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Sample records for acid-induced wall loosening

  1. Catalysts of plant cell wall loosening

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    The growing cell wall in plants has conflicting requirements to be strong enough to withstand the high tensile forces generated by cell turgor pressure while selectively yielding to those forces to induce wall stress relaxation, leading to water uptake and polymer movements underlying cell wall expansion. In this article, I review emerging concepts of plant primary cell wall structure, the nature of wall extensibility and the action of expansins, family-9 and -12 endoglucanases, family-16 xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH), and pectin methylesterases, and offer a critical assessment of their wall-loosening activity PMID:26918182

  2. Cell Wall Loosening in the Fungus, Phycomyces blakesleeanus

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Joseph K. E.; Truong, Jason T.; Munoz, Cindy M.; Ramirez, David G.

    2015-01-01

    A considerable amount of research has been conducted to determine how cell walls are loosened to produce irreversible wall deformation and expansive growth in plant and algal cells. The same cannot be said about fungal cells. Almost nothing is known about how fungal cells loosen their walls to produce irreversible wall deformation and expansive growth. In this study, anoxia is used to chemically isolate the wall from the protoplasm of the sporangiophores of Phycomyces blakesleeanus. The experimental results provide direct evidence of the existence of chemistry within the fungal wall that is responsible for wall loosening, irreversible wall deformation and elongation growth. In addition, constant-tension extension experiments are conducted on frozen-thawed sporangiophore walls to obtain insight into the wall chemistry and wall loosening mechanism. It is found that a decrease in pH to 4.6 produces creep extension in the frozen-thawed sporangiophore wall that is similar, but not identical, to that found in frozen-thawed higher plant cell walls. Experimental results from frozen-thawed and boiled sporangiophore walls suggest that protein activity may be involved in the creep extension. PMID:27135318

  3. In vivo cell wall loosening by hydroxyl radicals during cress seed germination and elongation growth.

    PubMed

    Müller, Kerstin; Linkies, Ada; Vreeburg, Robert A M; Fry, Stephen C; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2009-08-01

    Loosening of cell walls is an important developmental process in key stages of the plant life cycle, including seed germination, elongation growth, and fruit ripening. Here, we report direct in vivo evidence for hydroxyl radical ((*)OH)-mediated cell wall loosening during plant seed germination and seedling growth. We used electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to show that (*)OH is generated in the cell wall during radicle elongation and weakening of the endosperm of cress (Lepidium sativum; Brassicaceae) seeds. Endosperm weakening precedes radicle emergence, as demonstrated by direct biomechanical measurements. By (3)H fingerprinting, we showed that wall polysaccharides are oxidized in vivo by the developmentally regulated action of apoplastic (*)OH in radicles and endosperm caps: the production and action of (*)OH increased during endosperm weakening and radicle elongation and were inhibited by the germination-inhibiting hormone abscisic acid. Both effects were reversed by gibberellin. Distinct and tissue-specific target sites of (*)OH attack on polysaccharides were evident. In vivo (*)OH attack on cell wall polysaccharides were evident not only in germinating seeds but also in elongating maize (Zea mays; Poaceae) seedling coleoptiles. We conclude that plant cell wall loosening by (*)OH is a controlled action of this type of reactive oxygen species.

  4. Xyloglucan endotransglycosylase, a new wall-loosening enzyme activity from plants.

    PubMed

    Fry, S C; Smith, R C; Renwick, K F; Martin, D J; Hodge, S K; Matthews, K J

    1992-03-15

    cutting and rejoining intermicrofibrillar xyloglucan chains and that it thus causes the wall-loosening required for plant cell expansion.

  5. Isolation and characterization of beta-glucan synthase: A potential biochemical regulator of gravistimulated differential cell wall loosening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmanoff, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    In plants, gravity stimulates differential growth in the upper and lower halves of horizontally oriented organs. Auxin regulation of cell wall loosening and elongation is the basis for most models of this phenomenon. Auxin treatment of pea stem tissue rapidly increases the activity of Golgi-localized Beta-1,4-glucan synthase, an enzyme involved in biosynthesis of wall xyloglucan which apparently constitutes the substrate for the wall loosening process. The primary objective is to determine if auxin induces de novo formation of Golgi glucan synthase and increases the level of this glucan synthase mRNA. This shall be accomplished by (a) preparation of a monoclonal antibody to the synthase, (b) isolation, and characterization of the glucan synthase, and (c) examination for cross reactivity between the antibody and translation products of auxin induced mRNAs in pea tissue. The antibody will also be used to localize the glucan synthase in upper and lower halves of pea stem tissue before, during and after the response to gravity.

  6. Cell wall dynamics modulate acetic acid-induced apoptotic cell death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rego, António; Duarte, Ana M.; Azevedo, Flávio; Sousa, Maria J.; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Chaves, Susana R.

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid triggers apoptotic cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, similar to mammalian apoptosis. To uncover novel regulators of this process, we analyzed whether impairing MAPK signaling affected acetic acid-induced apoptosis and found the mating-pheromone response and, especially, the cell wall integrity pathways were the major mediators, especially the latter, which we characterized further. Screening downstream effectors of this pathway, namely targets of the transcription factor Rlm1p, highlighted decreased cell wall remodeling as particularly important for acetic acid resistance. Modulation of cell surface dynamics therefore emerges as a powerful strategy to increase acetic acid resistance, with potential application in industrial fermentations using yeast, and in biomedicine to exploit the higher sensitivity of colorectal carcinoma cells to apoptosis induced by acetate produced by intestinal propionibacteria. PMID:28357256

  7. Long-term acid-induced wall extension in an in-vitro system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleland, R. E.; Cosgrove, D.; Tepfer, M.

    1987-01-01

    When frozen-thawed Avena sativa L. coleoptile and Cucumis sativa L. hypocotyl sections, under tension, are acid-treated, they undergo rapid elongation (acid-extension). The acid-extension response consists of two concurrent phases: a burst of extension which decays exponentially over 1-2 h (ExE), and a constant rate of extension (CE) which can persist for at least 6h. The extension (delta L) is closely represented by the equation: delta L = a-a e(-kt) + C t where a is the total extension of the exponential phase, k is the rate constant for ExE, and c is the rate of linear extension (CE). Low pH and high tension increased a and c, whereas temperature influenced k. The magnitude of the CE (over 50% extension/10 h), the similarity in its time course to auxin-induced growth, and the apparent yield threshold for CE indicate that CE is more likely than ExE to be the type of extension which cell walls undergo during normal auxin-induced growth.

  8. Plant expansins: diversity and interactions with plant cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Expansins were discovered two decades ago as cell wall proteins that mediate acid-induced growth by catalyzing loosening of plant cell walls without lysis of wall polymers. In the interim our understanding of expansins has gotten more complex through bioinformatic analysis of expansin distribution and evolution, as well as through expression analysis, dissection of the upstream transcription factors regulating expression, and identification of additional classes of expansin by sequence and structural similarities. Molecular analyses of expansins from bacteria have identified residues essential for wall loosening activity and clarified the bifunctional nature of expansin binding to complex cell walls. Transgenic modulation of expansin expression modifies growth and stress physiology of plants, but not always in predictable and even understandable ways. PMID:26057089

  9. Plant expansins: diversity and interactions with plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2015-06-01

    Expansins were discovered two decades ago as cell wall proteins that mediate acid-induced growth by catalyzing loosening of plant cell walls without lysis of wall polymers. In the interim our understanding of expansins has gotten more complex through bioinformatic analysis of expansin distribution and evolution, as well as through expression analysis, dissection of the upstream transcription factors regulating expression, and identification of additional classes of expansin by sequence and structural similarities. Molecular analyses of expansins from bacteria have identified residues essential for wall loosening activity and clarified the bifunctional nature of expansin binding to complex cell walls. Transgenic modulation of expansin expression modifies growth and stress physiology of plants, but not always in predictable or even understandable ways.

  10. [Loosening of a Calcaneo-Stop Screw after Trampolining].

    PubMed

    Trieb, K; Fingernagel, T; Petershofer, A; Hofstaetter, S G

    2015-06-01

    Flexible flatfoot is a common malalignment in the paediatric population. Arthroereisis with a calcaneo-stop screw is an effective surgical procedure for treating juvenile flexible flatfoot after conservative measures have been fully exploited. In the present report, we describe the case of a loosening of a calcaneo-stop screw in a 12-year-old youth after excessive trampolining.

  11. Measuring Plant Cell Wall Extension (Creep) Induced by Acidic pH and by Alpha-Expansin

    PubMed Central

    Durachko, Daniel M.; Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Growing plant cell walls characteristically exhibit a property known as 'acid growth', by which we mean they are more extensible at low pH (< 5) 1. The plant hormone auxin rapidly stimulates cell elongation in young stems and similar tissues at least in part by an acid-growth mechanism 2, 3. Auxin activates a H+ pump in the plasma membrane, causing acidification of the cell wall solution. Wall acidification activates expansins, which are endogenous cell wall-loosening proteins 4, causing the cell wall to yield to the wall tensions created by cell turgor pressure. As a result, the cell begins to enlarge rapidly. This 'acid growth' phenomenon is readily measured in isolated (nonliving) cell wall specimens. The ability of cell walls to undergo acid-induced extension is not simply the result of the structural arrangement of the cell wall polysaccharides (e.g. pectins), but depends on the activity of expansins 5. Expansins do not have any known enzymatic activity and the only way to assay for expansin activity is to measure their induction of cell wall extension. This video report details the sources and preparation techniques for obtaining suitable wall materials for expansin assays and goes on to show acid-induced extension and expansin-induced extension of wall samples prepared from growing cucumber hypocotyls. To obtain suitable cell wall samples, cucumber seedlings are grown in the dark, the hypocotyls are cut and frozen at -80 °C. Frozen hypocotyls are abraded, flattened, and then clamped at constant tension in a special cuvette for extensometer measurements. To measure acid-induced extension, the walls are initially buffered at neutral pH, resulting in low activity of expansins that are components of the native cell walls. Upon buffer exchange to acidic pH, expansins are activated and the cell walls extend rapidly. We also demonstrate expansin activity in a reconstitution assay. For this part, we use a brief heat treatment to denature the native expansins in the

  12. [Particle disease--aseptic loosening of the total hip endoprosthesis].

    PubMed

    Kolundzić, Robert; Orlić, Dubravko

    2008-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) improves the ability and quality of life in patients with hip dysfunction due to different causes. Aseptic loosening is the major cause of the late hip endoprosthesis failure. It results from aseptic inflammatory reaction induced by the implant wear debris accumulating at the prosthesis interface, and is mediated by numerous cellular and humoral factors. Due to presence of wear debris we call aseptic loosening of the total hip endoprosthesis as "particle disease". In the most important of factors affecting the risk of aseptic instability include patient's age, sex, body mass index, underlying morbidity (reason for THA), endoprosthetic material and surgeon's skill. However, taken together, all these factors explain only a minor part of variability of this phenomenon. Factors that are decisive for the occurrence of aseptic instability are still largely unknown. The existence of "individual disposition" for development of aseptic instability that is not determined by demographic or biomechanical factors is well recognized.

  13. Development of Anti-Loosening Performance of Hyper Lock Nut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Shuji; Migita, Hiroaki; Kataoka, Mitumasa; Nakasaki, Nobuyuki; Murano, Kohshi

    Bolted joints are widely used in mechanical structures as they allow easy disassembly for maintenance without high cost. However, vibration-induced loosening due to dynamic loading remains a long-unresolved issue. We have developed a new type of nut named the hyper lock nut (HLN) that offers anti-loosening performance without a complicated tightening process and tools. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of joints bolted with the HLN, and tightening behavior was analyzed using the three-dimensional finite element method. The analytical results were compared with the experimental results for the HLN, and close qualitative agreement was observed between the two with respect to displacement, tightening force and tightening torque. We found a number of new aspects and plus points for joints bolted with the HLN in comparison to those fastened with JIS standard nuts. It was found that the tightening torque of the HLN is higher than that of JIS standard nuts, and that satisfactory anti-loosening performance can be realized through the thread contact force at the slit region and the angular face of the bearing surface.

  14. Role of cytokines in gonarthrosis and knee prosthesis aseptic loosening.

    PubMed

    Loria, Maria Paola; Dambra, Porzia; Moretti, Biagio; Patella, Vittorio; Capuzzimati, Laura; Cavallo, Elsa; Nettis, Eustachio; Pesce, Vito; Dell'Osso, Adriana; Simone, Carmelo; Tursi, Alfredo

    2004-01-01

    Cytokines, which have been demonstrated in synovial fluids during various joint diseases, play an important role in mediating synovial inflammation and in regulating the immune response of many inflammatory processes. We studied synovial fluid, serum, and synovial fragments obtained from 33 patients--10 affected by serious gonarthrosis re-quiring a prosthetic implant, 8 with knee prosthesis aseptic loosening, and (as controls) 15 affected by degenerative meniscopathies--to evaluate the degree of inflammation and level of interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10) and interferon gamma secretion. Histological analysis revealed slightly more infiltration by inflammatory cells in the synovial tissue of patients with gonarthrosis and knee prosthesis aseptic loosening than in that of the control group, with a high prevalence of macrophages. Moreover, we observed enhanced production of the studied cytokines, especially in synovial fluid as compared to serum, indicating that in the pathological conditions examined the inflammatory events are mainly localized. Because the role of these cytokines is to modulate inflammation, better knowledge of the involvement of cells and their soluble mediators in articular damage could guide immunomodulating treatment.

  15. Scintigraphic and x-ray arthrographic diagnosis of femoral prosthesis loosening: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Uri, G.; Wellman, H.; Capello, W.; Robb, J.; Greenman, G.

    1984-06-01

    In order to determine loosening of femoral components of conventional total hip arthroplasties, a comparison of radionuclide (RA) and radiographic arthrograms (XA) was performed. The hips of 29 patients were studied with radiographic contrast and intraarticular Tc-99m sulfur colloid. The XAs were positive for loosening in 10/29 studies, whereas the RAs were positive in 19/29 studies. In five of ten in which both studies were positive, the RA showed femoral prosthesis loosening more clearly than the XA. By surgical follow-up, there were four false-negative XAs. The data suggest that the RA is valuable in determining femoral component loosening.

  16. [Immune competence of human tissue lymphocytes in contact with loosened hip joint prostheses. On the topic of cellular or humoral rejection reaction as the mechanism of loosening].

    PubMed

    Peters, K M; Löer, F; Hofstädter, F; Casser, H R

    1991-05-01

    In several investigations rejections were accused of being a possible cause for the loosening of hip endoprostheses. Using immunocytochemical techniques we studied the number and type of lymphocytes in the tissue adjacent to loosened hip endoprostheses. Tissue samples were taken from 18 patients being reoperated for a loosened endoprostheses. Impressive lymphocyte infiltrates were found in 4 of 18 patients (22%). These infiltrates only consisted of T-cells. In the other samples only few lymphocytes were detected belonging to T- and B-lymphocyte population, respectively. In our patients T-cell mediated rejections were of minor importance for the loosening of total hip replacement. B-cell accumulations were detected in none of the samples.

  17. Wall relaxation and the driving forces for cell expansive growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    When water uptake by growing cells is prevented, the turgor pressure and the tensile stress in the cell wall are reduced by continued wall loosening. This process, termed in vivo stress relaxation, provides a new way to study the dynamics of wall loosening and to measure the wall yield threshold and the physiological wall extensibility. Stress relaxation experiments indicate that wall stress supplies the mechanical driving force for wall yielding. Cell expansion also requires water absorption. The driving force for water uptake during growth is created by wall relaxation, which lowers the water potential of the expanding cells. New techniques for measuring this driving force show that it is smaller than believed previously; in elongating stems it is only 0.3 to 0.5 bar. This means that the hydraulic resistance of the water transport pathway is small and that rate of cell expansion is controlled primarily by wall loosening and yielding.

  18. Fatigue of the cement/bone interface: the surface texture of bone and loosening.

    PubMed

    Arola, D; Stoffel, K A; Yang, D T

    2006-02-01

    Loosening is recognized as one of the primary sources of total hip replacement (THR) failure. In this study the influence of the bone surface texture on loosening of the cement/bone interface was studied. Model cemented hip replacements were prepared and subjected to cyclic loads that induced pure shear fatigue of the cement/bone interface. The femoral canals were textured with the use of specific cutting tools to achieve a desired surface topography. Loosening of the implant with cyclic loading was characterized in terms of the initial migration (Region I), steady-state loosening (Region II), and unstable loosening (Region III). Results from the experiments showed that the initial migration and rate of steady-state loosening were dependent upon the bone surface topography. The apparent fatigue strength ranged from 0.8 to 5.1 MPa, and denotes the cyclic shear stress required for loosening of 1 mm within 10 million cycles. Regardless of the bone surface topography the ratio of apparent fatigue strength and ultimate shear strength of the interfaces was approximately 0.24. In general, the apparent fatigue strength increased proportional to the average surface roughness of the femoral canal and the corresponding volume available for cement interdigitation. In addition, there was a strong correlation between the normalized initial migration and the apparent fatigue strength (i.e., specimens with the highest initial migration exhibited the lowest fatigue strength).

  19. Development of a non-invasive diagnostic technique for acetabular component loosening in total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Alshuhri, Abdullah A; Holsgrove, Timothy P; Miles, Anthony W; Cunningham, James L

    2015-08-01

    Current techniques for diagnosing early loosening of a total hip replacement (THR) are ineffective, especially for the acetabular component. Accordingly, new, accurate, and quantifiable methods are required. The aim of this study was to investigate the viability of vibrational analysis for accurately detecting acetabular component loosening. A simplified acetabular model was constructed using a Sawbones(®) foam block. By placing a thin silicone layer between the acetabular component and the Sawbones block, 2- and 4-mm soft tissue membranes were simulated representing different loosening scenarios. A constant amplitude sinusoidal excitation with a sweep range of 100-1500 Hz was used. Output vibration from the model was measured using an accelerometer and an ultrasound probe. Loosening was determined from output signal features such as the number and relative strength of observed harmonic frequencies. Both measurement methods were sufficient to measure the output vibration. Vibrational analysis reliably detected loosening corresponding to both 2 and 4 mm tissue membranes at driving frequencies between 100 and 1000 Hz (p < 0.01) using the accelerometer. In contrast, ultrasound detected 2-mm loosening at a frequency range of 850-1050 Hz (p < 0.01) and 4-mm loosening at 500-950 Hz (p < 0.01).

  20. Loosening detection of the femoral component of hip prostheses with extracorporeal shockwaves: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Johannes S; Jaeger, Sebastian; Kretzer, Jan Philippe; Rupp, Rüdiger; Bitsch, Rudi G

    2015-02-01

    The diagnosis of aseptic loosening of hip implants is often challenging. A vibrational analysis of the bone-implant interface could be an alternative method to analyze the fixation of endoprostheses. We assessed an innovative and new approach for excitation by using extracorporeal shockwaves in this study. In three cadaver specimens total hip arthroplasty was performed bilaterally. Four different states of implant loosening were simulated. Three accelerometers were fixed at the medial condyle, the greater trochanter, and the crest of the ilium. The bone-implant compound was excited with highly standardized extracorporeal shock waves. Resonance spectra between 100 Hz and 5000 Hz were recorded. This technique permitted a good adaptation to varying soft tissue conditions. The main resonance frequency of the hip joints occurred at about 2000 Hz. The analysis of the measured spectra showed an interrelation between the state of loosening and the frequency values of the resonances. In case of a stem loosening, there were significant shifts of the resonance into the lower frequency area between 386 Hz and 847 Hz. With this novel technique the degree of stem loosening could be assessed in a soft tissue considering configuration. This study forms a first step for future establishment of a non-invasive, non-radiological and fast applicable diagnostic procedure for early detection of endoprostheses loosening before manifest presence of clinical signs.

  1. The Effects of Spinopelvic Parameters and Paraspinal Muscle Degeneration on S1 Screw Loosening

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Bum; Lee, Young-Seok; Nam, Taek-Kyun; Park, Yong-Sook; Kim, Young-Baeg

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate risk factors for S1 screw loosening after lumbosacral fusion, including spinopelvic parameters and paraspinal muscles. Methods We studied with 156 patients with degenerative lumbar disease who underwent lumbosacral interbody fusion and pedicle screw fixation including the level of L5-S1 between 2005 and 2012. The patients were divided into loosening and non-loosening groups. Screw loosening was defined as a halo sign larger than 1 mm around a screw. We checked cross sectional area of paraspinal muscles, mean signal intensity of the muscles on T2 weight MRI as a degree of fatty degeneration, spinopelvic parameters, bone mineral density, number of fusion level, and the characteristic of S1 screw. Results Twenty seven patients showed S1 screw loosening, which is 24.4% of total. The mean duration for S1 screw loosening was 7.3±4.1 months after surgery. Statistically significant risk factors were increased age, poor BMD, 3 or more fusion levels (p<0.05). Among spinopelvic parameters, a high pelvic incidence (p<0.01), a greater difference between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordotic angle preoperatively (p<0.01) and postoperatively (p<0.05). Smaller cross-sectional area and high T2 signal intensity in both multifidus and erector spinae muscles were also significant muscular risk factors (p<0.05). Small converging angle (p<0.001) and short intraosseous length (p<0.05) of S1 screw were significant screw related risk factors (p<0.05). Conclusion In addition to well known risk factors, spinopelvic parameters and the degeneration of paraspinal muscles also showed significant effects on the S1 screw loosening. PMID:26587190

  2. Numerical Studies on Time-Varying Stiffness of Disk-Drum Type Rotor with Bolt Loosening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhaoye; Chu, Fulei

    2015-07-01

    Disk-drum type rotors are widely used in industry for their high stiffness and low weight properties. In disk-drum type rotors, the adjacent disks and drums are commonly connected by bolted joints. Those rotating joint interfaces are subjected to numerous combinations of loads during normal operation, where loosening of the connecting bolts might occur. The bolt loosening will change the local stiffness of the rotor, which in turn affect the rotor dynamics and even result in structural failures. In this paper, the local stiffness of a disk- drum rotor with bolt loosening is investigated numerically. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model for the bolted disk-drum joint is established in ANSYS, where the bolt loosening is simulated by reducing the preloads of certain bolts, and removing those bolts as the limiting case. Simulations are performed on the FE model to evaluate the joint behaviour under static loads. Periodic variations of the joint deflections with respect to the rotation angle of the shaft are obtained, which implies the appearance of the time-varying local stiffness in the rotor system. The studies in this paper help accurate prediction of the rotor dynamics and early detection of bolt loosening.

  3. Expression of tenascin-C in aseptic loosening of total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Konttinen, Y.; Li, T.; Michelsson, O.; Xu, J.; Sorsa, T.; Santavirta, S.; Imai, S.; Virtanen, I.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess if the bonding interlayer between the implant and bone in aseptic loosening of total hip replacement (THR) is qualitatively deteriorated by excessive accumulation of anti-adhesive glycoprotein, tenascin-C.
METHODS—Alkaline phosphatase-anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) method was used for immunohistochemical staining of tenascin-C in interface tissue and control synovial tissue.
RESULTS—Tenascin-C was found to be a major component of the extracellular matrix at a hitherto unrecognised site, namely the synovial membrane-like interface tissue between implant and bone in aseptic loosening of THR. The overall tenascin-C staining (median score 4.0) was greatly increased in aseptic loosening compared with synovial membrane (median score 2.0; p<0.001) and fibrous capsule (median score 2.0; p<0.001) from primary THR operations. Topological analysis disclosed that tenascin-C was also found at the critical implant-interface and interface-bone surfaces.
CONCLUSION—Local tenascin-C expression is increased as a result of a chronic foreign body type reaction associated with excessive cytokine production and tissue injury mediated by microtrauma and neutral endoproteinases. This qualitative and topological deterioration of the bonding interlayer by an increase of anti-adhesive tenascin-C expression may inadvertantly contribute to loosening.

 Keywords: tenascin; aseptic loosening; total hip replacement PMID:9893574

  4. An investigation of the aseptic loosening of an AISI 316L stainless steel hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Godec, Matjaz; Kocijan, Aleksandra; Dolinar, Drago; Mandrino, Djordje; Jenko, Monika; Antolic, Vane

    2010-08-01

    The total replacement of joints by the implantation of permanently indwelling prosthetic components has been one of the major successes of modern surgery in terms of relieving pain and correcting deformity. However, the aseptic loosening of a prosthetic-joint component is the most common reason for joint-revision surgery. Furthermore, it is thought that wear particles are one of the major contributors to the development and perpetuation of aseptic loosening. The aim of the present study was to identify the factors related to the aseptic loosening of an AISI 316L stainless steel total hip prosthesis. The stem was evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, with polished and rough regions being analyzed in order to establish the differences in the chemical compositions of both regions. Specific areas were examined using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and light microscopy.

  5. Reactivation of a tuberculous coxitis due to loosening of a total hip endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Fink, B; Casser, H R; Zilkens, K W; Rüther, W

    1995-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman who suffered from juvenile tuberculous coxitis at the age of 4 is presented. Her hip joint replacement lasted for 18 years and then needed replacing. Intraoperatively removed caseous soft tissue and an opalescent secretion histologically resembled a tuberculous focus, and bacteriological culture grew a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain. Four months after the replacement, the patient suffered from a tuberculosis-induced septic loosening of the newly replaced hip joint endoprosthesis. The tuberculosis relapse was probably due to aseptic loosening of the first hip joint endoprosthesis.

  6. Loosening of Total Knee Arthroplasty after Brucellosis Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Bahramian, Fateme; Mirzaee, Fateme; Zafarani, Zohreh; Aslani, Hamidreza

    2017-01-01

    In this report we describe a 78-year-old man whose total knee arthroplasty showed the symptoms of infection with brucella with radiographic signs of loosening 5 years after the index surgery. The patient was treated successfully after a 2-stage revision arthroplasty surgery along with using rifampicin and doxycycline for 8 weeks. PMID:28271092

  7. Detection of bolt loosening in C C composite thermal protection panels: II. Experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinkyu; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2006-04-01

    The research presented in this paper is motivated by the need for reliable inspection technology for the detection of bolt loosening in carbon-carbon (C-C) thermal protection system (TPS) panels using minimal human intervention. Based on the diagnostic scheme proposed in part I of the study, a new PZT (lead zirconate titanate)-embedded sensor washer was developed to constitute the sensor network. The sensor suite was included in the C-C TPS prototype without jeopardizing the integrity of the original fastening components. The sensor-embedded washer enhances the remote sensing capability and achieves sufficient sensitivity by guiding the diagnostic waves to propagate primarily through the inspection areas. After evolution of the sensor design and appropriate algorithm development, the verification tests were conducted using a shaker which simulated the acoustic environments during the re-entry process. The test results revealed that the proposed system successfully identified the loss of the preload for the bolted joints under loosening and gave the correct diagnostic results. The sensors were found to be durable under cyclic mechanical loads without major failures, and the diagnostic scheme was capable of locating a loosened bracket as well as discriminating major failure modes 1 and 2: panel and bracket loosening in the bracket.

  8. Detection of bolt loosening in C C composite thermal protection panels: I. Diagnostic principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinkyu; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2006-04-01

    A concept demonstrator of the structural health monitoring (SHM) system was developed to autonomously detect the degradation of the mechanical integrity of the standoff carbon-carbon (C-C) thermal protection system (TPS) panels. This system enables us to identify the location of the loosened bolts, as well as to predict the torque levels of those bolts accordingly. In the process of building the proposed SHM prototype, efforts have been focused primarily on developing a trustworthy diagnostic scheme and a responsive sensor suite. In part I of the study, an attenuation-based diagnostic method was proposed to assess the fastener integrity by observing the attenuation patterns of the resultant sensor signals. The attenuation-based method is based on the damping phenomena of ultrasonic waves across the bolted joints. The major advantage of the attenuation-based method over the conventional diagnostic methods is its local sensing capability of loosened brackets. The method can further discriminate the two major failure modes within a bracket: panel-joint loosening and bracket-joint loosening. The theoretical explanation of the attenuation-based method is performed using micro-contact theory and structural/internal damping principles, followed by parametric model studies and appropriate hypothesis testing.

  9. Bolt-loosening identification of bolt connections by vision image-based technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tuan-Cuong; Huynh, Thanh-Canh; Ryu, Joo-Young; Park, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Jeong-Tae

    2016-04-01

    In this study, an algorithm using image processing techniques is proposed to identify bolt-loosening in bolted connections of steel structures. Its basic concept is to identify rotation angles of nuts from a pictured image, and is mainly consisted of the following 3 steps: (1) taking a picture for a bolt joint, (2) segmenting the images for each nut by image processing techniques, and (3) identifying rotation angle of each nut and detecting bolt-loosening. By using the concept, an algorithm is designed for continuous monitoring and inspection of the bolt connections. As a key imageprocessing technique, Hough transform is used to identify rotation angles of nuts, and then bolt-loosening is detected by comparing the angles before and after bolt-loosening. Then the applicability of the proposed algorithm is evaluated by experimental tests for two lab-scaled models. A bolted joint model which consists of a splice plate and 8 sets of bolts and nuts with 2×4 array is used to simulate inspection of bridge connections, and a model which is consisted of a ring flange and 32 sets of bolt and nut is used to simulate continuous monitoring of bolted connections in wind turbine towers.

  10. Pathways of macrophage apoptosis within the interface membrane in aseptic loosening of prostheses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Wu, Wen; Cao, Lei; Huang, Yan; Zhu, Zhenan; Tang, Tingting; Dai, Kerong

    2011-12-01

    Aseptic loosening is a major cause of failure of total hip arthroplasty (THA). Macrophage apoptosis in interface membrane has been proved to play an important role in the pathogenesis of aseptic loosening. The purpose of current study was to identify the apoptotic mechanism of macrophages in the interface membrane of aseptic loosening. We collected periprosthetic interface membrane from 23 patients undergoing the revision operations for aseptic loosening of hip joint prostheses. To serve as the control group, samples of capsule were collected from 18 patients undergoing the primary hip arthroplasties for osteoarthritis (OA). The ultrastructure of interface membrane was examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and in situ apoptotic macrophage identification was performed by TUNEL staining. Furthermore, using immunohistochemical methods we investigated the expression of some apoptosis-related markers such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), cleaved caspase-3/4/8/9, cytochrome c, glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78), and growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153) in macrophages. These markers were regarded as apoptotic inducers or specific indicators of different apoptotic pathways such as death receptor pathway, mitochondrial pathway and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway. TEM showed that a great deal of wear debris was phagocytosed by macrophages, which displayed morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis. The results of TUNEL staining demonstrated that there were more apoptotic macrophages in interface membrane. The expression levels of iNOS, ONOO(-), cleaved caspase-3/4/8/9, cytochrome c, GRP78 and GADD153 in macrophages in interface membrane were significantly higher than those in the control samples (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that death receptor pathway, mitochondria/cytochrosome c caspase-dependent pathway and ER stress pathway are involved in the process of macrophage apoptosis. A

  11. Deep reclamation loosening of soils: State of the problem, results of research, prospects of application, and degradation changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidel'man, F. R.

    2016-09-01

    The efficiency of deep reclamation loosening used for soils of different types on the main parent rocks in the Nonchernozemic zone (mantle and moraine loams, Permian and varved loamy clays, and clays) is assessed basing on the results of long-term stationary and analytical investigations. The long-term aftereffect of the deep loosening on the density, porosity, water permeability, and the main elements of the soil water regime and factors limiting the use of deep loosening are considered. Over 6-12 years after the deep loosening, in the area, where active and passive loosening by a plough was made, a zone of elevated water permeability is preserved at the depth of 40-75 cm. Based on this phenomenon, a new technology of deep reclamation loosening, which restores the hydraulic connection between the arable and deeper soil layers, is proposed. The data on active deep rippers that provide soil loosening to the depth of 0.9-1.0 m are presented. Some agroecological aspects related to the duration of deep loosening effects on the soils and their productivity are discussed. Recommendations on the application of passive and active loosening and moling of heavy-textured gleyed soils are suggested for the European part of the Nonchernozemic zone in the Russian Federation. Field and laboratory works on estimating the efficiency of deep loosening continued for 15 years (1976-1990) for heavy-textured soils on the loess-like, fine-stratified varved clays, as well as on acid moraine and calcareous Permian clays and loamy clays in Moscow, Vologda, Novgorod, and Kirov oblasts.

  12. Do nit removal formulations and other treatments loosen head louse eggs and nits from hair?

    PubMed

    Burgess, I F

    2010-03-01

    Eggs of the head louse, Pediculus capitis De Geer (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae), are difficult to remove because the female louse fixes them to hairs using a proteinaceous secretion that hardens within seconds. The persistent eggshells are harmless but unsightly and are often mistaken for an active infestation. Combing with a fine comb (nit comb) does not readily remove the eggs or empty eggshells because of the resilience of the fixative and both folk remedies and medical products have claimed to facilitate their removal. Measurement of the force required to initiate sliding of the egg fixative using a slip-peel tester was unable to detect evidence that any of three products which claimed to have egg-loosening properties (Step 2 Nit Removal System, Clear Lice Egg Remover, RID Lice Egg Loosener Gel) had any activity or exerted any effect on the egg fixative beyond the lubricating effects conveyed by water or conventional hair conditioner.

  13. Perflurooctanoic Acid Induces Developmental Cardiotoxicity in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widespread environmental contaminant that is detectable in serum of the general U.S. population. PFOA is a known developmental toxicant that induces mortality in mammalian embryos and is thought to induce toxicity via interaction with the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPAR_). As the cardiovascular system is crucial for embryonic survival, PFOA-induced effects on the heart may partially explain embryonic mortality. To assess impacts of PFOA exposure on the developing heart in an avian model, we used histopathology and immunohistochemical staining for myosin to assess morphological alterations in 19-day-old chicken embryo hearts after PFOA exposure. Additionally, echocardiography and cardiac myofibril ATPase activity assays were used to assess functional alterations in 1-day-old hatchling chickens following developmental PFOA exposure. Overall thinning and thinning of a dense layer of myosin in the right ventricular wall were observed in PFOA-exposed chicken embryo hearts. Alteration of multiple cardiac structural and functional parameters, including left ventricular wall thickness, left ventricular volume, heart rate, stroke volume, and ejection fraction were detected with echocardiography in the exposed hatchling chickens. Assessment of ATPase activity indicated that the ratio of cardiac myofibril calcium-independent ATPase activity to calcium-dependent ATPase activity was not affected, which suggests that d

  14. Influence of the implant abutment types and the dynamic loading on initial screw loosening

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Sook

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study examined the effects of the abutment types and dynamic loading on the stability of implant prostheses with three types of implant abutments prepared using different fabrication methods by measuring removal torque both before and after dynamic loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three groups of abutments were produced using different types of fabrication methods; stock abutment, gold cast abutment, and CAD/CAM custom abutment. A customized jig was fabricated to apply the load at 30° to the long axis. The implant fixtures were fixed to the jig, and connected to the abutments with a 30 Ncm tightening torque. A sine curved dynamic load was applied for 105 cycles between 25 and 250 N at 14 Hz. Removal torque before loading and after loading were evaluated. The SPSS was used for statistical analysis of the results. A Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to compare screw loosening between the abutment systems. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was performed to compare screw loosening between before and after loading in each group (α=0.05). RESULTS Removal torque value before loading and after loading was the highest in stock abutment, which was then followed by gold cast abutment and CAD/CAM custom abutment, but there were no significant differences. CONCLUSION The abutment types did not have a significant influence on short term screw loosening. On the other hand, after 105 cycles dynamic loading, CAD/CAM custom abutment affected the initial screw loosening, but stock abutment and gold cast abutment did not. PMID:23509006

  15. A Novel RFID-Based Sensing Method for Low-Cost Bolt Loosening Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Cui, Xingmei; Xu, Yunpeng

    2016-01-01

    In coal mines, bolt loosening in the cage guide is affected by the harsh environmental factors and cage hoist vibration, leading to significant threats to work safety. It is crucial, to this effect, to successfully detect the status of multipoint bolts of guide structures. This paper proposes a system to monitor bolt status in harsh environments established based on the RFID technique. A proof-of-concept model was demonstrated consisting of a bolt gearing system, passive UHF RFID tags, a reader, and monitoring software. A tinfoil metal film is fixed on the retaining plate and an RFID tag bonded to a large gear, with the bolt to be detected fixed in the center of a smaller gear. The radio-frequency signal cannot be received by the reader if the tag is completely obscured by the tinfoil, and if the bolt is loose, the tag’s antenna is exposed when the gear revolves. A radio-frequency signal that carries corresponding bolt’s information is transmitted by the RFID tag to the RFID reader due to coil coupling, identifying loose bolt location and reporting them in the software. Confirmatory test results revealed that the system indeed successfully detects bolt loosening and comparative test results (based on a reed switch multipoint bolt loosening monitor system) provided valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed system. PMID:26828498

  16. Investigation of a Passive Sensor Array for Diagnosis of Loosening of Endoprosthetic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Ruther, Cathérine; Schulze, Christian; Boehme, Andrea; Nierath, Hannes; Ewald, Hartmut; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer; Kluess, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Currently, imaging methods are used to diagnose loosening of endoprosthetic implants, but fail to achieve 100% accuracy. In this study, a passive sensor array which is based on the interaction between magnetic oscillators inside the implant and an excitation coil outside the patient was investigated. The excited oscillators produce sound in the audible range, which varies according to the extent of loosening. By performing several experimental tests, the sensor array was optimized to guarantee reproducible and selective excitation of the sound emission. Variation in the distance between the oscillators demonstrated a definite influence on the quality of the generated sound signal. Furthermore, a numerical design analysis using the boundary element method was generated for consideration of the magnetic field and the selectivity of the oscillators during excitation. The numerical simulation of the coil showed the higher selectivity of a coil with a C-shape compared to a cylindrical coil. Based on these investigations, the passive sensor system reveals the potential for detection of implant loosening. Future aims include the further miniaturization of the oscillators and measurements to determine the sensitivity of the proposed sensor system. PMID:23344370

  17. Investigation of a passive sensor array for diagnosis of loosening of endoprosthetic implants.

    PubMed

    Ruther, Cathérine; Schulze, Christian; Boehme, Andrea; Nierath, Hannes; Ewald, Hartmut; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer; Kluess, Daniel

    2012-12-20

    Currently, imaging methods are used to diagnose loosening of endoprosthetic implants, but fail to achieve 100% accuracy. In this study, a passive sensor array which is based on the interaction between magnetic oscillators inside the implant and an excitation coil outside the patient was investigated. The excited oscillators produce sound in the audible range, which varies according to the extent of loosening. By performing several experimental tests, the sensor array was optimized to guarantee reproducible and selective excitation of the sound emission. Variation in the distance between the oscillators demonstrated a definite influence on the quality of the generated sound signal. Furthermore, a numerical design analysis using the boundary element method was generated for consideration of the magnetic field and the selectivity of the oscillators during excitation. The numerical simulation of the coil showed the higher selectivity of a coil with a C-shape compared to a cylindrical coil. Based on these investigations, the passive sensor system reveals the potential for detection of implant loosening. Future aims include the further miniaturization of the oscillators and measurements to determine the sensitivity of the proposed sensor system.

  18. A Novel RFID-Based Sensing Method for Low-Cost Bolt Loosening Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Cui, Xingmei; Xu, Yunpeng

    2016-01-28

    In coal mines, bolt loosening in the cage guide is affected by the harsh environmental factors and cage hoist vibration, leading to significant threats to work safety. It is crucial, to this effect, to successfully detect the status of multipoint bolts of guide structures. This paper proposes a system to monitor bolt status in harsh environments established based on the RFID technique. A proof-of-concept model was demonstrated consisting of a bolt gearing system, passive UHF RFID tags, a reader, and monitoring software. A tinfoil metal film is fixed on the retaining plate and an RFID tag bonded to a large gear, with the bolt to be detected fixed in the center of a smaller gear. The radio-frequency signal cannot be received by the reader if the tag is completely obscured by the tinfoil, and if the bolt is loose, the tag's antenna is exposed when the gear revolves. A radio-frequency signal that carries corresponding bolt's information is transmitted by the RFID tag to the RFID reader due to coil coupling, identifying loose bolt location and reporting them in the software. Confirmatory test results revealed that the system indeed successfully detects bolt loosening and comparative test results (based on a reed switch multipoint bolt loosening monitor system) provided valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed system.

  19. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis.

  20. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis. PMID:27598133

  1. Studies on the control of cell wall extension. Progress report, September 1, 1979-August 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, R. E.

    1980-09-24

    The growth rate of plant cells can be defined in terms of five parameters: the hydraulic conductivity of the tissue (L'p), the rate of export from the cell to the wall of a wall loosening factor (dW/dt), the capacity of the wall to be loosened in response to the wall loosening factor (WLC), the osmotic potential of the cells and outside solution (..pi../sub c/ and ..pi../sub o/, respectively), and the yield threshold for wall expansion (Y). The study assesses each of these parameters under conditions where growth is being enhanced or inhibited, with the purpose of explaining at the cellular level just how growth is being controlled. (ACR)

  2. Metal debris concentrations in soft tissues adjacent to loosened femoral stems is higher in uncemented than cemented implants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are still many questions related to aseptic femoral stem loosening. Systemic and local immune responses to the implanted “foreign body” is one of the reasons for loosening. The purpose of the study was to measure metal ion concentration (Ti, Co, Cr, Mo, Ni, Al) around loosened femoral stems and compare their levels around uncemented and cemented implants. Methods This paper reports 50 hips operated for isolated stem loosening, in 50 patients at the mean age of 57 years (from 21 to 87). There were 25 cemented (Co,Cr29,Mo,Ni) and 25 uncemented (Ti, Al) stems. The mean follow-up from primary hip replacement to revision was 10.1 years (from 0.5 to 17). During the procedure, scar tissue around the stem was taken for analysis of metal ions. Results The concentrations of titanium and aluminium in soft tissues around uncemented loosened stems were higher than cemented ones (p < 0.001, p < 0.001 respectively). However, no statistically significant differences were observed between both types of stems in terms of ions of the metal of which cemented implants had been made of (Co, Cr, Mo, Ni). Conclusions In soft tissue around a loosened stem, the concentrations of metal ions from implants are much higher in case of uncemented stems than of cemented ones. Metal ions from vitalium femoral heads were found around uncemented stems in similar values to cemented streams. PMID:25098913

  3. Regulation of Extracellular Matrix Remodeling Proteins by Osteoblasts in Titanium Nanoparticle-Induced Aseptic Loosening Model.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing; Hou, Yanhua; Fu, Na; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Li, Guo; Peng, Qiang; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-10-01

    Titanium (Ti)-wear particles, formed at the bone-implant interface, are responsible for aseptic loosening, which is a main cause of total joint replacement failure. There have been many studies on Ti particle-induced function changes in mono-cultured osteoblasts and synovial cells. However, little is known on extracellular matrix remodeling displayed by osteoblasts when in coexistence with Synovial cells. To further mimic the bone-implant interface environment, we firstly established a nanoscaled-Ti particle-induced aseptic loosening system by co-culturing osteoblasts and Synovial cells. We then explored the impact of the Synovial cells on Ti particle-engulfed osteoblasts in the mimicked flamed niche. The matrix metalloproteinases and lysyl oxidases expression levels, two protein families which are critical in osseointegration, were examined under induction by tumor necrosis factor-alpha. It was found that the co-culture between the osteoblasts and Synovial cells markedly increased the migration and proliferation of the osteoblasts, even in the Ti-particle engulfed osteoblasts. Importantly, the Ti-particle engulfed osteoblasts, induced by TNF-alpha after the co-culture, enhanced the release of the matrix metalloproteinases and reduced the expressions of lysyl oxidases. The regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling at the protein level was further assessed by investigations on gene expression of the matrix metalloproteinases and lysyl oxidases, which also suggested that the regulation started at the genetic level. Our research work has therefore revealed the critical role of multi cell-type interactions in the extracellular matrix remodeling within the peri-prosthetic tissues, which provides new insights on aseptic loosening and brings new clues about incomplete osseointegration between the implantation materials and their surrounding bones.

  4. Ibandronate and periprosthetic bone mass: new therapeutic approach in periprosthetic loosening prevention

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Maurizio; Quarta, Eugenio; Quarta, Laura; Grimaldi, Antonella; Orgiani, Antonio; Marsilio, Antonio; Rollo, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    A prosthetic implant modifies the physiological transmission of loads to the bone, initiating a remodeling process. Studies of the mechanisms responsible for periprosthetic bone loss contributed to the definition of new pharmacological strategies that may prevent aseptic implant loosening. Bisphosphonates are a class of drugs useful to this purpose, and have been shown to be effective in reducing periprosthetic resorption during the first year after the implant. We aimed to assess the inhibitory effect on periprosthetic osteolysis of ibandronate, a highly potent aminobisphosphonate, administered orally and IV with an extended interval between doses and optimal treatment adherence. In view of the fact that periprosthetic remodeling takes place during the first 6-12 months after surgery and is ultimately responsible for prosthesis longevity, we may conclude that the administration of high dosage ibandronate postsurgery by IV bolus and subsequently as cyclic oral treatment reduced cortical osteopenia in the metaphyseal region, and in the calcar region of the proximal femur. This therapy might therefore be used as preventive measure against postsurgical osteopenia and probably also against aseptic loosening. PMID:22461804

  5. SIRT1 protects osteoblasts against particle-induced inflammatory responses and apoptosis in aseptic prosthesis loosening.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhantao; Wang, Zhenheng; Jin, Jiewen; Wang, Yong; Bao, Nirong; Gao, Qian; Zhao, Jianning

    2017-02-01

    We hypothesized that SIRT1 downregulation in osteoblasts induced by wear particles was one of the reasons for particle-induced osteolysis (PIO) in total joint arthroplasty failure. In the present study, the expression of SIRT1 was examined in osteoblasts treated with TiAl6V4 particles (TiPs) and CoCrMo particles (CoPs) from materials used in prosthetics and specimens from PIO animal models. To address whether SIRT1 downregulation triggers inflammatory responses and apoptosis in osteoblasts, the effect of a SIRT1 activator, resveratrol on the expression of inflammatory cytokines and apoptosis in particle-treated osteoblasts was tested. The results demonstrated that SIRT1 expression was significantly downregulated in particle-treated osteoblasts and PIO animal models. Both pharmacological activation and overexpression of SIRT1 dramatically reduced the particle-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and osteoblast apoptosis through NF-κB and p53 signaling, respectively. Furthermore, in PIO animal models, resveratrol significantly reduced the severity of osteolysis. Collectively, the results of the present study indicated that SIRT1 plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of aseptic loosening, and further treatment targeted at SIRT1 possibly lead to novel approaches for prevention of aseptic prosthesis loosening.

  6. Effect of surface coating on the screw loosening of dental abutment screws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chan-Ik; Choe, Han-Cheol; Chung, Chae-Heon

    2004-12-01

    Regardless of the type of performed restoration, in most cases, a screw connection is employed between the abutment and implant. For this reason, implant screw loosening has remained a problem in restorative practices. The purpose of this study was to compare the surface of coated/plated screws with titanium and gold alloy screws and to evaluate the physical properties of coated/plated material after scratch tests via FE-SEM (field emission scanning electron microscopy) investigation. GoldTite, titanium screws provided by 3i (Implant Innovation, USA) and TorqTite, titanium screws by Steri-Oss (Nobel Biocare, USA) and gold screws and titanium screws by AVANA (Osstem Implant, Korea) were selected for this study. The surface, crest, and root of the abutment screws were observed by FE-SEM. A micro-diamond needle was also prepared for the scratch test. Each abutment screw was fixed, and a scratch on the surface of the head region was made at constant load and thereafter the fine trace was observed with FE-SEM. The surface of GoldTite was smoother than that of other screws and it also had abundant ductility and malleability compared with titanium and gold screws. The scratch tests also revealed that teflon particles were exfoliated easily in the screw coated with teflon. The titanium screw had rough surface and low ductility. The clinical use of gold-plated screws is recommended as a means of preventing screw loosening.

  7. Obestatin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Konturek, Peter; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide derived from the proghrelin, has been shown to exhibit some protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present study was to determine the effect of obestatin administration on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Obestatin was administered intraperitoneally twice a day at a dose of 8 nmol/kg, starting 24 h after the induction of colitis. Seven or 14 days after the induction of colitis, the healing rate of the colon was evaluated. Results. Treatment with obestatin after induction of colitis accelerated the healing of colonic wall damage and this effect was associated with a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase and content of interleukin-1β. Moreover, obestatin administration significantly reversed the colitis-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Conclusion. Administration of exogenous obestatin exhibits therapeutic effects in the course of acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect is related, at least in part, to the obestatin-evoked anti-inflammatory effect, an improvement of local blood flow, and an increase in cell proliferation in colonic mucosa. PMID:26798415

  8. Obestatin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Konturek, Peter; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide derived from the proghrelin, has been shown to exhibit some protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present study was to determine the effect of obestatin administration on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Obestatin was administered intraperitoneally twice a day at a dose of 8 nmol/kg, starting 24 h after the induction of colitis. Seven or 14 days after the induction of colitis, the healing rate of the colon was evaluated. Results. Treatment with obestatin after induction of colitis accelerated the healing of colonic wall damage and this effect was associated with a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase and content of interleukin-1β. Moreover, obestatin administration significantly reversed the colitis-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Conclusion. Administration of exogenous obestatin exhibits therapeutic effects in the course of acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect is related, at least in part, to the obestatin-evoked anti-inflammatory effect, an improvement of local blood flow, and an increase in cell proliferation in colonic mucosa.

  9. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) prevents periprosthetic inflammatory loosening through FBXL2-TRAF6 ubiquitination pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiang; Zhao, Gangsheng; Shi, Zhongli; Zhou, Chenhe; Chen, Yunlin; Hu, Bin; Yan, Shigui

    2017-04-05

    Previous studies have shown that Low intensity pulsed ultrasound(LIPUS) prevents polyethylene-debris-induced periprosthetic loosening in vivo, but the details of the mechanism by which it does so remain unclear. In this article, we used polyethylene debris induced RAW 264.7 cells as the in vitro model, and tested the effect of LIPUS on this model. Changes in the level of inflammatory cytokines, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were assessed. Gene overexpression and siRNA technique were applied, and the levels of expression of FBXL2, TRAF6, ERK, and related inflammatory cytokines were also measured. Results indicated that FBXL2-mediated TRAF6 ubiquitination and degradation also plays an important role in aseptic periprosthetic loosening process, and LIPUS prevents such loosening by strengthening this pathway.

  10. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) prevents periprosthetic inflammatory loosening through FBXL2-TRAF6 ubiquitination pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiang; Zhao, Gangsheng; Shi, Zhongli; Zhou, Chenhe; Chen, Yunlin; Hu, Bin; Yan, Shigui

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Low intensity pulsed ultrasound(LIPUS) prevents polyethylene-debris-induced periprosthetic loosening in vivo, but the details of the mechanism by which it does so remain unclear. In this article, we used polyethylene debris induced RAW 264.7 cells as the in vitro model, and tested the effect of LIPUS on this model. Changes in the level of inflammatory cytokines, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were assessed. Gene overexpression and siRNA technique were applied, and the levels of expression of FBXL2, TRAF6, ERK, and related inflammatory cytokines were also measured. Results indicated that FBXL2-mediated TRAF6 ubiquitination and degradation also plays an important role in aseptic periprosthetic loosening process, and LIPUS prevents such loosening by strengthening this pathway. PMID:28378753

  11. Hypochlorous and peracetic acid induced oxidation of dairy proteins.

    PubMed

    Kerkaert, Barbara; Mestdagh, Frédéric; Cucu, Tatiana; Aedo, Philip Roger; Ling, Shen Yan; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2011-02-09

    Hypochlorous and peracetic acids, both known disinfectants in the food industry, were compared for their oxidative capacity toward dairy proteins. Whey proteins and caseins were oxidized under well controlled conditions at pH 8 as a function of the sanitizing concentration. Different markers for protein oxidation were monitored. The results established that the protein carbonyl content was a rather unspecific marker for protein oxidation, which did not allow one to differentiate the oxidant used especially at the lower concentrations. Cysteine, tryptophan, and methionine were proven to be the most vulnerable amino acids for degradation upon hypochlorous and peracetic acid treatment, while tyrosine was only prone to degradation in the presence of hypochlorous acid. Hypochlorous acid induced oxidation gave rise to protein aggregation, while during peracetic acid induced oxidation, no high molecular weight aggregates were observed. Protein aggregation upon hypochlorous acid oxidation could primarily be linked to tryptophan and tyrosine degradation.

  12. Protective Mechanisms of Nitrone Antioxidants in Kanic Acid Induced Neurodegeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    L., Hong, J.S. (1996) Expression of) FosB in the rat hippocampus and striatum after systemic administration of kainic acid. Neurosci. Abstr. 22...gene expression in the hippocampus . Immunohistochemical methods and electromobility gel shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrate the concerted activation of...acid-induced neurodegenerative diseases. The major focus will be on the pathophysiological changes in the hippocampus . Special attention will be given

  13. Lipid Transfer Proteins Enhance Cell Wall Extension in TobaccoW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwland, Jeroen; Feron, Richard; Huisman, Bastiaan A.H.; Fasolino, Annalisa; Hilbers, Cornelis W.; Derksen, Jan; Mariani, Celestina

    2005-01-01

    Plant cells are enclosed by a rigid cell wall that counteracts the internal osmotic pressure of the vacuole and limits the rate and direction of cell enlargement. When developmental or physiological cues induce cell extension, plant cells increase wall plasticity by a process called loosening. It was demonstrated previously that a class of proteins known as expansins are mediators of wall loosening. Here, we report a type of cell wall–loosening protein that does not share any homology with expansins but is a member of the lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are known to bind a large range of lipid molecules to their hydrophobic cavity, and we show here that this cavity is essential for the cell wall–loosening activity of LTP. Furthermore, we show that LTP-enhanced wall extension can be described by a logarithmic time function. We hypothesize that LTP associates with hydrophobic wall compounds, causing nonhydrolytic disruption of the cell wall and subsequently facilitating wall extension. PMID:15937228

  14. The influence of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic-acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Maduzia, D; Matuszyk, A; Ceranowicz, D; Warzecha, Z; Ceranowicz, P; Fyderek, K; Galazka, K; Dembinski, A

    2015-12-01

    Ghrelin has been primarily shown to exhibit protective and therapeutic effect in the gut. Pretreatment with ghrelin inhibits the development of acute pancreatitis and accelerates pancreatic recovery in the course of this disease. In the stomach, ghrelin reduces gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol, stress or alendronate, as well as accelerates the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric and duodenal ulcer. The aim of present studies was to investigate the effect of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic acid-induced colitis. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Animals were treated intraperitoneally with saline (control) or ghrelin (4, 8 or 16 nmol/kg/dose). Saline or ghrelin was given twice: 8 and 1 h before induction of colitis. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 1 ml of 4% solution of acetic acid and the severity of colitis was assessed 1 or 24 hours after induction of inflammation. Rectal administration of acetic acid induced colitis in all animals. Damage of colonic wall was seen at the macroscopic and microscopic level. This effect was accompanied by a reduction in colonic blood flow and mucosal DNA synthesis. Moreover, induction of colitis significantly increased mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β), activity of myeloperoxidase and concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA). Mucosal activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was reduced. Pretreatment with ghrelin reduced the area and grade of mucosal damage. This effect was accompanied by an improvement of blood flow, DNA synthesis and SOD activity in colonic mucosa. Moreover, ghrelin administration reduced mucosal concentration of IL-1β and MDA, as well as decreased mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Administration of ghrelin protects the large bowel against the development of the acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect seems to be related to the ghrelin-evoked anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

  15. Contributions of human tissue analysis to understanding the mechanisms of loosening and osteolysis in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Jiri; Vaculova, Jana; Goodman, Stuart B.; Konttinen, Yrjö T.; Thyssen, Jacob P.

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic loosening and osteolysis are the most frequent late complications of total hip arthroplasty (THA) leading to revision of the prosthesis. This review aims to demonstrate how histopathological studies contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of aseptic loosening/osteolysis development. Only studies analysing periprosthetic tissues retrieved from failed implants in humans were included. Data from 101 studies (5532 patients with failure of THA implants) published in English or German between 1974 and 2013 were included. “Control” samples were reported in 45 of the 101 studies. The most frequently examined tissues were the bone-implant interface membrane and pseudosynovial tissues. Histopathological studies contribute importantly to determination of key cell populations underlying the biological mechanisms of aseptic loosening and osteolysis. The studies demonstrated the key molecules of the host response at the protein level (chemokines, cytokines, nitric oxide metabolites, metalloproteinases). However, these studies also have important limitations. Tissues harvested at revision surgery reflect specifically end-stage failure and may not adequately reveal the evolution of pathophysiological events that lead to prosthetic loosening and osteolysis. One possible solution is to examine tissues harvested from stable total hip arthroplasties that have been revised at various time periods due to dislocation or periprosthetic fracture in multicenter studies. PMID:24525037

  16. Long-term effects of deep soil loosening on root distribution and soil physical parameters in compacted lignite mine soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badorreck, Annika; Krümmelbein, Julia; Raab, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Soil compaction is a major problem of soils on dumped mining substrates in Lusatia, Germany. Deep ripping and cultivation of deep rooting plant species are considered to be effective ways of agricultural recultivation. Six years after experiment start, we studied the effect of initial deep soil loosening (i.e. down to 65 cm) on root systems of rye (Secale cereale) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and on soil physical parameters. We conducted a soil monolith sampling for each treatment (deep loosened and unloosened) and for each plant species (in three replicates, respectively) to determine root diameter, length density and dry mass as well as soil bulk density. Further soil physical analysis comprised water retention, hydraulic conductivity and texture in three depths. The results showed different reactions of the root systems of rye and alfalfa six years after deep ripping. In the loosened soil the root biomass of the rye was lower in depths of 20-40 cm and the root biomass of alfalfa was also decreased in depths of 20-50 cm together with a lower root diameter for both plant species. Moreover, total and fine root length density was higher for alfalfa and vice versa for rye. The soil physical parameters such as bulk density showed fewer differences, despite a higher bulk density in 30-40cm for the deep loosened rye plot which indicates a more pronounced plough pan.

  17. Measuring in vitro extensibility of growing plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the theory and practical aspects of measuring cell wall properties by four different extensometer techniques and how the results of these methods relate to the concept and ideal measurement of cell wall extensibility in the context of cell growth. These in vivo techniques are particularly useful for studies of the molecular basis of cell wall extension. Measurements of breaking strength, elastic compliance, and plastic compliance may be informative about changes in cell wall structure, whereas measurements of wall stress relaxation and creep are sensitive to both changes in wall structure and wall-loosening processes, such as those mediated by expansins and some lytic enzymes. A combination of methods is needed to obtain a broader view of cell wall behavior and properties connected with the concept of cell wall extensibility.

  18. Valproic acid-induced hyperammonaemic coma and unrecognised portosystemic shunt.

    PubMed

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Carrapatoso, Leonor; Ferreira, Fátima; Basilio, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    Hyperammonaemic encephalopathy is a rare and potentially fatal complication of valproic acid treatment. The clinical presentation of hyperammonaemic encephalopathy is wide and includes seizures and coma. We present a case of hyperammonaemic coma precipitated by sodium valproate use for symptomatic epilepsy in a patient with unrecognised portosystemic shunt, secondary to earlier alcoholism. The absence of any stigmata of chronic liver disease and laboratory markers of liver dysfunction delayed the recognition of this alcohol-related complication. The portal vein bypass led to a refractory, valproic acid-induced hyperammonaemic coma. The patient fully recovered after dialysis treatment.

  19. Squatting-Related Tibiofemoral Shear Reaction Forces and a Biomechanical Rationale for Femoral Component Loosening

    PubMed Central

    Thambyah, Ashvin

    2014-01-01

    Previous gait studies on squatting have described a rapid reversal in the direction of the tibiofemoral joint shear reaction force when going into a full weight-bearing deep knee flexion squat. The effects of such a shear reversal have not been considered with regard to the loading demand on knee implants in patients whose activities of daily living require frequent squatting. In this paper, the shear reversal effect is discussed and simulated in a finite element knee implant-bone model, to evaluate the possible biomechanical significance of this effect on femoral component loosening of high flexion implants as reported in the literature. The analysis shows that one of the effects of the shear reversal was a switch between large compressive and large tensile principal strains, from knee extension to flexion, respectively, in the region of the anterior flange of the femoral component. Together with the known material limits of cement and bone, this large mismatch in strains as a function of knee position provides new insight into how and why knee implants may fail in patients who perform frequent squatting. PMID:24982995

  20. Sutural loosening and skeletal flexibility during growth: determination of drop-like shapes in sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amy S; Ellers, Olaf; Lemire, Jim; Minor, Melissa; Leddy, Holly A

    2002-02-07

    The shape of sea urchins may be determined mechanically by patterns of force analogous to those that determine the shape of a water droplet. This mechanical analogy implies skeletal flexibility at the time of growth. Although comprised of many rigid calcite plates, sutural collagenous ligaments could confer such flexibility if the sutures between plates loosened and acted as joints at the time of growth. We present experimental evidence of such flexibility associated with weight gain and growth. Over 13-, 4-, and 2-week periods, fed urchins (Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis) gained weight and developed looser sutures than unfed urchins that maintained or lost weight. Further, skeletons of fed urchins force-relaxed more than did those of unfed urchins and urchins with loose sutures force-relaxed more than those with tight sutures. Urchins (Strongylocentrotus franciscanus) fed for two and a half weeks, gained weight, also had looser skeletons and deposited calcite at sutural margins, whereas unfed ones did not. In field populations of S. droebachiensis the percentage having loose sutures varied with urchin diameter and reflected their size-specific growth rate. The association between feeding, weight gain, calcite deposition, force relaxation and sutural looseness supports the hypothesis that urchins deform flexibly while growing, thus determining their drop-like shapes.

  1. Sutural loosening and skeletal flexibility during growth: determination of drop-like shapes in sea urchins.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amy S; Ellers, Olaf; Lemire, Jim; Minor, Melissa; Leddy, Holly A

    2002-01-01

    The shape of sea urchins may be determined mechanically by patterns of force analogous to those that determine the shape of a water droplet. This mechanical analogy implies skeletal flexibility at the time of growth. Although comprised of many rigid calcite plates, sutural collagenous ligaments could confer such flexibility if the sutures between plates loosened and acted as joints at the time of growth. We present experimental evidence of such flexibility associated with weight gain and growth. Over 13-, 4-, and 2-week periods, fed urchins (Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis) gained weight and developed looser sutures than unfed urchins that maintained or lost weight. Further, skeletons of fed urchins force-relaxed more than did those of unfed urchins and urchins with loose sutures force-relaxed more than those with tight sutures. Urchins (Strongylocentrotus franciscanus) fed for two and a half weeks, gained weight, also had looser skeletons and deposited calcite at sutural margins, whereas unfed ones did not. In field populations of S. droebachiensis the percentage having loose sutures varied with urchin diameter and reflected their size-specific growth rate. The association between feeding, weight gain, calcite deposition, force relaxation and sutural looseness supports the hypothesis that urchins deform flexibly while growing, thus determining their drop-like shapes. PMID:11839189

  2. Adhesion molecules in gonarthrosis and knee prosthesis aseptic loosening follow-up: possible therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Dambra, P; Loria, M P; Moretti, B; D'Oronzio, L; Patella, V; Pannofino, A; Cavallo, E; Pesce, V; Dell'Osso, A; Simone, C

    2003-05-01

    The involvement of the synovium is common in phlogistic processes of various joint diseases. Apart from synoviocytes and the other cells in the synovial tissue, circulating cells recruited from peripheral blood also participate in the phlogistic process. The increased expression of adhesion molecules on both circulating and endothelial cell surface may further this recruitment. We studied 15 patients affected by serious gonarthrosis requiring a prosthetic implant (GPI) and 7 with knee prosthesis aseptic loosening (KPL) to evaluate adhesion molecule expression and phlogistic infiltration in the synovium using immunohistochemistry and microscopic analysis. As control we studied 10 subjects affected by degenerative meniscopathies undergoing a selective arthroscopic surgical meniscectomy. Analysis with Kruskal-Wallis test showed no statistical significant differences in the expression of CD54, CD11a, CD11b and CD18 in three groups examined. The model of variance analysis (Friedman test), showed that CD54 expression is greater in patients with GPI and KPL in comparison with the other molecules. Adhesion molecules and their functions are important in arthropathies not only because their evaluation can allow us to identify the degree of inflammation and to predict its evolution, but also because pharmacological control of their expression could have important therapeutic implications.

  3. Increased isoprostane levels in oleic acid-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Koichi; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Tsushima, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Sumiko; Yokoyama, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Rikimaru; Obata, Toru

    2009-10-16

    The present study was performed to examine a role of oxidative stress in oleic acid-induced lung injury model. Fifteen anesthetized sheep were ventilated and instrumented with a lung lymph fistula and vascular catheters for blood gas analysis and measurement of isoprostanes (8-epi prostaglandin F2{alpha}). Following stable baseline measurements, oleic acid (0.08 ml/kg) was administered and observed 4 h. Isoprostane was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with the isotope dilution method. Isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph were significantly increased 2 h after oleic acid administration and then decreased at 4 h. The percent increases in isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph at 2 h were significantly correlated with deteriorated oxygenation at the same time point, respectively. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of the pulmonary fat embolism-induced acute lung injury model in sheep and that the increase relates with the deteriorated oxygenation.

  4. [Sunitinib and zoledronic acid induced osteonecrosis of the jaw].

    PubMed

    Soós, Balázs; Vajta, László; Szalma, József

    2015-11-15

    The tendency for bisphosphonate and non-bisphosphonate (eg.: antiresorptive or anti-angiogenesis drugs) induced osteonecrosis is increasing. Treatment of these patients is a challenge both for dentists and for oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Cooperation with the drug prescribing general medicine colleagues to prevent osteonecrosis is extremely important. Furthermore, prevention should include dental focus elimination, oral hygienic instructions and education, dental follow-up and, in case of manifest necrosis, referral to maxillofacial departments. Authors outline the difficulties of conservative and surgical treatment of a patient with sunitinib and zoledronic acid induced osteonecrosis. The patient became symptomless and the operated area healed entirely six and twelve months postoperatively. A long term success further follow-up is necessary to verify long-term success.

  5. Case report of early aseptic loosening of total hip arthroplasty in monostotic paget disease, a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Crego-Vita, Diana; Aedo-Martín, Daniel; Sánchez-Pérez, Coral

    2016-01-01

    Paget's disease of bone is a localised chronic osteopathy which produces bone deformities, bone hypervascularity, structural weakness and altered joint biomechanics. Although radiological diagnosis of Paget's disease of bone is usually straightforward, monostotic cases may potentially raise specific problems which require invasive and expensive procedures such as bone biopsies. The pelvis and upper femur are frequently affected, resulting in disabling hip disease that may require total hip arthroplasty. We report a case of Paget disease of bone in an 84-year-old woman, which was initially identified as avascular necrosis of the hip, reason for which she underwent total hip arthroplasty. During follow up, the patient complained about hip pain and in a few months she was not able to walk because of an early loosening with bone destruction. Radiological and laboratory exams were carried out with normal results except for alkaline phosphatase (AP). After treatment with biphosphonates hip pain relieved but hip reconstruction was not possible. In this paper we present an early aseptic loosening of hip arthroplasty due to monostotic Paget's disease of bone, a rare ethiology of loosening which poses particular diagnostic difficulties prompting an excessive use of excisional biopsies.

  6. Cell wall remodeling under abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Plants exposed to abiotic stress respond to unfavorable conditions on multiple levels. One challenge under drought stress is to reduce shoot growth while maintaining root growth, a process requiring differential cell wall synthesis and remodeling. Key players in this process are the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidases, which initially cross-link phenolic compounds and glycoproteins of the cell walls causing stiffening. The function of ROS shifts after having converted all the peroxidase substrates in the cell wall. If ROS-levels remain high during prolonged stress, OH°-radicals are formed which lead to polymer cleavage. In concert with xyloglucan modifying enzymes and expansins, the resulting cell wall loosening allows further growth of stressed organs. PMID:25709610

  7. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized.

  8. Computerized image analysis for acetic acid induced intraepithelial lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Ferris, Daron G.; Lieberman, Rich W.

    2008-03-01

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) exhibits certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Immature and dysphasic cervical squamous epithelium turns white after application of acetic acid during the exam. The whitening process occurs visually over several minutes and subjectively discriminates between dysphasic and normal tissue. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician analyzing the acetic acid induced lesions (acetowhite region) in a fully automatic way. This paper reports a study designed to measure multiple parameters of the acetowhitening process from two images captured with a digital colposcope. One image is captured before the acetic acid application, and the other is captured after the acetic acid application. The spatial change of the acetowhitening is extracted using color and texture information in the post acetic acid image; the temporal change is extracted from the intensity and color changes between the post acetic acid and pre acetic acid images with an automatic alignment. The imaging and data analysis system has been evaluated with a total of 99 human subjects and demonstrate its potential to screening underserved women where access to skilled colposcopists is limited.

  9. Oleic acid-induced mucosal injury in developing piglet intestine.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, O R; Henninger, K; Fowler, M; Tso, P; Crissinger, K D

    1993-03-01

    A role for luminal nutrients, in particular products of lipid digestion, in the pathogenesis of mucosal injury to developing intestine has been postulated. We evaluated changes in mucosal permeability and light and electron microscopic histology induced by luminal perfusion with the long-chain fatty acid oleate in developing piglet intestine as a function of age and concentration of the fatty acid. 51Cr-labeled EDTA plasma-to-lumen clearance was measured in jejunum and ileum of 1-day-, 3-day-, 2-wk-, and 1-mo-old piglets during sequential perfusion with saline control (20 min); 0, 1, 5, and 10 mM oleic acid/10 mM taurocholate in saline (20 min); and normal saline (60 min). The jejunum of piglets < or = 2 wk showed significantly greater increases in mucosal permeability compared with 1-mo-old animals after perfusion with oleic acid. This effect was dependent on the luminal concentration of the fatty acid and was associated with mucosal injury evident under light and electron microscopy. In contrast, the overall response in ileum was more attenuated compared with jejunum. Thus oleic acid, a common dietary fatty acid, induces dose- and age-dependent injury in developing piglet intestine. Investigation of the mechanisms of this injury may provide the basis for dietary modifications directed at decreasing the risk of mucosal injury during enteral feeding in neonatal intestine.

  10. Unsaturated fatty acids induce non-canonical autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Niso-Santano, Mireia; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Pietrocola, Federico; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Mariño, Guillermo; Cianfanelli, Valentina; Ben-Younès, Amena; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Markaki, Maria; Sica, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Chaba, Kariman; Bauvy, Chantal; Dupont, Nicolas; Kepp, Oliver; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Wolinski, Heimo; Madeo, Frank; Lavandero, Sergio; Codogno, Patrice; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Cecconi, Francesco; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-01-01

    To obtain mechanistic insights into the cross talk between lipolysis and autophagy, two key metabolic responses to starvation, we screened the autophagy-inducing potential of a panel of fatty acids in human cancer cells. Both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids such as palmitate and oleate, respectively, triggered autophagy, but the underlying molecular mechanisms differed. Oleate, but not palmitate, stimulated an autophagic response that required an intact Golgi apparatus. Conversely, autophagy triggered by palmitate, but not oleate, required AMPK, PKR and JNK1 and involved the activation of the BECN1/PIK3C3 lipid kinase complex. Accordingly, the downregulation of BECN1 and PIK3C3 abolished palmitate-induced, but not oleate-induced, autophagy in human cancer cells. Moreover, Becn1+/− mice as well as yeast cells and nematodes lacking the ortholog of human BECN1 mounted an autophagic response to oleate, but not palmitate. Thus, unsaturated fatty acids induce a non-canonical, phylogenetically conserved, autophagic response that in mammalian cells relies on the Golgi apparatus. PMID:25586377

  11. Sphingoid bases inhibit acid-induced demineralization of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van 't Hof, Wim; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Sotres, Javier; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H(+) ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products.

  12. Acid-induced unfolding mechanism of recombinant human endostatin.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Wu, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Hao; Chen, Qianjie; Luo, Yongzhang

    2004-03-09

    Endostatin is a potent angiogenesis inhibitor. The structure of endostatin is unique in that its secondary structure is mainly irregular loops and beta-sheets and contains only a small fraction of alpha-helices with two pairs of disulfide bonds in a nested pattern. We choose human endostatin as a model system to study the folding mechanism of this kind. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), tryptophan emission fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) were used to monitor the unfolding process of endostatin upon acid titration. Urea-induced unfolding was used to measure the stability of endostatin under different conditions. Our results show that endostatin is very acid-resistant; some native structure still remains even at pH 2 as evidenced by (1)H NMR. Trifluoroethanol (TFE) destabilizes native endostatin, while it makes endostatin even more acid-resistant in the low pH region. Stability measurement of endostatin suggests that endostatin is still in native structure at pH 3.5 despite the decreased stability. Acid-induced unfolding of endostatin is reversible, although it requires a long time to reach equilibrium below pH 3. Surprisingly, the alpha-helical content of endostatin is increased when it is unfolded at pH 1.6, and the alpha-helical content of the polypeptide chain of unfolded endostatin increases linearly with TFE concentration in the range of 0-30%. This observation indicates that the polypeptide chain of unfolded endostatin has an intrinsic alpha-helical propensity. Our discoveries may provide clues for refolding endostatin more efficiently. The acid-resistance property of endostatin may have biological significance in that it cannot be easily digested by proteases in an acidic environment such as in a lysosome in the cell.

  13. High dose of ascorbic acid induces cell death in mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Yukitoshi; Satoh, Motohiko; Satoh, Kiyotoshi; Hamada, Hironobu; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Kubota, Shunichiro

    2010-04-02

    Malignant mesothelioma is an asbestos-related fatal disease with no effective cure. Recently, high dose of ascorbate in cancer treatment has been reexamined. We studied whether high dose of ascorbic acid induced cell death of four human mesothelioma cell lines. High dose of ascorbic acid induced cell death of all mesothelioma cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. We further clarified the cell killing mechanism that ascorbic acid induced reactive oxygen species and impaired mitochondrial membrane potential. In vivo experiment, intravenous administration of ascorbic acid significantly decreased the growth rate of mesothelioma tumor inoculated in mice. These data suggest that ascorbic acid may have benefits for patients with mesothelioma.

  14. The Effect of Lumbar Lordosis on Screw Loosening in Dynesys Dynamic Stabilization: Four-Year Follow-Up with Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chao-Hung; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Fay, Li-Yu; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Dynesys dynamic stabilization (DDS) on clinical and radiographic outcomes, including spinal pelvic alignment. Method. Consecutive patients who underwent 1- or 2-level DDS for lumbar spondylosis, mild degenerative spondylolisthesis, or degenerative disc disease were included. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale for back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, and the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. Radiographic outcomes were assessed by radiographs and computed tomography. Pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis (LL) were also compared. Results. In 206 patients with an average follow-up of 51.1 ± 20.8 months, there were 87 screws (8.2%) in 42 patients (20.4%) that were loose. All clinical outcomes improved at each time point after operation. Patients with loosened screws were 45 years older. Furthermore, there was a higher risk of screw loosening in DDS involving S1, and these patients were more likely to have loosened screws if the LL failed to increase after the operation. Conclusions. The DDS screw loosening rate was overall 8.2% per screw and 20.4% per patient at more than 4 years of follow-up. Older patients, S1 involvement, and those patients who failed to gain LL postoperatively were at higher risk of screw loosening. PMID:26779532

  15. Two endogenous proteins that induce cell wall extension in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQueen-Mason, S.; Durachko, D. M.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Plant cell enlargement is regulated by wall relaxation and yielding, which is thought to be catalyzed by elusive "wall-loosening" enzymes. By employing a reconstitution approach, we found that a crude protein extract from the cell walls of growing cucumber seedlings possessed the ability to induce the extension of isolated cell walls. This activity was restricted to the growing region of the stem and could induce the extension of isolated cell walls from various dicot stems and the leaves of amaryllidaceous monocots, but was less effective on grass coleoptile walls. Endogenous and reconstituted wall extension activities showed similar sensitivities to pH, metal ions, thiol reducing agents, proteases, and boiling in methanol or water. Sequential HPLC fractionation of the active wall extract revealed two proteins with molecular masses of 29 and 30 kD associated with the activity. Each protein, by itself, could induce wall extension without detectable hydrolytic breakdown of the wall. These proteins appear to mediate "acid growth" responses of isolated walls and may catalyze plant cell wall extension by a novel biochemical mechanism.

  16. Bone Turnover Markers Correlate with Implant fixation in a Rat Model Using LPS Doped Particles to Induced Implant Loosening1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuo; Virdi, Amarjit S.; Sena, Kotaro; Hughes, W. Frank; Sumner, Dale R.

    2011-01-01

    Revision surgery for particle-induced implant loosening in total joint replacement is expected to increase dramatically over the next few decades. This study was designed to investigate if local tissue and serum markers of bone remodeling reflect implant fixation following administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-doped polyethylene (PE) particles in a rat model. 24 rats received bilateral implantation of intramedullary titanium rods in the distal femur, followed by weekly bilateral intra-articular injection of either LPS-doped PE particles (n = 12) or vehicle which contained no particles (n= 12) for 12 weeks. The group in which the particles were injected had increased serum C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen, decreased serum osteocalcin, increased peri-implant eroded surface, decreased peri-implant bone volume, and decreased mechanical pull-out strength compared to the controls. Implant fixation strength was positively correlated with peri-implant bone volume and serum osteocalcin and inversely correlated with serum C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen, while energy to yield was positively correlated with serum osteocalcin and inversely correlated with the number of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase positive cells at the interface and the amount of peri-implant eroded surface. There was no effect on trabecular bone volume at a remote site. Thus, the particle-induced impaired fixation in this rat model was directly associated with local and serum markers of elevated bone resorption and depressed bone formation, supporting the rationale of exploring both anti-catabolic and anabolic strategies to treat and prevent particle-related implant osteolysis and loosening and indicating that serum markers may prove useful in tracking implant fixation. PMID:22275163

  17. The role of wall calcium in the extension of cell walls of soybean hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virk, S. S.; Cleland, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Calcium crosslinks are load-bearing bonds in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) hypocotyl cell walls, but they are not the same load-bearing bonds that are broken during acid-mediated cell elongation. This conclusion is reached by studying the relationship between wall calcium, pH and the facilitated creep of frozen-thawed soybean hypocotyl sections. Supporting data include the following observations: 1) 2-[(2-bis-[carboxymethyl]amino-5-methylphenoxy)methyl]-6-methoxy-8-bis[car boxymethyl]aminoquinoline (Quin 2) and ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) caused only limited facilitated creep as compared with acid, despite removal of comparable or larger amounts of wall calcium; 2) the pH-response curves for calcium removal and acid-facilitated creep were different; 3) reversible acid-extension occurred even after removal of almost all wall calcium with Quin 2; and 4) growth of abraded sections did not involve a proportional loss of wall calcium. Removal of wall calcium, however, increased the capacity of the walls to undergo acid-facilitated creep. These data indicate that breakage of calcium crosslinks is not a major mechanism of cell-wall loosening in soybean hypocotyl tissues.

  18. Assembly and enlargement of the primary cell wall in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Growing plant cells are shaped by an extensible wall that is a complex amalgam of cellulose microfibrils bonded noncovalently to a matrix of hemicelluloses, pectins, and structural proteins. Cellulose is synthesized by complexes in the plasma membrane and is extruded as a self-assembling microfibril, whereas the matrix polymers are secreted by the Golgi apparatus and become integrated into the wall network by poorly understood mechanisms. The growing wall is under high tensile stress from cell turgor and is able to enlarge by a combination of stress relaxation and polymer creep. A pH-dependent mechanism of wall loosening, known as acid growth, is characteristic of growing walls and is mediated by a group of unusual wall proteins called expansins. Expansins appear to disrupt the noncovalent bonding of matrix hemicelluloses to the microfibril, thereby allowing the wall to yield to the mechanical forces generated by cell turgor. Other wall enzymes, such as (1-->4) beta-glucanases and pectinases, may make the wall more responsive to expansin-mediated wall creep whereas pectin methylesterases and peroxidases may alter the wall so as to make it resistant to expansin-mediated creep.

  19. Tranexamic acid induces kaolin intake stimulating a pathway involving tachykinin neurokinin 1 receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchi, Hitoshi; Kawarai-Shimamura, Asako; Kuwagata, Makiko; Orito, Kensuke

    2014-01-15

    Tranexamic acid suppresses post-partum haemorrhage and idiopathic menorrhagia through its anti-fibrinolytic action. Although it is clinically useful, it is associated with high risks of side effects such as emesis. Understanding the mechanisms underlying tranexamic acid-induced emesis is very important to explore appropriate anti-emetic drugs for the prevention and/or suppression of emesis. In this study, we examined the receptors involved in tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake in rats, which reflects the drug's clinical emetogenic potential in humans. Further, we examined the brain regions activated by administration of tranexamic acid and elucidated pivotal pathways of tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake. We examined the effects of ondansetron, a 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonist, domperidone, a dopamine 2 receptor antagonist, and aprepitant, a tachykinin neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor antagonist, on tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake in rats. Then, we determined the brain regions that showed increased numbers of c-Fos immunoreactive cells. Finally, we examined the effects of an antagonist(s) that reduced tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake on the increase in c-Fos immunoreactive cells. Aprepitant significantly decreased tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake. However, neither ondansetron nor domperidone decreased kaolin intake. Tranexamic acid significantly increased c-Fos immunoreactive cells by approximately 5.5-fold and 22-fold in the area postrema and nucleus of solitary tract, respectively. Aprepitant decreased the number of c-Fos immunoreactive cells in both areas. Tranexamic acid induced kaolin intake possibly via stimulation of tachykinin NK1 receptors in rats. The tachykinin NK1 receptor could be targeted to prevent and/or suppress emesis in patients receiving tranexamic acid.

  20. Proximal femoral reconstruction after aseptic loosening following proximal femoral replacement for Ewing sarcoma: a case report with one-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Schoof, Benjamin; Jakobs, Oliver; Gehrke, Thorsten; Gebauer, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 30-year-old patient initially treated for a proximal femoral Ewing's sarcoma when 12 years old. Index treatment comprised tumour resection and total hip arthroplasty. Two years later revision for aseptic loosening was performed. Subsequently, six further surgical revisons were performed for varying causes. At the age of 23 years the proximal femur was resected and a proximal femoral endoprosthesis implanted.Eighteen years after initial diagnosis the patient presented with recurrent aseptc loosening. Both the proximal femur and acetabulum were reconstructed. For acetabular reconstruction a structural allograft and a tantalum cup were utilised. Reconstruction of the femur utilsed extensive wire mesh and circlage wiring with impaction bone allograft into which a femoral stem was implanted.At one-year follow-up the patient was pain free, had no evidence of infection with satisfactory radiographs and no evidence of implant loosening. This is the first case reporting an extended proximal femoral reconstruction with a wire mesh in combination with impaction bone grafting in an aseptic loosened proximal femoral replacement following Ewing's Sarcoma.

  1. Multidimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Phyo, Pyae; Hong, Mei

    2016-09-01

    Plant biomass has become an important source of bio-renewable energy in modern society. The molecular structure of plant cell walls is difficult to characterize by most atomic-resolution techniques due to the insoluble and disordered nature of the cell wall. Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is uniquely suited for studying native hydrated plant cell walls at the molecular level with chemical resolution. Significant progress has been made in the last five years to elucidate the molecular structures and interactions of cellulose and matrix polysaccharides in plant cell walls. These studies have focused on primary cell walls of growing plants in both the dicotyledonous and grass families, as represented by the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana, Brachypodium distachyon, and Zea mays. To date, these SSNMR results have shown that 1) cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins form a single network in the primary cell wall; 2) in dicot cell walls, the protein expansin targets the hemicellulose-enriched region of the cellulose microfibril for its wall-loosening function; and 3) primary wall cellulose has polymorphic structures that are distinct from the microbial cellulose structures. This article summarizes these key findings, and points out future directions of investigation to advance our fundamental understanding of plant cell wall structure and function.

  2. Investigation of factors affecting loosening of Ilizarov ring-wire external fixator systems at the bone-wire interface.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Finn E; Pankaj, Pankaj; Simpson, A Hamish R W

    2012-05-01

    The potential for peri-implant bone yielding and subsequent loosening of Ilizarov ring-wire external fixation systems was investigated using non-linear finite element (FE) analyses. A strain-based plasticity model was employed to simulate bone yielding. FE models also incorporated contact behavior at the wire-bone interface, orthotropic elasticity, and periosteal-endosteal variation of bone properties. These simulations were used to determine the extent and location of yielding with change in age-related bone structure and properties for the bone-Ilizarov construct at the tibial midshaft. At critical wire-bone interfaces, the predicted volume of yielded bone with four wires (on either side of the fracture) was ∼40% of that with two wires. Old-aged cases showed considerably greater bone yielding at the wire-bone interface than young cases (1.7-2.2 times greater volumes of yielded bone). The volume of yielded bone at all wire-bone interfaces decreased with an increase in wire pre-tension. The absence of continuous through-thickness yielding offers an explanation for the clinical observation that Ilizarov ring-wire fixation can provide stable fracture fixation even in bone with high porosity.

  3. Loosening of the total knee arthroplasty: detection by radionuclide bone scanning. [/sup 99m/Tc-methylene diphosphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, J.C.; Hattner, R.S.; Murray, W.R.; Genant, H.K.

    1980-07-01

    Pain after total knee arthroplasty is a common clinical problem in orthopedics, and prosthetic loosening, often requiring surgical revision, is usually the etiology. Since standard clinical and radiographic diagnostic measures have not proven totally satisfactory, a study of the utility of bone scintigraphy to assess stability of the knee prosthesis was done. Thirty-five patients with 39 prostheses were studied. Seventeen patients with 21 total knee arthroplasties served as controls and were asymptomatic, were stable at surgery, or improved with conservative management. Eighteen knees in 18 symptomatic patients composed the experimental group. Of these, 11 knees were loose at surgery and seven have had surgery recommended. Scintigrams of the knees were obtained using /sup 99m/Tc-MDP, and ranked 0-3 corresponding to increasingly abnormal localization by three observers. Highly significant differences were observed between the abnormal and control groups (p<0.001). Reciprocal changes in sensitivity and specificity with increasingly stringent criteria were shown. While it is apparent that the bone scan cannot be used as the sole diagnostic method for evaluation of prosthetic stability, it does seem to be a useful adjunct along with clinical criteria and radiographic studies.

  4. Structural health monitoring for bolt loosening via a non-invasive vibro-haptics human-machine cooperative interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekedis, Mahmut; Mascerañas, David; Turan, Gursoy; Ercan, Emre; Farrar, Charles R.; Yildiz, Hasan

    2015-08-01

    For the last two decades, developments in damage detection algorithms have greatly increased the potential for autonomous decisions about structural health. However, we are still struggling to build autonomous tools that can match the ability of a human to detect and localize the quantity of damage in structures. Therefore, there is a growing interest in merging the computational and cognitive concepts to improve the solution of structural health monitoring (SHM). The main object of this research is to apply the human-machine cooperative approach on a tower structure to detect damage. The cooperation approach includes haptic tools to create an appropriate collaboration between SHM sensor networks, statistical compression techniques and humans. Damage simulation in the structure is conducted by releasing some of the bolt loads. Accelerometers are bonded to various locations of the tower members to acquire the dynamic response of the structure. The obtained accelerometer results are encoded in three different ways to represent them as a haptic stimulus for the human subjects. Then, the participants are subjected to each of these stimuli to detect the bolt loosened damage in the tower. Results obtained from the human-machine cooperation demonstrate that the human subjects were able to recognize the damage with an accuracy of 88 ± 20.21% and response time of 5.87 ± 2.33 s. As a result, it is concluded that the currently developed human-machine cooperation SHM may provide a useful framework to interact with abstract entities such as data from a sensor network.

  5. MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory


    MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated the hepatocarcinogenicity of DCA in rodents when administered in dri...

  6. A Fungal Endoglucanase with Plant Cell Wall Extension Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Sheng; Wu, Yajun; Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2001-01-01

    We have identified a wall hydrolytic enzyme from Trichoderma reesei with potent ability to induce extension of heat-inactivated type I cell walls. It is a small (23-kD) endo-1,4-β-glucanase (Cel12A) belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 12. Extension of heat-inactivated walls from cucumber (Cucumis sativus cv Burpee Pickler) hypocotyls was induced by Cel12A after a distinct lag time and was accompanied by a large increase in wall plasticity and elasticity. Cel12A also increased the rate of stress relaxation of isolated walls at very short times (<200 ms; equivalent to reducing t0, a parameter that estimates the minimum relaxation time). Similar changes in wall plasticity and elasticity were observed in wheat (Triticum aestivum cv Pennmore Winter) coleoptile (type II) walls, which showed only a negligible extension in response to Cel12A treatment. Thus, Cel12A modifies both type I and II walls, but substantial extension is found only in type I walls. Cel12A has strong endo-glucanase activity against xyloglucan and (1→3,1→4)-β-glucan, but did not exhibit endo-xylanase, endo-mannase, or endo-galactanase activities. In terms of kinetics of action and effects on wall rheology, wall loosening by Cel12A differs qualitatively from the action by expansins, which induce wall extension by a non-hydrolytic polymer creep mechanism. The action by Cel12A mimics some of the changes in wall rheology found after auxin-induced growth. The strategy used here to identify Cel12A could be used to identify analogous plant enzymes that cause auxin-induced changes in cell wall rheology. PMID:11553760

  7. Combination gene therapy targeting on interleukin-1β and RANKL for wear debris-induced aseptic loosening.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Jia, T-H; Zacharias, N; Gong, W; Du, H-X; Wooley, P H; Yang, S-Y

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a combination gene therapy to repress interleukin-1 (IL-1) and receptor activator of nuclear factor NF-kappa B ligand (RANKL) for the treatment of particulate debris-induced aseptic loosening, and tried to explore the molecular mechanism of the exogenous gene modifications on osteoclastogenesis. RAW cells activated by titanium particles were transduced with DFG-IL-1Ra (retroviral vector encoding IL-1 receptor antagonist) and AAV-OPG (adeno-associated viral vectors-osteoprotegerin) individually or in combination for 4 weeks. Pro-inflammatory cytokines in culture media were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and gene expressions of RANK, IL-1β, c-Fos, TRAF6, JNK1 and CPK were examined using real-time PCR. An established knee-implant-failure mouse model was employed to evaluate the efficacy of the in vivo double-gene therapy. The surgical implantation of a titanium alloy pin into the proximal tibia was followed by monthly challenge with titanium debris. Peri-implant gene transfers of IL-1Ra and OPG (respectively or in combination) were given 3 weeks after surgery. The combination of OPG and IL-1Ra gene transfer exhibited strong synergetic effects in blockage of inflammation and osteoclastogenesis at 8 weeks after gene modification. The combination therapy reversed peri-implant bone resorption and restored implant stability when compared with either single gene transduction. Real-time PCR data indicated that the action of IL-1Ra gene therapy may be mediated via the JNK1 pathway, while the reduction of osteoclastogenesis by OPG gene modification may be regulated by c-Fos expression. In addition, both gene modifications resulted in significant diminishment of TRAF6 expression.

  8. Effect of retorque on loosening torque of prosthetic screws under two levels of fit of implant-supported dentures.

    PubMed

    Spazzin, Aloísio Oro; Henrique, Guilherme Elias Pessanha; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of retorque on loosening torque (Lt) of prosthetic screws in implant-supported dentures with different fit levels. Ten mandibular implant-supported dentures were fabricated and then 20 cast models were then prepared using prosthetic structures to create 2 fit levels: passive fit (Pf) and misfit (Mf). Two tightening techniques were also evaluated: initial torque only (T1); and initial torque and retorque after 10 min (T2). Gold or titanium screws were used, resulting in 4 groups to each one: Pf/T1, Pf/T2, Mf/T1, Mf/T2. The Lt was measured 24 h after the tightening torque using digital torque meter. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05), separately for each screw material. For titanium screws, no significant difference (p>0.05) was found between Pf/T1 and Pf/T2, or between Pf/T2 and Mf/T2. However, statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was found between Pf/T1 and Mf/T1, and between Mf/T1 and Mf/T2. Mf reduced the Lt using T1, while and T2 increased the Lt for Mf. Retorque and fit were shown to have no significant influence on the Lt of the gold screws. Retorque application made insignificant the misfit effect on the Lt of the titanium screws, suggesting that this procedure should be performed routinely during the screw tightening in multi-unit dentures.

  9. Bone scan usefulness in patients with painful hip or knee prosthesis: 10 situations that can cause pain, other than loosening and infection.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Sofia; Ferreira, Teresa C; Salgado, Lucília; Paycha, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, with the higher median life expectancy, the number of hip and knee replacements has increased. Clinical examination and morphological studies are essential to evaluate patients with a painful arthroplasty. Nuclear medicine examinations also play an important role, their main usefulness being the exclusion of prosthesis complications. Nevertheless, conventional examinations, namely bone scan and white blood cell scintigraphy, can also identify complications, such as loosening and infection. This study describes the normal and pathologic patterns of a bone scan and exemplifies ten common situations that can cause pain in patients with hip or knee arthroplasty, other than loosening and infection, which can be disclosed on a bone scintigraphy. The ten situations that should be considered and looked for when analysing a bone scan are: referred pain, patellofemoral pain syndrome, fractures, fissures, abscess/haematoma, bone insert behaviour, heterotopic ossification, greater trochanter pseudarthrosis, osteoarthritis extension in a knee with an unicompartmental prosthesis, and systemic disease with bone involvement.

  10. Wall extensibility: its nature, measurement and relationship to plant cell growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cells is controlled principally by processes that loosen the wall and enable it to expand irreversibly. The central role of wall relaxation for cell expansion is reviewed. The most common methods for assessing the extension properties of plant cell walls ( wall extensibility') are described, categorized and assessed critically. What emerges are three fundamentally different approaches which test growing cells for their ability (a) to enlarge at different values of turgor, (b) to induce wall relaxation, and (c) to deform elastically or plastically in response to an applied tensile force. Analogous methods with isolated walls are similarly reviewed. The results of these different assays are related to the nature of plant cell growth and pertinent biophysical theory. I argue that the extensibilities' measured by these assays are fundamentally different from one another and that some are more pertinent to growth than others.

  11. Strontium-doped calcium polyphosphate/ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene composites: A new class of artificial joint components with enhanced biological efficacy to aseptic loosening.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhipeng; Huang, Bingxue; Li, Yiwen; Tian, Meng; Li, Li; Yu, Xixun

    2016-04-01

    To enhance implant stability and prolong the service life of artificial joint component, a new approach was proposed to improve the wear resistance of artificial joint component and endow artificial joint component with the biological efficacy of resistance to aseptic loosening. Strontium calcium polyphosphate (SCPP) were interfused in ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) by a combination of liquid nitrogen ball-milling and flat-panel curing process to prepare the SCPP/UHMWPE composites. The micro-structure, mechanical characterization, tribological characterization and bioactivities of various SCPP/UHMWPE composites were investigated. The results suggested that this method could statistically improve the wear resistance of UHMWPE resulting from a good SCPP particle dispersion. Moreover, it is also observed that the SCPP/UHMWPE composites-wear particles could promote the production of OPG by osteoblasts and decrease the production of RANKL by osteoblasts, and then increase the OPG/RANKL ratio. This indicated that the SCPP/UHMWPE composites had potential efficacy to prevent and treat aseptic loosening. Above all, the SCPP/UHMWPE composites with a suitable SCPP content would be the promising materials for fabricating artificial joint component with ability to resist aseptic loosening.

  12. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  13. Evolutionary divergence of β-expansin structure and function in grasses parallels emergence of distinctive primary cell wall traits.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, Javier; Guttman, Mara; Li, Lian-Chao; Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Expansins are wall-loosening proteins that promote the extension of primary cell walls without the hydrolysis of major structural components. Previously, proteins from the EXPA (α-expansin) family were found to loosen eudicot cell walls but to be less effective on grass cell walls, whereas the reverse pattern was found for EXPB (β-expansin) proteins obtained from grass pollen. To understand the evolutionary and structural bases for the selectivity of EXPB action, we assessed the extension (creep) response of cell walls from diverse monocot families to EXPA and EXPB treatments. Cell walls from Cyperaceae and Juncaceae (families closely related to grasses) displayed a typical grass response ('β-response'). Walls from more distant monocots, including some species that share with grasses high levels of arabinoxylan, responded preferentially to α-expansins ('α-response'), behaving in this regard like eudicots. An expansin with selective activity for grass cell walls was detected in Cyperaceae pollen, coinciding with the expression of genes from the divergent EXPB-I branch that includes grass pollen β-expansins. The evolutionary origin of this branch was located within Poales on the basis of phylogenetic analyses and its association with the 'sigma' whole-genome duplication. Accelerated evolution in this branch has remodeled the protein surface in contact with the substrate, potentially for binding highly substituted arabinoxylan. We propose that the evolution of the divergent EXPB-I group made a fundamental change in the target and mechanism of wall loosening in the grass lineage possible, involving a new structural role for xylans and the expansins that target them.

  14. Protective Effect of Ocimum basilicum Essential Oil Against Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Amir; Roohi, Parnia; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Ghannadi, Ali Reza; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Ocimum basilicum L has been traditionally used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in Iran. This study investigates the ameliorative effect of Ocimum basilicum essential oil on an acetic acid-induced colitis model in rats. Ocimum basilicum essential oil with 2 doses (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly ameliorated wet weight/length ratio of colonic tissue compared to the control group. Higher doses of essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly reduced ulcer severity, ulcer area, and ulcer index. On the other hand, histological examination revealed the diminution of total colitis index as a marker for inflammatory cell infiltration in the colonic segments of rats treated with Ocimum basilicum essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). The increased level of myeloperoxidase was significantly decreased after the treatment with the essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). These results suggest that Ocimum basilicum exhibits protective effect against acetic acid-induced colitis.

  15. SCH 58261 differentially influences quinolinic acid-induced effects in striatal and in hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Tebano, Maria Teresa; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Popoli, Patrizia

    2002-08-30

    The influence of the adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist SCH 58261 (7-(2-phenylethyl)-5-amino-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-trizolo[1,5-c] pyrimidine) (50, 200 nM, 1 microM) on quinolinic acid effects has been studied in rat striatal and hippocampal slices. Quinolinic acid induced disappearance of field potentials at concentrations of 500 microM and 2 mM in hippocampal and corticostriatal slices, respectively. We found that 1 microM SCH 58261 prevented quinolinic acid-induced field potential disappearance in corticostriatal but not in hippocampal slices. This finding demonstrates that the peculiar binding profile of SCH 58261 and the predominance in the hippocampus of "atypical" adenosine A(2A) receptor population (not recognized by SCH 58261) could have a functional relevance in the occurrence of region-specific neuroprotective effects.

  16. Effects of sodium bicarbonate on butyric acid-induced epithelial cell damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Takigawa, Satoko; Sugano, Naoyuki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Arai, Noriyuki; Ota, Noriko; Ito, Koichi

    2008-12-01

    Butyric acid is detected in periodontal pockets and is thought to be involved in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease. We examined the effects of sodium bicarbonate on the butyric acid-induced epithelial cell damage. The human gingival carcinoma cell line Ca9-22 was cultured in medium that contained butyric acid with or without sodium bicarbonate. The viability of cells treated with sodium bicarbonate was significantly higher than that of cells treated with butyric acid alone. The effects of butyric acid on ICAM-1 expression were significantly improved by sodium bicarbonate. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, sodium bicarbonate was indicated to be a useful therapeutic agent to reduce the butyric acid-induced periodontal tissue damage.

  17. Acetic acid induces a programmed cell death process in the food spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Ludovico, Paula; Sansonetty, Filipe; Silva, Manuel T; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2003-03-01

    Here we show that 320-800 mM acetic acid induces in Zygosaccharomyces bailii a programmed cell death (PCD) process that is inhibited by cycloheximide, is accompanied by structural and biochemical alterations typical of apoptosis, and occurs in cells with preserved mitochondrial and plasma membrane integrity (as revealed by rhodamine 123 (Rh123) and propidium iodide (PI) staining, respectively). Mitochondrial ultrastructural changes, namely decrease of the cristae number, formation of myelinic bodies and swelling were also seen. Exposure to acetic acid above 800 mM resulted in killing by necrosis. The occurrence of an acetic acid-induced active cell death process in Z. bailii reinforces the concept of a physiological role of the PCD in the normal yeast life cycle.

  18. Acid-inducible proton influx currents in the plasma membrane of murine osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Miyuki; Li, Guangshuai; Moriura, Yoshie; Hino, Yoshiko; Kawawaki, Junko; Sakai, Hiromu

    2016-05-01

    Acidification of the resorption pits, which is essential for dissolving bone, is produced by secretion of protons through vacuolar H(+)-ATPases in the plasma membrane of bone-resorbing cells, osteoclasts. Consequently, osteoclasts face highly acidic extracellular environments, where the pH gradient across the plasma membrane could generate a force driving protons into the cells. Proton influx mechanisms during the acid exposure are largely unknown, however. In this study, we investigated extracellular-acid-inducible proton influx currents in osteoclast-like cells derived from a macrophage cell line (RAW264). Decreasing extracellular pH to <5.5 induced non-ohmic inward currents. The reversal potentials depended on the pH gradients across the membrane and were independent of concentrations of Na(+), Cl(-), and HCO3 (-), suggesting that they were carried largely by protons. The acid-inducible proton influx currents were not inhibited by amiloride, a widely used blocker for cation channels/transporters, or by 4,4'-diisothiocyanato-2,2'-stilbenesulfonate(DIDS) which blocks anion channels/transporters. Additionally, the currents were not significantly affected by V-ATPase inhibitors, bafilomycin A1 and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. Extracellular Ca(2+) (10 mM) did not affect the currents, but 1 mM ZnCl2 decreased the currents partially. The intracellular pH in the vicinity of the plasma membrane was dropped by the acid-inducible H(+) influx currents, which caused overshoot of the voltage-gated H(+) channels after removal of acids. The H(+) influx currents were smaller in undifferentiated, mononuclear RAW cells and were negligible in COS7 cells. These data suggest that the acid-inducible H(+) influx (H(+) leak) pathway may be an additional mechanism modifying the pH environments of osteoclasts upon exposure to strong acids.

  19. Autophagy Protects against Palmitic Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Podocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xu-Shun; Chen, Xue-Mei; Wan, Jiang-Min; Gui, Hai-Bo; Ruan, Xiong-Zhong; Du, Xiao-Gang

    2017-02-22

    Autophagy is a highly conserved degradation process that is involved in the clearance of proteins and damaged organelles to maintain intracellular homeostasis and cell integrity. Type 2 diabetes is often accompanied by dyslipidemia with elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs). Podocytes, as an important component of the filtration barrier, are susceptible to lipid disorders. The loss of podocytes causes proteinuria, which is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. In the present study, we demonstrated that palmitic acid (PA) promoted autophagy in podocytes. We further found that PA increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in podocytes and that NAC (N-acetyl-cysteine), a potent antioxidant, significantly eliminated the excessive ROS and suppressed autophagy, indicating that the increased generation of ROS was associated with the palmitic acid-induced autophagy in podocytes. Moreover, we also found that PA stimulation decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in podocytes and induced podocyte apoptosis, while the inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine (CQ) enhanced palmitic acid-induced apoptosis accompanied by increased ROS generation, and the stimulation of autophagy by rapamycin (Rap) remarkably suppressed palmitic acid-induced ROS generation and apoptosis. Taken together, these in vitro findings suggest that PA-induced autophagy in podocytes is mediated by ROS production and that autophagy plays a protective role against PA-induced podocyte apoptosis.

  20. Protective effect of hispidulin on kainic acid-induced seizures and neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Su Jane; Huang, Shu Kuei

    2015-05-15

    Hispidulin is a flavonoid compound which is an active ingredient in a number of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs, and it has been reported to inhibit glutamate release. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hispidulin protects against seizures induced by kainic acid, a glutamate analog with excitotoxic properties. The results indicated that intraperitoneally administering hispidulin (10 or 50mg/kg) to rats 30 min before intraperitoneally injecting kainic acid (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and decreased seizure score. In addition, hispidulin substantially attenuated kainic acid-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the suppression of microglial activation and the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, hispidulin reduced kainic acid-induced c-Fos expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the hippocampus. These data suggest that hispidulin has considerable antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and antiinflammatory effects on kainic acid-induced seizures in rats.

  1. Autophagy Protects against Palmitic Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Podocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xu-shun; Chen, Xue-mei; Wan, Jiang-min; Gui, Hai-bo; Ruan, Xiong-zhong; Du, Xiao-gang

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved degradation process that is involved in the clearance of proteins and damaged organelles to maintain intracellular homeostasis and cell integrity. Type 2 diabetes is often accompanied by dyslipidemia with elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs). Podocytes, as an important component of the filtration barrier, are susceptible to lipid disorders. The loss of podocytes causes proteinuria, which is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. In the present study, we demonstrated that palmitic acid (PA) promoted autophagy in podocytes. We further found that PA increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in podocytes and that NAC (N-acetyl-cysteine), a potent antioxidant, significantly eliminated the excessive ROS and suppressed autophagy, indicating that the increased generation of ROS was associated with the palmitic acid-induced autophagy in podocytes. Moreover, we also found that PA stimulation decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in podocytes and induced podocyte apoptosis, while the inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine (CQ) enhanced palmitic acid-induced apoptosis accompanied by increased ROS generation, and the stimulation of autophagy by rapamycin (Rap) remarkably suppressed palmitic acid-induced ROS generation and apoptosis. Taken together, these in vitro findings suggest that PA-induced autophagy in podocytes is mediated by ROS production and that autophagy plays a protective role against PA-induced podocyte apoptosis. PMID:28225005

  2. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism.

  3. 'Stucco' Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This projected mosaic image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial clotting or cement-like properties of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) wide and 5 centimeters (2 inches) tall.(This image also appears as an inset on a separate image from the rover's navigation camera, showing the location of this particular spot within the trench wall.)

  4. Salinity stiffens the epidermal cell walls of salt-stressed maize leaves: is the epidermis growth-restricting?

    PubMed

    Zörb, Christian; Mühling, Karl H; Kutschera, Ulrich; Geilfus, Christoph-Martin

    2015-01-01

    As a result of salt (NaCl)-stress, sensitive varieties of maize (Zea mays L.) respond with a strong inhibition of organ growth. The reduction of leaf elongation investigated here has several causes, including a modification of the mechanical properties of the cell wall. Among the various tissues that form the leaf, the epidermis plays a special role in controlling organ growth, because it is thought to form a rigid outer leaf coat that can restrict elongation by interacting with the inner cell layers. This study was designed to determine whether growth-related changes in the leaf epidermis and its cell wall correspond to the overall reduction in cell expansion of maize leaves during an osmotic stress-phase induced by salt treatment. Two different maize varieties contrasting in their degree of salt resistance (i.e., the hybrids Lector vs. SR03) were compared in order to identify physiological features contributing to resistance towards salinity. Wall loosening-related parameters, such as the capacity of the epidermal cell wall to expand, β-expansin abundance and apoplastic pH values, were analysed. Our data demonstrate that, in the salt-tolerant maize hybrid which maintained leaf growth under salinity, the epidermal cell wall was more extensible under salt stress. This was associated with a shift of the epidermal apoplastic pH into a range more favourable for acid growth. The more sensitive hybrid that displayed a pronounced leaf growth-reduction was shown to have stiffer epidermal cell walls under stress. This may be attributable to the reduced abundance of cell wall-loosening β-expansin proteins following a high salinity-treatment in the nutrient solution (100 mM NaCl, 8 days). This study clearly documents that salt stress impairs epidermal wall-loosening in growth-reduced maize leaves.

  5. Salinity Stiffens the Epidermal Cell Walls of Salt-Stressed Maize Leaves: Is the Epidermis Growth-Restricting?

    PubMed Central

    Zörb, Christian; Mühling, Karl H.; Kutschera, Ulrich; Geilfus, Christoph-Martin

    2015-01-01

    As a result of salt (NaCl)-stress, sensitive varieties of maize (Zea mays L.) respond with a strong inhibition of organ growth. The reduction of leaf elongation investigated here has several causes, including a modification of the mechanical properties of the cell wall. Among the various tissues that form the leaf, the epidermis plays a special role in controlling organ growth, because it is thought to form a rigid outer leaf coat that can restrict elongation by interacting with the inner cell layers. This study was designed to determine whether growth-related changes in the leaf epidermis and its cell wall correspond to the overall reduction in cell expansion of maize leaves during an osmotic stress-phase induced by salt treatment. Two different maize varieties contrasting in their degree of salt resistance (i.e., the hybrids Lector vs. SR03) were compared in order to identify physiological features contributing to resistance towards salinity. Wall loosening-related parameters, such as the capacity of the epidermal cell wall to expand, β-expansin abundance and apoplastic pH values, were analysed. Our data demonstrate that, in the salt-tolerant maize hybrid which maintained leaf growth under salinity, the epidermal cell wall was more extensible under salt stress. This was associated with a shift of the epidermal apoplastic pH into a range more favourable for acid growth. The more sensitive hybrid that displayed a pronounced leaf growth-reduction was shown to have stiffer epidermal cell walls under stress. This may be attributable to the reduced abundance of cell wall-loosening β-expansin proteins following a high salinity-treatment in the nutrient solution (100 mM NaCl, 8 days). This study clearly documents that salt stress impairs epidermal wall-loosening in growth-reduced maize leaves. PMID:25760715

  6. Wall Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  7. A role for sodium and chloride in kainic acid-induced beading of inhibitory interneuron dendrites.

    PubMed

    Al-Noori, S; Swann, J W

    2000-01-01

    Excitotoxic injury of the dendrites of inhibitory interneurons could lead to decreases in their synaptic activation and explain subsequent local circuit hyperexcitability and epilepsy. A hallmark of dendrotoxicity, at least in principal neurons of the hippocampus and cortex, is focal or varicose swellings of dendritic arbors. In experiments reported here, transient (1h) exposure of hippocampal explant cultures to kainic acid produced marked focal swellings of the dendrites of parvalbumin-immunoreactive pyramidal basket cells in a highly reproducible and dose-dependent manner. At 5mM kainic acid, more than half of the immunopositive apical dendrites in area CA(1) had a beaded appearance. However, the somal volumes of these cells were unaltered by the same treatment. The presence of focal swellings was reversible with kainate washout and was not accompanied by interneuronal cell death. In contrast, exposure to much higher concentrations (300mM) of kainic acid resulted in the total loss of parvalbumin-positive interneurons from explants. Surprisingly, kainic acid-induced dendritic beading does not appear to be mediated by extracellular calcium. Beading was unaltered in the presence of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, the L-type calcium channel antagonist, nimodipine, cadmium, or by removing extracellular calcium. However, blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels by either tetrodotoxin or lidocaine abolished dendritic beading, while the activation of existing voltage-gated sodium channels by veratridine mimicked the kainic acid-induced dendritic beading. Finally, the removal of extracellular chloride prevented the kainic acid-induced dendritic beading.Thus, we suggest that the movement of Na(+) and Cl(-), rather than Ca(2+), into cells underlies the focal swellings of interneuron dendrites in hippocampus.

  8. Calcium Uptake via Mitochondrial Uniporter Contributes to Palmitic Acid-induced Apoptosis in Mouse Podocytes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zeting; Cao, Aili; Liu, Hua; Guo, Henjiang; Zang, Yingjun; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yunman; Wang, Hao; Yin, Peihao; Peng, Wen

    2017-02-09

    Podocytes are component cells of the glomerular filtration barrier, and their loss by apoptosis is the main cause of proteinuria that leads to diabetic nephropathy (DN). Therefore, insights into podocyte apoptosis mechanism would allow a better understanding of DN pathogenesis and thus help develop adequate therapeutic strategies. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of palmitic acid-inhibited cell death in mouse podocytes, and found that palmitic acid increased cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Palmitic acid induces apoptosis in podocytes through up-regulation of cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) , mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), cytochrome c release and depletion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) , The intracellular calcium chelator, 1,2-bis (2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N, N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM), partially prevented this up-regulation whereas 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), an inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP3R) inhibitor; dantrolene, a ryanodine receptor (RyR) inhibitor; and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostibene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), an anion exchange inhibitor, had no effect. Interestingly, ruthenium red and Ru360, both inhibitors of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU), blocked palmitic acid-induced mitochondrial Ca(2+) elevation, cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol, and apoptosis. siRNA to MCU markedly reduced curcumin-induced apoptosis. These data indicate that Ca(2+) uptake via mitochondrial uniporter contributes to palmitic acid-induced apoptosis in mouse podocytes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Clavulanic acid induces penile erection and yawning in male rats: comparison with apomorphine.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Melis, Maria Rosaria; Angioni, Laura; Argiolas, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    The beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid induced penile erection and yawning in a dose dependent manner when given intraperitoneally (IP, 0.05-5mg/kg), perorally (OS, 0.1-5mg/kg) and intracereboventricularly (ICV, 0.01-5 μg/rat) to male rats. The effect resembles that of the dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine given subcutaneously (SC) (0.02-0.25mg/kg), although the responses of the latter followed a U inverted dose-response curve, disappearing at doses higher than 0.1mg/kg. Clavulanic acid responses were reduced by about 55% by haloperidol, a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist (0.1mg/kg IP), and by d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin, an oxytocin receptor antagonist (2 μg/rat ICV), both given 15 min before clavulanic acid. A higher reduction of clavulanic acid responses (more than 80%) was also found with morphine, an opioid receptor agonist (5mg/kg IP), and with mianserin, a serotonin 5HT(2c) receptor antagonist (0.2mg/kg SC). In contrast, no reduction was found with naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist (1mg/kg IP). The ability of haloperidol, d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin and morphine to reduce clavulanic acid induced penile erection and yawning suggests that clavulanic acid induces these responses, at least in part, by increasing central dopaminergic neurotransmission. Dopamine in turn activates oxytocinergic neurotransmission and centrally released oxytocin induces penile erection and yawning. However, since both penile erection and yawning episodes were reduced not only by the blockade of central dopamine and oxytocin receptors and by the stimulation of opioid receptors, which inhibits oxytocinergic neurotransmission, but also by mianserin, an increase of central serotonin neurotransmission is also likely to participate in these clavulanic acid responses.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide Stimulates Butyric Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Fukushima, Kazuo; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that butyric acid, an extracellular metabolite from periodontopathic bacteria, induced apoptosis in murine thymocytes, splenic T cells, and human Jurkat T cells. In this study, we examined the ability of butyric acid to induce apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on this apoptosis. Butyric acid significantly inhibited the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody- and concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses in a dose-dependent fashion. This inhibition of PBMC growth by butyric acid depended on apoptosis in vitro. It was characterized by internucleosomal DNA digestion and revealed by gel electrophoresis followed by a colorimetric DNA fragmentation assay to occur in a concentration-dependent fashion. Butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis was accompanied by caspase-3 protease activity but not by caspase-1 protease activity. LPS potentiated butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed that LPS increased the proportion of sub-G1 cells and the number of late-stage apoptotic cells induced by butyric acid. Annexin V binding experiments with fractionated subpopulations of PBMC in flow cytometory revealed that LPS accelerated the butyric acid-induced CD3+-T-cell apoptosis followed by similar levels of both CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell apoptosis. The addition of LPS to PBMC cultures did not cause DNA fragmentation, suggesting that LPS was unable to induce PBMC apoptosis directly. These data suggest that LPS, in combination with butyric acid, potentiates CD3+ PBMC T-cell apoptosis and plays a role in the apoptotic depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. PMID:9864191

  11. The acid-induced folded state of Sac7d is the native state.

    PubMed Central

    Bedell, J. L.; McCrary, B. S.; Edmondson, S. P.; Shriver, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    Sac7d unfolds at low pH in the absence of salt, with the greatest extent of unfolding obtained at pH 2. We have previously shown that the acid unfolded protein is induced to refold by decreasing the pH to 0 or by addition of salt (McCrary BS, Bedell J. Edmondson SP, Shriver JW, 1998, J Mol Biol 276:203-224). Both near-ultraviolet circular dichroism spectra and ANS fluorescence enhancements indicate that the acid- and salt-induced folded states have a native fold and are not molten globular. 1H,15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR spectra confirm that the native, acid-, and salt-induced folded states are essentially identical. The most significant differences in amide 1H and 15N chemical shifts are attributed to hydrogen bonding to titrating carboxyl side chains and through-bond inductive effects. The 1H NMR chemical shifts of protons affected by ring currents in the hydrophobic core of the acid- and salt-induced folded states are identical to those observed in the native. The radius of gyration of the acid-induced folded state at pH 0 is shown to be identical to that of the native state at pH 7 by small angle X-ray scattering. We conclude that acid-induced collapse of Sac7d does not lead to a molten globule but proceeds directly to the native state. The folding of Sac7d as a function of pH and anion concentration is summarized with a phase diagram that is similar to those observed for other proteins that undergo acid-induced folding except that the A-state is encompassed by the native state. These results demonstrate that formation of a molten globule is not a general property of proteins that are refolded by acid. PMID:11106160

  12. Role of hepatocyte S6K1 in palmitic acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, lipotoxicity, insulin resistance and in oleic acid-induced protection.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Virginia; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Muntané, Jordi; Kozma, Sara C; Valverde, Ángela M

    2015-06-01

    The excess of saturated free fatty acids, such as palmitic acid, that induces lipotoxicity in hepatocytes, has been implicated in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease also associated with insulin resistance. By contrast, oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, attenuates the effects of palmitic acid. We evaluated whether palmitic acid is directly associated with both insulin resistance and lipoapoptosis in mouse and human hepatocytes and the impact of oleic acid in the molecular mechanisms that mediate both processes. In human and mouse hepatocytes palmitic acid at a lipotoxic concentration triggered early activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related kinases, induced the apoptotic transcription factor CHOP, activated caspase 3 and increased the percentage of apoptotic cells. These effects concurred with decreased IR/IRS1/Akt insulin pathway. Oleic acid suppressed the toxic effects of palmitic acid on ER stress activation, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance. Besides, oleic acid suppressed palmitic acid-induced activation of S6K1. This protection was mimicked by pharmacological or genetic inhibition of S6K1 in hepatocytes. In conclusion, this is the first study highlighting the activation of S6K1 by palmitic acid as a common and novel mechanism by which its inhibition by oleic acid prevents ER stress, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance in hepatocytes.

  13. Comparative neuroprotective profile of statins in quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    A possible neuroprotective role has been recently suggested for 3H3MGCoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Here, we sought to determine neuroprotective effect of statins in quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats. Rats were surgically administered quinolinic acid and treated with Atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (15, 30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (5, 10 mg/kg) once daily up to 3 weeks. Atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (10 mg/kg) treatment significantly attenuated the quinolinic acid induced behavioral (locomotor activity, rotarod performance and beam walk test), biochemical (lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration, SOD and catalase), mitochondrial enzyme complex alterations in rats suggesting their free radical scavenging potential. Additionally, atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (10 mg/kg) significantly decrease the TNF-α level and striatal lesion volume in quinolinic acid treated animals indicating their anti-inflammatory effects. In comparing the protective effect of different statins, atorvastatin is effective at both the doses while simvastatin and fluvastatins at respective lower doses were not able to produce the protective effect in quinolinic acid treated animals. These modulations can account, at least partly, for the beneficial effect of statins in our rodent model of striatal degeneration. Our findings show that statins could be explored as possible neuroprotective agents for neurodegenerative disorders such as HD.

  14. Salicylic acid induces mitochondrial injury by inhibiting ferrochelatase heme biosynthesis activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipul; Liu, Shujie; Ando, Hideki; Ishii, Ryohei; Tateno, Shumpei; Kaneko, Yuki; Yugami, Masato; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Nureki, Osamu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Salicylic acid is a classic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Although salicylic acid also induces mitochondrial injury, the mechanism of its antimitochondrial activity is not well understood. In this study, by using a one-step affinity purification scheme with salicylic acid-immobilized beads, ferrochelatase (FECH), a homodimeric enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis in mitochondria, was identified as a new molecular target of salicylic acid. Moreover, the cocrystal structure of the FECH-salicylic acid complex was determined. Structural and biochemical studies showed that salicylic acid binds to the dimer interface of FECH in two possible orientations and inhibits its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis confirmed that Trp301 and Leu311, hydrophobic amino acid residues located at the dimer interface, are directly involved in salicylic acid binding. On a gel filtration column, salicylic acid caused a shift in the elution profile of FECH, indicating that its conformational change is induced by salicylic acid binding. In cultured human cells, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis, whereas salicylic acid did not exert its inhibitory effect in FECH knockdown cells. Concordantly, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis in zebrafish embryos. Strikingly, the salicylic acid-induced effect in zebrafish was partially rescued by FECH overexpression. Taken together, these findings illustrate that FECH is responsible for salicylic acid-induced inhibition of heme synthesis, which may contribute to its antimitochondrial and anti-inflammatory function. This study establishes a novel aspect of the complex pharmacological effects of salicylic acid.

  15. Deoxycholic and chenodeoxycholic bile acids induce apoptosis via oxidative stress in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ignacio Barrasa, Juan; Olmo, Nieves; Pérez-Ramos, Pablo; Santiago-Gómez, Angélica; Lecona, Emilio; Turnay, Javier; Antonia Lizarbe, M

    2011-10-01

    The continuous exposure of the colonic epithelium to high concentrations of bile acids may exert cytotoxic effects and has been related to pathogenesis of colon cancer. A better knowledge of the mechanisms by which bile acids induce toxicity is still required and may be useful for the development of new therapeutic strategies. We have studied the effect of deoxycholic acid (DCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) treatments in BCS-TC2 human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Both bile acids promote cell death, being this effect higher for CDCA. Apoptosis is detected after 30 min-2 h of treatment, as observed by cell detachment, loss of membrane asymmetry, internucleosomal DNA degradation, appearance of mitochondrial transition permeability (MPT), and caspase and Bax activation. At longer treatment times, apoptosis is followed in vitro by secondary necrosis due to impaired mitochondrial activity and ATP depletion. Bile acid-induced apoptosis is a result of oxidative stress with increased ROS generation mainly by activation of plasma membrane enzymes, such as NAD(P)H oxidases and, to a lower extent, PLA2. These effects lead to a loss of mitochondrial potential and release of pro-apoptotic factors to the cytosol, which is confirmed by activation of caspase-9 and -3, but not caspase-8. This initial apoptotic steps promote cleavage of Bcl-2, allowing Bax activation and formation of additional pores in the mitochondrial membrane that amplify the apoptotic signal.

  16. Polyunsaturated Branched-Chain Fatty Acid Geranylgeranoic Acid Induces Unfolded Protein Response in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwao, Chieko; Shidoji, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    The acyclic diterpenoid acid geranylgeranoic acid (GGA) has been reported to induce autophagic cell death in several human hepatoma-derived cell lines; however, the molecular mechanism for this remains unknown. In the present study, several diterpenoids were examined for ability to induce XBP1 splicing and/or lipotoxicity for human hepatoma cell lines. Here we show that three groups of diterpenoids emerged: 1) GGA, 2,3-dihydro GGA and 9-cis retinoic acid induce cell death and XBP1 splicing; 2) all-trans retinoic acid induces XBP1 splicing but little cell death; and 3) phytanic acid, phytenic acid and geranylgeraniol induce neither cell death nor XBP1 splicing. GGA-induced ER stress/ unfolded protein response (UPR) and its lipotoxicity were both blocked by co-treatment with oleic acid. The blocking activity of oleic acid for GGA-induced XBP1 splicing was not attenuated by methylation of oleic acid. These findings strongly suggest that GGA at micromolar concentrations induces the so-called lipid-induced ER stress response/UPR, which is oleate-suppressive, and shows its lipotoxicity in human hepatoma cells. PMID:26186544

  17. Nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo

    2015-02-01

    Nucleic acids derived from viral pathogens are typical pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In mammals, the recognition of viral nucleic acids by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which include Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RLRs), induces the release of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferons (IFNs) through the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3/7 pathways, triggering the host antiviral state. However, whether nucleic acids can induce similar antiviral immunity in invertebrates remains ambiguous. Several studies have reported that nucleic acid mimics, especially dsRNA mimic poly(I:C), can strongly induce non-specific antiviral immune responses in insects, shrimp, and oyster. This behavior shows multiple similarities to the hallmarks of mammalian IFN responses. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates. We also discuss the potential recognition and regulatory mechanisms that confer non-specific antiviral immunity on invertebrate hosts.

  18. Ginkgolic acids induce neuronal death and activate protein phosphatase type-2C.

    PubMed

    Ahlemeyer, B; Selke, D; Schaper, C; Klumpp, S; Krieglstein, J

    2001-10-26

    The standardized extract from Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) is used for the treatment of dementia. Because of allergenic and genotoxic effects, ginkgolic acids are restricted in EGb 761 to 5 ppm. The question arises whether ginkgolic acids also have neurotoxic effects. In the present study, ginkgolic acids caused death of cultured chick embryonic neurons in a concentration-dependent manner, in the presence and in the absence of serum. Ginkgolic acids-induced death showed features of apoptosis as we observed chromatin condensation, shrinkage of the nucleus and reduction of the damage by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, demonstrating an active type of cell death. However, DNA fragmentation detected by the terminal-transferase-mediated ddUTP-digoxigenin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay and caspase-3 activation, which are also considered as hallmarks of apoptosis, were not seen after treatment with 150 microM ginkgolic acids in serum-free medium, a dose which increased the percentage of neurons with chromatin condensation and shrunken nuclei to 88% compared with 25% in serum-deprived, vehicle-treated controls. This suggests that ginkgolic acid-induced death showed signs of apoptosis as well as of necrosis. Ginkgolic acids specifically increased the activity of protein phosphatase type-2C, whereas other protein phosphatases such as protein phosphatases 1A, 2A and 2B, tyrosine phosphatase, and unspecific acid- and alkaline phosphatases were inhibited or remained unchanged, suggesting protein phosphatase 2C to play a role in the neurotoxic effect mediated by ginkgolic acids.

  19. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  20. Wall to Wall Optimal Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, Gregory P.; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Doering, Charles R.

    2013-11-01

    How much heat can be transported between impermeable fixed-temperature walls by incompressible flows with a given amount of kinetic energy or enstrophy? What do the optimal velocity fields look like? We employ variational calculus to address these questions in the context of steady 2D flows. The resulting nonlinear Euler-Lagrange equations are solved numerically, and in some cases analytically, to find the maximum possible Nusselt number Nu as a function of the Péclect number Pe , a measure of the flow's energy or enstrophy. We find that in the fixed-energy problem Nu ~ Pe , while in the fixed-enstrophy problem Nu ~ Pe 10 / 17 . In both cases, the optimal flow consists of an array of convection cells with aspect ratio Γ (Pe) . Interpreting our results in terms of the Rayleigh number Ra for relevant buoyancy-driven problems, we find Nu <= 1 + 0 . 035 Ra and Γ ~ Ra - 1 / 2 for porous medium convection (which occurs with fixed energy), and Nu <= 1 + 0 . 115 Ra 5 / 12 and Γ ~ Ra - 1 / 4 for Rayleigh-Bénard convection (which occurs with fixed enstrophy and for free-slip walls). This work was supported by NSF awards PHY-0855335, DMS-0927587, and PHY-1205219 (CRD) and DMS-0928098 (GPC). Much of this work was completed at the 2012 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (GFD) Program at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

  1. CA3 Synaptic Silencing Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Seizures and Hippocampal Network Oscillations123

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lily M. Y.; Wintzer, Marie E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Epilepsy is a neurological disorder defined by the presence of seizure activity, manifest both behaviorally and as abnormal activity in neuronal networks. An established model to study the disorder in rodents is the systemic injection of kainic acid, an excitatory neurotoxin that at low doses quickly induces behavioral and electrophysiological seizures. Although the CA3 region of the hippocampus has been suggested to be crucial for kainic acid-induced seizure, because of its strong expression of kainate glutamate receptors and its high degree of recurrent connectivity, the precise role of excitatory transmission in CA3 in the generation of seizure and the accompanying increase in neuronal oscillations remains largely untested. Here we use transgenic mice in which CA3 pyramidal cell synaptic transmission can be inducibly silenced in the adult to demonstrate CA3 excitatory output is required for both the generation of epileptiform oscillatory activity and the progression of behavioral seizures. PMID:27022627

  2. Detecting Cellulase Penetration Into Corn Stover Cell Walls by Immuno-Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Donohoe, B. S.; Selig, M. J.; Viamajala, S.; Vinzant, T. B.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.

    2009-06-15

    In general, pretreatments are designed to enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymes, allowing for more efficient conversion. In this study, we have detected the penetration of major cellulases present in a commercial enzyme preparation (Spezyme CP) into corn stem cell walls following mild-, moderate- and high-severity dilute sulfuric acid pretreatments. The Trichoderma reesei enzymes, Cel7A (CBH I) and Cel7B (EG I), as well as the cell wall matrix components xylan and lignin were visualized within digested corn stover cell walls by immuno transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using enzyme- and polymer-specific antibodies. Low severity dilute-acid pretreatment (20 min at 100 C) enabled <1% of the thickness of secondary cell walls to be penetrated by enzyme, moderate severity pretreatment at (20 min at 120 C) allowed the enzymes to penetrate {approx}20% of the cell wall, and the high severity (20 min pretreatment at 150 C) allowed 100% penetration of even the thickest cell walls. These data allow direct visualization of the dramatic effect dilute-acid pretreatment has on altering the condensed ultrastructure of biomass cell walls. Loosening of plant cell wall structure due to pretreatment and the subsequently improved access by cellulases has been hypothesized by the biomass conversion community for over two decades, and for the first time, this study provides direct visual evidence to verify this hypothesis. Further, the high-resolution enzyme penetration studies presented here provide insight into the mechanisms of cell wall deconstruction by cellulolytic enzymes.

  3. Heat shock protein 70-dependent protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ying; Naito, Yuji; Handa, Osamu; Hayashi, Natsuko; Kuki, Aiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yuko; Morita, Mayuko; Adachi, Satoko; Fukui, Akifumi; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Kishimoto, Etsuko; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-11-01

    Protection of the small intestine from mucosal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid is a critical issue in the field of gastroenterology. Polaprezinc an anti-ulcer drug, consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, provides gastric mucosal protection against various irritants. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of the RIE1 rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Confluent rat intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with 70 µM polaprezinc for 24 h, and then stimulated with or without 15 mM acetylsalicylic acid for a further 15 h. Subsequent cellular viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced cell death was also qualified by fluorescent microscopy of Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide. Heat shock proteins 70 protein expression after adding polaprezinc or acetylsalicylic acid was assessed by western blotting. To investigate the role of Heat shock protein 70, Heat shock protein 70-specific small interfering RNA was applied. Cell viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining and apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that acetylsalicylic acid significantly induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Polaprezinc significantly suppressed acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells at its late phase. At the same time, polaprezinc increased Heat shock protein 70 expressions of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. However, in Heat shock protein 70-silenced rat intestinal epithelial cells, polaprezinc could not suppress acetylsalicylic acid -induced apoptosis at its late phase. We conclude that polaprezinc-increased Heat shock protein 70 expression might be an important mechanism by which polaprezinc suppresses acetylsalicylic

  4. Neuroprotective effects of butterbur and rough aster against kainic Acid-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang Hee; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2005-01-01

    The separate and combined neuroprotective effects of rough aster (Aster scaber) and butterbur (Petasite japonicus) extracts against oxidative damage in the brain of mice challenged with kainic acid were examined by comparing behavioral changes and biochemical parameters of oxidative stress. Rough aster butanol extract (400 mg/kg) and/or butterbur butanol extract (150 or 400 mg/kg) were administered to male ICR mice, 6-8 weeks old, through a gavage for 4 days consecutively, and on day 4, kainic acid (50 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally. Compared with the vehicle-treated control, no significant changes in body and brain weight were observed in mice administered rough aster or butterbur butanol extract. Administration of kainic acid only, causing a lethality of approximately 54%, resulted in a significant decrease of total glutathione level and increase of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) value in brain tissue. The administration of butterbur or rough aster extract (400 mg/kg) decreased the lethality (50%) of kainic acid to 25%, alleviated the behavioral signs of neurotoxicity, restored the cytosolic glutathione level of brain homogenate to approximately 80% (P < .05), and reduced kainic acid-induced increases in TBARS values. In contrast to no significant neuroprotection by butterbur extract at a low dose (150 mg/kg), the combination of rough aster extract and butterbur extract reduced the lethality to 12.5%. Moreover, the combination delayed the onset time of behavioral signs by twofold, and significantly preserved the level of cytosolic glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities. However, the other biochemical parameters were not altered significantly by the combination. Thus, the combination of two vegetable extracts significantly increased the neuroprotective action against kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. Based on these findings, the combination of butterbur extract and rough aster extract contains a functional agent or

  5. The Ayurvedic drug, Ksheerabala, ameliorates quinolinic acid-induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Swathy, S S; Indira, M

    2010-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of neurotoxicity is the induction of oxidative stress. There is hardly any cure for neurotoxicity in modern medicine, whereas many drugs in Ayurveda possess neuroprotective effects; however, there is no scientific validation for these drugs. Ksheerabala is an ayurvedic drug which is used to treat central nervous system disorders, arthritis, and insomnia. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of Ksheerabala on quinolinic acid-induced toxicity in rat brain. The optimal dose of Ksheerabala was found from a dose escalation study, wherein it was found that Ksheerabala showed maximum protection against quinolinic acid-induced neurotoxicity at a dose of 15 microL/100 g body weight/day, which was selected for further experiments. Four groups of female albino rats were maintained for 21 days as follows: 1. Control group, 2. Quinolinic acid (55 microg/100 g body weight), 3. Ksheerabala (15 microL/100 g body weight), 4. Ksheerabala (15 microL/100 g body weight) + Quinolinic acid (55 microg/100 g body weight). At the end of the experimental period, levels of lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonyls, and activities of scavenging enzymes were analyzed. The results revealed that quinolinic acid intake caused enhanced lipid and protein peroxidation as evidenced by increased levels of peroxidation products such as malondialdehyde, hydroperoxide, conjugated dienes, and protein carbonyls. On the other hand, the activities of scavenging enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase as well as the concentration of glutathione were reduced. On coadminstration of Ksheerabala along with quinolinic acid, the levels of all the biochemical parameters were restored to near-normal levels, indicating the protective effect of the drug. These results were reinforced by histopathological studies.

  6. Proteomic investigation into betulinic acid-induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Pang, Qiuying; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Aiqin; Luo, Shaman; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid that exhibits anticancer functions in human cancer cells. This study provides evidence that betulinic acid is highly effective against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by inducing dose- and time-dependent apoptosis. The apoptotic process was further investigated using a proteomics approach to reveal protein expression changes in HeLa cells following betulinic acid treatment. Proteomic analysis revealed that there were six up- and thirty down-regulated proteins in betulinic acid-induced HeLa cells, and these proteins were then subjected to functional pathway analysis using multiple analysis software. UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decarboxylating, chain A Horf6-a novel human peroxidase enzyme that involved in redox process, was found to be down-regulated during the apoptosis process of the oxidative stress response pathway. Consistent with our results at the protein level, an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in betulinic acid-treated cells. The proteins glucose-regulated protein and cargo-selection protein TIP47, which are involved in the endoplasmic reticulum pathway, were up-regulated by betulinic acid treatment. Meanwhile, 14-3-3 family proteins, including 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε, were down-regulated in response to betulinic acid treatment, which is consistent with the decrease in expression of the target genes 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε. Furthermore, it was found that the antiapoptotic bcl-2 gene was down-regulated while the proapoptotic bax gene was up-regulated after betulinic acid treatment in HeLa cells. These results suggest that betulinic acid induces apoptosis of HeLa cells by triggering both the endoplasmic reticulum pathway and the ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

  7. DIBROMOACETIC ACID-INDUCED ELEVATIONS OF ESTRADIOL IN THE CYCLING AND OVARIECTOMOZED/ESTRADIOL-IMPLANTED FEMALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Goldman, JM and Murr, AS. Dibromoacetic Acid-induced Elevations of Estradiol in Both Cycling and Ovariectomized / Estradiol-implanted Female Rats

    ABSTRACT
    Haloacetic acids are one of the principal classes of disinfection by-products generated by the chlorination of mun...

  8. DIBROMOACETIC ACID-INDUCED ELEVATIONS IN CIRCULATING ESTRADIOL: EFFECTS IN BOTH CYCLING AND OVARIECTOMIZED/STEROID-PRIMED FEMALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    RTD-03-031
    Goldman, JM and Murr, AS. Dibromoacetic Acid-induced Elevations in Circulating Estradiol: Effects in Both Cycling and Ovariectomized/Steroid-primed Female Rats. Reproductive Toxicology (in press).

    Abstract

    Oral exposures to high concentrations of th...

  9. Rapid regulatory control of plant cell expansion and wall relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1991-08-14

    The aim of this project is to elucidate the biophysical and cellular mechanisms that control plant cell expansion. At present we are attempting to characterize the kinetics of the system(s) responsible for regulatory and compensatory behavior of growing cells and tissues. This work is significantly because it indicates that biochemical loosening and biophysical stress relaxation of the wall are part of a feedback loop controlling growth. This report briefly summarizes the efforts and results of the past 12 months. In large part, we have been trying to analyze the nature of growth rate noise,'' i.e. spontaneous and often erratic variations in growth rate. We are obtaining evidence that such noise'' is not random, but rather reveals an underlying growth mechanism with complex dynamics.

  10. Transcriptional analysis of the acid-inducible asr gene in enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    Seputiene, Vaida; Suziedelis, Kestutis; Normark, Staffan; Melefors, Ojar; Suziedeliene, Edita

    2004-09-01

    We show here that transcription of the asr gene in Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae is strongly dependent on the acidification level of the growth medium, with maximal induction at pH 4.0-4.5 as determined by Northern hybridization analysis. Previous gene array analyses have also shown that asr is the most acid-induced gene in the E. coli genome. Sequence alignment of the asr promoters from different enterobacterial species identified a highly conserved region located at position -70 to -30 relative to the asr transcriptional start site. By deletion of various segments of this region in the E. coli asr promoter it was shown that sequences upstream from the -40 position were important for induction. Transcription from the E. coli asr promoter was demonstrated to be growth-phase-dependent and to require the alternative sigma factor RpoS (sigma(S)) in stationary phase. Transcription of the asr gene was also found to be subject to negative control by the nucleoid protein H-NS.

  11. CCN1 is critical for acid-induced esophageal epithelial cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Modak, Cristina; Mouazzen, Wasim; Narvaez, Reinier; Reavis, Kevin M; Chai, Jianyuan

    2010-02-19

    CCN1 is a matricellular protein involved in both wound healing and cancer cell invasion. Increased CCN1 expression has been associated with the development of Barrett's esophagus and the increased risk of progression to esophageal adenocarcinoma. In both cases, acid reflux is a major contributor. Low pH has been shown to induce CCN1 gene expression in esophageal epithelial cells. Here we demonstrated that both CCN1 and low pH could cause esophageal epithelial cell transformation, including loss of E-cadherin, disruption of cell-cell junctions, and expression of mesenchymal markers. Furthermore, knockdown of CCN1 through RNA interference sufficiently attenuated acid-driven cell phenotypic changes, while over-expression of CCN1 exacerbated these effects, indicating a critical role of CCN1 in acid-induced esophageal epithelial cell transformation. Given the pivotal role of low pH in gastro-esophageal reflux disease and its progression towards esophageal adenocarcinoma, our study identified CCN1 as a key molecule mediating this process.

  12. Acid-induced gelation behavior of casein/whey protein solutions assessed by oscillatory rheology.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mahboubeh; Madadlou, Ashkan; Khosrowshahi, Asghar; Mohammadifar, Mohammadamin

    2014-09-01

    Gelation process of acid-induced casein gels was studied using response surface method (RSM). Ratio of casein to whey proteins, incubation and heating temperatures were independent variables. Final storage modulus (G') measured 200 min after the addition of glucono-δ-lactone and the gelation time i.e. the time at which G' of gels became greater than 1 Pa were the parameters studied. Incubation temperature strongly affected both parameters. The higher the incubation temperature, the lower was the G' and the shorter the gelation time. Increased heating temperature however, increased the G' but again shortened the gelation time. Increase in G' was attributed to the formation of disulphide cross-linkages between denatured whey proteins and casein chains; whilst the latter was legitimized by considering the higher isoelectric pH of whey proteins. Maximum response (G' = 268.93 Pa) was obtained at 2.7 % w/w, 25 °C and 90 °C for casein content, incubation and heating temperatures, respectively.

  13. Folic acid induces salicylic acid-dependent immunity in Arabidopsis and enhances susceptibility to Alternaria brassicicola.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Finni; Kanawati, Basem; Wenig, Marion; Hoffmann, Thomas; Franz-Oberdorf, Katrin; Schwab, Wilfried; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Vlot, A Corina

    2015-08-01

    Folates are essential for one-carbon transfer reactions in all organisms and contribute, for example, to de novo DNA synthesis. Here, we detected the folate precursors 7,8-dihydropteroate (DHP) and 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate (ADC) in extracts from Arabidopsis thaliana plants by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry. The accumulation of DHP, but not ADC, was induced after infection of plants with Pseudomonas syringae delivering the effector protein AvrRpm1. Application of folic acid or the DHP precursor 7,8-dihydroneopterin (DHN) enhanced resistance in Arabidopsis to P. syringae and elevated the transcript accumulation of the salicylic acid (SA) marker gene pathogenesis-related1 in both the treated and systemic untreated leaves. DHN- and folic acid-induced systemic resistance was dependent on SA biosynthesis and signalling. Similar to SA, folic acid application locally enhanced Arabidopsis susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola. Together, the data associate the folic acid pathway with innate immunity in Arabidopsis, simultaneously activating local and systemic SA-dependent resistance to P. syringae and suppressing local resistance to A. brassicicola.

  14. Acupuncture suppresses kainic acid-induced neuronal death and inflammatory events in mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Tae; Doo, Ah-Reum; Kim, Seung-Nam; Kim, Song-Yi; Kim, Yoon Young; Kim, Jang-Hyun; Lee, Hyejung; Yin, Chang Shik; Park, Hi-Joon

    2012-09-01

    The administration of kainic acid (KA) causes seizures and produces neurodegeneration in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells. The present study investigated a possible role of acupuncture in reducing hippocampal cell death and inflammatory events, using a mouse model of kainic acid-induced epilepsy. Male C57BL/6 mice received acupuncture treatments at acupoint HT8 or in the tail area bilaterally once a day for 2 days and again immediately after an intraperitoneal injection of KA (30 mg/kg). HT8 is located on the palmar surface of the forelimbs, between the fourth and fifth metacarpal bones. Twenty-four hours after the KA injection, neuronal cell survival, the activations of microglia and astrocytes, and mRNA expression of two proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), were measured in the hippocampus. Acupuncture stimulation at HT8, but not in the tail area, significantly reduced the KA-induced seizure, neuron death, microglial and astrocyte activations, and IL-1β mRNA expression in the hippocampus. The acupuncture stimulation also decreased the mRNA expression of TNF-α, but it was not significant. These results indicate that acupuncture at HT8 can inhibit hippocampal cell death and suppress KA-induced inflammatory events, suggesting a possible role for acupuncture in the treatment of epilepsy.

  15. Ethanol promotes saturated fatty acid-induced hepatoxicity through endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hong-Wei; Ma, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Wang, Cui-Fen; Lu, Jian; Cao, Wei; Wu, Xu-Dong

    2015-04-01

    Serum palmitic acid (PA), a type of saturated fatty acid, causes lipid accumulation and induces toxicity in hepatocytes. Ethanol (EtOH) is metabolized by the liver and induces hepatic injury and inflammation. Herein, we analyzed the effects of EtOH on PA-induced lipotoxicity in the liver. Our results indicated that EtOH aggravated PA-induced apoptosis and lipid accumulation in primary rat hepatocytes in dose-dependent manner. EtOH intensified PA-caused endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in vitro and in vivo, and the expressions of CHOP, ATF4, and XBP-1 in nucleus were significantly increased. EtOH also increased PA-caused cleaved caspase-3 in cytoplasm. In wild type and CHOP(-/-) mice treated with EtOH and high fat diet (HFD), EtOH worsened the HFD-induced liver injury and dyslipidemia, while CHOP knockout blocked toxic effects of EtOH and PA. Our study suggested that targeting UPR-signaling pathways is a promising, novel approach to reducing EtOH and saturated fatty acid-induced metabolic complications.

  16. The saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid, induces anxiety-like behavior in mice

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Morgan L.; Joesting, Jennifer J.; Lawson, Marcus A.; Chiu, Gabriel S.; Blevins, Neil A.; Kwakwa, Kristin A.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Excess fat in the diet can impact neuropsychiatric functions by negatively affecting cognition, mood and anxiety. We sought to show that the free fatty acid (FFA), palmitic acid, can cause adverse biobehaviors in mice that lasts beyond an acute elevation in plasma FFAs. Methods Mice were administered palmitic acid or vehicle as a single intraperitoneal (IP) injection. Biobehaviors were profiled 2 and 24 hrs after palmitic acid treatment. Quantification of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), serotonin (5-HT) and their major metabolites was performed in cortex, hippocampus and amygdala. FFA concentration was determined in plasma. Relative fold change in mRNA expression of unfolded protein response (UPR)-associated genes was determined in brain regions. Results In a dose-dependent fashion, palmitic acid rapidly reduced mouse locomotor activity by a mechanism that did not rely on TLR4, MyD88, IL-1, IL-6 or TNFα but was dependent on fatty acid chain length. Twenty-four hrs after palmitic acid administration mice exhibited anxiety-like behavior without impairment in locomotion, food intake, depressive-like behavior or spatial memory. Additionally, the serotonin metabolite 5-HIAA was increased by 33% in the amygdala 24 hrs after palmitic acid treatment. Conclusions Palmitic acid induces anxiety-like behavior in mice while increasing amygdala-based serotonin metabolism. These effects occur at a time point when plasma FFA levels are no longer elevated. PMID:25016520

  17. Palmitoleic acid induces the cardiac mitochondrial membrane permeability transition despite the presence of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Oyanagi, Eri; Uchida, Masataka; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Miyachi, Motohiko; Yamaguchi, Hidetaka; Nagami, Kuniatsu; Utsumi, Kozo; Yano, Hiromi

    Although palmitoleic acid (C16:1) is associated with arrhythmias, and increases in an age-dependent matter, the effects of L-carnitine, which is essential for the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria, are unclear. It has been postulated that L-carnitine may attenuate palmitate (C16:0)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. The aim of this study was to elucidate the activity of L-carnitine in the prevention of the palmitoleic acid-induced mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and cytochrome c release using isolated cardiac mitochondria from rats. Palmitoleoyl-CoA-induced mitochondrial respiration was not accelerated by L-carnitine treatment, and this respiration was slightly inhibited by oligomycin, which is an inhibitor of ATP synthase. Despite pretreatment with L-carnitine, the mitochondrial membrane potential decreased and mitochondrial swelling was induced by palmitoleoyl-CoA. In the presence of a combination of L-carnitine and tiron, a free radical scavenger, there was attenuated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release following palmitoleoyl-CoA treatment. We concluded that palmitoleic acid, but not palmitate, induces the cardiac mitochondrial membrane permeability transition despite the presence of L-carnitine.

  18. Bile acid induced colonic irritation stimulates intracolonic nitric oxide release in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, F; Mourelle, M; Papo, M; Guarner, F; Antolin, M; Armengol, J R; Malagelada, J R

    1996-01-01

    AIM--To measure the intracolonic release of nitric oxide end products (nitrates plus nitrites) and eicosanoids in response to intraluminal irritation with deoxycholic acid (DCA). PATIENTS--Seven patients with irritable bowel syndrome. METHODS--The left colon was perfused with a solution with or without 3 mM deoxycholic acid. Aspirates were assayed for eicosanoids by specific radioimmuno-assay, and for nitrates plus nitrites by the Griess reaction. To confirm that stimulated colonic mucosa can produce nitric oxide (NO), ancillary studies were performed in vitro using samples of normal mucosa obtained from five surgically resected colons. Samples were incubated for 30 minutes in Kreb's solution, 3 mM DCA or DCA with 1 mM L-nitro-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME) to inhibit the NO synthase. Finally, NO synthase activity was measured in five samples of human colonic mucosa. RESULTS--Intracolonic release of nitrates plus nitrites was basally undetectable in six of seven patients. Bile acid considerably increased the release of prostaglandin E2 and nitrates plus nitrites (p < 0.01). By contrast, no increase in thromboxane and leukotriene was seen. In vitro mucosal incubation with DCA increased the production of NO synthase products, which was blocked by L-NAME. Activity of Ca+2 independent NO synthase was detectable in four of five samples of human colonic mucosa. CONCLUSION--The human colonic mucosa responds to bile acid induced irritation by a surge in NO generation via NO synthase. PMID:8707118

  19. Saturated phosphatidic acids mediate saturated fatty acid-induced vascular calcification and lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Masashi; Miyazaki-Anzai, Shinobu; Keenan, Audrey L; Okamura, Kayo; Kendrick, Jessica; Chonchol, Michel; Offermanns, Stefan; Ntambi, James M; Kuro-O, Makoto; Miyazaki, Makoto

    2015-10-26

    Recent evidence indicates that saturated fatty acid-induced (SFA-induced) lipotoxicity contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms that underlie SFA-induced lipotoxicity remain unclear. Here, we have shown that repression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) enzymes, which regulate the intracellular balance of SFAs and unsaturated FAs, and the subsequent accumulation of SFAs in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), are characteristic events in the development of vascular calcification. We evaluated whether SMC-specific inhibition of SCD and the resulting SFA accumulation plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification and generated mice with SMC-specific deletion of both Scd1 and Scd2. Mice lacking both SCD1 and SCD2 in SMCs displayed severe vascular calcification with increased ER stress. Moreover, we employed shRNA library screening and radiolabeling approaches, as well as in vitro and in vivo lipidomic analysis, and determined that fully saturated phosphatidic acids such as 1,2-distearoyl-PA (18:0/18:0-PA) mediate SFA-induced lipotoxicity and vascular calcification. Together, these results identify a key lipogenic pathway in SMCs that mediates vascular calcification.

  20. Effect of galactose on acid induced molten globule state of Soybean Agglutinin: Biophysical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Parvez; Naseem, Farha; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2015-11-01

    In the present study the formation of molten globule-like unfolding intermediate Soybean Agglutinin (SBA) in acidic pH range has been established with the help of acrylamide quenching, intrinsic fluorescence, ANS fluorescence measurement, far UV CD and dynamic light scattering measurement. A marked increase in ANS fluorescence was observed at pH 2.2. Ksv of acrylamide quenching was found to be higher at pH 2.2 than that of native SBA at pH 7. Far UV CD spectra of pH induced state suggest that SBA shows significant retention of secondary structure closure to native. Hydrodynamic radius of SBA at pH 2.2 was found be more as compared to native state and also in other pH induced states. Further we checked the effect of galactose on the molten globule state of SBA. This study suggests that SBA exist as molten globule at pH 2.2 and this study will help in acid induced molten globule state of other proteins.

  1. Pulmonary vasoconstriction in oleic acid induced lung injury. A morphometric study.

    PubMed Central

    Grotjohan, H. P.; van der Heijde, R. M.; Wagenvoort, C. A.; Wagenvoort, N.; Versprille, A.

    1993-01-01

    Distribution and severity of active vasoconstriction of muscular pulmonary arteries were morphometrically assessed in anaesthetized, paralysed and mechanically ventilated pigs with respiratory distress, induced by oleic acid. Vasoconstriction was deduced from the medial thickness which was measured and expressed as a percentage of external diameter. Six pigs received oleic acid (0.12 +/- 0.07 ml/kg), dissolved 1:1 in 96% alcohol, in multiple injections of 0.1 ml. Six pigs were used as controls. After the oleic acid injections a stable hypoxaemia (PaO2 = 57 +/- 8 mmHg, at an inspiratory oxygen fraction of 0.6) and pulmonary hypertension (mean Ppa = 36 +/- 2 mmHg) were obtained for several hours. Electron microscopy revealed swelling of endothelial cells with signs of degeneration. Medial thickness was far greater in the oleic acid group than in the control group; overall mean values were 8.1 +/- 3.2 and 3.8 +/- 1.7% respectively (P < 0.001). Arteries with prominent vasoconstriction were lying in clusters. This pattern was the same in dependent and non-dependent regions. We concluded that in oleic acid induced respiratory distress active vasoconstriction of muscular pulmonary arteries is an important factor in the development of pulmonary hypertension. Besides vasoconstriction, endothelial swelling and intravascular clotting may contribute to the development of pulmonary hypertension. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8398807

  2. Tanshinone IIA Protects Against Folic Acid-Induced Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunming; Zhu, Wei; Shao, Qiuyuan; Yan, Xiang; Jin, Bo; Zhang, Miao; Xu, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA is a diterpene extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza, a popular and safe herb medicine that has been widely used in China and other Asian countries. Previous studies have demonstrated the pleiotropic effects of Tanshinone IIA on many disease treatments via its antitoxicity, anti-inflammation, anti-oxidative stress, as well as antifibrosis activities. However, its effect on acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been fully investigated. Here, we show for the first time that systemic administration of Tanshinone IIA can lead to improved kidney function in folic acid-induced kidney injury mice. In the acute phase of AKI, Tanshinone IIA attenuated renal tubular epithelial injury, as determined by histologic changes and the detection of Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in the kidney and urine. Additionally, Tanshinone IIA treatment resulted in elevated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression and decreased inflammatory cells infiltration as well as chemokine expression, suggesting that Tanshinone IIA promoted renal repair following AKI and inhibited local inflammatory response in the injured kidney. This led to decreased long-term fibrosis in the injured kidney, characterized by less accumulation of fibronectin and collagen I in tubulointerstitium. Taken together, these results suggest that Tanshinone IIA may represent a potential approach for AKI treatment.

  3. Targeting oxidative stress attenuates malonic acid induced Huntington like behavioral and mitochondrial alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2010-05-25

    Objective of the present study was to explore the possible role of oxidative stress in the malonic acid induced behavioral, biochemical and mitochondrial alterations in rats. In the present study, unilateral single injections of malonic acid at different doses (1.5, 3 and 6 micromol) were made into the ipsilateral striatum in rats. Behavioral parameters were accessed on 1st, 7th and 14th day post malonic acid administration. Oxidative stress parameters and mitochondrial enzyme functions were assessed on day 14 after behavioral observations. Ipsilateral striatal malonic acid (3 and 6 micromol) administration significantly reduced body weight, locomotor activity, motor coordination and caused oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation, nitrite, superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione) in the striatum as compared to sham treated animal. Mitochondrial enzyme complexes and MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolinium bromide) activity were significantly inhibited by malonic acid. Vitamin E treatment (50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly reversed the various behavioral, biochemical and mitochondrial alterations in malonic acid treated animals. Our findings show that targeting oxidative stress by vitamin E in malonic acid model, results in amelioration of behavioral and mitochondrial alterations are linked to inhibition of oxidative damage. Based upon these finding present study hypothesize that protection exerted by vitamin E on behavioral, mitochondrial markers indicates the possible preservation of the functional status of the striatal neurons by targeting the deleterious actions of oxidative stress.

  4. Tiagabine treatment in kainic acid induced cerebellar lesion of dystonia rat model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tsui-chin; Ngampramuan, Sukonthar; Kotchabhakdi, Naiphinich

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological disorder characterized by excessive involuntary muscle contractions that lead to twisting movements. The exaggerated movements have been studied and have implicated basal ganglia as the point of origin. In more recent studies, the cerebellum has also been identified as the possible target of dystonia, in the search for alternative treatments. Tiagabine is a selective GABA transporter inhibitor, which blocks the reuptake and recycling of GABA. The study of GABAergic drugs as an alternative treatment for cerebellar induced dystonia has not been reported. In our study, tiagabine was i.p. injected into kainic acid induced, cerebellar dystonic adult rats, and the effects were compared with non-tiagabine injected and sham-operated groups. Beam walking apparatus, telemetric electromyography (EMG) recording, and histological verification were performed to confirm dystonic symptoms in the rats on post-surgery treatment. Involuntary dystonic spasm was observed with repetitive rigidity, and twisting movements in the rats were also confirmed by a high score on the dystonic scoring and a high amplitude on the EMG data. The rats with tiagabine treatment were scored based on motor amelioration assessed via beam walking. The result of this study suggests and confirms that low dose of kainic acid microinjection is sufficient to induce dystonia from the cerebellar vermis. In addition, from the results of the EMG recording and the behavioral assessment through beam walking, tiagabine is demonstrated as being effective in reducing dystonic spasm and may be a possible alternative therapeutic drug in the treatment of dystonia. PMID:28337103

  5. Wall surveyor project report

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, D.J.; Johnston, B.C.; Azevedo, S.G.

    1996-02-22

    A report is made on the demonstration of a first-generation Wall Surveyor that is capable of surveying the interior and thickness of a stone, brick, or cement wall. LLNL`s Micropower Impulse Radar is used, based on emitting and detecting very low amplitude and short microwave impulses (MIR rangefinder). Six test walls were used. While the demonstrator MIR Wall Surveyor is not fieldable yet, it has successfully scanned the test walls and produced real-time images identifying the walls. It is planned to optimize and package the evaluation wall surveyor into a hand held unit.

  6. Ibandronate and cementless total hip arthroplasty: densitometric measurement of periprosthetic bone mass and new therapeutic approach to the prevention of aseptic loosening

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Maurizio; Quarta, Eugenio; Quarta, Laura; Calcagnile, Fabio; Grimaldi, Antonella; Orgiani, M. Antonio; Marsilio, Antonio; Rollo, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Summary Studies of the mechanisms of periprosthetic bone loss have led to the development of pharmacologic strategies intended to enhance bone mass recovery after surgery and consequently prevent aseptic loosening and prolong the implant survival. Bisphosphonates, potent anti-resorptive drugs widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and other disorders of bone metabolism, were shown to be particularly effective in reducing periprosthetic bone resorption in the first year after hip and knee arthroplasty, both cemented and cementless. Based on these results, we investigated the inhibitory effects of ibandronate on periprosthetic bone loss in a 2-year study of postmenopausal women that underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty. In the first 6 months both groups (A, treated with ibandronate 3 mg i.v. within five days after surgery and then with oral ibandronate 150 mg/month, plus calcium and vitamin D supplementation; and B, treated with calcium and vitamin D supplementation only) experienced bone loss, though to a lesser extent in group A. After 12 months, group A showed a remarkable BMD recovery, that was statistically significant versus baseline values (about +1, 74% of global BMD) and most evident in region R1 (+3, 81%) and R2 (+4, 12%); in group B, on the contrary, BMD values were unchanged compared with those at 6 months post-surgery. Quality of life scores also showed a greater improvement in group A, both at 6 and 12 months after surgery, likely because of the pain-reducing effects of ibandronate treatment. PMID:22783337

  7. If walls could talk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braam, J.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The plant cell wall is very complex, both in structure and function. The wall components and the mechanical properties of the wall have been implicated in conveying information that is important for morphogenesis. Proteoglycans, fragments of polysaccharides and the structural integrity of the wall may relay signals that influence cellular differentiation and growth control. Furthering our knowledge of cell wall structure and function is likely to have a profound impact on our understanding of how plant cells communicate with the extracellular environment.

  8. The Acid Growth Theory of auxin-induced cell elongation is alive and well

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rayle, D. L.; Cleland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Plant cells elongate irreversibly only when load-bearing bonds in the walls are cleaved. Auxin causes the elongation of stem and coleoptile cells by promoting wall loosening via cleavage of these bonds. This process may be coupled with the intercalation of new cell wall polymers. Because the primary site of auxin action appears to be the plasma membrane or some intracellular site, and wall loosening is extracellular, there must be communication between the protoplast and the wall. Some "wall-loosening factor" must be exported from auxin-impacted cells, which sets into motion the wall loosening events. About 20 years ago, it was suggested that the wall-loosening factor is hydrogen ions. This idea and subsequent supporting data gave rise to the Acid Growth Theory, which states that when exposed to auxin, susceptible cells excrete protons into the wall (apoplast) at an enhanced rate, resulting in a decrease in apoplastic pH. The lowered wall pH then activates wall-loosening processes, the precise nature of which is unknown. Because exogenous acid causes a transient (1-4 h) increase in growth rate, auxin must also mediate events in addition to wall acidification for growth to continue for an extended period of time. These events may include osmoregulation, cell wall synthesis, and maintenance of the capacity of walls to undergo acid-induced wall loosening. At present, we do not know if these phenomena are tightly coupled to wall acidification or if they are the products of multiple independent signal transduction pathways.

  9. Studies on the control of plant cell enlargement by cellular parameters: Progress report, July 1, 1987-June 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, R.E.

    1988-06-20

    The overall goal of this research is to determine the mechanisms by which the hormone auxin regulates plant cell enlargement. A general picture of one mechanism, the acid-growth mechanism, has emerged, largely from studies in this laboratory on Avena coleoptiles. It states that in auxin-responsive stem and coleoptile cells, auxin enhances the rate of excretion of protons from the cells. The resulting lowered pH in the apoplastic solution activates enzymes in the wall which cleave load-bearing bonds. The resulting wall loosening permits the cell to take up water, enlarge and extend the wall. Auxin plays additional roles in cell enlargement through effects on wall synthesis and protein synthesis; however, these effects result in the maintenance of the acid-induced wall loosening process but do not initiate wall loosening. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Tachykinin inhibition of acid-induced gastric hyperaemia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, A.; Jocic, M.; Herzeg, G.; Holzer, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. Primary afferent neurones releasing the vasodilator, calcitonin gene-related peptide, mediate the gastric hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion. The tachykinins neurokinin A (NKA) and substance P (SP) are located in the same neurones and are co-released with calcitonin gene-related peptide. In this study we investigated the effect and possible role of tachykinins in the acid-evoked gastric vasodilatation in urethane-anaesthetized rats. 2. Gastric acid back-diffusion, induced by perfusing the stomach with 15% ethanol in the presence of 0.05 M HCl, increased gastric mucosal blood flow by 60-90%, as determined by the hydrogen clearance technique. NKA and SP (0.14-3.78 nmol min-1 kg-1, infused intra-aortically) inhibited the gastric mucosal hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion in a dose-dependent manner, an effect that was accompanied by aggravation of ethanol/acid-induced macroscopic haemorrhagic lesions. 3. The inhibitory effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) on the acid-induced gastric mucosal vasodilatation was prevented by the tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonists, MEN 10,627 (200 nmol kg-1) but left unaltered by the NK1 receptor antagonist, SR 140,333 (300 nmol kg-1) and the mast-cell stabilizer, ketotifen (4.6 mumol kg-1). 4. Under basal conditions, with 0.05 M HCl being perfused through the stomach, NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) reduced gastric mucosal blood flow by about 25%, an effect that was abolished by SR 140,333 but not MEN 10,627 or ketotifen. 5. SR 140,333, MEN 10,627 or ketotifen had no significant effect on basal gastric mucosal blood flow nor did they modify the gastric mucosal hyperaemic reaction to acid back-diffusion. 6. The effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) in causing vasoconstriction and inhibiting the vasodilator response to acid back-diffusion was also seen when blood flow in the left gastric artery was measured with the ultrasonic transit time shift technique. 7. Arginine vasopressin (AVP, 0.1 nmol min-1 kg-1) induced gastric

  11. Pistacia lentiscus resin regulates intestinal damage and inflammation in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Gioxari, Aristea; Kaliora, Andriana C; Papalois, Apostolos; Agrogiannis, George; Triantafillidis, John K; Andrikopoulos, Nikolaos K

    2011-11-01

    Mastic (Pistacia lentiscus) of the Anacardiaceae family has exhibited anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties in patients with Crohn's disease. This study was based on the hypothesis that mastic inhibits intestinal damage in inflammatory bowel disease, regulating inflammation and oxidative stress in intestinal epithelium. Four different dosages of P. lentiscus powder in the form of powder were administered orally to trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitic rats. Eighty-four male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to seven groups: A, control; B, colitic; C-F, colitic rats daily supplemented with P. lentiscus powder at (C) 50 mg/kg, (D) 100 mg/kg, (E) 200 mg/kg, and (F) 300 mg/kg of body weight; and G, colitic rats treated daily with cortisone (25 μg/kg of body weight). Colonic damage was assessed microscopically. The cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and IL-10 and malonaldehyde were measured in colonic specimens. Results were expressed as mean ± SE values. Histological amelioration of colitis (P≤.001) and significant differences in colonic indices occurred after 3 days of treatment. Daily administration of 100 mg of P. lentiscus powder/kg of body weight decreased all inflammatory cytokines (P≤.05), whereas 50 mg of P. lentiscus powder/kg of body weight and cortisone treatment reduced only ICAM-1 (P≤.05 and P≤.01, respectively). Malonaldehyde was significantly suppressed in all treated groups (P≤.01). IL-10 remained unchanged. Cytokines and malonaldehyde remained unaltered after 6 days of treatment. Thus P. lentiscus powder could possibly have a therapeutic role in Crohn's disease, regulating oxidant/antioxidant balance and modulating inflammation.

  12. Praeruptorin D and E attenuate lipopolysaccharide/hydrochloric acid induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng-Jiu; Li, Jing-Rong; Zhu, Zheng-Guang; Kong, Huan-Yu; Jin, Hong; Zhang, Jun-Yan; Tian, Yuan-Xin; Li, Zhong-Huang; Wu, Xiao-Yun; Zhang, Jia-Jie; Wu, Shu-Guang

    2013-06-15

    Acute lung injury is a life-threatening syndrome characterized by overwhelming lung inflammation and increased microvascular permeability, which causes a high mortality rate worldwide. The dry root of Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn has been long used to treat respiratory diseases in China. In the present study, Praeruptorin A, C, D and E (PA, PC, PD and PE), four pyranocoumarins extracted from this herb, have been investigated for the pharmacological effects in experimental lung injury mouse models. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenged mice, PA and PC did not show protective effect against lung injury at the dose of 80 mg/kg. However, PD and PE significantly inhibited the infiltration of activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and decreased the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at the same dose. There was no statistically significant difference between PD and PE group. Further study demonstrated that PD and PE suppressed protein extravasations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, attenuated myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and the pathological changes in the lung. Both PD and PE suppressed LPS induced Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway activation in the lung by decreasing the cytoplasmic loss of Inhibitor κB-α (IκB-α) protein and inhibiting the translocation of p65 from cytoplasm to nucleus. We also extended our study to acid-induced acute lung injury and found that these two compounds protected mice from hydrochloric acid (HCl)-induced lung injury by inhibiting PMNs influx, IL-6 release and protein exudation. Taken together, these results suggested that PD and PE might be useful in the therapy of lung injury.

  13. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    SciTech Connect

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  14. Human sweet taste receptor mediates acid-induced sweetness of miraculin.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Ayako; Tsuchiya, Asami; Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Ito, Keisuke; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko; Briand, Loïc; Asakura, Tomiko; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2011-10-04

    Miraculin (MCL) is a homodimeric protein isolated from the red berries of Richadella dulcifica. MCL, although flat in taste at neutral pH, has taste-modifying activity to convert sour stimuli to sweetness. Once MCL is held on the tongue, strong sweetness is sensed over 1 h each time we taste a sour solution. Nevertheless, no molecular mechanism underlying the taste-modifying activity has been clarified. In this study, we succeeded in quantitatively evaluating the acid-induced sweetness of MCL using a cell-based assay system and found that MCL activated hT1R2-hT1R3 pH-dependently as the pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.8, and that the receptor activation occurred every time an acid solution was applied. Although MCL per se is sensory-inactive at pH 6.7 or higher, it suppressed the response of hT1R2-hT1R3 to other sweeteners at neutral pH and enhanced the response at weakly acidic pH. Using human/mouse chimeric receptors and molecular modeling, we revealed that the amino-terminal domain of hT1R2 is required for the response to MCL. Our data suggest that MCL binds hT1R2-hT1R3 as an antagonist at neutral pH and functionally changes into an agonist at acidic pH, and we conclude this may cause its taste-modifying activity.

  15. Human sweet taste receptor mediates acid-induced sweetness of miraculin

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Ayako; Tsuchiya, Asami; Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Ito, Keisuke; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko; Briand, Loïc; Asakura, Tomiko; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2011-01-01

    Miraculin (MCL) is a homodimeric protein isolated from the red berries of Richadella dulcifica. MCL, although flat in taste at neutral pH, has taste-modifying activity to convert sour stimuli to sweetness. Once MCL is held on the tongue, strong sweetness is sensed over 1 h each time we taste a sour solution. Nevertheless, no molecular mechanism underlying the taste-modifying activity has been clarified. In this study, we succeeded in quantitatively evaluating the acid-induced sweetness of MCL using a cell-based assay system and found that MCL activated hT1R2-hT1R3 pH-dependently as the pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.8, and that the receptor activation occurred every time an acid solution was applied. Although MCL per se is sensory-inactive at pH 6.7 or higher, it suppressed the response of hT1R2-hT1R3 to other sweeteners at neutral pH and enhanced the response at weakly acidic pH. Using human/mouse chimeric receptors and molecular modeling, we revealed that the amino-terminal domain of hT1R2 is required for the response to MCL. Our data suggest that MCL binds hT1R2-hT1R3 as an antagonist at neutral pH and functionally changes into an agonist at acidic pH, and we conclude this may cause its taste-modifying activity. PMID:21949380

  16. The cumulus cell layer protects the bovine maturing oocyte against fatty acid-induced lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lolicato, Francesca; Brouwers, Jos F; de Lest, Chris H A van; Wubbolts, Richard; Aardema, Hilde; Priore, Paola; Roelen, Bernard A J; Helms, J Bernd; Gadella, Bart M

    2015-01-01

    Mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue during metabolic stress increases the amount of free fatty acids in blood and follicular fluid and is associated with impaired female fertility. In a previous report, we described the effects of the three predominant fatty acids in follicular fluid (saturated palmitate and stearate and unsaturated oleate) on oocyte maturation and quality. In the current study, the effects of elevated fatty acid levels on cumulus cells were investigated. In a dose-dependent manner, the three fatty acids induced lipid storage in cumulus cells accompanied by an enhanced immune labeling of perilipin-2, a marker for lipid droplets. Lipidomic analysis confirmed incorporation of the administered fatty acids into triglyceride, resulting in a 3- to 6-fold increase of triglyceride content. In addition, palmitate selectively induced ceramide formation, which has been implicated in apoptosis. Indeed, of the three fatty acids tested, palmitate induced reactive oxygen species formation, caspase 3 activation, and mitochondria deterioration, leading to degeneration of the cumulus cell layers. This effect could be mimicked by addition of the ceramide-C2 analog and could be inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin-B1. Interfering with the intactness of the cumulus cell layers, either by mechanical force or by palmitate treatment, resulted in enhanced uptake of lipids in the oocyte and increased radical formation. Our results show that cumulus cells act as a barrier, protecting oocytes from in vitro induced lipotoxic effects. We suggest that this protective function of the cumulus cell layers is important for the developmental competence of the oocyte. The relevance of our findings for assisted reproduction technologies is discussed.

  17. Behavior-associated Neuronal Activation After Kainic Acid-induced Hippocampal Neurotoxicity is Modulated in Time.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Arredondo, Andrea; López-Hernández, Fernanda; García-Velázquez, Lizbeth; Arias, Clorinda; Zepeda, Angélica

    2017-02-01

    Kainic acid-induced (KA) hippocampal damage leads to neuronal death and further synaptic plasticity. Formation of aberrant as well as of functional connections after such procedure has been documented. However, the impact of such structural plasticity on cell activation along time after damage and in face of a behavioral demand has not been explored. We evaluated if the mRNA and protein levels of plasticity-related protein synaptophysin (Syp and SYP, respectively) and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein mRNA and protein levels (Arc and Arc, respectively) in the dentate gyrus were differentially modulated in time in response to a spatial-exploratory task after KA-induced hippocampal damage. In addition, we analyzed Arc+/NeuN+ immunopositive cells in the different experimental conditions. We infused KA intrahippocampally to young-adult rats and 10 or 30 days post-lesion (dpl) animals performed a hippocampus-activating spatial-exploratory task. Our results show that Syp mRNA levels significantly increase at 10dpl and return to control levels after 30dpl, whereas SYP protein levels are diminished at 10dpl, but significantly increase at 30dpl, as compared to 10dpl. Arc mRNA and protein levels are both increased at 30dpl as compared to sham. Also the number of NeuN+/Arc+ cells significantly increases at 30dpl in the group with a spatial-exploratory demand. These results provide information on the long-term modifications associated to structural plasticity and neuronal activation in the dentate gyrus after excitotoxic damage and in face of a spatial-exploratory behavior. Anat Rec, 300:425-432, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ruisanchez, Éva; Dancs, Péter; Kerék, Margit; Németh, Tamás; Faragó, Bernadett; Balogh, Andrea; Patil, Renukadevi; Jennings, Brett L.; Liliom, Károly; Malik, Kafait U.; Smrcka, Alan V.; Tigyi, Gabor; Benyó, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has been implicated as a mediator of several cardiovascular functions, but its potential involvement in the control of vascular tone is obscure. Here, we show that both LPA (18:1) and VPC31143 (a synthetic agonist of LPA1–3 receptors) relax intact mouse thoracic aorta with similar Emax values (53.9 and 51.9% of phenylephrine-induced precontraction), although the EC50 of LPA- and VPC31143-induced vasorelaxations were different (400 vs. 15 nM, respectively). Mechanical removal of the endothelium or genetic deletion of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) not only diminished vasorelaxation by LPA or VPC31143 but converted it to vasoconstriction. Freshly isolated mouse aortic endothelial cells expressed LPA1, LPA2, LPA4 and LPA5 transcripts. The LPA1,3 antagonist Ki16425, the LPA1 antagonist AM095, and the genetic deletion of LPA1, but not that of LPA2, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation. Inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3 kinase–protein kinase B/Akt pathway by wortmannin or MK-2206 failed to influence the effect of LPA. However, pharmacological inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) by U73122 or edelfosine, but not genetic deletion of PLCε, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation and indicated that a PLC enzyme, other than PLCε, mediates the response. In summary, the present study identifies LPA as an endothelium-dependent vasodilator substance acting via LPA1, PLC, and eNOS.—Ruisanchez, É., Dancs, P., Kerék, M., Németh, T., Faragó, B., Balogh, A., Patil, R., Jennings, B. L., Liliom, K., Malik, K. U., Smrcka, A. V., Tigyi, G., Benyó, Z. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. PMID:24249637

  19. Modification of plant cell wall structure accompanied by enhancement of saccharification efficiency using a chemical, lasalocid sodium

    PubMed Central

    Okubo-Kurihara, Emiko; Ohtani, Misato; Kurihara, Yukio; Kakegawa, Koichi; Kobayashi, Megumi; Nagata, Noriko; Komatsu, Takanori; Kikuchi, Jun; Cutler, Sean; Demura, Taku; Matsui, Minami

    2016-01-01

    The cell wall is one major determinant of plant cell morphology, and is an attractive bioresource. Here, we report a novel strategy to modify plant cell wall property by small molecules. Lasalocid sodium (LS) was isolated by chemical screening to identify molecules that affect the cell morphology of tobacco BY-2 cells. LS treatment led to an increase in cell wall thickness, whilst the quantity and sugar composition of the cell wall remained unchanged in BY-2 cells. The chemical also disordered the cellular arrangement of hypocotyls of Arabidopsis plants, resulting in a decrease in hypocotyl length. LS treatment enhanced enzymatic saccharification efficiency in both BY-2 cells and Arabidopsis plants. Microarray analysis on Arabidopsis showed that exposure to LS upregulated type III peroxidase genes, of which some are involved in lignin biogenesis, and jasmonic acid response genes, and phloroglucinol staining supported the activation of lignification by the LS treatment. As jasmonic acid-mediated lignification is a typical reaction to cell wall damage, it is possible that LS induces cell wall loosening, which can trigger cell wall damage response. Thus, LS is a unique chemical for modification of cell wall and morphology through changes in cell wall architecture. PMID:27694977

  20. Cell wall extension in Nitella as influenced by acids and ions.

    PubMed

    Métraux, J P; Taiz, L

    1977-04-01

    The giant internode cells of Nitella axillaris exhibit acid-induced growth similar to that found in higher plants. The threshold pH is 4.5, with a maximum at 3.5. The acid growth effect is transient, lasting no more than 32 min. Extensibility measurements of isolated cell walls showed a similar pattern of acid enhancement. Prolonged boiling in water (12 hr) only partially inhibited the acid-induced wall extensibility and actually increased the extensibility at pH 6. It was concluded that physical, rather than enzymatic, processes were responsible for acid-enhanced continuous extension ("creep") in Nitella walls. A complex cation-sensitive mechanism that affects extensibility was also characterized. Among the stimulatory (wall-softening) cations, divalents were generally more effective than monovalents, with magnesium being the most stimulatory. The inhibitory (wall-hardening) cations included divalents and trivalents, aluminum being the most inhibitory. Ionic effects on extensibility were even less sensitive to prolonged boiling in water than acid effects.

  1. Loosening Up the Uptight Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsman, Julie

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on releasing students' creative impulses, their imaginations, and their memories. Discusses a set of reading and writing activities that have been used with all kinds of students in a wide variety of settings. (RS)

  2. Effect of CMC Molecular Weight on Acid-Induced Gelation of Heated WPI-CMC Soluble Complex.

    PubMed

    Huan, Yan; Zhang, Sha; Vardhanabhuti, Bongkosh

    2016-02-01

    Acid-induced gelation properties of heated whey protein isolate (WPI) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) soluble complex were investigated as a function of CMC molecular weight (270, 680, and 750 kDa) and concentrations (0% to 0.125%). Heated WPI-CMC soluble complex with 6% protein was made by heating biopolymers together at pH 7.0 and 85 °C for 30 min and diluted to 5% protein before acid-induced gelation. Acid-induced gel formed from heated WPI-CMC complexes exhibited increased hardness and decreased water holding capacity with increasing CMC concentrations but gel strength decreased at higher CMC content. The highest gel strength was observed with CMC 750 k at 0.05%. Gels with low CMC concentration showed homogenous microstructure which was independent of CMC molecular weight, while increasing CMC concentration led to microphase separation with higher CMC molecular weight showing more extensive phase separation. When heated WPI-CMC complexes were prepared at 9% protein the acid gels showed improved gel hardness and water holding capacity, which was supported by the more interconnected protein network with less porosity when compared to complexes heated at 6% protein. It is concluded that protein concentration and biopolymer ratio during complex formation are the major factors affecting gel properties while the effect of CMC molecular weight was less significant.

  3. Insights into plant cell wall structure, architecture, and integrity using glycome profiling of native and AFEXTM-pre-treated biomass.

    PubMed

    Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G; Dale, Bruce E; Chundawat, Shishir P S

    2015-07-01

    Cell walls, which constitute the bulk of plant biomass, vary considerably in their structure, composition, and architecture. Studies on plant cell walls can be conducted on both native and pre-treated plant biomass samples, allowing an enhanced understanding of these structural and compositional variations. Here glycome profiling was employed to determine the relative abundance of matrix polysaccharides in several phylogenetically distinct native and pre-treated plant biomasses. Eight distinct biomass types belonging to four different subgroups (i.e. monocot grasses, woody dicots, herbaceous dicots, and softwoods) were subjected to various regimes of AFEX™ (ammonia fiber expansion) pre-treatment [AFEX is a trademark of MBI, Lansing (http://www.mbi.org]. This approach allowed detailed analysis of close to 200 cell wall glycan epitopes and their relative extractability using a high-throughput platform. In general, irrespective of the phylogenetic origin, AFEX™ pre-treatment appeared to cause loosening and improved accessibility of various xylan epitope subclasses in most plant biomass materials studied. For most biomass types analysed, such loosening was also evident for other major non-cellulosic components including subclasses of pectin and xyloglucan epitopes. The studies also demonstrate that AFEX™ pre-treatment significantly reduced cell wall recalcitrance among diverse phylogenies (except softwoods) by inducing structural modifications to polysaccharides that were not detectable by conventional gross composition analyses. It was found that monitoring changes in cell wall glycan compositions and their relative extractability for untreated and pre-treated plant biomass can provide an improved understanding of variations in structure and composition of plant cell walls and delineate the role(s) of matrix polysaccharides in cell wall recalcitrance.

  4. Insights into plant cell wall structure, architecture, and integrity using glycome profiling of native and AFEXTM-pre-treated biomass

    PubMed Central

    Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G.; Dale, Bruce E.; Chundawat, Shishir P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Cell walls, which constitute the bulk of plant biomass, vary considerably in their structure, composition, and architecture. Studies on plant cell walls can be conducted on both native and pre-treated plant biomass samples, allowing an enhanced understanding of these structural and compositional variations. Here glycome profiling was employed to determine the relative abundance of matrix polysaccharides in several phylogenetically distinct native and pre-treated plant biomasses. Eight distinct biomass types belonging to four different subgroups (i.e. monocot grasses, woody dicots, herbaceous dicots, and softwoods) were subjected to various regimes of AFEX™ (ammonia fiber expansion) pre-treatment [AFEX is a trademark of MBI, Lansing (http://www.mbi.org]. This approach allowed detailed analysis of close to 200 cell wall glycan epitopes and their relative extractability using a high-throughput platform. In general, irrespective of the phylogenetic origin, AFEX™ pre-treatment appeared to cause loosening and improved accessibility of various xylan epitope subclasses in most plant biomass materials studied. For most biomass types analysed, such loosening was also evident for other major non-cellulosic components including subclasses of pectin and xyloglucan epitopes. The studies also demonstrate that AFEX™ pre-treatment significantly reduced cell wall recalcitrance among diverse phylogenies (except softwoods) by inducing structural modifications to polysaccharides that were not detectable by conventional gross composition analyses. It was found that monitoring changes in cell wall glycan compositions and their relative extractability for untreated and pre-treated plant biomass can provide an improved understanding of variations in structure and composition of plant cell walls and delineate the role(s) of matrix polysaccharides in cell wall recalcitrance. PMID:25911738

  5. Insights into plant cell wall structure, architecture, and integrity using glycome profiling of native and AFEXTM -pre-treated biomass

    DOE PAGES

    Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G.; Dale, Bruce E.; ...

    2015-04-23

    We report that cell walls, which constitute the bulk of plant biomass, vary considerably in their structure, composition, and architecture. Studies on plant cell walls can be conducted on both native and pre-treated plant biomass samples, allowing an enhanced understanding of these structural and compositional variations. Here glycome profiling was employed to determine the relative abundance of matrix polysaccharides in several phylogenetically distinct native and pre-treated plant biomasses. Eight distinct biomass types belonging to four different subgroups (i.e. monocot grasses, woody dicots, herbaceous dicots, and softwoods) were subjected to various regimes of AFEX™ (ammonia fiber expansion) pre-treatment [AFEX is amore » trademark of MBI, Lansing (http://www.mbi.org]. This approach allowed detailed analysis of close to 200 cell wall glycan epitopes and their relative extractability using a high-throughput platform. In general, irrespective of the phylogenetic origin, AFEX™ pre-treatment appeared to cause loosening and improved accessibility of various xylan epitope subclasses in most plant biomass materials studied. For most biomass types analysed, such loosening was also evident for other major non-cellulosic components including subclasses of pectin and xyloglucan epitopes. The studies also demonstrate that AFEX™ pre-treatment significantly reduced cell wall recalcitrance among diverse phylogenies (except softwoods) by inducing structural modifications to polysaccharides that were not detectable by conventional gross composition analyses. Lastly, we found that monitoring changes in cell wall glycan compositions and their relative extractability for untreated and pre-treated plant biomass can provide an improved understanding of variations in structure and composition of plant cell walls and delineate the role(s) of matrix polysaccharides in cell wall recalcitrance.« less

  6. Adjacent-Level Hypermobility and Instrumented-Level Fatigue Loosening With Titanium and PEEK Rods for a Pedicle Screw System: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Aakas; Ingels, Marcel; Kodigudla, Manoj; Momeni, Narjes; Goel, Vijay; Agarwal, Anand K

    2016-05-01

    Adjacent-level disease is a common iatrogenic complication seen among patients undergoing spinal fusion for low back pain. This is attributed to the postsurgical differences in stiffness between the spinal levels, which result in abnormal forces, stress shielding, and hypermobility at the adjacent levels. In addition, as most patients undergoing these surgeries are osteoporotic, screw loosening at the index level is a complication that commonly accompanies adjacent-level disease. Recent studies indicate that a rod with lower rigidity than that of titanium may help to overcome these detrimental effects at the adjacent level. The present study was conducted in vitro using 12 L1-S1 specimens divided into groups of six, with each group instrumented with either titanium rods or PEEK (polyetheretherketone) rods. The test protocol included subjecting intact specimens to pure moments of 10 Nm in extension and flexion using an FS20 Biomechanical Spine Test System (Applied Test Systems) followed by hybrid moments on the instrumented specimens to achieve the same L1-S1 motion as that of the intact specimens. During the protocol's later phase, the L4-L5 units from each specimen were segmented for cyclic loading followed by postfatigue kinematic analysis to highlight the differences in motion pre- and postfatigue. The objectives included the in vitro comparison of (1) the adjacent-level motion before and after instrumentation with PEEK and titanium rods and (2) the pre- and postfatigue motion at the instrumented level with PEEK and titanium rods. The results showed that the adjacent levels above the instrumentation caused increased flexion and extension with both PEEK and titanium rods. The postfatigue kinematic data showed that the motion at the instrumented level (L4-L5) increased significantly in both flexion and extension compared to prefatigue motion in titanium groups. However, there was no significant difference in motion between the pre- and postfatigue data in the PEEK

  7. Glucocorticoids modulate amino acid-induced translation initiation in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenqi; Li, Guolian; Kimball, Scot R; Jahn, Linda A; Barrett, Eugene J

    2004-08-01

    Amino acids are unique anabolic agents in that they nutritively signal to mRNA translation initiation and serve as substrates for protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. Glucocorticoid excess antagonizes the anabolic action of amino acids on protein synthesis in laboratory animals. To examine whether excessive glucocorticoids modulate mixed amino acid-signaled translation initiation in human skeletal muscle, we infused an amino acid mixture (10% Travasol) systemically to 16 young healthy male volunteers for 6 h in the absence (n = 8) or presence (n = 8) of glucocorticoid excess (dexamethasone 2 mg orally every 6 h for 3 days). Vastus lateralis muscles were biopsied before and after amino acid infusion, and the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70(S6K)), and eIF2alpha and the guanine nucleotide exchange activity of eIF2B were measured. Systemic infusion of mixed amino acids significantly stimulated the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 (P < 0.04) and p70(S6K) (P < 0.001) and the dephosphorylation of eIF2alpha (P < 0.003) in the control group. Dexamethasone treatment did not alter the basal phosphorylation state of 4E-BP1, p70(S6K), or eIF2alpha; however, it abrogated the stimulatory effect of amino acid infusion on the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 (P = 0.31) without affecting amino acid-induced phosphorylation of p70(S6K) (P = 0.002) or dephosphorylation of eIF2alpha (P = 0.003). Neither amino acid nor dexamethasone treatment altered the guanine nucleotide exchange activity of eIF2B. We conclude that changes of amino acid concentrations within the physiological range stimulate mRNA translation by enhancing the binding of mRNA to the 43S preinitiation complex, and the activity of p70(S6K) and glucocorticoid excess blocks the former action in vivo in human skeletal muscle.

  8. Calcium bridges are not load-bearing cell-wall bonds in Avena coleoptiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rayle, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    I examined the ability of frozen-thawed Avena sativa L. coleoptile sections under applied load to extend in response to the calcium chelators ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and 2-[(2-bis-[carboxymethyl]amino-5-methylphenoxy)methyl]-6-methoxy-8-bis[car boxymethyl]aminoquinoline (Quin II). Addition of 5 mM EGTA to weakly buffered (0.1 mM, pH 6.2) solutions of 2(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (Mes) initiated rapid extension and wall acidification. When the buffer strength was increased (e.g. from 20 to 100 mM Mes, pH 6.2) EGTA did not initiate extension nor did it cause wall acidification. At 5 mM Quin II failed to stimulate cell extension or wall acidification at all buffer molarities tested (0.1 to 100 mM Mes). Both chelators rapidly and effectively removed Ca2+ from Avena sections. These data indicate that Ca2+ chelation per se does not result in loosening of Avena cells walls. Rather, EGTA promotes wall extension indirectly via wall acidification.

  9. The Lamportian cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Keiliszewski, M.; Lamport, D. )

    1991-05-01

    The Lamportian Warp-Weft hypothesis suggests a cellulose-extensin interpenetrating network where extensin mechanically couples the load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in a wall matrix that is best described as a microcomposite. This model is based on data gathered from the extensin-rich walls of tomato and sycamore cell suspension culture, wherein extensin precursors are insolubilized into the wall by undefined crosslinks. The authors recent work with cell walls isolated from intact tissue as well as walls from suspension cultured cells of the graminaceous monocots maize and rice, the non-graminaceous monocot asparagus, the primitive herbaceous dicot sugar beet, and the gymnosperm Douglas Fir indicate that although extensins are ubiquitous to all plant species examined, they are not the major structural protein component of most walls examined. Amino acid analyses of intact and HF-treated walls shows a major component neither an HRGP, nor directly comparable to the glycine-rich wall proteins such as those associated with seed coat walls or the 67 mole% glycine-rich proteins cloned from petunia and soybean. Clearly, structural wall protein alternatives to extensin exist and any cell wall model must take that into account. If we assume that extracellular matrices are a priori network structures, then new Hypless' structural proteins in the maize cell wall raise questions about the sort of network these proteins create: the kinds of crosslinks involved; how they are formed; and the roles played by the small amounts of HRGPs.

  10. Halogenation of microcapsule walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. R.; Schaab, C. K.; Scott, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Procedure for halogenation of confining walls of both gelatin and gelatin-phenolic resin capsules is similar to that used for microencapsulation. Ten percent halogen content renders capsule wall nonburning; any higher content enhances flame-retardant properties of selected internal phase material. Halogenation decreases permeability of wall material to encapsulated materials.

  11. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOEpatents

    Maniscalco, James A.; Meier, Wayne R.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  12. Wall contraction in Bloch wall films.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartran, D. S.; Bourne, H. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The phenomenon of wall contraction characterized by a peak in the velocity-field relationship and a region of negative differential mobility is observed in uniaxial magnetic thin films of various magnetic properties by careful interrupted-pulse experiments. The observed results agree quite well with the theory for bulk samples when the extensive flux closure of thin film walls is accounted for by a suitable empirical scaling factor.

  13. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  14. Repeated citalopram administration counteracts kainic acid-induced spreading of PSA-NCAM-immunoreactive cells and loss of reelin in the adult mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Jaako, Külli; Aonurm-Helm, Anu; Kalda, Anti; Anier, Kaili; Zharkovsky, Tamara; Shastin, Dmitri; Zharkovsky, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    Systemic or intracerebral administration of kainic acid in rodents induces neuronal death followed by a cascade of neuroplastic changes in the hippocampus. Kainic acid-induced neuroplasticity is evidenced by alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis, dispersion of the granule cell layer and re-organisation of mossy fibres. Similar abnormalities are observed in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and, therefore, kainic acid-induced hippocampal neuroplasticity might mimic pathological mechanisms leading to the formation of 'epileptic brain' in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Previous studies have demonstrated that selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor antidepressants might reduce the severity of seizures in epileptic patients and reduce neuronal death in laboratory animal models of kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. In the present study, we investigated whether kainic acid-induced neuroplasticity in mice is modulated by the repeated administration of citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. We found that at the histopathological level, repeated citalopram treatment counteracted the kainic acid-induced neuronal loss and dispersion of young granule neurons expressing the polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule within the granule cell layer of the hippocampus. Citalopram also counteracted the downregulation of reelin on both mRNA and protein levels induced by kainic acid administration. Our findings indicate that repeated administration of citalopram is able to prevent kainic acid-induced abnormal brain plasticity and thereby prevent the formation of an epileptic phenotype.

  15. Transcriptomic response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for its adaptation to sulphuric acid-induced stress.

    PubMed

    de Lucena, Rodrigo Mendonça; Elsztein, Carolina; de Barros Pita, Will; de Souza, Rafael Barros; de Sá Leitão Paiva Júnior, Sérgio; de Morais Junior, Marcos Antonio

    2015-11-01

    In bioethanol production plants, yeast cells are generally recycled between fermentation batches by using a treatment with sulphuric acid at a pH ranging from 2.0 to 2.5. We have previously shown that Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exposed to sulphuric acid treatment induce the general stress response pathway, fail to activate the protein kinase A signalling cascade and requires the mechanisms of cell wall integrity and high osmolarity glycerol pathways in order to survive in this stressful condition. In the present work, we used transcriptome-wide analysis as well as physiological assays to identify the transient metabolic responses of S. cerevisiae under sulphuric acid treatment. The results presented herein indicate that survival depends on a metabolic reprogramming of the yeast cells in order to assure the yeast cell viability by preventing cell growth under this harmful condition. It involves the differential expression of a subset of genes related to cell wall composition and integrity, oxidation-reduction processes, carbohydrate metabolism, ATP synthesis and iron uptake. These results open prospects for application of this knowledge in the improvement of industrial processes based on metabolic engineering to select yeasts resistant to acid treatment.

  16. Hot Pepper (Capsicum spp.) protects brain from sodium nitroprusside- and quinolinic acid-induced oxidative stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Oboh, G; Rocha, J B T

    2008-06-01

    One practical way through which free radical-mediated neurodegenerative diseases could be prevented is through the consumption of food rich in antioxidants. The ability of aqueous extracts of ripe and unripe Capsicum annum, Tepin (CAT) and Capsicum chinese, Habanero (CCH) to prevent lipid peroxidation induced by sodium nitroprusside and quinolinic acid in rat brain in vitro is assessed in this study. The aqueous extract of the peppers were prepared (1 g/20 mL). Incubating rat brain homogenates with pro-oxidant (7 microM sodium nitroprusside [222.5%] and 1 mM quinolinic acid [217.4%]) caused a significant increase (P < .05) in lipid peroxidation in rat brain homogenates. However, the aqueous extract of the peppers (4.2-16.8 mg/mL) caused a significant decrease (P < .05) in the lipid peroxidation in a dose-dependent manner. However, unripe CAT (92.5-55.2%) caused the highest inhibition of sodium nitroprusside-induced lipid peroxidation, while unripe CCH caused the least inhibition (161.0-102.1%). Furthermore, unripe CAT and CCH peppers had a significantly higher (P < .05) inhibitory effect on quinolinic acid-induced lipid peroxidation in rat brain than the ripe pepper (CAT and CCH). Therefore, the protection of the brain tissues by hot pepper depends on the total phenol content in sodium nitroprusside-induced lipid peroxidation, while ripening would reduce the protective properties of hot pepper against quinolinic acid-induced lipid peroxidation. However, unripe CAT has the highest protective properties against sodium nitroprusside- and quinolinic acid-induced lipid peroxidation in rat brain.

  17. Attenuation of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus by inhibition of endocannabinoid transport and degradation in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Shubina, Liubov; Aliev, Rubin; Kitchigina, Valentina

    2015-03-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a medical emergency associated with a high rate of mortality if not treated promptly. Exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids have been shown to possess anticonvulsant properties both in vivo and in vitro. Here we study the influence of endocannabinoid metabolism on the development of kainic acid-induced SE in guinea pigs. For this purpose, the inhibitors of endocannabinoid transport, AM404, and enzymatic (fatty acid amide hydrolase) degradation, URB597, were applied. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251, was also tested. Animal behavior as well as local electric field potentials in four structures: medial septum, hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and amygdala were analyzed when AM404 (120nmol), URB597 (4.8nmol) or AM251 (20nmol) were administrated alone or together with 0.4μg of kainic acid. All substances were injected i.c.v. AM404, URB597 or AM251 administered alone did not alter markedly local field potentials of all four studied structures in the long-term compared with their basal activity. AM404 and URB597 significantly alleviated kainic acid-induced SE, decreasing behavioral manifestations, duration of seizure events and SE in general without changing the amplitude of local field potentials. AM251 did not produce distinct effects on SE in terms of our experimental paradigm. There was no apparent change of the seizure initiation pattern when kainic acid was coadministrated with AM404, URB597 or AM251. The present study provides electrophysiologic and behavioral evidences that inhibition of endocannabinoid metabolism plays a protective role against kainic acid-induced SE and may be employed for therapeutic purposes. Further investigations of the influences of cannabinoid-related compounds on SE genesis and especially epileptogenesis are required.

  18. Importance of interferon inducible trans-membrane proteins and retinoic acid inducible gene I for influenza virus replication: A review.

    PubMed

    Suo, Siqingaowa; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interplay between Influenza viruses and host cells is key to elucidating the pathogenesis of these viruses. Several host factors have been identified that exert antiviral functions; however, influenza viruses continue to replicate utilizing host cell machinery. Herein, we review the mechanisms of action of two host-derived proteins on conferring cellular resistance to the influenza virus; (1) the interferon inducible trans-membrane proteins, 1, 2 and 3, a recently identified family of early restriction factors; and (2) retinoic acid inducible gene I, a key mediator of antiviral immunity. These data may contribute to the design of novel and efficient anti-influenza treatments.

  19. Genetic parameters for rennet- and acid-induced coagulation properties in milk from Swedish Red dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, F; Glantz, M; Poulsen, N A; Wadsö, L; Stålhammar, H; Andrén, A; Lindmark Månsson, H; Larsen, L B; Paulsson, M; Fikse, W F

    2014-01-01

    Milk coagulation is an important processing trait, being the basis for production of both cheese and fermented products. There is interest in including technological properties of these products in the breeding goal for dairy cattle. The aim of the present study was therefore to estimate genetic parameters for milk coagulation properties, including both rennet- and acid-induced coagulation, in Swedish Red dairy cattle using genomic relationships. Morning milk samples and blood samples were collected from 395 Swedish Red cows that were selected to be as genetically unrelated as possible. Using a rheometer, milk samples were analyzed for rennet- and acid-induced coagulation properties, including gel strength (G'), coagulation time, and yield stress (YS). In addition to the technological traits, milk composition was analyzed. A binary trait was created to reflect that milk samples that had not coagulated 40min after rennet addition were considered noncoagulating milk. The cows were genotyped by using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). Almost 600,000 markers remained after quality control and were used to construct a matrix of genomic relationships among the cows. Multivariate models including fixed effects of herd, lactation stage, and parity were fitted using the ASReml software to obtain estimates of heritabilities and genetic and phenotypic correlations. Heritability estimates (h(2)) for G' and YS in rennet and acid gels were found to be high (h(2)=0.38-0.62) and the genetic correlations between rennet-induced and acid-induced coagulation properties were weak but favorable, with the exception of YSrennet with G'acid and YSacid, both of which were strong. The high heritability (h(2)=0.45) for milk coagulating ability expressed as a binary trait suggests that noncoagulation could be eliminated through breeding. Additionally, the results indicated that the current breeding objective could increase the frequency of noncoagulating milk and

  20. In tobacco BY-2 cells xyloglucan oligosaccharides alter the expression of genes involved in cell wall metabolism, signalling, stress responses, cell division and transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Lien; Perrotta, Lara; Acosta, Alexis; Orellana, Esteban; Spadafora, Natasha; Bruno, Leonardo; Bitonti, Beatrice M; Albani, Diego; Cabrera, Juan Carlos; Francis, Dennis; Rogers, Hilary J

    2014-10-01

    Xyloglucan oligosaccharides (XGOs) are breakdown products of XGs, the most abundant hemicelluloses of the primary cell walls of non-Poalean species. Treatment of cell cultures or whole plants with XGOs results in accelerated cell elongation and cell division, changes in primary root growth, and a stimulation of defence responses. They may therefore act as signalling molecules regulating plant growth and development. Previous work suggests an interaction with auxins and effects on cell wall loosening, however their mode of action is not fully understood. The effect of an XGO extract from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) on global gene expression was therefore investigated in tobacco BY-2 cells using microarrays. Over 500 genes were differentially regulated with similar numbers and functional classes of genes up- and down-regulated, indicating a complex interaction with the cellular machinery. Up-regulation of a putative XG endotransglycosylase/hydrolase-related (XTH) gene supports the mechanism of XGO action through cell wall loosening. Differential expression of defence-related genes supports a role for XGOs as elicitors. Changes in the expression of genes related to mitotic control and differentiation also support previous work showing that XGOs are mitotic inducers. XGOs also affected expression of several receptor-like kinase genes and transcription factors. Hence, XGOs have significant effects on expression of genes related to cell wall metabolism, signalling, stress responses, cell division and transcriptional control.

  1. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  2. Lower cell wall pectin solubilisation and galactose loss during early fruit development in apple (Malus x domestica) cultivar 'Scifresh' are associated with slower softening rate.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jovyn K T; Schröder, Roswitha; Brummell, David A; Sutherland, Paul W; Hallett, Ian C; Smith, Bronwen G; Melton, Laurence D; Johnston, Jason W

    2015-03-15

    Substantial differences in softening behaviour can exist between fruit even within the same species. Apple cultivars 'Royal Gala' and 'Scifresh' soften at different rates despite having a similar genetic background and producing similar amounts of ethylene during ripening. An examination of cell wall metabolism from the fruitlet to the ripe stages showed that in both cultivars pectin solubilisation increased during cell expansion, declined at the mature stage and then increased again during ripening. This process was much less pronounced in the slower softening 'Scifresh' than in 'Royal Gala' at every developmental stage examined, consistent with less cell separation and softening in this cultivar. Both cultivars also exhibited a progressive loss of pectic galactan and arabinan side chains during development. The cell wall content of arabinose residues was similar in both cultivars, but the galactose residue content in 'Scifresh' remained higher than that of 'Royal Gala' at every developmental stage. The higher content of cell wall galactose residue in 'Scifresh' cell walls correlated with a lower β-galactosidase activity and more intense immunolabelling of RG-I galactan side chains in both microscopy sections and glycan microarrays. A high cell wall galactan content has been associated with reduced cell wall porosity, which may restrict access of cell wall-modifying enzymes and thus maintain better structural integrity later in development. The data suggest that the composition and structure of the cell wall at very early development stages may influence subsequent cell wall loosening, and may even predispose the wall's ensuing properties.

  3. The Target of β-Expansin EXPB1 in Maize Cell Walls from Binding and Solid-State NMR Studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Chen, Yuning; Tabuchi, Akira; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2016-12-01

    The wall-loosening actions of β-expansins are known primarily from studies of EXPB1 extracted from maize (Zea mays) pollen. EXPB1 selectively loosens cell walls (CWs) of grasses, but its specific binding target is unknown. We characterized EXPB1 binding to sequentially extracted maize CWs, finding that the protein primarily binds glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX), the major matrix polysaccharide in grass CWs. This binding is strongly reduced by salts, indicating that it is predominantly electrostatic in nature. For direct molecular evidence of EXPB1 binding, we conducted solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance experiments using paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE), which is sensitive to distances between unpaired electrons and nuclei. By mixing (13)C-enriched maize CWs with EXPB1 functionalized with a Mn(2+) tag, we measured Mn(2+)-induced PRE Strong (1)H and (13)C PREs were observed for the carboxyls of GAX, followed by more moderate PREs for carboxyl groups in homogalacturonan and rhamnogalacturonan-I, indicating that EXPB1 preferentially binds GAX In contrast, no PRE was observed for cellulose, indicating very weak interaction of EXPB1 with cellulose. Dynamics experiments show that EXPB1 changes GAX mobility in a complex manner: the rigid fraction of GAX became more rigid upon EXPB1 binding while the dynamic fraction became more mobile. Combining these data with previous results, we propose that EXPB1 loosens grass CWs by disrupting noncovalent junctions between highly substituted GAX and GAX of low substitution, which binds cellulose. This study provides molecular evidence of β-expansin's target in grass CWs and demonstrates a new strategy for investigating ligand binding for proteins that are difficult to express heterologously.

  4. Cell Wall Ultrastructure of Stem Wood, Roots, and Needles of a Conifer Varies in Response to Moisture Availability

    PubMed Central

    Pattathil, Sivakumar; Ingwers, Miles W.; Victoriano, Olivia L.; Kandemkavil, Sindhu; McGuire, Mary Anne; Teskey, Robert O.; Aubrey, Doug P.

    2016-01-01

    The composition, integrity, and architecture of the macromolecular matrix of cell walls, collectively referred to as cell wall ultrastructure, exhibits variation across species and organs and among cell types within organs. Indirect approaches have suggested that modifications to cell wall ultrastructure occur in response to abiotic stress; however, modifications have not been directly observed. Glycome profiling was used to study cell wall ultrastructure by examining variation in composition and extractability of non-cellulosic glycans in cell walls of stem wood, roots, and needles of loblolly pine saplings exposed to high and low soil moisture. Soil moisture influenced physiological processes and the overall composition and extractability of cell wall components differed as a function of soil moisture treatments. The strongest response of cell wall ultrastructure to soil moisture was increased extractability of pectic backbone epitopes in the low soil moisture treatment. The higher abundance of these pectic backbone epitopes in the oxalate extract indicate that the loosening of cell wall pectic components could be associated with the release of pectic signals as a stress response. The increased extractability of pectic backbone epitopes in response to low soil moisture availability was more pronounced in stem wood than in roots or needles. Additional responses to low soil moisture availability were observed in lignin-associated carbohydrates released in chlorite extracts of stem wood, including an increased abundance of pectic arabinogalactan epitopes. Overall, these results indicate that cell walls of loblolly pine organs undergo changes in their ultrastructural composition and extractability as a response to soil moisture availability and that cell walls of the stem wood are more responsive to low soil moisture availability compared to cell walls of roots and needles. To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence, delineated by glycomic analyses, that

  5. Cell Wall Ultrastructure of Stem Wood, Roots, and Needles of a Conifer Varies in Response to Moisture Availability

    DOE PAGES

    Pattathil, Sivakumar; Ingwers, Miles W.; Victoriano, Olivia L.; ...

    2016-06-24

    The composition, integrity, and architecture of the macromolecular matrix of cell walls, collectively referred to as cell wall ultrastructure, exhibits variation across species and organs and among cell types within organs. Indirect approaches have suggested that modifications to cell wall ultrastructure occur in response to abiotic stress; however, modifications have not been directly observed. Glycome profiling was used to study cell wall ultrastructure by examining variation in composition and extractability of non-cellulosic glycans in cell walls of stem wood, roots, and needles of loblolly pine saplings exposed to high and low soil moisture. Soil moisture influenced physiological processes and themore » overall composition and extractability of cell wall components differed as a function of soil moisture treatments. The strongest response of cell wall ultrastructure to soil moisture was increased extractability of pectic backbone epitopes in the low soil moisture treatment. The higher abundance of these pectic backbone epitopes in the oxalate extract indicate that the loosening of cell wall pectic components could be associated with the release of pectic signals as a stress response. The increased extractability of pectic backbone epitopes in response to low soil moisture availability was more pronounced in stem wood than in roots or needles. Additional responses to low soil moisture availability were observed in lignin associated carbohydrates released in chlorite extracts of stem wood, including an increased abundance of pectic arabinogalactan epitopes. Overall, these results indicate that cell walls of loblolly pine organs undergo changes in their ultrastructural composition and extractability as a response to soil moisture availability and that cell walls of the stem wood are more responsive to low soil moisture availability compared to cell walls of roots and needles. In conclusion, to our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence, delineated by

  6. Cell Wall Ultrastructure of Stem Wood, Roots, and Needles of a Conifer Varies in Response to Moisture Availability

    SciTech Connect

    Pattathil, Sivakumar; Ingwers, Miles W.; Victoriano, Olivia L.; Kandemkavil, Sindhu; McGuire, Mary Anne; Teskey, Robert O.; Aubrey, Doug P.

    2016-06-24

    The composition, integrity, and architecture of the macromolecular matrix of cell walls, collectively referred to as cell wall ultrastructure, exhibits variation across species and organs and among cell types within organs. Indirect approaches have suggested that modifications to cell wall ultrastructure occur in response to abiotic stress; however, modifications have not been directly observed. Glycome profiling was used to study cell wall ultrastructure by examining variation in composition and extractability of non-cellulosic glycans in cell walls of stem wood, roots, and needles of loblolly pine saplings exposed to high and low soil moisture. Soil moisture influenced physiological processes and the overall composition and extractability of cell wall components differed as a function of soil moisture treatments. The strongest response of cell wall ultrastructure to soil moisture was increased extractability of pectic backbone epitopes in the low soil moisture treatment. The higher abundance of these pectic backbone epitopes in the oxalate extract indicate that the loosening of cell wall pectic components could be associated with the release of pectic signals as a stress response. The increased extractability of pectic backbone epitopes in response to low soil moisture availability was more pronounced in stem wood than in roots or needles. Additional responses to low soil moisture availability were observed in lignin associated carbohydrates released in chlorite extracts of stem wood, including an increased abundance of pectic arabinogalactan epitopes. Overall, these results indicate that cell walls of loblolly pine organs undergo changes in their ultrastructural composition and extractability as a response to soil moisture availability and that cell walls of the stem wood are more responsive to low soil moisture availability compared to cell walls of roots and needles. In conclusion, to our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence, delineated by glycomic

  7. Cell Wall Ultrastructure of Stem Wood, Roots, and Needles of a Conifer Varies in Response to Moisture Availability.

    PubMed

    Pattathil, Sivakumar; Ingwers, Miles W; Victoriano, Olivia L; Kandemkavil, Sindhu; McGuire, Mary Anne; Teskey, Robert O; Aubrey, Doug P

    2016-01-01

    The composition, integrity, and architecture of the macromolecular matrix of cell walls, collectively referred to as cell wall ultrastructure, exhibits variation across species and organs and among cell types within organs. Indirect approaches have suggested that modifications to cell wall ultrastructure occur in response to abiotic stress; however, modifications have not been directly observed. Glycome profiling was used to study cell wall ultrastructure by examining variation in composition and extractability of non-cellulosic glycans in cell walls of stem wood, roots, and needles of loblolly pine saplings exposed to high and low soil moisture. Soil moisture influenced physiological processes and the overall composition and extractability of cell wall components differed as a function of soil moisture treatments. The strongest response of cell wall ultrastructure to soil moisture was increased extractability of pectic backbone epitopes in the low soil moisture treatment. The higher abundance of these pectic backbone epitopes in the oxalate extract indicate that the loosening of cell wall pectic components could be associated with the release of pectic signals as a stress response. The increased extractability of pectic backbone epitopes in response to low soil moisture availability was more pronounced in stem wood than in roots or needles. Additional responses to low soil moisture availability were observed in lignin-associated carbohydrates released in chlorite extracts of stem wood, including an increased abundance of pectic arabinogalactan epitopes. Overall, these results indicate that cell walls of loblolly pine organs undergo changes in their ultrastructural composition and extractability as a response to soil moisture availability and that cell walls of the stem wood are more responsive to low soil moisture availability compared to cell walls of roots and needles. To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence, delineated by glycomic analyses, that

  8. Metallic Wall Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan Michael (Inventor); Hofer, Richard Robert (Inventor); Mikellides, Ioannis G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A Hall thruster apparatus having walls constructed from a conductive material, such as graphite, and having magnetic shielding of the walls from the ionized plasma has been demonstrated to operate with nearly the same efficiency as a conventional non-magnetically shielded design using insulators as wall components. The new design is believed to provide the potential of higher power and uniform operation over the operating life of a thruster device.

  9. Palmitic acid but not palmitoleic acid induces insulin resistance in a human endothelial cell line by decreasing SERCA pump expression.

    PubMed

    Gustavo Vazquez-Jimenez, J; Chavez-Reyes, Jesus; Romero-Garcia, Tatiana; Zarain-Herzberg, Angel; Valdes-Flores, Jesus; Manuel Galindo-Rosales, J; Rueda, Angelica; Guerrero-Hernandez, Agustin; Olivares-Reyes, J Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Palmitic acid is a negative regulator of insulin activity. At the molecular level, palmitic acid reduces insulin stimulated Akt Ser473 phosphorylation. Interestingly, we have found that incubation with palmitic acid of human umbilical vein endothelial cells induced a biphasic effect, an initial transient elevation followed by a sustained reduction of SERCA pump protein levels. However, palmitic acid produced a sustained inhibition of SERCA pump ATPase activity. Insulin resistance state appeared before there was a significant reduction of SERCA2 expression. The mechanism by which palmitic acid impairs insulin signaling may involve endoplasmic reticulum stress, because this fatty acid induced activation of both PERK, an ER stress marker, and JNK, a kinase associated with insulin resistance. None of these effects were observed by incubating HUVEC-CS cells with palmitoleic acid. Importantly, SERCA2 overexpression decreased the palmitic acid-induced insulin resistance state. All these results suggest that SERCA pump might be the target of palmitic acid to induce the insulin resistance state in a human vascular endothelial cell line. Importantly, these data suggest that HUVEC-CS cells respond to palmitic acid-exposure with a compensatory overexpression of SERCA pump within the first hour, which eventually fades out and insulin resistance prevails.

  10. Allicin Alleviates Inflammation of Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid-Induced Rats and Suppresses P38 and JNK Pathways in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen; Lun, Weijian; Zhao, Xinmei; Lei, Shan; Guo, Yandong; Ma, Jiayi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Allicin has anti-inflammatory, antioxidative and proapoptotic properties. Aims. To evaluate the effects and investigate the mechanism of allicin on trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced colitis, specifically with mesalazine or sulfasalazine. Methods. 80 rats were divided equally into 8 groups: control; trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid; allicin prevention; allicin; mesalazine; sulfasalazine; allicin + sulfasalazine, and mesalazine + allicin. Systemic and colonic inflammation parameters were analysed. In addition, protein and culture medium of Caco-2 cells treated with various concentrations of IL-1β or allicin were collected for investigation of IL-8, NF-κB p65 P38, ERK, and JNK. One-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis H test were used for parametric and nonparametric tests, respectively. Results. Allicin reduced the body weight loss of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced rats, histological score, serum TNF-α and IL-1β levels, and colon IL-1β mRNA level and induced serum IL-4 level, particularly in combination with mesalazine. In addition, 1 ng/mL IL-1β stimulated the P38, ERK, and JNK pathways, whereas pretreatment with allicin depressed this phenomenon, except for the ERK pathway. Conclusions. The inflammation induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid is mitigated significantly by allicin treatment, particularly combined with mesalazine. Allicin inhibits the P38 and JNK pathways and the expression of NF-κB which explained the potential anti-inflammatory mechanisms of allicin. PMID:25729217

  11. Protective effect of Agave americana Linn. leaf extract in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mannasaheb, Basheerahmed A.A.; Kulkarni, Preeti V.; Sangreskopp, Mashood Ahmed; Savant, Chetan; Mohan, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Natural plants always provide core compounds for new drug development. In the present life and food style, inflammatory bowel disease has become common and needs a lead compound for its drug development. Aim: To evaluate the effect of Agave americana Linn. leaf extract in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats based on its traditional anti-inflammatory use. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were pretreated with A. americana leaf extract in the dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg p.o. daily for 7 days. On 8th day, 2 ml of 4% v/v acetic acid in saline was instilled into rats’ rectum. Prednisolone was used as standard drug and it was administered on the day of acetic acid instillation and continued for 3 days. Extract treatment was continued till 11th day. Body weight, ulcer score, colonic muscle contraction, antioxidant activity and histopathology were studied. Statistical analysis was performed using Parametric one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's posttest. Results: A. americana have retained total body weight significantly (P < 0.01) and decreased colon weight/length ratio. Extract have shown a significant decrease (P < 0.001) in ulcer scores, myeloperoxidase, lipid peroxidase activity. Further, extract have shown significant improvement in colonic muscle contraction, histopathology of colon etc., which is comparable with standard drug. Conclusion: A. americana possess protective effect against acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. PMID:26730148

  12. Nicotinic acid induces secretion of prostaglandin D2 in human macrophages: an in vitro model of the niacin flush.

    PubMed

    Meyers, C Daniel; Liu, Paul; Kamanna, Vaijinath S; Kashyap, Moti L

    2007-06-01

    Nicotinic acid is a safe, broad-spectrum lipid agent shown to prevent cardiovascular disease, yet its widespread use is limited by the prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) mediated niacin flush. Previous research suggests that nicotinic acid-induced PGD2 secretion is mediated by the skin, but the exact cell type remains unclear. We hypothesized that macrophages are a source of nicotinic acid-induced PGD2 secretion and performed a series of experiments to confirm this. Nicotinic acid (0.1-3 mM) induced PGD2 secretion in cultured human macrophages, but not monocytes or endothelial cells. The PGD2 secretion was dependent on the concentration of nicotinic acid and the time of exposure. Nicotinuric acid, but not nicotinamide, also induced PGD2 secretion. Pre-incubation of the cells with aspirin (100 microM) entirely prevented the nicotinic acid effects on PGD2 secretion. The PGD2 secreting effects of nicotinic acid were additive to the effects of the calcium ionophore A23187 (6 microM), but were independent of extra cellular calcium. These findings, combined with recent in vivo work, provide evidence that macrophages play a significant role in mediating the niacin flush and may lead to better strategies to eliminate this limiting side effect.

  13. Oral administration of omega-7 palmitoleic acid induces satiety and the release of appetite-related hormones in male rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Hong; Takeo, Jiro; Katayama, Masashi

    2013-06-01

    We have analyzed the effect of palmitoleic acid on short-term food intake in male rats. Administration of omega-7 palmitoleic acid by oral gavage significantly decreased food intake compared to palmitic acid, omega-9 oleic acid, or a vehicle control. Palmitoleic acid exhibited a dose-dependent effect in this context and did not cause general malaise. A triglyceride form of palmitoleate also decreased food intake, whereas olive oil, which is rich in oleic acid, did not. Palmitoleic acid accumulated within the small intestine in a dose-dependent fashion and elevated levels of the satiety hormone cholecystokinin (CCK). Both protein and mRNA levels of CCK were affected in this context. The suppression of food intake by palmitoleic acid was attenuated by intravenous injection of devazepide, a selective peripheral CCK receptor antagonist. Palmitoleic acid did not alter the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) target genes, and a PPARα antagonist did not affect palmitoleic acid-induced satiety. This suggests that the PPARα pathway might not be involved in suppressing food intake in response to palmitoleic acid. We have shown that orally administered palmitoleic acid induced satiety, enhanced the release of satiety hormones in rats.

  14. Evidence for the involvement of GPR40 and NADPH oxidase in palmitic acid-induced superoxide production and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Graciano, Maria Fernanda; Valle, Maíra Mello; Curi, Rui; Carpinelli, Angelo Rafael

    2013-01-01

    G protein coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase complex have been shown to be involved in the fatty acid amplification of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). The effect of palmitic acid on superoxide production and insulin secretion by INS-1E cells and the possible involvement of GPR40 and NADPH oxidase in these processes were examined in this study. Cells were incubated during 1 h with palmitic acid in low and high glucose concentrations, a GPR40 agonist (GW9508) and inhibitors of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium, DPI) and PKC (calphostin C). GW9508 induced superoxide production at 2.8 and 5.6 mM glucose concentrations and stimulated insulin secretion at 16.7 mM glucose concentration involving both PKC and NADPH oxidase activation. Palmitic acid induced superoxide production through NADPH oxidase and GPR40-dependent pathways and the stimulation of insulin secretion in the presence of a high glucose concentration was reduced by knockdown of GPR40 using siRNA. Our results suggest that palmitic acid induces superoxide production and potentiates GSIS through NADPH oxidase and GPR40 pathways in pancreatic ? cells.

  15. Effect of capsaicin and cimetidine on the healing of acetic acid induced gastric ulceration in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, J Y; Teng, C H; Chen, F C

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Capsaicin protects the gastric mucosa against experimental injury while capsaicin desensitisation reduces the rate of gastric ulcer healing. The effect of exogenous capsaicin on gastric ulcer healing has not to date been reported. AIM/METHOD: To investigate the effect of capsaicin, cimetidine, and in combination, given intragastrically in the healing of acetic acid induced chronic gastric ulcer in the rat. Treatment started immediately after ulcer induction. RESULTS: At the end of one week, capsaicin, cimetidine, and in combination increased ulcer healing but the effect of combined treatment was less than that of capsaicin alone. In an in vivo gastric chamber preparation, capsaicin increased, while cimetidine decreased, gastric mucosal blood flow measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. A dose response effect in reduction of gastric mucosal blood flow could be demonstrated for cimetidine. The gastric hyperaemic effect of capsaicin was blunted by prior administration of cimetidine. In contrast, capsaicin had no effect on gastric acid secretion and its addition to cimetidine did not affect the acid suppressant effect of the latter. CONCLUSIONS: Capsaicin promotes the healing of acetic acid induced gastric ulcer, probably by its gastric hyperaemic effect. Although cimetidine also promotes ulcer healing due to its inhibitory effect on acid secretion it may have an antagonistic effect on the gastric ulcer healing effect of capsaicin by virtue of inhibition of gastric hyperaemia. PMID:8984019

  16. Salicylic acid-induced superoxide generation catalyzed by plant peroxidase in hydrogen peroxide-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Makoto; Kawano, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that salicylic acid (SA) induces both immediate spike and long lasting phases of oxidative burst represented by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion radical (O2•−). In general, in the earlier phase of oxidative burst, apoplastic peroxidase are likely involved and in the late phase of the oxidative burst, NADPH oxidase is likely involved. Key signaling events connecting the 2 phases of oxidative burst are calcium channel activation and protein phosphorylation events. To date, the known earliest signaling event in response to exogenously added SA is the cell wall peroxidase-catalyzed generation of O2•− in a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent manner. However, this model is incomplete since the source of the initially required H2O2 could not be explained. Based on the recently proposed role for H2O2-independent mechanism for ROS production catalyzed by plant peroxidases (Kimura et al., 2014, Frontiers in Plant Science), we hereby propose a novel model for plant peroxidase-catalyzed oxidative burst fueled by SA. PMID:26633563

  17. Domain wall filters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-03-15

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  18. Wall Finishes; Carpentry: 901895.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline is designed to provide instruction in selecting, preparing, and installing wall finishing materials. Prerequisites for the course include mastery of building construction plans, foundations and walls, and basic mathematics. Intended for use in grades 11 and 12, the course contains five blocks of study totaling 135 hours of…

  19. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  20. Interactive Word Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Julie; Narvaez, Rose

    2013-01-01

    It is common to see word walls displaying the vocabulary that students have learned in class. Word walls serve as visual scaffolds and are a classroom strategy used to reinforce reading and language arts instruction. Research shows a strong relationship between student word knowledge and academic achievement (Stahl and Fairbanks 1986). As a…

  1. 'Stucco' Walls-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial 'clodding' or cementation of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across and makes up half of the projected 'Stucco Walls' image.

  2. Insights into plant cell wall structure, architecture, and integrity using glycome profiling of native and AFEXTM -pre-treated biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G.; Dale, Bruce E.; Chundawat, Shishir P. S.

    2015-04-23

    We report that cell walls, which constitute the bulk of plant biomass, vary considerably in their structure, composition, and architecture. Studies on plant cell walls can be conducted on both native and pre-treated plant biomass samples, allowing an enhanced understanding of these structural and compositional variations. Here glycome profiling was employed to determine the relative abundance of matrix polysaccharides in several phylogenetically distinct native and pre-treated plant biomasses. Eight distinct biomass types belonging to four different subgroups (i.e. monocot grasses, woody dicots, herbaceous dicots, and softwoods) were subjected to various regimes of AFEX™ (ammonia fiber expansion) pre-treatment [AFEX is a trademark of MBI, Lansing (http://www.mbi.org]. This approach allowed detailed analysis of close to 200 cell wall glycan epitopes and their relative extractability using a high-throughput platform. In general, irrespective of the phylogenetic origin, AFEX™ pre-treatment appeared to cause loosening and improved accessibility of various xylan epitope subclasses in most plant biomass materials studied. For most biomass types analysed, such loosening was also evident for other major non-cellulosic components including subclasses of pectin and xyloglucan epitopes. The studies also demonstrate that AFEX™ pre-treatment significantly reduced cell wall recalcitrance among diverse phylogenies (except softwoods) by inducing structural modifications to polysaccharides that were not detectable by conventional gross composition analyses. Lastly, we found that monitoring changes in cell wall glycan compositions and their relative extractability for untreated and pre-treated plant biomass can provide an improved understanding of variations in structure and composition of plant cell walls and delineate the role(s) of matrix polysaccharides in cell wall recalcitrance.

  3. Mechanisms of Motility Change on Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid-Induced Colonic Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Gab Jin; Cui, Yuan; Yeon, Dong-Soo; Kwon, Seong-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) characterized by recurrent episodes of colonic inflammation and tissue degeneration in human or animal models. The contractile force generated by the smooth muscle is significantly attenuated, resulting in altered motility leading to diarrhea or constipation in IBD. The aim of this study is to clarify the altered contractility of circular and longitudinal smooth muscle layers in proximal colon of trinitrobenzen sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis mouse. Colitis was induced by direct injection of TNBS (120 mg/kg, 50% ethanol) in proximal colon of ICR mouse using a 30 G needle anesthetized with ketamin (50 mg/kg), whereas animals in the control group were injected of 50% ethanol alone. In TNBS-induced colitis, the wall of the proximal colon is diffusely thickened with loss of haustration, and showed mucosal and mucular edema with inflammatory infiltration. The colonic inflammation is significantly induced the reduction of colonic contractile activity including spontaneous contractile activity, depolarization-induced contractility, and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated contractile response in circular muscle layer compared to the longitudinal muscle layer. The inward rectification of currents, especially, important to Ca2+ and Na+ influx-induced depolarization and contraction, was markedly reduced in the TNBS-induced colitis compared to the control. The muscarinic acetylcholine-mediated contractile responses were significantly attenuated in the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle strips induced by the reduction of membrane expression of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channel isoforms from the proximal colon of the TNBS-induced colitis mouse than the control. PMID:23269907

  4. Free Fatty Acids Induce Autophagy and LOX-1 Upregulation in Cultured Aortic Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng-I; Lee, Yueh-Hong; Chen, Po-Han; Lin, Yu-Chun; Chou, Ming-Huei; Kao, Ying-Hsien

    2016-11-05

    Elevation of free fatty acids (FFAs) is known to affect microvascular function and contribute to obesity-associated insulin resistance, hypertension, and microangiopathy. Proliferative and synthetic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) increase intimal thickness and destabilize atheromatous plaques. This study aimed to investigate whether saturated palmitic acid (PA) and monounsaturated oleic acid (OA) modulate autophagy activity, cell proliferation, and vascular tissue remodeling in an aortic VSMC cell line. Exposure to PA and OA suppressed growth of VSMCs without apoptotic induction, but enhanced autophagy flux with elevation of Beclin-1, Atg5, and LC3I/II. Cotreatment with autophagy inhibitors potentiated the FFA-suppressed VSMC growth and showed differential actions of PA and OA in autophagy flux retardation. Both FFAs upregulated lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1) but only OA increased LDL uptake by VSMCs. Mechanistically, FFAs induced hyperphosphorylation of Akt, ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and p38 MAPK. All pathways, except OA-activated PI3K/Akt cascade, were involved in the LOX-1 upregulation, whereas blockade of PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK cascades ameliorated the FFA-induced growth suppression on VSMCs. Moreover, both FFAs exhibited tissue remodeling effect through increasing MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and their gelatinolytic activities, whereas high-dose OA significantly suppressed collagen type I expression. Conversely, siRNA-mediated LOX-1 knockdown significantly attenuated the OA-induced tissue remodeling effects in VSMCs. In conclusion, OA and PA enhance autophagy flux, suppress aortic VSMC proliferation, and exhibit vascular remodeling effect, thereby leading to the loss of VSMCs and interstitial ECM in vascular walls and eventually the instability of atheromatous plaques. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-13, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. 22. SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING WEST FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING WEST FROM THE SAME POINT AS VIEW NO. 21. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  6. MIR wall surveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K

    1998-08-01

    This report addresses the problem of determining the layer thickness of a wall probed with a monostatic, hand-held implementation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR). Our goal is to locate the layers of the wall, and measure its overall thickness. The physical constraints require the device to be held fixed or swept rapidly over the wall. Thus an insufficient amount of backscattered data are collected to use diffraction tomographic [3] techniques to form images. The problem is therefore one of determining the wall layers from a set of time series reflection data. We develop two channel signal processing algorithms to determine the location of the layers of a wall, using as inputs the time series returned from the wall and the incident pulse. We study the problem using a finite difference time domain (FDTD) computer code to simulate the electromagnetic propagation within and scattering from a wall probed with five pulses. We use the results to develop and test signal processing procedures for locating the individual layers. We study two classes of algorithms: a deconvolution approach to determine a layered impulse response, and a correlation approach. After testing the algorithms on the FDTD results, we down-select to a suitable method.

  7. Yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death can occur without cytochrome c release which requires metacaspase YCA1.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Bobba, Antonella; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2010-01-04

    To investigate the role of cytochrome c (cyt c) release in yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death (AA-PCD), wild type (wt) and cells lacking metacaspase (Deltayca1), cytochrome c (Deltacyc1,7) and both (Deltacyc1,7Deltayca1) were compared for AA-PCD occurrence, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production and caspase activity. AA-PCD occurs in Deltacyc1,7 and Deltacyc1,7Deltayca1 cells slower than in wt, but similar to that in Deltayca1 cells, in which no cytochrome c release occurs. Both H(2)O(2) production and caspase activation occur in these cells with early and extra-activation in Deltacyc1,7 cells. We conclude that alternative death pathways can be activated in yeast AA-PCD, one dependent on cyt c release, which requires YCA1, and the other(s) independent on it.

  8. Combinatorial localized dissolution analysis: Application to acid-induced dissolution of dental enamel and the effect of surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Parker, Alexander S; Al Botros, Rehab; Kinnear, Sophie L; Snowden, Michael E; McKelvey, Kim; Ashcroft, Alexander T; Carvell, Mel; Joiner, Andrew; Peruffo, Massimo; Philpotts, Carol; Unwin, Patrick R

    2016-08-15

    A combination of scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to quantitatively study the acid-induced dissolution of dental enamel. A micron-scale liquid meniscus formed at the end of a dual barrelled pipette, which constitutes the SECCM probe, is brought into contact with the enamel surface for a defined period. Dissolution occurs at the interface of the meniscus and the enamel surface, under conditions of well-defined mass transport, creating etch pits that are then analysed via AFM. This technique is applied to bovine dental enamel, and the effect of various treatments of the enamel surface on acid dissolution (1mM HNO3) is studied. The treatments investigated are zinc ions, fluoride ions and the two combined. A finite element method (FEM) simulation of SECCM mass transport and interfacial reactivity, allows the intrinsic rate constant for acid-induced dissolution to be quantitatively determined. The dissolution of enamel, in terms of Ca(2+) flux ( [Formula: see text] ), is first order with respect to the interfacial proton concentration and given by the following rate law: [Formula: see text] , with k0=0.099±0.008cms(-1). Treating the enamel with either fluoride or zinc ions slows the dissolution rate, although in this model system the partly protective barrier only extends around 10-20nm into the enamel surface, so that after a period of a few seconds dissolution of modified surfaces tends towards that of native enamel. A combination of both treatments exhibits the greatest protection to the enamel surface, but the effect is again transient.

  9. Involvement of cyclooxygenase-1, prostaglandin E2 and EP1 receptors in acid-induced HCO3- secretion in stomach.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Aihara, E; Sasaki, Y; Nomura, Y; Ise, F

    2006-12-01

    We investigated the cyclooxygenase (COX) isoforms as well as prostaglandin E receptor EP subtypes responsible for acid-induced gastric HCO(3)(-) secretion in rats and EP receptor-knockout (-/-) mice. Under urethane anesthesia, a chambered stomach (in the presence of omeprazole) was perfused with saline, and HCO(3)(-) secretion was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method and by adding 2 mM HCl. Mucosal acidification was achieved by exposing the stomach for 10 min to 50 or 100 mM HCl. Acidification of the mucosa increased the secretion of HCO(3)(-) in the stomach of both rats and WT mice, in an indomethacin-inhibitable manner. The acid-induced gastric HCO(3)(-) secretion was inhibited by prior administration of indomethacin and SC-560 but not rofecoxib in rats and mice. Acidification increased the PGE(2) content of the rat stomach, and this response was significantly attenuated by indomethacin and SC-560 but not rofecoxib. This response was also attenuated by ONO-8711 (EP1 antagonist) but not AE3-208 (EP4 antagonist) in rats and disappeared in EP1 (-/-) but not EP3 (-/-) mice. PGE(2) increased gastric HCO(3)(-) secretion in both rats and WT mice, and this action was inhibited by ONO-8711 and disappeared in EP1 (-/-) but not EP3 (-/-) mice. These results support a mediator role for endogenous PGs in the gastric response induced by mucosal acidification and clearly indicate that the enzyme responsible for production of PGs in this process is COX-1. They further show that the presence of EP1 receptors is essential for the increase in the secretion of HCO(3)(-) in response to mucosal acidification in the stomach.

  10. Galantamine potentiates the protective effect of rofecoxib and caffeic acid against intrahippocampal Kainic acid-induced cognitive dysfunction in rat.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Prakash, Atish; Pahwa, Deeksha

    2011-05-30

    Role of neuroinflammatory mediators particularly cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), have been well suggested in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Rofecoxib is a selective cyclooxygenase 2 enzymes belongs to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, commonly called as coxibs. Whereas, caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) is one of the natural phenolic compounds and reported to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activity as one of mechanisms. Present study has been designed to investigate the effects of rofecoxib, caffeic acid and its potentiation by galantamine against intrahippocampal kainic acid-induced cognitive impairment, oxidative damage and mitochondrial respiratory enzyme alterations in rats. Kainic acid (KA) was administrated in the hippocampus region of rat brain. Various behavioral (locomotor activity and memory performances were assessed by using actophotometer and Morris water maze respectively) followed by oxidative stress, mitochondrial enzyme complex were assessed. Intrahippocampal administration of KA significantly impaired locomotor activity, memory performance, mitochondrial enzyme complexes and caused oxidative stress as compared to sham treatment. Rofecoxib (5 and 10mg/kg), caffeic acid (5 and 10mg/kg), Gal (2.5 and 5mg/kg) treatment for 14 days significantly improved locomotor activity, memory retention and oxidative defense (as evidenced by decrease lipid peroxidation, nitrite, increased superoxide dismutase activity and redox ratio) in hippocampus. Besides, alterations in the levels of mitochondrial enzymes and acetylcholine esterase enzyme were significantly restored by rofecoxib and caffeic acid as compared to control. Further, combination of rofecoxib (5mg/kg) with caffeic acid (5mg/kg) and lower dose of gal (2.5mg/kg) with rofecoxib (5mg/kg) treatments significantly potentiated their protective effect which was significant as compared to their effect per se. The results of the present study suggest that galantamine

  11. [Nursing care wall planning].

    PubMed

    Moreau, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Nursing care wall planners are not a tool for assessing workload, but a means of providing coherence and individualised monitoring of care. Its application is focused not only on team organisation, but also on the patient's needs.

  12. Rapid regulatory control of plant cell expansion and wall relaxation. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1991-08-14

    The aim of this project is to elucidate the biophysical and cellular mechanisms that control plant cell expansion. At present we are attempting to characterize the kinetics of the system(s) responsible for regulatory and compensatory behavior of growing cells and tissues. This work is significantly because it indicates that biochemical loosening and biophysical stress relaxation of the wall are part of a feedback loop controlling growth. This report briefly summarizes the efforts and results of the past 12 months. In large part, we have been trying to analyze the nature of growth rate ``noise,`` i.e. spontaneous and often erratic variations in growth rate. We are obtaining evidence that such ``noise`` is not random, but rather reveals an underlying growth mechanism with complex dynamics.

  13. Conducting Wall Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Hofer, Richard R.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Dotson, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    A unique configuration of the magnetic field near the wall of Hall thrusters, called Magnetic Shielding, has recently demonstrated the ability to significantly reduce the erosion of the boron nitride (BN) walls and extend the life of Hall thrusters by orders of magnitude. The ability of magnetic shielding to minimize interactions between the plasma and the discharge chamber walls has for the first time enabled the replacement of insulating walls with conducting materials without loss in thruster performance. The boron nitride rings in the 6 kW H6 Hall thruster were replaced with graphite that self-biased to near the anode potential. The thruster efficiency remained over 60% (within two percent of the baseline BN configuration) with a small decrease in thrust and increase in Isp typical of magnetically shielded Hall thrusters. The graphite wall temperatures decreased significantly compared to both shielded and unshielded BN configurations, leading to the potential for higher power operation. Eliminating ceramic walls makes it simpler and less expensive to fabricate a thruster to survive launch loads, and the graphite discharge chamber radiates more efficiently which increases the power capability of the thruster compared to conventional Hall thruster designs.

  14. Sensitivity-enhanced solid-state NMR detection of expansin’s target in plant cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Caporini, Marc A.; Rosay, Melanie; Zhong, Linghao; Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Hong, Mei

    2013-01-01

    Structure determination of protein binding to noncrystalline macromolecular assemblies such as plant cell walls (CWs) poses a significant structural biology challenge. CWs are loosened during growth by expansin proteins, which weaken the noncovalent network formed by cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins, but the CW target of expansins has remained elusive because of the minute amount of the protein required for activity and the complex nature of the CW. Using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, combined with sensitivity-enhancing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and differential isotopic labeling of expansin and polysaccharides, we have now determined the functional binding target of expansin in the Arabidopsis thaliana CW. By transferring the electron polarization of a biradical dopant to the nuclei, DNP allowed selective detection of 13C spin diffusion from trace concentrations of 13C, 15N-labeled expansin in the CW to nearby polysaccharides. From the spin diffusion data of wild-type and mutant expansins, we conclude that to loosen the CW, expansin binds highly specific cellulose domains enriched in xyloglucan, whereas more abundant binding to pectins is unrelated to activity. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate short 13C-13C distances of 4–6 Å between a hydrophobic surface of the cellulose microfibril and an aromatic motif on the expansin surface, consistent with the observed NMR signals. DNP-enhanced 2D 13C correlation spectra further reveal that the expansin-bound cellulose has altered conformation and is enriched in xyloglucan, thus providing unique insight into the mechanism of CW loosening. DNP-enhanced NMR provides a powerful, generalizable approach for investigating protein binding to complex macromolecular targets. PMID:24065828

  15. Ultimate Cost of Building Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Clayford T.; Gross, James G.

    The need for economic analysis of building walls is discussed, and the factors influencing the ultimate cost of exterior walls are studied. The present worth method is used to analyze three types of exterior non-loadbearing panel or curtain walls. Anticipated costs are expressed in terms of their present value per square foot of wall area. The…

  16. The Target of β-Expansin EXPB1 in Maize Cell Walls from Binding and Solid-State NMR Studies1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tuo; Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    The wall-loosening actions of β-expansins are known primarily from studies of EXPB1 extracted from maize (Zea mays) pollen. EXPB1 selectively loosens cell walls (CWs) of grasses, but its specific binding target is unknown. We characterized EXPB1 binding to sequentially extracted maize CWs, finding that the protein primarily binds glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX), the major matrix polysaccharide in grass CWs. This binding is strongly reduced by salts, indicating that it is predominantly electrostatic in nature. For direct molecular evidence of EXPB1 binding, we conducted solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance experiments using paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE), which is sensitive to distances between unpaired electrons and nuclei. By mixing 13C-enriched maize CWs with EXPB1 functionalized with a Mn2+ tag, we measured Mn2+-induced PRE. Strong 1H and 13C PREs were observed for the carboxyls of GAX, followed by more moderate PREs for carboxyl groups in homogalacturonan and rhamnogalacturonan-I, indicating that EXPB1 preferentially binds GAX. In contrast, no PRE was observed for cellulose, indicating very weak interaction of EXPB1 with cellulose. Dynamics experiments show that EXPB1 changes GAX mobility in a complex manner: the rigid fraction of GAX became more rigid upon EXPB1 binding while the dynamic fraction became more mobile. Combining these data with previous results, we propose that EXPB1 loosens grass CWs by disrupting noncovalent junctions between highly substituted GAX and GAX of low substitution, which binds cellulose. This study provides molecular evidence of β-expansin’s target in grass CWs and demonstrates a new strategy for investigating ligand binding for proteins that are difficult to express heterologously. PMID:27729469

  17. Olodaterol attenuates citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wex, Eva; Bouyssou, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Excessive coughing is a common feature of airway diseases. Different G-protein coupled receptors, including β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-AR), have been implicated in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cough reflex. However, the potential antitussive property of β2-AR agonists in patients with respiratory disease is a matter of ongoing debate. The aim of our study was to test the efficacy of the long-acting β2-AR agonist olodaterol with regard to its antitussive property in a pre-clinical model of citric acid-induced cough in guinea pigs and to compare the results to different clinically relevant β2-AR agonists. In our study β2-AR agonists were intratracheally administered, as dry powder, into the lungs of naïve or ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs 15 minutes prior to induction of cough by exposure to citric acid. Cough events were counted over 15 minutes during the citric acid exposure. Olodaterol dose-dependently inhibited the number of cough events in naïve and even more potently and with a greater maximal efficacy in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs (p < 0.01). Formoterol and salmeterol showed a trend towards reducing cough. On the contrary, indacaterol demonstrated pro-tussive properties as it significantly increased the number of coughs, both in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized animals (p < 0.001). In conclusion, olodaterol, at doses eliciting bronchodilation, showed antitussive properties in a model of citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. This is in agreement with pre-clinical and clinical studies showing antitussive efficacy of β2-AR agonists. Indacaterol increased the number of coughs in this model, which concurs with clinical data where a transient cough has been observed after indacaterol inhalation. While the antitussive properties of β2-AR agonists can be explained by their ability to lead to the cAMP-induced hyperpolarization of the neuron membrane thereby inhibiting sensory nerve activation and the

  18. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  19. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  20. Thermal treatment wall

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Newmark, Robin L.; Knauss, Kevin G.

    2000-01-01

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  1. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  2. Cell Wall Yield Properties of Growing Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    1985-01-01

    Growing pea stem tissue, when isolated from an external supply of water, undegoes stress relaxation because of continued loosening of the cell wall. A theoretical analysis is presented to show that such stress relaxation should result in an exponential decrease in turgor pressure down to the yield threshold (Y), with a rate constant given by φε where φ is the metabolically maintained irreversible extensibility of the cell wall and ε is the volumetric elastic modulus of the cell. This theory represents a new method to determine φ in growing tissues. Stress relaxation was measured in pea (Pisum sativus L.) stem segments using the pressure microprobe technique. From the rate of stress relaxation, φ of segments pretreated with water was calculated to be 0.08 per megapascal per hour while that of auxin-pretreated tissue was 0.24 per megapascal per hour. These values agreed closely with estimates of φ made by a steady-state technique. The yield threshold (0.29 megapascal) was not affected by auxin. Technical difficulties with measuring φ by stress relaxation may arise due to an internal water reserve or due to changes in φ subsequent to excision. These difficulties are discussed and evaluated. A theoretical analysis is also presented to show that the tissue hydraulic conductance may be estimated from the T½ of tissue swelling. Experimentally, pea stems had a swelling T½ of 2.0 minutes, corresponding to a relative hydraulic conductance of about 2.0 per megapascal per hour. This value is at least 8 times larger than φ. From these data and from computer modeling, it appears that the radial gradient in water potential which sustains water uptake in growing pea segments is small (0.04 megapascal). This means that hydraulic conductance does not substantially restrict growth. The results also demonstrate that the stimulation of growth by auxin can be entirely accounted for by the change in φ. PMID:16664243

  3. Gullies in Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-388, 11 June 2003

    Many craters and troughs at polar and middle latitudes on Mars have gullies carved in their walls. These gullies may have formed by running water; others have suggested alternative, exotic fluids such as liquid or gaseous carbon dioxide. This view of martian gullies was acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). The image shows gullies in the wall of an old meteor impact crater near 39.0oS, 200.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  4. Gullied Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-371, 25 May 2003

    Gullies are common in some regions on middle- and polar-latitude slopes, such as crater walls. This March 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies on the north wall of a crater in the Atlantis Chaos region near 34.3oS, 178.0oW. The gullies might have formed by flow of a fluid--perhaps liquid water--sometime in the geologically recent martian past. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  5. Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 Modulates Retinoic Acid-Induced Neuronal Differentiation of Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Cathrin; Paus, Marie; Frey, Katharina; Schmid, Ramona; Kohl, Zacharias; Mennerich, Detlev; Winkler, Jürgen; Gillardon, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Background Dominant mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene are the most prevalent cause of Parkinson's disease, however, little is known about the biological function of LRRK2 protein. LRRK2 is expressed in neural precursor cells suggesting a role in neurodevelopment. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, differential gene expression profiling revealed a faster silencing of pluripotency-associated genes, like Nanog, Oct4, and Lin28, during retinoic acid-induced neuronal differentiation of LRRK2-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells compared to wildtype cultures. By contrast, expression of neurotransmitter receptors and neurotransmitter release was increased in LRRK2+/− cultures indicating that LRRK2 promotes neuronal differentiation. Consistently, the number of neural progenitor cells was higher in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult LRRK2-deficient mice. Alterations in phosphorylation of the putative LRRK2 substrates, translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 and moesin, do not appear to be involved in altered differentiation, rather there is indirect evidence that a regulatory signaling network comprising retinoic acid receptors, let-7 miRNA and downstream target genes/mRNAs may be affected in LRRK2-deficient stem cells in culture. Conclusion/Significance Parkinson's disease-linked LRRK2 mutations that associated with enhanced kinase activity may affect retinoic acid receptor signaling during neurodevelopment and/or neuronal maintenance as has been shown in other mouse models of chronic neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21695257

  6. The effect of nedocromil sodium, sodium cromoglycate and codeine phosphate on citric acid-induced cough in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effects of nedocromil sodium, sodium cromoglycate and codeine phosphate on citric acid-induced cough have been studied in conscious tracheostomised dogs. 2. Nedocromil sodium (approximately 15 mg given as an aerosol) and codeine phosphate (5 mg kg-1, i.v.) significantly increased the time to the first cough when dogs were challenged with citric acid aerosol. The mean number of coughs in the initial period of coughing fell after treatment of dogs with nedocromil sodium or with codeine phosphate, but this reduction in mean cough number was not statistically significant. 3. Neither sodium cromoglycate (approximately 15 mg given as an aerosol) nor saline had significant effect on a citric acid challenge. 4. It is concluded that nedocromil sodium, but not sodium cromoglycate, possesses an anti-tussive action that may result from inhibition of sensory nerve activity in the lung. Nedocromil sodium may prove useful in the treatment of unproductive cough in situations where the use of a centrally-acting antitussive is undesirable. PMID:2836011

  7. Biocontrol agents-mediated suppression of oxalic acid induced cell death during Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-pea interaction.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akansha; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Surendra; Sarma, Birinchi Kumar; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2015-05-01

    Oxalic acid (OA) is an important pathogenic factor during early Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-host interaction and might work by reducing hydrogen peroxide production (H2 O2 ). In the present investigation, oxalic acid-induced cell death in pea was studied. Pea plants treated with biocontrol agents (BCAs) viz., Pseudomonas aeruginosa PJHU15, Bacillus subtilis BHHU100, and Trichoderma harzianum TNHU27 either singly and/or in consortium acted on S. sclerotiorum indirectly by enabling plants to inhibit the OA-mediated suppression of oxidative burst via induction of H2 O2 . Our results showed that BCA treated plants upon treatment with culture filtrate of the pathogen, conferred the resistance via. significantly decreasing relative cell death of pea against S. sclerotiorum compared to control plants without BCA treatment but treated with the culture filtrate of the pathogen. The results obtained from the present study indicate that the microbes especially in consortia play significant role in protection against S. sclerotiorum by modulating oxidative burst and partially enhancing tolerance by increasing the H2 O2 generation, which is otherwise suppressed by OA produced by the pathogen.

  8. Rheological and physical properties of camel and cow milk gels enriched with phosphate and calcium during acid-induced gelation.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Mohammad; Foukani, Mohammed; Karoui, Romdhane

    2017-02-01

    The rheological properties of acid-induced coagulation of camel and cow milk gels following the addition of calcium chloride (CaCl2) and hydrogen phosphate dehydrate (Na2HPO4*2H2O) were investigated using a dynamic low amplitude oscillatory rheology. For a considered condition, the final values of storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G″) of camel milk gels were significantly lower than those of cow milk gels. The increase of the added CaCl2 levels improved significantly the gelation properties of camel and cow milk gels, since a reduction in the gelation time and an increase in the gel firmness were observed. Following the addition of Na2HPO4*2H2O at 10 and 20 mM, no significant effect on the gelation rate and the firmness of camel milk gels was observed, while, a significant decrease in the gelation rate and firmness were observed for cow milk gels.

  9. Protective Effect of Cod (Gadus macrocephalus) Skin Collagen Peptides on Acetic Acid-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Huina; Wang, Zhicong; Hou, Hu; Zhang, Zhaohui; Li, Bafang

    2016-07-01

    This research was performed to explore the protective effect of cod skin collagen peptides (CCP) on gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid. The CCP were fractionated into low molecular CCP (LMCCP, Mw < 3 kDa) and high molecular CCP (HMCCP, Mw > 3 kDa). In HMCCP and LMCCP, glycine of accounted for about one-third of the total amino acids without cysteine and tryptophan, and hydrophobic amino acids accounted for about 50%. After 21 d CCP treatment (60 or 300 mg/kg, p.o./daily), the healing effects on acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers were evaluated by macroscopic measure, microscopic measure, and immune histochemistry. Moreover, the expression levels of the growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), and the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was detected. The results showed that both LMCCP and HMCCP could significantly decrease the ulcer areas and promote the healing of the lesions. They also could improve the levels of hexosamine, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, and reduce the content of malondialdehyde and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In addition, the expression level of TGFβ1 gene and HSP70 mRNA was significantly improved by the treatment. It suggested that CCP could be able to improve symptoms of gastric ulcer and probably be used in the treatment of gastric ulcer.

  10. Ellagic acid induces novel and atypical PKC isoforms and promotes caspase-3 dependent apoptosis by blocking energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sudha; Vinayak, Manjula

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidant ellagic acid is a herbal polyphenolic compound shown to possess growth-inhibiting and apoptotic activities in cancer. Protein kinase C (PKC) plays an important role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. Apoptosis of tumor cells is induced by inactivation of glycolytic enzyme of anaerobic metabolism, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-A, and by activating apoptotic protein caspase-3 via PKCδ. The present study aims to analyze the role of ellagic acid on regulation of novel and atypical isozymes of PKC to modulate apoptosis and anaerobic metabolism to prevent lymphoma growth as its role on classical PKCs is reported earlier. Expression of novel and atypical isozymes of PKC, activity of PKCδ, expression and activity of caspase-3, and LDH-A have been analyzed. Expression is measured by RT-PCR, activities of PKCδ as level of its catalytic fragment, caspase-3 as level of its p17 fragment, and LDH-A by specific staining. Lymphoma bearing mice were treated with 3 different doses of ellagic acid. The treatment enhanced expression of all novel and atypical PKCs, activity and expression of caspase-3, and activity of PKCδ but decreased activity and expression of LDH-A. Our results suggest that ellagic acid induces apoptosis via novel and atypical PKCs in association with caspase-3 and induces cancer cell death by blocking the energy metabolism.

  11. Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) induced hydroxyl radical formation in copper contaminated household drinking water: role of bicarbonate concentration.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Patric J; Asplund, Klara U M; Mäkelä, Johanna C; Lindqvist, Christer; Nordström, Tommy

    2003-08-01

    We have previously shown that Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) can trigger hydroxyl radical formation in copper contaminated household drinking water. We report here that the capacity of ascorbic acid to catalyze hydroxyl radical generation in the drinking water samples is strongly dependent on the bicarbonate concentration (buffer capacity and pH) of the samples. We found that at least 50 mg/l bicarbonate was required in the water samples to maintain the pH over 5.0 after ascorbic acid addition. At this pH, that is higher than the pKa1 4.25 of ascorbic acid, a hydroxyl radical generating redox cycling reaction involving the mono-anion of vitamin C and copper could take place. The ascorbic acid induced hydroxyl radical generating reaction could easily be mimicked in Milli-Q water by supplementing the water with copper and bicarbonate. Our results demonstrate that ascorbic acid can induce a pH dependent hydroxyl radical generating reaction in copper contaminated household tap water that is buffered with bicarbonate. The impact of consuming ascorbic acid together with copper and bicarbonate containing drinking water on human health is discussed.

  12. Swelling-activated and arachidonic acid-induced currents are TREK-1 in rat bladder smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukasaku, Mitsuko; Kimura, Junko; Yamaguchi, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Using the perforated patch voltage clamp, we investigated swelling-activated ionic channels (SACs) in rat urinary bladder smooth muscle cells. Hypo-osmotic (60%) bath solution increased a membrane current which was inhibited by the SAC inhibitor, gadolinium. The reversal potential of the hypotonicity-induced current shifted in the positive direction by increasing external K+ concentration. The hypotonicity-induced current was inhibited by extracellular acidic pH, phorbol ester and forskolin. These pharmacological properties are identical to those of arachidonic acid-induced current present in these cells, suggesting the presence of TREK-1, a four-transmembrane two pore domain K+ channel. Using RT-PCR we screened rat bladder smooth muscles and cerebellum for expression of TREK-1, TREK-2 and TRAAK mRNAs. Only TREK-1 mRNA was expressed in the bladder, while all three were expressed in the cerebellum. We conclude that a mechanosensitive K+ channel is present in rat bladder myocytes, which is activated by arachidonic acid and most likely is TREK-1. This K+ channel may have an important role in the regulation of bladder smooth muscle tone during urine storage. PMID:26911303

  13. Swelling-activated and arachidonic acid-induced currents are TREK-1 in rat bladder smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fukasaku, Mitsuko; Kimura, Junko; Yamaguchi, Osamu

    2016-06-08

    Using the perforated patch voltage clamp, we investigated swelling-activated ionic channels (SACs) in rat urinary bladder smooth muscle cells. Hypo-osmotic (60%) bath solution increased a membrane current which was inhibited by the SAC inhibitor, gadolinium. The reversal potential of the hypotonicity-induced current shifted in the positive direction by increasing external K(+) concentration. The hypotonicity-induced current was inhibited by extracellular acidic pH, phorbol ester and forskolin. These pharmacological properties are identical to those of arachidonic acid-induced current present in these cells, suggesting the presence of TREK-1, a four-transmembrane two pore domain K(+) channel. Using RT-PCR we screened rat bladder smooth muscles and cerebellum for expression of TREK-1, TREK-2 and TRAAK mRNAs. Only TREK-1 mRNA was expressed in the bladder, while all three were expressed in the cerebellum. We conclude that a mechanosensitive K(+) channel is present in rat bladder myocytes, which is activated by arachidonic acid and most likely is TREK-1. This K(+) channel may have an important role in the regulation of bladder smooth muscle tone during urine storage.

  14. Phenylbutyric acid induces the cellular senescence through an Akt/p21{sup WAF1} signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hag Dong; Jang, Chang-Young; Choe, Jeong Min; Sohn, Jeongwon; Kim, Joon

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenylbutyric acid induces cellular senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenylbutyric acid activates Akt kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The knockdown of PERK also can induce cellular senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt/p21{sup WAF1} pathway activates in PERK knockdown induced cellular senescence. -- Abstract: It has been well known that three sentinel proteins - PERK, ATF6 and IRE1 - initiate the unfolded protein response (UPR) in the presence of misfolded or unfolded proteins in the ER. Recent studies have demonstrated that upregulation of UPR in cancer cells is required to survive and proliferate. Here, we showed that long exposure to 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA), a chemical chaperone that can reduce retention of unfolded and misfolded proteins in ER, induced cellular senescence in cancer cells such as MCF7 and HT1080. In addition, we found that treatment with PBA activates Akt, which results in p21{sup WAF1} induction. Interestingly, the depletion of PERK but not ATF6 and IRE1 also induces cellular senescence, which was rescued by additional depletion of Akt. This suggests that Akt pathway is downstream of PERK in PBA induced cellular senescence. Taken together, these results show that PBA induces cellular senescence via activation of the Akt/p21{sup WAF1} pathway by PERK inhibition.

  15. The phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid induces AQP2 translocation independently from AQP2 phosphorylation in renal collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Valenti, G; Procino, G; Carmosino, M; Frigeri, A; Mannucci, R; Nicoletti, I; Svelto, M

    2000-06-01

    Phosphorylation by kinases and dephosphorylation by phosphatase markedly affect the biological activity of proteins involved in intracellular signaling. In this study we investigated the effect of the serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid on water permeability properties and on aquaporin2 (AQP2) translocation in AQP2-transfected renal CD8 cells. In CD8 cells both forskolin alone and okadaic acid alone increased the osmotic water permeability coefficient P(f) by about 4- to 5-fold. In intact cells, in vivo phosphorylation studies revealed that forskolin stimulation resulted in a threefold increase in AQP2 phosphorylation. In contrast, okadaic acid treatment promoted only a 60% increase in AQP2 phosphorylation which was abolished when this treatment was performed in the presence of 1 microM H89, a specific protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Nevertheless, in this latter condition, confocal microscopy analysis revealed that AQP2 translocated and fused to the apical membrane. Okadaic acid-induced AQP2 translocation was dose dependent having its maximal effect at a concentration of 1 microM. In conclusion, our results clearly indicate that okadaic acid exerts a full forskolin-like effect independent from AQP2 phosphorylation. Thus AQP2 phosphorylation is not essential for water channel translocation in renal cells, indicating that different pathways might exist leading to AQP2 apical insertion and increase in P(f).

  16. Attenuation of Folic Acid-Induced Renal Inflammatory Injury in Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Kent; Okamoto, Koji; Negishi, Kousuke; Suzuki, Yoshifumi; Nakao, Akihide; Fujita, Toshiro; Toda, Akiko; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Kita, Yoshihiro; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Ishii, Satoshi; Shimizu, Takao; Noiri, Eisei

    2006-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent lipid mediator with various biological activities, plays an important role in inflammation by recruiting leukocytes. In this study we used platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR)-deficient mice to elucidate the role of PAF in inflammatory renal injury induced by folic acid administration. PAFR-deficient mice showed significant amelioration of renal dysfunction and pathological findings such as acute tubular damage with neutrophil infiltration, lipid peroxidation observed with antibody to 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (day 2), and interstitial fibrosis with macrophage infiltration associated with expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the kidney (day 14). Acute tubular damage was attenuated by neutrophil depletion using a monoclonal antibody (RB6-8C5), demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils to acute phase injury. Macrophage infiltration was also decreased when treatment with a PAF antagonist (WEB2086) was started after acute phase. In vitro chemotaxis assay using a Boyden chamber demonstrated that PAF exhibits a strong chemotactic activity for macrophages. These results indicate that PAF is involved in pathogenesis of folic acid-induced renal injury by activating neutrophils in acute phase and macrophages in chronic interstitial fibrosis. Inhibiting the PAF pathway might be therapeutic to kidney injury from inflammatory cells. PMID:16651609

  17. Nucleotide sequence and spatial expression pattern of a drought- and abscisic Acid-induced gene of tomato.

    PubMed

    Plant, A L; Cohen, A; Moses, M S; Bray, E A

    1991-11-01

    The nucleotide sequence of le16, a tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) gene induced by drought stress and regulated by abscisic acid specifically in aerial vegetative tissue, is presented. The single open reading frame contained within the gene has the capacity to encode a polypeptide of 12.7 kilodaltons and is interrupted by a small intron. The predicted polypeptide is rich in leucine, glycine, and alanine and has an isoelectric point of 8.7. The amino terminus is hydrophobic and characteristic of signal sequences that target polypeptides for export from the cytoplasm. There is homology (47.2% identity) between the amino terminus of the LE 16 polypeptide and the corresponding amino terminal domain of the maize phospholipid transfer protein. le16 was expressed in drought-stressed leaf, petiole, and stem tissue and to a much lower extent in the pericarp of mature green tomato fruit and developing seeds. No expression was detected in the pericarp of red fruit or in drought-stressed roots. Expression of le16 was also induced in leaf tissue by a variety of other abiotic stresses including polyethylene glycol-mediated water deficit, salinity, cold stress, and heat stress. None of these stresses or direct applications of abscisic acid induced the expression of le16 in the roots of the same plants. The unique expression characteristics of this gene indicates that novel regulatory mechanisms, in addition to endogenous abscisic acid, are involved in controlling gene expression.

  18. Fly on the Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Dave; Korpan, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a peer observation program at the University of Victoria called the Lecture Club. The observers are not interactive during the class--they are the proverbial flies on the wall. The paper identifies the program as self-developmental, discussing the attributes of this learning-to-teach and peer-sharing…

  19. A Wall of Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Visitors to the campus of Orland High School (OHS) will never question that they have stepped into a world of the masses: kids, activity, personalities, busyness, and playfulness--a veritable cloud of mild bedlam. The wall of ceramic faces that greets a visitor in the school office is another reminder of the organized chaos that the teachers…

  20. A School without Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venuti, Len Tai

    1994-01-01

    During the summer, selected students of Hawaiian ancestry who have completed seventh or eighth grade participate in a boarding program with outdoor activities such as pulling taro, star gazing, and camping. The activities eliminate walls of doubt and fear and nurture self-confidence, creativity, personal growth, leadership, and cultural awareness.…

  1. The Wall Coverings Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Students love nothing better than personalizing their space--desk, bedroom, or even their cars. This article describes a classroom challenge that gives students a chance to let their spirits soar with the invention of a new form of wall treatment. A trip to a big box store might prove to be most helpful for students to visualize their new product…

  2. Wall turbulence control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Stephen P.; Lindemann, A. Margrethe; Beeler, George B.; Mcginley, Catherine B.; Goodman, Wesley L.; Balasubramanian, R.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of wall turbulence control devices which were experimentally investigated are discussed; these include devices for burst control, alteration of outer flow structures, large eddy substitution, increased heat transfer efficiency, and reduction of wall pressure fluctuations. Control of pre-burst flow was demonstrated with a single, traveling surface depression which is phase-locked to elements of the burst production process. Another approach to wall turbulence control is to interfere with the outer layer coherent structures. A device in the outer part of a boundary layer was shown to suppress turbulence and reduce drag by opposing both the mean and unsteady vorticity in the boundary layer. Large eddy substitution is a method in which streamline curvature is introduced into the boundary layer in the form of streamwise vortices. Riblets, which were already shown to reduce turbulent drag, were also shown to exhibit superior heat transfer characteristics. Heat transfer efficiency as measured by the Reynolds Analogy Factor was shown to be as much as 36 percent greater than a smooth flat plate in a turbulent boundary layer. Large Eddy Break-Up (LEBU) which are also known to reduce turbulent drag were shown to reduce turbulent wall pressure fluctuation.

  3. Lateral Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral abdominal wall (LAW) defects can manifest as a flank hernias, myofascial laxity/bulges, or full-thickness defects. These defects are quite different from those in the anterior abdominal wall defects and the complexity and limited surgical options make repairing the LAW a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. LAW reconstruction requires an understanding of the anatomy, physiologic forces, and the impact of deinnervation injury to design and perform successful reconstructions of hernia, bulge, and full-thickness defects. Reconstructive strategies must be tailored to address the inguinal ligament, retroperitoneum, chest wall, and diaphragm. Operative technique must focus on stabilization of the LAW to nonyielding points of fixation at the anatomic borders of the LAW far beyond the musculofascial borders of the defect itself. Thus, hernias, bulges, and full-thickness defects are approached in a similar fashion. Mesh reinforcement is uniformly required in lateral abdominal wall reconstruction. Inlay mesh placement with overlying myofascial coverage is preferred as a first-line option as is the case in anterior abdominal wall reconstruction. However, interposition bridging repairs are often performed as the surrounding myofascial tissue precludes a dual layered closure. The decision to place bioprosthetic or prosthetic mesh depends on surgeon preference, patient comorbidities, and clinical factors of the repair. Regardless of mesh type, the overlying soft tissue must provide stable cutaneous coverage and obliteration of dead space. In cases where the fasciocutaneous flaps surrounding the defect are inadequate for closure, regional pedicled flaps or free flaps are recruited to achieve stable soft tissue coverage. PMID:23372458

  4. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Arena, Lois; Mantha, Pallavi

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  5. 1. SOUTHEAST REAR WALL AND NORTHEAST SIDE WALL OF CABINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SOUTHEAST REAR WALL AND NORTHEAST SIDE WALL OF CABINS FORGEMAN'S HOUSE NO. 1 AT RIGHT - Mount Etna Iron Works, Forgeman's House No. 1, Legislative Route 07020 between junctions of T.R. 461 & 463, Williamsburg, Blair County, PA

  6. Typical Window, Interior Wall Paint Sequence, Wall Section, and Foundation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Typical Window, Interior Wall Paint Sequence, Wall Section, and Foundation Sections - Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp NP-5-C, Barracks No. 5, CCC Camp Historic District at Chapin Mesa, Cortez, Montezuma County, CO

  7. 4. CONSTRUCTION DETAIL, SW CORNER, SHOWING RETAINING WALL, BRIDGE WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. CONSTRUCTION DETAIL, SW CORNER, SHOWING RETAINING WALL, BRIDGE WALL AND EROSION ON ROAD SURFACE. - Bridalveil Fall Bridge No. 3, Spanning Bridalveil Creek on carriage road, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  8. DETAIL OF CROCKETT BARN WALL CONSTRUCTION, UPPER LEVEL. The wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF CROCKETT BARN WALL CONSTRUCTION, UPPER LEVEL. The wall construction of the Crockett barn includes a layer of diagonal sheathing that is exposed on the interior. - Crockett Farm, Barn, 1056 Fort Casey Road, Coupeville, Island County, WA

  9. Interior view of wall detail of southeast wall, view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of wall detail of southeast wall, view towards the southeast, without scale - Fort McClellan Ammunition Storage Area, Building No. 4408, Second Avenue (Magazine Road), Anniston, Calhoun County, AL

  10. EAST WALL OF CRYSTALLIZER WING TO THE LEFT, END WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST WALL OF CRYSTALLIZER WING TO THE LEFT, END WALL OF CRUSHING MILL IN CENTER. GABLE END OF BOILING HOUSE IN LEFT BACKGROUND. VIEW FROM THE SOUTH - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  11. 40. RETAINING WALL CONSTRUCTION SHOWING PORTION OF COMPLETED WALL. BACKFILLING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. RETAINING WALL CONSTRUCTION SHOWING PORTION OF COMPLETED WALL. BACKFILLING BY POWER SHOVEL IN PROGRESS. ZION NP NEGATIVE NO. 1490. PHOTOGRAPHER: PARKER, NO DATE - Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  12. Wind tunnels with adapted walls for reducing wall interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganzer, U.

    1979-01-01

    The basic principle of adaptable wind tunnel walls is explained. First results of an investigation carried out at the Aero-Space Institute of Berlin Technical University are presented for two dimensional flexible walls and a NACA 0012 airfoil. With five examples exhibiting very different flow conditions it is demonstrated that it is possible to reduce wall interference and to avoid blockage at transonic speeds by wall adaptation.

  13. 25. NORTH TRAINING WALL, EAST SECTION, SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. NORTH TRAINING WALL, EAST SECTION, SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, LOOKING WEST FROM A POINT ABOUT 500 FEET FROM THE MIDDLE HARBOR PARK FISHING PIER. (Panoramic view 1 of 2). - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  14. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  15. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  16. Hydroalcoholic extract of Brazilian red propolis exerts protective effects on acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Bezerra, Gislaine; de Menezes de Souza, Luana; Dos Santos, Adailma Santana; de Almeida, Grace Kelly Melo; Souza, Marília Trindade Santana; Santos, Sandra Lauton; Aparecido Camargo, Enilton; Dos Santos Lima, Bruno; de Souza Araújo, Adriano Antunes; Cardoso, Juliana Cordeiro; Gomes, Silvana Vieira Floresta; Gomes, Margarete Zanardo; de Albuquerque, Ricardo Luiz Cavalcanti

    2017-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a common intestinal inflammatory disease with an etiology that is not well understood. Although the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects of the hydroalcoholic extract of Brazilian red propolis (HERP) have been reported in various experimental models, its protective effect in models of UC have not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemopreventive effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Brazilian red propolis (HERP) in acetic acid-induced colitis (AAIC) using a rodent model. The HERP was chemically characterised by HPLC/DAD analyses. Male rats were randomly assigned into four groups: sham, vehicle (with AAIC, treated with vehicle), P10 (with AAIC, treated with 10mg/kg HERP), and P100 (with AAIC, treated with 100mg/kg HERP). Treatments were performed for 7days, and colitis was induced on day seven. Animals were euthanized 24h after colitis induction and body weight, colon length, gross and histological scores, malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) concentrations in colon tissue, and the immunohistochemical expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were assessed. The major compounds found in HERP were liquiritigenin (68.8mg/g), formononetin (54.29mg/g), biochanin A (30.97mg/g), and daidzein (19.90mg/g). Rats treated with 10mg/kg HERP demonstrated significant decreases in MPO concentrations, gross and histological scores of tissue damage, and iNOS expression (p<0.05). Similarly, rats treated with 100mg/kg HERP demonstrated significant decreases in MPO levels (p<0.05) and histological scores of tissue damage (p<0.05). The results of this study indicate that oral administration of HERP attenuates AAIC in rats, which may be due to anti-inflammatory effects related to iNOS inhibition.

  17. Chronic activity wheel running reduces the severity of kainic acid-induced seizures in the rat: possible role of galanin.

    PubMed

    Reiss, J I; Dishman, R K; Boyd, H E; Robinson, J K; Holmes, P V

    2009-04-17

    Studies in both humans and rodents suggest that exercise can be neuroprotective, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are still poorly understood. Three weeks of voluntary, physical activity in rats upregulates prepro-galanin messenger RNA levels in the locus coeruleus. Galanin is a neuropeptide extensively coexisting with norepinephrine that decreases neuronal hyperexcitability both in vivo and in vitro. Thus, exercise may diminish neural hyperexcitability through a galaninergic mechanism. The current experiments tested whether voluntary activity wheel running would protect against kainic acid-evoked seizures and whether galaninergic signaling is a necessary factor in this protection. In experiment 1, rats were given access to running wheels or remained sedentary for three weeks. After this period, rats received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 0, 7, 10 or 14 mg/kg kainic acid. Exercise decreased the severity of or eliminated seizure behaviors and hippocampal c-fos expression induced by kainic acid. In experiment 2, exercising or sedentary rats were injected intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) with 0.2 or 0.4 microg of kainic acid following either an injection of M-40 (a galanin receptor antagonist) or saline. Exercise decreased kainic acid-induced seizures at the 0.2 microg dose, and M-40 (6 nmol) decreased this effect. In contrast, there were no detectable differences between exercising and sedentary rats in behavior at the 0.4 microg dose. The results suggest that the protective effects of exercise against seizures are at least partially mediated by regulation of neural excitability through a process involving galanin.

  18. Mitochondrial proteomics of the acetic acid - induced programmed cell death response in a highly tolerant Zygosaccharomyces bailii - derived hybrid strain

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Joana F.; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Soares, Renata; Coelho, Ana V.; Leão, Cecília; Ludovico, Paula; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Very high concentrations of acetic acid at low pH induce programmed cell death (PCD) in both the experimental model Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in Zygosaccharomyces bailii, the latter being considered the most problematic acidic food spoilage yeast due to its remarkable intrinsic resistance to this food preservative. However, while the mechanisms underlying S. cerevisiae PCD induced by acetic acid have been previously examined, the corresponding molecular players remain largely unknown in Z. bailii. Also, the reason why acetic acid concentrations known to be necrotic for S. cerevisiae induce PCD with an apoptotic phenotype in Z. bailii remains to be elucidated. In this study, a 2-DE-based expression mitochondrial proteomic analysis was explored to obtain new insights into the mechanisms involved in PCD in the Z. bailii derived hybrid strain ISA1307. This allowed the quantitative assessment of expression of protein species derived from each of the parental strains, with special emphasis on the processes taking place in the mitochondria known to play a key role in acetic acid - induced PCD. A marked decrease in the content of proteins involved in mitochondrial metabolism, in particular, in respiratory metabolism (Cor1, Rip1, Lpd1, Lat1 and Pdb1), with a concomitant increase in the abundance of proteins involved in fermentation (Pdc1, Ald4, Dld3) was registered. Other differentially expressed identified proteins also suggest the involvement of the oxidative stress response, protein translation, amino acid and nucleotide metabolism, among other processes, in the PCD response. Overall, the results strengthen the emerging concept of the importance of metabolic regulation of yeast PCD. PMID:28357336

  19. Glia activation and cytokine increase in rat hippocampus by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Massimo; Perego, Carlo; Aliprandi, Marisa; Richichi, Cristina; Ravizza, Teresa; Colella, Daniele; Velískŏvá, Jana; Moshé, Solomon L; De Simoni, M Grazia; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2003-12-01

    In adult rats, status epilepticus (SE) induces cytokine production by glia especially when seizures are associated with neuronal injury. This suggests that cytokines may play a role in seizure-induced neuronal damage. As SE-induced injury is age-specific, we used rats of different ages (with distinct susceptibilities to seizure-induced neuronal injury) to elucidate the role of cytokines in this process. Thus, we investigated the activation of microglia and astrocytes, induction of cytokines, and hippocampal neuronal injury 4 and 24 h following kainic acid-induced SE in postnatal day (PN) 9, 15, and 21 rats. At PN9, there was little activation of microglia and astrocytes at any time point studied. Interleukin-1beta (IL), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and IL-6 or the naturally occurring IL-1 receptor antagonist (Ra) mRNA expression did not increase. No evidence of cell injury has been detected. At PN15, immunostaining of microglia and astrocytes was enhanced, but only IL-1beta mRNA expression was increased. These changes were observed 4 h after SE. Scattered injured neurons in CA3 and subiculum, but not in any other region, were present 24 h following SE. At PN21, immunostaining of microglia and astrocytes and the mRNA expression of all cytokines studied was significantly increased already 4 h after SE. At 24 h, many injured neurons were present in CA1 and CA3 regions and in 40% of rats in other forebrain areas. These data show that (i) the pattern of glia activation and cytokine gene transcription induced by SE is age-dependent and (ii) neuronal injury in the hippocampus occurs only when cytokines are induced and their synthesis precedes the appearance of neuronal damage. Thus, cytokine expression in immature brain is associated specifically with cell injury rather than with seizures per se, suggesting that proinflammatory cytokines may contribute to the occurence of SE-induced hippocampal damage.

  20. Subchronic treatment of donepezil rescues impaired social, hyperactive, and stereotypic behavior in valproic acid-induced animal model of autism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Woon; Seung, Hana; Kwon, Kyung Ja; Ko, Mee Jung; Lee, Eun Joo; Oh, Hyun Ah; Choi, Chang Soon; Kim, Ki Chan; Gonzales, Edson Luck; You, Jueng Soo; Choi, Dong-Hee; Lee, Jongmin; Han, Seol-Heui; Yang, Sung Min; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Shin, Chan Young; Bahn, Geon Ho

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of pervasive developmental disorders with core symptoms such as sociability deficit, language impairment, and repetitive/restricted behaviors. Although worldwide prevalence of ASD has been increased continuously, therapeutic agents to ameliorate the core symptoms especially social deficits, are very limited. In this study, we investigated therapeutic potential of donepezil for ASD using valproic acid-induced autistic animal model (VPA animal model). We found that prenatal exposure of valproic acid (VPA) induced dysregulation of cholinergic neuronal development, most notably the up-regulation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the prefrontal cortex of affected rat and mouse offspring. Similarly, differentiating cortical neural progenitor cell in culture treated with VPA showed increased expression of AChE in vitro. Chromatin precipitation experiments revealed that acetylation of histone H3 bound to AChE promoter region was increased by VPA. In addition, other histone deacetyalse inhibitors (HDACIs) such as trichostatin A and sodium butyrate also increased the expression of AChE in differentiating neural progenitor cells suggesting the essential role of HDACIs in the regulation of AChE expression. For behavioral analysis, we injected PBS or donepezil (0.3 mg/kg) intraperitoneally to control and VPA mice once daily from postnatal day 14 all throughout the experiment. Subchronic treatment of donepezil improved sociability and prevented repetitive behavior and hyperactivity of VPA-treated mice offspring. Taken together, these results provide evidence that dysregulation of ACh system represented by the up-regulation of AChE may serve as an effective pharmacological therapeutic target against autistic behaviors in VPA animal model of ASD, which should be subjected for further investigation to verify the clinical relevance.

  1. Priming by Hexanoic Acid Induce Activation of Mevalonic and Linolenic Pathways and Promotes the Emission of Plant Volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Llorens, Eugenio; Camañes, Gemma; Lapeña, Leonor; García-Agustín, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Hexanoic acid (Hx) is a short natural monocarboxylic acid present in some fruits and plants. Previous studies reported that soil drench application of this acid induces effective resistance in tomato plants against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae and in citrus against Alternaria alternata and Xanthomonas citri. In this work, we performed an in deep study of the metabolic changes produced in citrus by the application of Hx in response to the challenge pathogen A. alternata, focusing on the response of the plant. Moreover, we used 13C labeled hexanoic to analyze its behavior inside the plants. Finally, we studied the volatile emission of the treated plants after the challenge inoculation. Drench application of 13C labeled hexanoic demonstrated that this molecule stays in the roots and is not mobilized to the leaves, suggesting long distance induction of resistance. Moreover, the study of the metabolic profile showed an alteration of more than 200 molecules differentially induced by the application of the compound and the inoculation with the fungus. Bioinformatics analysis of data showed that most of these altered molecules could be related with the mevalonic and linolenic pathways suggesting the implication of these pathways in the induced resistance mediated by Hx. Finally, the application of this compound showed an enhancement of the emission of 17 volatile metabolites. Taken together, this study indicates that after the application of Hx this compound remains in the roots, provoking molecular changes that may trigger the defensive response in the rest of the plant mediated by changes in the mevalonic and linolenic pathways and enhancing the emission of volatile compounds, suggesting for the first time the implication of mevalonic pathway in response to hexanoic application. PMID:27148319

  2. Retinoic Acid Inducible Gene 1 Protein (RIG1)-Like Receptor Pathway Is Required for Efficient Nuclear Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Nazish; Ospino, Frank; Himmati, Farhan; Lee, Jieun; Chanda, Palas; Mocarski, Edward S; Cooke, John P

    2017-03-09

    We have revealed a critical role for innate immune signaling in nuclear reprogramming to pluripotency, and in the nuclear reprogramming required for somatic cell transdifferentiation. Activation of innate immune signaling causes global changes in the expression and activity of epigenetic modifiers to promote epigenetic plasticity. In our previous articles, we focused on the role of toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) in this signaling pathway. Here, we define the role of another innate immunity pathway known to participate in response to viral RNA, the retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 receptor (RIG-1)-like receptor (RLR) pathway. This pathway is represented by the sensors of viral RNA, RIG-1, LGP2, and melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5). We first found that TLR3 deficiency only causes a partial inhibition of nuclear reprogramming to pluripotency in mouse tail-tip fibroblasts, which motivated us to determine the contribution of RLR. We found that knockdown of interferon beta promoter stimulator 1, the common adaptor protein for the RLR family, substantially reduced nuclear reprogramming induced by retroviral or by modified messenger RNA expression of Oct 4, Sox2, KLF4, and c-MYC (OSKM). Importantly, a double knockdown of both RLR and TLR3 pathway led to a further decrease in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) colonies suggesting an additive effect of both these pathways on nuclear reprogramming. Furthermore, in murine embryonic fibroblasts expressing a doxycycline (dox)-inducible cassette of the genes encoding OSKM, an RLR agonist increased the yield of iPSCs. Similarly, the RLR agonist enhanced nuclear reprogramming by cell permeant peptides of the Yamanaka factors. Finally, in the dox-inducible system, RLR activation promotes activating histone marks in the promoter region of pluripotency genes. To conclude, innate immune signaling mediated by RLR plays a critical role in nuclear reprogramming. Manipulation of innate immune signaling may facilitate

  3. Niflumic acid-induced increase in potassium currents in frog motor nerve terminals: effects on transmitter release.

    PubMed

    Miralles, F; Marsal, J; Peres, J; Solsona, C

    1996-04-01

    The actions of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug niflumic acid were studied on frog neuromuscular preparations by conventional electrophysiological techniques. Niflumic acid reduced the amplitude and increased the latency of endplate potentials in a concentration-dependent manner. Neuromuscular junctions pretreated with niflumic acid (0.05-0.5 mM) showed much less depression than control when they were stimulated with trains of impulses. Inhibition of acetylcholine release was reverted by raising the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration but not by simply washing out the preparations with niflumic acid-free solutions. Pretreatment with indomethacin (0.1 mM), another nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, did not affect the niflumic acid-induced inhibition of evoked responses. Niflumic acid (0.1 mM) did not change the amplitude of miniature endplate potentials and had a dual action on the frequency of miniatures: it decreased their frequency at 0.1 mM whereas it produced an enormous increase in the rate of spontaneous discharge at 0.5 mM. Niflumic acid (0.1 - 1 mM) reversibly increased the amplitude and affected the kinetics of presynaptic voltage-activated K+ current and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) current in a concentration-dependent manner. Niflumic acid (0.1 - 1 mM) irreversibly decreased the amplitude and reversibly affected the kinetics of the nodal Na(+) current. Indomethacin (0.1 mM) had no effect on presynaptic currents. In conclusion, niflumic acid reduces acetylcholine release by increasing presynaptic K+ currents. This may shorten the depolarizing phase of the presynaptic action potential and may reduce the entry of Ca(2+) with each impulse.

  4. Arachidonic acid-induced Ca2+ sensitization of smooth muscle contraction through activation of Rho-kinase.

    PubMed

    Araki, S; Ito, M; Kureishi, Y; Feng, J; Machida, H; Isaka, N; Amano, M; Kaibuchi, K; Hartshorne, D J; Nakano, T

    2001-02-01

    Arachidonic acid activates isolated Rho-kinase and contracts permeabilized smooth muscle fibres. Various assays were carried out to examine the mechanism of this activation. Native Rho-kinase was activated 5-6 times by arachidonic acid but an N-terminal, constitutively-active fragment of Rho-kinase, expressed as a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion protein and including the catalytic subunit (GST-Rho-kinase-CAT), was not. GST-Rho-kinase-CAT was inhibited by a C-terminal fragment of Rho-kinase and arachidonic acid removed this inhibition. These results suggest that the C-terminal part of Rho-kinase, containing the RhoA binding site and the pleckstrin homology domain, acts as an autoinhibitor. It is suggested further that activation by arachidonic acid is due to its binding to the autoinhibitory region and subsequent release from the catalytic site. Arachidonic acid, at concentrations greater than 30 microM, increases force in alpha-toxin-permeabilized femoral artery but not in Triton X-100-skinned fibres. The content of Rho-kinase in the latter was lower than in alpha-toxin-treated or intact fibres. The arachidonic acid-induced contraction was not observed at a pCa above 8.0 and was inhibited by Y-27632 and wortmannin, inhibitors of Rho-kinase and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), respectively. The activation of Rho-kinase and subsequent phosphorylation of the myosin phosphatase target subunit inhibits myosin phosphatase and increases myosin phosphorylation.

  5. Stability of the Acetic Acid-Induced Bladder Irritation Model in Alpha Chloralose-Anesthetized Female Cats

    PubMed Central

    Kullmann, F. Aura; Wells, Grace I.; Langdale, Christopher L.; Zheng, Jihong; Thor, Karl B.

    2013-01-01

    Time- and vehicle-related variability of bladder and urethral rhabdosphincter (URS) activity as well as cardiorespiratory and blood chemistry values were examined in the acetic acid-induced bladder irritation model in α-chloralose-anesthetized female cats. Additionally, bladder and urethra were evaluated histologically using Mason trichrome and toluidine blue staining. Urodynamic, cardiovascular and respiratory parameters were collected during intravesical saline infusion followed by acetic acid (0.5%) to irritate the bladder. One hour after starting acetic acid infusion, a protocol consisting of a cystometrogram, continuous infusion-induced rhythmic voiding contractions, and a 5 min “quiet period” (bladder emptied without infusion) was precisely repeated every 30 minutes. Administration of vehicle (saline i.v.) occurred 15 minutes after starting each of the first 7 cystometrograms and duloxetine (1mg/kg i.v.) after the 8th. Acetic acid infusion into the bladder increased URS-EMG activity, bladder contraction frequency, and decreased contraction amplitude and capacity, compared to saline. Bladder activity and URS activity stabilized within 1 and 2 hours, respectively. Duloxetine administration significantly decreased bladder contraction frequency and increased URS-EMG activity to levels similar to previous reports. Cardiorespiratory parameters and blood gas levels remained consistent throughout the experiment. The epithelium of the bladder and urethra were greatly damaged and edema and infiltration of neutrophils in the lamina propria of urethra were observed. These data provide an ample evaluation of the health of the animals, stability of voiding function and appropriateness of the model for testing drugs designed to evaluate lower urinary tract as well as cardiovascular and respiratory systems function. PMID:24040064

  6. Functional and cellular characterization of human Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1) mutations associated with Smith-Magenis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Smith-Magenis Syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome in which the dosage sensitive gene has been identified: the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1). Little is known about the function of human RAI1. Results We generated the full-length cDNA of the wild type protein and five mutated forms: RAI1-HA 2687delC, RAI1-HA 3103delC, RAI1 R960X, RAI1-HA Q1562R, and RAI1-HA S1808N. Four of them have been previously associated with SMS clinical phenotype. Molecular weight, subcellular localization and transcription factor activity of the wild type and mutant forms were studied by western blot, immunofluorescence and luciferase assays respectively. The wild type protein and the two missense mutations presented a higher molecular weight than expected, localized to the nucleus and activated transcription of a reporter gene. The frameshift mutations generated a truncated polypeptide with transcription factor activity but abnormal subcellular localization, and the same was true for the 1-960aa N-terminal half of RAI1. Two different C-terminal halves of the RAI1 protein (1038aa-end and 1229aa-end) were able to localize into the nucleus but had no transactivation activity. Conclusion Our results indicate that transcription factor activity and subcellular localization signals reside in two separate domains of the protein and both are essential for the correct functionality of RAI1. The pathogenic outcome of some of the mutated forms can be explained by the dissociation of these two domains. PMID:20738874

  7. The Healing Effect of Teucrium polium in Acetic Acid-Induced Ulcerative Colitis in the Dog as an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabani, Davood; Bahrami, Faranak; Hosseini, Seyed Vahid; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad; Tanideh, Nader; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Amini, Masoud; Amini, Afshin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which include ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD), are debilitating and chronic disorders with unpredictable courses and complicated treatment measures. Therefore, an efficient treatment protocol seems necessary as therapeutic prophylaxis for these disorders. This study aims to determine the healing effect of Teucrium polium (T. polium) in acetic acid-induced UC in an experimental dog model. METHODS From September to December 2010, eight male (20-25 kg) crossbred dogs were used for induction of UC by 6% acetic acid, transrectally. After one week, three biopsies (10, 20 and 30 cm proximal to the anal verge) were taken from the colon of each animal for histological studies. In the presence of UC, 400 mg/kg/day of T. polium extract was administered orally and transrectally (via enema) for 30 days in six of the dogs. The remaining two dogs were used as controls and did not receive T. polium. Multiple biopsies were taken 7, 14, and 30 days after discontinuation of T. polium in the same manner as before treatment. RESULTS After administration of acetic acid, we noted the presence of multiple ulcers, diffuse inflammation, PMN infiltration in the lamina propria, glandular destruction and goblet cell depletion. Treatment with T. polium restored the colonic architecture with an increased number of healthy cells and a reduction in inflammatory cells. Damage of the surface epithelial cells and mucosal layer of the lumen were reversed, which lead to faster ulcer healing. CONCLUSION T. polium may be a treatment choice for UC and can broaden the current therapy options for UC. PMID:24829634

  8. Distribution of interstitial cells of Cajal in the bladders of fetal rats with retinoic acid induced myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Ali; Karakuş, Osman Zeki; Hakgüder, Gülce; Ateş, Oğuz; Özer, Erdener; Olguner, Mustafa; Akgür, Feza Miraç

    2016-01-01

    Objective Myelomeningocele (MMC) is one of the most common reason of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in children. Although neurogenic bladder dysfunction occurrence is related with bladder innervation, also there are some changes seen in the smooth muscle and neural cells of the bladder. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are the pacemaker cells found in organs with peristaltic activity. Although it has been shown that ICC are diminished in the rat urinary bladder with traumatic spinal cord injury, there is no data about ICC in fetal rat bladders with MMC. This study has been conducted to investigate the ICC in the bladders of fetal rats with retinoic acid induced MMC. Materials and methods Time dated pregnant Wistar albino rats were divided into 3 groups. In MMC group, dams were fed with gavage solution containing 60 mg/kg all-trans retinoic acid dissolved in olive oil on 10. embryologic day. Sham group animals were fed only olive oil. Control group dams were fed with standard rat chow. Fetuses were delivered by cesarean section and harvested on 22. embryologic day. MMC was identified by observing MMC sacs at the back of the fetuses. Distribution of ICCs were evaluated using immunohistochemical staining. Results ICCs were found in all groups, which have the same morphological features that had been described earlier in the gastrointestinal tract and the bladder. The density of the ICC in the MMC group was found to be significantly decreased when compared with the control and the sham groups (p<0.05). Conclusion The density of the ICC in the urinary bladder decreased in the neurogenic bladder developed in MMC. PMID:27909623

  9. The restrained expression of NF-kB in renal tissue ameliorates folic acid induced acute kidney injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dev; Singla, Surinder K; Puri, Veena; Puri, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kB) represent family of structurally-related eukaryotic transcription factors which regulate diverse array of cellular processes including immunological responses, inflammation, apoptosis, growth & development. Increased expression of NF-kB has often been seen in many diverse diseases, suggesting the importance of genomic deregulation to disease pathophysiology. In the present study we focused on acute kidney injury (AKI), which remains one of the major risk factor showing a high rate of mortality and morbidity. The pathology associated with it, however, remains incompletely known though inflammation has been reported to be one of the major risk factor in the disease pathophysiology. The role of NF-kB thus seemed pertinent. In the present study we show that high dose of folic acid (FA) induced acute kidney injury (AKI) characterized by elevation in levels of blood urea nitrogen & serum creatinine together with extensive tubular necrosis, loss of brush border and marked reduction in mitochondria. One of the salient observations of this study was a coupled increase in the expression of renal, relA, NF-kB2, and p53 genes and proteins during folic acid induced AKI (FA AKI). Treatment of mice with NF-kB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithio-carbamate ammonium (PDTC) lowered the expression of these transcription factors and ameliorated the aberrant renal function by decreasing serum creatinine levels. In conclusion, our results suggested that NF-kB plays a pivotal role in maintaining renal function that also involved regulating p53 levels during FA AKI.

  10. Stability of the acetic acid-induced bladder irritation model in alpha chloralose-anesthetized female cats.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, F Aura; Wells, Grace I; Langdale, Christopher L; Zheng, Jihong; Thor, Karl B

    2013-01-01

    Time- and vehicle-related variability of bladder and urethral rhabdosphincter (URS) activity as well as cardiorespiratory and blood chemistry values were examined in the acetic acid-induced bladder irritation model in α-chloralose-anesthetized female cats. Additionally, bladder and urethra were evaluated histologically using Mason trichrome and toluidine blue staining. Urodynamic, cardiovascular and respiratory parameters were collected during intravesical saline infusion followed by acetic acid (0.5%) to irritate the bladder. One hour after starting acetic acid infusion, a protocol consisting of a cystometrogram, continuous infusion-induced rhythmic voiding contractions, and a 5 min "quiet period" (bladder emptied without infusion) was precisely repeated every 30 minutes. Administration of vehicle (saline i.v.) occurred 15 minutes after starting each of the first 7 cystometrograms and duloxetine (1mg/kg i.v.) after the 8(th). Acetic acid infusion into the bladder increased URS-EMG activity, bladder contraction frequency, and decreased contraction amplitude and capacity, compared to saline. Bladder activity and URS activity stabilized within 1 and 2 hours, respectively. Duloxetine administration significantly decreased bladder contraction frequency and increased URS-EMG activity to levels similar to previous reports. Cardiorespiratory parameters and blood gas levels remained consistent throughout the experiment. The epithelium of the bladder and urethra were greatly damaged and edema and infiltration of neutrophils in the lamina propria of urethra were observed. These data provide an ample evaluation of the health of the animals, stability of voiding function and appropriateness of the model for testing drugs designed to evaluate lower urinary tract as well as cardiovascular and respiratory systems function.

  11. Protective Effect of the Methanolic Extract of Malva parviflora L. leaves on Acetic Acid-induced Ulcerative Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dugani, Aisha; Dakhil, Bushra; Treesh, Soad

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a general term describing chronic, idiopathic relapsing, inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract of unknown etiology. Previous studies have indicated that Malva parviflora leaf extract possesses anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiulcerogenic activity. activity. This work aimed to investigatee the anti-inflammatory effect of the methanolic (MEMP) and aqueous (AEMP) extracts of M. parviflora leaves on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods: 42 male Wistar albino rats were divided into seven groups (n = 6). Group I: Normal saline control group with no colitis; Group II: Acetic acid colitis group; Group III: 100 mg/kg/5 d MEMP; Group IV: 200 mg/kg/5 d.MEMP; Group V: 100 mg/kg/5 d AEMP; Group VI: 200 mg/kg/5 d AEMP; Group VII: Prednisolone group (2 mg/kg/5 d). Treatments were followed by induction of colitis using intrarectal instillation of 2 mL of 4% acetic acid. Colon damage was evaluated macroscopically (spleen weight/body weight, colon weight/length ratio) and the histological changes were also recorded. Results: The results of this study showed that acetic acid caused severe inflammation of the colon and a significant increase in spleen weight/body weight, and an increase in colon weight/length ratio compared with normal control group. Pretreatment with MEMP and AEMP for 5 days followed by induction of colitis resulted in a significant attenuation of spleen weight and colon weight/length ratio compared with acetic acid control group. Methanolic extract provided better anticolitic effect than aqueous extract; the effect was prominent at the dose of 200 mg/kg. Histopathological findings confirmed the protective effect of the MEMP. Conclusion: In conclusion, MEMP could ameliorate mucosal damage in experimentally induced colitis when given orally. PMID:27184642

  12. PcExl1 a Novel Acid Expansin-Like Protein from the Plant Pathogen Pectobacterium carotovorum, Binds Cell Walls Differently to BsEXLX1

    PubMed Central

    Olarte-Lozano, Miguel; Mendoza-Nuñez, Mario A.; Pastor, Nina; Segovia, Lorenzo; Folch-Mallol, Jorge; Martínez-Anaya, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Microbial expansins act on plant cell walls similarly to plant expansins, albeit their loosening activity levels are tenfold lesser compared to plant expansins. We report the characterization of an expansin-like gene from the plant pathogen Pectobacterium carotovorum, named exl1. PcExl1 is an acidic protein that binds cellulose (Avicel), and weakens filter paper. The acidic nature of PcExl1 confers different binding properties when compared to Bacillus subtilis BsEXLX1, which is a basic protein. PcExl1 binding to wheat cell wall increased when acidic components were depleted, reaching a similar level to the binding to Avicel, indicating that cellulose is the target of PcExl1. PMID:24755657

  13. DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-10-18

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact pulsed power device where the pulse forming lines, switching, and vacuum wall are integrated into a single compact geometry. For this effort, we initiated a extensive compact pulsed power development program and have pursued the study of switching (gas, oil, laser induced surface flashover and photoconductive), dielectrics (ceramics and nanoparticle composites), pulse forming line topologies (asymmetric and symmetric Blumleins and zero integral pulse forming lines), and multilayered vacuum insulator (HGI) technology. Finally, we fabricated an accelerator cell for test on ETAII (a 5.5 MeV, 2 kA, 70 ns pulsewidth electron beam accelerator). We review our past results and report on the progress of accelerator cell testing.

  14. The Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  15. Palmitic acid-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells is increased by liver X receptor agonist and attenuated by eicosapentaenoate.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huasheng; Zhong, Yuhua; Zhou, Shaobi; Li, Qingdi Quentin

    2011-01-01

    Saturated fatty acids are implicated in the development of diabetes via the impairment of pancreatic islet β-cell viability and function. Liver X receptors (LXRs) and eicosapentaenoate (EPA) are known regulators of fatty acid metabolism. However, their roles in the pathogenesis of diabetes remain incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of EPA and the LXR agonist T0901317 on saturated fatty acid (palmitic acid)-induced apoptosis in the insulinoma β-cell line INS-1, a model for insulin-secreting β-cells. T0901317 significantly promoted palmitic acid-induced apoptotic cell death in the INS-1 cells. Consistent with these results, caspase-3 activity and BAX and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) mRNA levels were markedly increased in INS-1 cells co-administered palmitic acid and T0901317. The production of reactive oxygen species was considerably higher in the cells cultured concurrently with T0901317 and palmitic acid than in the cells incubated with either agent alone. EPA treatment attenuated the cellular death promoted by palmitic acid and T0901317 in the INS-1 cells, disclosing a possible mediating mechanism involving the inhibition of SREBP-1c. Finally, T0901317 up-regulated the palmitic acid-induced expression of p27(KIP1), transforming growth factor beta 1, and SMAD3 proteins in INS-1 cells. These results demonstrate that palmitic acid-induced apoptosis in β-cells is enhanced by T0901317 via the activation of LXRs and is blocked by EPA via the inhibition of SREBP-1c, suggesting that the regulation of lipogenesis and lipotoxicity affecting pancreatic β-cell viability and insulin production may be a unique strategy for diabetes therapy.

  16. Palmitic acid induces interleukin-1β secretion via NLRP3 inflammasomes and inflammatory responses through ROS production in human placental cells.

    PubMed

    Shirasuna, Koumei; Takano, Hiroki; Seno, Kotomi; Ohtsu, Ayaka; Karasawa, Tadayoshi; Takahashi, Masafumi; Ohkuchi, Akihide; Suzuki, Hirotada; Matsubara, Shigeki; Iwata, Hisataka; Kuwayama, Takehito

    2016-08-01

    Maternal obesity, a major risk factor for adverse pregnancy complications, results in inflammatory cytokine release in the placenta. Levels of free fatty acids are elevated in the plasma of obese human. These fatty acids include obesity-related palmitic acids, which is a major saturated fatty acid, that promotes inflammatory responses. Increasing evidence indicates that nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasomes mediate inflammatory responses induced by endogenous danger signals. We hypothesized that inflammatory responses associated with gestational obesity cause inflammation. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of palmitic acid on the activation of NLRP3 inflammasomes and inflammatory responses in a human Sw.71 trophoblast cell line. Palmitic acid stimulated caspase-1 activation and markedly increased interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in Sw.71 cells. Treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor diminished palmitic acid-induced IL-1β release. In addition, NLRP3 and caspase-1 genome editing using a CRISPR/Cas9 system in Sw.71 cells suppressed IL-1β secretion, which was stimulated by palmitic acid. Moreover, palmitic acid stimulated caspase-3 activation and inflammatory cytokine secretion (e.g., IL-6 and IL-8). Palmitic acid-induced cytokine secretion were dependent on caspase-3 activation. In addition, palmitic acid-induced IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 secretion was depended on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. In conclusion, palmitic acid caused activation of NLRP3 inflammasomes and inflammatory responses, inducing IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 secretion, which is associated with ROS generation, in human Sw.71 placental cells. We suggest that obesity-related palmitic acid induces placental inflammation, resulting in association with pregnancy complications.

  17. PAR-2 activation enhances weak acid-induced ATP release through TRPV1 and ASIC sensitization in human esophageal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liping; Oshima, Tadayuki; Shan, Jing; Sei, Hiroo; Tomita, Toshihiko; Ohda, Yoshio; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Miwa, Hiroto

    2015-10-15

    Esophageal visceral hypersensitivity has been proposed to be the pathogenesis of heartburn sensation in nonerosive reflux disease. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is expressed in human esophageal epithelial cells and is believed to play a role in inflammation and sensation. PAR-2 activation may modulate these responses through adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release, which is involved in transduction of sensation and pain. The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are both acid-sensitive nociceptors. However, the interaction among these molecules and the mechanisms of heartburn sensation are still not clear. We therefore examined whether ATP release in human esophageal epithelial cells in response to acid is modulated by TRPV1 and ASICs and whether PAR-2 activation influences the sensitivity of TRPV1 and ASICs. Weak acid (pH 5) stimulated the release of ATP from primary human esophageal epithelial cells (HEECs). This effect was significantly reduced after pretreatment with 5-iodoresiniferatoxin (IRTX), a TRPV1-specific antagonist, or with amiloride, a nonselective ASIC blocker. TRPV1 and ASIC3 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection also decreased weak acid-induced ATP release. Pretreatment of HEECs with trypsin, tryptase, or a PAR-2 agonist enhanced weak acid-induced ATP release. Trypsin treatment led to the phosphorylation of TRPV1. Acid-induced ATP release enhancement by trypsin was partially blocked by IRTX, amiloride, or a PAR-2 antagonist. Conversely, acid-induced ATP release was augmented by PAR-2 activation through TRPV1 and ASICs. These findings suggested that the pathophysiology of heartburn sensation or esophageal hypersensitivity may be associated with the activation of PAR-2, TRPV1, and ASICs.

  18. Curtain Wall Creates Ventilation Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Curtain-wall structure proposed for removing methane and airborne coal dust from hydrojet-jaw mining machines. Channel between curtain wall and mine wall forms closed exhaust passage. Through it, gas and dust continuously removed so high concentrations of these explosive materials not build up.

  19. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  20. Human myeloblastic leukemia cells (HL-60) express a membrane receptor for estrogen that signals and modulates retinoic acid-induced cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kauss, M. Ariel; Reiterer, Gudrun; Bunaciu, Rodica P.; Yen, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    Estrogen receptors are historically perceived as nuclear ligand activated transcription factors. An estrogen receptor has now been found localized to the plasma membrane of human myeloblastic leukemia cells (HL-60). Its expression occurs throughout the cell cycle, progressively increasing as cells mature from G{sub 1} to S to G{sub 2}/M. To ascertain that the receptor functioned, the effect of ligands, including a non-internalizable estradiol-BSA conjugate and tamoxifen, an antagonist of nuclear estrogen receptor function, were tested. The ligands caused activation of the ERK MAPK pathway. They also modulated the effect of retinoic acid, an inducer of MAPK dependent terminal differentiation along the myeloid lineage in these cells. In particular the ligands inhibited retinoic acid-induced inducible oxidative metabolism, a functional marker of terminal myeloid cell differentiation. To a lesser degree they also diminished retinoic acid-induced earlier markers of cell differentiation, namely CD38 and CD11b. However, they did not regulate retinoic acid-induced G{sub 0} cell cycle arrest. There is thus a membrane localized estrogen receptor in HL-60 myeloblastic leukemia cells that can cause ERK activation and modulates the response of these cells to retinoic acid, indicating crosstalk between the membrane estrogen and retinoic acid evoked pathways relevant to propulsion of cell differentiation.

  1. Human myeloblastic leukemia cells (HL-60) express a membrane receptor for estrogen that signals and modulates retinoic acid-induced cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kauss, M Ariel; Reiterer, Gudrun; Bunaciu, Rodica P; Yen, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    Estrogen receptors are historically perceived as nuclear ligand activated transcription factors. An estrogen receptor has now been found localized to the plasma membrane of human myeloblastic leukemia cells (HL-60). Its expression occurs throughout the cell cycle, progressively increasing as cells mature from G(1) to S to G(2)/M. To ascertain that the receptor functioned, the effect of ligands, including a non-internalizable estradiol-BSA conjugate and tamoxifen, an antagonist of nuclear estrogen receptor function, were tested. The ligands caused activation of the ERK MAPK pathway. They also modulated the effect of retinoic acid, an inducer of MAPK dependent terminal differentiation along the myeloid lineage in these cells. In particular the ligands inhibited retinoic acid-induced inducible oxidative metabolism, a functional marker of terminal myeloid cell differentiation. To a lesser degree they also diminished retinoic acid-induced earlier markers of cell differentiation, namely CD38 and CD11b. However, they did not regulate retinoic acid-induced G(0) cell cycle arrest. There is thus a membrane localized estrogen receptor in HL-60 myeloblastic leukemia cells that can cause ERK activation and modulates the response of these cells to retinoic acid, indicating crosstalk between the membrane estrogen and retinoic acid evoked pathways relevant to propulsion of cell differentiation.

  2. Ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 is involved in acid-induced apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes in intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Feng-Lai; Wang, Hui-Ren; Zhao, Ming-Dong; Yuan, Wei; Cao, Lu; Duan, Ping-Guo; Jiang, Yun-Qi; Li, Xi-Lei; Dong, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) has been shown to be a receptor for protons. We investigated the role of proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptors in the apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes induced by extracellular acid. The expression of proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptors was examined in rat lumbar endplate chondrocytes. Knockdown of OGR1 was achieved by transfecting chondrocytes with specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) for OGR1. Apoptotic changes were evaluated by DNA fragmentation ELISA, electron microscopy, and flow cytometry. Intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+) ]i) was analyzed with laser scanning confocal microscopy. The mechanism of OGR1 in acid-induced apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes was also investigated. We found that OGR1 was predominantly expressed in rat endplate chondrocytes, and its expression was highly upregulated in response to acidosis. Knocking down OGR1 with shRNAs effectively attenuated acid-induced apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes and increased [Ca(2+) ]i. Blocking OGR1-mediated [Ca(2+) ]i elevation inhibited acid-induced calcium-sensitive proteases such as calpain and calcineurin, and also inhibited the activation of Bid, Bad, and Caspase 3 and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). OGR1-mediated [Ca(2+) ]i elevation has a crucial role in apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes by regulating activation of calcium-sensitive proteases and their downstream signaling.

  3. Sida rhomboidea.Roxb extract alleviates pathophysiological changes in experimental in vivo and in vitro models of high fat diet/fatty acid induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Thounaojam, Menaka C; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N; Dandekar, Deven S; Devkar, Ranjitsinh V; Ramachandran, A V

    2012-03-01

    The present study was aim to evaluate protective role of Sida rhomboidea.Roxb (SR) extract against high fat diet/fatty acid induced pathophysiological alterations in experimental model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Effect of SR extract on plasma levels of markers of hepatic damage, plasma and hepatic lipids, mitochondrial oxidative stress, status of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants and histopathological changes in liver tissue were evaluated in high fat diet fed C57BL/6J mice. Also, the effect of SR supplementation on lipid accumulation, lipid peroxidation, cytotoxicity and cell viability were evaluated in oleic acid treated HepG2 cells. Supplementation of NASH mice with SR extract prevented high fat diet induced elevation in plasma marker enzymes of liver damage, plasma and hepatic lipids, mitochondrial oxidative stress and compromised enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant status. Further, addition of SR extract to in vitro HepG2 cells minimized oleic acid induced lipid accumulation, higher lipid peroxidation, cytotoxicity and reduced cell viability. These in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that SR extract has the potential of preventing high fat/fatty acid induced NASH mainly due to its hypolipidemic and antioxidant activities.

  4. Left ventricular wall stress compendium.

    PubMed

    Zhong, L; Ghista, D N; Tan, R S

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) wall stress has intrigued scientists and cardiologists since the time of Lame and Laplace in 1800s. The left ventricle is an intriguing organ structure, whose intrinsic design enables it to fill and contract. The development of wall stress is intriguing to cardiologists and biomedical engineers. The role of left ventricle wall stress in cardiac perfusion and pumping as well as in cardiac pathophysiology is a relatively unexplored phenomenon. But even for us to assess this role, we first need accurate determination of in vivo wall stress. However, at this point, 150 years after Lame estimated left ventricle wall stress using the elasticity theory, we are still in the exploratory stage of (i) developing left ventricle models that properly represent left ventricle anatomy and physiology and (ii) obtaining data on left ventricle dynamics. In this paper, we are responding to the need for a comprehensive survey of left ventricle wall stress models, their mechanics, stress computation and results. We have provided herein a compendium of major type of wall stress models: thin-wall models based on the Laplace law, thick-wall shell models, elasticity theory model, thick-wall large deformation models and finite element models. We have compared the mean stress values of these models as well as the variation of stress across the wall. All of the thin-wall and thick-wall shell models are based on idealised ellipsoidal and spherical geometries. However, the elasticity model's shape can vary through the cycle, to simulate the more ellipsoidal shape of the left ventricle in the systolic phase. The finite element models have more representative geometries, but are generally based on animal data, which limits their medical relevance. This paper can enable readers to obtain a comprehensive perspective of left ventricle wall stress models, of how to employ them to determine wall stresses, and be cognizant of the assumptions involved in the use of specific models.

  5. Generation of hydroxyl radical in isolated pea root cell wall, and the role of cell wall-bound peroxidase, Mn-SOD and phenolics in their production.

    PubMed

    Kukavica, Biljana; Mojovic, Milos; Vuccinic, Zeljko; Maksimovic, Vuk; Takahama, Umeo; Jovanovic, Sonja Veljovic

    2009-02-01

    The hydroxyl radical produced in the apoplast has been demonstrated to facilitate cell wall loosening during cell elongation. Cell wall-bound peroxidases (PODs) have been implicated in hydroxyl radical formation. For this mechanism, the apoplast or cell walls should contain the electron donors for (i) H(2)O(2) formation from dioxygen; and (ii) the POD-catalyzed reduction of H(2)O(2) to the hydroxyl radical. The aim of the work was to identify the electron donors in these reactions. In this report, hydroxyl radical (.OH) generation in the cell wall isolated from pea roots was detected in the absence of any exogenous reductants, suggesting that the plant cell wall possesses the capacity to generate .OH in situ. Distinct POD and Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) isoforms different from other cellular isoforms were shown by native gel electropho-resis to be preferably bound to the cell walls. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of cell wall isolates containing the spin-trapping reagent, 5-diethoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO), was used for detection of and differentiation between .OH and the superoxide radical (O(2)(-).). The data obtained using POD inhibitors confirmed that tightly bound cell wall PODs are involved in DEPMPO/OH adduct formation. A decrease in DEPMPO/OH adduct formation in the presence of H(2)O(2) scavengers demonstrated that this hydroxyl radical was derived from H(2)O(2). During the generation of .OH, the concentration of quinhydrone structures (as detected by EPR spectroscopy) increased, suggesting that the H(2)O(2) required for the formation of .OH in isolated cell walls is produced during the reduction of O(2) by hydroxycinnamic acids. Cell wall isolates in which the proteins have been denaturated (including the endogenous POD and SOD) did not produce .OH. Addition of exogenous H(2)O(2) again induced the production of .OH, and these were shown to originate from the Fenton reaction with tightly bound metal ions

  6. The acid-inducible asr gene in Escherichia coli: transcriptional control by the phoBR operon.

    PubMed

    Suziedeliené, E; Suziedélis, K; Garbenciūté, V; Normark, S

    1999-04-01

    Escherichia coli responds to external acidification (pH 4.0 to 5.0) by synthesizing a newly identified, approximately 450-nucleotide RNA component. At maximal levels of induction it is one of the most abundant small RNAs in the cell and is relatively stable bacterial RNA. The acid-inducible RNA was purified, and the gene encoding it, designated asr (for acid shock RNA), mapped at 35.98 min on the E. coli chromosome. Analysis of the asr DNA sequence revealed an open reading frame coding for a 111-amino-acid polypeptide with a deduced molecular mass of approximately 11.6 kDa. According to computer-assisted analysis, the predicted polypeptide contains a typical signal sequence of 30 amino acids and might represent either a periplasmic or an outer membrane protein. The asr gene cloned downstream from a T7 promoter was translated in vivo after transcription using a T7 RNA polymerase transcription system. Expression of a plasmid-encoded asr::lacZ fusion under a native asr promoter was reduced approximately 15-fold in a complex medium, such as Luria-Bertani medium, versus the minimal medium. Transcription of the chromosomal asr was abolished in the presence of a phoB-phoR (a two-component regulatory system, controlling the pho regulon inducible by phosphate starvation) deletion mutant. Acid-mediated induction of the asr gene in the Delta(phoB-phoR) mutant strain was restored by introduction of the plasmid with cloned phoB-phoR genes. Primer extension analysis of the asr transcript revealed a region similar to the Pho box (the consensus sequence found in promoters transcriptionally activated by the PhoB protein) upstream from the determined transcription start. The asr promoter DNA region was demonstrated to bind PhoB protein in vitro. We discuss our results in terms of how bacteria might employ the phoB-phoR regulatory system to sense an external acidity and regulate transcription of the asr gene.

  7. Gullies in Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    6 April 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies in the wall of a large impact crater in Newton Basin near 41.9oS, 158.1oW. Such gullies may have formed by downslope movement of wet debris--i.e., water. Unfortunately, because the responsible fluid (if there was one) is no longer present today, only the geomorphology of the channels and debris aprons can be used to deduce that water might have been involved. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  8. Improved surgical mesh integration into the rat abdominal wall with arginine administration.

    PubMed

    Arbos, M A; Ferrando, J M; Quiles, M T; Vidal, J; López-Cano, M; Gil, J; Manero, J M; Peña, J; Huguet, P; Schwartz-Riera, S; Reventós, J; Armengol, M

    2006-02-01

    Prosthetic meshes are used as the standard of care in abdominal wall hernia repair. However, hernia recurrences and side effects remain unsolved problems. The demand by health care providers for increasingly efficient and cost-effective surgery encourages the development of newer strategies to improve devices and outcomes. Here, we evaluated whether l-arginine administration was able to ameliorate long-term polypropylene prostheses incorporation into the abdominal wall of Sprague-Dawley rats. Meshes were placed on-lay and continuous l-arginine was administered. In vivo biocompatibility was studied at 7, 25 and 30 days post-implantation. Effectively, l-arginine administration in combination with mesh triggered subtle changes in ECM composition that impinged on critical biochemical and structural features. Lastly, tensile strength augmented and stiffness decreased over the control condition. This could help to restructure the mechanical load transfer from the implant to the brittle surrounding tissues, i.e., impact load and fatigue load associated with mechanical tensions could be distributed between the mesh and the restored tissue in a more balanced manner, and ultimately help to reduce the incidence of loosening, recurrences, and local wound complications. Since the newly formed tissue is more mechanically stable, this approach could eventually be introduced to human hernia repair.

  9. Functional Analysis of Cellulose and Xyloglucan in the Walls of Stomatal Guard Cells of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rui, Yue; Anderson, Charles T

    2016-03-01

    Stomatal guard cells are pairs of specialized epidermal cells that control water and CO2 exchange between the plant and the environment. To fulfill the functions of stomatal opening and closure that are driven by changes in turgor pressure, guard cell walls must be both strong and flexible, but how the structure and dynamics of guard cell walls enable stomatal function remains poorly understood. To address this question, we applied cell biological and genetic analyses to investigate guard cell walls and their relationship to stomatal function in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using live-cell spinning disk confocal microscopy, we measured the motility of cellulose synthase (CESA)-containing complexes labeled by green fluorescent protein (GFP)-CESA3 and observed a reduced proportion of GFP-CESA3 particles colocalizing with microtubules upon stomatal closure. Imaging cellulose organization in guard cells revealed a relatively uniform distribution of cellulose in the open state and a more fibrillar pattern in the closed state, indicating that cellulose microfibrils undergo dynamic reorganization during stomatal movements. In cesa3(je5) mutants defective in cellulose synthesis and xxt1 xxt2 mutants lacking the hemicellulose xyloglucan, stomatal apertures, changes in guard cell length, and cellulose reorganization were aberrant during fusicoccin-induced stomatal opening or abscisic acid-induced stomatal closure, indicating that sufficient cellulose and xyloglucan are required for normal guard cell dynamics. Together, these results provide new insights into how guard cell walls allow stomata to function as responsive mediators of gas exchange at the plant surface.

  10. Rapid auxin-induced stimulation of cell wall synthesis in pea internodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kutschera, U.; Briggs, W.R.

    1987-05-01

    The effect of auxin (indole-3-acetic acid; IAA) on growth and incorporation of myo-(2-/sup 3/H(N)) inositol ((/sup 3/H)Ins) into noncellulosic polysacchharides in the cell walls of third internode sections from red light-grown pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) was investigated. Intact section were incubated on (/sup 3/H)Ins for 4 hr to permit uptake of the tracer and then IAA was added. Growth started after a lag phase of 15 min under these conditions. The sections were removed from the tracer and separated into epidermis and cortical cylinder (cortex plus vascular tissue). In the epidermis, IAA-induced stimulation of (/sup 3/H)Ins incorporation started after a lag of 15 min. The amount of incorporation was 15% higher after 30 min and 24% higher after 2 hr than in the control. In the cortical cylinder, IAA-induced stimulation of (/sup 3/H)Ins incorporation started only approx. = 1 hr after adding IAA. The ionophore monensin (20 ..mu..M) inhibited the IAA-induced growth by 95%. Under these conditions, the IAA-induced stimulation of (/sup 3/H)Ins incorporation and the IAA-induced increase in in vivo extensibility of the sections was almost completely inhibited, although oxygen uptake was unaffected. The authors suggest that wall synthesis (as represented by (/sup 3/H)Ins incorporation) and wall loosening (increase in in vivo extensibility) are related processes. The results support the hypothesis that IAA induces growth by rapid simulation of cell wall synthesis in the growth-limiting epidermal cell layer.

  11. Structure of axionic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M. C.; Sikivie, P.

    1985-09-01

    The structure of axionic domain walls is investigated using the low-energy effective theory of axions and pions. We derive the spatial dependence of the phases of the Peccei-Quinn scalar field and the QCD quark-antiquark condensates inside an axionic domain wall. Thence an accurate estimate of the wall surface energy density is obtained. The equations of motion for axions, photons, leptons, and baryons in the neighborhood of axionic domain walls are written down and estimates are given for the wall reflection and transmission coefficients of these particles. Finally, we discuss the energy dissipation by axionic domain walls oscillating in the early universe due to the reflection of particles in the primordial soup.

  12. α-Xylosidase plays essential roles in xyloglucan remodelling, maintenance of cell wall integrity, and seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Shigeyama, Takuma; Watanabe, Asuka; Tokuchi, Konatsu; Toh, Shigeo; Sakurai, Naoki; Shibuya, Naoto; Kawakami, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Regulation and maintenance of cell wall physical properties are crucial for plant growth and environmental response. In the germination process, hypocotyl cell expansion and endosperm weakening are prerequisites for dicot seeds to complete germination. We have identified the Arabidopsis mutant thermoinhibition-resistant germination 1 (trg1), which has reduced seed dormancy and insensitivity to unfavourable conditions for germination owing to a loss-of-function mutation of TRG1/XYL1, which encodes an α-xylosidase. Compared to those of wild type, the elongating stem of trg1 showed significantly lower viscoelasticity, and the fruit epidermal cells were longitudinally shorter and horizontally enlarged. Actively growing tissues of trg1 over-accumulated free xyloglucan oligosaccharides (XGOs), and the seed cell wall had xyloglucan with a greatly reduced molecular weight. These observations suggest that XGOs reduce xyloglucan size by serving as an acceptor in transglycosylation and eventually enhancing cell wall loosening. TRG1/XYL1 gene expression was abundant in growing wild-type organs and tissues but relatively low in cells at most actively elongating part of the tissues, suggesting that α-xylosidase contributes to maintaining the mechanical integrity of the primary cell wall in the growing and pre-growing tissues. In germinating seeds of trg1, expression of genes encoding specific abscisic acid and gibberellin metabolism enzymes was altered in accordance with the aberrant germination phenotype. Thus, cell wall integrity could affect seed germination not only directly through the physical properties of the cell wall but also indirectly through the regulation of hormone gene expression. PMID:27605715

  13. Asymptotic dynamics of monopole walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, R.

    2015-08-01

    We determine the asymptotic dynamics of the U(N) doubly periodic BPS monopole in Yang-Mills-Higgs theory, called a monopole wall, by exploring its Higgs curve using the Newton polytope and amoeba. In particular, we show that the monopole wall splits into subwalls when any of its moduli become large. The long-distance gauge and Higgs field interactions of these subwalls are Abelian, allowing us to derive an asymptotic metric for the monopole wall moduli space.

  14. Involvement of NADPH oxidase in high-dose phenolic acid-induced pro-oxidant activity on rat mesenteric venules.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen-Yuan; Xiao, Ying; Yao, Jian-Jing; Hao, Zhe; Zhao, Yu-Bin

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the potential role of phenolic acids in initiating oxidative damage to microvascular endothelial cells and the underlying mechanism mediating the pro-oxidant action. Male Wistar rats received high doses of phenolic acid [caffeic acid (CA), salvianolic acid B (SAB), chlorogenic acid (ChA) or ferulic acid (FA)]. The creation of reactive oxygen species in mesenteric microcirculation endothelial cells and adherent leukocytes along with venules were assessed using intravital microscopy. The expression levels of NADPH oxidase subunits (Nox4 and p22(phox)) in terminal ileum tissues were determined by western blot analysis. Intravenous injection of high-dose ChA or CA (7 mg/kg) markedly increased the peroxide production in the venular walls and upregulated the protein expression levels of Nox4 and p22(phox) in the ileum tissues, while the same dose of CA and SAB made no difference within the observation period. No changes were observed in the number of leukocytes adhering to the venular walls. High-dose ChA and FA led to an imbalance between the oxidant and antioxidant mechanism by boosting the expression levels of NADPH oxidase. Thus, we clarified the rationale behind the adverse effects of a herbal injection containing high levels of phenolic acid compounds.

  15. Oven wall panel construction

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Kenneth; Whike, Alan S.

    1980-04-22

    An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

  16. Crater Wall With Gullies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    8 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows gullies formed in the terraced wall of an impact crater on the floor of a larger crater near 39.1oS, 200.7oW. Gullies such as these are fairly common in craters and depressions at southern middle latitudes. They also occur in some areas at northern middle latitudes and in both polar regions. They may have formed by liquid water, or not--the Mars science community is still debating and discussing the issue. This picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  17. The Na+/H+ exchanger controls deoxycholic acid-induced apoptosis by a H+-activated, Na+-dependent ionic shift in esophageal cells.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Aaron; Chen, HwuDauRw; Khan, Mohammad R; Roesly, Heather; Hill, Kimberly A; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Mandal, Amritlal; Delamere, Nicholas A; Dvorak, Katerina

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis resistance is a hallmark of cancer cells. Typically, bile acids induce apoptosis. However during gastrointestinal (GI) tumorigenesis the cancer cells develop resistance to bile acid-induced cell death. To understand how bile acids induce apoptosis resistance we first need to identify the molecular pathways that initiate apoptosis in response to bile acid exposure. In this study we examined the mechanism of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced apoptosis, specifically the role of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) and Na(+) influx in esophageal cells. In vitro studies revealed that the exposure of esophageal cells (JH-EsoAd1, CP-A) to DCA (0.2 mM-0.5 mM) caused lysosomal membrane perturbation and transient cytoplasmic acidification. Fluorescence microscopy in conjunction with atomic absorption spectrophotometry demonstrated that this effect on lysosomes correlated with influx of Na(+), subsequent loss of intracellular K(+), an increase of Ca(2+) and apoptosis. However, ethylisopropyl-amiloride (EIPA), a selective inhibitor of NHE, prevented Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) changes and caspase 3/7 activation induced by DCA. Ouabain and amphotericin B, two drugs that increase intracellular Na(+) levels, induced similar changes as DCA (ion imbalance, caspase3/7 activation). On the contrary, DCA-induced cell death was inhibited by medium with low a Na(+) concentrations. In the same experiments, we exposed rat ileum ex-vivo to DCA with or without EIPA. Severe tissue damage and caspase-3 activation was observed after DCA treatment, but EIPA almost fully prevented this response. In summary, NHE-mediated Na(+) influx is a critical step leading to DCA-induced apoptosis. Cells tolerate acidification but evade DCA-induced apoptosis if NHE is inhibited. Our data suggests that suppression of NHE by endogenous or exogenous inhibitors may lead to apoptosis resistance during GI tumorigenesis.

  18. 13. LONG WEST WALL (LEFT) AND SHORT SOUTH WALL (RIGHT) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. LONG WEST WALL (LEFT) AND SHORT SOUTH WALL (RIGHT) OF AR-9, ALSO SHOWING MORE RECENT CONTROL ROOM BUILDING AT RIGHT. VIEW IS TO THE NORTHEAST. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base, Rammed Earth Aircraft Dispersal Revetments, Western Shore of Rogers Dry Lake, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. 10. VIEW OF LAMINARFLOW FILTER WALL NEAR SOUTH WALL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF LAMINAR-FLOW FILTER WALL NEAR SOUTH WALL OF CLEAN ROOM (102). NOTE GROUNDING CABLES NEAR BASEBOARD IN LOWER RIGHT BACKGROUND. WHITE SQUARE IN FOREGROUND IS A FLOOR DRAIN COVERED WITH TAPE. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Vehicle Support Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  20. North wall, central part, showing partial partition wall at left. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North wall, central part, showing partial partition wall at left. This area is labeled “Pioneering Research” on drawing copy NV-35-B-5 (submitted with HABS No. NV-35-B) (series 2 of 4) - Bureau of Mines Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Original Building, Date Street north of U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  1. 7. INTERIOR, MAIN GARAGE, SOUTHERN WALL, FROM CLOSE TO WALL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR, MAIN GARAGE, SOUTHERN WALL, FROM CLOSE TO WALL, LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING 'GAMEWELL' FIRE ALARM TAPE CONTROL SYSTEM (TECHNOLOGY CIRCA 1910) AT CENTER, AND ENTRY TO OFFICE AT FAR RIGHT. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Firehouse, East of Fourth Street, between A & B Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  2. Salinity-Induced Inhibition of Leaf Elongation in Maize Is Not Mediated by Changes in Cell Wall Acidification Capacity1

    PubMed Central

    Neves-Piestun, Beatriz G.; Bernstein, Nirit

    2001-01-01

    The physiological mechanisms underlying leaf growth inhibition under salt stress are not fully understood. Apoplastic pH is considered to play an important role in cell wall loosening and tissue growth and was demonstrated to be altered by several growth-limiting environmental conditions. In this study we have evaluated the possibility that inhibition of maize (Zea mays) leaf elongation by salinity is mediated by changes in growing cell wall acidification capacity. The kinetics of extended apoplast pH changes by leaf tissue of known expansion rates and extent of growth reduction under stress was investigated (in vivo) and was found similar for non-stressed and salt-stressed tissues at all examined apoplast salinity levels (0.1, 5, 10, or 25 mm NaCl). A similar rate of spontaneous acidification for the salt and control treatments was demonstrated also in in situ experiments. Unlike growing cells that acidified the external medium, mature nongrowing cells caused medium alkalinization. The kinetics of pH changes by mature tissue was also unchanged by salt stress. Fusicoccin, an enhancer of plasmalemma H+-ATPase activity level, greatly stimulated elongation growth and acidification rate to a similar extent in the control and salt treatments. That the ability of the growing tissue to acidify the apoplast did not change under same salt stress conditions that induced inhibition of tissue elongation rate suggests that salinity does not inhibit cell growth by impairing the acidification process or reducing the inherent capacity for cell wall acidification. PMID:11244121

  3. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  4. The Wonders of Word Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houle, Amy; Krogness, Allison

    2001-01-01

    Describes using a word wall, a visible display categorizing words alphabetically, enabling children in early childhood classrooms to discover new words and to practice and expand their language skills. Suggests that a word wall helps to create a secure learning environment, builds student confidence, and contributes to independent reading and…

  5. The "Brick Wall" Graphic Organizer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matteson, Shirley M.

    2016-01-01

    A brick wall provides a fitting description of what happens when teachers try to teach a concept for which students are unprepared. When students are unsuccessful academically, their foundational knowledge may be missing, incomplete, or incorrect. As a result, students "hit a brick wall," and their academic progress stops because they do…

  6. Great Wall of China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This ASTER sub-image covers a 12 x 12 km area in northern Shanxi Province, China, and was acquired January 9, 2001. The low sun angle, and light snow cover highlight a section of the Great Wall, visible as a black line running diagonally through the image from lower left to upper right. The Great Wall is over 2000 years old and was built over a period of 1000 years. Stretching 4500 miles from Korea to the Gobi Desert it was first built to protect China from marauders from the north.

    This image is located at 40.2 degrees north latitude and 112.8 degrees east longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats, monitoring potentially active volcanoes, identifying crop stress, determining cloud morphology and physical properties, wetlands Evaluation, thermal pollution monitoring, coral reef degradation, surface temperature mapping of soils and geology, and

  7. Channel Wall Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Identification of Novel MAGE-G1-Interacting Partners in Retinoic Acid-Induced P19 Neuronal Differentiation Using SILAC-Based Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Chen, Yujian; Lin, Shide; Yang, Shuguang; Liu, Shaojun

    2017-01-01

    MAGE-G1 is a protein plays role in the early process of neurogenesis. However, the fundamental roles MAGE-G1 played in neurogenesis have not yet been completely understood. Finding the partners MAGE-G1 interacting with will surely contribute to the function study of MAGE-G1. In this study, using Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture-immunoprecipitation quantitative proteomics, we screened the interacting proteins of MAGE-G1 during retinoic acid -induced neuronal differentiation of P19 cells and firstly found that FSCN1 and VIME were potential novel MAGE-G1-interacting proteins. Then, the interaction between overexpressed MAGE-G1 and FSCN1 or VIME was validated by GST-pull down assay in bacteria and by co-immunoprecipitation assay in COS7 cells. Endogenous co-immunoprecipitation assay further confirmed that MAGE-G1 interacted with FSCN1 or VIME in P19 cells after a 6-day retinoic acid-induced neuronal differentiation. Those results provide a functional linkage between MAGE-G1 and FSCN1 or VIME and may facilitate a better understanding of the fundamental aspects of MAGE-G1 during neurogenesis. PMID:28374796

  9. Beta-trace Protein as a new non-invasive immunological Marker for Quinolinic Acid-induced impaired Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Baranyi, Andreas; Amouzadeh-Ghadikolai, Omid; Lewinski, Dirk von; Breitenecker, Robert J.; Stojakovic, Tatjana; März, Winfried; Robier, Christoph; Rothenhäusler, Hans-Bernd; Mangge, Harald; Meinitzer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Quinolinic acid, a macrophage/microglia-derived excitotoxin fulfills a plethora of functions such as neurotoxin, gliotoxin, and proinflammatory mediator, and it alters the integrity and cohesion of the blood-brain barrier in several pathophysiological states. Beta-trace protein (BTP), a monomeric glycoprotein, is known to indicate cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Thus, the prior aim of this study was to investigate whether BTP might non-invasively indicate quinolinic acid-induced impaired blood-brain barrier integrity. The research hypotheses were tested in three subsamples with different states of immune activation (patients with HCV-infection and interferon-α, patients with major depression, and healthy controls). BTP has also been described as a sensitive marker in detecting impaired renal function. Thus, the renal function has been considered. Our study results revealed highest quinolinic acid and highest BTP- levels in the subsample of patients with HCV in comparison with the other subsamples with lower or no immune activation (quinolinic acid: F = 21.027, p < 0.001 [ANOVA]; BTP: F = 6.792, p < 0.01 [ANOVA]). In addition, a two-step hierarchical linear regression model showed that significant predictors of BTP levels are quinolinic acid, glomerular filtration rate and age. The neurotoxin quinolinic acid may impair blood-brain barrier integrity. BTP might be a new non-invasive biomarker to indicate quinolinic acid-induced impaired blood-brain barrier integrity. PMID:28276430

  10. Use of Activated Carbon in Packaging to Attenuate Formaldehyde-Induced and Formic Acid-Induced Degradation and Reduce Gelatin Cross-Linking in Solid Dosage Forms.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Stephen T; Zelesky, Todd C; Chen, Raymond; Likar, Michael D; MacDonald, Bruce C; Hawkins, Joel M; Carroll, Sophia C; Johnson, Gail M; Space, J Sean; Jensen, James F; DeMatteo, Vincent A

    2016-07-01

    Formaldehyde and formic acid are reactive impurities found in commonly used excipients and can be responsible for limiting drug product shelf-life. Described here is the use of activated carbon in drug product packaging to attenuate formaldehyde-induced and formic acid-induced drug degradation in tablets and cross-linking in hard gelatin capsules. Several pharmaceutical products with known or potential vulnerabilities to formaldehyde-induced or formic acid-induced degradation or gelatin cross-linking were subjected to accelerated stability challenges in the presence and absence of activated carbon. The effects of time and storage conditions were determined. For all of the products studied, activated carbon attenuated drug degradation or gelatin cross-linking. This novel use of activated carbon in pharmaceutical packaging may be useful for enhancing the chemical stability of drug products or the dissolution stability of gelatin-containing dosage forms and may allow for the 1) extension of a drug product's shelf-life when the limiting attribute is a degradation product induced by a reactive impurity, 2) marketing of a drug product in hotter and more humid climatic zones than currently supported without the use of activated carbon, and 3) enhanced dissolution stability of products that are vulnerable to gelatin cross-linking.

  11. Synergic Interaction of Rifaximin and Mutaflor (Escherichia coli Nissle 1917) in the Treatment of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Dembiński, Marcin; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bulanda, Małgorzata; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Gałązka, Krystyna; Konturek, Peter Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background. Inflammatory bowel disease results from the dysregulation of immune response to environmental and microbial agents in genetically susceptible individuals. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of rifaximin and/or Mutaflor (Escherichia coli Nissle 1917, EcN) administration on the healing of acetic acid-induced colitis. Methods. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats by rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Rifaximin (50 mg/kg/dose) and/or Mutaflor (109 CFU/dose) were given intragastrically once a day. The severity of colitis was assessed at the 8th day after induction of inflammation. Results. Treatment with rifaximin significantly accelerated the healing of colonic damage. This effect was associated with significant reversion of the acetic acid-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Moreover, administration of rifaximin significantly reduced concentration of proinflammatory TNF-α and activity of myeloperoxidase in colonic mucosa. Mutaflor given alone was without significant effect on activity of colitis. In contrast, Mutaflor given in combination with rifaximin significantly enhanced therapeutic effect of rifaximin. Moreover, Mutaflor led to settle of the colon by EcN and this effect was augmented by pretreatment with rifaximin. Conclusion. Rifaximin and Mutaflor exhibit synergic anti-inflammatory and therapeutic effect in acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. PMID:27433160

  12. Acid-Induced Activation of the Urease Promoters Is Mediated Directly by the ArsRS Two-Component System of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Pflock, Michael; Kennard, Simone; Delany, Isabel; Scarlato, Vincenzo; Beier, Dagmar

    2005-01-01

    The nickel-containing enzyme urease is an essential colonization factor of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori which enables the bacteria to survive the low-pH conditions of the stomach. Transcription of the urease genes is positively controlled in response to increasing concentrations of nickel ions and acidic pH. Here we demonstrate that acid-induced transcription of the urease genes is mediated directly by the ArsRS two-component system. Footprint analyses identify binding sites of the phosphorylated ArsR response regulator within the ureA and ureI promoters. Furthermore, deletion of a distal upstream ArsR binding site of the ureA promoter demonstrates its role in acid-dependent activation of the promoter. In addition, acid-induced transcription of the ureA gene is unaltered in a nikR mutant, providing evidence that pH-responsive regulation and nickel-responsive regulation of the ureA promoter are mediated by independent mechanisms involving the ArsR response regulator and the NikR protein. PMID:16177315

  13. Synergic Interaction of Rifaximin and Mutaflor (Escherichia coli Nissle 1917) in the Treatment of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Dembiński, Artur; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Dembiński, Marcin; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Gosiewski, Tomasz; Bulanda, Małgorzata; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Gałązka, Krystyna; Konturek, Peter Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background. Inflammatory bowel disease results from the dysregulation of immune response to environmental and microbial agents in genetically susceptible individuals. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of rifaximin and/or Mutaflor (Escherichia coli Nissle 1917, EcN) administration on the healing of acetic acid-induced colitis. Methods. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats by rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Rifaximin (50 mg/kg/dose) and/or Mutaflor (10(9) CFU/dose) were given intragastrically once a day. The severity of colitis was assessed at the 8th day after induction of inflammation. Results. Treatment with rifaximin significantly accelerated the healing of colonic damage. This effect was associated with significant reversion of the acetic acid-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Moreover, administration of rifaximin significantly reduced concentration of proinflammatory TNF-α and activity of myeloperoxidase in colonic mucosa. Mutaflor given alone was without significant effect on activity of colitis. In contrast, Mutaflor given in combination with rifaximin significantly enhanced therapeutic effect of rifaximin. Moreover, Mutaflor led to settle of the colon by EcN and this effect was augmented by pretreatment with rifaximin. Conclusion. Rifaximin and Mutaflor exhibit synergic anti-inflammatory and therapeutic effect in acetic acid-induced colitis in rats.

  14. Chicoric acid induces apoptosis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes through ROS-mediated PI3K/Akt and MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Haifang; Wang, Jing; Yuan, Li; Xiao, Chunxia; Wang, Yutang; Liu, Xuebo

    2013-02-20

    Chicoric acid has been reported to possess various bioactivities. However, the antiobesity effects of chicoric acid remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of chicoric acid on 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and its molecular mechanisms of apoptosis. Chicoric acid inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes which was characterized by chromatin condensation and poly ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) loss, Bax/Bcl-2 dysregulation, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 activation were observed, indicating mitochondria-dependent apoptosis induced by chicoric acid. Furthermore, PI3K/Akt and MAPK (p38 MAPK, JNK, and ERK1/2) signaling pathways were involved in chicoric acid-induced apoptosis. The employment of protein kinase inhibitors LY294002, SB203580, SP600125, and U0126 revealed that PI3K/Akt signaling pathway interplayed with MAPK signaling pathways. Moreover, chicoric acid induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Pretreatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) significantly blocked cell death and changes of Akt and MAPK signalings induced by chicoric acid. In addition, chicoric acid down regulated HO-1 and COX-2 via the PI3K/Akt pathway.

  15. Wall Shear Stress, Wall Pressure and Near Wall Velocity Field Relationships in a Whirling Annular Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Winslow, Robert B.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1996-01-01

    The mean and phase averaged pressure and wall shear stress distributions were measured on the stator wall of a 50% eccentric annular seal which was whirling in a circular orbit at the same speed as the shaft rotation. The shear stresses were measured using flush mounted hot-film probes. Four different operating conditions were considered consisting of Reynolds numbers of 12,000 and 24,000 and Taylor numbers of 3,300 and 6,600. At each of the operating conditions the axial distribution (from Z/L = -0.2 to 1.2) of the mean pressure, shear stress magnitude, and shear stress direction on the stator wall were measured. Also measured were the phase averaged pressure and shear stress. These data were combined to calculate the force distributions along the seal length. Integration of the force distributions result in the net forces and moments generated by the pressure and shear stresses. The flow field inside the seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 has been measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Phase averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  16. Denitrification Walls: Successes and Limitations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipper, L. A.; Barkle, G. F.; Burgess, C. P.; Vojvodic-Vukovic, M.

    2001-05-01

    There is a need to develop practical and inexpensive approaches for removing nitrate from ground water because of its potential adverse effect on receiving aquatic environments. Denitrification walls may be one such approach for removing nitrate from shallow groundwater. In January 1996, we constructed a denitrification wall by digging a trench that intercepted groundwater and mixed the excavated soil with sawdust before the mix was returned to the trench. Sawdust provides a source of energy for denitrifying bacteria, which convert nitrate in groundwater entering the wall to nitrogen gas. For the past 5 years, nitrate concentrations in groundwater entering this wall have ranged from 5 to 16 mg N L-1 but have always been reduced to less than 2 mg N L-1 in the wall indicating nearly complete removal of nitrate from the groundwater. We showed that this nitrate removal could be accounted for by denitrification rates which ranged from 0.6 to 18.1 mg N m-3 h-1. More recently we have encountered problems with denitrification walls constructed into coarsely textured soils (such as sands) where the addition of sawdust decreased hydraulic conductivity. As a consequence groundwater flowed under rather than through the wall. We are attempting to circumvent this problem using coarser grades of carbon amendments. Particulate carbon (such as sawdust) is likely to support lower rates of nitrate removal, but for longer, than soluble carbon sources because solid carbon sources degrade more slowly.

  17. [Influence of KU-1257 on the recurrence and relapse of acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcers in rats].

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, H; Ohsawa, A; Kobayashi, F; Ohkubo, H; Taga, F

    1996-02-01

    The influence of KU-1257 on the recurrence and relapse of acetic acid ulcers in rats was investigated grossly and histologically in comparison with that of cimetidine. The ulcer was induced by topical application of glacial acetic acid at the junction of the corpus and antrum on the anterior wall of the stomach. The drug was administered from the 5th to the 153rd day after the ulcer induction and then discontinued to the 238th day. The healing rates of the control groups (control) rose until the 119th day after the ulcer induction, followed by ups and downs. The quality of healing in the regenerated mucosa and the granulation tissue of the healed ulcer was poor, resulting in the recurrence and relapse of ulcers. The recurrence and relapse of ulcers also occurred in the cimetidine groups (CIM). On the other hand, the KU-1257 groups (KU-1257) showed much lower recurrence and relapse rates of ulcers than the control and CIM groups. Moreover, KU-1257, unlike CIM, improved the quality of ulcer healing throughout the period of its administration and even after it was discontinued. These results suggest that KU-1257 improves the quality of ulcer healing, and this may contribute to the low recurrence and relapse rates of ulcers.

  18. 27. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; SIDEWALL, NORTH WALL AND SOUTH WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; SIDEWALL, NORTH WALL AND SOUTH WALL FRAMING ELEVATIONS." Specifications No. ENG-04353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 27 of 148; file no. 1320/78. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, Rev. B; date: 15 April 1957. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. Domain walls riding the wave.

    SciTech Connect

    Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

    2010-11-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the ferromagnetic wire is

  20. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias.

  1. OTVE combustor wall condition monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szemenyei, Brian; Nelson, Robert S.; Barkhoudarian, S.

    1989-01-01

    Conventional ultrasonics, eddy current, and electromagnetic acoustic transduction (EMAT) technologies were evaluated to determine their capability of measuring wall thickness/wear of individual cooling channels in test specimens simulating conditions in the throat region of an OTVE combustion chamber liner. Quantitative results are presented for the eddy current technology, which was shown to measure up to the optimum 20-mil wall thickness with near single channel resolution. Additional results demonstrate the capability of the conventional ultrasonics and EMAT technologies to detect a thinning or cracked wall. Recommendations for additional eddy current and EMAT development tests are presented.

  2. Fly on the Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    The email was addressed not only to me, but also to all the Project Knowledge Sharing Community at Ames Research Center. We were invited to sit in on a major project review as a new experiment in knowledge sharing. This first-of-its-kind opportunity had been conceived by Claire Smith, who leads the knowledge sharing program, as well as heading up the Center's Project Leadership Development Program and serving as coordinator of the APPL-West program at Ames. The objective was to offer Ames project practitioners the opportunity to observe project-review processes as they happen. Not that I haven't participated in my share of project reviews, but this seemed like a great way for me to get up-to-date about a new project, the Kepler mission, and to experience a review from a new perspective. Typically, when you're being reviewed, it's difficult to see what's happening objectively-the same way it is on a project. Presenters are always thinking, 'Okay, what's on my slides? How much time do I have left? What are they going to ask me?' So when Claire's email pinged on my computer, I quickly responded by asking her to save a place for me. It was to be an informational review about progress on the project: what the team had done, where they were going, and what they needed to do to get there. There were people on the project team from all over the United States, and it was the first time for them to get together from all aspects of the project. For our part, as observers, we were asked to abide by a couple of rules: Don't ask any questions. and don't talk about the specifics of what we saw or heard. The idea was that we weren't supposed to be noticed. We weren't to buzz around and bother people. Hence the name for this experinient: Fly on the Wall.

  3. My Big Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espinosa, Paul S.

    2002-01-01

    It was June and I was in Yosemite National Park in California, 2,000-feet off the ground. I was climbing El Capitan, a majestic 3,000-foot high, mile-wide granite monolith--one of the most sought after and spectacular rock climbs in the world. After three days of climbing on its sheer face, and having completed the most difficult part of the route, my partner and I were heading down. A thunderstorm lasting all night and into the morning had soaked our tiny perch and all our worldly possessions. We began rappelling down the vertical wall by sliding to the ends of two 50meter ropes tied together and looped through a set of fixed rings bolted into the rock. At the end of the ropes was another rappel station consisting of a set of rings, placed by previous climbers for retreating parties, which we used to anchor ourselves to the rock face. We then pulled the ropes down from the rings above, threaded the ones in front of our noses and started down another rope length. Everything we brought up for our five-day climb to the summit we had to bring back down with us: ropes, climbing gear of every sort, sleeping bags, extra clothes, food, water, and other essentials. All this we either stuffed into a haul bag (an oversized reinforced duffel bag) or slung over our shoulders. The retreat was slow and methodical, akin to a train backing down a mountain, giving me ample time to think. My situation made me think about my work, mostly, about all the projects I have managed, or been involved in managing. As a NASA project manager, I have worked on a number of successful projects. I have also been involved in a number of projects I never saw the end of. I thought about all the projects I transferred off of for other opportunities, projects that were in full stride and ran out of funding, and ones put on the shelf because they would not meet a flight date. Oh yes, I have had many success, to be sure, or I would have burned out years ago. Lessons from both the successful and not

  4. Simulation of turbulent wall pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program has been developed to simulate the transient wall pressure field produced by a low speed fully turbulent boundary layer. The theoretical basis for the simulation has been discussed and preliminary results from a pressure simulation are presented.

  5. Plant cell walls to ethanol.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conversion of plant cell walls to ethanol constitutes generation 2 bioethanol production. The process consists of several steps: biomass selection/genetic modification, physiochemical pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, fermentation, and separation. Ultimately, it is desired to combine as man...

  6. Wall effects in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevallier, J. P.; Vaucheret, X.

    1986-01-01

    A synthesis of current trends in the reduction and computation of wall effects is presented. Some of the points discussed include: (1) for the two-dimensional, transonic tests, various control techniques of boundary conditions are used with adaptive walls offering high precision in determining reference conditions and residual corrections. A reduction in the boundary layer effects of the lateral walls is obtained at T2; (2) for the three-dimensional tests, the methods for the reduction of wall effects are still seldom applied due to a lesser need and to their complexity; (3) the supports holding the model of the probes have to be taken into account in the estimation of perturbatory effects.

  7. Hall thruster with grooved walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Ning, Zhongxi; Yu, Daren

    2013-02-01

    Axial-oriented and azimuthal-distributed grooves are formed on channel walls of a Hall thruster after the engine undergoes a long-term operation. Existing studies have demonstrated the relation between the grooves and the near-wall physics, such as sheath and electron near-wall transport. The idea to optimize the thruster performance with such grooves was also proposed. Therefore, this paper is devoted to explore the effects of wall grooves on the discharge characteristics of a Hall thruster. With experimental measurements, the variations on electron conductivity, ionization distribution, and integrated performance are obtained. The involved physical mechanisms are then analyzed and discussed. The findings help to not only better understand the working principle of Hall thruster discharge but also establish a physical fundamental for the subsequent optimization with artificial grooves.

  8. The contribution of a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) conductance to amino-acid-induced inward current responses of ciliated olfactory neurons of the rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Suzuki, N

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether amino-acid-induced inward currents of ciliated olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) include a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) conductance, we first studied changes in reversal potential and the current/voltage relationships of the responses of ORNs to an amino acid mixture (l-alanine, l-arginine, l-glutamate and l-norvaline; all 10 mmol l(-)(1)) with different concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) in the perfusion and recording pipette solutions. We also examined the effects of six different Cl(-) channel blockers on the responses of ORNs using a conventional whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. The amino acid mixture and one blocker were applied focally to the cilia of ORNs using a double-barrelled micropipette and a pressure ejection system. The expected shifts in reversal potential, indicating the contribution of the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) conductance, occurred in both positive and negative directions depending on the external and internal Na(+) and Cl(-) concentrations. Niflumic acid, flufenamic acid, NPPB [5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzonate] and DCDPC (3', 5-dichlorodiphenylamine-2-carboxylate), at 0.5 mmol l(-)(1), reversibly blocked both the amino-acid-induced inward currents and the background activity in most ORNs. The effectiveness of these blocking agents varied from 77 to 91 % for ORNs perfused externally with standard Ringer's solution. SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonate), at 5.0 mmol l(-)(1), irreversibly inhibited the physiological response (100 % inhibition), whereas DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2, 2'-disulphonate), at 5.0 mmol l(-)(1), had the smallest effect (45 %) of the inhibitors tested. The dose of niflumic acid inducing 50 % inhibition (IC(50)), determined specifically for the current component of the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, was 70 micromol l(-)(1). Our results suggest that these blockers are not specific for Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels and that

  9. The Apoplastic Copper AMINE OXIDASE1 Mediates Jasmonic Acid-Induced Protoxylem Differentiation in Arabidopsis Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Ghuge, Sandip A.; Carucci, Andrea; Rodrigues-Pousada, Renato A.; Tisi, Alessandra; Franchi, Stefano; Tavladoraki, Paraskevi; Cona, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Polyamines are involved in key developmental processes and stress responses. Copper amine oxidases oxidize the polyamine putrescine (Put), producing an aldehyde, ammonia, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) amine oxidase gene At4g14940 (AtAO1) encodes an apoplastic copper amine oxidase expressed at the early stages of vascular tissue differentiation in roots. Here, its role in root development and xylem differentiation was explored by pharmacological and forward/reverse genetic approaches. Analysis of the AtAO1 expression pattern in roots by a promoter::green fluorescent protein-β-glucuronidase fusion revealed strong gene expression in the protoxylem at the transition, elongation, and maturation zones. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) induced AtAO1 gene expression in vascular tissues, especially at the transition and elongation zones. Early protoxylem differentiation was observed upon MeJA treatment along with Put level decrease and H2O2 accumulation in wild-type roots, whereas Atao1 loss-of-function mutants were unresponsive to the hormone. The H2O2 scavenger N,N1-dimethylthiourea reversed the MeJA-induced early protoxylem differentiation in wild-type seedlings. Likewise, Put, which had no effect on Atao1 mutants, induced early protoxylem differentiation in the wild type, this event being counteracted by N,N1-dimethylthiourea treatment. Consistently, AtAO1-overexpressing plants showed lower Put levels and early protoxylem differentiation concurrent with H2O2 accumulation in the root zone where the first protoxylem cells with fully developed secondary wall thickenings are found. These results show that the H2O2 produced via AtAO1-driven Put oxidation plays a role in MeJA signaling leading to early protoxylem differentiation in root. PMID:25883242

  10. Yogurt containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL 2716 (LG21 yogurt) accelerated the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masayuki; Shimizu, Kimiko; Kurakazu, Keiko

    2010-01-01

    We have reported that LG21 yogurt containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL 2716 (LG21 yogurt) inhibits the formation of HCl-induced acute gastric lesions through the generation of prostaglandin E₂. This study aimed to determine the role of viable Lactobacillus in the healing of acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcer. LG21 yogurt or γ-ray radiated LG21 yogurt was administered orally twice a day for 10 d at a dose of 5 ml/kg. LG21 yogurt significantly accelerated the healing of the ulcer, but γ-ray radiated LG21 yogurt did not. However, both yogurts significantly inhibited HCl-induced gastric erosive lesions and enhanced the generation of gastric mucosal prostaglandin E₂. From the above results, it was found that viable bacteria are needed to accelerate the healing of chronic gastric ulcer, but not to inhibit gastric lesions.

  11. Acid-induced crystallinity enhancement of graphite-like C3N3+xHy synthesized through a facile one-pot approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hao; Guo, Qixun; He, Dingzeng; Li, Juntao; Sun, Shigang

    2017-02-01

    Graphite-like C3N3+xHy with s-triazine rings as building blocks were synthesized through a facile one-pot approach. It is surprising that the degree of crystallinity of the synthesized sample at 330 °C (sample CNH-330) was remarkably enhanced by the dilute hydrochloric acid treatment. The mechanism of the acid-induced crystallinity enhancement was preliminarily studied. XRD, FTIR, SEM, photoluminescence spectra, elemental analysis, and XPS were performed to investigate the composition and structure of the obtained samples. The remarkable enhancement of the degree of crystallinity may be attributed to the ordered formation of ammonium-salt-like structure by the reaction of HCl with dbnd NH or sbnd NH2 in CNH-330.

  12. Innovative Composite Wall System for Sheathing Masonry Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Robert L.; Cavallo, James

    1997-09-25

    Existing Housing - Much of the older multifamily housing stock in the United States includes units in structures with uninsulated masonry walls. Included in this stock are two- and three-story walk-up apartments, larger apartment complexes, and public housing (both high- rise and townhouse). This older multifamily housing has seen years of heavy use that may have left the plaster wall marred or damaged. Long- term building settlement or movement may have cracked the plaster, sometimes severely. Moisture from invented kitchens and baths may have caused condensation on uninsulated exterior walls. At best this condensation has left stains on the paint or wallpaper. At worst it has supported mold and mildew growth, fouling the air and creating unhealthy living conditions. Deteriorating plaster and flaking paint also result from wet walls. The presence of flaking, lead-based paint in older (pre-1978) housing is a major public health concern. Children can suffer permanent mental handicaps and psychological disorders if they are subjected to elevated levels of lead, while adults can suffer hypertension and other maladies. Studies have found that, in some urban communities with older housing stocks, over 35% of children tested have elevated blood lead levels (Hastings, et al.: 1997). Nationally, nearly 22% of black, non-hispanic children living in pre-1946 housing were found to have elevated levels of lead in their blood (MWWR Article: February 21,1997). The deterioration of many of these walls is to the point that lead can freely enter the living space.

  13. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Gelsolin in Acetic Acid Induced Writhing, Tail Immersion and Carrageenan Induced Paw Edema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Parasar, Devraj; Sagar, Amin; Choudhary, Vikas; Chopra, Bhupinder Singh; Garg, Renu; Ashish; Khatri, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Plasma gelsolin levels significantly decline in several disease conditions, since gelsolin gets scavenged when it depolymerizes and caps filamentous actin released in the circulation following tissue injury. It is well established that our body require/implement inflammatory and analgesic responses to protect against cell damage and injury to the tissue. This study was envisaged to examine analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of exogenous gelsolin (8 mg/mouse) in mice models of pain and acute inflammation. Administration of gelsolin in acetic acid-induced writhing and tail immersion tests not only demonstrated a significant reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhing effects, but also exhibited an analgesic activity in tail immersion test in mice as compared to placebo treated mice. Additionally, anti-inflammatory function of gelsolin (8 mg/mouse) compared with anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium (10 mg/kg)] was confirmed in the carrageenan injection induced paw edema where latter was measured by vernier caliper and fluorescent tomography imaging. Interestingly, results showed that plasma gelsolin was capable of reducing severity of inflammation in mice comparable to diclofenac sodium. Analysis of cytokines and histo-pathological examinations of tissue revealed administration of gelsolin and diclofenac sodium significantly reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6. Additionally, carrageenan groups pretreated with diclofenac sodium or gelsolin showed a marked decrease in edema and infiltration of inflammatory cells in paw tissue. Our study provides evidence that administration of gelsolin can effectively reduce the pain and inflammation in mice model. PMID:26426535

  14. Protective Effect of Unsaturated Fatty Acids on Palmitic Acid-Induced Toxicity in Skeletal Muscle Cells is not Mediated by PPARδ Activation.

    PubMed

    Tumova, Jana; Malisova, Lucia; Andel, Michal; Trnka, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Unsaturated free fatty acids (FFA) are able to prevent deleterious effects of saturated FFA in skeletal muscle cells although the mechanisms involved are still not completely understood. FFA act as endogenous ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), transcription factors regulating the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine whether activation of PPARδ, the most common PPAR subtype in skeletal muscle, plays a role in mediating the protective effect of unsaturated FFA on saturated FFA-induced damage in skeletal muscle cells and to examine an impact on mitochondrial respiration. Mouse C2C12 myotubes were treated for 24 h with different concentrations of saturated FFA (palmitic acid), unsaturated FFA (oleic, linoleic and α-linolenic acid), and their combinations. PPARδ agonist GW501516 and antagonist GSK0660 were also used. Both mono- and polyunsaturated FFA, but not GW501516, prevented palmitic acid-induced cell death. Mono- and polyunsaturated FFA proved to be effective activators of PPARδ compared to saturated palmitic acid; however, in combination with palmitic acid their effect on PPARδ activation was blocked and stayed at the levels observed for palmitic acid alone. Unsaturated FFA at moderate physiological concentrations as well as GW501516, but not palmitic acid, mildly uncoupled mitochondrial respiration. Our results indicate that although unsaturated FFA are effective activators of PPARδ, their protective effect on palmitic acid-induced toxicity is not mediated by PPARδ activation and subsequent induction of lipid regulatory genes in skeletal muscle cells. Other mechanisms, such as mitochondrial uncoupling, may underlie their effect.

  15. Valproic acid increases conservative homologous recombination frequency and reactive oxygen species formation: a potential mechanism for valproic acid-induced neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Defoort, Ericka N; Kim, Perry M; Winn, Louise M

    2006-04-01

    Valproic acid, a commonly used antiepileptic agent, is associated with a 1 to 2% incidence of neural tube defects when taken during pregnancy; however, the molecular mechanism by which this occurs has not been elucidated. Previous research suggests that valproic acid exposure leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). DNA damage due to ROS can result in DNA double-strand breaks, which can be repaired through homologous recombination (HR), a process that is not error-free and can result in detrimental genetic changes. Because the developing embryo requires tight regulation of gene expression to develop properly, we propose that the loss or dysfunction of genes involved in embryonic development through aberrant HR may ultimately cause neural tube defects. To determine whether valproic acid induces HR, Chinese hamster ovary 3-6 cells, containing a neomycin direct repeat recombination substrate, were exposed to valproic acid for 4 or 24 h. A significant increase in HR after exposure to valproic acid (5 and 10 mM) for 24 h was observed, which seems to occur through a conservative HR mechanism. We also demonstrated that exposure to valproic acid (5 and 10 mM) significantly increased intracellular ROS levels, which were attenuated by preincubation with polyethylene glycol-conjugated (PEG)-catalase. A significant change in the ratio of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine/2'-de-oxyguanosine, a measure of DNA oxidation, was not observed after valproic acid exposure; however, preincubation with PEG-catalase significantly blocked the increase in HR. These data demonstrate that valproic acid increases HR frequency and provides a possible mechanism for valproic acid-induced neural tube defects.

  16. Wall thickness effect on the resistive wall mode stability in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.-J.; Kotschenreuther, M.T.

    2005-07-15

    The effect of finite wall thickness on the stability of n=1 resistive wall modes in toroidal plasmas is investigated. A fusion reactor-relevant configuration is examined. The investigation employs a novel ideal-magnetohydrodynamics adaptive shooting code for axisymmetric plasmas, extended to take into account the wall thickness. Although finite wall thickness generally reduces the growth rate of the resistive wall modes, no contribution to stabilization is found to be made by the portion of the wall that is located beyond the critical position for perfectly conducting wall stabilization. Thus, when the inner side of the wall lies near the critical wall position, the scaling of the growth rate versus wall thickness in the realistic thick-wall calculation is significantly different from that of the usual thin-wall theory. The thin-wall estimate is relevant only when the wall is brought very close to the plasma and is not too thick.

  17. Effects of the flexibility of the arterial wall on the wall shear stresses and wall tension in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Fernandez, Miguel; Chomaz, Jean-Marc

    2005-11-01

    As an abdominal aortic aneurysm develops, large changes occur in the composition and structure of the arterial wall, which result in its stiffening. So far, most studies, whether experimental or numerical, have been conducted assuming the walls to be rigid. A numerical simulation of the fluid structure interactions is performed in different models of aneurysms in order to analyze the effects that the wall compliance might have on the flow topology. Both symmetric and non-symmetric models of aneurysms are considered, all idealistic in shape. The wall mechanical properties are varied in order to simulate the progressive stiffening of the walls. The spatial and temporal distributions of wall tension are calculated for the different values of the wall elasticity and compared to the results for the rigid walls. In the case of rigid walls, the calculation of the wall shear stresses and pressure compare very well with experimental results.

  18. Isolation of the Cell Wall.

    PubMed

    Canut, Hervé; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes a method allowing the purification of the cell wall for studying both polysaccharides and proteins. The plant primary cell wall is mainly composed of polysaccharides (90-95 % in mass) and of proteins (5-10 %). At the end of growth, specialized cells may synthesize a lignified secondary wall composed of polysaccharides (about 65 %) and lignin (about 35 %). Due to its composition, the cell wall is the cellular compartment having the highest density and this property is used for its purification. It plays critical roles during plant development and in response to environmental constraints. It is largely used in the food and textile industries as well as for the production of bioenergy. All these characteristics and uses explain why its study as a true cell compartment is of high interest. The proposed method of purification can be used for large amount of material but can also be downscaled to 500 mg of fresh material. Tools for checking the quality of the cell wall preparation, such as protein analysis and microscopy observation, are also provided.

  19. MHD Electrode and wall constructions

    DOEpatents

    Way, Stewart; Lempert, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    Electrode and wall constructions for the walls of a channel transmitting the hot plasma in a magnetohydrodynamic generator. The electrodes and walls are made of a plurality of similar modules which are spaced from one another along the channel. The electrodes can be metallic or ceramic, and each module includes one or more electrodes which are exposed to the plasma and a metallic cooling bar which is spaced from the plasma and which has passages through which a cooling fluid flows to remove heat transmitted from the electrode to the cooling bar. Each electrode module is spaced from and electrically insulated from each adjacent module while interconnected by the cooling fluid which serially flows among selected modules. A wall module includes an electrically insulating ceramic body exposed to the plasma and affixed, preferably by mechanical clips or by brazing, to a metallic cooling bar spaced from the plasma and having cooling fluid passages. Each wall module is, similar to the electrode modules, electrically insulated from the adjacent modules and serially interconnected to other modules by the cooling fluid.

  20. Functional domain walls in multiferroics.

    PubMed

    Meier, Dennis

    2015-11-25

    During the last decade a wide variety of novel and fascinating correlation phenomena has been discovered at domain walls in multiferroic bulk systems, ranging from unusual electronic conductance to inseparably entangled spin and charge degrees of freedom. The domain walls represent quasi-2D functional objects that can be induced, positioned, and erased on demand, bearing considerable technological potential for future nanoelectronics. Most of the challenges that remain to be solved before turning related device paradigms into reality, however, still fall in the field of fundamental condensed matter physics and materials science. In this topical review seminal experimental findings gained on electric and magnetic domain walls in multiferroic bulk materials are addressed. A special focus is put on the physical properties that emerge at so-called charged domain walls and the added functionality that arises from coexisting magnetic order. The research presented in this review highlights that we are just entering a whole new world of intriguing nanoscale physics that is yet to be explored in all its details. The goal is to draw attention to the persistent challenges and identify future key directions for the research on functional domain walls in multiferroics.

  1. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  2. The DEMO wall load challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenninger, R.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R.; Arbeiter, F.; Aubert, J.; Bachmann, C.; Barbato, L.; Barrett, T.; Beckers, M.; Biel, W.; Boccaccini, L.; Carralero, D.; Coster, D.; Eich, T.; Fasoli, A.; Federici, G.; Firdaouss, M.; Graves, J.; Horacek, J.; Kovari, M.; Lanthaler, S.; Loschiavo, V.; Lowry, C.; Lux, H.; Maddaluno, G.; Maviglia, F.; Mitteau, R.; Neu, R.; Pfefferle, D.; Schmid, K.; Siccinio, M.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Snicker, A.; Subba, F.; Varje, J.; Zohm, H.

    2017-04-01

    For several reasons the challenge to keep the loads to the first wall within engineering limits is substantially higher in DEMO compared to ITER. Therefore the pre-conceptual design development for DEMO that is currently ongoing in Europe needs to be based on load estimates that are derived employing the most recent plasma edge physics knowledge. An initial assessment of the static wall heat load limit in DEMO infers that the steady state peak heat flux limit on the majority of the DEMO first wall should not be assumed to be higher than 1.0 MW m‑2. This compares to an average wall heat load of 0.29 MW m‑2 for the design {\\tt {EU}}{\\tt {~}}{\\tt {DEMO1}}{\\tt {~2015}} assuming a perfect homogeneous distribution. The main part of this publication concentrates on the development of first DEMO estimates for charged particle, radiation, fast particle (all static) and disruption heat loads. Employing an initial engineering wall design with clear optimization potential in combination with parameters for the flat-top phase (x-point configuration), loads up to 7 MW m‑2 (penalty factor for tolerances etc not applied) have been calculated. Assuming a fraction of power radiated from the x-point region between 1/5 and 1/3, peaks of the total power flux density due to radiation of 0.6–0.8 MW m‑2 are found in the outer baffle region. This first review of wall loads, and the associated limits in DEMO clearly underlines a significant challenge that necessitates substantial engineering efforts as well as a considerable consolidation of the associated physics basis.

  3. Cell wall yield properties of growing tissue: evaluation by in vivo stress relaxation. [Pisum sativus L

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1985-06-01

    Growing pea stem tissue, when isolated from an external supply of water, undergoes stress relaxation because of continued loosening of the cell wall. A theoretical analysis is presented to show that such stress relaxation should result in an exponential decrease in turgor pressure down to the yield threshold (Y), with a rate constant given by phi epsilon where phi is the metabolically maintained irreversible extensibility of the cell wall and epsilon is the volumetric elastic modulus of the cell. Stress relaxation was measured in pea (Pisum sativus L.) stem segments using the pressure microprobe technique. From the rate of stress relaxation, phi of segments pretreated with water was calculated to be 0.08 per megapascal per hour while that of auxin-pretreated tissue was 0.24 per megapascal per hour. These values agreed closely with estimates of phi made by a steady-state technique. The yield threshold (0.29 megapascal) was not affected by auxin. A theoretical analysis is also presented to show that the tissue hydraulic conductance may be estimated from the T/sub 1/2/ of tissue swelling. Experimentally, pea stems had a swelling T/sub 1/2/ of 2.0 minutes, corresponding to a relative hydraulic conductance of about 2.0 per megapascal per hour. This value is at least 8 times larger than phi. From these data and from computer modeling, it appears that the radial gradient in water potential which sustains water uptake in growing pea segments is small (0.04 megapascal). This means that hydraulic conductance does not substantially restrict growth. The results also demonstrate that the stimulation of growth by auxin can be entirely accounted for by the change in phi.

  4. Sporothrix schenckii Cell Wall Peptidorhamnomannans

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M.

    2011-01-01

    This mini-review article is dedicated to clarifying certain important biochemical aspects of Sporothrix schenckii cell wall peptidorhamnomannans. Cell wall components involved in the host interaction such as antigens as well as a gp70 adhesin are important molecules present on the surface of the yeast parasitic phase. Other structural glycoconjugates present on the fungus cell surface are also described here. Knowledge of the fine structure of carbohydrate epitopes expressed on the surface in both morphological phases of S. schenckii permitted the development of non-invasive immunochemical methods to diagnose human and feline sporotrichosis. PMID:22203817

  5. Gullies in Terraced Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-375, 29 May 2003

    Gullies--possibly formed by a liquid such as water in the recent martian past--formed at two different levels in the walls of a meteor impact crater near 36.2oS, 185.5oW. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies in the upper crater wall (top of the image) and emergent from the slope of a lower terrace (bottom of the image). Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  6. Wall Interference in Wind Tunnels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    d’un d £ faut d’ßtendue des signatures. Sp^cialeinent dans le cas de la correction d’incidence, la pondäration des ecarts de Kp entre les deux parois, de...für Stromungsmechanik der Tech. Univers. Bienroder Weg 3 D -3300 Braunschweig — Germany MrL.H.Ohman Head, High Speed Aerodynamics Lab. National...CORRECTIONS IM ’. • SOLID-WALL TUNNELS FROM MEASUREMENTS OF STATIC PRESSURE AT THE WALLS j t by t P. R. Ashill and D . J. Weeks Aerodynamics

  7. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-03-01

    Incisional hernia is a common long-term complication to abdominal surgery, occurring in more than 20% of all patients. Some of these hernias become giant and affect patients in several ways. This patient group often experiences pain, decreased perceived body image, and loss of physical function, which results in a need for surgical repair of the giant hernia, known as abdominal wall reconstruction. In the current thesis, patients with a giant hernia were examined to achieve a better understanding of their physical and psychological function before and after abdominal wall reconstruction. Study I was a systematic review of the existing standardized methods for assessing quality of life after incisional hernia repair. After a systematic search in the electronic databases Embase and PubMed, a total of 26 studies using standardized measures for assessment of quality of life after incisional hernia repair were found. The most commonly used questionnaire was the generic Short-Form 36, which assesses overall health-related quality of life, addressing both physical and mental health. The second-most common questionnaire was the Carolinas Comfort Scale, which is a disease specific questionnaire addressing pain, movement limitation and mesh sensation in relation to a current or previous hernia. In total, eight different questionnaires were used at varying time points in the 26 studies. In conclusion, standardization of timing and method of quality of life assessment after incisional hernia repair was lacking. Study II was a case-control study of the effects of an enhanced recovery after surgery pathway for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for a giant hernia. Sixteen consecutive patients were included prospectively after the implementation of a new enhanced recovery after surgery pathway at the Digestive Disease Center, Bispebjerg Hospital, and compared to a control group of 16 patients included retrospectively in the period immediately prior to the

  8. Thermal breaking systems for metal stud walls -- Can metal stud walls perform as well as wood stud walls

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.

    1997-12-31

    Metal stud wall systems for residential buildings are gaining in popularity. Strong thermal bridges caused by highly conductive metal studs degrade the thermal performance of such walls. Several wall configurations have been developed to improve their thermal performance. The authors tried to evaluate some of these wall systems. The thermal performance of metal stud walls is frequently compared with that of wood stud walls. A reduction of the in-cavity R-value caused by the wood studs is about 10% in wood stud walls. In metal stud walls, thermal bridges generated by the metal components reduce their thermal performance by up to 55%. Today, metal stud walls are believed to be considerably less thermally effective than similar systems made of wood because steel has much higher thermal conductivity than wood. Relatively high R-values may be achieved by installing insulating sheathing, which is now widely recommended as the remedy for weak thermal performance of metal stud walls. A series of promising metal stud wall configurations was analyzed. Some of these walls were designed and tested by the authors, some were tested in other laboratories, and some were developed and forgotten a long time ago. Several types of thermal breaking systems were used in these walls. Two- and three-dimensional finite-difference computer simulations were used to analyze 20 metal stud wall configurations. Also, a series of hot-box tests were conducted on several of these walls. Test results for 22 additional metal stud walls were analyzed. Most of these walls contained conventional metal studs. Commonly used fiberglass and EPS were used as insulation materials. The most promising metal stud wall configurations have reductions in the center-of-cavity R-values of less than 20%.

  9. Reconstruction of chest wall defects.

    PubMed

    Hasse, J

    1991-12-01

    A series of 61 consecutive procedures of chest wall resection and reconstruction in 58 patients during the period between August, 1986 and December, 1990 is reported. The ages ranged between 6-77 years. The chest wall resection was indicated for malignant affections in 54 cases. Among these, there were 24 patients with bronchial carcinoma invading the chest wall, 17 patients with primary or metastatic sarcoma, 11 patients with recurrent breast cancer and 3 with cancer metastases of varying origin. Pulmonary resection included pneumonectomy in 8 cases, lobectomy in 19, segmental and wedge resections in 26. In the majority of resections, the reconstruction was accomplished without implants. In cases with full thickness removal of the chest wall, the plane of the rib cage and/or the sternum was reconstructed using Vicryl mesh (n = 7), PTFE soft tissue patch (n = 11), marlex-mesh (n = 1), or methyl-methacrylate (n = 3). There was one case of hospital mortality, 6 weeks postoperatively, due to neurological failure from an independent preoperatively undiagnosed brain tumor. There were 4 reoperations: one early and one late (4 months) infection, one case of limited superficial necrosis of a flap and one with chronic lymphous drainage from a large myocutaneous flap. In no instance was primary postoperative ventilation therapy necessary. Mechanical ventilation was instituted only on day 8 in the patient who accounts for the mortality in this series. In the presence of primary infection, the greater omentum was used for the restoration of the integument.

  10. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  11. Tube-Wall Thickness Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleint, R. E.; Baily, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Eddy-current measurements detect wear of thin walls (0.01 in) (0.25 mm) in small diameter (0.19 in) (5 mm) heat exchanger tubing. Flexible durable thin rod inserts eddy-current coil into the heatexchanger tube.

  12. Statistical characteristics of simulated walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiański, M.; Doroshkevich, A. G.; Müller, V.; Turchaninov, V.

    2000-11-01

    The large-scale matter distribution in three different simulations of CDM models is investigated and compared with corresponding results of the Zel'dovich theory of non-linear gravitational instability. We show that the basic characteristics of wall-like structure elements are well described by this theory, and that they can be expressed by the cosmological parameters and a few spectral moments of the perturbation spectrum. Therefore the characteristics of such elements provide reasonable estimates of these parameters. We show that the compressed matter is relaxed and gravitationally confined and manifests itself in the existence of walls as (quasi-)stationary structure elements with a lifetime restricted by their disruption into high-density clouds. The matter distribution is investigated in both real and redshift spaces. In both cases almost the same particles form the walls, and we estimate differences in corresponding wall characteristics. The same methods are applied to several mock catalogues of `galaxies', which allows us to characterize a large-scale bias between the spatial distribution of dark matter and of simulated `galaxies'.

  13. Designing a Sound Reducing Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erk, Kendra; Lumkes, John; Shambach, Jill; Braile, Larry; Brickler, Anne; Matthys, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Acoustical engineers use their knowledge of sound to design quiet environments (e.g., classrooms and libraries) as well as to design environments that are supposed to be loud (e.g., concert halls and football stadiums). They also design sound barriers, such as the walls along busy roadways that decrease the traffic noise heard by people in…

  14. Mirror, Mirror, on the Wall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Jim; Rose, M. Annette

    1998-01-01

    Students use tables of anthropometric data, their own measurements, underlying principles of physics, and math to solve a problem. The problem is to determine the height of a wall mirror, and where to mount it, so that 90% of the clientele can view their entire length without stretching or bending. (Author)

  15. Wary Eyes Monitoring Wall Street

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda

    2008-01-01

    School business officials kept a close watch on the financial markets this week--and on district investment portfolios and teacher-retirement funds--as stock prices gyrated and once-sound institutions got government bailouts or crumbled into bankruptcy. While financial observers said it was too soon to predict how Wall Street's upheaval might…

  16. Cell wall construction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Klis, Frans M; Boorsma, Andre; De Groot, Piet W J

    2006-02-01

    In this review, we discuss new insights in cell wall architecture and cell wall construction in the ascomycetous yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Transcriptional profiling studies combined with biochemical work have provided ample evidence that the cell wall is a highly adaptable organelle. In particular, the protein population that is anchored to the stress-bearing polysaccharides of the cell wall, and forms the interface with the outside world, is highly diverse. This diversity is believed to play an important role in adaptation of the cell to environmental conditions, in growth mode and in survival. Cell wall construction is tightly controlled and strictly coordinated with progression of the cell cycle. This is reflected in the usage of specific cell wall proteins during consecutive phases of the cell cycle and in the recent discovery of a cell wall integrity checkpoint. When the cell is challenged with stress conditions that affect the cell wall, a specific transcriptional response is observed that includes the general stress response, the cell wall integrity pathway and the calcineurin pathway. This salvage mechanism includes increased expression of putative cell wall assemblases and some potential cross-linking cell wall proteins, and crucial changes in cell wall architecture. We discuss some more enzymes involved in cell wall construction and also potential inhibitors of these enzymes. Finally, we use both biochemical and genomic data to infer that the architectural principles used by S. cerevisiae to build its cell wall are also used by many other ascomycetous yeasts and also by some mycelial ascomycetous fungi.

  17. Involvement of p38 MAPK and Nrf2 in phenolic acid-induced P-form phenol sulfotransferase expression in human hepatoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chi-Tai; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2006-05-01

    Phenolic acids have significant biological and pharmacological properties and some have demonstrated remarkable ability to alter sulfate conjugation. However, the modulation mechanisms of phenolic acids on phenol sulfotransferase expression have not been described. In the present study, we investigated the effects of phenolic acids on the expression of the Phase II P-form of phenol sulfotransferase (PST-P) in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. RT-PCR and western blot data revealed that gallic acid induced increase in PST-P expression at the mRNA and protein levels, respectively. This induction was also marked by an increase in PST-P activity. Actinomycin D and cycloheximide inhibited gallic acid-responsive PST-P mRNA expression, indicating that gallic acid is a requirement for transcription and de novo protein synthesis. Transient transfection of HepG2 cells with a reporter plasmid of the upstream region of the human PST gene caused a significant increase in reporter gene activity after gallic acid exposure. Moreover, gallic acid increased the nuclear levels of Nrf2, a transcription factor governing antioxidant response element (ARE). Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed increased binding of nuclear proteins to ARE consensus sequence after treatment with gallic acid. While investigating the signaling pathways responsible for PST-P induction, we observed that gallic acid activated the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK, abolished gallic acid-induced PST-P protein expression. Similarly, gallic acid also caused an accumulation of Nrf2. Moreover, the protective effects of gallic acid on tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced toxicity was partially blocked by p38 MAPK and PST-P inhibitors, further demonstrating that gallic acid attenuates oxidative stress through a pathway that involves p38 MAPK and PST-P. These results indicate that gallic acid is a potent inducer of PST-P and that PST-P induction is responsible

  18. Assessment of the antinociceptive effects of pregabalin alone or in combination with morphine during acetic acid-induced writhing in mice.

    PubMed

    Shamsi Meymandi, Manzumeh; Keyhanfar, Fariborz

    2013-09-01

    Visceral pain currently represents one of the most important pain treatment challenges in clinical practice, and investigators across the world are continuously designing and conducting numerous studies in search of new analgesics and new combination therapies. The current study assessed the analgesic effects of saline, pregabalin (2, 5, 17, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) and morphine (0.25, 0.5, 1, 3 and 5 mg/kg) alone or in combination on acetic-acid induced abdominal contractions in mice. The number of writhes and the inhibitory effects (as percentages, %E) were calculated as antinociception indexes. These indexes indicated that both pregabalin (Prg) and morphine (Mrp) produced dose-dependent antinociception. Pregabalin at 5 mg/kg (%E=32.5±4.0) or 2 mg/kg (%E=20.8±4.5) and morphine at 0.25 mg/kg (%E=20.2±7.8) and 0.5 mg/kg (%E=43.6±4.5) exhibited antinociceptive effects, and the combination of pregabalin and morphine produced significantly greater antinociceptive effects (%E=62.4±5.8 for Prg5+Mrp0.25; %E=71.7±4.8 for Prg5+Mrp0.5; and %E=54.1±4.0 for Prg2+Mrp0.25), although this enhancement was not observed when morphine was combined with 17 mg/kg pregabalin. Pre-treatment with 2 mg/kg (i.p.) naloxone did not affect increased analgesia when combined with these drugs. A dose-response curve was established for pregabalin at a fixed morphine dose and revealed that, at low doses, pregabalin dose-dependently enhanced the antinociceptive effects, while the opposite was true at high doses (17 and 25 mg/kg). In conclusion, pregabalin can produce levels of antinociception that are similar to those of morphine in acetic acid-induced viscero-somatic pain. The enhancement of antinociception produced by the co-administration of morphine and pregabalin is termed a supra-additive interaction and occurred at low doses but not at high doses. These findings militate for increased attention and caution in clinical settings.

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of two novel retinoic acid-inducible orphan G-protein-coupled receptors (GPRC5B and GPRC5C).

    PubMed

    Robbins, M J; Michalovich, D; Hill, J; Calver, A R; Medhurst, A D; Gloger, I; Sims, M; Middlemiss, D N; Pangalos, M N

    2000-07-01

    Using homology searching of public databases with a metabotropic glutamate receptor sequence from Caenorhabditis elegans, two novel protein sequences (named RAIG-2 (HGMW-approved symbol GPRC5B) and RAIG-3 (HGMW-approved symbol GPRC5C) were identified containing seven putative transmembrane domains characteristic of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). RAIG-2 and RAIG-3 encode open reading frames of 403 and 442 amino acid polypeptides, respectively, and show 58% similarity to the recently identified retinoic acid-inducible gene-1 (RAIG-1, HGMW-approved symbol RAI3). Analysis of the three protein sequences places them within the type 3 GPCR family, which includes metabotropic glutamate receptors, GABA(B) receptors, calcium-sensing receptors, and pheromone receptors. However, in contrast to other type 3 GPCRs, RAIG-1, RAIG-2, and RAIG-3 have only short N-terminal domains. RAIG-2 and RAIG-3 cDNA sequences were cloned into the mammalian expression vector pcDNA3 with c-myc or HA epitope tags inserted at their N-termini, respectively. Transient transfection experiments in HEK239T cells using these constructs demonstrated RAIG-2 and RAIG-3 expression at the cell surface. Distribution profiles of mRNA expression obtained by semiquantitative Taq-Man PCR analysis showed RAIG-2 to be predominantly expressed in human brain areas and RAIG-3 to be predominantly expressed in peripheral tissues. In addition, expression of RAIG-2 and RAIG-3 mRNA was increased following treatment with all-trans-retinoic acid in a manner similar to that previously described for RAIG-1. Finally, RAIG-2 was mapped to chromosome 16p12 (D16S405-D16S3045) and RAIG-3 to chromosome 17q25 (D17S1352-D17S785). These results suggest that RAIG-1, RAIG-2, and RAIG-3 represent a novel family of retinoic acid-inducible receptors, most closely related to the type 3 GPCR subfamily, and provide further evidence for a linkage between retinoic acid and G-protein-coupled receptor signal transduction pathways.

  20. Wall relaxation in growing stems: comparison of four species and assessment of measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, D J

    1987-01-01

    This study was carried out to develop improved methods for measuring in-vivo stress relaxation of growing tissues and to compare relaxation in the stems of four different species. When water uptake by growing tissue is prevented, in-vivo stress relaxation occurs because continued wall loosening reduces wall stress and cell turgor pressure. With this procedure one may measure the yield threshold for growth (Y), the turgor pressure in excess of the yield threshold (P-Y), and the physiological wall extensibility (phi). Three relaxation techniques proved useful: "turgor-relaxation", "balance-pressure" and "pressure-block". In the turgor-relaxation method, water is withheld from growing tissue and the reduction in turgor is measured directly with the pressure probe. This technique gives absolute values for P and Y, but requires tissue excision. In the balance-pressure technique, the excised growing region is sealed in a pressure chamber, and the subsequent reduction in water potential is measured as the applied pressure needed to return xylem sap to the cut surface. This method is simple, but only measures (P-Y), not the individual values of P and Y. In the pressure-block technique, the growing tissue is sealed into a pressure chamber, growth is monitored continuously, and just sufficient pressure is applied to the chamber to block growth. The method gives high-resolution kinetics of relaxation and does not require tissue excision, but only measures (P-Y). The three methods gave similar results when applied to the growing stems of pea (Pisum sativum L.), cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and zucchini (Curcubita pepo L.) seedlings. Values for (P-Y) averaged between 1.4 and 2.7 bar, depending on species. Yield thresholds averaged between 1.3 and 3.0 bar. Compared with the other methods, relaxation by pressure-block was faster and exhibited dynamic changes in wall-yielding properties. The two pressure-chamber methods were also used to measure

  1. Wall relaxation in growing stems: comparison of four species and assessment of measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    This study was carried out to develop improved methods for measuring in-vivo stress relaxation of growing tissues and to compare relaxation in the stems of four different species. When water uptake by growing tissue is prevented, in-vivo stress relaxation occurs because continued wall loosening reduces wall stress and cell turgor pressure. With this procedure one may measure the yield threshold for growth (Y), the turgor pressure in excess of the yield threshold (P-Y), and the physiological wall extensibility (phi). Three relaxation techniques proved useful: "turgor-relaxation", "balance-pressure" and "pressure-block". In the turgor-relaxation method, water is withheld from growing tissue and the reduction in turgor is measured directly with the pressure probe. This technique gives absolute values for P and Y, but requires tissue excision. In the balance-pressure technique, the excised growing region is sealed in a pressure chamber, and the subsequent reduction in water potential is measured as the applied pressure needed to return xylem sap to the cut surface. This method is simple, but only measures (P-Y), not the individual values of P and Y. In the pressure-block technique, the growing tissue is sealed into a pressure chamber, growth is monitored continuously, and just sufficient pressure is applied to the chamber to block growth. The method gives high-resolution kinetics of relaxation and does not require tissue excision, but only measures (P-Y). The three methods gave similar results when applied to the growing stems of pea (Pisum sativum L.), cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and zucchini (Curcubita pepo L.) seedlings. Values for (P-Y) averaged between 1.4 and 2.7 bar, depending on species. Yield thresholds averaged between 1.3 and 3.0 bar. Compared with the other methods, relaxation by pressure-block was faster and exhibited dynamic changes in wall-yielding properties. The two pressure-chamber methods were also used to measure

  2. Wall relaxation in growing stems: comparison of four species and assessment of measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, D J

    1987-06-01

    This study was carried out to develop improved methods for measuring in-vivo stress relaxation of growing tissues and to compare relaxation in the stems of four different species. When water uptake by growing tissue is prevented, in-vivo stress relaxation occurs because continued wall loosening reduces wall stress and cell turgor pressure. With this procedure one may measure the yield threshold for growth (Y), the turgor pressure in excess of the yield threshold (P-Y), and the physiological wall extensibility (ϕ). Three relaxation techniques proved useful: "turgor-relaxation", "balance-pressure" and "pressure-block". In the turgor-relaxation method, water is withheld from growing tissue and the reduction in turgor is measured directly with the pressure probe. This technique give absolute values for P and Y, but requires tissue excision. In the balance-pressure technique, the excised growing region is sealed in a pressure chamber, and the subsequent reduction in water potential is measured as the applied pressure needed to return xylem sap to the cut surface. This method is simple, but only measures (P-Y) not the individual values of P and Y. In the pressure-block technique, the growing tissue is sealed into a pressure chamber, growth is monitored continuously, and just sufficient pressure is applied to the chamber to block growth. The method gives high-resolution kinetics of relaxation and does not require tissue excision, but only measures (P-Y).The three methods gave similar results when applied to the growing stems of pea (Pisum sativum L.), cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and zucchini (Curcubita pepo L.) seedlings. Values for (P-Y) averaged between 1.4 and 2.7 bar, depending on species. Yield thresholds averaged between 1.3 and 3.0 bar. Compared with the other methods, relaxation by pressure-block was faster and exhibited dynamic changes in wall-yielding properties. The two pressure-chamber methods were also used to measure the

  3. Manuka Honey Exerts Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities That Promote Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Almasaudi, Saad B.; Al-Hindi, Rashad R.; Abdel-dayem, Umama A.; Ali, Soad S.; Saleh, Rasha M.; Al Jaouni, Soad K.

    2017-01-01

    Gastric ulcers are a major problem worldwide with no effective treatment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of manuka honey in the treatment of acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcers in rats. Different groups of rats were treated with three different concentrations of honey. Stomachs were checked macroscopically for ulcerative lesions in the glandular mucosa and microscopically for histopathological alterations. Treatment with manuka honey significantly reduced the ulcer index and maintained the glycoprotein content. It also reduced the mucosal myeloperoxidase activity, lipid peroxidation (MDA), and the inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) as compared to untreated control group. In addition, honey-treated groups showed significant increase in enzymatic (GPx and SOD) and nonenzymatic (GSH) antioxidants besides levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Flow cytometry studies showed that treatment of animals with manuka honey has normalized cell cycle distribution and significantly lowered apoptosis in gastric mucosa. In conclusion, the results indicated that manuka honey is effective in the treatment of chronic ulcer and preservation of mucosal glycoproteins. Its effects are due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that resulted in a significant reduction of the gastric mucosal MDA, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and caused an elevation in IL-10 levels. PMID:28250794

  4. Antiviral activity of human oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) is mediated by enhancing retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Yugen; Ghosh, Arundhati; Cuevas, Rolando A.; Forero, Adriana; Dhar, Jayeeta; Ibsen, Mikkel Søes; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan Leo; Schmidt, Tobias; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K.; Fujita, Takashi; Hartmann, Rune; Barik, Sailen; Hornung, Veit; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Virus infection is sensed in the cytoplasm by retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I, also known as DDX58), which requires RNA and polyubiquitin binding to induce type I interferon (IFN), and activate cellular innate immunity. We show that the human IFN-inducible oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) protein had antiviral activity and mediated RIG-I activation by mimicking polyubiquitin. Loss of OASL expression reduced RIG-I signaling and enhanced virus replication in human cells. Conversely, OASL expression suppressed replication of a number of viruses in a RIG-I-dependent manner and enhanced RIG-I-mediated IFN induction. OASL interacted and colocalized with RIG-I, and through its C-terminal ubiquitin-like domain specifically enhanced RIG-I signaling. Bone marrow derived macrophages from mice deficient for Oasl2 showed that among the two mouse orthologs of human OASL; Oasl2 is functionally similar to human OASL. Our findings show a mechanism by which human OASL contributes to host antiviral responses by enhancing RIG-I activation. PMID:24931123

  5. Role of Toll-like receptors and retinoic acid inducible gene I in endogenous production of type I interferon in dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Dai, Tingjun; Lv, Jingwei; Ji, Kunqian; Liu, Junling; Zhang, Bin; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2015-08-15

    To explore the possible mechanisms implicated in the endogenous production of type I interferons within the muscle tissue of dermatomyositis (DM) patients. We detected the co-localization of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) with Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and retinoic acid inducible gene (RIG)-I by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Western blotting confirmed the expression of TLRs and RIG-I. TLR-3 and RIG-I was preferentially expressed in the perifascicular atrophy fibers of DM. TLR-7 was only in inflammatory infiltrates of a few DM patients. TLR-4 and TLR-9 was expressed mainly in inflammatory infiltrates. Immunofluorescence showed extensive co-localization of BDCA-2 with TLR-9 and little co-localization with TLR-7. Western blotting showed upregulation of expression of TLRs and RIG-I in DM compared with the controls. Our findings indicate that endogenous production of type I IFN in DM is generated by pDCs, mainly through the TLR-9 pathway and in part by TLR-7. TLR-3 and RIG-I are implicated in the formation of perifascicular atrophy in DM.

  6. Increase in α-tubulin modifications in the neuronal processes of hippocampal neurons in both kainic acid-induced epileptic seizure and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Hang Thi; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Hashizume, Yoshio; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Ikegami, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegeneration includes acute changes and slow-developing alterations, both of which partly involve common cellular machinery. During neurodegeneration, neuronal processes are impaired along with dysregulated post-translational modifications (PTMs) of cytoskeletal proteins. In neuronal processes, tubulin undergoes unique PTMs including a branched form of modification called glutamylation and loss of the C-terminal tyrosine residue and the penultimate glutamic acid residue forming Δ2-tubulin. Here, we investigated the state of two PTMs, glutamylation and Δ2 form, in both acute and slow-developing neurodegenerations, using a newly generated monoclonal antibody, DTE41, which had 2-fold higher affinity to glutamylated Δ2-tubulin, than to unmodified Δ2-tubulin. DTE41 recognised glutamylated Δ2-tubulin preferentially in immunostaining than in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting. In normal mouse brain, DTE41 stained molecular layer of the cerebellum as well as synapse-rich regions in pyramidal neurons of the cerebral cortex. In kainic acid-induced epileptic seizure, DTE41-labelled signals were increased in the hippocampal CA3 region, especially in the stratum lucidum. In the hippocampi of post-mortem patients with Alzheimer’s disease, intensities of DTE41 staining were increased in mossy fibres in the CA3 region as well as in apical dendrites of the pyramidal neurons. Our findings indicate that glutamylation on Δ2-tubulin is increased in both acute and slow-developing neurodegeneration. PMID:28067280

  7. Lipid-induced insulin resistance mediated by the proinflammatory receptor TLR4 requires saturated fatty acid-induced ceramide biosynthesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Holland, William L; Bikman, Benjamin T; Wang, Li-Ping; Yuguang, Guan; Sargent, Katherine M; Bulchand, Sarada; Knotts, Trina A; Shui, Guanghou; Clegg, Deborah J; Wenk, Markus R; Pagliassotti, Michael J; Scherer, Philipp E; Summers, Scott A

    2011-05-01

    Obesity is associated with an enhanced inflammatory response that exacerbates insulin resistance and contributes to diabetes, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease. One mechanism accounting for the increased inflammation associated with obesity is activation of the innate immune signaling pathway triggered by TLR4 recognition of saturated fatty acids, an event that is essential for lipid-induced insulin resistance. Using in vitro and in vivo systems to model lipid induction of TLR4-dependent inflammatory events in rodents, we show here that TLR4 is an upstream signaling component required for saturated fatty acid-induced ceramide biosynthesis. This increase in ceramide production was associated with the upregulation of genes driving ceramide biosynthesis, an event dependent of the activity of the proinflammatory kinase IKKβ. Importantly, increased ceramide production was not required for TLR4-dependent induction of inflammatory cytokines, but it was essential for TLR4-dependent insulin resistance. These findings suggest that sphingolipids such as ceramide might be key components of the signaling networks that link lipid-induced inflammatory pathways to the antagonism of insulin action that contributes to diabetes.

  8. Alkali- or acid-induced changes in structure, moisture absorption ability and deacetylating reaction of β-chitin extracted from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) pens.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jooyeoun; Zhao, Yanyun

    2014-01-01

    Alkali- or acid-induced structural modifications in β-chitin from squid (Dosidicus gigas, d'Orbigny, 1835) pens and their moisture absorption ability (MAA) and deacetylating reaction were investigated and compared with α-chitin from shrimp shells. β-Chitin was converted into the α-form after 3h in 40% NaOH or 1-3 h in 40% HCl solution, and α-chitin obtained from NaOH treatment had higher MAA than had native α-chitin, due to polymorphic destructions. In contrast, induced α-chitin from acid treatment of β-chitin had few polymorphic modifications, showing no significant change (P>0.05) in MAA. β-Chitin was more susceptible to alkali deacetylation than was α-chitin, and required a lower concentration of NaOH and shorter reaction time. These results demonstrate that alkali- or acid-treated β-chitin retained high susceptibility toward solvents, which in turn resulted in good biological activity of β-chitosan for use as a natural antioxidant and antimicrobial substance or application as edible coatings and films for various food applications.

  9. Effect of dietary fibers on cholic acid induced cell proliferation in the colonic epithelium of C57BL/6J mice

    SciTech Connect

    Robblee, N.M.; Bruce, W.R.; Bird, R.P.

    1986-03-01

    It has been postulated that high fat diets promote tumorigenesis by increasing the level of secondary bile acids in the colonic lumen. Dietary fibers are thought to be protective perhaps through their interaction with bile acids. In the present study, animals were fed diets containing either 0%, 5%, or 10% cellulose (C), pectin (P), or wheat bran (WB). The diets were formulated to contain either 0% (control) or 0.2% cholic acid (test). After two weeks of dietary treatment the animals were injected with (/sup 3/H)-thymidine and their colons were processed for autoradiography. The number of labeled cells (LC) in the colonic crypts was determined. Among the control diets, 10%P induced a two-fold increase in the LC. All the test groups had significantly higher LC than in their controls. However, the C group excited a higher LC than the P or WB groups (5.2 +/- 0.8 vs 3.9 +/- 0.8 or 3.9 +/- 0.6). These results were substantiated by metaphase arrest technique. The authors results show that nonfermentable fiber does not alleviate bile acid induced cell proliferative activity in the colon whereas fermentable fibers will counteract the promotional effect of a high fat diet.

  10. Improvement of derivatized amino acid detection sensitivity in micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography by means of acid-induced pH-mediated stacking technique.

    PubMed

    Dziomba, Szymon; Bekasiewicz, Adrian; Prahl, Adam; Bączek, Tomasz; Kowalski, Piotr

    2014-10-01

    Derivatization is a frequently used sample preparation procedure applicable to the enhancement of analyte detection sensitivity. Amino acids mostly require derivatization prior to electrophoretic or chromatographic analysis, especially if spectrophotometric detection is used. This study presents an on-line preconcentration technique for derivatized amino acids. The sensitivity of the method was improved by the utilization of the proposed acid-induced pH-mediated stacking mechanism. The method is demonstrated by preconcentration of amino acids labeled with 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene. Use of optimized conditions for a large sample volume injection (40 s, 13.8 kPa) followed by electrokinetic injection of 0.1 M HCl (20 s, 10 kV) gave a 20- to 30-fold enhancement of sensitivity. The significance of the sweeping mechanism and pseudo-isotachophoresis for the on-line sample focusing and the influence of parameters on the preconcentration process were discussed. The applicability of the elaborated method was demonstrated using human urine samples.

  11. Evidence for genetic regulation of mRNA expression of the dosage-sensitive gene retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1) in human brain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Tao, Yu; Song, Fan; Yuan, Xi; Wang, Jian; Saffen, David

    2016-01-01

    RAI1 (retinoic acid induced-1) is a dosage-sensitive gene that causes Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) when mutated or deleted and Potocki-Lupski Syndrome (PTLS) when duplicated, with psychiatric features commonly observed in both syndromes. How common genetic variants regulate this gene, however, is unknown. In this study, we found that RAI1 mRNA expression in Chinese prefrontal and temporal cortex correlate with genotypes of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the RAI1 5′-upstream region. Using genotype imputation, “R2-Δ2” analysis, and data from the RegulomeDB database, we identified SNPs rs4925102 and rs9907986 as possible regulatory variants, accounting for approximately 30–40% of the variance in RAI1 mRNA expression in both brain regions. Specifically, rs4925102 and rs9907986 are predicted to disrupt the binding of retinoic acid RXR-RAR receptors and the transcription factor DEAF1 (Deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1), respectively. Consistent with these predictions, we observed binding of RXRα and RARα to the predicted RAI1 target in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Retinoic acid is crucial for early development of the central neural system, and DEAF1 is associated with intellectual disability. The observation that a significant portion of RAI1 mRNA expression is genetically controlled raises the possibility that common RAI1 5′-region regulatory variants contribute more generally to psychiatric disorders. PMID:26743651

  12. Elucidation of Acid-induced Unfolding and Aggregation of Human Immunoglobulin IgG1 and IgG2 Fc

    PubMed Central

    Latypov, Ramil F.; Hogan, Sabine; Lau, Hollis; Gadgil, Himanshu; Liu, Dingjiang

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms of Fc aggregation is an important prerequisite for developing stable and efficacious antibody-based therapeutics. In our study, high resolution two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to probe structural changes in the IgG1 Fc. A series of 1H-15N heteronuclear single-quantum correlation NMR spectra were collected between pH 2.5 and 4.7 to assess whether unfolding of CH2 domains precedes that of CH3 domains. The same pH range was subsequently screened in Fc aggregation experiments that utilized molecules of IgG1 and IgG2 subclasses with varying levels of CH2 glycosylation. In addition, differential scanning calorimetry data were collected over a pH range of 3–7 to assess changes in CH2 and CH3 thermostability. As a result, compelling evidence was gathered that emphasizes the importance of CH2 stability in determining the rate and extent of Fc aggregation. In particular, we found that Fc domains of the IgG1 subclass have a lower propensity to aggregate compared with those of the IgG2 subclass. Our data for glycosylated, partially deglycosylated, and fully deglycosylated molecules further revealed the criticality of CH2 glycans in modulating Fc aggregation. These findings provide important insights into the stability of Fc-based therapeutics and promote better understanding of their acid-induced aggregation process. PMID:22084250

  13. Direct calculation of wall interferences and wall adaptation for two-dimensional flow in wind tunnels with closed walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amecke, Juergen

    1986-01-01

    A method for the direct calculation of the wall induced interference velocity in two dimensional flow based on Cauchy's integral formula was derived. This one-step method allows the calculation of the residual corrections and the required wall adaptation for interference-free flow starting from the wall pressure distribution without any model representation. Demonstrated applications are given.

  14. A Near-Wall Reynolds-Stress Closure Without Wall Normals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. P.; So, R. M. C.

    1997-01-01

    Turbulent wall-bounded complex flows are commonly encountered in engineering practice and are of considerable interest in a variety of industrial applications. The presence of a wall significantly affects turbulence characteristics. In addition to the wall effects, turbulent wall-bounded flows become more complicated by the presence of additional body forces (e.g. centrifugal force and Coriolis force) and complex geometry. Most near-wall Reynolds stress models are developed from a high-Reynolds-number model which assumes turbulence is homogenous (or quasi-homogenous). Near-wall modifications are proposed to include wall effects in near-wall regions. In this process, wall normals are introduced. Good predictions could be obtained by Reynolds stress models with wall normals. However, ambiguity arises when the models are applied in flows with multiple walls. Many models have been proposed to model turbulent flows. Among them, Reynolds stress models, in which turbulent stresses are obtained by solving the Reynolds stress transport equations, have been proved to be the most successful ones. To apply the Reynolds stress models to wall-bounded flows, near-wall corrections accounting for the wall effects are needed, and the resulting models are called near-wall Reynolds stress models. In most of the existing near-wall models, the near-wall corrections invoke wall normals. These wall-dependent near-wall models are difficult to implement for turbulent flows with complex geometry and may give inaccurate predictions due to the ambiguity of wall normals at corners connecting multiple walls. The objective of this study is to develop a more general and flexible near-wall Reynolds stress model without using any wall-dependent variable for wall-bounded turbulent flows. With the aid of near-wall asymptotic analysis and results of direct numerical simulation, a new near-wall Reynolds stress model (NNWRS) is formulated based on Speziale et al.'s high-Reynolds-stress model with wall

  15. Microwave background distortions from domain walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Guenter; Noetzold, Dirk

    1990-01-01

    Domain walls arising in a cosmic phase transition after decoupling were recently proposed as seeds for the formation of large scale structure. The distortion induced in the microwave background radiation is calculated in dependence of the wall thickness, surface density, scalar field potential, cosmic redshift and the velocity of the wall. It was found that the maximal redshift distortion for both spherical and planar walls is of the order pi G sigma H(sup -1)(sub 0), where sigma is the surface energy density and H(sup -1)(sub 0) the Hubble parameter. It was also found that, for a wall thickness smaller than the horizon, walls can be treated as infinitely thin, i.e., the redshift distortion is independent of the wall thickness and the specific form of the scalar potential. For planar walls moving with a Lorentz-factor gamma the redshift distortion is enhanced by gamma cubed.

  16. Microwave background distortions from domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Guenter; Noetzold, Dirk

    1990-08-01

    Domain walls arising in a cosmic phase transition after decoupling were recently proposed as seeds for the formation of large scale structure. The distortion induced in the microwave background radiation is calculated in dependence of the wall thickness, surface density, scalar field potential, cosmic redshift and the velocity of the wall. It was found that the maximal redshift distortion for both spherical and planar walls is of the order pi G sigma H(sup -1)(sub 0), where sigma is the surface energy density and H(sup -1)(sub 0) the Hubble parameter. It was also found that, for a wall thickness smaller than the horizon, walls can be treated as infinitely thin, i.e., the redshift distortion is independent of the wall thickness and the specific form of the scalar potential. For planar walls moving with a Lorentz-factor gamma the redshift distortion is enhanced by gamma cubed.

  17. Microwave background distortions from domain walls.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, G.; Nötzold, D.

    1991-03-01

    Domain walls arising in a cosmic phase transition after decoupling were recently proposed as seeds for the formation of large-scale structure. The distortion induced in the microwave background radiation is calculated in dependence of the wall thickness, surface density, scalar field potential, cosmic redshift and the velocity of the wall. The authors find that the maximal redshift distortion for both spherical and planar walls is of the order πGσH0-1, where σ is the surface energy density and H0 the Hubble parameter. They also find that, for a wall thickness smaller than the horizon, walls can be treated as infinitely thin, i.e. the redshift distortion is independent of the wall thickness and the specific form of the scalar potential. For planar walls moving with a Lorentz-factor γ the redshift distortion is enhanced by γ3.

  18. Simulation of turbulent wall pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A Monte Carlo procedure was developed to simulate turbulent boundary layer wall pressure fluctuations. The approach utilizes much of the newly available conditional sampling information to construct the required distribution functions. Various disturbance wave forms were examined, as well as the effect of frequency-dependent decay. Good agreement between the simulation and experimental data was achieved for root mean square pressure level, power spectrum, and space time correlation.

  19. How do plant cell walls extend?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    This article briefly summarizes recent work that identifies the biophysical and biochemical processes that give rise to the extension of plant cell walls. I begin with the biophysical notion of stress relaxation of the wall and follow with recent studies of wall enzymes thought to catalyze wall extension and relaxation. Readers should refer to detailed reviews for more comprehensive discussion of earlier literature (Taiz, 1984; Carpita and Gibeaut, 1993; Cosgrove, 1993).

  20. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lagasse, P.R.

    1985-06-21

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and radius by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  1. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lagasse, Paul R.

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and circumference by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  2. Making Your Music Word Wall Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonhardt, Angela

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at what a word wall is and its use in the music classroom. The author outlines steps for creation of a word wall within the music classroom as well as the importance of such a resource. The author encourages the creation and consistent use of the word wall as leading to the development of stronger musicians and also independent,…

  3. Methods & Strategies: Put Your Walls to Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Julie; Durham, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides ideas and techniques to enhance your science teaching. This month's issue discusses planning and using interactive word walls to support science and reading instruction. Many classrooms have word walls displaying vocabulary that students have learned in class. Word walls serve as visual scaffolds to support instruction. To…

  4. 19. INTERIOR OF UTILITY ROOM SHOWING STUCCO WALL/DRYWALL WALL TRANSITION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. INTERIOR OF UTILITY ROOM SHOWING STUCCO WALL/DRYWALL WALL TRANSITION, ELECTRICAL JUNCTION BOXES, BUILT-IN WALL CABINETRY, AND ELECTRICAL WALL HEATER. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  5. Asymmetric counter propagation of domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade-Silva, I.; Clerc, M. G.; Odent, V.

    2016-07-01

    Far from equilibrium systems show different states and domain walls between them. These walls, depending on the type of connected equilibria, exhibit a rich spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we investigate the asymmetrical counter propagation of domain walls in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the shape and speed of the domain walls. Based on the molecular orientation, we infer that the counter propagative walls have different elastic deformations. These deformations are responsible of the asymmetric counter propagating fronts. Theoretically, based on symmetry arguments, we propose a simple bistable model under the influence of a nonlinear gradient, which qualitatively describes the observed dynamics.

  6. Experimental investigation of wall shock cancellation and reduction of wall interference in transonic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferri, A.; Roffe, G.

    1975-01-01

    A series of experiments were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of a three-dimensional land and groove wall geometry and a variable permeability distribution to reduce the interference produced by the porous walls of a supercritical transonic test section. The three-dimensional wall geometry was found to diffuse the pressure perturbations caused by small local mismatches in wall porosity permitting the use of a relatively coarse wall porosity control to reduce or eliminate wall interference effects. The wall porosity distribution required was found to be a sensitive function of Mach number requiring that the Mach number repeatability characteristics of the test apparatus be quite good. The effectiveness of a variable porosity wall is greatest in the upstream region of the test section where the pressure differences across the wall are largest. An effective variable porosity wall in the down stream region of the test section requires the use of a slightly convergent test section geometry.

  7. Effects of Abscisic Acid and Ethylene on the Gibberellic Acid-Induced Synthesis of α-Amylase by Isolated Wheat Aleurone Layers 1

    PubMed Central

    Varty, Keith; Arreguín, Barbarín L.; Gómez, Miguel T.; López, Pablo Jaime T.; Gómez, Miguel Angel L.

    1983-01-01

    Gibberellic acid-induced α-amylase synthesis in wheat aleurone layers (Triticum aestivum L. var Potam S-70) escaped from transcriptional control 30 h after addition of the hormone, as evidenced by the tissue's loss of susceptibility to cordycepin. Abscisic acid inhibited the accumulation of α-amylase activity when added to the tissue during this cordycepin-insensitive phase of enzyme induction. α-Amylase synthesis was not restored by the addition of cordycepin, indicating that the response to abscisic acid was not dependent upon the continuous synthesis of a short lived RNA. When ethylene was added simultaneously or some time after abscisic acid, the accumulation of α-amylase activity was sustained or quickly restored. The loss of susceptibility to cordycepin was completely prevented when aleurone layers were incubated with a combination of gibberellic and abscisic acids from the start of the induction period. This effect of abscisic acid was not reversed by ethylene. On the basis of these observations, it is suggested that abscisic acid inhibits both the transcription and translation of α-amylase mRNA, and that only the latter site of action is susceptible to reversal by ethylene. The rate of incorporation of [methyl-14C]choline into phospholipids was also inhibited by abscisic acid. Ethylene reversed this effect. The effects of abscisic acid and ethylene on phospholipid synthesis were not dependent upon the presence of gibberellic acid. No direct relationship was found between the control of α-amylase synthesis and membrane formation by abscisic acid and ethylene. PMID:16663284

  8. Retinoic acid-induced gene-I (RIG-I) associates with nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) to negatively regulate inflammatory signaling.

    PubMed

    Morosky, Stefanie A; Zhu, Jianzhong; Mukherjee, Amitava; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2011-08-12

    Cytoplasmic caspase recruiting domain (CARD)-containing molecules often function in the induction of potent antimicrobial responses in order to protect mammalian cells from invading pathogens. Retinoic acid-induced gene-I (RIG-I) and nucleotide binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) serve as key factors in the detection of viral and bacterial pathogens, and in the subsequent initiation of innate immune signals to combat infection. RIG-I and NOD2 share striking similarities in their cellular localization, both localize to membrane ruffles in non-polarized epithelial cells and both exhibit a close association with the junctional complex of polarized epithelia. Here we show that RIG-I and NOD2 not only colocalize to cellular ruffles and cell-cell junctions, but that they also form a direct interaction that is mediated by the CARDs of RIG-I and multiple regions of NOD2. Moreover, we show that RIG-I negatively regulates ligand-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling mediated by NOD2, and that NOD2 negatively regulates type I interferon induction by RIG-I. We also show that the three main Crohn disease-associated mutants of NOD2 (1007fs, R702W, G908R) form an interaction with RIG-I and negatively regulate its signaling to a greater extent than wild-type NOD2. Our results show that in addition to their role in innate immune recognition, RIG-I and NOD2 form a direct interaction at actin-enriched sites within cells and suggest that this interaction may impact RIG-I- and NOD2-dependent innate immune signaling.

  9. Hypoxia and retinoic acid-inducible NDRG1 expression is responsible for doxorubicin and retinoic acid resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eun Uk; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Youn-Jae; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Bo Hyun; Yu, Su Jong; Myung, Sun Jung; Kim, Yoon Jun; Lee, Hyo-Suk

    2010-12-01

    Hypoxia may activate survival signals in cancer cells. Moreover, hypoxic cells are less sensitive than normoxic cells to doxorubicin cytotoxicity, a potent activator of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. N-myc downstream-regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a hypoxia- and retinoic acid-inducible protein, and has been previously implicated in carcinogenesis. As this protein is also a downstream target of p53 and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells frequently evidence resistance to retinoic acid (RA) cytotoxicity, we attempted to determine whether the suppression of NDRG1 expression may sensitize HCC cells to doxorubicin and/or RA cytotoxicity. HCC cells expressed NDRG1 protein, and the expression of this protein was hypoxia- and RA-inducible. Doxorubicin treatment induced HCC cell cytotoxicity via the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic signals, including caspase-9 activation. Hypoxic HCC cells are less sensitive to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. The suppression of NDRG1 expression either by siRNA or flavopiridol sensitized hypoxic HCC cells to doxorubicin cytotoxicity, and this was attributed to more profound augmentation of JNK and caspase-9 activation. The suppression of NDRG1 expression also sensitized RA-resistant HCC cells to RA-induced apoptosis, and this sensitization was more apparent in hypoxic HCC cells than in normoxic cells. Glutaredoxin2 expression was down-regulated in NDRG1-suppressed HCC cells. These results show that hypoxia- and RA-inducible NDRG1 expression is responsible for doxorubicin and RA resistance in HCC cells. Thus, the selective interruption of NDRG1 signaling may prove to be therapeutically useful in HCCs, particularly in the advanced infiltrative type of tumors exposed to hypoxic environments.

  10. Gibberellic Acid-Induced Aleurone Layers Responding to Heat Shock or Tunicamycin Provide Insight into the N-Glycoproteome, Protein Secretion, and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress1[W

    PubMed Central

    Barba-Espín, Gregorio; Dedvisitsakul, Plaipol; Hägglund, Per; Svensson, Birte; Finnie, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The growing relevance of plants for the production of recombinant proteins makes understanding the secretory machinery, including the identification of glycosylation sites in secreted proteins, an important goal of plant proteomics. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone layers maintained in vitro respond to gibberellic acid by secreting an array of proteins and provide a unique system for the analysis of plant protein secretion. Perturbation of protein secretion in gibberellic acid-induced aleurone layers by two independent mechanisms, heat shock and tunicamycin treatment, demonstrated overlapping effects on both the intracellular and secreted proteomes. Proteins in a total of 22 and 178 two-dimensional gel spots changing in intensity in extracellular and intracellular fractions, respectively, were identified by mass spectrometry. Among these are proteins with key roles in protein processing and secretion, such as calreticulin, protein disulfide isomerase, proteasome subunits, and isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase. Sixteen heat shock proteins in 29 spots showed diverse responses to the treatments, with only a minority increasing in response to heat shock. The majority, all of which were small heat shock proteins, decreased in heat-shocked aleurone layers. Additionally, glycopeptide enrichment and N-glycosylation analysis identified 73 glycosylation sites in 65 aleurone layer proteins, with 53 of the glycoproteins found in extracellular fractions and 36 found in intracellular fractions. This represents major progress in characterization of the barley N-glycoproteome, since only four of these sites were previously described. Overall, these findings considerably advance knowledge of the plant protein secretion system in general and emphasize the versatility of the aleurone layer as a model system for studying plant protein secretion. PMID:24344171

  11. Molecular analysis of the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 gene (RAI1) in patients with suspected Smith-Magenis syndrome without the 17p11.2 deletion.

    PubMed

    Vilboux, Thierry; Ciccone, Carla; Blancato, Jan K; Cox, Gerald F; Deshpande, Charu; Introne, Wendy J; Gahl, William A; Smith, Ann C M; Huizing, Marjan

    2011-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex neurobehavioral disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies. The syndrome is primarily ascribed to a ∼3.7 Mb de novo deletion on chromosome 17p11.2. Haploinsufficiency of multiple genes likely underlies the complex clinical phenotype. RAI1 (Retinoic Acid Induced 1) is recognized as a major gene involved in the SMS phenotype. Extensive genetic and clinical analyses of 36 patients with SMS-like features, but without the 17p11.2 microdeletion, yielded 10 patients with RAI1 variants, including 4 with de novo deleterious mutations, and 6 with novel missense variants, 5 of which were familial. Haplotype analysis showed two major RAI1 haplotypes in our primarily Caucasian cohort; the novel RAI1 variants did not occur in a preferred haplotype. RNA analysis revealed that RAI1 mRNA expression was significantly decreased in cells of patients with the common 17p11.2 deletion, as well as in those with de novo RAI1 variants. Expression levels varied in patients with familial RAI1 variants and in non-17p11.2 deleted patients without identified RAI1 defects. No correlation between SNP haplotype and RAI1 expression was found. Two clinical features, ocular abnormalities and polyembolokoilomania (object insertion), were significantly correlated with decreased RAI1 expression. While not significantly correlated, the presence of hearing loss, seizures, hoarse voice, childhood onset of obesity and specific behavioral aspects and the absence of immunologic abnormalities and cardiovascular or renal structural anomalies, appeared to be specific for the de novo RAI1 subgroup. Recognition of the combination of these features will assist in referral for RAI1 analysis of patients with SMS-like features without detectable microdeletion of 17p11.2. Moreover, RAI1 expression emerged as a genetic target for development of therapeutic interventions for SMS.

  12. Hepatitis C Virus Frameshift/Alternate Reading Frame Protein Suppresses Interferon Responses Mediated by Pattern Recognition Receptor Retinoic-Acid-Inducible Gene-I

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Bum; Seronello, Scott; Mayer, Wasima; Ojcius, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) actively evades host interferon (IFN) responses but the mechanisms of how it does so are not completely understood. In this study, we present evidence for an HCV factor that contributes to the suppression of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-mediated IFN induction. Expression of frameshift/alternate reading frame protein (F/ARFP) from HCV -2/+1 frame in Huh7 hepatoma cells suppressed type I IFN responses stimulated by HCV RNA pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and poly(IC). The suppression occurred independently of other HCV factors; and activation of interferon stimulated genes, TNFα, IFN-λ1, and IFN-λ2/3 was likewise suppressed by HCV F/ARFP. Point mutations in the full-length HCV sequence (JFH1 genotype 2a strain) were made to introduce premature termination codons in the -2/+1 reading frame coding for F/ARFP while preserving the original reading frame, which enhanced IFNα and IFNβ induction by HCV. The potentiation of IFN response by the F/ARFP mutations was diminished in Huh7.5 cells, which already have a defective RIG-I, and by decreasing RIG-I expression in Huh7 cells. Furthermore, adding F/ARFP back via trans-complementation suppressed IFN induction in the F/ARFP mutant. The F/ARFP mutants, on the other hand, were not resistant to exogenous IFNα. Finally, HCV-infected human liver samples showed significant F/ARFP antibody reactivity, compared to HCV-uninfected control livers. Therefore, HCV F/ARFP likely cooperates with other viral factors to suppress type I and III IFN induction occurring through the RIG-I signaling pathway. This study identifies a novel mechanism of pattern recognition receptor modulation by HCV and suggests a biological function of the HCV alternate reading frame in the modulation of host innate immunity. PMID:27404108

  13. Citric acid induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis of human immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) via caspase- and mitochondrial-dependent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ying, Tsung-Ho; Chen, Chia-Wei; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Hung, Sung-Jen; Chung, Jing-Gung; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2013-10-01

    Citric acid is an alpha-hydroxyacid (AHA) widely used in cosmetic dermatology and skincare products. However, there is concern regarding its safety for the skin. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of citric acid on the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. HaCaT cells were treated with citric acid at 2.5-12.5 mM for different time periods. Cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis were investigated by 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining, flow cytometry, western blot and confocal microscopy. Citric acid not only inhibited proliferation of HaCaT cells in a dose-dependent manner, but also induced apoptosis and cell cycle-arrest at the G2/M phase (before 24 h) and S phase (after 24 h). Citric acid increased the level of Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX) and reduced the levels of B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2), B-cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL-XL) and activated caspase-9 and caspase-3, which subsequently induced apoptosis via caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways. Citric acid also activated death receptors and increased the levels of caspase-8, activated BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (BID) protein, Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and Endonuclease G (EndoG). Therefore, citric acid induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. The study results suggest that citric acid is cytotoxic to HaCaT cells via induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in vitro.

  14. Increased beta-oxidation in muscle cells enhances insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism and protects against fatty acid-induced insulin resistance despite intramyocellular lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, German; Commerford, S Renee; Richard, Ann-Marie T; Adams, Sean H; Corkey, Barbara E; O'Doherty, Robert M; Brown, Nicholas F

    2004-06-25

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance may be aggravated by intramyocellular accumulation of fatty acid-derived metabolites that inhibit insulin signaling. We tested the hypothesis that enhanced fatty acid oxidation in myocytes should protect against fatty acid-induced insulin resistance by limiting lipid accumulation. L6 myotubes were transduced with adenoviruses encoding carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) isoforms or beta-galactosidase (control). Two to 3-fold overexpression of L-CPT I, the endogenous isoform in L6 cells, proportionally increased oxidation of the long-chain fatty acids palmitate and oleate and increased insulin stimulation of [(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen by 60% while enhancing insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of p38MAPK. Incubation of control cells with 0.2 mm palmitate for 18 h caused accumulation of triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, and ceramide (but not long-chain acyl-CoA) and decreased insulin-stimulated [(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen (60%), [(3)H]deoxyglucose uptake (60%), and protein kinase B phosphorylation (20%). In the context of L-CPT I overexpression, palmitate preincubation produced a relative decrease in insulin-stimulated incorporation of [(14)C]glucose into glycogen (60%) and [(3)H]deoxyglucose uptake (40%) but did not inhibit phosphorylation of protein kinase B. Due to the enhancement of insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism induced by L-CPT I overexpression itself, net insulin-stimulated incorporation of [(14)C]glucose into glycogen and [(3)H]deoxyglucose uptake in L-CPT I-transduced, palmitate-treated cells were significantly greater than in palmitate-treated control cells (71 and 75% greater, respectively). However, L-CPT I overexpression failed to decrease intracellular triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, ceramide, or long-chain acyl-CoA. We propose that accelerated beta-oxidation in muscle cells exerts an insulin-sensitizing effect independently of changes in intracellular lipid content.

  15. Music application alleviates short-term memory impairments through increasing cell proliferation in the hippocampus of valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Min; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Choi, Hyun-Hee

    2016-06-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder and this disorder shows impairment in reciprocal social interactions, deficits in communication, and restrictive and repetitive patterns of behaviors and interests. The effect of music on short-term memory in the view of cell proliferation in the hippocampus was evaluated using valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups. Animal model of autism was made by subcutaneous injection of 400-mg/kg valproic acid into the rat pups on the postnatal day 14. The rat pups in the music-applied groups were exposed to the 65-dB comfortable classic music for 1 hr once a day, starting postnatal day 15 and continued until postnatal day 28. In the present results, short-term memory was deteriorated by autism induction. The numbers of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyridine (BrdU)-positive, Ki-67-positive, and doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased by autism induction. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) expressions in the hippocampus were also suppressed in the autistic rat pups. Music application alleviated short-term memory deficits with enhancing the numbers of BrdU-positive, Ki-67-positive, and DCX-positive cells in the autistic rat pups. Music application also enhanced BDNF and TrkB expressions in the autistic rat pups. The present study show that application of music enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation and alleviated short-term memory impairment through stimulating BDNF-TrkB signaling in the autistic rat pups. Music can be suggested as the therapeutic strategy to overcome the autism-induced memory deficits.

  16. Music application alleviates short-term memory impairments through increasing cell proliferation in the hippocampus of valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Min; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Choi, Hyun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder and this disorder shows impairment in reciprocal social interactions, deficits in communication, and restrictive and repetitive patterns of behaviors and interests. The effect of music on short-term memory in the view of cell proliferation in the hippocampus was evaluated using valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups. Animal model of autism was made by subcutaneous injection of 400-mg/kg valproic acid into the rat pups on the postnatal day 14. The rat pups in the music-applied groups were exposed to the 65-dB comfortable classic music for 1 hr once a day, starting postnatal day 15 and continued until postnatal day 28. In the present results, short-term memory was deteriorated by autism induction. The numbers of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyridine (BrdU)-positive, Ki-67-positive, and doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased by autism induction. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) expressions in the hippocampus were also suppressed in the autistic rat pups. Music application alleviated short-term memory deficits with enhancing the numbers of BrdU-positive, Ki-67-positive, and DCX-positive cells in the autistic rat pups. Music application also enhanced BDNF and TrkB expressions in the autistic rat pups. The present study show that application of music enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation and alleviated short-term memory impairment through stimulating BDNF-TrkB signaling in the autistic rat pups. Music can be suggested as the therapeutic strategy to overcome the autism-induced memory deficits. PMID:27419108

  17. A comparative study of the antitussive activity of levodropropizine and dropropizine in the citric acid-induced cough model in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, G; Cordaro, C I; Vanasia, M; Balzarotti, C; Camusso, L; Caiazzo, G; Maghini, L; Mazzocchi, M; Zennaro, M

    1992-01-01

    Levodropropizine is the levo-rotatory (S)-enantiomer of dropropizine, a racemic non-opiate antitussive agent which has been used clinically for many years. Compared with the racemic drug, levodropropizine exhibits in animal models similar antitussive activity but considerably lower central nervous system (CNS) depressant effects. It is also less likely to cause sedation in treated patients. Since the comparative antitussive potency of the two drugs in clinical experimental models has not been evaluated, the authors performed a randomized, double blind, cross over investigation in which the effects of single oral doses (60 and 90 mg) of levodropropizine and dropropizine were assessed by using the citric acid-induced cough model in eight normal volunteers. Stimulation tests involved inhalation of individual cumulative doses of citric acid (6.3 to 53.3 mg) which at pre-study assessment had been found to induce reproducibly at least ten coughs over a 30 sec period. Each subject was studied by repeating the citric acid stimulation test four times (0 h, 1 h, 2 h and 6 h) on each of five different days separated by intervals of at least three days. In the absence of drug administration (control session), cough response to citric inhalation was remarkably reproducible throughout the 6 h period of observation. A marked and statistically significant reduction in cough response (to about one third--one sixth of the pre-drug values) was observed 1 h after intake for both compounds. At subsequent testing 2 h and 6 h after dosing, cough response was still depressed and did not differ significantly from that observed at 1 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Calcium-dependent nitric oxide production is involved in the cytoprotective properties of n-acetylcysteine in glycochenodeoxycholic acid-induced cell death in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Rubio, Sandra; Linares, Clara I.; Bello, Rosario I.; Gonzalez, Raul; Ferrin, Gustavo; Hidalgo, Ana B.; Munoz-Gomariz, Elisa; Rodriguez, Blanca A.; Barrera, Pilar; Ranchal, Isidora; Duran-Prado, Mario; De la Mata, Manuel; Muntane, Jordi

    2010-01-15

    The intracellular oxidative stress has been involved in bile acid-induced cell death in hepatocytes. Nitric oxide (NO) exerts cytoprotective properties in glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)-treated hepatocytes. The study evaluated the involvement of Ca{sup 2+} on the regulation of NO synthase (NOS)-3 expression during N-acetylcysteine (NAC) cytoprotection against GCDCA-induced cell death in hepatocytes. The regulation of Ca{sup 2+} pools (EGTA or BAPTA-AM) and NO (L-NAME or NO donor) production was assessed during NAC cytoprotection in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The stimulation of Ca{sup 2+} entrance was induced by A23187 in HepG2. Cell death, Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, NOS-1, -2 and -3 expression, AP-1 activation, and NO production were evaluated. GCDCA reduced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration and NOS-3 expression, and enhanced cell death in HepG2. NO donor prevented, and L-NAME enhanced, GCDCA-induced cell death. The reduction of Ca{sup 2+} entry by EGTA, but not its release from intracellular stores by BAPTA-AM, enhanced cell death in GCDCA-treated cells. The stimulation of Ca{sup 2+} entrance by A23187 reduced cell death and enhanced NOS-3 expression in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The cytoprotective properties of NAC were related to the recovery of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration, NOS-3 expression and NO production induced by GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The increase of NO production by Ca{sup 2+}-dependent NOS-3 expression during NAC administration reduces cell death in GCDCA-treated hepatocytes.

  19. The histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid induces apoptosis, down-regulates the CXCR4 chemokine receptor and impairs migration of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Stamatopoulos, Basile; Meuleman, Nathalie; De Bruyn, Cécile; Delforge, Alain; Bron, Dominique; Lagneaux, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a neoplastic disorder that arises largely as a result of defective apoptosis leading to chemoresistance. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor, CXCR4, have been shown to play an important role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell trafficking and survival. Design and Methods Since histone acetylation is involved in the modulation of gene expression, we evaluated the effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells and in particular on cell survival, CXCR4 expression, migration, and drug sensitization. Results Here, we showed that treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (20 μM) for 48 hours induced a decrease in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell viability via apoptosis (n=20, P=0.0032). Using specific caspase inhibitors, we demonstrated the participation of caspases-3, -6 and -8, suggesting an activation of the extrinsic pathway. Additionally, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid significantly decreased CXCR4 mRNA (n=10, P=0.0010) and protein expression (n=40, P<0.0001). As a result, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell migration in response to stromal cell-derived factor-1 (n=23, P<0.0001) or through bone marrow stromal cells was dramatically impaired. Consequently, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid reduced the protective effect of the microenvironment and thus sensitized chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to chemotherapy such as fludarabine. Conclusions In conclusion, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid induces apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells via the extrinsic pathway and down-regulates CXCR4 expression leading to decreased cell migration. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in combination with other drugs represents a promising therapeutic approach to inhibiting migration, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell survival and potentially overcoming drug resistance. PMID:20145270

  20. Muscovy duck retinoic acid-induced gene I (MdRIG-I) functions in innate immunity against H9N2 avian influenza viruses (AIV) infections.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuqiang; Huang, Qingqing; Ji, Wenhui; Du, Bin; Fu, Qiang; An, Huiting; Li, Jing; Wang, Hengan; Yan, Yaxian; Ding, Chan; Sun, Jianhe

    2015-02-15

    Retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) is a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor that senses pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata) is a large duck different from other species of ducks, and is more susceptible to some microbial pathogens. In this study, the Muscovy duck RIG-I gene (MdRIG-I) was identified. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that MdRIG-I mRNA was widely expressed in different tissues, especially in those with mucosa. RIG-I null DF-1 cells transfected with DNA constructs encoding MdRIG-I or CARDs domain can activate IRF-3 and NF-κB to up-regulated activity of IFN-β promoter. The components of the signaling pathway downstream of RIG-I in mammalian cells including IRF-3, NF-κB, IFN-β and the IFN-stimulated genes Mx-1, PKR and MDA5 were significantly up-regulated in CARDs-overexpressing-DF-1 cells. Implicating RIG-I in the antiviral response to an infection in vivo, we found that RIG-I expression in brain, spleen, lung and bursa were up-regulated in ducks challenged with H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV), whose six internal genes were closely related to the H7N9 and H10N8 AIV. In vitro, DF-1 cells transfected with MdRIG-I plasmid can respond significantly to H9N2 AIV, evident through enhancement of IFN-β promoter activity and decreased virus titer. Altogether, these results indicated that MdRIG-I is a novel member of RLR gene family, engaging in the early stage of antiviral innate immunity.

  1. Downregulation of microRNA-451 in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis inhibits fatty acid-induced proinflammatory cytokine production through the AMPK/AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Hur, Wonhee; Lee, Joon Ho; Kim, Sung Woo; Kim, Jung-Hee; Bae, Si Hyun; Kim, Minhyung; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Young Seok; Park, Taesun; Um, Soo-Jong; Song, Byoung-Joon; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms associated with the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remain unclear. We attempted to identify the pattern of altered gene expression at different time points in a high fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD mouse model. The early up-regulated genes are mainly involved in the innate immune responses, while the late up-regulated genes represent the inflammation processes. Although recent studies have shown that microRNAs play important roles in hepatic metabolic functions, the pivotal role of microRNAs in the progression of NAFLD is not fully understood. We investigated the functions of miR-451, which was identified as a target gene in the inflammatory process in NAFLD. miR-451 expression was significantly decreased in the palmitate (PA)-exposed HepG2 cells and in liver tissues of HFD-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) mice. Its decreased expressions were also observed in liver specimens of NASH patients. In vitro analysis of the effect of miR-451 on proinflammatory cytokine provided evidence for negative regulation of PA-induced interleukin (IL)-8 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) production. Furthermore, miR-451 over-expression inhibited translocation of the PA-induced NF-κB p65 subunit into the nucleus. Our result showed that Cab39 is a direct target of miRNA-451 in steatotic cells. Further study showed that AMPK activated through Cab39 inhibits NF-κB transactivation induced in steatotic HepG2 cells. miR-451 over-expression in steatotic cells significantly suppressed PA-induced inflammatory cytokine. These results provide new insights into the negative regulation of miR-451 in fatty acid-induced inflammation via the AMPK/AKT pathway and demonstrate potential therapeutic applications for miR-451 in preventing the progression from simple steatosis to severely advanced liver disease.

  2. Blockage of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and upregulation of let 7b are critically involved in ursolic acid induced apoptosis in malignant mesothelioma cell

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Eun Jung; Won, Gunho; Lee, Jihyun; Yoon, Sang Wook; Lee, Ilho; Kim, Hee Jeong; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPN), which is caused by asbestos exposure, is one of aggressive lung tumors. In the present study, we elucidated the anti-tumor mechanism of ursolic acid in malignant mesotheliomas. Ursolic acid significantly exerted cytotoxicity in a time and dose dependent manner in H28, H2452 and MSTO-211H mesothelioma cells and inhibited cell proliferation by colony formation assay in a dose-dependent fashion. Also, ursolic acid treatment accumulated the sub-G1 population, attenuated the expression of procapase 9, cyclin D1, pAKT, p-glycogen synthase kinase 3-alpha/beta (pGSK3α/β), β-catenin and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFkB) and also cleaved caspase 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in mesothelioma cells. Furthermore, ursolic acid treatment blocked epithelial and mesenchymal transition (EMT) molecules by activating E-cadherin as an epithelial marker and attenuating Vimentin, and Twist as mesenchymal molecules. Interestingly, miRNA array revealed that 23 miRNAs (>2 folds) including let-7b and miRNA3613-5p, miRNA134 and miRNA196b were significantly upregulated while 33 miRNAs were downregulated in ursolic acid treated H2452 cells. Furthermore, overexpression of let 7b using let-7b mimics enhanced the antitumor effect of ursolic acid to attenuate the expression of procaspases 3, pro-PARP, pAKT, β-catenin and Twist and increase sub-G1 accumulation in H2452 mesothelioma cells. Overall, our findings suggest that ursolic acid induces apoptosis via inhibition of EMT and activation of let7b in mesothelioma cells as a potent chemotherapeutic agent for treatment of malignant mesotheliomas. PMID:28090191

  3. Blockage of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and upregulation of let 7b are critically involved in ursolic acid induced apoptosis in malignant mesothelioma cell.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Eun Jung; Won, Gunho; Lee, Jihyun; Yoon, Sang Wook; Lee, Ilho; Kim, Hee Jeong; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPN), which is caused by asbestos exposure, is one of aggressive lung tumors. In the present study, we elucidated the anti-tumor mechanism of ursolic acid in malignant mesotheliomas. Ursolic acid significantly exerted cytotoxicity in a time and dose dependent manner in H28, H2452 and MSTO-211H mesothelioma cells and inhibited cell proliferation by colony formation assay in a dose-dependent fashion. Also, ursolic acid treatment accumulated the sub-G1 population, attenuated the expression of procapase 9, cyclin D1, pAKT, p-glycogen synthase kinase 3-alpha/beta (pGSK3α/β), β-catenin and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFkB) and also cleaved caspase 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in mesothelioma cells. Furthermore, ursolic acid treatment blocked epithelial and mesenchymal transition (EMT) molecules by activating E-cadherin as an epithelial marker and attenuating Vimentin, and Twist as mesenchymal molecules. Interestingly, miRNA array revealed that 23 miRNAs (>2 folds) including let-7b and miRNA3613-5p, miRNA134 and miRNA196b were significantly upregulated while 33 miRNAs were downregulated in ursolic acid treated H2452 cells. Furthermore, overexpression of let 7b using let-7b mimics enhanced the antitumor effect of ursolic acid to attenuate the expression of procaspases 3, pro-PARP, pAKT, β-catenin and Twist and increase sub-G1 accumulation in H2452 mesothelioma cells. Overall, our findings suggest that ursolic acid induces apoptosis via inhibition of EMT and activation of let7b in mesothelioma cells as a potent chemotherapeutic agent for treatment of malignant mesotheliomas.

  4. Rai14 (retinoic acid induced protein 14) is involved in regulating f-actin dynamics at the ectoplasmic specialization in the rat testis*.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaojing; Mruk, Dolores D; Cheng, C Yan

    2013-01-01

    Rai14 (retinoic acid induced protein 14) is an actin binding protein first identified in the liver, highly expressed in the placenta, the testis, and the eye. In the course of studying actin binding proteins that regulate the organization of actin filament bundles in the ectoplasmic specialization (ES), a testis-specific actin-rich adherens junction (AJ) type, Rai14 was shown to be one of the regulatory proteins at the ES. In the rat testis, Rai14 was found to be expressed by Sertoli and germ cells, structurally associated with actin and an actin cross-linking protein palladin. Its expression was the highest at the ES in the seminiferous epithelium of adult rat testes, most notably at the apical ES at the Sertoli-spermatid interface, and expressed stage-specifically during the epithelial cycle in stage VII-VIII tubules. However, Rai14 was also found at the basal ES near the basement membrane, associated with the blood-testis barrier (BTB) in stage VIII-IX tubules. A knockdown of Rai14 in Sertoli cells cultured in vitro by RNAi was found to perturb the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability function in vitro, mediated by a disruption of F-actin, which in turn led to protein mis-localization at the Sertoli cell BTB. When Rai14 in the testis in vivo was knockdown by RNAi, defects in spermatid polarity and adhesion, as well as spermatid transport were noted mediated via changes in F-actin organization and mis-localization of proteins at the apical ES. In short, Rai14 is involved in the re-organization of actin filaments in Sertoli cells during the epithelial cycle, participating in conferring spermatid polarity and cell adhesion in the testis.

  5. Increased expression of retinoic acid-induced gene 1 in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression

    PubMed Central

    Haybaeck, Johannes; Postruznik, Magdalena; Miller, Christine L; Dulay, Jeannette R; Llenos, Ida C; Weis, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Background Retinoids regulate gene expression in different cells and tissues at the transcriptional level. Retinoic acid transcriptionally regulates downstream regulatory molecules, including enzymes, transcription factors, cytokines, and cytokine receptors. Animal models indicate an involvement of retinoid signaling pathways in the regulation of synaptic plasticity and learning, especially in the hippocampus. Retinoic acid-inducible or induced gene 1 (RAI-1) is induced during neuronal differentiation, and was associated with the severity of the phenotype and response to medication in schizophrenic patients. Methods In the present study, we used immunohistochemistry to investigate the expression of RAI-1 in 60 brains from the Stanley Neuropathology Consortium (15 cases each from controls and from patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression). Rating scores for density and intensity were determined in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Results All four groups showed high interindividual variation. RAI-1-positive cells were identified as neurons and astrocytes. Significantly increased intensities in cortical neurons were noted in all three major psychiatric groups compared with controls. The density of RAI-1-positive neurons was increased (P=0.06) in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. In bipolar disorder, RAI-1-positive astrocytes in gray matter showed a significantly increased intensity and compound value. Thus, a significant increase in the parameters measured was found in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression. Conclusion Our study shows a significant increase in expression of RAI-1 in the brains from patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depression. The increased expression might reflect altered signaling pathways, like that for retinoic acid. The underlying mechanisms leading to the increased expression and its functional consequences are so far unknown, and remain to be investigated in future studies

  6. Chest wall reconstruction after extended resection

    PubMed Central

    Seder, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive chest wall resection and reconstruction is a challenging procedure that requires a multidisciplinary approach, including input from thoracic surgeons, plastic surgeons, neurosurgeons, and radiation oncologists. The primary goals of any chest wall reconstruction is to obliterate dead space, restore chest wall rigidity, preserve pulmonary mechanics, protect intrathoracic organs, provide soft tissue coverage, minimize deformity, and allow patients to receive adjuvant radiotherapy. Successful chest wall reconstruction requires the re-establishment of skeletal stability to prevent chest wall hernias, avoids thoracoplasty-like contraction of the operated side, protects underlying viscera, and maintain a cosmetically-acceptable appearance. After skeletal stability is established, full tissue coverage can be achieved using direct closure, skin grafts, local advancement flaps, pedicled myocutaneous flaps, or free flaps. This review examines the indications for chest wall reconstruction and describes techniques for establishment of chest wall rigidity and soft tissue coverage. PMID:27942408

  7. Generalized Wall Function for Complex Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Povinelli, Louis A.; Liu, Nan-Suey; Chen, Kuo-Huey

    2000-01-01

    A generalized wall function was proposed by Shih et al., (1999). It accounts the effect of pressure gradients on the flow near the wall. Theory shows that the effect of pressure gradients on the flow in the inertial sublayer is very significant and the standard wall function should be replaced by a generalized wall function. Since the theory is also valid for boundary layer flows toward separation, the generalized wall function may be applied to complex turbulent flows with acceleration, deceleration, separation and recirculation. This paper is to verify the generalized wall function with numerical simulations for boundary layer flows with various adverse and favorable pressure gradients, including flows about to separate. Furthermore, a general procedure of implementation of the generalized wall function for National Combustion Code (NCC) is described, it can be applied to both structured and unstructured CFD codes.

  8. Pulmonary complications of abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Panitch, Howard B

    2015-01-01

    The abdominal wall is an integral component of the chest wall. Defects in the ventral abdominal wall alter respiratory mechanics and can impair diaphragm function. Congenital abdominal wall defects also are associated with abnormalities in lung growth and development that lead to pulmonary hypoplasia, pulmonary hypertension, and alterations in thoracic cage formation. Although infants with ventral abdominal wall defects can experience life-threatening pulmonary complications, older children typically experience a more benign respiratory course. Studies of lung and chest wall function in older children and adolescents with congenital abdominal wall defects are few; such investigations could provide strategies for improved respiratory performance, avoidance of respiratory morbidity, and enhanced exercise ability for these children.

  9. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2013-09-17

    A serpentine coolant flow path (54A-54G) formed by inner walls (50, 52) in a cavity (49) between pressure and suction side walls (22, 24) of a turbine airfoil (20A). A coolant flow (58) enters (56) an end of the airfoil, flows into a span-wise channel (54A), then flows forward (54B) over the inner surface of the pressure side wall, then turns behind the leading edge (26), and flows back along a forward part of the suction side wall, then follows a loop (54E) forward and back around an inner wall (52), then flows along an intermediate part of the suction side wall, then flows into an aft channel (54G) between the pressure and suction side walls, then exits the trailing edge (28). This provides cooling matched to the heating topography of the airfoil, minimizes differential thermal expansion, revives the coolant, and minimizes the flow volume needed.

  10. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, W.

    2012-06-30

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of

  11. Domain-confined catalytic soot combustion over Co3O4 anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst prepared by mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiale; Yu, Yifu; Dai, Fangfang; Meng, Ming; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Hu, Tiandou

    2013-12-21

    Herein, we introduce a specially designed domain-confined macroporous catalyst, namely, the Co3O4 nanocrystals anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst, which was synthesized by using the mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting method. This catalyst exhibits much better performance for catalytic soot combustion than the conventional TiO2 powder supported one in gravitational contact mode (GMC).

  12. Through-Wall Imaging Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    receiver dynamic range to be applied to the target scene behind the wall. A time-division multiplexed ( TDM ), multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO...by the data-acquisition computer. The TDM MIMO radar system sequences through each of the 44 bistatic combinations, acquiring one range profile at...96 5. 75 5. 75 2 FiGurE 5. In this cartoon of the time-division multiplexed ( TDM ), multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) array lay- out [compare to

  13. An improved resistive wall monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Fellenz, Brian; Crisp, Jim

    1998-12-10

    Resistive wall monitors were designed and built for the Fermilab Main Injector project. These devices measure longitudinal beam current from 3 KHz to 4 GHz with a 1 ohm gap impedance. The new design provides a larger aperture and a calibration port to improve the accuracy of single-bunch intensity measurements. Microwave absorber material is used to reduce interference from spurious electromagnetic waves traveling inside the beam pipe. Several types of ferrite materials were evaluated for the absorber. Inexpensive ferrite rods were selected and assembled in an array forming the desired geometry without machining.

  14. Wall interference assessment and corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.; Kemp, W. B., Jr.; Garriz, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    Wind tunnel wall interference assessment and correction (WIAC) concepts, applications, and typical results are discussed in terms of several nonlinear transonic codes and one panel method code developed for and being implemented at NASA-Langley. Contrasts between 2-D and 3-D transonic testing factors which affect WIAC procedures are illustrated using airfoil data from the 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel and Pathfinder 1 data from the National Transonic Facility. Initial results from the 3-D WIAC codes are encouraging; research on and implementation of WIAC concepts continue.

  15. Workshop on First Wall Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, K.; Fukutomi, M.

    1982-03-01

    Impurity control and first wall design in the JT 60 long pulse Tokamak is discussed. The present state of coating technology in Japan is reviewed with emphasis on fabrication methods and the characterization of thin coated films available by plasma spraying and chemical and physical vapor deposition. Surface preparation, radiation damage, internal stress, crystal structure and bonding are considered as well as the application of silicon carbide, titanium nitride, titanium carbide, titanium boride, and chromium nitride coatings by magnetron sputtering, long plating, electron beam evaporation, and gas absorption and reactive r.f. sputtering.

  16. First Wall and Operational Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Lasnier, C; Allen, S; Boedo, J; Groth, M; Brooks, N; McLean, A; LaBombard, B; Sharpe, J; Skinner, C; Whyte, D; Rudakov, D; West, W; Wong, C

    2006-06-19

    In this chapter we review numerous diagnostics capable of measurements at or near the first wall, many of which contribute information useful for safe operation of a tokamak. There are sections discussing infrared cameras, visible and VUV cameras, pressure gauges and RGAs, Langmuir probes, thermocouples, and erosion and deposition measurements by insertable probes and quartz microbalance. Also discussed are dust measurements by electrostatic detectors, laser scattering, visible and IR cameras, and manual collection of samples after machine opening. In each case the diagnostic is discussed with a view toward application to a burning plasma machine such as ITER.

  17. Moving walls and geometric phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchi, Paolo; Garnero, Giancarlo; Marmo, Giuseppe; Samuel, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We unveil the existence of a non-trivial Berry phase associated to the dynamics of a quantum particle in a one dimensional box with moving walls. It is shown that a suitable choice of boundary conditions has to be made in order to preserve unitarity. For these boundary conditions we compute explicitly the geometric phase two-form on the parameter space. The unboundedness of the Hamiltonian describing the system leads to a natural prescription of renormalization for divergent contributions arising from the boundary.

  18. Spontaneous Behaviors and Wall-Curvature Lead to Apparent Wall Preference in Planarian.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yoshitaro; Agata, Kiyokazu; Inoue, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The planarian Dugesia japonica tends to stay near the walls of its breeding containers and experimental dishes in the laboratory, a phenomenon called "wall preference". This behavior is thought to be important for environmental adaptation, such as hiding by planarians in nature. However, the mechanisms regulating wall-preference behavior are not well understood, since this behavior occurs in the absence of any particular stimulation. Here we show the mechanisms of wall-preference behavior. Surprisingly, planarian wall-preference behavior was also shown even by the head alone and by headless planarians. These results indicate that planarian "wall-preference" behavior only appears to be a "preference" behavior, and is actually an outcome of spontaneous behaviors, rather than of brain function. We found that in the absence of environmental cues planarians moved basically straight ahead until they reached a wall, and that after reaching a wall, they changed their direction of movement to one tangential to the wall, suggesting that this spontaneous behavior may play a critical role in the wall preference. When we tested another spontaneous behavior, the wigwag movement of the planarian head, using computer simulation with various wigwag angles and wigwag intervals, large wigwag angle and short wigwag interval reduced wall-preference behavior. This indicated that wigwag movement may determine the probability of staying near the wall or leaving the wall. Furthermore, in accord with this simulation, when we tested planarian wall-preference behavior using several assay fields with different curvature of the wall, we found that concavity and sharp curvature of walls negatively impacted wall preference by affecting the permissible angle of the wigwag movement. Together, these results indicate that planarian wall preference may be involuntarily caused by the combination of two spontaneous planarian behaviors: moving straight ahead until reaching a wall and then moving along it

  19. Spontaneous Behaviors and Wall-Curvature Lead to Apparent Wall Preference in Planarian

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Yoshitaro; Agata, Kiyokazu; Inoue, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The planarian Dugesia japonica tends to stay near the walls of its breeding containers and experimental dishes in the laboratory, a phenomenon called “wall preference”. This behavior is thought to be important for environmental adaptation, such as hiding by planarians in nature. However, the mechanisms regulating wall-preference behavior are not well understood, since this behavior occurs in the absence of any particular stimulation. Here we show the mechanisms of wall-preference behavior. Surprisingly, planarian wall-preference behavior was also shown even by the head alone and by headless planarians. These results indicate that planarian “wall-preference” behavior only appears to be a “preference” behavior, and is actually an outcome of spontaneous behaviors, rather than of brain function. We found that in the absence of environmental cues planarians moved basically straight ahead until they reached a wall, and that after reaching a wall, they changed their direction of movement to one tangential to the wall, suggesting that this spontaneous behavior may play a critical role in the wall preference. When we tested another spontaneous behavior, the wigwag movement of the planarian head, using computer simulation with various wigwag angles and wigwag intervals, large wigwag angle and short wigwag interval reduced wall-preference behavior. This indicated that wigwag movement may determine the probability of staying near the wall or leaving the wall. Furthermore, in accord with this simulation, when we tested planarian wall-preference behavior using several assay fields with different curvature of the wall, we found that concavity and sharp curvature of walls negatively impacted wall preference by affecting the permissible angle of the wigwag movement. Together, these results indicate that planarian wall preference may be involuntarily caused by the combination of two spontaneous planarian behaviors: moving straight ahead until reaching a wall and then

  20. Speech About the Great Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    Of all the sights that I saw during that trip, the one that provoked the most thought on my part was the Great Wall. The Great Wall defies imagination. It is simple and strong. It winds gracefully up and down. It scales slowly but steadily the distant hill, to disappear down into the valley beyond, only to climb again, inexorably, to surmount the next mountain in its path. As one examines the individual stones with which it was built, one realizes how much sweat and blood there must have been in its complex history. As one looks at the overall structure, at its strength and elegance, its real significance begins to emerge. It is long. It is tenacious. It is flexible in every turn, but is persistent and persisting in the long range development. Its overall unity of purpose is what gives it strength and character. And its overall unity of purpose is what makes it one of the man-made structures on the surface of the earth to become first visible to a visitor approaching our planet from outer space...

  1. [Ageing of the arterial wall].

    PubMed

    Hanon, O

    2006-11-01

    Several mechanisms are implicated in the arterial wall changes due to ageing: ageing, hypertension and atherosclerosis. Although the changes related to ageing (arteriosclerosis) have many factors in common with those induced by hypertension, they differ from those caused by atherosclerosis although commonly associated. Arteriosclerosis causes a diffuse increase of the rigidity of the large arteries by disease of the media, the main clinical manifestation of which is the increase in pulsed pressure. This arterial "hyperpulsability" contributes to a defect in coupling between the heart and the blood vessels which results in an increase in the pulsatile load of the left ventricle and to left ventricular hypertrophy and decreased coronary perfusion. Atherosclerosis seems more of a localised scarring phenomenon of the arterial wall which is exposed to a series of chronic aggressions characterised by deposits of lipids in the intima and whose main complication is thrombosis. Although these two processes may be associated, or interact one with the other, they are clearly different in nature. Therefore, atherosclerosis is a localised disease resulting in a decrease in arterial lumen, quite different from arteriosclerosis which is a diffuse, physiological condition which leads to an increase in the arterial lumen.

  2. Moss cell walls: structure and biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Alison W.; Roberts, Eric M.; Haigler, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of the moss Physcomitrella patens has stimulated new research examining the cell wall polysaccharides of mosses and the glycosyl transferases that synthesize them as a means to understand fundamental processes of cell wall biosynthesis and plant cell wall evolution. The cell walls of mosses and vascular plants are composed of the same classes of polysaccharides, but with differences in side chain composition and structure. Similarly, the genomes of P. patens and angiosperms encode the same families of cell wall glycosyl transferases, yet, in many cases these families have diversified independently in each lineage. Our understanding of land plant evolution could be enhanced by more complete knowledge of the relationships among glycosyl transferase functional diversification, cell wall structural and biochemical specialization, and the roles of cell walls in plant adaptation. As a foundation for these studies, we review the features of P. patens as an experimental system, analyses of cell wall composition in various moss species, recent studies that elucidate the structure and biosynthesis of cell wall polysaccharides in P. patens, and phylogenetic analysis of P. patens genes potentially involved in cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:22833752

  3. The State of the GeoWall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, P. J.; Leigh, J.; van Keken, P.; Johnson, A.

    2003-12-01

    The GeoWall stereo projection technology has been widely adopted within Earth Science. Over 20,000 undergraduate students per year use a GeoWall in classroom and lab settings at over 80 institutions around the world using over 200 GeoWalls. We believe that critical mass for this technology has been reached in the Earth Science. Many collaborations have been initiated. With Iris, GeoWall is exploring new ways to monitor seismic networks in real-time and to visualize extremely large, whole Earth seismic simulations. We are also working with a number of drilling organizations including JOI, DOSECC and LacCore to bring modern visualization technology to core interpretation and drill site selection. Also, over 15 museums now have or are building GeoWalls for informal education. Much of the science that is being performed on the GeoWall is finding its way directly into the classroom and science museum. One of the success stories has been the GeoWall Consortium's interaction with industry. The basic hardware for the GeoWall has been spun off to companies that now sell variations of the hardware. In addition, many software companies including ESRI and Dynamic Graphics have added support for the GeoWall in their products. The future of GeoWall is four fold. Curriculum development will bring more material to all GeoWall users. Assessment of the curriculum and educational psychology will give us GeoWall best practices. In technology development, the GeoWall 2 is a 20+ million pixel, tiled display which brings more resolution to the Earth Sciences than ever. To support research the consortium is developing a volume rendering application to visualize extremely large datasets.

  4. Rapid Changes in Cell Wall Yielding of Elongating Begonia argenteo-guttata L. Leaves in Response to Changes in Plant Water Status 1

    PubMed Central

    Serpe, Marcelo D.; Matthews, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    Elongation and epidermal cell turgor (P) of Begonia argenteoguttata L. leaves were simultaneously measured to determine the wall-yielding behavior of growing leaf cells in response to changes in plant water status. Rapid changes in plant water status were imposed by irrigating the rooting media with solutions of −0.20 and −0.30 MPa mannitol. These treatments caused decreases in P of 0.09 and 0.17 MPa, respectively. The decreases in P were complete within 10 min, and P did not change thereafter. Following treatments, leaf elongation was nil for periods of 25 to 38 min. Subsequently, elongation recovered to steady rates that were 45 or 75% lower than in the well-watered controls. Leaves of plants that were pretreated with −0.30 MPa of mannitol and rewatered showed an increase in P of 0.19 MPa, which was complete within 15 min; P did not change thereafter. Rewatering caused a several-fold increase in leaf elongation rates, which subsequently declined while P was increasing, to reach steady rates similar to that of the controls. Several estimates of elastic deformation indicated that most of the elongation responses to altered P were due to changes in irreversible deformation. The results showed that the initial effects of changes in P on leaf elongation were partially compensated for by changes in the cell wall-yielding properties. We conclude that linear relationships between P and adjusted growth rates are not necessarily indicative of constant wall-yielding properties. Instead, these relationships may reflect the effect of P on wall-loosening processes. PMID:16653208

  5. Rapid Changes in Cell Wall Yielding of Elongating Begonia argenteo-guttata L. Leaves in Response to Changes in Plant Water Status.

    PubMed

    Serpe, M D; Matthews, M A

    1992-12-01

    Elongation and epidermal cell turgor (P) of Begonia argenteoguttata L. leaves were simultaneously measured to determine the wall-yielding behavior of growing leaf cells in response to changes in plant water status. Rapid changes in plant water status were imposed by irrigating the rooting media with solutions of -0.20 and -0.30 MPa mannitol. These treatments caused decreases in P of 0.09 and 0.17 MPa, respectively. The decreases in P were complete within 10 min, and P did not change thereafter. Following treatments, leaf elongation was nil for periods of 25 to 38 min. Subsequently, elongation recovered to steady rates that were 45 or 75% lower than in the well-watered controls. Leaves of plants that were pretreated with -0.30 MPa of mannitol and rewatered showed an increase in P of 0.19 MPa, which was complete within 15 min; P did not change thereafter. Rewatering caused a several-fold increase in leaf elongation rates, which subsequently declined while P was increasing, to reach steady rates similar to that of the controls. Several estimates of elastic deformation indicated that most of the elongation responses to altered P were due to changes in irreversible deformation. The results showed that the initial effects of changes in P on leaf elongation were partially compensated for by changes in the cell wall-yielding properties. We conclude that linear relationships between P and adjusted growth rates are not necessarily indicative of constant wall-yielding properties. Instead, these relationships may reflect the effect of P on wall-loosening processes.

  6. Architecture of dermatophyte cell Walls: Electron microscopic and biochemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.; Kitajima, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 83 references on the cell wall structure of dermatophytes is presented. Topics discussed include separation and preparation of cell walls; microstructure of cell walls by electron microscopy; chemical composition of cell walls; structural model of cell walls; and morphological structure of cell walls.

  7. Near wall flow parameters in the blade end-wall corner region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, R. K.; Raj, R.

    The effects of secondary end-wall corner flows on near wall flow parameters in turbomachinary are studied. Important near wall flow parameters such as the wall shear stress vector, the mean wall pressure, the wall pressure fluctuations, and the correlation of the wall pressure fluctuation with the velocity fluctuation in three-dimensional turbulent flows are first experimentally investigated. The blade end-wall corner region is simulated by mounting airfoil section of symmetric blades on both sides of the flat plate with semicircular leading edge. Observed changes in the maximum values of the wall shear stress and its location from the corner line could be associated with the streching and attenuation of the horseshoe vortex. The values of wall pressure fluctuation intensity in the blade end-wall corner region are found to be influenced by the changes of the strength of the horseshoe vortex. The correlation of the wall pressure fluctuation with the velocity fluctuation indicated higher values of correlation coefficient in the inner region as compared to the outer region of the shear layer. The values of wall pressure-velocity correlation coefficient in the blade end-wall corner region also decrease in the streamwise direction while increasing in the presence of favorable and adverse pressure gradients.

  8. Near wall flow parameters in the blade end-wall corner region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhargava, R. K.; Raj, R.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of secondary end-wall corner flows on near wall flow parameters in turbomachinary are studied. Important near wall flow parameters such as the wall shear stress vector, the mean wall pressure, the wall pressure fluctuations, and the correlation of the wall pressure fluctuation with the velocity fluctuation in three-dimensional turbulent flows are first experimentally investigated. The blade end-wall corner region is simulated by mounting airfoil section of symmetric blades on both sides of the flat plate with semicircular leading edge. Observed changes in the maximum values of the wall shear stress and its location from the corner line could be associated with the streching and attenuation of the horseshoe vortex. The values of wall pressure fluctuation intensity in the blade end-wall corner region are found to be influenced by the changes of the strength of the horseshoe vortex. The correlation of the wall pressure fluctuation with the velocity fluctuation indicated higher values of correlation coefficient in the inner region as compared to the outer region of the shear layer. The values of wall pressure-velocity correlation coefficient in the blade end-wall corner region also decrease in the streamwise direction while increasing in the presence of favorable and adverse pressure gradients.

  9. Cell Wall Assembly in Fucus Zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Quatrano, Ralph S.; Stevens, Patricia T.

    1976-01-01

    Fertilization triggers the assembly of a cell wall around the egg cell of three brown algae, Fucus vesiculosus, F. distichus, and F. inflatus. New polysaccharide polymers are continually being added to the cell wall during the first 24 hours of synchronous embryo development. This wall assembly involves the extracellular deposition of fibrillar material by cytoplasmic vesicles fusing with the plasma membrane. One hour after fertilization a fragmented wall can be isolated free of cytoplasm and contains equal amounts of cellulose and alginic acid with no fucose-containing polymers (fucans) present. Birefringence of the wall caused by oriented cellulose microfibrils is not detected in all zygotes until 4 hours, at which time intact cell walls can be isolated that retain the shape of the zygote. These walls have a relatively low ratio of fucose to xylose and little sulfate when compared to walls from older embryos. When extracts of walls from 4-hour zygotes are subjected to cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH 7, a single fucan (F1) can be detected. By 12 hours, purified cell walls are composed of fucans containing a relatively high ratio of fucose to xylose and high levels of sulfate, and contain a second fucan (F2) which is electrophoretically distinct from F1. F2 appears to be deposited in only a localized region of the wall, that which elongates to form the rhizoid cell. Throughout wall assembly, the polyuronide block co-polymer alginic acid did not significantly vary its mannuronic (M) to guluronic (G) acid ratio (0.33-0.55) or its block distribution (MG, 54%; GG, 30%; MM, 16%). From 6 to 24 hours of embryo development, the proportion of the major polysaccharide components found in purified walls is stable. Alginic acid is the major polymer and comprises about 60% of the total wall, while cellulose and the fucans each make-up about 20% of the remainder. During the extracellular assembly of this wall, the intracellular levels of the storage glucan laminaran

  10. Wall Interference Study of the NTF Slotted Tunnel Using Bodies of Revolution Wall Signature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Venkit; Kuhl, David D.; Walker, Eric L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is a description of the analysis of blockage corrections for bodies of revolution for the slotted-wall configuration of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). A wall correction method based on the measured wall signature is used. Test data from three different-sized blockage bodies and four wall ventilation settings were analyzed at various Mach numbers and unit Reynolds numbers. The results indicate that with the proper selection of the boundary condition parameters, the wall correction method can predict blockage corrections consistent with the wall measurements for Mach numbers as high as 0.95.

  11. Secondary cell walls: biosynthesis and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Campbell, Liam; Turner, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Secondary cell walls (SCWs) are produced by specialized plant cell types, and are particularly important in those cells providing mechanical support or involved in water transport. As the main constituent of plant biomass, secondary cell walls are central to attempts to generate second-generation biofuels. Partly as a consequence of this renewed economic importance, excellent progress has been made in understanding how cell wall components are synthesized. SCWs are largely composed of three main polymers: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. In this review, we will attempt to highlight the most recent progress in understanding the biosynthetic pathways for secondary cell wall components, how these pathways are regulated, and how this knowledge may be exploited to improve cell wall properties that facilitate breakdown without compromising plant growth and productivity. While knowledge of individual components in the pathway has improved dramatically, how they function together to make the final polymers and how these individual polymers are incorporated into the wall remain less well understood.

  12. Seismic behavior of geogrid reinforced slag wall

    SciTech Connect

    Edincliler, Ayse; Baykal, Gokhan; Saygili, Altug

    2008-07-08

    Flexible retaining structures are known with their high performance under earthquake loads. In geogrid reinforced walls the performance of the fill material and the interface of the fill and geogrid controls the performance. Geosynthetic reinforced walls in seismic regions must be safe against not only static forces but also seismic forces. The objective of this study is to determine the behavior of a geogrid reinforced slag wall during earthquake by using shaking table experiments. This study is composed of three stages. In the first stage the physical properties of the material to be used were determined. In the second part, a case history involving the use of slag from steel industry in the construction of geogrid reinforced wall is presented. In the third stage, the results of shaking table tests conducted using model geogrid wall with slag are given. From the results, it is seen that slag can be used as fill material for geogrid reinforced walls subjected to earthquake loads.

  13. Collective magnetism at multiferroic vortex domain walls.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yanan; Lee, N; Choi, Y J; Cheong, S-W; Wu, Weida

    2012-12-12

    Cross-coupled phenomena of multiferroic domains and domain walls are of fundamental scientific and technological interest. Using cryogenic magnetic force microscopy, we find alternating net magnetic moments at ferroelectric domain walls around vortex cores in multiferroic hexagonal ErMnO(3), which correlate with each other throughout the entire vortex network. This collective nature of domain wall magnetism originates from the uncompensated Er(3+) moments at domain walls and the self-organization of the vortex network. Our results demonstrate that the collective domain wall magnetism can be controlled by external magnetic fields and represent a major advancement in the manipulation of local magnetic moments by harnessing cross-coupled domain walls.

  14. Parvalbumin interneurons and calretinin fibers arising from the thalamic nucleus reuniens degenerate in the subiculum after kainic acid-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Drexel, M; Preidt, A P; Kirchmair, E; Sperk, G

    2011-08-25

    The subiculum is the major output area of the hippocampus. It is closely interconnected with the entorhinal cortex and other parahippocampal areas. In animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in TLE patients it exerts increased network excitability and may crucially contribute to the propagation of limbic seizures. Using immunohistochemistry and in situ-hybridization we now investigated neuropathological changes affecting parvalbumin and calretinin containing neurons in the subiculum and other parahippocampal areas after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. We observed prominent losses in parvalbumin containing interneurons in the subiculum and entorhinal cortex, and in the principal cell layers of the pre- and parasubiculum. Degeneration of parvalbumin-positive neurons was associated with significant precipitation of parvalbumin-immunoreactive debris 24 h after kainic acid injection. In the subiculum the superficial portion of the pyramidal cell layer was more severely affected than its deep part. In the entorhinal cortex, the deep layers were more severely affected than the superficial ones. The decrease in number of parvalbumin-positive neurons in the subiculum and entorhinal cortex correlated with the number of spontaneous seizures subsequently experienced by the rats. The loss of parvalbumin neurons thus may contribute to the development of spontaneous seizures. On the other hand, surviving parvalbumin neurons revealed markedly increased expression of parvalbumin mRNA notably in the pyramidal cell layer of the subiculum and in all layers of the entorhinal cortex. This indicates increased activity of these neurons aiming to compensate for the partial loss of this functionally important neuron population. Furthermore, calretinin-positive fibers terminating in the molecular layer of the subiculum, in sector CA1 of the hippocampus proper and in the entorhinal cortex degenerated together with their presumed perikarya in the thalamic nucleus reuniens. In

  15. Role of dioxygenase α-DOX2 and SA in basal response and in hexanoic acid-induced resistance of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants against Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Carlos; de la O Leyva, María; Finiti, Ivan; López-Cruz, Jaime; Fernández-Crespo, Emma; García-Agustín, Pilar; González-Bosch, Carmen

    2015-03-01

    Resistance of tomato (Solanum Lycopersicum) to the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea requires complex interplay between hormonal signalling. In this study, we explored the involvement of new oxylipins in the tomato basal and induced response to this necrotroph through the functional analysis of the tomato α-dioxygenase2 (α-DOX2)-deficient mutant divaricata. We also investigated the role of SA in the defence response against this necrotrophic fungus using SA-deficient tomato nahG plants. The plants lacking dioxigenase α-DOX2, which catalyses oxylipins production from fatty acids, were more susceptible to Botrytis, and hexanoic acid-induced resistance (Hx-IR) was impaired; hence α-DOX2 is required for both tomato defence and the enhanced protection conferred by natural inducer hexanoic acid (Hx) against B. cinerea. The divaricata plants accumulated less pathogen-induced callose and presented lower levels of jasmonic acid (JA) and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) upon infection if compared to the wild type. Glutathion-S-transferase (GST) gene expression decreased and ROS production significantly increased in Botrytis-infected divaricata plants. These results indicate that absence of α-DOX2 influences the hormonal changes, oxidative burst and callose deposition that occur upon Botrytis infection in tomato. The study of SA-deficient nahG tomato plants showed that the plants with low SA levels displayed increased resistance to Botrytis, but were unable to display Hx-IR. This supports the involvement of SA in Hx-IR. NaghG plants displayed reduced callose and ROS accumulation upon infection and an increased GST expression. This reflects a positive relationship between SA and these defensive mechanisms in tomato. Finally, Hx boosted the pathogen-induced callose in nahG plants, suggesting that this priming mechanism is SA-independent. Our results support the involvement of the oxylipins pathway and SA in tomato response to Botrytis, probably through complex crosstalk of

  16. Conjugated linoleic acid-induced milk fat depression in lactating ewes is accompanied by reduced expression of mammary genes involved in lipid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hussein, M; Harvatine, K H; Weerasinghe, W M P B; Sinclair, L A; Bauman, D E

    2013-06-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are produced during rumen biohydrogenation and exert a range of biological effects. The trans-10,cis-12 CLA isomer is a potent inhibitor of milk fat synthesis in lactating dairy cows and some aspects of the mechanism have been established. Conjugated linoleic acid-induced milk fat depression has also been observed in small ruminants and our objective was to examine the molecular mechanism in lactating ewes. Multiparous lactating ewes were fed a basal ration (0.55:0.45 concentrate-to-forage ratio; dry matter basis) and randomly allocated to 2 dietary CLA levels (n=8 ewes/treatment). Treatments were zero CLA (control) or 15 g/d of lipid-encapsulated CLA supplement containing cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12 CLA isomers in equal proportions. Treatments were fed for 10 wk and the CLA supplement provided 1.5 g of trans-10,cis-12/d. No treatment effects were observed on milk yield or milk composition for protein or lactose at wk 10 of the study. In contrast, CLA treatment significantly decreased both milk fat percentage and milk fat yield (g/d) by about 23%. The de novo synthesized fatty acids (FA; C16) was increased (10%) for the CLA treatment. In agreement with the reduced de novo FA synthesis, mRNA abundance of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase α, FA synthase, stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1, and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 6 decreased by 25 to 40% in the CLA-treated group. Conjugated linoleic acid treatment did not significantly reduce the mRNA abundance of enzymes involved in NADPH production, but the mRNA abundance for sterol regulatory element-binding factor 1 and insulin-induced gene 1, genes involved in regulation of transcription of lipogenic enzymes, was decreased by almost 30 and 55%, respectively, with CLA treatment. Furthermore, mRNA abundance of lipoprotein lipase decreased by almost 40% due to CLA treatment

  17. Textural break foundation wall construction modules

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Steven J.

    1990-01-01

    Below-grade, textural-break foundation wall structures are provided for inhibiting diffusion and advection of liquids and gases into and out from a surrounding hydrogeologic environment. The foundation wall structure includes a foundation wall having an interior and exterior surface and a porous medium disposed around a portion of the exterior surface. The structure further includes a modular barrier disposed around a portion of the porous medium. The modular barrier is substantially removable from the hydrogeologic environment.

  18. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOEpatents

    Kosny, Jan; Gaskin, Sally

    2009-10-20

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  19. Blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruption with evisceration

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Ellen; Stawicki, Stanislaw PA; Bahner, David P

    2011-01-01

    Blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruptions associated with evisceration are very rare. The authors describe a case of traumatic abdominal wall disruption with bowel evisceration that occurred after a middle-aged woman sustained direct focal blunt force impact to the lower abdomen. Abdominal exploration and surgical repair of the abdominal wall defect were performed, with good clinical outcome. A brief overview of literature pertinent to this rare trauma scenario is presented. PMID:22229144

  20. Electron-wall Interaction in Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Raitses; D. Staack; M. Keidar; N.J. Fisch

    2005-02-11

    Electron-wall interaction effects in Hall thrusters are studied through measurements of the plasma response to variations of the thruster channel width and the discharge voltage. The discharge voltage threshold is shown to separate two thruster regimes. Below this threshold, the electron energy gain is constant in the acceleration region and therefore, secondary electron emission (SEE) from the channel walls is insufficient to enhance electron energy losses at the channel walls. Above this voltage threshold, the maximum electron temperature saturates.

  1. First wall for polarized fusion reactors

    DOEpatents

    Greenside, Henry S.; Budny, Robert V.; Post, Jr., Douglass E.

    1988-01-01

    Depolarization mechanisms arising from the recycling of the polarized fuel at the limiter and the first-wall of a fusion reactor are greater than those mechanisms in the plasma. Rapid depolarization of the plasma is prevented by providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec.sup.-1.

  2. Explosive Fragmentation of Dividing Walls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    their assistance in conducting the experiments and to Mlles. Donna K. Watiters and Norma Sandoval for their assistance in reducing the data. A1...SUPPORTED 102 10 -64 3.51 10 11 SIDE SU~PPORTED Rs 5.03 +TO swSYMBOL RS T - 3.51 kg/rn 1 2 A 2 2 r a0.60 2. 3 13.143. ISO . 158. 16.5. 173. 180, 188, 195...T Test Spac ing Thickness W R ISO . (ms o (g i) uwr 20 25.4 80.96 0.454 0.146 Wall is cracked at the base and at both side restraints but did not shear

  3. Plant cell walls to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Bowman, Michael J; Braker, Jay D; Dien, Bruce S; Hector, Ronald E; Lee, Charles C; Mertens, Jeffrey A; Wagschal, Kurt

    2012-03-01

    Conversion of plant cell walls to ethanol constitutes second generation bioethanol production. The process consists of several steps: biomass selection/genetic modification, physiochemical pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, fermentation and separation. Ultimately, it is desirable to combine as many of the biochemical steps as possible in a single organism to achieve CBP (consolidated bioprocessing). A commercially ready CBP organism is currently unreported. Production of second generation bioethanol is hindered by economics, particularly in the cost of pretreatment (including waste management and solvent recovery), the cost of saccharification enzymes (particularly exocellulases and endocellulases displaying kcat ~1 s-1 on crystalline cellulose), and the inefficiency of co-fermentation of 5- and 6-carbon monosaccharides (owing in part to redox cofactor imbalances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

  4. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  5. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  6. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  7. A Near-Wall Reynolds-Stress Closure without Wall Normals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. P.; So, R. M. C.

    1997-01-01

    With the aid of near-wall asymptotic analysis and results of direct numerical simulation, a new near-wall Reynolds stress model (NNWRS) is formulated based on the SSG high-Reynolds-stress model with wall-independent near-wall corrections. Only one damping function is used for flows with a wide range of Reynolds numbers to ensure that the near-wall modifications diminish away from the walls. The model is able to reproduce complicated flow phenomena induced by complex geometry, such as flow recirculation, reattachment and boundary-layer redevelopment in backward-facing step flow and secondary flow in three-dimensional square duct flow. In simple flows, including fully developed channel/pipe flow, Couette flow and boundary-layer flow, the wall effects are dominant, and the NNWRS model predicts less degree of turbulent anisotropy in the near-wall region compared with a wall-dependent near-wall Reynolds Stress model (NWRS) developed by So and colleagues. The comparison of the predictions given by the two models rectifies the misconception that the overshooting of skin friction coefficient in backward-facing step flow prevalent in those near-wall, models with wall normal is caused by he use of wall normal.

  8. Domain walls in antiferromagnetically coupled multilayer films.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Olav; Berger, Andreas; Fullerton, Eric E

    2003-11-07

    We report experimentally observed magnetic domain-wall structures in antiferromagnetically coupled multilayer films with perpendicular anisotropy. Our studies reveal a first-order phase transition from domain walls with no net moment to domain walls with ferromagnetic cores. The transition originates from the competition between dipolar and exchange energies, which we tune by means of layer thickness. Although observed in a synthetic antiferromagnetic system, such domain-wall structures may be expected to occur in A-type antiferromagnets with anisotropic exchange coupling.

  9. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  10. First wall for polarized fusion reactors

    DOEpatents

    Greenside, H.S.; Budny, R.V.; Post, D.E. Jr.

    1985-01-29

    A first-wall or first-wall coating for use in a fusion reactor having polarized fuel may be formed of a low-Z non-metallic material having slow spin relaxation, i.e., a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/. Materials having these properties include hydrogenated and deuterated amorphous semiconductors. A method for preventing the rapid depolarization of a polarized plasma in a fusion device may comprise the step of providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/.

  11. Pollen wall development in flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Stephen; Wortley, Alexandra H; Skvarla, John J; Rowley, John R

    2007-01-01

    The outer pollen wall, or exine, is more structurally complex than any other plant cell wall, comprising several distinct layers, each with its own organizational pattern. Since elucidation of the basic events of pollen wall ontogeny using electron microscopy in the 1970s, knowledge of their developmental genetics has increased enormously. However, self-assembly processes that are not under direct genetic control also play an important role in pollen wall patterning. This review integrates ultrastructural and developmental findings with recent models for self-assembly in an attempt to understand the origins of the morphological complexity and diversity that underpin the science of palynology.

  12. Large-eddy simulations with wall models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabot, W.

    1995-01-01

    The near-wall viscous and buffer regions of wall-bounded flows generally require a large expenditure of computational resources to be resolved adequately, even in large-eddy simulation (LES). Often as much as 50% of the grid points in a computational domain are devoted to these regions. The dense grids that this implies also generally require small time steps for numerical stability and/or accuracy. It is commonly assumed that the inner wall layers are near equilibrium, so that the standard logarithmic law can be applied as the boundary condition for the wall stress well away from the wall, for example, in the logarithmic region, obviating the need to expend large amounts of grid points and computational time in this region. This approach is commonly employed in LES of planetary boundary layers, and it has also been used for some simple engineering flows. In order to calculate accurately a wall-bounded flow with coarse wall resolution, one requires the wall stress as a boundary condition. The goal of this work is to determine the extent to which equilibrium and boundary layer assumptions are valid in the near-wall regions, to develop models for the inner layer based on such assumptions, and to test these modeling ideas in some relatively simple flows with different pressure gradients, such as channel flow and flow over a backward-facing step. Ultimately, models that perform adequately in these situations will be applied to more complex flow configurations, such as an airfoil.

  13. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Burke, David; Kaufman, Peter; McNeil, Michael; Albersheim, Peter

    1974-01-01

    The primary cell walls of six suspension-cultured monocots and of a single suspension-cultured gymnosperm have been investigated with the following results: (a) the compositions of all six monocot cell walls are remarkably similar, despite the fact that the cell cultures were derived from diverse tissues; (b) the cell walls of suspension-cultured monocots differ substantially from those of suspension-cultured dicots and from the suspension-cultured gymnosperm; (c) an arabinoxylan is a major component (40% or more by weight) of monocot primary cell walls; (d) mixed β-1,3; β-1,4-glucans were found only in the cell wall preparations of rye grass endosperm cells, and not in the cell walls of any of the other five monocot cell cultures nor in the walls of suspension-cultured Douglas fir cells; (e) the monocot primary cell walls studied contain from 9 to 14% cellulose, 7 to 18% uronic acids, and 7 to 17% protein; (f) hydroxyproline accounts for less than 0.2% of the cell walls of monocots. Similar data on the soluble extracellular polysaccharides secreted by these cells are included. PMID:16658824

  14. Mechanics of the Toxoplasma gondii oocyst wall

    PubMed Central

    Dumètre, Aurélien; Dubey, Jitender P.; Ferguson, David J. P.; Bongrand, Pierre; Azas, Nadine; Puech, Pierre-Henri

    2013-01-01

    The ability of microorganisms to survive under extreme conditions is closely related to the physicochemical properties of their wall. In the ubiquitous protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, the oocyst stage possesses a bilayered wall that protects the dormant but potentially infective parasites from harsh environmental conditions until their ingestion by the host. None of the common disinfectants are effective in killing the parasite because the oocyst wall acts as a primary barrier to physical and chemical attacks. Here, we address the structure and chemistry of the wall of the T. gondii oocyst by combining wall surface treatments, fluorescence imaging, EM, and measurements of its mechanical characteristics by using atomic force microscopy. Elasticity and indentation measurements indicated that the oocyst wall resembles common plastic materials, based on the Young moduli, E, evaluated by atomic force microscopy. Our study demonstrates that the inner layer is as robust as the bilayered wall itself. Besides wall mechanics, our results suggest important differences regarding the nonspecific adhesive properties of each layer. All together, these findings suggest a key biological role for the oocyst wall mechanics in maintaining the integrity of the T. gondii oocysts in the environment or after exposure to disinfectants, and therefore their potential infectivity to humans and animals. PMID:23798399

  15. Relevant surgical anatomy of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Babu V; Rajesh, Pala B

    2010-11-01

    The chest wall, like other regional anatomy, is a remarkable fusion of form and function. Principal functions are the protection of internal viscera and an expandable cylinder facilitating variable gas flow into the lungs. Knowledge of the anatomy of the whole cylinder (ribs, sternum, vertebra, diaphragm, intercostal spaces, and extrathoracic muscles) is therefore not only important in the local environment of a specific chest wall resection but also in its relation to overall function. An understanding of chest wall kinematics might help define the loss of function after resection and the effects of various chest wall substitutes. Therefore, this article is not an exhaustive anatomic description but a focused summary and discussion.

  16. Corrections to the thin wall approximation in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfinkle, David; Gregory, Ruth

    1989-01-01

    The question is considered whether the thin wall formalism of Israel applies to the gravitating domain walls of a lambda phi(exp 4) theory. The coupled Einstein-scalar equations that describe the thick gravitating wall are expanded in powers of the thickness of the wall. The solutions of the zeroth order equations reproduce the results of the usual Israel thin wall approximation for domain walls. The solutions of the first order equations provide corrections to the expressions for the stress-energy of the wall and to the Israel thin wall equations. The modified thin wall equations are then used to treat the motion of spherical and planar domain walls.

  17. Electromagnetic approaches to wall characterization, wall mitigation, and antenna design for through-the-wall radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thajudeen, Christopher

    Through-the-wall imaging (TWI) is a topic of current interest due to its wide range of public safety, law enforcement, and defense applications. Among the various available technologies such as, acoustic, thermal, and optical imaging, which can be employed to sense and image targets of interest, electromagnetic (EM) imaging, in the microwave frequency bands, is the most widely utilized technology and has been at the forefront of research in recent years. The primary objectives for any Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging (TWRI) system are to obtain a layout of the building and/or inner rooms, detect if there are targets of interest including humans or weapons, determine if there are countermeasures being employed to further obscure the contents of a building or room of interest, and finally to classify the detected targets. Unlike conventional radar scenarios, the presence of walls, made of common construction materials such as brick, drywall, plywood, cinder block, and solid concrete, adversely affects the ability of any conventional imaging technique to properly image targets enclosed within building structures as the propagation through the wall can induce shadowing effects on targets of interest which may result in image degradation, errors in target localization, and even complete target masking. For many applications of TWR systems, the wall ringing signals are strong enough to mask the returns from targets not located a sufficient distance behind the wall, beyond the distance of the wall ringing, and thus without proper wall mitigation, target detection becomes extremely difficult. The results presented in this thesis focus on the development of wall parameter estimation, and intra-wall and wall-type characterization techniques for use in both the time and frequency domains as well as analysis of these techniques under various real world scenarios such as reduced system bandwidth scenarios, various wall backing scenarios, the case of inhomogeneous walls, presence

  18. Phase-averaged wall shear stress, wall pressure, and near-wall velocity field measurements in a whirling annular seal

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.L.; Winslow, R.B.; Thames, H.D. III

    1996-07-01

    The flow field inside a 50 percent eccentric whirling annular seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6600 has been measured using a three-dimensional laser-Doppler anemometer system. Flush mount pressure and wall shear stress probes have been used to measure the stresses (normal and shear) along the length of the stator. The rotor was mounted eccentrically on the shaft so that the rotor orbit was circular and rotated at the same speed as the shaft (a whirl ratio of 1.0). This paper presents mean pressure, mean wall shear stress magnitude, and mean wall shear stress direction distributions along the length of the seal. Phase-averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase-averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall, where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure, and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  19. 8. NORTHWEST WALL OF AR8, ALSO SHOWING THE SOUTHWEST WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. NORTHWEST WALL OF AR-8, ALSO SHOWING THE SOUTHWEST WALL AND THE CREW SHELTER AT FAR RIGHT. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base, Rammed Earth Aircraft Dispersal Revetments, Western Shore of Rogers Dry Lake, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. Analysis of dynamic diffuse wall based on two-dimensional twist wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, T.; Kumosaki, K.; Inoue, M.

    1981-03-01

    The mechanism and the dynamic properties of the dynamic diffuse wall observed in Garnet bubbles have been analyzed based on two dimensional twist wall with a finite film thickness. The analysis reveals that during wall motion, 360 °-spin twist nucleates inside the wall and propagates along the film thickness. The wall distortion takes place where the 360 °-twist appears. Annihilation and/or accumulation of the 360 °-twist occurs at the film surface. The number of the 360 °-twists contained in a wall increases with increasing drive and in-plane fields, which leads to an increase of the apparent wall width obtained by domain walls observed by transmitted light (Faraday effect). Most of the experimental results may be well interpreted by the present analysis.

  1. A wall interference assessment/correction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.

    1993-01-01

    A Wall Signature method originally developed by Hackett was selected to be adapted for the Ames 12-ft Wind Tunnel Wall Interference Assessment/Correction (WIAC) System in the project. This method uses limited measurements of the static pressure at the wall, in conjunction with the solid wall boundary condition, to determine the strength and distribution of singularities representing the test article. The singularities are used in turn for estimating wall interference at the model location. The lifting interference will be treated separately by representing in a horseshoe vortex system for the model's lifting effects. The development and implementation of a working prototype will be completed, delivered, and documented with a software manual. The WIAC code will be validated by conducting numerically simulated experiments rather than actual wind tunnel experiments. The simulations will be used to generate both free-air and confined wind-tunnel flow fields for each of the test articles over a range of test configurations. Specifically, the pressure signature at the test section wall will be computed for the tunnel case to provide the simulated 'measured' data. These data will serve as the input for the WIAC method - Wall Signature method. The performance of the WIAC method then may be evaluated by comparing the corrected parameters with those for the free-air simulation. The following two additional tasks are included in the supplement No. 1 to the basic Grant. On-line wall interference calculation: The developed wall signature method (modified Hackett's method) for Ames 12-ft Tunnel will be the pre-computed coefficients which facilitate the on-line calculation of wall interference; and support system effects estimation: The effects on the wall pressure measurements due to the presence of the model support systems will be evaluated.

  2. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1" to 1 1/2"), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  3. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1” to 1 ½”), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  4. 7. NORTH WALL AND NORTHWEST WALL OF AR8, ALSO SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. NORTH WALL AND NORTHWEST WALL OF AR-8, ALSO SHOWING THE EAST END OF THE SOUTH WALL IN THE DISTANCE. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base, Rammed Earth Aircraft Dispersal Revetments, Western Shore of Rogers Dry Lake, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. Indirect localization of a magnetic domain wall mediated by quasi walls.

    PubMed

    Lacour, D; Montaigne, F; Rougemaille, N; Belkhou, R; Raabe, J; Hehn, M

    2015-05-26

    The manipulation of magnetic domain walls in thin films and nanostructures opens new opportunities for fundamental and applied research. But controlling reliably the position of a moving domain wall still remains challenging. So far, most of the studies aimed at understanding the physics of pinning and depinning processes in the magnetic layer in which the wall moves (active layer). In these studies, the role of other magnetic layers in the stack has been often ignored. Here, we report an indirect localization process of 180° domain walls that occurs in magnetic tunnel junctions, commonly used in spintronics. Combining Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy and micromagnetic simulations, magnetic configurations in both layers are resolved. When nucleating a 180° domain wall in the active layer, a quasi wall is created in the reference layer, atop the wall. The wall and its quasi wall must then be moved or positioned together, as a unique object. As a mutual effect, a localized change of the magnetic properties in the reference layer induces a localized quasi wall in the active layer. The two types of quasi walls are shown to be responsible for an indirect localization process of the 180° domain wall in the active layer.

  6. Differential scanning calorimetry of plant cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Liangshiou; Varner, J.E. ); Yuen, H.K. )

    1991-03-15

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry has been used to study the phase transition of cell wall preparations of the elongating and mature regions of soybean hypocotyls and of celery epidermis and collenchyma strands. A step-like transition believed to be glass transition was observed in walls isolated from the elongating region of soybean hypocotyls at 52.9C. Addition of 1 mM CaCl{sub 2} to the cell wall preparation increased the transition temperature to 60.8C and greatly reduced the transition magnitude. In walls from the mature region, the transition was small and occurred at a higher temperature (60.1C). Addition of calcium to the mature region cell wall had little effect on the transition. Based on the known interactions between calcium and pectin, the authors propose that calcium affects the glass transition by binding to the polygalacturonate backbone of wall pectin, resulting in a more rigid wall with a smaller transition at a higher temperature. The mature region either has more calcium in the wall or has more methyl-esterified pectin, making it less responsive to added calcium.

  7. Revisiting the Ladder on a Wall Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salu, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    The problem of a ladder leaning on a wall has been a staple of introductory physics for years. It is discussed in numerous physics textbooks and in journals. Now, it even has an Internet presence. Postings from students seek help for "ladder on a wall" problems. A quick review of those postings would show that they all deal with frictionless…

  8. 14 CFR 121.245 - Fire walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fire walls. 121.245 Section 121.245 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.245 Fire walls. Each...

  9. 14 CFR 121.245 - Fire walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fire walls. 121.245 Section 121.245 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.245 Fire walls. Each...

  10. 14 CFR 121.245 - Fire walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire walls. 121.245 Section 121.245 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.245 Fire walls. Each...

  11. 14 CFR 121.245 - Fire walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fire walls. 121.245 Section 121.245 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.245 Fire walls. Each...

  12. 14 CFR 121.245 - Fire walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fire walls. 121.245 Section 121.245 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.245 Fire walls. Each...

  13. Artificial Climbing Wall Design and Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinnamon, Jerry

    Climbing walls can be designed to satisfy the needs of both untrained and experienced climbers offering these people a place to learn their craft as well as a place for them to keep their skills honed during off seasons. Users of the artificial wall can be classified into special groups, such as "Youth at Risk," who are engaged in…

  14. Do plant cell walls have a code?

    PubMed

    Tavares, Eveline Q P; Buckeridge, Marcos S

    2015-12-01

    A code is a set of rules that establish correspondence between two worlds, signs (consisting of encrypted information) and meaning (of the decrypted message). A third element, the adaptor, connects both worlds, assigning meaning to a code. We propose that a Glycomic Code exists in plant cell walls where signs are represented by monosaccharides and phenylpropanoids and meaning is cell wall architecture with its highly complex association of polymers. Cell wall biosynthetic mechanisms, structure, architecture and properties are addressed according to Code Biology perspective, focusing on how they oppose to cell wall deconstruction. Cell wall hydrolysis is mainly focused as a mechanism of decryption of the Glycomic Code. Evidence for encoded information in cell wall polymers fine structure is highlighted and the implications of the existence of the Glycomic Code are discussed. Aspects related to fine structure are responsible for polysaccharide packing and polymer-polymer interactions, affecting the final cell wall architecture. The question whether polymers assembly within a wall display similar properties as other biological macromolecules (i.e. proteins, DNA, histones) is addressed, i.e. do they display a code?

  15. [The cell wall of Coelastrum (Chlorophycees)].

    PubMed

    Reymond, O

    1975-01-01

    The cell wall of Coelastrum is usually composed of three layers. The outermost layer was studied most extensively. It consists of erect tubules which often bear long bristles whose function may be to stabilize the algae in its enviroment. The cell wall can modify its morphology according to the enviroment.

  16. Mechanics of the Toxoplasma gondii oocyst wall

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of microorganisms to survive under extreme conditions is closely related to the physicochemical properties of their wall. In the ubiquitous protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, the oocyst stage possesses a bilayered wall that protects the dormant but potentially infective parasites from...

  17. Biosynthesis: Imaging cell-wall biosynthesis live

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugg, Timothy D. H.

    2013-01-01

    The biosynthesis of peptidoglycan is an important step in bacterial cell division and cell-wall maturation. Now it has been shown that fluorescent D-amino acids can be used to label the peptidoglycan cell wall of living bacteria, providing a new tool to study this important process.

  18. Turbulence measurements in curved wall jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodman, L. C.; Wood, N. J.; Roberts, L.

    1987-01-01

    Accurate turbulence measurements taken in wall jet flows are difficult to obtain, due to high intensity turbulence and problems in achieving two-dimensionality. The problem is compounded when streamwise curvature of the flow is introduced, since the jet entrainment and turbulence levels are greatly increased over the equivalent planar values. In this experiment, two-dimensional plane and curved wall jet flows are simulated by having a jet blow axially over a cylinder. In the plane case the cylinder has constant transverse radius, and in the curved cases the cylinder has a varying transverse radius. Although the wall jet in these cases is axisymmetric, adequate 'two-dimensional' flow can be obtained as long as the ratio of the jet width to the cylinder radius is small. The annular wall jet has several advantages over wall jets issuing from finite rectangular slots. Since the slot has no ends, three-dimensional effects caused by the finite length of the slot and side wall interference are eliminated. Also, the transverse curvature of the wall allows close optical access to the surface using a Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) system. Hot wire measurements and some LDV measurements are presented for plane and curved wall jet flows. An integral analysis is used to assess the effects of transverse curvature on the turbulent shear stress. The analysis and the data show that the effects of transverse curvature on both the mean flow and the shear stress are small enough for two-dimensional flow to be approximately satisfactorily.

  19. Risk Assessment of Energy-Efficient Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Pallin, Simon B.; Hun, Diana E.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Kehrer, Manfred

    2014-12-01

    This multi-year project aims to provide the residential construction industry with energy-efficient wall designs that are moisture durable. The present work focused on the initial step of this project, which is to develop a moisture durability protocol that identifies energy efficient wall designs that have a low probability of experiencing moisture problems.

  20. Safranine fluorescent staining of wood cell walls.

    PubMed

    Bond, J; Donaldson, L; Hill, S; Hitchcock, K

    2008-06-01

    Safranine is an azo dye commonly used for plant microscopy, especially as a stain for lignified tissues such as xylem. Safranine fluorescently labels the wood cell wall, producing green/yellow fluorescence in the secondary cell wall and red/orange fluorescence in the middle lamella (ML) region. We examined the fluorescence behavior of safranine under blue light excitation using a variety of wood- and fiber-based samples of known composition to interpret the observed color differentiation of different cell wall types. We also examined the basis for the differences in fluorescence emission using spectral confocal microscopy to examine lignin-rich and cellulose-rich cell walls including reaction wood and decayed wood compared to normal wood. Our results indicate that lignin-rich cell walls, such as the ML of tracheids, the secondary wall of compression wood tracheids, and wood decayed by brown rot, tend to fluoresce red or orange, while cellulose-rich cell walls such as resin canals, wood decayed by white rot, cotton fibers and the G-layer of tension wood fibers, tend to fluoresce green/yellow. This variation in fluorescence emission seems to be due to factors including an emission shift toward red wavelengths combined with dye quenching at shorter wavelengths in regions with high lignin content. Safranine fluorescence provides a useful way to differentiate lignin-rich and cellulose-rich cell walls without counterstaining as required for bright field microscopy.

  1. Ballistic Limit Equation for Single Wall Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratliff, J. M.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Bryant, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests and hydrocode simulations were used to determine the ballistic limit equation (BLE) for perforation of a titanium wall, as a function of wall thickness. Two titanium alloys were considered, and separate BLEs were derived for each. Tested wall thicknesses ranged from 0.5mm to 2.0mm. The single-wall damage equation of Cour-Palais [ref. 1] was used to analyze the Ti wall's shielding effectiveness. It was concluded that the Cour-Palais single-wall equation produced a non-conservative prediction of the ballistic limit for the Ti shield. The inaccurate prediction was not a particularly surprising result; the Cour-Palais single-wall BLE contains shield material properties as parameters, but it was formulated only from tests of different aluminum alloys. Single-wall Ti shield tests were run (thicknesses of 2.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 0.5 mm) on Ti 15-3-3-3 material custom cut from rod stock. Hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were used to establish the failure threshold empirically, using the additional constraint that the damage scales with impact energy, as was indicated by hydrocode simulations. The criterion for shield failure was defined as no detached spall from the shield back surface during HVI. Based on the test results, which confirmed an approximately energy-dependent shield effectiveness, the Cour-Palais equation was modified.

  2. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-10-28

    A serpentine coolant flow path is formed by inner walls in a cavity between pressure and suction side walls of a turbine airfoil, the cavity partitioned by one or more transverse partitions into a plurality of continuous serpentine cooling flow streams each having a respective coolant inlet.

  3. Steel shear walls, behavior, modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Astaneh-Asl, Abolhassan

    2008-07-08

    In recent years steel shear walls have become one of the more efficient lateral load resisting systems in tall buildings. The basic steel shear wall system consists of a steel plate welded to boundary steel columns and boundary steel beams. In some cases the boundary columns have been concrete-filled steel tubes. Seismic behavior of steel shear wall systems during actual earthquakes and based on laboratory cyclic tests indicates that the systems are quite ductile and can be designed in an economical way to have sufficient stiffness, strength, ductility and energy dissipation capacity to resist seismic effects of strong earthquakes. This paper, after summarizing the past research, presents the results of two tests of an innovative steel shear wall system where the boundary elements are concrete-filled tubes. Then, a review of currently available analytical models of steel shear walls is provided with a discussion of capabilities and limitations of each model. We have observed that the tension only 'strip model', forming the basis of the current AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls, is not capable of predicting the behavior of steel shear walls with length-to-thickness ratio less than about 600 which is the range most common in buildings. The main reasons for such shortcomings of the AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls is that it ignores the compression field in the shear walls, which can be significant in typical shear walls. The AISC method also is not capable of incorporating stresses in the shear wall due to overturning moments. A more rational seismic design procedure for design of shear walls proposed in 2000 by the author is summarized in the paper. The design method, based on procedures used for design of steel plate girders, takes into account both tension and compression stress fields and is applicable to all values of length-to-thickness ratios of steel shear walls. The method is also capable of including the effect of

  4. Accelerating forward genetics for cell wall deconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Vidaurre, Danielle; Bonetta, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The elucidation of the genes involved in cell wall synthesis and assembly remains one of the biggest challenges of cell wall biology. Although traditional genetic approaches, using simple yet elegant screens, have identified components of the cell wall, many unknowns remain. Exhausting the genetic toolbox by performing sensitized screens, adopting chemical genetics or combining these with improved cell wall imaging, hold the promise of new gene discovery and function. With the recent introduction of next-generation sequencing technologies, it is now possible to quickly and efficiently map and clone genes of interest in record time. The combination of a classical genetics approach and cutting edge technology will propel cell wall biology in plants forward into the future. PMID:22685448

  5. The interaction of transverse domain walls.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Benjamin

    2012-01-18

    The interaction between transverse domain walls is calculated analytically using a multipole expansion up to third order. Starting from an analytical expression for the magnetization in the wall, the monopole, dipole, and quadrupole moments are derived and their impact on the interaction is investigated using the surface and volume charges. The surface charges are important for the dipole moment while the volume charges constitute the monopole and quadrupole moments. For domain walls that are situated in different wires it is found that there is a strong deviation from the interaction of two monopoles. This deviation is caused by the interaction of the monopole of the wall in the first wire with the dipole of the wall in the second wire and vice versa. The dipole-dipole and the quadrupole-monopole interactions are found to be also of considerable size and non-negligible. A comparison with micromagnetic simulations shows a good agreement.

  6. 2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Cosgrove

    2004-09-21

    This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

  7. Through-the-wall polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Fauzia; Amin, Moeness G.

    2008-04-01

    Through-the-Wall Imaging is emerging as an affordable sensor technology supporting a variety of applications, such as surveillance and reconnaissance, emergency rescue, and firefighting. Motivated by the desire to understand the underlying phenomenology and performance bounds associated with imaging targets behind walls, several through-the-wall imaging experiments were conducted at the Center for Advanced Communications (CAC), Villanova University. These experiments aimed at supporting resolution, polarization, and localization of indoor targets and objects behind walls, and provided valuable dual-polarized synthetic aperture data measurements of indoor scenes of different complexity and population. In this paper, we present full-polarization imaging results, for a setting of calibrated reflectors behind a typical exterior grade wall. These imaging results provide polarimetric scene characterization and are shown to be in good agreement with the ground truth.

  8. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-07

    We simulate “automotion,” the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20 nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

  9. Metal stud wall systems -- Thermal disaster, or modern wall systems with highly efficient thermal insulation?

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.

    1997-11-01

    Because steel has higher thermal conductivity than wood and intense heat transfer occurs through the metal wall components, thermal performances of a metal stud wall are significantly lower than for similar wood stud walls. A reduction of the in-cavity R-value caused by the wood studs is about 10% in wood stud walls. That is why metal stud walls are believed to be considerably less thermally effective than similar made of wood. However, properly designed metal stud walls can be as thermally effective as wood stud walls. Relatively high R-values may be achieved by installing insulating sheathing, which is widely used as a remedy for a weak thermal performance of metal stud walls. A series of the promising metal stud wall configurations is analyzed using results of finite difference computer modeling and guarded hotbox tests. Some of these walls were designed and tested in the ORNL Building Technology Center, some were tested in other laboratories, and some walls were developed and forgotten long time ago. Also, a novel concept of combined foam-metal studs is considered. The main aim of the present paper is to prove that it is possible to build metal stud walls which perform as well as wood stud walls. The key lies in designing; metal stud wall systems have to be treated in a special way with particular consideration to the high thermal conduction of metal components. In the discussed collection of the efficient metal stud wall configurations, reductions of the in-cavity R-value caused by metal studs are between 10 and 20%.

  10. A wall interference assessment/correction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, C. F.

    1994-01-01

    A Wall Signature method originally developed by Hackett has been selected to be adapted for the Ames 12-ft Wind Tunnel WIAC system in the project. This method uses limited measurements of the static pressure at the wall, in conjunction with the solid wall boundary condition, to determine the strength and distribution of singularities representing the test article. The singularities are used in turn for estimating wall interference at the model location. The development and implementation of a working prototype will be completed, delivered and documented with a software manual. The WIAC code will be validated by conducting numerically simulated experiments rather than actual wind tunnel experiments. The simulations will be used to generate both free-air and confined wind-tunnel flow fields for each of the test articles over a range of test configurations. Specifically, the pressure signature at the test section wall will be computed for the tunnel case to provide the simulated 'measured' data. These data will serve as the input for the WIAC method--Wall Signature method. The performance of the WIAC method then may be evaluated by comparing the corrected parameters with those for the free-air simulation. The following two additional tasks are included: (1) On-line wall interference calculation: The developed wall signature method (modified Hackett's method) for Ames 12-ft Tunnel will be the pre-computed coefficients which facilitate the on-line calculation of wall interference, and (2) Support system effects estimation: The effects on the wall pressure measurements due to the presence of the model support systems will be evaluated.

  11. Wall crossing, quivers and crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aganagic, Mina; Schaeffer, Kevin

    2012-10-01

    We study the spectrum of BPS D-branes on a Calabi-Yau manifold using the 0 + 1 dimensional quiver gauge theory that describes the dynamics of the branes at low energies. We argue that Seiberg dualities of the quiver correspond to crossing the "walls of the second kind" of Kontsevich and Soibelman. There is a large class of examples where the BPS degeneracies of quivers corresponding to one D6 brane bound to arbitrary numbers of D4, D2 and D0 branes are counted by melting crystal configurations. The shape of the crystal is determined by the Calabi-Yau geometry and the background B-field, and its microscopic structure by the quiver Q. We prove that the BPS degeneracies computed from Q and Q' are related by the Kontsevich-Soibelman formula. We also show that, in the limit of infinite B-field, the combinatorics of crystals becomes that of the topological vertex, thus re-deriving the Gromov-Witten/Donaldson-Thomas correspondence.

  12. Wall street comes to Washington.

    PubMed

    2004-08-01

    While health care cost trends likely will continue slowing through the end of 2004, the longer-term outlook for a sustained slowdown in underlying costs and private health insurance premiums largely depends on the strength of the economy, according to market and health policy experts at the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) ninth annual Wall Street roundtable. Even as cost growth slows, insurers are practicing pricing discipline to keep premium trends ahead of cost trends to maintain profitability. Employers will continue to shift costs to workers through higher deductibles, copayments and coinsurance, but an improving economy could temper this trend as labor markets tighten. Employers remain skeptical of new health insurance products, including tiered-provider networks and consumer-driven health plans. Although growth in hospital use has slowed, the industry remains in the throes of a building boom. Increased payments to managed care plans could reinvigorate private plan participation in Medicare, but concerns about the federal budget deficit could prompt Congress to roll back rate increases.

  13. Final Report for "Stabilization of resistive wall modes using moving metal walls"

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Cary B.

    2014-02-05

    The UW experiment used a linear pinch experiment to study the stabilization of MHD by moving metal walls. The methodology of the experiment had three steps. (1) Identify and understand the no-wall MHD instability limits and character, (2) identify and understand the thin-wall MHD instabilities (re- sistive wall mode), and then (3) add the spinning wall and understand its impact on stability properties. During the duration of the grant we accomplished all 3 of these goals, discovered new physics, and completed the experiment as proposed.

  14. Flow Characteristics of Plane Wall Jet with Side Walls on Both Sides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imao, Shigeki; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Kozato, Yasuaki; Hayashi, Takayasu

    Flow characteristics of a two-dimensional jet with side walls have been studied experimentally. Three kinds of cylindrical walls and a flat wall were provided as the side walls, and they were combined and attached to a nozzle. Nine types of side wall conditions were investigated. Velocity was measured by a hot-wire probe and the separation point was measured by a Pitot tube. Mean velocity profiles, the growth of the jet half-width, the decay of jet maximum velocity, and the attachment distance were clarified. When cylindrical walls with different radii are installed, the flow pattern changes markedly depending on the velocity of the jet. A striking increase in the jet half-width is related to the separation of flow from the smaller cylindrical wall just behind the nozzle.

  15. Wall shear stress measurement in blade end-wall corner region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhargava, R.; Raj, R.; Boldman, D. R.

    1987-01-01

    The magnitude and the direction of wall shear stress and surface pressure in the blade end-wall corner region were investigated. The measurements were obtained on a specially designed Preston tube, the tip of which could be concentrically rotated about its axis of rotation at the measurement location. The magnitude of wall shear stress in the vicinity of the corner was observed to increase significantly (170 percent) compared to its far-upstream value; the increase was consistently higher on the blade surface compared to the value on the plate surface of the blade end-wall corner. On both surfaces in the blade end-wall corner, the variation of the wall shear stress direction was found to be more predominant in the vicinity of the blade leading-edge location. The trend of the measured wall shear stress direction showed good agreement with the limiting streamline directions obtained from the flow visualization studies.

  16. Regeneration of near-wall turbulence structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, James M.; Kim, John J.; Waleffe, Fabian A.

    1993-01-01

    An examination of the regeneration mechanisms of near-wall turbulence and an attempt to investigate the critical Reynolds number conjecture of Waleffe & Kim is presented. The basis is an extension of the 'minimal channel' approach of Jimenez and Moin which emphasizes the near-wall region and further reduces the complexity of the turbulent flow. Reduction of the flow Reynolds number to the minimum value which will allow turbulence to be sustained has the effect of reducing the ratio of the largest scales to the smallest scales or, equivalently, of causing the near-wall region to fill more of the area between the channel walls. In addition, since each wall may have an active near-wall region, half of the channel is always somewhat redundant. If a plane Couette flow is instead chosen as the base flow, this redundancy is eliminated: the mean shear of a plane Couette flow has a single sign, and at low Reynolds numbers, the two wall regions share a single set of structures. A minimal flow with these modifications possesses, by construction, the strongest constraints which allow sustained turbulence, producing a greatly simplified flow in which the regeneration process can be examined.

  17. Chiral spin torque at magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Kwang-Su; Thomas, Luc; Yang, See-Hun; Parkin, Stuart

    2013-07-01

    Spin-polarized currents provide a powerful means of manipulating the magnetization of nanodevices, and give rise to spin transfer torques that can drive magnetic domain walls along nanowires. In ultrathin magnetic wires, domain walls are found to move in the opposite direction to that expected from bulk spin transfer torques, and also at much higher speeds. Here we show that this is due to two intertwined phenomena, both derived from spin-orbit interactions. By measuring the influence of magnetic fields on current-driven domain-wall motion in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni/Co trilayers, we find an internal effective magnetic field acting on each domain wall, the direction of which alternates between successive domain walls. This chiral effective field arises from a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction at the Co/Pt interfaces and, in concert with spin Hall currents, drives the domain walls in lock-step along the nanowire. Elucidating the mechanism for the manipulation of domain walls in ultrathin magnetic films will enable the development of new families of spintronic devices.

  18. Isolation of plant cell wall proteins.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Boudart, Georges; Borderies, Giséle; Charmont, Stephane; Lafitte, Claude; Rossignol, Michel; Canut, Herve; Pont-Lezica, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The quality of a proteomic analysis of a cell compartment strongly depends on the reliability of the isolation procedure for the cell compartment of interest. Plant cell walls possess specific drawbacks: (1) the lack of a surrounding membrane may result in the loss of cell wall proteins (CWP) during the isolation procedure; (2) polysaccharide networks of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins form potential traps for contaminants such as intracellular proteins; (3) the presence of proteins interacting in many different ways with the polysaccharide matrix require different procedures to elute them from the cell wall. Three categories of CWP are distinguished: labile proteins that have little or no interactions with cell wall components, weakly bound proteins extractable with salts, and strongly bound proteins. Two alternative protocols are decribed for cell wall proteomics: (1) nondestructive techniques allowing the extraction of labile or weakly bound CWP without damaging the plasma membrane; (2) destructive techniques to isolate cell walls from which weakly or strongly bound CWP can be extracted. These protocols give very low levels of contamination by intracellular proteins. Their application should lead to a realistic view of the cell wall proteome at least for labile and weakly bound CWP extractable by salts.

  19. Recent advances in plant cell wall proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Albenne, Cécile; Boudart, Georges; Irshad, Muhammad; Canut, Hervé; Pont-Lezica, Rafael

    2008-02-01

    The plant extracellular matrix contains typical polysaccharides such as cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins that interact to form dense interwoven networks. Plant cell walls play crucial roles during development and constitute the first barrier of defense against invading pathogens. Cell wall proteomics has greatly contributed to the description of the protein content of a compartment specific to plants. Around 400 cell wall proteins (CWPs) of Arabidopsis, representing about one fourth of its estimated cell wall proteome, have been described. The main points to note are that: (i) the diversity of enzymes acting on polysaccharides suggests a great plasticity of cell walls; (ii) CWPs such as proteases, polysaccharide hydrolytic enzymes, and lipases may contribute to the generation of signals; (iii) proteins of unknown functions were identified, suggesting new roles for cell walls. Recently, the characterization of PTMs such as N- and O-glycosylations improved our knowledge of CWP structure. The presence of many glycoside hydrolases and proteases suggests a complex regulation of CWPs involving various types of post-translational events. The first 3-D structures to be resolved gave clues about the interactions between CWPs, or between CWPs and polysaccharides. Future work should include: extracting and identifying CWPs still recalcitrant to proteomics, describing the cell wall interactome, improving quantification, and unraveling the roles of each of the CWPs.

  20. Polyphosphorylated fungal cell wall glycopeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Bonetti, S.J.; Black, B.; Gander, J.E.

    1987-05-01

    Penicillium charlesii secretes a 65 kDa peptidophosphogalactomannan (pPGM) containing 10 phosphodiester residues and 10 galactofuranosyl-containing galactin chains attached to a linear mannan; the polysaccharides is attached to a 3 kDa seryl- and threonyl-rich peptide. The authors have now isolated and partially characterized a form of pPGM released from mycelia of P. charlesii treated at 50/sup 0/C for 15, 30, 60 or 120 min. Two- to 3-fold more pPGM was released by heat treatment than is secreted. Crude pPGM, released by heat, was fractionated on DE-52 and was fractionated into two major fractions on the basis of its difference in negative charge. /sup 1/H-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy of these two fractions provided spectra very similar to that of secreted pPGM previously reported from this laboratory. /sup 1/H-decoupled /sup 31/P NMR showed major signals at 1.47, and 0.22 ppm and minor signals at 1.32, 1.15, 1.00, 0.91 and 0.76 ppm. These signals are upfield from phosphomonoesters and are in the region observed for (6-O-phosphorylcholine)- and (6-O-phosphorylethanolamine)-..cap alpha..-D-mannopyranosyl residues which are 0.22 and 0.90 ppm, respectively. These polymers contain 30 phosphodiester residues per molecule of 70 kDa mass compared with 10 phosphodiesters in secreted pPGM. Acid phosphatase and alkaline protease were the only lytic enzymes released by heat treatment. The evidence suggests that much of the pPGM is derived from cell walls; and that the polysaccharide is highly phosphorylated.