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Sample records for acid-induced seizure activity

  1. Chronic activity wheel running reduces the severity of kainic acid-induced seizures in the rat: possible role of galanin.

    PubMed

    Reiss, J I; Dishman, R K; Boyd, H E; Robinson, J K; Holmes, P V

    2009-04-17

    Studies in both humans and rodents suggest that exercise can be neuroprotective, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are still poorly understood. Three weeks of voluntary, physical activity in rats upregulates prepro-galanin messenger RNA levels in the locus coeruleus. Galanin is a neuropeptide extensively coexisting with norepinephrine that decreases neuronal hyperexcitability both in vivo and in vitro. Thus, exercise may diminish neural hyperexcitability through a galaninergic mechanism. The current experiments tested whether voluntary activity wheel running would protect against kainic acid-evoked seizures and whether galaninergic signaling is a necessary factor in this protection. In experiment 1, rats were given access to running wheels or remained sedentary for three weeks. After this period, rats received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 0, 7, 10 or 14 mg/kg kainic acid. Exercise decreased the severity of or eliminated seizure behaviors and hippocampal c-fos expression induced by kainic acid. In experiment 2, exercising or sedentary rats were injected intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) with 0.2 or 0.4 microg of kainic acid following either an injection of M-40 (a galanin receptor antagonist) or saline. Exercise decreased kainic acid-induced seizures at the 0.2 microg dose, and M-40 (6 nmol) decreased this effect. In contrast, there were no detectable differences between exercising and sedentary rats in behavior at the 0.4 microg dose. The results suggest that the protective effects of exercise against seizures are at least partially mediated by regulation of neural excitability through a process involving galanin.

  2. CA3 Synaptic Silencing Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Seizures and Hippocampal Network Oscillations123

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lily M. Y.; Wintzer, Marie E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Epilepsy is a neurological disorder defined by the presence of seizure activity, manifest both behaviorally and as abnormal activity in neuronal networks. An established model to study the disorder in rodents is the systemic injection of kainic acid, an excitatory neurotoxin that at low doses quickly induces behavioral and electrophysiological seizures. Although the CA3 region of the hippocampus has been suggested to be crucial for kainic acid-induced seizure, because of its strong expression of kainate glutamate receptors and its high degree of recurrent connectivity, the precise role of excitatory transmission in CA3 in the generation of seizure and the accompanying increase in neuronal oscillations remains largely untested. Here we use transgenic mice in which CA3 pyramidal cell synaptic transmission can be inducibly silenced in the adult to demonstrate CA3 excitatory output is required for both the generation of epileptiform oscillatory activity and the progression of behavioral seizures. PMID:27022627

  3. Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Activity Regulates Brain Expression of P-Glycoprotein in the Kainic Acid-Induced Seizure Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nian; Di, Qing; Liu, Hao; Hu, Yong; Jiang, Ying; Yan, Yu-kui; Zhang, Yan-fang; Zhang, Ying-dong

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of NF-κB activity on the seizure susceptibility, brain damage, and P-gp expression in kainic acid- (KA-) induced seizure rats. Male SD rats were divided into saline control group (NS group), KA induced epilepsy group (EP group), and epilepsy group intervened with NF-κB inhibitor-pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate salt (PDTC group) or with dexamethasone (DEX group). No seizures were observed in the rats of NS group. Compared with NS group, increased P-gp expression and NF-κB activation in the rat brain of the EP group were observed after KA micro-injection. Both PDTC and DEX pre-treatment significantly increased the latency to grade III or V seizure onset compared to EP group but failed to show neuron-protective effect as the number of survival neurons didn't significantly differ from that in EP group. Furthermore, PDTC pre-treatment significantly decreased P-gp expression along with NF-κB activation in the hippocampus CA3 area and amygdala complex of rats compared with the EP group, implying that NF-κB activation involved in the seizure susceptibility and seizure induced brain P-gp over-expression. Additionally, DEX pre-treatment only decreased P-gp expression level without inhibition of NF-κB activation, suggesting NF-κB independent pathway may also participate in regulating seizure induced P-gp over-expression. PMID:21403895

  4. Protective effect of hispidulin on kainic acid-induced seizures and neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Su Jane; Huang, Shu Kuei

    2015-05-15

    Hispidulin is a flavonoid compound which is an active ingredient in a number of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs, and it has been reported to inhibit glutamate release. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hispidulin protects against seizures induced by kainic acid, a glutamate analog with excitotoxic properties. The results indicated that intraperitoneally administering hispidulin (10 or 50mg/kg) to rats 30 min before intraperitoneally injecting kainic acid (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and decreased seizure score. In addition, hispidulin substantially attenuated kainic acid-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the suppression of microglial activation and the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, hispidulin reduced kainic acid-induced c-Fos expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the hippocampus. These data suggest that hispidulin has considerable antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and antiinflammatory effects on kainic acid-induced seizures in rats.

  5. Three-dimensional optical tomographic brain imaging during kainic-acid-induced seizures in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluestone, Avraham Y.; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Hielscher, Andreas H.; Stewart, Mark

    2005-04-01

    In this study, we explored the potential of diffuse optical tomography for brain oximetry and describe our efforts towards imaging hemodynamic changes in rat brains during kainic-acid (KA) induced seizures. Using electrophysiological techniques we first showed that KA induces a pronounced transient hypotension in urethane anesthetized rats that is coincident with seizure activity beginning in ventral and spreading to dorsal hippocampus. We observed sustained increases in vagus and sympathetic activity during generalized limbic seizure activity, which alters blood pressure regulation and heart rhythms. Subsequently, we used optical tomographic methods to study KA induced seizures in anesthetized animals to better define the hemodynamic cerebral vascular response. We observed a lateralized increase in deoxyhemoglobin after KA injection at the time when the blood pressure (BP) was decreased. By contrast, injection of phenylephrine produced a symmetric global increase in total hemoglobin. These findings indicate that our instrument is sensitive to the local hemodynamics, both in response to a global increase in blood pressure (phenylephrine injection) and a lateralized decrease in oxyhemoglobin produced by an asymmetric response to KA; a response that may be critically important for severe autonomic nervous system alterations during seizures. The results of this study provide the impetus for combining complimentary modalities, imaging and electrophysiological, to ultimately gain a better understanding of the underlying physiology of seizure activity in the rat.

  6. Enhanced seizures and hippocampal neurodegeneration following kainic acid-induced seizures in metallothionein-I + II-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, J; Penkowa, M; Hadberg, H; Molinero, A; Hidalgo, J

    2000-07-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are major zinc binding proteins in the CNS that could be involved in the control of zinc metabolism as well as in protection against oxidative stress. Mice lacking MT-I and MT-II (MT-I + II deficient) because of targeted gene inactivation were injected with kainic acid (KA), a potent convulsive agent, to examine the neurobiological importance of these MT isoforms. At 35 mg/kg KA, MT-I + II deficient male mice showed a higher number of convulsions and a longer convulsion time than control mice. Three days later, KA-injected mice showed gliosis and neuronal injury in the hippocampus. MT-I + II deficiency decreased both astrogliosis and microgliosis and potentiated neuronal injury and apoptosis as shown by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated in situ end labelling (TUNEL), detection of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) and by increased interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme (ICE) and caspase-3 levels. Histochemically reactive zinc in the hippocampus was increased by KA to a greater extent in MT-I + II-deficient compared with control mice. KA-induced seizures also caused increased oxidative stress, as suggested by the malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein tyrosine nitration (NITT) levels and by the expression of MT-I + II, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), and Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD). MT-I + II deficiency potentiated the oxidative stress caused by KA. Both KA and MT-I + II deficiency significantly affected the expression of MT-III, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and its receptor (GM-CSFr). The present results indicate MT-I + II as important for neuron survival during KA-induced seizures, and suggest that both impaired zinc regulation and compromised antioxidant activity contribute to the observed neuropathology of the MT-I + II-deficient mice.

  7. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... because of sudden, abnormal electrical activity in the brain. When people think of seizures, they often think of convulsions in which a person's body shakes rapidly and uncontrollably. Not all seizures ... part of the brain. Generalized seizures are a result of abnormal activity ...

  8. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein haplodeficiency attenuates seizure severity and NF-κB-mediated neuroinflammation in kainic acid-induced seizures

    PubMed Central

    Shin, H J; Kim, H; Heo, R W; Kim, H J; Choi, W S; Kwon, H M; Roh, G S

    2014-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures followed by neuronal death are associated with neuroinflammation and blood–brain barrier (BBB) leakage. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is known as a transcriptional factor activating osmoprotective genes, and in brain, it is expressed in neuronal nuclei. Thus dysregulation of TonEBP may be involved in the pathology of KA-induced seizures. Here we used TonEBP heterozygote (+/−) mice to study the roles of TonEBP. Electroencephalographic study showed that TonEBP (+/−) mice reduced seizure frequency and severity compared with wild type during KA-induced status epilepticus. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting analysis showed that KA-induced neuroinflammation and BBB leakage were dramatically reduced in TonEBP (+/−) mice. Similarly, TonEBP-specific siRNA reduced glutamate-induced death in HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells. TonEBP haplodeficiency prevented KA-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and attenuated inflammation. Our findings identify TonEBP as a critical regulator of neuroinflammation and BBB leakage in KA-induced seizures, which suggests TonEBP as a good therapeutic target. PMID:24608792

  9. Ionic changes during experimentally induced seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Lux, H D; Heinemann, U

    1978-01-01

    Changes in intra- and extracellular ionic activity and their relation to generation and termination of seizure phenomena can be studied with the help of ion-selective microelectrodes. Transient changes in extracellular potassium activity (aK) of the cortex regularly accompany paroxysmal activity induced by electrical stimulation and pentylenetetrazol injections or occur within active penicillin and aluminum foci. A rise of aK from baseline levels of about 3 mmoles/l up to ceiling levels of 8--12 mmoles/l, followed by subnormal K activity, is typically found during seizure discharge. Extracellular K accumulation during seizures facilitates the spread into extrafocal regions. Ceiling levels of extracellular aK are characterized by pronounced K reabsorption which is probably a limiting mechanism for the rise in extracellular aK. It may be a consequence of a simultaneous rise in intracellular Na activity that an electrogenic Na--K exchange process is involved in the termination of ictal activity. Seizures are also accompanied by significant reductions in extracellular Ca2+ activity (aCa) to as low as 0.7 mmoles/l (resting aCa 1.25 mmoles/l). There is no critical level of lowered aCa at which a seizure ultimately results. However, unlike changes in aK reductions in aCa can precede ictal activity. Thus, a fall of aCa occurs before the onset of paroxysmal periods during cyclical spike driving in a penicillin focus and before seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol. Ca2+-dependent mechanisms may contribute to seizure generation. In addition to changes in aK and aCa, intracellular chloride activity (aCl) can increase during seizure activity, as a result of an impaired chloride extrusion mechanism, which would lead to a reduced efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission and, therefore, to facilitation of seizure generation.

  10. Continuous administration of antisense oligonucleotides to c-fos reduced the development of seizure susceptibility after ethacrynic acid-induced seizure in mice.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Junko; Omori, Kyoko; Yang, Li; Inagaki, Chiyoko

    2003-09-25

    We previously demonstrated that seizure susceptibility developed by the 14th day post-ethacrynic acid (EA)-induced seizure in mice, with a prolonged increase in the expression of c-fos mRNA in the brain during days 10-14. To examine whether such c-fos increase contributes to the development of seizure susceptibility, we administered antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to c-fos by continuous infusion into the lateral ventricle of mice that had shown a moderate stage of EA seizure, and evaluated the seizure susceptibility to kainic acid (10 mg/kg) on the 14th day. Antisense-infused mice displayed significant reduction of the c-Fos level in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex on the 7th and 14th days, and a significant decrease in seizure severity. These findings suggest that the prolonged increase in c-fos expression after EA seizure may lead to the development of seizure susceptibility.

  11. Parvalbumin interneurons and calretinin fibers arising from the thalamic nucleus reuniens degenerate in the subiculum after kainic acid-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Drexel, M; Preidt, A P; Kirchmair, E; Sperk, G

    2011-08-25

    The subiculum is the major output area of the hippocampus. It is closely interconnected with the entorhinal cortex and other parahippocampal areas. In animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in TLE patients it exerts increased network excitability and may crucially contribute to the propagation of limbic seizures. Using immunohistochemistry and in situ-hybridization we now investigated neuropathological changes affecting parvalbumin and calretinin containing neurons in the subiculum and other parahippocampal areas after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. We observed prominent losses in parvalbumin containing interneurons in the subiculum and entorhinal cortex, and in the principal cell layers of the pre- and parasubiculum. Degeneration of parvalbumin-positive neurons was associated with significant precipitation of parvalbumin-immunoreactive debris 24 h after kainic acid injection. In the subiculum the superficial portion of the pyramidal cell layer was more severely affected than its deep part. In the entorhinal cortex, the deep layers were more severely affected than the superficial ones. The decrease in number of parvalbumin-positive neurons in the subiculum and entorhinal cortex correlated with the number of spontaneous seizures subsequently experienced by the rats. The loss of parvalbumin neurons thus may contribute to the development of spontaneous seizures. On the other hand, surviving parvalbumin neurons revealed markedly increased expression of parvalbumin mRNA notably in the pyramidal cell layer of the subiculum and in all layers of the entorhinal cortex. This indicates increased activity of these neurons aiming to compensate for the partial loss of this functionally important neuron population. Furthermore, calretinin-positive fibers terminating in the molecular layer of the subiculum, in sector CA1 of the hippocampus proper and in the entorhinal cortex degenerated together with their presumed perikarya in the thalamic nucleus reuniens. In

  12. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Seizures KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Seizures Print A A A en español Folleto de instructiones: Convulsiones (Seizures) Although seizures can be frightening, many last only ...

  13. Domoic acid-induced seizures in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) are associated with neuroinflammatory brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kirkley, Kelly S; Madl, James E; Duncan, Colleen; Gulland, Frances M; Tjalkens, Ronald B

    2014-11-01

    California sea lions (CSLs) exposed to the marine biotoxin domoic acid (DA) develop an acute or chronic toxicosis marked by seizures and act as sentinels of the disease. Experimental evidence suggests that oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are important mechanisms underlying the seizurogenic potential of environmental toxicants but these pathways are relatively unstudied in CSLs. In the current study, we investigated the role of glutamate-glutamine changes and gliosis in DA-exposed CSLs to better understand the neurotoxic mechanisms occurring during DA toxicity. Sections from archived hippocampi from control and CSLs diagnosed with DA toxicosis were immunofluorescently stained for markers of gliosis, oxidative/nitrative stress and changes in glutamine synthetase (GS). Quantitative assessment revealed increasing loss of microtubule associated protein-2 positive neurons with elevations in 4-hydroxynonenal correlating with chronicity of exposure, whereas the pattern of activated glia expressing nitric oxide synthase 2 and tumor necrosis factor followed pathological severity. There was no significant change in the amount of GS positive cells but there was increased 3-nitrotyrosine in GS expressing cells and in neurons, particularly in animals with chronic DA toxicosis. These changes were consistently seen in the dentate gyrus and in the cornu ammonis (CA) sectors CA3, CA4, and CA1. The results of this study indicate that gliosis and resultant changes in GS are likely important mechanisms in DA-induced seizure that need to be further explored as potential therapies in treating exposed wildlife.

  14. Protective effects of bupivacaine against kainic acid-induced seizure and neuronal cell death in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kuan Ming; Wu, Chia Chan; Wang, Ming Jiuh; Lee, Ming Yi; Wang, Su Jane

    2015-01-01

    The excessive release of glutamate is a critical element in the neuropathology of epilepsy, and bupivacaine, a local anesthetic agent, has been shown to inhibit the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals. This study investigated whether bupivacaine produces antiseizure and antiexcitotoxic effects using a kainic acid (KA) rat model, an animal model used for temporal lobe epilepsy, and excitotoxic neurodegeneration experiments. The results showed that administering bupivacaine (0.4 mg/kg or 2 mg/kg) intraperitoneally to rats 30 min before intraperitoneal injection of KA (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and reduced the seizure score. In addition, bupivacaine attenuated KA-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the inhibition of microglial activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, bupivacaine shortened the latency of escaping onto the platform in the Morris water maze learning performance test. Collectively, these data suggest that bupivacaine has therapeutic potential for treating epilepsy.

  15. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... often with a loss of or change in consciousness. Seizures can be frightening, but most last only ... unusual sensations, uncontrollable muscle spasms, and loss of consciousness. Some seizures may be due to another medical ...

  16. Glia activation and cytokine increase in rat hippocampus by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Massimo; Perego, Carlo; Aliprandi, Marisa; Richichi, Cristina; Ravizza, Teresa; Colella, Daniele; Velískŏvá, Jana; Moshé, Solomon L; De Simoni, M Grazia; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2003-12-01

    In adult rats, status epilepticus (SE) induces cytokine production by glia especially when seizures are associated with neuronal injury. This suggests that cytokines may play a role in seizure-induced neuronal damage. As SE-induced injury is age-specific, we used rats of different ages (with distinct susceptibilities to seizure-induced neuronal injury) to elucidate the role of cytokines in this process. Thus, we investigated the activation of microglia and astrocytes, induction of cytokines, and hippocampal neuronal injury 4 and 24 h following kainic acid-induced SE in postnatal day (PN) 9, 15, and 21 rats. At PN9, there was little activation of microglia and astrocytes at any time point studied. Interleukin-1beta (IL), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and IL-6 or the naturally occurring IL-1 receptor antagonist (Ra) mRNA expression did not increase. No evidence of cell injury has been detected. At PN15, immunostaining of microglia and astrocytes was enhanced, but only IL-1beta mRNA expression was increased. These changes were observed 4 h after SE. Scattered injured neurons in CA3 and subiculum, but not in any other region, were present 24 h following SE. At PN21, immunostaining of microglia and astrocytes and the mRNA expression of all cytokines studied was significantly increased already 4 h after SE. At 24 h, many injured neurons were present in CA1 and CA3 regions and in 40% of rats in other forebrain areas. These data show that (i) the pattern of glia activation and cytokine gene transcription induced by SE is age-dependent and (ii) neuronal injury in the hippocampus occurs only when cytokines are induced and their synthesis precedes the appearance of neuronal damage. Thus, cytokine expression in immature brain is associated specifically with cell injury rather than with seizures per se, suggesting that proinflammatory cytokines may contribute to the occurence of SE-induced hippocampal damage.

  17. Intracerebroventricular administration of inosine is anticonvulsant against quinolinic acid-induced seizures in mice: an effect independent of benzodiazepine and adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Ganzella, Marcelo; Faraco, Rafael Berger; Almeida, Roberto Farina; Fernandes, Vinícius Fornari; Souza, Diogo Onofre

    2011-12-01

    Inosine (INO) has an anticonvulsant effect against seizures induced by antagonists of GABAergic system. Quinolinic acid (QA) is an agonist NMDA receptors implicated in the neurobiology of seizures. In the present study, we investigated the anticonvulsant effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) INO administration against QA-induced seizures in adult mice. We also investigated whether the benzodiazepines (BZ) or adenosine (ADO) receptors were involved in the INO effects. Animals were pretreated with an i.c.v. injection of either vehicle or INO before an i.c.v. administration of 4 μl QA (36.8 nmol). All animals pretreated with vehicle followed by QA presented seizures. INO protected against QA-induced seizures in a time and dose dependent manner (up to 60% at 400 nmol, 5 min before QA injection). Diazepam (DZ) and ADO (i.c.v.) also exhibited anticonvulsant effect against QA induced seizures. Additionally, i.p. administration of either flumazenil, a BZ receptor antagonist, or caffeine, an ADO receptor antagonist, did not change the anticonvulsant potency of INO i.c.v. injection, but completely abolished the DZ and ADO anticonvulsant effects, respectively. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that INO exert anticonvulsant effect against hyperactivity of the glutamatergic system independently of BZ or ADO receptors activation.

  18. Treatment of partial seizures and seizure-like activity with felbamate in six dogs.

    PubMed

    Ruehlmann, D; Podell, M; March, P

    2001-08-01

    Six dogs with partial seizures or partial seizure-like activity were treated with the antiepileptic drug felbamate between 1993 and 1998. All dogs had a history and results of diagnostic testing suggestive of either primary (idiopathic) or occult secondary epilepsy. Dogs ranged between four months and eight years of age at the onset of seizure activity. The median time period between onset of the first seizure and the start of felbamate therapy was 3.8 months (range 0.75 to 36 months). Median duration of therapy was nine months (range two to 22 months). All dogs experienced a reduction in seizure frequency after felbamate administration. Median total number of seizures post-treatment was two (range 0 to 9). Two dogs had an immediate and prolonged cessation of seizure activity. Steady-state trough serum felbamate concentrations measured at two weeks, and one, 12 and 22 months after the commencement of therapy in four dogs ranged between 13 and 55 mg/litre (median 35 mg/litre). Reversible haematological adverse effects were detected in two dogs, with one dog developing concurrent keratoconjunctivitis sicca. These results suggest that felbamate can be an effective antiepileptic drug without life-threatening complications when used as monotherapy for partial seizures in the dog.

  19. Increase in α-tubulin modifications in the neuronal processes of hippocampal neurons in both kainic acid-induced epileptic seizure and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Hang Thi; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Hashizume, Yoshio; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Ikegami, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegeneration includes acute changes and slow-developing alterations, both of which partly involve common cellular machinery. During neurodegeneration, neuronal processes are impaired along with dysregulated post-translational modifications (PTMs) of cytoskeletal proteins. In neuronal processes, tubulin undergoes unique PTMs including a branched form of modification called glutamylation and loss of the C-terminal tyrosine residue and the penultimate glutamic acid residue forming Δ2-tubulin. Here, we investigated the state of two PTMs, glutamylation and Δ2 form, in both acute and slow-developing neurodegenerations, using a newly generated monoclonal antibody, DTE41, which had 2-fold higher affinity to glutamylated Δ2-tubulin, than to unmodified Δ2-tubulin. DTE41 recognised glutamylated Δ2-tubulin preferentially in immunostaining than in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting. In normal mouse brain, DTE41 stained molecular layer of the cerebellum as well as synapse-rich regions in pyramidal neurons of the cerebral cortex. In kainic acid-induced epileptic seizure, DTE41-labelled signals were increased in the hippocampal CA3 region, especially in the stratum lucidum. In the hippocampi of post-mortem patients with Alzheimer’s disease, intensities of DTE41 staining were increased in mossy fibres in the CA3 region as well as in apical dendrites of the pyramidal neurons. Our findings indicate that glutamylation on Δ2-tubulin is increased in both acute and slow-developing neurodegeneration. PMID:28067280

  20. Depressed phosphatidic acid-induced contractile activity of failing cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tappia, Paramjit S; Maddaford, Thane G; Hurtado, Cecilia; Panagia, Vincenzo; Pierce, Grant N

    2003-01-10

    The effects of phosphatidic acid (PA), a known inotropic agent, on Ca(2+) transients and contractile activity of cardiomyocytes in congestive heart failure (CHF) due to myocardial infarction were examined. In control cells, PA induced a significant increase (25%) in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. The phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, 2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl N,N-diphenylcarbonate, blocked the positive inotropic action induced by PA, indicating that PA induces an increase in contractile activity and Ca(2+) transients through stimulation of PLC. Conversely, in failing cardiomyocytes there was a loss of PA-induced increase in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. PA did not alter resting cell length. Both diastolic and systolic [Ca(2+)] were significantly elevated in the failing cardiomyocytes. In vitro assessment of the cardiac sarcolemmal (SL) PLC activity revealed that the impaired failing cardiomyocyte response to PA was associated with a diminished stimulation of SL PLC activity by PA. Our results identify an important defect in the PA-PLC signaling pathway in failing cardiomyocytes, which may have significant implications for the depressed contractile function during CHF.

  1. Seizure facilitating activity of the oral contraceptive ethinyl estradiol.

    PubMed

    Younus, Iyan; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2016-03-01

    Contraceptive management is critical in women with epilepsy. Although oral contraceptives (OCs) are widely used by many women with epilepsy, little is known about their impact on epileptic seizures and epileptogenesis. Ethinyl estradiol (EE) is the primary component of OC pills. In this study, we investigated the pharmacological effect of EE on epileptogenesis and kindled seizures in female mice using the hippocampus kindling model. Animals were stimulated daily with or without EE until generalized stage 5 seizures were elicited. EE treatment significantly accelerated the rate of epileptogenesis. In acute studies, EE caused a significant decrease in the afterdischarge threshold and increased the incidence and severity of seizures in fully-kindled mice. In chronic studies, EE treatment caused a greater susceptibility to kindled seizures. Collectively, these results are consistent with moderate proconvulsant-like activity of EE. Such excitatory effects may affect seizure risk in women with epilepsy taking OC pills.

  2. Reduction of pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure activity in awake rats by seizure-triggered trigeminal nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fanselow, E E; Reid, A P; Nicolelis, M A

    2000-11-01

    Stimulation of the vagus nerve has become an effective method for desynchronizing the highly coherent neural activity typically associated with epileptic seizures. This technique has been used in several animal models of seizures as well as in humans suffering from epilepsy. However, application of this technique has been limited to unilateral stimulation of the vagus nerve, typically delivered according to a fixed duty cycle, independently of whether ongoing seizure activity is present. Here, we report that stimulation of another cranial nerve, the trigeminal nerve, can also cause cortical and thalamic desynchronization, resulting in a reduction of seizure activity in awake rats. Furthermore, we demonstrate that providing this stimulation only when seizure activity begins results in more effective and safer seizure reduction per second of stimulation than with previous methods. Seizure activity induced by intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazole was recorded from microwire electrodes in the thalamus and cortex of awake rats while the infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve was stimulated via a chronically implanted nerve cuff electrode. Continuous unilateral stimulation of the trigeminal nerve reduced electrographic seizure activity by up to 78%, and bilateral trigeminal stimulation was even more effective. Using a device that automatically detects seizure activity in real time on the basis of multichannel field potential signals, we demonstrated that seizure-triggered stimulation was more effective than the stimulation protocol involving a fixed duty cycle, in terms of the percent seizure reduction per second of stimulation. In contrast to vagus nerve stimulation studies, no substantial cardiovascular side effects were observed by unilateral or bilateral stimulation of the trigeminal nerve. These findings suggest that trigeminal nerve stimulation is safe in awake rats and should be evaluated as a therapy for human seizures. Furthermore, the results

  3. Nicotine Elicits Convulsive Seizures by Activating Amygdalar Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Iha, Higor A.; Kunisawa, Naofumi; Shimizu, Saki; Tokudome, Kentaro; Mukai, Takahiro; Kinboshi, Masato; Ikeda, Akio; Ito, Hidefumi; Serikawa, Tadao; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of epileptic disorders; however, the mechanisms of nACh receptors in seizure generation remain unknown. Here, we performed behavioral and immunohistochemical studies in mice and rats to clarify the mechanisms underlying nicotine-induced seizures. Treatment of animals with nicotine (1–4 mg/kg, i.p.) produced motor excitement in a dose-dependent manner and elicited convulsive seizures at 3 and 4 mg/kg. The nicotine-induced seizures were abolished by a subtype non-selective nACh antagonist, mecamylamine (MEC). An α7 nACh antagonist, methyllycaconitine, also significantly inhibited nicotine-induced seizures whereas an α4β2 nACh antagonist, dihydro-β-erythroidine, affected only weakly. Topographical analysis of Fos protein expression, a biological marker of neural excitation, revealed that a convulsive dose (4 mg/kg) of nicotine region-specifically activated neurons in the piriform cortex, amygdala, medial habenula, paratenial thalamus, anterior hypothalamus and solitary nucleus among 48 brain regions examined, and this was also suppressed by MEC. In addition, electric lesioning of the amygdala, but not the piriform cortex, medial habenula and thalamus, specifically inhibited nicotine-induced seizures. Furthermore, microinjection of nicotine (100 and 300 μg/side) into the amygdala elicited convulsive seizures in a dose-related manner. The present results suggest that nicotine elicits convulsive seizures by activating amygdalar neurons mainly via α7 nACh receptors. PMID:28232801

  4. Vagus nerve stimulation magnet activation for seizures: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R S; Eggleston, K S; Wright, C W

    2015-01-01

    Some patients receiving VNS Therapy report benefit from manually activating the generator with a handheld magnet at the time of a seizure. A review of 20 studies comprising 859 subjects identified patients who reported on-demand magnet mode stimulation to be beneficial. Benefit was reported in a weighted average of 45% of patients (range 0-89%) using the magnet, with seizure cessation claimed in a weighted average of 28% (range 15-67%). In addition to seizure termination, patients sometimes reported decreased intensity or duration of seizures or the post-ictal period. One study reported an isolated instance of worsening with magnet stimulation (Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med, 157, 2003 and 560). All of the reviewed studies assessed adjunctive magnet use. No studies were designed to provide Level I evidence of efficacy of magnet-induced stimulation. Retrospective analysis of one pivotal randomized trial of VNS therapy showed significantly more seizures terminated or improved in the active stimulation group vs the control group. Prospective, controlled studies would be required to isolate the effect and benefit of magnet mode stimulation and to document that the magnet-induced stimulation is the proximate cause of seizure reduction. Manual application of the magnet to initiate stimulation is not always practical because many patients are immobilized or unaware of their seizures, asleep or not in reach of the magnet. Algorithms based on changes in heart rate at or near the onset of the seizure provide a methodology for automated responsive stimulation. Because literature indicates additional benefits from on-demand magnet mode stimulation, a potential role exists for automatic activation of stimulation.

  5. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the cerebrospinal fluid of dogs with seizures.

    PubMed

    Chai, Orit; Sommer, Adi; Zimmerman, Gabriel; Soreq, Hermona; Friedman, Alon; Bdolah-Abram, Tali; Aroch, Itamar; Shamir, Merav H

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies in animal models have focused on the role of cholinergic elements, mainly acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the 'readthrough' acetylcholinesterase isoform (AChE-R), in seizures. A prospective double-masked study was conducted to assess the activity of AChE and AChE-R in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 26 dogs post-seizure, 28 dogs with intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) and 16 healthy dogs. AChE was also measured in the serum in the post-seizure and IVDD groups. The results showed no significant differences in CSF AChE among the three groups. AChE-R was not detected in any dog and AChE in the serum was similar between groups. This preliminary study provides new information on AChE and AChE-R in the CSF and sera of dogs following naturally-occurring seizures.

  6. Ginkgolic acids induce neuronal death and activate protein phosphatase type-2C.

    PubMed

    Ahlemeyer, B; Selke, D; Schaper, C; Klumpp, S; Krieglstein, J

    2001-10-26

    The standardized extract from Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) is used for the treatment of dementia. Because of allergenic and genotoxic effects, ginkgolic acids are restricted in EGb 761 to 5 ppm. The question arises whether ginkgolic acids also have neurotoxic effects. In the present study, ginkgolic acids caused death of cultured chick embryonic neurons in a concentration-dependent manner, in the presence and in the absence of serum. Ginkgolic acids-induced death showed features of apoptosis as we observed chromatin condensation, shrinkage of the nucleus and reduction of the damage by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, demonstrating an active type of cell death. However, DNA fragmentation detected by the terminal-transferase-mediated ddUTP-digoxigenin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay and caspase-3 activation, which are also considered as hallmarks of apoptosis, were not seen after treatment with 150 microM ginkgolic acids in serum-free medium, a dose which increased the percentage of neurons with chromatin condensation and shrunken nuclei to 88% compared with 25% in serum-deprived, vehicle-treated controls. This suggests that ginkgolic acid-induced death showed signs of apoptosis as well as of necrosis. Ginkgolic acids specifically increased the activity of protein phosphatase type-2C, whereas other protein phosphatases such as protein phosphatases 1A, 2A and 2B, tyrosine phosphatase, and unspecific acid- and alkaline phosphatases were inhibited or remained unchanged, suggesting protein phosphatase 2C to play a role in the neurotoxic effect mediated by ginkgolic acids.

  7. Absence Seizure (Petit Mal Seizure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staff Absence seizures involve brief, sudden lapses of consciousness. They're more common in children than adults. ... have seizures, the brain's usual electrical activity is altered. During an absence seizure, these electrical signals repeat ...

  8. Salicylic acid induces mitochondrial injury by inhibiting ferrochelatase heme biosynthesis activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipul; Liu, Shujie; Ando, Hideki; Ishii, Ryohei; Tateno, Shumpei; Kaneko, Yuki; Yugami, Masato; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Nureki, Osamu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Salicylic acid is a classic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Although salicylic acid also induces mitochondrial injury, the mechanism of its antimitochondrial activity is not well understood. In this study, by using a one-step affinity purification scheme with salicylic acid-immobilized beads, ferrochelatase (FECH), a homodimeric enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis in mitochondria, was identified as a new molecular target of salicylic acid. Moreover, the cocrystal structure of the FECH-salicylic acid complex was determined. Structural and biochemical studies showed that salicylic acid binds to the dimer interface of FECH in two possible orientations and inhibits its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis confirmed that Trp301 and Leu311, hydrophobic amino acid residues located at the dimer interface, are directly involved in salicylic acid binding. On a gel filtration column, salicylic acid caused a shift in the elution profile of FECH, indicating that its conformational change is induced by salicylic acid binding. In cultured human cells, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis, whereas salicylic acid did not exert its inhibitory effect in FECH knockdown cells. Concordantly, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis in zebrafish embryos. Strikingly, the salicylic acid-induced effect in zebrafish was partially rescued by FECH overexpression. Taken together, these findings illustrate that FECH is responsible for salicylic acid-induced inhibition of heme synthesis, which may contribute to its antimitochondrial and anti-inflammatory function. This study establishes a novel aspect of the complex pharmacological effects of salicylic acid.

  9. Optogenetic activation of superior colliculus neurons suppresses seizures originating in diverse brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Soper, Colin; Wicker, Evan; Kulick, Catherine V.; N’Gouemo, Prosper; Forcelli, Patrick A.

    2016-01-01

    Because sites of seizure origin may be unknown or multifocal, identifying targets from which activation can suppress seizures originating in diverse networks is essential. We evaluated the ability of optogenetic activation of the deep/intermediate layers of the superior colliculus (DLSC) to fill this role. Optogenetic activation of DLSC suppressed behavioral and electrographic seizures in the pentylenetetrazole (forebrain+brainstem seizures) and Area Tempestas (forebrain/complex partial seizures) models; this effect was specific to activation of DLSC, and not neighboring structures. DLSC activation likewise attenuated seizures evoked by gamma butyrolactone (thalamocortical/absence seizures), or acoustic stimulation of genetically epilepsy prone rates (brainstem seizures). Anticonvulsant effects were seen with stimulation frequencies as low as 5 Hz. Unlike previous applications of optogenetics for the control of seizures, activation of DLSC exerted broad-spectrum anticonvulsant actions, attenuating seizures originating in diverse and distal brain networks. These data indicate that DLSC is a promising target for optogenetic control of epilepsy. PMID:26721319

  10. The effects of quercetin on the gene expression of the GABAA receptor α5 subunit gene in a mouse model of kainic acid-induced seizure.

    PubMed

    Moghbelinejad, Sahar; Alizadeh, Safar; Mohammadi, Ghazaleh; Khodabandehloo, Fatemeh; Rashvand, Zahra; Najafipour, Reza; Nassiri-Asl, Marjan

    2017-03-01

    The flavonoid quercetin has recently been reported to have neuroprotective effects, and the role of the gamma-aminobutyric acid A alpha 5 subunit (GABAA α5) receptor has been determined in some nervous system disorders. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular mechanism of the effect of quercetin administered at anticonvulsive doses on the expression of the GABAA α5 receptor gene in kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures in mice. The experimental animals were divided into four groups: control, KA, and KA + quercetin at 50 or 100 mg/kg, respectively. The results showed a dose-dependent reduction in the behavioral seizure score with quercetin pre-treatment in the KA mouse model. Two hours after the end of the 7-day treatment regimen, expression of the GABAA α5 receptor gene in the hippocampus was found to be increased in the KA group, but this increase was reduced in the KA + quercetin 50 or 100 mg/kg treatment groups. These results suggest that expression of the GABAA α5 receptor could be a mechanism for reducing seizure severity or may be a marker of seizure severity. Further studies are necessary to clarify quercetin's mechanism of action and the relation of GABAA α5 receptor gene expression to seizure severity.

  11. Asynchronous electrical activity in epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Katherine; Lim, Eugene; Gliske, Stephen; Stacey, William; Fink, Christian

    High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) have been postulated to be potential biomarkers for focal epileptic seizures, with fast ripples (>250 Hz) as the most interesting candidate. The mechanisms underlying the generation of fast ripples, however, are not well understood. In this study, we draw upon results from previous computational studies on HFOs to develop a new mathematical model from first principles describing the generation of HFOs through asynchronous neuronal firing. Asynchrony in the model is obtained with the introduction of two parameters of heterogeneity: variability in the inter-spike interval (ISI) and jitter. The model predicts the generation of harmonic narrow-band oscillations if the heterogeneity-governing parameters do not differ from the predefined ISI by more than 20%. Comparisons against results from a separately constructed computational model verify the accuracy of the model in study. These results provide us with a rigorous framework in which we may investigate the mechanisms driving the generation of abnormal HFOs, and may serve as groundwork for future research in epileptogenesis. Nsf Grant 1003992, Ohio Wesleyan University SSRP.

  12. Long-Term Intake of Uncaria rhynchophylla Reduces S100B and RAGE Protein Levels in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Nou-Ying; Ho, Tin-Yun; Chen, Chao-Hsiang

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are crucial clinical manifestations of recurrent neuronal discharges in the brain. An imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory neuronal discharges causes brain damage and cell loss. Herbal medicines offer alternative treatment options for epilepsy because of their low cost and few side effects. We established a rat epilepsy model by injecting kainic acid (KA, 12 mg/kg, i.p.) and subsequently investigated the effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR) and its underlying mechanisms. Electroencephalogram and epileptic behaviors revealed that the KA injection induced epileptic seizures. Following KA injection, S100B levels increased in the hippocampus. This phenomenon was attenuated by the oral administration of UR and valproic acid (VA, 250 mg/kg). Both drugs significantly reversed receptor potentiation for advanced glycation end product proteins. Rats with KA-induced epilepsy exhibited no increase in the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor 3, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and chemokine receptor type 2, which play a role in inflammation. Our results provide novel and detailed mechanisms, explaining the role of UR in KA-induced epileptic seizures in hippocampal CA1 neurons. PMID:28386293

  13. Epilepsy-associated gene Nedd4-2 mediates neuronal activity and seizure susceptibility through AMPA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiuhe; Lee, Kwan Young; Man, Heng-Ye; Chung, Hee Jung

    2017-01-01

    The neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated gene 4–2, Nedd4-2, is an epilepsy-associated gene with at least three missense mutations identified in epileptic patients. Nedd4-2 encodes a ubiquitin E3 ligase that has high affinity toward binding and ubiquitinating membrane proteins. It is currently unknown how Nedd4-2 mediates neuronal circuit activity and how its dysfunction leads to seizures or epilepsies. In this study, we provide evidence to show that Nedd4-2 mediates neuronal activity and seizure susceptibility through ubiquitination of GluA1 subunit of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor, (AMPAR). Using a mouse model, termed Nedd4-2andi, in which one of the major forms of Nedd4-2 in the brain is selectively deficient, we found that the spontaneous neuronal activity in Nedd4-2andi cortical neuron cultures, measured by a multiunit extracellular electrophysiology system, was basally elevated, less responsive to AMPAR activation, and much more sensitive to AMPAR blockade when compared with wild-type cultures. When performing kainic acid-induced seizures in vivo, we showed that elevated seizure susceptibility in Nedd4-2andi mice was normalized when GluA1 is genetically reduced. Furthermore, when studying epilepsy-associated missense mutations of Nedd4-2, we found that all three mutations disrupt the ubiquitination of GluA1 and fail to reduce surface GluA1 and spontaneous neuronal activity when compared with wild-type Nedd4-2. Collectively, our data suggest that impaired GluA1 ubiquitination contributes to Nedd4-2-dependent neuronal hyperactivity and seizures. Our findings provide critical information to the future development of therapeutic strategies for patients who carry mutations of Nedd4-2. PMID:28212375

  14. Seizure-induced reduction in PIP3 levels contributes to seizure-activity and is rescued by valproic acid☆

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pishan; Walker, Matthew C.; Williams, Robin S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (3–5) trisphosphate (PIP3) is a central regulator of diverse neuronal functions that are critical for seizure progression, however its role in seizures is unclear. We have recently hypothesised that valproic acid (VPA), one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of epilepsy, may target PIP3 signalling as a therapeutic mode of action. Here, we show that seizure induction using kainic acid in a rat in vivo epilepsy model resulted in a decrease in hippocampal PIP3 levels and reduced protein kinase B (PKB/AKT) phosphorylation, measured using ELISA mass assays and Western blot analysis, and both changes were restored following VPA treatment. These finding were reproduced in cultured rat hippocampal primary neurons and entorhinal cortex–hippocampal slices during exposure to the GABA(A) receptor antagonist pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), which is widely used to generate seizures and seizure-like (paroxysmal) activity. Moreover, VPA's effect on paroxysmal activity in the PTZ slice model is blocked by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibition or PIP2 sequestration by neomycin, indicating that VPA's efficacy is dependent upon PIP3 signalling. PIP3 depletion following PTZ treatment may also provide a positive feedback loop, since enhancing PIP3 depletion increases, and conversely, reducing PIP3 dephosphorylation reduces paroxysmal activity and this effect is dependent upon AMPA receptor activation. Our results therefore indicate that PIP3 depletion occurs with seizure activity, and that VPA functions to reverse these effects, providing a novel mechanism for VPA in epilepsy treatment. PMID:24148856

  15. Behavior-associated Neuronal Activation After Kainic Acid-induced Hippocampal Neurotoxicity is Modulated in Time.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Arredondo, Andrea; López-Hernández, Fernanda; García-Velázquez, Lizbeth; Arias, Clorinda; Zepeda, Angélica

    2017-02-01

    Kainic acid-induced (KA) hippocampal damage leads to neuronal death and further synaptic plasticity. Formation of aberrant as well as of functional connections after such procedure has been documented. However, the impact of such structural plasticity on cell activation along time after damage and in face of a behavioral demand has not been explored. We evaluated if the mRNA and protein levels of plasticity-related protein synaptophysin (Syp and SYP, respectively) and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein mRNA and protein levels (Arc and Arc, respectively) in the dentate gyrus were differentially modulated in time in response to a spatial-exploratory task after KA-induced hippocampal damage. In addition, we analyzed Arc+/NeuN+ immunopositive cells in the different experimental conditions. We infused KA intrahippocampally to young-adult rats and 10 or 30 days post-lesion (dpl) animals performed a hippocampus-activating spatial-exploratory task. Our results show that Syp mRNA levels significantly increase at 10dpl and return to control levels after 30dpl, whereas SYP protein levels are diminished at 10dpl, but significantly increase at 30dpl, as compared to 10dpl. Arc mRNA and protein levels are both increased at 30dpl as compared to sham. Also the number of NeuN+/Arc+ cells significantly increases at 30dpl in the group with a spatial-exploratory demand. These results provide information on the long-term modifications associated to structural plasticity and neuronal activation in the dentate gyrus after excitotoxic damage and in face of a spatial-exploratory behavior. Anat Rec, 300:425-432, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Long-lasting c-fos and NGF mRNA expressions and loss of perikaryal parvalbumin immunoreactivity in the development of epileptogenesis after ethacrynic acid-induced seizure.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, J; Omori, K; Okugawa, G; Fujiseki, Y; Heizmann, C W; Inagaki, C

    1999-07-10

    A single cerebroventricular injection of ethacrynic acid (EA), a Cl(-)-ATPase inhibitor, induces generalized tonic-clonic convulsions in mice. To clarify whether such convulsive stimulus triggers a long-lasting rearrangement of the neural circuitry culminating in seizure susceptibility, we examined molecular, cellular and behavioral changes following the EA-induced seizure. The expression of immediate early gene c-fos mRNA as an index for cellular activation increased biphasically, with an early transient increase at 60 min and a late prolonged increase on the 10th to 14th day post-EA administration, most remarkably in the hippocampus and pyriform cortex. On the 14th day post-EA seizure, subconvulsive dose of kainic acid (5-17.5 mg/kg) caused severe (stage 5) seizure in 77% of the mice, with 70% mortality. In addition, the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) also showed biphasic increases with close spatiotemporal correlation with c-fos expression. Moreover, the number of cell somata and the density of axon fibers of parvalbumin (PARV)-positive cells, a subpopulation of GABAergic interneurons, decreased in area dentata, CA1 and CA3 on the 7th and 14th day post-EA seizure. In area dentata and CA1, the density of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-positive cells also decreased on the 14th day. Thus, the transient EA-induced seizures appear to develop seizure susceptibility by causing damage of a subpopulation of inhibitory interneurons along with increases in the expression of c-fos and NGF in limbic structures.

  17. Widespread changes in network activity allow non-invasive detection of mesial temporal lobe seizures.

    PubMed

    Lam, Alice D; Zepeda, Rodrigo; Cole, Andrew J; Cash, Sydney S

    2016-10-01

    Decades of experience with intracranial recordings in patients with epilepsy have demonstrated that seizures can occur in deep cortical regions such as the mesial temporal lobes without showing any obvious signs of seizure activity on scalp electroencephalogram. Predicated on the idea that these seizures are purely focal, currently, the only way to detect these 'scalp-negative seizures' is with intracranial recordings. However, intracranial recordings are only rarely performed in patients with epilepsy, and are almost never performed outside of the context of epilepsy. As such, little is known about scalp-negative seizures and their role in the natural history of epilepsy, their effect on cognitive function, and their association with other neurological diseases. Here, we developed a novel approach to non-invasively identify scalp-negative seizures arising from the mesial temporal lobe based on scalp electroencephalogram network connectivity measures. We identified 25 scalp-negative mesial temporal lobe seizures in 10 patients and obtained control records from an additional 13 patients, all of whom underwent recordings with foramen ovale electrodes and scalp electroencephalogram. Scalp data from these records were used to train a scalp-negative seizure detector, which consisted of a pair of logistic regression classifiers that used scalp electroencephalogram coherence properties as input features. On cross-validation performance, this detector correctly identified scalp-negative seizures in 40% of patients, and correctly identified the side of seizure onset for each seizure detected. In comparison, routine clinical interpretation of these scalp electroencephalograms failed to identify any of the scalp-negative seizures. Among the patients in whom the detector raised seizure alarms, 80% had scalp-negative mesial temporal lobe seizures. The detector had a false alarm rate of only 0.31 per day and a positive predictive value of 75%. Of the 13 control patients, false

  18. PDI regulates seizure activity via NMDA receptor redox in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Yang; Ko, Ah-Rhem; Hyun, Hye-Won; Min, Su-Ji; Kim, Ji-Eun

    2017-01-01

    Redox modulation of cysteine residues is one of the post-translational modifications of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Protein disulfide isomerases (PDI), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone, plays a crucial role in catalyzing disulfide bond formation, reduction, and isomerization. In the present study, we found that PDI bound to NMDAR in the normal hippocampus, and that this binding was increased in chronic epileptic rats. In vitro thiol reductase assay revealed that PDI increased the amount of thiols on full-length recombinant NR1 protein. PDI siRNA, 5–5′-dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), bacitracin and PDI antibody reduced seizure susceptibility in response to pilocarpine. In addition, PDI knockdown effectively ameliorated spontaneous seizure activity in chronic epileptic rats. Anticonvulsive effects of PDI siRNA were correlated to the reduction of the amount of free- and nitrosothiols on NMDAR, accompanied by the inhibition of PDI activity. However, PDI knockdown did not lead to alteration in basal neurotransmission or ER stress under physiological condition. These findings provide mechanistic insight into sulfhydration of disulfide bonds on NMDAR by PDI, and suggest that PDI may represent a target of potential therapeutics for epilepsy, which avoids a possible side effect on physiological receptor functionality. PMID:28198441

  19. Involvement of the neuronal phosphotyrosine signal adaptor N-Shc in kainic acid-induced epileptiform activity.

    PubMed

    Baba, Shiro; Onga, Kazuko; Kakizawa, Sho; Ohyama, Kyoji; Yasuda, Kunihiko; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Scott, Brian W; Burnham, W McIntyre; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Mori, Nozomu

    2016-06-08

    BDNF-TrkB signaling is implicated in experimental seizures and epilepsy. However, the downstream signaling involved in the epileptiform activity caused by TrkB receptor activation is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine whether TrkB-mediated N-Shc signal transduction was involved in kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptiform activity. We investigated KA-induced behavioral seizures, epileptiform activities and neuronal cell loss in hippocampus between N-Shc deficient and control mice. There was a significant reduction in seizure severity and the frequency of epileptiform discharges in N-Shc deficient mice, as compared with wild-type and C57BL/6 mice. KA-induced neuronal cell loss in the CA3 of hippocampus was also inhibited in N-Shc deficient mice. This study demonstrates that the activation of N-Shc signaling pathway contributes to an acute KA-induced epileptiform activity and neuronal cell loss in the hippocampus. We propose that the N-Shc-mediated signaling pathway could provide a potential target for the novel therapeutic approaches of epilepsy.

  20. Involvement of the neuronal phosphotyrosine signal adaptor N-Shc in kainic acid-induced epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Shiro; Onga, Kazuko; Kakizawa, Sho; Ohyama, Kyoji; Yasuda, Kunihiko; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Scott, Brian W.; Burnham, W. McIntyre; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Mori, Nozomu

    2016-01-01

    BDNF-TrkB signaling is implicated in experimental seizures and epilepsy. However, the downstream signaling involved in the epileptiform activity caused by TrkB receptor activation is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine whether TrkB-mediated N-Shc signal transduction was involved in kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptiform activity. We investigated KA-induced behavioral seizures, epileptiform activities and neuronal cell loss in hippocampus between N-Shc deficient and control mice. There was a significant reduction in seizure severity and the frequency of epileptiform discharges in N-Shc deficient mice, as compared with wild-type and C57BL/6 mice. KA-induced neuronal cell loss in the CA3 of hippocampus was also inhibited in N-Shc deficient mice. This study demonstrates that the activation of N-Shc signaling pathway contributes to an acute KA-induced epileptiform activity and neuronal cell loss in the hippocampus. We propose that the N-Shc-mediated signaling pathway could provide a potential target for the novel therapeutic approaches of epilepsy. PMID:27273072

  1. Multiscale Aspects of Generation of High-Gamma Activity during Seizures in Human Neocortex123

    PubMed Central

    Marcuccilli, Charles J.; Ben-Mabrouk, Faiza; Lew, Sean M.; Goodman, Robert R.; McKhann, Guy M.; Frim, David M.; Kohrman, Michael H.; Schevon, Catherine A.; van Drongelen, Wim

    2016-01-01

    High-gamma (HG; 80-150 Hz) activity in macroscopic clinical records is considered a marker for critical brain regions involved in seizure initiation; it is correlated with pathological multiunit firing during neocortical seizures in the seizure core, an area identified by correlated multiunit spiking and low frequency seizure activity. However, the effects of the spatiotemporal dynamics of seizure on HG power generation are not well understood. Here, we studied HG generation and propagation, using a three-step, multiscale signal analysis and modeling approach. First, we analyzed concurrent neuronal and microscopic network HG activity in neocortical slices from seven intractable epilepsy patients. We found HG activity in these networks, especially when neurons displayed paroxysmal depolarization shifts and network activity was highly synchronized. Second, we examined HG activity acquired with microelectrode arrays recorded during human seizures (n = 8). We confirmed the presence of synchronized HG power across microelectrode records and the macroscale, both specifically associated with the core region of the seizure. Third, we used volume conduction-based modeling to relate HG activity and network synchrony at different network scales. We showed that local HG oscillations require high levels of synchrony to cross scales, and that this requirement is met at the microscopic scale, but not within macroscopic networks. Instead, we present evidence that HG power at the macroscale may result from harmonics of ongoing seizure activity. Ictal HG power marks the seizure core, but the generating mechanism can differ across spatial scales. PMID:27257623

  2. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids induce plasminogen activator activity and DNA damage in rabbit spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Kokoli, A N; Lavrentiadou, S N; Zervos, I A; Tsantarliotou, M P; Georgiadis, M P; Nikolaidis, E A; Botsoglou, N; Boscos, C M; Taitzoglou, I A

    2017-02-20

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect(s) of dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) on rabbit semen. Adult rabbit bucks were assigned to two groups that were given two diets, a standard diet (control) and a diet supplemented with ω-3 PUFA. Sperm samples were collected from all bucks with the use of an artificial vagina in 20-day intervals, for a total period of 120 days. The enrichment of membranes in ω-3 PUFA was manifested by the elevation of the 22:5 ω-3 (docosapentaenoic acid [DPA]) levels within 40 days. This increase in DPA content did not affect semen characteristics (i.e., concentration, motility and viability). However, it was associated with the induction of lipid peroxidation in spermatozoa, as determined on the basis of the malondialdehyde content. Lipid peroxidation was associated with DNA fragmentation in ω-3 PUFA-enriched spermatozoa and a concomitant increase in plasminogen activator (PA) activity. The effects of ω-3 PUFA on sperm cells were evident within 40 days of ω-3 PUFA dietary intake and exhibited peack values on day 120. Our findings suggest that an ω-3 PUFA-rich diet may not affect semen characteristics; however, it may have a negative impact on the oxidative status and DNA integrity of the spermatozoa, which was associated with an induction of PAs activity.

  3. Perilesional brain edema and seizure activity in patients with calcified neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Theodore E.; Pretell, E. Javier; Lescano, Andres. G.; Bustos, Javier A.; Gilman, Robert H.; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Garcia, Héctor H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cysticercosis due to Taenia solium is a leading cause of adult acquired seizures and epilepsy that frequently occurs in patients with only calcified larval cysts. Transient episodes of perilesional brain edema occur around calcified foci but its importance, association with seizures, incidence, and pathophysiology are unknown. Methods One hundred and ten persons with only calcified lesions and a history of seizures or severe headaches were followed prospectively in a cohort design to assess the incidence of seizure relapses. In a nested case-control sub study, perilesional edema was assessed by MRI at the time a seizure occurred in the symptomatic patient and in a matched asymptomatic control, amongst the 110 followed. Results Median follow up was 32.33 months (SD 19.99). Twenty-nine people had an incident seizure with an estimated 5 year seizure incidence of 36%. Twenty-four patients of the 29 with seizure relapse had an MRI evaluation within five days of the event. Perilesional edema was found in 12 (50.0%) compared to 2 of 23 asymptomatic matched controls (8.7%). Conclusions Perilesional edema occurs frequently and is associated with episodic seizure activity in calcified neurocysticercosis. Our findings are likely representative of symptomatic patients in endemic regions and suggest a unique and possibly preventable cause of seizures in this population. PMID:18986841

  4. Unit Activity of Hippocampal Interneurons before Spontaneous Seizures in an Animal Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Izumi; Fujita, Satoshi; Thamattoor, Ajoy K.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of seizure initiation are unclear. To evaluate the possible roles of inhibitory neurons, unit recordings were obtained in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, and subiculum of epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats as they experienced spontaneous seizures. Most interneurons in the dentate gyrus, CA1, and subiculum increased their firing rate before seizures, and did so with significant consistency from seizure to seizure. Identification of CA1 interneuron subtypes based on firing characteristics during theta and sharp waves suggested that a parvalbumin-positive basket cell and putative bistratified cells, but not oriens lacunosum moleculare cells, were activated preictally. Preictal changes occurred much earlier than those described by most previous in vitro studies. Preictal activation of interneurons began earliest (>4 min before seizure onset), increased most, was most prevalent in the subiculum, and was minimal in CA3. Preictal inactivation of interneurons was most common in CA1 (27% of interneurons) and included a putative ivy cell and parvalbumin-positive basket cell. Increased or decreased preictal activity correlated with whether interneurons fired faster or slower, respectively, during theta activity. Theta waves were more likely to occur before seizure onset, and increased preictal firing of subicular interneurons correlated with theta activity. Preictal changes by other hippocampal interneurons were largely independent of theta waves. Within seconds of seizure onset, many interneurons displayed a brief pause in firing and a later, longer drop that was associated with reduced action potential amplitude. These findings suggest that many interneurons inactivate during seizures, most increase their activity preictally, but some fail to do so at the critical time before seizure onset. PMID:25904809

  5. Unit Activity of Hippocampal Interneurons before Spontaneous Seizures in an Animal Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Izumi; Fujita, Satoshi; Thamattoor, Ajoy K; Buckmaster, Paul S

    2015-04-22

    Mechanisms of seizure initiation are unclear. To evaluate the possible roles of inhibitory neurons, unit recordings were obtained in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, and subiculum of epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats as they experienced spontaneous seizures. Most interneurons in the dentate gyrus, CA1, and subiculum increased their firing rate before seizures, and did so with significant consistency from seizure to seizure. Identification of CA1 interneuron subtypes based on firing characteristics during theta and sharp waves suggested that a parvalbumin-positive basket cell and putative bistratified cells, but not oriens lacunosum moleculare cells, were activated preictally. Preictal changes occurred much earlier than those described by most previous in vitro studies. Preictal activation of interneurons began earliest (>4 min before seizure onset), increased most, was most prevalent in the subiculum, and was minimal in CA3. Preictal inactivation of interneurons was most common in CA1 (27% of interneurons) and included a putative ivy cell and parvalbumin-positive basket cell. Increased or decreased preictal activity correlated with whether interneurons fired faster or slower, respectively, during theta activity. Theta waves were more likely to occur before seizure onset, and increased preictal firing of subicular interneurons correlated with theta activity. Preictal changes by other hippocampal interneurons were largely independent of theta waves. Within seconds of seizure onset, many interneurons displayed a brief pause in firing and a later, longer drop that was associated with reduced action potential amplitude. These findings suggest that many interneurons inactivate during seizures, most increase their activity preictally, but some fail to do so at the critical time before seizure onset.

  6. The Control of Seizure-Like Activity in the Rat Hippocampal Slice

    PubMed Central

    Khosravani, Houman; Carlen, Peter L.; Velazquez, Jose L. Perez

    2003-01-01

    The sudden and transient hypersynchrony of neuronal firing that characterizes epileptic seizures can be considered as the transitory stabilization of metastable states present within the dynamical repertoire of a neuronal network. Using an in vitro model of recurrent spontaneous seizures in the rat horizontal hippocampal slice preparation, we present an approach to characterize the dynamics of the transition to seizure, and to use this information to control the activity and avoid the occurrence of seizure-like events. The transition from the interictal activity (between seizures) to the seizure-like event is aborted by brief (20–50 s) low-frequency (0.5 Hz) periodic forcing perturbations, applied via an extracellular stimulating electrode to the mossy fibers, the axons of the dentate neurons that synapse onto the CA3 pyramidal cells. This perturbation results in the stabilization of an interictal-like low-frequency firing pattern in the hippocampal slice. The results derived from this work shed light on the dynamics of the transition to seizure and will further the development of algorithms that can be used in automated devices to stop seizure occurrence. PMID:12524321

  7. Dynamic causal modelling of electrographic seizure activity using Bayesian belief updating

    PubMed Central

    Cooray, Gerald K.; Sengupta, Biswa; Douglas, Pamela K.; Friston, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Seizure activity in EEG recordings can persist for hours with seizure dynamics changing rapidly over time and space. To characterise the spatiotemporal evolution of seizure activity, large data sets often need to be analysed. Dynamic causal modelling (DCM) can be used to estimate the synaptic drivers of cortical dynamics during a seizure; however, the requisite (Bayesian) inversion procedure is computationally expensive. In this note, we describe a straightforward procedure, within the DCM framework, that provides efficient inversion of seizure activity measured with non-invasive and invasive physiological recordings; namely, EEG/ECoG. We describe the theoretical background behind a Bayesian belief updating scheme for DCM. The scheme is tested on simulated and empirical seizure activity (recorded both invasively and non-invasively) and compared with standard Bayesian inversion. We show that the Bayesian belief updating scheme provides similar estimates of time-varying synaptic parameters, compared to standard schemes, indicating no significant qualitative change in accuracy. The difference in variance explained was small (less than 5%). The updating method was substantially more efficient, taking approximately 5–10 min compared to approximately 1–2 h. Moreover, the setup of the model under the updating scheme allows for a clear specification of how neuronal variables fluctuate over separable timescales. This method now allows us to investigate the effect of fast (neuronal) activity on slow fluctuations in (synaptic) parameters, paving a way forward to understand how seizure activity is generated. PMID:26220742

  8. Attenuation of Folic Acid-Induced Renal Inflammatory Injury in Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Kent; Okamoto, Koji; Negishi, Kousuke; Suzuki, Yoshifumi; Nakao, Akihide; Fujita, Toshiro; Toda, Akiko; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Kita, Yoshihiro; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Ishii, Satoshi; Shimizu, Takao; Noiri, Eisei

    2006-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent lipid mediator with various biological activities, plays an important role in inflammation by recruiting leukocytes. In this study we used platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR)-deficient mice to elucidate the role of PAF in inflammatory renal injury induced by folic acid administration. PAFR-deficient mice showed significant amelioration of renal dysfunction and pathological findings such as acute tubular damage with neutrophil infiltration, lipid peroxidation observed with antibody to 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (day 2), and interstitial fibrosis with macrophage infiltration associated with expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the kidney (day 14). Acute tubular damage was attenuated by neutrophil depletion using a monoclonal antibody (RB6-8C5), demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils to acute phase injury. Macrophage infiltration was also decreased when treatment with a PAF antagonist (WEB2086) was started after acute phase. In vitro chemotaxis assay using a Boyden chamber demonstrated that PAF exhibits a strong chemotactic activity for macrophages. These results indicate that PAF is involved in pathogenesis of folic acid-induced renal injury by activating neutrophils in acute phase and macrophages in chronic interstitial fibrosis. Inhibiting the PAF pathway might be therapeutic to kidney injury from inflammatory cells. PMID:16651609

  9. Compromising KCC2 transporter activity enhances the development of continuous seizure activity

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Matthew R.; Deeb, Tarek Z.; Brandon, Nicholas J.; Dunlop, John; Davies, Paul A.; Moss, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired neuronal inhibition has long been associated with the increased probability of seizure occurrence and heightened seizure severity. Fast synaptic inhibition in the brain is primarily mediated by the type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAARs), ligand-gated ion channels that can mediate Cl− influx resulting in membrane hyperpolarization and the restriction of neuronal firing. In most adult brain neurons, the K+/Cl− co-transporter-2 (KCC2) establishes hyperpolarizing GABAergic inhibition by maintaining low [Cl−]i. In this study, we sought to understand how decreased KCC2 transport function affects seizure event severity. We impaired KCC2 transport in the 0-Mg2+ ACSF and 4-aminopyridine in vitro models of epileptiform activity in acute mouse brain slices. Experiments with the selective KCC2 inhibitor VU0463271 demonstrated that reduced KCC2 transport increased the duration of SLEs, resulting in non-terminating discharges of clonic-like activity. We also investigated slices obtained from the KCC2-Ser940Ala (S940A) point-mutant mouse, which has a mutation at a known functional phosphorylation site causing behavioral and cellular deficits under hyperexcitable conditions. We recorded from the entorhinal cortex of S940A mouse brain slices in both 0-Mg2+ ACSF and 4-aminopyridine, and demonstrated that loss of the S940 residue increased the susceptibility of continuous clonic-like discharges, an in vitro form of status epilepticus. Our experiments revealed KCC2 transport activity is a critical factor in seizure event duration and mechanisms of termination. Our results highlight the need for therapeutic strategies that potentiate KCC2 transport function in order to decrease seizure event severity and prevent the development of status epilepticus. PMID:27108931

  10. Anti-seizure activity of flower extracts of Nepeta bractaeta in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Jalal Uddin; Parray, Shabir Ahmad; Aslam, Mohammad; Ansari, Shahid; Nizami, Qudsia; Khanam, Razia; Siddiqui, Aisha; Ahmad, Mohd Aftab

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by unprovoked, recurring seizures that disrupts the nervous system and can cause mental and physical dysfunction. Based on the ethno pharmacological information of the plant, the methanolic and aqueous extracts of the flowers of Nepeta bractaeta was evaluated for its antiepileptic activity. The methanolic and aqueous extracts of the flowers of Nepeta bracteata were observed for their antiepileptic activity by increased current Electroshock seizures (ICES) test and Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) test using Swiss albino mice. Both the extracts showed significant activity in ICES and PTZ induced convulsions in comparison to control. In ICES model, NBAE at higher dose showed 16.7 % and NBME at higher dose showed 33.3 % protection against seizure and in PTZ model, NBME at higher dose showed 33.3 % protection against seizure. From the experiments performed, it can be said that Nepeta bractaeta does possess anticonvulsant property.

  11. Anti-seizure activity of flower extracts of Nepeta bractaeta in Swiss albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Jalal Uddin; Parray, Shabir Ahmad; Aslam, Mohammad; Ansari, Shahid; Nizami, Qudsia; Khanam, Razia; Siddiqui, Aisha; Ahmad, Mohd Aftab

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by unprovoked, recurring seizures that disrupts the nervous system and can cause mental and physical dysfunction. Based on the ethno pharmacological information of the plant, the methanolic and aqueous extracts of the flowers of Nepeta bractaeta was evaluated for its antiepileptic activity. The methanolic and aqueous extracts of the flowers of Nepeta bracteata were observed for their antiepileptic activity by increased current Electroshock seizures (ICES) test and Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) test using Swiss albino mice. Both the extracts showed significant activity in ICES and PTZ induced convulsions in comparison to control. In ICES model, NBAE at higher dose showed 16.7 % and NBME at higher dose showed 33.3 % protection against seizure and in PTZ model, NBME at higher dose showed 33.3 % protection against seizure. From the experiments performed, it can be said that Nepeta bractaeta does possess anticonvulsant property. PMID:27540346

  12. Saturated fatty acids induce c-Src clustering within membrane subdomains leading to JNK activation

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Ryan G.; Park, Eek-Joong; Li, Ning; Tran, Helen; Chen, Monica; Choi, Crystal; Solinas, Giovanni; Karin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Saturated fatty acids (FA) exert adverse health effects and are more likely to cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes than unsaturated FA, some of which exert protective and beneficial effects. Saturated FA, but not unsaturated FA, activate Jun N terminal kinase (JNK), which has been linked to obesity and insulin resistance in mice and men. However, it is unknown how saturated and unsaturated FA are discriminated. We now demonstrate that saturated FA activate JNK and induce insulin resistance by altering the membrane distribution of c-Src, causing it to partition into intracellular membrane subdomains where it may become activated. Conversely, unsaturated FA with known beneficial effects on glucose metabolism prevent c-Src membrane partitioning and activation, which are dependent on its myristoylation, and block JNK activation. Consumption of a diabetogenic high fat diet causes the partitioning and activation of c-Src within detergent insoluble membrane subdomains of adipocytes. PMID:21962514

  13. Neuroligin-1 Knockdown Suppresses Seizure Activity by Regulating Neuronal Hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Fang, Min; Wei, Jin-Lai; Tang, Bo; Liu, Jing; Chen, Ling; Tang, Zhao-Hua; Luo, Jing; Chen, Guo-Jun; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Abnormally synchronized synaptic transmission in the brain leads to epilepsy. Neuroligin-1 (NL1) is a synaptic cell adhesion molecule localized at excitatory synapses. NL1 modulates synaptic transmission and determines the properties of neuronal networks in the mammalian central nervous system. We showed that the expression of NL1 and its binding partner neurexin-1β was increased in temporal lobe epileptic foci in patients and lithium-pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats. We investigated electrophysiological and behavioral changes in epileptic rats after lentivirally mediated NL1 knockdown in the hippocampus to determine whether NL1 suppression prevented seizures and, if so, to explore the probable underlying mechanisms. Our behavioral studies revealed that NL1 knockdown in epileptic rats reduced seizure severity and increased seizure latency. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices from NL1 knockdown epileptic rats revealed a decrease in spontaneous action potential frequency and a decrease in miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) frequency but not amplitude. The amplitude of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent EPSCs was also selectively decreased. Notably, NL1 knockdown reduced total NMDAR1 expression and the surface/total ratio in the hippocampus of epileptic rats. Taken together, these data indicate that NL1 knockdown in epileptic rats may reduce the frequency and severity of seizures and suppress neuronal hyperexcitability via changes in postsynaptic NMDARs.

  14. Oxalic acid-induced modifications of postglycation activity of lysozyme and its glycoforms.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong Ying; Yaylayan, Varoujan A; Yeboah, Faustinus

    2010-05-26

    The role of selected carboxylic acids and their potential to influence the glycation pattern and the enzymatic activity of lysozyme using glucose and ribose were investigated independently of the pH of the reaction medium. The model systems were incubated with and without selected carboxylic acids (maleic, acetic, oxalic, and citraconic) at 50 degrees C for 12 or 24 and 48 h at constant pH of 6.5. The effect of carboxylic acids on the glycation of lysozyme was studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and by the measurement of the residual enzyme activity of lysozyme in the glycated samples. Of the carboxylic acids evaluated, oxalic acid showed the highest antiglycation activity. The residual lysozyme activity in both oxalic acid-glucose and oxalic acid-ribose systems was >80% compared with 46 and 36% activity in the controls of glucose and ribose systems, respectively. On the other hand, maleic, acetic, and citraconic acid containing systems with both sugars did not exhibit any enhanced enzyme activity relative to the controls. The results of this study show that oxalic acid was unique among the carboxylic acids evaluated with respect to its ability to interact with sugars and inhibit glycation.

  15. Neuroprotective activity of L-theanine on 3-nitropropionic acid-induced neurotoxicity in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Thangarajan, Sumathi; Deivasigamani, Asha; Natarajan, Suganya Sarumani; Krishnan, Prasanna; Mohanan, Sandhya Koombankallil

    2014-09-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the protective effect of L-theanine against 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP)-induced Huntington's disease (HD)-like symptoms in rats. The present experimental protocol design includes systemic 3-NP acid (10 mg/kg intraperitonially) treatment for 14 d. L-theanine (100 and 200 mg/kg) was given orally, once a day, 1 h before 3-NP acid treatment for 14 d. Body weight and behavioral parameters (Morris water maze, open field test (OFT), forced swim test (FST) and rotarod activity) were assessed on 1st, 5th, 10th and 15th day post-3-NP acid administration. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) levels and mitochondrial enzyme complex. Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) were measured on the 15th day in the striatum. Systemic 3-NP acid treatment significantly reduced body weight, locomotor activity and oxidative defense. The mitochondrial enzyme activity was also significantly impaired in the striatum region in 3-NP acid-treated animals. L-theanine (100 and 200 mg/kg b.wt.) treatment significantly attenuated the impairment in behavioral, biochemical and mitochondrial enzyme activities as compared to the 3-NP acid-treated group. The results of the present study suggest that pretreatment with L-theanine significantly attenuated 3-NP induced oxidative stress and restored the decreased SOD, GSH, CAT and SDH activity. It also decreased the neuronal damage as evidenced by histopathological analysis of striatum. Based on the above study, it has been proved that L-theanine has neuroprotective activity against 3-NP induced neurotoxicity.

  16. PGC-1β suppresses saturated fatty acid-induced macrophage inflammation by inhibiting TAK1 activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongen; Liu, Yan; Li, Di; Song, Jiayi; Xia, Min

    2016-02-01

    Inflammation of infiltrated macrophages in adipose tissue is a key contributor to the initiation of adipose insulin resistance. These macrophages are exposed to high local concentrations of free fatty acids (FFAs) and can be proinflammatory activated by saturated fatty acids (SFAs). However, the regulatory mechanisms on SFA-induced macrophage inflammation are still elusive. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1β (PGC-1β) is a member of the PGC-1 family of transcriptional coactivators and has been reported to play a key role in SFAs metabolism and in the regulation of inflammatory signaling. However, it remains unclear whether PGC-1β is involved in SFA-induced macrophage inflammation. In this study, we found that PGC-1β expression was significantly decreased in response to palmitic acid (PA) in macrophages in a dose dependent manner. PGC-1β inhibited PA induced TNFα, MCP-1, and IL-1β mRNA and protein expressions. Furthermore, PGC-1β significantly antagonized PA induced macrophage nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 and JUN N-terminal kinase activation. Mechanistically, we revealed that TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) and its adaptor protein TAK1 binding protein 1 (TAB1) played a dominant role in the regulatory effects of PGC-1β. We confirmed that PGC-1β inhibited downstream inflammatory signals via binding with TAB1 and thus preventing TAB1/TAK1 binding and TAK1 activation. Finally, we showed that PGC-1β overexpression in PA treated macrophages improved adipocytes PI3K-Akt insulin signaling in a paracrine fashion. Collectively, our results uncovered a novel mechanism on how macrophage inflammation induced by SFAs was regulated and suggest a potential target in the treatment of obesity induced insulin resistance.

  17. Swelling-activated and arachidonic acid-induced currents are TREK-1 in rat bladder smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukasaku, Mitsuko; Kimura, Junko; Yamaguchi, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Using the perforated patch voltage clamp, we investigated swelling-activated ionic channels (SACs) in rat urinary bladder smooth muscle cells. Hypo-osmotic (60%) bath solution increased a membrane current which was inhibited by the SAC inhibitor, gadolinium. The reversal potential of the hypotonicity-induced current shifted in the positive direction by increasing external K+ concentration. The hypotonicity-induced current was inhibited by extracellular acidic pH, phorbol ester and forskolin. These pharmacological properties are identical to those of arachidonic acid-induced current present in these cells, suggesting the presence of TREK-1, a four-transmembrane two pore domain K+ channel. Using RT-PCR we screened rat bladder smooth muscles and cerebellum for expression of TREK-1, TREK-2 and TRAAK mRNAs. Only TREK-1 mRNA was expressed in the bladder, while all three were expressed in the cerebellum. We conclude that a mechanosensitive K+ channel is present in rat bladder myocytes, which is activated by arachidonic acid and most likely is TREK-1. This K+ channel may have an important role in the regulation of bladder smooth muscle tone during urine storage. PMID:26911303

  18. Swelling-activated and arachidonic acid-induced currents are TREK-1 in rat bladder smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fukasaku, Mitsuko; Kimura, Junko; Yamaguchi, Osamu

    2016-06-08

    Using the perforated patch voltage clamp, we investigated swelling-activated ionic channels (SACs) in rat urinary bladder smooth muscle cells. Hypo-osmotic (60%) bath solution increased a membrane current which was inhibited by the SAC inhibitor, gadolinium. The reversal potential of the hypotonicity-induced current shifted in the positive direction by increasing external K(+) concentration. The hypotonicity-induced current was inhibited by extracellular acidic pH, phorbol ester and forskolin. These pharmacological properties are identical to those of arachidonic acid-induced current present in these cells, suggesting the presence of TREK-1, a four-transmembrane two pore domain K(+) channel. Using RT-PCR we screened rat bladder smooth muscles and cerebellum for expression of TREK-1, TREK-2 and TRAAK mRNAs. Only TREK-1 mRNA was expressed in the bladder, while all three were expressed in the cerebellum. We conclude that a mechanosensitive K(+) channel is present in rat bladder myocytes, which is activated by arachidonic acid and most likely is TREK-1. This K(+) channel may have an important role in the regulation of bladder smooth muscle tone during urine storage.

  19. Phosphatidic Acid Induces Ligand-independent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Endocytic Traffic through PDE4 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Norambuena, Andrés; Metz, Claudia; Jung, Juan E.; Silva, Antonia; Otero, Carolina; Cancino, Jorge; Retamal, Claudio; Valenzuela, Juan C.; Soza, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Endocytosis modulates EGFR function by compartmentalizing and attenuating or enhancing its ligand-induced signaling. Here we show that it can also control the cell surface versus intracellular distribution of empty/inactive EGFR. Our previous observation that PKA inhibitors induce EGFR internalization prompted us to test phosphatidic acid (PA) generated by phospholipase D (PLD) as an endogenous down-regulator of PKA activity, which activates rolipram-sensitive type 4 phosphodiesterases (PDE4) that degrade cAMP. We found that inhibition of PA hydrolysis by propranolol, in the absence of ligand, provokes internalization of inactive (neither tyrosine-phosphorylated nor ubiquitinated) EGFR, accompanied by a transient increase in PA levels and PDE4s activity. This EGFR internalization is mimicked by PA micelles and is strongly counteracted by PLD2 silencing, rolipram or forskolin treatment, and PKA overexpression. Accelerated EGFR endocytosis seems to be mediated by clathrin-dependent and -independent pathways, leading to receptor accumulation in juxtanuclear recycling endosomes, also due to a decreased recycling. Internalized EGFR can remain intracellular without degradation for several hours or return rapidly to the cell surface upon discontinuation of the stimulus. This novel regulatory mechanism of EGFR, also novel function of signaling PA, can transmodulate receptor accessibility in response to heterologous stimuli. PMID:20554760

  20. Uric acid is released in the brain during seizure activity and increases severity of seizures in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures.

    PubMed

    Thyrion, Lisa; Raedt, Robrecht; Portelli, Jeanelle; Van Loo, Pieter; Wadman, Wytse J; Glorieux, Griet; Lambrecht, Bart N; Janssens, Sophie; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Recent evidence points at an important role of endogenous cell-damage induced pro-inflammatory molecules in the generation of epileptic seizures. Uric acid, under the form of monosodium urate crystals, has shown to have pro-inflammatory properties in the body, but less is known about its role in seizure generation. This study aimed to unravel the contribution of uric acid to seizure generation in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures. We measured extracellular levels of uric acid in the brain and modulated them using complementary pharmacological and genetic tools. Local extracellular uric acid levels increased three to four times during acute limbic seizures and peaked between 50 and 100 min after kainic acid infusion. Manipulating uric acid levels through administration of allopurinol or knock-out of urate oxidase significantly altered the number of generalized seizures, decreasing and increasing them by a twofold respectively. Taken together, our results consistently show that uric acid is released during limbic seizures and suggest that uric acid facilitates seizure generalization.

  1. Arachidonic acid-induced Ca2+ sensitization of smooth muscle contraction through activation of Rho-kinase.

    PubMed

    Araki, S; Ito, M; Kureishi, Y; Feng, J; Machida, H; Isaka, N; Amano, M; Kaibuchi, K; Hartshorne, D J; Nakano, T

    2001-02-01

    Arachidonic acid activates isolated Rho-kinase and contracts permeabilized smooth muscle fibres. Various assays were carried out to examine the mechanism of this activation. Native Rho-kinase was activated 5-6 times by arachidonic acid but an N-terminal, constitutively-active fragment of Rho-kinase, expressed as a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion protein and including the catalytic subunit (GST-Rho-kinase-CAT), was not. GST-Rho-kinase-CAT was inhibited by a C-terminal fragment of Rho-kinase and arachidonic acid removed this inhibition. These results suggest that the C-terminal part of Rho-kinase, containing the RhoA binding site and the pleckstrin homology domain, acts as an autoinhibitor. It is suggested further that activation by arachidonic acid is due to its binding to the autoinhibitory region and subsequent release from the catalytic site. Arachidonic acid, at concentrations greater than 30 microM, increases force in alpha-toxin-permeabilized femoral artery but not in Triton X-100-skinned fibres. The content of Rho-kinase in the latter was lower than in alpha-toxin-treated or intact fibres. The arachidonic acid-induced contraction was not observed at a pCa above 8.0 and was inhibited by Y-27632 and wortmannin, inhibitors of Rho-kinase and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), respectively. The activation of Rho-kinase and subsequent phosphorylation of the myosin phosphatase target subunit inhibits myosin phosphatase and increases myosin phosphorylation.

  2. Salicylic acid induced cysteine protease activity during programmed cell death in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Szepesi, Ágnes; Tari, Irma

    2016-06-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR), a type of programmed cell death (PCD) during biotic stress is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). The aim of this work was to reveal the role of proteolysis and cysteine proteases in the execution of PCD in response of SA. Tomato plants were treated with sublethal (0.1 mM) and lethal (1 mM) SA concentrations through the root system. Treatment with 1 mM SA increased the electrolyte leakage and proteolytic activity and reduced the total protein content of roots after 6 h, while the proteolytic activity did not change in the leaves and in plants exposed to 0.1 mM SA. The expression of the papain-type cysteine protease SlCYP1, the vacuolar processing enzyme SlVPE1 and the tomato metacaspase SlMCA1 was induced within the first three hours in the leaves and after 0.5 h in the roots in the presence of 1 mM SA but the transcript levels did not increase significantly at sublethal SA. The Bax inhibitor-1 (SlBI-1), an antiapoptotic gene was over-expressed in the roots after SA treatments and it proved to be transient in the presence of sublethal SA. Protease inhibitors, SlPI2 and SlLTC were upregulated in the roots by sublethal SA but their expression remained low at 1 mM SA concentration. It is concluded that in contrast to leaves the SA-induced PCD is associated with increased proteolytic activity in the root tissues resulting from a fast up-regulation of specific cysteine proteases and down-regulation of protease inhibitors.

  3. Uric Acid Induces Endothelial Dysfunction by Activating the HMGB1/RAGE Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wei; Duan, Xi-Mei; Liu, Ying; Yu, Jiao; Tang, Yun-Liang; Liu, Ze-Lin; Jiang, Shan; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Liu, Jian-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) is a risk factor for endothelial dysfunction, a process in which inflammation may play an important role. UA increases high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB1) expression and extracellular release in endothelial cells. HMGB1 is an inflammatory cytokine that interacts with the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), inducing an oxidative stress and inflammatory response, which leads to endothelial dysfunction. In this study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated with a high concentration of UA (20 mg/dL) after which endothelial function and the expression of HMGB1, RAGE, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), inflammatory cytokines, and adhesion molecules were evaluated. UA inhibited endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production in HUVECs, increased intracellular HMGB1 expression and extracellular HMGB1 secretion, and upregulated RAGE expression. UA also activated NF-κB and increased the level of inflammatory cytokines. Blocking RAGE significantly suppressed the upregulation of RAGE and HMGB1 and prevented the increase in DNA binding activity of NF-κB and the levels of inflammatory cytokines. It also blocked the decrease in eNOS expression and NO production induced by UA. Our results suggest that high concentrations of UA cause endothelial dysfunction via the HMGB1/RAGE signaling pathway. PMID:28116308

  4. Seizure activity in dogs is associated with enhanced TIMP-2 expression of microglia.

    PubMed

    Stein, Veronika M; Genini, Sem; Puff, Christina; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2012-04-15

    In the pathogenesis of epilepsy aberrant synaptic plasticity plays an important role. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) are responsible for nervous tissue remodelling resulting in synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system (CNS) and might therefore be crucially involved in epileptogenesis. To assess the potential pathogenetic role of microglial MMPs and TIMPs in seizure induction, twenty-four dogs suffering from different intracranial diseases with and without seizure activity were comparatively examined. Microglial cells were isolated by density gradient centrifugation and their expression profiles of MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-12, MMP-13, MMP-14, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, and RECK (reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs) were examined via quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Interestingly, a significant up-regulation of TIMP-2 expression was found for the first time in dogs suffering from seizures. In conclusion, microglial TIMP expression might be involved in seizure generation.

  5. Seizure activity occurring in two dogs after S-ketamine-induction.

    PubMed

    Adami, C; Spadavecchia, C; Casoni, D

    2013-10-01

    Two healthy dogs were anaesthetized to undergo elective orthopaedic procedures. After premedication with methadone and acepromazine, general anaesthesia was induced with midazolam and S-ketamine. Immediately after anaesthetic induction, seizures occurred in both dogs. In the first dog the syndrome was characterized by tonic and clonic motor activity, muscular hypertone, hypersalivation, urination, defecation and hyperthermia. In the second dog muscular twitches of the temporal and masseter regions were observed, followed by increased skeletal muscles tone, hypersalivation, spontaneous urination and increase in body temperature. Recoveries from anaesthesia were uneventful and no seizures were observed. Considering the temporal association between anaesthetic induction and occurrence of seizures, and the fact that other causative factors could not be identified, it is hypothesized that S-ketamine played a role in determining the convulsive phenomena observed in these patients. S-ketamine might carry the potential for inducing seizures in otherwise healthy dogs, despite the concomitant use of GABA-ergic drugs.

  6. Nadroparin sodium activates Nrf2/HO-1 pathway in acetic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yalniz, Mehmet; Demirel, Ulvi; Orhan, Cemal; Bahcecioglu, Ibrahim Halil; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanefi; Aygun, Cem; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Kazim

    2012-06-01

    Effects of nadroparin sodium, a low molecular weight heparin, in colitis was investigated by analyzing proteins implicated in nuclear factor E2-related factor-2/heme oxygenase-1 (Nrf2/HO-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways. Twenty-eight rats were used. Colitis was induced by acetic acid (AA). Nadroparin sodium was given to prevention and treatment groups in addition to AA. Colitis was assessed histologically and levels of proteins were analyzed with Western blot. Nadroparin not only prevented and ameliorated the AA-induced colitis histopathologically but also decreased expression of colon NF-κB, activator protein-1, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and IL-6, which were significantly increased in group AA compared to control. The accumulation of Nrf2 in nuclear fraction and HO-1 found low in group AA was increased with nadroparin (p < 0.05). The mean malondialdehyde level increased with AA and was decreased significantly with nadroparin prevention and treatment (p < 0.001). Nadroparin sodium has both protective and therapeutic effects against colonic inflammation via exerting anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects by modulating Nrf2/HO-1 and NF-κB pathways.

  7. Compact acid-induced state of Clitoria ternatea agglutinin retains its biological activity.

    PubMed

    Naeem, A; Saleemuddin, M; Khan, R H

    2009-10-01

    The effects of pH on Clitoria ternatea agglutinin (CTA) were studied by spectroscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, and by measuring carbohydrate specificity. At pH 2.6, CTA lacks well-defined tertiary structure, as seen by fluorescence and near-UV CD spectra. Far-UV CD spectra show retention of 50% native-like secondary structure. The mean residue ellipticity at 217 nm plotted against pH showed a transition around pH 4.0 with loss of secondary structure leading to the formation of an acid-unfolded state. This state is relatively less denatured than the state induced by 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. With a further decrease in pH, this unfolded state regains ~75% secondary structure at pH 1.2, leading to the formation of the A-state with native-like near-UV CD spectral features. Enhanced 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonate binding was observed in A-state, indicating a "molten-globule" like conformation with exposed hydrophobic residues. Acrylamide quenching data exhibit reduced accessibility of quencher to tryptophan, suggesting a compact conformation at low pH. Size-exclusion chromatography shows the presence of a compact intermediate with hydrodynamic size corresponding to a monomer. Thermal denaturation of the native state was cooperative single-step transition and of the A-state was non-cooperative two-step transition. A-State regains 72% of the carbohydrate-binding activity.

  8. Low Frequency Stimulation Decreases Seizure Activity in a Mutation Model of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kile, Kara Buehrer; Tian, Nan; Durand, Dominique M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Purpose To investigate brain electrical activity in Q54 mice that display spontaneous seizures because of a gain-of-function mutation of the Scn2a sodium channel gene, and to evaluate the efficacy of low frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) for seizure frequency reduction. Methods EEG, EMG, and hippocampal deep electrodes were implanted into Q54 mice expressing an epileptic phenotype (n = 6). Chronic six channel recordings (wideband, 0.1–300 Hz) were stored 24 hours a day for more than 12 days. Low Frequency stimulation (LFS) (3Hz, square wave, biphasic, 100μs, 400μA) was applied to the ventral hippocampal commisure (VHC) in alternating five minute cycles (on or off) 24 hours a day for a period of four days. Results LFS (3Hz) resulted in a significant reduction in seizure frequency and duration (21% and 35%, p<0.05), when applied to the VHC of epileptic Q54 mice (n = 6). Seizure frequency was not directly affected by stimulation state (“on” versus “off”). Conclusion LFS applied at a frequency of 3Hz significantly reduced seizure frequency and duration in the Q54 model. Furthermore, the reduction of seizure frequency and duration by LFS was not immediate but had a delayed and lasting effect, supporting complex, indirect mechanisms of action. PMID:20659150

  9. Developmental Febrile Seizures Modulate Hippocampal Gene Expression of Hyperpolarization-Activated Channels in an Isoform- and Cell-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, Amy; Bender, Roland A.; Chen, Yuncai; Dube, Celine; Eghbal-Ahmadi, Mariam; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2012-01-01

    Febrile seizures, in addition to being the most common seizure type of the developing human, may contribute to the generation of subsequent limbic epilepsy. Our previous work has demonstrated that prolonged experimental febrile seizures in the immature rat model increased hippocampal excitability long term, enhancing susceptibility to future seizures. The mechanisms for these profound proepileptogenic changes did not require cell death and were associated with long-term slowed kinetics of the hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing current (IH). Here we show that these seizures modulate the expression of genes encoding this current, the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCNs): In CA1 neurons expressing multiple HCN isoforms, the seizures induced a coordinated reduction of HCN1 mRNA and enhancement of HCN2 expression, thus altering the neuronal HCN phenotype. The seizure-induced augmentation of HCN2 expression involved CA3 in addition to CA1, whereas for HCN4, mRNA expression was not changed by the seizures in either hippocampal region. This isoform- and region-specific transcriptional regulation of the HCNs required neuronal activity rather than hyperthermia alone, correlated with seizure duration, and favored the formation of slow-kinetics HCN2-encoded channels. In summary, these data demonstrate a novel, activity-dependent transcriptional regulation of HCN molecules by developmental seizures. These changes result in long-lasting alteration of the HCN phenotype of specific hippocampal neuronal populations, with profound consequences on the excitability of the hippocampal network. PMID:12040066

  10. Developmental febrile seizures modulate hippocampal gene expression of hyperpolarization-activated channels in an isoform- and cell-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Brewster, Amy; Bender, Roland A; Chen, Yuncai; Dube, Celine; Eghbal-Ahmadi, Mariam; Baram, Tallie Z

    2002-06-01

    Febrile seizures, in addition to being the most common seizure type of the developing human, may contribute to the generation of subsequent limbic epilepsy. Our previous work has demonstrated that prolonged experimental febrile seizures in the immature rat model increased hippocampal excitability long term, enhancing susceptibility to future seizures. The mechanisms for these profound proepileptogenic changes did not require cell death and were associated with long-term slowed kinetics of the hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing current (I(H)). Here we show that these seizures modulate the expression of genes encoding this current, the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCNs): In CA1 neurons expressing multiple HCN isoforms, the seizures induced a coordinated reduction of HCN1 mRNA and enhancement of HCN2 expression, thus altering the neuronal HCN phenotype. The seizure-induced augmentation of HCN2 expression involved CA3 in addition to CA1, whereas for HCN4, mRNA expression was not changed by the seizures in either hippocampal region. This isoform- and region-specific transcriptional regulation of the HCNs required neuronal activity rather than hyperthermia alone, correlated with seizure duration, and favored the formation of slow-kinetics HCN2-encoded channels. In summary, these data demonstrate a novel, activity-dependent transcriptional regulation of HCN molecules by developmental seizures. These changes result in long-lasting alteration of the HCN phenotype of specific hippocampal neuronal populations, with profound consequences on the excitability of the hippocampal network.

  11. Long-term electrical stimulation at ear and electro-acupuncture at ST36-ST37 attenuated COX-2 in the CA1 of hippocampus in kainic acid-induced epileptic seizure rats.

    PubMed

    Liao, En-Tzu; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lin, Yi-Wen; Liang Hsieh, Ching

    2017-03-28

    Seizures produce brain inflammation, which in turn enhances neuronal excitability. Therefore, anti-inflammation has become a therapeutic strategy for antiepileptic treatment. Cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays a critical role in postseizure brain inflammation and neuronal hyperexcitability. Our previous studies have shown that both electrical stimulation (ES) at the ear and electro-acupuncture (EA) at the Zusanli and Shangjuxu acupoints (ST36-ST37) for 6 weeks can reduce mossy fiber sprouting, spike population, and high-frequency hippocampal oscillations in kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptic seizure rats. This study further investigated the effect of long-term ear ES and EA at ST36-ST37 on the inflammatory response in KA-induced epileptic seizure rats. Both the COX-2 levels in the hippocampus and the number of COX-2 immunoreactive cells in the hippocampal CA1 region were increased after KA-induced epileptic seizures, and these were reduced through the 6-week application of ear ES or EA at ST36-ST37. Thus, long-term ear ES or long-term EA at ST36-ST37 have an anti-inflammatory effect, suggesting that they are beneficial for the treatment of epileptic seizures.

  12. Carbamazepine inhibits distinct chemoconvulsant-induced seizure-like activity in Dugesia tigrina.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Latha; Desaer, Cassie

    2011-10-01

    Planaria, non-parasitic flatworms, were recently shown to be a simple yet sensitive model for investigating the pharmacology of convulsants and anticonvulsants. The present findings show that three distinct chemoconvulsants, (-)-nicotine, picrotoxin, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), induce dose-dependent seizure-like paroxysms in the planarian Dugesia tigrina. Carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, iminodibenzyl derivatives, exhibit anticonvulsive effects mediated mainly through the inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. Apart from these primary molecular targets, both carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine are known to activate γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors and inhibit NMDA activated glutamate receptors and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The present study shows that in D. tigrina both carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine inhibit chemoconvulsant-induced seizure behaviors in a dose-dependent manner. Carbamazepine (100 μM) decreased by ~65% the cumulative mean planarian seizure-like activity (pSLA) observed in the presence of (-)-nicotine (10 μM), picrotoxin (5mM), or NMDA (3mM), whereas oxcarbazepine (1 μM) decreased by 45% the cumulative mean pSLA induced by (-)-nicotine (10μM). The results demonstrate, for the first time, the anti-seizure pharmacology of carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine in an invertebrate seizure model.

  13. Seizures, refractory status epilepticus, and depolarization block as endogenous brain activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Houssaini, Kenza; Ivanov, Anton I.; Bernard, Christophe; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy, refractory status epilepticus, and depolarization block are pathological brain activities whose mechanisms are poorly understood. Using a generic mathematical model of seizure activity, we show that these activities coexist under certain conditions spanning the range of possible brain activities. We perform a detailed bifurcation analysis and predict strategies to escape from some of the pathological states. Experimental results using rodent data provide support of the model, highlighting the concept that these pathological activities belong to the endogenous repertoire of brain activities.

  14. PAR-2 activation enhances weak acid-induced ATP release through TRPV1 and ASIC sensitization in human esophageal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liping; Oshima, Tadayuki; Shan, Jing; Sei, Hiroo; Tomita, Toshihiko; Ohda, Yoshio; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Miwa, Hiroto

    2015-10-15

    Esophageal visceral hypersensitivity has been proposed to be the pathogenesis of heartburn sensation in nonerosive reflux disease. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is expressed in human esophageal epithelial cells and is believed to play a role in inflammation and sensation. PAR-2 activation may modulate these responses through adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release, which is involved in transduction of sensation and pain. The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are both acid-sensitive nociceptors. However, the interaction among these molecules and the mechanisms of heartburn sensation are still not clear. We therefore examined whether ATP release in human esophageal epithelial cells in response to acid is modulated by TRPV1 and ASICs and whether PAR-2 activation influences the sensitivity of TRPV1 and ASICs. Weak acid (pH 5) stimulated the release of ATP from primary human esophageal epithelial cells (HEECs). This effect was significantly reduced after pretreatment with 5-iodoresiniferatoxin (IRTX), a TRPV1-specific antagonist, or with amiloride, a nonselective ASIC blocker. TRPV1 and ASIC3 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection also decreased weak acid-induced ATP release. Pretreatment of HEECs with trypsin, tryptase, or a PAR-2 agonist enhanced weak acid-induced ATP release. Trypsin treatment led to the phosphorylation of TRPV1. Acid-induced ATP release enhancement by trypsin was partially blocked by IRTX, amiloride, or a PAR-2 antagonist. Conversely, acid-induced ATP release was augmented by PAR-2 activation through TRPV1 and ASICs. These findings suggested that the pathophysiology of heartburn sensation or esophageal hypersensitivity may be associated with the activation of PAR-2, TRPV1, and ASICs.

  15. BAD-Dependent Regulation of Fuel Metabolism and KATP Channel Activity Confers Resistance to Epileptic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Giménez-Cassina, Alfredo; Martínez-François, Juan Ramón; Fisher, Jill K.; Szlyk, Benjamin; Polak, Klaudia; Wiwczar, Jessica; Tanner, Geoffrey R.; Lutas, Andrew; Yellen, Gary; Danial, Nika N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Neuronal excitation can be substantially modulated by alterations in metabolism, as evident from the anticonvulsant effect of diets that reduce glucose utilization and promote ketone body metabolism. We provide genetic evidence that BAD, a protein with dual functions in apoptosis and glucose metabolism, imparts reciprocal effects on metabolism of glucose and ketone bodies in brain cells. These effects involve phospho-regulation of BAD and are independent of its apoptotic function. BAD modifications that reduce glucose metabolism produce a marked increase in the activity of metabolically sensitive KATP channels in neurons, as well as resistance to behavioral and electrographic seizures in vivo. Seizure resistance is reversed by genetic ablation of the KATP channel, implicating the BAD-KATP axis in metabolic control of neuronal excitation and seizure responses. PMID:22632729

  16. Absence seizure

    MedlinePlus

    Seizure - petit mal; Seizure - absence; Petit mal seizure; Epilepsy - absence seizure ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  17. Magnesium sulfate treatment against sarin poisoning: dissociation between overt convulsions and recorded cortical seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Katalan, Shahaf; Lazar, Shlomi; Brandeis, Rachel; Rabinovitz, Ishai; Egoz, Inbal; Grauer, Ettie; Bloch-Shilderman, Eugenia; Raveh, Lily

    2013-02-01

    Sarin, a potent organophosphate cholinesterase inhibitor, induces an array of toxic effects including convulsions. Many antidotal treatments contain anticonvulsants to block seizure activity and the ensuing brain damage. Magnesium sulfate (MGS) is used to suppress eclamptic seizures in pregnant women with hypertension and was shown to block kainate-induced convulsions. Magnesium sulfate was evaluated herein as an anticonvulsant against sarin poisoning and its efficacy was compared with the potent anticonvulsants midazolam (MDZ) and caramiphen (CRM). Rats were exposed to a convulsant dose of sarin (96 μg/kg, im) and 1 min later treated with the oxime TMB4 and atropine to increase survival. Five minutes after initiation of convulsions, MGS, CRM, or MDZ were administered. Attenuation of tonic-clonic convulsions was observed following all these treatments. However, radio-telemetric electro-corticography (ECoG) monitoring demonstrated sustained seizure activity in MGS-injected animals while this activity was completely blocked by MDZ and CRM. This disrupted brain activity was associated with marked increase in brain translocator protein levels, a marker for brain damage, measured 1 week following exposure. Additionally, histopathological analyses of MGS-treated group showed typical sarin-induced brain injury excluding the hippocampus that was partially protected. Our results clearly show that MGS demonstrated misleading features as an anticonvulsant against sarin-induced seizures. This stems from the dissociation observed between overt convulsions and seizure activity. Thus, the presence or absence of motor convulsions may be an unreliable indicator in the assessment of clinical status and in directing adequate antidotal treatments following exposure to nerve agents in battle field or terror attacks.

  18. Optogenetic activation of VGLUT2-expressing excitatory neurons blocks epileptic seizure-like activity in the mouse entorhinal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yekhlef, Latefa; Breschi, Gian Luca; Taverna, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    We investigated whether an anti-epileptic effect is obtained by selectively activating excitatory neurons expressing ChR2 under the promoter for the synaptic vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2). VGLUT2-expressing cells were optically stimulated while local field potential and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in mouse entorhinal cortical slices perfused with the proconvulsive compound 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). In control conditions, blue light flashes directly depolarized the majority of putative glutamatergic cells, which in turn synaptically excited GABAergic interneurons. During bath perfusion with 4-AP, photostimuli triggered a fast EPSP-IPSP sequence which was often followed by tonic-clonic seizure-like activity closely resembling spontaneous ictal discharges. The GABAA-receptor antagonist gabazine blocked the progression of both light-induced and spontaneous seizures. Surprisingly, prolonged photostimuli delivered during ongoing seizures caused a robust interruption of synchronous discharges. Such break was correlated with a membrane potential depolarization block in principal cells, while putative GABAergic interneurons changed their firing activity from a burst-like to an irregular single-spike pattern. These data suggest that photostimulation of glutamatergic neurons triggers seizure-like activity only in the presence of an intact GABAergic transmission and that selectively activating the same glutamatergic cells robustly interrupts ongoing seizures by inducing a strong depolarization block, resulting in the disruption of paroxysmal burst-like firing. PMID:28230208

  19. Activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in peritumoral tissues can cause glioma-associated seizures.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yang; Xiang, Wang; Yanhui, Liu; Ruofei, Liang; Jiewen, Luo; Shu, Jiang; Qing, Mao

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic seizures, the most common symptom accompanying glioma, are closely associated with tumor growth and patient quality of life. However, the association between glioma and glioma-related epilepsy is poorly understood. In fact, findings related to the location of epileptogenicity have been inconsistent in previous studies. We investigated seizure foci in patients with glioma and the corresponding association between glioma-related epilepsy and the tumoral and peritumoral microenvironment. Clinical characteristics, extracellular electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and western blots were conducted on 12 patients with glioma; nine patients had histories of preoperative seizures while three did not. Samples from included patients were used to identify seizure foci and mTOR pathway status. Electrophysiological recordings were conducted on 36 samples (tumor, peritumoral, and normal brain tissues) from 12 patients. Interictal-like discharges (ILDs) were observed in seven of nine peritumoral tissues obtained from patients with glioma that had experienced perioperative seizures. No ILDs were observed in any other sample groups. Western blots and immunohistochemistry for mTOR pathway proteins (mTOR and S6k) suggested that the mTOR pathway was activated in peritumoral tissues of patients with seizure history, but inactivated in patients without seizure history. Our results suggest that mTOR pathway expression in peritumoral tissues is associated with tumor-related seizures, thus providing a potential target for therapeutics aimed at simultaneously controlling gliomas and seizures.

  20. The Cause of the Imbalance in the Neuronal Network Leading to Seizure Activity Can Be Predicted by the Electrographic Pattern of the Seizure Onset

    PubMed Central

    Bragin, Anatol; Azizyan, Avetis; Almajano, Joyel; Engel, Jerome

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the temporal dynamics of ictal electrical activity induced by injection of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline, and the glutamate agonist kainic acid, into the CA3 area of hippocampus. Experiments were conducted in freely moving adult Wistar rats implanted with microelectrodes in multiple brain areas. Wide-band electrical activity (0.1–3000 Hz) was recorded, and the latency of seizure onset as well as the pattern of electrical activity were investigated for each drug. The latencies between injection and the occurrence of first epileptiform events were 3.93 ± 2.76 (±STD) min for bicuculline and 6.37 ± 7.66 min for kainic acid, suggesting the existence of powerful seizure-suppressive mechanisms in the brain. Bicuculline evoked high-amplitude rhythmic epileptiform events at the site of injection which resembled interictal EEG spikes and rapidly propagated to adjacent and remote brain areas. Kainic acid evoked a completely different pattern with a gradual increase in the amplitude of 30–80 Hz activity. Whereas there was strong temporal correlation between EEG events at the site of bicuculline injection and discharges in distant areas, much less correlation was seen with kainic acid injection. Both patterns were followed by generalized ictal EEG discharges and behavioral seizures. Our results illustrate that the same area of the brain can trigger seizures with different electrographic patterns. The knowledge of the network mechanisms underlying these two distinct electrographic patterns might be helpful in designing differential strategies for preventing seizure occurrence. PMID:19295168

  1. Noninvasive transcranial focal stimulation via tripolar concentric ring electrodes lessens behavioral seizure activity of recurrent pentylenetetrazole administrations in rats

    PubMed Central

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Liu, Xiang; Besio, Walter G.

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately one percent of the world population. Antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in approximately 30% of patients and have side effects. We have been developing a noninvasive transcranial focal electrical stimulation with our novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes as an alternative/complementary therapy for seizure control. In this study we demonstrate the effect of focal stimulation on behavioral seizure activity induced by two successive pentylenetetrazole administrations in rats. Seizure onset latency, time of the first behavioral change, duration of seizure, and maximal seizure severity score were studied and compared for focal stimulation treated (n = 9) and control groups (n = 10). First, we demonstrate that no significant difference was found in behavioral activity for focal stimulation treated and control groups after the first pentylenetetrazole administration. Next, comparing first and second pentylenetetrazole administrations, we demonstrate there was a significant change in behavioral activity (time of the first behavioral change) in both groups that was not related to focal stimulation. Finally, we demonstrate focal stimulation provoking a significant change in seizure onset latency, duration of seizure, and maximal seizure severity score. We believe that these results, combined with our previous reports, suggest that transcranial focal stimulation may have an anticonvulsant effect. PMID:22692938

  2. The synergic effect of regular exercise and resveratrol on kainate-induced oxidative stress and seizure activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-jae; Kim, Il-Kon; Song, Wook; Lee, Jin; Park, Sok

    2013-01-01

    The synergic effect of regular exercise and resveratrol, a polyphenolic compound with potent antioxidant activity, was investigated against kainate-induced seizures and oxidative stress in mice. After 6 weeks of swimming training, the total body weight decreased and the blood concentration of lactate stabilized statistically in comparison with the sedentary mice, indicate that the training program increased the aerobic resistance of mice. Kainate (30 mg/kg) evoked seizure activity 5 min after injection, and seizure activity was measured seizure rating scores every 5 min up to 2 h. As previously well known experiments, regular exercise and resveratrol (40 mg/kg, daily supplementation for 6 weeks) have an inhibitory effect on kainate-induced seizure activity and oxidative stress. In particularly, a synergistic cooperation of regular exercise and resveratrol was observed in seizure activity, mortality and oxidative stress especially in SOD activity. These results suggest that regular exercise along with an anti-convulsant agent such as resveratrol could be a more efficient method for the prevention of seizure development than exercise alone.

  3. Use of Activated Carbon in Packaging to Attenuate Formaldehyde-Induced and Formic Acid-Induced Degradation and Reduce Gelatin Cross-Linking in Solid Dosage Forms.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Stephen T; Zelesky, Todd C; Chen, Raymond; Likar, Michael D; MacDonald, Bruce C; Hawkins, Joel M; Carroll, Sophia C; Johnson, Gail M; Space, J Sean; Jensen, James F; DeMatteo, Vincent A

    2016-07-01

    Formaldehyde and formic acid are reactive impurities found in commonly used excipients and can be responsible for limiting drug product shelf-life. Described here is the use of activated carbon in drug product packaging to attenuate formaldehyde-induced and formic acid-induced drug degradation in tablets and cross-linking in hard gelatin capsules. Several pharmaceutical products with known or potential vulnerabilities to formaldehyde-induced or formic acid-induced degradation or gelatin cross-linking were subjected to accelerated stability challenges in the presence and absence of activated carbon. The effects of time and storage conditions were determined. For all of the products studied, activated carbon attenuated drug degradation or gelatin cross-linking. This novel use of activated carbon in pharmaceutical packaging may be useful for enhancing the chemical stability of drug products or the dissolution stability of gelatin-containing dosage forms and may allow for the 1) extension of a drug product's shelf-life when the limiting attribute is a degradation product induced by a reactive impurity, 2) marketing of a drug product in hotter and more humid climatic zones than currently supported without the use of activated carbon, and 3) enhanced dissolution stability of products that are vulnerable to gelatin cross-linking.

  4. The Na+/H+ exchanger controls deoxycholic acid-induced apoptosis by a H+-activated, Na+-dependent ionic shift in esophageal cells.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Aaron; Chen, HwuDauRw; Khan, Mohammad R; Roesly, Heather; Hill, Kimberly A; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Mandal, Amritlal; Delamere, Nicholas A; Dvorak, Katerina

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis resistance is a hallmark of cancer cells. Typically, bile acids induce apoptosis. However during gastrointestinal (GI) tumorigenesis the cancer cells develop resistance to bile acid-induced cell death. To understand how bile acids induce apoptosis resistance we first need to identify the molecular pathways that initiate apoptosis in response to bile acid exposure. In this study we examined the mechanism of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced apoptosis, specifically the role of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) and Na(+) influx in esophageal cells. In vitro studies revealed that the exposure of esophageal cells (JH-EsoAd1, CP-A) to DCA (0.2 mM-0.5 mM) caused lysosomal membrane perturbation and transient cytoplasmic acidification. Fluorescence microscopy in conjunction with atomic absorption spectrophotometry demonstrated that this effect on lysosomes correlated with influx of Na(+), subsequent loss of intracellular K(+), an increase of Ca(2+) and apoptosis. However, ethylisopropyl-amiloride (EIPA), a selective inhibitor of NHE, prevented Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) changes and caspase 3/7 activation induced by DCA. Ouabain and amphotericin B, two drugs that increase intracellular Na(+) levels, induced similar changes as DCA (ion imbalance, caspase3/7 activation). On the contrary, DCA-induced cell death was inhibited by medium with low a Na(+) concentrations. In the same experiments, we exposed rat ileum ex-vivo to DCA with or without EIPA. Severe tissue damage and caspase-3 activation was observed after DCA treatment, but EIPA almost fully prevented this response. In summary, NHE-mediated Na(+) influx is a critical step leading to DCA-induced apoptosis. Cells tolerate acidification but evade DCA-induced apoptosis if NHE is inhibited. Our data suggests that suppression of NHE by endogenous or exogenous inhibitors may lead to apoptosis resistance during GI tumorigenesis.

  5. P-gp Protein Expression and Transport Activity in Rodent Seizure Models and Human Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hartz, Anika M S; Pekcec, Anton; Soldner, Emma L B; Zhong, Yu; Schlichtiger, Juli; Bauer, Bjoern

    2017-03-02

    A cure for epilepsy is currently not available, and seizure genesis, seizure recurrence, and resistance to antiseizure drugs remain serious clinical problems. Studies show that the blood-brain barrier is altered in animal models of epilepsy and in epileptic patients. In this regard, seizures increase expression of blood-brain barrier efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which is thought to reduce brain uptake of antiseizure drugs, and thus, contribute to antiseizure drug resistance. The goal of the current study was to assess the viability of combining in vivo and ex vivo preparations of isolated brain capillaries from animal models of seizures and epilepsy as well as from patients with epilepsy to study P-gp at the blood-brain barrier. Exposing isolated rat brain capillaries to glutamate ex vivo upregulated P-gp expression to levels that were similar to those in capillaries isolated from rats that had status epilepticus or chronic epilepsy. Moreover, the fold-increase in P-gp protein expression seen in animal models is consistent with the fold-increase in P-gp observed in human brain capillaries isolated from patients with epilepsy compared to age-matched control individuals. Overall, the in vivo/ex vivo approach presented here allows detailed analysis of the mechanisms underlying seizure-induced changes of P-gp expression and transport activity at the blood-brain barrier. This approach can be extended to other blood-brain barrier proteins that might contribute to drug-resistant epilepsy or other CNS disorders as well.

  6. Topiramate antagonizes NMDA- and AMPA-induced seizure-like activity in planarians.

    PubMed

    Rawls, Scott M; Thomas, Timmy; Adeola, Mobilaji; Patil, Tanvi; Raymondi, Natalie; Poles, Asha; Loo, Michael; Raffa, Robert B

    2009-10-01

    The mechanism of anticonvulsant action of topiramate includes inhibition of glutamate-activated ion channels. The evidence is most convincing for direct inhibitory action at the ionotropic AMPA (alpha-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid) and kainate ((2S,3S,4S)-3-(Carboxymethyl)-4-prop-1-en-2-ylpyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid) glutamate receptor subtypes. Less direct connection has been made to the NMDA (N-Methyl-d-aspartate) subtype. In the present study, we demonstrate that NMDA and AMPA produce concentration-dependent seizure-like activity in planarians, a type of flatworm which possesses mammalian-like neurotransmitters. In contrast, planarians exposed to the inhibitory amino acid, glycine, did not display pSLA. For combination experiments, topiramate significantly reduced planarian seizure-like activity (pSLA) produced by NMDA or AMPA. Additionally, NMDA-induced pSLA was antagonized by either an NMDA receptor antagonist (MK-801) or AMPA receptor antagonist (DNQX), thus suggesting that NMDA-induced pSLA was mediated by NMDA and non-NMDA receptors. The present results provide pharmacologic evidence of a functional inhibitory action of topiramate on glutamate receptor activity in invertebrates and provide a sensitive, quantifiable end-point for studying anti-seizure pharmacology.

  7. Curcumin inhibits trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced colitis in rats by activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Deng, Changsheng; Zheng, Jiaju; Xia, Jian; Sheng, Dan

    2006-08-01

    Curcumin is a widely used spice with anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. It has been reported that curcumin held therapeutic effects on experimental colitis by inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB). The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is a nuclear receptor with anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory effects and its activation may inhibit the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB. Several studies have shown that PPARgamma ligands had an important therapeutic effect in colitis. However there is no report about the alteration of PPARgamma in trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis treated with curcumin. In this study, we administered curcumin (30 mg/kg/day) by intraperitoneal injection immediately after colitis was induced and the injection lasted for two weeks. have evaluated the effects of curcumin on the colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS). Curcumin (30 mg/kg d) was administered by intraperitoneal just after colitis was induced and lasted for two weeks. Therapeutic effects of dexamethasone (Dex, 2 mg/kg d) alone and the combined effects of curcumin+Dex were also examined. We found that curcumin improved long-term survival rate of disease-bearing rats, promoted rat body weight recovery, and decreased macroscopic scores of the colitis. The expression levels of PPARgamma, 15-deoxy-D12,14-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) were all increased, but the expression level of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was decreased in rats after administration of curcumin. Treatment with Dex improved PPARgamma expression and inhibited the expression of COX-2, 15d-PGJ(2) and PGE(2). Combined effects of curcumin+Dex were similar to that of Dex. In summary, curcumin showed therapeutic effects on TNBS-induced colitis and the mechanisms by which curcumin exerts its effects may involve activation of PPARgamma and its ligands.

  8. Athletes with seizure disorders.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Byron Don; Pleacher, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with seizure disorders have long been restricted from participation in certain sporting activities. Those with seizure disorders are more likely than their peers to have a sedentary lifestyle and to develop obesity. Regular participation in physical activity can improve both physical and psychosocial outcomes for persons with seizure disorders. Seizure activity often is reduced among those patients who regularly engage in aerobic activity. Recent literature indicates that the diagnosis of seizure disorders remains highly stigmatizing in the adolescent population. Persons with seizure disorders may be more accepted by peer groups if they are allowed to participate in sports and recreational activities. Persons with seizure disorders are encouraged to participate in regular aerobic activities. They may participate in team sports and contact or collision activities provided that they utilize appropriate protective equipment. There seems to be no increased risk of injury or increasing seizure activity as the result of such participation. Persons with seizure disorders still are discouraged from participating in scuba diving and skydiving. The benefits of participation in regular sporting activity far outweigh any risk to the athlete with a seizure disorder who chooses to participate in sports.

  9. Interneurons spark seizure-like activity in the entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Maxime; Herrington, Rochelle; Hamidi, Shabnam; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    Excessive neuronal synchronization is presumably involved in epileptiform synchronization. However, the respective roles played by interneurons (GABAergic) and principal (glutamatergic) cells during interictal and ictal discharges remain unclear. Here, we employed tetrode wire recordings to establish the involvement of these two cell types in 4-aminopyridine-induced interictal- and low-voltage fast (LVF) onset ictal-like discharges in the rat entorhinal cortex in an in vitro slice preparation. We recorded a total of 90 single units (69 putative interneurons, 17 putative principal and 4 unclassified cells) from 36 slices, and found that: (i) interneurons (66.7%) were more likely to fire during interictal discharges than principal cells (35.3%); (ii) interneuron activity increased shortly before LVF ictal onset, whereas principal cell activity did not change; (iii) interneurons and principal cells fired at high rates throughout the tonic phase of the ictal discharge; however, (iv) only interneurons showed phase-locked relationship with LVF activity at 5-15Hz during the tonic phase. Finally, the association of interneuron firing with interictal discharges was maintained during blockade of ionotropic glutamatergic transmission. Our findings demonstrate the prominent involvement of interneurons in interictal discharge generation and in the transition to LVF ictal activity in this in vitro model of epileptiform synchronization.

  10. Anticonvulsant activity of β-caryophyllene against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Cleide Correia; de Oliveira, Clarissa Vasconcelos; Grigoletto, Jéssica; Ribeiro, Leandro Rodrigo; Funck, Vinícius Rafael; Grauncke, Ana Cláudia Beck; de Souza, Thaíze Lopes; Souto, Naieli Schiefelbein; Furian, Ana Flávia; Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider

    2016-03-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that plant-derived extracts and their isolated components are useful for treatment of seizures and, hence, constitute a valuable source of new antiepileptic drugs with improved efficacy and better adverse effect profile. β-Caryophyllene is a natural bicyclic sesquiterpene that occurs in a wide range of plant species and displays a number of biological actions, including neuroprotective activity. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that β-caryophyllene displays anticonvulsant effects. In addition, we investigated the effect of β-caryophyllene on behavioral parameters and on seizure-induced oxidative stress. Adult C57BL/6 mice received increasing doses of β-caryophyllene (0, 10, 30, or 100mg/kg). After 60 min, we measured the latencies to myoclonic and generalized seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ, 60 mg/kg). We found that β-caryophyllene increased the latency to myoclonic jerks induced by PTZ. This result was confirmed by electroencephalographic analysis. In a separate set of experiments, we found that mice treated with an anticonvulsant dose of β-caryophyllene (100mg/kg) displayed an improved recognition index in the object recognition test. This effect was not accompanied by behavioral changes in the open-field, rotarod, or forced swim tests. Administration of an anticonvulsant dose of β-caryophyllene (100mg/kg) did not prevent PTZ-induced oxidative stress (i.e., increase in the levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances or the decrease in nonprotein thiols content). Altogether, the present data suggest that β-caryophyllene displays anticonvulsant activity against seizures induced by PTZ in mice. Since no adverse effects were observed in the same dose range of the anticonvulsant effect, β-caryophyllene should be further evaluated in future development of new anticonvulsant drugs.

  11. The contribution of a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) conductance to amino-acid-induced inward current responses of ciliated olfactory neurons of the rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Suzuki, N

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether amino-acid-induced inward currents of ciliated olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) include a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) conductance, we first studied changes in reversal potential and the current/voltage relationships of the responses of ORNs to an amino acid mixture (l-alanine, l-arginine, l-glutamate and l-norvaline; all 10 mmol l(-)(1)) with different concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) in the perfusion and recording pipette solutions. We also examined the effects of six different Cl(-) channel blockers on the responses of ORNs using a conventional whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. The amino acid mixture and one blocker were applied focally to the cilia of ORNs using a double-barrelled micropipette and a pressure ejection system. The expected shifts in reversal potential, indicating the contribution of the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) conductance, occurred in both positive and negative directions depending on the external and internal Na(+) and Cl(-) concentrations. Niflumic acid, flufenamic acid, NPPB [5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzonate] and DCDPC (3', 5-dichlorodiphenylamine-2-carboxylate), at 0.5 mmol l(-)(1), reversibly blocked both the amino-acid-induced inward currents and the background activity in most ORNs. The effectiveness of these blocking agents varied from 77 to 91 % for ORNs perfused externally with standard Ringer's solution. SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonate), at 5.0 mmol l(-)(1), irreversibly inhibited the physiological response (100 % inhibition), whereas DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2, 2'-disulphonate), at 5.0 mmol l(-)(1), had the smallest effect (45 %) of the inhibitors tested. The dose of niflumic acid inducing 50 % inhibition (IC(50)), determined specifically for the current component of the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, was 70 micromol l(-)(1). Our results suggest that these blockers are not specific for Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels and that

  12. Acid-Induced Activation of the Urease Promoters Is Mediated Directly by the ArsRS Two-Component System of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Pflock, Michael; Kennard, Simone; Delany, Isabel; Scarlato, Vincenzo; Beier, Dagmar

    2005-01-01

    The nickel-containing enzyme urease is an essential colonization factor of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori which enables the bacteria to survive the low-pH conditions of the stomach. Transcription of the urease genes is positively controlled in response to increasing concentrations of nickel ions and acidic pH. Here we demonstrate that acid-induced transcription of the urease genes is mediated directly by the ArsRS two-component system. Footprint analyses identify binding sites of the phosphorylated ArsR response regulator within the ureA and ureI promoters. Furthermore, deletion of a distal upstream ArsR binding site of the ureA promoter demonstrates its role in acid-dependent activation of the promoter. In addition, acid-induced transcription of the ureA gene is unaltered in a nikR mutant, providing evidence that pH-responsive regulation and nickel-responsive regulation of the ureA promoter are mediated by independent mechanisms involving the ArsR response regulator and the NikR protein. PMID:16177315

  13. Protective Effect of Unsaturated Fatty Acids on Palmitic Acid-Induced Toxicity in Skeletal Muscle Cells is not Mediated by PPARδ Activation.

    PubMed

    Tumova, Jana; Malisova, Lucia; Andel, Michal; Trnka, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Unsaturated free fatty acids (FFA) are able to prevent deleterious effects of saturated FFA in skeletal muscle cells although the mechanisms involved are still not completely understood. FFA act as endogenous ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), transcription factors regulating the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine whether activation of PPARδ, the most common PPAR subtype in skeletal muscle, plays a role in mediating the protective effect of unsaturated FFA on saturated FFA-induced damage in skeletal muscle cells and to examine an impact on mitochondrial respiration. Mouse C2C12 myotubes were treated for 24 h with different concentrations of saturated FFA (palmitic acid), unsaturated FFA (oleic, linoleic and α-linolenic acid), and their combinations. PPARδ agonist GW501516 and antagonist GSK0660 were also used. Both mono- and polyunsaturated FFA, but not GW501516, prevented palmitic acid-induced cell death. Mono- and polyunsaturated FFA proved to be effective activators of PPARδ compared to saturated palmitic acid; however, in combination with palmitic acid their effect on PPARδ activation was blocked and stayed at the levels observed for palmitic acid alone. Unsaturated FFA at moderate physiological concentrations as well as GW501516, but not palmitic acid, mildly uncoupled mitochondrial respiration. Our results indicate that although unsaturated FFA are effective activators of PPARδ, their protective effect on palmitic acid-induced toxicity is not mediated by PPARδ activation and subsequent induction of lipid regulatory genes in skeletal muscle cells. Other mechanisms, such as mitochondrial uncoupling, may underlie their effect.

  14. Cerebral blood flow during paroxysmal EEG activation induced by sleep in patients with complex partial seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Gozukirmizi, E.; Meyer, J.S.; Okabe, T.; Amano, T.; Mortel, K.; Karacan, I.

    1982-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements were combined with sleep polysomnography in nine patients with complex partial seizures. Two methods were used: the 133Xe method for measuring regional (rCBF) and the stable xenon CT method for local (LCBF). Compared to nonepileptic subjects, who show diffuse CBF decreases during stages I-II, non-REM sleep onset, patients with complex partial seizures show statistically significant increases in CBF which are maximal in regions where the EEG focus is localized and are predominantly seen in one temporal region but are also propagated to other cerebral areas. Both CBF methods gave comparable results, but greater statistical significance was achieved by stable xenon CT methodology. CBF increases are more diffuse than predicted by EEG paroxysmal activity recorded from scalp electrodes. An advantage of the 133Xe inhalation method was achievement of reliable data despite movement of the head. This was attributed to the use of a helmet which maintained the probes approximated to the scalp. Disadvantages were poor resolution (7 cm3) and two-dimensional information. The advantage of stable xenon CT method is excellent resolution (80 mm3) in three dimensions, but a disadvantage is that movement of the head in patients with seizure disorders may limit satisfactory measurements.

  15. Dynamics of large-scale brain activity in normal arousal states and epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Rennie, C. J.; Rowe, D. L.

    2002-04-01

    Links between electroencephalograms (EEGs) and underlying aspects of neurophysiology and anatomy are poorly understood. Here a nonlinear continuum model of large-scale brain electrical activity is used to analyze arousal states and their stability and nonlinear dynamics for physiologically realistic parameters. A simple ordered arousal sequence in a reduced parameter space is inferred and found to be consistent with experimentally determined parameters of waking states. Instabilities arise at spectral peaks of the major clinically observed EEG rhythms-mainly slow wave, delta, theta, alpha, and sleep spindle-with each instability zone lying near its most common experimental precursor arousal states in the reduced space. Theta, alpha, and spindle instabilities evolve toward low-dimensional nonlinear limit cycles that correspond closely to EEGs of petit mal seizures for theta instability, and grand mal seizures for the other types. Nonlinear stimulus-induced entrainment and seizures are also seen, EEG spectra and potentials evoked by stimuli are reproduced, and numerous other points of experimental agreement are found. Inverse modeling enables physiological parameters underlying observed EEGs to be determined by a new, noninvasive route. This model thus provides a single, powerful framework for quantitative understanding of a wide variety of brain phenomena.

  16. What is the importance of abnormal "background" activity in seizure generation?

    PubMed

    Staba, Richard J; Worrell, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of interictal epileptiform spikes and seizures have played a central role in the study of epilepsy. The background EEG activity, however, has received less attention. In this chapter we discuss the characteristic features of the background activity of the brain when individuals are at rest and awake (resting wake) and during sleep. The characteristic rhythms of the background EEG are presented, and the presence of 1/f (β) behavior of the EEG power spectral density is discussed and its possible origin and functional significance. The interictal EEG findings of focal epilepsy and the impact of interictal epileptiform spikes on cognition are also discussed.

  17. Priming by Hexanoic Acid Induce Activation of Mevalonic and Linolenic Pathways and Promotes the Emission of Plant Volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Llorens, Eugenio; Camañes, Gemma; Lapeña, Leonor; García-Agustín, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Hexanoic acid (Hx) is a short natural monocarboxylic acid present in some fruits and plants. Previous studies reported that soil drench application of this acid induces effective resistance in tomato plants against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae and in citrus against Alternaria alternata and Xanthomonas citri. In this work, we performed an in deep study of the metabolic changes produced in citrus by the application of Hx in response to the challenge pathogen A. alternata, focusing on the response of the plant. Moreover, we used 13C labeled hexanoic to analyze its behavior inside the plants. Finally, we studied the volatile emission of the treated plants after the challenge inoculation. Drench application of 13C labeled hexanoic demonstrated that this molecule stays in the roots and is not mobilized to the leaves, suggesting long distance induction of resistance. Moreover, the study of the metabolic profile showed an alteration of more than 200 molecules differentially induced by the application of the compound and the inoculation with the fungus. Bioinformatics analysis of data showed that most of these altered molecules could be related with the mevalonic and linolenic pathways suggesting the implication of these pathways in the induced resistance mediated by Hx. Finally, the application of this compound showed an enhancement of the emission of 17 volatile metabolites. Taken together, this study indicates that after the application of Hx this compound remains in the roots, provoking molecular changes that may trigger the defensive response in the rest of the plant mediated by changes in the mevalonic and linolenic pathways and enhancing the emission of volatile compounds, suggesting for the first time the implication of mevalonic pathway in response to hexanoic application. PMID:27148319

  18. Cortical Up State Activity Is Enhanced After Seizures: A Quantitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gerkin, Richard C.; Clem, Roger L.; Shruti, Sonal; Kass, Robert E.; Barth, Alison L.

    2011-01-01

    In the neocortex, neurons participate in epochs of elevated activity, or Up states, during periods of quiescent wakefulness, slow-wave sleep, and general anesthesia. The regulation of firing during and between Up states is of great interest because it can reflect the underlying connectivity and excitability of neurons within the network. Automated analysis of the onset and characteristics of Up state firing across different experiments and conditions requires a robust and accurate method for Up state detection. Using measurements of membrane potential mean and variance calculated from whole-cell recordings of neurons from control and postseizure tissue, the authors have developed such a method. This quantitative and automated method is independent of cell- or condition-dependent variability in underlying noise or tonic firing activity. Using this approach, the authors show that Up state frequency and firing rates are significantly increased in layer 2/3 neocortical neurons 24 hours after chemo-convulsant-induced seizure. Down states in postseizure tissue show greater membrane-potential variance characterized by increased synaptic activity. Previously, the authors have found that postseizure increase in excitability is linked to a gain-of-function in BK channels, and blocking BK channels in vitro and in vivo can decrease excitability and eliminate seizures. Thus, the authors also assessed the effect of BK-channel antagonists on Up state properties in control and postseizure neurons. These data establish a robust and broadly applicable algorithm for Up state detection and analysis, provide a quantitative description of how prior seizures increase spontaneous firing activity in cortical networks, and show how BK-channel antagonists reduce this abnormal activity. PMID:21127407

  19. Cingulate seizure-like activity reveals neuronal avalanche regulated by network excitability and thalamic inputs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cortical neurons display network-level dynamics with unique spatiotemporal patterns that construct the backbone of processing information signals and contribute to higher functions. Recent years have seen a wealth of research on the characteristics of neuronal networks that are sufficient conditions to activate or cease network functions. Local field potentials (LFPs) exhibit a scale-free and unique event size distribution (i.e., a neuronal avalanche) that has been proven in the cortex across species, including mice, rats, and humans, and may be used as an index of cortical excitability. In the present study, we induced seizure activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) with medial thalamic inputs and evaluated the impact of cortical excitability and thalamic inputs on network-level dynamics. We measured LFPs from multi-electrode recordings in mouse cortical slices and isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Results The ACC activity exhibited a neuronal avalanche with regard to avalanche size distribution, and the slope of the power-law distribution of the neuronal avalanche reflected network excitability in vitro and in vivo. We found that the slope of the neuronal avalanche in seizure-like activity significantly correlated with cortical excitability induced by γ-aminobutyric acid system manipulation. The thalamic inputs desynchronized cingulate seizures and affected the level of cortical excitability, the modulation of which could be determined by the slope of the avalanche size. Conclusions We propose that the neuronal avalanche may be a tool for analyzing cortical activity through LFPs to determine alterations in network dynamics. PMID:24387299

  20. ABHD6 blockade exerts antiepileptic activity in PTZ-induced seizures and in spontaneous seizures in R6/2 mice.

    PubMed

    Naydenov, Alipi V; Horne, Eric A; Cheah, Christine S; Swinney, Katie; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Cao, Jessica K; Marrs, William R; Blankman, Jacqueline L; Tu, Sarah; Cherry, Allison E; Fung, Susan; Wen, Andy; Li, Weiwei; Saporito, Michael S; Selley, Dana E; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Oakley, John C; Stella, Nephi

    2014-07-16

    The serine hydrolase α/β-hydrolase domain 6 (ABHD6) hydrolyzes the most abundant endocannabinoid (eCB) in the brain, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and controls its availability at cannabinoid receptors. We show that ABHD6 inhibition decreases pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized tonic-clonic and myoclonic seizure incidence and severity. This effect is retained in Cnr1(-/-) or Cnr2(-/-) mice, but blocked by addition of a subconvulsive dose of picrotoxin, suggesting the involvement of GABAA receptors. ABHD6 inhibition also blocked spontaneous seizures in R6/2 mice, a genetic model of juvenile Huntington's disease known to exhibit dysregulated eCB signaling. ABHD6 blockade retained its antiepileptic activity over chronic dosing and was not associated with psychomotor or cognitive effects. While the etiology of seizures in R6/2 mice remains unsolved, involvement of the hippocampus is suggested by interictal epileptic discharges, increased expression of vGLUT1 but not vGAT, and reduced Neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression. We conclude that ABHD6 inhibition may represent a novel antiepileptic strategy.

  1. ABHD6 blockade exerts antiepileptic activity in PTZ-induced seizures and in spontaneous seizures in R6/2 mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Christine S.; Swinney, Katie; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Cao, Jessica K.; Marrs, William; Blankman, Jacqueline L.; Tu, Sarah; Cherry, Allison E.; Fung, Susan; Wen, Andy; Li, Weiwei; Saporito, Michael S.; Selley, Dana E.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Oakley, John C.; Stella, Nephi

    2014-01-01

    The serine hydrolase α/β-hydrolase domain 6 (ABHD6) hydrolyzes the most abundant endocannabinoid (eCB) in the brain, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and controls its availability at cannabinoid receptors. We show that ABHD6 inhibition decreases pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized tonic-clonic and myoclonic seizure incidence, and severity. This effect is retained in cnr1−/− or cnr2−/− mice, but blocked by addition of a subconvulsive dose of picrotoxin, suggesting the involvement of GABAA receptors. ABHD6 inhibition also blocked spontaneous seizures in R6/2 mice, a genetic model of Juvenile Huntington’s disease known to exhibit dysregulated eCB signaling. ABHD6 blockade retained its antiepileptic activity over chronic dosing and was not associated with psychomotor or cognitive effects. While the etiology of seizures in R6/2 mice remains unsolved, involvement of the hippocampus is suggested by interictal epileptic discharges, increased expression of vGLUT1 but not vGAT, and reduced Neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression. We conclude that ABHD6 inhibition may represent a novel antiepileptic strategy. PMID:25033180

  2. Intractable gelastic seizures during infancy: ictal positron emission tomography (PET) demonstrating epileptiform activity within the hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Eli; Goldsher, Dorit; Genizi, Jacob; Ravid, Sarit; Keidar, Zohar

    2008-02-01

    Gelastic seizures comprise a very rare form of epilepsy. They present with recurrent bursts of laughter voices without mirth and are most commonly associated with the evolution of a hypothalamic hamartoma. The purpose of this article is to describe the second reported ictal fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography study in a unique case of an infant with intractable gelastic seizures since the neonatal period associated with a hypothalamic hamartoma. The patient presented at 4 months old with recurrent, almost persistent, gelastic seizures consisting of laughter bouts without mirth. The seizures were noticeable at the first week of life and increased in frequency to last up to 12 hours, namely status gelasticus. These gelastic fits were accompanied with focal motor seizures, including unilateral right-eye blinking and mouth twitching. Developmental mile-stones were intact for age. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cortex demonstrated a large hypothalamic hamartoma within the third ventricle, hampering cerebrovascular fluid drainage of the lateral ventricles. An electroencephalography was nondiagnostic. Ictal fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography demonstrated a large circumscribed hypermetabolic region within the location of the hypothalamic hamartoma, representing localized intense epileptiform activity. The infant became instantly free of all seizure types given minute doses of oral benzodiazepine (clonazepam) and remains completely controlled after 12 months. Her overall development remains intact. This ictal fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography is the second reported study verifying that the main source of the epileptic activity inducing gelastic seizures originates from the hypothalamic hamartoma itself; therefore, a complementary fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography study should be considered in any patient presenting with intractable gelastic seizures, especially in those associated with hypothalamic hamartoma, in order

  3. Ethanol-withdrawal seizures are controlled by tissue plasminogen activator via modulation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Robert; Melchor, Jerry P; Matys, Tomasz; Skrzypiec, Anna E; Strickland, Sidney

    2005-01-11

    Chronic ethanol abuse causes up-regulation of NMDA receptors, which underlies seizures and brain damage upon ethanol withdrawal (EW). Here we show that tissue-plasminogen activator (tPA), a protease implicated in neuronal plasticity and seizures, is induced in the limbic system by chronic ethanol consumption, temporally coinciding with up-regulation of NMDA receptors. tPA interacts with NR2B-containing NMDA receptors and is required for up-regulation of the NR2B subunit in response to ethanol. As a consequence, tPA-deficient mice have reduced NR2B, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation, and seizures after EW. tPA-mediated facilitation of EW seizures is abolished by NR2B-specific NMDA antagonist ifenprodil. These results indicate that tPA mediates the development of physical dependence on ethanol by regulating NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

  4. [Ecstatic seizures].

    PubMed

    Likhachev, S A; Astapenko, A V; Osos, E L; Zmachynskaya, O L; Gvishch, T G

    2015-01-01

    Ecstatic seizures is a rare manifestation of epilepsy. They were described for the first time by F.M. Dostoevsky. Currently, the description of ecstatic seizures is possible to find in the scientific literature. The description of the own observation of a patient with emotional-affective seizures is presented. A role of the anterior insular cortex in the ecstatic seizures origin is discussed. The similarities between the feelings reported during ecstatic seizures and the feelings experienced under the effect of stimulant addictive drugs are described. The possible reasons of the low frequency of emotional-affective seizures are considered.

  5. 10 Methylxanthines, seizures and excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev

    2010-01-01

    Clinical evidence, in particular the wide use of theophylline as bronchodilator, suggests that methylxanthines can cause seizures in patients without known underlying epilepsy. Theophylline is also known to be an added risk factor for seizure exacerbation in patients with epilepsy. The proconvulsant activity of methylxanthines can best be explained by antagonizing the brain’s own anticonvulsant adenosine. Recent evidence suggests that adenosine dysfunction is a pathological hallmark of epilepsy contributing to seizure generation and seizure spread. Conversely, adenosine augmentation therapies are effective in seizure suppression and prevention, whereas adenosine receptor antagonists such as methylxanthines generally exacerbate seizures. The impact of the methylxanthines caffeine and theophylline on seizures and excitotoxicity depends on timing, dose, and acute versus chronic use. New findings suggest a role of free radicals in theophylline-induced seizures and adenosine-independent mechanisms for seizure generation have been proposed. PMID:20859799

  6. Antiviral activity of human oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) is mediated by enhancing retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Yugen; Ghosh, Arundhati; Cuevas, Rolando A.; Forero, Adriana; Dhar, Jayeeta; Ibsen, Mikkel Søes; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan Leo; Schmidt, Tobias; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K.; Fujita, Takashi; Hartmann, Rune; Barik, Sailen; Hornung, Veit; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Virus infection is sensed in the cytoplasm by retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I, also known as DDX58), which requires RNA and polyubiquitin binding to induce type I interferon (IFN), and activate cellular innate immunity. We show that the human IFN-inducible oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) protein had antiviral activity and mediated RIG-I activation by mimicking polyubiquitin. Loss of OASL expression reduced RIG-I signaling and enhanced virus replication in human cells. Conversely, OASL expression suppressed replication of a number of viruses in a RIG-I-dependent manner and enhanced RIG-I-mediated IFN induction. OASL interacted and colocalized with RIG-I, and through its C-terminal ubiquitin-like domain specifically enhanced RIG-I signaling. Bone marrow derived macrophages from mice deficient for Oasl2 showed that among the two mouse orthologs of human OASL; Oasl2 is functionally similar to human OASL. Our findings show a mechanism by which human OASL contributes to host antiviral responses by enhancing RIG-I activation. PMID:24931123

  7. Neuroprotective effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in seizures during development.

    PubMed

    Tandon, P; Yang, Y; Das, K; Holmes, G L; Stafstrom, C E

    1999-01-01

    Although the immature brain is highly susceptible to seizures, it is more resistant to seizure-induced neuronal loss than the adult brain. The developing brain contains high levels of neurotrophins which are involved in growth, differentiation and survival of neurons. To test the hypothesis that neurotrophins may protect the developing brain from seizure-induced neuronal loss, brain-derived neurotrophic factor up-regulation was blocked by intracerebroventricular infusion of an 18mer antisense oligodeoxynucleotide sequence to brain-derived neurotrophic factor in 19-day-old rats using micro-osmotic pumps. Control rats were infused with sense or missense oligodeoxynucleotide. Status epilepticus was induced by intraperitoneal administration of kainic acid 24 h after the start of oligodeoxynucleotide infusion. Seizure duration was significantly increased in the antisense oligodeoxynucleotide plus kainic acid group compared to groups that received kainic acid alone or kainic acid plus sense or missense oligodeoxynucleotide. There was no difference between groups in the latency to forelimb clonus. A twofold increase in brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels was observed in the hippocampus 20 h following kainic acid-induced seizures. This kainic acid-induced increase was absent in animals receiving infusion of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to brain-derived neurotrophic factor at time of seizure induction. Hippocampi of rats in this group (antisense oligodeoxynucleotide plus kainic acid) showed a loss of CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells and hilar interneurons. This neuronal loss was not dependent upon seizure duration since animals injected with diazepam to control seizure activity in the antisense plus kainic acid group also showed similar neuronal loss. Administration of kainic acid or infusion of antisense alone did not produce any cell loss in these regions. Induction of seizures at postnatal day 20, in the presence or absence of antisense oligonucleotide, did not produce

  8. Chromatin and DNA methylation dynamics during retinoic acid-induced RET gene transcriptional activation in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Angrisano, T.; Sacchetti, S.; Natale, F.; Cerrato, A.; Pero, R.; Keller, S.; Peluso, S.; Perillo, B.; Avvedimento, V. E.; Fusco, A.; Bruni, C. B.; Lembo, F.; Santoro, M.; Chiariotti, L.

    2011-01-01

    Although it is well known that RET gene is strongly activated by retinoic acid (RA) in neuroblastoma cells, the mechanisms underlying such activation are still poorly understood. Here we show that a complex series of molecular events, that include modifications of both chromatin and DNA methylation state, accompany RA-mediated RET activation. Our results indicate that the primary epigenetic determinants of RA-induced RET activation differ between enhancer and promoter regions. At promoter region, the main mark of RET activation was the increase of H3K4me3 levels while no significant changes of the methylation state of H3K27 and H3K9 were observed. At RET enhancer region a bipartite chromatin domain was detected in unstimulated cells and a prompt demethylation of H3K27me3 marked RET gene activation upon RA exposure. Moreover, ChIP experiments demonstrated that EZH2 and MeCP2 repressor complexes were associated to the heavily methylated enhancer region in the absence of RA while both complexes were displaced during RA stimulation. Finally, our data show that a demethylation of a specific CpG site at the enhancer region could favor the displacement of MeCP2 from the heavily methylated RET enhancer region providing a novel potential mechanism for transcriptional regulation of methylated RA-regulated loci. PMID:20952403

  9. Monitoring neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Geraldine B; Stevenson, Nathan J; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2013-08-01

    Neonatal seizures are a neurological emergency and prompt treatment is required. Seizure burden in neonates can be very high, status epilepticus a frequent occurrence, and the majority of seizures do not have any clinical correlate. Detection of neonatal seizures is only possible with continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. EEG interpretation requires special expertise that is not available in most neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). As a result, a simplified method of EEG recording incorporating an easy-to-interpret compressed trend of the EEG output (amplitude integrated EEG) from one of the EEG output from one or two channels has emerged as a popular way to monitor neurological function in the NICU. This is not without limitations; short duration and low amplitude seizures can be missed, artefacts are problematic and may mimic seizure-like activity and only a restricted area of the brain is monitored. Continuous multichannel EEG is the gold standard for detecting seizures and monitoring response to therapy but expert interpretation of the EEG output is generally not available. Some centres have set up remote access for neurophysiologists to the cot-side EEG, but reliable interpretation is wholly dependent on the 24 h availability of experts, an expensive solution. A more practical solution for the NICU without such expertise is an automated seizure detection system. This review outlines the current state of the art regarding cot-side monitoring of neonatal seizures in the NICU.

  10. Perfluorooctanoic acid induces human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell migration and invasion through activation of ERK/mTOR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fujun; Wang, Yixong; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Ying, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xuesen

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a common environmental pollutant that has been associated with various diseases, including cancer. We explored the molecular mechanisms underlying PFOA-induced endometrial cancer cell invasion and migration. PFOA treatment enhanced migration and invasion by human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells, which correlated with decreased E-cadherin expression, a marker of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PFOA also induced activation of ERK1/2/mTOR signaling. Treatment with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, antagonized the effects of PFOA and reversed the effects of PFOA activation in a xenograft mouse model of endometrial cancer. Consistent with these results, pre-treatment with rapamycin abolished PFOA-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin expression. These results indicate that PFOA is a carcinogen that promotes endometrial cancer cell migration and invasion through activation of ERK/mTOR signaling. PMID:27589685

  11. [Gelastic seizures: etiology, semiology, therapeutic perspectives].

    PubMed

    Usacheva, E L; Mukhin, K Iu; Prityko, A G; Aĭvazian, S O; Kharlamov, L A; Shorina, M Iu

    2003-01-01

    Gelastic seizures (laughing seizures) are a rare type of epileptic seizure in which laugh in a main and dominating manifestation of the seizure. As a rule, the seizures are caused by organic cerebral pathology and are often reported as a specific epilepsy marker related to hypothalamic hamartoma. The interictal EEG frequently shows a focal activity. Based on examination of 2 patients with gelastic seizures and hypothalamic hamartoma, clinical features, EEG characteristics and therapeutic perspectives for the disorder are discussed.

  12. N-methyl-D-aspartate, hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) and gamma-aminobutyric acid conductances govern the risk of epileptogenesis following febrile seizures in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ouardouz, Mohamed; Lema, Pablo; Awad, Patricia N; Di Cristo, Graziella; Carmant, Lionel

    2010-04-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common types of seizure in children, and are generally considered to be benign. However, febrile seizures in children with dysgenesis have been associated with the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. We have previously shown in a rat model of dysgenesis (cortical freeze lesion) and hyperthermia-induced seizures that 86% of these animals developed recurrent seizures in adulthood. The cellular changes underlying the increased risk of epileptogenesis in this model are not known. Using whole cell patch-clamp recordings from CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells, we found a more pronounced increase in excitability in rats with both hyperthermic seizures and dysgenesis than in rats with hyperthermic seizures alone or dysgenesis alone. The change was found to be secondary to an increase in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Inversely, hyperpolarization-activated cation current was more pronounced in naïve rats with hyperthermic seizures than in rats with dysgenesis and hyperthermic seizures or with dysgenesis alone. The increase in GABAA-mediated inhibition observed was comparable in rats with or without dysgenesis after hyperthermic seizures, whereas no changes were observed in rats with dysgenesis alone. Our work indicates that in this two-hit model, changes in NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs may facilitate epileptogenesis following febrile seizures. Changes in the hyperpolarization-activated cation currents may represent a protective reaction and act by damping the NMDA receptor-mediated hyperexcitability, rather than converting inhibition into excitation. These findings provide a new hypothesis of cellular changes following hyperthermic seizures in predisposed individuals, and may help in the design of therapeutic strategies to prevent epileptogenesis following prolonged febrile seizures.

  13. Nitric oxide-activated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase regulates the abscisic acid-induced antioxidant defence in maize.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fangfang; Lu, Rui; Liu, Huiying; Shi, Ben; Zhang, Jianhua; Tan, Mingpu; Zhang, Aying; Jiang, Mingyi

    2012-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and calcium (Ca2+)/calmodulin (CaM) are all required for abscisic acid (ABA)-induced antioxidant defence. Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is a strong candidate for the decoder of Ca2+ signals. However, whether CCaMK is involved in ABA-induced antioxidant defence is unknown. The results of the present study show that exogenous and endogenous ABA induced increases in the activity of ZmCCaMK and the expression of ZmCCaMK in leaves of maize. Subcellular localization analysis showed that ZmCCaMK is located in the nucleus, the cytoplasm, and the plasma membrane. The transient expression of ZmCCaMK and the RNA interference (RNAi) silencing of ZmCCaMK analysis in maize protoplasts revealed that ZmCCaMK is required for ABA-induced antioxidant defence. Moreover, treatment with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) induced the activation of ZmCCaMK and the expression of ZmCCaMK. Pre-treatments with an NO scavenger and inhibitor blocked the ABA-induced increases in the activity and the transcript level of ZmCCaMK. Conversely, RNAi silencing of ZmCCaMK in maize protoplasts did not affect the ABA-induced NO production, which was further confirmed using a mutant of OsCCaMK, the homologous gene of ZmCCaMK in rice. Moreover, H2O2 was also required for the ABA activation of ZmCCaMK, and pre-treatments with an NO scavenger and inhibitor inhibited the H2O2-induced increase in the activity of ZmCCaMK. Taken together, the data clearly suggest that ZmCCaMK is required for ABA-induced antioxidant defence, and H2O2-dependent NO production plays an important role in the ABA-induced activation of ZmCCaMK.

  14. Nitric oxide-activated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase regulates the abscisic acid-induced antioxidant defence in maize

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aying; Jiang, Mingyi

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and calcium (Ca2+)/calmodulin (CaM) are all required for abscisic acid (ABA)-induced antioxidant defence. Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is a strong candidate for the decoder of Ca2+ signals. However, whether CCaMK is involved in ABA-induced antioxidant defence is unknown. The results of the present study show that exogenous and endogenous ABA induced increases in the activity of ZmCCaMK and the expression of ZmCCaMK in leaves of maize. Subcellular localization analysis showed that ZmCCaMK is located in the nucleus, the cytoplasm, and the plasma membrane. The transient expression of ZmCCaMK and the RNA interference (RNAi) silencing of ZmCCaMK analysis in maize protoplasts revealed that ZmCCaMK is required for ABA-induced antioxidant defence. Moreover, treatment with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) induced the activation of ZmCCaMK and the expression of ZmCCaMK. Pre-treatments with an NO scavenger and inhibitor blocked the ABA-induced increases in the activity and the transcript level of ZmCCaMK. Conversely, RNAi silencing of ZmCCaMK in maize protoplasts did not affect the ABA-induced NO production, which was further confirmed using a mutant of OsCCaMK, the homologous gene of ZmCCaMK in rice. Moreover, H2O2 was also required for the ABA activation of ZmCCaMK, and pre-treatments with an NO scavenger and inhibitor inhibited the H2O2-induced increase in the activity of ZmCCaMK. Taken together, the data clearly suggest that ZmCCaMK is required for ABA-induced antioxidant defence, and H2O2-dependent NO production plays an important role in the ABA-induced activation of ZmCCaMK. PMID:22865912

  15. Aristolochic acid-induced apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest depends on ROS generation and MAP kinases activation.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Victor; Whyard, Terry C; Waltzer, Wayne C; Grollman, Arthur P; Rosenquist, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Ingestion of aristolochic acids (AAs) contained in herbal remedies results in a renal disease and, frequently, urothelial malignancy. The genotoxicity of AA in renal cells, including mutagenic DNA adducts formation, is well documented. However, the mechanisms of AA-induced tubular atrophy and renal fibrosis are largely unknown. To better elucidate some aspects of this process, we studied cell cycle distribution and cell survival of renal epithelial cells treated with AAI at low and high doses. A low dose of AA induces cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase via activation of DNA damage checkpoint pathway ATM-Chk2-p53-p21. DNA damage signaling pathway is activated more likely via increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by AA treatment then via DNA damage induced directly by AA. Higher AA concentration induced cell death partly via apoptosis. Since mitogen-activated protein kinases play an important role in cell survival, death and cell cycle progression, we assayed their function in AA-treated renal tubular epithelial cells. ERK1/2 and p38 but not JNK were activated in cells treated with AA. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2 and p38 as well as suppression of ROS generation with N-acetyl-L-cysteine resulted in the partial relief of cells from G2/M checkpoint and a decline of apoptosis level. Cell cycle arrest may be a mechanism for DNA repair, cell survival and reprogramming of epithelial cells to the fibroblast type. An apoptosis of renal epithelial cells at higher AA dose might be necessary to provide space for newly reprogrammed fibrotic cells.

  16. Palmitoleic acid prevents palmitic acid-induced macrophage activation and consequent p38 MAPK-mediated skeletal muscle insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Nicola A; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P; Cleasby, Mark E

    2014-08-05

    Obesity and saturated fatty acid (SFA) treatment are both associated with skeletal muscle insulin resistance (IR) and increased macrophage infiltration. However, the relative effects of SFA and unsaturated fatty acid (UFA)-activated macrophages on muscle are unknown. Here, macrophages were treated with palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid or both and the effects of the conditioned medium (CM) on C2C12 myotubes investigated. CM from palmitic acid-treated J774s (palm-mac-CM) impaired insulin signalling and insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis, reduced Inhibitor κBα and increased phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in myotubes. p38 MAPK inhibition or siRNA partially ameliorated these defects, as did addition of tumour necrosis factor-α blocking antibody to the CM. Macrophages incubated with both FAs generated CM that did not induce IR, while palmitoleic acid-mac-CM alone was insulin sensitising. Thus UFAs may improve muscle insulin sensitivity and counteract SFA-mediated IR through an effect on macrophage activation.

  17. Valproic acid induces differentiation and transient tumor regression, but spares leukemia-initiating activity in mouse models of APL.

    PubMed

    Leiva, M; Moretti, S; Soilihi, H; Pallavicini, I; Peres, L; Mercurio, C; Dal Zuffo, R; Minucci, S; de Thé, H

    2012-07-01

    Aberrant histone acetylation was physiopathologically associated with the development of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs). Reversal of histone deacetylation by histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACis) activates a cell death program that allows tumor regression in mouse models of AMLs. We have used several models of PML-RARA-driven acute promyelocytic leukemias (APLs) to analyze the in vivo effects of valproic acid, a well-characterized HDACis. Valproic acid (VPA)-induced rapid tumor regression and sharply prolonged survival. However, discontinuation of treatment was associated to an immediate relapse. In vivo, as well as ex vivo, VPA-induced terminal granulocytic differentiation. Yet, despite full differentiation, leukemia-initiating cell (LIC) activity was actually enhanced by VPA treatment. In contrast to all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or arsenic, VPA did not degrade PML-RARA. However, in combination with ATRA, VPA synergized for PML-RARA degradation and LIC eradication in vivo. Our studies indicate that VPA triggers differentiation, but spares LIC activity, further uncouple differentiation from APL clearance and stress the importance of PML-RARA degradation in APL cure.

  18. Lysophosphatidic acid induces reactive oxygen species generation by activating protein kinase C in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chu-Cheng; Lin, Chuan-En; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Ju, Tsai-Kai; Huang, Yuan-Li; Lee, Ming-Shyue; Chen, Jiun-Hong; Lee, Hsinyu

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPA induces ROS generation through LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3}. •LPA induces ROS generation by activating PLC. •PKCζ mediates LPA-induced ROS generation. -- Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in males, and PC-3 is a cell model popularly used for investigating the behavior of late stage prostate cancer. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lysophospholipid that mediates multiple behaviors in cancer cells, such as proliferation, migration and adhesion. We have previously demonstrated that LPA enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C expression in PC-3 cells by activating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to be an important mediator in cancer progression. Using flow cytometry, we showed that LPA triggers ROS generation within 10 min and that the generated ROS can be suppressed by pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. In addition, transfection with LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} siRNA efficiently blocked LPA-induced ROS production, suggesting that both receptors are involved in this pathway. Using specific inhibitors and siRNA, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) were also suggested to participate in LPA-induced ROS generation. Overall, we demonstrated that LPA induces ROS generation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells and this is mediated through the PLC/PKC/Nox pathway.

  19. Sulforaphane Ameliorates Okadaic Acid-Induced Memory Impairment in Rats by Activating the Nrf2/HO-1 Antioxidant Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Subhash; Rajasekar, N; Hanif, Kashif; Nath, Chandishwar; Shukla, Rakesh

    2016-10-01

    Okadaic acid (OKA) causes memory impairment and attenuates nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) along with oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in rats. Sulforaphane (dietary isothiocyanate compound), an activator of Nrf2 signaling, exhibits neuroprotective effects. However, the protective effect of sulforaphane in OKA-induced neurotoxicity remains uninvestigated. Therefore, in the present study, the role of sulforaphane in OKA-induced memory impairment in rats was explored. A significant increased Nrf2 expression in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex was observed in trained (Morris water maze) rats, and a significant decreased Nrf2 expression in memory-impaired (OKA, 200 ng icv) rats indicated its involvement in memory function. Sulforaphane administration (5 and 10 mg/kg, ip, days 1 and 2) ameliorates OKA-induced memory impairment in rats. The treatment also restored Nrf2 and its downstream antioxidant protein expression (GCLC, HO-1) and attenuated oxidative stress (ROS, nitrite, GSH), neuroinflammation (NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-10), and neuronal apoptosis in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of OKA-treated rats. Further, to determine whether modulation of Nrf2 signaling is responsible for the protective effect of sulforaphane, in vitro, Nrf2 siRNA and its downstream HO-1 inhibition studies were carried out in a rat astrocytoma cell line (C6). The protective effects of sulforaphane were abolished with Nrf2 siRNA and HO-1 inhibition in astrocytes. The results suggest that Nrf2-dependent activation of cellular antioxidant machinery results in sulforaphane-mediated protection against OKA-induced memory impairment in rats. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  20. Probucol increases striatal glutathione peroxidase activity and protects against 3-nitropropionic acid-induced pro-oxidative damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Colle, Dirleise; Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Moreira, Eduardo Luiz Gasnhar; Hartwig, Juliana Montagna; dos Santos, Alessandra Antunes; Zimmermann, Luciana Teixeira; Hort, Mariana Appel; Farina, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by symptoms attributable to the death of striatal and cortical neurons. The molecular mechanisms mediating neuronal death in HD involve oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Administration of 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), an irreversible inhibitor of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, in rodents has been proposed as a useful experimental model of HD. This study evaluated the effects of probucol, a lipid-lowering agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, on the biochemical parameters related to oxidative stress, as well as on the behavioral parameters related to motor function in an in vivo HD model based on 3-NP intoxication in rats. Animals were treated with 3.5 mg/kg of probucol in drinking water daily for 2 months and, subsequently, received 3-NP (25 mg/kg i.p.) once a day for 6 days. At the end of the treatments, 3-NP-treated animals showed a significant decrease in body weight, which corresponded with impairment on motor ability, inhibition of mitochondrial complex II activity and oxidative stress in the striatum. Probucol, which did not rescue complex II inhibition, protected against behavioral and striatal biochemical changes induced by 3-NP, attenuating 3-NP-induced motor impairments and striatal oxidative stress. Importantly, probucol was able to increase activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), an enzyme important in mediating the detoxification of peroxides in the central nervous system. The major finding of this study was that probucol protected against 3-NP-induced behavioral and striatal biochemical changes without affecting 3-NP-induced mitochondrial complex II inhibition, indicating that long-term probucol treatment resulted in an increased resistance against neurotoxic events (i.e., increased oxidative damage) secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction. These data appeared to be of great relevance when

  1. Conserved valproic-acid-induced lipid droplet formation in Dictyostelium and human hepatocytes identifies structurally active compounds.

    PubMed

    Elphick, Lucy M; Pawolleck, Nadine; Guschina, Irina A; Chaieb, Leila; Eikel, Daniel; Nau, Heinz; Harwood, John L; Plant, Nick J; Williams, Robin S B

    2012-03-01

    Lipid droplet formation and subsequent steatosis (the abnormal retention of lipids within a cell) has been reported to contribute to hepatotoxicity and is an adverse effect of many pharmacological agents including the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). In this study, we have developed a simple model system (Dictyostelium discoideum) to investigate the effects of VPA and related compounds in lipid droplet formation. In mammalian hepatocytes, VPA increases lipid droplet accumulation over a 24-hour period, giving rise to liver cell damage, and we show a similar effect in Dictyostelium following 30 minutes of VPA treatment. Using (3)H-labelled polyunsaturated (arachidonic) or saturated (palmitic) fatty acids, we shown that VPA treatment of Dictyostelium gives rise to an increased accumulation of both types of fatty acids in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and non-polar lipids in this time period, with a similar trend observed in human hepatocytes (Huh7 cells) labelled with [(3)H]arachidonic acid. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of β-oxidation in Dictyostelium phenocopies fatty acid accumulation, in agreement with data reported in mammalian systems. Using Dictyostelium, we then screened a range of VPA-related compounds to identify those with high and low lipid-accumulation potential, and validated these activities for effects on lipid droplet formation by using human hepatocytes. Structure-activity relationships for these VPA-related compounds suggest that lipid accumulation is independent of VPA-catalysed teratogenicity and inositol depletion. These results suggest that Dictyostelium could provide both a novel model system for the analysis of lipid droplet formation in human hepatocytes and a rapid method for identifying VPA-related compounds that show liver toxicology.

  2. Manuka Honey Exerts Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities That Promote Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Almasaudi, Saad B.; Al-Hindi, Rashad R.; Abdel-dayem, Umama A.; Ali, Soad S.; Saleh, Rasha M.; Al Jaouni, Soad K.

    2017-01-01

    Gastric ulcers are a major problem worldwide with no effective treatment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of manuka honey in the treatment of acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcers in rats. Different groups of rats were treated with three different concentrations of honey. Stomachs were checked macroscopically for ulcerative lesions in the glandular mucosa and microscopically for histopathological alterations. Treatment with manuka honey significantly reduced the ulcer index and maintained the glycoprotein content. It also reduced the mucosal myeloperoxidase activity, lipid peroxidation (MDA), and the inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) as compared to untreated control group. In addition, honey-treated groups showed significant increase in enzymatic (GPx and SOD) and nonenzymatic (GSH) antioxidants besides levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Flow cytometry studies showed that treatment of animals with manuka honey has normalized cell cycle distribution and significantly lowered apoptosis in gastric mucosa. In conclusion, the results indicated that manuka honey is effective in the treatment of chronic ulcer and preservation of mucosal glycoproteins. Its effects are due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that resulted in a significant reduction of the gastric mucosal MDA, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and caused an elevation in IL-10 levels. PMID:28250794

  3. Interaction between caspase-8 activation and endoplasmic reticulum stress in glycochenodeoxycholic acid-induced apoptotic HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Iizaka, Toru; Tsuji, Mayumi; Oyamada, Hideto; Morio, Yuri; Oguchi, Katsuji

    2007-11-30

    The accumulation of hydrophobic bile acid, such as glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA), in the liver has been thought to induce hepatocellular damage in human chronic cholestatic liver diseases. We previously reported that GCDCA-induced apoptosis was promoted by both mitochondria-mediated and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated pathways in rat hepatocytes. In this study, we elucidated the relationship between these pathways in GCDCA-induced apoptotic HepG2 cells. HepG2 cells were treated with GCDCA (100-500microM) with or without a caspase-8 inhibitor, Z-IETD-fluoromethyl ketone (Z-IETD-FMK) (30microM) for 3-24h. We demonstrated the presence of both apoptotic pathways in these cells; that is, we showed increases in cleaved caspase-3 proteins, the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, and the expression of ER resident molecular chaperone Bip mRNA and ER stress response-associated transcription factor Chop mRNA. On the other hand, pretreatment with Z-IETD-FMK significantly reduced the increases, compared with treatment with GCDCA alone. Immunofluorescence microscopic analysis showed that treatment with GCDCA increased the cleavage of BAP31, an integral membrane protein of ER, and pretreatment with Z-IETD-FMK suppressed the increase of caspase-8 and BAP31 cleavage. In conclusion, these results suggest that intact activated caspase-8 may promote and amplify the ER stress response by cleaving BAP31 in GCDCA-induced apoptotic cells.

  4. Captopril potentiates the anticonvulsant activity of carbamazepine and lamotrigine in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model.

    PubMed

    Lukawski, Krzysztof; Jakubus, Tomasz; Raszewski, Grzegorz; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2010-10-01

    Some studies suggest a higher risk of hypertension in people with epilepsy. Captopril, a potent and selective angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, is a well known antihypertensive drug. Besides the peripheral renin-angiotensin system (RAS), ACE inhibitors are also suggested to affect the brain RAS which might participate in the regulation of seizure susceptibility. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effect of captopril on the protective action of numerous antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine [CBZ], phenytoin [PHT], valproate [VPA], phenobarbital [PB], oxcarbazepine [OXC], lamotrigine [LTG] and topiramate [TPM]) against maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice. This study was accompanied by an evaluation of adverse effects of combined treatment with captopril and antiepileptic drugs in the passive avoidance task and chimney test. Captopril (25 and 50 mg/kg i.p.) did not influence the threshold for electroconvulsions. Among the tested antiepileptics, captopril (25 and 50 mg/kg i.p.) potentiated the antiseizure action of CBZ, decreasing its ED(50) value from 12.1 to 8.9 and 8.7 mg/kg, respectively. Moreover, captopril (50 mg/kg i.p.) enhanced the anticonvulsant activity of LTG. ED(50) value for LTG was lowered from 5.1 to 3.5 mg/kg. The observed interactions between captopril and CBZ or LTG were pharmacodynamic in nature as captopril did not alter plasma and total brain concentrations of these antiepileptics. The combinations of captopril with antiepileptic drugs did not lead to retention deficits in the passive avoidance task or motor impairment in the chimney test. Based on the current preclinical data, it is suggested that captopril may positively interact with CBZ and LTG in epileptic patients. The combinations of captopril with the remaining antiepileptics (PHT, VPA, PB, OXC and TPM) seem neutral.

  5. Seizure-like activity in a juvenile Angelman syndrome mouse model is attenuated by reducing Arc expression

    PubMed Central

    Mandel-Brehm, Caleigh; Salogiannis, John; Dhamne, Sameer C.; Rotenberg, Alexander; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder arising from loss-of-function mutations in the maternally inherited copy of the UBE3A gene, and is characterized by an absence of speech, excessive laughter, cognitive delay, motor deficits, and seizures. Despite the fact that the symptoms of AS occur in early childhood, behavioral characterization of AS mouse models has focused primarily on adult phenotypes. In this report we describe juvenile behaviors in AS mice that are strain-independent and clinically relevant. We find that young AS mice, compared with their wild-type littermates, produce an increased number of ultrasonic vocalizations. In addition, young AS mice have defects in motor coordination, as well as abnormal brain activity that results in an enhanced seizure-like response to an audiogenic challenge. The enhanced seizure-like activity, but not the increased ultrasonic vocalizations or motor deficits, is rescued in juvenile AS mice by genetically reducing the expression level of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein, Arc. These findings suggest that therapeutic interventions that reduce the level of Arc expression have the potential to reverse the seizures associated with AS. In addition, the identification of aberrant behaviors in young AS mice may provide clues regarding the neural circuit defects that occur in AS and ultimately allow new approaches for treating this disorder. PMID:25848016

  6. Seizure-like activity in a juvenile Angelman syndrome mouse model is attenuated by reducing Arc expression.

    PubMed

    Mandel-Brehm, Caleigh; Salogiannis, John; Dhamne, Sameer C; Rotenberg, Alexander; Greenberg, Michael E

    2015-04-21

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder arising from loss-of-function mutations in the maternally inherited copy of the UBE3A gene, and is characterized by an absence of speech, excessive laughter, cognitive delay, motor deficits, and seizures. Despite the fact that the symptoms of AS occur in early childhood, behavioral characterization of AS mouse models has focused primarily on adult phenotypes. In this report we describe juvenile behaviors in AS mice that are strain-independent and clinically relevant. We find that young AS mice, compared with their wild-type littermates, produce an increased number of ultrasonic vocalizations. In addition, young AS mice have defects in motor coordination, as well as abnormal brain activity that results in an enhanced seizure-like response to an audiogenic challenge. The enhanced seizure-like activity, but not the increased ultrasonic vocalizations or motor deficits, is rescued in juvenile AS mice by genetically reducing the expression level of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein, Arc. These findings suggest that therapeutic interventions that reduce the level of Arc expression have the potential to reverse the seizures associated with AS. In addition, the identification of aberrant behaviors in young AS mice may provide clues regarding the neural circuit defects that occur in AS and ultimately allow new approaches for treating this disorder.

  7. SEIZURE AND EPILEPSY: STUDIES OF SEIZURE DISORDERS IN DROSOPHILA

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Louise; Howlett, Iris C.; Rusan, Zeid M.; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the frequency of seizure disorders in the human population, the genetic and physiological basis for these defects has been difficult to resolve. Although many genetic contributions to seizure susceptibility have been identified, these involve disparate biological processes, many of which are not neural specific. The large number and heterogeneous nature of the genes involved makes it difficult to understand the complex factors underlying the etiology of seizure disorders. Examining the effect known genetic mutations have on seizure susceptibility is one approach that may prove fruitful. This approach may be helpful in both understanding how different physiological processes affect seizure susceptibility and identifying novel therapeutic treatments. We review here factors contributing to seizure susceptibility in Drosophila, a genetically tractable system that provides a model for human seizure disorders. Seizure-like neuronal activities and behaviors in the fruit fly are described, as well as a set of mutations that exhibit features resembling some human epilepsies and render the fly sensitive to seizures. Especially interesting are descriptions of a novel class of mutations that are second-site mutations that act as seizure suppressors. These mutations revert epilepsy phenotypes back to the wild-type range of seizure susceptibility. The genes responsible for seizure suppression are cloned with the goal of identifying targets for lead compounds that may be developed into new antiepileptic drugs. PMID:21906534

  8. Soluble epoxide hydrolase activity regulates inflammatory responses and seizure generation in two mouse models of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Wen; Hung, Shao-Wen; Wu, Yi-Chen; Wong, Lin-King; Lai, Ming-Tsong; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Lin, Yung-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is known to be involved in epileptogenesis with unclear mechanisms. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) seems to offer anti-inflammatory protection to ischemic brain injury in rodents. Thus, it is hypothesized that sEH inhibition might also affect the neuroinflammatory responses caused by epileptic seizures. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of sEH in neuroinflammation, seizure generation and subsequent epileptogenesis using two mouse models of temporal lobe epilepsy. Experimental epileptic seizures were induced by either pilocarpine or electrical amygdala kindling in both wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice and sEH knockout (sEH KO) mice. The sEH expression in the hippocampus was detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The effects of the sEH hydrolase inhibitors, 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid (AUDA) and N-[1-(1-oxopropyl)-4-piperidinyl]-N'-[4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenyl)-urea (TPPU), and of the genetic deletion of sEH on seizure-induced neuroinflammatory responses and the development of epilepsy were evaluated. In the hippocampus of WT mice, sEH was mainly expressed in astrocytes (GFAP(+)), neurons (NeuN(+)) and scattered microglia (Iba-1(+)) in the regions of CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus. Expression of sEH was significantly increased on day 7, 14, 21 and 28 after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). Administration with sEH inhibitors attenuated the SE-induced up-regulation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), the degradation of EETs, as well as IκB phosphorylation. Following treatment with AUDA, the frequency and duration of spontaneous motor seizures in the pilocarpine-SE mice were decreased and the seizure-induction threshold of the fully kindled mice was increased. Up-regulation of hippocampal IL-1β and IL-6 was found in both WT and sEH KO mice after successful induction of SE. Notably, sEH KO mice were more susceptible to seizures than WT mice. Seizure related

  9. Anti-kindling Effect of Bezafibrate, a Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptors Alpha Agonist, in Pentylenetetrazole Induced Kindling Seizure Model

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Lekha; Bhandari, Swati; Bhatia, Alka; Banerjee, Dibyajyoti; Chakrabarti, Amitava

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Studies in the animals suggested that Peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPARs) may be involved in seizure control and selective agonists of PPAR α or PPAR γ raise seizure thresholds. The present study was contemplated with the aim of evaluating the anti kindling effects and the mechanism of bezafibrate, a Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α (PPAR-α) agonist in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced kindling model of seizures in rats. Methods: In a PTZ kindled Wistar rat model, different doses of bezafibrate (100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg and 300 mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally 30 minutes before the PTZ injection. The PTZ injection was given on alternate day till the animal became fully kindled or till 10 weeks. The parameters measured were the latency to develop kindling and incidence of kindling, histopathological study of hippocampus, hippocampal lipid peroxidation studies, serum neuron specific enolase, and hippocampal DNA fragmentation study. Results: In this study, bezafibrate significantly reduced the incidence of kindling in PTZ treated rats and exhibited a marked prolongation in the latencies to seizures. In the present study bezafibrate decreased the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance i.e. Malondialdehyde levels, increased the reduced glutathione levels, catalase and superoxide dismutase activity in the brain. This added to its additional neuroprotective effects. Bezafibrate also reduced the neuronal damage and apoptosis in hippocampal area of the brain. Therefore bezafibrate exerted anticonvulsant properties in PTZ induced kindling model in rats. Conclusions: These findings may provide insights into the understanding of the mechanism of bezafibrate as an anti kindling agent and could offer a useful support to the basic antiepileptic therapy in preventing the development of PTZ induced seizures, suggesting its potential for therapeutic applications in temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:25625088

  10. A comparative study of the antitussive activity of levodropropizine and dropropizine in the citric acid-induced cough model in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, G; Cordaro, C I; Vanasia, M; Balzarotti, C; Camusso, L; Caiazzo, G; Maghini, L; Mazzocchi, M; Zennaro, M

    1992-01-01

    Levodropropizine is the levo-rotatory (S)-enantiomer of dropropizine, a racemic non-opiate antitussive agent which has been used clinically for many years. Compared with the racemic drug, levodropropizine exhibits in animal models similar antitussive activity but considerably lower central nervous system (CNS) depressant effects. It is also less likely to cause sedation in treated patients. Since the comparative antitussive potency of the two drugs in clinical experimental models has not been evaluated, the authors performed a randomized, double blind, cross over investigation in which the effects of single oral doses (60 and 90 mg) of levodropropizine and dropropizine were assessed by using the citric acid-induced cough model in eight normal volunteers. Stimulation tests involved inhalation of individual cumulative doses of citric acid (6.3 to 53.3 mg) which at pre-study assessment had been found to induce reproducibly at least ten coughs over a 30 sec period. Each subject was studied by repeating the citric acid stimulation test four times (0 h, 1 h, 2 h and 6 h) on each of five different days separated by intervals of at least three days. In the absence of drug administration (control session), cough response to citric inhalation was remarkably reproducible throughout the 6 h period of observation. A marked and statistically significant reduction in cough response (to about one third--one sixth of the pre-drug values) was observed 1 h after intake for both compounds. At subsequent testing 2 h and 6 h after dosing, cough response was still depressed and did not differ significantly from that observed at 1 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Seizure-like activity in the disinhibited CA1 minislice of adult guinea-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Karnup, Sergei; Stelzer, Armin

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous activity was monitored during pharmacological blockade of GABAA receptor function in the CA1 minislice (CA3 was cut off). Synaptic inhibition was blocked by competitive GABAA antagonists bicuculline-methiodide (Bic) or GABAZINE (GBZ) and the chloride channel blocker picrotoxin (PTX). Extra- and intracellular recordings using sharp electrodes were carried out in stratum radiatum and pyramidale. At low antagonist concentrations (Bic, GBZ: 1-10 μm; PTX: < 100 μm), synchronized bursts (< 500 ms in duration, interictal activity) were seen as described previously. However, in the presence of high concentrations (Bic, GBZ: 50-100 μm; PTX: 100-200 μm), seizure-like, ictal events (duration 4-17 s) were observed in 67 of 88 slices. No other experimental measures to increase excitability were applied: cation concentrations ([Ca2+]o= 2 mm, [Mg2+]o= 1.7 mm, [K+]o= 3 mm) and recording temperature (30-32 °C) were standard and GABAB-mediated inhibition was intact. In whole-slice recordings prominent interictal activity, but fewer ictal events were observed. A reduced ictal activity was also observed when interictal-like responses were evoked by afferent stimulation. Ictal activity was reversibly blocked by antagonists of excitatory transmission, CNQX (40 μm) or d-AP5 (50 μm). Disinhibition-induced ictal development did not rely on group I mGluR activation as it was not prevented in the presence of group I mGluR antagonists (AIDA or 4CPG). (RS)-3,5-DHPG prevented the induction and reversed the tertiary component of the ictal event through a group I mGluR-independent mechanism. PMID:11313441

  12. Optical electrocorticogram (OECoG) using wide-field calcium imaging reveals the divergence of neuronal and glial activity during acute rodent seizures.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Andy G S; Laffont, Philippe; Zhao, Mingrui; Ma, Hongtao; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2015-08-01

    The role of glia in epilepsy has been widely debated. Using in vivo bulk loading of calcium dyes, we imaged neuronal and glial activity in an acute pharmacologic rodent model of neocortical seizures. Optical calcium-based ECoG maps revealed that neuronal waves propagated rapidly and remained mostly confined to the seizure focus. Glial waves were triggered by ictal onset but propagated slowly in a stereotypical fashion far beyond the seizure focus. Although related at their onset, the divergence of these two phenomena during seizure evolution calls into question their interdependence and the criticality of the role of glia in seizure onset and neurovascular coupling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus".

  13. Anticonvulsant activity of bone marrow cells in electroconvulsive seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone marrow is an accessible source of progenitor cells, which have been investigated as treatment for neurological diseases in a number of clinical trials. Here we evaluated the potential benefit of bone marrow cells in protecting against convulsive seizures induced by maximum electroconvulsive shock (MES), a widely used model for screening of anti-epileptic drugs. Behavioral and inflammatory responses were measured after MES induction in order to verify the effects promoted by transplantation of bone marrow cells. To assess the anticonvulsant effects of bone marrow cell transplantation, we measured the frequency and duration of tonic seizure, the mortality rate, the microglial expression and the blood levels of cytokine IL-1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α after MES induction. We hypothesized that these behavioral and inflammatory responses to a strong stimulus such as a convulsive seizure could be modified by the transplantation of bone marrow cells. Results Bone marrow transplanted cells altered the convulsive threshold and showed anticonvulsant effect by protecting from tonic seizures. Bone marrow cells modified the microglial expression in the analyzed brain areas, increased the IL-10 and attenuate IL-6 levels. Conclusions Bone marrow cells exert protective effects by blocking the course of electroconvulsive seizures. Additionally, electroconvulsive seizures induced acute inflammatory responses by altering the pattern of microglia expression, as well as in IL-6 and IL-10 levels. Our findings also indicated that the anticonvulsant effects of these cells can be tested with the MES model following the same paradigm used for drug testing in pharmacological screening. Studies on the inflammatory reaction in response to acute seizures in the presence of transplanted bone marrow cells might open a wide range of discussions on the mechanisms relevant to the pathophysiology of epilepsies. PMID:24011127

  14. Reflex operculoinsular seizures.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Handsun; Tran, Thi Phuoc Yen; Pétrin, Myriam; Boucher, Olivier; Mohamed, Ismail; Bouthillier, Alain; Nguyen, Dang Khoa

    2016-03-01

    Activation of specific cortical territories by certain stimuli is known to trigger focal seizures. We report three cases of well documented operculo-insular reflex seizures, triggered by somatosensory stimuli in two and loud noises in the third. Limited operculoinsular resection resulted in an excellent outcome for all. We discuss these observations in regard to the literature on reflex epilepsy and known functions of the insula. [Published with video sequences online].

  15. Brain state evolution during seizure and under anesthesia: a network-based analysis of stereotaxic eeg activity in drug-resistant epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Yaffe, Robert; Burns, Sam; Gale, John; Park, Hyun-Joo; Bulacio, Juan; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological condition with a prevalence of 1%, and 14-34% have medically refractory epilepsy (MRE). Seizures in focal MRE are generated by a single epileptogenic zone (or focus), thus there is potentially a curative procedure - surgical resection. This procedure depends significantly on correct identification of the focus, which is often uncertain in clinical practice. In this study, we analyzed intracranial stereotaxic EEG (sEEG) data recorded in two human patients with drug-resistant epilepsy prior to undergoing resection surgery. We view the sEEG data as samples from the brain network and hypothesize that seizure foci can be identified based on their network connectivity during seizure. Specifically, we computed a time sequence of connectivity matrices from EEG recordings that represent network structure over time. For each patient, connectivity between electrodes was measured using the coherence in a given frequency band. Matrix structure was analyzed using singular value decomposition and the leading singular vector was used to estimate each electrode's time dependent centrality (importance to the network's connectivity). Our preliminary study suggests that seizure foci may be the most weakly connected regions in the brain during the beginning of a seizure and the most strongly connected regions towards the end of a seizure. Additionally, in one of the patients analyzed, the network connectivity under anesthesia highlights seizure foci. Ultimately, network centrality computed from sEEG activity may be used to develop an automated, reliable, and computationally efficient algorithm for identifying seizure foci.

  16. Changes in Extracellular Striatal Acetylcholine and Brain Seizure Activity Following Acute Exposure to Nerve Against in Freely Moving Guinea Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    groups. Additionally, nerve agent treat- ment did not significantly alter Ch levels, and no general trends were evident (data not shown...statistically significant at many time points (sarin) or with all agents (VX), there was a clear trend across all the agents that seizure activity resulted in...hairless guinea pigs and marmosets after intravenous and percu- taneous administration. Toxicol Appl PharmacoI191:48-62. Westergren I, Nystrom B, Hamberger

  17. Differential susceptibility of interneurons expressing neuropeptide Y or parvalbumin in the aged hippocampus to acute seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Kuruba, Ramkumar; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Parihar, Vipan K; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K

    2011-01-01

    Acute seizure (AS) activity in old age has an increased predisposition for evolving into temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Furthermore, spontaneous seizures and cognitive dysfunction after AS activity are often intense in the aged population than in young adults. This could be due to an increased vulnerability of inhibitory interneurons in the aged hippocampus to AS activity. We investigated this issue by comparing the survival of hippocampal GABA-ergic interneurons that contain the neuropeptide Y (NPY) or the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV) between young adult (5-months old) and aged (22-months old) F344 rats at 12 days after three-hours of AS activity. Graded intraperitoneal injections of the kainic acid (KA) induced AS activity and a diazepam injection at 3 hours after the onset terminated AS-activity. Measurement of interneuron numbers in different hippocampal subfields revealed that NPY+ interneurons were relatively resistant to AS activity in the aged hippocampus in comparison to the young adult hippocampus. Whereas, PV+ interneurons were highly susceptible to AS activity in both age groups. However, as aging alone substantially depleted these populations, the aged hippocampus after three-hours of AS activity exhibited 48% reductions in NPY+ interneurons and 70% reductions in PV+ interneurons, in comparison to the young hippocampus after similar AS activity. Thus, AS activity-induced TLE in old age is associated with far fewer hippocampal NPY+ and PV+ interneuron numbers than AS-induced TLE in the young adult age. This discrepancy likely underlies the severe spontaneous seizures and cognitive dysfunction observed in the aged people after AS activity.

  18. Valproic acid-induced hyperammonaemic coma and unrecognised portosystemic shunt.

    PubMed

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Carrapatoso, Leonor; Ferreira, Fátima; Basilio, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    Hyperammonaemic encephalopathy is a rare and potentially fatal complication of valproic acid treatment. The clinical presentation of hyperammonaemic encephalopathy is wide and includes seizures and coma. We present a case of hyperammonaemic coma precipitated by sodium valproate use for symptomatic epilepsy in a patient with unrecognised portosystemic shunt, secondary to earlier alcoholism. The absence of any stigmata of chronic liver disease and laboratory markers of liver dysfunction delayed the recognition of this alcohol-related complication. The portal vein bypass led to a refractory, valproic acid-induced hyperammonaemic coma. The patient fully recovered after dialysis treatment.

  19. Differential Activation of Calpain-1 and Calpain-2 following Kainate-Induced Seizure Activity in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seinfeld, Jeff; Xu, Xiaobo; Bi, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    Systemic injection of kainate produces repetitive seizure activity in both rats and mice. It also results in short-term synaptic modifications as well as delayed neurodegeneration. The signaling cascades involved in both short-term and delayed responses are not clearly defined. The calcium-dependent protease calpain is activated in various brain structures following systemic kainate injection, although the precise involvement of the two major brain calpain isoforms, calpain-1 and calpain-2, remains to be defined. It has recently been reported that calpain-1 and calpain-2 play opposite roles in NMDA receptor-mediated neuroprotection or neurodegeneration, with calpain-1 being neuroprotective and calpain-2 being neurodegenerative. In the present study, we determined the activation pattern of calpain-1 and calpain-2 by analyzing changes in levels of different calpain substrates, including spectrin, drebrin, and PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog; a specific calpain-2 substrate) in both rats, and wild-type and calpain-1 knock-out mice. The results indicate that, while calpain-2 is rapidly activated in pyramidal cells throughout CA1 and CA3, rapid calpain-1 activation is restricted to parvalbumin-positive and to a lesser extent CCK-positive, but not somatostatin-positive, interneurons. In addition, calpain-1 knock-out mice exhibit increased long-term neurodegeneration in CA1, reinforcing the notion that calpain-1 activation is neuroprotective. PMID:27622212

  20. Febrile seizures

    MedlinePlus

    Seizure - fever induced; Febrile convulsions ... an illness. It may not occur when the fever is highest. A cold or viral illness may ... other than symptoms of the illness causing the fever. Often, the child will not need a full ...

  1. Mechanisms of seizure-induced ‘transcriptional channelopathy’ of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated (HCN) channels

    PubMed Central

    Richichi, Cristina; Brewster, Amy L.; Bender, Roland A.; Simeone, Timothy A.; Zha, Qinqin; Yin, Hong Z.; Weiss, John H.; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2008-01-01

    Epilepsy may result from abnormal function of ion channels, such as those caused by genetic mutations. Recently, pathological alterations of the expression or localization of normal channels have been implicated in epilepsy generation, and termed ‘acquired channelopathies’. Altered expression levels of the HCN channels--that conduct the hyperpolarization-activated current, Ih--have been demonstrated in hippocampus of patients with severe temporal lobe epilepsy as well as in animal models of temporal lobe and absence epilepsies. Here we probe the mechanisms for the altered expression of HCN channels which is provoked by seizures. In organotypic hippocampal slice cultures, seizure-like events selectively reduced HCN type 1 channel expression and increased HCN2 mRNA levels, as occurs in vivo. The mechanisms for HCN1 reduction involved Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors-mediated Ca2+ influx, and subsequent activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. In contrast, upregulation of HCN2 expression was independent of these processes. The data demonstrate an orchestrated program for seizure-evoked transcriptional channelopathy involving the HCN channels, that may contribute to certain epilepsies. PMID:17964174

  2. Simultaneous EEG and diffuse optical imaging of seizure-related hemodynamic activity in the newborn infant brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebden, Jeremy C.; Cooper, Robert J.; Gibson, Adam; Everdell, Nick; Austin, Topun

    2012-06-01

    An optical imaging system has been developed which uses measurements of diffusely reflected near-infrared light to produce maps of changes in blood flow and oxygenation occurring within the cerebral cortex. Optical sources and detectors are coupled to the head via an array of optical fibers, on a probe held in contact with the scalp, and data is collected at a rate of 10 Hz. A clinical electroencephalography (EEG) system has been integrated with the optical system to enable simultaneous observation of electrical and hemodynamic activity in the cortex of neurologically compromised newborn infants diagnosed with seizures. Studies have made a potentially critically important discovery of previously unknown transient hemodynamic events in infants treated with anticonvulsant medication. We observed repeated episodes of small increases in cortical oxyhemoglobin concentration followed by a profound decrease in 3 of 4 infants studied, each with cerebral injury who presented with neonatal seizures. This was not accompanied by clinical or EEG seizure activity and was not present in nineteen matched controls. The underlying cause of these changes is currently unknown. We tentatively suggest that our results may be associated with a phenomenon known as cortical spreading depolarization, not previously observed in the infant brain.

  3. Hyperthermia-induced seizures alter adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    León-Navarro, David Agustín; Albasanz, José L; Martín, Mairena

    2015-08-01

    Febrile seizure is one of the most common convulsive disorders in children. The neuromodulator adenosine exerts anticonvulsant actions through binding adenosine receptors. Here, the impact of hyperthermia-induced seizures on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity has been studied at different periods in the cerebral cortical area by using radioligand binding, real-time PCR, and 5'-nucleotidase activity assays. Hyperthermic seizures were induced in 13-day-old rats using a warmed air stream from a hair dryer. Neonates exhibited rearing and falling over associated with hindlimb clonus seizures (stage 5 on Racine scale criteria) after hyperthermic induction. A significant increase in A1 receptor density was observed using [(3) H]DPCPX as radioligand, and mRNA coding A1 was observed 48 h after hyperthermia-induced seizures. In contrast, a significant decrease in A2A receptor density was detected, using [(3) H]ZM241385 as radioligand, 48 h after hyperthermia-evoked convulsions. These short-term changes in A1 and A2A receptors were also accompanied by a loss of 5'-nucleotidase activity. No significant variations either in A1 or A2A receptor density or 5'-nucleotidase were observed 5 and 20 days after hyperthermic seizures. Taken together, both regulation of A1 and A2A receptors and loss of 5'-nucleotidase in the cerebral cortex suggest the existence of a neuroprotective mechanism against seizures. Febrile seizure is one of the most common convulsive disorders in children. The consequences of hyperthermia-induced seizures (animal model of febrile seizures) on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity have been studied at different periods in cerebral cortical area. A significant increase in A1 receptor density and mRNA coding A1 was observed 48 h after hyperthermia-induced seizures. In contrast, a significant decrease in A2A receptor density and 5'-nucleotidase activity was detected 48 h after convulsions evoked by hyperthermia

  4. Acupuncture suppresses kainic acid-induced neuronal death and inflammatory events in mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Tae; Doo, Ah-Reum; Kim, Seung-Nam; Kim, Song-Yi; Kim, Yoon Young; Kim, Jang-Hyun; Lee, Hyejung; Yin, Chang Shik; Park, Hi-Joon

    2012-09-01

    The administration of kainic acid (KA) causes seizures and produces neurodegeneration in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells. The present study investigated a possible role of acupuncture in reducing hippocampal cell death and inflammatory events, using a mouse model of kainic acid-induced epilepsy. Male C57BL/6 mice received acupuncture treatments at acupoint HT8 or in the tail area bilaterally once a day for 2 days and again immediately after an intraperitoneal injection of KA (30 mg/kg). HT8 is located on the palmar surface of the forelimbs, between the fourth and fifth metacarpal bones. Twenty-four hours after the KA injection, neuronal cell survival, the activations of microglia and astrocytes, and mRNA expression of two proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), were measured in the hippocampus. Acupuncture stimulation at HT8, but not in the tail area, significantly reduced the KA-induced seizure, neuron death, microglial and astrocyte activations, and IL-1β mRNA expression in the hippocampus. The acupuncture stimulation also decreased the mRNA expression of TNF-α, but it was not significant. These results indicate that acupuncture at HT8 can inhibit hippocampal cell death and suppress KA-induced inflammatory events, suggesting a possible role for acupuncture in the treatment of epilepsy.

  5. Preictal Activity of Subicular, CA1, and Dentate Gyrus Principal Neurons in the Dorsal Hippocampus before Spontaneous Seizures in a Rat Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Satoshi; Toyoda, Izumi; Thamattoor, Ajoy K.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that spontaneous seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy might be preceded by increased action potential firing of hippocampal neurons. Preictal activity is potentially important because it might provide new opportunities for predicting when a seizure is about to occur and insight into how spontaneous seizures are generated. We evaluated local field potentials and unit activity of single, putative excitatory neurons in the subiculum, CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus in epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats as they experienced spontaneous seizures. Average action potential firing rates of neurons in the subiculum, CA1, and dentate gyrus, but not CA3, increased significantly and progressively beginning 2–4 min before locally recorded spontaneous seizures. In the subiculum, CA1, and dentate gyrus, but not CA3, 41–57% of neurons displayed increased preictal activity with significant consistency across multiple seizures. Much of the increased preictal firing of neurons in the subiculum and CA1 correlated with preictal theta activity, whereas preictal firing of neurons in the dentate gyrus was independent of theta. In addition, some CA1 and dentate gyrus neurons displayed reduced firing rates preictally. These results reveal that different hippocampal subregions exhibit differences in the extent and potential underlying mechanisms of preictal activity. The finding of robust and significantly consistent preictal activity of subicular, CA1, and dentate neurons in the dorsal hippocampus, despite the likelihood that many seizures initiated in other brain regions, suggests the existence of a broader neuronal network whose activity changes minutes before spontaneous seizures initiate. PMID:25505320

  6. Generalized tonic-clonic seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizure - grand mal; Grand mal seizure; Seizure - generalized; Epilepsy - generalized seizure ... occur as part of a repeated, chronic illness (epilepsy). Some seizures are due to psychological problems (psychogenic).

  7. Attenuation of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus by inhibition of endocannabinoid transport and degradation in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Shubina, Liubov; Aliev, Rubin; Kitchigina, Valentina

    2015-03-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a medical emergency associated with a high rate of mortality if not treated promptly. Exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids have been shown to possess anticonvulsant properties both in vivo and in vitro. Here we study the influence of endocannabinoid metabolism on the development of kainic acid-induced SE in guinea pigs. For this purpose, the inhibitors of endocannabinoid transport, AM404, and enzymatic (fatty acid amide hydrolase) degradation, URB597, were applied. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251, was also tested. Animal behavior as well as local electric field potentials in four structures: medial septum, hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and amygdala were analyzed when AM404 (120nmol), URB597 (4.8nmol) or AM251 (20nmol) were administrated alone or together with 0.4μg of kainic acid. All substances were injected i.c.v. AM404, URB597 or AM251 administered alone did not alter markedly local field potentials of all four studied structures in the long-term compared with their basal activity. AM404 and URB597 significantly alleviated kainic acid-induced SE, decreasing behavioral manifestations, duration of seizure events and SE in general without changing the amplitude of local field potentials. AM251 did not produce distinct effects on SE in terms of our experimental paradigm. There was no apparent change of the seizure initiation pattern when kainic acid was coadministrated with AM404, URB597 or AM251. The present study provides electrophysiologic and behavioral evidences that inhibition of endocannabinoid metabolism plays a protective role against kainic acid-induced SE and may be employed for therapeutic purposes. Further investigations of the influences of cannabinoid-related compounds on SE genesis and especially epileptogenesis are required.

  8. Role of specific muscarinic receptor subtypes in cholinergic parasympathomimetic responses, in vivo phosphoinositide hydrolysis, and pilocarpine-induced seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Bymaster, Frank P; Carter, Petra A; Yamada, Masahisa; Gomeza, Jesus; Wess, Jürgen; Hamilton, Susan E; Nathanson, Neil M; McKinzie, David L; Felder, Christian C

    2003-04-01

    Muscarinic agonist-induced parasympathomimetic effects, in vivo phosphoinositide hydrolysis and seizures were evaluated in wild-type and muscarinic M1-M5 receptor knockout mice. The muscarinic agonist oxotremorine induced marked hypothermia in all the knockout mice, but the hypothermia was reduced in M2 and to a lesser extent in M3 knockout mice. Oxotremorine-induced tremor was abolished only in the M2 knockout mice. Muscarinic agonist-induced salivation was reduced to the greatest extent in M3 knockout mice, to a lesser degree in M1 and M4 knockout mice, and was not altered in M2 and M5 knockout mice. Pupil diameter under basal conditions was increased only in the M3 knockout mice. Pilocarpine-induced increases in in vivo phosphoinositide hydrolysis were completely absent in hippocampus and cortex of M1 knockout mice, but in vivo phosphoinositide hydrolysis was unaltered in the M2-M5 knockout mice. A high dose of pilocarpine (300 mg/kg) caused seizures and lethality in wild-type and M2-M5 knockout mice, but produced neither effect in the M1 knockout mice. These data demonstrate a major role for M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes in mediating parasympathomimetic effects. Muscarinic M1 receptors activate phosphoinositide hydrolysis in cortex and hippocampus of mice, consistent with the role of M1 receptors in cognition. Muscarinic M1 receptors appear to be the only muscarinic receptor subtype mediating seizures.

  9. Pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures are associated with Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity decrease and alpha subunit phosphorylation state in the mice cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Marquezan, Bárbara P; Funck, Vinícius R; Oliveira, Clarissa V; Pereira, Letícia M; Araújo, Stífani M; Zarzecki, Micheli S; Royes, Luiz Fernando F; Furian, Ana Flávia; Oliveira, Mauro S

    2013-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and phosphorylation state of the catalytic α subunit are altered by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures. PTZ (30, 45 or 60 g/kg, i.p.) was administered to adult male Swiss mice, and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and phosphorylation state were measured in the cerebral cortex 15 min after PTZ administration. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity significantly decreased after PTZ-induced seizures (60 mg/kg). Immunoreactivity of phosphorylated Ser943 at α subunit was increased after PTZ-induced seizures. A significant positive correlation between Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and latency to myoclonic jerks and generalized seizures was found. Conversely, a strong negative correlation between Ser943 phosphorylation and latency to generalized seizures was detected. Given the role of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase as a major regulator of brain excitability, Ser943 at Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α subunit may represent a potentially valuable new target for drug development for seizure disorders.

  10. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  11. Frontal Lobe Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    Frontal lobe seizures Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Frontal lobe seizures are a common form of epilepsy, a ... seizures originate in the front of the brain. Frontal lobe seizures may also be caused by abnormal brain ...

  12. Neu1 sialidase and matrix metalloproteinase-9 cross-talk regulates nucleic acid-induced endosomal TOLL-like receptor-7 and -9 activation, cellular signaling and pro-inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Abdulkhalek, Samar; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2013-11-01

    The precise mechanism(s) by which intracellular TOLL-like receptors (TLRs) become activated by their ligands remains unclear. Here, we report a molecular organizational G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling platform to potentiate a novel mammalian neuraminidase-1 (Neu1) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) cross-talk in alliance with neuromedin B GPCR, all of which form a tripartite complex with TLR-7 and -9. siRNA silencing Neu1, MMP-9 and neuromedin-B GPCR in RAW-blue macrophage cells significantly reduced TLR7 imiquimod- and TLR9 ODN1826-induced NF-κB (NF-κB-pSer(536)) activity. Tamiflu, specific MMP-9 inhibitor, neuromedin B receptor specific antagonist BIM23127, and the selective inhibitor of whole heterotrimeric G-protein complex BIM-46174 significantly block nucleic acid-induced TLR-7 and -9 MyD88 recruitment, NF-κB activation and proinflammatory TNFα and MCP-1 cytokine responses. For the first time, Neu1 clearly plays a central role in mediating nucleic acid-induced intracellular TLR activation, and the interactions involving NMBR-MMP9-Neu1 cross-talk constitute a novel intracellular TLR signaling platform that is essential for NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory responses.

  13. Controlling Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how an implantable device could greatly improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy. Gabe Anderson was diagnosed with bilateral heterotopia, a congenital condition that can lead to the onset of complex partial seizures stemming from both hemispheres of the brain. In early 2004, Gabe became one of the first 35…

  14. Inhibition of retinoic acid-induced activation of 3' human HOXB genes by antisense oligonucleotides affects sequential activation of genes located upstream in the four HOX clusters.

    PubMed Central

    Faiella, A; Zappavigna, V; Mavilio, F; Boncinelli, E

    1994-01-01

    Most homeobox genes belonging to the Hox family are sequentially activated in embryonal carcinoma cells upon treatment with retinoic acid. Genes located at the 3' end of each one of the four Hox clusters are activated first, whereas upstream Hox genes are activated progressively later. This activation has been extensively studied for human HOX genes in the NT2/D1 cell line and shown to take place at the transcriptional level. To understand the molecular mechanisms of sequential HOX gene activation in these cells, we tried to modulate the expression of 3' HOX genes through the use of antisense oligonucleotides added to the culture medium. We chose the HOXB locus. A 5- to 15-fold reduction of the expression of HOXB1 and HOXB3 was sufficient to produce a significant inhibition of the activation of the upstream HOXB genes, as well as of their paralogs in the HOXA, HOXC, and HOXD clusters. Conversely, no effect was detectable on downstream HOX genes. The extent of this inhibition increased for progressively more-5' genes. The stability of the corresponding mRNAs appeared to be unaffected, supporting the idea that the observed effect might be mediated at the transcriptional level. These data suggest a cascade model of progressive activation of Hox genes, with a 3'-to-5' polarity. Images PMID:7911240

  15. Seizure-induced disinhibition of the HPA axis increases seizure susceptibility.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Kate K; Hooper, Andrew; Wakefield, Seth; Maguire, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Stress is the most commonly reported precipitating factor for seizures. The proconvulsant actions of stress hormones are thought to mediate the effects of stress on seizure susceptibility. Interestingly, epileptic patients have increased basal levels of stress hormones, including corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and corticosterone, which are further increased following seizures. Given the proconvulsant actions of stress hormones, we proposed that seizure-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may contribute to future seizure susceptibility. Consistent with this hypothesis, our data demonstrate that pharmacological induction of seizures in mice with kainic acid or pilocarpine increases circulating levels of the stress hormone, corticosterone, and exogenous corticosterone administration is sufficient to increase seizure susceptibility. However, the mechanism(s) whereby seizures activate the HPA axis remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis involves compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons, which govern HPA axis function. Following seizure activity, there is a collapse of the chloride gradient due to changes in NKCC1 and KCC2 expression, resulting in reduced amplitude of sIPSPs and even depolarizing effects of GABA on CRH neurons. Seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis results in future seizure susceptibility which can be blocked by treatment with an NKCC1 inhibitor, bumetanide, or blocking the CRH signaling with Antalarmin. These data suggest that compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons following an initial seizure event may cause hyperexcitability of the HPA axis and increase future seizure susceptibility.

  16. Seizure induces activation of multiple subtypes of neural progenitors and growth factors in hippocampus with neuronal maturation confined to dentate gyrus

    SciTech Connect

    Indulekha, Chandrasekharan L.; Sanalkumar, Rajendran; Thekkuveettil, Anoopkumar; James, Jackson

    2010-03-19

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is altered in response to different physiological and pathological stimuli. GFAP{sup +ve}/nestin{sup +ve} radial glial like Type-1 progenitors are considered to be the resident stem cell population in adult hippocampus. During neurogenesis these Type-1 progenitors matures to GFAP{sup -ve}/nestin{sup +ve} Type-2 progenitors and then to Type-3 neuroblasts and finally differentiates into granule cell neurons. In our study, using pilocarpine-induced seizure model, we showed that seizure initiated activation of multiple progenitors in the entire hippocampal area such as DG, CA1 and CA3. Seizure induction resulted in activation of two subtypes of Type-1 progenitors, Type-1a (GFAP{sup +ve}/nestin{sup +ve}/BrdU{sup +ve}) and Type-1b (GFAP{sup +ve}/nestin{sup +ve}/BrdU{sup -ve}). We showed that majority of Type-1b progenitors were undergoing only a transition from a state of dormancy to activated form immediately after seizures rather than proliferating, whereas Type-1a showed maximum proliferation by 3 days post-seizure induction. Type-2 (GFAP{sup -ve}/nestin{sup +ve}/BrdU{sup +ve}) progenitors were few compared to Type-1. Type-3 (DCX{sup +ve}) progenitors showed increased expression of immature neurons only in DG region by 3 days after seizure induction indicating maturation of progenitors happens only in microenvironment of DG even though progenitors are activated in CA1 and CA3 regions of hippocampus. Also parallel increase in growth factors expression after seizure induction suggests that microenvironmental niche has a profound effect on stimulation of adult neural progenitors.

  17. Seizure-dependent mTOR activation in 5-HT neurons promotes autism-like behaviors in mice

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, John J.; Yu, Wilson; Yang, Jun; Feng, Haihua; Helm, Meghan; McMahon, Elizabeth; Zhu, Xinjun; Shin, Damian; Huang, Yunfei

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are common comorbidities of one another. Despite the prevalent correlation between the two disorders, few studies have been able to elucidate a mechanistic link. We demonstrate that forebrain specific Tsc1 deletion in mice causes epilepsy and autism-like behaviors, concomitant with disruption of 5-HT neurotransmission. We find that epileptiform activity propagates to the raphe nuclei, resulting in seizure-dependent hyperactivation of mTOR in 5-HT neurons. To dissect whether mTOR hyperactivity in 5-HT neurons alone was sufficient to recapitulate an autism-like phenotype we utilized Tsc1flox/flox;Slc6a4-cre mice, in which mTOR is restrictively hyperactivated in 5-HT neurons. Tsc1flox/flox;Slc6a4-cre mice displayed alterations of the 5-HT system and autism-like behaviors, without causing epilepsy. Rapamycin treatment in these mice was sufficient to rescue the phenotype. We conclude that the spread of seizure activity to the brainstem is capable of promoting hyperactivation of mTOR in the raphe nuclei, which in turn promotes autism-like behaviors. Thus our study provides a novel mechanism describing how epilepsy can contribute to the development of autism-like behaviors, suggesting new therapeutic strategies for autism. PMID:25315683

  18. Epilepsy or seizures - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... food to the table. If possible, replace all glass doors either with safety glass or plastic. Most people with seizures can have a very active lifestyle. You should still plan ahead for the ... law from your doctor and the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV).

  19. NR4A1 Knockdown Suppresses Seizure Activity by Regulating Surface Expression of NR2B

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanke; Chen, Guojun; Gao, Baobing; Li, Yunlin; Liang, Shuli; Wang, Xiaofei; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhu, Binglin

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 1 (NR4A1), a downstream target of CREB that is a key regulator of epileptogenesis, has been implicated in a variety of biological processes and was previously identified as a seizure-associated molecule. However, the relationship between NR4A1 and epileptogenesis remains unclear. Here, we showed that NR4A1 protein was predominantly expressed in neurons and up-regulated in patients with epilepsy as well as pilocarpine-induced mouse epileptic models. NR4A1 knockdown by lentivirus transfection (lenti-shNR4A1) alleviated seizure severity and prolonged onset latency in mouse models. Moreover, reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation of NR4A1 and NR2B demonstrated their interaction. Furthermore, the expression of p-NR2B (Tyr1472) in epileptic mice and the expression of NR2B in the postsynaptic density (PSD) were significantly reduced in the lenti-shNR4A1 group, indicating that NR4A1 knockdown partly decreased surface NR2B by promoting NR2B internalization. These results are the first to indicate that the expression of NR4A1 in epileptic brain tissues may provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying epilepsy. PMID:27876882

  20. NR4A1 Knockdown Suppresses Seizure Activity by Regulating Surface Expression of NR2B.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanke; Chen, Guojun; Gao, Baobing; Li, Yunlin; Liang, Shuli; Wang, Xiaofei; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhu, Binglin

    2016-11-23

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 1 (NR4A1), a downstream target of CREB that is a key regulator of epileptogenesis, has been implicated in a variety of biological processes and was previously identified as a seizure-associated molecule. However, the relationship between NR4A1 and epileptogenesis remains unclear. Here, we showed that NR4A1 protein was predominantly expressed in neurons and up-regulated in patients with epilepsy as well as pilocarpine-induced mouse epileptic models. NR4A1 knockdown by lentivirus transfection (lenti-shNR4A1) alleviated seizure severity and prolonged onset latency in mouse models. Moreover, reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation of NR4A1 and NR2B demonstrated their interaction. Furthermore, the expression of p-NR2B (Tyr1472) in epileptic mice and the expression of NR2B in the postsynaptic density (PSD) were significantly reduced in the lenti-shNR4A1 group, indicating that NR4A1 knockdown partly decreased surface NR2B by promoting NR2B internalization. These results are the first to indicate that the expression of NR4A1 in epileptic brain tissues may provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying epilepsy.

  1. Synergistic effect of docosahexaenoic acid on anticonvulsant activity of valproic acid and lamotrigine in animal seizure models.

    PubMed

    Gavzan, Hakimeh; Sayyah, Mohammad; Sardari, Soroush; Babapour, Vahab

    2015-10-01

    Add-on therapy is a common strategy to improve efficacy and tolerability of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Anticonvulsant potential and appropriate safety of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) makes it a promising candidate for combination therapy. We evaluated influence of DHA on anticonvulsant activity of AEDs phenytoin, valproate, and lamotrigine in maximal electroshock (MES), pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), and kindling models of epilepsy. The dose-response to DHA was obtained 15 min after intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection in PTZ model of clonic seizures in mice, MES model of tonic seizures in mice, and kindling model of complex partial seizures in rats. The dose-response curve of valproate (30 min after i.p. injection to mice) in PTZ, phenytoin (60 min after i.p. injection to mice) in MES, and lamotrigine (60 min after i.p. injection to rats) in kindling models were obtained. Dose-response curves of the AEDs were then achieved in the presence of ED25 of DHA. DHA had no anticonvulsant effect in the MES model. However, it showed a dose-dependent protective effect against PTZ (ED50 = 0.13 μM) and kindled seizures (ED50 = 1.08 mM). DHA at ED25 caused a 3.6-fold increase in potency of valproate as its ED50 value from 117.5 (98.3-135.3) decreased to 32.5 (21.6-44.1) mg/kg. Moreover, a 4.9-fold increase in potency of lamotrigine occurred, as its ED50 value from 13.10 (11.50-14.9) decreased to 2.65 (0.8-5.6) mg/kg. CompuSyn analysis indicated synergistic anticonvulsant interaction between DHA and both valproate and lamotrigine. Co-administration strategy of the safe and inexpensive anticonvulsant compound DHA with AEDs should be favorably regarded in clinical studies of epilepsy treatment.

  2. A seizure-induced gain-of-function in BK channels is associated with elevated firing activity in neocortical pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shruti, Sonal; Clem, Roger L.; Barth, Alison L.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY A heritable gain-of-function in BK channel activity has been associated with spontaneous seizures in both rodents and humans. We find that chemoconvulsant-induced seizures induce a gain-of-function in BK channel current that is associated with abnormal, elevated network excitability. Action potential half-width, evoked firing rate, and spontaneous network activity in vitro were all altered 24 hrs following picrotoxin-induced seizures in layer 2/3 pyramidal cells in the neocortex of young mice (P13-P16). Action potential half-width and firing output could be normalized to control values by application of BK channel antagonists in vitro. Thus, both inherited and acquired BK channel gain-of-functions are linked to abnormal excitability. Because BK channel antagonists can reduce elevated firing activity in neocortical neurons, BK channels might serve as a new target for anticonvulsant therapy. PMID:18387812

  3. Long-term fish oil supplementation attenuates seizure activity in the amygdala induced by 3-mercaptopropionic acid in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Flores-Mancilla, L E; Hernández-González, M; Guevara, M A; Benavides-Haro, D E; Martínez-Arteaga, P

    2014-04-01

    Several studies have provided evidence of significant effects of omega-3 fatty acids on brain functionality, including seizures and disorders such as epilepsy. Fish oil (FO) is a marine product rich in unsaturated omega-3 fatty acids. Considering that the amygdala is one of the brain structures most sensitive to seizure generation, we aimed to evaluate the effect of long-term chronic FO supplementation (from embryonic conception to adulthood) on the severity of seizures and amygdaloid electroencephalographic activity (EEG) in a 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA)-induced seizure model using adult rats. Female Wistar rats were fed a commercial diet supplemented daily with FO (300mg/kg) from puberty through mating, gestation, delivery, and weaning of the pups. Only the male pups were then fed daily with a commercial diet supplemented with the same treatment as the dam up to the age of 150days postpartum, when they were bilaterally implanted in the amygdala to record behavior and EEG activity before, during, and after seizures induced by administering 3-MPA. Results were compared with those obtained from rats supplemented with palm oil (PO) and rats treated with a vehicle (CTRL). The male rats treated with FO showed longer latency to seizure onset, fewer convulsive episodes, and attenuated severity compared those in the PO and CTRL groups according to the Racine scale. Moreover, long-term FO supplementation was associated with a reduction of the absolute power (AP) of the fast frequencies (12-25Hz) in the amygdala during the seizure periods. These findings support the idea that chronic supplementation with omega-3 of marine origin may have antiseizure properties as other studies have suggested.

  4. In silico Screening and Evaluation of the Anticonvulsant Activity of Docosahexaenoic Acid-Like Molecules in Experimental Models of Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Loron, Ali Gharibi; Sardari, Soroush; Narenjkar, Jamshid; Sayyah, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Background: Resistance to antiepileptic drugs and the intolerability in 20-30% of the patients raises demand for developing new drugs with improved efficacy and safety. Acceptable anticonvulsant activity, good tolerability, and inexpensiveness of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) make it as a good candidate for designing and development of the new anticonvulsant medications. Methods: Ten DHA-based molecules were screened based on in silico screening of DHA-like molecules by root-mean-square deviation of atomic positions, the biological activity score of Professional Association for SQL Server, and structural requirements suggested by pharmacophore design. Anticonvulsant activity was tested against clonic seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ, 60 mg/kg, i.p.) and tonic seizures induced by maximal electroshock (MES, 50 mA, 50 Hz, 1 ms duration) by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of the screened compounds to mice. Results: Among screened compounds, 4-Phenylbutyric acid, 4-Biphenylacetic acid, phenylacetic acid, and 2-Phenylbutyric acid showed significant protective activity in pentylenetetrazole test with ED50 values of 4, 5, 78, and 70 mM, respectively. In MES test, shikimic acid and 4-tert-Butylcyclo-hexanecarboxylic acid showed significant activity with ED50 values 29 and 637 mM, respectively. Effective compounds had no mortality in mice up to the maximum i.c.v. injectable dose of 1 mM. Conclusion: Common electrochemical features and three-dimensional spatial structures of the effective compounds suggest the involvement of the anticonvulsant mechanisms similar to the parent compound DHA. PMID:27592363

  5. Predicting Epileptic Seizures in Advance

    PubMed Central

    Moghim, Negin; Corne, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6–0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG) data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling), is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity) of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance. PMID:24911316

  6. Mice lacking p35, a neuronal specific activator of Cdk5, display cortical lamination defects, seizures, and adult lethality.

    PubMed

    Chae, T; Kwon, Y T; Bronson, R; Dikkes, P; Li, E; Tsai, L H

    1997-01-01

    The adult mammalian cortex is characterized by a distinct laminar structure generated through a well-defined pattern of neuronal migration. Successively generated neurons are layered in an "inside-out" manner to produce six cortical laminae. We demonstrate here that p35, the neuronal-specific activator of cyclin-dependent kinase 5, plays a key role in proper neuronal migration. Mice lacking p35, and thus p35/cdk5 kinase activity, display severe cortical lamination defects and suffer from sporadic adult lethality and seizures. Histological examination reveals that the mutant mice lack the characteristic laminated structure of the cortex. Neuronal birth-dating experiments indicate a reversed packing order of cortical neurons such that earlier born neurons reside in superficial layers and later generated neurons occupy deep layers. The phenotype of p35 mutant mice thus demonstrates that the formation of cortical laminar structure depends on the action of the p35/cdk5 kinase.

  7. Knock-out of metacaspase and/or cytochrome c results in the activation of a ROS-independent acetic acid-induced programmed cell death pathway in yeast.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2010-08-20

    To gain further insight into yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death (AA-PCD) we analyzed the effects of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) on cell viability, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production, DNA fragmentation, cytochrome c (cyt c) release and caspase-like activation in wild type (wt) and metacaspase and/or cyt c-lacking cells. We found that NAC prevents AA-PCD in wt cells, by scavenging H(2)O(2) and by inhibiting both cyt c release and caspase-like activation. This shows the occurrence of a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent AA-PCD. Contrarily no NAC dependent change in AA-PCD of mutant cells was detectable, showing that a ROS-independent AA-PCD can also occur.

  8. Loss of SYNJ1 dual phosphatase activity leads to early onset refractory seizures and progressive neurological decline.

    PubMed

    Hardies, Katia; Cai, Yiying; Jardel, Claude; Jansen, Anna C; Cao, Mian; May, Patrick; Djémié, Tania; Hachon Le Camus, Caroline; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Deconinck, Tine; Bhambhani, Vikas; Long, Catherine; Sajan, Samin A; Helbig, Katherine L; Suls, Arvid; Balling, Rudi; Helbig, Ingo; De Jonghe, Peter; Depienne, Christel; De Camilli, Pietro; Weckhuysen, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    SYNJ1 encodes a polyphosphoinositide phosphatase, synaptojanin 1, which contains two consecutive phosphatase domains and plays a prominent role in synaptic vesicle dynamics. Autosomal recessive inherited variants in SYNJ1 have previously been associated with two different neurological diseases: a recurrent homozygous missense variant (p.Arg258Gln) that abolishes Sac1 phosphatase activity was identified in three independent families with early onset parkinsonism, whereas a homozygous nonsense variant (p.Arg136*) causing a severe decrease of mRNA transcript was found in a single patient with intractable epilepsy and tau pathology. We performed whole exome or genome sequencing in three independent sib pairs with early onset refractory seizures and progressive neurological decline, and identified novel segregating recessive SYNJ1 defects. A homozygous missense variant resulting in an amino acid substitution (p.Tyr888Cys) was found to impair, but not abolish, the dual phosphatase activity of SYNJ1, whereas three premature stop variants (homozygote p.Trp843* and compound heterozygote p.Gln647Argfs*6/p.Ser1122Thrfs*3) almost completely abolished mRNA transcript production. A genetic follow-up screening in a large cohort of 543 patients with a wide phenotypical range of epilepsies and intellectual disability revealed no additional pathogenic variants, showing that SYNJ1 deficiency is rare and probably linked to a specific phenotype. While variants leading to early onset parkinsonism selectively abolish Sac1 function, our results provide evidence that a critical reduction of the dual phosphatase activity of SYNJ1 underlies a severe disorder with neonatal refractory epilepsy and a neurodegenerative disease course. These findings further expand the clinical spectrum of synaptic dysregulation in patients with severe epilepsy, and emphasize the importance of this biological pathway in seizure pathophysiology.

  9. Cannabidiol Post-Treatment Alleviates Rat Epileptic-Related Behaviors and Activates Hippocampal Cell Autophagy Pathway Along with Antioxidant Defense in Chronic Phase of Pilocarpine-Induced Seizure.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Mahshid; Nikseresht, Sara; Khodagholi, Fariba; Naderi, Nima; Maghsoudi, Nader

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal and sometimes severe behavioral and molecular symptoms are usually observed in epileptic humans and animals. To address this issue, we examined the behavioral and molecular aspects of seizure evoked by pilocarpine. Autophagy can promote both cell survival and death, but there are controversial reports about the neuroprotective or neurodegenerative effects of autophagy in seizure. Cannabidiol has anticonvulsant properties in some animal models when used as a pretreatment. In this study, we investigated alteration of seizure scores, autophagy pathway proteins, and antioxidant status in hippocampal cells during the chronic phase of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy after treatment with cannabidiol. Cannabidiol (100 ng, intracerebroventricular injection) delayed the chronic phase of epilepsy. Single administration of cannabidiol during the chronic phase of seizure significantly diminished seizure scores such as mouth clonus, head nodding, monolateral and bilateral forelimb clonus and increased the activity of catalase enzyme and reduced glutathione content. Such a protective effect in the behavioral scores of epileptic rats was also observed after repeated administrations of cannabidiol at the onset of the silent phase. Moreover, the amount of Atg7, conjugation of Atg5/12, Atg12, and LC3II/LC3I ratio increased significantly in epileptic rats treated with repeated injections of cannabidiol. In short, our results suggest that post-treatment of Cannabidiol could enhance the induction of autophagy pathway and antioxidant defense in the chronic phase of epilepsy, which could be considered as the protective mechanisms of cannabidiol in a temporal lobe epilepsy model.

  10. Seizure Disorders in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizures that cause a loss of consciousness and violent, jerking movements, called grand mal seizures , are especially ... of seizure that causes loss of consciousness and violent, jerking movements. Intrauterine Device: A small device that ...

  11. Gelastic seizures involving the left parietal lobe.

    PubMed

    Machado, René Andrade; Astencio, Adriana Goicoechea

    2012-01-01

    Gelastic seizures have been described in various epilepsies arising from the temporal or frontal lobes, although the most commonly encountered form is related to the presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma. We describe a patient with gelastic seizures involving the left parietal lobe. Our patient, an 8-year-old girl, underwent interictal video/EEG monitoring and MRI. The seizures consisted of brief staring followed by smiling and laughing. Electroencephalography during the gelastic seizures showed rhythmic spikes and waves in the left parietal lobe. MRI revealed the characteristic features of focal cortical dysplasia. Our findings suggest that the left parietal lobe may actively participate in the particular epileptogenic network generating gelastic seizures.

  12. Evaluation of the anticonvulsant activity of 6-(4-chlorophenyoxy)-tetrazolo[5,1-a]phthalazine in various experimental seizure models in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xian-Yu; Wei, Cheng-Xi; Deng, Xian-Qing; Sun, Zhi-Gang; Quan, Zhe-Shan

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the anticonvulsant activity of a new phthalazine tetrazole derivative, QUAN-0808 (6-(4-chlorophenoxy)-tetrazolo[5,1-a]phthalazine), in the mouse maximal electroshock (MES) seizure model. The neurotoxicity of QUAN-0808 was investigated using the rotarod neurotoxicity test in mice. QUAN-0808 exhibited higher activity (median effective dose, ED(50) = 6.8 mg/kg) and lower neurotoxicity (median toxic dose, TD(50) = 456.4 mg/kg), resulting in a higher protective index (PI = 67.1) compared with carbamazepine (PI = 6.4). In addition, QUAN-0808 exhibited significant oral anticonvulsant activity (ED(50) = 24 mg/kg) against MES-induced seizure with low neurotoxicity (TD(50) > 4500 mg/kg) in mice, resulting in a PI value of more than 187.5. QUAN-0808 was also tested in chemically induced animal models of seizure (pentylenetetrazole [PTZ], isoniazid [ISO], thiosemicarbazide [THIO] and 3-mercaptopropionic acid [3-MP]) to further investigate the anticonvulsant activity; QUAN-0808 produced significant anticonvulsant activity against seizures induced by ISO, THIO and 3-MP.

  13. Beta/gamma oscillatory activity in the CA3 hippocampal area is depressed by aberrant GABAergic transmission from the dentate gyrus after seizures.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Mario; Vivar, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2007-01-03

    Oscillatory activity in the CA3 region is thought to be involved in the encoding and retrieval of information. These oscillations originate from the recurrent excitation between pyramidal cells that are entrained by the synchronous rhythmic inhibition of local interneurons. We show here that, after seizures, the dentate gyrus (DG) tonically inhibits beta/gamma (20-24 Hz) field oscillations in the CA3 area through GABA-mediated signaling. These oscillations originate in the interneuron network because they are maintained in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, and they can be blocked by GABA(A) receptor antagonists or by perfusion of a calcium-free extracellular medium. Inhibition of this oscillatory activity requires intact DG-to-CA3 connections, and it is suppressed by the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR). The influence of mGluR activation was reflected in the spontaneous subthreshold membrane oscillations of CA3 interneurons after one seizure but could also be observed in pyramidal cells after several seizures. Coincident stimulation of the DG at and beta/gamma frequencies produced a frequency-dependent excitation of interneurons and the inhibition of pyramidal cells. Indeed, these effects were maximal at the frequency that matched the mGluR-sensitive spontaneous field oscillations, suggesting a resonance phenomenon. Our results shed light on the mechanisms that may underlie the deficits in memory and cognition observed after epileptic seizures.

  14. Ion dynamics during seizures

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Joseph V.; Burman, Richard J.; Katz, Arieh A.; Akerman, Colin J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in membrane voltage brought about by ion fluxes through voltage and transmitter-gated channels represent the basis of neural activity. As such, electrochemical gradients across the membrane determine the direction and driving force for the flow of ions and are therefore crucial in setting the properties of synaptic transmission and signal propagation. Ion concentration gradients are established by a variety of mechanisms, including specialized transporter proteins. However, transmembrane gradients can be affected by ionic fluxes through channels during periods of elevated neural activity, which in turn are predicted to influence the properties of on-going synaptic transmission. Such activity-induced changes to ion concentration gradients are a feature of both physiological and pathological neural processes. An epileptic seizure is an example of severely perturbed neural activity, which is accompanied by pronounced changes in intracellular and extracellular ion concentrations. Appreciating the factors that contribute to these ion dynamics is critical if we are to understand how a seizure event evolves and is sustained and terminated by neural tissue. Indeed, this issue is of significant clinical importance as status epilepticus—a type of seizure that does not stop of its own accord—is a life-threatening medical emergency. In this review we explore how the transmembrane concentration gradient of the six major ions (K+, Na+, Cl−, Ca2+, H+and HCO3−) is altered during an epileptic seizure. We will first examine each ion individually, before describing how multiple interacting mechanisms between ions might contribute to concentration changes and whether these act to prolong or terminate epileptic activity. In doing so, we will consider how the availability of experimental techniques has both advanced and restricted our ability to study these phenomena. PMID:26539081

  15. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  16. Non-imidazole-based histamine H3 receptor antagonists with anticonvulsant activity in different seizure models in male adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Bassem; Saad, Ali; Latacz, Gniewomir; Kuder, Kamil; Olejarz, Agnieszka; Karcz, Tadeusz; Stark, Holger; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    A series of twelve novel non-imidazole-based ligands (3–14) was developed and evaluated for its in vitro binding properties at the human histamine H3 receptor (hH3R). The novel ligands were investigated for their in vivo protective effects in different seizure models in male adult rats. Among the H3R ligands (3–14) tested, ligand 14 showed significant and dose-dependent reduction in the duration of tonic hind limb extension in maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizure model subsequent to acute systemic administration (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), whereas ligands 4, 6, and 7 without appreciable protection in MES model were most promising in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) model. Moreover, the protective effect observed for ligand 14 in MES model was lower than that observed for the reference drug phenytoin and was entirely abrogated when rats were co-administered with the brain-penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR) but not the brain-penetrant H2R antagonist zolantidine (ZOL), demonstrating that histaminergic neurotransmission by activation of postsynaptically located H1Rs seems to be involved in the protective action. On the contrary, PYR and ZOL failed to abrogate the full protection provided by 4 in PTZ model and the moderate protective effect by 14 in strychnine (STR) model. Moreover, the experimental and in silico estimation of properties such as metabolism was performed for five selected test compounds. Also, lipophilicity using planar reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography method was included for better understanding of the molecular properties of the tested compounds. Additionally, the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination and toxicity parameters were evaluated for the most promising compounds 2, 4, 6, 7, and 14 utilizing in vitro methods. These interesting results highlight the potential of H3R ligands as new antiepileptic drugs or as adjuvants to available epilepsy medications. PMID:27932863

  17. Non-imidazole-based histamine H3 receptor antagonists with anticonvulsant activity in different seizure models in male adult rats.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Saad, Ali; Latacz, Gniewomir; Kuder, Kamil; Olejarz, Agnieszka; Karcz, Tadeusz; Stark, Holger; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    A series of twelve novel non-imidazole-based ligands (3-14) was developed and evaluated for its in vitro binding properties at the human histamine H3 receptor (hH3R). The novel ligands were investigated for their in vivo protective effects in different seizure models in male adult rats. Among the H3R ligands (3-14) tested, ligand 14 showed significant and dose-dependent reduction in the duration of tonic hind limb extension in maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizure model subsequent to acute systemic administration (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), whereas ligands 4, 6, and 7 without appreciable protection in MES model were most promising in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) model. Moreover, the protective effect observed for ligand 14 in MES model was lower than that observed for the reference drug phenytoin and was entirely abrogated when rats were co-administered with the brain-penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR) but not the brain-penetrant H2R antagonist zolantidine (ZOL), demonstrating that histaminergic neurotransmission by activation of postsynaptically located H1Rs seems to be involved in the protective action. On the contrary, PYR and ZOL failed to abrogate the full protection provided by 4 in PTZ model and the moderate protective effect by 14 in strychnine (STR) model. Moreover, the experimental and in silico estimation of properties such as metabolism was performed for five selected test compounds. Also, lipophilicity using planar reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography method was included for better understanding of the molecular properties of the tested compounds. Additionally, the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination and toxicity parameters were evaluated for the most promising compounds 2, 4, 6, 7, and 14 utilizing in vitro methods. These interesting results highlight the potential of H3R ligands as new antiepileptic drugs or as adjuvants to available epilepsy medications.

  18. Gelastic seizures involving the right parietal lobe.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee-Young; Hong, Seung Bong; Joo, Eun Yeon; Tae, Woo Suk; Han, Sun Jung; Cho, Jae Wook; Seo, Dae Won; Kim, Sun Hyung; Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Sun I

    2006-09-01

    Gelastic seizures have been described in various epilepsies arising from the temporal or frontal lobes, although the most commonly encountered form is related to the presence of an hypothalamic hamartoma. We report a patient with gelastic seizures involving the right parietal lobe. Our patient, a 32-year-old man, underwent video-EEG monitoring, interictal and ictal brain SPECTs during gelastic seizures. Subtraction ictal SPECT co-registered to MRI (SISCOM), was performed to localize any ictal hyperperfusion during these gelastic seizures. The seizures consisted of brief staring followed by smiling and laughing. Electroencephalography during the gelastic seizures showed rhythmic sharp waves in the right parietal lobe. SISCOM showed ictal hyperperfusion in the right parietal lobe and medial portions of right cerebellum. Our findings suggest that the right parietal lobe may actively participate in the particular epileptogenic network generating gelastic seizures.

  19. Effect of the Anti-depressant Sertraline, the Novel Anti-seizure Drug Vinpocetine and Several Conventional Antiepileptic Drugs on the Epileptiform EEG Activity Induced by 4-Aminopyridine.

    PubMed

    Sitges, Maria; Aldana, Blanca Irene; Reed, Ronald Charles

    2016-06-01

    Seizures are accompanied by an exacerbated activation of cerebral ion channels. 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) is a pro-convulsive agent which mechanism of action involves activation of Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels, and several antiepileptic drugs control seizures by reducing these channels permeability. The antidepressant, sertraline, and the anti-seizure drug vinpocetine are effective inhibitors of cerebral presynaptic Na(+) channels. Here the effectiveness of these compounds to prevent the epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP was compared with the effectiveness of seven conventional antiepileptic drugs. For this purpose, EEG recordings before and at three intervals within the next 30 min following 4-AP (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) were taken in anesthetized animals; and the EEG-highest peak amplitude values (HPAV) calculated. In control animals, the marked increase in the EEG-HPAV observed near 20 min following 4-AP reached its maximum at 30 min. Results show that this epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP is prevented by sertraline and vinpocetine at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg, and by carbamazepine, phenytoin, lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine at a higher dose (25 mg/kg). In contrast, topiramate (25 mg/kg), valproate (100 mg/kg) and levetiracetam (100 mg/kg) failed to prevent the epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP. It is concluded that 4-AP is a useful tool to elicit the mechanism of action of anti-seizure drugs at clinical meaningful doses. The particular efficacy of sertraline and vinpocetine to prevent seizures induced by 4-AP is explained by their high effectiveness to reduce brain presynaptic Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels permeability.

  20. Dynamics of regional brain activity in epilepsy: a cross-disciplinary study on both intracranial and scalp-recorded epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minadakis, George; Ventouras, Errikos; Gatzonis, Stylianos D.; Siatouni, Anna; Tsekou, Hara; Kalatzis, Ioannis; Sakas, Damianos E.; Stonham, John

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Recent cross-disciplinary literature suggests a dynamical analogy between earthquakes and epileptic seizures. This study extends the focus of inquiry for the applicability of models for earthquake dynamics to examine both scalp-recorded and intracranial electroencephalogram recordings related to epileptic seizures. Approach. First, we provide an updated definition of the electric event in terms of magnitude and we focus on the applicability of (i) a model for earthquake dynamics, rooted in a nonextensive Tsallis framework, (ii) the traditional Gutenberg and Richter law and (iii) an alternative method for the magnitude-frequency relation for earthquakes. Second, we apply spatiotemporal analysis in terms of nonextensive statistical physics and we further examine the behavior of the parameters included in the nonextensive formula for both types of electroencephalogram recordings under study. Main results. We confirm the previously observed power-law distribution, showing that the nonextensive formula can adequately describe the sequences of electric events included in both types of electroencephalogram recordings. We also show the intermittent behavior of the epileptic seizure cycle which is analogous to the earthquake cycles and we provide evidence of self-affinity of the regional electroencephalogram epileptic seizure activity. Significance. This study may provide a framework for the analysis and interpretation of epileptic brain activity and other biological phenomena with similar underlying dynamical mechanisms.

  1. Can Seizure-Alert Dogs predict seizures?

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen W; Goldstein, Laura H

    2011-12-01

    An index observation where a dog was trained to alert to, as well as respond to, human tonic-clonic seizures led to further research and refinement of training techniques. This was followed by anecdotal reports of pet dogs spontaneously anticipating human epileptic seizures. An industry has since developed training Seizure-Alert Dogs (SADs) to give humans warnings of their seizures. In some cases this has been accompanied by a reduction in seizure frequency. SADs may be trained along with the person with epilepsy, responding specifically to that person's seizures, or may be trained separately. Recent sceptical reports of non-epileptic seizures in some people with SADs have cast doubt on dogs' ability to anticipate true epileptic seizures. This may reflect selection criteria for training programmes as well as training methods used, but does not necessarily indicate that SADs might not be able to predict epileptic seizures. Whether the seizures are epileptic or non-epileptic, it is speculated that SADs probably alert to subtle pre-ictal human behaviour changes, but may also be sensitive to heart rate or olfactory cues. As yet, however, no rigorous data exist as to whether seizure prediction by SADS is better than chance, and what false positive and negative prediction rates might be.

  2. TONIC INFLUENCE OF NEOCORTEX ON HIPPOCAMPAL SEIZURES.

    PubMed

    Saralidze, E; Khuchua, L; Kobaidze, I

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between different brain structures could be crucial to predicting seizure occurrence, threshold and spread. Moreover, the sleep-wake cycle and electrical activity of brain structures in different phases of sleep could significantly affect the pattern and extent of seizure spread, and therefore the characteristics of epileptic activity. In this animal model using 15 Wistar rats, we show that the duration of hippocampal seizures, induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus, is significantly increased during slow sleep. Moreover, decreasing the electrical activity of the neocortex by cooling of the cortical surface or induction of cortical spreading depression also caused an increase in hippocampal seizure duration. Conversely, warming the cortical surface triggered a remission in spreading depression, in turn restoring the duration of epileptic episodes. Our data suggest that the neocortex probably exerts a tonic inhibitory influence on hippocampal seizures. Thus, cortico-hippocampal interaction could be an important component in the manifestation and generalization of limbic seizures.

  3. The effect of melatonin on lipid peroxidation and nitrite/nitrate levels, and on superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in kainic acid-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Akcay, Yasemin Delen; Yalcin, Ayfer; Sozmen, Eser Yildirim

    2005-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) initiates neuronal injury and death by inducing oxidative stress and nitric oxide release from various regions of the brain. It was recently shown that melatonin has free radical-scavenging action and may protect against kainate-induced toxicity. In order to assess the possible supportive effect of melatonin treatment in KA-induced injury in the rat brain cortex, we determined malondialdehyde (MDA) levels as an index of lipid peroxidation, and assessed the activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the levels of nitrite/nitrate 35 male rats were divided into five groups, each receiving a different intraperitoneal treatment: saline solution (0.2 ml), kainic acid (15 mg/kg), melatonin (20 mg/kg), KA then melatonin (each as above, 15 min apart), or melatonin then KA (each as above, 30 min apart). Administration of KA caused an about five-fold increase in the catalase activity and an increase in the SOD activity in the cortex relative to the activities for the controls. Treatment with melatonin 15 min after KA injection kept malondialdehyde levels and catalase and superoxide dismutase activities at the normal levels, and led to an increase in the levels of nitrite/nitrate. Our data suggests that melatonin treatment following KA administration has a protective effect on antioxidant enzyme activities and thus supports the role of melatonin and oxidative stress in the regulation of antioxidative enzyme activity.

  4. Influence of ethacrynic acid on the anticonvulsant activity of conventional antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model.

    PubMed

    Łukawski, Krzysztof; Swiderska, Grażyna; Łuszczki, Jarogniew J; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether ethacrynic acid (EA), a loop diuretic with anticonvulsant activity, would affect the protective action of the conventional antiepileptics (AEDs) carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PHT), valproate (VPA) and phenobarbital (PB) in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure (MES) model. The effects of acute and chronic treatment with EA on these AEDs were examined. At a single dose of 100 mg/kg ip, EA enhanced the antielectroshock activity of VPA, decreasing its ED₅₀ value from 225.6 to 146.6 mg/kg (p < 0.05), but enhancement was not observed following continuous administration of EA (12.5 mg/kg) for seven days. Combined treatment of EA with other AEDs had no effect on their ED₅₀ values. The observed interaction between EA and VPA was pharmacodynamic in nature as EA did not alter free plasma (non-protein-bound) and total brain concentrations of VPA. Taking into consideration the clinical use of both drugs, this interaction between EA and VPA can be important for patients receiving these drugs.

  5. In Vitro Screening for Antihepatic Steatosis Active Components within Coptidis Rhizoma Alkaloids Extract Using Liver Cell Extraction with HPLC Analysis and a Free Fatty Acid-Induced Hepatic Steatosis HepG2 Cell Assay.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hui; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Bei, Wei-Jian; Wang, Lai-You; Chen, Bao-Tian; Guo, Jiao

    2013-01-01

    A high-throughput method was developed and applied to screen for the active antihepatic steatosis components within Coptidis Rhizoma Alkaloids Extract (CAE). This method was a combination of two previously described assays: HepG2 cell extraction with HPLC analysis and a free fatty acid-induced (FFA) hepatic steatosis HepG2 cell assay. Two alkaloids within CAE, berberine and coptisine, were identified by HepG2 cell extraction with HPLC analysis as high affinity components for HepG2. These alkaloids were also determined to be active and potent compounds capable of lowering triglyceride (TG) accumulation in the FFA-induced hepatic steatosis HepG2 cell assay. This remarkable inhibition of TG accumulation (P < 0.01) by berberine and coptisine occurred at concentrations of 0.2  μ g/mL and 5.0 μ g/mL, respectively. At these concentrations, the effect seen was similar to that of a CAE at 100.0  μ g/mL. Another five alkaloids within CAE, palmatine, epiberberine, jateorhizine, columbamine, and magnoline, were found to have a lower affinity for cellular components from HepG2 cells and a lower inhibition of TG accumulation. The finding of two potent and active compounds within CAE indicates that the screening method we developed is a feasible, rapid, and useful tool for studying traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) in treating hepatic steatosis.

  6. A New Model to Study Sleep Deprivation-Induced Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Lucey, Brendan P.; Leahy, Averi; Rosas, Regine; Shaw, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Objectives: A relationship between sleep and seizures is well-described in both humans and rodent animal models; however, the mechanism underlying this relationship is unknown. Using Drosophila melanogaster mutants with seizure phenotypes, we demonstrate that seizure activity can be modified by sleep deprivation. Design: Seizure activity was evaluated in an adult bang-sensitive seizure mutant, stress sensitive B (sesB9ed4), and in an adult temperature sensitive seizure mutant seizure (seits1) under baseline and following 12 h of sleep deprivation. The long-term effect of sleep deprivation on young, immature sesB9ed4 flies was also assessed. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: Drosophila melanogaster. Interventions: Sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: Sleep deprivation increased seizure susceptibility in adult sesB9ed4/+ and seits1 mutant flies. Sleep deprivation also increased seizure susceptibility when sesB was disrupted using RNAi. The effect of sleep deprivation on seizure activity was reduced when sesB9ed4/+ flies were given the anti-seizure drug, valproic acid. In contrast to adult flies, sleep deprivation during early fly development resulted in chronic seizure susceptibility when sesB9ed4/+ became adults. Conclusions: These findings show that Drosophila is a model organism for investigating the relationship between sleep and seizure activity. Citation: Lucey BP, Leahy A, Rosas R, Shaw PJ. A new model to study sleep deprivation-induced seizure. SLEEP 2015;38(5):777–785. PMID:25515102

  7. Kainic acid-induced neurodegeneration and activation of inflammatory processes in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures: treatment with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor does not prevent neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Juha T; Ruohonen, Saku; Kukko-Lukjanov, Tiina-Kaisa; Plysjuk, Anna; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R; Holopainen, Irma E

    2011-06-01

    In the postnatal rodent hippocampus status epilepticus (SE) leads to age- and region-specific excitotoxic neuronal damage, the precise mechanisms of which are still incompletely known. Recent studies suggest that the activation of inflammatory responses together with glial cell reactivity highly contribute to excitotoxic neuronal damage. However, pharmacological tools to attenuate their activation in the postnatal brain are still poorly elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of inflammatory mediators in kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal damage in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs). A specific cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor N-[2-(cyclohexyloxy)-4-nitrophenyl]-methanesulfonamide (NS-398) was used to study whether or not it could ameliorate neuronal death. Our results show that KA treatment (24 h) resulted in a dose-dependent degeneration of CA3a/b pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, COX-2 immunoreactivity was pronouncedly enhanced particularly in CA3c pyramidal neurons, microglial and astrocyte morphology changed from a resting to active appearance, the expression of the microglial specific protein, Iba1, increased, and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production increased. These indicated the activation of inflammatory processes. However, the expression of neither proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), nor the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 mRNA was significantly altered by KA treatment as studied by real-time PCR. Despite activation of an array of inflammatory processes, neuronal damage could not be rescued either with the combined pre- and co-treatment with a specific COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398. Our results suggest that KA induces activation of a repertoire of inflammatory processes in immature OHCs, and that the timing of anti-inflammatory treatment to achieve neuroprotection is a challenge due to developmental properties and the complexity of inflammatory processes activated by

  8. Pioglitazone ameliorates behavioral, biochemical and cellular alterations in quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity: possible role of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-Upsilon (PPARUpsilon) in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2010-08-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that PPARUpsilon activators attenuate neurodegeneration and related complications. Therefore, the present study focused on the neuroprotective potential of pioglitazone against quinolinic acid (QUIN) induced neurotoxicity. Intrastriatal (unilaterally) administration of QUIN significantly altered body weight and motor function (locomotor activity, rotarod and beam walk performance). Further, QUIN treatment significantly caused oxidative damage (increased lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration and depleted endogenous antioxidant defense enzymes), altered mitochondrial enzyme complex (I, II and IV) activities and TNF-alpha level as compared to sham treated animals. Pioglitazone (10, 20 and 40mg/kg, p.o.) treatment significantly improved body weight and motor functions, oxidative defense. Further, pioglitazone treatment restored mitochondrial enzyme complex activity as well as TNF-alpha level as compared to QUIN treated group. While Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) (15mg/kg), PPARUpsilon antagonist significantly reversed the protective effect of the pioglitazone (40mg/kg) in the QUIN treated animals. Further, pioglitazone treatment significantly attenuated the striatal lesion volume in QUIN treated animals, suggesting a role for the PPARUpsilon pathway in QUIN induced neurotoxicity. Altogether, this evidence indicates that PPARUpsilon activation by pioglitazone attenuated QUIN induced neurotoxicity in animals and which could be an important therapeutic avenue to ameliorate Huntington like symptoms.

  9. Could dietary trans fatty acids induce movement disorders? Effects of exercise and its influence on Na⁺K⁺-ATPase and catalase activity in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A M; Dias, V T; Pase, C S; Roversi, K; Boufleur, N; Barcelos, R C S; Benvegnú, D M; Trevizol, F; Dolci, G S; Carvalho, N R; Quatrin, A; Soares, F A A; Reckziegel, P; Segat, H J; Rocha, J B T; Emanuelli, T; Bürger, M E

    2012-01-15

    The influence of trans fatty acids (FA) on development of orofacial dyskinesia (OD) and locomotor activity was evaluated. Rats were fed with diets enriched with 20% soybean oil (SO; n-6 FA), lard (L; saturated FA) or hydrogenated vegetable fat (HVF; trans FA) for 60 weeks. In the last 12 weeks each group was subdivided into sedentary and exercised (swimming). Brains of HVF and L-fed rats incorporated 0.33% and 0.20% of trans FA, respectively, while SO-fed group showed no incorporation of trans FA. HVF increased OD, while exercise exacerbated this in L and HVF-fed rats. HVF and L reduced locomotor activity, and exercise did not modify. Striatal catalase activity was reduced by L and HVF, but exercise increased its activity in the HVF-fed group. Na(+)K(+)-ATPase activity was not modified by dietary FA, however it was increased by exercise in striatum of SO and L-fed rats. We hypothesized that movement disorders elicited by HVF and less by L could be related to increased dopamine levels in striatum, which have been related to chronic trans FA intake. Exercise increased OD possibly by increase of brain dopamine levels, which generates pro-oxidant metabolites. Thus, a long-term intake of trans FA caused a small but significant brain incorporation of trans FA, which favored development of movement disorders. Exercise worsened behavioral outcomes of HVF and L-fed rats and increased Na(+)K(+)-ATPase activity of L and SO-fed rats, indicating its benefits. HVF blunted beneficial effects of exercise, indicating a critical role of trans FA in brain neurochemistry.

  10. Glucose Amplifies Fatty Acid-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Pancreatic β-Cells via Activation of mTORC1

    PubMed Central

    Bachar, Etti; Ariav, Yafa; Ketzinel-Gilad, Mali; Cerasi, Erol; Kaiser, Nurit; Leibowitz, Gil

    2009-01-01

    Background Palmitate is a potent inducer of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in β-cells. In type 2 diabetes, glucose amplifies fatty-acid toxicity for pancreatic β-cells, leading to β-cell dysfunction and death. Why glucose exacerbates β-cell lipotoxicity is largely unknown. Glucose stimulates mTORC1, an important nutrient sensor involved in the regulation of cellular stress. Our study tested the hypothesis that glucose augments lipotoxicity by stimulating mTORC1 leading to increased β-cell ER stress. Principal Findings We found that glucose amplifies palmitate-induced ER stress by increasing IRE1α protein levels and activating the JNK pathway, leading to increased β-cell apoptosis. Moreover, glucose increased mTORC1 activity and its inhibition by rapamycin decreased β-cell apoptosis under conditions of glucolipotoxicity. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin did not affect proinsulin and total protein synthesis in β-cells incubated at high glucose with palmitate. However, it decreased IRE1α expression and signaling and inhibited JNK pathway activation. In TSC2-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, in which mTORC1 is constitutively active, mTORC1 regulated the stimulation of JNK by ER stressors, but not in response to anisomycin, which activates JNK independent of ER stress. Finally, we found that JNK inhibition decreased β-cell apoptosis under conditions of glucolipotoxicity. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, our findings suggest that mTORC1 mediates glucose amplification of lipotoxicity, acting through activation of ER stress and JNK. Thus, mTORC1 is an important transducer of ER stress in β-cell glucolipotoxicity. Moreover, in stressed β-cells mTORC1 inhibition decreases IRE1α protein expression and JNK activity without affecting ER protein load, suggesting that mTORC1 regulates the β-cell stress response to glucose and fatty acids by modulating the synthesis and activity of specific proteins involved in the execution of the ER stress response

  11. Development of a salicylic acid inducible minimal sub-genomic transcript promoter from Figwort mosaic virus with enhanced root- and leaf-activity using TGACG motif rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Patro, Sunita; Ghosh, Jayasish; Das, Abhimanyu; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2012-07-15

    In Figwort mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript promoter (F-Sgt), function of the TGACG-regulatory motif, was investigated in the background of artificially designed promoter sequences. The 131bp (FS, -100 to +31) long F-Sgt promoter sequence containing one TGACG motif [FS-(TGACG)] was engineered to generate a set of three modified promoter constructs: [FS-(TGACG)(2), containing one additional TGACG motif at 7 nucleotides upstream of the original one], [FS-(TGACG)(3), containing two additional TGACG motifs at 7 nucleotides upstream and two nucleotides downstream of the original one] and [FS-(TGCTG)(mu), having a mutated TGACG motif]. EMSA and foot-printing analysis confirmed binding of tobacco nuclear factors with modified TGACG motif/s. The transcription-activation of the GUS gene by the TGACG motif/s in above promoter constructs was examined in transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants and observed that the transcription activation was affected by the spacing/s and number/s of the TGACG motif/s. The FS-(TGACG)(2) promoter showed strongest root-activity compared to other modified and CaMV35S promoters. Also under salicylic acid (SA) stress, the leaf-activity of the said promoter was further enhanced. All above findings were confirmed by real-time and semi-qRT PCR analysis. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrated that the TGACG motif plays an important role in inducing the root-specific expression of the F-Sgt promoter. This study advocates the importance of genetic manipulation of functional cis-motif for amending the tissue specificity of a plant promoter. SA inducible FS-(TGACG)(2) promoter with enhanced activity could be a useful candidate promoter for developing plants with enhanced crop productivity.

  12. Zebrafish Seizure Model Identifies p,p′-DDE as the Dominant Contaminant of Fetal California Sea Lions That Accounts for Synergistic Activity with Domoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Tiedeken, Jessica A.; Ramsdell, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Fetal poisoning of California sea lions (CSLs; Zalophus californianus) has been associated with exposure to the algal toxin domoic acid. These same sea lions accumulate a mixture of persistent environmental contaminants including pesticides and industrial products such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Developmental exposure to the pesticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its stable metabolite 1,1-bis-(4-chlorophenyl)-2,2-dichloroethene (p,p′-DDE) has been shown to enhance domoic acid–induced seizures in zebrafish; however, the contribution of other co-occurring contaminants is unknown. Objective We formulated a mixture of contaminants to include PCBs, PBDEs, hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), and chlordane at levels matching those reported for fetal CSL blubber to determine the impact of co-occurring persistent contaminants with p,p′-DDE on chemically induced seizures in zebrafish as a model for the CSLs. Methods Embryos were exposed (6–30 hr postfertilization) to p,p′-DDE in the presence or absence of a defined contaminant mixture prior to neurodevelopment via either bath exposure or embryo yolk sac microinjection. After brain maturation (7 days postfertilization), fish were exposed to a chemical convulsant, either pentylenetetrazole or domoic acid; resulting seizure behavior was then monitored and analyzed for changes, using cameras and behavioral tracking software. Results Induced seizure behavior did not differ significantly between subjects with embryonic exposure to a contaminant mixture and those exposed to p,p′-DDE only. Conclusion These studies demonstrate that p,p′-DDE—in the absence of PCBs, HCH, chlordane, and PBDEs that co-occur in fetal sea lions—accounts for the synergistic activity that leads to greater sensitivity to domoic acid seizures. PMID:20368122

  13. Elevated ERK/p90 ribosomal S6 kinase activity underlies audiogenic seizure susceptibility in fragile X mice.

    PubMed

    Sawicka, Kirsty; Pyronneau, Alexander; Chao, Miranda; Bennett, Michael V L; Zukin, R Suzanne

    2016-10-11

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and a leading genetic form of autism. The Fmr1 KO mouse, a model of FXS, exhibits elevated translation in the hippocampus and the cortex. ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) and mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) signaling regulate protein synthesis by activating downstream targets critical to translation initiation and elongation and are known to contribute to hippocampal defects in fragile X. Here we show that the effect of loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) on these pathways is brain region specific. In contrast to the hippocampus, ERK (but not mTOR) signaling is elevated in the neocortex of fragile X mice. Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, typically a downstream target of mTOR, is elevated in the neocortex, despite normal mTOR activity. This is significant in that S6 phosphorylation facilitates translation, correlates with neuronal activation, and is altered in neurodevelopmental disorders. We show that in fragile X mice, S6 is regulated by ERK via the "alternative" S6 kinase p90-ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK), as evidenced by the site of elevated phosphorylation and the finding that ERK inhibition corrects elevated RSK and S6 activity. These findings indicate that signaling networks are altered in the neocortex of fragile X mice such that S6 phosphorylation receives aberrant input from ERK/RSK. Importantly, an RSK inhibitor reduces susceptibility to audiogenic seizures in fragile X mice. Our findings identify RSK as a therapeutic target for fragile X and suggest the therapeutic potential of drugs for the treatment of FXS may vary in a brain-region-specific manner.

  14. Lysophosphatidic Acid-induced ERK Activation and Chemotaxis in MC3T3-E1 Preosteoblasts are Independent of EGF Receptor Transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Chrisler, William B.; Bollinger, Nikki; Karin, Norman J.

    2009-06-01

    Growing evidence indicates that bone-forming osteoblasts and their progenitors are target cells for the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) which is produced by degranulating platelets at sites of injury. LPA is a potent inducer of bone cell migration, proliferation and survival in vitro and an attractive candidate to facilitate preosteoblast chemotaxis during skeletal regeneration in vivo, but the intracellular signaling pathways mediating the effects of this lipid on bone cells are not defined. In this study we measured the ability of LPA to stimulate extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2) in MC3T3-E1 preosteoblastic cells and determined the contribution of this pathway to LPA-stimulated chemotaxis. LPA-treated cells exhibited a bimodal activation of ERK1/2 with maximal phosphorylation at 5 and 60 minutes. The kinetics of ERK1/2 phosphorylation were not coupled to Ras activation or LPA-induced elevations in cytosolic Ca2+. While LPA is coupled to the transactivation of the EGF receptor in many cell types, LPA-stimulated ERK1/2 activation in MC3T3-E1 cells was unaffected by inhibition of EGF receptor function. ERK isoforms rapidly accumulated at nuclear sites in LPA-treated cells, a process that was blocked if ERK1/2 phosphorylation was prevented with the MEK1 inhibitor U0126. Blocking ERK1/2 phosphorylation with U0126 also diminished MC3T3-E1 cell migration and altered the normal disassembly of LPA-induced stress fibers, while the inhibition of EGF receptor function had no effect on LPA-coupled preosteoblast motility. Our results identify ERK1/2 activation as a mediatora mediator of LPA-stimulated MC3T3-E1 cell migration that may be relevant to preosteoblast motility during bone repair in vivo.

  15. Malate-Aspartate Shuttle Inhibitor Aminooxyacetate Acid Induces Apoptosis and Impairs Energy Metabolism of Both Resting Microglia and LPS-Activated Microglia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Heyu; Wang, Caixia; Wei, Xunbin; Ding, Xianting; Ying, Weihai

    2015-06-01

    NADH shuttles mediate the transfer of the reducing equivalents of cytosolic NADH into mitochondria. Cumulating evidence has suggested that malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS), one of the two types of NADH shuttles, plays significant roles in such biological processes as glutamate synthesis in neurons. However, there has been no information regarding the roles of NADH shuttle in the survival and energy metabolism of microglia. In current study, using microglial BV2 cells as a cellular model, we determined the roles of MAS in the survival and energy metabolism of microglia by using aminooxyacetate acid (AOAA)-a widely used MAS inhibitor. Our study has suggested that AOAA can effectively inhibit the MAS activity of the cells. We also found that AOAA can induce both early- and late-stage apoptosis of resting microglia and lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-activated microglia. AOAA also induced mitochondrial depolarization, increases in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations, and decreases in the intracellular ATP levels. Moreover, our study has excluded the possibility that the major nonspecific effect of AOAA-inhibition of GABA transaminase-is involved in theses effects of AOAA. Collectively, our study has provided first information suggesting significant roles of MAS in the survival and energy metabolism in both resting microglia and LPS-activated microglia.

  16. Fenofibrate, a PPARα agonist, protect proximal tubular cells from albumin-bound fatty acids induced apoptosis via the activation of NF-kB.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Nan; Zheng, Xiaoyu; Liu, Hanzhe; Ma, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Albumin-bound fatty acids is the main cause of renal damage, PPARα is responsible in the metabolism of fatty acids. Previous study found that PPARα played a protective role in fatty acids overload associated tubular injury. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether fenofibrate, a PPARα ligands, could contribute to the renoprotective action in fatty acids overload proximal tubule epithelial cells. We observed in HK-2 cells that fenofibrate significantly inhibited fatty acids bound albumin (FA-BSA) induced up-regulation of MCP-1 and IL-8. Treatment with fenofibrate attenuated renal oxidative stress induced by FA-BSA as evidenced by decreased MDA level, increased SOD activity and catalase, GPx-1 expression. FA-BSA induced apoptosis of HK-2 cells were also obviously prevented by fenofibrate. Furthermore, fenofibrate significantly increased the expression of PPARα mRNA and protein in FA-BSA treated cells. Finally, the activation of NF-kB induced by FA-BSA was markedly suppressed by fenofibrate. Taken together, our study describes a renoprotective role of fenofibrate in fatty acids associated tubular toxicity, and the transcriptional activation of PPARα and suppression of NF-kB were at least partially involved.

  17. Chloroacetic acid induced neuronal cells death through oxidative stress-mediated p38-MAPK activation pathway regulated mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Hung; Chen, Sz-Jie; Su, Chin-Chuan; Yen, Cheng-Chieh; Tseng, To-Jung; Jinn, Tzyy-Rong; Tang, Feng-Cheng; Chen, Kuo-Liang; Su, Yi-Chang; Lee, kuan-I; Hung, Dong-Zong; Huang, Chun-Fa

    2013-01-07

    Chloroacetic acid (CA), a toxic chlorinated analog of acetic acid, is widely used in chemical industries as an herbicide, detergent, and disinfectant, and chemical intermediates that are formed during the synthesis of various products. In addition, CA has been found as a by-product of chlorination disinfection of drinking water. However, there is little known about neurotoxic injuries of CA on the mammalian, the toxic effects and molecular mechanisms of CA-induced neuronal cell injury are mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the cytotoxicity of CA on cultured Neuro-2a cells and investigated the possible mechanisms of CA-induced neurotoxicity. Treatment of Neuro-2a cells with CA significantly reduced the number of viable cells (in a dose-dependent manner with a range from 0.1 to 3mM), increased the generation of ROS, and reduced the intracellular levels of glutathione depletion. CA also increased the number of sub-G1 hypodiploid cells; increased mitochondrial dysfunction (loss of MMP, cytochrome c release, and accompanied by Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 down-regulation and Bax up-regulation), and activated the caspase cascades activations, which displayed features of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. These CA-induced apoptosis-related signals were markedly prevented by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Moreover, CA activated the JNK and p38-MAPK pathways, but did not that ERK1/2 pathway, in treated Neuro-2a cells. Pretreatment with NAC and specific p38-MAPK inhibitor (SB203580), but not JNK inhibitor (SP600125) effectively abrogated the phosphorylation of p38-MAPK and attenuated the apoptotic signals (including: decrease in cytotoxicity, caspase-3/-7 activation, the cytosolic cytochrome c release, and the reversed alteration of Bcl-2 and Bax mRNA) in CA-treated Neuro-2a cells. Taken together, these data suggest that oxidative stress-induced p38-MAPK activated pathway-regulated mitochondria-dependent apoptosis plays an important role in CA-caused neuronal cell

  18. MDMA decreases glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67-immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampus and increases seizure susceptibility: Role for glutamate.

    PubMed

    Huff, Courtney L; Morano, Rachel L; Herman, James P; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Gudelsky, Gary A

    2016-12-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) is a unique psychostimulant that continues to be a popular drug of abuse. It has been well documented that MDMA reduces markers of 5-HT axon terminals in rodents, as well as humans. A loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (IR) interneurons in the hippocampus following MDMA treatment has only been documented recently. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that MDMA reduces glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67-IR, another biochemical marker of GABA neurons, in the hippocampus and that this reduction in GAD67-IR neurons and an accompanying increase in seizure susceptibility involve glutamate receptor activation. Repeated exposure to MDMA (3×10mg/kg, ip) resulted in a reduction of 37-58% of GAD67-IR cells in the dentate gyrus (DG), CA1, and CA3 regions, as well as an increased susceptibility to kainic acid-induced seizures, both of which persisted for at least 30days following MDMA treatment. Administration of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 or the glutamate transporter type 1 (GLT-1) inducer ceftriaxone prevented both the MDMA-induced loss of GAD67-IR neurons and the increased vulnerability to kainic acid-induced seizures. The MDMA-induced increase in the extracellular concentration of glutamate in the hippocampus was significantly diminished in rats treated with ceftriaxone, thereby implicating a glutamatergic mechanism in the neuroprotective effects of ceftriaxone. In summary, the present findings support a role for increased extracellular glutamate and NMDA receptor activation in the MDMA-induced loss of hippocampal GAD67-IR neurons and the subsequent increased susceptibility to evoked seizures.

  19. Stimulation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels inhibits neurogenic contraction of human bladder from patients with urinary symptoms and reverses acetic acid-induced bladder hyperactivity in rats.

    PubMed

    La Fuente, José M; Fernández, Argentina; Cuevas, Pedro; González-Corrochano, Rocío; Chen, Mao Xiang; Angulo, Javier

    2014-07-15

    We have analysed the effects of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BK) stimulation on neurogenic and myogenic contraction of human bladder from healthy subjects and patients with urinary symptoms and evaluated the efficacy of activating BK to relief bladder hyperactivity in rats. Bladder specimens were obtained from organ donors and from men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Contractions elicited by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and carbachol (CCh) were evaluated in isolated bladder strips. in vivo cystometric recordings were obtained in anesthetized rats under control and acetic acid-induced hyperactive conditions. Neurogenic contractions of human bladder were potentiated by blockade of BK and small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK) but were unaffected by the blockade of intermediate calcium-activated potassium channels (IK). EFS-induced contractions were inhibited by BK stimulation with NS-8 or NS1619 or by SK/IK stimulation with NS309 (3µM). CCh-induced contractions were not modified by blockade or stimulation of BK, IK or SK. The anti-cholinergic agent, oxybutynin (0.3µM) inhibited either neurogenic or CCh-induced contractions. Neurogenic contractions of bladders from BPH patients were less sensitive to BK inhibition and more sensitive to BK activation than healthy bladders. The BK activator, NS-8 (5mg/kg; i.v.), reversed bladder hyperactivity induced by acetic acid in rats, while oxybutynin was ineffective. NS-8 did not significantly impact blood pressure or heart rate. BK stimulation specifically inhibits neurogenic contractions in patients with urinary symptoms and relieves bladder hyperactivity in vivo without compromising bladder contractile capacity or cardiovascular safety, supporting its potential therapeutic use for relieving bladder overactivity.

  20. Oleanolic acid induces migration in Mv1Lu and MDA-MB-231 epithelial cells involving EGF receptor and MAP kinases activation

    PubMed Central

    Ruzafa-Martínez, María; Ramos-Morcillo, Antonio Jesús

    2017-01-01

    During wound healing, skin function is restored by the action of several cell types that undergo differentiation, migration, proliferation and/or apoptosis. These dynamics are tightly regulated by the evolution of the extra cellular matrix (ECM) contents along the process. Pharmacologically active flavonoids have shown to exhibit useful physiological properties interesting in pathological states. Among them, oleanolic acid (OA), a pentacyclic triterpene, shows promising properties over wound healing, as increased cell migration in vitro and improved wound resolution in vivo. In this paper, we pursued to disclose the molecular mechanisms underlying those effects, by using an in vitro scratch assay in two epithelial cell lines of different linage: non-malignant mink lung epithelial cells, Mv1Lu; and human breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231. In every case, we observed that OA clearly enhanced cell migration for in vitro scratch closure. This correlated with the stimulation of molecular pathways related to mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, as ERK1,2 and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1,2 activation and c-Jun phosphorylation. Moreover, MDA-MB-231 cells treated with OA displayed an altered gene expression profile affecting transcription factor genes (c-JUN) as well as proteins involved in migration and ECM dynamics (PAI1), in line with the development of an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) status. Strikingly, upon OA treatment, we observed changes in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) subcellular localization, while interfering with its signalling completely prevented migration effects. This data provides a physiological framework supporting the notion that lipophilic plant extracts used in traditional medicine, might modulate wound healing processes in vivo through its OA contents. The molecular implications of these observations are discussed. PMID:28231262

  1. Blocking TGF-β Signaling Pathway Preserves Mitochondrial Proteostasis and Reduces Early Activation of PDGFRβ+ Pericytes in Aristolochic Acid Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Wistar Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pozdzik, Agnieszka A.; Giordano, Laetitia; Li, Gang; Antoine, Marie-Hélène; Quellard, Nathalie; Godet, Julie; De Prez, Eric; Husson, Cécile; Declèves, Anne-Emilie; Arlt, Volker M.; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Brochériou-Spelle, Isabelle; Ledbetter, Steven R.; Caron, Nathalie; Nortier, Joëlle L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ)+ perivascular cell activation becomes increasingly recognized as a main source of scar-associated kidney myofibroblasts and recently emerged as a new cellular therapeutic target. Aims In this regard, we first confirmed the presence of PDGFRβ+ perivascular cells in a human case of end-stage aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) and thereafter we focused on the early fibrosis events of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) inhibition in a rat model of AAN. Materials and Methods Neutralizing anti-TGFβ antibody (1D11) and its control isotype (13C4) were administered (5 mg/kg, i.p.) at Days -1, 0, 2 and 4; AA (15 mg/kg, sc) was injected daily. Results At Day 5, 1D11 significantly suppressed p-Smad2/3 signaling pathway improving renal function impairment, reduced the score of acute tubular necrosis, peritubular capillaritis, interstitial inflammation and neoangiogenesis. 1D11 markedly decreased interstitial edema, disruption of tubular basement membrane loss of brush border, cytoplasmic edema and organelle ultrastructure alterations (mitochondrial disruption and endoplasmic reticulum edema) in proximal tubular epithelial cells. Moreover, 1D11 significantly inhibited p-PERK activation and attenuated dysregulation of unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial proteostasis in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions The early inhibition of p-Smad2/3 signaling pathway improved acute renal function impairment, partially prevented epithelial-endothelial axis activation by maintaining PTEC proteostasis and reduced early PDGFRβ+ pericytes-derived myofibroblasts accumulation. PMID:27379382

  2. Yeast growth in raffinose results in resistance to acetic-acid induced programmed cell death mostly due to the activation of the mitochondrial retrograde pathway.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zdralević, Maša; Lattanzio, Paolo; Marzulli, Domenico; Pracheil, Tammy; Liu, Zhengchang; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    In order to investigate whether and how a modification of mitochondrial metabolism can affect yeast sensitivity to programmed cell death (PCD) induced by acetic acid (AA-PCD), yeast cells were grown on raffinose, as a sole carbon source, which, differently from glucose, favours mitochondrial respiration. We found that, differently from glucose-grown cells, raffinose-grown cells were mostly resistant to AA-PCD and that this was due to the activation of mitochondrial retrograde (RTG) response, which increased with time, as revealed by the up-regulation of the peroxisomal isoform of citrate synthase and isocitrate dehydrogenase isoform 1, RTG pathway target genes. Accordingly, the deletion of RTG2 and RTG3, a positive regulator and a transcription factor of the RTG pathway, resulted in AA-PCD, as shown by TUNEL assay. Neither deletion in raffinose-grown cells of HAP4, encoding the positive regulatory subunit of the Hap2,3,4,5 complex nor constitutive activation of the RTG pathway in glucose-grown cells due to deletion of MKS1, a negative regulator of RTG pathway, had effect on yeast AA-PCD. The RTG pathway was found to be activated in yeast cells containing mitochondria, in which membrane potential was measured, capable to consume oxygen in a manner stimulated by the uncoupler CCCP and inhibited by the respiratory chain inhibitor antimycin A. AA-PCD resistance in raffinose-grown cells occurs with a decrease in both ROS production and cytochrome c release as compared to glucose-grown cells en route to AA-PCD.

  3. Oleanolic acid induces migration in Mv1Lu and MDA-MB-231 epithelial cells involving EGF receptor and MAP kinases activation.

    PubMed

    Bernabé-García, Ángel; Armero-Barranco, David; Liarte, Sergio; Ruzafa-Martínez, María; Ramos-Morcillo, Antonio Jesús; Nicolás, Francisco José

    2017-01-01

    During wound healing, skin function is restored by the action of several cell types that undergo differentiation, migration, proliferation and/or apoptosis. These dynamics are tightly regulated by the evolution of the extra cellular matrix (ECM) contents along the process. Pharmacologically active flavonoids have shown to exhibit useful physiological properties interesting in pathological states. Among them, oleanolic acid (OA), a pentacyclic triterpene, shows promising properties over wound healing, as increased cell migration in vitro and improved wound resolution in vivo. In this paper, we pursued to disclose the molecular mechanisms underlying those effects, by using an in vitro scratch assay in two epithelial cell lines of different linage: non-malignant mink lung epithelial cells, Mv1Lu; and human breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231. In every case, we observed that OA clearly enhanced cell migration for in vitro scratch closure. This correlated with the stimulation of molecular pathways related to mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, as ERK1,2 and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1,2 activation and c-Jun phosphorylation. Moreover, MDA-MB-231 cells treated with OA displayed an altered gene expression profile affecting transcription factor genes (c-JUN) as well as proteins involved in migration and ECM dynamics (PAI1), in line with the development of an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) status. Strikingly, upon OA treatment, we observed changes in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) subcellular localization, while interfering with its signalling completely prevented migration effects. This data provides a physiological framework supporting the notion that lipophilic plant extracts used in traditional medicine, might modulate wound healing processes in vivo through its OA contents. The molecular implications of these observations are discussed.

  4. The transcription factors ADR1 or CAT8 are required for RTG pathway activation and evasion from yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death in raffinose

    PubMed Central

    Laera, Luna; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Ždralević, Maša; Marzulli, Domenico; Liu, Zhengchang; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on glucose undergoes programmed cell death (PCD) induced by acetic acid (AA-PCD), but evades PCD when grown in raffinose. This is due to concomitant relief of carbon catabolite repression (CCR) and activation of mitochondrial retrograde signaling, a mitochondria-to-nucleus communication pathway causing up-regulation of various nuclear target genes, such as CIT2, encoding peroxisomal citrate synthase, dependent on the positive regulator RTG2 in response to mitochondrial dysfunction. CCR down-regulates genes mainly involved in mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. In this work, we investigated the relationships between the RTG and CCR pathways in the modulation of AA-PCD sensitivity under glucose repression or de-repression conditions. Yeast single and double mutants lacking RTG2 and/or certain factors regulating carbon source utilization, including MIG1, HXK2, ADR1, CAT8, and HAP4, have been analyzed for their survival and CIT2 expression after acetic acid treatment. ADR1 and CAT8 were identified as positive regulators of RTG-dependent gene transcription. ADR1 and CAT8 interact with RTG2 and with each other in inducing cell resistance to AA-PCD in raffinose and controlling the nature of cell death. In the absence of ADR1 and CAT8, AA-PCD evasion is acquired through activation of an alternative factor/pathway repressed by RTG2, suggesting that RTG2 may play a function in promoting necrotic cell death in repressing conditions when RTG pathway is inactive. Moreover, our data show that simultaneous mitochondrial retrograde pathway activation and SNF1-dependent relief of CCR have a key role in central carbon metabolism reprogramming which modulates the yeast acetic acid-stress response. PMID:28357334

  5. CD44 stimulation by fragmented hyaluronic acid induces upregulation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and its receptor and subsequently facilitates invasion of human chondrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Mika; Kanayama, Naohiro; Nishida, Takashi; Takigawa, Masaharu; Terao, Toshihiko

    2002-12-01

    It has been established that fragmented hyaluronic acid (HA), but not native high molecular weight HA, can induce angiogenesis, cell proliferation and migration. We have studied the outside-in signal transduction pathways responsible for fragmented HA-mediated cancer cell invasion. In our study, we have studied the effects of CD44 stimulation by ligation with HA upon the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and -9 as well as urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), its receptor (uPAR) and its inhibitor (PAI-1) and the subsequent induction of invasion of human chondrosarcoma cell line HCS-2/8. Our study indicates that (i) CD44 stimulation by fragmented HA upregulates expression of uPA and uPAR mRNA and protein but does not affect MMPs secretion or PAI-1 mRNA expression; (ii) the effects of HA fragments are critically HA size dependent: high molecular weight HA is inactive, but lower molecular weight fragmented HA (Mr 3.5 kDa) is active; (iii) cells can bind avidly Mr 3.5 kDa fragmented HA through a CD44 molecule, whereas cells do not effectively bind higher Mr HA; (iv) a fragmented HA induces phosphorylation of MAP kinase proteins (MEK1/2, ERK1/2 and c-Jun) within 30 min; (v) CD44 is critical for the response (activation of MAP kinase and upregulation of uPA and uPAR expression); and (vi) cell invasion induced by CD44 stimulation with a fragmented HA is inhibited by anti-CD44 mAb, MAP kinase inhibitors, neutralizing anti-uPAR pAb, anti-catalytic anti-uPA mAb or amiloride. Therefore, our study represents the first report that CD44 stimulation induced by a fragmented HA results in activation of MAP kinase and, subsequently, enhances uPA and uPAR expression and facilitates invasion of human chondrosarcoma cells.

  6. Toward a probabilistic definition of seizures.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Ivan; Lyubushin, Alexey; Sornette, Didier

    2011-12-01

    This writing (1) draws attention to the intricacies inherent to the pursuit of a universal seizure definition even when powerful, well-understood signal analysis methods are used to this end; (2) identifies this aim as a multi-objective optimization problem and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of adopting or rejecting a unitary seizure definition; and (3) introduces a probabilistic measure of seizure activity to manage this thorny issue. The challenges posed by the attempt to define seizures unitarily may be partly related to their fractal properties and understood through a simplistic analogy to the so-called "Richardson effect." A revision of the time-honored conceptualization of seizures may be warranted to further advance epileptology. This article is part of a Supplemental Special Issue entitled The Future of Automated Seizure Detection and Prediction.

  7. Anticonvulsant activity of the antidepressant drug, tianeptine, against pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures mitigates cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Reeta, Kh; Prabhakar, Pankaj; Gupta, Yogendra K

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of depression, a common comorbidity in patients with epilepsy, is restricted as certain antidepressants are considered to be proconvulsants. In contrast, anticonvulsant effects have been reported with some antidepressants. In the present study, the effect of tianeptine, an antidepressant, was evaluated against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures, cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in rats. Tianeptine was administered in three doses (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) 30 min before PTZ (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). MK801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, and naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, were administered with tianeptine to evaluate the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate and opioid receptors, respectively. Morris water maze, elevated plus maze and passive avoidance tests were performed for behavioural assessment. Brain malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione levels were estimated as markers of oxidative stress. Tianeptine showed dose-dependent protection against PTZ seizures. Coadministration of tianeptine with MK801 potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of tianeptine. The protective effect of tianeptine against PTZ seizures was mitigated when tianeptine was administered with naloxone. Impairment of learning and memory by PTZ was prevented by tianeptine. Tianeptine also attenuated the seizure-induced increased oxidative stress. Thus, tianeptine showed an anticonvulsant effect along with amelioration of seizure-induced cognitive impairment and oxidative stress. Hence, tianeptine could be a useful drug in epileptic patients with depression, with the advantage of having both antidepressant and antiepileptic effects.

  8. Cellular and network mechanisms of electrographic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Bazhenov, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor; Fröhlich, Flavio; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2008-01-01

    Epileptic seizures constitute a complex multiscale phenomenon that is characterized by synchronized hyperexcitation of neurons in neuronal networks. Recent progress in understanding pathological seizure dynamics provides crucial insights into underlying mechanisms and possible new avenues for the development of novel treatment modalities. Here we review some recent work that combines in vivo experiments and computational modeling to unravel the pathophysiology of seizures of cortical origin. We particularly focus on how activity-dependent changes in extracellular potassium concentration affects the intrinsic dynamics of neurons involved in cortical seizures characterized by spike/wave complexes and fast runs. PMID:19190736

  9. Epileptic Seizures From Abnormal Networks: Why Some Seizures Defy Predictability

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Feraz; Kudela, Pawel; Bergey, Gregory K.; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Seizure prediction has proven to be difficult in clinically realistic environments. Is it possible that fluctuations in cortical firing could influence the onset of seizures in an ictal zone? To test this, we have now used neural network simulations in a computational model of cortex having a total of 65,536 neurons with intercellular wiring patterned after histological data. A spatially distributed Poisson driven background input representing the activity of neighboring cortex affected 1% of the neurons. Gamma distributions were fit to the interbursting phase intervals, a non-parametric test for randomness was applied, and a dynamical systems analysis was performed to search for period-1 orbits in the intervals. The non-parametric analysis suggests that intervals are being drawn at random from their underlying joint distribution and the dynamical systems analysis is consistent with a nondeterministic dynamical interpretation of the generation of bursting phases. These results imply that in a region of cortex with abnormal connectivity analogous to a seizure focus, it is possible to initiate seizure activity with fluctuations of input from the surrounding cortical regions. These findings suggest one possibility for ictal generation from abnormal focal epileptic networks. This mechanism additionally could help explain the difficulty in predicting partial seizures in some patients. PMID:22169211

  10. Effects of glutathione depletion by 2-cyclohexen-1-one on excitatory amino acids-induced enhancement of activator protein-1 DNA binding in murine hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ogita, K; Kitayama, T; Okuda, H; Yoneda, Y

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated the role of glutathione in mechanisms associated with excitatory amino acid signaling to the nuclear transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP1) in the brain using mice depleted of endogenous glutathione by prior treatment with 2-cyclohexen-1-one (CHX). In the hippocampus of animals treated with CHX 2 h before, a significant increase was seen in enhancement of AP1 DNA binding when determined 2 h after the injection of kainic acid (KA) at low doses. The sensitization to KA was not seen in animals injected with CHX 24 h before, in coincidence with the recovery of glutathione contents to the normal levels. By contrast, CHX did not significantly affect the potentiation by NMDA of AP1 binding under any experimental conditions. Prior treatment with CHX resulted in facilitation of behavioral changes induced by KA without affecting those induced by NMDA. These results suggest that endogenous glutathione may be at least in part involved in molecular mechanisms underlying transcriptional control by KA, but not by NMDA, signals of cellular functions.

  11. Relaxin attenuates aristolochic acid induced human tubular epithelial cell apoptosis in vitro by activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiang-Cheng; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Qun-Hong; Yang, Xiu; Xia, Wen-Kai; Chen, Qi; Wang, Ming; Fei, Xiao

    2017-04-06

    Aristolochic acid nephropathy remains a leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), however few treatment strategies exist. Emerging evidence has shown that H2 relaxin (RLX) possesses powerful antifibrosis and anti-apoptotic properties, therefore we aimed to investigate whether H2 relaxin can be employed to reduce AA-induced cell apoptosis. Human proximal tubular epithelial (HK-2) cells exposed to AA-I were treated with or without administration of H2 RLX. Cell viability was examined using the WST-8 assay. Apoptotic morphologic alterations were observed using the Hoechst 33342 staining method. Apoptosis was detected using flow cytometry. The expression of caspase 3, caspase 8, caspase 9, ERK1/2, Bax, Bcl-2, and Akt proteins was determined by Western blot. Co-treatment with RLX reversed the increased apoptosis observed in the AA-I only treated group. RLX restored expression of phosphorylated Akt which found to be decreased in the AA-I only treated cells. RLX co-treatment led to a decrease in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio as well as the cleaved form of caspase-3 compared to the AA-I only treated cells. This anti-apoptotic effect of RLX was attenuated by co-administration of the Akt inhibitor LY294002. The present study demonstrated H2 RLX can decrease AA-I induced apoptosis through activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  12. Maintained activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} despite of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in okadaic acid-induced neurodegenerative model

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong-Whan; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Choi, Jung-Eun; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Hui-Sun; Choe, Han; Lee, Seung-Chul; Kim, Dong-Hou

    2010-04-30

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK3{beta}) is recognized as one of major kinases to phosphorylate tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD), thus lots of AD drug discoveries target GSK3{beta}. However, the inactive form of GSK3{beta} which is phosphorylated at serine-9 is increased in AD brains. This is also inconsistent with phosphorylation status of other GSK3{beta} substrates, such as {beta}-catenin and collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2) since their phosphorylation is all increased in AD brains. Thus, we addressed this paradoxical condition of AD in rat neurons treated with okadaic acid (OA) which inhibits protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) and induces tau hyperphosphorylation and cell death. Interestingly, OA also induces phosphorylation of GSK3{beta} at serine-9 and other substrates including tau, {beta}-catenin and CRMP2 like in AD brains. In this context, we observed that GSK3{beta} inhibitors such as lithium chloride and 6-bromoindirubin-3'-monoxime (6-BIO) reversed those phosphorylation events and protected neurons. These data suggest that GSK3{beta} may still have its kinase activity despite increase of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in AD brains at least in PP2A-compromised conditions and that GSK3{beta} inhibitors could be a valuable drug candidate in AD.

  13. Docosahexaenoic acid and phosphatidylserine supplementations improve antioxidant activities and cognitive functions of the developing brain on pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shyh-Hwa; Chang, Chin-Dong; Chen, Pi-Hang; Su, Jheng-Ren; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Chaung, Hso-Chi

    2012-04-27

    Epilepsy provoked by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) is caused by an abnormal excitatory postsynaptic potential, which results in increased production of reactive oxygen species, and finally reducing cognitive functions. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with DHA and PS, administered either alone or in combination, on oxidative stress and behavioral and cognitive spatial memory in neonatal rats with PTZ-induced epileptic seizure. In this study, rat pups received repetitive doses of PTZ for induction of epileptic seizure and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6, n-3) and phosphatidylserine (PS) were orally administrated alone or together to the PTZ-induced epileptic animals daily for 36 d. The spatial memory, nitric mono-oxide (NO) production, and enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in brain and liver tissues were determined. PTZ administration significantly reduced the cell numbers in the hippocampus, shortened the escape latency in the safe target region, decreased activities of SOD and catalase, but increased NO content in both brain and liver tissues, while DHA and PS significantly extended the escape latency, reversed the oxidative parameters observed in the brain, and enhanced SOD activity in the liver. Dietary supplementation with DHA and PS may protect brain tissue from the oxidative stress caused by epileptic seizures and could serve to improve learning and memory ability in vivo.

  14. Protective Mechanisms of Nitrone Antioxidants in Kanic Acid Induced Neurodegeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    L., Hong, J.S. (1996) Expression of) FosB in the rat hippocampus and striatum after systemic administration of kainic acid. Neurosci. Abstr. 22...gene expression in the hippocampus . Immunohistochemical methods and electromobility gel shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrate the concerted activation of...acid-induced neurodegenerative diseases. The major focus will be on the pathophysiological changes in the hippocampus . Special attention will be given

  15. Grand Mal Seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... generalized tonic-clonic seizure — features a loss of consciousness and violent muscle contractions. It's the type of ... seizures have two stages: Tonic phase. Loss of consciousness occurs, and the muscles suddenly contract and cause ...

  16. Dreaming of seizures.

    PubMed

    Vercueil, Laurent

    2005-08-01

    Could some dreams and temporal lobe seizures share an intrinsic neuronal network? At the interplay of emotion, memory, dream, and temporal lobe seizure, we report on a patient with a left dysplastic amygdala and temporal lobe epilepsy who presented with a typical seizure while dreaming. Neuronal networks subserving affective states are suggested to be involved in emotional dream, memory recall, and amygdalo-hippocampal seizures.

  17. Neurophysiological aspects of neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuyoshi

    2014-05-01

    Recently, amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) has been increasingly used and proved useful in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) for the management of neonatal seizures. It does not replace, but is supplementary to standard EEG. This article reviews some of findings obtained with standard EEGs, and tries to interpret them with recent findings in the field of basic science. Seizures mainly occur in active-REM sleep in neonates. This is in sharp contrast to those in older children and adults, in whom epileptic seizures occur mainly in NREM sleep. This may be explained by neurotransmitter effects on sleep mechanisms of the neonatal brain that are different from those of older individuals. When all clinical seizures have no electrical correlates, they are non-epileptic, but when the correlation between clinical seizures and frequent electrical discharges are inconsistent, they should rather be considered epileptic, reflecting progression of status epilepticus causing electro-clinical dissociation. Electro-clinical dissociation is not a characteristic of neonatal seizures per se, but a feature of prolonged status epilepticus in adults as well as children. It occurs when prolonged status epilepticus itself causes a progressively severe encephalopathy, or when status occurs in the presence of a severe underlying encephalopathy. In neonates without pre-existing brain damage, frequent seizures per se may cause mild depression characterized by the loss of high voltage slow patterns, an important constituent of slow wave sleep reflecting cortico-cortical connectivity. Mild depression only in the acute stage is not associated with neurological sequelae, but previously damaged brain may be more vulnerable than normal brain.

  18. Review: Cav2.3 R-type Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels - Functional Implications in Convulsive and Non-convulsive Seizure Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wormuth, Carola; Lundt, Andreas; Henseler, Christina; Müller, Ralf; Broich, Karl; Papazoglou, Anna; Weiergräber, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background: Researchers have gained substantial insight into mechanisms of synaptic transmission, hyperexcitability, excitotoxicity and neurodegeneration within the last decades. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels are of central relevance in these processes. In particular, they are key elements in the etiopathogenesis of numerous seizure types and epilepsies. Earlier studies predominantly targeted on Cav2.1 P/Q-type and Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels relevant for absence epileptogenesis. Recent findings bring other channels entities more into focus such as the Cav2.3 R-type Ca2+ channel which exhibits an intriguing role in ictogenesis and seizure propagation. Cav2.3 R-type voltage gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) emerged to be important factors in the pathogenesis of absence epilepsy, human juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), and cellular epileptiform activity, e.g. in CA1 neurons. They also serve as potential target for various antiepileptic drugs, such as lamotrigine and topiramate. Objective: This review provides a summary of structure, function and pharmacology of VGCCs and their fundamental role in cellular Ca2+ homeostasis. We elaborate the unique modulatory properties of Cav2.3 R-type Ca2+ channels and point to recent findings in the proictogenic and proneuroapoptotic role of Cav2.3 R-type VGCCs in generalized convulsive tonic–clonic and complex-partial hippocampal seizures and its role in non-convulsive absence like seizure activity. Conclusion: Development of novel Cav2.3 specific modulators can be effective in the pharmacological treatment of epilepsies and other neurological disorders. PMID:27843503

  19. Evaluation of acetylcholine, seizure activity and neuropathology following high-dose nerve agent exposure and delayed neuroprotective treatment drugs in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Acon-Chen, Cindy; Koenig, Jeffrey A; Smith, Garrett R; Truitt, Amber R; Thomas, Thaddeus P; Shih, Tsung-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Organophosphorus nerve agents such as soman (GD) inhibit acetylcholinesterase, producing an excess of acetylcholine (ACh), which results in respiratory distress, convulsions and status epilepticus that leads to neuropathology. Several drugs (topiramate, clobazam, pregnanolone, allopregnanolone, UBP 302, cyclopentyladenosine [CPA], ketamine, midazolam and scopolamine) have been identified as potential neuroprotectants that may terminate seizures and reduce brain damage. To systematically evaluate their efficacy, this study employed in vivo striatal microdialysis and liquid chromatography to respectively collect and analyze extracellular ACh in freely moving rats treated with these drugs 20 min after seizure onset induced by a high dose of GD. Along with microdialysis, EEG activity was recorded and neuropathology assessed at 24 h. GD induced a marked increase of ACh, which peaked at 30 min post-exposure to 800% of control levels and then steadily decreased toward baseline levels. Approximately 40 min after treatment, only midazolam (10 mg/kg) and CPA (60 mg/kg) caused a significant reduction of ACh levels, with CPA reducing ACh levels more rapidly than midazolam. Both drugs facilitated a return to baseline levels at least 55 min after treatment. At 24 h, only animals treated with CPA (67%), midazolam (18%) and scopolamine (27%) exhibited seizure termination. While all treatments except for topiramate reduced neuropathology, CPA, midazolam and scopolamine showed the greatest reduction in pathology. Our results suggest that delayed treatment with CPA, midazolam, or scopolamine is effective at reducing GD-induced seizure activity and neuropathology, with CPA and midazolam capable of facilitating a reduction in GD-induced ACh elevation.

  20. Long-Term Treatment with Losartan Attenuates Seizure Activity and Neuronal Damage Without Affecting Behavioral Changes in a Model of Co-morbid Hypertension and Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tchekalarova, Jana D; Ivanova, Natasha; Atanasova, Dimitrina; Pechlivanova, Daniela M; Lazarov, Nikolai; Kortenska, Lidia; Mitreva, Rumiana; Lozanov, Valentin; Stoynev, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Over the last 10 years, accumulated experimental and clinical evidence has supported the idea that AT1 receptor subtype is involved in epilepsy. Recently, we have shown that the selective AT1 receptor antagonist losartan attenuates epileptogenesis and exerts neuroprotection in the CA1 area of the hippocampus in epileptic Wistar rats. This study aimed to verify the efficacy of long-term treatment with losartan (10 mg/kg) after kainate-induced status epilepticus (SE) on seizure activity, behavioral and biochemical changes, and neuronal damage in a model of co-morbid hypertension and epilepsy. Spontaneous seizures were video- and EEG-monitored in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) for a 16-week period after SE. The behavior was analyzed by open field, elevated plus maze, sugar preference test, and forced swim test. The levels of serotonin in the hippocampus and neuronal loss were estimated by HPLC and hematoxylin and eosin staining, respectively. The AT1 receptor antagonism delayed the onset of seizures and alleviated their frequency and duration during and after discontinuation of treatment. Losartan showed neuroprotection mostly in the CA3 area of the hippocampus and the septo-temporal hilus of the dentate gyrus in SHRs. However, the AT1 receptor antagonist did not exert a substantial influence on concomitant with epilepsy behavioral changes and decreased 5-HT levels in the hippocampus. Our results suggest that the antihypertensive therapy with an AT1 receptor blocker might be effective against seizure activity and neuronal damage in a co-morbid hypertension and epilepsy.

  1. Seizures in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Ch'ang, J; Claassen, J

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill patients with seizures are either admitted to the intensive care unit because of uncontrolled seizures requiring aggressive treatment or are admitted for other reasons and develop seizures secondarily. These patients may have multiorgan failure and severe metabolic and electrolyte disarrangements, and may require complex medication regimens and interventions. Seizures can be seen as a result of an acute systemic illness, a primary neurologic pathology, or a medication side-effect and can present in a wide array of symptoms from convulsive activity, subtle twitching, to lethargy. In this population, untreated isolated seizures can quickly escalate to generalized convulsive status epilepticus or, more frequently, nonconvulsive status epileptics, which is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Status epilepticus (SE) arises from a failure of inhibitory mechanisms and an enhancement of excitatory pathways causing permanent neuronal injury and other systemic sequelae. Carrying a high 30-day mortality rate, SE can be very difficult to treat in this complex setting, and a portion of these patients will become refractory, requiring narcotics and anesthetic medications. The most significant factor in successfully treating status epilepticus is initiating antiepileptic drugs as soon as possible, thus attentiveness and recognition of this disease are critical.

  2. Linoleic acid-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase II via p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-kappaB pathway in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, I-Mo; Yang, Chang-Hao; Yang, Chung-May; Chen, Muh-Shy

    2007-11-01

    High linoleic acid (LA) intake is known to correlate with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of LA on expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase II (COX-2) and their associated signaling pathways in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. ARPE-19 cells were treated with different concentrations of LA. Expressions of iNOS and COX-2 were examined using semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. Concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in the culture medium were determined by enzyme-link immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Activation of p42/44, p38, JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factors (NF)-kappaB were evaluated by Western blot analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). We found that LA induced expression of iNOS and COX-2 in RPE cells at the mRNA and protein levels in a time-and dose-dependent manner. Upregulation of iNOS and COX-2 resulted in increased production of NO and PGE(2). Moreover, LA caused degradation of IkappaB and increased NF-kappaB DNA binding activity. Effects of LA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression were inhibited by a NF-kappaB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). LA activated p42/44, but not p38 or JNK MAPK. Inhibition of p42/44 activity by PD98059 significantly reduced LA-induced activation of NF-kappaB. Linoleic acid-induced expression of iNOS and COX-2 as well as PGE(2) and NO release in RPE cells were sequentially mediated through activation of p42/p44, MAPK, then NF-kappaB. These results may provide new insights into both mechanisms of LA action on RPE cells and pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration.

  3. Effects of an Acute Seizure on Associative Learning and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Holley, Andrew J.; Lugo, Joaquin N.

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have demonstrated that inducing several seizures or continuous seizures in neonatal or adult rats results in impairments in learning and memory. The impact of a single acute seizure on learning and memory has not been investigated in mice. In this study, we exposed an adult 129SvEvTac mouse to the inhalant flurothyl until a behavioral seizure was induced. Our study consisted of 4 experiments where we examined the effect of one seizure before or after delay fear conditioning. We also included a separate cohort of animals that was tested in the open field after a seizure to rule out changes in locomotor activity influencing the results of memory tests. Mice that had experienced a single seizure 1 hour, but not 6 hours, prior to training showed a significant impairment in associative conditioning to the conditioned stimulus when compared to controls 24 hours later. There were no differences in freezing one day later for animals that experienced a single seizure 1 hour after associative learning. We also found that an acute seizure reduced activity levels in an open field test 2 hours but not 24 hours later. These findings suggest that an acute seizure occurring immediately before learning can have an effect on the recall of events occurring shortly after that seizure. In contrast, an acute seizure occurring shortly after learning appears to have little or no effect on long-term memory. These findings have implications for understanding the acute effects of seizures on the acquisition of new knowledge. PMID:26655449

  4. Remote effects of focal hippocampal seizures on the rat neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Englot, Dario J.; Mishra, Asht M.; Mansuripur, Peter K.; Herman, Peter; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2008-01-01

    Seizures have both local and remote effects on nervous system function. While propagated seizures are known to disrupt cerebral activity, little work has been done on remote network effects of seizures that do not propagate. Human focal temporal lobe seizures demonstrate remote changes including slow waves on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the neocortex. Ictal neocortical slow waves have been interpreted as seizure propagation, however we hypothesize that they reflect a depressed cortical state resembling sleep or coma. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed multi-modal studies of partial and secondarily-generalized limbic seizures in rats. Video/EEG monitoring of spontaneous seizures revealed slow waves in the frontal cortex during behaviorally mild partial seizures, contrasted with fast poly-spike activity during convulsive generalized seizures. Seizures induced by hippocampal stimulation produced a similar pattern, and were used to perform functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) weighted for blood oxygenation (BOLD) and blood volume (CBV), demonstrating increased signals in hippocampus, thalamus and septum, but decreases in orbitofrontal, cingulate, and retrosplenial cortex during partial seizures; and increases in all these regions during propagated seizures. Combining these results with neuronal recordings and CBF measurements, we related neocortical slow waves to reduced neuronal activity and cerebral metabolism during partial seizures, but found increased neuronal activity and metabolism during propagated seizures. These findings suggest that ictal neocortical slow waves represent an altered cortical state of depressed function, not propagated seizure activity. This remote effect of partial seizures may cause impaired cerebral functions, including loss of consciousness. PMID:18768701

  5. [Seizures revealing phosphocalcic metabolism abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Hmami, F; Chaouki, S; Benmiloud, S; Souilmi, F Z; Abourazzak, S; Idrissi, M; Atmani, S; Bouharrou, A; Hida, M

    2014-01-01

    Hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism produces a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, but overt symptoms may be sparse. One unusual presentation is onset or aggravation of epilepsy in adolescence revealing hypoparathyroidism. This situation can lead to delayed diagnosis, with inefficacity of the antiepileptic drugs. We report five cases of adolescence-onset epilepsy with unsuccessful antiepileptic therapy, even with gradually increasing dose. Physical examination revealed signs of hypocalcemia, confirmed biologically. Full testing disclosed the origin of the seizures: hypoparathyroidism in three patients and pseudohypoparathyroidism in the other two. In four of five patients, computed tomography showed calcification of the basal ganglia, defining Fahr's syndrome. The patients were treated with oral calcium and active vitamin D (1-alphahydroxy vitamin D3). Seizure frequency progressively decreased and serum calcium levels returned to normal. These cases illustrate the importance of the physical examination and of routine serum calcium assay in patients with new-onset epileptic seizures in order to detect hypocalcemia secondary to hypoparathyroidism.

  6. Suspected exercise-induced seizures in a young dog.

    PubMed

    Motta, L; Dutton, E

    2013-04-01

    A 12-month-old female neutered crossbreed was referred for investigation of seizure-like episodes occurring only at intense exercise. Thorough medical, neurological and cardiac investigations were performed and excluded the most commonly known causes of seizure-like activity. The dog was fitted with an ambulatory electrocardiography device and underwent another exercise-induced seizure. The electrocardiogram during the episode revealed a sinus tachycardia at approximately 300 beats/minute. A video recording of the episode revealed generalised tonic clonic limb activity with jaw chomping and frothing at the mouth typical of seizure activity. Antiepileptic medications were not prescribed and the owner was advised not to exercise the dog intensely. The dog responded well and did not seizure after 12 months of mild-moderate off-lead exercise. As all the seizures in this case were triggered by intense physical activity, it is suggested that this may be a new form of reflex seizure activity.

  7. Rapidly Learned Identification of Epileptic Seizures from Sonified EEG

    PubMed Central

    Loui, Psyche; Koplin-Green, Matan; Frick, Mark; Massone, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Sonification refers to a process by which data are converted into sound, providing an auditory alternative to visual display. Currently, the prevalent method for diagnosing seizures in epilepsy is by visually reading a patient’s electroencephalogram (EEG). However, sonification of the EEG data provides certain advantages due to the nature of human auditory perception. We hypothesized that human listeners will be able to identify seizures from EEGs using the auditory modality alone, and that accuracy of seizure identification will increase after a short training session. Here, we describe an algorithm that we have used to sonify EEGs of both seizure and non-seizure activity, followed by a training study in which subjects listened to short clips of sonified EEGs and determined whether each clip was of seizure or normal activity, both before and after a short training session. Results show that before training subjects performed at chance level in differentiating seizures from non-seizures, but there was a significant improvement of accuracy after the training session. After training, subjects successfully distinguished seizures from non-seizures using the auditory modality alone. Further analyses using signal detection theory demonstrated improvement in sensitivity and reduction in response bias as a result of training. This study demonstrates the potential of sonified EEGs to be used for the detection of seizures. Future studies will attempt to increase accuracy using novel training and sonification modifications, with the goals of managing, predicting, and ultimately controlling seizures using sonification as a possible biofeedback-based intervention for epilepsy. PMID:25352802

  8. Multi-Biosignal Analysis for Epileptic Seizure Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cogan, Diana; Birjandtalab, Javad; Nourani, Mehrdad; Harvey, Jay; Nagaraddi, Venkatesh

    2017-02-01

    Persons who suffer from intractable seizures are safer if attended when seizures strike. Consequently, there is a need for wearable devices capable of detecting both convulsive and nonconvulsive seizures in everyday life. We have developed a three-stage seizure detection methodology based on 339 h of data (26 seizures) collected from 10 patients in an epilepsy monitoring unit. Our intent is to develop a wearable system that will detect seizures, alert a caregiver and record the time of seizure in an electronic diary for the patient's physician. Stage I looks for concurrent activity in heart rate, arterial oxygenation and electrodermal activity, all of which can be monitored by a wrist-worn device and which in combination produce a very low false positive rate. Stage II looks for a specific pattern created by these three biosignals. For the patients whose seizures cannot be detected by Stage II, Stage III detects seizures using limited-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring with at most three electrodes. Out of 10 patients, Stage I recognized all 11 seizures from seven patients, Stage II detected all 10 seizures from six patients and Stage III detected all of the seizures of two out of the three patients it analyzed.

  9. Fluvoxamine alleviates seizure activity and downregulates hippocampal GAP-43 expression in pentylenetetrazole-kindled mice: role of 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Alhaj, Momen W; Zaitone, Sawsan A; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2015-06-01

    Epilepsy has been documented to lead to many changes in the nervous system including cell loss and mossy fiber sprouting. Neuronal loss and aberrant neuroplastic changes in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus have been identified in the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model. Antiseizure activity of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors has been reported in several studies. In the current study, the protective effect of fluvoxamine against PTZ-kindling was investigated in terms of seizure scores, neuronal loss, and regulation of hippocampal neuroplasticity. Further, the role of 5-HT3 receptors was determined. Kindling was induced by repeated injections of PTZ (35 mg/kg) thrice weekly, for a total of 13 injections. One hundred male albino mice were allocated into 10 groups: (1) saline, (2) PTZ, (3) diazepam (1 mg/kg)+PTZ, (4-6) fluvoxamine (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg)+PTZ, (7) ondansetron+fluvoxamine (20 mg/kg)+PTZ, (8) ondansetron+PTZ group, (9) ondansetron (2 mg/kg, i.p.)+saline, and (10) fluvoxamine (20 mg/kg)+saline. PTZ-kindled mice showed high seizure activity, hippocampal neuronal loss, and expression of growth-associated phosphoprotein (GAP-43) compared with saline-treated mice. Repeated administration of fluvoxamine (20 mg/kg) in PTZ-kindled mice suppressed seizure scores, protected against hippocampal neuronal loss, and downregulated GAP-43 expression, without producing any signs of the 5-HT syndrome in healthy rats. Importantly, pretreatment with a selective 5-HT3 receptor blocker (ondansetron) attenuated the aforementioned effects of fluvoxamine. In conclusion, the ameliorating effect of fluvoxamine on hippocampal neurons and neuroplasticity in PTZ-kindled mice was, at least in part, dependent on enhancement of hippocampal serotoninergic transmission at 5-HT3 receptors.

  10. Prevention of epileptic seizures by taurine.

    PubMed

    El Idrissi, Abdeslem; Messing, Jeffrey; Scalia, Jason; Trenkner, Ekkhart

    2003-01-01

    Parenteral injection of kainic acid (KA), a glutamate receptor agonist, causes severe and stereotyped behavioral convulsions in mice and is used as a rodent model for human temporal lobe epilepsy. The goal of this study is to examine the potential anti-convulsive effects of the neuro-active amino acid taurine, in the mouse model of KA-induced limbic seizures. We found that taurine (43 mg/Kg, s.c.) had a significant antiepileptic effect when injected 10 min prior to KA. Acute injection of taurine increased the onset latency and reduced the occurrence of tonic seizures. Taurine also reduced the duration of tonic-clonic convulsions and mortality rate following KA-induced seizures. Furthermore, taurine significantly reduced neuronal cell death in the CA3 region of the hippocampus, the most susceptible region to KA in the limbic system. On the other hand, supplementation of taurine in drinking water (0.05%) for 4 continuous weeks failed to decrease the number or latency of partial or tonic-clonic seizures. To the contrary, we found that taurine-fed mice showed increased susceptibility to KA-induced seizures, as demonstrated by a decreased latency for clonic seizures, an increased incidence and duration of tonic-clonic seizures, increased neuronal death in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and a higher post-seizure mortality of the animals. We suggest that the reduced susceptibility to KA-induced seizures in taurine-injected mice is due to an increase in GABA receptor function in the brain which increases the inhibitory drive within the limbic system. This is supported by our in vitro data obtained in primary neuronal cultures showing that taurine acts as a low affinity agonist for GABA(A) receptors, protects neurons against kainate excitotoxic insults and modulates calcium homeostasis. Therefore, taurine is potentially capable of treating seizure-associated brain damage.

  11. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures

    PubMed Central

    Greyson, Bruce; Fountain, Nathan B.; Derr, Lori L.; Broshek, Donna K.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. Fifty-five percent of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients' reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time. PMID:24592228

  12. How I treat a first single seizure in a child

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sheffali; Kaushik, Jaya Shankar

    2016-01-01

    An epileptic seizure is defined as transient occurrence of signs and/or symptoms due to abnormal excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in brain. There are diverse etiologies for acute seizure in infants and children. The present review provides a broad approach to diagnosis and treatment plan for acute seizure in children. The approach to a child with acute seizure is discussed with special emphasis on clinical approach based on history and focused examination with judicious choice of investigation and further management plan. The review also emphasizes on recognizing common nonepileptic events that masquerade as true seizure among infants and children. PMID:27011625

  13. In silico validation and structure activity relationship study of a series of pyridine-3-carbohydrazide derivatives as potential anticonvulsants in generalized and partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Reema; Sara, Udai Vir Singh; Khosa, Ratan Lal; Stables, James; Jain, Jainendra

    2013-06-01

    A series of twelve compounds (Compounds RNH1-RNH12) of acid hydrazones of pyridine-3-carbohydrazide or nicotinic acid hydrazide was synthesized and evaluated for anticonvulsant activity by MES, scPTZ, minimal clonic seizure and corneal kindling seizure test. Neurotoxicity was also determined for these compounds by rotarod test. Results showed that halogen substitution at meta and para position of phenyl ring exhibited better protection than ortho substitution. Compounds RNH4 and RNH12, were found to be the active analogs displaying 6Hz ED50 of 75.4 and 14.77 mg/kg while the corresponding MES ED50 values were 113.4 and 29.3 mg/kg respectively. In addition, compound RNH12 also showed scPTZ ED50 of 54.2 mg/kg. In the series, compound RNH12 with trifluoromethoxy substituted phenyl ring was the most potent analog exhibiting protection in all four animal models of epilepsy. Molecular docking study has also shown significant binding interactions of these two compounds with 1OHV, 2A1H and 1PBQ receptors. Thus, N-[(meta or para halogen substituted) benzylidene] pyridine-3-carbohydrazides could be used as lead compounds in anticonvulsant drug design and discovery.

  14. Genes, Seizures & Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Alica M.

    2006-01-01

    The chance that someone will develop any disease is influenced by heredity and environment. Epilepsy is not an exception. Everybody inherits a unique degree of susceptibility to seizures. About 3 percent of the United States population is prone to seizures and will get epilepsy at some point of their lives (1). Two thirds of the people with…

  15. Design, synthesis and potential 6 Hz psychomotor seizure test activity of some novel 2-(substituted)-3-{[substituted]amino}quinazolin-4(3H)-one.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Shrivastava, Birendra; Pandeya, Surendra N; Stables, James P

    2011-04-01

    Thirty new 2-(substituted)-3-{[substituted]amino}quinazolin-4(3H)-one were designed and synthesized keeping in view the structural requirement of pharmacophore and evaluated for anticonvulsant activity and neurotoxicity. The anticonvulsant activity of the titled compounds was assessed using the 6 Hz psychomotor seizure test. The most active compound of the series was 3-({(E)-[3-(4-chloro-3-methylphenoxy)phenyl]methylidene}amino)-2-phenylquinazolin-4(3H)-one PhQZ 7, which showed 100% protection (4/4, 0.5 h) and 75% protection (3/4, 0.25 h) at a dose of 100 mg/kg in mice. A computational study was carried out for calculation of pharmacophore pattern and prediction of pharmacokinetic properties. Titled compounds have also exhibited good binding properties with epilepsy molecular targets such as glutamate, GABA (A) delta and GABA (A) alpha-1 receptors, in Lamarckian genetic algorithm based flexible docking studies.

  16. Nitric Oxide-induced Activation of the Type 1 Ryanodine Receptor Is Critical for Epileptic Seizure-induced Neuronal Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Yoshinori; Kanemaru, Kazunori; Okubo, Yohei; Nakaune, Takuya; Suzuki, Junji; Shibata, Kazuki; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Koyama, Ryuta; Murayama, Takashi; Ito, Akihiro; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Ikegaya, Yuji; Sakurai, Takashi; Saito, Nobuhito; Kakizawa, Sho; Iino, Masamitsu

    2016-09-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a life-threatening emergency that can cause neurodegeneration with debilitating neurological disorders. However, the mechanism by which convulsive SE results in neurodegeneration is not fully understood. It has been shown that epileptic seizures produce markedly increased levels of nitric oxide (NO) in the brain, and that NO induces Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum via the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), which occurs through S-nitrosylation of the intracellular Ca(2+) release channel. Here, we show that through genetic silencing of NO-induced activation of the RyR1 intracellular Ca(2+) release channel, neurons were rescued from seizure-dependent cell death. Furthermore, dantrolene, an inhibitor of RyR1, was protective against neurodegeneration caused by SE. These results demonstrate that NO-induced Ca(2+) release via RyR is involved in SE-induced neurodegeneration, and provide a rationale for the use of RyR1 inhibitors for the prevention of brain damage following SE.

  17. Instantaneous frequency based newborn EEG seizure characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesbah, Mostefa; O'Toole, John M.; Colditz, Paul B.; Boashash, Boualem

    2012-12-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG), used to noninvasively monitor brain activity, remains the most reliable tool in the diagnosis of neonatal seizures. Due to their nonstationary and multi-component nature, newborn EEG seizures are better represented in the joint time-frequency domain than in either the time domain or the frequency domain. Characterising newborn EEG seizure nonstationarities helps to better understand their time-varying nature and, therefore, allow developing efficient signal processing methods for both modelling and seizure detection and classification. In this article, we used the instantaneous frequency (IF) extracted from a time-frequency distribution to characterise newborn EEG seizures. We fitted four frequency modulated (FM) models to the extracted IFs, namely a linear FM, a piecewise-linear FM, a sinusoidal FM, and a hyperbolic FM. Using a database of 30-s EEG seizure epochs acquired from 35 newborns, we were able to show that, depending on EEG channel, the sinusoidal and piecewise-linear FM models best fitted 80-98% of seizure epochs. To further characterise the EEG seizures, we calculated the mean frequency and frequency span of the extracted IFs. We showed that in the majority of the cases (>95%), the mean frequency resides in the 0.6-3 Hz band with a frequency span of 0.2-1 Hz. In terms of the frequency of occurrence of the four seizure models, the statistical analysis showed that there is no significant difference( p = 0.332) between the two hemispheres. The results also indicate that there is no significant differences between the two hemispheres in terms of the mean frequency ( p = 0.186) and the frequency span ( p = 0.302).

  18. ATPergic signalling during seizures and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Engel, Tobias; Alves, Mariana; Sheedy, Caroline; Henshall, David C

    2016-05-01

    Much progress has been made over the last few decades in the identification of new anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). However, 30% of epilepsy patients suffer poor seizure control. This underscores the need to identify alternative druggable neurotransmitter systems and drugs with novel mechanisms of action. An emerging concept is that seizure generation involves a complex interplay between neurons and glial cells at the tripartite synapse and neuroinflammation has been proposed as one of the main drivers of epileptogenesis. The ATP-gated purinergic receptor family is expressed throughout the brain and is functional on neurons and glial cells. ATP is released in high amounts into the extracellular space after increased neuronal activity and during chronic inflammation and cell death to act as a neuro- and gliotransmitter. Emerging work shows pharmacological targeting of ATP-gated purinergic P2 receptors can potently modulate seizure generation, inflammatory processes and seizure-induced brain damage. To date, work showing the functional contribution of P2 receptors has been mainly performed in animal models of acute seizures, in particular, by targeting the ionotropic P2X7 receptor subtype. Other ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptor family members have also been implicated in pathological processes following seizures such as the P2X4 receptor and the P2Y12 receptor. However, during epilepsy, the characterization of P2 receptors was mostly restricted to the study of expressional changes of the different receptor subtypes. This review summarizes the work to date on ATP-mediated signalling during seizures and the functional impact of targeting the ATP-gated purinergic receptors on seizures and seizure-induced pathology. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'.

  19. Imaging brain activity during seizures in freely behaving rats using a miniature multi-modal imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, Iliya; Koletar, Margaret M.; Ringuette, Dene; Gad, Raanan; Jeffrey, Melanie; Carlen, Peter L.; Stefanovic, Bojana; Levi, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    We report on a miniature label-free imaging system for monitoring brain blood flow and blood oxygenation changes in awake, freely behaving rats. The device, weighing 15 grams, enables imaging in a ∼ 2 × 2 mm field of view with 4.4 μm lateral resolution and 1 − 8 Hz temporal sampling rate. The imaging is performed through a chronically-implanted cranial window that remains optically clear between 2 to > 6 weeks after the craniotomy. This imaging method is well suited for longitudinal studies of chronic models of brain diseases and disorders. In this work, it is applied to monitoring neurovascular coupling during drug-induced absence-like seizures 6 weeks following the craniotomy. PMID:27699123

  20. Automatic multi-modal intelligent seizure acquisition (MISA) system for detection of motor seizures from electromyographic data and motion data.

    PubMed

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sándor; Wolf, Peter; Kjaer, Troels W; Sams, Thomas; Sorensen, Helge B D

    2012-08-01

    The objective is to develop a non-invasive automatic method for detection of epileptic seizures with motor manifestations. Ten healthy subjects who simulated seizures and one patient participated in the study. Surface electromyography (sEMG) and motion sensor features were extracted as energy measures of reconstructed sub-bands from the discrete wavelet transformation (DWT) and the wavelet packet transformation (WPT). Based on the extracted features all data segments were classified using a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm as simulated seizure or normal activity. A case study of the seizure from the patient showed that the simulated seizures were visually similar to the epileptic one. The multi-modal intelligent seizure acquisition (MISA) system showed high sensitivity, short detection latency and low false detection rate. The results showed superiority of the multi-modal detection system compared to the uni-modal one. The presented system has a promising potential for seizure detection based on multi-modal data.

  1. Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures mimicking gelastic seizures: A description of two cases.

    PubMed

    Mascia, Addolorata; Quarato, Pier Paolo; D'Aniello, Alfredo; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are sudden, involuntary seizure-like attacks that, unlike epileptic seizures, are not related to electrographic ictal discharges and are psychological in nature. Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures presenting symptoms mimic a wide array of nervous system dysfunctions, as they involve changes in behavior, motor activity, sensation, cognitive, and autonomic functions. Spontaneous paroxysms of laughing resembling gelastic seizure have only exceptionally been reported as main symptom of PNES. Here, we describe the cases of two patients with a prolonged history of laughter attacks mistaken for epilepsy and unresponsive to AED treatment. Brain MRI and interictal EEG were unremarkable. Video-EEG monitoring allowed us to document the spontaneous and suggestion-induced habitual episodes that were then diagnosed as PNES.

  2. Tranexamic acid induces kaolin intake stimulating a pathway involving tachykinin neurokinin 1 receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchi, Hitoshi; Kawarai-Shimamura, Asako; Kuwagata, Makiko; Orito, Kensuke

    2014-01-15

    Tranexamic acid suppresses post-partum haemorrhage and idiopathic menorrhagia through its anti-fibrinolytic action. Although it is clinically useful, it is associated with high risks of side effects such as emesis. Understanding the mechanisms underlying tranexamic acid-induced emesis is very important to explore appropriate anti-emetic drugs for the prevention and/or suppression of emesis. In this study, we examined the receptors involved in tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake in rats, which reflects the drug's clinical emetogenic potential in humans. Further, we examined the brain regions activated by administration of tranexamic acid and elucidated pivotal pathways of tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake. We examined the effects of ondansetron, a 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonist, domperidone, a dopamine 2 receptor antagonist, and aprepitant, a tachykinin neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor antagonist, on tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake in rats. Then, we determined the brain regions that showed increased numbers of c-Fos immunoreactive cells. Finally, we examined the effects of an antagonist(s) that reduced tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake on the increase in c-Fos immunoreactive cells. Aprepitant significantly decreased tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake. However, neither ondansetron nor domperidone decreased kaolin intake. Tranexamic acid significantly increased c-Fos immunoreactive cells by approximately 5.5-fold and 22-fold in the area postrema and nucleus of solitary tract, respectively. Aprepitant decreased the number of c-Fos immunoreactive cells in both areas. Tranexamic acid induced kaolin intake possibly via stimulation of tachykinin NK1 receptors in rats. The tachykinin NK1 receptor could be targeted to prevent and/or suppress emesis in patients receiving tranexamic acid.

  3. Seizures Following Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Monique E.; McMeniman, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Seizures following cardiopulmonary bypass are an immediate and alarming indication that a neurologic event has occurred. A case report of a 67-year-old man undergoing aortic valve surgery who unexpectedly experiences seizures following cardiopulmonary bypass is outlined. Possible contributing factors including atheromatous disease in the aorta, low cerebral perfusion pressures, an open-chamber procedure, and the use of tranexamic acid are identified. PMID:27729707

  4. Fibromyalgia and seizures.

    PubMed

    Tatum, William O; Langston, Michael E; Acton, Emily K

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this case-matched study was to determine how frequently fibromyalgia is associated with different paroxysmal neurological disorders and explore the utility of fibromyalgia as a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. The billing diagnosis codes of 1,730 new, non-selected patient encounters were reviewed over a three-year period for an epileptologist in a neurology clinic to identify all patients with historical diagnoses of fibromyalgia. The frequency with which epileptic seizures, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and physiological non-epileptic events were comorbid with fibromyalgia was assessed. Age and gender case-matched controls were used for a between-group comparison. Wilcoxon tests were used to analyse interval data, and Chi-square was used to analyse categorical data (p<0.05). Fibromyalgia was retrospectively identified in 95/1,730 (5.5%) patients in this cohort. Females represented 95% of the fibromyalgia sample (age: 53 years; 95% CI: 57, 51). Forty-three percent of those with fibromyalgia had a non-paroxysmal, neurological primary clinical diagnosis, most commonly chronic pain. Paroxysmal events were present in 57% of fibromyalgia patients and 54% of case-matched controls. Among patients with fibromyalgia and paroxysmal disorders, 11% had epileptic seizures, 74% had psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and 15% had physiological non-epileptic events, compared to case-matched controls with 37% epileptic seizures, 51% psychogenic non-epileptic events, and 12% physiological non-epileptic events (p = 0.009). Fibromyalgia was shown to be a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in patients with undifferentiated paroxysmal spells. However, our results suggest that the specificity and sensitivity of fibromyalgia as a marker for psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in a mixed general neurological population of patients is less than previously described.

  5. Consciousness and epilepsy: why are complex-partial seizures complex?

    PubMed Central

    Englot, Dario J.; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2010-01-01

    Why do complex-partial seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) cause a loss of consciousness? Abnormal function of the medial temporal lobe is expected to cause memory loss, but it is unclear why profoundly impaired consciousness is so common in temporal lobe seizures. Recent exciting advances in behavioral, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging techniques spanning both human patients and animal models may allow new insights into this old question. While behavioral automatisms are often associated with diminished consciousness during temporal lobe seizures, impaired consciousness without ictal motor activity has also been described. Some have argued that electrographic lateralization of seizure activity to the left temporal lobe is most likely to cause impaired consciousness, but the evidence remains equivocal. Other data correlates ictal consciousness in TLE with bilateral temporal lobe involvement of seizure spiking. Nevertheless, it remains unclear why bilateral temporal seizures should impair responsiveness. Recent evidence has shown that impaired consciousness during temporal lobe seizures is correlated with large-amplitude slow EEG activity and neuroimaging signal decreases in the frontal and parietal association cortices. This abnormal decreased function in the neocortex contrasts with fast polyspike activity and elevated cerebral blood flow in limbic and other subcortical structures ictally. Our laboratory has thus proposed the “network inhibition hypothesis,” in which seizure activity propagates to subcortical regions necessary for cortical activation, allowing the cortex to descend into an inhibited state of unconsciousness during complex-partial temporal lobe seizures. Supporting this hypothesis, recent rat studies during partial limbic seizures have shown that behavioral arrest is associated with frontal cortical slow waves, decreased neuronal firing, and hypometabolism. Animal studies further demonstrate that cortical deactivation and behavioral

  6. Repeated citalopram administration counteracts kainic acid-induced spreading of PSA-NCAM-immunoreactive cells and loss of reelin in the adult mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Jaako, Külli; Aonurm-Helm, Anu; Kalda, Anti; Anier, Kaili; Zharkovsky, Tamara; Shastin, Dmitri; Zharkovsky, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    Systemic or intracerebral administration of kainic acid in rodents induces neuronal death followed by a cascade of neuroplastic changes in the hippocampus. Kainic acid-induced neuroplasticity is evidenced by alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis, dispersion of the granule cell layer and re-organisation of mossy fibres. Similar abnormalities are observed in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and, therefore, kainic acid-induced hippocampal neuroplasticity might mimic pathological mechanisms leading to the formation of 'epileptic brain' in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Previous studies have demonstrated that selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor antidepressants might reduce the severity of seizures in epileptic patients and reduce neuronal death in laboratory animal models of kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. In the present study, we investigated whether kainic acid-induced neuroplasticity in mice is modulated by the repeated administration of citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. We found that at the histopathological level, repeated citalopram treatment counteracted the kainic acid-induced neuronal loss and dispersion of young granule neurons expressing the polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule within the granule cell layer of the hippocampus. Citalopram also counteracted the downregulation of reelin on both mRNA and protein levels induced by kainic acid administration. Our findings indicate that repeated administration of citalopram is able to prevent kainic acid-induced abnormal brain plasticity and thereby prevent the formation of an epileptic phenotype.

  7. Consciousness of seizures and consciousness during seizures: are they related?

    PubMed

    Detyniecki, Kamil; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances have been made in the network mechanisms underlying impairment of consciousness during seizures. However, less is known about patient awareness of their own seizures. Studying patient reports or documentation of their seizures is currently the most commonly utilized mechanism to scientifically measure patient awareness of seizures. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available evidence regarding the accuracy of patient seizure counts and identify the variables that may influence unreliable seizure reporting. Several groups looking at patient documentation of seizures during continuous EEG monitoring show that patients do not report as many as 50% of their seizures. These studies also suggest that seizures accompanied by loss of consciousness, arising from the left hemisphere or the temporal lobe, or occurring during sleep are associated with significantly reduced reporting. Baseline memory performance does not appear to have a major influence on the accuracy of seizure report. Further prospective studies using validated ictal behavioral testing as well as using correlation with newer electrophysiological and neuroimaging techniques for seizure localization are needed to more fully understand the mechanisms of underreporting of seizures. Better methods to alert caregivers about unrecognized seizures and to improve seizure documentation are under investigation.

  8. Ketone ester supplementation attenuates seizure activity, and improves behavior and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in an Angelman syndrome mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ciarlone, Stephanie L; Grieco, Joseph C; D'Agostino, Dominic P; Weeber, Edwin J

    2016-12-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a rare genetic and neurological disorder presenting with seizures, developmental delay, ataxia, and lack of speech. Previous studies have indicated that oxidative stress-dependent metabolic dysfunction may underlie the phenotypic deficits reported in the AS mouse model. While the ketogenic diet (KD) has been used to protect against oxidative stress and has successfully treated refractory epilepsy in AS case studies, issues arise due to its strict adherence requirements, in addition to selective eating habits and weight issues reported in patients with AS. We hypothesized that ketone ester supplementation would mimic the KD as an anticonvulsant and improve the behavioral and synaptic plasticity deficits in vivo. AS mice were supplemented R,S-1,3-butanediol acetoacetate diester (KE) ad libitum for eight weeks. KE administration improved motor coordination, learning and memory, and synaptic plasticity in AS mice. The KE was also anticonvulsant and altered brain amino acid metabolism in AS treated animals. Our findings suggest that KE supplementation produces sustained ketosis and ameliorates many phenotypes in the AS mouse model, and should be investigated further for future clinical use.

  9. Comparable seizure characteristics in magnetic seizure therapy and electroconvulsive therapy for major depression.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Sarah; Bewernick, Bettina H; Hurlemann, René; Soehle, Martin; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

    2013-11-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is highly effective for treatment-resistant depression (TRD); however, its use for less severe forms of depression is somewhat limited by a lack of control over current spreading to medial temporal lobe memory structures, resulting in various cognitive side effects. In contrast, magnetic seizure therapy (MST), which uses high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for local seizure induction, has been associated with reduced cognitive side effects. To assess whether different characteristics of seizures induced by both methods are responsible for the differences in neuropsychological side-effect profile, we studied seven TRD-patients undergoing both MST and ECT in an open-label, within subject, controlled crossover pilot study. Comparison parameters included seizure-related ictal characteristics, including motor activity, electromyogram (EMG), electroencephalogram (EEG), and postictal recovery and reorientation times.Our results showed no differences in motor activity or EMG and EEG characteristics, thus implicating similar electrophysiological processes in seizure induction with MST and ECT. In line with previous studies, we observed shorter postictal recovery and reorientation times following MST.The ictal characteristics of induced seizures were found similar with ECT and MST suggesting that the more focal seizure induction associated with MST may account for the more beneficial neuropsychological side effect profile of MST.

  10. Muscarinic M1 receptor and cannabinoid CB1 receptor do not modulate paraoxon-induced seizures

    PubMed Central

    Kow, Rebecca L; Cheng, Eugene M; Jiang, Kelly; Le, Joshua H; Stella, Nephi; Nathanson, Neil M

    2015-01-01

    One of the major signs of severe organophosphate poisoning is seizures. Previous studies have shown that both muscarinic agonist- and organophosphate-induced seizures require activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the central nervous system. Seizures induced by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine require the M1 receptor and are modulated by cannabinoid CB1 receptors. In this study, we determined whether M1 and CB1 receptors also regulated seizures induced by the organophosphate paraoxon. We found no differences in seizures induced by paraoxon in wild-type (WT) and M1 knockout (KO) mice, indicating that in contrast to pilocarpine seizures, M1 receptors are not required for paraoxon seizures. Furthermore, we found that pilocarpine administration resulted in seizure-independent activation of ERK in the hippocampus in a M1 receptor-dependent manner, while paraoxon did not induce seizure-independent activation of ERK in the mouse hippocampus. This shows that pilocarpine and paraoxon activated M1 receptors in the hippocampus to different extents. There were no differences in seizures induced by paraoxon in WT and CB1 KO mice, and neither CB1 agonist nor antagonist administration had significant effects on paraoxon seizures, indicating that, in contrast to pilocarpine seizures, paraoxon seizures are not modulated by CB1 receptors. These results demonstrate that there are fundamental molecular differences in the regulation of seizures induced by pilocarpine and paraoxon. PMID:25692018

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid findings after epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate ictally-induced CSF parameter changes after seizures in adult patients without acute inflammatory diseases or infectious diseases associated with the central nervous system. In total, 151 patients were included in the study. All patients were admitted to our department of neurology following acute seizures and received an extensive work-up including EEG, cerebral imaging, and CSF examinations. CSF protein elevation was found in most patients (92; 60.9%) and was significantly associated with older age, male sex, and generalized seizures. Abnormal CSF-to-serum glucose ratio was found in only nine patients (5.9%) and did not show any significant associations. CSF lactate was elevated in 34 patients (22.5%) and showed a significant association with focal seizures with impaired consciousness, status epilepticus, the presence of EEG abnormalities in general and epileptiform potentials in particular, as well as epileptogenic lesions on cerebral imaging. Our results indicate that non-inflammatory CSF elevation of protein and lactate after epileptic seizures is relatively common, in contrast to changes in CSF-to-serum glucose ratio, and further suggest that these changes are caused by ictal activity and are related to seizure type and intensity. We found no indication that these changes may have further-reaching pathological implications besides their postictal character.

  12. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage.

  13. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage. PMID:26754778

  14. Anticonvulsant activity of pregabalin in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure assay in α2δ1 (R217A) and α2δ2 (R279A) mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Lotarski, Susan; Hain, Heather; Peterson, Jason; Galvin, Stacey; Strenkowski, Bryan; Donevan, Sean; Offord, James

    2014-07-01

    Pregabalin has been shown to have anticonvulsant, analgesic, and anxiolytic activity in animal models. Pregabalin binds with high affinity to the α2δ1 and α2δ2 subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels. In order to better understand the relative contribution that binding to either the α2δ1 or α2δ2 subunits confers on the anticonvulsant activity of pregabalin, we characterized the anticonvulsant activity of pregabalin in different wild-type (WT) and mutant mouse strains. Two targeted mouse mutants have been made in which either the α2δ1 subunit was mutated (arginine-to-alanine mutation at amino acid 217; R217A) or the α2δ2 subunit was mutated (arginine-to-alanine mutation at amino acid 279; R279A). These mutations in α2δ1 or α2δ2 render the subunits relatively insensitive to pregabalin binding. The anticonvulsant activity of pregabalin was assessed in these different mouse lines using the maximal electroshock-induced seizure (MES) model. Pregabalin reduced the percentage of seizures and increased the latency to seizure in the MES model in two parental mouse strains used to construct the mutants. Pregabalin also reduced the percentage of seizures and increased latency to seizure similarly in the α2δ2 (R279A) and WT littermate control mice. In contrast, pregabalin's anticonvulsant efficacy was significantly reduced in α2δ1 (R217A) mutants compared with WT littermate control mice. Phenytoin showed anticonvulsant activity across all WT and mutant mice. These data show that the anticonvulsant activity of pregabalin in the MES model requires binding to the α2δ1 subunit.

  15. Characterization of Early Partial Seizure Onset: Frequency, Complexity and Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Jouny, Christophe C.; Bergey, Gregory K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective A clear classification of partial seizures onset features is not yet established. Complexity and entropy have been very widely used to describe dynamical systems, but a systematic evaluation of these measures to characterize partial seizures has never been performed. Methods Eighteen different measures including power in frequency bands up to 300Hz, Gabor atom density (GAD), Higuchi fractal dimension (HFD), Lempel-Ziv complexity, Shannon entropy, sample entropy, and permutation entropy, were selected to test sensitivity to partial seizure onset. Intracranial recordings from forty-five patients with mesial temporal, neocortical temporal and neocortical extratemporal seizure foci were included (331 partial seizures). Results GAD, Lempel-Ziv complexity, HFD, high frequency activity, and sample entropy were the most reliable measures to assess early seizure onset. Conclusions Increases in complexity and occurrence of high-frequency components appear to be commonly associated with early stages of partial seizure evolution from all regions. The type of measure (frequency-based, complexity or entropy) does not predict the efficiency of the method to detect seizure onset. Significance Differences between measures such as GAD and HFD highlight the multimodal nature of partial seizure onsets. Improved methods for early seizure detection may be achieved from a better understanding of these underlying dynamics. PMID:21872526

  16. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa [Naperville, IL; Kulikov, Stanislav [Sarov, RU; Osorio, Ivan [Leawood, KS; Raptis, Apostolos C [Downers Grove, IL

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  17. Modulation of Pilocarpine-Induced Seizures by Cannabinoid Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kow, Rebecca L.; Jiang, Kelly; Naydenov, Alipi V.; Le, Joshua H.; Stella, Nephi; Nathanson, Neil M.

    2014-01-01

    Administration of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine is commonly used to induce seizures in rodents for the study of epilepsy. Activation of muscarinic receptors has been previously shown to increase the production of endocannabinoids in the brain. Endocannabinoids act at the cannabinoid CB1 receptors to reduce neurotransmitter release and the severity of seizures in several models of epilepsy. In this study, we determined the effect of CB1 receptor activity on the induction in mice of seizures by pilocarpine. We found that decreased activation of the CB1 receptor, either through genetic deletion of the receptor or treatment with a CB1 antagonist, increased pilocarpine seizure severity without modifying seizure-induced cell proliferation and cell death. These results indicate that endocannabinoids act at the CB1 receptor to modulate the severity of pilocarpine-induced seizures. Administration of a CB1 agonist produced characteristic CB1-dependent behavioral responses, but did not affect pilocarpine seizure severity. A possible explanation for the lack of effect of CB1 agonist administration on pilocarpine seizures, despite the effects of CB1 antagonist administration and CB1 gene deletion, is that muscarinic receptor-stimulated endocannabinoid production is acting maximally at CB1 receptors to modulate sensitivity to pilocarpine seizures. PMID:24752144

  18. A new class of anticonvulsants possessing 6 Hz psychomotor seizure test activity: 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)-N'-[substituted] acetohydrazides.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Tripathi, Laxmi

    2012-05-01

    A series of 2-(1H-Benzotriazol-1-yl)-N'-[substituted]acetohydrazides were designed & synthesized keeping in view the structural requirement of pharmacophore and evaluated for anticonvulsant activity and neurotoxicity. The new compounds were characterized using FT-IR, 1H NMR, mass spectral data and elemental analysis. The anticonvulsant activity of the titled compounds was assessed using the 6 Hz psychomotor seizure test. The neurotoxicity was assessed using the rotorod method. The most active compound of the series was N'-[4-(1,3-Benzodioxol-5-yloxy)benzylidene]-2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)acetohydrazide (BTA 9), which showed good activity with 75 % protection (3/4, 0.5 h) at a dose of 100 mg/kg in mice. All the compounds exhibited no neurotoxicity. A computational study was carried out for calculation of pharmacophore pattern and prediction of pharmacokinetic properties. Titled compounds have also exhibited good binding properties with epilepsy molecular targets such as glutamate, GABA (A) delta, GABA (A) alpha-1 receptors and Na/H exchanger, in Lamarckian genetic algorithm based flexible docking studies.

  19. Seizure disorders in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Hanly, John G.; Urowitz, Murray B.; Su, Li; Gordon, Caroline; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Sanchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Romero-Diaz, Juanita; Wallace, Daniel J; Clarke, Ann E.; Ginzler, E.M.; Merrill, Joan T.; Isenberg, David A.; Rahman, Anisur; Petri, M.; Fortin, Paul R.; Gladman, D. D.; Bruce, Ian N.; Steinsson, Kristjan; Dooley, M.A.; Khamashta, Munther A.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Fessler, Barri J.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Manzi, Susan; Zoma, Asad A.; Sturfelt, Gunnar K.; Nived, Ola; Aranow, Cynthia; Mackay, Meggan; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; van Vollenhoven, R.F.; Kalunian, Kenneth C.; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Lim, Sam; Kamen, Diane L.; Peschken, Christine A.; Inanc, Murat; Theriault, Chris; Thompson, Kara; Farewell, Vernon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the frequency, attribution, outcome and predictors of seizures in SLE Methods The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) performed a prospective inception cohort study. Demographic variables, global SLE disease activity (SLEDAI-2K), cumulative organ damage (SLICC/ACR Damage Index (SDI)) and neuropsychiatric events were recorded at enrollment and annually. Lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin, anti-β2 glycoprotein-I, anti-ribosomal P and anti-NR2 glutamate receptor antibodies were measured at enrollment. Physician outcomes of seizures were recorded. Patient outcomes were derived from the SF-36 mental (MCS) and physical (PCS) component summary scores. Statistical analyses included Cox and linear regressions. Results The cohort was 89.4% female with a mean follow up of 3.5±2.9 years. 75/1631 (4.6%) had ≥1 seizure, the majority around the time of SLE diagnosis. Multivariate analysis indicated a higher risk of seizures with African race/ethnicity (HR(CI):1.97 (1.07–3.63); p=0.03) and lower education status (1.97 (1.21–3.19); p<0.01). Higher damage scores (without NP variables) were associated with an increased risk of subsequent seizures (SDI=1:3.93 (1.46–10.55)); SDI=2 or 3:1.57 (0.32–7.65); SDI≥4:7.86 (0.89–69.06); p=0.03). There was an association with disease activity but not with autoantibodies. Seizures attributed to SLE frequently resolved (59/78(76%)) in the absence of anti-seizure drugs. There was no significant impact on the MCS or PCS scores. Anti-malarial drugs in absence of immunosuppressive agents were associated with reduced seizure risk (0.07(0.01–0.66); p=0.03). Conclusion Seizures occurred close to SLE diagnosis, in patients with African race/ethnicity, lower educational status and cumulative organ damage. Most seizures resolved without a negative impact on health-related quality of life. Anti-malarial drugs were associated with a protective effect. PMID:22492779

  20. Comparison of extracellular striatal acetylcholine and brain seizure activity following acute exposure to the nerve agents cyclosarin and tabun in freely moving guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, John C; Acon-Chen, Cindy; McDonough, John H; Shih, Tsung-Ming

    2010-11-01

    Organophosphorus nerve agents like cyclosarin and tabun are potent cholinesterase inhibitors. The inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, which is responsible for breaking down acetylcholine (ACh) at the synapse and neuromuscular junction, leads to a build-up of extracellular ACh and a series of toxic consequences including hypersecretion, tremor, convulsion/seizure, respiratory distress, coma, and death. This study employed simultaneous and continuous electroencephalographic recording and striatal microdialysis collection for quantification of ACh changes (via subsequent HPLC analysis) during acute exposure to a 1.0 × LD(50) subcutaneous dose of either cyclosarin or tabun to investigate differences in cholinergic and behavioral effects. Information about the unique mechanisms and consequences of different nerve agents is intended to aid in the development of broad-spectrum medical countermeasures for nerve agents. At the dose administered, non-seizure and sustained seizure responses were observed in both agent groups and in the tabun-exposed group some subjects experienced an unsustained seizure response. Significant extracellular ACh increases were only observed in seizure groups. Cyclosarin and tabun were found to exhibit some unique cholinergic and ictogenic characteristics. Lethality only occurred in subjects experiencing sustained seizure, and there was no difference in lethality between agent groups that progressed to sustained seizure.

  1. Reflex gelastic-dacrystic seizures following hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Praharaj, Heramba Narayan

    2013-07-12

    Reflex or stimulus-sensitive epilepsies are uncommon epileptic syndromes triggered by exogenous-specific sensory stimulus or endogenous various mental activities. Gelastic-dacrystic seizures are rare epileptic manifestations characterised by ictal laughter and crying. Gelastic-dacrystic seizures are commonly caused by hypothalamic hamartoma but rarely described due to cortical dysplasia, lesions of frontal and temporal lobes, tumours and vascular malformations. We report a young woman who presented with somatosensory-evoked gelastic-dacrystic seizures. This patient had a positive history of perinatal insult substantiated by MRI findings. Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy as the cause of gelastic-dacrystic seizures has not been reported so far in the literature.

  2. Common time-frequency analysis of local field potential and pyramidal cell activity in seizure-like events of the rat hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotic, M.; Chiu, A. W. L.; Jahromi, S. S.; Carlen, P. L.; Bardakjian, B. L.

    2011-08-01

    To study cell-field dynamics, physiologists simultaneously record local field potentials and the activity of individual cells from animals performing cognitive tasks, during various brain states or under pathological conditions. However, apart from spike shape and spike timing analyses, few studies have focused on elucidating the common time-frequency structure of local field activity relative to surrounding cells across different periods of phenomena. We have used two algorithms, multi-window time frequency analysis and wavelet phase coherence (WPC), to study common intracellular-extracellular (I-E) spectral features in spontaneous seizure-like events (SLEs) from rat hippocampal slices in a low magnesium epilepsy model. Both algorithms were applied to 'pairs' of simultaneously observed I-E signals from slices in the CA1 hippocampal region. Analyses were performed over a frequency range of 1-100 Hz. I-E spectral commonality varied in frequency and time. Higher commonality was observed from 1 to 15 Hz, and lower commonality was observed in the 15-100 Hz frequency range. WPC was lower in the non-SLE region compared to SLE activity; however, there was no statistical difference in the 30-45 Hz band between SLE and non-SLE modes. This work provides evidence of strong commonality in various frequency bands of I-E SLEs in the rat hippocampus, not only during SLEs but also immediately before and after.

  3. Seizures and Teens: Sorting Out Seizures--Part Two

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devinsky, Orrin

    2006-01-01

    In adolescents, diagnosing seizures can be challenging and can lead to many pitfalls. Because seizures are episodic and unpredictable events, they usually do not occur in the doctor's office. Thus, a diagnosis of epilepsy is usually based on information presented by the person with seizures and their family. Together with results of diagnostic…

  4. S-allyl cysteine attenuates free fatty acid-induced lipogenesis in human HepG2 cells through activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Choi, Jae Ho; Do, Minh Truong; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2013-08-01

    S-Allyl cysteine (SAC), a nontoxic garlic compound, has a variety of pharmacological properties, including antioxidant and hepatoprotective properties. In this report, we provide evidence that SAC prevented free fatty acid (FFA)-induced lipid accumulation and lipotoxicity in hepatocytes. SAC significantly reduced FFA-induced generation of reactive oxygen species, caspase activation and subsequent cell death. Also, SAC mitigated total cellular lipid and triglyceride accumulation in steatotic HepG2 cells. SAC significantly increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) in HepG2 cells. Additionally, SAC down-regulated the levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) and its target genes, including ACC and fatty acid synthase. Use of a specific inhibitor showed that SAC activated AMPK via calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKK) and silent information regulator T1. Our results demonstrate that SAC activates AMPK through CaMKK and inhibits SREBP-1-mediated hepatic lipogenesis. Therefore, SAC has therapeutic potential for preventing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  5. Classification of seizures and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Riviello, James J

    2003-07-01

    The management of seizures and epilepsy begins with forming a differential diagnosis, making the diagnosis, and then classifying seizure type and epileptic syndrome. Classification guides treatment, including ancillary testing, management, prognosis, and if needed, selection of the appropriate antiepileptic drug (AED). Many AEDs are available, and certain seizure types or epilepsy syndromes respond to specific AEDs. The identification of the genetics, molecular basis, and pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy has resulted from classification of specific epileptic syndromes. The classification system used by the International League Against Epilepsy is periodically revised. The proposed revision changes the classification emphasis from the anatomic origin of seizures (focal vs generalized) to seizure semiology (ie, the signs or clinical manifestations). Modified systems have been developed for specific circumstances (eg, neonatal seizures, infantile seizures, status epilepticus, and epilepsy surgery). This article reviews seizure and epilepsy classification, emphasizing new data.

  6. Heat shock protein 70 protects against seizure-induced neuronal cell death in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activation-induced nitric oxide synthase II expression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chiung-Chih; Chen, Shang-Der; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Samuel H H; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2014-02-01

    Status epilepticus induces subcellular changes that may eventually lead to neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. Based on an animal model of status epilepticus, our laboratory showed previously that sustained hippocampal seizure activity activates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and upregulates nitric oxide synthase (NOS) II gene expression, leading to apoptotic neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. The present study examined the potential modulatory role of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) on NF-κB signaling in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus. In Sprague-Dawley rats, kainic acid (KA) was microinjected unilaterally into the hippocampal CA3 subfield to induce prolonged bilateral seizure activity. Expression of HSP70 was elevated as early as 1h after the elicitation of sustained seizure activity, followed by a progressive elevation that peaked at 24h. Pretreatment with an antisense oligonucleotide against hsp70 decreased the HSP70 expression, and significantly augmented IκB kinase (IKK) activity and phosphorylation of IκBα, alongside enhanced nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB in the hippocampal CA3 neurons and glial cells. These cellular events were followed by enhanced upregulation of NOS II and peroxynitrite expression 3h after sustained seizure activity that led to an increase of caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation in the hippocampal CA3 neurons 7days after experimental status epilepticus. We concluded that HSP70 protects against apoptotic cell death induced by NF-κB activation and NOS II-peroxynitrite signaling cascade in the hippocampal CA3 and glial cells following experimental status epilepticus via suppression of IKK activity and deactivation of IκBα.

  7. Neural - glial circuits : Can Interneurons stop seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadkarni, Suhita; Jung, Peter

    2004-03-01

    Recent progress in neurobiology suggests that astrocytes - through calcium excitability - are active partners to the neurons by integrating their activity and, in turn, regulating synaptic transmission. In a similar fashion neurons and interneurons are the 'Yin and Yang' of the hippocampus. The dichotomy of excitation and inhibition between pyramidal neurons and interneurons plays a crucial role in the function of the neuronal circuit.We consider a model of a pyramidal cell in contact with one synaptic astrocytes. It has been shown that such a circuit - triggered by transient stimulation - can exhibit sustained oscillations ("seizures") for strong coupling. The question we are considering is, under what conditions synaptic inhibition can stop these seizures?

  8. Modeling early-onset post-ischemic seizures in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chiping; Wang, Justin; Peng, Jessie; Patel, Nisarg; Huang, Yayi; Gao, Xiaoxing; Aljarallah, Salman; Eubanks, James H; McDonald, Robert; Zhang, Liang

    2015-09-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of seizures and epilepsy in the aged population, with post-stroke seizures being a poor prognostic factor. The pathological processes underlying post-stroke seizures are not well understood and studies of these seizures in aging/aged animals remain scarce. Therefore, our primary objective was to model post-stroke seizures in aging mice (C57 black strain, 16-20 months-old), with a focus on early-onset, convulsive seizures that occur within 24-hours of brain ischemia. We utilized a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and examined seizure activity and brain injury using combined behavioral and electroencephalographic monitoring and histological assessments. Aging mice exhibited vigorous convulsive seizures within hours of the middle cerebral artery occlusion. These seizures manifested with jumping, rapid running, barrel-rolling and/or falling all in the absence of hippocampal-cortical electrographic discharges. Seizure development was closely associated with severe brain injury and acute mortality. Anticonvulsive treatments after seizure occurrence offered temporary seizure control but failed to improve animal survival. A separate cohort of adult mice (6-8 months-old) exhibited analogous early-onset convulsive seizures following the middle cerebral artery occlusion but had better survival outcomes following anticonvulsive treatment. Collectively, our data suggest that early-onset convulsive seizures are a result of severe brain ischemia in aging animals.

  9. Seizures beget seizures in temporal lobe epilepsies: the boomerang effects of newly formed aberrant kainatergic synapses.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Crepel, Valérie; Represa, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    Do temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) seizures in adults promote further seizures? Clinical and experimental data suggest that new synapses are formed after an initial episode of status epilepticus, however their contribution to the transformation of a naive network to an epileptogenic one has been debated. Recent experimental data show that newly formed aberrant excitatory synapses on the granule cells of the fascia dentate operate by means of kainate receptor-operated signals that are not present on naive granule cells. Therefore, genuine epileptic networks rely on signaling cascades that differentiate them from naive networks. Recurrent limbic seizures generated by the activation of kainate receptors and synapses in naive animals lead to the formation of novel synapses that facilitate the emergence of further seizures. This negative, vicious cycle illustrates the central role of reactive plasticity in neurological disorders.

  10. Reduction of adrenergic neurotransmission with clonidine aggravates spike-wave seizures and alters activity in the cortex and the thalamus in WAG/Rij rats.

    PubMed

    Sitnikova, Evgenia; van Luijtelaar, Gilles

    2005-01-30

    The alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonist clonidine in low dose inhibits the release of noradrenaline and aggravates absence seizures. The present study examines properties of two types of spike-wave discharges (SWD) in a genetic model of absence epilepsy, the WAG/Rij rats. After reduction of noradrenergic neurotransmission with clonidine (0.00625 mg/kg, i.p.), the electrical activity was recorded in the neocortex, the ventroposteromedial nucleus (VPM) and the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN). Clonidine temporally reduced percentage of wakefulness but did not affect sleep. Clonidine decreased the spectral power of sleep EEG (mostly in the delta band), this effect was found in the cortex and in the VPM. Clonidine increased the incidence of SWD type I (generalized); the spectral power of SWD I was lower in the frontal cortex (mostly in 1-9 and 30-100 Hz) and in the VPM (1-5 Hz), but higher in the RTN (9-14 Hz). Local occipital SWD (type II) had a tendency to be less numerous after clonidine, they had a lower power in the 5-9 Hz band in the occipital cortex, in the VPM and in the RTN. It can be concluded that strengthening of 9-14 Hz activity in the RTN may underlie clonidine-induced aggravation of SWD I.

  11. Effect of ethacrynic acid on the anticonvulsant activity of the second-generation antiepileptics against maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Łukawski, Krzysztof; Swiderska, Grazyna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2009-12-01

    Recent experimental studies show that ethacrynic acid (ETA), a loop diuretic, exerts the anticonvulsant activity. Therefore, we tested the effect of ETA on the protective action of some second-generation antiepileptic drugs (oxcarbazepine [OXC], lamotrigine [LTG] and topiramate [TPM]) in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure (MES) model. ETA was administered acutely (50 and 100 mg/kg i.p.) or chronically, for 7 days (12.5 mg/kg i.p.). Both ETA acute (up to 100 mg/kg) and chronic (up to 12.5 mg/kg) treatment did not influence the threshold for electroconvulsions. In the MES test, ETA (100 mg/kg) potentiated the protective activity of TPM, decreasing its ED(50) value from 38.1 to 18.7 mg/kg (P<0.01). In contrast, ETA (100 mg/kg) remained without effect on the anticonvulsant action of the other antiepileptics (OXC and LTG) in mice. Chronic administration of ETA (12.5 mg/kg) did not affect the protective action of tested antiepileptics. The observed interaction between acute ETA and TPM was pharmacodynamic in nature because neither plasma nor total brain TPM concentrations were altered after injection of ETA.These results indicate existing interactions between ETA and TPM, which may have some clinical importance for epileptic patients treated with TPM and additionally ETA due to other medical causes.

  12. Seizures and brain regulatory systems: consciousness, sleep, and autonomic systems.

    PubMed

    Sedigh-Sarvestani, Madineh; Blumenfeld, Hal; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Bateman, Lisa M

    2015-06-01

    Research into the physiologic underpinnings of epilepsy has revealed reciprocal relationships between seizures and the activity of several regulatory systems in the brain. This review highlights recent progress in understanding and using the relationships between seizures and the arousal or consciousness system, the sleep-wake and associated circadian system, and the central autonomic network.

  13. Seizure Prediction: Methods

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Paul R.; Myers, Stephen; Geyer, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy, one of the most common neurological diseases, affects over 50 million people worldwide. Epilepsy can have a broad spectrum of debilitating medical and social consequences. Although antiepileptic drugs have helped treat millions of patients, roughly a third of all patients have seizures that are refractory to pharmacological intervention. The evolution of our understanding of this dynamic disease leads to new treatment possibilities. There is great interest in the development of devices that incorporate algorithms capable of detecting early onset of seizures or even predicting them hours before they occur. The lead time provided by these new technologies will allow for new types of interventional treatment. In the near future, seizures may be detected and aborted before physical manifestations begin. In this chapter we discuss the algorithms that make these devices possible and how they have been implemented to date. We also compare and contrast these measures, and review their individual strengths and weaknesses. Finally, we illustrate how these techniques can be combined in a closed-loop seizure prevention system. PMID:22078526

  14. Antipsychotic drugs and seizures.

    PubMed

    Remick, R A; Fine, S H

    1979-02-01

    The authors examine the clinical problem of which antipsychotic drug to use when antipsychotics are indicated in patients with a seizuire disorder or who are susceptible to seizures. While definitive answers to this problem are still unknown, guidelines are offered for antipsychotic drug use in this situation, based on the author's understanding of psychotropics and epilepsy.

  15. Positron emission tomography in generalized seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, W.H.; Brooks, R.; Margolin, R.; Patronas, N.; Sato, S.; Porter, R.J.; Mansi, L.; Bairamian, D.; DiChiro, G.

    1985-05-01

    The authors used /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to study nine patients with clinical absence or generalized seizures. One patient had only absence seizures, two had only generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and six had both seizure types. Interictal scans in eight failed to reveal focal or lateralized hypometabolism. No apparent abnormalities were noted. Two patients had PET scans after isotope injection during hyperventilation-induced generalized spike-wave discharges. Diffusely increased metabolic rates were found in one compared with an interictal scan, and in another compared with control values. Another patient had FDG injected during absence status: EEG showed generalized spike-wave discharges (during which she was unresponsive) intermixed with slow activity accompanied by confusion. Metabolic rates were decreased, compared with the interictal scan, throughout both cortical and subcortical structures. Interictal PET did not detect specific anatomic regions responsible for absence seizure onset in any patient, but the results of the ictal scans did suggest that pathophysiologic differences exist between absence status and single absence attacks.

  16. Detection of early seizures by diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Hajihashemi, M. Reza; Zhou, Junli; Carney, Paul R.; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-03-01

    In epilepsy it has been challenging to detect early changes in brain activity that occurs prior to seizure onset and to map their origin and evolution for possible intervention. Besides, preclinical seizure experiments need to be conducted in awake animals with images reconstructed and displayed in real-time. We demonstrate using a rat model of generalized epilepsy that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides a unique functional neuroimaging modality for noninvasively and continuously tracking brain activities with high spatiotemporal resolution. We developed methods to conduct seizure experiments in fully awake rats using a subject-specific helmet and a restraining mechanism. For the first time, we detected early hemodynamic responses with heterogeneous patterns several minutes preceding the electroencephalographic seizure onset, supporting the presence of a "pre-seizure" state both in anesthetized and awake rats. Using a novel time-series analysis of scattering images, we show that the analysis of scattered diffuse light is a sensitive and reliable modality for detecting changes in neural activity associated with generalized seizure. We found widespread hemodynamic changes evolving from local regions of the bilateral cortex and thalamus to the entire brain, indicating that the onset of generalized seizures may originate locally rather than diffusely. Together, these findings suggest DOT represents a powerful tool for mapping early seizure onset and propagation pathways.

  17. Pro-Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (proBDNF)-Mediated p75NTR Activation Promotes Depolarizing Actions of GABA and Increases Susceptibility to Epileptic Seizures.

    PubMed

    Riffault, Baptiste; Kourdougli, Nazim; Dumon, Camille; Ferrand, Nadine; Buhler, Emmanuelle; Schaller, Fabienne; Chambon, Caroline; Rivera, Claudio; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Porcher, Christophe

    2016-12-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is synthesized as a precursor, namely proBDNF, which can be processed into mature BDNF (mBDNF). Evidences suggest that proBDNF signaling through p75(NTR) may account for the emergence of neurological disorders. These findings support the view that the relative availability of mBDNF and proBDNF forms is an important mechanism underlying brain circuit formation and cognitive functions. Here we describe novel insights into the proBDNF/p75(NTR) mechanisms and function in vivo in modulating neuronal circuit and synaptic plasticity during the first postnatal weeks in rats. Our results showed that increased proBDNF/p75(NTR) signaling during development maintains a depolarizing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) response in a KCC2-dependent manner in mature neuronal cells. This resulted in altered excitation/inhibition balance and enhanced neuronal network activity. The enhanced proBDNF/p75(NTR) signaling ultimately led to increased seizure susceptibility that was abolished by in vivo injection of function blocking p75(NTR) antibody. Altogether, our study shed new light on how proBDNF/p75(NTR) signaling can orchestrate the GABA excitatory/inhibitory developmental sequence leading to depolarizing and excitatory actions of GABA in adulthood and subsequent epileptic disorders.

  18. Carbon monoxide offers neuroprotection from hippocampal cell damage induced by recurrent febrile seizures through the PERK-activated ER stress pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Yi, Wenxia; Qin, Jiong; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Jing; Chang, Xingzhi

    2015-01-12

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is neuroprotective in various models of brain injury, but the precise mechanisms for this are yet to be established. In the present study, using a rat model of recurrent febrile seizures (FSs), we found an increase in plasma CO, evidence of neuronal damage and apoptosis, an increase in the expression of the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) marker glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous binding protein (CHOP), and an increase in phosphorylated protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (p-PERK)/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (p-eIF2α) in the hippocampus after 10 FSs. Administration of Hemin (a CO donor) in FS rats alleviated the neuronal damage, reduced neuronal apoptosis, upregulated GRP78 expression, decreased CHOP, and increased p-PERK and p-eIF2α expression in the hippocampus, compared to FS control rats. In contrast, treating FS rats with ZnPP-IX (a CO synthase inhibitor) aggravated the neuronal damage, enhanced neuronal apoptosis, downregulated GRP78 expression, increased CHOP, and decreased p-PERK and p-eIF2α expression, compared to FS control rats. These results suggest that endogenous CO limits the neuronal damage induced by recurrent FSs, through the PERK-activated ERS pathway.

  19. Neologistic speech automatisms during complex partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Bell, W L; Horner, J; Logue, P; Radtke, R A

    1990-01-01

    There are no documented cases of seizures causing reiterative neologistic speech automatisms. We report an 18-year-old right-handed woman with stereotypic ictal speech automatisms characterized by phonemic jargon and reiterative neologisms. Video-EEG during the reiterative neologisms demonstrated rhythmic delta activity, which was most prominent in the left posterior temporal region. At surgery, there was an arteriovenous malformation impinging on the left supramarginal gyrus and the posterior portion of the superior temporal gyrus. Though intelligible speech automatisms can result from seizure foci in either hemisphere, neologistic speech automatisms may implicate a focus in the language-dominant hemisphere.

  20. Atenolol offers better protection than clonidine against cardiac injury in kainic acid-induced status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Read, M I; Harrison, J C; Kerr, D S; Sammut, I A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Status epilepticus is increasingly associated with cardiac injury in both clinical and animal studies. The current study examined ECG activity for up to 48 h following kainic acid (KA) seizure induction and compared the potential of atenolol and clonidine to attenuate this cardiac pathology. Experimental Approach Sprague-Dawley rats (male, 300–350 g) were implanted with ECG and electrocorticogram electrodes to allow simultaneous telemetric recordings of cardiac and cortical responses during and after KA-induced seizures. Animals were randomized into saline controls, and saline vehicle-, clonidine- or atenolol-pretreated KA groups. Key Results KA administration in the saline-pretreated group produced an immediate bradycardic response (maximal decrease of 28 ± 6%), coinciding with low-level seizure activity. As high-level seizure behaviours and EEG spiking increased, tachycardia also developed, with a maximum heart rate increase of 38 ± 7% coinciding with QTc prolongation and T wave elevation. Both clonidine and atenolol pretreatment attenuated seizure activity and reduced KA-induced changes in heart rate, QTc interval and T wave amplitude observed during both bradycardic and tachycardic phases in saline-pretreated KA animals. Clonidine, however, failed to reduce the power of EEG frequencies. Atenolol and to a lesser extent clonidine attenuated the cardiac hypercontraction band necrosis, inflammatory infiltration, and oedema at 48 h after KA, relative to the saline-KA group. Conclusions and Implications Severe seizure activity in this model was clearly associated with altered ECG activity and cardiac pathology. We suggest that modulation of sympathetic activity by atenolol provides a promising cardioprotective approach in status epilepticus. PMID:25765931

  1. Ictal Spread of Medial Temporal Lobe Seizures With and Without Secondary Generalization: An Intracranial EEG Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Yeoun; Farooque, Pue; Chen, William; Youngblood, Mark W.; Zaveri, Hitten P.; Gerrard, Jason L.; Spencer, Dennis D.; Hirsch, Lawrence J.; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective Secondary generalization of seizures has devastating consequences for patient safety and quality of life. The aim of this intracranial EEG (icEEG) study was to investigate the differences in onset and propagation patterns of temporal lobe seizures that remained focal vs. those with secondary generalization in order to better understand the mechanism of secondary generalization. Methods A total of 39 seizures were analyzed in 9 patients who met the following criteria: 1) icEEG-video monitoring with at least 1 secondarily generalized tonic clonic seizure (GTC), 2) pathologically proven hippocampal sclerosis, and 3) no seizures for at least 1 year after anteromedial temporal lobe resection. Seizures were classified as focal or secondary generalized by behavioral analysis of video. Onset and propagation patterns were compared by analysis of icEEG. Results We obtained data from 22 focal seizures without generalization (FS), and 17 GTC. Seizure onset patterns did not differ between FS and GTCs, but there were differences in later propagation. All seizures started with low voltage fast activity except 7 seizures in one patient (6 FS, 1 GTC), which started with sharply contoured theta activity. 15 of 39 seizures started from the hippocampus and 24 seizures (including 6 seizures in a patient without hippocampal contacts) started from other medial temporal lobe areas. We observed involvement or more prominent activation of the posterior-lateral temporal regions in GTCs prior to propagation to the other cortical regions, vs. FS which had no involvement or less prominent activation of the posterior lateral temporal cortex. Occipital contacts were not involved at the time of clinical secondary generalization. Significance The posterior-lateral temporal cortex may serve as an important “gateway” controlling propagation of medial temporal lobe seizures to other cortical regions. Identifying the mechanisms of secondary generalization of focal seizures may

  2. The Antiepileptic Drug Levetiracetam Suppresses Non-Convulsive Seizure Activity and Reduces Ischemic Brain Damage in Rats Subjected to Permanent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Ornella; Rispoli, Vincenzo; Leo, Antonio; Politi, Giovanni Bosco; Vinciguerra, Antonio; di Renzo, Gianfranco; Cataldi, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    The antiepileptic drug Levetiracetam (Lev) has neuroprotective properties in experimental stroke, cerebral hemorrhage and neurotrauma. In these conditions, non-convulsive seizures (NCSs) propagate from the core of the focal lesion into perilesional tissue, enlarging the damaged area and promoting epileptogenesis. Here, we explore whether Lev neuroprotective effect is accompanied by changes in NCS generation or propagation. In particular, we performed continuous EEG recordings before and after the permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (pMCAO) in rats that received Lev (100 mg/kg) or its vehicle immediately before surgery. Both in Lev-treated and in control rats, EEG activity was suppressed after pMCAO. In control but not in Lev-treated rats, EEG activity reappeared approximately 30-45 min after pMCAO. It initially consisted in single spikes and, then, evolved into spike-and-wave and polyspike-and-wave discharges. In Lev-treated rats, only rare spike events were observed and the EEG power was significantly smaller than in controls. Approximately 24 hours after pMCAO, EEG activity increased in Lev-treated rats because of the appearance of polyspike events whose power was, however, significantly smaller than in controls. In rats sacrificed 24 hours after pMCAO, the ischemic lesion was approximately 50% smaller in Lev-treated than in control rats. A similar neuroprotection was observed in rats sacrificed 72 hours after pMCAO. In conclusion, in rats subjected to pMCAO, a single Lev injection suppresses NCS occurrence for at least 24 hours. This electrophysiological effect could explain the long lasting reduction of ischemic brain damage caused by this drug. PMID:24236205

  3. Differential expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcripts after pilocarpine-induced seizure-like activity is related to mode of Ca2+ entry.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, F R; Lauterborn, J; Zimmer, J; Gall, C M

    2004-01-01

    Activity-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression is Ca2+-dependent, yet little is known about the Ca2+ channel contributions that might direct selective expression of the multiple BDNF transcripts. Here, effects of pilocarpine-induced seizure activity on total BDNF expression and on the individual sensitivity of BDNF transcripts to glutamate receptor and Ca2+ channel blockers were evaluated using hippocampal slice cultures and in situ hybridization of transcript-specific cRNA probes directed against mRNAs for the four 5' exons (I-IV) of the BDNF gene. mRNAs for nerve growth factor (NGF) and tyrosine kinase B (trkB) also were studied. Pilocarpine (5 mM) induced a dose- and time-dependent increase in total BDNF (exon V) mRNA expression in the dentate granule cells and CA3-CA1 pyramidal cells with maximal effects at 6 and 24 h, respectively. Increases were blocked by co-treatment with the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid/kainate 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX: 25 microM) and the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV; 25 microM), whereas the L-type voltage sensitive Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine (20 microM) was without detectable effect. Maximal NGF and trkB mRNA expression was induced by pilocarpine at 4 and 12 h, respectively. For the individual BDNF transcripts, APV blocked pilocarpine-induced increases in transcript II, whereas nifedipine blocked increases in transcripts I and III. Transcript IV levels were not altered by treatment. These results indicate that transcript II makes the greatest contribution to pilocarpine effects on total BDNF mRNA content in this model and provides evidence for regional and Ca2+ channel-specific differences in activity-dependent regulation of the different BDNF transcripts in hippocampus.

  4. Seizure Management for School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frueh, Eileen

    2008-01-01

    As many as 325,000 school-age children, ages 5-14, have epilepsy in the U.S. Thankfully, with medication, surgery, a special diet or vagus nerve stimulation, most go to school and fully participate in school activities. Children who continue to have seizures, however, may run into problems. Many of these problems can be overcome or prevented…

  5. Epileptic seizures as condensed sleep: an analysis of network dynamics from electroencephalogram signals.

    PubMed

    Gast, Heidemarie; Müller, Markus; Rummel, Christian; Roth, Corinne; Mathis, Johannes; Schindler, Kaspar; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2014-06-01

    Both deepening sleep and evolving epileptic seizures are associated with increasing slow-wave activity. Larger-scale functional networks derived from electroencephalogram indicate that in both transitions dramatic changes of communication between brain areas occur. During seizures these changes seem to be 'condensed', because they evolve more rapidly than during deepening sleep. Here we set out to assess quantitatively functional network dynamics derived from electroencephalogram signals during seizures and normal sleep. Functional networks were derived from electroencephalogram signals from wakefulness, light and deep sleep of 12 volunteers, and from pre-seizure, seizure and post-seizure time periods of 10 patients suffering from focal onset pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Nodes of the functional network represented electrical signals recorded by single electrodes and were linked if there was non-random cross-correlation between the two corresponding electroencephalogram signals. Network dynamics were then characterized by the evolution of global efficiency, which measures ease of information transmission. Global efficiency was compared with relative delta power. Global efficiency significantly decreased both between light and deep sleep, and between pre-seizure, seizure and post-seizure time periods. The decrease of global efficiency was due to a loss of functional links. While global efficiency decreased significantly, relative delta power increased except between the time periods wakefulness and light sleep, and pre-seizure and seizure. Our results demonstrate that both epileptic seizures and deepening sleep are characterized by dramatic fragmentation of larger-scale functional networks, and further support the similarities between sleep and seizures.

  6. Ambulatory Seizure Monitoring: From Concept to Prototype Device

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Mark H.; Threatt, Madeline; Solies, Karsten M.; McFerrin, Brent M.; Hopf, Lindsey B.; Birdwell, J. Douglas; Sillay, Karl A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The brain, made up of billions of neurons and synapses, is the marvelous core of human thought, action and memory. However, if neuronal activity manifests into abnormal electrical activity across the brain, neural behavior may exhibit synchronous neural firings known as seizures. If unprovoked seizures occur repeatedly, a patient may be diagnosed with epilepsy. Purpose The scope of this project is to develop an ambulatory seizure monitoring system that can be used away from a hospital, making it possible for the user to stay at home, and primary care personnel to monitor a patient's seizure activity in order to provide deeper analysis of the patient's condition and apply personalized intervention techniques. Methods The ambulatory seizure monitoring device is a research device that has been developed with the objective of acquiring a portable, clean electroencephalography (EEG) signal and transmitting it wirelessly to a handheld device for processing and notification. Result This device is comprised of 4 phases: acquisition, transmission, processing and notification. During the acquisition stage, the EEG signal is detected using EEG electrodes; these signals are filtered and amplified before being transmitted in the second stage. The processing stage encompasses the signal processing and seizure prediction. A notification is sent to the patient and designated contacts, given an impending seizure. Each of these phases is comprised of various design components, hardware and software. The experimental findings illustrate that there may be a triggering mechanism through the phase lock value method that enables seizure prediction. Conclusion The device addresses the need for long-term monitoring of the patient's seizure condition in order to provide the clinician a better understanding of the seizure's duration and frequency and ultimately provide the best remedy for the patient. PMID:27647960

  7. SEIZURE FORECASTING AND THE PREICTAL STATE IN CANINE EPILEPSY

    PubMed Central

    Varatharajah, Yogatheesan; Iyer, Ravishankar K.; Berry, Brent M.; Worrell, Gregory A.; Brinkmann, Benjamin H.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to predict seizures may enable patients with epilepsy to better manage their medications and activities, potentially reducing side effects and improving quality of life. Forecasting epileptic seizures remains a challenging problem, but machine learning methods using intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG) measures have shown promise. A machine-learning-based pipeline was developed to process iEEG recordings and generate seizure warnings. Results support the ability to forecast seizures at rates greater than a Poisson random predictor for all feature sets and machine learning algorithms tested. In addition, subject-specific neurophysiological changes in multiple features are reported preceding lead seizures, providing evidence supporting the existence of a distinct and identifiable preictal state. PMID:27464854

  8. The piriform, perirhinal, and entorhinal cortex in seizure generation.

    PubMed

    Vismer, Marta S; Forcelli, Patrick A; Skopin, Mark D; Gale, Karen; Koubeissi, Mohamad Z

    2015-01-01

    Understanding neural network behavior is essential to shed light on epileptogenesis and seizure propagation. The interconnectivity and plasticity of mammalian limbic and neocortical brain regions provide the substrate for the hypersynchrony and hyperexcitability associated with seizure activity. Recurrent unprovoked seizures are the hallmark of epilepsy, and limbic epilepsy is the most common type of medically-intractable focal epilepsy in adolescents and adults that necessitates surgical evaluation. In this review, we describe the role and relationships among the piriform (PIRC), perirhinal (PRC), and entorhinal cortex (ERC) in seizure-generation and epilepsy. The inherent function, anatomy, and histological composition of these cortical regions are discussed. In addition, the neurotransmitters, intrinsic and extrinsic connections, and the interaction of these regions are described. Furthermore, we provide evidence based on clinical research and animal models that suggest that these cortical regions may act as key seizure-trigger zones and, even, epileptogenesis.

  9. Seizure Forecasting and the Preictal State in Canine Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Varatharajah, Yogatheesan; Iyer, Ravishankar K; Berry, Brent M; Worrell, Gregory A; Brinkmann, Benjamin H

    2017-02-01

    The ability to predict seizures may enable patients with epilepsy to better manage their medications and activities, potentially reducing side effects and improving quality of life. Forecasting epileptic seizures remains a challenging problem, but machine learning methods using intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG) measures have shown promise. A machine-learning-based pipeline was developed to process iEEG recordings and generate seizure warnings. Results support the ability to forecast seizures at rates greater than a Poisson random predictor for all feature sets and machine learning algorithms tested. In addition, subject-specific neurophysiological changes in multiple features are reported preceding lead seizures, providing evidence supporting the existence of a distinct and identifiable preictal state.

  10. Levetiracetam in the Treatment of Epileptic Seizures After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Chao-Long; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chen, Nai-Ching; Tsai, Meng-Han; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2015-09-01

    After liver transplantation, patients may develop seizures or epilepsy due to a variety of etiologies. The ideal antiepileptic drugs for these patients are those with fewer drug interactions and less hepatic toxicity. In this study, we present patients using levetiracetam to control seizures after liver transplantation. We retrospectively enrolled patients who received levetiracetam for seizure control after liver transplantation. We analyzed the etiology of liver failure that required liver transplantation, etiology of the seizures, outcomes of seizure control, and the condition of the patient after follow-up at the outpatient department. Hematological and biochemical data before and after the use of levetiracetam were also collected. Fifteen patients who received intravenous or oral levetiracetam monotherapy for seizure control after liver transplantation were enrolled into this study. All of the patients remained seizure-free during levetiracetam treatment. Two patients died during the follow-up, and the other 13 patients were alive at the end of the study period and all were seizure-free without neurological sequelae that interfered with their daily activities. No patients experienced liver failure or rejection of the donor liver due to ineffective immunosuppressant medications. The dosage of immunosuppressants did not change before and after levetiracetam treatment, and there were no changes in hematological and biochemical data before and after treatment. Levetiracetam may be a suitable antiepileptic drug for patients who undergo liver transplantation due to fewer drug interactions and a favorable safety profile.

  11. Instruction manual for the ILAE 2017 operational classification of seizure types.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert S; Cross, J Helen; D'Souza, Carol; French, Jacqueline A; Haut, Sheryl R; Higurashi, Norimichi; Hirsch, Edouard; Jansen, Floor E; Lagae, Lieven; Moshé, Solomon L; Peltola, Jukka; Roulet Perez, Eliane; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Somerville, Ernest; Sperling, Michael; Yacubian, Elza Márcia; Zuberi, Sameer M

    2017-04-01

    This companion paper to the introduction of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) 2017 classification of seizure types provides guidance on how to employ the classification. Illustration of the classification is enacted by tables, a glossary of relevant terms, mapping of old to new terms, suggested abbreviations, and examples. Basic and extended versions of the classification are available, depending on the desired degree of detail. Key signs and symptoms of seizures (semiology) are used as a basis for categories of seizures that are focal or generalized from onset or with unknown onset. Any focal seizure can further be optionally characterized by whether awareness is retained or impaired. Impaired awareness during any segment of the seizure renders it a focal impaired awareness seizure. Focal seizures are further optionally characterized by motor onset signs and symptoms: atonic, automatisms, clonic, epileptic spasms, or hyperkinetic, myoclonic, or tonic activity. Nonmotor-onset seizures can manifest as autonomic, behavior arrest, cognitive, emotional, or sensory dysfunction. The earliest prominent manifestation defines the seizure type, which might then progress to other signs and symptoms. Focal seizures can become bilateral tonic-clonic. Generalized seizures engage bilateral networks from onset. Generalized motor seizure characteristics comprise atonic, clonic, epileptic spasms, myoclonic, myoclonic-atonic, myoclonic-tonic-clonic, tonic, or tonic-clonic. Nonmotor (absence) seizures are typical or atypical, or seizures that present prominent myoclonic activity or eyelid myoclonia. Seizures of unknown onset may have features that can still be classified as motor, nonmotor, tonic-clonic, epileptic spasms, or behavior arrest. This "users' manual" for the ILAE 2017 seizure classification will assist the adoption of the new system.

  12. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism.

  13. Unsaturated fatty acids induce non-canonical autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Niso-Santano, Mireia; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Pietrocola, Federico; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Mariño, Guillermo; Cianfanelli, Valentina; Ben-Younès, Amena; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Markaki, Maria; Sica, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Chaba, Kariman; Bauvy, Chantal; Dupont, Nicolas; Kepp, Oliver; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Wolinski, Heimo; Madeo, Frank; Lavandero, Sergio; Codogno, Patrice; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Cecconi, Francesco; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-01-01

    To obtain mechanistic insights into the cross talk between lipolysis and autophagy, two key metabolic responses to starvation, we screened the autophagy-inducing potential of a panel of fatty acids in human cancer cells. Both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids such as palmitate and oleate, respectively, triggered autophagy, but the underlying molecular mechanisms differed. Oleate, but not palmitate, stimulated an autophagic response that required an intact Golgi apparatus. Conversely, autophagy triggered by palmitate, but not oleate, required AMPK, PKR and JNK1 and involved the activation of the BECN1/PIK3C3 lipid kinase complex. Accordingly, the downregulation of BECN1 and PIK3C3 abolished palmitate-induced, but not oleate-induced, autophagy in human cancer cells. Moreover, Becn1+/− mice as well as yeast cells and nematodes lacking the ortholog of human BECN1 mounted an autophagic response to oleate, but not palmitate. Thus, unsaturated fatty acids induce a non-canonical, phylogenetically conserved, autophagic response that in mammalian cells relies on the Golgi apparatus. PMID:25586377

  14. Microscale spatiotemporal dynamics during neocortical propagation of human focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Fabien B; Eskandar, Emad N; Cosgrove, G Rees; Madsen, Joseph R; Blum, Andrew S; Potter, N Stevenson; Hochberg, Leigh R; Cash, Sydney S; Truccolo, Wilson

    2015-11-15

    Some of the most clinically consequential aspects of focal epilepsy, e.g. loss of consciousness, arise from the generalization or propagation of seizures through local and large-scale neocortical networks. Yet, the dynamics of such neocortical propagation remain poorly understood. Here, we studied the microdynamics of focal seizure propagation in neocortical patches (4×4 mm) recorded via high-density microelectrode arrays (MEAs) implanted in people with pharmacologically resistant epilepsy. Our main findings are threefold: (1) a newly developed stage segmentation method, applied to local field potentials (LFPs) and multiunit activity (MUA), revealed a succession of discrete seizure stages, each lasting several seconds. These different stages showed characteristic evolutions in overall activity and spatial patterns, which were relatively consistent across seizures within each of the 5 patients studied. Interestingly, segmented seizure stages based on LFPs or MUA showed a dissociation of their spatiotemporal dynamics, likely reflecting different contributions of non-local synaptic inputs and local network activity. (2) As previously reported, some of the seizures showed a peak in MUA that happened several seconds after local seizure onset and slowly propagated across the MEA. However, other seizures had a more complex structure characterized by, for example, several MUA peaks, more consistent with the succession of discrete stages than the slow propagation of a simple wavefront of increased MUA. In both cases, nevertheless, seizures characterized by spike-wave discharges (SWDs, ~2-3 Hz) eventually evolved into patterns of phase-locked MUA and LFPs. (3) Individual SWDs or gamma oscillation cycles (25-60 Hz), characteristic of two different types of recorded seizures, tended to propagate with varying degrees of directionality, directions of propagation and speeds, depending on the identified seizure stage. However, no clear relationship was observed between the MUA

  15. Microscale Spatiotemporal Dynamics during Neocortical Propagation of Human Focal Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Fabien B.; Eskandar, Emad N.; Cosgrove, G. Rees; Madsen, Joseph R.; Blum, Andrew S.; Potter, N. Stevenson; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Cash, Sydney S.; Truccolo, Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most clinically consequential aspects of focal epilepsy, e.g. loss of consciousness, arise from the generalization or propagation of seizures through local and large-scale neocortical networks. Yet, the dynamics of such neocortical propagation remain poorly understood. Here, we studied the microdynamics of focal seizure propagation in neocortical patches (4 × 4 mm) recorded via high-density microelectrode arrays (MEAs) implanted in people with pharmacologically resistant epilepsy. Our main findings are threefold: (1) A newly developed stage segmentation method, applied to local field potentials (LFPs) and multi-unit activity (MUA), revealed a succession of discrete seizure stages, each lasting several seconds. These different stages showed characteristic evolutions in overall activity and spatial patterns, which were relatively consistent across seizures within each of the 5 patients studied. Interestingly, segmented seizure stages based on LFPs or MUA showed a dissociation of their spatiotemporal dynamics, likely reflecting different contributions of non-local synaptic inputs and local network activity. (2) As previously reported, some of the seizures showed a peak in MUA that happened several seconds after local seizure onset and slowly propagated across the MEA. However, other seizures had a more complex structure characterized by, for example, several MUA peaks, more consistent with the succession of discrete stages than the slow propagation of a simple wavefront of increased MUA. In both cases, nevertheless, seizures characterized by spike-wave discharges (SWDs, ~ 2–3Hz) eventually evolved into patterns of phase-locked MUA and LFPs. (3) Individual SWDs or gamma oscillation cycles (25–60 Hz), characteristic of two different types of recorded seizures, tended to propagate with varying degrees of directionality, directions of propagation and speeds, depending on the identified seizure stage. However, no clear relationship was observed between the

  16. Features and futures: seizure detection in partial epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu; Hsin, Yue-Loong; Harnod, Tomor; Liu, Wentai

    2011-10-01

    Many factors underlying basic epileptic conditions determine the characteristics of epileptic seizures and the therapeutic outcome. Diagnosis and treatment rely on the clinical manifestations as well as electroencephalographic (EEG) epileptic activities. This article briefly reviews the fundamentals of the EEG, interictal, and ictal electrical activities of both extracranial and intracranial EEG of partial epilepsies, based on the information obtained from epilepsy patients who have undergone epilepsy surgery. The authors also present the status of their current research, focusing on decomposed seizure sources and the rendered spatial-temporal transitions in focal seizure.

  17. Optimal control based seizure abatement using patient derived connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Peter N.; Thomas, Jijju; Sinha, Nishant; Dauwels, Justin; Kaiser, Marcus; Thesen, Thomas; Ruths, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder in which patients have recurrent seizures. Seizures occur in conjunction with abnormal electrical brain activity which can be recorded by the electroencephalogram (EEG). Often, this abnormal brain activity consists of high amplitude regular spike-wave oscillations as opposed to low amplitude irregular oscillations in the non-seizure state. Active brain stimulation has been proposed as a method to terminate seizures prematurely, however, a general and widely-applicable approach to optimal stimulation protocols is still lacking. In this study we use a computational model of epileptic spike-wave dynamics to evaluate the effectiveness of a pseudospectral method to simulated seizure abatement. We incorporate brain connectivity derived from magnetic resonance imaging of a subject with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. We find that the pseudospectral method can successfully generate time-varying stimuli that abate simulated seizures, even when including heterogeneous patient specific brain connectivity. The strength of the stimulus required varies in different brain areas. Our results suggest that seizure abatement, modeled as an optimal control problem and solved with the pseudospectral method, offers an attractive approach to treatment for in vivo stimulation techniques. Further, if optimal brain stimulation protocols are to be experimentally successful, then the heterogeneity of cortical connectivity should be accounted for in the development of those protocols and thus more spatially localized solutions may be preferable. PMID:26089775

  18. Early Onset of Hypersynchronous Network Activity and Expression of a Marker of Chronic Seizures in the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bezzina, Charlotte; Verret, Laure; Juan, Cécile; Remaud, Jessica; Halley, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Cortical and hippocampal hypersynchrony of neuronal networks seems to be an early event in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis. Many mouse models of the disease also present neuronal network hypersynchrony, as evidenced by higher susceptibility to pharmacologically-induced seizures, electroencephalographic seizures accompanied by spontaneous interictal spikes and expression of markers of chronic seizures such as neuropeptide Y ectopic expression in mossy fibers. This network hypersynchrony is thought to contribute to memory deficits, but whether it precedes the onset of memory deficits or not in mouse models remains unknown. The earliest memory impairments in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease have been observed at 3 months of age. We thus assessed network hypersynchrony in Tg2576 and non-transgenic male mice at 1.5, 3 and 6 months of age. As soon as 1.5 months of age, Tg2576 mice presented higher seizure susceptibility to systemic injection of a GABAA receptor antagonist. They also displayed spontaneous interictal spikes on EEG recordings. Some Tg2576 mice presented hippocampal ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y which incidence seems to increase with age among the Tg2576 population. Our data reveal that network hypersynchrony appears very early in Tg2576 mice, before any demonstrated memory impairments. PMID:25768013

  19. Feasibility study of a caregiver seizure alert system in canine epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Coles, Lisa D; Patterson, Edward E; Sheffield, W Douglas; Mavoori, Jaideep; Higgins, Jason; Michael, Bland; Leyde, Kent; Cloyd, James C; Litt, Brian; Vite, Charles; Worrell, Gregory A

    2013-10-01

    A device capable of detecting seizures and alerting caregivers would be a major advance for epilepsy management, and could be used to guide early intervention and prevent seizure-related injuries. The objective of this work was to evaluate a seizure advisory system (SAS) that alerts caregivers of seizures in canines with naturally occurring epilepsy. Four dogs with epilepsy were implanted with a SAS that wirelessly transmits continuous intracranial EEG (iEEG) to an external device embedded with a seizure detection algorithm and the capability to alert caregivers. In this study a veterinarian was alerted by automated text message if prolonged or repetitive seizures occurred, and a rescue therapy protocol was implemented. The performance of the SAS caregiver alert was evaluated over the course of 8 weeks. Following discontinuation of antiepileptic drugs, the dogs experienced spontaneous unprovoked partial seizures that secondarily generalized. Three prolonged or repetitive seizure episodes occurred in 2 of the dogs. On each occasion, the SAS caregiver alert successfully alerted an on call veterinarian who confirmed the seizure activity via remote video-monitoring. A rescue medication was then administered and the seizures were aborted. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a SAS to alert caregivers to the occurrence of prolonged or repetitive seizures and enables rescue medications to be delivered in a timely manner. The SAS may improve the management of human epilepsy by alerting caregivers of seizures, enabling early interventions, and potentially improving outcomes and quality of life of patients and caregivers.

  20. Downregulated GABA and BDNF-TrkB pathway in chronic cyclothiazide seizure model.

    PubMed

    Kong, Shuzhen; Cheng, Zhihua; Liu, Jianhui; Wang, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Cyclothiazide (CTZ) has been reported to simultaneously enhance glutamate receptor excitation and inhibit GABAA receptor inhibition, and in turn it evokes epileptiform activities in hippocampal neurons. It has also been shown to acutely induce epileptic seizure behavior in freely moving rats. However, whether CTZ induced seizure rats could develop to have recurrent seizure still remains unknown. In the current study, we demonstrated that 46% of the CTZ induced seizure rats developed to have recurrent seizure behavior as well as epileptic EEG with a starting latency between 2 weeks and several months. In those chronic seizure rats 6 months after the seizure induction by the CTZ, our immunohistochemistry results showed that both GAD and GAT-1 were significantly decreased across CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus area of the hippocampus studied. In addition, both BDNF and its receptor TrkB were also decreased in hippocampus of the chronic CTZ seizure rats. Our results indicate that CTZ induced seizure is capable of developing to have recurrent seizure, and the decreased GABA synthesis and transport as well as the impaired BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway may contribute to the development of the recurrent seizure. Thus, CTZ seizure rats may provide a novel animal model for epilepsy study and anticonvulsant drug testing in the future.

  1. Seizures and Teens: The Practical Aspects of Managing Seizure Medications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne; Israel, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Medications are the primary treatment for epilepsy, yet many teens and their families have problems managing seizure medicines. Fear of side effects, difficulties remembering to take medicines and figuring out how to take them are common challenges. Unfortunately, not taking medicine as prescribed can lead to breakthrough seizures, which in turn…

  2. The Efficacy of LY293558 in Blocking Seizures and Associated Morphological, and Behavioral Alterations Induced by Soman in Immature Male Rats and the Role of the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor in Organophosphate Induced Seizures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-30

    convulsions. Electroencephalography and clinical neurophysiology 32:557-60 170 163. Lipp JA. 1973. Effect of benzodiazepine derivatives on soman...232. Racine RJ. 1972. Modification of seizure activity by electrical stimulation. II. Motor seizure. Electroencephalography and clinical

  3. INTRANIGRAL TRANSPLANTS OF A GABAERGIC CELL LINE PRODUCE LONG-TERM ALLEVIATION OF ESTABLISHED MOTOR SEIZURES

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Claudia G.; Mendoza-Trejo, Soledad; Aguilar, Manuel B.; Freed, William J.; Giordano., Magda

    2008-01-01

    We have previously shown that intranigral transplants of immortalized GABAergic cells decrease the number of kainic acid-induced seizures [5] in an animal model. In the present study, recurrent spontaneous behavioral seizures were established by repeated systemic injections of this excitotoxin into male Sprague Dawley rats. After the seizures had been established, cells were transplanted into the substantia nigra. Animals with transplants of control cells (without hGAD67 expression) or with sham transplants showed a death rate of more than 40% over the 12 weeks of observation, whereas in animals with M213-2O Cl4 transplants, the death rate was reduced to less than 20%. The M213-2O Cl4 transplants significantly reduced the percentage of animals showing behavioral seizures; animals with these transplants also showed a lower occurrence of stage V seizures than animals in the other groups. In vivo and in vitro analyses provided evidence that the GABAergic cells show sustained expression of both GAD67 and hGAD67cDNA, as well as increased GABA levels in the ventral mesencephalon of transplanted animals. Therefore, transplantation of GABA-producing cells can produce long-term alleviation of behavioral seizures in an animal model. PMID:18571743

  4. Febrile seizures - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000223.htm Febrile seizures - what to ask your doctor To use the ... enable JavaScript. Your child has had a febrile seizure. A simple febrile seizure stops by itself within ...

  5. A retrospective study on the use of acepromazine maleate in dogs with seizures.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Karen M; Marioni-Henry, Katia; Wagner, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    Use of acepromazine (i.e., acetylpromazine) maleate in dogs with a history of seizures is reportedly contraindicated because of the risk of decreasing the seizure threshold in these animals. In this retrospective study, acepromazine was administered for tranquilization to 36 dogs with a prior history of seizures and to decrease seizure activity in 11 dogs. No seizures were seen within 16 hours of acepromazine administration in the 36 dogs that received the drug for tranquilization during hospitalization. After acepromazine administration, seizures abated for 1.5 to 8 hours (n=6) or did not recur (n=2) in eight of 10 dogs that were actively seizing. Excitement-induced seizure frequency was reduced for 2 months in one dog.

  6. The ictal wavefront is the spatiotemporal source of discharges during spontaneous human seizures

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elliot H.; Liou, Jyun-you; Davis, Tyler S.; Merricks, Edward M.; Kellis, Spencer S.; Weiss, Shennan A.; Greger, Bradley; House, Paul A.; McKhann II, Guy M.; Goodman, Robert R.; Emerson, Ronald G.; Bateman, Lisa M.; Trevelyan, Andrew J.; Schevon, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    The extensive distribution and simultaneous termination of seizures across cortical areas has led to the hypothesis that seizures are caused by large-scale coordinated networks spanning these areas. This view, however, is difficult to reconcile with most proposed mechanisms of seizure spread and termination, which operate on a cellular scale. We hypothesize that seizures evolve into self-organized structures wherein a small seizing territory projects high-intensity electrical signals over a broad cortical area. Here we investigate human seizures on both small and large electrophysiological scales. We show that the migrating edge of the seizing territory is the source of travelling waves of synaptic activity into adjacent cortical areas. As the seizure progresses, slow dynamics in induced activity from these waves indicate a weakening and eventual failure of their source. These observations support a parsimonious theory for how large-scale evolution and termination of seizures are driven from a small, migrating cortical area. PMID:27020798

  7. Convulsive seizures from experimental focal cortical dysplasia occur independently of cell misplacement

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Lawrence S.; Wen, John H.; Claycomb, Kumiko; Huang, Yuegao; Harrsch, Felicia A.; Naegele, Janice R.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Buchanan, Gordon F.; Bordey, Angelique

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), a local malformation of cortical development, is the most common cause of pharmacoresistant epilepsy associated with life-long neurocognitive impairments. It remains unclear whether neuronal misplacement is required for seizure activity. Here we show that dyslamination and white matter heterotopia are not necessary for seizure generation in a murine model of type II FCDs. These experimental FCDs generated by increasing mTOR activity in layer 2/3 neurons of the medial prefrontal cortex are associated with tonic-clonic seizures and a normal survival rate. Preventing all FCD-related defects, including neuronal misplacement and dysmorphogenesis, with rapamycin treatments from birth eliminates seizures, but seizures recur after rapamycin withdrawal. In addition, bypassing neuronal misplacement and heterotopia using inducible vectors do not prevent seizure occurrence. Collectively, data obtained using our new experimental FCD-associated epilepsy suggest that life-long treatment to reduce neuronal dysmorphogenesis is required to suppress seizures in individuals with FCD. PMID:27249187

  8. Ictal electrographic pattern of focal subcortical seizures induced by sound in rats.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Lyudmila V; Grinenko, Olesya A

    2016-03-15

    It is now recognized that both generalized and focal seizures may originate in subcortical structures. The well-known types of focal subcortically-driven seizures are gelastic seizures in patients with the hypothalamic hamartoma and sound-induced seizures in rodents with audiogenic epilepsy. The seizures are generated by subcortical intrinsically epileptogenic focus, the hamartoma in humans and the inferior colliculus (IC) in rodents. In patients with gelastic epilepsy additional seizure types may develop with time that are supposed to result from secondary epileptogenesis and spreading of epileptic discharges to the cortex. Repeated audiogenic seizures can also lead to development of additional seizure behavior and secondary epileptic activation of the cortex. This process, named audiogenic kindling, may be useful for studying secondary subcortico-cortical epileptogenesis. Using intracollicular and intracortical recordings, we studied an ictal electrographic pattern of focal subcortical seizures induced by repeated sound stimulation in Wistar audiogenic-susceptible rats. The audiogenic seizures, representing brief attacks of paroxysmal unidirectional running, were accompanied by epileptiform abnormalities in the IC, mostly on the side ipsilateral to run direction, and enhanced rhythmic 8-9Hz activity in the cortex. With repetition of the subcortical seizures and kindling development, a secondary cortical discharge began to follow the IC seizure. The secondary discharge initially involved the cortex homolateral to the side of dominant subcortical epileptiform abnormalities and behaviorally expressed as limbic (partial) clonus. Kindling progression was associated with bilateralization of the secondary cortical discharge, an increase in its amplitude and duration, intensification of associated behavioral seizures (from partial clonus to generalized tonic-clonic convulsions). Thus, ictal recordings during brief audiogenic running seizures showed their focal

  9. Pre-seizure state identified by diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Junli; Jiang, Ruixin; Yang, Hao; Carney, Paul R.; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-01-01

    In epilepsy it has been challenging to detect early changes in brain activity that occurs prior to seizure onset and to map their origin and evolution for possible intervention. Here we demonstrate using a rat model of generalized epilepsy that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides a unique functional neuroimaging modality for noninvasively and continuously tracking such brain activities with high spatiotemporal resolution. We detected early hemodynamic responses with heterogeneous patterns, along with intracranial electroencephalogram gamma power changes, several minutes preceding the electroencephalographic seizure onset, supporting the presence of a “pre-seizure” state. We also observed the decoupling between local hemodynamic and neural activities. We found widespread hemodynamic changes evolving from local regions of the bilateral cortex and thalamus to the entire brain, indicating that the onset of generalized seizures may originate locally rather than diffusely. Together, these findings suggest DOT represents a powerful tool for mapping early seizure onset and propagation pathways. PMID:24445927

  10. Perflurooctanoic Acid Induces Developmental Cardiotoxicity in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widespread environmental contaminant that is detectable in serum of the general U.S. population. PFOA is a known developmental toxicant that induces mortality in mammalian embryos and is thought to induce toxicity via interaction with the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPAR_). As the cardiovascular system is crucial for embryonic survival, PFOA-induced effects on the heart may partially explain embryonic mortality. To assess impacts of PFOA exposure on the developing heart in an avian model, we used histopathology and immunohistochemical staining for myosin to assess morphological alterations in 19-day-old chicken embryo hearts after PFOA exposure. Additionally, echocardiography and cardiac myofibril ATPase activity assays were used to assess functional alterations in 1-day-old hatchling chickens following developmental PFOA exposure. Overall thinning and thinning of a dense layer of myosin in the right ventricular wall were observed in PFOA-exposed chicken embryo hearts. Alteration of multiple cardiac structural and functional parameters, including left ventricular wall thickness, left ventricular volume, heart rate, stroke volume, and ejection fraction were detected with echocardiography in the exposed hatchling chickens. Assessment of ATPase activity indicated that the ratio of cardiac myofibril calcium-independent ATPase activity to calcium-dependent ATPase activity was not affected, which suggests that d

  11. Clinical decision making in seizures and status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Teran, Felipe; Harper-Kirksey, Katrina; Jagoda, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Seizures and status epilepticus are frequent neurologic emergencies in the emergency department, accounting for 1% of all emergency department visits. The management of this time-sensitive and potentially life-threatening condition is challenging for both prehospital providers and emergency clinicians. The approach to seizing patients begins with differentiating seizure activity from mimics and follows with identifying potential secondary etiologies, such as alcohol-related seizures. The approach to the patient in status epilepticus and the patient with nonconvulsive status epilepticus constitutes a special clinical challenge. This review summarizes the best available evidence and recommendations regarding diagnosis and resuscitation of the seizing patient in the emergency setting.

  12. Targeted treatment of migrating partial seizures of infancy with quinidine.

    PubMed

    Bearden, David; Strong, Alanna; Ehnot, Jessica; DiGiovine, Marissa; Dlugos, Dennis; Goldberg, Ethan M

    2014-09-01

    Migrating partial seizures of infancy is an early onset epileptic encephalopathy syndrome that is typically resistant to treatment. The most common cause is a gain of function mutation in the potassium channel KCNT1. The antiarrhythmic drug quinidine is a partial antagonist of KCNT1 and hence may be a candidate drug for treatment of this condition. We report the case of a child with migrating partial seizures of infancy secondary to an activating mutation in KCNT1 treated with quinidine. Treatment with quinidine was correlated with a marked reduction in seizure frequency and improved psychomotor development.

  13. Acetic acid induces a programmed cell death process in the food spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Ludovico, Paula; Sansonetty, Filipe; Silva, Manuel T; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2003-03-01

    Here we show that 320-800 mM acetic acid induces in Zygosaccharomyces bailii a programmed cell death (PCD) process that is inhibited by cycloheximide, is accompanied by structural and biochemical alterations typical of apoptosis, and occurs in cells with preserved mitochondrial and plasma membrane integrity (as revealed by rhodamine 123 (Rh123) and propidium iodide (PI) staining, respectively). Mitochondrial ultrastructural changes, namely decrease of the cristae number, formation of myelinic bodies and swelling were also seen. Exposure to acetic acid above 800 mM resulted in killing by necrosis. The occurrence of an acetic acid-induced active cell death process in Z. bailii reinforces the concept of a physiological role of the PCD in the normal yeast life cycle.

  14. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  15. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Induces Human Adipocyte Delipidation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. Mark; Boysen, Maria Sandberg; Chung, Soonkyu; Fabiyi, Olowatoyin; Morrison, Ron F.; Mandrup, Susanne; McIntosh, Michael K.

    2005-01-01

    Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) reduces body fat in animals and some humans. Here we show that trans-10, cis-12 CLA, but not cis-9, trans-11 CLA, when added to cultures of stromal vascular cells containing newly differentiated human adipocytes, caused a time-dependent decrease in triglyceride content, insulin-stimulated glucose and fatty acid uptake, incorporation into lipid, and oxidation compared with controls. In parallel, gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and many of its downstream targets were diminished by trans-10, cis-12 CLA, whereas leptin gene expression was increased. Prior to changes in gene expression and metabolism, trans-10, cis-12 CLA caused a robust and sustained activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-related kinase (MEK/ERK) signaling. Furthermore, the trans-10, cis-12 CLA-mediated activation of MEK/ERK could be attenuated by pretreatment with U0126 and pertussis toxin. In parallel, pretreatment with U0126 blocked the ability of trans-10, cis-12 CLA to alter gene expression and attenuate glucose and fatty acid uptake of the cultures. Intriguingly, the induction by CLA of MEK/ERK signaling was linked to hypersecretion of adipocytokines interleukin-6 and interleukin-8. Collectively, these data demonstrate for the first time that trans-10, cis-12 CLA decreases the triglyceride content of newly differentiated human adipocytes by inducing MEK/ERK signaling through the autocrine/paracrine actions of interleukins-6 and 8. PMID:15067015

  16. A KCNQ channel opener for experimental neonatal seizures and status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Raol, YogendraSinh H.; Lapides, David A.; Keating, Jeffery; Brooks-Kayal, Amy R.; Cooper, Edward C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Neonatal seizures occur frequently, are often refractory to anticonvulsants, and are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Genetic and electrophysiological evidence indicates that KCNQ voltage-gated potassium channels are critical regulators of neonatal brain excitability. This study tests the hypothesis that selective openers of KCNQ channels may be effective for treatment of neonatal seizures. Methods We induced seizures in postnatal day 10 rats with either kainic acid or flurothyl. We measured seizure activity using quantified behavioral rating and electrocorticography. We compared the efficacy of flupirtine, a selective KCNQ channel opener, with phenobarbital and diazepam, two drugs in current use for neonatal seizures. Results Unlike phenobarbital or diazepam, flupirtine prevented animals from developing status epilepticus (SE) when administered prior to kainate. In the flurothyl model, phenobarbital and diazepam increased latency to seizure onset, but flupirtine completely prevented seizures throughout the experiment. Flupirtine was also effective in arresting electrographic and behavioral seizures when administered after animals had developed continuous kainate-induced SE. Flupirtine caused dose-related sedation and suppressed EEG activity, but did not result in respiratory suppression or result in any mortality. Interpretation Flupirtine appears more effective than either of two commonly used anti-epileptic drugs, phenobarbital and diazepam, in preventing and suppressing seizures in both the kainic acid and flurothyl models of symptomatic neonatal seizures. KCNQ channel openers merit further study as potential treatments for seizures in infants and children. PMID:19334075

  17. Seizures beget seizures: the quest for GABA as a key player.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2006-01-01

    Synapses mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptors are notoriously altered during periods of enhanced activity. Since a loss of inhibitory tone is a basic cause of seizures and epilepsies, it is important to determine the underlying mechanisms and the way this could be alleviated or at least reduced. Alterations of the intracellular content of chloride are thought to be a major player in the sequence of events that follow episodes of hyperactivity. In this review, I discuss these mechanisms both in the adult and developing brain, relying on studies in which chloride and GABAergic currents were measured by electrophysiological and imaging techniques. The main conclusion is that in adult systems, status epilepticus induces a complete re-organization of the networks, with cell death, axonal growth, and glutamatergic neosynapse formation leading to an increased glutamatergic drive. This, in turn, will decrease the threshold of seizure generation and thus contribute to seizure generation. In contrast, GABAergic synapses are not readily "plastic" as the lost interneurones and synapses are not replaced. Somatostatin-positive 0-LM Interneurons that innervate the dendrites of the principal cells in the hippocampus degenerate selectively, leading to a loss of the inhibitory drive in the dendrites, whereas somatic projecting basket cells and somatic inhibitory drives are relatively spared. This imbalance leads to a reduction of the inhibitory strength that is necessary but not sufficient to generate ongoing seizures. An additional important factor is the persistent increase of the intracellular chloride concentration that leads to a long-lasting shift in the depolarizing direction of the actions of GABA that will also contribute to seizure generation. In the developing brain, a major source of seizure generation is the depolarizing and often excitatory actions of GABA due to a higher intracellular chloride concentration ([Cl-]I) in immature neurons, a property

  18. Protein kinase C alpha-CARMA3 signaling axis links Ras to NF-kappa B for lysophosphatidic acid-induced urokinase plasminogen activator expression in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mahanivong, C; Chen, H M; Yee, S W; Pan, Z K; Dong, Z; Huang, S

    2008-02-21

    We reported previously that a signaling pathway consisting of G(i)-Ras-NF-kappaB mediates lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) upregulation in ovarian cancer cells. However, it is not clear what signaling components link Ras to nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB for this LPA-induced event. In the present study, we found that treatment of protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors including conventional PKC (cPKC) inhibitor Gö6976 abolished LPA-induced uPA upregulation in ovarian cancer cell lines tested, indicating the importance of cPKC activity in this LPA-induced event. Indeed, LPA stimulation led to the activation of PKCalpha and Ras-PKCalpha interaction. Although constitutively active mutants of PKCalpha (a cPKC), PKCtheta (a novel PKC (nPKC)) and PKCzeta (an atypical PKC (aPKC)) were all able to activate NF-kappaB and upregulate uPA expression, only dominant-negative PKCalpha mutant attenuated LPA-induced NF-kappaB activation and uPA upregulation. These results suggest that PKCalpha, rather than PKC isoforms in other PKC classes, participates in LPA-induced NF-kappaB activation and uPA upregulation in ovarian cancer cells. To determine the signaling components downstream of PKCalpha mediating LPA-induced uPA upregulation, we showed that forced expression of dominant-negative CARMA3 or silencing CARMA3, Bcl10 and MALT1 with specific siRNAs diminished these LPA-induced events. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PKCalpha/CARMA3 signaling axis is important in LPA-induced ovarian cancer cell in vitro invasion.

  19. Audiogenic reflex seizures in cats

    PubMed Central

    Lowrie, Mark; Bessant, Claire; Harvey, Robert J; Sparkes, Andrew; Garosi, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to characterise feline audiogenic reflex seizures (FARS). Methods An online questionnaire was developed to capture information from owners with cats suffering from FARS. This was collated with the medical records from the primary veterinarian. Ninety-six cats were included. Results Myoclonic seizures were one of the cardinal signs of this syndrome (90/96), frequently occurring prior to generalised tonic–clonic seizures (GTCSs) in this population. Other features include a late onset (median 15 years) and absence seizures (6/96), with most seizures triggered by high-frequency sounds amid occasional spontaneous seizures (up to 20%). Half the population (48/96) had hearing impairment or were deaf. One-third of cats (35/96) had concurrent diseases, most likely reflecting the age distribution. Birmans were strongly represented (30/96). Levetiracetam gave good seizure control. The course of the epilepsy was non-progressive in the majority (68/96), with an improvement over time in some (23/96). Only 33/96 and 11/90 owners, respectively, felt the GTCSs and myoclonic seizures affected their cat’s quality of life (QoL). Despite this, many owners (50/96) reported a slow decline in their cat’s health, becoming less responsive (43/50), not jumping (41/50), becoming uncoordinated or weak in the pelvic limbs (24/50) and exhibiting dramatic weight loss (39/50). These signs were exclusively reported in cats experiencing seizures for >2 years, with 42/50 owners stating these signs affected their cat’s QoL. Conclusions and relevance In gathering data on audiogenic seizures in cats, we have identified a new epilepsy syndrome named FARS with a geriatric onset. Further studies are warranted to investigate potential genetic predispositions to this condition. PMID:25916687

  20. Seizure Treatment in Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Solid organ transplantation is frequently complicated by a spectrum of seizure types, including single partial-onset or generalized tonic-clonic seizures, acute repetitive seizures or status epilepticus, and sometimes the evolution of symptomatic epilepsy. There is currently no specific evidence involving the transplant patient population to guide the selection, administration, or duration of antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy, so familiarity with clinical AED pharmacology and application of sound judgment are necessary for successful patient outcomes. An initial detailed search for symptomatic seizure etiologies, including metabolic, infectious, cerebrovascular, and calcineurin inhibitor treatment-related neuro-toxic complications such as posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), is imperative, as underlying central nervous system disorders may impose additional serious risks to cerebral or general health if not promptly detected and appropriately treated. The mainstay for post-transplant seizure management is AED therapy directed toward the suspected seizure type. Unfavorable drug interactions could place the transplanted organ at risk, so choosing an AED with limited interaction potential is also crucial. When the transplanted organ is dysfunctional or vulnerable to rejection, AEDs without substantial hepatic metabolism are favored in post-liver transplant patients, whereas after renal transplantation, AEDs with predominantly renal elimination may require dosage adjustment to prevent adverse effects. Levetiracetam, gabapentin, pregabalin, and lacosamide are drugs of choice for treatment of partial-onset seizures in post-transplant patients given their efficacy spectrum, generally excellent tolerability, and lack of drug interaction potential. Levetiracetam is the drug of choice for primary generalized seizures in post-transplant patients. When intravenous drugs are necessary for acute seizure management, benzodiazepines and

  1. Imposed glutathione-mediated redox switch modulates the tobacco wound-induced protein kinase and salicylic acid-induced protein kinase activation state and impacts on defence against Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Matern, Sanja; Peskan-Berghoefer, Tatjana; Gromes, Roland; Kiesel, Rebecca Vazquez; Rausch, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The role of the redox-active tripeptide glutathione in plant defence against pathogens has been studied extensively; however, the impact of changes in cellular glutathione redox potential on signalling processes during defence reactions has remained elusive. This study explored the impact of elevated glutathione content on the cytosolic redox potential and on early defence signalling at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as on subsequent defence reactions, including changes in salicylic acid (SA) content, pathogenesis-related gene expression, callose depositions, and the hypersensitive response. Wild-type (WT) Nicotiana tabacum L. and transgenic high-glutathione lines (HGL) were transformed with the cytosol-targeted sensor GRX1-roGFP2 to monitor the cytosolic redox state. Surprisingly, HGLs displayed an oxidative shift in their cytosolic redox potential and an activation of the tobacco MAPKs wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) and SA-induced protein kinase (SIPK). This activation occurred in the absence of any change in free SA content, but was accompanied by constitutively increased expression of several defence genes. Similarly, rapid activation of MAPKs could be induced in WT tobacco by exposure to either reduced or oxidized glutathione. When HGL plants were challenged with adapted or non-adapted Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, the cytosolic redox shift was further amplified and the defence response was markedly increased, showing a priming effect for SA and callose; however, the initial and transient hyperactivation of MAPK signalling was attenuated in HGLs. The results suggest that, in tobacco, MAPK and SA signalling may operate independently, both possibly being modulated by the glutathione redox potential. Possible mechanisms for redox-mediated MAPK activation are discussed.

  2. Cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) adversely effects on pilocarpine seizure-induced hippocampal neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Dong Won; Choi, Bo Young; Sohn, Min; Lee, Song Hee; Choi, Hui Chul; Song, Hong Ki; Suh, Sang Won

    2015-01-21

    Citicoline (CDP-choline; cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine) is an important intermediate in the biosynthesis of cell membrane phospholipids. Citicoline serves as a choline donor in the biosynthetic pathways of acetylcholine and neuronal membrane phospholipids, mainly phosphatidylcholine. The ability of citicoline to reverse neuronal injury has been tested in animal models of cerebral ischemia and clinical trials have been performed in stroke patients. However, no studies have examined the effect of citicoline on seizure-induced neuronal death. To clarify the potential therapeutic effects of citicoline on seizure-induced neuronal death, we used an animal model of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) was induced by intraperitoneal injection of pilocarpine (25mg/kg) in adult male rats. Citicoline (100 or 300 mg/kg) was injected into the intraperitoneal space two hours after seizure onset and a second injection was performed 24h after the seizure. Citicoline was injected once per day for one week after pilocarpine- or kainate-induced seizure. Neuronal injury and microglial activation were evaluated at 1 week post-seizure. Surprisingly, rather than offering protection, citicoline treatment actually enhanced seizure-induced neuronal death and microglial activation in the hippocampus compared to vehicle treated controls. Citicoline administration after seizure-induction increased immunoglobulin leakage via BBB disruption in the hippocampus compared with the vehicle-only group. To clarify if this adverse effect of citicoline is generalizable across alternative seizure models, we induced seizure by kainate injection (10mg/kg, i.p.) and then injected citicoline as in pilocarpine-induced seizure. We found that citicoline did not modulate kainate seizure-induced neuronal death, BBB disruption or microglial activation. These results suggest that citicoline may not have neuroprotective effects after seizure and that clinical application of citicoline after

  3. Cortical deactivation induced by subcortical network dysfunction in limbic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Englot, Dario J.; Modi, Badri; Mishra, Asht M.; DeSalvo, Matthew; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2009-01-01

    Normal human consciousness may be impaired by two possible routes: direct reduced function in widespread cortical regions, or indirect disruption of subcortical activating systems. The route through which temporal lobe limbic seizures impair consciousness is not known. We recently developed an animal model which, like human limbic seizures, exhibits neocortical deactivation including cortical slow waves and reduced cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF). We now find through functional MRI (fMRI) that electrically-stimulated hippocampal seizures in rats cause increased activity in subcortical structures including the septal area and mediodorsal thalamus, along with reduced activity in frontal, cingulate, and retrosplenial cortex. Direct recordings from the hippocampus, septum, and medial thalamus demonstrated fast poly-spike activity associated with increased neuronal firing and CBF, while frontal cortex showed slow oscillations with decreased neuronal firing and CBF. Stimulation of septal area, but not hippocampus or medial thalamus, in the absence of a seizure resulted in cortical deactivation with slow oscillations and behavioral arrest, resembling changes seen during limbic seizures. Transecting the fornix, the major route from hippocampus to subcortical structures, abolished the negative cortical and behavioral effects of seizures. Cortical slow oscillations and behavioral arrest could be reconstituted in fornix-lesioned animals by inducing synchronous activity in the hippocampus and septal area, implying involvement of a downstream region converged upon by both structures. These findings suggest that limbic seizures may cause neocortical deactivation indirectly, through impaired subcortical function. If confirmed, subcortical networks may represent a target for therapies aimed at preserving consciousness in human temporal lobe seizures. PMID:19828814

  4. Resveratrol analog piceatannol restores the palmitic acid-induced impairment of insulin signaling and production of endothelial nitric oxide via activation of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative heme oxygenase-1 in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sun-Oh; Son, Yong; Lee, Ju Hwan; Cheong, Yong-Kwan; Park, Seong Hoon; Chung, Hun-Taeg; Pae, Hyun-Ock

    2015-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the elevation of free fatty acids, including palmitic acid (PA), are associated with inflammation and oxidative stress, which may be involved in endothelial dysfunction, characterized by the reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) synthesized from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is important in the preservation of NO bioavailability. Piceatannol (Pic), with similar chemical structure to resveratrol, is suggested to possess similar protective effects as resveratrol. In the present study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), stimulated with PA, were used to examine the endothelial protective effects of Pic. Pic increased the expression of HO-1 via nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2 activation in the HUVECs, and decreased the PA-induced secretions of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α, and the formation of reactive oxygen species ROS via inhibition of NF-κB activation. Notably, following inhibition of HO-1 activity by tin protoporphryin-IX, Pic did not prevent cytokine secretion, ROS formation, and NF-κB activation in the PA-stimulated HUVECs. PA attenuated insulin-mediated insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) tyrosine phosphorylation, leading to decreased glucose uptake, and phosphorylation of eNOS, leading to a reduction in the production of NO. Pic effectively mitigated the inhibitory effects of PA on the insulin-mediated phosphorylation of IRS-1 and eNOS, which was not observed following inhibition of HO‑1 activity. The results of the present study suggested that Pic may have the potential to prevent PA-induced impairment of insulin signaling and eNOS function, by inducing the expression of the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant, HO-1.

  5. Human seizures couple across spatial scales through travelling wave dynamics.

    PubMed

    Martinet, L-E; Fiddyment, G; Madsen, J R; Eskandar, E N; Truccolo, W; Eden, U T; Cash, S S; Kramer, M A

    2017-04-04

    Epilepsy-the propensity toward recurrent, unprovoked seizures-is a devastating disease affecting 65 million people worldwide. Understanding and treating this disease remains a challenge, as seizures manifest through mechanisms and features that span spatial and temporal scales. Here we address this challenge through the analysis and modelling of human brain voltage activity recorded simultaneously across microscopic and macroscopic spatial scales. We show that during seizure large-scale neural populations spanning centimetres of cortex coordinate with small neural groups spanning cortical columns, and provide evidence that rapidly propagating waves of activity underlie this increased inter-scale coupling. We develop a corresponding computational model to propose specific mechanisms-namely, the effects of an increased extracellular potassium concentration diffusing in space-that support the observed spatiotemporal dynamics. Understanding the multi-scale, spatiotemporal dynamics of human seizures-and connecting these dynamics to specific biological mechanisms-promises new insights to treat this devastating disease.

  6. Soman-induced seizures impair norepinephrine-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Filbert, M.G.; Phann, S.; Forster, J.; Ballough, G.P.; Cann, F.J.

    1993-05-13

    Seizure activity increases turnover of phosphoinositide bisphosphate (PIP2). Turnover of PIP2 is thought to be modulated by neurotransmitter interactions. The effect of soman-induced seizures on neurotransmitter-stimulated PIP 2 turnover was examined in rats. Thirty minutes after induction of seizure activity, rats were euthanized and slices prepared from the hippocampus or cerebral cortex were incubated with myo-(2-3H) inositol for incorporation into phospholipids. Hydrolysis of phosphoinositides was determined by measuring the accumulation of (3H) inositol-l-phosphate (IP1) in the presence of LiCl. Carbachol, norepinephrine (NE) and high K+ increased accumulation of IP1 in slices from control rats. GABA was without effect on IP1 accumulation but potentiated the stimulation of PIP, hydrolysis by NE. NE-stimulated IP1 accumulation in slices from rats undergoing seizures was significantly reduced. GABA potentiation of the NE-stimulated hydrolysis was also reduced.

  7. Hepatoprotective Effects of Schisandra sphenanthera Extract against Lithocholic Acid-Induced Cholestasis in Male Mice Are Associated with Activation of the Pregnane X Receptor Pathway and Promotion of Liver Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hang; Li, Dongshun; Qin, Xiaoling; Chen, Pan; Tan, Huasen; Zeng, Xuezhen; Li, Xi; Fan, Xiaomei; Jiang, Yiming; Zhou, Yawen; Chen, Yixin; Wang, Ying; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported that the ethanol extract of Schisandra sphenanthera [Wuzhi (WZ) tablet] significantly protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatoxicity. However, whether WZ exerts a protective effect against cholestasis remains unclear. In this study, the protective effect of WZ on lithocholic acid (LCA)-induced intrahepatic cholestasis in mice was characterized and the involved mechanisms were investigated. WZ pretreatment (350 mg/kg) with LCA significantly reversed liver necrosis and decreased serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase activity. More importantly, serum total bile acids and total bilirubin were also remarkably reduced. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis showed that hepatic expression of pregnane X receptor (PXR) target genes such as CYP3A11 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 were significantly increased by WZ treatment. Luciferase assays performed in LS174T cells illustrated that WZ extract and its six bioactive lignans could all activate human PXR. In addition, WZ treatment significantly promoted liver regeneration via inhibition of p53/p21 to induce cell proliferation-associated proteins such as cyclin D1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. In conclusion, WZ has a protective effect against LCA-induced intrahepatic cholestasis, partially owing to activation of the PXR pathway and promotion of liver regeneration.

  8. The microbe-secreted isopeptide poly-γ-glutamic acid induces stress tolerance in Brassica napus L. seedlings by activating crosstalk between H2O2 and Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Peng; Pang, Xiao; Feng, Xiaohai; Li, Sha; Chi, Bo; Wang, Rui; Xu, Zongqi; Xu, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a microbe-secreted isopeptide that has been shown to promote growth and enhance stress tolerance in crops. However, its site of action and downstream signaling pathways are still unknown. In this study, we investigated γ-PGA-induced tolerance to salt and cold stresses in Brassica napus L. seedlings. Fluorescent labeling of γ-PGA was used to locate the site of its activity in root protoplasts. The relationship between γ-PGA-induced stress tolerance and two signal molecules, H2O2 and Ca2+, as well as the γ-PGA-elicited signaling pathway at the whole plant level, were explored. Fluorescent labeling showed that γ-PGA did not enter the cytoplasm but instead attached to the surface of root protoplasm. Here, it triggered a burst of H2O2 in roots by enhancing the transcription of RbohD and RbohF, and the elicited H2O2 further activated an influx of Ca2+ into root cells. Ca2+ signaling was transmitted via the stem from roots to leaves, where it elicited a fresh burst of H2O2, thus promoting plant growth and enhancing stress tolerance. On the basis of these observation, we propose that γ-PGA mediates stress tolerance in Brassica napus seedlings by activating an H2O2 burst and subsequent crosstalk between H2O2 and Ca2+ signaling. PMID:28198821

  9. The microbe-secreted isopeptide poly-γ-glutamic acid induces stress tolerance in Brassica napus L. seedlings by activating crosstalk between H2O2 and Ca(2).

    PubMed

    Lei, Peng; Pang, Xiao; Feng, Xiaohai; Li, Sha; Chi, Bo; Wang, Rui; Xu, Zongqi; Xu, Hong

    2017-02-13

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a microbe-secreted isopeptide that has been shown to promote growth and enhance stress tolerance in crops. However, its site of action and downstream signaling pathways are still unknown. In this study, we investigated γ-PGA-induced tolerance to salt and cold stresses in Brassica napus L. seedlings. Fluorescent labeling of γ-PGA was used to locate the site of its activity in root protoplasts. The relationship between γ-PGA-induced stress tolerance and two signal molecules, H2O2 and Ca(2+), as well as the γ-PGA-elicited signaling pathway at the whole plant level, were explored. Fluorescent labeling showed that γ-PGA did not enter the cytoplasm but instead attached to the surface of root protoplasm. Here, it triggered a burst of H2O2 in roots by enhancing the transcription of RbohD and RbohF, and the elicited H2O2 further activated an influx of Ca(2+) into root cells. Ca(2+) signaling was transmitted via the stem from roots to leaves, where it elicited a fresh burst of H2O2, thus promoting plant growth and enhancing stress tolerance. On the basis of these observation, we propose that γ-PGA mediates stress tolerance in Brassica napus seedlings by activating an H2O2 burst and subsequent crosstalk between H2O2 and Ca(2+) signaling.

  10. Gomisin J Inhibits Oleic Acid-Induced Hepatic Lipogenesis by Activation of the AMPK-Dependent Pathway and Inhibition of the Hepatokine Fetuin-A in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungsuk; Lim, Sue Ji; Lee, Hee-Ju; Kim, Sun Young; Nho, Chu Won

    2015-11-11

    The aim of our study is to investigate the molecular mechanism of gomisin J from Schisandra chinensis on the oleic acid (OA)-induced lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells. Gomisin J attenuated lipid accumulation in OA-induced HepG2 cells. It also suppressed the expression of lipogenic enzymes and inflammatory mediators and increased the expression of lipolytic enzymes in OA-induced HepG2 cells. Furthermore, the use of specific inhibitors and fetuin-A siRNA and liver kinase B1 (LKB1) siRNA transfected cells demonstrated that gomisin J regulated lipogenesis and lipolysis via inhibition of fetuin-A and activation of an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent pathway in HepG2 cells. Our results showed that gomisin J suppressed lipid accumulation by regulating the expression of lipogenic and lipolytic enzymes and inflammatory molecules through activation of AMPK, LKB1, and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and inhibition of fetuin-A in HepG2 cells. This suggested that gomisin J has potential benefits in treating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  11. An Scn1a epilepsy mutation in Scn8a alters seizure susceptibility and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Makinson, Christopher D.; Dutt, Karoni; Lin, Frank; Papale, Ligia A.; Shankar, Anupama; Barela, Arthur J.; Liu, Robert; Goldin, Alan L.; Escayg, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of SCN8A in epilepsy and behavior is critical in light of recently identified human SCN8A epilepsy mutations. We have previously demonstrated that Scn8amed and Scn8amed-jo mice carrying mutations in the Scn8a gene display increased resistance to flurothyl and kainic acid-induced seizures; however, they also exhibit spontaneous absence seizures. To further investigate the relationship between altered SCN8A function and epilepsy, we introduced the SCN1A-R1648H mutation, identified in a family with generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), into the corresponding position (R1627H) of the mouse Scn8a gene. Heterozygous R1627H mice exhibited increased resistance to some forms of pharmacologically and electrically induced seizures and the mutant Scn8a allele ameliorated the phenotype of Scn1a-R1648H mutants. Hippocampal slices from heterozygous R1627H mice displayed decreased bursting behavior compared to wild-type littermates. Paradoxically, at the homozygous level, R1627H mice did not display increased seizure resistance and were susceptible to audiogenic seizures. We furthermore observed increased hippocampal pyramidal cell excitability in heterozygous and homozygous Scn8a-R1627H mutants, and decreased interneuron excitability in heterozygous Scn8a-R1627H mutants. These results expand the phenotypes associated with disruption of the Scn8a gene and demonstrate that an Scn8a mutation can both confer seizure protection and increase seizure susceptibility. PMID:26410685

  12. Anticipating epileptic seizures: from mathematics to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Le Van Quyen, Michel

    2005-02-01

    The study of dynamical changes in the neural activity preceding an epileptic seizure allows the characterization of a preictal state several minutes prior to seizure onset. This opens new perspectives for studying the mechanisms of ictogenesis as well as for possible therapeutic interventions that represent a major breakthrough. In this review we present and discuss the results from our group in this domain using nonlinear analysis of brain signals, as well as its limitation and open questions.

  13. Seizures and brain regulatory systems: Consciousness, sleep, and autonomic systems

    PubMed Central

    Sedigh-Sarvestani, Madineh; Blumenfeld, Hal; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Bateman, Lisa M

    2014-01-01

    Research into the physiological underpinnings of epilepsy has revealed reciprocal relationships between seizures and the activity of several regulatory systems in the brain, including those governing sleep, consciousness and autonomic functions. This review highlights recent progress in understanding and utilizing the relationships between seizures and the arousal or consciousness system, the sleep-wake and associated circadian system, and the central autonomic network. PMID:25233249

  14. Optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic brainstem neurons during focal limbic seizures: Effects on cortical physiology.

    PubMed

    Furman, Moran; Zhan, Qiong; McCafferty, Cian; Lerner, Benjamin A; Motelow, Joshua E; Meng, Jin; Ma, Chanthia; Buchanan, Gordon F; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Cardin, Jessica A; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-12-01

    Focal temporal lobe seizures often cause impaired cortical function and loss of consciousness. Recent work suggests that the mechanism for depressed cortical function during focal seizures may depend on decreased subcortical cholinergic arousal, which leads to a sleep-like state of cortical slow-wave activity. To test this hypothesis, we sought to directly activate subcortical cholinergic neurons during focal limbic seizures to determine the effects on cortical function. Here we used an optogenetic approach to selectively stimulate cholinergic brainstem neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus during focal limbic seizures induced in a lightly anesthetized rat model. We found an increase in cortical gamma activity and a decrease in delta activity in response to cholinergic stimulation. These findings support the mechanistic role of reduced subcortical cholinergic arousal in causing cortical dysfunction during seizures. Through further work, electrical or optogenetic stimulation of subcortical arousal networks may ultimately lead to new treatments aimed at preventing cortical dysfunction during seizures.

  15. Cannabidiol exerts anti-convulsant effects in animal models of temporal lobe and partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nicholas A; Glyn, Sarah E; Akiyama, Satoshi; Hill, Thomas D M; Hill, Andrew J; Weston, Samantha E; Burnett, Matthew D A; Yamasaki, Yuki; Stephens, Gary J; Whalley, Benjamin J; Williams, Claire M

    2012-06-01

    Cannabis sativa has been associated with contradictory effects upon seizure states despite its medicinal use by numerous people with epilepsy. We have recently shown that the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) reduces seizure severity and lethality in the well-established in vivo model of pentylenetetrazole-induced generalised seizures, suggesting that earlier, small-scale clinical trials examining CBD effects in people with epilepsy warrant renewed attention. Here, we report the effects of pure CBD (1, 10 and 100mg/kg) in two other established rodent seizure models, the acute pilocarpine model of temporal lobe seizure and the penicillin model of partial seizure. Seizure activity was video recorded and scored offline using model-specific seizure severity scales. In the pilocarpine model CBD (all doses) significantly reduced the percentage of animals experiencing the most severe seizures. In the penicillin model, CBD (≥ 10 mg/kg) significantly decreased the percentage mortality as a result of seizures; CBD (all doses) also decreased the percentage of animals experiencing the most severe tonic-clonic seizures. These results extend the anti-convulsant profile of CBD; when combined with a reported absence of psychoactive effects, this evidence strongly supports CBD as a therapeutic candidate for a diverse range of human epilepsies.

  16. Oxygen desaturations triggered by partial seizures: implications for cardiopulmonary instability in epilepsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, A. S.; Ives, J. R.; Goldberger, A. L.; Al-Aweel, I. C.; Krishnamurthy, K. B.; Drislane, F. W.; Schomer, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: The occurrence of hypoxemia in adults with partial seizures has not been systematically explored. Our aim was to study in detail the temporal dynamics of this specific type of ictal-associated hypoxemia. METHODS: During long-term video/EEG monitoring (LTM), patients underwent monitoring of oxygen saturation using a digital Spo2 (pulse oximeter) transducer. Six patients (nine seizures) were identified with oxygen desaturations after the onset of partial seizure activity. RESULTS: Complex partial seizures originated from both left and right temporal lobes. Mean seizure duration (+/-SD) was 73 +/- 18 s. Mean Spo2 desaturation duration was 76 +/- 19 s. The onset of oxygen desaturation followed seizure onset with a mean delay of 43 +/- 16 s. Mean (+/-SD) Spo2 nadir was 83 +/- 5% (range, 77-91%), occurring an average of 35 +/- 12 s after the onset of the desaturation. One seizure was associated with prolonged and recurrent Spo2 desaturations. CONCLUSIONS: Partial seizures may be associated with prominent oxygen desaturations. The comparable duration of each seizure and its subsequent desaturation suggests a close mechanistic (possibly causal) relation. Spo2 monitoring provides an added means for seizure detection that may increase LTM yield. These observations also raise the possibility that ictal ventilatory dysfunction could play a role in certain cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy in adults with partial seizures.

  17. Activation of the SIRT1/p66shc antiapoptosis pathway via carnosic acid-induced inhibition of miR-34a protects rats against nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Shan, W; Gao, L; Zeng, W; Hu, Y; Wang, G; Li, M; Zhou, J; Ma, X; Tian, X; Yao, J

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that miR-34a expression is significantly upregulated and associated with apoptosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Carnosic acid (CA) is a novel antioxidant and a potential inhibitor of apoptosis in organ injury, including liver injury. This study aimed to investigate the signaling mechanisms underlying miR-34a expression and the antiapoptotic effect of CA in NAFLD. CA treatment significantly reduced the high-fat diet (HFD)-induced elevations in aminotransferase activity as well as in serum triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels but increased serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels. Moreover, CA treatment ameliorated the increase in cleaved caspase-3 caused by HFD exposure and completely reversed the HFD-induced decreases in manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and B-cell lymphoma-extra large expression. CA also counteracted the HFD- or palmitic acid (PA)-induced increases in caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity. Mechanistically, CA reversed the HFD- or PA-induced upregulation of miR-34a, which is the best-characterized regulator of SIRT1. Importantly, the decrease in miR-34a expression was closely associated with the activation of the SIRT1/p66shc pathway, which attenuates hepatocyte apoptosis in liver ischemia/reperfusion injury. A dual luciferase assay in L02 cells validated the modulation of SIRT1 by CA, which occurs at least partly via miR-34a. In addition, miR-34a overexpression was significantly counteracted by CA, which prevented the miR-34a-dependent repression of the SIRT1/p66shc pathway and apoptosis. Collectively, our results support a link between liver cell apoptosis and the miR-34a/SIRT1/p66shc pathway, which can be modulated by CA in NAFLD. PMID:26203862

  18. Inhibition of protein kinase C α/βII and activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase mediate glycyrrhetinic acid induced apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Junho; Ko, Hyun-suk; Sohn, Eun Jung; Kim, Bonglee; Kim, Jung Hyo; Kim, Hee Jeong; Kim, Chulwoo; Kim, Jai-eun; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2014-02-15

    Though glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) from Glycyrrhiza glabra was known to exert antioxidant, antifilarial, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor effects, the antitumor mechanism of GA was not clearly elucidated in non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLCCs). Thus, in the present study, the underlying apoptotic mechanism of GA was examined in NCI-H460 NSCLCCs. GA significantly suppressed the viability of NCI-H460 and A549 non-small lung cancer cells. Also, GA significantly increased the sub G1 population by cell cycle analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) positive cells in a concentration dependent manner in NCI-H460 non-small lung cancer cells. Consistently, GA cleaved poly (ADP-ribosyl) polymerase (PARP), caspase 9/3, attenuated the expression of Bcl-XL, Bcl-2, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin E in NCI-H460 cells. Interestingly, GA attenuated the phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC) α/βII and extracellular activated protein kinase (ERK) as well as activated the phosphorylation of PKC δ and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase in NCI-H460 cells. Conversely, PKC promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and JNK inhibitor SP600125 reversed the cleavages of caspase 3 and PARP induced by GA in NCI-H460 cells. Overall, our findings suggest that GA induces apoptosis via inhibition of PKC α/βII and activation of JNK in NCI-H460 non-small lung cancer cells as a potent anticancer candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  19. The HER2 inhibitor TAK165 Sensitizes Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells to Retinoic Acid-Induced Myeloid Differentiation by activating MEK/ERK mediated RARα/STAT1 axis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xuejing; Liu, Yujia; Li, Yangling; Xian, Miao; Zhou, Qian; Yang, Bo; Ying, Meidan; He, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    The success of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in differentiation therapy for patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) highly encourages researches to apply this therapy to other types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, AML, with the exception of APL, fails to respond to differentiation therapy. Therefore, research strategies to further sensitize cells to retinoids and to extend the range of AMLs that respond to retinoids beyond APLs are urgently needed. In this study, we showed that TAK165, a HER2 inhibitor, exhibited a strong synergy with ATRA to promote AML cell differentiation. We observed that TAK165 sensitized the AML cells to ATRA-induced cell growth inhibition, G0/G1 phase arrest, CD11b expression, mature morphologic changes, NBT reduction and myeloid regulator expression. Unexpectedly, HER2 pathway might not be essential for TAK165-enhanced differentiation when combined with ATRA, while the enhanced differentiation was dependent on the activation of the RARα/STAT1 axis. Furthermore, the MEK/ERK cascade regulated the activation of STAT1. Taken together, our study is the first to evaluate the synergy of TAK165 and ATRA in AML cell differentiation and to assess new opportunities for the combination of TAK165 and ATRA as a promising approach for future differentiation therapy. PMID:27074819

  20. Frequency evolution during tonic-clonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, R Quian; Garcia, H; Rabinowicz, A

    2002-09-01

    By using the Short Time Fourier Transform, we analyzed the EEG frequency evolution during tonic-clonic seizures on 18 scalp recordings corresponding to 7 patients admitted for Video-EEG monitoring. This information was correlated with clinical findings observed in the video recordings. From the time-frequency plots, we recognized patterns related with brain activity even when embedded in a background of muscle artifacts. In 13/18 seizures we found a clear frequency dynamics characterized by an activity originally localized at about 8 Hz, later slowing down to about 1.5 Hz. In the remaining cases muscle artifacts hinder the disclosure of a clear frequency evolution. The clonic phases started when the main frequency slowed down to about 3 Hz. We conclude that the Short Time Fourier Transform is very useful for a quantitative analysis of epileptic seizures, especially when muscle artifacts contaminate the recordings. We further conclude that the clonic phase starts as a response to brain activity that can be only established when brain oscillations are slow enough to be followed by the muscles.

  1. Impaired Serotonergic Brainstem Function during and after Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Qiong; Buchanan, Gordon F.; Motelow, Joshua E.; Andrews, John; Vitkovskiy, Petr; Chen, William C.; Serout, Florian; Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Kundishora, Adam; Furman, Moran; Li, Wei; Bo, Xiao; Richerson, George B.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired breathing, cardiac function, and arousal during and after seizures are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Previous work suggests that these changes are associated with depressed brainstem function in the ictal and post-ictal periods. Lower brainstem serotonergic systems are postulated to play an important role in cardiorespiratory changes during and after seizures, whereas upper brainstem serotonergic and other systems regulate arousal. However, direct demonstration of seizure-associated neuronal activity changes in brainstem serotonergic regions has been lacking. Here, we performed multiunit and single-unit recordings from medullary raphe and midbrain dorsal raphe nuclei in an established rat seizure model while measuring changes in breathing rate and depth as well as heart rate. Serotonergic neurons were identified by immunohistochemistry. Respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute ventilation were all significantly decreased during and after seizures in this model. We found that population firing of neurons in the medullary and midbrain raphe on multiunit recordings was significantly decreased during the ictal and post-ictal periods. Single-unit recordings from identified serotonergic neurons in the medullary raphe revealed highly consistently decreased firing during and after seizures. In contrast, firing of midbrain raphe serotonergic neurons was more variable, with a mixture of increases and decreases. The markedly suppressed firing of medullary serotonergic neurons supports their possible role in simultaneously impaired cardiorespiratory function in seizures. Decreased arousal likely arises from depressed population activity of several neuronal pools in the upper brainstem and forebrain. These findings have important implications for preventing morbidity and mortality in people living with epilepsy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Seizures often cause impaired breathing, cardiac dysfunction, and loss of consciousness. The brainstem and

  2. Clozapine, ziprasidone and aripiprazole but not haloperidol protect against kainic acid-induced lesion of the striatum in mice, in vivo: role of 5-HT1A receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Cosi, Cristina; Waget, Aurelie; Rollet, Karin; Tesori, Valentina; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian

    2005-05-10

    Excessive activation of non-NMDA receptors, AMPA and kainate, contributes to neuronal degeneration in acute and progressive pathologies, possibly including schizophrenia. Because 5-HT(1A) receptor agonists have neuroprotective properties (e.g., against NMDA-induced neurotoxicity), we compared the effects of the antipsychotics, clozapine, ziprasidone and aripiprazole, that are partial agonists at 5-HT(1A) receptor, with those of haloperidol, which is devoid of 5-HT(1A) agonist properties, on kainic acid (KA)-induced striatal lesion volumes, in C57Bl/6N mice. The involvement of 5-HT(1A) receptors was determined by antagonist studies with WAY100635, and data were compared with those obtained using the potent and high efficacy 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, F13714. Intra-striatal KA lesioning and measurement of lesion volumes using cresyl violet staining were carried out at 48 h after surgery. F13714, antipsychotics or vehicle were administered ip twice, 30 min before and 3 1/2 h after KA injection. WAY100635 (0.63 mg/kg) or vehicle were given sc 30 min before each drug injection. Clozapine (2 x 10 mg/kg), ziprasidone (2 x 20 mg/kg) and aripiprazole (2 x 10 mg/kg) decreased lesion volume by 61%, 59% and 73%, respectively. WAY100635 antagonized the effect of ziprasidone and of aripiprazole but only slightly attenuated that of clozapine. In contrast, haloperidol (2 x 0.16 mg/kg) did not affect KA-induced lesion volume. F13714 dose-dependently decreased lesion volume. The 61% decrease of lesion volume obtained with F13714 (2 x 0.63 mg/kg) was antagonized by WAY100635. WAY100635 alone did not affect lesion volume. These results show that 5-HT(1A) receptor activation protects against KA-induced striatal lesions and indicate that some atypical antipsychotic agents with 5-HT(1A) agonist properties may protect against excitotoxic injury, in vivo.

  3. Chimeric derivatives of functionalized amino acids and α-aminoamides: compounds with anticonvulsant activity in seizure models and inhibitory actions on central, peripheral, and cardiac isoforms of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Torregrosa, Robert; Yang, Xiao-Fang; Dustrude, Erik T; Cummins, Theodore R; Khanna, Rajesh; Kohn, Harold

    2015-07-01

    Six novel 3″-substituted (R)-N-(phenoxybenzyl) 2-N-acetamido-3-methoxypropionamides were prepared and then assessed using whole-cell, patch-clamp electrophysiology for their anticonvulsant activities in animal seizure models and for their sodium channel activities. We found compounds with various substituents at the terminal aromatic ring that had excellent anticonvulsant activity. Of these compounds, (R)-N-4'-((3″-chloro)phenoxy)benzyl 2-N-acetamido-3-methoxypropionamide ((R)-5) and (R)-N-4'-((3″-trifluoromethoxy)phenoxy)benzyl 2-N-acetamido-3-methoxypropionamide ((R)-9) exhibited high protective indices (PI=TD50/ED50) comparable with many antiseizure drugs when tested in the maximal electroshock seizure test to mice (intraperitoneally) and rats (intraperitoneally, orally). Most compounds potently transitioned sodium channels to the slow-inactivated state when evaluated in rat embryonic cortical neurons. Treating HEK293 recombinant cells that expressed hNaV1.1, rNaV1.3, hNaV1.5, or hNaV1.7 with (R)-9 recapitulated the high levels of sodium channel slow inactivation.

  4. Chimeric Derivatives of Functionalized Amino Acids and α-Aminoamides: Compounds with Anticonvulsant Activity in Seizure Models and Inhibitory Actions on Central, Peripheral, and Cardiac Isoforms of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Torregrosa, Robert; Yang, Xiao-Fang; Dustrude, Erik T.; Cummins, Theodore R.

    2015-01-01

    Six novel 3″-substituted (R)-N-(phenoxybenzyl) 2-N-acetamido-3-methoxypropionamides were prepared and then assessed using whole-cell, patch-clamp electrophysiology for their anticonvulsant activities in animal seizure models and for their sodium channel activities. We found compounds with various substituents at the terminal aromatic ring that had excellent anticonvulsant activity. Of these compounds, (R)-N-4′-((3″-chloro)phenoxy)benzyl 2-N-acetamido-3-methoxypropionamide ((R)-5) and (R)-N-4′-((3″-trifluoromethoxy)phenoxy)benzyl 2-N-acetamido-3-methoxypropionamide ((R)-9) exhibited high protective indices (PI = TD50/ED50) comparable with many antiseizure drugs when tested in the maximal electroshock seizure test to mice (intraperitoneally) and rats (intraperitoneally, orally). Most compounds potently transitioned sodium channels to the slow-inactivated state when evaluated in rat embryonic cortical neurons. Treating HEK293 recombinant cells that expressed hNav1.1, rNav1.3, hNav1.5, or hNav1.7 with (R)-9 recapitulated the high levels of sodium channel slow inactivation. PMID:25922183

  5. Ictal onset zone and seizure propagation delineated on ictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Madhavi; Tripathi, Manjari; Garg, Ajay; Damle, Nishikant; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    The present case highlights the utility of ictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in delineating the seizure onset zone in a child with complex partial seizures. Although F-18 FDG PET has been successfully used to delineate interictal hypometabolism, planned ictal FDG PET, in cases with prolonged seizure activity, can provide better spatial resolution than single-photon emission CT by delineating the seizure onset zone and propagation pathway.

  6. Reflex gelastic–dacrystic seizures following hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Praharaj, Heramba Narayan

    2013-01-01

    Reflex or stimulus-sensitive epilepsies are uncommon epileptic syndromes triggered by exogenous-specific sensory stimulus or endogenous various mental activities. Gelastic–dacrystic seizures are rare epileptic manifestations characterised by ictal laughter and crying. Gelastic–dacrystic seizures are commonly caused by hypothalamic hamartoma but rarely described due to cortical dysplasia, lesions of frontal and temporal lobes, tumours and vascular malformations. We report a young woman who presented with somatosensory-evoked gelastic–dacrystic seizures. This patient had a positive history of perinatal insult substantiated by MRI findings. Hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy as the cause of gelastic–dacrystic seizures has not been reported so far in the literature. PMID:23853086

  7. Seizure following the Use of the COX-2 Inhibitor Etoricoxib

    PubMed Central

    Arnao, Valentina; Riolo, Marianna; Fierro, Brigida

    2017-01-01

    We describe a case of epileptic seizures occurring after the use of a COX-2 inhibitor. A 61-year-old man was admitted to our department because of a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. EEG showed generalized slowdown of the activity. Neuroimaging and blood samples studies did not evidence alterations, but a careful pharmacological history revealed that the patient had taken the COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib to treat lumbago few days before the onset of clinical symptoms. No seizures were reported after etoricoxib discontinuation and an EEG resulted to be normal two months after this. Conclusion. Knowing the pharmacological history of a patient is important for understanding the clinical presentation and selecting appropriate treatment. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported case of generalized seizures associated with the use of COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:28210513

  8. Low level exposure to monomethyl arsonous acid-induced the over-production of inflammation-related cytokines and the activation of cell signals associated with tumor progression in a urothelial cell model

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero-Lourdes, C.; Medeiros, M.K.; Cardenas-Gonzalez, M.C.; Wnek, S.M.; Gandolfi, J.A.

    2010-04-15

    Human bladder cancer has been associated with chronic exposure to arsenic. Chronic exposure of an immortalized non-tumorigenic urothelial cell line (UROtsa cells) to arsenicals has transformed these cells to a malignant phenotype, but the involved mechanisms are not fully understood. Chronic inflammation has been linked with cancer development mainly because many pro-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors as well as angiogenic chemokines have been found in tumors. In this study the chronology of inflammatory cytokines production was profiled in UROtsa cells chronically exposed to the toxic arsenic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid [50 nM MMA(III)] to know the role of inflammation in cell transformation. Acute 50 nM MMA(III) exposure induced over-production of many pro-inflammatory cytokines as soon as 12 h after acute exposure. The same cytokines remain over-regulated after chronic exposure to 50 nM MMA(III), especially after 3 mo exposure. At 3 mo exposure the sustained production of cytokines like IL-1, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF is coincident with the appearance of characteristics associated with cell transformation seen in other arsenic-UROtsa studies. The sustained and increased activation of NFkappaB and c-Jun is also present along the transformation process and the phosphorylated proteins p38 MAPK and ERK 1/2 are increased also through the time line. Taken together these results support the notion that chronic inflammation is associated within MMA(III)-induced cell transformation and may act as a promoting factor in UROtsa cell transformation.

  9. Neuropeptide-mediated excitability: a key triggering mechanism for seizure generation in the developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Baram, Tallie Z.; Hatalski, Carolyn G.

    2012-01-01

    Most human seizures occur early in life, consistent with established excitability-promoting features of the developing brain. Surprisingly, the majority of developmental seizures are not spontaneous but are provoked by injurious or stressful stimuli. What mechanisms mediate ‘triggering’ of seizures and limit such reactive seizures to early postnatal life? Recent evidence implicates the excitatory neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Stress activates expression of the CRH gene in several limbic regions, and CRH-expressing neurons are strategically localized in the immature rat hippocampus, in which this neuropeptide increases the excitability of pyramidal cells in vitro. Indeed, in vivo, activation of CRH receptors – maximally expressed in hippocampus and amygdala during the developmental period which is characterized by peak susceptibility to ‘provoked’ convulsions – induces severe, age-dependent seizures. Thus, converging data indicate that activation of expression of CRH constitutes an important mechanism for generating developmentally regulated, triggered seizures, with considerable clinical relevance. PMID:9829688

  10. Local cerebral metabolism during partial seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.; Rausch, R.; Nuwer, M.

    1983-04-01

    Interictal and ictal fluorodeoxyglucose scans were obtained with positron CT from four patients with spontaneous recurrent partial seizures, one with epilepsia partialis continua, and one with a single partial seizure induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus. Ictal metabolic patterns were different for each patient studied. Focal and generalized increased and decreased metabolism were observed. Ictal hypermetabolism may exceed six times the interictal rate and could represent activation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses in the epileptogenic region and its projection fields. Hypometabolism seen on ictal scans most likely reflects postictal depression and may indicate projection fields of inhibited neurons. No quantitative relationship between alterations in metabolism and EEG or behavioral measurements of ictal events could be demonstrated.

  11. Heat shock protein 70-dependent protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ying; Naito, Yuji; Handa, Osamu; Hayashi, Natsuko; Kuki, Aiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yuko; Morita, Mayuko; Adachi, Satoko; Fukui, Akifumi; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Kishimoto, Etsuko; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-11-01

    Protection of the small intestine from mucosal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid is a critical issue in the field of gastroenterology. Polaprezinc an anti-ulcer drug, consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, provides gastric mucosal protection against various irritants. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of the RIE1 rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Confluent rat intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with 70 µM polaprezinc for 24 h, and then stimulated with or without 15 mM acetylsalicylic acid for a further 15 h. Subsequent cellular viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced cell death was also qualified by fluorescent microscopy of Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide. Heat shock proteins 70 protein expression after adding polaprezinc or acetylsalicylic acid was assessed by western blotting. To investigate the role of Heat shock protein 70, Heat shock protein 70-specific small interfering RNA was applied. Cell viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining and apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that acetylsalicylic acid significantly induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Polaprezinc significantly suppressed acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells at its late phase. At the same time, polaprezinc increased Heat shock protein 70 expressions of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. However, in Heat shock protein 70-silenced rat intestinal epithelial cells, polaprezinc could not suppress acetylsalicylic acid -induced apoptosis at its late phase. We conclude that polaprezinc-increased Heat shock protein 70 expression might be an important mechanism by which polaprezinc suppresses acetylsalicylic

  12. Reflex seizures, traits, and epilepsies: from physiology to pathology.

    PubMed

    Koepp, Matthias J; Caciagli, Lorenzo; Pressler, Ronit M; Lehnertz, Klaus; Beniczky, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are generally unpredictable and arise spontaneously. Patients often report non-specific triggers such as stress or sleep deprivation, but only rarely do seizures occur as a reflex event, in which they are objectively and consistently modulated, precipitated, or inhibited by external sensory stimuli or specific cognitive processes. The seizures triggered by such stimuli and processes in susceptible individuals can have different latencies. Once seizure-suppressing mechanisms fail and a critical mass (the so-called tipping point) of cortical activation is reached, reflex seizures stereotypically manifest with common motor features independent of the physiological network involved. The complexity of stimuli increases from simple sensory to complex cognitive-emotional with increasing age of onset. The topography of physiological networks involved follows the posterior-to-anterior trajectory of brain development, reflecting age-related changes in brain excitability. Reflex seizures and traits probably represent the extremes of a continuum, and understanding of their underlying mechanisms might help to elucidate the transition of normal physiological function to paroxysmal epileptic activity.

  13. Time-frequency analysis of intracranial EEG in patients with myoclonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Zhang, Guojun; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yan, Xiaoming; Li, Liping; Xu, Cuiping; Yu, Tao; Liu, Chunyan; Zhu, Yu; Lin, Yicong; Wang, Yuping

    2016-12-01

    Myoclonic seizures are defined as generalized seizures according to the classification of seizure by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). The pathogenesis of myoclonic seizures is not yet clear. There are very few studies on the focal surgical treatment of myoclonic seizures. The aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics of myoclonic seizure onset in different bands of the intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) and their dynamic changes in temporal and spatial evolution. We studied four patients with myoclonic seizures who were under the focal resection of the epileptogenic zone. We retrospectively analyzed the semiology, electrocorticogram (ECoG) and imaging data of these patients, and conducted time-frequency analysis of broadband ECoG activity. We found that myoclonic seizures without clinical lateralizing signs could be improved by the resection of the epileptogenic zone. The ECoG power in different frequency bands increased to a peak at 0.5s before the clinical seizure onset and decreased quickly afterwards. The power of alpha activity was highest during the preictal and ictal periods. The central zone had higher power than the epileptogenic zone in all frequency bands during the preictal period, but this difference was not statistically significant. Our results suggest that myoclonic seizures in some patients might have a focal origination, with a fast bilateral propagating network in all frequency bands, especially the alpha band.

  14. Hyponatraemia and seizures after ecstasy use.

    PubMed

    Holmes, S B; Banerjee, A K; Alexander, W D

    1999-01-01

    A patient presented to our unit with seizures and profound hyponatraemia after ingestion of a single tablet of ecstasy. The seizures proved resistant to therapy and ventilation on the intensive care unit was required. Resolution of the seizures occurred on correction of the metabolic abnormalities. The pathogenesis of seizures and hyponatraemia after ecstasy use is discussed. Ecstasy use should be considered in any young patient presenting with unexplained seizures and attention should be directed towards electrolyte levels, particularly sodium.

  15. Hypochlorous and peracetic acid induced oxidation of dairy proteins.

    PubMed

    Kerkaert, Barbara; Mestdagh, Frédéric; Cucu, Tatiana; Aedo, Philip Roger; Ling, Shen Yan; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2011-02-09

    Hypochlorous and peracetic acids, both known disinfectants in the food industry, were compared for their oxidative capacity toward dairy proteins. Whey proteins and caseins were oxidized under well controlled conditions at pH 8 as a function of the sanitizing concentration. Different markers for protein oxidation were monitored. The results established that the protein carbonyl content was a rather unspecific marker for protein oxidation, which did not allow one to differentiate the oxidant used especially at the lower concentrations. Cysteine, tryptophan, and methionine were proven to be the most vulnerable amino acids for degradation upon hypochlorous and peracetic acid treatment, while tyrosine was only prone to degradation in the presence of hypochlorous acid. Hypochlorous acid induced oxidation gave rise to protein aggregation, while during peracetic acid induced oxidation, no high molecular weight aggregates were observed. Protein aggregation upon hypochlorous acid oxidation could primarily be linked to tryptophan and tyrosine degradation.

  16. Seizures associated with low-dose tramadol for chronic pain treatment

    PubMed Central

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Sonbahar, Tuğba; Bayar, Fikret; Erdem, Ali Fuat

    2016-01-01

    The management of cancer pain still poses a major challenge for clinicians. Tramadol is a centrally acting synthetic opioid analgesic. Its well-known side effects include nausea, vomiting, and dizziness; seizures are a rare side effect. Some reports have found that tramadol triggers seizure activity at high doses, whereas a few preclinical studies have found that this seizure activity is not dose-related. We herein present a case involving a patient with laryngeal cancer who developed seizures while on low-dose oral tramadol. PMID:27212778

  17. A low computation cost method for seizure prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanli; Zhou, Weidong; Yuan, Qi; Wu, Qi

    2014-10-01

    The dynamic changes of electroencephalograph (EEG) signals in the period prior to epileptic seizures play a major role in the seizure prediction. This paper proposes a low computation seizure prediction algorithm that combines a fractal dimension with a machine learning algorithm. The presented seizure prediction algorithm extracts the Higuchi fractal dimension (HFD) of EEG signals as features to classify the patient's preictal or interictal state with Bayesian linear discriminant analysis (BLDA) as a classifier. The outputs of BLDA are smoothed by a Kalman filter for reducing possible sporadic and isolated false alarms and then the final prediction results are produced using a thresholding procedure. The algorithm was evaluated on the intracranial EEG recordings of 21 patients in the Freiburg EEG database. For seizure occurrence period of 30 min and 50 min, our algorithm obtained an average sensitivity of 86.95% and 89.33%, an average false prediction rate of 0.20/h, and an average prediction time of 24.47 min and 39.39 min, respectively. The results confirm that the changes of HFD can serve as a precursor of ictal activities and be used for distinguishing between interictal and preictal epochs. Both HFD and BLDA classifier have a low computational complexity. All of these make the proposed algorithm suitable for real-time seizure prediction.

  18. Efficacy of Retigabine on Acute Limbic Seizures in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, LK; Slomko, AM; Wongvravit, JP; Naseer, Z; Hu, S; Wan, WY; Ali, SS

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The efficacy of retigabine (RGB), a positive allosteric modulator of K+ channels indicated for adjunct treatment of partial seizures, was studied in two adult models of kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus to determine it’s toleratbility. Methods: Retigabine was administered systemiclly at high (5 mg/kg) and low (1–2 mg/kg) doses either 30 min prior to or 2 hr after KA-induced status epilepticus. High (1 µg/µL) and low (0.25 µg/µL) concentrations of RGB were also delivered by intrahippocampal microinjection in the presence of KA. Results: Dose-dependent effects of RGB were observed with both models. Lower doses increased seizure behavior latency and reduced the number of single spikes and synchronized burst events in the electroencephalogram (EEG). Higher doses worsened seizure behavior, produced severe ataxia, and increased spiking activity. Animals treated with RGB that were resistant to seizures did not exhibit significant injury or loss in GluR1 expression; however if stage 5–6 seizures were reached, typical hippocampal injury and depletion of GluR1 subunit protein in vulernable pyramidal fields occurred. Conclusions: RGB was neuroprotective only if seizures were significantly attenuated. GluR1 was simultaneously suppressed in the resistant granule cell layer in presence of RGB which may weaken excitatory transmission. Biphasic effects observed herein suggest that the human dosage must be carefully scrutinized to produce the optimal clinical response. PMID:26819936

  19. Recognition and management of seizures in children in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Edward; Dey, Indranil; Scammell, Andrea; Burnage, Katy; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2016-09-01

    Seizure is defined as 'a sudden surge of electrical activity in the brain, which usually affects how a person appears or acts for a short time'. Children who have experienced seizures commonly present to emergency departments (EDs), and detailed history taking will usually help differentiate between epileptic and non-epileptic events. ED nurses are often the first health professionals to manage children with seizures, and this is best done by following the ABCDE approach. Treatment involves termination of seizures with anticonvulsants, and children may need other symptomatic management. Seizures in children can be an extremely distressing experience for parents, who should be supported and kept informed by experienced ED nurses. Nurses also play a vital role in educating parents on correct administration of anticonvulsants and safety advice. This article discusses the aetiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of children with seizures, with particular emphasis on epilepsy. It includes two reflective case studies to highlight the challenges faced by healthcare professionals managing children who present with convulsions.

  20. Exogenous antenatal glucocorticoid treatment reduces susceptibility for hippocampal kindled and maximal electroconvulsive seizures in infant rats.

    PubMed

    Young, Nicole A; Teskey, G Campbell; Henry, Luke C; Edwards, Heather E

    2006-04-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX) and betamethasone (BETA) are synthetic glucocorticoids used clinically to reduce morbidity and mortality in infants at risk of premature birth. While their main role is to facilitate lung development, their effect on the developing nervous system and seizure susceptibility is unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that antenatal DEX or BETA treatment would alter seizure thresholds and spread of epileptiform activity in the brains of infant offspring. Pregnant dams received once daily injections with DEX, BETA, or vehicle on gestation days 15 to 18. Physical appearance, litter size, and weight of the pups were assessed postnatally. Seizure thresholds were determined on postnatal day 14 using electroconvulsive shock delivered through ear clips (i.e., generalized seizure) or kindling stimulation of the left hippocampus through indwelling electrodes (i.e., partial seizure). The rate of acquisition of kindled seizures was determined on postnatal days 14 and 15. Pups from dams treated with DEX and BETA were growth restricted. Antenatal BETA treatment increased seizure threshold for both models. Antenatal DEX treatment increased kindling threshold, but not electroconvulsive shock threshold. Kindling rate was unaffected by either antenatal treatment. In summary, repeated glucocorticoid treatments had adverse effects on weight, skin and litter size, raised seizure thresholds, and reduced seizure vulnerability. Although these effects are seemingly desirable with respect to seizure susceptibility, they suggest that the functional organization of the nervous system is altered with antenatal synthetic glucocorticoid treatment.

  1. Deoxycholic and chenodeoxycholic bile acids induce apoptosis via oxidative stress in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ignacio Barrasa, Juan; Olmo, Nieves; Pérez-Ramos, Pablo; Santiago-Gómez, Angélica; Lecona, Emilio; Turnay, Javier; Antonia Lizarbe, M

    2011-10-01

    The continuous exposure of the colonic epithelium to high concentrations of bile acids may exert cytotoxic effects and has been related to pathogenesis of colon cancer. A better knowledge of the mechanisms by which bile acids induce toxicity is still required and may be useful for the development of new therapeutic strategies. We have studied the effect of deoxycholic acid (DCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) treatments in BCS-TC2 human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Both bile acids promote cell death, being this effect higher for CDCA. Apoptosis is detected after 30 min-2 h of treatment, as observed by cell detachment, loss of membrane asymmetry, internucleosomal DNA degradation, appearance of mitochondrial transition permeability (MPT), and caspase and Bax activation. At longer treatment times, apoptosis is followed in vitro by secondary necrosis due to impaired mitochondrial activity and ATP depletion. Bile acid-induced apoptosis is a result of oxidative stress with increased ROS generation mainly by activation of plasma membrane enzymes, such as NAD(P)H oxidases and, to a lower extent, PLA2. These effects lead to a loss of mitochondrial potential and release of pro-apoptotic factors to the cytosol, which is confirmed by activation of caspase-9 and -3, but not caspase-8. This initial apoptotic steps promote cleavage of Bcl-2, allowing Bax activation and formation of additional pores in the mitochondrial membrane that amplify the apoptotic signal.

  2. Evaluation of first nonfebrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Wilden, Jessica A; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2012-08-15

    Nonfebrile seizures may indicate underlying disease or epilepsy. The patient history can often distinguish epileptic seizures from nonepileptic disorders by identifying the events directly preceding the convulsion, associated conditions, and details of the seizure, including triggers, length, and type of movements. Laboratory testing, lumbar puncture, and neuroimaging may be indicated depending on the presentation, suspected etiology, and patient's age. Electroencephalography should be performed 24 to 48 hours after a first seizure because of its substantial yield and ability to predict recurrence. Neuroimaging is recommended for adults, infants, and children who have cognitive or motor developmental delay or a focal seizure. Neuroimaging may be scheduled on an outpatient basis for patients with stable vital signs who are awake and have returned to neurologic baseline. Emergent neuroimaging should be performed in patients with persistent decreased mental status or a new focal neurologic abnormality. Although magnetic resonance imaging is generally preferred to head computed tomography because of its greater sensitivity for intracranial pathology, computed tomography should be performed if intracranial bleeding is suspected because of recent head trauma, coagulopathy, or severe headache. Treatment with an antiepileptic drug after a first seizure does not prevent epilepsy in the long term, but it decreases the short-term likelihood of a second seizure. Adults with an unremarkable neurologic examination, no comorbidities, and no known structural brain disease who have returned to neurologic baseline do not need to be started on antiepileptic therapy. Treatment decisions should weigh the benefit of decreased short-term risk of recurrence against the potential adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs.

  3. Seizures and Meperidine: Overstated and Underutilized.

    PubMed

    Schlick, Konrad H; Hemmen, Thomas M; Lyden, Patrick D

    2015-12-01

    Meperidine is used for pain control and treatment of shivering. Concerns about neurotoxicity, particularly seizures, have led to efforts limiting meperidine use. We reviewed the body of evidence linking meperidine to seizures. We searched PubMed for the terms meperidine, normeperidine, pethidine, and norpethidine; each was combined with the terms: seizure, epilepsy, epileptogenic, toxicity, overdose, seizure threshold, and convulsion. Articles were assessed for relevance. Semiologies were reviewed to ascertain seizure likelihood. Our search yielded 351 articles, of which 66 were relevant. Of these, 33 had primary clinical data on meperidine-associated seizures, comprising 50 patients. Twenty events were deemed likely to be seizures, 26 indeterminate, and 4 unlikely. Most studies were case reports. Confounding comorbidities were frequent. The evidence base for meperidine-associated seizures in man is scant. Seizure risk associated with meperidine appears to be overstated. The utility of meperidine should continue to be explored, especially for therapeutic hypothermia.

  4. Synchronization analysis of voltage-sensitive dye imaging during focal seizures in the rat neocortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, Daisuke; Bahar, Sonya

    2011-12-01

    Seizures are often assumed to result from an excess of synchronized neural activity. However, various recent studies have suggested that this is not necessarily the case. We investigate synchronization during focal neocortical seizures induced by injection of 4-aminopyridine (4AP) in the rat neocortex in vivo. Neocortical activity is monitored by field potential recording and by the fluorescence of the voltage-sensitive dye RH-1691. After removal of artifacts, the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) signal is analyzed using the nonlinear dynamics-based technique of stochastic phase synchronization in order to determine the degree of synchronization within the neocortex during the development and spread of each seizure event. Results show a large, statistically significant increase in synchronization during seizure activity. Synchrony is typically greater between closer pixel pairs during a seizure event; the entire seizure region is synchronized almost exactly in phase. This study represents, to our knowledge, the first application of synchronization analysis methods to mammalian VSD imaging in vivo. Our observations indicate a clear increase in synchronization in this model of focal neocortical seizures across a large area of the neocortex; a sharp increase in synchronization during seizure events was observed in all 37 seizures imaged. The results are consistent with a recent computational study which simulates the effect of 4AP in a neocortical neuron model.

  5. Generalized versus partial reflex seizures: a review.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gasparini, Sara; Spina, Edoardo; Mondello, Stefania; Labate, Angelo; Gambardella, Antonio; Aguglia, Umberto

    2014-08-01

    In this review we assess our currently available knowledge about reflex seizures with special emphasis on the difference between "generalized" reflex seizures induced by visual stimuli, thinking, praxis and language tasks, and "focal" seizures induced by startle, eating, music, hot water, somatosensory stimuli and orgasm. We discuss in particular evidence from animal, clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies supporting the concept that "generalized" reflex seizures, usually occurring in the setting of IGE, should be considered as focal seizures with quick secondary generalization. We also review recent advances in genetic and therapeutic approach of reflex seizures.

  6. A role for sodium and chloride in kainic acid-induced beading of inhibitory interneuron dendrites.

    PubMed

    Al-Noori, S; Swann, J W

    2000-01-01

    Excitotoxic injury of the dendrites of inhibitory interneurons could lead to decreases in their synaptic activation and explain subsequent local circuit hyperexcitability and epilepsy. A hallmark of dendrotoxicity, at least in principal neurons of the hippocampus and cortex, is focal or varicose swellings of dendritic arbors. In experiments reported here, transient (1h) exposure of hippocampal explant cultures to kainic acid produced marked focal swellings of the dendrites of parvalbumin-immunoreactive pyramidal basket cells in a highly reproducible and dose-dependent manner. At 5mM kainic acid, more than half of the immunopositive apical dendrites in area CA(1) had a beaded appearance. However, the somal volumes of these cells were unaltered by the same treatment. The presence of focal swellings was reversible with kainate washout and was not accompanied by interneuronal cell death. In contrast, exposure to much higher concentrations (300mM) of kainic acid resulted in the total loss of parvalbumin-positive interneurons from explants. Surprisingly, kainic acid-induced dendritic beading does not appear to be mediated by extracellular calcium. Beading was unaltered in the presence of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, the L-type calcium channel antagonist, nimodipine, cadmium, or by removing extracellular calcium. However, blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels by either tetrodotoxin or lidocaine abolished dendritic beading, while the activation of existing voltage-gated sodium channels by veratridine mimicked the kainic acid-induced dendritic beading. Finally, the removal of extracellular chloride prevented the kainic acid-induced dendritic beading.Thus, we suggest that the movement of Na(+) and Cl(-), rather than Ca(2+), into cells underlies the focal swellings of interneuron dendrites in hippocampus.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide Stimulates Butyric Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Fukushima, Kazuo; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that butyric acid, an extracellular metabolite from periodontopathic bacteria, induced apoptosis in murine thymocytes, splenic T cells, and human Jurkat T cells. In this study, we examined the ability of butyric acid to induce apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on this apoptosis. Butyric acid significantly inhibited the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody- and concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses in a dose-dependent fashion. This inhibition of PBMC growth by butyric acid depended on apoptosis in vitro. It was characterized by internucleosomal DNA digestion and revealed by gel electrophoresis followed by a colorimetric DNA fragmentation assay to occur in a concentration-dependent fashion. Butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis was accompanied by caspase-3 protease activity but not by caspase-1 protease activity. LPS potentiated butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed that LPS increased the proportion of sub-G1 cells and the number of late-stage apoptotic cells induced by butyric acid. Annexin V binding experiments with fractionated subpopulations of PBMC in flow cytometory revealed that LPS accelerated the butyric acid-induced CD3+-T-cell apoptosis followed by similar levels of both CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell apoptosis. The addition of LPS to PBMC cultures did not cause DNA fragmentation, suggesting that LPS was unable to induce PBMC apoptosis directly. These data suggest that LPS, in combination with butyric acid, potentiates CD3+ PBMC T-cell apoptosis and plays a role in the apoptotic depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. PMID:9864191

  8. Phase synchronization analysis of voltage-sensitive dye imaging during drug-induced epileptic seizures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, Daisuke; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Bahar, Sonya

    2008-03-01

    Epileptic seizures are generally held to result from excess and synchronized neural activity. However, recent studies have suggested that this is not necessarily the case. We investigate how the spatiotemporal pattern of synchronization changes during drug-induced in vivo neocortical seizures in rats. Epileptic seizures are caused by the potassium channel blocker 4-aminopyridine, which is often used in experiments to induce epileptic seizures. In our experiments, the neocortex is stained with the voltage-sensitive dye RH-1691. The intensity changes in dye fluorescence are measured by a CCD camera and are consistent with the signal from local field potential recording. We apply phase synchronization analysis to the voltage-sensitive dye signals from pairs of pixels in order to investigate the degree to which synchronization occurs, and how spatial patterns of synchrony may change, during the course of the seizure. Our preliminary results show that two distant pixels are well synchronized during a seizure event.

  9. [Case of frontal lobe epilepsy with gelastic seizures induced by emotion].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Sudo, Akira; Ito, Tomoshiro; Sano, Hitomi; Fukushima, Naoki

    2009-08-01

    Gelastic seizures without hypothalamic hamartoma is a rare forms of epilepsy. Here, we report the case of 4-year-old girl with gelastic seizures. There was no delay in mental or motor development of the patient. The patient exhibited a peculiar seizure pattern that suddenly clung to her mother stiffening her body and an outburst of laughter with no apparent cause. The frequency of the seizures increased over a period of 1 month. Although the brain MRI and interictal EEG showed no abnormality, ictal EEG showed a 14 Hz wave discharge and subsequent slow-wave activity and suppression in bilateral frontal areas. The seizures responded favorably to oral administration of carbamazepine. The induction of the seizures could be related to theophylline administration and emotional excitation.

  10. Gelastic seizures: A case of lateral frontal lobe epilepsy and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Stjepana; Deppe, Michael; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Schiffbauer, Hagen; Schwindt, Wolfram; Möddel, Gabriel; Dogan, Mujgan; Evers, Stefan

    2009-06-01

    We describe a 40-year-old patient with gelastic seizures triggered by hand movement. Despite nonlesional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electroencephalography (EEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are concordant with seizure onset in the right frontocentral area. Seizure semiology and EEG recordings imply involvement of mesial frontal structures remote from seizure initiation site. We reviewed all published cases on gelastic seizures of frontal lobe origin to find characteristic features. For further investigation of the phenomenon of movement-induced seizures, fMRI was performed using a finger tapping paradigm. Interictal fMRI revealed widespread activation of right motor cortex during finger tapping on either side outreaching the anatomical representation of the left finger. In line with this finding DTI revealed fiber track impairment in the right frontocentral region, supporting the hypothesis of a focal derangement. This case highlights the importance of complementary functional investigations in MRI-negative epilepsies.

  11. Automated seizure detection systems and their effectiveness for each type of seizure.

    PubMed

    Ulate-Campos, A; Coughlin, F; Gaínza-Lein, M; Fernández, I Sánchez; Pearl, P L; Loddenkemper, T

    2016-08-01

    Epilepsy affects almost 1% of the population and most of the approximately 20-30% of patients with refractory epilepsy have one or more seizures per month. Seizure detection devices allow an objective assessment of seizure frequency and a treatment tailored to the individual patient. A rapid recognition and treatment of seizures through closed-loop systems could potentially decrease morbidity and mortality in epilepsy. However, no single detection device can detect all seizure types. Therefore, the choice of a seizure detection device should consider the patient-specific seizure semiologies. This review of the literature evaluates seizure detection devices and their effectiveness for different seizure types. Our aim is to summarize current evidence, offer suggestions on how to select the most suitable seizure detection device for each patient and provide guidance to physicians, families and researchers when choosing or designing seizure detection devices. Further, this review will guide future prospective validation studies.

  12. Quinolones potentiate cefazolin-induced seizures in DBA/2 mice.

    PubMed Central

    De Sarro, A; Zappalá, M; Chimirri, A; Grasso, S; De Sarro, G B

    1993-01-01

    The behavioral and convulsant effects of cefazolin, a beta-lactam derivative, were studied after intraperitoneal administration to DBA/2 mice, a strain genetically susceptible to sound-induced seizures, and Swiss mice. DBA/2 mice were more susceptible to seizures induced by cefazolin than were Swiss mice. The proconvulsant effects of some quinolones on seizures evoked by intraperitoneal administration of cefazolin were also evaluated in DBA/2 mice. Our study also demonstrated that the order of proconvulsant activity in our epileptic model was pefloxacin > enoxacin > ofloxacin > rufloxacin > norfloxacin > cinoxacin > ciprofloxacin > nalidixic acid. The relationships between the chemical structures and proconvulsant activities of quinolone derivatives were studied. The relationship between lipophilicity and proconvulsant activity was also investigated. PMID:8395790

  13. Gelastic epilepsy and dysprosodia in a case of late-onset right frontal seizures.

    PubMed

    Cercy, Steven P; Kuluva, Joshua E

    2009-10-01

    Gelastic epilepsy (GE) is an uncommon type of seizure disorder characterized by stereotyped, unprovoked, inappropriate ictal laughter. GE is most frequently associated with hypothalamic hamartoma, with onset almost invariably occurring during childhood. GE also occurs occasionally with temporal and frontal cortical seizure foci. We describe an unusual case of senescent-onset GE with a right frontal seizure focus. In addition to laughter, dysprosodia was a clinical feature. Clinical and electroencephalographic evidence of seizure activity ceased on levetiracetam, and the patient showed concurrent improvement in cognitive function. We review the evidence for the cerebral representation of laughter and prosody, and discuss issues bearing on the differential diagnosis and management of GE.

  14. A novel genetic programming approach for epileptic seizure detection.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Arpit; Tiwari, Aruna; Krishna, Ramesh; Varma, Vishaal

    2016-02-01

    The human brain is a delicate mix of neurons (brain cells), electrical impulses and chemicals, known as neurotransmitters. Any damage has the potential to disrupt the workings of the brain and cause seizures. These epileptic seizures are the manifestations of epilepsy. The electroencephalograph (EEG) signals register average neuronal activity from the cerebral cortex and label changes in activity over large areas. A detailed analysis of these electroencephalograph (EEG) signals provides valuable insights into the mechanisms instigating epileptic disorders. Moreover, the detection of interictal spikes and epileptic seizures in an EEG signal plays an important role in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Automatic seizure detection methods are required, as these epileptic seizures are volatile and unpredictable. This paper deals with an automated detection of epileptic seizures in EEG signals using empirical mode decomposition (EMD) for feature extraction and proposes a novel genetic programming (GP) approach for classifying the EEG signals. Improvements in the standard GP approach are made using a Constructive Genetic Programming (CGP) in which constructive crossover and constructive subtree mutation operators are introduced. A hill climbing search is integrated in crossover and mutation operators to remove the destructive nature of these operators. A new concept of selecting the Globally Prime offspring is also presented to select the best fitness offspring generated during crossover. To decrease the time complexity of GP, a new dynamic fitness value computation (DFVC) is employed to increase the computational speed. We conducted five different sets of experiments to evaluate the performance of the proposed model in the classification of different mixtures of normal, interictal and ictal signals, and the accuracies achieved are outstandingly high. The experimental results are compared with the existing methods on same datasets, and these results affirm the potential use of

  15. Inflammatory markers associated with seizures.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Hong Seok; Kim, Sung Keun; Lee, Seo-Young

    2016-03-01

    Seizures can produce systemic changes, including elevated body temperature, white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein levels, which raises concern for potential infection. We describe seizure-induced inflammation-like responses and discuss how these changes may be distinguished from those associated with infection. We prospectively investigated 140 consecutive visits to the emergency room, in which patients presented with seizures. We defined elevated body temperature, white blood cell count, or C-reactive protein levels as inflammation-like responses. We investigated the occurrence of inflammation-like responses, characteristics of the seizures, neurological status at the initial visit, outcomes, and clinical findings to determine the presence of infection. We ascertained whether the patients had infection or not based on the overall information post-discharge. An inflammation-like response was observed in 56.3% of all visits and 19.3% were diagnosed with concurrent infection. Among the visits with inflammation-like response, 34.7% were shown to have an infection. Increases in body temperature and C-reactive protein levels were milder (<39°C and <6 mg/dl, respectively) in patients without infection compared to those with infection, whereas there was no difference in leukocytosis, with regard to the presence or absence of infection. Increased body temperature occurred only in cases of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, whereas leukocytosis and elevated C-reactive protein levels were reported in patients with any type of seizure. Body temperatures returned to normal within eight hours in uncomplicated cases. Seizures frequently induce an increase in body temperature, white blood cell count, or C-reactive protein levels, making it challenging to distinguish these changes from those associated with infection. Nonetheless, elevated body temperature in the absence of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, above 39̊C, or persisting for more than eight hours after

  16. Utility of different seizure induction protocols in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Gourav; Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha K

    2014-08-01

    Psychogenic non epileptic seizure (PNES) can be induced by several induction tests but their relative usefulness has not been evaluated. In this study, we report the sensitivity and specificity of various induction tests in the diagnosis of PNES and assess their discomfort level. The induction tests were: (a) compression of temple region (CTR), (b) verbal suggestion (VS), (c) tuning fork application (TFA), (d) moist swab application (MSA), (e) torch light stimulation (TLS) and (f) saline injection (SI). Up to 3 trials were done for each test except for normal saline injection which was given once. For comparison of these tests, patients with epileptic seizures were included as controls. The time to precipitate PNES was recorded and patients' discomfort levels were noted on a 0-10 scale. Video EEG was recorded in the PNES patients. 140 patients with PNES and 50 controls with epileptic seizures were included. The diagnostic yield of CTR was 65.7%, TFA 61.4%, MSA 60.7%, SI 55.6%, VS 54.3% and TLS 40.7%. These tests did not induce seizures in the controls. All these tests had 100% specificity and 100% positive predictive value in the diagnosis of PNES. The maximum discomfort was reported with SI and minimum with MSA. The similarity of efficacy and discomfort with CTR and TFA appear to be the most optimal induction techniques when compared with VS, AMS, TLS, and SI.

  17. Clavulanic acid induces penile erection and yawning in male rats: comparison with apomorphine.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Melis, Maria Rosaria; Angioni, Laura; Argiolas, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    The beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid induced penile erection and yawning in a dose dependent manner when given intraperitoneally (IP, 0.05-5mg/kg), perorally (OS, 0.1-5mg/kg) and intracereboventricularly (ICV, 0.01-5 μg/rat) to male rats. The effect resembles that of the dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine given subcutaneously (SC) (0.02-0.25mg/kg), although the responses of the latter followed a U inverted dose-response curve, disappearing at doses higher than 0.1mg/kg. Clavulanic acid responses were reduced by about 55% by haloperidol, a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist (0.1mg/kg IP), and by d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin, an oxytocin receptor antagonist (2 μg/rat ICV), both given 15 min before clavulanic acid. A higher reduction of clavulanic acid responses (more than 80%) was also found with morphine, an opioid receptor agonist (5mg/kg IP), and with mianserin, a serotonin 5HT(2c) receptor antagonist (0.2mg/kg SC). In contrast, no reduction was found with naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist (1mg/kg IP). The ability of haloperidol, d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin and morphine to reduce clavulanic acid induced penile erection and yawning suggests that clavulanic acid induces these responses, at least in part, by increasing central dopaminergic neurotransmission. Dopamine in turn activates oxytocinergic neurotransmission and centrally released oxytocin induces penile erection and yawning. However, since both penile erection and yawning episodes were reduced not only by the blockade of central dopamine and oxytocin receptors and by the stimulation of opioid receptors, which inhibits oxytocinergic neurotransmission, but also by mianserin, an increase of central serotonin neurotransmission is also likely to participate in these clavulanic acid responses.

  18. Multiple Sclerosis: Can It Cause Seizures?

    MedlinePlus

    ... it cause seizures? Is there any connection between multiple sclerosis and epilepsy? Answers from B Mark Keegan, M. ... seizures are more common in people who have multiple sclerosis (MS) than in those who don't have ...

  19. Neuronal desynchronization as a trigger for seizure generation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Fleming, Ioana Nicolaescu; Colpan, Mustafa Efkan; Mogul, David J

    2008-02-01

    Experimental reports have appeared which challenge the dogma that epileptic seizures arise as a consequence of neuronal hypersynchronization. We sought to explore what mechanisms that desynchronize neuronal firing could induce epileptic seizures. A computer model of connections in a mammalian hippocampal slice preparation was constructed including two recently-reported distinct inhibitory feedback circuits. When inhibition by interneurons that synapse on pyramidal dendrites was decreased, highly localized seizure-like bursting was observed in the CA3 region similar to that which occurs experimentally under GABAergic blockade. In contrast, when inhibition by interneurons that synapse in the axosomatic region was similarly decreased, no such bursting was observed. However, when this transient inhibition was increased, normal coordinated spread of excitation was interrupted by high-frequency localized seizure-like bursting. The increase of this inhibitory input resulted in decreased cell coupling of pyramidal neurons. A decrease in phase coherence was initially observed until seizure-like activity initiated causing a net increase in coherence as has been observed in epileptic patients. These results provide a possible pathway in which a decrease in synchronization could provide the trigger for inducing epileptiform activity.

  20. EEG seizure detection and prediction algorithms: a survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alotaiby, Turkey N.; Alshebeili, Saleh A.; Alshawi, Tariq; Ahmad, Ishtiaq; Abd El-Samie, Fathi E.

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy patients experience challenges in daily life due to precautions they have to take in order to cope with this condition. When a seizure occurs, it might cause injuries or endanger the life of the patients or others, especially when they are using heavy machinery, e.g., deriving cars. Studies of epilepsy often rely on electroencephalogram (EEG) signals in order to analyze the behavior of the brain during seizures. Locating the seizure period in EEG recordings manually is difficult and time consuming; one often needs to skim through tens or even hundreds of hours of EEG recordings. Therefore, automatic detection of such an activity is of great importance. Another potential usage of EEG signal analysis is in the prediction of epileptic activities before they occur, as this will enable the patients (and caregivers) to take appropriate precautions. In this paper, we first present an overview of seizure detection and prediction problem and provide insights on the challenges in this area. Second, we cover some of the state-of-the-art seizure detection and prediction algorithms and provide comparison between these algorithms. Finally, we conclude with future research directions and open problems in this topic.

  1. From cognitive networks to seizures: Stimulus evoked dynamics in a coupled cortical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaejin; Ermentrout, Bard; Bodner, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neuropathologies worldwide. Seizures arising in epilepsy or in seizure disorders are characterized generally by uncontrolled spread of excitation and electrical activity to a limited region or even over the entire cortex. While it is generally accepted that abnormal excessive firing and synchronization of neuron populations lead to seizures, little is known about the precise mechanisms underlying human epileptic seizures, the mechanisms of transitions from normal to paroxysmal activity, or about how seizures spread. Further complication arises in that seizures do not occur with a single type of dynamics but as many different phenotypes and genotypes with a range of patterns, synchronous oscillations, and time courses. The concept of preventing, terminating, or modulating seizures and/or paroxysmal activity through stimulation of brain has also received considerable attention. The ability of such stimulation to prevent or modulate such pathological activity may depend on identifiable parameters. In this work, firing rate networks with inhibitory and excitatory populations were modeled. Network parameters were chosen to model normal working memory behaviors. Two different models of cognitive activity were developed. The first model consists of a single network corresponding to a local area of the brain. The second incorporates two networks connected through sparser recurrent excitatory connectivity with transmission delays ranging from approximately 3 ms within local populations to 15 ms between populations residing in different cortical areas. The effect of excitatory stimulation to activate working memory behavior through selective persistent activation of populations is examined in the models, and the conditions and transition mechanisms through which that selective activation breaks down producing spreading paroxysmal activity and seizure states are characterized. Specifically, we determine critical parameters and architectural

  2. Mirthful gelastic seizures with ictal involvement of temporobasal regions.

    PubMed

    Oehl, Bernhard; Biethahn, Silke; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    Ictal laughter is the cardinal clinical sign of gelastic seizures in hypothalamic hamartomas and may also occur in extrahypothalamic epilepsies. Laughing consists of an affective and a motor component. It has been suggested that the affective component may result from an involvement of temporobasal structures, whereas the motor part is related to an involvement of the mesial frontal cortex. So far, evidence is based on a limited number of cases with spontaneously recorded seizures or in whom electrical stimulation of invasive intracranial EEG recordings has been performed. We report a patient who suffered from epigastric psychic auras, complex partial seizures with a gelastic component and secondarily generalized seizures. To evaluate a possible epileptogenic role of the hippocampus and dysplastic region in the right mid-temporal gyrus, intracranial monitoring with subdural electrodes over the temporobasal and temporolateral regions, as well as a deep brain electrode in the hippocampus, were performed. During the intial part of the seizure, consisting of an intense retrosternal ascending feeling with sexual connotation, rhythmic spikes in temporolateral contacts were detected. Concomitant with the development of smiling and laughter, a rhythmic activity over the temporobasal regions evolved. The patient became seizure-free following right temporal lobe resection. This case supports the assumption that ictal involvement of temporobasal structures is crucial for gelastic seizure components in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Progression to temporobasal regions was associated with the feeling of happiness whereas motor components of laughter occurred later. These findings are in accordance with the interpretation of surface recordings by Dericioglu and co-workers in a similar previous case. [Published with video sequences].

  3. Toward a noninvasive automatic seizure control system in rats with transcranial focal stimulations via tripolar concentric ring electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Liu, Xiang; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Mucio-Ramirez, Samuel; Liu, Yuhong; Sun, Yan L.; Kay, Steven M.; Besio, Walter G.

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately one percent of the world population. Antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in approximately 30% of patients and have side effects. We are developing a noninvasive, or minimally invasive, transcranial focal electrical stimulation system through our novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes to control seizures. In this study we demonstrate feasibility of an automatic seizure control system in rats with pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures through single and multiple stimulations. These stimulations are automatically triggered by a real-time electrographic seizure activity detector based on a disjunctive combination of detections from a cumulative sum algorithm and a generalized likelihood ratio test. An average seizure onset detection accuracy of 76.14% was obtained for the test set (n = 13). Detection of electrographic seizure activity was accomplished in advance of the early behavioral seizure activity in 76.92% of the cases. Automatically triggered stimulation significantly (p = 0.001) reduced the electrographic seizure activity power in the once stimulated group compared to controls in 70% of the cases. To the best of our knowledge this is the first closed-loop automatic seizure control system based on noninvasive electrical brain stimulation using tripolar concentric ring electrode electrographic seizure activity as feedback. PMID:22772373

  4. Serotonin neurones have anti-convulsant effects and reduce seizure-induced mortality

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Gordon F; Murray, Nicholas M; Hajek, Michael A; Richerson, George B

    2014-01-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the leading cause of death in patients with refractory epilepsy. Defects in central control of breathing are important contributors to the pathophysiology of SUDEP, and serotonin (5-HT) system dysfunction may be involved. Here we examined the effect of 5-HT neurone elimination or 5-HT reduction on seizure risk and seizure-induced mortality. Adult Lmx1bf/f/p mice, which lack >99% of 5-HT neurones in the CNS, and littermate controls (Lmx1bf/f) were subjected to acute seizure induction by maximal electroshock (MES) or pilocarpine, variably including electroencephalography, electrocardiography, plethysmography, mechanical ventilation or pharmacological therapy. Lmx1bf/f/p mice had a lower seizure threshold and increased seizure-induced mortality. Breathing ceased during most seizures without recovery, whereas cardiac activity persisted for up to 9 min before terminal arrest. The mortality rate of mice of both genotypes was reduced by mechanical ventilation during the seizure or 5-HT2A receptor agonist pretreatment. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram reduced mortality of Lmx1bf/f but not of Lmx1bf/f/p mice. In C57BL/6N mice, reduction of 5-HT synthesis with para-chlorophenylalanine increased MES-induced seizure severity but not mortality. We conclude that 5-HT neurones raise seizure threshold and decrease seizure-related mortality. Death ensued from respiratory failure, followed by terminal asystole. Given that SUDEP often occurs in association with generalised seizures, some mechanisms causing death in our model might be shared with those leading to SUDEP. This model may help determine the relationship between seizures, 5-HT system dysfunction, breathing and death, which may lead to novel ways to prevent SUDEP. PMID:25107926

  5. TRPV1 promotes repetitive febrile seizures by pro-inflammatory cytokines in immature brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Xian; Yu, Fang; Sanchez, Russell M; Liu, Yu-Qiang; Min, Jia-Wei; Hu, Jiang-Jian; Bsoul, Najeeb Bassam; Han, Song; Yin, Jun; Liu, Wan-Hong; He, Xiao-Hua; Peng, Bi-Wen

    2015-08-01

    Febrile seizure (FS) is the most common seizure disorder in children, and children with FS are regarded as a high risk for the eventual development of epilepsy. Brain inflammation may be implicated in the mechanism of FS. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is believed to act as a monitor and regulator of body temperature. The role of inflammation in synaptic plasticity mediation indicates that TRPV1 is relevant to several nervous system diseases, such as epilepsy. Here, we report a critical role for TRPV1 in a febrile seizure mouse model and reveal increased levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the immature brain. Animals were subjected to hyperthermia for 30 min, which generates seizures lasting approximately 20 min, and then were used for experiments. To invoke frequently repetitive febrile seizures, mice are exposed to hyperthermia for three times daily at an interval of 4h between every time induced seizure, and a total of 4 days to induce. Behavioral testing for febrile seizures revealed that a TRPV1 knock-out mouse model demonstrated a prolonged onset latency and a shortened duration and seizure grade of febrile seizure when compared with wild type (WT) mice. The expression levels of both TRPV1 mRNA and protein increased after a hyperthermia-induced febrile seizure in WT mice. Notably, TRPV1 activation resulted in a significant elevation in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and HMGB1) in the hippocampus and cortex. These data indicate that the reduction of TRPV1 expression parallels a decreased susceptibility to febrile seizures. Thus, preventative strategies might be developed for use during febrile seizures.

  6. Gelastic seizures: not always hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christina S; Parrent, Andrew G; Burneo, Jorge G

    2007-12-01

    Gelastic seizures are often associated with hypothalamic hamartomas. However, focal cortical dysplasias can also cause "laughing seizures", and such cases can be difficult to localize with EEG. This case report presents a 29-year-old woman who was successfully rendered free of gelastic seizures after resection of a frontal cortical dysplasia, localized through MRI and SPECT imaging.[Published with video sequences].

  7. Characterising seizures in anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis with dynamic causal modelling.

    PubMed

    Cooray, Gerald K; Sengupta, Biswa; Douglas, Pamela; Englund, Marita; Wickstrom, Ronny; Friston, Karl

    2015-09-01

    We characterised the pathophysiology of seizure onset in terms of slow fluctuations in synaptic efficacy using EEG in patients with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) encephalitis. EEG recordings were obtained from two female patients with anti-NMDA-R encephalitis with recurrent partial seizures (ages 19 and 31). Focal electrographic seizure activity was localised using an empirical Bayes beamformer. The spectral density of reconstructed source activity was then characterised with dynamic causal modelling (DCM). Eight models were compared for each patient, to evaluate the relative contribution of changes in intrinsic (excitatory and inhibitory) connectivity and endogenous afferent input. Bayesian model comparison established a role for changes in both excitatory and inhibitory connectivity during seizure activity (in addition to changes in the exogenous input). Seizures in both patients were associated with a sequence of changes in inhibitory and excitatory connectivity; a transient increase in inhibitory connectivity followed by a transient increase in excitatory connectivity and a final peak of excitatory-inhibitory balance at seizure offset. These systematic fluctuations in excitatory and inhibitory gain may be characteristic of (anti NMDA-R encephalitis) seizures. We present these results as a case study and replication to motivate analyses of larger patient cohorts, to see whether our findings generalise and further characterise the mechanisms of seizure activity in anti-NMDA-R encephalitis.

  8. Search and Seizure in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickok, Angelia B.

    1980-01-01

    Although problems of drug abuse, bomb threats, theft, and concealed weapons sometimes make search and seizure necessary, the student's rights must be protected through proper legal procedures. The article presents guidelines for conducting locker and personal searches and for educating students, teachers, and administrators on student rights. (DS)

  9. Microglial ablation and lipopolysaccharide preconditioning affects pilocarpine-induced seizures in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrione, M.M.; Mirrione, M.M.; Konomosa, D.K.; Ioradanis, G.; Dewey, S.L.; Agzzid, A.; Heppnerd, F.L.; Tsirka, St.E.

    2010-04-01

    Activated microglia have been associated with neurodegeneration in patients and in animal models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE), however their precise functions as neurotoxic or neuroprotective is a topic of significant investigation. To explore this, we examined the effects of pilocarpine-induced seizures in transgenic mice where microglia/macrophages were conditionally ablated. We found that unilateral ablation of microglia from the dorsal hippocampus did not alter acute seizure sensitivity. However, when this procedure was coupled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preconditioning (1 mg/kg given 24 h prior to acute seizure), we observed a significant pro-convulsant phenomenon. This effect was associated with lower metabolic activation in the ipsilateral hippocampus during acute seizures, and could be attributed to activity in the mossy fiber pathway. These findings reveal that preconditioning with LPS 24 h prior to seizure induction may have a protective effect which is abolished by unilateral hippocampal microglia/macrophage ablation.

  10. Mechanisms and effects of seizures in the immature brain.

    PubMed

    Nardou, Romain; Ferrari, Diana C; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2013-08-01

    The developing immature brain is not simply a small adult brain but rather possesses unique physiological properties. These include neuronal ionic currents that differ markedly from those in the adult brain, typically being longer-lasting and less selective. This enables immature heterogeneous neurons to connect and fire together but at the same time, along with other features may contribute to the enhanced propensity of the developing brain to become epileptic. Indeed, immature neurons tend to readily synchronize and thus generate seizures. Here, we review the differences between the immature and adult brain, with particular focus on the developmental sequence of γ-aminobutyric acid that excites immature neurons while being inhibitory in the normal adult brain. We review the mechanisms underlying the developmental changes to intracellular chloride levels, as well as how epileptiform activity can drive pathologic changes to chloride balance in the brain. We show that regulation of intracellular chloride is one important factor that underlies both the ease with which seizures can be generated and the facilitation of further seizures. We stress in particular the importance of understanding normal developmental sequences and how they are interrupted by seizures and other insults, and how this knowledge has led to the identification of potential novel treatments for conditions such as neonatal seizures.

  11. The effects of inferior olive lesion on strychnine seizure

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.C.; Chung, E.Y.; Van Woert, M.H. )

    1990-10-01

    Bilateral inferior olive lesions, produced by systemic administration of the neurotoxin 3-acetylpyridine (3AP) produce a proconvulsant state specific for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus. We have proposed that these phenomena are mediated through increased excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, through activation of glutamate receptors, in response to climbing fiber deafferentation. An increase in quisqualic acid (QA)-displaceable ({sup 3}H)AMPA ((RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid) binding in cerebella from inferior olive-lesioned rats was observed, but no difference in ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding displaced by glutamate, kainic acid (KA) or glutamate diethylester (GDEE) was seen. The excitatory amino acid antagonists GDEE and MK-801 ((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d)cyclo-hepten-5,10 imine) were tested as anticonvulsants for strychnine-induced seizures in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned and control rats. Neither drug effected seizures in control rats, however, both GDEE and MK-801 produced a leftward shift in the strychnine-seizure dose-response curve in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned rats. GDEE also inhibited strychnine-induced myoclonus in the lesioned group, while MK-801 had no effect on myoclonus. The decreased threshold for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus in the 3AP-inferior olive-lesioned rats may be due to an increase in glutamate receptors as suggested by the ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding data.

  12. Ethosuximide reduces electrographical and behavioral correlates of alcohol withdrawal seizure in DBA/2J mice

    PubMed Central

    Riegle, Melissa A.; Masicampo, Melissa M.; Caulder, Erin H.; Godwin, Dwayne W.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse depresses the nervous system and, upon cessation, rebound hyperexcitability can result in withdrawal seizure. Withdrawal symptoms, including seizures, may drive individuals to relapse, thus representing a significant barrier to recovery. Our lab previously identified an upregulation of the thalamic T-type calcium (T channel) isoform CaV3.2 as a potential contributor to the generation and propagation of seizures in a model of withdrawal. In the present study, we examined whether ethosuximide (ETX), a T-channel antagonist, could decrease the severity of ethanol withdrawal seizures by evaluating electrographical and behavioral correlates of seizure activity. DBA/2J mice were exposed to an intermittent ethanol exposure paradigm. Mice were treated with saline or ETX in each withdrawal period, and cortical EEG activity was recorded to determine seizure severity. We observed a progression in seizure activity with each successive withdrawal period. Treatment with ETX reduced ethanol withdrawal-induced spike and wave discharges (SWDs), in terms of absolute number, duration of events, and contribution to EEG power reduction in the 6–10 Hz frequency range. We also evaluated the effects of ETX on handling-induced convulsions. Overall, we observed a decrease in handling-induced convulsion severity in mice treated with ETX. Our findings suggest that ETX may be a useful pharmacological agent for studies of alcohol withdrawal and treatment of resulting seizures. PMID:24933286

  13. ACTH and prednisone in childhood seizure disorders.

    PubMed

    Snead, O C; Benton, J W; Myers, G J

    1983-08-01

    We treated 116 children with ACTH or prednisone. Fifty-two had infantile spasms with hypsarhythmia, and 64 had other types of intractable seizures. ACTH completely controlled seizures in all patients with infantile spasms and hypsarhythmia and 74% of those with other types of seizures. Prednisone controlled 51% of patients with infantile spasms and none with other seizures. Serious side effects were minimal for both drugs, and recurrent seizures occurred in 40 to 50% of patients within 4 to 14 months after completion of therapy.

  14. Comparative neuroprotective profile of statins in quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    A possible neuroprotective role has been recently suggested for 3H3MGCoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Here, we sought to determine neuroprotective effect of statins in quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats. Rats were surgically administered quinolinic acid and treated with Atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (15, 30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (5, 10 mg/kg) once daily up to 3 weeks. Atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (10 mg/kg) treatment significantly attenuated the quinolinic acid induced behavioral (locomotor activity, rotarod performance and beam walk test), biochemical (lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration, SOD and catalase), mitochondrial enzyme complex alterations in rats suggesting their free radical scavenging potential. Additionally, atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (10 mg/kg) significantly decrease the TNF-α level and striatal lesion volume in quinolinic acid treated animals indicating their anti-inflammatory effects. In comparing the protective effect of different statins, atorvastatin is effective at both the doses while simvastatin and fluvastatins at respective lower doses were not able to produce the protective effect in quinolinic acid treated animals. These modulations can account, at least partly, for the beneficial effect of statins in our rodent model of striatal degeneration. Our findings show that statins could be explored as possible neuroprotective agents for neurodegenerative disorders such as HD.

  15. Obestatin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Konturek, Peter; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide derived from the proghrelin, has been shown to exhibit some protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present study was to determine the effect of obestatin administration on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Obestatin was administered intraperitoneally twice a day at a dose of 8 nmol/kg, starting 24 h after the induction of colitis. Seven or 14 days after the induction of colitis, the healing rate of the colon was evaluated. Results. Treatment with obestatin after induction of colitis accelerated the healing of colonic wall damage and this effect was associated with a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase and content of interleukin-1β. Moreover, obestatin administration significantly reversed the colitis-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Conclusion. Administration of exogenous obestatin exhibits therapeutic effects in the course of acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect is related, at least in part, to the obestatin-evoked anti-inflammatory effect, an improvement of local blood flow, and an increase in cell proliferation in colonic mucosa. PMID:26798415

  16. Obestatin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Konturek, Peter; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide derived from the proghrelin, has been shown to exhibit some protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present study was to determine the effect of obestatin administration on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Obestatin was administered intraperitoneally twice a day at a dose of 8 nmol/kg, starting 24 h after the induction of colitis. Seven or 14 days after the induction of colitis, the healing rate of the colon was evaluated. Results. Treatment with obestatin after induction of colitis accelerated the healing of colonic wall damage and this effect was associated with a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase and content of interleukin-1β. Moreover, obestatin administration significantly reversed the colitis-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Conclusion. Administration of exogenous obestatin exhibits therapeutic effects in the course of acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect is related, at least in part, to the obestatin-evoked anti-inflammatory effect, an improvement of local blood flow, and an increase in cell proliferation in colonic mucosa.

  17. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis.

  18. Polyunsaturated Branched-Chain Fatty Acid Geranylgeranoic Acid Induces Unfolded Protein Response in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwao, Chieko; Shidoji, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    The acyclic diterpenoid acid geranylgeranoic acid (GGA) has been reported to induce autophagic cell death in several human hepatoma-derived cell lines; however, the molecular mechanism for this remains unknown. In the present study, several diterpenoids were examined for ability to induce XBP1 splicing and/or lipotoxicity for human hepatoma cell lines. Here we show that three groups of diterpenoids emerged: 1) GGA, 2,3-dihydro GGA and 9-cis retinoic acid induce cell death and XBP1 splicing; 2) all-trans retinoic acid induces XBP1 splicing but little cell death; and 3) phytanic acid, phytenic acid and geranylgeraniol induce neither cell death nor XBP1 splicing. GGA-induced ER stress/ unfolded protein response (UPR) and its lipotoxicity were both blocked by co-treatment with oleic acid. The blocking activity of oleic acid for GGA-induced XBP1 splicing was not attenuated by methylation of oleic acid. These findings strongly suggest that GGA at micromolar concentrations induces the so-called lipid-induced ER stress response/UPR, which is oleate-suppressive, and shows its lipotoxicity in human hepatoma cells. PMID:26186544

  19. Nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo

    2015-02-01

    Nucleic acids derived from viral pathogens are typical pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In mammals, the recognition of viral nucleic acids by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which include Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RLRs), induces the release of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferons (IFNs) through the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3/7 pathways, triggering the host antiviral state. However, whether nucleic acids can induce similar antiviral immunity in invertebrates remains ambiguous. Several studies have reported that nucleic acid mimics, especially dsRNA mimic poly(I:C), can strongly induce non-specific antiviral immune responses in insects, shrimp, and oyster. This behavior shows multiple similarities to the hallmarks of mammalian IFN responses. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates. We also discuss the potential recognition and regulatory mechanisms that confer non-specific antiviral immunity on invertebrate hosts.

  20. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis. PMID:27598133

  1. The influence of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic-acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Maduzia, D; Matuszyk, A; Ceranowicz, D; Warzecha, Z; Ceranowicz, P; Fyderek, K; Galazka, K; Dembinski, A

    2015-12-01

    Ghrelin has been primarily shown to exhibit protective and therapeutic effect in the gut. Pretreatment with ghrelin inhibits the development of acute pancreatitis and accelerates pancreatic recovery in the course of this disease. In the stomach, ghrelin reduces gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol, stress or alendronate, as well as accelerates the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric and duodenal ulcer. The aim of present studies was to investigate the effect of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic acid-induced colitis. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Animals were treated intraperitoneally with saline (control) or ghrelin (4, 8 or 16 nmol/kg/dose). Saline or ghrelin was given twice: 8 and 1 h before induction of colitis. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 1 ml of 4% solution of acetic acid and the severity of colitis was assessed 1 or 24 hours after induction of inflammation. Rectal administration of acetic acid induced colitis in all animals. Damage of colonic wall was seen at the macroscopic and microscopic level. This effect was accompanied by a reduction in colonic blood flow and mucosal DNA synthesis. Moreover, induction of colitis significantly increased mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β), activity of myeloperoxidase and concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA). Mucosal activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was reduced. Pretreatment with ghrelin reduced the area and grade of mucosal damage. This effect was accompanied by an improvement of blood flow, DNA synthesis and SOD activity in colonic mucosa. Moreover, ghrelin administration reduced mucosal concentration of IL-1β and MDA, as well as decreased mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Administration of ghrelin protects the large bowel against the development of the acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect seems to be related to the ghrelin-evoked anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

  2. Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.; Eisenstadt, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EEG data (e-data), artifact data (f-data) via application of a quadratic zero-phase filter of the raw data, artifact-filtered data (g- data) and that was the residual after subtracting f-data from e-data, and a low-pass-filtered version (h-data) of g-data. Two different seizures were analyzed for the same patient. Several nonlinear measures uniquely indicate an epileptic seizure in both cases, including an abrupt decrease in the time per wave cycle in f-data, an abrupt increase in the Kolmogorov entropy and in the correlation dimension for e-h data, and an abrupt increase in the correlation dimension for e-h data. The transition from normal to seizure state also is characterized by distinctly different trends in the nonlinear measures for each seizure and may be potential seizure predictors for this patient. Surrogate analysis of e-data shows that statistically significant nonlinear structure is present during the non-seizure, transition , and seizure epoches.

  3. Inferring Seizure Frequency From Brief EEG Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Westover, M. Brandon; Bianchi, Matt T.; Shafi, Mouhsin; Hoch, Daniel B.; Cole, Andrew J.; Chiappa, Keith; Cash, Sydney S.

    2012-01-01

    Routine EEGs remain a cornerstone test in caring for people with epilepsy. Although rare, a self-limited seizure (clinical or electrographic only) may be observed during such brief EEGs. The implications of observing a seizure in this situation, especially with respect to inferring the underlying seizure frequency, are unclear. The issue is complicated by the inaccuracy of patient-reported estimations of seizure frequency. The treating clinician is often left to wonder whether the single seizure indicates very frequent seizures, or if it is of lesser significance. We applied standard concepts of probabilistic inference to a simple model of seizure incidence to provide some guidance for clinicians facing this situation. Our analysis establishes upper and lower bounds on the seizure rate implied by observing a single seizure during routine EEG. Not surprisingly, with additional information regarding the expected seizure rate, these bounds can be further constrained. This framework should aid the clinician in applying a more principled approach toward decision making in the setting of a single seizure on a routine EEG. PMID:23545768

  4. Inferring seizure frequency from brief EEG recordings.

    PubMed

    Westover, M Brandon; Bianchi, Matt T; Shafi, Mouhsin; Hoch, Daniel B; Cole, Andrew J; Chiappa, Keith; Cash, Sydney S

    2013-04-01

    Routine EEGs remain a cornerstone test in caring for people with epilepsy. Although rare, a self-limited seizure (clinical or electrographic only) may be observed during such brief EEGs. The implications of observing a seizure in this situation, especially with respect to inferring the underlying seizure frequency, are unclear. The issue is complicated by the inaccuracy of patient-reported estimations of seizure frequency. The treating clinician is often left to wonder whether the single seizure indicates very frequent seizures, or if it is of lesser significance. We applied standard concepts of probabilistic inference to a simple model of seizure incidence to provide some guidance for clinicians facing this situation. Our analysis establishes upper and lower bounds on the seizure rate implied by observing a single seizure during routine EEG. Not surprisingly, with additional information regarding the expected seizure rate, these bounds can be further constrained. This framework should aid the clinician in applying a more principled approach toward decision making in the setting of a single seizure on a routine EEG.

  5. Anticonvulsant effect of xenon on neonatal asphyxial seizures.

    PubMed

    Azzopardi, Denis; Robertson, Nicola J; Kapetanakis, Andrew; Griffiths, James; Rennie, Janet M; Mathieson, Sean R; Edwards, A David

    2013-09-01

    Xenon, a monoatomic gas with very high tissue solubility, is a non-competitive inhibitor of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor, has antiapoptotic effects and is neuroprotective following hypoxic ischaemic injury in animals. Xenon may be expected to have anticonvulsant effects through glutamate receptor blockade, but this has not previously been demonstrated clinically. We examined seizure activity on the real time and amplitude integrated EEG records of 14 full-term infants with perinatal asphyxial encephalopathy treated within 12 h of birth with 30% inhaled xenon for 24 h combined with 72 h of moderate systemic hypothermia. Seizures were identified on 5 of 14 infants. Seizures stopped during xenon therapy but recurred within a few minutes of withdrawing xenon and stopped again after xenon was restarted. Our data show that subanaesthetic levels of xenon may have an anticonvulsant effect. Inhaled xenon may be a valuable new therapy in this hard-to-treat population.

  6. Role of hepatocyte S6K1 in palmitic acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, lipotoxicity, insulin resistance and in oleic acid-induced protection.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Virginia; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Muntané, Jordi; Kozma, Sara C; Valverde, Ángela M

    2015-06-01

    The excess of saturated free fatty acids, such as palmitic acid, that induces lipotoxicity in hepatocytes, has been implicated in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease also associated with insulin resistance. By contrast, oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, attenuates the effects of palmitic acid. We evaluated whether palmitic acid is directly associated with both insulin resistance and lipoapoptosis in mouse and human hepatocytes and the impact of oleic acid in the molecular mechanisms that mediate both processes. In human and mouse hepatocytes palmitic acid at a lipotoxic concentration triggered early activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related kinases, induced the apoptotic transcription factor CHOP, activated caspase 3 and increased the percentage of apoptotic cells. These effects concurred with decreased IR/IRS1/Akt insulin pathway. Oleic acid suppressed the toxic effects of palmitic acid on ER stress activation, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance. Besides, oleic acid suppressed palmitic acid-induced activation of S6K1. This protection was mimicked by pharmacological or genetic inhibition of S6K1 in hepatocytes. In conclusion, this is the first study highlighting the activation of S6K1 by palmitic acid as a common and novel mechanism by which its inhibition by oleic acid prevents ER stress, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance in hepatocytes.

  7. Polysomnographic assessment of spells in sleep: nocturnal seizures versus parasomnias.

    PubMed

    Dyken, M E; Yamada, T; Lin-Dyken, D C

    2001-12-01

    A dilemma can arise when attempting to distinguish a nocturnal seizure from a parasomnia because both phenomena can be characterized by a general increase in motor and autonomic activity with a transient reduction in the level of consciousness. An additional problem is that an accurate clinical diagnosis generally relies heavily on a detailed history. As sleep related disorders occur at a time when the patient is not fully cognizant, polysomnographic analysis can on occasion supplement for the intrinsic paucity of detailed history. Simultaneously, correlating the clinical and polysomnographic analysis immediately prior to, during, and following an event of interest, can be helpful in differentiating nocturnal seizures from parasomnias.

  8. Seizures as imbalanced up states: excitatory and inhibitory conductances during seizure-like events.

    PubMed

    Žiburkus, Jokubas; Cressman, John R; Schiff, Steven J

    2013-03-01

    Precisely timed and dynamically balanced excitatory (E) and inhibitory (I) conductances underlie the basis of neural network activity. Normal E/I balance is often shifted in epilepsy, resulting in neuronal network hyperexcitability and recurrent seizures. However, dynamics of the actual excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductances (ge and gi, respectively) during seizures remain unknown. To study the dynamics of E and I network balance, we calculated ge and gi during the initiation, body, and termination of seizure-like events (SLEs) in the rat hippocampus in vitro. Repetitive emergent SLEs in 4-aminopyridine (100 μM) and reduced extracellular magnesium (0.6 mM) were recorded in the identified CA1 pyramidal cells (PC) and oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM) interneurons. Calculated ge/gi ratio dynamics showed that the initiation stage of the SLEs was dominated by inhibition in the PCs and was more balanced in the O-LM cells. During the body of the SLEs, the balance shifted toward excitation, with ge and gi peaking in both cell types at nearly the same time. In the termination phase, PCs were again dominated by inhibition, whereas O-LM cells experienced persistent excitatory synaptic barrage. In this way, increased excitability of interneurons may play roles in both seizure initiation (žiburkus J, Cressman JR, Barreto E, Schiff SJ. J Neurophysiol 95: 3948-3954, 2006) and in their termination. Overall, SLE stages can be characterized in PC and O-LM cells by dynamically distinct changes in the balance of ge and gi, where a temporal sequence of imbalance shifts with the changing firing patterns of the cellular subtypes comprising the hyperexcitable microcircuits.

  9. Cyclooxygenase-1 as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Seizure Suppression: Evidences from Zebrafish Pentylenetetrazole-Seizure Model

    PubMed Central

    Barbalho, Patrícia Gonçalves; Carvalho, Benilton de Sá; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Maurer-Morelli, Claudia Vianna

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenases (COX)-1 and -2 are isoenzymes that catalyze the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandins (PGs). COX-2 and PGs are rapidly increased following seizures and are known to play important roles in the neuroinflammatory process. COX-2 isoform has been predominantly explored as the most suitable target for pharmacological intervention in epilepsy studies, while COX-1 remains poorly investigated. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of selective COX-1 inhibitor or selective COX-2 inhibitor on seizure suppression in the zebrafish pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-seizure model. Zebrafish larvae were incubated in 5 μM of SC-236 for 24 h or 2.8 μM of SC-560 for 30 min, followed by exposure to 15 mM PTZ for 60 min. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis was carried out to investigate transcription levels of cox1 (ptgs1), as well as to determine cfos levels, used as a marker for neuronal activity. Effects of selective COX-2 or COX-1 inhibitors on locomotor activity response (velocity and distance moved) during PTZ exposure were evaluated using the Danio Vision video-tracking system. Our results showed an inducible expression of the cox1 gene after 60 min of PTZ exposure. Cox1 mRNA levels were upregulated compared with the control group. We found that COX-2 inhibition treatment had no effect on zebrafish PTZ-induced seizures. On the other hand, COX-1 inhibition significantly attenuated PTZ-induced increase of locomotor activity and reduced the c-fos mRNA expression. These findings suggest that COX-1 inhibition rather than COX-2 has positive effects on seizure suppression in the zebrafish PTZ-seizure model. PMID:27895618

  10. Potent anti-seizure effects of D-leucine.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Adam L; Santos, Polan; O'Riordan, Kenneth J; Stafstrom, Carl E; Hardwick, J Marie

    2015-10-01

    There are no effective treatments for millions of patients with intractable epilepsy. High-fat ketogenic diets may provide significant clinical benefit but are challenging to implement. Low carbohydrate levels appear to be essential for the ketogenic diet to work, but the active ingredients in dietary interventions remain elusive, and a role for ketogenesis has been challenged. A potential antiseizure role of dietary protein or of individual amino acids in the ketogenic diet is understudied. We investigated the two exclusively ketogenic amino acids, L-leucine and L-lysine, and found that only L-leucine potently protects mice when administered prior to the onset of seizures induced by kainic acid injection, but not by inducing ketosis. Unexpectedly, the D-enantiomer of leucine, which is found in trace amounts in the brain, worked as well or better than L-leucine against both kainic acid and 6Hz electroshock-induced seizures. However, unlike L-leucine, D-leucine potently terminated seizures even after the onset of seizure activity. Furthermore, D-leucine, but not L-leucine, reduced long-term potentiation but had no effect on basal synaptic transmission in vitro. In a screen of candidate neuronal receptors, D-leucine failed to compete for binding by cognate ligands, potentially suggesting a novel target. Even at low doses, D-leucine suppressed ongoing seizures at least as effectively as diazepam but without sedative effects. These studies raise the possibility that D-leucine may represent a new class of anti-seizure agents, and that D-leucine may have a previously unknown function in eukaryotes.

  11. Intranasal delivery of antiepileptic medications for treatment of seizures.

    PubMed

    Wermeling, Daniel P

    2009-04-01

    Acute isolated seizure, repetitive or recurrent seizures, and status epilepticus are all deemed medical emergencies. Mortality and worse neurologic outcome are directly associated with the duration of seizure activity. A number of recent reviews have described consensus statements regarding the pharmacologic treatment protocols for seizures when patients are in pre-hospital, institutional, and home-bound settings. Benzodiazepines, such as lorazepam, diazepam, midazolam, and clonazepam are considered to be medications of first choice. The rapidity by which a medication can be delivered to the systemic circulation and then to the brain plays a significant role in reducing the time needed to treat seizures and reduce opportunity for damage to the CNS. Speed of delivery, particularly outside of the hospital, is enhanced when transmucosal routes of delivery are used in place of an intravenous injection. Intranasal transmucosal delivery of benzodiazepines is useful in reducing time to drug administration and cessation of seizures in the pre-hospital setting, when actively seizing patients arrive in the emergency room, and at home where caregivers treat their dependents. This review summarizes factors to consider when choosing a benzodiazepine for intranasal administration, including formulation and device considerations, pharmacology and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiles. A review of the most relevant clinical studies in epilepsy patients will provide context for the relative success of this technique with a number of benzodiazepines and relatively less sophisticated nasal preparations. Neuropeptides delivered intranasally, crossing the blood-brain barrier via the olfactory system, may increase the availability of medications for treatment of epilepsy. Consequently, there remains a significant unmet medical need to serve the pharamcotherapeutic requirements of epilepsy patients through commercial development and marketing of intranasal antiepileptic products.

  12. Increased isoprostane levels in oleic acid-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Koichi; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Tsushima, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Sumiko; Yokoyama, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Rikimaru; Obata, Toru

    2009-10-16

    The present study was performed to examine a role of oxidative stress in oleic acid-induced lung injury model. Fifteen anesthetized sheep were ventilated and instrumented with a lung lymph fistula and vascular catheters for blood gas analysis and measurement of isoprostanes (8-epi prostaglandin F2{alpha}). Following stable baseline measurements, oleic acid (0.08 ml/kg) was administered and observed 4 h. Isoprostane was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with the isotope dilution method. Isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph were significantly increased 2 h after oleic acid administration and then decreased at 4 h. The percent increases in isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph at 2 h were significantly correlated with deteriorated oxygenation at the same time point, respectively. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of the pulmonary fat embolism-induced acute lung injury model in sheep and that the increase relates with the deteriorated oxygenation.

  13. [Sunitinib and zoledronic acid induced osteonecrosis of the jaw].

    PubMed

    Soós, Balázs; Vajta, László; Szalma, József

    2015-11-15

    The tendency for bisphosphonate and non-bisphosphonate (eg.: antiresorptive or anti-angiogenesis drugs) induced osteonecrosis is increasing. Treatment of these patients is a challenge both for dentists and for oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Cooperation with the drug prescribing general medicine colleagues to prevent osteonecrosis is extremely important. Furthermore, prevention should include dental focus elimination, oral hygienic instructions and education, dental follow-up and, in case of manifest necrosis, referral to maxillofacial departments. Authors outline the difficulties of conservative and surgical treatment of a patient with sunitinib and zoledronic acid induced osteonecrosis. The patient became symptomless and the operated area healed entirely six and twelve months postoperatively. A long term success further follow-up is necessary to verify long-term success.

  14. Involvement of Thalamus in Initiation of Epileptic Seizures Induced by Pilocarpine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong-Hua; Li, Jia-Jia; Lu, Qin-Chi; Gong, Hai-Qing; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2014-01-01

    Studies have suggested that thalamus is involved in temporal lobe epilepsy, but the role of thalamus is still unclear. We obtained local filed potentials (LFPs) and single-unit activities from CA1 of hippocampus and parafascicular nucleus of thalamus during the development of epileptic seizures induced by pilocarpine in mice. Two measures, redundancy and directionality index, were used to analyze the electrophysiological characters of neuronal activities and the information flow between thalamus and hippocampus. We found that LFPs became more regular during the seizure in both hippocampus and thalamus, and in some cases LFPs showed a transient disorder at seizure onset. The variation tendency of the peak values of cross-correlation function between neurons matched the variation tendency of the redundancy of LFPs. The information tended to flow from thalamus to hippocampus during seizure initiation period no matter what the information flow direction was before the seizure. In some cases the information flow was symmetrically bidirectional, but none was found in which the information flowed from hippocampus to thalamus during the seizure initiation period. In addition, inactivation of thalamus by tetrodotoxin (TTX) resulted in a suppression of seizures. These results suggest that thalamus may play an important role in the initiation of epileptic seizures. PMID:24778885

  15. Effect of nootropic Solcoseryl on kainic acid-induced excitotoxic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mintz, M; Knowlton, B; Myslobodsky, M S

    1993-05-01

    Solcoseryl (S) has been shown to provide significant cytoprotection in a variety of models of cerebral hypoxia. In the present study, we quantified the epileptiform effects caused by kainic acid administered into the pontine reticular formation of rats and their response to S pretreatment. Compared to saline, the agent appeared to significantly reduce the mortality of rats in the course of status epilepticus. However, S-pretreated rats manifested an increased incidence of behavioral seizures. This untoward effect is attributed to the fact that S improves the functional potential of injured tissue and retards the period of metabolic exhaustion at a time when neuronal activity should be minimized.

  16. Lack of kainic acid-induced gamma oscillations predicts subsequent CA1 excitotoxic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Jinde, Seiichiro; Belforte, Juan E.; Yamamoto, Jun; Wilson, Matthew A.; Tonegawa, Susumu; Nakazawa, Kazu

    2009-01-01

    Gamma oscillations are a prominent feature of hippocampal network activity, but their functional role remains debated, ranging from mere epiphenomenon to crucial for information processing. Similarly, persistent gamma oscillations sometimes appear prior to epileptic discharges in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. However, the significance of this activity in hippocampal excitotoxicity is unclear. We assessed the relationship between kainic acid (KA)-induced gamma oscillations and excitotoxicity in genetically-engineered mice in which N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor deletion was confined to CA3 pyramidal cells. Mutants showed reduced CA3 pyramidal cell firing and augmented sharp wave-ripple activity, resulting in higher susceptibility to KA-induced seizures, and leading to strikingly selective neurodegeneration in the CA1 subfield. Interestingly, the KA-induced gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) level increases and persistent 30-50 Hz gamma oscillations observed in control mice prior to the first seizure discharge was abolished in the mutants. Consequently, on subsequent days, mutants manifested prolonged epileptiform activity and massive neurodegeneration of CA1 cells, including local GABAergic neurons. Remarkably, pretreatment with the potassium channel blocker α-dendrotoxin (DTX) increased GABA levels, restored gamma oscillations, and prevented CA1 degeneration in the mutants. These results demonstrate that emergence of low frequency gamma oscillations predicts increased resistance to KA-induced excitotoxicity, raising the possibility that gamma oscillations may have potential prognostic value for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:19735292

  17. Game-related seizures presenting with two types of clinical features.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Shang-Der; Huang, Chi-Ren

    2006-03-01

    We evaluated 22 patients with epileptic seizures in which the seizures were triggered by various games or game-related materials. Based on whether spontaneous seizure coexisted or not, these 22 patients were divided into two groups. Ten patients who experienced seizures exclusively while playing or watching specific games were referred to as Group I, while 12 patients that had both game-induced and spontaneous seizures were classified as Group II. The patients in Group I had a middle-age onset (39.1 years) with a male predominance (90%). The electroencephalogram (EEG) or brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed non-specific abnormalities in 60%, and the partial onset seizure was recognized in 30% of patients. Antiepileptic drugs had uncertain benefits in this group. In Group II, patients had a male predominance (67%), with onset during adolescence (16.3 years). Most of them had generalized tonic-clonic seizures, myoclonic seizures, and absences, and 42% showed epileptiform discharge on EEG. These 12 patients were categorized into idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Although photosensitivity was an important factor, higher mental activity seemed to be significant precipitants of seizures in Group II. Antiepileptic drugs were necessary and valproic acid alone or combined with clonazepam was effective in this group. The results showed that game-related seizures are not a unique and homogeneous syndrome and may consist of different mechanisms. Teenage onset, coexistent spontaneous seizure, and associated idiopathic generalized epilepsies were crucial factors in the determination of antiepileptic drug therapy. Moreover, avoiding the related games altogether may be a more productive preventive measure.

  18. Tardive seizure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Williams, Adedapo; Adetunji, Babatunde; Odulate, Adeola

    2006-12-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy remains the best option for treatment-resistant depressive episodes. A rare, but potentially dangerous, complication is tardive seizures, which occur after the patient has already stopped convulsing from the electroconvulsive therapy and has recovered full consciousness. We have decided to report this case, which many psychiatrists and psychiatry residents may not be familiar with, to heighten the awareness of the condition because it has ramifications in terms of safe management of the patients concerned.

  19. Smartphone applications for seizure management.

    PubMed

    Pandher, Puneet Singh; Bhullar, Karamdeep Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Technological advancements continue to provide innovative ways of enhancing patient care in medicine. In particular, the growing popularity of smartphone technology has seen the recent emergence of a myriad of healthcare applications (or apps) that promise to help shape the way in which health information is delivered to people worldwide. While limited research already exists on a range of such apps, our study is the first to examine the salient features of smartphone applications as they apply to the area of seizure management. For the purposes of this review, we conducted a search of the official online application stores of the five major smartphone platforms: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Windows Mobile and Nokia-Symbian. Apps were included if they reported to contain some information or tools relating to seizure management and excluded if they were aimed exclusively at health professionals. A total of 28 applications met these criteria. Overall, we found an increasing number of epilepsy apps available on the smartphone market, but with only a minority offering comprehensive educational information alongside tools such as seizure diaries, medication tracking and/or video recording.

  20. Seizure related accidents and injuries in childhood.

    PubMed

    Buffo, Thais Helena; Guerreiro, Marilisa M; Tai, Peter; Montenegro, Maria Augusta

    2008-09-01

    Several studies show that the risk of accidents involving patients with epilepsy is much higher compared to the general population. The objective of this study was to identify the frequency and type of seizure related injuries in children diagnosed with epilepsy. In addition we also assessed possible risk factors associated with this seizure related accidents in childhood. This study was conducted at the pediatric epilepsy clinic of Unicamp, from January 2005 to August 2006. We evaluated 100 consecutive children with epilepsy. Parents were interviewed by one of the authors using a structured questionnaire that included questions about seizure related accidents and related injuries. Forty-four patients reported seizure related accidents. Eighteen patients needed medical assistance at an emergency room due the severity of their seizure related accident. Forty patients reported having a seizure related accident prevented by a bystander. Another 14 patients reported avoiding a seizure related accident by luck alone. Contusions and lacerations were the most common type of lesion associated with seizures. Patients with symptomatic/probable symptomatic epilepsy and those using higher numbers of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) were at greater risk for seizure related accidents (p<0.05). We conclude that patients with symptomatic/probable symptomatic epilepsy and on multiple AEDs are at increased risk of seizure related accidents. Parents and caretakers should be even more cautious about risk of injury in such patients.

  1. Seizures in an Alzheimer's disease patient as a complication of colonoscopy premedication with meperidine.

    PubMed

    Nagler, Jerry; Hammarth, Patricia M; Poppers, David M

    2008-01-01

    We describe the first reported case of generalized tonic-clonic seizures induced by meperidine premedication for a colonoscopy procedure in a 63-year-old woman with Alzheimer's disease. The active metabolite of meperidine, normeperidine, is postulated to be the precipitating cause of the seizures, although a cholinesterase inhibitor and an N-methyl-D: -aspartate receptor antagonist, both routinely used for treatment of Alzheimer's disease, may have contributed by reducing the seizure threshold. The neuronal changes which occur in Alzheimer's disease can themselves also predispose to seizures. We recommend avoidance of meperidine for all flexible endoscopic procedures on patients with Alzheimer's disease and in any patient with a condition that predisposes to seizures, and suggest the use of alternative opioids.

  2. Physical exercise in rats with epilepsy is protective against seizures: evidence of animal studies.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; Terra, Vera Cristina; Cysneiros, Roberta Monterazzo; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão

    2009-12-01

    People with epilepsy have been discouraged from participating in physical activity due to the fear that it will exacerbate seizures. Clinical and animal studies indicate a reduction of seizure frequency as well as decrease susceptibility to subsequently evoked seizures after an exercise program. Analyses from experimental studies of animals with epilepsy submitted to physical training programs were performed. In all studies the physical training was able to reduce the number of spontaneous seizures in rats with epilepsy. Seizure occurrence during exercise was relatively absent in the majority of studies. No death was found in animals with epilepsy during 1680 h of exercise. Based on these results it is plausible encouraging persons with epilepsy to non-pharmacological treatments and preventative measures such as physical exercise.

  3. Painful generalised clonic and tonic-clonic seizures with retained consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Bell, W.; Walczak, T.; Shin, C.; Radtke, R.

    1997-01-01

    Two patients in whom consciousness and memory were retained during bilateral clonic or tonic-clonic seizures are reported on, and three patients reported on previously are reviewed. Ictal semiology differed from myoclonic and supplementary motor seizures, which are other seizure types characterised by bilateral motor movements and retained awareness. In the two new patients ictal pain was a prominent feature. It is proposed that propagation of seizure activity may be confined to the sensorimotor areas bilaterally while sparing the neural structures involved in maintaining consciousness and in processing language and memory. This unusual type of seizure may be misdiagnosed as a pseudoseizure. Detailed description of the ictal events and further laboratory evaluation including video-EEG monitoring may be necessary to make the distinction.

 PMID:9416819

  4. Changes in Cerebral Oxidative Metabolism during Neonatal Seizures Following Hypoxic–Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subhabrata; Bale, Gemma; Mathieson, Sean; Uria-Avellanal, Cristina; Meek, Judith; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Robertson, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common following hypoxic–ischemic brain injury in newborn infants. Prolonged or recurrent seizures have been shown to exacerbate neuronal damage in the developing brain; however, the precise mechanism is not fully understood. Cytochrome-c-oxidase is responsible for more than 90% of ATP production inside mitochondria. Using a novel broadband near-infrared spectroscopy system, we measured the concentration changes in the oxidation state of cerebral cytochrome-c-oxidase (Δ[oxCCO]) and hemodynamics during recurrent neonatal seizures following hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy in a newborn infant. A rapid increase in Δ[oxCCO] was noted at the onset of seizures along with a rise in the baseline of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Cerebral oxygenation and cerebral blood volume fell just prior to the seizure onset but recovered rapidly during seizures. Δ[oxCCO] during seizures correlated with changes in mean electroencephalogram voltage indicating an increase in neuronal activation and energy demand. The progressive decline in the Δ[oxCCO] baseline during seizures suggests a progressive decrease of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. PMID:27559538

  5. Enhanced autophagy signaling in diabetic rats with ischemia-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Xia, Luoxing; Lei, Zhigang; Shi, Zhongshan; Guo, Dave; Su, Henry; Ruan, Yiwen; Xu, Zao C

    2016-07-15

    Seizures are among the most common neurological sequelae of stroke, and ischemic insult in diabetes notably increases the incidence of seizures. Recent studies indicated that autophagy influences the outcome of stroke and involved in epileptogenesis. However, the association of autophagy and post-ischemic seizures in diabetes remains unclear. The present study aimed to reveal the involvement of autophagy in the seizures following cerebral ischemia in diabetes. Diabetes was induced in adult male Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). The diabetic rats were subjected to transient forebrain ischemia. The neuronal damage was assessed using hematoxylin-eosin staining. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to investigate the alteration of autophagy marker microtubule-associated protein light chain 1B (LC3B). The results showed that all diabetic animals developed seizures after ischemia. However, no apparent cell death was observed in the hippocampus of seizure rats 12h after the insult. The expression of LC3B was significantly enhanced in naïve animals after ischemia and was further increased in diabetic animals after ischemia. Immunofluorescence double-labeling study indicated that LC3B was mainly increased in neurons. Our study demonstrated, for the first time, that autophagy activity is significantly increased in diabetic animals with ischemia-induced seizures. Further studies are needed to explore the role of autophagy in seizure generation after ischemia in diabetic conditions.

  6. A novel seizure detection algorithm informed by hidden Markov model event states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldassano, Steven; Wulsin, Drausin; Ung, Hoameng; Blevins, Tyler; Brown, Mesha-Gay; Fox, Emily; Litt, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Recently the FDA approved the first responsive, closed-loop intracranial device to treat epilepsy. Because these devices must respond within seconds of seizure onset and not miss events, they are tuned to have high sensitivity, leading to frequent false positive stimulations and decreased battery life. In this work, we propose a more robust seizure detection model. Approach. We use a Bayesian nonparametric Markov switching process to parse intracranial EEG (iEEG) data into distinct dynamic event states. Each event state is then modeled as a multidimensional Gaussian distribution to allow for predictive state assignment. By detecting event states highly specific for seizure onset zones, the method can identify precise regions of iEEG data associated with the transition to seizure activity, reducing false positive detections associated with interictal bursts. The seizure detection algorithm was translated to a real-time application and validated in a small pilot study using 391 days of continuous iEEG data from two dogs with naturally occurring, multifocal epilepsy. A feature-based seizure detector modeled after the NeuroPace RNS System was developed as a control. Main results. Our novel seizure detection method demonstrated an improvement in false negative rate (0/55 seizures missed versus 2/55 seizures missed) as well as a significantly reduced false positive rate (0.0012 h versus 0.058 h-1). All seizures were detected an average of 12.1 ± 6.9 s before the onset of unequivocal epileptic activity (unequivocal epileptic onset (UEO)). Significance. This algorithm represents a computationally inexpensive, individualized, real-time detection method suitable for implantable antiepileptic devices that may considerably reduce false positive rate relative to current industry standards.

  7. Safe Treatment of Seizures in the Setting of HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Birbeck, Gretchen L.

    2013-01-01

    OPINION STATEMENT HIV+ patients are at increased risk for developing seizures due to the vulnerability of the central nervous system to HIV-associated diseases, immune dysfunction and metabolic disturbances. In patients with acute seizures, standard protocols still apply with urgent seizure cessation being the priority. Management of the person with established epilepsy who contracts HIV is challenging, but the decision to initiate chronic antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy in an HIV+ patient is also difficult. Chronic treatment guidelines emphasize the interactions between AEDs and antiretroviral (ARV) medications, but provide no explicit advice regarding when to initiate an AED, what medication to select, and/or the duration of treatment. Epidemiologic data regarding seizure recurrence risk in HIV+ individuals is not available. The risk of further seizures likely depends upon the underlying etiology for the seizure(s) and patients’ immune status and may be increased by the use of efavirenz (an ARV). The issues for consideration include AED-ARV interactions, organ dysfunction, seizure type, and drug side effects which may worsen or be confused with symptoms of HIV and/or epilepsy. Co-administration of enzyme inducing (EI)-AEDs and ARVs can result in virological failure, breakthrough seizure activity, AED toxicity and/or ARV toxicity. Where available, the AED of choice in HIV+ patients is levetiracetam due to its broad spectrum activity, ease of use, minimal drug interactions, and favorable side effect profile. Lacosamide, gabapentin, and pregabalin are also favored choices in patients with partial onset seizures and/or those failing levetiracetam. Where newer AEDs are not available, valproic acid may be the treatment of choice in terms of an AED which will not cause enzyme induction-associated ARV failure, but its side effect profile causes other obvious problems. In resource-limited settings (RLS) where only EI-AEDs are available, there are no good treatment

  8. Cell death and synaptic reorganizations produced by seizures.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Y

    2001-01-01

    The events that follow epilepsy seizures are not restricted to the immediate period. A series of long-term alterations occurs, including synaptic rearrangements, which have an impact on the brain circuit's mode of operation. With models of temporal lobe epilepsy, seizures have been shown to generate long-lasting changes in synaptic efficacy (epileptic long-term potentiation) because of removal of the magnesium block, activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, and an increase in intracellular calcium. This novel form of synaptic plasticity provides a link between memory effects and pathologic processes. Additionally, high-affinity kainate autoradiography, Timm stain, intraventricular injection of kainic acid, and 3D reconstruction experiments clearly indicate that even brief seizures produce changes in synaptic efficacy, followed 2-3 weeks later by aberrant neosynapse formation. Several key steps have been identified in the cascade leading from transient hyperactivity episodes to long-lasting, quasi-permanent modification of the neuronal circuit organization. These include the activation of immediate-early genes, activation of growth factor genes within hours, alterations in glutamate receptors, glial hypertrophy, and cytoskeletal protein changes. The cascade is activated by the increase in intracellular calcium and leads to axonal growth and neosynapse formation, which in turn participates in the etiology of the syndrome by reducing the threshold for further seizures. In summary, study data imply that the mature epileptic circuit has unique features in comparison with those present before a seizure episode, including new receptors, ionic channels, and other proteins. It is therefore essential to develop novel strategies based on the unique mode of operation of the mature epileptic circuit, rather than on acute models of epilepsy.

  9. Epileptic seizure after treatment with thiocolchicoside

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Giavina-Bianchi, Mara; Tanno, Luciana Kase; Ensina, Luis Felipe Chiaverini; Motta, Antôno Abílio; Kalil, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Background: Adverse drug reactions are important determinants of inpatient and outpatient morbidity. Thiocolchicoside is a semisynthetic derivate of naturally occurring colchicoside, which is largely used in humans as a centrally acting muscle relaxant. Epileptic seizures after thiocolchicoside intake have been reported in individuals with a history of epilepsy, acute brain injury or possible blood–brain barrier disruption. Case report: We report the case of a 66-year-old male patient presenting a sudden epileptic seizure temporally related to the intake of thiocolchicoside for muscle contracture and pain. The probably causes of the seizures were thiocolchicoside intake and cerebral microhemorrhages attributed to cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Discussion: Drugs only rarely cause focal seizures. Our case indicates that thiocolchicoside can precipitate seizures in predisposed patients, and that its use should be avoided in patients with brain diseases (and therefore lower seizure thresholds) or blood–brain barrier disruption. This information should be provided in the drug package insert. PMID:19707540

  10. Massively multiplayer online role-playing game-induced seizures: a neglected health problem in Internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2006-08-01

    As the Internet has become rapidly and widely integrated into society, Internet addiction has become a growing psychosocial problem. However, epileptic seizure, another out-of-the-ordinary health problem, is often neglected in this regard. Ten patients who experienced epileptic seizures while playing the newest genre of electronic games -- Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) -- were investigated. Patients were predominantly male young adults, and most of the events were generalized tonic-clonic seizures, myoclonic seizures, and absences. These patients should be categorized into idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Even though photosensitivity was an important factor, behavioral and higher mental activities also seemed to be significant seizure precipitants. Results demonstrated that MMORPG-induced seizures were not analogous to the ordinary video game-induced seizures. Significantly, an epileptic seizure warning did not always appear on the websites of MMORPGs and instructions for the software. While the prevalence of MMORPG-induced seizures remains unknown, it may exceed our expectations and impact our society. Not only for clinical neurologists but also for the primary physicians, educators, sociologists, and global online game publishers, there should be an awareness of this special form of reflex seizures in order to provide an appropriate health warning to MMORPG players.

  11. Seizure characteristics in Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Candee, Meghan S; Carey, John C; Krantz, Ian D; Filloux, Francis M

    2012-12-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a congenital disorder attributed to supernumerary isochromosome 12p mosaicism. Craniofacial dysmorphism, learning impairment and seizures are considered cardinal features. However, little is known regarding the seizure and epilepsy patterns in PKS. To better define the prevalence and spectrum of seizures in PKS, we studied 51 patients (39 male, 12 female; median age 4 years and 9 months; age range 7 months to 31 years) with confirmed 12p tetrasomy. Using a parent-based structured questionnaire, we collected data regarding seizure onset, frequency, timing, semiology, and medication therapy. Patients were recruited through our practice, at PKS Kids family events, and via the PKS Kids website. Epilepsy occurred in 27 (53%) with 23 (85%) of those with seizures having seizure onset prior to 3.5 years of age. Mean age at seizure onset was 2 years and 4 months. The most common seizure types were myoclonic (15/27, 56%), generalized convulsions (13/27, 48%), and clustered tonic spasms (similar to infantile spasms; 8/27, 30%). Thirteen of 27 patients with seizures (48%) had more than one seizure type with 26 out of 27 (96%) ever having taken antiepileptic medications. Nineteen of 27 (70%) continued to have seizures and 17/27 (63%) remained on antiepileptic medication. The most commonly used medications were: levetiracetam (10/27, 37%), valproic acid (10/27, 37%), and topiramate (9/27, 33%) with levetiracetam felt to be "most helpful" by parents (6/27, 22%). Further exploration of seizure timing, in-depth analysis of EEG recordings, and collection of MRI data to rule out confounding factors is warranted.

  12. Searching for hidden information with Gabor Transform in generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Quian Quiroga, R; Blanco, S; Rosso, O A; Garcia, H; Rabinowicz, A

    1997-10-01

    The analysis of generalized tonic clonic seizures is usually difficult with scalp EEG due to muscle artifact. We applied Gabor Transform to evaluate 20 seizures from 8 consecutive patients admitted for video-EEG monitoring. We studied the relative intensity ratios of alpha, theta and delta bands over time. In 14/20 events we found a significant decremental activity in the delta band at the onset of the seizure indicating that this is dominated by theta and alpha bands. We conclude that GT is a useful auxiliary tool in the analysis of ictal activity that sheds light on the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms.

  13. Complex phase synchronization in epileptic seizures: Evidence for a devil's staircase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Velazquez, J. L.; Garcia Dominguez, L.; Wennberg, R.

    2007-01-01

    We describe multifrequency phase synchronization in epileptic seizures. Using magnetoencephalographic recordings from three patients suffering generalized seizures, the evidence is presented that, in addition to the commonly studied 1:1 frequency locking, there exists complex multifrequency coordination that, in some cases, follows a classical “devil’s staircase.” Within the limitations of observing this phenomenon in a clinical experimental setting, these observations reveal that in pathological brain activity, complex frequency locking can be found similar to that identified in certain pathological cardiac re-entrant arrhythmias. This may suggest the existence of similar re-entrant mechanisms active in cerebral neocortex during epileptic seizures.

  14. The Ayurvedic drug, Ksheerabala, ameliorates quinolinic acid-induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Swathy, S S; Indira, M

    2010-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of neurotoxicity is the induction of oxidative stress. There is hardly any cure for neurotoxicity in modern medicine, whereas many drugs in Ayurveda possess neuroprotective effects; however, there is no scientific validation for these drugs. Ksheerabala is an ayurvedic drug which is used to treat central nervous system disorders, arthritis, and insomnia. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of Ksheerabala on quinolinic acid-induced toxicity in rat brain. The optimal dose of Ksheerabala was found from a dose escalation study, wherein it was found that Ksheerabala showed maximum protection against quinolinic acid-induced neurotoxicity at a dose of 15 microL/100 g body weight/day, which was selected for further experiments. Four groups of female albino rats were maintained for 21 days as follows: 1. Control group, 2. Quinolinic acid (55 microg/100 g body weight), 3. Ksheerabala (15 microL/100 g body weight), 4. Ksheerabala (15 microL/100 g body weight) + Quinolinic acid (55 microg/100 g body weight). At the end of the experimental period, levels of lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonyls, and activities of scavenging enzymes were analyzed. The results revealed that quinolinic acid intake caused enhanced lipid and protein peroxidation as evidenced by increased levels of peroxidation products such as malondialdehyde, hydroperoxide, conjugated dienes, and protein carbonyls. On the other hand, the activities of scavenging enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase as well as the concentration of glutathione were reduced. On coadminstration of Ksheerabala along with quinolinic acid, the levels of all the biochemical parameters were restored to near-normal levels, indicating the protective effect of the drug. These results were reinforced by histopathological studies.

  15. A seizure response dog: video recording of reacting behaviour during repetitive prolonged seizures.

    PubMed

    Di Vito, Lidia; Naldi, Ilaria; Mostacci, Barbara; Licchetta, Laura; Bisulli, Francesca; Tinuper, Paolo

    2010-06-01

    Seizure response and alerting behaviour may spontaneously develop in dogs living with children or adults with epilepsy. Some dogs can also be reliably trained to respond and anticipate seizures. We describe the case of a dog, not previously trained for assistance work, showing complex seizure response behaviour. This is the first release of a home video recording of a dog reacting to its owner's seizure.

  16. Focal Seizures Induced by Intracranial Electroencephalogram Grids

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Mesha-Gay; Litt, Brian; Davis, Kathryn; Richardson, Andrew G; Lucas, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a unique, but important seizure variant directly related to placement of subdural grids. Two distinct epileptogenic zones were identified, one which correlated with the patient’s baseline seizures and a separate zone associated with atypical semiology and localization. Inspection of this zone at surgery revealed cortical deformation from the grid itself. The patient underwent successful surgical resection of the primary epileptogenic zone, but not that of the atypical zone. She remains seizure free at two years following surgery. Recognition of grid-induced seizures is important as they may confound the interpretation of intracranial electroencephalograms (iEEG) and mislead resective surgery. PMID:27896038

  17. Detection of seizure precursors from depth-EEG using a sign periodogram transform.

    PubMed

    Niederhauser, Joël J; Esteller, Rosana; Echauz, Javier; Vachtsevanos, George; Litt, Brian

    2003-04-01

    Brief bursts of focal, low amplitude rhythmic activity have been observed on depth electroencephalogram (EEG) in the minutes before electrographic onset of seizures in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. We have found these periods to contain discrete, individualized synchronized activity in patient-specific frequency bands ranging from 20 to 40 Hz. We present a method for detecting and displaying these events using a periodogram of the sign-limited temporal derivative of the EEG signal, denoted joint sign periodogram event characterization transform (JSPECT). When applied to continuous 2-6 day depth-EEG recordings from ten patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, JSPECT demonstrated that these patient-specific EEG events reliably occurred 5-80 s prior to electrical onset of seizures in five patients with focal, unilateral seizure onsets. JSPECT did not reveal this type of activity prior to seizures in five other patients with bilateral, extratemporal or more diffuse seizure onsets on EEG. Patient-specific, localized rhythmic events may play an important role in seizure generation in temporal lobe epilepsy. The JSPECT method efficiently detects these events, and may be useful as part of an automated system for predicting electrical seizure onset in appropriate patients.

  18. Control of absence seizures induced by the pathways connected to SRN in corticothalamic system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bing; Guo, Daqing; Wang, Qingyun

    2015-06-01

    The cerebral cortex, thalamus and basal ganglia together form an important network in the brain, which is closely related to several nerve diseases, such as parkinson disease, epilepsy seizure and so on. Absence seizure can be characterized by 2-4 Hz oscillatory activity, and it can be induced by abnormal interactions between the cerebral cortex and thalamus. Many experimental results have also shown that basal ganglia are a key neural structure, which closely links the corticothalamic system in the brain. Presently, we use a corticothalamic-basal ganglia model to study which pathways in corticothalamic system can induce absence seizures and how these oscillatory activities can be controlled by projections from the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) to the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) or the specific relay nuclei (SRN) of the thalamus. By tuning the projection strength of the pathway "Excitatory pyramidal cortex-SRN", "SRN-Excitatory pyramidal cortex" and "SRN-TRN" respectively, different firing states including absence seizures can appear. This indicates that absence seizures can be induced by tuning the connection strength of the considered pathway. In addition, typical absence epilepsy seizure state "spike-and-slow wave discharges" can be controlled by adjusting the activation level of the SNr as the pathways SNr-SRN and SNr-TRN open independently or together. Our results emphasize the importance of basal ganglia in controlling absence seizures in the corticothalamic system, and can provide a potential idea for the clinical treatment.

  19. Critical evaluation of four different seizure detection systems tested on one patient with focal and generalized tonic and clonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Van de Vel, Anouk; Verhaert, Kristien; Ceulemans, Berten

    2014-08-01

    For long-term home monitoring of epileptic seizures, the measurement of extracerebral body signals such as abnormal movement is often easier and less obtrusive than monitoring intracerebral brain waves with electroencephalography (EEG). Non-EEG devices are commercially available but with little scientifically valid information and no consensus on which system works for which seizure type or patient. We evaluated four systems based on efficiency, comfort, and user-friendliness and compared them in one patient suffering from focal epilepsy with secondary generalization. The Emfit mat, Epi-Care device, and Epi-Care Free bracelet are commercially available alarm systems, while the VARIA (Video, Accelerometry, and Radar-Induced Activity recording) device is being developed by our team and requires offline analysis for seizure detection and does so by presenting the 5% or 10% (patient-specific) most abnormal movement events, irrespective of the number of seizures per night. As we chose to mimic the home situation, we did not record EEG and compared our results to the seizures reported by experienced staff that were monitoring the patient on a semicontinuous basis. This resulted in a sensitivity (sens) of 78% and false detection rate (FDR) of 0.55 per night for Emfit, sens 40% and FDR 0.41 for Epi-Care, sens 41% and FDR 0.05 for Epi-Care Free, and sens 56% and FDR 20.33 for VARIA. Good results were obtained by some of the devices, even though, as expected, nongeneralized and nonrhythmic motor seizures (involving the head only, having a tonic phase, or manifesting mainly as sound) were often missed. The Emfit mat was chosen for our patient, also based on user-friendliness (few setup steps), comfort (contactless), and possibility to adjust patient-specific settings. When in need of a seizure detection system for a patient, a thorough individual search is still required, which suggests the need for a database or overview including results of clinical trials describing the

  20. Computerized image analysis for acetic acid induced intraepithelial lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Ferris, Daron G.; Lieberman, Rich W.

    2008-03-01

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) exhibits certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Immature and dysphasic cervical squamous epithelium turns white after application of acetic acid during the exam. The whitening process occurs visually over several minutes and subjectively discriminates between dysphasic and normal tissue. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician analyzing the acetic acid induced lesions (acetowhite region) in a fully automatic way. This paper reports a study designed to measure multiple parameters of the acetowhitening process from two images captured with a digital colposcope. One image is captured before the acetic acid application, and the other is captured after the acetic acid application. The spatial change of the acetowhitening is extracted using color and texture information in the post acetic acid image; the temporal change is extracted from the intensity and color changes between the post acetic acid and pre acetic acid images with an automatic alignment. The imaging and data analysis system has been evaluated with a total of 99 human subjects and demonstrate its potential to screening underserved women where access to skilled colposcopists is limited.

  1. Oleic acid-induced mucosal injury in developing piglet intestine.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, O R; Henninger, K; Fowler, M; Tso, P; Crissinger, K D

    1993-03-01

    A role for luminal nutrients, in particular products of lipid digestion, in the pathogenesis of mucosal injury to developing intestine has been postulated. We evaluated changes in mucosal permeability and light and electron microscopic histology induced by luminal perfusion with the long-chain fatty acid oleate in developing piglet intestine as a function of age and concentration of the fatty acid. 51Cr-labeled EDTA plasma-to-lumen clearance was measured in jejunum and ileum of 1-day-, 3-day-, 2-wk-, and 1-mo-old piglets during sequential perfusion with saline control (20 min); 0, 1, 5, and 10 mM oleic acid/10 mM taurocholate in saline (20 min); and normal saline (60 min). The jejunum of piglets < or = 2 wk showed significantly greater increases in mucosal permeability compared with 1-mo-old animals after perfusion with oleic acid. This effect was dependent on the luminal concentration of the fatty acid and was associated with mucosal injury evident under light and electron microscopy. In contrast, the overall response in ileum was more attenuated compared with jejunum. Thus oleic acid, a common dietary fatty acid, induces dose- and age-dependent injury in developing piglet intestine. Investigation of the mechanisms of this injury may provide the basis for dietary modifications directed at decreasing the risk of mucosal injury during enteral feeding in neonatal intestine.

  2. Sphingoid bases inhibit acid-induced demineralization of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van 't Hof, Wim; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Sotres, Javier; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H(+) ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products.

  3. Nonepileptic seizures treatment workshop summary☆

    PubMed Central

    LaFrance, W. Curt; Alper, Kenneth; Babcock, Debra; Barry, John J.; Benbadis, Selim; Caplan, Rochelle; Gates, John; Jacobs, Margaret; Kanner, Andres; Martin, Roy; Rundhaugen, Lynn; Stewart, Randy; Vert, Christina

    2009-01-01

    In May 2005, an international, interdisciplinary group of researchers gathered in Bethesda, MD, USA, for a workshop to discuss the development of treatments for patients with nonepileptic seizures (NES). Specific subgroup topics that were covered included: pediatric NES; presenting the diagnosis of NES, outcome measures for NES trials; classification of NES subtypes; and pharmacological treatment approaches and psychotherapies. The intent was to develop specific research strategies that can be expanded to involve a large segment of the epilepsy and psychiatric treatment communities. Various projects have resulted from the workshop, including the initial development of a prospective randomized clinical trial for NES. PMID:16540377

  4. Occurrence of menstrual cycle related seizure patterns among epileptic women attending the tertiary neurology clinics of the National Hospital of Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Kariyawasam, S H; Mannapperuma, U; Jayasuriya, W J A B N; Weerathunga, J; Munasinghe, K

    2009-04-01

    Female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone have effects on seizure activity. Patterns of seizure exacerbations associated with the menstrual cycle have been described as catamenial epilepsy. This study was done to investigate the menstrual cycle related seizure occurrence among female epileptics using seizure-menstrual calendars and sex hormonal assays. Frequency and the patterns of seizure occurrence within the menstrual cycles were determined analyzing seizure-menstrual calendars. Luteal phase serum estradiol and progesterone were determined in those with menstrual cycle related seizure patterns to be compared with that of healthy women. Out of 349 epileptics, 6% showed occurrence of perimenstrual, periovulatory or perimenstrual+periovulatory seizure patterns on analysis of seizure-menstrual calendars. These women showed significantly higher luteal serum estradiol concentrations in comparison to age-matched healthy volunteers. There was no significant difference in the luteal serum progesterone concentrations. This study showed menstrual cycle related patterns of seizure occurrence in a minority of Sri Lankan epileptic women, similar to catamenial epilepsy patterns described by previous studies. These seizure patterns may be due to altered hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis function playing a role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy. We suggest the importance of maintaining seizure-menstrual calendars and hormonal studies in all epileptic women to establish the role of hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis in epilepsy and to achieve efficient control of epilepsy in women of childbearing age.

  5. Wavelet-based analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals for detection and localization of epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benke, George; Bozek-Kuzmicki, Maribeth; Colella, David; Jacyna, Garry M.; Benedetto, John J.

    1995-04-01

    A wavelet-based technique WISP is used to discriminate normal brain activity from brain activity during epileptic seizures. The WISP technique is used to exploit the noted difference in frequency content during the normal brain state and the seizure brain state so that detection and localization decisions can be made. An AR-Pole statistic technique is used as a comparative measure to base-line the WISP performance.

  6. EEG-fMRI coregistration in non-ketotic hyperglycemic occipital seizures.

    PubMed

    Del Felice, Alessandra; Zanoni, Tiziano; Avesani, Mirko; Formaggio, Emanuela; Storti, Silvia; Fiaschi, Antonio; Moretto, Giuseppe; Manganotti, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    We report the first case, to our knowledge, of non-ketotic hyperglycemic (NKH) related occipital seizures studied by continuous EEG-fMRI in an undiagnosed diabetic patient. Ictal EEG showed left posterior spikes and sharp-waves. Seizures subsided after insulin therapy was started. Continuous EEG-fMRI was performed and BOLD activation was identified in the left Brodmann's area 18 (visual association area). Activation of an epileptic focus related with the patient's metabolic disturbance can be postulated.

  7. Do energy drinks cause epileptic seizure and ischemic stroke?

    PubMed

    Dikici, Suber; Saritas, Ayhan; Besir, Fahri Halit; Tasci, Ahmet Hakan; Kandis, Hayati

    2013-01-01

    Energy drinks are popular among young individuals and marketed to college students, athletes, and active individuals between the ages of 21 and 35 years. We report a case that had ischemic stroke and epileptic seizure after intake of energy drink with alcohol. To the best of our knowledge, the following case is the first report of ischemic stroke after intake of energy drink. A previously healthy 37-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a witnessed tonic-clonic seizure. According to his wife's testimony, just before loss of consciousness, the patient had been drinking 3 boxes of energy drinks (Redbull, Istanbul, Turkey, 250 mL) with vodka on an empty stomach. He did not have a history of seizures, head trauma, or family history of seizures or another disease. In cranial diffusion magnetic resonance imaging, there were hyperintense signal changes in bilateral occipital area (more pronounced in the left occipital lobe), right temporal lobe, frontal lobe, and posterior parietal lobe. All tests associated with possible etiologic causes of ischemic stroke in young patients were negative. Herein, we want to attract attention to adverse effect of energy drink usage.

  8. Ictal EEG/fMRI study of vertiginous seizures.

    PubMed

    Morano, Alessandra; Carnì, Marco; Casciato, Sara; Vaudano, Anna Elisabetta; Fattouch, Jinane; Fanella, Martina; Albini, Mariarita; Basili, Luca Manfredi; Lucignani, Giulia; Scapeccia, Marco; Tomassi, Regina; Di Castro, Elisabetta; Colonnese, Claudio; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2017-03-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are extremely common complaints, related to either peripheral or central nervous system disorders. Among the latter, epilepsy has to be taken into consideration: indeed, vertigo may be part of the initial aura of a focal epileptic seizure in association with other signs/symptoms, or represent the only ictal manifestation, a rare phenomenon known as "vertiginous" or "vestibular" seizure. These ictal symptoms are usually related to a discharge arising from/involving temporal or parietal areas, which are supposed to be a crucial component of the so-called "vestibular cortex". In this paper, we describe three patients suffering from drug-resistant focal epilepsy, symptomatic of malformations of cortical development or perinatal hypoxic/ischemic lesions located in the posterior regions, who presented clusters of vertiginous seizur