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Sample records for acid-induced seizure activity

  1. Neuroprotective effects of trans-caryophyllene against kainic acid induced seizure activity and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Song, Zhi; Liao, Daguang; Zhang, Tianyi; Liu, Feng; Zhuang, Kai; Luo, Kui; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Trans-caryophyllene (TC), a component of essential oil found in many flowering plants, has shown its neuroprotective effects in various neurological disorders. However, the effects of TC on epilepsy haven't been reported before. In this study, we investigated the effect of TC on kainic acid-induced seizure activity caused by oxidative stress and pro-inflammation. We found that TC pretreatment significantly decreased seizure activity score compared to kainic acid treated group. Importantly, TC pretreatment leads to lowering the mortality in kainic acid treated mice. In addition, TC was found to significantly inhibit KA-induced generation of malondialdehyde. TC pretreatment also preserved the activity of GPx, SOD, and CAT. Notably, our data shows that an important property of TC is its capacity to exert cerebral anti-inflammatory effects by mitigating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β. These data suggest that TC has a potential protective effect on chemical induced seizure and brain damage. PMID:25417010

  2. γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid-Induced Electrographic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Joseph; Lucey, Brendan P.; Duntley, Stephen P.; Darken, Rachel S.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of absence-like electrographic seizures during NREM sleep in a patient who was taking sodium oxybate, a sodium salt of γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). An overnight full montage electroencephalography (EEG) study revealed numerous frontally predominant rhythmic 1.5-2 Hz sharp waves and spike-wave activity during stage N2 and N3 sleep at the peak dose time for sodium oxybate, resembling atypical absence-like electrographic seizures. The patient was later weaned off sodium oxybate, and a repeat study did not show any such electrographic seizures. Absence-like seizures induced by GHB had previously been described in experimental animal models. We present the first reported human case of absence-like electrographic seizure associated with sodium oxybate. Citation: Cheung J, Lucey BP, Duntley SP, Darken RS. γ-hydroxybutyric acid-induced electrographic seizures. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(7):811-812. PMID:25024661

  3. Protective effect of hispidulin on kainic acid-induced seizures and neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Su Jane; Huang, Shu Kuei

    2015-05-15

    Hispidulin is a flavonoid compound which is an active ingredient in a number of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs, and it has been reported to inhibit glutamate release. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hispidulin protects against seizures induced by kainic acid, a glutamate analog with excitotoxic properties. The results indicated that intraperitoneally administering hispidulin (10 or 50mg/kg) to rats 30 min before intraperitoneally injecting kainic acid (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and decreased seizure score. In addition, hispidulin substantially attenuated kainic acid-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the suppression of microglial activation and the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, hispidulin reduced kainic acid-induced c-Fos expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the hippocampus. These data suggest that hispidulin has considerable antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and antiinflammatory effects on kainic acid-induced seizures in rats. PMID:25746462

  4. Three-dimensional optical tomographic brain imaging during kainic-acid-induced seizures in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluestone, Avraham Y.; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Hielscher, Andreas H.; Stewart, Mark

    2005-04-01

    In this study, we explored the potential of diffuse optical tomography for brain oximetry and describe our efforts towards imaging hemodynamic changes in rat brains during kainic-acid (KA) induced seizures. Using electrophysiological techniques we first showed that KA induces a pronounced transient hypotension in urethane anesthetized rats that is coincident with seizure activity beginning in ventral and spreading to dorsal hippocampus. We observed sustained increases in vagus and sympathetic activity during generalized limbic seizure activity, which alters blood pressure regulation and heart rhythms. Subsequently, we used optical tomographic methods to study KA induced seizures in anesthetized animals to better define the hemodynamic cerebral vascular response. We observed a lateralized increase in deoxyhemoglobin after KA injection at the time when the blood pressure (BP) was decreased. By contrast, injection of phenylephrine produced a symmetric global increase in total hemoglobin. These findings indicate that our instrument is sensitive to the local hemodynamics, both in response to a global increase in blood pressure (phenylephrine injection) and a lateralized decrease in oxyhemoglobin produced by an asymmetric response to KA; a response that may be critically important for severe autonomic nervous system alterations during seizures. The results of this study provide the impetus for combining complimentary modalities, imaging and electrophysiological, to ultimately gain a better understanding of the underlying physiology of seizure activity in the rat.

  5. Seizure activity post organophosphate exposure.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, John

    2009-01-01

    Electrographic seizures are a feature of organophosphate anticholinesterase intoxication. Clinical studies of pesticide poisonings suggest that seizures are more common in children than in adults. Since flaccid paralysis, a characteristic sign of organophosphate poisoning, can mask convulsions, the most reliable indicator of seizures is the electroencephalogram, but this has not been widely used in clinical studies. Seizures can rapidly progress to status epilepticus, contributing to mortality and, in survivors, to neuronal damage and neurological impairment. Anticonvulsant drugs can significantly reduce the lethal and toxic effects of these compounds. A benzodiazepine, usually diazepam, is the treatment currently indicated for control of seizures. Animal studies have indicated that the early phase of seizure activity (0-5 min after seizure onset) is purely cholinergic, predominantly involving muscarinic mechanisms. Seizure activity subsequently progresses through mixed cholinergic and noncholinergic modulation (5-40 min) into a final noncholinergic phase. Neuropathology caused by seizures is most likely associated with glutamatergic excitotoxicity. Future prospects for improved treatments include new benzodiazepines, glutamate receptor antagonists, antimuscarinics with additional antiglutamatergic activity and adenosine receptor antagonists.

  6. An Incredible Tool for Tracking Seizure Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Jan Carter

    2007-01-01

    Eric Schumacher knows all too well the trials and tribulations of tracking seizures and daily activities in the ongoing attempt to gain seizure control. Diagnosed with epilepsy in his teens, he is now bringing a new and innovative tool to the market that could help countless people with epilepsy gain better control over their seizures and thus…

  7. Combined Low-Intensity Exercise and Ascorbic Acid Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Seizure and Oxidative Stress in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jae; Song, Wook; Jin, Eun Hee; Kim, Jongkyu; Chun, Yoonseok; An, Eung Nam; Park, Sok

    2016-05-01

    Physical exercise and vitamins such as ascorbic acid (ASC) have been recognized as an effective strategy in neuroprotection and neurorehabilitatioin. However, there is a need to find an efficient treatment regimen that includes ASC and low-intensity exercise to diminish the risk of overtraining and nutritional treatment by attenuating oxidative stress. In the present study, we investigated the combined effect of low-intensity physical exercise (EX) and ASC on kainic acid (KA)-induced seizure activity and oxidative stress in mice. The mice were randomly assigned into groups as follows: "KA only" (n = 11), "ASC + KA" (n = 11), "Ex + KA" (n = 11), "ASC + Ex + KA" (n = 11). In the present study, low intensity of swimming training period lasted 8 weeks and consisted of 30-min sessions daily (three times per week) without tail weighting. Although no preventive effect of low-intensity exercise or ASC on KA seizure occurrence was evident, there was a decrease of seizure activity, seizure development (latency to first seizures), and mortality in "ASC + Ex + KA" compared to "ASC + KA", "Ex + KA", and "KA only" group. In addition, a preventive synergistic coordination of low-intensity exercise and ASC was evident in glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activity compared to separate treatment. These results suggest that low-intensity exercise and ASC treatment have preventive effects on seizure activity and development with alternation of oxidative status. PMID:26646003

  8. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein haplodeficiency attenuates seizure severity and NF-κB-mediated neuroinflammation in kainic acid-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Shin, H J; Kim, H; Heo, R W; Kim, H J; Choi, W S; Kwon, H M; Roh, G S

    2014-07-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures followed by neuronal death are associated with neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is known as a transcriptional factor activating osmoprotective genes, and in brain, it is expressed in neuronal nuclei. Thus dysregulation of TonEBP may be involved in the pathology of KA-induced seizures. Here we used TonEBP heterozygote (+/-) mice to study the roles of TonEBP. Electroencephalographic study showed that TonEBP (+/-) mice reduced seizure frequency and severity compared with wild type during KA-induced status epilepticus. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting analysis showed that KA-induced neuroinflammation and BBB leakage were dramatically reduced in TonEBP (+/-) mice. Similarly, TonEBP-specific siRNA reduced glutamate-induced death in HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells. TonEBP haplodeficiency prevented KA-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and attenuated inflammation. Our findings identify TonEBP as a critical regulator of neuroinflammation and BBB leakage in KA-induced seizures, which suggests TonEBP as a good therapeutic target. PMID:24608792

  9. Correlation of 3-Mercaptopropionic Acid Induced Seizures and Changes in Striatal Neurotransmitters Monitored by Microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    Crick, Eric W.; Osorio, Ivan; Frei, Mark; Mayer, Andrew P.; Lunte, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study was to use a status epilepticus steady-state chemical model in rats using the convulsant, 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA), and to compare the changes in striatal neurotransmission on a slow (5 minute) and fast (60 second) timescale. In vivo microdialysis was combined with electrophysiological methods in order to provide a complete evaluation of the dynamics of the results obtained. Objective To compare the effects of a steady-state chemical model pof status epilepticus on striatal amino-acid and amine neurotransmitters contents, as measured via in vivo microdialysis combined with electrophysiological methods. Measurements were performed on samples collected every 60 seconds and every 5 minutes. “Fast” (60s) and “slow” (5 min.) sampling timescales were selected, to gain more insight into the dynamics of GABA synthesis inhibition and of its effects on other neurotransmitters and on cortical electrical activity. Methods 3-MPA was administered in the form of an intra-venous load(60 mg/kg) followed by a constant infusion (50 mg/kg/min) for min. Microdialysis samples were collected from the striatum at intervals of 5 minutes and 60 seconds and analyzed for biogenic amine and amino acid neurotransmitters. ECoG activity was monitored via screws placed over the cortex. Results In the 5 minute samples, glutamate (Glu) increased and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) decreased monotonically while changes in dopamine (DA) concentration were bimodal. In the sixty second samples, Glu changes were bimodal, a feature that was not apparent with the five minute samples. ECoG activity was indicative of status epilepticus. Conclusions This study describes the combination of in vivo microdialysis with electrophysiology to monitor the effect of 3-MPA on neurotransmission in the brain. This led to a better understanding of the chemical changes in the striatum due to the applied 3-MPA chemical model of status epilepticus. PMID:24462767

  10. Transient changes in the limbic histaminergic system after systemic kainic acid-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Lintunen, Minnamaija; Sallmen, Tina; Karlstedt, Kaj; Panula, Pertti

    2005-10-01

    Increased brain histamine is reported to protect against convulsions. We used systemic kainic acid (KA) administration to study possible changes of the histaminergic system in rat brain in status epilepticus (SE). Robust increases in brain histamine concentrations and numbers of histamine-immunoreactive nerve fibers were detected in the piriform cortex (Pir) and amygdala after KA injection, suggesting a reactive increase, which is opposite to other published aminergic transmitter responses. These changes, lasting several weeks, might be coupled to a mechanism unrelated to the anticonvulsive function of histamine. Transient increases in mRNA expression of H(3) receptor isoforms with a full-length third intracellular loop, coupled to mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, were detected first in the hippocampal CA3c area, followed by the Pir and amygdala and then the hippocampal CA1 area. These results suggest that histamine and H3 receptors, which also control the release of GABA and glutamate, might be involved in convulsive SE.

  11. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... two or more seizures may be diagnosed with epilepsy , also known as seizure disorder. Seizure Basics Under ... over and over might indicate the ongoing condition epilepsy . Febrile seizures can happen in children younger than ...

  12. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Seizures KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Seizures Print A A A Text Size en ... Seizures Febrile Seizures Brain and Nervous System Epilepsy First Aid: Febrile Seizures Word! Seizure Epilepsy Epilepsy Contact Us ...

  13. Protective effects of bupivacaine against kainic acid-induced seizure and neuronal cell death in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kuan Ming; Wu, Chia Chan; Wang, Ming Jiuh; Lee, Ming Yi; Wang, Su Jane

    2015-01-01

    The excessive release of glutamate is a critical element in the neuropathology of epilepsy, and bupivacaine, a local anesthetic agent, has been shown to inhibit the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals. This study investigated whether bupivacaine produces antiseizure and antiexcitotoxic effects using a kainic acid (KA) rat model, an animal model used for temporal lobe epilepsy, and excitotoxic neurodegeneration experiments. The results showed that administering bupivacaine (0.4 mg/kg or 2 mg/kg) intraperitoneally to rats 30 min before intraperitoneal injection of KA (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and reduced the seizure score. In addition, bupivacaine attenuated KA-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the inhibition of microglial activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, bupivacaine shortened the latency of escaping onto the platform in the Morris water maze learning performance test. Collectively, these data suggest that bupivacaine has therapeutic potential for treating epilepsy.

  14. Domoic acid-induced seizures in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) are associated with neuroinflammatory brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kirkley, Kelly S; Madl, James E; Duncan, Colleen; Gulland, Frances M; Tjalkens, Ronald B

    2014-11-01

    California sea lions (CSLs) exposed to the marine biotoxin domoic acid (DA) develop an acute or chronic toxicosis marked by seizures and act as sentinels of the disease. Experimental evidence suggests that oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are important mechanisms underlying the seizurogenic potential of environmental toxicants but these pathways are relatively unstudied in CSLs. In the current study, we investigated the role of glutamate-glutamine changes and gliosis in DA-exposed CSLs to better understand the neurotoxic mechanisms occurring during DA toxicity. Sections from archived hippocampi from control and CSLs diagnosed with DA toxicosis were immunofluorescently stained for markers of gliosis, oxidative/nitrative stress and changes in glutamine synthetase (GS). Quantitative assessment revealed increasing loss of microtubule associated protein-2 positive neurons with elevations in 4-hydroxynonenal correlating with chronicity of exposure, whereas the pattern of activated glia expressing nitric oxide synthase 2 and tumor necrosis factor followed pathological severity. There was no significant change in the amount of GS positive cells but there was increased 3-nitrotyrosine in GS expressing cells and in neurons, particularly in animals with chronic DA toxicosis. These changes were consistently seen in the dentate gyrus and in the cornu ammonis (CA) sectors CA3, CA4, and CA1. The results of this study indicate that gliosis and resultant changes in GS are likely important mechanisms in DA-induced seizure that need to be further explored as potential therapies in treating exposed wildlife. PMID:25286249

  15. Domoic acid-induced seizures in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) are associated with neuroinflammatory brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kirkley, Kelly S; Madl, James E; Duncan, Colleen; Gulland, Frances M; Tjalkens, Ronald B

    2014-11-01

    California sea lions (CSLs) exposed to the marine biotoxin domoic acid (DA) develop an acute or chronic toxicosis marked by seizures and act as sentinels of the disease. Experimental evidence suggests that oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are important mechanisms underlying the seizurogenic potential of environmental toxicants but these pathways are relatively unstudied in CSLs. In the current study, we investigated the role of glutamate-glutamine changes and gliosis in DA-exposed CSLs to better understand the neurotoxic mechanisms occurring during DA toxicity. Sections from archived hippocampi from control and CSLs diagnosed with DA toxicosis were immunofluorescently stained for markers of gliosis, oxidative/nitrative stress and changes in glutamine synthetase (GS). Quantitative assessment revealed increasing loss of microtubule associated protein-2 positive neurons with elevations in 4-hydroxynonenal correlating with chronicity of exposure, whereas the pattern of activated glia expressing nitric oxide synthase 2 and tumor necrosis factor followed pathological severity. There was no significant change in the amount of GS positive cells but there was increased 3-nitrotyrosine in GS expressing cells and in neurons, particularly in animals with chronic DA toxicosis. These changes were consistently seen in the dentate gyrus and in the cornu ammonis (CA) sectors CA3, CA4, and CA1. The results of this study indicate that gliosis and resultant changes in GS are likely important mechanisms in DA-induced seizure that need to be further explored as potential therapies in treating exposed wildlife.

  16. Ketogenic Diet, but Not Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Diet, Reduces Spontaneous Seizures in Juvenile Rats with Kainic Acid-induced Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dustin, Simone M.; Stafstrom, Carl E.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) is effective in many cases of drug-resistant epilepsy, particularly in children. In the classic KD, fats consist primarily of long-chain saturated triglycerides. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially the n-3 type, decrease neuronal excitability and provide neuroprotection; pilot human studies have raised the possibility of using PUFAs to control seizures in patients. Methods: To determine the relative roles of the KD and PUFAs in an animal model, we induced epilepsy in juvenile rats (P29–35) using intraperitoneal kainic acid (KA). KA caused status epilepticus in all rats. Two days after KA, rats were randomized to one of 4 dietary groups: Control diet; PUFA diet; KD; or KD plus PUFA. All diets were administered isocalorically at 90% of the rat recommended daily calorie requirement. Spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) were assessed for 3 months after diet randomization. Results: Rats receiving the KD or KD-PUFA diet had significantly fewer SRS than those receiving the Control diet or PUFA diet. The PUFA diet did not reduce SRS compared to the Control diet. Conclusions: In the KA epilepsy model, the KD protects against SRS occurrence but dietary enhancement with PUFA does not afford additional protection against spontaneous seizures. PMID:27390673

  17. Effects of brain IKKβ gene silencing by small interfering RNA on P-glycoprotein expression and brain damage in the rat kainic acid-induced seizure model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nian; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yan-Fang; Su, Ling-Ying; Liu, Xin-Hong; Li, Le-Chao; Hao, Jin-Bo; Huang, Xian-Jing; Di, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by over-expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in brain is an important mechanism accounting for the drug-therapy failure in epilepsy. Over-expression of P-gp in epilepsy rat brain may be regulated by inflammation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Inhibitory κ B kinase subunit β (IKKβ) is an up-stream molecular controlling NF-κB activation. With the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique and kainic acid (KA)-induced rat epileptic seizure model, the present study was aimed to further evaluate the role of NF-κB inhibition, via blocking IKKβ gene transcription, in the epileptic brain P-gp over-expression, seizure susceptibility, and post-seizure brain damage. siRNA targeting IKKβ was administered to rats via intracerebroventricular injection before seizure induction by KA microinjection; scrambled siRNA was used as control. Brain mRNA and protein levels of IKKβ and P-gp were detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. NF-κB activity was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Latency to grade III or V seizure onset was recorded, brain damage was evaluated by neuronal cell counting and epileptiform activity was monitored by electroencephalography. IKKβ siRNA pre-treatment inhibited NF-κB activation and abolished P-gp over-expression in KA-induced epileptic rat brain, accompanied by decreased seizure susceptibility. These findings suggested that epileptogenic-induced P-gp over-expression could be regulated by IKKβ through the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24040792

  18. Minocycline attenuates microglia activation and blocks the long-term epileptogenic effects of early-life seizures.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Jayne; Fox, Patrick D; Condello, Carlo; Bartolini, Alyssa; Koh, Sookyong

    2012-05-01

    Innate immunity mediated by microglia appears to play a crucial role in initiating and propagating seizure-induced inflammatory responses. To address the role of activated microglia in the pathogenesis of childhood epilepsy, we first examined the time course of microglia activation following kainic acid-induced status epilepticus (KA-SE) in Cx3cr1(GFP/+) transgenic mice whose microglia are fluorescently labeled. We then determined whether this seizure-induced microglia activation primes the central immune response to overreact and to increase the susceptibility to a second seizure later in life. We used an inhibitor of microglia activation, minocycline, to block the seizure-induced inflammation to determine whether innate immunity plays a causal role in mediating the long-term epileptogenic effects of early-life seizure. First status epilepticus was induced at postnatal day (P) 25 and a second status at P39. KA-SE at P25 caused nearly a two-fold increase in microglia activation within 24h. Significant seizure-induced activation persisted for 7 days and returned to baseline by 14 days. P39 animals with prior exposure to KA-SE not only responded with greater microglial activation in response to "second hit" of KA, but shorter latency to express seizures. Inhibition of seizure-induced inflammation by 7 day minocycline post-treatment abrogated both the exaggerated microglia activation and the increased susceptibility to the second seizure later in life. The priming effect of early-life seizures is accompanied by modified and rapidly reactivated microglia. Our results suggest that anti-inflammatory therapy after SE may be useful to block the epileptogenic process and mitigate the long-term damaging effects of early-life seizures. PMID:22366182

  19. Depressed phosphatidic acid-induced contractile activity of failing cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tappia, Paramjit S; Maddaford, Thane G; Hurtado, Cecilia; Panagia, Vincenzo; Pierce, Grant N

    2003-01-10

    The effects of phosphatidic acid (PA), a known inotropic agent, on Ca(2+) transients and contractile activity of cardiomyocytes in congestive heart failure (CHF) due to myocardial infarction were examined. In control cells, PA induced a significant increase (25%) in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. The phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, 2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl N,N-diphenylcarbonate, blocked the positive inotropic action induced by PA, indicating that PA induces an increase in contractile activity and Ca(2+) transients through stimulation of PLC. Conversely, in failing cardiomyocytes there was a loss of PA-induced increase in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. PA did not alter resting cell length. Both diastolic and systolic [Ca(2+)] were significantly elevated in the failing cardiomyocytes. In vitro assessment of the cardiac sarcolemmal (SL) PLC activity revealed that the impaired failing cardiomyocyte response to PA was associated with a diminished stimulation of SL PLC activity by PA. Our results identify an important defect in the PA-PLC signaling pathway in failing cardiomyocytes, which may have significant implications for the depressed contractile function during CHF.

  20. Dynamic changes during acid-induced activation of influenza hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Natalie K.; Guttman, Miklos; Ebner, Jamie L.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Influenza hemagglutinin (HA) mediates virus attachment to host cells and fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes during entry. While high-resolution structures are available for the pre-fusion HA ectodomain and the post-fusion HA2 subunit, the sequence of conformational changes during HA activation has eluded structural characterization. Here we apply hydrogen-deuterium exchange with mass spectrometry to examine changes in structural dynamics of the HA ectodomain at various stages of activation, as well as to compare the soluble ectodomain with intact HA on virions. At pH conditions approaching activation (pH 6.0–5.5) HA exhibits increased dynamics at the fusion peptide and neighboring regions, while the interface between receptor-binding subunits (HA1) becomes stabilized. In contrast to many activation models, these data suggest that HA responds to endosomal acidification by releasing the fusion peptide prior to HA1 uncaging and the spring-loaded refolding of HA2. This staged process may facilitate efficient HA-mediated fusion. PMID:25773144

  1. Resveratrol lacks protective activity against acute seizures in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Tomaciello, Francesca; Leclercq, Karine; Kaminski, Rafal M

    2016-10-01

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-stilbenetriol) is a natural product having diverse anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The compound has a wide spectrum of pharmacological and metabolic activity, including cardioprotective, neuroprotective, anticarcinogenic and anti-aging effects reported in numerous studies. Some reports also suggest potential anticonvulsant properties of resveratrol. In the present study, we used in mice three different seizure models which are routinely applied in preclinical drug discovery. The protective effects of resveratrol were evaluated in the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), maximal electroshock (MES) and 6-Hz electrical seizure models. Resveratrol (up to 300mg/kg) administered ip (5-60min pre-treatment time) remained without any protective activity against seizures induced in these models. There was only a trend towards a delay in seizure latency, which reached statistical significance after treatment with resveratrol (100mg/kg; 15min) in case of tonic convulsions induced by PTZ. Phenobarbital (PHB, ip, 45min), used as a reference compound, displayed a clear-cut and dose-dependent protection against seizures in all the models. The ED50 values obtained with PHB were as follows: 7.3mg/kg (PTZ model), 13.3mg/kg (MES model) and 29.7mg/kg (6-Hz model). The present data demonstrate that an acute treatment with resveratrol does not provide any significant protection in three seizure models which collectively are able to detect anticonvulsants with diverse mechanisms of action. However, it cannot be excluded that chronic treatment with resveratrol may offer some protection in these or other seizure models.

  2. Salicylic acid induces mitochondrial injury by inhibiting ferrochelatase heme biosynthesis activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipul; Liu, Shujie; Ando, Hideki; Ishii, Ryohei; Tateno, Shumpei; Kaneko, Yuki; Yugami, Masato; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Nureki, Osamu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Salicylic acid is a classic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Although salicylic acid also induces mitochondrial injury, the mechanism of its antimitochondrial activity is not well understood. In this study, by using a one-step affinity purification scheme with salicylic acid-immobilized beads, ferrochelatase (FECH), a homodimeric enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis in mitochondria, was identified as a new molecular target of salicylic acid. Moreover, the cocrystal structure of the FECH-salicylic acid complex was determined. Structural and biochemical studies showed that salicylic acid binds to the dimer interface of FECH in two possible orientations and inhibits its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis confirmed that Trp301 and Leu311, hydrophobic amino acid residues located at the dimer interface, are directly involved in salicylic acid binding. On a gel filtration column, salicylic acid caused a shift in the elution profile of FECH, indicating that its conformational change is induced by salicylic acid binding. In cultured human cells, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis, whereas salicylic acid did not exert its inhibitory effect in FECH knockdown cells. Concordantly, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis in zebrafish embryos. Strikingly, the salicylic acid-induced effect in zebrafish was partially rescued by FECH overexpression. Taken together, these findings illustrate that FECH is responsible for salicylic acid-induced inhibition of heme synthesis, which may contribute to its antimitochondrial and anti-inflammatory function. This study establishes a novel aspect of the complex pharmacological effects of salicylic acid.

  3. PK 11195 attenuates kainic acid-induced seizures and alterations in peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) protein components in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Veenman, L; Leschiner, S; Spanier, I; Weisinger, G; Weizman, A; Gavish, M

    2002-03-01

    Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) are located in glial cells in the brain and in peripheral tissues. Mitochondria form the primary location for PBR. Functional PBR appear to require at least three components: an isoquinoline binding protein, a voltage-dependent anion channel, and an adenine nucleotide carrier. In the present study, rats received intraperitoneal kainic acid injections, which are known to cause seizures, neurodegeneration, hyperactivity, gliosis, and a fivefold increase in PBR ligand binding density in the hippocampus. In the forebrain of control rats, hippocampal voltage-dependent anion channel and adenine nucleotide carrier abundance was relatively low, while isoquinoline binding protein abundance did not differ between hippocampus and the rest of the forebrain. One week after kainic acid injection, isoquinoline binding protein abundance was increased more than 20-fold in the hippocampal mitochondrial fraction. No significant changes were detected regarding hippocampal voltage-dependent anion channel and adenine nucleotide carrier abundance. Pre-treatment with the isoquinoline PK11195, a specific PBR ligand, attenuated the occurrence of seizures, hyperactivity, and increases in isoquinoline binding protein levels in the hippocampus, which usually follow kainic acid application. These data suggest that isoquinoline binding protein may be involved in these effects of kainic acid injections.

  4. Anti-osteoporosis activity of naringin in the retinoic acid-induced osteoporosis model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Yang, Zhonglin; Li, Ping; Zhang, Yabo; Sse, Wing Cho

    2007-01-01

    Isoflavonoids isolated from plants have been confirmed to fight osteoporosis and promote bone health. However, few studies have been conducted to describe the anti-osteoporosis activity of botanical flavonone. Based on the experimental outcomes, we demonstrated the ability of naringin to fight osteoporosis in vitro. We developed a retinoic acid-induced osteoporosis model of rats to assess whether naringin has similar bioactivity against osteoporosis in vitro. After a 14-day supplement of retinoic acid to induce osteoporosis, SD rats were administered naringin. A blood test showed that naringin-treated rats experienced significantly lower activity of serum alkaline phosphatase and had higher femur bone mineral density, compared to untreated rats. All three dosages of naringin improved the decrease in bone weight coefficient, the length and the diameter of the bone, the content of bone ash, calcium, and phosphorus content induced by retinoic acid. The data of histomorphological metrology of naringin groups showed no difference as compared to normal control rats. These outcomes suggest that naringin offer a potential in the management of osteoporosis in vitro. PMID:17708632

  5. SV40 enhancer activation during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of F9 embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sleigh, M J; Lockett, T J

    1985-01-01

    The transient expression vector pSV2CAT, which carries the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene under the control of the SV40 early promoter, was used to transfect the murine embryonal carcinoma cell line F9 at various times during the retinoic acid-induced differentiation of these cells. Expression of the CAT gene under SV40 promoter control was found to increase markedly on F9 cell differentiation, measured relative to expression from the thymidine kinase promoter in the same cells. A series of constructs was prepared to identify the features of the SV40 early promoter required for transcription in differentiated and undifferentiated cells, as well as the factors limiting transcription in each case. The increased transcription seen on F9 cell differentiation was not observed when cells were transfected with molecules lacking a functional enhancer. It appears that as embryonal carcinoma cells differentiate, increased SV40 transcription results from enhancer sequence activation. In both differentiated and undifferentiated cell types the level of transcription was found to be limited by the availability and/or activity of cellular factors necessary for enhancer function. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3004973

  6. The Effects of Amiloride on Seizure Activity, Cognitive Deficits and Seizure-Induced Neurogenesis in a Novel Rat Model of Febrile Seizures.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Tang-Peng; Zhu, Ge-Min; Ding, Yin-Xiu; Yang, Feng; Sun, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Accumulating data suggest that sodium-hydrogen exchangers (NHEs) play a key role in modulating seizure activity by regulating neuronal pH in the brain. Amiloride, an inhibitor of NHEs, has been demonstrated to be effective in many seizure models, although its efficacy for prolonged febrile seizures (FS) remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether amiloride could produce neuroprotective effects in a prolonged FS model in which FS were induced in rat pups at postnatal day 10 using a heated air approach. Amiloride was administered by intraperitoneal injection at three different doses (0.65, 1.3 and 2.6 mg/kg). Pretreatment with amiloride significantly delayed the onset of the first episode of limbic seizures, whereas posttreatment with amiloride decreased escape latency in the Morris water maze test compared to post-FS treatment with saline. Amiloride also inhibited seizure-induced aberrant neurogenesis. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the antiseizure activity of amiloride. In particular, posttreatment with amiloride resulted in cognitive improvement; this finding provides crucial evidence of the neuroprotective function of amiloride and of the therapeutic potential of amiloride in FS.

  7. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Lin, Yi-Wen; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Hsu-Jan; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR), which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA-) induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treatment in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Furthermore, oral UR for 6 weeks significantly attenuated the overexpression of astrocyte proliferation and S100B proteins but not γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors. These results indicate that oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate mossy fiber sprouting, astrocyte proliferation, and S100B protein overexpression and increase neuronal survival in KA-induced epileptic rat hippocampus PMID:21837247

  8. Stimulation of Anterior Thalamic Nuclei Protects Against Seizures and Neuronal Apoptosis in Hippocampal CA3 Region of Kainic Acid-induced Epileptic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Da-Wei; Liu, Huan-Guang; Yang, An-Chao; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The antiepileptic effect of the anterior thalamic nuclei (ANT) stimulation has been demonstrated; however, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic ANT stimulation on hippocampal neuron loss and apoptosis. Methods: Sixty-four rats were divided into four groups: The control group, the kainic acid (KA) group, the sham-deep brain stimulation (DBS) group, and the DBS group. KA was used to induce epilepsy. Seizure count and latency to the first spontaneous seizures were calculated. Nissl staining was used to analyze hippocampal neuronal loss. Polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were conducted to assess the expression of caspase-3 (Casp3), B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl2), and Bcl2-associated X protein (Bax) in the hippocampal CA3 region. One-way analysis of variance was used to determine the differences between the four groups. Results: The latency to the first spontaneous seizures in the DBS group was significantly longer than that in the KA group (27.50 ± 8.05 vs. 16.38 ± 7.25 days, P = 0.0005). The total seizure number in the DBS group was also significantly reduced (DBS vs. KA group: 11.75 ± 6.80 vs. 23.25 ± 7.72, P = 0.0002). Chronic ANT-DBS reduced neuronal loss in the hippocampal CA3 region (DBS vs. KA group: 23.58 ± 6.34 vs. 13.13 ± 4.00, P = 0.0012). After chronic DBS, the relative mRNA expression level of Casp3 was decreased (DBS vs. KA group: 1.18 ± 0.37 vs. 2.09 ± 0.46, P = 0.0003), and the relative mRNA expression level of Bcl2 was increased (DBS vs. KA group: 0.92 ± 0.21 vs. 0.48 ± 0.16, P = 0.0004). The protein expression levels of CASP3 (DBS vs. KA group: 1.25 ± 0.26 vs. 2.49 ± 0.38, P < 0.0001) and BAX (DBS vs. KA group: 1.57 ± 0.49 vs. 2.80 ± 0.63, P = 0.0012) both declined in the DBS group whereas the protein expression level of BCL2 (DBS vs. KA group: 0.78 ± 0.32 vs. 0.36 ± 0.17, P = 0.0086) increased in the DBS group. Conclusions: This study demonstrated

  9. Multiscale Aspects of Generation of High-Gamma Activity during Seizures in Human Neocortex123

    PubMed Central

    Marcuccilli, Charles J.; Ben-Mabrouk, Faiza; Lew, Sean M.; Goodman, Robert R.; McKhann, Guy M.; Frim, David M.; Kohrman, Michael H.; Schevon, Catherine A.; van Drongelen, Wim

    2016-01-01

    High-gamma (HG; 80-150 Hz) activity in macroscopic clinical records is considered a marker for critical brain regions involved in seizure initiation; it is correlated with pathological multiunit firing during neocortical seizures in the seizure core, an area identified by correlated multiunit spiking and low frequency seizure activity. However, the effects of the spatiotemporal dynamics of seizure on HG power generation are not well understood. Here, we studied HG generation and propagation, using a three-step, multiscale signal analysis and modeling approach. First, we analyzed concurrent neuronal and microscopic network HG activity in neocortical slices from seven intractable epilepsy patients. We found HG activity in these networks, especially when neurons displayed paroxysmal depolarization shifts and network activity was highly synchronized. Second, we examined HG activity acquired with microelectrode arrays recorded during human seizures (n = 8). We confirmed the presence of synchronized HG power across microelectrode records and the macroscale, both specifically associated with the core region of the seizure. Third, we used volume conduction-based modeling to relate HG activity and network synchrony at different network scales. We showed that local HG oscillations require high levels of synchrony to cross scales, and that this requirement is met at the microscopic scale, but not within macroscopic networks. Instead, we present evidence that HG power at the macroscale may result from harmonics of ongoing seizure activity. Ictal HG power marks the seizure core, but the generating mechanism can differ across spatial scales. PMID:27257623

  10. Involvement of the neuronal phosphotyrosine signal adaptor N-Shc in kainic acid-induced epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Shiro; Onga, Kazuko; Kakizawa, Sho; Ohyama, Kyoji; Yasuda, Kunihiko; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Scott, Brian W.; Burnham, W. McIntyre; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Mori, Nozomu

    2016-01-01

    BDNF-TrkB signaling is implicated in experimental seizures and epilepsy. However, the downstream signaling involved in the epileptiform activity caused by TrkB receptor activation is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine whether TrkB-mediated N-Shc signal transduction was involved in kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptiform activity. We investigated KA-induced behavioral seizures, epileptiform activities and neuronal cell loss in hippocampus between N-Shc deficient and control mice. There was a significant reduction in seizure severity and the frequency of epileptiform discharges in N-Shc deficient mice, as compared with wild-type and C57BL/6 mice. KA-induced neuronal cell loss in the CA3 of hippocampus was also inhibited in N-Shc deficient mice. This study demonstrates that the activation of N-Shc signaling pathway contributes to an acute KA-induced epileptiform activity and neuronal cell loss in the hippocampus. We propose that the N-Shc-mediated signaling pathway could provide a potential target for the novel therapeutic approaches of epilepsy. PMID:27273072

  11. Abscisic Acid Induces Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation in Barley Aleurone Protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Knetsch, MLW.; Wang, M.; Snaar-Jagalska, B. E.; Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.

    1996-06-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) induces a rapid and transient mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation in barley aleurone protoplasts. MAP kinase activity, measured as myelin basic protein phosphorylation by MAP kinase immunoprecipitates, increased after 1 min, peaked after 3 min, and decreased to basal levels after ~5 min of ABA treatment in vivo. Antibodies recognizing phosphorylated tyrosine residues precipitate with myelin basic protein kinase activity that has identical ABA activation characteristics and demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of MAP kinase occurs during activation. The half-maximal concentration of ABA required for MAP kinase activation, 3 x 10-7 M, is very similar to that required for ABA-induced rab16 gene expression. The tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor phenylarsine oxide can completely block ABA-induced MAP kinase activation and rab16 gene expression. These results lead us to conclude that ABA activates MAP kinase via a tyrosine phosphatase and that these steps are a prerequisite for ABA induction of rab16 gene expression.

  12. Abscisic Acid Induces Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation in Barley Aleurone Protoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Knetsch, MLW.; Wang, M.; Snaar-Jagalska, B. E.; Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.

    1996-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) induces a rapid and transient mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation in barley aleurone protoplasts. MAP kinase activity, measured as myelin basic protein phosphorylation by MAP kinase immunoprecipitates, increased after 1 min, peaked after 3 min, and decreased to basal levels after ~5 min of ABA treatment in vivo. Antibodies recognizing phosphorylated tyrosine residues precipitate with myelin basic protein kinase activity that has identical ABA activation characteristics and demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of MAP kinase occurs during activation. The half-maximal concentration of ABA required for MAP kinase activation, 3 x 10-7 M, is very similar to that required for ABA-induced rab16 gene expression. The tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor phenylarsine oxide can completely block ABA-induced MAP kinase activation and rab16 gene expression. These results lead us to conclude that ABA activates MAP kinase via a tyrosine phosphatase and that these steps are a prerequisite for ABA induction of rab16 gene expression. PMID:12239411

  13. Perilesional brain edema and seizure activity in patients with calcified neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Theodore E.; Pretell, E. Javier; Lescano, Andres. G.; Bustos, Javier A.; Gilman, Robert H.; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Garcia, Héctor H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cysticercosis due to Taenia solium is a leading cause of adult acquired seizures and epilepsy that frequently occurs in patients with only calcified larval cysts. Transient episodes of perilesional brain edema occur around calcified foci but its importance, association with seizures, incidence, and pathophysiology are unknown. Methods One hundred and ten persons with only calcified lesions and a history of seizures or severe headaches were followed prospectively in a cohort design to assess the incidence of seizure relapses. In a nested case-control sub study, perilesional edema was assessed by MRI at the time a seizure occurred in the symptomatic patient and in a matched asymptomatic control, amongst the 110 followed. Results Median follow up was 32.33 months (SD 19.99). Twenty-nine people had an incident seizure with an estimated 5 year seizure incidence of 36%. Twenty-four patients of the 29 with seizure relapse had an MRI evaluation within five days of the event. Perilesional edema was found in 12 (50.0%) compared to 2 of 23 asymptomatic matched controls (8.7%). Conclusions Perilesional edema occurs frequently and is associated with episodic seizure activity in calcified neurocysticercosis. Our findings are likely representative of symptomatic patients in endemic regions and suggest a unique and possibly preventable cause of seizures in this population. PMID:18986841

  14. Occurrence of nonconvulsive seizures, periodic epileptiform discharges, and intermittent rhythmic delta activity in rat focal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hartings, Jed A; Williams, Anthony J; Tortella, Frank C

    2003-02-01

    A significant proportion of neurologic patients suffer electroencephalographic (EEG) seizures in the acute phase following traumatic or ischemic brain injury, including many without overt behavioral manifestations. Although such nonconvulsive seizures may exacerbate neuropathological processes, they have received limited attention clinically and experimentally. Here we characterize seizure episodes following focal cerebral ischemia in the rat as a model for brain injury-induced seizures. Cortical EEG activity was recorded continuously from both hemispheres up to 72 h following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Seizure discharges appeared in EEG recordings within 1 h of MCAo in 13/16 (81%) animals and consisted predominantly of generalized 1-3 Hz rhythmic spiking. During seizures animals engaged in quiet awake or normal motor behaviors, but exhibited no motor convulsant activity. Animals had a mean of 10.6 seizure episodes within 2 h, with a mean duration of 60 s per episode. On average, seizures ceased at 1 h 59 min post-MCAo in permanently occluded animals and did not occur following reperfusion at 2 h in transiently occluded animals. In addition to seizures, periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs) appeared over penumbral regions in the injured hemisphere while intermittent rhythmic delta activity (IRDA) recurred in the contralateral hemisphere with frontoparietal dominance. PLEDs and IRDA persisted up to 72 h in permanent MCAo animals, and early onset of the former was predictive of prolonged seizure activity. The presentation of these EEG waveforms, each with characteristic features replicating those in clinical neurologic populations, validates rat MCAo for study of acutely induced brain seizures and other neurophysiological aspects of brain injury.

  15. Houttuyniae Herba Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Neurotoxicity via Calcium Response Modulation in the Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Jeong, Hyun Uk; Hong, Sung In; Oh, Myung Sook

    2015-12-01

    Epilepsy is a complex neurological disorder characterized by the repeated occurrence of electrical activity known as seizures. This activity induces increased intracellular calcium, which ultimately leads to neuronal damage. Houttuyniae Herba, the aerial part of Houttuynia cordata, has various pharmacological effects and is widely used as a traditional herb. In the present study, we evaluated the protective effects of Houttuyniae Herba water extract on kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. Kainic acid directly acts on calcium release, resulting in seizure behavior, neuronal damage, and cognitive impairment. In a rat primary hippocampal culture system, Houttuyniae Herba water extract significantly protected neuronal cells from kainic acid toxicity. In a seizure model where mice received intracerebellar kainic acid injections, Houttuyniae Herba water extract treatment resulted in a lower seizure stage score, ameliorated cognitive impairment, protected neuronal cells against kainic acid-induced toxicity, and suppressed neuronal degeneration in the hippocampus. In addition, Houttuyniae Herba water extract regulated increases in the intracellular calcium level, its related downstream pathways (reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial dysfunction), and calcium/calmodulin complex kinase type II immunoreactivity in the mouse hippocampus, which resulted from calcium influx stimulation induced by kainic acid. These results demonstrate the neuroprotective effects of Houttuyniae Herba water extract through inhibition of calcium generation in a kainic acid-induced epileptic model. PMID:26366753

  16. Dynamic causal modelling of electrographic seizure activity using Bayesian belief updating.

    PubMed

    Cooray, Gerald K; Sengupta, Biswa; Douglas, Pamela K; Friston, Karl

    2016-01-15

    Seizure activity in EEG recordings can persist for hours with seizure dynamics changing rapidly over time and space. To characterise the spatiotemporal evolution of seizure activity, large data sets often need to be analysed. Dynamic causal modelling (DCM) can be used to estimate the synaptic drivers of cortical dynamics during a seizure; however, the requisite (Bayesian) inversion procedure is computationally expensive. In this note, we describe a straightforward procedure, within the DCM framework, that provides efficient inversion of seizure activity measured with non-invasive and invasive physiological recordings; namely, EEG/ECoG. We describe the theoretical background behind a Bayesian belief updating scheme for DCM. The scheme is tested on simulated and empirical seizure activity (recorded both invasively and non-invasively) and compared with standard Bayesian inversion. We show that the Bayesian belief updating scheme provides similar estimates of time-varying synaptic parameters, compared to standard schemes, indicating no significant qualitative change in accuracy. The difference in variance explained was small (less than 5%). The updating method was substantially more efficient, taking approximately 5-10min compared to approximately 1-2h. Moreover, the setup of the model under the updating scheme allows for a clear specification of how neuronal variables fluctuate over separable timescales. This method now allows us to investigate the effect of fast (neuronal) activity on slow fluctuations in (synaptic) parameters, paving a way forward to understand how seizure activity is generated.

  17. Retinoic acid induced growth arrest of human breast carcinoma cells requires protein kinase C alpha expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y; Tighe, A P; Talmage, D A

    1997-09-01

    Retinoic acid inhibits proliferation of hormone-dependent, but not hormone-independent breast cancer cells. Retinoic acid-induced changes in cellular proliferation and differentiation are associated with disturbances in growth factor signaling and frequently with changes in protein kinase C expression. PKC delta, epsilon, and zeta are expressed in both hormone-dependent (T-47D) and hormone-independent (MDA-MB-231) cell lines. Retinoic acid arrested T-47D proliferation, induced PKC alpha expression and concomitantly repressed PKC zeta expression. The changes in PKC alpha and PKC zeta reflect retinoic acid-induced changes in mRNA. In contrast, retinoic acid had no effect on growth, or PKC expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. Growth arrest and the induction of PKC alpha, but not the reduction in PKC zeta, resulted from selective activation of RAR alpha. In total, these results support an important role for PKC alpha in mediating the anti-proliferative action of retinoids on human breast carcinoma cells.

  18. Brain State Is a Major Factor in Preseizure Hippocampal Network Activity and Influences Success of Seizure Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ewell, Laura A.; Liang, Liang; Armstrong, Caren; Soltész, Ivan; Leutgeb, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Neural dynamics preceding seizures are of interest because they may shed light on mechanisms of seizure generation and could be predictive. In healthy animals, hippocampal network activity is shaped by behavioral brain state and, in epilepsy, seizures selectively emerge during specific brain states. To determine the degree to which changes in network dynamics before seizure are pathological or reflect ongoing fluctuations in brain state, dorsal hippocampal neurons were recorded during spontaneous seizures in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizures emerged from all brain states, but with a greater likelihood after REM sleep, potentially due to an observed increase in baseline excitability during periods of REM compared with other brains states also characterized by sustained theta oscillations. When comparing the firing patterns of the same neurons across brain states associated with and without seizures, activity dynamics before seizures followed patterns typical of the ongoing brain state, or brain state transitions, and did not differ until the onset of the electrographic seizure. Next, we tested whether disparate activity patterns during distinct brain states would influence the effectiveness of optogenetic curtailment of hippocampal seizures in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Optogenetic curtailment was significantly more effective for seizures preceded by non-theta states compared with seizures that emerged from theta states. Our results indicate that consideration of behavioral brain state preceding a seizure is important for the appropriate interpretation of network dynamics leading up to a seizure and for designing effective seizure intervention. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Hippocampal single-unit activity is strongly shaped by behavioral brain state, yet this relationship has been largely ignored when studying activity dynamics before spontaneous seizures in medial temporal lobe epilepsy. In light of the increased attention on using single

  19. Interneuron activity leads to initiation of low-voltage fast-onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Shiri, Zahra; Manseau, Frédéric; Lévesque, Maxime; Williams, Sylvain; Avoli, Massimo

    2015-03-01

    Seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy can be classified as hypersynchronous and low-voltage fast according to their onset patterns. Experimental evidence suggests that low-voltage fast-onset seizures mainly result from the synchronous activity of γ-aminobutyric acid-releasing cells. In this study, we tested this hypothesis using the optogenetic control of parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the entorhinal cortex, in the in vitro 4-aminopyridine model. We found that both spontaneous and optogenetically induced seizures had similar low-voltage fast-onset patterns. In addition, both types of seizures presented with higher ripple than fast ripple rates. Our data demonstrate the involvement of interneuronal networks in the initiation of low-voltage fast-onset seizures.

  20. Inappropriate Neural Activity during a Sensitive Period in Embryogenesis Results in Persistent Seizure-like Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Giachello, Carlo N.G.; Baines, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Maturation of neural circuits requires activity-dependent processes that underpin the emergence of appropriate behavior in the adult. It has been proposed that disruption of these events, during specific critical periods when they exert maximal influence, may lead to neurodevelopmental diseases, including epilepsy [1, 2, 3]. However, complexity of neurocircuitry, coupled with the lack of information on network formation in mammals, makes it difficult to directly investigate this hypothesis. Alternative models, including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, show remarkable similarities between experimental seizure-like activity and clinical phenotypes [4, 5, 6]. In particular, a group of flies, termed bang-sensitive (bs) mutants have been extensively used to investigate the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying seizure [7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12]. Seizure phenotype can be measured in larval stages using an electroshock assay, and this behavior in bs mutants is dramatically reduced following ingestion of typical anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs; [13]). In this study we describe a critical period of embryonic development in Drosophila during which manipulation of neural activity is sufficient to significantly influence seizure behavior at postembryonic stages. We show that inhibition of elevated activity, characteristic of bs seizure models, during the critical period is sufficient to suppress seizure. By contrast, increasing neuronal excitation during the same period in wild-type (WT) is sufficient to permanently induce a seizure behavior. Further, we show that induction of seizure in WT correlates with functional alteration of motoneuron inputs that is a characteristic of bs mutants. Induction of seizure is rescued by prior administration of AEDs, opening a new perspective for early drug intervention in the treatment of genetic epilepsy. PMID:26549258

  1. Compromising KCC2 transporter activity enhances the development of continuous seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Matthew R; Deeb, Tarek Z; Brandon, Nicholas J; Dunlop, John; Davies, Paul A; Moss, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    Impaired neuronal inhibition has long been associated with the increased probability of seizure occurrence and heightened seizure severity. Fast synaptic inhibition in the brain is primarily mediated by the type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAARs), ligand-gated ion channels that can mediate Cl(-) influx resulting in membrane hyperpolarization and the restriction of neuronal firing. In most adult brain neurons, the K(+)/Cl(-) co-transporter-2 (KCC2) establishes hyperpolarizing GABAergic inhibition by maintaining low [Cl(-)]i. In this study, we sought to understand how decreased KCC2 transport function affects seizure event severity. We impaired KCC2 transport in the 0-Mg(2+) ACSF and 4-aminopyridine in vitro models of epileptiform activity in acute mouse brain slices. Experiments with the selective KCC2 inhibitor VU0463271 demonstrated that reduced KCC2 transport increased the duration of SLEs, resulting in non-terminating discharges of clonic-like activity. We also investigated slices obtained from the KCC2-Ser940Ala (S940A) point-mutant mouse, which has a mutation at a known functional phosphorylation site causing behavioral and cellular deficits under hyperexcitable conditions. We recorded from the entorhinal cortex of S940A mouse brain slices in both 0-Mg(2+) ACSF and 4-aminopyridine, and demonstrated that loss of the S940 residue increased the susceptibility of continuous clonic-like discharges, an in vitro form of status epilepticus. Our experiments revealed KCC2 transport activity is a critical factor in seizure event duration and mechanisms of termination. Our results highlight the need for therapeutic strategies that potentiate KCC2 transport function in order to decrease seizure event severity and prevent the development of status epilepticus. PMID:27108931

  2. Anti-seizure activity of flower extracts of Nepeta bractaeta in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Jalal Uddin; Parray, Shabir Ahmad; Aslam, Mohammad; Ansari, Shahid; Nizami, Qudsia; Khanam, Razia; Siddiqui, Aisha; Ahmad, Mohd Aftab

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by unprovoked, recurring seizures that disrupts the nervous system and can cause mental and physical dysfunction. Based on the ethno pharmacological information of the plant, the methanolic and aqueous extracts of the flowers of Nepeta bractaeta was evaluated for its antiepileptic activity. The methanolic and aqueous extracts of the flowers of Nepeta bracteata were observed for their antiepileptic activity by increased current Electroshock seizures (ICES) test and Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) test using Swiss albino mice. Both the extracts showed significant activity in ICES and PTZ induced convulsions in comparison to control. In ICES model, NBAE at higher dose showed 16.7 % and NBME at higher dose showed 33.3 % protection against seizure and in PTZ model, NBME at higher dose showed 33.3 % protection against seizure. From the experiments performed, it can be said that Nepeta bractaeta does possess anticonvulsant property.

  3. Anti-seizure activity of flower extracts of Nepeta bractaeta in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Jalal Uddin; Parray, Shabir Ahmad; Aslam, Mohammad; Ansari, Shahid; Nizami, Qudsia; Khanam, Razia; Siddiqui, Aisha; Ahmad, Mohd Aftab

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by unprovoked, recurring seizures that disrupts the nervous system and can cause mental and physical dysfunction. Based on the ethno pharmacological information of the plant, the methanolic and aqueous extracts of the flowers of Nepeta bractaeta was evaluated for its antiepileptic activity. The methanolic and aqueous extracts of the flowers of Nepeta bracteata were observed for their antiepileptic activity by increased current Electroshock seizures (ICES) test and Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) test using Swiss albino mice. Both the extracts showed significant activity in ICES and PTZ induced convulsions in comparison to control. In ICES model, NBAE at higher dose showed 16.7 % and NBME at higher dose showed 33.3 % protection against seizure and in PTZ model, NBME at higher dose showed 33.3 % protection against seizure. From the experiments performed, it can be said that Nepeta bractaeta does possess anticonvulsant property. PMID:27540346

  4. Do seizures and epileptic activity worsen epilepsy and deteriorate cognitive function?

    PubMed

    Avanzini, Giuliano; Depaulis, Antoine; Tassinari, Alberto; de Curtis, Marco

    2013-11-01

    Relevant to the definition of epileptic encephalopathy (EE) is the concept that the epileptic activity itself may contribute to bad outcomes, both in terms of epilepsy and cognition, above and beyond what might be expected from the underlying pathology alone, and that these can worsen over time. The review of the clinical and experimental evidence that seizures or interictal electroencephalography (EEG) discharges themselves can induce a progression toward more severe epilepsy and a regression of brain function leads to the following conclusions: The possibility of seizure-dependent worsening is by no means a general one but is limited to some types of epilepsy, namely mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and EEs. Clinical and experimental data concur in indicating that prolonged seizures/status epilepticus (SE) are a risky initial event that can set in motion an epileptogenic process leading to persistent, possibly drug-refractory epilepsies. The mechanisms for SE-related epileptogenic process are incompletely known; they seem to involve inflammation and/or glutamatergic transmission. The evidence of the role of recurrent individual seizures in sustaining epilepsy progression is ambiguous. The correlation between high seizure frequency and bad outcome does not necessarily demonstrate a cause-effect relationship, rather high seizure frequency and bad outcome can both depend on a particularly aggressive epileptogenic process. The results of EE studies challenge the idea of a common seizure-dependent mechanism for epilepsy progression/intellectual deterioration.

  5. Uric acid is released in the brain during seizure activity and increases severity of seizures in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures.

    PubMed

    Thyrion, Lisa; Raedt, Robrecht; Portelli, Jeanelle; Van Loo, Pieter; Wadman, Wytse J; Glorieux, Griet; Lambrecht, Bart N; Janssens, Sophie; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Recent evidence points at an important role of endogenous cell-damage induced pro-inflammatory molecules in the generation of epileptic seizures. Uric acid, under the form of monosodium urate crystals, has shown to have pro-inflammatory properties in the body, but less is known about its role in seizure generation. This study aimed to unravel the contribution of uric acid to seizure generation in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures. We measured extracellular levels of uric acid in the brain and modulated them using complementary pharmacological and genetic tools. Local extracellular uric acid levels increased three to four times during acute limbic seizures and peaked between 50 and 100 min after kainic acid infusion. Manipulating uric acid levels through administration of allopurinol or knock-out of urate oxidase significantly altered the number of generalized seizures, decreasing and increasing them by a twofold respectively. Taken together, our results consistently show that uric acid is released during limbic seizures and suggest that uric acid facilitates seizure generalization. PMID:26774005

  6. Spatiotemporal differences in the c-fos pathway between C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice following flurothyl-induced seizures: a dissociation of hippocampal Fos from seizure activity

    PubMed Central

    Kadiyala, Sridhar B.; Papandrea, Dominick; Tuz, Karina; Anderson, Tara M.; Jayakumar, Sachidhanand; Herron, Bruce J.; Ferland, Russell J.

    2014-01-01

    Significant differences in seizure characteristics between inbred mouse strains highlight the importance of genetic predisposition to epilepsy. Here, we examined the genetic differences between the seizure-resistant C57BL/6J (B6) mouse strain and the seizure-susceptible DBA/2J (D2) strain in the phospho-Erk and Fos pathways to examine seizure-induced neuronal activity to uncover potential mechanistic correlates to these disparate seizure responsivities. Expression of neural activity markers was examined following 1, 5, or 8 seizures, or after 8 seizures, a 28 day rest period, and a final flurothyl rechallenge. Two brain regions, the hippocampus and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH), had significantly different Fos expression profiles following seizures. Fos expression was highly robust in B6 hippocampus following one seizure and remained elevated following multiple seizures. Conversely, there was an absence of Fos (and phospho-Erk) expression in D2 hippocampus following one generalized seizure that increased with multiple seizures. This lack of Fos expression occurred despite intracranial electroencephalographic recordings indicating that the D2 hippocampus propagated ictal discharge during the first flurothyl seizure suggesting a dissociation of seizure discharge from Fos and phospho-Erk expression. Global transcriptional analysis confirmed a dysregulation of the c-fos pathway in D2 mice following 1 seizure. Moreover, global analysis of RNA expression differences between B6 and D2 hippocampus revealed a unique pattern of transcripts that were co-regulated with Fos in D2 hippocampus following 1 seizure. These expression differences could, in part, account for D2’s seizure susceptibility phenotype. Following 8 seizures, a 28 day rest period, and a final flurothyl rechallenge, ~85% of B6 mice develop a more complex seizure phenotype consisting of a clonic-forebrain seizure that uninterruptedly progresses into a brainstem seizure. This seizure phenotype

  7. Seizure activity occurring in two dogs after S-ketamine-induction.

    PubMed

    Adami, C; Spadavecchia, C; Casoni, D

    2013-10-01

    Two healthy dogs were anaesthetized to undergo elective orthopaedic procedures. After premedication with methadone and acepromazine, general anaesthesia was induced with midazolam and S-ketamine. Immediately after anaesthetic induction, seizures occurred in both dogs. In the first dog the syndrome was characterized by tonic and clonic motor activity, muscular hypertone, hypersalivation, urination, defecation and hyperthermia. In the second dog muscular twitches of the temporal and masseter regions were observed, followed by increased skeletal muscles tone, hypersalivation, spontaneous urination and increase in body temperature. Recoveries from anaesthesia were uneventful and no seizures were observed. Considering the temporal association between anaesthetic induction and occurrence of seizures, and the fact that other causative factors could not be identified, it is hypothesized that S-ketamine played a role in determining the convulsive phenomena observed in these patients. S-ketamine might carry the potential for inducing seizures in otherwise healthy dogs, despite the concomitant use of GABA-ergic drugs.

  8. Kainic acid induces expression of caveolin-1 in activated microglia in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shigeko; Matsuda, Wakoto; Tooyama, Ikuo; Yasuhara, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Caveolin-1, a major constituent of caveolae, has been implicated in endocytosis, signal transduction and cholesterol transport in a wide variety of cells. In the present study, the expression of caveolin-1 was examined by immunohistochemistry in rat brain with or without systemic injection of kainic acid (KA). Caveolin-1 immunoreactivity was observed in capillary walls in brains of control rats. From one to seven days after KA injection, caveolin-1 immunoreactivity appeared in activated microglia in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and other brain regions. The strongest immunoreactivity of microglia was seen after 3 days after KA administration. The expression of caveolin-1 was confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The induction of caveolin-1 expression in microglia activated in response to kainic acid administration suggests its possible role in a modulation of inflammation. PMID:23690214

  9. Gallic Acid Induces Necroptosis via TNF–α Signaling Pathway in Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ya Ju; Hsu, Shih Lan; Liu, Yi Ting; Lin, Yu Hsuan; Lin, Ming Hui; Huang, Shu Jung; Ho, Ja-an Annie; Wu, Li-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Gallic acid (3, 4, 5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA), a natural phenolic acid widely found in gallnuts, tea leaves and various fruits, possesses several bioactivities against inflammation, oxidation, and carcinogenicity. The beneficial effect of GA on the reduction of animal hepatofibrosis has been indicated due to its antioxidative property. However, the cytotoxicity of GA autoxidation causing cell death has also been reported. Herein, we postulated that GA might target activated hepatic stellate cells (aHSCs), the cell type responsible for hepatofibrosis, to mitigate the process of fibrosis. The molecular cytotoxic mechanisms that GA exerted on aHSCs were then analyzed. The results indicated that GA elicited aHSC programmed cell death through TNF–α–mediated necroptosis. GA induced significant oxidative stress through the suppression of catalase activity and the depletion of glutathione (GSH). Elevated oxidative stress triggered the production of TNF–α facilitating the undergoing of necroptosis through the up-regulation of key necroptotic regulatory proteins TRADD and receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3), and the inactivation of caspase–8. Calmodulin and calpain–1 activation were engaged, which promoted subsequent lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). The TNF–α antagonist (SPD–304) and the RIP1 inhibitor (necrostatin–1, Nec–1) confirmed GA-induced TNFR1–mediated necroptosis. The inhibition of RIP1 by Nec–1 diverted the cell death from necroptosis to apoptosis, as the activation of caspase 3 and the increase of cytochrome c. Collectively, this is the first report indicating that GA induces TNF signaling–triggered necroptosis in aHSCs, which may offer an alternative strategy for the amelioration of liver fibrosis. PMID:25816210

  10. Leukocyte Infiltration Triggers Seizure Recurrence in a Rat Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zanhua; Wang, Suping; Liu, Jinjie; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Yongbo

    2016-06-01

    Epilepsy, which affects about 1 % of the population worldwide, leads to poor prognosis and increased morbidity. However, effective drugs providing satisfactory control on seizure relapse were rare, which encouraged more etiological studies. Whether inflammation is one of key events underlying seizure is in debate. In order to explore the role of inflammatory in the pathogenesis and development of epilepsy, we conducted intra-caudal vein injection of leukocytes to aggravated brain inflammatory process in kainic acid-induced seizure model in this study. The results showed that intravenous administration of activated leukocytes increased the frequency and reduced the latent phase of seizure recurrences in rat models of epileptic seizure, during which leukocyte inflammation, brain-blood barrier damage, and neuron injury were also significantly aggravated, indicating that leukocyte infiltration might facilitate seizure recurrence through aggravating brain inflammation, brain-blood barrier damage, and neuron injury. PMID:27040283

  11. Salicylic acid induced cysteine protease activity during programmed cell death in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Szepesi, Ágnes; Tari, Irma

    2016-06-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR), a type of programmed cell death (PCD) during biotic stress is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). The aim of this work was to reveal the role of proteolysis and cysteine proteases in the execution of PCD in response of SA. Tomato plants were treated with sublethal (0.1 mM) and lethal (1 mM) SA concentrations through the root system. Treatment with 1 mM SA increased the electrolyte leakage and proteolytic activity and reduced the total protein content of roots after 6 h, while the proteolytic activity did not change in the leaves and in plants exposed to 0.1 mM SA. The expression of the papain-type cysteine protease SlCYP1, the vacuolar processing enzyme SlVPE1 and the tomato metacaspase SlMCA1 was induced within the first three hours in the leaves and after 0.5 h in the roots in the presence of 1 mM SA but the transcript levels did not increase significantly at sublethal SA. The Bax inhibitor-1 (SlBI-1), an antiapoptotic gene was over-expressed in the roots after SA treatments and it proved to be transient in the presence of sublethal SA. Protease inhibitors, SlPI2 and SlLTC were upregulated in the roots by sublethal SA but their expression remained low at 1 mM SA concentration. It is concluded that in contrast to leaves the SA-induced PCD is associated with increased proteolytic activity in the root tissues resulting from a fast up-regulation of specific cysteine proteases and down-regulation of protease inhibitors. PMID:27165526

  12. Salicylic acid induced cysteine protease activity during programmed cell death in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Szepesi, Ágnes; Tari, Irma

    2016-06-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR), a type of programmed cell death (PCD) during biotic stress is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). The aim of this work was to reveal the role of proteolysis and cysteine proteases in the execution of PCD in response of SA. Tomato plants were treated with sublethal (0.1 mM) and lethal (1 mM) SA concentrations through the root system. Treatment with 1 mM SA increased the electrolyte leakage and proteolytic activity and reduced the total protein content of roots after 6 h, while the proteolytic activity did not change in the leaves and in plants exposed to 0.1 mM SA. The expression of the papain-type cysteine protease SlCYP1, the vacuolar processing enzyme SlVPE1 and the tomato metacaspase SlMCA1 was induced within the first three hours in the leaves and after 0.5 h in the roots in the presence of 1 mM SA but the transcript levels did not increase significantly at sublethal SA. The Bax inhibitor-1 (SlBI-1), an antiapoptotic gene was over-expressed in the roots after SA treatments and it proved to be transient in the presence of sublethal SA. Protease inhibitors, SlPI2 and SlLTC were upregulated in the roots by sublethal SA but their expression remained low at 1 mM SA concentration. It is concluded that in contrast to leaves the SA-induced PCD is associated with increased proteolytic activity in the root tissues resulting from a fast up-regulation of specific cysteine proteases and down-regulation of protease inhibitors.

  13. Stearic acid induces proinflammatory cytokine production partly through activation of lactate-HIF1α pathway in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hongming; Chen, Liang; Hao, Lijun; Zhang, Xuan; Chen, Yujuan; Ruan, Zhihua; Liang, Houjie

    2015-01-01

    The biomechanics stress and chronic inflammation in obesity are causally linked to osteoarthritis. However, the metabolic factors mediating obesity-related osteoarthritis are still obscure. Here we scanned and identified at least two elevated metabolites (stearic acid and lactate) from the plasma of diet-induced obese mice. We found that stearic acid potentiated LDH-a-dependent production of lactate, which further stabilized HIF1α protein and increased VEGF and proinflammatory cytokine expression in primary mouse chondrocytes. Treatment with LDH-a and HIF1α inhibitors notably attenuated stearic acid-or high fat diet-stimulated proinflammatory cytokine production in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, positive correlation of plasma lactate, cartilage HIF1α and cytokine levels with the body mass index was observed in subjects with osteoarthritis. In conclusion, saturated free fatty acid induced proinflammatory cytokine production partly through activation of a novel lactate-HIF1α pathway in chondrocytes. Our findings hold promise of developing novel clinical strategies for the management of obesity-related diseases such as osteoarthritis.

  14. Compact acid-induced state of Clitoria ternatea agglutinin retains its biological activity.

    PubMed

    Naeem, A; Saleemuddin, M; Khan, R H

    2009-10-01

    The effects of pH on Clitoria ternatea agglutinin (CTA) were studied by spectroscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, and by measuring carbohydrate specificity. At pH 2.6, CTA lacks well-defined tertiary structure, as seen by fluorescence and near-UV CD spectra. Far-UV CD spectra show retention of 50% native-like secondary structure. The mean residue ellipticity at 217 nm plotted against pH showed a transition around pH 4.0 with loss of secondary structure leading to the formation of an acid-unfolded state. This state is relatively less denatured than the state induced by 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. With a further decrease in pH, this unfolded state regains ~75% secondary structure at pH 1.2, leading to the formation of the A-state with native-like near-UV CD spectral features. Enhanced 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonate binding was observed in A-state, indicating a "molten-globule" like conformation with exposed hydrophobic residues. Acrylamide quenching data exhibit reduced accessibility of quencher to tryptophan, suggesting a compact conformation at low pH. Size-exclusion chromatography shows the presence of a compact intermediate with hydrodynamic size corresponding to a monomer. Thermal denaturation of the native state was cooperative single-step transition and of the A-state was non-cooperative two-step transition. A-State regains 72% of the carbohydrate-binding activity. PMID:19916921

  15. Activation of the central histaminergic system mediates arachidonic-acid-induced cardiovascular effects.

    PubMed

    Altinbas, Burcin; Topuz, Bora Burak; İlhan, Tuncay; Yilmaz, Mustafa Sertac; Erdost, Hatice; Yalcin, Murat

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explain the involvement of the central histaminergic system in arachidonic acid (AA)-induced cardiovascular effects in normotensive rats using hemodynamic, immunohistochemistry, and microdialysis studies. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered AA (0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 μmol) induced dose- and time-dependent increases in mean arterial pressure and decreased heart rate in conscious normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats. Central injection of AA (0.5 μmol) also increased posterior hypothalamic extracellular histamine levels and produced strong COX-1 but not COX-2 immunoreactivity in the posterior hypothalamus of rats. Moreover, the cardiovascular effects and COX-1 immunoreactivity in the posterior hypothalamus induced by AA (0.5 μmol; i.c.v.) were almost completely blocked by the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (50 and 100 nmol; i.c.v.) and partially blocked by the H1 receptor blocker chlorpheniramine (100 nmol; i.c.v.) and the H3-H4 receptor antagonist thioperamide (50 and 100 nmol; i.c.v.). In conclusion, these results indicate that centrally administered AA induces pressor and bradycardic responses in conscious rats. Moreover, we suggest that AA may activate histaminergic neurons and increase extracellular histamine levels, particularly in the posterior hypothalamus. Acting as a neurotransmitter, histamine is potentially involved in AA-induced cardiovascular effects under normotensive conditions.

  16. Single unit action potentials in humans and the effect of seizure activity

    PubMed Central

    Merricks, Edward M.; Smith, Elliot H.; McKhann, Guy M.; Goodman, Robert R.; Bateman, Lisa M.; Emerson, Ronald G.

    2015-01-01

    Spike-sorting algorithms have been used to identify the firing patterns of isolated neurons (‘single units’) from implanted electrode recordings in patients undergoing assessment for epilepsy surgery, but we do not know their potential for providing helpful clinical information. It is important therefore to characterize both the stability of these recordings and also their context. A critical consideration is where the units are located with respect to the focus of the pathology. Recent analyses of neuronal spiking activity, recorded over extended spatial areas using microelectrode arrays, have demonstrated the importance of considering seizure activity in terms of two distinct spatial territories: the ictal core and penumbral territories. The pathological information in these two areas, however, is likely to be very different. We investigated, therefore, whether units could be followed reliably over prolonged periods of times in these two areas, including during seizure epochs. We isolated unit recordings from several hundred neurons from four patients undergoing video-telemetry monitoring for surgical evaluation of focal neocortical epilepsies. Unit stability could last in excess of 40 h, and across multiple seizures. A key finding was that in the penumbra, spike stereotypy was maintained even during the seizure. There was a net tendency towards increased penumbral firing during the seizure, although only a minority of units (10–20%) showed significant changes over the baseline period, and notably, these also included neurons showing significant reductions in firing. In contrast, within the ictal core territories, regions characterized by intense hypersynchronous multi-unit firing, our spike sorting algorithms failed as the units were incorporated into the seizure activity. No spike sorting was possible from that moment until the end of the seizure, but recovery of the spike shape was rapid following seizure termination: some units reappeared within tens of

  17. Seizures, refractory status epilepticus, and depolarization block as endogenous brain activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Houssaini, Kenza; Ivanov, Anton I.; Bernard, Christophe; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy, refractory status epilepticus, and depolarization block are pathological brain activities whose mechanisms are poorly understood. Using a generic mathematical model of seizure activity, we show that these activities coexist under certain conditions spanning the range of possible brain activities. We perform a detailed bifurcation analysis and predict strategies to escape from some of the pathological states. Experimental results using rodent data provide support of the model, highlighting the concept that these pathological activities belong to the endogenous repertoire of brain activities.

  18. Activity-dependent alternative splicing increases persistent sodium current and promotes seizure

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Günay, Cengiz; Marley, Richard; Prinz, Astrid A.; Baines, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Activity of voltage-gated Na channels (Nav) is modified by alternative splicing. However, whether altered splicing of human Nav’s contributes to epilepsy remains to be conclusively shown. We show here that altered splicing of the Drosophila Nav (paralytic, DmNav) contributes to seizure-like behaviour in identified seizure-mutants. We focus attention on a pair of mutually-exclusive alternate exons (termed K and L), which form part of the voltage sensor (S4) in domain III of the expressed channel. The presence of exon L results in a large, non-inactivating, persistent INap. Many forms of human epilepsy are associated with an increase in this current. In wildtype (WT) Drosophila larvae ~70-80% of DmNav transcripts contain exon L, the remainder contain exon K. Splicing of DmNav to include exon L is increased to ~100% in both the slamdance and easily-shocked seizure-mutants. This change to splicing is prevented by reducing synaptic activity levels through exposure to the antiepileptic phenytoin or the inhibitory transmitter GABA. Conversely, enhancing synaptic activity in WT, by feeding of picrotoxin, is sufficient to increase INap and promote seizure through increased inclusion of exon L to 100%. We also show that the underlying activity-dependent mechanism requires the presence of Pasilla, an RNA-binding protein. Finally, we use computational modelling to show that increasing INap is sufficient to potentiate membrane excitability consistent with a seizure phenotype. Thus, increased synaptic excitation favors inclusion of exon L which, in turn, further increases neuronal excitability. Thus, at least in Drosophila, this self-reinforcing cycle may promote the incidence of seizure. PMID:22623672

  19. Epileptic fast intracerebral EEG activity: evidence for spatial decorrelation at seizure onset

    PubMed Central

    Wendling, Fabrice; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Bourien, Jérôme; Chauvel, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Low-voltage rapid discharges (or fast EEG ictal activity) constitute a characteristic electrophysiological pattern in focal seizures of human epilepsy. They are characterized by a decrease of signal voltage with a marked increase of signal frequency (typically beyond 25 Hz). They have long been observed in stereoelectroencephalographic (SEEG) signals recorded with intra-cerebral electrodes, generally occurring at seizure onset and simultaneously involving distinct brain regions. Spectral properties of rapid ictal discharges as well as spatial correlations measured between SEEG signals generated from distant sites before, during and after these discharges were studied. Cross-correlation estimates within typical EEG sub-bands and statistical tests performed in ten patients suffering from partial epilepsy (frontal, temporal or fronto-temporal) reveal that SEEG signals are significantly de-correlated during the discharge period compared to periods that precede and follow this discharge. These results can be interpreted as a functional decoupling of distant brain sites at seizure onset followed by an abnormally high re-coupling when the seizure develops. They lead to the concept of “disruption” that is complementary of that of “activation” (revealed by significantly high correlations between signals recorded during seizures), both giving insights into our understanding of pathophysiological processes involved in human partial epilepsies as well as in the interpretation of clinical semiology. PMID:12764064

  20. Effects of Luteolin on Liver, Kidney and Brain in Pentylentetrazol-Induced Seizures: Involvement of Metalloproteinases and NOS Activities

    PubMed Central

    Birman, Hüsniye; Dar, Kadriye Akgün; Kapucu, Ayşegül; Acar, Samet; Üzüm, Gülay

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Flavonoids are an important group of recognized antioxidants in plants. Luteolin (LUT) is a natural flavonoid in the plant kingdom. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of the LUT in the liver, kidney and brain of pentylentetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizure and the relationship between nitric oxide synthases (iNOS, eNOS) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP2, MMP9). Materials and Methods: LUT (10 mg/kg) was given intraperitoneally during two weeks prior to seizure induction. A single dose PTZ 80 mg/kg i.p. was administered and seizures were observed and evaluated with regard to latency, frequency and stage for one hour. Results: Seizure frequen cy after PTZ administration was significantly decreased in LUT pretreated rats (p<0.05). An increase of immunhistochemical reactions of iNOS and MMP2, but a decrease of eNOS activity, were observed in rat hippocampus and peripheral tissues during the PTZ induced seizures. LUT pretreatment reversed the iNOS and MMP2 activity to the control levels and significantly increased the eNOS activity (p<0.001). Conclusion: LUT seems to have an effective role in reducing the seizure frequency and a protective role on peripheral organ injury in animal models of seizure. The protective effect of LUT in seizures and the seizure induced peripheral tissue damage warrant further investigations. PMID:25206993

  1. Febrile Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... or prolonged seizures are a risk factor for epilepsy but most children who experience febrile seizures do ... develop the reoccurring seizures that re characteristic of epilepsy. Certain children who have febrile seizures face an ...

  2. Febrile Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... febrile seizure does not mean a child has epilepsy, since that disorder is characterized by reoccurring seizures ... outcome but carry an increased risk of developing epilepsy. How common are febrile seizures? Febrile seizures are ...

  3. Absence seizure

    MedlinePlus

    Seizure - petit mal; Seizure - absence; Petit mal seizure; Epilepsy - absence seizure ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  4. Computational Modeling of Seizure Dynamics Using Coupled Neuronal Networks: Factors Shaping Epileptiform Activity

    PubMed Central

    Naze, Sebastien; Bernard, Christophe; Jirsa, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Epileptic seizure dynamics span multiple scales in space and time. Understanding seizure mechanisms requires identifying the relations between seizure components within and across these scales, together with the analysis of their dynamical repertoire. Mathematical models have been developed to reproduce seizure dynamics across scales ranging from the single neuron to the neural population. In this study, we develop a network model of spiking neurons and systematically investigate the conditions, under which the network displays the emergent dynamic behaviors known from the Epileptor, which is a well-investigated abstract model of epileptic neural activity. This approach allows us to study the biophysical parameters and variables leading to epileptiform discharges at cellular and network levels. Our network model is composed of two neuronal populations, characterized by fast excitatory bursting neurons and regular spiking inhibitory neurons, embedded in a common extracellular environment represented by a slow variable. By systematically analyzing the parameter landscape offered by the simulation framework, we reproduce typical sequences of neural activity observed during status epilepticus. We find that exogenous fluctuations from extracellular environment and electro-tonic couplings play a major role in the progression of the seizure, which supports previous studies and further validates our model. We also investigate the influence of chemical synaptic coupling in the generation of spontaneous seizure-like events. Our results argue towards a temporal shift of typical spike waves with fast discharges as synaptic strengths are varied. We demonstrate that spike waves, including interictal spikes, are generated primarily by inhibitory neurons, whereas fast discharges during the wave part are due to excitatory neurons. Simulated traces are compared with in vivo experimental data from rodents at different stages of the disorder. We draw the conclusion that slow

  5. Computational modeling of seizure dynamics using coupled neuronal networks: factors shaping epileptiform activity.

    PubMed

    Naze, Sebastien; Bernard, Christophe; Jirsa, Viktor

    2015-05-01

    Epileptic seizure dynamics span multiple scales in space and time. Understanding seizure mechanisms requires identifying the relations between seizure components within and across these scales, together with the analysis of their dynamical repertoire. Mathematical models have been developed to reproduce seizure dynamics across scales ranging from the single neuron to the neural population. In this study, we develop a network model of spiking neurons and systematically investigate the conditions, under which the network displays the emergent dynamic behaviors known from the Epileptor, which is a well-investigated abstract model of epileptic neural activity. This approach allows us to study the biophysical parameters and variables leading to epileptiform discharges at cellular and network levels. Our network model is composed of two neuronal populations, characterized by fast excitatory bursting neurons and regular spiking inhibitory neurons, embedded in a common extracellular environment represented by a slow variable. By systematically analyzing the parameter landscape offered by the simulation framework, we reproduce typical sequences of neural activity observed during status epilepticus. We find that exogenous fluctuations from extracellular environment and electro-tonic couplings play a major role in the progression of the seizure, which supports previous studies and further validates our model. We also investigate the influence of chemical synaptic coupling in the generation of spontaneous seizure-like events. Our results argue towards a temporal shift of typical spike waves with fast discharges as synaptic strengths are varied. We demonstrate that spike waves, including interictal spikes, are generated primarily by inhibitory neurons, whereas fast discharges during the wave part are due to excitatory neurons. Simulated traces are compared with in vivo experimental data from rodents at different stages of the disorder. We draw the conclusion that slow

  6. Acute imidazenil treatment after the onset of DFP-induced seizure is more effective and longer lasting than midazolam at preventing seizure activity and brain neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Kadriu, Bashkim; Guidotti, Alessandro; Costa, Erminio; Davis, John M; Auta, James

    2011-03-01

    Diazepam (DZ), the preferred anticonvulsant benzodiazepine (BZ) for the treatment of organophosphate (OP) nerve agent-induced seizures and neuronal damage, has been associated with unwanted effects such as sedation, amnesia, cardiorespiratory depression, anticonvulsant tolerance, and dependence liability. In a search for safer and more effective anticonvulsant BZs against OP-induced seizure and neuronal damage, we have previously shown that imidazenil (IMD), a low-intrinsic efficacy positive allosteric modulator of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) action at α1-containing GABA(A) receptors, which has high intrinsic efficacy at α2-, α3-, and α5-containing GABA(A) receptors, is more potent and longer lasting than DZ pretreatment at protecting rats from diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP)-induced electrocorticographic (ECoG) seizures and neuronal damage. The effects of IMD were observed at doses that are devoid of sedative, amnestic, and anticonvulsant tolerance actions. In the present study, we compared the anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of a combination of atropine (2 mg/kg, ip) and pyridine-2-aldoxime methochloride (2-PAM, 20 mg/kg, ip) with IMD (0.5 mg/kg, ip) or midazolam (MDZ, 0.5-2 mg/kg, ip) administered after the onset of DFP (1.5 mg/kg, sc)-induced seizure activity. The severity of DFP-induced ECoG seizures was assessed by continuous radio telemetry recordings in unrestrained and freely moving rats. Furthermore, the extent of neuronal damage was evaluated using a neuron-specific nuclear protein immunolabeling and fluoro-jade B staining procedure. We report here that IMD is more efficacious and longer lasting than sedating doses of MDZ in protecting rats from DFP-induced ECoG seizures and neuronal damage.

  7. Interleukin-1β biosynthesis inhibition reduces acute seizures and drug resistant chronic epileptic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Maroso, Mattia; Balosso, Silvia; Ravizza, Teresa; Iori, Valentina; Wright, Christopher Ian; French, Jacqueline; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2011-04-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical observations indicate that brain inflammation is an important factor in epilepsy. In particular, induction of interleukin-converting enzyme (ICE)/caspase-1 and activation of interleukin (IL)-1β/IL-1 receptor type 1 axis both occur in human epilepsy, and contribute to experimentally induced acute seizures. In this study, the anticonvulsant activity of VX-765 (a selective ICE/caspase-1 inhibitor) was examined in a mouse model of chronic epilepsy with spontaneous recurrent epileptic activity refractory to some common anticonvulsant drugs. Moreover, the effects of this drug were studied in one acute model of seizures in mice, previously shown to involve activation of ICE/caspase-1. Quantitative analysis of electroencephalogram activity was done in mice exposed to acute seizures or those developing chronic epileptic activity after status epilepticus to assess the anticonvulsant effects of systemic administration of VX-765. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissue was carried out at the end of pharmacological experiments in epileptic mice to evaluate neuropathology, glia activation and IL-1β expression, and the effect of treatment. Repeated systemic administration of VX-765 significantly reduced chronic epileptic activity in mice in a dose-dependent fashion (12.5-200 mg/kg). This effect was observed at doses ≥ 50 mg/kg, and was reversible with discontinuation of the drug. Maximal drug effect was associated with inhibition of IL-1β synthesis in activated astrocytes. The same dose regimen of VX-765 also reduced acute seizures in mice and delayed their onset time. These results support a new target system for anticonvulsant pharmacological intervention to control epileptic activity that does not respond to some common anticonvulsant drugs. PMID:21431948

  8. Excitotoxin-induced neuronal degeneration and seizure are mediated by tissue plasminogen activator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsirka, Stella E.; Gualandris, Anna; Amaral, David G.; Strickland, Sidney

    1995-09-01

    NEURONAL degeneration in the hippocampus, a region of the brain important for acquisition of memory in humans, occurs in various pathological conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, brain ischaemia and epilepsy. When neuronal activity is stimulated in the adult rat and mouse hippocampus, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to the active protease plasmin, is transcriptionally induced1,2. The activity of tPA in neural tissue is correlated with neurite outgrowth3, regeneration4 and migration5, suggesting that it might be involved in neuronal plasticity. Here we show that tPA is produced primarily by microglia in the hippocampus. Using excitotoxins to induce neuronal cell loss, we demonstrate that tPA-deficient mice are resistant to neuronal degeneration. These mice are also less susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures than wild-type mice. These findings identify a role for tPA in neuronal degeneration and seizure.

  9. Excitotoxin-induced neuronal degeneration and seizure are mediated by tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Tsirka, S E; Gualandris, A; Amaral, D G; Strickland, S

    1995-09-28

    Neuronal degeneration in the hippocampus, a region of the brain important for acquisition of memory in humans, occurs in various pathological conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, brain ischaemia and epilepsy. When neuronal activity is stimulated in the adult rat and mouse hippocampus, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to the active protease plasmin, is transcriptionally induced. The activity of tPA in neural tissue is correlated with neurite outgrowth, regeneration and migration, suggesting that it might be involved in neuronal plasticity. Here we show that tPA is produced primarily by microglia in the hippocampus. Using excitotoxins to induce neuronal cell loss, we demonstrate that tPA-deficient mice are resistant to neuronal degeneration. These mice are also less susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures than wild-type mice. These findings identify a role for tPA in neuronal degeneration and seizure.

  10. Athletes with seizure disorders.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Byron Don; Pleacher, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with seizure disorders have long been restricted from participation in certain sporting activities. Those with seizure disorders are more likely than their peers to have a sedentary lifestyle and to develop obesity. Regular participation in physical activity can improve both physical and psychosocial outcomes for persons with seizure disorders. Seizure activity often is reduced among those patients who regularly engage in aerobic activity. Recent literature indicates that the diagnosis of seizure disorders remains highly stigmatizing in the adolescent population. Persons with seizure disorders may be more accepted by peer groups if they are allowed to participate in sports and recreational activities. Persons with seizure disorders are encouraged to participate in regular aerobic activities. They may participate in team sports and contact or collision activities provided that they utilize appropriate protective equipment. There seems to be no increased risk of injury or increasing seizure activity as the result of such participation. Persons with seizure disorders still are discouraged from participating in scuba diving and skydiving. The benefits of participation in regular sporting activity far outweigh any risk to the athlete with a seizure disorder who chooses to participate in sports.

  11. Acute toxicity and anticonvulsant activity of liposomes containing nimodipine on pilocarpine-induced seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Lina Clara Gayoso e Almendra Ibiapina; Cavalcanti, Isabella Macário Ferro; Satyal, Prabodh; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide Stela; Rolim, Hercília Maria Lins; Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes

    2015-01-12

    Nimodipine has been shown to have an inhibitory action on seizures and brain damage in rodents. However, the pharmaceutical applicability of this drug is limited by its low solubility in gastrointestinal fluids and high first-pass effect in the liver, which leads to low bioavailability. These difficulties can be overcome through the use of liposomes. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the toxicity and anticonvulsant activity of liposomes containing nimodipine (NMD-Lipo) on pilocarpine-induced seizures. NMD-Lipo was prepared using the lipid-film hydration method. Central nervous system toxicity of NMD-Lipo was assessed by Hippocratic screening. Systemic toxicity was evaluated by analyses of biochemical and hematological parameters and by observing possible signs of toxicity. The possible anticonvulsant activity was tested by the pilocarpine model. The administration of the NMD-Lipo at doses of 0.1, 1, and 10 mg/kg caused no toxicity in animals. Furthermore, NMD-Lipo prevented the installation of 100% of the pilocarpine-induced seizures and prevented the death of 100% of the mice treated with pilocarpine. These data shown that NMD-Lipo has an anticonvulsant activity significantly superior to free NMD, suggesting that the liposomes promoted a drug controlled release by improving its bioavailability and consequently increasing its pharmacological activity.

  12. Targeting Pannexin1 Improves Seizure Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Marcelo F.; Veliskova, Jana; Patel, Naman K.; Lutz, Sarah E.; Caille, Dorothee; Charollais, Anne; Meda, Paolo; Scemes, Eliana

    2011-01-01

    Imbalance of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is one of several causes of seizures. ATP has also been implicated in epilepsy. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the release of ATP from cells and the consequences of the altered ATP signaling during seizures. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is found in astrocytes and in neurons at high levels in the embryonic and young postnatal brain, declining in adulthood. Panx1 forms large-conductance voltage sensitive plasma membrane channels permeable to ATP that are also activated by elevated extracellular K+ and following P2 receptor stimulation. Based on these properties, we hypothesized that Panx1 channels may contribute to seizures by increasing the levels of extracellular ATP. Using pharmacological tools and two transgenic mice deficient for Panx1 we show here that interference with Panx1 ameliorates the outcome and shortens the duration of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. These data thus indicate that the activation of Panx1 in juvenile mouse hippocampi contributes to neuronal hyperactivity in seizures. PMID:21949881

  13. Uric acid induces oxidative stress and growth inhibition by activating adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signal pathways in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongneng; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Hisatome, Ichiro; Li, Youfeng; Cheng, Weijie; Sun, Ning; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Tianliang; Zhu, Yuzhang; Li, Zhi; Jing, Xubin; Zhou, Rui; Cheng, Jidong

    2013-08-15

    Hyperuricaemia is a disorder of purine metabolism, and is strongly associated with insulin resistance and abnormal glucose metabolism. As the producer of insulin, pancreatic β cells might be affected by elevated serum uric acid levels and contribute to the disregulated glucose metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effect of high uric acid on rat pancreatic β cell function. Under high uric acid condition, proliferation of pancreatic β cells was inhibited, production of reactive oxygen species increased, and glucose stimulated insulin secretion was also compromised. Further examination on signal transduction pathways revealed that uric acid-induced ROS is involved in the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Pharmacological inhibition of ERK activation rescued β cells from growth inhibition. More importantly, activation of ERK induced by uric acid is significantly diminished by AMPK inhibitor, indicating ERK as a downstream target of AMPK in response to high uric acid condition. We also investigated the transportation channel for uric acid into pancreatic β cells. While major urate transporter URAT1 is not expressed in β cells, organic anion transporter (OAT) inhibitor successfully blocked the activation of ERK by uric acid. Our data indicate that high uric acid levels induce oxidative damage and inhibit growth of rat pancreatic β cells by activating the AMPK and ERK signal pathways. Hyperuricemia may contribute to abnormal glucose metabolism by causing oxidative damage and function inhibition of pancreatic β cells.

  14. Febrile seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... does not have a history of seizure disorders (epilepsy). A tonic-clonic seizure involves the entire body. ... no evidence that they cause death, brain damage, epilepsy, or learning problems. Most children outgrow febrile seizures ...

  15. Use of Activated Carbon in Packaging to Attenuate Formaldehyde-Induced and Formic Acid-Induced Degradation and Reduce Gelatin Cross-Linking in Solid Dosage Forms.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Stephen T; Zelesky, Todd C; Chen, Raymond; Likar, Michael D; MacDonald, Bruce C; Hawkins, Joel M; Carroll, Sophia C; Johnson, Gail M; Space, J Sean; Jensen, James F; DeMatteo, Vincent A

    2016-07-01

    Formaldehyde and formic acid are reactive impurities found in commonly used excipients and can be responsible for limiting drug product shelf-life. Described here is the use of activated carbon in drug product packaging to attenuate formaldehyde-induced and formic acid-induced drug degradation in tablets and cross-linking in hard gelatin capsules. Several pharmaceutical products with known or potential vulnerabilities to formaldehyde-induced or formic acid-induced degradation or gelatin cross-linking were subjected to accelerated stability challenges in the presence and absence of activated carbon. The effects of time and storage conditions were determined. For all of the products studied, activated carbon attenuated drug degradation or gelatin cross-linking. This novel use of activated carbon in pharmaceutical packaging may be useful for enhancing the chemical stability of drug products or the dissolution stability of gelatin-containing dosage forms and may allow for the 1) extension of a drug product's shelf-life when the limiting attribute is a degradation product induced by a reactive impurity, 2) marketing of a drug product in hotter and more humid climatic zones than currently supported without the use of activated carbon, and 3) enhanced dissolution stability of products that are vulnerable to gelatin cross-linking.

  16. The Na+/H+ Exchanger Controls Deoxycholic Acid-Induced Apoptosis by a H+-Activated, Na+-Dependent Ionic Shift in Esophageal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Aaron; Chen, HwuDauRw; Khan, Mohammad R.; Roesly, Heather; Hill, Kimberly A.; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Mandal, Amritlal; Delamere, Nicholas A.; Dvorak, Katerina

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis resistance is a hallmark of cancer cells. Typically, bile acids induce apoptosis. However during gastrointestinal (GI) tumorigenesis the cancer cells develop resistance to bile acid-induced cell death. To understand how bile acids induce apoptosis resistance we first need to identify the molecular pathways that initiate apoptosis in response to bile acid exposure. In this study we examined the mechanism of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced apoptosis, specifically the role of Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE) and Na+ influx in esophageal cells. In vitro studies revealed that the exposure of esophageal cells (JH-EsoAd1, CP-A) to DCA (0.2 mM -0.5 mM) caused lysosomal membrane perturbation and transient cytoplasmic acidification. Fluorescence microscopy in conjunction with atomic absorption spectrophotometry demonstrated that this effect on lysosomes correlated with influx of Na+, subsequent loss of intracellular K+, an increase of Ca2+ and apoptosis. However, ethylisopropyl-amiloride (EIPA), a selective inhibitor of NHE, prevented Na+, K+ and Ca2+ changes and caspase 3/7 activation induced by DCA. Ouabain and amphotericin B, two drugs that increase intracellular Na+ levels, induced similar changes as DCA (ion imbalance, caspase3/7 activation). On the contrary, DCA-induced cell death was inhibited by medium with low a Na+ concentrations. In the same experiments, we exposed rat ileum ex-vivo to DCA with or without EIPA. Severe tissue damage and caspase-3 activation was observed after DCA treatment, but EIPA almost fully prevented this response. In summary, NHE-mediated Na+ influx is a critical step leading to DCA-induced apoptosis. Cells tolerate acidification but evade DCA-induced apoptosis if NHE is inhibited. Our data suggests that suppression of NHE by endogenous or exogenous inhibitors may lead to apoptosis resistance during GI tumorigenesis. PMID:21887327

  17. Anticonvulsant activity of β-caryophyllene against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Cleide Correia; de Oliveira, Clarissa Vasconcelos; Grigoletto, Jéssica; Ribeiro, Leandro Rodrigo; Funck, Vinícius Rafael; Grauncke, Ana Cláudia Beck; de Souza, Thaíze Lopes; Souto, Naieli Schiefelbein; Furian, Ana Flávia; Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider

    2016-03-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that plant-derived extracts and their isolated components are useful for treatment of seizures and, hence, constitute a valuable source of new antiepileptic drugs with improved efficacy and better adverse effect profile. β-Caryophyllene is a natural bicyclic sesquiterpene that occurs in a wide range of plant species and displays a number of biological actions, including neuroprotective activity. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that β-caryophyllene displays anticonvulsant effects. In addition, we investigated the effect of β-caryophyllene on behavioral parameters and on seizure-induced oxidative stress. Adult C57BL/6 mice received increasing doses of β-caryophyllene (0, 10, 30, or 100mg/kg). After 60 min, we measured the latencies to myoclonic and generalized seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ, 60 mg/kg). We found that β-caryophyllene increased the latency to myoclonic jerks induced by PTZ. This result was confirmed by electroencephalographic analysis. In a separate set of experiments, we found that mice treated with an anticonvulsant dose of β-caryophyllene (100mg/kg) displayed an improved recognition index in the object recognition test. This effect was not accompanied by behavioral changes in the open-field, rotarod, or forced swim tests. Administration of an anticonvulsant dose of β-caryophyllene (100mg/kg) did not prevent PTZ-induced oxidative stress (i.e., increase in the levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances or the decrease in nonprotein thiols content). Altogether, the present data suggest that β-caryophyllene displays anticonvulsant activity against seizures induced by PTZ in mice. Since no adverse effects were observed in the same dose range of the anticonvulsant effect, β-caryophyllene should be further evaluated in future development of new anticonvulsant drugs. PMID:26827298

  18. Lipoteichoic Acid-Induced Nitric Oxide Production Depends on the Activation of Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor and Jak21

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Hyun; Kim, Je Hak; Seo, Ho Seong; Martin, Michael H.; Chung, Gook-Hyun; Michalek, Suzanne M.; Nahm, Moon H.

    2006-01-01

    NO production by macrophages in response to lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and a synthetic lipopeptide (Pam3CSK4) was investigated. LTA and Pam3CSK4 induced the production of both TNF-α and NO. Inhibitors of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) blocked LTA- or Pam3CSK4-induced production of NO but not TNF-α. Jak2 tyrosine kinase blocked LTA-induced production of NO but not TNF-α. PAFR inhibition blocked phosphorylation of Jak2 and STAT1, a key factor for expressing inducible NO synthase. In addition, LTA did not induce IFN-β expression, and p38 mitogen-activated protein serine kinase was necessary for LTA-induced NO production but not for TNF-α production. These findings suggest that Gram-positive bacteria induce NO production using a PAFR signaling pathway to activate STAT1 via Jak2. This PAFR/Jak2/STAT1 signaling pathway resembles the IFN-β, type I IFNR/Jak/STAT1 pathway described for LPS. Consequently, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria appear to have different but analogous mechanisms for NO production. PMID:16365452

  19. Cerebral blood flow during paroxysmal EEG activation induced by sleep in patients with complex partial seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Gozukirmizi, E.; Meyer, J.S.; Okabe, T.; Amano, T.; Mortel, K.; Karacan, I.

    1982-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements were combined with sleep polysomnography in nine patients with complex partial seizures. Two methods were used: the 133Xe method for measuring regional (rCBF) and the stable xenon CT method for local (LCBF). Compared to nonepileptic subjects, who show diffuse CBF decreases during stages I-II, non-REM sleep onset, patients with complex partial seizures show statistically significant increases in CBF which are maximal in regions where the EEG focus is localized and are predominantly seen in one temporal region but are also propagated to other cerebral areas. Both CBF methods gave comparable results, but greater statistical significance was achieved by stable xenon CT methodology. CBF increases are more diffuse than predicted by EEG paroxysmal activity recorded from scalp electrodes. An advantage of the 133Xe inhalation method was achievement of reliable data despite movement of the head. This was attributed to the use of a helmet which maintained the probes approximated to the scalp. Disadvantages were poor resolution (7 cm3) and two-dimensional information. The advantage of stable xenon CT method is excellent resolution (80 mm3) in three dimensions, but a disadvantage is that movement of the head in patients with seizure disorders may limit satisfactory measurements.

  20. Dynamics of large-scale brain activity in normal arousal states and epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Rennie, C. J.; Rowe, D. L.

    2002-04-01

    Links between electroencephalograms (EEGs) and underlying aspects of neurophysiology and anatomy are poorly understood. Here a nonlinear continuum model of large-scale brain electrical activity is used to analyze arousal states and their stability and nonlinear dynamics for physiologically realistic parameters. A simple ordered arousal sequence in a reduced parameter space is inferred and found to be consistent with experimentally determined parameters of waking states. Instabilities arise at spectral peaks of the major clinically observed EEG rhythms-mainly slow wave, delta, theta, alpha, and sleep spindle-with each instability zone lying near its most common experimental precursor arousal states in the reduced space. Theta, alpha, and spindle instabilities evolve toward low-dimensional nonlinear limit cycles that correspond closely to EEGs of petit mal seizures for theta instability, and grand mal seizures for the other types. Nonlinear stimulus-induced entrainment and seizures are also seen, EEG spectra and potentials evoked by stimuli are reproduced, and numerous other points of experimental agreement are found. Inverse modeling enables physiological parameters underlying observed EEGs to be determined by a new, noninvasive route. This model thus provides a single, powerful framework for quantitative understanding of a wide variety of brain phenomena.

  1. Relationship of rectal & hippocampal temperature profiles to seizure activity in rats prone & resistant to hot water induced epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ullal, G R; Satishchandra, P; Shankar, S K; Dadlani, R; Arshi, I

    1998-12-01

    The present study evaluates the relationship of seizure proneness, to core body and brain temperature following hot water stimulation with water of 55 degrees C in freely ambulant rats. The rectal and hippocampal temperatures were recorded in 40 rats with bathing that included the head, while 10 other rats had similar thermal stimulation, but of the body alone. Bipolar stainless steel electrodes were stereotactically implanted into the dorsal hippocampal regions which served the dual purpose of recording the seizure discharges as well as regional brain temperature. It was observed that in the seizure prone (SP) rats, the mean rate of rise in rectal temperature was 1.5 degrees C/min, whereas in the seizure resistant (SR) animals it was 0.78 degree C/ min. However, there was no noticeable difference in the rate of rise in brain temperatures between the SP and SR groups, the rate of rise being 0.3 degree C/min. In the rats subjected to hot water bath over the body (excluding the head), there was no seizure activity. Further, there was no change in the brain temperature recorded in these rats, despite the rate of rise in rectal temperature being similar to that in the SP rats. These observations indicate that two thermoregulatory factors operate in seizure proneness-viz., a rapid rise in core body temperature; and a rise in local brain temperature. Both should coexist in order to elicit a hyperthermic seizure in rats.

  2. Environmental manipulations early in development alter seizure activity, Ih and HCN1 protein expression later in life.

    PubMed

    Schridde, Ulrich; Strauss, Ulf; Bräuer, Anja U; van Luijtelaar, Gilles

    2006-06-01

    Although absence epilepsy has a genetic origin, evidence from an animal model (Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk; WAG/Rij) suggests that seizures are sensitive to environmental manipulations. Here, we show that manipulations of the early rearing environment (neonatal handling, maternal deprivation) of WAG/Rij rats leads to a pronounced decrease in seizure activity later in life. Recent observations link seizure activity in WAG/Rij rats to the hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) in the somatosensory cortex, the site of seizure generation. Therefore, we investigated whether the alterations in seizure activity between rats reared differently might be correlated with changes in Ih and its channel subunits hyperpolarization-activated cation channel HCN1, 2 and 4. Whole-cell recordings from layer 5 pyramidal neurons, in situ hybridization and Western blot of the somatosensory cortex revealed an increase in Ih and HCN1 in neonatal handled and maternal deprived, compared to control rats. The increase was specific to HCN1 protein expression and did not involve HCN2/4 protein expression, or mRNA expression of any of the subunits (HCN1, 2, 4). Our findings provide the first evidence that relatively mild changes in the neonatal environment have a long-term impact of absence seizures, Ih and HCN1, and suggest that an increase of Ih and HCN1 is associated with absence seizure reduction. Our findings shed new light on the role of Ih and HCN in brain functioning and development and demonstrate that genetically determined absence seizures are quite sensitive for early interventions.

  3. What is the importance of abnormal "background" activity in seizure generation?

    PubMed

    Staba, Richard J; Worrell, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of interictal epileptiform spikes and seizures have played a central role in the study of epilepsy. The background EEG activity, however, has received less attention. In this chapter we discuss the characteristic features of the background activity of the brain when individuals are at rest and awake (resting wake) and during sleep. The characteristic rhythms of the background EEG are presented, and the presence of 1/f (β) behavior of the EEG power spectral density is discussed and its possible origin and functional significance. The interictal EEG findings of focal epilepsy and the impact of interictal epileptiform spikes on cognition are also discussed. PMID:25012365

  4. Priming by Hexanoic Acid Induce Activation of Mevalonic and Linolenic Pathways and Promotes the Emission of Plant Volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Llorens, Eugenio; Camañes, Gemma; Lapeña, Leonor; García-Agustín, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Hexanoic acid (Hx) is a short natural monocarboxylic acid present in some fruits and plants. Previous studies reported that soil drench application of this acid induces effective resistance in tomato plants against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae and in citrus against Alternaria alternata and Xanthomonas citri. In this work, we performed an in deep study of the metabolic changes produced in citrus by the application of Hx in response to the challenge pathogen A. alternata, focusing on the response of the plant. Moreover, we used 13C labeled hexanoic to analyze its behavior inside the plants. Finally, we studied the volatile emission of the treated plants after the challenge inoculation. Drench application of 13C labeled hexanoic demonstrated that this molecule stays in the roots and is not mobilized to the leaves, suggesting long distance induction of resistance. Moreover, the study of the metabolic profile showed an alteration of more than 200 molecules differentially induced by the application of the compound and the inoculation with the fungus. Bioinformatics analysis of data showed that most of these altered molecules could be related with the mevalonic and linolenic pathways suggesting the implication of these pathways in the induced resistance mediated by Hx. Finally, the application of this compound showed an enhancement of the emission of 17 volatile metabolites. Taken together, this study indicates that after the application of Hx this compound remains in the roots, provoking molecular changes that may trigger the defensive response in the rest of the plant mediated by changes in the mevalonic and linolenic pathways and enhancing the emission of volatile compounds, suggesting for the first time the implication of mevalonic pathway in response to hexanoic application. PMID:27148319

  5. [Ecstatic seizures].

    PubMed

    Likhachev, S A; Astapenko, A V; Osos, E L; Zmachynskaya, O L; Gvishch, T G

    2015-01-01

    Ecstatic seizures is a rare manifestation of epilepsy. They were described for the first time by F.M. Dostoevsky. Currently, the description of ecstatic seizures is possible to find in the scientific literature. The description of the own observation of a patient with emotional-affective seizures is presented. A role of the anterior insular cortex in the ecstatic seizures origin is discussed. The similarities between the feelings reported during ecstatic seizures and the feelings experienced under the effect of stimulant addictive drugs are described. The possible reasons of the low frequency of emotional-affective seizures are considered. PMID:26356170

  6. Seizures induced by music.

    PubMed

    Ogunyemi, A O; Breen, H

    1993-01-01

    Musicogenic epilepsy is a rare disorder. Much remains to be learned about the electroclinical features. This report describes a patient who has been followed at our institution for 17 years, and was investigated with long-term telemetered simultaneous video-EEG recordings. She began to have seizures at the age of 10 years. She experienced complex partial seizures, often preceded by elementary auditory hallucination and complex auditory illusion. The seizures occurred in relation to singing, listening to music or thinking about music. She also had occasional generalized tonic clonic seizures during sleep. There was no significant antecedent history. The family history was negative for epilepsy. The physical examination was unremarkable. CT and MRI scans of the brain were normal. During long-term simultaneous video-EEG recordings, clinical and electrographic seizure activities were recorded in association with singing and listening to music. Mathematical calculation, copying or viewing geometric patterns and playing the game of chess failed to evoke seizures.

  7. Direct-current Stimulation and Multi-electrode Array Recording of Seizure-like Activity in Mice Brain Slice Preparation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hsiang-Chin; Chang, Wei-Jen; Chang, Wei-Pang; Shyu, Bai-Chuang

    2016-01-01

    Cathodal transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) induces suppressive effects on drug-resistant seizures. To perform effective actions, the stimulation parameters (e.g., orientation, field strength, and stimulation duration) need to be examined in mice brain slice preparations. Testing and arranging the orientation of the electrode relative to the position of the mice brain slice are feasible. The present method preserves the thalamocingulate pathway to evaluate the effect of DCS on anterior cingulate cortex seizure-like activities. The results of the multichannel array recordings indicated that cathodal DCS significantly decreased the amplitude of the stimulation-evoked responses and duration of 4-aminopyridine and bicuculline-induced seizure-like activity. This study also found that cathodal DCS applications at 15 min caused long-term depression in the thalamocingulate pathway. The present study investigates the effects of DCS on thalamocingulate synaptic plasticity and acute seizure-like activities. The current procedure can test the optimal stimulation parameters including orientation, field strength, and stimulation duration in an in vitro mouse model. Also, the method can evaluate the effects of DCS on cortical seizure-like activities at both the cellular and network levels. PMID:27341682

  8. Activation of the c-fos gene in prodynorphin- and proenkephalin-expressing cells of nucleus tractus solitarius after seizures.

    PubMed

    Kanter, R K; Erickson, J T; Millhorn, D E

    1994-10-01

    We performed studies to determine the anatomical regions and chemical phenotypes of neurons within the rat medulla oblongata activated by pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures. Activated cells were identified by their expression of the c-fos gene, detected by in situ hybridization for c-fos mRNA and immunocytochemistry for Fos protein. Activated cells were located predominantly in nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), with c-fos mRNA appearing within 20 min after seizures (peak at 1-2 h), followed by Fos immunoreactivity visible at 1 h (peak at 2-4 h). Neither nonspecific noxious stimulation by intraperitoneal injection of saline nor brief exposure to hypoxic or hypercapnic gas mixtures to stimulate chemoreceptors reproduced this pattern of labeling. Prodynorphin or proenkephalin mRNA, detected by in situ hybridization, was colocalized with Fos immunoreactivity in many NTS cells. Thus, seizures activate neuronal pathways in the medulla oblongata which express genes for endogenous opioids. Potential long-term effects of seizures are suggested by the in situ hybridization finding that NTS prodynorphin mRNA increased 24 h after seizures compared to control levels. PMID:7957742

  9. The anti-inflammatory activity of duloxetine, a serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, prevents kainic acid-induced hippocampal neuronal death in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee-Soo; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Hong, Seongkweon; Cho, Jun Hwi; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Choong-Hyun

    2015-11-15

    Duloxetine (DXT), a potent serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, is widely used in the treatment of major depressive disorder. In the present study, we examined the effects of DXT treatment on seizure behavior and excitotoxic neuronal damage in the mouse hippocampal CA3 region following intraperitoneal kainic acid (KA) injection. DXT treatment showed no effect on KA-induced behavioral seizure activity. However, treatment with 10mg/kg DXT reduced KA-induced neuronal death in the hippocampal CA3 region at 72h after KA administration, and treatment with 20 and 40mg/kg DXT showed a noticeable neuroprotection in the hippocampal CA3 region after KA injection. In addition, KA-induced activations of microglia and astrocytes as well as KA-induced increases of TNF-α and IL-1β levels were also suppressed by DXT treatment. These results indicate that DXT displays the neuroprotective effect against KA-induced excitotoxic neuronal death through anti-inflammatory action. PMID:26453128

  10. A Low-cost Method for Analyzing Seizure-like Activity and Movement in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Bryan; Burke, Brian; Pathakamuri, Joseph; Coleman, John; Kuebler, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Video tracking systems have been used widely to analyze Drosophila melanogaster movement and detect various abnormalities in locomotive behavior. While these systems can provide a wealth of behavioral information, the cost and complexity of these systems can be prohibitive for many labs. We have developed a low-cost assay for measuring locomotive behavior and seizure movement in D. melanogaster. The system uses a web-cam to capture images that can be processed using a combination of inexpensive and free software to track the distance moved, the average velocity of movement and the duration of movement during a specified time-span. To demonstrate the utility of this system, we examined a group of D. melanogaster mutants, the Bang-sensitive (BS) paralytics, which are 3-10 times more susceptible to seizure-like activity (SLA) than wild type flies. Using this novel system, we were able to detect that the BS mutant bang senseless (bss) exhibits lower levels of exploratory locomotion in a novel environment than wild type flies. In addition, the system was used to identify that the drug metformin, which is commonly used to treat type II diabetes, reduces the intensity of SLA in the BS mutants. PMID:24637378

  11. HOMEOSTATIC REGULATION OF KCC2 ACTIVITY BY THE ZINC RECEPTOR mZnR/GPR39 DURING SEIZURES

    PubMed Central

    Gilad, David; Shorer, Sharon; Ketzef, Maya; Friedman, Alon; Sekler, Israel; Aizenman, Elias; Hershfinkel, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the synaptic metabotropic zinc receptor mZnR/GPR39 in physiological adaptation to epileptic seizures. We previously demonstrated that synaptic activation of mZnR/GPR39 enhances inhibitory drive in the hippocampus by upregulating neuronal K+/Cl− co-transporter 2 (KCC2) activity. Here, we first show that mZnR/GPR39 knockout (KO) adult mice have dramatically enhanced susceptibility to seizures triggered by a single intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid, when compared to wild type (WT) littermates. Kainate also substantially enhances seizure-associated gamma oscillatory activity in juvenile mZnR/GPR39 KO hippocampal slices, a phenomenon that can be reproduced in WT tissue by extracellular Zn2+ chelation. Importantly, kainate-induced synaptic Zn2+ release enhances surface expression and transport activity of KCC2 in WT, but not mZnR/GPR39 KO hippocampal neurons. Kainate-dependent upregulation of KCC2 requires mZnR/GPR39 activation of the Gαq/phospholipase C/extracellular regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signaling cascade. We suggest that mZnR/GPR39-dependent upregulation of KCC2 activity provides homeostatic adaptation to an excitotoxic stimulus by increasing inhibition. As such, mZnR/GPR39 may provide a novel pharmacological target for dampening epileptic seizure activity. PMID:25562657

  12. Antiviral activity of human oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) is mediated by enhancing retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Yugen; Ghosh, Arundhati; Cuevas, Rolando A.; Forero, Adriana; Dhar, Jayeeta; Ibsen, Mikkel Søes; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan Leo; Schmidt, Tobias; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K.; Fujita, Takashi; Hartmann, Rune; Barik, Sailen; Hornung, Veit; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Virus infection is sensed in the cytoplasm by retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I, also known as DDX58), which requires RNA and polyubiquitin binding to induce type I interferon (IFN), and activate cellular innate immunity. We show that the human IFN-inducible oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) protein had antiviral activity and mediated RIG-I activation by mimicking polyubiquitin. Loss of OASL expression reduced RIG-I signaling and enhanced virus replication in human cells. Conversely, OASL expression suppressed replication of a number of viruses in a RIG-I-dependent manner and enhanced RIG-I-mediated IFN induction. OASL interacted and colocalized with RIG-I, and through its C-terminal ubiquitin-like domain specifically enhanced RIG-I signaling. Bone marrow derived macrophages from mice deficient for Oasl2 showed that among the two mouse orthologs of human OASL; Oasl2 is functionally similar to human OASL. Our findings show a mechanism by which human OASL contributes to host antiviral responses by enhancing RIG-I activation. PMID:24931123

  13. Circumventing seizure activity in a series of G protein coupled receptor 119 (GPR119) agonists.

    PubMed

    Scott, James S; Bowker, Suzanne S; Brocklehurst, Katy J; Brown, Hayley S; Clarke, David S; Easter, Alison; Ertan, Anne; Goldberg, Kristin; Hudson, Julian A; Kavanagh, Stefan; Laber, David; Leach, Andrew G; MacFaul, Philip A; Martin, Elizabeth A; McKerrecher, Darren; Schofield, Paul; Svensson, Per H; Teague, Joanne

    2014-11-13

    Agonism of GPR119 is viewed as a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of type II diabetes and other elements of metabolic syndrome. During progression of a previously disclosed candidate 1 through mice toxicity studies, we observed tonic-clonic convulsions in several mice at high doses. An in vitro hippocampal brain slice assay was used to assess the seizure liability of subsequent compounds, leading to the identification of an aryl sulfone as a replacement for the 3-cyano pyridyl group. Subsequent optimization to improve the overall profile, specifically with regard to hERG activity, led to alkyl sulfone 16. This compound did not cause tonic-clonic convulsions in mice, had a good pharmacokinetic profile, and displayed in vivo efficacy in murine models. Importantly, it was shown to be effective in wild-type (WT) but not GPR119 knockout (KO) animals, consistent with the pharmacology observed being due to agonism of GPR119.

  14. Retinoic acid-induced AP-1 transcriptional activity regulates B16 mouse melanoma growth inhibition and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Boskovic, Goran; Niles, Richard M

    2003-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) inhibits growth and induces differentiation of B16 mouse melanoma cells. These effects are accompanied by a large increase in PKCalpha mRNA and protein levels and surprisingly an increase in activating protein-1 (AP-1) transcriptional activity. To further investigate the RA-induced AP-1 activity we established clones of B16 cells stably expressing an AP-1-luciferase reporter gene. Treatment of these clones with phorbol dibutyrate increased AP-1 activity which peaked at 2-4 h and returned to baseline level by 24 h. In contrast, RA treatment resulted in a slow increase in AP-1 activity that reached a maximum level at 48 h and was maintained for the duration of the treatment. We tested the importance of the RA-induced AP-1 activity by establishing clones which stably express a dominant negative fos gene (A-fos) and have greatly diminished AP-1 activity. Growth rates of untreated A-fos expressing cells were similar to wt B16 and clones not expressing A-fos. However, clones expressing the dominant-negative fos had a markedly decreased sensitivity to RA-induced inhibition of anchorage-dependent and -independent growth. Treatment of wt B16 cells for 48 h with RA increased melanin production by two to fourfold, but this effect was completely lost in the A-fos clones. The ability of RA to induce RARbeta and PKCalpha expression was retained in A-fos clones, suggesting that A-fos was not interfering with RAR transcription activation functions. We tested whether the RA-induced AP-1 activity might be mediated by the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway. Inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation stimulated AP-1 activity, which was not additive to that induced by RA. This finding raises the possibility that this MAPK pathway may be a target of retinoid action. Our observations suggest that AP-1 transcriptional activity induced by RA likely plays an important role in the biological changes mediated by this retinoid in B16 melanoma cells. PMID:12494454

  15. Dose Dependent Activation of Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene-I Promotes Both Proliferation and Apoptosis Signals in Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ming; Zhu, Chao; Ye, Weimin; Zhu, Hanguang; Chen, Wantao; Zhang, Chenping; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2013-01-01

    The retinoic-acid-inducible gene (RIG)-like receptor (RLR) family proteins are major pathogen reorganization receptors (PRR) responsible for detection of viral RNA, which initiates antiviral response. Here, we evaluated the functional role of one RLR family member, RIG-I, in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). RIG-I is abundantly expressed both in poorly-differentiated primary cancer and lymph node metastasis, but not in normal adjacent tissues. Activation of RIG-I by transfection with low dose of 5′-triphosphate RNA (3p-RNA) induces low levels of interferon and proinflammatory cytokines and promotes NF-κB- and Akt-dependent cell proliferation, migration and invasion. In contrast, activation of RIG-I by a high dose of 3p-RNA induces robust mitochondria-derived apoptosis accompanied by decreased activation of Akt, which is independent of the interferon and TNFα receptor, but can be rescued by over-expression of constitutively active Akt. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that the CARD domain of RIG-I is essential for inducing apoptosis by interacting with caspase-9. Together, our results reveal a dual role of RIG-I in HNSCC through regulating activation of Akt, in which RIG-I activation by low-dose viral dsRNA increases host cell surviral, whereas higher level of RIG-I activation leads to apopotosis. These findings highlight the therapeutic potential of dsRNA mediated RIG-I activation in the treatment of HNSCC. PMID:23484008

  16. Clavulanic acid does not affect convulsions in acute seizure tests in mice.

    PubMed

    Gasior, Maciej; Socała, Katarzyna; Nieoczym, Dorota; Wlaź, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Clavulanic acid (CLAV) inhibits bacterial β-lactamases and is commonly used to aid antibiotic therapy. Prompted by the initial evidence suggestive of the potential anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties of CLAV, the present study was undertaken to systematically evaluate its acute effects on seizure thresholds in seizure tests typically used in primary screening of potential antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In the present study, 6-Hz seizure threshold, maximal electroshock seizure threshold (MEST) test, and intravenous pentylenetetrazole (i.v. PTZ) seizure tests were used to determine anticonvulsant effects of intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered CLAV in mice. Acute effects on motor coordination and muscle strength were assessed in the chimney and grip-strength tests, respectively. Doses of CLAV studied in the present study were either comparable or extended the doses reported in the literature to be effective against kainic acid-induced convulsions in mice or behaviorally active in rodents and monkeys. CLAV had no effect on seizure thresholds in the 6-Hz (64 ng/kg to 1 mg/kg) and MEST (64 ng/kg to 5 mg/kg) seizure tests. Similarly, CLAV had no effect on seizure thresholds for i.v. PTZ-induced myoclonic twitch, clonic convulsions, and tonic convulsions (64 ng/kg to 5 mg/kg). Finally, CLAV (64 ng/kg to 5 mg/kg) had no effect on the motor performance and muscle strength in the chimney and grip-strength tests, respectively. In summary, CLAV failed to affect seizure thresholds in three seizure tests in mice. Although the results of the present study do not support further development of CLAV as an AED, its beneficial effects in chronic epilepsy models warrant further evaluation owing to its, for example, potential neuroprotective properties.

  17. Seizures in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Born, H A

    2015-02-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) increases the risk for late-onset seizures and neuronal network abnormalities. An elevated co-occurrence of AD and seizures has been established in the more prevalent sporadic form of AD. Recent evidence suggests that nonconvulsive network abnormalities, including seizures and other electroencephalographic abnormalities, may be more commonly found in patients than previously thought. Patients with familial AD are at an even greater risk for seizures, which have been found in patients with mutations in PSEN1, PSEN2, or APP, as well as with APP duplication. This review also provides an overview of seizure and electroencephalography studies in AD mouse models. The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide has been identified as a possible link between AD and seizures, and while Aβ is known to affect neuronal activity, the full-length amyloid precursor protein (APP) and other APP cleavage products may be important for the development and maintenance of cortical network hyperexcitability. Nonconvulsive epileptiform activity, such as seizures or network abnormalities that are shorter in duration but may occur with higher frequency, may contribute to cognitive impairments characteristic of AD, such as amnestic wandering. Finally, the review discusses recent studies using antiepileptic drugs to rescue cognitive deficits in AD mouse models and human patients. Understanding the mechanistic link between epileptiform activity and AD is a research area of growing interest. Further understanding of the connection between neuronal hyperexcitability and Alzheimer's as well as the potential role of epileptiform activity in the progression of AD will be beneficial for improving treatment strategies.

  18. SEIZURE AND EPILEPSY: STUDIES OF SEIZURE DISORDERS IN DROSOPHILA

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Louise; Howlett, Iris C.; Rusan, Zeid M.; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the frequency of seizure disorders in the human population, the genetic and physiological basis for these defects has been difficult to resolve. Although many genetic contributions to seizure susceptibility have been identified, these involve disparate biological processes, many of which are not neural specific. The large number and heterogeneous nature of the genes involved makes it difficult to understand the complex factors underlying the etiology of seizure disorders. Examining the effect known genetic mutations have on seizure susceptibility is one approach that may prove fruitful. This approach may be helpful in both understanding how different physiological processes affect seizure susceptibility and identifying novel therapeutic treatments. We review here factors contributing to seizure susceptibility in Drosophila, a genetically tractable system that provides a model for human seizure disorders. Seizure-like neuronal activities and behaviors in the fruit fly are described, as well as a set of mutations that exhibit features resembling some human epilepsies and render the fly sensitive to seizures. Especially interesting are descriptions of a novel class of mutations that are second-site mutations that act as seizure suppressors. These mutations revert epilepsy phenotypes back to the wild-type range of seizure susceptibility. The genes responsible for seizure suppression are cloned with the goal of identifying targets for lead compounds that may be developed into new antiepileptic drugs. PMID:21906534

  19. Phthalic acid induces oxidative stress and alters the activity of some antioxidant enzymes in roots of Malus prunifolia.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ru; Ma, Fengwang; Liang, Dong; Zhao, Xin

    2009-04-01

    Apple replant is a widespread agricultural problem documented in all of the major fruit-growing regions of the world. In order to better understand the phytotoxic mechanisms induced by allelochemicals involved with this problem, Malus prunifolia plants were grown hydroponically to the six-leaf-stage in the presence of phthalic acid (0 or 1 mM) for 5, 10, or 15 days. Apple plants were evaluated for: shoot and root length, fresh and dry weight, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) content, superoxide radical (O(2) (*-)) generation rate, and antioxidant enzyme activities. Shoot and root lengths and fresh and dry weights of M. prunifolia decreased in plants exposed to phthalic acid. MDA and H(2)O(2) content increased in phthalic acid-treated plants as did the generation rate of O(2) (*-) in M. prunifolia roots. The activities of superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1), peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7), catalase (EC 1.11.1.6), ascorbate peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.11), glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2), dehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1), and monodehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.6.5.4) increased in phthalic acid-stressed roots compared with control roots. These results suggest that activation of the antioxidant system by phthalic acid led to the formation of reactive oxygen species that resulted in cellular damage and the decrease of M. prunifolia growth. PMID:19352774

  20. Seizure-like activity in a juvenile Angelman syndrome mouse model is attenuated by reducing Arc expression

    PubMed Central

    Mandel-Brehm, Caleigh; Salogiannis, John; Dhamne, Sameer C.; Rotenberg, Alexander; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder arising from loss-of-function mutations in the maternally inherited copy of the UBE3A gene, and is characterized by an absence of speech, excessive laughter, cognitive delay, motor deficits, and seizures. Despite the fact that the symptoms of AS occur in early childhood, behavioral characterization of AS mouse models has focused primarily on adult phenotypes. In this report we describe juvenile behaviors in AS mice that are strain-independent and clinically relevant. We find that young AS mice, compared with their wild-type littermates, produce an increased number of ultrasonic vocalizations. In addition, young AS mice have defects in motor coordination, as well as abnormal brain activity that results in an enhanced seizure-like response to an audiogenic challenge. The enhanced seizure-like activity, but not the increased ultrasonic vocalizations or motor deficits, is rescued in juvenile AS mice by genetically reducing the expression level of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein, Arc. These findings suggest that therapeutic interventions that reduce the level of Arc expression have the potential to reverse the seizures associated with AS. In addition, the identification of aberrant behaviors in young AS mice may provide clues regarding the neural circuit defects that occur in AS and ultimately allow new approaches for treating this disorder. PMID:25848016

  1. Seizure-like activity in a juvenile Angelman syndrome mouse model is attenuated by reducing Arc expression.

    PubMed

    Mandel-Brehm, Caleigh; Salogiannis, John; Dhamne, Sameer C; Rotenberg, Alexander; Greenberg, Michael E

    2015-04-21

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder arising from loss-of-function mutations in the maternally inherited copy of the UBE3A gene, and is characterized by an absence of speech, excessive laughter, cognitive delay, motor deficits, and seizures. Despite the fact that the symptoms of AS occur in early childhood, behavioral characterization of AS mouse models has focused primarily on adult phenotypes. In this report we describe juvenile behaviors in AS mice that are strain-independent and clinically relevant. We find that young AS mice, compared with their wild-type littermates, produce an increased number of ultrasonic vocalizations. In addition, young AS mice have defects in motor coordination, as well as abnormal brain activity that results in an enhanced seizure-like response to an audiogenic challenge. The enhanced seizure-like activity, but not the increased ultrasonic vocalizations or motor deficits, is rescued in juvenile AS mice by genetically reducing the expression level of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein, Arc. These findings suggest that therapeutic interventions that reduce the level of Arc expression have the potential to reverse the seizures associated with AS. In addition, the identification of aberrant behaviors in young AS mice may provide clues regarding the neural circuit defects that occur in AS and ultimately allow new approaches for treating this disorder. PMID:25848016

  2. Lysophosphatidic acid induces reactive oxygen species generation by activating protein kinase C in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chu-Cheng; Lin, Chuan-En; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Ju, Tsai-Kai; Huang, Yuan-Li; Lee, Ming-Shyue; Chen, Jiun-Hong; Lee, Hsinyu

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPA induces ROS generation through LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3}. •LPA induces ROS generation by activating PLC. •PKCζ mediates LPA-induced ROS generation. -- Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in males, and PC-3 is a cell model popularly used for investigating the behavior of late stage prostate cancer. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lysophospholipid that mediates multiple behaviors in cancer cells, such as proliferation, migration and adhesion. We have previously demonstrated that LPA enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C expression in PC-3 cells by activating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to be an important mediator in cancer progression. Using flow cytometry, we showed that LPA triggers ROS generation within 10 min and that the generated ROS can be suppressed by pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. In addition, transfection with LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} siRNA efficiently blocked LPA-induced ROS production, suggesting that both receptors are involved in this pathway. Using specific inhibitors and siRNA, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) were also suggested to participate in LPA-induced ROS generation. Overall, we demonstrated that LPA induces ROS generation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells and this is mediated through the PLC/PKC/Nox pathway.

  3. Epilepsy or seizures - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... You should still plan ahead for the possible dangers of a certain activity. DO NOT do any ... seizure would put you or someone else in danger. Wear a medical alert bracelet. Tell family members, ...

  4. Probucol increases striatal glutathione peroxidase activity and protects against 3-nitropropionic acid-induced pro-oxidative damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Colle, Dirleise; Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Moreira, Eduardo Luiz Gasnhar; Hartwig, Juliana Montagna; dos Santos, Alessandra Antunes; Zimmermann, Luciana Teixeira; Hort, Mariana Appel; Farina, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by symptoms attributable to the death of striatal and cortical neurons. The molecular mechanisms mediating neuronal death in HD involve oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Administration of 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), an irreversible inhibitor of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, in rodents has been proposed as a useful experimental model of HD. This study evaluated the effects of probucol, a lipid-lowering agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, on the biochemical parameters related to oxidative stress, as well as on the behavioral parameters related to motor function in an in vivo HD model based on 3-NP intoxication in rats. Animals were treated with 3.5 mg/kg of probucol in drinking water daily for 2 months and, subsequently, received 3-NP (25 mg/kg i.p.) once a day for 6 days. At the end of the treatments, 3-NP-treated animals showed a significant decrease in body weight, which corresponded with impairment on motor ability, inhibition of mitochondrial complex II activity and oxidative stress in the striatum. Probucol, which did not rescue complex II inhibition, protected against behavioral and striatal biochemical changes induced by 3-NP, attenuating 3-NP-induced motor impairments and striatal oxidative stress. Importantly, probucol was able to increase activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), an enzyme important in mediating the detoxification of peroxides in the central nervous system. The major finding of this study was that probucol protected against 3-NP-induced behavioral and striatal biochemical changes without affecting 3-NP-induced mitochondrial complex II inhibition, indicating that long-term probucol treatment resulted in an increased resistance against neurotoxic events (i.e., increased oxidative damage) secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction. These data appeared to be of great relevance when

  5. Sulforaphane Ameliorates Okadaic Acid-Induced Memory Impairment in Rats by Activating the Nrf2/HO-1 Antioxidant Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Subhash; Rajasekar, N; Hanif, Kashif; Nath, Chandishwar; Shukla, Rakesh

    2016-10-01

    Okadaic acid (OKA) causes memory impairment and attenuates nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) along with oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in rats. Sulforaphane (dietary isothiocyanate compound), an activator of Nrf2 signaling, exhibits neuroprotective effects. However, the protective effect of sulforaphane in OKA-induced neurotoxicity remains uninvestigated. Therefore, in the present study, the role of sulforaphane in OKA-induced memory impairment in rats was explored. A significant increased Nrf2 expression in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex was observed in trained (Morris water maze) rats, and a significant decreased Nrf2 expression in memory-impaired (OKA, 200 ng icv) rats indicated its involvement in memory function. Sulforaphane administration (5 and 10 mg/kg, ip, days 1 and 2) ameliorates OKA-induced memory impairment in rats. The treatment also restored Nrf2 and its downstream antioxidant protein expression (GCLC, HO-1) and attenuated oxidative stress (ROS, nitrite, GSH), neuroinflammation (NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-10), and neuronal apoptosis in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of OKA-treated rats. Further, to determine whether modulation of Nrf2 signaling is responsible for the protective effect of sulforaphane, in vitro, Nrf2 siRNA and its downstream HO-1 inhibition studies were carried out in a rat astrocytoma cell line (C6). The protective effects of sulforaphane were abolished with Nrf2 siRNA and HO-1 inhibition in astrocytes. The results suggest that Nrf2-dependent activation of cellular antioxidant machinery results in sulforaphane-mediated protection against OKA-induced memory impairment in rats. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  6. Probucol Increases Striatal Glutathione Peroxidase Activity and Protects against 3-Nitropropionic Acid-Induced Pro-Oxidative Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Colle, Dirleise; Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Moreira, Eduardo Luiz Gasnhar; Hartwig, Juliana Montagna; dos Santos, Alessandra Antunes; Zimmermann, Luciana Teixeira; Hort, Mariana Appel; Farina, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by symptoms attributable to the death of striatal and cortical neurons. The molecular mechanisms mediating neuronal death in HD involve oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Administration of 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), an irreversible inhibitor of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, in rodents has been proposed as a useful experimental model of HD. This study evaluated the effects of probucol, a lipid-lowering agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, on the biochemical parameters related to oxidative stress, as well as on the behavioral parameters related to motor function in an in vivo HD model based on 3-NP intoxication in rats. Animals were treated with 3.5 mg/kg of probucol in drinking water daily for 2 months and, subsequently, received 3-NP (25 mg/kg i.p.) once a day for 6 days. At the end of the treatments, 3-NP-treated animals showed a significant decrease in body weight, which corresponded with impairment on motor ability, inhibition of mitochondrial complex II activity and oxidative stress in the striatum. Probucol, which did not rescue complex II inhibition, protected against behavioral and striatal biochemical changes induced by 3-NP, attenuating 3-NP-induced motor impairments and striatal oxidative stress. Importantly, probucol was able to increase activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), an enzyme important in mediating the detoxification of peroxides in the central nervous system. The major finding of this study was that probucol protected against 3-NP-induced behavioral and striatal biochemical changes without affecting 3-NP-induced mitochondrial complex II inhibition, indicating that long-term probucol treatment resulted in an increased resistance against neurotoxic events (i.e., increased oxidative damage) secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction. These data appeared to be of great relevance when

  7. Role of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase in α-linolenic acid-induced intestinal lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xihong; Chen, Jingqing; Wu, Weiche; Wang, Xinxia; Wang, Yizhen

    2015-09-28

    n-3 Long-chain PUFA up-regulate intestinal lipid metabolism. However, whether these metabolic effects of PUFA on intestine are mediated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) remains to be elucidated. To determine the effects of α-linolenic acid (ALA) on intestinal fatty acid (FA) metabolism and whether these effects were affected by AMPK deletion, mice deficient in the catalytic subunit of AMPKα1 or AMPKα2 and wild-type (WT) mice were fed either a high-fat diet (HF) or HF supplemented with ALA (HF-A). The results showed that ALA supplementation decreased serum TAG content in WT mice. ALA also increased mRNA expression of genes (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a, acyl-CoA oxidase 1, medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, cytochrome P450 4A10 and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoenzyme 4a) involved in intestinal lipid oxidation and mRNA expression of TAG synthesis-related genes (monoacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2, diacylglycerol O-acyltransferases 1 and 2) in WT mice. Consistent with these, expression levels of phosphorylated AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 were also increased in WT mice after ALA addition. However, in the absence of either AMPKα1 or AMPKα2, ALA supplementation failed to increase intestinal lipid oxidation. In addition, no significant effects of either diet (HF and HF-A) or genotype (WT, AMPKα1(-/-) and AMPKα2(-/-)) on FA uptake in the intestine and faecal TAG output were observed. Our results suggest that AMPK is indispensable for the effects of ALA on intestinal lipid oxidation. PMID:26268732

  8. 5-Methyl Salicylic Acid-Induced Thermo Responsive Reversible Transition in Surface Active Ionic Liquid Assemblies: A Spectroscopic Approach.

    PubMed

    Roy, Arpita; Dutta, Rupam; Banerjee, Pavel; Kundu, Sangita; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2016-07-19

    This article describes the formation of stable unilamellar vesicles involving surface active ionic liquid (SAIL), 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C16mimCl), and 5-methyl salicylic acid (5mS). Turbidity, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and viscosity measurements suggest that C16mimCl containing micellar aggregates are transformed to elongated micelle and finally into vesicular aggregates with the addition of 5mS. Besides, we have also investigated the photophysical aspects of a hydrophobic (coumarin 153, C153) and a hydrophilic molecule (rhodamine 6G (R6G) perchlorate) during 5mS-induced micelle to vesicle transition. The rotational motion of C153 becomes slower, whereas faster motion is observed for R6G during micelle to vesicle transition. Moreover, the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measurements suggest that the translational diffusion of hydrophobic probe becomes slower in C16mimCl-5mS aggregates in comparison to C16mimCl micelle. However, a reverse trend in translational diffusion motion of hydrophilic molecule has been observed in C16mimCl-5mS aggregates. Moreover, we have also found that the C16mimCl-5mS containing vesicles are transformed into micelles upon enhanced temperature, and it is further confirmed by turbidity, DLS measurements that this transition is a reversible one. Finally, temperature-induced rotational motion of C153 and R6G has been monitored in C16mimCl-5mS aggregates to get a complete scenario regarding the temperature-induced vesicle to micelle transition. PMID:27345738

  9. Dopey's seizure.

    PubMed

    Dan, B; Christiaens, F

    1999-06-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic condition namely characterized by developmental delay, virtual absence of expressive verbal language, peculiar organization of movement, seizures and happy demeanor. This syndrome has been recognized since 1965, but it seems that Walt Disney presented an original depiction of it in his first full-length animated film, including myoclonic jerks and an apparently generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

  10. Musicogenic seizures.

    PubMed

    Avanzini, Giuliano

    2003-11-01

    Eighty-seven reports of patients with seizures induced by listening and/or playing music and one personal observation are reviewed. Music-induced (or musicogenic) seizures are currently classified among the reflex seizures precipitated by complex stimuli. According to the available information, they are defined as focal seizures due to a discharge involving lateral and mesial temporal and orbitofrontal areas. The specific musical component responsible for seizure precipitation is still undetermined. An important role is attributed to the emotional aspect of music. The existence of this rare disorder should be borne in mind by neurologists, who should also be aware of the existing musical test batteries that may help in understanding better the nature of triggering mechanisms responsible for this unique pathological condition. The implementations of the results of ongoing investigations on brain processing of musical information will advance our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the transition from interictal to ictal phases of epilepsy. PMID:14681120

  11. MicroRNA-Mediated Downregulation of the Potassium Channel Kv4.2 Contributes to Seizure Onset.

    PubMed

    Gross, Christina; Yao, Xiaodi; Engel, Tobias; Tiwari, Durgesh; Xing, Lei; Rowley, Shane; Danielson, Scott W; Thomas, Kristen T; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Schroeder, Lindsay M; Pun, Raymund Y K; Danzer, Steve C; Henshall, David C; Bassell, Gary J

    2016-09-27

    Seizures are bursts of excessive synchronized neuronal activity, suggesting that mechanisms controlling brain excitability are compromised. The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv4.2, a major mediator of hyperpolarizing A-type currents in the brain, is a crucial regulator of neuronal excitability. Kv4.2 expression levels are reduced following seizures and in epilepsy, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we report that Kv4.2 mRNA is recruited to the RNA-induced silencing complex shortly after status epilepticus in mice and after kainic acid treatment of hippocampal neurons, coincident with reduction of Kv4.2 protein. We show that the microRNA miR-324-5p inhibits Kv4.2 protein expression and that antagonizing miR-324-5p is neuroprotective and seizure suppressive. MiR-324-5p inhibition also blocks kainic-acid-induced reduction of Kv4.2 protein in vitro and in vivo and delays kainic-acid-induced seizure onset in wild-type but not in Kcnd2 knockout mice. These results reveal an important role for miR-324-5p-mediated silencing of Kv4.2 in seizure onset. PMID:27681419

  12. SEIZURE ACTIVITY INVOLVED IN THE UP-REGULATION OF BDNF mRNA EXPRESSION BY ACTIVATION OF CENTRAL MU OPIOID RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, H. N.; KO, M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Chemical-induced seizures up-regulated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of endogenous opioids preferentially activating μ opioid receptor (MOR) could also increase BDNF mRNA expression. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent i.c.v. administration of synthetic MOR-selective agonists in rats can modulate both seizure activity and up-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression. Effects and potencies of i.c.v. administration of morphine and [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO), were directly investigated by scoring behavioral seizures and measuring BDNF mRNA expression. In addition, effects of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone and antiepileptic drugs, diazepam, phenobarbital, and valproate, on i.c.v. MOR agonist-induced behavioral seizures and up-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression were determined. A single i.c.v. administration of morphine (10–100 μg) or DAMGO (0.15–1.5 μg) dose-dependently elicited behavioral seizures and increased BDNF mRNA expression in the widespread brain regions. However, subcutaneous administration of MOR agonists neither produced behavioral seizures nor increased BDNF mRNA expression. Pretreatment with naloxone 1 mg/kg significantly reduced behavioral seizure scores and the up-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression elicited by i.c.v. morphine or DAMGO. Similarly, diazepam 10 mg/kg and phenobarbital 40 mg/kg significantly blocked i.c.v. MOR agonist-induced actions. Pretreatment with valproate 300 mg/kg only attenuated behavioral seizures, but it did not affect morphine-induced increase of BDNF mRNA expression. This study provides supporting evidence that seizure activity plays an important role in the up-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression elicited by central MOR activation and that decreased inhibitory action of GABAergic system through the modulation on GABA receptor synaptic function by central MOR activation is involved in its regulation of BDNF m

  13. [Pentylenetetrazole kindling in rats: whether neurodegeneration is associated with manifestations of seizure activity?].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, T V; Iakovleva, A A; Stepanichev, M Iu; Guliaeva, N V

    2005-07-01

    Structural changes in neurons and oxidative stress in hippocampus were studied in rats "tolerant" (TR) and susceptible (SR) to tonic and clonic seizures in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling. The number of normal neurons was significantly decreased in CA1 subfield of TR hippocampus after 11 injections of PTZ, while in SR neuronal cell loss was evident in CA1 and fascia dentata. In both groups, neuronal cell loss was accompanied by increase in damaged neuron number in CA4 subfield. After 21 injections of PTZ, the decrease in normal neuron number was revealed in CA1 subfield of both TR and SR, while the number of damaged neurons was above the control level in hippocampal subfields CA1 and CA4 in TR only. Glutathione level was decreased in hippocampus of both TR and SR as compared with control rats. Thus, rats tolerant to PTZ-induced convulsions demonstrated oxidative stress and neurodegeneration in hippocampus. The results suggest that, in PTZ kindling model, oxidative damage of neurons resulting in neurodegeneration in hippocampus is not directly related to the convulsive activity.

  14. Anticonvulsant activity of bone marrow cells in electroconvulsive seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone marrow is an accessible source of progenitor cells, which have been investigated as treatment for neurological diseases in a number of clinical trials. Here we evaluated the potential benefit of bone marrow cells in protecting against convulsive seizures induced by maximum electroconvulsive shock (MES), a widely used model for screening of anti-epileptic drugs. Behavioral and inflammatory responses were measured after MES induction in order to verify the effects promoted by transplantation of bone marrow cells. To assess the anticonvulsant effects of bone marrow cell transplantation, we measured the frequency and duration of tonic seizure, the mortality rate, the microglial expression and the blood levels of cytokine IL-1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α after MES induction. We hypothesized that these behavioral and inflammatory responses to a strong stimulus such as a convulsive seizure could be modified by the transplantation of bone marrow cells. Results Bone marrow transplanted cells altered the convulsive threshold and showed anticonvulsant effect by protecting from tonic seizures. Bone marrow cells modified the microglial expression in the analyzed brain areas, increased the IL-10 and attenuate IL-6 levels. Conclusions Bone marrow cells exert protective effects by blocking the course of electroconvulsive seizures. Additionally, electroconvulsive seizures induced acute inflammatory responses by altering the pattern of microglia expression, as well as in IL-6 and IL-10 levels. Our findings also indicated that the anticonvulsant effects of these cells can be tested with the MES model following the same paradigm used for drug testing in pharmacological screening. Studies on the inflammatory reaction in response to acute seizures in the presence of transplanted bone marrow cells might open a wide range of discussions on the mechanisms relevant to the pathophysiology of epilepsies. PMID:24011127

  15. Activation of adenosine receptor potentiates the anticonvulsant effect of phenytoin against amygdala kindled seizures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhen; Zhong, Xiao-Ling; Zong, Yu; Wu, Zhong-Chen; Zhang, Qun; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance in epilepsy is considered as a complicated and multifactorial problem. Poor penetration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) across blood-brain barrier (BBB) into the brain, which results in insufficient level of the drugs at the targeted brain region, has been discussed as one mechanism contributing to pharmacoresistance of epilepsies. Therefore, modulating permeability of BBB is the effective treatment strategy since it facilitates the entry of AEDs into the central nervous system (CNS). Recently, signaling through receptors for the adenosine has been identified as a potent modulator of BBB permeability. This paper aimed to investigate the effects of auxiliary application of adenosine receptor (AR) agonist on amygdala-kindled seizures in adult male Wistar rats. When fully kindled seizures were achieved by daily electrical stimulation of the amygdala, rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, phenytoin, and phenytoin (PHT)+5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) groups. NECA (0.08 mg/kg, i.v.) was applied to the PHT+NECA group after the administration of PHT (75 mg/kg, i.p. on the first day; 50mg/kg, i.p. on the following 9 days). Intravenous infusion of NECA resulted in a significant increase in brain PHT levels as compared with the PHT treatment alone. On the other hand, the auxiliary application of NECA dramatically decreased the frequency of generalized seizures and seizure stage, shortened duration of afterdischarge and generalized seizures, as well as the elevated the afterdischarge threshold and generalized seizures threshold. Our study demonstrated that auxiliary application of AR agonist enhanced brain antiepileptic drug levels and strengthened the anticonvulsant properties of PHT against amygdala kindled seizures.

  16. A comparative study of the antitussive activity of levodropropizine and dropropizine in the citric acid-induced cough model in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, G; Cordaro, C I; Vanasia, M; Balzarotti, C; Camusso, L; Caiazzo, G; Maghini, L; Mazzocchi, M; Zennaro, M

    1992-01-01

    Levodropropizine is the levo-rotatory (S)-enantiomer of dropropizine, a racemic non-opiate antitussive agent which has been used clinically for many years. Compared with the racemic drug, levodropropizine exhibits in animal models similar antitussive activity but considerably lower central nervous system (CNS) depressant effects. It is also less likely to cause sedation in treated patients. Since the comparative antitussive potency of the two drugs in clinical experimental models has not been evaluated, the authors performed a randomized, double blind, cross over investigation in which the effects of single oral doses (60 and 90 mg) of levodropropizine and dropropizine were assessed by using the citric acid-induced cough model in eight normal volunteers. Stimulation tests involved inhalation of individual cumulative doses of citric acid (6.3 to 53.3 mg) which at pre-study assessment had been found to induce reproducibly at least ten coughs over a 30 sec period. Each subject was studied by repeating the citric acid stimulation test four times (0 h, 1 h, 2 h and 6 h) on each of five different days separated by intervals of at least three days. In the absence of drug administration (control session), cough response to citric inhalation was remarkably reproducible throughout the 6 h period of observation. A marked and statistically significant reduction in cough response (to about one third--one sixth of the pre-drug values) was observed 1 h after intake for both compounds. At subsequent testing 2 h and 6 h after dosing, cough response was still depressed and did not differ significantly from that observed at 1 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. A comparative study of the antitussive activity of levodropropizine and dropropizine in the citric acid-induced cough model in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, G; Cordaro, C I; Vanasia, M; Balzarotti, C; Camusso, L; Caiazzo, G; Maghini, L; Mazzocchi, M; Zennaro, M

    1992-01-01

    Levodropropizine is the levo-rotatory (S)-enantiomer of dropropizine, a racemic non-opiate antitussive agent which has been used clinically for many years. Compared with the racemic drug, levodropropizine exhibits in animal models similar antitussive activity but considerably lower central nervous system (CNS) depressant effects. It is also less likely to cause sedation in treated patients. Since the comparative antitussive potency of the two drugs in clinical experimental models has not been evaluated, the authors performed a randomized, double blind, cross over investigation in which the effects of single oral doses (60 and 90 mg) of levodropropizine and dropropizine were assessed by using the citric acid-induced cough model in eight normal volunteers. Stimulation tests involved inhalation of individual cumulative doses of citric acid (6.3 to 53.3 mg) which at pre-study assessment had been found to induce reproducibly at least ten coughs over a 30 sec period. Each subject was studied by repeating the citric acid stimulation test four times (0 h, 1 h, 2 h and 6 h) on each of five different days separated by intervals of at least three days. In the absence of drug administration (control session), cough response to citric inhalation was remarkably reproducible throughout the 6 h period of observation. A marked and statistically significant reduction in cough response (to about one third--one sixth of the pre-drug values) was observed 1 h after intake for both compounds. At subsequent testing 2 h and 6 h after dosing, cough response was still depressed and did not differ significantly from that observed at 1 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1295724

  18. Dopey's seizure.

    PubMed

    Dan, B; Christiaens, F

    1999-06-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic condition namely characterized by developmental delay, virtual absence of expressive verbal language, peculiar organization of movement, seizures and happy demeanor. This syndrome has been recognized since 1965, but it seems that Walt Disney presented an original depiction of it in his first full-length animated film, including myoclonic jerks and an apparently generalized tonic-clonic seizure. PMID:10452923

  19. Localization of cortical tissue optical changes during seizure activity in vivo with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Melissa M.; Hsu, Mike S.; Rodriguez, Carissa L.; Szu, Jenny I.; Oliveira, Michael C.; Binder, Devin K.; Park, B. Hyle

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a high resolution, minimally invasive imaging technique, which can produce depth-resolved cross-sectional images. In this study, OCT was used to detect changes in the optical properties of cortical tissue in vivo in mice during the induction of global (pentylenetetrazol) and focal (4-aminopyridine) seizures. Through the use of a confidence interval statistical method on depth-resolved volumes of attenuation coefficient, we demonstrated localization of regions exhibiting both significant positive and negative changes in attenuation coefficient, as well as differentiating between global and focal seizure propagation. PMID:26137382

  20. Differential Activation of Calpain-1 and Calpain-2 following Kainate-Induced Seizure Activity in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seinfeld, Jeff; Xu, Xiaobo; Bi, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    Systemic injection of kainate produces repetitive seizure activity in both rats and mice. It also results in short-term synaptic modifications as well as delayed neurodegeneration. The signaling cascades involved in both short-term and delayed responses are not clearly defined. The calcium-dependent protease calpain is activated in various brain structures following systemic kainate injection, although the precise involvement of the two major brain calpain isoforms, calpain-1 and calpain-2, remains to be defined. It has recently been reported that calpain-1 and calpain-2 play opposite roles in NMDA receptor-mediated neuroprotection or neurodegeneration, with calpain-1 being neuroprotective and calpain-2 being neurodegenerative. In the present study, we determined the activation pattern of calpain-1 and calpain-2 by analyzing changes in levels of different calpain substrates, including spectrin, drebrin, and PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog; a specific calpain-2 substrate) in both rats, and wild-type and calpain-1 knock-out mice. The results indicate that, while calpain-2 is rapidly activated in pyramidal cells throughout CA1 and CA3, rapid calpain-1 activation is restricted to parvalbumin-positive and to a lesser extent CCK-positive, but not somatostatin-positive, interneurons. In addition, calpain-1 knock-out mice exhibit increased long-term neurodegeneration in CA1, reinforcing the notion that calpain-1 activation is neuroprotective. PMID:27622212

  1. Differential Activation of Calpain-1 and Calpain-2 following Kainate-Induced Seizure Activity in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seinfeld, Jeff; Xu, Xiaobo; Bi, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    Systemic injection of kainate produces repetitive seizure activity in both rats and mice. It also results in short-term synaptic modifications as well as delayed neurodegeneration. The signaling cascades involved in both short-term and delayed responses are not clearly defined. The calcium-dependent protease calpain is activated in various brain structures following systemic kainate injection, although the precise involvement of the two major brain calpain isoforms, calpain-1 and calpain-2, remains to be defined. It has recently been reported that calpain-1 and calpain-2 play opposite roles in NMDA receptor-mediated neuroprotection or neurodegeneration, with calpain-1 being neuroprotective and calpain-2 being neurodegenerative. In the present study, we determined the activation pattern of calpain-1 and calpain-2 by analyzing changes in levels of different calpain substrates, including spectrin, drebrin, and PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog; a specific calpain-2 substrate) in both rats, and wild-type and calpain-1 knock-out mice. The results indicate that, while calpain-2 is rapidly activated in pyramidal cells throughout CA1 and CA3, rapid calpain-1 activation is restricted to parvalbumin-positive and to a lesser extent CCK-positive, but not somatostatin-positive, interneurons. In addition, calpain-1 knock-out mice exhibit increased long-term neurodegeneration in CA1, reinforcing the notion that calpain-1 activation is neuroprotective.

  2. Differential Activation of Calpain-1 and Calpain-2 following Kainate-Induced Seizure Activity in Rats and Mice.

    PubMed

    Seinfeld, Jeff; Baudry, Neema; Xu, Xiaobo; Bi, Xiaoning; Baudry, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Systemic injection of kainate produces repetitive seizure activity in both rats and mice. It also results in short-term synaptic modifications as well as delayed neurodegeneration. The signaling cascades involved in both short-term and delayed responses are not clearly defined. The calcium-dependent protease calpain is activated in various brain structures following systemic kainate injection, although the precise involvement of the two major brain calpain isoforms, calpain-1 and calpain-2, remains to be defined. It has recently been reported that calpain-1 and calpain-2 play opposite roles in NMDA receptor-mediated neuroprotection or neurodegeneration, with calpain-1 being neuroprotective and calpain-2 being neurodegenerative. In the present study, we determined the activation pattern of calpain-1 and calpain-2 by analyzing changes in levels of different calpain substrates, including spectrin, drebrin, and PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog; a specific calpain-2 substrate) in both rats, and wild-type and calpain-1 knock-out mice. The results indicate that, while calpain-2 is rapidly activated in pyramidal cells throughout CA1 and CA3, rapid calpain-1 activation is restricted to parvalbumin-positive and to a lesser extent CCK-positive, but not somatostatin-positive, interneurons. In addition, calpain-1 knock-out mice exhibit increased long-term neurodegeneration in CA1, reinforcing the notion that calpain-1 activation is neuroprotective. PMID:27622212

  3. Generalized tonic-clonic seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizure - grand mal; Grand mal seizure; Seizure - generalized; Epilepsy - generalized seizure ... occur as part of a repeated, chronic illness (epilepsy). Some seizures are due to psychological problems (psychogenic).

  4. Glutamate transporters alterations in the reorganizing dentate gyrus are associated with progressive seizure activity in chronic epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Gorter, Jan A; Van Vliet, Erwin A; Proper, Evelien A; De Graan, Pierre N E; Ghijsen, Wim E J M; Lopes Da Silva, Fernando H; Aronica, Eleonora

    2002-01-21

    The expression of glial and neuronal glutamate transporter proteins was investigated in the hippocampal region at different time points after electrically induced status epilepticus (SE) in the rat. This experimental rat model for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy is characterized by cell loss, gliosis, synaptic reorganization, and chronic seizures after a latent period. Despite extensive gliosis, immunocytochemistry revealed only an up-regulation of both glial transporters localized at the outer aspect of the inner molecular layer (iml) in chronic epileptic rats. The neuronal EAAC1 transporter was increased in many somata of individual CA1-3 neurons and granule cells that had survived after SE; this up-regulation was still present in the chronic epileptic phase. In contrast, a permanent decrease of EAAC1 immunoreactivity was observed in the iml of the dentate gyrus. This permanent decrease in EAAC1 expression, which was only observed in rats that experienced progressive spontaneous seizure activity, could lead to abnormal glutamate levels in the iml once new abnormal glutamatergic synaptic contacts are formed by means of sprouted mossy fibers. Considering the steady growth of reorganizing mossy fibers in the iml, the absence of a glutamate reuptake mechanism in this region could contribute to progression of spontaneous seizure activity, which occurs with a similar time course.

  5. Simultaneous EEG and diffuse optical imaging of seizure-related hemodynamic activity in the newborn infant brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebden, Jeremy C.; Cooper, Robert J.; Gibson, Adam; Everdell, Nick; Austin, Topun

    2012-06-01

    An optical imaging system has been developed which uses measurements of diffusely reflected near-infrared light to produce maps of changes in blood flow and oxygenation occurring within the cerebral cortex. Optical sources and detectors are coupled to the head via an array of optical fibers, on a probe held in contact with the scalp, and data is collected at a rate of 10 Hz. A clinical electroencephalography (EEG) system has been integrated with the optical system to enable simultaneous observation of electrical and hemodynamic activity in the cortex of neurologically compromised newborn infants diagnosed with seizures. Studies have made a potentially critically important discovery of previously unknown transient hemodynamic events in infants treated with anticonvulsant medication. We observed repeated episodes of small increases in cortical oxyhemoglobin concentration followed by a profound decrease in 3 of 4 infants studied, each with cerebral injury who presented with neonatal seizures. This was not accompanied by clinical or EEG seizure activity and was not present in nineteen matched controls. The underlying cause of these changes is currently unknown. We tentatively suggest that our results may be associated with a phenomenon known as cortical spreading depolarization, not previously observed in the infant brain.

  6. Hyperthermia-induced seizures alter adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    León-Navarro, David Agustín; Albasanz, José L; Martín, Mairena

    2015-08-01

    Febrile seizure is one of the most common convulsive disorders in children. The neuromodulator adenosine exerts anticonvulsant actions through binding adenosine receptors. Here, the impact of hyperthermia-induced seizures on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity has been studied at different periods in the cerebral cortical area by using radioligand binding, real-time PCR, and 5'-nucleotidase activity assays. Hyperthermic seizures were induced in 13-day-old rats using a warmed air stream from a hair dryer. Neonates exhibited rearing and falling over associated with hindlimb clonus seizures (stage 5 on Racine scale criteria) after hyperthermic induction. A significant increase in A1 receptor density was observed using [(3) H]DPCPX as radioligand, and mRNA coding A1 was observed 48 h after hyperthermia-induced seizures. In contrast, a significant decrease in A2A receptor density was detected, using [(3) H]ZM241385 as radioligand, 48 h after hyperthermia-evoked convulsions. These short-term changes in A1 and A2A receptors were also accompanied by a loss of 5'-nucleotidase activity. No significant variations either in A1 or A2A receptor density or 5'-nucleotidase were observed 5 and 20 days after hyperthermic seizures. Taken together, both regulation of A1 and A2A receptors and loss of 5'-nucleotidase in the cerebral cortex suggest the existence of a neuroprotective mechanism against seizures. Febrile seizure is one of the most common convulsive disorders in children. The consequences of hyperthermia-induced seizures (animal model of febrile seizures) on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity have been studied at different periods in cerebral cortical area. A significant increase in A1 receptor density and mRNA coding A1 was observed 48 h after hyperthermia-induced seizures. In contrast, a significant decrease in A2A receptor density and 5'-nucleotidase activity was detected 48 h after convulsions evoked by hyperthermia

  7. Diphenylarsinic Acid Induced Activation of Cultured Rat Cerebellar Astrocytes: Phosphorylation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Upregulation of Transcription Factors, and Release of Brain-Active Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Mami; Kojima, Mikiya; Asai, Ryota; Kanehira, Tomoko; Sakaguchi, Fumika; Takahata, Kazuaki; Arakaki, Rina; Aoyama, Yohei; Yoshida, Hikari; Yoshida, Kenji; Yukawa, Kazunori; Tashiro, Tomoko; Hirano, Seishiro

    2016-03-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was detected as the primary compound responsible for the arsenic poisoning that occurred in Kamisu, Ibaraki, Japan, where people using water from a well that was contaminated with a high level of arsenic developed neurological (mostly cerebellar) symptoms and dysregulation of regional cerebral blood flow. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism of DPAA-induced cerebellar symptoms, we focused on astrocytes, which have a brain-protective function. Incubation with 10 µM DPAA for 96 h promoted cell proliferation, increased the expression of antioxidative stress proteins (heme oxygenase-1 and heat shock protein 70), and induced the release of cytokines (MCP-1, adrenomedullin, FGF2, CXCL1, and IL-6). Furthermore, DPAA overpoweringly increased the phosphorylation of three major mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and SAPK/JNK), which indicated MAPK activation, and subsequently induced expression and/or phosphorylation of transcription factors (Nrf2, CREB, c-Jun, and c-Fos) in cultured rat cerebellar astrocytes. Structure-activity relationship analyses of DPAA and other related pentavalent organic arsenicals revealed that DPAA at 10 µM activated astrocytes most effective among organic arsenicals tested at the same dose. These results suggest that in a cerebellum exposed to DPAA, abnormal activation of the MAPK-transcription factor pathway and irregular secretion of these neuroactive, glioactive, and/or vasoactive cytokines in astrocytes can be the direct/indirect cause of functional abnormalities in surrounding neurons, glial cells, and vascular cells: This in turn might lead to the onset of cerebellar symptoms and disruption of cerebral blood flow. PMID:26645585

  8. Preictal Activity of Subicular, CA1, and Dentate Gyrus Principal Neurons in the Dorsal Hippocampus before Spontaneous Seizures in a Rat Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Satoshi; Toyoda, Izumi; Thamattoor, Ajoy K.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that spontaneous seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy might be preceded by increased action potential firing of hippocampal neurons. Preictal activity is potentially important because it might provide new opportunities for predicting when a seizure is about to occur and insight into how spontaneous seizures are generated. We evaluated local field potentials and unit activity of single, putative excitatory neurons in the subiculum, CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus in epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats as they experienced spontaneous seizures. Average action potential firing rates of neurons in the subiculum, CA1, and dentate gyrus, but not CA3, increased significantly and progressively beginning 2–4 min before locally recorded spontaneous seizures. In the subiculum, CA1, and dentate gyrus, but not CA3, 41–57% of neurons displayed increased preictal activity with significant consistency across multiple seizures. Much of the increased preictal firing of neurons in the subiculum and CA1 correlated with preictal theta activity, whereas preictal firing of neurons in the dentate gyrus was independent of theta. In addition, some CA1 and dentate gyrus neurons displayed reduced firing rates preictally. These results reveal that different hippocampal subregions exhibit differences in the extent and potential underlying mechanisms of preictal activity. The finding of robust and significantly consistent preictal activity of subicular, CA1, and dentate neurons in the dorsal hippocampus, despite the likelihood that many seizures initiated in other brain regions, suggests the existence of a broader neuronal network whose activity changes minutes before spontaneous seizures initiate. PMID:25505320

  9. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  10. Sulforhodamine 101, a widely used astrocyte marker, can induce cortical seizure-like activity at concentrations commonly used

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Rune; Nedergaard, Maiken; Petersen, Nicolas Caesar

    2016-01-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is a preferential astrocyte marker widely used in 2-photon microscopy experiments. Here we show, that topical loading of two commonly used SR101 concentrations, 100 μM and 250 μM when incubated for 10 min, can induce seizure-like local field potential (LFP) activity in both anaesthetized and awake mouse sensori-motor cortex. This cortical seizure-like activity develops in less than ten minutes following topical loading, and when applied longer, these neuronal discharges reliably evoke contra-lateral hindlimb muscle contractions. Short duration (<1 min) incubation of 100 μM and 250 μM SR101 or application of lower concentrations 25 μM and 50 μM of SR101, incubated for 30 and 20 min, respectively, did not induce abnormal LFP activity in sensori-motor cortex, but did label astrocytes, and may thus be considered more appropriate concentrations for in vivo astrocyte labeling. In addition to label astrocytes SR101 may, at 100 μM and 250 μM, induce abnormal neuronal activity and interfere with cortical circuit activity. SR101 concentration of 50 μM or lower did not induce abnormal neuronal activity. We advocate that, to label astrocytes with SR101, concentrations no higher than 50 μM should be used for in vivo experiments. PMID:27457281

  11. Controlling Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how an implantable device could greatly improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy. Gabe Anderson was diagnosed with bilateral heterotopia, a congenital condition that can lead to the onset of complex partial seizures stemming from both hemispheres of the brain. In early 2004, Gabe became one of the first 35…

  12. Seizure-induced disinhibition of the HPA axis increases seizure susceptibility.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Kate K; Hooper, Andrew; Wakefield, Seth; Maguire, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Stress is the most commonly reported precipitating factor for seizures. The proconvulsant actions of stress hormones are thought to mediate the effects of stress on seizure susceptibility. Interestingly, epileptic patients have increased basal levels of stress hormones, including corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and corticosterone, which are further increased following seizures. Given the proconvulsant actions of stress hormones, we proposed that seizure-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may contribute to future seizure susceptibility. Consistent with this hypothesis, our data demonstrate that pharmacological induction of seizures in mice with kainic acid or pilocarpine increases circulating levels of the stress hormone, corticosterone, and exogenous corticosterone administration is sufficient to increase seizure susceptibility. However, the mechanism(s) whereby seizures activate the HPA axis remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis involves compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons, which govern HPA axis function. Following seizure activity, there is a collapse of the chloride gradient due to changes in NKCC1 and KCC2 expression, resulting in reduced amplitude of sIPSPs and even depolarizing effects of GABA on CRH neurons. Seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis results in future seizure susceptibility which can be blocked by treatment with an NKCC1 inhibitor, bumetanide, or blocking the CRH signaling with Antalarmin. These data suggest that compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons following an initial seizure event may cause hyperexcitability of the HPA axis and increase future seizure susceptibility.

  13. Temporal bone chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst presenting as an intracranial mass with clinical seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Christopher J; Walcott, Brian P; Linskey, Katy R; Kahle, Kristopher T; Nahed, Brian V; Asaad, Wael F

    2011-06-01

    Chondroblastomas are rare tumors that characteristically arise from the epiphyseal cartilage of long bones of the immature skeleton. Intracranial involvement is uncommon, though the squamous portion of the temporal bone is preferentially affected due to its cartilaginous origin. Patients with temporal bone chondroblastomas classically present with otologic symptoms, while primary neurological complaints are rare. In this report, we describe a 33 year-old man with a chondroblastoma of the temporal bone and an associated aneurysmal bone cyst constituting a large intracranial mass lesion who presented with new-onset seizure activity. We review issues relevant to the pathology and treatment of these lesions.

  14. Cytokine-dependent bidirectional connection between impaired social behavior and susceptibility to seizures associated with maternal immune activation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Washington, James; Kumar, Udaya; Medel-Matus, Jesus-Servando; Shin, Don; Sankar, Raman; Mazarati, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) results in the development of autism in the offspring via hyperactivation of IL-6 signaling. Furthermore, experimental studies showed that the MIA-associated activation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) concurrently with IL-6 increases the rate and the severity of hippocampal kindling in mice, thus offering an explanation for autism-epilepsy comorbidity. We examined whether epileptic phenotype triggered by prenatal exposure to IL-6 and IL-1β combination is restricted to kindling or whether it is reproducible in another model of epilepsy, whereby spontaneous seizures develop following kainic acid (KA)- induced status epilepticus. We also examined whether in mice prenatally exposed to IL-6 and IL-6+IL-1β, the presence of spontaneous seizures would exacerbate autism-like features. Between days 12 and 16 of pregnancy, C57bl/6j mice received daily injections of IL-6, IL-1β or IL-6+IL-1β combination. At postnatal day 40, male offspring was examined for the presence of social behavioral deficit and status epilepticus was induced by intrahippocampal KA injection. After six weeks of monitoring for spontaneous seizures, sociability was tested again. Both IL-6 and IL-6+IL-1β offspring presented with social behavioral deficit. Prenatal exposure to IL-6 alleviated, while such exposure to IL-6+IL-1β exacerbated the severity of KA-induced epilepsy. Increased severity of epilepsy in the IL-6+IL-1β mice correlated with the improvement of autism-like behavior. We conclude that complex and not necessarily agonistic relationships exist between epileptic and autism-like phenotypes in an animal model of MIA coupled with KA-induced epilepsy, and that the nature of these relationships depends on components of MIA involved. PMID:26103532

  15. Seizure induces activation of multiple subtypes of neural progenitors and growth factors in hippocampus with neuronal maturation confined to dentate gyrus

    SciTech Connect

    Indulekha, Chandrasekharan L.; Sanalkumar, Rajendran; Thekkuveettil, Anoopkumar; James, Jackson

    2010-03-19

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is altered in response to different physiological and pathological stimuli. GFAP{sup +ve}/nestin{sup +ve} radial glial like Type-1 progenitors are considered to be the resident stem cell population in adult hippocampus. During neurogenesis these Type-1 progenitors matures to GFAP{sup -ve}/nestin{sup +ve} Type-2 progenitors and then to Type-3 neuroblasts and finally differentiates into granule cell neurons. In our study, using pilocarpine-induced seizure model, we showed that seizure initiated activation of multiple progenitors in the entire hippocampal area such as DG, CA1 and CA3. Seizure induction resulted in activation of two subtypes of Type-1 progenitors, Type-1a (GFAP{sup +ve}/nestin{sup +ve}/BrdU{sup +ve}) and Type-1b (GFAP{sup +ve}/nestin{sup +ve}/BrdU{sup -ve}). We showed that majority of Type-1b progenitors were undergoing only a transition from a state of dormancy to activated form immediately after seizures rather than proliferating, whereas Type-1a showed maximum proliferation by 3 days post-seizure induction. Type-2 (GFAP{sup -ve}/nestin{sup +ve}/BrdU{sup +ve}) progenitors were few compared to Type-1. Type-3 (DCX{sup +ve}) progenitors showed increased expression of immature neurons only in DG region by 3 days after seizure induction indicating maturation of progenitors happens only in microenvironment of DG even though progenitors are activated in CA1 and CA3 regions of hippocampus. Also parallel increase in growth factors expression after seizure induction suggests that microenvironmental niche has a profound effect on stimulation of adult neural progenitors.

  16. Activity-dependent expression of ELAV/Hu RBPs and neuronal mRNAs in seizure and cocaine brain.

    PubMed

    Tiruchinapalli, Dhanrajan M; Caron, Marc G; Keene, Jack D

    2008-12-01

    Growing evidence indicates that both seizure (glutamate) and cocaine (dopamine) treatment modulate synaptic plasticity within the mesolimbic region of the CNS. Activation of glutamatergic neurons depends on the localized translation of neuronal mRNA products involved in modulating synaptic plasticity. In this study, we demonstrate the dendritic localization of HuR and HuD RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and their association with neuronal mRNAs following these two paradigms of seizure and cocaine treatment. Both the ubiquitously expressed HuR and neuronal HuD RBPs were detected in different regions as well as within dendrites of the brain and in dissociated neurons. Quantitative analysis revealed an increase in HuR, HuD and p-glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) protein levels as well as neuronal mRNAs encoding Homer, CaMKIIalpha, vascular early response gene, GAP-43, neuritin, and neuroligin protein products following either seizure or cocaine treatment. Inhibition of the Akt/GSK3beta signaling pathway by acute or chronic LiCl treatment revealed changes in HuR, HuD, pGSK3beta, p-Akt, and beta-catenin protein levels. In addition, a genetically engineered hyperdopaminergic mouse model (dopamine transporter knockout) revealed decreased expression of HuR protein levels, but no significant change was observed in HuD or fragile-X mental retardation protein RBPs. Finally, our data suggest that HuR and HuD RBPs potentially interact directly with neuronal mRNAs important for differentiation and synaptic plasticity. PMID:19014379

  17. Similarities and differences of acute nonconvulsive seizures and other epileptic activities following penetrating and ischemic brain injuries in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xi-Chun May; Mountney, Andrea; Chen, Zhiyong; Wei, Guo; Cao, Ying; Leung, Lai Yee; Khatri, Vivek; Cunningham, Tracy; Tortella, Frank C

    2013-04-01

    The similarities and differences between acute nonconvulsive seizures (NCS) and other epileptic events, for example, periodic epileptiform discharges (PED) and intermittent rhythmic delta activities (IRDA), were characterized in rat models of penetrating and ischemic brain injuries. The NCS were spontaneously induced by either unilateral frontal penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) or permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO), and were detected by continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring begun immediately after the injury and continued for 72 h or 24 h, respectively. Analysis of NCS profiles (incidence, frequency, duration, and time distribution) revealed a high NCS incidence in both injury models. The EEG waveform expressions of NCS and PED exhibited intrinsic variations that resembled human electrographic manifestations of post-traumatic and post-ischemic ictal and inter-ictal events, but these waveform variations were not distinguishable between the two types of brain injury. However, the NCS after pMCAO occurred more acutely and intensely (latency=0.6 h, frequency=25 episodes/rat) compared with the PBBI-induced NCS (latency=24 h, frequency=10 episodes/rat), such that the most salient features differentiating post-traumatic and post-ischemic NCS were the intensity and time distribution of the NCS profiles. After pMCAO, nearly 50% of the seizures occurred within the first 2 h of injury, whereas after PBBI, NCS occurred sporadically (0-5%/h) throughout the 72 h recording period. The PED were episodically associated with NCS. By contrast, the IRDA appeared to be independent of other epileptic events. This study provided comprehensive comparisons of post-traumatic and post-ischemic epileptic profiles. The identification of the similarities and differences across a broad spectrum of epileptic events may lead to differential strategies for post-traumatic and post-stroke seizure interventions.

  18. Long-term fish oil supplementation attenuates seizure activity in the amygdala induced by 3-mercaptopropionic acid in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Flores-Mancilla, L E; Hernández-González, M; Guevara, M A; Benavides-Haro, D E; Martínez-Arteaga, P

    2014-04-01

    Several studies have provided evidence of significant effects of omega-3 fatty acids on brain functionality, including seizures and disorders such as epilepsy. Fish oil (FO) is a marine product rich in unsaturated omega-3 fatty acids. Considering that the amygdala is one of the brain structures most sensitive to seizure generation, we aimed to evaluate the effect of long-term chronic FO supplementation (from embryonic conception to adulthood) on the severity of seizures and amygdaloid electroencephalographic activity (EEG) in a 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA)-induced seizure model using adult rats. Female Wistar rats were fed a commercial diet supplemented daily with FO (300mg/kg) from puberty through mating, gestation, delivery, and weaning of the pups. Only the male pups were then fed daily with a commercial diet supplemented with the same treatment as the dam up to the age of 150days postpartum, when they were bilaterally implanted in the amygdala to record behavior and EEG activity before, during, and after seizures induced by administering 3-MPA. Results were compared with those obtained from rats supplemented with palm oil (PO) and rats treated with a vehicle (CTRL). The male rats treated with FO showed longer latency to seizure onset, fewer convulsive episodes, and attenuated severity compared those in the PO and CTRL groups according to the Racine scale. Moreover, long-term FO supplementation was associated with a reduction of the absolute power (AP) of the fast frequencies (12-25Hz) in the amygdala during the seizure periods. These findings support the idea that chronic supplementation with omega-3 of marine origin may have antiseizure properties as other studies have suggested.

  19. Predicting Epileptic Seizures in Advance

    PubMed Central

    Moghim, Negin; Corne, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6–0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG) data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling), is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity) of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance. PMID:24911316

  20. Lipopolysaccharide prevents valproic acid-induced apoptosis via activation of nuclear factor-κB and inhibition of p53 activation.

    PubMed

    Tsolmongyn, Bilegtsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Odkhuu, Erdenezaya; Haque, Abedul; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Komatsu, Takayuki; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    The effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on valproic acid (VPA)-induced cell death was examined by using mouse RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS inhibited the activation of caspase 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. LPS inhibited VPA-induced p53 activation and pifithrin-α as a p53 inhibitor as well as LPS prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. LPS abolished the increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, which is a critical indicator of p53-mediated mitochondrial damage, in response to VPA. The nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibitors, Bay 11-7082 and parthenolide, abolished the preventive action of LPS on VPA-induced apoptosis. A series of toll-like receptor ligands, Pam3CSK4, poly I:C, and CpG DNA as well as LPS prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. Taken together, LPS was suggested to prevent VPA-induced apoptosis via activation of anti-apoptotic NF-κB and inhibition of pro-apoptotic p53 activation. The detailed inhibitory mechanism of VPA-induced apoptosis by LPS is discussed.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide prevents valproic acid-induced apoptosis via activation of nuclear factor-κB and inhibition of p53 activation.

    PubMed

    Tsolmongyn, Bilegtsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Odkhuu, Erdenezaya; Haque, Abedul; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Komatsu, Takayuki; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    The effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on valproic acid (VPA)-induced cell death was examined by using mouse RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS inhibited the activation of caspase 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. LPS inhibited VPA-induced p53 activation and pifithrin-α as a p53 inhibitor as well as LPS prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. LPS abolished the increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, which is a critical indicator of p53-mediated mitochondrial damage, in response to VPA. The nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibitors, Bay 11-7082 and parthenolide, abolished the preventive action of LPS on VPA-induced apoptosis. A series of toll-like receptor ligands, Pam3CSK4, poly I:C, and CpG DNA as well as LPS prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. Taken together, LPS was suggested to prevent VPA-induced apoptosis via activation of anti-apoptotic NF-κB and inhibition of pro-apoptotic p53 activation. The detailed inhibitory mechanism of VPA-induced apoptosis by LPS is discussed. PMID:23770718

  2. Lipopolysaccharide potentiates hyperthermia-induced seizures

    PubMed Central

    Eun, Baik-Lin; Abraham, Jayne; Mlsna, Lauren; Kim, Min Jung; Koh, Sookyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged febrile seizures (FS) have both acute and long-lasting effects on the developing brain. Because FS are often associated with peripheral infection, we aimed to develop a preclinical model of FS that simulates fever and immune activation in order to facilitate the implementation of targeted therapy after prolonged FS in young children. Methods The innate immune activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to postnatal day 14 rat (200 μg/kg) and mouse (100 μg/kg) pups 2–2.5 h prior to hyperthermic seizures (HT) induced by hair dryer or heat lamp. To determine whether simulation of infection enhances neuronal excitability, latency to seizure onset, threshold temperature and total number of seizures were quantified. Behavioral seizures were correlated with electroencephalographic changes in rat pups. Seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production was assessed in blood samples at various time points after HT. Seizure-induced microglia activation in the hippocampus was quantified using Cx3cr1GFP/+ mice. Results Lipopolysaccharide priming increased susceptibility of rats and mice to hyperthemic seizures and enhanced seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production and microglial activation. Conclusions Peripheral inflammation appears to work synergistically with hyperthermia to potentiate seizures and to exacerbate seizure-induced immune responses. By simulating fever, a regulated increase in body temperature from an immune challenge, we developed a more clinically relevant animal model of prolonged FS. PMID:26357586

  3. Seizure Disorders in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizures that cause a loss of consciousness and violent, jerking movements, called grand mal seizures , are especially ... of seizure that causes loss of consciousness and violent, jerking movements. Intrauterine Device: A small device that ...

  4. Localizing epileptic seizure onsets with Granger causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Bhim M.; Epstein, Charles M.; Dhamala, Mukesh

    2013-09-01

    Accurate localization of the epileptic seizure onset zones (SOZs) is crucial for successful surgery, which usually depends on the information obtained from intracranial electroencephalography (IEEG) recordings. The visual criteria and univariate methods of analyzing IEEG recordings have not always produced clarity on the SOZs for resection and ultimate seizure freedom for patients. Here, to contribute to improving the localization of the SOZs and to understanding the mechanism of seizure propagation over the brain, we applied spectral interdependency methods to IEEG time series recorded from patients during seizures. We found that the high-frequency (>80 Hz) Granger causality (GC) occurs before the onset of any visible ictal activity and causal relationships involve the recording electrodes where clinically identifiable seizures later develop. These results suggest that high-frequency oscillatory network activities precede and underlie epileptic seizures, and that GC spectral measures derived from IEEG can assist in precise delineation of seizure onset times and SOZs.

  5. Loss of SYNJ1 dual phosphatase activity leads to early onset refractory seizures and progressive neurological decline.

    PubMed

    Hardies, Katia; Cai, Yiying; Jardel, Claude; Jansen, Anna C; Cao, Mian; May, Patrick; Djémié, Tania; Hachon Le Camus, Caroline; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Deconinck, Tine; Bhambhani, Vikas; Long, Catherine; Sajan, Samin A; Helbig, Katherine L; Suls, Arvid; Balling, Rudi; Helbig, Ingo; De Jonghe, Peter; Depienne, Christel; De Camilli, Pietro; Weckhuysen, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    SYNJ1 encodes a polyphosphoinositide phosphatase, synaptojanin 1, which contains two consecutive phosphatase domains and plays a prominent role in synaptic vesicle dynamics. Autosomal recessive inherited variants in SYNJ1 have previously been associated with two different neurological diseases: a recurrent homozygous missense variant (p.Arg258Gln) that abolishes Sac1 phosphatase activity was identified in three independent families with early onset parkinsonism, whereas a homozygous nonsense variant (p.Arg136*) causing a severe decrease of mRNA transcript was found in a single patient with intractable epilepsy and tau pathology. We performed whole exome or genome sequencing in three independent sib pairs with early onset refractory seizures and progressive neurological decline, and identified novel segregating recessive SYNJ1 defects. A homozygous missense variant resulting in an amino acid substitution (p.Tyr888Cys) was found to impair, but not abolish, the dual phosphatase activity of SYNJ1, whereas three premature stop variants (homozygote p.Trp843* and compound heterozygote p.Gln647Argfs*6/p.Ser1122Thrfs*3) almost completely abolished mRNA transcript production. A genetic follow-up screening in a large cohort of 543 patients with a wide phenotypical range of epilepsies and intellectual disability revealed no additional pathogenic variants, showing that SYNJ1 deficiency is rare and probably linked to a specific phenotype. While variants leading to early onset parkinsonism selectively abolish Sac1 function, our results provide evidence that a critical reduction of the dual phosphatase activity of SYNJ1 underlies a severe disorder with neonatal refractory epilepsy and a neurodegenerative disease course. These findings further expand the clinical spectrum of synaptic dysregulation in patients with severe epilepsy, and emphasize the importance of this biological pathway in seizure pathophysiology. PMID:27435091

  6. Cannabidiol Post-Treatment Alleviates Rat Epileptic-Related Behaviors and Activates Hippocampal Cell Autophagy Pathway Along with Antioxidant Defense in Chronic Phase of Pilocarpine-Induced Seizure.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Mahshid; Nikseresht, Sara; Khodagholi, Fariba; Naderi, Nima; Maghsoudi, Nader

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal and sometimes severe behavioral and molecular symptoms are usually observed in epileptic humans and animals. To address this issue, we examined the behavioral and molecular aspects of seizure evoked by pilocarpine. Autophagy can promote both cell survival and death, but there are controversial reports about the neuroprotective or neurodegenerative effects of autophagy in seizure. Cannabidiol has anticonvulsant properties in some animal models when used as a pretreatment. In this study, we investigated alteration of seizure scores, autophagy pathway proteins, and antioxidant status in hippocampal cells during the chronic phase of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy after treatment with cannabidiol. Cannabidiol (100 ng, intracerebroventricular injection) delayed the chronic phase of epilepsy. Single administration of cannabidiol during the chronic phase of seizure significantly diminished seizure scores such as mouth clonus, head nodding, monolateral and bilateral forelimb clonus and increased the activity of catalase enzyme and reduced glutathione content. Such a protective effect in the behavioral scores of epileptic rats was also observed after repeated administrations of cannabidiol at the onset of the silent phase. Moreover, the amount of Atg7, conjugation of Atg5/12, Atg12, and LC3II/LC3I ratio increased significantly in epileptic rats treated with repeated injections of cannabidiol. In short, our results suggest that post-treatment of Cannabidiol could enhance the induction of autophagy pathway and antioxidant defense in the chronic phase of epilepsy, which could be considered as the protective mechanisms of cannabidiol in a temporal lobe epilepsy model.

  7. Thymoquinone and vitamin C attenuates pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures via activation of GABAB1 receptor in adult rats cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ikram; Badshah, Haroon; Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Lee, Hae Young; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that leads to neuronal excitability and provoke various forms of cellular reorganization in the brain. In this study, we investigate the anti-convulsant and neuroprotective effects of thymoquinone (TQ) and vitamin C against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized seizures. Epileptic seizures were induced in adult rats using systemic intraperitoneal injections of PTZ (50 mg/kg) for 7 days. Animals pretreated with either TQ or vitamin C or in combination attenuated PTZ-induced seizures and mortality in rats as well neurodegeneration in the cells. Compared to PTZ, TQ and vitamin C significantly prolonged the onset of seizures (p > 0.05) as well decrease the high-grade seizures. Analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings revealed that TQ or vitamin C supplementation significantly reduced polyspike and epileptiform discharges. Epileptic seizures caused a decline in expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid B1 receptor (GABAB1R) (p > 0.05), unchanged expression of protein kinase A (PKA), decreased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) (p > 0.05) and inhibit the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) (p > 0.05) in cortex and hippocampus, respectively, compared with control. Changes in expression of GABAB1R, CaMKII and CREB by PTZ were reversed by TQ and vitamin C supplementation. Moreover, PTZ significantly increased Bax, decreased Bcl-2 expression and finally the activation of caspase-3. TQ and vitamin C pretreatment reversed all these deleterious effects induced by PTZ. TQ and vitamin C showed anticonvulsant effects via activation of GABAB1R/CaMKII/CREB pathway and suggest a potential therapeutic role in epilepsy. PMID:25429759

  8. Thymoquinone and vitamin C attenuates pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures via activation of GABAB1 receptor in adult rats cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ikram; Badshah, Haroon; Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Lee, Hae Young; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that leads to neuronal excitability and provoke various forms of cellular reorganization in the brain. In this study, we investigate the anti-convulsant and neuroprotective effects of thymoquinone (TQ) and vitamin C against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized seizures. Epileptic seizures were induced in adult rats using systemic intraperitoneal injections of PTZ (50 mg/kg) for 7 days. Animals pretreated with either TQ or vitamin C or in combination attenuated PTZ-induced seizures and mortality in rats as well neurodegeneration in the cells. Compared to PTZ, TQ and vitamin C significantly prolonged the onset of seizures (p > 0.05) as well decrease the high-grade seizures. Analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings revealed that TQ or vitamin C supplementation significantly reduced polyspike and epileptiform discharges. Epileptic seizures caused a decline in expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid B1 receptor (GABAB1R) (p > 0.05), unchanged expression of protein kinase A (PKA), decreased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) (p > 0.05) and inhibit the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) (p > 0.05) in cortex and hippocampus, respectively, compared with control. Changes in expression of GABAB1R, CaMKII and CREB by PTZ were reversed by TQ and vitamin C supplementation. Moreover, PTZ significantly increased Bax, decreased Bcl-2 expression and finally the activation of caspase-3. TQ and vitamin C pretreatment reversed all these deleterious effects induced by PTZ. TQ and vitamin C showed anticonvulsant effects via activation of GABAB1R/CaMKII/CREB pathway and suggest a potential therapeutic role in epilepsy.

  9. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  10. Ion dynamics during seizures

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Joseph V.; Burman, Richard J.; Katz, Arieh A.; Akerman, Colin J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in membrane voltage brought about by ion fluxes through voltage and transmitter-gated channels represent the basis of neural activity. As such, electrochemical gradients across the membrane determine the direction and driving force for the flow of ions and are therefore crucial in setting the properties of synaptic transmission and signal propagation. Ion concentration gradients are established by a variety of mechanisms, including specialized transporter proteins. However, transmembrane gradients can be affected by ionic fluxes through channels during periods of elevated neural activity, which in turn are predicted to influence the properties of on-going synaptic transmission. Such activity-induced changes to ion concentration gradients are a feature of both physiological and pathological neural processes. An epileptic seizure is an example of severely perturbed neural activity, which is accompanied by pronounced changes in intracellular and extracellular ion concentrations. Appreciating the factors that contribute to these ion dynamics is critical if we are to understand how a seizure event evolves and is sustained and terminated by neural tissue. Indeed, this issue is of significant clinical importance as status epilepticus—a type of seizure that does not stop of its own accord—is a life-threatening medical emergency. In this review we explore how the transmembrane concentration gradient of the six major ions (K+, Na+, Cl−, Ca2+, H+and HCO3−) is altered during an epileptic seizure. We will first examine each ion individually, before describing how multiple interacting mechanisms between ions might contribute to concentration changes and whether these act to prolong or terminate epileptic activity. In doing so, we will consider how the availability of experimental techniques has both advanced and restricted our ability to study these phenomena. PMID:26539081

  11. Automated seizure detection using EKG.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Ivan

    2014-03-01

    Changes in heart rate, most often increases, are associated with the onset of epileptic seizures and may be used in lieu of cortical activity for automated seizure detection. The feasibility of this aim was tested on 241 clinical seizures from 81 subjects admitted to several Epilepsy Centers for invasive monitoring for evaluation for epilepsy surgery. The performance of the EKG-based seizure detection algorithm was compared to that of a validated algorithm applied to electrocorticogram (ECoG). With the most sensitive detection settings [threshold T: 1.15; duration D: 0 s], 5/241 seizures (2%) were undetected (false negatives) and with the highest [T: 1.3; D: 5 s] settings, the number of false negative detections rose to 34 (14%). The rate of potential false positive (PFP) detections was 9.5/h with the lowest and 1.1/h with the highest T, D settings. Visual review of 336 ECoG segments associated with PFPs revealed that 120 (36%) were associated with seizures, 127 (38%) with bursts of epileptiform discharges and only 87 (26%) were true false positives. Electrocardiographic (EKG)-based seizure onset detection preceded clinical onset by 0.8 s with the lowest and followed it by 13.8 s with the highest T, D settings. Automated EKG-based seizure detection is feasible and has potential clinical utility given its ease of acquisition, processing, high signal/noise and ergonomic advantages viz-a-viz EEG (electroencephalogram) or ECoG. Its use as an "electronic" seizure diary will remedy in part, the inaccuracies of those generated by patients/care-givers in a cost-effective manner.

  12. Effect of the Anti-depressant Sertraline, the Novel Anti-seizure Drug Vinpocetine and Several Conventional Antiepileptic Drugs on the Epileptiform EEG Activity Induced by 4-Aminopyridine.

    PubMed

    Sitges, Maria; Aldana, Blanca Irene; Reed, Ronald Charles

    2016-06-01

    Seizures are accompanied by an exacerbated activation of cerebral ion channels. 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) is a pro-convulsive agent which mechanism of action involves activation of Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels, and several antiepileptic drugs control seizures by reducing these channels permeability. The antidepressant, sertraline, and the anti-seizure drug vinpocetine are effective inhibitors of cerebral presynaptic Na(+) channels. Here the effectiveness of these compounds to prevent the epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP was compared with the effectiveness of seven conventional antiepileptic drugs. For this purpose, EEG recordings before and at three intervals within the next 30 min following 4-AP (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) were taken in anesthetized animals; and the EEG-highest peak amplitude values (HPAV) calculated. In control animals, the marked increase in the EEG-HPAV observed near 20 min following 4-AP reached its maximum at 30 min. Results show that this epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP is prevented by sertraline and vinpocetine at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg, and by carbamazepine, phenytoin, lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine at a higher dose (25 mg/kg). In contrast, topiramate (25 mg/kg), valproate (100 mg/kg) and levetiracetam (100 mg/kg) failed to prevent the epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP. It is concluded that 4-AP is a useful tool to elicit the mechanism of action of anti-seizure drugs at clinical meaningful doses. The particular efficacy of sertraline and vinpocetine to prevent seizures induced by 4-AP is explained by their high effectiveness to reduce brain presynaptic Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels permeability. PMID:26830290

  13. Dynamics of regional brain activity in epilepsy: a cross-disciplinary study on both intracranial and scalp-recorded epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minadakis, George; Ventouras, Errikos; Gatzonis, Stylianos D.; Siatouni, Anna; Tsekou, Hara; Kalatzis, Ioannis; Sakas, Damianos E.; Stonham, John

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Recent cross-disciplinary literature suggests a dynamical analogy between earthquakes and epileptic seizures. This study extends the focus of inquiry for the applicability of models for earthquake dynamics to examine both scalp-recorded and intracranial electroencephalogram recordings related to epileptic seizures. Approach. First, we provide an updated definition of the electric event in terms of magnitude and we focus on the applicability of (i) a model for earthquake dynamics, rooted in a nonextensive Tsallis framework, (ii) the traditional Gutenberg and Richter law and (iii) an alternative method for the magnitude-frequency relation for earthquakes. Second, we apply spatiotemporal analysis in terms of nonextensive statistical physics and we further examine the behavior of the parameters included in the nonextensive formula for both types of electroencephalogram recordings under study. Main results. We confirm the previously observed power-law distribution, showing that the nonextensive formula can adequately describe the sequences of electric events included in both types of electroencephalogram recordings. We also show the intermittent behavior of the epileptic seizure cycle which is analogous to the earthquake cycles and we provide evidence of self-affinity of the regional electroencephalogram epileptic seizure activity. Significance. This study may provide a framework for the analysis and interpretation of epileptic brain activity and other biological phenomena with similar underlying dynamical mechanisms.

  14. Tobacco smoking, epilepsy, and seizures.

    PubMed

    Rong, Lingling; Frontera, Alfred T; Benbadis, Selim R

    2014-02-01

    Tobacco smoking is considered the greatest risk factor for death caused by noncommunicable diseases. In contrast to extensive research on the association between tobacco smoking and diseases such as heart attack, stroke, and cancers, studies on the association between tobacco smoking and seizures or epilepsy are insufficient. The exact roles tobacco smoking and nicotine use play in seizures or epilepsy have not been well reviewed. We reviewed available literature and found that 1) there are vast differences between tobacco smoke and nicotine based on their components and their effects on seizures or epilepsy; 2) the seizure risk in acute active tobacco smokers, women who smoke during pregnancy, electronic cigarette smokers, and the role of smoking in sudden unexplained/unexpected death in epilepsy remain unclear; 3) seizure risks are higher in acute secondhand smokers, chronic active smokers, and babies whose mothers smoke; 4) tobacco smoke protects against seizures in animal models whereas nicotine exerts mixed effects in animals; and 5) tobacco smoking agents can be noneffective, proconvulsant, or anticonvulsant. Finally, the opportunities for future research on this topic is discussed.

  15. A New Model to Study Sleep Deprivation-Induced Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Lucey, Brendan P.; Leahy, Averi; Rosas, Regine; Shaw, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Objectives: A relationship between sleep and seizures is well-described in both humans and rodent animal models; however, the mechanism underlying this relationship is unknown. Using Drosophila melanogaster mutants with seizure phenotypes, we demonstrate that seizure activity can be modified by sleep deprivation. Design: Seizure activity was evaluated in an adult bang-sensitive seizure mutant, stress sensitive B (sesB9ed4), and in an adult temperature sensitive seizure mutant seizure (seits1) under baseline and following 12 h of sleep deprivation. The long-term effect of sleep deprivation on young, immature sesB9ed4 flies was also assessed. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: Drosophila melanogaster. Interventions: Sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: Sleep deprivation increased seizure susceptibility in adult sesB9ed4/+ and seits1 mutant flies. Sleep deprivation also increased seizure susceptibility when sesB was disrupted using RNAi. The effect of sleep deprivation on seizure activity was reduced when sesB9ed4/+ flies were given the anti-seizure drug, valproic acid. In contrast to adult flies, sleep deprivation during early fly development resulted in chronic seizure susceptibility when sesB9ed4/+ became adults. Conclusions: These findings show that Drosophila is a model organism for investigating the relationship between sleep and seizure activity. Citation: Lucey BP, Leahy A, Rosas R, Shaw PJ. A new model to study sleep deprivation-induced seizure. SLEEP 2015;38(5):777–785. PMID:25515102

  16. Flight and seizure motor patterns in Drosophila mutants: simultaneous acoustic and electrophysiological recordings of wing beats and flight muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Atulya; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tethered flies allow studies of biomechanics and electrophysiology of flight control. We performed microelectrode recordings of spikes in an indirect flight muscle (the dorsal longitudinal muscle, DLMa) coupled with acoustic analysis of wing beat frequency (WBF) via microphone signals. Simultaneous electrophysiological recording of direct and indirect flight muscles has been technically challenging; however, the WBF is thought to reflect in a one-to-one relationship with spiking activity in a subset of direct flight muscles, including muscle m1b. Therefore, our approach enables systematic mutational analysis for changes in temporal features of electrical activity of motor neurons innervating subsets of direct and indirect flight muscles. Here, we report the consequences of specific ion channel disruptions on the spiking activity of myogenic DLMs (firing at ∼5 Hz) and the corresponding WBF (∼200 Hz). We examined mutants of the genes enconding: 1) voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (cacophony, cac), 2) Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (slowpoke, slo), and 3) voltage-gated K(+) channels (Shaker, Sh) and their auxiliary subunits (Hyperkinetic, Hk and quiver, qvr). We found flight initiation in response to an air puff was severely disrupted in both cac and slo mutants. However, once initiated, slo flight was largely unaltered, whereas cac displayed disrupted DLM firing rates and WBF. Sh, Hk, and qvr mutants were able to maintain normal DLM firing rates, despite increased WBF. Notably, defects in the auxiliary subunits encoded by Hk and qvr could lead to distinct consequences, that is, disrupted DLM firing rhythmicity, not observed in Sh. Our mutant analysis of direct and indirect flight muscle activities indicates that the two motor activity patterns may be independently modified by specific ion channel mutations, and that this approach can be extended to other dipteran species and additional motor programs, such as electroconvulsive stimulation-induced seizures.

  17. Orgasm Induced Seizures: A Rare Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Chaukimath, S P; Patil, P S

    2015-01-01

    A variety of stimuli can cause reflex seizures, Some triggers include light, music and cognitive phenomenon. There are case reports however where the phenomenon of sexual activity has been a trigger for epileptic seizures. Most of these cases reported are in women so far, and were found to be localized to right cerebral hemisphere. We report a case of a 36-year-old male with orgasm-induced seizures, with other atypical features compared to majority of previous reports. PMID:27057393

  18. Post-seizure α-tocopherol treatment decreases neuroinflammation and neuronal degeneration induced by status epilepticus in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ambrogini, Patrizia; Minelli, Andrea; Galati, Claudia; Betti, Michele; Lattanzi, Davide; Ciffolilli, Silvia; Piroddi, Marta; Galli, Francesco; Cuppini, Riccardo

    2014-08-01

    Vitamin E (as α-tocopherol, α-T) was shown to have beneficial effects in epilepsy, mainly ascribed to its antioxidant properties. Besides radical-induced neurotoxicity, neuroinflammation is also involved in the pathophysiology of epilepsy, since neuroglial activation and cytokine production exacerbate seizure-induced neurotoxicity and contribute to epileptogenesis. We previously showed that α-T oral supplementation before inducing status epilepticus, markedly reduces astrocytic and microglial activation, neuronal cell death and oxidative stress in the hippocampus, as observed 4 days after seizure. In order to evaluate the possibility that such a neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effect may also provide a strategy for an acute intervention in epilepsy, in this study, seizures were induced by single intaperitoneal injection of kainic acid and, starting from 3 h after status epilepticus, rats were treated with an intraperitoneal bolus of α-T (250 mg/kg b.w.; once a day) for 4 days, that was the time after which morphological and biochemical analyses were performed on hippocampus. Post-seizure α-T administration significantly reduced astrocytosis and microglia activation, and decreased neuron degeneration and spine loss; these effects were associated with the presence of a lowered lipid peroxidation in hippocampus. These results confirm and further emphasize the anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective role of α-T in kainic acid-induced epilepsy. Moreover, the findings show that post-seizure treatment with α-T provides an effective secondary prevention against post-seizure inflammation-induced brain damages and possibly against their epileptogenic effects. PMID:24488645

  19. Post-seizure α-tocopherol treatment decreases neuroinflammation and neuronal degeneration induced by status epilepticus in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ambrogini, Patrizia; Minelli, Andrea; Galati, Claudia; Betti, Michele; Lattanzi, Davide; Ciffolilli, Silvia; Piroddi, Marta; Galli, Francesco; Cuppini, Riccardo

    2014-08-01

    Vitamin E (as α-tocopherol, α-T) was shown to have beneficial effects in epilepsy, mainly ascribed to its antioxidant properties. Besides radical-induced neurotoxicity, neuroinflammation is also involved in the pathophysiology of epilepsy, since neuroglial activation and cytokine production exacerbate seizure-induced neurotoxicity and contribute to epileptogenesis. We previously showed that α-T oral supplementation before inducing status epilepticus, markedly reduces astrocytic and microglial activation, neuronal cell death and oxidative stress in the hippocampus, as observed 4 days after seizure. In order to evaluate the possibility that such a neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effect may also provide a strategy for an acute intervention in epilepsy, in this study, seizures were induced by single intaperitoneal injection of kainic acid and, starting from 3 h after status epilepticus, rats were treated with an intraperitoneal bolus of α-T (250 mg/kg b.w.; once a day) for 4 days, that was the time after which morphological and biochemical analyses were performed on hippocampus. Post-seizure α-T administration significantly reduced astrocytosis and microglia activation, and decreased neuron degeneration and spine loss; these effects were associated with the presence of a lowered lipid peroxidation in hippocampus. These results confirm and further emphasize the anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective role of α-T in kainic acid-induced epilepsy. Moreover, the findings show that post-seizure treatment with α-T provides an effective secondary prevention against post-seizure inflammation-induced brain damages and possibly against their epileptogenic effects.

  20. Zebrafish Seizure Model Identifies p,p′-DDE as the Dominant Contaminant of Fetal California Sea Lions That Accounts for Synergistic Activity with Domoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Tiedeken, Jessica A.; Ramsdell, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Fetal poisoning of California sea lions (CSLs; Zalophus californianus) has been associated with exposure to the algal toxin domoic acid. These same sea lions accumulate a mixture of persistent environmental contaminants including pesticides and industrial products such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Developmental exposure to the pesticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its stable metabolite 1,1-bis-(4-chlorophenyl)-2,2-dichloroethene (p,p′-DDE) has been shown to enhance domoic acid–induced seizures in zebrafish; however, the contribution of other co-occurring contaminants is unknown. Objective We formulated a mixture of contaminants to include PCBs, PBDEs, hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), and chlordane at levels matching those reported for fetal CSL blubber to determine the impact of co-occurring persistent contaminants with p,p′-DDE on chemically induced seizures in zebrafish as a model for the CSLs. Methods Embryos were exposed (6–30 hr postfertilization) to p,p′-DDE in the presence or absence of a defined contaminant mixture prior to neurodevelopment via either bath exposure or embryo yolk sac microinjection. After brain maturation (7 days postfertilization), fish were exposed to a chemical convulsant, either pentylenetetrazole or domoic acid; resulting seizure behavior was then monitored and analyzed for changes, using cameras and behavioral tracking software. Results Induced seizure behavior did not differ significantly between subjects with embryonic exposure to a contaminant mixture and those exposed to p,p′-DDE only. Conclusion These studies demonstrate that p,p′-DDE—in the absence of PCBs, HCH, chlordane, and PBDEs that co-occur in fetal sea lions—accounts for the synergistic activity that leads to greater sensitivity to domoic acid seizures. PMID:20368122

  1. Ursolic acid induces apoptosis in human leukaemia cells and exhibits anti-leukaemic activity in nude mice through the PKB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ning; Cheng, Senping; Budhraja, Amit; Gao, Ziyi; Chen, Jieping; Liu, E-Hu; Huang, Cheng; Chen, Deying; Yang, Zailin; Liu, Qun; Li, Ping; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Ursolic acid (UA) has been extensively used as an anti-leukaemic agent in traditional Chinese medicine. In the present study, we investigated the ability of UA to induce apoptosis in human leukaemia cells in relation to its effects on caspase activation, Mcl-1 down-regulation and perturbations in stress-induced signalling pathways such as PKB and JNK. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Leukaemia cells were treated with UA after which apoptosis, caspase activation, PKB and JNK signalling pathways were evaluated. The anti-tumour activity of UA was evaluated using xenograft mouse model. KEY RESULTS UA induced apoptosis in human leukaemia cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner; this was associated with caspase activation, down-regulation of Mcl-1 and inactivation of PKB accompanied by activation of JNK. Enforced activation of PKB by a constitutively active PKB construct prevented UA-mediated JNK activation, Mcl-1 down-regulation, caspase activation and apoptosis. Conversely, UA lethality was potentiated by the PI3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. Interruption of the JNK pathway by pharmacological or genetic (e.g. siRNA) attenuated UA-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, UA-mediated inhibition of tumour growth in vivo was associated with induction of apoptosis, inactivation of PKB as well as activation of JNK. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Collectively, these findings suggest a hierarchical model of UA-induced apoptosis in human leukaemia cells in which UA induces PKB inactivation, leading to JNK activation and culminating in Mcl-1 down-regulation, caspase activation and apoptosis. These findings indicate that interruption of PKB/JNK pathways may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in haematological malignancies. PMID:21950524

  2. Changes in focal interictal epileptiform activity during and after the performance of verbal and visuospatial tasks in a patient with intractable partial seizures.

    PubMed Central

    Boniface, S J; Kennett, R P; Oxbury, J M; Oxbury, S M

    1994-01-01

    An 18-year-old male with intractable complex partial seizures is described in whom localised epileptiform discharges in the EEG were influenced in a specific manner by different cognitive tasks. The patient had impaired verbal skills but above average visuospatial ability, and seizures probably arising in the left temporal lobe. Comparison of verbal and visuospatial tasks showed that focal epileptiform activity was suppressed or enhanced depending on the nature of the immediate and preceding cognitive tasks. The finding of particular interest was the activity of a posterior temporal spike focus only during rest periods after verbal tasks, by contrast with an independent mid-to-anterior temporal focus that was suppressed during verbal tasks. PMID:8126513

  3. Abscisic acid induced changes in production of primary and secondary metabolites, photosynthetic capacity, antioxidant capability, antioxidant enzymes and lipoxygenase inhibitory activity of Orthosiphon stamineus Benth.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z E

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate and distinguish the relationships in the production of total phenolics, total flavonoids, soluble sugars, H2O2, O2-, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity, leaf gas exchange, antioxidant activity, antioxidant enzyme activity [ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Lipoxygenase inhibitory activity (LOX)] under four levels of foliar abscisic acid (ABA) application (0, 2, 4, 6 µM) for 15 weeks in Orthosiphon stamineus Benth. It was found that the production of plant secondary metabolites, soluble sugars, antioxidant activity, PAL activity and LOX inhibitory activity was influenced by foliar application of ABA. As the concentration of ABA was increased from 0 to 6 µM the production of total phenolics, flavonoids, sucrose, H2O2, O2-, PAL activity and LOX inhibitory activity was enhanced. It was also observed that the antioxidant capabilities (DPPH and ORAC) were increased. This was followed by increases in production of antioxidant enzymes APX, CAT and SOD. Under high application rates of ABA the net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was found to be reduced. The production of primary and secondary metabolites displayed a significant positive relationship with H2O2 (total phenolics, r2 = 0.877; total flavonoids, r2 = 0.812; p ≤ 0.05) and O2- (total phenolics, r2 = 0.778; total flavonoids, r2 = 0.912; p ≤ 0.05). This indicated that increased oxidative stress at high application rates of ABA, improved the production of phytochemicals. PMID:23884129

  4. A 20-kDa domain is required for phosphatidic acid-induced allosteric activation of phospholipase D from Streptomyces chromofuscus.

    PubMed

    Geng, D; Baker, D P; Foley, S F; Zhou, C; Stieglitz, K; Roberts, M F

    1999-03-19

    Two phospholipase D (PLD) enzymes with both hydrolase and transferase activities were isolated from Streptomyces chromofuscus. There were substantial differences in the kinetic properties of the two PLD enzymes towards monomeric, micellar, and vesicle substrates. The most striking difference was that the higher molecular weight enzyme (PLD57 approximately 57 kDa) could be activated allosterically with a low mole fraction of phosphatidic acid (PA) incorporated into a PC bilayer (Geng et al., J. Biol. Chem. 273 (1998) 12195-12202). PLD42/20, a tightly associated complex of two peptides, one of 42 kDa and the other 20 kDa, had a 4-6-fold higher Vmax toward PC substrates than PLD57 and was not activated by PA. N-Terminal sequencing of both enzymes indicated that both components of PLD42/20 were cleavage products of PLD57. The larger component included the N-terminal segment of PLD57 and contained the active site. The N-terminus of the smaller peptide corresponded to the C-terminal region of PLD57; this peptide had no PLD activity by itself. Increasing the pH of PLD42/20 to 8.9, followed by chromatography of PLD42/20 on a HiTrap Q column at pH 8.5 separated the 42- and 20-kDa proteins. The 42-kDa complex had about the same specific activity with or without the 20-kDa fragment. The lack of PA activation for the 42-kDa protein and for PLD42/20 indicates that an intact C-terminal region of PLD57 is necessary for activation by PA. Furthermore, the mechanism for transmission of the allosteric signal requires an intact PLD57.

  5. Anticonvulsant activity of the antidepressant drug, tianeptine, against pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures mitigates cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Reeta, Kh; Prabhakar, Pankaj; Gupta, Yogendra K

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of depression, a common comorbidity in patients with epilepsy, is restricted as certain antidepressants are considered to be proconvulsants. In contrast, anticonvulsant effects have been reported with some antidepressants. In the present study, the effect of tianeptine, an antidepressant, was evaluated against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures, cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in rats. Tianeptine was administered in three doses (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) 30 min before PTZ (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). MK801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, and naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, were administered with tianeptine to evaluate the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate and opioid receptors, respectively. Morris water maze, elevated plus maze and passive avoidance tests were performed for behavioural assessment. Brain malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione levels were estimated as markers of oxidative stress. Tianeptine showed dose-dependent protection against PTZ seizures. Coadministration of tianeptine with MK801 potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of tianeptine. The protective effect of tianeptine against PTZ seizures was mitigated when tianeptine was administered with naloxone. Impairment of learning and memory by PTZ was prevented by tianeptine. Tianeptine also attenuated the seizure-induced increased oxidative stress. Thus, tianeptine showed an anticonvulsant effect along with amelioration of seizure-induced cognitive impairment and oxidative stress. Hence, tianeptine could be a useful drug in epileptic patients with depression, with the advantage of having both antidepressant and antiepileptic effects.

  6. Anticonvulsant activity of the antidepressant drug, tianeptine, against pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures mitigates cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Reeta, Kh; Prabhakar, Pankaj; Gupta, Yogendra K

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of depression, a common comorbidity in patients with epilepsy, is restricted as certain antidepressants are considered to be proconvulsants. In contrast, anticonvulsant effects have been reported with some antidepressants. In the present study, the effect of tianeptine, an antidepressant, was evaluated against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures, cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in rats. Tianeptine was administered in three doses (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) 30 min before PTZ (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). MK801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, and naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, were administered with tianeptine to evaluate the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate and opioid receptors, respectively. Morris water maze, elevated plus maze and passive avoidance tests were performed for behavioural assessment. Brain malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione levels were estimated as markers of oxidative stress. Tianeptine showed dose-dependent protection against PTZ seizures. Coadministration of tianeptine with MK801 potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of tianeptine. The protective effect of tianeptine against PTZ seizures was mitigated when tianeptine was administered with naloxone. Impairment of learning and memory by PTZ was prevented by tianeptine. Tianeptine also attenuated the seizure-induced increased oxidative stress. Thus, tianeptine showed an anticonvulsant effect along with amelioration of seizure-induced cognitive impairment and oxidative stress. Hence, tianeptine could be a useful drug in epileptic patients with depression, with the advantage of having both antidepressant and antiepileptic effects. PMID:27561095

  7. Kainic acid-induced neurodegeneration and activation of inflammatory processes in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures: treatment with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor does not prevent neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Juha T; Ruohonen, Saku; Kukko-Lukjanov, Tiina-Kaisa; Plysjuk, Anna; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R; Holopainen, Irma E

    2011-06-01

    In the postnatal rodent hippocampus status epilepticus (SE) leads to age- and region-specific excitotoxic neuronal damage, the precise mechanisms of which are still incompletely known. Recent studies suggest that the activation of inflammatory responses together with glial cell reactivity highly contribute to excitotoxic neuronal damage. However, pharmacological tools to attenuate their activation in the postnatal brain are still poorly elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of inflammatory mediators in kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal damage in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs). A specific cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor N-[2-(cyclohexyloxy)-4-nitrophenyl]-methanesulfonamide (NS-398) was used to study whether or not it could ameliorate neuronal death. Our results show that KA treatment (24 h) resulted in a dose-dependent degeneration of CA3a/b pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, COX-2 immunoreactivity was pronouncedly enhanced particularly in CA3c pyramidal neurons, microglial and astrocyte morphology changed from a resting to active appearance, the expression of the microglial specific protein, Iba1, increased, and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production increased. These indicated the activation of inflammatory processes. However, the expression of neither proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), nor the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 mRNA was significantly altered by KA treatment as studied by real-time PCR. Despite activation of an array of inflammatory processes, neuronal damage could not be rescued either with the combined pre- and co-treatment with a specific COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398. Our results suggest that KA induces activation of a repertoire of inflammatory processes in immature OHCs, and that the timing of anti-inflammatory treatment to achieve neuroprotection is a challenge due to developmental properties and the complexity of inflammatory processes activated by

  8. Pioglitazone ameliorates behavioral, biochemical and cellular alterations in quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity: possible role of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-Upsilon (PPARUpsilon) in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2010-08-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that PPARUpsilon activators attenuate neurodegeneration and related complications. Therefore, the present study focused on the neuroprotective potential of pioglitazone against quinolinic acid (QUIN) induced neurotoxicity. Intrastriatal (unilaterally) administration of QUIN significantly altered body weight and motor function (locomotor activity, rotarod and beam walk performance). Further, QUIN treatment significantly caused oxidative damage (increased lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration and depleted endogenous antioxidant defense enzymes), altered mitochondrial enzyme complex (I, II and IV) activities and TNF-alpha level as compared to sham treated animals. Pioglitazone (10, 20 and 40mg/kg, p.o.) treatment significantly improved body weight and motor functions, oxidative defense. Further, pioglitazone treatment restored mitochondrial enzyme complex activity as well as TNF-alpha level as compared to QUIN treated group. While Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) (15mg/kg), PPARUpsilon antagonist significantly reversed the protective effect of the pioglitazone (40mg/kg) in the QUIN treated animals. Further, pioglitazone treatment significantly attenuated the striatal lesion volume in QUIN treated animals, suggesting a role for the PPARUpsilon pathway in QUIN induced neurotoxicity. Altogether, this evidence indicates that PPARUpsilon activation by pioglitazone attenuated QUIN induced neurotoxicity in animals and which could be an important therapeutic avenue to ameliorate Huntington like symptoms. PMID:20450929

  9. Sulforaphane Ameliorates 3-Nitropropionic Acid-Induced Striatal Toxicity by Activating the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE Pathway and Inhibiting the MAPKs and NF-κB Pathways.

    PubMed

    Jang, Minhee; Cho, Ik-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    The potential neuroprotective value of sulforaphane (SFN) in Huntington's disease (HD) has not been established yet. We investigated whether SFN prevents and improves the neurological impairment and striatal cell death in a 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP)-induced mouse model of HD. SFN (2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg/day, i.p.) was given daily 30 min before 3-NP treatment (pretreatment) and from onset/progression/peak points of the neurological scores. Pretreatment with SFN (5.0 mg/kg/day) produced the best neuroprotective effect with respect to the neurological scores and lethality among other conditions. The protective effects due to pretreatment with SFN were associated with the following: suppression of the formation of a lesion area, neuronal death, succinate dehydrogenase activity, apoptosis, microglial activation, and mRNA or protein expression of inflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 in the striatum after 3-NP treatment. Also, pretreatment with SFN activated the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1)-nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway and inhibited the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathways in the striatum after 3-NP treatment. As expected, the pretreatment with activators (dimethyl fumarate and antioxidant response element inducer-3) of the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway decreased the neurological impairment and lethality after 3-NP treatment. Our findings suggest that SFN may effectively attenuate 3-NP-induced striatal toxicity by activating the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway and inhibiting the MAPKs and NF-κB pathways and that SFN has a wide therapeutic time-window for HD-like symptoms. PMID:26096705

  10. Dreaming of seizures.

    PubMed

    Vercueil, Laurent

    2005-08-01

    Could some dreams and temporal lobe seizures share an intrinsic neuronal network? At the interplay of emotion, memory, dream, and temporal lobe seizure, we report on a patient with a left dysplastic amygdala and temporal lobe epilepsy who presented with a typical seizure while dreaming. Neuronal networks subserving affective states are suggested to be involved in emotional dream, memory recall, and amygdalo-hippocampal seizures.

  11. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-κB signaling pathways in perfluorooctane sulfonic acid-induced inflammatory reaction in BV2 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingying; Qian, Wenyi; Wang, Yixin; Gao, Rong; Wang, Jun; Xiao, Hang

    2015-12-01

    Microglial activation is closely related to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases by producing proinflammatory cytokines. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), known as an emerging persistent organic pollutant, is reported to disturb human immune homeostasis; however, whether it affects cytokine production or the immune response in the central nervous system remains unclear. The present study was aimed to explore whether PFOS contributed to inflammatory action and to investigate the corresponding mechanisms in BV2 microglia. PFOS-mediated morphologic changes, cytokine responses and signaling events were examined by light microscopy, real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot assays. Our results indicated that PFOS increased BV2 cells activation and simultaneously increased tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 expression. In addition, the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase inhibitor (SP600125), as well as ERK1/2 blocker (PD98059), transcriptionally at least, displayed anti-inflammatory properties on PFOS-elicited cytokine responses. Moreover, the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB was specifically activated by PFOS as well. These results, taken together, suggested that PFOS exerts its functional effects on the response of microglial cell activation via, in part, the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase, ERK and NF-κB signaling pathways with its subsequent influence on proinflammatory action.

  12. Development of a salicylic acid inducible minimal sub-genomic transcript promoter from Figwort mosaic virus with enhanced root- and leaf-activity using TGACG motif rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Patro, Sunita; Ghosh, Jayasish; Das, Abhimanyu; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2012-07-15

    In Figwort mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript promoter (F-Sgt), function of the TGACG-regulatory motif, was investigated in the background of artificially designed promoter sequences. The 131bp (FS, -100 to +31) long F-Sgt promoter sequence containing one TGACG motif [FS-(TGACG)] was engineered to generate a set of three modified promoter constructs: [FS-(TGACG)(2), containing one additional TGACG motif at 7 nucleotides upstream of the original one], [FS-(TGACG)(3), containing two additional TGACG motifs at 7 nucleotides upstream and two nucleotides downstream of the original one] and [FS-(TGCTG)(mu), having a mutated TGACG motif]. EMSA and foot-printing analysis confirmed binding of tobacco nuclear factors with modified TGACG motif/s. The transcription-activation of the GUS gene by the TGACG motif/s in above promoter constructs was examined in transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants and observed that the transcription activation was affected by the spacing/s and number/s of the TGACG motif/s. The FS-(TGACG)(2) promoter showed strongest root-activity compared to other modified and CaMV35S promoters. Also under salicylic acid (SA) stress, the leaf-activity of the said promoter was further enhanced. All above findings were confirmed by real-time and semi-qRT PCR analysis. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrated that the TGACG motif plays an important role in inducing the root-specific expression of the F-Sgt promoter. This study advocates the importance of genetic manipulation of functional cis-motif for amending the tissue specificity of a plant promoter. SA inducible FS-(TGACG)(2) promoter with enhanced activity could be a useful candidate promoter for developing plants with enhanced crop productivity.

  13. Search and Seizure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Kenneth T.

    This paper examines the practice of search and seizure from a legal perspective. All issues concerning lawful or unlawful search and seizure, whether in a public school or otherwise, are predicated upon the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution. The terms "search,""seizure,""probable cause,""reasonable suspicion," and "exclusionary…

  14. Lysophosphatidic Acid-induced ERK Activation and Chemotaxis in MC3T3-E1 Preosteoblasts are Independent of EGF Receptor Transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Chrisler, William B.; Bollinger, Nikki; Karin, Norman J.

    2009-06-01

    Growing evidence indicates that bone-forming osteoblasts and their progenitors are target cells for the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) which is produced by degranulating platelets at sites of injury. LPA is a potent inducer of bone cell migration, proliferation and survival in vitro and an attractive candidate to facilitate preosteoblast chemotaxis during skeletal regeneration in vivo, but the intracellular signaling pathways mediating the effects of this lipid on bone cells are not defined. In this study we measured the ability of LPA to stimulate extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2) in MC3T3-E1 preosteoblastic cells and determined the contribution of this pathway to LPA-stimulated chemotaxis. LPA-treated cells exhibited a bimodal activation of ERK1/2 with maximal phosphorylation at 5 and 60 minutes. The kinetics of ERK1/2 phosphorylation were not coupled to Ras activation or LPA-induced elevations in cytosolic Ca2+. While LPA is coupled to the transactivation of the EGF receptor in many cell types, LPA-stimulated ERK1/2 activation in MC3T3-E1 cells was unaffected by inhibition of EGF receptor function. ERK isoforms rapidly accumulated at nuclear sites in LPA-treated cells, a process that was blocked if ERK1/2 phosphorylation was prevented with the MEK1 inhibitor U0126. Blocking ERK1/2 phosphorylation with U0126 also diminished MC3T3-E1 cell migration and altered the normal disassembly of LPA-induced stress fibers, while the inhibition of EGF receptor function had no effect on LPA-coupled preosteoblast motility. Our results identify ERK1/2 activation as a mediatora mediator of LPA-stimulated MC3T3-E1 cell migration that may be relevant to preosteoblast motility during bone repair in vivo.

  15. Inhibition of all-trans-retinoic acid-induced proteasome activation potentiates the differentiating effect of retinoid in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yanfen; Zhou, Xinglu; Lin, Meihua; Ying, Meidan; Luo, Peihua; Zhu, Difeng; Lou, Jianshu; Yang, Bo; He, Qiaojun

    2011-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is nowadays considered to be the sole efficient agent for differentiation-based therapy in leukemia; however, the mechanisms of ATRA's biological effects remain largely unknown. Here we first reported that ATRA-induced myeloid leukemia differentiation was accompanied with the increased level of ubiquitin-protein conjugates and the upregulation of proteasome activity. To explore the functional role of the activated proteasome in retinoic acid (RA) signaling, the effects of proteasome inhibitors on RA-induced cell differentiation were determined. Our results demonstrated that inhibition of ATRA-elevated proteasome activity obviously promoted the myeloid maturation program triggered by ATRA, suggesting that the overactivated proteasome is not beneficial for ATRA's effects. Further studies demonstrated that the synergistic differentiating effects of ATRA and proteasome inhibitors might be associated with the protection of retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) from degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP). Moreover, the accumulated RARα was able to enhance the transcription of its target gene, which might also contribute to the enhanced differentiation of leukemia cells. Together, by linking the UPP to ATRA-dependent signaling, our data provide a novel insight into studying the mechanisms of ATRA-elicited cellular effects and imply the possibility of combination of ATRA and proteasome inhibitors in leukemia therapy.

  16. Catalase potentiates retinoic acid-induced THP-1 monocyte differentiation into macrophage through inhibition of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiurong; Jin, Ting; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Yan

    2007-06-01

    Macrophage differentiation plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular diseases and many other physiological processes. However, the role of reaction oxygen species in macrophage differentiation has not been elucidated. Here, we report functional characterization of catalase, an enzyme that degrades hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), in THP-1 monocyte differentiation. Treatment of THP-1 cells with catalase was able to synergize with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) to enhance macrophage differentiation, demonstrated by changes of cell adherence, cell cycle arrest, nitroblue tetrazolium reduction, and expression of differentiation markers including CD68, CD11b, and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9). ATRA could stimulate retinoic acid (RA) receptor-mediated transcription, but this was not affected by catalase. However, ATRA and catalase were capable of reducing transcriptional activity mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma). Consistently, PPARgamma antagonists enhanced, and PPARgamma agonists inhibited MMP9 expression stimulated by ATRA and catalase in THP-1 cells. Therefore, these data indicate that catalase is able to potentiate ATRA-induced macrophage differentiation by inhibition of PPARgamma activity, underscoring an important interplay between H(2)O(2), RA, and PPARgamma in macrophages.

  17. Cathepsin L Plays a Role in Quinolinic Acid-Induced NF-Κb Activation and Excitotoxicity in Rat Striatal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rong; Wu, Jun-Chao; Liang, Zhong-Qin; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Wang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    The present study seeks to investigate the role of cathepsin L in glutamate receptor-induced transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation and excitotoxicity in rats striatal neurons. Stereotaxic administration of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonist Quinolinic acid (QA) into the unilateral striatum was used to produce the in vivo excitotoxic model. Co-administration of QA and the cathepsin L inhibitor Z-FF-FMK or 1-Naphthalenesulfonyl-IW-CHO (NaphthaCHO) was used to assess the contribution of cathepsin L to QA-induced striatal neuron death. Western blot analysis and cathepsin L activity assay were used to assess the changes in the levels of cathepsin L after QA treatment. Western blot analysis was used to assess the changes in the protein levels of inhibitor of NF-κB alpha isoform (IκB-α) and phospho-IκB alpha (p-IκBα) after QA treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to detect the effects of Z-FF-FMK or NaphthaCHO on QA-induced NF-κB. Western blot analysis was used to detect the effects of Z-FF-FMK or NaphthaCHO on QA-induced IκB-α phosphorylation and degradation, changes in the levels of IKKα, p-IKKα, TP53, caspase-3, beclin1, p62, and LC3II/LC3I. The results show that QA-induced loss of striatal neurons were strongly inhibited by Z-FF-FMK or NaphthaCHO. QA-induced degradation of IκB-α, NF-κB nuclear translocation, up-regulation of NF-κB responsive gene TP53, and activation of caspase-3 was strongly inhibited by Z-FF-FMK or NaphthaCHO. QA-induced increases in beclin 1, LC3II/LC3I, and down-regulation of p62 were reduced by Z-FF-FMK or NaphthaCHO. These results suggest that cathepsin L is involved in glutamate receptor-induced NF-κB activation. Cathepsin L inhibitors have neuroprotective effects by inhibiting glutamate receptor-induced IκB-α degradation and NF-κB activation. PMID:24073275

  18. Yeast growth in raffinose results in resistance to acetic-acid induced programmed cell death mostly due to the activation of the mitochondrial retrograde pathway.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zdralević, Maša; Lattanzio, Paolo; Marzulli, Domenico; Pracheil, Tammy; Liu, Zhengchang; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    In order to investigate whether and how a modification of mitochondrial metabolism can affect yeast sensitivity to programmed cell death (PCD) induced by acetic acid (AA-PCD), yeast cells were grown on raffinose, as a sole carbon source, which, differently from glucose, favours mitochondrial respiration. We found that, differently from glucose-grown cells, raffinose-grown cells were mostly resistant to AA-PCD and that this was due to the activation of mitochondrial retrograde (RTG) response, which increased with time, as revealed by the up-regulation of the peroxisomal isoform of citrate synthase and isocitrate dehydrogenase isoform 1, RTG pathway target genes. Accordingly, the deletion of RTG2 and RTG3, a positive regulator and a transcription factor of the RTG pathway, resulted in AA-PCD, as shown by TUNEL assay. Neither deletion in raffinose-grown cells of HAP4, encoding the positive regulatory subunit of the Hap2,3,4,5 complex nor constitutive activation of the RTG pathway in glucose-grown cells due to deletion of MKS1, a negative regulator of RTG pathway, had effect on yeast AA-PCD. The RTG pathway was found to be activated in yeast cells containing mitochondria, in which membrane potential was measured, capable to consume oxygen in a manner stimulated by the uncoupler CCCP and inhibited by the respiratory chain inhibitor antimycin A. AA-PCD resistance in raffinose-grown cells occurs with a decrease in both ROS production and cytochrome c release as compared to glucose-grown cells en route to AA-PCD. PMID:23906793

  19. Yeast growth in raffinose results in resistance to acetic-acid induced programmed cell death mostly due to the activation of the mitochondrial retrograde pathway.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zdralević, Maša; Lattanzio, Paolo; Marzulli, Domenico; Pracheil, Tammy; Liu, Zhengchang; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    In order to investigate whether and how a modification of mitochondrial metabolism can affect yeast sensitivity to programmed cell death (PCD) induced by acetic acid (AA-PCD), yeast cells were grown on raffinose, as a sole carbon source, which, differently from glucose, favours mitochondrial respiration. We found that, differently from glucose-grown cells, raffinose-grown cells were mostly resistant to AA-PCD and that this was due to the activation of mitochondrial retrograde (RTG) response, which increased with time, as revealed by the up-regulation of the peroxisomal isoform of citrate synthase and isocitrate dehydrogenase isoform 1, RTG pathway target genes. Accordingly, the deletion of RTG2 and RTG3, a positive regulator and a transcription factor of the RTG pathway, resulted in AA-PCD, as shown by TUNEL assay. Neither deletion in raffinose-grown cells of HAP4, encoding the positive regulatory subunit of the Hap2,3,4,5 complex nor constitutive activation of the RTG pathway in glucose-grown cells due to deletion of MKS1, a negative regulator of RTG pathway, had effect on yeast AA-PCD. The RTG pathway was found to be activated in yeast cells containing mitochondria, in which membrane potential was measured, capable to consume oxygen in a manner stimulated by the uncoupler CCCP and inhibited by the respiratory chain inhibitor antimycin A. AA-PCD resistance in raffinose-grown cells occurs with a decrease in both ROS production and cytochrome c release as compared to glucose-grown cells en route to AA-PCD.

  20. Blocking TGF-β Signaling Pathway Preserves Mitochondrial Proteostasis and Reduces Early Activation of PDGFRβ+ Pericytes in Aristolochic Acid Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Wistar Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pozdzik, Agnieszka A.; Giordano, Laetitia; Li, Gang; Antoine, Marie-Hélène; Quellard, Nathalie; Godet, Julie; De Prez, Eric; Husson, Cécile; Declèves, Anne-Emilie; Arlt, Volker M.; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Brochériou-Spelle, Isabelle; Ledbetter, Steven R.; Caron, Nathalie; Nortier, Joëlle L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ)+ perivascular cell activation becomes increasingly recognized as a main source of scar-associated kidney myofibroblasts and recently emerged as a new cellular therapeutic target. Aims In this regard, we first confirmed the presence of PDGFRβ+ perivascular cells in a human case of end-stage aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) and thereafter we focused on the early fibrosis events of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) inhibition in a rat model of AAN. Materials and Methods Neutralizing anti-TGFβ antibody (1D11) and its control isotype (13C4) were administered (5 mg/kg, i.p.) at Days -1, 0, 2 and 4; AA (15 mg/kg, sc) was injected daily. Results At Day 5, 1D11 significantly suppressed p-Smad2/3 signaling pathway improving renal function impairment, reduced the score of acute tubular necrosis, peritubular capillaritis, interstitial inflammation and neoangiogenesis. 1D11 markedly decreased interstitial edema, disruption of tubular basement membrane loss of brush border, cytoplasmic edema and organelle ultrastructure alterations (mitochondrial disruption and endoplasmic reticulum edema) in proximal tubular epithelial cells. Moreover, 1D11 significantly inhibited p-PERK activation and attenuated dysregulation of unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial proteostasis in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions The early inhibition of p-Smad2/3 signaling pathway improved acute renal function impairment, partially prevented epithelial-endothelial axis activation by maintaining PTEC proteostasis and reduced early PDGFRβ+ pericytes-derived myofibroblasts accumulation. PMID:27379382

  1. ROS-dependent Syk and Pyk2-mediated STAT1 activation is required for 15(S)-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-induced CD36 expression and foam cell formation

    PubMed Central

    Kotla, Sivareddy; Singh, Nikhlesh K.; Traylor, James G.; Orr, A. Wayne; Rao, Gadiparthi N.

    2014-01-01

    15(S)-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15(S)-HETE), the major 15-lipoxygenase 1/2 (15-LO1/2) metabolite of arachidonic acid (AA), induces CD36 expression through xanthine oxidase and NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production and Syk and Pyk2-dependent STAT1 activation. In line with these observations, 15(S)-HETE also induced foam cell formation involving ROS, Syk, Pyk2 and STAT1-mediated CD36 expression. In addition, peritoneal macrophages from Western diet-fed ApoE−/− mice exhibited elevated levels of xanthine oxidase and NADPH oxidase activities, ROS production, Syk, Pyk2, and STAT1 phosphorylation and CD36 expression compared to those from ApoE−/−:12/15-LO−/− mice and these events correlated with increased lipid deposits, macrophage content and lesion progression in the aortic roots. Human atherosclerotic arteries also showed increased 15-LO1 expression, STAT1 phosphorylation and CD36 levels as compared to normal arteries. Together, these findings suggest that 12/15-LO metabolites of AA, particularly 12/15(S)-HETE might play a crucial role in atherogenesis by enhancing foam cell formation. PMID:25152235

  2. Evaluation of acetylcholine, seizure activity and neuropathology following high-dose nerve agent exposure and delayed neuroprotective treatment drugs in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Acon-Chen, Cindy; Koenig, Jeffrey A; Smith, Garrett R; Truitt, Amber R; Thomas, Thaddeus P; Shih, Tsung-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Organophosphorus nerve agents such as soman (GD) inhibit acetylcholinesterase, producing an excess of acetylcholine (ACh), which results in respiratory distress, convulsions and status epilepticus that leads to neuropathology. Several drugs (topiramate, clobazam, pregnanolone, allopregnanolone, UBP 302, cyclopentyladenosine [CPA], ketamine, midazolam and scopolamine) have been identified as potential neuroprotectants that may terminate seizures and reduce brain damage. To systematically evaluate their efficacy, this study employed in vivo striatal microdialysis and liquid chromatography to respectively collect and analyze extracellular ACh in freely moving rats treated with these drugs 20 min after seizure onset induced by a high dose of GD. Along with microdialysis, EEG activity was recorded and neuropathology assessed at 24 h. GD induced a marked increase of ACh, which peaked at 30 min post-exposure to 800% of control levels and then steadily decreased toward baseline levels. Approximately 40 min after treatment, only midazolam (10 mg/kg) and CPA (60 mg/kg) caused a significant reduction of ACh levels, with CPA reducing ACh levels more rapidly than midazolam. Both drugs facilitated a return to baseline levels at least 55 min after treatment. At 24 h, only animals treated with CPA (67%), midazolam (18%) and scopolamine (27%) exhibited seizure termination. While all treatments except for topiramate reduced neuropathology, CPA, midazolam and scopolamine showed the greatest reduction in pathology. Our results suggest that delayed treatment with CPA, midazolam, or scopolamine is effective at reducing GD-induced seizure activity and neuropathology, with CPA and midazolam capable of facilitating a reduction in GD-induced ACh elevation. PMID:27329284

  3. Unbalanced Peptidergic Inhibition in Superficial Neocortex Underlies Spike and Wave Seizure Activity.

    PubMed

    Hall, S; Hunt, M; Simon, A; Cunnington, L G; Carracedo, L M; Schofield, I S; Forsyth, R; Traub, R D; Whittington, M A

    2015-06-24

    Slow spike and wave discharges (0.5-4 Hz) are a feature of many epilepsies. They are linked to pathology of the thalamocortical axis and a thalamic mechanism has been elegantly described. Here we present evidence for a separate generator in local circuits of associational areas of neocortex manifest from a background, sleep-associated delta rhythm in rat. Loss of tonic neuromodulatory excitation, mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine or serotonin (5HT3A) receptors, of 5HT3-immunopositive interneurons caused an increase in amplitude and slowing of the delta rhythm until each period became the "wave" component of the spike and wave discharge. As with the normal delta rhythm, the wave of a spike and wave discharge originated in cortical layer 5. In contrast, the "spike" component of the spike and wave discharge originated from a relative failure of fast inhibition in layers 2/3-switching pyramidal cell action potential outputs from single, sparse spiking during delta rhythms to brief, intense burst spiking, phase-locked to the field spike. The mechanisms underlying this loss of superficial layer fast inhibition, and a concomitant increase in slow inhibition, appeared to be precipitated by a loss of neuropeptide Y (NPY)-mediated local circuit inhibition and a subsequent increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-mediated disinhibition. Blockade of NPY Y1 receptors was sufficient to generate spike and wave discharges, whereas blockade of VIP receptors almost completely abolished this form of epileptiform activity. These data suggest that aberrant, activity-dependent neuropeptide corelease can have catastrophic effects on neocortical dynamics. PMID:26109655

  4. Lipid phosphate phosphatase-1 regulates lysophosphatidic acid-induced calcium release, NF-κB activation and interleukin-8 secretion in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    LPA (lysophosphatidic acid), a potent bioactive phospholipid, elicits diverse cellular responses through activation of the G-protein-coupled receptors LPA1–LPA4. LPA-mediated signalling is partially regulated by LPPs (lipid phosphate phosphatases; LPP-1, -2 and -3) that belong to the phosphatase superfamily. This study addresses the role of LPPs in regulating LPA-mediated cell signalling and IL-8 (interleukin-8) secretion in HBEpCs (human bronchial epithelial cells). Reverse transcription–PCR and Western blotting revealed the presence and expression of LPP-1–3 in HBEpCs. Exogenous [3H]oleoyl LPA was hydrolysed to [3H]-mono-oleoylglycerol. Infection of HBEpCs with an adenoviral construct of human LPP-1 for 48 h enhanced the dephosphorylation of exogenous LPA by 2–3-fold compared with vector controls. Furthermore, overexpression of LPP-1 partially attenuated LPA-induced increases in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, phosphorylation of IκB (inhibitory κB) and translocation of NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB) to the nucleus, and almost completely prevented IL-8 secretion. Infection of cells with an adenoviral construct of the mouse LPP-1 (R217K) mutant partially attenuated LPA-induced IL-8 secretion without altering LPA-induced changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, phosphorylation of IκB, NF-κB activation or IL-8 gene expression. Our results identify LPP-1 as a key regulator of LPA signalling and IL-8 secretion in HBEpCs. Thus LPPs could represent potential targets in regulating leucocyte infiltration and airway inflammation. PMID:15461590

  5. Effects of an acute seizure on associative learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Holley, Andrew J; Lugo, Joaquin N

    2016-01-01

    Past studies have demonstrated that inducing several seizures or continuous seizures in neonatal or adult rats results in impairments in learning and memory. The impact of a single acute seizure on learning and memory has not been investigated in mice. In this study, we exposed adult 129SvEvTac mice to the inhalant flurothyl until a behavioral seizure was induced. Our study consisted of 4 experiments where we examined the effect of one seizure before or after delay fear conditioning. We also included a separate cohort of animals that was tested in the open field after a seizure to rule out changes in locomotor activity influencing the results of memory tests. Mice that had experienced a single seizure 1h, but not 6h, prior to training showed a significant impairment in associative conditioning to the conditioned stimulus when compared with controls 24h later. There were no differences in freezing one day later for animals that experienced a single seizure 1h after associative learning. We also found that an acute seizure reduced activity levels in an open-field test 2h but not 24h later. These findings suggest that an acute seizure occurring immediately before learning can have an effect on the recall of events occurring shortly after that seizure. In contrast, an acute seizure occurring shortly after learning appears to have little or no effect on long-term memory. These findings have implications for understanding the acute effects of seizures on the acquisition of new knowledge.

  6. Peroxidase-like activity of Fe3O4@carbon nanoparticles enhances ascorbic acid-induced oxidative stress and selective damage to PC-3 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    An, Qiao; Sun, Chuanyu; Li, Dian; Xu, Ke; Guo, Jia; Wang, Changchun

    2013-12-26

    Ascorbic acid (AA) is capable of inhibiting cancer cell growth by perturbing the normal redox state of cells and causing toxic effects through the generation of abundant reactive-oxygen species (ROS). However, the clinical utility of AA at a tolerable dosage is plagued by a relatively low in vivo efficacy. This study describes the development of a peroxidase-like composite nanoparticle for use in an AA-mediated therapeutic strategy. On the basis of a high-throughput, one-pot solvothermal approach, Fe3O4@C nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized and then modified with folic acid (FA) on the surface. Particular focus is concentrated on the assessment of peroxidase-like catalytic activity by a chromogenic reaction in the presence of H2O2. The carbon shell of Fe3O4@C NPs contains partially graphitized carbon and thus facilitates electron transfer in the catalytic decomposition of H2O2, leading to the production of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. Along with magnetic responsiveness and receptor-binding specificity, the intrinsic peroxidase-like catalytic activity of Fe3O4@C-FA NPs pronouncedly promotes AA-induced oxidative stress in cancer cells and optimizes the ROS-mediated antineoplastic efficacy of exogenous AA. In vitro experiments using human prostate cancer PC-3 cells demonstrate that Fe3O4@C-FA NPs serve as a peroxidase mimic to create hydroxyl radicals from endogenous H2O2 that is yielded in response to exogenous AA via an oxidative stress process. The usage of a dual agent leads to the enhanced cytotoxicity of PC-3 cells, and, because of the synergistic effect of NPs, the administrated dosage of AA is reduced markedly. However, because normal cells (HEK 293T cells) appear to have a higher capacity to cope with additionally generated ROS than cancer cells, the NP-AA combination shows little damage in this case, proving that selective killing of cancer cells could be achieved owing to preferential accumulation of ROS in cancer cells. A possible ROS

  7. Peroxidase-like activity of Fe3O4@carbon nanoparticles enhances ascorbic acid-induced oxidative stress and selective damage to PC-3 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    An, Qiao; Sun, Chuanyu; Li, Dian; Xu, Ke; Guo, Jia; Wang, Changchun

    2013-12-26

    Ascorbic acid (AA) is capable of inhibiting cancer cell growth by perturbing the normal redox state of cells and causing toxic effects through the generation of abundant reactive-oxygen species (ROS). However, the clinical utility of AA at a tolerable dosage is plagued by a relatively low in vivo efficacy. This study describes the development of a peroxidase-like composite nanoparticle for use in an AA-mediated therapeutic strategy. On the basis of a high-throughput, one-pot solvothermal approach, Fe3O4@C nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized and then modified with folic acid (FA) on the surface. Particular focus is concentrated on the assessment of peroxidase-like catalytic activity by a chromogenic reaction in the presence of H2O2. The carbon shell of Fe3O4@C NPs contains partially graphitized carbon and thus facilitates electron transfer in the catalytic decomposition of H2O2, leading to the production of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. Along with magnetic responsiveness and receptor-binding specificity, the intrinsic peroxidase-like catalytic activity of Fe3O4@C-FA NPs pronouncedly promotes AA-induced oxidative stress in cancer cells and optimizes the ROS-mediated antineoplastic efficacy of exogenous AA. In vitro experiments using human prostate cancer PC-3 cells demonstrate that Fe3O4@C-FA NPs serve as a peroxidase mimic to create hydroxyl radicals from endogenous H2O2 that is yielded in response to exogenous AA via an oxidative stress process. The usage of a dual agent leads to the enhanced cytotoxicity of PC-3 cells, and, because of the synergistic effect of NPs, the administrated dosage of AA is reduced markedly. However, because normal cells (HEK 293T cells) appear to have a higher capacity to cope with additionally generated ROS than cancer cells, the NP-AA combination shows little damage in this case, proving that selective killing of cancer cells could be achieved owing to preferential accumulation of ROS in cancer cells. A possible ROS

  8. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Induces Proliferation, Survival, and Migration in A549 Lung Cancer Cells by Activating the ERK Signaling Pathway through a Transcription-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Quintero Barceinas, Reyna Sara; García-Regalado, Alejandro; Aréchaga-Ocampo, Elena; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; González-De la Rosa, Claudia Haydée

    2015-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has been used as an antineoplastic because of its ability to promote proliferation, inhibition, and differentiation, primarily in leukemia; however, in other types of cancer, such as lung cancer, treatment with ATRA is restricted because not all the patients experience the same results. The ERK signaling pathway is dysregulated in cancer cells, including lung cancer, and this dysregulation promotes proliferation and cell invasion. In this study, we demonstrate that treatment with ATRA can activate the ERK signaling pathway by a transcription-independent mechanism through a signaling cascade that involves RARα and PI3K, promoting growth, survival, and migration in lung cancer cells. Until now, this mechanism was unknown in lung cancer cells. The inhibition of the ERK signaling pathway restores the beneficial effects of ATRA, reduces proliferation, increases apoptosis, and blocks the cell migration process in lung cancer cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that the combination of ATRA with ERK inhibitor in clinical trials for lung cancer is warranted. PMID:26557664

  9. Maintained activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} despite of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in okadaic acid-induced neurodegenerative model

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong-Whan; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Choi, Jung-Eun; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Hui-Sun; Choe, Han; Lee, Seung-Chul; Kim, Dong-Hou

    2010-04-30

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK3{beta}) is recognized as one of major kinases to phosphorylate tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD), thus lots of AD drug discoveries target GSK3{beta}. However, the inactive form of GSK3{beta} which is phosphorylated at serine-9 is increased in AD brains. This is also inconsistent with phosphorylation status of other GSK3{beta} substrates, such as {beta}-catenin and collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2) since their phosphorylation is all increased in AD brains. Thus, we addressed this paradoxical condition of AD in rat neurons treated with okadaic acid (OA) which inhibits protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) and induces tau hyperphosphorylation and cell death. Interestingly, OA also induces phosphorylation of GSK3{beta} at serine-9 and other substrates including tau, {beta}-catenin and CRMP2 like in AD brains. In this context, we observed that GSK3{beta} inhibitors such as lithium chloride and 6-bromoindirubin-3'-monoxime (6-BIO) reversed those phosphorylation events and protected neurons. These data suggest that GSK3{beta} may still have its kinase activity despite increase of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in AD brains at least in PP2A-compromised conditions and that GSK3{beta} inhibitors could be a valuable drug candidate in AD.

  10. Prospective Study of 2 Bed Alarms for Detection of Nocturnal Seizures.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Stephen; Poppel, Kate Van; McGregor, Amy; Ellis, Michelle; Patters, Andrea; Wheless, James

    2013-11-01

    For parents of children with epilepsy, seizures occurring in sleep are a major concern. Risk factors for sudden unexplained death in epilepsy patients include being in bed and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. A device for detecting nocturnal seizure activity would be valuable. Children with various seizure types undergoing evaluation had standard video electroencephalography (EEG), cardiopulmonary and nursing monitoring, and 1 of 2 models (ST-2 and MP5) of a Medpage bed alarm. The video EEG record was reviewed to detect any seizures missed by the bed alarms or caregivers. The ability of the bed alarms to detect motor seizures in general and specific seizure types was tested. In 15 patients, 69 seizures were recorded by video EEG. The ST-2 did not detect any nocturnal seizures. The MP5 alarm detected 1 of 15 in sleeping patients: a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. The Medpage seizure alarms do not appear to adequately detect nocturnal seizures. PMID:23076428

  11. Video game induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Ferrie, C D; De Marco, P; Grünewald, R A; Giannakodimos, S; Panayiotopoulos, C P

    1994-08-01

    Fifteen patients who experienced epileptic seizures while playing video games are described together with a review of 20 cases in the English literature. Nine of the 15 cases and all but two of the reported cases experienced their first seizure while playing video games. Two thirds of patients had idiopathic generalised epilepsy and mainly reported generalised tonic clonic seizures, but some had typical absence seizures and myoclonic jerks while playing video games. In this series, 30% with idiopathic generalised epilepsy had juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Overall, 70% of patients with idiopathic generalised epilepsy were photosensitive to intermittent photic stimulation and the mechanism of seizure provocation was probably similar to that of television induced seizures, although sensitivity to specific patterns was sometimes important. Two children had self induced video game seizures. Non-photic factors such as excitement, fatigue, sleep deprivation, cognitive processing, and diurnal variation in susceptibility seemed to be important seizure precipitants, particularly in non-photo-sensitive patients. Twenty nine per cent of patients had partial (mainly occipital) video game associated seizures. Occipital spikes were common in the EEG of these patients. Photosensitivity to intermittent photic stimulation may have been important in two patients but in the others, who all played arcade video games, other mechanisms need to be considered. Video game associated seizures are a feature of several epileptic syndromes and differ in precipitants and appropriate management.

  12. Helicopter mishap attributed to single seizure.

    PubMed

    Simon, Esan; Watts, Darron; Bohnker, Bruce K

    2008-03-01

    A case report is presented of a 36-year-old U.S. Coast Guard aviator who had a single seizure while operating a helicopter on the ground. His seizure activity produced a loss of consciousness during which he pushed the cyclic to the left anterior quadrant that resulted in a ground mishap. No risk factors were identified in an extensive neurological workup. The current guidance for handling seizures in military aviation personnel is reviewed, along with considerations for treatment. Although the military aviation selection process carefully screens applicants for seizure history and potential, occasional seizures in the aviation population remain possible. Such events may result in military aircraft mishaps despite careful risk factor surveillance, as demonstrated by this case.

  13. Metabolic Disruption in Drosophila Bang-Sensitive Seizure Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Fergestad, Tim; Bostwick, Bret; Ganetzky, Barry

    2006-01-01

    We examined a number of Drosophila mutants with increased susceptibility to seizures following mechanical or electrical stimulation to better understand the underlying factors that predispose neurons to aberrant activity. Several mutations in this class have been molecularly identified and suggest metabolic disruption as a possible source for increased seizure susceptibility. We mapped the bang-sensitive seizure mutation knockdown (kdn) to cytological position 5F3 and identified citrate synthase as the affected gene. These results further support a role for mitochondrial metabolism in controlling neuronal activity and seizure susceptibility. Biochemical analysis in bang-sensitive mutants revealed reductions in ATP levels consistent with disruption of mitochondrial energy production in these mutants. Electrophysiological analysis of mutants affecting mitochondrial proteins revealed an increased likelihood for a specific pattern of seizure activity. Our data implicate cellular metabolism in regulating seizure susceptibility and suggest that differential sensitivity of neuronal subtypes to metabolic changes underlies distinct types of seizure activity. PMID:16648587

  14. Characterization of Disopyramide derivative ADD424042 as a non-cardiotoxic neuronal sodium channel blocker with broad-spectrum anticonvulsant activity in rodent seizure models.

    PubMed

    Król, Marek; Ufnal, Marcin; Szulczyk, Bartłomiej; Podsadni, Piotr; Drapała, Adrian; Turło, Jadwiga; Dawidowski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    It was reported that antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) can be useful in controlling refractory seizures in humans or in enhancing the action of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in animal models. Disopyramide phosphate (DISO) is an AAD that blocks sodium channels in cardiac myocytes. We evaluated a DISO derivative, 2-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-(pyridin-2-yl)acetamide (ADD424042) for its anticonvulsant activity in a battery of rodent models of epileptic seizures. The compound displayed a broad spectrum of activity in the 'classical' models as well as in the models of pharmacoresistant seizures. Furthermore, ADD424042 showed good therapeutic indices between the anticonvulsant activity and the motor impairment. On the contrary, no anticonvulsant effects but severe lethality were observed in the primary anticonvulsant testing of the parent DISO. By performing the whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments in dispersed cortical neurons we demonstrated that ADD424042 decreased the maximal amplitude of voltage-gated sodium channels with an IC50 value in nM range. Moreover, the compound enhanced use-dependent block and decreased excitability in pyramidal neurons in the current-clamp experiments in cortical slices. Importantly, we found that ADD424042 possessed either no, or very small cardiotoxic effect. In contrast to DISO, ADD424042 did not produce any apparent changes in electrocardiogram (ECG) and arterial blood pressure recordings. ADD424042 had no effect on QT and corrected QT intervals, at a dose which was 15 times higher than ED50 for the anticonvulsant effect in the MES model. Taken together, these data suggest that ADD424042 has the potential to become a lead structure for novel broadly acting AEDs with wide margin of cardiac safety.

  15. Fosinopril and zofenopril, two angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, potentiate the anticonvulsant activity of antiepileptic drugs against audiogenic seizures in DBA/2 mice.

    PubMed

    Sarro, Giovambattista De; Paola, Eugenio Donato Di; Gratteri, Santo; Gareri, Pietro; Rispoli, Vincenzo; Siniscalchi, Antonio; Tripepi, Giovanni; Gallelli, Luca; Citraro, Rita; Russo, Emilio

    2012-03-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists in the brain and it may be involved in pathogenesis of neurological and psychiatric disorders including seizures. The aim of the present research was to evaluate the effects of some angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi; captopril, enalapril, fosinopril and zofenopril), commonly used as antihypertensive agents, in the DBA/2 mice animal model of generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Furthermore, the co-administration of these compounds with some antiepileptic drugs (AEDs; carbamazepine, diazepam, felbamate, gabapentin, lamotrigine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, topiramate and valproate) was studied in order to identify possible positive interactions in the same model. All ACEi were able to decrease the severity of audiogenic seizures with the exception of enalapril up to the dose of 100mg/kg, the rank order of activity was as follows: fosinopril>zofenopril>captopril. The co-administration of ineffective doses of all ACE inhibitors with AEDs, generally increased the potency of the latter. Fosinopril was the most active in potentiating the activity of AEDs and the combination of ACEi with lamotrigine and valproate was the most favorable, whereas, the co-administrations with diazepam and phenobarbital seemed to be neutral. The increase in potency was generally associated with an enhancement of motor impairment, however, the therapeutic index of combined treatment of AEDs with ACEi was predominantly more favorable than control. ACEi administration did not influence plasma and brain concentrations of the AEDs studied excluding pharmacokinetic interactions and concluding that it is of pharmacodynamic nature. In conclusion, fosinopril, zofenopril, enalapril and captopril showed an additive anticonvulsant effect when co-administered with some AEDs, most notably carbamazepine, felbamate, lamotrigine, topiramate and valproate, implicating a possible therapeutic relevance of such drug combinations.

  16. Ambroxol-induced focal epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Fanella, Martina; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that in epileptic patients some compounds and different drugs used for the treatment of comorbidities can facilitate or provoke seizures, this evidence regarding a wide spectrum of pharmacological categories. The potential facilitating factors usually include direct toxic effects or pharmacological interactions of either active ingredients or excipients. We report the case of a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy who experienced focal epileptic seizures, easily and constantly reproducible, after each administration of a cough syrup. This is, to our knowledge, the first electroencephalogram-documented case of focal epileptic seizures induced by cough syrup containing ambroxol as active ingredient.

  17. Ambroxol-induced focal epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Fanella, Martina; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that in epileptic patients some compounds and different drugs used for the treatment of comorbidities can facilitate or provoke seizures, this evidence regarding a wide spectrum of pharmacological categories. The potential facilitating factors usually include direct toxic effects or pharmacological interactions of either active ingredients or excipients. We report the case of a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy who experienced focal epileptic seizures, easily and constantly reproducible, after each administration of a cough syrup. This is, to our knowledge, the first electroencephalogram-documented case of focal epileptic seizures induced by cough syrup containing ambroxol as active ingredient. PMID:24824664

  18. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures.

    PubMed

    Greyson, Bruce; Fountain, Nathan B; Derr, Lori L; Broshek, Donna K

    2014-01-01

    Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. Fifty-five percent of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients' reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time.

  19. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures

    PubMed Central

    Greyson, Bruce; Fountain, Nathan B.; Derr, Lori L.; Broshek, Donna K.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. Fifty-five percent of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients' reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time. PMID:24592228

  20. How I treat a first single seizure in a child

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sheffali; Kaushik, Jaya Shankar

    2016-01-01

    An epileptic seizure is defined as transient occurrence of signs and/or symptoms due to abnormal excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in brain. There are diverse etiologies for acute seizure in infants and children. The present review provides a broad approach to diagnosis and treatment plan for acute seizure in children. The approach to a child with acute seizure is discussed with special emphasis on clinical approach based on history and focused examination with judicious choice of investigation and further management plan. The review also emphasizes on recognizing common nonepileptic events that masquerade as true seizure among infants and children. PMID:27011625

  1. Chrysophanic Acid Induces Necrosis but not Necroptosis in Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Caki-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chrysophanic acid, also known as chrysophanol, has a number of biological activities. It enhances memory and learning abilities, raises superoxide dismutase activity, and has anti-cancer effects in several model systems. According to previous reports, chrysophanic acid-induced cell death shares features of necrotic cell death. However, the molecular and cellular processes underlying chrysophanic acid-induced cell death remain poorly understood. Methods: Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was monitored by cell viability assay and Annexin V-propidium iodide (PI) staining of renal cell carcinoma Caki-2 cells. The induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by chrysophanic acid and the suppression of ROS by anti-oxidants were evaluated by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate staining. The expression and phosphorylation of proteins that are involved in apoptosis and necroptosis were detected by immunoblotting. Results: The extent of chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was concentration and time dependent, and dead cells mainly appeared in the PI-positive population, which is a major feature of necrosis, upon fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was associated with the generation of intracellular ROS, and this effect was reversed by pretreatment with N-acetyl cysteine. Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was not associated with changes in apoptotic or necroptotic marker proteins. Conclusions: The cell death induced by chrysophanic acid resembled neither apoptotic nor necroptotic cell death in human renal cell carcinoma Caki-2 cells. PMID:27390736

  2. More than 40% of those not taking antiseizure medication with recent seizures reported that epilepsy or its treatment interfered with their recent activities, 2010 and 2013 US National Health Interview Surveys.

    PubMed

    Kobau, Rosemarie; Cui, Wanjun; Zack, Matthew M

    2016-09-01

    From the combined 2010 and 2013 National Health Interview Surveys, we estimated US national age-standardized prevalence of adults with active epilepsy who reported that a nervous system/sensory organ condition caused a limitation (e.g., walking; memory; or physical, mental, or emotional problems) and, separately, that epilepsy interfered with their activities (e.g., working, schooling, or socializing) during the 30days preceding the survey. Sixty-one percent of adults who took antiseizure medication and had recent seizures and 51% of those who took medication and had no seizures reported having limitations caused by a nervous system/sensory organ condition. Sixty-two percent of adults who took antiseizure medication and had recent seizures and 20% of those who took medication and had no seizures reported that epilepsy or its treatment interfered with their recent activities. Forty-one percent of those who did not take medication and had recent seizures also reported that epilepsy interfered with their activities. To reduce activity limitations in people with epilepsy, health and social service providers can ensure that adequate policies and practices that promote access to high quality care and social participation are in effect in organizations and communities. PMID:27459033

  3. Interictal spikes and epileptic seizures: their relationship and underlying rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Karoly, Philippa J; Freestone, Dean R; Boston, Ray; Grayden, David B; Himes, David; Leyde, Kent; Seneviratne, Udaya; Berkovic, Samuel; O'Brien, Terence; Cook, Mark J

    2016-04-01

    We report on a quantitative analysis of electrocorticography data from a study that acquired continuous ambulatory recordings in humans over extended periods of time. The objectives were to examine patterns of seizures and spontaneous interictal spikes, their relationship to each other, and the nature of periodic variation. The recorded data were originally acquired for the purpose of seizure prediction, and were subsequently analysed in further detail. A detection algorithm identified potential seizure activity and a template matched filter was used to locate spikes. Seizure events were confirmed manually and classified as either clinically correlated, electroencephalographically identical but not clinically correlated, or subclinical. We found that spike rate was significantly altered prior to seizure in 9 out of 15 subjects. Increased pre-ictal spike rate was linked to improved predictability; however, spike rate was also shown to decrease before seizure (in 6 out of the 9 subjects). The probability distribution of spikes and seizures were notably similar, i.e. at times of high seizure likelihood the probability of epileptic spiking also increased. Both spikes and seizures showed clear evidence of circadian regulation and, for some subjects, there were also longer term patterns visible over weeks to months. Patterns of spike and seizure occurrence were highly subject-specific. The pre-ictal decrease in spike rate is not consistent with spikes promoting seizures. However, the fact that spikes and seizures demonstrate similar probability distributions suggests they are not wholly independent processes. It is possible spikes actively inhibit seizures, or that a decreased spike rate is a secondary symptom of the brain approaching seizure. If spike rate is modulated by common regulatory factors as seizures then spikes may be useful biomarkers of cortical excitability. PMID:26912639

  4. Genes, Seizures & Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Alica M.

    2006-01-01

    The chance that someone will develop any disease is influenced by heredity and environment. Epilepsy is not an exception. Everybody inherits a unique degree of susceptibility to seizures. About 3 percent of the United States population is prone to seizures and will get epilepsy at some point of their lives (1). Two thirds of the people with…

  5. In silico validation and structure activity relationship study of a series of pyridine-3-carbohydrazide derivatives as potential anticonvulsants in generalized and partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Reema; Sara, Udai Vir Singh; Khosa, Ratan Lal; Stables, James; Jain, Jainendra

    2013-06-01

    A series of twelve compounds (Compounds RNH1-RNH12) of acid hydrazones of pyridine-3-carbohydrazide or nicotinic acid hydrazide was synthesized and evaluated for anticonvulsant activity by MES, scPTZ, minimal clonic seizure and corneal kindling seizure test. Neurotoxicity was also determined for these compounds by rotarod test. Results showed that halogen substitution at meta and para position of phenyl ring exhibited better protection than ortho substitution. Compounds RNH4 and RNH12, were found to be the active analogs displaying 6Hz ED50 of 75.4 and 14.77 mg/kg while the corresponding MES ED50 values were 113.4 and 29.3 mg/kg respectively. In addition, compound RNH12 also showed scPTZ ED50 of 54.2 mg/kg. In the series, compound RNH12 with trifluoromethoxy substituted phenyl ring was the most potent analog exhibiting protection in all four animal models of epilepsy. Molecular docking study has also shown significant binding interactions of these two compounds with 1OHV, 2A1H and 1PBQ receptors. Thus, N-[(meta or para halogen substituted) benzylidene] pyridine-3-carbohydrazides could be used as lead compounds in anticonvulsant drug design and discovery.

  6. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator deficiency has little effect on seizure susceptibility and acquired epilepsy phenotype but reduces spontaneous exploration in mice.

    PubMed

    Rantala, J; Kemppainen, S; Ndode-Ekane, X E; Lahtinen, L; Bolkvadze, Tamuna; Gurevicius, K; Tanila, H; Pitkänen, A

    2015-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), a serine protease, converts plasminogen to plasmin. Activation of plasmin leads to degradation of the extracellular matrix, which is critical for tissue recovery, angiogenesis, cell migration, and axonal and synaptic plasticity. We hypothesized that uPA deficiency would cause an abnormal neurophenotype and would lead to exacerbated epileptogenesis after brain injury. Wild-type (Wt) and uPA-/- mice underwent a battery of neurologic behavioral tests evaluating general reactivity, spontaneous exploratory activity, motor coordination, pain threshold, fear and anxiety, and memory. We placed particular emphasis on the effect of uPA deficiency on seizure susceptibility, including the response to convulsants (pentylenetetrazol, kainate, or pilocarpine) and kainate-induced epileptogenesis and epilepsy. The uPA-/- mice showed no motor or sensory impairment compared with the Wt mice. Hippocampus-dependent spatial memory also remained intact. The uPA-/- mice, however, exhibited reduced exploratory activity and an enhanced response to a tone stimulus (p<0.05 compared with the Wt mice). The urokinase-type plasminogen activator deficient mice showed no increase in spontaneous or evoked epileptiform electrographic activity. Rather, the response to pilocarpine administration was reduced compared with the Wt mice (p<0.05). Also, the epileptogenesis and the epilepsy phenotype after intrahippocampal kainate injection were similar to those in the Wt mice. Taken together, uPA deficiency led to diminished interest in the environmental surroundings and enhanced emotional reactivity to unexpected aversive stimuli. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator deficiency was not associated with enhanced seizure susceptibility or worsened poststatus epilepticus epilepsy phenotype.

  7. Decreased subcortical cholinergic arousal in focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Motelow, Joshua E.; Li, Wei; Zhan, Qiong; Mishra, Asht M.; Sachdev, Robert N. S.; Liu, Geoffrey; Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Zayyad, Zaina; Lee, Hyun Seung; Chu, Victoria; Andrews, John P.; Englot, Dario J.; Herman, Peter; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Impaired consciousness in temporal lobe seizures has a major negative impact on quality of life. The prevailing view holds that this disorder impairs consciousness by seizure spread to the bilateral temporal lobes. We propose instead that seizures invade subcortical regions and depress arousal, causing impairment through decreases rather than through increases in activity. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in a rodent model, we found increased activity in regions known to depress cortical function including lateral septum and anterior hypothalamus. Importantly, we found suppression of intralaminar thalamic and brainstem arousal systems and suppression of the cortex. At a cellular level, we found reduced firing of identified cholinergic neurons in the brainstem pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus and basal forebrain. Finally, we used enzyme-based amperometry to demonstrate reduced cholinergic neurotransmission in both cortex and thalamus. Decreased subcortical arousal is a novel mechanism for loss of consciousness in focal temporal lobe seizures. PMID:25654258

  8. Instantaneous frequency based newborn EEG seizure characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesbah, Mostefa; O'Toole, John M.; Colditz, Paul B.; Boashash, Boualem

    2012-12-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG), used to noninvasively monitor brain activity, remains the most reliable tool in the diagnosis of neonatal seizures. Due to their nonstationary and multi-component nature, newborn EEG seizures are better represented in the joint time-frequency domain than in either the time domain or the frequency domain. Characterising newborn EEG seizure nonstationarities helps to better understand their time-varying nature and, therefore, allow developing efficient signal processing methods for both modelling and seizure detection and classification. In this article, we used the instantaneous frequency (IF) extracted from a time-frequency distribution to characterise newborn EEG seizures. We fitted four frequency modulated (FM) models to the extracted IFs, namely a linear FM, a piecewise-linear FM, a sinusoidal FM, and a hyperbolic FM. Using a database of 30-s EEG seizure epochs acquired from 35 newborns, we were able to show that, depending on EEG channel, the sinusoidal and piecewise-linear FM models best fitted 80-98% of seizure epochs. To further characterise the EEG seizures, we calculated the mean frequency and frequency span of the extracted IFs. We showed that in the majority of the cases (>95%), the mean frequency resides in the 0.6-3 Hz band with a frequency span of 0.2-1 Hz. In terms of the frequency of occurrence of the four seizure models, the statistical analysis showed that there is no significant difference( p = 0.332) between the two hemispheres. The results also indicate that there is no significant differences between the two hemispheres in terms of the mean frequency ( p = 0.186) and the frequency span ( p = 0.302).

  9. Aspartame and seizures.

    PubMed

    Jobe, P C; Dailey, J W

    1993-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that the dietary sweetener aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) might promote seizures and this hypothesis has been argued in the published literature. The current manuscript reviews the biochemical, neurochemical and behavioral experiments that have been carried out in order to assess the hypothesis linking aspartame with seizure promotion. We conclude that convulsive seizures are not caused by orally administered aspartame in rodents or in primates, including humans. Early reports of seizure facilitation by aspartame in several rodent models were not confirmed by later and more careful experimentation. Proconvulsive effects were absent in humans and other mammals with epilepsy and those without epilepsy. Lack of convulsive liability was evident, even when doses many fold higher than those consumed in the human diet, were used in experimental paradigms. Studies of aspartame in absence seizures are not as complete as those in convulsive seizures, but available evidence in humans does not document an association between absence seizure incidence and aspartame usage.

  10. Seizure detection, seizure prediction, and closed-loop warning systems in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ramgopal, Sriram; Thome-Souza, Sigride; Jackson, Michele; Kadish, Navah Ester; Sánchez Fernández, Iván; Klehm, Jacquelyn; Bosl, William; Reinsberger, Claus; Schachter, Steven; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2014-08-01

    Nearly one-third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures despite optimal medication management. Systems employed to detect seizures may have the potential to improve outcomes in these patients by allowing more tailored therapies and might, additionally, have a role in accident and SUDEP prevention. Automated seizure detection and prediction require algorithms which employ feature computation and subsequent classification. Over the last few decades, methods have been developed to detect seizures utilizing scalp and intracranial EEG, electrocardiography, accelerometry and motion sensors, electrodermal activity, and audio/video captures. To date, it is unclear which combination of detection technologies yields the best results, and approaches may ultimately need to be individualized. This review presents an overview of seizure detection and related prediction methods and discusses their potential uses in closed-loop warning systems in epilepsy. PMID:25174001

  11. Imaging brain activity during seizures in freely behaving rats using a miniature multi-modal imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, Iliya; Koletar, Margaret M.; Ringuette, Dene; Gad, Raanan; Jeffrey, Melanie; Carlen, Peter L.; Stefanovic, Bojana; Levi, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    We report on a miniature label-free imaging system for monitoring brain blood flow and blood oxygenation changes in awake, freely behaving rats. The device, weighing 15 grams, enables imaging in a ∼ 2 × 2 mm field of view with 4.4 μm lateral resolution and 1 − 8 Hz temporal sampling rate. The imaging is performed through a chronically-implanted cranial window that remains optically clear between 2 to > 6 weeks after the craniotomy. This imaging method is well suited for longitudinal studies of chronic models of brain diseases and disorders. In this work, it is applied to monitoring neurovascular coupling during drug-induced absence-like seizures 6 weeks following the craniotomy. PMID:27699123

  12. Imaging brain activity during seizures in freely behaving rats using a miniature multi-modal imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, Iliya; Koletar, Margaret M.; Ringuette, Dene; Gad, Raanan; Jeffrey, Melanie; Carlen, Peter L.; Stefanovic, Bojana; Levi, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    We report on a miniature label-free imaging system for monitoring brain blood flow and blood oxygenation changes in awake, freely behaving rats. The device, weighing 15 grams, enables imaging in a ∼ 2 × 2 mm field of view with 4.4 μm lateral resolution and 1 − 8 Hz temporal sampling rate. The imaging is performed through a chronically-implanted cranial window that remains optically clear between 2 to > 6 weeks after the craniotomy. This imaging method is well suited for longitudinal studies of chronic models of brain diseases and disorders. In this work, it is applied to monitoring neurovascular coupling during drug-induced absence-like seizures 6 weeks following the craniotomy.

  13. On the nature of seizure dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, William C.; Quilichini, Pascale P.; Ivanov, Anton I.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures can occur spontaneously and in a recurrent manner, which defines epilepsy; or they can be induced in a normal brain under a variety of conditions in most neuronal networks and species from flies to humans. Such universality raises the possibility that invariant properties exist that characterize seizures under different physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we analysed seizure dynamics mathematically and established a taxonomy of seizures based on first principles. For the predominant seizure class we developed a generic model called Epileptor. As an experimental model system, we used ictal-like discharges induced in vitro in mouse hippocampi. We show that only five state variables linked by integral-differential equations are sufficient to describe the onset, time course and offset of ictal-like discharges as well as their recurrence. Two state variables are responsible for generating rapid discharges (fast time scale), two for spike and wave events (intermediate time scale) and one for the control of time course, including the alternation between ‘normal’ and ictal periods (slow time scale). We propose that normal and ictal activities coexist: a separatrix acts as a barrier (or seizure threshold) between these states. Seizure onset is reached upon the collision of normal brain trajectories with the separatrix. We show theoretically and experimentally how a system can be pushed toward seizure under a wide variety of conditions. Within our experimental model, the onset and offset of ictal-like discharges are well-defined mathematical events: a saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcation, respectively. These bifurcations necessitate a baseline shift at onset and a logarithmic scaling of interspike intervals at offset. These predictions were not only confirmed in our in vitro experiments, but also for focal seizures recorded in different syndromes, brain regions and species (humans and zebrafish). Finally, we identified several possible biophysical

  14. Analysis of Epileptic Seizures with Complex Network

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yan; Wang, Yinghua; Yu, Tao; Li, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of abnormal neural activities involving large area of brain networks. Until now the nature of functional brain network associated with epilepsy is still unclear. Recent researches indicate that the small world or scale-free attributes and the occurrence of highly clustered connection patterns could represent a general organizational principle in the human brain functional network. In this paper, we seek to find whether the small world or scale-free property of brain network is correlated with epilepsy seizure formation. A mass neural model was adopted to generate multiple channel EEG recordings based on regular, small world, random, and scale-free network models. Whether the connection patterns of cortical networks are directly associated with the epileptic seizures was investigated. The results showed that small world and scale-free cortical networks are highly correlated with the occurrence of epileptic seizures. In particular, the property of small world network is more significant during the epileptic seizures. PMID:25147576

  15. What is a seizure network? Long-range network consequences of focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Hal

    2014-01-01

    What defines the spatial and temporal boundaries of seizure activity in brain networks? To fully answer this question a precise and quantitative definition of seizures is needed, which unfortunately remains elusive. Nevertheless, it is possible to ask under conditions where clearly divergent patterns of activity occur in large-scale brain networks whether certain activity patterns are part of the seizure while others are not. Here we examine brain network activity during focal limbic seizures, including diverse regions such as the hippocampus, subcortical arousal systems and fronto-parietal association cortex. Based on work from patients and from animal models we describe a characteristic pattern of intense increases in neuronal firing, cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) signals and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in the hippocampus during focal limbic seizures. Similar increases are seen in certain closely linked subcortical structures such as the lateral septal nuclei and anterior hypothalamus, which contain inhibitory neurons. In marked contrast, decreases in all of these parameters are seen in the subcortical arousal systems of the upper brainstem and intralaminar thalamus, as well as in the fronto-parietal association cortex. We propose that the seizure proper can be defined as regions showing intense increases, while those areas showing opposite changes are inhibited by the seizure network and constitute long-range network consequences beyond the seizure itself. Importantly, the fronto-parietal cortex shows sleep-like slow wave activity and depressed metabolism under these conditions, associated with impaired consciousness. Understanding which brain networks are directly involved in seizures versus which sustain secondary consequences can provide new insights into the mechanisms of brain dysfunction in epilepsy, hopefully leading to innovative treatment

  16. Psychogenic (nonepileptic) seizures.

    PubMed

    Krumholz, Allan; Hopp, Jennifer

    2006-07-01

    Psychogenic (nonepileptic) seizures are among the most common and serious of all psychogenic neurological disorders. They account for approximately 20% of all intractable seizure disorders referred to comprehensive epilepsy centers and present with a reported annual incidence of approximately 4% that of true epilepsy. These events are serious and disabling. Indeed, compared with patients with true epilepsy, patients with psychogenic seizures exhibit more frequent, severe, and disabling seizures as well as a poorer quality of life. The diagnosis and management of psychogenic seizures remain challenging, although advances in video electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring have improved the ability of physicians to identify these disorders accurately. The prognosis of these patients is still relatively poor, and a good outcome seems dependent on a young age at diagnosis, early diagnosis, less severe psychological comorbidities, and continued follow-up and management by the diagnosing neurologist or clinician. Additional psychological or psychiatric assessment may be beneficial, particularly in elucidating the etiology of the disorder as well as identifying comorbid disorders, and may help in the long-term management of these patients. This review presents the history, epidemiology, differential diagnosis, and management of psychogenic seizures, with particular attention to the use of diagnostic testing, including video EEG monitoring.

  17. Consciousness of seizures and consciousness during seizures: are they related?

    PubMed

    Detyniecki, Kamil; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances have been made in the network mechanisms underlying impairment of consciousness during seizures. However, less is known about patient awareness of their own seizures. Studying patient reports or documentation of their seizures is currently the most commonly utilized mechanism to scientifically measure patient awareness of seizures. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available evidence regarding the accuracy of patient seizure counts and identify the variables that may influence unreliable seizure reporting. Several groups looking at patient documentation of seizures during continuous EEG monitoring show that patients do not report as many as 50% of their seizures. These studies also suggest that seizures accompanied by loss of consciousness, arising from the left hemisphere or the temporal lobe, or occurring during sleep are associated with significantly reduced reporting. Baseline memory performance does not appear to have a major influence on the accuracy of seizure report. Further prospective studies using validated ictal behavioral testing as well as using correlation with newer electrophysiological and neuroimaging techniques for seizure localization are needed to more fully understand the mechanisms of underreporting of seizures. Better methods to alert caregivers about unrecognized seizures and to improve seizure documentation are under investigation.

  18. Comparable seizure characteristics in magnetic seizure therapy and electroconvulsive therapy for major depression.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Sarah; Bewernick, Bettina H; Hurlemann, René; Soehle, Martin; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

    2013-11-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is highly effective for treatment-resistant depression (TRD); however, its use for less severe forms of depression is somewhat limited by a lack of control over current spreading to medial temporal lobe memory structures, resulting in various cognitive side effects. In contrast, magnetic seizure therapy (MST), which uses high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for local seizure induction, has been associated with reduced cognitive side effects. To assess whether different characteristics of seizures induced by both methods are responsible for the differences in neuropsychological side-effect profile, we studied seven TRD-patients undergoing both MST and ECT in an open-label, within subject, controlled crossover pilot study. Comparison parameters included seizure-related ictal characteristics, including motor activity, electromyogram (EMG), electroencephalogram (EEG), and postictal recovery and reorientation times.Our results showed no differences in motor activity or EMG and EEG characteristics, thus implicating similar electrophysiological processes in seizure induction with MST and ECT. In line with previous studies, we observed shorter postictal recovery and reorientation times following MST.The ictal characteristics of induced seizures were found similar with ECT and MST suggesting that the more focal seizure induction associated with MST may account for the more beneficial neuropsychological side effect profile of MST.

  19. Hyaluronan deficiency due to Has3 knock-out causes altered neuronal activity and seizures via reduction in brain extracellular space.

    PubMed

    Arranz, Amaia M; Perkins, Katherine L; Irie, Fumitoshi; Lewis, David P; Hrabe, Jan; Xiao, Fanrong; Itano, Naoki; Kimata, Koji; Hrabetova, Sabina; Yamaguchi, Yu

    2014-04-30

    Hyaluronan (HA), a large anionic polysaccharide (glycosaminoglycan), is a major constituent of the extracellular matrix of the adult brain. To address its function, we examined the neurophysiology of knock-out mice deficient in hyaluronan synthase (Has) genes. Here we report that these Has mutant mice are prone to epileptic seizures, and that in Has3(-/-) mice, this phenotype is likely derived from a reduction in the size of the brain extracellular space (ECS). Among the three Has knock-out models, namely Has3(-/-), Has1(-/-), and Has2(CKO), the seizures were most prevalent in Has3(-/-) mice, which also showed the greatest HA reduction in the hippocampus. Electrophysiology in Has3(-/-) brain slices demonstrated spontaneous epileptiform activity in CA1 pyramidal neurons, while histological analysis revealed an increase in cell packing in the CA1 stratum pyramidale. Imaging of the diffusion of a fluorescent marker revealed that the transit of molecules through the ECS of this layer was reduced. Quantitative analysis of ECS by the real-time iontophoretic method demonstrated that ECS volume was selectively reduced in the stratum pyramidale by ∼ 40% in Has3(-/-) mice. Finally, osmotic manipulation experiments in brain slices from Has3(-/-) and wild-type mice provided evidence for a causal link between ECS volume and epileptiform activity. Our results provide the first direct evidence for the physiological role of HA in the regulation of ECS volume, and suggest that HA-based preservation of ECS volume may offer a novel avenue for development of antiepileptogenic treatments.

  20. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage. PMID:26754778

  1. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage. PMID:26754778

  2. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Kulikov, Stanislav; Osorio, Ivan; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  3. Febrile and other occasional seizures.

    PubMed

    Bast, T; Carmant, L

    2013-01-01

    Seizures with fever that result from encephalitis or meningitis usually occur late in the course of febrile illness, and are focal and prolonged. Febrile seizures are by far the most common affecting 5% of the population, followed by posttraumatic seizures and those observed in the setting of a toxic, infectious, or metabolic encephalopathy. This chapter reviews the clinical presentation of the three most common forms, due to fever, trauma, and intoxication. Febrile seizures carry no cognitive or mortality risk. Recurrence risk is increased by young age, namely before 1 year of age. Febrile seizures that persist after the age of 6 years are usually part of the syndrome of Generalized epilepsy febrile seizures plus. These febrile seizures have a strong link with epilepsy since non-febrile seizures may occur later in the same patient and in other members of the same family with an autosomal dominant transmission. Complex febrile seizures, i.e., with focal or prolonged manifestations or followed by focal defect, are related to later mesial temporal epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis; risk factors are seizure duration and brain malformation. Prophylactic treatment is usually not required in febrile seizures. Early onset of complex seizures is the main indication for AED prophylaxis. Early posttraumatic seizures, i.e., within the first week, are often focal and indicate brain trauma: contusion, hematoma, 24 hours amnesia, and depressed skull fracture are major factors of posttraumatic epilepsy. Prophylaxis with antiepileptic drugs is not effective. Various psychotropic drugs, including antiepileptics, may cause seizures.

  4. Identification of a neurovascular signaling pathway regulating seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Linda; Stevenson, Tamara K; Su, Enming J; Ragsdale, Margaret; Moore, Shannon; Craciun, Stefan; Schielke, Gerald P; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Lawrence, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Objective A growing body of evidence suggests that increased blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability can contribute to the development of seizures. The protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been shown to promote BBB permeability and susceptibility to seizures. In this study, we examined the pathway regulated by tPA in seizures. Methods An experimental model of kainate-induced seizures was used in genetically modified mice, including mice deficient in tPA (tPA−/−), its inhibitor neuroserpin (Nsp−/−), or both (Nsp:tPA−/−), and in mice conditionally deficient in the platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα). Results Compared to wild-type (WT) mice, Nsp−/− mice have significantly reduced latency to seizure onset and generalization; whereas tPA−/− mice have the opposite phenotype, as do Nsp:tPA−/− mice. Furthermore, interventions that maintain BBB integrity delay seizure propagation, whereas osmotic disruption of the BBB in seizure-resistant tPA−/− mice dramatically reduces the time to seizure onset and accelerates seizure progression. The phenotypic differences in seizure progression between WT, tPA−/−, and Nsp−/− mice are also observed in electroencephalogram recordings in vivo, but absent in ex vivo electrophysiological recordings where regulation of the BBB is no longer necessary to maintain the extracellular environment. Finally, we demonstrate that these effects on seizure progression are mediated through signaling by PDGFRα on perivascular astrocytes. Interpretation Together, these data identify a specific molecular pathway involving tPA-mediated PDGFRα signaling in perivascular astrocytes that regulates seizure progression through control of the BBB. Inhibition of PDGFRα signaling and maintenance of BBB integrity might therefore offer a novel clinical approach for managing seizures. PMID:26273685

  5. Capsaicin prevents kainic acid-induced epileptogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Hee; Lee, Jong-Geol; Yon, Jung-Min; Oh, Ki-Wan; Baek, In-Jeoung; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Lee, Beom Jun; Yun, Young Won; Nam, Sang-Yoon

    2011-05-01

    Epilepsy is a neurodegenerative disease with periodic occurrences of spontaneous seizures as the main symptom. The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of capsaicin, the major ingredient of hot peppers, in a kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus model. After intraperitoneal injections of KA (30mg/kg) in 8-week-old male ICR mice, the animals were treated subcutaneously with capsaicin (0.33mg/kg or 1mg/kg) and then examined for any anti-ictogenic, hypothermic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic effects of the capsaicin treatment 3 days after KA treatment. KA injections significantly enhanced neurodegenerative conditions but co-injection with capsaicin reduced the detrimental effects of KA in a dose-dependent manner in mice. The co-administered group that received KA and 1mg/kg of capsaicin showed significantly decreased behavioral seizure activity and body temperature for 3h and also remarkably blocked intense and high-frequency seizure discharges in the parietal cortex for 3 days compared with those that received KA alone. Capsaicin treatment significantly diminished the levels of oxidant activity and malondialdehyde concentration and increased the antioxidant activity in the blood and brain of KA-treated mice. In addition, capsaicin significantly lowered the KA-induced increase in the concentration of the cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α in the brain. Furthermore, co-treatment of KA and capsaicin (1mg/kg) resulted in considerably decreased apoptotic cell death in the cornu ammonis sections of the hippocampus compared with that seen in the KA-alone group. These findings indicate that capsaicin is preventative for the epileptogenesis induced by KA in mice.

  6. Seizure-induced neglect.

    PubMed Central

    Heilman, K M; Howell, G J

    1980-01-01

    A man with intermittent right parieto-occipital seizures was monitored by electroencephalography while he received 60 trials of being touched on the right, left, or both hands. Half of the trials were given during a focal seizure, and half were given interictally. While the patient was having seizures, he appropriately responded to all 10 stimuli delivered to the right hand, but four of 10 responses were incorrect (allaesthetic) when he was stimulated on the left. With bilateral simultaneous stimulation he neglected the left hand in all 10 trials. His interictal performance was flawless. When given a line-bisection task on two occasions during a seizure, the patient attempted to make a mark to the left of the entire sheet of paper. Immediately postictally he made a mark at the right end of the line. The case illustrates that focal seizures may induce elements of the neglect syndrome and that attention (to contralateral stimuli) and intention to perform (in the contralateral hemispatial field) may be dissociable phenomena. PMID:6777464

  7. Quantitative analysis of surface electromyography: Biomarkers for convulsive seizures.

    PubMed

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Pressler, Ronit; Wolf, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Muscle activity during seizures is in electroencephalographical (EEG) praxis often considered an irritating artefact. This article discusses ways by surface electromyography (EMG) to turn it into a valuable tool of epileptology. Muscles are in direct synaptic contact with motor neurons. Therefore, EMG signals provide direct information about the electric activity in the motor cortex. Qualitative analysis of EMG has traditionally been a part of the long-term video-EEG recordings. Recent development in quantitative analysis of EMG signals yielded valuable information on the pathomechanisms of convulsive seizures, demonstrating that it was different from maximal voluntary contraction, and different from convulsive psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. Furthermore, the tonic phase of the generalised tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) proved to have different quantitative features than tonic seizures. The high temporal resolution of EMG allowed detailed characterisation of temporal dynamics of the GTCS, suggesting that the same inhibitory mechanisms that try to prevent the build-up of the seizure activity, contribute to ending the seizure. These findings have clinical implications: the quantitative EMG features provided the pathophysiologic substrate for developing neurophysiologic biomarkers that accurately identify GTCS. This proved to be efficient both for seizure detection and for objective, automated distinction between convulsive and non-convulsive epileptic seizures.

  8. Treatment with melatonin after status epilepticus attenuates seizure activity and neuronal damage but does not prevent the disturbance in diurnal rhythms and behavioral alterations in spontaneously hypertensive rats in kainate model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Petkova, Zlatina; Tchekalarova, Jana; Pechlivanova, Daniela; Moyanova, Slavianka; Kortenska, Lidia; Mitreva, Rumiana; Popov, Deyan; Markova, Petya; Lozanov, Valentin; Atanasova, Dimitrina; Lazarov, Nikolai; Stoynev, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Melatonin is involved in the control of circadian and seasonal rhythmicity, possesses potent antioxidant activity, and exerts a neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effect. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) are widely accepted as an experimental model of essential hypertension with hyperactivity, deficient sustained attention, and alterations in circadian autonomic profiles. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether melatonin treatment during epileptogenesis can prevent the deleterious consequences of status epilepticus (SE) in SHRs in the kainate (KA) model of temporal lobe of epilepsy (TLE). Spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRSs) were EEG- and video-recorded during and after the treatment protocol. Melatonin (10mg/kg diluted in drinking water, 8weeks) increased the seizure-latent period, decreased the frequency of SRSs, and attenuated the circadian rhythm of seizure activity in SHRs. However, melatonin was unable to affect the disturbed diurnal rhythms and behavioral changes associated with epilepsy, including the decreased anxiety level, depression, and impaired spatial memory. Melatonin reduced neuronal damage specifically in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and piriform cortex and decreased hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) levels both in control and epileptic SHRs. Although long-term melatonin treatment after SE shows a potential to attenuate seizure activity and neuronal loss, it is unable to restore epilepsy-associated behavioral abnormalities in SHRs. PMID:24440891

  9. Treatment with melatonin after status epilepticus attenuates seizure activity and neuronal damage but does not prevent the disturbance in diurnal rhythms and behavioral alterations in spontaneously hypertensive rats in kainate model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Petkova, Zlatina; Tchekalarova, Jana; Pechlivanova, Daniela; Moyanova, Slavianka; Kortenska, Lidia; Mitreva, Rumiana; Popov, Deyan; Markova, Petya; Lozanov, Valentin; Atanasova, Dimitrina; Lazarov, Nikolai; Stoynev, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Melatonin is involved in the control of circadian and seasonal rhythmicity, possesses potent antioxidant activity, and exerts a neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effect. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) are widely accepted as an experimental model of essential hypertension with hyperactivity, deficient sustained attention, and alterations in circadian autonomic profiles. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether melatonin treatment during epileptogenesis can prevent the deleterious consequences of status epilepticus (SE) in SHRs in the kainate (KA) model of temporal lobe of epilepsy (TLE). Spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRSs) were EEG- and video-recorded during and after the treatment protocol. Melatonin (10mg/kg diluted in drinking water, 8weeks) increased the seizure-latent period, decreased the frequency of SRSs, and attenuated the circadian rhythm of seizure activity in SHRs. However, melatonin was unable to affect the disturbed diurnal rhythms and behavioral changes associated with epilepsy, including the decreased anxiety level, depression, and impaired spatial memory. Melatonin reduced neuronal damage specifically in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and piriform cortex and decreased hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) levels both in control and epileptic SHRs. Although long-term melatonin treatment after SE shows a potential to attenuate seizure activity and neuronal loss, it is unable to restore epilepsy-associated behavioral abnormalities in SHRs.

  10. Tuberculoma-Induced Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Salway, R. James; Sangani, Shruti; Parekh, Samira; Bhatt, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Seizures in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients can be caused by a wide variety of opportunistic infections, and, especially in developing countries, tuberculosis (TB) should be high on the differential. In India, TB is the most common opportunistic infection in HIV and it can have several different central nervous system manifestations, including intracranial tuberculomas. In this case, an HIV patient presenting with new-onset seizure and fever was diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis and multiple intracranial tuberculomas. The patient received standard TB medications, steroids, and anticonvulsants in the emergency department and was admitted for further care. PMID:26587082

  11. Seizures and Teens: Sorting Out Seizures--Part Two

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devinsky, Orrin

    2006-01-01

    In adolescents, diagnosing seizures can be challenging and can lead to many pitfalls. Because seizures are episodic and unpredictable events, they usually do not occur in the doctor's office. Thus, a diagnosis of epilepsy is usually based on information presented by the person with seizures and their family. Together with results of diagnostic…

  12. Valproic Acid-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis with Pseudocyst Formation: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Khamrui, Sujan; Kataria, Mohnish; Biswas, Jayanta; Saha, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid is the most widely used anti-epilep­tic drug in children, and it is probably the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. Outcomes for patients with valproic acid-associated pancreatitis vary from full recovery after discontinuation of the drug to severe acute pancreatitis and death. Here, we present a case of valproic acid-induced severe acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation in a 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy and generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no resolution of the pseudocyst after discontinuation of valproic acid. The patient became symptomatic with a progressive increase in the size of the pseudocyst. She was successfully treated with cystogastrostomy and was well at 12-month follow-up. PMID:26366333

  13. Modeling early-onset post-ischemic seizures in aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chiping; Wang, Justin; Peng, Jessie; Patel, Nisarg; Huang, Yayi; Gao, Xiaoxing; Aljarallah, Salman; Eubanks, James H; McDonald, Robert; Zhang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of seizures and epilepsy in the aged population, with post-stroke seizures being a poor prognostic factor. The pathological processes underlying post-stroke seizures are not well understood and studies of these seizures in aging/aged animals remain scarce. Therefore, our primary objective was to model post-stroke seizures in aging mice (C57 black strain, 16–20 month-old), with a focus on early-onset, convulsive seizures that occur within 24-hours of brain ischemia. We utilized a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and examined seizure activity and brain injury using combined behavioral and electroencephalographic monitoring and histological assessments. Aging mice exhibited vigorous convulsive seizures within hours of the middle cerebral artery occlusion. These seizures manifested with jumping, rapid running, barrel-rolling and/or falling all in the absence of hippocampal-cortical electrographic discharges. Seizure development was closely associated with severe brain injury and acute mortality. Anticonvulsive treatments after seizure occurrence offered temporary seizure control but failed to improve animal survival. A separate cohort of adult mice (6–8 months-old) exhibited analogous early-onset convulsive seizures following the middle cerebral artery occlusion but had better survival outcomes following anticonvulsive treatment. Collectively, our data suggest that early-onset convulsive seizures are a result of severe brain ischemia in aging animals. PMID:25943585

  14. Modeling early-onset post-ischemic seizures in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chiping; Wang, Justin; Peng, Jessie; Patel, Nisarg; Huang, Yayi; Gao, Xiaoxing; Aljarallah, Salman; Eubanks, James H; McDonald, Robert; Zhang, Liang

    2015-09-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of seizures and epilepsy in the aged population, with post-stroke seizures being a poor prognostic factor. The pathological processes underlying post-stroke seizures are not well understood and studies of these seizures in aging/aged animals remain scarce. Therefore, our primary objective was to model post-stroke seizures in aging mice (C57 black strain, 16-20 months-old), with a focus on early-onset, convulsive seizures that occur within 24-hours of brain ischemia. We utilized a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and examined seizure activity and brain injury using combined behavioral and electroencephalographic monitoring and histological assessments. Aging mice exhibited vigorous convulsive seizures within hours of the middle cerebral artery occlusion. These seizures manifested with jumping, rapid running, barrel-rolling and/or falling all in the absence of hippocampal-cortical electrographic discharges. Seizure development was closely associated with severe brain injury and acute mortality. Anticonvulsive treatments after seizure occurrence offered temporary seizure control but failed to improve animal survival. A separate cohort of adult mice (6-8 months-old) exhibited analogous early-onset convulsive seizures following the middle cerebral artery occlusion but had better survival outcomes following anticonvulsive treatment. Collectively, our data suggest that early-onset convulsive seizures are a result of severe brain ischemia in aging animals.

  15. Heat shock protein 70 protects against seizure-induced neuronal cell death in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activation-induced nitric oxide synthase II expression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chiung-Chih; Chen, Shang-Der; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Samuel H H; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2014-02-01

    Status epilepticus induces subcellular changes that may eventually lead to neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. Based on an animal model of status epilepticus, our laboratory showed previously that sustained hippocampal seizure activity activates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and upregulates nitric oxide synthase (NOS) II gene expression, leading to apoptotic neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. The present study examined the potential modulatory role of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) on NF-κB signaling in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus. In Sprague-Dawley rats, kainic acid (KA) was microinjected unilaterally into the hippocampal CA3 subfield to induce prolonged bilateral seizure activity. Expression of HSP70 was elevated as early as 1h after the elicitation of sustained seizure activity, followed by a progressive elevation that peaked at 24h. Pretreatment with an antisense oligonucleotide against hsp70 decreased the HSP70 expression, and significantly augmented IκB kinase (IKK) activity and phosphorylation of IκBα, alongside enhanced nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB in the hippocampal CA3 neurons and glial cells. These cellular events were followed by enhanced upregulation of NOS II and peroxynitrite expression 3h after sustained seizure activity that led to an increase of caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation in the hippocampal CA3 neurons 7days after experimental status epilepticus. We concluded that HSP70 protects against apoptotic cell death induced by NF-κB activation and NOS II-peroxynitrite signaling cascade in the hippocampal CA3 and glial cells following experimental status epilepticus via suppression of IKK activity and deactivation of IκBα.

  16. Pre-seizure state identified by diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Junli; Jiang, Ruixin; Yang, Hao; Carney, Paul R.; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-01-01

    In epilepsy it has been challenging to detect early changes in brain activity that occurs prior to seizure onset and to map their origin and evolution for possible intervention. Here we demonstrate using a rat model of generalized epilepsy that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides a unique functional neuroimaging modality for noninvasively and continuously tracking such brain activities with high spatiotemporal resolution. We detected early hemodynamic responses with heterogeneous patterns, along with intracranial electroencephalogram gamma power changes, several minutes preceding the electroencephalographic seizure onset, supporting the presence of a ``pre-seizure'' state. We also observed the decoupling between local hemodynamic and neural activities. We found widespread hemodynamic changes evolving from local regions of the bilateral cortex and thalamus to the entire brain, indicating that the onset of generalized seizures may originate locally rather than diffusely. Together, these findings suggest DOT represents a powerful tool for mapping early seizure onset and propagation pathways.

  17. Farnesoid X receptor activation by chenodeoxycholic acid induces detoxifying enzymes through AMP-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2-mediated phosphorylation of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β.

    PubMed

    Noh, Kyoung; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Young Woo; Kim, Sang Geon

    2011-08-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates redox homeostasis and elicits a cytoprotective effect. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-β (C/EBPβ) plays a role in regulating the expression of hepatocyte-specific genes and contributes to hepatocyte protection and liver regeneration. In view of the role of FXR in xenobiotic metabolism and hepatocyte survival, this study investigated the potential of FXR to activate C/EBPβ for the induction of detoxifying enzymes and the responsible regulatory pathway. Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a major component in bile acids, activates FXR. In HepG2 cells, CDCA treatment activated C/EBPβ, as shown by increases in its phosphorylation, nuclear accumulation, and expression. 3-(2,6-Dichlorophenyl)-4-(3'-carboxy-2-chlorostilben-4-yl-)oxymethyl-5-isopropyl-isoxazole (GW4064), a synthetic FXR ligand, had similar effects. In addition, CDCA enhanced luciferase gene transcription from the construct containing -1.65-kb GSTA2 promoter, which contained C/EBP response element (pGL-1651). Moreover, CDCA treatment activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which led to extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation, as evidenced by the results of experiments using a dominant-negative mutant of AMPKα and chemical inhibitor. The activation of ERK1/2 was responsible for the activating phosphorylation of C/EBPβ. FXR knockdown attenuated the ability of CDCA to activate AMPK and ERK1/2 and phosphorylate C/EBPβ. Consistently, enforced expression of FXR promoted the phosphorylation of AMPKα, ERK1/2, and C/EBPβ, verifying that C/EBPβ phosphorylation elicited by CDCA results from the activation of AMPK and ERK1/2 by FXR. In mice, CDCA treatment activated C/EBPβ with the induction of detoxifying enzymes in the liver. Our results demonstrate that CDCA induces antioxidant and xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes by activating C/EBPβ through AMPK-dependent ERK1/2 pathway downstream of FXR.

  18. Positron emission tomography in generalized seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, W.H.; Brooks, R.; Margolin, R.; Patronas, N.; Sato, S.; Porter, R.J.; Mansi, L.; Bairamian, D.; DiChiro, G.

    1985-05-01

    The authors used /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to study nine patients with clinical absence or generalized seizures. One patient had only absence seizures, two had only generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and six had both seizure types. Interictal scans in eight failed to reveal focal or lateralized hypometabolism. No apparent abnormalities were noted. Two patients had PET scans after isotope injection during hyperventilation-induced generalized spike-wave discharges. Diffusely increased metabolic rates were found in one compared with an interictal scan, and in another compared with control values. Another patient had FDG injected during absence status: EEG showed generalized spike-wave discharges (during which she was unresponsive) intermixed with slow activity accompanied by confusion. Metabolic rates were decreased, compared with the interictal scan, throughout both cortical and subcortical structures. Interictal PET did not detect specific anatomic regions responsible for absence seizure onset in any patient, but the results of the ictal scans did suggest that pathophysiologic differences exist between absence status and single absence attacks.

  19. Seizure Prediction and Detection via Phase and Amplitude Lock Values

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Mark H.; Padmanabha, Akshay; Hossain, Gahangir; de Jongh Curry, Amy L.; Blaha, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    A robust seizure prediction methodology would enable a “closed-loop” system that would only activate as impending seizure activity is detected. Such a system would eliminate ongoing stimulation to the brain, thereby eliminating such side effects as coughing, hoarseness, voice alteration, and paresthesias (Murphy et al., 1998; Ben-Menachem, 2001), while preserving overall battery life of the system. The seizure prediction and detection algorithm uses Phase/Amplitude Lock Values (PLV/ALV) which calculate the difference of phase and amplitude between electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes local and remote to the epileptic event. PLV is used as the seizure prediction marker and signifies the emergence of abnormal neuronal activations through local neuron populations. PLV/ALVs are used as seizure detection markers to demarcate the seizure event, or when the local seizure event has propagated throughout the brain turning into a grand-mal event. We verify the performance of this methodology against the “CHB-MIT Scalp EEG Database” which features seizure attributes for testing. Through this testing, we can demonstrate a high degree of sensivity and precision of our methodology between pre-ictal and ictal events. PMID:27014017

  20. Detection of early seizures by diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Hajihashemi, M. Reza; Zhou, Junli; Carney, Paul R.; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-03-01

    In epilepsy it has been challenging to detect early changes in brain activity that occurs prior to seizure onset and to map their origin and evolution for possible intervention. Besides, preclinical seizure experiments need to be conducted in awake animals with images reconstructed and displayed in real-time. We demonstrate using a rat model of generalized epilepsy that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides a unique functional neuroimaging modality for noninvasively and continuously tracking brain activities with high spatiotemporal resolution. We developed methods to conduct seizure experiments in fully awake rats using a subject-specific helmet and a restraining mechanism. For the first time, we detected early hemodynamic responses with heterogeneous patterns several minutes preceding the electroencephalographic seizure onset, supporting the presence of a "pre-seizure" state both in anesthetized and awake rats. Using a novel time-series analysis of scattering images, we show that the analysis of scattered diffuse light is a sensitive and reliable modality for detecting changes in neural activity associated with generalized seizure. We found widespread hemodynamic changes evolving from local regions of the bilateral cortex and thalamus to the entire brain, indicating that the onset of generalized seizures may originate locally rather than diffusely. Together, these findings suggest DOT represents a powerful tool for mapping early seizure onset and propagation pathways.

  1. Evidence for consolidation of neuronal assemblies after seizures in humans.

    PubMed

    Bower, Mark R; Stead, Matt; Bower, Regina S; Kucewicz, Michal T; Sulc, Vlastimil; Cimbalnik, Jan; Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Vasoli, Vincent M; St Louis, Erik K; Meyer, Fredric B; Marsh, W Richard; Worrell, Gregory A

    2015-01-21

    The establishment of memories involves reactivation of waking neuronal activity patterns and strengthening of associated neural circuits during slow-wave sleep (SWS), a process known as "cellular consolidation" (Dudai and Morris, 2013). Reactivation of neural activity patterns during waking behaviors that occurs on a timescale of seconds to minutes is thought to constitute memory recall (O'Keefe and Nadel, 1978), whereas consolidation of memory traces may be revealed and served by correlated firing (reactivation) that appears during sleep under conditions suitable for synaptic modification (Buhry et al., 2011). Although reactivation has been observed in human neuronal recordings (Gelbard-Sagiv et al., 2008; Miller et al., 2013), reactivation during sleep has not, likely because data are difficult to obtain and the effect is subtle. Seizures, however, provide intense and synchronous, yet sparse activation (Bower et al., 2012) that could produce a stronger consolidation effect if seizures activate learning-related mechanisms similar to those activated by learned tasks. Continuous wide-bandwidth recordings from patients undergoing intracranial monitoring for drug-resistant epilepsy revealed reactivation of seizure-related neuronal activity during subsequent SWS, but not wakefulness. Those neuronal assemblies that were most strongly activated during seizures showed the largest correlation changes, suggesting that consolidation selectively strengthened neuronal circuits activated by seizures. These results suggest that seizures "hijack" physiological learning mechanisms and also suggest a novel epilepsy therapy targeting neuronal dynamics during post-seizure sleep.

  2. The Effects of Quinacrine, Proglumide, and Pentoxifylline on Seizure Activity, Cognitive Deficit, and Oxidative Stress in Rat Lithium-Pilocarpine Model of Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Taweel, Gasem M.; Aboshaiqah, Ahmad E.; Ajarem, Jamaan S.

    2014-01-01

    The present data indicate that status epilepticus (SE) induced in adult rats is associated with cognitive dysfunctions and cerebral oxidative stress (OS). This has been demonstrated using lithium-pilocarpine (Li-Pc) model of SE. OS occurring in hippocampus and striatum of mature brain following SE is apparently due to both the increased free radicals production and the limited antioxidant defense. Pronounced alterations were noticed in the enzymatic, glutathione-S transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as in the nonenzymatic; thiobarbituric acid (TBARS) and reduced glutathione (GST), indices of OS in the hippocampus and striatum of SE induced animals. Quinacrine (Qcn), proglumide (Pgm), and pentoxifylline (Ptx) administered to animals before inducing SE, were significantly effective in ameliorating the seizure activities, cognitive dysfunctions, and cerebral OS. The findings suggest that all the drugs were effective in the order of Ptx < Pgm < Qcn indicating that these drugs are potentially antiepileptic as well as antioxidant; however, further studies are needed to establish this fact. It can be assumed that these antiepileptic substances with antioxidant properties combined with conventional therapies might provide a beneficial effect in treatment of epilepsy through ameliorating the cerebral OS. PMID:25478062

  3. Carbon monoxide offers neuroprotection from hippocampal cell damage induced by recurrent febrile seizures through the PERK-activated ER stress pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Yi, Wenxia; Qin, Jiong; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Jing; Chang, Xingzhi

    2015-01-12

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is neuroprotective in various models of brain injury, but the precise mechanisms for this are yet to be established. In the present study, using a rat model of recurrent febrile seizures (FSs), we found an increase in plasma CO, evidence of neuronal damage and apoptosis, an increase in the expression of the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) marker glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous binding protein (CHOP), and an increase in phosphorylated protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (p-PERK)/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (p-eIF2α) in the hippocampus after 10 FSs. Administration of Hemin (a CO donor) in FS rats alleviated the neuronal damage, reduced neuronal apoptosis, upregulated GRP78 expression, decreased CHOP, and increased p-PERK and p-eIF2α expression in the hippocampus, compared to FS control rats. In contrast, treating FS rats with ZnPP-IX (a CO synthase inhibitor) aggravated the neuronal damage, enhanced neuronal apoptosis, downregulated GRP78 expression, increased CHOP, and decreased p-PERK and p-eIF2α expression, compared to FS control rats. These results suggest that endogenous CO limits the neuronal damage induced by recurrent FSs, through the PERK-activated ERS pathway.

  4. The tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasmin extracellular proteolytic system regulates seizure-induced hippocampal mossy fiber outgrowth through a proteoglycan substrate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y P; Siao, C J; Lu, W; Sung, T C; Frohman, M A; Milev, P; Bugge, T H; Degen, J L; Levine, J M; Margolis, R U; Tsirka, S E

    2000-03-20

    Short seizure episodes are associated with remodeling of neuronal connections. One region where such reorganization occurs is the hippocampus, and in particular, the mossy fiber pathway. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we show here a critical role in vivo for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), an extracellular protease that converts plasminogen to plasmin, to induce mossy fiber sprouting. We identify DSD-1-PG/phosphacan, an extracellular matrix component associated with neurite reorganization, as a physiological target of plasmin. Mice lacking tPA displayed decreased mossy fiber outgrowth and an aberrant band at the border of the supragranular region of the dentate gyrus that coincides with the deposition of unprocessed DSD-1-PG/phosphacan and excessive Timm-positive, mossy fiber termini. Plasminogen-deficient mice also exhibit the laminar band and DSD- 1-PG/phosphacan deposition, but mossy fiber outgrowth through the supragranular region is normal. These results demonstrate that tPA functions acutely, both through and independently of plasmin, to mediate mossy fiber reorganization.

  5. Ictal Spread of Medial Temporal Lobe Seizures With and Without Secondary Generalization: An Intracranial EEG Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Yeoun; Farooque, Pue; Chen, William; Youngblood, Mark W.; Zaveri, Hitten P.; Gerrard, Jason L.; Spencer, Dennis D.; Hirsch, Lawrence J.; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective Secondary generalization of seizures has devastating consequences for patient safety and quality of life. The aim of this intracranial EEG (icEEG) study was to investigate the differences in onset and propagation patterns of temporal lobe seizures that remained focal vs. those with secondary generalization in order to better understand the mechanism of secondary generalization. Methods A total of 39 seizures were analyzed in 9 patients who met the following criteria: 1) icEEG-video monitoring with at least 1 secondarily generalized tonic clonic seizure (GTC), 2) pathologically proven hippocampal sclerosis, and 3) no seizures for at least 1 year after anteromedial temporal lobe resection. Seizures were classified as focal or secondary generalized by behavioral analysis of video. Onset and propagation patterns were compared by analysis of icEEG. Results We obtained data from 22 focal seizures without generalization (FS), and 17 GTC. Seizure onset patterns did not differ between FS and GTCs, but there were differences in later propagation. All seizures started with low voltage fast activity except 7 seizures in one patient (6 FS, 1 GTC), which started with sharply contoured theta activity. 15 of 39 seizures started from the hippocampus and 24 seizures (including 6 seizures in a patient without hippocampal contacts) started from other medial temporal lobe areas. We observed involvement or more prominent activation of the posterior-lateral temporal regions in GTCs prior to propagation to the other cortical regions, vs. FS which had no involvement or less prominent activation of the posterior lateral temporal cortex. Occipital contacts were not involved at the time of clinical secondary generalization. Significance The posterior-lateral temporal cortex may serve as an important “gateway” controlling propagation of medial temporal lobe seizures to other cortical regions. Identifying the mechanisms of secondary generalization of focal seizures may

  6. The Antiepileptic Drug Levetiracetam Suppresses Non-Convulsive Seizure Activity and Reduces Ischemic Brain Damage in Rats Subjected to Permanent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Ornella; Rispoli, Vincenzo; Leo, Antonio; Politi, Giovanni Bosco; Vinciguerra, Antonio; di Renzo, Gianfranco; Cataldi, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    The antiepileptic drug Levetiracetam (Lev) has neuroprotective properties in experimental stroke, cerebral hemorrhage and neurotrauma. In these conditions, non-convulsive seizures (NCSs) propagate from the core of the focal lesion into perilesional tissue, enlarging the damaged area and promoting epileptogenesis. Here, we explore whether Lev neuroprotective effect is accompanied by changes in NCS generation or propagation. In particular, we performed continuous EEG recordings before and after the permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (pMCAO) in rats that received Lev (100 mg/kg) or its vehicle immediately before surgery. Both in Lev-treated and in control rats, EEG activity was suppressed after pMCAO. In control but not in Lev-treated rats, EEG activity reappeared approximately 30-45 min after pMCAO. It initially consisted in single spikes and, then, evolved into spike-and-wave and polyspike-and-wave discharges. In Lev-treated rats, only rare spike events were observed and the EEG power was significantly smaller than in controls. Approximately 24 hours after pMCAO, EEG activity increased in Lev-treated rats because of the appearance of polyspike events whose power was, however, significantly smaller than in controls. In rats sacrificed 24 hours after pMCAO, the ischemic lesion was approximately 50% smaller in Lev-treated than in control rats. A similar neuroprotection was observed in rats sacrificed 72 hours after pMCAO. In conclusion, in rats subjected to pMCAO, a single Lev injection suppresses NCS occurrence for at least 24 hours. This electrophysiological effect could explain the long lasting reduction of ischemic brain damage caused by this drug. PMID:24236205

  7. Psychogenic pseudoepileptic seizures: clinical and electroencephalogram (EEG) video-tape recordings.

    PubMed

    Jedrzejczak, J; Owczarek, K; Majkowski, J

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents a clinical and electrophysiological analysis of type and duration of seizures recorded by means of long-term video electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring, a method which enables accurate diagnosis of psychogenic pseudoepileptic seizures occurring with or without epileptic seizures. Analysis is based on 1083 patients, hospitalized at our department between 1990 and 1997, with a preliminary diagnosis of epilepsy. Psychogenic pseudoepileptic seizures were diagnosed in 85 patients (7.8%). In 48 patients, pseudoepileptic seizures alone were diagnosed (group 1), whereas 37 patients had a mixed condition in which pseudoepileptic seizures were accompanied by epileptic seizures (group 2). For comparison of duration of pseudo- and epileptic seizures a control group (group 3), consisting of 55 patients randomly selected from the population of patients suffering from epileptic seizures alone, was parceled out. Long-term video EEG monitoring was performed in 70 patients. In 55 (79%) of these patients 230 seizures (221 pseudoepileptic and nine epileptic) were recorded. In 30 patients (32%), the diagnosis was based on clinical observation of the seizures and on the number of EEG recordings, including activating procedures such as sleep deprivation, photostimulation, hyperventilation and anti-epileptic drug withdrawal. We found that the duration of epileptic seizures was significantly shorter than the duration of psychogenic pseudoepileptic seizures. Our study has exposed the difficulties involved in the diagnosis of psychogenic pseudoepileptic seizures and the negligible value of neuroimaging techniques and interictal EEG recordings in the differential diagnosis of epileptic versus nonepileptic seizures. In this study, psychogenic seizures were significantly more frequent in women than in men; patient history analysis did not confirm the hypothesis that sexual abuse may cause psychogenic seizures.

  8. Excitatory amino acid transporter 2 downregulation correlates with thalamic neuronal death following kainic acid-induced status epilepticus in rat.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Masashi; Kurokawa, Haruna; Shimada, Akinori; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Miyata, Hajime; Morita, Takehito

    2015-02-01

    Recurrent seizures without interictal resumption (status epilepticus) have been reported to induce neuronal death in the midline thalamic region that has functional roles in memory and decision-making; however, the pathogenesis underlying status epilepticus-induced thalamic neuronal death is yet to be determined. We performed histological and immunohistochemical studies as well as cerebral blood flow measurement using 4.7 tesla magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer on midline thalamic region in Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 75, male, 7 weeks after birth, body weight 250-300 g) treated with intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (10 mg/kg) to induce status epilepticus (n = 55) or normal saline solution (n = 20). Histological study using paraffin-embedded specimens revealed neuronal death showing ischemic-like changes and Fluoro-Jade C positivity with calcium deposition in the midline thalamic region of epileptic rats. The distribution of neuronal death was associated with focal loss of immunoreactivity for excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2), stronger immunoreaction for glutamate and increase in number of Iba-1-positive microglial cells showing swollen cytoplasm and long processes. Double immunofluorescence study demonstrated co-expression of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) within microglial cells, and loss of EAAT2 immunoreactivity in reactive astrocytes. These microglial alterations and astrocytic EAAT2 downregulation were also observed in tissue without obvious neuronal death in kainic acid-treated rats. These results suggest the possible role of glutamate excitotoxicity in neuronal death in the midline thalamic region following kainic acid-induced status epilepticus due to astrocytic EAAT2 downregulation following microglial activation showing upregulation of IL-1β and iNOS.

  9. Emergence of semiology in epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Chauvel, Patrick; McGonigal, Aileen

    2014-09-01

    Semiology, the manifestation of epilepsy, is dependent upon electrical activity produced by epileptic seizures that are organized within existing neural pathways. Clinical signs evolve as the epileptic discharge spreads in both time and space. Studying the relation between these, of which the temporal component is at least as important as the spatial one, is possible using anatomo-electro-clinical correlations of stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) data. The period of semiology production occurs with variable time lag after seizure onset and signs then emerge more or less rapidly depending on seizure type (temporal seizures generally propagating more slowly and frontal seizures more quickly). The subset of structures involved in semiological production, the "early spread network", is tightly linked to those constituting the epileptogenic zone. The level of complexity of semiological features varies according to the degree of involvement of the primary or associative cortex, with the former having a direct relation to peripheral sensory and motor systems with production of hallucinations (visual and auditory) or elementary sensorimotor signs. Depending on propagation pattern, these signs can occur in a "march" fashion as described by Jackson. On the other hand, seizures involving the associative cortex, having a less direct relation with the peripheral nervous system, and necessarily involving more widely distributed networks manifest with altered cognitive and/or behavioral signs whose neural substrate involves a network of cortical structures, as has been observed for normal cognitive processes. Other than the anatomical localization of these structures, the frequency of the discharge is a crucial determinant of semiological effect since a fast (gamma) discharge will tend to deactivate normal function, whereas a slower theta discharge can mimic physiological function. In terms of interaction between structures, the degree of synchronization plays a key role in

  10. Ambulatory Seizure Monitoring: From Concept to Prototype Device

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Mark H.; Threatt, Madeline; Solies, Karsten M.; McFerrin, Brent M.; Hopf, Lindsey B.; Birdwell, J. Douglas; Sillay, Karl A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The brain, made up of billions of neurons and synapses, is the marvelous core of human thought, action and memory. However, if neuronal activity manifests into abnormal electrical activity across the brain, neural behavior may exhibit synchronous neural firings known as seizures. If unprovoked seizures occur repeatedly, a patient may be diagnosed with epilepsy. Purpose The scope of this project is to develop an ambulatory seizure monitoring system that can be used away from a hospital, making it possible for the user to stay at home, and primary care personnel to monitor a patient's seizure activity in order to provide deeper analysis of the patient's condition and apply personalized intervention techniques. Methods The ambulatory seizure monitoring device is a research device that has been developed with the objective of acquiring a portable, clean electroencephalography (EEG) signal and transmitting it wirelessly to a handheld device for processing and notification. Result This device is comprised of 4 phases: acquisition, transmission, processing and notification. During the acquisition stage, the EEG signal is detected using EEG electrodes; these signals are filtered and amplified before being transmitted in the second stage. The processing stage encompasses the signal processing and seizure prediction. A notification is sent to the patient and designated contacts, given an impending seizure. Each of these phases is comprised of various design components, hardware and software. The experimental findings illustrate that there may be a triggering mechanism through the phase lock value method that enables seizure prediction. Conclusion The device addresses the need for long-term monitoring of the patient's seizure condition in order to provide the clinician a better understanding of the seizure's duration and frequency and ultimately provide the best remedy for the patient.

  11. Ambulatory Seizure Monitoring: From Concept to Prototype Device

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Mark H.; Threatt, Madeline; Solies, Karsten M.; McFerrin, Brent M.; Hopf, Lindsey B.; Birdwell, J. Douglas; Sillay, Karl A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The brain, made up of billions of neurons and synapses, is the marvelous core of human thought, action and memory. However, if neuronal activity manifests into abnormal electrical activity across the brain, neural behavior may exhibit synchronous neural firings known as seizures. If unprovoked seizures occur repeatedly, a patient may be diagnosed with epilepsy. Purpose The scope of this project is to develop an ambulatory seizure monitoring system that can be used away from a hospital, making it possible for the user to stay at home, and primary care personnel to monitor a patient's seizure activity in order to provide deeper analysis of the patient's condition and apply personalized intervention techniques. Methods The ambulatory seizure monitoring device is a research device that has been developed with the objective of acquiring a portable, clean electroencephalography (EEG) signal and transmitting it wirelessly to a handheld device for processing and notification. Result This device is comprised of 4 phases: acquisition, transmission, processing and notification. During the acquisition stage, the EEG signal is detected using EEG electrodes; these signals are filtered and amplified before being transmitted in the second stage. The processing stage encompasses the signal processing and seizure prediction. A notification is sent to the patient and designated contacts, given an impending seizure. Each of these phases is comprised of various design components, hardware and software. The experimental findings illustrate that there may be a triggering mechanism through the phase lock value method that enables seizure prediction. Conclusion The device addresses the need for long-term monitoring of the patient's seizure condition in order to provide the clinician a better understanding of the seizure's duration and frequency and ultimately provide the best remedy for the patient. PMID:27647960

  12. The piriform, perirhinal, and entorhinal cortex in seizure generation

    PubMed Central

    Vismer, Marta S.; Forcelli, Patrick A.; Skopin, Mark D.; Gale, Karen; Koubeissi, Mohamad Z.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding neural network behavior is essential to shed light on epileptogenesis and seizure propagation. The interconnectivity and plasticity of mammalian limbic and neocortical brain regions provide the substrate for the hypersynchrony and hyperexcitability associated with seizure activity. Recurrent unprovoked seizures are the hallmark of epilepsy, and limbic epilepsy is the most common type of medically-intractable focal epilepsy in adolescents and adults that necessitates surgical evaluation. In this review, we describe the role and relationships among the piriform (PIRC), perirhinal (PRC), and entorhinal cortex (ERC) in seizure-generation and epilepsy. The inherent function, anatomy, and histological composition of these cortical regions are discussed. In addition, the neurotransmitters, intrinsic and extrinsic connections, and the interaction of these regions are described. Furthermore, we provide evidence based on clinical research and animal models that suggest that these cortical regions may act as key seizure-trigger zones and, even, epileptogenesis. PMID:26074779

  13. Atenolol offers better protection than clonidine against cardiac injury in kainic acid-induced status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Read, M I; Harrison, J C; Kerr, D S; Sammut, I A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Status epilepticus is increasingly associated with cardiac injury in both clinical and animal studies. The current study examined ECG activity for up to 48 h following kainic acid (KA) seizure induction and compared the potential of atenolol and clonidine to attenuate this cardiac pathology. Experimental Approach Sprague-Dawley rats (male, 300–350 g) were implanted with ECG and electrocorticogram electrodes to allow simultaneous telemetric recordings of cardiac and cortical responses during and after KA-induced seizures. Animals were randomized into saline controls, and saline vehicle-, clonidine- or atenolol-pretreated KA groups. Key Results KA administration in the saline-pretreated group produced an immediate bradycardic response (maximal decrease of 28 ± 6%), coinciding with low-level seizure activity. As high-level seizure behaviours and EEG spiking increased, tachycardia also developed, with a maximum heart rate increase of 38 ± 7% coinciding with QTc prolongation and T wave elevation. Both clonidine and atenolol pretreatment attenuated seizure activity and reduced KA-induced changes in heart rate, QTc interval and T wave amplitude observed during both bradycardic and tachycardic phases in saline-pretreated KA animals. Clonidine, however, failed to reduce the power of EEG frequencies. Atenolol and to a lesser extent clonidine attenuated the cardiac hypercontraction band necrosis, inflammatory infiltration, and oedema at 48 h after KA, relative to the saline-KA group. Conclusions and Implications Severe seizure activity in this model was clearly associated with altered ECG activity and cardiac pathology. We suggest that modulation of sympathetic activity by atenolol provides a promising cardioprotective approach in status epilepticus. PMID:25765931

  14. Neuropeptide FF receptors as novel targets for limbic seizure attenuation.

    PubMed

    Portelli, Jeanelle; Meurs, Alfred; Bihel, Frederic; Hammoud, Hassan; Schmitt, Martine; De Kock, Joery; Utard, Valerie; Humbert, Jean-Paul; Bertin, Isabelle; Buffel, Ine; Coppens, Jessica; Tourwe, Dirk; Maes, Veronique; De Prins, An; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Massie, Ann; Balasubramaniam, Ambikaipakan; Boon, Paul; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Simonin, Frederic; Smolders, Ilse

    2015-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well established anticonvulsant and first-in-class antiepileptic neuropeptide. In this study, the controversial role of NPY1 receptors in epilepsy was reassessed by testing two highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands and a mixed NPY1/NPFF receptor antagonist BIBP3226 in a rat model for limbic seizures. While BIBP3226 significantly attenuated the pilocarpine-induced seizures, neither of the highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands altered the seizure severity. Administration of the NPFF1/NPFF2 receptor antagonist RF9 also significantly attenuated limbic seizure activity. To further prove the involvement of NPFF receptors in these seizure-modulating effects, low and high affinity antagonists for the NPFF receptors were tested. We observed that the low affinity ligand failed to exhibit anticonvulsant properties while the two high affinity ligands significantly attenuated the seizures. Continuous NPFF1 receptor agonist administration also inhibited limbic seizures whereas bolus administration of the NPFF1 receptor agonist was without effect. This suggests that continuous agonist perfusion could result in NPFF1 receptor desensitization and mimic NPFF1 receptor antagonist administration. Our data unveil for the first time the involvement of the NPFF system in the management of limbic seizures. PMID:25963417

  15. Neuropeptide FF receptors as novel targets for limbic seizure attenuation.

    PubMed

    Portelli, Jeanelle; Meurs, Alfred; Bihel, Frederic; Hammoud, Hassan; Schmitt, Martine; De Kock, Joery; Utard, Valerie; Humbert, Jean-Paul; Bertin, Isabelle; Buffel, Ine; Coppens, Jessica; Tourwe, Dirk; Maes, Veronique; De Prins, An; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Massie, Ann; Balasubramaniam, Ambikaipakan; Boon, Paul; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Simonin, Frederic; Smolders, Ilse

    2015-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well established anticonvulsant and first-in-class antiepileptic neuropeptide. In this study, the controversial role of NPY1 receptors in epilepsy was reassessed by testing two highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands and a mixed NPY1/NPFF receptor antagonist BIBP3226 in a rat model for limbic seizures. While BIBP3226 significantly attenuated the pilocarpine-induced seizures, neither of the highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands altered the seizure severity. Administration of the NPFF1/NPFF2 receptor antagonist RF9 also significantly attenuated limbic seizure activity. To further prove the involvement of NPFF receptors in these seizure-modulating effects, low and high affinity antagonists for the NPFF receptors were tested. We observed that the low affinity ligand failed to exhibit anticonvulsant properties while the two high affinity ligands significantly attenuated the seizures. Continuous NPFF1 receptor agonist administration also inhibited limbic seizures whereas bolus administration of the NPFF1 receptor agonist was without effect. This suggests that continuous agonist perfusion could result in NPFF1 receptor desensitization and mimic NPFF1 receptor antagonist administration. Our data unveil for the first time the involvement of the NPFF system in the management of limbic seizures.

  16. Synthesis and anticonvulsant activities of novel 2-(cyclopentylmethylene)hydrazinyl-1,3-thiazoles in mouse models of seizures.

    PubMed

    Łączkowski, Krzysztof Z; Sałat, Kinga; Misiura, Konrad; Podkowa, Adrian; Malikowska, Natalia

    2016-12-01

    Synthesis, characterization and investigation of in vivo anticonvulsant activities of 13 novel cyclopentanecarbaldehyde-based 2,4-disubstituted 1,3-thiazoles are presented. Their structures were determined using (1)H and (13)C NMR, FAB(+)-MS, HRMS and elemental analyses. The results of anticonvulsant screening reveal that seven intraperitoneally administered compounds: 3a, 3b, 3d, 3e, 3f, 3k and 3m containing F-, Cl-, Br-, CF3-, CH3- and adamantyl substituents demonstrated significant anticonvulsant activity in the pentylenetetrazole model with median effective doses (ED50) ≤ 20 mg/kg, respectively, which was approximately seven-fold lower than that reported for the reference drug, ethosuximide. Noteworthy, none of these compounds impaired animals' motor skills in the rotarod test.

  17. Seizures Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Dennis

    This guide provides information on seizures in students with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and offers guidelines for classroom management. First, a classification system for seizures is presented with specific types of seizures explained. Post-traumatic seizures are specifically addressed as is the importance of seizure prevention when possible.…

  18. Luteolin prevents uric acid-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Shi, Xuhui; Shuai, Xuanyu; Xu, Yuemei; Liu, Yun; Liang, Xiubin; Wei, Dong; Su, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Elevated uric acid causes direct injury to pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined the effects of luteolin, an important antioxidant, on uric acid-induced β-cell dysfunction. We first evaluated the effect of luteolin on nitric oxide (NO) formation in uric acid-stimulated Min6 cells using the Griess method. Next, we performed transient transfection and reporter assays to measure transcriptional activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Western blotting assays were also performed to assess the effect of luteolin on the expression of MafA and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in uric acid-treated cells. Finally, we evaluated the effect of luteolin on uric acid-induced inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in Min6 cells and freshly isolated mouse pancreatic islets. We found that luteolin significantly inhibited uric acid-induced NO production, which was well correlated with reduced expression of iNOS mRNA and protein. Furthermore, decreased activity of NF-κB was implicated in inhibition by luteolin of increased iNOS expression induced by uric acid. Besides, luteolin significantly increased MafA expression in Min6 cells exposed to uric acid, which was reversed by overexpression of iNOS. Moreover, luteolin prevented uric acid-induced inhibition of GSIS in both Min6 cells and mouse islets. In conclusion, luteolin protects pancreatic β-cells from uric acid-induced dysfunction and may confer benefit on the protection of pancreatic β-cells in hyperuricemia-associated diabetes. PMID:25050113

  19. Disruption of Endocytosis with the Dynamin Mutant shibirets1 Suppresses Seizures in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Jason R.; Wong, Karen G.; Siddiqui, Faria M.; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in modern medicine is to control epilepsies that do not respond to currently available medications. Since seizures consist of coordinated and high-frequency neural activity, our goal was to disrupt neurotransmission with a synaptic transmission mutant and evaluate its ability to suppress seizures. We found that the mutant shibire, encoding dynamin, suppresses seizure-like activity in multiple seizure–sensitive Drosophila genotypes, one of which resembles human intractable epilepsy in several aspects. Because of the requirement of dynamin in endocytosis, increased temperature in the shits1 mutant causes impairment of synaptic vesicle recycling and is associated with suppression of the seizure-like activity. Additionally, we identified the giant fiber neuron as critical in the seizure circuit and sufficient to suppress seizures. Overall, our results implicate mutant dynamin as an effective seizure suppressor, suggesting that targeting or limiting the availability of synaptic vesicles could be an effective and general method of controlling epilepsy disorders. PMID:26341658

  20. A study of the dynamics of seizure propagation across micro domains in the vicinity of the seizure onset zone

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Ishita; Kudela, Pawel; Korzeniewska, Anna; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.; Anderson, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The use of micro-electrode arrays to measure electrical activity from the surface of the brain is increasingly being investigated as a means to improve seizure onset zone localization. In this work, we used a multivariate autoregressive model to determine the evolution of seizure dynamics in the 70 – 110 Hz high frequency band across micro-domains sampled by such micro-electrode arrays. Approach We used 7 complex partial seizures recorded from 4 patients undergoing intracranial monitoring for surgical evaluation to reconstruct the seizure propagation pattern over sliding windows using a directed transfer function measure. Main results We showed that a directed transfer function can be used to estimate the flow of seizure activity in a set of simulated micro-electrode data with known propagation pattern. In general, depending on the location of the micro-electrode grid with respect to the clinical seizure onset zone and the time from seizure onset, ictal propagation changed in directional characteristics over a 2 to 10 seconds time scale, with gross directionality limited to spatial dimensions of approximately 9mm2. It was also seen that the strongest seizure patterns in the high frequency band and their sources over such micro-domains are more stable over time and across seizures bordering the clinically determined seizure onset zone than inside. Significance This type of propagation analysis might in future provide an additional tool to epileptologists for characterizing epileptogenic tissue. This will potentially help narrowing down resection zones without compromising essential brain functions as well as provide important information about targeting anti-epileptic stimulation devices. PMID:26061006

  1. Seizures and Teens: The Practical Aspects of Managing Seizure Medications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne; Israel, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Medications are the primary treatment for epilepsy, yet many teens and their families have problems managing seizure medicines. Fear of side effects, difficulties remembering to take medicines and figuring out how to take them are common challenges. Unfortunately, not taking medicine as prescribed can lead to breakthrough seizures, which in turn…

  2. Early onset of hypersynchronous network activity and expression of a marker of chronic seizures in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bezzina, Charlotte; Verret, Laure; Juan, Cécile; Remaud, Jessica; Halley, Hélène; Rampon, Claire; Dahan, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Cortical and hippocampal hypersynchrony of neuronal networks seems to be an early event in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Many mouse models of the disease also present neuronal network hypersynchrony, as evidenced by higher susceptibility to pharmacologically-induced seizures, electroencephalographic seizures accompanied by spontaneous interictal spikes and expression of markers of chronic seizures such as neuropeptide Y ectopic expression in mossy fibers. This network hypersynchrony is thought to contribute to memory deficits, but whether it precedes the onset of memory deficits or not in mouse models remains unknown. The earliest memory impairments in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease have been observed at 3 months of age. We thus assessed network hypersynchrony in Tg2576 and non-transgenic male mice at 1.5, 3 and 6 months of age. As soon as 1.5 months of age, Tg2576 mice presented higher seizure susceptibility to systemic injection of a GABAA receptor antagonist. They also displayed spontaneous interictal spikes on EEG recordings. Some Tg2576 mice presented hippocampal ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y which incidence seems to increase with age among the Tg2576 population. Our data reveal that network hypersynchrony appears very early in Tg2576 mice, before any demonstrated memory impairments. PMID:25768013

  3. Early Onset of Hypersynchronous Network Activity and Expression of a Marker of Chronic Seizures in the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bezzina, Charlotte; Verret, Laure; Juan, Cécile; Remaud, Jessica; Halley, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Cortical and hippocampal hypersynchrony of neuronal networks seems to be an early event in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis. Many mouse models of the disease also present neuronal network hypersynchrony, as evidenced by higher susceptibility to pharmacologically-induced seizures, electroencephalographic seizures accompanied by spontaneous interictal spikes and expression of markers of chronic seizures such as neuropeptide Y ectopic expression in mossy fibers. This network hypersynchrony is thought to contribute to memory deficits, but whether it precedes the onset of memory deficits or not in mouse models remains unknown. The earliest memory impairments in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease have been observed at 3 months of age. We thus assessed network hypersynchrony in Tg2576 and non-transgenic male mice at 1.5, 3 and 6 months of age. As soon as 1.5 months of age, Tg2576 mice presented higher seizure susceptibility to systemic injection of a GABAA receptor antagonist. They also displayed spontaneous interictal spikes on EEG recordings. Some Tg2576 mice presented hippocampal ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y which incidence seems to increase with age among the Tg2576 population. Our data reveal that network hypersynchrony appears very early in Tg2576 mice, before any demonstrated memory impairments. PMID:25768013

  4. Hemorrhagic Retinopathy Following Spondylosis Surgery and Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Valeshabad, Ali Kord; Francis, Andrew W.; Setlur, Vikram; Chang, Peter; Mieler, William F.; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy in an adult female following lumbar spinal surgery and seizure. Case Report A 38 year old female presented with bilateral blurry vision and spots in the visual field. The patient had lumbar spondylosis surgery which was complicated by a dural tear with persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak. Visual symptoms started immediately following witnessed seizure-like activity. At presentation, visual acuity was 20/100 and 20/25 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination demonstrated bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy with subhyaloid, intraretinal and subretinal involvement. At 4 month follow up, visual acuity improved to 20/60 and 20/20 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination and fundus photography showed resolution of retinal hemorrhages in both eyes. Conclusions The first case of bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy following lumbar spondylosis surgery and witnessed seizure in an adult was reported. Ophthalmic examination may be warranted following episodes of seizure in adults. PMID:26099062

  5. Mianserin and convulsive seizures

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J. Guy; Glen-Bott, Mary

    1983-01-01

    1 Forty patients have been reported to the Committee on Safety of Medicines (CSM) because of convulsions occurring during treatment with mianserin, suggesting that this drug is more epileptogenic than tricyclic antidepressants. 2 Details concerning 83% of these cases were obtained in a questionnaire study carried out in collaboration with the CSM and compared with those of a control group. 3 Ratings of the relationship between drug and effect carried out by neurologists and J.G.E. showed considerable variations and confidence of a causal connection in only a minority of patients. 4 As the CSM data do not allow for a reliable assessment of the relative epileptogenic effects of antidepressants, a comparison has been made between unpublished work on seizures occurring during treatment with imipramine and amitriptyline and published research on mianserin. This suggests that mianserin is no more epileptogenic than tricyclic antidepressants. 5 Factors that might predispose to seizures include relevant family and past medical history, starting treatment, a change in dose, benzodiazepine withdrawal and concomitant treatment with other drugs that have epileptogenic properties. PMID:6824561

  6. Convulsive seizures from experimental focal cortical dysplasia occur independently of cell misplacement

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Lawrence S.; Wen, John H.; Claycomb, Kumiko; Huang, Yuegao; Harrsch, Felicia A.; Naegele, Janice R.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Buchanan, Gordon F.; Bordey, Angelique

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), a local malformation of cortical development, is the most common cause of pharmacoresistant epilepsy associated with life-long neurocognitive impairments. It remains unclear whether neuronal misplacement is required for seizure activity. Here we show that dyslamination and white matter heterotopia are not necessary for seizure generation in a murine model of type II FCDs. These experimental FCDs generated by increasing mTOR activity in layer 2/3 neurons of the medial prefrontal cortex are associated with tonic-clonic seizures and a normal survival rate. Preventing all FCD-related defects, including neuronal misplacement and dysmorphogenesis, with rapamycin treatments from birth eliminates seizures, but seizures recur after rapamycin withdrawal. In addition, bypassing neuronal misplacement and heterotopia using inducible vectors do not prevent seizure occurrence. Collectively, data obtained using our new experimental FCD-associated epilepsy suggest that life-long treatment to reduce neuronal dysmorphogenesis is required to suppress seizures in individuals with FCD. PMID:27249187

  7. The ictal wavefront is the spatiotemporal source of discharges during spontaneous human seizures

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elliot H.; Liou, Jyun-you; Davis, Tyler S.; Merricks, Edward M.; Kellis, Spencer S.; Weiss, Shennan A.; Greger, Bradley; House, Paul A.; McKhann II, Guy M.; Goodman, Robert R.; Emerson, Ronald G.; Bateman, Lisa M.; Trevelyan, Andrew J.; Schevon, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    The extensive distribution and simultaneous termination of seizures across cortical areas has led to the hypothesis that seizures are caused by large-scale coordinated networks spanning these areas. This view, however, is difficult to reconcile with most proposed mechanisms of seizure spread and termination, which operate on a cellular scale. We hypothesize that seizures evolve into self-organized structures wherein a small seizing territory projects high-intensity electrical signals over a broad cortical area. Here we investigate human seizures on both small and large electrophysiological scales. We show that the migrating edge of the seizing territory is the source of travelling waves of synaptic activity into adjacent cortical areas. As the seizure progresses, slow dynamics in induced activity from these waves indicate a weakening and eventual failure of their source. These observations support a parsimonious theory for how large-scale evolution and termination of seizures are driven from a small, migrating cortical area. PMID:27020798

  8. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism.

  9. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism. PMID:26551768

  10. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Laali, Abolghasem; Nosrati, Nazanin; Jahani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS) lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20–25 cc) lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure. PMID:25709968

  11. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion.

    PubMed

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Laali, Abolghasem; Nosrati, Nazanin; Jahani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS) lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20-25 cc) lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure. PMID:25709968

  12. Unsaturated fatty acids induce non-canonical autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Niso-Santano, Mireia; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Pietrocola, Federico; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Mariño, Guillermo; Cianfanelli, Valentina; Ben-Younès, Amena; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Markaki, Maria; Sica, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Chaba, Kariman; Bauvy, Chantal; Dupont, Nicolas; Kepp, Oliver; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Wolinski, Heimo; Madeo, Frank; Lavandero, Sergio; Codogno, Patrice; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Cecconi, Francesco; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-01-01

    To obtain mechanistic insights into the cross talk between lipolysis and autophagy, two key metabolic responses to starvation, we screened the autophagy-inducing potential of a panel of fatty acids in human cancer cells. Both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids such as palmitate and oleate, respectively, triggered autophagy, but the underlying molecular mechanisms differed. Oleate, but not palmitate, stimulated an autophagic response that required an intact Golgi apparatus. Conversely, autophagy triggered by palmitate, but not oleate, required AMPK, PKR and JNK1 and involved the activation of the BECN1/PIK3C3 lipid kinase complex. Accordingly, the downregulation of BECN1 and PIK3C3 abolished palmitate-induced, but not oleate-induced, autophagy in human cancer cells. Moreover, Becn1+/− mice as well as yeast cells and nematodes lacking the ortholog of human BECN1 mounted an autophagic response to oleate, but not palmitate. Thus, unsaturated fatty acids induce a non-canonical, phylogenetically conserved, autophagic response that in mammalian cells relies on the Golgi apparatus. PMID:25586377

  13. Characterization of salicylic acid-induced genes in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Park, Y-S; Min, H-J; Ryang, S-H; Oh, K-J; Cha, J-S; Kim, H Y; Cho, T-J

    2003-06-01

    Salicylic acid is a messenger molecule in the activation of defense responses in plants. In this study, we isolated four cDNA clones representing salicylic acid-induced genes in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis) by subtractive hybridization. Of the four clones, the BC5-2 clone encodes a putative glucosyltransferase protein. The BC5-3 clone is highly similar to an Arabidopsis gene encoding a putative metal-binding farnesylated protein. The BC6-1 clone is a chitinase gene with similarities to a rapeseed class IV chitinase. Class IV chitinases have deletions in the chitin-binding and catalytic domains and the BC6-1 chitinase has an additional deletion in the catalytic domain. The BCP8-1 clone is most homologous to an Arabidopsis gene that contains a tandem array of two thiJ-like sequences. These four cabbage genes were barely expressed in healthy leaves, but were strongly induced by salicylic acid and benzothiadiazole. Expression of the three genes represented by the BC5-2, BC5-3 and BCP8-1 clones were also induced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, a nonhost pathogen that elicits a hypersensitive response in Chinese cabbage. None of these four genes, however, was strongly induced by methyl jasmonate or by ethylene.

  14. Musical hallucinations associated with seizures originating from an intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D L; Tatini, U; Zimmerman, R S; Bortz, J J; Sirven, J I

    2001-04-01

    Hallucinations are defined as sensory phenomena in the absence of external sensory stimuli. Auditory hallucinations have been shown to arise from many different intracranial lesions, but seizures manifesting as musical hallucinations triggered by unruptured intracranial aneurysms are rare. We present a case of persistent, episodic musical hallucinations associated with seizures that led to the discovery of 2 small intracranial aneurysms. Typical electroencephalographic findings for seizure activity were observed but resolved after surgical clipping of the aneurysms. Concomitantly, the patient's hallucinations resolved. The literature on musical hallucinations is reviewed. PMID:11322359

  15. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot. PMID:26662874

  16. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  17. Increased seizure latency and decreased severity of pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in mice after essential oil administration.

    PubMed

    Koutroumanidou, Eleni; Kimbaris, Athanasios; Kortsaris, Alexandros; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Polissiou, Moschos; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos; Pagonopoulou, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pretreatment with essential oils (EOs) from eight aromatic plants on the seizure latency and severity of pentylenetetrazol- (PTZ-) induced seizures in mice was evaluated. Weight-dependent doses of Rosmarinus officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha spicata, Mentha pulegium, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha piperita, Origanum dictamnus, and Origanum vulgare, isolated from the respective aromatic plants from NE Greece, were administered 60 minutes prior to intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of a lethal dose of PTZ to eight respective groups of Balb-c mice. Control group received only one i.p. PTZ injection. Motor and behavioral activity of the animals after EOs administration, development of tonic-clonic seizures, seizure latency and severity, and percentage of survival after PTZ administration were determined for each group. All groups of mice treated with the EOs showed reduced activity and stability after the administration of the oil, except for those treated with O. vulgare (100% mortality after the administration of the oil). After PTZ administration, mice from the different groups showed increased latency and reduced severity of seizures (ranging from simple twitches to complete seizures). Mice who had received M. piperita demonstrated no seizures and 100% survival. The different drastic component and its concentration could account for the diversity of anticonvulsant effects. PMID:23819045

  18. A study of the dynamics of seizure propagation across micro domains in the vicinity of the seizure onset zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Ishita; Kudela, Pawel; Korzeniewska, Anna; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.; Anderson, William S.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The use of micro-electrode arrays to measure electrical activity from the surface of the brain is increasingly being investigated as a means to improve seizure onset zone (SOZ) localization. In this work, we used a multivariate autoregressive model to determine the evolution of seizure dynamics in the 70-110 Hz high frequency band across micro-domains sampled by such micro-electrode arrays. We showed that a directed transfer function (DTF) can be used to estimate the flow of seizure activity in a set of simulated micro-electrode data with known propagation pattern. Approach. We used seven complex partial seizures recorded from four patients undergoing intracranial monitoring for surgical evaluation to reconstruct the seizure propagation pattern over sliding windows using a DTF measure. Main results. We showed that a DTF can be used to estimate the flow of seizure activity in a set of simulated micro-electrode data with a known propagation pattern. In general, depending on the location of the micro-electrode grid with respect to the clinical SOZ and the time from seizure onset, ictal propagation changed in directional characteristics over a 2-10 s time scale, with gross directionality limited to spatial dimensions of approximately 9 m{{m}2}. It was also seen that the strongest seizure patterns in the high frequency band and their sources over such micro-domains are more stable over time and across seizures bordering the clinically determined SOZ than inside. Significance. This type of propagation analysis might in future provide an additional tool to epileptologists for characterizing epileptogenic tissue. This will potentially help narrowing down resection zones without compromising essential brain functions as well as provide important information about targeting anti-epileptic stimulation devices.

  19. Audiogenic reflex seizures in cats

    PubMed Central

    Lowrie, Mark; Bessant, Claire; Harvey, Robert J; Sparkes, Andrew; Garosi, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to characterise feline audiogenic reflex seizures (FARS). Methods An online questionnaire was developed to capture information from owners with cats suffering from FARS. This was collated with the medical records from the primary veterinarian. Ninety-six cats were included. Results Myoclonic seizures were one of the cardinal signs of this syndrome (90/96), frequently occurring prior to generalised tonic–clonic seizures (GTCSs) in this population. Other features include a late onset (median 15 years) and absence seizures (6/96), with most seizures triggered by high-frequency sounds amid occasional spontaneous seizures (up to 20%). Half the population (48/96) had hearing impairment or were deaf. One-third of cats (35/96) had concurrent diseases, most likely reflecting the age distribution. Birmans were strongly represented (30/96). Levetiracetam gave good seizure control. The course of the epilepsy was non-progressive in the majority (68/96), with an improvement over time in some (23/96). Only 33/96 and 11/90 owners, respectively, felt the GTCSs and myoclonic seizures affected their cat’s quality of life (QoL). Despite this, many owners (50/96) reported a slow decline in their cat’s health, becoming less responsive (43/50), not jumping (41/50), becoming uncoordinated or weak in the pelvic limbs (24/50) and exhibiting dramatic weight loss (39/50). These signs were exclusively reported in cats experiencing seizures for >2 years, with 42/50 owners stating these signs affected their cat’s QoL. Conclusions and relevance In gathering data on audiogenic seizures in cats, we have identified a new epilepsy syndrome named FARS with a geriatric onset. Further studies are warranted to investigate potential genetic predispositions to this condition. PMID:25916687

  20. Nonepileptic seizures: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Perez, David L; LaFrance, W Curt

    2016-06-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are a functional neurological disorder/conversion disorder subtype, which are neurobehavioral conditions at the interface of neurology and psychiatry. Significant advancements over the past decade have been made in the diagnosis, management, and neurobiological understanding of PNES. This article reviews published PNES research focusing on semiologic features that distinguish PNES from epileptic seizures, consensus diagnostic criteria, the intersection of PNES and other comorbidities, neurobiological studies, evidence-based treatment interventions, and outcome studies. Epidemiology and healthcare utilization studies highlight a continued unmet medical need in the comprehensive care of PNES. Consensus guidelines for diagnostic certainty are based on clinical history, semiology of witnessed typical event(s), and EEG findings. While certain semiologic features may aid in the diagnosis of PNES, the gold standard remains capturing a typical event on video electroencephalography (EEG) showing the absence of epileptiform activity with history and semiology consistent with PNES. Medical-neurologic and psychiatric comorbidities are prevalent in PNES; these should be assessed in diagnostic evaluations and integrated into treatment interventions and prognostic considerations. Several studies, including a pilot, multicenter, randomized clinical trial, have now demonstrated that a cognitive behavioral therapy-informed psychotherapy is an efficacious treatment for PNES, and additional efforts are necessary to evaluate the utility of pharmacologic and other psychotherapy treatments. Neuroimaging studies, while requiring replication, suggest that PNES may occur in the context of alterations within and across sensorimotor, emotion regulation/processing, cognitive control, and multimodal integration brain systems. Future research could investigate similarities and differences between PNES and other somatic symptom disorders.

  1. Nonepileptic seizures: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Perez, David L; LaFrance, W Curt

    2016-06-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are a functional neurological disorder/conversion disorder subtype, which are neurobehavioral conditions at the interface of neurology and psychiatry. Significant advancements over the past decade have been made in the diagnosis, management, and neurobiological understanding of PNES. This article reviews published PNES research focusing on semiologic features that distinguish PNES from epileptic seizures, consensus diagnostic criteria, the intersection of PNES and other comorbidities, neurobiological studies, evidence-based treatment interventions, and outcome studies. Epidemiology and healthcare utilization studies highlight a continued unmet medical need in the comprehensive care of PNES. Consensus guidelines for diagnostic certainty are based on clinical history, semiology of witnessed typical event(s), and EEG findings. While certain semiologic features may aid in the diagnosis of PNES, the gold standard remains capturing a typical event on video electroencephalography (EEG) showing the absence of epileptiform activity with history and semiology consistent with PNES. Medical-neurologic and psychiatric comorbidities are prevalent in PNES; these should be assessed in diagnostic evaluations and integrated into treatment interventions and prognostic considerations. Several studies, including a pilot, multicenter, randomized clinical trial, have now demonstrated that a cognitive behavioral therapy-informed psychotherapy is an efficacious treatment for PNES, and additional efforts are necessary to evaluate the utility of pharmacologic and other psychotherapy treatments. Neuroimaging studies, while requiring replication, suggest that PNES may occur in the context of alterations within and across sensorimotor, emotion regulation/processing, cognitive control, and multimodal integration brain systems. Future research could investigate similarities and differences between PNES and other somatic symptom disorders. PMID:26996600

  2. Treating acute seizures with benzodiazepines: does seizure duration matter?

    PubMed

    Naylor, David E

    2014-10-01

    Several clinical trials have shown improved seizure control and outcome by early initiation of treatment with benzodiazepines, before arrival in the emergency department and before intravenous access can be established. Here, evidence is provided and reviewed for rapid treatment of acute seizures in order to avoid the development of benzodiazepine pharmacoresistance and the emergence of self-sustaining status epilepticus. Alterations in the physiology, pharmacology, and postsynaptic level of GABA-A receptors can develop within minutes to an hour and hinder the ability of synaptic inhibition to stop seizures while also impairing the efficacy of GABAergic agents, such as benzodiazepines, to boost impaired inhibition. In addition, heightened excitatory transmission further exacerbates the inhibitory/excitatory balance and makes seizure control even more resistant to treatment. The acute increase in the surface expression of NMDA receptors during prolonged seizures also may cause excitotoxic injury, cell death, and other pathological expressions and re-arrangements of receptor subunits that all contribute to long-term sequelae such as cognitive impairment and chronic epilepsy. In conclusion, a short window of opportunity exists when seizures are maximally controlled by first-line benzodiazepine treatment. After that, multiple pathological mechanisms quickly become engaged that make seizures increasingly more difficult to control with high risk for long-term harm.

  3. Effects of hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures on acute hippocampal injury and later-life seizure susceptibility and anxiety-related behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Alvarez, Natalia; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Dunleavy, Mark; Waddington, John L; Boylan, Geraldine B; Henshall, David C

    2015-11-01

    Seizures are common during the neonatal period, often due to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and may contribute to acute brain injury and the subsequent development of cognitive deficits and childhood epilepsy. Here we explored short- and long-term consequences of neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures in 7 day old C57BL/6J mice. Seizure activity, molecular markers of hypoxia and histological injury were investigated acutely after hypoxia and response to chemoconvulsants and animal behaviour was explored at adulthood. Hypoxia was induced by exposing pups to 5% oxygen for 15 min (global hypoxia). Electrographically defined seizures with behavioral correlates occurred in 95% of these animals and seizures persisted for many minutes after restitution of normoxia. There was minimal morbidity or mortality. Pre- or post-hypoxia injection of phenobarbital (50mg/kg) had limited efficacy at suppressing seizures. The hippocampus from neonatal hypoxia-seizure mice displayed increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the immediate early gene c-fos, minimal histological evidence of cell injury and activation of caspase-3 in scattered neurons. Behavioral analysis of mice five weeks after hypoxia-induced seizures detected novel anxiety-related and other behaviors, while performance in a spatial memory test was similar to controls. Seizure threshold tests with kainic acid at six weeks revealed that mice previously subject to neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures developed earlier, more frequent and longer-duration seizures. This study defines a set of electro-clinical, molecular, pharmacological and behavioral consequences of hypoxia-induced seizures that indicate short- and long-term deleterious outcomes and may be a useful model to investigate the pathophysiology and treatment of neonatal seizures in humans.

  4. Effects of hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures on acute hippocampal injury and later-life seizure susceptibility and anxiety-related behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Alvarez, Natalia; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Dunleavy, Mark; Waddington, John L; Boylan, Geraldine B; Henshall, David C

    2015-11-01

    Seizures are common during the neonatal period, often due to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and may contribute to acute brain injury and the subsequent development of cognitive deficits and childhood epilepsy. Here we explored short- and long-term consequences of neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures in 7 day old C57BL/6J mice. Seizure activity, molecular markers of hypoxia and histological injury were investigated acutely after hypoxia and response to chemoconvulsants and animal behaviour was explored at adulthood. Hypoxia was induced by exposing pups to 5% oxygen for 15 min (global hypoxia). Electrographically defined seizures with behavioral correlates occurred in 95% of these animals and seizures persisted for many minutes after restitution of normoxia. There was minimal morbidity or mortality. Pre- or post-hypoxia injection of phenobarbital (50mg/kg) had limited efficacy at suppressing seizures. The hippocampus from neonatal hypoxia-seizure mice displayed increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the immediate early gene c-fos, minimal histological evidence of cell injury and activation of caspase-3 in scattered neurons. Behavioral analysis of mice five weeks after hypoxia-induced seizures detected novel anxiety-related and other behaviors, while performance in a spatial memory test was similar to controls. Seizure threshold tests with kainic acid at six weeks revealed that mice previously subject to neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures developed earlier, more frequent and longer-duration seizures. This study defines a set of electro-clinical, molecular, pharmacological and behavioral consequences of hypoxia-induced seizures that indicate short- and long-term deleterious outcomes and may be a useful model to investigate the pathophysiology and treatment of neonatal seizures in humans. PMID:26341542

  5. A mouse model of tuberous sclerosis: neuronal loss of Tsc1 causes dysplastic and ectopic neurons, reduced myelination, seizure activity, and limited survival.

    PubMed

    Meikle, Lynsey; Talos, Delia M; Onda, Hiroaki; Pollizzi, Kristen; Rotenberg, Alexander; Sahin, Mustafa; Jensen, Frances E; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2007-05-23

    Tuberous sclerosis (TSC) is a hamartoma syndrome caused by mutations in TSC1 or TSC2 in which cerebral cortical tubers and seizures are major clinical issues. We have engineered mice in which most cortical neurons lose Tsc1 expression during embryonic development. These Tsc1 mutant mice display several neurological abnormalities beginning at postnatal day 5 with subsequent failure to thrive and median survival of 35 d. The mice also display clinical and electrographic seizures both spontaneously and with physical stimulation, and some seizures end in a fatal tonic phase. Many cortical and hippocampal neurons are enlarged and/or dysplastic in the Tsc1 mutant mice, strongly express phospho-S6, and are ectopic in multiple sites in the cortex and hippocampus. There is a striking delay in myelination in the mutant mice, which appears to be caused by an inductive neuronal defect. This new TSC brain model replicates several features of human TSC brain lesions and implicates an important function of Tsc1/Tsc2 in neuronal development.

  6. Seizures and brain regulatory systems: Consciousness, sleep, and autonomic systems

    PubMed Central

    Sedigh-Sarvestani, Madineh; Blumenfeld, Hal; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Bateman, Lisa M

    2014-01-01

    Research into the physiological underpinnings of epilepsy has revealed reciprocal relationships between seizures and the activity of several regulatory systems in the brain, including those governing sleep, consciousness and autonomic functions. This review highlights recent progress in understanding and utilizing the relationships between seizures and the arousal or consciousness system, the sleep-wake and associated circadian system, and the central autonomic network. PMID:25233249

  7. Oxygen desaturations triggered by partial seizures: implications for cardiopulmonary instability in epilepsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, A. S.; Ives, J. R.; Goldberger, A. L.; Al-Aweel, I. C.; Krishnamurthy, K. B.; Drislane, F. W.; Schomer, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: The occurrence of hypoxemia in adults with partial seizures has not been systematically explored. Our aim was to study in detail the temporal dynamics of this specific type of ictal-associated hypoxemia. METHODS: During long-term video/EEG monitoring (LTM), patients underwent monitoring of oxygen saturation using a digital Spo2 (pulse oximeter) transducer. Six patients (nine seizures) were identified with oxygen desaturations after the onset of partial seizure activity. RESULTS: Complex partial seizures originated from both left and right temporal lobes. Mean seizure duration (+/-SD) was 73 +/- 18 s. Mean Spo2 desaturation duration was 76 +/- 19 s. The onset of oxygen desaturation followed seizure onset with a mean delay of 43 +/- 16 s. Mean (+/-SD) Spo2 nadir was 83 +/- 5% (range, 77-91%), occurring an average of 35 +/- 12 s after the onset of the desaturation. One seizure was associated with prolonged and recurrent Spo2 desaturations. CONCLUSIONS: Partial seizures may be associated with prominent oxygen desaturations. The comparable duration of each seizure and its subsequent desaturation suggests a close mechanistic (possibly causal) relation. Spo2 monitoring provides an added means for seizure detection that may increase LTM yield. These observations also raise the possibility that ictal ventilatory dysfunction could play a role in certain cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy in adults with partial seizures.

  8. Impaired Serotonergic Brainstem Function during and after Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Qiong; Buchanan, Gordon F.; Motelow, Joshua E.; Andrews, John; Vitkovskiy, Petr; Chen, William C.; Serout, Florian; Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Kundishora, Adam; Furman, Moran; Li, Wei; Bo, Xiao; Richerson, George B.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired breathing, cardiac function, and arousal during and after seizures are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Previous work suggests that these changes are associated with depressed brainstem function in the ictal and post-ictal periods. Lower brainstem serotonergic systems are postulated to play an important role in cardiorespiratory changes during and after seizures, whereas upper brainstem serotonergic and other systems regulate arousal. However, direct demonstration of seizure-associated neuronal activity changes in brainstem serotonergic regions has been lacking. Here, we performed multiunit and single-unit recordings from medullary raphe and midbrain dorsal raphe nuclei in an established rat seizure model while measuring changes in breathing rate and depth as well as heart rate. Serotonergic neurons were identified by immunohistochemistry. Respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute ventilation were all significantly decreased during and after seizures in this model. We found that population firing of neurons in the medullary and midbrain raphe on multiunit recordings was significantly decreased during the ictal and post-ictal periods. Single-unit recordings from identified serotonergic neurons in the medullary raphe revealed highly consistently decreased firing during and after seizures. In contrast, firing of midbrain raphe serotonergic neurons was more variable, with a mixture of increases and decreases. The markedly suppressed firing of medullary serotonergic neurons supports their possible role in simultaneously impaired cardiorespiratory function in seizures. Decreased arousal likely arises from depressed population activity of several neuronal pools in the upper brainstem and forebrain. These findings have important implications for preventing morbidity and mortality in people living with epilepsy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Seizures often cause impaired breathing, cardiac dysfunction, and loss of consciousness. The brainstem and

  9. Anticonvulsant activity of novel 1-(substituted benzylidene)-4-(1-(morpholino/piperidino methyl)-2,3-dioxoindolin-5-yl) semicarbazide derivatives in mice and rats acute seizure models.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Chinnasamy Rajaram; Raja, Sundararajan; Saravanan, Govindaraj

    2012-10-01

    A series of novel 1-(substituted benzylidene)-4-(1-(morpholino/piperidino methyl)-2,3-dioxoindolin-5-yl) semicarbazides 6a-6t was designed and synthesized on the basis of semicarbazide-based pharmacophoric model to meet the structural requirements necessary for anticonvulsant activity. The compounds were subjected to in vivo antiepileptic evaluation using maximal electroshock test and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole seizure test methods. The neurotoxicity was determined by rotorod test. In the preliminary screening, compounds 6c, 6d, 6g, 6h, and 6m were found active in maximal electroshock test model, while 6g, 6i, 6m, and 6o showed significant antiepileptic activity in subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole seizure test model. Further, the compounds 6c, 6d, 6g, 6h, 6i, and 6m were administered orally to rats, of which 6c and 6g showed better activity than phenytoin. Among the synthesized compounds, 6g revealed excellent protection in both models with lower neurotoxicity. PMID:22540392

  10. Docosahexaenoic acid induces increases in [Ca2+]i via inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate production and activates protein kinase C gamma and -delta via phosphatidylserine binding site: implication in apoptosis in U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Aires, Virginie; Hichami, Aziz; Filomenko, Rodolphe; Plé, Aude; Rébé, Cédric; Bettaieb, Ali; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2007-12-01

    We investigated, in monocytic leukemia U937 cells, the effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6 n-3) on calcium signaling and determined the implication of phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) in this pathway. DHA induced dose-dependent increases in [Ca2+]i, which were contributed by intracellular pool, via the production of inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and store-operated Ca2+ (SOC) influx, via opening of Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels. Chemical inhibition of PLC, PKCgamma, and PKCdelta, but not of PKCbeta I/II, PKCalpha, or PKCbetaI, significantly diminished DHA-induced increases in [Ca2+]i. In vitro PKC assays revealed that DHA induced a approximately 2-fold increase in PKCgamma and -delta activities, which were temporally correlated with the DHA-induced increases in [Ca2+]i. In cell-free assays, DHA, but not other structural analogs of fatty acids, activated these PKC isoforms. Competition experiments revealed that DHA-induced activation of both the PKCs was dose-dependently inhibited by phosphatidylserine (PS). Furthermore, DHA induced apoptosis via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, followed by caspase-3 activation. Chemical inhibition of PKCgamma/delta and of SOC/CRAC channels significantly attenuated both DHA-stimulated ROS production and caspase-3 activity. Our study suggests that DHA-induced activation of PLC/IP3 pathway and activation of PKCgamma/delta, via its action on PS binding site, may be involved in apoptosis in U937 cells.

  11. Mapping preictal networks preceding childhood absence seizures using magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Jacobs-Brichford, Eliza; Horn, Paul S; Tenney, Jeffrey R

    2014-10-01

    The electrographic hallmark of childhood absence seizures is 3 Hz generalized spike and wave discharges; however, there is likely a focal thalamic or cortical onset that cannot be detected using scalp electroencephalography (EEG). The purpose of this study was to study the earliest preictal changes in children with absence epilepsy. In this report, magnetoencephalography recordings of 44 absence seizures recorded from 12 children with drug-naïve childhood absence seizures were used to perform time frequency analysis and source localization prior to the onset of the seizures. Evidence of preictal magnetoencephalography frequency changes were detected a mean of 694 ms before the initial spike on the EEG. A consistent pattern of focal sources was present in the frontal cortex and thalamus during this preictal period, but source localization occurred synchronously so that independent activity between the 2 structures could not be distinguished.

  12. Nitric Oxide Regulates Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus following Seizures.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Bruno P; Santos, Daniela F; Santos, Ana I; Carvalho, Caetana M; Araújo, Inês M

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis is changed by brain injury. When neuroinflammation accompanies injury, activation of resident microglial cells promotes the release of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species like nitric oxide (NO). In these conditions, NO promotes proliferation of neural stem cells (NSC) in the hippocampus. However, little is known about the role of NO in the survival and differentiation of newborn cells in the injured dentate gyrus. Here we investigated the role of NO following seizures in the regulation of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival of NSC in the hippocampus using the kainic acid (KA) induced seizure mouse model. We show that NO increased the proliferation of NSC and the number of neuroblasts following seizures but was detrimental to the survival of newborn neurons. NO was also required for the maintenance of long-term neuroinflammation. Taken together, our data show that NO positively contributes to the initial stages of neurogenesis following seizures but compromises survival of newborn neurons.

  13. Semiological seizure classification: before and after video-EEG monitoring of seizures.

    PubMed

    Hirfanoglu, Tugba; Serdaroglu, Ayse; Cansu, Ali; Bilir, Erhan; Gucuyener, Kivilcim

    2007-04-01

    The study objective was to assess the applicability and reliability of the semiological seizure classification in children with epilepsy in outpatient clinics. Ninety patients (age range, 2-16 years) who experienced clinical seizures during prolonged video-electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring were evaluated. Semiological seizure classification was performed, first based on history obtained from parents of the patient during outpatient follow-up visits and then based on video EEG-monitoring. Kappa statistics (kappa) were used to evaluate the consistency of the two rounds of semiological seizure classification. Classification based on history yielded the following distribution: simple motor seizures (66.3%), aura (28%), complex motor seizures (15.8%), special seizures (15.8%), dialeptic seizures (9.3%), and autonomic seizures (3.7%). Classification based on video EEG-monitoring yielded a different distribution: simple motor seizures (55.7%), complex motor seizures (26.9%), automotor seizures (26.9%), aura (23%), dialeptic seizures (22.1%), special seizures (9.6%), and autonomic seizures (1.9%). Negative myoclonic seizures (kappa = 1, P = 0.000) and hypermotor seizures (kappa = 0.85, P = 0.000) had excellent consistency; somatosensory aura (kappa = 0.26, P = 0.012) and automotor seizures (kappa = 0.28, P = 0.004) had the lowest consistency. The families or doctors often defined simple motor seizures (decrease of 10.6% from before to after monitoring, kappa = 0.44); the proportion of complex motor seizures changed rather from before to after monitoring (11.1%, kappa = 0.33). Generally, parents can describe seizures quite well. We suggest that semiological seizure classification is a reliable method applicable for everyday use during outpatient visits, especially if seizure semiology is evaluated individually for each component or if the semiological seizure classification is modified or refined for some seizure components (tonic, clonic, versive, conscious, automotor

  14. Imposed glutathione-mediated redox switch modulates the tobacco wound-induced protein kinase and salicylic acid-induced protein kinase activation state and impacts on defence against Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Matern, Sanja; Peskan-Berghoefer, Tatjana; Gromes, Roland; Kiesel, Rebecca Vazquez; Rausch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The role of the redox-active tripeptide glutathione in plant defence against pathogens has been studied extensively; however, the impact of changes in cellular glutathione redox potential on signalling processes during defence reactions has remained elusive. This study explored the impact of elevated glutathione content on the cytosolic redox potential and on early defence signalling at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as on subsequent defence reactions, including changes in salicylic acid (SA) content, pathogenesis-related gene expression, callose depositions, and the hypersensitive response. Wild-type (WT) Nicotiana tabacum L. and transgenic high-glutathione lines (HGL) were transformed with the cytosol-targeted sensor GRX1-roGFP2 to monitor the cytosolic redox state. Surprisingly, HGLs displayed an oxidative shift in their cytosolic redox potential and an activation of the tobacco MAPKs wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) and SA-induced protein kinase (SIPK). This activation occurred in the absence of any change in free SA content, but was accompanied by constitutively increased expression of several defence genes. Similarly, rapid activation of MAPKs could be induced in WT tobacco by exposure to either reduced or oxidized glutathione. When HGL plants were challenged with adapted or non-adapted Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, the cytosolic redox shift was further amplified and the defence response was markedly increased, showing a priming effect for SA and callose; however, the initial and transient hyperactivation of MAPK signalling was attenuated in HGLs. The results suggest that, in tobacco, MAPK and SA signalling may operate independently, both possibly being modulated by the glutathione redox potential. Possible mechanisms for redox-mediated MAPK activation are discussed. PMID:25628332

  15. Imposed glutathione-mediated redox switch modulates the tobacco wound-induced protein kinase and salicylic acid-induced protein kinase activation state and impacts on defence against Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Matern, Sanja; Peskan-Berghoefer, Tatjana; Gromes, Roland; Kiesel, Rebecca Vazquez; Rausch, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The role of the redox-active tripeptide glutathione in plant defence against pathogens has been studied extensively; however, the impact of changes in cellular glutathione redox potential on signalling processes during defence reactions has remained elusive. This study explored the impact of elevated glutathione content on the cytosolic redox potential and on early defence signalling at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as on subsequent defence reactions, including changes in salicylic acid (SA) content, pathogenesis-related gene expression, callose depositions, and the hypersensitive response. Wild-type (WT) Nicotiana tabacum L. and transgenic high-glutathione lines (HGL) were transformed with the cytosol-targeted sensor GRX1-roGFP2 to monitor the cytosolic redox state. Surprisingly, HGLs displayed an oxidative shift in their cytosolic redox potential and an activation of the tobacco MAPKs wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) and SA-induced protein kinase (SIPK). This activation occurred in the absence of any change in free SA content, but was accompanied by constitutively increased expression of several defence genes. Similarly, rapid activation of MAPKs could be induced in WT tobacco by exposure to either reduced or oxidized glutathione. When HGL plants were challenged with adapted or non-adapted Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, the cytosolic redox shift was further amplified and the defence response was markedly increased, showing a priming effect for SA and callose; however, the initial and transient hyperactivation of MAPK signalling was attenuated in HGLs. The results suggest that, in tobacco, MAPK and SA signalling may operate independently, both possibly being modulated by the glutathione redox potential. Possible mechanisms for redox-mediated MAPK activation are discussed.

  16. Local cerebral metabolism during partial seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.; Rausch, R.; Nuwer, M.

    1983-04-01

    Interictal and ictal fluorodeoxyglucose scans were obtained with positron CT from four patients with spontaneous recurrent partial seizures, one with epilepsia partialis continua, and one with a single partial seizure induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus. Ictal metabolic patterns were different for each patient studied. Focal and generalized increased and decreased metabolism were observed. Ictal hypermetabolism may exceed six times the interictal rate and could represent activation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses in the epileptogenic region and its projection fields. Hypometabolism seen on ictal scans most likely reflects postictal depression and may indicate projection fields of inhibited neurons. No quantitative relationship between alterations in metabolism and EEG or behavioral measurements of ictal events could be demonstrated.

  17. Occipital seizures imitating migraine aura.

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotopoulos, C P; Sharoqi, I A; Agathonikou, A

    1997-01-01

    Three cases are reported in which symptoms of occipital seizures resembled the visual aura of migraine. Careful recording of the characteristics and timing of such visual effects will often resolve the diagnostic dilemma. PMID:9204019

  18. Interferon regulatory factor-1 binds c-Cbl, enhances mitogen activated protein kinase signaling and promotes retinoic acid-induced differentiation of HL-60 human myelo-monoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Miaoqing; Bunaciu, Rodica P; Congleton, Johanna; Jensen, Holly A; Sayam, Lavanya G; Varner, Jeffrey D; Yen, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (RA) and interferons (IFNs) have efficacy in treating certain leukemias and lymphomas, respectively, motivating interest in their mechanism of action to improve therapy. Both RA and IFNs induce interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1). We find that in HL-60 myeloblastic leukemia cells which undergo mitogen activated protien kinase (MAPK)-dependent myeloid differentiation in response to RA, IRF-1 propels differentiation. RA induces MAPK-dependent expression of IRF-1. IRF-1 binds c-Cbl, a MAPK related adaptor. Ectopic IRF-1 expression causes CD38 expression and activation of the Raf/MEK/ERK axis, and enhances RA-induced differentiation by augmenting CD38, CD11b, respiratory burst and G0 arrest. Ectopic IRF-1 expression also decreases the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, a stem cell marker, and enhances RA-induced ALDH1 down-regulation. Interestingly, expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which is RA-induced and known to down-regulate Oct4 and drive RA-induced differentiation, also enhances IRF-1 expression. The data are consistent with a model whereby IRF-1 acts downstream of RA and AhR to enhance Raf/MEK/ERK activation and propel differentiation.

  19. Ranolazine overdose-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Akil, Nour; Bottei, Edward; Kamath, Sameer

    2015-12-01

    Ranolazine is a new anti-anginal medication that was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2006 for patients with symptomatic chronic angina despite optimized therapy. This paper presents a case report of a fifteen year old male patient admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit after ranolazine overdose ingestion. He had recurrent new onset seizures that are most likely due to ranolazine overdose. Seizures have never been reported with ranolazine use or abuse. PMID:26072257

  20. Reflex seizures, traits, and epilepsies: from physiology to pathology.

    PubMed

    Koepp, Matthias J; Caciagli, Lorenzo; Pressler, Ronit M; Lehnertz, Klaus; Beniczky, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are generally unpredictable and arise spontaneously. Patients often report non-specific triggers such as stress or sleep deprivation, but only rarely do seizures occur as a reflex event, in which they are objectively and consistently modulated, precipitated, or inhibited by external sensory stimuli or specific cognitive processes. The seizures triggered by such stimuli and processes in susceptible individuals can have different latencies. Once seizure-suppressing mechanisms fail and a critical mass (the so-called tipping point) of cortical activation is reached, reflex seizures stereotypically manifest with common motor features independent of the physiological network involved. The complexity of stimuli increases from simple sensory to complex cognitive-emotional with increasing age of onset. The topography of physiological networks involved follows the posterior-to-anterior trajectory of brain development, reflecting age-related changes in brain excitability. Reflex seizures and traits probably represent the extremes of a continuum, and understanding of their underlying mechanisms might help to elucidate the transition of normal physiological function to paroxysmal epileptic activity.

  1. Reflex seizures, traits, and epilepsies: from physiology to pathology.

    PubMed

    Koepp, Matthias J; Caciagli, Lorenzo; Pressler, Ronit M; Lehnertz, Klaus; Beniczky, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are generally unpredictable and arise spontaneously. Patients often report non-specific triggers such as stress or sleep deprivation, but only rarely do seizures occur as a reflex event, in which they are objectively and consistently modulated, precipitated, or inhibited by external sensory stimuli or specific cognitive processes. The seizures triggered by such stimuli and processes in susceptible individuals can have different latencies. Once seizure-suppressing mechanisms fail and a critical mass (the so-called tipping point) of cortical activation is reached, reflex seizures stereotypically manifest with common motor features independent of the physiological network involved. The complexity of stimuli increases from simple sensory to complex cognitive-emotional with increasing age of onset. The topography of physiological networks involved follows the posterior-to-anterior trajectory of brain development, reflecting age-related changes in brain excitability. Reflex seizures and traits probably represent the extremes of a continuum, and understanding of their underlying mechanisms might help to elucidate the transition of normal physiological function to paroxysmal epileptic activity. PMID:26627365

  2. Early seizures in acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Chraa; Kissani, Najib

    2015-01-01

    Early seizures (ES) may complicate the clinical course of patients with acute stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and the predictive factors for early seizures as well the clinical outcome in patients with first-ever stroke. A total of 352 consecutive patients with first-ever stroke, admitted to our department, were included in this retrospective study. Early seizures were defined as seizures occurring within 7 days from acute stroke. Patients with history of epilepsy were excluded. About 47 patients (13%) had early seizure, and 8 had a status epilepticus. We had 28 women and 19 men. The mean age was 71.6 ± 14.6. They were significantly more common in patients with cortical involvement, severe and large stroke, and in patient with cortical associated hemorrhage. ES were associated with an increase in adverse outcome (mortality and disability). Early seizures occured in about 13% of patients with acute stroke. In these patients hemorrhagic transformation is a predictive factor for ES. ES seem to be associated with a worse outcome after acute stroke. PMID:26097640

  3. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Induces TGF-β2 in Intestinal Epithelial Cells via RhoA- and p38α MAPK-Mediated Activation of the Transcription Factor ATF2

    PubMed Central

    Namachivayam, Kopperuncholan; MohanKumar, Krishnan; Arbach, Dima; Jagadeeswaran, Ramasamy; Jain, Sunil K.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Mehta, Dolly; Jankov, Robert P.; Maheshwari, Akhil

    2015-01-01

    Objective We have shown previously that preterm infants are at risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), an inflammatory bowel necrosis typically seen in infants born prior to 32 weeks’ gestation, because of the developmental deficiency of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 in the intestine. The present study was designed to investigate all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) as an inducer of TGF-β2 in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and to elucidate the involved signaling mechanisms. Methods AtRA effects on intestinal epithelium were investigated using IEC6 cells. TGF-β2 expression was measured using reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and Western blots. Signaling pathways were investigated using Western blots, transiently-transfected/transduced cells, kinase arrays, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and selective small molecule inhibitors. Results AtRA-treatment of IEC6 cells selectively increased TGF-β2 mRNA and protein expression in a time- and dose-dependent fashion, and increased the activity of the TGF-β2 promoter. AtRA effects were mediated via RhoA GTPase, Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1), p38α MAPK, and activating transcription factor (ATF)-2. AtRA increased phospho-ATF2 binding to the TGF-β2 promoter and increased histone H2B acetylation in the TGF-β2 nucleosome, which is typically associated with transcriptional activation. Conclusions AtRA induces TGF-β2 expression in IECs via RhoA- and p38α MAPK-mediated activation of the transcription factor ATF2. Further studies are needed to investigate the role of atRA as a protective/therapeutic agent in gut mucosal inflammation. PMID:26225425

  4. Hepatoprotective Effects of Schisandra sphenanthera Extract against Lithocholic Acid-Induced Cholestasis in Male Mice Are Associated with Activation of the Pregnane X Receptor Pathway and Promotion of Liver Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hang; Li, Dongshun; Qin, Xiaoling; Chen, Pan; Tan, Huasen; Zeng, Xuezhen; Li, Xi; Fan, Xiaomei; Jiang, Yiming; Zhou, Yawen; Chen, Yixin; Wang, Ying; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported that the ethanol extract of Schisandra sphenanthera [Wuzhi (WZ) tablet] significantly protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatoxicity. However, whether WZ exerts a protective effect against cholestasis remains unclear. In this study, the protective effect of WZ on lithocholic acid (LCA)-induced intrahepatic cholestasis in mice was characterized and the involved mechanisms were investigated. WZ pretreatment (350 mg/kg) with LCA significantly reversed liver necrosis and decreased serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase activity. More importantly, serum total bile acids and total bilirubin were also remarkably reduced. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis showed that hepatic expression of pregnane X receptor (PXR) target genes such as CYP3A11 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 were significantly increased by WZ treatment. Luciferase assays performed in LS174T cells illustrated that WZ extract and its six bioactive lignans could all activate human PXR. In addition, WZ treatment significantly promoted liver regeneration via inhibition of p53/p21 to induce cell proliferation-associated proteins such as cyclin D1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. In conclusion, WZ has a protective effect against LCA-induced intrahepatic cholestasis, partially owing to activation of the PXR pathway and promotion of liver regeneration.

  5. Gomisin J Inhibits Oleic Acid-Induced Hepatic Lipogenesis by Activation of the AMPK-Dependent Pathway and Inhibition of the Hepatokine Fetuin-A in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungsuk; Lim, Sue Ji; Lee, Hee-Ju; Kim, Sun Young; Nho, Chu Won

    2015-11-11

    The aim of our study is to investigate the molecular mechanism of gomisin J from Schisandra chinensis on the oleic acid (OA)-induced lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells. Gomisin J attenuated lipid accumulation in OA-induced HepG2 cells. It also suppressed the expression of lipogenic enzymes and inflammatory mediators and increased the expression of lipolytic enzymes in OA-induced HepG2 cells. Furthermore, the use of specific inhibitors and fetuin-A siRNA and liver kinase B1 (LKB1) siRNA transfected cells demonstrated that gomisin J regulated lipogenesis and lipolysis via inhibition of fetuin-A and activation of an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent pathway in HepG2 cells. Our results showed that gomisin J suppressed lipid accumulation by regulating the expression of lipogenic and lipolytic enzymes and inflammatory molecules through activation of AMPK, LKB1, and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and inhibition of fetuin-A in HepG2 cells. This suggested that gomisin J has potential benefits in treating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  6. Chlorogenic acid induces apoptosis to inhibit inflammatory proliferation of IL-6-induced fibroblast-like synoviocytes through modulating the activation of JAK/STAT and NF-κB signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    LOU, LIXIA; ZHOU, JINGWEI; LIU, YUJUN; WEI, YI; ZHAO, JIULI; DENG, JIAGANG; DONG, BIN; ZHU, LINGQUN; WU, AIMING; YANG, YINGXI; CHAI, LIMIN

    2016-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is the primary constituent of Caulis Lonicerae, a Chinese herb used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The present study aimed to investigate whether CGA was able to inhibit the proliferation of the fibroblast-like synoviocyte cell line (RSC-364), stimulated by interleukin (IL)-6, through inducing apoptosis. Following incubation with IL-6 or IL-6 and CGA, the cellular proliferation of RSC-364 cells was detected by MTT assay. The ratio of apoptosed cells were detected by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to observe protein expression levels of key molecules involved in the Janus-activated kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (JAK/STAT) signaling pathway [phosphorylated (p)-STAT3, JAK1 and gp130] and the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway [phosphorylated (p)-inhibitor of κB kinase subunit α/β and NF-κB p50). It was revealed that CGA was able to inhibit the inflammatory proliferation of RSC-364 cells mediated by IL-6 through inducing apoptosis. CGA was also able to suppress the expression levels of key molecules in the JAK/STAT and NF-κB signaling pathways, and inhibit the activation of these signaling pathways in the inflammatory response through IL-6-mediated signaling, thereby resulting in the inhibition of the inflammatory proliferation of synoviocytes. The present results indicated that CGA may have potential as a novel therapeutic agent for inhibiting inflammatory hyperplasia of the synovium through inducing synoviocyte apoptosis in patients with RA. PMID:27168850

  7. Rho Kinase ROCK2 Mediates Acid-Induced NADPH Oxidase NOX5-S Expression in Human Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weibiao

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of the progression from Barrett’s esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) are not fully understood. We have shown that NOX5-S may be involved in this progression. However, how acid upregulates NOX5-S is not well known. We found that acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression was significantly decreased by the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y27632 in BE mucosal biopsies and FLO-1 EA cells. In addition, acid treatment significantly increased the Rho kinase activity in FLO-1 cells. The acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production was significantly decreased by knockdown of Rho kinase ROCK2, but not by knockdown of ROCK1. Conversely, the overexpression of the constitutively active ROCK2, but not the constitutively active ROCK1, significantly enhanced the NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production. Moreover, the acid-induced increase in Rho kinase activity and in NOX5-S mRNA expression was blocked by the removal of calcium in both FLO-1 and OE33 cells. The calcium ionophore A23187 significantly increased the Rho kinase activity and NOX5-S mRNA expression. We conclude that acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production may depend on the activation of ROCK2, but not ROCK1, in EA cells. The acid-induced activation of Rho kinase may be mediated by the intracellular calcium increase. It is possible that persistent acid reflux present in BE patients may increase the intracellular calcium, activate ROCK2 and thereby upregulate NOX5-S. High levels of reactive oxygen species derived from NOX5-S may cause DNA damage and thereby contribute to the progression from BE to EA. PMID:26901778

  8. Seizures associated with low-dose tramadol for chronic pain treatment

    PubMed Central

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Sonbahar, Tuğba; Bayar, Fikret; Erdem, Ali Fuat

    2016-01-01

    The management of cancer pain still poses a major challenge for clinicians. Tramadol is a centrally acting synthetic opioid analgesic. Its well-known side effects include nausea, vomiting, and dizziness; seizures are a rare side effect. Some reports have found that tramadol triggers seizure activity at high doses, whereas a few preclinical studies have found that this seizure activity is not dose-related. We herein present a case involving a patient with laryngeal cancer who developed seizures while on low-dose oral tramadol. PMID:27212778

  9. Recognition and management of seizures in children in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Edward; Dey, Indranil; Scammell, Andrea; Burnage, Katy; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2016-09-01

    Seizure is defined as 'a sudden surge of electrical activity in the brain, which usually affects how a person appears or acts for a short time'. Children who have experienced seizures commonly present to emergency departments (EDs), and detailed history taking will usually help differentiate between epileptic and non-epileptic events. ED nurses are often the first health professionals to manage children with seizures, and this is best done by following the ABCDE approach. Treatment involves termination of seizures with anticonvulsants, and children may need other symptomatic management. Seizures in children can be an extremely distressing experience for parents, who should be supported and kept informed by experienced ED nurses. Nurses also play a vital role in educating parents on correct administration of anticonvulsants and safety advice. This article discusses the aetiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of children with seizures, with particular emphasis on epilepsy. It includes two reflective case studies to highlight the challenges faced by healthcare professionals managing children who present with convulsions. PMID:27615348

  10. Effects of clobenpropit on pentylenetetrazole-kindled seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lisan; Chen, Zhong; Ren, Keming; Leurs, Rob; Chen, Junchun; Zhang, Wenbin; Ye, Bo; Wei, Erqing; Timmerman, Henk

    2003-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not clobenpropit, a selective and potent histamine H(3) receptor antagonist, can protect from pentylenetetrazole (35 mg/kg)-kindled seizures in rats. I.c.v. injection with clobenpropit (10 and 20 microg) significantly delayed the seizure stage and prolonged the latency to the onset of myoclonic jerks and the latency to the clonic generalized seizure in a dose-dependent manner. The protection by clobenpropit (20 microg) was completely antagonized by both immepip (5 and 10 microg, i.c.v.), a selective potent histamine H(3) receptor agonist, and alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (alpha-FMH, 50 microg, i.c.v.), a selective histidine decarboxylase inhibitor. In addition, clobenpropit markedly potentiated the histidine (100 and 200 mg/kg)-induced inhibition of pentylenetetrazole-kindled seizures. Pyrilamine (2 and 5 microg, i.c.v.) reversed the inhibition of pentylenetetrazole-kindled seizures induced by clobenpropit, whereas cimetidine had no effect even at a high dose of 5 microg. These results indicate that clobenpropit protects against pentylenetetrazole-kindled seizures in rats, and that its action is mainly due to the activation of endogenous histamine by blocking autoinhibitory presynaptic histamine H(3) receptors.

  11. Efficacy of Retigabine on Acute Limbic Seizures in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, LK; Slomko, AM; Wongvravit, JP; Naseer, Z; Hu, S; Wan, WY; Ali, SS

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The efficacy of retigabine (RGB), a positive allosteric modulator of K+ channels indicated for adjunct treatment of partial seizures, was studied in two adult models of kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus to determine it’s toleratbility. Methods: Retigabine was administered systemiclly at high (5 mg/kg) and low (1–2 mg/kg) doses either 30 min prior to or 2 hr after KA-induced status epilepticus. High (1 µg/µL) and low (0.25 µg/µL) concentrations of RGB were also delivered by intrahippocampal microinjection in the presence of KA. Results: Dose-dependent effects of RGB were observed with both models. Lower doses increased seizure behavior latency and reduced the number of single spikes and synchronized burst events in the electroencephalogram (EEG). Higher doses worsened seizure behavior, produced severe ataxia, and increased spiking activity. Animals treated with RGB that were resistant to seizures did not exhibit significant injury or loss in GluR1 expression; however if stage 5–6 seizures were reached, typical hippocampal injury and depletion of GluR1 subunit protein in vulernable pyramidal fields occurred. Conclusions: RGB was neuroprotective only if seizures were significantly attenuated. GluR1 was simultaneously suppressed in the resistant granule cell layer in presence of RGB which may weaken excitatory transmission. Biphasic effects observed herein suggest that the human dosage must be carefully scrutinized to produce the optimal clinical response. PMID:26819936

  12. Cannabidiol Rescues Acute Hepatic Toxicity and Seizure Induced by Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Luciano Rezende; Gomides, Lindisley Ferreira; David, Bruna Araújo; Antunes, Maísa Mota; Diniz, Ariane Barros; Moreira, Fabrício de Araújo; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is a commonly abused illicit drug that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The most severe and common complications are seizures, ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction, and acute liver injury. Here, we demonstrated that acute cocaine intoxication promoted seizure along with acute liver damage in mice, with intense inflammatory infiltrate. Considering the protective role of the endocannabinoid system against cell toxicity, we hypothesized that treatment with an anandamide hydrolysis inhibitor, URB597, or with a phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), protects against cocaine toxicity. URB597 (1.0 mg/kg) abolished cocaine-induced seizure, yet it did not protect against acute liver injury. Using confocal liver intravital microscopy, we observed that CBD (30 mg/kg) reduced acute liver inflammation and damage induced by cocaine and prevented associated seizure. Additionally, we showed that previous liver damage induced by another hepatotoxic drug (acetaminophen) increased seizure and lethality induced by cocaine intoxication, linking hepatotoxicity to seizure dynamics. These findings suggest that activation of cannabinoid system may have protective actions on both liver and brain induced by cocaine, minimizing inflammatory injury promoted by cocaine, supporting its further clinical application in the treatment of cocaine abuse. PMID:25999668

  13. Combination anticonvulsant treatment of soman-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Koplovitz, I; Schulz, S; Shutz, M; Railer, R; Macalalag, R; Schons, M; McDonough, J

    2001-12-01

    These studies investigated the effectiveness of combination treatment with a benzodiazepine and an anticholinergic drug against soman-induced seizures. The anticholinergic drugs considered were biperiden, scopolamine, trihexaphenidyl, and procyclidine; the benzodiazepines were diazepam and midazolam. Male guinea pigs were implanted surgically with cortical screw electrodes. Electrocorticograms were displayed continually and recorded on a computerized electroencephalographic system. Pyridostigmine (0.026 mg x kg(-1), i.m.) was injected as a pretreatment to inhibit red blood cell acetylcholinesterase by 30-40%. Thirty minutes after pyridostigmine, 2 x LD50 (56 microg x kg(-1)) of soman was injected s.c., followed 1 min later by i.m. treatment with atropine (2 mg x kg(-1)) + 2-PAM (25 mg x kg(-1)). Electrographic seizures occurred in all animals. Anticonvulsant treatment combinations were administered i.m. at 5 or 40 min after seizure onset. Treatment consisted of diazepam or midazolam plus one of the above-mentioned anticholinergic drugs. All doses of the treatment compounds exhibited little or no antiseizure efficacy when given individually. The combination of a benzodiazepine and an anticholinergic drug was effective in terminating soman-induced seizure, whether given 5 or 40 min after seizure onset. The results suggest a strong synergistic effect of combining benzodiazepines with centrally active anticholinergic drugs and support the concept of using an adjunct to supplement diazepam for the treatment of nerve-agent-induced seizures.

  14. Repeated exposure to low doses of kainic acid activates nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) prior to seizure in transgenic NF-κB/EGFP reporter mice.

    PubMed

    Miller, James A; Kirkley, Kelly A; Padmanabhan, Rachel; Liang, Li-Ping; Raol, Yogendra H; Patel, Manisha; Bialecki, Russell A; Tjalkens, Ronald B

    2014-09-01

    Predicting seizurogenic properties of pharmacologically active compounds is difficult due to the complex nature of the mechanisms involved and because of the low sensitivity and high variability associated with current behavioral-based methods. To identify early neuronal signaling events predictive of seizure, we exposed transgenic NF-κB/EGFP reporter mice to multiple low doses of kainic acid (KA), postulating that activation of the stress-responsive NF-κB pathway could be a sensitive indicator of seizurogenic potential. The sub-threshold dose level proximal to the induction of seizure was determined as 2.5mg/kg KA, using video EEG monitoring. Subsequent analysis of reporter expression demonstrated significant increases in NF-κB activation in the CA3 and CA1 regions of the hippocampus 24h after a single dose of 2.5mg/kg KA. This response was primarily observed in pyramidal neurons with little non-neuronal expression. Neuronal NF-κB/EGFP expression was observed in the absence of glial activation, indicating a lack of neurodegeneration-induced neuroinflammation. Protein expression of the immediate-early gene, Nurr1, increased in neurons in parallel to NF-κB activation, supporting that the sub-threshold doses of KA employed directly caused neuronal stress. Lastly, KA also stimulated NF-κB activation in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures established from NF-κB/EGFP reporter mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate the potential advantages of using genetically encoded stress pathway reporter models in the screening of seizurogenic properties of new pharamacologically active compounds.

  15. [Martin Luther's seizure disorder].

    PubMed

    Feldmann, H

    1989-01-01

    Martin Luther's diseases are well documented, because he used to discuss them freely in his letters. There is also a wealth of evidence through reports by his friends. Most of his diseases were common and well known to the contemporary physicians, who accordingly interpreted them correctly: bladder stones, chronic constipation, hemorrhoids. Luther's death obviously was due to a coronary thrombosis. During the last 19 years of his life, in addition to these "natural diseases", Luther also suffered from recurring attacks of a peculiar symptomatology. Luther himself and his friends considered these seizures to be no "natural disease", but Satan punching his flesh, and he compared them to St. Paul's disease (2. Cor. 12). The first of these attacks occurred on July 6, 1527, when Luther was 43 years of age. It began with a roaring tinnitus in his left ear, which increased dramatically and seemed to occupy the left half of his head. Then a state of sickness and collapse followed, however, consciousness was retained throughout the whole period. After a night's rest all the symptoms had subsided, except the tinnitus, which, from that day on, continued for all the following years in varying intensity. Similar attacks with increase of the tinnitus and vertigo as the leading symptoms, seized Luther at irregular intervals and distressed him extremely. Former investigators of Luther's diseases interpreted these attacks as manifestations of a psychiatric disorder and a chronic inflammatory disease of the middle ear. The present detailed study reveals that it was a typical case of Menière's disease of the left ear manifesting itself more than 330 years before Menière's classical observation.

  16. [Martin Luther's seizure disorder].

    PubMed

    Feldmann, H

    1989-01-01

    Martin Luther's diseases are well documented, because he used to discuss them freely in his letters. There is also a wealth of evidence through reports by his friends. Most of his diseases were common and well known to the contemporary physicians, who accordingly interpreted them correctly: bladder stones, chronic constipation, hemorrhoids. Luther's death obviously was due to a coronary thrombosis. During the last 19 years of his life, in addition to these "natural diseases", Luther also suffered from recurring attacks of a peculiar symptomatology. Luther himself and his friends considered these seizures to be no "natural disease", but Satan punching his flesh, and he compared them to St. Paul's disease (2. Cor. 12). The first of these attacks occurred on July 6, 1527, when Luther was 43 years of age. It began with a roaring tinnitus in his left ear, which increased dramatically and seemed to occupy the left half of his head. Then a state of sickness and collapse followed, however, consciousness was retained throughout the whole period. After a night's rest all the symptoms had subsided, except the tinnitus, which, from that day on, continued for all the following years in varying intensity. Similar attacks with increase of the tinnitus and vertigo as the leading symptoms, seized Luther at irregular intervals and distressed him extremely. Former investigators of Luther's diseases interpreted these attacks as manifestations of a psychiatric disorder and a chronic inflammatory disease of the middle ear. The present detailed study reveals that it was a typical case of Menière's disease of the left ear manifesting itself more than 330 years before Menière's classical observation. PMID:2529669

  17. Interaction between synaptic inhibition and glial-potassium dynamics leads to diverse seizure transition modes in biophysical models of human focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Y Ho, E C; Truccolo, Wilson

    2016-10-01

    How focal seizures initiate and evolve in human neocortex remains a fundamental problem in neuroscience. Here, we use biophysical neuronal network models of neocortical patches to study how the interaction between inhibition and extracellular potassium ([K (+)] o ) dynamics may contribute to different types of focal seizures. Three main types of propagated focal seizures observed in recent intracortical microelectrode recordings in humans were modelled: seizures characterized by sustained (∼30-60 Hz) gamma local field potential (LFP) oscillations; seizures where the onset in the propagated site consisted of LFP spikes that later evolved into rhythmic (∼2-3 Hz) spike-wave complexes (SWCs); and seizures where a brief stage of low-amplitude fast-oscillation (∼10-20 Hz) LFPs preceded the SWC activity. Our findings are fourfold: (1) The interaction between elevated [K (+)] o (due to abnormal potassium buffering by glial cells) and the strength of synaptic inhibition plays a predominant role in shaping these three types of seizures. (2) Strengthening of inhibition leads to the onset of sustained narrowband gamma seizures. (3) Transition into SWC seizures is obtained either by the weakening of inhibitory synapses, or by a transient strengthening followed by an inhibitory breakdown (e.g. GABA depletion). This reduction or breakdown of inhibition among fast-spiking (FS) inhibitory interneurons increases their spiking activity and leads them eventually into depolarization block. Ictal spike-wave discharges in the model are then sustained solely by pyramidal neurons. (4) FS cell dynamics are also critical for seizures where the evolution into SWC activity is preceded by low-amplitude fast oscillations. Different levels of elevated [K (+)] o were important for transitions into and maintenance of sustained gamma oscillations and SWC discharges. Overall, our modelling study predicts that the interaction between inhibitory interneurons and [K (+)] o glial buffering under

  18. Interaction between synaptic inhibition and glial-potassium dynamics leads to diverse seizure transition modes in biophysical models of human focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Y Ho, E C; Truccolo, Wilson

    2016-10-01

    How focal seizures initiate and evolve in human neocortex remains a fundamental problem in neuroscience. Here, we use biophysical neuronal network models of neocortical patches to study how the interaction between inhibition and extracellular potassium ([K (+)] o ) dynamics may contribute to different types of focal seizures. Three main types of propagated focal seizures observed in recent intracortical microelectrode recordings in humans were modelled: seizures characterized by sustained (∼30-60 Hz) gamma local field potential (LFP) oscillations; seizures where the onset in the propagated site consisted of LFP spikes that later evolved into rhythmic (∼2-3 Hz) spike-wave complexes (SWCs); and seizures where a brief stage of low-amplitude fast-oscillation (∼10-20 Hz) LFPs preceded the SWC activity. Our findings are fourfold: (1) The interaction between elevated [K (+)] o (due to abnormal potassium buffering by glial cells) and the strength of synaptic inhibition plays a predominant role in shaping these three types of seizures. (2) Strengthening of inhibition leads to the onset of sustained narrowband gamma seizures. (3) Transition into SWC seizures is obtained either by the weakening of inhibitory synapses, or by a transient strengthening followed by an inhibitory breakdown (e.g. GABA depletion). This reduction or breakdown of inhibition among fast-spiking (FS) inhibitory interneurons increases their spiking activity and leads them eventually into depolarization block. Ictal spike-wave discharges in the model are then sustained solely by pyramidal neurons. (4) FS cell dynamics are also critical for seizures where the evolution into SWC activity is preceded by low-amplitude fast oscillations. Different levels of elevated [K (+)] o were important for transitions into and maintenance of sustained gamma oscillations and SWC discharges. Overall, our modelling study predicts that the interaction between inhibitory interneurons and [K (+)] o glial buffering under

  19. Generalized versus partial reflex seizures: a review.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gasparini, Sara; Spina, Edoardo; Mondello, Stefania; Labate, Angelo; Gambardella, Antonio; Aguglia, Umberto

    2014-08-01

    In this review we assess our currently available knowledge about reflex seizures with special emphasis on the difference between "generalized" reflex seizures induced by visual stimuli, thinking, praxis and language tasks, and "focal" seizures induced by startle, eating, music, hot water, somatosensory stimuli and orgasm. We discuss in particular evidence from animal, clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies supporting the concept that "generalized" reflex seizures, usually occurring in the setting of IGE, should be considered as focal seizures with quick secondary generalization. We also review recent advances in genetic and therapeutic approach of reflex seizures.

  20. Automated seizure detection systems and their effectiveness for each type of seizure.

    PubMed

    Ulate-Campos, A; Coughlin, F; Gaínza-Lein, M; Fernández, I Sánchez; Pearl, P L; Loddenkemper, T

    2016-08-01

    Epilepsy affects almost 1% of the population and most of the approximately 20-30% of patients with refractory epilepsy have one or more seizures per month. Seizure detection devices allow an objective assessment of seizure frequency and a treatment tailored to the individual patient. A rapid recognition and treatment of seizures through closed-loop systems could potentially decrease morbidity and mortality in epilepsy. However, no single detection device can detect all seizure types. Therefore, the choice of a seizure detection device should consider the patient-specific seizure semiologies. This review of the literature evaluates seizure detection devices and their effectiveness for different seizure types. Our aim is to summarize current evidence, offer suggestions on how to select the most suitable seizure detection device for each patient and provide guidance to physicians, families and researchers when choosing or designing seizure detection devices. Further, this review will guide future prospective validation studies.

  1. Differential operator in seizure detection.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Kaushik

    2012-01-01

    Differential operators can detect significant changes in signals. This has been utilized to enhance the contrast of the seizure signatures in depth EEG or ECoG. We have actually taken normalized exponential of absolute value of single or double derivative of epileptic ECoG. This in short we call differential filtering. Windowed variance operation has been performed to automatically detect seizure onset on differentially filtered signal. A novel method for determining the duration of seizure has also been proposed. Since all operations take only linear time, the whole method is extremely fast. Seven empirical parameters have been introduced whose patient specific thresholding brings down the rate of false detection to a bare minimum. Results of implementation of the methods on the ECoG data of four epileptic patients have been reported with an ROC curve analysis. High value of the area under the ROC curve indicates excellent detection performance.

  2. NKCC1 transporter facilitates seizures in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Dzhala, Volodymyr I; Talos, Delia M; Sdrulla, Dan A; Brumback, Audrey C; Mathews, Gregory C; Benke, Timothy A; Delpire, Eric; Jensen, Frances E; Staley, Kevin J

    2005-11-01

    During development, activation of Cl(-)-permeable GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)-R) excites neurons as a result of elevated intracellular Cl(-) levels and a depolarized Cl(-) equilibrium potential (E(Cl)). GABA becomes inhibitory as net outward neuronal transport of Cl(-) develops in a caudal-rostral progression. In line with this caudal-rostral developmental pattern, GABAergic anticonvulsant compounds inhibit motor manifestations of neonatal seizures but not cortical seizure activity. The Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC1) facilitates the accumulation of Cl(-) in neurons. The NKCC1 blocker bumetanide shifted E(Cl) negative in immature neurons, suppressed epileptiform activity in hippocampal slices in vitro and attenuated electrographic seizures in neonatal rats in vivo. Bumetanide had no effect in the presence of the GABA(A)-R antagonist bicuculline, nor in brain slices from NKCC1-knockout mice. NKCC1 expression level versus expression of the Cl(-)-extruding transporter (KCC2) in human and rat cortex showed that Cl(-) transport in perinatal human cortex is as immature as in the rat. Our results provide evidence that NKCC1 facilitates seizures in the developing brain and indicate that bumetanide should be useful in the treatment of neonatal seizures.

  3. A novel genetic programming approach for epileptic seizure detection.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Arpit; Tiwari, Aruna; Krishna, Ramesh; Varma, Vishaal

    2016-02-01

    The human brain is a delicate mix of neurons (brain cells), electrical impulses and chemicals, known as neurotransmitters. Any damage has the potential to disrupt the workings of the brain and cause seizures. These epileptic seizures are the manifestations of epilepsy. The electroencephalograph (EEG) signals register average neuronal activity from the cerebral cortex and label changes in activity over large areas. A detailed analysis of these electroencephalograph (EEG) signals provides valuable insights into the mechanisms instigating epileptic disorders. Moreover, the detection of interictal spikes and epileptic seizures in an EEG signal plays an important role in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Automatic seizure detection methods are required, as these epileptic seizures are volatile and unpredictable. This paper deals with an automated detection of epileptic seizures in EEG signals using empirical mode decomposition (EMD) for feature extraction and proposes a novel genetic programming (GP) approach for classifying the EEG signals. Improvements in the standard GP approach are made using a Constructive Genetic Programming (CGP) in which constructive crossover and constructive subtree mutation operators are introduced. A hill climbing search is integrated in crossover and mutation operators to remove the destructive nature of these operators. A new concept of selecting the Globally Prime offspring is also presented to select the best fitness offspring generated during crossover. To decrease the time complexity of GP, a new dynamic fitness value computation (DFVC) is employed to increase the computational speed. We conducted five different sets of experiments to evaluate the performance of the proposed model in the classification of different mixtures of normal, interictal and ictal signals, and the accuracies achieved are outstandingly high. The experimental results are compared with the existing methods on same datasets, and these results affirm the potential use of

  4. What is more harmful, seizures or epileptic EEG abnormalities? Is there any clinical data?

    PubMed

    Holmes, Gregory L

    2014-10-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common and often devastating co-morbidity of childhood epilepsy. While the aetiology of the epilepsy is a critical determinant of cognitive outcome, there is considerable evidence from both rodent and human studies that indicate that seizures and interictal epileptiform abnormalities can contribute to cognitive impairment. A critical feature of childhood epilepsy is that the seizures and epileptiform activity occur in a brain with developing, plastic neuronal circuits. The consequences of seizures and interictal epileptiform activity in the developing brain differ from similar paroxysmal events occurring in the relatively fixed circuitry of the mature brain. In animals, it is possible to study interictal spikes independently from seizures, and it has been demonstrated that interictal spikes are as detrimental as seizures during brain development. In the clinic, distinguishing the differences between interictal spikes and seizures is more difficult, since both typically occur together. However, both seizures and interictal spikes result in transient cognitive impairment. Recurrent seizures, particularly when frequent, can lead to cognitive regression. While the clinical data linking interictal spikes to persistent cognitive impairment is limited, interictal spikes occurring during the formation and stabilization of neuronal circuits likely contribute to aberrant connectivity. There is insufficient clinical literature to indicate whether interictal spikes are more detrimental than seizures during brain development.

  5. Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy: Possible Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... whether they could increase the risk of developing epilepsy later. Febrile seizures are defined as seizures that ... brains of patients who underwent surgery for severe epilepsy. 3 The children with FSE were com- pared ...

  6. Mitochondrial genome depletion in human liver cells abolishes bile acid-induced apoptosis: role of the Akt/mTOR survival pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jose J G; Hernandez, Alicia; Revuelta, Isabel E; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ester; Gonzalez-Buitrago, Jose M; Perez, Maria J

    2013-08-01

    Acute accumulation of bile acids in hepatocytes may cause cell death. However, during long-term exposure due to prolonged cholestasis, hepatocytes may develop a certain degree of chemoresistance to these compounds. Because mitochondrial adaptation to persistent oxidative stress may be involved in this process, here we have investigated the effects of complete mitochondrial genome depletion on the response to bile acid-induced hepatocellular injury. A subline (Rho) of human hepatoma SK-Hep-1 cells totally depleted of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was obtained, and bile acid-induced concentration-dependent activation of apoptosis/necrosis and survival signaling pathways was studied. In the absence of changes in intracellular ATP content, Rho cells were highly resistant to bile acid-induced apoptosis and partially resistant to bile acid-induced necrosis. In Rho cells, both basal and bile acid-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion, was decreased. Bile acid-induced proapoptotic signals were also decreased, as evidenced by a reduction in the expression ratios Bax-α/Bcl-2, Bcl-xS/Bcl-2, and Bcl-xS/Bcl-xL. This was mainly due to a downregulation of Bax-α and Bcl-xS. Moreover, in these cells the Akt/mTOR pathway was constitutively activated in a ROS-independent manner and remained similarly activated in the presence of bile acid treatment. In contrast, ERK1/2 activation was constitutively reduced and was not activated by incubation with bile acids. In conclusion, these results suggest that impaired mitochondrial function associated with mtDNA alterations, which may occur in liver cells during prolonged cholestasis, may activate mechanisms of cell survival accounting for an enhanced resistance of hepatocytes to bile acid-induced apoptosis. PMID:23597504

  7. EEG seizure detection and prediction algorithms: a survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alotaiby, Turkey N.; Alshebeili, Saleh A.; Alshawi, Tariq; Ahmad, Ishtiaq; Abd El-Samie, Fathi E.

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy patients experience challenges in daily life due to precautions they have to take in order to cope with this condition. When a seizure occurs, it might cause injuries or endanger the life of the patients or others, especially when they are using heavy machinery, e.g., deriving cars. Studies of epilepsy often rely on electroencephalogram (EEG) signals in order to analyze the behavior of the brain during seizures. Locating the seizure period in EEG recordings manually is difficult and time consuming; one often needs to skim through tens or even hundreds of hours of EEG recordings. Therefore, automatic detection of such an activity is of great importance. Another potential usage of EEG signal analysis is in the prediction of epileptic activities before they occur, as this will enable the patients (and caregivers) to take appropriate precautions. In this paper, we first present an overview of seizure detection and prediction problem and provide insights on the challenges in this area. Second, we cover some of the state-of-the-art seizure detection and prediction algorithms and provide comparison between these algorithms. Finally, we conclude with future research directions and open problems in this topic.

  8. Licofelone attenuates quinolinic acid induced Huntington like symptoms: possible behavioral, biochemical and cellular alterations.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2011-03-30

    Cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase enzymes are involved in arachidonic acid metabolism. Emerging evidence indicates that cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors prevent neurodegenerative processes and related complications. Therefore, the present study has been designed to explore the neuroprotective potential of licofelone (dual COX-2/5-LOX inhibitor) against quinolinic acid induced Huntington like symptom in rats. Intrastriatal administration of quinolinic acid significantly caused reduction in body weight and motor function (locomotor activity, rotarod performance and beam walk test), oxidative defense (as evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration and decreased endogenous antioxidant enzymes), alteration in mitochondrial enzyme complex (I, II and IV) activities, raised TNF-α level and striatal lesion volume as compared to sham treated animals. Licofelone (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg) treatment significantly improved body weight, locomotor activity, rotarod performance, balance beam walk performance, oxidative defense, mitochondrial enzyme complex activities and attenuated TNF-α level and striatal lesion as compared to control (quinolinic acid). The present study highlights that licofelone attenuates behavioral, biochemical and cellular alterations against quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity and this could be an important therapeutic avenue to ameliorate the Huntington like symptoms. PMID:21237233

  9. Modeling cortical source dynamics and interactions during seizure.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Tim; Acar, Zeynep Akalin; Worrell, Gregory; Makeig, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Mapping the dynamics and spatial topography of brain source processes critically involved in initiating and propagating seizure activity is critical for effective epilepsy diagnosis, intervention, and treatment. In this report we analyze neuronal dynamics before and during epileptic seizures using adaptive multivariate autoregressive (VAR) models applied to maximally-independent (ICA) sources of intracranial EEG (iEEG, ECoG) data recorded from subdural electrodes implanted in a human patient for evaluation of surgery for epilepsy. We visualize the spatial distribution of causal sources and sinks of ictal activity on the cortical surface (gyral and sulcal) using a novel combination of multivariate Granger-causal and graph-theoretic metrics combined with distributed source localization by Sparse Bayesian Learning applied to a multi-scale patch basis. This analysis reveals and visualizes distinct, seizure stage-dependent shifts in inter-component spatiotemporal dynamics and connectivity including the clinically-identified epileptic foci. PMID:22254582

  10. From cognitive networks to seizures: stimulus evoked dynamics in a coupled cortical network.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaejin; Ermentrout, Bard; Bodner, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neuropathologies worldwide. Seizures arising in epilepsy or in seizure disorders are characterized generally by uncontrolled spread of excitation and electrical activity to a limited region or even over the entire cortex. While it is generally accepted that abnormal excessive firing and synchronization of neuron populations lead to seizures, little is known about the precise mechanisms underlying human epileptic seizures, the mechanisms of transitions from normal to paroxysmal activity, or about how seizures spread. Further complication arises in that seizures do not occur with a single type of dynamics but as many different phenotypes and genotypes with a range of patterns, synchronous oscillations, and time courses. The concept of preventing, terminating, or modulating seizures and/or paroxysmal activity through stimulation of brain has also received considerable attention. The ability of such stimulation to prevent or modulate such pathological activity may depend on identifiable parameters. In this work, firing rate networks with inhibitory and excitatory populations were modeled. Network parameters were chosen to model normal working memory behaviors. Two different models of cognitive activity were developed. The first model consists of a single network corresponding to a local area of the brain. The second incorporates two networks connected through sparser recurrent excitatory connectivity with transmission delays ranging from approximately 3 ms within local populations to 15 ms between populations residing in different cortical areas. The effect of excitatory stimulation to activate working memory behavior through selective persistent activation of populations is examined in the models, and the conditions and transition mechanisms through which that selective activation breaks down producing spreading paroxysmal activity and seizure states are characterized. Specifically, we determine critical parameters and architectural

  11. From cognitive networks to seizures: Stimulus evoked dynamics in a coupled cortical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaejin; Ermentrout, Bard; Bodner, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neuropathologies worldwide. Seizures arising in epilepsy or in seizure disorders are characterized generally by uncontrolled spread of excitation and electrical activity to a limited region or even over the entire cortex. While it is generally accepted that abnormal excessive firing and synchronization of neuron populations lead to seizures, little is known about the precise mechanisms underlying human epileptic seizures, the mechanisms of transitions from normal to paroxysmal activity, or about how seizures spread. Further complication arises in that seizures do not occur with a single type of dynamics but as many different phenotypes and genotypes with a range of patterns, synchronous oscillations, and time courses. The concept of preventing, terminating, or modulating seizures and/or paroxysmal activity through stimulation of brain has also received considerable attention. The ability of such stimulation to prevent or modulate such pathological activity may depend on identifiable parameters. In this work, firing rate networks with inhibitory and excitatory populations were modeled. Network parameters were chosen to model normal working memory behaviors. Two different models of cognitive activity were developed. The first model consists of a single network corresponding to a local area of the brain. The second incorporates two networks connected through sparser recurrent excitatory connectivity with transmission delays ranging from approximately 3 ms within local populations to 15 ms between populations residing in different cortical areas. The effect of excitatory stimulation to activate working memory behavior through selective persistent activation of populations is examined in the models, and the conditions and transition mechanisms through which that selective activation breaks down producing spreading paroxysmal activity and seizure states are characterized. Specifically, we determine critical parameters and architectural

  12. Serotonin neurones have anti-convulsant effects and reduce seizure-induced mortality

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Gordon F; Murray, Nicholas M; Hajek, Michael A; Richerson, George B

    2014-01-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the leading cause of death in patients with refractory epilepsy. Defects in central control of breathing are important contributors to the pathophysiology of SUDEP, and serotonin (5-HT) system dysfunction may be involved. Here we examined the effect of 5-HT neurone elimination or 5-HT reduction on seizure risk and seizure-induced mortality. Adult Lmx1bf/f/p mice, which lack >99% of 5-HT neurones in the CNS, and littermate controls (Lmx1bf/f) were subjected to acute seizure induction by maximal electroshock (MES) or pilocarpine, variably including electroencephalography, electrocardiography, plethysmography, mechanical ventilation or pharmacological therapy. Lmx1bf/f/p mice had a lower seizure threshold and increased seizure-induced mortality. Breathing ceased during most seizures without recovery, whereas cardiac activity persisted for up to 9 min before terminal arrest. The mortality rate of mice of both genotypes was reduced by mechanical ventilation during the seizure or 5-HT2A receptor agonist pretreatment. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram reduced mortality of Lmx1bf/f but not of Lmx1bf/f/p mice. In C57BL/6N mice, reduction of 5-HT synthesis with para-chlorophenylalanine increased MES-induced seizure severity but not mortality. We conclude that 5-HT neurones raise seizure threshold and decrease seizure-related mortality. Death ensued from respiratory failure, followed by terminal asystole. Given that SUDEP often occurs in association with generalised seizures, some mechanisms causing death in our model might be shared with those leading to SUDEP. This model may help determine the relationship between seizures, 5-HT system dysfunction, breathing and death, which may lead to novel ways to prevent SUDEP. PMID:25107926

  13. Lipopolysaccharide Stimulates Butyric Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Fukushima, Kazuo; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that butyric acid, an extracellular metabolite from periodontopathic bacteria, induced apoptosis in murine thymocytes, splenic T cells, and human Jurkat T cells. In this study, we examined the ability of butyric acid to induce apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on this apoptosis. Butyric acid significantly inhibited the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody- and concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses in a dose-dependent fashion. This inhibition of PBMC growth by butyric acid depended on apoptosis in vitro. It was characterized by internucleosomal DNA digestion and revealed by gel electrophoresis followed by a colorimetric DNA fragmentation assay to occur in a concentration-dependent fashion. Butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis was accompanied by caspase-3 protease activity but not by caspase-1 protease activity. LPS potentiated butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed that LPS increased the proportion of sub-G1 cells and the number of late-stage apoptotic cells induced by butyric acid. Annexin V binding experiments with fractionated subpopulations of PBMC in flow cytometory revealed that LPS accelerated the butyric acid-induced CD3+-T-cell apoptosis followed by similar levels of both CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell apoptosis. The addition of LPS to PBMC cultures did not cause DNA fragmentation, suggesting that LPS was unable to induce PBMC apoptosis directly. These data suggest that LPS, in combination with butyric acid, potentiates CD3+ PBMC T-cell apoptosis and plays a role in the apoptotic depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. PMID:9864191

  14. Block term decomposition for modelling epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunyadi, Borbála; Camps, Daan; Sorber, Laurent; Paesschen, Wim Van; Vos, Maarten De; Huffel, Sabine Van; Lathauwer, Lieven De

    2014-12-01

    Recordings of neural activity, such as EEG, are an inherent mixture of different ongoing brain processes as well as artefacts and are typically characterised by low signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, EEG datasets are often inherently multidimensional, comprising information in time, along different channels, subjects, trials, etc. Additional information may be conveyed by expanding the signal into even more dimensions, e.g. incorporating spectral features applying wavelet transform. The underlying sources might show differences in each of these modes. Therefore, tensor-based blind source separation techniques which can extract the sources of interest from such multiway arrays, simultaneously exploiting the signal characteristics in all dimensions, have gained increasing interest. Canonical polyadic decomposition (CPD) has been successfully used to extract epileptic seizure activity from wavelet-transformed EEG data (Bioinformatics 23(13):i10-i18, 2007; NeuroImage 37:844-854, 2007), where each source is described by a rank-1 tensor, i.e. by the combination of one particular temporal, spectral and spatial signature. However, in certain scenarios, where the seizure pattern is nonstationary, such a trilinear signal model is insufficient. Here, we present the application of a recently introduced technique, called block term decomposition (BTD) to separate EEG tensors into rank- ( L r , L r ,1) terms, allowing to model more variability in the data than what would be possible with CPD. In a simulation study, we investigate the robustness of BTD against noise and different choices of model parameters. Furthermore, we show various real EEG recordings where BTD outperforms CPD in capturing complex seizure characteristics.

  15. Using wearable sensors for semiology-independent seizure detection - towards ambulatory monitoring of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Heldberg, Beeke E; Kautz, Thomas; Leutheuser, Heike; Hopfengartner, Rudiger; Kasper, Burkhard S; Eskofier, Bjoern M

    2015-08-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of the central nervous system. Nearly 70% of people with epilepsy respond to a proper treatment, but for a successful therapy of epilepsy, physicians need to know if and when seizures occur. The gold standard diagnosis tool video-electroencephalography (vEEG) requires patients to stay at hospital for several days. A wearable sensor system, e.g. a wristband, serving as diagnostic tool or event monitor, would allow unobtrusive ambulatory long-term monitoring while reducing costs. Previous studies showed that seizures with motor symptoms such as generalized tonic-clonic seizures can be detected by measuring the electrodermal activity (EDA) and motion measuring acceleration (ACC). In this study, EDA and ACC from 8 patients were analyzed. In extension to previous studies, different types of seizures, including seizures without motor activity, were taken into account. A hierarchical classification approach was implemented in order to detect different types of epileptic seizures using data from wearable sensors. Using a k-nearest neighbor (kNN) classifier an overall sensitivity of 89.1% and an overall specificity of 93.1% were achieved, for seizures without motor activity the sensitivity was 97.1% and the specificity was 92.9%. The presented method is a first step towards a reliable ambulatory monitoring system for epileptic seizures with and without motor activity.

  16. Characterising seizures in anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis with dynamic causal modelling

    PubMed Central

    Cooray, Gerald K.; Sengupta, Biswa; Douglas, Pamela; Englund, Marita; Wickstrom, Ronny; Friston, Karl

    2015-01-01

    We characterised the pathophysiology of seizure onset in terms of slow fluctuations in synaptic efficacy using EEG in patients with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) encephalitis. EEG recordings were obtained from two female patients with anti-NMDA-R encephalitis with recurrent partial seizures (ages 19 and 31). Focal electrographic seizure activity was localised using an empirical Bayes beamformer. The spectral density of reconstructed source activity was then characterised with dynamic causal modelling (DCM). Eight models were compared for each patient, to evaluate the relative contribution of changes in intrinsic (excitatory and inhibitory) connectivity and endogenous afferent input. Bayesian model comparison established a role for changes in both excitatory and inhibitory connectivity during seizure activity (in addition to changes in the exogenous input). Seizures in both patients were associated with a sequence of changes in inhibitory and excitatory connectivity; a transient increase in inhibitory connectivity followed by a transient increase in excitatory connectivity and a final peak of excitatory–inhibitory balance at seizure offset. These systematic fluctuations in excitatory and inhibitory gain may be characteristic of (anti NMDA-R encephalitis) seizures. We present these results as a case study and replication to motivate analyses of larger patient cohorts, to see whether our findings generalise and further characterise the mechanisms of seizure activity in anti-NMDA-R encephalitis. PMID:26032883

  17. Microglial ablation and lipopolysaccharide preconditioning affects pilocarpine-induced seizures in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrione, M.M.; Mirrione, M.M.; Konomosa, D.K.; Ioradanis, G.; Dewey, S.L.; Agzzid, A.; Heppnerd, F.L.; Tsirka, St.E.

    2010-04-01

    Activated microglia have been associated with neurodegeneration in patients and in animal models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE), however their precise functions as neurotoxic or neuroprotective is a topic of significant investigation. To explore this, we examined the effects of pilocarpine-induced seizures in transgenic mice where microglia/macrophages were conditionally ablated. We found that unilateral ablation of microglia from the dorsal hippocampus did not alter acute seizure sensitivity. However, when this procedure was coupled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preconditioning (1 mg/kg given 24 h prior to acute seizure), we observed a significant pro-convulsant phenomenon. This effect was associated with lower metabolic activation in the ipsilateral hippocampus during acute seizures, and could be attributed to activity in the mossy fiber pathway. These findings reveal that preconditioning with LPS 24 h prior to seizure induction may have a protective effect which is abolished by unilateral hippocampal microglia/macrophage ablation.

  18. Microglial ablation and lipopolysaccharide preconditioning affects pilocarpine-induced seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mirrione, Martine M.; Konomos, Dorothy K.; Gravanis, Iordanis; Dewey, Stephen L.; Aguzzi, Adriano; Heppner, Frank L.; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2010-01-01

    Activated microglia have been associated with neurodegeneration in patients and in animal models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE), however their precise functions as neurotoxic or neuroprotective is a topic of significant investigation. To explore this, we examined the effects of pilocarpine induced seizures in transgenic mice where microglia/macrophages were conditionally ablated. We found that unilateral ablation of microglia from the dorsal hippocampus did not alter acute seizure sensitivity. However, when this procedure was coupled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preconditioning (1 mg/kg given 24 hours prior to acute seizure), we observed a significant pro-convulsant phenomenon. This effect was associated with lower metabolic activation in the ipsilateral hippocampus during acute seizures, and could be attributed to activity in the mossy fiber pathway. These findings reveal that preconditioning with LPS 24 hours prior to seizure induction may have a protective effect which is abolished by unilateral hippocampal microglia/macrophage ablation. PMID:20382223

  19. Altered Function of the DnaJ Family Cochaperone DNJ-17 Modulates Locomotor Circuit Activity in a Caenorhabditis elegans Seizure Model

    PubMed Central

    Takayanagi-Kiya, Seika; Jin, Yishi

    2016-01-01

    The highly conserved cochaperone DnaJ/Hsp40 family proteins are known to interact with molecular chaperone Hsp70, and can regulate many cellular processes including protein folding, translocation, and degradation. In studies of Caenorhabditis elegans locomotion mutants, we identified a gain-of-function (gf) mutation in dnj-17 closely linked to the widely used e156 null allele of C. elegans GAD (glutamic acid decarboxylase) unc-25. dnj-17 encodes a DnaJ protein orthologous to human DNAJA5. In C. elegans DNJ-17 is a cytosolic protein and is broadly expressed in many tissues. dnj-17(gf) causes a single amino acid substitution in a conserved domain, and behaves as a hypermorphic mutation. The effect of this dnj-17(gf) is most prominent in mutants lacking GABA synaptic transmission. In a seizure model caused by a mutation in the ionotropic acetylcholine receptor acr-2(gf), dnj-17(gf) exacerbates the convulsion phenotype in conjunction with absence of GABA. Null mutants of dnj-17 show mild resistance to aldicarb, while dnj-17(gf) is hypersensitive. These results highlight the importance of DnaJ proteins in regulation of C. elegans locomotor circuit, and provide insights into the in vivo roles of DnaJ proteins in humans. PMID:27185401

  20. The effects of inferior olive lesion on strychnine seizure

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.C.; Chung, E.Y.; Van Woert, M.H. )

    1990-10-01

    Bilateral inferior olive lesions, produced by systemic administration of the neurotoxin 3-acetylpyridine (3AP) produce a proconvulsant state specific for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus. We have proposed that these phenomena are mediated through increased excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, through activation of glutamate receptors, in response to climbing fiber deafferentation. An increase in quisqualic acid (QA)-displaceable ({sup 3}H)AMPA ((RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid) binding in cerebella from inferior olive-lesioned rats was observed, but no difference in ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding displaced by glutamate, kainic acid (KA) or glutamate diethylester (GDEE) was seen. The excitatory amino acid antagonists GDEE and MK-801 ((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d)cyclo-hepten-5,10 imine) were tested as anticonvulsants for strychnine-induced seizures in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned and control rats. Neither drug effected seizures in control rats, however, both GDEE and MK-801 produced a leftward shift in the strychnine-seizure dose-response curve in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned rats. GDEE also inhibited strychnine-induced myoclonus in the lesioned group, while MK-801 had no effect on myoclonus. The decreased threshold for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus in the 3AP-inferior olive-lesioned rats may be due to an increase in glutamate receptors as suggested by the ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding data.

  1. Salubrinal, ER stress inhibitor, attenuates kainic acid-induced hippocampal cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Soo; Heo, Rok Won; Kim, Hwajin; Yi, Chin-Ok; Shin, Hyun Joo; Han, Jong Woo; Roh, Gu Seob

    2014-10-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal death is closely linked to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial dysfunction. Parkin is an ubiquitin E3 ligase that mediates the ubiquitination of the Bcl-2 family of proteins and its mutations are associated with neuronal apoptosis in neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated the effect of salubrinal, an ER stress inhibitor, on the regulation of ER stress and mitochondrial apoptosis induced by KA, in particular, by controlling parkin expression. We showed that salubrinal significantly reduced seizure activity and increased survival rates of mice with KA-induced seizures. We found that salubrinal protected neurons against apoptotic death by reducing expression of mitochondrial apoptotic factors and elF2α-ATF4-CHOP signaling proteins. Interestingly, we showed that salubrinal decreased the KA-induced parkin expression and inhibited parkin translocation to mitochondria, which suggests that parkin may regulate a cross-talk between ER and mitochondria. Collectively, inhibition of ER stress attenuates mitochondrial apoptotic and ER stress pathways and controls parkin-mediated neuronal death following KA-induced seizures. PMID:24728926

  2. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid-induced pemphigus vulgaris: case report.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Adone; Russo, Teresa; Faccenda, Franco; Piccolo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced pemphigus is a well-established variety of pemphigus, presenting with clinical and histopathologic features identical to idiopathic form. Medical history plays a fundamental role in the diagnosis of drug-induced pemphigus. A large variety of drugs have been implicated in its pathogenesis and they may induce acantholysis via biochemical and/or immune mechanism. We present a case of a 69-year-old woman affected by amoxicillin/clavulanic acid-induced pemphigus and discuss its pathogenetic mechanism.

  3. Clavulanic acid induces penile erection and yawning in male rats: comparison with apomorphine.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Melis, Maria Rosaria; Angioni, Laura; Argiolas, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    The beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid induced penile erection and yawning in a dose dependent manner when given intraperitoneally (IP, 0.05-5mg/kg), perorally (OS, 0.1-5mg/kg) and intracereboventricularly (ICV, 0.01-5 μg/rat) to male rats. The effect resembles that of the dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine given subcutaneously (SC) (0.02-0.25mg/kg), although the responses of the latter followed a U inverted dose-response curve, disappearing at doses higher than 0.1mg/kg. Clavulanic acid responses were reduced by about 55% by haloperidol, a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist (0.1mg/kg IP), and by d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin, an oxytocin receptor antagonist (2 μg/rat ICV), both given 15 min before clavulanic acid. A higher reduction of clavulanic acid responses (more than 80%) was also found with morphine, an opioid receptor agonist (5mg/kg IP), and with mianserin, a serotonin 5HT(2c) receptor antagonist (0.2mg/kg SC). In contrast, no reduction was found with naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist (1mg/kg IP). The ability of haloperidol, d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin and morphine to reduce clavulanic acid induced penile erection and yawning suggests that clavulanic acid induces these responses, at least in part, by increasing central dopaminergic neurotransmission. Dopamine in turn activates oxytocinergic neurotransmission and centrally released oxytocin induces penile erection and yawning. However, since both penile erection and yawning episodes were reduced not only by the blockade of central dopamine and oxytocin receptors and by the stimulation of opioid receptors, which inhibits oxytocinergic neurotransmission, but also by mianserin, an increase of central serotonin neurotransmission is also likely to participate in these clavulanic acid responses.

  4. Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.; Eisenstadt, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EEG data (e-data), artifact data (f-data) via application of a quadratic zero-phase filter of the raw data, artifact-filtered data (g- data) and that was the residual after subtracting f-data from e-data, and a low-pass-filtered version (h-data) of g-data. Two different seizures were analyzed for the same patient. Several nonlinear measures uniquely indicate an epileptic seizure in both cases, including an abrupt decrease in the time per wave cycle in f-data, an abrupt increase in the Kolmogorov entropy and in the correlation dimension for e-h data, and an abrupt increase in the correlation dimension for e-h data. The transition from normal to seizure state also is characterized by distinctly different trends in the nonlinear measures for each seizure and may be potential seizure predictors for this patient. Surrogate analysis of e-data shows that statistically significant nonlinear structure is present during the non-seizure, transition , and seizure epoches.

  5. Determination of seizure propagation across microdomains using spectral measures of causality.

    PubMed

    Basu, Ishita; Kudela, Pawel; Anderson, William S

    2014-01-01

    The use of microelectrode arrays to measure electrical activity from the surface of the brain is increasingly being investigated as a means to improve seizure focus localization. In this work, we determine seizure propagation across microdomains sampled by such microelectrode arrays and compare the results using two widely used frequency domain measures of causality, namely the partial directed coherence and the directed direct transfer function. We show that these two measures produce very similar propagation patterns for simulated microelectrode activity over a relatively smaller number of channels. However as the number of channels increases, partial directed coherence produces better estimates of the actual propagation pattern. Additionally, we apply these two measures to determine seizure propagation over microelectrode arrays measured from a patient undergoing intracranial monitoring for seizure focus localization and find very similar patterns which also agree with a threshold based reconstruction during seizure onset. PMID:25571448

  6. Endogenous heme oxygenase prevents impairment of cerebral vascular functions caused by seizures.

    PubMed

    Carratu, Pierluigi; Pourcyrous, Massroor; Fedinec, Alex; Leffler, Charles W; Parfenova, Helena

    2003-09-01

    In newborn pigs, the mechanism of seizure-induced cerebral hyperemia involves carbon monoxide (CO), the vasodilator product of heme catabolism by heme oxygenase (HO). We hypothesized that seizures cause cerebral vascular dysfunction when HO activity is inhibited. With the use of cranial window techniques, we examined cerebral vascular responses to endothelium-dependent (hypercapnia and bradykinin) and endothelium-independent (isoproterenol and sodium nitroprusside) dilators during the recovery from bicuculline-induced seizures in saline controls and in animals pretreated with a HO inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin (SnPP). SnPP (3 mg/kg iv) blocked dilation to heme and reduced the CO level in cortical periarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid, indicating HO inhibition in the cerebral microcirculation. In saline control piglets, seizures increased the CO level, which correlated with the time-dependent cerebral vasodilation; during the recovery (2 h after seizure induction), responses to all vasodilators were preserved. In SnPP-treated animals, cerebral vasodilation and the CO responses to seizures were greatly reduced, and cerebral vascular reactivity was severely impaired during the recovery. These findings suggest that HO in the cerebral microcirculation is rapidly activated during seizures and provides endogenous protection against seizure-induced vascular injury.

  7. Neocortical very fast oscillations (ripples, 80-200 Hz) during seizures: intracellular correlates.

    PubMed

    Grenier, François; Timofeev, Igor; Steriade, Mircea

    2003-02-01

    Multi-site field potential and intracellular recordings from various neocortical areas were used to study very fast oscillations or ripples (80-200 Hz) during electrographic seizures in cats under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. The animals displayed spontaneously occurring and electrically induced seizures comprising spike-wave complexes (2-3 Hz) and fast runs (10-20 Hz). Neocortical ripples had much higher amplitudes during seizures than during the slow oscillation preceding the onset of seizures. A series of experimental data from the present study supports the hypothesis that ripples are implicated in seizure initiation. Ripples were particularly strong at the onset of seizures and halothane, which antagonizes the occurrence of ripples, also blocked seizures. The firing of electrophysiologically defined cellular types was phase-locked with ripples in simultaneously recorded field potentials. This indicates that ripples during paroxysmal events are associated with a coordination of firing in a majority of neocortical neurons. This was confirmed with dual intracellular recordings. Based on the amplitude that neocortical ripples reach during paroxysmal events, we propose a mechanism by which neocortical ripples during normal network activity could actively participate in the initiation of seizures on reaching a certain threshold amplitude. This mechanism involves a vicious feedback loop in which very fast oscillations in field potentials are a reflection of synchronous action potentials, and in turn these oscillations help generate and synchronize action potentials in adjacent neurons through electrical interactions.

  8. Game-related seizures presenting with two types of clinical features.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Shang-Der; Huang, Chi-Ren

    2006-03-01

    We evaluated 22 patients with epileptic seizures in which the seizures were triggered by various games or game-related materials. Based on whether spontaneous seizure coexisted or not, these 22 patients were divided into two groups. Ten patients who experienced seizures exclusively while playing or watching specific games were referred to as Group I, while 12 patients that had both game-induced and spontaneous seizures were classified as Group II. The patients in Group I had a middle-age onset (39.1 years) with a male predominance (90%). The electroencephalogram (EEG) or brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed non-specific abnormalities in 60%, and the partial onset seizure was recognized in 30% of patients. Antiepileptic drugs had uncertain benefits in this group. In Group II, patients had a male predominance (67%), with onset during adolescence (16.3 years). Most of them had generalized tonic-clonic seizures, myoclonic seizures, and absences, and 42% showed epileptiform discharge on EEG. These 12 patients were categorized into idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Although photosensitivity was an important factor, higher mental activity seemed to be significant precipitants of seizures in Group II. Antiepileptic drugs were necessary and valproic acid alone or combined with clonazepam was effective in this group. The results showed that game-related seizures are not a unique and homogeneous syndrome and may consist of different mechanisms. Teenage onset, coexistent spontaneous seizure, and associated idiopathic generalized epilepsies were crucial factors in the determination of antiepileptic drug therapy. Moreover, avoiding the related games altogether may be a more productive preventive measure.

  9. Involvement of the neuropeptide nociceptin/orphanin FQ in kainate seizures.

    PubMed

    Bregola, Gianni; Zucchini, Silvia; Rodi, Donata; Binaschi, Anna; D'Addario, Claudio; Landuzzi, Daniela; Reinscheid, Rainer; Candeletti, Sanzio; Romualdi, Patrizia; Simonato, Michele

    2002-11-15

    The neuropeptide nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) has been shown to modulate neuronal excitability and neurotransmitter release. Previous studies indicate that the mRNA levels for the N/OFQ precursor (proN/OFQ) are increased after seizures. However, it is unclear whether N/OFQ plays a role in seizure expression. Therefore, (1) we analyzed proN/OFQ mRNA levels and NOP (the N/OFQ receptor) mRNA levels and receptor density in the kainate model of epilepsy, using Northern blot analysis, in situ hybridization, and receptor binding assay, and (2) we examined susceptibility to kainate seizure in mice treated with 1-[(3R, 4R)-1-cyclooctylmethyl-3-hydroxymethyl-4-piperidyl]-3-ethyl-1, 3-dihydro-benzimidazol-2-one (J-113397), a selective NOP receptor antagonist, and in proN/OFQ knock-out mice. After kainate administration, increased proN/OFQ gene expression was observed in the reticular nucleus of the thalamus and in the medial nucleus of the amygdala. In contrast, NOP mRNA levels and receptor density decreased in the amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus, and cortex. Mice treated with the NOP receptor antagonist J-113397 displayed reduced susceptibility to kainate-induced seizures (i.e., significant reduction of behavioral seizure scores). N/OFQ knock-out mice were less susceptible to kainate seizures compared with their wild-type littermates, in that lethality was reduced, latency to generalized seizure onset was prolonged, and behavioral seizure scores decreased. Intracerebroventricular administration of N/OFQ prevented reduced susceptibility to kainate seizures in N/OFQ knock-out mice. These data indicate that acute limbic seizures are associated with increased N/OFQ release in selected areas, causing downregulation of NOP receptors and activation of N/OFQ biosynthesis, and support the notion that the N/OFQ-NOP system plays a facilitatory role in kainate seizure expression.

  10. Smartphone applications for seizure management.

    PubMed

    Pandher, Puneet Singh; Bhullar, Karamdeep Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Technological advancements continue to provide innovative ways of enhancing patient care in medicine. In particular, the growing popularity of smartphone technology has seen the recent emergence of a myriad of healthcare applications (or apps) that promise to help shape the way in which health information is delivered to people worldwide. While limited research already exists on a range of such apps, our study is the first to examine the salient features of smartphone applications as they apply to the area of seizure management. For the purposes of this review, we conducted a search of the official online application stores of the five major smartphone platforms: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Windows Mobile and Nokia-Symbian. Apps were included if they reported to contain some information or tools relating to seizure management and excluded if they were aimed exclusively at health professionals. A total of 28 applications met these criteria. Overall, we found an increasing number of epilepsy apps available on the smartphone market, but with only a minority offering comprehensive educational information alongside tools such as seizure diaries, medication tracking and/or video recording.

  11. Occipital lobe seizures and epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Adcock, Jane E; Panayiotopoulos, Chrysostomos P

    2012-10-01

    Occipital lobe epilepsies (OLEs) manifest with occipital seizures from an epileptic focus within the occipital lobes. Ictal clinical symptoms are mainly visual and oculomotor. Elementary visual hallucinations are common and characteristic. Postictal headache occurs in more than half of patients (epilepsy-migraine sequence). Electroencephalography (EEG) is of significant diagnostic value, but certain limitations should be recognized. Occipital spikes and/or occipital paroxysms either spontaneous or photically induced are the main interictal EEG abnormalities in idiopathic OLE. However, occipital epileptiform abnormalities may also occur without clinical relationship to seizures particularly in children. In cryptogenic/symptomatic OLE, unilateral posterior EEG slowing is more common than occipital spikes. In neurosurgical series of symptomatic OLE, interictal EEG abnormalities are rarely strictly occipital. The most common localization is in the posterior temporal regions and less than one-fifth show occipital spikes. In photosensitive OLE, intermittent photic stimulation elicits (1) spikes/polyspikes confined in the occipital regions or (2) generalized spikes/polyspikes with posterior emphasis. In ictal EEG, a well-localized unifocal rhythmic ictal discharge during occipital seizures is infrequent. A bioccipital field spread to the temporal regions is common. Frequency, severity, and response to treatment vary considerably from good to intractable and progressive mainly depending on underlying causes.

  12. Temporal distribution of seizures in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Taubøll, E; Lundervold, A; Gjerstad, L

    1991-03-01

    A major problem in epileptology is why a seizure occurs at a particular moment in time. An initial step in solving this problem is a detailed analysis of the temporal distribution of seizures. Using methods and theories of stochastic processes, seizure patterns in a group of epileptic outpatients were examined for stationarity, randomness, dependency and periodicity in a prospective study. Sixteen of the 21 seizure diaries included in the study showed stationarity; 2 were non-stationary and 3 inconclusive. Eleven of the 16 stationary diaries were non-Poisson (P less than 0.005), indicating that in the majority of patients seizures did not occur randomly. The most frequently encountered phenomenon was seizure clustering. Clustering was considered when the diaries fulfilled all three criteria: (1) a positive R-test (P less than 0.001); (2) deviation from the fitted Poisson distribution towards clustering; and (3) the feature of an autoregressive process in the autocorrelogram plot. Dependency between seizure events was demonstrated in 8 of the 16 stationary diaries, computing first order transition probabilities. A detailed analysis of seizure occurrence is a major step towards a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying seizure precipitation. This is exemplified by our finding of a relation between seizure frequency and the menstrual cycle.

  13. Obestatin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Konturek, Peter; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide derived from the proghrelin, has been shown to exhibit some protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present study was to determine the effect of obestatin administration on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Obestatin was administered intraperitoneally twice a day at a dose of 8 nmol/kg, starting 24 h after the induction of colitis. Seven or 14 days after the induction of colitis, the healing rate of the colon was evaluated. Results. Treatment with obestatin after induction of colitis accelerated the healing of colonic wall damage and this effect was associated with a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase and content of interleukin-1β. Moreover, obestatin administration significantly reversed the colitis-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Conclusion. Administration of exogenous obestatin exhibits therapeutic effects in the course of acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect is related, at least in part, to the obestatin-evoked anti-inflammatory effect, an improvement of local blood flow, and an increase in cell proliferation in colonic mucosa.

  14. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis. PMID:27598133

  15. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis. PMID:27598133

  16. Icariin, a major constituent from Epimedium brevicornum, attenuates ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zong, Nan; Li, Fei; Deng, Yuanyuan; Shi, Jingshan; Jin, Feng; Gong, Qihai

    2016-10-15

    Excitotoxicity is one of the most extensively studied causes of neuronal death and plays an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Icariin is a flavonoid component of a traditional Chinese medicine reported to possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of icariin against learning and memory impairment induced by excitotoxicity. Here, we demonstrated that rats receiving intracerebroventricular injection of excitatory neurotoxin ibotenic acid exhibited impaired learning and memory. Oral administration of icariin at doses of 20 and 40mg/kg rescued behavioral performance and protected against neurotoxicity in rat hippocampus by suppressing ibotenic acid induced pro-apoptosis. Furthermore, Western blott of hippocampal specimens revealed that icariin up-regulated the expression of calbindin-D28k protein following ibotenic acid administration. Additionally, icariin inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family phosphorylation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling, implicating the MAPK signaling and NF-κB signaling pathways were involved in the mechanism underlying icariin-mediated neuroprotection against ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity. These data suggested that icariin could be a potential agent for treatment of excitotoxicity-related diseases, including AD. PMID:27368415

  17. Nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo

    2015-02-01

    Nucleic acids derived from viral pathogens are typical pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In mammals, the recognition of viral nucleic acids by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which include Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RLRs), induces the release of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferons (IFNs) through the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3/7 pathways, triggering the host antiviral state. However, whether nucleic acids can induce similar antiviral immunity in invertebrates remains ambiguous. Several studies have reported that nucleic acid mimics, especially dsRNA mimic poly(I:C), can strongly induce non-specific antiviral immune responses in insects, shrimp, and oyster. This behavior shows multiple similarities to the hallmarks of mammalian IFN responses. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates. We also discuss the potential recognition and regulatory mechanisms that confer non-specific antiviral immunity on invertebrate hosts.

  18. Comparative neuroprotective profile of statins in quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    A possible neuroprotective role has been recently suggested for 3H3MGCoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Here, we sought to determine neuroprotective effect of statins in quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats. Rats were surgically administered quinolinic acid and treated with Atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (15, 30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (5, 10 mg/kg) once daily up to 3 weeks. Atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (10 mg/kg) treatment significantly attenuated the quinolinic acid induced behavioral (locomotor activity, rotarod performance and beam walk test), biochemical (lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration, SOD and catalase), mitochondrial enzyme complex alterations in rats suggesting their free radical scavenging potential. Additionally, atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (10 mg/kg) significantly decrease the TNF-α level and striatal lesion volume in quinolinic acid treated animals indicating their anti-inflammatory effects. In comparing the protective effect of different statins, atorvastatin is effective at both the doses while simvastatin and fluvastatins at respective lower doses were not able to produce the protective effect in quinolinic acid treated animals. These modulations can account, at least partly, for the beneficial effect of statins in our rodent model of striatal degeneration. Our findings show that statins could be explored as possible neuroprotective agents for neurodegenerative disorders such as HD. PMID:20696189

  19. Icariin, a major constituent from Epimedium brevicornum, attenuates ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zong, Nan; Li, Fei; Deng, Yuanyuan; Shi, Jingshan; Jin, Feng; Gong, Qihai

    2016-10-15

    Excitotoxicity is one of the most extensively studied causes of neuronal death and plays an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Icariin is a flavonoid component of a traditional Chinese medicine reported to possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of icariin against learning and memory impairment induced by excitotoxicity. Here, we demonstrated that rats receiving intracerebroventricular injection of excitatory neurotoxin ibotenic acid exhibited impaired learning and memory. Oral administration of icariin at doses of 20 and 40mg/kg rescued behavioral performance and protected against neurotoxicity in rat hippocampus by suppressing ibotenic acid induced pro-apoptosis. Furthermore, Western blott of hippocampal specimens revealed that icariin up-regulated the expression of calbindin-D28k protein following ibotenic acid administration. Additionally, icariin inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family phosphorylation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling, implicating the MAPK signaling and NF-κB signaling pathways were involved in the mechanism underlying icariin-mediated neuroprotection against ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity. These data suggested that icariin could be a potential agent for treatment of excitotoxicity-related diseases, including AD.

  20. The influence of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic-acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Maduzia, D; Matuszyk, A; Ceranowicz, D; Warzecha, Z; Ceranowicz, P; Fyderek, K; Galazka, K; Dembinski, A

    2015-12-01

    Ghrelin has been primarily shown to exhibit protective and therapeutic effect in the gut. Pretreatment with ghrelin inhibits the development of acute pancreatitis and accelerates pancreatic recovery in the course of this disease. In the stomach, ghrelin reduces gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol, stress or alendronate, as well as accelerates the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric and duodenal ulcer. The aim of present studies was to investigate the effect of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic acid-induced colitis. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Animals were treated intraperitoneally with saline (control) or ghrelin (4, 8 or 16 nmol/kg/dose). Saline or ghrelin was given twice: 8 and 1 h before induction of colitis. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 1 ml of 4% solution of acetic acid and the severity of colitis was assessed 1 or 24 hours after induction of inflammation. Rectal administration of acetic acid induced colitis in all animals. Damage of colonic wall was seen at the macroscopic and microscopic level. This effect was accompanied by a reduction in colonic blood flow and mucosal DNA synthesis. Moreover, induction of colitis significantly increased mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β), activity of myeloperoxidase and concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA). Mucosal activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was reduced. Pretreatment with ghrelin reduced the area and grade of mucosal damage. This effect was accompanied by an improvement of blood flow, DNA synthesis and SOD activity in colonic mucosa. Moreover, ghrelin administration reduced mucosal concentration of IL-1β and MDA, as well as decreased mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Administration of ghrelin protects the large bowel against the development of the acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect seems to be related to the ghrelin-evoked anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

  1. The influence of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic-acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Maduzia, D; Matuszyk, A; Ceranowicz, D; Warzecha, Z; Ceranowicz, P; Fyderek, K; Galazka, K; Dembinski, A

    2015-12-01

    Ghrelin has been primarily shown to exhibit protective and therapeutic effect in the gut. Pretreatment with ghrelin inhibits the development of acute pancreatitis and accelerates pancreatic recovery in the course of this disease. In the stomach, ghrelin reduces gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol, stress or alendronate, as well as accelerates the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric and duodenal ulcer. The aim of present studies was to investigate the effect of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic acid-induced colitis. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Animals were treated intraperitoneally with saline (control) or ghrelin (4, 8 or 16 nmol/kg/dose). Saline or ghrelin was given twice: 8 and 1 h before induction of colitis. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 1 ml of 4% solution of acetic acid and the severity of colitis was assessed 1 or 24 hours after induction of inflammation. Rectal administration of acetic acid induced colitis in all animals. Damage of colonic wall was seen at the macroscopic and microscopic level. This effect was accompanied by a reduction in colonic blood flow and mucosal DNA synthesis. Moreover, induction of colitis significantly increased mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β), activity of myeloperoxidase and concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA). Mucosal activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was reduced. Pretreatment with ghrelin reduced the area and grade of mucosal damage. This effect was accompanied by an improvement of blood flow, DNA synthesis and SOD activity in colonic mucosa. Moreover, ghrelin administration reduced mucosal concentration of IL-1β and MDA, as well as decreased mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Administration of ghrelin protects the large bowel against the development of the acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect seems to be related to the ghrelin-evoked anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects. PMID:26769837

  2. A Case of Hyperventilation Syndrome Mimicking Complex Partial Seizure: Usefulness of EEG Monitoring in Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Bong Su

    2015-01-01

    Acute hyperventilation syndrome not only can be clinically misdiagnosed as epileptic seizures, but also complex partial seizures may involve hyperventilation as a part of aura. Although electrography (EEG) monitoring is one of the most important procedure to differentiate these conditions, it could not be widely used in emergency department. Variety forms of epileptic attack, mainly idiopathic generalized epilepsy, are provoked by voluntary hyperventilation. In contrast, it is not clear whether hyperventilation can activate the partial seizures. We reported a case of acute hyperventilation syndrome (HSV) mimicking first onset complex partial seizure, impending non-convulsive status epilepticus, which was diagnosed by EEG in the emergency department. The electrographic seizure was provoked again by voluntary hyperventilation after clinical improvement. PMID:26157670

  3. Illusory shadow person causing paradoxical gaze deviations during temporal lobe seizures.

    PubMed

    Zijlmans, M; van Eijsden, P; Ferrier, C H; Kho, K H; van Rijen, P C; Leijten, F S S

    2009-06-01

    Generally, activation of the frontal eye field during seizures can cause versive (forced) gaze deviation, while non-versive head deviation is hypothesised to result from ictal neglect after inactivation of the ipsilateral temporo-parietal area. Almost all non-versive head deviations occurring during temporal lobe seizures are directed to the side of seizure onset, so in derogatory cases it is worth while explaining the paradoxical event. We present a patient with a paradoxical direction of gaze deviation during temporal lobe seizures with an unexpected explanation. Electrocortical stimulation of the temporo-parieto-occipital junction elicited an irrepressible urge to look towards an illusory shadow person besides the patient. Paradoxical non-versive gaze deviations in temporal lobe seizures may be due to illusory experiences masked by postictal amnesia. PMID:19448096

  4. Severe burns as a consequence of seizures in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Spitz, M C

    1992-01-01

    We report 10 seizure-related thermal injuries severe enough to require hospitalization in patients with epilepsy. Eight of the ten incidents were with patients who had had seizures with impaired consciousness two or more times a month. This suggests that seizure frequency is a risk factor and implies the importance of striving for optimal seizure control. Two burns each occurred from an electric iron, a hand-held hair dryer, and stove-top cooking. Minimizing these activities, especially in patients with frequent consciousness-altering seizures, may be useful. Three burns occurred while showering; these resulted in the most severe injuries, with hospital stays of 29, 30, and 41 days. Simple plumbing devices may have prevented these injuries.

  5. Physical exercise in rats with epilepsy is protective against seizures: evidence of animal studies.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; Terra, Vera Cristina; Cysneiros, Roberta Monterazzo; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão

    2009-12-01

    People with epilepsy have been discouraged from participating in physical activity due to the fear that it will exacerbate seizures. Clinical and animal studies indicate a reduction of seizure frequency as well as decrease susceptibility to subsequently evoked seizures after an exercise program. Analyses from experimental studies of animals with epilepsy submitted to physical training programs were performed. In all studies the physical training was able to reduce the number of spontaneous seizures in rats with epilepsy. Seizure occurrence during exercise was relatively absent in the majority of studies. No death was found in animals with epilepsy during 1680 h of exercise. Based on these results it is plausible encouraging persons with epilepsy to non-pharmacological treatments and preventative measures such as physical exercise.

  6. Illusory shadow person causing paradoxical gaze deviations during temporal lobe seizures.

    PubMed

    Zijlmans, M; van Eijsden, P; Ferrier, C H; Kho, K H; van Rijen, P C; Leijten, F S S

    2009-06-01

    Generally, activation of the frontal eye field during seizures can cause versive (forced) gaze deviation, while non-versive head deviation is hypothesised to result from ictal neglect after inactivation of the ipsilateral temporo-parietal area. Almost all non-versive head deviations occurring during temporal lobe seizures are directed to the side of seizure onset, so in derogatory cases it is worth while explaining the paradoxical event. We present a patient with a paradoxical direction of gaze deviation during temporal lobe seizures with an unexpected explanation. Electrocortical stimulation of the temporo-parieto-occipital junction elicited an irrepressible urge to look towards an illusory shadow person besides the patient. Paradoxical non-versive gaze deviations in temporal lobe seizures may be due to illusory experiences masked by postictal amnesia.

  7. Role of hepatocyte S6K1 in palmitic acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, lipotoxicity, insulin resistance and in oleic acid-induced protection.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Virginia; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Muntané, Jordi; Kozma, Sara C; Valverde, Ángela M

    2015-06-01

    The excess of saturated free fatty acids, such as palmitic acid, that induces lipotoxicity in hepatocytes, has been implicated in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease also associated with insulin resistance. By contrast, oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, attenuates the effects of palmitic acid. We evaluated whether palmitic acid is directly associated with both insulin resistance and lipoapoptosis in mouse and human hepatocytes and the impact of oleic acid in the molecular mechanisms that mediate both processes. In human and mouse hepatocytes palmitic acid at a lipotoxic concentration triggered early activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related kinases, induced the apoptotic transcription factor CHOP, activated caspase 3 and increased the percentage of apoptotic cells. These effects concurred with decreased IR/IRS1/Akt insulin pathway. Oleic acid suppressed the toxic effects of palmitic acid on ER stress activation, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance. Besides, oleic acid suppressed palmitic acid-induced activation of S6K1. This protection was mimicked by pharmacological or genetic inhibition of S6K1 in hepatocytes. In conclusion, this is the first study highlighting the activation of S6K1 by palmitic acid as a common and novel mechanism by which its inhibition by oleic acid prevents ER stress, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance in hepatocytes.

  8. Seizure risk in patients with attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder treated with atomoxetine.

    PubMed

    Wernicke, Joachim F; Holdridge, Karen Chilcott; Jin, Ling; Edison, Timothy; Zhang, Shuyu; Bangs, Mark E; Allen, Albert J; Ball, Susan; Dunn, David

    2007-07-01

    The comorbidity of seizures, epilepsy, and attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) prompted the examination of whether atomoxetine use for ADHD is associated with an increased risk of seizures. Seizures and seizure-related symptoms were reviewed from two independent Eli Lilly and Company databases: the atomoxetine clinical trials database and the atomoxetine postmarketing spontaneous adverse event database. Review of clinical trial data indicated that the crude incidence rates of seizure adverse events were between 0.1 and 0.2%, and were not significantly different between atomoxetine, placebo, and methylphenidate. Only 2% of the postmarketing spontaneous reports of seizure events were classified as having no clear contributing or confounding factors, and the reporting rate (8 per 100 000 patients exposed) was within the expected range of population-based incidence. Although children with ADHD are increasingly recognized as being at an elevated risk for seizures, treatment of ADHD symptoms with atomoxetine does not appear to elevate this risk further. The shared vulnerability between ADHD and seizure activity should be taken into account when making treatment decisions for populations of children with epilepsy and children with ADHD. PMID:17593120

  9. Changes in Cerebral Oxidative Metabolism during Neonatal Seizures Following Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Subhabrata; Bale, Gemma; Mathieson, Sean; Uria-Avellanal, Cristina; Meek, Judith; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Robertson, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common following hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in newborn infants. Prolonged or recurrent seizures have been shown to exacerbate neuronal damage in the developing brain; however, the precise mechanism is not fully understood. Cytochrome-c-oxidase is responsible for more than 90% of ATP production inside mitochondria. Using a novel broadband near-infrared spectroscopy system, we measured the concentration changes in the oxidation state of cerebral cytochrome-c-oxidase (Δ[oxCCO]) and hemodynamics during recurrent neonatal seizures following hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in a newborn infant. A rapid increase in Δ[oxCCO] was noted at the onset of seizures along with a rise in the baseline of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Cerebral oxygenation and cerebral blood volume fell just prior to the seizure onset but recovered rapidly during seizures. Δ[oxCCO] during seizures correlated with changes in mean electroencephalogram voltage indicating an increase in neuronal activation and energy demand. The progressive decline in the Δ[oxCCO] baseline during seizures suggests a progressive decrease of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. PMID:27559538

  10. Changes in Cerebral Oxidative Metabolism during Neonatal Seizures Following Hypoxic–Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subhabrata; Bale, Gemma; Mathieson, Sean; Uria-Avellanal, Cristina; Meek, Judith; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Robertson, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common following hypoxic–ischemic brain injury in newborn infants. Prolonged or recurrent seizures have been shown to exacerbate neuronal damage in the developing brain; however, the precise mechanism is not fully understood. Cytochrome-c-oxidase is responsible for more than 90% of ATP production inside mitochondria. Using a novel broadband near-infrared spectroscopy system, we measured the concentration changes in the oxidation state of cerebral cytochrome-c-oxidase (Δ[oxCCO]) and hemodynamics during recurrent neonatal seizures following hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy in a newborn infant. A rapid increase in Δ[oxCCO] was noted at the onset of seizures along with a rise in the baseline of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Cerebral oxygenation and cerebral blood volume fell just prior to the seizure onset but recovered rapidly during seizures. Δ[oxCCO] during seizures correlated with changes in mean electroencephalogram voltage indicating an increase in neuronal activation and energy demand. The progressive decline in the Δ[oxCCO] baseline during seizures suggests a progressive decrease of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. PMID:27559538

  11. Morphine modulates the effects of histamine H1 and H3 receptors on seizure susceptibility in pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure model of mice.

    PubMed

    Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Hassanipour, Mahsa; Shirzadian, Armin; Gooshe, Maziar; Alijanpour, Sakineh; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaie; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2015-12-15

    Histamine regulates release of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate and also is involved in several functions in central nervous system (CNS). It has been shown that histamine participates in disorders like seizure. It has been well documented that morphine dose-dependently induces anti or proconvulsant effects. In the current study, we firstly showed that morphine (1mg/kg) exerts anticonvulsant effects which significantly reversed by naltrexone administration. Secondly, we determined seizure threshold for H1 and H3 receptors agonists and antagonists in mouse model of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced clonic seizures. Our results showed that activation of H1 receptors by 2-(2-Pyridyl)-ethylamine exerts anticonvulsant properties while inhibition of H1 receptors by pyrilamine maleate induced proconvulsant effects. Furthermore, we showed that immepip dihydrobromide, a H3 receptor agonist, increased seizure susceptibility to PTZ whereas thioperamide, a H3 receptor antagonist increased seizure threshold. We also revealed that pretreatment with morphine potently reversed the effects of histaminergic system on seizure threshold suggesting the involvement of opioid system in alteration of seizure threshold by histaminergic drugs.

  12. Increased isoprostane levels in oleic acid-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Koichi; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Tsushima, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Sumiko; Yokoyama, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Rikimaru; Obata, Toru

    2009-10-16

    The present study was performed to examine a role of oxidative stress in oleic acid-induced lung injury model. Fifteen anesthetized sheep were ventilated and instrumented with a lung lymph fistula and vascular catheters for blood gas analysis and measurement of isoprostanes (8-epi prostaglandin F2{alpha}). Following stable baseline measurements, oleic acid (0.08 ml/kg) was administered and observed 4 h. Isoprostane was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with the isotope dilution method. Isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph were significantly increased 2 h after oleic acid administration and then decreased at 4 h. The percent increases in isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph at 2 h were significantly correlated with deteriorated oxygenation at the same time point, respectively. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of the pulmonary fat embolism-induced acute lung injury model in sheep and that the increase relates with the deteriorated oxygenation.

  13. Proteomic study on usnic-acid-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Zhao, Xiaoping; Lu, Xiaoyan; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Yi

    2012-07-25

    Usnic acid, a lichen metabolite, is used as a dietary supplement for weight loss. However, clinical studies have shown that usnic acid causes hepatotoxicity. The present study aims to investigate the mechanism of usnic acid hepatotoxicity in vivo. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to analyze the expression profiles of differentially regulated and expressed proteins in rat liver after usnic acid administration. The results reveal the differential expression of 10 proteins in usnic-acid-treated rats compared to the normal controls. These proteins are associated with oxidative stress, lipid metabolism, and several other molecular pathways. The endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria may be the primary targets of usnic-acid-induced hepatotoxicity.

  14. A novel seizure detection algorithm informed by hidden Markov model event states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldassano, Steven; Wulsin, Drausin; Ung, Hoameng; Blevins, Tyler; Brown, Mesha-Gay; Fox, Emily; Litt, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Recently the FDA approved the first responsive, closed-loop intracranial device to treat epilepsy. Because these devices must respond within seconds of seizure onset and not miss events, they are tuned to have high sensitivity, leading to frequent false positive stimulations and decreased battery life. In this work, we propose a more robust seizure detection model. Approach. We use a Bayesian nonparametric Markov switching process to parse intracranial EEG (iEEG) data into distinct dynamic event states. Each event state is then modeled as a multidimensional Gaussian distribution to allow for predictive state assignment. By detecting event states highly specific for seizure onset zones, the method can identify precise regions of iEEG data associated with the transition to seizure activity, reducing false positive detections associated with interictal bursts. The seizure detection algorithm was translated to a real-time application and validated in a small pilot study using 391 days of continuous iEEG data from two dogs with naturally occurring, multifocal epilepsy. A feature-based seizure detector modeled after the NeuroPace RNS System was developed as a control. Main results. Our novel seizure detection method demonstrated an improvement in false negative rate (0/55 seizures missed versus 2/55 seizures missed) as well as a significantly reduced false positive rate (0.0012 h versus 0.058 h‑1). All seizures were detected an average of 12.1 ± 6.9 s before the onset of unequivocal epileptic activity (unequivocal epileptic onset (UEO)). Significance. This algorithm represents a computationally inexpensive, individualized, real-time detection method suitable for implantable antiepileptic devices that may considerably reduce false positive rate relative to current industry standards.

  15. A novel seizure detection algorithm informed by hidden Markov model event states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldassano, Steven; Wulsin, Drausin; Ung, Hoameng; Blevins, Tyler; Brown, Mesha-Gay; Fox, Emily; Litt, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Recently the FDA approved the first responsive, closed-loop intracranial device to treat epilepsy. Because these devices must respond within seconds of seizure onset and not miss events, they are tuned to have high sensitivity, leading to frequent false positive stimulations and decreased battery life. In this work, we propose a more robust seizure detection model. Approach. We use a Bayesian nonparametric Markov switching process to parse intracranial EEG (iEEG) data into distinct dynamic event states. Each event state is then modeled as a multidimensional Gaussian distribution to allow for predictive state assignment. By detecting event states highly specific for seizure onset zones, the method can identify precise regions of iEEG data associated with the transition to seizure activity, reducing false positive detections associated with interictal bursts. The seizure detection algorithm was translated to a real-time application and validated in a small pilot study using 391 days of continuous iEEG data from two dogs with naturally occurring, multifocal epilepsy. A feature-based seizure detector modeled after the NeuroPace RNS System was developed as a control. Main results. Our novel seizure detection method demonstrated an improvement in false negative rate (0/55 seizures missed versus 2/55 seizures missed) as well as a significantly reduced false positive rate (0.0012 h versus 0.058 h-1). All seizures were detected an average of 12.1 ± 6.9 s before the onset of unequivocal epileptic activity (unequivocal epileptic onset (UEO)). Significance. This algorithm represents a computationally inexpensive, individualized, real-time detection method suitable for implantable antiepileptic devices that may considerably reduce false positive rate relative to current industry standards.

  16. Massively multiplayer online role-playing game-induced seizures: a neglected health problem in Internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2006-08-01

    As the Internet has become rapidly and widely integrated into society, Internet addiction has become a growing psychosocial problem. However, epileptic seizure, another out-of-the-ordinary health problem, is often neglected in this regard. Ten patients who experienced epileptic seizures while playing the newest genre of electronic games -- Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) -- were investigated. Patients were predominantly male young adults, and most of the events were generalized tonic-clonic seizures, myoclonic seizures, and absences. These patients should be categorized into idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Even though photosensitivity was an important factor, behavioral and higher mental activities also seemed to be significant seizure precipitants. Results demonstrated that MMORPG-induced seizures were not analogous to the ordinary video game-induced seizures. Significantly, an epileptic seizure warning did not always appear on the websites of MMORPGs and instructions for the software. While the prevalence of MMORPG-induced seizures remains unknown, it may exceed our expectations and impact our society. Not only for clinical neurologists but also for the primary physicians, educators, sociologists, and global online game publishers, there should be an awareness of this special form of reflex seizures in order to provide an appropriate health warning to MMORPG players.

  17. Seizure characteristics in Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Candee, Meghan S; Carey, John C; Krantz, Ian D; Filloux, Francis M

    2012-12-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a congenital disorder attributed to supernumerary isochromosome 12p mosaicism. Craniofacial dysmorphism, learning impairment and seizures are considered cardinal features. However, little is known regarding the seizure and epilepsy patterns in PKS. To better define the prevalence and spectrum of seizures in PKS, we studied 51 patients (39 male, 12 female; median age 4 years and 9 months; age range 7 months to 31 years) with confirmed 12p tetrasomy. Using a parent-based structured questionnaire, we collected data regarding seizure onset, frequency, timing, semiology, and medication therapy. Patients were recruited through our practice, at PKS Kids family events, and via the PKS Kids website. Epilepsy occurred in 27 (53%) with 23 (85%) of those with seizures having seizure onset prior to 3.5 years of age. Mean age at seizure onset was 2 years and 4 months. The most common seizure types were myoclonic (15/27, 56%), generalized convulsions (13/27, 48%), and clustered tonic spasms (similar to infantile spasms; 8/27, 30%). Thirteen of 27 patients with seizures (48%) had more than one seizure type with 26 out of 27 (96%) ever having taken antiepileptic medications. Nineteen of 27 (70%) continued to have seizures and 17/27 (63%) remained on antiepileptic medication. The most commonly used medications were: levetiracetam (10/27, 37%), valproic acid (10/27, 37%), and topiramate (9/27, 33%) with levetiracetam felt to be "most helpful" by parents (6/27, 22%). Further exploration of seizure timing, in-depth analysis of EEG recordings, and collection of MRI data to rule out confounding factors is warranted. PMID:23169688

  18. Emergency Management of Seizures in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Christine; O'Hara, Kathryn; Kiel, Sarah; McCullough, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    Effective seizure management in the school setting is a critical issue for students with seizures, as well as their parents, classmates, and school personnel. The unpredictable nature of seizures and the potential outcomes of experiencing a seizure in school are sources of anxiety for students with seizures. The ability to respond appropriately to…

  19. Role of nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation in pathophysiological mechanisms of audiogenic seizures in GEP Rats and DBA/2 mice.

    PubMed

    Bashkatova, V G; Mikoyan, V D; Malikova, L A; Raevskii, K S

    2003-07-01

    We evaluated the role of nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation in the pathophysiological mechanisms of seizures in genetically epilepsy prone (GEP) rats and DBA/2 mice with genetically determined audiogenic epilepsy. In rats and mice acoustic stimulation led to locomotor activation followed by clonic-tonic seizures. The contents of nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation products at the peak of seizures markedly surpassed the control level. PMID:14534598

  20. Seizures and X-linked intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Roger E.; Holden, Kenton R.; Rogers, R. Curtis; Schwartz, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Intellectual disability occurs as an isolated X-linked trait and as a component of recognizable X-linked syndromes in the company of somatic, metabolic, neuromuscular, or behavioral abnormalities. Seizures accompany intellectual disability in almost half of these X-linked disorders. The spectrum of seizures found in the X-linked intellectual disability syndromes is broad, varying in time of onset, type of seizure, and response to anticonvulsant therapy. The majority of the genes associated with XLID and seizures have now been identified. PMID:22377486

  1. Control of absence seizures induced by the pathways connected to SRN in corticothalamic system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bing; Guo, Daqing; Wang, Qingyun

    2015-06-01

    The cerebral cortex, thalamus and basal ganglia together form an important network in the brain, which is closely related to several nerve diseases, such as parkinson disease, epilepsy seizure and so on. Absence seizure can be characterized by 2-4 Hz oscillatory activity, and it can be induced by abnormal interactions between the cerebral cortex and thalamus. Many experimental results have also shown that basal ganglia are a key neural structure, which closely links the corticothalamic system in the brain. Presently, we use a corticothalamic-basal ganglia model to study which pathways in corticothalamic system can induce absence seizures and how these oscillatory activities can be controlled by projections from the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) to the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) or the specific relay nuclei (SRN) of the thalamus. By tuning the projection strength of the pathway "Excitatory pyramidal cortex-SRN", "SRN-Excitatory pyramidal cortex" and "SRN-TRN" respectively, different firing states including absence seizures can appear. This indicates that absence seizures can be induced by tuning the connection strength of the considered pathway. In addition, typical absence epilepsy seizure state "spike-and-slow wave discharges" can be controlled by adjusting the activation level of the SNr as the pathways SNr-SRN and SNr-TRN open independently or together. Our results emphasize the importance of basal ganglia in controlling absence seizures in the corticothalamic system, and can provide a potential idea for the clinical treatment.

  2. The effective connectivity of the seizure onset zone and ictal perfusion changes in amygdala kindled rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Cleeren, Evy; Premereur, Elsie; Casteels, Cindy; Goffin, Karolien; Janssen, Peter; Van Paesschen, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are network-level phenomena. Hence, epilepsy may be regarded as a circuit-level disorder that cannot be understood outside this context. Better insight into the effective connectivity of the seizure onset zone and the manner in which seizure activity spreads could lead to specifically-tailored therapies for epilepsy. We applied the electrical amygdala kindling model in two rhesus monkeys until these animals displayed consistent stage IV seizures. At this stage, we investigated the effective connectivity of the amygdala by means of electrical microstimulation during fMRI (EM-fMRI). In addition, we imaged changes in perfusion during a seizure using ictal SPECT perfusion imaging. The spatial overlap between the connectivity network and the ictal perfusion network was assessed both at the regional level, by calculating Dice coefficients using anatomically defined regions of interest, and at the voxel level. The kindled amygdala was extensively connected to bilateral cortical and subcortical structures, which in many cases were connected multisynaptically to the amygdala. At the regional level, the spatial extents of many of these fMRI activations and deactivations corresponded to the respective increases and decreases in perfusion imaged during a stage IV seizure. At the voxel level, however, some regions showed residual seizure-specific activity (not overlapping with the EM-fMRI activations) or fMRI-specific activation (not overlapping with the ictal SPECT activations), indicating that frequently, only a part of a region anatomically connected to the seizure onset zone participated in seizure propagation. Thus, EM-fMRI in the amygdala of electrically-kindled monkeys reveals widespread areas that are often connected multisynaptically to the seizure focus. Seizure activity appears to spread, to a large extent, via these connected areas.

  3. The effective connectivity of the seizure onset zone and ictal perfusion changes in amygdala kindled rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Cleeren, Evy; Premereur, Elsie; Casteels, Cindy; Goffin, Karolien; Janssen, Peter; Van Paesschen, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are network-level phenomena. Hence, epilepsy may be regarded as a circuit-level disorder that cannot be understood outside this context. Better insight into the effective connectivity of the seizure onset zone and the manner in which seizure activity spreads could lead to specifically-tailored therapies for epilepsy. We applied the electrical amygdala kindling model in two rhesus monkeys until these animals displayed consistent stage IV seizures. At this stage, we investigated the effective connectivity of the amygdala by means of electrical microstimulation during fMRI (EM-fMRI). In addition, we imaged changes in perfusion during a seizure using ictal SPECT perfusion imaging. The spatial overlap between the connectivity network and the ictal perfusion network was assessed both at the regional level, by calculating Dice coefficients using anatomically defined regions of interest, and at the voxel level. The kindled amygdala was extensively connected to bilateral cortical and subcortical structures, which in many cases were connected multisynaptically to the amygdala. At the regional level, the spatial extents of many of these fMRI activations and deactivations corresponded to the respective increases and decreases in perfusion imaged during a stage IV seizure. At the voxel level, however, some regions showed residual seizure-specific activity (not overlapping with the EM-fMRI activations) or fMRI-specific activation (not overlapping with the ictal SPECT activations), indicating that frequently, only a part of a region anatomically connected to the seizure onset zone participated in seizure propagation. Thus, EM-fMRI in the amygdala of electrically-kindled monkeys reveals widespread areas that are often connected multisynaptically to the seizure focus. Seizure activity appears to spread, to a large extent, via these connected areas. PMID:27489773

  4. Experiencing neonatal maternal separation increased the seizure threshold in adult male mice: Involvement of the opioid system.

    PubMed

    Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Amiri, Shayan; Shirzadian, Armin; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Alijanpour, Sakineh; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Mohammadi-Asl, Ali; Hassanipour, Mahsa; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaie; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2015-11-01

    Experiencing early-life stress has been considered as a potent risk factor for the development of many of brain disorders, including seizures. Intervening mechanisms through which neonatal maternal separation (MS) alters the seizure susceptibility in adulthood have not been well studied. In the current study, by applying 180 min of MS stress (PND 2-14), we determined the seizure susceptibility and considered the role of the opioid system. Maternal separation increased the seizure threshold, and administration of anticonvulsant/proconvulsant doses of morphine (1 and 30 mg/kg, respectively) reversed the impact of MS. Using tail flick and hot plate tests, we exposed animals to 30 min Restraint stress (RS) and found that MS decreased the pain threshold, suggesting the hyporesponsiveness of the opioid system. These results supported the abnormal seizure activity observed in the MS mice and suggested that abnormalities in the opioid system following MS alter seizure susceptibility in later life. PMID:26409126

  5. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain defects) Brain tumor (rare) Drug abuse Electric shock Epilepsy Fever (particularly in young children ) Head injury Heart disease Heat illness ( heat intolerance ) High fever Phenylketonuria ( PKU ), which ...

  6. Do energy drinks cause epileptic seizure and ischemic stroke?

    PubMed

    Dikici, Suber; Saritas, Ayhan; Besir, Fahri Halit; Tasci, Ahmet Hakan; Kandis, Hayati

    2013-01-01

    Energy drinks are popular among young individuals and marketed to college students, athletes, and active individuals between the ages of 21 and 35 years. We report a case that had ischemic stroke and epileptic seizure after intake of energy drink with alcohol. To the best of our knowledge, the following case is the first report of ischemic stroke after intake of energy drink. A previously healthy 37-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a witnessed tonic-clonic seizure. According to his wife's testimony, just before loss of consciousness, the patient had been drinking 3 boxes of energy drinks (Redbull, Istanbul, Turkey, 250 mL) with vodka on an empty stomach. He did not have a history of seizures, head trauma, or family history of seizures or another disease. In cranial diffusion magnetic resonance imaging, there were hyperintense signal changes in bilateral occipital area (more pronounced in the left occipital lobe), right temporal lobe, frontal lobe, and posterior parietal lobe. All tests associated with possible etiologic causes of ischemic stroke in young patients were negative. Herein, we want to attract attention to adverse effect of energy drink usage. PMID:22867827

  7. Metalloproteinase inhibition prevents inhibitory synapse reorganization and seizure genesis.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Emily; Everest, Michelle; Brown, Arthur; Poulter, Michael O

    2014-10-01

    The integrity and stability of interneurons in a cortical network are essential for proper network function. Loss of interneuron synaptic stability and precise organization can lead to disruptions in the excitation/inhibition balance, a characteristic of epilepsy. This study aimed to identify alterations to the GABAergic interneuron network in the piriform cortex (PC: a cortical area believed to be involved in the development of seizures) after kindling-induced seizures. Immunohistochemistry was used to mark perineuronal nets (PNNs: structures in the extracellular matrix that provide synaptic stability and restrict reorganization of inhibitory interneurons) and interneuron nerve terminals in control and kindled tissues. We found that PNNs were significantly decreased around parvalbumin-positive interneurons after the induction of experimental epilepsy. Additionally, we found layer-specific increases in GABA release sites originating from calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin interneurons, implying that there is a re-wiring of the interneuronal network. This increase in release sites was matched by an increase in GABAergic post-synaptic densities. We hypothesized that the breakdown of the PNN could be due to the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and that the prevention of PNN breakdown may reduce the rewiring of interneuronal circuits and suppress seizures. To test this hypothesis we employed doxycycline, a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor, to stabilize PNNs in kindled rats. We found that doxycycline prevented PNN breakdown, re-organization of the inhibitory innervation, and seizure genesis. Our observations indicate that PNN degradation may be necessary for the development of seizures by facilitating interneuron plasticity and increased GABAergic activity.

  8. Clinical Management of Seizures in Patients With Low-Grade Glioma.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Anna F; Blakeley, Jaishri

    2015-07-01

    Seizures, transient disruptions of normal brain electrical activity, are common for patients with low-grade glioma (LGG) and significantly affect quality of life. Up to 75% of patients with a LGG will have seizures in the course of their disease (compared with 1%-2% of the general population). Depending on the type of abnormal electrical activity, the functional implications of seizure can impact any domain, including mental status, sensation or strength. In most cases, either the seizure or the medications used to treat the seizure may contribute to cognitive and psychosocial difficulties of various degrees of severity. Hence, effective management of seizures is a major priority for patients with LGG. Evidence-based guidelines suggest that levetiracetam is the best first-line agent for treatment of seizures in this population due to both its efficacy and tolerability. An important consideration in the field of neuro-oncology is that levetiracetam has very few drug interactions. Unfortunately, approximately one-third of patients with LGG have refractory epilepsy where additional agents such as valproic acid, or lacosamide, lamotrigine and nonpharmacologic therapies such as diet-based interventions, epilepsy surgery, and devices are considered.

  9. Clinical Management of Seizures in Patients With Low-Grade Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowski, Anna F.; Blakeley, Jaishri

    2015-01-01

    Seizures, transient disruptions of normal brain electrical activity, are common for patients with low-grade glioma (LGG) and significantly affect quality of life. Up to 75% of patients with a LGG will have seizures in the course of their disease (compared with 1%–2% of the general population). Depending on the type of abnormal electrical activity, the functional implications of seizure can impact any domain, including mental status, sensation or strength. In most cases, either the seizure or the medications used to treat the seizure may contribute to cognitive and psychosocial difficulties of various degrees of severity. Hence, effective management of seizures is a major priority for patients with LGG. Evidence-based guidelines suggest that levetiracetam is the best first-line agent for treatment of seizures in this population due to both its efficacy and tolerability. An important consideration in the field of neuro-oncology is that levetiracetam has very few drug interactions. Unfortunately, approximately one-third of patients with LGG have refractory epilepsy where additional agents such as valproic acid, or lacosamide, lamotrigine and nonpharmacologic therapies such as diet-based interventions, epilepsy surgery, and devices are considered. PMID:26050593

  10. The Prognostic Value of Amplitude-Integrated EEG in Full-Term Neonates with Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lili; Hou, Xinlin; Sun, Guoyu; Li, Lei; Liu, Yunzhe; Zhou, Congle; Gu, Ruolei; Luo, Yuejia

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal seizures pose a high risk for adverse outcome in survived infants. While the prognostic value of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram (aEEG) is well established in neonates with encephalopathy and asphyxia, neonatal seizure studies focusing on the direct correlation between early aEEG measurement and subsequent neurologic outcome are scarce. In this study, the prognostic value of aEEG features was systematically analyzed in 143 full-term neonates to identify prognostic indicators of neurodevelopmental outcome. Neonatal aEEG features of background pattern, cyclicity, and seizure activity, as well as the etiology of neonatal seizures, were significantly associated with neurodevelopmental outcome at one year of age. aEEG background pattern was highly associated with neurologic outcomes (χ2 = 116.9), followed by aEEG cyclicity (χ2 = 87.2) and seizure etiology (χ2 = 79.3). Multiple linear regression showed that the four predictors explained 71.2% of the variation in neurological outcome, with standardized β coefficients of 0.44, 0.24, 0.22, and 0.14 for the predictors of aEEG background pattern, cyclicity, etiology, and aEEG seizure activity, respectively. This clinically applicable scoring system based on etiology and three aEEG indices would allow pediatricians to assess the risk for neurodevelopmental impairment and facilitate an early intervention in newborns developing seizures. PMID:24236076

  11. Epileptic spasms without hypsarrhythmia in infancy and childhood: tonic spasms as a seizure type.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Luciana R De; Seraphim, Evelyn A; Corso, Jeana T; Naves, Pedro Vf; Carvalho, Kelly Cristina de; Ramirez, Milton David H; Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Guaranha, Mirian Sb; Yacubian, Elza Márcia T

    2015-06-01

    Epileptic spasms were defined by the International League Against Epilepsy Task Force on Classification and Terminology in 2001 as a specific seizure type. Epileptic spasms without hypsarrhythmia have been described in some series of patients, occurring either in infancy or childhood. More prolonged epileptic spasms without hypsarrhythmia were previously defined as a different seizure type, and referred to as "tonic spasm seizures". Here, we present a 5-year-old boy who started having epileptic spasms without hypsarrhythmia at 8 months of age, effectively treated with oxcarbazepine. With the withdrawal of medication, epileptic spasms returned. Video-EEG monitoring revealed high-voltage slow waves superimposed by low-voltage fast activity, followed by an electrodecremental phase and a burst of asymmetric fast activity, time-locked to clinical tonic spasm seizures. Brain MRI showed left temporal atrophy with temporal pole grey/white matter junction blurring and ictal PET-CT showed left basal frontal hypermetabolism. Seizures were refractory to several AEDs and vigabatrin was introduced with seizure cessation. Despite efforts to classify epileptic spasms, these are still considered as part of the group of unknown seizure types. In some cases, a focal origin has been suggested, leading to the term "periodic spasms" and "focal spasms". In this case, epileptic spasms without hypsarrhythmia, associated with tonic spasms, may be a variant of focal spasms and might be considered as an epileptic syndrome. [Published with video sequence]. PMID:25895540

  12. The effect of subchronic supplementation with folic acid on homocysteine induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Rasic-Markovic, A; Rankov-Petrovic, B; Hrncic, D; Krstic, D; Colovic, M; Macut, Dj; Djuric, D; Stanojlovic, Olivera

    2015-06-01

    Influence of folic acid on the CNS is still unclear. Folate has a neuroprotective effect, while on the other hand excess folate can exacerbate seizures in epileptics. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of subchronic administration of folic acid on behavioural and electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics of DL homocysteine thiolactone induced seizures in adult rats. The activity of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and Mg²⁺-ATPase in different brain regions was investigated. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into groups: 1. Controls (C, 0.9% NaCl); 2. DL homocysteine-thiolactone 8.0 mmol/kg (H); 3. Subchronic supplementation with folic acid 5 mg/kg for 7 days (F) and 4. Subchronic supplementation with F + single dose of H (FH). Seizure behaviour was assessed by incidence, latency, number and intensity of seizure episodes. Seizure severity was described by a descriptive scale with grades 0-4. For EEG recordings, three gold-plated recording electrodes were implanted into the skull. Subchronic supplementation with folic acid did not affect seizure incidence, median number of seizure episodes and severity in FH, comparison with H (p > 0.05). The majority of seizure episodes in all groups were of grade 2. There were no significant differences in lethal outcomes at 24 h upon H injection in the FH vs. H group. The activity of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and Mg²⁺-ATPase was significantly increased in almost all examined structures in the FH vs. H group. Subchronic folic acid administration did not exacerbate H induced seizures and completely recovered the activity of ATPases.

  13. Attenuation of proinflammatory cytokines and apoptotic process by verapamil and diltiazem against quinolinic acid induced Huntington like alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2011-02-01

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disease with complex pathophysiology. Recently, role of neuroinflammation and interplay between various other cellular cascades have been suggested to be involved in pathophysiology of Huntington disease. Involvement of calcium overload mediated oxidative damage and excitotoxicity have been suggested to play a central role in quinolinic acid induced Huntington like symptoms. The present study has been carried out to investigate the neuroprotective effect of calcium channel blockers (verapamil and diltiazem) against quinolinic acid induced dysfunction in motor, biochemical and neuroinflammatory signaling in rats. Intrastriatal quinolinic acid administration leads to significant motor [locomotor (72% reduction), rotarod (55% reduction), balance beam walk performance] dysfunction coupled with the marked oxidative damage and increased neuroinflammatory markers [TNF-α (140%), IL-6 (115%), caspase-3(75%)] levels in striatum as compared to the sham treatment. Verapamil (10 and 20mg/kg), diltiazem (10 and 20mg/kg) drug treatment for 21days resulted in a significant improvement in the motor function (improvement in locomotor activity, rotarod and balance beam walk performance). Further, verapamil (10 and 20mg/kg), diltiazem (10 and 20mg/kg) treatment significantly attenuated oxidative damage, level of proinflammatory mediators (TNF-α IL-6 and caspase-3) in quinolinic acid treated animals. Results of the present study demonstrate that protective effect of these calcium channel blockers (verapamil, diltiazem) might be due to their inhibitory action on different neuroinflammatory pathways against quinolinic acid induced Huntington disease like symptoms in rats. PMID:21112316

  14. Transient inhibitory seizures mimicking crescendo TIAs.

    PubMed

    Lee, H; Lerner, A

    1990-01-01

    Somatic inhibitory seizures are thought to occur rarely. We describe a patient with somatic inhibitory seizures who initially presented with a clinical picture of crescendo transient ischemic attacks. He did not improve with anticoagulation, but the episodes ceased promptly after the administration of an anticonvulsant.

  15. Search and Seizure in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staros, Kari; Williams, Charles F.

    2007-01-01

    The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects the people of the United States from unreasonable searches and seizures. On first reading, these protections seem clearly defined. The amendment was meant to protect Americans from the kinds of random searches and seizures that the colonists experienced under British colonial rule. Under…

  16. A Discriminative Approach to EEG Seizure Detection

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ashley N.; Sow, Daby; Biem, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Seizures are abnormal sudden discharges in the brain with signatures represented in electroencephalograms (EEG). The efficacy of the application of speech processing techniques to discriminate between seizure and non-seizure states in EEGs is reported. The approach accounts for the challenges of unbalanced datasets (seizure and non-seizure), while also showing a system capable of real-time seizure detection. The Minimum Classification Error (MCE) algorithm, which is a discriminative learning algorithm with wide-use in speech processing, is applied and compared with conventional classification techniques that have already been applied to the discrimination between seizure and non-seizure states in the literature. The system is evaluated on 22 pediatric patients multi-channel EEG recordings. Experimental results show that the application of speech processing techniques and MCE compare favorably with conventional classification techniques in terms of classification performance, while requiring less computational overhead. The results strongly suggests the possibility of deploying the designed system at the bedside. PMID:22195192

  17. Differences between two feline epilepsy models in sleep and waking state disorders, state dependency of seizures and seizure susceptibility: amygdala kindling interferes with systemic penicillin epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Shouse, M N

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether contemporary feline models of petit mal (systemic penicillin epilepsy) or temporal lobe epilepsy (amygdala kindling) resemble human seizure disorders with respect to disturbances of sleep and waking states, the state dependency of seizures, and transference of seizure susceptibility. These variables were examined in 6-h polygraphic recordings before and during exposure to both seizure models in 24 cats; 12 cats had intramuscular (i.m.) injections of 300,000 or 400,000 IU/kg of penicillin prior to kindling, and 12 were kindled before penicillin challenge. Results were as follows. First, penicillin increased light slow wave sleep (SWS) and drowsiness, during which spike-wave (SW) activity was maximal. Generalized tonic-clonic convulsions (GTCs) occurred predominantly in drowsiness after awakening from SWS. Second, kindling produced more deep SWS than did penicillin; susceptibility to kindled GTCs peaked during deep SWS, especially in transition to rapid eye movement sleep (REM). Third, penicillin did not influence subsequent sleep disorders or seizure susceptibility during kindling; kindling interfered with penicillin-induced GTCs, SW activity, and sleep disorders. Collectively, the findings suggest distinct state disorders and state-dependent seizure profiles in the two models. These differences parallel human analogues and may have contributed to the transference results. Kindling is a chronic model with persistent sleep and seizure abnormalities that differ from and may have discouraged penicillin epilepsy. Penicillin is an acute model with transient state and seizure disorders, a fact that may account for the absence of penicillin transference to kindling.

  18. Esophageal Submucosal Injection of Capsaicin but Not Acid Induces Symptoms in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert H; Korsapati, Hariprasad; Bhalla, Vikas; Varki, Nissi; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is a candidate for mediating acid-induced symptoms in the esophagus. We conducted studies to determine if the presence of acid in the mucosa/submucosa and direct activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin elicited symptoms in normal healthy subjects. We also studied the presence of TRPV1 receptors in the esophagus. Methods Unsedated endoscopy was performed on healthy subjects with no symptoms. Using a sclerotherapy needle, normal saline (pH 2.0–7.5) was injected into the mucosa/submucosa, 5 cm above the Z line. In a separate group of healthy subjects, injection of capsaicin and vehicle was also studied. Quality of symptoms was reported using the McGill Pain Questionnaire, and symptom intensity using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Immunohistochemistry was performed on 8 surgical esophagus specimens using TRPV1 antibody. Results Acid injection either did not elicit or elicited mild symptoms in subjects at all pH solutions. Capsaicin but not the vehicle elicited severe heartburn/chest pain in all subjects. Mean VAS for capsaicin was 91 ± 3 and symptoms lasted for 25 ± 1 minutes. Immunohistochemistry revealed a linear TRPV1 staining pattern between the epithelial layer and the submucosa that extended into the papillae. Eighty-five percent of papillae stained positive for TRPV1 with a mean 1.1 positive papillae per high-powered field. Conclusions The mechanism of acid-induced heartburn and chest pain is not the simple interaction of hydrogen ions with afferents located in the esophageal mucosa and submucosa. TRPV1 receptors are present in the lamina propria and their activation induces heartburn and chest pain. PMID:26932896

  19. Epileptic seizure induced by fennel essential oil.

    PubMed

    Skalli, Souad; Soulaymani Bencheikh, Rachida

    2011-09-01

    An epileptic seizure is reported in a 38-year-old woman, known to be an epileptic patient. Although she was under antiepileptic treatment and had well-controlled epilepsy, she developed a typical generalised tonic-clonic seizure and remained unconscious for 45 minutes following ingestion of a number of cakes containing an unknown quantity of fennel essential oil. Involuntary diarrhoea accompanied her epileptic seizure. This reported case recalls the fact that fennel essential oil can induce seizures and that this oil should probably be avoided by patients with epilepsy. Labelling of products with fennel essential oil should refer to the risk of seizures, particularly for patients with epilepsy. An awareness programme should involve all stakeholders affected by this issue.

  20. Sulfuric acid-induced corrosion of aluminum surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Q.; Freedman, A.; Robinson, G.N.

    1995-12-01

    The sulfuric acid-induced corrosion of smooth (2 nm average roughness) aluminum surfaces has been studied in real times using an in situ Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectrometer and a quartz crystal microbalance. Submicron thick, 35 to 55 weight percent (5 to 12 molal), sulfuric acid films were formed on room temperature metal surfaces by the reaction of gas-phase SO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O vapor in a flowing gas system at a total pressure of {approximately}200 Torr. The deposition of the acid films and subsequent changes in their chemical composition resulting from corrosion of the aluminum substrate could be monitored using characteristic infrared absorption features. The corrosion process always significantly perturbed the spectral signature of the films from that which was observed on inert gold surfaces. Using changes in spectral features that are linked to the production of Al{sup 3+} as indicators of corrosion, the authors conclude the rate of corrosion of the metal is strongly enhanced by both higher relative humidities and increased rates of sulfuric acid deposition.

  1. Computerized image analysis for acetic acid induced intraepithelial lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Ferris, Daron G.; Lieberman, Rich W.

    2008-03-01

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) exhibits certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Immature and dysphasic cervical squamous epithelium turns white after application of acetic acid during the exam. The whitening process occurs visually over several minutes and subjectively discriminates between dysphasic and normal tissue. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician analyzing the acetic acid induced lesions (acetowhite region) in a fully automatic way. This paper reports a study designed to measure multiple parameters of the acetowhitening process from two images captured with a digital colposcope. One image is captured before the acetic acid application, and the other is captured after the acetic acid application. The spatial change of the acetowhitening is extracted using color and texture information in the post acetic acid image; the temporal change is extracted from the intensity and color changes between the post acetic acid and pre acetic acid images with an automatic alignment. The imaging and data analysis system has been evaluated with a total of 99 human subjects and demonstrate its potential to screening underserved women where access to skilled colposcopists is limited.

  2. Sphingoid bases inhibit acid-induced demineralization of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van 't Hof, Wim; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Sotres, Javier; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H(+) ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products.

  3. Acute seizure suppression by transcranial direct current stimulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dhamne, Sameer C; Ekstein, Dana; Zhuo, Zhihong; Gersner, Roman; Zurakowski, David; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Jensen, Frances E; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a focal neuromodulation technique that suppresses cortical excitability by low-amplitude constant electrical current, and may have an antiepileptic effect. Yet, tDCS has not been tested in status epilepticus (SE). Furthermore, a combined tDCS and pharmacotherapy antiseizure approach is unexplored. We therefore examined in the rat pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) SE model whether cathodal tDCS (1) suppresses seizures, (2) augments lorazepam (LZP) efficacy, and (3) enhances GABAergic cortical inhibition. Methods Experiment 1 aimed to identify an effective cathodal tDCS intensity. Rats received intraperitoneal PTZ followed by tDCS (sham, cathodal 1 mA, or cathodal 0.1 mA; for 20 min), and then a second PTZ challenge. In Experiment 2, two additional animal groups received a subtherapeutic LZP dose after PTZ, and then verum or sham tDCS. Clinical and electroencephalography (EEG) epileptic activity were compared between all groups. In Experiment 3, we measured GABA-mediated paired-pulse inhibition of the motor evoked potential by paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (ppTMS) in rats that received PTZ or saline, and either verum or sham tDCS. Results Cathodal 1 mA tDCS (1) reduced EEG spike bursts, and suppressed clinical seizures after the second PTZ challenge, (2) in combination with LZP was more effective in seizure suppression and improved the clinical seizure outcomes compared to either tDCS or LZP alone, and (3) prevented the loss of ppTMS motor cortex inhibition that accompanied PTZ injection. Interpretation These results suggest that cathodal 1 mA tDCS alone and in combination with LZP can suppress seizures by augmenting GABAergic cortical inhibition. PMID:26339678

  4. Sympathetic regulation of cerebral blood flow during seizures in newborn lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, C.D.; Wagerle, L.C.; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, M. )

    1988-09-01

    The authors examined cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation by the sympathetic nerves in 12 newborn lambs during seizures, a potent reflex stimulator of the sympathetic nervous system. CBF was measured with microspheres, and seizures were induced with bicuculline. In six of these lambs, one hemibrain was denervated (D) chronically by interrupting the ipsilateral cervical sympathetic trunk; the other hemibrain remained innervated (I). Before and after 10, 35, and 70 min of seizures, cerebral gray matter blood flow was measured. In the cerebral white matter, hippocampus, caudate, and thalamus blood flows to the D and I hemibrains were similar before seizures but during seizures they were 10-39% greater in the D than in the I hemibrain. Midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellum D and I blood flows were always similar. In the other six lambs, acute denervation during seizures increased ipsilateral cerebral gray and hippocampus blood flow by 10-31%, but unilateral electrical stimulation decreased ipsilateral cerebral gray, cerebral white, hippocampus, thalamus, and caudate blood flow by 17-27%. The data demonstrate that, during seizures, sympathetic nerve activity modifies regional CBF and the effect is sustained, suggesting a role for the sympathetic nervous system in newborn CBF regulation.

  5. Untroubled musical judgement of a performing organist during early epileptic seizure of the right temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Wieser, H G; Walter, R

    1997-01-01

    The case of a professional musician with a right temporal lobe epilepsy is presented. Whilst playing an organ concert (John Stanley's Voluntary VIII, Op. 5), he suffered a complex partial seizure. The recorded concert performance (with the seizure) was analysed and compared with other available exercise records and with the composition. The musical analysis of the seizure-induced variations reveals that at the beginning of the seizure, the left hand started to become unprecise in time and deviated from the score, whereas the right hand remained faultless at this time. With increasing duration of the seizure discharge, the dissociation of both hands from the score increased but the right hand compensated for the errors of the left hand in a musically meaningful way, i.e. with the aim to compensate for the seizure-induced errors of the left hand. The case illustrates untroubled musical judgement during epileptic activity in the right temporal lobe at the beginning of the seizure. Whereas the temporal formation of the performance was markedly impaired, the ability of improvisation-in the sense of a 'perfect musical solution' to errors of the left hand-remained intact.

  6. Correlation between the enhancement of flunitrazepam binding by GABA and seizure susceptibility in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, R.J.; Wehner, J.M.

    1987-06-08

    Various populations of mice exhibit differential sensitivity to seizure-inducing agents. The relationship of seizure susceptibility to alterations in the GABA receptor complex was investigated in six different populations of mice consisting of four inbred strains (C57BL, DBA, C3H, and BALB) and two selected lines (long sleep and short sleep). Seizure activity was induced by intraperitoneal administration of the GAD inhibitor, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and latencies to seizure onset and tonus were measured. In naive mice of the same populations, GABA enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding was measured in extensively washed whole brain membranes at several GABA concentrations. Both differential seizure sensitivity to 3-mercaptopropionic acid and differential enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding by GABA were observed in these six populations of mice. Correlational analyses indicated a positive correlation between the degree of GABA enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding and resistance to the seizure-inducing properties of 3-mercaptopropionic acid. These data suggest that genetic differences in sensitivity to seizure-inducing agents that disrupt the GABAergic system may be related to differences in coupling between the various receptors associated with the GABA receptor complex.

  7. The effect of seizures and kindling on reproductive hormones in the rat.

    PubMed

    Edwards, H E; MacLusky, N J; Burnham, W M

    2000-09-01

    Reproductive dysfunction and endocrine disorders are common among both women and men with epilepsy, and, in particular, with temporal lobe epilepsy. In clinical studies, it is hard to separate the effects of seizures from the effects of medication and life style. Studies in rodents, however, suggest that seizures per se can contribute to reproductive dysfunction. In female rats, generalized seizures disrupt normal ovarian cyclicity in adults, and repeated electroshock seizures delay the onset of puberty in juveniles. Right amygdala kindling in adult female rats causes acyclicity, the development of polycystic ovaries and premature aging of the hypothalamic-pituitary neuroendocrine axis, leading to chronic anovulation and continuous estrogen exposure. In adult male rats, repeated electroshock seizures result in transient hypogonadism, characterized by decreased serum testosterone levels and lowered gonadal tissue weight. In contrast, right amygdala kindling increases serum testosterone, estradiol levels and gonadal weight. These findings suggest that reproductive dysfunction in women and men with epilepsy may result from recurrent seizure activity, due to seizure-related interference with the normal functions of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  8. Scaling Effects and Spatio-Temporal Multilevel Dynamics in Epileptic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are one of the most well-known dysfunctions of the nervous system. During a seizure, a highly synchronized behavior of neural activity is observed that can cause symptoms ranging from mild sensual malfunctions to the complete loss of body control. In this paper, we aim to contribute towards a better understanding of the dynamical systems phenomena that cause seizures. Based on data analysis and modelling, seizure dynamics can be identified to possess multiple spatial scales and on each spatial scale also multiple time scales. At each scale, we reach several novel insights. On the smallest spatial scale we consider single model neurons and investigate early-warning signs of spiking. This introduces the theory of critical transitions to excitable systems. For clusters of neurons (or neuronal regions) we use patient data and find oscillatory behavior and new scaling laws near the seizure onset. These scalings lead to substantiate the conjecture obtained from mean-field models that a Hopf bifurcation could be involved near seizure onset. On the largest spatial scale we introduce a measure based on phase-locking intervals and wavelets into seizure modelling. It is used to resolve synchronization between different regions in the brain and identifies time-shifted scaling laws at different wavelet scales. We also compare our wavelet-based multiscale approach with maximum linear cross-correlation and mean-phase coherence measures. PMID:22363431

  9. Administration of aspartame potentiates pentylenetetrazole- and fluorothyl-induced seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Pinto, J M; Maher, T J

    1988-01-01

    An association has recently been proposed between the incidence of seizures and prolonged consumption of the phenylalanine-containing artificial sweetener, aspartame. Since consumption of aspartame, unlike dietary protein, can elevate phenylalanine in brain, and thereby inhibit the synthesis and release of neurotransmitters known to protect against seizure activity, the effect of oral doses of aspartame on the sensitivity of mice to the proconvulsant agents, pentylenetetrazole and fluorothyl was studied. Doses of aspartame were used which increased phenylalanine more than tyrosine in brain, as occurs in humans after the consumption of any dose of aspartame. Pretreatment with aspartame significantly increased the percentage of animals convulsing after administration of pentylenetetrazole and significantly lowered the CD50 for this convulsant. The average time to onset of seizures induced by fluorothyl in control mice was 510 sec; pretreatment with oral doses of 1000, 1500 and 2000 mg/kg of aspartame 1 hr earlier significantly reduced the time required to elicit seizures (394, 381 and 339 sec, respectively). The seizure-promoting effect of aspartame could be demonstrated 30, 60 or 120 min after the 1000 mg/kg dose. The seizures induced by either convulsant were potentiated by equimolar amounts of phenylalanine, a major endogenous metabolite of aspartame, while the other metabolites, aspartic acid and methanol, were without effect. Administration together with aspartame of the large neutral amino acid valine, which competes with phenylalanine for entry into the brain, completely abolished the seizure-promoting effect of aspartame.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Atypical “seizure-like” activity in cortical reverberating networks in vitro can be caused by LPS-induced inflammation: a multi-electrode array study from a hundred neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gullo, Francesca; Amadeo, Alida; Donvito, Giulia; Lecchi, Marzia; Costa, Barbara; Constanti, Andrew; Wanke, Enzo

    2014-01-01

    We show here that a mild sterile inflammation induced by the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in a neuron/astrocyte/microglial cortical network, modulates neuronal excitability and can initiate long-duration burst events resembling epileptiform seizures, a recognized feature of various central nervous neurodegenerative, neurological and acute systemic diseases associated with neuroinflammation. To study this action, we simultaneously analyzed the reverberating bursting activity of a hundred neurons by using in vitro multi-electrode array methods. ∼5 h after LPS application, we observed a net increase in the average number of spikes elicited in engaged cells and within each burst, but no changes neither in spike waveforms nor in burst rate. This effect was characterized by a slow, twofold exponential increase of the burst duration and the appearance of rarely occurring long burst events that were never seen during control recordings. These changes and the time-course of microglia-released proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), were blocked by pre-treatment with 50 nM minocycline, an established anti-inflammatory agent which was inactive when applied alone. Assay experiments also revealed that application of 60 pM exogenous TNF-α after 12–15 h, produced non-washable changes of neuronal excitability, completely different from those induced by LPS, suggesting that TNF-α release alone was not responsible for our observed findings. Our results indicate that the link between neuroinflammation and hyperexcitability can be unveiled by studying the long-term activity of in vitro neuronal/astrocyte/microglial networks. PMID:25404893

  11. Neuroprotective effects of butterbur and rough aster against kainic Acid-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang Hee; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2005-01-01

    The separate and combined neuroprotective effects of rough aster (Aster scaber) and butterbur (Petasite japonicus) extracts against oxidative damage in the brain of mice challenged with kainic acid were examined by comparing behavioral changes and biochemical parameters of oxidative stress. Rough aster butanol extract (400 mg/kg) and/or butterbur butanol extract (150 or 400 mg/kg) were administered to male ICR mice, 6-8 weeks old, through a gavage for 4 days consecutively, and on day 4, kainic acid (50 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally. Compared with the vehicle-treated control, no significant changes in body and brain weight were observed in mice administered rough aster or butterbur butanol extract. Administration of kainic acid only, causing a lethality of approximately 54%, resulted in a significant decrease of total glutathione level and increase of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) value in brain tissue. The administration of butterbur or rough aster extract (400 mg/kg) decreased the lethality (50%) of kainic acid to 25%, alleviated the behavioral signs of neurotoxicity, restored the cytosolic glutathione level of brain homogenate to approximately 80% (P < .05), and reduced kainic acid-induced increases in TBARS values. In contrast to no significant neuroprotection by butterbur extract at a low dose (150 mg/kg), the combination of rough aster extract and butterbur extract reduced the lethality to 12.5%. Moreover, the combination delayed the onset time of behavioral signs by twofold, and significantly preserved the level of cytosolic glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities. However, the other biochemical parameters were not altered significantly by the combination. Thus, the combination of two vegetable extracts significantly increased the neuroprotective action against kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. Based on these findings, the combination of butterbur extract and rough aster extract contains a functional agent or

  12. Reduction of Seizure Occurrence from Exposure to Auditory Stimulation in Individuals with Neurological Handicaps: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bodner, Mark; Turner, Robert P.; Schwacke, John; Bowers, Christopher; Norment, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this work was to determine in a clinical trial the efficacy of reducing or preventing seizures in patients with neurological handicaps through sustained cortical activation evoked by passive exposure to a specific auditory stimulus (particular music). The specific type of stimulation had been determined in previous studies to evoke anti-epileptiform/anti-seizure brain activity. Methods The study was conducted at the Thad E. Saleeby Center in Harstville, South Carolina, which is a permanent residence for individuals with heterogeneous neurological impairments, many with epilepsy. We investigated the ability to reduce or prevent seizures in subjects through cortical stimulation from sustained passive nightly exposure to a specific auditory stimulus (music) in a three-year randomized controlled study. In year 1, baseline seizure rates were established. In year 2, subjects were randomly assigned to treatment and control groups. Treatment group subjects were exposed during sleeping hours to specific music at regular intervals. Control subjects received no music exposure and were maintained on regular anti-seizure medication. In year 3, music treatment was terminated and seizure rates followed. We found a significant treatment effect (p = 0.024) during the treatment phase persisting through the follow-up phase (p = 0.002). Subjects exposed to treatment exhibited a significant 24% decrease in seizures during the treatment phase, and a 33% decrease persisting through the follow-up phase. Twenty-four percent of treatment subjects exhibited a complete absence of seizures during treatment. Conclusion/Significance Exposure to specific auditory stimuli (i.e. music) can significantly reduce seizures in subjects with a range of epilepsy and seizure types, in some cases achieving a complete cessation of seizures. These results are consistent with previous work showing reductions in epileptiform activity from particular music exposure and offers

  13. Do reflex seizures and spontaneous seizures form a continuum? - triggering factors and possible common mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Irmen, Friederike; Wehner, Tim; Lemieux, Louis

    2015-02-01

    Recent changes in the understanding and classification of reflex seizures have fuelled a debate on triggering mechanisms of seizures and their conceptual organization. Previous studies and patient reports have listed extrinsic and intrinsic triggers, albeit their multifactorial and dynamic nature is poorly understood. This paper aims to review literature on extrinsic and intrinsic seizure triggers and to discuss common mechanisms among them. Among self-reported seizure triggers, emotional stress is most frequently named. Reflex seizures are typically associated with extrinsic sensory triggers; however, intrinsic cognitive or proprioceptive triggers have also been assessed. The identification of a trigger underlying a seizure may be more difficult if it is intrinsic and complex, and if triggering mechanisms are multifactorial. Therefore, since observability of triggers varies and triggers are also found in non-reflex seizures, the present concept of reflex seizures may be questioned. We suggest the possibility of a conceptual continuum between reflex and spontaneous seizures rather than a dichotomy and discuss evidence to the notion that to some extent most seizures might be triggered.

  14. Role of Adenosine Signaling on Pentylenetetrazole-Induced Seizures in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Siebel, Anna Maria; Menezes, Fabiano Peres; Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Schaefer, Isabel da Costa; Frantz, Juliana Zanetti; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adenosine is a well-known endogenous modulator of neuronal excitability with anticonvulsant properties. Thus, the modulation exerted by adenosine might be an effective tool to control seizures. In this study, we investigated the effects of drugs that are able to modulate adenosinergic signaling on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in adult zebrafish. The adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) decreased the latency to the onset of the tonic-clonic seizure stage. The adenosine A1 receptor agonist cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) increased the latency to reach the tonic-clonic seizure stage. Both the adenosine A2A receptor agonist and antagonist, CGS 21680 and ZM 241385, respectively, did not promote changes in seizure parameters. Pretreatment with the ecto-5′nucleotidase inhibitor adenosine 5′-(α,β-methylene) diphosphate (AMPCP) decreased the latency to the onset of the tonic-clonic seizure stage. However, when pretreated with the adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA), or with the nucleoside transporter (NT) inhibitors, dipyridamole and S-(4-Nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI), animals showed longer latency to reach the tonic-clonic seizure status. Finally, our molecular analysis of the c-fos gene expression corroborates these behavioral results. Our findings indicate that the activation of adenosine A1 receptors is an important mechanism to control the development of seizures in zebrafish. Furthermore, the actions of ecto-5′-nucleotidase, ADA, and NTs are directly involved in the control of extracellular adenosine levels and have an important role in the development of seizure episodes in zebrafish. PMID:25560904

  15. Role of adenosine signaling on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siebel, Anna Maria; Menezes, Fabiano Peres; Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Kist, Luiza Wilges; da Costa Schaefer, Isabel; Frantz, Juliana Zanetti; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Da Silva, Rosane Souza; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2015-04-01

    Adenosine is a well-known endogenous modulator of neuronal excitability with anticonvulsant properties. Thus, the modulation exerted by adenosine might be an effective tool to control seizures. In this study, we investigated the effects of drugs that are able to modulate adenosinergic signaling on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in adult zebrafish. The adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) decreased the latency to the onset of the tonic-clonic seizure stage. The adenosine A1 receptor agonist cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) increased the latency to reach the tonic-clonic seizure stage. Both the adenosine A2A receptor agonist and antagonist, CGS 21680 and ZM 241385, respectively, did not promote changes in seizure parameters. Pretreatment with the ecto-5'nucleotidase inhibitor adenosine 5'-(α,β-methylene) diphosphate (AMPCP) decreased the latency to the onset of the tonic-clonic seizure stage. However, when pretreated with the adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA), or with the nucleoside transporter (NT) inhibitors, dipyridamole and S-(4-Nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI), animals showed longer latency to reach the tonic-clonic seizure status. Finally, our molecular analysis of the c-fos gene expression corroborates these behavioral results. Our findings indicate that the activation of adenosine A1 receptors is an important mechanism to control the development of seizures in zebrafish. Furthermore, the actions of ecto-5'-nucleotidase, ADA, and NTs are directly involved in the control of extracellular adenosine levels and have an important role in the development of seizure episodes in zebrafish.

  16. Role of GluK1 Kainate Receptors in Seizures, Epileptic Discharges, and Epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Brita; Reis, Janine; Gasior, Maciej; Kaminski, Rafal M.

    2014-01-01

    Kainate receptors containing the GluK1 subunit have an impact on excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in brain regions, such as the amygdala and hippocampus, which are relevant to seizures and epilepsy. Here we used 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA), a potent and selective agonist of kainate receptors that include the GluK1 subunit, in conjunction with mice deficient in GluK1 and GluK2 kainate receptor subunits to assess the role of GluK1 kainate receptors in provoking seizures and in kindling epileptogenesis. We found that systemic ATPA, acting specifically via GluK1 kainate receptors, causes locomotor arrest and forelimb extension (a unique behavioral characteristic of GluK1 activation) and induces myoclonic behavioral seizures and electrographic seizure discharges in the BLA and hippocampus. In contrast, the proconvulsant activity of systemic AMPA, kainate, and pentylenetetrazol is not mediated by GluK1 kainate receptors, and deletion of these receptors does not elevate the threshold for seizures in the 6 Hz model. ATPA also specifically activates epileptiform discharges in BLA slices in vitro via GluK1 kainate receptors. Olfactory bulb kindling developed similarly in wild-type, GluK1, and GluK2 knock-out mice, demonstrating that GluK1 kainate receptors are not required for epileptogenesis or seizure expression in this model. We conclude that selective activation of kainate receptors containing the GluK1 subunit can trigger seizures, but these receptors are not necessary for seizure generation in models commonly used to identify therapeutic agents for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:24760837

  17. Advances in management of neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Vesoulis, Zachary A; Mathur, Amit M

    2014-06-01

    Seizures are more common in the neonatal period than any other time in the human lifespan. A high index of suspicion for seizures should be maintained for infants who present with encephalopathy soon after birth, have had a stroke, central nervous system (CNS) infection or intracranial hemorrhage or have a genetic or metabolic condition associated with CNS malformations. Complicating the matter, most neonatal seizures lack a clinical correlate with only subtle autonomic changes and often no clinical indication at all. Over the last three decades, several tools have been developed to enhance the detection and treatment of neonatal seizures. The use of electroencephalography (EEG) and the later development of amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG), allows for Neurologists and non-Neurologists alike, to significantly increase the sensitivity of seizure detection. When applied to the appropriate clinical setting, time to diagnosis and start of therapy is greatly reduced. Phenobarbital maintains the status of first-line therapy in worldwide use. However, newer anti-epileptic agents such as, levetiracetam, bumetanide, and topiramate are increasingly being applied to the neonatal population, offering the potential for seizure treatment with a significantly better side-effect profile. Seizures in premature infants, continue to confound clinicians and researchers alike. Though the apparent seizure burden is significant and there is an association between seizures and adverse outcomes, the two are not cleanly correlated. Compounding the issue, GABA-ergic anti-epileptic drugs are not only less effective in this age group due to reversed neuronal ion gradients but may cause harm. Selecting an appropriate treatment group remains a challenge. PMID:24796413

  18. PARP1 activation/expression modulates regional-specific neuronal and glial responses to seizure in a hemodynamic-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-E; Kim, Y-J; Kim, J Y; Kang, T-C

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) plays a regulatory role in apoptosis, necrosis and other cellular processes after injury. Status epilepticus (SE) induces neuronal and astroglial death that show regional-specific patterns in the rat hippocampus and piriform cortex (PC). Thus, we investigated whether PARP1 regulates the differential neuronal/glial responses to pilocarpine (PILO)-induced SE in the distinct brain regions. In the present study, both CA1 and CA3 neurons showed PARP1 hyperactivation-dependent neuronal death pathway, whereas PC neurons exhibited PARP1 degradation-mediated neurodegeneration following SE. PARP1 degradation was also observed in astrocytes within the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. PARP1 induction was detected in CA1-3-reactive astrocytes, as well as in reactive microglia within the PC. Although PARP1 inhibitors attenuated CA1-3 neuronal death and reactive gliosis in the CA1 region, they deteriorated the astroglial death in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus and in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 region. Ex vivo study showed the similar regional and cellular patterns of PARP1 activation/degradation. Taken together, our findings suggest that the cellular-specific PARP1 activation/degradation may distinctly involve regional-specific neuronal damage, astroglial death and reactive gliosis in response to SE independently of hemodynamics.

  19. Biotelemetry system for Epilepsy Seizure Control

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, LaCurtise; Bohnert, George W.

    2009-07-02

    The Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control Project developed and tested an automated telemetry system for use in an epileptic seizure prevention device that precisely controls localized brain temperature. This project was a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) grant to the Kansas City Plant (KCP), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to partner with Flint Hills Scientific, LLC, Lawrence, KS and Biophysical Laboratory Ltd (BIOFIL), Sarov, Russia to develop a method to help control epileptic seizures.

  20. Hallervorden-Spatz Syndrome with Seizures.

    PubMed

    Gothwal, Sunil; Nayan, Swati

    2016-04-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome is a disorder characterized by dystonia, parkinsonism, and iron accumulation in the brain. The disease is caused by mutations in gene encoding pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) and patients have pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. We present an 8-year-old boy with progressive muscle dystonia, neuroregression, frequent fall and multiple injury marks of different stages. Seizures are rare with PANK2. This child had seizure onset at 4 years of age and seizure free on valproate and levetricetam. The CT scan showed tiger eye appearance and mutations on PANK2 gene. PMID:27303611

  1. Microarray Noninvasive Neuronal Seizure Recordings from Intact Larval Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Michaela; Dhamne, Sameer C; LaCoursiere, Christopher M; Tambunan, Dimira; Poduri, Annapurna; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish epilepsy models are emerging tools in experimental epilepsy. Zebrafish larvae, in particular, are advantageous because they can be easily genetically altered and used for developmental and drug studies since agents applied to the bath penetrate the organism easily. Methods for electrophysiological recordings in zebrafish are new and evolving. We present a novel multi-electrode array method to non-invasively record electrical activity from up to 61 locations of an intact larval zebrafish head. This method enables transcranial noninvasive recording of extracellular field potentials (which include multi-unit activity and EEG) to identify epileptic seizures. To record from the brains of zebrafish larvae, the dorsum of the head of an intact larva was secured onto a multi-electrode array. We recorded from individual electrodes for at least three hours and quantified neuronal firing frequency, spike patterns (continuous or bursting), and synchrony of neuronal firing. Following 15 mM potassium chloride- or pentylenetetrazole-infusion into the bath, spike and burst rate increased significantly. Additionally, synchrony of neuronal firing across channels, a hallmark of epileptic seizures, also increased. Notably, the fish survived the experiment. This non-invasive method complements present invasive zebrafish neurophysiological techniques: it affords the advantages of high spatial and temporal resolution, a capacity to measure multiregional activity and neuronal synchrony in seizures, and fish survival for future experiments, such as studies of epileptogenesis and development. PMID:27281339

  2. Microarray Noninvasive Neuronal Seizure Recordings from Intact Larval Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Michaela; Dhamne, Sameer C.; LaCoursiere, Christopher M.; Tambunan, Dimira; Poduri, Annapurna; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish epilepsy models are emerging tools in experimental epilepsy. Zebrafish larvae, in particular, are advantageous because they can be easily genetically altered and used for developmental and drug studies since agents applied to the bath penetrate the organism easily. Methods for electrophysiological recordings in zebrafish are new and evolving. We present a novel multi-electrode array method to non-invasively record electrical activity from up to 61 locations of an intact larval zebrafish head. This method enables transcranial noninvasive recording of extracellular field potentials (which include multi-unit activity and EEG) to identify epileptic seizures. To record from the brains of zebrafish larvae, the dorsum of the head of an intact larva was secured onto a multi-electrode array. We recorded from individual electrodes for at least three hours and quantified neuronal firing frequency, spike patterns (continuous or bursting), and synchrony of neuronal firing. Following 15 mM potassium chloride- or pentylenetetrazole-infusion into the bath, spike and burst rate increased significantly. Additionally, synchrony of neuronal firing across channels, a hallmark of epileptic seizures, also increased. Notably, the fish survived the experiment. This non-invasive method complements present invasive zebrafish neurophysiological techniques: it affords the advantages of high spatial and temporal resolution, a capacity to measure multiregional activity and neuronal synchrony in seizures, and fish survival for future experiments, such as studies of epileptogenesis and development. PMID:27281339

  3. Lack of Chronic Histologic Lesions Supportive of Sublethal Spontaneous Seizures in FVB/N Mice.

    PubMed

    Kohnken, Rebecca A; Schwahn, Denise J

    2016-04-01

    FVB/N mice with 'space cadet' syndrome are prone to audiogenic seizures and are considered excitotoxic 'sensitive' mice due to the neuronal damage that accompanies seizures. FVB/N mice found dead demonstrate acute neuronal cell death--attributed to a massive seizure episode--within the hippocampus and cerebrocortical laminae. However, the behavioral features of FVB/N mice and numerous studies using excitotoxins to induce seizure activity indicate that this strain experiences multiple sublethal seizures. To assess whether FVB/N mice develop histologically detectable lesions, we evaluated the brains of 86 aged (154-847 d) FVB/N mice without a history of seizures. The hippocampus and cerebrocortical laminae were evaluated histologically for neuronal atrophy and gliosis. Neuronal atrophy was quantified by counting neurons in the hippocampus (CA3 and dentate gyrus) and cerebral cortex. Gliosis was quantified by using immunohistochemistry for glial fibrillary acidic protein and glial counting in the cerebral cortex. In addition, ventricular area was calculated. Our study revealed no changes in brain weight with age, no neuronal loss or gliosis, no correlation between neuronal or glial cell profile densities and brain weight or age, and no differences in ventricular size between FVB/N and control mice. Neuronal densities in the cerebral cortex and granule cells of the dentate gyrus were lower in FVB/N mice than in control Swiss Webster mice. We conclude that although acute lesions of seizure activity are a previous feature of the FVB/N strain, chronic seizure activity in these mice either is negligible or does not cause morphologic or phenotypic changes.

  4. Lack of Chronic Histologic Lesions Supportive of Sublethal Spontaneous Seizures in FVB/N Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kohnken, Rebecca A; Schwahn, Denise J

    2016-01-01

    FVB/N mice with ‘space cadet’ syndrome are prone to audiogenic seizures and are considered excitotoxic ‘sensitive’ mice due to the neuronal damage that accompanies seizures. FVB/N mice found dead demonstrate acute neuronal cell death—attributed to a massive seizure episode—within the hippocampus and cerebrocortical laminae. However, the behavioral features of FVB/N mice and numerous studies using excitotoxins to induce seizure activity indicate that this strain experiences multiple sublethal seizures. To assess whether FVB/N mice develop histologically detectable lesions, we evaluated the brains of 86 aged (154-847 d) FVB/N mice without a history of seizures. The hippocampus and cerebrocortical laminae were evaluated histologically for neuronal atrophy and gliosis. Neuronal atrophy was quantified by counting neurons in the hippocampus (CA3 and dentate gyrus) and cerebral cortex. Gliosis was quantified by using immunohistochemistry for glial fibrillary acidic protein and glial counting in the cerebral cortex. In addition, ventricular area was calculated. Our study revealed no changes in brain weight with age, no neuronal loss or gliosis, no correlation between neuronal or glial cell profile densities and brain weight or age, and no differences in ventricular size between FVB/N and control mice. Neuronal densities in the cerebral cortex and granule cells of the dentate gyrus were lower in FVB/N mice than in control Swiss Webster mice. We conclude that although acute lesions of seizure activity are a previous feature of the FVB/N strain, chronic seizure activity in these mice either is negligible or does not cause morphologic or phenotypic changes. PMID:27053564

  5. Systemic availability of guanidinoacetate affects GABAA receptor function and seizure threshold in GAMT deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schulze, A; Tran, C; Levandovskiy, V; Patel, V; Cortez, M A

    2016-08-01

    Deficiency of guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) causes creatine depletion and guanidinoacetate accumulation in brain with the latter deemed to be responsible for the severe seizure disorder seen in affected patients. We studied electrical brain activity and GABAA mediated mechanisms of B6J.Cg-Gamt(tm1Isb) mice. Electrocorticographic (ECoG) monitoring of pharmacological treatments with ornithine (5 % in drinking water for 5-18 days) and/or Picrotoxin (PTX) (a GABAA receptor antagonist) (1.5 mg/kg, I.P.) in Gamt(MUT) and Gamt(WT) groups [n = 3, mean age (SEM) = 6.9 (0.2) weeks]. Mice were fitted with two frontal and two parietal epidural electrodes under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia. Baseline and test recordings were performed for determination of seizure activity over a 2 h period. The ECoG baseline of Gamt(MUT) exhibited an abnormal monotonous cortical rhythm (7-8 Hz) with little variability during awake and sleep states compared to wild type recordings. Ornithine treatment and also PTX administration led to a relative normalization of the Gamt(MUT) ECoG phenotype. Gamt(WT) on PTX exhibited electro-behavioral seizures, whereas the Gamt(MUT) did not have PTX induced seizures at the same PTX dose. Gamt(MUT) treated with both ornithine and PTX did not show electro-behavioral seizures while ornithine elevated the PTX seizure threshold of Gamt(MUT) mice even further. These data demonstrate: (1) that there is expression of electrical seizure activity in this Gamt-deficient transgenic mouse strain, and (2) that the systemic availability of guanidinoacetate affects GABAA receptor function and seizure thresholds. These findings are directly and clinically relevant for patients with a creatine-deficiency syndrome due to genetic defects in GAMT and provide a rational basis for a combined ornithine/picrotoxin therapeutic intervention.

  6. 19 CFR 162.22 - Seizure of conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Seizure of conveyances. 162.22 Section 162.22 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.22 Seizure of conveyances. (a)...

  7. Mapping of limbic seizure progressions utilizing the electrogenic status epilepticus model and the 14C-2-deoxyglucose method.

    PubMed

    Handforth, A; Ackermann, R F

    1995-01-01

    We have previously described a model of limbic status epilepticus in which chronic prolonged seizure states of immobile, exploratory, minor convulsive or clonic convulsive behavior are induced by intracerebral electrical stimulation; these states appear to belong to the same behavioral progression as kindled seizures. We postulated that the underlying seizure substrates, as mapped by the 14C-2-deoxyglucose method, should reflect a corresponding anatomic progression of discharge spread. Status epilepticus was induced in rat by pulsed-train current delivered for up to 90 min to one of several subcortical areas. Autoradiographs revealed that most of the observed patterns of seizure-induced metabolic activation comprised a hierarchical sequence, such that progressively more extensive patterns subsumed anatomic territories activated in less extensive patterns, thus allowing inferences as to the progression of discharge spread. In this sequence, the basolateral amygdala ipsilateral to the induction electrode was among the first structures to be activated. In successively larger activation patterns a small unilateral network related to basolateral amygdala was involved; this evolved through a transitional state to a unilateral extensive limbic pattern; which in turn was succeeded by bilateral extensive limbic activation. This hierarchical sequence culminated in a neocortical activation pattern, in which most of the forebrain was involved in intense seizure-induced activation. Seizure behaviors increased in severity in correspondence with the underlying seizure-activated anatomic substrate. In contrast, patterns of seizure activation were observed which did not fit within the early stages of the above sequence, although analysis indicates that the later stages of spread may be shared. The study of these patterns and those reported in the literature indicates that although limbic seizure networks may be anatomically distinct at their origination, further expansion is

  8. Initiation, Propagation, and Termination of Partial (Focal) Seizures

    PubMed Central

    de Curtis, Marco; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The neurophysiological patterns that correlate with partial (focal) seizures are well defined in humans by standard electroencephalogram (EEG) and presurgical depth electrode recordings. Seizure patterns with similar features are reproduced in animal models of partial seizures and epilepsy. However, the network determinants that support interictal spikes, as well as the initiation, progression, and termination of seizures, are still elusive. Recent findings show that inhibitory networks are prominently involved at the onset of these seizures, and that extracellular changes in potassium contribute to initiate and sustain seizure progression. The end of a partial seizure correlates with an increase in network synchronization, which possibly involves both excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms. PMID:26134843

  9. The use of self-generation procedures facilitates verbal memory in individuals with seizure disorders.

    PubMed

    Schefft, Bruce K; Dulay, Mario F; Fargo, Jamison D; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Yeh, Hwa-shain; Privitera, Michael D

    2008-07-01

    The efficacy of a self-generation encoding procedure in facilitating the encoding and retrieval of verbal memories was compared with the didactic presentation of information in individuals with seizure disorders. Through a within-subject design, 87 patients (25 left temporal seizure onset, 29 right temporal, 8 frontal, and 25 psychogenic nonepileptic seizures) received a self-generation learning condition and a didactic learning condition and were subsequently tested for verbal paired associate free recall, cued recall, and recognition memory. All patient groups benefited from the use of the self-generation condition relative to the didactic condition. Better performance occurred with the self-generation procedure for cued recall and recognition memory test performance, but not free recall. Individuals with a left temporal seizure onset (patients with the poorest memory performance on the didactic condition) benefited the most from the self-generation condition. A memory encoding strategy that actively involves patient participation enhances memory performance. PMID:18343201

  10. TLR9 signalling in microglia attenuates seizure-induced aberrant neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Taito; Murao, Naoya; Katano, Yuki; Juliandi, Berry; Kohyama, Jun; Akira, Shizuo; Kawai, Taro; Nakashima, Kinichi

    2015-01-01

    Pathological conditions such as epilepsy cause misregulation of adult neural stem/progenitor populations in the adult hippocampus in mice, and the resulting abnormal neurogenesis leads to impairment in learning and memory. However, how animals cope with abnormal neurogenesis remains unknown. Here we show that microglia in the mouse hippocampus attenuate convulsive seizure-mediated aberrant neurogenesis through the activation of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), an innate immune sensor known to recognize microbial DNA and trigger inflammatory responses. We found that microglia sense self-DNA from degenerating neurons following seizure, and secrete tumour necrosis factor-α, resulting in attenuation of aberrant neurogenesis. Furthermore, TLR9 deficiency exacerbated seizure-induced cognitive decline and recurrent seizure severity. Our findings thus suggest the existence of bidirectional communication between the innate immune and nervous systems for the maintenance of adult brain integrity. PMID:25751136

  11. TLR9 signalling in microglia attenuates seizure-induced aberrant neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Taito; Murao, Naoya; Katano, Yuki; Juliandi, Berry; Kohyama, Jun; Akira, Shizuo; Kawai, Taro; Nakashima, Kinichi

    2015-03-09

    Pathological conditions such as epilepsy cause misregulation of adult neural stem/progenitor populations in the adult hippocampus in mice, and the resulting abnormal neurogenesis leads to impairment in learning and memory. However, how animals cope with abnormal neurogenesis remains unknown. Here we show that microglia in the mouse hippocampus attenuate convulsive seizure-mediated aberrant neurogenesis through the activation of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), an innate immune sensor known to recognize microbial DNA and trigger inflammatory responses. We found that microglia sense self-DNA from degenerating neurons following seizure, and secrete tumour necrosis factor-α, resulting in attenuation of aberrant neurogenesis. Furthermore, TLR9 deficiency exacerbated seizure-induced cognitive decline and recurrent seizure severity. Our findings thus suggest the existence of bidirectional communication between the innate immune and nervous systems for the maintenance of adult brain integrity.

  12. Automatic Detection of Seizures with Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Dale E.; Harris, John C.; Cutchis, Protagoras N.; Cristion, John A.; Lesser, Ronald P.; Webber, W. Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    There are an estimated two million people with epilepsy in the United States. Many of these people do not respond to anti-epileptic drug therapy. Two devices can be developed to assist in the treatment of epilepsy. The first is a microcomputer-based system designed to process massive amounts of electroencephalogram (EEG) data collected during long-term monitoring of patients for the purpose of diagnosing seizures, assessing the effectiveness of medical therapy, or selecting patients for epilepsy surgery. Such a device would select and display important EEG events. Currently many such events are missed. A second device could be implanted and would detect seizures and initiate therapy. Both of these devices require a reliable seizure detection algorithm. A new algorithm is described. It is believed to represent an improvement over existing seizure detection algorithms because better signal features were selected and better standardization methods were used.

  13. Topiramate increases the risk of valproic acid-induced encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Noh, Young; Kim, Dong Wook; Chu, Kon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Moon, Hye-Jin; Lee, Sang Kun

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic encephalopathy is a rare but serious complication of valproic acid (VPA) therapy that usually presents with impaired consciousness or increased seizure frequency. Although it has been suggested that topiramate (TPM) increases the risk of VPA-induced encephalopathy, the additional risk in patients receiving TPM therapy has not been evaluated. We reviewed all adult patients who took VPA between January 2005 and February 2009 at the Seoul National University Hospital and identified patients with VPA-induced encephalopathy based on clinical and electroencephalography (EEG) data. Information on sex, age, serum ammonia level, serum VPA level, liver function test, and EEG was collected from patient registry and medical data. We enrolled 8,372 patients who received VPA therapy and 1,236 patients who received VPA/TPM combination therapy. We identified 11 patients with VPA-induced encephalopathy (0.13%), 7 of whom received a combination therapy of VPA and TPM. The odds ratio of VPA-induced encephalopathy with TPM over that without TPM was 10.16. There were no significant differences in sex distribution, number of antiepileptic agents, ammonia level, VPA serum level, underlying diseases, dosage of VPA, duration of VPA treatment, treatment of encephalopathy, and outcomes between the two groups. Our study showed that the prevalence of VPA-induced encephalopathy is approximately 0.1% among patients treated with VPA and that the risk of this condition, although still low, can increase by approximately 10 times in the presence of TPM therapy. Based on these results, we suggest that TPM should be carefully used in patients receiving VPA treatment.

  14. GABAA Receptors in Normal Development and Seizures: Friends or Foes?

    PubMed Central

    Galanopoulou, Aristea S

    2008-01-01

    GABAA receptors have an age-adapted function in the brain. During early development, they mediate excitatory effects resulting in activation of calcium sensitive signaling processes that are important for the differentiation of the brain. In more mature stages of development and in adults, GABAA receptors transmit inhibitory signals. The maturation of GABAA signaling follows sex-specific patterns, which appear to also be important for the sexual differentiation of the brain. The inhibitory effects of GABAA receptor activation have been widely exploited in the treatment of conditions where neuronal silencing is necessary. For instance, drugs that target GABAA receptors are the mainstay of treatment of seizures. Recent evidence suggests however that the physiology and function of GABAA receptors changes in the brain of a subject that has epilepsy or status epilepticus. This review will summarize the physiology of and the developmental factors regulating the signaling and function of GABAA receptors; how these may change in the brain that has experienced prior seizures; what are the implications for the age and sex specific treatment of seizures and status epilepticus. Finally, the implications of these changes for the treatment of certain forms of medically refractory epilepsies and status epilepticus will be discussed. PMID:19305785

  15. Nonphotosensitive video game-induced partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Shigematsu, H; Kubota, H; Inoue, Y; Fujiwara, T; Yagi, K; Seino, M

    1995-08-01

    We report a 9-year-old boy with a ring 20 chromosome anomaly whose complex partial seizures (CPS), presumably of frontal lobe origin, were often induced by playing video games. Neither photosensitivity nor pattern sensitivity was observed. An intensive video-EEG investigation showed that video games as well as mental calculation elicited rhythmic runs of bilateral high-voltage slow waves, which eventually evolved into ictal discharges. This case suggests that higher brain functions can be involved in seizure induction.

  16. Millimeter-scale epileptiform spike patterns and their relationship to seizures.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Ann C; Viventi, Jonathan; Blanco, Justin A; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Rogers, John A; Litt, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Advances in neural electrode technology are enabling brain recordings with increasingly fine spatial and temporal resolution. We explore spatio-temporal (ST) patterns of local field potential spikes using a new high-density active electrode array with 500 μm resolution. We record subdural micro-electrocorticographic (μECoG) signals in vivo from a feline model of acute neocortical epileptiform spikes and seizures induced with local administration of the GABA antagonist, picrotoxin. We employ a clustering algorithm to separate 2-dimensional (2-D) spike patterns to isolate distinct classes of spikes unique to the interictal and ictal states. Our findings indicate that the 2-D patterns can be used to distinguish seizures from non-seizure state. We find two statistically significant ST patterns that uniquely characterize ictal epochs. We conclude that millimeter-scale ST spike dynamics contain useful information about ictal state. This finding may be important to understanding mechanisms underlying local circuit activity during seizure generation. Further work will investigate whether patterns we identify can increase our understanding of seizure dynamics and their underlying mechanisms and inform new electrical stimulation protocols for seizure termination.

  17. Genetic effects on sleep/wake variation of seizures

    PubMed Central

    Winawer, Melodie R.; Shih, Jerry; Beck, Erin S.; Hunter, Jessica E.; Epstein, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective There is a complex bidirectional relationship between sleep and epilepsy. Sleep/wake timing of seizures has been investigated for several individual seizure types and syndromes, but few large-scale studies of the timing of seizures exist in people with varied epilepsy types. In addition, the genetic contributions to seizure timing have not been well studied. Methods Sleep/wake timing of seizures was determined for 1,395 subjects in 546 families enrolled in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP). We examined seizure timing among subjects with different epilepsy types, seizure types, epilepsy syndromes, and localization. We also examined the familial aggregation of sleep/wake occurrence of seizures. Results Seizures in nonacquired focal epilepsy (NAFE) were more likely to occur during sleep than seizures in generalized epilepsy (GE), for both convulsive (odds ratio [OR] 5.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.59–7.52) and nonconvulsive seizures (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.48–7.21). Seizures occurring within 1 h of awakening were more likely to occur in patients with GE than with NAFE for both convulsive (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.54– 3.39) and nonconvulsive (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.04–2.66) seizures. Frontal onset seizures were more likely than temporal onset seizures to occur during sleep. Sleep/wake timing of seizures in first-degree relatives predicted timing of seizures in the proband. Significance We found that sleep/wake timing of seizures is associated with both epilepsy syndrome and seizure type. In addition, we provide the first evidence for a genetic contribution to sleep/wake timing of seizures in a large group of individuals with common epilepsy syndromes. PMID:26948972

  18. Ultrastructural changes to rat hippocampus in pentylenetetrazol- and kainic acid-induced status epilepticus: A study using electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhvania, Mzia G; Ksovreli, Mariam; Japaridze, Nadezhda J; Lordkipanidze, Tamar G

    2015-07-01

    A pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced status epilepticus model in rats was used in the study. The brains were studied one month after treatment. Ultrastructural observations using electron microscopy performed on the neurons, glial cells, and synapses, in the hippocampal CA1 region of epileptic brains, demonstrated the following major changes over normal control brain tissue. (i) There is ultrastructural alterations in some neurons, glial cells and synapses in the hippocampal CA1 region. (ii) The destruction of cellular organelles and peripheral, partial or even total chromatolysis in some pyramidal cells and in interneurons are observed. Several astrocytes are proliferated or activated. Presynaptic terminals with granular vesicles and degenerated presynaptic profiles are rarely observed. (iii) The alterations observed are found to be dependent on the frequency of seizure activities following the PTZ treatment. It was observed that if seizure episodes are frequent and severe, the ultrastructure of hippocampal area is significantly changed. Interestingly, the ultrastructure of CA1 area is found to be only moderately altered if seizure episodes following the status epilepticus are rare and more superficial; (iv) alterations in mitochondria and dendrites are among the most common ultrastructural changes seen, suggesting cell stress and changes to cellular metabolism. These morphological changes, observed in brain neurons in status epilepticus, are a reflection of epileptic pathophysiology. Further studies at the chemical and molecular level of neurotransmitter release, such as at the level of porosomes (secretory portals) at the presynaptic membrane, will further reveal molecular details of these changes.

  19. Gene expression analysis in children with complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 or rotavirus gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Mitsuru; Oka, Takashi; Yamashita, Nobuko; Saito, Yukie; Fujii, Yosuke; Nagaoka, Yoshiharu; Yashiro, Masato; Tsukahara, Hirokazu; Morishima, Tsuneo

    2014-02-01

    Viral infections have been implicated as a cause of complex seizures in children. The pathogenic differences in complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 or rotavirus gastroenteritis remain unclear. This study analyzed the gene expression profiles in the peripheral whole blood from pediatric patients with complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 or rotavirus gastroenteritis. The gene expression profiles of ten patients (five with seizures and five without) with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and six patients (three with seizures and three without) with rotavirus gastroenteritis were examined. Gene expression profiles in the whole blood were different in complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 or rotavirus gastroenteritis. Transcripts related to the immune response were significantly differentially expressed in complex seizures with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, and transcripts related to the stress response were significantly differentially expressed in complex seizures with rotavirus gastroenteritis. Pathway analysis showed that the mitogen-activated protein kinases in the T cell receptor signaling pathway were activated in complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. Dysregulation of the genes related to immune response or stress response could contribute to the pathogenic differences of the complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 or rotavirus gastroenteritis.

  20. Seizure or syncope: lessons over time.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Volney L

    2012-03-01

    A 25-year-old woman with recurrent syncopal episodes presented with a first time generalized tonic clonic (GTC) seizure. She had experienced two prior fainting spells lasting seconds and associated with diet pills and dehydration. She had another similar spell prior to falling, sustaining a laceration to the right posterior occiput, and having a witnessed GTC seizure. Her scalp electroencephalography (EEG) showed left temporal slowing with sharp features. T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI revealed two moderately enhancing focal lesions within the left frontal and temporal regions. These findings raised the possibility of an underlying seizure focus. Repeat imaging studies of this patient 1 month later, however, demonstrated resolution of these findings and an area of encephalomalacia, consistent with a traumatic coup contrecoup injury. A repeat EEG was normal. Therefore, the cause of the loss of consciousness was due to syncope with the consequent head injury giving rise to an isolated seizure. Understanding the underlying cause of a seizure is important in dictating treatment. In this setting the patient was not initiated on seizure medication and has done well. PMID:22245277

  1. Monitor for status epilepticus seizures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Mark; Simkins, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the sensor technology and associated electronics of a monitor designed to detect the onset of a seizure disorder called status epilepticus. It is a condition that affects approximately 3-5 percent of those individuals suffering from epilepsy. This form of epilepsy does not follow the typical cycle of start-peak-end. The convulsions continue until medically interrupted and are life threatening. The mortality rate is high without prompt medical treatment at a suitable facility. The paper describes the details of a monitor design that provides an inexpensive solution to the needs of those responsible for the care of individuals afflicted with this disorder. The monitor has been designed as a cooperative research and development effort involving the United States Army Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center's Benet Laboratories (Benet) and the Cerebral Palsy Center for the Disabled (Center), in association with the Department of Neurology at Albany Medical College (AMC). Benet has delivered a working prototype of the device for field testing, in collaboration with Albany Medical College. The Center has identified several children in need of special monitoring and has agreed to pursue commercialization of the device.

  2. Seizure prevention by the naturally occurring phenols, carvacrol and thymol in a partial seizure-psychomotor model.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rajesh Kumar; Baker, Max T

    2014-12-01

    The natural compounds carvacrol and thymol completely prevented seizures in the 6 Hz, 32 mA partial seizure model. Carvacrol and thymol, both exhibited an ED₅₀ = 35.8 mg/kg, ip and yielded protective indices of 5.3 and 3.4, respectively. At 44 mA current intensity, carvacrol and thymol exhibited ED₅₀s of 88.82 mg/kg (PI = 2.15) and 73.0 mg/kg (PI = 1.65), respectively. Thymol, but not carvacrol showed partial inhibitory activity in the maximal electroshock (MES), sc Metrazol (scMET) and Corneal-kindled models. These results suggest that carvacrol and thymol are more efficacious anticonvulsants than suggested by their lower efficacies in the conventional MES and scMET tests. PMID:25454269

  3. Anacardic acid induces apoptosis-like cell death in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Muzaffar, Suhail; Bose, Chinchu; Banerji, Ashok; Nair, Bipin G; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2016-01-01

    Anacardic acid (6-pentadecylsalicylic acid), extracted from cashew nut shell liquid, is a natural phenolic lipid well known for its strong antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities. Its effect has been well studied in bacterial and mammalian systems but remains largely unexplored in fungi. The present study identifies antifungal, cytotoxic, and antioxidant activities of anacardic acid in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. It was found that anacardic acid causes inhibition of conidial germination and mycelial growth in this ascomycetous fungus. Phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin condensation, DNA degradation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential suggest that growth inhibition of fungus is mainly caused by apoptosis-like cell death. Broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK treatment indicated that anacardic acid induces caspase-independent apoptosis in M. oryzae. Expression of a predicted ortholog of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was upregulated during the process of apoptosis, suggesting the possibility of mitochondria dependent apoptosis via activation of apoptosis-inducing factor. Anacardic acid treatment leads to decrease in reactive oxygen species rather than increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation normally observed during apoptosis, confirming the antioxidant properties of anacardic acid as suggested by earlier reports. Our study also shows that anacardic acid renders the fungus highly sensitive to DNA damaging agents like ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Treatment of rice leaves with anacardic acid prevents M. oryzae from infecting the plant without affecting the leaf, suggesting that anacardic acid can be an effective antifungal agent. PMID:26381667

  4. Integrating electrodermal biofeedback into pharmacologic treatment of grand mal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Scrimali, Tullio; Tomasello, Damiana; Sciuto, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Electrodermal activity (EDA) and electrodermal biofeedback, when integrated with pharmacologic treatments, indicate promising methods for the treatment of grand mal seizures. They can be used to monitor patient arousal and help patients learn new strategies to better cope with stress and anxiety. Our proposed method can possibly reduce the number of crises for patients who are dependent on pharmacologic therapy and can improve their quality of life. This article describes the scientific background of electrodermal monitoring and electrodermal biofeedback for patients affected by grand mal seizures. In this study, we have reported a clinical case study. The patient was treated for 2 years with electrodermal biofeedback to augment pharmacologic treatments. The trial has been designed in accordance with “n = 1 case study research”. Our results have shown that our methods could achieve a significant reduction in grand mal seizures and sympathetic arousal when applied. The patient under consideration was also relaxed and exhibited greater competency to cope with stress. Additionally, the patient’s sense of mastery and self-efficacy was enhanced. PMID:26029078

  5. [Portable Epileptic Seizure Monitoring Intelligent System Based on Android System].

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wu, Shufeng; Yang, Chunlin; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Yu, Tao; Lu, Chengbiao; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-02-01

    The clinical electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring systems based on personal computer system can not meet the requirements of portability and home usage. The epilepsy patients have to be monitored in hospital for an extended period of time, which imposes a heavy burden on hospitals. In the present study, we designed a portable 16-lead networked monitoring system based on the Android smart phone. The system uses some technologies including the active electrode, the WiFi wireless transmission, the multi-scale permutation entropy (MPE) algorithm, the back-propagation (BP) neural network algorithm, etc. Moreover, the software of Android mobile application can realize the processing and analysis of EEG data, the display of EEG waveform and the alarm of epileptic seizure. The system has been tested on the mobile phones with Android 2. 3 operating system or higher version and the results showed that this software ran accurately and steadily in the detection of epileptic seizure. In conclusion, this paper provides a portable and reliable solution for epileptic seizure monitoring in clinical and home applications. PMID:27382736

  6. Histamine and Seizures : Implications for the Treatment of Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, H; Iinuma, K

    1996-05-01

    Experimental studies have indicated that the central histaminergic neuron system plays an important role in the inhibition of seizures through stimulation of histamine H1 receptors, especially in the developmental period. This has therapeutic implications for currently available drugs that act at histamine receptors. H1 receptor antagonists, including classical antihistamines and anti-allergy drugs, occasionally induce convulsions in healthy children and patients with epilepsy. In particular, promethazine, carbinoxamine, mepyramine (pyrilamine) and ketotifen should be used with caution in these patients. These drugs are widely used as components of over-the-counter medications. The use of the d-chlorphenamine (d-chlorpheniramine) activation study with EEG monitoring is useful for assessing the seizure susceptibility of patients who have had convulsions secondary to administration of H1 receptor antagonists.H2 receptor antagonists have also occasionally been reported to induce convulsions in critically ill and polymedicated patients, and patients with chronic renal or hepatic failure. However, experimental findings have not been consistent with these clinical reports, such that the role of these receptors and their ligands in inducing seizures cannot be confirmed.Recently, H3 receptor antagonists, which enhance endogenous histamine release in the brain, have been demonstrated to have a potent anticonvulsant action. Therefore, these compounds may represent a new avenue for the development of antiepileptic drugs. Considering that H3 receptor antagonists also induce arousal patterns on the EEG, it is possible that they will not be associated with the sedative effects of many conventional antiepileptic drugs.

  7. Integrating electrodermal biofeedback into pharmacologic treatment of grand mal seizures.

    PubMed

    Scrimali, Tullio; Tomasello, Damiana; Sciuto, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Electrodermal activity (EDA) and electrodermal biofeedback, when integrated with pharmacologic treatments, indicate promising methods for the treatment of grand mal seizures. They can be used to monitor patient arousal and help patients learn new strategies to better cope with stress and anxiety. Our proposed method can possibly reduce the number of crises for patients who are dependent on pharmacologic therapy and can improve their quality of life. This article describes the scientific background of electrodermal monitoring and electrodermal biofeedback for patients affected by grand mal seizures. In this study, we have reported a clinical case study. The patient was treated for 2 years with electrodermal biofeedback to augment pharmacologic treatments. The trial has been designed in accordance with "n = 1 case study research". Our results have shown that our methods could achieve a significant reduction in grand mal seizures and sympathetic arousal when applied. The patient under consideration was also relaxed and exhibited greater competency to cope with stress. Additionally, the patient's sense of mastery and self-efficacy was enhanced. PMID:26029078

  8. [Portable Epileptic Seizure Monitoring Intelligent System Based on Android System].

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wu, Shufeng; Yang, Chunlin; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Yu, Tao; Lu, Chengbiao; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-02-01

    The clinical electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring systems based on personal computer system can not meet the requirements of portability and home usage. The epilepsy patients have to be monitored in hospital for an extended period of time, which imposes a heavy burden on hospitals. In the present study, we designed a portable 16-lead networked monitoring system based on the Android smart phone. The system uses some technologies including the active electrode, the WiFi wireless transmission, the multi-scale permutation entropy (MPE) algorithm, the back-propagation (BP) neural network algorithm, etc. Moreover, the software of Android mobile application can realize the processing and analysis of EEG data, the display of EEG waveform and the alarm of epileptic seizure. The system has been tested on the mobile phones with Android 2. 3 operating system or higher version and the results showed that this software ran accurately and steadily in the detection of epileptic seizure. In conclusion, this paper provides a portable and reliable solution for epileptic seizure monitoring in clinical and home applications.

  9. Seizure suppression through manipulating splicing of a voltage-gated sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; He, Miaomiao

    2015-01-01

    Seizure can result from increased voltage-gated persistent sodium current expression. Although many clinically-approved antiepileptic drugs target voltage-gated persistent sodium current, none exclusively repress this current without also adversely affecting the transient voltage-gated sodium current. Achieving a more selective block has significant potential for the treatment of epilepsy. Recent studies show that voltage-gated persistent sodium current amplitude is regulated by alternative splicing offering the possibility of a novel route for seizure control. In this study we identify 291 splicing regulators that, on knockdown, alter splicing of the Drosophila voltage-gated sodium channel to favour inclusion of exon K, rather than the mutually exclusive exon L. This change is associated with both a significant reduction in voltage-gated persistent sodium current, without change to transient voltage-gated sodium current, and to rescue of seizure in this model insect. RNA interference mediated knock-down, in two different seizure mutants, shows that 95 of these regulators are sufficient to significantly reduce seizure duration. Moreover, most suppress seizure activity in both mutants, indicative that they are part of well conserved pathways and likely, therefore, to be optimal candidates to take forward to mammalian studies. We provide proof-of-principle for such studies by showing that inhibition of a selection of regulators, using small molecule inhibitors, is similarly effective to reduce seizure. Splicing of the Drosophila sodium channel shows many similarities to its mammalian counterparts, including altering the amplitude of voltage-gated persistent sodium current. Our study provides the impetus to investigate whether manipulation of splicing of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels may be exploitable to provide effective seizure control. PMID:25681415

  10. Seizure suppression through manipulating splicing of a voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; He, Miaomiao; Baines, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    Seizure can result from increased voltage-gated persistent sodium current expression. Although many clinically-approved antiepileptic drugs target voltage-gated persistent sodium current, none exclusively repress this current without also adversely affecting the transient voltage-gated sodium current. Achieving a more selective block has significant potential for the treatment of epilepsy. Recent studies show that voltage-gated persistent sodium current amplitude is regulated by alternative splicing offering the possibility of a novel route for seizure control. In this study we identify 291 splicing regulators that, on knockdown, alter splicing of the Drosophila voltage-gated sodium channel to favour inclusion of exon K, rather than the mutually exclusive exon L. This change is associated with both a significant reduction in voltage-gated persistent sodium current, without change to transient voltage-gated sodium current, and to rescue of seizure in this model insect. RNA interference mediated knock-down, in two different seizure mutants, shows that 95 of these regulators are sufficient to significantly reduce seizure duration. Moreover, most suppress seizure activity in both mutants, indicative that they are part of well conserved pathways and likely, therefore, to be optimal candidates to take forward to mammalian studies. We provide proof-of-principle for such studies by showing that inhibition of a selection of regulators, using small molecule inhibitors, is similarly effective to reduce seizure. Splicing of the Drosophila sodium channel shows many similarities to its mammalian counterparts, including altering the amplitude of voltage-gated persistent sodium current. Our study provides the impetus to investigate whether manipulation of splicing of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels may be exploitable to provide effective seizure control.

  11. Seizure prophylaxis in an animal model of epilepsy by dietary fluoxetine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Richman, Alyssa; Heinrichs, Stephen C

    2007-04-01

    Clinical and animal model evidence suggests that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) act as anticonvulsants. The present studies tested the possibility that the El mouse model of genetically predisposed/handling-triggered epilepsy would exhibit fewer seizures following SSRI treatment via dietary fluoxetine adulteration. In particular, potential bioenergetic and neural mechanisms for anticonvulsant efficacy of fluoxetine were explored using food intake/body weight monitoring and quantification of brain serotonin transporter protein. El mice consuming a chow diet ad libitum or yoked in quantity to fluoxetine diet intake exhibited seizure incidence of 40% in response to tail-suspension handling, whereas seizures were abolished (0%) among El mice consuming a fluoxetine-adultered diet over 7 days. A 3 day period of fluoxetine administration was insufficient to exert anticonvulsant efficacy and all treatment groups exhibited the same circadian locomotor activity patterns at the time of seizure susceptibility testing. Bioenergetic factors could not account for the anticonvulsant efficacy of fluoxetine since yoked diet controls with matched food intake, body weight change and blood glucose levels exhibited the same 40% seizure incidence as ad libitum chow controls. Importantly, the 7 day period of dietary fluoxetine exposure was effective in selectively reducing cell density in the parietal cortex and increasing serotonin transporter protein content in the nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these results suggest that dietary fluoxetine supplementation abolishes handling-induced seizure susceptibility in El mice via a neural remodeling mechanism independent of energy balance.

  12. Seizure Suppression by High Temperature via cAMP Modulation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Saras, Arunesh; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Bang-sensitive (BS) Drosophila mutants display characteristic seizure-like activity (SLA) and paralysis after mechanical shock . After high-frequency electrical stimulation (HFS) of the brain, they generate robust seizures at very low threshold voltage. Here we report an important phenomenon, which effectively suppresses SLA in BS mutants. High temperature causes seizure suppression in all BS mutants (parabss1, eas, sda) examined in this study. This effect is fully reversible and flies show complete recovery from BS paralysis once the temperature effect is nullified. High temperature induces an increase in seizure threshold after a brief pulse of heat shock (HS). By genetic screening, we identified the involvement of cAMP in the suppression of seizures by high temperature. We propose that HS induces adenylyl cyclase which in turn increases cAMP concentration which eventually suppresses seizures in mutant flies. In summary, we describe an unusual phenomenon, where high temperature can suppress SLA in flies by modulating cAMP concentration. PMID:27558668

  13. A signal processing based analysis and prediction of seizure onset in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V; Hussaini, Jamal; Hussaini, Jalal; Delaviz, Ali; Delaviz, Fatemeh; Habibi, Shaghayegh; Ramezanpoor, Sara

    2016-01-01

    One of the main areas of behavioural neuroscience is forecasting the human behaviour. Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted, causing seizures or periods of unusual behaviour, sensations and sometimes loss of consciousness. An estimated 5% of the world population has epileptic seizure but there is not any method to cure it. More than 30% of people with epilepsy cannot control seizure. Epileptic seizure prediction, refers to forecasting the occurrence of epileptic seizures, is one of the most important but challenging problems in biomedical sciences, across the world. In this research we propose a new methodology which is based on studying the EEG signals using two measures, the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension. In order to validate the proposed method, it is applied to epileptic EEG signals of patients by computing the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension, and then the results are validated versus the reference data. The results of these analyses show that we are able to forecast the onset of a seizure on average of 25.76 seconds before the time of occurrence.

  14. Psychomotor seizures, Penfield, Gibbs, Bailey and the development of anterior temporal lobectomy: a historical vignette.

    PubMed

    Vannemreddy, Prasad; Stone, James L; Vannemreddy, Siddharth; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2010-04-01

    Psychomotor seizures, referred to as limbic or partial complex seizures, have had an interesting evolution in diagnosis and treatment. Hughlings Jackson was the first to clearly relate the clinical syndrome and likely etiology to lesions in the uncinate region of the medial temporal lobe. With the application of electroencephalography (EEG) to the study of human epilepsy as early as 1934 by Gibbs, Lennox, and Davis in Boston, electrical recordings have significantly advanced the study of epilepsy. In 1937, Gibbs and Lennox proposed the term "psychomotor epilepsy" to describe a characteristic EEG pattern of seizures accompanied by mental, emotional, motor, and autonomic phenomena. Concurrently, typical psychomotor auras and dreamy states were produced by electrical stimulation of medial temporal structures during epilepsy surgery by Penfield in Montreal. In 1937, Jasper joined Penfield, EEG was introduced and negative surgical explorations became less frequent. Nevertheless, Penfield preferred to operate only on space occupying lesions. A milestone in psychomotor seizure diagnosis was in the year 1946 when Gibbs, at the Illinois Neuropsychiatric Institute, Chicago, reported that the patient falling asleep during EEG was a major activator of the psychomotor discharges and electrographic ictal episodes becoming more prominently recorded. Working with Percival Bailey, Gibbs was proactive in applying EEG to define surgical excision of the focus in patients with intractable psychomotor seizures. By early 1950s, the Montreal group began to clearly delineate causative medial temporal lesions such as hippocampal sclerosis and tumors in the production of psychomotor seizures.

  15. Bim regulation may determine hippocampal vulnerability after injurious seizures and in temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Sachiko; Schindler, Clara K.; Meller, Robert; So, Norman K.; Araki, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Akitaka; Lan, Jing-Quan; Taki, Waro; Simon, Roger P.; Henshall, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Programmed cell death pathways have been implicated in the mechanism by which neurons die following brief and prolonged seizures, but the significance of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins in the process remains poorly defined. Expression of the death agonist Bcl-2–interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) is under the control of the forkhead in rhabdomyosarcoma (FKHR) transcription factors. This prompted us to examine the response of this pathway to experimental seizures and in hippocampi from patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. A short period of status epilepticus in rats that damaged the hippocampus activated FKHR/FKHRL-1 and induced a significant increase in expression of Bim. Blocking of FKHR/FKHRL-1 dephosphorylation after seizures improved hippocampal neuronal survival in vivo, and Bim antisense oligonucleotides were neuroprotective against seizures in vitro. Inhibition of Akt increased the FKHR/Bim response and DNA fragmentation within the normally resistant cortex. Analysis of hippocampi from patients with intractable epilepsy revealed that Bim levels were significantly lower than in controls and FKHR was inhibited; we were able to reproduce these results experimentally in rats by evoking multiple brief, noninjurious electroshock seizures. We conclude that Bim expression may be a critical determinant of whether seizures damage the brain, and that its control may be neuroprotective in status epilepticus and epilepsy. PMID:15057313

  16. Migrating partial seizures in infancy: a malignant disorder with developmental arrest.

    PubMed

    Coppola, G; Plouin, P; Chiron, C; Robain, O; Dulac, O

    1995-10-01

    Fourteen infants of both sexes had a previously unreported epileptic condition characterized by nearly continuous multifocal seizures. The first seizures occurred at a mean age of 3 months, without antecedent risk factors. At 1 to 10 months, the seizures became very frequent. They were partial with variable clinical expression, and the EEG showed that the discharges randomly involved multiple independent sites, moving from one cortical area to another in consecutive seizures. Although their topography varied, the EEG ictal pattern of each seizure was very similar. It consisted of rhythmic alpha or theta activity which spread to involve an increasing area of the cortical surface. Patients regressed developmentally and became quadriplegic with severe axial hypotonia. Three patients died at age 7 months and at age 7 and 8 years, respectively. Seizures were controlled in only 2 patients, and only 3 children resumed psychomotor development. Extensive investigation failed to determine an etiology, and there was no familial recurrence. Neuropathological examination of the brain in two cases showed only severe hippocampal neuronal loss and accompanying gliosis. PMID:7555952

  17. A Wavelet-Based Artifact Reduction From Scalp EEG for Epileptic Seizure Detection.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Kafiul; Rastegarnia, Amir; Yang, Zhi

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a method to reduce artifacts from scalp EEG recordings to facilitate seizure diagnosis/detection for epilepsy patients. The proposed method is primarily based on stationary wavelet transform and takes the spectral band of seizure activities (i.e., 0.5-29 Hz) into account to separate artifacts from seizures. Different artifact templates have been simulated to mimic the most commonly appeared artifacts in real EEG recordings. The algorithm is applied on three sets of synthesized data including fully simulated, semi-simulated, and real data to evaluate both the artifact removal performance and seizure detection performance. The EEG features responsible for the detection of seizures from nonseizure epochs have been found to be easily distinguishable after artifacts are removed, and consequently, the false alarms in seizure detection are reduced. Results from an extensive experiment with these datasets prove the efficacy of the proposed algorithm, which makes it possible to use it for artifact removal in epilepsy diagnosis as well as other applications regarding neuroscience studies.

  18. Regression of stroke-like lesions in MELAS-syndrome after seizure control.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Barton, Peter

    2010-12-01

    There are some indications that seizure activity promotes the development of stroke-like episodes, or vice versa, in patients with mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome or other syndromic mitochondrial disorders. A 41-year-old Caucasian female with MELAS syndrome, presenting with short stature, microcytic anaemia, increased blood-sedimentation rate, myopathy, hyper-gammaglobulinaemia, an iron-metabolism defect, migraine-like headaches, and stroke-like episodes, developed complex partial and generalised seizures at age 32 years. Valproic acid was ineffective but after switching to lamotrigine and lorazepam, she became seizure-free for five years and stroke-like episodes did not recur. Cerebral MRI initially showed enhanced gyral thickening and a non-enhanced T2-hyperintensity over the left parieto-temporo-occipital white matter and cortex and enhanced caudate heads. After two years without seizures, the non-enhanced hyperintense parieto-temporo-occipital lesion had disappeared, being attributed to consequent seizure control. The caudate heads, however, remained hyperintense throughout the observational period. This case indicates that adequate seizure control in a patient with MELAS syndrome may prevent the recurrence of stroke-like episodes and may result in the disappearance of stroke-like lesions on MRI.

  19. A signal processing based analysis and prediction of seizure onset in patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main areas of behavioural neuroscience is forecasting the human behaviour. Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted, causing seizures or periods of unusual behaviour, sensations and sometimes loss of consciousness. An estimated 5% of the world population has epileptic seizure but there is not any method to cure it. More than 30% of people with epilepsy cannot control seizure. Epileptic seizure prediction, refers to forecasting the occurrence of epileptic seizures, is one of the most important but challenging problems in biomedical sciences, across the world. In this research we propose a new methodology which is based on studying the EEG signals using two measures, the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension. In order to validate the proposed method, it is applied to epileptic EEG signals of patients by computing the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension, and then the results are validated versus the reference data. The results of these analyses show that we are able to forecast the onset of a seizure on average of 25.76 seconds before the time of occurrence. PMID:26586477

  20. High doses of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride accelerate onset of CNS oxygen toxicity seizures in unanesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Pilla, R; Held, H E; Landon, C S; Dean, J B

    2013-08-29

    Pseudoephedrine (PSE) salts (hydrochloride and sulfate) are commonly used as nasal and paranasal decongestants by scuba divers. Anecdotal reports from the Divers Alert Network suggest that taking PSE prior to diving while breathing pure O₂ increases the risk for CNS oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT), which manifests as seizures. We hypothesized that high doses of PSE reduce the latency time to seizure (LS) in unanesthetized rats breathing 5 atmospheres absolute (ATA) of hyperbaric oxygen. Sixty-three male rats were implanted with radio-transmitters that recorded electroencephalogram activity and body temperature. After ≥7-day recovery, and 2 h before "diving", each rat was administered either saline solution (control) or PSE hydrochloride intragastrically at the following doses (mg PSE/kg): 0, 40, 80, 100, 120, 160, and 320. Rats breathed pure O₂ and were dived to 5ATA until the onset of behavioral seizures coincident with neurological seizures. LS was the time elapsed between reaching 5ATA and exhibiting seizures. We observed a significant dose-dependent decrease in the LS at doses of 100-320 mg/kg, whereas no significant differences in LS from control value were observed at doses ≤80 mg/kg. Our findings showed that high doses of PSE accelerate the onset of CNS-OT seizures in unanesthetized rats breathing 5ATA of poikilocapnic hyperoxia. Extrapolating our findings to humans, we conclude that the recommended daily dose of PSE should not be abused prior to diving with oxygen-enriched gas mixes or pure O₂.

  1. Seizures and Teens: Surgery for Seizures--What's It All About?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchowny, Michael S.; Dean, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Nearly 1 out of 2 children and teens with seizures may need to take medications throughout their lives. At least 25% will develop a condition called refractory epilepsy--meaning that their seizures do not respond to medical therapy. For these children and teens, non-drug therapies such as brain surgery are available that may offer a chance to…

  2. Seizures and Teens: When Seizures Aren't the Only Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanner, Andres M.; Shafer, Patricia O.

    2006-01-01

    Some teenagers with epilepsy only have to deal with seizures, which can be tough enough, but for other teens, seizures are not the only problem. Parents and caregivers often report changes in their teens' abilities to think clearly, learn in school, or remain focused in class. Mood and other behavioral problems may also be seen. It is critical…