Science.gov

Sample records for acid-induced epileptic seizures

  1. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Lin, Yi-Wen; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Hsu-Jan; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR), which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA-) induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treatment in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Furthermore, oral UR for 6 weeks significantly attenuated the overexpression of astrocyte proliferation and S100B proteins but not γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors. These results indicate that oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate mossy fiber sprouting, astrocyte proliferation, and S100B protein overexpression and increase neuronal survival in KA-induced epileptic rat hippocampus PMID:21837247

  2. Predicting Epileptic Seizures in Advance

    PubMed Central

    Moghim, Negin; Corne, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6–0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG) data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling), is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity) of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance. PMID:24911316

  3. Stimulation of Anterior Thalamic Nuclei Protects Against Seizures and Neuronal Apoptosis in Hippocampal CA3 Region of Kainic Acid-induced Epileptic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Da-Wei; Liu, Huan-Guang; Yang, An-Chao; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The antiepileptic effect of the anterior thalamic nuclei (ANT) stimulation has been demonstrated; however, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic ANT stimulation on hippocampal neuron loss and apoptosis. Methods: Sixty-four rats were divided into four groups: The control group, the kainic acid (KA) group, the sham-deep brain stimulation (DBS) group, and the DBS group. KA was used to induce epilepsy. Seizure count and latency to the first spontaneous seizures were calculated. Nissl staining was used to analyze hippocampal neuronal loss. Polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were conducted to assess the expression of caspase-3 (Casp3), B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl2), and Bcl2-associated X protein (Bax) in the hippocampal CA3 region. One-way analysis of variance was used to determine the differences between the four groups. Results: The latency to the first spontaneous seizures in the DBS group was significantly longer than that in the KA group (27.50 ± 8.05 vs. 16.38 ± 7.25 days, P = 0.0005). The total seizure number in the DBS group was also significantly reduced (DBS vs. KA group: 11.75 ± 6.80 vs. 23.25 ± 7.72, P = 0.0002). Chronic ANT-DBS reduced neuronal loss in the hippocampal CA3 region (DBS vs. KA group: 23.58 ± 6.34 vs. 13.13 ± 4.00, P = 0.0012). After chronic DBS, the relative mRNA expression level of Casp3 was decreased (DBS vs. KA group: 1.18 ± 0.37 vs. 2.09 ± 0.46, P = 0.0003), and the relative mRNA expression level of Bcl2 was increased (DBS vs. KA group: 0.92 ± 0.21 vs. 0.48 ± 0.16, P = 0.0004). The protein expression levels of CASP3 (DBS vs. KA group: 1.25 ± 0.26 vs. 2.49 ± 0.38, P < 0.0001) and BAX (DBS vs. KA group: 1.57 ± 0.49 vs. 2.80 ± 0.63, P = 0.0012) both declined in the DBS group whereas the protein expression level of BCL2 (DBS vs. KA group: 0.78 ± 0.32 vs. 0.36 ± 0.17, P = 0.0086) increased in the DBS group. Conclusions: This study demonstrated

  4. Ambroxol-induced focal epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Fanella, Martina; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that in epileptic patients some compounds and different drugs used for the treatment of comorbidities can facilitate or provoke seizures, this evidence regarding a wide spectrum of pharmacological categories. The potential facilitating factors usually include direct toxic effects or pharmacological interactions of either active ingredients or excipients. We report the case of a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy who experienced focal epileptic seizures, easily and constantly reproducible, after each administration of a cough syrup. This is, to our knowledge, the first electroencephalogram-documented case of focal epileptic seizures induced by cough syrup containing ambroxol as active ingredient.

  5. Ambroxol-induced focal epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Fanella, Martina; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that in epileptic patients some compounds and different drugs used for the treatment of comorbidities can facilitate or provoke seizures, this evidence regarding a wide spectrum of pharmacological categories. The potential facilitating factors usually include direct toxic effects or pharmacological interactions of either active ingredients or excipients. We report the case of a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy who experienced focal epileptic seizures, easily and constantly reproducible, after each administration of a cough syrup. This is, to our knowledge, the first electroencephalogram-documented case of focal epileptic seizures induced by cough syrup containing ambroxol as active ingredient. PMID:24824664

  6. Epileptic seizure induced by fennel essential oil.

    PubMed

    Skalli, Souad; Soulaymani Bencheikh, Rachida

    2011-09-01

    An epileptic seizure is reported in a 38-year-old woman, known to be an epileptic patient. Although she was under antiepileptic treatment and had well-controlled epilepsy, she developed a typical generalised tonic-clonic seizure and remained unconscious for 45 minutes following ingestion of a number of cakes containing an unknown quantity of fennel essential oil. Involuntary diarrhoea accompanied her epileptic seizure. This reported case recalls the fact that fennel essential oil can induce seizures and that this oil should probably be avoided by patients with epilepsy. Labelling of products with fennel essential oil should refer to the risk of seizures, particularly for patients with epilepsy. An awareness programme should involve all stakeholders affected by this issue.

  7. Localizing epileptic seizure onsets with Granger causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Bhim M.; Epstein, Charles M.; Dhamala, Mukesh

    2013-09-01

    Accurate localization of the epileptic seizure onset zones (SOZs) is crucial for successful surgery, which usually depends on the information obtained from intracranial electroencephalography (IEEG) recordings. The visual criteria and univariate methods of analyzing IEEG recordings have not always produced clarity on the SOZs for resection and ultimate seizure freedom for patients. Here, to contribute to improving the localization of the SOZs and to understanding the mechanism of seizure propagation over the brain, we applied spectral interdependency methods to IEEG time series recorded from patients during seizures. We found that the high-frequency (>80 Hz) Granger causality (GC) occurs before the onset of any visible ictal activity and causal relationships involve the recording electrodes where clinically identifiable seizures later develop. These results suggest that high-frequency oscillatory network activities precede and underlie epileptic seizures, and that GC spectral measures derived from IEEG can assist in precise delineation of seizure onset times and SOZs.

  8. Analysis of Epileptic Seizures with Complex Network

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yan; Wang, Yinghua; Yu, Tao; Li, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of abnormal neural activities involving large area of brain networks. Until now the nature of functional brain network associated with epilepsy is still unclear. Recent researches indicate that the small world or scale-free attributes and the occurrence of highly clustered connection patterns could represent a general organizational principle in the human brain functional network. In this paper, we seek to find whether the small world or scale-free property of brain network is correlated with epilepsy seizure formation. A mass neural model was adopted to generate multiple channel EEG recordings based on regular, small world, random, and scale-free network models. Whether the connection patterns of cortical networks are directly associated with the epileptic seizures was investigated. The results showed that small world and scale-free cortical networks are highly correlated with the occurrence of epileptic seizures. In particular, the property of small world network is more significant during the epileptic seizures. PMID:25147576

  9. Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.; Eisenstadt, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EEG data (e-data), artifact data (f-data) via application of a quadratic zero-phase filter of the raw data, artifact-filtered data (g- data) and that was the residual after subtracting f-data from e-data, and a low-pass-filtered version (h-data) of g-data. Two different seizures were analyzed for the same patient. Several nonlinear measures uniquely indicate an epileptic seizure in both cases, including an abrupt decrease in the time per wave cycle in f-data, an abrupt increase in the Kolmogorov entropy and in the correlation dimension for e-h data, and an abrupt increase in the correlation dimension for e-h data. The transition from normal to seizure state also is characterized by distinctly different trends in the nonlinear measures for each seizure and may be potential seizure predictors for this patient. Surrogate analysis of e-data shows that statistically significant nonlinear structure is present during the non-seizure, transition , and seizure epoches.

  10. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES).

    PubMed

    Hingray, C; Biberon, J; El-Hage, W; de Toffol, B

    2016-01-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are defined as change in behavior or consciousness resembling epileptic seizures but which have a psychological origin. PNES are categorized as a manifestation of dissociative or somatoform (conversion) disorders. Video-EEG recording of an event is the gold standard for diagnosis. PNES represent a symptom, not the underlying disease and the mechanism of dissociation is pivotal in the pathophysiology. Predisposing, precipitating and perpetuating factors should be carefully assessed on a case-by-case basis. The process of communicating the diagnosis using a multidisciplinary approach is an important and effective therapeutic step. PMID:27117433

  11. Epileptic Seizure Detection and Warning Device

    SciTech Connect

    Elarton, J.K.; Koepsel, K.L.

    1999-06-21

    Flint Hills Scientific, L.L.C. (FHS) has invented what is believed to be the first real-time epileptic seizure detection and short-term prediction method in the world. They have demonstrated an IBM PC prototype with a multi-channel EEG monitoring configuration. This CRADA effort applied AlliedSignal FM and T hardware design, manufacturing miniaturization, and high quality manufacturing expertise in converting the prototype into a small, portable, self-contained, multi-channel EEG epileptic seizure detection and warning device. The purpose of this project was to design and build a proof-of-concept miniaturized prototype of the FHS-developed PC-based prototype. The resultant DSP prototype, measuring 4'' x 6'' x 2'', seizure detection performance compared favorably with the FHS PC prototype, thus validating the DSP design goals. The very successful completion of this project provided valuable engineering information for FHS for future prototype commercialization as well as providing AS/FM and T engineers DSP design experience.

  12. Emergence of semiology in epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Chauvel, Patrick; McGonigal, Aileen

    2014-09-01

    Semiology, the manifestation of epilepsy, is dependent upon electrical activity produced by epileptic seizures that are organized within existing neural pathways. Clinical signs evolve as the epileptic discharge spreads in both time and space. Studying the relation between these, of which the temporal component is at least as important as the spatial one, is possible using anatomo-electro-clinical correlations of stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) data. The period of semiology production occurs with variable time lag after seizure onset and signs then emerge more or less rapidly depending on seizure type (temporal seizures generally propagating more slowly and frontal seizures more quickly). The subset of structures involved in semiological production, the "early spread network", is tightly linked to those constituting the epileptogenic zone. The level of complexity of semiological features varies according to the degree of involvement of the primary or associative cortex, with the former having a direct relation to peripheral sensory and motor systems with production of hallucinations (visual and auditory) or elementary sensorimotor signs. Depending on propagation pattern, these signs can occur in a "march" fashion as described by Jackson. On the other hand, seizures involving the associative cortex, having a less direct relation with the peripheral nervous system, and necessarily involving more widely distributed networks manifest with altered cognitive and/or behavioral signs whose neural substrate involves a network of cortical structures, as has been observed for normal cognitive processes. Other than the anatomical localization of these structures, the frequency of the discharge is a crucial determinant of semiological effect since a fast (gamma) discharge will tend to deactivate normal function, whereas a slower theta discharge can mimic physiological function. In terms of interaction between structures, the degree of synchronization plays a key role in

  13. [Intracranial tumors and epileptic seizures: treatment principles].

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Andrea O; Vulliémoz, Serge

    2016-04-27

    Epileptic seizures represent a relatively frequent issue in patients with intracranial neoplasms, and very frequently imply the start of an antiepileptic treatment as secondary prophylaxis. Even if the current level of evidence is relatively low, compounds with a limited risk of pharmacokinetic interactions are clearly preferred. Levetiracetam is probably the most prescribed agent in this setting, while pregabalin, valproate, lacosamide and lamotrigine are valuable alternatives. The treatment choice has to consider the different profiles of side effects and should be tailored to each patient. In this setting, a multidisciplinary approach including general practicioner, oncologist and neurologist is strongly advocated. PMID:27281943

  14. γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid-Induced Electrographic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Joseph; Lucey, Brendan P.; Duntley, Stephen P.; Darken, Rachel S.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of absence-like electrographic seizures during NREM sleep in a patient who was taking sodium oxybate, a sodium salt of γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). An overnight full montage electroencephalography (EEG) study revealed numerous frontally predominant rhythmic 1.5-2 Hz sharp waves and spike-wave activity during stage N2 and N3 sleep at the peak dose time for sodium oxybate, resembling atypical absence-like electrographic seizures. The patient was later weaned off sodium oxybate, and a repeat study did not show any such electrographic seizures. Absence-like seizures induced by GHB had previously been described in experimental animal models. We present the first reported human case of absence-like electrographic seizure associated with sodium oxybate. Citation: Cheung J, Lucey BP, Duntley SP, Darken RS. γ-hydroxybutyric acid-induced electrographic seizures. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(7):811-812. PMID:25024661

  15. Block term decomposition for modelling epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunyadi, Borbála; Camps, Daan; Sorber, Laurent; Paesschen, Wim Van; Vos, Maarten De; Huffel, Sabine Van; Lathauwer, Lieven De

    2014-12-01

    Recordings of neural activity, such as EEG, are an inherent mixture of different ongoing brain processes as well as artefacts and are typically characterised by low signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, EEG datasets are often inherently multidimensional, comprising information in time, along different channels, subjects, trials, etc. Additional information may be conveyed by expanding the signal into even more dimensions, e.g. incorporating spectral features applying wavelet transform. The underlying sources might show differences in each of these modes. Therefore, tensor-based blind source separation techniques which can extract the sources of interest from such multiway arrays, simultaneously exploiting the signal characteristics in all dimensions, have gained increasing interest. Canonical polyadic decomposition (CPD) has been successfully used to extract epileptic seizure activity from wavelet-transformed EEG data (Bioinformatics 23(13):i10-i18, 2007; NeuroImage 37:844-854, 2007), where each source is described by a rank-1 tensor, i.e. by the combination of one particular temporal, spectral and spatial signature. However, in certain scenarios, where the seizure pattern is nonstationary, such a trilinear signal model is insufficient. Here, we present the application of a recently introduced technique, called block term decomposition (BTD) to separate EEG tensors into rank- ( L r , L r ,1) terms, allowing to model more variability in the data than what would be possible with CPD. In a simulation study, we investigate the robustness of BTD against noise and different choices of model parameters. Furthermore, we show various real EEG recordings where BTD outperforms CPD in capturing complex seizure characteristics.

  16. Quadriplegia Following Epileptic Seizure : Things to Keep in Mind

    PubMed Central

    Yeşilbudak, Zülal; Şişman, Lokman; Uca, Ali Ulvi

    2016-01-01

    People with epilepsy are believed to be at a higher risk of incurring accidental injury than people who do not have seizures. The incidence of injury, either due to seizure or accident as a consequent of seizure is also high and varies from 0.03% to 3%. The most common injuries are head contusions, lacerations, burns and fractures. In this article, we present a case of quadriplegia after a generalized epileptic seizure. PMID:27226869

  17. Quadriplegia Following Epileptic Seizure : Things to Keep in Mind.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Hasan Hüseyin; Yeşilbudak, Zülal; Şişman, Lokman; Uca, Ali Ulvi

    2016-05-01

    People with epilepsy are believed to be at a higher risk of incurring accidental injury than people who do not have seizures. The incidence of injury, either due to seizure or accident as a consequent of seizure is also high and varies from 0.03% to 3%. The most common injuries are head contusions, lacerations, burns and fractures. In this article, we present a case of quadriplegia after a generalized epileptic seizure. PMID:27226869

  18. Evolving functional network properties and synchronizability during human epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Kaspar A.; Bialonski, Stephan; Horstmann, Marie-Therese; Elger, Christian E.; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2008-09-01

    We assess electrical brain dynamics before, during, and after 100 human epileptic seizures with different anatomical onset locations by statistical and spectral properties of functionally defined networks. We observe a concave-like temporal evolution of characteristic path length and cluster coefficient indicative of a movement from a more random toward a more regular and then back toward a more random functional topology. Surprisingly, synchronizability was significantly decreased during the seizure state but increased already prior to seizure end. Our findings underline the high relevance of studying complex systems from the viewpoint of complex networks, which may help to gain deeper insights into the complicated dynamics underlying epileptic seizures.

  19. Epileptic seizure prediction by non-linear methods

    DOEpatents

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Day, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.

    1999-01-12

    This research discloses methods and apparatus for automatically predicting epileptic seizures monitor and analyze brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis tools; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; comparison of the trend to known seizure predictors; and providing notification that a seizure is forthcoming. 76 figs.

  20. Epileptic seizure prediction by non-linear methods

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M.; Clapp, Ned E.; Daw, C. Stuart; Lawkins, William F.

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for automatically predicting epileptic seizures monitor and analyze brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis tools; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; comparison of the trend to known seizure predictors; and providing notification that a seizure is forthcoming.

  1. A novel genetic programming approach for epileptic seizure detection.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Arpit; Tiwari, Aruna; Krishna, Ramesh; Varma, Vishaal

    2016-02-01

    The human brain is a delicate mix of neurons (brain cells), electrical impulses and chemicals, known as neurotransmitters. Any damage has the potential to disrupt the workings of the brain and cause seizures. These epileptic seizures are the manifestations of epilepsy. The electroencephalograph (EEG) signals register average neuronal activity from the cerebral cortex and label changes in activity over large areas. A detailed analysis of these electroencephalograph (EEG) signals provides valuable insights into the mechanisms instigating epileptic disorders. Moreover, the detection of interictal spikes and epileptic seizures in an EEG signal plays an important role in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Automatic seizure detection methods are required, as these epileptic seizures are volatile and unpredictable. This paper deals with an automated detection of epileptic seizures in EEG signals using empirical mode decomposition (EMD) for feature extraction and proposes a novel genetic programming (GP) approach for classifying the EEG signals. Improvements in the standard GP approach are made using a Constructive Genetic Programming (CGP) in which constructive crossover and constructive subtree mutation operators are introduced. A hill climbing search is integrated in crossover and mutation operators to remove the destructive nature of these operators. A new concept of selecting the Globally Prime offspring is also presented to select the best fitness offspring generated during crossover. To decrease the time complexity of GP, a new dynamic fitness value computation (DFVC) is employed to increase the computational speed. We conducted five different sets of experiments to evaluate the performance of the proposed model in the classification of different mixtures of normal, interictal and ictal signals, and the accuracies achieved are outstandingly high. The experimental results are compared with the existing methods on same datasets, and these results affirm the potential use of

  2. Epileptic encephalopathies: Optimizing seizure control and developmental outcome.

    PubMed

    Jehi, Lara; Wyllie, Elaine; Devinsky, Orrin

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive and developmental outcomes in patients with epileptic encephalopathy are hypothesized to result from an interplay between the underlying epileptic pathologic substrate and the acquired consequences of frequent and repetitive seizures and epileptiform discharges that often straddle the interictal and ictal boundaries. This article briefly reviews the evidence related to this assumption, presents critical questions that need to be answered to clarify this relationship, and advances a set of concrete steps that may help improve developmental patient outcomes. PMID:26293588

  3. Canine and feline epileptic seizures and the lunar cycle: 2,507 seizures (2000-2008).

    PubMed

    Browand-Stainback, Laura; Levesque, Donald; McBee, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizures in 211 canine and feline patients diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy were evaluated for temporal significance in relation to the lunar cycle. Seizure counts were compared among each of the eight individual lunar phases, among each of eight exact lunar phase dates, and by percent of lunar illumination using generalized estimating equations. No statistical significance was found in any of these comparisons excluding a relationship between the onset of epileptic seizures and the phases of the moon. Alteration in anticonvulsant treatment or monitoring of canine and feline patients with idiopathic epilepsy at large was not warranted based on the lunar cycle.

  4. Interictal spikes and epileptic seizures: their relationship and underlying rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Karoly, Philippa J; Freestone, Dean R; Boston, Ray; Grayden, David B; Himes, David; Leyde, Kent; Seneviratne, Udaya; Berkovic, Samuel; O'Brien, Terence; Cook, Mark J

    2016-04-01

    We report on a quantitative analysis of electrocorticography data from a study that acquired continuous ambulatory recordings in humans over extended periods of time. The objectives were to examine patterns of seizures and spontaneous interictal spikes, their relationship to each other, and the nature of periodic variation. The recorded data were originally acquired for the purpose of seizure prediction, and were subsequently analysed in further detail. A detection algorithm identified potential seizure activity and a template matched filter was used to locate spikes. Seizure events were confirmed manually and classified as either clinically correlated, electroencephalographically identical but not clinically correlated, or subclinical. We found that spike rate was significantly altered prior to seizure in 9 out of 15 subjects. Increased pre-ictal spike rate was linked to improved predictability; however, spike rate was also shown to decrease before seizure (in 6 out of the 9 subjects). The probability distribution of spikes and seizures were notably similar, i.e. at times of high seizure likelihood the probability of epileptic spiking also increased. Both spikes and seizures showed clear evidence of circadian regulation and, for some subjects, there were also longer term patterns visible over weeks to months. Patterns of spike and seizure occurrence were highly subject-specific. The pre-ictal decrease in spike rate is not consistent with spikes promoting seizures. However, the fact that spikes and seizures demonstrate similar probability distributions suggests they are not wholly independent processes. It is possible spikes actively inhibit seizures, or that a decreased spike rate is a secondary symptom of the brain approaching seizure. If spike rate is modulated by common regulatory factors as seizures then spikes may be useful biomarkers of cortical excitability. PMID:26912639

  5. Detection of Epileptic Seizure Using Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Borujeny, Golshan Taheri; Yazdi, Mehran; Keshavarz-Haddad, Alireza; Borujeny, Arash Rafie

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of epileptic seizures is mainly done by means of electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. Although this method is accurate, it is not comfortable for the patient as the EEG-electrodes have to be attached to the scalp which hampers the patient's movement. This makes long-term home monitoring not feasible. In this paper, the aim is to propose a seizure detection system based on accelerometry for the detection of epileptic seizure. The used sensors are wireless, which can improve quality of life for the patients. In this system, three 2D accelerometer sensors are positioned on the right arm, left arm, and left thigh of an epileptic patient. Datasets from three patients suffering from severe epilepsy are used in this paper for the development of an automatic detection algorithm. This monitoring system is based on Wireless Sensor Networks and can determine the location of the patient when a seizure is detected and then send an alarm to hospital staff or the patient's relatives. Our wireless sensor nodes are MICAz Motes developed by Crossbow Technology. The proposed system can be used for patients living in a clinical environment or at their home, where they do only their daily routines. The analysis of the recorded data is done by an Artificial Neural Network and K Nearest-Neighbor to recognize seizure movements from normal movements. The results show that K Nearest Neighbor performs better than Artificial Neural Network for detecting these seizures. The results also show that if at least 50% of the signal consists of seizure samples, we can detect the seizure accurately. In addition, there is no need for training the algorithm for each new patient. PMID:24098859

  6. The quantitative measurement of consciousness during epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Nani, Andrea; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of consciousness is a fundamental element in the classification of epileptic seizures. It is, therefore, of great importance for clinical practice to develop instruments that enable an accurate and reliable measurement of the alteration of consciousness during seizures. Over the last few years, three psychometric scales have been specifically proposed to measure ictal consciousness: the Ictal Consciousness Inventory (ICI), the Consciousness Seizure Scale (CSS), and the Responsiveness in Epilepsy Scale--versions I and II (RES-I and RES-II). The ICI is a self-report psychometric instrument which retrospectively assesses ictal consciousness along the dimensions of the level/arousal and contents/awareness. The CSS has been used by clinicians to quantify the impairment of consciousness in order to establish correlations with the brain mechanisms underlying alterations of consciousness during temporal lobe seizures. The most recently developed observer-rated instrument is the RES-I, which has been used to assess responsiveness during epileptic seizures in patients undergoing video-EEG. The implementation of standardized psychometric tools for the assessment of ictal consciousness can complement clinical observations and contribute to improve accuracy in seizure classification.

  7. [Diagnosis and treatment of non-triggered single epileptic seizures].

    PubMed

    Martinez-Juarez, I E; Moreno, J; Ladino, L D; Castro, N; Hernandez-Vanegas, L; Burneo, J G; Hernandez-Ronquillo, L; Tellez-Zenteno, J F

    2016-08-16

    Epileptic seizures are one of the main reasons for neurological visits in an emergency department. Convulsions represent a traumatic event for the patient and the family, with significant medical and social consequences. Due to their prevalence and impact, the initial management is of vital importance. Although following the first epileptic seizure, early recurrence diminishes after establishing treatment with antiepileptic drugs, the forecast for developing epilepsy and long-term outcomes are not altered by any early intervention. Detailed questioning based on the symptoms of the convulsions, the patient's medical history and a full electroencephalogram and neuroimaging study make it possible to define the risk of recurrence of the seizure and the possible diagnosis of epilepsy. Epileptic abnormalities, the presence of old or new potentially epileptogenic brain lesions, as well as nocturnal seizures, increase the risk of recurrence. Physicians must assess each patient on an individual basis to determine the most suitable treatment, and explain the risk of not being treated versus the risk that exists if treatment with antiepileptic drugs is established.

  8. [Diagnosis and treatment of non-triggered single epileptic seizures].

    PubMed

    Martinez-Juarez, I E; Moreno, J; Ladino, L D; Castro, N; Hernandez-Vanegas, L; Burneo, J G; Hernandez-Ronquillo, L; Tellez-Zenteno, J F

    2016-08-16

    Epileptic seizures are one of the main reasons for neurological visits in an emergency department. Convulsions represent a traumatic event for the patient and the family, with significant medical and social consequences. Due to their prevalence and impact, the initial management is of vital importance. Although following the first epileptic seizure, early recurrence diminishes after establishing treatment with antiepileptic drugs, the forecast for developing epilepsy and long-term outcomes are not altered by any early intervention. Detailed questioning based on the symptoms of the convulsions, the patient's medical history and a full electroencephalogram and neuroimaging study make it possible to define the risk of recurrence of the seizure and the possible diagnosis of epilepsy. Epileptic abnormalities, the presence of old or new potentially epileptogenic brain lesions, as well as nocturnal seizures, increase the risk of recurrence. Physicians must assess each patient on an individual basis to determine the most suitable treatment, and explain the risk of not being treated versus the risk that exists if treatment with antiepileptic drugs is established. PMID:27439486

  9. [Classification of epileptic seizures and syndromes].

    PubMed

    Noachtar, S; Rémi, J

    2012-02-01

    Advances in diagnostic and therapeutic options require a revision of the current classification of seizures and epilepsies. Recently, a classification proposal was introduced which reflects the ambivalence of the Internationalen Liga gegen Epilepsie (ILAE). We suggest that epileptology should utilize the same established systematic approach used in clinical neurology.

  10. Cardiac arrhythmias during or after epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    van der Lende, Marije; Surges, Rainer; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2016-01-01

    Seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias are frequently reported and have been implicated as potential pathomechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). We attempted to identify clinical profiles associated with various (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias. We conducted a systematic search from the first date available to July 2013 on the combination of two terms: ‘cardiac arrhythmias’ and ‘epilepsy’. The databases searched were PubMed, Embase (OVID version), Web of Science and COCHRANE Library. We attempted to identify all case reports and case series. We identified seven distinct patterns of (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias: ictal asystole (103 cases), postictal asystole (13 cases), ictal bradycardia (25 cases), ictal atrioventricular (AV)-conduction block (11 cases), postictal AV-conduction block (2 cases), (post)ictal atrial flutter/atrial fibrillation (14 cases) and postictal ventricular fibrillation (3 cases). Ictal asystole had a mean prevalence of 0.318% (95% CI 0.316% to 0.320%) in people with refractory epilepsy who underwent video-EEG monitoring. Ictal asystole, bradycardia and AV-conduction block were self-limiting in all but one of the cases and seen during focal dyscognitive seizures. Seizure onset was mostly temporal (91%) without consistent lateralisation. Postictal arrhythmias were mostly found following convulsive seizures and often associated with (near) SUDEP. The contrasting clinical profiles of ictal and postictal arrhythmias suggest different pathomechanisms. Postictal rather than ictal arrhythmias seem of greater importance to the pathophysiology of SUDEP. PMID:26038597

  11. Cardiac arrhythmias during or after epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    van der Lende, Marije; Surges, Rainer; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2016-01-01

    Seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias are frequently reported and have been implicated as potential pathomechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). We attempted to identify clinical profiles associated with various (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias. We conducted a systematic search from the first date available to July 2013 on the combination of two terms: 'cardiac arrhythmias' and 'epilepsy'. The databases searched were PubMed, Embase (OVID version), Web of Science and COCHRANE Library. We attempted to identify all case reports and case series. We identified seven distinct patterns of (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias: ictal asystole (103 cases), postictal asystole (13 cases), ictal bradycardia (25 cases), ictal atrioventricular (AV)-conduction block (11 cases), postictal AV-conduction block (2 cases), (post)ictal atrial flutter/atrial fibrillation (14 cases) and postictal ventricular fibrillation (3 cases). Ictal asystole had a mean prevalence of 0.318% (95% CI 0.316% to 0.320%) in people with refractory epilepsy who underwent video-EEG monitoring. Ictal asystole, bradycardia and AV-conduction block were self-limiting in all but one of the cases and seen during focal dyscognitive seizures. Seizure onset was mostly temporal (91%) without consistent lateralisation. Postictal arrhythmias were mostly found following convulsive seizures and often associated with (near) SUDEP. The contrasting clinical profiles of ictal and postictal arrhythmias suggest different pathomechanisms. Postictal rather than ictal arrhythmias seem of greater importance to the pathophysiology of SUDEP.

  12. The approach to patients with "non-epileptic seizures"

    PubMed Central

    Mellers, J

    2005-01-01

    Up to one fifth of patients who present to specialist clinics with seizures do not have epilepsy. The majority of such patients suffer from psychologically mediated episodes; dissociative seizures, often referred to as "non-epileptic seizures". This paper describes the diagnostic evaluation of seizure disorders, including clinical assessment and the role of special investigations. The organic and psychiatric imitators of epilepsy are outlined and findings on psychiatric assessment are reviewed. This group of patients often proves difficult to engage in appropriate treatment and an approach to explaining the diagnosis is described. As yet there are no controlled trials of treatment in this disorder but preliminary evidence suggests cognitive behavioural therapy is both a rational and promising way forward. PMID:16085740

  13. Epileptic Seizure Forewarning by Nonlinear Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.

    2002-04-19

    This report describes work that was performed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (Contractor) and a commercial participant, VIASYS Healthcare Inc. (formerly Nicolet Biomedical, Inc.). The Contractor has patented technology that forewarns of impending epileptic events via scalp electroencephalograph (EEG) data and successfully demonstrated this technology on 20 datasets from the Participant under pre-CRADA effort. This CRADA sought to bridge the gap between the Contractor's existing research-class software and a prototype medical device for subsequent commercialization by the Participant. The objectives of this CRADA were (1) development of a combination of existing computer hardware and Contractor-patented software into a clinical process for warning of impending epileptic events in human patients, and (2) validation of the epilepsy warning methodology. This work modified the ORNL research-class FORTRAN for forewarning to run under a graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI-FORTRAN software subsequently was installed on desktop computers at five epilepsy monitoring units. The forewarning prototypes have run for more than one year without any hardware or software failures. This work also reported extensive analysis of model and EEG datasets to demonstrate the usefulness of the methodology. However, the Participant recently chose to stop work on the CRADA, due to a change in business priorities. Much work remains to convert the technology into a commercial clinical or ambulatory device for patient use, as discussed in App. H.

  14. Epileptic seizures: Quakes of the brain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, Ivan; Frei, Mark G.; Sornette, Didier; Milton, John; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    A dynamical analogy supported by five scale-free statistics (the Gutenberg-Richter distribution of event sizes, the distribution of interevent intervals, the Omori and inverse Omori laws, and the conditional waiting time until the next event) is shown to exist between two classes of seizures (“focal” in humans and generalized in animals) and earthquakes. Increments in excitatory interneuronal coupling in animals expose the system’s dependence on this parameter and its dynamical transmutability: moderate increases lead to power-law behavior of seizure energy and interevent times, while marked ones to scale-free (power-law) coextensive with characteristic scales and events. The coextensivity of power law and characteristic size regimes is predicted by models of coupled heterogeneous threshold oscillators of relaxation and underscores the role of coupling strength in shaping the dynamics of these systems.

  15. Convulsive Syncope Induced by Ventricular Arrhythmia Masquerading as Epileptic Seizures: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sabu, John; Regeti, Kalyani; Mallappallil, Mary; Kassotis, John; Islam, Hamidul; Zafar, Shoaib; Khan, Rafay; Ibrahim, Hiyam; Kanta, Romana; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla; Nai, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    It is important but difficult to distinguish convulsive syncope from epileptic seizure in many patients. We report a case of a man who presented to emergency department after several witnessed seizure-like episodes. He had a previous medical history of systolic heart failure and automated implantable converter defibrillator (AICD) in situ. The differential diagnoses raised were epileptic seizures and convulsive syncope secondary to cardiac arrhythmia. Subsequent AICD interrogation revealed ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation (v-tach/fib). Since convulsive syncope and epileptic seizure share many similar clinical features, early diagnosis is critical for choosing the appropriate management and preventing sudden cardiac death in patients with presumed epileptic seizure. PMID:27429683

  16. [Portable Epileptic Seizure Monitoring Intelligent System Based on Android System].

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wu, Shufeng; Yang, Chunlin; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Yu, Tao; Lu, Chengbiao; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-02-01

    The clinical electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring systems based on personal computer system can not meet the requirements of portability and home usage. The epilepsy patients have to be monitored in hospital for an extended period of time, which imposes a heavy burden on hospitals. In the present study, we designed a portable 16-lead networked monitoring system based on the Android smart phone. The system uses some technologies including the active electrode, the WiFi wireless transmission, the multi-scale permutation entropy (MPE) algorithm, the back-propagation (BP) neural network algorithm, etc. Moreover, the software of Android mobile application can realize the processing and analysis of EEG data, the display of EEG waveform and the alarm of epileptic seizure. The system has been tested on the mobile phones with Android 2. 3 operating system or higher version and the results showed that this software ran accurately and steadily in the detection of epileptic seizure. In conclusion, this paper provides a portable and reliable solution for epileptic seizure monitoring in clinical and home applications. PMID:27382736

  17. [Portable Epileptic Seizure Monitoring Intelligent System Based on Android System].

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wu, Shufeng; Yang, Chunlin; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Yu, Tao; Lu, Chengbiao; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-02-01

    The clinical electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring systems based on personal computer system can not meet the requirements of portability and home usage. The epilepsy patients have to be monitored in hospital for an extended period of time, which imposes a heavy burden on hospitals. In the present study, we designed a portable 16-lead networked monitoring system based on the Android smart phone. The system uses some technologies including the active electrode, the WiFi wireless transmission, the multi-scale permutation entropy (MPE) algorithm, the back-propagation (BP) neural network algorithm, etc. Moreover, the software of Android mobile application can realize the processing and analysis of EEG data, the display of EEG waveform and the alarm of epileptic seizure. The system has been tested on the mobile phones with Android 2. 3 operating system or higher version and the results showed that this software ran accurately and steadily in the detection of epileptic seizure. In conclusion, this paper provides a portable and reliable solution for epileptic seizure monitoring in clinical and home applications.

  18. Startle provoked epileptic seizures:features in 19 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Manford, M R; Fish, D R; Shorvon, S D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To define the clinical characteristics of a group of patients with startle provoked epileptic seizures (SPES). METHODS--Nineteen patients were identified during the course of a larger study of clinical seizure patterns. A witnessed seizure account was obtained in all patients; interictal EEG in 18, video-EEG-telemetry in eight, CT in 18, and high resolution MRI in eight. RESULTS--The onset of SPES was in childhood or adolescence in 14 of 19 patients. It was preceded by exclusively spontaneous seizures in nine patients and SPES had been replaced by exclusively spontaneous seizures in two patients. Sudden noise was the main triggering stimulus and somatosensory and visual stimuli were also effective in some patients. The clinical seizure pattern involved asymmetric tonic posturing in 16 of 19 patients. Focal neurological signs were present in nine patients, mental retardation in six, and 10 were clinically normal. Ictal scalp EEG showed a clear seizure discharge in only one patient with a tonic seizure pattern; over the lateral frontal electrodes contralateral to the posturing limbs. Brain CT showed a porencephalic cyst in three patients, focal frontal atrophy in one, and generalised atrophy in one. Brain MRI was undertaken in five normal subjects and three neurologically impaired patients, six with normal CT. It showed a porencephalic cyst in one patient. In six patients, there were dysplastic lesions. They affected the lateral premotor cortex in three patients and the perisylvian cortex in three patients, one with bilateral perisylvian abnormality. CONCLUSIONS--SPES are more frequent than is generally appreciated. They may be transient and occur relatively commonly without fixed deficit, by contrast with previous reports. The imaging abnormalities identified in those without diffuse cerebral damage suggest that SPES are often due to occult congenital lesions and that the lateral premotor and perisylvian cortices are important in this phenomenon. Images

  19. Patterns of human local cerebral glucose metabolism during epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1982-10-01

    Ictal patterns of local cerebral metabolic rate have been studied in epileptic patients by positron computed tomography with /sup 18/F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Partial seizures were associated with activation of anatomic structures unique to each patient studied. Ictal increases and decreases in local cerebral metabolism were observed. Scans performed during generalized convulsions induced by electroshock demonstrated a diffuse ictal increase and postictal decrease in cerebral metabolism. Petit mal absences were associated with a diffuse increase in cerebral metabolic rate. The ictal fluorodeoxyglucose patterns obtained from patients do not resemble autoradiographic patterns obtained from common experimental animal models of epilepsy.

  20. Do energy drinks cause epileptic seizure and ischemic stroke?

    PubMed

    Dikici, Suber; Saritas, Ayhan; Besir, Fahri Halit; Tasci, Ahmet Hakan; Kandis, Hayati

    2013-01-01

    Energy drinks are popular among young individuals and marketed to college students, athletes, and active individuals between the ages of 21 and 35 years. We report a case that had ischemic stroke and epileptic seizure after intake of energy drink with alcohol. To the best of our knowledge, the following case is the first report of ischemic stroke after intake of energy drink. A previously healthy 37-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a witnessed tonic-clonic seizure. According to his wife's testimony, just before loss of consciousness, the patient had been drinking 3 boxes of energy drinks (Redbull, Istanbul, Turkey, 250 mL) with vodka on an empty stomach. He did not have a history of seizures, head trauma, or family history of seizures or another disease. In cranial diffusion magnetic resonance imaging, there were hyperintense signal changes in bilateral occipital area (more pronounced in the left occipital lobe), right temporal lobe, frontal lobe, and posterior parietal lobe. All tests associated with possible etiologic causes of ischemic stroke in young patients were negative. Herein, we want to attract attention to adverse effect of energy drink usage. PMID:22867827

  1. Epileptic spasms without hypsarrhythmia in infancy and childhood: tonic spasms as a seizure type.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Luciana R De; Seraphim, Evelyn A; Corso, Jeana T; Naves, Pedro Vf; Carvalho, Kelly Cristina de; Ramirez, Milton David H; Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Guaranha, Mirian Sb; Yacubian, Elza Márcia T

    2015-06-01

    Epileptic spasms were defined by the International League Against Epilepsy Task Force on Classification and Terminology in 2001 as a specific seizure type. Epileptic spasms without hypsarrhythmia have been described in some series of patients, occurring either in infancy or childhood. More prolonged epileptic spasms without hypsarrhythmia were previously defined as a different seizure type, and referred to as "tonic spasm seizures". Here, we present a 5-year-old boy who started having epileptic spasms without hypsarrhythmia at 8 months of age, effectively treated with oxcarbazepine. With the withdrawal of medication, epileptic spasms returned. Video-EEG monitoring revealed high-voltage slow waves superimposed by low-voltage fast activity, followed by an electrodecremental phase and a burst of asymmetric fast activity, time-locked to clinical tonic spasm seizures. Brain MRI showed left temporal atrophy with temporal pole grey/white matter junction blurring and ictal PET-CT showed left basal frontal hypermetabolism. Seizures were refractory to several AEDs and vigabatrin was introduced with seizure cessation. Despite efforts to classify epileptic spasms, these are still considered as part of the group of unknown seizure types. In some cases, a focal origin has been suggested, leading to the term "periodic spasms" and "focal spasms". In this case, epileptic spasms without hypsarrhythmia, associated with tonic spasms, may be a variant of focal spasms and might be considered as an epileptic syndrome. [Published with video sequence]. PMID:25895540

  2. Fear as the main feature of epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Biraben, A; Taussig, D; Thomas, P; Even, C; Vignal, J; Scarabin, J; Chauvel, P

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—There are circumstances in which partial seizures may be misdiagnosed as acute psychiatric disturbances. In particular, when fear is the prominent feature the patient may be considered for years as having panic attacks. Eight patients in whom fear was the main symptom of the seizures are reported on. Patients who had a proved lack of consciousness during the fits and patients in whom fear was just fear of having a seizure were excluded. The ictal involvement of temporal limbic and frontal structures in those patients with fear of particular intensity was studied.
METHODS—The localisation of the epileptogenic zone was assessed by prolonged interictal EEG recordings as well as ictal video-EEG recording of at least one seizure in every patient; five had ictal SPECT and four had chronic stereotactic implantation of depth electrodes (SEEG). In six patients, a cortical resection was performed with an Engel's class 1 outcome (minimum 28 months follow up, except for two patients).
RESULTS—Localisations of primary epileptogenic zones were right temporal in three patients, left temporal in three, bitemporal in one, and frontal in one. In all cases, diagnosis of epileptic seizures could be clinically evoked because of the stereotypy of fits and of associated symptoms. The association of a fear sensation, autonomic symptoms, and coordinated behaviour suggests disturbance of a particular system. The SEEG data argue for temporolimbic and prefrontal lobe involvement in the expression of ictal fear.
CONCLUSIONS—In intense ictal fear, with coordinated behaviour and autonomic features, the discharge may involve or interfere with a physiological complex information processing network. This network involves orbitoprefrontal, anterior cingulate, and temporal limbic cortices.

 PMID:11160466

  3. Evaluation of the pentylenetetrazole seizure threshold test in epileptic mice as surrogate model for drug testing against pharmacoresistant seizures.

    PubMed

    Töllner, Kathrin; Twele, Friederike; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a major problem in epilepsy therapy, so that development of more effective AEDs is an unmet clinical need. Several rat and mouse models of epilepsy with spontaneous difficult-to-treat seizures exist, but because testing of antiseizure drug efficacy is extremely laborious in such models, they are only rarely used in the development of novel AEDs. Recently, the use of acute seizure tests in epileptic rats or mice has been proposed as a novel strategy for evaluating novel AEDs for increased antiseizure efficacy. In the present study, we compared the effects of five AEDs (valproate, phenobarbital, diazepam, lamotrigine, levetiracetam) on the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure threshold in mice that were made epileptic by pilocarpine. Experiments were started 6 weeks after a pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. At this time, control seizure threshold was significantly lower in epileptic than in nonepileptic animals. Unexpectedly, only one AED (valproate) was less effective to increase seizure threshold in epileptic vs. nonepileptic mice, and this difference was restricted to doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg, whereas the difference disappeared at 400mg/kg. All other AEDs exerted similar seizure threshold increases in epileptic and nonepileptic mice. Thus, induction of acute seizures with PTZ in mice pretreated with pilocarpine does not provide an effective and valuable surrogate method to screen drugs for antiseizure efficacy in a model of difficult-to-treat chronic epilepsy as previously suggested from experiments with this approach in rats. PMID:26930359

  4. Seizures triggered by pentylenetetrazol in marmosets made chronically epileptic with pilocarpine show greater refractoriness to treatment.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Josy Carolina C; Lima, Thiago Z; Queiroz, Claudio M; Cinini, Simone M; Blanco, Miriam M; Mello, Luiz E

    2016-10-01

    The efficiency of most of the new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on clinical trials still falls short the success reported in pre-clinical studies, possibly because the validity of the animal models is insufficient to fully represent the human pathology. To improve the translational value for testing AEDs, we propose the use of non-human primates. Here, we suggest that triggering limbic seizures with low doses of PTZ in pilocarpine-treated marmosets might provide a more effective basis for the development of AED. Marmosets with epileptic background were more susceptible to seizures induced by PTZ, which were at least 3 times longer and more severe (about 6 times greater frequency of generalized seizures) in comparison to naïve peers. Accordingly, PTZ-induced seizures were remarkably less attenuated by AEDs in epileptic than naïve marmosets. While phenobarbital (40mg/kg) virtually abolished seizures regardless of the animal's background, carbamazepine (120mg/kg) and valproic acid (400mg/kg) could not prevent PTZ-induced seizures in epileptic animals with the same efficiency as observed in naïve peers. VPA was less effective regarding the duration of individual seizures in epileptic animals, as assessed in ECoG (p=0.05). Similarly following CBZ treatment, the behavioral manifestation of generalized seizures lasted longer in epileptic (p<0.05), which were also more frequent than in the naïve group (p<0.05). As expected, epileptic marmosets experiencing stronger seizures showed more NPY- and ΔFosB-immunostained neurons in a number of brain areas associated with the generation and spread of limbic seizures. Our results suggest that PTZ induced seizures over an already existing epileptic background constitutes a reliable and controllable mean for the screening of new AEDs.

  5. Medical management of epileptic seizures: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Anand K; Khandker, Nabil; Kurczewski, Lisa; Brophy, Gretchen M

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic illnesses. This condition afflicts 2.9 million adults and children in the US, leading to an economic impact amounting to $15.5 billion. Despite the significant burden epilepsy places on the population, it is not very well understood. As this understanding continues to evolve, it is important for clinicians to stay up to date with the latest advances to provide the best care for patients. In the last 20 years, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved 15 new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), with many more currently in development. Other advances have been achieved in terms of diagnostic modalities like electroencephalography technology, treatment devices like vagal nerve and deep-brain stimulators, novel alternate routes of drug administration, and improvement in surgical techniques. Specific patient populations, such as the pregnant, elderly, those with HIV/AIDS, and those with psychiatric illness, present their own unique challenges, with AED side effects, drug interactions, and medical–psychiatric comorbidities adding to the conundrum. The purpose of this article is to review the latest literature guiding the management of acute epileptic seizures, focusing on the current challenges across different practice settings, and it discusses studies in various patient populations, including the pregnant, geriatric, those with HIV/AIDS, comatose, psychiatric, and “pseudoseizure” patients, and offers possible evidence-based solutions or the expert opinion of the authors. Also included is information on newer AEDs, routes of administration, and significant AED-related drug-interaction tables. This review has tried to address only some of these issues that any practitioner who deals with the acute management of seizures may encounter. The document also highlights the numerous avenues for new research that would help practitioners optimize epilepsy management. PMID:26966367

  6. Medical management of epileptic seizures: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Anand K; Khandker, Nabil; Kurczewski, Lisa; Brophy, Gretchen M

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic illnesses. This condition afflicts 2.9 million adults and children in the US, leading to an economic impact amounting to $15.5 billion. Despite the significant burden epilepsy places on the population, it is not very well understood. As this understanding continues to evolve, it is important for clinicians to stay up to date with the latest advances to provide the best care for patients. In the last 20 years, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved 15 new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), with many more currently in development. Other advances have been achieved in terms of diagnostic modalities like electroencephalography technology, treatment devices like vagal nerve and deep-brain stimulators, novel alternate routes of drug administration, and improvement in surgical techniques. Specific patient populations, such as the pregnant, elderly, those with HIV/AIDS, and those with psychiatric illness, present their own unique challenges, with AED side effects, drug interactions, and medical-psychiatric comorbidities adding to the conundrum. The purpose of this article is to review the latest literature guiding the management of acute epileptic seizures, focusing on the current challenges across different practice settings, and it discusses studies in various patient populations, including the pregnant, geriatric, those with HIV/AIDS, comatose, psychiatric, and "pseudoseizure" patients, and offers possible evidence-based solutions or the expert opinion of the authors. Also included is information on newer AEDs, routes of administration, and significant AED-related drug-interaction tables. This review has tried to address only some of these issues that any practitioner who deals with the acute management of seizures may encounter. The document also highlights the numerous avenues for new research that would help practitioners optimize epilepsy management.

  7. Ensemble Classifier for Epileptic Seizure Detection for Imperfect EEG Data

    PubMed Central

    Mahmuddin, Massudi; Mohamed, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Brain status information is captured by physiological electroencephalogram (EEG) signals, which are extensively used to study different brain activities. This study investigates the use of a new ensemble classifier to detect an epileptic seizure from compressed and noisy EEG signals. This noise-aware signal combination (NSC) ensemble classifier combines four classification models based on their individual performance. The main objective of the proposed classifier is to enhance the classification accuracy in the presence of noisy and incomplete information while preserving a reasonable amount of complexity. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the NSC technique, which yields higher accuracies of 90% for noiseless data compared with 85%, 85.9%, and 89.5% in other experiments. The accuracy for the proposed method is 80% when SNR = 1 dB, 84% when SNR = 5 dB, and 88% when SNR = 10 dB, while the compression ratio (CR) is 85.35% for all of the datasets mentioned. PMID:25759863

  8. Capparis ovata modulates brain oxidative toxicity and epileptic seizures in pentylentetrazol-induced epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Akay, Mehmet Berk; Çelik, Ömer; Yıldırım, Muhammed İkbal; Balcı, Erdinç; Yürekli, Vedat Ali

    2013-04-01

    It has been widely suggested that oxidative stress products play an important role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy. Capparis ovata (C. ovata) may useful treatment of epilepsy because it contains antioxidant flavonoids. The current study was designed to determine the effects of C. ovata on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant levels and electroencephalography (EEG) records in pentylentetrazol (PTZ)-induced epileptic rats. Thirty-two rats were randomly divided into four groups. First group was used as control although second group was PTZ group. Oral 100 and 200 mg/kg C. ovata were given to rats constituting the third and fourth groups for 7 days before PTZ administration. Second, third and forth groups received 60 mg/kg PTZ for induction of epilepsy. Three hours after administration of PTZ, EEG records, brain cortex and blood samples were taken all groups. The lipid peroxidation levels of the brain cortex, number of spikes and epileptiform discharges of EEG were higher in PTZ group than in control and C. ovata group whereas they were decreased by C. ovata administration. Vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E and β-carotene concentrations of brain cortex and latency to first spike of EEG were decreased by the PTZ administration although the brain cortex and plasma vitamin concentrations, and brain cortex and erythrocyte glutathione and glutathione peroxidase values were increased in PTZ + 100 and PTZ + 200 mg C. ovata groups. In conclusion, C. ovata administration caused protection against the PTZ-induced brain oxidative toxicity by inhibiting free radical and epileptic seizures, and supporting antioxidant redox system.

  9. Apparatus and method for epileptic seizure detection using non-linear techniques

    DOEpatents

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.

    1998-04-28

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for automatically detecting epileptic seizures by monitoring and analyzing brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; determining that one or more trends in the nonlinear measures indicate a seizure, and providing notification of seizure occurrence. 76 figs.

  10. Apparatus and method for epileptic seizure detection using non-linear techniques

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M.; Clapp, Ned E.; Daw, C. Stuart; Lawkins, William F.

    1998-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for automatically detecting epileptic seizures by monitoring and analyzing brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; determining that one or more trends in the nonlinear measures indicate a seizure, and providing notification of seizure occurrence.

  11. Protective effect of hispidulin on kainic acid-induced seizures and neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Su Jane; Huang, Shu Kuei

    2015-05-15

    Hispidulin is a flavonoid compound which is an active ingredient in a number of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs, and it has been reported to inhibit glutamate release. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hispidulin protects against seizures induced by kainic acid, a glutamate analog with excitotoxic properties. The results indicated that intraperitoneally administering hispidulin (10 or 50mg/kg) to rats 30 min before intraperitoneally injecting kainic acid (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and decreased seizure score. In addition, hispidulin substantially attenuated kainic acid-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the suppression of microglial activation and the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, hispidulin reduced kainic acid-induced c-Fos expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the hippocampus. These data suggest that hispidulin has considerable antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and antiinflammatory effects on kainic acid-induced seizures in rats. PMID:25746462

  12. The influence of potassium concentration on epileptic seizures in a coupled neuronal model in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Du, Mengmeng; Li, Jiajia; Wang, Rong; Wu, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Experiments on hippocampal slices have recorded that a novel pattern of epileptic seizures with alternating excitatory and inhibitory activities in the CA1 region can be induced by an elevated potassium ion (K(+)) concentration in the extracellular space between neurons and astrocytes (ECS-NA). To explore the intrinsic effects of the factors (such as glial K(+) uptake, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, the K(+) concentration of the bath solution, and K(+) lateral diffusion) influencing K(+) concentration in the ECS-NA on the epileptic seizures recorded in previous experiments, we present a coupled model composed of excitatory and inhibitory neurons and glia in the CA1 region. Bifurcation diagrams showing the glial K(+) uptake strength with either the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase pump strength or the bath solution K(+) concentration are obtained for neural epileptic seizures. The K(+) lateral diffusion leads to epileptic seizure in neurons only when the synaptic conductance values of the excitatory and inhibitory neurons are within an appropriate range. Finally, we propose an energy factor to measure the metabolic demand during neuron firing, and the results show that different energy demands for the normal discharges and the pathological epileptic seizures of the coupled neurons.

  13. The influence of potassium concentration on epileptic seizures in a coupled neuronal model in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Du, Mengmeng; Li, Jiajia; Wang, Rong; Wu, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Experiments on hippocampal slices have recorded that a novel pattern of epileptic seizures with alternating excitatory and inhibitory activities in the CA1 region can be induced by an elevated potassium ion (K(+)) concentration in the extracellular space between neurons and astrocytes (ECS-NA). To explore the intrinsic effects of the factors (such as glial K(+) uptake, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, the K(+) concentration of the bath solution, and K(+) lateral diffusion) influencing K(+) concentration in the ECS-NA on the epileptic seizures recorded in previous experiments, we present a coupled model composed of excitatory and inhibitory neurons and glia in the CA1 region. Bifurcation diagrams showing the glial K(+) uptake strength with either the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase pump strength or the bath solution K(+) concentration are obtained for neural epileptic seizures. The K(+) lateral diffusion leads to epileptic seizure in neurons only when the synaptic conductance values of the excitatory and inhibitory neurons are within an appropriate range. Finally, we propose an energy factor to measure the metabolic demand during neuron firing, and the results show that different energy demands for the normal discharges and the pathological epileptic seizures of the coupled neurons. PMID:27668019

  14. Modern technology calls for a modern approach to classification of epileptic seizures and the epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Lüders, Hans O; Amina, Shahram; Baumgartner, Christopher; Benbadis, Selim; Bermeo-Ovalle, Adriana; Devereaux, Michael; Diehl, Beate; Edwards, Jonathan; Baca-Vaca, Guadalupe Fernandez; Hamer, Hajo; Ikeda, Akio; Kaiboriboon, Kitti; Kellinghaus, Christoph; Koubeissi, Mohamad; Lardizabal, David; Lhatoo, Samden; Lüders, Jürgen; Mani, Jayanti; Mayor, Luis Carlos; Miller, Jonathan; Noachtar, Soheyl; Pestana, Elia; Rosenow, Felix; Sakamoto, Americo; Shahid, Asim; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Syed, Tanvir; Tanner, Adriana; Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2012-03-01

    In the last 10-15 years the ILAE Commission on Classification and Terminology has been presenting proposals to modernize the current ILAE Classification of Epileptic Seizures and Epilepsies. These proposals were discussed extensively in a series of articles published recently in Epilepsia and Epilepsy Currents. There is almost universal consensus that the availability of new diagnostic techniques as also of a modern understanding of epilepsy calls for a complete revision of the Classification of Epileptic Seizures and Epilepsies. Unfortunately, however, the Commission is still not prepared to take a bold step ahead and completely revisit our approach to classification of epileptic seizures and epilepsies. In this manuscript we critically analyze the current proposals of the Commission and make suggestions for a classification system that reflects modern diagnostic techniques and our current understanding of epilepsy. PMID:22332669

  15. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Kulikov, Stanislav; Osorio, Ivan; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  16. Measuring resetting of brain dynamics at epileptic seizures: application of global optimization and spatial synchronization techniques.

    PubMed

    Sabesan, Shivkumar; Chakravarthy, Niranjan; Tsakalis, Kostas; Pardalos, Panos; Iasemidis, Leon

    2009-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are manifestations of intermittent spatiotemporal transitions of the human brain from chaos to order. Measures of chaos, namely maximum Lyapunov exponents (STL(max)), from dynamical analysis of the electroencephalograms (EEGs) at critical sites of the epileptic brain, progressively converge (diverge) before (after) epileptic seizures, a phenomenon that has been called dynamical synchronization (desynchronization). This dynamical synchronization/desynchronization has already constituted the basis for the design and development of systems for long-term (tens of minutes), on-line, prospective prediction of epileptic seizures. Also, the criterion for the changes in the time constants of the observed synchronization/desynchronization at seizure points has been used to show resetting of the epileptic brain in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), a phenomenon that implicates a possible homeostatic role for the seizures themselves to restore normal brain activity. In this paper, we introduce a new criterion to measure this resetting that utilizes changes in the level of observed synchronization/desynchronization. We compare this criterion's sensitivity of resetting with the old one based on the time constants of the observed synchronization/desynchronization. Next, we test the robustness of the resetting phenomena in terms of the utilized measures of EEG dynamics by a comparative study involving STL(max), a measure of phase (ϕ(max)) and a measure of energy (E) using both criteria (i.e. the level and time constants of the observed synchronization/desynchronization). The measures are estimated from intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG) recordings with subdural and depth electrodes from two patients with focal temporal lobe epilepsy and a total of 43 seizures. Techniques from optimization theory, in particular quadratic bivalent programming, are applied to optimize the performance of the three measures in detecting preictal entrainment. It is

  17. Possible reasons why certain epileptics commit unlawful acts during or directly after seizures.

    PubMed

    van Rensburg, P H; Gagiano, C A; Verschoor, T

    1994-01-01

    Courts have accepted that epileptics sometimes commit unlawful acts as a result of an epileptic seizure. Reasons for this unlawful behaviour may be found in the interictal, ictal and post-ictal phases of the seizure. Interictal aspects which are relevant to the form of epileptic automatism may be the person's natural tendencies, the same psychodynamic factors which determine the contents of dreams, the person's social background of violence and the contents of a person's thoughts immediately before a seizure. Ictal aspects include the specific part of the brain from which the seizure originates, the loss of integration of incoming sensorial stimuli with motor-emotional output, the loss of higher control associated with a reversion to primitive automatic behaviour and the emergence of repressed feelings and aggressive instincts. Post-ictal violent behaviour may stem from the epileptic's misinterpretation of well-meant attempts by bystanders to protect him or her against the consequences of his or her confused conduct--and is usually characterized by a clouded consciousness, paranoid ideas and hallucinations.

  18. Real-time detection of epileptic seizures in animal models using reservoir computing.

    PubMed

    Buteneers, Pieter; Verstraeten, David; Nieuwenhuyse, Bregt Van; Stroobandt, Dirk; Raedt, Robrecht; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul; Schrauwen, Benjamin

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of studies have investigated the effects of closed-loop anti-epileptic treatments. Most of the current research still is very labour intensive: real-time treatment is manually triggered and conclusions can only be drawn after multiple days of manual review and annotation of the electroencephalogram (EEG). In this paper we propose a technique based on reservoir computing (RC) to automatically and in real-time detect epileptic seizures in the intra-cranial EEG (iEEG) of epileptic rats in order to immediately trigger seizure treatment. The performance of the system is evaluated in two different seizure types: absence seizures from genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS) and limbic seizures from post status epilepticus (PSE) rats. The dataset consists of 452 hours iEEG from 23 GAERS and 2083 hours iEEG from 22 PSE rats. In the default set-up the system detects 0.09 and 0.13 false positives per seizure and misses 0.07 and 0.005 events per seizure for GAERS and PSE rats respectively. It achieves an average detection delay below 1s in GAERS and less than 10s in the PSE data. This detection delay and the number of missed seizures can be further decreased when a higher false positive rate is allowed. Our method outperforms state-of-the-art detection techniques and only a few parameters require optimization on a limited training set. It is therefore suited for automatic seizure detection based on iEEG and may serve as a useful tool for epilepsy researchers. The technique avoids the time-consuming manual review and annotation of EEG and can be incorporated in a closed-loop treatment strategy.

  19. Neuroethological approach to frontolimbic epileptic seizures and parasomnias: The same central pattern generators for the same behaviours.

    PubMed

    Tassinari, C A; Cantalupo, G; Högl, B; Cortelli, P; Tassi, L; Francione, S; Nobili, L; Meletti, S; Rubboli, G; Gardella, E

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this report is not to make a differential diagnosis between epileptic nocturnal seizures and non-epileptic sleep-related movement disorders, or parasomnias. On the contrary, our goal is to emphasize the commonly shared semiological features of some epileptic seizures and parasomnias. Such similar features might be explained by the activation of the same neuronal networks (so-called 'central pattern generators' or CPG). These produce the stereotypical rhythmic motor sequences - in other words, behaviours - that are adaptive and species-specific (such as eating/alimentary, attractive/aversive, locomotor and nesting habits). CPG are located at the subcortical level (mainly in the brain stem and spinal cord) and, in humans, are under the control of the phylogenetically more recent neomammalian neocortical structures, according to a simplified Jacksonian model. Based on video-polygraphic recordings of sleep-related epileptic seizures and non-epileptic events (parasomnias), we have documented how a transient "neomammalian brain" dysfunction - whether epileptic or not - can 'release' (disinhibition?) the CPG responsible for involuntary motor behaviours. Thus, in both epileptic seizures and parasomnias, we can observe: (a) oroalimentary automatisms, bruxism and biting; (b) ambulatory behaviours, ranging from the classical bimanual-bipedal activity of 'frontal' hypermotor seizures, epileptic and non-epileptic wanderings, and somnambulism to periodic leg movements (PLM), alternating leg muscle activation (ALMA) and restless legs syndrome (RLS); and (c) various sleep-related events such as ictal fear, sleep terrors, nightmares and violent behaviour. PMID:19733874

  20. Epileptic seizures evoked by card games, draughts, and similar games.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, N

    1987-01-01

    Three Asian patients, since adolescence, had myoclonic jerks and tonic-clonic seizures during card games, draughts, and a local game "punchi." Interictal EEG showed generalized bisynchronous atypical 3-Hz spike and wave discharges. Test procedures evoked EEG dysrhythmia and clinical seizures in two patients. These patients and previously reported cases have the seizure disorder juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (impulsive petit mal), which seems particularly sensitive to provocation by cognitive functions, especially decision making. Myoclonic epilepsy is considered resistant to antiepileptic drugs other than clonazepam and valproate, but two of our patients responded well to clobazam. PMID:3622411

  1. Do seizures and epileptic activity worsen epilepsy and deteriorate cognitive function?

    PubMed

    Avanzini, Giuliano; Depaulis, Antoine; Tassinari, Alberto; de Curtis, Marco

    2013-11-01

    Relevant to the definition of epileptic encephalopathy (EE) is the concept that the epileptic activity itself may contribute to bad outcomes, both in terms of epilepsy and cognition, above and beyond what might be expected from the underlying pathology alone, and that these can worsen over time. The review of the clinical and experimental evidence that seizures or interictal electroencephalography (EEG) discharges themselves can induce a progression toward more severe epilepsy and a regression of brain function leads to the following conclusions: The possibility of seizure-dependent worsening is by no means a general one but is limited to some types of epilepsy, namely mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and EEs. Clinical and experimental data concur in indicating that prolonged seizures/status epilepticus (SE) are a risky initial event that can set in motion an epileptogenic process leading to persistent, possibly drug-refractory epilepsies. The mechanisms for SE-related epileptogenic process are incompletely known; they seem to involve inflammation and/or glutamatergic transmission. The evidence of the role of recurrent individual seizures in sustaining epilepsy progression is ambiguous. The correlation between high seizure frequency and bad outcome does not necessarily demonstrate a cause-effect relationship, rather high seizure frequency and bad outcome can both depend on a particularly aggressive epileptogenic process. The results of EE studies challenge the idea of a common seizure-dependent mechanism for epilepsy progression/intellectual deterioration.

  2. Predictability of epileptic seizures: a comparative study using Lyapunov exponent and entropy based measures.

    PubMed

    Sabesan, Shivkumar; Narayanan, K; Prasad, Awadhesh; Spanias, A; Sackellares, J C; Iasemidis, L D

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a comparative study involving measures from the theory of chaos, namely the short-term largest Lyapunov exponent, Shannon and Kullback-Leibler entropies from information theory, has been carried out in terms of their predictability of temporal lobe epileptic seizures. These three measures are estimated from electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings with sub-dural and in-depth electrodes from various brain locations in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Techniques from optimization theory are applied to select optimal sets of electrodes whose dynamics is then followed over time. Results from analysis of multiple seizures in two epileptic patients with these measures are presented and compared in terms of their ability to identify pre-ictal dynamical entrainment well ahead of seizure onset time. PMID:12724881

  3. Real-time Detection of Precursors to Epileptic Seizures: Non-Linear Analysis of System Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nesaei, Sahar; Sharafat, Ahmad R

    2014-04-01

    We propose a novel approach for detecting precursors to epileptic seizures in intracranial electroencephalograms (iEEG), which is based on the analysis of system dynamics. In the proposed scheme, the largest Lyapunov exponent of the discrete wavelet packet transform (DWPT) of the segmented EEG signals is considered as the discriminating features. Such features are processed by a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to identify whether the corresponding segment of the EEG signal contains a precursor to an epileptic seizure. When consecutive EEG segments contain such precursors, a decision is made that a precursor is in fact detected. The proposed scheme is applied to the Freiburg dataset, and the results show that seizure precursors are detected in a time frame that unlike other existing schemes is very much convenient to patients, with sensitivity of 100% and negligible false positive detection rates.

  4. Real-time Detection of Precursors to Epileptic Seizures: Non-Linear Analysis of System Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Nesaei, Sahar; Sharafat, Ahmad R.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel approach for detecting precursors to epileptic seizures in intracranial electroencephalograms (iEEG), which is based on the analysis of system dynamics. In the proposed scheme, the largest Lyapunov exponent of the discrete wavelet packet transform (DWPT) of the segmented EEG signals is considered as the discriminating features. Such features are processed by a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to identify whether the corresponding segment of the EEG signal contains a precursor to an epileptic seizure. When consecutive EEG segments contain such precursors, a decision is made that a precursor is in fact detected. The proposed scheme is applied to the Freiburg dataset, and the results show that seizure precursors are detected in a time frame that unlike other existing schemes is very much convenient to patients, with sensitivity of 100% and negligible false positive detection rates. PMID:24761374

  5. Seizure, Fit or Attack? The Use of Diagnostic Labels by Patients with Epileptic or Non-Epileptic Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plug, Leendert; Sharrack, Basil; Reuber, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the use of diagnostic labels such as "seizure", "attack", "fit", and "blackout" by patients who experience seizures. While previous research on patients' preferences for diagnostic terminology has relied on questionnaires, we assess patients' own preferences and their responses to a doctor's use of different labels…

  6. Alterations of endocannabinoids in cerebrospinal fluid of dogs with epileptic seizure disorder

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological disorders in dogs characterized by recurrent seizures. The endocannabinoid (EC) system plays a central role in suppressing pathologic neuronal excitability and in controlling the spread of activity in an epileptic network. Endocannabinoids are released on demand and their dysregulation has been described in several pathological conditions. Recurrent seizures may lead to an adverse reorganization of the EC system and impairment of its protective effect. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2AG) are altered in epileptic dogs. Concentrations of AEA and total AG (sum of 2AG and 1AG) were measured in 40 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy and in 16 unaffected, healthy control dogs using liquid chromatography combined with tandem mass spectrometry. Results AEA and total AG were measured at 4.94 (3.18 – 9.17) pM and 1.43 (0.90 – 1.92) nM in epileptic dogs and at 3.19 (2.04 – 4.28) pM and 1.76 (1.08 – 2.69) nM in the control group, respectively (median, 25 – 75% percentiles in brackets). The AEA difference between epileptic and healthy dogs was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Values correlated with seizure severity and duration of seizure activity. Dogs with cluster seizures and/or status epilepticus and with seizure activity for more than six months displayed the highest EC concentrations. Conclusion In conclusion, we present the first endocannabinoid measurements in canine CSF and confirm the hypothesis that the EC system is altered in canine idiopathic epilepsy. PMID:24370333

  7. High performance seizure-monitoring system using a vibration sensor and videotape recording: behavioral analysis of genetically epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Amano, S; Yokoyama, M; Torii, R; Fukuoka, J; Tanaka, K; Ihara, N; Hazama, F

    1997-06-01

    A new seizure-monitoring apparatus containing a piezoceramic vibration sensor combined with videotape recording was developed. Behavioral analysis of Ihara's genetically epileptic rat (IGER), which is a recently developed novel mutant with spontaneously limbic-like seizures, was performed using this new device. Twenty 8-month-old male IGERs were monitored continuously for 72 h. Abnormal behaviors were detected by use of a vibration recorder, and epileptic seizures were confirmed by videotape recordings taken synchronously with vibration recording. Representative forms of seizures were generalized convulsions and circling seizures. Generalized convulsions were found in 13 rats, and circling seizures in 7 of 20 animals. Two rats had generalized and circling seizures, and two rats did not have seizures. Although there was no apparent circadian rhythm to the generalized seizures, circling seizures occurred mostly between 1800 and 0800 h. A correlation between the sleep-wake cycle and the occurrence of circling seizures seems likely. Without exception, all the seizure actions were recorded by the vibration recorder and the videotape recorder. To eliminate the risk of a false-negative result, investigators scrutinized the information obtained from the vibration sensor and the videotape recorder. The newly developed seizure-monitoring system was found to facilitate detailed analysis of epileptic seizures in rats.

  8. Serodiagnosis of neurocysticercosis in patients with epileptic seizure using ELISA and immunoblot assay.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Maria M I; Peralta, Regina Helena S; Livramento, José A; Hoshino-Shimizu, Sumie; Peralta, José M; Vaz, Adelaide J

    2006-01-01

    Sera from 88 patients from Santa Catarina and São Paulo states of Brazil, with epileptic seizures who underwent cerebral computed tomography (CT) were analyzed for the detection of antibodies to T. solium cysticercus by ELISA and Immunoblot (IB) with the following antigens: Taenia solium cysticercus total saline (Tso), Taenia crassiceps cysticercus vesicular fluid (Tcra-vf) and T. crassiceps cysticercus glycoproteins (Tcra-gp). ELISA carried out with Tso, Tcra-vf and Tcra-gp antigens showed 95%, 90% and 80% sensitivities, respectively, and 68%, 85% and 93% specificities, respectively. In the epileptic patients group, ELISA positivity was 30%, 51% and 35% with Tso, Tcra-vf and Tcra-gp antigens respectively. Considering the IB as the confirmatory test, the positivity was 16% (14/88) in the epileptic patients total group and 22% (12/54) in the epileptic patients with positive CT and signals of cysticercosis. We found a significant statistical correlation among ELISA or IB results and the phase of the disease when any antigens were used (p < 0.05). We emphasize the need to introduce in the laboratory routine the search for neurocysticercosis (NC) in patients presenting with epileptic seizures because of the high risk of acquiring NC in our region and its potential cause of epilepsy.

  9. Detection of tonic epileptic seizures based on surface electromyography.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Sigge N; Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sandor; Sorensen, Helge B D

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to design an algorithm for detection of tonic seizures based on surface electromyography signals from the deltoids. A successful algorithm has a future prospect of being implemented in a wearable device as part of an alarm system. This has already been done for generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and the hypothesis was that some of the same characteristics could be found for tonic seizures. The signals were pre-processed by a high-pass filter to remove low frequency noise such as movement artifacts. Several different features were investigated, including kurtosis, median frequency, zero crossing rate and approximate entropy. These features were used as input in the random forest classifier to decide if a data segment was from a seizure or not. The goal was to develop a generic algorithm for all tonic seizures, but better results were achieved when certain parameters were adapted specifically for each patient. With patient specific parameters the algorithm obtained a sensitivity of 100% for four of six patients with false detection rates between 0.08 and 7.90 per hour. PMID:25570115

  10. Interleukin-1β biosynthesis inhibition reduces acute seizures and drug resistant chronic epileptic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Maroso, Mattia; Balosso, Silvia; Ravizza, Teresa; Iori, Valentina; Wright, Christopher Ian; French, Jacqueline; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2011-04-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical observations indicate that brain inflammation is an important factor in epilepsy. In particular, induction of interleukin-converting enzyme (ICE)/caspase-1 and activation of interleukin (IL)-1β/IL-1 receptor type 1 axis both occur in human epilepsy, and contribute to experimentally induced acute seizures. In this study, the anticonvulsant activity of VX-765 (a selective ICE/caspase-1 inhibitor) was examined in a mouse model of chronic epilepsy with spontaneous recurrent epileptic activity refractory to some common anticonvulsant drugs. Moreover, the effects of this drug were studied in one acute model of seizures in mice, previously shown to involve activation of ICE/caspase-1. Quantitative analysis of electroencephalogram activity was done in mice exposed to acute seizures or those developing chronic epileptic activity after status epilepticus to assess the anticonvulsant effects of systemic administration of VX-765. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissue was carried out at the end of pharmacological experiments in epileptic mice to evaluate neuropathology, glia activation and IL-1β expression, and the effect of treatment. Repeated systemic administration of VX-765 significantly reduced chronic epileptic activity in mice in a dose-dependent fashion (12.5-200 mg/kg). This effect was observed at doses ≥ 50 mg/kg, and was reversible with discontinuation of the drug. Maximal drug effect was associated with inhibition of IL-1β synthesis in activated astrocytes. The same dose regimen of VX-765 also reduced acute seizures in mice and delayed their onset time. These results support a new target system for anticonvulsant pharmacological intervention to control epileptic activity that does not respond to some common anticonvulsant drugs. PMID:21431948

  11. Oxidative Stress Measurement and Prediction of Epileptic Seizure in Children and Adults With Severe Motor and Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Masahito; Satomura, Shigeko; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Ito, Etsuro; Kyotani, Shojiro

    2016-01-01

    Background The medical care of severe motor and intellectual disabilities (SMID) depends on the empirical medical care. Epileptic seizure specific to SMID is difficult to suppress using anti-epileptic drugs, and its tendency to persist for long periods poses an issue. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the relationship between epileptic seizure in cases with SMID and oxidative stress in the living body by examining endogenous antioxidants, the degree of oxidation (reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs)), and the biological antioxidant potential (BAP) as indicators. Methods Target patients were 43 SMID epilepsy patients. Blood was sampled before breakfast and medication. As for the specimen, d-ROMs and BAP were measured using the free radical analyzer. Results The present study did not reveal any correlation between endogenous antioxidants (albumin) and the frequency of epileptic seizures. On the other hand, d-ROMs were correlated with the frequency of epileptic seizure. In particular, strong correlations between the frequency of epileptic seizures and the d-ROMs/BAP ratio as well as the BAP/d-ROMs ratio were noted. Conclusions These results indicate that the use of d-ROMs and BAP as biomarkers can provide a tool for predicting the prognosis of epileptic seizures in patients with SMID. PMID:27222671

  12. Measure profile surrogates: A method to validate the performance of epileptic seizure prediction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuz, Thomas; Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Mormann, Florian; Kraskov, Alexander; Stögbauer, Harald; Elger, Christian E.; Lehnertz, Klaus; Grassberger, Peter

    2004-06-01

    In a growing number of publications it is claimed that epileptic seizures can be predicted by analyzing the electroencephalogram (EEG) with different characterizing measures. However, many of these studies suffer from a severe lack of statistical validation. Only rarely are results passed to a statistical test and verified against some null hypothesis H0 in order to quantify their significance. In this paper we propose a method to statistically validate the performance of measures used to predict epileptic seizures. From measure profiles rendered by applying a moving-window technique to the electroencephalogram we first generate an ensemble of surrogates by a constrained randomization using simulated annealing. Subsequently the seizure prediction algorithm is applied to the original measure profile and to the surrogates. If detectable changes before seizure onset exist, highest performance values should be obtained for the original measure profiles and the null hypothesis. “The measure is not suited for seizure prediction” can be rejected. We demonstrate our method by applying two measures of synchronization to a quasicontinuous EEG recording and by evaluating their predictive performance using a straightforward seizure prediction statistics. We would like to stress that the proposed method is rather universal and can be applied to many other prediction and detection problems.

  13. Late-diagnosed bilateral intertrochanteric femur fracture during an epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Copuroğlu, Cem; Ozcan, Mert; Dülger, Hakan; Yalnız, Erol

    2012-01-01

    Although spontaneous and simultaneous bilateral hip fractures without trauma are seen rarely, epileptic seizures may lead to these fractures. We present an 82-year-old female patient with poor bone quality and a 20-year history of epilepsy. She had been using anticonvulsant drugs for almost 20 years. Following a convulsive epileptic attack, bilateral intertrochanteric femur fractures occurred (causing bilateral hip pain), which was diagnosed on the 12th day. An earlier pelvic anteroposterior roentgenogram would be helpful for early diagnosis. It should not be forgotten that bone fractures may be observed without trauma in epilepsy patients.

  14. Could supplementary dietary tryptophan and taurine prevent epileptic seizures?

    PubMed

    Maurizi, C P

    1985-12-01

    Roles for melatonin, taurine, and the pineal gland in epilepsy are examined. Cerebrospinal fluid melatonin and taurine may be natural anticonvulsants. The flow of cerebrospinal fluid may bathe the medial and lateral geniculate ganglia and the superior and inferior colliculli with these anticonvulsant substances. Supplemental dietary taurine and tryptophan could be of value in the treatment and prevention of seizures.

  15. Network dynamics of the brain and influence of the epileptic seizure onset zone

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Samuel P.; Santaniello, Sabato; Yaffe, Robert B.; Jouny, Christophe C.; Crone, Nathan E.; Bergey, Gregory K.; Anderson, William S.; Sarma, Sridevi V.

    2014-01-01

    The human brain is a dynamic networked system. Patients with partial epileptic seizures have focal regions that periodically diverge from normal brain network dynamics during seizures. We studied the evolution of brain connectivity before, during, and after seizures with graph-theoretic techniques on continuous electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings (5.4 ± 1.7 d per patient, mean ± SD) from 12 patients with temporal, occipital, or frontal lobe partial onset seizures. Each electrode was considered a node in a graph, and edges between pairs of nodes were weighted by their coherence within a frequency band. The leading eigenvector of the connectivity matrix, which captures network structure, was tracked over time and clustered to uncover a finite set of brain network states. Across patients, we found that (i) the network connectivity is structured and defines a finite set of brain states, (ii) seizures are characterized by a consistent sequence of states, (iii) a subset of nodes is isolated from the network at seizure onset and becomes more connected with the network toward seizure termination, and (iv) the isolated nodes may identify the seizure onset zone with high specificity and sensitivity. To localize a seizure, clinicians visually inspect seizures recorded from multiple intracranial electrode contacts, a time-consuming process that may not always result in definitive localization. We show that network metrics computed from all ECoG channels capture the dynamics of the seizure onset zone as it diverges from normal overall network structure. This suggests that a state space model can be used to help localize the seizure onset zone in ECoG recordings. PMID:25404339

  16. Convulsive seizures and SUDEP in a mouse model of SCN8A epileptic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Wagnon, Jacy L; Korn, Matthew J; Parent, Rachel; Tarpey, Taylor A; Jones, Julie M; Hammer, Michael F; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Parent, Jack M; Meisler, Miriam H

    2015-01-15

    De novo mutations of the voltage-gated sodium channel gene SCN8A have recently been recognized as a cause of epileptic encephalopathy, which is characterized by refractory seizures with developmental delay and cognitive disability. We previously described the heterozygous SCN8A missense mutation p.Asn1768Asp in a child with epileptic encephalopathy that included seizures, ataxia, and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). The mutation results in increased persistent sodium current and hyperactivity of transfected neurons. We have characterized a knock-in mouse model expressing this dominant gain-of-function mutation to investigate the pathology of the altered channel in vivo. The mutant channel protein is stable in vivo. Heterozygous Scn8a(N1768D/+) mice exhibit seizures and SUDEP, confirming the causality of the de novo mutation in the proband. Using video/EEG analysis, we detect ictal discharges that coincide with convulsive seizures and myoclonic jerks. Prior to seizure onset, heterozygous mutants are not defective in motor learning or fear conditioning, but do exhibit mild impairment of motor coordination and social discrimination. Homozygous mutant mice exhibit earlier seizure onset than heterozygotes and more rapid progression to death. Analysis of the intermediate phenotype of functionally hemizygous Scn8a(N1768D/-) mice indicates that severity is increased by a double dose of mutant protein and reduced by the presence of wild-type protein. Scn8a(N1768D) mutant mice provide a model of epileptic encephalopathy that will be valuable for studying the in vivo effects of hyperactive Nav1.6 and the response to therapeutic interventions.

  17. Epileptic seizure classification in EEG signals using second-order difference plot of intrinsic mode functions.

    PubMed

    Pachori, Ram Bilas; Patidar, Shivnarayan

    2014-02-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder which is characterized by transient and unexpected electrical disturbance of the brain. The electroencephalogram (EEG) is a commonly used signal for detection of epileptic seizures. This paper presents a new method for classification of ictal and seizure-free EEG signals. The proposed method is based on the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and the second-order difference plot (SODP). The EMD method decomposes an EEG signal into a set of symmetric and band-limited signals termed as intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). The SODP of IMFs provides elliptical structure. The 95% confidence ellipse area measured from the SODP of IMFs has been used as a feature in order to discriminate seizure-free EEG signals from the epileptic seizure EEG signals. The feature space obtained from the ellipse area parameters of two IMFs has been used for classification of ictal and seizure-free EEG signals using the artificial neural network (ANN) classifier. It has been shown that the feature space formed using ellipse area parameters of first and second IMFs has given good classification performance. Experimental results on EEG database available by the University of Bonn, Germany, are included to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. [Psychogenic NonEpileptic Seizures: Current Knowledge and Contributions of the Study of Emotions].

    PubMed

    Rutka, Roman; Denis, Anne; Vercueil, Laurent; Hot, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are paroxysmal attacks that can imitate epileptic seizures but do not have a neurological origin. There has been mounting interest these last few years to unravel psychological and neuronal factors that contribute to the development of PNES. The objective of this review is twofold. First, we examine recent contributions of clinical and researches studies to define the main features of PNES. Then, we focus on the possible link between changes in processing of emotional information and the onset of PNES. In this article, we identify promising directions for future research and argue that affective neuroscience may provide original findings to better understand this disease. PMID:27570954

  19. Early Detection of Human Epileptic Seizures Based on Intracortical Local Field Potentials.

    PubMed

    Park, Yun S; Hochberg, Leigh R; Eskandar, Emad N; Cash, Sydney S; Truccolo, Wilson

    2013-01-01

    The unpredictability of re-occurring seizures dramatically impacts the quality of life and autonomy of people with epilepsy. Reliable early seizure detection could open new therapeutic possibilities and thus substantially improve quality of life and autonomy. Though many seizure detection studies have shown the potential of scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) and intracranial EEG (iEEG) signals, reliable early detection of human seizures remains elusive in practice. Here, we examined the use of intracortical local field potentials (LFPs) recorded from 4×4-mm(2) 96-microelectrode arrays (MEA) for early detection of human epileptic seizures. We adopted a framework consisting of (1) sampling of intracortical LFPs; (2) denoising of LFPs with the Kalman filter; (3) spectral power estimation in specific frequency bands using 1-sec moving time windows; (4) extraction of statistical features, such as the mean, variance, and Fano factor (calculated across channels) of the power in each frequency band; and (5) cost-sensitive support vector machine (SVM) classification of ictal and interictal samples. We tested the framework in one-participant dataset, including 4 seizures and corresponding interictal recordings preceding each seizure. The participant was a 52-year-old woman suffering from complex partial seizures. LFPs were recorded from an MEA implanted in the participant's left middle temporal gyrus. In this participant, spectral power in 0.3-10 Hz, 20-55 Hz, and 125-250 Hz changed significantly between ictal and interictal epochs. The examined seizure detection framework provided an event-wise sensitivity of 100% (4/4) and only one 20-sec-long false positive event in interictal recordings (likely an undetected subclinical event under further visual inspection), and a detection latency of 4.35 ± 2.21 sec (mean ± std) with respect to iEEG-identified seizure onsets. These preliminary results indicate that intracortical MEA recordings may provide key signals to quickly and

  20. Untroubled musical judgement of a performing organist during early epileptic seizure of the right temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Wieser, H G; Walter, R

    1997-01-01

    The case of a professional musician with a right temporal lobe epilepsy is presented. Whilst playing an organ concert (John Stanley's Voluntary VIII, Op. 5), he suffered a complex partial seizure. The recorded concert performance (with the seizure) was analysed and compared with other available exercise records and with the composition. The musical analysis of the seizure-induced variations reveals that at the beginning of the seizure, the left hand started to become unprecise in time and deviated from the score, whereas the right hand remained faultless at this time. With increasing duration of the seizure discharge, the dissociation of both hands from the score increased but the right hand compensated for the errors of the left hand in a musically meaningful way, i.e. with the aim to compensate for the seizure-induced errors of the left hand. The case illustrates untroubled musical judgement during epileptic activity in the right temporal lobe at the beginning of the seizure. Whereas the temporal formation of the performance was markedly impaired, the ability of improvisation-in the sense of a 'perfect musical solution' to errors of the left hand-remained intact.

  1. Scaling Effects and Spatio-Temporal Multilevel Dynamics in Epileptic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are one of the most well-known dysfunctions of the nervous system. During a seizure, a highly synchronized behavior of neural activity is observed that can cause symptoms ranging from mild sensual malfunctions to the complete loss of body control. In this paper, we aim to contribute towards a better understanding of the dynamical systems phenomena that cause seizures. Based on data analysis and modelling, seizure dynamics can be identified to possess multiple spatial scales and on each spatial scale also multiple time scales. At each scale, we reach several novel insights. On the smallest spatial scale we consider single model neurons and investigate early-warning signs of spiking. This introduces the theory of critical transitions to excitable systems. For clusters of neurons (or neuronal regions) we use patient data and find oscillatory behavior and new scaling laws near the seizure onset. These scalings lead to substantiate the conjecture obtained from mean-field models that a Hopf bifurcation could be involved near seizure onset. On the largest spatial scale we introduce a measure based on phase-locking intervals and wavelets into seizure modelling. It is used to resolve synchronization between different regions in the brain and identifies time-shifted scaling laws at different wavelet scales. We also compare our wavelet-based multiscale approach with maximum linear cross-correlation and mean-phase coherence measures. PMID:22363431

  2. Clinical characteristics of epileptic seizures in a case of dihydropteridine reductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Furujo, Mahoko; Kinoshita, Masako; Ichiba, Yozo; Romstad, Anne; Shintaku, Haruo; Kubo, Toshihide

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the clinical characteristics and efficacy of neurotransmitters and levetiracetam in a patient with hyperphenylalaninemia due to dihydropteridine reductase (DHPR) deficiency who developed epileptic seizures. A boy with DHPR deficiency, who had been successfully treated with tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), levodopa, and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) since he was 2 months old, started having monthly episodes of blurred vision, loss of consciousness, and falls at the age of 12 years. He was taking BH4 510 mg/day, levodopa 670 mg/day, 5-HTP 670 mg/day, and entacapone 300 mg/day. We evaluated the seizure semiology, EEG findings, and efficacy of levodopa, 5-HTP, and levetiracetam (LEV). His seizures were comprised of an abrupt loss of awareness and eye deviation to the right. Interictal EEG showed slightly slow posterior-dominant rhythm in 7-8 Hz; intermittent, irregular slowing in the bilateral parieto-occipital region; and multiregional independent spikes in bilateral hemispheres. Ictal EEG showed a seizure pattern starting at the left temporal region. Brain MRI showed diffuse signal increase of deep white matter on T2-weighted and FLAIR images. Dosage increase of levodopa to 1340 mg/day, of 5-HTP to 1500 mg/day, or of both did not suppress seizures. Levetiracetam 2000 mg/day markedly reduced seizures without any adverse events. Patients with DHPR deficiency can develop epileptic seizures of partial onset which can be successfully and safely treated with LEV. PMID:25667865

  3. [Clinical symptomatology of epileptic seizures of temporal origin].

    PubMed

    Bancaud, J

    1987-01-01

    Many discrepancies still exist in the description of clinical symptoms and signs attributable to a paroxysmal disorganization of temporal structures. They result from various methodological appraisals of clinical, electrophysiological and neuroradiological data concerning partial epilepsies. However a study of anatomo-electroclinical correlations in temporal seizures yield an easy pattern when the methods of elaboration, the criteria of validity and their meaning are strictly defined. An analysis of temporal seizures, recorded, filmed and described clinically in 300 patients having had a pre-surgical SEEG examination is the basis of a proposed classification of their main clinical features. The structures supposed to be ictally disorganized are, for each category, as follows: simple and complex visual and auditory hallucinations and illusions are due to a discharge beginning in the temporal-occipital or superior (posterior or anterior) temporal cortex. Memory troubles like dreamy-state are due to a simultaneous impairment of some neo-cortical areas and of Ammon's horn. Instinctive-affective troubles, like genital and sexual signs, or symptoms, emotional, mood, affective troubles seem to be linked to discharges in hippocampal and juxta-insular, internal perisylvian areas. Autonomous (cardiac, digestive, etc.) troubles are linked to a disorganization of basal limbic structures and especially of the perisylvian cortex. Motor and verbal automatisms have different meanings: only chewing is due to a discharge in the amygdalian area and in its hypothalamic efferents. Cognitive impairment is difficult to classify.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Can hyper-synchrony in meditation lead to seizures? Similarities in meditative and epileptic brain states.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Shane

    2014-10-01

    Meditation is used worldwide by millions of people for relaxation and stress relief. Given sufficient practice, meditators may also experience a variety of altered states of consciousness. These states can lead to a variety of unusual experiences, including physical, emotional and psychic disturbances. This paper highlights the correspondences between brain states associated with these experiences and the symptoms and neurophysiology of epileptic simple partial seizures. Seizures, like meditation practice, can result in both positive and negative experiences. The neurophysiology and chemistry underlying simple partial seizures are characterised by a high degree of excitability and high levels of neuronal synchrony in gamma-band brain activity. Following a survey of the literature that shows that meditation practice is also linked to high power gamma activity, an account of how meditation could cause such activity is provided. This paper discusses the diagnostic challenges for the claim that meditation practices lead to brain states similar to those found in epileptic seizures, and seeks to develop our understanding of the range of pathological and non-pathological states that result from a hyper-excited and hyper-synchronous brain.

  5. Disinhibition-induced transitions between absence and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Fan, Denggui; Wang, Qingyun; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological experiments have long revealed the existence of two-way transitions between absence and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures in the cerebral cortex. Based on a modified spatially-extended Taylor &Baier neural field model, we here propose a computational framework to mathematically describe the transition dynamics between these epileptic seizures. We first demonstrate the existence of various transition types that are induced by disinhibitory functions between two inhibitory variables in an isolated Taylor &Baier model. Moreover, we show that these disinhibition-induced transitions can lead to stable tonic-clonic oscillations as well as periodic spike with slow-wave discharges, which are the hallmark of absence seizures. We also observe fascinating dynamical states, such as periodic 2-spike with slow-wave discharges, tonic death, bursting oscillations, as well as saturated firing. Most importantly, we identify paths that represent physiologically plausible transitions between absence and tonic-clonic seizures in the modified spatially-extended Taylor &Baier model. PMID:26224066

  6. Hidden pattern discovery on epileptic EEG with 1-D local binary patterns and epileptic seizures detection by grey relational analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Yılmaz

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach to detect epilepsy seizures by using Electroencephalography (EEG), which is one of the most common methods for the diagnosis of epilepsy, based on 1-Dimension Local Binary Pattern (1D-LBP) and grey relational analysis (GRA) methods. The main aim of this paper is to evaluate and validate a novel approach, which is a computer-based quantitative EEG analyzing method and based on grey systems, aimed to help decision-maker. In this study, 1D-LBP, which utilizes all data points, was employed for extracting features in raw EEG signals, Fisher score (FS) was employed to select the representative features, which can also be determined as hidden patterns. Additionally, GRA is performed to classify EEG signals through these Fisher scored features. The experimental results of the proposed approach, which was employed in a public dataset for validation, showed that it has a high accuracy in identifying epileptic EEG signals. For various combinations of epileptic EEG, such as A-E, B-E, C-E, D-E, and A-D clusters, 100, 96, 100, 99.00 and 100% were achieved, respectively. Also, this work presents an attempt to develop a new general-purpose hidden pattern determination scheme, which can be utilized for different categories of time-varying signals.

  7. Detection of epileptic seizure in EEG signals using linear least squares preprocessing.

    PubMed

    Roshan Zamir, Z

    2016-09-01

    An epileptic seizure is a transient event of abnormal excessive neuronal discharge in the brain. This unwanted event can be obstructed by detection of electrical changes in the brain that happen before the seizure takes place. The automatic detection of seizures is necessary since the visual screening of EEG recordings is a time consuming task and requires experts to improve the diagnosis. Much of the prior research in detection of seizures has been developed based on artificial neural network, genetic programming, and wavelet transforms. Although the highest achieved accuracy for classification is 100%, there are drawbacks, such as the existence of unbalanced datasets and the lack of investigations in performances consistency. To address these, four linear least squares-based preprocessing models are proposed to extract key features of an EEG signal in order to detect seizures. The first two models are newly developed. The original signal (EEG) is approximated by a sinusoidal curve. Its amplitude is formed by a polynomial function and compared with the predeveloped spline function. Different statistical measures, namely classification accuracy, true positive and negative rates, false positive and negative rates and precision, are utilised to assess the performance of the proposed models. These metrics are derived from confusion matrices obtained from classifiers. Different classifiers are used over the original dataset and the set of extracted features. The proposed models significantly reduce the dimension of the classification problem and the computational time while the classification accuracy is improved in most cases. The first and third models are promising feature extraction methods with the classification accuracy of 100%. Logistic, LazyIB1, LazyIB5, and J48 are the best classifiers. Their true positive and negative rates are 1 while false positive and negative rates are 0 and the corresponding precision values are 1. Numerical results suggest that these

  8. Detection of epileptic seizure in EEG signals using linear least squares preprocessing.

    PubMed

    Roshan Zamir, Z

    2016-09-01

    An epileptic seizure is a transient event of abnormal excessive neuronal discharge in the brain. This unwanted event can be obstructed by detection of electrical changes in the brain that happen before the seizure takes place. The automatic detection of seizures is necessary since the visual screening of EEG recordings is a time consuming task and requires experts to improve the diagnosis. Much of the prior research in detection of seizures has been developed based on artificial neural network, genetic programming, and wavelet transforms. Although the highest achieved accuracy for classification is 100%, there are drawbacks, such as the existence of unbalanced datasets and the lack of investigations in performances consistency. To address these, four linear least squares-based preprocessing models are proposed to extract key features of an EEG signal in order to detect seizures. The first two models are newly developed. The original signal (EEG) is approximated by a sinusoidal curve. Its amplitude is formed by a polynomial function and compared with the predeveloped spline function. Different statistical measures, namely classification accuracy, true positive and negative rates, false positive and negative rates and precision, are utilised to assess the performance of the proposed models. These metrics are derived from confusion matrices obtained from classifiers. Different classifiers are used over the original dataset and the set of extracted features. The proposed models significantly reduce the dimension of the classification problem and the computational time while the classification accuracy is improved in most cases. The first and third models are promising feature extraction methods with the classification accuracy of 100%. Logistic, LazyIB1, LazyIB5, and J48 are the best classifiers. Their true positive and negative rates are 1 while false positive and negative rates are 0 and the corresponding precision values are 1. Numerical results suggest that these

  9. Ecstatic Epileptic Seizures: A Glimpse into the Multiple Roles of the Insula

    PubMed Central

    Gschwind, Markus; Picard, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    Ecstatic epileptic seizures are a rare but compelling epileptic entity. During the first seconds of these seizures, ecstatic auras provoke feelings of well-being, intense serenity, bliss, and “enhanced self-awareness.” They are associated with the impression of time dilation, and can be described as a mystic experience by some patients. The functional neuroanatomy of ecstatic seizures is still debated. During recent years several patients presenting with ecstatic auras have been reported by others and us (in total n = 52); a few of them in the setting of presurgical evaluation including electrical brain stimulation. According to the recently recognized functions of the insula, and the results of nuclear brain imaging and electrical stimulation, the ecstatic symptoms in these patients seem to localize to a functional network centered around the anterior insular cortex, where we thus propose to locate this rare ictal phenomenon. Here we summarize the role of the multiple sensory, autonomic, affective, and cognitive functions of the insular cortex, which are integrated into the creation of self-awareness, and we suggest how this system may become dysfunctional on several levels during ecstatic aura. PMID:26924970

  10. Subclinical tonic-clonic epileptic seizure detected by an implantable loop recorder.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Ritsuko; Abe, Haruhiko; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tamura, Masahito; Takeuchi, Masaaki; Otsuji, Yutaka; Benditt, David G

    2013-01-01

    A 73-year old man received an implantable loop recorder (ILR) for the evaluation of transient loss of consciousness (TLOC) spells. His medical history was without any epileptic convulsions or automatism. ILR recording during a spontaneous episode revealed the presence of a regular, narrow QRS complex tachycardia associated with low-amplitude, high-frequency, continuous or discontinuous artifacts, consistent with myopotentials. During the event, the regular, low-amplitude continuous signals gradually became discontinuous, with a prolongation of the inter-signal cycle length, until their disappearance after manual activation of the ILR. The patient was diagnosed as experiencing subclinical tonic-clonic epileptic seizures. Antiepileptic drug treatment was initiated, and the patient has remained free of TLOC symptoms during 13 months follow-up. PMID:24097218

  11. The influence of hubs in the structure of a neuronal network during an epileptic seizure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Abner Cardoso; Cerdeira, Hilda A.; Machado, Birajara Soares

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we propose changes in the structure of a neuronal network with the intention to provoke strong synchronization to simulate episodes of epileptic seizure. Starting with a network of Izhikevich neurons we slowly increase the number of connections in selected nodes in a controlled way, to produce (or not) hubs. We study how these structures alter the synchronization on the spike firings interval, on individual neurons as well as on mean values, as a function of the concentration of connections for random and non-random (hubs) distribution. We also analyze how the post-ictal signal varies for the different distributions. We conclude that a network with hubs is more appropriate to represent an epileptic state.

  12. Ethical Dilemmas in Pediatric and Adolescent Psychogenic Non-Epileptic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Cristie M.; Falcone, Tatiana; Caplan, Rochelle; Timmons-Mitchell, Jane; Jares, Kristine; Ford, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    To date only a very narrow window of ethical dilemmas in psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) have been explored. Numerous distinct ethical dilemmas arise in diagnosing and treating pediatric and adolescent patients with PNES. Important ethical values at stake include trust, transparency, confidentiality, professionalism, autonomy of all stakeholders and justice. In order to further elucidate the ethical challenges in caring for this population, an ethical analysis of the special challenges faced in four specific domains is undertaken: (1) conducting and communicating a diagnosis of PNES; (2) advising patients about full transparency and disclosure to community including patients’ peers; (3) responding to requests to continue anti-epileptic drugs; and (4) managing challenges arising from school policy and procedure. An analysis of these ethical issues is essential for the advancement of best care practices that promote the overall well-being of patients and their families. PMID:25022823

  13. IPS Interest in the EEG of Patients after a Single Epileptic Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Mounach, Jamal; Satte, Amal; Ouhabi, Hamid; El Hessni, Aboubaker

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study aims to evaluate the incidence of pathological cerebral activity responses to intermittent rhythmic photic stimulation (IPS) after a single epileptic seizure. Patients and Methods. One hundred and thirty-seven EEGs were performed at the Neurophysiology Department of Mohamed V Teaching Military Hospital in Rabat. Clinical and EEG data was collected. Results. 9.5% of our patients had photoparoxysmal discharges (PPD). Incidence was higher in males than in females, but p value was not significant (p = 0.34), and it was higher in children compared to adults with significant p value (p = 0.08). The most epileptogenic frequencies were within the range 15–20 Hz. 63 patients had an EEG after 72 hours; among them 11 were photosensitive (p = 0.001). The frequency of the PPR was significantly higher in patients with generalized abnormalities than in focal abnormalities (p = 0.001). EEG confirmed a genetic generalized epilepsy in 8 cases among 13 photosensitive patients. Conclusion. PPR is age related. The frequencies within the range 15–20 Hz should inevitably be included in EEG protocols. The presence of PPR after a first seizure is probably more in favor of generalized seizure rather than the other type of seizure. PPR seems independent from the delay Seizure-EEG. Our study did not show an association between sex and photosensitivity.

  14. An Automatic Prediction of Epileptic Seizures Using Cloud Computing and Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Sanjay; Sood, Sandeep K; Gupta, Sunil Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders which is characterized by the spontaneous and unforeseeable occurrence of seizures. An automatic prediction of seizure can protect the patients from accidents and save their life. In this article, we proposed a mobile-based framework that automatically predict seizures using the information contained in electroencephalography (EEG) signals. The wireless sensor technology is used to capture the EEG signals of patients. The cloud-based services are used to collect and analyze the EEG data from the patient's mobile phone. The features from the EEG signal are extracted using the fast Walsh-Hadamard transform (FWHT). The Higher Order Spectral Analysis (HOSA) is applied to FWHT coefficients in order to select the features set relevant to normal, preictal and ictal states of seizure. We subsequently exploit the selected features as input to a k-means classifier to detect epileptic seizure states in a reasonable time. The performance of the proposed model is tested on Amazon EC2 cloud and compared in terms of execution time and accuracy. The findings show that with selected HOS based features, we were able to achieve a classification accuracy of 94.6 %.

  15. An Automatic Prediction of Epileptic Seizures Using Cloud Computing and Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Sanjay; Sood, Sandeep K; Gupta, Sunil Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders which is characterized by the spontaneous and unforeseeable occurrence of seizures. An automatic prediction of seizure can protect the patients from accidents and save their life. In this article, we proposed a mobile-based framework that automatically predict seizures using the information contained in electroencephalography (EEG) signals. The wireless sensor technology is used to capture the EEG signals of patients. The cloud-based services are used to collect and analyze the EEG data from the patient's mobile phone. The features from the EEG signal are extracted using the fast Walsh-Hadamard transform (FWHT). The Higher Order Spectral Analysis (HOSA) is applied to FWHT coefficients in order to select the features set relevant to normal, preictal and ictal states of seizure. We subsequently exploit the selected features as input to a k-means classifier to detect epileptic seizure states in a reasonable time. The performance of the proposed model is tested on Amazon EC2 cloud and compared in terms of execution time and accuracy. The findings show that with selected HOS based features, we were able to achieve a classification accuracy of 94.6 %. PMID:27628727

  16. IPS Interest in the EEG of Patients after a Single Epileptic Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Mounach, Jamal; Satte, Amal; Ouhabi, Hamid; El Hessni, Aboubaker

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study aims to evaluate the incidence of pathological cerebral activity responses to intermittent rhythmic photic stimulation (IPS) after a single epileptic seizure. Patients and Methods. One hundred and thirty-seven EEGs were performed at the Neurophysiology Department of Mohamed V Teaching Military Hospital in Rabat. Clinical and EEG data was collected. Results. 9.5% of our patients had photoparoxysmal discharges (PPD). Incidence was higher in males than in females, but p value was not significant (p = 0.34), and it was higher in children compared to adults with significant p value (p = 0.08). The most epileptogenic frequencies were within the range 15–20 Hz. 63 patients had an EEG after 72 hours; among them 11 were photosensitive (p = 0.001). The frequency of the PPR was significantly higher in patients with generalized abnormalities than in focal abnormalities (p = 0.001). EEG confirmed a genetic generalized epilepsy in 8 cases among 13 photosensitive patients. Conclusion. PPR is age related. The frequencies within the range 15–20 Hz should inevitably be included in EEG protocols. The presence of PPR after a first seizure is probably more in favor of generalized seizure rather than the other type of seizure. PPR seems independent from the delay Seizure-EEG. Our study did not show an association between sex and photosensitivity. PMID:27635393

  17. IPS Interest in the EEG of Patients after a Single Epileptic Seizure.

    PubMed

    Taoufiqi, Fatima Zahra; Mounach, Jamal; Satte, Amal; Ouhabi, Hamid; El Hessni, Aboubaker

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study aims to evaluate the incidence of pathological cerebral activity responses to intermittent rhythmic photic stimulation (IPS) after a single epileptic seizure. Patients and Methods. One hundred and thirty-seven EEGs were performed at the Neurophysiology Department of Mohamed V Teaching Military Hospital in Rabat. Clinical and EEG data was collected. Results. 9.5% of our patients had photoparoxysmal discharges (PPD). Incidence was higher in males than in females, but p value was not significant (p = 0.34), and it was higher in children compared to adults with significant p value (p = 0.08). The most epileptogenic frequencies were within the range 15-20 Hz. 63 patients had an EEG after 72 hours; among them 11 were photosensitive (p = 0.001). The frequency of the PPR was significantly higher in patients with generalized abnormalities than in focal abnormalities (p = 0.001). EEG confirmed a genetic generalized epilepsy in 8 cases among 13 photosensitive patients. Conclusion. PPR is age related. The frequencies within the range 15-20 Hz should inevitably be included in EEG protocols. The presence of PPR after a first seizure is probably more in favor of generalized seizure rather than the other type of seizure. PPR seems independent from the delay Seizure-EEG. Our study did not show an association between sex and photosensitivity. PMID:27635393

  18. Glatiramer acetate, an anti-demyelination drug, reduced rats' epileptic seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol via protection of myelin sheath.

    PubMed

    You, Yu; Zhao, Yaqun; Bai, Hui; Liu, Zhiliang; Meng, Fanxin; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Ruxiang

    2013-06-14

    Glatiramer acetate (GA) is a clinically prescribed immunomodulator drug used to treat demyelinating disease like multiple sclerosis (MS). Persistent down-regulation in the expression of myelin sheath proteins has been observed in both rats with pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) induced chronic epilepsy and some clinical epilepsy patients. Hypothetically, protection of myelin sheath by pharmaceutical means in the process of epilepsy might, to some extent, be helpful to control epileptic seizures. Therefore, we tried to use GA to treat PTZ-induced epilepsy rats. GA treatment successfully protected rats' myelin sheath from demyelination in the process of PTZ-induced epileptic seizures. Notably, electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring demonstrated that GA-treated epilepsy rats showed significantly lowered epileptiform discharges. Correspondingly, behavioral recording showed reduced frequency of seizures in GA-treated epilepsy rats. The results indicate that epilepsy associated demyelination may be a contributing factor in seizures behavior, and early intervention with anti-demyelination drugs may be beneficial to reduce the severity of seizures behavior.

  19. Anti-Taenia solium larval stage Ig G antibodies in patients with epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Parija, Subhash Chandra; Raman, Gireesh A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cysticercosis is the most common differential diagnosis for epilepsy. The present study was carried out to assess the serological response among patients with epileptic seizures visiting JIPMER Hospital Puducherry. Materials and Methods: A total of 934 serum samples were collected from patients with epileptic seizures. A standardized questionnaire was designed to obtain information on the demographic, socioeconomic, environmental, and behavioral characteristics related to the transmission of infection. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect the anti-Taenia solium larval stage IgG antibodies. Samples found reactive and inconclusive by ELISA were further tested by the enzyme immunotransfer blot (EITB). Results: The frequency of antibodies in the serum samples of the above-mentioned population was 16.2% by EITB. Anti-Taenia solium larval stage antibodies were detected in serum samples of 163 patients, out of which 27 (16.56%) patients belonged to the 0 – 15-year age group, 82 (50.30%) patients were in the 16 – 40-year age group, and 52 (31.90%) patients were above 41 years, respectively. Although the sera from males had higher OD values than those from females, the difference was not statistically significant. Out of 163 seropositive by ELISA, 152 (93.25%) were found to be positive by EITB. Out of the 152, 61 (40.13%) were farmers and 79 (51.97%) were office or factory workers. Conclusions: In conclusion, the results indicate a probable endemic situation and a high prevalence of cysticercosis in patients with epileptic seizures. Living in poor sanitary conditions seems to be an important factor related to human cysticercosis in Puducherry and the neighboring districts of Tamil Nadu. PMID:23508037

  20. Brain network dynamics characterization in epileptic seizures. Joint directed graph and pairwise synchronization measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, A. C.; Machado, B. S.; Florence, G.; Hamad, A. P.; Sakamoto, A. C.; Fujita, A.; Baccalá, L. A.; Amaro, E.; Sameshima, K.

    2014-12-01

    Here we propose and evaluate a new approach to analyse multichannel mesial temporal lobe epilepsy EEG data from eight patients through complex network and synchronization theories. The method employs a Granger causality test to infer the directed connectivity graphs and a wavelet transform based phase synchronization measure whose characteristics allow studying dynamical transitions during epileptic seizures. We present a new combined graph measure that quantifies the level of network hub formation, called network hub out-degree, which closely reflects the level of synchronization observed during the ictus.

  1. Monitoring changing dynamics with correlation integrals: Case study of an epileptic seizure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, David E.

    We describe a procedure (and the motivation behind it) which rapidly and accurately tracks the onset and progress of an epileptic seizure. Roughly speaking, one monitors changes in the relative dispersion of a re-embedded time series. The results are robust with respect to variation of adjustable parameters such as embedding dimension, lag time, and critical distances. Moreover, the general method is virtually unaffected when the data are significantly corrupted by external noise. When the information computed for the individual channels is displayed in an appropriate space-time plot, the progress and geometric location of the seizure are easily seen. An interpretation of these results in terms of a cloud of particles moving in an abstract phase space is examined.

  2. A two-state Markov mixture model for a time series of epileptic seizure counts.

    PubMed

    Albert, P S

    1991-12-01

    This paper discusses a model for a time series of epileptic seizure counts in which the mean of a Poisson distribution changes according to an underlying two-state Markov chain. The EM algorithm (Dempster, Laird, and Rubin, 1977, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series B 39, 1-38) is used to compute maximum likelihood estimators for the parameters of this two-state mixture model and extensions are made allowing for nonstationarity. The model is illustrated using daily seizure counts for patients with intractable epilepsy and results are compared with a simple Poisson distribution and Poisson regressions. Some simulation results are also presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this model. PMID:1786324

  3. Epileptic Seizure Detection with Log-Euclidean Gaussian Kernel-Based Sparse Representation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shasha; Zhou, Weidong; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Yanli

    2016-05-01

    Epileptic seizure detection plays an important role in the diagnosis of epilepsy and reducing the massive workload of reviewing electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. In this work, a novel algorithm is developed to detect seizures employing log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based sparse representation (SR) in long-term EEG recordings. Unlike the traditional SR for vector data in Euclidean space, the log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based SR framework is proposed for seizure detection in the space of the symmetric positive definite (SPD) matrices, which form a Riemannian manifold. Since the Riemannian manifold is nonlinear, the log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel function is applied to embed it into a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) for performing SR. The EEG signals of all channels are divided into epochs and the SPD matrices representing EEG epochs are generated by covariance descriptors. Then, the testing samples are sparsely coded over the dictionary composed by training samples utilizing log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based SR. The classification of testing samples is achieved by computing the minimal reconstructed residuals. The proposed method is evaluated on the Freiburg EEG dataset of 21 patients and shows its notable performance on both epoch-based and event-based assessments. Moreover, this method handles multiple channels of EEG recordings synchronously which is more speedy and efficient than traditional seizure detection methods.

  4. Effect of baicalin on hippocampal damage in kainic acid-induced epileptic mice

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zheng-Jian; Liang, Ri-Sheng; Shi, Song-Sheng; Wang, Chun-Hua; Yang, Wei-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of baicalin on the expression of miR-497 and its target B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) in the hippocampus of kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptic mice. To establish status epilepticus (SE), 0.1 µg/5 µl KA was injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle in mice, which then received an intraperitoneal injection of baicalin (100 mg/kg) after 1 and 8 h. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to observe the pathological changes in morphology and neuronal apoptosis was determined by terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling staining. Western blot analysis was used to detect the expression of Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 proteins in the hippocampus, while reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify hippocampal miR-497 expression. The results showed that baicalin significantly attenuated neuronal damage and apoptosis in the hippocampus 72 h after SE. In addition, baicalin decreased SE-induced expression of miR-497 and cleaved caspase-3 protein, while upregulating the expression of Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, the present results suggest that baicalin possesses potent antiapoptotic properties and attenuates hippocampal injury in mice after SE, which may be associated with the downregulation of miR-497 and cleaved caspase-3 and the upregulation of Bcl-2. PMID:27588062

  5. All together now: Analogies between chimera state collapses and epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Andrzejak, Ralph G; Rummel, Christian; Mormann, Florian; Schindler, Kaspar

    2016-01-01

    Conceptually and structurally simple mathematical models of coupled oscillator networks can show a rich variety of complex dynamics, providing fundamental insights into many real-world phenomena. A recent and not yet fully understood example is the collapse of coexisting synchronous and asynchronous oscillations into a globally synchronous motion found in networks of identical oscillators. Here we show that this sudden collapse is promoted by a further decrease of synchronization, rather than by critically high synchronization. This strikingly counterintuitive mechanism can be found also in nature, as we demonstrate on epileptic seizures in humans. Analyzing spatiotemporal correlation profiles derived from intracranial electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) of seizures in epilepsy patients, we found a pronounced decrease of correlation at the seizure onsets. Applying our findings in a closed-loop control scheme to models of coupled oscillators in chimera states, we succeed in both provoking and preventing outbreaks of global synchronization. Our findings not only advance the understanding of networks of coupled dynamics but can open new ways to control them, thus offering a vast range of potential new applications.

  6. All together now: Analogies between chimera state collapses and epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Rummel, Christian; Mormann, Florian; Schindler, Kaspar

    2016-01-01

    Conceptually and structurally simple mathematical models of coupled oscillator networks can show a rich variety of complex dynamics, providing fundamental insights into many real-world phenomena. A recent and not yet fully understood example is the collapse of coexisting synchronous and asynchronous oscillations into a globally synchronous motion found in networks of identical oscillators. Here we show that this sudden collapse is promoted by a further decrease of synchronization, rather than by critically high synchronization. This strikingly counterintuitive mechanism can be found also in nature, as we demonstrate on epileptic seizures in humans. Analyzing spatiotemporal correlation profiles derived from intracranial electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) of seizures in epilepsy patients, we found a pronounced decrease of correlation at the seizure onsets. Applying our findings in a closed-loop control scheme to models of coupled oscillators in chimera states, we succeed in both provoking and preventing outbreaks of global synchronization. Our findings not only advance the understanding of networks of coupled dynamics but can open new ways to control them, thus offering a vast range of potential new applications. PMID:26957324

  7. All together now: Analogies between chimera state collapses and epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Rummel, Christian; Mormann, Florian; Schindler, Kaspar

    2016-03-01

    Conceptually and structurally simple mathematical models of coupled oscillator networks can show a rich variety of complex dynamics, providing fundamental insights into many real-world phenomena. A recent and not yet fully understood example is the collapse of coexisting synchronous and asynchronous oscillations into a globally synchronous motion found in networks of identical oscillators. Here we show that this sudden collapse is promoted by a further decrease of synchronization, rather than by critically high synchronization. This strikingly counterintuitive mechanism can be found also in nature, as we demonstrate on epileptic seizures in humans. Analyzing spatiotemporal correlation profiles derived from intracranial electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) of seizures in epilepsy patients, we found a pronounced decrease of correlation at the seizure onsets. Applying our findings in a closed-loop control scheme to models of coupled oscillators in chimera states, we succeed in both provoking and preventing outbreaks of global synchronization. Our findings not only advance the understanding of networks of coupled dynamics but can open new ways to control them, thus offering a vast range of potential new applications.

  8. Chronic Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation Protects Against Seizures, Cognitive Impairments, Hippocampal Apoptosis, and Inflammatory Responses in Epileptic Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian-Qian; Zhu, Li-Jun; Wang, Xian-Hong; Zuo, Jian; He, Hui-Yan; Tian, Miao-Miao; Wang, Lei; Liang, Gui-Ling; Wang, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) has recently been demonstrated effective in the treatment of epilepsy and mood disorders. Here, we aim to determine the effects of TNS on epileptogenesis, cognitive function, and the associated hippocampal apoptosis and inflammatory responses. Rats were injected with pilocarpine to produce status epilepticus (SE) and the following chronic epilepsy. After SE induction, TNS treatment was conducted for 4 consecutive weeks. A pilocarpine re-injection was then used to induce a seizure in the epileptic rats. The hippocampal neuronal apoptosis induced by seizure was assessed by TUNEL staining and inflammatory responses by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The spontaneous recurrent seizure (SRS) number was counted through video monitoring, and the cognitive function assessed through Morris Water Maze (MWM) test. TNS treatment attenuated the SRS attacks and improved the cognitive impairment in epileptic rats. A pilocarpine re-injection resulted in less hippocampal neuronal apoptosis and reduced level of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and microglial activation in epileptic rats with TNS treatment in comparison to the epileptic rats without TNS treatment. It is concluded that TNS treatment shortly after SE not only protected against the chronic spontaneous seizures but also improved cognitive impairments. These antiepileptic properties of TNS may be related to its attenuating effects on hippocampal apoptosis and pro-inflammatory responses.

  9. Ngram-Derived Pattern Recognition for the Detection and Prediction of Epileptic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Amir; Juffali, Walid; El-Imad, Jamil; Constandinou, Timothy G.; Toumazou, Christofer

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a new method that combines symbol dynamics methodologies with an Ngram algorithm for the detection and prediction of epileptic seizures. The presented approach specifically applies Ngram-based pattern recognition, after data pre-processing, with similarity metrics, including the Hamming distance and Needlman-Wunsch algorithm, for identifying unique patterns within epochs of time. Pattern counts within each epoch are used as measures to determine seizure detection and prediction markers. Using 623 hours of intracranial electrocorticogram recordings from 21 patients containing a total of 87 seizures, the sensitivity and false prediction/detection rates of this method are quantified. Results are quantified using individual seizures within each case for training of thresholds and prediction time windows. The statistical significance of the predictive power is further investigated. We show that the method presented herein, has significant predictive power in up to 100% of temporal lobe cases, with sensitivities of up to 70–100% and low false predictions (dependant on training procedure). The cases of highest false predictions are found in the frontal origin with 0.31–0.61 false predictions per hour and with significance in 18 out of 21 cases. On average, a prediction sensitivity of 93.81% and false prediction rate of approximately 0.06 false predictions per hour are achieved in the best case scenario. This compares to previous work utilising the same data set that has shown sensitivities of up to 40–50% for a false prediction rate of less than 0.15/hour. PMID:24886714

  10. Atlanto axial rotatory dislocation in adults: a rare complication of an epileptic seizure--case report.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Roberto; Donnarumma, Pasquale; Marotta, Nicola; Missori, Paolo; Viozzi, Ilaria; Landi, Alessandro; Delfini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Atlanto Axial Rotatory Dislocations (AARDs) are a heterogeneous group of post-traumatic pathologies typical of the pediatric age, and rare in adults. We describe the case of a 34-year-old woman, developing Atlanto Axial Rotatory Fixation (AARF) after a generalized tonic-clonic epileptic seizure, an extremely rare traumatic cause never described in literature. AARF was detected only 1 month after the accident and nonsurgical treatment was attempted at the beginning. The patient underwent surgery only 2 months after the accident. The best treatment should be conservative reduction within 1 month; when it is not possible, it is advisable to perform surgery as soon as possible. C1-C2 fixation with Harm's technique is the gold standard for fixed luxations. Delay of treatment makes intraoperative reduction more difficult and increase the establishment of the chronic permanent change of neck muscles and ligaments.

  11. An 81.6 μW FastICA processor for epileptic seizure detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chia-Hsiang; Shih, Yi-Hsin; Chiueh, Herming

    2015-02-01

    To improve the performance of epileptic seizure detection, independent component analysis (ICA) is applied to multi-channel signals to separate artifacts and signals of interest. FastICA is an efficient algorithm to compute ICA. To reduce the energy dissipation, eigenvalue decomposition (EVD) is utilized in the preprocessing stage to reduce the convergence time of iterative calculation of ICA components. EVD is computed efficiently through an array structure of processing elements running in parallel. Area-efficient EVD architecture is realized by leveraging the approximate Jacobi algorithm, leading to a 77.2% area reduction. By choosing proper memory element and reduced wordlength, the power and area of storage memory are reduced by 95.6% and 51.7%, respectively. The chip area is minimized through fixed-point implementation and architectural transformations. Given a latency constraint of 0.1 s, an 86.5% area reduction is achieved compared to the direct-mapped architecture. Fabricated in 90 nm CMOS, the core area of the chip is 0.40 mm(2). The FastICA processor, part of an integrated epileptic control SoC, dissipates 81.6 μW at 0.32 V. The computation delay of a frame of 256 samples for 8 channels is 84.2 ms. Compared to prior work, 0.5% power dissipation, 26.7% silicon area, and 3.4 × computation speedup are achieved. The performance of the chip was verified by human dataset.

  12. Effects of A1 receptor agonist/antagonist on spontaneous seizures in pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Beatriz Oliveira; Hamani, Clement; Ferreira, Elenn; Miranda, Maísa Ferreira; Fernandes, Maria José S; Rodrigues, Antonio M; de Almeida, Antônio-Carlos G; Covolan, Luciene

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous anticonvulsant that activates pre- and postsynaptic adenosine A1 receptors. A1 receptor agonists increase the latency for the development of seizures and status epilepticus following pilocarpine administration. Although hippocampal adenosine is increased in the chronic phase of the pilocarpine model, it is not known whether the modulation of A1 receptors may influence the frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS). Here, we tested the hypothesis that the A1 receptor agonist RPia ([R]-N-phenylisopropyladenosine) and the A1 antagonist DPCPX (8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine) administered to chronic pilocarpine epileptic rats would respectively decrease and increase the frequency of SRS and hippocampal excitability. Four months after Pilo-induced SE, chronic epileptic rats were video-monitored for the recording of SRS before (basal) and after a 2-week treatment with RPia (25μg/kg) or DPCPX (50μg/kg). Following sacrifice, brain slices were studied with electrophysiology. We found that rats given RPia had a 93% nonsignificant reduction in the frequency of seizures compared with their own pretreatment baseline. In contrast, the administration of DPCPX resulted in an 87% significant increase in seizure rate. Nontreated epileptic rats had a similar frequency of seizures along the study. Corroborating our behavioral data, in vitro recordings showed that slices from animals previously given DPCPX had a shorter latency to develop epileptiform activity, longer and higher DC shifts, and higher spike amplitude compared with slices from nontreated Pilo controls. In contrast, smaller spike amplitude was recorded in slices from animals given RPia. In summary, the administration of A1 agonists reduced hippocampal excitability but not the frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures in chronic epileptic rats, whereas A1 receptor antagonists increased both.

  13. Effects of A1 receptor agonist/antagonist on spontaneous seizures in pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Beatriz Oliveira; Hamani, Clement; Ferreira, Elenn; Miranda, Maísa Ferreira; Fernandes, Maria José S; Rodrigues, Antonio M; de Almeida, Antônio-Carlos G; Covolan, Luciene

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous anticonvulsant that activates pre- and postsynaptic adenosine A1 receptors. A1 receptor agonists increase the latency for the development of seizures and status epilepticus following pilocarpine administration. Although hippocampal adenosine is increased in the chronic phase of the pilocarpine model, it is not known whether the modulation of A1 receptors may influence the frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS). Here, we tested the hypothesis that the A1 receptor agonist RPia ([R]-N-phenylisopropyladenosine) and the A1 antagonist DPCPX (8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine) administered to chronic pilocarpine epileptic rats would respectively decrease and increase the frequency of SRS and hippocampal excitability. Four months after Pilo-induced SE, chronic epileptic rats were video-monitored for the recording of SRS before (basal) and after a 2-week treatment with RPia (25μg/kg) or DPCPX (50μg/kg). Following sacrifice, brain slices were studied with electrophysiology. We found that rats given RPia had a 93% nonsignificant reduction in the frequency of seizures compared with their own pretreatment baseline. In contrast, the administration of DPCPX resulted in an 87% significant increase in seizure rate. Nontreated epileptic rats had a similar frequency of seizures along the study. Corroborating our behavioral data, in vitro recordings showed that slices from animals previously given DPCPX had a shorter latency to develop epileptiform activity, longer and higher DC shifts, and higher spike amplitude compared with slices from nontreated Pilo controls. In contrast, smaller spike amplitude was recorded in slices from animals given RPia. In summary, the administration of A1 agonists reduced hippocampal excitability but not the frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures in chronic epileptic rats, whereas A1 receptor antagonists increased both. PMID:27371881

  14. Failure of adaptive self-organized criticality during epileptic seizure attacks.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Christian; Storch, Alexander; Hallmeyer-Elgner, Susanne; Bullmore, Ed; Gross, Thilo

    2012-01-01

    Critical dynamics are assumed to be an attractive mode for normal brain functioning as information processing and computational capabilities are found to be optimal in the critical state. Recent experimental observations of neuronal activity patterns following power-law distributions, a hallmark of systems at a critical state, have led to the hypothesis that human brain dynamics could be poised at a phase transition between ordered and disordered activity. A so far unresolved question concerns the medical significance of critical brain activity and how it relates to pathological conditions. Using data from invasive electroencephalogram recordings from humans we show that during epileptic seizure attacks neuronal activity patterns deviate from the normally observed power-law distribution characterizing critical dynamics. The comparison of these observations to results from a computational model exhibiting self-organized criticality (SOC) based on adaptive networks allows further insights into the underlying dynamics. Together these results suggest that brain dynamics deviates from criticality during seizures caused by the failure of adaptive SOC.

  15. Hardware for seizure prediction: towards wearable devices to support epileptic people.

    PubMed

    Castellaro, Cipriano; Favaro, Gianpietro; Salemi, Giovanni; Sarto, Matteo; Rizzo, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the hardware developed for the EPILEPSIAE project (www.epilepsiae.eu), focused on epileptic seizure prediction. A portable low power acquisition system for EEG signals, called LTM-EU (Long Term Monitoring), with 64 channels and 2048 Hz sampling rate each and a safe (high isolation) PC interface on a PCIe bus specifically designed for this task, is described. The acquisition system, designed for a rapid commercialization, though used for research purposes, got the CE certification. The signal from the patient, on each channel, is amplified, converted in digital form and stored into a local flash memory (SD-MMC, 4 GB). Data are then formatted into a serial stream at 4 Mb/s and sent through a half-duplex RS485 link to the host where a specifically designed PCIe (BQPCIe) interface receive them and release the information to the OS (Windows or Linux). The amplifier runs with a couple of AA battery for more than 15 hours (300 mW). If a wireless link is established (Bluetooth), a bandwidth limited stream of data (or a subset of channels) is sent for monitoring purposes. The mission is to support the researchers of the consortium with a suitable hardware to have a real time seizure prediction system for algorithms tests. In the experimental phase all algorithms run on a portable PC, wire or wireless connected to the acquisition system. PMID:22254635

  16. Absence of an effect of aspartame on seizures induced by electroshock in epileptic and non-epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Jobe, P C; Lasley, S M; Burger, R L; Bettendorf, A F; Mishra, P K; Dailey, J W

    1992-06-01

    Seizure facilitation has been proposed as a possible adverse effect of dietary consumption of aspartame. The conversion of this sweetener to phenylalanine and aspartate in the gastrointestinal tract, and subsequent absorption, elevates plasma levels of these two amino acids. Absorbed phenylalanine competes with other large neutral amino acids, including tyrosine and tryptophan, for transport into brain. Theoretically, this competition might reduce brain tyrosine and tryptophan which could decrease synthesis of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin. Diminished synaptic release of these monoaminergic neurotransmitters facilitates seizures in many seizure models. Our present study evaluates effects of oral aspartame on amino acids and electroshock seizures in normal and seizure predisposed rats. Heroic doses of aspartame produced predićtable changes in plasma amino acids. However, none of the aspartame doses altered seizure indices. We conclude that aspartame does not alter maximal electroshock seizures in normal rats or in rats predisposed to seizures.

  17. Epileptic Seizure Prediction based on Ratio and Differential Linear Univariate Features

    PubMed Central

    Rasekhi, Jalil; Mollaei, Mohammad Reza Karami; Bandarabadi, Mojtaba; Teixeira, César A.; Dourado, António

    2015-01-01

    Bivariate features, obtained from multichannel electroencephalogram recordings, quantify the relation between different brain regions. Studies based on bivariate features have shown optimistic results for tackling epileptic seizure prediction problem in patients suffering from refractory epilepsy. A new bivariate approach using univariate features is proposed here. Differences and ratios of 22 linear univariate features were calculated using pairwise combination of 6 electroencephalograms channels, to create 330 differential, and 330 relative features. The feature subsets were classified using support vector machines separately, as one of the two classes of preictal and nonpreictal. Furthermore, minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance feature reduction method is employed to improve the predictions and reduce the number of false alarms. The studies were carried out on features obtained from 10 patients. For reduced subset of 30 features and using differential approach, the seizures were on average predicted in 60.9% of the cases (28 out of 46 in 737.9 h of test data), with a low false prediction rate of 0.11 h−1. Results of bivariate approaches were compared with those achieved from original linear univariate features, extracted from 6 channels. The advantage of proposed bivariate features is the smaller number of false predictions in comparison to the original 22 univariate features. In addition, reduction in feature dimension could provide a less complex and the more cost-effective algorithm. Results indicate that applying machine learning methods on a multidimensional feature space resulting from relative/differential pairwise combination of 22 univariate features could predict seizure onsets with high performance. PMID:25709936

  18. Three-dimensional optical tomographic brain imaging during kainic-acid-induced seizures in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluestone, Avraham Y.; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Hielscher, Andreas H.; Stewart, Mark

    2005-04-01

    In this study, we explored the potential of diffuse optical tomography for brain oximetry and describe our efforts towards imaging hemodynamic changes in rat brains during kainic-acid (KA) induced seizures. Using electrophysiological techniques we first showed that KA induces a pronounced transient hypotension in urethane anesthetized rats that is coincident with seizure activity beginning in ventral and spreading to dorsal hippocampus. We observed sustained increases in vagus and sympathetic activity during generalized limbic seizure activity, which alters blood pressure regulation and heart rhythms. Subsequently, we used optical tomographic methods to study KA induced seizures in anesthetized animals to better define the hemodynamic cerebral vascular response. We observed a lateralized increase in deoxyhemoglobin after KA injection at the time when the blood pressure (BP) was decreased. By contrast, injection of phenylephrine produced a symmetric global increase in total hemoglobin. These findings indicate that our instrument is sensitive to the local hemodynamics, both in response to a global increase in blood pressure (phenylephrine injection) and a lateralized decrease in oxyhemoglobin produced by an asymmetric response to KA; a response that may be critically important for severe autonomic nervous system alterations during seizures. The results of this study provide the impetus for combining complimentary modalities, imaging and electrophysiological, to ultimately gain a better understanding of the underlying physiology of seizure activity in the rat.

  19. Neuroprotective effects of trans-caryophyllene against kainic acid induced seizure activity and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Song, Zhi; Liao, Daguang; Zhang, Tianyi; Liu, Feng; Zhuang, Kai; Luo, Kui; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Trans-caryophyllene (TC), a component of essential oil found in many flowering plants, has shown its neuroprotective effects in various neurological disorders. However, the effects of TC on epilepsy haven't been reported before. In this study, we investigated the effect of TC on kainic acid-induced seizure activity caused by oxidative stress and pro-inflammation. We found that TC pretreatment significantly decreased seizure activity score compared to kainic acid treated group. Importantly, TC pretreatment leads to lowering the mortality in kainic acid treated mice. In addition, TC was found to significantly inhibit KA-induced generation of malondialdehyde. TC pretreatment also preserved the activity of GPx, SOD, and CAT. Notably, our data shows that an important property of TC is its capacity to exert cerebral anti-inflammatory effects by mitigating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β. These data suggest that TC has a potential protective effect on chemical induced seizure and brain damage. PMID:25417010

  20. Large-scale modeling of epileptic seizures: scaling properties of two parallel neuronal network simulation algorithms.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Lorenzo L; Lee, Hyong C; Hereld, Mark; Visser, Sid; Stevens, Rick L; Wildeman, Albert; van Drongelen, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Our limited understanding of the relationship between the behavior of individual neurons and large neuronal networks is an important limitation in current epilepsy research and may be one of the main causes of our inadequate ability to treat it. Addressing this problem directly via experiments is impossibly complex; thus, we have been developing and studying medium-large-scale simulations of detailed neuronal networks to guide us. Flexibility in the connection schemas and a complete description of the cortical tissue seem necessary for this purpose. In this paper we examine some of the basic issues encountered in these multiscale simulations. We have determined the detailed behavior of two such simulators on parallel computer systems. The observed memory and computation-time scaling behavior for a distributed memory implementation were very good over the range studied, both in terms of network sizes (2,000 to 400,000 neurons) and processor pool sizes (1 to 256 processors). Our simulations required between a few megabytes and about 150 gigabytes of RAM and lasted between a few minutes and about a week, well within the capability of most multinode clusters. Therefore, simulations of epileptic seizures on networks with millions of cells should be feasible on current supercomputers. PMID:24416069

  1. Large-scale modeling of epileptic seizures: scaling properties of two parallel neuronal network simulation algorithms.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Lorenzo L; Lee, Hyong C; Hereld, Mark; Visser, Sid; Stevens, Rick L; Wildeman, Albert; van Drongelen, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Our limited understanding of the relationship between the behavior of individual neurons and large neuronal networks is an important limitation in current epilepsy research and may be one of the main causes of our inadequate ability to treat it. Addressing this problem directly via experiments is impossibly complex; thus, we have been developing and studying medium-large-scale simulations of detailed neuronal networks to guide us. Flexibility in the connection schemas and a complete description of the cortical tissue seem necessary for this purpose. In this paper we examine some of the basic issues encountered in these multiscale simulations. We have determined the detailed behavior of two such simulators on parallel computer systems. The observed memory and computation-time scaling behavior for a distributed memory implementation were very good over the range studied, both in terms of network sizes (2,000 to 400,000 neurons) and processor pool sizes (1 to 256 processors). Our simulations required between a few megabytes and about 150 gigabytes of RAM and lasted between a few minutes and about a week, well within the capability of most multinode clusters. Therefore, simulations of epileptic seizures on networks with millions of cells should be feasible on current supercomputers.

  2. Nav1.1 modulation by a novel triazole compound attenuates epileptic seizures in rodents.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, John; Dutton, Stacey; Diaz-Bustamante, Marcelo; McPherson, Annie; Olivares, Nicolas; Kalia, Jeet; Escayg, Andrew; Bosmans, Frank

    2014-05-16

    Here, we report the discovery of a novel anticonvulsant drug with a molecular organization based on the unique scaffold of rufinamide, an anti-epileptic compound used in a clinical setting to treat severe epilepsy disorders such as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Although accumulating evidence supports a working mechanism through voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels, we found that a clinically relevant rufinamide concentration inhibits human (h)Nav1.1 activation, a distinct working mechanism among anticonvulsants and a feature worth exploring for treating a growing number of debilitating disorders involving hNav1.1. Subsequent structure-activity relationship experiments with related N-benzyl triazole compounds on four brain hNav channel isoforms revealed a novel drug variant that (1) shifts hNav1.1 opening to more depolarized voltages without further alterations in the gating properties of hNav1.1, hNav1.2, hNav1.3, and hNav1.6; (2) increases the threshold to action potential initiation in hippocampal neurons; and (3) greatly reduces the frequency of seizures in three animal models. Altogether, our results provide novel molecular insights into the rational development of Nav channel-targeting molecules based on the unique rufinamide scaffold, an outcome that may be exploited to design drugs for treating disorders involving particular Nav channel isoforms while limiting adverse effects. PMID:24635129

  3. Nav1.1 Modulation by a Novel Triazole Compound Attenuates Epileptic Seizures in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the discovery of a novel anticonvulsant drug with a molecular organization based on the unique scaffold of rufinamide, an anti-epileptic compound used in a clinical setting to treat severe epilepsy disorders such as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Although accumulating evidence supports a working mechanism through voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels, we found that a clinically relevant rufinamide concentration inhibits human (h)Nav1.1 activation, a distinct working mechanism among anticonvulsants and a feature worth exploring for treating a growing number of debilitating disorders involving hNav1.1. Subsequent structure–activity relationship experiments with related N-benzyl triazole compounds on four brain hNav channel isoforms revealed a novel drug variant that (1) shifts hNav1.1 opening to more depolarized voltages without further alterations in the gating properties of hNav1.1, hNav1.2, hNav1.3, and hNav1.6; (2) increases the threshold to action potential initiation in hippocampal neurons; and (3) greatly reduces the frequency of seizures in three animal models. Altogether, our results provide novel molecular insights into the rational development of Nav channel-targeting molecules based on the unique rufinamide scaffold, an outcome that may be exploited to design drugs for treating disorders involving particular Nav channel isoforms while limiting adverse effects. PMID:24635129

  4. Reduced tonic inhibition after stroke promotes motor performance and epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Jaenisch, Nadine; Liebmann, Lutz; Guenther, Madlen; Hübner, Christian A; Frahm, Christiane; Witte, Otto W

    2016-01-01

    Stroke survivors often recover from motor deficits, either spontaneously or with the support of rehabilitative training. Since tonic GABAergic inhibition controls network excitability, it may be involved in recovery. Middle cerebral artery occlusion in rodents reduces tonic GABAergic inhibition in the structurally intact motor cortex (M1). Transcript and protein abundance of the extrasynaptic GABAA-receptor complex α4β3δ are concurrently reduced (δ-GABAARs). In vivo and in vitro analyses show that stroke-induced glutamate release activates NMDA receptors, thereby reducing KCC2 transporters and down-regulates δ-GABAARs. Functionally, this is associated with improved motor performance on the RotaRod, a test in which mice are forced to move in a similar manner to rehabilitative training sessions. As an adverse side effect, decreased tonic inhibition facilitates post-stroke epileptic seizures. Our data imply that early and sometimes surprisingly fast recovery following stroke is supported by homeostatic, endogenous plasticity of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors. PMID:27188341

  5. Reduced tonic inhibition after stroke promotes motor performance and epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Jaenisch, Nadine; Liebmann, Lutz; Guenther, Madlen; Hübner, Christian A.; Frahm, Christiane; Witte, Otto W.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke survivors often recover from motor deficits, either spontaneously or with the support of rehabilitative training. Since tonic GABAergic inhibition controls network excitability, it may be involved in recovery. Middle cerebral artery occlusion in rodents reduces tonic GABAergic inhibition in the structurally intact motor cortex (M1). Transcript and protein abundance of the extrasynaptic GABAA-receptor complex α4β3δ are concurrently reduced (δ-GABAARs). In vivo and in vitro analyses show that stroke-induced glutamate release activates NMDA receptors, thereby reducing KCC2 transporters and down-regulates δ-GABAARs. Functionally, this is associated with improved motor performance on the RotaRod, a test in which mice are forced to move in a similar manner to rehabilitative training sessions. As an adverse side effect, decreased tonic inhibition facilitates post-stroke epileptic seizures. Our data imply that early and sometimes surprisingly fast recovery following stroke is supported by homeostatic, endogenous plasticity of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors. PMID:27188341

  6. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: so-called psychiatric comorbidity and underlying defense mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Beghi, Massimiliano; Negrini, Paola Beffa; Perin, Cecilia; Peroni, Federica; Magaudda, Adriana; Cerri, Cesare; Cornaggia, Cesare Maria

    2015-01-01

    In Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) do not have a unique classification as they can be found within different categories: conversion, dissociative, and somatization disorders. The ICD-10, instead, considers PNES within dissociative disorders, merging the dissociative disorders and conversion disorders, although the underlying defense mechanisms are different. The literature data show that PNES are associated with cluster B (mainly borderline) personality disorders and/or to people with depressive or anxiety disorders. Defense mechanisms in patients with PNES with a prevalence of anxious/depressive symptoms are of “neurotic” type; their goal is to lead to a “split”, either vertical (dissociation) or horizontal (repression). The majority of patients with this type of PNES have alexithymia traits, meaning that they had difficulties in feeling or perceiving emotions. In subjects where PNES are associated with a borderline personality, in which the symbolic function is lost, the defense mechanisms are of a more archaic nature (denial). PNES with different underlying defense mechanisms have different prognoses (despite similar severity of PNES) and need usually a different treatment (pharmacological or psychological). Thus, it appears superfluous to talk about psychiatric comorbidity, since PNES are a different symptomatic expression of specific psychiatric disorders. PMID:26491330

  7. Frontal linear scleroderma en coup de sabre associated with epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Inci, Rahime; Inci, Mehmet Fatih; Ozkan, Fuat; Oztürk, Perihan

    2012-12-10

    Linear scleroderma is a rare variant of localised scleroderma, which is usually seen in childhood and during the adolescent period, and can cause severe functional morbidity as well as cosmetic and psychological problems. Although its ethiopathogenesis is yet obscure, autoimmunity, local ischaemia and injuries, vaccination, irradiation, vitamin K injections, Borrelia burgdorferi and Varicella infections have been incriminated. A 4-year-old girl who had been followed up for about 18 months with diagnosis of epilepsy had a colour discolouration and depression that first appeared 1 year ago and then progressed on her left frontal region. Her CT scan showed a thinning in the frontal bone and depression in the frontal region. These findings are described as 'en coup de sabre' a rare form of linear scleroderma localised at the frontal region of the scalp. In this paper, we present clinical and radiological findings of a 4-year-old girl with epileptic seizures that started 1 year before the onset of the lesion of linear scleroderma.

  8. Frontal linear scleroderma en coup de sabre associated with epileptic seizure

    PubMed Central

    Inci, Rahime; Inci, Mehmet Fatih; Ozkan, Fuat; Oztürk, Perihan

    2012-01-01

    Linear scleroderma is a rare variant of localised scleroderma, which is usually seen in childhood and during the adolescent period, and can cause severe functional morbidity as well as cosmetic and psychological problems. Although its ethiopathogenesis is yet obscure, autoimmunity, local ischaemia and injuries, vaccination, irradiation, vitamin K injections, Borrelia burgdorferi and Varicella infections have been incriminated. A 4-year-old girl who had been followed up for about 18 months with diagnosis of epilepsy had a colour discolouration and depression that first appeared 1 year ago and then progressed on her left frontal region. Her CT scan showed a thinning in the frontal bone and depression in the frontal region. These findings are described as ‘en coup de sabre’ a rare form of linear scleroderma localised at the frontal region of the scalp. In this paper, we present clinical and radiological findings of a 4-year-old girl with epileptic seizures that started 1 year before the onset of the lesion of linear scleroderma. PMID:23230261

  9. Psychological and psychiatric aspects of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES): A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard J; Reuber, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are common in neurological settings and often associated with considerable distress and disability. The psychological mechanisms underlying PNES are poorly understood and there is a lack of well-established, evidence-based treatments. This paper advances our understanding of PNES by providing a comprehensive systematic review of the evidence pertaining to the main theoretical models of this phenomenon. Methodological quality appraisal and effect size calculation were conducted on one hundred forty empirical studies on the following aspects of PNES: life adversity, dissociation, anxiety, suggestibility, attentional dysfunction, family/relationship problems, insecure attachment, defence mechanisms, somatization/conversion, coping, emotion regulation, alexithymia, emotional processing, symptom modelling, learning and expectancy. Although most of the studies were only of low to moderate quality, some findings are sufficiently consistent to warrant tentative conclusions: (i) physical symptom reporting is elevated in patients with PNES; (ii) trait dissociation and exposure to traumatic events are common but not inevitable correlates of PNES; (iii) there is a mismatch between subjective reports of anxiety and physical arousal during PNES; and (iv) inconsistent findings in this area are likely to be attributable to the heterogeneity of patients with PNES. Empirical, theoretical and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:27084446

  10. Large-Scale Modeling of Epileptic Seizures: Scaling Properties of Two Parallel Neuronal Network Simulation Algorithms

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pesce, Lorenzo L.; Lee, Hyong C.; Hereld, Mark; Visser, Sid; Stevens, Rick L.; Wildeman, Albert; van Drongelen, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Our limited understanding of the relationship between the behavior of individual neurons and large neuronal networks is an important limitation in current epilepsy research and may be one of the main causes of our inadequate ability to treat it. Addressing this problem directly via experiments is impossibly complex; thus, we have been developing and studying medium-large-scale simulations of detailed neuronal networks to guide us. Flexibility in the connection schemas and a complete description of the cortical tissue seem necessary for this purpose. In this paper we examine some of the basic issues encountered in these multiscale simulations. We have determinedmore » the detailed behavior of two such simulators on parallel computer systems. The observed memory and computation-time scaling behavior for a distributed memory implementation were very good over the range studied, both in terms of network sizes (2,000 to 400,000 neurons) and processor pool sizes (1 to 256 processors). Our simulations required between a few megabytes and about 150 gigabytes of RAM and lasted between a few minutes and about a week, well within the capability of most multinode clusters. Therefore, simulations of epileptic seizures on networks with millions of cells should be feasible on current supercomputers.« less

  11. Comparison of frequency bands using spectral entropy for epileptic seizure prediction.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Susana; Garay, Arturo; Coulombie, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Under the hypothesis that the uncontrolled neuronal synchronization propagates recruiting more and more neurons, the aim is to detect its onset as early as possible by signal analysis. This synchronization is not noticeable just by looking at the EEG, so mathematical tools are needed for its identification. Objective. The aim of this study is to compare the results of spectral entropies calculated in different frequency bands of the EEG signals to decide which band may be a better tool to predict an epileptic seizure. Materials and Methods. Invasive ictal records were used. We measured the Fourier spectrum entropy of the electroencephalographic signals 4 to 32 minutes before the attack in low, medium and high frequencies. Results. The high-frequency band shows a markedly rate of increase of the entropy, with positive slopes and low correlation coefficient. The entropy rate of growth in the low-frequency band is practically zero, with a correlation around 0.2 and mostly positive slopes. The mid-frequency band showed both positive and negative slopes with low correlation. Conclusions. The entropy in the high frequencies could be predictor, because it shows changes in the previous moments of the attack. Its main problem is the variability, which makes it difficult to set the threshold that ensures an adequate prediction.

  12. Similarities and differences of acute nonconvulsive seizures and other epileptic activities following penetrating and ischemic brain injuries in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xi-Chun May; Mountney, Andrea; Chen, Zhiyong; Wei, Guo; Cao, Ying; Leung, Lai Yee; Khatri, Vivek; Cunningham, Tracy; Tortella, Frank C

    2013-04-01

    The similarities and differences between acute nonconvulsive seizures (NCS) and other epileptic events, for example, periodic epileptiform discharges (PED) and intermittent rhythmic delta activities (IRDA), were characterized in rat models of penetrating and ischemic brain injuries. The NCS were spontaneously induced by either unilateral frontal penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) or permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO), and were detected by continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring begun immediately after the injury and continued for 72 h or 24 h, respectively. Analysis of NCS profiles (incidence, frequency, duration, and time distribution) revealed a high NCS incidence in both injury models. The EEG waveform expressions of NCS and PED exhibited intrinsic variations that resembled human electrographic manifestations of post-traumatic and post-ischemic ictal and inter-ictal events, but these waveform variations were not distinguishable between the two types of brain injury. However, the NCS after pMCAO occurred more acutely and intensely (latency=0.6 h, frequency=25 episodes/rat) compared with the PBBI-induced NCS (latency=24 h, frequency=10 episodes/rat), such that the most salient features differentiating post-traumatic and post-ischemic NCS were the intensity and time distribution of the NCS profiles. After pMCAO, nearly 50% of the seizures occurred within the first 2 h of injury, whereas after PBBI, NCS occurred sporadically (0-5%/h) throughout the 72 h recording period. The PED were episodically associated with NCS. By contrast, the IRDA appeared to be independent of other epileptic events. This study provided comprehensive comparisons of post-traumatic and post-ischemic epileptic profiles. The identification of the similarities and differences across a broad spectrum of epileptic events may lead to differential strategies for post-traumatic and post-stroke seizure interventions.

  13. The new ILAE report on terminology and concepts for organization of epileptic seizures: a clinician's critical view and contribution.

    PubMed

    Panayiotopoulos, Chrysostomos P

    2011-12-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) standardized classification and terminology for "epileptic seizures" of 1981 and "epilepsies and epileptic syndromes" of 1989 provide a fundamental framework for organizing and differentiating the epilepsies. However, a revision of these classifications is mandated by recent major technologic and scientific advances. Since 1997, the relevant ILAE Commissions have made significant efforts to achieve better and internationally uniform classifications as reflected in their reports of 2001, 2006, and 2010. Their initial aim to construct a "new scientific classification from application of methods used in biology that determines separate species and natural classes" proved elusive and, therefore, the last Commission in their report of 2010 confined their revisions to "new terminology and concepts" instead of "proposing a new classification (in the sense of organization) of epilepsies." It is unfortunate that most of the proposals in this report are modified interpretations and nomenclature of previous ILAE classifications; new terms are not better than the old ones, and recent advances have not been incorporated. Hence, the new ILAE report met with considerable protest from several expert epileptologists. This critical review refers mainly to the epileptic seizures, the classification of which may be an easier and less controversial task in the ILAE revisions. A revised classification should incorporate advanced knowledge of seizure pathophysiology, and clinical, interictal, and ictal manifestations. Such an attempt was made and detailed in the 2006 report of the ILAE Classification Core Group. However, these changes were largely discarded in the new ILAE report of 2010, without justification. This is inexplicable considering that the scientific advances that were available to the two Commissions were the same or had improved between 2006 and 2010. Of major concern is that "No specific classification is recommended for

  14. Glutamate transporters alterations in the reorganizing dentate gyrus are associated with progressive seizure activity in chronic epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Gorter, Jan A; Van Vliet, Erwin A; Proper, Evelien A; De Graan, Pierre N E; Ghijsen, Wim E J M; Lopes Da Silva, Fernando H; Aronica, Eleonora

    2002-01-21

    The expression of glial and neuronal glutamate transporter proteins was investigated in the hippocampal region at different time points after electrically induced status epilepticus (SE) in the rat. This experimental rat model for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy is characterized by cell loss, gliosis, synaptic reorganization, and chronic seizures after a latent period. Despite extensive gliosis, immunocytochemistry revealed only an up-regulation of both glial transporters localized at the outer aspect of the inner molecular layer (iml) in chronic epileptic rats. The neuronal EAAC1 transporter was increased in many somata of individual CA1-3 neurons and granule cells that had survived after SE; this up-regulation was still present in the chronic epileptic phase. In contrast, a permanent decrease of EAAC1 immunoreactivity was observed in the iml of the dentate gyrus. This permanent decrease in EAAC1 expression, which was only observed in rats that experienced progressive spontaneous seizure activity, could lead to abnormal glutamate levels in the iml once new abnormal glutamatergic synaptic contacts are formed by means of sprouted mossy fibers. Considering the steady growth of reorganizing mossy fibers in the iml, the absence of a glutamate reuptake mechanism in this region could contribute to progression of spontaneous seizure activity, which occurs with a similar time course.

  15. Effects of Vitamin E on seizure frequency, electroencephalogram findings, and oxidative stress status of refractory epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehvari, Jafar; Motlagh, Fataneh Gholami; Najafi, Mohamad; Ghazvini, Mohammad Reza Aghaye; Naeini, Amirmansour Alavi; Zare, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress has been a frequent finding in epileptic patients receiving antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In this study, the influence of Vitamin E on the antiseizure activity and redox state of patients treated with carbamazepine, sodium valproate, and levetiracetam has been investigated. Materials and Methods: This double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out on 65 epileptic patients with chronic antiepileptic intake. The subjects received 400 IU/day of Vitamin E or placebo for 6 months. Seizure frequency, electroencephalogram (EEG), and redox state markers were measured monthly through the study. Results: Total antioxidant capacity, catalase and glutathione were significantly higher in Vitamin E received group compared with controls (P < 0.05) whereas malodialdehyde levels did not differ between two groups (P < 0.07). Vitamin E administration also caused a significant decrease in the frequency of seizures (P < 0.001) and improved EEG findings (P = 0.001). Of 32 patients in case group, the positive EEG decreased in 16 patients (50%) whereas among 33 patients in control group only 4 patients (12.1%) showed decreased positive EEG. Conclusion: The results of this preliminary study indicate that coadministration of antioxidant Vitamin E with AEDs improves seizure control and reduces oxidative stress. PMID:27099849

  16. Independent Neuronal Origin of Seizures and Behavioral Comorbidities in an Animal Model of a Severe Childhood Genetic Epileptic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Asinof, Samuel K; Sukoff Rizzo, Stacey J; Buckley, Alexandra R; Beyer, Barbara J; Letts, Verity A; Frankel, Wayne N; Boumil, Rebecca M

    2015-06-01

    The childhood epileptic encephalopathies (EE's) are seizure disorders that broadly impact development including cognitive, sensory and motor progress with severe consequences and comorbidities. Recently, mutations in DNM1 (dynamin 1) have been implicated in two EE syndromes, Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome and Infantile Spasms. Dnm1 encodes dynamin 1, a large multimeric GTPase necessary for activity-dependent membrane recycling in neurons, including synaptic vesicle endocytosis. Dnm1Ftfl or "fitful" mice carry a spontaneous mutation in the mouse ortholog of DNM1 and recapitulate many of the disease features associated with human DNM1 patients, providing a relevant disease model of human EE's. In order to examine the cellular etiology of seizures and behavioral and neurological comorbidities, we engineered a conditional Dnm1Ftfl mouse model of DNM1 EE. Observations of Dnm1Ftfl/flox mice in combination with various neuronal subpopulation specific cre strains demonstrate unique seizure phenotypes and clear separation of major neurobehavioral comorbidities from severe seizures associated with the germline model. This demonstration of pleiotropy suggests that treating seizures per se may not prevent severe comorbidity observed in EE associated with dynamin-1 mutations, and is likely to have implications for other genetic forms of EE. PMID:26125563

  17. Effects of brain IKKβ gene silencing by small interfering RNA on P-glycoprotein expression and brain damage in the rat kainic acid-induced seizure model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nian; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yan-Fang; Su, Ling-Ying; Liu, Xin-Hong; Li, Le-Chao; Hao, Jin-Bo; Huang, Xian-Jing; Di, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by over-expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in brain is an important mechanism accounting for the drug-therapy failure in epilepsy. Over-expression of P-gp in epilepsy rat brain may be regulated by inflammation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Inhibitory κ B kinase subunit β (IKKβ) is an up-stream molecular controlling NF-κB activation. With the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique and kainic acid (KA)-induced rat epileptic seizure model, the present study was aimed to further evaluate the role of NF-κB inhibition, via blocking IKKβ gene transcription, in the epileptic brain P-gp over-expression, seizure susceptibility, and post-seizure brain damage. siRNA targeting IKKβ was administered to rats via intracerebroventricular injection before seizure induction by KA microinjection; scrambled siRNA was used as control. Brain mRNA and protein levels of IKKβ and P-gp were detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. NF-κB activity was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Latency to grade III or V seizure onset was recorded, brain damage was evaluated by neuronal cell counting and epileptiform activity was monitored by electroencephalography. IKKβ siRNA pre-treatment inhibited NF-κB activation and abolished P-gp over-expression in KA-induced epileptic rat brain, accompanied by decreased seizure susceptibility. These findings suggested that epileptogenic-induced P-gp over-expression could be regulated by IKKβ through the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24040792

  18. The similarities between the hallucinations associated with the partial epileptic seizures of the occipital lobe and ball lightning observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, G. K.; Cooray, V.

    2007-12-01

    Ball Lightning was seen and described since antiquity and recorded in many places. Ball lightning is usually observed during thunderstorms but large number of ball lightning observations is also reported during fine weather without any connection to thunderstorms or lightning. However, so far no one has managed to generate them in the laboratory. It is photographed very rarely and in many cases the authenticity of them is questionable. It is possible that many different phenomena are grouped together and categorized simply as ball lightning. Indeed, the visual hallucinations associated with simple partial epileptic seizures, during which the patient remains conscious, may also be categorized by a patient unaware of his or her condition as ball lightning observation. Such visual hallucinations may occur as a result of an epileptic seizure in the occipital, temporo-occipital or temporal lobes of the cerebrum [1,2,3]. In some cases the hallucination is perceived as a coloured ball moving horizontally from the periphery to the centre of the vision. The ball may appear to be rotating or spinning. The colour of the ball can be red, yellow, blue or green. Sometimes, the ball may appear to have a solid structure surrounded by a thin glow or in other cases the ball appears to generate spark like phenomena. When the ball is moving towards the centre of the vision it may increase its intensity and when it reaches the centre it can 'explode' illuminating the whole field of vision. During the hallucinations the vision is obscured only in the area occupied by the apparent object. The hallucinations may last for 5 to 30 seconds and rarely up to a minute. Occipital seizures may spread into other regions of the brain giving auditory, olfactory and sensory sensations. These sensations could be buzzing sounds, the smell of burning rubber, pain with thermal perception especially in the arms and the face, and numbness and tingling sensation. In some cases a person may experience only

  19. Dynamics of regional brain activity in epilepsy: a cross-disciplinary study on both intracranial and scalp-recorded epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minadakis, George; Ventouras, Errikos; Gatzonis, Stylianos D.; Siatouni, Anna; Tsekou, Hara; Kalatzis, Ioannis; Sakas, Damianos E.; Stonham, John

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Recent cross-disciplinary literature suggests a dynamical analogy between earthquakes and epileptic seizures. This study extends the focus of inquiry for the applicability of models for earthquake dynamics to examine both scalp-recorded and intracranial electroencephalogram recordings related to epileptic seizures. Approach. First, we provide an updated definition of the electric event in terms of magnitude and we focus on the applicability of (i) a model for earthquake dynamics, rooted in a nonextensive Tsallis framework, (ii) the traditional Gutenberg and Richter law and (iii) an alternative method for the magnitude-frequency relation for earthquakes. Second, we apply spatiotemporal analysis in terms of nonextensive statistical physics and we further examine the behavior of the parameters included in the nonextensive formula for both types of electroencephalogram recordings under study. Main results. We confirm the previously observed power-law distribution, showing that the nonextensive formula can adequately describe the sequences of electric events included in both types of electroencephalogram recordings. We also show the intermittent behavior of the epileptic seizure cycle which is analogous to the earthquake cycles and we provide evidence of self-affinity of the regional electroencephalogram epileptic seizure activity. Significance. This study may provide a framework for the analysis and interpretation of epileptic brain activity and other biological phenomena with similar underlying dynamical mechanisms.

  20. What is more harmful, seizures or epileptic EEG abnormalities? Is there any clinical data?

    PubMed

    Holmes, Gregory L

    2014-10-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common and often devastating co-morbidity of childhood epilepsy. While the aetiology of the epilepsy is a critical determinant of cognitive outcome, there is considerable evidence from both rodent and human studies that indicate that seizures and interictal epileptiform abnormalities can contribute to cognitive impairment. A critical feature of childhood epilepsy is that the seizures and epileptiform activity occur in a brain with developing, plastic neuronal circuits. The consequences of seizures and interictal epileptiform activity in the developing brain differ from similar paroxysmal events occurring in the relatively fixed circuitry of the mature brain. In animals, it is possible to study interictal spikes independently from seizures, and it has been demonstrated that interictal spikes are as detrimental as seizures during brain development. In the clinic, distinguishing the differences between interictal spikes and seizures is more difficult, since both typically occur together. However, both seizures and interictal spikes result in transient cognitive impairment. Recurrent seizures, particularly when frequent, can lead to cognitive regression. While the clinical data linking interictal spikes to persistent cognitive impairment is limited, interictal spikes occurring during the formation and stabilization of neuronal circuits likely contribute to aberrant connectivity. There is insufficient clinical literature to indicate whether interictal spikes are more detrimental than seizures during brain development.

  1. [Effect of citicoline on the development of chronic epileptization of the brain (pentylenetetrazole kindling) and acute seizures reaction of kindled mice C57Bl/6].

    PubMed

    Kuznetzova, L V; Karpova, M N; Zinkovsky, K A; Klishina, N V

    2014-01-01

    In experiments on mice C57Bl/6 was studied effects of citicoline (500 mg/kg, i.p.) on development of chronically epileptization of the brain--pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling (30 mg/kg PTZ, i.p. during 24 days) and on acute generalized seizures (i.v., 1% solution of PTZ with the speed of 0.01 ml/s). It was shown that daily injection of citicoline an hour before the introduction of PTZ had no effect on development of chronically epileptization of the brain --PTZ-kindling (the latency of seizures appearance and their severity). However, citicoIine posses anticonvulsive effects on acute seizures in kindled mice. In animals with increased seizure susceptibility of the brain caused by kindling and severity of seizures 2-3 points injection citicoline after 14 days of kindling had anticonvulsive effect, increasing the threshold clonic seizures. Injection of citicoline during 24 days of kindled animals and severity of seizures 3-5 points caused the increase of thresholds as clonic and tonic phase of seizures with lethal outcome. Thus, the anticonvulsant effect of citicoline more pronounced in the long-term use.

  2. Epileptic Seizure Detection and Prediction Based on Continuous Cerebral Blood Flow Monitoring--a Review.

    PubMed

    Tewolde, Senay; Oommen, Kalarickal; Lie, Donald Y C; Zhang, Yuanlin; Chyu, Ming-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is the third most common neurological illness, affecting 1% of the world's population. Despite advances in medicine, about 25 to 30% of the patients do not respond to or cannot tolerate the severe side effects of medical treatment, and surgery is not an option for the majority of patients with epilepsy. The objective of this article is to review the current state of research on seizure detection based on cerebral blood flow (CBF) data acquired by thermal diffusion flowmetry (TDF), and CBF-based seizure prediction. A discussion is provided on the applications, advantages, and disadvantages of TDF in detecting and localizing seizure foci, as well as its role in seizure prediction. Also presented are an overview of the present challenges and possible future research directions (along with methodological guidelines) of the CBF-based seizure detection and prediction methods. PMID:26288885

  3. NeuroKinect: A Novel Low-Cost 3Dvideo-EEG System for Epileptic Seizure Motion Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, João Paulo Silva; Choupina, Hugo Miguel Pereira; Rocha, Ana Patrícia; Fernandes, José Maria; Achilles, Felix; Loesch, Anna Mira; Vollmar, Christian; Hartl, Elisabeth; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2016-01-01

    body motion trajectories when compared to a 2D frame by frame tracking procedure. We conclude that this new approach provides a more comfortable (both for patients and clinical professionals), simpler, faster and lower-cost procedure than previous approaches, therefore providing a reliable tool to quantitatively analyze MOI patterns of epileptic seizures in the routine of EMUs around the world. We hope this study encourages other EMUs to adopt similar approaches so that more quantitative information is used to improve epilepsy diagnosis. PMID:26799795

  4. Genetic and environmental interactions determine seizure susceptibility in epileptic EL mice.

    PubMed

    Todorova, M T; Mantis, J G; Le, M; Kim, C Y; Seyfried, T N

    2006-10-01

    Gene identification has progressed rapidly for monogenic epilepsies, but complex gene-environmental interactions have hindered progress in gene identification for multifactorial epilepsies. We analyzed the role of environmental risk factors in the inheritance of multifactorial idiopathic generalized epilepsy in the EL mouse. Seizure susceptibility was evaluated in the EL (E) and seizure-resistant ABP/LeJ (A) parental mouse strains and in their AEF1 and AEF2 hybrid offspring using a handling-induced seizure test. The seizure test was administered in three environments (environments I, II and III) that differed with respect to the number of seizure tests administered (one test or four tests) and the age of the mice when tested (young or old). The inheritance of seizure susceptibility appeared dominant after repetitive seizure testing in young or old mice, but recessive after a single test in old mice. Heritability was high (0.67-0.77) in each environment. Significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) that were associated with environments I and III (repetitive testing) were found on chromosomes 2 and 9 and colocalized with previously mapped El2 and El4, respectively. The El2 QTL found in environment I associated only with female susceptibility. A novel QTL, El-N, for age-dependent predisposition to seizures was found on proximal chromosome 9 only in environment II. The findings indicate that environmental risk factors determine the genetic architecture of seizure susceptibility in EL mice and suggest that QTL for complex epilepsies should be defined in terms of the environment in which they are expressed.

  5. Cannabidiol Post-Treatment Alleviates Rat Epileptic-Related Behaviors and Activates Hippocampal Cell Autophagy Pathway Along with Antioxidant Defense in Chronic Phase of Pilocarpine-Induced Seizure.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Mahshid; Nikseresht, Sara; Khodagholi, Fariba; Naderi, Nima; Maghsoudi, Nader

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal and sometimes severe behavioral and molecular symptoms are usually observed in epileptic humans and animals. To address this issue, we examined the behavioral and molecular aspects of seizure evoked by pilocarpine. Autophagy can promote both cell survival and death, but there are controversial reports about the neuroprotective or neurodegenerative effects of autophagy in seizure. Cannabidiol has anticonvulsant properties in some animal models when used as a pretreatment. In this study, we investigated alteration of seizure scores, autophagy pathway proteins, and antioxidant status in hippocampal cells during the chronic phase of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy after treatment with cannabidiol. Cannabidiol (100 ng, intracerebroventricular injection) delayed the chronic phase of epilepsy. Single administration of cannabidiol during the chronic phase of seizure significantly diminished seizure scores such as mouth clonus, head nodding, monolateral and bilateral forelimb clonus and increased the activity of catalase enzyme and reduced glutathione content. Such a protective effect in the behavioral scores of epileptic rats was also observed after repeated administrations of cannabidiol at the onset of the silent phase. Moreover, the amount of Atg7, conjugation of Atg5/12, Atg12, and LC3II/LC3I ratio increased significantly in epileptic rats treated with repeated injections of cannabidiol. In short, our results suggest that post-treatment of Cannabidiol could enhance the induction of autophagy pathway and antioxidant defense in the chronic phase of epilepsy, which could be considered as the protective mechanisms of cannabidiol in a temporal lobe epilepsy model.

  6. Optimal training dataset composition for SVM-based, age-independent, automated epileptic seizure detection.

    PubMed

    Bogaarts, J G; Gommer, E D; Hilkman, D M W; van Kranen-Mastenbroek, V H J M; Reulen, J P H

    2016-08-01

    Automated seizure detection is a valuable asset to health professionals, which makes adequate treatment possible in order to minimize brain damage. Most research focuses on two separate aspects of automated seizure detection: EEG feature computation and classification methods. Little research has been published regarding optimal training dataset composition for patient-independent seizure detection. This paper evaluates the performance of classifiers trained on different datasets in order to determine the optimal dataset for use in classifier training for automated, age-independent, seizure detection. Three datasets are used to train a support vector machine (SVM) classifier: (1) EEG from neonatal patients, (2) EEG from adult patients and (3) EEG from both neonates and adults. To correct for baseline EEG feature differences among patients feature, normalization is essential. Usually dedicated detection systems are developed for either neonatal or adult patients. Normalization might allow for the development of a single seizure detection system for patients irrespective of their age. Two classifier versions are trained on all three datasets: one with feature normalization and one without. This gives us six different classifiers to evaluate using both the neonatal and adults test sets. As a performance measure, the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) is used. With application of FBC, it resulted in performance values of 0.90 and 0.93 for neonatal and adult seizure detection, respectively. For neonatal seizure detection, the classifier trained on EEG from adult patients performed significantly worse compared to both the classifier trained on EEG data from neonatal patients and the classier trained on both neonatal and adult EEG data. For adult seizure detection, optimal performance was achieved by either the classifier trained on adult EEG data or the classifier trained on both neonatal and adult EEG data. Our results show that age

  7. A comparison of the cost-effectiveness of treatment of prolonged acute convulsive epileptic seizures in children across Europe

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the majority of children and adolescents with epilepsy, optimal drug therapy adequately controls their condition. However, among the remaining patients who are still uncontrolled despite mono-, bi- or tri-therapy with chronic anti-epileptic treatment, a rescue medication is required. In Western Europe, the licensed medications available for first-line treatment of prolonged acute convulsive seizures (PACS) vary widely, and so comparators for clinical and economic evaluation are not consistent. No European guidelines currently exist for the treatment of PACS in children and adolescents and limited evidence is available for the effectiveness of treatments in the community setting. The authors present cost-effectiveness data for BUCCOLAM® (midazolam oromucosal solution) for the treatment of PACS in children and adolescents in the context of the treatment pathway in seven European countries in patients from 6 months to 18 years. For each country, the health economic model consisted of a decision tree, with decision nodes informed by clinical data and expert opinion obtained via a Delphi methodology. The events modelled are those associated with a patient experiencing a seizure in the community setting. The model assessed the likelihood of medication being administered successfully and of seizure cessation. The associated resource use was also modelled, and ambulance call-outs and hospitalisations were considered. The patient’s quality of life was estimated by clinicians, who completed a five-level EuroQol five dimensions questionnaire from the perspective of a child or adolescent suffering a seizure. Despite differences in current therapy, treatment patterns and healthcare costs in all countries assessed, BUCCOLAM was shown to be cost saving and offered increased health-related benefits for patients in the treatment of PACS compared with the current local standard of care. PMID:24949280

  8. Pharmacological Characterization of an Antisense Knockdown Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome: Inhibition of Epileptic Seizures by the Serotonin Agonist Fenfluramine

    PubMed Central

    Copmans, Daniëlle; Langlois, Mélanie; Crawford, Alexander D.; Ceulemans, Berten; Lagae, Lieven; de Witte, Peter A. M.; Esguerra, Camila V.

    2015-01-01

    Dravet syndrome (DS) is one of the most pharmacoresistant and devastating forms of childhood epilepsy syndromes. Distinct de novo mutations in the SCN1A gene are responsible for over 80% of DS cases. While DS is largely resistant to treatment with existing anti-epileptic drugs, promising results have been obtained in clinical trials with human patients treated with the serotonin agonist fenfluramine as an add-on therapeutic. We developed a zebrafish model of DS using morpholino antisense oligomers (MOs) targeting scn1Lab, the zebrafish ortholog of SCN1A. Zebrafish larvae with an antisense knockdown of scn1Lab (scn1Lab morphants) were characterized by automated behavioral tracking and high-resolution video imaging, in addition to measuring brain activity through local field potential recordings. Our findings reveal that scn1Lab morphants display hyperactivity, convulsive seizure-like behavior, loss of posture, repetitive jerking and a myoclonic seizure-like pattern. The occurrence of spontaneous seizures was confirmed by local field potential recordings of the forebrain, measuring epileptiform discharges. Furthermore, we show that these larvae are remarkably sensitive to hyperthermia, similar to what has been described for mouse models of DS, as well as for human DS patients. Pharmacological evaluation revealed that sodium valproate and fenfluramine significantly reduce epileptiform discharges in scn1Lab morphants. Our findings for this zebrafish model of DS are in accordance with clinical data for human DS patients. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating effective seizure inhibition of fenfluramine in an animal model of Dravet syndrome. Moreover, these results provide a basis for identifying novel analogs with improved activity and significantly milder or no side effects. PMID:25965391

  9. TNF-overexpression in Borna disease virus-infected mouse brains triggers inflammatory reaction and epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Katharina; Schaudien, Dirk; Eisel, Ulrich L M; Herzog, Sibylle; Richt, Jürgen A; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Herden, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Proinflammatory state of the brain increases the risk for seizure development. Neonatal Borna disease virus (BDV)-infection of mice with neuronal overexpression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) was used to investigate the complex relationship between enhanced cytokine levels, neurotropic virus infection and reaction pattern of brain cells focusing on its role for seizure induction. Viral antigen and glial markers were visualized by immunohistochemistry. Different levels of TNF in the CNS were provided by the use of heterozygous and homozygous TNF overexpressing mice. Transgenic TNF, total TNF (native and transgenic), TNF-receptor (TNFR1, TNFR2), IL-1 and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor subunit 2B (NR2B) mRNA values were measured by real time RT-PCR. BDV-infection of TNF-transgenic mice resulted in non-purulent meningoencephalitis accompanied by epileptic seizures with a higher frequency in homozygous animals. This correlated with lower weight gain, stronger degree and progression of encephalitis and early, strong microglia activation in the TNF-transgenic mice, most obviously in homozygous animals. Activation of astroglia could be more intense and associated with an unusual hypertrophy in the transgenic mice. BDV-antigen distribution and infectivity in the CNS was comparable in TNF-transgenic and wild-type animals. Transgenic TNF mRNA-expression was restricted to forebrain regions as the transgene construct comprised the promoter of NMDA-receptor subunit2B and induced up-regulation of native TNF mRNA. Total TNF mRNA levels did not increase significantly after BDV-infection in the brain of transgenic mice but TNFR1, TNFR2 and IL-1 mRNA values, mainly in the TNF overexpressing brain areas. NR2B mRNA levels were not influenced by transgene expression or BDV-infection. Neuronal TNF-overexpression combined with BDV-infection leads to cytokine up-regulation, CNS inflammation and glial cell activation and confirmed the presensitizing effect of elevated cytokine

  10. Classification of normal and epileptic seizure EEG signals using wavelet transform, phase-space reconstruction, and Euclidean distance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hong; Lim, Joon S; Kim, Jae-Kwon; Yang, Junggi; Lee, Youngho

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes new combined methods to classify normal and epileptic seizure EEG signals using wavelet transform (WT), phase-space reconstruction (PSR), and Euclidean distance (ED) based on a neural network with weighted fuzzy membership functions (NEWFM). WT, PSR, ED, and statistical methods that include frequency distributions and variation, were implemented to extract 24 initial features to use as inputs. Of the 24 initial features, 4 minimum features with the highest accuracy were selected using a non-overlap area distribution measurement method supported by the NEWFM. These 4 minimum features were used as inputs for the NEWFM and this resulted in performance sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 96.33%, 100%, and 98.17%, respectively. In addition, the area under Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve was used to measure the performances of NEWFM both without and with feature selections.

  11. Rat epileptic seizures evoked by BmK {alpha}IV and its possible mechanisms involved in sodium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Chai Zhifang; Bai Zhantao; Zhang Xuying; Liu Tong; Pang Xueyan; Ji Yonghua . E-mail: yhji@server.shcnc.ac.cn

    2007-05-01

    This study showed that rat unilateral intracerebroventricular injection of BmK {alpha}IV, a sodium channel modulator derived from scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, induced clusters of spikes, epileptic discharges and convulsion-related behavioral changes. BmK {alpha}IV potently promoted the release of endogenous glutamate from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. In vitro examination of the effect of BmK {alpha}IV on intrasynaptosomal free calcium concentration [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and sodium concentration [Na{sup +}]{sub i} revealed that BmK {alpha}IV-evoked glutamate release from synaptosomes was associated with an increase in Ca{sup 2+} and Na{sup +} influx. Moreover, BmK {alpha}IV-mediated glutamate release and ion influx was completely blocked by tetrodotoxin, a blocker of sodium channel. Together, these results suggest that the induction of BmK {alpha}IV-evoked epileptic seizures may be involved in the modulation of BmK {alpha}IV on tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels located on the nerve terminal, which subsequently enhances the Ca{sup 2+} influx to cause an increase of glutamate release. These findings may provide some insight regarding the mechanism of neuronal action of BmK {alpha}IV in the central nervous system for understanding epileptogenesis involved in sodium channels.

  12. Effects of cell phone radiation on lipid peroxidation, glutathione and nitric oxide levels in mouse brain during epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Esmekaya, Meric Arda; Tuysuz, Mehmet Zahid; Tomruk, Arın; Canseven, Ayse G; Yücel, Engin; Aktuna, Zuhal; Keskil, Semih; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the this study was to evaluate the effects of cellular phone radiation on oxidative stress parameters and oxide levels in mouse brain during pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced epileptic seizure. Eight weeks old mice were used in the study. Animals were distributed in the following groups: Group I: Control group treated with PTZ, Group II: 15min cellular phone radiation+PTZ treatment+30min cellular phone radiation, Group III: 30min cellular phone radiation+PTZ treatment+30min cellular phone radiation. The RF radiation was produced by a 900MHz cellular phone. Lipid peroxidation, which is the indicator of oxidative stress was quantified by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The glutathione (GSH) levels were determined by the Ellman method. Tissue total nitric oxide (NOx) levels were obtained using the Griess assay. Lipid peroxidation and NOx levels of brain tissue increased significantly in group II and III compared to group I. On the contrary, GSH levels were significantly lower in group II and III than group I. However, no statistically significant alterations in any of the endpoints were noted between group II and Group III. Overall, the experimental findings demonstrated that cellular phone radiation may increase the oxidative damage and NOx level during epileptic activity in mouse brain.

  13. Effects of cell phone radiation on lipid peroxidation, glutathione and nitric oxide levels in mouse brain during epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Esmekaya, Meric Arda; Tuysuz, Mehmet Zahid; Tomruk, Arın; Canseven, Ayse G; Yücel, Engin; Aktuna, Zuhal; Keskil, Semih; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the this study was to evaluate the effects of cellular phone radiation on oxidative stress parameters and oxide levels in mouse brain during pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced epileptic seizure. Eight weeks old mice were used in the study. Animals were distributed in the following groups: Group I: Control group treated with PTZ, Group II: 15min cellular phone radiation+PTZ treatment+30min cellular phone radiation, Group III: 30min cellular phone radiation+PTZ treatment+30min cellular phone radiation. The RF radiation was produced by a 900MHz cellular phone. Lipid peroxidation, which is the indicator of oxidative stress was quantified by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The glutathione (GSH) levels were determined by the Ellman method. Tissue total nitric oxide (NOx) levels were obtained using the Griess assay. Lipid peroxidation and NOx levels of brain tissue increased significantly in group II and III compared to group I. On the contrary, GSH levels were significantly lower in group II and III than group I. However, no statistically significant alterations in any of the endpoints were noted between group II and Group III. Overall, the experimental findings demonstrated that cellular phone radiation may increase the oxidative damage and NOx level during epileptic activity in mouse brain. PMID:26836107

  14. Role of GluK1 Kainate Receptors in Seizures, Epileptic Discharges, and Epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Brita; Reis, Janine; Gasior, Maciej; Kaminski, Rafal M.

    2014-01-01

    Kainate receptors containing the GluK1 subunit have an impact on excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in brain regions, such as the amygdala and hippocampus, which are relevant to seizures and epilepsy. Here we used 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA), a potent and selective agonist of kainate receptors that include the GluK1 subunit, in conjunction with mice deficient in GluK1 and GluK2 kainate receptor subunits to assess the role of GluK1 kainate receptors in provoking seizures and in kindling epileptogenesis. We found that systemic ATPA, acting specifically via GluK1 kainate receptors, causes locomotor arrest and forelimb extension (a unique behavioral characteristic of GluK1 activation) and induces myoclonic behavioral seizures and electrographic seizure discharges in the BLA and hippocampus. In contrast, the proconvulsant activity of systemic AMPA, kainate, and pentylenetetrazol is not mediated by GluK1 kainate receptors, and deletion of these receptors does not elevate the threshold for seizures in the 6 Hz model. ATPA also specifically activates epileptiform discharges in BLA slices in vitro via GluK1 kainate receptors. Olfactory bulb kindling developed similarly in wild-type, GluK1, and GluK2 knock-out mice, demonstrating that GluK1 kainate receptors are not required for epileptogenesis or seizure expression in this model. We conclude that selective activation of kainate receptors containing the GluK1 subunit can trigger seizures, but these receptors are not necessary for seizure generation in models commonly used to identify therapeutic agents for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:24760837

  15. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... two or more seizures may be diagnosed with epilepsy , also known as seizure disorder. Seizure Basics Under ... over and over might indicate the ongoing condition epilepsy . Febrile seizures can happen in children younger than ...

  16. A Wavelet-Based Artifact Reduction From Scalp EEG for Epileptic Seizure Detection.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Kafiul; Rastegarnia, Amir; Yang, Zhi

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a method to reduce artifacts from scalp EEG recordings to facilitate seizure diagnosis/detection for epilepsy patients. The proposed method is primarily based on stationary wavelet transform and takes the spectral band of seizure activities (i.e., 0.5-29 Hz) into account to separate artifacts from seizures. Different artifact templates have been simulated to mimic the most commonly appeared artifacts in real EEG recordings. The algorithm is applied on three sets of synthesized data including fully simulated, semi-simulated, and real data to evaluate both the artifact removal performance and seizure detection performance. The EEG features responsible for the detection of seizures from nonseizure epochs have been found to be easily distinguishable after artifacts are removed, and consequently, the false alarms in seizure detection are reduced. Results from an extensive experiment with these datasets prove the efficacy of the proposed algorithm, which makes it possible to use it for artifact removal in epilepsy diagnosis as well as other applications regarding neuroscience studies.

  17. Epileptic seizure onset detection based on EEG and ECG data fusion.

    PubMed

    Qaraqe, Marwa; Ismail, Muhammad; Serpedin, Erchin; Zulfi, Haneef

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a novel method for seizure onset detection using fused information extracted from multichannel electroencephalogram (EEG) and single-channel electrocardiogram (ECG). In existing seizure detectors, the analysis of the nonlinear and nonstationary ECG signal is limited to the time-domain or frequency-domain. In this work, heart rate variability (HRV) extracted from ECG is analyzed using a Matching-Pursuit (MP) and Wigner-Ville Distribution (WVD) algorithm in order to effectively extract meaningful HRV features representative of seizure and nonseizure states. The EEG analysis relies on a common spatial pattern (CSP) based feature enhancement stage that enables better discrimination between seizure and nonseizure features. The EEG-based detector uses logical operators to pool SVM seizure onset detections made independently across different EEG spectral bands. Two fusion systems are adopted. In the first system, EEG-based and ECG-based decisions are directly fused to obtain a final decision. The second fusion system adopts an override option that allows for the EEG-based decision to override the fusion-based decision in the event that the detector observes a string of EEG-based seizure decisions. The proposed detectors exhibit an improved performance, with respect to sensitivity and detection latency, compared with the state-of-the-art detectors. Experimental results demonstrate that the second detector achieves a sensitivity of 100%, detection latency of 2.6s, and a specificity of 99.91% for the MAJ fusion case. PMID:27057745

  18. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Seizures KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Seizures Print A A A Text Size en ... Seizures Febrile Seizures Brain and Nervous System Epilepsy First Aid: Febrile Seizures Word! Seizure Epilepsy Epilepsy Contact Us ...

  19. Epileptic seizures as a manifestation of cow's milk allergy: a studied relationship and description of our pediatric experience.

    PubMed

    Falsaperla, Raffaele; Pavone, Piero; Miceli Sopo, Stefano; Mahmood, Fahad; Scalia, Ferdinando; Corsello, Giovanni; Lubrano, Riccardo; Vitaliti, Giovanna

    2014-12-01

    Adverse reactions after ingestion of cow's milk proteins can occur at any age, from birth and even amongst exclusively breast-fed infants, although not all of these are hypersensitivity reactions. The most common presentations related to cow's milk protein allergy are skin reactions, failure to thrive, anaphylaxis as well as gastrointestinal and respiratory disorders. In addition, several cases of cow's milk protein allergy in the literature have documented neurological involvement, manifesting with convulsive seizures in children. This may be due to CNS spread of a peripheral inflammatory response. Furthermore, there is evidence that pro-inflammatory cytokines are responsible for disrupting the blood-brain barrier, causing focal CNS inflammation thereby triggering seizures, although further studies are needed to clarify the pathogenic relationship between atopy and its neurological manifestations. This review aims to analyze current published data on the link between cow's milk protein allergy and epileptic events, highlighting scientific evidence for any potential pathogenic mechanism and describing our clinical experience in pediatrics. PMID:25394911

  20. Epileptic fast intracerebral EEG activity: evidence for spatial decorrelation at seizure onset

    PubMed Central

    Wendling, Fabrice; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Bourien, Jérôme; Chauvel, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Low-voltage rapid discharges (or fast EEG ictal activity) constitute a characteristic electrophysiological pattern in focal seizures of human epilepsy. They are characterized by a decrease of signal voltage with a marked increase of signal frequency (typically beyond 25 Hz). They have long been observed in stereoelectroencephalographic (SEEG) signals recorded with intra-cerebral electrodes, generally occurring at seizure onset and simultaneously involving distinct brain regions. Spectral properties of rapid ictal discharges as well as spatial correlations measured between SEEG signals generated from distant sites before, during and after these discharges were studied. Cross-correlation estimates within typical EEG sub-bands and statistical tests performed in ten patients suffering from partial epilepsy (frontal, temporal or fronto-temporal) reveal that SEEG signals are significantly de-correlated during the discharge period compared to periods that precede and follow this discharge. These results can be interpreted as a functional decoupling of distant brain sites at seizure onset followed by an abnormally high re-coupling when the seizure develops. They lead to the concept of “disruption” that is complementary of that of “activation” (revealed by significantly high correlations between signals recorded during seizures), both giving insights into our understanding of pathophysiological processes involved in human partial epilepsies as well as in the interpretation of clinical semiology. PMID:12764064

  1. A tautology in the classification of generalized non-convulsive epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Seino, M; Fujiwara, T; Miyakoshi, M; Yagi, K

    1980-01-01

    Five patients with the Lennox-Gastaut syndrome who have shown generalized nonconvulsive seizures were presented. The seizure manifestations which occurred spontaneously were documented by simultaneous recording and analyzed in terms of clinical and electroencephalographic correlates. According to the diagnostic criteria of the International Classification, it was possible, on the one hand, to regard them as "atypical complex absences" in which the impairment of consciousness is accompanied by other symptoms, which tend to dominate the clinical picture. They were: hypotonic, hypertonic, myoclonic and akinetic components, respectively. On the other hand, if we give a special weight to the accompanying symptoms, it is entirely possible that they are at the same time diagnosed atonic, axial tonic, bilateral myoclonic and akinetic seizures. The initial impairment of consciousness is common to all the seizure manifestations, and the ictal and interictal EEG expressions are not of diagnostic significance. A question arises as to whether two different nomenclatures were arbitrarily given to a unique ictal manifestation or not as far as the generalized non-convulsive seizures were concerned.

  2. Environmental enrichment restores CA1 hippocampal LTP and reduces severity of seizures in epileptic mice.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Emanuela; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Pendolino, Valentina; Bagetta, Vincenza; Pignataro, Annabella; Fejtova, Anna; Costa, Cinzia; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Picconi, Barbara; Calabresi, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    We have analyzed the effects of environmental enrichment (EE) in a seizure-prone mouse model in which the genetic disruption of the presynaptic protein Bassoon leads to structural and functional alterations in the hippocampus and causes early spontaneous seizures mimicking human neurodevelopmental disorders. One-month EE starting at P21 reduced seizure severity, preserved long-term potentiation (LTP) and paired-pulse synaptic responses in the hippocampal CA1 neuronal population and prevented the reduction of spine density and dendrite branching of pyramidal neurons. These data demonstrate that EE exerts its therapeutic effect by normalizing multiple aspects of hippocampal function and provide experimental support for its use in the optimization of existent treatments.

  3. Automatic epileptic seizure detection using scalp EEG and advanced artificial intelligence techniques.

    PubMed

    Fergus, Paul; Hignett, David; Hussain, Abir; Al-Jumeily, Dhiya; Abdel-Aziz, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    The epilepsies are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders and syndromes characterised by recurrent, involuntary, paroxysmal seizure activity, which is often associated with a clinicoelectrical correlate on the electroencephalogram. The diagnosis of epilepsy is usually made by a neurologist but can be difficult to be made in the early stages. Supporting paraclinical evidence obtained from magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography may enable clinicians to make a diagnosis of epilepsy and investigate treatment earlier. However, electroencephalogram capture and interpretation are time consuming and can be expensive due to the need for trained specialists to perform the interpretation. Automated detection of correlates of seizure activity may be a solution. In this paper, we present a supervised machine learning approach that classifies seizure and nonseizure records using an open dataset containing 342 records. Our results show an improvement on existing studies by as much as 10% in most cases with a sensitivity of 93%, specificity of 94%, and area under the curve of 98% with a 6% global error using a k-class nearest neighbour classifier. We propose that such an approach could have clinical applications in the investigation of patients with suspected seizure disorders.

  4. Automatic Epileptic Seizure Detection Using Scalp EEG and Advanced Artificial Intelligence Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The epilepsies are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders and syndromes characterised by recurrent, involuntary, paroxysmal seizure activity, which is often associated with a clinicoelectrical correlate on the electroencephalogram. The diagnosis of epilepsy is usually made by a neurologist but can be difficult to be made in the early stages. Supporting paraclinical evidence obtained from magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography may enable clinicians to make a diagnosis of epilepsy and investigate treatment earlier. However, electroencephalogram capture and interpretation are time consuming and can be expensive due to the need for trained specialists to perform the interpretation. Automated detection of correlates of seizure activity may be a solution. In this paper, we present a supervised machine learning approach that classifies seizure and nonseizure records using an open dataset containing 342 records. Our results show an improvement on existing studies by as much as 10% in most cases with a sensitivity of 93%, specificity of 94%, and area under the curve of 98% with a 6% global error using a k-class nearest neighbour classifier. We propose that such an approach could have clinical applications in the investigation of patients with suspected seizure disorders. PMID:25710040

  5. Aspartame has no effect on seizures or epileptiform discharges in epileptic children.

    PubMed

    Shaywitz, B A; Anderson, G M; Novotny, E J; Ebersole, J S; Sullivan, C M; Gillespie, S M

    1994-01-01

    The effects of aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester; APM) on the neurological status of children with well-documented seizures were examined in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. We report on 10 children (5 boys, 5 girls, ages 5-13 yr) who were tested for 2 weeks each on APM and placebo (single morning dose, 34 mg/kg). Seven children had generalized convulsions with 4 also having absence episodes. One child had absence seizures and 2 had complex partial seizures only. On each arm of the study, children were admitted to the hospital for a standard 21-lead electroencephalogram (EEG), continuous 24-hour cassette EEG, and determination of biochemical variables in plasma and urine. Subjects completed the Subjects Treatment Emergent Symptoms Scale (STESS) and parents the Conners Behavior Rating Scale. There were no significant differences between APM and placebo in the standard EEG or 24-hour EEG. No differences were noted for the STESS or the Conners ratings, and no differences were noted for any of the biochemical measures (except for expected increases in phenylalanine and tyrosine after APM). Our findings indicate that, in this group of vulnerable children, APM does not provoke seizures.

  6. Anti-epileptic effects of neuropeptide Y gene transfection into the rat brain☆

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Changzheng; Zhao, Wenqing; Li, Wenling; Lv, Peiyuan; Dong, Xiufang

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y gene transfection into normal rat brain tissue can provide gene overexpression, which can attenuate the severity of kainic acid-induced seizures. In this study, a recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying the neuropeptide Y gene was transfected into brain tissue of rats with kainic acid-induced epilepsy through stereotactic methods. Following these transfections, we verified overexpression of the neuropeptide Y gene in the epileptic brain. Electroencephalograms showed that seizure severity was significantly inhibited and seizure latency was significantly prolonged up to 4 weeks after gene transfection. Moreover, quantitative fluorescent PCR and western blot assays revealed that the mRNA and protein expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits NR1, NR2A, and NR2B was inhibited in the hippocampus of epileptic rats. These findings indicate that neuropeptide Y may inhibit seizures via down-regulation of the functional expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. PMID:25206425

  7. Apnoea and bradycardia during epileptic seizures: relation to sudden death in epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Nashef, L; Walker, F; Allen, P; Sander, J W; Shorvon, S D; Fish, D R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To record non-invasively ictal cardiorespiratory variables. METHODS--Techniques employed in polysomnography were used in patients with epilepsy undergoing EEG-video recording at a telemetry unit. RESULTS--Apnoea (> 10, range > 10-63, mean 24 s) was seen in 20 of 47 clinical seizures (three secondary generalised, 16 complex partial, and one tonic) and 10 of 17 patients. Apnoea was central in 10 patients, but obstructive apnoea was also recorded in three of 10. Oxyhaemoglobin saturation (SpO2) dropped to less than 85% in 10 seizures (six patients). An increase in heart rate was common (91% of seizures). Bradycardia/sinus arrest was documented in four patients (mean maximum RR interval 5.36, range 2.8-8.6 s) but always in the context of a change in respiratory pattern. CONCLUSION--Ictal apnoea was often seen. The occurrence of bradycardia in association with apnoea suggests the involvement of cardiorespiratory reflexes. Similar mechanisms may operate in cases of sudden death in epilepsy. PMID:8609507

  8. Dynamics of large-scale brain activity in normal arousal states and epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Rennie, C. J.; Rowe, D. L.

    2002-04-01

    Links between electroencephalograms (EEGs) and underlying aspects of neurophysiology and anatomy are poorly understood. Here a nonlinear continuum model of large-scale brain electrical activity is used to analyze arousal states and their stability and nonlinear dynamics for physiologically realistic parameters. A simple ordered arousal sequence in a reduced parameter space is inferred and found to be consistent with experimentally determined parameters of waking states. Instabilities arise at spectral peaks of the major clinically observed EEG rhythms-mainly slow wave, delta, theta, alpha, and sleep spindle-with each instability zone lying near its most common experimental precursor arousal states in the reduced space. Theta, alpha, and spindle instabilities evolve toward low-dimensional nonlinear limit cycles that correspond closely to EEGs of petit mal seizures for theta instability, and grand mal seizures for the other types. Nonlinear stimulus-induced entrainment and seizures are also seen, EEG spectra and potentials evoked by stimuli are reproduced, and numerous other points of experimental agreement are found. Inverse modeling enables physiological parameters underlying observed EEGs to be determined by a new, noninvasive route. This model thus provides a single, powerful framework for quantitative understanding of a wide variety of brain phenomena.

  9. Wavelet Jensen Shannon divergence as a tool for studying the dynamics of frequency band components in EEG epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, M. E.; Lamberti, P. W.; Rosso, O. A.

    2007-06-01

    We develop a quantitative method of analysis of EEG records. The method is based on the wavelet analysis of the record and on the capability of the Jensen-Shannon divergence (JSD) to identify dynamical changes in a time series. The JSD is a measure of distance between probability distributions. Therefore for its evaluation it is necessary to define a (time dependent) probability distribution along the record. We define this probability distribution from the wavelet decomposition of the associated time series. The wavelet JSD provides information about dynamical changes in the scales and can be considered a complementary methodology reported earlier [O.A. Rosso, S. Blanco, A. Rabinowicz, Signal Processing 86 (2003) 1275; O.A. Rosso, S. Blanco, J. Yordanova, V. Kolev, A. Figliola, M. Schürmann, E. Başar, J. Neurosci. Methods 105 (2001) 65; O.A. Rosso, M.T. Martin, A. Figliola, K. Keller, A. Plastino, J. Neurosci. Methods 153 (2006) 163]. In the present study we have demonstrated it by analyzing EEG signal of tonic-clonic epileptic seizures applying the JSD method. The display of the JSD curves enables easy comparison of frequency band component dynamics. This would, in turn, promise easy and successful comparison of the EEG records from various scalp locations of the brain.

  10. Online Epileptic Seizure Prediction Using Wavelet-Based Bi-Phase Correlation of Electrical Signals Tomography.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, Zahra; Amirfattahi, Rasoul; Shayegh, Farzaneh; Ghassemi, Fahimeh

    2015-09-01

    Considerable efforts have been made in order to predict seizures. Among these methods, the ones that quantify synchronization between brain areas, are the most important methods. However, to date, a practically acceptable result has not been reported. In this paper, we use a synchronization measurement method that is derived according to the ability of bi-spectrum in determining the nonlinear properties of a system. In this method, first, temporal variation of the bi-spectrum of different channels of electro cardiography (ECoG) signals are obtained via an extended wavelet-based time-frequency analysis method; then, to compare different channels, the bi-phase correlation measure is introduced. Since, in this way, the temporal variation of the amount of nonlinear coupling between brain regions, which have not been considered yet, are taken into account, results are more reliable than the conventional phase-synchronization measures. It is shown that, for 21 patients of FSPEEG database, bi-phase correlation can discriminate the pre-ictal and ictal states, with very low false positive rates (FPRs) (average: 0.078/h) and high sensitivity (100%). However, the proposed seizure predictor still cannot significantly overcome the random predictor for all patients. PMID:26126613

  11. Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation prevents chronic epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinxu; Wang, Xiaoming; Ke, Sha; Tan, Juan; Hu, Litian; Zhang, Yaodan; Cui, Wenjuan

    2013-09-25

    Although low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation can potentially treat epilepsy, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the influence of low-frequency re-petitive transcranial magnetic simulation on changes in several nonlinear dynamic electroence-phalographic parameters in rats with chronic epilepsy and explored the mechanism underlying petitive transcranial magnetic simulation-induced antiepileptic effects. An epilepsy model was es-tablished using lithium-pilocarpine intraperitoneal injection into adult Sprague-Dawley rats, which were then treated with repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation for 7 consecutive days. Nonlinear electroencephalographic parameters were obtained from the rats at 7, 14, and 28 days post-stimulation. Results showed significantly lower mean correlation-dimension and Kolmogo-rov-entropy values for stimulated rats than for non-stimulated rats. At 28 days, the complexity and point-wise correlation dimensional values were lower in stimulated rats. Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation has suppressive effects on electrical activity in epileptic rats, thus explaining its effectiveness in treating epilepsy. PMID:25206567

  12. What Non-neuronal Mechanisms Should Be Studied to Understand Epileptic Seizures?

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    While seizures ultimately result from aberrant firing of neuronal networks, several laboratories have embraced a non-neurocentric view of epilepsy to show that other cells in the brain also bear an etiologic impact in epilepsy. Astrocytes and brain endothelial cells are examples of controllers of neuronal homeostasis; failure of proper function of either cell type has been shown to have profound consequences on neurophysiology. Recently, an even more holistic view of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of epilepsy has emerged to include white blood cells, immunological synapses, the extracellular matrix and the neurovascular unit. This review will briefly summarize these findings and propose mechanisms and targets for future research efforts on non-neuronal features of neurological disorders including epilepsy. PMID:25012382

  13. Combined Low-Intensity Exercise and Ascorbic Acid Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Seizure and Oxidative Stress in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jae; Song, Wook; Jin, Eun Hee; Kim, Jongkyu; Chun, Yoonseok; An, Eung Nam; Park, Sok

    2016-05-01

    Physical exercise and vitamins such as ascorbic acid (ASC) have been recognized as an effective strategy in neuroprotection and neurorehabilitatioin. However, there is a need to find an efficient treatment regimen that includes ASC and low-intensity exercise to diminish the risk of overtraining and nutritional treatment by attenuating oxidative stress. In the present study, we investigated the combined effect of low-intensity physical exercise (EX) and ASC on kainic acid (KA)-induced seizure activity and oxidative stress in mice. The mice were randomly assigned into groups as follows: "KA only" (n = 11), "ASC + KA" (n = 11), "Ex + KA" (n = 11), "ASC + Ex + KA" (n = 11). In the present study, low intensity of swimming training period lasted 8 weeks and consisted of 30-min sessions daily (three times per week) without tail weighting. Although no preventive effect of low-intensity exercise or ASC on KA seizure occurrence was evident, there was a decrease of seizure activity, seizure development (latency to first seizures), and mortality in "ASC + Ex + KA" compared to "ASC + KA", "Ex + KA", and "KA only" group. In addition, a preventive synergistic coordination of low-intensity exercise and ASC was evident in glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activity compared to separate treatment. These results suggest that low-intensity exercise and ASC treatment have preventive effects on seizure activity and development with alternation of oxidative status. PMID:26646003

  14. Mutations in SLC13A5 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Epileptic Encephalopathy with Seizure Onset in the First Days of Life

    PubMed Central

    Thevenon, Julien; Milh, Mathieu; Feillet, François; St-Onge, Judith; Duffourd, Yannis; Jugé, Clara; Roubertie, Agathe; Héron, Delphine; Mignot, Cyril; Raffo, Emmanuel; Isidor, Bertrand; Wahlen, Sandra; Sanlaville, Damien; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Darmency-Stamboul, Véronique; Toutain, Annick; Lefebvre, Mathilde; Chouchane, Mondher; Huet, Frédéric; Lafon, Arnaud; de Saint Martin, Anne; Lesca, Gaetan; El Chehadeh, Salima; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Odent, Sylvie; Villard, Laurent; Philippe, Christophe; Faivre, Laurence; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy (EE) refers to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of severe disorders characterized by seizures, abnormal interictal electro-encephalogram, psychomotor delay, and/or cognitive deterioration. We ascertained two multiplex families (including one consanguineous family) consistent with an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern of EE. All seven affected individuals developed subclinical seizures as early as the first day of life, severe epileptic disease, and profound developmental delay with no facial dysmorphism. Given the similarity in clinical presentation in the two families, we hypothesized that the observed phenotype was due to mutations in the same gene, and we performed exome sequencing in three affected individuals. Analysis of rare variants in genes consistent with an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance led to identification of mutations in SLC13A5, which encodes the cytoplasmic sodium-dependent citrate carrier, notably expressed in neurons. Disease association was confirmed by cosegregation analysis in additional family members. Screening of 68 additional unrelated individuals with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy for SLC13A5 mutations led to identification of one additional subject with compound heterozygous mutations of SLC13A5 and a similar clinical presentation as the index subjects. Mutations affected key residues for sodium binding, which is critical for citrate transport. These findings underline the value of careful clinical characterization for genetic investigations in highly heterogeneous conditions such as EE and further highlight the role of citrate metabolism in epilepsy. PMID:24995870

  15. Mutations in SLC13A5 cause autosomal-recessive epileptic encephalopathy with seizure onset in the first days of life.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Julien; Milh, Mathieu; Feillet, François; St-Onge, Judith; Duffourd, Yannis; Jugé, Clara; Roubertie, Agathe; Héron, Delphine; Mignot, Cyril; Raffo, Emmanuel; Isidor, Bertrand; Wahlen, Sandra; Sanlaville, Damien; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Darmency-Stamboul, Véronique; Toutain, Annick; Lefebvre, Mathilde; Chouchane, Mondher; Huet, Frédéric; Lafon, Arnaud; de Saint Martin, Anne; Lesca, Gaetan; El Chehadeh, Salima; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Odent, Sylvie; Villard, Laurent; Philippe, Christophe; Faivre, Laurence; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-07-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy (EE) refers to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of severe disorders characterized by seizures, abnormal interictal electro-encephalogram, psychomotor delay, and/or cognitive deterioration. We ascertained two multiplex families (including one consanguineous family) consistent with an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern of EE. All seven affected individuals developed subclinical seizures as early as the first day of life, severe epileptic disease, and profound developmental delay with no facial dysmorphism. Given the similarity in clinical presentation in the two families, we hypothesized that the observed phenotype was due to mutations in the same gene, and we performed exome sequencing in three affected individuals. Analysis of rare variants in genes consistent with an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance led to identification of mutations in SLC13A5, which encodes the cytoplasmic sodium-dependent citrate carrier, notably expressed in neurons. Disease association was confirmed by cosegregation analysis in additional family members. Screening of 68 additional unrelated individuals with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy for SLC13A5 mutations led to identification of one additional subject with compound heterozygous mutations of SLC13A5 and a similar clinical presentation as the index subjects. Mutations affected key residues for sodium binding, which is critical for citrate transport. These findings underline the value of careful clinical characterization for genetic investigations in highly heterogeneous conditions such as EE and further highlight the role of citrate metabolism in epilepsy.

  16. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein haplodeficiency attenuates seizure severity and NF-κB-mediated neuroinflammation in kainic acid-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Shin, H J; Kim, H; Heo, R W; Kim, H J; Choi, W S; Kwon, H M; Roh, G S

    2014-07-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures followed by neuronal death are associated with neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is known as a transcriptional factor activating osmoprotective genes, and in brain, it is expressed in neuronal nuclei. Thus dysregulation of TonEBP may be involved in the pathology of KA-induced seizures. Here we used TonEBP heterozygote (+/-) mice to study the roles of TonEBP. Electroencephalographic study showed that TonEBP (+/-) mice reduced seizure frequency and severity compared with wild type during KA-induced status epilepticus. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting analysis showed that KA-induced neuroinflammation and BBB leakage were dramatically reduced in TonEBP (+/-) mice. Similarly, TonEBP-specific siRNA reduced glutamate-induced death in HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells. TonEBP haplodeficiency prevented KA-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and attenuated inflammation. Our findings identify TonEBP as a critical regulator of neuroinflammation and BBB leakage in KA-induced seizures, which suggests TonEBP as a good therapeutic target. PMID:24608792

  17. Calcification of the pineal gland: relationship to laterality of the epileptic foci in patients with complex partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R

    1992-01-01

    The right and left temporal lobes differ from each other with respect to the rate of intrauterine growth, the timing of maturation, rate of aging, anatomical organization, neurochemistry, metabolic rate, electroencephalographic measures, and function. These functional differences between the temporal lobes underlies the different patterns of psychopathology and endocrine reproductive disturbances noted in patients with temporolimbic epilepsy. The right hemisphere has greater limbic and reticular connections than the left. Since the pineal gland receives direct innervation from the limbic system and the secretion of melatonin is influenced by an input from the reticular system, I propose that lesions in the right temporal lobe have a greater impact on pineal melatonin functions as opposed to those in the left dominant temporal lobe. Consequently, since calcification of the pineal gland is thought to reflect past secretory activity of the gland, I predicted a higher prevalence of pineal calcification (PC) in epileptic patients with right temporal lobe as opposed to those with left temporal lobe foci. To investigate this hypothesis, the prevalence of PC on CT scan was studied in a sample of 70 patients (43 men, 27 women, mean age: 29.2 years, range 9-58; SD = 10.1) with complex partial seizures, of whom 49 (70.0%) had a right temporal lobe focus. PC was present in 51 patients (72.8%) and was unrelated to any of the historical and demographic data surveyed. In the patients with a focus in the right temporal lobe, PC was present in 46 cases (93.8%) as compared to 5 of 21 patients (23.8%) with left temporal lobe foci.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1341678

  18. Phase-Amplitude Coupling Is Elevated in Deep Sleep and in the Onset Zone of Focal Epileptic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mina; Frauscher, Birgit; Gotman, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between different EEG frequency bands have been widely investigated in normal and pathologic brain activity. Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) is one of the important forms of this interaction where the amplitude of higher frequency oscillations is modulated by the phase of lower frequency activity. Here, we studied the dynamic variations of PAC of high (gamma and ripple) and low (delta, theta, alpha, and beta) frequency bands in patients with focal epilepsy in different sleep stages during the interictal period, in an attempt to see if coupling is different in more or less epileptogenic regions. Sharp activities were excluded to avoid their effect on the PAC. The results revealed that the coupling intensity was generally the highest in stage N3 of sleep and the lowest in rapid eye movement sleep. We also compared the coupling strength in different regions [seizure onset zone (SOZ), exclusively irritative zone, and normal zone]. PAC between high and low frequency rhythms was found to be significantly stronger in the SOZ compared to normal regions. Also, the coupling was generally more elevated in spiking channels outside the SOZ than in normal regions. We also examined how the power in the delta band correlates to the PAC, and found a mild but statistically significant correlation between slower background activity in epileptic channels and the elevated coupling in these channels. The results suggest that an elevated PAC may reflect some fundamental abnormality, even after exclusion of sharp activities and even in the interictal period. PAC may therefore contribute to understanding the underlying dynamics of epileptogenic brain regions. PMID:27536227

  19. Phase-Amplitude Coupling Is Elevated in Deep Sleep and in the Onset Zone of Focal Epileptic Seizures.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mina; Frauscher, Birgit; Gotman, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between different EEG frequency bands have been widely investigated in normal and pathologic brain activity. Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) is one of the important forms of this interaction where the amplitude of higher frequency oscillations is modulated by the phase of lower frequency activity. Here, we studied the dynamic variations of PAC of high (gamma and ripple) and low (delta, theta, alpha, and beta) frequency bands in patients with focal epilepsy in different sleep stages during the interictal period, in an attempt to see if coupling is different in more or less epileptogenic regions. Sharp activities were excluded to avoid their effect on the PAC. The results revealed that the coupling intensity was generally the highest in stage N3 of sleep and the lowest in rapid eye movement sleep. We also compared the coupling strength in different regions [seizure onset zone (SOZ), exclusively irritative zone, and normal zone]. PAC between high and low frequency rhythms was found to be significantly stronger in the SOZ compared to normal regions. Also, the coupling was generally more elevated in spiking channels outside the SOZ than in normal regions. We also examined how the power in the delta band correlates to the PAC, and found a mild but statistically significant correlation between slower background activity in epileptic channels and the elevated coupling in these channels. The results suggest that an elevated PAC may reflect some fundamental abnormality, even after exclusion of sharp activities and even in the interictal period. PAC may therefore contribute to understanding the underlying dynamics of epileptogenic brain regions. PMID:27536227

  20. An Integrative Neurocircuit Perspective on Psychogenic Non-Epileptic Seizures and Functional Movement Disorders: Neural Functional Unawareness

    PubMed Central

    Perez, DL; Dworetzky, BA; Dickerson, BC; Leung, L; Cohn, R; Baslet, G; Silbersweig, DA

    2014-01-01

    Functional Neurological Disorder (conversion disorder) is a neurobehavioral condition frequently encountered by neurologists. Psychogenic Non-Epileptic Seizure (PNES) and Functional Movement Disorder (FMD) patients present to epileptologists and movement disorder specialists respectively, yet neurologists lack a neurobiological perspective through which to understand these enigmatic groups. Observational research studies suggest that PNES and FMD may represent variants of similar (or the same) conditions given that both groups exhibit a female predominance, have increased prevalence of mood-anxiety disorders, frequently endorse prior abuse, and share phenotypic characteristics. In this perspective article, neuroimaging studies in PNES and FMD are reviewed, and discussed using studies of emotional dysregulation, dissociation and psychological trauma in the context of motor control. Convergent neuroimaging findings implicate alterations in brain circuits mediating emotional expression, regulation and awareness (anterior cingulate and ventromedial prefrontal cortices, insula, amygdala, vermis), cognitive control and motor inhibition (dorsal anterior cingulate, dorsolateral prefrontal, inferior frontal cortices), self-referential processing and perceptual awareness (posterior parietal cortex, temporoparietal junction), and motor planning and coordination (supplementary motor area, cerebellum). Striatal-thalamic components of prefrontal-parietal networks may also play a role in pathophysiology. Aberrant medial prefrontal and amygdalar neuroplastic changes mediated by chronic stress may facilitate the development of functional neurological symptoms in a subset of patients. Improved biological understanding of PNES and FMD will likely reduce stigma and aid the identification of neuroimaging biomarkers guiding treatment development, selection and prognosis. Additional research should investigate neurocircuit abnormalities within and across functional neurological disorder

  1. Optimized Seizure Detection Algorithm: A Fast Approach for Onset of Epileptic in EEG Signals Using GT Discriminant Analysis and K-NN Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Kh.; Azizi, E.; Haddadnia, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a severe disorder of the central nervous system that predisposes the person to recurrent seizures. Fifty million people worldwide suffer from epilepsy; after Alzheimer’s and stroke, it is the third widespread nervous disorder. Objective In this paper, an algorithm to detect the onset of epileptic seizures based on the analysis of brain electrical signals (EEG) has been proposed. 844 hours of EEG were recorded form 23 pediatric patients consecutively with 163 occurrences of seizures. Signals had been collected from Children’s Hospital Boston with a sampling frequency of 256 Hz through 18 channels in order to assess epilepsy surgery. By selecting effective features from seizure and non-seizure signals of each individual and putting them into two categories, the proposed algorithm detects the onset of seizures quickly and with high sensitivity. Method In this algorithm, L-sec epochs of signals are displayed in form of a third-order tensor in spatial, spectral and temporal spaces by applying wavelet transform. Then, after applying general tensor discriminant analysis (GTDA) on tensors and calculating mapping matrix, feature vectors are extracted. GTDA increases the sensitivity of the algorithm by storing data without deleting them. Finally, K-Nearest neighbors (KNN) is used to classify the selected features. Results The results of simulating algorithm on algorithm standard dataset shows that the algorithm is capable of detecting 98 percent of seizures with an average delay of 4.7 seconds and the average error rate detection of three errors in 24 hours. Conclusion Today, the lack of an automated system to detect or predict the seizure onset is strongly felt.

  2. Optimized Seizure Detection Algorithm: A Fast Approach for Onset of Epileptic in EEG Signals Using GT Discriminant Analysis and K-NN Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Kh.; Azizi, E.; Haddadnia, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a severe disorder of the central nervous system that predisposes the person to recurrent seizures. Fifty million people worldwide suffer from epilepsy; after Alzheimer’s and stroke, it is the third widespread nervous disorder. Objective In this paper, an algorithm to detect the onset of epileptic seizures based on the analysis of brain electrical signals (EEG) has been proposed. 844 hours of EEG were recorded form 23 pediatric patients consecutively with 163 occurrences of seizures. Signals had been collected from Children’s Hospital Boston with a sampling frequency of 256 Hz through 18 channels in order to assess epilepsy surgery. By selecting effective features from seizure and non-seizure signals of each individual and putting them into two categories, the proposed algorithm detects the onset of seizures quickly and with high sensitivity. Method In this algorithm, L-sec epochs of signals are displayed in form of a third-order tensor in spatial, spectral and temporal spaces by applying wavelet transform. Then, after applying general tensor discriminant analysis (GTDA) on tensors and calculating mapping matrix, feature vectors are extracted. GTDA increases the sensitivity of the algorithm by storing data without deleting them. Finally, K-Nearest neighbors (KNN) is used to classify the selected features. Results The results of simulating algorithm on algorithm standard dataset shows that the algorithm is capable of detecting 98 percent of seizures with an average delay of 4.7 seconds and the average error rate detection of three errors in 24 hours. Conclusion Today, the lack of an automated system to detect or predict the seizure onset is strongly felt. PMID:27672628

  3. Thrombin induces long-term potentiation of reactivity to afferent stimulation and facilitates epileptic seizures in rat hippocampal slices: toward understanding the functional consequences of cerebrovascular insults.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Nicola; Shavit, Efrat; Chapman, Joab; Segal, Menahem

    2008-01-16

    The effects of thrombin, a blood coagulation serine protease, were studied in rat hippocampal slices, in an attempt to comprehend its devastating effects when released into the brain after stroke and head trauma. Thrombin acting through its receptor, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), produced a long-lasting enhancement of the reactivity of CA1 neurons to afferent stimulation, an effect that saturated the ability of the tissue to undergo tetanus-induced long-term potentiation. This effect was mediated by activation of a PAR1 receptor, because it was shared by a PAR1 agonist, and was blocked by its selective antagonist. An independent effect of thrombin involved the lowering of the threshold for generating epileptic seizures in CA3 region of the hippocampus. Thus, the experiments in a slice mimicked epileptic and cognitive dysfunction induced by thrombin in the brain, and suggest that these effects are mediated by activation of the PAR1 receptor. PMID:18199772

  4. Ketogenic Diet, but Not Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Diet, Reduces Spontaneous Seizures in Juvenile Rats with Kainic Acid-induced Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dustin, Simone M.; Stafstrom, Carl E.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) is effective in many cases of drug-resistant epilepsy, particularly in children. In the classic KD, fats consist primarily of long-chain saturated triglycerides. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially the n-3 type, decrease neuronal excitability and provide neuroprotection; pilot human studies have raised the possibility of using PUFAs to control seizures in patients. Methods: To determine the relative roles of the KD and PUFAs in an animal model, we induced epilepsy in juvenile rats (P29–35) using intraperitoneal kainic acid (KA). KA caused status epilepticus in all rats. Two days after KA, rats were randomized to one of 4 dietary groups: Control diet; PUFA diet; KD; or KD plus PUFA. All diets were administered isocalorically at 90% of the rat recommended daily calorie requirement. Spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) were assessed for 3 months after diet randomization. Results: Rats receiving the KD or KD-PUFA diet had significantly fewer SRS than those receiving the Control diet or PUFA diet. The PUFA diet did not reduce SRS compared to the Control diet. Conclusions: In the KA epilepsy model, the KD protects against SRS occurrence but dietary enhancement with PUFA does not afford additional protection against spontaneous seizures. PMID:27390673

  5. Protective effects of bupivacaine against kainic acid-induced seizure and neuronal cell death in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kuan Ming; Wu, Chia Chan; Wang, Ming Jiuh; Lee, Ming Yi; Wang, Su Jane

    2015-01-01

    The excessive release of glutamate is a critical element in the neuropathology of epilepsy, and bupivacaine, a local anesthetic agent, has been shown to inhibit the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals. This study investigated whether bupivacaine produces antiseizure and antiexcitotoxic effects using a kainic acid (KA) rat model, an animal model used for temporal lobe epilepsy, and excitotoxic neurodegeneration experiments. The results showed that administering bupivacaine (0.4 mg/kg or 2 mg/kg) intraperitoneally to rats 30 min before intraperitoneal injection of KA (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and reduced the seizure score. In addition, bupivacaine attenuated KA-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the inhibition of microglial activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, bupivacaine shortened the latency of escaping onto the platform in the Morris water maze learning performance test. Collectively, these data suggest that bupivacaine has therapeutic potential for treating epilepsy.

  6. Domoic acid-induced seizures in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) are associated with neuroinflammatory brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kirkley, Kelly S; Madl, James E; Duncan, Colleen; Gulland, Frances M; Tjalkens, Ronald B

    2014-11-01

    California sea lions (CSLs) exposed to the marine biotoxin domoic acid (DA) develop an acute or chronic toxicosis marked by seizures and act as sentinels of the disease. Experimental evidence suggests that oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are important mechanisms underlying the seizurogenic potential of environmental toxicants but these pathways are relatively unstudied in CSLs. In the current study, we investigated the role of glutamate-glutamine changes and gliosis in DA-exposed CSLs to better understand the neurotoxic mechanisms occurring during DA toxicity. Sections from archived hippocampi from control and CSLs diagnosed with DA toxicosis were immunofluorescently stained for markers of gliosis, oxidative/nitrative stress and changes in glutamine synthetase (GS). Quantitative assessment revealed increasing loss of microtubule associated protein-2 positive neurons with elevations in 4-hydroxynonenal correlating with chronicity of exposure, whereas the pattern of activated glia expressing nitric oxide synthase 2 and tumor necrosis factor followed pathological severity. There was no significant change in the amount of GS positive cells but there was increased 3-nitrotyrosine in GS expressing cells and in neurons, particularly in animals with chronic DA toxicosis. These changes were consistently seen in the dentate gyrus and in the cornu ammonis (CA) sectors CA3, CA4, and CA1. The results of this study indicate that gliosis and resultant changes in GS are likely important mechanisms in DA-induced seizure that need to be further explored as potential therapies in treating exposed wildlife. PMID:25286249

  7. Domoic acid-induced seizures in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) are associated with neuroinflammatory brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kirkley, Kelly S; Madl, James E; Duncan, Colleen; Gulland, Frances M; Tjalkens, Ronald B

    2014-11-01

    California sea lions (CSLs) exposed to the marine biotoxin domoic acid (DA) develop an acute or chronic toxicosis marked by seizures and act as sentinels of the disease. Experimental evidence suggests that oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are important mechanisms underlying the seizurogenic potential of environmental toxicants but these pathways are relatively unstudied in CSLs. In the current study, we investigated the role of glutamate-glutamine changes and gliosis in DA-exposed CSLs to better understand the neurotoxic mechanisms occurring during DA toxicity. Sections from archived hippocampi from control and CSLs diagnosed with DA toxicosis were immunofluorescently stained for markers of gliosis, oxidative/nitrative stress and changes in glutamine synthetase (GS). Quantitative assessment revealed increasing loss of microtubule associated protein-2 positive neurons with elevations in 4-hydroxynonenal correlating with chronicity of exposure, whereas the pattern of activated glia expressing nitric oxide synthase 2 and tumor necrosis factor followed pathological severity. There was no significant change in the amount of GS positive cells but there was increased 3-nitrotyrosine in GS expressing cells and in neurons, particularly in animals with chronic DA toxicosis. These changes were consistently seen in the dentate gyrus and in the cornu ammonis (CA) sectors CA3, CA4, and CA1. The results of this study indicate that gliosis and resultant changes in GS are likely important mechanisms in DA-induced seizure that need to be further explored as potential therapies in treating exposed wildlife.

  8. Sudden death from pelvic hemorrhage after bilateral central fracture dislocations of the hip due to an epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Hughes, C A; O'Briain, D S

    2000-12-01

    Fracture and dislocation of major joints may be caused by the forceful tonic muscular contractions of seizure activity. A 77-year-old man who was found dead in bed with no sign of external trauma had bilateral central fracture dislocations of the femoral head through the acetabular floor with fatal pelvic hemorrhage and extensive pulmonary fat and bone marrow embolism. He had epilepsy, but the last seizure was 6 years earlier, and he had long discontinued medication. The fractures were attributed to a new unwitnessed seizure. This is the twentieth case of central fracture dislocation of the hip since 1970, when better anesthesia eliminated convulsive therapy-induced fractures. The authors review these 20 cases. Seizures followed inflammation, infarction or neoplasia of the brain, eclampsia, metabolic or iatrogenic causes, or epilepsy (6 cases, 2 of which had no prior seizures for 5 years). There were 11 men (mean age, 64 years) and 9 women (mean age, 47 years). Fractures were unilateral in 13 and bilateral in 7. Additional fractures (in vertebrae, shoulders, or femur) were present in eight. Only eight had prior bone disease. Local symptoms led to diagnosis in most, but two were identified incidentally on imaging. The current patient was the only one to die suddenly, but six other patients presented with shock and three died (one of whom had injuries that led to a suspicion of manslaughter). Central fracture-dislocation of the hip is a rare and little known consequence of seizures, with strong potential for misdiagnosis and lethal complications.

  9. Effects of single-dose neuropeptide Y on levels of hippocampal BDNF, MDA, GSH, and NO in a rat model of pentylenetetrazole-induced epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Kir, Hale Maral; Sahin, Deniz; Oztaş, Berrin; Musul, Mert; Kuskay, Sevinc

    2013-11-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders, characterized by recurrent seizures, which may increase the content of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of Neuropeptide Y on oxidative and nitrosative balance and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels induced by pentylenetetrazole (a standard convulsant drug) in the hippocampus of Wistar rats. Three groups of seven rats were treated intraperitoneally as follows: group 1 (saline + saline) 1 ml saline, group 2 (salin + Pentylenetetrazole) 1 ml saline 30 min before Pentylenetetrazole; and group 3 (Neuropeptide Y + Pentylenetetrazole) 60 μg/kg Neuropeptide Y 30 min before 60 mg/kg Pentylenetetrazole. After 24 h, the animals were euthanized by decapitation. Hippocampus were isolated to evaluate the malondialdehyde, glutathione, nitric oxide, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in three rat groups. The results of this study demonstrated that while intraperitoneally administered neuropeptide Y did not result in a statistically significant difference in BDNF levels, its administration caused a statistically significant decrease in malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels and an increase in glutathione levels in rats with pentylenetetrazole-induced epileptic seizure. Neuropeptide Y were able to reduce nitroxidative damage induced by pentylenetetrazole in the hippocampus of Wistar rats.

  10. Leukocyte Infiltration Triggers Seizure Recurrence in a Rat Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zanhua; Wang, Suping; Liu, Jinjie; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Yongbo

    2016-06-01

    Epilepsy, which affects about 1 % of the population worldwide, leads to poor prognosis and increased morbidity. However, effective drugs providing satisfactory control on seizure relapse were rare, which encouraged more etiological studies. Whether inflammation is one of key events underlying seizure is in debate. In order to explore the role of inflammatory in the pathogenesis and development of epilepsy, we conducted intra-caudal vein injection of leukocytes to aggravated brain inflammatory process in kainic acid-induced seizure model in this study. The results showed that intravenous administration of activated leukocytes increased the frequency and reduced the latent phase of seizure recurrences in rat models of epileptic seizure, during which leukocyte inflammation, brain-blood barrier damage, and neuron injury were also significantly aggravated, indicating that leukocyte infiltration might facilitate seizure recurrence through aggravating brain inflammation, brain-blood barrier damage, and neuron injury. PMID:27040283

  11. Houttuyniae Herba Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Neurotoxicity via Calcium Response Modulation in the Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Jeong, Hyun Uk; Hong, Sung In; Oh, Myung Sook

    2015-12-01

    Epilepsy is a complex neurological disorder characterized by the repeated occurrence of electrical activity known as seizures. This activity induces increased intracellular calcium, which ultimately leads to neuronal damage. Houttuyniae Herba, the aerial part of Houttuynia cordata, has various pharmacological effects and is widely used as a traditional herb. In the present study, we evaluated the protective effects of Houttuyniae Herba water extract on kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. Kainic acid directly acts on calcium release, resulting in seizure behavior, neuronal damage, and cognitive impairment. In a rat primary hippocampal culture system, Houttuyniae Herba water extract significantly protected neuronal cells from kainic acid toxicity. In a seizure model where mice received intracerebellar kainic acid injections, Houttuyniae Herba water extract treatment resulted in a lower seizure stage score, ameliorated cognitive impairment, protected neuronal cells against kainic acid-induced toxicity, and suppressed neuronal degeneration in the hippocampus. In addition, Houttuyniae Herba water extract regulated increases in the intracellular calcium level, its related downstream pathways (reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial dysfunction), and calcium/calmodulin complex kinase type II immunoreactivity in the mouse hippocampus, which resulted from calcium influx stimulation induced by kainic acid. These results demonstrate the neuroprotective effects of Houttuyniae Herba water extract through inhibition of calcium generation in a kainic acid-induced epileptic model. PMID:26366753

  12. Updated ILAE evidence review of antiepileptic drug efficacy and effectiveness as initial monotherapy for epileptic seizures and syndromes.

    PubMed

    Glauser, Tracy; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Bourgeois, Blaise; Cnaan, Avital; Guerreiro, Carlos; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Mattson, Richard; French, Jacqueline A; Perucca, Emilio; Tomson, Torbjorn

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this report was to update the 2006 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) report and identify the level of evidence for long-term efficacy or effectiveness for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as initial monotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed or untreated epilepsy. All applicable articles from July 2005 until March 2012 were identified, evaluated, and combined with the previous analysis (Glauser et al., 2006) to provide a comprehensive update. The prior analysis methodology was utilized with three modifications: (1) the detectable noninferiority boundary approach was dropped and both failed superiority studies and prespecified noninferiority studies were analyzed using a noninferiority approach, (2) the definition of an adequate comparator was clarified and now includes an absolute minimum point estimate for efficacy/effectiveness, and (3) the relationship table between clinical trial ratings, level of evidence, and conclusions no longer includes a recommendation column to reinforce that this review of efficacy/evidence for specific seizure types does not imply treatment recommendations. This evidence review contains one clarification: The commission has determined that class I superiority studies can be designed to detect up to a 20% absolute (rather than relative) difference in the point estimate of efficacy/effectiveness between study treatment and comparator using an intent-to-treat analysis. Since July, 2005, three class I randomized controlled trials (RCT) and 11 class III RCTs have been published. The combined analysis (1940-2012) now includes a total of 64 RCTs (7 with class I evidence, 2 with class II evidence) and 11 meta-analyses. New efficacy/effectiveness findings include the following: levetiracetam and zonisamide have level A evidence in adults with partial onset seizures and both ethosuximide and valproic acid have level A evidence in children with childhood absence epilepsy. There are no major changes in the level of evidence

  13. Epileptic Encephalopathies: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sonia; Al Baradie, Raidah

    2012-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are an epileptic condition characterized by epileptiform abnormalities associated with progressive cerebral dysfunction. In the classification of the International League Against Epilepsy eight age-related epileptic encephalopathy syndromes are recognized. These syndromes include early myoclonic encephalopathy and Ohtahara syndrome in the neonatal period, West syndrome and Dravet syndrome in infancy, myoclonic status in nonprogressive encephalopathies, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, Landau-Kleffner syndrome, and epilepsy with continuous spike waves during slow wave sleep in childhood and adolescences. Other epileptic syndromes such as migrating partial seizures in infancy and severe epilepsy with multiple independent spike foci may be reasonably added. In this paper, we provide an overview of epileptic encephalopathies including clinical neurophysiological features, cognitive deterioration, and management options especially that these conditions are generally refractory to standard antiepileptic drugs. PMID:23213494

  14. Synchrotron X-ray microtransections: a non invasive approach for epileptic seizures arising from eloquent cortical areas

    PubMed Central

    Pouyatos, B.; Nemoz, C.; Chabrol, T.; Potez, M.; Bräuer, E.; Renaud, L.; Pernet-Gallay, K.; Estève, F.; David, O.; Kahane, P.; Laissue, J. A.; Depaulis, A.; Serduc, R.

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron-generated X-ray (SRX) microbeams deposit high radiation doses to submillimetric targets whilst minimizing irradiation of neighboring healthy tissue. We developed a new radiosurgical method which demonstrably transects cortical brain tissue without affecting adjacent regions. We made such image-guided SRX microtransections in the left somatosensory cortex in a rat model of generalized epilepsy using high radiation doses (820 Gy) in thin (200 μm) parallel slices of tissue. This procedure, targeting the brain volume from which seizures arose, altered the abnormal neuronal activities for at least 9 weeks, as evidenced by a decrease of seizure power and coherence between tissue slices in comparison to the contralateral cortex. The brain tissue located between transections stayed histologically normal, while the irradiated micro-slices remained devoid of myelin and neurons two months after irradiation. This pre-clinical proof of concept highlights the translational potential of non-invasive SRX transections for treating epilepsies that are not eligible for resective surgery. PMID:27264273

  15. Synchrotron X-ray microtransections: a non invasive approach for epileptic seizures arising from eloquent cortical areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouyatos, B.; Nemoz, C.; Chabrol, T.; Potez, M.; Bräuer, E.; Renaud, L.; Pernet-Gallay, K.; Estève, F.; David, O.; Kahane, P.; Laissue, J. A.; Depaulis, A.; Serduc, R.

    2016-06-01

    Synchrotron-generated X-ray (SRX) microbeams deposit high radiation doses to submillimetric targets whilst minimizing irradiation of neighboring healthy tissue. We developed a new radiosurgical method which demonstrably transects cortical brain tissue without affecting adjacent regions. We made such image-guided SRX microtransections in the left somatosensory cortex in a rat model of generalized epilepsy using high radiation doses (820 Gy) in thin (200 μm) parallel slices of tissue. This procedure, targeting the brain volume from which seizures arose, altered the abnormal neuronal activities for at least 9 weeks, as evidenced by a decrease of seizure power and coherence between tissue slices in comparison to the contralateral cortex. The brain tissue located between transections stayed histologically normal, while the irradiated micro-slices remained devoid of myelin and neurons two months after irradiation. This pre-clinical proof of concept highlights the translational potential of non-invasive SRX transections for treating epilepsies that are not eligible for resective surgery.

  16. A 1.83 μJ/Classification, 8-Channel, Patient-Specific Epileptic Seizure Classification SoC Using a Non-Linear Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Bin Altaf, Muhammad Awais; Yoo, Jerald

    2016-02-01

    A non-linear support vector machine (NLSVM) seizure classification SoC with 8-channel EEG data acquisition and storage for epileptic patients is presented. The proposed SoC is the first work in literature that integrates a feature extraction (FE) engine, patient specific hardware-efficient NLSVM classification engine, 96 KB SRAM for EEG data storage and low-noise, high dynamic range readout circuits. To achieve on-chip integration of the NLSVM classification engine with minimum area and energy consumption, the FE engine utilizes time division multiplexing (TDM)-BPF architecture. The implemented log-linear Gaussian basis function (LL-GBF) NLSVM classifier exploits the linearization to achieve energy consumption of 0.39 μ J/operation and reduces the area by 28.2% compared to conventional GBF implementation. The readout circuits incorporate a chopper-stabilized DC servo loop to minimize the noise level elevation and achieve noise RTI of 0.81 μ Vrms for 0.5-100 Hz bandwidth with an NEF of 4.0. The 5 × 5 mm (2) SoC is implemented in a 0.18 μm 1P6M CMOS process consuming 1.83 μ J/classification for 8-channel operation. SoC verification has been done with the Children's Hospital Boston-MIT EEG database, as well as with a specific rapid eye-blink pattern detection test, which results in an average detection rate, average false alarm rate and latency of 95.1%, 0.94% (0.27 false alarms/hour) and 2 s, respectively. PMID:25700471

  17. Domoic acid epileptic disease.

    PubMed

    Ramsdell, John S; Gulland, Frances M

    2014-03-01

    Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:24663110

  18. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramsdell, John S.; Gulland, Frances M.

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:24663110

  19. PK 11195 attenuates kainic acid-induced seizures and alterations in peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) protein components in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Veenman, L; Leschiner, S; Spanier, I; Weisinger, G; Weizman, A; Gavish, M

    2002-03-01

    Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) are located in glial cells in the brain and in peripheral tissues. Mitochondria form the primary location for PBR. Functional PBR appear to require at least three components: an isoquinoline binding protein, a voltage-dependent anion channel, and an adenine nucleotide carrier. In the present study, rats received intraperitoneal kainic acid injections, which are known to cause seizures, neurodegeneration, hyperactivity, gliosis, and a fivefold increase in PBR ligand binding density in the hippocampus. In the forebrain of control rats, hippocampal voltage-dependent anion channel and adenine nucleotide carrier abundance was relatively low, while isoquinoline binding protein abundance did not differ between hippocampus and the rest of the forebrain. One week after kainic acid injection, isoquinoline binding protein abundance was increased more than 20-fold in the hippocampal mitochondrial fraction. No significant changes were detected regarding hippocampal voltage-dependent anion channel and adenine nucleotide carrier abundance. Pre-treatment with the isoquinoline PK11195, a specific PBR ligand, attenuated the occurrence of seizures, hyperactivity, and increases in isoquinoline binding protein levels in the hippocampus, which usually follow kainic acid application. These data suggest that isoquinoline binding protein may be involved in these effects of kainic acid injections.

  20. Video game induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Ferrie, C D; De Marco, P; Grünewald, R A; Giannakodimos, S; Panayiotopoulos, C P

    1994-08-01

    Fifteen patients who experienced epileptic seizures while playing video games are described together with a review of 20 cases in the English literature. Nine of the 15 cases and all but two of the reported cases experienced their first seizure while playing video games. Two thirds of patients had idiopathic generalised epilepsy and mainly reported generalised tonic clonic seizures, but some had typical absence seizures and myoclonic jerks while playing video games. In this series, 30% with idiopathic generalised epilepsy had juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Overall, 70% of patients with idiopathic generalised epilepsy were photosensitive to intermittent photic stimulation and the mechanism of seizure provocation was probably similar to that of television induced seizures, although sensitivity to specific patterns was sometimes important. Two children had self induced video game seizures. Non-photic factors such as excitement, fatigue, sleep deprivation, cognitive processing, and diurnal variation in susceptibility seemed to be important seizure precipitants, particularly in non-photo-sensitive patients. Twenty nine per cent of patients had partial (mainly occipital) video game associated seizures. Occipital spikes were common in the EEG of these patients. Photosensitivity to intermittent photic stimulation may have been important in two patients but in the others, who all played arcade video games, other mechanisms need to be considered. Video game associated seizures are a feature of several epileptic syndromes and differ in precipitants and appropriate management.

  1. Clinical review of genetic epileptic encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Grace J.; Asher, Y. Jane Tavyev; Graham, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Seizures are a frequently encountered finding in patients seen for clinical genetics evaluations. The differential diagnosis for the cause of seizures is quite diverse and complex, and more than half of all epilepsies have been attributed to a genetic cause. Given the complexity of such evaluations, we highlight the more common causes of genetic epileptic encephalopathies and emphasize the usefulness of recent technological advances. The purpose of this review is to serve as a practical guide for clinical geneticists in the evaluation and counseling of patients with genetic epileptic encephalopathies. Common syndromes will be discussed, in addition to specific seizure phenotypes, many of which are refractory to anti-epileptic agents. Divided by etiology, we overview the more common causes of infantile epileptic encephalopathies, channelopathies, syndromic, metabolic, and chromosomal entities. For each condition, we will outline the diagnostic evaluation and discuss effective treatment strategies that should be considered. PMID:22342633

  2. [West syndrome associated with epileptic negative myoclonus].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Takashi; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Oka, Makio; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro

    2014-09-01

    We report a 10-month-old girl who had brief epileptic negative myoclonus during the course of West syndrome. She began to have epileptic spasms in series at the age of 8 months. Video-electroencephalograph (EEG) monitoring revealed that she also had brief epileptic negative myoclonus when she was 10 months old. Brief atonia of limbs occurred in isolation or in a cluster during drowsiness or sleep. The ictal EEG exhibited diffuse polyspikes and waves or diffuse high-voltage slow waves that were overlapped by low-voltage fast waves. 3 to 4 hundred milliseconds of silent periods were observed in the bilateral deltoid electromyograms, which correspond to the EEG patterns. The occurrence of other types of seizures, partial seizures in particular, accompanied by epileptic spasms has been fully investigated. This is the first case report of a patient with West syndrome whose coexisting epileptic negative myoclonus was confirmed by a silent electromyogram pattern.

  3. [Video electroencephalographic diagnosis of epileptic and non-epileptic paroxysmal episodes in infants and children at the pre-school age].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jiménez, Angeles; García-Fernández, Marta; Santiago, M del Mar; Fournier-Del Castillo, M Concepción

    2012-05-21

    The main usefulness of video electroencephalographic (video-EEG) monitoring lies in the fact that it allows proper classification of the type of epileptic seizure and epileptic syndrome, identification of minor seizures, location of the epileptogenic zone and differentiation between epileptic seizures and non-epileptic paroxysmal manifestations (NEPM). In infants and pre-school age children, the clinical signs with which epileptic seizures are expressed differ to those of older children, seizures with bilateral motor signs such as epileptic spasms, tonic and myoclonic seizures predominate, and seizures with interruption of activity or hypomotor seizures, and no prominent automatisms are observed. In children with focal epilepsies, focal and generalised signs are often superposed, both clinically and in the EEG. NEPM may be benign transitory disorders or they can be episodic symptoms of different neurological or psychopathological disorders. NEPM are often observed in children with mental retardation, neurological compromise or autism spectrum disorders, who present epileptic seizures and epileptiform abnormalities in the baseline EEG. It then becomes necessary to determine which episodes correspond to epileptic seizures and which do not. The NEPM that are most frequently registered in the video-EEG in infants and pre-school age children are unexpected sudden motor contractions ('spasms'), introspective tendencies, motor stereotypic movements and paroxysmal sleep disorders.

  4. [Clinical approach to the first epileptic crisis in adults].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jovel, Camilo Alfonso; Sobrino-Mejía, Fidel Ernesto

    2014-04-16

    Seizures are one of the main reasons for visits to emergency and neurology. Represent a traumatic event with potential medical and social consequences. A first epileptic seizure, can be the initial manifestation of malignancy, systemic disorder or infection, but can also be the first manifestation of epilepsy. The misdiagnosis of symptomatic seizures and unprovoked seizure, significantly affects prognosis and patient outcomes. The aim of this review is to examine the general concepts that enable successful diagnostic and therapeutic approach to the patient presenting with a first epileptic seizure. PMID:24723179

  5. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot. PMID:26662874

  6. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  7. Current issues on epileptic women.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, J

    2000-05-01

    Issues linked to epileptic women are being reviewed. Ovarian steroid hormones have a number of effects on the brain that predispose to epileptic activity. In particular, estradiol produces changes in the hippocampus synapses predisposing hyperexcitability associated with seizures. Also, menses and menopause periods, in which there are changing levels of steroid ovarian hormones, are associated with a particular appearing of seizures (catamenial epilepsy) and with phenotypic changes of previous ones. Epilepsy can affect the reproductive system, inducing endocrinal abnormalities (through disruption of cortical regulation of hypothalamus hormone release, and changes in the central nervous system concentration of steroid hormones induced by antiepileptics), infertility (linked to abnormalities in menstrual cycle or to the occurrence of polycytic ovaries, particularly in association with valproate treatment), and sexual disfunction (namely related to physiologic defects). Oral hormonal contraceptives should be performed using a pill with > 50mg of estrogen in order to prevent its potential loss of efficacy induced by enzyme-inducing antiepileptics. Concerning pregnancy, some topics should be discussed with, and advised to epileptic women, including: the possibility of withdrawal antiepileptics and the need of folic acid supplementation when planning a pregnancy; the risk of increased seizure frequency during pregnancy, and of the occurrence of obstetric complications; the increased risk of teratogenesis associated with antiepileptic therapy (mainly if in polytherapy); the need of vitamin K supplementation during the last month of pregnancy in order to avoid newborn haemorrhages; and the general absence of risk of breastfeeding even under sustained antiepileptic therapy. PMID:10828312

  8. Cell Signaling Underlying Epileptic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bozzi, Yuri; Dunleavy, Mark; Henshall, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is a complex disease, characterized by the repeated occurrence of bursts of electrical activity (seizures) in specific brain areas. The behavioral outcome of seizure events strongly depends on the brain regions that are affected by overactivity. Here we review the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the generation of seizures in epileptogenic areas. Pathways activated by modulatory neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin), involving the activation of extracellular-regulated kinases and the induction of immediate early genes (IEGs) will be first discussed in relation to the occurrence of acute seizure events. Activation of IEGs has been proposed to lead to long-term molecular and behavioral responses induced by acute seizures. We also review deleterious consequences of seizure activity, focusing on the contribution of apoptosis-associated signaling pathways to the progression of the disease. A deep understanding of signaling pathways involved in both acute- and long-term responses to seizures continues to be crucial to unravel the origins of epileptic behaviors and ultimately identify novel therapeutic targets for the cure of epilepsy. PMID:21852968

  9. Clustering Approach to Quantify Long-Term Spatio-Temporal Interactions in Epileptic Intracranial Electroencephalography

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Anant; Erdogmus, Deniz; Shiau, Deng S.; Principe, Jose C.; Sackellares, Chris J.

    2007-01-01

    Abnormal dynamical coupling between brain structures is believed to be primarily responsible for the generation of epileptic seizures and their propagation. In this study, we attempt to identify the spatio-temporal interactions of an epileptic brain using a previously proposed nonlinear dependency measure. Using a clustering model, we determine the average spatial mappings in an epileptic brain at different stages of a complex partial seizure. Results involving 8 seizures from 2 epileptic patients suggest that there may be a fixed pattern associated with regional spatio-temporal dynamics during the interictal to pre-post-ictal transition. PMID:18317515

  10. Epileptic EEG visualization and sonification based on linear discriminate analysis.

    PubMed

    Wei Chen; Chia-Ping Shen; Ming-Jang Chiu; Qibin Zhao; Cichocki, Andrzej; Jeng-Wei Lin; Feipei Lai

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we first presents a high accuracy epileptic electroencephalogram (EEG) classification algorithm. EEG data of epilepsy patients are preprocessed, segmented, and decomposed to intrinsic mode functions, from which features are extracted. Two classifiers are trained based on linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to classify EEG data into three types, i.e., normal, spike, and seizure. We further in-depth investigate the changes of the decision values in LDA on continuous EEG data. An epileptic EEG visualization and sonification algorithm is proposed to provide both temporal and spatial information of spike and seizure of epilepsy patients. In the experiment, EEG data of six subjects (two normal and four seizure patients) are included. The experiment result shows the proposed epileptic EEG classification algorithm achieves high accuracy. As well, the visualization and sonification algorithm exhibits a great help in nursing seizure patients and localizing the area of seizures. PMID:26737286

  11. Transient epileptic amnesia: clinical report of a cohort of patients.

    PubMed

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Brunetti, Valerio; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Quaranta, Davide; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-07-01

    Transient epileptic amnesia is a seizure disorder, usually with onset in the middle-elderly and good response to low dosages of antiepileptic drugs. We describe the clinical, electroencephalography (EEG), and neuroimaging features of 11 patients with a temporal lobe epilepsy characterized by amnesic seizures as the sole or the main symptom. We outline the relevance of a detailed clinical history to recognize amnesic seizures and to avoid the more frequent misdiagnoses. Moreover, the response to monotherapy was usually good, although the epileptic disorder was symptomatic of acquired lesions in the majority of patients.

  12. Progress in autoimmune epileptic encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, S.; Vincent, A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Autoimmune epileptic encephalopathy is a potentially treatable neurological syndrome characterized by the coexistence of a neuronal antibody in the CSF and serum. Patients present with combinations of seizures, neuropsychiatric features, movement disorder and cognitive decline, but some patients have isolated seizures either at first presentation or during their illness. This review summarises our current understanding of the roles of specific neuronal antibodies in epilepsy-related syndromes and aims to aid the clinician in diagnosis and treatment. Recent findings Antigen discovery methods in three neuroimmunology centres independently identified antibodies to different subunits of the GABAA receptor; high levels of these antibodies were found mainly in patients with severe refractory seizures. These and other antibodies were also found in a proportion (<10%) of children and adults with epilepsy. A clinical study comparing immunotherapy in patients with autoantibodies or without an identified target antigen found neuroinflammatory features were predictive of a therapeutic response. New in-vitro and in-vivo studies, and spontaneous animal models, have confirmed the pathogenicity and epileptogenicity of neuronal antibodies and their relevance to other mammals. Summary Neuronal antibodies are an important cause of autoimmune epileptic encephalopathy, early recognition is important as there may be an underlying tumour, and early treatment is associated with a better outcome. In the absence of an antibody, the clinician should adopt a pragmatic approach and consider a trial of immunotherapy when other causes have been excluded. PMID:26886357

  13. Psychogenic pseudoepileptic seizures: clinical and electroencephalogram (EEG) video-tape recordings.

    PubMed

    Jedrzejczak, J; Owczarek, K; Majkowski, J

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents a clinical and electrophysiological analysis of type and duration of seizures recorded by means of long-term video electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring, a method which enables accurate diagnosis of psychogenic pseudoepileptic seizures occurring with or without epileptic seizures. Analysis is based on 1083 patients, hospitalized at our department between 1990 and 1997, with a preliminary diagnosis of epilepsy. Psychogenic pseudoepileptic seizures were diagnosed in 85 patients (7.8%). In 48 patients, pseudoepileptic seizures alone were diagnosed (group 1), whereas 37 patients had a mixed condition in which pseudoepileptic seizures were accompanied by epileptic seizures (group 2). For comparison of duration of pseudo- and epileptic seizures a control group (group 3), consisting of 55 patients randomly selected from the population of patients suffering from epileptic seizures alone, was parceled out. Long-term video EEG monitoring was performed in 70 patients. In 55 (79%) of these patients 230 seizures (221 pseudoepileptic and nine epileptic) were recorded. In 30 patients (32%), the diagnosis was based on clinical observation of the seizures and on the number of EEG recordings, including activating procedures such as sleep deprivation, photostimulation, hyperventilation and anti-epileptic drug withdrawal. We found that the duration of epileptic seizures was significantly shorter than the duration of psychogenic pseudoepileptic seizures. Our study has exposed the difficulties involved in the diagnosis of psychogenic pseudoepileptic seizures and the negligible value of neuroimaging techniques and interictal EEG recordings in the differential diagnosis of epileptic versus nonepileptic seizures. In this study, psychogenic seizures were significantly more frequent in women than in men; patient history analysis did not confirm the hypothesis that sexual abuse may cause psychogenic seizures.

  14. Febrile Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... or prolonged seizures are a risk factor for epilepsy but most children who experience febrile seizures do ... develop the reoccurring seizures that re characteristic of epilepsy. Certain children who have febrile seizures face an ...

  15. Febrile Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... febrile seizure does not mean a child has epilepsy, since that disorder is characterized by reoccurring seizures ... outcome but carry an increased risk of developing epilepsy. How common are febrile seizures? Febrile seizures are ...

  16. Absence seizure

    MedlinePlus

    Seizure - petit mal; Seizure - absence; Petit mal seizure; Epilepsy - absence seizure ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  17. Biotelemetry system for Epilepsy Seizure Control

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, LaCurtise; Bohnert, George W.

    2009-07-02

    The Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control Project developed and tested an automated telemetry system for use in an epileptic seizure prevention device that precisely controls localized brain temperature. This project was a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) grant to the Kansas City Plant (KCP), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to partner with Flint Hills Scientific, LLC, Lawrence, KS and Biophysical Laboratory Ltd (BIOFIL), Sarov, Russia to develop a method to help control epileptic seizures.

  18. [Drivers license qualification for epileptics].

    PubMed

    Egli, M; Hartmann, H; Hess, R

    1977-03-26

    The question whether a person with epilepsy qualified for a driving licence must be examined from the point of view of the individual as well as that of the community. The general public should be protected against unduly high risks from epileptic drivers, whereas the patient has a right to live as normal a life as possible, which includes driving an automobile. Too rigid criteria for obtaining the license increase the number of persons who evade medical control and drive "illegally". To require physicians to report their epileptic patients to the authorities would be counterproductive; it would also destroy the personal confidence between physician and patient which is so essential for successful treatment. Epileptic persons endanger safety on the road only slightly: 0.1-0.3% of all traffic accidents are due to epileptic seizures. In contrast, abuse of alcohol plays a major role in 6-9% of all accidents, whereas 80-90% are attributable to evident mistakes by the driver. Epileptic patients under regular medical supervision who are licenced on grounds of approved criteria do not cause more accidents than the general population. A dangerous group are, however, those with mental alterations (organic or reactive) and particularly patients with aggressive and expansive-compensatory traits, as well as those driving without permission. Prognostic criteria as to the further course of the disease are paramount for the assessment of qualification for the licence. The following rules have proved their worth: 2 years freedom from seizures (with or without therapy), no abnormalities specific for epilepsy in the EEG, no serious mental changes, regular medical supervision and treatment mus be guaranteed. Departures from these rules should be confined to exceptional cases with the consent of a physician specialized in epileptology. The same holds for admission to higher categories of driving licence, the only practical eventuality being category D (lorries), and even this only in

  19. Orgasm Induced Seizures: A Rare Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Chaukimath, S P; Patil, P S

    2015-01-01

    A variety of stimuli can cause reflex seizures, Some triggers include light, music and cognitive phenomenon. There are case reports however where the phenomenon of sexual activity has been a trigger for epileptic seizures. Most of these cases reported are in women so far, and were found to be localized to right cerebral hemisphere. We report a case of a 36-year-old male with orgasm-induced seizures, with other atypical features compared to majority of previous reports. PMID:27057393

  20. [Epileptic seizures complicated by Takotsubo syndrome].

    PubMed

    Garea Garcia-Malvar, M J; Gonzalez-Silva, Y; Epureanu-Epureanu, V

    2014-11-01

    Introduccion. El sindrome de takotsubo es un trastorno caracterizado por disfuncion ventricular reversible, dolor precordial de tipo anginoso y cambios electrocardiograficos sin evidencia de obstruccion coronaria en coronariografia. Se desencadena por estres, y es frecuente tras crisis epilepticas. Presentamos el caso de una paciente que inicia esta miocardiopatia tras una crisis epileptica al finalizar su sesion de hemodialisis. Caso clinico. Mujer de 55 años en hemodialisis por insuficiencia renal cronica, con epilepsia secundaria a lesion residual frontoparietal derecha por un hematoma que preciso evacuacion quirurgica. Tras una sesion de hemodialisis experimenta una crisis epileptica focal con generalizacion secundaria y, horas despues de esta, dolor centrotoracico. En seriacion enzimatica se objetiva elevacion de troponina I y, electrocardiograficamente, ondas T negativas en derivaciones precordiales (V2-V6). Se realiza coronariografia, cuyo resultado es normal, y se demuestran alteraciones de la contractilidad, confirmadas como de caracter transitorio en un estudio ecocardiografico seriado. Todos los datos anteriores hacen sospechar el diagnostico de sindrome de takotsubo. Conclusion. Las complicaciones cardiacas son una de las causas de morbimortalidad en la epilepsia, y entre ellas se encuentra el sindrome de takotsubo. La incidencia real de dicho sindrome se desconoce, pero dada su implicacion en la mortalidad de causa cardiaca en la epilepsia es importante sospecharlo ante la presencia de disfuncion cardiaca tras una crisis epileptica.

  1. Eight to Twelve Hertz Occipital EEG Training with Moderate and Severely Retarded Epileptic Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudrud, Eric; Striefel, Sebastian

    1981-01-01

    Three retarded epileptic individuals (17 to 22 years old) with a variety of seizure disorders were provided with 8 to 12 Hz occipital EEG biofeedback training. While seizures were not totally eliminated in any of the Ss, the results of the study indicated that all Ss exhibited decreases in some aspect of their seizure activity. (Author)

  2. Increased excitability and metabolism in pilocarpine induced epileptic rats: effect of Bacopa monnieri.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Jobin; Paul, Jes; Nandhu, M S; Paulose, C S

    2010-09-01

    We have evaluated the acetylcholine esterase and malate dehydrogenase activity in the muscle, epinephrine, norepinephrine, insulin and T3 content in the serum of epileptic rats. Acetylcholine esterase and malate dehydrogenase activity increased in the muscle and decreased in the heart of the epileptic rats compared to control. Insulin and T3 content were increased significantly in the serum of the epileptic rats. Our results suggest that repetitive seizures resulted in increased metabolism and excitability in epileptic rats. Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A treatment prevents the occurrence of seizures there by reducing the impairment on peripheral nervous system.

  3. Differential operator in seizure detection.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Kaushik

    2012-01-01

    Differential operators can detect significant changes in signals. This has been utilized to enhance the contrast of the seizure signatures in depth EEG or ECoG. We have actually taken normalized exponential of absolute value of single or double derivative of epileptic ECoG. This in short we call differential filtering. Windowed variance operation has been performed to automatically detect seizure onset on differentially filtered signal. A novel method for determining the duration of seizure has also been proposed. Since all operations take only linear time, the whole method is extremely fast. Seven empirical parameters have been introduced whose patient specific thresholding brings down the rate of false detection to a bare minimum. Results of implementation of the methods on the ECoG data of four epileptic patients have been reported with an ROC curve analysis. High value of the area under the ROC curve indicates excellent detection performance.

  4. Ion dynamics during seizures

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Joseph V.; Burman, Richard J.; Katz, Arieh A.; Akerman, Colin J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in membrane voltage brought about by ion fluxes through voltage and transmitter-gated channels represent the basis of neural activity. As such, electrochemical gradients across the membrane determine the direction and driving force for the flow of ions and are therefore crucial in setting the properties of synaptic transmission and signal propagation. Ion concentration gradients are established by a variety of mechanisms, including specialized transporter proteins. However, transmembrane gradients can be affected by ionic fluxes through channels during periods of elevated neural activity, which in turn are predicted to influence the properties of on-going synaptic transmission. Such activity-induced changes to ion concentration gradients are a feature of both physiological and pathological neural processes. An epileptic seizure is an example of severely perturbed neural activity, which is accompanied by pronounced changes in intracellular and extracellular ion concentrations. Appreciating the factors that contribute to these ion dynamics is critical if we are to understand how a seizure event evolves and is sustained and terminated by neural tissue. Indeed, this issue is of significant clinical importance as status epilepticus—a type of seizure that does not stop of its own accord—is a life-threatening medical emergency. In this review we explore how the transmembrane concentration gradient of the six major ions (K+, Na+, Cl−, Ca2+, H+and HCO3−) is altered during an epileptic seizure. We will first examine each ion individually, before describing how multiple interacting mechanisms between ions might contribute to concentration changes and whether these act to prolong or terminate epileptic activity. In doing so, we will consider how the availability of experimental techniques has both advanced and restricted our ability to study these phenomena. PMID:26539081

  5. Febrile seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... does not have a history of seizure disorders (epilepsy). A tonic-clonic seizure involves the entire body. ... no evidence that they cause death, brain damage, epilepsy, or learning problems. Most children outgrow febrile seizures ...

  6. Concepts of Connectivity and Human Epileptic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Louis; Daunizeau, Jean; Walker, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    This review attempts to place the concept of connectivity from increasingly sophisticated neuroimaging data analysis methodologies within the field of epilepsy research. We introduce the more principled connectivity terminology developed recently in neuroimaging and review some of the key concepts related to the characterization of propagation of epileptic activity using what may be called traditional correlation-based studies based on EEG. We then show how essentially similar methodologies, and more recently models addressing causality, have been used to characterize whole-brain and regional networks using functional MRI data. Following a discussion of our current understanding of the neuronal system aspects of the onset and propagation of epileptic discharges and seizures, we discuss the most advanced and ambitious framework to attempt to fully characterize epileptic networks based on neuroimaging data. PMID:21472027

  7. Pediatric Epileptic Encephalopathies: Pathophysiology and Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Shao, Li-Rong; Stafstrom, Carl E

    2016-05-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are syndromes in which seizures or interictal epileptiform activity contribute to or exacerbate brain function, beyond that caused by the underlying pathology. These severe epilepsies begin early in life, are associated with poor lifelong outcome, and are resistant to most treatments. Therefore, they represent an immense challenge for families and the medical care system. Furthermore, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the epileptic encephalopathies are poorly understood, hampering attempts to devise novel treatments. This article reviews animal models of the three classic epileptic encephalopathies-West syndrome (infantile spasms), Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and continuous spike waves during sleep or Landau-Kleffner syndrome-with discussion of how animal models are revealing underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that might be amenable to targeted therapy. PMID:27544466

  8. Seizure-induced disinhibition of the HPA axis increases seizure susceptibility.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Kate K; Hooper, Andrew; Wakefield, Seth; Maguire, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Stress is the most commonly reported precipitating factor for seizures. The proconvulsant actions of stress hormones are thought to mediate the effects of stress on seizure susceptibility. Interestingly, epileptic patients have increased basal levels of stress hormones, including corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and corticosterone, which are further increased following seizures. Given the proconvulsant actions of stress hormones, we proposed that seizure-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may contribute to future seizure susceptibility. Consistent with this hypothesis, our data demonstrate that pharmacological induction of seizures in mice with kainic acid or pilocarpine increases circulating levels of the stress hormone, corticosterone, and exogenous corticosterone administration is sufficient to increase seizure susceptibility. However, the mechanism(s) whereby seizures activate the HPA axis remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis involves compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons, which govern HPA axis function. Following seizure activity, there is a collapse of the chloride gradient due to changes in NKCC1 and KCC2 expression, resulting in reduced amplitude of sIPSPs and even depolarizing effects of GABA on CRH neurons. Seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis results in future seizure susceptibility which can be blocked by treatment with an NKCC1 inhibitor, bumetanide, or blocking the CRH signaling with Antalarmin. These data suggest that compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons following an initial seizure event may cause hyperexcitability of the HPA axis and increase future seizure susceptibility.

  9. Seizures and hyponatremia after excessive intake of diet coke.

    PubMed

    Mortelmans, Luc J M; Van Loo, Michel; De Cauwer, Harald G; Merlevede, Karen

    2008-02-01

    We describe a case of epileptic seizures after a massive intake of diet coke. Apart from the hyponatremia due to water intoxication the convulsions can be potentiated by the high dose of caffeine and aspartame from the diet coke. To our knowledge this is the first report of seizures due to excessive diet coke intake.

  10. [Ecstatic seizures].

    PubMed

    Likhachev, S A; Astapenko, A V; Osos, E L; Zmachynskaya, O L; Gvishch, T G

    2015-01-01

    Ecstatic seizures is a rare manifestation of epilepsy. They were described for the first time by F.M. Dostoevsky. Currently, the description of ecstatic seizures is possible to find in the scientific literature. The description of the own observation of a patient with emotional-affective seizures is presented. A role of the anterior insular cortex in the ecstatic seizures origin is discussed. The similarities between the feelings reported during ecstatic seizures and the feelings experienced under the effect of stimulant addictive drugs are described. The possible reasons of the low frequency of emotional-affective seizures are considered. PMID:26356170

  11. Imaging DC MEG Fields Associated with Epileptic Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, B. J.; Bowyer, S. M.; Moran, J. E.; Jenrow, K.; Tepley, N.

    2004-10-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a non-invasive brain imaging modality, with high spatial and temporal resolution, used to evaluate and quantify the magnetic fields associated with neuronal activity. Complex partial epileptic seizures are characterized by hypersynchronous neuronal activity believed to arise from a zone of epileptogenesis. This study investigated the characteristics of direct current (DC) MEG shifts arising at epileptic onset. MEG data were acquired with rats using a six-channel first order gradiometer system. Limbic status epilepticus was induced by IA (femoral) administration of kainic acid. DC-MEG shifts were observed at the onset of epileptic spike train activity and status epilepticus. Epilepsy is also being studied in patients undergoing presurgical mapping from the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at Henry Ford Hospital using a whole head Neuromagnetometer. Preliminary data analysis shows that DC-MEG waveforms, qualitatively similar to those seen in the animal model, are evident prior to seizure activity in human subjects.

  12. Febrile Seizures and Behavioural and Cognitive Outcomes in Preschool Children: An Old Issue Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deonna, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    The possible deleterious role of febrile seizures on development is an old issue. It took a long time to realize that impaired development or occurrence of chronic epilepsy affected a very small minority of children with febrile seizures. These children either had pre-existing brain damage, specific genetic epileptic conditions, or seizure-induced…

  13. The role of antiepileptic drugs in free radicals generation and antioxidant levels in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Eldin, Essam Eldin Mohamed Nour; Elshebiny, Hosam Abdel-Fattah; Mohamed, Tarek Mostafa; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed Abdel-Azim; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki

    2016-01-01

    Many risk factors are encountered during the pathogenesis of epilepsy. In this study, the effect of seizure frequency on free radical generation and antioxidants levels in epileptic patients was evaluated. This study was carried out on 15 healthy controls (GI) and 60 epileptic patients treated with mono- or poly-therapy of carbamazepine, valproic acid, or phenytoin. The treated epileptic patients were divided into 2 main groups according to the seizure frequency: controlled seizure patients GII (n = 30) and uncontrolled seizure patients GIII (n = 30). GII included the GIIA subgroup (n = 15) which had been seizure free for more than 12 months and the GIIB subgroup (n = 15) which had been seizure free for a period from 6 to12 months. GIII included GIIIA (n = 15) and GIIIB (n = 15) for patients which had a seizure frequency of less than and more than four times/month, respectively. In comparison to the control group (GI), the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde/creatinine ratio were significantly increased in GIIB, GIIIA, and GIIIB, while vitamins A and E levels were significantly decreased in GIIIB. Serum NO levels had significant negative correlations with serum vitamin E in the GIIA and GIIB groups, and with vitamin A in the GIIIA and GIIIB groups. However, serum NO had positive correlation with urinary MDA/Cr ratio. The imbalance between free radical generation and antioxidant system in epileptic patients may be a factor in seizure frequency.

  14. [The role of the nurse in the patient education of young epileptic patients].

    PubMed

    Danse, Marion; Goujon, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    An epileptic seizure in a child is a major source of anxiety and turns the family's everyday life upside down. Through therapeutic education, the nurse guides the families towards the autonomous management of the seizures, antiepileptic treatments, adaptations to daily life and potential comorbidities.

  15. How I treat a first single seizure in a child

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sheffali; Kaushik, Jaya Shankar

    2016-01-01

    An epileptic seizure is defined as transient occurrence of signs and/or symptoms due to abnormal excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in brain. There are diverse etiologies for acute seizure in infants and children. The present review provides a broad approach to diagnosis and treatment plan for acute seizure in children. The approach to a child with acute seizure is discussed with special emphasis on clinical approach based on history and focused examination with judicious choice of investigation and further management plan. The review also emphasizes on recognizing common nonepileptic events that masquerade as true seizure among infants and children. PMID:27011625

  16. The Expanding Clinical Spectrum of Genetic Pediatric Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Shbarou, Rolla; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2016-05-01

    Pediatric epileptic encephalopathies represent a clinically challenging and often devastating group of disorders that affect children at different stages of infancy and childhood. With the advances in genetic testing and neuroimaging, the etiologies of these epileptic syndromes are now better defined. The various encephalopathies that are reviewed in this article include the following: early infantile epileptic encephalopathy or Ohtahara syndrome, early myoclonic encephalopathy, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, West syndrome, severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (Dravet syndrome), Landau-Kleffner syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-wave during sleep. Their clinical features, prognosis as well as underlying genetic etiologies are presented and updated. PMID:27544470

  17. [An epileptic syndrome in infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Sumerkina, M L

    1997-01-01

    The results of examination of 102 patients with infantile cerebral paralysis (ICP) with epileptic syndrome (ES) at the age from 3 months to 14 years are presented. Epileptic fits predominated in patients with hemiparetic form of ICP (40.8%) and spastic diplegia (32.4%). ES manifestations were observed in ICP during the first 3 years of life (more than 80% of cases). The peculiarities of ES clinical course were revealed. There were determined the main types of seizures in patients with ICP which depended on age of their manifestation, as well as their further transformation and prognosis. Computer tomographic and EEG-correlations were established in different forms of ICP. They permitted to revealed pathogenetic mechanisms of ES development in patients with ICP and to determine therapeutic policy and prognosis of the disease. PMID:9163254

  18. Compulsive versifying after treatment of transient epileptic amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Woollacott, Ione O. C.; Fletcher, Phillip D.; Massey, Luke A.; Pasupathy, Amirtha; Rossor, Martin N.; Caine, Diana; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Warren, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Compulsive production of verse is an unusual form of hypergraphia that has been reported mainly in patients with right temporal lobe seizures. We present a patient with transient epileptic amnesia and a left temporal seizure focus, who developed isolated compulsive versifying, producing multiple rhyming poems, following seizure cessation induced by lamotrigine. Functional neuroimaging studies in the healthy brain implicate left frontotemporal areas in generating novel verbal output and rhyme, while dysregulation of neocortical and limbic regions occurs in temporal lobe epilepsy. This case complements previous observations of emergence of altered behavior with reduced seizure frequency in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Such cases suggest that reduced seizure frequency has the potential not only to stabilize or improve memory function, but also to trigger complex, specific behavioral alterations. PMID:25157425

  19. Compulsive versifying after treatment of transient epileptic amnesia.

    PubMed

    Woollacott, Ione O C; Fletcher, Phillip D; Massey, Luke A; Pasupathy, Amirtha; Rossor, Martin N; Caine, Diana; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Warren, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    Compulsive production of verse is an unusual form of hypergraphia that has been reported mainly in patients with right temporal lobe seizures. We present a patient with transient epileptic amnesia and a left temporal seizure focus, who developed isolated compulsive versifying, producing multiple rhyming poems, following seizure cessation induced by lamotrigine. Functional neuroimaging studies in the healthy brain implicate left frontotemporal areas in generating novel verbal output and rhyme, while dysregulation of neocortical and limbic regions occurs in temporal lobe epilepsy. This case complements previous observations of emergence of altered behavior with reduced seizure frequency in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Such cases suggest that reduced seizure frequency has the potential not only to stabilize or improve memory function, but also to trigger complex, specific behavioral alterations.

  20. Music and its association with epileptic disorders.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    The association between music and epileptic seizures is complex and intriguing. Musical processing within the human brain recruits a network which involves many cortical areas that could activate as part of a temporal lobe seizure or become hyperexcitable on musical exposure as in the case of musicogenic epilepsy. The dichotomous effect of music on seizures may be explained by modification of dopaminergic circuitry or counteractive cognitive and sensory input in ictogenesis. Research has explored the utility of music as a therapy in epilepsy and while limited studies show some evidence of an effect on seizure activity; further work is required to ascertain its clinical potential. Sodium channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs, e.g., carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, appear to effect pitch perception particularly in native-born Japanese, a rare but important adverse effect, particularly if a professional musician. Temporal lobe surgery for right lateralizing epilepsy has the capacity to effect all facets of musical processing, although risk and correlation to resection area need further research. There is a need for the development of investigative tools of musical processing that could be utilized along the surgical pathway. Similarly, work is also required in devising a musical paradigm as part of electroencephalography to improve surveillance of musicogenic seizures. These clinical applications could aid the management of epilepsy and preservation of musical ability. PMID:25725912

  1. Music and its association with epileptic disorders.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    The association between music and epileptic seizures is complex and intriguing. Musical processing within the human brain recruits a network which involves many cortical areas that could activate as part of a temporal lobe seizure or become hyperexcitable on musical exposure as in the case of musicogenic epilepsy. The dichotomous effect of music on seizures may be explained by modification of dopaminergic circuitry or counteractive cognitive and sensory input in ictogenesis. Research has explored the utility of music as a therapy in epilepsy and while limited studies show some evidence of an effect on seizure activity; further work is required to ascertain its clinical potential. Sodium channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs, e.g., carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, appear to effect pitch perception particularly in native-born Japanese, a rare but important adverse effect, particularly if a professional musician. Temporal lobe surgery for right lateralizing epilepsy has the capacity to effect all facets of musical processing, although risk and correlation to resection area need further research. There is a need for the development of investigative tools of musical processing that could be utilized along the surgical pathway. Similarly, work is also required in devising a musical paradigm as part of electroencephalography to improve surveillance of musicogenic seizures. These clinical applications could aid the management of epilepsy and preservation of musical ability.

  2. Automated seizure detection using EKG.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Ivan

    2014-03-01

    Changes in heart rate, most often increases, are associated with the onset of epileptic seizures and may be used in lieu of cortical activity for automated seizure detection. The feasibility of this aim was tested on 241 clinical seizures from 81 subjects admitted to several Epilepsy Centers for invasive monitoring for evaluation for epilepsy surgery. The performance of the EKG-based seizure detection algorithm was compared to that of a validated algorithm applied to electrocorticogram (ECoG). With the most sensitive detection settings [threshold T: 1.15; duration D: 0 s], 5/241 seizures (2%) were undetected (false negatives) and with the highest [T: 1.3; D: 5 s] settings, the number of false negative detections rose to 34 (14%). The rate of potential false positive (PFP) detections was 9.5/h with the lowest and 1.1/h with the highest T, D settings. Visual review of 336 ECoG segments associated with PFPs revealed that 120 (36%) were associated with seizures, 127 (38%) with bursts of epileptiform discharges and only 87 (26%) were true false positives. Electrocardiographic (EKG)-based seizure onset detection preceded clinical onset by 0.8 s with the lowest and followed it by 13.8 s with the highest T, D settings. Automated EKG-based seizure detection is feasible and has potential clinical utility given its ease of acquisition, processing, high signal/noise and ergonomic advantages viz-a-viz EEG (electroencephalogram) or ECoG. Its use as an "electronic" seizure diary will remedy in part, the inaccuracies of those generated by patients/care-givers in a cost-effective manner.

  3. Temporal distribution of seizures in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Taubøll, E; Lundervold, A; Gjerstad, L

    1991-03-01

    A major problem in epileptology is why a seizure occurs at a particular moment in time. An initial step in solving this problem is a detailed analysis of the temporal distribution of seizures. Using methods and theories of stochastic processes, seizure patterns in a group of epileptic outpatients were examined for stationarity, randomness, dependency and periodicity in a prospective study. Sixteen of the 21 seizure diaries included in the study showed stationarity; 2 were non-stationary and 3 inconclusive. Eleven of the 16 stationary diaries were non-Poisson (P less than 0.005), indicating that in the majority of patients seizures did not occur randomly. The most frequently encountered phenomenon was seizure clustering. Clustering was considered when the diaries fulfilled all three criteria: (1) a positive R-test (P less than 0.001); (2) deviation from the fitted Poisson distribution towards clustering; and (3) the feature of an autoregressive process in the autocorrelogram plot. Dependency between seizure events was demonstrated in 8 of the 16 stationary diaries, computing first order transition probabilities. A detailed analysis of seizure occurrence is a major step towards a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying seizure precipitation. This is exemplified by our finding of a relation between seizure frequency and the menstrual cycle.

  4. Predictability of uncontrollable multifocal seizures – towards new treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Lehnertz, Klaus; Dickten, Henning; Porz, Stephan; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Elger, Christian E.

    2016-01-01

    Drug-resistant, multifocal, non-resectable epilepsies are among the most difficult epileptic disorders to manage. An approach to control previously uncontrollable seizures in epilepsy patients would consist of identifying seizure precursors in critical brain areas combined with delivering a counteracting influence to prevent seizure generation. Predictability of seizures with acceptable levels of sensitivity and specificity, even in an ambulatory setting, has been repeatedly shown, however, in patients with a single seizure focus only. We did a study to assess feasibility of state-of-the-art, electroencephalogram-based seizure-prediction techniques in patients with uncontrollable multifocal seizures. We obtained significant predictive information about upcoming seizures in more than two thirds of patients. Unexpectedly, the emergence of seizure precursors was confined to non-affected brain areas. Our findings clearly indicate that epileptic networks, spanning lobes and hemispheres, underlie generation of seizures. Our proof-of-concept study is an important milestone towards new therapeutic strategies based on seizure-prediction techniques for clinical practice. PMID:27091239

  5. Clinically silent seizures in a neonate with tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Mitsuru; Okumura, Akihisa; Abe, Shinpei; Igarashi, Ayuko; Hisata, Ken; Shoji, Hiromichi; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Although seizures during infancy in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex are common, seizures in neonates are infrequent. Here, we report the clinical course and electroencephalography (EEG) findings of a neonate with tuberous sclerosis complex associated with clinically silent seizures. The patient was a girl in whom cardiac tumors were detected on fetal ultrasonography. Brain magnetic resonance imaging during the neonatal period showed subependymal and cortical tubers. Routine EEG indicated unexpected ictal changes with no noticeable clinical symptoms. Ictal EEG was associated with a subtle increase in heart rate and a brief increase in chin electromyogram. These changes were difficult to identify clinically. The patient later developed focal seizures and epileptic spasms and had severe psychomotor delay. The present case suggests the occurrence of clinically silent seizures before the appearance of epileptic spasms in infants with tuberous sclerosis, and that EEG is an option for neonates with a prenatal diagnosis. PMID:26712128

  6. Epileptogenesis and epileptic maturation in phosphorylation site-specific SNAP-25 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shigeru; Yamamori, Saori; Otsuka, Shintaro; Saito, Masanori; Suzuki, Eiji; Kataoka, Masakazu; Miyaoka, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Masami

    2015-09-01

    Snap25(S187A/S187A) mouse is a knock-in mouse with a single amino acid substitution at a protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation site of the synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25), which is a target-soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (t-SNARE) protein essential for neurotransmitter release. Snap25(S187A/S187A) mice exhibit several distinct phenotypes, including reductions in dopamine and serotonin release in the brain, anxiety-like behavior, and cognitive dysfunctions. Homozygous mice show spontaneous epileptic convulsions, and about 15% of the mice die around three weeks after birth. The remaining mice survive for almost two years and exhibit spontaneous recurrent seizures throughout their lifetime. Here, we conducted long-term continuous video electroencephalogram recording of the mice and analyzed the process of epileptogenesis and epileptic maturation in detail. Spikes and slow-wave discharges (SWDs) were observed in the cerebral cortex and thalamus before epileptic convulsions began. SWDs showed several properties similar to those observed in absence seizures including (1) lack of in the hippocampus, (2) movement arrest during SWDs, and (3) inhibition by ethosuximide. Multiple generalized seizures occurred in all homozygous mice around three weeks after birth. However, seizure generation stopped within several days, and a seizure-free latent period began. Following a spike-free quiet period, the number of spikes increased gradually, and epileptic seizures reappeared. Subsequently, spontaneous seizures occurred cyclically throughout the life of the mice, and several progressive changes in seizure frequency, seizure duration, seizure cycle interval, seizure waveform, and the number and waveform of epileptic discharges during slow-wave sleep occurred with different time courses over 10 weeks. Anxiety-related behaviors appeared suddenly within three days after epileptic seizures began and were delayed markedly by oral administration of

  7. Exploring human epileptic activity at the single-neuron level.

    PubMed

    Tankus, Ariel

    2016-05-01

    Today, localization of the seizure focus heavily relies on EEG monitoring (scalp or intracranial). However, current technology enables much finer resolutions. The activity of hundreds of single neurons in the human brain can now be simultaneously explored before, during, and after a seizure or in association with an interictal discharge. This technology opens up new horizons to understanding epilepsy at a completely new level. This review therefore begins with a brief description of the basis of the technology, the microelectrodes, and the setup for their implantation in patients with epilepsy. Using these electrodes, recent studies provide novel insights into both the time domain and firing patterns of epileptic activity of single neurons. In the time domain, seizure-related activity may occur even minutes before seizure onset (in its current, EEG-based definition). Seizure-related neuronal interactions exhibit complex heterogeneous dynamics. In the seizure-onset zone, changes in firing patterns correlate with cell loss; in the penumbra, neurons maintain their spike stereotypy during a seizure. Hence, investigation of the extracellular electrical activity is expected to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the disease; it may, in the future, serve for a more accurate localization of the seizure focus; and it may also be employed to predict the occurrence of seizures prior to their behavioral manifestation in order to administer automatic therapeutic interventions.

  8. Noninvasive real time tomographic imaging of epileptic foci and networks.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Ji, Lijun; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Bo; Yang, Jianjun; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Max S; Zhou, Junli; Carney, Paul R; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-02-01

    While brain imaging and electrophysiology play a central role in neuroscience research and in the evaluation of neurological disorders, a single noninvasive modality that offers both high spatial and temporal resolution is currently not available. Here we show in an acute epilepsy rat model that photoacoustic tomography (PAT) can noninvasively track seizure brain dynamics with both high spatial and temporal resolution, and at a depth that is clinically relevant. The noninvasive yet whole surface and depth capabilities of the PAT system allowed us to actually see what is happening during ictogenesis in terms of seizure onset and spread. Both seizure onset and propagation were tomographically detected at a spatial resolution of 150μm and a temporal resolution of 300ms, respectively. The current study lends support to the theory that seizure onset and spread involves a rich interplay between multiple cortical and subcortical brain areas during the onset and spread of epileptic seizures. Dynamical changes of vasculature during epileptiform events were also detected with high spatiotemporal resolution. Together, these findings suggest that PAT represents a powerful tool for noninvasively mapping seizure onset and propagation patterns, and the 'functional' connectivity within epileptic brain networks. PMID:23128072

  9. A practical approach to uncomplicated seizures in children.

    PubMed

    McAbee, G N; Wark, J E

    2000-09-01

    Uncomplicated seizures and epilepsy are common in infants and children. Family physicians should be aware of certain epilepsy syndromes that occur in children, such as febrile seizures, benign focal epilepsy of childhood, complex partial epilepsy, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and video game-related epilepsy. Not all uncomplicated childhood seizures require neuroimaging or treatment. Febrile seizures, rolandic seizures and video game-related seizures are childhood epileptic syndromes that are typically not associated with brain structural lesions on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, and are often not treated with anticonvulsant drugs. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy does not require neuroimaging but does require treatment because of a high rate of recurrent seizures. Complex partial epilepsy often requires both neuroimaging and treatment. Although seizures are diagnosed primarily on clinical grounds, all children with a possible seizure (except febrile seizures) should have an electroencephalogram. Interictal EEGs may be normal. Computed tomography has demonstrated abnormalities in 7 to 19 percent of children with new-onset seizures. The yield of magnetic resonance imaging for specific childhood seizure types is not known, but it is the preferred modality of neuroimaging for many clinical presentations. Most children's seizures treated with anticonvulsants are controlled by the first drug selected. The value of "therapeutic' serum drug levels is questionable in the management of uncomplicated childhood seizures.

  10. Dopey's seizure.

    PubMed

    Dan, B; Christiaens, F

    1999-06-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic condition namely characterized by developmental delay, virtual absence of expressive verbal language, peculiar organization of movement, seizures and happy demeanor. This syndrome has been recognized since 1965, but it seems that Walt Disney presented an original depiction of it in his first full-length animated film, including myoclonic jerks and an apparently generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

  11. Musicogenic seizures.

    PubMed

    Avanzini, Giuliano

    2003-11-01

    Eighty-seven reports of patients with seizures induced by listening and/or playing music and one personal observation are reviewed. Music-induced (or musicogenic) seizures are currently classified among the reflex seizures precipitated by complex stimuli. According to the available information, they are defined as focal seizures due to a discharge involving lateral and mesial temporal and orbitofrontal areas. The specific musical component responsible for seizure precipitation is still undetermined. An important role is attributed to the emotional aspect of music. The existence of this rare disorder should be borne in mind by neurologists, who should also be aware of the existing musical test batteries that may help in understanding better the nature of triggering mechanisms responsible for this unique pathological condition. The implementations of the results of ongoing investigations on brain processing of musical information will advance our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the transition from interictal to ictal phases of epilepsy. PMID:14681120

  12. Two types of isolated epileptic nystagmus: case report

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yunfeng; Wang, Juan; Li, Desheng; Lang, Senyang

    2015-01-01

    Epileptic nystagmus (EN) is a quick, repetitive jerky movement of the eyeball caused by seizure activity, unaccompanied by other ictal phenomena rare. Here, we described two cases, one characterized by binocular and the other by monocular isolated epileptic nystagmus (IEN), and we identified the characteristics of the etiology, clinical manifestations, electroencephalogram, imaging, treatment and prognosis in epileptic nystagmus through reviewing literature. We found IEN occurs more frequently in children than in adults. Etiological factors included trauma, cerebral vascular disease, tumor, and anoxia. The frequency of IEN was high, which varied from several to hundreds of times per day, and the duration of it was usually less than 1 minute. EN and its subtypes, such as epileptic monocular nystagmus, vertical epileptic nystagmus, epileptic skew deviation, periodic alternating nystagmus, and partial oculo-clonic status, are rare. The fast phase of the nystagmus was contralateral to the epileptogenic zone in most cases. Periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs) is a distinct EEG pattern in EN. Our findings suggested that the occipital lobe may plays a key role in the origin of EN. PMID:26550287

  13. Advances in management of neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Vesoulis, Zachary A; Mathur, Amit M

    2014-06-01

    Seizures are more common in the neonatal period than any other time in the human lifespan. A high index of suspicion for seizures should be maintained for infants who present with encephalopathy soon after birth, have had a stroke, central nervous system (CNS) infection or intracranial hemorrhage or have a genetic or metabolic condition associated with CNS malformations. Complicating the matter, most neonatal seizures lack a clinical correlate with only subtle autonomic changes and often no clinical indication at all. Over the last three decades, several tools have been developed to enhance the detection and treatment of neonatal seizures. The use of electroencephalography (EEG) and the later development of amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG), allows for Neurologists and non-Neurologists alike, to significantly increase the sensitivity of seizure detection. When applied to the appropriate clinical setting, time to diagnosis and start of therapy is greatly reduced. Phenobarbital maintains the status of first-line therapy in worldwide use. However, newer anti-epileptic agents such as, levetiracetam, bumetanide, and topiramate are increasingly being applied to the neonatal population, offering the potential for seizure treatment with a significantly better side-effect profile. Seizures in premature infants, continue to confound clinicians and researchers alike. Though the apparent seizure burden is significant and there is an association between seizures and adverse outcomes, the two are not cleanly correlated. Compounding the issue, GABA-ergic anti-epileptic drugs are not only less effective in this age group due to reversed neuronal ion gradients but may cause harm. Selecting an appropriate treatment group remains a challenge. PMID:24796413

  14. [Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: overview and implications for practice].

    PubMed

    Szita, Bernadett; Hidasi, Zoltán

    2016-05-15

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures are enigmatic disorders at the interface of neurology and psychiatry. Seizures resemble epileptic seizures but are not associated with electrical discharges in the brain. Symptoms typically start in early adulthood and women are far more affected than men. Video-EEG is widely considered to be the gold standard for diagnosis. Still psychogenic nonepileptic seizures are often misdiagnosed and treated as epilepsy for years that is burdensome to patients and costly to the healthcare system. Patients having psychogenic nonepileptic seizures show a high prevalence of traumatic life events, therefore, psychosocial factors are thought to play an important role in the etiology. Neurobiological factors may also contribute to the development of seizures as a subgroup of patients are characterized by cognitive impairment and subtle structural and functional brain abnormalities. Treatment includes psychotherapeutic procedures, particularly cognitive behavioral therapy and additional pharmacological interventions. This article presents an overview of the clinical context, diagnosis, etiology and treatment of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. PMID:27156524

  15. [Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: overview and implications for practice].

    PubMed

    Szita, Bernadett; Hidasi, Zoltán

    2016-05-15

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures are enigmatic disorders at the interface of neurology and psychiatry. Seizures resemble epileptic seizures but are not associated with electrical discharges in the brain. Symptoms typically start in early adulthood and women are far more affected than men. Video-EEG is widely considered to be the gold standard for diagnosis. Still psychogenic nonepileptic seizures are often misdiagnosed and treated as epilepsy for years that is burdensome to patients and costly to the healthcare system. Patients having psychogenic nonepileptic seizures show a high prevalence of traumatic life events, therefore, psychosocial factors are thought to play an important role in the etiology. Neurobiological factors may also contribute to the development of seizures as a subgroup of patients are characterized by cognitive impairment and subtle structural and functional brain abnormalities. Treatment includes psychotherapeutic procedures, particularly cognitive behavioral therapy and additional pharmacological interventions. This article presents an overview of the clinical context, diagnosis, etiology and treatment of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

  16. Analysis of Epileptic Discharges from Implanted Subdural Electrodes in Patients with Sturge-Weber Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective Almost two-thirds of patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) have epilepsy, and half of them require surgery for it. However, it is well known that scalp electroencephalography (EEG) does not demonstrate unequivocal epileptic discharges in patients with SWS. Therefore, we analyzed interictal and ictal discharges from intracranial subdural EEG recordings in patients treated surgically for SWS to elucidate epileptogenicity in this disorder. Methods Five intractable epileptic patients with SWS who were implanted with subdural electrodes for presurgical evaluation were enrolled in this study. We examined the following seizure parameters: seizure onset zone (SOZ), propagation speed of seizure discharges, and seizure duration by visual inspection. Additionally, power spectrogram analysis on some frequency bands at SOZ was performed from 60 s before the visually detected seizure onset using the EEG Complex Demodulation Method (CDM). Results We obtained 21 seizures from five patients for evaluation, and all seizures initiated from the cortex under the leptomeningeal angioma. Most of the patients presented with motionless staring and respiratory distress as seizure symptoms. The average seizure propagation speed and duration were 3.1 ± 3.6 cm/min and 19.4 ± 33.6 min, respectively. Significant power spectrogram changes at the SOZ were detected at 10–30 Hz from 15 s before seizure onset, and at 30–80 Hz from 5 s before seizure onset. Significance In patients with SWS, seizures initiate from the cortex under the leptomeningeal angioma, and seizure propagation is slow and persists for a longer period. CDM indicated beta to low gamma-ranged seizure discharges starting from shortly before the visually detected seizure onset. Our ECoG findings indicate that ischemia is a principal mechanism underlying ictogenesis and epileptogenesis in SWS. PMID:27054715

  17. [Epilepsy from a metaphysical perspective: an interpretation of the biblical story of the epileptic boy and Raphael's Transfiguration].

    PubMed

    Janz, D

    1994-01-01

    Raphael's last painting reveals, in the upper half of the picture, Christ's transfiguration on Mount Tabor and, in the lower half, the young boy's epileptic seizure at the foot of the mountain in the presence of the other disciples. Raphael depicts both events, which are told in succession in the Gospels, as if they took place at the same time. By synchronizing both scenes, Raphael demonstrated a significant correspondence between Christ and the epileptic boy which reveals the epileptic seizure as a symbolic representation of a transcendental event. This metaphysical aspect of epilepsy depicted by Raphael can also be found in the corresponding biblical passages. In the Gospels, the metamorphosis caused by the epileptic seizure is used as a simile for Christ's transfiguration through suffering, death and resurrection.

  18. [A child with ictal fear as the primary epileptic manifestation].

    PubMed

    Inutsuka, Miki; Ogino, Tatsuya; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Ohtsuka, Yoko; Oka, Eiji

    2003-07-01

    We report a 4-year-old boy with ictal fear as his primary epileptic manifestation. Following an arrest of motion, the boy started to scream and struggle with an expression of horror on his face. Oral automatisms appeared around the end of the seizure. Complex visual and gustatory hallucinations and pain in the left leg were also observed. Ictal and interictal scalp EEGs revealed epileptic discharges in bilateral frontal regions. Ictal SPECT (99 mTc-HMPAO) showed hyperperfusion in right medial temporal area. These findings suggest that ictal fear associated with other ictal manifestations such as various hallucinations and oral automatisms resulted from rapid spread of epileptic discharges from frontal lobes to the right anterior temporal region.

  19. Automatic Detection of Seizures with Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Dale E.; Harris, John C.; Cutchis, Protagoras N.; Cristion, John A.; Lesser, Ronald P.; Webber, W. Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    There are an estimated two million people with epilepsy in the United States. Many of these people do not respond to anti-epileptic drug therapy. Two devices can be developed to assist in the treatment of epilepsy. The first is a microcomputer-based system designed to process massive amounts of electroencephalogram (EEG) data collected during long-term monitoring of patients for the purpose of diagnosing seizures, assessing the effectiveness of medical therapy, or selecting patients for epilepsy surgery. Such a device would select and display important EEG events. Currently many such events are missed. A second device could be implanted and would detect seizures and initiate therapy. Both of these devices require a reliable seizure detection algorithm. A new algorithm is described. It is believed to represent an improvement over existing seizure detection algorithms because better signal features were selected and better standardization methods were used.

  20. Quantitative analysis of surface electromyography: Biomarkers for convulsive seizures.

    PubMed

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Pressler, Ronit; Wolf, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Muscle activity during seizures is in electroencephalographical (EEG) praxis often considered an irritating artefact. This article discusses ways by surface electromyography (EMG) to turn it into a valuable tool of epileptology. Muscles are in direct synaptic contact with motor neurons. Therefore, EMG signals provide direct information about the electric activity in the motor cortex. Qualitative analysis of EMG has traditionally been a part of the long-term video-EEG recordings. Recent development in quantitative analysis of EMG signals yielded valuable information on the pathomechanisms of convulsive seizures, demonstrating that it was different from maximal voluntary contraction, and different from convulsive psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. Furthermore, the tonic phase of the generalised tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) proved to have different quantitative features than tonic seizures. The high temporal resolution of EMG allowed detailed characterisation of temporal dynamics of the GTCS, suggesting that the same inhibitory mechanisms that try to prevent the build-up of the seizure activity, contribute to ending the seizure. These findings have clinical implications: the quantitative EMG features provided the pathophysiologic substrate for developing neurophysiologic biomarkers that accurately identify GTCS. This proved to be efficient both for seizure detection and for objective, automated distinction between convulsive and non-convulsive epileptic seizures.

  1. Dopey's seizure.

    PubMed

    Dan, B; Christiaens, F

    1999-06-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic condition namely characterized by developmental delay, virtual absence of expressive verbal language, peculiar organization of movement, seizures and happy demeanor. This syndrome has been recognized since 1965, but it seems that Walt Disney presented an original depiction of it in his first full-length animated film, including myoclonic jerks and an apparently generalized tonic-clonic seizure. PMID:10452923

  2. Generalized tonic-clonic seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizure - grand mal; Grand mal seizure; Seizure - generalized; Epilepsy - generalized seizure ... occur as part of a repeated, chronic illness (epilepsy). Some seizures are due to psychological problems (psychogenic).

  3. The differences in epileptic characteristics in patients with porencephaly and schizencephaly.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Miki; Maeda, Tomoki; Izumi, Tatsuro

    2012-08-01

    The epileptic characteristics and their differences in patients with porencephaly and schizencephaly were, respectively, evaluated. Eleven patients with porencephaly and eight patients with schizencephaly were retrospectively enrolled in this study. Five of the six patients with extensive porencephaly and all five patients with open-lip schizencephaly had been suffering from various types of epileptic seizures. Three patients with extensive porencephaly and all five patients with open-lip schizencephaly had presented with early onset seizures before 9 months of age. Two patients with extensive porencephaly and three patients with open-lip schizencephaly had presented with West syndrome. These two groups of patients with epileptic seizures showed generalized epilepsy or generalized epilepsy with unilateral dominancy at the onset, and then developed localization-related epilepsy or unilateral seizures with increasing age. The epileptic paroxysms showed multifocal independent spikes, which were not always localized in the defect or cleft sites at the last examination. Polytherapy or synergistic combinations were eventually introduced for these intractable seizures in both groups for patients without any evidence of efficacy. In the porencephaly patients, four of five patients achieved good seizure control with appropriate monotherapy or two-drug therapy including valproate. All five patients with schizencephaly had been treated by polytherapy, and three of them had persistent intractable seizures in spite of trying rational monotherapy or two-drug therapy. The epileptic intractability associated with open-lip schizencephaly might be related to the epileptogenesis of these extensive and widespread defective lesions, which were commonly associated with cortical dysplasia. A trial of rational monotherapy or two-drug therapy may be effective, rather than larger-number polytherapy in many cases, more in porencephaly than schizencephaly. PMID:22024697

  4. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures.

    PubMed

    Greyson, Bruce; Fountain, Nathan B; Derr, Lori L; Broshek, Donna K

    2014-01-01

    Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. Fifty-five percent of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients' reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time.

  5. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures

    PubMed Central

    Greyson, Bruce; Fountain, Nathan B.; Derr, Lori L.; Broshek, Donna K.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. Fifty-five percent of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients' reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time. PMID:24592228

  6. Is an epilepsy presurgical evaluation necessary for mid-grade and high-grade brain tumors presenting with seizures?

    PubMed

    Hamer, Hajo M; Hong, Seung Bong

    2013-12-01

    Patients with epilepsy caused by mid-grade and high-grade tumors do not usually undergo formal presurgical epilepsy evaluations before tumor resection. However, a minority of these patients may benefit significantly from just such a structured presurgical evaluation especially when seizure freedom or seizure reduction is a surgical aim in addition to total tumor resection. Typical cases comprise patients with multifocal tumors, tumors with bilateral extension, tumors over eloquent cortex, and the need for differentiation of spells of an uncertain nature, for example, epileptic versus psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. If they are epileptic, the definition of the epileptic lesion versus the epileptogenic zone and eloquent cortex can be another reason for monitoring. In addition to noninvasive recordings, invasive studies that use subdural or depths electrodes can be of special importance in these patients, leading to an exact delineation of the epileptogenic zone, usually extending beyond the epileptic lesion, and allow safe differentiation of epileptic from eloquent cortex.

  7. [Non-epileptic motor paroxysmal phenomena in wakefulness in childhood].

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Víctor L; Arberas, Claudia L

    2013-09-01

    Paroxysmal events in childhood are a challenge for pediatric neurologists, given its highly heterogeneous clinical manifestations, often difficult to distinguish between phenomena of epileptic seizure or not. The non-epileptic paroxysmal episodes are neurological phenomena, with motor, sensory symptoms, and/or sensory impairments, with or without involvement of consciousness, epileptic phenomena unrelated, so no electroencephalographic correlative expression between or during episodes. From the clinical point of view can be classified into four groups: motor phenomena, syncope, migraine (and associated conditions) and acute psychiatric symptoms. In this paper we analyze paroxysmal motor phenomena in awake children, dividing them according to their clinical manifestations: extrapyramidal episodes (paroxysmal kinesiogenic, non kinesiogenic and not related to exercise dyskinesias, Dopa responsive dystonia) and similar symptoms of dystonia (Sandifer syndrome); manifestations of startle (hyperekplexia); episodic eye and head movements (benign paroxysmal tonic upward gaze nistagmus deviation); episodic ataxia (familial episodic ataxias, paroxysmal benign vertigo); stereotyped and phenomena of self-gratification; and myoclonic events (benign myoclonus of early infancy). The detection of these syndromes will, in many cases, allow an adequate genetic counseling, initiate a specific treatment and avoid unnecessary additional studies. Molecular studies have demonstrated a real relationship between epileptic and non-epileptic basis of many of these entities and surely the identification of the molecular basis and understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms in many of them allow us, in the near future will benefit our patients.

  8. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  9. The protective effect of myo-inositol on hippocamal cell loss and structural alterations in neurons and synapses triggered by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Kotaria, Nato; Kiladze, Maia; Zhvania, Mzia G; Japaridze, Nadezhda J; Bikashvili, Tamar; Solomonia, Revaz O; Bolkvadze, Tamar

    2013-07-01

    It is known that myo-inositol pretreatment attenuates the seizure severity and several biochemical changes provoked by experimentally induced status epilepticus. However, it remains unidentified whether such properties of myo-inositol influence the structure of epileptic brain. In the present light and electron microscopic research we elucidate if pretreatment with myo-inositol has positive effect on hippocampal cell loss, and cell and synapses damage provoked by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. Adult male Wistar rats were treated with (i) saline, (ii) saline + kainic acid, (iii) myo-inositol + kainic acid. Assessment of cell loss at 2, 14, and 30 days after treatment demonstrate cytoprotective effect of myo-inositol in CA1 and CA3 areas. It was strongly expressed in pyramidal layer of CA1, radial and oriental layers of CA3 and in less degree-in other layers of both fields. Ultrastructural alterations were described in CA1, 14 days after treatment. The structure of neurons, synapses, and porosomes are well preserved in the rats pretreated with myo-inositol in comparing with rats treated with only kainic acid.

  10. Controlling Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how an implantable device could greatly improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy. Gabe Anderson was diagnosed with bilateral heterotopia, a congenital condition that can lead to the onset of complex partial seizures stemming from both hemispheres of the brain. In early 2004, Gabe became one of the first 35…

  11. Seizures Related to Vitamin B6 Deficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Gun; Lee, Yeonkyung; Shin, Hyeeun; Kang, Kyusik; Park, Jong-Moo; Kim, Byung-Kun; Kwon, Ohyun; Lee, Jung-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B6 is closely associated with functions of the nervous, immune, and endocrine systems. Its deficiency may result in neurological disorders including convulsions and epileptic encephalopathy. Until today, this has only been reported in infants, children, and critically ill adult patients. We report a case of a 36year-old man with chronic alcoholism who presented with seizures after gastrointestinal disturbance. His seizures persisted even after treatment with antiepileptic drugs, but eventually disappeared after administration of pyridoxine. Hence, vitamin B6 deficiency may cause seizures in adult patients with chronic alcoholism. PMID:26157671

  12. [Clinical presentation and diagnosis of epileptic auras].

    PubMed

    Barletova, E I; Kremenchugskaia, M R; Mukhin, K Iu; Glukhova, L Iu; Mironov, M B

    2012-01-01

    To define clinical presentations of visual auras and to reveal their clinical, encephalographic and neuroimaging correlates, we examined 23 patients, aged from 5 to 25 years (mean 14±6 years), with focal forms of epilepsy. Patients had visual auras regardless of the etiology of epilepsy which developed immediately before epileptic seizures or were isolated. Patients had simple or complex visual hallucinations, the former occurring more frequently, visual illusions and ictal amaurosis. Positive visual phenomena were noted more frequently than negative ones. In most of the patients, visual hallucinations were associated with the pathological activity in cortical occipital regions of the brain and, in some cases, in temporal and parietal regions. The different pathologies (developmental defects, post-ischemic, atrophic and other disturbances) identified by MRI were found in a half of patients. PMID:23120768

  13. [Clinical presentation and diagnosis of epileptic auras].

    PubMed

    Barletova, E I; Kremenchugskaia, M R; Mukhin, K Iu; Glukhova, L Iu; Mironov, M B

    2012-01-01

    To define clinical presentations of visual auras and to reveal their clinical, encephalographic and neuroimaging correlates, we examined 23 patients, aged from 5 to 25 years (mean 14±6 years), with focal forms of epilepsy. Patients had visual auras regardless of the etiology of epilepsy which developed immediately before epileptic seizures or were isolated. Patients had simple or complex visual hallucinations, the former occurring more frequently, visual illusions and ictal amaurosis. Positive visual phenomena were noted more frequently than negative ones. In most of the patients, visual hallucinations were associated with the pathological activity in cortical occipital regions of the brain and, in some cases, in temporal and parietal regions. The different pathologies (developmental defects, post-ischemic, atrophic and other disturbances) identified by MRI were found in a half of patients.

  14. Clinical and electrographic findings in epileptic vertigo and dizziness

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Han; Robinson, Karen A.; Kaplan, Peter W.; Newman-Toker, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Seizures can cause vestibular symptoms, even without obvious epileptic features. We sought to characterize epileptic vertigo or dizziness (EVD) to improve differentiation from nonepileptic causes, particularly when vestibular symptoms are the sole manifestation. Methods: We conducted a systematic review with electronic (Medline) and manual search for English-language studies (1955–2014). Two independent reviewers selected studies. Study/patient characteristics were abstracted. We defined 3 study population types: (1) seizures, some experiencing vertigo/dizziness (disease cohort); (2) vertigo/dizziness, some due to seizures (symptom cohort); (3) vertigo/dizziness due to seizures in all patients (EVD-only cohort). Results: We identified 84 studies describing 11,354 patients (disease cohort = 8,129; symptom cohort = 2,965; EVD-only cohort = 260). Among 1,055 EVD patients in whom a distinction could be made, non-isolated EVD was present in 8.5%, isolated EVD in 0.8%. Thorough diagnostic workups (ictal EEG, vestibular testing, and brain MRI to exclude other causes) were rare (<0.1%). Ictal EEG was reported in 487 (4.3%), formal neuro-otologic assessment in 1,107 (9.7%). Localized EEG abnormalities (n = 350) were most frequently temporal (79.8%) and uncommonly parietal (11.8%). Duration of episodic vestibular symptoms varied, but was very brief (<30 seconds) in 69.6% of isolated EVD and 6.9% of non-isolated EVD. Conclusions: Non-isolated EVD is much more prevalent than isolated EVD, which appears to be rare. Diagnostic evaluations for EVD are often incomplete. EVD is primarily associated with temporal lobe seizures; whether this reflects greater epidemiologic prevalence of temporal lobe seizures or a tighter association with dizziness/vertigo presentations than with other brain regions remains unknown. Consistent with clinical wisdom, isolated EVD spells often last just seconds, although many patients experience longer spells. PMID:25795644

  15. The Persistence of Erroneous Familiarity in an Epileptic Male: Challenging Perceptual Theories of Deja Vu Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Akira R.; Moulin, Christopher J. A.

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a 39-year-old, temporal lobe epileptic male, MH. Prior to complex partial seizure, experienced up to three times a day, MH often experiences an aura experienced as a persistent sensation of deja vu. Data-driven theories of deja vu formation suggest that partial familiarity for the perceived stimulus is responsible for the…

  16. Excitatory amino acid transporter 2 downregulation correlates with thalamic neuronal death following kainic acid-induced status epilepticus in rat.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Masashi; Kurokawa, Haruna; Shimada, Akinori; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Miyata, Hajime; Morita, Takehito

    2015-02-01

    Recurrent seizures without interictal resumption (status epilepticus) have been reported to induce neuronal death in the midline thalamic region that has functional roles in memory and decision-making; however, the pathogenesis underlying status epilepticus-induced thalamic neuronal death is yet to be determined. We performed histological and immunohistochemical studies as well as cerebral blood flow measurement using 4.7 tesla magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer on midline thalamic region in Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 75, male, 7 weeks after birth, body weight 250-300 g) treated with intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (10 mg/kg) to induce status epilepticus (n = 55) or normal saline solution (n = 20). Histological study using paraffin-embedded specimens revealed neuronal death showing ischemic-like changes and Fluoro-Jade C positivity with calcium deposition in the midline thalamic region of epileptic rats. The distribution of neuronal death was associated with focal loss of immunoreactivity for excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2), stronger immunoreaction for glutamate and increase in number of Iba-1-positive microglial cells showing swollen cytoplasm and long processes. Double immunofluorescence study demonstrated co-expression of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) within microglial cells, and loss of EAAT2 immunoreactivity in reactive astrocytes. These microglial alterations and astrocytic EAAT2 downregulation were also observed in tissue without obvious neuronal death in kainic acid-treated rats. These results suggest the possible role of glutamate excitotoxicity in neuronal death in the midline thalamic region following kainic acid-induced status epilepticus due to astrocytic EAAT2 downregulation following microglial activation showing upregulation of IL-1β and iNOS.

  17. Occipital lobe seizures and epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Adcock, Jane E; Panayiotopoulos, Chrysostomos P

    2012-10-01

    Occipital lobe epilepsies (OLEs) manifest with occipital seizures from an epileptic focus within the occipital lobes. Ictal clinical symptoms are mainly visual and oculomotor. Elementary visual hallucinations are common and characteristic. Postictal headache occurs in more than half of patients (epilepsy-migraine sequence). Electroencephalography (EEG) is of significant diagnostic value, but certain limitations should be recognized. Occipital spikes and/or occipital paroxysms either spontaneous or photically induced are the main interictal EEG abnormalities in idiopathic OLE. However, occipital epileptiform abnormalities may also occur without clinical relationship to seizures particularly in children. In cryptogenic/symptomatic OLE, unilateral posterior EEG slowing is more common than occipital spikes. In neurosurgical series of symptomatic OLE, interictal EEG abnormalities are rarely strictly occipital. The most common localization is in the posterior temporal regions and less than one-fifth show occipital spikes. In photosensitive OLE, intermittent photic stimulation elicits (1) spikes/polyspikes confined in the occipital regions or (2) generalized spikes/polyspikes with posterior emphasis. In ictal EEG, a well-localized unifocal rhythmic ictal discharge during occipital seizures is infrequent. A bioccipital field spread to the temporal regions is common. Frequency, severity, and response to treatment vary considerably from good to intractable and progressive mainly depending on underlying causes.

  18. Modeling cortical source dynamics and interactions during seizure.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Tim; Acar, Zeynep Akalin; Worrell, Gregory; Makeig, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Mapping the dynamics and spatial topography of brain source processes critically involved in initiating and propagating seizure activity is critical for effective epilepsy diagnosis, intervention, and treatment. In this report we analyze neuronal dynamics before and during epileptic seizures using adaptive multivariate autoregressive (VAR) models applied to maximally-independent (ICA) sources of intracranial EEG (iEEG, ECoG) data recorded from subdural electrodes implanted in a human patient for evaluation of surgery for epilepsy. We visualize the spatial distribution of causal sources and sinks of ictal activity on the cortical surface (gyral and sulcal) using a novel combination of multivariate Granger-causal and graph-theoretic metrics combined with distributed source localization by Sparse Bayesian Learning applied to a multi-scale patch basis. This analysis reveals and visualizes distinct, seizure stage-dependent shifts in inter-component spatiotemporal dynamics and connectivity including the clinically-identified epileptic foci. PMID:22254582

  19. Hidden Markov chain modeling for epileptic networks identification.

    PubMed

    Le Cam, Steven; Louis-Dorr, Valérie; Maillard, Louis

    2013-01-01

    The partial epileptic seizures are often considered to be caused by a wrong balance between inhibitory and excitatory interneuron connections within a focal brain area. These abnormal balances are likely to result in loss of functional connectivities between remote brain structures, while functional connectivities within the incriminated zone are enhanced. The identification of the epileptic networks underlying these hypersynchronies are expected to contribute to a better understanding of the brain mechanisms responsible for the development of the seizures. In this objective, threshold strategies are commonly applied, based on synchrony measurements computed from recordings of the electrophysiologic brain activity. However, such methods are reported to be prone to errors and false alarms. In this paper, we propose a hidden Markov chain modeling of the synchrony states with the aim to develop a reliable machine learning methods for epileptic network inference. The method is applied on a real Stereo-EEG recording, demonstrating consistent results with the clinical evaluations and with the current knowledge on temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:24110697

  20. Distribution entropy analysis of epileptic EEG signals.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Yan, Chang; Karmakar, Chandan; Liu, Changchun

    2015-01-01

    It is an open-ended challenge to accurately detect the epileptic seizures through electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. Recently published studies have made elaborate attempts to distinguish between the normal and epileptic EEG signals by advanced nonlinear entropy methods, such as the approximate entropy, sample entropy, fuzzy entropy, and permutation entropy, etc. Most recently, a novel distribution entropy (DistEn) has been reported to have superior performance compared with the conventional entropy methods for especially short length data. We thus aimed, in the present study, to show the potential of DistEn in the analysis of epileptic EEG signals. The publicly-accessible Bonn database which consisted of normal, interictal, and ictal EEG signals was used in this study. Three different measurement protocols were set for better understanding the performance of DistEn, which are: i) calculate the DistEn of a specific EEG signal using the full recording; ii) calculate the DistEn by averaging the results for all its possible non-overlapped 5 second segments; and iii) calculate it by averaging the DistEn values for all the possible non-overlapped segments of 1 second length, respectively. Results for all three protocols indicated a statistically significantly increased DistEn for the ictal class compared with both the normal and interictal classes. Besides, the results obtained under the third protocol, which only used very short segments (1 s) of EEG recordings showed a significantly (p <; 0.05) increased DistEn for the interictal class in compassion with the normal class, whereas both analyses using relatively long EEG signals failed in tracking this difference between them, which may be due to a nonstationarity effect on entropy algorithm. The capability of discriminating between the normal and interictal EEG signals is of great clinical relevance since it may provide helpful tools for the detection of a seizure onset. Therefore, our study suggests that the Dist

  1. [Transient epileptic amnesia].

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Kazuhiro; Yoshizaki, Takahito

    2016-03-01

    Transient amnesia is one of common clinical phenomenon of epilepsy that are encountered by physicians. The amnestic attacks are often associated with persistent memory disturbances. Epilepsy is common among the elderly, with amnesia as a common symptom and convulsions relatively uncommon. Therefore, amnesia due to epilepsy can easily be misdiagnosed as dementia. The term 'transient epileptic amnesia (TEA)' was introduced in the early 1990s by Kapur, who highlighted that amnestic attacks caused by epilepsy can be similar to those occurring in 'transient global amnesia', but are distinguished by features brevity and recurrence. In 1998, Zeman et al. proposed diagnostic criteria for TEA.

  2. Increased extracellular levels of glutamate in the hippocampus of chronically epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Soukupova, M; Binaschi, A; Falcicchia, C; Palma, E; Roncon, P; Zucchini, S; Simonato, M

    2015-08-20

    An increase in the release of excitatory amino acids has consistently been observed in the hippocampus during seizures, both in humans and animals. However, very little or nothing is known about the extracellular levels of glutamate and aspartate during epileptogenesis and in the interictal chronic period of established epilepsy. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the relationship between seizure activity and changes in hippocampal glutamate and aspartate extracellular levels under basal and high K(+)-evoked conditions, at various time-points in the natural history of experimental temporal lobe epilepsy, using in vivo microdialysis. Hippocampal extracellular glutamate and aspartate levels were evaluated: 24h after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE); during the latency period preceding spontaneous seizures; immediately after the first spontaneous seizure; in the chronic (epileptic) period. We found that (i) basal (spontaneous) glutamate outflow is increased in the interictal phases of the chronic period, whereas basal aspartate outflow remains stable for the entire course of the disease; (ii) high K(+) perfusion increased glutamate and aspartate outflow in both control and pilocarpine-treated animals, and the overflow of glutamate was clearly increased in the chronic group. Our data suggest that the glutamatergic signaling is preserved and even potentiated in the hippocampus of epileptic rats, and thus may favor the occurrence of spontaneous recurrent seizures. Together with an impairment of GABA signaling (Soukupova et al., 2014), these data suggest that a shift toward excitation occurs in the excitation/inhibition balance in the chronic epileptic state. PMID:26073699

  3. Electroencephalographic examination of epileptic dogs under propofol restraint.

    PubMed

    Akos, Pákozdy; Thalhammer, Johann G; Leschnik, Michael; Halász, Péter

    2012-09-01

    The main aim of this study was to identify interictal epileptiform discharges in a group of dogs with seizures of known aetiology (symptomatic epilepsy, SE) and in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE). Propofol was used for chemical restraint in all dogs. We found electroencephalographic (EEG) changes that could be considered epileptiform discharges (EDs) in 5 out of 40 dogs (12.5%). The EEG changes identified were spikes in four cases and periodic epileptiform discharges in one case. All EDs were seen in the SE group. We conclude that the interictal electroencephalographic examinations of propofolanaesthetised dogs suffering from IE and SE rarely show epileptic discharges and that the diagnostic value of such EEGs in the work-up for epilepsy seems to be low as epileptic discharges were unlikely to be detected. However, positive findings are more likely to be connected with SE. We found frequent, transient EEG phenomena (spindles, K-complexes, vertex waves, positive occipital sharp transients of sleep, cyclic alternating patterns), which are non-epileptic but their differentiation from epileptic phenomena is challenging.

  4. [Visual epileptic seizures. Signs and symptoms, and clinical implications].

    PubMed

    González-Cuevas, Montserrat; Toledo, Manuel; Santamarina, Estevo; Sueiras-Gil, María; Cambrodí-Masip, Roser; Sarria, Silvana; Quintana, Manuel; Salas-Puig, Javier

    2015-03-16

    Introduccion. Los fenomenos visuales pueden ser sintomas de crisis epilepticas, aunque con un significado clinico y una relacion con el foco epileptogeno incierto. Objetivo. Describir las implicaciones clinicas de las crisis epilepticas visuales segun su semiologia en adultos. Pacientes y metodos. Durante un año se recoge consecutivamente a pacientes que describian semiologia visual como manifestacion principal de sus crisis y se clasifican los sintomas visuales segun las caracteristicas de la descripcion. Resultados. Se incluye a 78 pacientes con una edad media de 43,5 años. El 97% de los casos eran epilepsias focales. Entre el 63% de las epilepsias sintomaticas, el 57% eran vasculares. Las crisis visuales eran, en un 81,9%, el aura previa a la crisis, y en un 17,9%, crisis visuales aisladas. La coexistencia de crisis visuales y otro tipo de crisis se asocio a farmacorresistencia (p = 0,021). Los sintomas visuales fueron: alucinaciones simples (55,1%), ilusiones (23,1%), alucinaciones complejas (15,4%) y perdida de vision (6,4%). La localizacion lobar de las lesiones era occipital (24,4%), temporoparietooccipital (21,8%), temporal (9%), parietal (3,8%) y frontal (1,3%). Las lesiones occipitales se asociaron con alucinaciones visuales simples (p < 0,001), y las ilusiones visuales y alucinaciones visuales complejas, con lesiones de la encrucijada temporoparietooccipital (p < 0,05). Del 55,1% de los pacientes con lesion unilateral en la resonancia magnetica, el 33% referia los sintomas en el hemicampo visual contralateral. Conclusiones. Las crisis visuales se presentan, principalmente, como auras epilepticas. Las alucinaciones simples se relacionan con el origen occipital, mientras que las alucinaciones complejas se asocian con regiones cerebrales mas anteriores. La aparicion de fenomenos visuales lateralizados nos orienta a un origen en el hemisferio contralateral.

  5. Detecting epileptic seizure from scalp EEG using Lyapunov spectrum.

    PubMed

    Khoa, Truong Quang Dang; Huong, Nguyen Thi Minh; Toi, Vo Van

    2012-01-01

    One of the inherent weaknesses of the EEG signal processing is noises and artifacts. To overcome it, some methods for prediction of epilepsy recently reported in the literature are based on the evaluation of chaotic behavior of intracranial electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. These methods reduced noises, but they were hazardous to patients. In this study, we propose using Lyapunov spectrum to filter noise and detect epilepsy on scalp EEG signals only. We determined that the Lyapunov spectrum can be considered as the most expected method to evaluate chaotic behavior of scalp EEG recordings and to be robust within noises. Obtained results are compared to the independent component analysis (ICA) and largest Lyapunov exponent. The results of detecting epilepsy are compared to diagnosis from medical doctors in case of typical general epilepsy.

  6. [Neurophysiological markers of generalized and focal epileptic seizures].

    PubMed

    Kravtsova, E Yu; Shulakova, K V

    2016-01-01

    Цель исследования. Выявить нейрофизиологические маркеры фокальных и генерализованных эпилептических приступов в межприступном периоде. Материал и методы. Обследованы 64 пациента. Изолированными генерализованными тонико-клоническими припадками страдали 36 пациентов, фокальными — 28. Контрольную группу составили 27 практически здоровых лиц. Применялись ЭЭГ-видеомониторинг, анализ биоэлектрической активности мозга во время бодрствования и дневного сна, спектральный анализ ЭЭГ, количественные и качественные показатели сна. Результаты и заключение. При генерализованных эпилептических приступах увеличивается представленность альфа-ритма в левом полушарии, во время бодрствования развивается фокальная эпилептиформная активность во время первых двух стадий дневного сна. При фокальных эпилептических приступах увеличивается представленность дельта- и бета-2 ритма в левом полушарии, региональные эпилептиформные изменения усугубляются во время 1-й и 2-й стадий медленного сна с инициацией в лобных отведениях. Наличие фокального компонента в эпилептиформной активности в межприступном периоде пациентов с различными видами приступов необходимо учитывать при обследовании и назначении терапии пациентам с труднодиагностируемым типом эпилепсии.

  7. [Diagnosis and certification of the ability of epileptic patients to drive motor vehicles: cases consulted by the author].

    PubMed

    Sińczuk-Walczak, Halina; Wagrowska-Koski, Ewa

    2002-01-01

    Epilepsy is a frequent diagnostic problem. It is also difficult to certify whether an epileptic patient is able to drive a motor vehicle. With the advent of efficient anti-epileptic treatment, a general practice of refusing epileptic patients driving license should be seriously reconsidered. However, the matter should be given careful consideration not to jeopardize public safety and patients' rights. The aim of the study was to highlight the problems encountered in rediagnosing and certifying people with diagnosed epilepsy or pseudoepileptic seizures. The authors discuss the diagnosis and certification procedures in persons with epileptic seizures after severe craniocerebral trauma. They also analyze a case of diagnosed epilepsy suggesting the syncope in a patient with cardiac defect; a case of psychogenous pseudoepileptic seizures and the course of the disease in a patient with febrile convulsions in childhood. The problems result from the fact that reliable medical histories are not available and thus the retroassessment of the clinical picture of epileptic seizures is not possible. Missing results of timely laboratory tests (EEG, ECG) and diagnostic errors concerning earlier episodes, especially epilepsy diagnosed inconsiderately, are additional obstacles.

  8. TRIGGER SELF-CONTROL AND SEIZURE ARREST IN THE ANDREWS/REITER BEHAVIORAL APPROACH TO EPILEPSY: A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF SEIZURE FREQUENCY

    PubMed Central

    Michaelis, Rosa; Schonfeld, Warren; Elsas, Siegward-M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to describe changes of seizure frequency in epilepsy patients who participated in the Andrews/Reiter behavioral intervention for epilepsy. For this uncontrolled retrospective study, data was extracted from patients’ medical journals. Intention-to-treat-analyses were restricted to patients with sufficient documentation supporting a diagnosis of probable or definite epilepsy. Main outcome variable was a comparison of mean seizure frequency at baseline and towards completion of the program. The seizure frequency of 30 (50%%) patients showed a clinically meaningful improvement (>50% reduction of seizures) towards the end of the intervention. Twenty-two (37%) patients became seizure-free at the end of the intervention. In summary, a clinically meaningful reduction in reported seizure frequency was observed in epilepsy patients who received the Andrews/Reiter intervention for epilepsy. Prospective trials are needed to further investigate the program’s efficacy and to study epileptic seizure triggers. PMID:22341960

  9. Seizure onset detection based on a Uni- or multi-modal intelligent seizure acquisition (UISA/MISA) system.

    PubMed

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sandor; Wolf, Peter; Henriksen, Jonas; Sams, Thomas; Sorensen, Helge B D

    2010-01-01

    An automatic Uni- or Multi-modal Intelligent Seizure Acquisition (UISA/MISA) system is highly applicable for onset detection of epileptic seizures based on motion data. The modalities used are surface electromyography (sEMG), acceleration (ACC) and angular velocity (ANG). The new proposed automatic algorithm on motion data is extracting features as "log-sum" measures of discrete wavelet components. Classification into the two groups "seizure" versus "non-seizure" is made based on the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm. The algorithm performs with a sensitivity of 91-100%, a median latency of 1 second and a specificity of 100% on multi-modal data from five healthy subjects simulating seizures. The uni-modal algorithm based on sEMG data from the subjects and patients performs satisfactorily in some cases. As expected, our results clearly show superiority of the multi-modal approach, as compared with the uni-modal one. PMID:21096611

  10. A Case of Hyperventilation Syndrome Mimicking Complex Partial Seizure: Usefulness of EEG Monitoring in Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Bong Su

    2015-01-01

    Acute hyperventilation syndrome not only can be clinically misdiagnosed as epileptic seizures, but also complex partial seizures may involve hyperventilation as a part of aura. Although electrography (EEG) monitoring is one of the most important procedure to differentiate these conditions, it could not be widely used in emergency department. Variety forms of epileptic attack, mainly idiopathic generalized epilepsy, are provoked by voluntary hyperventilation. In contrast, it is not clear whether hyperventilation can activate the partial seizures. We reported a case of acute hyperventilation syndrome (HSV) mimicking first onset complex partial seizure, impending non-convulsive status epilepticus, which was diagnosed by EEG in the emergency department. The electrographic seizure was provoked again by voluntary hyperventilation after clinical improvement. PMID:26157670

  11. Guidelines for epilepsy management in India classification of seizures and epilepsy syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ramaratnam, Sridharan; Satishchandra, P

    2010-10-01

    This article is part of the Guidelines for Epilepsy management in India. This article reviews the classification systems used for epileptic seizures and epilepsy and present the recommendations based on current evidence. At present, epilepsy is classified according to seizure type and epilepsy syndrome using the universally accepted International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification of epileptic seizures and epilepsy syndromes. A multi-axial classification system incorporating ictal phenomenology, seizure type, epilepsy syndrome, etiology and impairments is being developed by the ILAE task force. The need to consider age-related epilepsy syndromes is particularly important in children with epilepsy. The correct classification of seizure type and epilepsy syndrome helps the individual with epilepsy to receive appropriate investigations, treatment, and information about the likely prognosis. PMID:21264131

  12. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on the serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong-Li; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Nuan; Yu, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurodegenerative disease with an increasing morbidity. Clinical treatment of epilepsy includes symptomatic treatment, etiological treatment, surgery and prevention. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients, and to examine the correlation between these effects and secondary cerebrovascular events. A total of 68 epileptic patients, diagnosed between May 2012 and May 2014, were included in the present study. The study included 8 cases of autonomic seizures, 10 cases of absence seizures, 13 cases of complex partial seizures, 28 cases of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and 9 cases of simple partial seizures. The patients received appropriate AED treatment according to the characteristics of epileptic seizure and the treatment guidance. The differences in the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these patients, and the differences in the secondary cerebrovascular events in these patients after 1 year follow-up were analyzed. The difference in the AEDs used by various epileptic patients was statistically significant (P<0.05). The proportion of AED monotherapy in the autonomic seizure group and petit mal group was highest, and the proportion of two AED in combination with the psychomotor seizure, grand mal and simple partial seizure groups was highest. The serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these patients following treatment were significantly lower than those prior to treatment (P<0.05). The differences in the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these groups following treatment were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The difference in the incidence of cerebrovascular events in these groups at follow up was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The multifactorial logistic regression analysis revealed that the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 were the independent risk factors for epilepsy with secondary

  13. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on the serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong-Li; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Nuan; Yu, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurodegenerative disease with an increasing morbidity. Clinical treatment of epilepsy includes symptomatic treatment, etiological treatment, surgery and prevention. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients, and to examine the correlation between these effects and secondary cerebrovascular events. A total of 68 epileptic patients, diagnosed between May 2012 and May 2014, were included in the present study. The study included 8 cases of autonomic seizures, 10 cases of absence seizures, 13 cases of complex partial seizures, 28 cases of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and 9 cases of simple partial seizures. The patients received appropriate AED treatment according to the characteristics of epileptic seizure and the treatment guidance. The differences in the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these patients, and the differences in the secondary cerebrovascular events in these patients after 1 year follow-up were analyzed. The difference in the AEDs used by various epileptic patients was statistically significant (P<0.05). The proportion of AED monotherapy in the autonomic seizure group and petit mal group was highest, and the proportion of two AED in combination with the psychomotor seizure, grand mal and simple partial seizure groups was highest. The serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these patients following treatment were significantly lower than those prior to treatment (P<0.05). The differences in the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these groups following treatment were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The difference in the incidence of cerebrovascular events in these groups at follow up was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The multifactorial logistic regression analysis revealed that the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 were the independent risk factors for epilepsy with secondary

  14. A signal processing based analysis and prediction of seizure onset in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V; Hussaini, Jamal; Hussaini, Jalal; Delaviz, Ali; Delaviz, Fatemeh; Habibi, Shaghayegh; Ramezanpoor, Sara

    2016-01-01

    One of the main areas of behavioural neuroscience is forecasting the human behaviour. Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted, causing seizures or periods of unusual behaviour, sensations and sometimes loss of consciousness. An estimated 5% of the world population has epileptic seizure but there is not any method to cure it. More than 30% of people with epilepsy cannot control seizure. Epileptic seizure prediction, refers to forecasting the occurrence of epileptic seizures, is one of the most important but challenging problems in biomedical sciences, across the world. In this research we propose a new methodology which is based on studying the EEG signals using two measures, the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension. In order to validate the proposed method, it is applied to epileptic EEG signals of patients by computing the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension, and then the results are validated versus the reference data. The results of these analyses show that we are able to forecast the onset of a seizure on average of 25.76 seconds before the time of occurrence.

  15. A signal processing based analysis and prediction of seizure onset in patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main areas of behavioural neuroscience is forecasting the human behaviour. Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted, causing seizures or periods of unusual behaviour, sensations and sometimes loss of consciousness. An estimated 5% of the world population has epileptic seizure but there is not any method to cure it. More than 30% of people with epilepsy cannot control seizure. Epileptic seizure prediction, refers to forecasting the occurrence of epileptic seizures, is one of the most important but challenging problems in biomedical sciences, across the world. In this research we propose a new methodology which is based on studying the EEG signals using two measures, the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension. In order to validate the proposed method, it is applied to epileptic EEG signals of patients by computing the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension, and then the results are validated versus the reference data. The results of these analyses show that we are able to forecast the onset of a seizure on average of 25.76 seconds before the time of occurrence. PMID:26586477

  16. Massively multiplayer online role-playing game-induced seizures: a neglected health problem in Internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2006-08-01

    As the Internet has become rapidly and widely integrated into society, Internet addiction has become a growing psychosocial problem. However, epileptic seizure, another out-of-the-ordinary health problem, is often neglected in this regard. Ten patients who experienced epileptic seizures while playing the newest genre of electronic games -- Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) -- were investigated. Patients were predominantly male young adults, and most of the events were generalized tonic-clonic seizures, myoclonic seizures, and absences. These patients should be categorized into idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Even though photosensitivity was an important factor, behavioral and higher mental activities also seemed to be significant seizure precipitants. Results demonstrated that MMORPG-induced seizures were not analogous to the ordinary video game-induced seizures. Significantly, an epileptic seizure warning did not always appear on the websites of MMORPGs and instructions for the software. While the prevalence of MMORPG-induced seizures remains unknown, it may exceed our expectations and impact our society. Not only for clinical neurologists but also for the primary physicians, educators, sociologists, and global online game publishers, there should be an awareness of this special form of reflex seizures in order to provide an appropriate health warning to MMORPG players.

  17. Seizure Disorders in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizures that cause a loss of consciousness and violent, jerking movements, called grand mal seizures , are especially ... of seizure that causes loss of consciousness and violent, jerking movements. Intrauterine Device: A small device that ...

  18. Recognition and management of seizures in children in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Edward; Dey, Indranil; Scammell, Andrea; Burnage, Katy; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2016-09-01

    Seizure is defined as 'a sudden surge of electrical activity in the brain, which usually affects how a person appears or acts for a short time'. Children who have experienced seizures commonly present to emergency departments (EDs), and detailed history taking will usually help differentiate between epileptic and non-epileptic events. ED nurses are often the first health professionals to manage children with seizures, and this is best done by following the ABCDE approach. Treatment involves termination of seizures with anticonvulsants, and children may need other symptomatic management. Seizures in children can be an extremely distressing experience for parents, who should be supported and kept informed by experienced ED nurses. Nurses also play a vital role in educating parents on correct administration of anticonvulsants and safety advice. This article discusses the aetiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of children with seizures, with particular emphasis on epilepsy. It includes two reflective case studies to highlight the challenges faced by healthcare professionals managing children who present with convulsions. PMID:27615348

  19. Reflex seizures, traits, and epilepsies: from physiology to pathology.

    PubMed

    Koepp, Matthias J; Caciagli, Lorenzo; Pressler, Ronit M; Lehnertz, Klaus; Beniczky, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are generally unpredictable and arise spontaneously. Patients often report non-specific triggers such as stress or sleep deprivation, but only rarely do seizures occur as a reflex event, in which they are objectively and consistently modulated, precipitated, or inhibited by external sensory stimuli or specific cognitive processes. The seizures triggered by such stimuli and processes in susceptible individuals can have different latencies. Once seizure-suppressing mechanisms fail and a critical mass (the so-called tipping point) of cortical activation is reached, reflex seizures stereotypically manifest with common motor features independent of the physiological network involved. The complexity of stimuli increases from simple sensory to complex cognitive-emotional with increasing age of onset. The topography of physiological networks involved follows the posterior-to-anterior trajectory of brain development, reflecting age-related changes in brain excitability. Reflex seizures and traits probably represent the extremes of a continuum, and understanding of their underlying mechanisms might help to elucidate the transition of normal physiological function to paroxysmal epileptic activity.

  20. Reflex seizures, traits, and epilepsies: from physiology to pathology.

    PubMed

    Koepp, Matthias J; Caciagli, Lorenzo; Pressler, Ronit M; Lehnertz, Klaus; Beniczky, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are generally unpredictable and arise spontaneously. Patients often report non-specific triggers such as stress or sleep deprivation, but only rarely do seizures occur as a reflex event, in which they are objectively and consistently modulated, precipitated, or inhibited by external sensory stimuli or specific cognitive processes. The seizures triggered by such stimuli and processes in susceptible individuals can have different latencies. Once seizure-suppressing mechanisms fail and a critical mass (the so-called tipping point) of cortical activation is reached, reflex seizures stereotypically manifest with common motor features independent of the physiological network involved. The complexity of stimuli increases from simple sensory to complex cognitive-emotional with increasing age of onset. The topography of physiological networks involved follows the posterior-to-anterior trajectory of brain development, reflecting age-related changes in brain excitability. Reflex seizures and traits probably represent the extremes of a continuum, and understanding of their underlying mechanisms might help to elucidate the transition of normal physiological function to paroxysmal epileptic activity. PMID:26627365

  1. EEG-confirmed epileptic activity in a cat with VGKC-complex/LGI1 antibody-associated limbic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Pakozdy, Akos; Glantschnigg, Ursula; Leschnik, Michael; Hechinger, Harald; Moloney, Teresa; Lang, Bethan; Halasz, Peter; Vincent, Angela

    2014-03-01

    A 5-year-old, female client-owned cat presented with acute onset of focal epileptic seizures with orofacial twitching and behavioural changes. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral temporal lobe hyperintensities and the EEG was consistent with ictal epileptic seizure activity. After antiepileptic and additional corticosteroid treatment, the cat recovered and by 10 months of follow-up was seizure-free without any problem. Retrospectively, antibodies to LGI1, a component of the voltage-gated potassium channel-complex, were identified. Feline focal seizures with orofacial involvement have been increasingly recognised in client-owned cats, and autoimmune limbic encephalitis was recently suggested as a possible aetiology. This is the first report of EEG, MRI and long-term follow-up of this condition in cats which is similar to human limbic encephalitis.

  2. Virtual Cortical Resection Reveals Push-Pull Network Control Preceding Seizure Evolution.

    PubMed

    Khambhati, Ankit N; Davis, Kathryn A; Lucas, Timothy H; Litt, Brian; Bassett, Danielle S

    2016-09-01

    In ∼20 million people with drug-resistant epilepsy, focal seizures originating in dysfunctional brain networks will often evolve and spread to surrounding tissue, disrupting function in otherwise normal brain regions. To identify network control mechanisms that regulate seizure spread, we developed a novel tool for pinpointing brain regions that facilitate synchronization in the epileptic network. Our method measures the impact of virtually resecting putative control regions on synchronization in a validated model of the human epileptic network. By applying our technique to time-varying functional networks, we identified brain regions whose topological role is to synchronize or desynchronize the epileptic network. Our results suggest that greater antagonistic push-pull interaction between synchronizing and desynchronizing brain regions better constrains seizure spread. These methods, while applied here to epilepsy, are generalizable to other brain networks and have wide applicability in isolating and mapping functional drivers of brain dynamics in health and disease.

  3. Virtual Cortical Resection Reveals Push-Pull Network Control Preceding Seizure Evolution.

    PubMed

    Khambhati, Ankit N; Davis, Kathryn A; Lucas, Timothy H; Litt, Brian; Bassett, Danielle S

    2016-09-01

    In ∼20 million people with drug-resistant epilepsy, focal seizures originating in dysfunctional brain networks will often evolve and spread to surrounding tissue, disrupting function in otherwise normal brain regions. To identify network control mechanisms that regulate seizure spread, we developed a novel tool for pinpointing brain regions that facilitate synchronization in the epileptic network. Our method measures the impact of virtually resecting putative control regions on synchronization in a validated model of the human epileptic network. By applying our technique to time-varying functional networks, we identified brain regions whose topological role is to synchronize or desynchronize the epileptic network. Our results suggest that greater antagonistic push-pull interaction between synchronizing and desynchronizing brain regions better constrains seizure spread. These methods, while applied here to epilepsy, are generalizable to other brain networks and have wide applicability in isolating and mapping functional drivers of brain dynamics in health and disease. PMID:27568515

  4. Uric acid is released in the brain during seizure activity and increases severity of seizures in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures.

    PubMed

    Thyrion, Lisa; Raedt, Robrecht; Portelli, Jeanelle; Van Loo, Pieter; Wadman, Wytse J; Glorieux, Griet; Lambrecht, Bart N; Janssens, Sophie; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Recent evidence points at an important role of endogenous cell-damage induced pro-inflammatory molecules in the generation of epileptic seizures. Uric acid, under the form of monosodium urate crystals, has shown to have pro-inflammatory properties in the body, but less is known about its role in seizure generation. This study aimed to unravel the contribution of uric acid to seizure generation in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures. We measured extracellular levels of uric acid in the brain and modulated them using complementary pharmacological and genetic tools. Local extracellular uric acid levels increased three to four times during acute limbic seizures and peaked between 50 and 100 min after kainic acid infusion. Manipulating uric acid levels through administration of allopurinol or knock-out of urate oxidase significantly altered the number of generalized seizures, decreasing and increasing them by a twofold respectively. Taken together, our results consistently show that uric acid is released during limbic seizures and suggest that uric acid facilitates seizure generalization. PMID:26774005

  5. Inflammation and endothelium response in epileptic patients: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Farhang, Amir; Javanmard, Saghayegh Haghjooy; Mehvari, Jafar; Zare, Mohammad; Saadatnia, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability plays an important role in the brain impairments. The barrier is composed of endothelium cells, due to the presence of tight junctions that connect endothelium cells. The failure of BBB function has triggering chronic or acute seizures through brain inflammation and BBB permeability. Seizure induces vasodilation, BBB leakage and up-regulation of vascular cell adhesion molecules which able to bind integrins blood leukocytes. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study we included 40 epileptic patients who were sampled during a seizure as a case group and 20 healthy subjects as a healthy control group. Plasma levels of the inflammation and endothelium markers including intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), vascular adhesion molecule (VCAM), interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Results: The ICAM and VCAM concentration in the epileptic patients (135.8 ± 5.35) (52.04 ± 4.24) were significantly higher than healthy control group (110.32 ± 5.04) (23.38 ± 3.01) (P < 0.005). IL-1 beta concentration was not significantly different between groups (P = 0.594). However, CRP level was significantly up-regulated in epileptic patients (P < 0.005). Conclusion: Epileptic patients have BBB leakage and dysfunction as the up-regulation of the endothelium cytokines showed. The BBB leakage may be the result of the inflammatory impairment.

  6. Two epileptic syndromes, one brain: childhood absence epilepsy and benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes.

    PubMed

    Cerminara, Caterina; Coniglio, Antonella; El-Malhany, Nadia; Casarelli, Livia; Curatolo, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BCECTS), or benign rolandic epilepsy (BRE), are the most common forms of childhood epilepsy. CAE and BCECTS are well-known and clearly defined syndromes; although they are strongly dissimilar in terms of their pathophysiology, these functional epileptic disturbances share many features such as similar age at onset, overall good prognosis, and inheritance factors. Few reports are available on the concomitance of CAE and BCECTS in the same patients or the later occurrence of generalized epilepsy in patients with a history of partial epilepsy. In most cases described in the literature, absence seizures always started after the onset of benign focal epilepsy but the contrary has never occurred yet. We describe two patients affected by idiopathic generalized epileptic syndrome with typical absences, who experienced BCECTS after remission of seizures and normalization of EEG recordings. While the coexistence of different seizure types within an epileptic syndrome is not uncommon, the occurrence of childhood absence and BCECTS in the same child appears to be extremely rare, and this extraordinary event supports the hypothesis that CAE and BCECTS are two distinct epileptic conditions. However, recent interesting observations in animal models suggest that BCECTS and CAE could be pathophysiologically related and that genetic links could play a large role.

  7. Inflammation and endothelium response in epileptic patients: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Farhang, Amir; Javanmard, Saghayegh Haghjooy; Mehvari, Jafar; Zare, Mohammad; Saadatnia, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability plays an important role in the brain impairments. The barrier is composed of endothelium cells, due to the presence of tight junctions that connect endothelium cells. The failure of BBB function has triggering chronic or acute seizures through brain inflammation and BBB permeability. Seizure induces vasodilation, BBB leakage and up-regulation of vascular cell adhesion molecules which able to bind integrins blood leukocytes. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study we included 40 epileptic patients who were sampled during a seizure as a case group and 20 healthy subjects as a healthy control group. Plasma levels of the inflammation and endothelium markers including intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), vascular adhesion molecule (VCAM), interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Results: The ICAM and VCAM concentration in the epileptic patients (135.8 ± 5.35) (52.04 ± 4.24) were significantly higher than healthy control group (110.32 ± 5.04) (23.38 ± 3.01) (P < 0.005). IL-1 beta concentration was not significantly different between groups (P = 0.594). However, CRP level was significantly up-regulated in epileptic patients (P < 0.005). Conclusion: Epileptic patients have BBB leakage and dysfunction as the up-regulation of the endothelium cytokines showed. The BBB leakage may be the result of the inflammatory impairment. PMID:27656600

  8. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  9. Reducing premature KCC2 expression rescues seizure susceptibility and spine morphology in atypical febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Awad, Patricia N; Sanon, Nathalie T; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Carriço, Josianne Nunes; Ouardouz, Mohamed; Gagné, Jonathan; Duss, Sandra; Wolf, Daniele; Desgent, Sébastien; Cancedda, Laura; Carmant, Lionel; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2016-07-01

    Atypical febrile seizures are considered a risk factor for epilepsy onset and cognitive impairments later in life. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and a history of atypical febrile seizures often carry a cortical malformation. This association has led to the hypothesis that the presence of a cortical dysplasia exacerbates febrile seizures in infancy, in turn increasing the risk for neurological sequelae. The mechanisms linking these events are currently poorly understood. Potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2 affects several aspects of neuronal circuit development and function, by modulating GABAergic transmission and excitatory synapse formation. Recent data suggest that KCC2 downregulation contributes to seizure generation in the epileptic adult brain, but its role in the developing brain is still controversial. In a rodent model of atypical febrile seizures, combining a cortical dysplasia and hyperthermia-induced seizures (LHS rats), we found a premature and sustained increase in KCC2 protein levels, accompanied by a negative shift of the reversal potential of GABA. In parallel, we observed a significant reduction in dendritic spine size and mEPSC amplitude in CA1 pyramidal neurons, accompanied by spatial memory deficits. To investigate whether KCC2 premature overexpression plays a role in seizure susceptibility and synaptic alterations, we reduced KCC2 expression selectively in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by in utero electroporation of shRNA. Remarkably, KCC2 shRNA-electroporated LHS rats show reduced hyperthermia-induced seizure susceptibility, while dendritic spine size deficits were rescued. Our findings demonstrate that KCC2 overexpression in a compromised developing brain increases febrile seizure susceptibility and contribute to dendritic spine alterations. PMID:26875662

  10. Treatable newborn and infant seizures due to inborn errors of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Campistol, Jaume; Plecko, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    About 25% of seizures in the neonatal period have causes other than asphyxia, ischaemia or intracranial bleeding. Among these are primary genetic epileptic encephalopathies with sometimes poor prognosis and high mortality. In addition, some forms of neonatal infant seizures are due to inborn errors of metabolism that do not respond to common AEDs, but are amenable to specific treatment. In this situation, early recognition can allow seizure control and will prevent neurological deterioration and long-term sequelae. We review the group of inborn errors of metabolism that lead to newborn/infant seizures and epilepsy, of which the treatment with cofactors is very different to that used in typical epilepsy management.

  11. Effects of Anterior Thalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Chronic Epileptic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Beatriz; Cavarsan, Clarissa; Miranda, Maisa Ferreira; Aarão, Mayra C.; Madureira, Ana Paula; Rodrigues, Antônio M.; Nobrega, José N.; Mello, Luiz E.; Hamani, Clement

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been investigated for the treatment of epilepsy. In rodents, an increase in the latency for the development of seizures and status epilepticus (SE) has been reported in different animal models but the consequences of delivering stimulation to chronic epileptic animals have not been extensively addressed. We study the effects of anterior thalamic nucleus (AN) stimulation at different current intensities in rats rendered epileptic following pilocarpine (Pilo) administration. Four months after Pilo-induced SE, chronic epileptic rats were bilaterally implanted with AN electrodes or had sham-surgery. Stimulation was delivered for 6 h/day, 5 days/week at 130 Hz, 90 µsec. and either 100 µA or 500 µA. The frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures in animals receiving stimulation was compared to that recorded in the preoperative period and in rats given sham treatment. To investigate the effects of DBS on hippocampal excitability, brain slices from animals receiving AN DBS or sham surgery were studied with electrophysiology. We found that rats treated with AN DBS at 100 µA had a 52% non-significant reduction in the frequency of seizures as compared to sham-treated controls and 61% less seizures than at baseline. Animals given DBS at 500 µA had 5.1 times more seizures than controls and a 2.8 fold increase in seizure rate as compared to preoperative values. In non-stimulated controls, the average frequency of seizures before and after surgery remained unaltered. In vitro recordings have shown that slices from animals previously given DBS at 100 µA had a longer latency for the development of epileptiform activity, shorter and smaller DC shifts, and a smaller spike amplitude compared to non-stimulated controls. In contrast, a higher spike amplitude was recorded in slices from animals given AN DBS at 500 µA. PMID:24892420

  12. Determination of epileptic focus side in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy using long-term noninvasive fNIRS/EEG monitoring for presurgical evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rizki, Edmi Edison; Uga, Minako; Dan, Ippeita; Dan, Haruka; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Yokota, Hidenori; Oguro, Keiji; Watanabe, Eiju

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Noninvasive localization of an epileptogenic zone is a fundamental step for presurgical evaluation of epileptic patients. Here, we applied long-term simultaneous functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS)/electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring for focus diagnosis in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Six MTLE patients underwent long-term (8–16 h per day for 4 days) fNIRS/EEG monitoring for the occurrence of spontaneous seizures. Four spontaneous seizures were successfully recorded out of the six patients. To determine oxy-Hb amplitude, the period-average values of oxy-Hb across 20 s from the EEG- or clinically defined epileptic onset were calculated for both hemispheres from the simultaneously recorded fNIRS data. The average oxy-Hb values for the temporal lobe at the earlier EEG- or clinically defined epileptic onsets were greater for the epileptic side than for the contralateral side after EEG activity suppression, spike train, and clinical seizure in all four cases. The true laterality was determined based on the relief of seizures by selective amygdalo-hippocampectomy. Thus, oxy-Hb amplitude could be a reliable measure for determining the epileptic focus side. Long-term simultaneous fNIRS/EEG measurement serves as an effective tool for recording spontaneous seizures. Cerebral hemodynamic measurement by fNIRS would serve as a valuable supplementary noninvasive measurement method for presurgical evaluation of MTLE. PMID:26158007

  13. Meditation improves clinicoelectroencephalographic measures in drug-resistant epileptics.

    PubMed

    Deepak, K K; Manchanda, S K; Maheshwari, M C

    1994-03-01

    Eleven adults suffering from drug-resistant epilepsies were given meditation practice, while another nine adults acted as waiting list controls. All patients were on antiepileptic drugs and their serum drug levels were monitored regularly. Patients in the intervention group were given training in meditation, and they practiced meditation 20 minutes a day for one year. They showed a significant reduction in seizure frequency and duration, an increase in the dominant background EEG frequency, a reduction in mean spectral intensity of the 0.7-7.7 Hz segment, and an increment in mean spectral intensity in the 8-12 Hz segment of the EEG. All changes were statistically significant. Control patients did not show significant changes in seizure frequency and duration during the observation period of one year. The results indicate that continued meditation practice is of substantial help in improving the clinicoelectrographic picture in drug-resistant epileptics.

  14. Epilepsy and seizure classification in 63 dogs: a reappraisal of veterinary epilepsy terminology.

    PubMed

    Berendt, M; Gram, L

    1999-01-01

    The human definitions of epilepsy and seizure classification were applied rigidly to epileptic dogs to investigate whether the distribution of the seizure types and epilepsies of dogs is comparable to that of human beings. Sixty-three dogs were referred because of recurrent (> 2) epileptic seizures. Only dogs without previous or ongoing antiepileptic treatment were included. All dogs had a physical and neurologic examination and blood work that included a CBC and a biochemical profile. All owners were asked to complete a questionnaire, focusing on seizure development. In addition, video recordings of suspected seizure episodes were analyzed if available. In the majority of dogs where an intracranial lesion was suspected, a computerized tomography scan was performed. Sixty-five percent of the dogs experienced partial seizures with or without secondary generalization and 32% exhibited primary generalized seizures; in 3% of the dogs the seizures could not be classified. Twenty-five percent of these cases were classified as idiopathic, 16% as symptomatic, and 45% as cryptogenic epilepsy; in 14% of these a classification was not possible. Applying human definitions, the distribution of seizure types and epilepsy classifications in these dogs differed widely from those in previous reports of canine epilepsy, where generalized seizures and idiopathic epilepsy were most frequently reported. However, our findings are consistent with the results of several large studies of human epilepsy patients. In dogs with epilepsy, closer attention must be given to the detection of a partial onset of seizures. In this study, detailed questioning of the owners and when possible analysis of video recorded seizures, proved to be sufficient for diagnosing seizures with a partial onset in a significant number of dogs. Partial onset of seizures may be an indication of underlying cerebral pathology. Some adjustments of veterinary epilepsy terminology are suggested.

  15. Seizure Prediction and Detection via Phase and Amplitude Lock Values

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Mark H.; Padmanabha, Akshay; Hossain, Gahangir; de Jongh Curry, Amy L.; Blaha, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    A robust seizure prediction methodology would enable a “closed-loop” system that would only activate as impending seizure activity is detected. Such a system would eliminate ongoing stimulation to the brain, thereby eliminating such side effects as coughing, hoarseness, voice alteration, and paresthesias (Murphy et al., 1998; Ben-Menachem, 2001), while preserving overall battery life of the system. The seizure prediction and detection algorithm uses Phase/Amplitude Lock Values (PLV/ALV) which calculate the difference of phase and amplitude between electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes local and remote to the epileptic event. PLV is used as the seizure prediction marker and signifies the emergence of abnormal neuronal activations through local neuron populations. PLV/ALVs are used as seizure detection markers to demarcate the seizure event, or when the local seizure event has propagated throughout the brain turning into a grand-mal event. We verify the performance of this methodology against the “CHB-MIT Scalp EEG Database” which features seizure attributes for testing. Through this testing, we can demonstrate a high degree of sensivity and precision of our methodology between pre-ictal and ictal events. PMID:27014017

  16. Moonstruck? The effect of the lunar cycle on seizures.

    PubMed

    Baxendale, Sallie; Fisher, Jennifer

    2008-10-01

    Recent reports on the effects of the lunar cycle on seizure occurrence have yielded mixed results. If the moon phase is influential, we hypothesized that this would be due to the moon's contribution to nocturnal illumination, rather than its waxing or waning state, and that significant correlations would not be apparent if local cloud cover were controlled for. We found a significant negative correlation between the mean number of seizures and the fraction of the moon illuminated by the sun (rho=-0.09, P<0.05) in 1571 seizures recorded in a dedicated epilepsy inpatient unit over 341 days. This correlation disappeared when we controlled for the local clarity of the night sky, suggesting that it is the brightness of the night and the contribution the moon phase makes to nocturnal luminance, rather than the moon phase per se, that may influence the occurrence of epileptic seizures.

  17. Faciobrachial dystonic seizures: the influence of immunotherapy on seizure control and prevention of cognitive impairment in a broadening phenotype.

    PubMed

    Irani, Sarosh R; Stagg, Charlotte J; Schott, Jonathan M; Rosenthal, Clive R; Schneider, Susanne A; Pettingill, Philippa; Pettingill, Rosemary; Waters, Patrick; Thomas, Adam; Voets, Natalie L; Cardoso, Manuel J; Cash, David M; Manning, Emily N; Lang, Bethan; Smith, Shelagh J M; Vincent, Angela; Johnson, Michael R

    2013-10-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies, particularly those directed against leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1, are associated with a common form of limbic encephalitis that presents with cognitive impairment and seizures. Faciobrachial dystonic seizures have recently been reported as immunotherapy-responsive, brief, frequent events that often predate the cognitive impairment associated with this limbic encephalitis. However, these observations were made from a retrospective study without serial cognitive assessments. Here, we undertook the first prospective study of faciobrachial dystonic seizures with serial assessments of seizure frequencies, cognition and antibodies in 10 cases identified over 20 months. We hypothesized that (i) faciobrachial dystonic seizures would show a differential response to anti-epileptic drugs and immunotherapy; and that (ii) effective treatment of faciobrachial dystonic seizures would accelerate recovery and prevent the development of cognitive impairment. The 10 cases expand both the known age at onset (28 to 92 years, median 68) and clinical features, with events of longer duration, simultaneously bilateral events, prominent automatisms, sensory aura, and post-ictal fear and speech arrest. Ictal epileptiform electroencephalographic changes were present in three cases. All 10 cases were positive for voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibodies (346-4515 pM): nine showed specificity for leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1. Seven cases had normal clinical magnetic resonance imaging, and the cerebrospinal fluid examination was unremarkable in all seven tested. Faciobrachial dystonic seizures were controlled more effectively with immunotherapy than anti-epileptic drugs (P = 0.006). Strikingly, in the nine cases who remained anti-epileptic drug refractory for a median of 30 days (range 11-200), the addition of corticosteroids was associated with cessation of faciobrachial dystonic seizures within 1 week in three and within 2

  18. Signal subspace integration for improved seizure localization

    PubMed Central

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Fernández, Iván Sánchez; Chang, Bernard S.; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    A subspace signal processing approach is proposed for improved scalp EEG-based localization of broad-focus epileptic seizures, and estimation of the directions of source arrivals (DOA). Ictal scalp EEGs from adult and pediatric patients with broad-focus seizures were first decomposed into dominant signal modes, and signal and noise subspaces at each modal frequency, to improve the signal-to-noise ratio while preserving the original data correlation structure. Transformed (focused) modal signals were then resynthesized into wideband signals from which the number of sources and DOA were estimated. These were compared to denoised signals via principal components analysis (PCA). Coherent subspace processing performed better than PCA, significantly improved the localization of ictal EEGs and the estimation of distinct sources and corresponding DOAs. PMID:23366067

  19. Signal subspace integration for improved seizure localization.

    PubMed

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Fernández, Iván Sánchez; Chang, Bernard S; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    A subspace signal processing approach is proposed for improved scalp EEG-based localization of broad-focus epileptic seizures, and estimation of the directions of source arrivals (DOA). Ictal scalp EEGs from adult and pediatric patients with broad-focus seizures were first decomposed into dominant signal modes, and signal and noise subspaces at each modal frequency, to improve the signal-to-noise ratio while preserving the original data correlation structure. Transformed (focused) modal signals were then resynthesized into wideband signals from which the number of sources and DOA were estimated. These were compared to denoised signals via principal components analysis (PCA). Coherent subspace processing performed better than PCA, significantly improved the localization of ictal EEGs and the estimation of distinct sources and corresponding DOAs. PMID:23366067

  20. Levetiracetam seizure prophylaxis in craniotomy patients at high risk for postoperative seizures

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Sankalp; Khan, Shariq Ali; Agrawal, Abhishek; Friedman, Allan H.; McDonagh, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The risk of developing immediate postoperative seizures in patients undergoing supratentorial brain tumor surgery without anti-epileptic drug (AED) prophylaxis is 15-20%. Patients who present with pre-operative seizures and patients with supratentorial meningioma or supratentorial low grade gliomas are at significantly higher risk. There is little data on the efficacy of levetiracetam as a prophylactic AED in the immediate postoperative period (within 7 days of surgery) in these patients. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 165 adult patients classified as higher risk for postoperative seizures who underwent brain tumor resection at Duke University Hospital between time May 2010 and December 2011. All patients had received levetiracetam monotherapy in doses of 1000-3000 mg/day in the immediate postoperative period. Results: We identified 165 patients with following tumor locations: Frontal 83 (50.3%), Temporal 37 (22.4%), Parietal 30 (18.2%), Occipital 2 (1.2%) and 13 (7.8%) with single lesions involving more than one lobe. Histology revealed: Glioma 98 (59.4%), Meningioma 57 (34.5%) and Brain Metastases 6 (3.6%). Preoperatively, 88/165 (53.3%) patients had presented with seizures. 12/165 patients (7.3%) developed clinical seizures (generalized 10, partial 2) in the immediate post-operative period. Other than somnolence in 7 patients (4.2%), no major side-effects were noted. Conclusions: The incidence of seizures was significantly lower in patients treated with levetiracetam (7.3%) when compared with the expected (15-20%) rate without AED prophylaxis based on the previous literature. Levetiracetam appears effective and safe for seizure prevention in patients undergoing brain tumor resection and who are at significantly higher risk of developing post-operative seizures. These findings warrant confirmation in a prospective randomized trial. PMID:24550999

  1. The Role of Astroglia in the Epileptic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Losi, Gabriele; Cammarota, Mario; Carmignoto, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsies comprise a family of multifactorial neurological disorders that affect at least 50 million people worldwide. Despite a long history of neurobiological and clinical studies the mechanisms that lead the brain network to a hyperexcitable state and to the intense, massive neuronal discharges reflecting a seizure episode are only partially defined. Most epilepsies of genetic origin are related to mutations in ionic channels that cause neuronal hyperexcitability. However, idiopathic epilepsies of unclear origin represent the majority of these brain disorders. A large body of evidence suggests that in the epileptic brain neurons are not the only players. Indeed, the glial cell astrocyte is known to be morphologically and functionally altered in different types of epilepsy. Although it is unclear whether these astrocyte dysfunctions can have a causative role in epileptogenesis, the hypothesis that astrocytes contribute to epileptiform activities recently received a considerable experimental support. Notably, currently used antiepileptic drugs, that act mainly on neuronal ion channels, are ineffective in a large group of patients. Clarifying astrocyte functions in the epileptic brain tissue could unveil astrocytes as novel therapeutic targets. In this review we present first a short overview on the role of astrocytes in the epileptic brain starting from the “historical” observations on their fundamental modulation of brain homeostasis, such as the control of water content, ionic equilibrium, and neurotransmitters concentrations. We then focus our review on most recent studies that hint at a distinct contribution of these cells in the generation of focal epileptiform activities. PMID:22807916

  2. Studying Network Mechanisms Using Intracranial Stimulation in Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    David, Olivier; Bastin, Julien; Chabardès, Stéphan; Minotti, Lorella; Kahane, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Patients suffering from focal drug-resistant epilepsy who are explored using intracranial electrodes allow to obtain data of exceptional value for studying brain dynamics in correlation with pathophysiological and cognitive processes. Direct electrical stimulation (DES) of cortical regions and axonal tracts in those patients elicits a number of very specific perceptual or behavioral responses, but also abnormal responses due to specific configurations of epileptic networks. Here, we review how anatomo-functional brain connectivity and epilepsy network mechanisms can be assessed from DES responses measured in patients. After a brief summary of mechanisms of action of brain electrical stimulation, we recall the conceptual framework for interpreting DES results in the context of brain connectivity and review how DES can be used for the characterization of functional networks, the identification of the seizure onset zone, the study of brain plasticity mechanisms, and the anticipation of epileptic seizures. This pool of exceptional data may be underexploited by fundamental research on brain connectivity and leaves much to be learned. PMID:21060722

  3. Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts is upregulated in temporal lobe epilepsy and contributes to experimental seizures.

    PubMed

    Iori, Valentina; Maroso, Mattia; Rizzi, Massimo; Iyer, Anand M; Vertemara, Roberta; Carli, Mirjana; Agresti, Alessandra; Antonelli, Antonella; Bianchi, Marco E; Aronica, Eleonora; Ravizza, Teresa; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2013-10-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation in neuron and astrocytes by High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1) protein is a key mechanism of seizure generation. HMGB1 also activates the Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE), but it was unknown whether RAGE activation contributes to seizures or to HMGB1 proictogenic effects. We found that acute EEG seizures induced by 7ng intrahippocampal kainic acid (KA) were significantly reduced in Rage-/- mice relative to wild type (Wt) mice. The proictogenic effect of HMGB1 was decreased in Rage-/- mice, but less so, than in Tlr4-/- mice. In a mouse mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) model, status epilepticus induced by 200ng intrahippocampal KA and the onset of the spontaneous epileptic activity were similar in Rage-/-, Tlr4-/- and Wt mice. However, the number of hippocampal paroxysmal episodes and their duration were both decreased in epileptic Rage-/- and Tlr4-/- mice vs Wt mice. All strains of epileptic mice displayed similar cognitive deficits in the novel object recognition test vs the corresponding control mice. CA1 neuronal cell loss was increased in epileptic Rage-/- vs epileptic Wt mice, while granule cell dispersion and doublecortin (DCX)-positive neurons were similarly affected. Notably, DCX neurons were preserved in epileptic Tlr4-/- mice. We did not find compensatory changes in HMGB1-related inflammatory signaling nor in glutamate receptor subunits in Rage-/- and Tlr4-/- naïve mice, except for ~20% NR2B subunit reduction in Rage-/- mice. RAGE was induced in neurons, astrocytes and microvessels in human and experimental mTLE hippocampi. We conclude that RAGE contributes to hyperexcitability underlying acute and chronic seizures, as well as to the proictogenic effects of HMGB1. RAGE and TLR4 play different roles in the neuropathologic sequelae developing after status epilepticus. These findings reveal new molecular mechanisms underlying seizures, cell loss and neurogenesis which involve inflammatory pathways

  4. Evaluation of selected recurrence measures in discriminating pre-ictal and inter-ictal periods from epileptic EEG data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngamga, Eulalie Joelle; Bialonski, Stephan; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen; Geier, Christian; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the suitability of selected measures of complexity based on recurrence quantification analysis and recurrence networks for an identification of pre-seizure states in multi-day, multi-channel, invasive electroencephalographic recordings from five epilepsy patients. We employ several statistical techniques to avoid spurious findings due to various influencing factors and due to multiple comparisons and observe precursory structures in three patients. Our findings indicate a high congruence among measures in identifying seizure precursors and emphasize the current notion of seizure generation in large-scale epileptic networks. A final judgment of the suitability for field studies, however, requires evaluation on a larger database.

  5. Immune-mediated steroid-responsive epileptic spasms and epileptic encephalopathy associated with VGKC-complex antibodies.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, Jehan; Brenner, Tanja; Gill, Deepak; Troedson, Christopher; Sinclair, Adriane J; Brilot, Fabienne; Vincent, Angela; Lang, Bethan; Dale, Russell C

    2011-11-01

    Autoantibodies that bind to voltage-gated potassium-channel complex proteins (VGKC-complex antibodies) occur frequently in adults with limbic encephalitis presenting with cognitive impairment and seizures. Recently, VGKC-complex antibodies have been described in a few children with limbic encephalitis, and children with unexplained encephalitis presenting with status epilepticus. We report a case of infantile-onset epileptic spasms and developmental delay compatible with epileptic encephalopathy. Our patient was a female infant, aged 4 months at presentation. She had evidence of immune activation in the central nervous system with elevated cerebrospinal fluid neopterin and mirrored oligoclonal bands, which prompted testing for autoantibodies. VGKC-complex antibodies were elevated (201 pmol/L, normal<100), but extended antibody testing, including leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2), was negative. The patient showed a partial response to steroid treatment, which was started late in the disease course. On review at 13 months of age, her development was consistent with an age of 5 to 6 months. These results suggest that VGKC-complex antibodies might represent a marker of immune therapy responsiveness in a subgroup of patients with infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

  6. Management of a high risk epileptic patient under conscious sedation: A multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    Chellathurai, Burnice Nalina Kumari; Thiagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Jayakumaran, SelvaKumar; Devadoss, Pradeep; Elavazhagan

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy, characterized by the risk of recurrent seizures, is a chronic disease that afflicts about 5% of the world's population. The main dental problems associated with epileptic patients include gingival hyperplasia, minor oral injuries, tooth trauma, and prosthodontic problems, which require the dental treatment. Stress and fear are the most common triggering factors for the epilepsy in dental chair. Therefore, a more appropriate method of treating such epileptic patients may be warranted. Conscious sedation is a technique of providing good anesthesia and analgesia to patients, the main advantage of which is the patient's rapid return to presentation levels. Midazolam used as a sedative agent has anticonvulsant properties. This case report highlights a case requiring multiple dental procedures carried out in a high risk epileptic patient under conscious sedation. PMID:27041847

  7. The Lombrosian prejudice in medicine. The case of epilepsy. Epileptic psychosis. Epilepsy and aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Granieri, Enrico; Fazio, Patrik

    2012-02-01

    In the nineteenth century, epilepsy became subject of experimental research. Lombroso established a relationship between epilepsy and criminality believing in the existence of epileptoid traits and atavism. He tried to demonstrate the common origin of epilepsy, criminality, and genius; factors deteriorating the CNS would act upon centers, which control behavior and ethics. This impairment would cause a lack of control on the lower nervous centers, reducing restraints of instincts and criminal behavior. He described developmental frontal cortex lesions in epileptic patients (today Taylor's dysplasia) and these observations supported the erroneous conviction of a relationship between criminality and epilepsy. Neurological, behavioral, and criminological sciences analyzed Lombroso's doctrine, whereas it was controversial that epileptic patients should be prone to violent actions and aggressive behavior. Today, there is an international panel of experts on epilepsy, which suggests five relevant criteria to determine if a crime committed with aggressiveness could result from epileptic seizures.

  8. Long-term variability of global statistical properties of epileptic brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhnert, Marie-Therese; Elger, Christian E.; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2010-12-01

    We investigate the influence of various pathophysiologic and physiologic processes on global statistical properties of epileptic brain networks. We construct binary functional networks from long-term, multichannel electroencephalographic data recorded from 13 epilepsy patients, and the average shortest path length and the clustering coefficient serve as global statistical network characteristics. For time-resolved estimates of these characteristics we observe large fluctuations over time, however, with some periodic temporal structure. These fluctuations can—to a large extent—be attributed to daily rhythms while relevant aspects of the epileptic process contribute only marginally. Particularly, we could not observe clear cut changes in network states that can be regarded as predictive of an impending seizure. Our findings are of particular relevance for studies aiming at an improved understanding of the epileptic process with graph-theoretical approaches.

  9. A comprehensive oral and dental management of an epileptic and intellectually deteriorated adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sourabh Ramesh; Pendyala, Gowri Swaminatham; Saraf, Veena; Choudhari, Shantanu; Mopagar, Viddyasagar

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy along with intellectual deterioration and other neurological disorders can have social, physical, and psychological consequences, especially, when they begin in childhood. Moreover, the seizure episode along with mental deterioration may compromise the oral and dental care resulting in numerous decayed teeth. This report presents the case history of an adolescent with poor oral hygiene and numerous decayed teeth. This report also presents the comprehensive endodontic, surgical, and prosthodontic management of epileptic mentally challenged patient in the dental office. Epilepsy along with intellectual deterioration and other neurological disorders can have social, physical, and psychological consequences, especially, when they begin in childhood. Moreover, the seizure episode along with mental deterioration may compromise the oral and dental care resulting in numerous decayed teeth. This report presents the case history of an adolescent with poor oral hygiene and numerous decayed teeth. This report also presents the comprehensive endodontic, surgical, and prosthodontic management of epileptic mentally challenged patient in the dental office. PMID:24130597

  10. Using bivariate signal analysis to characterize the epileptic focus: The benefit of surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejak, R. G.; Chicharro, D.; Lehnertz, K.; Mormann, F.

    2011-04-01

    The disease epilepsy is related to hypersynchronous activity of networks of neurons. While acute epileptic seizures are the most extreme manifestation of this hypersynchronous activity, an elevated level of interdependence of neuronal dynamics is thought to persist also during the seizure-free interval. In multichannel recordings from brain areas involved in the epileptic process, this interdependence can be reflected in an increased linear cross correlation but also in signal properties of higher order. Bivariate time series analysis comprises a variety of approaches, each with different degrees of sensitivity and specificity for interdependencies reflected in lower- or higher-order properties of pairs of simultaneously recorded signals. Here we investigate which approach is best suited to detect putatively elevated interdependence levels in signals recorded from brain areas involved in the epileptic process. For this purpose, we use the linear cross correlation that is sensitive to lower-order signatures of interdependence, a nonlinear interdependence measure that integrates both lower- and higher-order properties, and a surrogate-corrected nonlinear interdependence measure that aims to specifically characterize higher-order properties. We analyze intracranial electroencephalographic recordings of the seizure-free interval from 29 patients with an epileptic focus located in the medial temporal lobe. Our results show that all three approaches detect higher levels of interdependence for signals recorded from the brain hemisphere containing the epileptic focus as compared to signals recorded from the opposite hemisphere. For the linear cross correlation, however, these differences are not significant. For the nonlinear interdependence measure, results are significant but only of moderate accuracy with regard to the discriminative power for the focal and nonfocal hemispheres. The highest significance and accuracy is obtained for the surrogate-corrected nonlinear

  11. Cerebral perfusion alterations in epileptic patients during peri-ictal and post-ictal phase: PASL vs DSC-MRI.

    PubMed

    Pizzini, Francesca B; Farace, Paolo; Manganotti, Paolo; Zoccatelli, Giada; Bongiovanni, Luigi G; Golay, Xavier; Beltramello, Alberto; Osculati, Antonio; Bertini, Giuseppe; Fabene, Paolo F

    2013-07-01

    Non-invasive pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) MRI is a method to study brain perfusion that does not require the administration of a contrast agent, which makes it a valuable diagnostic tool as it reduces cost and side effects. The purpose of the present study was to establish the viability of PASL as an alternative to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI) and other perfusion imaging methods in characterizing changes in perfusion patterns caused by seizures in epileptic patients. We evaluated 19 patients with PASL. Of these, the 9 affected by high-frequency seizures were observed during the peri-ictal period (within 5hours since the last seizure), while the 10 patients affected by low-frequency seizures were observed in the post-ictal period. For comparison, 17/19 patients were also evaluated with DSC-MRI and CBF/CBV. PASL imaging showed focal vascular changes, which allowed the classification of patients in three categories: 8 patients characterized by increased perfusion, 4 patients with normal perfusion and 7 patients with decreased perfusion. PASL perfusion imaging findings were comparable to those obtained by DSC-MRI. Since PASL is a) sensitive to vascular alterations induced by epileptic seizures, b) comparable to DSC-MRI for detecting perfusion asymmetries, c) potentially capable of detecting time-related perfusion changes, it can be recommended for repeated evaluations, to identify the epileptic focus, and in follow-up and/or therapy-response assessment. PMID:23623332

  12. Cerebral perfusion alterations in epileptic patients during peri-ictal and post-ictal phase: PASL vs DSC-MRI.

    PubMed

    Pizzini, Francesca B; Farace, Paolo; Manganotti, Paolo; Zoccatelli, Giada; Bongiovanni, Luigi G; Golay, Xavier; Beltramello, Alberto; Osculati, Antonio; Bertini, Giuseppe; Fabene, Paolo F

    2013-07-01

    Non-invasive pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) MRI is a method to study brain perfusion that does not require the administration of a contrast agent, which makes it a valuable diagnostic tool as it reduces cost and side effects. The purpose of the present study was to establish the viability of PASL as an alternative to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI) and other perfusion imaging methods in characterizing changes in perfusion patterns caused by seizures in epileptic patients. We evaluated 19 patients with PASL. Of these, the 9 affected by high-frequency seizures were observed during the peri-ictal period (within 5hours since the last seizure), while the 10 patients affected by low-frequency seizures were observed in the post-ictal period. For comparison, 17/19 patients were also evaluated with DSC-MRI and CBF/CBV. PASL imaging showed focal vascular changes, which allowed the classification of patients in three categories: 8 patients characterized by increased perfusion, 4 patients with normal perfusion and 7 patients with decreased perfusion. PASL perfusion imaging findings were comparable to those obtained by DSC-MRI. Since PASL is a) sensitive to vascular alterations induced by epileptic seizures, b) comparable to DSC-MRI for detecting perfusion asymmetries, c) potentially capable of detecting time-related perfusion changes, it can be recommended for repeated evaluations, to identify the epileptic focus, and in follow-up and/or therapy-response assessment.

  13. [Bilateral Dislocation Fracture of the Humeral Head (Right AO 11C3.3; Left AO 11A1.3) without Direct Trauma Due to First Clinical Manifestation of Seizure - a Case Report and Review of the Literature].

    PubMed

    Ploeger, M M; Pennekamp, P H; Müller, M C; Kabir, K; Burger, C; Wirtz, D C; Schmolders, J

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of fractures among epileptics is frequent and mostly occurs by direct trauma due to falls caused by seizures. The risk of fractures is estimated to be 50 % higher in epileptics than in the general population. Most of the fractures affect the proximal femora and the hip joint. Dorsal shoulder dislocations occur frequently in epileptics. If they occur bilaterally, this is pathognomonic for seizuring. Besides this, shoulder dislocation and bilateral dislocation fractures of the humeral head, however, are far more rare even among epileptics but pathognomonic for seizure. In this case report we present a female patient with bilateral dislocation fracture of the humeral head due to first clinical manifestation of a tonic-clonic seizure without direct trauma.

  14. Using wearable sensors for semiology-independent seizure detection - towards ambulatory monitoring of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Heldberg, Beeke E; Kautz, Thomas; Leutheuser, Heike; Hopfengartner, Rudiger; Kasper, Burkhard S; Eskofier, Bjoern M

    2015-08-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of the central nervous system. Nearly 70% of people with epilepsy respond to a proper treatment, but for a successful therapy of epilepsy, physicians need to know if and when seizures occur. The gold standard diagnosis tool video-electroencephalography (vEEG) requires patients to stay at hospital for several days. A wearable sensor system, e.g. a wristband, serving as diagnostic tool or event monitor, would allow unobtrusive ambulatory long-term monitoring while reducing costs. Previous studies showed that seizures with motor symptoms such as generalized tonic-clonic seizures can be detected by measuring the electrodermal activity (EDA) and motion measuring acceleration (ACC). In this study, EDA and ACC from 8 patients were analyzed. In extension to previous studies, different types of seizures, including seizures without motor activity, were taken into account. A hierarchical classification approach was implemented in order to detect different types of epileptic seizures using data from wearable sensors. Using a k-nearest neighbor (kNN) classifier an overall sensitivity of 89.1% and an overall specificity of 93.1% were achieved, for seizures without motor activity the sensitivity was 97.1% and the specificity was 92.9%. The presented method is a first step towards a reliable ambulatory monitoring system for epileptic seizures with and without motor activity.

  15. Physics of the Brain: Interaction of the Optical-Fiber-Guided Multi-Ultraviolet-Photon Beams with the Epilepsy Topion, (the Seizure Onset Area)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    A novel method for the possible prevention of epileptic seizures is proposed, based on the multi-ultraviolet-photon beam interaction with the epilepsy topion, (nonlinear coupling of an ultra high frequency mode to the brain beta phonons). It is hypothesized that epilepsy is a chaotic-dynamics phenomenon: small electrical changes in the epilepsy-topion lead, (within the 10s of milliseconds), to the onset of chaos, (seizure--excessive electrical discharge), and subsequent cascading into adjacent areas. The ultraviolet photons may control the imbalance of sodium and potassium ions and, consequently, may prove to be efficient in the prevention of epileptic seizures. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  16. Using Lorenz plot and Cardiac Sympathetic Index of heart rate variability for detecting seizures for patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Jesper; Beniczky, Sandor; Johansen, Peter; Sidenius, Per; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Tachycardia is often seen during epileptic seizures, but it also occurs during physical exercise. In order to assess whether focal epileptic seizures can be detected by short term moving window Heart Rate Variability (HRV) analysis, we modified the geometric HRV method, Lorenz plot, to consist of only 30, 50 or 100 R-R intervals per analyzed window. From each window we calculated the longitudinal (L) and transverse (T) variability of Lorenz plot to retrieve the Cardiac Sympathetic Index (CSI) as (L/T) and "Modified CSI" (described in methods), and compared the maximum during the patient's epileptic seizures with that during the patient's own exercise and non-seizure sessions as control. All five analyzed patients had complex partial seizures (CPS) originating in the temporal lobe (11 seizures) during their 1-5 days long term video-EEG monitoring. All CPS with electroencephalographic correlation were selected for the HRV analysis. The CSI and Modified CSI were correspondently calculated after each heart beat depicting the prior 30, 50 and 100 R-R intervals at the time. CSI (30, 50 and 100) and Modified CSI (100) showed a higher maximum peak during seizures than exercise/non-seizure (121-296%) for 4 of the 5 patients within 4 seconds before till 60 seconds after seizure onset time even though exercise maximum HR exceeded that of the seizures. The results indicate a detectable, sudden and inordinate shift towards sympathetic overdrive in the sympathovagal balance of the autonomic nervous system just around seizure-onset for certain patients. This new modified moving window Lorenz plot method seems promising way of constructing a portable ECG-based epilepsy alarm for certain patients with epilepsy who needs aid during seizure.

  17. Ictal analgesia in temporal lobe epilepsy - The mechanism of seizure-related burns.

    PubMed

    Szűcs, Anna; Horváth, András; Rásonyi, György; Fabó, Dániel; Szabó, Géza; Sákovics, Anna; Kamondi, Anita

    2015-08-01

    Seizure-related injuries have major impact in the excess mortality and morbidity of epilepsy patients. Experimental data suggest that analgesia may develop during seizures contributing to the severity of seizure-related accidents, especially burns. We aimed to identify those seizure-types that may lead to burn-injuries by seizure-related analgesia. In our tertiary epilepsy centre, we asked 100 epilepsy patients having a history of seizure-related injury, to complete our burn-and-pain questionnaire. Fifty-one patients completed the survey; their epileptology data were collected and those with a seizure-related burn were interviewed. Forty-two out of the 51 patients (82%) had partial epilepsy and 9 (18%) had idiopathic generalised epilepsy. Twenty-six persons (51%) reported decreased pain perception during or after seizures in general. Twelve patients (23%) had suffered one or more seizure-related burn. Five of them fell onto a hot surface or fire accidentally, during generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Seven out of the 12 burnt patients (58%) grasped a hot object or reached into boiling fluid during complex partial seizures; without experiencing-, or reacting in response to pain. These patients had temporal lobe epilepsy, 5 of them had left temporal seizure onset. Our hypothesis based on the circumstantial analysis of our patients' burn-injuries; is that temporal lobe seizures may cause ictal/postictal analgesia. It may be caused by the seizure-related epileptic facilitation of the periaqueductal gray matter; the central pain-inhibiting structure of the brain. Seizure-related endogenous opioid-release my have a contributory role in inhibiting pain-perception. Ictal analgesia warrants better burn-prevention in temporal lobe epilepsy patients. Understanding the mechanism of ictal analgesia and specifying those seizures-types prone to cause it; may help indentifying human pain-inhibiting pathways.

  18. Dreaming of seizures.

    PubMed

    Vercueil, Laurent

    2005-08-01

    Could some dreams and temporal lobe seizures share an intrinsic neuronal network? At the interplay of emotion, memory, dream, and temporal lobe seizure, we report on a patient with a left dysplastic amygdala and temporal lobe epilepsy who presented with a typical seizure while dreaming. Neuronal networks subserving affective states are suggested to be involved in emotional dream, memory recall, and amygdalo-hippocampal seizures.

  19. 78 FR 17917 - Medical Waivers for Merchant Mariner Credential Applicants With a History of Seizure Disorders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Background and Purpose Coast Guard regulations in 46 CFR 10.215 contain the...-epileptic drugs (AEDs)); and (a) If AEDs have been stopped, the mariner must have been seizure- free for a... given changes in the mariner's weight or other factors such as drug interactions. Significant...

  20. Molecular Correlates of Age-Dependent Seizures in an Inherited Neonatal-Infantile Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Yunxiang; Deprez, Liesbet; Maljevic, Snezana; Pitsch, Julika; Claes, Lieve; Hristova, Dimitrina; Jordanova, Albena; Ala-Mello, Sirpa; Bellan-Koch, Astrid; Blazevic, Dragica; Schubert, Simone; Thomas, Evan A.; Petrou, Steven; Becker, Albert J.; De Jonghe, Peter; Lerche, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Many idiopathic epilepsy syndromes have a characteristic age dependence, the underlying molecular mechanisms of which are largely unknown. Here we propose a mechanism that can explain that epileptic spells in benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures occur almost exclusively during the first days to months of life. Benign familial…

  1. Search and Seizure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Kenneth T.

    This paper examines the practice of search and seizure from a legal perspective. All issues concerning lawful or unlawful search and seizure, whether in a public school or otherwise, are predicated upon the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution. The terms "search,""seizure,""probable cause,""reasonable suspicion," and "exclusionary…

  2. Impaired peri-nidal cerebrovascular reserve in seizure patients with brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Fierstra, Jorn; Conklin, John; Krings, Timo; Slessarev, Marat; Han, Jay S; Fisher, Joseph A; Terbrugge, Karel; Wallace, M Christopher; Tymianski, Michael; Mikulis, David J

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are a common presentation in patients with newly diagnosed brain arteriovenous malformations, but the pathophysiological mechanisms causing the seizures remain poorly understood. We used magnetic resonance imaging-based quantitative cerebrovascular reactivity mapping and conventional angiography to determine whether seizure-prone patients with brain arteriovenous malformations exhibit impaired cerebrovascular reserve or morphological angiographic features predictive of seizures. Twenty consecutive patients with untreated brain arteriovenous malformations were recruited (10 with and 10 without epileptic seizures) along with 12 age-matched healthy controls. Blood oxygen level-dependent MRI was performed while applying iso-oxic step changes in end-tidal partial pressure of CO(2) to obtain quantitative cerebrovascular reactivity measurements. The brain arteriovenous malformation morphology was evaluated by angiography, to determine to what extent limitations of arterial blood supply or the presence of restricted venous outflow and tissue congestion correlated with seizure susceptibility. Only patients with seizures exhibited impaired peri-nidal cerebrovascular reactivity by magnetic resonance imaging (0.11 ± 0.10 versus 0.25 ± 0.07, respectively; P < 0.001) and venous drainage patterns suggestive of tissue congestion on angiography. However, cerebrovascular reactivity changes were not of a magnitude suggestive of arterial steal, and were probably compatible with venous congestion in aetiology. Our findings demonstrate a strong association between impaired peri-nidal cerebrovascular reserve and epileptic seizure presentation in patients with brain arteriovenous malformation. The impaired cerebrovascular reserve may be associated with venous congestion. Quantitative measurements of cerebrovascular reactivity using blood oxygen level-dependent MRI appear to correlate with seizure susceptibility in patients with brain arteriovenous malformation.

  3. Ovarian hormones, anticonvulsant drugs, and seizures during the menstrual cycle in women with epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Rościszewska, D; Buntner, B; Guz, I; Zawisza, L

    1986-01-01

    The excretion of three oestrogen fractions and progesterone metabolites in 64 female epileptic patients was determined during the menstrual cycle, and in 50 women of this sample serum phenytoin and phenobarbitone levels were measured. A significant decrease of both hormones in epileptic patients was found as compared to a control group. The variations in serum phenytoin levels were greater in females with so-called catamenial epilepsy with a marked fall of drug levels between days 27 and 28 corresponding with an increase of seizure frequency. The effect of progesterone deficit on seizure susceptibility before menstrual bleeding is discussed, and the need of serum anticonvulsant level determination during the premenstrual phase in epileptic women is suggested. PMID:3958732

  4. A study of the dynamics of seizure propagation across micro domains in the vicinity of the seizure onset zone

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Ishita; Kudela, Pawel; Korzeniewska, Anna; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.; Anderson, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The use of micro-electrode arrays to measure electrical activity from the surface of the brain is increasingly being investigated as a means to improve seizure onset zone localization. In this work, we used a multivariate autoregressive model to determine the evolution of seizure dynamics in the 70 – 110 Hz high frequency band across micro-domains sampled by such micro-electrode arrays. Approach We used 7 complex partial seizures recorded from 4 patients undergoing intracranial monitoring for surgical evaluation to reconstruct the seizure propagation pattern over sliding windows using a directed transfer function measure. Main results We showed that a directed transfer function can be used to estimate the flow of seizure activity in a set of simulated micro-electrode data with known propagation pattern. In general, depending on the location of the micro-electrode grid with respect to the clinical seizure onset zone and the time from seizure onset, ictal propagation changed in directional characteristics over a 2 to 10 seconds time scale, with gross directionality limited to spatial dimensions of approximately 9mm2. It was also seen that the strongest seizure patterns in the high frequency band and their sources over such micro-domains are more stable over time and across seizures bordering the clinically determined seizure onset zone than inside. Significance This type of propagation analysis might in future provide an additional tool to epileptologists for characterizing epileptogenic tissue. This will potentially help narrowing down resection zones without compromising essential brain functions as well as provide important information about targeting anti-epileptic stimulation devices. PMID:26061006

  5. Targeting Pannexin1 Improves Seizure Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Marcelo F.; Veliskova, Jana; Patel, Naman K.; Lutz, Sarah E.; Caille, Dorothee; Charollais, Anne; Meda, Paolo; Scemes, Eliana

    2011-01-01

    Imbalance of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is one of several causes of seizures. ATP has also been implicated in epilepsy. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the release of ATP from cells and the consequences of the altered ATP signaling during seizures. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is found in astrocytes and in neurons at high levels in the embryonic and young postnatal brain, declining in adulthood. Panx1 forms large-conductance voltage sensitive plasma membrane channels permeable to ATP that are also activated by elevated extracellular K+ and following P2 receptor stimulation. Based on these properties, we hypothesized that Panx1 channels may contribute to seizures by increasing the levels of extracellular ATP. Using pharmacological tools and two transgenic mice deficient for Panx1 we show here that interference with Panx1 ameliorates the outcome and shortens the duration of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. These data thus indicate that the activation of Panx1 in juvenile mouse hippocampi contributes to neuronal hyperactivity in seizures. PMID:21949881

  6. How Sleep Activates Epileptic Networks?

    PubMed Central

    Halász, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background. The relationship between sleep and epilepsy has been long ago studied, and several excellent reviews are available. However, recent development in sleep research, the network concept in epilepsy, and the recognition of high frequency oscillations in epilepsy and more new results may put this matter in a new light. Aim. The review address the multifold interrelationships between sleep and epilepsy networks and with networks of cognitive functions. Material and Methods. The work is a conceptual update of the available clinical data and relevant studies. Results and Conclusions. Studies exploring dynamic microstructure of sleep have found important gating mechanisms for epileptic activation. As a general rule interictal epileptic manifestations seem to be linked to the slow oscillations of sleep and especially to the reactive delta bouts characterized by A1 subtype in the CAP system. Important link between epilepsy and sleep is the interference of epileptiform discharges with the plastic functions in NREM sleep. This is the main reason of cognitive impairment in different forms of early epileptic encephalopathies affecting the brain in a special developmental window. The impairment of cognitive functions via sleep is present especially in epileptic networks involving the thalamocortical system and the hippocampocortical memory encoding system. PMID:24159386

  7. How sleep activates epileptic networks?

    PubMed

    Halász, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background. The relationship between sleep and epilepsy has been long ago studied, and several excellent reviews are available. However, recent development in sleep research, the network concept in epilepsy, and the recognition of high frequency oscillations in epilepsy and more new results may put this matter in a new light. Aim. The review address the multifold interrelationships between sleep and epilepsy networks and with networks of cognitive functions. Material and Methods. The work is a conceptual update of the available clinical data and relevant studies. Results and Conclusions. Studies exploring dynamic microstructure of sleep have found important gating mechanisms for epileptic activation. As a general rule interictal epileptic manifestations seem to be linked to the slow oscillations of sleep and especially to the reactive delta bouts characterized by A1 subtype in the CAP system. Important link between epilepsy and sleep is the interference of epileptiform discharges with the plastic functions in NREM sleep. This is the main reason of cognitive impairment in different forms of early epileptic encephalopathies affecting the brain in a special developmental window. The impairment of cognitive functions via sleep is present especially in epileptic networks involving the thalamocortical system and the hippocampocortical memory encoding system.

  8. Uncontrolled seizures resulting from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis complicating neurobrucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Faraji, Fardin; Didgar, Farshid; Talaie-Zanjani, Afsoon; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare form of stroke caused by thrombosis in venous sinuses of the brain. In this study, we reported on a patient with venous sinus thrombosis and brucellosis who presented with uncontrolled seizure despite being treated with anti-epileptic drugs at high doses. The case was a 33-year-old woman with a history of controlled complex partial seizure who presented with headache, asthenia, and uncontrolled seizure for one month. She was febrile and a brain CT scan indicated hemorrhagic focus in the left posterior parietal and the temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography also proved venous sinus thrombosis in the left transverse sinus. Besides [In addition], a laboratory assessment confirmed brucellosis. Following the treatment with anti-coagulant, anti-brucellosis, and anti-epileptic agents, the patient was discharged in good condition with medical orders. Clinical suspicion and accurate evaluation of a patient's history is the most important clue in diagnosis and treatment of brucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, especially in uncontrolled seizure in patients who had previously been under control. PMID:24250168

  9. Complex Partial Seizure as a Manifestation of Non-Ketotic Hyperglycemia: The Needle Recovered From Haystack?

    PubMed

    Rani, Khairil Amir; Ahmed, Mohamed H; Dunphy, Louise; Behnam, Yousif

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of a 75-year-old gentleman with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus presenting with acute onset expressive dysphasia and right hemi-paresis with no prior history of seizure. He developed clusters of stereotypical complex partial seizures which were refractory to anti-epileptic agents. He was not known to have diabetes and his brain MRI was normal. His random blood sugar measurement on admission to hospital was 30 mmol/L with HbA1c measurement of 14.8%. His seizures terminated completely when his hyperglycemia was corrected with insulin and rehydration therapy. PMID:27222677

  10. Seizure frequency in pilocarpine-treated rats is independent of circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Bajorat, Rika; Wilde, Marleen; Sellmann, Tina; Kirschstein, Timo; Köhling, Rüdiger

    2011-09-01

    Pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) results in chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures resembling human temporal lobe epilepsy. In this and other experimental models, behaviorally monitored seizure frequency was suggested to vary in a circadian fashion, and to increase with time. We re-addressed those hypotheses using continuous video-electroencephalography (EEG) telemetry in rats with SE at 30 days of age. In 11 chronically epileptic animals monitored up to 300 days after SE in a fixed 12 h light/dark cycle, we found that seizure frequency did not correlate with circadian rhythm.

  11. Complex Partial Seizure as a Manifestation of Non-Ketotic Hyperglycemia: The Needle Recovered From Haystack?

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Khairil Amir; Ahmed, Mohamed H.; Dunphy, Louise; Behnam, Yousif

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 75-year-old gentleman with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus presenting with acute onset expressive dysphasia and right hemi-paresis with no prior history of seizure. He developed clusters of stereotypical complex partial seizures which were refractory to anti-epileptic agents. He was not known to have diabetes and his brain MRI was normal. His random blood sugar measurement on admission to hospital was 30 mmol/L with HbA1c measurement of 14.8%. His seizures terminated completely when his hyperglycemia was corrected with insulin and rehydration therapy. PMID:27222677

  12. Nonepileptic seizures: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Perez, David L; LaFrance, W Curt

    2016-06-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are a functional neurological disorder/conversion disorder subtype, which are neurobehavioral conditions at the interface of neurology and psychiatry. Significant advancements over the past decade have been made in the diagnosis, management, and neurobiological understanding of PNES. This article reviews published PNES research focusing on semiologic features that distinguish PNES from epileptic seizures, consensus diagnostic criteria, the intersection of PNES and other comorbidities, neurobiological studies, evidence-based treatment interventions, and outcome studies. Epidemiology and healthcare utilization studies highlight a continued unmet medical need in the comprehensive care of PNES. Consensus guidelines for diagnostic certainty are based on clinical history, semiology of witnessed typical event(s), and EEG findings. While certain semiologic features may aid in the diagnosis of PNES, the gold standard remains capturing a typical event on video electroencephalography (EEG) showing the absence of epileptiform activity with history and semiology consistent with PNES. Medical-neurologic and psychiatric comorbidities are prevalent in PNES; these should be assessed in diagnostic evaluations and integrated into treatment interventions and prognostic considerations. Several studies, including a pilot, multicenter, randomized clinical trial, have now demonstrated that a cognitive behavioral therapy-informed psychotherapy is an efficacious treatment for PNES, and additional efforts are necessary to evaluate the utility of pharmacologic and other psychotherapy treatments. Neuroimaging studies, while requiring replication, suggest that PNES may occur in the context of alterations within and across sensorimotor, emotion regulation/processing, cognitive control, and multimodal integration brain systems. Future research could investigate similarities and differences between PNES and other somatic symptom disorders.

  13. Nonepileptic seizures: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Perez, David L; LaFrance, W Curt

    2016-06-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are a functional neurological disorder/conversion disorder subtype, which are neurobehavioral conditions at the interface of neurology and psychiatry. Significant advancements over the past decade have been made in the diagnosis, management, and neurobiological understanding of PNES. This article reviews published PNES research focusing on semiologic features that distinguish PNES from epileptic seizures, consensus diagnostic criteria, the intersection of PNES and other comorbidities, neurobiological studies, evidence-based treatment interventions, and outcome studies. Epidemiology and healthcare utilization studies highlight a continued unmet medical need in the comprehensive care of PNES. Consensus guidelines for diagnostic certainty are based on clinical history, semiology of witnessed typical event(s), and EEG findings. While certain semiologic features may aid in the diagnosis of PNES, the gold standard remains capturing a typical event on video electroencephalography (EEG) showing the absence of epileptiform activity with history and semiology consistent with PNES. Medical-neurologic and psychiatric comorbidities are prevalent in PNES; these should be assessed in diagnostic evaluations and integrated into treatment interventions and prognostic considerations. Several studies, including a pilot, multicenter, randomized clinical trial, have now demonstrated that a cognitive behavioral therapy-informed psychotherapy is an efficacious treatment for PNES, and additional efforts are necessary to evaluate the utility of pharmacologic and other psychotherapy treatments. Neuroimaging studies, while requiring replication, suggest that PNES may occur in the context of alterations within and across sensorimotor, emotion regulation/processing, cognitive control, and multimodal integration brain systems. Future research could investigate similarities and differences between PNES and other somatic symptom disorders. PMID:26996600

  14. Relationship between seizure frequency and number of neuronal and non-neuronal cells in the hippocampus throughout the life of rats with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lopim, Glauber Menezes; Vannucci Campos, Diego; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Lent, Roberto; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Arida, Ricardo Mario

    2016-03-01

    The relationship between seizure frequency and cell death has been a subject of controversy. To tackle this issue, we determined the frequency of seizures and the total number of hippocampal cells throughout the life of rats with epilepsy using the pilocarpine model. Seizure frequency varied in animals with epilepsy according to which period of life they were in, with a progressive increase in the number of seizures until 180 days (sixth months) of epileptic life followed by a decrease (330 days-eleventh month) and subsequently stabilization of seizures. Cell counts by means of isotropic fractionation showed a reduction in the number of hippocampal neuronal cells following 30, 90, 180 and 360 days of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) in rats compared to their controls (about 25%-30% of neuronal cell reduction). In addition, animals with 360 days of SRS showed a reduction in the number of neuronal cells when compared with animals with 90 and 180 days of seizures. The total number of hippocampal non-neuronal cells was reduced in rats with epilepsy after 30 days of SRS, but no significant alteration was observed on the 90th, 180th and 360th days. The total number of neuronal cells was negatively correlated with seizure frequency, indicating an association between occurrence of epileptic seizures throughout life and neuronal loss. In sum, our results add novel data to the literature concerning the time-course of SRS and hippocampal cell number throughout epileptic life.

  15. A computational platform for continuous seizure anticipation, monitoring and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Giannakakis, Giorgos; Pediaditis, Matthew; Stavrinidis, George; Konstantinidis, George; Kritsotakis, Vangelis; Tsakanikas, Vasilis; Ligerakis, Michael; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Vorgia, Pelagia; Tsiknakis, Manolis

    2016-01-01

    The development of platforms that are able to continuously monitor and handle epileptic seizures in a non invasive manner is of great importance as they would improve the quality of life of drug resistant epileptic patients. In this work, a device and a computational platform is presented for acquiring low noise electroencephalographic signals, for the detection/prediction of epileptic seizures and the storage of ictal activity in an electronic personal health record. In order to develop this platform, a systematic clinical protocol was established including a number of drug resistant children from the University Hospital of Heraklion. Dry electrodes with innovative micro-spike design were proposed in order to increase the signal to noise ratio of the recorded EEG signals. A wearable low cost platform and its corresponding wireless communication protocol was developed focus on minimizing the interference with the patient's body. A computational subsystem with advanced algorithms provides detection/anticipation of upcoming seizure activity and aims to protect the patient from an accident due to a seizure or to improve his/her social life. Finally, the seizure activity information is stored in an electronic health record for further clinical evaluation. PMID:27225563

  16. Weighted and directed interactions in evolving large-scale epileptic brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickten, Henning; Porz, Stephan; Elger, Christian E.; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    Epilepsy can be regarded as a network phenomenon with functionally and/or structurally aberrant connections in the brain. Over the past years, concepts and methods from network theory substantially contributed to improve the characterization of structure and function of these epileptic networks and thus to advance understanding of the dynamical disease epilepsy. We extend this promising line of research and assess—with high spatial and temporal resolution and using complementary analysis approaches that capture different characteristics of the complex dynamics—both strength and direction of interactions in evolving large-scale epileptic brain networks of 35 patients that suffered from drug-resistant focal seizures with different anatomical onset locations. Despite this heterogeneity, we find that even during the seizure-free interval the seizure onset zone is a brain region that, when averaged over time, exerts strongest directed influences over other brain regions being part of a large-scale network. This crucial role, however, manifested by averaging on the population-sample level only – in more than one third of patients, strongest directed interactions can be observed between brain regions far off the seizure onset zone. This may guide new developments for individualized diagnosis, treatment and control.

  17. Weighted and directed interactions in evolving large-scale epileptic brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Dickten, Henning; Porz, Stephan; Elger, Christian E.; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy can be regarded as a network phenomenon with functionally and/or structurally aberrant connections in the brain. Over the past years, concepts and methods from network theory substantially contributed to improve the characterization of structure and function of these epileptic networks and thus to advance understanding of the dynamical disease epilepsy. We extend this promising line of research and assess—with high spatial and temporal resolution and using complementary analysis approaches that capture different characteristics of the complex dynamics—both strength and direction of interactions in evolving large-scale epileptic brain networks of 35 patients that suffered from drug-resistant focal seizures with different anatomical onset locations. Despite this heterogeneity, we find that even during the seizure-free interval the seizure onset zone is a brain region that, when averaged over time, exerts strongest directed influences over other brain regions being part of a large-scale network. This crucial role, however, manifested by averaging on the population-sample level only – in more than one third of patients, strongest directed interactions can be observed between brain regions far off the seizure onset zone. This may guide new developments for individualized diagnosis, treatment and control. PMID:27708381

  18. The Dynamics of the Epileptic Brain Reveal Long-Memory Processes

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Mark J.; Varsavsky, Andrea; Himes, David; Leyde, Kent; Berkovic, Samuel Frank; O’Brien, Terence; Mareels, Iven

    2014-01-01

    The pattern of epileptic seizures is often considered unpredictable and the interval between events without correlation. A number of studies have examined the possibility that seizure activity respects a power-law relationship, both in terms of event magnitude and inter-event intervals. Such relationships are found in a variety of natural and man-made systems, such as earthquakes or Internet traffic, and describe the relationship between the magnitude of an event and the number of events. We postulated that human inter-seizure intervals would follow a power-law relationship, and furthermore that evidence for the existence of a long-memory process could be established in this relationship. We performed a post hoc analysis, studying eight patients who had long-term (up to 2 years) ambulatory intracranial EEG data recorded as part of the assessment of a novel seizure prediction device. We demonstrated that a power-law relationship could be established in these patients (β = − 1.5). In five out of the six subjects whose data were sufficiently stationary for analysis, we found evidence of long memory between epileptic events. This memory spans time scales from 30 min to 40 days. The estimated Hurst exponents range from 0.51 to 0.77 ± 0.01. This finding may provide evidence of phase-transitions underlying the dynamics of epilepsy. PMID:25386160

  19. Modeling and analyzing non-seizure EEG data for patients with epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Lawkins, W.F.; Clapp, N.E. Jr.; Daw, C.S.; Hively, L.M.; Protopopescu, V.; Eisenstadt, M.L.

    1996-05-01

    We present nonlinear analysis of non-seizure electroencephalogram (EEG) time series data from four epileptic patients. A non-seizure state is a period that is free of any part of an epileptic seizure, including the transition to a fully developed episode. EEG measurements are typically contaminated with a large amount of non- neurophysiological source information, generally called artifact, which arises, for example, from eye movement, muscle tension, and physical motion. The first objective of this study is to gain some insight into how much variability in analysis results to be expected from patients having similar clinical characteristics. The second objective is to investigate the impact of eye movement on the analysis results. A special feature presented here is the introduction and testing of a filter for eye movement artifact. The third objective is to determine if neurophysiological activity as viewed from two adjacent channels appears dynamically to be the same.

  20. Seizure Prediction: Science Fiction or Soon to Become Reality?

    PubMed

    Freestone, Dean R; Karoly, Philippa J; Peterson, Andre D H; Kuhlmann, Levin; Lai, Alan; Goodarzy, Farhad; Cook, Mark J

    2015-11-01

    This review highlights recent developments in the field of epileptic seizure prediction. We argue that seizure prediction is possible; however, most previous attempts have used data with an insufficient amount of information to solve the problem. The review discusses four methods for gaining more information above standard clinical electrophysiological recordings. We first discuss developments in obtaining long-term data that enables better characterisation of signal features and trends. Then, we discuss the usage of electrical stimulation to probe neural circuits to obtain robust information regarding excitability. Following this, we present a review of developments in high-resolution micro-electrode technologies that enable neuroimaging across spatial scales. Finally, we present recent results from data-driven model-based analyses, which enable imaging of seizure generating mechanisms from clinical electrophysiological measurements. It is foreseeable that the field of seizure prediction will shift focus to a more probabilistic forecasting approach leading to improvements in the quality of life for the millions of people who suffer uncontrolled seizures. However, a missing piece of the puzzle is devices to acquire long-term high-quality data. When this void is filled, seizure prediction will become a reality.

  1. Characteristics of Veterans diagnosed with seizures within Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Rizwana; Kelly, Pamela R; Husain, Aatif M; Tran, Tung T

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the demographics of Veterans diagnosed with seizures and taking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) during fiscal year (FY) 2011 (October 1, 2010, to September 30, 2011), particularly with regard to comorbid traumatic brain injury (TBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Information collected included age; sex; Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation New Dawn (OIF/OEF/OND) status; and relevant encounter diagnosis codes for seizures, TBI, and PTSD. During FY11, 87,377 Veterans with seizures on AEDs were managed within the VHA. Prevalence was 15.5 per 1,000, and annual incidence was 148.2 per 100,000. The percentages of comorbid TBI and PTSD were 15.8% and 24.1%, respectively. For OIF/OEF/OND Veterans, these percentages increased to 52.6% and 70.4%, respectively. PTSD and TBI are risk factors for both epilepsy and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. Within the VHA, many Veterans experiencing seizures cannot be successfully treated with AEDs. The VHA Epilepsy Centers of Excellence promotes a multidisciplinary approach to increase and improve access to both epilepsy and mental health specialists for the care of epileptic and nonepileptic seizures. PMID:26745205

  2. Mutations of the Calcium Channel Gene cacophony Suppress Seizures in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Saras, Arunesh; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Bang sensitive (BS) Drosophila mutants display characteristic seizure-like phenotypes resembling, in some aspects, those of human seizure disorders such as epilepsy. The BS mutant parabss1, caused by a gain-of-function mutation of the voltage-gated Na+ channel gene, is extremely seizure-sensitive with phenotypes that have proven difficult to ameliorate by anti-epileptic drug feeding or by seizure-suppressor mutation. It has been presented as a model for intractable human epilepsy. Here we show that cacophony (cacTS2), a mutation of the Drosophila presynaptic Ca++ channel α1 subunit gene, is a particularly potent seizure-suppressor mutation, reverting seizure-like phenotypes for parabss1 and other BS mutants. Seizure-like phenotypes for parabss1 may be suppressed by as much as 90% in double mutant combinations with cacTS2. Unexpectedly, we find that parabss1 also reciprocally suppresses cacTS2 seizure-like phenotypes. The cacTS2 mutant displays these seizure-like behaviors and spontaneous high-frequency action potential firing transiently after exposure to high temperature. We find that this seizure-like behavior in cacTS2 is ameliorated by 85% in double mutant combinations with parabss1. PMID:26771829

  3. Athletes with seizure disorders.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Byron Don; Pleacher, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with seizure disorders have long been restricted from participation in certain sporting activities. Those with seizure disorders are more likely than their peers to have a sedentary lifestyle and to develop obesity. Regular participation in physical activity can improve both physical and psychosocial outcomes for persons with seizure disorders. Seizure activity often is reduced among those patients who regularly engage in aerobic activity. Recent literature indicates that the diagnosis of seizure disorders remains highly stigmatizing in the adolescent population. Persons with seizure disorders may be more accepted by peer groups if they are allowed to participate in sports and recreational activities. Persons with seizure disorders are encouraged to participate in regular aerobic activities. They may participate in team sports and contact or collision activities provided that they utilize appropriate protective equipment. There seems to be no increased risk of injury or increasing seizure activity as the result of such participation. Persons with seizure disorders still are discouraged from participating in scuba diving and skydiving. The benefits of participation in regular sporting activity far outweigh any risk to the athlete with a seizure disorder who chooses to participate in sports.

  4. Phenomenology of hallucinations, illusions, and delusions as part of seizure semiology.

    PubMed

    Kasper, B S; Kasper, E M; Pauli, E; Stefan, H

    2010-05-01

    In partial epilepsy, a localized hypersynchronous neuronal discharge evolving into a partial seizure affecting a particular cortical region or cerebral subsystem can give rise to subjective symptoms, which are perceived by the affected person only, that is, ictal hallucinations, illusions, or delusions. When forming the beginning of a symptom sequence leading to impairment of consciousness and/or a classic generalized seizure, these phenomena are referred to as an epileptic aura, but they also occur in isolation. They often manifest in the fully awake state, as part of simple partial seizures, but they also can be associated to different degrees of disturbed consciousness. Initial ictal symptoms often are closely related to the physiological functions of the cortical circuit involved and, therefore, can provide localizing information. When brain regions related to sensory integration are involved, the seizure discharge can cause specific kinds of hallucinations, for example, visual, auditory, gustatory, olfactory, and cutaneous sensory sensations. In addition to these elementary sensory perceptions, quite complex hallucinations related to a partial seizure can arise, for example, perception of visual scenes or hearing music. By involving psychic and emotional spheres of human perception, many seizures also give rise to hallucinatory emotional states (e.g., fear or happiness) or even more complex hallucinations (e.g., visuospatial phenomena), illusions (e.g., déjà vu, out-of-body experience), or delusional beliefs (e.g., identity change) that often are not easily recognized as epileptic. Here we suggest a classification into elementary sensory, complex sensory, and complex integratory seizure symptoms. Epileptic hallucinations, illusions, and delusions shine interesting light on the physiology and functional anatomy of brain regions involved and their functions in the human being. This article, in which 10 cases are described, introduces the fascinating

  5. Phenomenology of hallucinations, illusions, and delusions as part of seizure semiology.

    PubMed

    Kasper, B S; Kasper, E M; Pauli, E; Stefan, H

    2010-05-01

    In partial epilepsy, a localized hypersynchronous neuronal discharge evolving into a partial seizure affecting a particular cortical region or cerebral subsystem can give rise to subjective symptoms, which are perceived by the affected person only, that is, ictal hallucinations, illusions, or delusions. When forming the beginning of a symptom sequence leading to impairment of consciousness and/or a classic generalized seizure, these phenomena are referred to as an epileptic aura, but they also occur in isolation. They often manifest in the fully awake state, as part of simple partial seizures, but they also can be associated to different degrees of disturbed consciousness. Initial ictal symptoms often are closely related to the physiological functions of the cortical circuit involved and, therefore, can provide localizing information. When brain regions related to sensory integration are involved, the seizure discharge can cause specific kinds of hallucinations, for example, visual, auditory, gustatory, olfactory, and cutaneous sensory sensations. In addition to these elementary sensory perceptions, quite complex hallucinations related to a partial seizure can arise, for example, perception of visual scenes or hearing music. By involving psychic and emotional spheres of human perception, many seizures also give rise to hallucinatory emotional states (e.g., fear or happiness) or even more complex hallucinations (e.g., visuospatial phenomena), illusions (e.g., déjà vu, out-of-body experience), or delusional beliefs (e.g., identity change) that often are not easily recognized as epileptic. Here we suggest a classification into elementary sensory, complex sensory, and complex integratory seizure symptoms. Epileptic hallucinations, illusions, and delusions shine interesting light on the physiology and functional anatomy of brain regions involved and their functions in the human being. This article, in which 10 cases are described, introduces the fascinating

  6. A study of the dynamics of seizure propagation across micro domains in the vicinity of the seizure onset zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Ishita; Kudela, Pawel; Korzeniewska, Anna; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.; Anderson, William S.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The use of micro-electrode arrays to measure electrical activity from the surface of the brain is increasingly being investigated as a means to improve seizure onset zone (SOZ) localization. In this work, we used a multivariate autoregressive model to determine the evolution of seizure dynamics in the 70-110 Hz high frequency band across micro-domains sampled by such micro-electrode arrays. We showed that a directed transfer function (DTF) can be used to estimate the flow of seizure activity in a set of simulated micro-electrode data with known propagation pattern. Approach. We used seven complex partial seizures recorded from four patients undergoing intracranial monitoring for surgical evaluation to reconstruct the seizure propagation pattern over sliding windows using a DTF measure. Main results. We showed that a DTF can be used to estimate the flow of seizure activity in a set of simulated micro-electrode data with a known propagation pattern. In general, depending on the location of the micro-electrode grid with respect to the clinical SOZ and the time from seizure onset, ictal propagation changed in directional characteristics over a 2-10 s time scale, with gross directionality limited to spatial dimensions of approximately 9 m{{m}2}. It was also seen that the strongest seizure patterns in the high frequency band and their sources over such micro-domains are more stable over time and across seizures bordering the clinically determined SOZ than inside. Significance. This type of propagation analysis might in future provide an additional tool to epileptologists for characterizing epileptogenic tissue. This will potentially help narrowing down resection zones without compromising essential brain functions as well as provide important information about targeting anti-epileptic stimulation devices.

  7. [Cell signaling in the epileptic hippocampus].

    PubMed

    Ferrer, I

    Cell signaling commanding death or survival in human epileptic hippocampus is difficult to trace because of the long interval between the beginning of symptoms and the sampling of damaged cerebral tissue for neuropathological examination. Intraperitoneal injection of the glutamate analogue kainic acid (KA) is a useful tool to analyze the effects of seizures and the excitotoxic damage in the rodent hippocampus. KA acts on NMDA and KA receptors, whereas it has little impact on AMPA receptors. Neurons of the hilus and CA3 neurons are primary targets of KA, although parvalbumin containing GABAergic neurons are less vulnerable than glutamatergic neurons. Immediate responses to KA are hsp 70 mRNA induction and HSP 70/72 protein expression, as well as c fos and c jun mRNA, and c Fos and c Jun protein expression in the hippocampus. Yet increased c Fos and c Jun expression is not a predictor of cell death or cell survival. In contrast, the tissular plasminogen activator (tPA) and the membrane Fas/Fas L signaling pathway probably have a role in facilitating cell death following KA injection. The involvement of other pathways remains controversial. Increased expression of the pro apoptotic Bax together with decreased Bcl 2 suggests Bax mediated apoptosis. Activation of the mitochondrial pathway includes leakage of citochrome c to the cytosol and activation of the caspase cascade leading to apoptosis. However, other studies have emphasized the limited expression of caspase 3, the main executioner of apoptosis, and the relevance of necrosis as the main form of cell death following KA excitotoxicity. Phosphorylation dependent activation of several kinases, including MAPK, p 38 and JNK/SAPK, and their substrates has been found in KA treated animals. Decreased CREBp expression is associated with cell death whereas increased ATF 2P and Elk 1P are associated with cell survival. Trophic factors probably do not play a significant role during the early stages of hippocanmpal damage but

  8. [Social adaptation of epileptic patients].

    PubMed

    Boldyrev, A I

    1983-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the changes seen in the field of social adaptation of epileptics over the last 21 years disclosed an increase in occupational adaptation of such patients in conditions of common production. Thus, judging by the number of epileptic patients registered in the outpatient psychoneurologic centers in 1958, 1970 and 1979, there has been a 8.8%-increase in the proportion of those being employed. Among the patients who work as office employees, some 45% are engaged in occupations requiring a definite unimpaired developmental and intellectual level. 80% of the affected children attend nonspecialized schools. All this necessitates the reviewing of the current concepts about the severity, course, and prognosis of epilepsy. A joint impact of biological and social factors is shown to be important in the occupational adaptation of patients. Considerable attention is given to the role of environmental, including psychogenic factors in the formation of secondary neurotic and psychic disorders. PMID:6880517

  9. Wavelet analysis of epileptic spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latka, Miroslaw; Was, Ziemowit; Kozik, Andrzej; West, Bruce J.

    2003-05-01

    Interictal spikes and sharp waves in human EEG are characteristic signatures of epilepsy. These potentials originate as a result of synchronous pathological discharge of many neurons. The reliable detection of such potentials has been the long standing problem in EEG analysis, especially after long-term monitoring became common in investigation of epileptic patients. The traditional definition of a spike is based on its amplitude, duration, sharpness, and emergence from its background. However, spike detection systems built solely around this definition are not reliable due to the presence of numerous transients and artifacts. We use wavelet transform to analyze the properties of EEG manifestations of epilepsy. We demonstrate that the behavior of wavelet transform of epileptic spikes across scales can constitute the foundation of a relatively simple yet effective detection algorithm.

  10. Patient non-specific algorithm for seizures detection in scalp EEG.

    PubMed

    Orosco, Lorena; Correa, Agustina Garcés; Diez, Pablo; Laciar, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder that affects about 1% of the population in the world. Seizure detection is an important component in both the diagnosis of epilepsy and seizure control. In this work a patient non-specific strategy for seizure detection based on Stationary Wavelet Transform of EEG signals is developed. A new set of features is proposed based on an average process. The seizure detection consisted in finding the EEG segments with seizures and their onset and offset points. The proposed offline method was tested in scalp EEG records of 24-48h of duration of 18 epileptic patients. The method reached mean values of specificity of 99.9%, sensitivity of 87.5% and a false positive rate per hour of 0.9.

  11. Clinical and electroencephalographic data indicative of brain tumours in a seizure population.

    PubMed Central

    Vignaendra, V.; Ng, K. K.; Lim, C. L.; Loh, T. G.

    1978-01-01

    One hundred and two patients suffering from seizures, with focal EEG signs (101 cases) and focal seizures but generalized EEG abnormalities (one case) were divided into tumour (twenty-one cases) and non-tumour (eighty-one cases) groups on the basis of contrast radiological studies. Retrospective analysis of various clinical data and EEG abnormalities, determined before the contrast radiological examinations, showed that the following were statistically significantly different between the two groups in favour of a tumoral aetiology for the seizures: age at onset of fits (greater than 20 years), presence of focal neurological signs and increased intracranial pressure, presence of focal unilateral delta waves without accompanying epileptic discharges, beta asymmetry between the cerebral hemispheres and hyperventilation-induced electrical seizures. A brain scan was a very useful screening test for the detection of a tumoral aetiology for seizures. PMID:625452

  12. Pathways of seizure propagation from the temporal to the occipital lobe.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Julia; Dubeau, François; Olivier, André; Andermann, Frederick

    2008-12-01

    Propagation of ictal epileptic discharges influences the clinical appearance of seizures. Fast propagation from the occipital to temporal lobe has been well described, but until now the reverse direction of spread has not been emphasized. We describe two patients who experienced ictal propagation from temporal to occipital regions. One case presented with amaurosis during a seizure with temporal onset and temporal-occipital spread. In the second, temporal-occipital spread was documented during a seizure, which continued in the occipital lobe for six minutes. Depth electrode studies suggested the temporal ictal onset of seizures in both patients. Propagation from temporal to occipital lobe structures must be considered in the assessment of patients who have seizures with both temporal and occipital features. The propagation may have predictive value for their surgical outcome. The underlying anatomical structure might be the inferior longitudinal fasciculus.

  13. The causes of new-onset epilepsy and seizures in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shasha; Yu, Weihua; Lü, Yang

    2016-01-01

    With increasing age, the prevalence and incidence of epilepsy and seizures increases correspondingly. New-onset epilepsy in elderly people often has underlying etiology, including cerebrovascular diseases, primary neuron degenerative disorders, intracerebral tumors, and traumatic head injury. In addition, an acute symptomatic seizure cannot be called epilepsy, which manifests usually as a common symptom secondary to metabolic or toxicity factors in older people. In this review, we have mainly focused on the causes of new-onset epilepsy and seizures in elderly people. This knowledge will certainly help us to understand the reasons for high incidences of epilepsy and seizures in elderly people. We look forward to controlling epileptic seizures via the treatment of primary diseases in the future. PMID:27382285

  14. Seizures induced by music.

    PubMed

    Ogunyemi, A O; Breen, H

    1993-01-01

    Musicogenic epilepsy is a rare disorder. Much remains to be learned about the electroclinical features. This report describes a patient who has been followed at our institution for 17 years, and was investigated with long-term telemetered simultaneous video-EEG recordings. She began to have seizures at the age of 10 years. She experienced complex partial seizures, often preceded by elementary auditory hallucination and complex auditory illusion. The seizures occurred in relation to singing, listening to music or thinking about music. She also had occasional generalized tonic clonic seizures during sleep. There was no significant antecedent history. The family history was negative for epilepsy. The physical examination was unremarkable. CT and MRI scans of the brain were normal. During long-term simultaneous video-EEG recordings, clinical and electrographic seizure activities were recorded in association with singing and listening to music. Mathematical calculation, copying or viewing geometric patterns and playing the game of chess failed to evoke seizures.

  15. Wavelet transforms for electroencephalographic spike and seizure detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Steven J.; Milton, John G.

    1993-11-01

    The application of wavelet transforms (WT) to experimental data from the nervous system has been hindered by the lack of a straightforward method to handle noise. A noise reduction technique, developed recently for use in wavelet cluster analysis in cosmology and astronomy, is here adapted for electroencephalographic (EEG) time-series data. Noise is filtered using control surrogate data sets generated from randomized aspects of the original time-series. In this study, WT were applied to EEG data from human patients undergoing brain mapping with implanted subdural electrodes for the localization of epileptic seizure foci. EEG data in 1D were analyzed from individual electrodes, and 2D data from electrode grids. These techniques are a powerful means to identify epileptic spikes in such data, and offer a method to identity the onset and spatial extent of epileptic seizure foci. The method is readily applied to the detection of structure in stationary and non-stationary time-series from a variety of physical systems.

  16. The involvement of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the anti-epileptic action of curcumin on pentylenetetrazol-kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenting; Su, Jing; Liu, Jing; Jiang, Changbin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, it was investigated whether a NO signaling pathway is involved in the anti-epileptic effect of curcumin on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-kindled rats. PTZ-kindled rats received different doses of curcumin that were administered intraperitoneally for 24 days. Either a non-selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) (N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)), a selective inhibitor of neuronal NOS (7-Nitroindazole (7-NI)), a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS (aminoguanidine (AG)), or a NO precursor (L-arginine (L-ARG)) was administered chronically to evaluate the role of NO in curcumin's anti-seizure effect. A chronic administration of curcumin (200 mg/kg) was most effective for decreasing the mean frequency of epileptiform discharge. Furthermore, a pretreatment with L-NAME or 7-NI augmented the anti-epileptic effect of curcumin. In contrast, AG failed to significantly alter the anti-epileptic effect of curcumin. A pretreatment with L-ARG temporally reversed the anti-epileptic effect of curcumin in the early stage, but in the late stage, it potentiated curcumin's anti-epileptic effect. These findings suggest that the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway may be involved in the anti-epileptic properties of curcumin, and that the role of nNOS (and not iNOS) is prominent in this neuroprotective feature. PMID:26406082

  17. Decreased GABA receptor in the cerebral cortex of epileptic rats: effect of Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstact Background Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA), the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the cerebral cortex, maintains the inhibitory tones that counter balances neuronal excitation. When this balance is perturbed, seizures may ensue. Methods In the present study, alterations of the general GABA, GABAA and GABAB receptors in the cerebral cortex of the epileptic rat and the therapeutic application of Bacopa monnieri were investigated. Results Scatchard analysis of [3H]GABA, [3H]bicuculline and [3H]baclofen in the cerebral cortex of the epileptic rat showed significant decrease in Bmax (P < 0.001) compared to control. Real Time PCR amplification of GABA receptor subunits such as GABAAά1, GABAAγ, GABAAδ, GABAB and GAD where down regulated (P < 0.001) in epileptic rats. GABAAά5 subunit and Cyclic AMP responsible element binding protein were up regulated. Confocal imaging study confirmed the decreased GABA receptors in epileptic rats. Epileptic rats have deficit in radial arm and Y maze performance. Conclusions Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A treatment reverses epilepsy associated changes to near control suggesting that decreased GABA receptors in the cerebral cortex have an important role in epileptic occurrence; Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A have therapeutic application in epilepsy management. PMID:22364254

  18. Genetic investigations of the epileptic encephalopathies: Recent advances.

    PubMed

    Myers, C T; Mefford, H C

    2016-01-01

    The epileptic encephalopathies (EEs) are a group of epilepsy syndromes characterized by multiple seizure types, abundant epileptiform activity, and developmental delay or regression. Advances in genomic technologies over the past decade have accelerated our understanding of the genetic etiology of EE, which is largely due to de novo mutations. Chromosome microarrays to detect copy number variants identify a genomic cause in at least 5-10% of cases. Next-generation sequencing in the form of gene panels or whole exome sequencing have highlighted the role of de novo sequence changes and revealed extensive genetic heterogeneity. The novel gene discoveries in EE implicate diverse cellular pathways including chromatin remodeling, transcriptional regulation, and mTOR regulation in the etiology of epilepsy, highlighting new targets for potential therapeutic intervention. In this chapter, we discuss the rapid pace of gene discovery in EE facilitated by genomic technologies and highlight several novel genes and potential therapies. PMID:27323938

  19. The anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of baicalin on pilocarpine-induced epileptic model in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang-Feng; Gao, Fei; Li, Xiao-Wei; Jia, Rui-Hua; Meng, Xian-Dong; Zhao, Rui; Jing, Yun-Yun; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Wen

    2012-08-01

    Baicalin, a flavonoid compound purified from plant Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has been reported to possess a wide variety of pharmacological properties including anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic and neuroprotective properties. Oxidative stress can dramatically alter neuronal function and has been linked to status epilepticus (SE). However, the neuroprotective effect of baicalin on epilepsy is unclear. In this study we investigated whether Baicalin could exert anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects in the pilocarpine-induced epileptic model in rats. To this end, we recorded the latency to first limbic seizure and SE and observed the incidence of SE and mortality. The changes of oxidative stress were measured 24 h after pilocarpine-induced SE. Nissl staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling and Fluoro-Jade B staining were performed to detect the neuronal loss, apoptosis and degeneration in hippocampus 72 h after pilocarpine-induced seizure. Pretreatment with baicalin significantly delayed the onset of the first limbic seizures and SE, reduced the mortality rate, and attenuated the changes in the levels of lipid peroxidation, nitrite content and reduced glutathione in the hippocampus of pilocarpine-treated rats. Furthermore, we also found that baicalin attenuated the neuronal cell loss, apoptosis, and degeneration caused by pilocarpine-induced seizures in rat hippocampus. Collectively, these results indicated remarkable anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of baicalin and should encourage further studies to investigate baicalin as an adjuvant in epilepsy both to prevent seizures and to protect against seizure induced brain injury.

  20. A novel seizure detection algorithm informed by hidden Markov model event states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldassano, Steven; Wulsin, Drausin; Ung, Hoameng; Blevins, Tyler; Brown, Mesha-Gay; Fox, Emily; Litt, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Recently the FDA approved the first responsive, closed-loop intracranial device to treat epilepsy. Because these devices must respond within seconds of seizure onset and not miss events, they are tuned to have high sensitivity, leading to frequent false positive stimulations and decreased battery life. In this work, we propose a more robust seizure detection model. Approach. We use a Bayesian nonparametric Markov switching process to parse intracranial EEG (iEEG) data into distinct dynamic event states. Each event state is then modeled as a multidimensional Gaussian distribution to allow for predictive state assignment. By detecting event states highly specific for seizure onset zones, the method can identify precise regions of iEEG data associated with the transition to seizure activity, reducing false positive detections associated with interictal bursts. The seizure detection algorithm was translated to a real-time application and validated in a small pilot study using 391 days of continuous iEEG data from two dogs with naturally occurring, multifocal epilepsy. A feature-based seizure detector modeled after the NeuroPace RNS System was developed as a control. Main results. Our novel seizure detection method demonstrated an improvement in false negative rate (0/55 seizures missed versus 2/55 seizures missed) as well as a significantly reduced false positive rate (0.0012 h versus 0.058 h‑1). All seizures were detected an average of 12.1 ± 6.9 s before the onset of unequivocal epileptic activity (unequivocal epileptic onset (UEO)). Significance. This algorithm represents a computationally inexpensive, individualized, real-time detection method suitable for implantable antiepileptic devices that may considerably reduce false positive rate relative to current industry standards.

  1. A novel seizure detection algorithm informed by hidden Markov model event states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldassano, Steven; Wulsin, Drausin; Ung, Hoameng; Blevins, Tyler; Brown, Mesha-Gay; Fox, Emily; Litt, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Recently the FDA approved the first responsive, closed-loop intracranial device to treat epilepsy. Because these devices must respond within seconds of seizure onset and not miss events, they are tuned to have high sensitivity, leading to frequent false positive stimulations and decreased battery life. In this work, we propose a more robust seizure detection model. Approach. We use a Bayesian nonparametric Markov switching process to parse intracranial EEG (iEEG) data into distinct dynamic event states. Each event state is then modeled as a multidimensional Gaussian distribution to allow for predictive state assignment. By detecting event states highly specific for seizure onset zones, the method can identify precise regions of iEEG data associated with the transition to seizure activity, reducing false positive detections associated with interictal bursts. The seizure detection algorithm was translated to a real-time application and validated in a small pilot study using 391 days of continuous iEEG data from two dogs with naturally occurring, multifocal epilepsy. A feature-based seizure detector modeled after the NeuroPace RNS System was developed as a control. Main results. Our novel seizure detection method demonstrated an improvement in false negative rate (0/55 seizures missed versus 2/55 seizures missed) as well as a significantly reduced false positive rate (0.0012 h versus 0.058 h-1). All seizures were detected an average of 12.1 ± 6.9 s before the onset of unequivocal epileptic activity (unequivocal epileptic onset (UEO)). Significance. This algorithm represents a computationally inexpensive, individualized, real-time detection method suitable for implantable antiepileptic devices that may considerably reduce false positive rate relative to current industry standards.

  2. Perirhinal Cortex Hyperexcitability in Pilocarpine-Treated Epileptic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Benini, Ruba; Longo, Daniela; Biagini, Giuseppe; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The perirhinal cortex (PC), which is heavily connected with several epileptogenic regions of the limbic system such as the entorhinal cortex and amygdala, is involved in the generation and spread of seizures. However, the functional alterations occurring within an epileptic PC network are unknown. Here, we analyzed this issue by using in vitro electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry in brain tissue obtained from pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats and age-matched, nonepileptic controls (NECs). Neurons recorded intracellularly from the PC deep layers in the two experimental groups had similar intrinsic and firing properties and generated spontaneous depolarizing and hyperpolarizing postsynaptic potentials with comparable duration and amplitude. However, spontaneous and stimulus-induced epileptiform discharges were seen with field potential recordings in over one-fifth of pilocarpine-treated slices but never in NEC tissue. These network events were reduced in duration by antagonizing NMDA receptors and abolished by NMDA + non-NMDA glutamatergic receptor antagonists. Pharmacologically isolated isolated inhibitory postsynaptic potentials had reversal potentials for the early GABAA receptor-mediated component that were significantly more depolarized in pilocarpine-treated cells. Experiments with a potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 antibody identified, in pilocarpine-treated PC, a significant immunostaining decrease that could not be explained by neuronal loss. However, interneurons expressing parvalbumin and neuropeptide Y were found to be decreased throughout the PC, whereas cholecystokinin-positive cells were diminished in superficial layers. These findings demonstrate synaptic hyper-excitability that is contributed by attenuated inhibition in the PC of pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats and underscore the role of PC networks in temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:20865722

  3. Mapping Epileptic Activity: Sources or Networks for the Clinicians?

    PubMed Central

    Pittau, Francesca; Mégevand, Pierre; Sheybani, Laurent; Abela, Eugenio; Grouiller, Frédéric; Spinelli, Laurent; Michel, Christoph M.; Seeck, Margitta; Vulliemoz, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic seizures of focal origin are classically considered to arise from a focal epileptogenic zone and then spread to other brain regions. This is a key concept for semiological electro-clinical correlations, localization of relevant structural lesions, and selection of patients for epilepsy surgery. Recent development in neuro-imaging and electro-physiology and combinations, thereof, have been validated as contributory tools for focus localization. In parallel, these techniques have revealed that widespread networks of brain regions, rather than a single epileptogenic region, are implicated in focal epileptic activity. Sophisticated multimodal imaging and analysis strategies of brain connectivity patterns have been developed to characterize the spatio-temporal relationships within these networks by combining the strength of both techniques to optimize spatial and temporal resolution with whole-brain coverage and directional connectivity. In this paper, we review the potential clinical contribution of these functional mapping techniques as well as invasive electrophysiology in human beings and animal models for characterizing network connectivity. PMID:25414692

  4. Epileptic neuronal networks: methods of identification and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Hermann; Lopes da Silva, Fernando H

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to examine evidence for the concept that epileptic activity should be envisaged in terms of functional connectivity and dynamics of neuronal networks. Basic concepts regarding structure and dynamics of neuronal networks are briefly described. Particular attention is given to approaches that are derived, or related, to the concept of causality, as formulated by Granger. Linear and non-linear methodologies aiming at characterizing the dynamics of neuronal networks applied to EEG/MEG and combined EEG/fMRI signals in epilepsy are critically reviewed. The relevance of functional dynamical analysis of neuronal networks with respect to clinical queries in focal cortical dysplasias, temporal lobe epilepsies, and "generalized" epilepsies is emphasized. In the light of the concepts of epileptic neuronal networks, and recent experimental findings, the dichotomic classification in focal and generalized epilepsy is re-evaluated. It is proposed that so-called "generalized epilepsies," such as absence seizures, are actually fast spreading epilepsies, the onset of which can be tracked down to particular neuronal networks using appropriate network analysis. Finally new approaches to delineate epileptogenic networks are discussed.

  5. Magnetoencephalography in pediatric neurology and in epileptic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Verrotti, Alberto; Pizzella, Vittorio; Trotta, Daniela; Madonna, Laura; Chiarelli, Francesco; Romani, Gian Luca

    2003-04-01

    In recent years, great advances in the knowledge of neuromagnetism have permitted the application of Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices to the pathophysiologic study of the human brain. In particular, in pediatric neurology, the integration of biomagnetism with magnetic resonance imaging and other techniques for medical imaging have allowed for precise neuromagnetic measurements of the human brain. The more frequently used technique is magnetoencephalography. Recent data have illustrated the usefulness of magnetoencephalography in mapping activity of sensory and motor areas and in studying the spatiotemporal pattern of brain activation specific to somatosensory function. Moreover, magnetoencephalography is an important tool to localize epileptic activity; magnetic source imaging superimposes magnetoencephalographic localizations on the magnetic resonance imaging and yields improved spatial resolution as compared with surface electroencephalography. The role of magnetoencephalography in evaluating patients with epilepsy continues to evolve; in fact, it seems to be very useful in the localization of the epileptogenic zone in patients with partial epilepsy. This application of magnetoencephalography is essential in the selection of epileptic children candidates to surgical treatment of seizures.

  6. [The frequency of seizures in patients with primary brain tumors or cerebral metastases. An evaluation from the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Neuro-Oncology and the Department of Neurology, Kaiser Franz Josef Hospital, Vienna].

    PubMed

    Oberndorfer, Stefan; Schmal, Thomas; Lahrmann, Heinz; Urbanits, Sabine; Lindner, Klaus; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2002-11-30

    Epileptic seizures are common in patients with cerebral metastases as well as in patients with primary brain tumors. In cancer patients without primary brain tumors or brain metastasis, epileptic seizures may occur due to metabolic or toxic causes, or due to infections. We performed a retrospective analysis from our neurooncological database concerning the occurrence of seizures in patients with primary brain tumors, patients with cerebral metastases and in cancer patients without brain tumors. Patients with low grade gliomas, such as astrocytoma WHO I + II (69%), oligodendroglioma WHO II (50%), and mixed glioma WHO II-III (56%) were more likely to have seizures than patients with anaplastic glioma WHO III (44%), glioblastoma WHO IV (48%) or meningeoma (45%). In patients with brain metastasis, melanoma (67%), cancer of the lung (29%), and gastrointestinal tumors (21%) were the primaries with the highest frequency of seizures. In cancer patients without brain metastases or primary brain tumors, seizures occurred in 4%. In conclusion, the occurrence of epileptic seizures in patients suffering from primary brain tumors, as well as in patients with cerebral metastases, varied within the tumor entity. Therefore, especially in brain tumors where a higher probability of epileptic seizures is expected, they should be taken into account in the care of cancer patients.

  7. Noisy neural nets exhibiting epileptic features.

    PubMed

    Kokkinidis, M; Anninos, P

    1985-04-01

    On the basis of our previous studies of noisy neural nets we propose a model for the explanation of epileptic phenomena. Our neural net model is capable of exhibiting epileptic features if the number of spontaneously firing neurons is periodically increased beyond a certain threshold. Some alternative epileptogenic mechanisms are also discussed. The epileptic behavior of the neural net is determined by a combination of certain parameters of its phase diagram. The general features of the model are consistent with several experimental observations and explain some poorly understood clinical phenomena. The differences between normal and epileptic neural nets are explained in terms of the structural properties of the model.

  8. Transient epileptic amnesia: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A

    2014-02-01

    Transient epileptic amnesia (TEA) is a distinctive syndrome and comprises episodic transient amnesia with an epileptic basis, without impairment of other aspects of cognitive function. Additional interictal memory deficits are common in TEA. An epileptic origin, after other etiologies have been excluded, should be considered and carefully investigated in patients complaining of isolated memory disturbances, particularly with recurrent short-lasting amnesic attacks. In all suspected cases of epilepsy, a detailed clinical history is of paramount importance, but ancillary tests including EEG and MRI could be very helpful. Transient epileptic amnesia is typically a benign and treatable condition. Future studies should investigate the exact mechanism(s) of this unique syndrome.

  9. No association between ApoE polymorphism and febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Lavenex, Pierre; Lavenex, Pamela Banta; Cachat, François; Gehri, Mario; Juvet, Typhaine

    2016-01-01

    Seizures associated with fever are a common pediatric problem, affecting about 2-7 % of children between 3 months and 5 years of age. Differentiation of febrile seizures from acute symptomatic seizures secondary to central nervous system infections or seizures associated with fever in children with epilepsy is essential to provide appropriate treatment and follow-up care. Here, we tested the hypothesis that children who exhibit simple febrile seizures during early childhood, but do not develop epileptic seizures later in life, might preferentially carry the ApoE2 allele of the gene coding for the apolipoprotein E. We did not find any differences in the distribution of ApoE alleles or genotypes between individuals who exhibited simple febrile seizures (n = 93) and age-matched, typically developing subjects (n = 80). We found that the observed allele and genotype frequencies did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, which suggests that the frequencies of ApoE alleles and genotypes are stable in the Swiss population from which our samples were derived. Across both groups of subjects (n = 173), we found an ApoE2 allele frequency of 0.064, an ApoE3 frequency of 0.829 and an ApoE4 frequency of 0.107. Our findings are consistent with previous reports of the distribution of ApoE polymorphism for European subjects free of any neurological disorders, and show that the different alleles of the gene coding for the apolipoprotein E are not associated with the occurrence of simple febrile seizures. PMID:26233231

  10. Modern management of seizures and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gschwind, Markus; Seeck, Margitta

    2016-01-01

    Complete seizure control is achieved in 40-50% of all epileptic patients with drug treatment, as reported in most epidemiological studies. Many effective antiepileptic drugs with a favourable profile are available in Switzerland, allowing treatment tailored to the patient's needs. Unfortunately, up to 40-50% of all patients will eventually relapse (pharmacoresistant epilepsy). These patients run a high risk of additional morbidity and mortality. Possible pharmacoresistant epilepsy should be considered early in the disease, when there is a lack of response to the first antiepileptic drug, since only 14% of those will respond to a second drug, and only 2% to a third drug if the second fails too. Epilepsy surgery is a viable option for these patients. It requires in-depth evaluation in specialized centres, and is related to complete seizure control in 50-90% of the patients, depending on the lesion type and site. Only for patients in whom surgery cannot be offered should neuromodulation treatments be considered. Today, two different approaches are approved, vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) and deep brain stimulation in the anterior thalamic nuclei (DBS-ANT). Although only a minority of patients become totally seizure-free. Both VNS and DBS-ANT represent an important adjunct in the therapeutic armamentarium. In the present review, we outline a practical approach for the different steps in therapeutic decisions and we summarise the profiles of modern antiepileptic drugs as well outcome of surgical and neuromodulatory therapies. The goal of any approach should be to obtain complete seizure control. In general, if two antiepileptic drugs are not successful, in-depth evaluation of the patient in a specialised center is strongly recommended. PMID:27322347

  11. Body packing: from seizures to laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Janczak, Joanna M; Beutner, Ulrich; Hasler, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Body packing is a common method for illegal drug trafficking. Complications associated with body packing can be severe and even lead to rapid death. Thus, a timely diagnosis is warranted. As most body packers initially do not show any symptoms, making a correct diagnosis can be rather challenging. We describe a case of a 41-year-old male, who was admitted with an epileptic seizure and who turned out to be a cocaine intoxicated body packer. Due to neurological and cardiovascular deterioration an emergency surgery was performed. Four bags of cocaine could be removed. We discuss the current management regimen in symptomatic and asymptomatic body packers and highlight pearls and pitfalls with diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25883813

  12. Successful psychotherapy for psychogenic seizures in men.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Maria Clare; Schofield, Margot J; Middleton, Warwick

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined factors contributing to the development and successful treatment of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES), in civilian men. In-depth interviews were conducted with therapist-client dyads comprising two male clients who had been successfully treated for PNES and their therapists. A theory-building case study approach provided evidence that those factors known to contribute to PNES and other somatoform symptoms in females and in males engaged in war also contributed to these symptoms in these two civilian males. In addition, PNES in these civilian males occurred in contexts where masculine identity was developmentally curtailed and socially constrained. Successful treatments occurred in long-term therapeutic relationships that sanctioned verbal expression of strong emotion and provided the attunement necessary for development of a robust masculine identity. These findings have implications for the funding of therapy, and training of therapists.

  13. Epileptic encephalopathy: Use and misuse of a clinically and conceptually important concept.

    PubMed

    Howell, Katherine B; Harvey, A Simon; Archer, John S

    2016-03-01

    The term epileptic encephalopathy (EE) denotes a process by which epileptic activity adversely affects brain function over and above the underlying etiology. Underlying mechanisms are poorly understood, but recent studies demonstrate that seizures and interictal epileptiform discharges can disrupt distributed neural networks that underpin cognitive functions, both temporarily and permanently. EE is just one of a number of factors that can affect development in epilepsy. The presence and relative contribution of EE to cognitive impairment is often difficult to separate from that of the underlying etiology or even effects of antiepileptic medication (AEM). This difficulty has led to the increasing use of the term EE to encapsulate "severe" epileptic syndromes, or etiologies associated with severe epilepsy and intellectual disability (ID), regardless of evidence that the epileptic process has impacted cognition. The use of the term EE in the literature to describe both the process of cognitive impairment by epileptic activity and as a category for severe epilepsy syndromes is creating confusion. We propose that use of the term EE be restricted to the central concept of a pervasive epileptic process disrupting development, and that the use of EE as a classifier be avoided. A different term is needed to encapsulate the broad and heterogenous group of patients with severe epilepsy and ID, for which the mechanisms may be unknown but are often closely related to the underlying genetic, metabolic, or structural etiology. An improved understanding of the mechanisms by which EE develops is of critical importance, potentially leading to identification of biomarkers for early detection and treatment. PMID:26778176

  14. Early-onset epileptic encephalopathies and the diagnostic approach to underlying causes

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Su-Kyeong

    2015-01-01

    Early-onset epileptic encephalopathies are one of the most severe early onset epilepsies that can lead to progressive psychomotor impairment. These syndromes result from identifiable primary causes, such as structural, neurodegenerative, metabolic, or genetic defects, and an increasing number of novel genetic causes continue to be uncovered. A typical diagnostic approach includes documentation of anamnesis, determination of seizure semiology, electroencephalography, and neuroimaging. If primary biochemical investigations exclude precipitating conditions, a trial with the administration of a vitaminic compound (pyridoxine, pyridoxal-5-phosphate, or folinic acid) can then be initiated regardless of presumptive seizure causes. Patients with unclear etiologies should be considered for a further workup, which should include an evaluation for inherited metabolic defects and genetic analyses. Targeted next-generation sequencing panels showed a high diagnostic yield in patients with epileptic encephalopathy. Mutations associated with the emergence of epileptic encephalopathies can be identified in a targeted fashion by sequencing the most likely candidate genes. Next-generation sequencing technologies offer hope to a large number of patients with cryptogenic encephalopathies and will eventually lead to new therapeutic strategies and more favorable long-term outcomes. PMID:26692875

  15. Epileptic Pattern Recognition and Discovery of the Local Field Potential in Amygdala Kindling Process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Lin; Chen, Yin-Lin; Su, Alvin Wen-Yu; Shaw, Fu-Zen; Liang, Sheng-Fu

    2016-03-01

    Epileptogenesis, which occurs in an epileptic brain, is an important focus for epilepsy. The spectral analysis has been popularly applied to study the electrophysiological activities. However, the resolution is dominated by the window function of the algorithm used and the sample size. In this report, a temporal waveform analysis method is proposed to investigate the relationship of electrophysiological discharges and motor outcomes with a kindling process. Wistar rats were subjected to electrical amygdala kindling to induce temporal lobe epilepsy. During the kindling process, different morphologies of afterdischarges (ADs) were found and a recognition method, using template matching techniques combined with morphological comparators, was developed to automatically detect the epileptic patterns. The recognition results were compared to manually labeled results, and 79%-91% sensitivity was found. In addition, the initial ADs (the first 10 s) of different seizure stages were specifically utilized for recognition, and an average of 85% sensitivity was achieved. Our study provides an alternative viewpoint away from frequency analysis and time-frequency analysis to investigate epileptogenesis in an epileptic brain. The recognition method can be utilized as a preliminary inspection tool to identify remarkable changes in a patient's electrophysiological activities for clinical use. Moreover, we demonstrate the feasibility of predicting behavioral seizure stages from the early epileptiform discharges.

  16. Microarray Noninvasive Neuronal Seizure Recordings from Intact Larval Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Michaela; Dhamne, Sameer C; LaCoursiere, Christopher M; Tambunan, Dimira; Poduri, Annapurna; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish epilepsy models are emerging tools in experimental epilepsy. Zebrafish larvae, in particular, are advantageous because they can be easily genetically altered and used for developmental and drug studies since agents applied to the bath penetrate the organism easily. Methods for electrophysiological recordings in zebrafish are new and evolving. We present a novel multi-electrode array method to non-invasively record electrical activity from up to 61 locations of an intact larval zebrafish head. This method enables transcranial noninvasive recording of extracellular field potentials (which include multi-unit activity and EEG) to identify epileptic seizures. To record from the brains of zebrafish larvae, the dorsum of the head of an intact larva was secured onto a multi-electrode array. We recorded from individual electrodes for at least three hours and quantified neuronal firing frequency, spike patterns (continuous or bursting), and synchrony of neuronal firing. Following 15 mM potassium chloride- or pentylenetetrazole-infusion into the bath, spike and burst rate increased significantly. Additionally, synchrony of neuronal firing across channels, a hallmark of epileptic seizures, also increased. Notably, the fish survived the experiment. This non-invasive method complements present invasive zebrafish neurophysiological techniques: it affords the advantages of high spatial and temporal resolution, a capacity to measure multiregional activity and neuronal synchrony in seizures, and fish survival for future experiments, such as studies of epileptogenesis and development. PMID:27281339

  17. Microarray Noninvasive Neuronal Seizure Recordings from Intact Larval Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Michaela; Dhamne, Sameer C.; LaCoursiere, Christopher M.; Tambunan, Dimira; Poduri, Annapurna; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish epilepsy models are emerging tools in experimental epilepsy. Zebrafish larvae, in particular, are advantageous because they can be easily genetically altered and used for developmental and drug studies since agents applied to the bath penetrate the organism easily. Methods for electrophysiological recordings in zebrafish are new and evolving. We present a novel multi-electrode array method to non-invasively record electrical activity from up to 61 locations of an intact larval zebrafish head. This method enables transcranial noninvasive recording of extracellular field potentials (which include multi-unit activity and EEG) to identify epileptic seizures. To record from the brains of zebrafish larvae, the dorsum of the head of an intact larva was secured onto a multi-electrode array. We recorded from individual electrodes for at least three hours and quantified neuronal firing frequency, spike patterns (continuous or bursting), and synchrony of neuronal firing. Following 15 mM potassium chloride- or pentylenetetrazole-infusion into the bath, spike and burst rate increased significantly. Additionally, synchrony of neuronal firing across channels, a hallmark of epileptic seizures, also increased. Notably, the fish survived the experiment. This non-invasive method complements present invasive zebrafish neurophysiological techniques: it affords the advantages of high spatial and temporal resolution, a capacity to measure multiregional activity and neuronal synchrony in seizures, and fish survival for future experiments, such as studies of epileptogenesis and development. PMID:27281339

  18. Genes, Seizures & Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Alica M.

    2006-01-01

    The chance that someone will develop any disease is influenced by heredity and environment. Epilepsy is not an exception. Everybody inherits a unique degree of susceptibility to seizures. About 3 percent of the United States population is prone to seizures and will get epilepsy at some point of their lives (1). Two thirds of the people with…

  19. Ultrastructural changes to rat hippocampus in pentylenetetrazol- and kainic acid-induced status epilepticus: A study using electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhvania, Mzia G; Ksovreli, Mariam; Japaridze, Nadezhda J; Lordkipanidze, Tamar G

    2015-07-01

    A pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced status epilepticus model in rats was used in the study. The brains were studied one month after treatment. Ultrastructural observations using electron microscopy performed on the neurons, glial cells, and synapses, in the hippocampal CA1 region of epileptic brains, demonstrated the following major changes over normal control brain tissue. (i) There is ultrastructural alterations in some neurons, glial cells and synapses in the hippocampal CA1 region. (ii) The destruction of cellular organelles and peripheral, partial or even total chromatolysis in some pyramidal cells and in interneurons are observed. Several astrocytes are proliferated or activated. Presynaptic terminals with granular vesicles and degenerated presynaptic profiles are rarely observed. (iii) The alterations observed are found to be dependent on the frequency of seizure activities following the PTZ treatment. It was observed that if seizure episodes are frequent and severe, the ultrastructure of hippocampal area is significantly changed. Interestingly, the ultrastructure of CA1 area is found to be only moderately altered if seizure episodes following the status epilepticus are rare and more superficial; (iv) alterations in mitochondria and dendrites are among the most common ultrastructural changes seen, suggesting cell stress and changes to cellular metabolism. These morphological changes, observed in brain neurons in status epilepticus, are a reflection of epileptic pathophysiology. Further studies at the chemical and molecular level of neurotransmitter release, such as at the level of porosomes (secretory portals) at the presynaptic membrane, will further reveal molecular details of these changes.

  20. Complex partial epileptic-like experiences in university students and practitioners of Dharmakaya in Thailand: comparison with Canadian university students.

    PubMed

    Murphy, T; Persinger, M A

    2001-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that individuals who frequently practice meditation within another culture whose assumptions explicitly endorse this practice should exhibit more frequent and varied experience associated with complex partial epilepsy (without the seizures) as inferred by the Personal Philosophy Inventory and Roberts' Questionnaire for the Epileptic Spectrum Disorder. 80 practitioners of Dharma Meditation and 24 university students in Thailand were compared with 76 students from first-year courses in psychology in a Canadian university. Although there were large significant differences for some items and clusters of items expected as a result of cultural differences, there were no statistically significant differences between the two populations for the proportions of complex partial epileptic-like experiences or their frequency of occurrence. There were no strong or consistent correlations between the history of meditation within the sample who practiced Dharma meditation and these experiences. These results suggest complex partial epileptic-like experiences may be a normal feature of the human species.

  1. [Difficulties in diagnosis of frontal syndrome in epileptic children: clinical, diagnostic, physiopathological aspects. Apropos of 6 cases].

    PubMed

    Septien, L; Brenot, M; Giroud, M; Gras, P; Nivelon, J L; Dumas, R

    1992-01-01

    The authors report 6 cases of acute frontal syndrome following severe seizures of frontal origin. The study of the 6 cases shows the place of disorders in affectivity, behavior, judgement and motor activity; such features changing over time. The relationship between the frontal syndrome and epilepsy is suggested by the fact that the frontal syndrome appears after an increased frequency of frontal seizures, with prolonged discharges of generalized or frontal spikes. The frontal syndrome disappears slowly with the epileptic discharges, and no frontal lesion is found on CT-Scan. Such cases suggest that the frontal syndrome is functional, linked to the localization of the epileptic discharges; it may be regarded as a post-critic deficit, and must be differentiated from a post-critic delirium or a psychotic state. PMID:1329013

  2. Accelerometry-based home monitoring for detection of nocturnal hypermotor seizures based on novelty detection.

    PubMed

    Cuppens, Kris; Karsmakers, Peter; Van de Vel, Anouk; Bonroy, Bert; Milosevic, Milica; Luca, Stijn; Croonenborghs, Tom; Ceulemans, Berten; Lagae, Lieven; Van Huffel, Sabine; Vanrumste, Bart

    2014-05-01

    Nocturnal home monitoring of epileptic children is often not feasible due to the cumbersome manner of seizure monitoring with the standard method of video/EEG-monitoring. We propose a method for hypermotor seizure detection based on accelerometers attached to the extremities. From the acceleration signals, multiple temporal, frequency, and wavelet-based features are extracted. After determining the features with the highest discriminative power, we classify movement events in epileptic and nonepileptic movements. This classification is only based on a nonparametric estimate of the probability density function of normal movements. Such approach allows us to build patient-specific models to classify movement data without the need for seizure data that are rarely available. If, in the test phase, the probability of a data point (event) is lower than a threshold, this event is considered to be an epileptic seizure; otherwise, it is considered as a normal nocturnal movement event. The mean performance over seven patients gives a sensitivity of 95.24% and a positive predictive value of 60.04%. However, there is a noticeable interpatient difference. PMID:24122607

  3. EEG seizure detection and prediction algorithms: a survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alotaiby, Turkey N.; Alshebeili, Saleh A.; Alshawi, Tariq; Ahmad, Ishtiaq; Abd El-Samie, Fathi E.

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy patients experience challenges in daily life due to precautions they have to take in order to cope with this condition. When a seizure occurs, it might cause injuries or endanger the life of the patients or others, especially when they are using heavy machinery, e.g., deriving cars. Studies of epilepsy often rely on electroencephalogram (EEG) signals in order to analyze the behavior of the brain during seizures. Locating the seizure period in EEG recordings manually is difficult and time consuming; one often needs to skim through tens or even hundreds of hours of EEG recordings. Therefore, automatic detection of such an activity is of great importance. Another potential usage of EEG signal analysis is in the prediction of epileptic activities before they occur, as this will enable the patients (and caregivers) to take appropriate precautions. In this paper, we first present an overview of seizure detection and prediction problem and provide insights on the challenges in this area. Second, we cover some of the state-of-the-art seizure detection and prediction algorithms and provide comparison between these algorithms. Finally, we conclude with future research directions and open problems in this topic.

  4. Mozart K.448 listening decreased seizure recurrence and epileptiform discharges in children with first unprovoked seizures: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of reports show the beneficial effects of listening to Mozart music in decreasing epileptiform discharges as well as seizure frequency in epileptic children. There has been no effective method to reduce seizure recurrence after the first unprovoked seizure until now. In this study, we investigated the effect of listening to Mozart K.448 in reducing the seizure recurrence rate in children with first unprovoked seizures. Methods Forty-eight children who experienced their first unprovoked seizure with epileptiform discharges were included in the study. They were randomly placed into treatment (n = 24) and control (n = 24) groups. Children in the treatment group listened to Mozart K.448 daily before bedtime for at least six months. Two patients in the treatment group were excluded from analysis due to discontinuation intervention. Finally, forty-six patients were analyzed. Most of these patients (89.1%) were idiopathic in etiology. Seizure recurrence rates and reduction of epileptiform discharges were compared. Results The average follow-up durations in the treatment and control groups were 18.6 ± 6.6 and 20.1 ± 5.1 months, respectively. The seizure recurrence rate was estimated to be significantly lower in the treatment group than the control group over 24 months (37.2% vs. 76.8%, p = 0.0109). Significant decreases in epileptiform discharges were also observed after 1, 2, and 6 months of listening to Mozart K.448 when compared with EEGs before listening to music. There were no significant differences in gender, mentality, seizure type, and etiology between the recurrence and non-recurrence groups. Conclusions Although the case number was limited and control music was not performed in this study, the study revealed that listening to Mozart K.448 reduced the seizure recurrence rate and epileptiform discharges in children with first unprovoked seizures, especially of idiopathic etiology. We believe that Mozart K.448

  5. Coexistence of epileptic nocturnal wanderings and an arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Genchi, Alejandro; Díaz-Galviz, John L; García-Reyna, Juan Carlos; Avila-Ordoñez, Mario U

    2007-06-15

    Episodic nocturnal wanderings (ENWs) have rarely been associated with gross abnormalities of brain structures. We describe the case of a patient with ENWs in coexistence with an arachnoid cyst (AC). The patient was a 15-year-old boy who presented with nocturnal attacks characterized by complex motor behaviors. An MRI revealed a left temporal cyst and a SPECT Tc99 scan showed left temporal hypoperfusion and bilateral frontal hyperperfusion, more evident on the right side. During an all-night polysomnographic recording with audiovisual monitoring, dystonic posture followed by sleepwalking-like behavior was documented. The sleepwalking-like behavior was preceded by a spike discharge over the left frontocentral region with contralateral projection and secondary generalization during stage 2 sleep. Treatment with levetiracetam produced a striking remission of seizures. This supports a conservative management of an AC, considering that it may be an incidental finding. In epileptic patients, an AC may not necessarily be related to the location of the seizure focus. PMID:17694730

  6. Autobiographical amnesia and accelerated forgetting in transient epileptic amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Manes, F; Graham, K; Zeman, A; de Lujan, Calcagno M; Hodges, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Recurrent brief isolated episodes of amnesia associated with epileptiform discharges on EEG recordings have been interpreted as a distinct entity termed transient epileptic amnesia (TEA). Patients with TEA often complain of autobiographical amnesia for recent and remote events, but show normal anterograde memory. Objective: To investigate (a) accelerated long term forgetting and (b) autobiographical memory in a group of patients with TEA. Methods: Seven patients with TEA and seven age matched controls were evaluated on a range of anterograde memory tasks in two sessions separated by 6 weeks and by the Galton-Crovitz test of cued autobiographical memory. Results: Patients with TEA showed abnormal long term forgetting of verbal material, with virtually no recall after 6 weeks. In addition, there was impaired recall of autobiographical memories from the time periods 1985–89 and 1990–94 but not from 1995–1999. Conclusions: TEA is associated with accelerated loss of new information and impaired remote autobiographical memory. There are a number of possible explanations including ongoing subclinical ictal activity, medial temporal lobe damage as a result of seizure, or subtle ischaemic pathology. Future analyses should seek to clarify the relationship between aetiology, seizure frequency, and degree of memory impairment. PMID:16170082

  7. Nutritional Aspects of Treatment in Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    SOLTANI, Danesh; GHAFFAR POUR, Majid; TAFAKHORI, Abbas; SARRAF, Payam; BITARAFAN, Sama

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by interruption of normal neuronal functions that is manifested by behavioral disorders, changing of awareness level, and presence of some sensory, autonomic and motor symptoms or signs. It is resulted from many different causes. Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are considered to manage epileptic attacks. Some of them change metabolism and absorption of many nutrients. Therefore, epileptic patients may be in higher risk of nutrient deficiency and its unwelcome effects. In the present paper, we intend to review the relationship between nutrition and epilepsy in two aspects. In one aspect we discuss the nutritional status in epileptic patients, the causes of nutritional deficiencies and the way of compensation of the nutrient deficiencies. It will guide these patients to have a healthy life. In another aspect we explain the role of some nutrients and specific diets in management of epileptic attacks. It can help to better control of epileptic attacks in these patients. PMID:27375750

  8. Seizures in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Born, H A

    2015-02-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) increases the risk for late-onset seizures and neuronal network abnormalities. An elevated co-occurrence of AD and seizures has been established in the more prevalent sporadic form of AD. Recent evidence suggests that nonconvulsive network abnormalities, including seizures and other electroencephalographic abnormalities, may be more commonly found in patients than previously thought. Patients with familial AD are at an even greater risk for seizures, which have been found in patients with mutations in PSEN1, PSEN2, or APP, as well as with APP duplication. This review also provides an overview of seizure and electroencephalography studies in AD mouse models. The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide has been identified as a possible link between AD and seizures, and while Aβ is known to affect neuronal activity, the full-length amyloid precursor protein (APP) and other APP cleavage products may be important for the development and maintenance of cortical network hyperexcitability. Nonconvulsive epileptiform activity, such as seizures or network abnormalities that are shorter in duration but may occur with higher frequency, may contribute to cognitive impairments characteristic of AD, such as amnestic wandering. Finally, the review discusses recent studies using antiepileptic drugs to rescue cognitive deficits in AD mouse models and human patients. Understanding the mechanistic link between epileptiform activity and AD is a research area of growing interest. Further understanding of the connection between neuronal hyperexcitability and Alzheimer's as well as the potential role of epileptiform activity in the progression of AD will be beneficial for improving treatment strategies.

  9. Aspartame and seizures.

    PubMed

    Jobe, P C; Dailey, J W

    1993-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that the dietary sweetener aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) might promote seizures and this hypothesis has been argued in the published literature. The current manuscript reviews the biochemical, neurochemical and behavioral experiments that have been carried out in order to assess the hypothesis linking aspartame with seizure promotion. We conclude that convulsive seizures are not caused by orally administered aspartame in rodents or in primates, including humans. Early reports of seizure facilitation by aspartame in several rodent models were not confirmed by later and more careful experimentation. Proconvulsive effects were absent in humans and other mammals with epilepsy and those without epilepsy. Lack of convulsive liability was evident, even when doses many fold higher than those consumed in the human diet, were used in experimental paradigms. Studies of aspartame in absence seizures are not as complete as those in convulsive seizures, but available evidence in humans does not document an association between absence seizure incidence and aspartame usage.

  10. Tracking inflammation in the epileptic rat brain by bi-functional fluorescent and magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, Emma; Polyak, Boris; Inbar, Dorrit; Kenan, Gilad; Rai, Ahmad; Wehrli, Suzanne L; Roberts, Timothy P L; Bishara, Ameer; Mann, Aniv; Shmuel, Miriam; Rozovsky, Katya; Itzhak, Gal; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Magdassi, Shlomo; Ekstein, Dana; Eyal, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Correct localization of epileptic foci can improve surgical outcome in patients with drug-resistant seizures. Our aim was to demonstrate that systemically injected nanoparticles identify activated immune cells, which have been reported to accumulate in epileptogenic brain tissue. Fluorescent and magnetite-labeled nanoparticles were injected intravenously to rats with lithium-pilocarpine-induced chronic epilepsy. Cerebral uptake was studied ex vivo by confocal microscopy and MRI. Cellular uptake and biological effects were characterized in vitro in murine monocytes and microglia cell lines. Microscopy confirmed that the nanoparticles selectively accumulate within myeloid cells in the hippocampus, in association with inflammation. The nanoparticle signal was also detectable by MRI. The in vitro studies demonstrate rapid nanoparticle uptake and good cellular tolerability. We show that nanoparticles can target myeloid cells in epileptogenic brain tissue. This system can contribute to pre-surgical and intra-surgical localization of epileptic foci, and assist in detecting immune system involvement in epilepsy. PMID:26964483

  11. EEG seizure identification by using optimized wavelet decomposition.

    PubMed

    Pinzon-Morales, R D; Orozco-Gutierrez, A; Castellanos-Dominguez, G

    2011-01-01

    A methodology for wavelet synthesis based on lifting scheme and genetic algorithms is presented. Often, the wavelet synthesis is addressed to solve the problem of choosing properly a wavelet function from an existing library, but which may be not specially designed to the application in hand. The task under consideration is the identification of epileptic seizures over electroencephalogram recordings. Although basic classifiers are employed, results rendered that the proposed methodology is successful in the considered study achieving similar classification rates that had been reported in literature. PMID:22254892

  12. Seizure prediction using polynomial SVM classification.

    PubMed

    Zisheng Zhang; Parhi, Keshab K

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a novel patient-specific algorithm for prediction of seizures in epileptic patients with low hardware complexity and low power consumption. In the proposed approach, we first compute the spectrogram of the input fragmented EEG signals from a few electrodes. Each fragmented data clip is ten minutes in duration. Band powers, relative spectral powers and ratios of spectral powers are extracted as features. The features are then subjected to electrode selection and feature selection using classification and regression tree. The baseline experiment uses all features from selected electrodes and these features are then subjected to a radial basis function kernel support vector machine (RBF-SVM) classifier. The proposed method further selects a small number features from the selected electrodes and train a polynomial support vector machine (SVM) classifier with degree of 2 on these features. Prediction performances are compared between the baseline experiment and the proposed method. The algorithm is tested using intra-cranial EEG (iEEG) from the American Epilepsy Society Seizure Prediction Challenge database. The baseline experiment using a large number of features and RBF-SVM achieves a 100% sensitivity and an average AUC of 0.9985, while the proposed algorithm using only a small number of features and polynomial SVM with degree of 2 can achieve a sensitivity of 100.0%, an average area under curve (AUC) of 0.9795. For both experiments, only 10% of the available training data are used for training. PMID:26737598

  13. Burn injury in epileptic patients: an experience in a tertiary institute.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, M S; Ahmad, I; Khan, A H; Fahud Khurram, M; Haq, A

    2014-09-30

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence, types and severity of burn injuries, including sites involved, morbidities, operative procedures, and their outcomes, to prevent or reduce the frequency and morbidity of such injuries in epileptic patients. This retrospective study was conducted at our centre between February 2008 and January 2012. The study included 54 patients who sustained burn injuries due to epileptic seizures, accounting for 1.3% of all burn admissions. All patients, irrespective of the severity of their injuries, were admitted to our centre, assessed, treated and educated regarding specific preventive measures. All study data were evaluated from patient medical records. Causes of burn injury were as follows: scald burns (30), contact with hot surfaces (12), electrical burns in the bathroom (6), and flame burns (6). Second degree burns were the most common (18 out of 54 patients) and third degree burns were the least common. Upper limb and trunk were the most common sites involved (36 out of 54 patients). Thirty patients required surgical intervention whereas the remainder was conservatively managed. Most of the injuries occurred in the age group between 30-37 years. Injuries occurred predominantly in females [42 females, 12 males; F:M=3.5:1]. The study revealed that patients with epilepsy should be categorized as a high risk group considering the sudden and unpredictable attack of epileptic seizures leading to loss of consciousness and accidental burn injuries. Early surgical intervention and targeting of all epileptic patients for education and instituting the specific preventive measures gives good outcomes. PMID:26170789

  14. Burn injury in epileptic patients: an experience in a tertiary institute

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, M.S.; Ahmad, I.; Khan, A.H.; Fahud Khurram, M.; Haq, A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence, types and severity of burn injuries, including sites involved, morbidities, operative procedures, and their outcomes, to prevent or reduce the frequency and morbidity of such injuries in epileptic patients. This retrospective study was conducted at our centre between February 2008 and January 2012. The study included 54 patients who sustained burn injuries due to epileptic seizures, accounting for 1.3% of all burn admissions. All patients, irrespective of the severity of their injuries, were admitted to our centre, assessed, treated and educated regarding specific preventive measures. All study data were evaluated from patient medical records. Causes of burn injury were as follows: scald burns (30), contact with hot surfaces (12), electrical burns in the bathroom (6), and flame burns (6). Second degree burns were the most common (18 out of 54 patients) and third degree burns were the least common. Upper limb and trunk were the most common sites involved (36 out of 54 patients). Thirty patients required surgical intervention whereas the remainder was conservatively managed. Most of the injuries occurred in the age group between 30-37 years. Injuries occurred predominantly in females [42 females, 12 males; F:M=3.5:1]. The study revealed that patients with epilepsy should be categorized as a high risk group considering the sudden and unpredictable attack of epileptic seizures leading to loss of consciousness and accidental burn injuries. Early surgical intervention and targeting of all epileptic patients for education and instituting the specific preventive measures gives good outcomes. PMID:26170789

  15. Transient epileptic amnesia: Update on a slowly emerging epileptic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Felician, O; Tramoni, E; Bartolomei, F

    2015-03-01

    Transient epileptic amnesia (TEA) is a recently individualized, late-onset, pharmaco-sensitive form of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with recurrent episodes of acute memory loss, but also interictal memory disturbances characterized by autobiographical and topographical memory impairment and a long-term consolidation deficit. In this article, we review the main clinical and electrophysiological characteristics of TEA, discuss its putative neuroanatomical substrate and mechanisms, common features and how it differs from related concepts, with the overall aim to defend the idea that TEA deserves to be recognized as a distinct epilepsy syndrome. While the pathophysiological basis remains largely unknown, emotional and/or dysimmune factors may have a potential influence. Most importantly, the concept of TEA is highly relevant to tertiary epilepsy and memory clinics, but also to routine neurology practice, leading to an adequate diagnosis and management of epilepsy-related, acute and long-standing memory deficits.

  16. Epilepsy or seizures - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... You should still plan ahead for the possible dangers of a certain activity. DO NOT do any ... seizure would put you or someone else in danger. Wear a medical alert bracelet. Tell family members, ...

  17. Substantial and sustained seizure reduction with ketogenic diet in a patient with Ohtahara syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sivaraju, Adithya; Nussbaum, Ilisa; Cardoza, Candace S; Mattson, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    Ketogenic diet has been shown to be efficacious in some epileptic encephalopathies but rarely reported as being useful in children with Ohtahara syndrome. This could possibly be attributed to the rarity of the disease and associated short survival period. We report on a 5-year-old child with Ohtahara syndrome, whose seizures failed to improve with all known medications, continued to show persistent suppression-burst pattern on the electroencephalography (EEG) and had substantial reduction in seizure frequency for one year post-initiation of ketogenic diet. He has not had a single visit to the emergency room because of seizures in the last one year, and more importantly, there has been a clear improvement noted in his level of interaction and temperament. Patients with Ohtahara syndrome invariably have medically intractable seizures and catastrophic neurodevelopmental outcome. Ketogenic diet is a treatment modality that might be worth considering even in this group of patients. PMID:26005637

  18. Pilomotor seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy: A case report with sequential changes in magnetic resonance imaging☆

    PubMed Central

    Kurita, Tsugiko; Sakurai, Kotaro; Takeda, Youji; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Piloerection is a rare ictal manifestation of temporal lobe epilepsy. The case is a 38-year-old man with acute onset of repetitive pilomotor seizures. Lacking other symptoms implicating epileptic seizures, a month passed before he was diagnosed with epilepsy. Ictal electroencephalography revealed rhythmic waves in the right temporal area. Reversible magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities were visible in the right hippocampus, right uncus, and right amygdala. The appropriate antiepileptic drug therapy made him seizure-free, but following MRI, he showed right hippocampal atrophy one year after seizure cessation. This case is significant in that we can follow sequential MRI from onset, and it is meaningful for considering the mesial temporal area as involved with piloerection. PMID:25667848

  19. Evaluation of epileptic dogs as an animal model of human epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Löscher, W; Schwartz-Porsche, D; Frey, H H; Schmidt, D

    1985-01-01

    In 126 epileptic dogs with spontaneously recurring generalized tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizures, epidemiological aspects and the efficacy of chronic oral treatment with common antiepileptic drugs were studied. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetics of antiepileptic drugs in dogs was compared with the values known for man. As in man, idiopathic epilepsy appeared to be more common than symptomatic epilepsy in dogs. There was a preponderance of male vs. female animals. When the breeds of the epileptic dogs were compared to the distribution of breeds in the hospital population, breed-related differences in the prevalence of epilepsy were found. The highest prevalence was seen in Cocker spaniels, Miniature schnauzers, Collies and Bassets. The total prevalence of dogs with epilepsy was 0.55%. Comparison of pharmacokinetics of antiepileptic drugs showed that some drugs were suited for maintenance therapy in dogs (primidone, phenobarbital, ethosuximide, trimethadione) whereas others appeared not to be ideally suited because of their short half-lives (phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproic acid, diazepam, clonazepam, nitrazepam). This was confirmed by the evaluation of antiepileptic drug efficacy in epileptic dogs. 46 dogs were treated with primidone at daily doses of 14-104 mg/kg for 6-60 months. During medication with primidone, effective plasma levels of its metabolite phenobarbital could be maintained. Complete control of seizures or a reduction of seizure frequency by at least 75% was achieved in 39% of the dogs at phenobarbital concentrations of 5-49 micrograms/ml. Similar figures were obtained during chronic treatment with phenobarbital at daily doses of 2.5-13 mg/kg.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Optical triggered seizures using a caged 4-Aminopyridine.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingrui; McGarry, Laura M; Ma, Hongtao; Harris, Samuel; Berwick, Jason; Yuste, Rafael; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of epilepsy are critical not only for understanding the fundamental mechanism of epilepsy but also for testing the efficacy of new antiepileptic drugs and novel therapeutic interventions. Photorelease of caged molecules is widely used in biological research to control pharmacologic events with high spatio-temporal resolution. We developed a technique for in vivo optical triggering of neocortical seizures using a novel caged compound based on ruthenium photochemistry (RuBi-4AP). Epileptiform events in mouse cortex were induced with blue light in both whole brain and focal illumination. Multi-electrode array recording and optical techniques were used to characterize the propagation of these epileptic events, including interictal spikes, polyspikes, and ictal discharges. These results demonstrate a novel optically-triggered seizure model, with high spatio-temporal control, that could have widespread application in the investigation of ictal onset, propagation and to develop novel light-based therapeutic interventions. PMID:25698919

  1. Correlation of 3-Mercaptopropionic Acid Induced Seizures and Changes in Striatal Neurotransmitters Monitored by Microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    Crick, Eric W.; Osorio, Ivan; Frei, Mark; Mayer, Andrew P.; Lunte, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study was to use a status epilepticus steady-state chemical model in rats using the convulsant, 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA), and to compare the changes in striatal neurotransmission on a slow (5 minute) and fast (60 second) timescale. In vivo microdialysis was combined with electrophysiological methods in order to provide a complete evaluation of the dynamics of the results obtained. Objective To compare the effects of a steady-state chemical model pof status epilepticus on striatal amino-acid and amine neurotransmitters contents, as measured via in vivo microdialysis combined with electrophysiological methods. Measurements were performed on samples collected every 60 seconds and every 5 minutes. “Fast” (60s) and “slow” (5 min.) sampling timescales were selected, to gain more insight into the dynamics of GABA synthesis inhibition and of its effects on other neurotransmitters and on cortical electrical activity. Methods 3-MPA was administered in the form of an intra-venous load(60 mg/kg) followed by a constant infusion (50 mg/kg/min) for min. Microdialysis samples were collected from the striatum at intervals of 5 minutes and 60 seconds and analyzed for biogenic amine and amino acid neurotransmitters. ECoG activity was monitored via screws placed over the cortex. Results In the 5 minute samples, glutamate (Glu) increased and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) decreased monotonically while changes in dopamine (DA) concentration were bimodal. In the sixty second samples, Glu changes were bimodal, a feature that was not apparent with the five minute samples. ECoG activity was indicative of status epilepticus. Conclusions This study describes the combination of in vivo microdialysis with electrophysiology to monitor the effect of 3-MPA on neurotransmission in the brain. This led to a better understanding of the chemical changes in the striatum due to the applied 3-MPA chemical model of status epilepticus. PMID:24462767

  2. Transient changes in the limbic histaminergic system after systemic kainic acid-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Lintunen, Minnamaija; Sallmen, Tina; Karlstedt, Kaj; Panula, Pertti

    2005-10-01

    Increased brain histamine is reported to protect against convulsions. We used systemic kainic acid (KA) administration to study possible changes of the histaminergic system in rat brain in status epilepticus (SE). Robust increases in brain histamine concentrations and numbers of histamine-immunoreactive nerve fibers were detected in the piriform cortex (Pir) and amygdala after KA injection, suggesting a reactive increase, which is opposite to other published aminergic transmitter responses. These changes, lasting several weeks, might be coupled to a mechanism unrelated to the anticonvulsive function of histamine. Transient increases in mRNA expression of H(3) receptor isoforms with a full-length third intracellular loop, coupled to mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, were detected first in the hippocampal CA3c area, followed by the Pir and amygdala and then the hippocampal CA1 area. These results suggest that histamine and H3 receptors, which also control the release of GABA and glutamate, might be involved in convulsive SE.

  3. Psychogenic (nonepileptic) seizures.

    PubMed

    Krumholz, Allan; Hopp, Jennifer

    2006-07-01

    Psychogenic (nonepileptic) seizures are among the most common and serious of all psychogenic neurological disorders. They account for approximately 20% of all intractable seizure disorders referred to comprehensive epilepsy centers and present with a reported annual incidence of approximately 4% that of true epilepsy. These events are serious and disabling. Indeed, compared with patients with true epilepsy, patients with psychogenic seizures exhibit more frequent, severe, and disabling seizures as well as a poorer quality of life. The diagnosis and management of psychogenic seizures remain challenging, although advances in video electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring have improved the ability of physicians to identify these disorders accurately. The prognosis of these patients is still relatively poor, and a good outcome seems dependent on a young age at diagnosis, early diagnosis, less severe psychological comorbidities, and continued follow-up and management by the diagnosing neurologist or clinician. Additional psychological or psychiatric assessment may be beneficial, particularly in elucidating the etiology of the disorder as well as identifying comorbid disorders, and may help in the long-term management of these patients. This review presents the history, epidemiology, differential diagnosis, and management of psychogenic seizures, with particular attention to the use of diagnostic testing, including video EEG monitoring.

  4. Consciousness of seizures and consciousness during seizures: are they related?

    PubMed

    Detyniecki, Kamil; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances have been made in the network mechanisms underlying impairment of consciousness during seizures. However, less is known about patient awareness of their own seizures. Studying patient reports or documentation of their seizures is currently the most commonly utilized mechanism to scientifically measure patient awareness of seizures. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available evidence regarding the accuracy of patient seizure counts and identify the variables that may influence unreliable seizure reporting. Several groups looking at patient documentation of seizures during continuous EEG monitoring show that patients do not report as many as 50% of their seizures. These studies also suggest that seizures accompanied by loss of consciousness, arising from the left hemisphere or the temporal lobe, or occurring during sleep are associated with significantly reduced reporting. Baseline memory performance does not appear to have a major influence on the accuracy of seizure report. Further prospective studies using validated ictal behavioral testing as well as using correlation with newer electrophysiological and neuroimaging techniques for seizure localization are needed to more fully understand the mechanisms of underreporting of seizures. Better methods to alert caregivers about unrecognized seizures and to improve seizure documentation are under investigation.

  5. Focal electroencephalographic abnormalities and computerised tomography findings in children with seizures.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, J; Appleton, R E; Carty, H; Beirne, M; Acomb, B A

    1993-01-01

    A persistent focal abnormality was observed in 157 (16%) electroencephalograms undertaken in 964 consecutive children with epileptic and non-epileptic seizures seen over one year. CT head scans were performed in 121 (77%) of the 157 children with a focus on the EEG; 26 (21%) showed an abnormality, and 21 (81%) of the abnormalities were localised. There was no difference in the proportion of abnormal scans associated with a delta or slow wave focus compared with a spike or sharp wave focus. An abnormal scan was uncommon after a single seizure. In only two patients (1.7% of all scans) did the findings on CT alter or greatly influence subsequent management. PMID:8482957

  6. Relation between stress-precipitated seizures and the stress response in childhood epilepsy.

    PubMed

    van Campen, Jolien S; Jansen, Floor E; Pet, Milou A; Otte, Willem M; Hillegers, Manon H J; Joels, Marian; Braun, Kees P J

    2015-08-01

    response were the number of anti-epileptic drugs (β = -0.27, P = 0.05) and sleep quality (β = 0.30, P = 0.03). In conclusion, we show that children with acute stress-sensitive seizures have a decreased cortisol response to stress. These results support our hypothesis that stress-sensitivity of seizures is associated with alterations of the stress response, thereby providing a first step in unravelling the mechanisms behind the seizure-precipitating effects of stress. Increased knowledge of the relation between stress and seizures in childhood epilepsy might benefit our understanding of the fundamental processes underlying epilepsy and ictogenesis in general, and provide valuable clues to direct the development of new therapeutic strategies for epilepsy. PMID:26049086

  7. Game-related seizures presenting with two types of clinical features.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Shang-Der; Huang, Chi-Ren

    2006-03-01

    We evaluated 22 patients with epileptic seizures in which the seizures were triggered by various games or game-related materials. Based on whether spontaneous seizure coexisted or not, these 22 patients were divided into two groups. Ten patients who experienced seizures exclusively while playing or watching specific games were referred to as Group I, while 12 patients that had both game-induced and spontaneous seizures were classified as Group II. The patients in Group I had a middle-age onset (39.1 years) with a male predominance (90%). The electroencephalogram (EEG) or brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed non-specific abnormalities in 60%, and the partial onset seizure was recognized in 30% of patients. Antiepileptic drugs had uncertain benefits in this group. In Group II, patients had a male predominance (67%), with onset during adolescence (16.3 years). Most of them had generalized tonic-clonic seizures, myoclonic seizures, and absences, and 42% showed epileptiform discharge on EEG. These 12 patients were categorized into idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Although photosensitivity was an important factor, higher mental activity seemed to be significant precipitants of seizures in Group II. Antiepileptic drugs were necessary and valproic acid alone or combined with clonazepam was effective in this group. The results showed that game-related seizures are not a unique and homogeneous syndrome and may consist of different mechanisms. Teenage onset, coexistent spontaneous seizure, and associated idiopathic generalized epilepsies were crucial factors in the determination of antiepileptic drug therapy. Moreover, avoiding the related games altogether may be a more productive preventive measure.

  8. Interaction of prenatal stress and morphine alters prolactin and seizure in rat pups.

    PubMed

    Saboory, Ehsan; Ebrahimi, Loghman; Roshan-Milani, Shiva; Hashemi, Paria

    2015-10-01

    Prenatal exposure to stress and morphine has complicated effects on epileptic seizure. In the present study, effect of prenatal forced-swim stress and morphine co-administration on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) induced epileptic behaviors and prolactin blood level (PBL) was investigated in rat offspring. Pregnant Wistar rats were divided to four groups of control-saline, control-morphine, stressed-saline and stressed-morphine. In the stressed group, pregnant rats were placed in 25°C water on gestation days 17, 18 and 19 (GD17, GD18 and GD19) for 30 min. In the morphine/saline group, pregnant rats received morphine (10, 12 and 15 mg/kg, IP, on GD17, GD18 and GD19, respectively) or saline (1 ml, IP). In the morphine/saline-stressed group, the rats received morphine or saline and then exposed to stress. On postnatal days 6 and 15 (P6 and P15), blood samples were obtained and PBL was determined. At P15 and P25, the rest of the pups was injected with PTZ to induce seizure. Then, epileptic behaviors of each rat were observed individually. Latency of first convulsion decreased in control-morphine and stressed-saline groups while increased in stressed-morphine rats compared to control-saline group on P15 (P=0.04). Number of tonic-clonic seizures significantly increased in control-morphine and stressed-saline rats compared to control-saline group at P15 (P=0.02). PBL increased in stressed-saline, control-morphine and stress-morphine groups compared to control-saline rats. It can be concluded that prenatal exposure of rats to forced-swim stress and morphine changed their susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizure and PBL during infancy and prepubertal period. Co-administration of morphine attenuated effect of stress on epileptic behaviors.

  9. Mapping the epileptic brain with EEG dynamical connectivity: Established methods and novel approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulou, Margarita; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul; Marinazzo, Daniele

    2012-11-01

    Several algorithms rooted in statistical physics, mathematics and machine learning are used to analyze neuroimaging data from patients suffering from epilepsy, with the main goals of localizing the brain region where the seizure originates from and of detecting upcoming seizure activity in order to trigger therapeutic neurostimulation devices. Some of these methods explore the dynamical connections between brain regions, exploiting the high temporal resolution of the electroencephalographic signals recorded at the scalp or directly from the cortical surface or in deeper brain areas. In this paper we describe this specific class of algorithms and their clinical application, by reviewing the state of the art and reporting their application on EEG data from an epileptic patient.

  10. Febrile and other occasional seizures.

    PubMed

    Bast, T; Carmant, L

    2013-01-01

    Seizures with fever that result from encephalitis or meningitis usually occur late in the course of febrile illness, and are focal and prolonged. Febrile seizures are by far the most common affecting 5% of the population, followed by posttraumatic seizures and those observed in the setting of a toxic, infectious, or metabolic encephalopathy. This chapter reviews the clinical presentation of the three most common forms, due to fever, trauma, and intoxication. Febrile seizures carry no cognitive or mortality risk. Recurrence risk is increased by young age, namely before 1 year of age. Febrile seizures that persist after the age of 6 years are usually part of the syndrome of Generalized epilepsy febrile seizures plus. These febrile seizures have a strong link with epilepsy since non-febrile seizures may occur later in the same patient and in other members of the same family with an autosomal dominant transmission. Complex febrile seizures, i.e., with focal or prolonged manifestations or followed by focal defect, are related to later mesial temporal epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis; risk factors are seizure duration and brain malformation. Prophylactic treatment is usually not required in febrile seizures. Early onset of complex seizures is the main indication for AED prophylaxis. Early posttraumatic seizures, i.e., within the first week, are often focal and indicate brain trauma: contusion, hematoma, 24 hours amnesia, and depressed skull fracture are major factors of posttraumatic epilepsy. Prophylaxis with antiepileptic drugs is not effective. Various psychotropic drugs, including antiepileptics, may cause seizures.

  11. Anticonvulsant effects of a triheptanoin diet in two mouse chronic seizure models

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Sarah; Stoll, James; Sweetman, Lawrence; Borges, Karin

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that in epileptic brains citric acid cycle intermediate levels may be deficient leading to hyperexcitability. Anaplerosis is the metabolic refilling of deficient metabolites. Our goal was to determine the anticonvulsant effects of feeding triheptanoin, the triglyceride of anaplerotic heptanoate. CF1 mice were fed 0-35% calories from triheptanoin. Body weights and dietary intake were similar in mice fed triheptanoin vs. standard diet. Triheptanoin feeding increased blood propionyl-carnitine levels, signifying its metabolism. 35%, but not 20%, triheptanoin delayed development of corneal kindled seizures. After pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE), triheptanoin feeding increased the pentylenetetrazole tonic seizure threshold during the chronically epileptic stage. Mice in the chronically epileptic stage showed various changes in brain metabolite levels, including a reduction in malate. Triheptanoin feeding largely restored a reduction in propionyl-CoA levels and increased methylmalonyl-CoA levels in SE mice. In summary, triheptanoin was anticonvulsant in two chronic mouse models and increased levels of anaplerotic precursor metabolites in epileptic mouse brains. The mechanisms of triheptanoin's effects and its efficacy in humans suffering from epilepsy remain to be determined. PMID:20691264

  12. Postoperative seizure following transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kertmen, Hayri; Gürer, Bora; Yilmaz, Erdal Resit; Sekerci, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic surgery for lumbar disc herniation has been available for more than 30 years. Transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy is a well-known, safe, and effective method used for the treatment of the lumbar disc herniation. The published complications of the transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy consist of infections, thrombophlebitis, dysesthesia, dural tear, vascular injury, and death. Seizure after transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy is an extremely rare complication. A 20-year-old patient applied at our department who had undergone transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar. During the procedure, while performing the discography, non-ionic contrast media was administered into the thecal sac inadvertently. Two hours after surgery, the patient developed generalized tonic-clonic seizure of 5-min duration. Diagnosis of iohexol-induced seizure was made and the patient was treated supportively without anti-epileptics. Here we present the first case of seizure after transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy, which was caused by inadvertent administration of the contrast media into the thecal sac.

  13. Postoperative seizure following transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kertmen, Hayri; Gürer, Bora; Yilmaz, Erdal Resit; Sekerci, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic surgery for lumbar disc herniation has been available for more than 30 years. Transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy is a well-known, safe, and effective method used for the treatment of the lumbar disc herniation. The published complications of the transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy consist of infections, thrombophlebitis, dysesthesia, dural tear, vascular injury, and death. Seizure after transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy is an extremely rare complication. A 20-year-old patient applied at our department who had undergone transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar. During the procedure, while performing the discography, non-ionic contrast media was administered into the thecal sac inadvertently. Two hours after surgery, the patient developed generalized tonic-clonic seizure of 5-min duration. Diagnosis of iohexol-induced seizure was made and the patient was treated supportively without anti-epileptics. Here we present the first case of seizure after transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy, which was caused by inadvertent administration of the contrast media into the thecal sac. PMID:27695562

  14. Crowdsourcing reproducible seizure forecasting in human and canine epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Wagenaar, Joost; Abbot, Drew; Adkins, Phillip; Bosshard, Simone C; Chen, Min; Tieng, Quang M; He, Jialune; Muñoz-Almaraz, F J; Botella-Rocamora, Paloma; Pardo, Juan; Zamora-Martinez, Francisco; Hills, Michael; Wu, Wei; Korshunova, Iryna; Cukierski, Will; Vite, Charles; Patterson, Edward E; Litt, Brian; Worrell, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    SEE MORMANN AND ANDRZEJAK DOI101093/BRAIN/AWW091 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE  : Accurate forecasting of epileptic seizures has the potential to transform clinical epilepsy care. However, progress toward reliable seizure forecasting has been hampered by lack of open access to long duration recordings with an adequate number of seizures for investigators to rigorously compare algorithms and results. A seizure forecasting competition was conducted on kaggle.com using open access chronic ambulatory intracranial electroencephalography from five canines with naturally occurring epilepsy and two humans undergoing prolonged wide bandwidth intracranial electroencephalographic monitoring. Data were provided to participants as 10-min interictal and preictal clips, with approximately half of the 60 GB data bundle labelled (interictal/preictal) for algorithm training and half unlabelled for evaluation. The contestants developed custom algorithms and uploaded their classifications (interictal/preictal) for the unknown testing data, and a randomly selected 40% of data segments were scored and results broadcasted on a public leader board. The contest ran from August to November 2014, and 654 participants submitted 17 856 classifications of the unlabelled test data. The top performing entry scored 0.84 area under the classification curve. Following the contest, additional held-out unlabelled data clips were provided to the top 10 participants and they submitted classifications for the new unseen data. The resulting area under the classification curves were well above chance forecasting, but did show a mean 6.54 ± 2.45% (min, max: 0.30, 20.2) decline in performance. The kaggle.com model using open access data and algorithms generated reproducible research that advanced seizure forecasting. The overall performance from multiple contestants on unseen data was better than a random predictor, and demonstrates the feasibility of seizure forecasting in canine and human

  15. Crowdsourcing reproducible seizure forecasting in human and canine epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wagenaar, Joost; Abbot, Drew; Adkins, Phillip; Bosshard, Simone C.; Chen, Min; Tieng, Quang M.; He, Jialune; Muñoz-Almaraz, F. J.; Botella-Rocamora, Paloma; Pardo, Juan; Zamora-Martinez, Francisco; Hills, Michael; Wu, Wei; Korshunova, Iryna; Cukierski, Will; Vite, Charles; Patterson, Edward E.; Litt, Brian; Worrell, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    See Mormann and Andrzejak (doi:10.1093/brain/aww091) for a scientific commentary on this article.   Accurate forecasting of epileptic seizures has the potential to transform clinical epilepsy care. However, progress toward reliable seizure forecasting has been hampered by lack of open access to long duration recordings with an adequate number of seizures for investigators to rigorously compare algorithms and results. A seizure forecasting competition was conducted on kaggle.com using open access chronic ambulatory intracranial electroencephalography from five canines with naturally occurring epilepsy and two humans undergoing prolonged wide bandwidth intracranial electroencephalographic monitoring. Data were provided to participants as 10-min interictal and preictal clips, with approximately half of the 60 GB data bundle labelled (interictal/preictal) for algorithm training and half unlabelled for evaluation. The contestants developed custom algorithms and uploaded their classifications (interictal/preictal) for the unknown testing data, and a randomly selected 40% of data segments were scored and results broadcasted on a public leader board. The contest ran from August to November 2014, and 654 participants submitted 17 856 classifications of the unlabelled test data. The top performing entry scored 0.84 area under the classification curve. Following the contest, additional held-out unlabelled data clips were provided to the top 10 participants and they submitted classifications for the new unseen data. The resulting area under the classification curves were well above chance forecasting, but did show a mean 6.54 ± 2.45% (min, max: 0.30, 20.2) decline in performance. The kaggle.com model using open access data and algorithms generated reproducible research that advanced seizure forecasting. The overall performance from multiple contestants on unseen data was better than a random predictor, and demonstrates the feasibility of seizure forecasting in canine and

  16. Crowdsourcing reproducible seizure forecasting in human and canine epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wagenaar, Joost; Abbot, Drew; Adkins, Phillip; Bosshard, Simone C.; Chen, Min; Tieng, Quang M.; He, Jialune; Muñoz-Almaraz, F. J.; Botella-Rocamora, Paloma; Pardo, Juan; Zamora-Martinez, Francisco; Hills, Michael; Wu, Wei; Korshunova, Iryna; Cukierski, Will; Vite, Charles; Patterson, Edward E.; Litt, Brian; Worrell, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    See Mormann and Andrzejak (doi:10.1093/brain/aww091) for a scientific commentary on this article.   Accurate forecasting of epileptic seizures has the potential to transform clinical epilepsy care. However, progress toward reliable seizure forecasting has been hampered by lack of open access to long duration recordings with an adequate number of seizures for investigators to rigorously compare algorithms and results. A seizure forecasting competition was conducted on kaggle.com using open access chronic ambulatory intracranial electroencephalography from five canines with naturally occurring epilepsy and two humans undergoing prolonged wide bandwidth intracranial electroencephalographic monitoring. Data were provided to participants as 10-min interictal and preictal clips, with approximately half of the 60 GB data bundle labelled (interictal/preictal) for algorithm training and half unlabelled for evaluation. The contestants developed custom algorithms and uploaded their classifications (interictal/preictal) for the unknown testing data, and a randomly selected 40% of data segments were scored and results broadcasted on a public leader board. The contest ran from August to November 2014, and 654 participants submitted 17 856 classifications of the unlabelled test data. The top performing entry scored 0.84 area under the classification curve. Following the contest, additional held-out unlabelled data clips were provided to the top 10 participants and they submitted classifications for the new unseen data. The resulting area under the classification curves were well above chance forecasting, but did show a mean 6.54 ± 2.45% (min, max: 0.30, 20.2) decline in performance. The kaggle.com model using open access data and algorithms generated reproducible research that advanced seizure forecasting. The overall performance from multiple contestants on unseen data was better than a random predictor, and demonstrates the feasibility of seizure forecasting in canine and

  17. Seizure-induced neglect.

    PubMed Central

    Heilman, K M; Howell, G J

    1980-01-01

    A man with intermittent right parieto-occipital seizures was monitored by electroencephalography while he received 60 trials of being touched on the right, left, or both hands. Half of the trials were given during a focal seizure, and half were given interictally. While the patient was having seizures, he appropriately responded to all 10 stimuli delivered to the right hand, but four of 10 responses were incorrect (allaesthetic) when he was stimulated on the left. With bilateral simultaneous stimulation he neglected the left hand in all 10 trials. His interictal performance was flawless. When given a line-bisection task on two occasions during a seizure, the patient attempted to make a mark to the left of the entire sheet of paper. Immediately postictally he made a mark at the right end of the line. The case illustrates that focal seizures may induce elements of the neglect syndrome and that attention (to contralateral stimuli) and intention to perform (in the contralateral hemispatial field) may be dissociable phenomena. PMID:6777464

  18. Treatment with phenobarbital and monitoring of epileptic patients in rural Mali.

    PubMed Central

    Nimaga, K.; Desplats, D.; Doumbo, O.; Farnarier, G.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of phenobarbital treatment for epileptic patients in rural Mali. METHODS: Epileptic patients were treated at home with phenobarbital at daily dosages ranging from 50 mg for children to 200 mg for adults and their condition was monitored. Advice was given to patients, their families, and the village authorities in order to achieve compliance. An uninterrupted supply of generic phenobarbital was provided and a rural physician made two follow-up visits to each village to ensure that the drug was taken in the correct doses. The physician gave information to the population, distributed the phenobarbital in sufficient quantities to cover the periods between visits, and monitored the patients' responses to treatment. During the first year the physician visited the patients every two months. The frequency of visits was subsequently reduced to once every four months. FINDINGS: In the six months preceding treatment the average rate of seizures among patients exceeded four per month. After a year of treatment, 80.2% of the patients experienced no seizures for at least five months. A total of 15.7% of patients experienced a reduction in seizures. In many cases no further seizures occurred and there were improvements in physical health, mental health and social status. There were very few side-effects and no cases of poisoning were reported. The cost of treatment per patient per year was 7 US dollars for generic phenobarbital and 8.4 US dollars for logistics. CONCLUSION: Low doses of phenobarbital were very effective against epilepsy. However, there is an urgent need for programmes involving increased numbers of physicians in rural areas and, at the national level, for the inclusion of epilepsy treatment in the activities of health care facilities. Internationally, an epilepsy control programme providing free treatment should be developed. PMID:12163916

  19. Effect of prenatal forced-swim stress and morphine co-administration on pentylentetrazol-induced epileptic behaviors in infant and prepubertal rats.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Loghman; Saboory, Ehsan; Roshan-Milani, Shiva; Hashemi, Paria

    2014-09-01

    Prenatal exposure to stress and morphine has complicated effects on epileptic seizure. Many reports have shown an interaction between morphine- and stress-induced behavioral changes in adult rats. In the present study, effect of prenatal forced-swim stress and morphine co-administration on pentylentetrazole (PTZ)-induced epileptic behaviors was investigated in rat offspring to address effect of the interaction between morphine and stress. Pregnant rats were divided to four groups of control-saline, control-morphine, stressed-saline and stressed-morphine. In the stressed group, the rats were placed in 25 °C water on 17-19 days of pregnancy. In the morphine/saline group, the rats received morphine/saline on the same days. In the morphine/saline-stressed group, they were exposed to stress and received morphine/saline simultaneously. On postnatal day 15 (P15), blood samples were collected to determine corticosterone (COS) level. On P15 and P25, PTZ was injected to the rest of pups to induce seizure. Then, epileptic behaviors of each rat were individually observed. Latency of tonic-colonic seizures decreased in control-morphine and stressed-saline groups while increasing in stressed-morphine rats compared to control-saline group on P15. Duration of tonic-colonic seizures significantly increased in control-morphine and stressed-saline rats compared to stressed-morphine and control-saline rats on P15, but not P25. COS levels increased in stressed-saline group but decreased in control-morphine group compared to control-saline rats. Body weight was significantly higher in morphine groups than saline treated rats. Prenatal exposure to forced-swim stress potentiated PTZ-induced seizure in the offspring rats. Co-administration of morphine attenuated effect of stress on body weight, COS levels, and epileptic behaviors.

  20. Naringenin ameliorates kainic acid-induced morphological alterations in the dentate gyrus in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungha; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Shin, Won-Ho; Bae, Young-Seuk; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-10-19

    Granule cell dispersion (GCD) in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is a morphological alteration characteristic of temporal lobe epilepsy. Recently, we reported that treatment with naringin, a flavonoid found in grapefruit and citrus fruits, reduced spontaneous recurrent seizures by inhibiting kainic acid (KA)-induced GCD and neuronal cell death in mouse hippocampus, suggesting that naringin might have beneficial effects for preventing epileptic events in the adult brain. However, it is still unclear whether the beneficial effects of naringin treatment are mediated by the metabolism of naringin into naringenin in the KA-treated hippocampus. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated whether intraperitoneal injections of naringenin could mimic naringin-induced effects against GCD caused by intrahippocampal KA injections in mice. Our results showed that treatment with naringenin delayed the onset of KA-induced seizures and attenuated KA-induced GCD by inhibiting activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in both neurons and reactive astrocytes in the DG. In addition, its administration attenuated the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) from microglial activation in the DG following KA treatment. These results suggest that naringenin may be an active metabolite of naringin and help prevent the progression of epileptic insults in the hippocampus in vivo; therefore, naringenin may be a beneficial metabolite of naringin for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:27584687

  1. Naringenin ameliorates kainic acid-induced morphological alterations in the dentate gyrus in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungha; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Shin, Won-Ho; Bae, Young-Seuk; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-10-19

    Granule cell dispersion (GCD) in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is a morphological alteration characteristic of temporal lobe epilepsy. Recently, we reported that treatment with naringin, a flavonoid found in grapefruit and citrus fruits, reduced spontaneous recurrent seizures by inhibiting kainic acid (KA)-induced GCD and neuronal cell death in mouse hippocampus, suggesting that naringin might have beneficial effects for preventing epileptic events in the adult brain. However, it is still unclear whether the beneficial effects of naringin treatment are mediated by the metabolism of naringin into naringenin in the KA-treated hippocampus. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated whether intraperitoneal injections of naringenin could mimic naringin-induced effects against GCD caused by intrahippocampal KA injections in mice. Our results showed that treatment with naringenin delayed the onset of KA-induced seizures and attenuated KA-induced GCD by inhibiting activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in both neurons and reactive astrocytes in the DG. In addition, its administration attenuated the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) from microglial activation in the DG following KA treatment. These results suggest that naringenin may be an active metabolite of naringin and help prevent the progression of epileptic insults in the hippocampus in vivo; therefore, naringenin may be a beneficial metabolite of naringin for the treatment of epilepsy.

  2. The value of magnetoencephalography for seizure-onset zone localization in magnetic resonance imaging-negative partial epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bouet, Romain; Delpuech, Claude; Ryvlin, Philippe; Isnard, Jean; Guenot, Marc; Bertrand, Olivier; Hammers, Alexander; Mauguière, François

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment of epilepsy is a challenge for patients with non-contributive brain magnetic resonance imaging. However, surgery is feasible if the seizure-onset zone is precisely delineated through intracranial electroencephalography recording. We recently described a method, volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes, to delineate the spiking volume of patients with focal epilepsy using magnetoencephalography. We postulated that the extent of the spiking volume delineated with volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes could predict the localizability of the seizure-onset zone by intracranial electroencephalography investigation and outcome of surgical treatment. Twenty-one patients with non-contributive magnetic resonance imaging findings were included. All patients underwent intracerebral electroencephalography investigation through stereotactically implanted depth electrodes (stereo-electroencephalography) and magnetoencephalography with delineation of the spiking volume using volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes. We evaluated the spatial congruence between the spiking volume determined by magnetoencephalography and the localization of the seizure-onset zone determined by stereo-electroencephalography. We also evaluated the outcome of stereo-electroencephalography and surgical treatment according to the extent of the spiking volume (focal, lateralized but non-focal or non-lateralized). For all patients, we found a spatial overlap between the seizure-onset zone and the spiking volume. For patients with a focal spiking volume, the seizure-onset zone defined by stereo-electroencephalography was clearly localized in all cases and most patients (6/7, 86%) had a good surgical outcome. Conversely, stereo-electroencephalography failed to delineate a seizure-onset zone in 57% of patients with a lateralized spiking volume, and in the two patients with bilateral spiking volume. Four of the 12 patients with non-focal spiking volumes were operated upon, none became seizure

  3. The value of magnetoencephalography for seizure-onset zone localization in magnetic resonance imaging-negative partial epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Julien; Bouet, Romain; Delpuech, Claude; Ryvlin, Philippe; Isnard, Jean; Guenot, Marc; Bertrand, Olivier; Hammers, Alexander; Mauguière, François

    2013-10-01

    Surgical treatment of epilepsy is a challenge for patients with non-contributive brain magnetic resonance imaging. However, surgery is feasible if the seizure-onset zone is precisely delineated through intracranial electroencephalography recording. We recently described a method, volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes, to delineate the spiking volume of patients with focal epilepsy using magnetoencephalography. We postulated that the extent of the spiking volume delineated with volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes could predict the localizability of the seizure-onset zone by intracranial electroencephalography investigation and outcome of surgical treatment. Twenty-one patients with non-contributive magnetic resonance imaging findings were included. All patients underwent intracerebral electroencephalography investigation through stereotactically implanted depth electrodes (stereo-electroencephalography) and magnetoencephalography with delineation of the spiking volume using volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes. We evaluated the spatial congruence between the spiking volume determined by magnetoencephalography and the localization of the seizure-onset zone determined by stereo-electroencephalography. We also evaluated the outcome of stereo-electroencephalography and surgical treatment according to the extent of the spiking volume (focal, lateralized but non-focal or non-lateralized). For all patients, we found a spatial overlap between the seizure-onset zone and the spiking volume. For patients with a focal spiking volume, the seizure-onset zone defined by stereo-electroencephalography was clearly localized in all cases and most patients (6/7, 86%) had a good surgical outcome. Conversely, stereo-electroencephalography failed to delineate a seizure-onset zone in 57% of patients with a lateralized spiking volume, and in the two patients with bilateral spiking volume. Four of the 12 patients with non-focal spiking volumes were operated upon, none became seizure

  4. Tuberculoma-Induced Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Salway, R. James; Sangani, Shruti; Parekh, Samira; Bhatt, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Seizures in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients can be caused by a wide variety of opportunistic infections, and, especially in developing countries, tuberculosis (TB) should be high on the differential. In India, TB is the most common opportunistic infection in HIV and it can have several different central nervous system manifestations, including intracranial tuberculomas. In this case, an HIV patient presenting with new-onset seizure and fever was diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis and multiple intracranial tuberculomas. The patient received standard TB medications, steroids, and anticonvulsants in the emergency department and was admitted for further care. PMID:26587082

  5. SEIZURE AND EPILEPSY: STUDIES OF SEIZURE DISORDERS IN DROSOPHILA

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Louise; Howlett, Iris C.; Rusan, Zeid M.; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the frequency of seizure disorders in the human population, the genetic and physiological basis for these defects has been difficult to resolve. Although many genetic contributions to seizure susceptibility have been identified, these involve disparate biological processes, many of which are not neural specific. The large number and heterogeneous nature of the genes involved makes it difficult to understand the complex factors underlying the etiology of seizure disorders. Examining the effect known genetic mutations have on seizure susceptibility is one approach that may prove fruitful. This approach may be helpful in both understanding how different physiological processes affect seizure susceptibility and identifying novel therapeutic treatments. We review here factors contributing to seizure susceptibility in Drosophila, a genetically tractable system that provides a model for human seizure disorders. Seizure-like neuronal activities and behaviors in the fruit fly are described, as well as a set of mutations that exhibit features resembling some human epilepsies and render the fly sensitive to seizures. Especially interesting are descriptions of a novel class of mutations that are second-site mutations that act as seizure suppressors. These mutations revert epilepsy phenotypes back to the wild-type range of seizure susceptibility. The genes responsible for seizure suppression are cloned with the goal of identifying targets for lead compounds that may be developed into new antiepileptic drugs. PMID:21906534

  6. Seizures and Teens: Sorting Out Seizures--Part Two

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devinsky, Orrin

    2006-01-01

    In adolescents, diagnosing seizures can be challenging and can lead to many pitfalls. Because seizures are episodic and unpredictable events, they usually do not occur in the doctor's office. Thus, a diagnosis of epilepsy is usually based on information presented by the person with seizures and their family. Together with results of diagnostic…

  7. Automated Detection of Tonic-Clonic Seizures Using 3-D Accelerometry and Surface Electromyography in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Milosevic, Milica; Van de Vel, Anouk; Bonroy, Bert; Ceulemans, Berten; Lagae, Lieven; Vanrumste, Bart; Huffel, Sabine Van

    2016-09-01

    Epileptic seizure detection is traditionally done using video/electroencephalography monitoring, which is not applicable for long-term home monitoring. In recent years, attempts have been made to detect the seizures using other modalities. In this study, we investigated the application of four accelerometers (ACM) attached to the limbs and surface electromyography (sEMG) electrodes attached to upper arms for the detection of tonic-clonic seizures. sEMG can identify the tension during the tonic phase of tonic-clonic seizure, while ACM is able to detect rhythmic patterns of the clonic phase of tonic-clonic seizures. Machine learning techniques, including feature selection and least-squares support vector machine classification, were employed for detection of tonic-clonic seizures from ACM and sEMG signals. In addition, the outputs of ACM and sEMG-based classifiers were combined using a late integration approach. The algorithms were evaluated on 1998.3 h of data recorded nocturnally in 56 patients of which seven had 22 tonic-clonic seizures. A multimodal approach resulted in a more robust detection of short and nonstereotypical seizures (91%), while the number of false alarms increased significantly compared with the use of single sEMG modality (0.28-0.5/12h). This study also showed that the choice of the recording system should be made depending on the prevailing pediatric patient-specific seizure characteristics and nonepileptic behavior.

  8. Multimodal effective connectivity analysis reveals seizure focus and propagation in musicogenic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Klamer, Silke; Rona, Sabine; Elshahabi, Adham; Lerche, Holger; Braun, Christoph; Honegger, Jürgen; Erb, Michael; Focke, Niels K

    2015-06-01

    Dynamic causal modeling (DCM) is a method to non-invasively assess effective connectivity between brain regions. 'Musicogenic epilepsy' is a rare reflex epilepsy syndrome in which seizures can be elicited by musical stimuli and thus represents a unique possibility to investigate complex human brain networks and test connectivity analysis tools. We investigated effective connectivity in a case of musicogenic epilepsy using DCM for fMRI, high-density (hd-) EEG and MEG and validated results with intracranial EEG recordings. A patient with musicogenic seizures was examined using hd-EEG/fMRI and simultaneous '256-channel hd-EEG'/'whole head MEG' to characterize the epileptogenic focus and propagation effects using source analysis techniques and DCM. Results were validated with invasive EEG recordings. We recorded one seizure with hd-EEG/fMRI and four auras with hd-EEG/MEG. During the seizures, increases of activity could be observed in the right mesial temporal region as well as bilateral mesial frontal regions. Effective connectivity analysis of fMRI and hd-EEG/MEG indicated that right mesial temporal neuronal activity drives changes in the frontal areas consistently in all three modalities, which was confirmed by the results of invasive EEG recordings. Seizures thus seem to originate in the right mesial temporal lobe and propagate to mesial frontal regions. Using DCM for fMRI, hd-EEG and MEG we were able to correctly localize focus and propagation of epileptic activity and thereby characterize the underlying epileptic network in a patient with musicogenic epilepsy. The concordance between all three functional modalities validated by invasive monitoring is noteworthy, both for epileptic activity spread as well as for effective connectivity analysis in general. PMID:25797835

  9. Anticonvulsant and antiarrhythmic effects of nifedipine in rats prone to audiogenic seizures.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, D D; Ferreira, A J; Doretto, M C; Almeida, A P

    2012-11-01

    Calcium ion participates in the regulation of neural transmission and the presynaptic release of neurotransmitters. It is also involved in epileptic events, cardiac arrhythmias and abnormal conduction of stimuli. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker, on epileptic seizures and on reperfusion arrhythmias in rats prone to audiogenic epileptic seizures (Wistar audiogenic rats, WAR) and in normal Wistar rats (N = 6/group). The seizure severity index was applied after an intraperitoneal injection of 20 or 40 mg/kg nifedipine (N20 and N40 groups, respectively). The Langendorff technique was used to analyze cardiac function, as well as the incidence and severity of the reperfusion arrhythmias after ligature and release of the left coronary artery in rats treated or not with nifedipine. We found that nifedipine treatment decreased seizure severity (0.94 ± 0.02 for WAR; 0.70 ± 0.10 for WAR + N20; 0.47 ± 0.08 for WAR + N40) and increased the latent period (13 ± 2 s for WAR; 35 ± 10 s for WAR + N20; 48 ± 7 s for WAR + N40) for the development of seizures in WAR. Furthermore, the incidence and severity of the reperfusion arrhythmias were lower in WAR and normal Wistar rats injected with nifedipine. In WAR, these effects were mediated, at least in part, by a decrease in heart rate. Thus, our results indicate that nifedipine may be considered to be a potential adjuvant drug for epilepsy treatment, especially in those cases associated with cardiac rhythm abnormalities.

  10. Functional MRI evidence for language plasticity in adult epileptic patients: Preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Cousin, Emilie; Baciu, Monica; Pichat, Cédric; Kahane, Philippe; Le Bas, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    The present fMRI study explores the cerebral reorganisation of language in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, according to the age of seizures onset (early or late) and the hippocampal sclerosis (associated or not). Seven right-handed control volunteers and seven preoperative adult epileptic patients performed a rhyme decision (language condition) and a visual detection (control condition) tasks in visually presented words and unreadable characters, respectively. All patients were left hemisphere dominant for language. Appropriate statistical analyses provided the following preliminary results: (1) patients compared with healthy subjects showed lower degree of hemispheric lateralization with supplementary involvement of the right hemisphere; (2) the degree of hemispheric specialization depends on the considered region; (3) patients with early seizures show signs of temporal and parietal reorganization more frequently than patients with late onset of seizures; (4) patients with early seizures show a tendency for intra-hemispheric frontal reorganisation; (5) associated hippocampal sclerosis facilitates the inter-hemispheric shift of temporal activation. Although our patients were left hemisphere predominant for language, the statistical analyses indicated that the degree of lateralization was significantly lower than in healthy subjects. This result has been considered as the indication of atypical lateralization of language. PMID:18728818

  11. Consecutive 15 min is necessary for focal low frequency stimulation to inhibit amygdaloid-kindling seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Yi; Xu, Zhenghao; Xu, Cenglin; Ying, Xiaoying; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Shihong; Xiao, Bo; Chen, Zhong

    2013-09-01

    Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) is emerging as a new option for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. The stimulation duration may influence the anti-epileptic effect of LFS but is poorly studied. The present study was designed to evaluate the anti-epileptic effect of focal LFS with different stimulation duration on amygdaloid-kindling seizures in rats. We found 15 and 30 min but not 1 or 5 min LFS delivered immediately after the kindling stimulation slowed the progression of behavioral seizure stages and reduced mean afterdischarge duration (ADD) during kindling acquisition. In fully kindled animals, 15 and 30min rather than 1 and 5 min LFS decreased the incidence of generalized seizures and the average seizure stage as well as shortened the cumulative generalized seizure duration (GSD). Meanwhile, EEG analysis showed 15 and 30 min LFS specifically lowered the power in delta band. However, if 15min LFS delivered intermittently by 5 min interval, it had no suppressing effect on kindling rat. Thus, it is likely that consecutive 15 min is necessary for LFS to inhibit amygdaloid-kindling seizures in rats, indicating the stimulation duration may be a key fact affecting the clinical effect of LFS on epilepsy.

  12. Valproic Acid-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis with Pseudocyst Formation: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Khamrui, Sujan; Kataria, Mohnish; Biswas, Jayanta; Saha, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid is the most widely used anti-epilep­tic drug in children, and it is probably the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. Outcomes for patients with valproic acid-associated pancreatitis vary from full recovery after discontinuation of the drug to severe acute pancreatitis and death. Here, we present a case of valproic acid-induced severe acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation in a 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy and generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no resolution of the pseudocyst after discontinuation of valproic acid. The patient became symptomatic with a progressive increase in the size of the pseudocyst. She was successfully treated with cystogastrostomy and was well at 12-month follow-up. PMID:26366333

  13. Ictal but Not Interictal Epileptic Discharges Activate Astrocyte Endfeet and Elicit Cerebral Arteriole Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Gonzalo, Marta; Losi, Gabriele; Brondi, Marco; Uva, Laura; Sato, Sebastian Sulis; de Curtis, Marco; Ratto, Gian Michele; Carmignoto, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Activation of astrocytes by neuronal signals plays a central role in the control of neuronal activity-dependent blood flow changes in the normal brain. The cellular pathways that mediate neurovascular coupling in the epileptic brain remain, however, poorly defined. In a cortical slice model of epilepsy, we found that the ictal, seizure-like discharge, and only to a minor extent the interictal discharge, evokes both a Ca2+ increase in astrocyte endfeet and a vasomotor response. We also observed that rapid ictal discharge-induced arteriole responses were regularly preceded by Ca2+ elevations in endfeet and were abolished by pharmacological inhibition of Ca2+ signals in these astrocyte processes. Under these latter conditions, arterioles exhibited after the ictal discharge only slowly developing vasodilations. The poor efficacy of interictal discharges, compared with ictal discharges, to activate endfeet was confirmed also in the intact in vitro isolated guinea pig brain. Although the possibility of a direct contribution of neurons, in particular in the late response of cerebral blood vessels to epileptic discharges, should be taken into account, our study supports the view that astrocytes are central for neurovascular coupling also in the epileptic brain. The massive endfeet Ca2+ elevations evoked by ictal discharges and the poor response to interictal events represent new information potentially relevant to interpret data from diagnostic brain imaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance, utilized in the clinic to localize neural activity and to optimize neurosurgery of untreatable epilepsies. PMID:21747758

  14. GABRB3 mutations: a new and emerging cause of early infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Papandreou, Apostolos; McTague, Amy; Trump, Natalie; Ambegaonkar, Gautam; Ngoh, Adeline; Meyer, Esther; Scott, Richard H; Kurian, Manju A

    2016-04-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor β3 gene (GABRB3) encodes the β3-subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA ) receptor, which mediates inhibitory signalling within the central nervous system. Recently, GABRB3 mutations have been identified in a few patients with infantile spasms and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. We report the clinical and electrographic features of a novel case of GABRB3-related early-onset epileptic encephalopathy. Our patient presented with neonatal hypotonia and feeding difficulties, then developed pharmacoresistant epileptic encephalopathy, characterized by multiple seizure types from 3 months of age. Electroencephalography demonstrated ictal generalized and interictal multifocal epileptiform abnormalities. Using a SureSelectXT custom multiple gene panel covering 48 early infantile epileptic encephalopathy/developmental delay genes, a novel de novo GABRB3 heterozygous missense mutation, c.860C>T (p.Thr287Ile), was identified and confirmed on Sanger sequencing. GABRB3 is an emerging cause of early-onset epilepsy. Novel genetic technologies, such as whole-exome/genome sequencing and multiple gene panels, will undoubtedly identify further cases, allowing more detailed electroclinical delineation of the GABRB3-related genotypic and phenotypic spectra.

  15. Sleep-related epileptic behaviors and non-REM-related parasomnias: Insights from stereo-EEG.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Steve A; Proserpio, Paola; Terzaghi, Michele; Pigorini, Andrea; Sarasso, Simone; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Tassi, Laura; Nobili, Lino

    2016-02-01

    During the last decade, many clinical and pathophysiological aspects of sleep-related epileptic and non-epileptic paroxysmal behaviors have been clarified. Advances have been achieved in part through the use of intracerebral recording methods such as stereo-electroencephalography (S-EEG), which has allowed a unique "in vivo" neurophysiological insight into focal epilepsy. Using S-EEG, the local features of physiological and pathological EEG activity in different cortical and subcortical structures have been better defined during the entire sleep-wake spectrum. For example, S-EEG has contributed to clarify the semiology of sleep-related seizures as well as highlight the specific epileptogenic networks involved during ictal activity. Moreover, intracerebral EEG recordings derived from patients with epilepsy have been valuable to study sleep physiology and specific sleep disorders. The occasional co-occurrence of NREM-related parasomnias in epileptic patients undergoing S-EEG investigation has permitted the recordings of such events, highlighting the presence of local electrophysiological dissociated states and clarifying the underlying pathophysiological substrate of such NREM sleep disorders. Based on these recent advances, the authors review and summarize the current and relevant S-EEG literature on sleep-related hypermotor epilepsies and NREM-related parasomnias. Finally, novel data and future research hypothesis will be discussed.

  16. De novo loss- or gain-of-function mutations in KCNA2 cause epileptic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Stephan; Møller, Rikke S.; Maher, Bridget; Hernandez-Hernandez, Laura; Synofzik, Matthis; Caglayan, Hande S.; Arslan, Mutluay; Serratosa, José M.; Nothnagel, Michael; May, Patrick; Krause, Roland; Löffler, Heidrun; Detert, Katja; Dorn, Thomas; Vogt, Heinrich; Krämer, Günter; Schöls, Ludger; Mullis, Primus E.; Linnankivi, Tarja; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Sterbova, Katalin; Craiu, Dana C.; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Korff, Christian M.; Weber, Yvonne G.; Steinlin, Maja; Gallati, Sabina; Bertsche, Astrid; Bernhard, Matthias K.; Merkenschlager, Andreas; Kiess, Wieland; Gonzalez, Michael; Züchner, Stephan; Palotie, Aarno; Suls, Arvid; De Jonghe, Peter; Helbig, Ingo; Biskup, Saskia; Wolff, Markus; Maljevic, Snezana; Schüle, Rebecca; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Lerche, Holger; Lemke, Johannes R.

    2015-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of severe epilepsies accompanied by intellectual disability and other neurodevelopmental features1-6. Using next generation sequencing, we identified four different de novo mutations in KCNA2, encoding the potassium channel KV1.2, in six patients with epileptic encephalopathy (one mutation recurred three times independently). Four individuals presented with febrile and multiple afebrile, often focal seizure types, multifocal epileptiform discharges strongly activated by sleep, mild-moderate intellectual disability, delayed speech development and sometimes ataxia. Functional studies of the two mutations associated with this phenotype revealed an almost complete loss-of-function with a dominant-negative effect. Two further individuals presented with a different and more severe epileptic encephalopathy phenotype. They carried mutations inducing a drastic gain-of-function effect leading to permanently open channels. These results establish KCNA2 as a novel gene involved in human neurodevelopmental disorders by two different mechanisms, predicting either hyperexcitability or electrical silencing of KV1.2-expressing neurons. PMID:25751627

  17. Early-life epileptic encephalopathy secondary to SZT2 pathogenic recessive variants.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Charu; Angle, Brad; Millichap, John J

    2016-06-01

    Advances in genetic testing have led to the identification of increasing numbers of novel gene mutations that underlie infantile-onset epileptic encephalopathies. Recently, a mutagenesis screen identified a novel gene, SZT2, with no known protein function that has been linked to epileptogenesis in mice. Thus far, two clinical reports have identified children with different recessive mutations in SZT2 and varying clinical phenotypes. One case report described patients with epileptic encephalopathy and the other noted patients with cognitive deficiencies, but normal MRI and no epilepsy. This case report identifies novel mutations (a compound heterozygous frameshift and a nonsense variant) in the SZT2 gene with distinct clinical and radiographic findings relative to those previously reported. Our patient presented with intractable epilepsy at 2 months of age. Seizures were refractory to numerous antiepileptic medications and the patient finally achieved seizure cessation at age 3 years with a combination of divalproex and lamotrigine. Our patient had similar facial dysmorphisms (macrocephaly, high forehead, and down-slanted palpebral fissures) to a previous case with truncating mutation. While developmental delay and cognitive deficiencies were present, our case had unique MRI findings suggesting migrational abnormalities not previously reported in other cases. PMID:27248490

  18. Effect of topiramate on interleukin 6 expression in the hippocampus of amygdala-kindled epileptic rats

    PubMed Central

    YE, FEI; CHEN, XU-QIN; BAO, GUAN-SHUI; HUA, YIN; WANG, ZHE-DONG; BAO, YI-CHUAN

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the changes in expression and the possible functions of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in electrical kindling of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in epileptic rats. Bipolar electrodes were implanted into the BLA of Sprague-Dawley rats, and the rats were then subjected to chronic electrical stimulation through the electrodes to induce kindling. The seizure characteristics and behavioral changes of the rats were observed, and electroencephalograms were recorded during and following kindling. The IL-6 mRNA expression in the hippocampi of the rats was analyzed using semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and control and topiramate (TPM)-treated groups were compared. The mean time-period required for kindling was 13.50±3.99 days, and the afterdischarge duration (ADD) measured between 21,450 and 119,720 msec. The expression of IL-6 mRNA was significantly upregulated in the kindled rats. TPM was able to depress the seizures and decrease the IL-6 level in the kindled rats. In conclusion, IL-6 mRNA was upregulated in the hippocampi of epileptic rats, and IL-6 may have participated in the process of kindling. PMID:24348794

  19. Assessment of oral side effects of Antiepileptic drugs and traumatic oro-facial injuries encountered in Epileptic children

    PubMed Central

    Ghafoor, P A Fazal; Rafeeq, Mohammed; Dubey, Alok

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is a chronic disorder with unpredictably recurring seizure. Uncontrolled attacks can put patients at risk of suffering oro-facial trauma. Antiepileptic drugs (AED) provide satisfactory control of seizures in most of the patients with epilepsy. However use of AED has been found to cause many side effects inclusive of side effects in the oral cavity also. Materials & Methods: This study was conducted on 150 epileptic children, who were on anti epileptic medication for one year. Results: Gingival over growth was seen as common side effect of the AED drugs. Lip and cheek biting were the most common soft tissue injury, while tooth fracture was the most common hard tissue dental injury. Conclusion: General physicians, physicians & dentists should be well aware of the potential side effects of AED. A Dentist should be well versed and trained to manage oro-facial injuries in the emergency department. How to cite the article: Ghafoor PA, Rafeeq M, Dubey A. Assessment of oral side effects of Antiepileptic drugs and traumaticoro-facial injuries encountered in Epileptic children. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(2):126-8. PMID:24876713

  20. Epilepsy in patients with gliomas: incidence and control of seizures.

    PubMed

    Iuchi, Toshihiko; Hasegawa, Yuzo; Kawasaki, Koichiro; Sakaida, Tsukasa

    2015-01-01

    Brain tumor-related epilepsy (BTRE) is a unique condition that is distinct from primary epilepsy. The aim of this retrospective study was to clarify the epidemiology and results of treatment of BTRE in a single institution. From a database of 121 consecutive patients with supratentorial gliomas treated at Chiba Cancer Center from 2006-2012, the incidence and control of seizures before and after surgery were retrospectively evaluated. Epilepsy occurred in 33.9% of patients before surgery. All patients received prophylactic anti-epileptic drugs (AED) during surgery; however, seizures occurred in 9.1% of patients within the first postoperative week. During follow-up, seizures occurred in 48.3% of patients. The overall incidence of seizures was 73.7% in patients with World Health Organization Grade II gliomas, 66.7% in those with Grade III and 56.8% in those with Grade IV gliomas. Levetiracetam was very well tolerated. However, carbamazepine and phenytoin were poorly tolerated because of adverse effects. AED were discontinued in 56 patients. Fifteen of these patients (26.8%) had further seizures, half occurring within 3 months and 80% within 6 months of AED withdrawal. No clinical factors that indicated it was safe to discontinue AED were identified. The unpredictable epileptogenesis associated with gliomas and their excision requires prolonged administration of AED. To maintain quality of life and to safely and effectively control the tumor, it is necessary to select AED that do not adversely affect cognitive function or interact with other drugs, including anti-cancer agents.

  1. Acute seizure suppression by transcranial direct current stimulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dhamne, Sameer C; Ekstein, Dana; Zhuo, Zhihong; Gersner, Roman; Zurakowski, David; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Jensen, Frances E; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a focal neuromodulation technique that suppresses cortical excitability by low-amplitude constant electrical current, and may have an antiepileptic effect. Yet, tDCS has not been tested in status epilepticus (SE). Furthermore, a combined tDCS and pharmacotherapy antiseizure approach is unexplored. We therefore examined in the rat pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) SE model whether cathodal tDCS (1) suppresses seizures, (2) augments lorazepam (LZP) efficacy, and (3) enhances GABAergic cortical inhibition. Methods Experiment 1 aimed to identify an effective cathodal tDCS intensity. Rats received intraperitoneal PTZ followed by tDCS (sham, cathodal 1 mA, or cathodal 0.1 mA; for 20 min), and then a second PTZ challenge. In Experiment 2, two additional animal groups received a subtherapeutic LZP dose after PTZ, and then verum or sham tDCS. Clinical and electroencephalography (EEG) epileptic activity were compared between all groups. In Experiment 3, we measured GABA-mediated paired-pulse inhibition of the motor evoked potential by paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (ppTMS) in rats that received PTZ or saline, and either verum or sham tDCS. Results Cathodal 1 mA tDCS (1) reduced EEG spike bursts, and suppressed clinical seizures after the second PTZ challenge, (2) in combination with LZP was more effective in seizure suppression and improved the clinical seizure outcomes compared to either tDCS or LZP alone, and (3) prevented the loss of ppTMS motor cortex inhibition that accompanied PTZ injection. Interpretation These results suggest that cathodal 1 mA tDCS alone and in combination with LZP can suppress seizures by augmenting GABAergic cortical inhibition. PMID:26339678

  2. Spatial characterization of interictal high frequency oscillations in epileptic neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Trevelyan, A. J.; Schroeder, C. E.; Goodman, R. R.; McKhann, G.; Emerson, R. G.

    2009-01-01

    Interictal high frequency oscillations (HFOs), in particular those with frequency components in excess of 200 Hz, have been proposed as important biomarkers of epileptic cortex as well as the genesis of seizures. We investigated the spatial extent, classification and distribution of HFOs using a dense 4 × 4 mm2 two dimensional microelectrode array implanted in the neocortex of four patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. The majority (97%) of oscillations detected included fast ripples and were concentrated in relatively few recording sites. While most HFOs were limited to single channels, ∼10% occurred on a larger spatial scale with simultaneous but morphologically distinct detections in multiple channels. Eighty per cent of these large-scale events were associated with interictal epileptiform discharges. We propose that large-scale HFOs, rather than the more frequent highly focal events, are the substrates of the HFOs detected by clinical depth electrodes. This feature was prominent in three patients but rarely seen in only one patient recorded outside epileptogenic cortex. Additionally, we found that HFOs were commonly associated with widespread interictal epileptiform discharges but not with locally generated ‘microdischarges’. Our observations raise the possibility that, rather than being initiators of epileptiform activity, fast ripples may be markers of a secondary local response. PMID:19745024

  3. Neuronal avalanches, epileptic quakes and other transient forms of neurodynamics.

    PubMed

    Milton, John G

    2012-07-01

    Power-law behaviors in brain activity in healthy animals, in the form of neuronal avalanches, potentially benefit the computational activities of the brain, including information storage, transmission and processing. In contrast, power-law behaviors associated with seizures, in the form of epileptic quakes, potentially interfere with the brain's computational activities. This review draws attention to the potential roles played by homeostatic mechanisms and multistable time-delayed recurrent inhibitory loops in the generation of power-law phenomena. Moreover, it is suggested that distinctions between health and disease are scale-dependent. In other words, what is abnormal and defines disease it is not the propagation of neural activity but the propagation of activity in a neural population that is large enough to interfere with the normal activities of the brain. From this point of view, epilepsy is a disease that results from a failure of mechanisms, possibly located in part in the cortex itself or in the deep brain nuclei and brainstem, which truncate or otherwise confine the spatiotemporal scales of these power-law phenomena.

  4. Magnetoencephalographic signatures of insular epileptic spikes based on functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Zerouali, Younes; Pouliot, Philippe; Robert, Manon; Mohamed, Ismail; Bouthillier, Alain; Lesage, Frédéric; Nguyen, Dang K

    2016-09-01

    Failure to recognize insular cortex seizures has recently been identified as a cause of epilepsy surgeries targeting the temporal, parietal, or frontal lobe. Such failures are partly due to the fact that current noninvasive localization techniques fare poorly in recognizing insular epileptic foci. Our group recently demonstrated that magnetoencephalography (MEG) is sensitive to epileptiform spikes generated by the insula. In this study, we assessed the potential of distributed source imaging and functional connectivity analyses to distinguish insular networks underlying the generation of spikes. Nineteen patients with operculo-insular epilepsy were investigated. Each patient underwent MEG as well as T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as part of their standard presurgical evaluation. Cortical sources of MEG spikes were reconstructed with the maximum entropy on the mean algorithm, and their time courses served to analyze source functional connectivity. The results indicate that the anterior and posterior subregions of the insula have specific patterns of functional connectivity mainly involving frontal and parietal regions, respectively. In addition, while their connectivity patterns are qualitatively similar during rest and during spikes, couplings within these networks are much stronger during spikes. These results show that MEG can establish functional connectivity-based signatures that could help in the diagnosis of different subtypes of insular cortex epilepsy. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3250-3261, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27220112

  5. Neocortical GABA release at high intracellular sodium and low extracellular calcium: an anti-seizure mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rassner, Michael P; Moser, Andreas; Follo, Marie; Joseph, Kevin; van Velthoven-Wurster, Vera; Feuerstein, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    In epilepsy, the GABA and glutamate balance may be disrupted and a transient decrease in extracellular calcium occurs before and during a seizure. Flow Cytometry based fluorescence activated particle sorting experiments quantified synaptosomes from human neocortical tissue, from both epileptic and non-epileptic patients (27.7% vs. 36.9% GABAergic synaptosomes, respectively). Transporter-mediated release of GABA in human and rat neocortical synaptosomes was measured using the superfusion technique for the measurement of endogenous GABA. GABA release was evoked by either a sodium channel activator or a sodium/potassium-ATPase inhibitor when exocytosis was possible or prevented, and when the sodium/calcium exchanger was active or inhibited. The transporter-mediated release of GABA is because of elevated intracellular sodium. A reduction in the extracellular calcium increased this release (in both non-epileptic and epileptic, except Rasmussen encephalitis, synaptosomes). The inverse was seen during calcium doubling. In humans, GABA release was not affected by exocytosis inhibition, that is, it was solely transporter-mediated. However, in rat synaptosomes, an increase in GABA release at zero calcium was only exhibited when the exocytosis was prevented. The absence of calcium amplified the sodium/calcium exchanger activity, leading to elevated intracellular sodium, which, together with the stimulation-evoked intracellular sodium increment, enhanced GABA transporter reversal. Sodium/calcium exchange inhibitors diminished GABA release. Thus, an important seizure-induced extracellular calcium reduction might trigger a transporter- and sodium/calcium exchanger-related anti-seizure mechanism by augmenting transporter-mediated GABA release, a mechanism absent in rats. Uniquely, the additional increase in GABA release because of calcium-withdrawal dwindled during the course of illness in Rasmussen encephalitis. Seizures cause high Na(+) influx through action potentials. A

  6. Role of multiple-scale modeling of epilepsy in seizure forecasting.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Levin; Grayden, David B; Wendling, Fabrice; Schiff, Steven J

    2015-06-01

    Over the past three decades, a number of seizure prediction, or forecasting, methods have been developed. Although major achievements were accomplished regarding the statistical evaluation of proposed algorithms, it is recognized that further progress is still necessary for clinical application in patients. The lack of physiological motivation can partly explain this limitation. Therefore, a natural question is raised: can computational models of epilepsy be used to improve these methods? Here, we review the literature on the multiple-scale neural modeling of epilepsy and the use of such models to infer physiologic changes underlying epilepsy and epileptic seizures. The authors argue how these methods can be applied to advance the state-of-the-art in seizure forecasting.

  7. Effects of traumatic brain injury on reactive astrogliosis and seizures in mouse models of Alexander disease

    PubMed Central

    Cotrina, Maria Luisa; Chen, Michael; Han, Xiaoning; Iliff, Jeffrey; Ren, Zeguang; Sun, Wei; Hagemann, Tracy; Goldman, James; Messing, Albee; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Alexander disease (AxD) is the only known human pathology caused by mutations in an astrocyte-specific gene, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). These mutations result in abnormal GFAP accumulations that promote seizures, motor delays and, ultimately, death. The exact contribution of increased, abnormal levels of astrocytic mutant GFAP in the development and progression of the epileptic phenotype is not clear, and we addressed this question using two mouse models of AxD. Comparison of brain seizure activity spontaneously and after traumatic brain injury (TBI), an effective way to trigger seizures, revealed that abnormal GFAP accumulation contributes to abnormal brain activity (increased interictal discharges) but is not a risk factor for the development of epilepsy after TBI. These data highlight the need to further explore the complex and heterogeneous response of astrocytes towards injury and the involvement of GFAP in the progression of AxD. PMID:25069089

  8. Synaptic vesicle protein2A decreases in amygdaloid-kindling pharmcoresistant epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Li-kun; Wu, Guo-feng

    2015-10-01

    Synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) involvement has been reported in the animal models of epilepsy and in human intractable epilepsy. The difference between pharmacosensitive epilepsy and pharmacoresistant epilepsy remains poorly understood. The present study aimed to observe the hippocampus SV2A protein expression in amygdale-kindling pharmacoresistant epileptic rats. The pharmacosensitive epileptic rats served as control. Amygdaloid-kindling model of epilepsy was established in 100 healthy adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The kindled rat model of epilepsy was used to select pharmacoresistance by testing their seizure response to phenytoin and phenobarbital. The selected pharmacoresistant rats were assigned to a pharmacoresistant epileptic group (PRE group). Another 12 pharmacosensitive epileptic rats (PSE group) served as control. Immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to determine SV2A expression in the hippocampus tissue samples from both the PRE and the PSE rats. Immunohistochemistry staining showed that SV2A was mainly accumulated in the cytoplasm of the neurons, as well as along their dendrites throughout all subfields of the hippocampus. Immunoreactive staining level of SV2A-positive cells was 0.483 ± 0.304 in the PRE group and 0.866 ± 0.090 in the PSE group (P < 0.05). Real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that 2(-ΔΔCt) value of SV2A mRNA was 0.30 ± 0.43 in the PRE group and 0.76 ± 0.18 in the PSE group (P < 0.05). Western blotting analysis obtained the similar findings (0.27 ± 0.21 versus 1.12 ± 0.21, P < 0.05). PRE rats displayed a significant decrease of SV2A in the brain. SV2A may be associated with the pathogenesis of intractable epilepsy of the amygdaloid-kindling rats.

  9. Behavioral deficit and decreased GABA receptor functional regulation in the cerebellum of epileptic rats: effect of Bacopa monnieri and bacoside A.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Jobin; Peeyush Kumar, T; Khan, Reas S; Paulose, C S

    2010-04-01

    In the present study, the effects of Bacopa monnieri and its active component, bacoside A, on motor deficit and alterations of GABA receptor functional regulation in the cerebellum of epileptic rats were investigated. Scatchard analysis of [(3)H]GABA and [(3)H]bicuculline in the cerebellum of epileptic rats revealed a significant decrease in B(max) compared with control. Real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification of GABA(A) receptor subunits-GABA(Aalpha1), GABA(Aalpha5,) and GABA(Adelta)-was downregulated (P<0.001) in the cerebellum of epileptic rats compared with control rats. Epileptic rats exhibit deficits in radial arm and Y-maze performance. Treatment with B. monnieri and bacoside A reversed these changes to near-control levels. Our results suggest that changes in GABAergic activity, motor learning, and memory deficit are induced by the occurrence of repetitive seizures. Treatment with B. monnieri and bacoside A prevents the occurrence of seizures thereby reducing the impairment of GABAergic activity, motor learning, and memory deficit.

  10. From cognitive networks to seizures: stimulus evoked dynamics in a coupled cortical network.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaejin; Ermentrout, Bard; Bodner, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neuropathologies worldwide. Seizures arising in epilepsy or in seizure disorders are characterized generally by uncontrolled spread of excitation and electrical activity to a limited region or even over the entire cortex. While it is generally accepted that abnormal excessive firing and synchronization of neuron populations lead to seizures, little is known about the precise mechanisms underlying human epileptic seizures, the mechanisms of transitions from normal to paroxysmal activity, or about how seizures spread. Further complication arises in that seizures do not occur with a single type of dynamics but as many different phenotypes and genotypes with a range of patterns, synchronous oscillations, and time courses. The concept of preventing, terminating, or modulating seizures and/or paroxysmal activity through stimulation of brain has also received considerable attention. The ability of such stimulation to prevent or modulate such pathological activity may depend on identifiable parameters. In this work, firing rate networks with inhibitory and excitatory populations were modeled. Network parameters were chosen to model normal working memory behaviors. Two different models of cognitive activity were developed. The first model consists of a single network corresponding to a local area of the brain. The second incorporates two networks connected through sparser recurrent excitatory connectivity with transmission delays ranging from approximately 3 ms within local populations to 15 ms between populations residing in different cortical areas. The effect of excitatory stimulation to activate working memory behavior through selective persistent activation of populations is examined in the models, and the conditions and transition mechanisms through which that selective activation breaks down producing spreading paroxysmal activity and seizure states are characterized. Specifically, we determine critical parameters and architectural

  11. From cognitive networks to seizures: Stimulus evoked dynamics in a coupled cortical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaejin; Ermentrout, Bard; Bodner, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neuropathologies worldwide. Seizures arising in epilepsy or in seizure disorders are characterized generally by uncontrolled spread of excitation and electrical activity to a limited region or even over the entire cortex. While it is generally accepted that abnormal excessive firing and synchronization of neuron populations lead to seizures, little is known about the precise mechanisms underlying human epileptic seizures, the mechanisms of transitions from normal to paroxysmal activity, or about how seizures spread. Further complication arises in that seizures do not occur with a single type of dynamics but as many different phenotypes and genotypes with a range of patterns, synchronous oscillations, and time courses. The concept of preventing, terminating, or modulating seizures and/or paroxysmal activity through stimulation of brain has also received considerable attention. The ability of such stimulation to prevent or modulate such pathological activity may depend on identifiable parameters. In this work, firing rate networks with inhibitory and excitatory populations were modeled. Network parameters were chosen to model normal working memory behaviors. Two different models of cognitive activity were developed. The first model consists of a single network corresponding to a local area of the brain. The second incorporates two networks connected through sparser recurrent excitatory connectivity with transmission delays ranging from approximately 3 ms within local populations to 15 ms between populations residing in different cortical areas. The effect of excitatory stimulation to activate working memory behavior through selective persistent activation of populations is examined in the models, and the conditions and transition mechanisms through which that selective activation breaks down producing spreading paroxysmal activity and seizure states are characterized. Specifically, we determine critical parameters and architectural

  12. Non-invasive cerebral blood volume measurement during seizures using multi-channel near infrared spectroscopic topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Eiju; Maki, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Fumio; Yamashita, Yuichi; Koizumi, Hideaki; Mayanagi, Yoshiaki

    2000-07-01

    Near infrared spectroscopic topography (NIRS) is widely recognized as a noninvasive method to measure the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) dynamics coupled with neuronal activities. We analyzed the rCBV change in the early phase of epileptic seizures in 12 consecutive patients with medically intractable epilepsy. Seizure was induced by bemegride injection. We used eight-channel NIRS in nine cases and 24 channel in three cases. In all of the cases, rCBV increased rapidly after the seizure onset on the focus side. The increased rCBV was observed for about 30 - 60 s. The NIRS method can be applied to monitor the rCBV change continuously during seizures. Therefore, this method may be combined with ictal SPECT as one of the most reliable noninvasive methods of focus diagnosis.

  13. [EEG analysis and prognosis in 125 cases of non-hyperpyretic seizures occurring in children under three (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Samson-Dollfus, D; Szeibert, J; Parain, D; Senant, J; Menard, J F

    1981-12-01

    Between 1955 and 1970 recordings were made from 125 children aged 1-36 months who had had a first epileptic seizure (non-hyperthermic). 100 of these children were followed up for from 5 to 20 years: 35 had had their first seizure before 1 year of age and 65 between the age of 1 and 3. Hypsarrythmia was more frequent under 1 year of age, whereas short diffuse spike and wave bursts were observed only after 1 year. However, localized spikes, asymmetrical or slow tracings as well as normal tracings were observed in both groups, without significant difference. A fatal outcome is more frequent when the first seizure took place before the age of 1 year. However, in our sample the intellectual development of the surviving children does not depend on the time of the first seizure. In any case the prognosis is unfavorable, since only 31 of the children followed up developed normally. PMID:7345501

  14. The Effects of Sub-Chronic Treatment with Aripiprazole on Pentylenetetrazole- and Electroshock-Induced Seizures in Mice: The Role of Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Moezi, Leila; Hosseini, Mahsa; Oveisi, Simin; Niknahad, Hossein; Shafaroodi, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Almost all antipsychotics have been associated with a risk of epileptic seizure provocation. Aripiprazole is a novel atypical antipsychotic. The risk of seizures with aripiprazole is reported to be the lowest among atypical agents. In this study, we investigated the effect of aripiprazole on seizure of mice in sub-chronic treatments. We also examined the interaction of nitric oxide (NO) with aripiprazole in seizure experiments. Mice received aripiprazole for 6 days and then on the 7th day aripiprazole was injected 60 min before intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole or electroshock. L-NAME (non-selective NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor), 7-nitroindazole (neuronal NOS selective inhibitor), aminoguanidine (inducible NOS selective inhibitors) or L-arginine (NO donor), all were injected 5 min before aripiprazole in separate groups. The results of both seizure models demonstrated anti-epileptic properties of aripiprazole in sub-chronic administrations. Co-administration of aripiprazole and selective and non-selective NOS inhibitors prevented the anticonvulsant effect of aripiprazole. While L-arginine and aripiprazole co-administration increased the clonic seizure threshold and protection against tonic seizure and death, these effects were not significant. The current results indicated that aripiprazole has anticonvulsant effects probably through the release of NO.

  15. The effect of subchronic supplementation with folic acid on homocysteine induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Rasic-Markovic, A; Rankov-Petrovic, B; Hrncic, D; Krstic, D; Colovic, M; Macut, Dj; Djuric, D; Stanojlovic, Olivera

    2015-06-01

    Influence of folic acid on the CNS is still unclear. Folate has a neuroprotective effect, while on the other hand excess folate can exacerbate seizures in epileptics. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of subchronic administration of folic acid on behavioural and electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics of DL homocysteine thiolactone induced seizures in adult rats. The activity of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and Mg²⁺-ATPase in different brain regions was investigated. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into groups: 1. Controls (C, 0.9% NaCl); 2. DL homocysteine-thiolactone 8.0 mmol/kg (H); 3. Subchronic supplementation with folic acid 5 mg/kg for 7 days (F) and 4. Subchronic supplementation with F + single dose of H (FH). Seizure behaviour was assessed by incidence, latency, number and intensity of seizure episodes. Seizure severity was described by a descriptive scale with grades 0-4. For EEG recordings, three gold-plated recording electrodes were implanted into the skull. Subchronic supplementation with folic acid did not affect seizure incidence, median number of seizure episodes and severity in FH, comparison with H (p > 0.05). The majority of seizure episodes in all groups were of grade 2. There were no significant differences in lethal outcomes at 24 h upon H injection in the FH vs. H group. The activity of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and Mg²⁺-ATPase was significantly increased in almost all examined structures in the FH vs. H group. Subchronic folic acid administration did not exacerbate H induced seizures and completely recovered the activity of ATPases.

  16. Inappropriate Neural Activity during a Sensitive Period in Embryogenesis Results in Persistent Seizure-like Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Giachello, Carlo N.G.; Baines, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Maturation of neural circuits requires activity-dependent processes that underpin the emergence of appropriate behavior in the adult. It has been proposed that disruption of these events, during specific critical periods when they exert maximal influence, may lead to neurodevelopmental diseases, including epilepsy [1, 2, 3]. However, complexity of neurocircuitry, coupled with the lack of information on network formation in mammals, makes it difficult to directly investigate this hypothesis. Alternative models, including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, show remarkable similarities between experimental seizure-like activity and clinical phenotypes [4, 5, 6]. In particular, a group of flies, termed bang-sensitive (bs) mutants have been extensively used to investigate the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying seizure [7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12]. Seizure phenotype can be measured in larval stages using an electroshock assay, and this behavior in bs mutants is dramatically reduced following ingestion of typical anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs; [13]). In this study we describe a critical period of embryonic development in Drosophila during which manipulation of neural activity is sufficient to significantly influence seizure behavior at postembryonic stages. We show that inhibition of elevated activity, characteristic of bs seizure models, during the critical period is sufficient to suppress seizure. By contrast, increasing neuronal excitation during the same period in wild-type (WT) is sufficient to permanently induce a seizure behavior. Further, we show that induction of seizure in WT correlates with functional alteration of motoneuron inputs that is a characteristic of bs mutants. Induction of seizure is rescued by prior administration of AEDs, opening a new perspective for early drug intervention in the treatment of genetic epilepsy. PMID:26549258

  17. Effects of phenytoin and lamotrigine treatment on serum BDNF levels in offsprings of epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Soysal, Handan; Doğan, Zümrüt; Kamışlı, Özden

    2016-04-01

    The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is to promote and modulate neuronal responses across neurotransmitter systems in the brain. Therefore, abnormal BDNF signaling may be associated with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Low BDNF levels have been reported in brains and serums of patients with psychotic disorders. In the present study, we investigated the effects of antiepileptic drugs on BDNF in developing rats. Pregnant rats were treated with phenytoin (PHT), lamotrigine (LTG) and folic acid for long-term, all through their gestational periods. Experimental epilepsy (EE) model was applied in pregnant rats. Epileptic seizures were determined with electroencephalography. After birth, serum BDNF levels were measured in 136 newborn rats on postnatal day (PND) 21 and postnatal day 38. In postnatal day 21, serum BDNF levels of experimental epilepsy group were significantly lower compared with PHT group. This decrease is statistically significant. Serum BDNF levels increased in the group LTG. This increase compared with LTG+EE group was statistically significant. In the folic acid (FA) group, levels of serum BDNF decreased statistically significantly compared to the PHT group. On postnatal day 38, no significant differences were found among the groups for serum BDNF levels. We concluded that, the passed seizures during pregnancy adversely affect fetal brain development, lowering of serum BDNF levels. PHT use during pregnancy prevents seizure-induced injury by increasing the levels of BDNF. About the increase level of BDNF, LTG is much less effective than PHT, the positive effect of folic acid on serum BDNF levels was not observed. LTG increase in BDNF is much less effective than PHT, folic acid did not show a positive effect on serum BDNF levels. Epilepsy affects fetal brain development during gestation in pregnant rats, therefore anti-epileptic therapy should be continued during pregnancy. PMID:26706181

  18. Clavulanic acid does not affect convulsions in acute seizure tests in mice.

    PubMed

    Gasior, Maciej; Socała, Katarzyna; Nieoczym, Dorota; Wlaź, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Clavulanic acid (CLAV) inhibits bacterial β-lactamases and is commonly used to aid antibiotic therapy. Prompted by the initial evidence suggestive of the potential anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties of CLAV, the present study was undertaken to systematically evaluate its acute effects on seizure thresholds in seizure tests typically used in primary screening of potential antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In the present study, 6-Hz seizure threshold, maximal electroshock seizure threshold (MEST) test, and intravenous pentylenetetrazole (i.v. PTZ) seizure tests were used to determine anticonvulsant effects of intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered CLAV in mice. Acute effects on motor coordination and muscle strength were assessed in the chimney and grip-strength tests, respectively. Doses of CLAV studied in the present study were either comparable or extended the doses reported in the literature to be effective against kainic acid-induced convulsions in mice or behaviorally active in rodents and monkeys. CLAV had no effect on seizure thresholds in the 6-Hz (64 ng/kg to 1 mg/kg) and MEST (64 ng/kg to 5 mg/kg) seizure tests. Similarly, CLAV had no effect on seizure thresholds for i.v. PTZ-induced myoclonic twitch, clonic convulsions, and tonic convulsions (64 ng/kg to 5 mg/kg). Finally, CLAV (64 ng/kg to 5 mg/kg) had no effect on the motor performance and muscle strength in the chimney and grip-strength tests, respectively. In summary, CLAV failed to affect seizure thresholds in three seizure tests in mice. Although the results of the present study do not support further development of CLAV as an AED, its beneficial effects in chronic epilepsy models warrant further evaluation owing to its, for example, potential neuroprotective properties.

  19. Terminology and classification of seizures and epilepsy in veterinary patients.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Christopher L

    2013-05-01

    The classification of epileptic seizures and epilepsy is a controversial and dynamic topic that has undergone many iterations in human medicine. The International League against Epilepsy is a multinational organization that has formed a number of task forces and subcommittees to study this issue, and has ratified several reports outlining recommended terminology and classification schemes for human patients. Veterinary publications on this issue have generally adapted these schemes to fit small animal patients, but a formally endorsed system to classify seizures and epilepsy has never been developed for veterinary patients. This review outlines the classification systems that have been published for human patients and summarizes previous efforts by veterinary authors to utilize these methods. Finally, a set of definitions and terminology for use in veterinary patients is proposed, which includes a glossary of descriptive terminology for ictal semiology and a diagnostic scheme for classification of individual patients. This document is intended as a starting point of discussion, which will hopefully eventually result in a formally ratified document that will be useful for communication between health professionals, the design of clinical trials and for guiding treatment decisions and prognostication for veterinary patients with seizures.

  20. Computational Modeling of Seizure Dynamics Using Coupled Neuronal Networks: Factors Shaping Epileptiform Activity

    PubMed Central

    Naze, Sebastien; Bernard, Christophe; Jirsa, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Epileptic seizure dynamics span multiple scales in space and time. Understanding seizure mechanisms requires identifying the relations between seizure components within and across these scales, together with the analysis of their dynamical repertoire. Mathematical models have been developed to reproduce seizure dynamics across scales ranging from the single neuron to the neural population. In this study, we develop a network model of spiking neurons and systematically investigate the conditions, under which the network displays the emergent dynamic behaviors known from the Epileptor, which is a well-investigated abstract model of epileptic neural activity. This approach allows us to study the biophysical parameters and variables leading to epileptiform discharges at cellular and network levels. Our network model is composed of two neuronal populations, characterized by fast excitatory bursting neurons and regular spiking inhibitory neurons, embedded in a common extracellular environment represented by a slow variable. By systematically analyzing the parameter landscape offered by the simulation framework, we reproduce typical sequences of neural activity observed during status epilepticus. We find that exogenous fluctuations from extracellular environment and electro-tonic couplings play a major role in the progression of the seizure, which supports previous studies and further validates our model. We also investigate the influence of chemical synaptic coupling in the generation of spontaneous seizure-like events. Our results argue towards a temporal shift of typical spike waves with fast discharges as synaptic strengths are varied. We demonstrate that spike waves, including interictal spikes, are generated primarily by inhibitory neurons, whereas fast discharges during the wave part are due to excitatory neurons. Simulated traces are compared with in vivo experimental data from rodents at different stages of the disorder. We draw the conclusion that slow

  1. Computational modeling of seizure dynamics using coupled neuronal networks: factors shaping epileptiform activity.

    PubMed

    Naze, Sebastien; Bernard, Christophe; Jirsa, Viktor

    2015-05-01

    Epileptic seizure dynamics span multiple scales in space and time. Understanding seizure mechanisms requires identifying the relations between seizure components within and across these scales, together with the analysis of their dynamical repertoire. Mathematical models have been developed to reproduce seizure dynamics across scales ranging from the single neuron to the neural population. In this study, we develop a network model of spiking neurons and systematically investigate the conditions, under which the network displays the emergent dynamic behaviors known from the Epileptor, which is a well-investigated abstract model of epileptic neural activity. This approach allows us to study the biophysical parameters and variables leading to epileptiform discharges at cellular and network levels. Our network model is composed of two neuronal populations, characterized by fast excitatory bursting neurons and regular spiking inhibitory neurons, embedded in a common extracellular environment represented by a slow variable. By systematically analyzing the parameter landscape offered by the simulation framework, we reproduce typical sequences of neural activity observed during status epilepticus. We find that exogenous fluctuations from extracellular environment and electro-tonic couplings play a major role in the progression of the seizure, which supports previous studies and further validates our model. We also investigate the influence of chemical synaptic coupling in the generation of spontaneous seizure-like events. Our results argue towards a temporal shift of typical spike waves with fast discharges as synaptic strengths are varied. We demonstrate that spike waves, including interictal spikes, are generated primarily by inhibitory neurons, whereas fast discharges during the wave part are due to excitatory neurons. Simulated traces are compared with in vivo experimental data from rodents at different stages of the disorder. We draw the conclusion that slow

  2. Migrating partial seizures in infancy: a malignant disorder with developmental arrest.

    PubMed

    Coppola, G; Plouin, P; Chiron, C; Robain, O; Dulac, O

    1995-10-01

    Fourteen infants of both sexes had a previously unreported epileptic condition characterized by nearly continuous multifocal seizures. The first seizures occurred at a mean age of 3 months, without antecedent risk factors. At 1 to 10 months, the seizures became very frequent. They were partial with variable clinical expression, and the EEG showed that the discharges randomly involved multiple independent sites, moving from one cortical area to another in consecutive seizures. Although their topography varied, the EEG ictal pattern of each seizure was very similar. It consisted of rhythmic alpha or theta activity which spread to involve an increasing area of the cortical surface. Patients regressed developmentally and became quadriplegic with severe axial hypotonia. Three patients died at age 7 months and at age 7 and 8 years, respectively. Seizures were controlled in only 2 patients, and only 3 children resumed psychomotor development. Extensive investigation failed to determine an etiology, and there was no familial recurrence. Neuropathological examination of the brain in two cases showed only severe hippocampal neuronal loss and accompanying gliosis. PMID:7555952

  3. Abnormal expression and spatiotemporal change of Slit2 in neurons and astrocytes in temporal lobe epileptic foci: A study of epileptic patients and experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Fang, Min; Liu, Guang-Wei; Pan, Yu-Min; Shen, Lan; Li, Cheng-Shan; Xi, Zhi-Qin; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Liang; Chen, Dan; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2010-04-01

    Repellent guidance molecules provide targeting information to outgrowing axons along predetermined pathways during development. These molecules may also play a role in synaptic reorganization in the adult brain and thereby promote epileptogenesis. Our aim was to investigate the expression of Slit2, one of repellent guidance molecules, in temporal lobe epileptic foci from epileptic patients and experimental animals. Thirty-five temporal neocortex tissue samples from patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and fifteen histological normal temporal lobes from controls were selected. Fifty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into six groups, including five groups with epilepsy induced by lithium-pilocarpine administration and one control group. Temporal lobe tissue samples were taken from rats at 1, 7, 14, 30, and 60 days post-seizure and from controls. Expression of Slit2 was assessed by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and Western blot analysis. Slit2 was mainly expressed in neurons in human controls and in both neurons and astrocytes in TLE patients. Slit2 expression was significantly higher in TLE patients as compared with the controls. Slit2-positive cells were mainly neurons in the rat temporal lobe tissues of the control group, the acute period group, and the latent period group, while the Slit2-positive cells were mainly astrocytes in chronic phase. Compared with controls, Slit2 expression in animals in the TLE group gradually decreased from days 1 to 14 post-seizure, but then increased over the levels seen in controls, to peak levels at days 30 and 60. These results suggest that Slit2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of TLE.

  4. [Civil and criminal responsibility of epileptics].

    PubMed

    Villanueva, F

    1997-03-01

    Since the new Penal Code has come into force, certain sections have been altered, such as those dealing with exculpatory circumstances, and as specialists treating patients with possible mental changes, we should be aware that section 20 now takes the place of the former section 8. The situation of the epileptic with regard to civil and criminal responsibility, has hardly changed. This is not surprising in view of current clinico-therapeutic knowledge. Epileptic patients are legally able to testify, inherit etc. and also have the obligation to compensate for damage they have caused. An attempt is made to define the immunity from prosecution of epileptics in accordance with non-static criteria, and to use a mixed biological-mental formula, which would make it possible to discover whether there was an alteration or anomaly of mental state at the time of the criminal offence, which would mean that the patient was unable to understand the unlawfulness of his action, or to act in accordance with such understanding. The deed itself is considered, without labelling illnesses or persons, seeking a simple definition of immunity from prosecution. The epileptic is immune from prosecution during a full attack, whilst during the rest of the time each case has to be decided individually. We emphasize the necessity of 'declassifying' epilepsy as a typical endogenous psychosis, which puts these patients into the group of the insane, although this term is no longer included in the new legal code.

  5. Referral of epileptic patients in North East Coast of West Malaysia an area with poor MRI coverage: an analysis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Y; Alias, N N; Shuaib, I L; Tharakan, J; Abdullah, J; Munawir, A H; Naing, N N

    2006-11-01

    Advances in neuroimaging techniques, particularly Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), have proved invaluable in detecting structural brain lesions in patients with epilepsy in developed countries. In Malaysia, a few electroencephalography facilities available in rural district hospitals run by trained physician assistants have Internet connections to a government neurological center in Kuala Lumpur. These facilities are more commonly available than MRI machines, which require radiological expertise and helium replacement, which may problematic in Southeast Asian countries where radiologists are found in mainly big cities or towns. We conducted a cross-sectional study over a two year period begining January 2001 on rural patients, correlating EEG reports and MRI images with a clinical diagnosis of epilepsy to set guidelines for which rural patients need to be referred to a hospital with MRI facilities. The patients referred by different hospitals without neurological services were classified as having generalized, partial or unclassified seizures based on the International Classification of Epileptic Seizures proposed by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). The clinical parameters studied were seizure type, seizure frequency, status epilepticus and duration of seizure. EEG reports were reviewed for localized and generalized abnormalities and epileptiform changes. Statistical analysis was performed using logistic regression and area under the curve. The association between clinical and radiological abnormalities was evaluated for sensitivity and specificity. Twenty-six males and 18 females were evaluated. The mean age was 20.7 +/- 13.3 years. Nineteen (43.2%) had generalized seizures, 22 (50.0%) had partial seizures and 3 (6.8%) presented with unclassified seizures. The EEG was abnormal in 30 patients (20 with generalized abnormalities and 10 localized abnormalities). The MRI was abnormal in 17 patients (38.6%); the abnormalities observed were cerebral

  6. The effect of some immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory drugs on Li-pilocarpine-induced epileptic disorders in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Borham, Layla E; Mahfoz, Amal M; Ibrahim, Ibrahim A A; Shahzad, Naiyer; ALrefai, Abeer Ahmed; Labib, Amira A; Bin Sef, Bassam; Alshareef, Abdulrahmman; Khan, Meshal; Milibary, Ali; Al Ghamdi, Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Evidence shows that inflammatory and immune processes within the brain might account for the pathophysiology of epilepsy. Therefore, developing new antiepileptic drugs that can modulate seizures through mechanisms other than traditional drugs is required for the treatment of refractory epilepsy. This study aims to determine the relationship between brain inflammation and epilepsy, to examine the contribution of some biochemical parameters involved in brain inflammation, and to address the effect of pharmacological interventions using some anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory drugs in an experimental epilepsy model. Adult male rats were divided into seven groups of 20. G1 was the normal, non-treated control. G2 was the epileptic, non-treated group. G3-G7 were treated with celecoxib, methotrexate, azathioprine, dexamethasone, and valproate, respectively, for a period of three weeks. Induction of status epilepticus (SE) by Li-pilocarpine was performed on groups G2-G7. EEG tracing was conducted, and inflammatory mediators (brain and serum IL-1ß, IL 6, PGE2, HSP70, TGF-β2, and IFNγ) were measured. The induction of SE increased the amplitude and frequency of EEG tracing and inflammatory mediators more than in the normal control group. Treatments of epileptic rats reduced the frequency and amplitude of EEG tracing and significantly decreased the levels of inflammatory mediators in some treated rats compared to G2. These findings demonstrate that some anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory drugs can lower the frequency and amplitude of seizures and reduce some inflammatory mediators in epilepsy treatments, strengthening the possibility that targeting these immunological and inflammatory pathways may represent another effective therapeutic approach to preventing epileptic seizures.

  7. The effective connectivity of the seizure onset zone and ictal perfusion changes in amygdala kindled rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Cleeren, Evy; Premereur, Elsie; Casteels, Cindy; Goffin, Karolien; Janssen, Peter; Van Paesschen, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are network-level phenomena. Hence, epilepsy may be regarded as a circuit-level disorder that cannot be understood outside this context. Better insight into the effective connectivity of the seizure onset zone and the manner in which seizure activity spreads could lead to specifically-tailored therapies for epilepsy. We applied the el