotidase activity. However, basal bile flow and bilirubin transport maximum (Tm) were significantly reduced after ethinyl estradiol treatment. Liver plasma membrane fractions rich in canalicular membranes were prepared from groups of rats in each of three categories; normal, after bile duct ligation, or ethinyl estradiol administration, and their respective controls. Electron microscopy and enzyme marker studies demonstrated plasma membrane fractions free of significant contamination. Plasma membrane fractions prepared from mild as well as severe cholestasis had increased alkaline phosphatase activity, and reduced 5′-nucleotidase and Mg2+-ATPase activities. Co2+-CMPase activity was unchanged. Kinetic analysis of 5′-nucleotidase and Mg2+-ATPase activities in plasma membrane fractions demonstrated reduced Vmaz (but unaltered Km). Reducted Vmaz was unrelated to addition in vitro of di-or trihydroxy bile salts or ethinyl estradiol and, therefore, suggests that reduced activities in cholestasis are due to decreased enzyme content. Cholestasis was not associated with changes in the synthesis or degradation rate of pulse-labeled plasma membrane proteins or alterations in the major protein bands separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Plasma membrane cholesterol, phospholipid, and neutral sugar content was unaltered, but sialic acid content was significantly increased in both forms of cholestasis. Alterations in

  16. The unique ligand binding features of subfamily-II iLBPs with respect to bile salts and related drugs.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Filippo; Ceccon, Alberto; Zanzoni, Serena; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Ragona, Laura; Molinari, Henriette; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Intracellular lipid binding proteins (iLBPs) are a family of evolutionarily related small cytoplasmic proteins implicated in the transcellular transport of lipophilic ligands. Subfamily-II iLBPs include the liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), and the ileal and the liver and ileal bile acid binding proteins (L-BABP and I-BABP). Atomic-level investigations during the past 15-20 years have delivered relevant information on bile acid binding by this protein group, revealing unique features including binding cooperativity, promiscuity, and site selectivity. Using NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical techniques, our laboratories have contributed to an understanding of the molecular determinants of some of these properties and their generality among proteins from different animal species. We focused especially on formation of heterotypic complexes, considering the mixed compositions of physiological bile acid pools. Experiments performed with synthetic bile acid derivatives showed that iLBPs could act as targets for cell-specific contrast agents and, more generally, as effective carriers of amphiphilic drugs. This review collects the major findings related to bile salt interactions with iLBPs aiming to provide keys for a deeper understanding of protein-mediated intracellular bile salt trafficking. PMID:25468388

  17. In vitro determination by 1H-NMR studies that bile with shorter nucleation times contain cholesterol-enriched vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, S S; Parkes, H G; Ellul, J P; Murphy, G M

    1995-06-01

    Although biliary vesicles are considered to be the primary source of cholesterol found in cholesterol gallstones, difficulties in quantitatively separating the different cholesterol transport modes in bile still remain. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR) offers an alternative approach. Investigations were carried out on both model biles and human gallbladder bile samples: (i) to follow the effect of increasing sodium glycocholate concentrations on the 1H-NMR spectra of arachidonic acid rich-phospholipid, and cholesterol-lecithin vesicles, (ii) to compare the concentrations of total phospholipids in bile determined enzymatically with those obtained by integration of the phospholipid choline head group resonance peak, and (iii) to examine the relationship between biliary cholesterol nucleation time (NT) and the areas of the biliary lipid 1H-NMR peaks. It was found that the molecular motions of vesicle phospholipid, as determined by 1H-NMR, were restricted by saturation with cholesterol. In bile from patients with cholesterol gallstones, the reduced NMR fluidity of the phospholipid choline-head group indicated that the proportion of cholesterol-phospholipid vesicles containing more than 50% cholesterol, on a molar basis, was increased. The ratios of the N+(CH3)3 and = CH proton resonance peaks showed no overlap between samples with cholesterol gallstones and shorter NT and those with either no gallstones or pigment stones and longer NT. 1H-NMR spectroscopy indicates in a non-invasive manner those biles which are prone to cholesterol crystal formation.

  18. Are serum bile salt concentrations raised in hyperlipidaemia?

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, G J; Douglas, J G; Finlayson, N D; Percy-Robb, I W

    1980-01-01

    We have studied serum fasting and postprandial primary bile salt concentrations in a group of 10 consecutive hyperlipidaemic subjects. The efficiency of hepatic bile salt clearance in the same subjects was aslo studied using an injected dose of sodium glycocholate. No increase in serum fasting or postprandial concentrations of the primary bile salts were observed and hepatic bile salt clearance was only marginally abnormal in one subject. The presence of hyperlipidaemia does not invalidate the use of serum conjugated bile salt analysis for the detection of liver diseases. PMID:7399323

  19. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  20. Novel, major 2α- and 2β-hydroxy bile alcohols and bile acids in the bile of Arapaima gigas, a large South American river fish.

    PubMed

    Sato née Okihara, Rika; Saito, Tetsuya; Ogata, Hiroaki; Nakane, Naoya; Namegawa, Kazunari; Sekiguchi, Shoutaro; Omura, Kaoru; Kurabuchi, Satoshi; Mitamura, Kuniko; Ikegawa, Shigeo; Raines, Jan; Hagey, Lee R; Hofmann, Alan F; Iida, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Bile alcohols and bile acids from gallbladder bile of the Arapaima gigas, a large South American freshwater fish, were isolated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The structures of the major isolated compounds were determined by electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance using (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectra. The novel bile salts identified were six variants of 2-hydroxy bile acids and bile alcohols in the 5α- and 5β-series, with 29% of all compounds having hydroxylation at C-2. Three C27 bile alcohols were present (as ester sulfates): (24ξ,25ξ)-5α-cholestan-2α,3α,7α,12α,24,26-hexol; (25ξ)-5β-cholestan-2β,3α,7α,12α,26,27-hexol, and (25ξ)-5α-cholestan-2α,3α,7α,12α,26,27-hexol. A single C27 bile acid was identified: (25ξ)-2α,3α,7α,12α-tetrahydroxy-5α-cholestan-26-oic acid, present as its taurine conjugate. Two novel C24 bile acids were identified: the 2α-hydroxy derivative of allochenodeoxycholic acid and the 2β-hydroxy derivative of cholic acid, both occurring as taurine conjugates. These studies extend previous work in establishing the natural occurrence of novel 2α- and 2β-hydroxy-C24 and C27 bile acids as well as C27 bile alcohols in both the normal (5β) as well as the (5α) "allo" A/B-ring juncture. The bile salt profile of A. gigas appears to be unique among vertebrates. PMID:26768415

  1. N-Methyltaurine N-acyl amidated bile acids and deoxycholic acid in the bile of angelfish (Pomacanthidae): a novel bile acid profile in Perciform fish.

    PubMed

    Satoh Née Okihara, Rika; Saito, Tetsuya; Ogata, Hiroaki; Ohsaki, Ayumi; Iida, Takashi; Asahina, Kiyoshi; Mitamura, Kuniko; Ikegawa, Shigeo; Hofmann, Alan F; Hagey, Lee R

    2014-02-01

    Two novel N-acyl amidated bile acids, N-methyltaurine conjugated cholic acid and N-methyltaurine conjugated deoxycholic acid, were found to be major biliary bile acids in two species of angelfish the regal (Pygoplites diacanthus) and the blue-girdled (Pomacanthus navarchus) angelfish. The identification was based on their having MS and NMR spectra identical to those of synthetic standards. A survey of biliary bile acids of 10 additional species of angelfish found 7 with N-methyltaurine conjugation. In all 12 species, conjugated deoxycholic acid (known to be formed by bacterial 7-dehydroxylation of cholic acid) was a major bile acid. In all previous studies of biliary bile acids in fish, deoxycholic acid has been present in only trace proportions. In addition, bile acid conjugation with N-methyltaurine has not been detected previously in any known vertebrate. N-methyltaurine conjugated bile acids are resistant to bacterial deconjugation and dehydroxylation, and such resistance to bacterial enzymes should aid in the maintenance of high concentrations of bile acids during lipid digestion. Our findings suggest that these species of angelfish have a novel microbiome in their intestine containing anaerobic bacteria, and describe the presence of N-methyltaurine conjugated bile acids that are resistant to bacterial attack.

  2. The mediators of bile action on the exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Riepl, R L; Lehnert, P

    1993-05-01

    Under basal conditions, bile and bile salts applied intraduodenally influence plasma levels of several gastroenteropancreatic peptides. Besides those with stimulatory effects on exocrine pancreatic secretion, others with inhibitory or no effects are released as well. Furthermore, cholinergic and peptidergic neural mechanisms may also be activated. Secretin seems to be the most important mediator of bile- or bile salt-induced water and bicarbonate secretion. In addition, VIP released from peptidergic nerve endings in the pancreas may also be involved in the mediation of the hydrokinetic effect. With regard to water and bicarbonate secretion, cholinergic mechanisms probably are of minor importance. Cholinergic mechanisms, however, seem to be the most important mediator of bile- or bile salt-induced pancreatic enzyme secretion. CCK may act as an additional mediator of the ecbolic effect. This statement, however, is based on few results only and has to be confirmed by further studies. Gastroenteropancreatic peptides with an inhibitory action on the exocrine pancreas were also released by intraduodenal bile or bile salts. Somatostatin is released in physiologically relevant amounts to bring about a counter-regulation. Plasma PP levels are also enhanced by bile and bile salts. The amounts of PP released, however, are below those observed postprandially. In contrast to their stimulatory action on basal pancreatic secretion, bile and bile salts have no or even an inhibitory effect on pancreatic secretion stimulated by intraluminal nutrients. Accordingly, the release of gastroenteropancreatic peptides is not influenced (for example, secretin) or even reduced (for example, CCK) when bile or bile salts are added to intraluminal nutrients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. The mediators of bile action on the exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Riepl, R L; Lehnert, P

    1993-05-01

    Under basal conditions, bile and bile salts applied intraduodenally influence plasma levels of several gastroenteropancreatic peptides. Besides those with stimulatory effects on exocrine pancreatic secretion, others with inhibitory or no effects are released as well. Furthermore, cholinergic and peptidergic neural mechanisms may also be activated. Secretin seems to be the most important mediator of bile- or bile salt-induced water and bicarbonate secretion. In addition, VIP released from peptidergic nerve endings in the pancreas may also be involved in the mediation of the hydrokinetic effect. With regard to water and bicarbonate secretion, cholinergic mechanisms probably are of minor importance. Cholinergic mechanisms, however, seem to be the most important mediator of bile- or bile salt-induced pancreatic enzyme secretion. CCK may act as an additional mediator of the ecbolic effect. This statement, however, is based on few results only and has to be confirmed by further studies. Gastroenteropancreatic peptides with an inhibitory action on the exocrine pancreas were also released by intraduodenal bile or bile salts. Somatostatin is released in physiologically relevant amounts to bring about a counter-regulation. Plasma PP levels are also enhanced by bile and bile salts. The amounts of PP released, however, are below those observed postprandially. In contrast to their stimulatory action on basal pancreatic secretion, bile and bile salts have no or even an inhibitory effect on pancreatic secretion stimulated by intraluminal nutrients. Accordingly, the release of gastroenteropancreatic peptides is not influenced (for example, secretin) or even reduced (for example, CCK) when bile or bile salts are added to intraluminal nutrients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8099758

  4. Effect of the bile-acid sequestrant colestipol on postprandial serum bile-acid concentration: evaluation by bioluminescent enzymic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rossi, S S; Wayne, M L; Smith, R B; Wright, C E; Andreadis, N A; Hofmann, A F

    1989-02-01

    Chronic ingestion of bile-acid sequestrants has been shown to decrease the serum cholesterol concentration and coronary events in hypercholesterolaemic patients. To develop improved sequestrants, a rapid, convenient method for testing the bile-acid binding efficacy of sequestrants is needed. Serum bile-acid concentrations could be used to detect bile-acid binding by an administered sequestrant, since the serum bile-acid concentration is determined largely by the rate of intestinal absorption in healthy individuals. To test this, serum bile-acid concentrations were measured at frequent intervals over 24 h in five otherwise healthy hypercholesterolaemic subjects during the ingestion of three standard meals, with or without the addition of 5 g colestipol granules administered 30 min before each meal. Total serum bile-acid concentration was measured with a previously reported bioluminescent enzymic assay, that uses a 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, an oxido-reductase, and a bacterial luciferase co-immobilized on to Sepharose beads. Bile acids in 1 ml of serum were isolated by solid-phase extraction chromatography with reversed-phase C18 cartridges. Colestipol lowered the postprandial elevation of serum bile acids by one half, with a subsequent decrease in the cumulative area under the curve. The data suggest that measurement of serum bile-acid concentrations by bioluminescence is a rapid, simple way to document the efficacy of bile-acid sequestrants.

  5. Sex differences in the bile acid composition of human bile: Studies in patients with and without gallstones

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, M. M.; Yousef, I. M.

    1973-01-01

    The bile acid composition of human gallbladder bile was studied in 83 subjects, 20 of each sex without discernible hepatobiliary disease, and 20 men and 23 women with cholelithiasis. The bile acids were measured by combined thin-layer and gas-liquid chromatography. In the bile of patients without cholelithiasis the molar percent of cholic acid was significantly greater in men while that of chenodeoxycholic acid was significantly greater in women. In the bile of patients with cholelithiasis the concentration of total bile acids was reduced in both sexes but there was no sex difference in the molar percent of any of the bile acids. The molar percent of CDCA (both glycine and taurine conjugates) was reduced in women, while the molar percent of CA (only the glycine conjugate) was reduced in men. PMID:4728947

  6. Bile salt-membrane interactions and the physico-chemical mechanisms of bile salt toxicity.

    PubMed

    Heuman, D M

    1995-09-01

    We present evidence that ursodeoxycholate prevents toxicity of more hydrophobic bile salts by inhibiting micellar solubilization of membrane lipids. Using both centrifugal ultrafiltration and gel filtration methods we studied leakage of inulin from vesicles composed of egg phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. We observed that the addition of tauroursodeoxycholate to taurodeoxycholate reduced leakage of inulin from large unilamelar vesicles compared to that seen with taurodeoxycholate alone. This protective effect was observed only at high membrane cholesterol:phospholipid ratios (> or = 0.5). By gel filtration we found that fractional leakage of inulin from vesicles was identical to fractional phospholipid solubilization, indicating that release of inulin from vesicles results from membrane dissolution rather than from increased permeability of otherwise intact membranes. Addition of tauroursodeoxycholate to taurodeoxycholate was found to suppress the dissolution of phospholipid from cholesterol-rich vesicles. Bile salts were found to absorb to vesicles with an affinity proportional to their relative hydrophobicity, as estimated by reverse phase HPLC. Adsorption affinity decreased progressively with increasing membrane cholesterol content. Different bile salts displaced each other from membranes in proportion to their respective binding, affinities. Tauroursodeoxycholate, which absorbed to membranes with low affinity, displaced taurodeoxycholate from vesicles only weakly. Based on these findings we postulate that bile salts may damage the liver through solubilization of canalicular membrane lipids. Ursodeoxycholate may protect the liver by inhibiting dissolution of the cholesterol-rich canalicular membrane by more hydrophobic endogenous bile salts. Biliary secretion of vesicles rich in phosphatidylcholine may buffer the intermicellar concentration of bile acids at levels below those required to disrupt the cholesterol-rich canalicular membrane; thus biliary vesicle

  7. Interaction of Biologically Active Flavins inside Bile Salt Aggregates: Molecular Level Investigation.

    PubMed

    Maity, Banibrata; Ahmed, Sayeed Ashique; Seth, Debabrata

    2016-09-22

    In this work we have studied the photophysics of biologically active flavin molecule lumichrome (LCM) in different bile-salt aggregates. With alteration of the functional groups of the bile salts, the photophysics of confined fluorophore is largely affected and shows difference in their spectral behavior. This study also reveals the selective prototropic species of LCM present in bile salt aggregates. In the presence of the bile salt aggregates, LCM molecule shows excitation and emission wavelength-dependent emission properties, indicating switch over of the structural change of different prototropic form of the LCM molecule. The observation of higher rotational relaxation time in NaDC aggregates compared to NaTC aggregates clearly reflects that NaDC aggregates are more rigid due to its greater hydrophobicity and large in size, which is capable to bind the guest molecule more into their nanoconfined medium. Moreover, due to less acidic nature, NaDC aggregates have more ability to accept hydrogen bond from the LCM molecule and show the selective formation of isoalloxazine N10 anion (A1 monoanionic form) of LCM. PMID:27557394

  8. Observation of the seleno bis-(S-glutathionyl) arsinium anion in rat bile.

    PubMed

    George, Graham N; Gailer, Jürgen; Ponomarenko, Olena; La Porte, Paul F; Strait, Karen; Alauddin, Mohammad; Ahsan, Habibul; Ahmed, Selim; Spallholz, Julian; Pickering, Ingrid J

    2016-05-01

    Certain arsenic and selenium compounds show a remarkable mutual cancelation of toxicities, where a lethal dose of one can be voided by an equimolar and otherwise lethal dose of the other. It is now well established that the molecular basis of this antagonism is the formation and biliary excretion of seleno bis-(S-glutathionyl) arsinium anion [(GS)2AsSe](-). Previous work has definitively demonstrated the presence of [(GS)2AsSe](-) in rabbit bile, but only in the presence of other arsenic and selenium species. Rabbits have a gall bladder, which concentrates bile and lowers its pH; it seems likely that this may be responsible for the breakdown of biliary [(GS)2AsSe](-). Since rats have no gall bladder, the bile proceeds directly through the bile duct from the hepatobiliary tree. In the present work we have shown that the primary product of biliary co-excretion of arsenic and selenium in rats is [(GS)2AsSe](-), with essentially 100% of the arsenic and selenium present as this species. The chemical plausibility of the X-ray absorption spectroscopy-derived structural conclusions of this novel arsenic and selenium co-excretion product is supported by density functional theory calculations. These results establish the biomolecular basis to further explore the use of selenium dietary supplements as a possible palliative for chronic low-level arsenic poisoning of human populations. PMID:26883676

  9. [Neuroma of the common bile duct].

    PubMed

    Saint-Paul, M C; Benchimol, D; Dumas, R; Michiels, J F; Hofman, P; van den Broucke, X; Richelme, H; Fuzibet, J; Loubière, R

    1993-01-01

    After a surgical operation on the biliary tract, stenoses can occur, most of the time due to fibrotic lesions, and more rarely due to granulomas or traumatic neuromas. The latter generally develop on the cystic stump after a cholecystectomy. The occurrence of a traumatic neuroma on the common bile duct is much more rarely described. We report the case of a 64 year-old man presenting, four years after a surgical removal of the gallbladder, with a cholangitis, due to neuroma located on the choledochus. He was treated by surgical resection of the common bile-duct at the site of the stenotic zone, and choledocojejunal anastomosis; post-operative course was satisfactory.

  10. Colesevelam: a new bile acid sequestrant.

    PubMed

    Wong, N N

    2001-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the most prevalent form of cardiovascular disease in the United States. Hyperlipidemia--specifically, increased total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels--positively correlates with the development of coronary heart disease. Colesevelam, a nonabsorbed, water-insoluble polymer, is a new bile acid sequestrant that is effective in lowering total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. In several short-term, placebo-controlled studies, colesevelam has decreased total cholesterol levels by approximately 6 to 10% and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels by approximately 9 to 20%. When given in combination with atorvastatin, lovastatin, or simvastatin, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were decreased more than with colesevelam alone. Its unique hydrogel formulation may also minimize the potential for gastrointestinal adverse effects, which are common with other bile acid sequestrants. There have been few published studies available concerning this drug; no long-term studies and few large-scale studies have been published.

  11. Bile tract adenomyoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Gui-Ming; Wang, Yi-Jun; Du, Zhi; Li, Dong-Yan; Liu, Chang-Li

    2008-01-01

    This paper described a rare case of adenomyoma of common bile duct. The case is a 51-year-old man who was hospitalized for yellow color skin and sclera and itching for 2 mo without abdominal pain. Nothing special was found in physical examination except yellowish skin and sclera. The clinical presentation and Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), and ultrasonography suspected a tumor of the distal bile duct. The patient was treated successfully by pancreaticoduodenectomy. Histologically, the lesion consisted of adenoid and myofibrous tissue and moderate atypia. The immunophenotype of the epithelial component was cytokeratin 7+/cytokeratin 20-. The patient has been well without any evidence of recurrence for 12 mo since his operation. PMID:18203305

  12. Advances in understanding of bile acid diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids (BA) are actively reabsorbed in the terminal ileum by the apical Na+-dependent bile salt transporter. This review addresses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of BA diarrhea (BAD). BAD is typically caused by ileal resection or disease; 25–33% of patients with chronic functional diarrhea or irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea (IBS-D) have BAD, possibly from deficiency in the ileal hormone, FGF-19, which normally provides feedback inhibition of BA synthesis. Diagnosis of BAD is typically based on reduced BA retention of radiolabeled BA (75SeHCAT), increased BA synthesis (serum C4) or increased fecal BA loss. In clinical practice, diagnosis is often based on response to BA sequestrants (e.g., cholestyramine or colesevelam). Diagnostic tests for BA malabsorption (BAM) need to be used more extensively in clinical practice. In the future, farnesoid X receptor agonists that stimulate ileal production of FGF-19 may be alternative treatments of BAD. PMID:24410472

  13. Functional genomic analysis of bile salt resistance in Enterococcus faecium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterococcus faecium is a Gram-positive commensal bacterium of the mammalian intestinal tract. In the last two decades it has also emerged as a multi-resistant nosocomial pathogen. In order to survive in and colonize the human intestinal tract E. faecium must resist the deleterious actions of bile. The molecular mechanisms exploited by this bacterium to tolerate bile are as yet unexplored. Results In this study we used a high-throughput quantitative screening approach of transposon mutant library, termed Microarray-based Transposon Mapping (M-TraM), to identify the genetic determinants required for resistance to bile salts in E. faecium E1162. The gene gltK, which is predicted to encode a glutamate/aspartate transport system permease protein, was identified by M-TraM to be involved in bile resistance. The role of GltK in bile salt resistance was confirmed by the subsequent observation that the deletion of gltK significantly sensitized E. faecium E1162 to bile salts. To further characterize the response of E. faecium E1162 to bile salts, we performed a transcriptome analysis to identify genes that are regulated by exposure to 0.02% bile salts. Exposure to bile salts resulted in major transcriptional rearrangements, predominantly in genes involved in carbohydrate, nucleotide and coenzyme transport and metabolism. Conclusion These findings add to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which E. faecium responds and resists the antimicrobial action of bile salts. PMID:23641968

  14. Bear bile: dilemma of traditional medicinal use and animal protection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yibin; Siu, Kayu; Wang, Ning; Ng, Kwan-Ming; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Nagamatsu, Tadashi; Tong, Yao

    2009-01-01

    Bear bile has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for thousands of years. Modern investigations showed that it has a wide range of pharmacological actions with little toxicological side effect and the pure compounds have been used for curing hepatic and biliary disorders for decades. However, extensive consumption of bear bile made bears endangered species. In the 1980's, bear farming was established in China to extract bear bile from living bears with "Free-dripping Fistula Technique". Bear farming is extremely inhumane and many bears died of illness such as chronic infections and liver cancer. Efforts are now given by non-governmental organizations, mass media and Chinese government to end bear farming ultimately. At the same time, systematic research has to be done to find an alternative for bear bile. In this review, we focused on the literature, laboratory and clinical results related to bear bile and its substitutes or alternative in English and Chinese databases. We examined the substitutes or alternative of bear bile from three aspects: pure compounds derived from bear bile, biles from other animals and herbs from TCM. We then discussed the strategy for stopping the trading of bear bile and issues of bear bile related to potential alternative candidates, existing problems in alternative research and work to be done in the future. PMID:19138420

  15. Treatment of Bile Acid Amidation Defects with Glycocholic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Heubi, James E.; Setchell, Kenneth D.R.; Jha, Pinky; Buckley, Donna; Zhang, Wujuan; Rosenthal, Philip; Potter, Carol; Horslen, Simon; Suskind, David

    2014-01-01

    Bile acid amidation defects were predicted to present with fat/fat soluble vitamin malabsorption with minimal cholestasis. We identified and treated 5 patients (1 male/4 females) from 4 families with defective bile acid amidation due to a genetically confirmed deficiency in bile acid CoA:amino acid N-acyl transferase (BAAT) with the conjugated bile acid, glycocholic acid (GCA). Fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry analysis of urine and bile at baseline revealed predominantly unconjugated cholic acid and absence of the usual glycine and taurine conjugated primary bile acids. Treatment with 15 mg/kg GCA resulted in total duodenal bile acid concentrations of 23.3 ± 19.1 mmol/L (mean ± SD) and 63.5 ± 4.0% of the bile acids were secreted in bile in the conjugated form of which GCA represented 59.6 ± 9.3% of the total biliary bile acids. Unconjugated cholic acid continued to be present in high concentrations in bile because of partial intestinal deconjugation of orally administered GCA. Serum total bile acid concentrations did not significantly differ between pretreatment and post-treatment samples and serum contained predominantly unconjugated cholic acid. These findings confirmed efficient intestinal absorption, hepatic extraction and biliary secretion of the administered GCA. Oral tolerance tests for vitamin D2 (1000 IU vitamin D2/kg) and tocopherol (100 IU/kg tocopherol acetate) demonstrated improvement in fat-soluble vitamin absorption after GCA treatment. Growth improved in 3/3 growth-delayed prepubertal patients. Conclusions: Oral glycocholic acid therapy is safe and effective in improving growth and fat-soluble vitamin absorption in children and adolescents with inborn errors of bile acid metabolism due to amidation defects. PMID:25163551

  16. [Ultrasound of gallbladder and bile duct].

    PubMed

    Segura Grau, A; Joleini, S; Díaz Rodríguez, N; Segura Cabral, J M

    2016-01-01

    The cystic nature of the gallbladder and bile duct when dilated, and the advantages of ultrasound as a quick, reproducible, convenient, cheap and low risk technique, with a high sensitivity and specificity, make it the most eligible technique in biliary pathology studies. Ultrasound has become a valuable tool for doctors studying biliary pathology and its complications, from abnormal liver function results, right upper quadrant pain, or jaundice, to cholelithiasis, cholecystitis, or suspicion of biliary tumors.

  17. [The photometric determination of total bile protein].

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, V P; Savel'ev, V G

    1989-01-01

    Studies of bilirubin absorption spectra by protein measurements with the use of the biuret test and Lowry's method have shown that bilirubin influences much the protein absorption spectrum, provoking higher results in examinations of the bile. To eliminate bilirubin effects, the authors recommend bilirubin extraction with ethyl-acetone mixture in a 1:1 ratio after protein sedimentation with trichloroacetic acid. The biuret test with bilirubin-free protein yields results compatible with those obtained by nonphotometric techniques not involving bilirubin effects.

  18. Application of palladium-catalyzed carboxyl anhydride-boronic acid cross coupling in the synthesis of novel bile acids analogs with modified side chains.

    PubMed

    Mayorquín-Torres, Martha C; Flores-Álamo, Marcos; Iglesias-Arteaga, Martin A

    2015-09-01

    Palladium-catalyzed cross coupling of 4-methoxycarbonyl phenyboronic acid with acetylated bile acids in which the carboxyl functions was activated by formation of a mixed anhydride with pivalic anhydride afforded the cross coupled compounds, which were converted in novel side chain modified bile acids by one pot carbonyl reduction/removal of the protecting acetyl groups by Wolff-Kishner reduction. Unambiguous assignments of the NMR signals and crystal characterization of the heretofore unknown compounds are provided.

  19. Diagnosis of bile duct cancer by bile cytology: usefulness of post-brushing biliary lavage fluid

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Hirokazu; Sasaki, Keiko; Nagata, Kaori; Ohno, Sachiyo; Uesaka, Katsuhiko; Mori, Keita; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Takizawa, Kohei; Kakushima, Naomi; Tanaka, Masaki; Kawata, Noboru; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pathologic evidence of biliary diseases can be obtained from cytology in addition to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP); however, the diagnostic effectiveness is not satisfactory. Study aim: This retrospective, single-center study evaluated the efficacy of various sampling methods for the cytologic diagnosis of bile duct cancer. Patients and methods: Biliary samples included bile that was simply aspirated, brush smear, brush-rinsed saline, and post-brushing biliary lavage fluid. A set of samples was compared for cytologic efficacy in 76 patients with surgically proven bile duct cancer and in 50 patients with benign biliary stricture. Results: The cytologic sensitivity for diagnosing biliary cancer was 34 % with aspirated bile, 32 % with brush smear, 43 % with brush-rinsed saline, and 70 % with post-brushing biliary lavage fluid, in contrast to the null false-positive result in the benign cases. The sensitivity of cytology was significantly higher with post-brushing lavage fluid than with the other three sampling methods (P < 0.0001), and post-brushing lavage fluid improved the cumulative sensitivity by 24 % (P = 0.002). The sensitivity of biliary cytology was also associated with the amount of aspirated bile (P = 0.01) and with the aspiration site (P = 0.03). The rate of cancer positivity in a cytology set differed according to the tumor macroscopic type (85 % in the protruding type vs. 40 % in the flat type; P = 0.003), and according to the size of the cancer (87 % for tumors ≥ 50 mm vs. 66 % for tumors < 50 mm; P = 0.02). Conclusions: Post-brushing biliary lavage fluid cytology provides superior diagnostic efficacy, and its addition to ERCP procedures is recommended for obtaining cytologic evidence of bile duct cancer. PMID:26357678

  20. In vivo multiphoton imaging of bile duct ligation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Feng-Chieh; Chen, Hsiao-Chin; Chang, Po-shou; Yang, Shu-Mei; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    Bile is the exocrine secretion of liver and synthesized by hepatocytes. It is drained into duodenum for the function of digestion or drained into gallbladder for of storage. Bile duct obstruction is a blockage in the tubes that carry bile to the gallbladder and small intestine. However, Bile duct ligation results in the changes of bile acids in serum, liver, urine, and feces1, 2. In this work, we demonstrate a novel technique to image this pathological condition by using a newly developed in vivo imaging system, which includes multiphoton microscopy and intravital hepatic imaging chamber. The images we acquired demonstrate the uptake, processing of 6-CFDA in hepatocytes and excretion of CF in the bile canaliculi. In addition to imaging, we can also measure kinetics of the green fluorescence intensity.

  1. Microstructural evolution of lipid aggregates in nucleating model and human biles visualized by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Konikoff, F M; Danino, D; Weihs, D; Rubin, M; Talmon, Y

    2000-02-01

    Obtaining reliable information on the physical state and ultrastructure of bile is difficult because of its mixed aqueous-lipid composition and thermodynamic metastability. We have used time-lapse cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) combined with video-enhanced light microscopy (VELM) to study microstructural evolution in nucleating bile. A well-characterized model bile and gallbladder biles from cholesterol and pigment gallstone patients were studied sequentially during cholesterol nucleation and precipitation. In model bile, cholesterol crystallization was preceded by the appearance of the following distinct microstructures: spheroidal micelles (3-5 nm), discoidal membrane patches (50-150 nm) often in multiple layers (2-10), discs (50-100 nm), and unilamellar (50-200 nm) and larger multilamellar vesicles (MLVs). The membrane patches and discs appeared to be short-lived intermediates in a micelle-to-vesicle transition. Vesicular structures formed by growth and closure of patches as well as by budding off from vesicles with fewer bilayers. MLVs became more abundant, uniform, and concentric as a function of time. In native bile, all the above microstructures, except discoidal membrane patches, were observed. However, native MLVs were more uniform and concentric from the beginning. When cholesterol crystals appeared by light microscopy, MLVs were always detected by cryo-TEM. Edges of early cholesterol crystals were lined up with micelles and MLVs in a way suggesting an active role in feeding crystal growth from these microstructures. These findings, for the first time documented by cryo-TEM in human bile, provide a microstructural framework that can serve as a basis for investigation of specific factors that influence biliary cholesterol nucleation and crystal formation.

  2. Receptor-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein stimulates bile acid synthesis by cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Junker, L.H.; Davis, R.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the lipoprotein-mediated stimulation of bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. Adding 280 micrograms/ml of cholesterol in the form of human or rat low density lipoprotein (LDL) to the culture medium increased bile acid synthesis by 1.8- and 1.6-fold, respectively. As a result of the uptake of LDL, the synthesis of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate was decreased and cellular cholesteryl ester mass was increased. Further studies demonstrated that rat apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich high density lipoprotein (HDL) both stimulated bile acid synthesis 1.5-fold, as well as inhibited the formation of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate. Reductive methylation of LDL blocked the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, as well as the stimulation of bile acid synthesis, suggesting that these processes require receptor-mediated uptake. To identify the receptors responsible, competitive binding studies using 125I-labeled apoE-free LDL and 125I-labeled apoE-rich HDL were performed. Both apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL displayed an equal ability to compete for binding of the other, suggesting that a receptor or a group of receptors that recognizes both apolipoproteins is involved. Additional studies show that hepatocytes from cholestyramine-treated rats displayed 2.2- and 3.4-fold increases in the binding of apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL, respectively. These data show for the first time that receptor-mediated uptake of LDL by the liver is intimately linked to processes activating bile acid synthesis.

  3. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B.; Renaud, Helen J.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin + imipenem and cephalothin + neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vancomycin + imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin + neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism. - Highlights: • Various antibiotics have different effects on intestinal bacteria. • Antibiotics alter bile acid composition in mouse liver and intestine. • Antibiotics influence genes involved in bile acid homeostasis. • Clostridia appear to be important for secondary bile acid formation.

  4. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes. PMID:19754879

  5. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes.

  6. Bile Nephropathy in Flucloxacillin-Induced Cholestatic Liver Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Collins, John F.; Zwi, L. Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney injury in the context of cholestatic liver dysfunction is not uncommon; this has been historically referred to as cholemic nephrosis implying a direct deleterious renal effect of cholemia. However, scepticism about the exact role that bile and its constituents play in this injury has led to the disappearance of the term. We describe a case of severe AKI due to bile nephropathy with bile casts in flucloxacillin-induced liver dysfunction. We also discuss the recent literature reviving the concept of bile nephropathy. PMID:27006842

  7. The sodium bile salt cotransport family SLC10.

    PubMed

    Hagenbuch, Bruno; Dawson, Paul

    2004-02-01

    The SLC10 family of sodium/bile salt cotransporters contains over 50 members in animal, plant and bacterial species. In man, two well-characterized members and three orphan transporters are known. The Na(+)/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP; SLC10A1) and the apical sodium-dependent bile salt transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) are critical components of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts. NTCP and ASBT are cotransporters that mediate sodium-dependent, electrogenic uptake of mainly bile salts into hepatocytes (NTCP), biliary epithelial cells, ileal enterocytes and renal proximal tubular cells (ASBT).

  8. Physical activity as a determinant of fecal bile acid levels

    PubMed Central

    Wertheim, Betsy C.; Martínez, María Elena; Ashbeck, Erin L.; Roe, Denise J.; Jacobs, Elizabeth T.; Alberts, David S.; Thompson, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity is protective against colon cancer, whereas colonic bile acid exposure is a suspected risk factor. While likely related, the association between physical activity and bile acid levels has not been well studied. Furthermore, the effect of triglycerides, which are known to modify bile acid levels, on this relationship has not been investigated. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of baseline fecal bile acid levels for 735 colorectal adenoma formers obtained from participants in a phase III ursodeoxycholic acid chemoprevention trial. Compared to the lowest quartile of recreational physical activity duration, the highest quartile was associated with a 17% lower fecal bile acid concentration, adjusted for age, sex, dietary fiber intake, and body mass index (P = 0.042). Furthermore, consistent with a previously established relationship between serum triglyceride levels and bile acid metabolism, we stratified by triglyceride level and observed a 34% lower fecal bile acid concentration (highest versus lowest quartiles of physical activity) in individuals with low triglycerides (< 136 mg/dL; P = 0.002). In contrast, no association between physical activity and fecal bile acid concentration was observed for subjects with high triglycerides (≥ 136 mg/dL). Our results suggest that the biological mechanism responsible for the protective effect of physical activity on the incidence of colon cancer may be partially mediated by decreasing colonic bile acid exposure. However, this effect may be limited to individuals with lower triglyceride levels. PMID:19383885

  9. [Pancreato-biliary maljunctions and congenital cystic dilatation of the bile ducts in adults].

    PubMed

    Kianmanesh, R; Régimbeau, J M; Belghiti, J

    2001-08-01

    Pancreato-biliary maljunctions (PBM) in adults are defined by the presence of an abnormally long common pancreato-biliary duct (more than 15 mm long) formed outside the duodenal wall and/or by high amylase level in the bile. The high amylase level in the bile is the functional expression of a chronic toxic reflux of pancreatic juices into the biliary tree. The presence of the PBM have two basic consequences: (i) formation of congenital cystic dilatations of the bile duct (CCBD) during embryogenesis and (ii) cancerous degeneration of extrahepatic bile ducts including the gall bladder. CCBD are commonly found in Southeast of Asia and in Japan where more than two-thirds of the worldwide cases are reported. Women are more frequently touched. The main manifestations are pain, cholangitis and acute pancreatitis. Cancerous degeneration mainly due to chronic pancreatico-biliary reflux consecutive to the presence of PBM is the most serious complication of CCBD. Its global incidence is about 16% and increases by age and after cysto-digestive derivations widely performed in the past. In 80% of the cases a cholangiocarcinoma involving the extrahepatic portion of the biliary tree including dilated segments such as the gall bladder and/or cystic wall is found. The treatment of choice of most common types of CCBD with PMD is complete excision of most of the sites where cancer may arise and should interrupt the pancreato-biliary reflux. This treatment significantly reduces the incidence of bile duct cancer to 0.7%. However, despite the absence of mortality, the overall morbidity rates reach from 20% to 40%. In the complete excision, the entire common bile duct from porta hepatis to the intrapancreatic portion of the choledochus and the gall bladder are resected. The bile continuity is assured by a hepatico-jejunal Y anastomosis. When there is no CCBD, the high risk of gall bladder cancer in the presence of a PBM justifies by itself a preventive cholecystectomy even if no biliary

  10. 5 beta-hydroxylation by the liver. Identification of 3,5,7-trihydroxy nor-bile acids as new major biotransformation products of 3,7-dihydroxy nor-bile acids in rodents.

    PubMed

    Schteingart, C D; Hagey, L R; Setchell, K D; Hofmann, A F

    1993-05-25

    24-Norursodeoxycholic acid (nor-UDCA), when administered into the anesthetized biliary fistula hamster or injected into the perfusate of an isolated liver, was hydroxylated at C-5 to give 5 beta-hydroxynorursodeoxycholic acid 2 (3 alpha,5,7 beta-trihydroxy-24-nor-5 beta-cholan-23-oic acid), which was secreted into bile mainly as such. Similarly, 24-norchenodeoxycholic acid (nor-CDCA) was 5 beta-hydroxylated to give 5 beta-hydroxynor-chenodeoxycholic acid 4 (3 alpha,5,7 alpha-trihydroxy-24-nor-5 beta-cholan-23-oic acid), which was also secreted into bile without appreciable further biotransformation. The site of hydroxylation was assigned by 13C and 1H NMR and mass spectrometry. 5-Hydroxylation was a major biotransformation pathway at physiological bile acid loads. 5-Hydroxylation of UDCA also occurred in the perfused rat liver but to a lesser extent. 5-Hydroxylation of nor-UDCA was not observed in rabbit, dog, or man, indicating that its formation is species-specific. 5-Hydroxylation of nor-CDCA and nor-UDCA is the first reported example of hydroxylation of a tertiary carbon atom of bile acids. Nor-dihydroxy bile acids appear to be useful for the detection of minor hydroxylation pathways, because their prolonged hepatobiliary retention exposes them repeatedly to hydroxylases present in the hepatobiliary system.

  11. Prevention of taurolithocholate-induced hepatic bile canalicular distortions by HPLC-characterized extracts of artichoke (Cynara scolymus) leaves.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, R

    2002-09-01

    The effects of water-soluble extracts of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) leaves on taurolithocholate-induced cholestatic bile canalicular membrane distortions were studied in primary cultured rat hepatocytes using electron microscopy. Artichoke extracts at concentrations between 0.08 and 0.5 mg/ml were able to prevent the formation of bizarre canalicular membrane transformations in a dose-dependent manner when added simultaneously with the bile acid. However, prevention also occurred when the hepatocytes were preincubated with the extracts, indicating that absorption of the bile acid to components of the extracts was not involved. These results demonstrate that artichoke leaf extracts exert a potent anticholestatic action at least in the case of taurolithocholate. This effect may contribute to the overall hepatoprotective influence of this herbal formulation.

  12. Total protein output during rapid reduction of bile salt secretion rates in man.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, P R; Toth, J L; Upadhya, G A; Ilson, R G; Strasberg, S M

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to study the effect of bile salt secretion on total biliary protein secretion in man. Bile was collected in eight patients from a tube in the bile duct. Collection was started after a meal and continued for six hours, in order to obtain bile salt secretion rates over the entire physiological range. Total protein secretion rates did not vary with change in bile salt secretion or bile flow. The protein pattern assessed by SDS-PAGE did not vary with bile salt secretion. The results indicate that bile salt secretion has little influence on biliary protein secretion under these conditions in man. Changes in bile salt secretion were associated with linear change in bile flow, but there was no relationship between bile flow and protein secretion rates. This argues against convective sieving of plasma proteins into bile. Images Fig. 4 PMID:2920916

  13. Determination of conjugated bile acids in human bile and duodenal fluid by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bloch, C A; Watkins, J B

    1978-05-01

    A simple mehtod using reverse-phase liquid chromatography is presented for resolution and quantitation of the major conjugated bile acids of man, including the glycine and taurine conjugates of the dihydroxy bile acids, chenodeoxycholic and deoxycholic acid. Using modern, high-performance chromatographic equipment, analysis time is less than 30 minutes. The quantitative range of the method, with detection by refractive index, is 0.05 to 0.1 mumol of bile acid and the limit of detection for an injection sample is 0.01 mumol. This provides a sensitivity sufficient for analysis of dilute duodenal and gallbladder bile with minimal sample preparation.

  14. Predicting Infected Bile Among Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Cholecystostomy

    SciTech Connect

    Beardsley, Shannon L.; Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D.; Patel, Aalpen; Freiman, David B.; Soulen, Michael C.; Stavropoulos, S. William; Clark, Timothy W.I.

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. Patients may not achieve a clinical benefit after percutaneous cholecystostomy due to the inherent difficulty in identifying patients who truly have infected gallbladders. We attempted to identify imaging and biochemical parameters which would help to predict which patients have infected gallbladders. Methods. A retrospective review was performed of 52 patients undergoing percutaneous cholecystostomy for clinical suspicion of acute cholecystitis in whom bile culture results were available. Multiple imaging and biochemical variables were examined alone and in combination as predictors of infected bile, using logistic regression. Results. Of the 52 patients, 25 (48%) had infected bile. Organisms cultured included Enterococcus, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, E. coli, Citrobacter and Candida. No biochemical parameters were significantly predictive of infected bile; white blood cell count >15,000 was weakly associated with greater odds of infected bile (odds ratio 2.0, p = NS). The presence of gallstones, sludge, gallbladder wall thickening and pericholecystic fluid by ultrasound or CT were not predictive of infected bile, alone or in combination, although a trend was observed among patients with CT findings of acute cholecystitis toward a higher 30-day mortality. Radionuclide scans were performed in 31% of patients; all were positive and 66% of these patients had infected bile. Since no patient who underwent a radionuclide scan had a negative study, this variable could not be entered into the regression model due to collinearity. Conclusion. No single CT or ultrasound imaging variable was predictive of infected bile, and only a weak association of white blood cell count with infected bile was seen. No other biochemical parameters had any association with infected bile. The ability of radionuclide scanning to predict infected bile was higher than that of ultrasound or CT. This study illustrates the continued challenge to identify bacterial cholecystitis

  15. [Degenerated papillomatosis of the bile duct].

    PubMed

    De Castro Gutiérrez, J; Armengol Carrasco, M; Oller Sales, B; Fdez-Llamazares Rodríguez, J; Julián Ibáñez, J F; Broggi Trías, M A; Salvá Lacombe, J A

    1989-07-01

    Papillomatosis of the biliary ducts is exceptional. It is defined by the presence of multiple, benign, papillary type, epithelial tumors on the choledochus and hepatic ducts, and can also effect the gallbladder and intrahepatic bile ducts. It courses with a tendency to recurrence and secondary degeneration, and its prognosis is uncertain and sometimes grave. The treatment is surgical and depends on the extension of the lesions, often being only palliative. The techniques of choice are curettage and biliodigestive derivation. A case is presented of degenerated papillomatosis treated by cephalic duodenopancreatectomy and cholecystectomy.

  16. The Effect of Hydroxyl Moieties and Their Oxosubstitution on Bile Acid Association Studied in Floating Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Szekeres, Márta; Viskolcz, Béla; Poša, Mihalj; Csanádi, János; Škorić, Dušan; Illés, Erzsébet; Tóth, Ildikó Y.; Tombácz, Etelka

    2014-01-01

    Bile salt aggregates are promising candidates for drug delivery vehicles due to their unique fat-solubilizing ability. However, the toxicity of bile salts increases with improving fat-solubilizing capability and so an optimal combination of efficient solubilization and low toxicity is necessary. To improve hydrophilicity (and decrease toxicity), we substituted hydroxyl groups of several natural bile acid (BA) molecules for oxogroups and studied their intrinsic molecular association behavior. Here we present the comparative Langmuir trough study of the two-dimensional (2D) association behavior of eight natural BAs and four oxoderivatives (traditionally called keto-derivatives) floated on an aqueous subphase. The series of BAs and derivatives showed systematic changes in the shape of the compression isotherms. Two types of association could be distinguished: the first transition was assigned to the formation of dimers through H-bonding and the second to the hydrophobic aggregation of BA dimers. Hydrophobic association of BA molecules in the films is linked to the ability of forming H-bonded dimers. Both H-bond formation and hydrophobic association weakened with increasing number of hydroxyl groups, decreasing distance between hydroxyl groups, and increasing oxosubstitution. The results also show that the Langmuir trough method is extremely useful in selecting appropriate BA molecules to design drug delivery systems. PMID:25685831

  17. Properties Related to Bile as Viewed in Makhzan ol-Adviya

    PubMed Central

    Mosaffa-Jahromi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: The human body has simple and compound organs that obtain their nourishment through four humors. One of them is bile (yellow bile). According to Iranian traditional medicine (ITM), there are various kinds of natural medicines with their specific mechanisms of action affecting on bile in the human body. Hakim Aghili Shirazi (18th century), one of the great scholars in ITM field, introduced all types of natural medicines influencing bile in his valuable book written in Persian, “Makhzan-ul-Adwiah”, about single herbal medicines (mofradat). The aim of this review article was to introduce all types of natural medicines influencing bile in the human body. Methods: The classification of natural medicines influencing bile was studied in this article as viewed by Hakim Aghili Shirazi in Makhzan-ul-Adwiah. Results: Reviewing Makhzan-ul-Adwiah, this natural influencing bile is defined in ten categories. These are Haabes-e Safra (obstructive of bile), Daafe-e Safra (expellant of bile), Raafe-e Safra (resolver of bile), Ghaate-e Safra (stopper of bile), Ghaame-e Safra (suppressant of bile), Kaasere-e Safra (fractionating of bile), Mohregh-e Safra (burner of bile), Moder-e Safra (bile diuretic), Mosaken-e Safra (bile reliever), and Mos’hel-e Safra (bile laxative). Conclusion: Each group has a specific function and mechanism on bile. Recognition of the precise mechanisms of these natural medicines is necessary to prescribe a suitable remedy for bilious diseases by traditional medicine specialists. PMID:27516682

  18. Apparent selective bile acid malabsorption as a consequence of ileal exclusion: effects on bile acid, cholesterol, and lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Akerlund, J E; Björkhem, I; Angelin, B; Liljeqvist, L; Einarsson, K

    1994-01-01

    A new model has been developed to characterise the effect of a standardised ileal exclusion on bile acid, cholesterol, and lipoprotein metabolism in humans. Twelve patients treated by colectomy and ileostomy for ulcerative colitis were studied on two occasions: firstly with a conventional ileostomy and then three months afterwards with an ileal pouch operation with an ileoanal anastomosis and a protective loop ileostomy, excluding on average 95 cm of the distal ileum. The ileostomy contents were collected during 96 hours and the excretion of bile acids and cholesterol was determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fasting blood and duodenal bile samples were collected on two consecutive days. After the exclusion of the distal ileum, both cholic and chenodeoxycholic acid excretion in the ileostomy effluent increased four to five times without any change in cholesterol excretion. Serum concentrations of lathosterol (a marker of cholesterol biosynthesis) and 7 alpha-hydroxycholesterol (a marker for bile acid biosynthesis) were increased several fold. Plasma concentrations of total VLDL triglycerides were also increased whereas the concentrations of total and LDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B were decreased. There were no changes in biliary lipid composition or cholesterol saturation of bile. The results show that the exclusion of about 95 cm of distal ileum causes malabsorption of bile acids but apparently not of cholesterol. The bile acid malabsorption leads to increased synthesis of both bile acids and cholesterol in the liver. It is suggested that bile acids can regulate cholesterol synthesis by a mechanism independent of the effect of bile acids on cholesterol absorption. The enhanced demand for cholesterol also leads to a decrease in plasma LDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein B concentrations. The malabsorption of bile acids did not affect biliary lipid composition or cholesterol saturations of VLDL triglycerides. PMID:7926917

  19. State of the art in bile analysis in forensic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Bévalot, F; Cartiser, N; Bottinelli, C; Guitton, J; Fanton, L

    2016-02-01

    In forensic toxicology, alternative matrices to blood are useful in case of limited, unavailable or unusable blood sample, suspected postmortem redistribution or long drug intake-to-sampling interval. The present article provides an update on the state of knowledge for the use of bile in forensic toxicology, through a review of the Medline literature from 1970 to May 2015. Bile physiology and technical aspects of analysis (sampling, storage, sample preparation and analytical methods) are reported, to highlight specificities and consequences from an analytical and interpretative point of view. A table summarizes cause of death and quantification in bile and blood of 133 compounds from more than 200 case reports, providing a useful tool for forensic physicians and toxicologists involved in interpreting bile analysis. Qualitative and quantitative interpretation is discussed. As bile/blood concentration ratios are high for numerous molecules or metabolites, bile is a matrix of choice for screening when blood concentrations are low or non-detectable: e.g., cases of weak exposure or long intake-to-death interval. Quantitative applications have been little investigated, but small molecules with low bile/blood concentration ratios seem to be good candidates for quantitative bile-based interpretation. Further experimental data on the mechanism and properties of biliary extraction of xenobiotics of forensic interest are required to improve quantitative interpretation.

  20. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of problem bile duct calculi].

    PubMed

    Jakobeit, C; Greiner, L

    1993-02-01

    ESWL is a new gentle, very effective, poor-risk technique in treatment of extrahepatic problematic bile-duct stones. This method might substitute surgical choledochotomy to a great extent. ESWL is a new therapeutic alternative to achieve nonoperative freedom of stones or, at least, to treat biliary obstruction in intrahepatic bile-duct stones, which are not treatable by endoscopic operative methods.

  1. Isolation and characterization of chicken bile matrix metalloproteinase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian bile is rich in matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), the enzymes that cleave extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as collagens and proteoglycans. Changes in bile MMP expression have been correlated with hepatic and gall bladder pathologies but the significance of their expression in normal, he...

  2. Chicken bile Matrix metalloproteinase; its characterization and significance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies from our lab had shown that the avian bile was rich in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), enzymes implicated in the degradation of extracellular matrices (ECM) such as collagens and proteoglycans. We hypothesized that bile MMP may be evolutionarily associated with the digestion of ECM ...

  3. Bile signalling promotes chronic respiratory infections and antibiotic tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Reen, F. Jerry; Flynn, Stephanie; Woods, David F.; Dunphy, Niall; Chróinín, Muireann Ní; Mullane, David; Stick, Stephen; Adams, Claire; O’Gara, Fergal

    2016-01-01

    Despite aggressive antimicrobial therapy, many respiratory pathogens persist in the lung, underpinning the chronic inflammation and eventual lung decline that are characteristic of respiratory disease. Recently, bile acid aspiration has emerged as a major comorbidity associated with a range of lung diseases, shaping the lung microbiome and promoting colonisation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. In order to uncover the molecular mechanism through which bile modulates the respiratory microbiome, a combination of global transcriptomic and phenotypic analyses of the P. aeruginosa response to bile was undertaken. Bile responsive pathways responsible for virulence, adaptive metabolism, and redox control were identified, with macrolide and polymyxin antibiotic tolerance increased significantly in the presence of bile. Bile acids, and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) in particular, elicited chronic biofilm behaviour in P. aeruginosa, while induction of the pro-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin-6 (IL-6) in lung epithelial cells by CDCA was Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) dependent. Microbiome analysis of paediatric CF sputum samples demonstrated increased colonisation by P. aeruginosa and other Proteobacterial pathogens in bile aspirating compared to non-aspirating patients. Together, these data suggest that bile acid signalling is a leading trigger for the development of chronic phenotypes underlying the pathophysiology of chronic respiratory disease. PMID:27432520

  4. State of the art in bile analysis in forensic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Bévalot, F; Cartiser, N; Bottinelli, C; Guitton, J; Fanton, L

    2016-02-01

    In forensic toxicology, alternative matrices to blood are useful in case of limited, unavailable or unusable blood sample, suspected postmortem redistribution or long drug intake-to-sampling interval. The present article provides an update on the state of knowledge for the use of bile in forensic toxicology, through a review of the Medline literature from 1970 to May 2015. Bile physiology and technical aspects of analysis (sampling, storage, sample preparation and analytical methods) are reported, to highlight specificities and consequences from an analytical and interpretative point of view. A table summarizes cause of death and quantification in bile and blood of 133 compounds from more than 200 case reports, providing a useful tool for forensic physicians and toxicologists involved in interpreting bile analysis. Qualitative and quantitative interpretation is discussed. As bile/blood concentration ratios are high for numerous molecules or metabolites, bile is a matrix of choice for screening when blood concentrations are low or non-detectable: e.g., cases of weak exposure or long intake-to-death interval. Quantitative applications have been little investigated, but small molecules with low bile/blood concentration ratios seem to be good candidates for quantitative bile-based interpretation. Further experimental data on the mechanism and properties of biliary extraction of xenobiotics of forensic interest are required to improve quantitative interpretation. PMID:26773224

  5. Scissionable bile acid nanostructures for lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meagley, Robert P.; Sharma, Geeta; Guptab, Ankur

    2007-03-01

    Pixelated photoresists, i.e. resists that compartmentalize photochemistry into discrete imaging elements are an emerging design for improved resolution. A pixelated design seeks to overcome chaotic organization in complex resist formulations through application of small regular or symmetric imaging species, and/or through the application of preorganization of resist components. [1] Another approach, backbone scission, has also emerged as a powerful method to improve resist performance. [2] In this approach, the parts of the resist structure that have undergone radiation driven chemistry are disconnected from the unaffected material. This enhances contrast and also confers an additional mechanism: structural disruption. Bile acids have been used recently as building blocks to enable host-guest chemistry [3] and have been incorporated as additives in photoresists [4] and structural elements [5]. They as a class are fairly large (mw ~400) highly functionalized molecules possessing a hydrophobic face, alcohol groups and a carboxylic acid group. We describe here a scissionable pixelated resist architecture based on bile acids bound by acid-sensitive tertiary ester linkages into dendrimeric arrays. This design seeks to employ structural disintegration and catalyst pre-organization in addition to solubility switching as contrast mechanisms. Preliminary EUV and ebeam studies have shown G0 and G1 materials capable of sub-micron imaging.

  6. Classification and management of bile duct injuries.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Miguel Angel; Domínguez, Ismael

    2011-04-27

    To review the classification and general guidelines for treatment of bile duct injury patients and their long term results. In a 20-year period, 510 complex circumferential injuries have been referred to our team for repair at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición "Salvador Zubirán" hospital in Mexico City and 198 elsewhere (private practice). The records at the third level Academic University Hospital were analyzed and divided into three periods of time: GI-1990-99 (33 cases), GII- 2000-2004 (139 cases) and GIII- 2004-2008 (140 cases). All patients were treated with a Roux en Y hepatojejunostomy. A decrease in using transanastomotic stents was observed (78% vs 2%, P = 0.0001). Partial segment IV and V resection was more frequently carried out (45% vs 75%, P = 0.2) (to obtain a high bilioenteric anastomosis). Operative mortality (3% vs 0.7%, P = 0.09), postoperative cholangitis (54% vs 13%, P = 0.0001), anastomosis strictures (30% vs 5%, P = 0.0001), short and long term complications and need for reoperation (surgical or radiological) (45% vs 11%, P = 0.0001) were significantly less in the last period. The authors concluded that transition to a high volume center has improved long term results for bile duct injury repair. Even interested and tertiary care centers have a learning curve.

  7. Bile Acid Diarrhea: Prevalence, Pathogenesis, and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Bile acid diarrhea (BAD) is usually seen in patients with ileal Crohn’s disease or ileal resection. However, 25% to 50% of patients with functional diarrhea or diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) also have evidence of BAD. It is estimated that 1% of the population may have BAD. The causes of BAD include a deficiency in fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF-19), a hormone produced in enterocytes that regulates hepatic bile acid (BA) synthesis. Other potential causes include genetic variations that affect the proteins involved in BA enterohepatic circulation and synthesis or in the TGR5 receptor that mediates the actions of BA in colonic secretion and motility. BAs enhance mucosal permeability, induce water and electrolyte secretion, and accelerate colonic transit partly by stimulating propulsive high-amplitude colonic contractions. There is an increased proportion of primary BAs in the stool of patients with IBS-D, and some changes in the fecal microbiome have been described. There are several methods of diagnosing BAD, such as 75selenium homotaurocholic acid test retention, serum C4, FGF-19, and fecal BA measurement; presently, therapeutic trials with BA sequestrants are most commonly used for diagnosis. Management involves the use of BA sequestrants including cholestyramine, colestipol, and colesevelam. FXR agonists such as obeticholic acid constitute a promising new approach to treating BAD. PMID:25918262

  8. Impaired Bile Acid Homeostasis in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Voskuijl, Wieger; Mouzaki, Marialena; Groen, Albert K.; Alexander, Jennifer; Bourdon, Celine; Wang, Alice; Versloot, Christian J.; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Bandsma, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objective Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is a major cause of mortality in children under 5 years and is associated with hepatic steatosis. Bile acids are synthesized in the liver and participate in dietary fat digestion, regulation of energy expenditure, and immune responses. The aim of this work was to investigate whether SAM is associated with clinically relevant changes in bile acid homeostasis. Design An initial discovery cohort with 5 healthy controls and 22 SAM-patients was used to identify altered bile acid homeostasis. A follow up cohort of 40 SAM-patients were then studied on admission and 3 days after clinical stabilization to assess recovery in bile acid metabolism. Recruited children were 6–60 months old and admitted for SAM in Malawi. Clinical characteristics, feces and blood were collected on admission and prior to discharge. Bile acids, 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and FGF-19 were quantified. Results On admission, total serum bile acids were higher in children with SAM than in healthy controls and glycine-conjugates accounted for most of this accumulation with median and interquartile range (IQR) of 24.6 μmol/L [8.6–47.7] compared to 1.9 μmol/L [1.7–3.3] (p = 0.01) in controls. Total serum bile acid concentrations did not decrease prior to discharge. On admission, fecal conjugated bile acids were lower and secondary bile acids higher at admission compared to pre- discharge, suggesting increased bacterial conversion. FGF19 (Fibroblast growth factor 19), a marker of intestinal bile acid signaling, was higher on admission and was associated with decreased C4 concentrations as a marker of bile acid synthesis. Upon recovery, fecal calprotectin, a marker of intestinal inflammation, was lower. Conclusion SAM is associated with increased serum bile acid levels despite reduced synthesis rates. In SAM, there tends to be increased deconjugation of bile acids and conversion from primary to secondary bile acids, which may contribute to the

  9. Congenital web of the common bile duct in association with cholelithiasis.

    PubMed

    Papaziogas, Basilios; Lazaridis, Charalampos; Pavlidis, Theodoros; Galanis, Ioannis; Paraskevas, George; Papaziogas, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Congenital web formations are extremely rare anomalies of the extrahepatic biliary tree. The age at presentation and the clinical symptomatology of these anomalies depend on the grade of the biliary obstruction. We report a case of a common bile duct septum in association with cholelithiasis in a 30-year-old woman. The diagnosis was made on preoperative magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and confirmed with intraoperative cholangiography. Because all known causes of acquired web formation were excluded, a congenital origin of the web was assumed. The patient was treated with a hepaticoduodenostomy above the level of the septum. The embryological aspects of this rare anomaly are described.

  10. The Metabolism of Cholestanol, Cholesterol, and Bile Acids in Cerebrotendinous Xanthomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Salen, Gerald; Grundy, Scott M.

    1973-01-01

    The metabolism of cholesterol and its 5-dihydro derivative, cholestanol, was investigated by means of sterol balance and isotope kinetic techniques in 3 subjects with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) and 11 other individuals. All subjects were hospitalized on a metabolic ward and were fed diets practically free of cholesterol and cholestanol. After the intravenous administration of [1,2-3H]cholestanol, the radioactive sterol was transported and esterified in plasma lipoproteins in an identical manner to cholesterol. In these short-term experiments, the specific activity-time curves of plasma cholestanol conformed to two-pool models in both the CTX and control groups. However, cholestanol plasma concentrations, total body miscible pools, and daily synthesis rates were two to five times greater in the CTX than control individuals. The short-term specific activity decay curves of plasma [4-14C]cholesterol also conformed to two-pool models in both groups. However, in the CTX subjects the decay was more rapid, and daily cholesterol synthesis was nearly double that of the control subjects. Plasma concentrations and the sizes of the rapidly turning over pool of exchangeable cholesterol were apparently small in the CTX subjects, and these measurements did not correlate with the large cholesterol deposits found in tendon and tuberous xanthomas. Despite active cholesterol synthesis, bile acid formation was subnormal in the CTX subjects. However, bile acid sequestration was accompanied by a rise in plasma cholestanol levels and greatly augmented fecal cholestanol outputs. In contrast, the administration of clofibrate lowered plasma cholesterol levels 50% and presumably reduced synthesis in the CTX subjects. Plasma cholesterol concentrations and fecal steroid excretion did not change significantly during this therapy. These findings indicate that the excessive tissue deposits of cholesterol and cholestanol that characterize CTX were associated with hyperactive neutral

  11. Positive predictive value of cholescintigraphy in common bile duct obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Lecklitner, M.L.; Austin, A.R.; Benedetto, A.R.; Growcock, G.W.

    1986-09-01

    Technetium-99m DISIDA imaging was employed in 400 patients to differentiate obstruction of the common bile duct from medical and other surgical causes of hyperbilirubinemia. Sequential anterior images demonstrated variable degrees of liver uptake, yet there was no evidence of intrabiliary or extrabiliary radioactivity for at least 4 hr after injection in 25 patients. Twenty-three patients were surgically documented to have complete obstruction of the common bile duct. One patient had hepatitis, and another had sickle cell crisis without bile duct obstruction. The remaining patients had either partial or no obstruction of the common bile duct. We conclude that the presence of liver uptake without evident biliary excretion by 4 hr on cholescintigraphy is highly sensitive and predictive of total obstruction of the common bile duct.

  12. Transcystic Approach to Laparoscopic Common Bile Duct Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Zhewei; Huang, Xia; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: One-stage laparoscopic management for common bile duct stones in patients with gallbladder stones has gained wide acceptance. We developed a novel technique using a transcystic approach for common bile duct exploration as an alternative to the existing procedures. Methods: From April 2010 to June 2012, 9 consecutive patients diagnosed with cholelithiasis and common bile duct stones were enrolled in this study. The main inclusion criteria included no upper abdominal surgical history and the presence of a stone measuring <5 mm. After the gallbladder was dissected free from the liver connections in a retrograde fashion, the fundus of the gallbladder was extracted via the port incision in the right epigastrium. The choledochoscope was inserted into the gallbladder through the small opening in the fundus of the gallbladder extracorporeally and was advanced toward the common bile duct via the cystic duct under the guidance of both laparoscopic imaging and endoscopic imaging. After stones were retrieved under direct choledochoscopic vision, a drainage tube was placed in the subhepatic space. Results: Of 9 patients, 7 had successful transcystic common bile duct stone clearance. A narrow cystic duct and the unfavorable anatomy of the junction of the cystic duct and common bile duct resulted in losing access to the common bile duct. No bile leakage, hemobilia, or pancreatitis occurred. Wound infection occurred in 2 patients. Transient epigastric colic pain occurred in 2 patients and was relieved by use of anisodamine. A transient increase in the amylase level was observed in 3 patients. Short-term follow-up did not show any recurrence of common bile duct stones. Conclusion: Our novel transcystic approach to laparoscopic common bile duct exploration is feasible and efficient. PMID:25516702

  13. Rapid Determination of Bile Acids in Bile from Various Mammals by Reversed-Phase Ultra-Fast Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Si, Gu Leng Ri; Yao, Peng; Shi, Luwen

    2015-08-01

    A valid and efficient reversed-phase ultra-fast liquid chromatography method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 13 bile acids in the bile of three mammal species, including rat, pig and human gallstone patients. Chromatographic separation was performed with a Shim-pack XR-ODS column, and the mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and potassium phosphate buffer (pH 2.6) at a flow rate of 0.5 mL min(-1). The linear detection range of most bile acids ranged from 2 to 600 ng µL(-1) with a good correlation coefficient (>0.9995). The precision of each bile acid was <1.8% for intraday and <4.8% for interday. All bile acids were separated in 15 min with satisfactory resolution, and the total analysis time was 18 min, including equilibration. The method was successfully applied in rapid screening of bile samples from the three mammals. Significant metabolic frameworks of bile acids among various species were observed, whereas considerable quantitative variations in both inter- and intraspecies were also observed, especially for gallstone patients. Our results suggest that detecting the change of bile acid profiles could be applied for the diagnosis of gallstone disease. PMID:25520305

  14. Aberrant bile ducts, 'remnant surface bile ducts,' and peribiliary glands: descriptive anatomy, historical nomenclature, and surgical implications.

    PubMed

    El Gharbawy, Ramadan M; Skandalakis, Lee J; Heffron, Thomas G; Skandalakis, John E

    2011-05-01

    The term "aberrant bile ducts" has been used to designate three heterogeneous groups of biliary structures: (1) bile ducts degenerating or disappearing (unknown etiology, diverse locations); (2) curious biliary structures in the transverse fissure; and (3) aberrant right bile ducts draining directly into the common hepatic duct. We report our observations on these three groups. Twenty-nine fresh human livers of stillborns and adults were injected differentially with colored latex and dissected. Adult livers showed portal venous and hepatic arterial branches, and bile ducts not associated with parenchyma, subjacent to and firmly adherent with the liver capsule: elements of ramifications of normal sheaths were present on the liver's surface. These ramifications, having lost parenchyma associated with them, then sequentially lost their portal branches, bile ducts and arterial branches. This process affected the ramifications of the sheaths in the left triangular ligament, adjacent to the inferior vena cava, in the gallbladder bed and anywhere else on the liver's surface and resulted in the presence of bile ducts accompanied by portal venous and/or hepatic arterial branches and not associated with parenchyma for a period of time. This first group represented normal bile ducts that do not meet the criteria of aberration and could be appropriately designated "remnant surface bile ducts." Such changes were not found in the transverse fissures and review of the literature revealed that the curious biliary structures are the microscopic peribiliary glands. The third group met the criteria of aberration and the anatomy of a representative duct is described.

  15. Substitutes for Bear Bile for the Treatment of Liver Diseases: Research Progress and Future Perspective.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Tan, Hor Yue; Wang, Ning; Hong, Ming; Li, Lei; Cheung, Fan; Feng, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    Bear bile has been a well-known Chinese medicine for thousands of years. Because of the endangered species protection, the concept on substitutes for bear bile was proposed decades ago. Based on their chemical composition and pharmacologic actions, artificial bear bile, bile from other animals, synthetic compounds, and medicinal plants may be the promising candidates to replace bear bile for the similar therapeutic purpose. Accumulating research evidence has indicated that these potential substitutes for bear bile have displayed the same therapeutic effects as bear bile. However, stopping the use of bear bile is a challenging task. In this review, we extensively searched PubMed and CNKI for literatures, focusing on comparative studies between bear bile and its substitutes for the treatment of liver diseases. Recent research progress in potential substitutes for bear bile in the last decade is summarized, and a strategy for the use of substitutes for bear bile is discussed carefully. PMID:27087822

  16. Substitutes for Bear Bile for the Treatment of Liver Diseases: Research Progress and Future Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sha; Tan, Hor Yue; Wang, Ning; Hong, Ming; Li, Lei; Cheung, Fan; Feng, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    Bear bile has been a well-known Chinese medicine for thousands of years. Because of the endangered species protection, the concept on substitutes for bear bile was proposed decades ago. Based on their chemical composition and pharmacologic actions, artificial bear bile, bile from other animals, synthetic compounds, and medicinal plants may be the promising candidates to replace bear bile for the similar therapeutic purpose. Accumulating research evidence has indicated that these potential substitutes for bear bile have displayed the same therapeutic effects as bear bile. However, stopping the use of bear bile is a challenging task. In this review, we extensively searched PubMed and CNKI for literatures, focusing on comparative studies between bear bile and its substitutes for the treatment of liver diseases. Recent research progress in potential substitutes for bear bile in the last decade is summarized, and a strategy for the use of substitutes for bear bile is discussed carefully. PMID:27087822

  17. Cattle bile but not bear bile or pig bile induces lipid profile changes and fatty liver injury in mice: mediation by cholic acid.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shiro; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2012-02-01

    Three types of animal bile preparation, bear bile (BB), cattle bile (CB) and pig bile (PB) differ in bile acid composition and are supposed to exert different pharmacotoxicological actions. Dietary supplementation with CB at 1% (w/w) for 4 weeks decreased triacylglycerol (TAG) level but increased total cholesterol (CHO) level in serum, which were associated with fatty liver injury in mice. The increased levels of cholesterol esters (CE) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in the serum and liver were observed in the mice fed the CB-supplemented diet. Lipid abnormalities and fatty liver injury observed in the mice fed the CB diet were not induced by the supplementation with BB and PB. The supplementation with cholic acid (CA), the most abundant bile acid in CB, could induce lipid abnormalities and fatty liver injury, which were indistinguishable from those induced by CB supplementation. CB and CA supplementation induced similar changes in the expression levels of mRNAs in the liver. Thus, CB induced lipid abnormalities and fatty liver injury, which can be attributed to the actions of CA contained in CB. The inabilities of BB and PB to induce lipid abnormalities and fatty liver injury are supposed to be due to their limited contents of CA.

  18. Influence of Phosphatidylcholine and Calcium on Self-Association and Bile Salt Mixed Micellar Binding of the Natural Bile Pigment, Bilirubin Ditaurate.

    PubMed

    Neubrand, Michael W; Carey, Martin C; Laue, Thomas M

    2015-11-17

    Recently [Neubrand, M. W., et al. (2015) Biochemistry 54, 1542-1557], we determined a concentration-dependent monomer-dimer-tetramer equilibrium in aqueous bilirubin ditaurate (BDT) solutions and explored the nature of high-affinity binding of BDT monomers with monomers and micelles of the common taurine-conjugated bile salts (BS). We now investigate, employing complementary physicochemical methods, including fluorescence emission spectrophotometry and quasi-elastic light scattering spectroscopy, the influence of phosphatidylcholine (PC), the predominant phospholipid of bile and calcium, the major divalent biliary cation, on these self-interactions and heterointeractions. We have used short-chain, lyso and long-chain PC species as models and contrasted our results with those of parallel studies employing unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) as the fully charged dianion. Both bile pigments interacted with the zwitterionic headgroup of short-chain lecithins, forming water-soluble (BDT) and insoluble ion-pair complexes (UCB), respectively. Upon micelle formation, BDT monomers apparently remained at the headgroup mantle of short-chain PCs, but the ion pairs with UCB became internalized within the micelle's hydrophobic core. BDT interacted with the headgroups of unilamellar egg yolk (EY) PC vesicles; however, with the simultaneous addition of CaCl2, a reversible aggregation took place, but not vesicle fusion. With mixed EYPC/BS micelles, BDT became bound to the hydrophilic surface (as with simple BS micelles), and in turn, both BDT and BS bound calcium, but not other divalent cations. The calcium complexation of BDT and BS was enhanced strongly with increases in micellar EYPC, suggesting calcium-mediated cross-bridging of hydrophilic headgroups at the micelle's surface. Therefore, the physicochemical binding of BDT to BS in an artificial bile medium is influenced not only by BS species and concentration but also by long-chain PCs and calcium ions that exert a specific rather

  19. Influence of Phosphatidylcholine and Calcium on Self-Association and Bile Salt Mixed Micellar Binding of the Natural Bile Pigment, Bilirubin Ditaurate.

    PubMed

    Neubrand, Michael W; Carey, Martin C; Laue, Thomas M

    2015-11-17

    Recently [Neubrand, M. W., et al. (2015) Biochemistry 54, 1542-1557], we determined a concentration-dependent monomer-dimer-tetramer equilibrium in aqueous bilirubin ditaurate (BDT) solutions and explored the nature of high-affinity binding of BDT monomers with monomers and micelles of the common taurine-conjugated bile salts (BS). We now investigate, employing complementary physicochemical methods, including fluorescence emission spectrophotometry and quasi-elastic light scattering spectroscopy, the influence of phosphatidylcholine (PC), the predominant phospholipid of bile and calcium, the major divalent biliary cation, on these self-interactions and heterointeractions. We have used short-chain, lyso and long-chain PC species as models and contrasted our results with those of parallel studies employing unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) as the fully charged dianion. Both bile pigments interacted with the zwitterionic headgroup of short-chain lecithins, forming water-soluble (BDT) and insoluble ion-pair complexes (UCB), respectively. Upon micelle formation, BDT monomers apparently remained at the headgroup mantle of short-chain PCs, but the ion pairs with UCB became internalized within the micelle's hydrophobic core. BDT interacted with the headgroups of unilamellar egg yolk (EY) PC vesicles; however, with the simultaneous addition of CaCl2, a reversible aggregation took place, but not vesicle fusion. With mixed EYPC/BS micelles, BDT became bound to the hydrophilic surface (as with simple BS micelles), and in turn, both BDT and BS bound calcium, but not other divalent cations. The calcium complexation of BDT and BS was enhanced strongly with increases in micellar EYPC, suggesting calcium-mediated cross-bridging of hydrophilic headgroups at the micelle's surface. Therefore, the physicochemical binding of BDT to BS in an artificial bile medium is influenced not only by BS species and concentration but also by long-chain PCs and calcium ions that exert a specific rather

  20. Regulation of Bile Salt Transport in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Francis R.; Sutherland, Eileen M.; Gonzalez, Manuel

    1982-01-01

    Expansion of the bile salt pool size in rats increases maximum excretory capacity for taurocholate. We examined whether increased bile salt transport is due to recruitment of centrolobular transport units or rather to adaptive changes in the hepatocyte. Daily sodium cholate (100 mg/100 g body wt) was administered orally to rats. This treatment was well tolerated for at least 4 d and produced an 8.2-fold expansion of the bile salt pool. This expanded pool consisted predominently (99%) of cholic and deoxycholic acids. Significantly increased bile salt transport was not observed until 16 h after bile acid loading, and maximum elevations of transport capacity to 2.3-fold of control required ∼2 d. In contrast, maximum sulfobromophthalein excretion rates increased 2.2-fold as early as 4 h and actually fell to 1.5-fold increase at 4 d. We studied the possibility that this adaptive increase in bile salt secretory transport was due to changes in canalicular surface membrane area, lipid composition, or increased number of putative carriers. Canalicular membrane protein recovery and the specific activities of leucine aminopeptidase, Mg++-ATPase and 5′-nucleotidase activities were unaltered by bile salt pool expansion. The content of free and esterified cholesterol and total phospholipids was unchanged in liver surface membrane fractions compared with control values. In contrast, sodium cholate administration selectively increased specific [14C]cholic acid binding sites twofold in liver surface membrane fractions. Increased numbers of [14C]cholic acid receptors (a) was associated with the time-dependent increase in bile salt transport, and (b) was selective for the taurine conjugate of cholate and (c) was reduced by chenodeoxycholate. Changes in bile acid binding sites 16 h following taurocholate and chenodeoxycholate and the lack of change with glycocholate was associated with comparable changes in bile salt transport. In conclusion, selective bile salts increase bile

  1. Effects of bile acid administration on bile acid synthesis and its circadian rhythm in man

    SciTech Connect

    Pooler, P.A.; Duane, W.C.

    1988-09-01

    In man bile acid synthesis has a distinct circadian rhythm but the relationship of this rhythm to feedback inhibition by bile acid is unknown. We measured bile acid synthesis as release of 14CO2 from (26-14C)cholesterol every 2 hr in three normal volunteers during five separate 24-hr periods. Data were fitted by computer to a cosine curve to estimate amplitude and acrophase of the circadian rhythm. In an additional six volunteers, we measured synthesis every 2 hr from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. only. During the control period, amplitude (expressed as percentage of mean synthesis) averaged 52% and acrophase averaged 6:49 a.m. During administration of ursodeoxycholic acid (15 mg per kg per day), synthesis averaged 126% of baseline (p less than 0.1), amplitude averaged 43% and acrophase averaged 6:20 a.m. During administration of chenodeoxycholic acid (15 mg per kg per day), synthesis averaged 43% of baseline (p less than 0.001), amplitude averaged 53% and acrophase averaged 9:04 a.m. Addition of prednisone to this regimen of chenodeoxycholic acid to eliminate release of 14CO2 from corticosteroid hormone synthesis resulted in a mean amplitude of 62% and a mean acrophase of 6:50 a.m., values very similar to those in the baseline period. Administration of prednisone alone also did not significantly alter the baseline amplitude (40%) or acrophase (6:28 a.m.). We conclude that neither chenodeoxycholic acid nor ursodeoxycholic acid significantly alters the circadian rhythm of bile acid synthesis in man.

  2. Interaction of uncharged bile salt derivatives with the ileal bile salt transport system.

    PubMed

    Bundy, R; Mauskopf, J; Walker, J T; Lack, L

    1977-05-01

    Two series of uncharged conjugated bile salt derivatives, N-conjugates of ethanolamine and 3-amino-1,2-propanediol were studied for interaction with the ileal bile salt transport system. Evidence for interaction is threefold. 1) In everted gut sac experiments more material was removed from the mucosal compartment when ileal sacs were used. 2) These derivatives inhibited the in vitro transport of taurocholate. 3) In vivo intestinal perfusion demonstrated greater absorption from ileum than from jejunum. Number three demonstrates that such interactions are followed by transmucosal movement. Their uphill transport was less than taurocholate transport. The Na(+) requirement for cholyl-3-amino-1,2-propanediol interaction with the system was greater than for taurocholate. This observation is similar to that previously observed with taurodehydrocholate, which had a greater Na(+) requirement for transport than taurocholate. Therefore removal of the anionic charge, as well as distortion of steroid shape, increases the Na(+) requirement for substrate interaction with the transport system. These observations support our hypothesis that this interaction involves two recognition components; one includes the steroid moiety, the other a coulombic interaction between the anionic bile salt and a cationic membrane site. Additionally the membrane would have an anionic group to accomodate the Na(+). Both factors (steroidal and coulombic) operate for optimal substrate attachment. Simultaneously the system's affinity for Na(+) increases and active transport then proceeds.

  3. Primary Bile Duct Melanoma Causing Obstructive Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Addepally, Naga S.; Klair, Jagpal S.; Lai, Keith; Aduli, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the few malignancies that are well known for unusual behavior. Primary malignant melanoma usually originates from squamous epithelium of skin, mucous membranes, retina, and uvea. Although melanoma can metastasize to any part of the body, including biliary tract, primary malignant melanoma of bile ducts is an extremely rare entity. We present a 52-year-old man who presented with 5-month epigastric pain and 15-pound weight loss, with 1-week duration of jaundice, nausea/vomiting, pale stools, and dark urine, blood work suggested cholestatic jaundice. Imaging revealed a large perihilar/peripancreatic mass involving the portal vein and hepatic artery, and intrahepatic biliary dilation. Biliary brushings revealed neoplastic cells strongly suggestive of malignant melanoma. PMID:27807580

  4. [Morphological study of bile in the diagnosis of biliary diseases].

    PubMed

    Potekhina, Iu P

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study principles of bile structurization in healthy people and patients with various biliary diseases. 160 patients with different biliary diseases and other diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone were examined. Samples of gallbladder bile were taken from corpses of young men, who did not have any diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone. Their diagnoses were confirmed by an ultrasound morphological study. Bile was studied by the cuneate dehydration and viscosimetric methods. The structure of facies of gallbladder bile under conditions of absence of diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone was shown. The facies have a wide convex peripheral zone (a cushion) without any well-defined border. The central part of the facies is amorphous or fine-grained, sometimes with occasional inclusions of larger crystals. Markers of exacerbation of chronic cholecystitis (dendrites in the central zone of bile facies) as well as signs of the presence of a malignant neoplasm touching the bile (large diamond-shaped crystals in the central zone of bile facies where dendrites begin) were discovered. PMID:14556555

  5. Equilibrium and kinetic factors influencing bile sequestrant efficacy.

    PubMed

    Luner, P E; Amidon, G L

    1992-05-01

    In vitro bile salt binding equilibria and kinetic studies were performed with cholestyramine to determine how these factors influence bile sequestrant efficacy in vivo. Chloride ion at physiologic concentrations caused more than a twofold reduction in glycocholate (GCH) binding, compared to binding in the absence of salt, over a range of GCH concentrations and was also observed to displace bound GCH. In addition, chloride ion displaced from cholestyramine as a result of bile salt binding was measured using a chloride selective electrode, and the results show that bile salt binding is due to ion exchange. Comparison of the results of the equilibrium binding experiments to human data shows that the effect of anion binding competition alone cannot account for the lack of efficacy of cholestyramine. Consideration of other effects, such as additional binding competition or poor availability for binding, based on data from the literature, shows that adequate bile salt binding potential exists and that these interferences are not major factors influencing resin efficacy. In kinetic studies, both binding uptake of GCH and displacement of GCH from cholestyramine by chloride ion were relatively rapid, indicating that cholestyramine should equilibrate rapidly with bile salts in the GI tract. Based on these findings, it is suggested that the low efficacy of cholestyramine is a result mainly of its relatively poor ability to prevent bile salt reabsorption in the ileum.

  6. Development of intrahepatic bile ducts in rat foetal liver explants in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Gall, J. A.; Bhathal, P. S.

    1990-01-01

    The origin of intrahepatic bile ducts was investigated in organ cultures of 13, 16 and 19-day foetal rat livers embedded for up to 10 days in a semi-solid agar gel on a filter-raft assembly. Following 10 days in culture, 13-day foetal explants consisted of liver cell trabeculae lined by endothelial cells. Although maturation of the liver cells and bile canaliculi was observed, duct development was found in less than 10% of the explants. Supplementation of the media with putative inducers of bile duct development or culture of explants adjacent to other tissues did not induce regular duct development. By contrast, explants from the porta hepatis of 19-day foetuses cultured for 4 days, but not 10 days, regularly contained duct-like structures. The formation of the few ducts in cultures of 13-day foetal liver explants indicates that these cells can arise by transformation of hepatoblasts but that specific inducers of development are required for predictable and continuous differentiation of biliary epithelial cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2310614

  7. Identification of Helicobacter spp. in bile and gallbladder tissue of patients with symptomatic gallbladder disease

    PubMed Central

    Sabbaghian, M Shirin; Ranaudo, Jeffrey; Zeng, Lin; Alongi, Alexandra P; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Shamamian, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background: This experimental study was designed to determine if Helicobacter spp. contribute to benign gallbladder disease using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. Methods: Patients with benign gallbladder disease scheduled for elective cholecystectomy at New York University Langone Medical Center were recruited from February to May 2008. Bile, gallbladder tissue and gallstones were collected. DNA was isolated from these specimens and amplified via PCR using C97F and C98R primers specific for Helicobacter spp. Appropriate positive and negative controls were used. Products were analysed with agarose gel electrophoresis, sequenced and results aligned using sequencher. Plasma was collected for detection of anti-Helicobacter pylori antibodies via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Of 36 patients, 12 patients' bile and/or tissue were positive for Helicobacter spp. by PCR. Species were most homologous with H. pylori, although other Helicobacter spp. were suggested. Six of 12 patients demonstrated anti-Helicobacter antibodies in plasma, suggesting that the remaining six might have demonstrated other species besides H. pylori. Four of six plasma samples with anti-Helicobacter antibodies were anti-CagA (cytotoxin associated gene) negative. Discussion: Helicobacter spp. can be detected in bile and gallbladder tissue of patients with benign gallbladder disease. The contribution of these bacteria to the pathophysiology of gallbladder disease and gallstone formation requires further study. PMID:20495657

  8. Effect of calcium, magnesium and sodium ions on in vitro nucleation of human gall bladder bile.

    PubMed Central

    Neithercut, W D

    1989-01-01

    The effect of increasing the calcium, magnesium and sodium concentration in gall bladder bile samples from 21 patients with gall stones and nine controls on the in vitro rate of formation of cholesterol microcrystals and numbers of cholesterol microcrystals formed was examined. Addition of these cations to raise the mean maximum concentration of calcium ions to 19.8 mmol/l, of magnesium ions to 20 mmol/l and sodium ions to 998 mmol/l did not trigger nucleation in control bile samples or samples from patients with gall stones. Increasing the mean concentration of calcium ions to 8.6 mmol/l and of sodium to 320 mmol/l increased the numbers of cholesterol monohydrate crystals/0.1 mm3 counted by light polarisation phase contrast microscopy at the time of nucleation in samples from patients with gall stones from a median of 2 (range 1-10) in control portions to 18 (range 2-128) for calcium ions and 10 (range 2-141) for sodium ions (p less than 0.001). Calcium and magnesium ions were more effective than sodium ions, and calcium ions could increase crystal numbers at concentrations found in samples from patients with gall stones, median 4.6 mmol/l (range 2.7-16.9 mmol/l). The concentrations of calcium and magnesium present in bile may therefore influence the rate of development of gall stones. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2731760

  9. The Effect of Oxygen on Bile Resistance in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Morgan L; Pendarvis, Ken; Nanduri, Bindu; Edelmann, Mariola J; Jenkins, Haley N; Reddy, Joseph S; Wilson, Jessica G; Ding, Xuan; Broadway, Paul R; Ammari, Mais G; Paul, Oindrila; Roberts, Brandy; Donaldson, Janet R

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative anaerobe that is the causative agent of the disease listeriosis. The infectious ability of this bacterium is dependent upon resistance to stressors encountered within the gastrointestinal tract, including bile. Previous studies have indicated bile salt hydrolase activity increases under anaerobic conditions, suggesting anaerobic conditions influence stress responses. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine if reduced oxygen availability increased bile resistance of L. monocytogenes. Four strains representing three serovars were evaluated for changes in viability and proteome expression following exposure to bile in aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Viability for F2365 (serovar 4b), EGD-e (serovar 1/2a), and 10403S (serovar 1/2a) increased following exposure to 10% porcine bile under anaerobic conditions (P < 0.05). However, HCC23 (serovar 4a) exhibited no difference (P > 0.05) in bile resistance between aerobic and anaerobic conditions, indicating that oxygen availability does not influence resistance in this strain. The proteomic analysis indicated F2365 and EGD-e had an increased expression of proteins associated with cell envelope and membrane bioenergetics under anaerobic conditions, including thioredoxin-disulfide reductase and cell division proteins. Interestingly, HCC23 had an increase in several dehydrogenases following exposure to bile under aerobic conditions, suggesting that the NADH:NAD+ is altered and may impact bile resistance. Variations were observed in the expression of the cell shape proteins between strains, which corresponded to morphological differences observed by scanning electron microscopy. These data indicate that oxygen availability influences bile resistance. Further research is needed to decipher how these changes in metabolism impact pathogenicity in vivo and also the impact that this has on susceptibility of a host to listeriosis. PMID:27274623

  10. Bile salts of vertebrates: structural variation and possible evolutionary significance[S

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Alan F.; Hagey, Lee R.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    Biliary bile salt composition of 677 vertebrate species (103 fish, 130 reptiles, 271 birds, 173 mammals) was determined. Bile salts were of three types: C27 bile alcohols, C27 bile acids, or C24 bile acids, with default hydroxylation at C-3 and C-7. C27 bile alcohols dominated in early evolving fish and amphibians; C27 bile acids, in reptiles and early evolving birds. C24 bile acids were present in all vertebrate classes, often with C27 alcohols or with C27 acids, indicating two evolutionary pathways from C27 bile alcohols to C24 bile acids: a) a ‘direct’ pathway and b) an ‘indirect’ pathway with C27 bile acids as intermediates. Hydroxylation at C-12 occurred in all orders and at C-16 in snakes and birds. Minor hydroxylation sites were C-1, C-2, C-5, C-6, and C-15. Side chain hydroxylation in C27 bile salts occurred at C-22, C-24, C-25, and C-26, and in C24 bile acids, at C-23 (snakes, birds, and pinnipeds). Unexpected was the presence of C27 bile alcohols in four early evolving mammals. Bile salt composition showed significant variation between orders but not between families, genera, or species. Bile salt composition is a biochemical trait providing clues to evolutionary relationships, complementing anatomical and genetic analyses. PMID:19638645

  11. [Biochemical features of gallbladder bile in biliary tract diseases].

    PubMed

    Plotnikova, E Iu; Aleksandrova, A Iu; Beloborodova, E I; Didlovslaia, N A

    2007-06-01

    Sixty-two and 58 patients with hypo- and hypermotor biliary tract dysfunction (BTD), respectively, as well as 59 patients with chronic acalculous cholecystitis (CAC) and 63 with opisthorchiasis-complicated CAC were examined. A control group comprised 33 patients of the same sex and age. All the patients underwent fractional duodenal intubation, followed by clinical, biochemical, and serological bile studies. All the examinees were found to increased gallbladder bile lithogenicity, minor changes being observed in biliary tract dysfunction and more pronounced ones being in opisthorchiasis. A biochemical study of gallbladder bile, followed by its lithogenicity correction, is recommended in the treatment of different forms of BTD. PMID:17682480

  12. Redox modulation and human bile duct cancer inhibition by curcumin.

    PubMed

    Suphim, Bunliang; Prawan, Auemduan; Kukongviriyapan, Upa; Kongpetch, Sarinya; Buranrat, Benjaporn; Kukongviriyapan, Veerapol

    2010-01-01

    Curcumin, a major component from tumeric and well-known dietary spice, possesses various pharmacological effects. The cancer chemoprevention effect is suggested to act through its pro-oxidant property. The study was to clarify effects of curcumin on cholangiocarcinoma cells, a cancer of the bile duct that refractory to chemotherapeutic drugs. We examined time-course of oxidant formation in relation to antitumor and the adaptive antioxidant response of the cells. Curcumin induced antiproliferation and apoptosis in KKU-M214 CCA cells with concentration- and time- dependent manners. The antiproliferative effect of curcumin was observed at concentrations as low as 3 microM and was not necessarily associated with oxidative stress, while induction of apoptosis required significant production of superoxide anion, suppression of cellular redox and collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Western blot analysis showed a temporal relationship between the suppression of nuclear NF-kappaB with Bcl-XL protein levels. Up-regulation of p53 and Bax was associated with marked oxidative stress and apoptosis. Curcumin also induced Nrf2 protein expression with up-regulation of gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase mRNA and increased cellular antioxidant, glutathione. The study suggests that curcumin could be developed into an effective chemoprevention against CCA.

  13. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Verhaag, Esther M.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Koehorst, Martijn; Groen, Albert K.; Moshage, Han; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be explained by a hormetic response in hepatocytes that limits cell death during cholestasis. Aim To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the hormetic response that protect hepatocytes against experimental cholestatic conditions. Methods HepG2.rNtcp cells were preconditioned (24 h) with sub-apoptotic concentrations (0.1–50 μM) of various bile acids, the superoxide donor menadione, TNF-α or the Farsenoid X Receptor agonist GW4064, followed by a challenge with the apoptosis-inducing bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA; 200 μM for 4 h), menadione (50 μM, 6 h) or cytokine mixture (CM; 6 h). Levels of apoptotic and necrotic cell death, mRNA expression of the bile salt export pump (ABCB11) and bile acid sensors, as well as intracellular GCDCA levels were analyzed. Results Preconditioning with the pro-apoptotic bile acids GCDCA, taurocholic acid, or the protective bile acids (tauro)ursodeoxycholic acid reduced GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity in HepG2.rNtcp cells. Bile acid preconditioning did not induce significant levels of necrosis in GCDCA-challenged HepG2.rNtcp cells. In contrast, preconditioning with cholic acid, menadione or TNF-α potentiated GCDCA-induced apoptosis. GCDCA preconditioning specifically reduced GCDCA-induced cell death and not CM- or menadione-induced apoptosis. The hormetic effect of GCDCA preconditioning was concentration- and time-dependent. GCDCA-, CDCA- and GW4064- preconditioning enhanced ABCB11 mRNA levels, but in contrast to the bile acids, GW4064 did not significantly reduce GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity. The GCDCA challenge strongly increased intracellular levels of this bile acid, which was not lowered by GCDCA

  14. Synthesis of nucleoside and nucleotide conjugates of bile acids, and polymerase construction of bile acid-functionalized DNA.

    PubMed

    Ikonen, Satu; Macícková-Cahová, Hana; Pohl, Radek; Sanda, Miloslav; Hocek, Michal

    2010-03-01

    Aqueous Sonogashira cross-coupling reactions of 5-iodopyrimidine or 7-iodo-7-deazaadenine nucleosides with bile acid-derived terminal acetylenes linked via an ester or amide tether gave the corresponding bile acid-nucleoside conjugates. Analogous reactions of halogenated nucleoside triphosphates gave directly bile acid-modified dNTPs. Enzymatic incorporation of these modified nucleotides to DNA was successfully performed using Phusion polymerase for primer extension. One of the dNTPs (dCTP bearing cholic acid) was also efficient for PCR amplification. PMID:20165813

  15. Effect of the structure of bile salt aggregates on the binding of aromatic guests and the accessibility of anions.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Carpentier, Eric; Newell, Edward D; Olague, Lana M; Heafey, Eve; Yihwa, Chang; Bohne, Cornelia

    2009-12-15

    The binding of naphthalene (Np), 1-ethylnaphthalene (EtNp), acenaphthene (AcN), and 1-naphthyl-1-ethanol (NpOH) as guests to the aggregates of sodium cholate (NaCh), taurocholate (NaTC), deoxycholate (NaDC), and deoxytaurocholate (NaTDC) was studied with the objective of determining how the structure of the bile salts affects the binding dynamics of guests and quenchers with the bile salt aggregates. Time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence experiments were used to determine the binding efficiency of the guests with the aggregates and were also employed to investigate the quenching of the singlet excited state of the guests by iodide anions. Quenching studies of the triplet excited states using laser flash photolysis were employed to determine the accessibility to the aggregate of nitrite anions, used as quenchers, and the dissociation rate constants of the guests from the bile salt aggregates. The binding efficiency of the guests to NaDC and NaTDC is higher than for NaCh and NaTC, and the protection efficiency is also higher for NaDC and NaTDC, in line with the larger aggregates formed for the latter bile salts. The formation of aggregates is in part driven by the structure of the guest, where an increased protection efficiency and residence time can be achieved by the introduction of short alkyl substituents (AcN or EtNp vs Np). NpOH was shown to be located in a very different environment in all four bile salts when compared to AcN, EtNp, and Np, suggesting that hydrogen bonding plays an important role in the formation of the aggregate around NpOH. PMID:19606836

  16. Maternal bile acid transporter deficiency promotes neonatal demise

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Fei; Wang, Yao; Pitre, Aaron; Fang, Zhong-ze; Frank, Matthew W.; Calabrese, Christopher; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Neale, Geoffrey; Frase, Sharon; Vogel, Peter; Rock, Charles O.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Schuetz, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is associated with adverse neonatal survival and is estimated to impact between 0.4 and 5% of pregnancies worldwide. Here we show that maternal cholestasis (due to Abcb11 deficiency) produces neonatal death among all offspring within 24 h of birth due to atelectasis-producing pulmonary hypoxia, which recapitulates the neonatal respiratory distress of human ICP. Neonates of Abcb11-deficient mothers have elevated pulmonary bile acids and altered pulmonary surfactant structure. Maternal absence of Nr1i2 superimposed on Abcb11 deficiency strongly reduces maternal serum bile acid concentrations and increases neonatal survival. We identify pulmonary bile acids as a key factor in the disruption of the structure of pulmonary surfactant in neonates of ICP. These findings have important implications for neonatal respiratory failure, especially when maternal bile acids are elevated during pregnancy, and highlight potential pathways and targets amenable to therapeutic intervention to ameliorate this condition. PMID:26416771

  17. Maternal bile acid transporter deficiency promotes neonatal demise.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Fei; Wang, Yao; Pitre, Aaron; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Frank, Matthew W; Calabrese, Christopher; Krausz, Kristopher W; Neale, Geoffrey; Frase, Sharon; Vogel, Peter; Rock, Charles O; Gonzalez, Frank J; Schuetz, John D

    2015-09-29

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is associated with adverse neonatal survival and is estimated to impact between 0.4 and 5% of pregnancies worldwide. Here we show that maternal cholestasis (due to Abcb11 deficiency) produces neonatal death among all offspring within 24 h of birth due to atelectasis-producing pulmonary hypoxia, which recapitulates the neonatal respiratory distress of human ICP. Neonates of Abcb11-deficient mothers have elevated pulmonary bile acids and altered pulmonary surfactant structure. Maternal absence of Nr1i2 superimposed on Abcb11 deficiency strongly reduces maternal serum bile acid concentrations and increases neonatal survival. We identify pulmonary bile acids as a key factor in the disruption of the structure of pulmonary surfactant in neonates of ICP. These findings have important implications for neonatal respiratory failure, especially when maternal bile acids are elevated during pregnancy, and highlight potential pathways and targets amenable to therapeutic intervention to ameliorate this condition.

  18. What Are the Risk Factors for Bile Duct Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the large intestine called ulcerative colitis. Bile duct stones , which are similar to, but much smaller than ... between ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Older age Older people are more likely than younger people ...

  19. Dissolution rate of griseofulvin in bile salt solutions.

    PubMed

    de Smidt, J H; Offringa, J C; Crommelin, D J

    1991-04-01

    Bile salts increase the apparent solubility of lipophilic poorly water-soluble drugs like griseofulvin. In this study, the dissolution kinetics of griseofulvin in solutions of bile salts (sodium taurocholate and sodium cholate) were investigated. A rotating disk apparatus was chosen to monitor dissolution kinetics; it well-defined hydrodynamic conditions allowed for analysis of the behavior of bile salt micelles under different conditions. Griseofulvin solubility and dissolution rate increased with increasing bile salt concentration in the dissolution medium. The enhancement of the dissolution rate was not linearly related to the solubility increase, as diffusional transport of the solubilized drug proved to be less efficient than transport of the unsolubilized ("free") drug. The dissolution process proved to be controlled by convective diffusion. An analysis of the data with the phase separation model provided results for the micellar diffusion coefficient comparable with literature data obtained with different techniques. PMID:1865343

  20. Influence of bile flow interruption on acute experimental pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sarli, L; Gafà, M; Lupi, M; Peracchia, A

    1984-01-01

    The influence of bile flow interruption on the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis has been evaluated in the rat. The pancreatitis was induced by Pfeffer's technique and the severity of the disease was assessed by a macroscopic examination of the pancreatic damage and the calculation of amylase-to-creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR) as well. The results showed that the bile reflux into the pancreas made the pancreatic lesions caused by stasis in the gland associated with hyperstimulation of exocrine secretion more severe. On the other hand the bile reflux had no influence when the pancreatitis was due to flowing back of duodenal contents into the pancreas (closed duodenal loop). It was concluded that the bile effect is probably consistent with a pressure mechanism. In addition the reliability of ACCR in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was confirmed, and the test was effective in detecting even milder pancreatic damages. PMID:6206023

  1. Effects of feeding bile acids and a bile acid sequestrant on hepatic bile acid composition in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2010-11-01

    An improved ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) method was established for the simultaneous analysis of various bile acids (BA) and applied to investigate liver BA content in C57BL/6 mice fed 1% cholic acid (CA), 0.3% deoxycholic acid (DCA), 0.3% chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), 0.3% lithocholic acid (LCA), 3% ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), or 2% cholestyramine (resin). Results indicate that mice have a remarkable ability to maintain liver BA concentrations. The BA profiles in mouse livers were similar between CA and DCA feedings, as well as between CDCA and LCA feedings. The mRNA expression of Cytochrome P450 7a1 (Cyp7a1) was suppressed by all BA feedings, whereas Cyp7b1 was suppressed only by CA and UDCA feedings. Gender differences in liver BA composition were observed after feeding CA, DCA, CDCA, and LCA, but they were not prominent after feeding UDCA. Sulfation of CA and CDCA was found at the 7-OH position, and it was increased by feeding CA or CDCA more in male than female mice. In contrast, sulfation of LCA and taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) was female-predominant, and it was increased by feeding UDCA and LCA. In summary, the present systematic study on BA metabolism in mice will aid in interpreting BA-mediated gene regulation and hepatotoxicity.

  2. Role of the neuropeptide, bombesin, in bile secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, W. K.

    1997-01-01

    Since ancient times, bile secretion has been considered vital for maintaining health. One of the main functions of bile secretion is gastric acid neutralization with biliary bicarbonate during a meal or Pavlovian response. Although the liver has many extrinsic and intrinsic nerve innervations, the functional role of these nerves in biliary physiology is poorly understood. To understand the role of neural regulation in bile secretion, our recent studies on the effect of bombesin, a neuropeptide, on bile secretion and its underlying mechanisms will be reviewed. Using isolated perfused rat livers (IPRL) from both normal and 2 week bile duct ligated rats, as well as hepatocyte couplets and isolated bile duct units (IBDU) from normal rat livers, bombesin was shown to stimulate biliary bicarbonate and fluid secretion from bile ducts. Detailed pH studies indicated that bombesin stimulated the activity of Cl-/HCO3- exchanger, which was counterbalanced by a secondary activation of electrogenic Na+/HCO3- symport. Quantitative videomicroscopic studies showed that bombesin-stimulated fluid secretion in IBDU was dependent on Cl- and HCO3- in the media, anion exchanger(s), Cl- and K+ channels, and carbonic anhydrase, but not on the microtubular system. Furthermore, this bombesin response is inhibited by somatostatin but not substance P. Finally, studies of secondary messengers in isolated cholangiocytes and IBDU indicated that bombesin had no effect on intracellular cAMP, cGMP, or Ca++ levels in cholangiocytes. These results provide evidence that neuropeptides such as bombesin can directly stimulate fluid and bicarbonate secretion from cholangiocytes by activating luminal Cl-/HCO3- exchange, but by different mechanisms from those established for secretin. These findings, in turn, suggest that neuropeptides may play an important regulatory role in biliary transport and secretion. Thus, this neuropeptidergic regulation of bile secretion may provide a plausible mechanism for the

  3. Cholecystocolonic fistula: malabsorptive consequences of lost bile acids.

    PubMed

    Benage, D; O'Connor, K W

    1990-04-01

    A patient with the painless onset of a cholecystocolonic fistula associated with virtually complete common bile duct obstruction due to stones provided a unique opportunity to assess the consequences of prolonged bile acid depletion on the digestion and absorption of nutrients. Over 2 years, the patient insidiously developed steatorrhea, osteomalacia with an atraumatic pelvic fracture, and congestive heart failure complicated by polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (torsade de pointes) all of which could be attributed to malabsorption of fat and fat-soluble vitamins.

  4. Laser spectroscopy and imaging of gallbladder stones, tissue and bile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafi, M.; Kokaj, J.; Bhatia, K. S.; Makdisi, Y.; Mathew, K.

    2007-01-01

    Laser spectroscopic study of billary calculi and tissues is described. Fluorescence spectra of human gallbladder stones, bile and tissues were recorded with streak camera in the frequency and time domain. Potential of fluorescence as a diagnostic tool to discriminate between the intended target and the surrounding tissues and bile is evaluated. Initiation of fragmentation process is visualized by high-speed shadowgraphy, interferometry performed during the laser impact and generation of plasma causing growth and collapse of bubbles.

  5. Metagenomic sequencing of bile from gallstone patients to identify different microbial community patterns and novel biliary bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hongzhang; Ye, Fuqiang; Xie, Lu; Yang, Jianfeng; Li, Zhen; Xu, Peisong; Meng, Fei; Li, Lei; Chen, Ying; Bo, Xiaochen; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high worldwide prevalence of gallstone disease, the role of the biliary microbiota in gallstone pathogenesis remains obscure. Next-generation sequencing offers advantages for systematically understanding the human microbiota; however, there have been few such investigations of the biliary microbiome. Here, we performed whole-metagenome shotgun (WMS) sequencing and 16S rRNA sequencing on bile samples from 15 Chinese patients with gallstone disease. Microbial communities of most individuals were clustered into two types, according to the relative enrichment of different intestinal bacterial species. In the bile samples, oral cavity/respiratory tract inhabitants were more prevalent than intestinal inhabitants and existed in both community types. Unexpectedly, the two types were not associated with fever status or surgical history, and many bacteria were patient-specific. We identified 13 novel biliary bacteria based on WMS sequencing, as well as genes encoding putative proteins related to gallstone formation and bile resistance (e.g., β-glucuronidase and multidrug efflux pumps). Bile samples from gallstone patients had reduced microbial diversity compared to healthy faecal samples. Patient samples were enriched in pathways related to oxidative stress and flagellar assembly, whereas carbohydrate metabolic pathways showed varying behaviours. As the first biliary WMS survey, our study reveals the complexity and specificity of biliary microecology. PMID:26625708

  6. Bile acids induce hepatic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sawitza, Iris; Kordes, Claus; Götze, Silke; Herebian, Diran; Häussinger, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have the potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages and their therapeutic potential has become obvious. In the liver, MSC are represented by stellate cells which have the potential to differentiate into hepatocytes after stimulation with growth factors. Since bile acids can promote liver regeneration, their influence on liver-resident and bone marrow-derived MSC was investigated. Physiological concentrations of bile acids such as tauroursodeoxycholic acid were able to initiate hepatic differentiation of MSC via the farnesoid X receptor and transmembrane G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 5 as investigated with knockout mice. Notch, hedgehog, transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenic protein family and non-canonical Wnt signalling were also essential for bile acid-mediated differentiation, whereas β-catenin-dependent Wnt signalling was able to attenuate this process. Our findings reveal bile acid-mediated signalling as an alternative way to induce hepatic differentiaion of stem cells and highlight bile acids as important signalling molecules during liver regeneration. PMID:26304833

  7. EFFECT OF BILE DUCT LIGATION ON BILE ACID COMPOSITION IN MOUSE SERUM AND LIVER

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youcai; Hong, Ji-Young; Rockwell, Cheryl E.; Copple, Bryan L.; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cholestatic liver diseases can be caused by genetic defects, drug toxicities, hepatobiliary malignancies or obstruction of the biliary tract. Cholestasis leads to accumulation of bile acids (BAs) in hepatocytes. Direct toxicity of BAs is currently the most accepted hypothesis for cholestatic liver injury. However, information on which bile acids are actually accumulating during cholestasis is limited. Aims Assess BA composition in liver and serum after bile duct ligation (BDL) in male C57Bl/6 mice between 6 h and 14 days and evaluate toxicity of most abundant BAs. Results BA concentrations increased in liver (27-fold) and serum (1400-fold) within 6 h after surgery and remained elevated up to 14 days. BAs in livers of BDL mice became more hydrophilic than sham controls, mainly due to increased 6β-hydroxylation and taurine conjugation. Among the 8 unconjugated and 16 conjugated BAs identified in serum and liver, only taurocholic acid (TCA), β-muricholic acid (βMCA) and TβMCA were substantially elevated representing >95% of these BAs over the entire time course. Although glycochenodeoxycholic acid and other conjugated BAs increased in BDL animals, the changes were several orders of magnitude lower compared to TCA, βMCA and TβMCA. A mixture of these BAs did not cause apoptosis or necrosis but induced inflammatory gene expression in cultured murine hepatocytes. Conclusion The concentrations of cytotoxic BAs are insufficient to cause hepatocellular injury. In contrast, TCA, βMCA and TβMCA are able to induce pro-inflammatory mediators in hepatocytes. Thus, BAs act as inflammagens and not as cytotoxic mediators after BDL in mice. PMID:22098667

  8. Individual bile acids have differential effects on bile acid signaling in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Peizhen Rockwell, Cheryl E. Cui, Julia Yue Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2015-02-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate BA synthesis and transport by the farnesoid X receptor in the liver (FXR-SHP) and intestine (FXR-Fgf15). However, the relative importance of individual BAs in regulating these processes is not known. Therefore, mice were fed various doses of five individual BAs, including cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxoycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in their diets at various concentrations for one week to increase the concentration of one BA in the enterohepatic circulation. The mRNA of BA synthesis and transporting genes in liver and ileum were quantified. In the liver, the mRNA of SHP, which is the prototypical target gene of FXR, increased in mice fed all concentrations of BAs. In the ileum, the mRNA of the intestinal FXR target gene Fgf15 was increased at lower doses and to a higher extent by CA and DCA than by CDCA and LCA. Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis, was decreased more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Cyp8b1, the enzyme that 12-hydroxylates BAs and is thus responsible for the synthesis of CA, was decreased much more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Surprisingly, neither a decrease in the conjugated BA uptake transporter (Ntcp) nor increase in BA efflux transporter (Bsep) was observed by FXR activation, but an increase in the cholesterol efflux transporter (Abcg5/Abcg8) was observed with FXR activation. Thus in conclusion, CA and DCA are more potent FXR activators than CDCA and LCA when fed to mice, and thus they are more effective in decreasing the expression of the rate limiting gene in BA synthesis Cyp7a1 and the 12-hydroxylation of BAs Cyp8b1, and are also more effective in increasing the expression of Abcg5/Abcg8, which is responsible for biliary cholesterol excretion. However, feeding BAs do not alter the mRNA or protein levels of Ntcp or Bsep, suggesting that the uptake or efflux of BAs is not regulated by FXR at physiological and

  9. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Gallbladder Cancer or Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  10. Endoscopic lithotripsy for bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Lee, J G; Leung, J W

    1993-01-01

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy and common duct stone extraction is successful in 85-90% of patients using conventional balloons and baskets. However, most patients with biliary stones > 2 cm will require mechanical, electrohydraulic, or laser lithotripsy prior to stone extraction. Mechanical lithotripsy is inexpensive, easy to perform, and effective in 80-90% of cases. Most failures result from inability to entrap the stone in the lithotripsy basket. These cases may be successfully treated using either electrohydraulic or laser lithotripsy (intraductal shockwave lithotripsy). In most cases, intraductal shockwave lithotripsy requires direct visual control. Due to difficulty with peroral cholangioscopy, these techniques will not be widely used until a smaller, more maneuverable "mother and baby scope" system is developed. We recommend mechanical lithotripsy as the initial treatment for large biliary stones. Failed cases should be referred to specialized centers for a repeat attempt with intraductal shockwave lithotripsy. With this approach, an experienced endoscopist is successful in removing biliary stones in over 95% of patients. Long term biliary stenting remains a viable option for the high risk patients with large common bile duct stones.

  11. Bile acid signaling and liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mingjie; Wang, Xichun; Xu, Ganyu; Yan, Qingfeng; Huang, Wendong

    2015-02-01

    The liver is able to regenerate itself in response to partial hepatectomy or liver injury. This is accomplished by a complex network of different cell types and signals both inside and outside the liver. Bile acids (BAs) are recently identified as liver-specific metabolic signals and promote liver regeneration by activating their receptors: Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) and G-protein-coupled BA receptor 1 (GPBAR1, or TGR5). FXR is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. FXR promotes liver regeneration after 70% partial hepatectomy (PHx) or liver injury. Moreover, activation of FXR is able to alleviate age-related liver regeneration defects. Both liver- and intestine-FXR are activated by BAs after liver resection or injury and promote liver regeneration through distinct mechanism. TGR5 is a membrane-bound BA receptor and it is also activated during liver regeneration. TGR5 regulates BA hydrophobicity and stimulates BA excretion in urine during liver regeneration. BA signaling thus represents a novel metabolic pathway during liver regeneration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development.

  12. Elemental diet and bile induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, M D; Tonkens, R M

    1976-08-01

    The effectiveness of an elemental diet was investigated as both a prophylactic and therapeutic agent in experimental canine pancreatitis. Pancreatitis was induced by operative injection of a bile -saline solution mixture under pressure retrograde into the main pancreatic duct. In addition to a preinjection control sample, serial biopsies were obtained at 30 minute intervals for 90 minutes after injection and fixed for light and electron microscopic examinations. In addition, preoperative and postoperative blood samples were drawn and analyzed for amylase. After operation, half of the dogs from each original group were fed Vivonex-100, the other half from each group, regular laboratory chow, yielding four ultimate groups based on preoperative and postoperative diets. Successful induction of pancreatitis was evaluated by the difference between preoperative and postoperative amylase values, all of which were significant by group at the p less than 0.01 level. No ultrastructural evidence was found for the modification of zymogen granules with the pretreatment elemental diet nor were differences evident, histologically or ultrastructurally, in the severity of pancreatitis between the pretreated and nonpretreated groups. Finally, gross mortality figures demonstrated no efficacy of elemental diet for pretreatment prophylaxis of acute pancreatitis.

  13. Structure and functional characterization of a bile acid 7α dehydratase BaiE in secondary bile acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Shiva; Chiu, Hsien-Po; Jones, David H; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Miller, Mitchell D; Xu, Qingping; Farr, Carol L; Ridlon, Jason M; Wells, James E; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A; Hylemon, Phillip B; Lesley, Scott A

    2016-03-01

    Conversion of the primary bile acids cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) to the secondary bile acids deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid (LCA) is performed by a few species of intestinal bacteria in the genus Clostridium through a multistep biochemical pathway that removes a 7α-hydroxyl group. The rate-determining enzyme in this pathway is bile acid 7α-dehydratase (baiE). In this study, crystal structures of apo-BaiE and its putative product-bound [3-oxo-Δ(4,6) -lithocholyl-Coenzyme A (CoA)] complex are reported. BaiE is a trimer with a twisted α + β barrel fold with similarity to the Nuclear Transport Factor 2 (NTF2) superfamily. Tyr30, Asp35, and His83 form a catalytic triad that is conserved across this family. Site-directed mutagenesis of BaiE from Clostridium scindens VPI 12708 confirm that these residues are essential for catalysis and also the importance of other conserved residues, Tyr54 and Arg146, which are involved in substrate binding and affect catalytic turnover. Steady-state kinetic studies reveal that the BaiE homologs are able to turn over 3-oxo-Δ(4) -bile acid and CoA-conjugated 3-oxo-Δ(4) -bile acid substrates with comparable efficiency questioning the role of CoA-conjugation in the bile acid metabolism pathway. PMID:26650892

  14. Differentiation of various traditional Chinese medicines derived from animal bile and gallstone: simultaneous determination of bile acids by liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xue; Ye, Min; Pan, De-lin; Miao, Wen-juan; Xiang, Cheng; Han, Jian; Guo, De-an

    2011-01-01

    Animal biles and gallstones are popularly used in traditional Chinese medicines, and bile acids are their major bioactive constituents. Some of these medicines, like cow-bezoar, are very expensive, and may be adulterated or even replaced by less expensive but similar species. Due to poor ultraviolet absorbance and structural similarity of bile acids, effective technology for species differentiation and quality control of bile-based Chinese medicines is still lacking. In this study, a rapid and reliable method was established for the simultaneous qualitative and quantitative analysis of 18 bile acids, including 6 free steroids (cholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, deoxycholic acid, lithocholic acid, hyodeoxycholic acid, and ursodeoxycholic acid) and their corresponding glycine conjugates and taurine conjugates, by using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). This method was used to analyze six bile-based Chinese medicines: bear bile, cattle bile, pig bile, snake bile, cow-bezoar, and artificial cow-bezoar. Samples were separated on an Atlantis dC₁₈ column and were eluted with methanol-acetonitrile-water containing ammonium acetate. The mass spectrometer was monitored in the negative electrospray ionization mode. Total ion currents of the samples were compared for species differentiation, and the contents of bile acids were determined by monitoring specific ion pairs in a selected reaction monitoring program. All 18 bile acids showed good linearity (r² > 0.993) in a wide dynamic range of up to 2000-fold, using dehydrocholic acid as the internal standard. Different animal biles could be explicitly distinguished by their major characteristic bile acids: tauroursodeoxycholic acid and taurochenodeoxycholic acid for bear bile, glycocholic acid, cholic acid and taurocholic acid for cattle bile, glycohyodeoxycholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid for pig bile, and taurocholic acid for snake bile. Furthermore, cattle bile, cow

  15. Differentiation of various traditional Chinese medicines derived from animal bile and gallstone: simultaneous determination of bile acids by liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xue; Ye, Min; Pan, De-lin; Miao, Wen-juan; Xiang, Cheng; Han, Jian; Guo, De-an

    2011-01-01

    Animal biles and gallstones are popularly used in traditional Chinese medicines, and bile acids are their major bioactive constituents. Some of these medicines, like cow-bezoar, are very expensive, and may be adulterated or even replaced by less expensive but similar species. Due to poor ultraviolet absorbance and structural similarity of bile acids, effective technology for species differentiation and quality control of bile-based Chinese medicines is still lacking. In this study, a rapid and reliable method was established for the simultaneous qualitative and quantitative analysis of 18 bile acids, including 6 free steroids (cholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, deoxycholic acid, lithocholic acid, hyodeoxycholic acid, and ursodeoxycholic acid) and their corresponding glycine conjugates and taurine conjugates, by using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). This method was used to analyze six bile-based Chinese medicines: bear bile, cattle bile, pig bile, snake bile, cow-bezoar, and artificial cow-bezoar. Samples were separated on an Atlantis dC₁₈ column and were eluted with methanol-acetonitrile-water containing ammonium acetate. The mass spectrometer was monitored in the negative electrospray ionization mode. Total ion currents of the samples were compared for species differentiation, and the contents of bile acids were determined by monitoring specific ion pairs in a selected reaction monitoring program. All 18 bile acids showed good linearity (r² > 0.993) in a wide dynamic range of up to 2000-fold, using dehydrocholic acid as the internal standard. Different animal biles could be explicitly distinguished by their major characteristic bile acids: tauroursodeoxycholic acid and taurochenodeoxycholic acid for bear bile, glycocholic acid, cholic acid and taurocholic acid for cattle bile, glycohyodeoxycholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid for pig bile, and taurocholic acid for snake bile. Furthermore, cattle bile, cow

  16. Human erythrocyte Band 3 functions as a receptor for the sialic acid-independent invasion of Plasmodium falciparum. Role of the RhopH3-MSP1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Michael; Yamodo, Innocent; Ranjan, Ravi; Li, Xuerong; Mines, Gregory; Marinkovic, Marina; Hanada, Toshihiko; Oh, Steven S.; Chishti, Athar H.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum takes advantage of two broadly defined alternate invasion pathways when infecting human erythrocytes: one that depends on and the other that is independent of host sialic acid residues on the erythrocyte surface. Within the sialic acid-dependent (SAD) and sialic acid-independent (SAID) invasion pathways, several alternate host receptors are used by Plasmodium falciparum based on its particular invasion phenotype. Earlier, we reported that two putative extracellular regions of human erythrocyte band 3 termed 5C and 6A function as host invasion receptor segments binding parasite proteins MSP1 and MSP9 via a SAID mechanism. In this study, we developed two mono-specific anti-peptide chicken IgY antibodies to demonstrate that the 5C and 6A regions of band 3 are exposed on the surface of human erythrocytes. These antibodies inhibited erythrocyte invasion by the Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 and 7G8 strains (SAID invasion phenotype), and the blocking effect was enhanced in sialic acid-depleted erythrocytes. In contrast, the IgY antibodies had only a marginal inhibitory effect on FCR3 and Dd2 strains (SAD invasion phenotype). A direct biochemical interaction between erythrocyte band 3 epitopes and parasite RhopH3, identified by the yeast two-hybrid screen, was established. RhopH3 formed a complex with MSP119 and 5ABC region of band 3, and a recombinant segment of RhopH3 inhibited parasite invasion in human erythrocytes. Together, these findings provide evidence that erythrocyte band 3 functions as a major host invasion receptor in the SAID invasion pathway by assembling a multi-protein complex composed of parasite ligands RhopH3 and MSP1. PMID:25157665

  17. Urinary bile casts in bile cast nephropathy secondary to severe falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Manoj Kumar; Behera, Ashok Kumar; Karua, Purna Chandra; Bariha, Prafulla Kumar; Rath, Ashutosh; Aggrawal, Kailash Chandra; Nahak, Snigdha Rani; Gudaganatti, Santosh Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe cholestatic jaundice may complicate with bile cast nephropathy (BCN) causing severe acute kidney injury (AKI). In this study, we investigate BCN in severe falciparum malaria complicated with jaundice and AKI. Methods This prospective study was conducted in a tertiary health care institution with high prevalence of malaria. A cohort of 110 patients with falciparum malaria complicated with cerebral malaria, jaundice and AKI were enrolled. Species diagnosis was made from peripheral blood smear or rapid diagnostic test. Severe malaria was diagnosed from WHO criteria. BCN was diagnosed with the detection of bile casts in urine or in biopsy. The recovery pattern and outcome with and without BCN was assessed. Results Out of 110 patients, 20 (18.2%) patients had BCN and 15 (13.6%) patients had hepato-renal syndrome. Patients with BCN had high conjugated bilirubin (26.5 ± 4.1 mg/dL), urea (75.9 ± 10.3 mg/dL) and creatinine (7.2 ± 0.8 mg/dL), longer duration of illness (6.4 ± 1.1 days), higher mortality (25.0%) and prolonged recovery time of hepatic (9.6 ± 2.4 days) and renal dysfunction (15.1 ± 6.5 days) compared with patients without BCN. Conclusions Prolonged duration of illness and increased bilirubin cause BCN among patients with severe falciparum malaria with jaundice and AKI, which is associated with high mortality and morbidity. PMID:27478612

  18. Nucleation time of gall bladder bile in gall stone patients: influence of bile acid treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Sahlin, S; Ahlberg, J; Angelin, B; Reihnér, E; Einarsson, K

    1991-01-01

    The time required for precipitation of cholesterol crystals (nucleation time, NT) was determined and related to the cholesterol saturation in gall bladder bile of gall stone free subjects (n = 11), patients with pigment stones (n = 3), and patients with cholesterol gall stones (n = 30) undergoing cholecystectomy. Seven of the gall stone patients had been treated with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and nine with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), 15 mg/kg/day for three weeks before operation. NT was longer in gall stone free subjects (mean, 20 days), patients with pigment stones (14 days) and patients treated with CDCA (24 days) and UDCA (17 days) compared with untreated patients with cholesterol gall stones (1.5 days). In spite of low cholesterol saturation and prolonged NT, and in contrast to those treated with CDCA, four of the nine patients treated with UDCA had cholesterol crystals in their bile. These observations give further support to the concept that the mechanism for inducing gall stone dissolution may be different for CDCA and UDCA. PMID:1773966

  19. Identification and characterization of two bile acid coenzyme A transferases from Clostridium scindens, a bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating intestinal bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ridlon, Jason M.; Hylemon, Phillip B.

    2012-01-01

    The human bile acid pool composition is composed of both primary bile acids (cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid) and secondary bile acids (deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid). Secondary bile acids are formed by the 7α-dehydroxylation of primary bile acids carried out by intestinal anaerobic bacteria. We have previously described a multistep biochemical pathway in Clostridium scindens that is responsible for bile acid 7α-dehydroxylation. We have identified a large (12 kb) bile acid inducible (bai) operon in this bacterium that encodes eight genes involved in bile acid 7α-dehydroxylation. However, the function of the baiF gene product in this operon has not been elucidated. In the current study, we cloned and expressed the baiF gene in E. coli and discovered it has bile acid CoA transferase activity. In addition, we discovered a second bai operon encoding three genes. The baiK gene in this operon was expressed in E. coli and found to encode a second bile acid CoA transferase. Both bile acid CoA transferases were determined to be members of the type III family by amino acid sequence comparisons. Both bile acid CoA transferases had broad substrate specificity, except the baiK gene product, which failed to use lithocholyl-CoA as a CoA donor. Primary bile acids are ligated to CoA via an ATP-dependent mechanism during the initial steps of 7α-dehydroxylation. The bile acid CoA transferases conserve the thioester bond energy, saving the cell ATP molecules during bile acid 7α-dehydroxylation. ATP-dependent CoA ligation is likely quickly supplanted by ATP-independent CoA transfer. PMID:22021638

  20. Unconjugated Bilirubin and an Increased Proportion of Bilirubin Monoconjugates in the Bile of Patients with Gilbert's Syndrome and Crigler-Najjar Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fevery, Johan; Blanckaert, Norbert; Heirwegh, Karel P. M.; Préaux, Anne-Marie; Berthelot, Pierre

    1977-01-01

    Bilirubin pigments were studied in the bile of 20 normal adults, 25 patients with Gilbert's syndrome, 9 children with Crigler-Najjar disease, and 6 patients with hemolysis, to determine how a deficiency of hepatic bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase would affect the end products of bilirubin biotransformation. In the bile from patients with Gilbert's syndrome, a striking increase was found in the proportion of bilirubin monoconjugates (48.6±9.8% of total conjugates) relative to that in normal bile (27.2±7.8%). This increase was even more pronounced in children with Crigler-Najjar disease, in whom, even in the most severe cases, glucuronide could always be demonstrated in the bile. Furthermore, unconjugated bilirubin-IXα was unquestionably present in the bile of these children and amounted to 30-57% of their total bilirubin pigments (<1% in the controls). It was not possible to predict from the biliary bilirubin composition whether a child would respond to phenobarbital therapy or not. Bile composition was normal in patients with hemolysis, except when there was associated deficiency of hepatic glucuronosyltransferase. Therefore, the observed alterations were not a simple consequence of unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. The present findings suggest that Crigler-Najjar disease represents a more pronounced expression than Gilbert's syndrome of a common biochemical defect. Hepatic bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase deficiency leads to decreased formation of diconjugates with an ensuing increase in the proportion of bilirubin monoconjugates in bile; in the most severe cases, an elevated content of biliary unconjugated bilirubin is also found. PMID:409736

  1. Bile acids in combination with low pH induce oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage: relevance to the pathogenesis of Barrett's oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, Katerina; Payne, Claire M; Chavarria, Melissa; Ramsey, Lois; Dvorakova, Barbora; Bernstein, Harris; Holubec, Hana; Sampliner, Richard E; Guy, Naihsuan; Condon, Amanda; Bernstein, Carol; Green, Sylvan B; Prasad, Anil; Garewal, Harinder S

    2007-01-01

    Background Barrett's oesophagus is a premalignant condition associated with an increased risk for the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (ADCA). Previous studies indicated that oxidative damage contributes to the development of ADCA. Objective To test the hypothesis that bile acids and gastric acid, two components of refluxate, can induce oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage. Methods Oxidative stress was evaluated by staining Barrett's oesophagus tissues with different degrees of dysplasia with 8‐hydroxy‐deoxyguanosine (8‐OH‐dG) antibody. The levels of 8‐OH‐dG were also evaluated ex vivo in Barrett's oesophagus tissues incubated for 10 min with control medium and medium acidified to pH 4 and supplemented with 0.5 mM bile acid cocktail. Furthermore, three oesophageal cell lines (Seg‐1 cells, Barrett's oesophagus cells and HET‐1A cells) were exposed to control media, media containing 0.1 mM bile acid cocktail, media acidified to pH 4, and media at pH 4 supplemented with 0.1 mM bile acid cocktail, and evaluated for induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Results Immunohistochemical analysis showed that 8‐OH‐dG is formed mainly in the epithelial cells in dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus. Importantly, incubation of Barrett's oesophagus tissues with the combination of bile acid cocktail and acid leads to increased formation of 8‐OH‐dG. An increase in ROS in oesophageal cells was detected after exposure to pH 4 and bile acid cocktail. Conclusions Oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage can be induced in oesophageal tissues and cells by short exposures to bile acids and low pH. These alterations may underlie the development of Barrett's oesophagus and tumour progression. PMID:17145738

  2. Moulded calculus of common bile duct mimicking a stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Brocki, Marian; Śmigielski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Bile duct stenosis, in most cases, appears to be the consequence of pancreatic head, ampulla of Vater and bile duct tumours, cholangitis sclerosans, as well as iatrogenic damages, which may all be diagnosed during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). In very rare cases the restriction may result from an atypically shaped wedged stone. This situation creates many diagnostic problems, which in the majority of cases can be solved using imaging studies. However, in some patients even a significant extension of diagnostic procedures may not lead to a correct diagnosis. We present a diagnostically difficult case of a deposit imitating restriction. We present a 70-year-old woman with common bile duct restriction undiagnosed despite several ultrasound examinations (USG), computed tomography (CT), double magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Only after the third ERCP examination a fragmented, by formerly introduced prosthesis, deposit, imitating narrowing, was revealed. Identification of bile duct deposits depends on their composition, localisation and the imaging techniques used. Pigment calculi with atypical shape, bile density, air density or surrounding tissue density are very difficult to diagnose. Thus, the sensitivity of common bile duct stone detection in USG, CT, MRCP and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is 5–88%; 6–88%; 73–97%; and 84–98%, respectively. Moreover, ERCP may not diagnose the character of the restriction even in 5.2% up to 30% of the patients. Consequently, assessment of diagnosis in a number of patients is difficult. A deposit imitating common bile duct (CBD) restriction is a rare, difficult to diagnose phenomenon, which should be taken into account during differential diagnosis of CBD restrictions. PMID:25061493

  3. The effect of bile salts on carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Milov, D E; Jou, W S; Shireman, R B; Chun, P W

    1992-02-01

    Bile salts are potent inhibitors of bovine carbonic anhydrase and human carbonic anhydrase I and human carbonic anhydrase II. To further characterize the binding of bile salts to carbonic anhydrase, rate constants for the CO2 hydration reaction in the presence of deoxycholate, cholate, glycocholate and taurocholate were determined using stop-flow experiments. Values for the Michaelis-Menton dissociation constant for bovine carbonic anhydrase, human carbonic anhydrase I and human carbonic anhydrase II were found to be 5.2, 9.2 and 13.2 mmol/L, respectively. The inhibition constant values for the various bile salts tested ranged from 0.1 to 1 mmol/L for bovine carbonic anhydrase, 1.6 to 2.4 mmol/L for human carbonic anhydrase I and 0.09 to 0.7 mmol/L for human carbonic anhydrase II. Our results suggest a mechanism of noncompetitive carbonic anhydrase inhibition for bile salts. Bile-salt binding to carbonic anhydrases as measured by scanning molecular sieve chromatography resulted in an increase in partition radius, molecular volume and surface area. The partition radius increased from 24 A to 28 A in the presence of 2.5 mmol/L sodium deoxycholate at critical micelle concentration. As determined by sedimentation equilibrium measurements, approximately 1 gm of carbonic anhydrase will bind 0.03 gm of deoxycholate, suggesting three to six binding sites for bile salt on the carbonic anhydrase molecule. The conformational changes and inhibition of carbonic anhydrases resulting from bile-salt binding may be important to the regulation of enzymatic activity in tissues along the enterohepatic circulation; by limiting bicarbonate availability this interaction may also contribute to the metabolic derangements seen in patients with cholestatic liver disease. PMID:1735532

  4. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder. PMID:25639618

  5. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder.

  6. Digestion of phospholipids after secretion of bile into the duodenum changes the phase behavior of bile components.

    PubMed

    Birru, Woldeamanuel A; Warren, Dallas B; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Williams, Hywel D; Benameur, Hassan; Porter, Christopher J H; Chalmers, David K; Pouton, Colin W

    2014-08-01

    Bile components play a significant role in the absorption of dietary fat, by solubilizing the products of fat digestion. The absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs from the gastrointestinal tract is often enhanced by interaction with the pathways of fat digestion and absorption. These processes can enhance drug absorption. Thus, the phase behavior of bile components and digested lipids is of great interest to pharmaceutical scientists who seek to optimize drug solubilization in the gut lumen. This can be achieved by dosing drugs after food or preferably by formulating the drug in a lipid-based delivery system. Phase diagrams of bile salts, lecithin, and water have been available for many years, but here we investigate the association structures that occur in dilute aqueous solution, in concentrations that are present in the gut lumen. More importantly, we have compared these structures with those that would be expected to be present in the intestine soon after secretion of bile. Phosphatidylcholines are rapidly hydrolyzed by pancreatic enzymes to yield equimolar mixtures of their monoacyl equivalents and fatty acids. We constructed phase diagrams that model the association structures formed by the products of digestion of biliary phospholipids. The micelle-vesicle phase boundary was clearly identifiable by dynamic light scattering and nephelometry. These data indicate that a significantly higher molar ratio of lipid to bile salt is required to cause a transition to lamellar phase (i.e., liposomes in dilute solution). Mixed micelles of digested bile have a higher capacity for solubilization of lipids and fat digestion products and can be expected to have a different capacity to solubilize lipophilic drugs. We suggest that mixtures of lysolecithin, fatty acid, and bile salts are a better model of molecular associations in the gut lumen, and such mixtures could be used to better understand the interaction of drugs with the fat digestion and absorption pathway.

  7. Influence of dietary sugar on cholesterol and bile acid metabolism in the rat: Marked reduction of hepatic Abcg5/8 expression following sucrose ingestion.

    PubMed

    Apro, Johanna; Beckman, Lena; Angelin, Bo; Rudling, Mats

    2015-06-12

    Previous studies have indicated that dietary intake of sugar may lower bile acid production, and may promote cholesterol gallstone formation in humans. We studied the influence of dietary sucrose on cholesterol and bile acid metabolism in the rat. In two different experiments, rats received high-sucrose diets. In the first, 60% of the weight of standard rat chow was replaced with sucrose (high-sucrose diet). In the second, rats received a diet either containing 65% sucrose (controlled high-sucrose diet) or 65% complex carbohydrates, in order to keep other dietary components constant. Bile acid synthesis, evaluated by measurements of the serum marker 7-alpha-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and of the hepatic mRNA expression of Cyp7a1, was markedly reduced by the high-sucrose diet, but not by the controlled high-sucrose diet. Both diets strongly reduced the hepatic - but not the intestinal - mRNA levels of Abcg5 and Abcg8. The differential patterns of regulation of bile acid synthesis induced by the two sucrose-enriched diets indicate that it is not sugar per se in the high-sucrose diet that reduces bile acid synthesis, but rather the reduced content of fiber or fat. In contrast, the marked reduction of hepatic Abcg5/8 observed is an effect of the high sugar content of the diets.

  8. The liver X-receptor alpha controls hepatic expression of the human bile acid-glucuronidating UGT1A3 enzyme in human cells and transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Mélanie; Senekeo-Effenberger, Kathy; Trottier, Jocelyn; Bonzo, Jessica A; Bélanger, Julie; Kaeding, Jenny; Staels, Bart; Caron, Patrick; Tukey, Robert H; Barbier, Olivier

    2006-08-01

    Glucuronidation, an important bile acid detoxification pathway, is catalyzed by enzymes belonging to the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) family. Among UGT enzymes, UGT1A3 is considered the major human enzyme for the hepatic C24-glucuronidation of the primary chenodeoxycholic (CDCA) and secondary lithocholic (LCA) bile acids. We identify UGT1A3 as a positively regulated target gene of the oxysterol-activated nuclear receptor liver X-receptor alpha (LXRalpha). In human hepatic cells and human UGT1A transgenic mice, LXRalpha activators induce UGT1A3 mRNA levels and the formation of CDCA-24glucuronide (24G) and LCA-24G. Furthermore, a functional LXR response element (LXRE) was identified in the UGT1A3 promoter by site-directed mutagenesis, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiment. In addition, LXRalpha is found to interact with the SRC-1alpha and NCoR cofactors to regulate the UGT1A3 gene, but not with PGC-1beta. In conclusion, these observations establish LXRalpha as a crucial regulator of bile acid glucuronidation in humans and suggest that accumulation of oxysterols in hepatocytes during cholestasis favors bile acid detoxification as glucuronide conjugates. LXR agonists may be useful for stimulating both bile acid detoxification and cholesterol removal in cholestatic or hypercholesterolemic patients, respectively. PMID:16871576

  9. Alterations in hepatic pericanalicular cytoplasm during enhanced bile secretory activity.

    PubMed

    Jones, A L; Schmucker, D L; Mooney, J S; Ockner, R K; Adler, R D

    1979-04-01

    In an attempt to demonstrate the morphology of the bile secretory apparatus, male rats were restrained and maintained on an isocaloric diet with (experimental) and without (control) taurocholate, which was continuously infused via a duodenal cannula. This method of taurocholate administration promotes a 2-fold increase in the bile acid pool size and bile secretory rate and increases the transport maximum of taurocholate by approximately 50%. After 48 hours, the livers from both the control and experimental animals were perfusion-fixed and whole hepatocytes as well as pericanalicular cytoplasm (defined as a 1-micron. wide zone of cytoplasm adjacent to the bile canaliculus) in both centrolobular and periportal cells were subjected to a stereologic analysis. Although taurocholate infusion produced relatively few changes in the amounts of organelles or inclusionswithin hepatocytes, it caused highly significant increases in the amount ofGolgi-rich area, Golgi membranes, and the number of vesicles with diameters greater than 1000 A in the pericanalicular area of cytoplasm. In addition to these changes, which occurred in both central and periportal zones, decreases in the volume of lysosomes and the surface area of smooth surfaced endoplasmic reticulum were observed. These data provide new evidence that the "bile secretory apparatus" may encompass several hepatocellular components which include the Golgi complex and a vesicular transport system.

  10. Optimizing Human Bile Preparation for Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hao-Tsai; Sung, Chang-Mu; Pai, Betty Chien-Jung; Liu, Nai-Jen; Chen, Carl PC

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Bile is an important body fluid which assists in the digestion of fat and excretion of endogenous and exogenous compounds. In the present study, an improved sample preparation for human bile was established. Methods and Material. The method involved acetone precipitation followed by protein extraction using commercially available 2D Clean-Up kit. The effectiveness was evaluated by 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) profiling quality, including number of protein spots and spot distribution. Results. The total protein of bile fluid in benign biliary disorders was 0.797 ± 0.465 μg/μL. The sample preparation method using acetone precipitation first followed by 2D Clean-Up kit protein extraction resulted in better quality of 2DE gel images in terms of resolution as compared with other sample preparation methods. Using this protocol, we obtained approximately 558 protein spots on the gel images and with better protein spots presentation of haptoglobin, serum albumin, serotransferrin, and transthyretin. Conclusions. Protein samples of bile prepared using acetone precipitation followed by 2D Clean-Up kit exhibited high protein resolution and significant protein profile. This optimized protein preparation protocol can effectively concentrate bile proteins, remove abundant proteins and debris, and yield clear presentation of nonabundant proteins and its isoforms on 2-dimensional electrophoresis gel images. PMID:26966686

  11. Bile acid receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liyun; Bambha, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    With the high prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and other features of the metabolic syndrome in United States, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has inevitably become a very prevalent chronic liver disease and is now emerging as one of the leading indications for liver transplantation. Insulin resistance and derangement of lipid metabolism, accompanied by activation of the pro-inflammatory response and fibrogenesis, are essential pathways in the development of the more clinically significant form of NAFLD, known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Recent advances in the functional characterization of bile acid receptors, such as farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor (TGR) 5, have provided further insight in the pathophysiology of NASH and have led to the development of potential therapeutic targets for NAFLD and NASH. Beyond maintaining bile acid metabolism, FXR and TGR5 also regulate lipid metabolism, maintain glucose homeostasis, increase energy expenditure, and ameliorate hepatic inflammation. These intriguing features have been exploited to develop bile acid analogues to target pathways in NAFLD and NASH pathogenesis. This review provides a brief overview of the pathogenesis of NAFLD and NASH, and then delves into the biological functions of bile acid receptors, particularly with respect to NASH pathogenesis, with a description of the associated experimental data, and, finally, we discuss the prospects of bile acid analogues in the treatment of NAFLD and NASH. PMID:26668692

  12. Quantitative profiling of bile acids in rat bile using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-orbitrap mass spectrometry: Alteration of the bile acid composition with aging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gakyung; Lee, Hyunbeom; Hong, Jongki; Lee, Soo Hyun; Jung, Byung Hwa

    2016-09-15

    Bile acids (BAs) play important roles in physiological functions, including the homeostasis of cholesterol and lipids and as ligands for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). With the increasing importance of BAs, analytical methods for their quantification and screening have been developed. However, due to the diverse range and variety of BAs with different activation potency, a simple, effective, and sensitive method is required to screen BAs for accurate quantification and identification. This paper presents an application of ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap MS) for profiling BAs in bile. Using this method, along with the accurate quantification of 19 targeted BAs, 22 unknown BAs were detected and characterized by their fragmentation patterns. The method is beneficial for screening most of the BAs (quantitatively and qualitatively) in rat bile with simple preparation in a single run. The sample dilution ranges of each BA were optimized depending on the concentration of BAs in the bile to obtain good peak separation and accurate data. The method validation was performed successfully using charcoal-treated bile and the intra and inter-day coefficients of variation were less than 20% for all BAs while the recovery were above 88.5% except for the lithocholic acid. The method was applied to profile the age-dependent changes in the contents of rat BAs. Through statistical analysis, we found that as the rats aged, unconjugated BAs and glycine-conjugated BAs decreased or were unaffected, while taurine-conjugated BAs were increased in general. Among the unknown BAs, 5 of the taurine-conjugated BAs increased, while a glycine-conjugated BA decreased, in agreement with the trends of the targeted BAs. PMID:27450898

  13. Retroperitoneal Biloma Secondary to Operative Common Bile Duct Injury

    PubMed Central

    Čólović, Radoje; Perišić-Savić, Mirjana

    1991-01-01

    Encapsulated collections of bile (“biloma”) may be a sequela of liver trauma, operative injury or disease. Such collections may be intrahepatic or extrahepatic and usually in the supramesocolic compartment of the abdomen. This is a report of a retroperitoneal biloma, an entity that has been reported only twice to date but this is the first secondary to an operative common bile duct lesion. Evacuation of the biloma and reconstruction of the associated biliary stricture were successfully carried out. The patient remains sympton free with normal clinical and laboratory data more than 14 months after surgery. Operative common bile duct (CBD) injury may be followed by a number of complications. To our knowledge retroperitoneal biloma secondary to a CBD lesion has not been previously reported. PMID:2043516

  14. Bactobilin: blue bile pigment isolated from Clostridium tetanomorphum.

    PubMed Central

    Brumm, P J; Fried, J; Friedmann, H C

    1983-01-01

    A blue bile pigment, possessing four acetic and four propionic acid side chains has been isolated from extracts of the anaerobic microorganism Clostridium tetanomorphum and in smaller amounts from Propionibacterium shermanii. The compound could be prepared in larger amounts by incubation of C. tetanomorphum enzyme extracts with added delta-aminolevulinic acid. The ultraviolet-visible, infrared, and proton magnetic resonance spectra of the pigment indicate a chromophore of the biliverdin type. Field-desorption mass spectrometry of the purified methyl ester showed a strong molecular ion at m/e = 962. This corresponds to the molecular weight expected for the octamethyl ester of a bilatriene type of bile pigment structurally derived from uroporphyrin III or I. Of the five possible structures, two could be eliminated by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The name bactobilin is proposed for this previously unreported bile pigment. PMID:6575387

  15. CT diagnosis of an iatrogenic bile duct injury

    PubMed Central

    Mbarushimana, Simon; Morris-Stiff, Gareth; Hassn, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Bile duct injuries are a recognised complication of cholecystectomy and a number of options exist for their evaluation. A 44-year-old woman presented with a suspected biliary leak 11 days following an open cholecystectomy. Her medical history was significant for biliopancreatic diversion 2 years previously. An ultrasound scan demonstrated a perihepatic collection but no dilation of the biliary tree was observed. The patient's surgical history and the lack of biliary dilation precluded an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, and she could not undergo an MR cholangiopancreatography due to claustrophobia. A CT cholangiogram was performed and clarified the location of the injury, facilitating operative identification and repair of the bile duct. CT cholangiography performed as a dynamic procedure is useful as a means of identifying bile duct injuries. PMID:25267805

  16. Endoscopic management of difficult common bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Trikudanathan, Guru; Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Parsi, Mansour A

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopy is widely accepted as the first treatment option in the management of bile duct stones. In this review we focus on the alternative endoscopic modalities for the management of difficult common bile duct stones. Most biliary stones can be removed with an extraction balloon, extraction basket or mechanical lithotripsy after endoscopic sphincterotomy. Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation with or without endoscopic sphincterotomy or mechanical lithotripsy has been shown to be effective for management of difficult to remove bile duct stones in selected patients. Ductal clearance can be safely achieved with peroral cholangioscopy guided laser or electrohydraulic lithotripsy in most cases where other endoscopic treatment modalities have failed. Biliary stenting may be an alternative treatment option for frail and elderly patients or those with serious co morbidities. PMID:23345939

  17. [Postoperative handling in biliodigestive derivation by iatrogenic bile duct injury].

    PubMed

    Domínguez, I; Mercado, M A

    2008-01-01

    Bile duct injury is a severe complication related to cholecystectomy, impacting in the long-term quality of life and functional status. Bile duct repair is the first-line treatment for complex injuries. During short-term and long-term postoperative care, it is important to bear in mind the diagnostic tools, both laboratory and imaging, that will be useful to evaluate a possible surgical complication and to plan an adequate therapeutic strategy. In addition, post-surgical classification describes patients according to their complications and clinical course. In this review we describe the principal issues of postoperative care after bile duct repair, highlighting the diagnosis, severity classification and therapeutic approach of acute cholangitis.

  18. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lili; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Huang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases. PMID:26579439

  19. Autofluorescent polarimetry of bile films in the liver pathology differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prysyazhnyuk, V. P.; Ushenko, Yu. O.; Dubolazov, O. V.; Ushenko, A. G.; Savich, V. O.; Karachevtsev, A. O.

    2015-09-01

    A new information optical technique of diagnostics of the structure of the polycrystalline bile films is proposed. The model of Mueller-matrix description of mechanisms of optical anisotropy of such objects as optical activity, birefringence, as well as linear and circular dichroism is suggested. The ensemble of informationally topical azimuthally stable Mueller-matrix invariants is determined. Within the statistical analysis of such parameters distributions the objective criteria of differentiation of the polycrystalline bile films taken from patients with fatty degeneration (group 1) chronic hepatitis (group 2) of the liver were determined. From the point of view of probative medicine the operational characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) of the information-optical method of Mueller-matrix mapping of polycrystalline films of bile were found and its efficiency in diagnostics of pathological changes was demonstrated.

  20. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lili; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Huang, Wendong

    2015-03-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases. PMID:26579439

  1. Fecal bile acids of black-footed ferrets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, Louise; Johnson, M.K.; Clark, T.W.; Schroder, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    Fecal bile acid characteristics have been used to identify scats to species of origin. Fecal bile acids in scats from 20 known black-footed ferrets ( Mustela nigripes ), 7 other known small carnivores, and 72 of unknown origin were analyzed to determine if this procedure could be used as a tool to verify ferret presence in an area. Seventeen ferret scats were suitable for analysis and had a mean fecal bile acid index of 156 ± 9. This was significantly different from mean indices for the other carnivores; however, substantial overlap among confidence intervals occurred for badgers, kit foxes, and especially long-tailed weasels. We conclude this method is not useful for making positive identifications if individual ferret scats and suggest that we may be able to definitively identify individual scats with reasonable confidence by using gas-liquid chromatography.

  2. [Intraoperative ultrasonography for common bile duct exploration during laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Bende, Sándor; Botos, Akos; Ottlakán, Aurél; Pásztor, Pál; Pálfi, Attila; Liptay-Wagner, Péter

    2003-12-01

    The "Endomedix Laparoscan" and the "Leopard" and "Panther" intraoperative ultrasounds were successfully used for the detection of unsuspected common bile duct stones during laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Out of 60 patients six had common bile duct (CBD) stones and in one patient sludge has been seen. In patients with CBD stones, four small calculi have been observed in one patient, despite negative intraoperative cholangiography (IC). In an other patient a stone in the retropancreatic part of the CBD was detected. Based on preoperative findings CBD stone was unsuspected. We found that intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) is useful for in investigating the CBD to detect unsuspected common bile duct stones. It can be used for the examination of other organs (liver, pancreas, hepatoduodenal ligament) as well. The method is easy to perform, fairly simple and informative so it can replace IC during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  3. Nasogastric tube placement into the hepaticojejunostomy anastomosis in pancreaticoduodenectomy: a simple surgical technique for prevention of bile leak.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Bulent; Ozcabi, Yetkin; Tasdelen, Iksan; Onur, Ender; Memisoglu, Kemal

    2016-05-01

    Hepaticojejunostomy is an important part of many surgical procedures including pancreaticoduodenectomy. Biliary leakage from hepaticojejunostomy may be associated with intraabdominal abscess formation, biliary peritonitis, and even mortality. A 72-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with obstructive jaundice. After initial evaluation, she was diagnosed with distal common bile duct obstruction without accurate diagnosis. Before planned pancreaticoduodenectomy, biliary drainage with a T-tube was performed due to the presence of cholangitis. After the first operation, pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Postinflammatory changes around the hilar region made the hepaticojejunostomy risky. A bilio-digestive anastomosis was performed using a new technique. A nasogastric tube was placed into the common bile duct proximal to the anastomosis. The postoperative course of the patient was uneventful. The use of a nasogastric tube as a stent in risky hepaticojejunostomies is a simple technique that can be beneficial.

  4. The role of alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase in bile acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cuebas, Dean A; Phillips, Christopher; Schmitz, Werner; Conzelmann, Ernst; Novikov, Dmitry K

    2002-05-01

    According to current views, the second peroxisomal beta-oxidation pathway is responsible for the degradation of the side chain of bile acid intermediates. Peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme type 2 [peroxisomal multifunctional 2-enoyl-CoA hydratase/(R)-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase; MFE-2] catalyses the second (hydration) and third (dehydrogenation) reactions of the pathway. Deficiency of MFE-2 leads to accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids, 2-methyl-branched fatty acids and C(27) bile acid intermediates in plasma, but bile acid synthesis is not blocked completely. In this study we describe an alternative pathway, which allows MFE-2 deficiency to be overcome. The alternative pathway consists of alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase and peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme type 1 [peroxisomal multifunctional 2-enoyl-CoA hydratase/(S)-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase; MFE-1]. (24E)-3alpha,7alpha,12alpha-Trihydroxy-5beta-cholest-24-enoyl-CoA, the presumed physiological isomer, is hydrated by MFE-1 with the formation of (24S,25S)-3alpha,7alpha,12alpha,24-tetrahydroxy-5beta-cholestanoyl-CoA [(24S,25S)-24-OH-THCA-CoA], which after conversion by a alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase into the (24S,25R) isomer can again be dehydrogenated by MFE-1 to 24-keto-3alpha,7alpha,12alpha-trihydroxycholestanoyl-CoA, a physiological intermediate in cholic acid synthesis. The discovery of the alternative pathway of cholesterol side-chain oxidation will improve diagnosis of peroxisomal deficiencies by identification of serum 24-OH-THCA-CoA diastereomer profiles.

  5. Reverse-phase h.p.l.c. separation, quantification and preparation of bilirubin and its conjugates from native bile. Quantitative analysis of the intact tetrapyrroles based on h.p.l.c. of their ethyl anthranilate azo derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Spivak, W; Carey, M C

    1985-01-01

    , mouse, prairie dog) that are experimental models of both pigment and cholesterol gallstone formation. Conjugated bilirubins in the biles of other animals (human, monkey, pony, cat, rat and dog) are chemically more diverse and include mono-, di- and mixed disconjugates of glucuronic acid, xylose and glucose in proportions that give distinct patterns for each species. PMID:3919713

  6. SK&F 97426-A: a novel bile acid sequestrant with higher affinities and slower dissociation rates for bile acids in vitro than cholestyramine.

    PubMed

    Benson, G M; Alston, D R; Hickey, D M; Jaxa-Chamiec, A A; Whittaker, C M; Haynes, C; Glen, A; Blanchard, S; Cresswell, S R; Suckling, K E

    1997-01-01

    SK&F 97426-A is a novel bile acid sequestrant that is threefold more potent than cholestyramine at increasing bile acid excretion in the hamster. SK&F 97426-A is a quaternary alkylammonium polymethacrylate that was selected for comparison with cholestyramine in vivo because of its superior in vitro bile acid binding properties. Association, dissociation, affinity, and capacity experiments were performed under physiologically relevant conditions with the most abundant bile acids found in human bile. The bile acids came to equilibrium with SK&F 97426-A and cholestyramine within approximately 30 min and 6 min, respectively. SK&F 97426-A and cholestyramine had similar capacities for all the bile acids (between 2.5 and 4 mmol/g) and both had similar, very high affinities and slow dissociation rates for the dihydroxy bile acids. However, SK&F 97426-A had much higher affinities for the trihydroxy bile acids glycocholic acid and taurocholic acid than did cholestyramine. Dissociation of glycocholic acid and taurocholic acid from SK&F 97426-A was also much slower (27 and 25%, respectively, dissociated after 60 min) than from cholestyramine (89 and 84%, respectively, dissociated after 60 min). The higher affinities and slower dissociation rates of the trihydroxy bile acids for and from SK&F 97426-A probably account for the increased potency of SK&F 97426-A over cholestyramine in vivo.

  7. Bile acids in cholestasis: bad for the liver, not so good for the kidney.

    PubMed

    Erlinger, Serge

    2014-09-01

    The elegant paper by Fickert et al. on bile duct ligated mice provides convincing evidence for the hypothesis that bile acids retained in the serum during cholestasis and excreted through the kidneys are toxic to collecting duct cells. The authors propose that bile acids initiate a chain of reactions leading to tubulointerstitial nephritis and fibrosis. Mice with cholestasis were protected by prefeeding with the hydrophilic bile acid norursodeoxycholic acid, an observation which suggests a potential therapeutic option for cholemic nephropathy.

  8. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein–Coupled Bile Acid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brighton, Cheryl A.; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E.; Glass, Leslie L.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein–coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1–secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca2+. In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca2+ response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber–mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms. PMID:26280129

  9. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Brighton, Cheryl A; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E; Glass, Leslie L; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1-secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca(2+). In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca(2+) response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber-mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms.

  10. Sertraline-Associated Cholestasis and Ductopenia Consistent with Vanishing Bile Duct Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Máire A; Cui, Jiawei; Lin, Henry C

    2016-02-01

    An adolescent with depression treated with sertraline developed cholestasis and bile duct paucity, which resolved with medication discontinuation. Vanishing bile duct syndrome is an acquired destruction of interlobular bile ducts. This type of drug-induced liver injury has been associated with other medications and requires practitioners' awareness of potential hepatotoxicity.

  11. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhong, Wei; Li, Houkai; Li, Qiong; Qiu, Yunping; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Huiyuan; Zhao, Xueqing; Zhang, Shucha; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zeisel, Steven H.; Jia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the bile acid metabolism is limited by the fact that previous analyses have primarily focused on a selected few circulating bile acids; the bile acid profiles of the liver and gastrointestinal tract pools are rarely investigated. Here, we determined how chronic ethanol consumption altered the bile acids in multiple body compartments (liver, gastrointestinal tract, and serum) of rats. Rats were fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet with 38% of calories as ethanol (the amount equivalent of 4–5 drinks in humans). While conjugated bile acids predominated in the liver (98.3%), duodenum (97.8%), and ileum (89.7%), unconjugated bile acids comprised the largest proportion of measured bile acids in serum (81.2%), the cecum (97.7%), and the rectum (97.5%). In particular, taurine-conjugated bile acids were significantly decreased in the liver and gastrointestinal tract of ethanol-treated rats, while unconjugated and glycine-conjugated species increased. Ethanol consumption caused increased expression of genes involved in bile acid biosynthesis, efflux transport, and reduced expression of genes regulating bile acid influx transport in the liver. These results provide an improved understanding of the systemic modulations of bile acid metabolism in mammals through the gut-liver axis.—Xie, G., Zhong, W., Li, H., Li, Q., Qiu, Y., Zheng, X., Chen, H., Zhao, X., Zhang, S., Zhou, Z., Zeisel, S. H., Jia, W. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption. PMID:23709616

  12. Dissolution rates of model gallstones in human and animal biles and importance of interfacial resistance.

    PubMed

    Molokhia, A M; Hofmann, A F; Higuchi, W I; Tuchinda, M; Feld, K; Prakongpan, S; Danzinger, R G

    1977-08-01

    Cholesterol monohydrate dissolution kinetics in human gallbladder bile were studied to determine the magnitudes of the in vitro dissolution rates, the rate resistances in human gallbladder bile, and the extent that the interfacial resistance is the rate-determining factor. Dissolution rate studies also were conducted using human duodenal bile and animal bile for comparison. The dissolution rate resistance, R, ranged from 10(4) sec/cm for chicken bile to 10(4)-10(6) sec/cm for human bile. Interfacial resistance was the rate-determining factor for essentially all results. Where chemical composition data were obtained, the R values for the human bile samples were consistent with predictions made from the simulated bile studies. In two human gallbladder specimens having low bile acid-lecithin molar ratios (i.e., 2.9 and 2.3), very high R values of 1.9 X 10(5) and 4.1 X 10(5) sec/cm were found. These values were in good agreement with the findings in the simulated bile studies and suggest that stone dissolution in patients with low bile acid-lecithin ratios may proceed very slowly, even when the bile is highly undersaturated with respect to cholesterol.

  13. Erlotinib in Treating Patients With Unresectable Liver, Bile Duct, or Gallbladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  14. Extracorporeal abdominal massage may help prevent recurrent bile duct stones after endoscopic sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Naohito; Hamaya, Sae; Tatsuta, Miwa; Nakatsu, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) is effective, but recurrent bile duct stones are a common late complication. Because there are still no effective therapies for preventing this complication, some patients have experienced bile duct stone recurrence many times. We describe herein a method of abdominal massage to treat patients with prior cholecystectomy who have experienced recurrence of bile duct stones. PMID:27540575

  15. Ultracentrifugal isolation of vesicular carriers of biliary cholesterol in native human and rat bile.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, N; Garrido, J; Nervi, F

    1987-01-01

    We have utilized ultracentrifugation of native bile-Metrizamide density gradients to isolate a vesicular transport system of biliary lipids in both man and rat. We identified vesicular structures by electron microscopy. Fresh bile specimens were obtained from bile fistula rats (unsaturated bile) and from patients 1 week after bile duct surgery (supersaturated bile). Metrizamide was dissolved in bile (33% w/v), and continuous density gradients were performed with undiluted bile (density limits = 1.020 to 1.300 gm per ml). The relative distribution of biliary cholesterol, phospholipid and bile salt was studied as a function of the density of the fractions. Approximately 50% of total rat biliary cholesterol and between 61 and 90% of human biliary cholesterol was concentrated in the lightest fractions of the gradients (density less than 1.060 gm per ml). In contrast, less than 20% of bile salts was present in fractions with densities lower than 1.060 gm per ml. The highest amounts of bile salts and phospholipids of the bile-Metrizamide density gradients were found in the density range of 1.075 to 1.100 gm per ml in both human and rat bile. More than 80% of biliary proteins was found in fractions with densities greater than 1.075 gm per ml, and only 2% was found in the cholesterol-rich fraction with density less than 1.060 gm per ml in both species. When bile salt concentration was raised in rat bile from 38 to 97 mM by adding taurocholate, the low density cholesterol-rich fraction almost disappeared. Electron microscopy of negatively stained preparations of the fractions with density less than 1.060 gm per ml showed 40 to 120 nm vesicles, which were not apparent in the other fractions. Similar vesicles were demonstrated also in fresh rat bile and within the canaliculi after acute depletion of the bile salt pool (biliary bile salt concentration of 3.45 mM; total biliary lipid concentration of 0.25 gm%). The structure of these vesicles was shown in thin sections of liver

  16. [HPTLC densitometric determination of free bile acids in bezoar].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Li, S; Cheng, J; Yan, K; Tian, S

    1990-06-01

    Cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA) which are extracted with CH3OH from Bezoar can be separated on HPTLC silica gel plate (made in China) with isooctane-n-butyl acetate-acetic acid (4:2:1), and the three bile acids were determined by TLC densitometry.

  17. Aztreonam biliary excretion in bile duct ligated jaundiced rats.

    PubMed

    Rulli, F; Muzi, M; Zanella, E; Cipriani, P; Magni, A; Giordano, A; Filadoro, F

    1991-04-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to assess aztreonam biliary concentrations in bile duct ligated jaundiced rats. The study proved that aztreonam biliary concentrations are sufficient to inhibit Gram-negative bacteria within the first and the second hour after antibiotic administration. The experimental model suggests that clinical conditions such as lithiasis or neoplasms of the biliary tree should not totally inhibit the antibiotic excretion.

  18. Macitentan does not interfere with hepatic bile salt transport.

    PubMed

    Treiber, Alexander; Äänismaa, Päivi; de Kanter, Ruben; Delahaye, Stephane; Treher, Marianne; Hess, Patrick; Sidharta, Patricia

    2014-07-01

    Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension with the endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan has been associated with transient increases in liver transaminases. Mechanistically, bosentan inhibits the bile salt export pump (BSEP) leading to an intrahepatic accumulation of cytotoxic bile salts, which eventually results in hepatocellular damage. BSEP inhibition by bosentan is amplified by its accumulation in the liver as bosentan is a substrate of organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) transport proteins. The novel endothelin receptor antagonist macitentan shows a superior liver safety profile. Introduction of the less acidic sulfamide moiety and increased lipophilicity yield a hepatic disposition profile different from other endothelin receptor antagonists. Passive diffusion rather than OATP-mediated uptake is the driving force for macitentan uptake into the liver. Interaction with the sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and BSEP transport proteins involved in hepatic bile salt homeostasis is therefore limited due to the low intrahepatic drug concentrations. Evidence for this conclusion is provided by in vitro experiments in drug transporter-expressing cell lines, acute and long-term studies in rats and dogs, absence of plasma bile salt changes in healthy human volunteers after multiple dosing, and finally the liver safety profile of macitentan in the completed phase III morbidity/mortality SERAPHIN (Study with an Endothelin Receptor Antagonist in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension to Improve Clinical Outcome) trial.

  19. Tolerance of Bifidobacterium human isolates to bile, acid and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Andriantsoanirina, Valérie; Allano, Solène; Butel, Marie José; Aires, Julio

    2013-06-01

    Bifidobacteria are part of the human gastrointestinal microbiota and are used as probiotics in functional food products because of their health promoting properties. However, only few data are available on the phenotypic characteristics displayed by human bifidobacteria strain populations. In this study we compared the in vitro tolerance to acid, bile and oxygen of the largest number of independent human intestinal strains. Bile and acid tolerance varied among species and independent strains within a species: B. adolescentis strains were the most tolerant to bile followed by Bifidobacterium longum and B. breve; B. longum, B. breve and B. dentium showed the highest viability levels after exposure to acid pH. Oxygen tolerance was largely distributed among intestinal bifidobacteria: B. longum, B. breve and B. bifidum showed the highest oxygen tolerance. B. adolescentis showed the highest susceptibility to acid and oxygen stresses. The present study gave us the opportunity to update our knowledge about the phenotypic characteristics of human intestinal bifidobacteria. B. longum and B. breve harboured the best tolerance to oxygen, bile and acid stresses. Based on such biological characters, B. longum and B. breve species showed the highest interest in terms of potential selection of human probiotics.

  20. Chemical composition of blood and bile of the shovelnose sturgeon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunn, J.B.; Christenson, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    Samples of gallbladder bile and blood from shovelnose sturgeons (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus) collected from the Chippewa River, Wisconsin, contained concentrations of Na+, K+, Ca++, Mg++, Cl-, inorganic phosphate, and total cholesterol closely comparable with those reported for similar samples from other species of freshwater sturgeons.

  1. 21 CFR 184.1560 - Ox bile extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ox bile extract. 184.1560 Section 184.1560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... known as purified oxgall or sodium choleate, is a yellowish green, soft solid, with a partly...

  2. Complications following repair of extrahepatic bile duct injuries after blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Montes, J A; Rojo, E; Martín, L G

    2001-10-01

    Extrahepatic bile duct traumatic injuries are extremely rare and their treatment is difficult and with several controversies. The aim of this study was to offer some more clinical information on their surgical repair and outcome. We present seven patients with extrahepatic biliary tract lesions after blunt abdominal trauma, (isolated gallbladder lesions were excluded) four males and three females from 23 to 51 years of age (mean age 35.1 years). All patients had suffered high-energy blunt abdominal trauma and presented associated injuries, mostly liver trauma and lung contusions. Six gallbladder lesions and six common bile duct injures were identified; a right hepatic duct laceration and a left hepatic duct transection were also present. Injuries were treated either with primary repair or with duct-jejunal anastomoses with Roux-en-Y reconstruction. Principal complications were postoperative anastomotic leakage (1 case) and recurrent cholangitis (3 cases) with or without stricture. Not-diagnosed injuries caused substantial morbidity. We prefer and recommend the use of primary repair in partial ruptures with no significant tissue loss and biliary-enteric anastomoses in large injuries and complete transections because they offer the best long-term drainage with less risk of stricture formation than end-to-end anastomoses. We defend the use of long duration (6 to 9 months) transanastomotic stents. PMID:11596896

  3. Profiling serum bile acid glucuronides in humans: gender divergences, genetic determinants and response to fenofibrate

    PubMed Central

    Trottier, Jocelyn; Perreault, Martin; Rudkowska, Iwona; Levy, Cynthia; Dallaire-Theroux, Amélie; Verreault, Mélanie; Caron, Patrick; Staels, Bart; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Straka, Robert J.; Barbier, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Glucuronidation, catalyzed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes detoxifies cholestatic bile acids (BAs). We aimed at i) characterizing the circulating BA-glucuronide (-G) pool composition in humans, ii) evaluating how sex and UGT polymorphisms influence this composition, and iii) analyzing the effects of lipid-lowering drug fenofibrate on the circulating BA-G profile in 300 volunteers and 5 cholestatic patients. Eleven BA-Gs were determined in pre- and post-fenofibrate samples. Men exhibited higher BA-G concentrations, and various genotype/BA-G associations were discovered in relevant UGT genes. The chenodeoxycholic acid-3G concentration was associated with the UGT2B7 802C>T polymorphism. Glucuronidation assays confirmed the predominant role of UGT2B7 and UGT1A4 in CDCA-3G formation. Fenofibrate exposure increased the serum levels of 5 BA-G species, including CDCA-3G, and up-regulated expression of UGT1A4, but not UGT2B7, in hepatic cells. This study demonstrates that fenofibrate stimulates BA glucuronidation in humans, and thus reduces bile acid toxicity in the liver. PMID:23756370

  4. Antioxidant and bile acid binding activity of buckwheat protein in vitro digests.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Xiong, Youling L

    2009-05-27

    The objective of the study was to assess the antioxidant and bile acid removing potential of buckwheat protein (BWP) during a two-stage in vitro digestion (1 h of pepsin followed by 2 h of pancreatin). Antioxidant activity of the digests was analyzed by determining: (1) Fe(2+) chelation, (2) reducing power, (3) 2,2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiszoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS(+•)) radical scavenging capacity, and (4) TBARS formation in a liposome system. The initial pepsin digestion decreased the BWP antioxidant activity; however, subsequent pancreatin digestion fully recovered the reducing power and increased (P < 0.05) the ability to chelate Fe(2+) (45%), scavenge ABTS(+•) (87%), and curtail lipid peroxidation (45%) when compared with intact BWP. The final BWP digest exhibited a 67% increase (P < 0.05) in cholic acid binding capability over that of the nondigested BWP control but was comparable to the control in binding chenodeoxycholic and deoxycholic acids. Digestion-resistant peptides were largely responsible for bile acid elimination. PMID:19320435

  5. Between peptides and bile acids: self-assembly of phenylalanine substituted cholic acids.

    PubMed

    Travaglini, Leana; D'Annibale, Andrea; di Gregorio, Maria Chiara; Schillén, Karin; Olsson, Ulf; Sennato, Simona; Pavel, Nicolae V; Galantini, Luciano

    2013-08-01

    Biocompatible molecules that undergo self-assembly are of high importance in biological and medical applications of nanoscience. Peptides and bile acids are among the most investigated due to their ability to self-organize into many different, often stimuli-sensitive, supramolecular structures. With the aim of preparing molecules mixing the aggregation properties of bile acid and amino acid-based molecules, we report on the synthesis and self-association behavior of two diastereomers obtained by substituting a hydroxyl group of cholic acid with a l-phenylalanine residue. The obtained molecules are amphoteric, and we demonstrate that they show a pH-dependent self-assembly. Both molecules aggregate in globular micelles at high pH, whereas they form tubular superstructures under acid conditions. Unusual narrow nanotubes with outer and inner cross-section diameters of about 6 and 3 nm are formed by the derivatives. The diasteroisomer with α orientation of the substituent forms in addition a wider tubule (17 nm cross-section diameter). The ability to pack in supramolecular tubules is explained in terms of a wedge-shaped bola-form structure of the derivatives. Parallel or antiparallel face-to-face dimers are hypothesized as fundamental building blocks for the formation of the narrow and wide nanotubes, respectively.

  6. Ostα depletion protects liver from oral bile acid load

    PubMed Central

    Velazquez, Heino; Mennone, Albert; Ballatori, Nazzareno; Boyer, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Bile acid homeostasis is tightly maintained through interactions between the liver, intestine, and kidney. During cholestasis, the liver is incapable of properly clearing bile acids from the circulation, and alternative excretory pathways are utilized. In obstructive cholestasis, urinary elimination is often increased, and this pathway is further enhanced after bile duct ligation in mice that are genetically deficient in the heteromeric, basolateral organic solute transporter alpha-beta (Ostα-Ostβ). In this study, we examined renal and intestinal function in Ostα-deficient and wild-type mice in a model of bile acid overload. After 1% cholic acid feeding, Ostα-deficient mice had significantly lower serum ALT levels compared with wild-type controls, indicating partial protection from liver injury. Urinary clearance of bile acids, but not clearance of [3H]inulin, was significantly higher in cholic acid-fed Ostα-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice but was not sufficient to account for the protection. Fecal excretion of bile acids over the 5 days of cholic acid feeding was responsible for almost all of the bile acid loss in Ostα-deficient mice, suggesting that intestinal losses of bile acids accounted for the protection from liver injury. Thus fecal loss of bile acids after bile acid overload reduced the need for the kidney to filter and excrete the excess bile acids. In conclusion, Ostα-deficient mice efficiently eliminate excess bile acids via the feces. Inhibition of intestinal bile acid absorption might be an effective therapeutic target in early stages of cholestasis when bile acids are still excreted into bile. PMID:21719738

  7. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    SciTech Connect

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  8. Effects of essential fatty acid deficiency on enterohepatic circulation of bile salts in mice.

    PubMed

    Lukovac, S; Los, E L; Stellaard, F; Rings, E H H M; Verkade, H J

    2009-09-01

    Essential fatty acid (EFA) deficiency in mice has been associated with increased bile production, which is mainly determined by the enterohepatic circulation (EHC) of bile salts. To establish the mechanism underlying the increased bile production, we characterized in detail the EHC of bile salts in EFA-deficient mice using stable isotope technique, without interrupting the normal EHC. Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) has been proposed as an important regulator of bile salt synthesis and homeostasis. In Fxr(-/-) mice we additionally investigated to what extent alterations in bile production during EFA deficiency were FXR dependent. Furthermore, we tested in differentiating Caco-2 cells the effects of EFA deficiency on expression of FXR-target genes relevant for feedback regulation of bile salt synthesis. EFA deficiency-enhanced bile flow and biliary bile salt secretion were associated with elevated bile salt pool size and synthesis rate (+146 and +42%, respectively, P < 0.05), despite increased ileal bile salt reabsorption (+228%, P < 0.05). Cyp7a1 mRNA expression was unaffected in EFA-deficient mice. However, ileal mRNA expression of Fgf15 (inhibitor of bile salt synthesis) was significantly reduced, in agreement with absent inhibition of the hepatic bile salt synthesis. Bile flow and biliary secretion were enhanced to the same extent in EFA-deficient wild-type and Fxr(-/-) mice, indicating contribution of other factors besides FXR in regulation of EHC during EFA deficiency. In vitro experiments show reduced induction of mRNA expression of relevant genes upon chenodeoxycholic acid and a selective FXR agonist GW4064 stimulation in EFA-deficient Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, our data indicate that EFA deficiency is associated with interrupted negative feedback of bile salt synthesis, possibly because of reduced ileal Fgf15 expression.

  9. Regulation of bile acid synthesis in rat hepatocyte monolayer cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kubaska, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    Primary hepatocyte monolayer cultures (PHC) were prepared and incubated in serum free media. Cells from a cholestyramine fed rat converted exogenous (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol into (/sup 14/C)-bile acids at a 3-fold greater rate than rats fed a normal diet. PHC synthesize bile acids (BA) at a rate of approximately 0.06 ..mu..g/mg protein/h. The major bile acid composition, as determined by GLC, was ..beta..-muricholic acid (BMC) and cholic acid (CA) in a 3:1 ratio, respectively. PHC rapidly converted free BA and BA intermediates into taurine conjugated trihydroxy-BA up to 87h after plating. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A-reductase activity assayed in microsomes prepared from PHC, decreased during the initial 48h, then remained constant. Cholesterol 7..cap alpha..-hydroxylase activity decreased during the initial 48h, then increased during the next 48h. This occurred while whole cells produced BA at a linear rate. The effect of individual BA on bile acid synthesis (BAS) was also studied. Relative rates of BAS were measured as the conversion of (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol into (/sup 14/C)-BA. BA combinations were tested in order to simulate the composition of the enterohepatic circulation. The addition of TCA (525 ..mu..M) plus TCDCA (80..mu..M), in concentrations which greatly exceed the concentration of BA (60..mu..M) in rate portal blood, failed to inhibit BAS. BA plus phospholipid and/or cholesterol also did not inhibit BAS. Surprisingly, crude rat bile with a final concentration comparable to those in the synthetic mix inhibited (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol conversion into (/sup 14/C)-BA.

  10. Asymptomatic Bile Duct Dilatation in Children: Is It a Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yeo Ju; Lee, Mi Jung; Koh, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Bile duct dilatation is a relatively common sonographic finding; nevertheless, its clinical significance in children is controversial because little research has been done in the area. Therefore, we investigated the natural course and clinical significance of biliary duct dilatation in children. Methods We performed a retrospective study of 181 children (range, 1-day-old to 17-year-old) in whom dilatation of the intrahepatic duct and/or common hepatic duct and/or common bile duct was detected by abdominal ultrasonography at the Severance Children's Hospital between November 2005 and March 2014. We reviewed and analyzed laboratory test results, clinical manifestations, and clinical course in these patients. Results Pediatric patients (n=181) were enrolled in the study and divided into two groups. The first group included 59 subjects, without definitive cause of bile duct dilatation, who did not require treatment; the second group included 122 subjects, with definitive cause of bile duct dilatation or underlying biliary disease, who did require treatment. In the first group, 24 patients (40.7%) showed spontaneous resolution of bile duct dilatation, 20 patients (33.9%) showed no change, and 15 patients (25.4%) were lost to follow-up. In the second group, 31 patients were diagnosed with choledochal cysts, and 91 patients presented with biliary tract dilatations due to secondary causes, such as gallbladder or liver disease, post-operative complications, or malignancy. Conclusion Biliary dilatation in pediatric patients without symptoms, and without laboratory and other sonographic abnormalities, showed a benign clinical course. No pathologic conditions were noted on follow-up ultrasonography. PMID:26473138

  11. A novel primary bile acid in the Shoebill stork and herons and its phylogenetic significance.

    PubMed

    Hagey, L R; Schteingart, C D; Ton-Nu, H-T; Hofmann, A F

    2002-05-01

    The Shoebill stork, an enigma phylogenetically, was found to contain as its dominant biliary bile acid 16alpha-hydroxychenodeoxycholic acid, a heretofore undescribed bile acid. The bile acid occurred as its taurine N-acyl amidate; structure was established by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS). A search for this novel bile acid in other Ciconiiformes showed that it constituted >92% of biliary bile acids in five of nine herons in the Ardidae, but was absent in all other families (Ciconiidae, Threskiornithidae, Scopidae, Phoenicopteridae). The presence of this biochemical trait in the Shoebill stork and certain herons suggests that these birds are closely related.

  12. Aspirin Prevention of Cholesterol Gallstone Formation in Prairie Dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sum P.; Carey, Martin C.; Lamont, J. Thomas

    1981-03-01

    When prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are fed a diet containing cholesterol, a marked increase in gallbladder mucin secretion parallels the evolution of cholesterol supersaturated bile. Gelation of mucin precedes the precipitation of cholesterol liquid and solid crystals and the development of gallstones. Aspirin given to prairie dogs inhibited mucin hypersecretion and gel accumulation and prevented gallstone formation without influencing the cholesterol content of supersaturated bile. This suggests that gallbladder mucin is a nucleation matrix for cholesterol gallstones.

  13. Identification of the major endogenous leukotriene metabolite in the bile of rats as N-acetyl leukotriene E4

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, W.; Denzlinger, C.; Rapp, S.; Weckbecker, G.; Keppler, D.

    1986-02-01

    Mercapturic acid formation, an established pathway in the detoxication of xenobiotics, is demonstrated for cysteinyl leukotrienes generated in rats in vivo after endotoxin treatment. The mercapturate N-acetyl-leukotriene E4 (N-acetyl-LTE4) represented a major metabolite eliminated into bile after injection of (/sup 3/H)LTC4 as shown by cochromatography with synthetic N-acetyl-LTE4 in four different HPLC solvent systems. The identity of endogenous N-acetyl-LTE4 elicited by endotoxin in vivo was additionally verified by enzymatic deacetylation followed by chemical N-acetylation. The deacetylation was catalyzed by penicillin amidase. Endogenous cysteinyl leukotrienes were quantified by radioimmunoassay after HPLC separation. A N-acetyl-LTE4 concentration of 80 nmol/l was determined in bile collected between 30 and 60 min after endotoxin injection. Under this condition, other cysteinyl leukotrienes detected in bile by radioimmunoassay amounted to less than 5% of N-acetyl-LTE4. The mercapturic acid pathway, leading from the glutathione conjugate LTC4 to N-acetyl-LTE4, thus plays an important role in the deactivation and elimination of these potent endogenous mediators.

  14. Investigating bile salt aggregation using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila Verde, Ana; Frenkel, Daan

    2010-03-01

    Bile salts are necessary for fat digestion due to their unusual surfactant properties: they assemble into small, polydisperse micelles and easily form mixed micelles with poorly soluble amphiphiles. Understanding these properties requires molecular scale information about bile salt micelles, something challenging to obtain experimentally but amenable to computational modeling. To address this issue we build a coarse-grained model of bile salts. We investigate their aggregation behavior through molecular dynamics simulations in a grand-canonical parallel tempering scheme. We validate our model against available solubility and light scattering data. Our results indicate that at physiological bile salt and counter ion concentrations, bile salts pack in many different orientations in pure bile micelles, contrary to standard surfactants. This feature may be physiologically relevant, allowing bile salts to solubilize the heterogeneous blends of fats typical of digestion.

  15. CPI-613 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  16. Effects of artificial depletion of the bile acid pool in man.

    PubMed Central

    Jazrawi, R P; Bridges, C; Joseph, A E; Northfield, T C

    1986-01-01

    In order to elucidate the relationship between bile acid pool size and cholesterol saturation index of fasting state gall bladder bile, we artificially depleted the bile acid pool in 12 healthy volunteers. Bile acid pool size decreased from 7.6 +/- 0.9 to 5.8 +/- 0.7 mmol (mean +/- SEM, p less than 0.01), and saturation index of fasting state gall bladder bile increased from 0.93 +/- 0.07 to 1.18 +/- 0.07 (p less than 0.001). There was no alteration in saturation index of basal or stimulated hepatic bile. There was no change in gall bladder storage of basal hepatic bile, nor in the proportion of the bile acid pool stored in the gall bladder. The bile acid mass in the gall bladder fell from 4.9 +/- 0.5 to 3.4 +/- 0.4 mmol (p less than 0.05) and phospholipid mass from 1.6 +/- 0.3 to 1.2 +/- 0.2 mmol (p less than 0.05), but there was no change in cholesterol mass. The gall bladder volume fell from 30 +/- 4 to 18 +/- 2 ml (p less than 0.01). These results suggest that artificial depletion of the bile acid pool increased saturation index of fasting state gall bladder bile without altering saturation index of basal or stimulated hepatic bile; it probably increased the ratio of basal: stimulated hepatic bile within the gall bladder by decreasing gall bladder storage of stimulated hepatic bile. PMID:3732888

  17. Early Increases in Bile Acids Post Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Are Driven by Insulin-Sensitizing, Secondary Bile Acids

    PubMed Central

    Albaugh, Vance L.; Flynn, Charles Robb; Cai, Steven; Xiao, Yi; Tamboli, Robyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity and resolution of diabetes. Over the last decade, it has become well accepted that this resolution of diabetes occurs before significant weight loss; however, the mechanisms behind this effect remain unknown and could represent novel therapeutic targets for obesity and diabetes. Bile acids have been identified as putative mediators of these weight loss-independent effects. Objective: To identify the longitudinal changes in bile acids after RYGB, which may provide mechanistic insight into the weight loss-independent effects of RYGB. Design: Observational study before/after intervention. Setting: Academic medical center. Patients/Participants: Samples were collected from morbidly obese patients (n = 21) before and after RYGB. Intervention: RYGB. Main Outcome Measures: Seventeen individual bile acid species were measured preoperatively and at 1, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Anthropometric, hormonal, and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp data were also examined to identify physiological parameters associated with bile acid changes. Results: Fasting total plasma bile acids increased after RYGB; however, increases were bimodal and were observed only at 1 (P < .05) and 24 months (P < .01). One-month increases were secondary to surges in ursodeoxycholic acid and its glycine and taurine conjugates, bacterially derived bile acids with putative insulin-sensitizing effects. Increases at 24 months were due to gradual rises in primary unconjugated bile acids as well as deoxycholic acid and its glycine conjugate. Plasma bile acid changes were not significantly associated with any anthropometric or hormonal measures, although hepatic insulin sensitivity was significantly improved at 1 month. Conclusions: Overall findings suggest that bacterially derived bile acids may mediate the early improvements at 1 month after RYGB. Future studies should examine the changes in specific bile

  18. Biliary calcium and gallstone formation.

    PubMed

    Moore, E W

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a brief overview of the current status of the field of biliary calcium and the role of calcium in the formation and maturation of gallstones. The study of free Ca+(+) ions in bile by electrochemical potentiometric measurements using Ca+(+)-selective ion-exchange electrodes is a relatively new field, but much progress has been made in the past few years. Using this powerful analytical tool, new concepts and findings have arisen in almost every aspect of biliary calcium. Although the current symposium is targeted primarily toward cholesterol gallstones, there are several areas in which understanding of biliary calcium may significantly contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of cholesterol, as well as "pigment" (calcium salt), gallstones. Five broad areas are considered in relation to biliary calcium: (a) physiology (calcium entry into bile), (b) biophysics (the regulation of biliary free [Ca+(+)] as related to Gibbs-Donnan equilibria, (c) physical chemistry (the physicochemical state of calcium in bile, (d) thermodynamics (calcium solubility in bile), and (e) kinetics (pronucleating and antinucleating factors and metastable states). With more specific reference to cholesterol stones, consideration is also made of (a) the calcium salt "seed" hypothesis in cholesterol stone pathogenesis; (b) the interactions of Ca+(+) with phospholipid-cholesterol vesicles, with consideration of possible structural requirements and (c) thermodynamic and kinetic factors as related to peripheral or "eggshell" calcification of existing cholesterol stones. PMID:2210651

  19. Resistance to butyrate impairs bile acid-induced apoptosis in human colon adenocarcinoma cells via up-regulation of Bcl-2 and inactivation of Bax.

    PubMed

    Barrasa, Juan I; Santiago-Gómez, Angélica; Olmo, Nieves; Lizarbe, María Antonia; Turnay, Javier

    2012-12-01

    A critical risk factor in colorectal carcinogenesis and tumor therapy is the resistance to the apoptotic effects of different compounds from the intestinal lumen, among them butyrate (main regulator of colonic epithelium homeostasis). Insensitivity to butyrate-induced apoptosis yields resistance to other agents, as bile acids or chemotherapy drugs, allowing the selective growth of malignant cell subpopulations. Here we analyze bile acid-induced apoptosis in a butyrate-resistant human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (BCS-TC2.BR2) to determine the mechanisms that underlay the resistance to these agents in comparison with their parental butyrate-sensitive BCS-TC2 cells. This study demonstrates that DCA and CDCA still induce apoptosis in butyrate-resistant cells through increased ROS production by activation of membrane-associated enzymes and subsequent triggering of the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Although this mechanism is similar to that described in butyrate-sensitive cells, cell viability is significantly higher in resistant cells. Moreover, butyrate-resistant cells show higher Bcl-2 levels that confer resistance to bile acid-induced apoptosis sequestering Bax and avoiding Bax-dependent pore formation in the mitochondria. We have confirmed that this resistance is reverted using the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263, thus demonstrating that the lower sensitivity of butyrate-resistant cells to the apoptotic effects of bile acids is mainly due to increased Bcl-2 levels.

  20. Synthesis and antifungal activity of bile acid-derived oxazoles.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Lucía R; Svetaz, Laura; Butassi, Estefanía; Zacchino, Susana A; Palermo, Jorge A; Sánchez, Marianela

    2016-04-01

    Peracetylated bile acids (1a-g) were used as starting materials for the preparation of fourteen new derivatives bearing an oxazole moiety in their side chain (6a-g, 8a-g). The key step for the synthetic path was a Dakin-West reaction followed by a Robinson-Gabriel cyclodehydration. A simpler model oxazole (12) was also synthesized. The antifungal activity of the new compounds (6a-g) as well as their starting bile acids (1a-g) was tested against Candida albicans. Compounds 6e and 6g showed the highest percentages of inhibition (63.84% and 61.40% at 250 μg/mL respectively). Deacetylation of compounds 6a-g, led to compounds 8a-g which showed lower activities than the acetylated derivatives. PMID:26827629

  1. Role of bile acids in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer: An old topic with new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hui-Yi; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    The role of bile acids in colorectal cancer has been well documented, but their role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this review, we examined the risk factors of pancreatic cancer. We found that bile acids are associated with most of these factors. Alcohol intake, smoking, and a high-fat diet all lead to high secretion of bile acids, and bile acid metabolic dysfunction is a causal factor of gallstones. An increase in secretion of bile acids, in addition to a long common channel, may result in bile acid reflux into the pancreatic duct and to the epithelial cells or acinar cells, from which pancreatic adenocarcinoma is derived. The final pathophysiological process is pancreatitis, which promotes dedifferentiation of acinar cells into progenitor duct-like cells. Interestingly, bile acids act as regulatory molecules in metabolism, affecting adipose tissue distribution, insulin sensitivity and triglyceride metabolism. As a result, bile acids are associated with three risk factors of pancreatic cancer: obesity, diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. In the second part of this review, we summarize several studies showing that bile acids act as cancer promoters in gastrointestinal cancer. However, more question are raised than have been solved, and further oncological and physiological experiments are needed to confirm the role of bile acids in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis.

  2. Role of bile acids in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer: An old topic with new perspective.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui-Yi; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-09-01

    The role of bile acids in colorectal cancer has been well documented, but their role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this review, we examined the risk factors of pancreatic cancer. We found that bile acids are associated with most of these factors. Alcohol intake, smoking, and a high-fat diet all lead to high secretion of bile acids, and bile acid metabolic dysfunction is a causal factor of gallstones. An increase in secretion of bile acids, in addition to a long common channel, may result in bile acid reflux into the pancreatic duct and to the epithelial cells or acinar cells, from which pancreatic adenocarcinoma is derived. The final pathophysiological process is pancreatitis, which promotes dedifferentiation of acinar cells into progenitor duct-like cells. Interestingly, bile acids act as regulatory molecules in metabolism, affecting adipose tissue distribution, insulin sensitivity and triglyceride metabolism. As a result, bile acids are associated with three risk factors of pancreatic cancer: obesity, diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. In the second part of this review, we summarize several studies showing that bile acids act as cancer promoters in gastrointestinal cancer. However, more question are raised than have been solved, and further oncological and physiological experiments are needed to confirm the role of bile acids in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis. PMID:27672269

  3. MAFG is a transcriptional repressor of bile acid synthesis and metabolism.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Q; Tarling, Elizabeth J; Ahn, Hannah; Hagey, Lee R; Romanoski, Casey E; Lee, Richard G; Graham, Mark J; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Edwards, Peter A

    2015-02-01

    Specific bile acids are potent signaling molecules that modulate metabolic pathways affecting lipid, glucose and bile acid homeostasis, and the microbiota. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver, and the key enzymes involved in bile acid synthesis (Cyp7a1, Cyp8b1) are regulated transcriptionally by the nuclear receptor FXR. We have identified an FXR-regulated pathway upstream of a transcriptional repressor that controls multiple bile acid metabolism genes. We identify MafG as an FXR target gene and show that hepatic MAFG overexpression represses genes of the bile acid synthetic pathway and modifies the biliary bile acid composition. In contrast, loss-of-function studies using MafG(+/-) mice causes de-repression of the same genes with concordant changes in biliary bile acid levels. Finally, we identify functional MafG response elements in bile acid metabolism genes using ChIP-seq analysis. Our studies identify a molecular mechanism for the complex feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis controlled by FXR.

  4. Metabolic effects of intestinal absorption and enterohepatic cycling of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Ferrebee, Courtney B.; Dawson, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The classical functions of bile acids include acting as detergents to facilitate the digestion and absorption of nutrients in the gut. In addition, bile acids also act as signaling molecules to regulate glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism and energy expenditure. The signaling potential of bile acids in compartments such as the systemic circulation is regulated in part by an efficient enterohepatic circulation that functions to conserve and channel the pool of bile acids within the intestinal and hepatobiliary compartments. Changes in hepatobiliary and intestinal bile acid transport can alter the composition, size, and distribution of the bile acid pool. These alterations in turn can have significant effects on bile acid signaling and their downstream metabolic targets. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of the inter-relationship between the enterohepatic cycling of bile acids and the metabolic consequences of signaling via bile acid-activated receptors, such as farnesoid X nuclear receptor (FXR) and the G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor (TGR5). PMID:26579438

  5. Role of bile acids in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer: An old topic with new perspective.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui-Yi; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-09-01

    The role of bile acids in colorectal cancer has been well documented, but their role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this review, we examined the risk factors of pancreatic cancer. We found that bile acids are associated with most of these factors. Alcohol intake, smoking, and a high-fat diet all lead to high secretion of bile acids, and bile acid metabolic dysfunction is a causal factor of gallstones. An increase in secretion of bile acids, in addition to a long common channel, may result in bile acid reflux into the pancreatic duct and to the epithelial cells or acinar cells, from which pancreatic adenocarcinoma is derived. The final pathophysiological process is pancreatitis, which promotes dedifferentiation of acinar cells into progenitor duct-like cells. Interestingly, bile acids act as regulatory molecules in metabolism, affecting adipose tissue distribution, insulin sensitivity and triglyceride metabolism. As a result, bile acids are associated with three risk factors of pancreatic cancer: obesity, diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. In the second part of this review, we summarize several studies showing that bile acids act as cancer promoters in gastrointestinal cancer. However, more question are raised than have been solved, and further oncological and physiological experiments are needed to confirm the role of bile acids in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis.

  6. MAFG Is a Transcriptional Repressor of Bile Acid Synthesis and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Q.; Tarling, Elizabeth J.; Ahn, Hannah; Hagey, Lee R.; Romanoski, Casey E.; Lee, Richard G.; Graham, Mark J.; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Edwards, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Specific bile acids are potent signaling molecules that modulate metabolic pathways affecting lipid, glucose and bile acid homeostasis and the microbiota. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver, and the key enzymes involved in bile acid synthesis (Cyp7a1, Cyp8b1) are regulated transcriptionally by the nuclear receptor FXR. We have identified an FXR-regulated pathway upstream of a transcriptional repressor that controls multiple bile acid metabolism genes. We identify MafG as an FXR target gene and show that hepatic MAFG overexpression represses genes of the bile acid synthetic pathway, and modifies the biliary bile acid composition. In contrast, loss-of-function studies using MafG+/− mice causes de-repression of the same genes with concordant changes in biliary bile acid levels. Finally, we identify functional MafG response elements in bile acid metabolism genes using ChIP-Seq analysis. Our studies identify a molecular mechanism for the complex feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis controlled by FXR. PMID:25651182

  7. Role of bile acids in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer: An old topic with new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hui-Yi; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    The role of bile acids in colorectal cancer has been well documented, but their role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this review, we examined the risk factors of pancreatic cancer. We found that bile acids are associated with most of these factors. Alcohol intake, smoking, and a high-fat diet all lead to high secretion of bile acids, and bile acid metabolic dysfunction is a causal factor of gallstones. An increase in secretion of bile acids, in addition to a long common channel, may result in bile acid reflux into the pancreatic duct and to the epithelial cells or acinar cells, from which pancreatic adenocarcinoma is derived. The final pathophysiological process is pancreatitis, which promotes dedifferentiation of acinar cells into progenitor duct-like cells. Interestingly, bile acids act as regulatory molecules in metabolism, affecting adipose tissue distribution, insulin sensitivity and triglyceride metabolism. As a result, bile acids are associated with three risk factors of pancreatic cancer: obesity, diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. In the second part of this review, we summarize several studies showing that bile acids act as cancer promoters in gastrointestinal cancer. However, more question are raised than have been solved, and further oncological and physiological experiments are needed to confirm the role of bile acids in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis. PMID:27672269

  8. Identification and differentiation of bear bile used in medicinal products in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, D L; Chang, H C; Chang, C P; Chen, C Y

    1997-09-01

    One hundred eighty-three suspect bear bile used in medicinal products, collected in Taiwan as gall bladders or dried powder forms, were analyzed using FTIR, HPTLC, and HPLC techniques to identify whether they are indeed bear bile. Those confirmed were further examined to determine whether the observed analytical parameters can be reliably used for source inference, i.e., differentiating products among North American black bear, farmed Asiatic black bear, polar bear, etc. Our data suggested that North American and polar bears contain a higher concentration of TC (relative to TUDC and TCDC), whereas the relative concentration of TC in Asiatic bears (wild or farmed) is much lower. Thus, the relative concentration of TC can potentially be used for differentiating Asiatic bear bile from North American and polar bear products, but it cannot be used for the differentiation of wild and farmed bear bile as suggested in an earlier report by Espinoza et al. The origin of the 183 samples analyzed were found to be as follows: 118 (64%), bile salts, or gall bladders were of domestic pig; 56 (31%), bile products of Asiatic bear; 4 (2.2%), Asiatic bear mixed with pig bile salts; 3 (1.6%) goat gall bladders; 1 (0.55%) water buffalo bile salts; and 1 (0.55%), pig bile salts mixed with water buffalo bile salts. PMID:9304828

  9. Non-Newtonian flow of pathological bile in the biliary system: experimental investigation and CFD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchumov, Alex G.; Gilev, Valeriy; Popov, Vitaliy; Samartsev, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vasiliy

    2014-02-01

    The paper presents an experimental study of pathological human bile taken from the gallbladder and bile ducts. The flow dependences were obtained for different types of bile from patients with the same pathology, but of different age and sex. The parameters of the Casson's and Carreau's equations were found for bile samples. Results on the hysteretic bile behavior at loading-unloading tests are also presented, which proved that the pathologic bile is a non-Newtonian thixotropic liquid. The viscosity of the gallbladder bile was shown to be higher compared to the duct bile. It was found that at higher shear stress the pathological bile behaves like Newtonian fluid, which is explained by reorientation of structural components. Moreover, some pathological bile flow in the biliary system CFD simulations were performed. The velocity and pressure distributions as well as flow rates in the biliary segments during the gallbladder refilling and emptying phases are obtained. The results of CFD simulations can be used for surgeons to assess the patient's condition and choose an adequate treatment.

  10. In Sickness and in Health: The Relationships Between Bacteria and Bile in the Human Gut.

    PubMed

    Hay, A J; Zhu, J

    2016-01-01

    Colonization of a human host with a commensal microbiota has a complex interaction in which bacterial communities provide numerous health benefits to the host. An equilibrium between host and microbiota is kept in check with the help of biliary secretions by the host. Bile, composed primarily of bile salts, promotes digestion. It also provides a barrier between host and bacteria. After bile salts are synthesized in the liver, they are stored in the gallbladder to be released after food intake. The set of host-secreted bile salts is modified by the resident bacteria. Because bile salts are toxic to bacteria, an equilibrium of modified bile salts is reached that allows commensal bacteria to survive, yet rebuffs invading pathogens. In addition to direct toxic effects on cells, bile salts maintain homeostasis as signaling molecules, tuning the immune system. To cause disease, gram-negative pathogenic bacteria have shared strategies to survive this harsh environment. Through exclusion of bile, efflux of bile, and repair of bile-induced damage, these pathogens can successfully disrupt and outcompete the microbiota to activate virulence factors. PMID:27565580

  11. Identification and differentiation of bear bile used in medicinal products in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, D L; Chang, H C; Chang, C P; Chen, C Y

    1997-09-01

    One hundred eighty-three suspect bear bile used in medicinal products, collected in Taiwan as gall bladders or dried powder forms, were analyzed using FTIR, HPTLC, and HPLC techniques to identify whether they are indeed bear bile. Those confirmed were further examined to determine whether the observed analytical parameters can be reliably used for source inference, i.e., differentiating products among North American black bear, farmed Asiatic black bear, polar bear, etc. Our data suggested that North American and polar bears contain a higher concentration of TC (relative to TUDC and TCDC), whereas the relative concentration of TC in Asiatic bears (wild or farmed) is much lower. Thus, the relative concentration of TC can potentially be used for differentiating Asiatic bear bile from North American and polar bear products, but it cannot be used for the differentiation of wild and farmed bear bile as suggested in an earlier report by Espinoza et al. The origin of the 183 samples analyzed were found to be as follows: 118 (64%), bile salts, or gall bladders were of domestic pig; 56 (31%), bile products of Asiatic bear; 4 (2.2%), Asiatic bear mixed with pig bile salts; 3 (1.6%) goat gall bladders; 1 (0.55%) water buffalo bile salts; and 1 (0.55%), pig bile salts mixed with water buffalo bile salts.

  12. Bile Acid-Induced Necrosis in Primary Human Hepatocytes and in Patients with Obstructive Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. PMID:25636263

  13. Biliary proteins. Unique inhibitors of cholesterol crystal nucleation in human gallbladder bile.

    PubMed Central

    Holzbach, R T; Kibe, A; Thiel, E; Howell, J H; Marsh, M; Hermann, R E

    1984-01-01

    The onset time for cholesterol crystal nucleation of supersaturated normal human gallbladder biles is consistently prolonged when compared with biles from patients with cholesterol gallstone disease. Investigation of the factor(s) responsible for the suspended supersaturation (metastability) of normal human biles revealed that model bile solutions of cholesterol saturation index (CSI) and molar lipid composition identical to individual gallbladder bile specimens had much shorter crystal nucleation times, i.e., exhibited decreased metastability. Unsaturated normal biles, after supplementation with lecithin, cholesterol, and sodium taurocholate to a 'standard' supersaturated lipid composition, also demonstrated nucleation times three- to 15-fold longer than the comparable standard model bile. Total lipid extracts of normal biles, however, when similarly supplemented, did not differ in nucleation time from the control model solution. Gallbladder biles were fractionated by gel chromatography and the eluted fractions were pooled into two fractions. The fractions eluting in about the first 25% of the included volume when mixed with the supersaturated standard model bile induced a modest increase in nucleation time of approximately 1.5 times the control value. The fractions eluting in the second 25% of the included volume and which contained all of the bile lipids, were concentrated and supplemented with lipids to the standard composition. The nucleation times of these supplements were 3-10 times longer than the control nucleation times. Delipidated bile protein mixtures, purified by discontinuous sucrose gradient centrifugation, were recombined with purified lipids at the standard composition used previously. The nucleation times of these mixtures were significantly prolonged to the same extent as those associated with the second chromatographic fraction. These observations demonstrate that the delayed onset (inhibition) of cholesterol crystal nucleation observed in

  14. Bile duct confluence: anatomic variations and its classification.

    PubMed

    Chaib, Eleazar; Kanas, Alexandre Fligelman; Galvão, Flavio Henrique Ferreira; D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro

    2014-03-01

    Accurate knowledge of the anatomy of the bile ducts is critical for successfully hepato-biliary surgery. We describe the anatomical variations of the confluence of the bile ducts, their branches patterns, frequency and classification. From 1996 to 2011, we have collected data of the bile duct confluence. 2,032 and 1,014 anatomical variations of right and left bile ducts, respectively, were reviewed and classified according to the branching pattern. The frequencies of each type of the right hepatic duct (RHD) were as follows: Type A1-1,247 (61.3%); Type A2-296 (14.5%); Type A3-272 (13.3%); Type A4-124 (6.1%); Type A5-21 (1%) and others-72 (3.5%) and, for the left hepatic duct (LHD) was as follows: Type B1-773 (76.2%); Type B2-153 (15%); Type B3-38 (3.7%); Type B4-9 (0.8%); Type B5-29 (2.8%) and others-12 (1.1%). Atypical branching patterns of both the right and left hepatic ducts were found in 14 and 8%, respectively. The two most common variations of the RHD were right anterior and posterior hepatic ducts join together to form the RHD and trifurcation where the RHD is absent and right anterior and posterior hepatic ducts join directly to the confluence with the LHD to form the common hepatic duct. The two most common variations in the LHD were segment IV drainage to the left and right hepatic ducts.

  15. Diagnosis of obstructive jaundice with nondilated bile ducts.

    PubMed

    Muhletaler, C A; Gerlock, A J; Fleischer, A C; James, A E

    1980-06-01

    Obstructive jaundice with nondilated bile ducts was identified by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) in nine of 29 jaundiced patients in whom the etiology of the jaundice was not clearly established by clinical or laboratory means and no dilated ducts were seen at somography or computed tomography (CT). PTC was helpful in these none patients by: (1) differentiating obstructive from nonobstructive jaundice, (2) localizing the site and etiology of the obstructing lesion, and (3) determining operability.

  16. Laparoscopic Transcystic Common Bile Duct Exploration: Advantages over Laparoscopic Choledochotomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Yuan, Rongfa; Xiong, Xiaoli; Wu, Linquan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The ideal treatment for choledocholithiasis should be simple, readily available, reliable, minimally invasive and cost-effective for patients. We performed this study to compare the benefits and drawbacks of different laparoscopic approaches (transcystic and choledochotomy) for removal of common bile duct stones. Methods A systematic search was implemented for relevant literature using Cochrane, PubMed, Ovid Medline, EMBASE and Wanfang databases. Both the fixed-effects and random-effects models were used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) or the mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for this study. Results The meta-analysis included 18 trials involving 2,782 patients. There were no statistically significant differences between laparoscopic choledochotomy for common bile duct exploration (LCCBDE) (n = 1,222) and laparoscopic transcystic common bile duct exploration (LTCBDE) (n = 1,560) regarding stone clearance (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.50–1.07; P = 0.11), conversion to other procedures (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.21–1.79; P = 0.38), total morbidity (OR 1.65, 95% CI 0.92–2.96; P = 0.09), operative time (MD 12.34, 95% CI −0.10–24.78; P = 0.05), and blood loss (MD 1.95, 95% CI −9.56–13.46; P = 0.74). However, the LTCBDE group showed significantly better results for biliary morbidity (OR 4.25, 95% CI 2.30–7.85; P<0.001), hospital stay (MD 2.52, 95% CI 1.29–3.75; P<0.001), and hospital expenses (MD 0.30, 95% CI 0.23–0.37; P<0.001) than the LCCBDE group. Conclusions LTCBDE is safer than LCCBDE, and is the ideal treatment for common bile duct stones. PMID:27668730

  17. Regulation of human class I alcohol dehydrogenases by bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Langhi, Cédric; Pedraz-Cuesta, Elena; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F.; Rodríguez, Joan C.

    2013-01-01

    Class I alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH1s) are the rate-limiting enzymes for ethanol and vitamin A (retinol) metabolism in the liver. Because previous studies have shown that human ADH1 enzymes may participate in bile acid metabolism, we investigated whether the bile acid-activated nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates ADH1 genes. In human hepatocytes, both the endogenous FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid and synthetic FXR-specific agonist GW4064 increased ADH1 mRNA, protein, and activity. Moreover, overexpression of a constitutively active form of FXR induced ADH1A and ADH1B expression, whereas silencing of FXR abolished the effects of FXR agonists on ADH1 expression and activity. Transient transfection studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed functional FXR response elements in the ADH1A and ADH1B proximal promoters, thus indicating that both genes are direct targets of FXR. These findings provide the first evidence for direct connection of bile acid signaling and alcohol metabolism. PMID:23772048

  18. Regulation of human class I alcohol dehydrogenases by bile acids.

    PubMed

    Langhi, Cédric; Pedraz-Cuesta, Elena; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F; Rodríguez, Joan C

    2013-09-01

    Class I alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH1s) are the rate-limiting enzymes for ethanol and vitamin A (retinol) metabolism in the liver. Because previous studies have shown that human ADH1 enzymes may participate in bile acid metabolism, we investigated whether the bile acid-activated nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates ADH1 genes. In human hepatocytes, both the endogenous FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid and synthetic FXR-specific agonist GW4064 increased ADH1 mRNA, protein, and activity. Moreover, overexpression of a constitutively active form of FXR induced ADH1A and ADH1B expression, whereas silencing of FXR abolished the effects of FXR agonists on ADH1 expression and activity. Transient transfection studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed functional FXR response elements in the ADH1A and ADH1B proximal promoters, thus indicating that both genes are direct targets of FXR. These findings provide the first evidence for direct connection of bile acid signaling and alcohol metabolism.

  19. Colesevelam: potential uses for the newest bile resin.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Karen L; Schonder, Kristine S

    2005-01-01

    Colesevelam is the newest bile resin with a unique chemical structure. It binds to bile acids with higher affinity than traditional bile acid sequestrants and has fewer gastrointestinal side effects and drug interactions. Colesevelam is safe and efficacious alone or in combination with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) in reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Despite this, the role of colesevelam in the treatment of hyperlipidemia remains limited, particularly in the face of new lipid lowering agents. As guidelines for cholesterol control become more stringent, the need to maximize therapeutic benefit through combination therapy will become increasingly more important. Colesevelam has a dose-sparing effect on statin therapy, potentially decreasing the risk of unwanted side effects or drug-drug interactions associated with statin use. This makes colesevelam a viable option for addition to a statin regimen when goal LDL-C levels cannot be achieved with a statin alone. Additionally, anecdotal reports indicate that colesevelam may have potential benefits in certain patient populations that cannot tolerate other lipid lowering therapies, including organ transplant recipients, cholestatic liver disesase, and end-stage renal disease. By recognizing the potential utility of colesevelam, clinicians can better manage those patients who are not able to tolerate first-line therapies. PMID:15867945

  20. Synthesis of 24-phenyl-24-oxo steroids derived from bile acids by palladium-catalyzed cross coupling with phenylboronic acid. NMR characterization and X-ray structures.

    PubMed

    Mayorquín-Torres, Martha C; Romero-Ávila, Margarita; Flores-Álamo, Marcos; Iglesias-Arteaga, Martin A

    2013-11-01

    Palladium-catalyzed cross coupling of phenyboronic acid with acetylated bile acids in which the carboxyl functions have been activated by formation of a mixed anhydride with pivalic anhydride afforded moderate to good yield of 24-phenyl-24-oxo-steroids. Unambiguous assignments of the NMR signals were made with the aid of combined 1D and 2D NMR techniques. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the obtained structures.

  1. Potency of individual bile acids to regulate bile acid synthesis and transport genes in primary human hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Hong; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Lei, Xiaohong; Cui, Julia Yue; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Stephen C; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate their own homeostasis, but the potency of individual bile acids is not known. This study examined the effects of cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on expression of BA synthesis and transport genes in human primary hepatocyte cultures. Hepatocytes were treated with the individual BAs at 10, 30, and 100μM for 48 h, and RNA was extracted for real-time PCR analysis. For the classic pathway of BA synthesis, BAs except for UDCA markedly suppressed CYP7A1 (70-95%), the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid synthesis, but only moderately (35%) down-regulated CYP8B1 at a high concentration of 100μM. BAs had minimal effects on mRNA of two enzymes of the alternative pathway of BA synthesis, namely CYP27A1 and CYP7B1. BAs increased the two major target genes of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), namely the small heterodimer partner (SHP) by fourfold, and markedly induced fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) over 100-fold. The BA uptake transporter Na(+)-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide was unaffected, whereas the efflux transporter bile salt export pump was increased 15-fold and OSTα/β were increased 10-100-fold by BAs. The expression of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3; sixfold), ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter G5 (ABCG5; sixfold), multidrug associated protein-2 (MRP2; twofold), and MRP3 (threefold) were also increased, albeit to lesser degrees. In general, CDCA was the most potent and effective BA in regulating these genes important for BA homeostasis, whereas DCA and CA were intermediate, LCA the least, and UDCA ineffective.

  2. Individual bile acids have differential effects on bile acid signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Peizhen; Rockwell, Cheryl E; Cui, Julia Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2015-02-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate BA synthesis and transport by the farnesoid X receptor in the liver (FXR-SHP) and intestine (FXR-Fgf15). However, the relative importance of individual BAs in regulating these processes is not known. Therefore, mice were fed various doses of five individual BAs, including cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxoycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in their diets at various concentrations for one week to increase the concentration of one BA in the enterohepatic circulation. The mRNA of BA synthesis and transporting genes in liver and ileum were quantified. In the liver, the mRNA of SHP, which is the prototypical target gene of FXR, increased in mice fed all concentrations of BAs. In the ileum, the mRNA of the intestinal FXR target gene Fgf15 was increased at lower doses and to a higher extent by CA and DCA than by CDCA and LCA. Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis, was decreased more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Cyp8b1, the enzyme that 12-hydroxylates BAs and is thus responsible for the synthesis of CA, was decreased much more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Surprisingly, neither a decrease in the conjugated BA uptake transporter (Ntcp) nor increase in BA efflux transporter (Bsep) was observed by FXR activation, but an increase in the cholesterol efflux transporter (Abcg5/Abcg8) was observed with FXR activation. Thus in conclusion, CA and DCA are more potent FXR activators than CDCA and LCA when fed to mice, and thus they are more effective in decreasing the expression of the rate limiting gene in BA synthesis Cyp7a1 and the 12-hydroxylation of BAs Cyp8b1, and are also more effective in increasing the expression of Abcg5/Abcg8, which is responsible for biliary cholesterol excretion. However, feeding BAs do not alter the mRNA or protein levels of Ntcp or Bsep, suggesting that the uptake or efflux of BAs is not regulated by FXR at physiological and

  3. Bile acid nephropathy in a bodybuilder abusing an anabolic androgenic steroid.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Randy L; Castano, Ekaterina; Moeckel, Gilbert; Perazella, Mark A

    2014-09-01

    Bile acid nephropathy, also known as cholemic nephrosis or nephropathy, is an entity that can be seen in patients with severe cholestatic liver disease. It typically is associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) with various forms of hepatic disease. Most often, patients with severe obstructive jaundice develop this lesion, which is thought to occur due to direct bile acid injury to tubular cells, as well as obstructing bile acid casts. Patients with end-stage liver disease also can develop AKI, in which case a more heterogeneous lesion occurs that includes hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular injury/necrosis. In this circumstance, acute tubular injury develops from a combination of hemodynamic changes with some contribution from direct bile acid-related tubular toxicity and obstructive bile casts. We present a case of AKI due to bile acid nephropathy in a bodybuilder who developed severe cholestatic liver disease in the setting of anabolic androgenic steroid use. PMID:24953892

  4. Solubilization and Interaction Studies of Bile Salts with Surfactants and Drugs: a Review.

    PubMed

    Malik, Nisar Ahmad

    2016-05-01

    In this review, bile salt, bile salt-surfactant, and bile salt-drug interactions and their solubilization studies are mainly focused. Usefulness of bile salts in digestion, absorption, and excretion of various compounds and their rare properties in ordering the shape and size of the micelles owing to the presence of hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces are taken into consideration while compiling this review. Bile salts as potential bio-surfactants to solubilize drugs of interest are also highlighted. This review will give an insight into the selection of drugs in different applications as their properties get modified by interaction with bile salts, thus influencing their solution behavior which, in turn, modifies the phase-forming behavior, microemulsion, and clouding phenomenon, besides solubilization. Finally, their future perspectives are taken into consideration to assess their possible uses as bio-surfactants without side effects to human beings.

  5. A biosynthetic pathway for a prominent class of microbiota-derived bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, A. Sloan; Fischbach, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The gut bile acid pool is millimolar in concentration, varies widely in composition among individuals, and is linked to metabolic disease and cancer. Although these molecules derive almost exclusively from the microbiota, remarkably little is known about which bacterial species and genes are responsible for their biosynthesis. Here, we report a biosynthetic pathway for the second most abundant class in the gut, iso (3β-hydroxy) bile acids, whose levels exceed 300 µM in some humans and are absent in others. We show, for the first time, that iso bile acids are produced by Ruminococcus gnavus, a far more abundant commensal than previously known producers; and that the iso bile acid pathway detoxifies deoxycholic acid, favoring the growth of the keystone genus Bacteroides. By revealing the biosynthetic genes for an abundant class of bile acids, our work sets the stage for predicting and rationally altering the composition of the bile acid pool. PMID:26192599

  6. Bile acid nephropathy in a bodybuilder abusing an anabolic androgenic steroid.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Randy L; Castano, Ekaterina; Moeckel, Gilbert; Perazella, Mark A

    2014-09-01

    Bile acid nephropathy, also known as cholemic nephrosis or nephropathy, is an entity that can be seen in patients with severe cholestatic liver disease. It typically is associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) with various forms of hepatic disease. Most often, patients with severe obstructive jaundice develop this lesion, which is thought to occur due to direct bile acid injury to tubular cells, as well as obstructing bile acid casts. Patients with end-stage liver disease also can develop AKI, in which case a more heterogeneous lesion occurs that includes hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular injury/necrosis. In this circumstance, acute tubular injury develops from a combination of hemodynamic changes with some contribution from direct bile acid-related tubular toxicity and obstructive bile casts. We present a case of AKI due to bile acid nephropathy in a bodybuilder who developed severe cholestatic liver disease in the setting of anabolic androgenic steroid use.

  7. In vitro model systems to investigate bile salt export pump (BSEP) activity and drug interactions: A review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yaofeng; Woolf, Thomas F; Gan, Jinping; He, Kan

    2016-08-01

    The bile salt export pump protein (BSEP), expressed on the canalicular membranes of hepatocytes, is primarily responsible for the biliary excretion of bile salts. The inhibition of BSEP transport activity can lead to an increase in intracellular bile salt levels and liver injury. This review discusses the various in vitro assays currently available for assessing the effect of drugs or other chemical entities to modulate BSEP transport activity. BSEP transporter assays use one of the following platforms: Xenopus laevis oocytes; canalicular membrane vesicles (CMV); BSEP-expressed membrane vesicles; cell lines expressing BSEP; sandwich cultured hepatocytes (SCH); and hepatocytes in suspension. Two of these, BSEP-expressed insect membrane vesicles and sandwich cultured hepatocytes, are the most commonly used assays. BSEP membrane vesicles prepared from transfected insect cells are useful for assessing BSEP inhibition or substrate specificity and exploring mechanisms of BSEP-associated genetic diseases. This model can be applied in a high-throughput format for discovery-drug screening. However, experimental results from use of membrane vesicles may lack physiological relevance and the model does not allow for investigation of in situ metabolism in modulation of BSEP activity. Hepatocyte-based assays that use the SCH format provide results that are generally more physiologically relevant than membrane assays. The SCH model is useful in detailed studies of the biliary excretion of drugs and BSEP inhibition, but due to the complexity of SCH preparation, this model is used primarily for determining biliary clearance and BSEP inhibition in a limited number of compounds. The newly developed hepatocyte in suspension assay avoids many of the complexities of the SCH method. The use of pooled cryopreserved hepatocytes in suspension minimizes genetic variance and individual differences in BSEP activity and also provides the opportunity for higher throughput screening and cross

  8. Ceramide formation mediated by acid sphingomyelinase facilitates endosomal escape of caliciviruses.

    PubMed

    Shivanna, Vinay; Kim, Yunjeong; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2015-09-01

    Our recent results demonstrated that bile acids facilitate virus escape from the endosomes into the cytoplasm for successful replication of porcine enteric calicivirus (PEC). We report a novel finding that bile acids can be substituted by cold treatment for endosomal escape and virus replication. This endosomal escape by cold treatment or bile acids is associated with ceramide formation by acid sphingomyelinase (ASM). ASM catalyzes hydrolysis of sphingomyelin into ceramide, which is known to destabilize lipid bilayer. Treatment of LLC-PK cells with bile acids or cold led to ceramide formation, and small molecule antagonists or siRNA of ASM blocked ceramide formation in the endosomes and significantly reduced PEC replication. Inhibition of ASM resulted in the retention of PEC, feline calicivirus or murine norovirus in the endosomes in correlation with reduced viral replication. These results suggest the importance of viral escape from the endosomes for the replication of various caliciviruses. PMID:25985440

  9. A stated preference investigation into the Chinese demand for farmed vs. wild bear bile.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Adam J; Hepburn, Cameron; Macdonald, David W

    2011-01-01

    Farming of animals and plants has recently been considered not merely as a more efficient and plentiful supply of their products but also as a means of protecting wild populations from that trade. Amongst these nascent farming products might be listed bear bile. Bear bile has been exploited by traditional Chinese medicinalists for millennia. Since the 1980s consumers have had the options of: illegal wild gall bladders, bile extracted from caged live bears or the acid synthesised chemically. Despite these alternatives bears continue to be harvested from the wild. In this paper we use stated preference techniques using a random sample of the Chinese population to estimate demand functions for wild bear bile with and without competition from farmed bear bile. We find a willingness to pay considerably more for wild bear bile than farmed. Wild bear bile has low own price elasticity and cross price elasticity with farmed bear bile. The ability of farmed bear bile to reduce demand for wild bear bile is at best limited and, at prevailing prices, may be close to zero or have the opposite effect. The demand functions estimated suggest that the own price elasticity of wild bear bile is lower when competing with farmed bear bile than when it is the only option available. This means that the incumbent product may actually sell more items at a higher price when competing than when alone in the market. This finding may be of broader interest to behavioural economists as we argue that one explanation may be that as product choice increases price has less impact on decision making. For the wildlife farming debate this indicates that at some prices the introduction of farmed competition might increase the demand for the wild product.

  10. Effects of Bile Salt Sodium Glycodeoxycholate on the Self-Assembly of PEO-PPO-PEO Triblock Copolymer P123 in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Bayati, Solmaz; Galantini, Luciano; Knudsen, Kenneth D; Schillén, Karin

    2015-12-22

    A comprehensive experimental study on the interaction between the PEO-PPO-PEO block copolymer P123 (EO20PO68EO20) and the anionic bile salt sodium glycodeoxycholate (NaGDC) in water has been performed. The work was aimed at investigating the suitability of using P123 as bile salt sequestrant beside the fundamental aspects of PEO-PPO-PEO block copolymer-bile salt interactions. Various experimental techniques including dynamic and static light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were employed in combination with electrophoretic mobility measurements. The system was investigated at a constant P123 concentration of 1.74 mM and with varying bile salt concentrations up to approximately 250 mM NaGDC (or a molar ratio n(NaGDC)/n(P123) = 144). In the mixed P123-NaGDC solutions, the endothermic process related to the self-assembly of P123 was observed to gradually decrease in enthalpy and shift to higher temperatures upon progressive addition of NaGDC. To explain this effect, the formation of NaGDC micelles carrying partly dehydrated P123 unimers was proposed and translated into a stoichiometric model, which was able to fit the experimental DSC data. In the mixtures at low molar ratios, NaGDC monomers associated with the P123 micelle forming a charged "P123 micelle-NaGDC" complex with a dehydrated PPO core. These complexes disintegrated upon increasing NaGDC concentration to form small "NaGDC-P123" complexes visualized as bile salt micelles including one or a few P123 copolymer chains.

  11. Bile duct invasion can be an independent prognostic factor in early stage hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ye-Rang; Kim, Hyeyoung; Lee, Jeong-Moo; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Kyung-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), bile duct invasion occurs far more rarely than vascular invasion and is not well characterized. In addition, the pathologic finding of bile duct invasion is not considered an independent prognostic factor for HCC following surgery. In this study, we determined the characteristics of HCC with bile duct invasion, and assessed the clinical significance of bile duct invasion. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 363 patients who underwent hepatic resection for HCC at Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH) from January 2009 to December 2011. Preoperative, operative, and pathological data were collected. The risk factors for recurrence and survival were analyzed. Subsequently, the patients were divided into 2 groups according to disease stage (American Joint Committee on Cancer/International Union Against Cancer 7th edition): early stage (T1 and 2) and advanced stage (T3 and 4) group; and risk factors in the sub-groups were analyzed. Results Among 363 patients, 13 showed bile duct invasion on pathology. Patients with bile duct invasion had higher preoperative total bilirubin levels, greater microvascular invasion, and a higher death rate than those without bile duct invasion. In multivariate analysis, bile duct invasion was not an independent prognostic factor for survival for the entire cohort, but, was an independent prognostic factor for early stage. Conclusions Bile duct invasion accompanied microvascular invasion in most cases, and could be used as an independent prognostic factor for survival especially in early stage HCC (T1 and T2). PMID:26693236

  12. Differential proteomic analysis of outer membrane enriched extracts of Bacteroides fragilis grown under bile salts stress.

    PubMed

    Boente, Renata F; Pauer, Heidi; Silva, Deborah N S; Filho, Joaquim Santos; Sandim, Vanessa; Antunes, Luis Caetano M; Ferreira, Rosana Barreto Rocha; Zingali, Russolina B; Domingues, Regina M C P; Lobo, Leandro A

    2016-06-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the most commonly isolated anaerobic bacteria from infectious processes. Several virulence traits contribute to the pathogenic nature of this bacterium, including the ability to tolerate the high concentrations of bile found in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The activity of bile salts is similar to detergents and may lead to membrane permeabilization and cell death. Modulation of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) is considered a crucial event to bile salts resistance. The primary objective of the current work was to identify B. fragilis proteins associated with the stress induced by high concentration of bile salts. The outer membrane of B. fragilis strain 638R was isolated after growth either in the presence of 2% conjugated bile salts or without bile salts. The membrane fractions were separated on SDS-PAGE and analyzed by ESI-Q/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 37 proteins were identified; among them nine were found to be expressed exclusively in the absence of bile salts whereas eight proteins were expressed only in the presence of bile salts. These proteins are related to cellular functions such as transport through membrane, nutrient uptake, and protein-protein interactions. This study demonstrates the alteration of OMPs composition in B. fragilis during bile salts stress resistance and adaptation to environmental changes. Proteomics of OMPs was also shown to be a useful approach in the identification of new targets for functional analyses.

  13. Recent Progress on Bile Acid Receptor Modulators for Treatment of Metabolic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping

    2016-07-28

    Bile acids are steroid-derived molecules synthesized in the liver, secreted from hepatocytes into the bile canaliculi, and subsequently stored in the gall bladder. During the feeding, bile flows into the duodenum, where it contributes to the solubilization and digestion of lipid-soluble nutrients. After a meal, bile-acid levels increase in the intestine, liver, and also in the systemic circulation. Therefore, serum bile-acid levels serve as an important sensing mechanism for nutrient and energy. Recent studies have described bile acids as versatile signaling molecules endowed with systemic endocrine functions. Bile acids are ligands for G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) such as TGR5 (also known as GPBAR1, M-BAR, and BG37) and nuclear hormone receptors including farnesoid X receptor (FXR; also known as NR1H4). Acting through these diverse signaling pathways, bile acids regulate triglyceride, cholesterol, glucose homeostasis, and energy expenditure. These bile-acid-controlled signaling pathways have become the source of promising novel drug targets to treat common metabolic and hepatic diseases. PMID:26878262

  14. Characterization of a primary bile ductular cell culture from the livers of rats during extrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed Central

    Sirica, A. E.; Sattler, C. A.; Cihla, H. P.

    1985-01-01

    The establishment of novel bile ductular cell cultures was accomplished with the use of explants of a hyperplastic bile ductular tissue preparation obtained from rat livers at 10 to 15 weeks after bile duct ligation or a bile ductular cell fraction isolated from this tissue preparation by a procedure involving Percoll density gradient centrifugation. Observations made on these primary explant and monolayer bile ductular cell cultures were limited to the first 3 days of culture where the morphologic features of the bile ductular epithelium remained fairly well preserved, while fibroblast contamination was found to be very low. These cultured cells also retained over this period a high specific activity for the bile ductular cell marker enzyme gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, as well as possessed measurable but decreasing specific activities for leucine aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase. Karyotypic analysis of the cultured monolayer cells further showed them to be diploid. In addition, preliminary transplantation studies demonstrated the presence of well-differentiated bile ductular-like structures following inoculation of the freshly isolated bile ductular cell fraction into the interscapular fat pads of recipient rats. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2861743

  15. Bile-induced 'pili' in Campylobacter jejuni are bacteria-independent artifacts of the culture medium.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, E C; Ghori, N; Falkow, S

    2001-03-01

    In 1996, it was reported that the enteric pathogen Campylobacter jejuni produces pilus-like appendages in response to bile salts such as deoxycholate (DOC), and that the formation of these appendages requires the putative peptidase PspA. Pili were known to be important virulence determinants in other pathogenic bacteria but had never before been observed for C. jejuni. We report here that these appendages are not pili, but are instead a bacteria-independent morphological artifact of the growth medium. Furthermore, the pspA gene is not required for their formation. Broth cultures containing a threshold concentration of DOC inoculated with no bacteria produced identical abundant, fibrous, pilus-like structures as those cultures that had been inoculated with C. jejuni. These fibres were also found in growth media from DOC-containing pspA:CmR mutant cultures. These results are consistent with the absence of candidate pilin monomers in protein gel analyses as well as the dearth of pilin-like genes and pilus formation gene clusters in the C. jejuni genome.

  16. Characterization of the major diazo-positive pigments in bile of homozygous Gunn rats

    PubMed Central

    Blanckaert, Norbert; Fevery, Johan; Heirwegh, Karel P. M.; Compernolle, Frans

    1977-01-01

    Bilinoid pigments in bile of homozygous Gunn rats (jj) were analysed either after formation of dipyrrolic ethyl anthranilate azo derivatives or as the unmodified parent tetrapyrroles. 1. T.l.c. of the azo derivatives revealed seven major unconjugated components which were structurally characterized by chemical tests, spectrophotometry and mass spectrometry. In addition, two minor components were identified as azodipyrrole (A+B)-glucoside and azodipyrrole (A+B)-β-d-glucuronide. 2. Extraction and t.l.c. of the tetrapyrrolic pigments showed 13 major yellow diazo-positive bands. Four of them, accounting for 59% of total diazo-positive material, were identified as unconjugated bilirubin-IXα, -IXβ, -IXγ and -IXδ. A fifth band (16%) was characterized as a mixture of two isomeric monohydroxyl derivatives and another band (8%) as a dihydroxyl derivative of bilirubin-IXα. 3. Although unconjugated bilirubin-IXα constitutes one-third of total diazo-positive material in bile of our strain of Gunn rats, the daily amount excreted represented only about 3–4% of daily bilirubin production. 4. Phototherapy caused a 2.2-fold increase in the biliary output of diazo-positive bilinoids, but did not affect markedly their composition. However, an additional diazo-negative pigment, accounting for one-third of total yellow colour, was observed but was not identified. Mass-spectral data on two dipyrrolic azopigments have been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50076 (3 pages) with the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, W. Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms given in Biochem. J. (1977) 161, 1. PMID:880230

  17. Deconjugated Bile Salts Produced by Extracellular Bile-Salt Hydrolase-Like Activities from the Probiotic Lactobacillus johnsonii La1 Inhibit Giardia duodenalis In vitro Growth

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Marie-Agnès; Sow, Cissé; Zirah, Séverine; Deregnaucourt, Christiane; Chaouch, Soraya; Queiroz, Rayner M. L.; Charneau, Sébastien; Allain, Thibault; Florent, Isabelle; Grellier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Giardiasis, currently considered a neglected disease, is caused by the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia duodenalis and is widely spread in human as well as domestic and wild animals. The lack of appropriate medications and the spread of resistant parasite strains urgently call for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Host microbiota or certain probiotic strains have the capacity to provide some protection against giardiasis. By combining biological and biochemical approaches, we have been able to decipher a molecular mechanism used by the probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii La1 to prevent Giardia growth in vitro. We provide evidence that the supernatant of this strain contains active principle(s) not directly toxic to Giardia but able to convert non-toxic components of bile into components highly toxic to Giardia. By using bile acid profiling, these components were identified as deconjugated bile-salts. A bacterial bile-salt-hydrolase of commercial origin was able to mimic the properties of the supernatant. Mass spectrometric analysis of the bacterial supernatant identified two of the three bile-salt-hydrolases encoded in the genome of this probiotic strain. These observations document a possible mechanism by which L. johnsonii La1, by secreting, or releasing BSH-like activity(ies) in the vicinity of replicating Giardia in an environment where bile is present and abundant, can fight this parasite. This discovery has both fundamental and applied outcomes to fight giardiasis, based on local delivery of deconjugated bile salts, enzyme deconjugation of bile components, or natural or recombinant probiotic strains that secrete or release such deconjugating activities in a compartment where both bile salts and Giardia are present. PMID:27729900

  18. Interaction of Bile Salts with β-Cyclodextrins Reveals Nonclassical Hydrophobic Effect and Enthalpy-Entropy Compensation.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bijan K; Ghosh, Narayani; Mukherjee, Saptarshi

    2016-04-28

    Herein, we present an endeavor toward exploring the lacuna underlying the host:guest chemistry of inclusion complex formation between bile salt(s) and β-cyclodextrin(s) (βCDs). An extensive thermodynamic investigation based on isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrates a dominant contribution from exothermic enthalpy change (ΔH < 0) accompanying the phenomenon of inclusion complex formation, along with a relatively smaller contribution to total free energy change from the entropic component. However, the negative heat capacity change (ΔCp < 0) displays the hallmark for a pivotal role of hydrophobic effect underlying the interaction. Contrary to the classical hydrophobic effect, such apparently paradoxical thermodynamic signature has been adequately described under the notion of "nonclassical hydrophobic effect". On the basis of our results, the displacement of disordered water from hydrophobic binding sites has been argued to mark the enthalpic signature and the key role of such interaction forces is further corroborated from enthalpy-entropy compensation behavior showing indication for almost complete compensation. To this end, we have quantified the interaction of two bile salt molecules (namely, sodium deoxycholate and sodium glycocholate) with a series of varying chemical substituents on the host counterpart, namely, βCD, (2-hydroxypropyl)-βCD, and methyl βCD.

  19. Interaction of Bile Salts with β-Cyclodextrins Reveals Nonclassical Hydrophobic Effect and Enthalpy-Entropy Compensation.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bijan K; Ghosh, Narayani; Mukherjee, Saptarshi

    2016-04-28

    Herein, we present an endeavor toward exploring the lacuna underlying the host:guest chemistry of inclusion complex formation between bile salt(s) and β-cyclodextrin(s) (βCDs). An extensive thermodynamic investigation based on isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrates a dominant contribution from exothermic enthalpy change (ΔH < 0) accompanying the phenomenon of inclusion complex formation, along with a relatively smaller contribution to total free energy change from the entropic component. However, the negative heat capacity change (ΔCp < 0) displays the hallmark for a pivotal role of hydrophobic effect underlying the interaction. Contrary to the classical hydrophobic effect, such apparently paradoxical thermodynamic signature has been adequately described under the notion of "nonclassical hydrophobic effect". On the basis of our results, the displacement of disordered water from hydrophobic binding sites has been argued to mark the enthalpic signature and the key role of such interaction forces is further corroborated from enthalpy-entropy compensation behavior showing indication for almost complete compensation. To this end, we have quantified the interaction of two bile salt molecules (namely, sodium deoxycholate and sodium glycocholate) with a series of varying chemical substituents on the host counterpart, namely, βCD, (2-hydroxypropyl)-βCD, and methyl βCD. PMID:27054266

  20. [Endosonography in tumors of the pancreas and bile ducts].

    PubMed

    Nattermann, C; Dancygier, H

    1993-01-01

    The sensitivity of EUS in demonstrating pancreatic tumors lies above 90% and tumors smaller than 2 cm in diameter can be visualized. Therefore EUS can be applied e.g. in the early diagnosis of symptomatic endocrine tumors. However, it is not suited as a screening method for pancreatic carcinoma in asymptomatic patients. The EUS findings do not permit a clear differentiation between malignant and inflammatory (pseudo) tumors. The specificity for the demonstration of malignant tumors is 74%. Its main importance is in the locoregional staging of tumors. EUS is superior to all other imaging tools in determining tumor extension and infiltration into the portal or splenic vein. The pT-stage is determined correctly preoperatively in 90% and lymph node metastases (N1) in about 73% (sensitivity 80-90%/specificity 50%) of the cases. Malignant tumors of Vater's papilla (ampullary tumors) and of extrahepatic bile ducts can be demonstrated endosonographically in nearly all cases. However, tumors of the proximal bile ducts, especially of the right hepatic duct are difficult and sometimes impossible to visualize. The value of EUS in bile duct cancer is in local tumor staging. The pT-stage is determined correctly in 80-90%, the sensitivity and specificity for N1-stage is 80-90% and 30% respectively. Comparative studies with other methods are lacking at the present time. The value of EUS in gall bladder tumors is not yet determined. Stones in the gall bladder may hinder the visualization of the gall bladder wall. In one study the pT-stage for gall bladder carcinoma was determined correctly preoperatively in 76.9% and the N1-stage in 80.7% of cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Regulation of hepatic bile acid transporters Ntcp and Bsep expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xingguo; Buckley, David; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2009-01-01

    Sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp) and bile salt export pump (Bsep) are two key transporters for hepatic bile acid uptake and excretion. Alterations in Ntcp and Bsep expression have been reported in pathophysiological conditions. In the present study, the effects of age, gender, and various chemicals on the regulation of these two transporters were characterized in mice. Ntcp and Bsep mRNA levels in mouse liver were low in the fetus, but increased to its highest expression at parturition. After birth, mouse Ntcp and Bsep mRNA decreased by more than 50%, and then gradually increased to adult levels by day 30. Expression of mouse Ntcp mRNA and protein exhibit higher levels in female than male livers, which is consistent with the trend of human NTCP mRNA expression between men and women. No gender difference exists in BSEP/Bsep expression in human and mouse livers. Hormone replacements conducted in gonadectomized, hypophysectomized, and lit/lit mice indicate that female-predominant Ntcp expression in mouse liver is due to the inhibitory effect of male-pattern GH secretion, but not sex hormones. Ntcp and Bsep expression are in general resistant to induction by a large battery of microsomal enzyme inducers. Administration of cholestyramine increased Ntcp, whereas chenodeoxycholic acid increased Bsep mRNA expression. In silico analysis indicates that female-predominant mouse and human Ntcp/NTCP expression may be due to GH. In conclusion, mouse Ntcp and Bsep are regulated by age, gender, cholestyramine, and bile acid, but resistant to induction by most microsomal enzyme inducers. PMID:17897632

  2. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease.

  3. Gut microbiota, cirrhosis and alcohol regulate bile acid metabolism in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Ridlon, Jason M.; Kang, Dae-Joong; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the complex role of the bile acid-gut microbiome axis in health and disease processes is evolving rapidly. Our focus revolves around the interaction of the gut microbiota with liver diseases, especially cirrhosis. The bile acid pool size has recently been shown to be a function of microbial metabolism of bile acid and regulation of the microbiota by bile acids is important in the development and progression of several liver diseases. Humans produce a large, conjugated hydrophilic bile acid pool, maintained through positive-feedback antagonism of FXR in intestine and liver. Microbes use bile acids, and via FXR signaling this results in a smaller, unconjugated hydrophobic bile acid pool. This equilibrium is critical to maintain health. The challenge is to examine the manifold functions of gut bile acids as modulators of antibiotic, probiotic and disease progression in cirrhosis, metabolic syndrome and alcohol use. Recent studies have shown potential mechanisms explaining how perturbations in the microbiome affect bile acid pool size and composition. With advancing liver disease and cirrhosis, there is dysbiosis in the fecal, ileal and colonic mucosa, in addition to a decrease in bile acid concentration in the intestine due to the liver problems. This results in a dramatic shift toward the Firmicutes, particularly Clostridium cluster XIVa and increasing production of deoxycholic acid (DCA). Alcohol intake speeds up these processes in the subjects with and without cirrhosis without significant FXR feedback. Taken together, these pathways can impact intestinal and systemic inflammation while worsening dysbiosis. The interaction between bile acids, alcohol, cirrhosis and dysbiosis is an important relationship that influences intestinal and systemic inflammation, which in turn determines progression of the overall disease process. These interactions and the impact of commonly used therapies for liver disease can provide insight into the pathogenesis

  4. Repression of Salmonella enterica phoP expression by small molecules from physiological bile.

    PubMed

    Antunes, L Caetano M; Wang, Melody; Andersen, Sarah K; Ferreira, Rosana B R; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Han, Jun; Borchers, Christoph H; Finlay, B Brett

    2012-05-01

    Infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi in humans causes the life-threatening disease typhoid fever. In the laboratory, typhoid fever can be modeled through the inoculation of susceptible mice with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Using this murine model, we previously characterized the interactions between Salmonella Typhimurium and host cells in the gallbladder and showed that this pathogen can successfully invade gallbladder epithelial cells and proliferate. Additionally, we showed that Salmonella Typhimurium can use bile phospholipids to grow at high rates. These abilities are likely important for quick colonization of the gallbladder during typhoid fever and further pathogen dissemination through fecal shedding. To further characterize the interactions between Salmonella and the gallbladder environment, we compared the transcriptomes of Salmonella cultures grown in LB broth or physiological murine bile. Our data showed that many genes involved in bacterial central metabolism are affected by bile, with the citric acid cycle being repressed and alternative respiratory systems being activated. Additionally, our study revealed a new aspect of Salmonella interactions with bile through the identification of the global regulator phoP as a bile-responsive gene. Repression of phoP expression could also be achieved using physiological, but not commercial, bovine bile. The biological activity does not involve PhoPQ sensing of a bile component and is not caused by bile acids, the most abundant organic components of bile. Bioactivity-guided purification allowed the identification of a subset of small molecules from bile that can elicit full activity; however, a single compound with phoP inhibitory activity could not be isolated, suggesting that multiple molecules may act in synergy to achieve this effect. Due to the critical role of phoP in Salmonella virulence, further studies in this area will likely reveal aspects of the interaction between Salmonella

  5. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor of Common Bile Duct in a Girl.

    PubMed

    D'Cunha, Aureen; Jehangir, Susan; Thomas, Reju

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare, low grade malignant lesion which can occur anywhere in the body. In children it is usually found in the visceral soft tissues with a potential for local invasion and recurrence, and rarely distant metastasis. We report the diagnostic dilemma faced in the management of a 12-year old girl who presented with obstructive jaundice with a mass lesion at the distal end of the common bile duct. She underwent a tumor resection with a bilio-enteric bypass followed by a course of oral steroids and celecoxib.

  6. Probing the Binding Site of Bile Acids in TGR5.

    PubMed

    Macchiarulo, Antonio; Gioiello, Antimo; Thomas, Charles; Pols, Thijs W H; Nuti, Roberto; Ferrari, Cristina; Giacchè, Nicola; De Franco, Francesca; Pruzanski, Mark; Auwerx, Johan; Schoonjans, Kristina; Pellicciari, Roberto

    2013-12-12

    TGR5 is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) mediating cellular responses to bile acids (BAs). Although some efforts have been devoted to generate homology models of TGR5 and draw structure-activity relationships of BAs, none of these studies has hitherto described how BAs bind to TGR5. Here, we present an integrated computational, chemical, and biological approach that has been instrumental to determine the binding mode of BAs to TGR5. As a result, key residues have been identified that are involved in mediating the binding of BAs to the receptor. Collectively, these results provide new hints to design potent and selective TGR5 agonists. PMID:24900622

  7. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor of Common Bile Duct in a Girl

    PubMed Central

    Jehangir, Susan; Thomas, Reju

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare, low grade malignant lesion which can occur anywhere in the body. In children it is usually found in the visceral soft tissues with a potential for local invasion and recurrence, and rarely distant metastasis. We report the diagnostic dilemma faced in the management of a 12-year old girl who presented with obstructive jaundice with a mass lesion at the distal end of the common bile duct. She underwent a tumor resection with a bilio-enteric bypass followed by a course of oral steroids and celecoxib. PMID:27672578

  8. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor of Common Bile Duct in a Girl.

    PubMed

    D'Cunha, Aureen; Jehangir, Susan; Thomas, Reju

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare, low grade malignant lesion which can occur anywhere in the body. In children it is usually found in the visceral soft tissues with a potential for local invasion and recurrence, and rarely distant metastasis. We report the diagnostic dilemma faced in the management of a 12-year old girl who presented with obstructive jaundice with a mass lesion at the distal end of the common bile duct. She underwent a tumor resection with a bilio-enteric bypass followed by a course of oral steroids and celecoxib. PMID:27672578

  9. Probing the Binding Site of Bile Acids in TGR5

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    TGR5 is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) mediating cellular responses to bile acids (BAs). Although some efforts have been devoted to generate homology models of TGR5 and draw structure–activity relationships of BAs, none of these studies has hitherto described how BAs bind to TGR5. Here, we present an integrated computational, chemical, and biological approach that has been instrumental to determine the binding mode of BAs to TGR5. As a result, key residues have been identified that are involved in mediating the binding of BAs to the receptor. Collectively, these results provide new hints to design potent and selective TGR5 agonists. PMID:24900622

  10. Protective effects of nonionic tri-block copolymers on bile acid-mediated epithelial barrier disruption.

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, A.; Fink, D.; Musch, M.; Valuckaite, V.; Zabornia, O.; Grubjesic, S.; Firestone, M. A.; Matthews, J. B.; Alverdy, J. C.

    2011-11-01

    Translocation of bacteria and other luminal factors from the intestine following surgical injury can be a major driver of critical illness. Bile acids have been shown to play a key role in the loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function during states of host stress. Experiments to study the ability of nonionic block copolymers to abrogate barrier failure in response to bile acid exposure are described. In vitro experiments were performed with the bile salt sodium deoxycholate on Caco-2 enterocyte monolayers using transepithelial electrical resistance to assay barrier function. A bisphenol A coupled triblock polyethylene glycol (PEG), PEG 15-20, was shown to prevent sodium deoxycholate-induced barrier failure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, lactate dehydrogenase, and caspase 3-based cell death detection assays demonstrated that bile acid-induced apoptosis and necrosis were prevented with PEG 15-20. Immunofluorescence microscopic visualization of the tight junctional protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) demonstrated that PEG 15-20 prevented significant changes in tight junction organization induced by bile acid exposure. Preliminary transepithelial electrical resistance-based studies examining structure-function correlates of polymer protection against bile acid damage were performed with a small library of PEG-based copolymers. Polymer properties associated with optimal protection against bile acid-induced barrier disruption were PEG-based compounds with a molecular weight greater than 10 kd and amphiphilicity. The data demonstrate that PEG-based copolymer architecture is an important determinant that confers protection against bile acid injury of intestinal epithelia.

  11. Intestinal bile acid sensing is linked to key endocrine and metabolic signalng pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bile acids have historically been considered to mainly function in cholesterol homeostasis and facilitate fat digestion in the gastrointestinal tract. Recent discoveries show that bile acids also function as signaling molecules that exert diverse endocrine and metabolic actions by activating G prote...

  12. Evaluation of Postmortem Drug Concentrations in Bile Compared with Blood and Urine in Forensic Autopsy Cases.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Mariko; Michiue, Tomomi; Oritani, Shigeki; Ishikawa, Takaki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    For drug screening and pharmaco-/toxicokinetic analysis, bile as a major drug excretion route in addition to urine may be used in forensic autopsy cases; however, there are limited published data on correlations between bile and blood or urine drug concentrations. The present study retrospectively investigated drug concentrations in bile, compared with blood and urine concentrations, reviewing forensic autopsy cases during 6 years (January 2009-December 2014). Drugs were analyzed using automated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following solid-liquid phase extraction. Compared with peripheral blood concentrations, bile concentrations were higher for most drugs; however, caffeine concentrations were similar. Bile concentrations were mostly lower than urine concentrations for amphetamines, caffeine and methylephedrine, but were usually similar to or higher for other drugs. Significant correlations were detected between bile and peripheral blood concentrations for amphetamines, several cold remedies, phenobarbital, phenothiazine derivatives and diazepam, as well as between bile and urine concentrations for amphetamines, caffeine, diphenhydramine, phenobarbital and promethazine derivatives. These findings suggest that bile can provide supplemental data useful in routine forensic toxicology, for the spectrum of drugs mentioned above, as well as for investigating pharmaco-/toxicokinetics and postmortem redistribution when analyzed in combination with drug concentrations at other sites. PMID:27185819

  13. Simple steatosis sensitizes cholestatic rats to liver injury and dysregulates bile salt synthesis and transport

    PubMed Central

    Lionarons, Daniël A.; Heger, Michal; van Golen, Rowan F.; Alles, Lindy K.; van der Mark, Vincent A.; Kloek, Jaap J.; de Waart, Dirk R.; Marsman, Hendrik A.; Rusch, Henny; Verheij, Joanne; Beuers, Ulrich; Paulusma, Coen C.; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disorder. It is uncertain if simple steatosis, the initial and prevailing form of NAFLD, sensitizes the liver to cholestasis. Here, we compared the effects of obstructive cholestasis in rats with a normal liver versus rats with simple steatosis induced by a methionine/choline-deficient diet. We found that plasma liver enzymes were higher and hepatic neutrophil influx, inflammation, and fibrosis were more pronounced in animals with combined steatosis and cholestasis compared to cholestasis alone. Circulating bile salt levels were markedly increased and hepatic bile salt composition shifted from hydrophilic tauro-β-muricholate to hydrophobic taurocholate. This shift was cytotoxic for HepG2 hepatoma cells. Gene expression analysis revealed induction of the rate-limiting enzyme in bile salt synthesis, cytochrome P450 7a1 (CYP7A1), and modulation of the hepatic bile salt transport system. In conclusion, simple steatosis sensitizes the liver to cholestatic injury, inflammation, and fibrosis in part due to a cytotoxic shift in bile salt composition. Plasma bile salt levels were elevated, linked to dysregulation of bile salt synthesis and enhanced trafficking of bile salts from the liver to the systemic circulation. PMID:27535001

  14. Modelling of the pathological bile flow in the duct with a calculus.

    PubMed

    Kuchumov, Alex G; Nyashin, Yuriy I; Samarcev, Vladimir A; Gavrilov, Vasiliy A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to develop an analytical model for description of the pathological bile flow in the major duodenal papilla duct with a calculus. The problem is separated into two parts. The first part deals with determination of bile behaviour and constitutive relation parameters of the pathological bile. The viscosity vs. shear rate, the viscosity vs. time, and shear stress vs. shear rate dependences are obtained for different types of bile taken from patients of different age and sex. As a result, the approximation of curves described by the Casson equation was obtained. It was shown that the pathological bile is a thixotropic non-Newtonian fluid. The second part is directly related to modelling of the bile flow in the duct with a calculus. As a result of solving the problem, the bile velocity profile, flow rate vs. time, and bile pressure vs. calculus radius were obtained. The dependences obtained may play an important role in the assessment of an indication to operation. PMID:24479556

  15. Bile Acid Responses in Methane and Non-Methane Producers to Standard Breakfast Meals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bile acids and their conjugates are important regulators of glucose homeostasis. Previous research has revealed the ratio of cholic acid to deoxycholic acid to affect insulin resistance in humans. Bile acid de-conjugation and intestinal metabolism depend on gut microbes which may be affected by hos...

  16. Defense of mammalian body against heavy metal-induced toxicities: Sequestration by the choroid plexus and elimination via the bile

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Wei.

    1991-01-01

    Tissue sequestration and biliary elimination are two of the important mechanisms by which mammalian body defends against heavy metal insults. In rats or rabbits that had received Pb, Cd, Hg, As and [sup 210]Po, these metal ions were sequestered in the choroid plexus at concentrations of Pb, Cd, Hg, As and Po that were 57, 33, 12, 13 and 5 times higher, respectively, than those found in the brain cortex. In addition, the concentrations of these heavy metal ions were many fold greater in the choroid plexus than in the CSF or blood. The accumulation of Pb in the choroid plexus was dose-dependent and time-related. When the choroid plexus was incubated, in vitro, with ouabain, the latter significantly inhibited the uptake of Cd from the CSF side of the choroid plexus. Cystine concentration was four times greater in the choroid plexus than in brain cortex. Results suggest that the choroid plexus sequesters toxic metal and metalloid ions. It appears to do this in order to protect the CSF and brain from toxic heavy metals in the blood. The effects of N-(2,3-dimercaptopropyl)phthalamidic acid (DMPA), meso-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and 2,3-dimercapto-1-propane sulfonic acid (DMPS) on biliary excretion of Cd was studied in rat chronic intoxication mode. DMPA (0.10 mmol/kg, iv), when given to rats three days after exposure to Cd, elicited within 30 min a 20-fold increase in biliary Cd excretion. GSH in rat bile was also increased three fold as compared to control. Neither DMSA nor DMPS increased biliary Cd or GSH. Upon iv administration, DMPA, not DMSA, appeared in bile. An altered, presumably disulfide, form of DMPS was also found in bile. Incubation of DMPA or DMSA with Cd-saturated MT resulted in the removal of Cd from MT. DMPS, however, promoted the formation of MT polymers. DMPA protected biliary GSH from autoxidation.

  17. [Bile secretion intensity and the chemical makeup of the bile in white rats with liver dystrophy in the process of sodium selenite treatment].

    PubMed

    Danik, L M

    1976-01-01

    In male rats with acute liver dystrophia, caused by carbon tetracloride, effect of sodium slentie (at doses of 1 mg and 10 mg per 100 g of body weight) on the bile secretion was studied. The drug normalized rapidly the functions of liver tissue, synthesis and excretion of bile acids, bilirubin secretion and excetion of cholesterol. Treatment with sodium selenite increased detoxication process in the organism, prevented death of the animals. PMID:1025887

  18. The effects of lithogenic bile on gallbladder epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Moody, F G; Haley-Russell, D; Li, Y F; Husband, K J; Weisbrodt, N W; Dewey, R B

    1989-01-01

    Prairie dogs were fed a 1.2% cholesterol diet for up to 24 weeks to evaluate the effects of lithogenic bile on the mucosa of the gallbladder. There was a progressive increase in the lithogenic index of the gallbladder bile (1.44 +/- 0.15 at 4 weeks, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five of 70 animals developed gallstones between the second and fourth week. Increasing stone burden was associated with a 27% (p less than 0.05) decrease in the electrical resistance of the epithelium and a 60% (p less than 0.05) decrease in net sodium transport when measured isotopically in an Ussing chamber (3 weeks). After 4 months, seven of ten animals developed inflammatory mucosal polyps characterized by a heavy infiltration of plasma cells into an expanded matrix. Cellular infiltration began as early as 2 weeks. These changes occurred without alterations in the ultrastructural appearance of the epithelium. Images Figs. 3A and B. Figs. 4A and B. Figs. 4A and B. Figs. 5A and B. PMID:2774711

  19. NMR characterization of a novel bile acid sequestrant, DMP 504.

    PubMed

    Lerke, S A; Nemeth, G; Schubert, E; Hovsepian, P K

    2001-02-01

    DMP 504, a potential bile acid sequestrant for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, is a highly insoluble, cross-linked polymer which does not lend itself to ordinary means of characterization used for drug substances in the pharmaceutical industry. Therefore, alternative characterization techniques have been sought. As part of an effort into extensive characterization of DMP 504 drug substance, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to provide insight into details of the DMP 504 polymer structure. The primary motivation for determining the structure of the polymer chain is to relate the DMP 504 structure to its performance properties as a bile acid sequestrant. Characterization of the polymer chain and understanding of the structural basis of its properties is essential in optimizing and controlling the manufacture of reproducible drug substance. NMR has proven a versatile tool for the description of polymer structure and dynamics because of the wide range of nuclear interactions affecting the NMR signal. This allows the design of experiments to elicit information about specific polymer interactions or properties. The methods of sample preparation utilized to obtain NMR spectra of the insoluble polymer, as well as a discussion and comparison of results for the characterization of DMP 504 obtained using several different NMR techniques will be presented.

  20. Common bile duct obstruction caused by the hydatid daughter cysts.

    PubMed

    Busić, Zeljko; Amić, Enio; Servis, Draien; Predrijevac, Mladen; Stipancić, Igor; Busić, Dubravka

    2004-06-01

    Echinococcosis is a human parasitary disease. In 2002, 29 new cases of liver echinococcosis were recorded in Croatia. Liver is the most common site of hydatid cysts. Nine patients with echinoccocal liver disease were operated in our department in 2002. Here we present a case where a patient with verified hydatid cyst in the left liver lobe developed high fever, jaundice, nausea, vomiting and pain in the upper abdomen. The symptoms were initially ascribed to the acute cholangitis. After unsuccessful antibiotic treatment, computerized tomography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) were performed, demonstrating daughter cysts in the common bile duct. During ERCP, papilotomy was made and daughter cysts were extracted. Hydatid cyst was surgically removed, and a communication between the cyst and left hepatic duct was noted during surgery. Pericystectomy, choledochotomy, removal of remaining daughter cysts from the common bile duct, and sutures of left hepatic duct were performed. The patient recovered fully after the surgery. One of the possible complications of the liver hydatid cysts is the communication between cyst and the biliary tree. Such communications are usually asymptomatic, but symptoms can also mimic acute cholangitis and jaundice, which may lead to the misdiagnosis of the patient's condition.

  1. Clinical application of transcriptional activators of bile salt transporters☆

    PubMed Central

    Baghdasaryan, Anna; Chiba, Peter; Trauner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Hepatobiliary bile salt (BS) transporters are critical determinants of BS homeostasis controlling intracellular concentrations of BSs and their enterohepatic circulation. Genetic or acquired dysfunction of specific transport systems causes intrahepatic and systemic retention of potentially cytotoxic BSs, which, in high concentrations, may disturb integrity of cell membranes and subcellular organelles resulting in cell death, inflammation and fibrosis. Transcriptional regulation of canalicular BS efflux through bile salt export pump (BSEP), basolateral elimination through organic solute transporters alpha and beta (OSTα/OSTβ) as well as inhibition of hepatocellular BS uptake through basolateral Na+-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) represent critical steps in protection from hepatocellular BS overload and can be targeted therapeutically. In this article, we review the potential clinical implications of the major BS transporters BSEP, OSTα/OSTβ and NTCP in the pathogenesis of hereditary and acquired cholestatic syndromes, provide an overview on transcriptional control of these transporters by the key regulatory nuclear receptors and discuss the potential therapeutic role of novel transcriptional activators of BS transporters in cholestasis. PMID:24333169

  2. Surgical versus endoscopic management of common bile duct stones.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, B M; Kozarek, R A; Ryan, J A; Ball, T J; Traverso, L W

    1988-01-01

    The charts of all patients with common bile duct (CBD) stones admitted to Virginia Mason Medical Center between January 1, 1981 and July 31, 1986 were reviewed to define current methods of management and results of operative versus endoscopic therapy. Two hundred thirty-seven patients with CBD stones were treated. One hundred thirty patients had intact gallbladders. Of these patients, 76 (59%) underwent cholecystectomy and common bile duct exploration (CBDE) while 54 (41%) underwent endoscopic papillotomy (EP) only. Of the 107 patients admitted with recurrent stones after cholecystectomy, all but five were treated with EP. The overall mortality rate was 3.0%. Complications, success, and death rates were all similar for CBDE and EP, but the complications of EP were often serious and directly related to the procedure (GI hemorrhage, 6; duodenal perforation, 5; biliary sepsis, 4; pancreatitis, 1). Patients undergoing EP required significantly shorter hospitalization than those undergoing CBDE. Multivariate analysis showed that age greater than 70 years, technical failure, and complications increased the risk of death, regardless of procedure performed. Twenty-one per cent of those undergoing EP with gallbladders intact eventually required cholecystectomy. The conclusion is that the results of EP and CBDE are similar, and the use of EP has not reduced the mortality rates of this disease. PMID:3341812

  3. Mechanisms of triglyceride metabolism in patients with bile acid diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Nidhi Midhu; McFarlane, Michael; Nwokolo, Chuka; Bardhan, Karna Dev; Arasaradnam, Ramesh Pulendran

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are essential for the absorption of lipids. BA synthesis is inhibited through intestinal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activity. BA sequestration is known to influence BA metabolism and control serum lipid concentrations. Animal data has demonstrated a regulatory role for the FXR in triglyceride metabolism. FXR inhibits hepatic lipogenesis by inhibiting the expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c via small heterodimer primer activity. Conversely, FXR promotes free fatty acids oxidation by inducing the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α. FXR can reduce the expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, which regulates the assembly of very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). FXR activation in turn promotes the clearance of circulating triglycerides by inducing apolipoprotein C-II, very low-density lipoproteins receptor (VLDL-R) and the expression of Syndecan-1 together with the repression of apolipoprotein C-III, which increases lipoprotein lipase activity. There is currently minimal clinical data on triglyceride metabolism in patients with bile acid diarrhoea (BAD). Emerging data suggests that a third of patients with BAD have hypertriglyceridemia. Further research is required to establish the risk of hypertriglyceridaemia in patients with BAD and elicit the mechanisms behind this, allowing for targeted treatment. PMID:27570415

  4. Bile Acid Alters Male Mouse Fertility in Metabolic Syndrome Context

    PubMed Central

    Baptissart, Marine; De Haze, Angélique; Vaz, Frederic; Kulik, Wim; Damon-Soubeyrand, Christelle; Baron, Silvère; Caira, Françoise; Volle, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids have recently been demonstrated as molecules with endocrine activities controlling several physiological functions such as immunity and glucose homeostases. They act mainly through two receptors, the nuclear receptor Farnesol-X-Receptor alpha (FXRα) and the G-protein coupled receptor (TGR5). These recent studies have led to the idea that molecules derived from bile acids (BAs) and targeting their receptors must be good targets for treatment of metabolic diseases such as obesity or diabetes. Thus it might be important to decipher the potential long term impact of such treatment on different physiological functions. Indeed, BAs have recently been demonstrated to alter male fertility. Here we demonstrate that in mice with overweight induced by high fat diet, BA exposure leads to increased rate of male infertility. This is associated with the altered germ cell proliferation, default of testicular endocrine function and abnormalities in cell-cell interaction within the seminiferous epithelium. Even if the identification of the exact molecular mechanisms will need more studies, the present results suggest that both FXRα and TGR5 might be involved. We believed that this work is of particular interest regarding the potential consequences on future approaches for the treatment of metabolic diseases. PMID:26439743

  5. Hyperspectral image segmentation of the common bile duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarov, Daniel; Wehner, Eleanor; Schwarz, Roderich; Zuzak, Karel; Livingston, Edward

    2013-03-01

    Over the course of the last several years hyperspectral imaging (HSI) has seen increased usage in biomedicine. Within the medical field in particular HSI has been recognized as having the potential to make an immediate impact by reducing the risks and complications associated with laparotomies (surgical procedures involving large incisions into the abdominal wall) and related procedures. There are several ongoing studies focused on such applications. Hyperspectral images were acquired during pancreatoduodenectomies (commonly referred to as Whipple procedures), a surgical procedure done to remove cancerous tumors involving the pancreas and gallbladder. As a result of the complexity of the local anatomy, identifying where the common bile duct (CBD) is can be difficult, resulting in comparatively high incidents of injury to the CBD and associated complications. It is here that HSI has the potential to help reduce the risk of such events from happening. Because the bile contained within the CBD exhibits a unique spectral signature, we are able to utilize HSI segmentation algorithms to help in identifying where the CBD is. In the work presented here we discuss approaches to this segmentation problem and present the results.

  6. Mechanisms of triglyceride metabolism in patients with bile acid diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Nidhi Midhu; McFarlane, Michael; Nwokolo, Chuka; Bardhan, Karna Dev; Arasaradnam, Ramesh Pulendran

    2016-08-14

    Bile acids (BAs) are essential for the absorption of lipids. BA synthesis is inhibited through intestinal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activity. BA sequestration is known to influence BA metabolism and control serum lipid concentrations. Animal data has demonstrated a regulatory role for the FXR in triglyceride metabolism. FXR inhibits hepatic lipogenesis by inhibiting the expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c via small heterodimer primer activity. Conversely, FXR promotes free fatty acids oxidation by inducing the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α. FXR can reduce the expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, which regulates the assembly of very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). FXR activation in turn promotes the clearance of circulating triglycerides by inducing apolipoprotein C-II, very low-density lipoproteins receptor (VLDL-R) and the expression of Syndecan-1 together with the repression of apolipoprotein C-III, which increases lipoprotein lipase activity. There is currently minimal clinical data on triglyceride metabolism in patients with bile acid diarrhoea (BAD). Emerging data suggests that a third of patients with BAD have hypertriglyceridemia. Further research is required to establish the risk of hypertriglyceridaemia in patients with BAD and elicit the mechanisms behind this, allowing for targeted treatment. PMID:27570415

  7. Phytosterol ester constituents affect micellar cholesterol solubility in model bile.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew W; Hang, Jiliang; Dussault, Patrick H; Carr, Timothy P

    2010-09-01

    Plant sterols and stanols (phytosterols) and their esters are nutraceuticals that lower LDL cholesterol, but the mechanisms of action are not fully understood. We hypothesized that intact esters and simulated hydrolysis products of esters (phytosterols and fatty acids in equal ratios) would differentially affect the solubility of cholesterol in model bile mixed micelles in vitro. Sodium salts of glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids were sonicated with phosphatidylcholine and either sterol esters or combinations of sterols and fatty acids to determine the amount of cholesterol solubilized into micelles. Intact sterol esters did not solubilize into micelles, nor did they alter cholesterol solubility. However, free sterols and fatty acids altered cholesterol solubility independently (no interaction effect). Equal contents of cholesterol and either campesterol, stigmasterol, sitosterol, or stigmastanol (sitostanol) decreased cholesterol solubility in micelles by approximately 50% compared to no phytosterol present, with stigmasterol performing slightly better than sitosterol. Phytosterols competed with cholesterol in a dose-dependent manner, demonstrating a 1:1 M substitution of phytosterol for cholesterol in micelle preparations. Unsaturated fatty acids increased the micelle solubility of sterols as compared with saturated or no fatty acids. No differences were detected in the size of the model micelles. Together, these data indicate that stigmasterol combined with saturated fatty acids may be more effective at lowering cholesterol micelle solubility in vivo.

  8. Liquid crystal based biosensors for bile acid detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Sihui; Liang, Wenlang; Tanner, Colleen; Fang, Jiyu; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2013-03-01

    The concentration level of bile acids is a useful indicator for early diagnosis of liver diseases. The prevalent measurement method in detecting bile acids is the chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, which is precise yet expensive. Here we present a biosensor platform based on liquid crystal (LC) films for the detection of cholic acid (CA). This platform has the advantage of low cost, label-free, solution phase detection and simple analysis. In this platform, LC film of 4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) was hosted by a copper grid supported with a polyimide-coated glass substrate. By immersing into sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, the LC film was coated with SDS which induced a homeotropic anchoring of 5CB. Addition of CA introduced competitive adsorption between CA and SDS at the interface, triggering a transition from homeotropic to homogeneous anchoring. The detection limit can be tuned by changing the pH value of the solution from 12uM to 170uM.

  9. Therapeutic uses of animal biles in traditional Chinese medicine: An ethnopharmacological, biophysical chemical and medicinal review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David Q-H; Carey, Martin C

    2014-01-01

    Forty-four different animal biles obtained from both invertebrates and vertebrates (including human bile) have been used for centuries for a host of maladies in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) beginning with dog, ox and common carp biles approximately in the Zhou dynasty (c. 1046-256 BCE). Overall, different animal biles were prescribed principally for the treatment of liver, biliary, skin (including burns), gynecological and heart diseases, as well as diseases of the eyes, ears, nose, mouth and throat. We present an informed opinion of the clinical efficacy of the medicinal uses of the different animal biles based on their presently known principal chemical components which are mostly steroidal detergent-like molecules and the membrane lipids such as unesterified cholesterol and mixed phosphatidylcholines and sometimes sphingomyelin, as well as containing lipopigments derived from heme principally bilirubin glucuronides. All of the available information on the ethnopharmacological uses of biles in TCM were collated from the rich collection of ancient Chinese books on materia medica held in libraries in China and United States and the composition of various animal biles was based on rigorous separatory and advanced chemical identification techniques published since the mid-20th century collected via library (Harvard’s Countway Library) and electronic searches (PubMed and Google Scholar). Our analysis of ethnomedical data and information on biliary chemistry shows that specific bile salts, as well as the common bile pigment bilirubin and its glucuronides plus the minor components of bile such as vitamins A, D, E, K, as well as melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) are salutary in improving liver function, dissolving gallstones, inhibiting bacterial and viral multiplication, promoting cardiac chronotropsim, as well as exhibiting anti-inflammatory, anti-pyretic, anti-oxidant, sedative, anti-convulsive, anti-allergic, anti-congestive, anti-diabetic and anti

  10. Therapeutic uses of animal biles in traditional Chinese medicine: an ethnopharmacological, biophysical chemical and medicinal review.

    PubMed

    Wang, David Q-H; Carey, Martin C

    2014-08-01

    Forty-four different animal biles obtained from both invertebrates and vertebrates (including human bile) have been used for centuries for a host of maladies in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) beginning with dog, ox and common carp biles approximately in the Zhou dynasty (c. 1046-256 BCE). Overall, different animal biles were prescribed principally for the treatment of liver, biliary, skin (including burns), gynecological and heart diseases, as well as diseases of the eyes, ears, nose, mouth and throat. We present an informed opinion of the clinical efficacy of the medicinal uses of the different animal biles based on their presently known principal chemical components which are mostly steroidal detergent-like molecules and the membrane lipids such as unesterified cholesterol and mixed phosphatidylcholines and sometimes sphingomyelin, as well as containing lipopigments derived from heme principally bilirubin glucuronides. All of the available information on the ethnopharmacological uses of biles in TCM were collated from the rich collection of ancient Chinese books on materia medica held in libraries in China and United States and the composition of various animal biles was based on rigorous separatory and advanced chemical identification techniques published since the mid-20(th) century collected via library (Harvard's Countway Library) and electronic searches (PubMed and Google Scholar). Our analysis of ethnomedical data and information on biliary chemistry shows that specific bile salts, as well as the common bile pigment bilirubin and its glucuronides plus the minor components of bile such as vitamins A, D, E, K, as well as melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) are salutary in improving liver function, dissolving gallstones, inhibiting bacterial and viral multiplication, promoting cardiac chronotropsim, as well as exhibiting anti-inflammatory, anti-pyretic, anti-oxidant, sedative, anti-convulsive, anti-allergic, anti-congestive, anti-diabetic and anti

  11. Faecal bile acids are natural ligands of the mouse accessory olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Wayne I; Dinser, Jordan A; Cansler, Hillary L; Zhang, Xingjian; Dinh, Daniel D; Browder, Natasha S; Riddington, Ian M; Meeks, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    The accessory olfactory system (AOS) guides behaviours that are important for survival and reproduction, but understanding of AOS function is limited by a lack of identified natural ligands. Here we report that mouse faeces are a robust source of AOS chemosignals and identify bile acids as a class of natural AOS ligands. Single-unit electrophysiological recordings from accessory olfactory bulb neurons in ex vivo preparations show that AOS neurons are strongly and selectively activated by peripheral stimulation with mouse faecal extracts. Faecal extracts contain several unconjugated bile acids that cause concentration-dependent neuronal activity in the AOS. Many AOS neurons respond selectively to bile acids that are variably excreted in male and female mouse faeces, and others respond to bile acids absent in mouse faeces. These results identify faeces as a natural source of AOS information, and suggest that bile acids may be mammalian pheromones and kairomones. PMID:27324439

  12. Effects of bile salts on percolation and size of AOT reversed micelles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Erford, Karen; Kiserow, Douglas J; McGown, Linda B

    2003-06-15

    The effects of two trihydroxy bile salts, sodium taurocholate (NaTC) and 3-[(3-cholamidylpropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulfonate (CHAPS), on the size, shape and percolation temperature of reversed micelles formed by sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) in isooctane were studied. The percolation temperature of the reversed micelles decreased upon inclusion of bile salts, indicating increased water uptake. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements showed consistent enlargement of reversed micelles upon addition of the bile salts; the hydrodynamic radius increased sixfold in the presence of 10 mM CHAPS and doubled in the presence of 5 mM NaTC. Inclusion of the enzyme yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) increased the percolation temperature and distorted the spherical structure of the AOT reversed micelles. The spherical structure was restored upon addition of bile salt. These results may help to explain the increase in activity of YADH in AOT reversed micelles upon addition of bile salts.

  13. Regulation of antibacterial defense in the small intestine by the nuclear bile acid receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Takeshi; Moschetta, Antonio; Lee, Youn-Kyoung; Peng, Li; Zhao, Guixiang; Downes, Michael; Yu, Ruth T.; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Repa, Joyce J.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.

    2006-03-01

    Obstruction of bile flow results in bacterial proliferation and mucosal injury in the small intestine that can lead to the translocation of bacteria across the epithelial barrier and systemic infection. These adverse effects of biliary obstruction can be inhibited by administration of bile acids. Here we show that the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor for bile acids, induces genes involved in enteroprotection and inhibits bacterial overgrowth and mucosal injury in ileum caused by bile duct ligation. Mice lacking FXR have increased ileal levels of bacteria and a compromised epithelial barrier. These findings reveal a central role for FXR in protecting the distal small intestine from bacterial invasion and suggest that FXR agonists may prevent epithelial deterioration and bacterial translocation in patients with impaired bile flow. bacteria | biliary obstruction | epithelial barrier | ileum

  14. The Use of a Hemostasis Introducer for Percutaneous Extraction of Bile Duct Stones

    PubMed Central

    Feisthammel, Juergen; Moche, Micheal; Mossner, Joachim; Hoffmeister, Albrecht

    2012-01-01

    Background Choledocholithiasis is defined as presence of at least one gallstone in the bile duct. Those bile duct stones (BDS) usually are extracted by ERCP. In case the bile duct is not accessible endoscopically (e.g. after major abdominal surgery), PTCD has to be performed. Extraction of the stones via PTCD has several risks as are hemorrhage, pancreatitis and injuries of the liver tissue. Methods We here report about our experience with a significant modification of this technique by use of a 13-french hemostasis introducer as a sheath to track the transhepatic access to the bile ducts in order to reduce time and risk. Results Three patients were treated by use of the reported modification. In all cases, the stones were successfully removable without complications. Conclusion We demonstrate that the use of a hemostasis introducer for percutaneous extraction of common bile duct stones seems to be promising in terms of shortening hospital stay and increasing patient safety.

  15. Faecal bile acids are natural ligands of the mouse accessory olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Wayne I.; Dinser, Jordan A.; Cansler, Hillary L.; Zhang, Xingjian; Dinh, Daniel D.; Browder, Natasha S.; Riddington, Ian M.; Meeks, Julian P.

    2016-01-01

    The accessory olfactory system (AOS) guides behaviours that are important for survival and reproduction, but understanding of AOS function is limited by a lack of identified natural ligands. Here we report that mouse faeces are a robust source of AOS chemosignals and identify bile acids as a class of natural AOS ligands. Single-unit electrophysiological recordings from accessory olfactory bulb neurons in ex vivo preparations show that AOS neurons are strongly and selectively activated by peripheral stimulation with mouse faecal extracts. Faecal extracts contain several unconjugated bile acids that cause concentration-dependent neuronal activity in the AOS. Many AOS neurons respond selectively to bile acids that are variably excreted in male and female mouse faeces, and others respond to bile acids absent in mouse faeces. These results identify faeces as a natural source of AOS information, and suggest that bile acids may be mammalian pheromones and kairomones. PMID:27324439

  16. Bile cast nephropathy: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jaymon; Walayat, Saqib; Kalva, Nikhil; Palmer-Hill, Sidney; Dhillon, Sonu

    2016-07-21

    Bile cast nephropathy is a condition of renal dysfunction in the setting of hyperbilirubinemia. There are very few cases of this condition reported in the last decade and a lack of established treatment guidelines. While the exact etiology remains unknown, bile cast nephropathy is presumed to be secondary to multiple concurrent insults to the kidney including direct toxicity from bile acids, obstructive physiology from bile casts, and systemic hypoperfusion from vasodilation. Therapy directed at bilirubin reduction may improve renal function, but will likely need dialysis or plasmapheresis as well. We report our case of bile cast nephropathy and the therapeutic measures undertaken in a middle-aged male with chronic renal insufficiency that developed hyperbilirubinemia and drug-induced liver injury secondary to antibiotic use. He developed acute renal injury in the setting of rising bilirubin. He subsequently had a progressive decline in renal and hepatic function, requiring dialysis and plasmapheresis with some improvement, ultimately requiring transplantation.

  17. Mechanism of bile acid-regulated glucose and lipid metabolism in duodenal-jejunal bypass

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jie; Zou, Lei; Li, Xirui; Han, Dali; Wang, Shan; Hu, Sanyuan; Guan, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Bile acid plays an important role in regulating blood glucose, lipid and energy metabolism. The present study was implemented to determine the effect of duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) on FXR, TGR-5expression in terminal ileum and its bile acid-related mechanism on glucose and lipid metabolism. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect relative gene or protein expression in liver and intestine. Firstly, we found that expression of FXR in liver and terminal ileum of DJB group was significantly higher than that in S-DJB group (P<0.05). In addition, DJB dramatically increased the activation of TGR-5 in the liver of rats. Furthermore, PEPCK, G6Pase, FBPase 1 and GLP-1 were up-regulated by DJB. In conclusion, these results showed that bile acid ameliorated glucose and lipid metabolism through bile acid-FXR and bile acid- TGR-5 signaling pathway. PMID:26884847

  18. Bile cast nephropathy: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jaymon; Walayat, Saqib; Kalva, Nikhil; Palmer-Hill, Sidney; Dhillon, Sonu

    2016-01-01

    Bile cast nephropathy is a condition of renal dysfunction in the setting of hyperbilirubinemia. There are very few cases of this condition reported in the last decade and a lack of established treatment guidelines. While the exact etiology remains unknown, bile cast nephropathy is presumed to be secondary to multiple concurrent insults to the kidney including direct toxicity from bile acids, obstructive physiology from bile casts, and systemic hypoperfusion from vasodilation. Therapy directed at bilirubin reduction may improve renal function, but will likely need dialysis or plasmapheresis as well. We report our case of bile cast nephropathy and the therapeutic measures undertaken in a middle-aged male with chronic renal insufficiency that developed hyperbilirubinemia and drug-induced liver injury secondary to antibiotic use. He developed acute renal injury in the setting of rising bilirubin. He subsequently had a progressive decline in renal and hepatic function, requiring dialysis and plasmapheresis with some improvement, ultimately requiring transplantation. PMID:27468221

  19. Homologue gene of bile acid transporters ntcp, asbt, and ost-alpha in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss: tissue expression, effect of fasting, and response to bile acid administration.

    PubMed

    Murashita, Koji; Yoshiura, Yasutoshi; Chisada, Shin-Ichi; Furuita, Hirofumi; Sugita, Tsuyoshi; Matsunari, Hiroyuki; Iwashita, Yasuro; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2014-04-01

    Bile acid transporters belonging to the SLC10A protein family, Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP or SLC10A1), apical sodium-dependent bile salt transporter (ASBT or SLC10A2), and organic solute transporter alpha (Ost-alpha) have been known to play critical roles in the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids in mammals. In this study, ntcp, asbt, and ost-alpha-1/-2 cDNA were cloned, their tissue distributions were characterized, and the effects of fasting and bile acid administration on their expression were examined in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. The structural characteristics of Ntcp, Asbt, and Ost-alpha were well conserved in trout, and three-dimensional structure analysis showed that Ntcp and Asbt were similar to each other. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that trout asbt was primarily expressed in the hindgut, while ntcp expression occurred in the brain, and ost-alpha-1/-2 was mainly expressed in the liver or ovary. Although asbt and ost-alpha-1 mRNA levels in the gut increased in response to fasting for 4 days, ost-alpha-1 expression in the liver decreased. Similarly, bile acid administration increased asbt and ost-alpha-1 expression levels in the gut, while those of ntcp and ost-alpha-2 in the liver decreased. These results suggested that the genes asbt, ntcp, and ost-alpha are involved in bile acid transport in rainbow trout.

  20. Enzymic measurement of primary bile acids and the primary bile acid ratio in serum with the IL-Multistat III Fluorescence Light-Scattering Centrifugal Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Papanastasiou-Diamandi, A; Diamandis, E P; Soldin, S J

    1984-08-01

    Enzymic fluorimetric methods are described for the determination of primary bile acids and of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDC) and cholic acid (C) in serum. Bile acids are extracted from 0.3 mL of serum in a simple 5-min step with use of Sep-Pak C cartridges. Total primary bile acids are measured by an equilibrium technique after reaction with beta-NAD in the presence of 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Chenodeoxycholic acid (and its conjugates) is measured by a reaction-rate technique employing the same reaction as above but under different experimental conditions. A small contribution of cholic acid (and its conjugates) to the reaction rate is eliminated by simple calculations. Cholic acid is calculated by difference of the two determinations. In both assays NADH fluorescence is measured with the Multistat centrifugal analyzer. Absolute recovery of bile acids from serum was about 87%. Day-to-day standard deviations for CDC and C were 1.6 and 2.0 mumol/L at serum concentrations of 22.1 and 24.1 mumol/L respectively. Comparison data with a cholylglycine RIA procedure gave the following correlation coefficients (x = RIA, y = proposed method): r = 0.980 (RIA vs total primary bile acids), r = 0.918 (RIA vs CDC) and r = 0.989 (RIA vs C). The methods described appear more practical for use on a routine basis than methods in the literature for the calculation of the primary bile acid ratio. PMID:6090040

  1. The Effects of Boron Derivatives on Lipid Absorption from the Intestine and on Bile Lipids and Bile Acids of Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Iris H.; Reynolds, David J.; Wong, O. T.; Sood, A.; Spielvogel, B. F.

    1995-01-01

    N,N-dimethyl-n-octadecylamine borane 1 at 8 mg/kg/day, tetrakis-u-(trimethylamine boranecarboxylato)-bis(trimethyl-carboxyborane)-dicopper(II) 2 at 2.5 mg/kg/day and trimethylamine-carboxyborane 3 at 8 mg/kg/day were evaluated for their effects on bile lipids, bile acids, small intestinal absorption of cholesterol and cholic acid and liver and small intestinal enzyme activities involved in lipid metabolism. The agent administered orally elevated rat bile excretion of lipids, e.g. cholesterol and phospholipids, and compounds 2 and 3 increased the bile flow rate. These agents altered the composition of the bile acids, but there was no significant increase in lithocholic acid which is most lithogenic agent in rats. The three agents did decrease cholesterol absorption from isolated in situ intestinal duodenum loops in the presence of drug. Hepatic and small intestinal mucosa enzyme activities, e.g. ATP-dependent citrate lyase, acyl CoA cholesterol acyl transferase, cholsterol-7-α -hydroxylase, sn glycerol-3-phosphate acyl transferase, phosphatidylate phosphohydrolase, and lipoprotein lipase, were reduced. However, the boron derivatives 1 and 3 decreased hepatic HMG-CoA reductase activity, the regulatory enzyme for cholesterol synthesis, but the compounds had no effects on small intestinal mucosa HMG-CoA reductase activity. There was no evidence of hepatic cell damage afforded by the drugs based on clinical chemistry values which would induce alterations in bile acid concentrations after treatment of the rat. PMID:18472747

  2. Structural basis of the alternating-access mechanism in a bile acid transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Levin, Elena J.; Pan, Yaping; McCoy, Jason G.; Sharma, Ruchika; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in hepatocytes and secreted through the biliary tract into the small intestine, where they aid in absorption of lipids and fat-soluble vitamins. Through a process known as enterohepatic recirculation, more than 90% of secreted bile acids are then retrieved from the intestine and returned to the liver for resecretion. In humans, there are two Na+-dependent bile acid transporters involved in enterohepatic recirculation, the Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP; also known as SLC10A1) expressed in hepatocytes, and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; also known as SLC10A2) expressed on enterocytes in the terminal ileum. In recent years, ASBT has attracted much interest as a potential drug target for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia, because inhibition of ASBT reduces reabsorption of bile acids, thus increasing bile acid synthesis and consequently cholesterol consumption. However, a lack of three-dimensional structures of bile acid transporters hampers our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms of substrate selectivity and transport, and to interpret the wealth of existing functional data. The crystal structure of an ASBT homologue from Neisseria meningitidis (ASBTNM) in detergent was reported recently, showing the protein in an inward-open conformation bound to two Na+ and a taurocholic acid. However, the structural changes that bring bile acid and Na+ across the membrane are difficult to infer from a single structure. To understand the structural changes associated with the coupled transport of Na+ and bile acids, here we solved two structures of an ASBT homologue from Yersinia frederiksenii (ASBTYf) in a lipid environment, which reveal that a large rigid-body rotation of a substrate-binding domain gives the conserved `crossover' region, where two discontinuous helices cross each other, alternating accessibility from either side of the cell membrane. This result has implications

  3. Bile pigment pharmacokinetics and absorption in the rat: therapeutic potential for enteral administration

    PubMed Central

    Bulmer, AC; Coombes, JS; Blanchfield, JT; Toth, I; Fassett, RG; Taylor, SM

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Bilirubin and biliverdin possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and their exogenous administration protects against the effects of inflammation and trauma in experimental models. Despite the therapeutic potential of bile pigments, little is known about their in vivo parenteral or enteral absorption after exogenous administration. This study investigated the absorption and pharmacokinetics of bile pigments after i.v., i.p. and intraduodenal (i.d.) administration in addition to their metabolism and routes of excretion. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Anaesthetized Wistar rats had their bile duct, jugular and portal veins cannulated. Bile pigments were infused and their circulating concentrations/biliary excretion were measured over 180 min. KEY RESULTS After i.v. administration of unconjugated bilirubin, biliverdin and bilirubin ditaurate, their plasma concentrations decreased exponentially over time. Subsequently, native and metabolized compounds appeared in the bile. When administered i.p., their absolute bioavailabilities equalled 14.0, 16.1 and 33.1%, respectively, and correspondingly 38, 28 and 34% of the same bile pigment doses were excreted in the bile. Administration of unconjugated bilirubin and bilirubin ditaurate i.d. increased their portal and systemic concentrations and their systemic bioavailability equalled 1.0 and 2.0%, respectively. Correspondingly, 2.7 and 4.6%, of the doses were excreted in the bile. Biliverdin was rapidly metabolized and these products were absorbed and excreted via the urine and bile. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Bile pigment absorption from the peritoneal and duodenal cavities demonstrate new routes of administration for the treatment of inflammatory and traumatic pathology. Oral biliverdin administration may lead to the production of active metabolite that protect from inflammation/complement activation. PMID:21486273

  4. Biliary albumin excretion induced by bile salts in rats is a pathological phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, M.; Kitani, K.; Kanai, S. )

    1989-09-01

    The bile to plasma 125I-albumin concentration ratio (B/P ratio) was examined before and during various bile salt infusions in male Wistar rats that had previously received iv injection of 125I-albumin. Endogenous rat albumin and IgG concentrations in the bile were also determined by a single radial immunodiffusion method. Taurocholate (TC) infusion (1.0 mumol/min/100 g body wt) significantly increased the bile flow rate in the first hr but the flow began to decline in the second hr. The B/P ratio as well as rat albumin (and IgG) excretion into the bile significantly increased as early as 15 min after the start of TC infusion, and the increase became more pronounced in the second hr, when the bile flow began to decrease. Infusion of taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDC, 0.4 mumol/min/100 g) caused a reduction in bile flow 15 min after the start of infusion but the B/P ratio increased 40 times at its peak compared with the basal value before the bile salt infusion. Simultaneous infusion of tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDC, 0.6 mumol/min/100 g) and TCDC not only abolished the cholestasis induced by TCDC but maintained stable choleresis as long as for 2 hr. During this choleretic period, the B/P ration never exceeded the basal value. The choleresis induced by either taurodehydrocholate (TDHC) or bucolome was not accompanied by enhanced albumin excretion. In rats given TDHC infusion, albumin excretion started to increase only after the bile flow began to decline following the initial choleretic period. The enhanced excretion of albumin induced by TC and TCDC is therefore suggested to be caused not by the choleresis per se but by a possible concomitant increase in the communication between sinusoids and bile canaliculi, which eventually leads to cholestasis.

  5. Aspirated bile: a major host trigger modulating respiratory pathogen colonisation in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Reen, F J; Woods, D F; Mooij, M J; Chróinín, M N; Mullane, D; Zhou, L; Quille, J; Fitzpatrick, D; Glennon, J D; McGlacken, G P; Adams, C; O'Gara, F

    2014-10-01

    Chronic respiratory infections are a leading global cause of morbidity and mortality. However, the molecular triggers that cause respiratory pathogens to adopt persistent and often untreatable lifestyles during infection remain largely uncharacterised. Recently, bile aspiration caused by gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) has emerged as a significant complication associated with respiratory disease, and cystic fibrosis (CF) in particular. Based on our previous finding that the physiological concentrations of bile influence respiratory pathogens towards a chronic lifestyle in vitro, we investigated the impact of bile aspiration on the lung microbiome of respiratory patients. Sputum samples (n = 25) obtained from a cohort of paediatric CF patients were profiled for the presence of bile acids using high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Pyrosequencing was performed on a set of ten DNA samples that were isolated from bile aspirating (n = 5) and non-bile aspirating (n = 5) patients. Both denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing revealed significantly reduced biodiversity and richness in the sputum samples from bile aspirating patients when compared with non-aspirating patients. Families and genera associated with the pervasive CF microbiome dominated aspirating patients, while bacteria associated with the healthy lung were most abundant in non-aspirating patients. Bile aspiration linked to GOR is emerging as a major host trigger of chronic bacterial infections. The markedly reduced biodiversity and increased colonisation by dominant proteobacterial CF-associated pathogens observed in the sputum of bile aspirating patients suggest that bile may play a major role in disease progression in CF and other respiratory diseases. PMID:24816901

  6. Ursodeoxycholic acid in the Ursidae: biliary bile acids of bears, pandas, and related carnivores.

    PubMed

    Hagey, L R; Crombie, D L; Espinosa, E; Carey, M C; Igimi, H; Hofmann, A F

    1993-11-01

    The biliary bile acid composition of gallbladder bile obtained from six species of bears (Ursidae), the Giant panda, the Red panda, and 11 related carnivores were determined by reversed phase liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bile acids were conjugated solely with taurine (in N-acyl linkage) in all species. Ursodeoxycholic acid (3 alpha, 7 beta-dihydroxy-5 beta-cholan-24-oic acid) was present in all Ursidae, averaging 1-39% of biliary bile acids depending on the species; it was not detected or present as a trace constituent (< 0.5%) in all other species, including the Giant panda. Ursodeoxycholic acid was present in 73 of 75 American Black bears, and its proportion averaged 34% (range 0-62%). Ursodeoxycholic acid averaged 17% of biliary bile acids in the Polar bear (n = 4) and 18% in the Brown bear (n = 6). Lower proportions (1-8%) were present in the Sun bear (n = 2), Ceylon Sloth bear (n = 1), and the Spectacled bear (n = 1). Bile of all species contained taurine-conjugated chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid. In some related carnivores, deoxycholic acid, the 7-dehydroxylation product of cholic acid, was also present. To determine whether the 7 beta hydroxy group of ursodeoxycholic acid was formed by hepatic or bacterial enzymes, bile acids were determined in hepatic bile obtained from bears with chronic biliary fistulae. Fistula bile samples contained ursodeoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and a trace amount of cholic acid, all as taurine conjugates, indicating that ursodeoxycholic acid is a primary bile acid formed in the liver in Ursidae.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Chronic intermittent psychological stress promotes macrophage reverse cholesterol transport by impairing bile acid absorption in mice

    PubMed Central

    Silvennoinen, Reija; Quesada, Helena; Kareinen, Ilona; Julve, Josep; Kaipiainen, Leena; Gylling, Helena; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escola-Gil, Joan Carles; Kovanen, Petri T; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Psychological stress is a risk factor for atherosclerosis, yet the pathophysiological mechanisms involved remain elusive. The transfer of cholesterol from macrophage foam cells to liver and feces (the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport, m-RCT) is an important antiatherogenic pathway. Because exposure of mice to physical restraint, a model of psychological stress, increases serum levels of corticosterone, and as bile acid homeostasis is disrupted in glucocorticoid-treated animals, we investigated if chronic intermittent restraint stress would modify m-RCT by altering the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. C57Bl/6J mice exposed to intermittent stress for 5 days exhibited increased transit through the large intestine and enhanced fecal bile acid excretion. Of the transcription factors and transporters that regulate bile acid homeostasis, the mRNA expression levels of the hepatic farnesoid X receptor (FXR), the bile salt export pump (BSEP), and the intestinal fibroblast growth factor 15 (FGF15) were reduced, whereas those of the ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT), responsible for active bile acid absorption, remained unchanged. Neither did the hepatic expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the key enzyme regulating bile acid synthesis, change in the stressed mice. Evaluation of the functionality of the m-RCT pathway revealed increased fecal excretion of bile acids that had been synthesized from macrophage-derived cholesterol. Overall, our study reveals that chronic intermittent stress in mice accelerates m-RCT specifically by increasing fecal excretion of bile acids. This novel mechanism of m-RCT induction could have antiatherogenic potential under conditions of chronic stress. PMID:25969465

  8. Effects of trypsin, thrombin and proteinase-activated receptors on guinea pig common bile duct motility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Che

    2012-11-10

    Trypsin and thrombin activate proteinase-activated receptors (PARs), which modulate gastrointestinal motility. The common bile duct is exposed to many proteinases that can activate PARs, especially during infection and stone obstruction. We investigated PAR effects on common bile duct motility in vitro. Contraction and relaxation of isolated guinea pig common bile duct strips caused by PAR(1), PAR(2) and PAR(4) agonists were measured using isometric transducers. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to determine the expression of PAR(1) and PAR(2). Thrombin and two PAR(1) peptide agonists, TFLLR-NH(2) and SFLLRN-NH(2), evoked moderate relaxation of the carbachol-contracted common bile duct in a concentration-dependent manner. Trypsin and three PAR(2) peptide agonists, 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH(2), SLIGKV-NH(2) and SLIGRL-NH(2), generated moderate to marked relaxation as well. The existence of PAR(1) and PAR(2) mRNA in the common bile duct was identified by RT-PCR. Moreover, two PAR(4)-selective agonists, AYPGKF-NH(2) and GYPGQV-NH(2), produced relaxation of the common bile duct. In contrast, all PAR(1), PAR(2) and PAR(4) inactive control peptides did not elicit relaxation. This indicates that PAR(1), PAR(2) and PAR(4) mediate common bile duct relaxation. The thrombin, TFLLR-NH(2), trypsin, and AYPGKF-NH(2)-induced responses were not affected by tetrodotoxin, implying that the PAR effects are not neurally mediated. Our findings provide the first evidence that PAR(1) and PAR(2) mediate whereas agonists of PAR(4) elicit relaxation of the guinea pig common bile duct. Trypsin and thrombin relax the common bile duct. PARs may play an important role in the control of common bile duct motility. PMID:22960409

  9. Profiling of urinary bile acids in piglets by a combination of enzymatic deconjugation and targeted LC-MRM-MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bile acids (BAs) have an important role in the control of fat, glucose and cholesterol metabolism. Synthesis of bile acids is the major pathway for the metabolism of cholesterol and for the excretion of excess cholesterol in mammals. Bile acid intermediates and/or their metabolites are excreted in...

  10. Steam Cooking Significantly Improves in Vitro Bile Acid Binding of Beets, Eggplant, Asparagus, Carrots, Green Beans and Cauliflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relative healthful potential of cooked beets, okra, eggplant, asparagus, carrots, green beans, cauliflower and turnips was evaluated by determining their in vitro bile acid binding using a mixture of bile acids secreted in human bile at a duodenal physiological pH of 6.3. Six treatments and two...

  11. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Unresectable Locally Advanced or Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Bile Duct or Gallbladder

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Gastrointestinal Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  12. Comparative studies of bile salts. A new type of bile salt from Arapaima gigas (Cuvier) (family Osteoglossidae)

    PubMed Central

    Haslewood, G. A. D.; Tökés, L.

    1972-01-01

    1. Arapaima gigas bile salts were hydrolysed by alkali or cleaved with dioxan–trichloroacetic acid to give cholic acid, arapaimic acid, arapaimol-A and arapaimol-B. 2. I.r., n.m.r. and mass spectroscopy and [α]D measurements indicated that arapaimic acid and arapaimol-A and -B are respectively 2α,3α,7α,12α-tetrahydroxy-5β,25∈-cholestan-26-oic acid, 5β,25R-cholestane-2β,3α,7α,12α,26-pentol and 5β-cholestane-2β,3α,7α,12α,26,27-hexol. 3. Partial synthesis of 2β,3α,7α,12α-tetrahydroxy-5α- and -5β-cholan-24-oic acid and their spectral examination fully confirmed these conclusions. 4. A. gigas bile salts show primitive features in that they comprise alcohol sulphates and a C27 acid; they are also specialized in showing 2β-hydroxylation. PMID:5073728

  13. The hypocholesterolemic and antiatherogenic effects of Cholazol H, a chemically functionalized insoluble fiber with bile acid sequestrant properties in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Wilson, T A; Romano, C; Liang, J; Nicolosi, R J

    1998-08-01

    Cholazol H (Alpha-Beta Technology, Worcester, MA), a chemically functionalized, insoluble dietary fiber with bile acid sequestrant properties, was studied in 30 male F1 B Golden Syrian hamsters for its effect on plasma lipid concentrations and early atherogenesis in experiment 1. In experiment 2, 30 male Golden Syrian hamsters were studied for the effects on plasma lipids and fecal excretion of bile acids. In experiment 1, three groups of 10 hamsters each were fed a chow-based hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with 5% coconut oil and 0.1% cholesterol for 6 weeks. After 6 weeks, hamsters were continued on the diet with either 0% drug (hypercholesterolemic diet [HCD]), 0.5% cholestyramine (CSTY), or 0.5% Cholazol H for 8 weeks. Fasting plasma lipids were measured at weeks 6, 10, and 14, and early atherosclerosis (fatty streak formation) was measured at week 14. Relative to HCD, CSTY and Cholazol H significantly lowered plasma total cholesterol (TC) (-37%, P < .03, and -30%, P < .04, respectively) and plasma very-low and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (nonHDL-C) (-45%, P < .02, and -36%, P < .03, respectively) with no significant effects on plasma HDL-C or triglycerides (TG). Despite similar reductions in nonHDL-C, only Cholazol H significantly prevented early atherosclerosis (-38%, P < .02) relative to HCD. In experiment 2, three groups of 10 hamsters each were fed a chow-based hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with 10% coconut oil and 0.05% cholesterol and either 0% drug HCD, 0.5% CSTY, or 0.5% Cholazol H for 4 weeks. Fasting plasma lipids were measured at weeks 2 and 4, and fecal bile acids were measured at week 4. Both Cholazol H and CSTY were equally effective in significantly lowering plasma TC (-16%, P < .003, and -13%, P < .01, respectively) and nonHDL-C (-22%, P < .004, and -18%, P < .02, respectively), with no significant effect on HDL-C and TG relative to HCD. Cholazol H and CSTY produced a significantly greater concentration of fecal total

  14. Blast-like cell compartment in carcinogen-induced proliferating bile ductules.

    PubMed Central

    Novikoff, P. M.; Yam, A.; Oikawa, I.

    1996-01-01

    Small non-epithelial cells with morphological features of blast-like cells are found within a proliferating intrahepatic biliary system after institution in rats of a diethylnitrosamine, 2-acetylaminofluorene, partial hepatectomy carcinogenesis protocol. Two to three days after the partial hepatectomy step of the carcinogen protocol, the small blast-like cells are evident beneath a layer of bile ductule epithelial cells that line the walls of the bile ductules. The basally located small cells are not exposed to the bile ductule lumen or to the surrounding basal lamina. They ranged in size from 3.0 to 5.0 microns, exhibit an undifferentiated phenotype, including a high nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio and no to minimal differentiated cytoplasmic and surface structures. Mitosis of blast-like cells are evident, and their nuclei express proliferating nuclear cell antigen. The ductal blast-like cells do not express cytokeratin 19, oval cell antigen 270.38, or actin immunoreactivity, in contrast to bile ductule epithelial cells. The basal cells, as well as bile ductule epithelial cells, are negative for a panel of T and B lymphocyte surface markers in contrast to lymphocytes present in the connective tissue stroma surrounding the bile ductules and throughout the hepatic parenchyma. Within some segments of the biliary system, some of the ductal blast-like cells increased in size to approximately 10 microns and showed increased amounts of cytoplasmic organelles and plasma membrane filapodia but did not develop the polarized phenotype of bile ductule epithelial cells (ie, apical microvilli, desmosomes, connections to bile ductule cells, and exposure to duct lumen); however, their nuclear morphology was essentially similar to the smaller basal cells. We also found bile ductules to contain two types of polarized epithelial cells, one with the characteristic oval nucleus of the oval/bile ductule epithelial cells and the other, transitional epithelial cells with a rounder nucleus and

  15. Interaction of a dietary fiber (pectin) with gastrointestinal components (bile salts, calcium, and lipase): a calorimetry, electrophoresis, and turbidity study.

    PubMed

    Espinal-Ruiz, Mauricio; Parada-Alfonso, Fabián; Restrepo-Sánchez, Luz-Patricia; Narváez-Cuenca, Carlos-Eduardo; McClements, David Julian

    2014-12-31

    An in vitro gastrointestinal model consisting of oral, gastric, and intestinal phases was used to elucidate the impact of pectin on the digestion of emulsified lipids. Pectin reduced the extent of lipid digestion, which was attributed to its binding interactions with specific gastrointestinal components. The interaction of pectin with bile salts, lipase, CaCl2, and NaCl was therefore investigated by turbidity, microstructure, electrophoresis, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) at pH 7.0 and 37 °C. ITC showed that the interaction of pectin was endothermic with bile salts, but exothermic with CaCl2, NaCl, and lipase. Electrophoresis, microstructure, and turbidity measurements showed that anionic pectin formed electrostatic complexes with calcium ions, which may have decreased lipid digestion due to increased lipid flocculation or microgel formation because this would reduce the surface area of lipid exposed to the lipase. This research provides valuable insights into the physicochemical and molecular mechanisms of the interaction of pectin with gastrointestinal components that may affect the rate and extent of lipid digestion.

  16. Impact of mucin, bile salts and cholesterol on the virulence of Vibrio anguillarum towards gnotobiotic sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) larvae.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Bossier, Peter; Dierckens, Kristof; Laureau, Stanislas; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-30

    In this study, we investigated the impact of the host factors mucin, bile salts and cholesterol on the virulence of the economically important aquatic pathogen Vibrio anguillarum towards sea bass larvae. Pretreatment of V. anguillarum with either one of the host factors (at 10 mg l(-1)) prior to inoculation into the sea bass rearing water increased virulence of the bacterium, although the effect of cholesterol was not significant. Each of the three host factors significantly increased several virulence-related phenotypes in V. anguillarum, i.e. protease activity, flagellar motility, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production, whereas there was no effect on growth of the bacterium under these conditions. Furthermore, the host factors increased the expression of genes involved in these phenotypes, i.e. the metalloprotease empA, the flagellar transcriptional regulator fleQ, the flagellin gene flaA, the chemotaxis methyltransferase gene cheR, the exopolysaccharide biosynthesis gene wbfD and the exopolysaccharide export gene wza. Our results indicate that V. anguillarum uses host mucin, bile salts, and cholesterol as cues to promote the expression of several important virulence traits that enhance the success of transmission from one host to another.

  17. Bile Acid Metabolome after an Oral Lipid Tolerance Test by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas; Neumann, Hannah; Karrasch, Thomas; Liebisch, Gerhard; Schäffler, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Context Besides their role in intestinal resorption of lipids, bile acids are regarded as endocrine and metabolic signaling molecules. The detailed profile of bile acid species in peripheral blood after an oral lipid tolerance test (OLTT) is unknown. Objective We quantified the regulation of 18 bile acids after OLTT in healthy individuals. Material and methods 100 volunteers were characterized by anthropometric and laboratory parameters and underwent OLTT. Venous blood was drawn in the fasted state (0 h) and at 2h, 4h, and 6 h after OLTT. Serum concentrations of 18 bile acids were measured by LC-MS/MS. Results All of the 6 taurine-conjugated bile acids (TUDCA, THDCA, TCA, TCDCA, TDCA, TLCA) and all of the 6 glycine-conjugated bile acids (GUDCA, GHDCA, GCA, GCDCA, GDCA, GLCA) rose significantly at 2h and remained elevated during OLTT. Of the primary bile acids, CA remained unchanged, whereas CDCA significantly decreased at 4h. Of the secondary bile acids, DCA, UDCA and HDCA were not altered, whereas LCA decreased. There was a significant positive correlation between the intestinal feed-back regulator of bile acid synthesis FGF-19 and bile acids. This correlation seems to depend on all of the six taurine-conjugated bile acids and on GCA, GDCA, and GCDCA. Females and users of hormonal contraception displayed higher levels of taurine-conjugated bile acids. Conclusions The novelty of the study is based on the identification of single bile acids during OLTT. LC-MS/MS-based quantification of bile acids in serum provides a reliable tool for future investigation of endocrine and metabolic effects of bile acids. PMID:26863103

  18. Ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter protein levels are down-regulated through ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation induced by bile acids.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Hayashi, Kenjiro; Kuribayashi, Hideaki; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2013-08-15

    The ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT or SLC10A2) has a crucial role in intestinal bile acid absorption. We previously reported that enterobacteria-mediated bile acid conversion was involved in the alteration of ileal ASBT expression levels. In the present study, to investigate the hypothesis that ileal ASBT protein levels are post-translationally regulated by enterobacteria-associated bile acids, alteration of ileal ASBT protein levels was analysed in mice 12 h and 24 h after anti-bacterial drug ampicillin (ABPC) treatment (100 mg/kg, single shot) that altered bile acid composition in the intestinal lumen. In ABPC-treated mice, enterobacteria-biotransformed bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) and cholic acid (CA) levels were decreased, whereas taurocholic acid (TCA) and tauro-β-muricholic acid levels were increased in the intestinal lumen. Ileal ASBT protein levels in brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMVs), but not ileal Asbt mRNA levels, were significantly increased in the ABPC-treated mice, and the extent of ubiquitination of the ileal ASBT protein was reduced in the ABPC-treated mice. Treatment of ABPC-pretreated mice with CA or TDCA, but not TCA, significantly decreased ileal ASBT protein levels and increased the extent of ubiquitination of ileal ASBT protein. Treatment of mice with the lysosome inhibitor, chloroquine, or the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, increased ileal ASBT protein levels in BBMVs. CA-mediated reduction of ASBT protein levels in the ABPC-pretreated mice was attenuated by co-treatment with chloroquine or MG132. These results suggest that ileal ASBT protein is degraded by a ubiquitin-dependent pathway in response to enterobacteria-associated bile acids. PMID:23872411

  19. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the extrahepatic bile duct: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Oshiro, Yukio; Gen, Ryozo; Hashimoto, Shinji; Oda, Tatsuya; Sato, Taiki; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) originating from the gastrointestinal hepatobiliary-pancreas is a rare, invasive, and progressive disease, for which the prognosis is extremely poor. The patient was a 72-year-old man referred with complaints of jaundice. He was diagnosed with middle extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (cT4N1M0, cStage IV). He underwent a right hepatectomy combined with extrahepatic bile duct and portal vein resection after percutaneous transhepatic portal vein embolization. Microscopic examination showed a large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma according to the WHO criteria for the clinicopathologic classification of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Currently, the patient is receiving combination chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide for postoperative multiple liver metastases. Although NEC is difficult to diagnose preoperatively, it should be considered an uncommon alternative diagnosis. PMID:27570432

  20. Colesevelam: a new and improved bile acid sequestrant?

    PubMed

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Karagiannis, Asterios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Athyros, Vasilios G

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with statins represents an essential component both of primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention strategies. However, a proportion of patients cannot reach low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) targets with the highest tolerable dose of a potent statin or is intolerant to statins. Several treatment options are available for these patients. Colesevelam is a relatively new bile acid sequestrant that decreases serum LDL-C levels. Moreover, colesevelam improves glycemic control and seems to be well-tolerated, at least in short-term studies. Therefore, colesevelam seems to be a useful tool for the management of high-risk patients who cannot achieve LDL-C targets with monotherapy with a potent statin.

  1. Bile Acids, FXR, and Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Olivier F.; Still, Christopher D.; Argyropoulos, George; Edwards, Michael; Gerhard, Glenn S.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity represent major risk factors for diabetes and related metabolic diseases. Obesity is associated with a chronic and progressive inflammatory response leading to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus, although the precise mechanism mediating this inflammatory process remains poorly understood. The most effective intervention for the treatment of obesity, bariatric surgery, leads to glucose normalization and remission of T2D. Recent work in both clinical studies and animal models supports bile acids (BAs) as key mediators of these effects. BAs are involved in lipid and glucose homeostasis primarily via the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) transcription factor. BAs are also involved in regulating genes involved in inflammation, obesity, and lipid metabolism. Here, we review the novel role of BAs in bariatric surgery and the intersection between BAs and immune, obesity, weight loss, and lipid metabolism genes. PMID:27006824

  2. Retained and recurrent bile duct stones. Surgical or nonsurgical removal?

    PubMed Central

    Girard, R M; Legros, G

    1981-01-01

    An experience with 69 patients who underwent 72 common bile duct reoperations for retained or recurrent choledocholithiasis is presented. The mean age of the patients was 57 years, and 35 patients had associated conditions. In this series six patients (8.3%) had minor complications and no patient developed major complications or died. Two (2.9%) patients developed recurrent choledocholithiasis. In recent years, nonoperative removal of retained stones through a T-tube by mechanical extraction or chemical dissolution, and removal of retained or recurrent stones by endoscopic sphincterotomy has gained widespread popularity. Retained or recurrent choledocholithiasis should be managed on an individual basis. Reoperation has a good success rate, low morbidity and mortality rates. It should be considered as the treatment of choice in low risk patients, in whom a retained stone cannot be mechanically extracted through a T-tube, and in patients with recurrent choledocholithiasis diagnosed after removal of the T-tube. PMID:7469550

  3. Curcumin Prevents Bile Canalicular Alterations in the Liver of Hamsters Infected with Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Jattujan, Prapaporn; Pinlaor, Somchai; Charoensuk, Lakhanawan; Arunyanart, Channarong; Welbat, Jariya Umka

    2013-01-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini infection causes inflammation and liver injury leading to periductal fibrosis. Little is known about the pathological alterations in bile canaliculi in opisthorchiasis. This study aimed to investigate bile canalicular alterations in O. viverrini-infected hamsters and to examine the chemopreventive effects of curcumin on such changes. Hamsters were infected with O. viverrini and one group of animals was fed with 1% dietary curcumin supplement. Animals were examined during the acute infection phase, days 21 and 30 post-infection (PI) and chronic infection phase (day 90 PI). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that in the infected group fed with a normal diet, bile canaliculi became slightly tortuous by 30 day PI and more tortuous at day 90 PI. Transmission electron microscopy showed a reduction in microvilli density of canaliculi starting at day 30 PI, with a marked loss of microvilli at day 90 PI. These ultrastructral changes were slightly seen at day 21 PI, which was similar to that found in infected animals fed with 1% curcumin-supplemented diet. Notably, curcumin treatment prevented the reduction of microvilli density, reduced the dilation of bile canaliculi, and decreased the tortuosity of the bile canaliculi relative to non-infected animals on a normal diet at days 30 and 90 PI. These results suggest that curcumin reduces alteration of bile canaliculi and may be a promising agent to prevent the onset of bile duct abnormalities induced by O. viverrini infection. PMID:24516276

  4. Curcumin prevents bile canalicular alterations in the liver of hamsters infected with Opisthorchis viverrini.

    PubMed

    Jattujan, Prapaporn; Pinlaor, Somchai; Charoensuk, Lakhanawan; Arunyanart, Channarong; Welbat, Jariya Umka; Chaijaroonkhanarak, Wunnee

    2013-12-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini infection causes inflammation and liver injury leading to periductal fibrosis. Little is known about the pathological alterations in bile canaliculi in opisthorchiasis. This study aimed to investigate bile canalicular alterations in O. viverrini-infected hamsters and to examine the chemopreventive effects of curcumin on such changes. Hamsters were infected with O. viverrini and one group of animals was fed with 1% dietary curcumin supplement. Animals were examined during the acute infection phase, days 21 and 30 post-infection (PI) and chronic infection phase (day 90 PI). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that in the infected group fed with a normal diet, bile canaliculi became slightly tortuous by 30 day PI and more tortuous at day 90 PI. Transmission electron microscopy showed a reduction in microvilli density of canaliculi starting at day 30 PI, with a marked loss of microvilli at day 90 PI. These ultrastructral changes were slightly seen at day 21 PI, which was similar to that found in infected animals fed with 1% curcumin-supplemented diet. Notably, curcumin treatment prevented the reduction of microvilli density, reduced the dilation of bile canaliculi, and decreased the tortuosity of the bile canaliculi relative to non-infected animals on a normal diet at days 30 and 90 PI. These results suggest that curcumin reduces alteration of bile canaliculi and may be a promising agent to prevent the onset of bile duct abnormalities induced by O. viverrini infection.

  5. Bile acid salt binding with colesevelam HCl is not affected by suspension in common beverages.

    PubMed

    Hanus, Martin; Zhorov, Eugene

    2006-12-01

    It has been previously reported that anions in common beverages may bind to bile acid sequestrants (BAS), reducing their capacity for binding bile acid salts. This study examined the ability of the novel BAS colesevelam hydrochloride (HCl), in vitro, to bind bile acid sodium salts following suspension in common beverages. Equilibrium binding was evaluated under conditions of constant time and varying concentrations of bile acid salts in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). A stock solution of sodium salts of glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC), taurodeoxycholic acid (TDC), and glycocholic acid (GC), was added to each prepared sample of colesevelam HCl. Bile acid salt binding was calculated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Kinetics experiments were conducted using constant initial bile acid salt concentrations and varying binding times. The affinity, capacity, and kinetics of colesevelam HCl binding for GCDC, TDC, and GC were not significantly altered after suspension in water, carbonated water, Coca-Cola, Sprite, grape juice, orange juice, tomato juice, or Gatorade. The amount of bile acid sodium salt bound as a function of time was unchanged by pretreatment with any beverage tested. The in vitro binding characteristics of colesevelam HCl are unchanged by suspension in common beverages. PMID:16937334

  6. Mediators of exocrine pancreatic secretion induced by intraduodenal application of bile and taurodeoxycholate in man.

    PubMed

    Riepl, R L; Reichardt, B; Rauscher, J; Tzavella, K; Teufel, J; Lehnert, P

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether cholecystokinin, neurotensin, and cholinergic mechanisms act as mediators of bile salt-stimulated exocrine pancreatic secretion. Ten fasting healthy subjects provided with a double-lumen tube received 2, 4, and 6 g cattle bile and 200, 400, and 600 mg Na-taurodeoxycholate (TDC) into the duodenum at 65-min intervals, respectively. The application of TDC was repeated in another 10 subjects after intravenous bolus injection of 2.5 micrograms/kg b.w. atropine followed by continuous infusion of 5 micrograms/kg.h. Secretions of volume, bicarbonate, trypsin, and lipase were determined in 10-min fractions of duodenal juice. Plasma samples were analysed for cholecystokinin-like immunoreactivity (CCK-LI) and neurotensin with radioimmunoassays. Volume, bicarbonate, trypsin, and lipase secretion rates were significantly increased by 4 g and 6 g bile and by all doses of TDC. Incremental volume and bicarbonate output was dose-dependently enhanced by bile and TDC, and trypsin and lipase output by bile. Atropine significantly decreased the baseline values and all responses to TDC. Plasma concentrations and integrated CCK-LI and neurotensin significantly increased after 4 and 6 g bile and after 400 and 600 mg TDC. Atropine did not significantly influence peptide release. It is concluded that both hydrokinetic and ecbolic pancreatic secretion stimulated by intraduodenal bile and TDC are dependent on a cholinergic tone. CCK and probably also neurotensin act as further mediators of the ecbolic effect.

  7. Management of common bile duct obstruction associated with spontaneous perforation of the biliary tree.

    PubMed

    Megison, S M; Votteler, T P

    1992-02-01

    Spontaneous perforation of the extrahepatic biliary tree during infancy is an uncommon event. The cause of bile duct perforation is unclear, but one-quarter of reported cases have been associated with a stone or bile sludge obstructing the distal common bile duct. A 4-week-old girl had jaundice, and a DISIDA (99m technetium diisopropyl iminodiacetic acid) scan revealed perforation of the biliary tree. Exploratory surgery showed distal common bile duct obstruction with proximal perforation. No attempt was made to remove the obstructing lesion because of duct inflammation. Common bile duct obstruction persisted until week 5 after surgery when cholangiography revealed free flow of contrast into the duodenum through a common bile duct of normal caliber without a filling defect. In the presence of acute inflammation associated with perforation of the biliary tree, exploration of the common bile duct to relieve a distal obstruction could prove hazardous. Our case and a review of the literature suggest that the obstructing stone or sludge may pass spontaneously if managed expectantly.

  8. Bile salts act as effective protein-unfolding agents and instigators of disulfide stress in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Claudia M.; Knoefler, Daniela; Vitvitsky, Victor; Banerjee, Ruma; Jakob, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Commensal and pathogenic bacteria must deal with many different stress conditions to survive in and colonize the human gastrointestinal tract. One major challenge that bacteria encounter in the gut is the high concentration of bile salts, which not only aid in food absorption but also act as effective physiological antimicrobials. The mechanism by which bile salts limit bacterial growth is still largely unknown. Here, we show that bile salts cause widespread protein unfolding and aggregation, affecting many essential proteins. Simultaneously, the bacterial cytosol becomes highly oxidizing, indicative of disulfide stress. Strains defective in reducing oxidative thiol modifications, restoring redox homeostasis, or preventing irreversible protein aggregation under disulfide stress conditions are sensitive to bile salt treatment. Surprisingly, cholate and deoxycholate, two of the most abundant and very closely related physiological bile salts, vary substantially in their destabilizing effects on proteins in vitro and cause protein unfolding of different subsets of proteins in vivo. Our results provide a potential mechanistic explanation for the antimicrobial effects of bile salts, help explain the beneficial effects of bile salt mixtures, and suggest that we have identified a physiological source of protein-unfolding disulfide stress conditions in bacteria. PMID:24706920

  9. K+ and Ca2+ modified Na-X zeolites as possible bile acids sequestrant.

    PubMed

    Linares, Carlos F; Valenzuela, Elymar; Ocanto, Freddy; Pérez, Víctor; Valbuena, Oscar; Goldwasser, Mireya R

    2008-05-01

    Modified zeolite X, previously exchanged with K+ and Ca2+ cations were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, chemical analysis and BET techniques. Different masses of these solids were mixed with an ox bile solution at different reaction times. The supernatants obtained by centrifugations were submitted to bile acid and phospholipids quantitative determinations. The amount of bile acids adsorbed was 65, 28 and 77% and for phospholipids was 45, 67 and 98% for KX, NaX and CaX respectively. As expected, as the amount of mass used increases more bile acids and phospholipids are adsorbed due to a larger surface of the solid being available for adsorption. On the other hand, 120 min of reaction time were sufficient for the adsorption of both components. The solids, after incubations with bile solutions were treated with abundant distilled water and dried at room temperature. The FT-IR analysis of these solids did not detect any bile and on the zeolite surface with suggested that the bile acid adsorption on the exchanged zeolites is moderated by weak and non covalent interactions.

  10. Bile Acids as Hormones: The FXR-FGF15/19 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kliewer, Steven A.; Mangelsdorf, David J.

    2015-01-01

    While it has long been recognized that bile acids are essential for solubilizing lipophilic nutrients in the small intestine, the discovery in 1999 that bile acids serve as ligands for the nuclear receptor FXR opened the floodgates in terms of characterizing their actions as selective signaling molecules. Bile acids act on FXR in ileal enterocytes to induce the expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 15/19, an atypical FGF that functions as a hormone. FGF15/19 subsequently acts on a cell surface receptor complex in hepatocytes to repress bile acid synthesis and gluconeogenesis and to stimulate glycogen and protein synthesis. FGF15/19 also stimulates gallbladder filling. Thus, the bile acid-FXR-FGF15/19 signaling pathway regulates diverse aspects of the postprandial enterohepatic response. Pharmacologically, this endocrine pathway provides exciting new opportunities for treating metabolic disease and bile acid-related disorders such as primary biliary cirrhosis and bile acid diarrhea. Both FXR agonists and FGF19 analogs are currently in clinical trials. PMID:26045265

  11. Effects of human and porcine bile on the proteome of Helicobacter hepaticus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Helicobacter hepaticus colonizes the intestine and liver of mice causing hepatobiliary disorders such as hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and has also been associated with inflammatory bowel disease in children. In its habitat, H. hepaticus must encounter bile which has potent antibacterial properties. To elucidate virulence and host-specific adaptation mechanisms of H. hepaticus modulated by human or porcine bile, a proteomic study of its response to the two types of bile was performed employing two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry. Results The 2-DE and mass spectrometry analyses of the proteome revealed that 46 proteins of H. hepaticus were differentially expressed in human bile, 18 up-regulated and 28 down-regulated. In the case of porcine bile, 32 proteins were differentially expressed of which 19 were up-regulated, and 13 were down-regulated. Functional classifications revealed that identified proteins participated in various biological functions including stress response, energy metabolism, membrane stability, motility, virulence and colonization. Selected genes were analyzed by RT-PCR to provide internal validation for the proteomic data as well as provide insight into specific expressions of motility, colonization and virulence genes of H. hepaticus in response to human or porcine bile. Conclusions Overall, the data suggested that bile is an important factor that determines virulence, host adaptation, localization and colonization of specific niches within host environment. PMID:22533459

  12. Evaluation of Streptococcus pneumoniae in bile samples: A case series review.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Naoya; Kawamura, Ichiro; Tsukahara, Mika; Mori, Keita; Kurai, Hanako

    2016-06-01

    Although Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important pathogen of humans, pneumococcal cholangitis is rare because of the rapid autolysis of S. pneumoniae. The aim of this case series was to review patients with bile cultures positive for S. pneumoniae. This study was a single center retrospective case series review of patients with S. pneumoniae in their bile at a tertiary-care cancer center between September 2002 and August 2015. Subjects consisted of all patients in whom S. pneumoniae was isolated in their bile during the study period. Bile specimens for culture were obtained from biliary drainage procedures such as endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage, endoscopic nasobiliary drainage, and percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. There were 20 patients with bile cultures positive for S. pneumoniae during the study period. All patients presented with extrahepatic obstructive jaundice due to hepatopancreatobiliary tumors. Nineteen of 20 patients underwent the placement of plastic intrabiliary tubes. The mean time between the first-time drainage and the positive culture was 26 days (range 0-313 days). Although 12 of 20 patients met our definition of cholangitis, 5 were clinically treated with antibiotics based on a physician's assessment of whether there was a true infection. The present study is the largest case series of patients with S. pneumoniae in their bile. Based on our findings, the isolation of S. pneumoniae from bile may be attributed to the placement of biliary drainage devices. PMID:27025902

  13. Mediators of exocrine pancreatic secretion induced by intraduodenal application of bile and taurodeoxycholate in man.

    PubMed

    Riepl, R L; Reichardt, B; Rauscher, J; Tzavella, K; Teufel, J; Lehnert, P

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether cholecystokinin, neurotensin, and cholinergic mechanisms act as mediators of bile salt-stimulated exocrine pancreatic secretion. Ten fasting healthy subjects provided with a double-lumen tube received 2, 4, and 6 g cattle bile and 200, 400, and 600 mg Na-taurodeoxycholate (TDC) into the duodenum at 65-min intervals, respectively. The application of TDC was repeated in another 10 subjects after intravenous bolus injection of 2.5 micrograms/kg b.w. atropine followed by continuous infusion of 5 micrograms/kg.h. Secretions of volume, bicarbonate, trypsin, and lipase were determined in 10-min fractions of duodenal juice. Plasma samples were analysed for cholecystokinin-like immunoreactivity (CCK-LI) and neurotensin with radioimmunoassays. Volume, bicarbonate, trypsin, and lipase secretion rates were significantly increased by 4 g and 6 g bile and by all doses of TDC. Incremental volume and bicarbonate output was dose-dependently enhanced by bile and TDC, and trypsin and lipase output by bile. Atropine significantly decreased the baseline values and all responses to TDC. Plasma concentrations and integrated CCK-LI and neurotensin significantly increased after 4 and 6 g bile and after 400 and 600 mg TDC. Atropine did not significantly influence peptide release. It is concluded that both hydrokinetic and ecbolic pancreatic secretion stimulated by intraduodenal bile and TDC are dependent on a cholinergic tone. CCK and probably also neurotensin act as further mediators of the ecbolic effect. PMID:9049590

  14. Bile Acids as Hormones: The FXR-FGF15/19 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kliewer, Steven A; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2015-01-01

    While it has long been recognized that bile acids are essential for solubilizing lipophilic nutrients in the small intestine, the discovery in 1999 that bile acids serve as ligands for the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) opened the floodgates in terms of characterizing their actions as selective signaling molecules. Bile acids act on FXR in ileal enterocytes to induce the expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)15/19, an atypical FGF that functions as a hormone. FGF15/19 subsequently acts on a cell surface receptor complex in hepatocytes to repress bile acid synthesis and gluconeogenesis, and to stimulate glycogen and protein synthesis. FGF15/19 also stimulates gallbladder filling. Thus, the bile acid-FXR-FGF15/19 signaling pathway regulates diverse aspects of the postprandial enterohepatic response. Pharmacologically, this endocrine pathway provides exciting new opportunities for treating metabolic disease and bile acid-related disorders such as primary biliary cirrhosis and bile acid diarrhea. Both FXR agonists and FGF19 analogs are currently in clinical trials. PMID:26045265

  15. Bile tolerance and its effect on antibiotic susceptibility of probiotic Lactobacillus candidates.

    PubMed

    Hyacinta, Májeková; Hana, Kiňová Sepová; Andrea, Bilková; Barbora, Čisárová

    2015-05-01

    Before use in practice, it is necessary to precisely identify and characterize a new probiotic candidate. Eight animal lactobacilli and collection strain Lactobacillus reuteri CCM 3625 were studied from the point of saccharide fermentation profiles, bile salt resistance, antibiogram profiles, and influence of bile on sensitivity to antibiotics. Studied lactobacilli differed in their sugar fermentation ability determined by API 50CHL and their identification based on these profiles did not correspond with molecular-biological one in most cases. Survival of strains Lactobacillus murinus C and L. reuteri KO4b was not affected by presence of bile. The resistance of genus Lactobacillus to vancomycin and quinolones (ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin) was confirmed in all strains tested. This study provides the new information about oxgall (0.5 and 1 %) effect on the lactobacilli antibiotic susceptibility. Antibiotic profiles were not noticeably affected, and both bile concentrations tested had comparable impact on the lactobacilli antibiotic sensitivity. Interesting change was noticed in L. murinus C, where the resistance to cephalosporins was reverted to susceptibility. Similarly, susceptibility of L. reuteri E to ceftazidime arose after incubation in both concentration of bile. After influence of 1 % bile, Lactobacillus mucosae D lost its resistance to gentamicin. On the base of gained outcomes, the best probiotic properties manifested L. reuteri KO4b, Lactobacillus plantarum KG4, and L. reuteri E due to their survival in the presence of bile.

  16. The Role of CT cholangiography in the Detection and Localisation of Suspected Bile Leakage Following Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Michael; Kaplan, Elan; Udayasiri, Ruwangi; Usatoff, Val

    2012-01-01

    Background Most bile duct injuries are not recognized at the time of initial surgery. Optimal treatment requires early recognition. CT IVC has become increasingly important in identifying bile leaks and their source after cholecystectomy. Our study aims to report the outcomes of using CT IVC post operatively and how accurately it can detect or localise bile leaks. Methods From 2000 - 2009, twenty patients were managed for suspected bile leak post cholecystectomy within the Alfred Hospital. The study included a retrospective evaluation of the initial procedure, presenting symptoms, site of ductal injury, diagnostic procedures and therapeutic interventions. Results were analysed to determine success of the imaging procedure, and to correlate imaging diagnosis with results both diagnostically and clinically. Results Twenty patients had a suspected bile leak, of which 3 were detected at the time of surgery. Seven patients had a CTIVC as their primary investigation. It identified bile leak in 6 and the anatomical site in 5. One had a leak excluded and was managed conservatively. Conclusions CT Cholangiography is a feasible and low-risk tool for imaging of the biliary tract in suspected bile leaks post cholecystectomy. It is a valuable non-invasive investigation that may help avoid endoscopic retrograde Cholangiography or surgery.

  17. Evaluation of bile reflux in HIDA images based on fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Lo, Rong-Chin; Huang, Wen-Lin; Fan, Yu-Ming

    2015-05-01

    We propose a new method to help physicians assess, using a hepatobiliary iminodiacetic acid scan image, whether or not there is bile reflux into the stomach. The degree of bile reflux is an important index for clinical diagnosis of stomach diseases. The proposed method applies image-processing technology combined with a hydrodynamic model to determine the extent of bile reflux or whether the duodenum is also folded above the stomach. This condition in 2D dynamic images suggests that bile refluxes into the stomach, when endoscopy shows no bile reflux. In this study, we used optical flow to analyze images from Tc99m-diisopropyl iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy (Tc99m-DISIDA) to ascertain the direction and velocity of bile passing through the pylorus. In clinical diagnoses, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is the main clinical tool for evaluating functional images of hepatobiliary metabolism. Computed tomography (CT) shows anatomical images of the external contours of the stomach, liver, and biliary extent. By exploiting the functional fusion of the two kinds of medical image, physicians can obtain a more accurate diagnosis. We accordingly reconstructed 3D images from SPECT and CT to help physicians choose which cross sections to fuse with software and to help them more accurately diagnose the extent and quantity of bile reflux.

  18. Activation of CFTR by ASBT-mediated bile salt absorption.

    PubMed

    Bijvelds, Marcel J C; Jorna, Huub; Verkade, Henkjan J; Bot, Alice G M; Hofmann, Franz; Agellon, Luis B; Sinaasappel, Maarten; de Jonge, Hugo R

    2005-11-01

    In cholangiocytes, bile salt (BS) uptake via the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) may evoke ductular flow by enhancing cAMP-mediated signaling to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. We considered that ASBT-mediated BS uptake in the distal ileum might also modulate intestinal fluid secretion. Taurocholate (TC) induced a biphasic rise in the short circuit current across ileal tissue, reflecting transepithelial electrogenic ion transport. This response was sensitive to bumetanide and largely abrogated in Cftr-null mice, indicating that it predominantly reflects CFTR-mediated Cl- secretion. The residual response in Cftr-null mice could be attributed to electrogenic ASBT activity, as it matched the TC-coupled absorptive Na+ flux. TC-evoked Cl- secretion required ASBT-mediated TC uptake, because it was blocked by a selective ASBT inhibitor and was restricted to the distal ileum. Suppression of neurotransmitter or prostaglandin release, blocking of the histamine H1 receptor, or pretreatment with 5-hydroxytryptamine did not abrogate the TC response, suggesting that neurocrine or immune mediators of Cl- secretion are not involved. Responses to TC were retained after carbachol treatment and after permeabilization of the basolateral membrane with nystatin, indicating that BS modulate CFTR channel gating rather than the driving force for Cl- exit. TC-induced Cl- secretion was maintained in cGMP-dependent protein kinase II-deficient mice and only partially inhibited by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor H89, suggesting a mechanism of CFTR activation different from cAMP or cGMP signaling. We conclude that active BS absorption in the ileum triggers CFTR activation and, consequently, local salt and water secretion, which may serve to prevent intestinal obstruction in the postprandial state. PMID:16037545

  19. Limits of Surgical Resection for Bile Duct Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Fabian; Heinrich, Stefan; Lang, Hauke

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Perihilar cholangiocarcinoma is the most frequent cholangiocarcinoma and poses difficulties in preoperative evaluation. For its therapy, often major hepatic resections as well as resection and reconstruction of the hepatic artery or the portal vein are necessary. In the last decades, great advances were made in both the surgical procedures and the perioperative anesthetic management. In this article, we describe from our point of view which facts represent the limits for curative (R0) resection in perihilar cholangiocarcinoma. Methods Retrospective data of a 6-year period (2008-2014) was collected in an SPSS 22 database and further analyzed with focus on the surgical approach and the postoperative as well as histological results. Results Out of 96 patients in total we were able to intend a curative resection in 73 patients (76%). In 58/73 (79.5%) resections an R0 situation could be reached (R1 n = 14; R2 n = 1). 23 patients were irresectable because of peritoneal carcinosis (n = 8), broad infiltration of major blood vessels (n = 8), bilateral advanced tumor growth to the intrahepatic bile ducts (n = 3), infiltration of the complete liver hilum (n = 2), infiltration of the gallbladder (n = 1), and liver cirrhosis (n = 1). Patients with a T4 stadium were treated with curative intention twice, and in each case an R1 resection was achieved. Most patients with irresectable tumors can be suspected to have a T4 stadium as well. In a T3 situation (n = 6) we could establish five R0 resections and one R1 resection. Conclusion The limit of surgical resection for bile duct cancer is the advanced tumor stage (T stadium). While in a T3 stadium an R0 resection is possible in most cases, we were not able to perform an R0 resection in a T4 stadium. From our point of view, early T stadium cannot usually be estimated through expanded diagnostics but only through surgical exploration. PMID:26468314

  20. Review: the liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Hugo L

    2009-12-01

    The liver bile acid-binding proteins, L-BABPs, formerly called the liver "basic" fatty acid-binding proteins, are a subfamily of the fatty acid-binding proteins, FABPs. All the members of this protein group share the same fold: a 10 stranded beta barrel in which two short helices are inserted in between the first and the second strand of antiparallel beta sheet. The barrel encloses the ligand binding cavity of the protein while the two helices are believed to be involved in ligand accessibility to the binding site. The L-BABP subfamily has been found to be present in the liver of several vertebrates: fish, amphibians, reptiles, and birds but not in mammals. The members of the FABP family present in mammals that appear to be more closely related to the L-BABPs are the liver FABPs and the ileal BABPs, both very extensively studied. Several L-BABP X-ray structures are available and chicken L-BABP has also been studied using NMR spectroscopy. The stoichiometry of ligand binding for bile acids, first determined by X-ray crystallography for the chicken liver protein, is of two cholates per protein molecule with the only exception of zebrafish L-BABP which, due to the presence of a disulfide bridge, has a stoichiometry of 1:1. The stoichiometry of ligand binding for fatty acids, determined with several different techniques, is 1:1. An unanswered question of great relevance is the identity of the protein that in mammals performs the function that in other vertebrates is carried out by the L-BABPS.

  1. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury. PMID:26208104

  2. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury.

  3. Protective effect of bile acid derivatives in phalloidin-induced rat liver toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Herraez, Elisa; Macias, Rocio I.R.; Vazquez-Tato, Jose; Hierro, Carlos; Monte, Maria J.; Marin, Jose J.G.

    2009-08-15

    Phalloidin causes severe liver damage characterized by marked cholestasis, which is due in part to irreversible polymerization of actin filaments. Liver uptake of this toxin through the transporter OATP1B1 is inhibited by the bile acid derivative BALU-1, which does not inhibit the sodium-dependent bile acid transporter NTCP. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether BALU-1 prevents liver uptake of phalloidin without impairing endogenous bile acid handling and hence may have protective effects against the hepatotoxicity induced by this toxin. In anaesthetized rats, i.v. administration of BALU-1 increased bile flow more than taurocholic acid (TCA). Phalloidin administration decreased basal (- 60%) and TCA-stimulated bile flow (- 55%) without impairing bile acid output. Phalloidin-induced cholestasis was accompanied by liver necrosis, nephrotoxicity and haematuria. In BALU-1-treated animals, phalloidin-induced cholestasis was partially prevented. Moreover haematuria was not observed, which was consistent with histological evidences of BALU-1-prevented injury of liver and kidney tissue. HPLC-MS/MS analysis revealed that BALU-1 was secreted in bile mainly in non-conjugated form, although a small proportion (< 5%) of tauro-BALU-1 was detected. BALU-1 did not inhibit the biliary secretion of endogenous bile acids. When highly choleretic bile acids, - ursodeoxycholic (UDCA) and dehydrocholic acid (DHCA) - were administered, they were found less efficient than BALU-1 in preventing phalloidin-induced cholestasis. Biliary phalloidin elimination was low but it was increased by BALU-1 > TCA > DHCA > UDCA. In conclusion, BALU-1 is able to protect against phalloidin-induced hepatotoxicity, probably due to an inhibition of the liver uptake and an enhanced biliary secretion of this toxin.

  4. A study on biliary ductal system and bile fistula in the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis.

    PubMed

    Xu, G; Elsey, R M; Lance, V A; Javors, B; Chen, T S; Salen, G; Tint, G S

    1997-12-15

    The anomalous arrangement of bile ducts in the Crocodylia has not been fully appreciated. A clear understanding of biliary anatomy is necessary in order to create complete bile drainage in these reptiles. The object of this study was to clarify the anatomy of the bile ductal system and to establish total bile fistulas in the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis. Bile duct anatomy was studied in 104 juvenile alligators, and bile fistulas were constructed in seven alligators. In 93 out of 104 (89%) of the juveniles dissected there was an interconnection between the right and left hepatic duct before the right hepatic duct emptied into the gallbladder. The left hepatic duct then entered the duodenum independently of the cystic duct which drained the gallbladder directly into the duodenum. In 8% of the animals, the left hepatic duct did not enter the duodenum but joined with the right duct, forming a common hepatic duct that emptied into the gallbladder. In 3% of the cases, the right hepatic duct emptied into the gallbladder, while the left duct had no communication with the right hepatic duct and drained separately into the duodenum. This arrangement of bile ducts is similar to that seen in birds and reflects the common ancestry of crocodiles and birds. In other reptiles, the biliary system shows much more variability and is different from the alligator. In five of seven alligators in which total biliary diversion was attempted, the biliary catheter remained in place and stayed patent from 2-7 weeks. Bile flow was extremely low (1.5-2.5 ml/24 h) when compared to that of mammals (80-100 ml/24 h). This study demonstrates the variable nature of the biliary ductal system in Alligator mississippiensis and suggest a method for constructing an effective total bile fistula in these animals.

  5. Biliary lipids, bile acids, and gallbladder function in the human female:effects of contraceptive steroids

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, F., Jr.; Everson, G.T.; DeMark, B.; McKinley, C.; Showalter, R.; Braverman, D.Z.; Szczepanik-Van Leeuwen, P.; Klein, P.D.

    1982-06-01

    Reported are biliary lipid composition and secretion, bile acid composition and kinetics, and gallbladder function in a group of healthy, nonobese women taking a contraceptive steroid preparation. A comparable group of healthy women served as controls. Biliary lipid secretion rate was measured by the marker perfusion technique. Bile acid distribution was determined by gas-lipid chromatography. The pool size, FTR, and synthesis rate of each bile acid were measured by using CA and CDCA labeled with the stable isotope of carbon, /sup 13/C. In some of the subjects gallbladder storage and emptying were measured during the kinetic study, by real-time ultrasonography. Contraceptive steroid use was associated with a significant increase in biliary cholesterol saturation and in the lithogenic index of bile. The rate of cholesterol secretion in the contraceptive steroid group was 50% greater than in the control (p << 0.001) and the rate of bile acid secretion was reduced (p < 0.02). The total bile acid pool size was significantly increased by contraceptive steroids. The major increase occurred in the CA pool (p < 0.04). The daily rate of enterohepatic cycles of the bile acid pool was decreased by contraceptive steroids from 6.6 to 4.3 (p < 0.01). The only effect of contraceptive steroids on gallbladder function was a slower emptying rate in response to intraduodenal amino acid infusion. No index of gallbladder function correlated significantly with any parameter of bile acid kinetics in this small group of subjects. The findings confirm the lithogenic effect of contraceptive steroids and indicate that its causes are an increase in cholesterol secretion and a decrease in bile acid secretion.

  6. Prevention of bile peritonitis by laparoscopic evacuation and lavage after nonoperative treatment of liver injuries.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Glen A; Richardson, J David; Brown, Aaron L; Christmas, A Britton; Miller, Frank B; Harbrecht, Brian G; Carrillo, Eddy H

    2007-06-01

    One of the major lessons learned in the World War II experience with liver injuries was that bile peritonitis was a major factor in morbidity and mortality; the nearly uniform drainage of liver injuries in the subsequent operative era prevented this problem. In the era of nonoperative management, patients who do not require operative treatment for hemodynamic instability may develop large bile and/or blood collections that are often ignored or inadequately drained by percutaneous methods. These inadequately treated bile collections may cause systemic inflammatory response syndrome and/or respiratory distress. We present an experience with laparoscopic evacuation of major bile/blood collections that may prevent the inflammatory sequelae of bile peritonitis. Patients usually underwent operation between 3 and 5 days postinjury (range, 2-18) if CT demonstrated large fluid collections throughout the abdomen/pelvis not amenable to percutaneous drainage. Most patients had signs of systemic inflammatory response syndrome, respiratory compromise, or elevated bilirubin. The bile and retained hematoma was evacuated from around the liver and closed-suction drainage was placed. Twenty-eight patients underwent laparoscopic evacuation/lavage of bile collections (about 4% of total blunt liver injuries). The majority (75%) had Grade IV or V injury. The amount of evacuated fluid ranged from 300 to 3800 mL. Other adjunctive procedures (endoscopic retrograde pancreaticocholangiography, angiography, and laparotomy) were occasionally required. There were no complications related to the procedure. Most patients had a dramatic decline in tachycardia, temperature, white blood cell count, serum bilirubin, and pain. Respiratory failure also resolved in most patients. Large bile and/or blood accumulations are present in a subset of patients with severe liver injuries treated nonoperatively. Delayed laparoscopic evacuation of these collections prevents bile peritonitis and decreases

  7. Key discoveries in bile acid chemistry and biology and their clinical applications: history of the last eight decades.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Alan F; Hagey, Lee R

    2014-08-01

    During the last 80 years there have been extraordinary advances in our knowledge of the chemistry and biology of bile acids. We present here a brief history of the major achievements as we perceive them. Bernal, a physicist, determined the X-ray structure of cholesterol crystals, and his data together with the vast chemical studies of Wieland and Windaus enabled the correct structure of the steroid nucleus to be deduced. Today, C24 and C27 bile acids together with C27 bile alcohols constitute most of the bile acid "family". Patterns of bile acid hydroxylation and conjugation are summarized. Bile acid measurement encompasses the techniques of GC, HPLC, and MS, as well as enzymatic, bioluminescent, and competitive binding methods. The enterohepatic circulation of bile acids results from vectorial transport of bile acids by the ileal enterocyte and hepatocyte; the key transporters have been cloned. Bile acids are amphipathic, self-associate in solution, and form mixed micelles with polar lipids, phosphatidylcholine in bile, and fatty acids in intestinal content during triglyceride digestion. The rise and decline of dissolution of cholesterol gallstones by the ingestion of 3,7-dihydroxy bile acids is chronicled. Scientists from throughout the world have contributed to these achievements.

  8. A New Insight into the Physiological Role of Bile Salt Hydrolase among Intestinal Bacteria from the Genus Bifidobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Jarocki, Piotr; Podleśny, Marcin; Glibowski, Paweł; Targoński, Zdzisław

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence of bile salt hydrolase in fourteen strains belonging to the genus Bifidobacterium. Deconjugation activity was detected using a plate test, two-step enzymatic reaction and activity staining on a native polyacrylamide gel. Subsequently, bile salt hydrolases from B. pseudocatenulatum and B. longum subsp. suis were purified using a two-step chromatographic procedure. Biochemical characterization of the bile salt hydrolases showed that the purified enzymes hydrolyzed all of the six major human bile salts under the pH and temperature conditions commonly found in the human gastrointestinal tract. Next, the dynamic rheometry was applied to monitor the gelation process of deoxycholic acid under different conditions. The results showed that bile acids displayed aqueous media gelating properties. Finally, gel-forming abilities of bifidobacteria exhibiting bile salt hydrolase activity were analyzed. Our investigations have demonstrated that the release of deconjugated bile acids led to the gelation phenomenon of the enzymatic reaction solution containing purified BSH. The presented results suggest that bile salt hydrolase activity commonly found among intestinal microbiota increases hydrogel-forming abilities of certain bile salts. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that bile salt hydrolase activity among Bifidobacterium is directly connected with the gelation process of bile salts. In our opinion, if such a phenomenon occurs in physiological conditions of human gut, it may improve bacterial ability to colonize the gastrointestinal tract and their survival in this specific ecological niche. PMID:25470405

  9. Key discoveries in bile acid chemistry and biology and their clinical applications: history of the last eight decades

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Alan F.; Hagey, Lee R.

    2014-01-01

    During the last 80 years there have been extraordinary advances in our knowledge of the chemistry and biology of bile acids. We present here a brief history of the major achievements as we perceive them. Bernal, a physicist, determined the X-ray structure of cholesterol crystals, and his data together with the vast chemical studies of Wieland and Windaus enabled the correct structure of the steroid nucleus to be deduced. Today, C24 and C27 bile acids together with C27 bile alcohols constitute most of the bile acid “family”. Patterns of bile acid hydroxylation and conjugation are summarized. Bile acid measurement encompasses the techniques of GC, HPLC, and MS, as well as enzymatic, bioluminescent, and competitive binding methods. The enterohepatic circulation of bile acids results from vectorial transport of bile acids by the ileal enterocyte and hepatocyte; the key transporters have been cloned. Bile acids are amphipathic, self-associate in solution, and form mixed micelles with polar lipids, phosphatidylcholine in bile, and fatty acids in intestinal content during triglyceride digestion. The rise and decline of dissolution of cholesterol gallstones by the ingestion of 3,7-dihydroxy bile acids is chronicled. Scientists from throughout the world have contributed to these achievements. PMID:24838141

  10. Evaluating the Beneficial and Detrimental Effects of Bile Pigments in Early and Later Life

    PubMed Central

    Dennery, Phyllis A.

    2012-01-01

    The heme degradation pathway has been conserved throughout phylogeny and allows for the removal of a pro-oxidant and the generation of unique molecules including bile pigments with important cellular functions. The impact of bile pigments on health and disease are reviewed, as is the special circumstance of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. In addition, the importance of promoter polymorphisms in the UDP-glucuronosyl transferase gene (UGTA1), which is key to the elimination of excess bilirubin and to the prevention of its toxicity, are discussed. Overall, the duality of bile pigments as either cytoprotective or toxic molecules is highlighted. PMID:22737125

  11. Intraductal shock-wave lithotripsy in complicated common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Riemann, J F; Kohler, B; Weber, J; Schlauch, D

    1992-02-01

    Intracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy was performed in 36 patients with problematic common bile duct stones. All of the patients had undergone unsuccessful mechanical lithotripsy prior to this procedure. In 29 patients (80.6%), the stones were fragmented under cholangioscopic control and subsequently extracted with a Dormia basket. In seven patients, the procedure failed due to stone impaction or failure to intubate the common bile duct with a nasobiliary tube. No complications were observed. Cholangioscopically guided intracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is a highly effective and safe procedure for the conservative treatment of complicated common bile duct stones.

  12. Spontaneous perforation of the common bile-duct in the neonate: imaging and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ford, W D; Sen, S; Morris, L; LeQuesne, G

    1988-10-01

    The presence of bile in the peritoneal cavity and obstructive jaundice without liver derangement in the neonatal period is pathognomonic of spontaneous perforation of the bile-ducts. These features can be demonstrated preoperatively with ultrasound, nuclide imaging and liver function tests, without recourse to paracentesis, and the risk of contaminating the bile ascites. Furthermore, the presence of isotope in the general peritoneal cavity will exclude the diagnosis of a choledochal cyst so that jejunum should not be anastamosed to the 'false capsule' of a spontaneous perforation. PMID:3067698

  13. Bile salt surfactants in micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography: Application to hydrophobic molecule separations

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, R.O.; Sepaniak, M.J. . Dept. of Chemistry); Hinze, W.L. . Dept. of Chemistry); Gorse, J.; Oldiges, K. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-01-01

    Bile Salt surfactants are used in the micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC) separation of various hydrophobic compounds. The use of methanol in the mobile phase allows the separation of previously intractable compounds including polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The effects of methanol on critical micelle concentration is investigated for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and the bile salt sodium cholate. It is determined that the unique structure of the bile salt micelle is much more tolerant to the addition of organic solvents than SDS, thereby increasing the scope of applications of MECC to include hydrophobic compounds. 30 refs., 9 figs.

  14. Detection of bacterial DNA in bile of cats with lymphocytic cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Otte, C M A; Gutiérrez, O Pérez; Favier, R P; Rothuizen, J; Penning, L C

    2012-04-23

    In this study, we have successfully used molecular methods based on the amplification of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene on feline bile samples to show that bile of cats with LC is not sterile. This is probably due to the fact that the inflammatory process in the biliary tree causes dilatations. As a result, bacteria can easily migrate from the intestines via the common bile duct. The diversity of species identified and the presence of Helicobacter spp. DNA in both patients and controls suggests that bacteriobilia is secondary to the disease and is not the cause of LC.

  15. Detection of bile duct leaks using MR cholangiography with mangfodipir trisodium (Teslascan).

    PubMed

    Vitellas, K M; El-Dieb, A; Vaswani, K; Bennett, W F; Fromkes, J; Steinberg, S; Bova, J G

    2001-01-01

    Mangafodipir trisodium (Teslascan), a hepatobiliary contrast agent, has the potential of providing functional biliary imaging similar to hepatobiliary scintigraphy. To our knowledge. the potential role of this biliary contrast agent in the detection of bile duct leaks has not been reported. In this case report, we report the first case of a bile duct leak diagnosed with enhanced MRI with mangafodipir trisodium in a patient following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Our case illustrates that functional MR cholangiography images can be successfully acquired by using a post-mangafodipir fat-suppressed GRE technique and that bile duct leaks can be detected.

  16. Prevention of induced atherosclerosis by diversion of bile or blockade of intestinal lymphatics in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, P J; Karipineni, R C; Pertsemlidis, D; Danese, C A

    1976-01-01

    The prevention of induced hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis was studied by means of intestinal lymphatic blockade and of bile diversion in the dog. Hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis were produced by high cholesterol feeding after induction of hypothyroidism with radio-iodine plus thiouracil. Complete diversion of bile, by shunting all bile into the urinary bladder, effectively prevented hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis; in contrast, blockade of the intestinal lymphatics failed to prevent the consequences of the atherogenic regimen, because of the development of collateral lymphatic channels. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:817679

  17. Effects of bile acids and the bile acid receptor FXR agonist on the respiratory rhythm in the in vitro brainstem medulla slice of neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cong; Wang, Xianbao; Cong, Yuling; Deng, Yi; Xu, Yijun; Chen, Aihua; Yin, Yanru

    2014-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is always accompanied by adverse fetal outcomes such as malfunctions of respiration. Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays a critical role in the homeostasis of bile acids. Thus, we are determined to explore the effects of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and five bile acids on respiratory rhythm generation and modulation of neonatal rats. Spontaneous periodic respiratory-related rhythmical discharge activity (RRDA) was recorded from hypoglossal nerves during the perfusion of modified Krebs solution. Group 1-6 was each given GW4064 and five bile acids of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), cholic acid (CA) as well as ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) at different concentrations to identify their specific functions on respiratory rhythm modulations. Group 7 was applied to receive FXR blocker Z-guggulsterone and Z-guggulsterone with the above bile acids separately to explore the role of FXR in the respiratory rhythm modulation. Group 8 was given dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as controls. Apart from UDCA, CDCA, DCA LCA and CA all exerted effects on RRDA recorded from hypoglossal nerves in a concentration-dependent manner. Respiratory cycle (RC), Inspiratory time (TI), Expiratory Time (TE) and Integral Amplitude (IA) were influenced and such effects could be reversed by Z-guggulsterone. FXR may contribute to the effects on the modulation of respiratory rhythm exerted by bile acids.

  18. Evolutionary diversity of bile salts in reptiles and mammals, including analysis of ancient human and extinct giant ground sloth coprolites

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bile salts are the major end-metabolites of cholesterol and are also important in lipid and protein digestion and in influencing the intestinal microflora. We greatly extend prior surveys of bile salt diversity in both reptiles and mammals, including analysis of 8,000 year old human coprolites and coprolites from the extinct Shasta ground sloth (Nothrotherium shastense). Results While there is significant variation of bile salts across species, bile salt profiles are generally stable within families and often within orders of reptiles and mammals, and do not directly correlate with differences in diet. The variation of bile salts generally accords with current molecular phylogenies of reptiles and mammals, including more recent groupings of squamate reptiles. For mammals, the most unusual finding was that the Paenungulates (elephants, manatees, and the rock hyrax) have a very different bile salt profile from the Rufous sengi and South American aardvark, two other mammals classified with Paenungulates in the cohort Afrotheria in molecular phylogenies. Analyses of the approximately 8,000 year old human coprolites yielded a bile salt profile very similar to that found in modern human feces. Analysis of the Shasta ground sloth coprolites (approximately 12,000 years old) showed the predominant presence of glycine-conjugated bile acids, similar to analyses of bile and feces of living sloths, in addition to a complex mixture of plant sterols and stanols expected from an herbivorous diet. Conclusions The bile salt synthetic pathway has become longer and more complex throughout vertebrate evolution, with some bile salt modifications only found within single groups such as marsupials. Analysis of the evolution of bile salt structures in different species provides a potentially rich model system for the evolution of a complex biochemical pathway in vertebrates. Our results also demonstrate the stability of bile salts in coprolites preserved in arid climates

  19. Potential role of conjugated bilirubin and copper in the metabolism of lipid peroxides in bile.

    PubMed

    Stocker, R; Ames, B N

    1987-11-01

    Conjugated bilirubin and copper ions at their physiological concentrations in bile may play an important role in hydroperoxide and other detoxification. Conjugated bilirubin may also be an important chain-breaking antioxidant preventing lipid peroxidation. Bilirubin ditaurine (BR-DT), a water-soluble model compound of conjugated bilirubin, completely prevents the peroxyl radical-induced oxidation of phosphatidylcholine in either multilamellar liposomes or micelles. This antioxidant activity is associated with the bilirubin moiety of BR-DT, since taurine alone is inefficient in scavenging peroxyl radicals. The number of peroxyl radicals trapped per molecule of BR-DT is 1.9, compared to 4.7 trapped per molecule of biliverdin, the water-soluble physiological precursor of bilirubin. Peroxyl radical-induced oxidation of BR-DT results in a spectral shift in maximal absorbance toward shorter wavelengths; biliverdin is not formed as a major oxidation product. BR-DT, but neither taurine nor biliverdin, greatly accelerates the cupric ion-catalyzed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxide. In the presence of ferric ion, BR-DT shows no lipid hydroperoxide-degrading activity. Addition of cupric ion to BR-DT results in formation of a complex with spectral features similar to that of a biliverdin-cupric ion complex, indicating that BR-DT and cupric ion undergo redox reactions.

  20. Changes in bile acids, FGF-19 and sterol absorption in response to bile salt hydrolase active L. reuteri NCIMB 30242.

    PubMed

    Martoni, Christopher J; Labbé, Alain; Ganopolsky, Jorge G; Prakash, Satya; Jones, Mitchell L

    2015-01-01

    The size and composition of the circulating bile acid (BA) pool are important factors in regulating the human gut microbiota. Disrupted regulation of BA metabolism is implicated in several chronic diseases. Bile salt hydrolase (BSH)-active Lactobacillus reuteri NCIMB 30242, previously shown to decrease LDL-cholesterol and increase circulating BA, was investigated for its dose response effect on BA profile in a pilot clinical study. Ten otherwise healthy hypercholesterolemic adults, recruited from a clinical trial site in London, ON, were randomized to consume delayed release or standard release capsules containing L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 in escalating dose over 4 weeks. In another aspect, 4 healthy normocholesterolemic subjects with LDL-C below 3.4 mmol/l received delayed release L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 at a constant dose over 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the change in plasma BA profile over the intervention period. Additional outcomes included circulating fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-19, plant sterols and LDL-cholesterol as well as fecal microbiota and bsh gene presence. After one week of intervention subjects receiving delayed release L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 increased total BA by 1.13 ± 0.67 μmol/l (P = 0.02), conjugated BA by 0.67 ± 0.39 μmol/l (P = 0.02) and unconjugated BA by 0.46 ± 0.43 μmol/l (P = 0.07), which represented a greater than 2-fold change relative to baseline. Increases in BA were largely maintained post-week 1 and were generally correlated with FGF-19 and inversely correlated with plant sterols. This is the first clinical support showing that a BSH-active probiotic can significantly and rapidly influence BA metabolism and may prove useful in chronic diseases beyond hypercholesterolemia. PMID:25612224

  1. Arabidopsis poly(A) polymerase PAPS1 limits founder-cell recruitment to organ primordia and suppresses the salicylic acid-independent immune response downstream of EDS1/PAD4.

    PubMed

    Trost, Gerda; Vi, Son Lang; Czesnick, Hjördis; Lange, Peggy; Holton, Nick; Giavalisco, Patrick; Zipfel, Cyril; Kappel, Christian; Lenhard, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Polyadenylation of pre-mRNAs by poly(A) polymerase (PAPS) is a critical process in eukaryotic gene expression. As found in vertebrates, plant genomes encode several isoforms of canonical nuclear PAPS enzymes. In Arabidopsis thaliana these isoforms are functionally specialized, with PAPS1 affecting both organ growth and immune response, at least in part by the preferential polyadenylation of subsets of pre-mRNAs. Here, we demonstrate that the opposite effects of PAPS1 on leaf and flower growth reflect the different identities of these organs, and identify a role for PAPS1 in the elusive connection between organ identity and growth patterns. The overgrowth of paps1 mutant petals is due to increased recruitment of founder cells into early organ primordia, and suggests that PAPS1 activity plays unique roles in influencing organ growth. By contrast, the leaf phenotype of paps1 mutants is dominated by a constitutive immune response that leads to increased resistance to the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis and reflects activation of the salicylic acid-independent signalling pathway downstream of ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1)/PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4). These findings provide an insight into the developmental and physiological basis of the functional specialization amongst plant PAPS isoforms.

  2. A Molecular Necklace: Threading β-Cyclodextrins onto Polymers Derived from Bile Acids.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yong-Guang; Malveau, Cedric; Mezour, Mohamed A; Perepichka, Dmitrii F; Zhu, X X

    2016-09-19

    A molecular necklace of polypseudorotaxanes was prepared by threading β-cyclodextrins (β-CD) onto biodegradable and thermoresponsive polyurethanes derived from bile acids. These polyurethanes were synthesized via a simple step condensation of bile acid-based dicarbonate with poly(ethylene glycol)-diamine. The β-CD rings slide onto the poly(ethylene glycol) segments and selectively recognize the bile acid units of the polyurethane chains, whereas the poly(ethylene glycol) segments remain crystalline with a lower crystallinity. This bio-compound-derived molecular necklace can be visualized by scanning tunneling microscopy. The polypseudorotaxanes show thermosensitivity in water and the phase transition temperature may be fine-tuned by varying the molar ratios of β-CD to the bile acid units. Such an interesting necklace model of polypseudorotaxane constructed from natural compounds may lead to the further exploration of their applications, such as as an enzyme model, due to their biological nature. PMID:27558980

  3. [Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in giant stones in the common bile duct--a case report].

    PubMed

    Schreiber, F; Brandstätter, G; Pristautz, H; Wenzl, H; Savli, H; Kronawetter, M

    1991-09-01

    A huge common bile duct stone of 6 to 3 cm in diameter in a 64 year old lady was approached by ESWL, after endoscopic therapy such as mechanical lithotripsy and removal with the Dormia basket had failed because of the extraordinary size of this stone. A surgical therapy was not possible because of pronounced vascular and cardiopulmonary risk, so ESWL was applied to this patient. The stone was fragmented in two sessions of ESWL under sonographic targeting and the fragments were removed endoscopically. After one month one fragment still remained in the common bile duct, which then was removed also endoscopically. Two months later the ERC showed a stone-free common bile duct. This case demonstrates, that even common bile duct stones of extraordinary size can be removed by combining ESWL with endoscopic techniques. Following the trend to minimally invasive therapy, sonography should be preferred over XRay in diagnosis before ESWL as well as during ESWL.

  4. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) of common bile duct calculi without previous endoscopic papillotomy].

    PubMed

    Jakobeit, C; Greiner, L; Schumacher, R; Johanns, W; Janssen, J; Sulliga, M; Schnabel, R; Welp, L B; Pumplün, B

    1996-07-01

    In 17 patients (8 men, 9 women; mean age 61.5 years) with problematic bile-duct stones (papilla endoscopically inaccessible, residual bile-duct stones after recent laparoscopic cholecystectomy or age below 25 years) the chances of successful treatment by ESWL without sphincterotomy were examined. In 15 patients with solitary stones measuring up to 14 mm "pulverization-ESWL" produced complete freedom from stones after spontaneous migration of fragments through the intact papilla. Only two patients with two ductal stones measuring up to 15 mm still had residual fragments in the bile duct after treatment. The ideal stone for ESWL without sphincterotomy is thus the solitary bile-duct stone measuring up to 14 mm. Before performing a high-risk sphincterotomy, before re-operation and in young patients one should therefore always examine whether ESWL without sphincterotomy is indicated.

  5. A Molecular Necklace: Threading β-Cyclodextrins onto Polymers Derived from Bile Acids.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yong-Guang; Malveau, Cedric; Mezour, Mohamed A; Perepichka, Dmitrii F; Zhu, X X

    2016-09-19

    A molecular necklace of polypseudorotaxanes was prepared by threading β-cyclodextrins (β-CD) onto biodegradable and thermoresponsive polyurethanes derived from bile acids. These polyurethanes were synthesized via a simple step condensation of bile acid-based dicarbonate with poly(ethylene glycol)-diamine. The β-CD rings slide onto the poly(ethylene glycol) segments and selectively recognize the bile acid units of the polyurethane chains, whereas the poly(ethylene glycol) segments remain crystalline with a lower crystallinity. This bio-compound-derived molecular necklace can be visualized by scanning tunneling microscopy. The polypseudorotaxanes show thermosensitivity in water and the phase transition temperature may be fine-tuned by varying the molar ratios of β-CD to the bile acid units. Such an interesting necklace model of polypseudorotaxane constructed from natural compounds may lead to the further exploration of their applications, such as as an enzyme model, due to their biological nature.

  6. Prevention of Bile Leak after Liver Surgery: A Fool-proof Method

    PubMed Central

    Pujahari, Aswini K.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aim: Bile leak is not uncommon after liver surgeries. There is no adequate method described to prevent this morbid complication. Materials and Methods: At the end of the liver procedure, transcystic normal saline was injected under pressure with distal clamping. Leaking saline on the cut surface of the liver was sutured. The process was repeated till no leaking was observed. A suction drain was kept for any bile leak. Results: Open liver resection and hydatid cyst surgery cases were included. There were 24 cases, with 13 males and 11 females. The age range was from 4 to 80 years, with a mean of 48 years (SD ± 17.7). The number of leak sites that could be sutured were 0-4 (mean of 2.3 ± 0.5). None had bile leak postoperatively. Conclusion: Transcystic injection under pressure with distal clamping demonstrates the leak sites. Suturing them prevents the postoperative bile leak. PMID:19568579

  7. Surgical treatment of incarcerated calculi via laparoscopic bile duct exploration using laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, H.; Wang, S. Y.; Jin, X. L.; Jin, J. C.; Gu, H. B.; Zhang, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the practicability and clinical value of applying laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps to laparoscopic bile duct exploration (LCBDE) for the surgical treatment of incarcerated calculi. A total of 63 patients were diagnosed with cholecystolithiasis and choledocholithiasis. The present study performed a retrospective analysis of clinical samples from 16 of these patients who had incarcerated calculi at the terminus of the common bile duct, and who had been treated with laparoscopic cholecystectomy and LCBDE. During the procedure, laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps were used to gently remove the calculi from the common bile duct. Of the surgical procedures that used laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps, one case was unsuccessful and 15 cases were successful. The results of the present study suggested that it may be clinically advisable to use laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps to remove incarcerated calculi from the common bile duct during a laparoscopy, since it is easy, economical and effective. PMID:27698730

  8. Surgical treatment of incarcerated calculi via laparoscopic bile duct exploration using laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, H.; Wang, S. Y.; Jin, X. L.; Jin, J. C.; Gu, H. B.; Zhang, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the practicability and clinical value of applying laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps to laparoscopic bile duct exploration (LCBDE) for the surgical treatment of incarcerated calculi. A total of 63 patients were diagnosed with cholecystolithiasis and choledocholithiasis. The present study performed a retrospective analysis of clinical samples from 16 of these patients who had incarcerated calculi at the terminus of the common bile duct, and who had been treated with laparoscopic cholecystectomy and LCBDE. During the procedure, laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps were used to gently remove the calculi from the common bile duct. Of the surgical procedures that used laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps, one case was unsuccessful and 15 cases were successful. The results of the present study suggested that it may be clinically advisable to use laparotomy biliary lithotomy forceps to remove incarcerated calculi from the common bile duct during a laparoscopy, since it is easy, economical and effective.

  9. Application of ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to profiling rat and dog bile.

    PubMed

    Plumb, Robert S; Rainville, Paul D; Potts, Warren B; Johnson, Kelly A; Gika, Eleni; Wilson, Ian D

    2009-05-01

    Reversed-phase gradient UPLC-ESI-MS, in both positive and negative ionization modes, has been applied to the analysis of untreated bile obtained from bile-cannulated rats and dogs. The use of UPLC provided a high-resolution system that enabled global metabolite profiles of bile from the two species to be obtained that were suitable for metabolomic and metabonomic applications. When these metabolite profiles were analyzed using unsupervised multivariate statistical methods, based on principle components analysis (PCA), they were correctly classified by species of origin. Conventional approaches to characterizing sample components via, for example, mass and retention time compared to authentic standards resulted in the identification of a range of bile acids. In addition, the value of using an "MSE" approach to simplify the problem of classifying and identifying the metabolites present in the sample (as e.g., sulfates or taurine conjugates) was demonstrated.

  10. Common bile duct perforation sealed with a metal fully-covered stent.

    PubMed

    García-Cano, Jesús; Ferri-Bataller, Ramón; Gómez-Ruiz, Carmen Julia

    2016-08-01

    A common bile duct perforation due to sphincteroplasty is reported. It was managed by temporary insertion of a metal fully covered stent with good outcomes. Images from the procedure are provided. PMID:27554382

  11. Mutations in the nuclear bile acid receptor FXR cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Potter, Carol J.; Xiao, Rui; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Kang Ho; Shneider, Benjamin L.; Picarsic, Jennifer L.; Jacobson, Theodora A.; Zhang, Jing; He, Weimin; Liu, Pengfei; Knisely, A. S.; Finegold, Milton J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lupski, James R.; Plon, Sharon E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Yang, Yaping; Washington, Gabriel C.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Berquist, William E.; Kambham, Neeraja; Singh, Ravinder J.; Xia, Fan; Enns, Gregory M.; Moore, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring prompt diagnosis. Mutations in several different genes can cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, but known genes cannot account for all familial cases. Here we report four individuals from two unrelated families with neonatal cholestasis and mutations in NR1H4, which encodes the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a bile acid-activated nuclear hormone receptor that regulates bile acid metabolism. Clinical features of severe, persistent NR1H4-related cholestasis include neonatal onset with rapid progression to end-stage liver disease, vitamin K-independent coagulopathy, low-to-normal serum gamma-glutamyl transferase activity, elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein and undetectable liver bile salt export pump (ABCB11) expression. Our findings demonstrate a pivotal function for FXR in bile acid homeostasis and liver protection. PMID:26888176

  12. [Early referrals of patients with bile duct lesion improve reconstructive surgery outcome].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Zaida; Solís, Diego R; Solís, David H

    2011-01-01

    Damage to the bile ducts caused during open cholecystectomy or laparoscopic cholecystectomy remains a major problem in the practice of surgery today. This is associated with a poor quality of life and increased morbidity. The incidence of bile duct damage varies with the type of damage and the type of surgery performed. Currently the incidence of bile duct damage in Puerto Rico, as a result of the removal of the gallbladder is unknown. Without doubt the seriousness of complications, high costs due to handling and suffering of both patient and family make it necessary to further research on the subject. It is for this reason that we made the following research on population, with the aim of improving the quality of care offered in the island, and in turn reduce the time of referral of patients with bile duct damage. It has been shown to decrease the time of referral improved patient outcomes.

  13. Elevated plasma bile acid concentrations in two sisters with tyrosinaemia type I.

    PubMed

    Sass, J O; Skladal, D

    2000-02-01

    A 21-month-old girl suffering from tyrosinaemia type I and undergoing treatment with 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoro-methylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione (NTBC) presented with pruritus which rapidly ceased with administration of high doses of ursodeoxycholic acid. Determination of plasma bile acids revealed clearly elevated levels both in samples taken before and after the onset of NTBC therapy, thus indicating, that the increase was not related to the administration of this drug. This result is corroborated by data from the first patient's newborn sister, diagnosed with the same disease, who showed elevated plasma bile acid concentrations in all samples examined, except for the cord plasma. This is the first report on altered bile acid concentrations in tyrosinaemia type I, and underlines the need for thorough investigation of bile acid metabolism in this disease.

  14. Characterization of retinoyl beta-glucuronide as a minor metabolite of retinoic acid in bile.

    PubMed Central

    Zile, M H; Schnoes, H K; DeLuca, H F

    1980-01-01

    Several metabolites detected in the bile of rats given radioactive retinoic acid were separated by liquid/gel partition chromatography and purified by high-pressure liquid chromatography. One of these metabolites was found to be sensitive to beta-D-glucuronidase, yielding both 13-cis- and all-trans-retinoic acid. It had the characteristic ultraviolet absorption spectrum of retinoic acid esters. Trimethylsilyl ether and acetyl derivatives of the methylated metabolite were prepared and examined by mass spectrometry. The resulting mass spectra established the structure to be retinoyl beta-glucuronide. Retinoyl glucuronide was rapidly excreted into the bile: the excretion was complete by 12 hr after the administration of retinoic acid. At this time the metabolite represented 12% of bile radioactivity (10% of dose). These observations confirm the existence of retinoyl glucuronide but demonstrate that it represents only one of several retinoic acid metabolites in bile. PMID:6932017

  15. [Effect of selenium on the bile-forming function of the liver].

    PubMed

    Danik, L M

    1976-01-01

    The paper deals with efficiency of sodium selenite in case of acute damage of the liver in rats as well as with its effect on main functions of the liver in norm and pathology, especially on biligenesis, synthesis and secretion of bile acids, bilirubin and cholesterol. The preparation in doses of 1 and 10 Mg per 100 g of weight is established to produce a normalizing effect of intensity of biliation synthesis and secretion of bile acids, secretion of bilirubin and excretion of cholesterol in the animals with the affected liver. The preparation has a cholagogic effect as well. In the healthy rats sodium selenite increases the intensity of bile secretion, intensifies synthesis and secretion of bile acids and bilirubin. A stimulating effect of the preparation on biligenesis is maintained with the liver dystrophy induced by carbon tetrachloride and polychlorines as well. Under these conditions it is manifested to a greater extent than in the healthy animals. PMID:982619

  16. Proteomic and transcriptomic analysis of the response to bile stress of Lactobacillus casei BL23.

    PubMed

    Alcántara, Cristina; Zúñiga, Manuel

    2012-05-01

    Lactobacillus casei is a lactic acid bacterium commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract of animals, and some strains are used as probiotics. The ability of probiotic strains to survive the passage through the gastrointestinal tract is considered a key factor for their probiotic action. Therefore, tolerance to bile salts is a desirable feature for probiotic strains. In this study we have characterized the response of L. casei BL23 to bile by a transcriptomic and proteomic approach. The analysis revealed that exposure to bile induced changes in the abundance of 52 proteins and the transcript levels of 67 genes. The observed changes affected genes and proteins involved in the stress response, fatty acid and cell wall biosynthesis, metabolism of carbohydrates, transport of peptides, coenzyme levels, membrane H(+)-ATPase, and a number of uncharacterized genes and proteins. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms that enable L. casei BL23 to cope with bile stress. PMID:22322960

  17. Formation of retinoic acid from retinol in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Emerick, R. J.; Zile, Maija; DeLuca, H. F.

    1967-01-01

    1. The formation in vivo of retinoic acid from microgram quantities of intrajugularly administered [15-14C]retinol was demonstrated in the rat. 2. Endogenously formed retinoic acid (about 0·1μg./rat) was found in liver, and to a much smaller extent in intestine, 12hr. after retinol administration. 3. Excretion of some of the endogenously formed retinoic acid occurred in the bile of bile-duct-cannulated rats. 4. Excretion of unaltered retinoic acid in the urine of intact rats did not occur even after the intrajugular administration of preformed retinoic acid. PMID:6029617

  18. Effect of bile diversion on satiety and fat absorption from liquid and solid dietary sources

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, J.E.; Gu, Y.G.; Meyer, J.H.

    1988-12-01

    In previous studies, liquid fat has been used to determine the effect of bile diversion on fat absorption. Since protein digests, in addition to bile salts, are capable of solubilizing lipids, we hypothesized that fat incorporated in the protein-rich matrix of solid food would be less sensitive to bile diversion than fat ingested as an oil or liquid. Using (3H)glycerol triether as a nonabsorbable fat recovery marker, we determined how much (14C)triolein was absorbed from solid (chicken liver) and liquid (margarine) dietary sources. After a standard liquid/solid meal with either the chicken liver or margarine labeled, midintestinal chyme was collected for 6 hr, extracted, and counted for 14C and 3H activity. Zero, eighty, or one hundred percent of endogenous bile was diverted. Fat absorption from both chicken liver and margarine was nearly complete by midintestine with 0% diversion and was little affected by diversion of 80% of bile. Complete biliary diversion significantly decreased fat absorption from margarine (87.9 +/- 4.4 to 37.2 +/- 9.2%, P less than 0.05) but reduced (14C)triolein absorption from chicken liver less consistently and insignificantly (78.8 +/- 6.9 to 43.9 +/- 10.6%). These data indicate that fat absorption is not solely dependent on bile and support the hypothesis that fat ingested in a cellular matrix is less dependent on bile than liquid fat. Using these same animals but with the midintestinal cannulas plugged to expose the distal intestine to unabsorbed luminal nutrients, we also demonstrated that bile diversion of an initial meal reduced food consumption at a meal offered 3 hr later.

  19. Primary Patency of Wallstents in Malignant Bile Duct Obstruction: Single vs. Two or More Noncoaxial Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Maybody, Majid Brown, Karen T.; Brody, Lynn A.; Covey, Anne M.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Getrajdman, George I.

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the primary patency of two or more noncoaxial self-expanding metallic Wallstents (Boston Scientific, Natick, MA) and to compare this with the primary patency of a single stent in malignant bile duct obstruction. From August 2002 to August 2004, 127 patients had stents placed for malignant bile duct obstruction. Forty-five patients were treated with more than one noncoaxial self-expanding metallic stents and 82 patients had a single stent placed. Two patients in the multiple-stent group were lost to follow-up. The primary patency period was calculated from the date of stenting until the first poststenting intervention for stent occlusion, death, or the time of last documented follow-up. The patency of a single stent was significantly different from that of multiple stents (P = 0.0004). In the subset of patients with high bile duct obstruction, the patency of a single stent remained significantly different from that of multiple stents (P = 0.02). In the single-stent group, there was no difference in patency between patients with high vs. those with low bile duct obstruction (P = 0.43). The overall median patency for the multistent group and the single-stent group was 201 and 261 days, respectively. In conclusion, the patency of a single stent placed for malignant low or high bile duct obstruction is similar, and significantly longer than, that of multiple stents placed for malignant high bile duct obstruction. Given the median patency of 201 days, when indicated, percutaneous stenting of multiple bile ducts is an effective palliative measure for patients with malignant high bile duct obstruction.

  20. Binding of bile acids by pastry products containing bioactive substances during in vitro digestion.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Krzysztof; Górecka, Danuta; Szwengiel, Artur; Smoczyńska, Paulina; Czaczyk, Katarzyna; Komolka, Patrycja

    2015-03-01

    The modern day consumer tends to choose products with health enhancing properties, enriched in bioactive substances. One such bioactive food component is dietary fibre, which shows a number of physiological properties including the binding of bile acids. Dietary fibre should be contained in everyday, easily accessible food products. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine sorption capacities of primary bile acid (cholic acid - CA) and secondary bile acids (deoxycholic - DCA and lithocholic acids - LCA) by muffins (BM) and cookies (BC) with bioactive substances and control muffins (CM) and cookies (CC) in two sections of the in vitro gastrointestinal tract. Variations in gut flora were also analysed in the process of in vitro digestion of pastry products in a bioreactor. Enzymes: pepsin, pancreatin and bile salts: cholic acid, deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid were added to the culture. Faecal bacteria, isolated from human large intestine, were added in the section of large intestine. The influence of dietary fibre content in cookies and concentration of bile acids in two stages of digestion were analysed. Generally, pastry goods with bioactive substances were characterized by a higher content of total fibre compared with the control samples. These products also differ in the profile of dietary fibre fractions. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed that the bile acid profile after two stages of digestion depends on the quality and quantity of fibre. The bile acid profile after digestion of BM and BC forms one cluster, and with the CM and CC forms a separate cluster. High concentration of H (hemicellulose) is positively correlated with LCA (low binding effect) and negatively correlated with CA and DCA contents. The relative content of bile acids in the second stage of digestion was in some cases above the content in the control sample, particularly LCA. This means that the bacteria introduced in the 2nd stage of digestion synthesize the LCA.

  1. [Chromatographic determination of bile acids in biological fluids with sensitive and selective detection].

    PubMed

    Goto, J

    1990-11-01

    Separation and determination of bile acids in biological fluids by high-performance liquid chromatography are reviewed. The capacity ratios of bile acids on an ODS column were affected by the number, position and configuration of the hydroxyl group on the steroid nucleus, and the chromatographic behavior was markedly influenced by the pH of a mobile phase according to the conjugated form at C-24. A new pre-column derivatization reagent, 1-anthroyl nitrile, was developed and applied to the analysis of bile acids in biological fluids. Bile acids were derivatized through the 3 alpha-hydroxyl group into the corresponding esters, separated on an ODS column, and monitored by a fluorescence detector with detection limit of 20 fmol. The sensitive method for the determination of bile acids in biological materials by gas chromatography (GC) in combination with negative ion chemical ionization (NICI) mass spectrometry is also described. Of various derivatives for the carboxyl group, the pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) ester provided the highest value of the ratio of the negative to positive ion current. A characteristic carboxylate anion [M-181]- was produced as the most abundant ion by the loss of the PFB group in NICI. PFB esters of bile acids were further derivatized into the dimethylethylsilyl ethers and then separated by GC. The detection limit was 2 fg when the characteristic anion was monitored in the NICI mode. The preparation of 18O-labelled bile acids, as the internal standard for the trace analysis or the tracer for the metabolic study, was developed. Finally, the clean-up procedure for bile acids in biological fluids was investigated. The combined use of solid-phase extraction with a Sep-pak C18 or Bond Elut cartridge and group separation on a lipophilic ion-exchange gel, piperidinohydroxypropyl Sephadex LH-20, was found most effective for this purpose. PMID:2082011

  2. Analysis of chicken bile by gel precipitation reactions using a lectin in the place of antibody.

    PubMed

    Cotter, P F

    2000-09-01

    A lectin obtained from black turtle beans (BTB) was precipitated with IgA in chicken bile samples in various forms of agarose gel systems. Ouchterlony-type double-diffusion (ODD) precipitation patterns between the lectin, bile IgA, and heavy chain-specific antibody contained spurs of the type suggestive of partial immunologic identity. The immunoelectrophoresis precipitation patterns between the same three reactants were mirror images and fused on the cathodic side of the immunoelectrophoresis origin. In addition to use in ODD-type gels, BTB could also be incorporated into agarose gels suitable for Mancini (radial immunodiffusion) or Laurell-type rocket electrophoresis. Bile samples obtained from Cornell lines OS and C, broiler breeder males, and University of California-Davis congenic lines were investigated using BTB- and antibody-based methods. The results of this study indicated that IgA was the most frequently detected isotype in bile, occurring in 139 of 156 (89%) samples. Most bile samples (128/156; 82%) also contained IgG, whereas fewer (19/156; 12%) contained IgM. Cornell lines appeared to differ from broiler breeders, having a higher frequency of IgM-positive samples. Of the total bile samples studied, 11% (17/156) of samples from broiler breeders and the Cornell lines appeared to be devoid of IgA; the bile of one broiler breeder was found to be devoid of all three isotypes. Instances were found in which bile samples shown to be negative for IgA by antibody-ODD were shown to be positive by BTB-ODD. Thus BTB appears to be a suitable adjunct to antibody for the study of IgA.

  3. CAR and PXR agonists stimulate hepatic bile acid and bilirubin detoxification and elimination pathways in mice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Martin; Halilbasic, Emina; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Zollner, Gernot; Fickert, Peter; Langner, Cord; Zatloukal, Kurt; Denk, Helmut; Trauner, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Induction of hepatic phase I/II detoxification enzymes and alternative excretory pumps may limit hepatocellular accumulation of toxic biliary compounds in cholestasis. Because the nuclear xenobiotic receptors constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulate involved enzymes and transporters, we aimed to induce adaptive alternative pathways with different CAR and PXR agonists in vivo. Mice were treated with the CAR agonists phenobarbital and 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichlorpyridyloxy)]benzene, as well as the PXR agonists atorvastatin and pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile. Hepatic bile acid and bilirubin-metabolizing/detoxifying enzymes (Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Sult2a1), their regulatory nuclear receptors (CAR, PXR, farnesoid X receptor), and bile acid/organic anion and lipid transporters (Ntcp, Oatp1,2,4, Bsep, Mrp2-4, Mdr2, Abcg5/8, Asbt) in the liver and kidney were analyzed via reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Potential functional relevance was tested in common bile duct ligation (CBDL). CAR agonists induced Mrp2-4 and Oatp2; PXR agonists induced only Mrp3 and Oatp2. Both PXR and CAR agonists profoundly stimulated bile acid-hydroxylating/detoxifying enzymes Cyp3a11 and Cyp2b10. In addition, CAR agonists upregulated bile acid-sulfating Sult2a1 and bilirubin-glucuronidating Ugt1a1. These changes were accompanied by reduced serum levels of bilirubin and bile acids in healthy and CBDL mice and by increased levels of polyhydroxylated bile acids in serum and urine of cholestatic mice. Atorvastatin significantly increased Oatp2, Mdr2, and Asbt, while other transporters and enzymes were moderately affected. In conclusion, administration of specific CAR or PXR ligands results in coordinated stimulation of major hepatic bile acid/bilirubin metabolizing and detoxifying enzymes and hepatic key alternative efflux systems, effects that are predicted to counteract cholestasis. PMID:15986414

  4. [Effects of helium-neon laser on physico-chemical properties of the bile].

    PubMed

    Mansurov, Kh Kh; Dzhuraev, Kh Sh; Barakaev, S B; Kharina, T P; Pulatov, L I

    1990-08-01

    The influence of helium-neon laser radiation on bile physico-chemical characteristics in healthy subjects and in patients with the physico-chemical stage of gallstone disease was studied in vitro. This type of laser was found to induce positive therapeutic effects, such as: correction of hydrogen ion concentrations, surface tension and viscosity decrease and prolonged bile nucleation in patients with gallstone disease.

  5. Reconstitution of bile acid transport in the rat hepatoma McArdle RH-7777 cell line.

    PubMed

    Torchia, E C; Shapiro, R J; Agellon, L B

    1996-07-01

    The liver recovers bile acids from the portal circulation primarily via an active process that is dependent on sodium ions. Hepatocytes lose the ability to transport bile acids in culture, and, in liver-derived permanent cell lines, this ability is severely reduced or absent. To study the importance of bile acids in regulating liver-specific functions (e.g., cellular bile acid and cholesterol metabolism), we have re-established active bile acid transport in cultured cells. The complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the rat sodium/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (ntcp) was placed under the control of a cytomegalovirus promoter and transfected into the rat hepatoma cell line, McArdle RH-7777. Transfected cells were screened for the ability to take up [3H]-taurocholate. Clones that displayed the ability to take up taurocholate were expanded (designated McNtcp) and further characterized. The apparent Michaelis constant (Km) for taurocholate uptake was similar among the different clones. The observed maximum velocity (Vmax), however, differed and was positively correlated with the abundance of recombinant ntcp messenger RNA (mRNA). The highest level of taurocholate uptake activity observed in McNtcp cells was comparable with that of freshly isolated hepatocytes. Efflux of accumulated taurocholate from McNtcp cells proceeded in a manner similar to primary hepatocytes, indicating that McArdle RH-7777 cells have retained the ability to secrete bile acids. Moreover, taurocholate uptake in McNtcp cells was inhibited by other bile acid species. Based on the observed kinetic parameters, the reconstituted McArdle RH-7777 cells mimic the ability of primary hepatocytes to transport bile acids.

  6. NMR characterization of the interaction of the Salmonella type III secretion system protein SipD and bile salts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Nordhues, Bryce A; Zhong, Dalian; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2010-05-18

    Salmonella and Shigella bacteria require the type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject virulence proteins into their hosts and initiate infections. The tip proteins SipD and IpaD are critical components of the Salmonella and Shigella T3SS, respectively. Recently, SipD and IpaD have been shown to interact with bile salts, which are enriched in the intestines, and are hypothesized to act as environmental sensors for these enteric pathogens. Bile salts activate the Shigella T3SS but repress the Salmonella T3SS, and the mechanism of this differing response to bile salts is poorly understood. Further, how SipD binds to bile salts is currently unknown. Computer modeling predicted that IpaD binds the bile salt deoxycholate in a cleft formed by the N-terminal domain and the long central coiled coil of IpaD. Here, we used NMR methods to determine which SipD residues are affected by the interaction with the bile salts deoxycholate, chenodeoxycholate, and taurodeoxcholate. The bile salts perturbed nearly the same set of SipD residues; however, the largest chemical shift perturbations occurred away from what was predicted for the bile salt binding site in IpaD. Our NMR results indicate that that bile salt interaction of SipD will be different from what was predicted for IpaD, suggesting a possible mechanism for the differing response of Salmonella and Shigella to bile salts.

  7. Xenobiotic, bile acid, and cholesterol transporters: function and regulation.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Curtis D; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2010-03-01

    Transporters influence the disposition of chemicals within the body by participating in absorption, distribution, and elimination. Transporters of the solute carrier family (SLC) comprise a variety of proteins, including organic cation transporters (OCT) 1 to 3, organic cation/carnitine transporters (OCTN) 1 to 3, organic anion transporters (OAT) 1 to 7, various organic anion transporting polypeptide isoforms, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, peptide transporters (PEPT) 1 and 2, concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNT) 1 to 3, equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1 to 3, and multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters (MATE) 1 and 2, which mediate the uptake (except MATEs) of organic anions and cations as well as peptides and nucleosides. Efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, such as ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), multidrug resistance proteins (MDR) 1 and 2, bile salt export pump, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 1 to 9, breast cancer resistance protein, and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G members 5 and 8, are responsible for the unidirectional export of endogenous and exogenous substances. Other efflux transporters [ATPase copper-transporting beta polypeptide (ATP7B) and ATPase class I type 8B member 1 (ATP8B1) as well as organic solute transporters (OST) alpha and beta] also play major roles in the transport of some endogenous chemicals across biological membranes. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of these transporters (both rodent and human) with regard to tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and substrate preferences. Because uptake and efflux transporters are expressed in multiple cell types, the roles of transporters in a variety of tissues, including the liver, kidneys, intestine, brain, heart, placenta, mammary glands, immune cells, and testes are discussed. Attention is also placed upon a variety of

  8. Xenobiotic, Bile Acid, and Cholesterol Transporters: Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aleksunes, Lauren M.

    2010-01-01

    Transporters influence the disposition of chemicals within the body by participating in absorption, distribution, and elimination. Transporters of the solute carrier family (SLC) comprise a variety of proteins, including organic cation transporters (OCT) 1 to 3, organic cation/carnitine transporters (OCTN) 1 to 3, organic anion transporters (OAT) 1 to 7, various organic anion transporting polypeptide isoforms, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, peptide transporters (PEPT) 1 and 2, concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNT) 1 to 3, equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1 to 3, and multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters (MATE) 1 and 2, which mediate the uptake (except MATEs) of organic anions and cations as well as peptides and nucleosides. Efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, such as ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), multidrug resistance proteins (MDR) 1 and 2, bile salt export pump, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 1 to 9, breast cancer resistance protein, and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G members 5 and 8, are responsible for the unidirectional export of endogenous and exogenous substances. Other efflux transporters [ATPase copper-transporting β polypeptide (ATP7B) and ATPase class I type 8B member 1 (ATP8B1) as well as organic solute transporters (OST) α and β] also play major roles in the transport of some endogenous chemicals across biological membranes. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of these transporters (both rodent and human) with regard to tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and substrate preferences. Because uptake and efflux transporters are expressed in multiple cell types, the roles of transporters in a variety of tissues, including the liver, kidneys, intestine, brain, heart, placenta, mammary glands, immune cells, and testes are discussed. Attention is also placed upon a variety of regulatory

  9. Effect of bile on nisin-mediated antibacterial activity and the expression of nisin genes of Lactococcus lactis W8.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Suranjita; Mukhopadhyay, Bidhan Chandra; Chakrabartty, Pran Krishna; Biswas, Swadesh Ranjan

    2013-12-01

    The capability of Lactococcus lactis to produce nisin in the presence of bile in the intestinal environment remains an intriguing question. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of bile on production of nisin and the mRNA expression of nisin genes of L. lactis W8. The strain L. lactis W8 was grown on glucose in the absence and presence of bile (0.005-0.08 %) and the antibacterial activities of culture supernatants were determined. In culture with 0.035 % bile, the nisin activity was significantly reduced (400 AU/mL) within 5 h compared to that in the control without bile (2000 AU/mL), while growth of the cells was only slightly affected. In the presence of 0.07 % bile no nisin activity of the strain was manifested. Consistent with these results, mRNA expression of nisin-biosynthetic genes nisZ, nisRK, nisI, and nisF was down-regulated by 7.5-, 2.5-, 1.7-, and 6.0-fold, respectively in cells grown in the presence of bile (0.07 %) as compared to control culture without bile. The present study suggested that bile inhibited transcription of nisin genes. Nisin-production in intestine by orally administered L. lactis, thus, does not occur since complete inhibition of nisin-production by bile is observed at a concentration much lower than the physiological concentration (0.3 %) of bile present in the human intestine. The molecular mechanism underlying the bile-mediated inhibition of nisin genes remains to be elucidated. This is the first report on bile-mediated inhibition of nisin genes.

  10. Impact of Inhibiting Ileal Apical Versus Basolateral Bile acid Transport on Cholesterol Metabolism and Atherosclerosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bile acid sequestrants have been used for many years to treat hypercholesterolemia by increasing hepatic conversion of cholesterol to bile acids, thereby inducing hepatic LDL receptor expression and clearance of apoB-containing particles. In order to further understand the underlying molecular mechanisms linking gut-liver signaling and cholesterol homeostasis, mouse models defective in ileal apical membrane bile acid transport (Asbt null) and ileal basolateral membrane bile acid transport (Ostα null) were studied under basal and hypercholesterolemic conditions. Key Messages Hepatic conversion of cholesterol to bile acids is the major pathway for cholesterol catabolism and a major mechanism for cholesterol elimination. Blocking ileal apical membrane bile acid transport (Asbt null mice) increases fecal bile acid excretion, hepatic Cyp7a1 expression and the relative proportion of taurocholate in the bile acid pool, but decreases ileal FGF15 expression, bile acid pool size, and hepatic cholest