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Sample records for acid-induced writhing formalin

  1. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Gelsolin in Acetic Acid Induced Writhing, Tail Immersion and Carrageenan Induced Paw Edema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Parasar, Devraj; Sagar, Amin; Choudhary, Vikas; Chopra, Bhupinder Singh; Garg, Renu; Ashish; Khatri, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Plasma gelsolin levels significantly decline in several disease conditions, since gelsolin gets scavenged when it depolymerizes and caps filamentous actin released in the circulation following tissue injury. It is well established that our body require/implement inflammatory and analgesic responses to protect against cell damage and injury to the tissue. This study was envisaged to examine analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of exogenous gelsolin (8 mg/mouse) in mice models of pain and acute inflammation. Administration of gelsolin in acetic acid-induced writhing and tail immersion tests not only demonstrated a significant reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhing effects, but also exhibited an analgesic activity in tail immersion test in mice as compared to placebo treated mice. Additionally, anti-inflammatory function of gelsolin (8 mg/mouse) compared with anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium (10 mg/kg)] was confirmed in the carrageenan injection induced paw edema where latter was measured by vernier caliper and fluorescent tomography imaging. Interestingly, results showed that plasma gelsolin was capable of reducing severity of inflammation in mice comparable to diclofenac sodium. Analysis of cytokines and histo-pathological examinations of tissue revealed administration of gelsolin and diclofenac sodium significantly reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6. Additionally, carrageenan groups pretreated with diclofenac sodium or gelsolin showed a marked decrease in edema and infiltration of inflammatory cells in paw tissue. Our study provides evidence that administration of gelsolin can effectively reduce the pain and inflammation in mice model. PMID:26426535

  2. Assessment of the antinociceptive effects of pregabalin alone or in combination with morphine during acetic acid-induced writhing in mice.

    PubMed

    Shamsi Meymandi, Manzumeh; Keyhanfar, Fariborz

    2013-09-01

    Visceral pain currently represents one of the most important pain treatment challenges in clinical practice, and investigators across the world are continuously designing and conducting numerous studies in search of new analgesics and new combination therapies. The current study assessed the analgesic effects of saline, pregabalin (2, 5, 17, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) and morphine (0.25, 0.5, 1, 3 and 5 mg/kg) alone or in combination on acetic-acid induced abdominal contractions in mice. The number of writhes and the inhibitory effects (as percentages, %E) were calculated as antinociception indexes. These indexes indicated that both pregabalin (Prg) and morphine (Mrp) produced dose-dependent antinociception. Pregabalin at 5 mg/kg (%E=32.5±4.0) or 2 mg/kg (%E=20.8±4.5) and morphine at 0.25 mg/kg (%E=20.2±7.8) and 0.5 mg/kg (%E=43.6±4.5) exhibited antinociceptive effects, and the combination of pregabalin and morphine produced significantly greater antinociceptive effects (%E=62.4±5.8 for Prg5+Mrp0.25; %E=71.7±4.8 for Prg5+Mrp0.5; and %E=54.1±4.0 for Prg2+Mrp0.25), although this enhancement was not observed when morphine was combined with 17 mg/kg pregabalin. Pre-treatment with 2 mg/kg (i.p.) naloxone did not affect increased analgesia when combined with these drugs. A dose-response curve was established for pregabalin at a fixed morphine dose and revealed that, at low doses, pregabalin dose-dependently enhanced the antinociceptive effects, while the opposite was true at high doses (17 and 25 mg/kg). In conclusion, pregabalin can produce levels of antinociception that are similar to those of morphine in acetic acid-induced viscero-somatic pain. The enhancement of antinociception produced by the co-administration of morphine and pregabalin is termed a supra-additive interaction and occurred at low doses but not at high doses. These findings militate for increased attention and caution in clinical settings.

  3. Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of Pyeongwisan on LPS-Stimulated Murine Macrophages and Mouse Models of Acetic Acid-Induced Writhing Response and Xylene-Induced Ear Edema

    PubMed Central

    Oh, You-Chang; Jeong, Yun Hee; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ha, Jeong-Ho; Gu, Min Jung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-01

    Pyeongwisan (PW) is an herbal medication used in traditional East Asian medicine to treat anorexia, abdominal distension, borborygmus and diarrhea caused by gastric catarrh, atony and dilatation. However, its effects on inflammation-related diseases are unknown. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of PW on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in macrophages and on local inflammation in vivo. We investigated the biological effects of PW on the production of inflammatory mediators, pro-inflammatory cytokines and related products as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Additionally, we evaluated the analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response and the inhibitory activity on xylene-induced ear edema in mice. PW showed anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In addition, PW strongly suppressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a NO synthesis enzyme, induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and inhibited NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation. Also, PW suppressed TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β cytokine production in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophage cells. Furthermore, PW showed an analgesic effect on the writhing response and an inhibitory effect on mice ear edema. We demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects and inhibitory mechanism in macrophages as well as inhibitory activity of PW in vivo for the first time. Our results suggest the potential value of PW as an inflammatory therapeutic agent developed from a natural substance. PMID:25569097

  4. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of pyeongwisan on LPS-stimulated murine macrophages and mouse models of acetic acid-induced writhing response and xylene-induced ear edema.

    PubMed

    Oh, You-Chang; Jeong, Yun Hee; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ha, Jeong-Ho; Gu, Min Jung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-06

    Pyeongwisan (PW) is an herbal medication used in traditional East Asian medicine to treat anorexia, abdominal distension, borborygmus and diarrhea caused by gastric catarrh, atony and dilatation. However, its effects on inflammation-related diseases are unknown. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of PW on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in macrophages and on local inflammation in vivo. We investigated the biological effects of PW on the production of inflammatory mediators, pro-inflammatory cytokines and related products as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Additionally, we evaluated the analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response and the inhibitory activity on xylene-induced ear edema in mice. PW showed anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In addition, PW strongly suppressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a NO synthesis enzyme, induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and inhibited NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation. Also, PW suppressed TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β cytokine production in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophage cells. Furthermore, PW showed an analgesic effect on the writhing response and an inhibitory effect on mice ear edema. We demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects and inhibitory mechanism in macrophages as well as inhibitory activity of PW in vivo for the first time. Our results suggest the potential value of PW as an inflammatory therapeutic agent developed from a natural substance.

  5. Viscous Nonlinear Dynamics of Twist and Writhe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.; Powers, Thomas R.; Wiggins, Chris H.

    1998-06-01

    Exploiting the ``natural'' frame of space curves, we formulate an intrinsic dynamics of a twisted elastic filament in a viscous fluid. Coupled nonlinear equations describing the temporal evolution of the filament's complex curvature and twist density capture the dynamic interplay of twist and writhe. These equations are used to illustrate a remarkable nonlinear phenomenon: geometric untwisting of open filaments, whereby twisting strains relax through a transient writhing instability without axial rotation. Experimentally observed writhing motions of fibers of the bacterium B. subtilis [N. H. Mendelson et al., J. Bacteriol. 177, 7060 (1995)] may be examples of this untwisting process.

  6. The Writhe of Helical Structures in the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toeroek, T.; Berger, M. A.; Kliem, B.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Helicity is a fundamental property of magnetic fields, conserved in ideal MHD. In flux rope topology, it consists of twist and writhe helicity. Despite the common occurrence of helical structures in the solar atmosphere, little is known about how their shape relates to the writhe, which fraction of helicity is contained in writhe, and how much helicity is exchanged between twist and writhe when they erupt. Aims. Here we perform a quantitative investigation of these questions relevant for coronal flux ropes. Methods. The decomposition of the writhe of a curve into local and nonlocal components greatly facilitates its computation. We use it to study the relation between writhe and projected S shape of helical curves and to measure writhe and twist in numerical simulations of flux rope instabilities. The results are discussed with regard to filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results. (1) We demonstrate that the relation between writhe and projected S shape is not unique in principle, but that the ambiguity does not affect low-lying structures, thus supporting the established empirical rule which associates stable forward (reverse) S shaped structures low in the corona with positive (negative) helicity. (2) Kink-unstable erupting flux ropes are found to transform a far smaller fraction of their twist helicity into writhe helicity than often assumed. (3) Confined flux rope eruptions tend to show stronger writhe at low heights than ejective eruptions (CMEs). This argues against suggestions that the writhing facilitates the rise of the rope through the overlying field. (4) Erupting filaments which are S shaped already before the eruption and keep the sign of their axis writhe (which is expected if field of one chirality dominates the source volume of the eruption), must reverse their S shape in the course of the rise. Implications for the occurrence of the helical kink instability in such events are discussed.

  7. Twisting and Writhing with George Ellery Hale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    2013-06-01

    Early in his productive career in astronomy, George Ellery Hale developed innovative solar instrumentation that allowed him to make narrow-band images. Among the solar phenomena he discovered were sunspot vortices, which he attributed to storms akin to cyclones in our own atmosphere. Using the concept of magnetic helicity, physicists and mathematicians describe the topology of magnetic fields, including twisting and writhing. Our contemporary understanding of Hale's vortices as a consequence of large-scale twist in sunspot magnetic fields hinges on a key property of helicity: conservation. I will describe the critical role that this property plays, when applied to twist and writhe, in a fundamental aspect of global solar magnetism: the hemispheric and solar cycle dependences of active region electric currents with respect to magnetic fields. With the advent of unbroken sequences of high-resolution magnetic images, such as those presently available from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on Solar Dynamics Observatory, the flux of magnetic helicity through the photosphere can be observed quantitatively. As magnetic flux tubes buoy up through the convection zone, buffeted and shredded by turbulence, they break up into fragments by repeated random bifurcation. We track these rising flux fragments in the photosphere, and calculate the flux of energy and magnetic helicity there. Using a quantitative model of coronal currents, we also track connections between these fragments to calculate the energy and magnetic helicity stored at topological interfaces that are in some ways analogous to the storage of stress at faults in the Earth's crust. Comparison of these values to solar flares and interplanetary coronal mass ejections implies that this is the primary storage mechanism for energy and magnetic helicity released in those phenomena, and suggests a useful tool for quantitative prediction of geomagnetic storms.

  8. The extended polar writhe: a tool for open curves mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, Christopher B.; Neukirch, Sébastien

    2016-05-01

    A measure of the writhing of a curve is introduced and is used to extend the Călugăreanu decomposition for closed curves, as well as the polar decomposition for curves bound between planes. The new writhe measure is also shown to be able to assess changes in linking due to belt-trick and knotting type deformations, and further its utility is illustrated on examples taken from elastic rod parameter-continuation studies. Finally C++ and mathematica codes are made available and shown to be faster than existing algorithms for the numerical computation of the writhe.

  9. The Writhe of Helical Structures in the Solar Corona

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-23

    2010 The writhe of helical structures in the solar corona T. Török1,2, M. A. Berger2,3, and B. Kliem2,4,5 1 LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC...2009; accepted ... ABSTRACT Context. Helicity is a fundamental property of magnetic fields, conserved in ideal MHD. In flux rope topology, it consists of...twist and writhe helicity . Despite the common occurrence of helical structures in the solar atmosphere, little is known about how their shape relates

  10. Conservation of writhe helicity under anti-parallel reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laing, Christian E.; Ricca, Renzo L.; Sumners, De Witt L.

    2015-03-01

    Reconnection is a fundamental event in many areas of science, from the interaction of vortices in classical and quantum fluids, and magnetic flux tubes in magnetohydrodynamics and plasma physics, to the recombination in polymer physics and DNA biology. By using fundamental results in topological fluid mechanics, the helicity of a flux tube can be calculated in terms of writhe and twist contributions. Here we show that the writhe is conserved under anti-parallel reconnection. Hence, for a pair of interacting flux tubes of equal flux, if the twist of the reconnected tube is the sum of the original twists of the interacting tubes, then helicity is conserved during reconnection. Thus, any deviation from helicity conservation is entirely due to the intrinsic twist inserted or deleted locally at the reconnection site. This result has important implications for helicity and energy considerations in various physical contexts.

  11. Ilex paraguariensis Promotes Orofacial Pain Relief After Formalin Injection: Involvement of Noradrenergic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Eudislaine Fonseca; de Oliveira, Simone Kobe; Nardi, Viviane Koepp; Gelinski, Tathiana Carla; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Maraschin, Marcelo; Nardi, Geisson Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Background: Drinking mate or chimarrão, a hot infusion of Ilex paraguariensis (ILEX) leaves, is a common habit in Southern South America that has a social and almost ritualistic role. It has been used as a stimulant beverage in South America and analgesic in regions of Argentina for treatment of headache and others painful inflammatory conditions such as arthritis and rheumatism. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological activity of I. paraguariensis infusion (ILEX) on orofacial nociception model induced by formalin, and study its mechanism of action. Materials and Methods: The analgesic effect of ILEX was assessed through writhing test, paw formalin test, paw edema induced by carrageenan, and orofacial pain induced by formalin. To study the action mechanism of ILEX, opioidergic, dopaminergic, nitrergic, and adrenergic pathways were investigated. Results: The high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of ILEX infusion revealed caffeine and theobromine. The treatment with ILEX reduced the number of writhing. However, it was effective neither in the formalin paw test nor in the paw edema induced by carrageenan. Different from formalin paw test, ILEX was able to reduce the orofacial reactivity to formalin in 31.8% (70.4 ± 2.5 s; first phase), and 20% (127.3 ± 18.9 s; second phase). The analgesic effect of ILEX results from the modulation of noradrenergic pathways since prazosin (α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, 0.15 mg/kg; intraperitoneal) reversed the analgesic effect of ILEX. Conclusions: The present report demonstrates that analgesic effect of ILEX in orofacial formalin test is due mainly to modulation of noradrenergic pathways. SUMMARY Ilex paraguariensis (ILEX) has been used as a stimulant beverage in South America and analgesic in regions of Argentina for the treatment of headache and others painful inflammatory conditions such arthritis and rheumatism.The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological activity of ILEX on

  12. Torsional Buckling and Writhing Dynamics of Elastic Cables and DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, S; Perkins, N C; Lee, C L

    2003-02-14

    Marine cables under low tension and torsion on the sea floor can undergo a dynamic buckling process during which torsional strain energy is converted to bending strain energy. The resulting three-dimensional cable geometries can be highly contorted and include loops and tangles. Similar geometries are known to exist for supercoiled DNA and these also arise from the conversion of torsional strain energy to bending strain energy or, kinematically, a conversion of twist to writhe. A dynamic form of Kirchhoff rod theory is presented herein that captures these nonlinear dynamic processes. The resulting theory is discretized using the generalized-method for finite differencing in both space and time. The important kinematics of cross-section rotation are described using an incremental rotation ''vector'' as opposed to traditional Euler angles or Euler parameters. Numerical solutions are presented for an example system of a cable subjected to increasing twist at one end. The solutions show the dynamic evolution of the cable from an initially straight element, through a buckled element in the approximate form of a helix, and through the dynamic collapse of this helix through a looped form.

  13. Occupational formalin asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Hendrick, D J; Lane, D J

    1977-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to formalin used to sterilise artificial kidney machines was shown by inhalation provocation tests to be responsible for attacks of wheezing accompanied by productive cough in two members of the nursing staff of a haemodialysis unit. Three further members of the staff of 28 who were continually exposed to this substance occupationally had developed similar recurrent but less frequent episodes since joining the unit. Two underwent inhalation provocation tests with formalin which did not reproduce these symptoms.Single episodes of these symptoms had been noted by three additional staff members so that altogether eight (29%) had experienced attacks described as bronchitic since becoming exposed to formalin. We suggest that, while exposure to formalin did not seem to be directly responsible in all cases, it might have increased susceptibility to other provoking agents or induced a hyper-reactive responsiveness of the airways. The responses observed in the two nurses after inhalation provocation tests with fromalin were predominantly of airways obstruction. Wheezing began between two and three hours after exposure, and peak expiratory flow rates fell maximally by approximately 50%. Reactions persisted for 10 hours to 10 days depending on the exposure dose. A productive cough was a prominent feature. The sputum appeared to be mucopurulent, but culture produced a scanty growth of Haemophilus influenzae only, together with upper respiratory tract commensals. The cellular content was not homogeneous, neutrophil leucocytes and eosinophil leucocoytes variably dominating. Variable responses of neutrophil and eosinophil leucocytes were also seen in the peripheral blood. PMID:557329

  14. Thermodynamics of the first transition in writhe of a small circular DNA by Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Gebe, J A; Schurr, J M

    1996-04-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are employed to investigate the thermodynamics of the first transition in writhe of a circular model filament corresponding to a 468 base-pair DNA. Parameters employed in these simulations are the torsional rigidity, C = 2.0 x 10(-19) dyne cm2, and persistence length, P = 500 A. Intersubunit interactions are modeled by a screened Coulomb potential. For a straight line of subunits this accurately approximates the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann potential of a cylinder with the linear charge density of DNA. Curves of relative free energy vs writhe at fixed linking difference (delta l) exhibit two minima, one corresponding to slightly writhed circles and one to slightly underwrithed figure-8's, whenever delta l lies in the transition region. The free energies of the two minima are equal when delta lc = 1.35, which defines the midpoint of the transition. At this midpoint, the free energy barrier between the two minima is found to be delta Gbar = (0.20) kBT at 298 K. Curves of mean potential energy vs writhe at fixed linking difference similarly exhibit two minima for delta l values in the transition region, and the two minimum mean potential energies are equal when delta l = 1.50. At the midpoint writhe, delta lc = 1.35, the difference in mean potential energy between the minimum free energy figure-8 and circle states is (1.3) kBT, and the difference in their entropies is 1.3 kB. Thus, the entropy of the minimum free energy figure-8 state significantly exceeds that of the circle at the midpoint of the transition. The first transition in writhe is found to occur over a rather broad range of delta l values from 0.85 to 1.85. The twist energy parameter (ET), which governs the overall free energy of supercoiling, undergoes a sigmoidal decrease, while the translational diffusion coefficient undergoes a sigmoidal increase, over this same range. The static structure factor exhibits an increase, which reflects a decrease in radius of gyration associated

  15. Comparison of molecular contours for measuring writhe in atomistic supercoiled DNA.

    PubMed

    Sutthibutpong, Thana; Harris, Sarah A; Noy, Agnes

    2015-06-09

    DNA molecular center-lines designed from atomistic-resolution structures are compared for the evaluation of the writhe in supercoiled DNA using molecular dynamics simulations of two sets of minicircles with 260 and 336 base pairs. We present a new method called WrLINE that systematically filters out local (i.e., subhelical turn) irregularities using a sliding-window averaged over a single DNA turn and that provides a measure of DNA writhe that is suitable for comparing atomistic resolution data with those obtained from measurements of the global molecular shape. In contrast, the contour traced by the base-pair origins defined by the 3DNA program largely overestimates writhe due to the helical periodicity of DNA. Nonetheless, this local modulation of the molecular axis emerges as an internal mechanism for the DNA to confront superhelical stress, where the adjustment between low and high twist is coupled to a high and low local periodicity, respectively, mimicking the different base-stacking conformational space of A and B canonical DNA forms.

  16. The linking number and the writhe of uniform random walks and polygons in confined spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotou, E.; Millett, K. C.; Lambropoulou, S.

    2010-01-01

    Random walks and polygons are used to model polymers. In this paper we consider the extension of the writhe, self-linking number and linking number to open chains. We then study the average writhe, self-linking and linking number of random walks and polygons over the space of configurations as a function of their length. We show that the mean squared linking number, the mean squared writhe and the mean squared self-linking number of oriented uniform random walks or polygons of length n, in a convex confined space, are of the form O(n2). Moreover, for a fixed simple closed curve in a convex confined space, we prove that the mean absolute value of the linking number between this curve and a uniform random walk or polygon of n edges is of the form O(\\sqrt{n}) . Our numerical studies confirm those results. They also indicate that the mean absolute linking number between any two oriented uniform random walks or polygons, of n edges each, is of the form O(n). Equilateral random walks and polygons are used to model polymers in θ-conditions. We use numerical simulations to investigate how the self-linking and linking number of equilateral random walks scale with their length.

  17. Roles of substance P and somatostatin on transmission of nociceptive information induced by formalin in spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, T.; Shibata, M.; Takahashi, H.; Inoki, R. )

    1990-03-01

    Nociceptive response induced by 0.5% Formalin in the hindpaw of mice had two peaks, 0-5 min (first phase) and 15-20 min (second phase). By using the distinct biphasic response, the nature of the transmitter systems activated by Formalin in the spinal cord was studied for the purpose of determining the difference of the role of substance P (SP) and somatostatin (SST). The injection of (D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9)SP, (D-Arg1, D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9, Leu11)SP and SP antiserum inhibited only the first phase response. The i.t. injection of -Aminoheptanoyl-Phe-D-Trp-Lys-(OBz)-Thr- (an SST antagonist), SST antiserum and cysteamine (an SST depletor) inhibited only the second phase. This result indicates that SP is involved in the transmission of the first phase, and SST is involved in the transmission of the second phase of the Formalin-induced nociceptive response. With regard to other nociceptive stimuli, two i.t. SP antagonists produced a significant analgesia in the hot plate and tail pinch tests but had no effect in the acetic acid writhing test. However, i.t. SST antagonist and cysteamine produced a significant analgesia in the writhing test but had no effect in the hot plate and tail pinch test. These results suggest that SP participates in the transient pain induced by such acute stimuli as hot plate, tail pinch and the first phase of Formalin response and that SST participates in the prolonged and inflammatory pain induced by stimuli such as acetic acid and the second phase response.

  18. Analgesic properties of Epilobium angustifolium, evaluated by the hot plate test and the writhing test.

    PubMed

    Tita, B; Abdel-Haq, H; Vitalone, A; Mazzanti, G; Saso, L

    2001-01-01

    The analgesic properties of Epilobium angustifolium (Ea), a plant containing flavonoids with anti-inflammatory activity, have not been sufficiently studied so far. Thus, we decided to evaluate, by the classical hot plate test and the writhing test, the analgesic effect of a dry extract of Ea obtained by evaporating a commercially available mother tincture. In the former assay, the effect of Ea (380 mg/kg) was slightly lower than that of morphine (10 mg/kg s.c.). In the writhing test, which is more sensitive for non-steroidal analgesics, the effect of Ea was already significant (P < 0.05) at 95 mg/kg while at doses > or = 190 mg/kg, its activity was similar to that of lysine acetylsalicylate (300 mg/kg). The LD50 of this dry extract of Ea was 1.4+/-0.1 g/kg. Further studies are necessary for the identification of the active principles and the elucidation of their mechanism of action.

  19. 21 CFR 529.1030 - Formalin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... For control of external protozoan parasites Bodo spp., Epistylis spp., and Zoothamnium spp. (ii) All... protozoan parasites on shrimp: Shrimp Concentration of formalin (microliters per liter) Tanks and...

  20. Dynamics of Bacillus subtilis helical macrofiber morphogenesis: writhing, folding, close packing, and contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelson, N H

    1982-01-01

    Helical Bacillus subtilis macrofibers are highly ordered structures consisting of individual cells packed in a geometry remarkably similar to that found in helically twisted yarns (G. A. Carnaby, in J. W. S. Hearle et al., ed., The Mechanics of Flexible Fibre Assemblies, p. 99-112, 1980; N. H. Mendelson, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 75:2478-2482, 1978). The growth and formation of macrofibers were studied with time-lapse microscopy methods. The basic growth mode consisted of fiber elongation, folding, and the helical wrapping together of the folded portion into a tight helical fiber. This sequence was reiterated at both ends of the structure, resulting in terminal loops. Macrofiber growth was accompanied by the helical turning of the structure along its long axis. Right-handed structures turned clockwise and left-handed ones turned counterclockwise when viewed along the length of a fiber looking toward a loop end. Helical turning forced the individual cellular filaments into a close-packing arrangement during growth. Tension was evident within the structures and they writhed as they elongated. Tension was relieved by folding, which occurred when writhing became so violent that the structure touched itself, forming a loop. When the multistranded structure produced by repeated folding cycles became too rigid for additional folding, the morphogenesis of a ball-like structure began. The dynamics of helical macrofiber formation was interpreted in terms of stress-strain deformations. In view of the similarities between macrofiber structures and those found in multifilament yarns and cables, the physics of helical macrofiber structure and also growth may be suitable for analysis developed in these fields concerning the mechanics of flexible fiber assemblies (C. P. Buckley; J. W. S. Hearle; and J. J. Thwaites, in J. W. S. Hearle et al., ed., The Mechanics of Flexible Fibre Assemblies, p. 1-97, 1980). Images PMID:6806245

  1. TRPA1 mediates formalin-induced pain.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Colleen R; Mandel-Brehm, Josh; Bautista, Diana M; Siemens, Jan; Deranian, Kari L; Zhao, Michael; Hayward, Neil J; Chong, Jayhong A; Julius, David; Moran, Magdalene M; Fanger, Christopher M

    2007-08-14

    The formalin model is widely used for evaluating the effects of analgesic compounds in laboratory animals. Injection of formalin into the hind paw induces a biphasic pain response; the first phase is thought to result from direct activation of primary afferent sensory neurons, whereas the second phase has been proposed to reflect the combined effects of afferent input and central sensitization in the dorsal horn. Here we show that formalin excites sensory neurons by directly activating TRPA1, a cation channel that plays an important role in inflammatory pain. Formalin induced robust calcium influx in cells expressing cloned or native TRPA1 channels, and these responses were attenuated by a previously undescribed TRPA1-selective antagonist. Moreover, sensory neurons from TRPA1-deficient mice lacked formalin sensitivity. At the behavioral level, pharmacologic blockade or genetic ablation of TRPA1 produced marked attenuation of the characteristic flinching, licking, and lifting responses resulting from intraplantar injection of formalin. Our results show that TRPA1 is the principal site of formalin's pain-producing action in vivo, and that activation of this excitatory channel underlies the physiological and behavioral responses associated with this model of pain hypersensitivity.

  2. Antinociceptive Effect of Tephrosia sinapou Extract in the Acetic Acid, Phenyl-p-benzoquinone, Formalin, and Complete Freund's Adjuvant Models of Overt Pain-Like Behavior in Mice.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Renata M; Zarpelon, Ana C; Domiciano, Talita P; Georgetti, Sandra R; Baracat, Marcela M; Moreira, Isabel C; Andrei, Cesar C; Verri, Waldiceu A; Casagrande, Rubia

    2016-01-01

    Tephrosia toxicaria, which is currently known as Tephrosia sinapou (Buc'hoz) A. Chev. (Fabaceae), is a source of compounds such as flavonoids. T. sinapou has been used in Amazonian countries traditional medicine to alleviate pain and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effects of T. sinapou ethyl acetate extract in overt pain-like behavior models in mice by using writhing response and flinching/licking tests. We demonstrated in this study that T. sinapou extract inhibited, in a dose (1-100 mg/kg) dependent manner, acetic acid- and phenyl-p-benzoquinone- (PBQ-) induced writhing response. Furthermore, it was active via intraperitoneal, subcutaneous, and peroral routes of administration. T. sinapou extract also inhibited formalin- and complete Freund's adjuvant- (CFA-) induced flinching/licking at 100 mg/kg dose. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that T. sinapou ethyl acetate extract reduces inflammatory pain in the acetic acid, PBQ, formalin, and CFA models of overt pain-like behavior. Therefore, the potential of analgesic activity of T. sinapou indicates that it deserves further investigation.

  3. Antinociceptive Effect of Tephrosia sinapou Extract in the Acetic Acid, Phenyl-p-benzoquinone, Formalin, and Complete Freund's Adjuvant Models of Overt Pain-Like Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Renata M.; Zarpelon, Ana C.; Domiciano, Talita P.; Georgetti, Sandra R.; Baracat, Marcela M.; Moreira, Isabel C.; Andrei, Cesar C.; Verri, Waldiceu A.; Casagrande, Rubia

    2016-01-01

    Tephrosia toxicaria, which is currently known as Tephrosia sinapou (Buc'hoz) A. Chev. (Fabaceae), is a source of compounds such as flavonoids. T. sinapou has been used in Amazonian countries traditional medicine to alleviate pain and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effects of T. sinapou ethyl acetate extract in overt pain-like behavior models in mice by using writhing response and flinching/licking tests. We demonstrated in this study that T. sinapou extract inhibited, in a dose (1–100 mg/kg) dependent manner, acetic acid- and phenyl-p-benzoquinone- (PBQ-) induced writhing response. Furthermore, it was active via intraperitoneal, subcutaneous, and peroral routes of administration. T. sinapou extract also inhibited formalin- and complete Freund's adjuvant- (CFA-) induced flinching/licking at 100 mg/kg dose. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that T. sinapou ethyl acetate extract reduces inflammatory pain in the acetic acid, PBQ, formalin, and CFA models of overt pain-like behavior. Therefore, the potential of analgesic activity of T. sinapou indicates that it deserves further investigation. PMID:27293981

  4. Chiral symmetry breaking of a double-stranded helical chain through bend-writhe coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanao, Tomohiro; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2014-06-01

    This paper explores asymmetric elasticity of a double-stranded helical chain, which serves as a minimal model of biopolymers. The model consists of two elastic chains that mutually intertwine in a right-handed manner, forming a double-stranded helix. A simple numerical experiment for structural relaxation, which reduces the total elastic energy of the model monotonically without thermal fluctuations, reveals possible asymmetric elasticity inherent in the helical chain. It is first shown that a short segment of the double-stranded helical chain has a tendency to unwind when it is bent. It is also shown that a short segment of the helical chain has a tendency to writhe in the left direction upon bending. This tendency gives rise to a propensity for a longer segment of the chain to form a left-handed superhelix spontaneously upon bending. Finally, this propensity of the helical chain to form a left-handed superhelix is proposed to be a possible origin of the uniform left-handed wrapping of DNA around nucleosome core particles in nature. The results presented here could provide deeper insights into the roles and significance of helical chirality of biopolymers.

  5. 21 CFR 529.1030 - Formalin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... protozoan parasites Bodo spp., Epistylis spp., and Zoothamnium spp. (iv) All finfish. For control of... formalin used is 1,000 to 2,000 microliters per liter. (iii) For control of external protozoan parasites...

  6. 21 CFR 529.1030 - Formalin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... protozoan parasites Bodo spp., Epistylis spp., and Zoothamnium spp. (iv) All finfish. For control of... formalin used is 1,000 to 2,000 microliters per liter. (iii) For control of external protozoan parasites...

  7. 21 CFR 529.1030 - Formalin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... protozoan parasites Bodo spp., Epistylis spp., and Zoothamnium spp. (iv) All finfish. For control of... formalin used is 1,000 to 2,000 microliters per liter. (iii) For control of external protozoan parasites...

  8. OBSERVATIONS FROM SDO, HINODE, AND STEREO OF A TWISTING AND WRITHING START TO A SOLAR-FILAMENT-ERUPTION CASCADE

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Hara, Hirohisa E-mail: ron.moore@nasa.gov

    2012-12-10

    We analyze data from SDO (AIA, HMI), Hinode (SOT, XRT, EIS), and STEREO (EUVI) of a solar eruption sequence of 2011 June 1 near 16:00 UT, with an emphasis on the early evolution toward eruption. Ultimately, the sequence consisted of three emission bursts and two filament ejections. SDO/AIA 304 A images show absorbing-material strands initially in close proximity which over {approx}20 minutes form a twisted structure, presumably a flux rope with {approx}10{sup 29} erg of free energy that triggers the resulting evolution. A jump in the filament/flux rope's displacement (average velocity {approx}20 km s{sup -1}) and the first burst of emission accompanies the flux-rope formation. After {approx}20 more minutes, the flux rope/filament kinks and writhes, followed by a semi-steady state where the flux rope/filament rises at ({approx}5 km s{sup -1}) for {approx}10 minutes. Then the writhed flux rope/filament again becomes MHD unstable and violently erupts, along with rapid (50 km s{sup -1}) ejection of the filament and the second burst of emission. That ejection removed a field that had been restraining a second filament, which subsequently erupts as the second filament ejection accompanied by the third (final) burst of emission. Magnetograms from SDO/HMI and Hinode/SOT, and other data, reveal several possible causes for initiating the flux-rope-building reconnection, but we are not able to say which is dominant. Our observations are consistent with magnetic reconnection initiating the first burst and the flux-rope formation, with MHD processes initiating the further dynamics. Both filament ejections are consistent with the standard model for solar eruptions.

  9. Erroneous aluminum and cobalt tissue concentrations from using formalin.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, R D

    2001-10-01

    Because of the liberation of metal particles from orthopedic implants, concerns have been voiced about their long-term safety. To document the presence and measure the amount of metal in periprosthetic tissues, many reports have analyzed tissue specimens obtained from revision surgery. Some report the inclusion of formalin in tissue processing. However, the unavailability of any medical-grade formalin solution with a known metal content raises the suspicion of sample contamination. The purpose of this study was to measure the concentration of the metals in the formalin found in common orthopedic alloys and to assess this chemical's role in removing metal ions from tissue samples. To do this, tissues with known metal concentrations of cobalt and aluminum were mixed with formalin, and the differences in the formalin and tissue concentrations of these elements were evaluated. Tissue and formalin samples were tested prior to and immediately after their mixing and then at three 10-day intervals. At the end of the study additional unmixed samples of formalin and tissue for both metals were tested to ensure there had been no contamination. Both cobalt and aluminum were found in off-the-shelf formalin, with observed decreases in tissue metal concentration and increases in formalin metal concentration.

  10. Observations from Hinode and SDO of a Twisting and Writhing Start to a Solar-filament-eruption Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Hara, Hirohisa

    2013-01-01

    Active region eruption of 1 June 2011. Ejective eruption. GOES class C4.1 flare. SDO/AIA, various filters (94, 131, 171, 193, 211, 304, 335 Ang.) High time cadence (24 s) and high spatial resolution (0 .6 pixels). SDO/HMI line-of-sight magnetograms. Hinode observed the onset, and the later decay phase. There are two filament eruptions (filament 1 and filament 2). Filament 1 has slow rise with steps, as in several previous cases. GOES "episodes" play role of "microflares" in other events; that is, filament jumps <=> intensity peaks. Episode 1 brightening: Accompanied by filament 1 s initial motions. (Rest of talk.) Filament 1 becomes unstable, and.. Episode 2 brightening: Flare ribbons following filament 1 s fast liftoff. This destabilizes neighboring filament 2, and... Episode 3 brightening: Flare ribbons of whole system following filament 2 s eruption.Something leads to reconnection; not totally clear what. Reconnection -> twisted flux rope in approx.20 min; episode 1 microflare (flare ribbons; TC) and filament jump. Twist -> writhe, via kink instability; filament-trajectory plateau, approx. 20 min. Writhe -> jump and eruption of filament 1, via instability; episode 2 microflare (flare ribbons; TC). (E.g., Williams et al.) First eruption -> second filament eruption (episode 3 flare ribbons; TC). (E.g., Sterling, Moore; Liu et al.; Torok et al.; Schrijver & Title.). Estimate amount of free energy in newly-twisted field (cf. Moore 1988): where we have taken L and r = 50, 3 arcsec. Energy of the total system is likely 1030 ergs or more. So "no" is answer to question. Additional energy comes from remainder of sheared large loop, shear (free energy) of second filament, etc. (Normally assumed situation.) Some history of twist-induced instability in filament eruptions: e.g., Sakurai, Torok & Kliem, Fan & Gibson, Gilbert et al., van Driel-Gesztelyi et al. Criterion : Kink instability for line-tied tube (Hood & Priest): 2.5pi; for Titov & Demoulin loop (Torok et al

  11. Application of alternative fixatives to formalin in diagnostic pathology.

    PubMed

    Benerini Gatta, L; Cadei, M; Balzarini, P; Castriciano, S; Paroni, R; Verzeletti, A; Cortellini, V; De Ferrari, F; Grigolato, P

    2012-05-04

    Fixation is a critical step in the preparation of tissues for histopathology. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different fixatives vs formalin on proteins and DNA, and to evaluate alternative fixation for morphological diagnosis and nucleic acid preservation for molecular methods. Forty tissues were fixed for 24 h with six different fixatives: the gold standard fixative formalin, the historical fixatives Bouin and Hollande, and the alternative fixatives Greenfix, UPM and CyMol. Tissues were stained (Haematoxylin-Eosin, Periodic Acid Schiff, Trichromic, Alcian-blue, High Iron Diamine), and their antigenicity was determined by immunohistochemistry (performed with PAN-CK, CD31, Ki-67, S100, CD68, AML antibodies). DNA extraction, KRAS sequencing, FISH for CEP-17, and flow cytometry analysis of nuclear DNA content were applied. For cell morphology the alternative fixatives (Greenfix, UPM, CyMol) were equivalent to formalin. As expected, Hollande proved the best fixative for morphology. The morphology obtained with Bouin was comparable to that with formalin. Hollande was the best fixative for histochemistry. Bouin proved equivalent to formalin. The alternative fixatives were equivalent to formalin, although with greater variability in haematoxylin-eosin staining. It proved possible to obtain immunohistochemical staining largely equivalent to that following formalin-fixation with the following fixatives: Greenfix, Hollande, UPM and CyMol. The tissues fixed in Bouin did not provide results comparable to those obtained with formalin. The DNA extracted from samples fixed with alternative fixatives was found to be suitable for molecular analysis.

  12. Ge-Gen Decoction attenuates oxytocin-induced uterine contraction and writhing response: potential application in primary dysmenorrhea therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Chai, Cheng-Zhi; Yue, Xin-Yi; Yan, Yan; Kou, Jun-Ping; Cao, Zheng-Yu; Yu, Bo-Yang

    2016-02-01

    The uterine tetanic contraction and uterine artery blood flow reduction are possible reasons for primary dysmenorrhea (PD). In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the uterine relaxant effect and the influence on uterine artery blood velocity of Ge-Gen Decoction (GGD), a well-known Chinese herbal formula. In female ICR mice, uterine contraction was induced by oxytocin exposure following estradiol benzoate pretreatment, and the uterine artery blood velocity was detected by Doppler ultrasound. Histopathological examination of the uterine tissue samples were performed by H&E staining. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that oxytocin, posterior pituitary, or acetylcholine induced contractions in isolated mouse uterus. GGD inhibited both spontaneous and stimulated contractions. In vivo study demonstrated that GGD significantly reduced oxytocin-induced writhing responses with a maximal inhibition of 87%. Further study demonstrated that GGD normalized oxytocin-induced abnormalities of prostaglandins F2 alpha (PGF2α) and Ca(2+) in mice. In addition, injection of oxytocin induced a decrease in uterine artery blood flow velocity. Pretreatment with GGD reversed the oxytocin response on blood flow velocity. Histopathological examination showed pretreatment with GGD alleviated inflammation and edema in the uterus when compared with the model group. Both ex vivo and in vivo results indicated that GGD possessed a significant spasmolytic effect on uterine tetanic contraction as well as improvement on uterine artery blood velocity which may involve PGF2α and Ca(2+) signaling, suggesting that GGD may have a clinic potential in PD therapy.

  13. Pitfalls of formalin fixation for determination of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, S M; Broomhead, V; Spickett, G P; Wilkinson, R

    1999-06-01

    Sera can produce nuclear or perinuclear immunofluorescence staining in neutrophils which may be caused by antibodies with differing antigenic specificities. These include perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (P-ANCA), granulocyte specific antinuclear antibody (GS-ANA), and antinuclear antibody (ANA). There is controversy over the value of formalin fixation of neutrophils in differentiating antibodies giving selective or preferential reaction with the nuclear or perinuclear area of neutrophils. In a comparative study of 77 sera, formalin fixation caused inconsistency, nonspecific effects, and false positivity owing to enhanced fluorescence. If formalin fixed neutrophils are used in the routine diagnostic laboratory, this will add confusion to the interpretation of the ANCA assay.

  14. Pitfalls of formalin fixation for determination of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, S M; Broomhead, V; Spickett, G P; Wilkinson, R

    1999-01-01

    Sera can produce nuclear or perinuclear immunofluorescence staining in neutrophils which may be caused by antibodies with differing antigenic specificities. These include perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (P-ANCA), granulocyte specific antinuclear antibody (GS-ANA), and antinuclear antibody (ANA). There is controversy over the value of formalin fixation of neutrophils in differentiating antibodies giving selective or preferential reaction with the nuclear or perinuclear area of neutrophils. In a comparative study of 77 sera, formalin fixation caused inconsistency, nonspecific effects, and false positivity owing to enhanced fluorescence. If formalin fixed neutrophils are used in the routine diagnostic laboratory, this will add confusion to the interpretation of the ANCA assay. PMID:10562820

  15. Proteomic developments in the analysis of formalin-fixed tissue.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Ove J R; Arentz, Georgia; Hoffmann, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Retrospective proteomic studies, including those which aim to elucidate the molecular mechanisms driving cancer, require the assembly and characterization of substantial patient tissue cohorts. The difficulty of maintaining and accessing native tissue archives has prompted the development of methods to access archives of formalin-fixed tissue. Formalin-fixed tissue archives, complete with patient meta data, have accumulated for decades, presenting an invaluable resource for these retrospective studies. This review presents the current knowledge concerning formalin-fixed tissue, with descriptions of the mechanisms of formalin fixation, protein extraction, top-down proteomics, bottom-up proteomics, quantitative proteomics, phospho- and glycoproteomics as well as imaging mass spectrometry. Particular attention has been given to the inclusion of proteomic investigations of archived tumour tissue. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Medical Proteomics.

  16. Formalin preservation of avian blood for organochlorine analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stafford, C.J.; Stickel, W.H.; Lamb, D.W.; Kenaga, E.E.

    1981-01-01

    Blood biopsy for chemical analysis is a valuable technique for evaluating chemical exposure of birds in the wild without harming the birds. Field conditions, however, often make sample storage difficult. Better methods than freezing are needed to improve the interpretive value of chemical analysis of the sample. The use of formalin was explored for this purpose. A pooled sample of blood containing naturally incorporated 1,1-bis-(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane (DDT), 2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl)1,1 dichloroethylene (DDE), and dieldrin was subdivided into 30 samples, of which 10 were frozen, 10 more were kept at room temperature, and 10 were formalinized by adding I part of chemically pure formalin to 20 parts of blood. The formalinized samples yielded the highest and least variable concentrations of chemicals. The field procedures are outlined.

  17. Antinociceptive activity of discretamine isolated from Duguetia moricandiana.

    PubMed

    Almeida, J R G S; de Lima, J T; de Oliveira, H R; de Oliveira, M R; Meira, P R M; Lúcio, A S S C; Barbosa Filho, J M; Quintans Júnior, L J

    2011-12-01

    The phytochemical study of Duguetia moricandiana Mart. (Annonaceae) yielded the isolation of the alkaloid which was identified by spectral analysis as discretamine. The evaluation of antinociceptive activity carried out by the acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin and hot plate tests in mice, suggests a potent antinociceptive effect. Discretamine (5, 10 and 20 mg kg⁻¹, i.p.) significantly reduced the number of writhes similarly at all doses tested and the number of paw licks during the first phase of formalin test when compared to control. The effect of discretamine on hot plate response provides a confirmation of its central effect. These results indicate antinociceptive properties of this alkaloid.

  18. Application of alternative fixatives to formalin in diagnostic pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gatta, L. Benerini; Cadei, M.; Balzarini, P.; Castriciano, S.; Paroni, R.; Verzeletti, A.; Cortellini, V.; De Ferrari, F.; Grigolato, P.

    2012-01-01

    Fixation is a critical step in the preparation of tissues for histopathology. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different fixatives vs formalin on proteins and DNA, and to evaluate alternative fixation for morphological diagnosis and nucleic acid preservation for molecular methods. Forty tissues were fixed for 24 h with six different fixatives: the gold standard fixative formalin, the historical fixatives Bouin and Hollande, and the alternative fixatives Greenfix, UPM and CyMol. Tissues were stained (Haematoxylin-Eosin, Periodic Acid Schiff, Trichromic, Alcian-blue, High Iron Diamine stainings), and their antigenicity was determined by immunohistochemistry (performed with PAN-CK, CD31, Ki-67, S100, CD68, AML antibodies). DNA extraction, KRAS sequencing, FISH for CEP-17, and flow cytometry analysis of nuclear DNA content were applied. For cell morphology the alternative fixatives (Greenfix, UPM, CyMol) were equivalent to formalin. As expected, Hollande proved to be the best fixative for morphology. The morphology obtained with Bouin was comparable to the one with formalin. Hollande was the best fixative for histochemistry. Bouin proved to be equivalent to formalin. The alternative fixatives were equivalent to formalin, although with greater variability in haematoxylin-eosin staining. It proved the possibility to obtain immunohistochemical staining largely equivalent to that following formalin-fixation with the following fixatives: Greenfix, Hollande, UPM and CyMol. The tissues fixed in Bouin did not provide results comparable to those obtained with formalin. The DNA extracted from samples fixed with alternative fixatives was found to be suitable for molecular analysis. PMID:22688293

  19. Intravesical formalin for hemorrhagic cystitis: A contemporary cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ziegelmann, Matthew J.; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Joyce, Daniel D.; Montgomery, Brian D.; Linder, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Hemorrhagic cystitis presents a difficult clinical challenge, yet data regarding treatment options is sparse. Here, we sought to evaluate outcomes of a contemporary cohort of patients treated with intravesical formalin for hemorrhagic cystitis. Methods We identified a retrospective cohort of eight patients managed with formalin for hemorrhagic cystitis from 2000–2014. All patients failed prior measures, including bladder irrigation, clot evacuation, and other intravesical agents. Treatment success was defined as hematuria resolution during the given hospitalization without use of additional invasive therapies. We also evaluated treatment complications and additional treatments following hospital dismissal. Results Etiology of cystitis was radiation for malignancy in all cases. The formalin concentration ranged from 1–4%, with escalation used in treatment failures. Five patients (62.5%) received a single dose of 1% formalin, two patients received two doses, and one patient received three doses. Notably, intraoperative cystography identified vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in 50.0% of patients. Six patients (75.0%) achieved treatment success, with a median time to resolution of four days (range 1–17 days). Of those refractory to formalin, one was managed with indwelling nephrostomy tubes and one underwent cystectomy. Median followup was eight months. Of the responders, two eventually required cystectomy, one for recurrent hematuria and one for recalcitrant bladder neck contracture and bladder dysfunction. The remaining four patients (50%) required no additional therapy. Conclusions Formalin remains an important tool for treating refractory hemorrhagic cystitis, with roughly 75.0% of patients requiring no additional therapy prior to hospital discharge. Notably, there is a risk of bladder dysfunction following formalin. PMID:28360951

  20. Hypochlorous and peracetic acid induced oxidation of dairy proteins.

    PubMed

    Kerkaert, Barbara; Mestdagh, Frédéric; Cucu, Tatiana; Aedo, Philip Roger; Ling, Shen Yan; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2011-02-09

    Hypochlorous and peracetic acids, both known disinfectants in the food industry, were compared for their oxidative capacity toward dairy proteins. Whey proteins and caseins were oxidized under well controlled conditions at pH 8 as a function of the sanitizing concentration. Different markers for protein oxidation were monitored. The results established that the protein carbonyl content was a rather unspecific marker for protein oxidation, which did not allow one to differentiate the oxidant used especially at the lower concentrations. Cysteine, tryptophan, and methionine were proven to be the most vulnerable amino acids for degradation upon hypochlorous and peracetic acid treatment, while tyrosine was only prone to degradation in the presence of hypochlorous acid. Hypochlorous acid induced oxidation gave rise to protein aggregation, while during peracetic acid induced oxidation, no high molecular weight aggregates were observed. Protein aggregation upon hypochlorous acid oxidation could primarily be linked to tryptophan and tyrosine degradation.

  1. Protective Mechanisms of Nitrone Antioxidants in Kanic Acid Induced Neurodegeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    L., Hong, J.S. (1996) Expression of) FosB in the rat hippocampus and striatum after systemic administration of kainic acid. Neurosci. Abstr. 22...gene expression in the hippocampus . Immunohistochemical methods and electromobility gel shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrate the concerted activation of...acid-induced neurodegenerative diseases. The major focus will be on the pathophysiological changes in the hippocampus . Special attention will be given

  2. The proteomics of formalin-fixed wax-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, David Cilia; Murray, Graeme I

    2013-04-01

    Proteomics, which is the global analysis of protein expression in cells and tissues, has emerged over the last ten to fifteen years as a key set of technologies to improve our understanding of disease processes and to identify new diagnostic, prognostic and predictive disease biomarkers. Whilst most proteomic studies have been conducted on fresh frozen tissue, the continuous improvements in technical procedures for protein extraction and separation, coupled with increasingly powerful bioinformatics, have provided the opportunity for proteomic analysis to be conducted on formalin-fixed wax-embedded tissue. This potential advance should allow proteomic analysis to be performed on the extensive archives of clinically annotated formalin fixed wax embedded tissue blocks stored in pathology departments worldwide. In this review the main techniques and their limitations involved in proteomic analysis of formalin fixed wax embedded tissue will be outlined and examples of their successful application will be indicated.

  3. Safety of formalin treatments on warm- and coolwater fish eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rach, Jeff J.; Howe, George E.; Schreier, Theresa M.

    1997-01-01

    Formalin is widely used for treating fungal infections of fish eggs in intensive aquaculture operations. The use of formalin in the United States is only allowed on salmonid and esocid eggs unless a special exemption is granted for use on other species. This study was conducted to determine the safety of formalin treatments on eggs of representative warm- and coolwater fish species and data was used to support a request to allow the use of formalin on the eggs of warmwater and additional coolwater fish species. Non-eyed eggs of walleye (Stizostedion vitreum), common carp (Cyprinus carpio), white sucker (Catostomus commersoni), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), and lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) were cultured in miniature egg hatching jars and treated for 45 min every-other-day with 1500, 4500, or 7500 μL L-1 formalin up to hatch. For all species tested, the percent hatch was greater in 1500 mu L L-1 treatment groups than in untreated controls. Walleye eggs were the least sensitive species and had a hatch of 87% in the 7500 mu L L-1 treatment. Lake sturgeon were the most sensitive species with a mean hatch of 54% in 1500 mu L L-1 treatments. Adequate margins of safety exist for standard treatments (1500 mu L L-1 for 15 min) on eggs of all species tested except lake sturgeon. Fungal infections drastically reduced or eliminated hatch in most control groups whereas most treated groups were free of infections. This confirms the efficacy of formalin as an fungicide. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. Manifold-Splitting Regularization, Self-Linking Twisting, Writhing Numbers of Space-Time Ribbons and POLYAKOV’S Proof of Fermi-Bose Transmutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tze, Chia-Hsiung

    We present an alternative formulation of Polyakov’s regularization of Gauss’ integral formula for a single closed Feynman path. A key element in his proof of the D=3 fermi-bose transmutations induced by topological gauge fields, this regularization is linked here with the existence and properties of a nontrivial topological invariant for a closed space ribbon. This self-linking coefficient, an integer, is the sum of two differential characteristics of the ribbon, its twisting and writhing numbers. These invariants form the basis for a physical interpretation of our regularization. Their connection to Polyakov’s spinorization is discussed. We further generalize our construction to the self-linking, twisting and writhing of higher dimensional d=n (odd) submanifolds in D=(2n+1) space-time. Our comprehensive analysis intends to supplement Polyakov’s work as it identifies a natural path to its higher dimensional mathematical and physical generalizations. Combining the theorems of White on self-linking of manifolds and of Adams on nontrivial Hopf fibre bundles and the four composition-division algebras, we argue that besides Polyakov’s case where (d, D)=(1, 3) tied to complex numbers, the potentially interesting extensions are two chiral models with (d, D)=(3, 7) and (7, 15) uniquely linked to quaternions and octonions. In Memoriam Richard P. Feynman

  5. 40 CFR 721.9285 - Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction products of formalin (37... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9285 Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12. (a) Chemical... as reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12 (PMN P-95-535) is subject to reporting...

  6. 40 CFR 721.9285 - Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reaction products of formalin (37... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9285 Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12. (a) Chemical... as reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12 (PMN P-95-535) is subject to reporting...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9285 - Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reaction products of formalin (37... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9285 Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12. (a) Chemical... as reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12 (PMN P-95-535) is subject to reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9285 - Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reaction products of formalin (37... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9285 Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12. (a) Chemical... as reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12 (PMN P-95-535) is subject to reporting...

  9. Valproic acid-induced hyperammonaemic coma and unrecognised portosystemic shunt.

    PubMed

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Carrapatoso, Leonor; Ferreira, Fátima; Basilio, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    Hyperammonaemic encephalopathy is a rare and potentially fatal complication of valproic acid treatment. The clinical presentation of hyperammonaemic encephalopathy is wide and includes seizures and coma. We present a case of hyperammonaemic coma precipitated by sodium valproate use for symptomatic epilepsy in a patient with unrecognised portosystemic shunt, secondary to earlier alcoholism. The absence of any stigmata of chronic liver disease and laboratory markers of liver dysfunction delayed the recognition of this alcohol-related complication. The portal vein bypass led to a refractory, valproic acid-induced hyperammonaemic coma. The patient fully recovered after dialysis treatment.

  10. Antinociceptive profiles and mechanisms of orally administered coumarin in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Hyun; Sim, Yun-Beom; Kang, Yu-Jung; Kim, Sung-Su; Kim, Chea-Ha; Kim, Su-Jin; Lim, Su-Min; Suh, Hong-Won

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the antinociceptive profiles of coumarin were examined in ICR mice. Coumarin administered orally (from 1 to 10 mg/kg) showed an antinociceptive effect in a dose-dependent manner as measured in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Duration of antinociceptive action of coumarin maintained at least for 60 min. But, the cumulative response time of nociceptive behaviors induced by a subcutaneous (s.c.) formalin injection, intrathecal (i.t.) substance P (0.7 µg) or glutamate (20 µg) injection was not affected by coumarin. In addition, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) or intrathecal (i.t.) administration with coumarin (10-40 µg) attenuated acetic acid-induced writhing response in a dose dependent manner. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) pretreatment with naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist) attenuated antinociceptive effect induced by coumarin in the writhing test. Furthermore, i.c.v. or i.t. pretreatment with naloxone (5 µg) reversed the decreased acetic acid-induced writhing response. However, methysergide (a 5-HT serotonergic receptor antagonist) or yohimbine (an α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist) did not affect antinociception induced by coumarin in the writhing test. Our results suggest that coumarin exerts a selective antinociceptive property in the acetic acid-induced visceral-derived pain model. Furthermore, the antinociceptive effect of coumarin may be mediated by activation of central opioid receptors, but not serotonergic and adrenergic receptors.

  11. Synergism between tramadol and parecoxib in the orofacial formalin test.

    PubMed

    Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario Alberto; Zapata-Morales, Juan Ramón; Castañeda-Santana, Demian Ismael; de la Rosa-Coronado, Maximiliano; Aragon-Martinez, Othoniel Hugo

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the interaction between tramadol and parecoxib in the orofacial formalin test. Tramadol (10, 31.6, 56, and 100 mg/kg ip) or parecoxib (31.6, 56, 100, and 178 mg/kg ip) were administered 10 min before formalin (2.5%) injection into the upper lip to characterize the dose-response curve of each individual drug in the orofacial pain test in mice. Once the dose-response curve of each drug was obtained, an experimental effective dose 50 (ED50 ) value was determined for each drug. The tramadol-parecoxib combination was evaluated in four different groups of animals. The isobolographic analysis and the interaction index were used to evaluate the nature of interaction between both drugs. The isobologram and the interaction index showed increased in the antinociceptive effect of the combination. The tramadol-parecoxib combination produces a synergism in the second phase of the orofacial formalin test.

  12. Increased isoprostane levels in oleic acid-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Koichi; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Tsushima, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Sumiko; Yokoyama, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Rikimaru; Obata, Toru

    2009-10-16

    The present study was performed to examine a role of oxidative stress in oleic acid-induced lung injury model. Fifteen anesthetized sheep were ventilated and instrumented with a lung lymph fistula and vascular catheters for blood gas analysis and measurement of isoprostanes (8-epi prostaglandin F2{alpha}). Following stable baseline measurements, oleic acid (0.08 ml/kg) was administered and observed 4 h. Isoprostane was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with the isotope dilution method. Isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph were significantly increased 2 h after oleic acid administration and then decreased at 4 h. The percent increases in isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph at 2 h were significantly correlated with deteriorated oxygenation at the same time point, respectively. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of the pulmonary fat embolism-induced acute lung injury model in sheep and that the increase relates with the deteriorated oxygenation.

  13. [Sunitinib and zoledronic acid induced osteonecrosis of the jaw].

    PubMed

    Soós, Balázs; Vajta, László; Szalma, József

    2015-11-15

    The tendency for bisphosphonate and non-bisphosphonate (eg.: antiresorptive or anti-angiogenesis drugs) induced osteonecrosis is increasing. Treatment of these patients is a challenge both for dentists and for oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Cooperation with the drug prescribing general medicine colleagues to prevent osteonecrosis is extremely important. Furthermore, prevention should include dental focus elimination, oral hygienic instructions and education, dental follow-up and, in case of manifest necrosis, referral to maxillofacial departments. Authors outline the difficulties of conservative and surgical treatment of a patient with sunitinib and zoledronic acid induced osteonecrosis. The patient became symptomless and the operated area healed entirely six and twelve months postoperatively. A long term success further follow-up is necessary to verify long-term success.

  14. A High Throughput Combinatorial Library Technique for Identifying Formalin-Sensitive Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Vani, Kodela; Bogen, Steven A.; Sompuram, Seshi R.

    2007-01-01

    We present a technique for identifying the amino acids responsible for a loss of immunoreactivity in response to treating an antigen with a chemical modifier. This is of particular interest for the chemical formaldehyde, the cross-linking agent in formalin. Formalin is a commonly used fixative to preserve the cellular architecture of cells and tissues and to prevent degradation from proteases and nucleases. Formalin is also routinely used in the preparation of vaccines, to inactivate both toxins and microbes. Formalin fixation attenuates infectivity and pathogenicity by cross-linking while often preserving antigenicity. However, some epitopes are irreversibly modified by formalin while others are not. An understanding of how formalin affects epitope immunoreactivity may be useful in vaccine development or in the development of diagnostic antibody reagents for formalin-fixed tissues. In this report, we describe a method for systematically identifying formalin-sensitive and formalin-insensitive epitopes in a high throughput fashion, for any particular antibody. The data from this effort underscore the importance of certain amino acids, notably lysine, in affecting antibody immunoreactivity after formalin fixation. The method can be generally applicable in exploring the sensitivity of protein epitopes to an agent or condition of interest. PMID:17056057

  15. Vibrational spectroscopy studies of formalin-fixed cervix tissues.

    PubMed

    Krishna, C M; Sockalingum, G D; Vadhiraja, B M; Maheedhar, K; Rao, A C K; Rao, L; Venteo, L; Pluot, M; Fernandes, D J; Vidyasagar, M S; Kartha, V B; Manfait, M

    2007-02-15

    Optical histopathology is fast emerging as a potential tool in cancer diagnosis. Fresh tissues in saline are ideal samples for optical histopathology. However, evaluation of suitability of ex vivo handled tissues is necessitated because of severe constraints in sample procurement, handling, and other associated problems with fresh tissues. Among these methods, formalin-fixed samples are shown to be suitable for optical histopathology. However, it is necessary to further evaluate this method from the point of view discriminating tissues with minute biochemical variations. A pilot Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopic studies of formalin-fixed tissues normal, malignant, and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy from the same malignant cervix subjects were carried out, with an aim to explore the feasibility of discriminating these tissues, especially the tissues after-2-fractions of radiotherapy from other two groups. Raman and FTIR spectra exhibit large differences for normal and malignant tissues and subtle differences are seen between malignant and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy tissues. Spectral data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and it provided good discrimination of normal and malignant tissues. PCA of data of three tissues, normal, malignant, and 2-fractions after radiotherapy, gave two clusters corresponding to normal and malignant + after-2-fractions of radiotherapy tissues. A second step of PCA was required to achieve discrimination between malignant and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy tissues. Hence, this study not only further supports the use of formalin-fixed tissues in optical histopathology, especially from Raman spectroscopy point of view, it also indicates feasibility of discriminating tissues with minute biochemical differences such as malignant and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy.

  16. Formalin injection produces long-lasting hypersensitivity with characteristics of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Abarca, Ana Belen; Avila-Rojas, Sabino Hazael; Barragán-Iglesias, Paulino; Pineda-Farias, Jorge Baruch; Granados-Soto, Vinicio

    2017-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether 1%, 2% or 5% formalin injection produce hypersensitivity with characteristics of the neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve injury. Formalin injection (1%, 2% and 5%) produced concentration-dependent long-lasting (at least 14 days) mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia in both paws. Likewise, L5/L6 spinal nerve ligation induced allodynia and hyperalgesia in both paws. The intensity of hypersensitivity was greater in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral paw in all models. Systemic gabapentin or morphine completely reduced 1% formalin-induced hypersensitivity. In contrast, both drugs were not able to fully diminish 2-5% formalin- and nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity. Indomethacin produced a significant effect in the chronic 1% formalin test. Conversely, this drug did not modify 2 or 5% formalin- and nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity. Spinal nerve injury and 2-5%, but not 1%, formalin injection enhanced ATF3 protein expression and immunofluorescence in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, 2-5%, but not 1%, formalin injection or spinal nerve injury also enhanced α2δ-1 subunit protein levels in DRG. Our results suggest that 5% and, at lesser extent, 2% formalin injection produces long-lasting hypersensitivity with a pharmacological and molecular pattern that resembles neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve ligation.

  17. Computerized image analysis for acetic acid induced intraepithelial lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Ferris, Daron G.; Lieberman, Rich W.

    2008-03-01

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) exhibits certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Immature and dysphasic cervical squamous epithelium turns white after application of acetic acid during the exam. The whitening process occurs visually over several minutes and subjectively discriminates between dysphasic and normal tissue. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician analyzing the acetic acid induced lesions (acetowhite region) in a fully automatic way. This paper reports a study designed to measure multiple parameters of the acetowhitening process from two images captured with a digital colposcope. One image is captured before the acetic acid application, and the other is captured after the acetic acid application. The spatial change of the acetowhitening is extracted using color and texture information in the post acetic acid image; the temporal change is extracted from the intensity and color changes between the post acetic acid and pre acetic acid images with an automatic alignment. The imaging and data analysis system has been evaluated with a total of 99 human subjects and demonstrate its potential to screening underserved women where access to skilled colposcopists is limited.

  18. Oleic acid-induced mucosal injury in developing piglet intestine.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, O R; Henninger, K; Fowler, M; Tso, P; Crissinger, K D

    1993-03-01

    A role for luminal nutrients, in particular products of lipid digestion, in the pathogenesis of mucosal injury to developing intestine has been postulated. We evaluated changes in mucosal permeability and light and electron microscopic histology induced by luminal perfusion with the long-chain fatty acid oleate in developing piglet intestine as a function of age and concentration of the fatty acid. 51Cr-labeled EDTA plasma-to-lumen clearance was measured in jejunum and ileum of 1-day-, 3-day-, 2-wk-, and 1-mo-old piglets during sequential perfusion with saline control (20 min); 0, 1, 5, and 10 mM oleic acid/10 mM taurocholate in saline (20 min); and normal saline (60 min). The jejunum of piglets < or = 2 wk showed significantly greater increases in mucosal permeability compared with 1-mo-old animals after perfusion with oleic acid. This effect was dependent on the luminal concentration of the fatty acid and was associated with mucosal injury evident under light and electron microscopy. In contrast, the overall response in ileum was more attenuated compared with jejunum. Thus oleic acid, a common dietary fatty acid, induces dose- and age-dependent injury in developing piglet intestine. Investigation of the mechanisms of this injury may provide the basis for dietary modifications directed at decreasing the risk of mucosal injury during enteral feeding in neonatal intestine.

  19. Unsaturated fatty acids induce non-canonical autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Niso-Santano, Mireia; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Pietrocola, Federico; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Mariño, Guillermo; Cianfanelli, Valentina; Ben-Younès, Amena; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Markaki, Maria; Sica, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Chaba, Kariman; Bauvy, Chantal; Dupont, Nicolas; Kepp, Oliver; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Wolinski, Heimo; Madeo, Frank; Lavandero, Sergio; Codogno, Patrice; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Cecconi, Francesco; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-01-01

    To obtain mechanistic insights into the cross talk between lipolysis and autophagy, two key metabolic responses to starvation, we screened the autophagy-inducing potential of a panel of fatty acids in human cancer cells. Both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids such as palmitate and oleate, respectively, triggered autophagy, but the underlying molecular mechanisms differed. Oleate, but not palmitate, stimulated an autophagic response that required an intact Golgi apparatus. Conversely, autophagy triggered by palmitate, but not oleate, required AMPK, PKR and JNK1 and involved the activation of the BECN1/PIK3C3 lipid kinase complex. Accordingly, the downregulation of BECN1 and PIK3C3 abolished palmitate-induced, but not oleate-induced, autophagy in human cancer cells. Moreover, Becn1+/− mice as well as yeast cells and nematodes lacking the ortholog of human BECN1 mounted an autophagic response to oleate, but not palmitate. Thus, unsaturated fatty acids induce a non-canonical, phylogenetically conserved, autophagic response that in mammalian cells relies on the Golgi apparatus. PMID:25586377

  20. Sphingoid bases inhibit acid-induced demineralization of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van 't Hof, Wim; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Sotres, Javier; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H(+) ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products.

  1. Proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed prostate cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Hood, Brian L; Darfler, Marlene M; Guiel, Thomas G; Furusato, Bungo; Lucas, David A; Ringeisen, Bradley R; Sesterhenn, Isabell A; Conrads, Thomas P; Veenstra, Timothy D; Krizman, David B

    2005-11-01

    Proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue would enable retrospective biomarker investigations of this vast archive of pathologically characterized clinical samples that exist worldwide. These FFPE tissues are, however, refractory to proteomic investigations utilizing many state of the art methodologies largely due to the high level of covalently cross-linked proteins arising from formalin fixation. A novel tissue microdissection technique has been developed and combined with a method to extract soluble peptides directly from FFPE tissue for mass spectral analysis of prostate cancer (PCa) and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). Hundreds of proteins from PCa and BPH tissue were identified, including several known PCa markers such as prostate-specific antigen, prostatic acid phosphatase, and macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1. Quantitative proteomic profiling utilizing stable isotope labeling confirmed similar expression levels of prostate-specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase in BPH and PCa cells, whereas the expression of macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 was found to be greater in PCa as compared with BPH cells.

  2. Peripheral synergism between tramadol and ibuprofen in the formalin test.

    PubMed

    Chavarria-Bolaños, Daniel; Perez-Urizar, José; Grandfils, Christian; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury

    2014-06-01

    Preclinical Research Analgesics with different mechanisms of action can be combined in order to obtain pharmacological synergism, employing lower doses of each agent, thus diminishing side effects. For instance, an atypical dual analgesic such as tramadol (TMD) and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug such as ibuprofen (IBU) are good candidates to be evaluated when combined and applied peripherally. The present study was conducted to evaluate possible local synergism between TMD and IBU when combined peripherally using the formalin test in rats. The effects of the individual analgesics and their combinations were evaluated simultaneously using a 5% formalin dilution. Dose-effect curves were determined for TMD (50-400 μg/paw) and IBU (1-100 μg/paw). Experimental effective doses were evaluated and isobolographic analyses were constructed to evaluate TMD-IBU combination synergism. Both drugs produced a dose-dependent analgesic effect when applied separately. Isobolographic analysis showed synergism during phase 1 (0-10 min) and phase 2 (15-60 min) when compared with theoretical doses (P < 0.05), with interaction indexes of 0.06 and 0.09, respectively. The present information supports the peripheral analgesic effect of TMD and IBU, especially when combined at appropriate doses.

  3. Involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress in formalin-induced pain is attenuated by 4-phenylbutyric acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fan; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Jianmei; Li, Meirong; Zhong, Feng; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Yuezhu; Wang, Yaping

    2017-01-01

    Background Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in many neurological and inflammatory responses. Peripheral inflammatory responses can induce central sensitization and trigger inflammatory pain. However, there is little research on the relationship between ER stress and inflammatory pain. In this study, we examined whether the ER stress response is involved in peripheral inflammatory pain using a formalin-induced rat pain model. Methods Rats were divided into the following five groups: control, formalin, formalin + vehicle, formalin + 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) (40 mg/kg) and formalin + 4-PBA (100 mg/kg). Formalin-induced pain was assessed behaviorally by recording licking activity. The expression levels of immunoglobulin-binding protein (BIP), activating transcription factor-6 (ATF6), phosphorylated inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (p-IRE1), phosphorylated protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (p-PERK) and c-fos were quantitatively assessed by Western blot, and the distribution of BIP, ATF6 and c-fos in the lumbar enlargement of spinal cord were identified by immunohistochemistry in spinal dorsal horn slices. In addition, the concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the spinal cord were tested by biochemical measurement and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Results Intraperitoneal injection of 4-PBA at the dose of 100 mg/kg before formalin injection significantly decreased nociceptive behavior in the second phase compared with control, formalin, formalin + vehicle and formalin + 4-PBA (40 mg/kg) (P<0.05). Western blot showed that formalin injection significantly upregulated the expression of BIP, ATF6, p-PERK and c-fos in the spinal cord. This upregulation was reduced by peritoneal injection of 4-PBA (P<0.05), while expression of p-IRE1 was not altered by formalin treatment. Immunohistochemistry revealed markedly increased staining density for BIP, ATF6 and c-fos in the superficial spinal dorsal horn after

  4. Efficacy and toxicity of formalin solutions containing paraformaldehyde for fish and egg treatments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howe, G.E.; Marking, L.L.; Bills, T.D.; Schreier, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    Formalin used for fish and egg treatments at hatcheries often develops a white precipitate called paraformaldehyde when stored at low temperatures. This presents a problem for hatchery managers because most of the literature and treatment procedures claim that formalin containing paraformaldehyde is more toxic than pure formalin and is not safe for fish or egg treatments. Acute toxicity tests with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) showed that the toxicity of formalin solutions containing a moderate amount of fine paraformaldehyde was similar to that of pure formalin. In efficacy tests on fish eggs, the bottom fraction of a formalin solution containing paraformaldehyde and a sample from the clear top fraction were equally effective in controlling fungal infection on rainbow trout eggs and caused no treatment-related mortality. Chemical assays found on average a 3% difference in formaldehyde concentration between top and bottom fractions of a formalin solution containing paraformaldehyde. We recommend normal use of formalin solutions containing light to moderate amounts of fine paraformaldehyde. Allowing solutions to warm to room temperature may resolubilize moderate amounts of paraformaldehyde if the exposure to cold was not prolonged. If precipitation is heavier, clear top fractions can be decanted and used as normal because paraformaldehyde settles to the bottom of containers. Formalin solutions that have been exposed to freezing temperatures for long periods (more than 6 weeks) and have developed large amounts of paraformaldehyde solids should not be used and resolubilization by warming is not possible. Formation of paraformaldehyde in formalin solutions can be easily avoided by storing formalin at room temperature.

  5. Acid-induced unfolding mechanism of recombinant human endostatin.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Wu, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Hao; Chen, Qianjie; Luo, Yongzhang

    2004-03-09

    Endostatin is a potent angiogenesis inhibitor. The structure of endostatin is unique in that its secondary structure is mainly irregular loops and beta-sheets and contains only a small fraction of alpha-helices with two pairs of disulfide bonds in a nested pattern. We choose human endostatin as a model system to study the folding mechanism of this kind. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), tryptophan emission fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) were used to monitor the unfolding process of endostatin upon acid titration. Urea-induced unfolding was used to measure the stability of endostatin under different conditions. Our results show that endostatin is very acid-resistant; some native structure still remains even at pH 2 as evidenced by (1)H NMR. Trifluoroethanol (TFE) destabilizes native endostatin, while it makes endostatin even more acid-resistant in the low pH region. Stability measurement of endostatin suggests that endostatin is still in native structure at pH 3.5 despite the decreased stability. Acid-induced unfolding of endostatin is reversible, although it requires a long time to reach equilibrium below pH 3. Surprisingly, the alpha-helical content of endostatin is increased when it is unfolded at pH 1.6, and the alpha-helical content of the polypeptide chain of unfolded endostatin increases linearly with TFE concentration in the range of 0-30%. This observation indicates that the polypeptide chain of unfolded endostatin has an intrinsic alpha-helical propensity. Our discoveries may provide clues for refolding endostatin more efficiently. The acid-resistance property of endostatin may have biological significance in that it cannot be easily digested by proteases in an acidic environment such as in a lysosome in the cell.

  6. Chemical Facial Cellulitis Due to Inadvertent Injection of Formalin into Oral Tissue Space

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Pawandeep Sandhu; Arakeri, Gururaj

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the accidental injection of formalin into oral tissue space, in an 8-year old child resulting in chemical facial necrotizing cellulitis and its management. The common practice of keeping formalin in local anesthesia vials should be avoided by dental clinics, to prevent such unfortunate incidents. PMID:26918101

  7. High dose of ascorbic acid induces cell death in mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Yukitoshi; Satoh, Motohiko; Satoh, Kiyotoshi; Hamada, Hironobu; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Kubota, Shunichiro

    2010-04-02

    Malignant mesothelioma is an asbestos-related fatal disease with no effective cure. Recently, high dose of ascorbate in cancer treatment has been reexamined. We studied whether high dose of ascorbic acid induced cell death of four human mesothelioma cell lines. High dose of ascorbic acid induced cell death of all mesothelioma cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. We further clarified the cell killing mechanism that ascorbic acid induced reactive oxygen species and impaired mitochondrial membrane potential. In vivo experiment, intravenous administration of ascorbic acid significantly decreased the growth rate of mesothelioma tumor inoculated in mice. These data suggest that ascorbic acid may have benefits for patients with mesothelioma.

  8. Revelation in the Field of Tissue Preservation – A Preliminary Study on Natural Formalin Substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Shankargouda; Premalatha, BR; Rao, Roopa S; Ganavi, BS

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The quest for formalin substitutes has long been going on due to its health hazards. Honey has been proven as a safe alternative to formalin. However, we explored more economical, eco-friendly & readily available substances like sugar & jaggery as natural substitutes for formalin. The aim of this study was to compare the tissue fixation abilities of honey, sugar syrup & jaggery syrup with that of formalin using H & E stain and to determine the best fixative among the three. Materials and Methods: Commercially available fresh goat meat (buccal mucosa) was cut into five bits & each bit was placed in five different containers containing 10% buffered formalin, distilled water, 20% honey, 20% sugar syrup & 30% jaggery syrup with formalin as positive control & distilled water as negative control. 24 hours tissue fixation was attained at room temperature followed by conventional processing and staining. The tissue sections were assessed for cytoplasmic, nuclear details & staining quality under light microscopy. Each criteria was rated on a scale of 1- 4 (1 for poor & 4 for excellent) & the whole procedure was blinded. Results were analysed by Kruskal Wallis ANOVA test. Inter-observer variability was determined by Kappa statistics. Results: The preservation of tissue by honey, sugar & jaggery syrup was comparable to that of formalin. Among the three natural fixatives, jaggery syrup excelled. Conclusion: Our effort of using sugar and jaggery for tissue fixation is first of its kind and yielded good results. Hence they can be successfully adopted in routine histopathology laboratories in place of formalin. Clinical relevance: Natural fixatives can be used in place of the hazardous formalin with equal efficiency. Also, jaggery being highly economical and universally available can be employed in large scale as in screening camps. How to cite this article: Patil S, Premalatha B R, Rao R S, Ganavi B S. Revelation in the Field of Tissue Preservation – A

  9. Physiological evidence that the 'interphase' in the formalin test is due to active inhibition.

    PubMed

    Henry, J L; Yashpal, K; Pitcher, G M; Coderre, T J

    1999-07-01

    Injection of a dilute solution of formalin into a rat hindpaw produces a biphasic nociceptive response consisting of an early phase during the first 5 min after formalin injection and a later phase starting after 15 min and lasting for 40-50 min. The period between the two phases of nociceptive responding is generally considered to be a phase of inactivity. We compared the nociceptive behaviors produced by a single hindpaw injection of 50 microl of formalin with those produced by two formalin injections given 20 min apart. A single formalin injection at concentrations of either 1 or 2.5%, produced the typical biphasic nociceptive responses. In rats given a second injection of either 1 or 2.5% formalin 20 min after the first, a triphasic response occurred, with a second diminution of nociceptive behavior observed between 10 and 15 min after the second injection. When a second injection of 2.5% formalin was given 5 min after the first, there was no difference from the scores in the group given only one injection. In electrophysiological experiments on single dorsal horn nociceptive neurons, a second injection of 2.5% formalin into the peripheral cutaneous receptive field, 40 min after the first and at the same site of injection as the first formalin injection, depressed neuronal activity for approximately 15-20 min. From the data it can be concluded that the interphase period in the formalin test is due to active inhibition. Furthermore, the inhibition which we are reporting here is independent of the concentration of formalin used, and thus of any so-called inflammatory component. The lack of additive nociceptive effects when the inter-injection interval was only 5 min, suggests that a maximum inhibition was provoked by 2.5% formalin; it can also be concluded that the active inhibition is of overriding importance physiologically, compared with the nociceptive activity. Data from parallel electrophysiological experiments on spinal dorsal horn neurons demonstrated a

  10. Effects of formalin fixation on tissue optical properties of in-vitro brain samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Martelli, Fabrizio; Giordano, Flavio; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Guerrini, Renzo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-03-01

    Application of light spectroscopy based techniques for the detection of cancers have emerged as a promising approach for tumor diagnostics. In-vivo or freshly excised samples are normally used for point spectroscopic studies. However, ethical issues related to in-vivo studies, rapid decay of surgically excised tissues and sample availability puts a limitation on in-vivo and in-vitro studies. There has been a few studies reported on the application of formalin fixed samples with good discrimination capability. Usually formalin fixation is performed to prevent degradation of tissues after surgical resection. Fixing tissues in formalin prevents cell death by forming cross-linkages with proteins. Previous investigations have revealed that washing tissues fixed in formalin using phosphate buffered saline is known to reduce the effects of formalin during spectroscopic measurements. But this could not be the case with reflectance measurements. Hemoglobin is a principal absorbing medium in biological tissues in the visible range. Formalin fixation causes hemoglobin to seep out from red blood cells. Also, there could be alterations in the refractive index of tissues when fixed in formalin. In this study, we propose to investigate the changes in tissue optical properties between freshly excised and formalin fixed brain tissues. The results indicate a complete change in the spectral profile in the visible range where hemoglobin has its maximum absorption peaks. The characteristic bands of oxy-hemoglobin at 540, 580 nm and deoxy-hemoglobin at 555 nm disappear in the case of samples fixed in formalin. In addition, an increased spectral intensity was observed for the wavelengths greater than 650 nm where scattering phenomena are presumed to dominate.

  11. Tranexamic acid induces kaolin intake stimulating a pathway involving tachykinin neurokinin 1 receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchi, Hitoshi; Kawarai-Shimamura, Asako; Kuwagata, Makiko; Orito, Kensuke

    2014-01-15

    Tranexamic acid suppresses post-partum haemorrhage and idiopathic menorrhagia through its anti-fibrinolytic action. Although it is clinically useful, it is associated with high risks of side effects such as emesis. Understanding the mechanisms underlying tranexamic acid-induced emesis is very important to explore appropriate anti-emetic drugs for the prevention and/or suppression of emesis. In this study, we examined the receptors involved in tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake in rats, which reflects the drug's clinical emetogenic potential in humans. Further, we examined the brain regions activated by administration of tranexamic acid and elucidated pivotal pathways of tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake. We examined the effects of ondansetron, a 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonist, domperidone, a dopamine 2 receptor antagonist, and aprepitant, a tachykinin neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor antagonist, on tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake in rats. Then, we determined the brain regions that showed increased numbers of c-Fos immunoreactive cells. Finally, we examined the effects of an antagonist(s) that reduced tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake on the increase in c-Fos immunoreactive cells. Aprepitant significantly decreased tranexamic acid-induced kaolin intake. However, neither ondansetron nor domperidone decreased kaolin intake. Tranexamic acid significantly increased c-Fos immunoreactive cells by approximately 5.5-fold and 22-fold in the area postrema and nucleus of solitary tract, respectively. Aprepitant decreased the number of c-Fos immunoreactive cells in both areas. Tranexamic acid induced kaolin intake possibly via stimulation of tachykinin NK1 receptors in rats. The tachykinin NK1 receptor could be targeted to prevent and/or suppress emesis in patients receiving tranexamic acid.

  12. Pulmonary function test in formalin exposed and nonexposed subjects: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Uthiravelu, P.; Saravanan, A.; Kumar, C. Kishor; Vaithiyanandane, V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The main function of the lung is gas exchange, which can be assessed in several ways. A spirometer measures the flow and the volumes of the inspired and expired air. The thoracic and abdominal muscle strength plays an important role in pulmonary function and diffusing lung capacity. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of formalin exposure on the pulmonary function to compare with healthy individuals. To assess the chronic effects of formalin exposure on Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in the faculties, lab technicians and attender of the Department of Anatomy and Pathology of SRM Medical Hospital and Research Centre, Kattankulathur. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was carried out in 50 healthy formalin exposed subjects (at least 5 years exposure) from Department of Anatomy and Pathology of SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Kattankulathur and 50 healthy controls of same age group of this study were included after obtaining ethical clearance and consent ‘Easy One Pro Spirometer (Ndd Medical Technologies, Cheshire SK 101LT, United Kingdom) was used to find out the PFT. Results: Student's t-test was applied to compare the PFT parameters between formalin exposed and formalin nonexposed group. There was a significant difference in mean and standard deviation of pulmonary parameters with the P < 0.005 in formalin exposed, which shows that they have lesser ventilatory drive. Conclusion: The formalin exposed subjects in our study presented with a mixed disorder of both obstructive and restrictive type. We also found that there was a negative correlation of pulmonary function with that of the degree and duration of exposure to formalin. PMID:26015743

  13. Intrathecal L-arginine reduces the antinociception of sevoflurane in formalin-induced pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Qing; Zeng, Yin-Ming; Dai, Ti-Jun; Tang, Qi-Feng

    2015-03-17

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of spinal nitric oxide (NO) to the antinociceptive effects of emulsified sevoflurane in rats. Formalin tests were used to assess the nociceptive response. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the effects of emulsified sevoflurane on formalin-induced changes of Fos-like immunoreactive (Fos-LI)-positive neurons in the spinal cord. We found that emulsified sevoflurane administered intraperitoneally at a dosage of 2.5 ml/kg did not impair motor performance in rats, but it significantly decreased the formalin-induced paw licking time. Furthermore, Fos-LI-positive neurons were mainly found in the ipsilateral dorsal horn after the injection of formalin. The administration of emulsified sevoflurane significantly decreased Fos-LI-labeled neurons. Finally, intrathecal L-arginine alone did not affect the basal pain threshold, but it significantly decreased the antinociceptive response of emulsified sevoflurane against formalin injection and the suppressive effects of sevoflurane on formalin-induced Fos protein expression (P<0.05). These data suggest that spinal cord NO is involved in the antinociception of sevoflurane in rats.

  14. Formalin pain does not modify food-hoarding behaviour in male rats.

    PubMed

    Aloisi, A M; Carli, G

    1996-04-01

    Many animal species hoard food by carrying it to their home area. In this experiment we evaluated the interaction between persistent (formalin) pain and food-hoarding behaviour. A food-hoarding apparatus, consisting of a home cage connected with an alley at the end of which were placed food pellets, was used to test (60 min each day) food-restricted rats which had been familiarized with the apparatus for three days. Three groups of animals were used, one of which was tested in the apparatus in the absence of pellets. On the day of testing, the two groups of rats allowed to perform food-hoarding were either sham- or formalin-injected (50 μl, 10%) in the dorsal surface of the hind paw immediately before testing; the third group, not allowed to hoard pellets, was also injected with formalin. In animals treated with formalin, the availability of food resulted in shorter durations of Licking, Self-Grooming and Inactivity. In animals allowed to hoard food, formalin injection affected neither hoarding parameters nor exploratory activities. Our results show that, in food-restricted rats, food-hoarding behaviour is not modified by persistent nociceptive stimuli while Licking, a complex response to formalin pain, is decreased by the drive to relieve hunger.

  15. Experimental studies on the acute cardiovascular toxicity of formalin and its antidotal treatment.

    PubMed

    Strubelt, O; Brasch, H; Pentz, R; Younes, M

    1990-01-01

    Rats anesthetized with pentobarbital and ventilated artificially were infused with 0.01 ml formalin (= 0.12 mmol formaldehyde)/kg.min. They exhibited a sharp decline of arterial blood pressure, heart rate and peripheral resistance and a slower one of cardiac output and died after 59.9 +/- 6.0 min of infusion. Sinus bradycardia and, in some cases, AV-arrhythmia occurred in the ECG. The additional infusion with cysteine attenuated the cardiovascular failure and more than doubled the survival time of formalin-infused rats. Infusion of N-acetylcysteine or correction of formalin-induced metabolic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate, on the other hand, did not exert antidotal activity. On isolated rat atria in vitro, formalin decreased the rate and the contractility and cysteine antagonized these effects of formalin. In conclusion, the severe and often lethal incidents observed following the therapeutic administration of formalin are due to the cardiovascular-depressive activity of formaldehyde and may be antagonized by cysteine.

  16. Toxicity of formalin, malachite green, and the mixture to four life stages of rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bills, Terry D.; Advised by: Hosler, Charles F.; Cumming, Kenneth B.; Nord, Richard P.; Senff, Robert E.

    1974-01-01

    Formalin, malachite green, or a mixture of them are utilized in fish culture for control of external parasites of fish and control of fungus on fish and fish eggs. Very little information is available concerning the toxicity of these compounds to fish under laboratory test conditions or the differences in sensitivity to these chemicals at various life stages. This study was designed to 1) determine the toxicity of formalin, malachite green and the mixture to four life stages of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) under various laboratory test conditions, 2) determine the degradation of formalin and malachite green in water, 3) determine the effect of additive toxicity, and 4) determine the differences in sensitivity of two different lots of eggs to the chemicals. The 96-hour LC50 (lethal concentration required to produce 50% mortality) for formalin against rainbow trout in soft water ranged from 580 micrograms/liter for the eyed egg stage to 134 micrograms/liter for the fingerling stage. The 96-hour LC50 for malachite green against rainbow trout in soft water ranged from 2.00 mg/L for the eyed egg stage to 0.0224 mg/L for the fingerling stage. The additive indices for formalin and malachite green when applied in combination show strictly additive toxicity as the ranges overlap zero in all tests. Deactivation indices for formalin and malachite green show essentially no change in toxicity of the solutions to rainbow trout when aged for periods of 1, 2, and 3 weeks.

  17. The anti-nociceptive potential of tilmicosin against chemical-induced but not thermal-induced pain in mice.

    PubMed

    El-Mahmoudy, A; Gheith, I

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the analgesic activity of the macrolide antibiotic tilmicosin at dose levels of 20 and 40 mg/kg of body weight, subcutaneously, against chemical- and thermal-induced acute pains, using acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin-induced pain, hot-plate, and tail-flick models in mice. Tilmicosin showed a dose-dependent significant decrease in the number of writhes in the acetic acid-induced writhing test and significant decrease in hind paw-licking time in the late phase of the formalin test. However, it did not cause any significant changes in the reaction times to heat stimuli in the hot-plate and tail-flick models. In chemically-induced pains, both dose levels of tilmicosin showed significant effects compared to those of the corresponding standard peripheral analgesic, acetylsalicylic acid (200 mg/kg of body weight, subcutaneously) being 26.37±2.88 and 43.64±3.85% vs. 73.35±1.44% in acetic acid test; and 19.23±3.85 and 44.90±1.80% vs. 73.63±2.39% in the late phase of formalin test, respectively. These results may indicate that tilmicosin possesses a significant peripheral but not central analgesic potential that may be beneficial in symptomatic relief of pain when it is used in therapy, in addition to its well-established antibacterial effect.

  18. Efficacy of formalin, copper sulfate, and a commercial footbath product in the control of digital dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A G V; Machado, V S; Caixeta, L S; Pereira, R V; Bicalho, R C

    2010-08-01

    The objective was to evaluate the relative efficacy of a novel, commercially available disinfectant agent (T-Hexx Dragonhyde HBC, Hydromer, Branchburg, NJ) compared with formalin and copper sulfate. The hypothesis was 2 sided; therefore, the hypothesis was that the new agent would be better or worse compared with the industry gold standard footbath agents, formalin and copper sulfate. The study was conducted in a large commercial dairy farm located near Ithaca, New York, from June 18, 2009 to October 26, 2009. Two identical studies were conducted, the first comparing Dragonhyde (5% solution, twice weekly) and formalin (5% solution, twice weekly) and the second comparing Dragonhyde (5% solution, twice weekly) and copper sulfate (10% solution, twice weekly). The study design was identical for both studies with 4 pens (physically identical), 2 treatments (Dragonhyde vs. formalin and Dragonhyde vs. copper sulfate), 2 periods (crossing over the treatment within pen), and 3 repeated measures (3 observations per cow: enrollment, wk 2, and wk 4). For study 1, 406 cows were enrolled (n=201 formalin and 205 Dragonhyde). For study 2, 356 cows were enrolled (n=189 copper sulfate and 167 Dragonhyde). The adjusted odds of digital dermatitis lesion (DDL) throughout the study period were analyzed by mixed logistic regression model. In study 1, the odds of DDL were 1.36 times higher for the formalin group compared with the Dragonhyde group. In study 2, the data were analyzed by a similar statistical model and the variable treatment did not significantly affect the overall prevalence of DDL. In conclusion, the performance of 3 hoof care products was evaluated and it was concluded that Dragonhyde performed better than formalin and that there was no difference between copper sulfate and Dragonhyde.

  19. MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory


    MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated the hepatocarcinogenicity of DCA in rodents when administered in dri...

  20. Antinociceptive effect of amygdalin isolated from Prunus armeniaca on formalin-induced pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Pil; Kim, Chang-Ju; Lee, Hye-Jung; Shim, Insop; Yin, Chang Shik; Yang, Young; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2008-08-01

    Amygdalin is a plant glucoside isolated from the stones of rosaceous fruits, such as apricots, peaches, almond, cherries, and plums. To investigate the pain-relieving activity of amygdalin, we induced pain in rats through intraplantar injection of formalin, and evaluated the antinociceptive effect of amygdalin at doses of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 10.0 mg/kg-body weight by observing nociceptive behavior such as licking, biting and shaking, the number of Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the spinal cord, and the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the plantar skin. The intramuscular injection of amygdalin significantly reduced the formalin-induced tonic pain in both early (the initial 10 min after formalin injection) and late phases (10-30 min following the initial formalin injection). During the late phase, amygdalin did reduce the formalin-induced pain in a dose-dependent manner in a dose range less than 1 mg/kg. Molecular analysis targeting c-Fos and inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) also showed a significant effect of amygdalin, which matched the results of the behavioral pain analysis. These results suggest that amygdalin is effective at alleviating inflammatory pain and that it can be used as an analgesic with anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities.

  1. Molecular identification of Taenia specimens after long-term preservation in formalin.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyeong-Kyu; Kim, Kyu-Heon; Eom, Keeseon S

    2011-06-01

    The majority of Taenia tapeworm specimens in the museum collections are usually kept in a formalin fixative for permanent preservation mainly for use in morphological examinations. This study aims to improve Taenia tapeworm identification even of one preserved in formalin for a maximum of 81 years. Taenia tapeworms were collected by the parasite collection unit of the Swiss Natural History Museum and from units in Indonesia, Japan and Korea. A small amount of formalin-fixed tissue (100 mg) was crushed in liquid nitrogen and then soaked in a Tris-EDTA buffer for 3-5h. The sample was then digested in SDS and proteinase K (20 mg/ml) for 3-5h at 56 °C. After the addition of proteinase K (20mg/ml), SDS and hexadecyl-trimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB), incubation was continued for another 3h at 65 °C. A maximum yield of genomic DNA was obtained from this additional step and the quality of genomic DNA obtained with this extraction method seemed to be independent of the duration of storage time in the formalin fixative. The molecular identification of Taenia tapeworms was performed by using PCR and DNA sequences corresponding to position 80-428 of cox1 gene. T. asiatica was detected in the isolates of Indonesia, Japan and Korea. Improvements in the genomic DNA extraction method from formalin fixed museum collections will help in the molecular identification of parasites.

  2. Liver X Receptor β Is Involved in Formalin-Induced Spontaneous Pain.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaohang; Cai, Yulong; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Jinghui; He, Xie; Yu, Dan; Huang, Jing; Jing, Sheng; Du, Zhiyong; Yang, Tiande; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Fan, Xiaotang

    2017-03-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the liver X receptor(LXR) β modulates inflammatory pain. However, the molecular mechanisms through which LXRβ modulates pain are unclear. Here, we found that LXRβ-null mice responded more strongly to acute noxious stimuli than wild-type (WT) littermates (in the hot plate and Hargreaves tests) and had augmented tonic inflammatory pain (in the formalin test). This increased reactivity to inflammatory pain was accompanied by enhanced formalin-evoked Fos and pERK staining of second-order nociceptive neurons. Immunohistochemistry showed that the expression of CGRP, SP, and IB4 was increased in the lamina I-II of the lumbar dorsal horns in formalin-injected LXRβ knockout (KO) mice compared with the WT controls. In addition, LXRβ deletion in the mice enhanced the formalin-induced inflammation with more activated microglia and astrocytes in the spinal cord. Furthermore, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β ,TNF-α) as well as NFκB in the formalin-injected paw were elevated by the loss of LXRβ. Taken together, these data indicate that LXRβ is involved in acute as well as inflammatory pain, and thus, it may be considered as a new target for the development of analgesics.

  3. Effects of silymarin on neuropathic pain and formalin-induced nociception in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Faezeh Vahdati; Rezaee, Ramin; Sazegara, Hasan; Hashemzaei, Mahmoud; Shirani, Kobra; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Based on the previous reports, silymarin can suppress nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leukotrienes, cytokines production, and neutrophils infiltration. Regarding the fact that inflammation plays an important role in neuropathic and formalin-induced pain, it was assumed that silymarin could reduce pain. The present study investigates the analgesic effects of silymarin in chemical nociception and a model of neuropathic pain. Materials and Methods: Chemical nociception was produced by injection of 20 µl of formalin (0.5% formaldehyde in saline) into the plantar region of the right hind paw. A sciatic-nerve ligated mouse was applied as the model of neuropathic pain and the antinociceptive response of silymarin was examined 14 days after unilateral nerve-ligation using the hot plate test. Results: The intraperitoneal administration of silymarin (25, 50, and, 100 mg/kg) 2 hr prior to the intraplantar formalin injection suppressed the nociceptive response during the late phase of the formalin test significantly, but it was not in a dose-dependent manner. Different doses of silymarin 14 days after unilateral sciatic nerve ligation in hot plate test did not induce obvious antinociception. Conclusion: Results of the present study indicated that repeated administration of silymarin prevents the formalin-induced nociceptive behavior. However, it is not effective in the treatment of sciatic neuropathic pain. PMID:26351564

  4. Reckless formalin injection in the eyelid instead of local anesthetic: case report

    PubMed Central

    Masmoudi, Tasnim; Mahjoub, Mohamed; Chkirbene, Youssef; Jedidi, Maher

    2016-01-01

    Accidental injection of formalin is certainly rare, but it has serious consequences in terms of morbidity and mortality. We report a case of severe ophthalmic damage due to an accidental formalin's injection in the eyelid of a three-year-old child presenting with congenital ptosis's surgical repair of her left eye. This accident has damaged the orbital region and led to upper left eyelid's necrosis, eyeball's deformation and ipsilateral cataract. In terms of our observation, we discussed consequences of this rare type of accident, and its systematic and loco-regional effects. We tried also to explain these manifestations by analyzing the metabolism process of formalin in the human body. Finally, a medico-legal implication of such accident has been illustrated according to the Tunisian law (Penal Code of the Tunisian republic 'PCT'). PMID:28154659

  5. Effects of formalin, methacarn, and fineFIX fixatives on RNA preservation.

    PubMed

    Dotti, Isabella; Bonin, Serena; Basili, Giorgio; Nardon, Ermanno; Balani, Alessandro; Siracusano, Salvatore; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Palmisano, Silvia; De Manzini, Nicolò; Stanta, Giorgio

    2010-06-01

    Formalin-fixed tissues represent the most abundant clinical material for retrospective studies. However, formalin highly affects macromolecules, impairing their extraction and analysis. In this study, the suitability of some potential substitutes of formalin for RNA-based applications has been considered. Conventional formalin was compared with methacarn and the commercial FineFIX. Their impact on overall RNA preservation was investigated in a cell line-based model fixed during a time course treatment and in a series of fixed human tissues. RNA yield was detected by Nanodrop; ribosomal RNA (rRNA) integrity by electrophoresis and the Agilent Bioanalyzer; messenger RNA (mRNA) integrity by Northern blot and endpoint reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction; and mRNA amount by real-time polymerase chain reaction. In the cell line model, formalin fixation showed time-dependent detrimental effects on overall RNA preservation. Methacarn and FineFIX were more conservative on both rRNA and mRNA preservation and their impact was time-independent. In tissues, high rRNA degradation levels were found in all fixed specimens, contrasting with the results found in the cells. Conversely, the effects of the fixatives on mRNA integrity reflected the observations shown in the cell line model. In methacarn-fixed samples mRNA amount was also preserved, whereas in formalin and FineFIX-fixed samples it was notably lower when compared with the fresh frozen control. Alcohol-based fixatives are a good solution for long-term fixation of both cytologic and tissue samples by virtue of their time-independent effects on mRNA preservation. In fixed tissue samples, however, the potential effects of preanalytical tissue-related factors should be considered when performing mRNA quantitative analysis.

  6. Antinociceptive Effect of Intrathecal Nefopam and Interaction with Morphine in Formalin-Induced Pain of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Soo Young; Park, A Reum; Yoon, Myung Ha; Lee, Hyung Gon; Kim, Woong Mo

    2013-01-01

    Background Nefopam, a non-opiate analgesic, has been regarded as a substance that reduces the requirement for morphine, but conflicting results have also been reported. The inhibition of monoamine reuptake is a mechanism of action for the analgesia of nefopam. The spinal cord is an important site for the action of monoamines however, the antinociceptive effect of intrathecal nefopam was not clear. This study was performed to examine the antinociceptive effect of intrathecal (i.t.) nefopam and the pattern of pharmacologic interaction with i.t. morphine in the formalin test. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with an i.t. catheter, and were randomly treated with a vehicle, nefopam, or morphine. Formalin was injected into the hind-paw 10 min. after an i.t. injection of the above experiment drugs. After obtaining antinociceptive ED50 of nefopam and morphine, the mixture of nefopam and morphine was tested for the antinociceptive effect in the formalin test at a dose of 1/8, 1/4, 1/2 of ED50, or ED50 of each drug followed by an isobolographic analysis. Results Intrathecal nefopam significantly reduced the flinching responses in both phases of the formalin test in a dose-dependent manner. Its effect, however, peaked at a dose of 30 µg in phase 1 (39.8% of control) and 10 µg during phase 2 (37.6% of control). The isobolograhic analysis indicated an additive interaction of nefopam and morphine during phase 2, and a synergy effect in antinociception during phase 1. Conclusions This study demonstrated that i.t. nefopam produces an antinociceptive effect in formalin induced pain behavior during both phases of the formalin test, while interacting differently with i.t. morphine, synergistically during phase 1, and additively during phase 2. PMID:23342202

  7. TRPV4 is necessary for trigeminal irritant pain and functions as a cellular formalin receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Kanju, Patrick; Fang, Quan; Lee, Suk Hee; Parekh, Puja K; Lee, Whasil; Moore, Carlene; Brenner, Daniel; Gereau, Robert W; Wang, Fan; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Detection of external irritants by head nociceptor neurons has deep evolutionary roots. Irritant-induced aversive behavior is a popular pain model in laboratory animals. It is used widely in the formalin model, where formaldehyde is injected into the rodent paw, eliciting quantifiable nocifensive behavior that has a direct, tissue-injury-evoked phase, and a subsequent tonic phase caused by neural maladaptation. The formalin model has elucidated many antipain compounds and pain-modulating signaling pathways. We have adopted this model to trigeminally innervated territories in mice. In addition, we examined the involvement of TRPV4 channels in formalin-evoked trigeminal pain behavior because TRPV4 is abundantly expressed in trigeminal ganglion (TG) sensory neurons, and because we have recently defined TRPV4's role in response to airborne irritants and in a model for temporomandibular joint pain. We found TRPV4 to be important for trigeminal nocifensive behavior evoked by formalin whisker pad injections. This conclusion is supported by studies with Trpv4(-/-) mice and TRPV4-specific antagonists. Our results imply TRPV4 in MEK-ERK activation in TG sensory neurons. Furthermore, cellular studies in primary TG neurons and in heterologous TRPV4-expressing cells suggest that TRPV4 can be activated directly by formalin to gate Ca(2+). Using TRPA1-blocker and Trpa1(-/-) mice, we found that both TRP channels co-contribute to the formalin trigeminal pain response. These results imply TRPV4 as an important signaling molecule in irritation-evoked trigeminal pain. TRPV4-antagonistic therapies can therefore be envisioned as novel analgesics, possibly for specific targeting of trigeminal pain disorders, such as migraine, headaches, temporomandibular joint, facial, and dental pain, and irritation of trigeminally innervated surface epithelia.

  8. Formalin treatments pass new tests. Additional notes on the control of ecto-parasitic protozoa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1940-01-01

    After the completion of the eхреriments reported recently, in which the efficacy of formalin in controlling infections of Gostia mecatrix was demonstrated, the author was afforded an opportunity to test the value of formalin solutions in combatting established mixed infections of (Gyrodactylus, Tricbodina, Cyclochaeta) and a stalked protozoan on rainbow trout fingerlings. This opportunity was provided through the courtesy and cooperation of Clarence F. Pautzke, Chief Biologist for the Washington State Game Department, and Lee Walters, Superintendent of the Washington State Hatchery at Seward Park, Seattle.

  9. Effects of Electroacupuncture at BL60 on Formalin-Induced Pain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kyung-Ha; Won, Ran; Shim, Insop; Lee, Hyejung; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Acupuncture was used to treat symptoms of pain in the ancient orient. The present study was conducted to determine the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) at the BL60 acupoint on male Sprague-Dawley rats. Each rat received EA at BL60 acupoint before formalin injection. Behavioral responses were recorded using a video camera and c-Fos immunohistochemistry was performed thereafter. Treatment of EA at BL60 significantly inhibited flinching behavior and c-fos expression induced by formalin injection into the paw, compared to a control group. These results suggest that electroacupuncture at BL60 acupoint may be effective in relieving inflammatory pain. PMID:22550540

  10. Fixing Formalin: A Method to Recover Genomic-Scale DNA Sequence Data from Formalin-Fixed Museum Specimens Using High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hykin, Sarah M; Bi, Ke; McGuire, Jimmy A

    2015-01-01

    For 150 years or more, specimens were routinely collected and deposited in natural history collections without preserving fresh tissue samples for genetic analysis. In the case of most herpetological specimens (i.e. amphibians and reptiles), attempts to extract and sequence DNA from formalin-fixed, ethanol-preserved specimens-particularly for use in phylogenetic analyses-has been laborious and largely ineffective due to the highly fragmented nature of the DNA. As a result, tens of thousands of specimens in herpetological collections have not been available for sequence-based phylogenetic studies. Massively parallel High-Throughput Sequencing methods and the associated bioinformatics, however, are particularly suited to recovering meaningful genetic markers from severely degraded/fragmented DNA sequences such as DNA damaged by formalin-fixation. In this study, we compared previously published DNA extraction methods on three tissue types subsampled from formalin-fixed specimens of Anolis carolinensis, followed by sequencing. Sufficient quality DNA was recovered from liver tissue, making this technique minimally destructive to museum specimens. Sequencing was only successful for the more recently collected specimen (collected ~30 ybp). We suspect this could be due either to the conditions of preservation and/or the amount of tissue used for extraction purposes. For the successfully sequenced sample, we found a high rate of base misincorporation. After rigorous trimming, we successfully mapped 27.93% of the cleaned reads to the reference genome, were able to reconstruct the complete mitochondrial genome, and recovered an accurate phylogenetic placement for our specimen. We conclude that the amount of DNA available, which can vary depending on specimen age and preservation conditions, will determine if sequencing will be successful. The technique described here will greatly improve the value of museum collections by making many formalin-fixed specimens available for

  11. Fixing Formalin: A Method to Recover Genomic-Scale DNA Sequence Data from Formalin-Fixed Museum Specimens Using High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hykin, Sarah M.; Bi, Ke; McGuire, Jimmy A.

    2015-01-01

    For 150 years or more, specimens were routinely collected and deposited in natural history collections without preserving fresh tissue samples for genetic analysis. In the case of most herpetological specimens (i.e. amphibians and reptiles), attempts to extract and sequence DNA from formalin-fixed, ethanol-preserved specimens—particularly for use in phylogenetic analyses—has been laborious and largely ineffective due to the highly fragmented nature of the DNA. As a result, tens of thousands of specimens in herpetological collections have not been available for sequence-based phylogenetic studies. Massively parallel High-Throughput Sequencing methods and the associated bioinformatics, however, are particularly suited to recovering meaningful genetic markers from severely degraded/fragmented DNA sequences such as DNA damaged by formalin-fixation. In this study, we compared previously published DNA extraction methods on three tissue types subsampled from formalin-fixed specimens of Anolis carolinensis, followed by sequencing. Sufficient quality DNA was recovered from liver tissue, making this technique minimally destructive to museum specimens. Sequencing was only successful for the more recently collected specimen (collected ~30 ybp). We suspect this could be due either to the conditions of preservation and/or the amount of tissue used for extraction purposes. For the successfully sequenced sample, we found a high rate of base misincorporation. After rigorous trimming, we successfully mapped 27.93% of the cleaned reads to the reference genome, were able to reconstruct the complete mitochondrial genome, and recovered an accurate phylogenetic placement for our specimen. We conclude that the amount of DNA available, which can vary depending on specimen age and preservation conditions, will determine if sequencing will be successful. The technique described here will greatly improve the value of museum collections by making many formalin-fixed specimens available for

  12. Anti-nociceptive Effect of 7-methoxy Coumarin from Eupatorium Triplinerve vahl (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Binoy Varghese; Kadhirvelu, Parimala; Nadipelly, Jagan; Shanmugasundaram, Jaikumar; Sayeli, Vijaykumar; Subramanian, Viswanathan

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the anti-nociceptive activity of 7-methoxy coumarin isolated from ethyl acetate fraction of the alcoholic extract of Eupatorium triplinerve Vahl. Materials and Methods: The shade dried leaves of E. triplinerve were extracted with ethyl alcohol and the extract was condensed. This extract was fractionated with n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol. The ethyl acetate fraction was subjected to column chromatography which yielded a crystalline compound-A, which was investigated for spectral characteristics. Pharmacological studies: The isolated compound-A was subjected to behavioral studies and anti-nociceptive evaluation in mice by acetic acid induced writhing and formalin induced nociception. Results: The spectral studies indicated that the structure of compound-A complies with 7- methoxy coumarin. Pre-treatment with 7-methoxy coumarin reduced the number of abdominal constrictions in mice and decreased the time spent in paw licking and biting response in formalin assay. There were no significant behavioral changes. Conclusion: A dose dependent anti-nociceptive action of 7- methoxy coumarin was revealed by the present experiments which support the traditional use of E. triplinerve in pain and inflammatory disorders. SUMMARY Bio-guided fractionation of alcoholic extract of E. triplinerve yielded 7-methoxy coumarin.7-methoxy coumarin was evaluated for its anti-nociceptive potential by acetic acid induced writhing and formalin induced nociception assays.7-methoxy coumarin exhibited significant inhibition of acetic acid induced writhing response and the second phase of formalin nociception.The anti-nociceptive action of 7-methoxy coumarin revealed by the present experiments supports the traditional use of E. triplinerve in pain and inflammatory disorders. Abbreviation used: TLC-Thin layer chromatography, Kg-kilogram, g-gram, TXB2-Thromboxane B2, UV-Ultraviolet, IgE-Immunoglobulin E, s.c-subcutaneous, p.o-oral route PMID:28216887

  13. Effect of chrysin on nociception in formalin test and serum levels of noradrenalin and corticosterone in rats

    PubMed Central

    Farkhondeh, Tahereh; Samarghandian, Saeed; Azimin-Nezhad, Mohsen; Samini, Fariborz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The levels of corticosterone and noradrenalin as the two nociception modulators modify after stress condition. The propose of current study was to investigate the effect of chrysin on formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors and serum levels of corticosterone and noradrenalin in rats. Materials and methods: Pain was induced by applying 20 μL of 5% formalin in distilled water in the subplantar of the right hind paw. Chrysin (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.) was administered 60 min before formalin injection. Morphine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 30 min before formalin injection. The control group received the same volume of saline by i.p. injection 30 min before formalin injection. Results: Chrysin treatment can significantly decrease formalin-induced pain in rat in a dose-dependent manner. Chrysin (150 mg/kg) significantly inhibit the first phase (P < 0.01), whereas, the all concentration of chrysin were affected on the later phase of formalin-induced pain (P < 0.05). Chrysin could significantly attenuate the content of corticosterone and noradrenalin in the serum versus to the control rats (P < 0.01). Conclusion: The current study confirms that the chrysin decreased the nociceptive behaviors in the formalin test and indicate a correlation with decrease in serum corticosterone and noradrenalin levels. PMID:25932190

  14. Protective Effect of Ocimum basilicum Essential Oil Against Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Amir; Roohi, Parnia; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Ghannadi, Ali Reza; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Ocimum basilicum L has been traditionally used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in Iran. This study investigates the ameliorative effect of Ocimum basilicum essential oil on an acetic acid-induced colitis model in rats. Ocimum basilicum essential oil with 2 doses (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly ameliorated wet weight/length ratio of colonic tissue compared to the control group. Higher doses of essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly reduced ulcer severity, ulcer area, and ulcer index. On the other hand, histological examination revealed the diminution of total colitis index as a marker for inflammatory cell infiltration in the colonic segments of rats treated with Ocimum basilicum essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). The increased level of myeloperoxidase was significantly decreased after the treatment with the essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). These results suggest that Ocimum basilicum exhibits protective effect against acetic acid-induced colitis.

  15. SCH 58261 differentially influences quinolinic acid-induced effects in striatal and in hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Tebano, Maria Teresa; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Popoli, Patrizia

    2002-08-30

    The influence of the adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist SCH 58261 (7-(2-phenylethyl)-5-amino-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-trizolo[1,5-c] pyrimidine) (50, 200 nM, 1 microM) on quinolinic acid effects has been studied in rat striatal and hippocampal slices. Quinolinic acid induced disappearance of field potentials at concentrations of 500 microM and 2 mM in hippocampal and corticostriatal slices, respectively. We found that 1 microM SCH 58261 prevented quinolinic acid-induced field potential disappearance in corticostriatal but not in hippocampal slices. This finding demonstrates that the peculiar binding profile of SCH 58261 and the predominance in the hippocampus of "atypical" adenosine A(2A) receptor population (not recognized by SCH 58261) could have a functional relevance in the occurrence of region-specific neuroprotective effects.

  16. Effects of sodium bicarbonate on butyric acid-induced epithelial cell damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Takigawa, Satoko; Sugano, Naoyuki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Arai, Noriyuki; Ota, Noriko; Ito, Koichi

    2008-12-01

    Butyric acid is detected in periodontal pockets and is thought to be involved in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease. We examined the effects of sodium bicarbonate on the butyric acid-induced epithelial cell damage. The human gingival carcinoma cell line Ca9-22 was cultured in medium that contained butyric acid with or without sodium bicarbonate. The viability of cells treated with sodium bicarbonate was significantly higher than that of cells treated with butyric acid alone. The effects of butyric acid on ICAM-1 expression were significantly improved by sodium bicarbonate. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, sodium bicarbonate was indicated to be a useful therapeutic agent to reduce the butyric acid-induced periodontal tissue damage.

  17. Acetic acid induces a programmed cell death process in the food spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Ludovico, Paula; Sansonetty, Filipe; Silva, Manuel T; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2003-03-01

    Here we show that 320-800 mM acetic acid induces in Zygosaccharomyces bailii a programmed cell death (PCD) process that is inhibited by cycloheximide, is accompanied by structural and biochemical alterations typical of apoptosis, and occurs in cells with preserved mitochondrial and plasma membrane integrity (as revealed by rhodamine 123 (Rh123) and propidium iodide (PI) staining, respectively). Mitochondrial ultrastructural changes, namely decrease of the cristae number, formation of myelinic bodies and swelling were also seen. Exposure to acetic acid above 800 mM resulted in killing by necrosis. The occurrence of an acetic acid-induced active cell death process in Z. bailii reinforces the concept of a physiological role of the PCD in the normal yeast life cycle.

  18. Changes in saccharin preference behavior as a primary outcome to evaluate pain and analgesia in acetic acid-induced visceral pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    de la Puente, Beatriz; Romero-Alejo, Elizabeth; Vela, José Miguel; Merlos, Manuel; Zamanillo, Daniel; Portillo-Salido, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Reflex-based procedures are important measures in preclinical pain studies that evaluate stimulated behaviors. These procedures, however, are insufficient to capture the complexity of the pain experience, which is often associated with the depression of several innate behaviors. While recent studies have made efforts to evidence the suppression of some positively motivated behaviors in certain pain models, they are still far from being routinely used as readouts for analgesic screening. Here, we characterized and compared the effect of the analgesic ibuprofen (Ibu) and the stimulant, caffeine, in assays of acute pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behavior. Intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid (AA) served as a noxious stimulus to stimulate a writhing response or depress saccharin preference and locomotor activity (LMA) in mice. AA injection caused the maximum number of writhes between 5 and 20 minutes after administration, and writhing almost disappeared 1 hour later. AA-treated mice showed signs of depression-like behaviors after writhing resolution, as evidenced by reduced locomotion and saccharin preference for at least 4 and 6 hours, respectively. Depression-like behaviors resolved within 24 hours after AA administration. A dose of Ibu (40 mg/kg) – inactive to reduce AA-induced abdominal writhing – administered before or after AA injection significantly reverted pain-induced saccharin preference deficit. The same dose of Ibu also significantly reverted the AA-depressed LMA, but only when it was administered after AA injection. Caffeine restored locomotion – but not saccharin preference – in AA-treated mice, thus suggesting that the reduction in saccharin preference – but not in locomotion – was specifically sensitive to analgesics. In conclusion, AA-induced acute pain attenuated saccharin preference and LMA beyond the resolution of writhing behavior, and the changes in the expression of hedonic behavior, such as sweet taste preference, can be

  19. Changes in saccharin preference behavior as a primary outcome to evaluate pain and analgesia in acetic acid-induced visceral pain in mice.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Beatriz; Romero-Alejo, Elizabeth; Vela, José Miguel; Merlos, Manuel; Zamanillo, Daniel; Portillo-Salido, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Reflex-based procedures are important measures in preclinical pain studies that evaluate stimulated behaviors. These procedures, however, are insufficient to capture the complexity of the pain experience, which is often associated with the depression of several innate behaviors. While recent studies have made efforts to evidence the suppression of some positively motivated behaviors in certain pain models, they are still far from being routinely used as readouts for analgesic screening. Here, we characterized and compared the effect of the analgesic ibuprofen (Ibu) and the stimulant, caffeine, in assays of acute pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behavior. Intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid (AA) served as a noxious stimulus to stimulate a writhing response or depress saccharin preference and locomotor activity (LMA) in mice. AA injection caused the maximum number of writhes between 5 and 20 minutes after administration, and writhing almost disappeared 1 hour later. AA-treated mice showed signs of depression-like behaviors after writhing resolution, as evidenced by reduced locomotion and saccharin preference for at least 4 and 6 hours, respectively. Depression-like behaviors resolved within 24 hours after AA administration. A dose of Ibu (40 mg/kg) - inactive to reduce AA-induced abdominal writhing - administered before or after AA injection significantly reverted pain-induced saccharin preference deficit. The same dose of Ibu also significantly reverted the AA-depressed LMA, but only when it was administered after AA injection. Caffeine restored locomotion - but not saccharin preference - in AA-treated mice, thus suggesting that the reduction in saccharin preference - but not in locomotion - was specifically sensitive to analgesics. In conclusion, AA-induced acute pain attenuated saccharin preference and LMA beyond the resolution of writhing behavior, and the changes in the expression of hedonic behavior, such as sweet taste preference, can be used as a more

  20. Acid-inducible proton influx currents in the plasma membrane of murine osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Miyuki; Li, Guangshuai; Moriura, Yoshie; Hino, Yoshiko; Kawawaki, Junko; Sakai, Hiromu

    2016-05-01

    Acidification of the resorption pits, which is essential for dissolving bone, is produced by secretion of protons through vacuolar H(+)-ATPases in the plasma membrane of bone-resorbing cells, osteoclasts. Consequently, osteoclasts face highly acidic extracellular environments, where the pH gradient across the plasma membrane could generate a force driving protons into the cells. Proton influx mechanisms during the acid exposure are largely unknown, however. In this study, we investigated extracellular-acid-inducible proton influx currents in osteoclast-like cells derived from a macrophage cell line (RAW264). Decreasing extracellular pH to <5.5 induced non-ohmic inward currents. The reversal potentials depended on the pH gradients across the membrane and were independent of concentrations of Na(+), Cl(-), and HCO3 (-), suggesting that they were carried largely by protons. The acid-inducible proton influx currents were not inhibited by amiloride, a widely used blocker for cation channels/transporters, or by 4,4'-diisothiocyanato-2,2'-stilbenesulfonate(DIDS) which blocks anion channels/transporters. Additionally, the currents were not significantly affected by V-ATPase inhibitors, bafilomycin A1 and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. Extracellular Ca(2+) (10 mM) did not affect the currents, but 1 mM ZnCl2 decreased the currents partially. The intracellular pH in the vicinity of the plasma membrane was dropped by the acid-inducible H(+) influx currents, which caused overshoot of the voltage-gated H(+) channels after removal of acids. The H(+) influx currents were smaller in undifferentiated, mononuclear RAW cells and were negligible in COS7 cells. These data suggest that the acid-inducible H(+) influx (H(+) leak) pathway may be an additional mechanism modifying the pH environments of osteoclasts upon exposure to strong acids.

  1. Autophagy Protects against Palmitic Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Podocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xu-Shun; Chen, Xue-Mei; Wan, Jiang-Min; Gui, Hai-Bo; Ruan, Xiong-Zhong; Du, Xiao-Gang

    2017-02-22

    Autophagy is a highly conserved degradation process that is involved in the clearance of proteins and damaged organelles to maintain intracellular homeostasis and cell integrity. Type 2 diabetes is often accompanied by dyslipidemia with elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs). Podocytes, as an important component of the filtration barrier, are susceptible to lipid disorders. The loss of podocytes causes proteinuria, which is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. In the present study, we demonstrated that palmitic acid (PA) promoted autophagy in podocytes. We further found that PA increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in podocytes and that NAC (N-acetyl-cysteine), a potent antioxidant, significantly eliminated the excessive ROS and suppressed autophagy, indicating that the increased generation of ROS was associated with the palmitic acid-induced autophagy in podocytes. Moreover, we also found that PA stimulation decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in podocytes and induced podocyte apoptosis, while the inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine (CQ) enhanced palmitic acid-induced apoptosis accompanied by increased ROS generation, and the stimulation of autophagy by rapamycin (Rap) remarkably suppressed palmitic acid-induced ROS generation and apoptosis. Taken together, these in vitro findings suggest that PA-induced autophagy in podocytes is mediated by ROS production and that autophagy plays a protective role against PA-induced podocyte apoptosis.

  2. Protective effect of hispidulin on kainic acid-induced seizures and neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Su Jane; Huang, Shu Kuei

    2015-05-15

    Hispidulin is a flavonoid compound which is an active ingredient in a number of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs, and it has been reported to inhibit glutamate release. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hispidulin protects against seizures induced by kainic acid, a glutamate analog with excitotoxic properties. The results indicated that intraperitoneally administering hispidulin (10 or 50mg/kg) to rats 30 min before intraperitoneally injecting kainic acid (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and decreased seizure score. In addition, hispidulin substantially attenuated kainic acid-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the suppression of microglial activation and the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, hispidulin reduced kainic acid-induced c-Fos expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the hippocampus. These data suggest that hispidulin has considerable antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and antiinflammatory effects on kainic acid-induced seizures in rats.

  3. Autophagy Protects against Palmitic Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Podocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xu-shun; Chen, Xue-mei; Wan, Jiang-min; Gui, Hai-bo; Ruan, Xiong-zhong; Du, Xiao-gang

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved degradation process that is involved in the clearance of proteins and damaged organelles to maintain intracellular homeostasis and cell integrity. Type 2 diabetes is often accompanied by dyslipidemia with elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs). Podocytes, as an important component of the filtration barrier, are susceptible to lipid disorders. The loss of podocytes causes proteinuria, which is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. In the present study, we demonstrated that palmitic acid (PA) promoted autophagy in podocytes. We further found that PA increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in podocytes and that NAC (N-acetyl-cysteine), a potent antioxidant, significantly eliminated the excessive ROS and suppressed autophagy, indicating that the increased generation of ROS was associated with the palmitic acid-induced autophagy in podocytes. Moreover, we also found that PA stimulation decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in podocytes and induced podocyte apoptosis, while the inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine (CQ) enhanced palmitic acid-induced apoptosis accompanied by increased ROS generation, and the stimulation of autophagy by rapamycin (Rap) remarkably suppressed palmitic acid-induced ROS generation and apoptosis. Taken together, these in vitro findings suggest that PA-induced autophagy in podocytes is mediated by ROS production and that autophagy plays a protective role against PA-induced podocyte apoptosis. PMID:28225005

  4. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism.

  5. Experiments upon the control of Trichodiniasis of salmonid fishes by the prolonged recirculation of formalin solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1940-01-01

    In a search for more effective disinfectants to combat parasitic diseases of hatchery fish, the authors report results from a series of experiments designed to determine the toxicity of varying exposures to concentrations of formalin, sodium p-phenolsulphonate, ammonium sulphate, and sodium benzoate. Non-toxic concentrations of these disinfectants were tested, in addition to the usual hatchery methods of salt treatment and hand dipping in copper sulphate and acetic acid solutions, on No. 1 brook trout fingerlings which had been experimentally infected with the protozoan parasite Trichodina sp. (previously known as Cyclochaeta sp.).Of the disinfectants tested, only formalin completely removed all parasites. Salt treatment in a 5 per cent solution, by weight, as well as hand dipping in 1:500 acetic acid, failed to eradicate all parasites present, although a marked reduction in their numbers did occur. The hand dipping in a 1:2,000 copper sulphate solution was found to be without practical value for the removal of parasites.The authors recommend a prolonged treatment for sixty minutes by recirculating a 1:4,000 solution of formalin, or, where circumstances permit, a 120- to 150-minute exposure to a 1:6,000 concentration of formalin, as the most effective, most economical, and least toxic treatments for combating infections of Trichodina sp., and presumably those of other external parasites as well, among hatchery fish.

  6. Antinociceptive Effects of Spinal Manipulative Therapy on Nociceptive Behavior of Adult Rats during the Formalin Test

    PubMed Central

    Onifer, Stephen M.; Reed, William R.; Sozio, Randall S.; Long, Cynthia R.

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing pain relief resulting from spinal manipulative therapies, including low velocity variable amplitude spinal manipulation (LVVA-SM), requires determining their mechanisms. Pain models that incorporate simulated spinal manipulative therapy treatments are needed for these studies. The antinociceptive effects of a single LVVA-SM treatment on rat nociceptive behavior during the commonly used formalin test were investigated. Dilute formalin was injected subcutaneously into a plantar hindpaw. Licking behavior was video-recorded for 5 minutes. Ten minutes of LVVA-SM at 20° flexion was administered with a custom-made device at the lumbar (L5) vertebra of isoflurane-anesthetized experimental rats (n = 12) beginning 10 minutes after formalin injection. Hindpaw licking was video-recorded for 60 minutes beginning 5 minutes after LVVA-SM. Control rats (n = 12) underwent the same methods except for LVVA-SM. The mean times spent licking the formalin-injected hindpaw of both groups 1–5 minutes after injection were not different. The mean licking time during the first 20 minutes post-LVVA-SM of experimental rats was significantly less than that of control rats (P < 0.001). The mean licking times of both groups during the second and third 20 minutes post-LVVA-SM were not different. Administration of LVVA-SM had a short-term, remote antinociceptive effect similar to clinical findings. Therefore, mechanistic investigations using this experimental approach are warranted. PMID:26693243

  7. Synergistic antinociceptive effects of alfentanil and propofol in the formalin test.

    PubMed

    Jia, Na; Zuo, Xiaochun; Guo, Chao; Li, Yuwen; Cui, Jia; Zhao, Chao; Cao, Shanshan; Wang, Chao; Li, Ruili; Wu, Yin; Wen, Aidong

    2017-04-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the combined analgesic effect of alfentanil and propofol in the formalin test. Diluted formalin was injected into the dorsal surface of the right hind paw in rats. Nociceptive behavior was determined by counting the number of flinches of the injected paw for 1 h after injection; a reduction in formalin‑induced flinching was interpreted as an antinociceptive effect. Isobolographic analysis was used to determine the type of antinociceptive interaction (additivity, antagonism or synergism). Extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) and c‑fos protein levels were also detected by western blot analysis to determine the potential mechanisms of the synergistic effect. Alfentanil, propofol or an alfentanil‑propofol combination had an antinociceptive effect in the formalin test. The median effective dose (ED50), value of the individual drug was also obtained. The derived theoretical ED50 for the antinociceptive effect (4.36 mg/kg) was different from the observed experimental ED50 value (2.51 mg/kg). The interaction between alfentanil and propofol that produced the antinociceptive effect was synergistic according to isobolographic analysis. Furthermore, the combination of alfentanil and propofol treatments may produce synergistically antinociceptive effects by inhibiting the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and decreasing the expression of c‑fos in the spinal cord. These results demonstrated that combined treatment, with alfentanil and propofol, produced synergistic antinociceptive effects in the formalin test and may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of acute pain.

  8. Taste Aversions Conditioned by the Aversiveness of Insulin and Formalin: Role of CS Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domjan, Michael; Levy, Carolyn J.

    1977-01-01

    Experimenters in the past have reported that when insulin is used as the unconditioned stimulus (US), rats will learn an aversion to a sodium chloride but not a sucrose solution, whereas with formalin as the US, they will learn an aversion to a sucrose but not a saline solution. The present experiments failed to confirm these findings. (Editor)

  9. 40 CFR 721.9285 - Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9285 Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 34638, June 18, 2014. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...

  10. Evaluating Quality of Aged Archival Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Samples for RNA-Sequencing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples offer a vast, untapped source of genomic data for biomarker discovery. However, the quality of FFPE samples is often highly variable, and conventional methods to assess RNA quality for RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) are not infor...

  11. Antinociception induced by central administration of histamine in the formalin test in rats.

    PubMed

    Mojtahedin, Ali; Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Zanboori, Ali

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of histamine, mepyramine (H1-receptor antagonist) and famotidine (H2-receptor antagonist) have been investigated on the formalin test in rats. Subcutaneous injection of formalin (50 microl, 1%) into the ventral surface of the left hind paw produced a marked biphasic pain response (first phase: 0-5 min and second phase: 15-45 min). All the performed treatments did not significantly influence the first phase of pain. Histamine at the doses of 10 and 40 microg and mepyramine and famotidine at the same doses of 20 and 80 microg, significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the late phase of formalin-induced pain. Pretreatments with mepyramine and famotidine at the same dose of 80 microg, significantly (P < 0.05) prevented the histamine (40 microg)-induced antinociception. These results indicate that brain histamine produces antinociception, and both central H1 and H2 receptors may involve in the histamine-induced antinociception in the formalin test in rats.

  12. Targeted or whole genome sequencing of formalin fixed tissue samples: potential applications in cancer genomics.

    PubMed

    Munchel, Sarah; Hoang, Yen; Zhao, Yue; Cottrell, Joseph; Klotzle, Brandy; Godwin, Andrew K; Koestler, Devin; Beyerlein, Peter; Fan, Jian-Bing; Bibikova, Marina; Chien, Jeremy

    2015-09-22

    Current genomic studies are limited by the poor availability of fresh-frozen tissue samples. Although formalin-fixed diagnostic samples are in abundance, they are seldom used in current genomic studies because of the concern of formalin-fixation artifacts. Better characterization of these artifacts will allow the use of archived clinical specimens in translational and clinical research studies. To provide a systematic analysis of formalin-fixation artifacts on Illumina sequencing, we generated 26 DNA sequencing data sets from 13 pairs of matched formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and fresh-frozen (FF) tissue samples. The results indicate high rate of concordant calls between matched FF/FFPE pairs at reference and variant positions in three commonly used sequencing approaches (whole genome, whole exome, and targeted exon sequencing). Global mismatch rates and C · G > T · A substitutions were comparable between matched FF/FFPE samples, and discordant rates were low (<0.26%) in all samples. Finally, low-pass whole genome sequencing produces similar pattern of copy number alterations between FF/FFPE pairs. The results from our studies suggest the potential use of diagnostic FFPE samples for cancer genomic studies to characterize and catalog variations in cancer genomes.

  13. Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Tissue as a Starting Point for PrPSc Detection by ELISA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue are regularly employed in TSE diagnosis by IHC, the standard by which all other diagnostic protocols are currently judged. While IHC affords advantages over diagnostic approaches that typically utilize fresh or frozen tissue, such as Western blot...

  14. PrPSc detection in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue by ELISA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue is regularly employed in the diagnosis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) by immunohistochemistry (IHC), the standard by which all other TSE diagnostic protocols are judged. While IHC affords advantages over diagnostic approaches that typically...

  15. Forensic toxicological analyses of drugs in tissues in formalin solutions and in fixatives.

    PubMed

    Uekusa, Kyoko; Hayashida, Makiko; Ohno, Youkichi

    2015-04-01

    Forensic toxicological drug analyses of human specimens are usually performed immediately after autopsy or on frozen preserved tissues. Occasionally, cases require analysis of drugs from tissues fixed in formalin solution. To improve the estimation of the level of drug in tissues following formalin fixation, we studied drug concentrations in human tissues, liver and kidney, that were collected from a drug-positive autopsy case. Parts of tissues were preserved in formalin solution for 1, 3, 6 and 13 months. Tissues obtained before and after preservation, along with tissue-exposed fixatives, were assayed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; all of the samples were assayed for the presence of drugs and changes in the drug concentrations both before and after preservation in formalin. Concentrations of assayed drugs decreased upon fixation in formalin; levels of these drugs did not necessarily show further decreases during subsequent storage in fixative, up to 13 months. Distinct trends in drug levels were found in liver and kidney. In liver, the levels of chlorpromazine, levomepromazine, and promethazine decreased to 23-39% at 1 month after preservation; all 3 of these drugs were detected at all tested time points of preservation. Bromazepam was not detected at 13 months after preservation. Milnacipran was the most unstable after preservation in formalin solution among all of the assayed drugs. In kidney, all assayed drugs exhibited reduced stability during preservation compared to levels in liver. Methamphetamine and methylenedioxymethamphetamine were not detected in any time points of tissues. The proportions of the drugs that remained within the tissues differed between liver and kidney. Also, S-oxide compounds of chlorpromazine and levomepromazine, which were not observed before preservation, were detected in fixed liver tissues and their fixatives at 3, 6 and 13 months of preservation. These results suggest that analyses in formalin-fixed tissues need to

  16. Effect of gonadal steroid hormones on formalin-induced temporomandibular joint inflammation.

    PubMed

    Torres-Chávez, K E; Sanfins, J M; Clemente-Napimoga, J T; Pelegrini-Da-Silva, A; Parada, C A; Fischer, L; Tambeli, C H

    2012-02-01

    We have recently demonstrated that gonadal steroid hormones decrease formalin-induced temporomandibular joint nociception in rats. Given that the attenuation of inflammation is a potential mechanism underlying this antinociceptive effect, we evaluated the effect of gonadal steroid hormones on formalin-induced temporomandibular joint inflammation. Plasma extravasation, a major sign of acute inflammation, and neutrophil migration, an important event related to tissue injury, were evaluated. Formalin induced significantly lower temporomandibular joint plasma extravasation and neutrophil migration in proestrus females than in males and in diestrus females. Since estradiol serum level is high in proestrus females and low in diestrus females and in males, these findings suggest that the high physiological level of estradiol decreases temporomandibular joint inflammation. Estradiol but not progesterone administration in ovariectomized females significantly decreased formalin-induced plasma extravasation and neutrophil migration, an effect that was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. Plasma extravasation and neutrophil migration were not affected by orchiectomy, but testosterone or estradiol administration in orchidectomized males significantly decreased them. The androgen receptor antagonist flutamide blocked the anti-inflammatory effect of testosterone while ICI 182780 blocked that of estradiol in males. Previous intravenous administration of a nonspecific selectin inhibitor significantly decreased formalin-induced temporomandibular joint nociception and neutrophil migration in males, revealing a potent and positive correlation between temporomandibular joint nociception and inflammation. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a pronounced anti-inflammatory effect of estradiol and testosterone in the temporomandibular joint region and suggest that this effect may mediate, at least in part, the antinociceptive effect of these hormones.

  17. Stabilization of a model formalinized protein antigen encapsulated in poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-based microspheres.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W; Schwendeman, S P

    2001-10-01

    A formaldehyde-mediated aggregation pathway (FMAP) has been shown to be primarily responsible for the solid-state aggregation of lyophilized formalinized protein antigens [e.g., tetanus toxoid (TT) and formalinized bovine serum albumin (f-BSA)] in the presence of moisture and physiological temperature. Coincorporation of the formaldehyde-interacting amino acid, histidine, strongly inhibits the FMAP. The purpose of this study was to test whether previous solid-state data are applicable toward the stabilization of formalinized antigens encapsulated in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based microspheres. Formaldehyde-treated bovine serum albumin (f-BSA) and BSA were selected as a model formalinized protein antigen and a nonformalinized control, respectively. As in the solid state, we found that the FMAP was dominant in the aggregation of f-BSA encapsulated in PLGA 50/50 microspheres, whereas the aggregation mechanism of encapsulated BSA was mostly converted from thiol-disulfide interchange to an acid-catalyzed noncovalent pathway. The lack of noncovalent aggregation in encapsulated f-BSA could be explained by its higher thermodynamic stability after formalinization, which inhibits protein unfolding. Targeting the FMAP, coencapsulation of histidine and trehalose successfully inhibited the aggregation of f-BSA in microspheres. By combining the use of an optimized oil-in-oil (o/o) encapsulation method, coencapsulation of histidine and trehalose, and use of low-acid-content poly(D,L-lactide) (PLA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) blends, a 2-month continuous release of f-BSA was achieved with the absence of aggregation.

  18. Analgesic activity of the ethanolic extract of Shorea robusta resin in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Tariq Ahmad; Kumar, Dhirendra; Prasad, Raju; Verma, Pawan Kumar; Sardar, Kaustuk K.; Tandan, Surendra Kumar; Kumar, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Shorea robusta (Sal), an important traditional Indian medicinal plant used in various ailments and rituals and the indigenous use of the resin of this plant as a medicament for treatment of various inflammatory conditions is well documented in literature. In the present study, ethanolic extract of S. robusta resin (SRE) was evaluated for its analgesic activity by making use of different central and peripheral pain models. Materials and Methods: The analgesic activity of SRE was assessed by employing different pain models such as, i) hot plate and tail flick tests for central analgesia, ii) acetic acid- induced writhing (peripheral analgesic model), iii) formalin-induced hind paw licking (both central and peripheral model), iv) carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia (peripheral analgesic model) and v) post-surgical pain (peripheral analgesic model). Results: The extract produced significant central and peripheral analgesic effects, as is evident from increase in reaction time in hot plate and tail flick tests, inhibition in writhing counts in acetic acid-induced writhing test, inhibition of licking time in formalin-induced hind paw licking, increased pain threshold in paw withdrawal latency in carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia and increased paw withdrawal threshold in post-surgical pain. Conclusion: The results of the present study demonstrate marked antinociceptive effects of SRE. PMID:23087512

  19. Amplification of Herpes simplex type 1 and Human Herpes type 5 viral DNA from formalin-fixed Alzheimer brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, John D; Royall, Donald; Daum, Luke T; Kagan-Hallet, Kathleen; Chambers, James P

    2005-12-16

    It is known that nucleic acids from formalin-fixed tissues are not nearly as good templates for DNA amplification as those extracted from fresh tissues. However, specimens stored in most pathologic archives are initially fixed in formalin. The possibility of an infectious etiology of several diseases including Alzheimer's underscores the usefulness of archived tissue in assessing the association of infectious agents with specific pathology. In this report, we describe in detail a method resulting in robust amplification of HSV1 and Human Herpes type (HHV) 5 viral DNA targets using formalin-fixed Alzheimer brain frontal and temporal tissue as source of amplification template. Herpes simplex type 2 viral DNA was not detected in the limited samples examined in this study. Amplicons were verified by sequence analysis. Brain tissue stored in formalin longer than 1 year prior to post-formalin-fixation analysis gave rise to significantly shorter amplicons consistent with the observation that template DNA integrity decreases significantly with increasing time of storage in formalin. Thus, this report should be useful in PCR-based investigations assessing the regional presence of viral DNAs in formalin-fixed brain tissue.

  20. Evidence for the participation of Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels in formalin-induced acute and chronic nociception.

    PubMed

    García, Guadalupe; Martínez-Rojas, Vladimir A; Rocha-González, Héctor I; Granados-Soto, Vinicio; Murbartián, Janet

    2014-09-04

    In this study we determined the role of Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels (CaCC) in acute and chronic nociceptive responses elicited by 1% formalin. Formalin injection produced a typical pattern of flinching behavior for about 1h. Moreover, it produced secondary allodynia and hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral and contralateral paws for at least 6 days. Local peripheral and intrathecal pre-treatment (-10 min) with the non-selective and selective CaCC blockers niflumic acid and CaCCinh-A01, respectively, prevented formalin-induced flinching behavior mainly during phase 2 of the formalin test. Furthermore, niflumic acid and CaCCinh-A01 also prevented in a dose-dependent manner the long-lasting evoked secondary mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral and contralateral paws. Moreover, local peripheral and intrathecal post-treatment (on day 6) with both CaCC blockers decreased the established formalin-induced secondary mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia behavior in both paws. CaCC anoctamin-1 and bestrophin-1 were detected in the dorsal root ganglia. Formalin injection increased anoctamin-1, but not bestrophin-1 protein levels at 6 days. Intrathecal injection of the CaCC inhibitor CaCCinh-A01 prevented formalin-induced anoctamin-1 increase. Data suggest that peripheral and spinal CaCC, and particularly anoctamin-1, participates in the acute nociception induced by formalin as well as in the development and maintenance of secondary mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia. Thus, CaCC activity contributes to neuronal excitability in the process of nociception induced by formalin.

  1. A role for sodium and chloride in kainic acid-induced beading of inhibitory interneuron dendrites.

    PubMed

    Al-Noori, S; Swann, J W

    2000-01-01

    Excitotoxic injury of the dendrites of inhibitory interneurons could lead to decreases in their synaptic activation and explain subsequent local circuit hyperexcitability and epilepsy. A hallmark of dendrotoxicity, at least in principal neurons of the hippocampus and cortex, is focal or varicose swellings of dendritic arbors. In experiments reported here, transient (1h) exposure of hippocampal explant cultures to kainic acid produced marked focal swellings of the dendrites of parvalbumin-immunoreactive pyramidal basket cells in a highly reproducible and dose-dependent manner. At 5mM kainic acid, more than half of the immunopositive apical dendrites in area CA(1) had a beaded appearance. However, the somal volumes of these cells were unaltered by the same treatment. The presence of focal swellings was reversible with kainate washout and was not accompanied by interneuronal cell death. In contrast, exposure to much higher concentrations (300mM) of kainic acid resulted in the total loss of parvalbumin-positive interneurons from explants. Surprisingly, kainic acid-induced dendritic beading does not appear to be mediated by extracellular calcium. Beading was unaltered in the presence of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, the L-type calcium channel antagonist, nimodipine, cadmium, or by removing extracellular calcium. However, blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels by either tetrodotoxin or lidocaine abolished dendritic beading, while the activation of existing voltage-gated sodium channels by veratridine mimicked the kainic acid-induced dendritic beading. Finally, the removal of extracellular chloride prevented the kainic acid-induced dendritic beading.Thus, we suggest that the movement of Na(+) and Cl(-), rather than Ca(2+), into cells underlies the focal swellings of interneuron dendrites in hippocampus.

  2. Calcium Uptake via Mitochondrial Uniporter Contributes to Palmitic Acid-induced Apoptosis in Mouse Podocytes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zeting; Cao, Aili; Liu, Hua; Guo, Henjiang; Zang, Yingjun; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yunman; Wang, Hao; Yin, Peihao; Peng, Wen

    2017-02-09

    Podocytes are component cells of the glomerular filtration barrier, and their loss by apoptosis is the main cause of proteinuria that leads to diabetic nephropathy (DN). Therefore, insights into podocyte apoptosis mechanism would allow a better understanding of DN pathogenesis and thus help develop adequate therapeutic strategies. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of palmitic acid-inhibited cell death in mouse podocytes, and found that palmitic acid increased cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Palmitic acid induces apoptosis in podocytes through up-regulation of cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) , mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), cytochrome c release and depletion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) , The intracellular calcium chelator, 1,2-bis (2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N, N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM), partially prevented this up-regulation whereas 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), an inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP3R) inhibitor; dantrolene, a ryanodine receptor (RyR) inhibitor; and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostibene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), an anion exchange inhibitor, had no effect. Interestingly, ruthenium red and Ru360, both inhibitors of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU), blocked palmitic acid-induced mitochondrial Ca(2+) elevation, cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol, and apoptosis. siRNA to MCU markedly reduced curcumin-induced apoptosis. These data indicate that Ca(2+) uptake via mitochondrial uniporter contributes to palmitic acid-induced apoptosis in mouse podocytes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Clavulanic acid induces penile erection and yawning in male rats: comparison with apomorphine.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Melis, Maria Rosaria; Angioni, Laura; Argiolas, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    The beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid induced penile erection and yawning in a dose dependent manner when given intraperitoneally (IP, 0.05-5mg/kg), perorally (OS, 0.1-5mg/kg) and intracereboventricularly (ICV, 0.01-5 μg/rat) to male rats. The effect resembles that of the dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine given subcutaneously (SC) (0.02-0.25mg/kg), although the responses of the latter followed a U inverted dose-response curve, disappearing at doses higher than 0.1mg/kg. Clavulanic acid responses were reduced by about 55% by haloperidol, a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist (0.1mg/kg IP), and by d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin, an oxytocin receptor antagonist (2 μg/rat ICV), both given 15 min before clavulanic acid. A higher reduction of clavulanic acid responses (more than 80%) was also found with morphine, an opioid receptor agonist (5mg/kg IP), and with mianserin, a serotonin 5HT(2c) receptor antagonist (0.2mg/kg SC). In contrast, no reduction was found with naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist (1mg/kg IP). The ability of haloperidol, d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin and morphine to reduce clavulanic acid induced penile erection and yawning suggests that clavulanic acid induces these responses, at least in part, by increasing central dopaminergic neurotransmission. Dopamine in turn activates oxytocinergic neurotransmission and centrally released oxytocin induces penile erection and yawning. However, since both penile erection and yawning episodes were reduced not only by the blockade of central dopamine and oxytocin receptors and by the stimulation of opioid receptors, which inhibits oxytocinergic neurotransmission, but also by mianserin, an increase of central serotonin neurotransmission is also likely to participate in these clavulanic acid responses.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide Stimulates Butyric Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Fukushima, Kazuo; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that butyric acid, an extracellular metabolite from periodontopathic bacteria, induced apoptosis in murine thymocytes, splenic T cells, and human Jurkat T cells. In this study, we examined the ability of butyric acid to induce apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on this apoptosis. Butyric acid significantly inhibited the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody- and concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses in a dose-dependent fashion. This inhibition of PBMC growth by butyric acid depended on apoptosis in vitro. It was characterized by internucleosomal DNA digestion and revealed by gel electrophoresis followed by a colorimetric DNA fragmentation assay to occur in a concentration-dependent fashion. Butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis was accompanied by caspase-3 protease activity but not by caspase-1 protease activity. LPS potentiated butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed that LPS increased the proportion of sub-G1 cells and the number of late-stage apoptotic cells induced by butyric acid. Annexin V binding experiments with fractionated subpopulations of PBMC in flow cytometory revealed that LPS accelerated the butyric acid-induced CD3+-T-cell apoptosis followed by similar levels of both CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell apoptosis. The addition of LPS to PBMC cultures did not cause DNA fragmentation, suggesting that LPS was unable to induce PBMC apoptosis directly. These data suggest that LPS, in combination with butyric acid, potentiates CD3+ PBMC T-cell apoptosis and plays a role in the apoptotic depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. PMID:9864191

  5. The acid-induced folded state of Sac7d is the native state.

    PubMed Central

    Bedell, J. L.; McCrary, B. S.; Edmondson, S. P.; Shriver, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    Sac7d unfolds at low pH in the absence of salt, with the greatest extent of unfolding obtained at pH 2. We have previously shown that the acid unfolded protein is induced to refold by decreasing the pH to 0 or by addition of salt (McCrary BS, Bedell J. Edmondson SP, Shriver JW, 1998, J Mol Biol 276:203-224). Both near-ultraviolet circular dichroism spectra and ANS fluorescence enhancements indicate that the acid- and salt-induced folded states have a native fold and are not molten globular. 1H,15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR spectra confirm that the native, acid-, and salt-induced folded states are essentially identical. The most significant differences in amide 1H and 15N chemical shifts are attributed to hydrogen bonding to titrating carboxyl side chains and through-bond inductive effects. The 1H NMR chemical shifts of protons affected by ring currents in the hydrophobic core of the acid- and salt-induced folded states are identical to those observed in the native. The radius of gyration of the acid-induced folded state at pH 0 is shown to be identical to that of the native state at pH 7 by small angle X-ray scattering. We conclude that acid-induced collapse of Sac7d does not lead to a molten globule but proceeds directly to the native state. The folding of Sac7d as a function of pH and anion concentration is summarized with a phase diagram that is similar to those observed for other proteins that undergo acid-induced folding except that the A-state is encompassed by the native state. These results demonstrate that formation of a molten globule is not a general property of proteins that are refolded by acid. PMID:11106160

  6. Role of hepatocyte S6K1 in palmitic acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, lipotoxicity, insulin resistance and in oleic acid-induced protection.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Virginia; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Muntané, Jordi; Kozma, Sara C; Valverde, Ángela M

    2015-06-01

    The excess of saturated free fatty acids, such as palmitic acid, that induces lipotoxicity in hepatocytes, has been implicated in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease also associated with insulin resistance. By contrast, oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, attenuates the effects of palmitic acid. We evaluated whether palmitic acid is directly associated with both insulin resistance and lipoapoptosis in mouse and human hepatocytes and the impact of oleic acid in the molecular mechanisms that mediate both processes. In human and mouse hepatocytes palmitic acid at a lipotoxic concentration triggered early activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related kinases, induced the apoptotic transcription factor CHOP, activated caspase 3 and increased the percentage of apoptotic cells. These effects concurred with decreased IR/IRS1/Akt insulin pathway. Oleic acid suppressed the toxic effects of palmitic acid on ER stress activation, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance. Besides, oleic acid suppressed palmitic acid-induced activation of S6K1. This protection was mimicked by pharmacological or genetic inhibition of S6K1 in hepatocytes. In conclusion, this is the first study highlighting the activation of S6K1 by palmitic acid as a common and novel mechanism by which its inhibition by oleic acid prevents ER stress, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance in hepatocytes.

  7. Stress of formalin treatment in juvenile spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary; Yasutake, W.T.

    1973-01-01

    The physiological stress of 200 ppm formalin treatments at 10 C is more severe in the juvenile steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) than in the spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). In the steelhead, a marked hypochloremia follows a 1-hr treatment and recovery requires about 24 hr. During longer treatments, hypercholesterolemia together with reduced regulatory precision, hypercortisolemia, alkaline reserve depletion, and hypocapnia unaccompanied by a fall in blood pH occur — suggestive of compensated respiratory alkalosis. In the spring chinook, hypochloremia and reduced plasma cholesterol regulatory precision are the significant treatment side effects but recovery requires only a few hours.Formalin treatments also cause epithelial separation, hypertrophy, and necrosis in the gills of both fishes but again, consistent with the physiological dysfunctions, these are more severe in the steelhead.

  8. Effect of adenoviral delivery of prodynorphin gene on experimental inflammatory pain induced by formalin in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xionggang; Wang, Tingting; Lin, Caizhu; Chen, Baihong

    2014-01-01

    Circumstantial evidences suggest that dynorphins and their common precursor prodynorphin (PDYN) are involved in antinociception and neuroendocrine signaling. DREAM knockout mice had increased levels of PDYN and dynorphin expression, and reduced sensitivity to painful stimuli. However, some data support the notion that the up-regulation of spinal dynorphin expression is a common critical feature in neuropathic pain. It is not clear whether the production of dynorphin A can be increased when more PDYN is present. In this study we investigated the changes in pain behaviors, spinal PDYN mRNA expression and dynorphin A production on formalin-induced pain in rats receiving the pretreatment of adenoviral delivery of PDYN. Our results showed that the adenoviral transfer of PDYN gene was sufficient to reduce pain behaviors resulting from formalin injection, and the antinociceptive effect after receiving the pretreatment of adenoviral delivery of PDYN was mediated at the level of the spinal cord via KOR. PMID:25663984

  9. Formalin-treated bacteria as selective B cell mitogens: results in primary and acquired immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Sirianni, M C; Pucillo, L P; Fiorilli, M; Aiuti, F; Banck, G; Forsgren, A

    1981-01-01

    The mitogenic activity of the formalin-treated bacterial strains Branhamella catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae and the Cowan I strain of Staphylococcus aureus was assessed in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from patients with primary immunodeficiencies, acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and in umbilical cord blood lymphocytes. The bacteria selectively stimulated B cells, as demonstrated by the finding of a normal de novo DNA synthesis in children with a T cell defect and of an absent response in X-linked agammaglobulinaemia and severe combined immunodeficiency. A decreased mitogenic activity was exerted on PBL from four out of seven adults with common variable hypogammaglobulinemia (CVH). In B-CLL the mitogenic activity was normal while in T-ALL it was decreased. Umbilical cord blood lymphocytes responded better than PBL from adults. The selective stimulative ability of the bacteria for B lymphocytes is expressed when PBL are cultured together with the formalin-treated bacteria for 48 to 72 hr. PMID:6976247

  10. The stress of Formalin treatments in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary

    1971-01-01

    Changes in gill function, acid–base balance and pituitary activation occurring during standard 200 ppm formalin treatments of juvenile rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) were compared. Plasma Cl−, Ca++, total CO2, and interrenal vitamin C in the trout declined continuously and in proportion to the exposure time, but the salmon were able to maintain these metabolic parameters at approximately initial levels. Blood pH and alkaline reserve regulation of the salmon was also less affected by formalin treatments, especially during prolonged exposures. The oxygen consumption of both species was depressed, but substantially more so in the trout than could be accounted for by decreased ventilation rates. Little frank hemolysis occurred in either species, but there was a significant bilirubinemia in the trout.

  11. Comparative neuroprotective profile of statins in quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    A possible neuroprotective role has been recently suggested for 3H3MGCoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Here, we sought to determine neuroprotective effect of statins in quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats. Rats were surgically administered quinolinic acid and treated with Atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (15, 30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (5, 10 mg/kg) once daily up to 3 weeks. Atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (10 mg/kg) treatment significantly attenuated the quinolinic acid induced behavioral (locomotor activity, rotarod performance and beam walk test), biochemical (lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration, SOD and catalase), mitochondrial enzyme complex alterations in rats suggesting their free radical scavenging potential. Additionally, atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (10 mg/kg) significantly decrease the TNF-α level and striatal lesion volume in quinolinic acid treated animals indicating their anti-inflammatory effects. In comparing the protective effect of different statins, atorvastatin is effective at both the doses while simvastatin and fluvastatins at respective lower doses were not able to produce the protective effect in quinolinic acid treated animals. These modulations can account, at least partly, for the beneficial effect of statins in our rodent model of striatal degeneration. Our findings show that statins could be explored as possible neuroprotective agents for neurodegenerative disorders such as HD.

  12. Obestatin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Konturek, Peter; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide derived from the proghrelin, has been shown to exhibit some protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present study was to determine the effect of obestatin administration on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Obestatin was administered intraperitoneally twice a day at a dose of 8 nmol/kg, starting 24 h after the induction of colitis. Seven or 14 days after the induction of colitis, the healing rate of the colon was evaluated. Results. Treatment with obestatin after induction of colitis accelerated the healing of colonic wall damage and this effect was associated with a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase and content of interleukin-1β. Moreover, obestatin administration significantly reversed the colitis-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Conclusion. Administration of exogenous obestatin exhibits therapeutic effects in the course of acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect is related, at least in part, to the obestatin-evoked anti-inflammatory effect, an improvement of local blood flow, and an increase in cell proliferation in colonic mucosa. PMID:26798415

  13. Obestatin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Konturek, Peter; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide derived from the proghrelin, has been shown to exhibit some protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present study was to determine the effect of obestatin administration on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Obestatin was administered intraperitoneally twice a day at a dose of 8 nmol/kg, starting 24 h after the induction of colitis. Seven or 14 days after the induction of colitis, the healing rate of the colon was evaluated. Results. Treatment with obestatin after induction of colitis accelerated the healing of colonic wall damage and this effect was associated with a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase and content of interleukin-1β. Moreover, obestatin administration significantly reversed the colitis-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Conclusion. Administration of exogenous obestatin exhibits therapeutic effects in the course of acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect is related, at least in part, to the obestatin-evoked anti-inflammatory effect, an improvement of local blood flow, and an increase in cell proliferation in colonic mucosa.

  14. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis.

  15. Salicylic acid induces mitochondrial injury by inhibiting ferrochelatase heme biosynthesis activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipul; Liu, Shujie; Ando, Hideki; Ishii, Ryohei; Tateno, Shumpei; Kaneko, Yuki; Yugami, Masato; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Nureki, Osamu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Salicylic acid is a classic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Although salicylic acid also induces mitochondrial injury, the mechanism of its antimitochondrial activity is not well understood. In this study, by using a one-step affinity purification scheme with salicylic acid-immobilized beads, ferrochelatase (FECH), a homodimeric enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis in mitochondria, was identified as a new molecular target of salicylic acid. Moreover, the cocrystal structure of the FECH-salicylic acid complex was determined. Structural and biochemical studies showed that salicylic acid binds to the dimer interface of FECH in two possible orientations and inhibits its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis confirmed that Trp301 and Leu311, hydrophobic amino acid residues located at the dimer interface, are directly involved in salicylic acid binding. On a gel filtration column, salicylic acid caused a shift in the elution profile of FECH, indicating that its conformational change is induced by salicylic acid binding. In cultured human cells, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis, whereas salicylic acid did not exert its inhibitory effect in FECH knockdown cells. Concordantly, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis in zebrafish embryos. Strikingly, the salicylic acid-induced effect in zebrafish was partially rescued by FECH overexpression. Taken together, these findings illustrate that FECH is responsible for salicylic acid-induced inhibition of heme synthesis, which may contribute to its antimitochondrial and anti-inflammatory function. This study establishes a novel aspect of the complex pharmacological effects of salicylic acid.

  16. Deoxycholic and chenodeoxycholic bile acids induce apoptosis via oxidative stress in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ignacio Barrasa, Juan; Olmo, Nieves; Pérez-Ramos, Pablo; Santiago-Gómez, Angélica; Lecona, Emilio; Turnay, Javier; Antonia Lizarbe, M

    2011-10-01

    The continuous exposure of the colonic epithelium to high concentrations of bile acids may exert cytotoxic effects and has been related to pathogenesis of colon cancer. A better knowledge of the mechanisms by which bile acids induce toxicity is still required and may be useful for the development of new therapeutic strategies. We have studied the effect of deoxycholic acid (DCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) treatments in BCS-TC2 human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Both bile acids promote cell death, being this effect higher for CDCA. Apoptosis is detected after 30 min-2 h of treatment, as observed by cell detachment, loss of membrane asymmetry, internucleosomal DNA degradation, appearance of mitochondrial transition permeability (MPT), and caspase and Bax activation. At longer treatment times, apoptosis is followed in vitro by secondary necrosis due to impaired mitochondrial activity and ATP depletion. Bile acid-induced apoptosis is a result of oxidative stress with increased ROS generation mainly by activation of plasma membrane enzymes, such as NAD(P)H oxidases and, to a lower extent, PLA2. These effects lead to a loss of mitochondrial potential and release of pro-apoptotic factors to the cytosol, which is confirmed by activation of caspase-9 and -3, but not caspase-8. This initial apoptotic steps promote cleavage of Bcl-2, allowing Bax activation and formation of additional pores in the mitochondrial membrane that amplify the apoptotic signal.

  17. Polyunsaturated Branched-Chain Fatty Acid Geranylgeranoic Acid Induces Unfolded Protein Response in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwao, Chieko; Shidoji, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    The acyclic diterpenoid acid geranylgeranoic acid (GGA) has been reported to induce autophagic cell death in several human hepatoma-derived cell lines; however, the molecular mechanism for this remains unknown. In the present study, several diterpenoids were examined for ability to induce XBP1 splicing and/or lipotoxicity for human hepatoma cell lines. Here we show that three groups of diterpenoids emerged: 1) GGA, 2,3-dihydro GGA and 9-cis retinoic acid induce cell death and XBP1 splicing; 2) all-trans retinoic acid induces XBP1 splicing but little cell death; and 3) phytanic acid, phytenic acid and geranylgeraniol induce neither cell death nor XBP1 splicing. GGA-induced ER stress/ unfolded protein response (UPR) and its lipotoxicity were both blocked by co-treatment with oleic acid. The blocking activity of oleic acid for GGA-induced XBP1 splicing was not attenuated by methylation of oleic acid. These findings strongly suggest that GGA at micromolar concentrations induces the so-called lipid-induced ER stress response/UPR, which is oleate-suppressive, and shows its lipotoxicity in human hepatoma cells. PMID:26186544

  18. Nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo

    2015-02-01

    Nucleic acids derived from viral pathogens are typical pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In mammals, the recognition of viral nucleic acids by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which include Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RLRs), induces the release of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferons (IFNs) through the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3/7 pathways, triggering the host antiviral state. However, whether nucleic acids can induce similar antiviral immunity in invertebrates remains ambiguous. Several studies have reported that nucleic acid mimics, especially dsRNA mimic poly(I:C), can strongly induce non-specific antiviral immune responses in insects, shrimp, and oyster. This behavior shows multiple similarities to the hallmarks of mammalian IFN responses. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates. We also discuss the potential recognition and regulatory mechanisms that confer non-specific antiviral immunity on invertebrate hosts.

  19. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis. PMID:27598133

  20. Ginkgolic acids induce neuronal death and activate protein phosphatase type-2C.

    PubMed

    Ahlemeyer, B; Selke, D; Schaper, C; Klumpp, S; Krieglstein, J

    2001-10-26

    The standardized extract from Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) is used for the treatment of dementia. Because of allergenic and genotoxic effects, ginkgolic acids are restricted in EGb 761 to 5 ppm. The question arises whether ginkgolic acids also have neurotoxic effects. In the present study, ginkgolic acids caused death of cultured chick embryonic neurons in a concentration-dependent manner, in the presence and in the absence of serum. Ginkgolic acids-induced death showed features of apoptosis as we observed chromatin condensation, shrinkage of the nucleus and reduction of the damage by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, demonstrating an active type of cell death. However, DNA fragmentation detected by the terminal-transferase-mediated ddUTP-digoxigenin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay and caspase-3 activation, which are also considered as hallmarks of apoptosis, were not seen after treatment with 150 microM ginkgolic acids in serum-free medium, a dose which increased the percentage of neurons with chromatin condensation and shrunken nuclei to 88% compared with 25% in serum-deprived, vehicle-treated controls. This suggests that ginkgolic acid-induced death showed signs of apoptosis as well as of necrosis. Ginkgolic acids specifically increased the activity of protein phosphatase type-2C, whereas other protein phosphatases such as protein phosphatases 1A, 2A and 2B, tyrosine phosphatase, and unspecific acid- and alkaline phosphatases were inhibited or remained unchanged, suggesting protein phosphatase 2C to play a role in the neurotoxic effect mediated by ginkgolic acids.

  1. Synergistic analgesia of duloxetine and celecoxib in the mouse formalin test: a combination analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong-Hai; Dong, Yu-Lin; Wang, Yu-Tong; Zhao, Guo-Li; Lu, Gui-Jun; Yang, Jing; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Gu, Ze-Xu; Wang, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Duloxetine, a serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, and celecoxib, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, are commonly used analgesics for persistent pain, however with moderate gastrointestinal side effects or analgesia tolerance. One promising analgesic strategy is to give a combined prescription, allowing the maximal or equal efficacy with fewer side effects. In the current study, the efficacy and side effects of combined administration of duloxetine and celecoxib were tested in the mouse formalin pain model. The subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of formalin into the left hindpaw induced significant somatic and emotional pain evaluated by the biphasic spontaneous flinching of the injected hindpaw and interphase ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) during the 1 h after formalin injection, respectively. Pretreatment with intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of duloxetine or celecoxib at 1 h before formalin injection induced the dose-dependent inhibition on the second but not first phase pain responses. Combined administration of duloxetine and celecoxib showed significant analgesia for the second phase pain responses. Combination analgesia on the first phase was observed only with higher dose combination. A statistical difference between the theoretical and experimental ED50 for the second phase pain responses was observed, which indicated synergistic interaction of the two drugs. Concerning the emotional pain responses revealed with USVs, we assumed that the antinociceptive effects were almost completely derived from duloxetine, since celecoxib was ineffective when administered alone or reduced the dosage of duloxetine when given in combination. Based on the above findings, acute concomitant administration of duloxetine and celecoxib showed synergism on the somatic pain behavior but not emotional pain behaviors.

  2. Synergistic Analgesia of Duloxetine and Celecoxib in the Mouse Formalin Test: A Combination Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guo-Li; Lu, Gui-Jun; Yang, Jing; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Gu, Ze-Xu; Wang, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Duloxetine, a serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, and celecoxib, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, are commonly used analgesics for persistent pain, however with moderate gastrointestinal side effects or analgesia tolerance. One promising analgesic strategy is to give a combined prescription, allowing the maximal or equal efficacy with fewer side effects. In the current study, the efficacy and side effects of combined administration of duloxetine and celecoxib were tested in the mouse formalin pain model. The subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of formalin into the left hindpaw induced significant somatic and emotional pain evaluated by the biphasic spontaneous flinching of the injected hindpaw and interphase ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) during the 1 h after formalin injection, respectively. Pretreatment with intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of duloxetine or celecoxib at 1 h before formalin injection induced the dose-dependent inhibition on the second but not first phase pain responses. Combined administration of duloxetine and celecoxib showed significant analgesia for the second phase pain responses. Combination analgesia on the first phase was observed only with higher dose combination. A statistical difference between the theoretical and experimental ED50 for the second phase pain responses was observed, which indicated synergistic interaction of the two drugs. Concerning the emotional pain responses revealed with USVs, we assumed that the antinociceptive effects were almost completely derived from duloxetine, since celecoxib was ineffective when administered alone or reduced the dosage of duloxetine when given in combination. Based on the above findings, acute concomitant administration of duloxetine and celecoxib showed synergism on the somatic pain behavior but not emotional pain behaviors. PMID:24116126

  3. Synergistic effect of the interaction between curcumin and diclofenac on the formalin test in rats.

    PubMed

    De Paz-Campos, Marco A; Ortiz, Mario I; Chávez Piña, Aracely E; Zazueta-Beltrán, Liliana; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto

    2014-10-15

    The association of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with certain plant extracts can increase antinociceptive activity, permitting the use of lower doses and thus limiting side effects. Therefore, the aim objective of the current study was to examine the effects of curcumin on the nociception and pharmacokinetics of diclofenac in rats. Antinociception was assessed using the formalin test. Diluted formalin was injected subcutaneously into the dorsal surface of the right hind paw. Nociceptive behavior was quantified as the number of flinches of the injected paw during 60 min after injection, and a reduction in formalin-induced flinching was interpreted as an antinociceptive response. Rats were treated with oral diclofenac (1-31 mg/kg), curcumin (3.1-100 mg/kg) or the diclofenac-curcumin combination (2.4-38.4 mg/kg). To determine the possibility of a pharmacokinetic interaction, the oral bioavailability of diclofenac (10 mg/kg) was studied in presence and the absence of curcumin (31 mg/kg). Diclofenac, curcumin, or diclofenac-curcumin combination produced an antinociceptive effect on the formalin test. ED30 values were estimated for the individual drugs, and an isobologram was constructed. The derived theoretical ED30 for the antinociceptive effect (19.2 mg/kg) was significantly different from the observed experimental ED30 value (9.8 mg/kg); hence, the interaction between diclofenac and curcumin that mediates the antinociceptive effect was synergistic. Notwithstanding, the interaction does not appear to involve pharmacokinetic mechanisms, as oral curcumin failed to produce any significant alteration in oral diclofenac bioavailability. Data suggest that the diclofenac-curcumin combination can interact at the systemic level and may have therapeutic advantages for the clinical treatment of inflammatory pain.

  4. Effects of Lugol's iodine solution and formalin on cell volume of three bloom-forming dinoflagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Sun, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Yongfang

    2016-09-01

    Fixatives are traditionally used in marine ecosystem research. The bias introduced by fixatives on the dimensions of plankton cells may lead to an overestimation or underestimation of the carbon biomass. To determine the impact of traditional fixatives on dinoflagellates during short- and long-term fixation, we analyzed the degree of change in three bloom-forming dinoflagellates (Prorocentrum micans, Scrippsiella trochoidea and Noctiluca scintillans) brought about by Lugol's iodine solution (hereafter Lugol's) and formalin. The fixation effects were species-specific. P. micans cell volume showed no significant change following long-term preservation, and S. trochoidea swelled by approximately 8.06% in Lugol's and by 20.97% in formalin as a percentage of the live cell volume, respectively. N. scintillans shrank significantly in both fixatives. The volume change due to formalin in N. scintillans was not concentration-dependent, whereas the volume shrinkage of N. scintillans cells fixed with Lugol's at a concentration of 2% was nearly six-fold that in cells fixed with Lugol's at a concentration of 0.6%-0.8%. To better estimate the volume of N. scintillans fixed in formalin at a concentration of 5%, we suggest that the conversion relationship was as follows: volume of live cell=volume of intact fixed cell/0.61. Apart from size change, damage induced by fixatives on N. scintillans was obvious. Lugol's is not a suitable fixative for N. scintillans due to high frequency of broken cells. Accurate carbon biomass estimate of N. scintillans should be performed on live samples. These findings help to improve the estimate of phytoplankton cell volume and carbon biomass in marine ecosystem.

  5. Efficacy of formalin and hydrogen peroxide to increase survival of channel catfish infected with saprolegniasis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rach, J.J.; Schreier, T.; Gaikowski, M.P.; Schleis, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    The efficacy of formalin and hydrogen peroxide to increase survival associated with external saprolegniasis on fingerlings of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus was evaluated in four laboratory trials. Fungal epizootics were initiated according to procedures developed in a fungal-disease model. Fish were abraded with a dremel tool and then placed in an aerated static infection tank containing fungal-infected hemp seeds held in teaballs that were suspended in 100 L of water for 24 h (trials 1-3) or 6 h (trial 4). In the formalin trials, treatment regimens of 0, 82, and 166 mg/L (trial 1) or 0 and 83 mg/L (trial 2) were administered to channel catfish for 60 min once every other day for a total of three treatments (trial 1) or once daily for a total of seven treatments (trial 2). In the hydrogen peroxide trials, treatment regimens of 0, 75, and 102 mg/L (trial 3) or 0 and 75 mg/L (trial 4) were administered to channel catfish for 60 min once every other day for a total of three treatments. Each treatment regimen was tested in triplicate, with 10 fish per replicate. Formalin exposures of 83 (seven treatments; 33% survival) and 166 mg/L (three treatments; 63% survival) for 60 min significantly (P <= 0.01) increased channel catfish survival in comparison with controls (of which 3% and 13%, respectively, survived). In trial 4, hydrogen peroxide exposure of 75 mg/L (63% survival) for 60 min significantly (P <= 0.01) increased channel catfish survival in comparison with the untreated controls (13% survival). Formalin and hydrogen peroxide treatments were effective in increasing survival in channel catfish infected with fungus.

  6. Cytology Preparations of Formalin Fixative Aid Detection of Giardia in Duodenal Biopsy Samples.

    PubMed

    Panarelli, Nicole C; Gobara, Nariman; Hoda, Rana S; Chaump, Michael; Jessurun, Jose; Yantiss, Rhonda K

    2017-04-01

    Giardiasis is the most common intestinal parasitic infection in the United States. The organism elicits no, or minimal, inflammatory changes in duodenal biopsy samples, so it can be easily overlooked. We performed this study to determine whether Giardia could be isolated from the formalin fixative of biopsy samples, and to evaluate the value of fluid analysis in the assessment for potential infection. We prospectively evaluated duodenal biopsy samples from 92 patients with a clinical suspicion of giardiasis or symptoms compatible with that diagnosis (ie, diarrhea, bloating, or abdominal pain) Biopsy samples were routinely processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Histologic diagnoses included giardiasis (5 cases, 4%), normal findings (64 cases, 70%), peptic injury/active duodenitis (12 cases, 13%), and intraepithelial lymphocytosis with villous blunting (10 cases, 12%). Fifteen cases (13%) showed detached degenerated epithelial cells or mucus droplets in the intervillous space that resembled Giardia. Cytology slides were prepared from formalin in the biopsy container using the standard Cytospin protocol and reviewed by a cytopathologist blinded to the biopsy findings. Cytologic evaluation revealed Giardia spp. in all 5 biopsy-proven cases, and identified an additional case that was not detected by biopsy analysis. Organisms were significantly more numerous (mean: 400 trophozoites; range, 120 to 810) and showed better morphologic features in cytology preparations compared with tissue sections (mean: 129 trophozoites; range, 37 to 253 organisms; P=0.05). Our findings suggest that cytology preparations from formalin fixative can resolve diagnostically challenging cases and even enhance Giardia detection in some cases.

  7. Genetic ablation of GINIP-expressing primary sensory neurons strongly impairs Formalin-evoked pain

    PubMed Central

    Urien, Louise; Gaillard, Stéphane; Lo Re, Laure; Malapert, Pascale; Bohic, Manon; Reynders, Ana; Moqrich, Aziz

    2017-01-01

    Primary sensory neurons are heterogeneous by myriad of molecular criteria. However, the functional significance of this remarkable heterogeneity is just emerging. We precedently described the GINIP+ neurons as a new subpopulation of non peptidergic C-fibers encompassing the free nerve ending cutaneous MRGPRD+ neurons and C-LTMRs. Using our recently generated ginip mouse model, we have been able to selectively ablate the GINIP+ neurons and assess their functional role in the somatosensation. We found that ablation of GINIP+ neurons affected neither the molecular contents nor the central projections of the spared neurons. GINIP-DTR mice exhibited impaired sensation to gentle mechanical stimuli applied to their hairy skin and had normal responses to noxious mechanical stimuli applied to their glabrous skin, under acute and injury-induced conditions. Importantly, loss of GINIP+ neurons significantly altered formalin-evoked first pain and drastically suppressed the second pain response. Given that MRGPRD+ neurons have been shown to be dispensable for formalin-evoked pain, our study suggest that C-LTMRs play a critical role in the modulation of formalin-evoked pain. PMID:28240741

  8. Physiological effects of potassium chloride, formalin and handling stress on bonytail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sykes, Catherine L.; Caldwell, Colleen A.; Gould, William R.

    2011-01-01

    We characterized the sublethal physiological changes in bonytail Gila elegans subjected to consecutive 750-mg/L potassium chloride (KCl) and 25-mg/L formalin treatments for the removal of zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha and quagga mussel D. bugensis veligers. Plasma cortisol, glucose, and osmolality were measured over 24 h and at 14 d posthandling after exposing bonytail to KCl and one net stressor (capture with a net), KCl plus formalin and two net stressors, and one or two net stressors without chemicals. Elevated plasma cortisol (322–440 ng/mL) and glucose (254–399 mg/dL) concentrations were observed in all treatments compared with the concentrations in control fish (plasma cortisol, 56 ng/mL; glucose, 43 mg/dL). While there were no detectable differences in plasma osmolality among the treatment and control fish, a difference was observed between fish that were handled once versus twice. Chemical effects of stress were not observed in any of the physiological responses when the KCl treatment was compared with the one-net stressor treatment or when the KCl plus formalin treatment was compared with the two-net stressor treatment. Cumulative responses, however, were observed between one net stressor and two net stressors for plasma glucose and osmolality but not for plasma cortisol. Plasma cortisol and glucose levels remained elevated at 24 h posthandling, indicating that bonytail had not completely recovered from the handling stressors and would benefit from a recovery period in protected refugia before being released.

  9. A case study of rabies diagnosis from formalin-fixed brain material.

    PubMed

    Coertse, J; Nel, L H; Sabeta, C T; Weyer, J; Grobler, A; Walters, J; Markotter, W

    2011-12-01

    Rabies is caused by several Lyssavirus species, a group of negative sense RNA viruses. Although rabies is preventable, it is often neglected particularly in developing countries in the face of many competing public and veterinary health priorities. Epidemiological information based on laboratory-based surveillance data is critical to adequately strategise control and prevention plans. In this regard the fluorescent antibody test for rabies virus antigen in brain tissues is still considered the basic requirement for laboratory confirmation of animal cases. Occasionally brain tissues from suspected rabid animals are still submitted in formalin, although this has been discouraged for a number of years. Immunohistochemical testing or a modified fluorescent antibody technique can be performed on such samples. However, this method is cumbersome and cannot distinguish between different Lyssavirus species. Owing to RNA degradation in formalin-fixed tissues, conventional RT-PCR methodologies have also been proven to be unreliable. This report is concerned with a rabies case in a domestic dog from an area in South Africa where rabies is not common. Typing of the virus involved was therefore important, but the only available sample was submitted as a formalin-fixed specimen. A real-time RT-PCR method was therefore applied and it was possible to confirm rabies and obtain phylogenetic information that indicated a close relationship between this virus and the canid rabies virus variants from another province (KwaZulu-Natal) in South Africa.

  10. Bimodal Spectroscopy of Formalin Fixed Samples to Discriminate Dysplastic and Tumor Brain Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, S.; Cicchi, R.; Giordano, F.; Buccoliero, A. M.; Guerrini, R.; Pavone, F. S.

    2014-12-01

    Biomedical spectroscopy has gained attention in the past few years for disease diagnosis. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopies provide finger-print information related to biochemical and morphological alterations when tissues progress from the normal to a malignant stage. Usually, freshly excised tissue specimens are preferred for bio-spectroscopic studies. However, ethical issues, sample availability and distance between the surgery room and the laboratory provide an impelling restriction for in-vitro spectroscopic studies using freshly excised samples. After surgical resection tissues are fixed in 4% formalin for histological studies under a light microscope. The process of fixation prevents degradation of tissues. In this study, we probe the use of formalin fixed sample for differentiating normal and dysplastic brain tissues using fluorescence and Raman spectroscopies. It was found that fluorescence spectral profile changes in the wavelength range from 550-750 nm between dysplastic and tumor samples. Also, significant differences were found in the Raman spectral profiles of such samples. The results indicate a potential diagnostic application of spectroscopy in formalin fixed brain samples for differentiating dysplastic and tumor brain tissues.

  11. Measurements of the anisotropy of ultrasonic velocity in freshly excised and formalin-fixed myocardial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Steven L.; Yang, Min; Marutyan, Karen R.; Wallace, Kirk D.; Holland, Mark R.; Miller, James G.

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the anisotropy of ultrasonic velocity in freshly excised myocardial tissue and to examine the effects of formalin-fixation. Through-transmission radio-frequency-based measurements were performed on ovine and bovine myocardial specimens from 24 different hearts. A total of 81 specimens were obtained from specific locations within each heart to investigate the possibility of regional differences in anisotropy of velocity in the left ventricular wall and septum. No regional differences were observed for either lamb or cow myocardial specimens. In addition, no specific species-dependent differences were observed between ovine and bovine myocardium. Average values of velocity at room temperature for perpendicular and parallel insonification were 1556.9+/-0.6 and 1565.2+/-0.7 m/s (mean+/-standard error), respectively, for bovine myocardium (N=45) and 1556.3+/-0.6 and 1564.7+/-0.7 m/s for ovine myocardium (N=36). Immediately after measurements of freshly excised myocardium, ovine specimens were fixed in formalin for at least one month and then measurements were repeated. Formalin-fixation appears to increase the overall velocity at all angles of insonification and to increase the magnitude of anisotropy of velocity.

  12. The Antinociceptive Effects of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Borago Officinalis Flower in Male Rats Using Formalin Test

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadimoghadm, Mahdieh; Shahraki, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Borago officinalis flower (borage) is a known sedative in herbal medicine; the aim of the present study was to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of borage hydroalcoholic extract in formalin test male rats. Methods: Fifty-six adult male albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into seven groups: Control groups of A (intact), B (saline), and C (Positive control) plus test groups of D, E, F, and G (n=8). The groups D, E, and F received 6.25, 12.5, and 25 mg/kg, Borago officinalis flower hydroalcholic extract before the test, respectively but group G received 25 mg/kg borage extract and aspirin before the test. A biphasic pain was induced by injection of formalin 1%. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS software ver. 17 employing statistical tests of Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney. The results were expressed as mean±SD. Statistical differences were considered significant at P<0.05. Results: The results revealed that the acute and chronic pain behavior score in test groups of D, E, F, and G significantly decreased compared to groups A and B, but this score did not show any difference compared to group C. Moreover, chronic pain behavior score in group G was significantly lower than all other groups. Discussion: The results indicated that Borago officinalis hydroalcoholic extract affects the acute and chronic pain behavior response in formaline test male rats. PMID:26649166

  13. Intracerebroventricular administration of 26RFa produces an analgesic effect in the rat formalin test.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Miyazaki, Rika; Yamada, Toshihiko

    2009-09-01

    GPR103 is one of the orphan G protein-coupled receptors. Recently, an endogenous ligand for GPR103, 26RFa, was identified. Many 26RFa binding sites have been observed in various nuclei of the brain involved in the processing of pain such as the parafascicular thalamic nucleus, the locus coeruleus, the dorsal raphe nucleus, and the parabrachial nucleus. In the present study, the effects of intracerebroventricular injection of 26RFa were tested in the rat. Intracerebroventricular injection of 26RFa significantly decreased the number of both phase 1 and phase 2 agitation behaviors induced by paw formalin injection. This analgesic effect of 26RFa on the phase 1 response, but not phase 2 response, was antagonized by BIBP3226, a mixed antagonist of neuropeptide Y Y1 and neuropeptide FF receptors. Intracerebroventricular injection of 26RFa has no effect in the 52.5 degrees C hot plate test. Intracerebroventricular injection of 26RFa had no effect on the expression of Fos-like immunoreactivity induced by paw formalin injection in the superficial layers of the spinal dorsal horn. These data suggest that (1) 26RFa modulates nociceptive transmission at the supraspinal site during a formalin test, (2) the mechanism 26RFa uses to produce an analgesic effect on the phase 1 response is different from that on the phase 2 response, and (3) intracerebroventricularly injected 26RFa dose not directly inhibit the nociceptive input to the spinal cord.

  14. A technique for detection of agglutinating activity of antilymphocytic serum using formalinized and trypan-blue-stained lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Janković, B. D.; Isaković, Katarina; Petrović, Spomenka

    1970-01-01

    This paper describes technical details of a micro-reaction for the in vitro detection of agglutinating potency of antilymphocytic serum produced in rabbits with chicken, rat and dog thymus cells. The titration of antilymphocytic serum includes the use of microtitre plastic plates and lymphocytes treated with formalin and stained with trypan blue stain. Formalinized and stained lymphocytes represent a stable antigen of long durability, and the application of those cells in leucoagglutination increases the accuracy and sensitivity of the reaction. PMID:5477930

  15. Involvement of bradykinin, cytokines, sympathetic amines and prostaglandins in formalin-induced orofacial nociception in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chichorro, Juliana G; Lorenzetti, Berenice B; Zampronio, Aleksander R

    2004-01-01

    This study characterises some of the mechanisms and mediators involved in the orofacial nociception triggered by injection of formalin into the upper lip of the rat, by assessing the influence of various treatments on behavioural nociceptive responses (duration of facial rubbing) elicited either by a low subthreshold (i.e. non-nociceptive; 0.63%) or a higher concentration of the algogen (2.5%). The kininase II inhibitor captopril (5 mg kg−1, s.c.) and prostaglandin(PG) E2 (100 ng lip−1) potentiated both phases of the response to 0.63% formalin, whereas tumour necrosis factor (TNFα; 5 pg lip−1), interleukin(IL)-1β (0.5 pg lip−1), IL-6 (2 ng lip−1) and IL-8 (200 pg lip−1), or the indirectly acting sympathomimetic drug tyramine (200 μg lip−1), each augmented only the second phase of nociception. Conversely, both phases of nociception induced by 2.5% formalin were inhibited by the bradykinin (BK) B2 receptor antagonist HOE140 (5 μg lip−1) or the selective β1-adrenoceptor antagonist atenolol (100 μg lip−1). However, the BK B1 receptor antagonist des-Arg9-Leu8-BK (1 and 2 μg lip−1), antibody and/or antiserum against each of the cytokines, the adrenergic neurone blocker guanethidine (30 mg kg−1 day−1, s.c., for 3 days) and the cyclooxygenase(COX)-2 inhibitor celecoxib (50 and 200 μg lip−1, s.c.; or 1 and 3 mg kg−1, i.p.) reduced only the second phase of the response. The nonselective COX inhibitor indomethacin and the 5-lipoxygenase activating protein inhibitor MK886 did not change formalin-induced nociception. Our results indicate that BK, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, sympathetic amines and PGs (but not leukotrienes) contribute significantly to formalin-induced orofacial nociception in the rat and the response seems to be more susceptible to inhibition by B2 receptor antagonist and selective COX-2 inhibitor than by B1 receptor antagonist or nonselective COX inhibitor. PMID:15006904

  16. Antinociceptive activity of Ricinus communis L. leaves

    PubMed Central

    Taur, Dnyaneshwar J; Waghmare, Maruti G; Bandal, Rajendra S; Patil, Ravindra Y

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antinociceptive activity of the methanol extract of Ricinus communis leaves (MRCL). Methods Antinociceptive activity was evaluated using acetic acid induced writhing test, formalin induced paw licking and tail immersion method in mice at doses of 100, 125 and 150 mg/kg bw. Results The results indicated that MRCL exhibited considerable antinociceptive activity against three classical models of pain in mice. Preliminary phytochemical analysis suggested the presence of saponin, steroids and alkaloids. Conclusions It can be concluded that MRCL possesses antinociceptive potential that may be due to saponin, steroids and alkaloids in it. PMID:23569744

  17. CA3 Synaptic Silencing Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Seizures and Hippocampal Network Oscillations123

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lily M. Y.; Wintzer, Marie E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Epilepsy is a neurological disorder defined by the presence of seizure activity, manifest both behaviorally and as abnormal activity in neuronal networks. An established model to study the disorder in rodents is the systemic injection of kainic acid, an excitatory neurotoxin that at low doses quickly induces behavioral and electrophysiological seizures. Although the CA3 region of the hippocampus has been suggested to be crucial for kainic acid-induced seizure, because of its strong expression of kainate glutamate receptors and its high degree of recurrent connectivity, the precise role of excitatory transmission in CA3 in the generation of seizure and the accompanying increase in neuronal oscillations remains largely untested. Here we use transgenic mice in which CA3 pyramidal cell synaptic transmission can be inducibly silenced in the adult to demonstrate CA3 excitatory output is required for both the generation of epileptiform oscillatory activity and the progression of behavioral seizures. PMID:27022627

  18. Cell wall dynamics modulate acetic acid-induced apoptotic cell death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rego, António; Duarte, Ana M.; Azevedo, Flávio; Sousa, Maria J.; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Chaves, Susana R.

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid triggers apoptotic cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, similar to mammalian apoptosis. To uncover novel regulators of this process, we analyzed whether impairing MAPK signaling affected acetic acid-induced apoptosis and found the mating-pheromone response and, especially, the cell wall integrity pathways were the major mediators, especially the latter, which we characterized further. Screening downstream effectors of this pathway, namely targets of the transcription factor Rlm1p, highlighted decreased cell wall remodeling as particularly important for acetic acid resistance. Modulation of cell surface dynamics therefore emerges as a powerful strategy to increase acetic acid resistance, with potential application in industrial fermentations using yeast, and in biomedicine to exploit the higher sensitivity of colorectal carcinoma cells to apoptosis induced by acetate produced by intestinal propionibacteria. PMID:28357256

  19. Heat shock protein 70-dependent protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ying; Naito, Yuji; Handa, Osamu; Hayashi, Natsuko; Kuki, Aiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yuko; Morita, Mayuko; Adachi, Satoko; Fukui, Akifumi; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Kishimoto, Etsuko; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-11-01

    Protection of the small intestine from mucosal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid is a critical issue in the field of gastroenterology. Polaprezinc an anti-ulcer drug, consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, provides gastric mucosal protection against various irritants. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of the RIE1 rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Confluent rat intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with 70 µM polaprezinc for 24 h, and then stimulated with or without 15 mM acetylsalicylic acid for a further 15 h. Subsequent cellular viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced cell death was also qualified by fluorescent microscopy of Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide. Heat shock proteins 70 protein expression after adding polaprezinc or acetylsalicylic acid was assessed by western blotting. To investigate the role of Heat shock protein 70, Heat shock protein 70-specific small interfering RNA was applied. Cell viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining and apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that acetylsalicylic acid significantly induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Polaprezinc significantly suppressed acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells at its late phase. At the same time, polaprezinc increased Heat shock protein 70 expressions of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. However, in Heat shock protein 70-silenced rat intestinal epithelial cells, polaprezinc could not suppress acetylsalicylic acid -induced apoptosis at its late phase. We conclude that polaprezinc-increased Heat shock protein 70 expression might be an important mechanism by which polaprezinc suppresses acetylsalicylic

  20. Antinociceptive and antiinflammatory activities of pine (Pinus densiflora) pollen extract.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Mi

    2007-05-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the antinociceptive and antiinflammatory activity of pine (Pinus densiflora) pollen in mice. The antinociceptive activity was determined using acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction and formalin-induced licking, and the hot plate test. Antiinflammatory effects were evaluated using carrageenan- and formalin-induced paw edema, and arachidonic acid-induced ear edema in mice. The ethanol extract of pine pollen (100 and 200 mg/kg, p.o.) produced a significant inhibition of both phases of the formalin pain test in mice, a reduction in mouse writhing induced by acetic acid and an elevation of the pain threshold in the hot plate test in mice. The pine pollen extract also produced a significant inhibition of carrageenan- and formalin-induced paw edema as well as arachidonic acid-induced ear edema in mice. The inhibitions were similar to those produced by aminopyrine and indomethacin, p.o. The different polyphenols found in pine pollen could account for the antinociceptive and antiinflammatory actions. The results obtained indicate that the extract possesses analgesic and antiinflammatory effects.

  1. Neuroprotective effects of butterbur and rough aster against kainic Acid-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang Hee; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2005-01-01

    The separate and combined neuroprotective effects of rough aster (Aster scaber) and butterbur (Petasite japonicus) extracts against oxidative damage in the brain of mice challenged with kainic acid were examined by comparing behavioral changes and biochemical parameters of oxidative stress. Rough aster butanol extract (400 mg/kg) and/or butterbur butanol extract (150 or 400 mg/kg) were administered to male ICR mice, 6-8 weeks old, through a gavage for 4 days consecutively, and on day 4, kainic acid (50 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally. Compared with the vehicle-treated control, no significant changes in body and brain weight were observed in mice administered rough aster or butterbur butanol extract. Administration of kainic acid only, causing a lethality of approximately 54%, resulted in a significant decrease of total glutathione level and increase of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) value in brain tissue. The administration of butterbur or rough aster extract (400 mg/kg) decreased the lethality (50%) of kainic acid to 25%, alleviated the behavioral signs of neurotoxicity, restored the cytosolic glutathione level of brain homogenate to approximately 80% (P < .05), and reduced kainic acid-induced increases in TBARS values. In contrast to no significant neuroprotection by butterbur extract at a low dose (150 mg/kg), the combination of rough aster extract and butterbur extract reduced the lethality to 12.5%. Moreover, the combination delayed the onset time of behavioral signs by twofold, and significantly preserved the level of cytosolic glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities. However, the other biochemical parameters were not altered significantly by the combination. Thus, the combination of two vegetable extracts significantly increased the neuroprotective action against kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. Based on these findings, the combination of butterbur extract and rough aster extract contains a functional agent or

  2. The Ayurvedic drug, Ksheerabala, ameliorates quinolinic acid-induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Swathy, S S; Indira, M

    2010-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of neurotoxicity is the induction of oxidative stress. There is hardly any cure for neurotoxicity in modern medicine, whereas many drugs in Ayurveda possess neuroprotective effects; however, there is no scientific validation for these drugs. Ksheerabala is an ayurvedic drug which is used to treat central nervous system disorders, arthritis, and insomnia. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of Ksheerabala on quinolinic acid-induced toxicity in rat brain. The optimal dose of Ksheerabala was found from a dose escalation study, wherein it was found that Ksheerabala showed maximum protection against quinolinic acid-induced neurotoxicity at a dose of 15 microL/100 g body weight/day, which was selected for further experiments. Four groups of female albino rats were maintained for 21 days as follows: 1. Control group, 2. Quinolinic acid (55 microg/100 g body weight), 3. Ksheerabala (15 microL/100 g body weight), 4. Ksheerabala (15 microL/100 g body weight) + Quinolinic acid (55 microg/100 g body weight). At the end of the experimental period, levels of lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonyls, and activities of scavenging enzymes were analyzed. The results revealed that quinolinic acid intake caused enhanced lipid and protein peroxidation as evidenced by increased levels of peroxidation products such as malondialdehyde, hydroperoxide, conjugated dienes, and protein carbonyls. On the other hand, the activities of scavenging enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase as well as the concentration of glutathione were reduced. On coadminstration of Ksheerabala along with quinolinic acid, the levels of all the biochemical parameters were restored to near-normal levels, indicating the protective effect of the drug. These results were reinforced by histopathological studies.

  3. Proteomic investigation into betulinic acid-induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Pang, Qiuying; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Aiqin; Luo, Shaman; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid that exhibits anticancer functions in human cancer cells. This study provides evidence that betulinic acid is highly effective against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by inducing dose- and time-dependent apoptosis. The apoptotic process was further investigated using a proteomics approach to reveal protein expression changes in HeLa cells following betulinic acid treatment. Proteomic analysis revealed that there were six up- and thirty down-regulated proteins in betulinic acid-induced HeLa cells, and these proteins were then subjected to functional pathway analysis using multiple analysis software. UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decarboxylating, chain A Horf6-a novel human peroxidase enzyme that involved in redox process, was found to be down-regulated during the apoptosis process of the oxidative stress response pathway. Consistent with our results at the protein level, an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in betulinic acid-treated cells. The proteins glucose-regulated protein and cargo-selection protein TIP47, which are involved in the endoplasmic reticulum pathway, were up-regulated by betulinic acid treatment. Meanwhile, 14-3-3 family proteins, including 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε, were down-regulated in response to betulinic acid treatment, which is consistent with the decrease in expression of the target genes 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε. Furthermore, it was found that the antiapoptotic bcl-2 gene was down-regulated while the proapoptotic bax gene was up-regulated after betulinic acid treatment in HeLa cells. These results suggest that betulinic acid induces apoptosis of HeLa cells by triggering both the endoplasmic reticulum pathway and the ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

  4. Forebrain medial septum region facilitates nociception in a rat formalin model of inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andy Thiam-Huat; Ariffin, Mohammed Zacky; Zhou, Mingyi; Ye, Jenn Zhou; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Khanna, Sanjay

    2011-11-01

    The medial septum is anatomically and functionally linked to the hippocampus, a region implicated in nociception. However, the role of medial septum in nociception remains unclear. To investigate the role of the region in nociception in rats, muscimol, a GABA agonist, or zolpidem, a positive allosteric modulator of GABA(A) receptors, was microinjected into medial septum to attenuate the activity of neurons in the region. Electrophysiological studies in anesthetized rats indicated that muscimol evoked a stronger and longer-lasting suppression of medial septal-mediated activation of hippocampal theta field activity than zolpidem. Similarly, microinjection of muscimol (1 or 2 μg/0.5 μl) into the medial septum of awake rats suppressed both licking and flinching behaviors in the formalin test of inflammatory pain, whereas only the latter behavior was affected by zolpidem (8 or 12 μg/0.5 μl) administered into the medial septum. Interestingly, both drugs selectively attenuated nociceptive behaviors in the second phase of the formalin test that are partly driven by central plasticity. Indeed, muscimol reduced the second phase behaviors by 30% to 60%, which was comparable to the reduction seen with systemic administration of a moderate dose of the analgesic morphine. The reduction was accompanied by a decrease in formalin-induced expression of spinal c-Fos protein that serves as an index of spinal nociceptive processing. The drug effects on nociceptive behaviors were without overt sedation and were distinct from the effects observed after septal lateral microinjections. Taken together, these findings suggest that the activation of medial septum is pro-nociceptive and facilitates aspects of central neural processing underlying nociception.

  5. Pulmonary eosinophils and their role in immunopathologic responses to formalin-inactivated pneumonia virus of mice

    PubMed Central

    Percopo, Caroline M.; Qiu, Zhijun; Phipps, Simon; Foster, Paul S.; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced disease is the term used to describe the aberrant Th2 skewed responses to naturally-acquired human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) infection observed in individuals vaccinated with formalin-inactivated viral antigens. Here we explore this paradigm with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a pathogen that faithfully reproduces features of severe hRSV infection in a rodent host. We demonstrate that PVM infection in mice vaccinated with formalin-inactivated antigens from PVM-infected cells (PVM Ags) yields Th2-skewed hypersensitivity, analogous to that observed in response to hRSV. Specifically, we detect elevated levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of PVM-infected mice that were vaccinated with PVM Ags, but not among mice vaccinated with formalin-inactivated antigens from uninfected cells (Ctrl Ags). Interestingly, infection in PVM Ag-vaccinated mice was associated with a ~10-fold reduction in lung virus titer and protection against weight loss when compared to infected mice vaccinated with Ctrl Ags, despite the absence of serum neutralizing antibodies. Given recent findings documenting a role for eosinophils in promoting clearance of hRSV in vivo, we explored the role of eosinophils in altering the pathogenesis of disease with eosinophil-deficient mice. We found that eosinophil deficiency had no impact on virus titer in PVM Ags-vaccinated mice, nor on weight loss or levels of CCL11 (eotaxin-1), interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-5, or IL-13 in BAL fluid. However, levels of both IL-4 and CCL3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α) in BAL fluid were markedly diminished in PVM Ag-vaccinated, PVM-infected eosinophil-deficient mice when compared to wild type controls (246 words). PMID:19542471

  6. Melatonin reduces formalin-induced nociception and tactile allodynia in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Arreola-Espino, Rosaura; Urquiza-Marín, Héctor; Ambriz-Tututi, Mónica; Araiza-Saldaña, Claudia Ivonne; Caram-Salas, Nadia L; Rocha-González, Héctor I; Mixcoatl-Zecuatl, Teresa; Granados-Soto, Vinicio

    2007-12-22

    The purpose of this study was to assess the antinociceptive and antiallodynic effect of melatonin as well as its possible mechanism of action in diabetic rats. Streptozotocin (50 mg/kg) injection caused hyperglycemia within 1 week. Formalin-evoked flinching was increased in diabetic rats as compared to non-diabetic rats. Oral administration of melatonin (10-300 mg/kg) dose-dependently reduced flinching behavior in diabetic rats. In addition, K-185 (a melatonin MT(2) receptor antagonist, 0.2-2 mg/kg, s.c.) completely blocked the melatonin-induced antinociception in diabetic rats, whereas that naltrexone (a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, s.c.) and naltrindole (a selective delta opioid receptor antagonist, 0.5 mg/kg, s.c.), but not 5'-guanidinonaltrindole (a selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, s.c.), partially reduced the antinociceptive effect of melatonin. Given alone K-185, naltrexone, naltrindole or 5'-guanidinonaltrindole did not modify formalin-induced nociception in diabetic rats. Four to 8 weeks after diabetes induction, tactile allodynia was observed in the streptozotocin-injected rats. On this condition, oral administration of melatonin (75-300 mg/kg) dose-dependently reduced tactile allodynia in diabetic rats. Both antinociceptive and antiallodynic effects were not related to motor changes as melatonin did not modify number of falls in the rotarod test. Results indicate that melatonin is able to reduce formalin-induced nociception and tactile allodynia in streptozotocin-injected rats. In addition, data suggest that melatonin MT(2) and delta opioid receptors may play an important role in these effects.

  7. Twisting and Writhing with George Ellery Hale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    2013-07-01

    Early in his productive career in astronomy, George Ellery Hale developed innovative instrumentation that allowed him to image the magnetically-dominated solar chromosphere. Among the solar phenomena he discovered were sunspot vortices, which he attributed to storms akin to cyclones in our own atmosphere. Much more recently, physicists discovered a quantity that is very well conserved in ideal magnetohydrodynamics: magnetic helicity. Our contemporary understanding of Hale's vortices as a consequence of large-scale twist in sunspot magnetic fields hinges on this conservation. I will review the crucial role that this property plays in the hemispheric and solar cycle dependences of Hales vortices, as well as solar flares and CMEs.

  8. Multiplexed miRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Neil; Cekan, Pavol; Bognanni, Claudia; Tuschl, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multiplexed miRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (miRNA FISH) is an advanced method for visualizing differentially expressed miRNAs, together with other reference RNAs, in archival tissues. Some miRNAs are excellent disease biomarkers due to their abundance and cell-type specificity. However, these short RNA molecules are difficult to visualize due to loss by diffusion, probe mishybridization, and signal detection and signal amplification issues. Here, we describe a reliable and adjustable method for visualizing and normalizing miRNA signals in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections.

  9. Multiplexed miRNA Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Renwick, Neil; Cekan, Pavol; Bognanni, Claudia; Tuschl, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Multiplexed miRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (miRNA FISH) is an advanced method for visualizing differentially expressed miRNAs, together with other reference RNAs, in archival tissues. Some miRNAs are excellent disease biomarkers due to their abundance and cell-type specificity. However, these short RNA molecules are difficult to visualize due to loss by diffusion, probe mishybridization, and signal detection and signal amplification issues. Here, we describe a reliable and adjustable method for visualizing and normalizing miRNA signals in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. PMID:25218385

  10. Detection and Genotyping of Human Papillomaviruses from Archival Formalin-Fixed Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Chen, Zigui; McBride, Alison A

    2016-11-18

    Pathology departments routinely process and store formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples for clinical diagnosis. These collections often contain decades' worth of samples and represent a treasure trove of specimens that can be analyzed for retrospective epidemiological studies, diagnostics, and pathogen discovery. Accurate amplification and sequencing of DNA from these samples is critical for the usability of these FFPE samples. Here we present a collection of protocols that describe extraction of DNA from FFPE tissues, PCR amplification of human papillomavirus DNA, and subsequent genotyping of the infecting virus. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Determination of protein loss during aqueous and phase partition fixation using formalin and glutaraldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, E.T.; Feldhoff, R.C.; Nettleton, G.S.

    1984-10-01

    In phase partition fixation tissue is immersed in an organic solvent at equilibrium with an aqueous phase containing a fixing agent. By using radioisotope labeling techniques the effects of phase partition fixation on protein retention during fixation of tissue with formalin and glutaraldehyde have been determined and compared with those of standard aqueous fixation using these fixatives. It has been shown that retention of protein in tissue during phase partition fixation was as good or better than during aqueous fixation. Improved retention provides further evidence that phase partition fixation may be a useful alternative to aqueous fixation.

  12. Hydroalcoholic extract of Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) and its constituent carnosol inhibit formalin-induced pain and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Emami, F; Ali-Beig, H; Farahbakhsh, S; Mojabi, N; Rastegar-Moghadam, B; Arbabian, S; Kazemi, M; Tekieh, E; Golmanesh, L; Ranjbaran, M; Jalili, C; Noroozzadeh, A; Sahraei, H

    2013-04-01

    The anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive properties of Rosmarinus officinalis L. (ROL) extract and its major constituent, carnosol in male NMRI mice (W:25-30 g) have been evaluated in the present study. Formalin (2%, 20 microL) was injected into the plantar portion of the hind paw and resulting pain and inflammation was studied for 60 min. The plant extract, carnosol and other drugs were administered intraperitoneally or subcutaneously 30 min before formalin injection. In a separate experiment, the effects of the extract and carnosol on plasma corticosterone levels and activity of the enzymes cyclooxygenase type 1 and 2 (COX1 and COX2) were investigated. Injection of different doses of ROL and carnosol reduced pain in the phase 2 of the formalin test, which was not inhibited by naloxone and/or memantine. In addition, pretreatment of the animals with ROL and/or carnosol reduces the formalin-induced inflammation. Furthermore, the extract and carnosol did not affect plasma corticosterone levels compared with the control group. Interestingly, both the extract and carnosol inhibited COX1 and COX2 activity. It could be concluded that ROL extract and carnosol suppressed pain and inflammation induced by formalin injection, which may be due to inhibition of COX1 and COX2 enzymes activity.

  13. Palmitoylethanolamide reduces formalin-induced neuropathic-like behaviour through spinal glial/microglial phenotypical changes in mice.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Livio; Guida, Francesca; Boccella, Serena; Bellini, Giulia; Gatta, Luisa; Rossi, Francesca; de Novellis, Vito; Maione, Sabatino

    2013-02-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an endogenous cannabinoid-like compound in the central nervous system, which can modulate several functions in different pathological states, such as inflammation and pain response. We have here investigated the effect of PEA (5-10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) on mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia 3 and 7 days following peripheral injection of formalin. Formalin induced a significant decrease of thermal and mechanical threshold in the injected and contralateral paw. PEA chronic treatment (once per day) significantly reduced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent manner. Consistently, in vivo electrophysiological analysis revealed a significant increase of the duration and frequency, and a rapid decrease in the onset of evoked activity of the spinal nociceptive neurons 7 days after formalin. PEA normalized the electrophysiological parameters in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, we investigated PEA effect on the glial/microglial phenotypical changes associated with spinal neuronal sensitization. We found that formalin induced a significant microglia and glia activation normalized by PEA, together with increased expression of glial interleukin 10. Finally, primary microglial cell cultures, conditioned with PEA or vehicle, where transplanted in naive and formalin-treated mice, and nociceptive neurons were recorded. We observed that only PEA-conditioned cells normalized the activity of sensitized nociceptive neurons. In conclusion these data confirm the potent anti-inflammatory and anti-allodynic effect of PEA, and highlight a possible targeted microglial/glial effect of this drug in the spinal cord.

  14. Efficacy of hydrogen peroxide versus formalin treatments to control mortality associated with saprolegniasis on lake trout eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rach, J.J.; Redman, S.; Bast, D.; Gaikowski, M.P.

    2005-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide versus formalin treatments to control fungal infections on eggs of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush incubated at a hatchery in Wisconsin. Four strains of lake trout eggs were incubated in six vertical-flow Heath incubators; three replicate incubators for each chemical. Each incubator had 13 trays containing approximately 25,000-30,000 eggs/tray. Formalin (1,667 mg/L) or hydrogen peroxide (1,000 mg/L) treatments were administered once daily for 15 min up to the development of visible eye spots in the eggs (eyed egg stage). Eyed and dead eggs were separated using a photoelectric egg sorter, and the number of live and dead eggs was determined volumetrically. In the hydrogen peroxide test group, the bottom trays of each incubator had fungus present on the eggs, whereas no fungus was observed on eggs treated with formalin. The mean percentage of eyed eggs for an incubator treated with formalin (75%) was significantly greater than an incubator treated with hydrogen peroxide (70%). Formalin was the most efficacious therapeutant; however, both therapeutants were effective in increasing lake trout egg survival up to the eyed egg stage. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  15. DIBROMOACETIC ACID-INDUCED ELEVATIONS OF ESTRADIOL IN THE CYCLING AND OVARIECTOMOZED/ESTRADIOL-IMPLANTED FEMALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Goldman, JM and Murr, AS. Dibromoacetic Acid-induced Elevations of Estradiol in Both Cycling and Ovariectomized / Estradiol-implanted Female Rats

    ABSTRACT
    Haloacetic acids are one of the principal classes of disinfection by-products generated by the chlorination of mun...

  16. DIBROMOACETIC ACID-INDUCED ELEVATIONS IN CIRCULATING ESTRADIOL: EFFECTS IN BOTH CYCLING AND OVARIECTOMIZED/STEROID-PRIMED FEMALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    RTD-03-031
    Goldman, JM and Murr, AS. Dibromoacetic Acid-induced Elevations in Circulating Estradiol: Effects in Both Cycling and Ovariectomized/Steroid-primed Female Rats. Reproductive Toxicology (in press).

    Abstract

    Oral exposures to high concentrations of th...

  17. Pre-fusion F is absent on the surface of formalin-inactivated respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    Killikelly, April M.; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Graham, Barney S.

    2016-01-01

    The lack of a licensed vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can be partly attributed to regulatory hurdles resulting from vaccine enhanced respiratory disease (ERD) subsequent to natural RSV infection that was observed in clinical trials of formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) in antigen-naïve infants. To develop an effective vaccine that does not enhance RSV illness, it is important to understand how formalin and heat inactivation affected the antigenicity and immunogenicity of FI-RSV compared to native virus. Informed by atomic structures of RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein in prefusion (pre-F) and postfusion (post-F) conformations, we demonstrate that FI-RSV predominately presents post-F on the virion surface, whereas infectious RSV presents both pre-F and post-F conformations. This significant antigenic distinction has not been previously appreciated. Thus, a stabilized pre-F antigen is more representative of live RSV than F in its post-F conformation, as displayed on the surface of FI-RSV. This finding has major implications for discriminating current pre-F-based immunogens from FI-RSV used in historical vaccine trials. PMID:27682426

  18. Minimum formalin fixation time for consistent estrogen receptor immunohistochemical staining of invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Neal S; Ferkowicz, Monica; Odish, Eva; Mani, Anju; Hastah, Farnaz

    2003-07-01

    To identify the minimum time necessary for consistent immunohistochemical estrogen receptor (ER) results in our laboratory, we evaluated results in timed fixation blocks and cases with disparate and similar needle core biopsy and partial mastectomy specimens. Tissue sections of 24 ER-positive, invasive breast carcinomas were fixed for 3, 6, 8, and 12 hours and 1, 2, and 7 days. ER values were quantified using the Q score (0-7). In timed fixation blocks, the mean Q score per block was 2.46 for blocks fixed for 3 hours, 5.75 for blocks fixed for 6 hours, and 6.70 for blocks fixed for 8 hours (P < .001). The difference between the case maximum and mean block Q scores was a plateau of almost 0 at 6 to 8 hours of formalin fixation. For needle core biopsy specimen fixation times, the means for specimens with ER-disparate and ER-similar results were 1.2 and 6.3 hours, respectively (P = .01). The minimum formalin fixation time for reliable immunohistochemical ER results is 6 to 8 hours in our laboratory, regardless of the type or size of specimen.

  19. Spinal vasopressin alleviates formalin-induced nociception by enhancing GABAA receptor function in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fang; Qu, Zu-Wei; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Liao, Min; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2015-04-23

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) plays a regulatory role in nociception. Intrathecal administration of AVP displays an antinociceptive effect. However, little is understood about the mechanism underlying spinal AVP analgesia. Here, we have found that spinal AVP dose dependently reduced the second, but not first, phase of formalin-induced spontaneous nociception in mice. The AVP analgesia was completely blocked by intrathecal injected SR 49059, a vasopressin-1A (V1A) receptor antagonist. However, spinal AVP failed to exert its antinociceptive effect on the second phase formalin-induced spontaneous nociception in V1A receptor knock-out (V1A-/-) mice. The AVP analgesia was also reversed by bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist. Moreover, AVP potentiated GABA-activated currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons from wild-type littermates, but not from V1A-/- mice. Our results may reveal a novel spinal mechanism of AVP analgesia by enhancing the GABAA receptor function in the spinal cord through V1A receptors.

  20. [Interaction between gabapentin and D-serin in the formalin orofacial test].

    PubMed

    Quiñónez, Belkis; Silva, Elizabeth; González, Luis E; Hernández, Luis

    2009-12-01

    Gabapentin is a useful agent for the relief of trigeminal neuralgia and orofacial phantom pain. However, there is scarce information on the gabapentin analgesic effect in orofacial pain models. We tested the analgesic action of gabapentin on the formalin-induced face grooming in the rat, an orofacial pain paradigm. IP Gabapentin (10 mg/kg), induced a drastic reduction in face grooming during phase I and II, indicating a clear-cut antinociceptive effect. However, at 1 mg/kg, gabapentin had an analgesic effect only on phase I. D-serine (100 microg, ICV) was silent when given alone and did not antagonize the antinociceptive effect of gabapentin. On the contrary, gabapentin 1 mg/kg plus D-serine significantly reduced face grooming in phase II. These results show a difference between gabapentin induced orofacial analgesia and previous studies showing gabapentin-induced hind paw analgesia in the formalin test, only during phase II, as well as D-serine antagonism of gabapentin. The results are discussed in terms of different pain processing of hind paw, versus orofacial nociceptive stimulation.

  1. Long-term gender behavioral vulnerability after nociceptive neonatal formalin stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Negrigo, Aline; Medeiros, Magda; Guinsburg, Ruth; Covolan, Luciene

    2011-03-03

    The role of sex and gender in accounting for individual pain behaviors is poorly understood. The present study was conducted to determine whether neonatal nociceptive stimuli at postnatal day 1 (PD1) in rats would lead to a differential behavioral impact based on gender. Animals were divided in 4 groups according to treatment (two injections of 4% formalin into the pad of right paws at PD1 or control) and gender. The sensory threshold and cognition tests were performed in adult rats using the hot plate, open field, elevated plus maze and forced swim tests. The number of paw licks was higher in females and in formalin-treated rats (P=0.02), but without interaction between gender and treatment. Exploratory activity was reduced in males (P<0.01), especially in the nociceptive group (P<0.01). Anxiety levels were higher in the female-nociceptive group (P<0.05). Depression-like behavior was more evident among females, independent of treatment. We concluded that a single acute nociceptive stimulation early in development does not affect nociception and depressive behaviors, but is able to alter the exploratory behavior and anxiety levels in adulthood in a gender specific manner.

  2. Pulsed radiofrequency attenuates diabetic neuropathic pain and suppresses formalin-evoked spinal glutamate release in rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Hsin; Hou, Shao-Yun; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Chung-Ren

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) has been used to treat chronic pain for years, but its effectiveness and mechanism in treating diabetic neuropathic pain are still unexplored. The aim of this study was to elucidate the modulation of diabetic neuropathic pain induced by streptozotocin and the release of spinal excitatory amino acids by PRF. METHODS: Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin. Pulsed radiofrequency was applied to L5 and L6 dorsal roots at 42 °C for 2 min. The responses of all of the groups to thermal, mechanical and cold stimuli were measured for a period of 6 d after this process. Seven days after PRF treatment, intrathecal microdialysis was used to examine the effect of pulsed radiofrequency on the formalin-evoked spinal release of excitatory amino acids and concurrent behaviour responses from diabetic rats. RESULTS: Three weeks after intraperitoneal streptozotocin treatment and before PRF application, mechanical, thermal and cold hypersensitivity occurred. Application of PRF significantly alleviated hyperglycaemia-induced mechanical, thermal and cold hypersensitivity and also attenuated the increase in formalin-evoked CSF glutamate concentration, compared with sham treated diabetic rats. CONCLUSION: It may be concluded that PRF has an analgesic effect on neuropathic pain by suppressing the nociception-induced release of excitatory neurotransmitters. PRF may provide a novel promising therapeutic approach for managing diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:27994505

  3. Comparison of protocols for DNA extraction from long-term preserved formalin fixed tissues.

    PubMed

    Paireder, Stefan; Werner, Bettina; Bailer, Josef; Werther, Wolfgang; Schmid, Erich; Patzak, Beatrix; Cichna-Markl, Margit

    2013-08-15

    The current study compared the applicability of protocols to extract DNA from formalin fixed heart tissues that have been preserved for more than 50 years. Ten methods were tested: a cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) standard protocol, seven variants of this standard protocol, and two commercial kits. In the case of younger specimens (fixed in 1951, 1934, or 1914), extracts with DNA concentrations ≥ 10.0 ng/μl were obtained with the standard CTAB protocol, two variants of the standard protocol including prolonged tissue digestion (72 h instead of 1-2h), and a commercial kit particularly recommended for DNA extraction from formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues (FFPE Kit). With the FFPE Kit, DNA could also be extracted from older tissues (fixed in 1893, 1850/1851, or before 1820). In general, the purity of the DNA extracts, assessed from the ratio of the absorbance at 260 and 280 nm, was not very high. In spite of their rather low purity, the DNA extracts could, however, be used to amplify a 122-bp sequence and, in most cases, also a 171-bp sequence of the gene coding for human albumin by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

  4. Differential effects of topically applied formalin and aromatic compounds on neurogenic-mediated microvascular leakage in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Futamura, Masaki; Goto, Shiho; Kimura, Ryoko; Kimoto, Izumi; Miyake, Mio; Ito, Komei; Sakamoto, Tatsuo

    2009-01-08

    Various volatile organic compounds (VOCs) act as a causative agent of skin inflammation. We investigated the effect of topical application of several VOCs and formalin on microvascular leakage in rat skin. We tested capsaicin, which is a reagent that specifically causes the skin response via endogenously released tachykinins. Evans blue dye extravasation served as an index of the increase in skin vascular permeability. After shaving the abdomen, we applied formalin, m-xylene, toluene, styrene, benzene, ethylbenzene, acetone, diethyl ether, hexane, heptane, cyclohexane and capsaicin to the skin. At 40min after application, skin samples were collected. Among all of the VOCs tested, all of the aromatic compounds significantly produced skin microvascular leakage that was similar to formalin and capsaicin. We also investigated the skin responses seen after the intravenous administration of CP-99,994 (1.5 or 5mg/kg), which is a tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist, ketotifen (1 or 3mg/kg), which is a histamine H1 receptor antagonist that stabilizes the mast cells, and the topical application of capsazepine (22.5 or 50mM), which is the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist. The response induced by formalin and capsaicin was completely inhibited by CP-99,994. On the other hand, the antagonist partially reduced the response induced by m-xylene, toluene and styrene by 39%, 50% and 46%, respectively. Capsazepine and ketotifen did not alter the response induced by formalin or any of the aromatic compounds. Like capsaicin, formalin and the aromatic compounds at least partially caused skin microvascular leakage, which was due to tachykinin NK1 receptor activation related to the release of tachykinins from the sensory nerve endings. However, it is unlikely that mast cells and TRPV1 play an important role in the skin response.

  5. Hormonal and molecular effects of restraint stress on formalin-induced pain-like behavior in male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Long, Caela C; Sadler, Katelyn E; Kolber, Benedict J

    2016-10-15

    The evolutionary advantages to the suppression of pain during a stressful event (stress-induced analgesia (SIA)) are obvious, yet the reasoning behind sex-differences in the expression of this pain reduction are not. The different ways in which males and females integrate physiological stress responses and descending pain inhibition are unclear. A potential supraspinal modulator of stress-induced analgesia is the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). This limbic brain region is involved in both the processing of stress and pain; the CeA is anatomically and molecularly linked to regions of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis and descending pain network. The CeA exhibits sex-based differences in response to stress and pain that may differentially induce SIA in males and females. Here, sex-based differences in behavioral and molecular indices of SIA were examined following noxious stimulation. Acute restraint stress in male and female mice was performed prior to intraplantar injections of formalin, a noxious inflammatory agent. Spontaneous pain-like behaviors were measured for 60min following formalin injection and mechanical hypersensitivity was evaluated 120 and 180min post-injection. Restraint stress altered formalin-induced spontaneous behaviors in male and female mice and formalin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in male mice. To assess molecular indices of SIA, tissue samples from the CeA and blood samples were collected at the 180min time point. Restraint stress prevented formalin-induced increases in extracellular signal regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) phosphorylation in the male CeA, but no changes associated with pERK2 were seen with formalin or restraint in females. Sex differences were also seen in plasma corticosterone concentrations 180min post injection. These results demonstrate sex-based differences in behavioral, molecular, and hormonal indices of acute stress in mice that extend for 180min after stress and noxious stimulation.

  6. Transcriptional analysis of the acid-inducible asr gene in enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    Seputiene, Vaida; Suziedelis, Kestutis; Normark, Staffan; Melefors, Ojar; Suziedeliene, Edita

    2004-09-01

    We show here that transcription of the asr gene in Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae is strongly dependent on the acidification level of the growth medium, with maximal induction at pH 4.0-4.5 as determined by Northern hybridization analysis. Previous gene array analyses have also shown that asr is the most acid-induced gene in the E. coli genome. Sequence alignment of the asr promoters from different enterobacterial species identified a highly conserved region located at position -70 to -30 relative to the asr transcriptional start site. By deletion of various segments of this region in the E. coli asr promoter it was shown that sequences upstream from the -40 position were important for induction. Transcription from the E. coli asr promoter was demonstrated to be growth-phase-dependent and to require the alternative sigma factor RpoS (sigma(S)) in stationary phase. Transcription of the asr gene was also found to be subject to negative control by the nucleoid protein H-NS.

  7. CCN1 is critical for acid-induced esophageal epithelial cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Modak, Cristina; Mouazzen, Wasim; Narvaez, Reinier; Reavis, Kevin M; Chai, Jianyuan

    2010-02-19

    CCN1 is a matricellular protein involved in both wound healing and cancer cell invasion. Increased CCN1 expression has been associated with the development of Barrett's esophagus and the increased risk of progression to esophageal adenocarcinoma. In both cases, acid reflux is a major contributor. Low pH has been shown to induce CCN1 gene expression in esophageal epithelial cells. Here we demonstrated that both CCN1 and low pH could cause esophageal epithelial cell transformation, including loss of E-cadherin, disruption of cell-cell junctions, and expression of mesenchymal markers. Furthermore, knockdown of CCN1 through RNA interference sufficiently attenuated acid-driven cell phenotypic changes, while over-expression of CCN1 exacerbated these effects, indicating a critical role of CCN1 in acid-induced esophageal epithelial cell transformation. Given the pivotal role of low pH in gastro-esophageal reflux disease and its progression towards esophageal adenocarcinoma, our study identified CCN1 as a key molecule mediating this process.

  8. Acid-induced gelation behavior of casein/whey protein solutions assessed by oscillatory rheology.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mahboubeh; Madadlou, Ashkan; Khosrowshahi, Asghar; Mohammadifar, Mohammadamin

    2014-09-01

    Gelation process of acid-induced casein gels was studied using response surface method (RSM). Ratio of casein to whey proteins, incubation and heating temperatures were independent variables. Final storage modulus (G') measured 200 min after the addition of glucono-δ-lactone and the gelation time i.e. the time at which G' of gels became greater than 1 Pa were the parameters studied. Incubation temperature strongly affected both parameters. The higher the incubation temperature, the lower was the G' and the shorter the gelation time. Increased heating temperature however, increased the G' but again shortened the gelation time. Increase in G' was attributed to the formation of disulphide cross-linkages between denatured whey proteins and casein chains; whilst the latter was legitimized by considering the higher isoelectric pH of whey proteins. Maximum response (G' = 268.93 Pa) was obtained at 2.7 % w/w, 25 °C and 90 °C for casein content, incubation and heating temperatures, respectively.

  9. Folic acid induces salicylic acid-dependent immunity in Arabidopsis and enhances susceptibility to Alternaria brassicicola.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Finni; Kanawati, Basem; Wenig, Marion; Hoffmann, Thomas; Franz-Oberdorf, Katrin; Schwab, Wilfried; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Vlot, A Corina

    2015-08-01

    Folates are essential for one-carbon transfer reactions in all organisms and contribute, for example, to de novo DNA synthesis. Here, we detected the folate precursors 7,8-dihydropteroate (DHP) and 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate (ADC) in extracts from Arabidopsis thaliana plants by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry. The accumulation of DHP, but not ADC, was induced after infection of plants with Pseudomonas syringae delivering the effector protein AvrRpm1. Application of folic acid or the DHP precursor 7,8-dihydroneopterin (DHN) enhanced resistance in Arabidopsis to P. syringae and elevated the transcript accumulation of the salicylic acid (SA) marker gene pathogenesis-related1 in both the treated and systemic untreated leaves. DHN- and folic acid-induced systemic resistance was dependent on SA biosynthesis and signalling. Similar to SA, folic acid application locally enhanced Arabidopsis susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola. Together, the data associate the folic acid pathway with innate immunity in Arabidopsis, simultaneously activating local and systemic SA-dependent resistance to P. syringae and suppressing local resistance to A. brassicicola.

  10. Acupuncture suppresses kainic acid-induced neuronal death and inflammatory events in mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Tae; Doo, Ah-Reum; Kim, Seung-Nam; Kim, Song-Yi; Kim, Yoon Young; Kim, Jang-Hyun; Lee, Hyejung; Yin, Chang Shik; Park, Hi-Joon

    2012-09-01

    The administration of kainic acid (KA) causes seizures and produces neurodegeneration in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells. The present study investigated a possible role of acupuncture in reducing hippocampal cell death and inflammatory events, using a mouse model of kainic acid-induced epilepsy. Male C57BL/6 mice received acupuncture treatments at acupoint HT8 or in the tail area bilaterally once a day for 2 days and again immediately after an intraperitoneal injection of KA (30 mg/kg). HT8 is located on the palmar surface of the forelimbs, between the fourth and fifth metacarpal bones. Twenty-four hours after the KA injection, neuronal cell survival, the activations of microglia and astrocytes, and mRNA expression of two proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), were measured in the hippocampus. Acupuncture stimulation at HT8, but not in the tail area, significantly reduced the KA-induced seizure, neuron death, microglial and astrocyte activations, and IL-1β mRNA expression in the hippocampus. The acupuncture stimulation also decreased the mRNA expression of TNF-α, but it was not significant. These results indicate that acupuncture at HT8 can inhibit hippocampal cell death and suppress KA-induced inflammatory events, suggesting a possible role for acupuncture in the treatment of epilepsy.

  11. Ethanol promotes saturated fatty acid-induced hepatoxicity through endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hong-Wei; Ma, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Wang, Cui-Fen; Lu, Jian; Cao, Wei; Wu, Xu-Dong

    2015-04-01

    Serum palmitic acid (PA), a type of saturated fatty acid, causes lipid accumulation and induces toxicity in hepatocytes. Ethanol (EtOH) is metabolized by the liver and induces hepatic injury and inflammation. Herein, we analyzed the effects of EtOH on PA-induced lipotoxicity in the liver. Our results indicated that EtOH aggravated PA-induced apoptosis and lipid accumulation in primary rat hepatocytes in dose-dependent manner. EtOH intensified PA-caused endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in vitro and in vivo, and the expressions of CHOP, ATF4, and XBP-1 in nucleus were significantly increased. EtOH also increased PA-caused cleaved caspase-3 in cytoplasm. In wild type and CHOP(-/-) mice treated with EtOH and high fat diet (HFD), EtOH worsened the HFD-induced liver injury and dyslipidemia, while CHOP knockout blocked toxic effects of EtOH and PA. Our study suggested that targeting UPR-signaling pathways is a promising, novel approach to reducing EtOH and saturated fatty acid-induced metabolic complications.

  12. The saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid, induces anxiety-like behavior in mice

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Morgan L.; Joesting, Jennifer J.; Lawson, Marcus A.; Chiu, Gabriel S.; Blevins, Neil A.; Kwakwa, Kristin A.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Excess fat in the diet can impact neuropsychiatric functions by negatively affecting cognition, mood and anxiety. We sought to show that the free fatty acid (FFA), palmitic acid, can cause adverse biobehaviors in mice that lasts beyond an acute elevation in plasma FFAs. Methods Mice were administered palmitic acid or vehicle as a single intraperitoneal (IP) injection. Biobehaviors were profiled 2 and 24 hrs after palmitic acid treatment. Quantification of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), serotonin (5-HT) and their major metabolites was performed in cortex, hippocampus and amygdala. FFA concentration was determined in plasma. Relative fold change in mRNA expression of unfolded protein response (UPR)-associated genes was determined in brain regions. Results In a dose-dependent fashion, palmitic acid rapidly reduced mouse locomotor activity by a mechanism that did not rely on TLR4, MyD88, IL-1, IL-6 or TNFα but was dependent on fatty acid chain length. Twenty-four hrs after palmitic acid administration mice exhibited anxiety-like behavior without impairment in locomotion, food intake, depressive-like behavior or spatial memory. Additionally, the serotonin metabolite 5-HIAA was increased by 33% in the amygdala 24 hrs after palmitic acid treatment. Conclusions Palmitic acid induces anxiety-like behavior in mice while increasing amygdala-based serotonin metabolism. These effects occur at a time point when plasma FFA levels are no longer elevated. PMID:25016520

  13. Palmitoleic acid induces the cardiac mitochondrial membrane permeability transition despite the presence of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Oyanagi, Eri; Uchida, Masataka; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Miyachi, Motohiko; Yamaguchi, Hidetaka; Nagami, Kuniatsu; Utsumi, Kozo; Yano, Hiromi

    Although palmitoleic acid (C16:1) is associated with arrhythmias, and increases in an age-dependent matter, the effects of L-carnitine, which is essential for the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria, are unclear. It has been postulated that L-carnitine may attenuate palmitate (C16:0)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. The aim of this study was to elucidate the activity of L-carnitine in the prevention of the palmitoleic acid-induced mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and cytochrome c release using isolated cardiac mitochondria from rats. Palmitoleoyl-CoA-induced mitochondrial respiration was not accelerated by L-carnitine treatment, and this respiration was slightly inhibited by oligomycin, which is an inhibitor of ATP synthase. Despite pretreatment with L-carnitine, the mitochondrial membrane potential decreased and mitochondrial swelling was induced by palmitoleoyl-CoA. In the presence of a combination of L-carnitine and tiron, a free radical scavenger, there was attenuated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release following palmitoleoyl-CoA treatment. We concluded that palmitoleic acid, but not palmitate, induces the cardiac mitochondrial membrane permeability transition despite the presence of L-carnitine.

  14. Bile acid induced colonic irritation stimulates intracolonic nitric oxide release in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, F; Mourelle, M; Papo, M; Guarner, F; Antolin, M; Armengol, J R; Malagelada, J R

    1996-01-01

    AIM--To measure the intracolonic release of nitric oxide end products (nitrates plus nitrites) and eicosanoids in response to intraluminal irritation with deoxycholic acid (DCA). PATIENTS--Seven patients with irritable bowel syndrome. METHODS--The left colon was perfused with a solution with or without 3 mM deoxycholic acid. Aspirates were assayed for eicosanoids by specific radioimmuno-assay, and for nitrates plus nitrites by the Griess reaction. To confirm that stimulated colonic mucosa can produce nitric oxide (NO), ancillary studies were performed in vitro using samples of normal mucosa obtained from five surgically resected colons. Samples were incubated for 30 minutes in Kreb's solution, 3 mM DCA or DCA with 1 mM L-nitro-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME) to inhibit the NO synthase. Finally, NO synthase activity was measured in five samples of human colonic mucosa. RESULTS--Intracolonic release of nitrates plus nitrites was basally undetectable in six of seven patients. Bile acid considerably increased the release of prostaglandin E2 and nitrates plus nitrites (p < 0.01). By contrast, no increase in thromboxane and leukotriene was seen. In vitro mucosal incubation with DCA increased the production of NO synthase products, which was blocked by L-NAME. Activity of Ca+2 independent NO synthase was detectable in four of five samples of human colonic mucosa. CONCLUSION--The human colonic mucosa responds to bile acid induced irritation by a surge in NO generation via NO synthase. PMID:8707118

  15. Saturated phosphatidic acids mediate saturated fatty acid-induced vascular calcification and lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Masashi; Miyazaki-Anzai, Shinobu; Keenan, Audrey L; Okamura, Kayo; Kendrick, Jessica; Chonchol, Michel; Offermanns, Stefan; Ntambi, James M; Kuro-O, Makoto; Miyazaki, Makoto

    2015-10-26

    Recent evidence indicates that saturated fatty acid-induced (SFA-induced) lipotoxicity contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms that underlie SFA-induced lipotoxicity remain unclear. Here, we have shown that repression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) enzymes, which regulate the intracellular balance of SFAs and unsaturated FAs, and the subsequent accumulation of SFAs in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), are characteristic events in the development of vascular calcification. We evaluated whether SMC-specific inhibition of SCD and the resulting SFA accumulation plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification and generated mice with SMC-specific deletion of both Scd1 and Scd2. Mice lacking both SCD1 and SCD2 in SMCs displayed severe vascular calcification with increased ER stress. Moreover, we employed shRNA library screening and radiolabeling approaches, as well as in vitro and in vivo lipidomic analysis, and determined that fully saturated phosphatidic acids such as 1,2-distearoyl-PA (18:0/18:0-PA) mediate SFA-induced lipotoxicity and vascular calcification. Together, these results identify a key lipogenic pathway in SMCs that mediates vascular calcification.

  16. Effect of galactose on acid induced molten globule state of Soybean Agglutinin: Biophysical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Parvez; Naseem, Farha; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2015-11-01

    In the present study the formation of molten globule-like unfolding intermediate Soybean Agglutinin (SBA) in acidic pH range has been established with the help of acrylamide quenching, intrinsic fluorescence, ANS fluorescence measurement, far UV CD and dynamic light scattering measurement. A marked increase in ANS fluorescence was observed at pH 2.2. Ksv of acrylamide quenching was found to be higher at pH 2.2 than that of native SBA at pH 7. Far UV CD spectra of pH induced state suggest that SBA shows significant retention of secondary structure closure to native. Hydrodynamic radius of SBA at pH 2.2 was found be more as compared to native state and also in other pH induced states. Further we checked the effect of galactose on the molten globule state of SBA. This study suggests that SBA exist as molten globule at pH 2.2 and this study will help in acid induced molten globule state of other proteins.

  17. Pulmonary vasoconstriction in oleic acid induced lung injury. A morphometric study.

    PubMed Central

    Grotjohan, H. P.; van der Heijde, R. M.; Wagenvoort, C. A.; Wagenvoort, N.; Versprille, A.

    1993-01-01

    Distribution and severity of active vasoconstriction of muscular pulmonary arteries were morphometrically assessed in anaesthetized, paralysed and mechanically ventilated pigs with respiratory distress, induced by oleic acid. Vasoconstriction was deduced from the medial thickness which was measured and expressed as a percentage of external diameter. Six pigs received oleic acid (0.12 +/- 0.07 ml/kg), dissolved 1:1 in 96% alcohol, in multiple injections of 0.1 ml. Six pigs were used as controls. After the oleic acid injections a stable hypoxaemia (PaO2 = 57 +/- 8 mmHg, at an inspiratory oxygen fraction of 0.6) and pulmonary hypertension (mean Ppa = 36 +/- 2 mmHg) were obtained for several hours. Electron microscopy revealed swelling of endothelial cells with signs of degeneration. Medial thickness was far greater in the oleic acid group than in the control group; overall mean values were 8.1 +/- 3.2 and 3.8 +/- 1.7% respectively (P < 0.001). Arteries with prominent vasoconstriction were lying in clusters. This pattern was the same in dependent and non-dependent regions. We concluded that in oleic acid induced respiratory distress active vasoconstriction of muscular pulmonary arteries is an important factor in the development of pulmonary hypertension. Besides vasoconstriction, endothelial swelling and intravascular clotting may contribute to the development of pulmonary hypertension. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8398807

  18. Tanshinone IIA Protects Against Folic Acid-Induced Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunming; Zhu, Wei; Shao, Qiuyuan; Yan, Xiang; Jin, Bo; Zhang, Miao; Xu, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA is a diterpene extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza, a popular and safe herb medicine that has been widely used in China and other Asian countries. Previous studies have demonstrated the pleiotropic effects of Tanshinone IIA on many disease treatments via its antitoxicity, anti-inflammation, anti-oxidative stress, as well as antifibrosis activities. However, its effect on acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been fully investigated. Here, we show for the first time that systemic administration of Tanshinone IIA can lead to improved kidney function in folic acid-induced kidney injury mice. In the acute phase of AKI, Tanshinone IIA attenuated renal tubular epithelial injury, as determined by histologic changes and the detection of Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in the kidney and urine. Additionally, Tanshinone IIA treatment resulted in elevated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression and decreased inflammatory cells infiltration as well as chemokine expression, suggesting that Tanshinone IIA promoted renal repair following AKI and inhibited local inflammatory response in the injured kidney. This led to decreased long-term fibrosis in the injured kidney, characterized by less accumulation of fibronectin and collagen I in tubulointerstitium. Taken together, these results suggest that Tanshinone IIA may represent a potential approach for AKI treatment.

  19. Targeting oxidative stress attenuates malonic acid induced Huntington like behavioral and mitochondrial alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2010-05-25

    Objective of the present study was to explore the possible role of oxidative stress in the malonic acid induced behavioral, biochemical and mitochondrial alterations in rats. In the present study, unilateral single injections of malonic acid at different doses (1.5, 3 and 6 micromol) were made into the ipsilateral striatum in rats. Behavioral parameters were accessed on 1st, 7th and 14th day post malonic acid administration. Oxidative stress parameters and mitochondrial enzyme functions were assessed on day 14 after behavioral observations. Ipsilateral striatal malonic acid (3 and 6 micromol) administration significantly reduced body weight, locomotor activity, motor coordination and caused oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation, nitrite, superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione) in the striatum as compared to sham treated animal. Mitochondrial enzyme complexes and MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolinium bromide) activity were significantly inhibited by malonic acid. Vitamin E treatment (50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly reversed the various behavioral, biochemical and mitochondrial alterations in malonic acid treated animals. Our findings show that targeting oxidative stress by vitamin E in malonic acid model, results in amelioration of behavioral and mitochondrial alterations are linked to inhibition of oxidative damage. Based upon these finding present study hypothesize that protection exerted by vitamin E on behavioral, mitochondrial markers indicates the possible preservation of the functional status of the striatal neurons by targeting the deleterious actions of oxidative stress.

  20. Tiagabine treatment in kainic acid induced cerebellar lesion of dystonia rat model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tsui-chin; Ngampramuan, Sukonthar; Kotchabhakdi, Naiphinich

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological disorder characterized by excessive involuntary muscle contractions that lead to twisting movements. The exaggerated movements have been studied and have implicated basal ganglia as the point of origin. In more recent studies, the cerebellum has also been identified as the possible target of dystonia, in the search for alternative treatments. Tiagabine is a selective GABA transporter inhibitor, which blocks the reuptake and recycling of GABA. The study of GABAergic drugs as an alternative treatment for cerebellar induced dystonia has not been reported. In our study, tiagabine was i.p. injected into kainic acid induced, cerebellar dystonic adult rats, and the effects were compared with non-tiagabine injected and sham-operated groups. Beam walking apparatus, telemetric electromyography (EMG) recording, and histological verification were performed to confirm dystonic symptoms in the rats on post-surgery treatment. Involuntary dystonic spasm was observed with repetitive rigidity, and twisting movements in the rats were also confirmed by a high score on the dystonic scoring and a high amplitude on the EMG data. The rats with tiagabine treatment were scored based on motor amelioration assessed via beam walking. The result of this study suggests and confirms that low dose of kainic acid microinjection is sufficient to induce dystonia from the cerebellar vermis. In addition, from the results of the EMG recording and the behavioral assessment through beam walking, tiagabine is demonstrated as being effective in reducing dystonic spasm and may be a possible alternative therapeutic drug in the treatment of dystonia. PMID:28337103

  1. Preliminary pharmacological activity of the methanolic extract of Premna integrifolia barks in rats

    PubMed Central

    Khatun, Hajera; Majumder, Rajib; Al Mamun; Alam, Efte Kharul; Jami, Safkath Ibne; Alam, Badrul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Premna integrifolia Linn (Family: Verbenaceae) synonym of Premna serratifolia has tremendous medicinal value. Preliminary pharmacological studies were performed on the methanolic extract of Premna integrifolia (MEPI) bark to investigate neuropharmacological, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Materials and methods: Neuropharmacology study was done by open field and hole cross test whereas acetic acid writhing test and formalin induced pain was done for analgesic activity of MEPI. Carrageenan induced inflammatory model was considered for anti-inflammatory activity evaluation. Results: A statistically significant (p0.05) decrease in locomotor activity was observed at all doses in the open-field and hole-cross tests. The extract significantly (p0.05) and dose dependently reduced the writhing reflex in the acetic acid-induced writhing test as well as licking response in the formalin induced inflammatory pain. At 200 mg/kg body weight dose, MEPI showed 71.16% inhibition in carrageenan induced anti-inflammatory activity. Conclusion: The finding of this study suggests that MEPI will provide scientific support for the use of this species in traditional medicine. PMID:25050319

  2. [Use in immunohistochemical studies of a method of restoration of antigenic specificity as affected by microwaves in tissue fixed with formalin and embedded in paraffin].

    PubMed

    Gurevich, L E; Isakov, V A

    1999-01-01

    Recovery of specific antigenic characteristics using microwave treatment of paraffin sections of tissues fixed by formalin allows to extend spectrum of antibodies for immunohistochemical diagnosis. Microwaves enable the reaction on the material prepared according to the standard technique, and macropreparations long stored in formalin and archive blocks.

  3. Use of polymerase chain reaction in detection of Marek’s disease and reticuloendotheliosis viruses in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumorous tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed for the diagnosis of Marek’s disease (MD) and reticuloendotheliosis (RE) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues; and for the diagnosis of MD in tissues only preserved in 10% neutral buffered formalin. MD virus (MDV) and RE vi...

  4. Tachykinin inhibition of acid-induced gastric hyperaemia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, A.; Jocic, M.; Herzeg, G.; Holzer, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. Primary afferent neurones releasing the vasodilator, calcitonin gene-related peptide, mediate the gastric hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion. The tachykinins neurokinin A (NKA) and substance P (SP) are located in the same neurones and are co-released with calcitonin gene-related peptide. In this study we investigated the effect and possible role of tachykinins in the acid-evoked gastric vasodilatation in urethane-anaesthetized rats. 2. Gastric acid back-diffusion, induced by perfusing the stomach with 15% ethanol in the presence of 0.05 M HCl, increased gastric mucosal blood flow by 60-90%, as determined by the hydrogen clearance technique. NKA and SP (0.14-3.78 nmol min-1 kg-1, infused intra-aortically) inhibited the gastric mucosal hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion in a dose-dependent manner, an effect that was accompanied by aggravation of ethanol/acid-induced macroscopic haemorrhagic lesions. 3. The inhibitory effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) on the acid-induced gastric mucosal vasodilatation was prevented by the tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonists, MEN 10,627 (200 nmol kg-1) but left unaltered by the NK1 receptor antagonist, SR 140,333 (300 nmol kg-1) and the mast-cell stabilizer, ketotifen (4.6 mumol kg-1). 4. Under basal conditions, with 0.05 M HCl being perfused through the stomach, NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) reduced gastric mucosal blood flow by about 25%, an effect that was abolished by SR 140,333 but not MEN 10,627 or ketotifen. 5. SR 140,333, MEN 10,627 or ketotifen had no significant effect on basal gastric mucosal blood flow nor did they modify the gastric mucosal hyperaemic reaction to acid back-diffusion. 6. The effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) in causing vasoconstriction and inhibiting the vasodilator response to acid back-diffusion was also seen when blood flow in the left gastric artery was measured with the ultrasonic transit time shift technique. 7. Arginine vasopressin (AVP, 0.1 nmol min-1 kg-1) induced gastric

  5. Pistacia lentiscus resin regulates intestinal damage and inflammation in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Gioxari, Aristea; Kaliora, Andriana C; Papalois, Apostolos; Agrogiannis, George; Triantafillidis, John K; Andrikopoulos, Nikolaos K

    2011-11-01

    Mastic (Pistacia lentiscus) of the Anacardiaceae family has exhibited anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties in patients with Crohn's disease. This study was based on the hypothesis that mastic inhibits intestinal damage in inflammatory bowel disease, regulating inflammation and oxidative stress in intestinal epithelium. Four different dosages of P. lentiscus powder in the form of powder were administered orally to trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitic rats. Eighty-four male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to seven groups: A, control; B, colitic; C-F, colitic rats daily supplemented with P. lentiscus powder at (C) 50 mg/kg, (D) 100 mg/kg, (E) 200 mg/kg, and (F) 300 mg/kg of body weight; and G, colitic rats treated daily with cortisone (25 μg/kg of body weight). Colonic damage was assessed microscopically. The cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and IL-10 and malonaldehyde were measured in colonic specimens. Results were expressed as mean ± SE values. Histological amelioration of colitis (P≤.001) and significant differences in colonic indices occurred after 3 days of treatment. Daily administration of 100 mg of P. lentiscus powder/kg of body weight decreased all inflammatory cytokines (P≤.05), whereas 50 mg of P. lentiscus powder/kg of body weight and cortisone treatment reduced only ICAM-1 (P≤.05 and P≤.01, respectively). Malonaldehyde was significantly suppressed in all treated groups (P≤.01). IL-10 remained unchanged. Cytokines and malonaldehyde remained unaltered after 6 days of treatment. Thus P. lentiscus powder could possibly have a therapeutic role in Crohn's disease, regulating oxidant/antioxidant balance and modulating inflammation.

  6. Praeruptorin D and E attenuate lipopolysaccharide/hydrochloric acid induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng-Jiu; Li, Jing-Rong; Zhu, Zheng-Guang; Kong, Huan-Yu; Jin, Hong; Zhang, Jun-Yan; Tian, Yuan-Xin; Li, Zhong-Huang; Wu, Xiao-Yun; Zhang, Jia-Jie; Wu, Shu-Guang

    2013-06-15

    Acute lung injury is a life-threatening syndrome characterized by overwhelming lung inflammation and increased microvascular permeability, which causes a high mortality rate worldwide. The dry root of Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn has been long used to treat respiratory diseases in China. In the present study, Praeruptorin A, C, D and E (PA, PC, PD and PE), four pyranocoumarins extracted from this herb, have been investigated for the pharmacological effects in experimental lung injury mouse models. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenged mice, PA and PC did not show protective effect against lung injury at the dose of 80 mg/kg. However, PD and PE significantly inhibited the infiltration of activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and decreased the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at the same dose. There was no statistically significant difference between PD and PE group. Further study demonstrated that PD and PE suppressed protein extravasations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, attenuated myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and the pathological changes in the lung. Both PD and PE suppressed LPS induced Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway activation in the lung by decreasing the cytoplasmic loss of Inhibitor κB-α (IκB-α) protein and inhibiting the translocation of p65 from cytoplasm to nucleus. We also extended our study to acid-induced acute lung injury and found that these two compounds protected mice from hydrochloric acid (HCl)-induced lung injury by inhibiting PMNs influx, IL-6 release and protein exudation. Taken together, these results suggested that PD and PE might be useful in the therapy of lung injury.

  7. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    SciTech Connect

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  8. Human sweet taste receptor mediates acid-induced sweetness of miraculin.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Ayako; Tsuchiya, Asami; Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Ito, Keisuke; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko; Briand, Loïc; Asakura, Tomiko; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2011-10-04

    Miraculin (MCL) is a homodimeric protein isolated from the red berries of Richadella dulcifica. MCL, although flat in taste at neutral pH, has taste-modifying activity to convert sour stimuli to sweetness. Once MCL is held on the tongue, strong sweetness is sensed over 1 h each time we taste a sour solution. Nevertheless, no molecular mechanism underlying the taste-modifying activity has been clarified. In this study, we succeeded in quantitatively evaluating the acid-induced sweetness of MCL using a cell-based assay system and found that MCL activated hT1R2-hT1R3 pH-dependently as the pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.8, and that the receptor activation occurred every time an acid solution was applied. Although MCL per se is sensory-inactive at pH 6.7 or higher, it suppressed the response of hT1R2-hT1R3 to other sweeteners at neutral pH and enhanced the response at weakly acidic pH. Using human/mouse chimeric receptors and molecular modeling, we revealed that the amino-terminal domain of hT1R2 is required for the response to MCL. Our data suggest that MCL binds hT1R2-hT1R3 as an antagonist at neutral pH and functionally changes into an agonist at acidic pH, and we conclude this may cause its taste-modifying activity.

  9. Human sweet taste receptor mediates acid-induced sweetness of miraculin

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Ayako; Tsuchiya, Asami; Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Ito, Keisuke; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko; Briand, Loïc; Asakura, Tomiko; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2011-01-01

    Miraculin (MCL) is a homodimeric protein isolated from the red berries of Richadella dulcifica. MCL, although flat in taste at neutral pH, has taste-modifying activity to convert sour stimuli to sweetness. Once MCL is held on the tongue, strong sweetness is sensed over 1 h each time we taste a sour solution. Nevertheless, no molecular mechanism underlying the taste-modifying activity has been clarified. In this study, we succeeded in quantitatively evaluating the acid-induced sweetness of MCL using a cell-based assay system and found that MCL activated hT1R2-hT1R3 pH-dependently as the pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.8, and that the receptor activation occurred every time an acid solution was applied. Although MCL per se is sensory-inactive at pH 6.7 or higher, it suppressed the response of hT1R2-hT1R3 to other sweeteners at neutral pH and enhanced the response at weakly acidic pH. Using human/mouse chimeric receptors and molecular modeling, we revealed that the amino-terminal domain of hT1R2 is required for the response to MCL. Our data suggest that MCL binds hT1R2-hT1R3 as an antagonist at neutral pH and functionally changes into an agonist at acidic pH, and we conclude this may cause its taste-modifying activity. PMID:21949380

  10. The cumulus cell layer protects the bovine maturing oocyte against fatty acid-induced lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lolicato, Francesca; Brouwers, Jos F; de Lest, Chris H A van; Wubbolts, Richard; Aardema, Hilde; Priore, Paola; Roelen, Bernard A J; Helms, J Bernd; Gadella, Bart M

    2015-01-01

    Mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue during metabolic stress increases the amount of free fatty acids in blood and follicular fluid and is associated with impaired female fertility. In a previous report, we described the effects of the three predominant fatty acids in follicular fluid (saturated palmitate and stearate and unsaturated oleate) on oocyte maturation and quality. In the current study, the effects of elevated fatty acid levels on cumulus cells were investigated. In a dose-dependent manner, the three fatty acids induced lipid storage in cumulus cells accompanied by an enhanced immune labeling of perilipin-2, a marker for lipid droplets. Lipidomic analysis confirmed incorporation of the administered fatty acids into triglyceride, resulting in a 3- to 6-fold increase of triglyceride content. In addition, palmitate selectively induced ceramide formation, which has been implicated in apoptosis. Indeed, of the three fatty acids tested, palmitate induced reactive oxygen species formation, caspase 3 activation, and mitochondria deterioration, leading to degeneration of the cumulus cell layers. This effect could be mimicked by addition of the ceramide-C2 analog and could be inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin-B1. Interfering with the intactness of the cumulus cell layers, either by mechanical force or by palmitate treatment, resulted in enhanced uptake of lipids in the oocyte and increased radical formation. Our results show that cumulus cells act as a barrier, protecting oocytes from in vitro induced lipotoxic effects. We suggest that this protective function of the cumulus cell layers is important for the developmental competence of the oocyte. The relevance of our findings for assisted reproduction technologies is discussed.

  11. Behavior-associated Neuronal Activation After Kainic Acid-induced Hippocampal Neurotoxicity is Modulated in Time.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Arredondo, Andrea; López-Hernández, Fernanda; García-Velázquez, Lizbeth; Arias, Clorinda; Zepeda, Angélica

    2017-02-01

    Kainic acid-induced (KA) hippocampal damage leads to neuronal death and further synaptic plasticity. Formation of aberrant as well as of functional connections after such procedure has been documented. However, the impact of such structural plasticity on cell activation along time after damage and in face of a behavioral demand has not been explored. We evaluated if the mRNA and protein levels of plasticity-related protein synaptophysin (Syp and SYP, respectively) and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein mRNA and protein levels (Arc and Arc, respectively) in the dentate gyrus were differentially modulated in time in response to a spatial-exploratory task after KA-induced hippocampal damage. In addition, we analyzed Arc+/NeuN+ immunopositive cells in the different experimental conditions. We infused KA intrahippocampally to young-adult rats and 10 or 30 days post-lesion (dpl) animals performed a hippocampus-activating spatial-exploratory task. Our results show that Syp mRNA levels significantly increase at 10dpl and return to control levels after 30dpl, whereas SYP protein levels are diminished at 10dpl, but significantly increase at 30dpl, as compared to 10dpl. Arc mRNA and protein levels are both increased at 30dpl as compared to sham. Also the number of NeuN+/Arc+ cells significantly increases at 30dpl in the group with a spatial-exploratory demand. These results provide information on the long-term modifications associated to structural plasticity and neuronal activation in the dentate gyrus after excitotoxic damage and in face of a spatial-exploratory behavior. Anat Rec, 300:425-432, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ruisanchez, Éva; Dancs, Péter; Kerék, Margit; Németh, Tamás; Faragó, Bernadett; Balogh, Andrea; Patil, Renukadevi; Jennings, Brett L.; Liliom, Károly; Malik, Kafait U.; Smrcka, Alan V.; Tigyi, Gabor; Benyó, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has been implicated as a mediator of several cardiovascular functions, but its potential involvement in the control of vascular tone is obscure. Here, we show that both LPA (18:1) and VPC31143 (a synthetic agonist of LPA1–3 receptors) relax intact mouse thoracic aorta with similar Emax values (53.9 and 51.9% of phenylephrine-induced precontraction), although the EC50 of LPA- and VPC31143-induced vasorelaxations were different (400 vs. 15 nM, respectively). Mechanical removal of the endothelium or genetic deletion of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) not only diminished vasorelaxation by LPA or VPC31143 but converted it to vasoconstriction. Freshly isolated mouse aortic endothelial cells expressed LPA1, LPA2, LPA4 and LPA5 transcripts. The LPA1,3 antagonist Ki16425, the LPA1 antagonist AM095, and the genetic deletion of LPA1, but not that of LPA2, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation. Inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3 kinase–protein kinase B/Akt pathway by wortmannin or MK-2206 failed to influence the effect of LPA. However, pharmacological inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) by U73122 or edelfosine, but not genetic deletion of PLCε, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation and indicated that a PLC enzyme, other than PLCε, mediates the response. In summary, the present study identifies LPA as an endothelium-dependent vasodilator substance acting via LPA1, PLC, and eNOS.—Ruisanchez, É., Dancs, P., Kerék, M., Németh, T., Faragó, B., Balogh, A., Patil, R., Jennings, B. L., Liliom, K., Malik, K. U., Smrcka, A. V., Tigyi, G., Benyó, Z. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. PMID:24249637

  13. Estradiol-induced antinociceptive responses on formalin-induced nociception are independent of COX and HPA activation.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Deirtra A; Barr, Gordon A; Amador, Nicole; Shivers, Kai-Yvonne; Kemen, Lynne; Kreiter, Christopher M; Jenab, Shirzad; Inturrisi, Charles E; Quinones-Jenab, Vanya

    2011-07-01

    Estrogen modulates pain perception but how it does so is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine if estradiol reduces nociceptive responses in part via hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1/COX-2 activity. The first study examined the effects of estradiol (20%) or vehicle with concurrent injection nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on formalin-induced nociceptive responding (flinching) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The drugs were ibuprofen (COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitor), SC560 (COX-1 inhibitor), or NS398 (COX-2 inhibitor). In a second study, estradiol's effects on formalin-induced nociception were tested in adrenalectomized (ADX), OVX, and ADX+OVX rats. Serum levels of prostaglandins (PG) PGE(2) and corticosterone were measured. Estradiol significantly decreased nociceptive responses in OVX rats with effects during both the first and the second phase of the formalin test. The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) did not alter nociception at the doses used here. Adrenalectomy neither altered flinching responses in female rats nor reversed estradiol-induced antinociceptive responses. Estradiol alone had no effect on corticosterone (CORT) or prostaglandin levels after the formalin test, dissociating the effects of estradiol on behavior and these serum markers. Ibuprofen and NS398 significantly reduced PGE2 levels. CORT was not decreased by OVX surgery or by estradiol below that of ADX. Only IBU significantly increased corticosterone levels. Taken together, our results suggest that estradiol-induced antinociception in female rats is independent of COX activity and HPA axis activation.

  14. Detection and characterization of Newcastle disease virus in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from commercial broilers in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Glil, Mostafa Y; Mor, Sunil K; Sharafeldin, Tamer A; Porter, Robert E; Goyal, Sagar M

    2014-03-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) is highly contagious and causes severe economic losses to the poultry industry due to high morbidity and mortality. In this report, we describe the detection of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in formalin-fixed tissues from an outbreak of ND on broiler farms in Egypt. The affected birds experienced respiratory and/or nervous signs and a 75% mortality rate. Tissue samples were collected and placed in 10% neutral buffered formalin followed by embedding in paraffin. RNA was extracted from 80-microm formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks and recovered in 60 microl of elution buffer. All samples were negative for influenza virus by real-time reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR but positive for NDV. These flocks were known to have been vaccinated with a live NDV vaccine (LaSota strain). The nucleic acid sequences of the virus detected in this study were similar to those of a velogenic virus at its cleavage site 111GRRQKR*F117 and clustered with class II genogroup VII lineage of NDV, with a nucleotide sequence identity of 94%-99%. Although extraction and amplification of NDV from paraffin-embedded tissues from experimentally infected birds has been reported previously, this study reports on the use of RT-PCR on formalin-fixed tissues from actual field samples.

  15. Effect of plantar subcutaneous administration of bergamot essential oil and linalool on formalin-induced nociceptive behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Soh; Otowa, Akira; Kamio, Satomi; Sato, Kazuma; Yagi, Tomomi; Kishikawa, Yukinaga; Komatsu, Takaaki; Bagetta, Giacinto; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Nakamura, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of bergamot essential oil (BEO) or linalool, a major volatile component of BEO, on the nociceptive response to formalin. Plantar subcutaneous injection of BEO or linalool into the ipsilateral hindpaw reduced both the first and late phases of the formalin-induced licking and biting responses in mice. Plantar subcutaneous injection of BEO or linalool into the contralateral hindpaw did not yield an antinociceptive effect, suggesting that the antinociceptive effect of BEO or linalool in the formalin test occurred peripherally. Intraperitoneal and plantar subcutaneous injection pretreatment with naloxone hydrochloride, an opioid receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated both BEO- and linalool-induced antinociception. Pretreatment with naloxone methiodide, a peripherally acting opioid receptor antagonists, also significantly antagonized the antinociceptive effects of BEO and linalool. Our results provide evidence for the involvement of peripheral opioids in antinociception induced by BEO and linalool. These results suggest that activation of peripheral opioid receptors may play an important role in reducing formalin-induced nociception.

  16. Detection of the sarin hydrolysis product in formalin-fixed brain tissues of victims of the Tokyo subway terrorist attack.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Y; Nagao, M; Takatori, T; Niijima, H; Nakajima, M; Iwase, H; Kobayashi, M; Iwadate, K

    1998-06-01

    One of the hydrolysis products of sarin (isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) was detected in formalin-fixed brain tissues of victims poisoned in the Tokyo subway terrorist attack. Part of this procedure, used for the detection of sarin hydrolysis products in erythrocytes of sarin victims, has been described previously. The test materials were four individual cerebellums, which had been stored in formalin fixative for about 2 years. Sarin-bound acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was solubilized from these cerebellums, purified by immunoaffinity chromatography, and digested with trypsin. Then the sarin hydrolysis products bound to AChE were released by alkaline phosphatase digestion, subjected to trimethylsilyl derivatization (TMS), and detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Peaks at m/z 225 and m/z 240, which are indicative of TMS-methylphosphonic acid, were observed within the retention time range of authentic methylphosphonic acid. However, no isopropyl methylphosphonic acid was detected in the formalin-fixed cerebellums of these 4 sarin victims, probably because the isopropoxy group of isopropyl methylphosphonic acid underwent chemical hydrolysis during storage. This procedure will be useful for the forensic diagnosis of poisoning by protein-bound, highly toxic agents, such as sarin, which are easily hydrolysed. This appears to be the first time that intoxication by a nerve agent has been demonstrated by analyzing formalin-fixed brains obtained at autopsy.

  17. Multimodal Raman-fluorescence spectroscopy of formalin fixed samples is able to discriminate brain tumors from dysplastic tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Giordano, Flavio; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2014-05-01

    In the recent years, there has been a considerable surge in the application of spectroscopy for disease diagnosis. Raman and fluorescence spectra provide characteristic spectral profile related to biochemical and morphological changes when tissues progress from normal state towards malignancy. Spectroscopic techniques offer the advantage of being minimally invasive compared to traditional histopathology, real time and quantitative. In biomedical optical diagnostics, freshly excised specimens are preferred for making ex-vivo spectroscopic measurements. With regard to fresh tissues, if the lab is located far away from the clinic it could pose a problem as spectral measurements have to be performed immediately after dissection. Tissue samples are usually placed in a fixative agent such as 4% formaldehyde to preserve the samples before processing them for routine histopathological studies. Fixation prevents the tissues from decomposition by arresting autolysis. In the present study, we intend to investigate the possibility of using formalin fixed samples for discrimination of brain tumours from dysplastic tissue using Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy. Formalin fixed samples were washed with phosphate buffered saline for about 5 minutes in order to remove the effects of formalin during spectroscopic measurements. In case of fluorescence spectroscopy, changes in spectral profile have been observed in the region between 550-670 nm between dysplastic and tumor samples. For Raman measurements, we found significant differences in the spectral profiles between dysplasia and tumor. In conclusion, formalin fixed samples can be potentially used for the spectroscopic discrimination of tumor against dysplastic tissue in brain samples.

  18. In situ hybridization with labeled probes: assessment of african Swine Fever virus in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Ballester, Maria; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) has become a very valuable molecular diagnostic tool to detect specific DNA or RNA sequences in biological samples through the use of complementary DNA- or RNA-labeled probes. Here, we describe an optimized in situ hybridization protocol to detect African swine fever virus (ASFV) DNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues using digoxigenin-labeled probes.

  19. Dose-Response Analysis of RNA-Seq Profiles in Archival Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples provide a vast untapped resource for chemical safety and translational science. To date, genomic profiling of FFPE samples has been limited by poor RNA quality and inconsistent results with limited utility in dose-response assessmen...

  20. Dose-Response Analysis of RNA-Seq Profiles in Archival Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) Samples.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of archival resources has been limited to date by inconsistent methods for genomic profiling of degraded RNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. RNA-sequencing offers a promising way to address this problem. Here we evaluated transcriptomic dose responses us...

  1. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of N-linked glycans on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded murine kidney.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Ove J R; Briggs, Matthew T; Condina, Mark R; Winderbaum, Lyron J; Pelzing, Matthias; McColl, Shaun R; Everest-Dass, Arun V; Packer, Nicolle H; Hoffmann, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Recent developments in spatial proteomics have paved the way for retrospective in situ mass spectrometry (MS) analyses of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical tissue samples. This type of analysis is commonly referred to as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging. Recently, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded MALDI imaging analyses were augmented to allow in situ analyses of tissue-specific N-glycosylation profiles. In the present study, we outline an improved automated sample preparation method for N-glycan MALDI imaging, which uses in situ PNGase F-mediated release and measurement of N-linked glycans from sections of formalin-fixed murine kidney. The sum of the presented data indicated that N-glycans can be cleaved from proteins within formalin-fixed tissue and characterized using three strategies: (i) extraction and composition analysis through on-target MALDI MS and liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization ion trap MS; (ii) MALDI profiling, where N-glycans are released and measured from large droplet arrays in situ; and (iii) MALDI imaging, which maps the tissue specificity of N-glycans at a higher resolution. Thus, we present a complete, straightforward method that combines MALDI imaging and characterization of tissue-specific N-glycans and complements existing strategies.

  2. An Optimized Method of Metabolite Extraction from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue for GC/MS Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wojakowska, Anna; Marczak, Łukasz; Jelonek, Karol; Polanski, Krzysztof; Widlak, Piotr; Pietrowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens constitute a highly valuable source of clinical material for retrospective molecular studies. However, metabolomic assessment of such archival material remains still in its infancy. Hence, there is an urgent need for efficient methods enabling extraction and profiling of metabolites present in FFPE tissue specimens. Here we demonstrate the methodology for isolation of primary metabolites from archival tissues; either fresh-frozen, formalin-fixed or formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded specimens of mouse kidney were analysed and compared in this work. We used gas chromatography followed by mass spectrometry (GC/MS approach) to identify about 80 metabolites (including amino acids, saccharides, carboxylic acids, fatty acids) present in such archive material. Importantly, about 75% of identified compounds were detected in all three types of specimens. Moreover, we observed that fixation with formalin itself (and their duration) did not affect markedly the presence of particular metabolites in tissue-extracted material, yet fixation for 24h could be recommended as a practical standard. Paraffin embedding influenced efficiency of extraction, which resulted in reduced quantities of several compounds. Nevertheless, we proved applicability of FFPE specimens for non-targeted GS/MS-based profiling of tissue metabolome, which is of great importance for feasibility of metabolomics studies using retrospective clinical material.

  3. Multiple immunofluorescence labeling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Robertson, David; Isacke, Clare M

    2011-01-01

    Multiple immunofluorescent labeling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is not a routinely used method. At least in part, this is due to the perception that the innate autofluorescence of the FFPE material forbids the use of immunofluorescent labeling. As a result, immunohistochemical (immunoperoxidase) staining of FFPE material or cryosectioning methods is used instead. In this chapter, we describe a robust optimized method for high-resolution immunofluorescence labeling of FFPE tissue that involves the combination of antigen retrieval, indirect immunofluorescence, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Once such samples have been prepared and imaged by confocal microscopy, they can be stored at -20°C for extensive periods (>250 days) and reexamined with minimal loss of quality. As a consequence, this method has the potential to open up the large archival sample collections to multiple immunofluorescent investigations.

  4. Simple salting-out method for DNA extraction from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Elena R C; Neves, Adriana C; Silva-Valenzuela, Maria G; Sousa, Suzana O M; Nunes, Fabio D

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to standardize a method of DNA extraction from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues (PETs) using a salt solution to precipitate protein and isopropanol to precipitate DNA. The samples were submitted to a DNA extraction method in which two different concentrations of ammonium acetate (2 and 4M) were compared with a phenol-chloroform extraction method and with a commercial DNA isolation kit. DNA was qualified and quantified by spectrophotometer analysis, electrophoresis, and amplification by PCR. The 167 and 268bp fragments of APC and beta-globin genes, respectively, were amplified equally from DNA extracted by all tested methods and in all cases. However, the 536bp fragment of beta-globin gene was not amplified in all cases. According to our results, the extraction method using ammonium acetate proved to be simple and suitable for obtaining DNA of good quality, which can be easily amplified by PCR.

  5. A formalin fixative for immunochemical and ultrastructural studies on gastrointestinal endocrine cells.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, G; Dawson, I

    1979-01-01

    Using indirect immunofluorescence, indirect immunoperoxidase, and unlabelled antibody enzyme techniques, gastrin, pancreatic glucagon, insulin, and somatostatin were localised in sections of both wax- and resin-embedded tissues that had been fixed in a buffered formalin solution. Ultrastructural preservation of the resin-embedded samples was also adequate for combined electron microscopy and light microscope immunochemistry. As the fixative concerned is stable it can be permanently available in surgical units. It is suggested, therefore, that this fixative should prove useful as an alternative to buffered formaldehyde, which must be freshly prepared from paraformaldehyde powder, in institutions where specimen collection is difficult or which have to refer cases with an endocrine involvement to other laboratories for immunochemical and fine structural examination. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:372249

  6. Proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Casadonte, Rita; Caprioli, Richard M

    2012-01-01

    Archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue collections represent a valuable informational resource for proteomic studies. Multiple FFPE core biopsies can be assembled in a single block to form tissue microarrays (TMAs). We describe a protocol for analyzing protein in FFPE -TMAs using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MAL DI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). The workflow incorporates an antigen retrieval step following deparaffinization, in situ trypsin digestion, matrix application and then mass spectrometry signal acquisition. The direct analysis of FFPE -TMA tissue using IMS allows direct analysis of multiple tissue samples in a single experiment without extraction and purification of proteins. The advantages of high speed and throughput, easy sample handling and excellent reproducibility make this technology a favorable approach for the proteomic analysis of clinical research cohorts with large sample numbers. For example, TMA analysis of 300 FFPE cores would typically require 6 h of total time through data acquisition, not including data analysis. PMID:22011652

  7. The Utilization of Formalin Fixed-Paraffin-Embedded Specimens in High Throughput Genomic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pan

    2017-01-01

    High throughput genomic assays empower us to study the entire human genome in short time with reasonable cost. Formalin fixed-paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue processing remains the most economical approach for longitudinal tissue specimen storage. Therefore, the ability to apply high throughput genomic applications to FFPE specimens can expand clinical assays and discovery. Many studies have measured the accuracy and repeatability of data generated from FFPE specimens using high throughput genomic assays. Together, these studies demonstrate feasibility and provide crucial guidance for future studies using FFPE specimens. Here, we summarize the findings of these studies and discuss the limitations of high throughput data generated from FFPE specimens across several platforms that include microarray, high throughput sequencing, and NanoString. PMID:28246590

  8. The influence of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic-acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Maduzia, D; Matuszyk, A; Ceranowicz, D; Warzecha, Z; Ceranowicz, P; Fyderek, K; Galazka, K; Dembinski, A

    2015-12-01

    Ghrelin has been primarily shown to exhibit protective and therapeutic effect in the gut. Pretreatment with ghrelin inhibits the development of acute pancreatitis and accelerates pancreatic recovery in the course of this disease. In the stomach, ghrelin reduces gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol, stress or alendronate, as well as accelerates the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric and duodenal ulcer. The aim of present studies was to investigate the effect of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic acid-induced colitis. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Animals were treated intraperitoneally with saline (control) or ghrelin (4, 8 or 16 nmol/kg/dose). Saline or ghrelin was given twice: 8 and 1 h before induction of colitis. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 1 ml of 4% solution of acetic acid and the severity of colitis was assessed 1 or 24 hours after induction of inflammation. Rectal administration of acetic acid induced colitis in all animals. Damage of colonic wall was seen at the macroscopic and microscopic level. This effect was accompanied by a reduction in colonic blood flow and mucosal DNA synthesis. Moreover, induction of colitis significantly increased mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β), activity of myeloperoxidase and concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA). Mucosal activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was reduced. Pretreatment with ghrelin reduced the area and grade of mucosal damage. This effect was accompanied by an improvement of blood flow, DNA synthesis and SOD activity in colonic mucosa. Moreover, ghrelin administration reduced mucosal concentration of IL-1β and MDA, as well as decreased mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Administration of ghrelin protects the large bowel against the development of the acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect seems to be related to the ghrelin-evoked anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

  9. Detection of protozoa in water samples by formalin/ether concentration method.

    PubMed

    Lora-Suarez, Fabiana; Rivera, Raul; Triviño-Valencia, Jessica; Gomez-Marin, Jorge E

    2016-09-01

    Methods to detect protozoa in water samples are expensive and laborious. We evaluated the formalin/ether concentration method to detect Giardia sp., Cryptosporidium sp. and Toxoplasma in water. In order to test the properties of the method, we spiked water samples with different amounts of each protozoa (0, 10 and 50 cysts or oocysts) in a volume of 10 L of water. Immunofluorescence assay was used for detection of Giardia and Cryptosporidium. Toxoplasma oocysts were identified by morphology. The mean percent of recovery in 10 repetitions of the entire method, in 10 samples spiked with ten parasites and read by three different observers, were for Cryptosporidium 71.3 ± 12, for Giardia 63 ± 10 and for Toxoplasma 91.6 ± 9 and the relative standard deviation of the method was of 17.5, 17.2 and 9.8, respectively. Intraobserver variation as measured by intraclass correlation coefficient, was fair for Toxoplasma, moderate for Cryptosporidium and almost perfect for Giardia. The method was then applied in 77 samples of raw and drinkable water in three different plant of water treatment. Cryptosporidium was found in 28 of 77 samples (36%) and Giardia in 31 of 77 samples (40%). Theses results identified significant differences in treatment process to reduce the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium. In conclusion, the formalin ether method to concentrate protozoa in water is a new alternative for low resources countries, where is urgently need to monitor and follow the presence of theses protozoa in drinkable water.

  10. Optimization of gene expression microarray protocol for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues

    PubMed Central

    Belder, Nevin; Coşkun, Öznur; Erdoğan, Beyza Doğanay; Savaş, Berna; Ensari, Arzu; Özdağ, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a widely available clinical specimen for retrospective studies. The possibility of long-term clinical follow-up of FFPE samples makes them a valuable source to evaluate links between molecular and clinical information. Working with FFPE samples in the molecular research area, especially using high-throughput molecular techniques such as microarray gene expression profiling, has come into prominence. Because of the harmful effects of formalin fixation process such as degradation of nucleic acids, cross-linking with proteins, and chemical modifications on DNA and RNA, there are some limitations in gene expression profiling studies using FFPE samples. To date many studies have been conducted to evaluate gene expression profiling using microarrays (Thomas et al., Thomas et al. (2013) [1]; Scicchitano et al., Scicchitano et al. (2006) [2]; Frank et al., Frank et al. (2007) [3]; Fedorowicz et al., Fedorowicz et al. (2009) [4]). However, there is still no generally accepted, efficient and standardized procedure for microarray analysis of FFPE samples. This paper describes the microarray data presented in our recently accepted to be published article showing a standard protocol from deparaffinization of FFPE tissue sections and RNA extraction to microarray gene expression analysis. Here we represent our data in detail, deposited in the gene expression omnibus (GEO) database with the accession number GSE73883. Four combinations of two different cRNA/cDNA preparation and labeling protocols with two different array platforms (Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 and U133_X3P) were evaluated to determine which combination gives the best percentage of present call. The study presents a dataset for comparative analysis which has a potential in terms of providing a robust protocol for gene expression profiling with FFPE tissue samples. PMID:26981433

  11. Elastic scattering spectroscopy findings in formalin-fixed oral squamous cell carcinoma specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinson, B.; Elmaaytah, M.; Jerjes, W.; Hopper, C.

    2005-11-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been shown to spread locally and infiltrate adjacent bone or via the lymphatic system to the cervical lymph nodes. This usually necessitates a surgical neck dissection and either a local or segmental resection for bone clearance. While histopathology remains the gold standard for tissue diagnosis, several new diagnostic techniques are being developed that rely on physical and biochemical changes that mirror or precede malignant changes within tissue. The aim of this study was to compare findings of Elastic Scattering Spectroscopy (ESS) with histopathology on formalin-fixed specimens of both neck lymph node dissections and de-calcified archival bone from patients with OSCC. We wished to see if this technique could be used as an adjunct or alternative to histopathology in defining cervical nodal involvement and if it could be used to identify bone resection margins positive for tumour. 130 lymph nodes were examined from 13 patients. The nodes were formalin-fixed, bivalved and examined by ESS. The intensity of the spectrum at 4 points was considered for comparison; at 360nm, 450nm, 630nm and 690nm. 341 spectra were taken from the mandibular specimens of 21 patients, of which 231 spectra were taken from histologically positive sites and the rest were normal. The nodes and bone specimens were then routinely processed with haematoxylin and eosin-stained sections, examined histopathologically, and the results compared. Using Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) as a statistical method, a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 68% was obtained for the neck nodes and a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 80% for the bone margins.

  12. Effects of crocin and safranal, saffron constituents, on the formalin-induced orofacial pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Erfanparast, Amir; Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Taati, Mina; Dabbaghi, Milad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Crocin and safranal are the main components of saffron, and have many biological functions such as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. In the present study, we investigated the effects of crocin, safranal, morphine, diclofenac and naloxone in combined and separately on formalin-induced orofacial pain in rats. Materials and Methods: Subcutaneous injection of a diluted formalin solution (50 µl, 1.5%) into the upper lip region produced a biphasic pattern of pain response (a neurogenic phase: 0-3 min and an inflammatory phase: 15-33 min). The time each animal spent face rubbing with ipsilateral forepaw was recorded and considered as an index of nociception Results: Intraperitoneal injections of crocin (12.5 and 25 mg/kg), safranal (0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg), diclofenac (5 and 10 mg/kg) and morphine (1 and 2 mg/kg) suppressed the second phase of pain. The second phase of pain was also reduced when low (ineffective) doses of crocin (6.25 mg/kg) and safranal (0.125 mg/kg) were co-administered with low doses of diclofenac (2.5 mg/kg) and morphine (0.5 mg/kg). The more antinociceptive effects were observed when the medium doses of the above-mentioned chemicals used together. Naloxone prevented morphine-induced antinociception, but did not inhibit the suppressive effects of crocin and safranal. Safranal at a high dose (0.5 mg/kg) suppressed locomotor activity. Conclusion: The present results showed antinociceptive effects for crocin and safranal in inflammatory pain. Opioid receptors may not be involved in the antinociceptive effect of crocin and safranal. Crocin and safranal increased diclofenac-induced antinociception. PMID:26468458

  13. Modification of formalin-induced nociception by different histamine receptor agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Farzin, Davood; Nosrati, Farnaz

    2007-01-15

    The present study evaluated the effects of different histamine receptor agonists and antagonists on the nociceptive response in the mouse formalin test. Intracerebroventricular (20-40 microg/mouse i.c.v.) or subcutaneous (1-10 mg/kg s.c.) injection of HTMT (H(1) receptor agonist) elicited a dose-related hyperalgesia in the early and late phases. Conversely, intraperitoneal (20 and 30 mg/kg i.p.) injection of dexchlorpheniramine (H(1) receptor antagonist) was antinociceptive in both phases. At a dose ineffective per se, dexchlorpheniramine (10 mg/kg i.p.) antagonized the hyperalgesia induced by HTMT (40 mug/mouse i.c.v. or 10 mg/kg s.c.). Dimaprit (H(2) receptor agonist, 30 mg/kg i.p.) and ranitidine (H(2) receptor antagonist, 20 and 40 mg/kg i.p.) reduced the nociceptive responses in the early and late phases. No significant change in the antinociceptive activity was found following the combination of dimaprit (30 mg/kg i.p.) with ranitidine (10 mg/kg i.p.). The antinociceptive effect of dimaprit (30 mg/kg i.p.) was prevented by naloxone (5 mg/kg i.p.) in the early phase or by imetit (H(3) receptor agonist, 25 mg/kg i.p.) in both early and late phases. The histamine H(3) receptor agonist imetit was hyperalgesic following i.p. administration of 50 mg/kg. Imetit-induced hyperalgesia was completely prevented by treatment with a dose ineffective per se of thioperamide (H(3) receptor antagonist, 5 mg/kg i.p.). The results suggest that histamine H(1) and H(3) receptor activations increase sensitivity to nociceptive stimulus in the formalin test.

  14. FTIR and Raman microspectroscopy of normal, benign, and malignant formalin-fixed ovarian tissues.

    PubMed

    Krishna, C Murali; Sockalingum, G D; Bhat, Rani A; Venteo, L; Kushtagi, Pralhad; Pluot, M; Manfait, M

    2007-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is the sixth most common cancer among women worldwide, and mortality rates from this cancer are higher than for other gynecological cancers. This is attributed to a lack of reliable screening methods and the inadequacy of treatment modalities for the advanced stages of the disease. FTIR and Raman spectroscopic studies of formalin-fixed normal, benign, and malignant ovarian tissues have been undertaken in order to investigate and attempt to understand the underlying biochemical changes associated with the disease, and to explore the feasibility of discriminating between these different tissue types. Raman spectra of normal tissues indicate the dominance of proteins and lower contents of DNA and lipids compared to malignant tissues. Among the pathological tissues studied, spectra from benign tissues seem to contain more proteins and less DNA and lipids compared to malignant tissue spectra. FTIR studies corroborate these findings. FTIR and Raman spectra of both normal and benign tissues showed more similarities than those of malignant tissues. Cluster analysis of first-derivative Raman spectra in the 700-1700 cm(-1) range gave two clear groups, one corresponding to malignant and the other to normal+benign tissues. At a lower heterogeneity level, the normal+benign cluster gave three nonoverlapping subclusters, one corresponding to normal and two for benign tissues. Cluster analysis of second-derivative FTIR spectra in the combined spectral regions of 1540-1680 and 1720-1780 cm(-1) resulted into two clear clusters corresponding to malignant and normal+benign tissues. The cluster corresponding to normal+benign tissues produced nonoverlapping subclusters for normal and benign tissues at a lower heterogeneity level. The findings of this study demonstrate the feasibility of Raman and FTIR microspectroscopic discrimination of formalin-fixed normal, benign, and malignant ovarian tissues.

  15. Optimization of gene expression microarray protocol for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Belder, Nevin; Coşkun, Öznur; Erdoğan, Beyza Doğanay; Savaş, Berna; Ensari, Arzu; Özdağ, Hilal

    2016-03-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a widely available clinical specimen for retrospective studies. The possibility of long-term clinical follow-up of FFPE samples makes them a valuable source to evaluate links between molecular and clinical information. Working with FFPE samples in the molecular research area, especially using high-throughput molecular techniques such as microarray gene expression profiling, has come into prominence. Because of the harmful effects of formalin fixation process such as degradation of nucleic acids, cross-linking with proteins, and chemical modifications on DNA and RNA, there are some limitations in gene expression profiling studies using FFPE samples. To date many studies have been conducted to evaluate gene expression profiling using microarrays (Thomas et al., Thomas et al. (2013) [1]; Scicchitano et al., Scicchitano et al. (2006) [2]; Frank et al., Frank et al. (2007) [3]; Fedorowicz et al., Fedorowicz et al. (2009) [4]). However, there is still no generally accepted, efficient and standardized procedure for microarray analysis of FFPE samples. This paper describes the microarray data presented in our recently accepted to be published article showing a standard protocol from deparaffinization of FFPE tissue sections and RNA extraction to microarray gene expression analysis. Here we represent our data in detail, deposited in the gene expression omnibus (GEO) database with the accession number GSE73883. Four combinations of two different cRNA/cDNA preparation and labeling protocols with two different array platforms (Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 and U133_X3P) were evaluated to determine which combination gives the best percentage of present call. The study presents a dataset for comparative analysis which has a potential in terms of providing a robust protocol for gene expression profiling with FFPE tissue samples.

  16. Effect of CMC Molecular Weight on Acid-Induced Gelation of Heated WPI-CMC Soluble Complex.

    PubMed

    Huan, Yan; Zhang, Sha; Vardhanabhuti, Bongkosh

    2016-02-01

    Acid-induced gelation properties of heated whey protein isolate (WPI) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) soluble complex were investigated as a function of CMC molecular weight (270, 680, and 750 kDa) and concentrations (0% to 0.125%). Heated WPI-CMC soluble complex with 6% protein was made by heating biopolymers together at pH 7.0 and 85 °C for 30 min and diluted to 5% protein before acid-induced gelation. Acid-induced gel formed from heated WPI-CMC complexes exhibited increased hardness and decreased water holding capacity with increasing CMC concentrations but gel strength decreased at higher CMC content. The highest gel strength was observed with CMC 750 k at 0.05%. Gels with low CMC concentration showed homogenous microstructure which was independent of CMC molecular weight, while increasing CMC concentration led to microphase separation with higher CMC molecular weight showing more extensive phase separation. When heated WPI-CMC complexes were prepared at 9% protein the acid gels showed improved gel hardness and water holding capacity, which was supported by the more interconnected protein network with less porosity when compared to complexes heated at 6% protein. It is concluded that protein concentration and biopolymer ratio during complex formation are the major factors affecting gel properties while the effect of CMC molecular weight was less significant.

  17. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities of aqueous ethanolic extract of Tamarix aphylla L. (Saltcedar) in mice.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Abbas, Khizar; Hamayun, Rahma; Ali, Muhammad

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activity of aqueous ethanolic extracts of Tamarix aphylla. The powdered plant was extracted by the method of cold maceration using aqueous ethanol (70:30) as solvents. Analgesic activity was assessed by Eddy's hot plate method, formalin-induced paw licking and acetic acid-induced writhing in mice. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carageenan-induced mice paw edema. The anti-pyretic activity was determined by yeast-induced pyrexia in mice. The aqueous ethanolic extract of Tamarix aphylla showed 42% inhibition (p<0.005) of acetic acid- induced writhing, 63% reduction (p<0.005) in formalin-induced paw licking, and 42% increase (p<0.05) in reaction time as compared to normal control. The extract did not show significant anti-inflammatory activity. However, it showed significant antipyretic effect (p<0.005). The results of this study demonstrate that aqueous ethanolic extract of Tamarix aphylla exhibit analgesic and antipyretic activity but lacks anti-inflammatory activity.

  18. Analgesic, Anti-Inflammatory, and Antioxidant Activities of Byrsonima duckeana W. R. Anderson (Malpighiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Verdam, Maria Christina dos Santos; de Andrade, Kleyton Cardoso; Fernandes, Karina Lorena Meira; Machado, Tallita Marques; de Souza, Mayane Pereira; Koolen, Hector Henrique Ferreira; Miyazaki, Cristina Mayumi Sasaki; Kalegari, Milena; Miguel, Marilis Dallarmi; Stuelp-Campelo, Patricia Maria; Miguel, Obdulio Gomes

    2017-01-01

    Background. Byrsonima is a promising neotropical genus, rich in flavonoids and triterpenes, with several proven pharmacological properties. Nevertheless, Byrsonima duckeana W. R. Anderson is an Amazonian species almost not studied. Objective. To assess the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic activities of Byrsonima duckeana leaves. Materials and Methods. We analyzed an ethanol extract and its fractions for polyphenol content and UHPLC-MS/MS, phosphomolybdenum, DPPH, TBARS antioxidant tests, formalin-induced pain, carrageenan-induced peritonitis, acetic acid-induced abdominal writhings, and hot plate assays. Results. All the samples showed high polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity in the phosphomolybdenum, DPPH, and TBARS tests. We identified ethyl gallate, quinic acid, gallic acid, catechin, epicatechin, quercetrin, and quercetin in the samples. B. duckeana was able to reduce leukocyte migration in the carrageenan-induced peritonitis by 43% and the licking time in the formalin test by 57%. In the acetic acid-induced writhing test, the chloroform (FCL) and ethyl acetate (FEA) fractions were the most active samples. FEA was selected for the hot plate test, where all the dosages tested (5, 50, and 200 mg·kg−1) showed significant analgesic activity. Conclusion. B. duckeana has interesting analgesic and antioxidant activities, due to its high phenolic content, especially phenolic acids. PMID:28367492

  19. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities of Thymus serphyllum Linn. in mice.

    PubMed

    Alamger; Mazhar, Uzma; Mushtaq, Muhammad Naveed; Khan, Hafeez Ullah; Maheen, Safirah; Malik, Muhammad Nasir Hayat; Ahmad, Taseer; Latif, Fouzia; Tabassum, Nazia; Khan, Abdul Qayyum; Ahsan, Haseeb; Khan, Wasim; Javed, Ibrahim; Ali, Haider

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities of Thymus serphyllum Linn. in mice. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan and egg albumin induced paw edema in mice, while analgesic activity was assessed using formalin induced paw licking and acetic acid induced abdominal writhing in mice. For determination of antipyretic activity, pyrexia was induced by subcutaneous injection of 20% yeast. All the extracts produced significant anti-inflammatory effect however, ether extract produced maximum effect 34% inhibition (p < 0.001) against carrageenan and 22% (p < 0.01) inhibition against egg albumin induced paw edema in mice at the end of 3 h. Ether extract produced prominent analgesic effect 77% (p < 0.001) inhibition in acetic acid induced abdominal writhing and 59% inhibition in formalin induced paw licking model in mice, respectively. Ether extract also demonstrated significant (p < 0.001) antipyretic activity against yeast induced pyrexia. The plant showed no sign of toxicity up to the dose of 2000 mg/kg in mice. This study supports the use of Thymus serphyllum in traditional medicine for inflammation accompanied by pain and fever.

  20. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities of extra virgin olive oil.

    PubMed

    Fezai, Myriam; Senovilla, Laura; Jemaà, Mohamed; Ben-Attia, Mossadok

    2013-01-01

    Background. In folk medicine, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is used as a remedy for a variety of diseases. This study investigates the in vivo antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer effects of EVOO on mice and rats. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, using the acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin tests in mice, the analgesic effect of EVOO was evaluated. Acetylsalicylic acid and morphine were used as standard drugs, respectively. The anti-inflammatory activity was investigated by means of the carrageenan-induced paw edema model in rats using acetylsalicylic acid and dexamethasone as standard drugs. Last, the xenograft model in athymic mice was used to evaluate the anticancer effect in vivo. Results. EVOO significantly decreased acetic acid-induced abdominal writhes and reduces acute and inflammatory pain in the two phases of the formalin test. It has also a better effect than Dexamethasone in the anti-inflammatory test. Finally, the intraperitoneal administration of EVOO affects the growth of HCT 116 tumours xenografted in athymic mice. Conclusion. EVOO has a significant analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. However, further detailed studies are required to determine the active component responsible for these effects and mechanism pathway.

  1. Phytochemical Screening and Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Oroxylum indicum

    PubMed Central

    Das, B. K.; Al-Amin, M. M.; Russel, S. M.; Kabir, S.; Bhattacherjee, R.; Hannan, J. M. A.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to study phytochemical screening and analgesic activity of ethanol extract of Oroxylum indicum. The dried powder of the barks of the plant was extracted with 95% ethanol and was subjected to various phytochemical tests to ascertain the principle constituents contained in the extract. The result revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, glycosides in the ethanol extract of Oroxylum indicum. The extract was screened for analgesic activity by using hot plate, acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin test. The ethanol extract of the plant at two different doses (250 and 500 mg/kg) showed significant (P<0.05) analgesic effect in all test methods (hot plate, acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin). The analgesic activity was compared with a standard drug (ketorolac at 10 mg/kg). Based on the present findings and previous literature review it can be concluded that flavonoids and tannins might be responsible for the analgesic activity. We suggest that ethanol extract of Oroxylum indicum might have potential chemical constituents that could be used in the future for the development of novel analgesic agent. PMID:25593396

  2. Immunomodulatory, analgesic and antipyretic effects of violacein isolated from Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Antonisamy, P; Ignacimuthu, S

    2010-03-01

    Violacein was isolated from Chromobacterium violaceum, a soil Gram negative bacterium collected from the forest water body soil sample of Kolli Hills; Tamil Nadu, India. In the present study the immunomodulatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities of violacein were investigated in wistar rats and mice. Analgesic effect was evaluated by acetic acid- induced writhing, formalin induced paw licking and hotplate tests. Immunomodulatory effect was investigated by using ovalbumin- induced active paw anaphylaxis and sheep red blood cells (SRBC)-induced DTH tests. Antipyretic activity was evaluated by yeast- induced hyperpyrexia in rats. The anti- oedema effect was compared with indomethacin. Violacein inhibited 42.9% of ovalbumin- induced edema. Further we found that violacein (40mg/kg b.w.) reduced the edema induced by sheep red blood cells. Violacein also produced significant (p<0.05) analgesic activity in acetic acid induced writhing response, formalin induced paw licking response and hot plate analysis. Treatment with violacein showed a significant (p<0.05) dose-dependent reduction in pyrexia in rats. The results suggest that violacein possesses potent immunomodulatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities.

  3. DNA identification of formalin-fixed organs is affected by fixation time and type of fixatives: using the AmpF l STR(R) Identifiler(R) PCR Amplification Kit.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Mami; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Motani-Saitoh, Hisako; Yajima, Daisuke; Hayakawa, Mutsumi; Otsuka, Katsura; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2012-01-01

    Personal identification using DNA typing of formalin-fixed tissue is very important in the forensic sciences. However, few studies have been conducted to determine the detection limit of DNA typing of formalin fixation time in samples using the AmpFℓSTR(®) Identifiler(®) PCR Amplification Kit (Identifiler Kit). We collected samples from five cadavers submitted for forensic autopsies, and fixed them either in a 10% formalin solution, or in a 10% neutral-buffered formalin solution. The amount of template DNA for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and the detection limit of DNA typing for the Identifiler Kit were determined. When tissues were fixed in 10% formalin, 10 ng of DNA template was required for successful genotyping even after three-hour fixation and 100 ng was required after one-week fixation for PCR amplification. However, when tissues were fixed in 10% neutral-buffered formalin, the required amount of DNA template was 1 ng for a fixation time of three hours to three days and 125 ng for three months. Fixation time in neutral-buffered formalin was longer for successful PCR than that in formalin solution. Dropout was more common with increasing formalin fixation time. These results suggest that neutral-buffered formalin is preferred to formalin for fixation of tissues if they are to be subjected to DNA typing and that tissues fixed with neutral-buffered formalin can be used for DNA typing using the Identifiler Kit unless the fixation time exceeds one month.

  4. Argon Plasma Coagulation Therapy Versus Topical Formalin for Intractable Rectal Bleeding and Anorectal Dysfunction After Radiation Therapy for Prostate Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric; Tam, William; Schoeman, Mark; Moore, James; Thomas, Michelle; Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the effect of argon plasma coagulation (APC) and topical formalin for intractable rectal bleeding and anorectal dysfunction associated with chronic radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: Thirty men (median age, 72 years; range, 49-87 years) with intractable rectal bleeding (defined as ≥1× per week and/or requiring blood transfusions) after radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma were randomized to treatment with APC (n=17) or topical formalin (n=13). Each patient underwent evaluations of (1) anorectal symptoms (validated questionnaires, including modified Late Effects in Normal Tissues–Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic and visual analogue scales for rectal bleeding); (2) anorectal motor and sensory function (manometry and graded rectal balloon distension); and (3) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and after the treatment endpoint (defined as reduction in rectal bleeding to 1× per month or better, reduction in visual analogue scales to ≤25 mm, and no longer needing blood transfusions). Results: The treatment endpoint was achieved in 94% of the APC group and 100% of the topical formalin group after a median (range) of 2 (1-5) sessions of either treatment. After a follow-up duration of 111 (29-170) months, only 1 patient in each group needed further treatment. Reductions in rectal compliance and volumes of sensory perception occurred after APC, but no effect on anorectal symptoms other than rectal bleeding was observed. There were no differences between APC and topical formalin for anorectal symptoms and function, nor for anal sphincteric morphology. Conclusions: Argon plasma coagulation and topical formalin had comparable efficacy in the durable control of rectal bleeding associated with chronic radiation proctitis but had no beneficial effect on anorectal dysfunction.

  5. Quantification of HER2 by Targeted Mass Spectrometry in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) Breast Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Carine; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Lamerz, Jens; Kux van Geijtenbeek, Sabine; McKee, Thomas A; Venturi, Miro; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Hochstrasser, Denis; Cutler, Paul; Lescuyer, Pierre; Ducret, Axel

    2015-10-01

    The ability to accurately quantify proteins in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues using targeted mass spectrometry opens exciting perspectives for biomarker discovery. We have developed and evaluated a selectedreaction monitoring assay for the human receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 (HER2) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded breast tumors. Peptide candidates were identified using an untargeted mass spectrometry approach in relevant cell lines. A multiplexed assay was developed for the six best candidate peptides and evaluated for linearity, precision and lower limit of quantification. Results showed a linear response over a calibration range of 0.012 to 100 fmol on column (R(2): 0.99-1.00).The lower limit of quantification was 0.155 fmol on column for all peptides evaluated. The six HER2 peptides were quantified by selected reaction monitoring in a cohort of 40 archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues from women with invasive breast carcinomas, which showed different levels of HER2 gene amplification as assessed by standard methods used in clinical pathology. The amounts of the six HER2 peptides were highly and significantly correlated with each other, indicating that peptide levels can be used as surrogates of protein amounts in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. After normalization for sample size, selected reaction monitoring peptide measurements were able to correctly predict 90% of cases based on HER2 amplification as defined by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists. In conclusion, the developed assay showed good analytical performance and a high agreement with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization data. This study demonstrated that selected reaction monitoring allows to accurately quantify protein expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues and represents therefore a powerful approach for biomarker discovery studies. The untargeted mass spectrometry

  6. Phytochemistry, anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of the aqueous leaf extract of Lagenaria breviflora (Cucurbitaceae) in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Adedapo, Adeolu; Adewuyi, Temitayo; Sofidiya, Margaret

    2013-03-01

    The plant, and especially the fruit of Lagenaria breviflora is widely used in folklore medicine in West Africa as a herbal remedy for the treatment of human measles, digestive disorders, and as wound antiseptics (e.g. umbilical incision wound), while livestock farmers use it for Newcastle disease and coccidiosis treatment in various animal species, especially poultry. The purpose of this study was to contribute with new information on this plant leaves extract effect, as few studies have considered their effects. We collected fresh leaves of Lagenaria breviflora from the school farm of the University of Ibadan, Nigeria in May 2011. Dried leaves were ground and a 200g sample was used to prepare the extract. The grounded leaves material was allowed to shake in 1000mL distilled water for 48h, in an orbital shaker at room temperature of 24 degreeC. The obtained extract was filtered and concentrated to dryness under reduced pressure at 40 degreeC, and the thick solution was lyophilized, for a final extract yield of 12.6%. Standard phytochemical methods were used to test the presence of saponins, alkaloids, tannins, anthraquinones, cardiac glycosides, cyanogenetic glycosides and flavonoids. The anti-inflammatory activity of the aqueous leaf extract of the plant was assessed using carrageenan-induced paw edema and histamine-induced paw edema in rats. The analgesic effect was determined using the acetic acid writhing method as well as formalin test in mice. Our results showed that the extract at 100 and 200mg/ kg body weight significantly reduced the formation of the oedema induced by carrageenan and histamine. In the acetic acid-induced writhing model, the extract showed a good analgesic effect characterized by reduction in the number of writhes when compared to the control. The extract caused dose-dependent decrease of licking time and licking frequency in rats injected with 2.5% formalin, signifying its analgesic effect. These results were however less than those of

  7. Glucocorticoids modulate amino acid-induced translation initiation in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenqi; Li, Guolian; Kimball, Scot R; Jahn, Linda A; Barrett, Eugene J

    2004-08-01

    Amino acids are unique anabolic agents in that they nutritively signal to mRNA translation initiation and serve as substrates for protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. Glucocorticoid excess antagonizes the anabolic action of amino acids on protein synthesis in laboratory animals. To examine whether excessive glucocorticoids modulate mixed amino acid-signaled translation initiation in human skeletal muscle, we infused an amino acid mixture (10% Travasol) systemically to 16 young healthy male volunteers for 6 h in the absence (n = 8) or presence (n = 8) of glucocorticoid excess (dexamethasone 2 mg orally every 6 h for 3 days). Vastus lateralis muscles were biopsied before and after amino acid infusion, and the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70(S6K)), and eIF2alpha and the guanine nucleotide exchange activity of eIF2B were measured. Systemic infusion of mixed amino acids significantly stimulated the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 (P < 0.04) and p70(S6K) (P < 0.001) and the dephosphorylation of eIF2alpha (P < 0.003) in the control group. Dexamethasone treatment did not alter the basal phosphorylation state of 4E-BP1, p70(S6K), or eIF2alpha; however, it abrogated the stimulatory effect of amino acid infusion on the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 (P = 0.31) without affecting amino acid-induced phosphorylation of p70(S6K) (P = 0.002) or dephosphorylation of eIF2alpha (P = 0.003). Neither amino acid nor dexamethasone treatment altered the guanine nucleotide exchange activity of eIF2B. We conclude that changes of amino acid concentrations within the physiological range stimulate mRNA translation by enhancing the binding of mRNA to the 43S preinitiation complex, and the activity of p70(S6K) and glucocorticoid excess blocks the former action in vivo in human skeletal muscle.

  8. Analgesic effects of stem bark extracts of Trichilia monadelpha (Thonn.) JJ De Wilde

    PubMed Central

    Woode, Eric; Amoh-Barimah, Ama Kyeraa; Abotsi, Wonder Kofi Mensah; Ainooson, George Kwaw; Owusu, George

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Various parts of Trichilia monadelpha (Thonn) JJ De Wilde (Fam. Meliaceae) are used in Ghanaian traditional medicine for the treatment of painful and inflammatory conditions. The present study examined the analgesic properties of the petroleum ether (PEE), ethyl acetate (EAE), and the hydro-ethanolic (HAE) extract of the stem bark of the plant in murine models. Materials and Methods: PEE, EAE, and HAE were assessed in chemical (acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing and formalin tests), thermal (hot plate test), and mechanical (Randall-Selitto paw pressure test) pain models. The possible mechanisms of the antinociceptive action were also examined with various antagonists in the formalin test. Results: HAE, EAE, and PEE, each at doses of 10–100 mg/kg orally, and the positive controls (morphine and diclofenac) elicited significant dose-dependent antinociceptive activity in the chemical (acetic acid abdominal writhing and formalin tests), thermal (hot plate test), and mechanical (Randall-Selitto paw pressure test) pain models in rodents. The antinociceptive effect of HAE was partly or wholly reversed by systemic administration of atropine, naloxone, and glibenclamide. The antinociceptive effects of EAE and PEE were inhibited by atropine. Conclusion: The extracts HAE, EAE, and PEE caused dose-related antinociception in chemical, thermal, and mechanical models of pain in animals. The mechanism of action of HAE involves an interaction with muscarinic cholinergic, adenosinergic, opioidergic pathways, and ATP-sensitive K+ channels while that of EAE and PEE involve the muscarinic cholinergic system. PMID:23248409

  9. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of essential oil extracted from Chamaecyparis obtusa in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Yujin; Jung, Seung Min; Yoo, Seung-Ah; Kim, Wan-Uk; Cho, Chul-Soo; Park, Bum-Jin; Woo, Jong-Min; Yoon, Chong-Hyeon

    2015-12-01

    Essential oil extracted from Chamaecyparis obtusa (EOCO) consists of several monoterpenes with anti-inflammatory effects. Monoterpenes are expected to have an analgesic effect through inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators. The present study investigated the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of EOCO in animal models of pain. Intraperitoneal injection with EOCO (5 or 10mg/kg), aspirin (positive control, 300mg/kg), or DMSO (negative control) was performed 1h before the nociception tests: acetic acid-induced writhing response, formalin test, and hot plate test in mice, and acidic saline-induced allodynia in rats. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-inflammatory enzymes in formalin-injected paws was determined by ELISA and western blotting, respectively. Treatment with EOCO significantly reduced acetic acid-induced writhing and paw-licking time in late response of the formalin tests. The anti-nociceptive effect was comparable with aspirin. However, EOCO did not affect the reaction time of licking of the hind paws or jumping in hot plate test and the mechanical withdrawal thresholds in acidic saline-induced allodynia model. Formalin-injected paws of mice treated with EOCO revealed the down-regulated expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2, as compared with those of control mice. These data showed the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of EOCO. The pain-relieving effect might be attributed to inhibition of peripheral pain in association with inflammatory response. EOCO could be a useful therapeutic strategy to manage pain and inflammatory diseases.

  10. Programming of formalin-induced nociception by neonatal LPS exposure: Maintenance by peripheral and central neuroimmune activity.

    PubMed

    Zouikr, Ihssane; Ahmed, Abdulrzag F; Horvat, Jay C; Beagley, Kenneth W; Clifton, Vicki L; Ray, Allyson; Thorne, Rick F; Jarnicki, Andrew G; Hansbro, Philip M; Hodgson, Deborah M

    2015-02-01

    The immune and nociceptive systems are shaped during the neonatal period where they undergo fine-tuning and maturation. Painful experiences during this sensitive period of development are known to produce long-lasting effects on the immune and nociceptive responses. It is less clear, however, whether inflammatory pain responses are primed by neonatal exposure to mild immunological stimuli, such as with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we examine the impact of neonatal LPS exposure on inflammatory pain responses, peripheral and hippocampal interleukin-1β (IL-1β), as well as mast cell number and degranulation in preadolescent and adult rats. Wistar rats were injected with LPS (0.05mg/kg IP, Salmonella enteritidis) or saline on postnatal days (PNDs) 3 and 5 and later subjected to the formalin test at PNDs 22 and 80-97. At both time-points, and one-hour after formalin injection, blood and hippocampus were collected for measuring circulating and central IL-1β levels using ELISA and Western blot, respectively. Paw tissue was also isolated to assess mast cell number and degree of degranulation using Toluidine Blue staining. Behavioural analyses indicate that at PND 22, LPS-challenged rats displayed enhanced flinching (p<.01) and licking (p<.01) in response to formalin injection. At PNDs 80-97, LPS-challenged rats exhibited increased flinching (p<.05), an effect observed in males only. Furthermore, neonatal LPS exposure enhanced circulating IL-1β and mast cell degranulation in preadolescent but not adult rats following formalin injection. Hippocampal IL-1β levels were increased in LPS-treated adult but not preadolescent rats in response to formalin injection. These data suggest neonatal LPS exposure produces developmentally regulated changes in formalin-induced behavioural responses, peripheral and central IL-1β levels, as well as mast cell degranulation following noxious stimulation later in life. These findings highlight the importance of immune activation during

  11. Pharmacological modulation of neuropathic pain-related depression of behavior: effects of morphine, ketoprofen, bupropion and [INCREMENT]9-tetrahydrocannabinol on formalin-induced depression of intracranial self-stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Leitl, Michael D; Negus, S Stevens

    2016-06-01

    Neuropathic pain is often associated with behavioral depression. Intraplantar formalin produces sustained, neuropathy-associated depression of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) in rats. This study evaluated pharmacological modulation of formalin-induced ICSS depression. Rats with intracranial electrodes targeting the medial forebrain bundle responded for electrical brain stimulation in an ICSS procedure. Bilateral intraplantar formalin administration depressed ICSS for 14 days. Morphine (0.32-3.2 mg/kg), ketoprofen (0.1-10 mg/kg), bupropion (3.2-32 mg/kg), and [INCREMENT]9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; 0.32-3.2 mg/kg) were evaluated for their effectiveness to reverse formalin-induced depression of ICSS. Drug effects on formalin-induced mechanical allodynia were evaluated for comparison. Morphine and bupropion reversed both formalin-induced ICSS depression and mechanical allodynia, and effects on ICSS were sustained during repeated treatment. Ketoprofen failed to reverse either formalin effect. THC blocked mechanical allodynia, but decreased ICSS in control rats and exacerbated formalin-induced depression of ICSS. The failure of ketoprofen to alter formalin effects suggests that formalin effects result from neuropathy rather than inflammation. The effectiveness of morphine and bupropion to reverse formalin effects agrees with other evidence that these drugs block pain-depressed behavior in rats and relieve neuropathic pain in humans. The effects of THC suggest general behavioral suppression and do not support the use of THC to treat neuropathic pain.

  12. Repeated citalopram administration counteracts kainic acid-induced spreading of PSA-NCAM-immunoreactive cells and loss of reelin in the adult mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Jaako, Külli; Aonurm-Helm, Anu; Kalda, Anti; Anier, Kaili; Zharkovsky, Tamara; Shastin, Dmitri; Zharkovsky, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    Systemic or intracerebral administration of kainic acid in rodents induces neuronal death followed by a cascade of neuroplastic changes in the hippocampus. Kainic acid-induced neuroplasticity is evidenced by alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis, dispersion of the granule cell layer and re-organisation of mossy fibres. Similar abnormalities are observed in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and, therefore, kainic acid-induced hippocampal neuroplasticity might mimic pathological mechanisms leading to the formation of 'epileptic brain' in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Previous studies have demonstrated that selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor antidepressants might reduce the severity of seizures in epileptic patients and reduce neuronal death in laboratory animal models of kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. In the present study, we investigated whether kainic acid-induced neuroplasticity in mice is modulated by the repeated administration of citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. We found that at the histopathological level, repeated citalopram treatment counteracted the kainic acid-induced neuronal loss and dispersion of young granule neurons expressing the polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule within the granule cell layer of the hippocampus. Citalopram also counteracted the downregulation of reelin on both mRNA and protein levels induced by kainic acid administration. Our findings indicate that repeated administration of citalopram is able to prevent kainic acid-induced abnormal brain plasticity and thereby prevent the formation of an epileptic phenotype.

  13. Hot Pepper (Capsicum spp.) protects brain from sodium nitroprusside- and quinolinic acid-induced oxidative stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Oboh, G; Rocha, J B T

    2008-06-01

    One practical way through which free radical-mediated neurodegenerative diseases could be prevented is through the consumption of food rich in antioxidants. The ability of aqueous extracts of ripe and unripe Capsicum annum, Tepin (CAT) and Capsicum chinese, Habanero (CCH) to prevent lipid peroxidation induced by sodium nitroprusside and quinolinic acid in rat brain in vitro is assessed in this study. The aqueous extract of the peppers were prepared (1 g/20 mL). Incubating rat brain homogenates with pro-oxidant (7 microM sodium nitroprusside [222.5%] and 1 mM quinolinic acid [217.4%]) caused a significant increase (P < .05) in lipid peroxidation in rat brain homogenates. However, the aqueous extract of the peppers (4.2-16.8 mg/mL) caused a significant decrease (P < .05) in the lipid peroxidation in a dose-dependent manner. However, unripe CAT (92.5-55.2%) caused the highest inhibition of sodium nitroprusside-induced lipid peroxidation, while unripe CCH caused the least inhibition (161.0-102.1%). Furthermore, unripe CAT and CCH peppers had a significantly higher (P < .05) inhibitory effect on quinolinic acid-induced lipid peroxidation in rat brain than the ripe pepper (CAT and CCH). Therefore, the protection of the brain tissues by hot pepper depends on the total phenol content in sodium nitroprusside-induced lipid peroxidation, while ripening would reduce the protective properties of hot pepper against quinolinic acid-induced lipid peroxidation. However, unripe CAT has the highest protective properties against sodium nitroprusside- and quinolinic acid-induced lipid peroxidation in rat brain.

  14. Attenuation of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus by inhibition of endocannabinoid transport and degradation in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Shubina, Liubov; Aliev, Rubin; Kitchigina, Valentina

    2015-03-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a medical emergency associated with a high rate of mortality if not treated promptly. Exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids have been shown to possess anticonvulsant properties both in vivo and in vitro. Here we study the influence of endocannabinoid metabolism on the development of kainic acid-induced SE in guinea pigs. For this purpose, the inhibitors of endocannabinoid transport, AM404, and enzymatic (fatty acid amide hydrolase) degradation, URB597, were applied. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251, was also tested. Animal behavior as well as local electric field potentials in four structures: medial septum, hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and amygdala were analyzed when AM404 (120nmol), URB597 (4.8nmol) or AM251 (20nmol) were administrated alone or together with 0.4μg of kainic acid. All substances were injected i.c.v. AM404, URB597 or AM251 administered alone did not alter markedly local field potentials of all four studied structures in the long-term compared with their basal activity. AM404 and URB597 significantly alleviated kainic acid-induced SE, decreasing behavioral manifestations, duration of seizure events and SE in general without changing the amplitude of local field potentials. AM251 did not produce distinct effects on SE in terms of our experimental paradigm. There was no apparent change of the seizure initiation pattern when kainic acid was coadministrated with AM404, URB597 or AM251. The present study provides electrophysiologic and behavioral evidences that inhibition of endocannabinoid metabolism plays a protective role against kainic acid-induced SE and may be employed for therapeutic purposes. Further investigations of the influences of cannabinoid-related compounds on SE genesis and especially epileptogenesis are required.

  15. Importance of interferon inducible trans-membrane proteins and retinoic acid inducible gene I for influenza virus replication: A review.

    PubMed

    Suo, Siqingaowa; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interplay between Influenza viruses and host cells is key to elucidating the pathogenesis of these viruses. Several host factors have been identified that exert antiviral functions; however, influenza viruses continue to replicate utilizing host cell machinery. Herein, we review the mechanisms of action of two host-derived proteins on conferring cellular resistance to the influenza virus; (1) the interferon inducible trans-membrane proteins, 1, 2 and 3, a recently identified family of early restriction factors; and (2) retinoic acid inducible gene I, a key mediator of antiviral immunity. These data may contribute to the design of novel and efficient anti-influenza treatments.

  16. Genetic parameters for rennet- and acid-induced coagulation properties in milk from Swedish Red dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, F; Glantz, M; Poulsen, N A; Wadsö, L; Stålhammar, H; Andrén, A; Lindmark Månsson, H; Larsen, L B; Paulsson, M; Fikse, W F

    2014-01-01

    Milk coagulation is an important processing trait, being the basis for production of both cheese and fermented products. There is interest in including technological properties of these products in the breeding goal for dairy cattle. The aim of the present study was therefore to estimate genetic parameters for milk coagulation properties, including both rennet- and acid-induced coagulation, in Swedish Red dairy cattle using genomic relationships. Morning milk samples and blood samples were collected from 395 Swedish Red cows that were selected to be as genetically unrelated as possible. Using a rheometer, milk samples were analyzed for rennet- and acid-induced coagulation properties, including gel strength (G'), coagulation time, and yield stress (YS). In addition to the technological traits, milk composition was analyzed. A binary trait was created to reflect that milk samples that had not coagulated 40min after rennet addition were considered noncoagulating milk. The cows were genotyped by using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). Almost 600,000 markers remained after quality control and were used to construct a matrix of genomic relationships among the cows. Multivariate models including fixed effects of herd, lactation stage, and parity were fitted using the ASReml software to obtain estimates of heritabilities and genetic and phenotypic correlations. Heritability estimates (h(2)) for G' and YS in rennet and acid gels were found to be high (h(2)=0.38-0.62) and the genetic correlations between rennet-induced and acid-induced coagulation properties were weak but favorable, with the exception of YSrennet with G'acid and YSacid, both of which were strong. The high heritability (h(2)=0.45) for milk coagulating ability expressed as a binary trait suggests that noncoagulation could be eliminated through breeding. Additionally, the results indicated that the current breeding objective could increase the frequency of noncoagulating milk and

  17. Long term formalin preserved stool specimens for detection of intestinal parasites from school aged children in Tripoli, Libya.

    PubMed

    Ben Musa, Najla A; Ibrahim, R

    2007-12-01

    A total of 949 single stool samples were collected from school aged children (5-14 years old) in the city of Tripoli. The samples were preserved in 10% formalin and examined by routine microscopy using normal saline and Lugol's iodine preparations as well as the formol ethyl concentration method after a storage period of twelve months at room temperature. Of 949 samples examined 4.5% were positive. Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba coli were the only protozoan parasites identified with an infection rate of 3.2% & 1.3% respecttively. No helminthes were detected in any of the samples. About 14% of the children had intestinal yeast infection Candida albicans in their stool of which 0.63% was infected with intestinal parasites. No distortion or alteration of morphology was observed particularly in G. lamblia. Preservation in 10% formalin is a very productive means for the accurate identification of protozoan parasites.

  18. Determination of Both Fetus' and Mother's Blood Type from an Autopsy Case Immersed in Formalin for Over 50 Years.

    PubMed

    Uno, Akari Takaya; Morita, Satomu; Furukawa, Satoshi; Nishi, Katsuji; Hitosugi, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    A female fetus which had been immersed in formalin for more than 50 years was found in Japan. Because no liquid blood could be obtained, we tried to use immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods to tissue samples obtained at autopsy to identify both the fetal and mother's blood type. We detected B antigens on endothelial cells in paraffin sections of the fetal organs. Furthermore, we observed both anti-A- and anti-B-positive red blood cells in the intervillous space, which is indicative of the mother's blood type. To our knowledge, this is the first case report on determining the blood type of both the fetus and the mother from tissue immersed in formalin for such a long time. The results suggest that IHC is valuable for the determination of ABO blood type in circumstances of long postmortem duration and unfavorable storage conditions.

  19. Targeted-capture massively-parallel sequencing enables robust detection of clinically informative mutations from formalin-fixed tumours

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Stephen Q.; Li, Jason; Salemi, Renato; Sheppard, Karen E.; Hongdo Do; Tothill, Richard W.; McArthur, Grant A.; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing offers the ability to interrogate a tumour biopsy for multiple mutational changes. For clinical samples, methodologies must enable maximal extraction of available sequence information from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material. We assessed the use of targeted capture for mutation detection in FFPE DNA. The capture probes targeted the coding region of all known kinase genes and selected oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. Seven melanoma cell lines and matching FFPE xenograft DNAs were sequenced. An informatics pipeline was developed to identify variants and contaminating mouse reads. Concordance of 100% was observed between unfixed and formalin-fixed for reported COSMIC variants including BRAF V600E. mutations in genes not conventionally screened including ERBB4, ATM, STK11 and CDKN2A were readily detected. All regions were adequately covered with independent reads regardless of GC content. This study indicates that hybridisation capture is a robust approach for massively parallel sequencing of FFPE samples. PMID:24336498

  20. Full-length protein extraction protocols and gel-based downstream applications in formalin-fixed tissue proteomics.

    PubMed

    Tanca, Alessandro; Uzzau, Sergio; Addis, Maria Filippa

    2015-01-01

    Archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue repositories and their associated clinical information can represent a valuable resource for tissue proteomics. In order to make these tissues available for protein biomarker discovery and validation studies, dedicated sample preparation procedures overcoming the intermolecular cross-links introduced by formalin need to be implemented. This chapter describes a full-length protein extraction protocol optimized for downstream gel-based proteomics applications. Using the procedures detailed here, SDS-PAGE, western immunoblotting, GeLC-MS/MS, 2D-PAGE, and 2D-DIGE can be carried out on FFPE tissues. Technical tips, critical aspects, and drawbacks of the method are presented and discussed.

  1. Use of polymerase chain reaction in detection of Marek's disease and reticuloendotheliosis viruses in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumorous tissues.

    PubMed

    Cao, Weisheng; Mays, Jody; Dunn, John; Fulton, Richard; Silva, Robert; Fadly, Aly

    2013-12-01

    A simple PCR method was developed for the detection of Marek's disease (MD) and reticuloendotheliosis (RE) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, and for the detection of MD in tissues only preserved in 10% neutral buffered formalin. MD virus (MDV) and RE virus proviral DNA were detected in FFPE tissues stored for over 20 yr. MDV was also detected in tissues only preserved in formalin for up to 6 mo. The data indicate that PCR of formalin-fixed and FFPE tissues is a simple and valuable tool that can be used to identify MD and RE infection. The method described in this paper is a good alternative to any biologic or immunohistochemical assay to confirm the detection of MD and RE, as it does not require shipping frozen tissues to the diagnostic laboratory.

  2. Infrared microscopy for the study of biological cell monolayers. I. Spectral effects of acetone and formalin fixation.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Gary; Wang, Ruili; Krug, Peter; Katz, David; Hilliard, Julia

    2008-11-01

    Infrared spectroscopy of biological cell monolayers grown on surfaces is a poorly developed field. This is unfortunate because these monolayers have potential as biological sensors. Here we have used infrared microscopy, in both transmission and transflection geometries, to study air-dried Vero cell monolayers. Using both methods allows one to distinguish sampling artefactual features from real sample spectral features. In transflection experiments, amide I/II absorption bands down-shift 9/4 cm(-1), respectively, relative to the corresponding bands in transmission experiments. In all other spectral regions no pronounced frequency differences in spectral bands in transmission and transflection experiments were observed. Transmission and transflection infrared microscopy were used to obtain infrared spectra for unfixed and acetone- or formalin-fixed Vero cell monolayers. Formalin-fixed monolayers display spectra that are very similar to that obtained using unfixed cells. However, acetone fixation leads to considerable spectral modifications. For unfixed and formalin-fixed monolayers, a distinct band is observed at 1740 cm(-1). This band is absent in spectra obtained using acetone-fixed monolayers. The 1740 cm(-1) band is associated with cellular ester lipids. In support of this hypothesis, two bands at 2925 and 2854 cm(-1) are also found to disappear upon acetone fixation. These bands are associated with C-H modes of the cellular lipids. Acetone fixation also leads to modification of protein amide I and II absorption bands. This may be expected as acetone causes coagulation of soluble cellular proteins. Other spectral changes associated with acetone or formalin fixation in the 1400-800 cm(-1) region are discussed.

  3. Evaluation of the antinociceptive activities of enaminone compounds on the formalin and hot plate tests in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masocha, Willias; Kombian, Samuel B.; Edafiogho, Ivan O.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, we found that methyl 4-(4‧-bromophenyl)aminocyclohex-3-en-6-methyl-2-oxo-1-oate (E139), an anticonvulsant enaminone, has antinociceptive activity in the hot plate test. In this study we evaluated the antinociceptive activity of five anilino enaminones E139, ethyl 4-(4‧-chlorophenyl)amino-6-methyl-2-oxocyclohex-3-en-1-oate (E121), ethyl 4-(4‧-bromophenyl)amino-6-methyl-2-oxocyclohex-3-en-1-oate (E122), methyl 4-(4‧-chlorophenyl)amino-6-methyl-2-oxocyclohex-3-en-1-oate (E138) and ethyl 4-(4‧-fluorophenyl)amino-6-methyl-2-oxocyclohex-3-en-1-oate (BRG 19) using the formalin and hot plate tests. E139 has been reported to exert its effects via enhancement of extracellular GABA levels, thus tiagabine, a GABA transporter inhibitor, was evaluated as a control together with indomethacin. Tiagabine had antinociceptive activity in both phase 1 (neurogenic pain) and phase 2 (inflammatory pain) of the formalin test, whereas indomethacin had activity only in phase 2. E139 and E138 had antinociceptive activity in both phases of the formalin test, whereas E121 had activity only in phase 1 and BRG 19 had activity only in phase 2. E122 had no significant activity in either phase. In the hot plate test only E139 had antinociceptive activity. Administration of either bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, or CGP 35348, a GABAB receptor antagonist, blocked the antinociceptive activity of E139. In conclusion our results indicate that E139 has antinociceptive activity in the formalin and hot plate tests that are dependent on GABA receptors.

  4. Efficacy of formalin, hydrogen-peroxide, and sodium-chloride on fungal-infected rainbow-trout eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schreier, T.M.; Rach, J.J.; Howe, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    Antifungal agents are essential for the maintenance of healthy stocks of fish and their eggs in intensive aquaculture operations. In the usa, formalin is the only fungicide approved for use in fish culture, however, hydrogen peroxide and sodium chloride have been granted low regulatory priority drug status by the united states food and drug administration (fda) and their use is allowed. We evaluated the efficacy of these fungicides for controlling fungal infections on rainbow trout eggs. A pilot study was conducted to determine the minimum water flow rate required to administer test chemicals accurately in heath incubators. A minimum water flow rate of 7.6 1 min(-1) was necessary to maintain treatment concentrations during flow-through chemical exposures, the antifungal activity of formalin, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium chloride was evaluated by treating uninfected and 10% fungal-infected (saprolegnia parasitica) rainbow trout eggs (oncorhynchus mykiss) for 15 min every other day until hatch. There were no significant differences among treatments in percent hatch or final infection for uninfected eggs receiving prophylactic chemical treatments, eggs of the negative control group (uninfected and untreated) had a mean hatch exceeding 86%, all chemical treatments conducted on the infected egg groups controlled the spread of fungus and improved hatching success compared with the positive control groups (infected and untreated), formalin treatments of 1000 and 1500 mu l 1(-1) and hydrogen peroxide treatments of 500 and 1000 mu l 1(-1) were the most effective. Sodium chloride treatments of 30000 mg 1(-1) improved fry hatch, but the compound was less effective at inhibiting fungal growths compared with hydrogen peroxide and formalin treatments.

  5. Effects of formalin, chloramine-T, and low salinity dip on the behavior and hemolymph biochemistry of the American lobster.

    PubMed Central

    Speare, D J; Cawthorn, R J; Horney, B S; MacMillan, R; MacKenzie, A L

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the salinity and formalin sensitivity of a ciliate parasite (Anophryoides haemophila) of the American lobster (Homarus americanus), and to examine the target-animal (lobster) safety of chemical-bath treatments involving low salinity, formalin, or chloramine-T that could be used to control this parasite in lobster pounds. "Bumper car" disease, caused by An. haemophila, is an important concern to lobster pound operators in eastern North America, because of the implicated lobster mortality rate and the general lack of preventive and therapeutic intervention regimes. We determined, using an in vitro method, that formalin at 50 mg/L, or low salinity at 8.0 parts per thousand (ppt) for 1 hour killed 100% of the parasites. When healthy lobsters were exposed to formalin at 200 mg/L, there were no negative behavioral responses and no significant differences in a panel of hemolymph biochemical indices. Similar results occurred when lobsters were exposed to chloramine-T, a common finfish therapeutic agent for topical bacteria and protozoa, at 10 mg/L for 1 hour. The low salinity treatment (8.0 ppt) resulted in significant adverse changes in lobster behavior and biochemical indices; however, these changes did not persist for more than 1 week after treatment ended. Although these treatments are unlikely to kill parasites that have already invaded the lobster carapace, they should be effective in reducing parasite loads on the gill and carapace surface of the lobster and in the environment of the impoundment housing. PMID:9111691

  6. Proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung neuroendocrine tumor samples from hospital archives.

    PubMed

    Tanca, Alessandro; Addis, Maria Filippa; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Tonelli, Roberto; Falchi, Giovanni; Eccher, Albino; Roggio, Tonina; Fanciulli, Giuseppe; Uzzau, Sergio

    2011-03-01

    Hospital tissue repositories host an invaluable supply of diseased samples with matched retrospective clinical information. In this work, a recently optimized method for extracting full-length proteins from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues was evaluated on lung neuroendocrine tumor (LNET) samples collected from hospital repositories. LNETs comprise a heterogeneous spectrum of diseases, for which subtype-specific diagnostic markers are lacking. Six archival samples diagnosed as typical carcinoid (TC) or small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) were subjected to a full-length protein extraction followed by a GeLC-MS/MS analysis, enabling the identification of over 300 distinct proteins per tumor subtype. All identified proteins were categorized through DAVID software, revealing a differential distribution of functional classes, such as those involved in RNA processing, response to oxidative stress and ion homeostasis. Moreover, using spectral counting for protein abundance estimation and beta-binomial test as statistical filter, a list of 28 differentially expressed proteins was generated and submitted to pathway analysis by means of Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. Differential expression of chromogranin-A (more expressed in TCs) and stathmin (more expressed in SCLCs) was consistently confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Therefore, FFPE hospital archival samples can be successfully subjected to proteomic investigations aimed to biomarker discovery following a GeLC-MS/MS label-free approach.

  7. Superresolution Imaging of Clinical Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Breast Cancer with Single Molecule Localization Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Creech, Matthew K.; Wang, Jing; Nan, Xiaolin; Gibbs, Summer L.

    2017-01-01

    Millions of archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens contain valuable molecular insight into healthy and diseased states persevered in their native ultrastructure. To diagnose and treat diseases in tissue on the nanoscopic scale, pathology traditionally employs electron microscopy (EM), but this platform has significant limitations including cost and painstaking sample preparation. The invention of single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) optically overcame the diffraction limit of light to resolve fluorescently labeled molecules on the nanoscale, leading to many exciting biological discoveries. However, applications of SMLM in preserved tissues has been limited. Through adaptation of the immunofluorescence workflow on FFPE sections milled at histological thickness, cellular architecture can now be visualized on the nanoscale using SMLM including individual mitochondria, undulations in the nuclear lamina, and the HER2 receptor on membrane protrusions in human breast cancer specimens. Using astigmatism imaging, these structures can also be resolved in three dimensions to a depth of ~800 nm. These results demonstrate the utility of SMLM in efficiently uncovering ultrastructural information of archived clinical samples, which may offer molecular insights into the physiopathology of tissues to assist in disease diagnosis and treatment using conventional sample preparation methods. PMID:28098202

  8. DNA extraction from fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Hua; Gouda-Vossos, Amany; Dzamko, Nicolas; Halliday, Glenda; Huang, Yue

    2013-10-01

    Both fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human brain tissues are invaluable resources for molecular genetic studies of central nervous system diseases, especially neurodegenerative disorders. To identify the optimal method for DNA extraction from human brain tissue, we compared methods on differently-processed tissues. Fragments of LRRK2 and MAPT (257 bp and 483 bp/245 bp) were amplified for evaluation. We found that for FFPE samples, the success rate of DNA extraction was greater when using a commercial kit than a laboratory-based method (successful DNA extraction from 76% versus 33% of samples). PCR amplicon size and storage period were key factors influencing the success rate of DNA extraction from FFPE samples. In the fresh-frozen samples, the DNA extraction success rate was 100% using either a commercial kit (QIAamp DNA Micro) or a laboratory-based method (sample boiling in 0.1 mol/L NaOH, followed by proteinase K digestion, and then DNA extraction using Chelex-100) regardless of PCR amplicon length or tissue storage time. Although the present results demonstrate that PCR-amplifiable genomic DNA can be extracted from both fresh-frozen and FFPE samples, fresh brain tissue is recommended for DNA extraction in future neuropathological studies.

  9. Genomic DNA extraction methods using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Potluri, Keerti; Mahas, Ahmed; Kent, Michael N; Naik, Sameep; Markey, Michael

    2015-10-01

    As new technologies come within reach for the average cytogenetic laboratory, the study of chromosome structure has become increasingly more sophisticated. Resolution has improved from karyotyping (in which whole chromosomes are discernible) to fluorescence in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH, with which specific megabase regions are visualized), array-based CGH (aCGH, examining hundreds of base pairs), and next-generation sequencing (providing single base pair resolution). Whole genome next-generation sequencing remains a cost-prohibitive method for many investigators. Meanwhile, the cost of aCGH has been reduced during recent years, even as resolution has increased and protocols have simplified. However, aCGH presents its own set of unique challenges. DNA of sufficient quantity and quality to hybridize to arrays and provide meaningful results is required. This is especially difficult for DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Here, we compare three different methods for acquiring DNA of sufficient length, purity, and "amplifiability" for aCGH and other downstream applications. Phenol-chloroform extraction and column-based commercial kits were compared with adaptive focused acoustics (AFA). Of the three extraction methods, AFA samples showed increased amplicon length and decreased polymerase chain reaction (PCR) failure rate. These findings support AFA as an improvement over previous DNA extraction methods for FFPE tissues.

  10. Detection of alpha human papillomaviruses in archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Kocjan, Boštjan J; Hošnjak, Lea; Poljak, Mario

    2016-03-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens stored in pathology departments worldwide are an invaluable source for diagnostic purposes when fresh clinical material is unavailable as well as for retrospective molecular and epidemiological studies, especially when dealing with rare clinical conditions for which prospective collection is not feasible. Accurate detection of HPV infection in these specimens is particularly challenging because nucleic acids are often degraded and therefore, not suitable for amplification of larger fragments of the viral genome or viral gene transcripts. This review provides a brief summary of molecular methods for detecting alpha-HPV DNA/RNA in FFPE tissue specimens. We specifically address the key procedural and environmental factors that have the greatest impact on the quality of nucleic acids extracted from FFPE tissue specimens, and describe some solutions that can be used to increase their integrity and/or amplifiability. Moreover, commonly used methods for HPV DNA/RNA detection in FFPE tissue specimens are presented and discussed, focusing on studies using polymerase chain reaction as an HPV detection method and published after 1999. Finally, we briefly summarize our 22 years of experience with HPV detection in FFPE tissue specimens.

  11. Synergistic antinociceptive interaction between palmitoylethanolamide and tramadol in the mouse formalin test.

    PubMed

    Déciga-Campos, Myrna; Ramírez-Marín, Pamela Moncerrat; López-Muñoz, Francisco Javier

    2015-10-15

    Pharmacological synergism has been used to obtain a higher efficacy using drug concentrations at which side effects are minimal. In this study, the pharmacological antinociceptive interaction between N-palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and tramadol was investigated. The individual concentration-response curves for PEA (0.1-56.2 μg/paw) and tramadol (1-56.2 μg/paw) were evaluated in mice in which nociception was induced by an intraplantar injection of 2% formalin. Isobolographic analysis was used to evaluate the pharmacological interaction between PEA (EC50=23.7±1.6 μg/paw) and tramadol (EC50=26.02±2.96 μg/paw) using the EC50 and a fixed 1:1 ratio combination. The isobologram demonstrated that the combinations investigated in this study produced a synergistic interaction; the experimental values (Zexp=9.5±0.2 μg/paw) were significantly smaller than those calculated theoretically (Zadd=24.8±0.2 μg/paw). The antinociceptive mechanisms of the PEA and tramadol combination involved the opioid receptor, transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α). The sedative effect of the combination of PEA and tramadol was less than that generated by individual treatments. These findings suggest that the PEA and tramadol combination produced enhanced antinociceptive efficacy at concentrations at which side effects are minimal.

  12. Quantitative Profiling of Single Formalin Fixed Tumour Sections: proteomics for translational research

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Christopher S.; McConechy, Melissa K.; Cochrane, Dawn R.; Nazeran, Tayyebeh; Karnezis, Anthony N.; Huntsman, David G.; Morin, Gregg B.

    2016-01-01

    Although re-sequencing of gene panels and mRNA expression profiling are now firmly established in clinical laboratories, in-depth proteome analysis has remained a niche technology, better suited for studying model systems rather than challenging materials such as clinical trial samples. To address this limitation, we have developed a novel and optimized platform called SP3-Clinical Tissue Proteomics (SP3-CTP) for in-depth proteome profiling of practical quantities of tumour tissues, including formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE). Using single 10 μm scrolls of clinical tumour blocks, we performed in-depth quantitative analyses of individual sections from ovarian tumours covering the high-grade serous, clear cell, and endometrioid histotypes. This examination enabled the generation of a novel high-resolution proteome map of ovarian cancer histotypes from clinical tissues. Comparison of the obtained proteome data with large-scale genome and transcriptome analyses validated the observed proteome biology for previously validated hallmarks of this disease, and also identified novel protein features. A tissue microarray analysis validated cystathionine gamma-lyase (CTH) as a novel clear cell carcinoma feature with potential clinical relevance. In addition to providing a milestone in the understanding of ovarian cancer biology, these results show that in-depth proteomic analysis of clinically annotated FFPE materials can be effectively used as a biomarker discovery tool and perhaps ultimately as a diagnostic approach. PMID:27713570

  13. Exome enrichment and SOLiD sequencing of formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) prostate cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Menon, Roopika; Deng, Mario; Boehm, Diana; Braun, Martin; Fend, Falko; Boehm, Detlef; Biskup, Saskia; Perner, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized cancer research allowing the comprehensive study of cancer using high throughput deep sequencing methodologies. These methods detect genomic alterations, nucleotide substitutions, insertions, deletions and copy number alterations. SOLiD (Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection, Life Technologies) is a promising technology generating billions of 50 bp sequencing reads. This robust technique, successfully applied in gene identification, might be helpful in detecting novel genes associated with cancer initiation and progression using formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue. This study's aim was to compare the validity of whole exome sequencing of fresh-frozen vs. FFPE tumor tissue by normalization to normal prostatic FFPE tissue, obtained from the same patient. One primary fresh-frozen sample, corresponding FFPE prostate cancer sample and matched adjacent normal prostatic tissue was subjected to exome sequencing. The sequenced reads were mapped and compared. Our study was the first to show comparable exome sequencing results between FFPE and corresponding fresh-frozen cancer tissues using SOLiD sequencing. A prior study has been conducted comparing the validity of sequencing of FFPE vs. fresh frozen samples using other NGS platforms. Our validation further proves that FFPE material is a reliable source of material for whole exome sequencing.

  14. Formalin solution and acetone as organic additives in electrodeposition of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, H. M. A.

    2002-07-01

    The effect of different concentrations of 40% (v/v) formalin solution and acetone on the electrowinning and electrorefining of copper from acidified copper sulfate solution under natural convection regime has been studied at different temperatures. The results show that the limiting current density and consequently, the rate of copper electrodeposition decreases with increasing the mole fraction of the co-solvent due to the changes in the physicochemical properties of the mixture like density, viscosity, dielectric constant and state of solvation. The percentage of inhibition in presence of the co-solvent ranged between 3.6 and 45.5% dependent on the type and mole fraction of the co-solvent, temperature and anode type. A criticism to the effect of oxygen discharge velocity on enhancing the electrodeposition process and its relation with the mass transfer coefficient has been recorded. Thermodynamic parameters and electron dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) of the deposits formed on the cathode surface have been studied to understand the effect of such solvents on the electrodeposition process.

  15. Superresolution Imaging of Clinical Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Breast Cancer with Single Molecule Localization Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Creech, Matthew K; Wang, Jing; Nan, Xiaolin; Gibbs, Summer L

    2017-01-18

    Millions of archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens contain valuable molecular insight into healthy and diseased states persevered in their native ultrastructure. To diagnose and treat diseases in tissue on the nanoscopic scale, pathology traditionally employs electron microscopy (EM), but this platform has significant limitations including cost and painstaking sample preparation. The invention of single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) optically overcame the diffraction limit of light to resolve fluorescently labeled molecules on the nanoscale, leading to many exciting biological discoveries. However, applications of SMLM in preserved tissues has been limited. Through adaptation of the immunofluorescence workflow on FFPE sections milled at histological thickness, cellular architecture can now be visualized on the nanoscale using SMLM including individual mitochondria, undulations in the nuclear lamina, and the HER2 receptor on membrane protrusions in human breast cancer specimens. Using astigmatism imaging, these structures can also be resolved in three dimensions to a depth of ~800 nm. These results demonstrate the utility of SMLM in efficiently uncovering ultrastructural information of archived clinical samples, which may offer molecular insights into the physiopathology of tissues to assist in disease diagnosis and treatment using conventional sample preparation methods.

  16. Extraction of DNA from human embryos after long-term preservation in formalin and Bouin's solutions.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Momoko; Minegishi, Katsura; Komada, Munekazu; Tsuchiya, Maiko; Kameda, Tomomi; Yamada, Shigehito

    2016-05-01

    The "Kyoto Collection of Human Embryos" at Kyoto University was begun in 1961. Although morphological analyses of samples in the Kyoto Collection have been performed, these embryos have been considered difficult to genetically analyze because they have been preserved in formalin or Bouin's solution for 20-50 years. Owing to the recent advances in molecular biology, it has become possible to extract DNA from long-term fixed tissues. The purpose of this study was to extract DNA from wet preparations of human embryo samples after long-term preservation in fixing solution. We optimized the DNA extraction protocol to be suitable for tissues that have been damaged by long-term fixation, including DNA-protein crosslinking damage. Diluting Li2 CO3 with 70% ethanol effectively removed picric acid from samples fixed in Bouin's solution. Additionally, 20.0 mg/mL proteinase was valuable to lyse the long-term fixed samples. The extracted DNA was checked with PCR amplification using several sets of primers and sequence analysis. The PCR products included at least 295- and 838-bp amplicons. These results show that the extracted DNA is applicable for genetic analyses, and indicate that old embryos in the Kyoto Collection should be made available for future studies. The protocol described in this study can successfully extract DNA from old specimens and, with improvements, should be applicable in research aiming to understand the molecular mechanisms of human congenital anomalies.

  17. Molecular Mapping Alzheimer's Disease: MALDI Imaging of Formalin-fixed, Paraffin-embedded Human Hippocampal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Andrea R.; Perry, George; Bethea, Chloe; Castellani, Rudolph J.; Bach, Stephan B.H.

    2016-01-01

    A method for the molecular mapping of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human hippocampal tissue affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) is presented. This approach utilizes imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). The usefulness of this technique in comparing diseased versus nor mal tissue at the molecular level while continuing to maintain topological and morphological integrity is evident in the preliminary findings. The critical correlation of the deparaffination, washing, matrix deposition, and analysis steps in handling the tissue sections and how these steps impact the successful mapping of human hippocampal tissue is clearly demonstrated. By use of this technique we have been able to identify several differences between the hippocampal AD tissue and the control hippocampal tissue. From the observed peptide clip masses we present preliminary identifications of the amyloid-beta peptides known to be prominent in the brains of those with AD. We have obtained high-resolution mass spectra and mass images with 100μm spatial resolution. Future experiments will couple this work with MALDI LIFT experiments to enable top down proteomics of fresh frozen tissue, which is not possible with paraffin-embedded tissues. PMID:27843502

  18. Proteomic analysis of neurons microdissected from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded Alzheimer's disease brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Eleanor S; Nayak, Shruti; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2015-10-21

    The vast majority of human tissue specimens are formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) archival samples, making this type of tissue a potential gold mine for medical research. It is now accepted that proteomics can be done using FFPE tissue and can generate similar results as snap-frozen tissue. However, the current methodology requires a large amount of starting protein, limiting the questions that can be answered in these types of proteomics studies and making cell-type specific proteomics studies difficult. Cell-type specific proteomics has the potential to greatly enhance understanding of cell functioning in both normal and disease states. Therefore, here we describe a new method that allows localized proteomics on individual cell populations isolated from FFPE tissue sections using laser capture microdissection. To demonstrate this technique we microdissected neurons from archived tissue blocks of the temporal cortex from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Using this method we identified over 400 proteins in microdissected neurons; on average 78% that were neuronal and 50% that were associated with Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, this technique is able to provide accurate and meaningful data and has great potential for any future study that wishes to perform localized proteomics using very small amounts of archived FFPE tissue.

  19. Probing focal cortical dysplasia in formalin fixed samples using tissue optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Giordano, Flavio; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Conti, Valerio; Guerrini, Renzo; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2016-03-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is one of most common causes of intractable epilepsy in pediatric population and these are often insensitive to anti-epileptic drugs. FCD is characterized by a disarray in localized regions of the cerebral cortex and abnormal neurons which results them to misfire with incorrect signals. Resective neurosurgery to remove or disconnect the affected parts from the rest of the brain seems to be a viable option to treat FCD. Before neurosurgery the subject could undergo imaging studies including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) scans. On the downside FCD could be elusive in MRI images and may be practically invisible in CT scans. Furthermore, unnecessary removal of normal tissues is to be taken into consideration as this could lead to neurological defects. In this context, optical spectroscopy have been widely investigated as an alternative technique for the detection of abnormal tissues in different organ sites. Disease progression is accompanied by a number of architectural, biochemical and morphological changes. These variations are reflected in the spectral intensity and line shape. Here, in this proof of concept study we propose to investigate the application of tissue optical spectroscopy based on fluorescence excitation at two wavelength 378 and 445 nm coupled along with Raman spectroscopy for the detection of FCD on formalin fixed tissue specimens from pediatric subjects. For fluorescence at both the excitation wavelengths FCD showed a decreased intensity at longer wavelength when compared to normal tissues. Also, differences exist in the Raman spectral profiles of normal and FCD.

  20. Global transcriptome analysis of formalin-fixed prostate cancer specimens identifies biomarkers of disease recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Long, Qi; Xu, Jianpeng; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; Sannigrahi, Soma; Johnson, Brent A.; Zhou, Wei; Gillespie, Theresa; Park, Jong Y.; Nam, Robert K.; Sugar, Linda; Stanimirovic, Aleksandra; Seth, Arun K.; Petros, John A.; Moreno, Carlos S.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer death in American men and there is an unmet need for biomarkers to identify patients with aggressive disease. In an effort to identify biomarkers of recurrence, we performed global RNA sequencing on 106 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) prostatectomy samples from 100 patients at three independent sites, defining a 24-gene signature panel. The 24 genes in this panel function in cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, hypoxia, apoptosis, PI3K signaling, steroid metabolism, translation, chromatin modification and transcription. Sixteen genes have been associated with cancer with five specifically associated with prostate cancer (BTG2, IGFBP3, SIRT1, MXI1 and FDPS). Validation was performed on an independent publicly available dataset of 140 patients, where the new signature panel outperformed markers published previously in terms of predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR). Our work also identified differences in gene expression between Gleason Pattern 4+3 and 3+4 tumors, including several genes involved in the epithelial to mesenchymal transition and developmental pathways. Overall, this study defines a novel biomarker panel that has the potential to improve the clinical management of prostate cancer. PMID:24713434

  1. Complete solubilization of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue may improve proteomic studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shan-Rong; Taylor, Clive R; Fowler, Carol B; Mason, Jeffrey T

    2013-04-01

    Tissue-based proteomic approaches (tissue proteomics) are essential for discovering and evaluating biomarkers for personalized medicine. In any proteomics study, the most critical issue is sample extraction and preparation. This problem is especially difficult when recovering proteins from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. However, improving and standardizing protein extraction from FFPE tissue is a critical need because of the millions of archival FFPE tissues available in tissue banks worldwide. Recent progress in the application of heat-induced antigen retrieval principles for protein extraction from FFPE tissue has resulted in a number of published FFPE tissue proteomics studies. However, there is currently no consensus on the optimal protocol for protein extraction from FFPE tissue or accepted standards for quantitative evaluation of the extracts. Standardization is critical to ensure the accurate evaluation of FFPE protein extracts by proteomic methods such as reverse phase protein arrays, which is now in clinical use. In our view, complete solubilization of FFPE tissue samples is the best way to achieve the goal of standardizing the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues. However, further studies are recommended to develop standardized protein extraction methods to ensure quantitative and qualitative reproducibility in the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues.

  2. Protein extraction from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections: quality evaluation by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shan-Rong; Liu, Cheng; Balgley, Brian M; Lee, Cheng; Taylor, Clive R

    2006-06-01

    A satisfactory protocol of protein extraction has been established based on the heat-induced antigen retrieval (AR) technique widely applied in immunohistochemistry for archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. Based on AR, an initial serial experiment to identify an optimal protocol of heat-induced protein extraction was carried out using FFPE mouse tissues. The optimal protocol for extraction of proteins was then performed on an archival FFPE tissue of human renal carcinoma. FFPE sections were boiled in a retrieval solution of Tris-HCl containing 2% SDS, followed by incubation. Fresh tissue taken from the same case of renal carcinoma was processed for extraction of proteins by a conventional method using radioimmunoprecipitation assay solution, to compare the efficiency of protein extraction from FFPE tissue sections with extraction from fresh tissue. As a control, further sections of the same FFPE sample were processed by the same procedure without heating treatment. Evaluation of the quality of protein extracted from FFPE tissue was done using gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, showing most identified proteins extracted from FFPE tissue sections were overlapped with those extracted from fresh tissue.

  3. MammaPrint molecular diagnostics on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Sapino, Anna; Roepman, Paul; Linn, Sabine C; Snel, Mireille H J; Delahaye, Leonie J M J; van den Akker, Jeroen; Glas, Annuska M; Simon, Iris M; Barth, Neil; de Snoo, Femke A; van 't Veer, Laura J; Molinaro, Luca; Berns, Els M J J; Wesseling, Jelle; Riley, Lee B; Anderson, David; Nguyen, Bichlien; Cox, Charles E

    2014-03-01

    MammaPrint, a prognostic 70-gene profile for early-stage breast cancer, has been available for fresh tissue. Improvements in RNA processing have enabled microarray diagnostics for formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. Here, we describe method optimization, validation, and performance of MammaPrint using analyte from FFPE tissue. Laboratory procedures for enabling the assay to be run on FFPE tissue were determined using 157 samples, and the assay was established using 125 matched FFPE and fresh tissues. Validation of MammaPrint-FFPE, compared with MammaPrint-fresh, was performed on an independent series of matched tissue from five hospitals (n = 211). Reproducibility, repeatability, and precision of the FFPE assay (n = 87) was established for duplicate analysis of the same tumor, interlaboratory performance, 20-day repeat experiments, and repeated analyses over 12 months. FFPE sample processing had a success rate of 97%. The MammaPrint assay using FFPE analyte demonstrated an overall equivalence of 91.5% (95% confidence interval, 86.9% to 94.5%) between the 211 independent matched FFPE and fresh tumor samples. Precision was 97.3%, and repeatability was 97.8%, with highly reproducible results between replicate samples of the same tumor and between two laboratories (concordance, 96%). Thus, with 580 tumor samples, MammaPrint was successfully translated to FFPE tissue. The assay has high precision and reproducibility, and FFPE results are substantially equivalent to results derived from fresh tissue.

  4. Comprehensive tissue processing strategy for quantitative proteomics of formalin-fixed multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Ly, Linda; Barnett, Michael H; Zheng, Yuan Z; Gulati, Twishi; Prineas, John W; Crossett, Ben

    2011-10-07

    Formalin-fixed (FF) autopsy tissue comprises the bulk of existing Multiple Sclerosis (MSc) pathology archives, providing a rich pool of material for biomarker discovery and disease characterization. Here, we present the development of a heat-induced extraction protocol for the proteomic analysis of FF brain tissue, its application to the study of lesion remyelination and its failure in MSc. A 4-round extraction strategy was optimized using FF tissue leading to a 35% increase in the number of proteins identified compared to a single extraction; and a 65% increase in proteins identified with ≥4 peptides. Histological staining of sections with oil red O and luxol fast blue-periodic acid Schiff, required to characterize MSc lesions was found to have minimal effect on LC-MS/MS. The application of the optimized protocol to chronic demyelinated and remyelinated FF MSc lesions and the adjacent periplaque white matter, isolated through laser guided manual dissection from 3 patients, identified 428 unique proteins (0.2% FDR) using LC-MS/MS. Comparison of the lesion types using iTRAQ and 2-D LC-MS/MS revealed 82 differentially expressed proteins. Protein quantitation by iTRAQ and spectral counting was well-correlated (r(s)= 0.7653; p < 10(-30)). The data generated from this work illustrates the scope of the methodology and provides insights into the pathogenesis of MSc and remyelination.

  5. Exome Enrichment and SOLiD Sequencing of Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE) Prostate Cancer Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Roopika; Deng, Mario; Boehm, Diana; Braun, Martin; Fend, Falko; Boehm, Detlef; Biskup, Saskia; Perner, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized cancer research allowing the comprehensive study of cancer using high throughput deep sequencing methodologies. These methods detect genomic alterations, nucleotide substitutions, insertions, deletions and copy number alterations. SOLiD (Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection, Life Technologies) is a promising technology generating billions of 50 bp sequencing reads. This robust technique, successfully applied in gene identification, might be helpful in detecting novel genes associated with cancer initiation and progression using formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue. This study’s aim was to compare the validity of whole exome sequencing of fresh-frozen vs. FFPE tumor tissue by normalization to normal prostatic FFPE tissue, obtained from the same patient. One primary fresh-frozen sample, corresponding FFPE prostate cancer sample and matched adjacent normal prostatic tissue was subjected to exome sequencing. The sequenced reads were mapped and compared. Our study was the first to show comparable exome sequencing results between FFPE and corresponding fresh-frozen cancer tissues using SOLiD sequencing. A prior study has been conducted comparing the validity of sequencing of FFPE vs. fresh frozen samples using other NGS platforms. Our validation further proves that FFPE material is a reliable source of material for whole exome sequencing. PMID:22942743

  6. CytoLyt® fixation and decalcification pretreatments alter antigenicity in normal tissues compared with standard formalin fixation.

    PubMed

    Gruchy, Jennette R; Barnes, Penny J; Dakin Haché, Kelly A

    2015-04-01

    Immunohistochemistry is used on cell blocks constructed from cytopathology samples fixed in methanol-based fixatives, such as CytoLyt (Cytyc Corp), and on surgical pathology tissues exposed to decalcifying agents, often without technical validation. We evaluated a panel of commonly utilized antibodies in normal tissues exposed to differing preanalytic conditions as follows: CytoLyt fixation, formalin fixation followed by exposure to decalcifying agents (Leica Decalcifier I-10% formic acid or Leica Decalcifier II-5% hydrochloric acid), or standard formalin fixation. Altered expression was observed with several antibodies compared with standard formalin fixation. Specifically, there was absent or near absent expression of thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), D2-40, and CD20 in CytoLyt-fixed tissues, whereas reduced expression was observed for p63, estrogen receptor, S100 protein, CD3, calretinin, chromogranin, and synaptophysin. Absent or near absent expression of TTF-1 was also observed with exposure to hydrochloric acid, whereas reduced expression was observed for CK5/6, CK7, p63, estrogen receptor, leukocyte common antigen, CD3, CD20, and synaptophysin. Exposure to formic acid had less impact with reduced expression observed for only 3 antibodies (CK8/18, CK7, and TTF-1). The results of this study demonstrate the need to validate immunohistochemical protocols on control tissue treated in the same manner as test tissue, including CytoLyt fixation and exposure of tissue to decalcifying agents.

  7. Acute toxicities of potassium permanganate, formalin, and Lugol's iodine solution to a marine ciliate, Pleuronema coronatum (ciliophora, scuticociliatida)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yantao, Qiu; Weibo, Song

    2002-10-01

    Acute toxicities of potassium permanganate, formalin, and Lugol’s iodine solution to a commonly occurred marine ciliate Pleuronema coronatum (Ciliophora, Scuticociliatida) were measured. Linear regression analysis of the results highlighted the close relationships between doses of the medicines and mortalities of the organisms, thus providing a capability to predict toxicity effects from the dose. Toxic effects of the medicines on the ciliates were described in the present paper, and the median lethal concentrations (LC50 values) were given. Results of measurements indicated that 2 h-LC50 and 12 h-LC50 values of formalin on P. coronatum were 59.00×10-6 and 43.57×10-6, while those of Lugol’s solutions were 90.13 and 67.84×10-6 respectively. The tolerance of P. coronatum to formalin is apparently lower than that to Lugol’s iodine solution and potassium permanganate is a suitable medicine to kill ciliates in short time.

  8. Identification of N,N-dimethylamphetamine formed by methylation of methamphetamine in formalin-fixed liver tissue by multistage mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shakleya, Diaa M; Kraner, James C; Kaplan, James A; Gannett, Peter M; Callery, Patrick S

    2006-03-10

    Methamphetamine is methylated in the presence of unbuffered formalin solutions within hours at room temperature. The product, N,N-dimethylamphetamine, is also found in human liver exposed to methamphetamine followed by incubation with formalin. In the present study, a direct mass spectrometric method was developed to identify N,N-dimethylamphetamine in human liver before and after treatment with formalin. Human liver samples were obtained from four deaths that were investigated by the West Virginia Office of Chief Medical Examiner. Full toxicological analysis was conducted on samples from the decedents and methamphetamine was among the positive findings in each case. The method used to expose liver tissue to formaldehyde involved treating a small piece of liver from each case with formalin solution (20% v/v) for 24 h at room temperature. The formalin treated tissues were homogenized and the resulting suspension was sonicated for 5 min, and then centrifuged. Supernatant aliquots were directly analyzed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry without chromatographic isolation. Positive ion multistage mass spectra recorded in MS, MS/MS and MS/MS/MS (MS3) modes were used to confirm the presence of N,N-dimethylamphetamine and methamphetamine in the mixture. Liver tissue not treated with formalin did not contain a detectable level of N,N-dimethylamphetamine. Decreases in methamphetamine concentrations in liver tissue resulting from treatment with formalin were measured using deuterium-labeled methamphetamine as internal standard. The method can be completed in less than 2 h on thawed tissue. The results suggest that the process of fixing tissues with formalin may lead to false negative findings for methamphetamine.

  9. The validation of Calophyllum brasiliense ("guanandi") uses in Brazilian traditional medicine as analgesic by in vivo antinociceptive evaluation and its chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Klein-Júnior, Luiz Carlos; Zambiasi, Daniele; Salgado, Giovana Rocha; Delle Monache, Franco; Filho, Valdir Cechinel; de Campos Buzzi, Fátima

    2017-04-08

    Calophyllum brasiliense is used as anti-inflammatory and analgesic in Brazilian traditional medicine. Thus, the main purpose of this study is to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of the chloroform fraction of C. brasiliense (CFCB) roots and to investigate its main mechanism of action. The antinociceptive effect of CFCB was evaluated in mice using acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin-induced paw licking, and hot-plate tests and capsaicin- and glutamate-induced nociception. Brasiliensic acid and 1,2-dimethoxyxanthone were isolated and evaluated in writhing test. The amount of 1,2-dimethoxyxanthone was determined in the fraction by UPLC-DAD. CFCB inhibited abdominal constrictions induced by acetic acid up to 97%, with an ID50 of 9.4 mg/kg (i.p.) and 131.8 mg/kg (p.o.). In the formalin test, CFCB impaired paw licking with an ID50 of 26.3 mg/kg for the first phase and 27.5 mg/kg for the second phase (i.p.). The painful response evoked by capsaicin and glutamate was significantly reduced (ID50 26.7 and 47.9 mg/kg, i.p.). The latency time was increased up to 76% at 60 mg/kg (i.p.) in the hot-plate test. 1,2-Dimethoxyxanthone was almost three times more potent (ID50 27.6 μmol/kg, i.p.) than brasiliensic acid (72.0 μmol/kg) in acetic acid-induced writhing test. The amount of the xanthone was estimated as 92.5 mg/g in the extract. CFCB inhibited the nociceptive response associated to several agents. TRPV1 channels play an important role in the mechanism of action of the fraction. In addition, 1,2-dimethoxyxanthone largely contributes to the antinociceptive effect of CFCB.

  10. Antinociceptive effect of Encholirium spectabile: A Bromeliaceae from the Brazilian caatinga biome

    PubMed Central

    de Lima-Saraiva, Sarah Raquel Gomes; Silva, Juliane Cabral; Branco, Carla Rodrigues Cardoso; Branco, Alexsandro; Cavalcanti Amorim, Elba Lúcia; da Silva Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes

    2014-01-01

    Background: Encholirium spectabile is a species found in outcrops rocky throughout the Brazilian Caatinga. Objective: This study was carried out to evaluate the antinociceptive effects of ethanolic extract of the leaves from E. spectabile (Es-EtOH) in mice using chemical and thermal models of nociception. Material and Methods: HPLC was used to determine the fingerprint chromatogram. The Es-EtOH was examined for its antinociceptive activity at the doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg intraperitoneal (i.p.). The evaluation of antinociceptive activity was carried out by the acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin and hot plate tests in mice. Rota-rod test was used for the evaluation of motor coordination. Results: In the acetic acid-induced writhing test, the Es-EtOH (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the number of writhings by 68.59, 79.33 and 65.28%, respectively. Additionally, Es-EtOH (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased by 34.14, 52.61 and 60.97% the paw licking time in the first phase, as well as 89.56, 79.90 and 96.71% in the second phase of the formalin test, respectively. Es-EtOH also showed effect in the hot plate test, since increased the latency time at dose of 100 mg/kg after 60 minutes. In addition, Es-EtOH did not impair motor coordination. The presence of phenolic compounds in the extract was confirmed using HPLC. These results indicate that Es-EtOH has antinociceptive activity, probably of peripheral origin. The mechanism involved is not completely understood but, at least in part there is the participation of opioid receptors. PMID:25298687

  11. Palmitic acid but not palmitoleic acid induces insulin resistance in a human endothelial cell line by decreasing SERCA pump expression.

    PubMed

    Gustavo Vazquez-Jimenez, J; Chavez-Reyes, Jesus; Romero-Garcia, Tatiana; Zarain-Herzberg, Angel; Valdes-Flores, Jesus; Manuel Galindo-Rosales, J; Rueda, Angelica; Guerrero-Hernandez, Agustin; Olivares-Reyes, J Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Palmitic acid is a negative regulator of insulin activity. At the molecular level, palmitic acid reduces insulin stimulated Akt Ser473 phosphorylation. Interestingly, we have found that incubation with palmitic acid of human umbilical vein endothelial cells induced a biphasic effect, an initial transient elevation followed by a sustained reduction of SERCA pump protein levels. However, palmitic acid produced a sustained inhibition of SERCA pump ATPase activity. Insulin resistance state appeared before there was a significant reduction of SERCA2 expression. The mechanism by which palmitic acid impairs insulin signaling may involve endoplasmic reticulum stress, because this fatty acid induced activation of both PERK, an ER stress marker, and JNK, a kinase associated with insulin resistance. None of these effects were observed by incubating HUVEC-CS cells with palmitoleic acid. Importantly, SERCA2 overexpression decreased the palmitic acid-induced insulin resistance state. All these results suggest that SERCA pump might be the target of palmitic acid to induce the insulin resistance state in a human vascular endothelial cell line. Importantly, these data suggest that HUVEC-CS cells respond to palmitic acid-exposure with a compensatory overexpression of SERCA pump within the first hour, which eventually fades out and insulin resistance prevails.

  12. Allicin Alleviates Inflammation of Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid-Induced Rats and Suppresses P38 and JNK Pathways in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen; Lun, Weijian; Zhao, Xinmei; Lei, Shan; Guo, Yandong; Ma, Jiayi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Allicin has anti-inflammatory, antioxidative and proapoptotic properties. Aims. To evaluate the effects and investigate the mechanism of allicin on trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced colitis, specifically with mesalazine or sulfasalazine. Methods. 80 rats were divided equally into 8 groups: control; trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid; allicin prevention; allicin; mesalazine; sulfasalazine; allicin + sulfasalazine, and mesalazine + allicin. Systemic and colonic inflammation parameters were analysed. In addition, protein and culture medium of Caco-2 cells treated with various concentrations of IL-1β or allicin were collected for investigation of IL-8, NF-κB p65 P38, ERK, and JNK. One-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis H test were used for parametric and nonparametric tests, respectively. Results. Allicin reduced the body weight loss of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced rats, histological score, serum TNF-α and IL-1β levels, and colon IL-1β mRNA level and induced serum IL-4 level, particularly in combination with mesalazine. In addition, 1 ng/mL IL-1β stimulated the P38, ERK, and JNK pathways, whereas pretreatment with allicin depressed this phenomenon, except for the ERK pathway. Conclusions. The inflammation induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid is mitigated significantly by allicin treatment, particularly combined with mesalazine. Allicin inhibits the P38 and JNK pathways and the expression of NF-κB which explained the potential anti-inflammatory mechanisms of allicin. PMID:25729217

  13. Protective effect of Agave americana Linn. leaf extract in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mannasaheb, Basheerahmed A.A.; Kulkarni, Preeti V.; Sangreskopp, Mashood Ahmed; Savant, Chetan; Mohan, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Natural plants always provide core compounds for new drug development. In the present life and food style, inflammatory bowel disease has become common and needs a lead compound for its drug development. Aim: To evaluate the effect of Agave americana Linn. leaf extract in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats based on its traditional anti-inflammatory use. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were pretreated with A. americana leaf extract in the dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg p.o. daily for 7 days. On 8th day, 2 ml of 4% v/v acetic acid in saline was instilled into rats’ rectum. Prednisolone was used as standard drug and it was administered on the day of acetic acid instillation and continued for 3 days. Extract treatment was continued till 11th day. Body weight, ulcer score, colonic muscle contraction, antioxidant activity and histopathology were studied. Statistical analysis was performed using Parametric one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's posttest. Results: A. americana have retained total body weight significantly (P < 0.01) and decreased colon weight/length ratio. Extract have shown a significant decrease (P < 0.001) in ulcer scores, myeloperoxidase, lipid peroxidase activity. Further, extract have shown significant improvement in colonic muscle contraction, histopathology of colon etc., which is comparable with standard drug. Conclusion: A. americana possess protective effect against acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. PMID:26730148

  14. Nicotinic acid induces secretion of prostaglandin D2 in human macrophages: an in vitro model of the niacin flush.

    PubMed

    Meyers, C Daniel; Liu, Paul; Kamanna, Vaijinath S; Kashyap, Moti L

    2007-06-01

    Nicotinic acid is a safe, broad-spectrum lipid agent shown to prevent cardiovascular disease, yet its widespread use is limited by the prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) mediated niacin flush. Previous research suggests that nicotinic acid-induced PGD2 secretion is mediated by the skin, but the exact cell type remains unclear. We hypothesized that macrophages are a source of nicotinic acid-induced PGD2 secretion and performed a series of experiments to confirm this. Nicotinic acid (0.1-3 mM) induced PGD2 secretion in cultured human macrophages, but not monocytes or endothelial cells. The PGD2 secretion was dependent on the concentration of nicotinic acid and the time of exposure. Nicotinuric acid, but not nicotinamide, also induced PGD2 secretion. Pre-incubation of the cells with aspirin (100 microM) entirely prevented the nicotinic acid effects on PGD2 secretion. The PGD2 secreting effects of nicotinic acid were additive to the effects of the calcium ionophore A23187 (6 microM), but were independent of extra cellular calcium. These findings, combined with recent in vivo work, provide evidence that macrophages play a significant role in mediating the niacin flush and may lead to better strategies to eliminate this limiting side effect.

  15. Oral administration of omega-7 palmitoleic acid induces satiety and the release of appetite-related hormones in male rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Hong; Takeo, Jiro; Katayama, Masashi

    2013-06-01

    We have analyzed the effect of palmitoleic acid on short-term food intake in male rats. Administration of omega-7 palmitoleic acid by oral gavage significantly decreased food intake compared to palmitic acid, omega-9 oleic acid, or a vehicle control. Palmitoleic acid exhibited a dose-dependent effect in this context and did not cause general malaise. A triglyceride form of palmitoleate also decreased food intake, whereas olive oil, which is rich in oleic acid, did not. Palmitoleic acid accumulated within the small intestine in a dose-dependent fashion and elevated levels of the satiety hormone cholecystokinin (CCK). Both protein and mRNA levels of CCK were affected in this context. The suppression of food intake by palmitoleic acid was attenuated by intravenous injection of devazepide, a selective peripheral CCK receptor antagonist. Palmitoleic acid did not alter the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) target genes, and a PPARα antagonist did not affect palmitoleic acid-induced satiety. This suggests that the PPARα pathway might not be involved in suppressing food intake in response to palmitoleic acid. We have shown that orally administered palmitoleic acid induced satiety, enhanced the release of satiety hormones in rats.

  16. Evidence for the involvement of GPR40 and NADPH oxidase in palmitic acid-induced superoxide production and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Graciano, Maria Fernanda; Valle, Maíra Mello; Curi, Rui; Carpinelli, Angelo Rafael

    2013-01-01

    G protein coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase complex have been shown to be involved in the fatty acid amplification of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). The effect of palmitic acid on superoxide production and insulin secretion by INS-1E cells and the possible involvement of GPR40 and NADPH oxidase in these processes were examined in this study. Cells were incubated during 1 h with palmitic acid in low and high glucose concentrations, a GPR40 agonist (GW9508) and inhibitors of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium, DPI) and PKC (calphostin C). GW9508 induced superoxide production at 2.8 and 5.6 mM glucose concentrations and stimulated insulin secretion at 16.7 mM glucose concentration involving both PKC and NADPH oxidase activation. Palmitic acid induced superoxide production through NADPH oxidase and GPR40-dependent pathways and the stimulation of insulin secretion in the presence of a high glucose concentration was reduced by knockdown of GPR40 using siRNA. Our results suggest that palmitic acid induces superoxide production and potentiates GSIS through NADPH oxidase and GPR40 pathways in pancreatic ? cells.

  17. Effect of capsaicin and cimetidine on the healing of acetic acid induced gastric ulceration in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, J Y; Teng, C H; Chen, F C

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Capsaicin protects the gastric mucosa against experimental injury while capsaicin desensitisation reduces the rate of gastric ulcer healing. The effect of exogenous capsaicin on gastric ulcer healing has not to date been reported. AIM/METHOD: To investigate the effect of capsaicin, cimetidine, and in combination, given intragastrically in the healing of acetic acid induced chronic gastric ulcer in the rat. Treatment started immediately after ulcer induction. RESULTS: At the end of one week, capsaicin, cimetidine, and in combination increased ulcer healing but the effect of combined treatment was less than that of capsaicin alone. In an in vivo gastric chamber preparation, capsaicin increased, while cimetidine decreased, gastric mucosal blood flow measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. A dose response effect in reduction of gastric mucosal blood flow could be demonstrated for cimetidine. The gastric hyperaemic effect of capsaicin was blunted by prior administration of cimetidine. In contrast, capsaicin had no effect on gastric acid secretion and its addition to cimetidine did not affect the acid suppressant effect of the latter. CONCLUSIONS: Capsaicin promotes the healing of acetic acid induced gastric ulcer, probably by its gastric hyperaemic effect. Although cimetidine also promotes ulcer healing due to its inhibitory effect on acid secretion it may have an antagonistic effect on the gastric ulcer healing effect of capsaicin by virtue of inhibition of gastric hyperaemia. PMID:8984019

  18. Quantification of HER2 by Targeted Mass Spectrometry in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) Breast Cancer Tissues*

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Carine; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Lamerz, Jens; Kux van Geijtenbeek, Sabine; McKee, Thomas A.; Venturi, Miro; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Hochstrasser, Denis; Cutler, Paul; Lescuyer, Pierre; Ducret, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The ability to accurately quantify proteins in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues using targeted mass spectrometry opens exciting perspectives for biomarker discovery. We have developed and evaluated a selectedreaction monitoring assay for the human receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 (HER2) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded breast tumors. Peptide candidates were identified using an untargeted mass spectrometry approach in relevant cell lines. A multiplexed assay was developed for the six best candidate peptides and evaluated for linearity, precision and lower limit of quantification. Results showed a linear response over a calibration range of 0.012 to 100 fmol on column (R2: 0.99–1.00).The lower limit of quantification was 0.155 fmol on column for all peptides evaluated. The six HER2 peptides were quantified by selected reaction monitoring in a cohort of 40 archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues from women with invasive breast carcinomas, which showed different levels of HER2 gene amplification as assessed by standard methods used in clinical pathology. The amounts of the six HER2 peptides were highly and significantly correlated with each other, indicating that peptide levels can be used as surrogates of protein amounts in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. After normalization for sample size, selected reaction monitoring peptide measurements were able to correctly predict 90% of cases based on HER2 amplification as defined by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists. In conclusion, the developed assay showed good analytical performance and a high agreement with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization data. This study demonstrated that selected reaction monitoring allows to accurately quantify protein expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues and represents therefore a powerful approach for biomarker discovery studies. The untargeted mass spectrometry

  19. Role of the histamine system in nefopam-induced antinociception in mice.

    PubMed

    Girard, Philippe; Pansart, Yannick; Coppé, Marie-Claude; Verniers, Danielle; Gillardin, Jean-Marie

    2004-10-25

    The present study explored the role of the histaminergic system in nefopam analgesia based on the structural relationship between nefopam and diphenhydramine. In vitro binding assays revealed that nefopam possesses moderate affinity for histamine H1 and H2 receptor subtypes, with IC50 of 0.8 and 6.9 microM, respectively, but no affinity for histamine H(3) receptor subtype until 100 microM. Subcutaneous nefopam administration dose-dependently inhibited pain in acetic acid-induced writhing (1-30 mg/kg) and formalin (1-10 mg/kg) tests in the mouse. Pretreatment with the histamine-depleting agent alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (alpha-FMH, 50 mg/kg), the histamine H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine (3 or 10 mg/kg), or the histamine H2 receptor antagonists cimetidine (100 mg/kg) and zolantidine (10 or 30 mg/kg) did not significantly modify nefopam antinociception in both tests. The histamine H3 receptor agonist R(-)alpha-methylhistamine (RAMH, 10 mg/kg) did not significantly modify the nefopam analgesic activity in the writhing test. At 25 mg/kg, RAMH inhibited nefopam antinociception at 3 mg/kg, but not at 10 mg/kg in the formalin test. However, pretreatment with the histamine H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide (25 mg/kg) inhibited nefopam antinociception in the writhing test, but not in the formalin test. In conclusion, nefopam analgesic activity is not mediated by histamine H1 or H2 receptors, but can be slightly modulated by histamine H3 receptors in mouse pain tests.

  20. Highly multiplexed single-cell analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancer tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gerdes, Michael J.; Sevinsky, Christopher J.; Sood, Anup; Adak, Sudeshna; Bello, Musodiq O.; Bordwell, Alexander; Can, Ali; Corwin, Alex; Dinn, Sean; Filkins, Robert J.; Hollman, Denise; Kamath, Vidya; Kaanumalle, Sireesha; Kenny, Kevin; Larsen, Melinda; Lazare, Michael; Lowes, Christina; McCulloch, Colin C.; McDonough, Elizabeth; Pang, Zhengyu; Rittscher, Jens; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Sarachan, Brion D.; Seel, Maximilian L.; Seppo, Antti; Shaikh, Kashan; Sui, Yunxia; Zhang, Jingyu; Ginty, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Limitations on the number of unique protein and DNA molecules that can be characterized microscopically in a single tissue specimen impede advances in understanding the biological basis of health and disease. Here we present a multiplexed fluorescence microscopy method (MxIF) for quantitative, single-cell, and subcellular characterization of multiple analytes in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. Chemical inactivation of fluorescent dyes after each image acquisition round allows reuse of common dyes in iterative staining and imaging cycles. The mild inactivation chemistry is compatible with total and phosphoprotein detection, as well as DNA FISH. Accurate computational registration of sequential images is achieved by aligning nuclear counterstain-derived fiducial points. Individual cells, plasma membrane, cytoplasm, nucleus, tumor, and stromal regions are segmented to achieve cellular and subcellular quantification of multiplexed targets. In a comparison of pathologist scoring of diaminobenzidine staining of serial sections and automated MxIF scoring of a single section, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, estrogen receptor, p53, and androgen receptor staining by diaminobenzidine and MxIF methods yielded similar results. Single-cell staining patterns of 61 protein antigens by MxIF in 747 colorectal cancer subjects reveals extensive tumor heterogeneity, and cluster analysis of divergent signaling through ERK1/2, S6 kinase 1, and 4E binding protein 1 provides insights into the spatial organization of mechanistic target of rapamycin and MAPK signal transduction. Our results suggest MxIF should be broadly applicable to problems in the fields of basic biological research, drug discovery and development, and clinical diagnostics. PMID:23818604

  1. PCR for the Diagnosis of Abdominal Angiostrongyliasis in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Human Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Rubens; da Silva, Ana Cristina Aramburú; Müller, Carla Aristonara; Alves, Silvana Lunardini; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; Fornari, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    To date the diagnosis of abdominal angiostrongyliasis (AA) depends on the histological identification of Angiostrongylus costaricensis (AC) in surgical specimens. However, microscopic evaluation is time consuming and often fails in identifying the parasite. We tested whether PCR might help in the diagnosis of AA by identifying parasite DNA in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. We used primers based on DNA from Angiostrongilus cantonensis. Four groups of FFPE intestinal tissue were tested: (1) confirmed cases (n = 20), in which AC structures were present in the target tissue; (2) presumptive cases (n = 20), containing changes secondary to AC infection in the absence of AC structures; (3) negative controls (n = 3), consisting of normal colonic tissue; and (4) tissue affected by other parasitoses (n = 7), including strongyloidiasis, ascaridiasis, schistosomiasis, and enterobiasis. Most lesions of confirmed cases were located in small and/or large bowel (90%), as compared with presumptive cases, in which 70% of lesions were in appendix (P = 0.0002). When confronted with cases of other parasitoses, PCR showed sensitivity of 55%, specificity of 100% and positive predictive value of 100%. In presumptive cases PCR was positive in 4 (20%). All specimens from negative controls and other parasitoses were negative. In conclusion, the PCR technique showed intermediate sensitivity and optimal specificity, being clinically relevant when positive for abdominal angiostrongyliasis. It allowed a 20% gain in diagnosis of presumptive cases. PCR might help in the diagnosis of abdominal angiostrongyliasis, particularly when the pathologists are not experienced with such disease. PMID:24705328

  2. Regional T1 relaxation time constants in Ex vivo human brain: Longitudinal effects of formalin exposure

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Mekala R.; Shu, Yunhong; Lesnick, Timothy G.; Jack, Clifford R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Relaxation time constants are useful as markers of tissue properties. Imaging ex vivo tissue is done for research purposes; however, T1 relaxation time constants are altered by tissue fixation in a time‐dependent manner. This study investigates regional changes in T1 relaxation time constants in ex vivo brain tissue over 6 months of fixation. Methods Five ex vivo human brain hemispheres in 10% formalin were scanned over 6 months. Mean T1 relaxation time constants were measured in regions of interest (ROIs) representing gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) regions and analyzed as a function of fixation time. Results Cortical GM ROIs had longer T1 relaxation time constants than WM ROIs; the thalamus had T1 relaxation time constants similar to those of WM ROIs. T1 relaxation time constants showed rapid shortening within the first 6 weeks after fixation followed by a slower rate of decline. Conclusion Both GM and WM T1 relaxation time constants of fixed brain tissue show rapid decline within the first 6 weeks after autopsy and slow by 6 months. This information is useful for optimizing MR imaging acquisition parameters according to fixation time for ex vivo brain imaging studies. Magn Reson Med 77:774–778, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:26888162

  3. Unmasking of complements using proteinase-K in formalin fixed paraffin embedded renal biopsies.

    PubMed

    Nada, R; Kumar, A; Kumar, V G; Gupta, K L; Joshi, K

    2016-01-01

    Renal biopsy interpretation requires histopathology, direct immunofluorescence (DIF) and electron microscopy. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPE) sent for light microscopy can be used for DIF after antigen retrieval. However, complement staining has not been satisfactory. We standardized DIF using proteinase-K for antigen retrieval in FFPE renal biopsies. A pilot study was conducted on known cases of membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN), membranoproliferative type-1 (MPGN-1), immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN), and anti-glomerular basement disease (anti-GBM). Immunofluorescence panel included fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugated IgG, IgA, IgM, complements (C3 and C1q), light chains (kappa, lambda) and fibrinogen antibodies. After standardization of the technique, 75 renal biopsies and 43 autopsies cases were stained. Out of 43 autopsy cases, immune-complex mediated glomerulonephritis (GN) was confirmed in 18 cases (Lupus nephritis-11, IgAN-6, MGN-1), complement-mediated dense deposit disease (DDD-1) and monoclonal diseases in 4 cases (amyloidosis-3, cast nephropathy-1). Immune-mediated injury was excluded in 17 cases (focal segmental glomerulosclerosis -3, crescentic GN-6 [pauci-immune-3, anti-GBM-3], thrombotic microangiopathy-5, atherosclerosis-3). Renal biopsies (n-75) where inadequate or no frozen sample was available; this technique classified 52 mesangiocapillary pattern as MPGN type-1-46, DDD-2 and (C3GN-4). Others were diagnosed as IgAN-3, lupus nephritis-2, MGN-4, diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (DPGN)-1, Non-IC crescentic GN-1, monoclonal diseases-3. In nine cases, DIF on FFPE tissue could not help in making diagnosis. Proteinase-K enzymatic digestion of FFPE renal biopsies can unmask complements (both C3 and C1q) in immune-complexes mediated and complement-mediated diseases. This method showed good results on autopsy tissues archived for as long as 15 years.

  4. THE COMBINED EFFECTS OF FORMALIN FIXATION AND INDIVIDUAL STEPS IN TISSUE PROCESSING ON IMMUNO-RECOGNITION

    PubMed Central

    Otali, Dennis; Stockard, Cecil R.; Oelschlager, Denise K.; Wan, Wen; Manne, Upender; Watts, Stephen A.; Grizzle, William E.

    2010-01-01

    It is accepted that the aldehyde-based fixation of cells can affect the immunodetection of antigens; however, the effects of tissue processing on immunodetection have not been analyzed systematically. We therefore investigated the effects of aldehyde-based fixation and the individual steps of tissue processing on immunohistochemical detection of specific antigens. DU145 (prostate) and SKOV3 (ovarian) cancer cell lines were cultured as monolayers on microscope slides. The immunohistochemical detection of Ki67/MIB-1 and PCNA was evaluated after various times of fixation in 10% neutral-buffered formalin (NBF) plus after each of the individual cumulative steps of tissue processing. The effect of antigen retrieval (AR) was evaluated concomitantly as an additional variable. Our results indicate that, in addition to fixation, each of the different steps in tissue processing has effects on immunorecognition of the epitopes recognized by these antibodies. The extensive dehydration through ethanols to absolute ethanol had only modest effects except for the detection of Ki67/MIB-1 in SKOV-3 cells where the effect was stronger. In general, however, the establishment of a hydrophobic environment by xylene resulted in the greatest decrease in immunorecognition. Antigen retrieval was able to compensate for most, but not all of the losses in staining following fixation and exposure to xylene; however, AR gave very consistent results for most steps of tissue processing, suggesting that AR should also be used in staining for PCNA. The cellular variations that were noted indicate that the effects of fixation and other steps of tissue processing may depend upon how antigens are packaged by specific cells. PMID:19886759

  5. Formalin Inactivation of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Vaccine Alters the Antigenicity and Immunogenicity of a Neutralization Epitope in Envelope Protein Domain III

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yi-Chin; Chiu, Hsien-Chung; Chen, Li-Kuang; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.; Chiou, Shyan-Song

    2015-01-01

    Formalin-inactivated Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccines are widely available, but the effects of formalin inactivation on the antigenic structure of JEV and the profile of antibodies elicited after vaccination are not well understood. We used a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to map the antigenic structure of live JEV virus, untreated control virus (UCV), formalin-inactivated commercial vaccine (FICV), and formalin-inactivated virus (FIV). The binding activity of T16 MAb against Nakayama-derived FICV and several strains of FIV was significantly lower compared to live virus and UCV. T16 MAb, a weakly neutralizing JEV serocomplex antibody, was found to inhibit JEV infection at the post-attachment step. The T16 epitope was mapped to amino acids 329, 331, and 389 within domain III (EDIII) of the envelope (E) glycoprotein. When we explored the effect of formalin inactivation on the immunogenicity of JEV, we found that Nakayama-derived FICV, FIV, and UCV all exhibited similar immunogenicity in a mouse model, inducing anti-JEV and anti-EDII 101/106/107 epitope-specific antibodies. However, the EDIII 329/331/389 epitope-specific IgG antibody and neutralizing antibody titers were significantly lower for FICV-immunized and FIV-immunized mouse serum than for UCV-immunized. Formalin inactivation seems to alter the antigenic structure of the E protein, which may reduce the potency of commercially available JEV vaccines. Virus inactivation by H2O2, but not by UV or by short-duration and higher temperature formalin treatment, is able to maintain the antigenic structure of the JEV E protein. Thus, an alternative inactivation method, such as H2O2, which is able to maintain the integrity of the E protein may be essential to improving the potency of inactivated JEV vaccines. PMID:26495991

  6. Yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death can occur without cytochrome c release which requires metacaspase YCA1.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Bobba, Antonella; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2010-01-04

    To investigate the role of cytochrome c (cyt c) release in yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death (AA-PCD), wild type (wt) and cells lacking metacaspase (Deltayca1), cytochrome c (Deltacyc1,7) and both (Deltacyc1,7Deltayca1) were compared for AA-PCD occurrence, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production and caspase activity. AA-PCD occurs in Deltacyc1,7 and Deltacyc1,7Deltayca1 cells slower than in wt, but similar to that in Deltayca1 cells, in which no cytochrome c release occurs. Both H(2)O(2) production and caspase activation occur in these cells with early and extra-activation in Deltacyc1,7 cells. We conclude that alternative death pathways can be activated in yeast AA-PCD, one dependent on cyt c release, which requires YCA1, and the other(s) independent on it.

  7. Combinatorial localized dissolution analysis: Application to acid-induced dissolution of dental enamel and the effect of surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Parker, Alexander S; Al Botros, Rehab; Kinnear, Sophie L; Snowden, Michael E; McKelvey, Kim; Ashcroft, Alexander T; Carvell, Mel; Joiner, Andrew; Peruffo, Massimo; Philpotts, Carol; Unwin, Patrick R

    2016-08-15

    A combination of scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to quantitatively study the acid-induced dissolution of dental enamel. A micron-scale liquid meniscus formed at the end of a dual barrelled pipette, which constitutes the SECCM probe, is brought into contact with the enamel surface for a defined period. Dissolution occurs at the interface of the meniscus and the enamel surface, under conditions of well-defined mass transport, creating etch pits that are then analysed via AFM. This technique is applied to bovine dental enamel, and the effect of various treatments of the enamel surface on acid dissolution (1mM HNO3) is studied. The treatments investigated are zinc ions, fluoride ions and the two combined. A finite element method (FEM) simulation of SECCM mass transport and interfacial reactivity, allows the intrinsic rate constant for acid-induced dissolution to be quantitatively determined. The dissolution of enamel, in terms of Ca(2+) flux ( [Formula: see text] ), is first order with respect to the interfacial proton concentration and given by the following rate law: [Formula: see text] , with k0=0.099±0.008cms(-1). Treating the enamel with either fluoride or zinc ions slows the dissolution rate, although in this model system the partly protective barrier only extends around 10-20nm into the enamel surface, so that after a period of a few seconds dissolution of modified surfaces tends towards that of native enamel. A combination of both treatments exhibits the greatest protection to the enamel surface, but the effect is again transient.

  8. Involvement of cyclooxygenase-1, prostaglandin E2 and EP1 receptors in acid-induced HCO3- secretion in stomach.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Aihara, E; Sasaki, Y; Nomura, Y; Ise, F

    2006-12-01

    We investigated the cyclooxygenase (COX) isoforms as well as prostaglandin E receptor EP subtypes responsible for acid-induced gastric HCO(3)(-) secretion in rats and EP receptor-knockout (-/-) mice. Under urethane anesthesia, a chambered stomach (in the presence of omeprazole) was perfused with saline, and HCO(3)(-) secretion was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method and by adding 2 mM HCl. Mucosal acidification was achieved by exposing the stomach for 10 min to 50 or 100 mM HCl. Acidification of the mucosa increased the secretion of HCO(3)(-) in the stomach of both rats and WT mice, in an indomethacin-inhibitable manner. The acid-induced gastric HCO(3)(-) secretion was inhibited by prior administration of indomethacin and SC-560 but not rofecoxib in rats and mice. Acidification increased the PGE(2) content of the rat stomach, and this response was significantly attenuated by indomethacin and SC-560 but not rofecoxib. This response was also attenuated by ONO-8711 (EP1 antagonist) but not AE3-208 (EP4 antagonist) in rats and disappeared in EP1 (-/-) but not EP3 (-/-) mice. PGE(2) increased gastric HCO(3)(-) secretion in both rats and WT mice, and this action was inhibited by ONO-8711 and disappeared in EP1 (-/-) but not EP3 (-/-) mice. These results support a mediator role for endogenous PGs in the gastric response induced by mucosal acidification and clearly indicate that the enzyme responsible for production of PGs in this process is COX-1. They further show that the presence of EP1 receptors is essential for the increase in the secretion of HCO(3)(-) in response to mucosal acidification in the stomach.

  9. Galantamine potentiates the protective effect of rofecoxib and caffeic acid against intrahippocampal Kainic acid-induced cognitive dysfunction in rat.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Prakash, Atish; Pahwa, Deeksha

    2011-05-30

    Role of neuroinflammatory mediators particularly cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), have been well suggested in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Rofecoxib is a selective cyclooxygenase 2 enzymes belongs to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, commonly called as coxibs. Whereas, caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) is one of the natural phenolic compounds and reported to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activity as one of mechanisms. Present study has been designed to investigate the effects of rofecoxib, caffeic acid and its potentiation by galantamine against intrahippocampal kainic acid-induced cognitive impairment, oxidative damage and mitochondrial respiratory enzyme alterations in rats. Kainic acid (KA) was administrated in the hippocampus region of rat brain. Various behavioral (locomotor activity and memory performances were assessed by using actophotometer and Morris water maze respectively) followed by oxidative stress, mitochondrial enzyme complex were assessed. Intrahippocampal administration of KA significantly impaired locomotor activity, memory performance, mitochondrial enzyme complexes and caused oxidative stress as compared to sham treatment. Rofecoxib (5 and 10mg/kg), caffeic acid (5 and 10mg/kg), Gal (2.5 and 5mg/kg) treatment for 14 days significantly improved locomotor activity, memory retention and oxidative defense (as evidenced by decrease lipid peroxidation, nitrite, increased superoxide dismutase activity and redox ratio) in hippocampus. Besides, alterations in the levels of mitochondrial enzymes and acetylcholine esterase enzyme were significantly restored by rofecoxib and caffeic acid as compared to control. Further, combination of rofecoxib (5mg/kg) with caffeic acid (5mg/kg) and lower dose of gal (2.5mg/kg) with rofecoxib (5mg/kg) treatments significantly potentiated their protective effect which was significant as compared to their effect per se. The results of the present study suggest that galantamine

  10. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Urtica dioica leaf extract in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Klooshani, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study was aimed to examine the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Urtica dioica leaf extract in animal models. Materials and Methods: Hydroalcoholic extract of the plant leaves was prepared by percolation method. Male Swiss mice (25-35 g) and male Wistar rats (180-200 g) were randomly distributed in control, standard drug, and three experimental groups (n=6 in each group). Acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin test, and carrageenan-induced paw edema were used to assess the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. Results: The extract dose-dependently reduced acetic acid-induced abdominal twitches. In formalin test, the extract at any of applied doses (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) could not suppress the licking behavior of first phase while doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg significantly inhibited the second phase of formalin test. In carrageenan test, the extract at a dose of 400 mg/kg significantly inhibited the paw edema by 26%. Conclusion: The results confirm the folkloric use of the plant extract in painful and inflammatory conditions. Further studies are needed to characterize the active constituents and the mechanism of action of the plant extract. PMID:25050274

  11. History and future of human cadaver preservation for surgical training: from formalin to saturated salt solution method.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shogo; Naito, Munekazu; Kawata, Shinichi; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hirai, Shuichi; Itoh, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, surgical training meant on-the-job training with live patients in an operating room. However, due to advancing surgical techniques, such as minimally invasive surgery, and increasing safety demands during procedures, human cadavers have been used for surgical training. When considering the use of human cadavers for surgical training, one of the most important factors is their preservation. In this review, we summarize four preservation methods: fresh-frozen cadaver, formalin, Thiel's, and saturated salt solution methods. Fresh-frozen cadaver is currently the model that is closest to reality, but it also presents myriad problems, including the requirement of freezers for storage, limited work time because of rapid putrefaction, and risk of infection. Formalin is still used ubiquitously due to its low cost and wide availability, but it is not ideal because formaldehyde has an adverse health effect and formalin-embalmed cadavers do not exhibit many of the qualities of living organs. Thiel's method results in soft and flexible cadavers with almost natural colors, and Thiel-embalmed cadavers have been appraised widely in various medical disciplines. However, Thiel's method is relatively expensive and technically complicated. In addition, Thiel-embalmed cadavers have a limited dissection time. The saturated salt solution method is simple, carries a low risk of infection, and is relatively low cost. Although more research is needed, this method seems to be sufficiently useful for surgical training and has noteworthy features that expand the capability of clinical training. The saturated salt solution method will contribute to a wider use of cadavers for surgical training.

  12. DNA Extraction Method Affects the Detection of a Fungal Pathogen in Formalin-Fixed Specimens Using qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Andrea J.; LaBonte, John P.; Ball, Morgan L.; Richards-Hrdlicka, Kathryn L.; Toothman, Mary H.; Briggs, Cheryl J.

    2015-01-01

    Museum collections provide indispensable repositories for obtaining information about the historical presence of disease in wildlife populations. The pathogenic amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has played a significant role in global amphibian declines, and examining preserved specimens for Bd can improve our understanding of its emergence and spread. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) enables Bd detection with minimal disturbance to amphibian skin and is significantly more sensitive to detecting Bd than histology; therefore, developing effective qPCR methodologies for detecting Bd DNA in formalin-fixed specimens can provide an efficient and effective approach to examining historical Bd emergence and prevalence. Techniques for detecting Bd in museum specimens have not been evaluated for their effectiveness in control specimens that mimic the conditions of animals most likely to be encountered in museums, including those with low pathogen loads. We used American bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) of known infection status to evaluate the success of qPCR to detect Bd in formalin-fixed specimens after three years of ethanol storage. Our objectives were to compare the most commonly used DNA extraction method for Bd (PrepMan, PM) to Macherey-Nagel DNA FFPE (MN), test optimizations for Bd detection with PM, and provide recommendations for maximizing Bd detection. We found that successful detection is relatively high (80–90%) when Bd loads before formalin fixation are high, regardless of the extraction method used; however, at lower infection levels, detection probabilities were significantly reduced. The MN DNA extraction method increased Bd detection by as much as 50% at moderate infection levels. Our results indicate that, for animals characterized by lower pathogen loads (i.e., those most commonly encountered in museum collections), current methods may underestimate the proportion of Bd-infected amphibians. Those extracting DNA from archived museum

  13. Sigma-1 receptor antagonist, BD1047 reduces nociceptive responses and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in mice orofacial formalin model.

    PubMed

    Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1Rs) play a role in different types of pain and in central sensitization mechanism in spinal cord. However, it is currently unexplored whether Sig-1Rs are involved in orofacial pain processing. Here we show whether a selective Sig-1R antagonist, BD1047 reduces nociceptive responses in the mouse orofacial formalin model and the number of Fos-immunoreactive (ir) cells in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). In addition, it was examined whether the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) or p38 (pp38) mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), which are closely linked to pain signaling and sensitization, in TNC was modified by BD1047. The 5% formalin (10 µL) was subcutaneously injected into the right upper lip, and the rubbing responses with ipsilateral fore- or hind paw were counted for 45 min. BD1047 (1, 3 or 10 mg/kg) were intraperitoneally treated 30 min before formalin injection. High dose of BD1047 (10 mg/kg) produced significant anti-nociceptive effects in the first and the second phase. The number of Fos-ir cells in ipsilateral side of TNC was also reduced by BD1047 as compared to that in saline-treated animals. In addition, the number of pp38-ir cells in ipsilateral TNC was decreased in BD1047-treated animals, whereas the number of pERK-ir cells was not modified. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Sig-1Rs play a pivotal role in the orofacial pain processing, and the pp38 signaling pathway can be associated with Sig-1R's action in TNC.

  14. A novel approach for HLA-A typing in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded-derived DNA.

    PubMed

    Villabona, Lisa; Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Andersson, Emilia K; Seliger, Barbara; Dalianis, Tina; Masucci, Giuseppe V

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a novel approach for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typing from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded-derived DNA. HLAs can be a prognostic factor in cancer and have an extensive polymorphism. This polymorphism is predominantly restricted to exons, which encode the peptide-binding domain of the protein. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded material is routinely collected in the clinic and therefore a great source of DNA for genetic analyses. However, its low quality due to fragmentation and nucleotide changes has often created obstacles in designing genetic assays. In this study, we amplified the most polymorphic exons of the HLA-A gene, exons 2, 3, and 4, in 16 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples >10 years old. These tissue samples belonged to patients already HLA-typed by peripheral blood samples at the routine laboratory. Acquired amplification products were used for sequencing, which provided enough information to establish an HLA allele. The same method was applied to DNA extracted from peripheral blood from a healthy volunteer with known HLA type. Of the samples, 14/16 (88%) were successfully typed, in one sample only one of the alleles could be determined, and in one sample no allele could be determined. The amplification of the most polymorphic exons of HLA-A was a successful alternative when DNA quality prevented positive results with previously described methods. The method is usable when an HLA type is needed but the patients are deceased and/or no whole blood samples can be collected. It has thus potential to be used in several fields such as the clinic, research, and forensic science.

  15. The Effect of Acute Intra Locus Coeruleus (LC) Microinfusion of Bupropion on Formalin-Induced Pain Behavior in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Jahanbani, Marzieh; Nasri, Sima; Pakdel, Firouz Ghaderi; Cankurt, Ulker; Shahabi, Parviz; Amirabadi, Sanaz; Naderi, Somayyeh; Osalou, Mostafa Ashrafi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory pain is a common sign of chronic diseases. Some brain regions such as locus coeruleus (LC) of the brainstem nor-epinephrine (NE) system have a key role in The mechanisms of the pain modulation and dependence. Bupropion synthesized as an antidepressant, but it is using for smoke cessation. It can change morphine withdrawal signs such as pain related behaviors. This study tested the acute effect of intra-LC microinfusion of bupropion on the formalin-induced pain behavior in rats. Methods Wistar male rats were divided into 6 groups (control-naïve, control-operated, shamoperated, and 3 treated groups with 10-2, 10-3, 10-4 mol/µl intra-LC of bupropion). The injection guide cannulae were implanted into LC nuclei bilaterally by stereotaxic coordinated surgery under sterile condition. The sham group received normal saline as drug vehicle but control groups had no intra-LC injections. Formalin (50 µl, 2.5%) was injected subcutaneously in plantar region of the right hindpaw in all animals (30 min after drug administration in treated animals). Nociceptive signs were observed continuously and registered on-line each minute. Common pain scoring was used for pain assessment. Results The analysis of data by one-way ANOVA showed that bupropion can reduce pain behavior scores significantly. Bupropion reduced total pain score in the phase 01 (60%) and phase 02 (52%) of maximal behavior compared to the sham group, dose dependently and significantly. The pain scores of controls and sham groups had no significant difference. Discussion The results showed that bupropion has analgesic effects on LC neurons and can alter the neurochemical involvement of LC in pain process. Bupropion has different and significant effect on early and late phases of formalin test. PMID:25436082

  16. Hop Extract Produces Antinociception by Acting on Opioid System in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo-Hyun; Sim, Yun-Beom; Kang, Yu-Jung; Kim, Sung-Su; Kim, Chea-Ha; Kim, Su-jin; Seo, Jee-Young; Lim, Su-Min

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the antinociceptive profiles of hop extract were characterized in ICR mice. Hop extract administered orally (from 25 to 100 mg/kg) showed an antinociceptive effect in a dose-dependent manner as measured in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Antinociceptive action of hop extract was maintained at least for 60 min. Moreover, cumulative response time of nociceptive behaviors induced with intraplantar formalin injection was reduced by hop extract treatment during the 2nd phases. Furthermore, the cumulative nociceptive response time for intrathecal injection of substance P (0.7 µg) or glutamate (20 µg) was diminished by hop extract. Intraperitoneal pretreatment with naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist) attenuated antinociceptive effect induced by hop extract in the writhing test. However, methysergide (a 5-HT serotonergic receptor antagonist) or yohimbine (an α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist) did not affect antinociception induced by hop extract in the writhing test. Our results suggest that hop extract shows an antinociceptive property in various pain models. Furthermore, the antinociceptive effect of hop extract may be mediated by opioidergic receptors, but not serotonergic and α2-adrenergic receptors. PMID:22802700

  17. Generating Exome Enriched Sequencing Libraries from Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue DNA for Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Marosy, Beth A; Craig, Brian D; Hetrick, Kurt N; Witmer, P Dane; Ling, Hua; Griffith, Sean M; Myers, Benjamin; Ostrander, Elaine A; Stanford, Janet L; Brody, Lawrence C; Doheny, Kimberly F

    2017-01-11

    This unit describes a technique for generating exome-enriched sequencing libraries using DNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. Utilizing commercially available kits, we present a low-input FFPE workflow starting with 50 ng of DNA. This procedure includes a repair step to address damage caused by FFPE preservation that improves sequence quality. Subsequently, libraries undergo an in-solution-targeted selection for exons, followed by sequencing using the Illumina next-generation short-read sequencing platform. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Atypical carcinoid and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung: a proteomic dataset from formalin-fixed archival samples

    PubMed Central

    Tanca, Alessandro; Addis, Maria Filippa; Pisanu, Salvatore; Abbondio, Marcello; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Eccher, Albino; Rindi, Guido; Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Uzzau, Sergio; Fanciulli, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a dataset generated using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival samples from two rare lung neuroendocrine tumor subtypes (namely, two atypical carcinoids, ACs, and two large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, LCNECs). Samples were subjected to a shotgun proteomics pipeline, comprising full-length protein extraction, SDS removal through spin columns, in solution trypsin digestion, long gradient liquid chromatography peptide separation and LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 1260 and 2436 proteins were identified in the AC and LCNEC samples, respectively, with FDR <1%. MS data are available in the PeptideAtlas repository at http://www.peptideatlas.org/PASS/PASS00375. PMID:27054153

  19. Interaction between the dopaminergic and opioidergic systems in dorsal hippocampus in modulation of formalin-induced orofacial pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Reisi, Zahra; Haghparast, Amir; Pahlevani, Pouyan; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Haghparast, Abbas

    2014-09-01

    The hippocampus is a region of the brain that serves several functions. The dopaminergic system acts through D1- and D2-like receptors to interfere in pain modulation and the opioid receptors play major roles in analgesic processes and there are obvious overlaps between these two systems. The present study investigated the interaction between the opioidergic and dopaminergic systems in the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) region for formalin-induced orofacial pain. Two guide cannulae were stereotaxically implanted in the CA1 region and morphine (0.5, 1, 2 and 4 μg/0.5 μl saline) and naloxone (0.3, 1 and 3 μg/0.5 μl saline) were used as the opioid receptor agonist and antagonist, respectively. SKF-38393 (1 μg/0.5 μl saline) was used as a D1-like receptor agonist, quinpirole (2 μg/0.5 μl saline) as a D2-like receptor agonist, SCH-23390 (0.5 μg/0.5 μl saline) as a D1-like receptor antagonist and sulpiride (3 μg/0.5 μl DMSO) as a D2-like receptor antagonist. To induce orofacial pain, 50 μl of 1% formalin was subcutaneously injected into the left side of the upper lip. Our results showed that different doses of morphine significantly reduced orofacial pain in both phases induced by formalin. Naloxone (1 and 3 μg) reversed morphine induced analgesia in CA1. SKF-38393 and quinpirole with naloxone (1 μg) significantly decreased formalin-induced orofacial pain in both phases. SCH-23390 had no effect on the antinociceptive response of morphine in both phases of orofacial pain. Sulpiride reversed the antinociceptive effects of morphine only in the first phase, but this result was not significant. Our findings suggest that there is cross-talk between the opioidergic and dopaminergic systems. Opioidergic neurons also exerted antinociceptive effects by modulation of the dopaminergic system in the CA1 region of the brain.

  20. Efficacy of spray administration of formalin-killed Streptococcus agalactiae in hybrid Red Tilapia.

    PubMed

    Noraini, O; Sabri, M Y; Siti-Zahrah, A

    2013-06-01

    An initial evaluation of spray vaccination was carried out with 60 hybrid Red Tilapia Oreochromis spp., divided into three groups that consisted of 10 fish per group with duplicates. The formalin-killed cells (FKCs) of Streptococcus agalactiae were administered once to group 1 by spray and once daily for five consecutive days to group 2. Group 3 remained as the untreated control group and was sprayed with normal saline. A booster was given twice to all the groups, once at the second week and again at the fourth week after the first vaccination. After this initial evaluation, a challenge study was conducted with 40 tilapia divided into two groups that consisted of 10 fish per group with duplicates. Group 1 was vaccinated with FKCs of S. agalactiae by a single spray administration while group 2 remained as the untreated control group. A booster was given twice using the same protocol as in the initial evaluation. After 6 weeks, fish from one of the duplicate tanks from each of groups 1 and 2 were challenged with pathogenic S. agalactiae by intraperitoneal (IP) injection, while fish in another tank were challenged through immersion. Based on the observations, serum immunoglobulin M (IgM) levels were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the challenged fish than in the either the preexposed fish or the control group 1 week after the initial exposure. However, no significant differences (P > 0.05) were noted between challenged groups 1 and 2. In addition, no significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed between the frequencies of exposure. The mucus IgM level, however, remained high after each booster until the end of the 8-week study period. Meanwhile, serum IgM levels decreased after the challenge. A higher percentage of survival was noted for fish challenged through immersion (80%) compared with IP injection (70%). These results suggested that single spray exposure was able to induce IgM, which gave moderate to high protection during the challenge study.

  1. Quantitative and qualitative study of STR DNA from ethanol and formalin fixed tissues.

    PubMed

    Alqaydi, Maryam; Roy, Reena

    2016-05-01

    Complete and concordant autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) DNA profiles were obtained from 2.0mg human tissue samples of various types after they were preserved for 24 weeks in 100% ethanol and amplified with the GlobalFiler(®) and the PowerPlex(®) Fusion Amplification Kits. When 4.0mg of the same tissues were preserved for 12 weeks in 10% Neutral Buffered Formalin (NBF) they yielded partial profiles when amplified with the same kits. However, these NBF preserved tissues yielded complete autosomal profiles when amplified with the AmpFlSTR(®) MiniFiler™ Amplification Kit. Six tissue specimens from the male donor were also amplified with the PowerPlex(®) Y-23 System. Y-STR profiles were successfully generated from 2.0mg tissue specimens when preserved for 12 weeks in 100% Ethanol. Only partial profiles were obtained when the fixation time was increased to 24 weeks. Only partial Y-STR profiles were also obtained from 4.0mg tissue specimen from the same donor when preserved in 10% NBF. In an attempt to optimize the method, the preserved samples that yielded partial profiles were homogenized using the BioMasher III disposable homogenizer and BioMasher III homogenizer and filter. These homogenized tissues did not yield significantly better or more complete profiles when using the GlobalFiler(®), AmpFlSTR(®) MiniFiler™ Amplification Kits, the PowerPlex(®) Fusion System or the PowerPlex(®) Y23 System. A total number of 240 tissue samples were analyzed in this project. The amplification of the tissues preserved in 10% NBF with kits such as AmpFlSTR(®) MiniFiler™ and GlobalFiler(®) Amplification Kits that contain mini STR primers can be beneficial in forensic testing. The results of the study indicate that in cases such as when a victim or a suspect is missing, the profiles obtained from minute amounts of chemically fixed tissues can be used as reference samples and compared to evidence found at the crime scene.

  2. Caloric Restriction and Formalin-Induced Inflammation: An Experimental Study in Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Nozad, Aisan; Safari, Mir Bahram; Saboory, Ehsan; Derafshpoor, Leila; Mohseni Moghaddam, Parvaneh; Ghaffari, Farzaneh; Naseri, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute and chronic inflammations are difficult to control. Using chemical anti-inflammatory medications along with their complications considerably limit their use. According to Traditional Iranian Medicine (TIM), there is an important relation between inflammation and Imtila (food and blood accumulation in the body); food reduction or its more modern equivalent Caloric Restriction (CR) may act against both Imtila and inflammation. Objectives: This experimental study aimed to investigate the effect of 30% reduction in daily calorie intake on inflammation in rats. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 male rats (Rattus rattus) weighing 220 to 270 g were obtained. Then, the inflammation was induced by injecting formalin in their paws. Next, the rats were randomized by generating random numbers into two equal groups (9 + 9) putting on either normal diet (controls) or a similar diet with 30% reduction of calorie (cases). Paw volume changes were recorded twice per day by one observer in both groups using a standard plethysmometer for 8 consecutive days. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP), Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), complete blood count (erythrocyte, platelet, and white blood cell) and hemoglobin were compared between the groups. Results: Decline of both body weight and paw volume was significantly more prominent in the case than in the control rats within the study period (P < 0.001 and < 0.001, respectively). Paw volume decrease was more prominent after day 3. On day 8, serum CRP-positive (1 or 2 +) rats were more frequent in ad libitum fed group comparing with those received CR (33.3% vs. 11.1%). This difference, however, was insignificant (P = 0.58). At the same time, mean ESR was significantly higher in the control rats comparing with that in the case group (29.00 ± 2.89 h vs. 14.00 ± 1.55 h; P = 0.001). Other serum parameters were not significantly different between the two groups at endpoint. Conclusions: Rats fed with a 30% calorie

  3. Efficacy of argon plasma coagulation compared with topical formalin application for chronic radiation proctopathy

    PubMed Central

    Alfadhli, AA; Alazmi, WM; Ponich, T; Howard, JM; Prokopiw, I; Alaqeel, A; Gregor, JC

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic radiation proctopathy (CRP) is a troublesome complication of radiotherapy to the pelvis for which current treatment modalities are suboptimal. Currently, the application of formalin to the rectal mucosa (AFR) and thermal ablation with argon plasma coagulation (APC) are the most promising options. OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy and safety of AFR with APC for CRP. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Records of 22 patients (male to female ratio, 19:3; mean age, 74 years) who received either APC or AFR for chronic hematochezia caused by CRP, and who were evaluated and treated between May 1998 and April 2002, were reviewed. Complete evaluations were made three months after completion of each therapeutic modality. Patients were considered to be responders if there was a 10% increase in hemoglobin from baseline or complete normalization of hemoglobin (male patients, higher than 130 g/L; female patients, higher than 115 g/L) without the requirement for blood transfusion. RESULTS: The mean hemoglobin level before therapy was 107 g/L. Patients received an average of 1.78 sessions for APC and 1.81 sessions for AFR. Eleven patients (50%) were treated with APC alone, eight patients (36%) with AFR alone and three (14%) with both modalities (two with AFR followed by APC, and one with APC followed by AFR). Eleven of 14 patients (79%) in the APC group were responders, compared with three of 11 patients (27%) in the AFR group (P=0.017). In the APC group, seven of 11 responders required only a single session, while in the AFR group, only one patient responded after a single session. Adverse events (nausea, vomiting, flushing, abdominal cramps, rectal pain and fever) occurred in two patients after APC and in nine patients after AFR (P=0.001). In the APC group, the mean hemoglobin level increase was 20 g/L at three months follow-up, compared with 14 g/L in the AFR group. CONCLUSION: This retrospective study suggests that APC is more effective and safe than topical AFR to

  4. Systematic comparison of tissue fixation with alternative fixatives to conventional tissue fixation with buffered formalin in a xenograft-based model.

    PubMed

    Nietner, Thorben; Jarutat, Tiantom; Mertens, Alfred

    2012-09-01

    In our study we systematically compared the alternative fixatives acidified formal alcohol (AFA), PAXgene®, HOPE®, and combinations of AFA or formalin with ultrasound treatment to standard (buffered) formalin fixation. We examined general morphology and detectability of protein structures by immunohistochemistry of the membrane receptors epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), and phosphorylated human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (phospho-HER2). In order to allow for stringent comparability of different fixation techniques, we used matched mouse xenograft tumor samples from three different human cancer cell lines (colon, ovarian, and non-small cell lung cancer), either fixed conventionally with formalin or an alternative fixative. Tissue morphology after fixation with AFA and PAXgene® was comparable to formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPET) morphology. Ultrasound fixations resulted in slightly inferior morphology and HOPE® fixation preserved morphology only poorly compared to FFPET in this system. None of the tested alternative fixatives enabled immunohistochemical detectability of all three targets in the same manner as FFPET. Pronounced staining was possible for EGFR and IGF-1R with all alternative fixatives but HOPE®, and phospho-HER2 staining was only noteworthy with formalin-ultrasound-fixed tissue. Therefore, the use of alternative fixatives comes with the need for careful validation of obtained IHC results individually for each target.

  5. Blockade of peripheral 5HT3 receptor attenuates the formalin-induced nocifensive behavior in persistent temporomandibular joint inflammation of rat.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Keiichiro; Imbe, Hiroki; Tashiro, Akimasa; Kumabe, Shunji; Senba, Emiko

    2004-09-02

    The role of peripheral 5HT3 receptors in the orofacial nocifensive behavior induced by the injection of formalin into masseter muscle was evaluated. The behavioral activities evoked by the formalin injection exhibited a biphasic response in the rats with or without temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation (CFA group or non-CFA group). The orofacial nocifensive behavioral activity was enhanced after TMJ inflammation. Systemic administration of tropisetron, 5HT3 receptor antagonist, reduced the nocifensive behavioral activities in the late phase of orofacial formalin test in CFA group, but not in non-CFA group. Local administration of tropisetron into the masseter muscle in CFA group, but not in non-CFA group also attenuated the behavioral activities in the late phase. Unexpectedly, low dose of local tropisetron reduced the nocifensive behavioral activities in the early phase of orofacial formalin test in CFA group. These data suggest that induction of TMJ inflammation causes the elevation of the orofacial nocifensive behavioral activities evoked by formalin injection into masseter muscle, and that peripheral 5HT3 receptors may play a critical role in nociception and the transmission of orofacial pain.

  6. Anti-nociceptive Activity of Ethnomedicinally Important Analgesic Plant Isodon rugosus Wall. ex Benth: Mechanistic Study and Identifications of Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Zeb, Anwar; Ahmad, Sajjad; Ullah, Farhat; Ayaz, Muhammad; Sadiq, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Isodon rugosus Wall. ex Benth. is extensively used as traditional medicine for the management of various types of pain including tooth ache, gastric pain, abdominal pain, ear ache, and generalized body pain. The current study is designed to scientifically verify the purported uses of I. rugosus as analgesic agent and to figure out its possible mechanism of action. Bioactive compounds responsible for analgesic activity were identified using GC and GC-MS analysis. Analgesic potentials were evaluated using acetic acid induced writhing, hot plate test, and formalin induced paw licking test. In acetic acid induced writhing chloroform fraction (Ir.Chf) exhibited 53% analgesia while formalin test displayed 61% inhibition at phase-I and 45% at phase-II respectively at a dose of 100 mg/kg. Similarly, in hot plate test Ir.Chf displayed average reaction time of 7 min at 15, 30, 45, and 60 min intervals. The possible mechanism of action was found to be the central pathway via opioidergic receptors as the mice showed morphine like analgesic activity at pre-administration of naloxone (opioid antagonist) in hot plate and formalin tests. In GC-MS analysis, 83 compounds were identified among which eight compounds including benzyl alcohol, sebacic acid, myristic acid, phytol, sugiol, Tocopherol, α-Amyrin, and stigmasterol were sorted out as previously reported analgesic compounds. Current study revealed that analgesic potential of I. rugosus can attributed to the presence of analgesic compounds. It may also be concluded that opioids receptors are involved in the analgesic mechanism of I. rugosus due to effective antagonism of nalaxone. PMID:27458379

  7. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Bridelia retusa Methanolic Fruit Extract in Experimental Animals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Tekeshwar; Jain, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory potentials of methanolic extract of Bridelia retusa fruit (BRME) were evaluated against different animal models in rodents. Antinociceptive effects of BRME were assessed in mice using the acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin test. Anti-inflammatory effects of BRME in three different doses, namely, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, were evaluated by utilizing different animal models representing various changes associated with inflammation, namely, carrageenan-induced paw oedema, histamine and serotonin-induced paw oedema, arachidonic acid-induced paw oedema, formalin-induced paw oedema, TPA-induced ear oedema, acetic acid-induced vascular permeability, total WBC count in paw fluid, and myeloperoxidase assay. Also BRME was phytochemically evaluated using chromatographic method. The BRME did not exhibit any signs of toxicity up to a dose of 2000 mg/kg. The extract showed statistical significant inhibition of induced nociception and inflammation in dose dependent manner. The higher dose of extract significantly inhibited pain and inflammation against control (P < 0.001). HPLC results revealed the presence of gallic acid and ellagic acid as phytoconstituents in BRME and it was proven as anti-inflammatory agents. The present study scientifically demonstrated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory potential of fruit of B. retusa methanolic extract. These effects may be attributed to the presence of polyphenolic phytoconstituents in the extract. PMID:25506619

  8. Observing Anti-inflammatory and Anti-nociceptive Activities of Glycyrrhizin Through Regulating COX-2 and Pro-inflammatory Cytokines Expressions in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Ling; Li, Yu-Xiang; Niu, Ya-Ting; Zheng, Jie; Wu, Jing; Shi, Guang-Jiang; Ma, Lin; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Yu, Jian-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of glycyrrhizin (GL) in mice and to explore the possible related mechanisms. Xylene-induced ear edema, carrageenan-induced paw edema and acetic acid-induced vascular permeability test were used to investigate the anti-inflammatory activities of GL in mice. Anti-nociceptive effects of GL were assessed by using acetic acid-induced writhing, hot plate test and formalin test, as well as evaluation of spontaneous locomotor activity and motor performance. The mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as TNF-α, IL-6 and iNOS) and the protein expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were explored by using real-time fluorogenic PCR and Western blot, respectively. The results showed that GL significantly reduced xylene-induced ear edema, carrageenan-induced paw edema, and acetic acid-induced vascular permeation. Additionally, GL significantly inhibited the nociceptions induced by acetic acid and formalin. However, the nociceptions could not be decreased by GL in the hot plate test, and GL did not affect spontaneous locomotor activity and motor performance. The expression levels of TNF-α, IL-6, iNOS and COX-2 were significantly downregulated by GL. In conclusion, GL exerts significant anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities by attenuating the expression levels of TNF-α, IL-6, iNOS and COX-2.

  9. Retrospective study of melamine/cyanuric acid-induced renal failure in dogs in Korea between 2003 and 2004.

    PubMed

    Yhee, J-Y; Brown, C A; Yu, C-H; Kim, J-H; Poppenga, R; Sur, J-H

    2009-03-01

    In early 2007, American pet food ingredients leading to nephrotoxic renal failure of dogs and cats raised serious concerns about the safety of pet foods. Major pet food companies recalled more than 1,000 commercial pet foods in consideration of pet safety. A similar pet food-associated outbreak of nephrotoxic renal failure occurred in Asia, in late 2003 and 2004, resulting in a similar extensive pet food recall. At that time, contamination of ingredients with a nephrotoxin-producing fungus at a pet food production facility was suspected. However, toxicologic evidence to substantiate a mycotoxicosis was lacking. Moreover, the renal lesions were not typical of those reported with fungal nephrotoxins. During 2003 and 2004, 14 dogs were presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital of Konkuk University, Seoul, Korea, with renal failure and distinctive renal pathologic findings. Grossly, the kidneys were greenish in color with greenish uroliths in the renal pelvis or bladder. Histologically, characteristic crystals with pinwheel radiating striations were present in distal tubular segments. Toxicologic analysis identified melamine, cyanuric acid, and ammelide in deparaffinized formalin-fixed kidney samples.

  10. Inactivation of the prelimbic rather than infralimbic cortex impairs acquisition and expression of formalin-induced conditioned place avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhao-Cai; Pan, Qi; Zheng, Chun; Deng, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Jin-Yan; Luo, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Conditioned place avoidance (CPA) paradigm has been used to investigate the affective component of pain. Although the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) has been demonstrated to play an important role in the affective aspect of pain, whether the other prefrontal subdivisions are involved in pain-related aversion is unknown. The present study investigated the role of the prelimbic cortex (PL) and infralimbic cortex (IL) in the acquisition and expression of formalin-induced CPA (F-CPA) in rats. GABAA receptor agonist muscimol was bilaterally microinjected into PL/IL before or after the formalin-paired training, to explore the effect of temporary inactivation of PL/IL on the acquisition and expression of F-CPA, respectively. The results showed that inactivation of PL rather than IL impaired the acquisition and expression of F-CPA. Moreover, the PL inactivation did not block the acquisition of LiCl-induced CPA, suggesting that PL may be specifically implicated in the pain-emotion related encoding. These results indicate that PL but not IL is involved in the aversive dimension of pain. PMID:24726402

  11. Chronologic comparison of root dentin moisture in extracted human teeth stored in formalin, sodium azide, and distilled water.

    PubMed

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Ahn, Chul; Zhang, Song; Zhu, Qiang; Spångberg, Larz S W

    2009-07-01

    This study quantified in vitro the root dentin moisture when 10% formalin (group A), 3% sodium azide (group B), and distilled water (group C) were used as teeth storage media. The root dentin moisture of 66 extracted human mandibular single-rooted teeth was measured at baseline (day 0) and at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days using a digital grain moisture meter. The baseline dentin moisture value was used as covariate in the generalized estimating equation (GEE) analysis. The mean dentin moisture values (%) +/- SD on days 0, 1, 3, 7, and 14 were, respectively: 10.6 +/- 0.64, 14.3 +/- 0.71, 14.6 +/- 0.84, 14.4 +/- 0.64, and 14.7 +/- 0.75 in group A; 11.4 +/- 0.94, 14.6 +/- 0.95, 14.6 +/- 0.76, 14.6 +/- 0.93, and 14.8 +/- 0.81 in group B; and 10.2 +/- 0.95, 12.8 +/- 0.90, 13.3 +/- 0.95, 13.0 +/- 0.91, and 13.2 +/- 0.89 in group C. The dentin moisture increased in all 3 groups; however, there was no overall significant difference in moisture between the formalin and sodium azide groups.

  12. Cinobufagin enhances the protective efficacy of formalin-inactivated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine through Th1 immune response.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuai-Cheng; Yi, Peng-Fei; Guo, Xun; Zhang, Li-Yan; Xu, Dao-Xiu; Fu, Yun-Xing; Cui, Zhen-Qiang; Shen, Hai-Qing; Wei, Xu-Bin; Fu, Ben-Dong

    2016-10-01

    Cinobufagin (CBG), one active ingredient isolated from Venenum Bufonis, has been demonstrated to have immunoregulatory effect. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CBG can enhance the protective efficacy of formalin-inactivated Salmonella typhimurium (FIST) in mice. ICR mice were immunized with FIST (10(6) CFU/mouse) alone or mixed with CBG (10, 20, and 40 μg) or alum (200 μg) on day 1 and day 15. Two weeks after the second immunization, serum and spleen were sampled for measuring FIST-specific antibody levels, cytokine levels, and splenocyte proliferation. The results showed that CBG enhanced FIST-specific IgG and IgG2a, the levels of interferon-gamma (IFNγ) and nitric oxide (NO), and the splenocyte proliferation response induced by concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide, and FIST. In vivo protection studies showed that CBG significantly decreased the bacterial burdens in the spleen and prolonged the survival time of FIST-immunized mice challenged with live Salmonella typhimurium. In vivo IFNγ neutralization led to a significant reduction in FIST-specific IgG2a and IFNγ levels, and in the protective efficacy in CBG/FIST-immunized mice. In conclusion, CBG enhances the protective efficacy of formalin-inactivated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine by promoting the Th1 immune response.

  13. Interaction between histamine and morphine at the level of the hippocampus in the formalin-induced orofacial pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Erfanparast, Amir; Farshid, Amir Abbas; Khalilzadeh, Emad

    2011-01-01

    The present study explored the interaction between histaminergic and opioidergic systems at the level of the hippocampus in modulation of orofacial pain by intra-hippocampal microinjections of histamine, pyrilamine (an antagonist of histamine H(1) receptors), ranitidine (an antagonist of histamine H(2) receptors), morphine (an opioid receptor agonist) and naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist) in separate and combined treatments. Orofacial pain was induced by subcutaneous (sc) injection of formalin (50 μl, 1%) in the upper lip region and the time spent face rubbing was recorded in 3 min blocks for 45 min. Formalin (sc) produced a marked biphasic (first phase: 0-3 min, second phase: 15-33 min) pain response. Histamine and morphine suppressed both phases of pain. Histamine increased morphine-induced antinociception. Pyrilamine and ranitidine had no effects when used alone, whereas pretreatments with pyrilamine and ranitidine prevented histamine- and morphine-induced antinociceptive effects. Naloxone alone non-significantly increased pain intensity and inhibited the antinociceptive effects of morphine and histamine. The results of the present study indicate that at the level of the hippocampus, histamine through its H(1) and H(2) receptors, mediates orofacial region pain. Moreover, morphine via a naloxone-reversible mechanism produces analgesia. In addition, both histamine H(1) and H(2) receptors, as well as opioid receptors may be involved in the interaction between histamine and morphine in producing analgesia.

  14. Whole-genome single-cell copy number profiling from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples.

    PubMed

    Martelotto, Luciano G; Baslan, Timour; Kendall, Jude; Geyer, Felipe C; Burke, Kathleen A; Spraggon, Lee; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Chadalavada, Kalyani; Nanjangud, Gouri; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Moody, Pamela; D'Italia, Sean; Rodgers, Linda; Cox, Hilary; da Cruz Paula, Arnaud; Stepansky, Asya; Schizas, Michail; Wen, Hannah Y; King, Tari A; Norton, Larry; Weigelt, Britta; Hicks, James B; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2017-03-01

    A substantial proportion of tumors consist of genotypically distinct subpopulations of cancer cells. This intratumor genetic heterogeneity poses a substantial challenge for the implementation of precision medicine. Single-cell genomics constitutes a powerful approach to resolve complex mixtures of cancer cells by tracing cell lineages and discovering cryptic genetic variations that would otherwise be obscured in tumor bulk analyses. Because of the chemical alterations that result from formalin fixation, single-cell genomic approaches have largely remained limited to fresh or rapidly frozen specimens. Here we describe the development and validation of a robust and accurate methodology to perform whole-genome copy-number profiling of single nuclei obtained from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical tumor samples. We applied the single-cell sequencing approach described here to study the progression from in situ to invasive breast cancer, which revealed that ductal carcinomas in situ show intratumor genetic heterogeneity at diagnosis and that these lesions may progress to invasive breast cancer through a variety of evolutionary processes.

  15. Impact of pre-analytical factors on the proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Seonaid M; Craven, Rachel A; Nirmalan, Niroshini J; Harnden, Patricia; Selby, Peter J; Banks, Rosamonde E

    2013-04-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples represent a tremendous potential resource for biomarker discovery, with large numbers of samples in hospital pathology departments and links to clinical information. However, the cross-linking of proteins and nucleic acids by formalin fixation has hampered analysis and proteomic studies have been restricted to using frozen tissue, which is more limited in availability as it needs to be collected specifically for research. This means that rare disease subtypes cannot be studied easily. Recently, improved extraction techniques have enabled analysis of FFPE tissue by a number of proteomic techniques. As with all clinical samples, pre-analytical factors are likely to impact on the results obtained, although overlooked in many studies. The aim of this review is to discuss the various pre-analytical factors, which include warm and cold ischaemic time, size of sample, fixation duration and temperature, tissue processing conditions, length of storage of archival tissue and storage conditions, and to review the studies that have considered these factors in more detail. In those areas where investigations are few or non-existent, illustrative examples of the possible importance of specific factors have been drawn from studies using frozen tissue or from immunohistochemical studies of FFPE tissue.

  16. High-resolution copy number profiling by array CGH using DNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    van Essen, Hendrik F; Ylstra, Bauke

    2012-01-01

    We describe protocols to acquire high-quality DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues for the use in array comparative genome hybridization (CGH). Formalin fixation combined with paraffin embedding is routine procedure for solid malignancies in the diagnostic practice of the pathologist. As a consequence, large archives of FFPE tissues are available in pathology institutes across the globe. This archival material is for many research questions an invaluable resource, with long-term clinical follow-up and survival data available. FFPE is, thus, highly attractive for large genomics studies, including experiments requiring samples for test/learning and validation. Most larger array CGH studies have, therefore, made use of FFPE material and show that CNAs have tumor- and tissue-specific traits (Chin et al. Cancer Cell 10: 529-541, 2006; Fridlyand et al. BMC Cancer 6: 96, 2006; Weiss et al. Oncogene 22: 1872-1879, 2003; Jong et al. Oncogene 26: 1499-1506, 2007). The protocols described are tailored to array CGH of FFPE solid malignancies: from sectioning FFPE blocks to specific cynosures for pathological revisions of sections, DNA isolation, quality testing, and amplification. The protocols are technical in character and elaborate up to the labeling of isolated DNA while further processes and interpretation and data analysis are beyond the scope.

  17. Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Rosa damascena Hydroalcoholic Extract and its Essential Oil in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Ghannadi, Alireza; Hajiloo, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    Extracts obtained from the petals of Rosa damascena (Rosaceae) are used in Iranian folk medicine as remedies for the treatment of some inflammatory diseases. In this study the hydroalcoholic extract and essential oil of the plant were investigated for its possible anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities. The extract was administered at the doses (p.o.) of 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg and the doses of essential oil were 100, 200 and 400 μL/kg. The acetic acid-induced writhing response, formalin-induced paw licking time in the early and late phases and light tail flick test were used in mice to assess analgesic activity. For evaluation of anti-inflammatory effect carrageenan-induced paw edema served as a valid animal model in rats. The extract significantly attenuated the writhing responses induced by an intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid and also showed potent analgesic effect in both phases of formalin test but not in light tail flick test. In addition, the higher dose of the extract significantly (P < 0.05) reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema. Essential oil of the plant at all administered doses failed to show any analgesic or anti-inflammatory effect in above mentioned tests. These results provide support for the use of hydroalcoholic extract of Rosa damascena in relieving inflammatory pain, and insight into the development of new agents for treating inflammatory diseases.

  18. Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Rosa damascena Hydroalcoholic Extract and its Essential Oil in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Ghannadi, Alireza; Hajiloo, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    Extracts obtained from the petals of Rosa damascena (Rosaceae) are used in Iranian folk medicine as remedies for the treatment of some inflammatory diseases. In this study the hydroalcoholic extract and essential oil of the plant were investigated for its possible anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities. The extract was administered at the doses (p.o.) of 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg and the doses of essential oil were 100, 200 and 400 μL/kg. The acetic acid-induced writhing response, formalin-induced paw licking time in the early and late phases and light tail flick test were used in mice to assess analgesic activity. For evaluation of anti-inflammatory effect carrageenan-induced paw edema served as a valid animal model in rats. The extract significantly attenuated the writhing responses induced by an intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid and also showed potent analgesic effect in both phases of formalin test but not in light tail flick test. In addition, the higher dose of the extract significantly (P < 0.05) reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema. Essential oil of the plant at all administered doses failed to show any analgesic or anti-inflammatory effect in above mentioned tests. These results provide support for the use of hydroalcoholic extract of Rosa damascena in relieving inflammatory pain, and insight into the development of new agents for treating inflammatory diseases. PMID:24363723

  19. The ruthenium NO donor, [Ru(bpy)2(NO)SO3](PF6), inhibits inflammatory pain: involvement of TRPV1 and cGMP/PKG/ATP-sensitive potassium channel signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Staurengo-Ferrari, Larissa; Mizokami, Sandra S; Silva, Jean J; da Silva, Francisco O N; Sousa, Eduardo H S; da França, Luiz G; Matuoka, Mariana L; Georgetti, Sandra R; Baracat, Marcela M; Casagrande, Rubia; Pavanelli, Wander R; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2013-04-01

    The activation of nitric oxide (NO) production is an analgesic mechanism shared by drugs such as morphine and diclofenac. Therefore, the controlled release of low amounts of NO seems to be a promising analgesic approach. In the present study, the antinociceptive effect of the ruthenium NO donor [Ru(bpy)2(NO)SO3](PF6) (complex I) was investigated. It was observed that complex I inhibited in a dose (0.3-10mg/kg)-dependent manner the acetic acid-induced writhing response. At the dose of 1mg/kg, complex I inhibited the phenyl-p-benzoquinone-induced writhing response and formalin- and complete Freund's adjuvant-induced licking and flinch responses. Additionally, complex I also inhibited transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1)-dependent overt pain-like behavior induced by capsaicin. Complex I also inhibited the carrageenin-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and increase of myeloperoxidase activity (MPO) in paw skin samples. The inhibitory effect of complex I in the carrageenin-induced hyperalgesia, MPO activity and formalin was prevented by the treatment with ODQ, KT5823 and glybenclamide, indicating that complex I inhibits inflammatory hyperalgesia by activating the cGMP/PKG/ATP-sensitive potassium channel signaling pathway. The present study demonstrates the efficacy of a novel ruthenium NO donor and its analgesic mechanisms.

  20. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of flavonoids PMT1 and PMT2 isolated from Piper montealegreanum Yuncker (Piperaceae) in mice.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz, Aline Cavalcanti; Alves, Harley da Silva; Cavalcante-Silva, Luiz Henrique Agra; Dias, Thays de Lima Matos Freire; Santos, Mariana da Silva; Melo, Gabriela Muniz de Albuquerque; Campesatto, Eliane Aparecida; Chaves, Maria Célia de Oliveira; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we identified the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of two flavonoids (PMT1 and PMT2) from Piper montealegreanum. The antinociceptive effect was evaluated using the classical tests: acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin and hot plate test. PMT1 and PMT2 (0.1, 1, 30 and 100 μmol/kg, i.p.) reduced the writhings, with an ID50 of 0.58 and 0.44 μmol/kg, respectively. Moreover, these flavonoids (100 μmol/kg, i.p.) inhibited paw-licking time in the neurogenic phase of the formalin test, but only PMT2 was active in the inflammatory phase. However, PMT1 and PMT2 (100 μmol/kg, i.p.) did not increase the latency time of the animals in the hot plate. In order to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of these flavonoids, capsaicin-induced ear oedema was carried out. Both flavonoids (100 μmol/kg, i.p.) were active in this model. These results suggest that PMT1 and PMT2 have antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities.

  1. Clinical and Analytical Evaluation of a Single-Vial Stool Collection Device with Formalin-Free Fixative for Improved Processing and Comprehensive Detection of Gastrointestinal Parasites.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Brianne A; Jensen, Ryan; Arias, Nora; Heffron, Michael; Gubler, Elyse; Case, Kristin; Gowans, Jason; Couturier, Marc Roger

    2015-08-01

    Microscopic examination of feces is a standard laboratory method for diagnosing gastrointestinal parasite infections. In North America, the ovum and parasite (O&P) examination is typically performed using stool that is chemically fixed in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and formalin, after which the stool is concentrated by filtration to enhance sensitivity. Mini Parasep solvent-free (SF) tubes allow collection and concentration within a single collection vial. The goal of the study was to determine whether consolidated processing and concentration with the Parasep tubes using an alcohol-based fixative (Alcorfix) provide O&P examinations equivalent to or better than those done by processing of PVA-formalin-fixed stool using a SpinCon concentration device. Parasep tubes revealed filtration performance equivalent to that of the SpinCon concentration device using PVA-formalin-fixed stool containing protozoa. Specimens cocollected in Parasep tubes containing PVA-formalin and Alcorfix revealed comparable morphology and staining for various protozoa. Alcorfix effectively fixed live Cryptosporidium and microsporidia such that morphology and staining were conserved for modified acid-fast and modified trichrome stains. A work flow analysis revealed significant time savings for batches of 10 or 30 O&P specimens in tubes with Alcorfix compared to the amount of time that it took to analyze the same number of specimens in tubes with PVA-formalin. The direct hands-on time savings with Mini Parasep tubes were 17 min and 41 s and 32 min and 1 s for batches of 10 and 30 specimens, respectively. Parasep tubes containing Alcorfix provide significant work flow advantages to laboratories that process medium to high volumes of O&P specimens by streamlining processing and converting to a single tube. These improvements in work flow, reduction of the amount of formalin used in the laboratory, and equivalent microscopy results are attractive advancements in O&P testing for North American

  2. Olodaterol attenuates citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wex, Eva; Bouyssou, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Excessive coughing is a common feature of airway diseases. Different G-protein coupled receptors, including β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-AR), have been implicated in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cough reflex. However, the potential antitussive property of β2-AR agonists in patients with respiratory disease is a matter of ongoing debate. The aim of our study was to test the efficacy of the long-acting β2-AR agonist olodaterol with regard to its antitussive property in a pre-clinical model of citric acid-induced cough in guinea pigs and to compare the results to different clinically relevant β2-AR agonists. In our study β2-AR agonists were intratracheally administered, as dry powder, into the lungs of naïve or ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs 15 minutes prior to induction of cough by exposure to citric acid. Cough events were counted over 15 minutes during the citric acid exposure. Olodaterol dose-dependently inhibited the number of cough events in naïve and even more potently and with a greater maximal efficacy in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs (p < 0.01). Formoterol and salmeterol showed a trend towards reducing cough. On the contrary, indacaterol demonstrated pro-tussive properties as it significantly increased the number of coughs, both in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized animals (p < 0.001). In conclusion, olodaterol, at doses eliciting bronchodilation, showed antitussive properties in a model of citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. This is in agreement with pre-clinical and clinical studies showing antitussive efficacy of β2-AR agonists. Indacaterol increased the number of coughs in this model, which concurs with clinical data where a transient cough has been observed after indacaterol inhalation. While the antitussive properties of β2-AR agonists can be explained by their ability to lead to the cAMP-induced hyperpolarization of the neuron membrane thereby inhibiting sensory nerve activation and the

  3. Antinociceptive activity of NK1 receptor antagonists: non-specific effects of racemic RP67580.

    PubMed Central

    Rupniak, N. M.; Boyce, S.; Williams, A. R.; Cook, G.; Longmore, J.; Seabrook, G. R.; Caeser, M.; Iversen, S. D.; Hill, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    1. Release of substance P in the dorsal horn is considered a primary event in the perception of pain. The profile of racemic RP67580, a non-peptide antagonist at the NK1 (substance P) receptor, was examined in a range of antinociception tests on rodents. 2. At doses up to 30 mg kg-1, s.c. racemic RP67580 exhibited antinociceptive activity in writhing and formalin paw tests in mice and gerbils. Acetic acid induced writhing and the licking response to formalin were reduced to 40-50% of the level observed in vehicle-treated animals (P < 0.05). However, this agent was not active in mouse tail flick, rat paw pressure or rat and guinea-pig formalin paw tests. 3. Like racemic RP67580, the calcium channel blockers nifedipine (30 mg kg-1, i.p.) and verapamil (10 or 20 mg kg-1, s.c.) inhibited the response to formalin by approximately 60% in gerbils (P < 0.05 compared with vehicle-treated animals). 4. Evidence for calcium channel antagonist activity of RP67580 was obtained in vitro. Racemic RP67580 inhibited calcium entry into depolarized strips of guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle myenteric plexus (apparent KB = 587 +/- 115 nM), inhibited [3H]-diltiazem binding to rabbit skeletal membranes (IC50 = 298 nM) and depressed high threshold calcium currents in neurones cultured from rat cortex (10% inhibition at 10 microM). 5. These findings indicate that the acute antinociceptive effects of RP67580 may not be attributable to a specific interaction with NK1 receptors and may be mediated via calcium channel blockade. PMID:8306108

  4. Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 Modulates Retinoic Acid-Induced Neuronal Differentiation of Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Cathrin; Paus, Marie; Frey, Katharina; Schmid, Ramona; Kohl, Zacharias; Mennerich, Detlev; Winkler, Jürgen; Gillardon, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Background Dominant mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene are the most prevalent cause of Parkinson's disease, however, little is known about the biological function of LRRK2 protein. LRRK2 is expressed in neural precursor cells suggesting a role in neurodevelopment. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, differential gene expression profiling revealed a faster silencing of pluripotency-associated genes, like Nanog, Oct4, and Lin28, during retinoic acid-induced neuronal differentiation of LRRK2-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells compared to wildtype cultures. By contrast, expression of neurotransmitter receptors and neurotransmitter release was increased in LRRK2+/− cultures indicating that LRRK2 promotes neuronal differentiation. Consistently, the number of neural progenitor cells was higher in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult LRRK2-deficient mice. Alterations in phosphorylation of the putative LRRK2 substrates, translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 and moesin, do not appear to be involved in altered differentiation, rather there is indirect evidence that a regulatory signaling network comprising retinoic acid receptors, let-7 miRNA and downstream target genes/mRNAs may be affected in LRRK2-deficient stem cells in culture. Conclusion/Significance Parkinson's disease-linked LRRK2 mutations that associated with enhanced kinase activity may affect retinoic acid receptor signaling during neurodevelopment and/or neuronal maintenance as has been shown in other mouse models of chronic neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21695257

  5. The effect of nedocromil sodium, sodium cromoglycate and codeine phosphate on citric acid-induced cough in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effects of nedocromil sodium, sodium cromoglycate and codeine phosphate on citric acid-induced cough have been studied in conscious tracheostomised dogs. 2. Nedocromil sodium (approximately 15 mg given as an aerosol) and codeine phosphate (5 mg kg-1, i.v.) significantly increased the time to the first cough when dogs were challenged with citric acid aerosol. The mean number of coughs in the initial period of coughing fell after treatment of dogs with nedocromil sodium or with codeine phosphate, but this reduction in mean cough number was not statistically significant. 3. Neither sodium cromoglycate (approximately 15 mg given as an aerosol) nor saline had significant effect on a citric acid challenge. 4. It is concluded that nedocromil sodium, but not sodium cromoglycate, possesses an anti-tussive action that may result from inhibition of sensory nerve activity in the lung. Nedocromil sodium may prove useful in the treatment of unproductive cough in situations where the use of a centrally-acting antitussive is undesirable. PMID:2836011

  6. Biocontrol agents-mediated suppression of oxalic acid induced cell death during Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-pea interaction.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akansha; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Surendra; Sarma, Birinchi Kumar; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2015-05-01

    Oxalic acid (OA) is an important pathogenic factor during early Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-host interaction and might work by reducing hydrogen peroxide production (H2 O2 ). In the present investigation, oxalic acid-induced cell death in pea was studied. Pea plants treated with biocontrol agents (BCAs) viz., Pseudomonas aeruginosa PJHU15, Bacillus subtilis BHHU100, and Trichoderma harzianum TNHU27 either singly and/or in consortium acted on S. sclerotiorum indirectly by enabling plants to inhibit the OA-mediated suppression of oxidative burst via induction of H2 O2 . Our results showed that BCA treated plants upon treatment with culture filtrate of the pathogen, conferred the resistance via. significantly decreasing relative cell death of pea against S. sclerotiorum compared to control plants without BCA treatment but treated with the culture filtrate of the pathogen. The results obtained from the present study indicate that the microbes especially in consortia play significant role in protection against S. sclerotiorum by modulating oxidative burst and partially enhancing tolerance by increasing the H2 O2 generation, which is otherwise suppressed by OA produced by the pathogen.

  7. Rheological and physical properties of camel and cow milk gels enriched with phosphate and calcium during acid-induced gelation.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Mohammad; Foukani, Mohammed; Karoui, Romdhane

    2017-02-01

    The rheological properties of acid-induced coagulation of camel and cow milk gels following the addition of calcium chloride (CaCl2) and hydrogen phosphate dehydrate (Na2HPO4*2H2O) were investigated using a dynamic low amplitude oscillatory rheology. For a considered condition, the final values of storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G″) of camel milk gels were significantly lower than those of cow milk gels. The increase of the added CaCl2 levels improved significantly the gelation properties of camel and cow milk gels, since a reduction in the gelation time and an increase in the gel firmness were observed. Following the addition of Na2HPO4*2H2O at 10 and 20 mM, no significant effect on the gelation rate and the firmness of camel milk gels was observed, while, a significant decrease in the gelation rate and firmness were observed for cow milk gels.

  8. Protective Effect of Cod (Gadus macrocephalus) Skin Collagen Peptides on Acetic Acid-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Huina; Wang, Zhicong; Hou, Hu; Zhang, Zhaohui; Li, Bafang

    2016-07-01

    This research was performed to explore the protective effect of cod skin collagen peptides (CCP) on gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid. The CCP were fractionated into low molecular CCP (LMCCP, Mw < 3 kDa) and high molecular CCP (HMCCP, Mw > 3 kDa). In HMCCP and LMCCP, glycine of accounted for about one-third of the total amino acids without cysteine and tryptophan, and hydrophobic amino acids accounted for about 50%. After 21 d CCP treatment (60 or 300 mg/kg, p.o./daily), the healing effects on acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers were evaluated by macroscopic measure, microscopic measure, and immune histochemistry. Moreover, the expression levels of the growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), and the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was detected. The results showed that both LMCCP and HMCCP could significantly decrease the ulcer areas and promote the healing of the lesions. They also could improve the levels of hexosamine, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, and reduce the content of malondialdehyde and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In addition, the expression level of TGFβ1 gene and HSP70 mRNA was significantly improved by the treatment. It suggested that CCP could be able to improve symptoms of gastric ulcer and probably be used in the treatment of gastric ulcer.

  9. Ellagic acid induces novel and atypical PKC isoforms and promotes caspase-3 dependent apoptosis by blocking energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sudha; Vinayak, Manjula

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidant ellagic acid is a herbal polyphenolic compound shown to possess growth-inhibiting and apoptotic activities in cancer. Protein kinase C (PKC) plays an important role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. Apoptosis of tumor cells is induced by inactivation of glycolytic enzyme of anaerobic metabolism, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-A, and by activating apoptotic protein caspase-3 via PKCδ. The present study aims to analyze the role of ellagic acid on regulation of novel and atypical isozymes of PKC to modulate apoptosis and anaerobic metabolism to prevent lymphoma growth as its role on classical PKCs is reported earlier. Expression of novel and atypical isozymes of PKC, activity of PKCδ, expression and activity of caspase-3, and LDH-A have been analyzed. Expression is measured by RT-PCR, activities of PKCδ as level of its catalytic fragment, caspase-3 as level of its p17 fragment, and LDH-A by specific staining. Lymphoma bearing mice were treated with 3 different doses of ellagic acid. The treatment enhanced expression of all novel and atypical PKCs, activity and expression of caspase-3, and activity of PKCδ but decreased activity and expression of LDH-A. Our results suggest that ellagic acid induces apoptosis via novel and atypical PKCs in association with caspase-3 and induces cancer cell death by blocking the energy metabolism.

  10. Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) induced hydroxyl radical formation in copper contaminated household drinking water: role of bicarbonate concentration.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Patric J; Asplund, Klara U M; Mäkelä, Johanna C; Lindqvist, Christer; Nordström, Tommy

    2003-08-01

    We have previously shown that Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) can trigger hydroxyl radical formation in copper contaminated household drinking water. We report here that the capacity of ascorbic acid to catalyze hydroxyl radical generation in the drinking water samples is strongly dependent on the bicarbonate concentration (buffer capacity and pH) of the samples. We found that at least 50 mg/l bicarbonate was required in the water samples to maintain the pH over 5.0 after ascorbic acid addition. At this pH, that is higher than the pKa1 4.25 of ascorbic acid, a hydroxyl radical generating redox cycling reaction involving the mono-anion of vitamin C and copper could take place. The ascorbic acid induced hydroxyl radical generating reaction could easily be mimicked in Milli-Q water by supplementing the water with copper and bicarbonate. Our results demonstrate that ascorbic acid can induce a pH dependent hydroxyl radical generating reaction in copper contaminated household tap water that is buffered with bicarbonate. The impact of consuming ascorbic acid together with copper and bicarbonate containing drinking water on human health is discussed.

  11. Swelling-activated and arachidonic acid-induced currents are TREK-1 in rat bladder smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukasaku, Mitsuko; Kimura, Junko; Yamaguchi, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Using the perforated patch voltage clamp, we investigated swelling-activated ionic channels (SACs) in rat urinary bladder smooth muscle cells. Hypo-osmotic (60%) bath solution increased a membrane current which was inhibited by the SAC inhibitor, gadolinium. The reversal potential of the hypotonicity-induced current shifted in the positive direction by increasing external K+ concentration. The hypotonicity-induced current was inhibited by extracellular acidic pH, phorbol ester and forskolin. These pharmacological properties are identical to those of arachidonic acid-induced current present in these cells, suggesting the presence of TREK-1, a four-transmembrane two pore domain K+ channel. Using RT-PCR we screened rat bladder smooth muscles and cerebellum for expression of TREK-1, TREK-2 and TRAAK mRNAs. Only TREK-1 mRNA was expressed in the bladder, while all three were expressed in the cerebellum. We conclude that a mechanosensitive K+ channel is present in rat bladder myocytes, which is activated by arachidonic acid and most likely is TREK-1. This K+ channel may have an important role in the regulation of bladder smooth muscle tone during urine storage. PMID:26911303

  12. Swelling-activated and arachidonic acid-induced currents are TREK-1 in rat bladder smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fukasaku, Mitsuko; Kimura, Junko; Yamaguchi, Osamu

    2016-06-08

    Using the perforated patch voltage clamp, we investigated swelling-activated ionic channels (SACs) in rat urinary bladder smooth muscle cells. Hypo-osmotic (60%) bath solution increased a membrane current which was inhibited by the SAC inhibitor, gadolinium. The reversal potential of the hypotonicity-induced current shifted in the positive direction by increasing external K(+) concentration. The hypotonicity-induced current was inhibited by extracellular acidic pH, phorbol ester and forskolin. These pharmacological properties are identical to those of arachidonic acid-induced current present in these cells, suggesting the presence of TREK-1, a four-transmembrane two pore domain K(+) channel. Using RT-PCR we screened rat bladder smooth muscles and cerebellum for expression of TREK-1, TREK-2 and TRAAK mRNAs. Only TREK-1 mRNA was expressed in the bladder, while all three were expressed in the cerebellum. We conclude that a mechanosensitive K(+) channel is present in rat bladder myocytes, which is activated by arachidonic acid and most likely is TREK-1. This K(+) channel may have an important role in the regulation of bladder smooth muscle tone during urine storage.

  13. Phenylbutyric acid induces the cellular senescence through an Akt/p21{sup WAF1} signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hag Dong; Jang, Chang-Young; Choe, Jeong Min; Sohn, Jeongwon; Kim, Joon

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenylbutyric acid induces cellular senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenylbutyric acid activates Akt kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The knockdown of PERK also can induce cellular senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt/p21{sup WAF1} pathway activates in PERK knockdown induced cellular senescence. -- Abstract: It has been well known that three sentinel proteins - PERK, ATF6 and IRE1 - initiate the unfolded protein response (UPR) in the presence of misfolded or unfolded proteins in the ER. Recent studies have demonstrated that upregulation of UPR in cancer cells is required to survive and proliferate. Here, we showed that long exposure to 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA), a chemical chaperone that can reduce retention of unfolded and misfolded proteins in ER, induced cellular senescence in cancer cells such as MCF7 and HT1080. In addition, we found that treatment with PBA activates Akt, which results in p21{sup WAF1} induction. Interestingly, the depletion of PERK but not ATF6 and IRE1 also induces cellular senescence, which was rescued by additional depletion of Akt. This suggests that Akt pathway is downstream of PERK in PBA induced cellular senescence. Taken together, these results show that PBA induces cellular senescence via activation of the Akt/p21{sup WAF1} pathway by PERK inhibition.

  14. The phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid induces AQP2 translocation independently from AQP2 phosphorylation in renal collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Valenti, G; Procino, G; Carmosino, M; Frigeri, A; Mannucci, R; Nicoletti, I; Svelto, M

    2000-06-01

    Phosphorylation by kinases and dephosphorylation by phosphatase markedly affect the biological activity of proteins involved in intracellular signaling. In this study we investigated the effect of the serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid on water permeability properties and on aquaporin2 (AQP2) translocation in AQP2-transfected renal CD8 cells. In CD8 cells both forskolin alone and okadaic acid alone increased the osmotic water permeability coefficient P(f) by about 4- to 5-fold. In intact cells, in vivo phosphorylation studies revealed that forskolin stimulation resulted in a threefold increase in AQP2 phosphorylation. In contrast, okadaic acid treatment promoted only a 60% increase in AQP2 phosphorylation which was abolished when this treatment was performed in the presence of 1 microM H89, a specific protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Nevertheless, in this latter condition, confocal microscopy analysis revealed that AQP2 translocated and fused to the apical membrane. Okadaic acid-induced AQP2 translocation was dose dependent having its maximal effect at a concentration of 1 microM. In conclusion, our results clearly indicate that okadaic acid exerts a full forskolin-like effect independent from AQP2 phosphorylation. Thus AQP2 phosphorylation is not essential for water channel translocation in renal cells, indicating that different pathways might exist leading to AQP2 apical insertion and increase in P(f).

  15. Attenuation of Folic Acid-Induced Renal Inflammatory Injury in Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Kent; Okamoto, Koji; Negishi, Kousuke; Suzuki, Yoshifumi; Nakao, Akihide; Fujita, Toshiro; Toda, Akiko; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Kita, Yoshihiro; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Ishii, Satoshi; Shimizu, Takao; Noiri, Eisei

    2006-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent lipid mediator with various biological activities, plays an important role in inflammation by recruiting leukocytes. In this study we used platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR)-deficient mice to elucidate the role of PAF in inflammatory renal injury induced by folic acid administration. PAFR-deficient mice showed significant amelioration of renal dysfunction and pathological findings such as acute tubular damage with neutrophil infiltration, lipid peroxidation observed with antibody to 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (day 2), and interstitial fibrosis with macrophage infiltration associated with expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the kidney (day 14). Acute tubular damage was attenuated by neutrophil depletion using a monoclonal antibody (RB6-8C5), demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils to acute phase injury. Macrophage infiltration was also decreased when treatment with a PAF antagonist (WEB2086) was started after acute phase. In vitro chemotaxis assay using a Boyden chamber demonstrated that PAF exhibits a strong chemotactic activity for macrophages. These results indicate that PAF is involved in pathogenesis of folic acid-induced renal injury by activating neutrophils in acute phase and macrophages in chronic interstitial fibrosis. Inhibiting the PAF pathway might be therapeutic to kidney injury from inflammatory cells. PMID:16651609

  16. Nucleotide sequence and spatial expression pattern of a drought- and abscisic Acid-induced gene of tomato.

    PubMed

    Plant, A L; Cohen, A; Moses, M S; Bray, E A

    1991-11-01

    The nucleotide sequence of le16, a tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) gene induced by drought stress and regulated by abscisic acid specifically in aerial vegetative tissue, is presented. The single open reading frame contained within the gene has the capacity to encode a polypeptide of 12.7 kilodaltons and is interrupted by a small intron. The predicted polypeptide is rich in leucine, glycine, and alanine and has an isoelectric point of 8.7. The amino terminus is hydrophobic and characteristic of signal sequences that target polypeptides for export from the cytoplasm. There is homology (47.2% identity) between the amino terminus of the LE 16 polypeptide and the corresponding amino terminal domain of the maize phospholipid transfer protein. le16 was expressed in drought-stressed leaf, petiole, and stem tissue and to a much lower extent in the pericarp of mature green tomato fruit and developing seeds. No expression was detected in the pericarp of red fruit or in drought-stressed roots. Expression of le16 was also induced in leaf tissue by a variety of other abiotic stresses including polyethylene glycol-mediated water deficit, salinity, cold stress, and heat stress. None of these stresses or direct applications of abscisic acid induced the expression of le16 in the roots of the same plants. The unique expression characteristics of this gene indicates that novel regulatory mechanisms, in addition to endogenous abscisic acid, are involved in controlling gene expression.

  17. Involvement of dopamine receptors within the dorsal hippocampus in suppression of the formalin-induced orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Shamsizadeh, Ali; Pahlevani, Pouyan; Haghparast, Amir; Moslehi, Maryam; Zarepour, Leila; Haghparast, Abbas

    2013-12-01

    It is widely established that the dopaminergic system has profound effects on pain modulation in different regions of the brain including the hippocampus, the salient area for brain functions. The orofacial region is one of the most densely innervated (by the trigeminal nerves) areas of the body susceptible to acute and chronic pains. In this study, we tried to examine the effects of dopamine receptors located in the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) region upon the modulation of orofacial pain induced by the formalin test. To induce orofacial pain in male Wistar rats, 50μl of 1% formalin was subcutaneously injected into the upper lip. In control and experimental groups, two guide cannulae were stereotaxically implanted in the CA1, and SKF-38393 (0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2μg/0.5μl saline) as a D1-like receptor agonist, SCH-23390 (1μg/0.5μl saline) as a D1-like receptor antagonist, Quinpirole (0.5, 1, 2 and 4μg/0.5μl saline) as a D2-like receptor agonist and Sulpiride(3μg/0.5μl DMSO) as a D2-like receptor antagonist or vehicles were microinjected. For induction of orofacial pain, 50μl of 1% formalin was subcutaneously injected into the left side of the upper lip. Results indicated that SKF-38393 at the dose of 1 and 2μg significantly reduced pain during the first and second phases of observed pain while SCH-23390 reversed such analgesic effect. Moreover, there is a significant difference between groups in which animals received 2 and 4μg quinpirole or vehicle in the first phase (early phase) of pain. The three high doses of this compound (1, 2 and 4μg) appeared to have an analgesic effect during the second (late) phase. Furthermore, Sulpiride could potentially reverse the observed analgesic effects already induced by an agonist. Current findings suggest that the dorsal hippocampal dopamine receptors exert an analgesic effect during the orofacial pain test.

  18. KINFix – A formalin-free non-commercial fixative optimized for histological, immunohistochemical and molecular analyses of neurosurgical tissue specimens

    PubMed Central

    Stefanits, Harald; Bieńkowski, Michał; Galanski, Markus; Mitulović, Goran; Ströbel, Thomas; Gelpi, Ellen; Ribalta, Teresa; Broholm, Helle; Hartmann, Christian; Kros, Johan M.; Preusser, Matthias; Hainfellner, Johannes A.

    2016-01-01

    An optimal fixative should ideally combine the advantages of formalin fixation and freezing, allowing for good preservation of histology and molecular components, easy handling and storage, lack of toxicity, and low costs. Most of these criteria are fulfilled by ethanol-based solutions, and due to our good experience with the commercial RCL2 fixative, reflected by our published single-center trial, we initiated a multicenter ring trial. However, during its course, RCL2 was discontinued on the market. Therefore, we created our own agent, KINFix, composed of the same main constituents as RCL2, and employed it in our laboratory with similar results. Here we present our evaluation of the three fixatives formalin, RCL2, and KINFix from the perspective of histopathology as well as nucleic acid and protein analyses in comparison to fresh frozen tissues together with the multicenter ring trial data for RCL2. We observe that RCL2 and KINFix offer comparable histomorphology and superior template for molecular analyses than formalin. Moreover, KINFix as freely available fixative might overcome some of the difficulties related to the commercial agents. Therefore, we conclude that KINFix might be an attractive complement to formalin in tissue processing and advocate its use in neuropathological practice. PMID:26521938

  19. Efficacy of bath treatments of formalin and copper sulfate on cultured white bass, Morone chrysops, concurrently infected by Onchocleidus mimus and Ichthyophthirius multifiliis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Treatment efficacy of repeated 1 h baths of formalin (100 mg/L) or copper sulfate (CuSO4) (2.1 mg/L) were evaluated against concurrent infections of Onchocleidus mimus (Mueller, 1936; Monogenoidea: Ancyrocephalidae) and Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Fouquet, 1876; Hymenostomatida: Ichthyopththiriida...

  20. KINFix--A formalin-free non-commercial fixative optimized for histological, immunohistochemical and molecular analyses of neurosurgical tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Stefanits, Harald; Bienkowski, Michal; Galanski, Markus; Mitulovic, Goran; Ströbel, Thomas; Gelpi, Ellen; Ribalta, Teresa; Broholm, Helle; Hartmann, Christian; Kros, Johan M; Preusser, Matthias; Hainfellner, Johannes A

    2016-01-01

    An optimal fixative should ideally combine the advantages of formalin fixation and freezing, allowing for good preservation of histology and molecular components, easy handling and storage, lack of toxicity, and low costs. Most of these criteria are fulfilled by ethanol-based solutions, and due to our good experience with the commercial RCL2 fixative, reflected by our published single-center trial, we initiated a multicenter ring trial. However, during its course, RCL2 was discontinued on the market. Therefore, we created our own agent, KINFix, composed of the same main constituents as RCL2, and employed it in our laboratory with similar results. Here we present our evaluation of the three fixatives formalin, RCL2, and KINFix from the perspective of histopathology as well as nucleic acid and protein analyses in comparison to fresh frozen tissues together with the multicenter ring trial data for RCL2. We observe that RCL2 and KINFix offer comparable histomorphology and superior template for molecular analyses than formalin. Moreover, KINFix as freely available fixative might overcome some of the difficulties related to the commercial agents. Therefore, we conclude that KINFix might be an attractive complement to formalin in tissue processing and advocate its use in neuropathological practice.

  1. The effects of age-in-block on RNA-seq analysis of archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Archival samples represent a vast resource for identification of chemical and pharmaceutical targets. Previous use of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples has been limited due to changes in RNA introduced by fixation and embedding procedures. Recent advances in RNA-seq...

  2. Mining the archives: a cross-platform analysis of gene expression profiles in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples represent a potentially invaluable resource for genomic research into the molecular basis of disease. However, use of FFPE samples in gene expression studies has been limited by technical challenges resulting from degradation...

  3. Primary oral Penicillium marneffei infection diagnosed by PCR-based molecular identification and transmission electron microscopic observation from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xia; Zhang, Ruifeng; Yang, Hanjun; Lei, Song; Zhang, Yizhi; Ran, Yuping

    2012-11-07

    We report a case of primary oral Penicillium marneffei infection in a 39-year-old man without HIV infection. Although fungal culture was negative, the patient was finally confirmed to have P. marneffei infection by PCR-based molecular identification and transmission electron microscopic observation from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. The patient was cured with taking itraconazole for 3 months.

  4. Selective 5-HT7 receptor agonists LP 44 and LP 211 elicit an analgesic effect on formalin-induced orofacial pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    DEMİRKAYA, Kadriye; AKGÜN, Özlem Martı; ŞENEL, Buğra; ÖNCEL TORUN, Zeynep; SEYREK, Melik; LACİVİTA, Enza; LEOPOLDO, Marcello; DOĞRUL, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The most recently identified serotonin (5-HT) receptor is the 5-HT7 receptor. The antinociceptive effects of a 5-HT7 receptor agonist have been shown in neuropathic and inflammatory animal models of pain. A recent study demonstrated the functional expression of 5-HT7 receptors in the substantia gelatinosa (SG) of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis, which receives and processes orofacial nociceptive inputs. Objective To investigate the antinociceptive effects of pharmacological activation of 5-HT7 receptors on orofacial pain in mice. Material and Methods Nociception was evaluated by using an orofacial formalin test in male Balb-C mice. Selective 5-HT7 receptor agonists, LP 44 and LP 211 (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg), were given intraperitoneally 30 min prior to a formalin injection. A bolus of 10 µl of 4% subcutaneous formalin was injected into the upper lip of mice and facial grooming behaviors were monitored. The behavioral responses consisted of two distinct periods, the early phase corresponding to acute pain (Phase I: 0–12 min) and the late phase (Phase II: 12–30 min). Results LP 44 and LP 211 (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg) produced an analgesic effect with reductions in face rubbing time in both Phase I and Phase II of the formalin test. Conclusion Our results suggest that 5-HT7 receptor agonists may be promising analgesic drugs in the treatment of orofacial pain. PMID:27383702

  5. Differential roles of spinal cholera toxin- and pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins in nociceptive responses caused by formalin, capsaicin, and substance P in mice.

    PubMed

    Chung, K M; Lee, K C; Choi, S S; Suh, H W

    2001-03-15

    The aim of the present study is to characterize the roles of spinal cholera toxin (CTX)- and pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G proteins in the regulation of various nociceptive responses. The effects of intrathecal (i.t.) pretreatments with CTX and PTX on the formalin (subcutaneous)-, capsaicin (i.t.)-, and substance P (SP; i.t.)-induced nociceptive behaviours were examined in mice. Pretreatment with CTX (i.t.; 24 h before) significantly and dose-dependently (0.05-0.5 microg) suppressed both the first and second phases of the formalin-induced nociceptive behaviour. On the other hand, pretreatment with PTX (i.t., 6 days before) at the same doses (0.05-N0.5 microg) did not affect the formalin-induced response. Capsaicin (i.t., 0.5 microg)- and SP (i.t., 0.7 microg)-induced nociceptive behaviours were attenuated by the pretreatment with CTX. In addition, SP-induced nociceptive response was also attenuated by the pretreatment with PTX. However, the capsaicin-induced nociceptive response was not influenced by PTX pretreatment. These findings suggest that, at the spinal cord level, CTX-sensitive G-proteins are involved in the formalin-, capsaicin-, and SP-induced nociceptive behavioural responses, whereas PTX-sensitive G proteins are involved in SP-induced nociceptive response.

  6. Use of Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in diagnosis of Marek’s disease and reticuloendotheliosis in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumorous tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PCR was used in diagnosis of Marek’s disease (MD) and reticuloendotheliosis (RE) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumorous tissues that have been stored for periods varied from 5-244 months. In another experiment, PCR was also used in diagnosis of MD in tumorous tissues that have been onl...

  7. The effectiveness of repeated tank treatments of copper sulfate and formalin on gill flukes and Ich in naturally infested white bass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ectoparasites infesting the gills of juvenile fish reared in tanks can cause serious fish losses. Multiple treatments of formalin and copper sulfate (CuSO4) were evaluated for effectiveness against a natural infestation of gill flukes Onchocleidus mimus (Monogenoidea: Ancyrocephalidae) and Ichthyop...

  8. Comparison of eight commercially available kits for DNA extraction from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Janecka, Anna; Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Gasińska, Anna

    2015-05-01

    A proper extraction method from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks is essential to obtain DNA of satisfactory quality/quantity. We compared the effectiveness of eight commercially available kits for DNA extraction based on 10 FFPE tissues. Kits differed significantly in terms of DNA yield, purity, and quality. Using the QIAamp DNA FFPE Tissue Kit (Qiagen) and the ReliaPrep FFPE gDNA Miniprep System (Promega), we obtained DNA of the highest quality and acceptable quantity. We also demonstrated that overnight digestion of samples usually improved DNA yield and/or purity. For precious or limited material, double elution is recommended for obtaining up to 42% higher amount of DNA.

  9. Detection of loss of heterozygosity in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor specimens by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, A. B.; Navone, N. M.; Conti, C. J.

    1991-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-based procedure was used for the detection of DNA length polymorphisms generated by naturally occurring genetic deletions or insertions of known sequence. This method consists of a simple one-step assay that does not require any restriction enzyme analysis or Southern blot hybridization, allowing identification in ethidium bromide-stained gels. The procedure described here was used to detect loss of heterozygosity at various loci, including the Hbb beta-globin gene cluster, in chemically induced mouse skin tumors, using a variety of tissue preparations, including microdissection of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens, short-term cultures, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting of epithelial populations. This approach may be useful in detecting tumor-specific reduction to homozygosity at polymorphic chromosomal loci, allowing the mapping of putative tumor-suppressor loci involved in carcinogenesis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1992758

  10. Development and evaluation of a formalin-inactivated West Nile Virus vaccine (WN-VAX) for a human vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Posadas-Herrera, Guillermo; Inoue, Shingo; Fuke, Isao; Muraki, Yuko; Mapua, Cynthia A; Khan, Afjal Hossain; Parquet, Maria Del Carmen; Manabe, Sadao; Tanishita, Osamu; Ishikawa, Toyokazu; Natividad, Filipinas F; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Hasebe, Futoshi; Morita, Kouichi

    2010-11-23

    A formalin-inactivated West Nile Virus (WNV) vaccine (WN-VAX) derived from the WNV-NY99 strain was tested for its safety, efficacy, dilution limit for complete protection, and cross-neutralization. Safety tests performed with experimental animals, bacteria, or cultured cell lines showed no evidence of short- or long-term adverse effects. WN-VAX also protected 100% of 4-week-old mice against a lethal challenge from the WNV-NY99 strain after two doses of intraperitoneal inoculation-even when the vaccine was diluted to 3.2ng/dose. Moreover, very limited cross-neutralization activity against Japanese encephalitis virus, Dengue virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Yellow fever virus or St. Louis encephalitis virus was observed. Therefore, the WN-VAX satisfies the requirements for human trials planned to be done in Japan.

  11. Central effect of histamine and peripheral effect of histidine on the formalin-induced pain response in mice.

    PubMed

    Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Rahimi, Saead

    2004-08-01

    1. The present study was designed to investigate the role of brain histamine in modulating pain transmission in mice. 2. In conscious mice implanted with an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) cannula, the effects of i.v.c. injections of normal saline (control) and low and high doses histamine (2 and 40 microg/mouse, respectively) were investigated on the duration of paw licking and biting induced by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of formalin (20 microL; 5%) into the plantar surface of the left hindpaw. 3. To clarify the involvement of histidine in the pain response, the effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of low and high doses of histidine (50 and 1000 mg/kg, respectively) alone or before i.c.v. injection of histamine were also examined. 4. Intraplantar injection of formalin induced a biphasic pain response (first phase: 0-5 min after injection; second phase: 20-40 min after injection). 5. Histamine (2 microg/mouse, i.c.v.) had no effect on the first phase of the pain response, but suppressed the second phase. The higher dose of histamine (40 microg/mouse, i.c.v.) suppressed both phases of the pain response. 6. Histidine, at 50 mg/kg, i.p., had no effect on the pain response, but the higher dose (1000 mg/kg, i.p.) suppressed the both phases of the pain response. 7. Pretreatment with the low dose of histidine (50 mg/kg, i.p.) prior to administration of 2 microg/mouse, i.c.v., histamine did not change the antinociception induced by low-dose histamine. However, pretreatment with the high dose of histidine (1000 mg/kg, i.p.) prior to 2 microg/mouse, i.c.v., histamine produced antinociception that resembled that seen following administration of the high dose of either histidine or histamine. Pretreatment with the low dose of histidine (50 mg/kg, i.p.) prior to administration of 40 microg/mouse, i.c.v., histamine has no effect on the pain response following high-dose histamine. Pretreatment with 1000 mg/kg, i.p., histidine prior to administration of 40 microg

  12. High-quality genomic DNA extraction from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples deparaffinized using mineral oil

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jianghai; Kennedy, Stephen H.; Svarovsky, Therese; Rogers, Jeffrey; Kemnitz, Joseph W.; Xu, Anlong; Zondervan, Krina T.

    2009-01-01

    Extracting DNA from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue remains a challenge, despite numerous attempts to develop a more effective method. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) success rates with DNA extracted using current methods remain low. We extracted DNA from 140 long-term archived FFPE samples using a simple but effective deparaffinization method, removing the wax with mineral oil, and a commercially available DNA extraction kit. DNA quality was subsequently tested in a genotyping experiment with 14 microsatellite markers. High-quality DNA was obtained with a mean PCR success rate of 97% (range: 88–100%) across markers. The results suggested that DNA extracted using this novel method is likely to be suitable for genetic studies involving DNA fragments <200 bp. PMID:19698695

  13. [Amyloid typing from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues using LMD-LC-MS/MS system].

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Masayoshi; Obayashi, Konen; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Ando, Yukio

    2014-03-01

    Amyloidosis is one of the protein conformational disorders in which normally soluble proteins accumulate insoluble amyloid fibrils, leading to severe organ dysfunction. To date, 30 different amyloidogenic proteins have been reported. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is usually used to identify the amyloid precursor protein, but the results may be inconclusive owing to a loss of epitopes or small amounts of amyloid deposits, comprising unknown amyloidogenic protein. Recently, laser microdissection (LMD)-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been used in a novel method to identify amyloid precursor protein from amyloid-laden formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues. We describe the usefulness of the system for amyloid typing in this report.

  14. Molecular identification of Coccidioides immitis in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from a Colombian patient.

    PubMed

    Canteros, Cristina E; Vélez H, Alejandro; Toranzo, Adriana I; Suárez-Alvarez, Roberto; Tobón O, Ángela; Jimenez A, María del Pilar; Restrepo M, Ángela

    2015-06-01

    Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii are the etiologic agents of coccidioidomycosis, an endemic fungal disease of the Americas. In Colombia, this mycosis is uncommon, and only five cases, two of them imported, have been documented.By means of DNA sequencing, C. immitis was identified in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissues samples from the 5th Colombian patient diagnosed in 1997. The patient was born in Pinto, Department of Magdalena, and had never visited other geographic regions, a reason to consider that the mycosis had been acquired locally.This species is primarily found in California although it has been occasionally reported in other geographic areas such as Mexico and Brazil. This is the first indigenous report of C. immitis-associated coccidioidomycosis in a Colombian patient.

  15. Use of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples for gene expression studies in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Musella, Valeria; Callari, Maurizio; Di Buduo, Eleonora; Scuro, Manuela; Dugo, Matteo; Miodini, Patrizia; Bianchini, Giampaolo; Paolini, Biagio; Gianni, Luca; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Cappelletti, Vera

    2015-01-01

    To obtain gene expression profiles from samples collected in clinical trials, we conducted a pilot study to assess feasibility and estimate sample attrition rates when profiling formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens. Ten matched fresh-frozen and fixed breast cancer samples were profiled using the Illumina HT-12 and Ref-8 chips, respectively. The profiles obtained with Ref 8, were neither technically nor biologically reliable since they failed to yield the expected separation between estrogen receptor positive and negative samples. With the use of Affymetrix HG-U133 2.0 Plus chips on fixed samples and a quantitative polymerase chain reaction -based sample pre-assessment step, results were satisfactory in terms of biological reliability, despite the low number of present calls (M = 21%±5). Compared with the Illumina DASL WG platform, Affymetrix data showed a wider interquartile range (1.32 vs 0.57, P<2.2 E-16,) and larger fold changes. The Affymetrix chips were used to run a pilot study on 60 fixed breast cancers. By including in the workflow the sample pre-assessment steps, 96% of the samples predicted to give good results (44/46), were in fact rated as satisfactory from the point of view of technical and biological meaningfulness. Our gene expression profiles showed strong agreement with immunohistochemistry data, were able to reproduce breast cancer molecular subtypes, and allowed the validation of an estrogen receptor status classifier derived in frozen samples. The approach is therefore suitable to profile formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples collected in clinical trials, provided that quality controls are run both before (sample pre-assessment) and after hybridization on the array.

  16. Hydroalcoholic extract of Brazilian red propolis exerts protective effects on acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Bezerra, Gislaine; de Menezes de Souza, Luana; Dos Santos, Adailma Santana; de Almeida, Grace Kelly Melo; Souza, Marília Trindade Santana; Santos, Sandra Lauton; Aparecido Camargo, Enilton; Dos Santos Lima, Bruno; de Souza Araújo, Adriano Antunes; Cardoso, Juliana Cordeiro; Gomes, Silvana Vieira Floresta; Gomes, Margarete Zanardo; de Albuquerque, Ricardo Luiz Cavalcanti

    2017-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a common intestinal inflammatory disease with an etiology that is not well understood. Although the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects of the hydroalcoholic extract of Brazilian red propolis (HERP) have been reported in various experimental models, its protective effect in models of UC have not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemopreventive effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Brazilian red propolis (HERP) in acetic acid-induced colitis (AAIC) using a rodent model. The HERP was chemically characterised by HPLC/DAD analyses. Male rats were randomly assigned into four groups: sham, vehicle (with AAIC, treated with vehicle), P10 (with AAIC, treated with 10mg/kg HERP), and P100 (with AAIC, treated with 100mg/kg HERP). Treatments were performed for 7days, and colitis was induced on day seven. Animals were euthanized 24h after colitis induction and body weight, colon length, gross and histological scores, malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) concentrations in colon tissue, and the immunohistochemical expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were assessed. The major compounds found in HERP were liquiritigenin (68.8mg/g), formononetin (54.29mg/g), biochanin A (30.97mg/g), and daidzein (19.90mg/g). Rats treated with 10mg/kg HERP demonstrated significant decreases in MPO concentrations, gross and histological scores of tissue damage, and iNOS expression (p<0.05). Similarly, rats treated with 100mg/kg HERP demonstrated significant decreases in MPO levels (p<0.05) and histological scores of tissue damage (p<0.05). The results of this study indicate that oral administration of HERP attenuates AAIC in rats, which may be due to anti-inflammatory effects related to iNOS inhibition.

  17. Chronic activity wheel running reduces the severity of kainic acid-induced seizures in the rat: possible role of galanin.

    PubMed

    Reiss, J I; Dishman, R K; Boyd, H E; Robinson, J K; Holmes, P V

    2009-04-17

    Studies in both humans and rodents suggest that exercise can be neuroprotective, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are still poorly understood. Three weeks of voluntary, physical activity in rats upregulates prepro-galanin messenger RNA levels in the locus coeruleus. Galanin is a neuropeptide extensively coexisting with norepinephrine that decreases neuronal hyperexcitability both in vivo and in vitro. Thus, exercise may diminish neural hyperexcitability through a galaninergic mechanism. The current experiments tested whether voluntary activity wheel running would protect against kainic acid-evoked seizures and whether galaninergic signaling is a necessary factor in this protection. In experiment 1, rats were given access to running wheels or remained sedentary for three weeks. After this period, rats received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 0, 7, 10 or 14 mg/kg kainic acid. Exercise decreased the severity of or eliminated seizure behaviors and hippocampal c-fos expression induced by kainic acid. In experiment 2, exercising or sedentary rats were injected intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) with 0.2 or 0.4 microg of kainic acid following either an injection of M-40 (a galanin receptor antagonist) or saline. Exercise decreased kainic acid-induced seizures at the 0.2 microg dose, and M-40 (6 nmol) decreased this effect. In contrast, there were no detectable differences between exercising and sedentary rats in behavior at the 0.4 microg dose. The results suggest that the protective effects of exercise against seizures are at least partially mediated by regulation of neural excitability through a process involving galanin.

  18. Mitochondrial proteomics of the acetic acid - induced programmed cell death response in a highly tolerant Zygosaccharomyces bailii - derived hybrid strain

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Joana F.; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Soares, Renata; Coelho, Ana V.; Leão, Cecília; Ludovico, Paula; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Very high concentrations of acetic acid at low pH induce programmed cell death (PCD) in both the experimental model Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in Zygosaccharomyces bailii, the latter being considered the most problematic acidic food spoilage yeast due to its remarkable intrinsic resistance to this food preservative. However, while the mechanisms underlying S. cerevisiae PCD induced by acetic acid have been previously examined, the corresponding molecular players remain largely unknown in Z. bailii. Also, the reason why acetic acid concentrations known to be necrotic for S. cerevisiae induce PCD with an apoptotic phenotype in Z. bailii remains to be elucidated. In this study, a 2-DE-based expression mitochondrial proteomic analysis was explored to obtain new insights into the mechanisms involved in PCD in the Z. bailii derived hybrid strain ISA1307. This allowed the quantitative assessment of expression of protein species derived from each of the parental strains, with special emphasis on the processes taking place in the mitochondria known to play a key role in acetic acid - induced PCD. A marked decrease in the content of proteins involved in mitochondrial metabolism, in particular, in respiratory metabolism (Cor1, Rip1, Lpd1, Lat1 and Pdb1), with a concomitant increase in the abundance of proteins involved in fermentation (Pdc1, Ald4, Dld3) was registered. Other differentially expressed identified proteins also suggest the involvement of the oxidative stress response, protein translation, amino acid and nucleotide metabolism, among other processes, in the PCD response. Overall, the results strengthen the emerging concept of the importance of metabolic regulation of yeast PCD. PMID:28357336

  19. Glia activation and cytokine increase in rat hippocampus by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Massimo; Perego, Carlo; Aliprandi, Marisa; Richichi, Cristina; Ravizza, Teresa; Colella, Daniele; Velískŏvá, Jana; Moshé, Solomon L; De Simoni, M Grazia; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2003-12-01

    In adult rats, status epilepticus (SE) induces cytokine production by glia especially when seizures are associated with neuronal injury. This suggests that cytokines may play a role in seizure-induced neuronal damage. As SE-induced injury is age-specific, we used rats of different ages (with distinct susceptibilities to seizure-induced neuronal injury) to elucidate the role of cytokines in this process. Thus, we investigated the activation of microglia and astrocytes, induction of cytokines, and hippocampal neuronal injury 4 and 24 h following kainic acid-induced SE in postnatal day (PN) 9, 15, and 21 rats. At PN9, there was little activation of microglia and astrocytes at any time point studied. Interleukin-1beta (IL), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and IL-6 or the naturally occurring IL-1 receptor antagonist (Ra) mRNA expression did not increase. No evidence of cell injury has been detected. At PN15, immunostaining of microglia and astrocytes was enhanced, but only IL-1beta mRNA expression was increased. These changes were observed 4 h after SE. Scattered injured neurons in CA3 and subiculum, but not in any other region, were present 24 h following SE. At PN21, immunostaining of microglia and astrocytes and the mRNA expression of all cytokines studied was significantly increased already 4 h after SE. At 24 h, many injured neurons were present in CA1 and CA3 regions and in 40% of rats in other forebrain areas. These data show that (i) the pattern of glia activation and cytokine gene transcription induced by SE is age-dependent and (ii) neuronal injury in the hippocampus occurs only when cytokines are induced and their synthesis precedes the appearance of neuronal damage. Thus, cytokine expression in immature brain is associated specifically with cell injury rather than with seizures per se, suggesting that proinflammatory cytokines may contribute to the occurence of SE-induced hippocampal damage.

  20. Subchronic treatment of donepezil rescues impaired social, hyperactive, and stereotypic behavior in valproic acid-induced animal model of autism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Woon; Seung, Hana; Kwon, Kyung Ja; Ko, Mee Jung; Lee, Eun Joo; Oh, Hyun Ah; Choi, Chang Soon; Kim, Ki Chan; Gonzales, Edson Luck; You, Jueng Soo; Choi, Dong-Hee; Lee, Jongmin; Han, Seol-Heui; Yang, Sung Min; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Shin, Chan Young; Bahn, Geon Ho

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of pervasive developmental disorders with core symptoms such as sociability deficit, language impairment, and repetitive/restricted behaviors. Although worldwide prevalence of ASD has been increased continuously, therapeutic agents to ameliorate the core symptoms especially social deficits, are very limited. In this study, we investigated therapeutic potential of donepezil for ASD using valproic acid-induced autistic animal model (VPA animal model). We found that prenatal exposure of valproic acid (VPA) induced dysregulation of cholinergic neuronal development, most notably the up-regulation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the prefrontal cortex of affected rat and mouse offspring. Similarly, differentiating cortical neural progenitor cell in culture treated with VPA showed increased expression of AChE in vitro. Chromatin precipitation experiments revealed that acetylation of histone H3 bound to AChE promoter region was increased by VPA. In addition, other histone deacetyalse inhibitors (HDACIs) such as trichostatin A and sodium butyrate also increased the expression of AChE in differentiating neural progenitor cells suggesting the essential role of HDACIs in the regulation of AChE expression. For behavioral analysis, we injected PBS or donepezil (0.3 mg/kg) intraperitoneally to control and VPA mice once daily from postnatal day 14 all throughout the experiment. Subchronic treatment of donepezil improved sociability and prevented repetitive behavior and hyperactivity of VPA-treated mice offspring. Taken together, these results provide evidence that dysregulation of ACh system represented by the up-regulation of AChE may serve as an effective pharmacological therapeutic target against autistic behaviors in VPA animal model of ASD, which should be subjected for further investigation to verify the clinical relevance.

  1. Priming by Hexanoic Acid Induce Activation of Mevalonic and Linolenic Pathways and Promotes the Emission of Plant Volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Llorens, Eugenio; Camañes, Gemma; Lapeña, Leonor; García-Agustín, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Hexanoic acid (Hx) is a short natural monocarboxylic acid present in some fruits and plants. Previous studies reported that soil drench application of this acid induces effective resistance in tomato plants against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae and in citrus against Alternaria alternata and Xanthomonas citri. In this work, we performed an in deep study of the metabolic changes produced in citrus by the application of Hx in response to the challenge pathogen A. alternata, focusing on the response of the plant. Moreover, we used 13C labeled hexanoic to analyze its behavior inside the plants. Finally, we studied the volatile emission of the treated plants after the challenge inoculation. Drench application of 13C labeled hexanoic demonstrated that this molecule stays in the roots and is not mobilized to the leaves, suggesting long distance induction of resistance. Moreover, the study of the metabolic profile showed an alteration of more than 200 molecules differentially induced by the application of the compound and the inoculation with the fungus. Bioinformatics analysis of data showed that most of these altered molecules could be related with the mevalonic and linolenic pathways suggesting the implication of these pathways in the induced resistance mediated by Hx. Finally, the application of this compound showed an enhancement of the emission of 17 volatile metabolites. Taken together, this study indicates that after the application of Hx this compound remains in the roots, provoking molecular changes that may trigger the defensive response in the rest of the plant mediated by changes in the mevalonic and linolenic pathways and enhancing the emission of volatile compounds, suggesting for the first time the implication of mevalonic pathway in response to hexanoic application. PMID:27148319

  2. Retinoic Acid Inducible Gene 1 Protein (RIG1)-Like Receptor Pathway Is Required for Efficient Nuclear Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Nazish; Ospino, Frank; Himmati, Farhan; Lee, Jieun; Chanda, Palas; Mocarski, Edward S; Cooke, John P

    2017-03-09

    We have revealed a critical role for innate immune signaling in nuclear reprogramming to pluripotency, and in the nuclear reprogramming required for somatic cell transdifferentiation. Activation of innate immune signaling causes global changes in the expression and activity of epigenetic modifiers to promote epigenetic plasticity. In our previous articles, we focused on the role of toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) in this signaling pathway. Here, we define the role of another innate immunity pathway known to participate in response to viral RNA, the retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 receptor (RIG-1)-like receptor (RLR) pathway. This pathway is represented by the sensors of viral RNA, RIG-1, LGP2, and melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5). We first found that TLR3 deficiency only causes a partial inhibition of nuclear reprogramming to pluripotency in mouse tail-tip fibroblasts, which motivated us to determine the contribution of RLR. We found that knockdown of interferon beta promoter stimulator 1, the common adaptor protein for the RLR family, substantially reduced nuclear reprogramming induced by retroviral or by modified messenger RNA expression of Oct 4, Sox2, KLF4, and c-MYC (OSKM). Importantly, a double knockdown of both RLR and TLR3 pathway led to a further decrease in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) colonies suggesting an additive effect of both these pathways on nuclear reprogramming. Furthermore, in murine embryonic fibroblasts expressing a doxycycline (dox)-inducible cassette of the genes encoding OSKM, an RLR agonist increased the yield of iPSCs. Similarly, the RLR agonist enhanced nuclear reprogramming by cell permeant peptides of the Yamanaka factors. Finally, in the dox-inducible system, RLR activation promotes activating histone marks in the promoter region of pluripotency genes. To conclude, innate immune signaling mediated by RLR plays a critical role in nuclear reprogramming. Manipulation of innate immune signaling may facilitate

  3. Niflumic acid-induced increase in potassium currents in frog motor nerve terminals: effects on transmitter release.

    PubMed

    Miralles, F; Marsal, J; Peres, J; Solsona, C

    1996-04-01

    The actions of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug niflumic acid were studied on frog neuromuscular preparations by conventional electrophysiological techniques. Niflumic acid reduced the amplitude and increased the latency of endplate potentials in a concentration-dependent manner. Neuromuscular junctions pretreated with niflumic acid (0.05-0.5 mM) showed much less depression than control when they were stimulated with trains of impulses. Inhibition of acetylcholine release was reverted by raising the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration but not by simply washing out the preparations with niflumic acid-free solutions. Pretreatment with indomethacin (0.1 mM), another nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, did not affect the niflumic acid-induced inhibition of evoked responses. Niflumic acid (0.1 mM) did not change the amplitude of miniature endplate potentials and had a dual action on the frequency of miniatures: it decreased their frequency at 0.1 mM whereas it produced an enormous increase in the rate of spontaneous discharge at 0.5 mM. Niflumic acid (0.1 - 1 mM) reversibly increased the amplitude and affected the kinetics of presynaptic voltage-activated K+ current and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) current in a concentration-dependent manner. Niflumic acid (0.1 - 1 mM) irreversibly decreased the amplitude and reversibly affected the kinetics of the nodal Na(+) current. Indomethacin (0.1 mM) had no effect on presynaptic currents. In conclusion, niflumic acid reduces acetylcholine release by increasing presynaptic K+ currents. This may shorten the depolarizing phase of the presynaptic action potential and may reduce the entry of Ca(2+) with each impulse.

  4. Arachidonic acid-induced Ca2+ sensitization of smooth muscle contraction through activation of Rho-kinase.

    PubMed

    Araki, S; Ito, M; Kureishi, Y; Feng, J; Machida, H; Isaka, N; Amano, M; Kaibuchi, K; Hartshorne, D J; Nakano, T

    2001-02-01

    Arachidonic acid activates isolated Rho-kinase and contracts permeabilized smooth muscle fibres. Various assays were carried out to examine the mechanism of this activation. Native Rho-kinase was activated 5-6 times by arachidonic acid but an N-terminal, constitutively-active fragment of Rho-kinase, expressed as a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion protein and including the catalytic subunit (GST-Rho-kinase-CAT), was not. GST-Rho-kinase-CAT was inhibited by a C-terminal fragment of Rho-kinase and arachidonic acid removed this inhibition. These results suggest that the C-terminal part of Rho-kinase, containing the RhoA binding site and the pleckstrin homology domain, acts as an autoinhibitor. It is suggested further that activation by arachidonic acid is due to its binding to the autoinhibitory region and subsequent release from the catalytic site. Arachidonic acid, at concentrations greater than 30 microM, increases force in alpha-toxin-permeabilized femoral artery but not in Triton X-100-skinned fibres. The content of Rho-kinase in the latter was lower than in alpha-toxin-treated or intact fibres. The arachidonic acid-induced contraction was not observed at a pCa above 8.0 and was inhibited by Y-27632 and wortmannin, inhibitors of Rho-kinase and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), respectively. The activation of Rho-kinase and subsequent phosphorylation of the myosin phosphatase target subunit inhibits myosin phosphatase and increases myosin phosphorylation.

  5. Stability of the Acetic Acid-Induced Bladder Irritation Model in Alpha Chloralose-Anesthetized Female Cats

    PubMed Central

    Kullmann, F. Aura; Wells, Grace I.; Langdale, Christopher L.; Zheng, Jihong; Thor, Karl B.

    2013-01-01

    Time- and vehicle-related variability of bladder and urethral rhabdosphincter (URS) activity as well as cardiorespiratory and blood chemistry values were examined in the acetic acid-induced bladder irritation model in α-chloralose-anesthetized female cats. Additionally, bladder and urethra were evaluated histologically using Mason trichrome and toluidine blue staining. Urodynamic, cardiovascular and respiratory parameters were collected during intravesical saline infusion followed by acetic acid (0.5%) to irritate the bladder. One hour after starting acetic acid infusion, a protocol consisting of a cystometrogram, continuous infusion-induced rhythmic voiding contractions, and a 5 min “quiet period” (bladder emptied without infusion) was precisely repeated every 30 minutes. Administration of vehicle (saline i.v.) occurred 15 minutes after starting each of the first 7 cystometrograms and duloxetine (1mg/kg i.v.) after the 8th. Acetic acid infusion into the bladder increased URS-EMG activity, bladder contraction frequency, and decreased contraction amplitude and capacity, compared to saline. Bladder activity and URS activity stabilized within 1 and 2 hours, respectively. Duloxetine administration significantly decreased bladder contraction frequency and increased URS-EMG activity to levels similar to previous reports. Cardiorespiratory parameters and blood gas levels remained consistent throughout the experiment. The epithelium of the bladder and urethra were greatly damaged and edema and infiltration of neutrophils in the lamina propria of urethra were observed. These data provide an ample evaluation of the health of the animals, stability of voiding function and appropriateness of the model for testing drugs designed to evaluate lower urinary tract as well as cardiovascular and respiratory systems function. PMID:24040064

  6. Functional and cellular characterization of human Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1) mutations associated with Smith-Magenis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Smith-Magenis Syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome in which the dosage sensitive gene has been identified: the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1). Little is known about the function of human RAI1. Results We generated the full-length cDNA of the wild type protein and five mutated forms: RAI1-HA 2687delC, RAI1-HA 3103delC, RAI1 R960X, RAI1-HA Q1562R, and RAI1-HA S1808N. Four of them have been previously associated with SMS clinical phenotype. Molecular weight, subcellular localization and transcription factor activity of the wild type and mutant forms were studied by western blot, immunofluorescence and luciferase assays respectively. The wild type protein and the two missense mutations presented a higher molecular weight than expected, localized to the nucleus and activated transcription of a reporter gene. The frameshift mutations generated a truncated polypeptide with transcription factor activity but abnormal subcellular localization, and the same was true for the 1-960aa N-terminal half of RAI1. Two different C-terminal halves of the RAI1 protein (1038aa-end and 1229aa-end) were able to localize into the nucleus but had no transactivation activity. Conclusion Our results indicate that transcription factor activity and subcellular localization signals reside in two separate domains of the protein and both are essential for the correct functionality of RAI1. The pathogenic outcome of some of the mutated forms can be explained by the dissociation of these two domains. PMID:20738874

  7. The Healing Effect of Teucrium polium in Acetic Acid-Induced Ulcerative Colitis in the Dog as an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabani, Davood; Bahrami, Faranak; Hosseini, Seyed Vahid; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad; Tanideh, Nader; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Amini, Masoud; Amini, Afshin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which include ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD), are debilitating and chronic disorders with unpredictable courses and complicated treatment measures. Therefore, an efficient treatment protocol seems necessary as therapeutic prophylaxis for these disorders. This study aims to determine the healing effect of Teucrium polium (T. polium) in acetic acid-induced UC in an experimental dog model. METHODS From September to December 2010, eight male (20-25 kg) crossbred dogs were used for induction of UC by 6% acetic acid, transrectally. After one week, three biopsies (10, 20 and 30 cm proximal to the anal verge) were taken from the colon of each animal for histological studies. In the presence of UC, 400 mg/kg/day of T. polium extract was administered orally and transrectally (via enema) for 30 days in six of the dogs. The remaining two dogs were used as controls and did not receive T. polium. Multiple biopsies were taken 7, 14, and 30 days after discontinuation of T. polium in the same manner as before treatment. RESULTS After administration of acetic acid, we noted the presence of multiple ulcers, diffuse inflammation, PMN infiltration in the lamina propria, glandular destruction and goblet cell depletion. Treatment with T. polium restored the colonic architecture with an increased number of healthy cells and a reduction in inflammatory cells. Damage of the surface epithelial cells and mucosal layer of the lumen were reversed, which lead to faster ulcer healing. CONCLUSION T. polium may be a treatment choice for UC and can broaden the current therapy options for UC. PMID:24829634

  8. Distribution of interstitial cells of Cajal in the bladders of fetal rats with retinoic acid induced myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Ali; Karakuş, Osman Zeki; Hakgüder, Gülce; Ateş, Oğuz; Özer, Erdener; Olguner, Mustafa; Akgür, Feza Miraç

    2016-01-01

    Objective Myelomeningocele (MMC) is one of the most common reason of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in children. Although neurogenic bladder dysfunction occurrence is related with bladder innervation, also there are some changes seen in the smooth muscle and neural cells of the bladder. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are the pacemaker cells found in organs with peristaltic activity. Although it has been shown that ICC are diminished in the rat urinary bladder with traumatic spinal cord injury, there is no data about ICC in fetal rat bladders with MMC. This study has been conducted to investigate the ICC in the bladders of fetal rats with retinoic acid induced MMC. Materials and methods Time dated pregnant Wistar albino rats were divided into 3 groups. In MMC group, dams were fed with gavage solution containing 60 mg/kg all-trans retinoic acid dissolved in olive oil on 10. embryologic day. Sham group animals were fed only olive oil. Control group dams were fed with standard rat chow. Fetuses were delivered by cesarean section and harvested on 22. embryologic day. MMC was identified by observing MMC sacs at the back of the fetuses. Distribution of ICCs were evaluated using immunohistochemical staining. Results ICCs were found in all groups, which have the same morphological features that had been described earlier in the gastrointestinal tract and the bladder. The density of the ICC in the MMC group was found to be significantly decreased when compared with the control and the sham groups (p<0.05). Conclusion The density of the ICC in the urinary bladder decreased in the neurogenic bladder developed in MMC. PMID:27909623

  9. The restrained expression of NF-kB in renal tissue ameliorates folic acid induced acute kidney injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dev; Singla, Surinder K; Puri, Veena; Puri, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kB) represent family of structurally-related eukaryotic transcription factors which regulate diverse array of cellular processes including immunological responses, inflammation, apoptosis, growth & development. Increased expression of NF-kB has often been seen in many diverse diseases, suggesting the importance of genomic deregulation to disease pathophysiology. In the present study we focused on acute kidney injury (AKI), which remains one of the major risk factor showing a high rate of mortality and morbidity. The pathology associated with it, however, remains incompletely known though inflammation has been reported to be one of the major risk factor in the disease pathophysiology. The role of NF-kB thus seemed pertinent. In the present study we show that high dose of folic acid (FA) induced acute kidney injury (AKI) characterized by elevation in levels of blood urea nitrogen & serum creatinine together with extensive tubular necrosis, loss of brush border and marked reduction in mitochondria. One of the salient observations of this study was a coupled increase in the expression of renal, relA, NF-kB2, and p53 genes and proteins during folic acid induced AKI (FA AKI). Treatment of mice with NF-kB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithio-carbamate ammonium (PDTC) lowered the expression of these transcription factors and ameliorated the aberrant renal function by decreasing serum creatinine levels. In conclusion, our results suggested that NF-kB plays a pivotal role in maintaining renal function that also involved regulating p53 levels during FA AKI.

  10. Stability of the acetic acid-induced bladder irritation model in alpha chloralose-anesthetized female cats.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, F Aura; Wells, Grace I; Langdale, Christopher L; Zheng, Jihong; Thor, Karl B

    2013-01-01

    Time- and vehicle-related variability of bladder and urethral rhabdosphincter (URS) activity as well as cardiorespiratory and blood chemistry values were examined in the acetic acid-induced bladder irritation model in α-chloralose-anesthetized female cats. Additionally, bladder and urethra were evaluated histologically using Mason trichrome and toluidine blue staining. Urodynamic, cardiovascular and respiratory parameters were collected during intravesical saline infusion followed by acetic acid (0.5%) to irritate the bladder. One hour after starting acetic acid infusion, a protocol consisting of a cystometrogram, continuous infusion-induced rhythmic voiding contractions, and a 5 min "quiet period" (bladder emptied without infusion) was precisely repeated every 30 minutes. Administration of vehicle (saline i.v.) occurred 15 minutes after starting each of the first 7 cystometrograms and duloxetine (1mg/kg i.v.) after the 8(th). Acetic acid infusion into the bladder increased URS-EMG activity, bladder contraction frequency, and decreased contraction amplitude and capacity, compared to saline. Bladder activity and URS activity stabilized within 1 and 2 hours, respectively. Duloxetine administration significantly decreased bladder contraction frequency and increased URS-EMG activity to levels similar to previous reports. Cardiorespiratory parameters and blood gas levels remained consistent throughout the experiment. The epithelium of the bladder and urethra were greatly damaged and edema and infiltration of neutrophils in the lamina propria of urethra were observed. These data provide an ample evaluation of the health of the animals, stability of voiding function and appropriateness of the model for testing drugs designed to evaluate lower urinary tract as well as cardiovascular and respiratory systems function.

  11. Protective Effect of the Methanolic Extract of Malva parviflora L. leaves on Acetic Acid-induced Ulcerative Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dugani, Aisha; Dakhil, Bushra; Treesh, Soad

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a general term describing chronic, idiopathic relapsing, inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract of unknown etiology. Previous studies have indicated that Malva parviflora leaf extract possesses anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiulcerogenic activity. activity. This work aimed to investigatee the anti-inflammatory effect of the methanolic (MEMP) and aqueous (AEMP) extracts of M. parviflora leaves on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods: 42 male Wistar albino rats were divided into seven groups (n = 6). Group I: Normal saline control group with no colitis; Group II: Acetic acid colitis group; Group III: 100 mg/kg/5 d MEMP; Group IV: 200 mg/kg/5 d.MEMP; Group V: 100 mg/kg/5 d AEMP; Group VI: 200 mg/kg/5 d AEMP; Group VII: Prednisolone group (2 mg/kg/5 d). Treatments were followed by induction of colitis using intrarectal instillation of 2 mL of 4% acetic acid. Colon damage was evaluated macroscopically (spleen weight/body weight, colon weight/length ratio) and the histological changes were also recorded. Results: The results of this study showed that acetic acid caused severe inflammation of the colon and a significant increase in spleen weight/body weight, and an increase in colon weight/length ratio compared with normal control group. Pretreatment with MEMP and AEMP for 5 days followed by induction of colitis resulted in a significant attenuation of spleen weight and colon weight/length ratio compared with acetic acid control group. Methanolic extract provided better anticolitic effect than aqueous extract; the effect was prominent at the dose of 200 mg/kg. Histopathological findings confirmed the protective effect of the MEMP. Conclusion: In conclusion, MEMP could ameliorate mucosal damage in experimentally induced colitis when given orally. PMID:27184642

  12. The intrathecal administration of losartan, an AT1 receptor antagonist, produces an antinociceptive effect through the inhibiton of p38 MAPK phosphorylation in the mouse formalin test.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Wataru; Ogata, Yoshiki; Nakagawasai, Osamu; Yaoita, Fukie; Tanado, Takeshi; Tan-No, Koichi

    2015-01-12

    We have recently reported that an intrathecal (i.t.) administration of angiotensin II (Ang II) into mice induces a nociceptive behavior accompanied by the activation of p38 MAPK signaling via AT1 receptors (Nemoto et al., 2013, Mol. Pain 9, 38). These results suggested that Ang II participates in the facilitation of nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. In the present study, we used formalin test to examine the effect of i.t.-administered losartan, an AT1 receptor antagonist, and determine whether Ang II acts as a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator in the spinal transmission of nociceptive information. When administered i.t. 5 min before the injection of a 2% formalin solution into the plantar surface of the hindpaw, losartan (30-100 nmol) produced a dose-dependent and significant antinociceptive effect during both the first and second phases of the test. In the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord (laminae I and II), the fluorescence intensities for Ang II and phospho-p38 MAPK were both significantly increased on the ipsilateral side 3 min after the injection of formalin compared to saline-treated controls. Moreover, the increase of phospho-p38 MAPK fluorescence intensity was significantly inhibited by the i.t. administration of losartan (54.8 nmol) 5 min prior to formalin. These results indicate that losartan produces an antinociceptive effect through the inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation in the mouse formalin test and that Ang II may act as a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator in the spinal transmission of nociceptive information.

  13. Evaluation of double formalin--Lugol's fixation in assessing number and biomass of ciliates: an example of estimations at mesoscale in NE Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Karayanni, Hera; Christaki, Urania; Van Wambeke, France; Dalby, Andrew P

    2004-03-01

    Ciliated protozoa are potential grazers of primary and bacterial production and act as intermediaries between picoplankton and copepods and other large suspension feeders. Accurate determination of ciliate abundance and feeding mode is crucial in oceanic carbon budget estimations. However, the impact of different fixatives on the abundance and cell volume of ciliates has been investigated in only a few studies using either laboratory cultures or natural populations. Lugol's solution and formalin are the most commonly used fixatives for the preservation of ciliates samples. In the present study, the aim was to compare 0.4% Lugol's solution and 2% borated-formalin fixation and evaluate the need of counting duplicate samples each using a different fixative. For this, a large number of samples (n = 110) from the NE Atlantic was analyzed in the frame of POMME program (Multidisciplinary Mesoscale Ocean Program). We established a statistically significant relationship (p < 0.0001) between Lugol's and formalin fixed samples for both abundance (r2 = 0.50) and biomass (r2 = 0.76) of aloricate ciliates which showed that counts were higher in Lugol's solution by a factor of 2 and a non-taxon specific cell-loss in formalin. However, loricate ciliate abundance in our samples which were represented primarily by Tintinnus spp. did not show any difference between the two treatments. Abundance and biomass of mixotrophic ciliates (chloroplast-bearing cells) were for various reasons underestimated in both treatments. Our results show that unique fixation by formalin may severely underestimate ciliates abundance and biomass although their population may not alter. For this reason, Lugol's solution is best for the estimation of their abundance and biomass. However, for counts of mixotrophs and the evaluation of the ecological role of ciliates in carbon flux, double fixation is essential. Compromises regarding the fixatives have lead to severe underestimations of mixotrophs in studies

  14. Palmitic acid-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells is increased by liver X receptor agonist and attenuated by eicosapentaenoate.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huasheng; Zhong, Yuhua; Zhou, Shaobi; Li, Qingdi Quentin

    2011-01-01

    Saturated fatty acids are implicated in the development of diabetes via the impairment of pancreatic islet β-cell viability and function. Liver X receptors (LXRs) and eicosapentaenoate (EPA) are known regulators of fatty acid metabolism. However, their roles in the pathogenesis of diabetes remain incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of EPA and the LXR agonist T0901317 on saturated fatty acid (palmitic acid)-induced apoptosis in the insulinoma β-cell line INS-1, a model for insulin-secreting β-cells. T0901317 significantly promoted palmitic acid-induced apoptotic cell death in the INS-1 cells. Consistent with these results, caspase-3 activity and BAX and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) mRNA levels were markedly increased in INS-1 cells co-administered palmitic acid and T0901317. The production of reactive oxygen species was considerably higher in the cells cultured concurrently with T0901317 and palmitic acid than in the cells incubated with either agent alone. EPA treatment attenuated the cellular death promoted by palmitic acid and T0901317 in the INS-1 cells, disclosing a possible mediating mechanism involving the inhibition of SREBP-1c. Finally, T0901317 up-regulated the palmitic acid-induced expression of p27(KIP1), transforming growth factor beta 1, and SMAD3 proteins in INS-1 cells. These results demonstrate that palmitic acid-induced apoptosis in β-cells is enhanced by T0901317 via the activation of LXRs and is blocked by EPA via the inhibition of SREBP-1c, suggesting that the regulation of lipogenesis and lipotoxicity affecting pancreatic β-cell viability and insulin production may be a unique strategy for diabetes therapy.

  15. Palmitic acid induces interleukin-1β secretion via NLRP3 inflammasomes and inflammatory responses through ROS production in human placental cells.

    PubMed

    Shirasuna, Koumei; Takano, Hiroki; Seno, Kotomi; Ohtsu, Ayaka; Karasawa, Tadayoshi; Takahashi, Masafumi; Ohkuchi, Akihide; Suzuki, Hirotada; Matsubara, Shigeki; Iwata, Hisataka; Kuwayama, Takehito

    2016-08-01

    Maternal obesity, a major risk factor for adverse pregnancy complications, results in inflammatory cytokine release in the placenta. Levels of free fatty acids are elevated in the plasma of obese human. These fatty acids include obesity-related palmitic acids, which is a major saturated fatty acid, that promotes inflammatory responses. Increasing evidence indicates that nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasomes mediate inflammatory responses induced by endogenous danger signals. We hypothesized that inflammatory responses associated with gestational obesity cause inflammation. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of palmitic acid on the activation of NLRP3 inflammasomes and inflammatory responses in a human Sw.71 trophoblast cell line. Palmitic acid stimulated caspase-1 activation and markedly increased interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in Sw.71 cells. Treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor diminished palmitic acid-induced IL-1β release. In addition, NLRP3 and caspase-1 genome editing using a CRISPR/Cas9 system in Sw.71 cells suppressed IL-1β secretion, which was stimulated by palmitic acid. Moreover, palmitic acid stimulated caspase-3 activation and inflammatory cytokine secretion (e.g., IL-6 and IL-8). Palmitic acid-induced cytokine secretion were dependent on caspase-3 activation. In addition, palmitic acid-induced IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 secretion was depended on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. In conclusion, palmitic acid caused activation of NLRP3 inflammasomes and inflammatory responses, inducing IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 secretion, which is associated with ROS generation, in human Sw.71 placental cells. We suggest that obesity-related palmitic acid induces placental inflammation, resulting in association with pregnancy complications.

  16. PAR-2 activation enhances weak acid-induced ATP release through TRPV1 and ASIC sensitization in human esophageal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liping; Oshima, Tadayuki; Shan, Jing; Sei, Hiroo; Tomita, Toshihiko; Ohda, Yoshio; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Miwa, Hiroto

    2015-10-15

    Esophageal visceral hypersensitivity has been proposed to be the pathogenesis of heartburn sensation in nonerosive reflux disease. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is expressed in human esophageal epithelial cells and is believed to play a role in inflammation and sensation. PAR-2 activation may modulate these responses through adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release, which is involved in transduction of sensation and pain. The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are both acid-sensitive nociceptors. However, the interaction among these molecules and the mechanisms of heartburn sensation are still not clear. We therefore examined whether ATP release in human esophageal epithelial cells in response to acid is modulated by TRPV1 and ASICs and whether PAR-2 activation influences the sensitivity of TRPV1 and ASICs. Weak acid (pH 5) stimulated the release of ATP from primary human esophageal epithelial cells (HEECs). This effect was significantly reduced after pretreatment with 5-iodoresiniferatoxin (IRTX), a TRPV1-specific antagonist, or with amiloride, a nonselective ASIC blocker. TRPV1 and ASIC3 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection also decreased weak acid-induced ATP release. Pretreatment of HEECs with trypsin, tryptase, or a PAR-2 agonist enhanced weak acid-induced ATP release. Trypsin treatment led to the phosphorylation of TRPV1. Acid-induced ATP release enhancement by trypsin was partially blocked by IRTX, amiloride, or a PAR-2 antagonist. Conversely, acid-induced ATP release was augmented by PAR-2 activation through TRPV1 and ASICs. These findings suggested that the pathophysiology of heartburn sensation or esophageal hypersensitivity may be associated with the activation of PAR-2, TRPV1, and ASICs.

  17. Human myeloblastic leukemia cells (HL-60) express a membrane receptor for estrogen that signals and modulates retinoic acid-induced cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kauss, M. Ariel; Reiterer, Gudrun; Bunaciu, Rodica P.; Yen, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    Estrogen receptors are historically perceived as nuclear ligand activated transcription factors. An estrogen receptor has now been found localized to the plasma membrane of human myeloblastic leukemia cells (HL-60). Its expression occurs throughout the cell cycle, progressively increasing as cells mature from G{sub 1} to S to G{sub 2}/M. To ascertain that the receptor functioned, the effect of ligands, including a non-internalizable estradiol-BSA conjugate and tamoxifen, an antagonist of nuclear estrogen receptor function, were tested. The ligands caused activation of the ERK MAPK pathway. They also modulated the effect of retinoic acid, an inducer of MAPK dependent terminal differentiation along the myeloid lineage in these cells. In particular the ligands inhibited retinoic acid-induced inducible oxidative metabolism, a functional marker of terminal myeloid cell differentiation. To a lesser degree they also diminished retinoic acid-induced earlier markers of cell differentiation, namely CD38 and CD11b. However, they did not regulate retinoic acid-induced G{sub 0} cell cycle arrest. There is thus a membrane localized estrogen receptor in HL-60 myeloblastic leukemia cells that can cause ERK activation and modulates the response of these cells to retinoic acid, indicating crosstalk between the membrane estrogen and retinoic acid evoked pathways relevant to propulsion of cell differentiation.

  18. Human myeloblastic leukemia cells (HL-60) express a membrane receptor for estrogen that signals and modulates retinoic acid-induced cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kauss, M Ariel; Reiterer, Gudrun; Bunaciu, Rodica P; Yen, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    Estrogen receptors are historically perceived as nuclear ligand activated transcription factors. An estrogen receptor has now been found localized to the plasma membrane of human myeloblastic leukemia cells (HL-60). Its expression occurs throughout the cell cycle, progressively increasing as cells mature from G(1) to S to G(2)/M. To ascertain that the receptor functioned, the effect of ligands, including a non-internalizable estradiol-BSA conjugate and tamoxifen, an antagonist of nuclear estrogen receptor function, were tested. The ligands caused activation of the ERK MAPK pathway. They also modulated the effect of retinoic acid, an inducer of MAPK dependent terminal differentiation along the myeloid lineage in these cells. In particular the ligands inhibited retinoic acid-induced inducible oxidative metabolism, a functional marker of terminal myeloid cell differentiation. To a lesser degree they also diminished retinoic acid-induced earlier markers of cell differentiation, namely CD38 and CD11b. However, they did not regulate retinoic acid-induced G(0) cell cycle arrest. There is thus a membrane localized estrogen receptor in HL-60 myeloblastic leukemia cells that can cause ERK activation and modulates the response of these cells to retinoic acid, indicating crosstalk between the membrane estrogen and retinoic acid evoked pathways relevant to propulsion of cell differentiation.

  19. Ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 is involved in acid-induced apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes in intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Feng-Lai; Wang, Hui-Ren; Zhao, Ming-Dong; Yuan, Wei; Cao, Lu; Duan, Ping-Guo; Jiang, Yun-Qi; Li, Xi-Lei; Dong, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) has been shown to be a receptor for protons. We investigated the role of proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptors in the apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes induced by extracellular acid. The expression of proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptors was examined in rat lumbar endplate chondrocytes. Knockdown of OGR1 was achieved by transfecting chondrocytes with specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) for OGR1. Apoptotic changes were evaluated by DNA fragmentation ELISA, electron microscopy, and flow cytometry. Intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+) ]i) was analyzed with laser scanning confocal microscopy. The mechanism of OGR1 in acid-induced apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes was also investigated. We found that OGR1 was predominantly expressed in rat endplate chondrocytes, and its expression was highly upregulated in response to acidosis. Knocking down OGR1 with shRNAs effectively attenuated acid-induced apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes and increased [Ca(2+) ]i. Blocking OGR1-mediated [Ca(2+) ]i elevation inhibited acid-induced calcium-sensitive proteases such as calpain and calcineurin, and also inhibited the activation of Bid, Bad, and Caspase 3 and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). OGR1-mediated [Ca(2+) ]i elevation has a crucial role in apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes by regulating activation of calcium-sensitive proteases and their downstream signaling.

  20. Sida rhomboidea.Roxb extract alleviates pathophysiological changes in experimental in vivo and in vitro models of high fat diet/fatty acid induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Thounaojam, Menaka C; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N; Dandekar, Deven S; Devkar, Ranjitsinh V; Ramachandran, A V

    2012-03-01

    The present study was aim to evaluate protective role of Sida rhomboidea.Roxb (SR) extract against high fat diet/fatty acid induced pathophysiological alterations in experimental model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Effect of SR extract on plasma levels of markers of hepatic damage, plasma and hepatic lipids, mitochondrial oxidative stress, status of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants and histopathological changes in liver tissue were evaluated in high fat diet fed C57BL/6J mice. Also, the effect of SR supplementation on lipid accumulation, lipid peroxidation, cytotoxicity and cell viability were evaluated in oleic acid treated HepG2 cells. Supplementation of NASH mice with SR extract prevented high fat diet induced elevation in plasma marker enzymes of liver damage, plasma and hepatic lipids, mitochondrial oxidative stress and compromised enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant status. Further, addition of SR extract to in vitro HepG2 cells minimized oleic acid induced lipid accumulation, higher lipid peroxidation, cytotoxicity and reduced cell viability. These in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that SR extract has the potential of preventing high fat/fatty acid induced NASH mainly due to its hypolipidemic and antioxidant activities.

  1. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Crude Methanolic Extract of Red Alga Bryothamnion triquetrum

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante-Silva, Luiz Henrique Agra; da Matta, Carolina Barbosa Brito; de Araújo, Morgana Vital; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; de Lira, Daysianne Pereira; de Oliveira Santos, Bárbara Viviana; de Miranda, George Emmanuel C.; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana

    2012-01-01

    The marine environment is an extraordinary reservoir of bioactive natural products, many of which exhibit chemical and structural features not found in terrestrial natural products. In this regard, the aim of this study was to investigate the possible antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of a crude methanolic extract of the red alga Bryothamnion triquetrum (BT-MeOH) in murine models. Groups of Swiss mice of both sexes (25–30 g) were used throughout the experiments. The potential antinociceptive of BT-MeOH was evaluated by means of the following tests: acetic acid-induced writhing, hot-plate test and glutamate- and formalin-induced nociception. The anti-inflammatory activity of BT-MeOH was investigated using the zymosan A-induced peritonitis test. The tests were conducted using 100 mg/kg (p.o.) BT-MeOH, 33.3 mg/kg (p.o.) dipyrone, 35.7 mg/kg (p.o.) indomethacin and 5.7 mg/kg (s.c.) morphine. The extract and all standard drugs were administered 40 min before the nociceptive/inflammatory stimulus. In the acetic acid-induced writhing test, BT-MeOH and dipyrone inhibited the nociceptive response by 55.9% (22.2 ± 2.0 writhings; p < 0.01) and 80.9% (9.6 ± 2.1 writhings; p < 0.01). In the hot-plate test, BT-MeOH did not increase the latency time of the animals in the time evaluated. In addition, BT-MeOH inhibited glutamate-induced nociception by 50.1%. While BT-MeOH did not inhibit the neurogenic phase in formalin-induced nociception, the inflammatory phase was inhibited by 53.1% (66.8 ± 14.2 s; p < 0.01). Indomethacin inhibited the inflammatory phase by 60.2% (56.8 ± 8.7 s; p < 0.01). In the zymosan-induced peritonitis test, BT-MeOH inhibited 55.6% (6.6 ± 0.2 × 106 leukocytes/mL; p < 0.01) of leukocyte migration, while indomethacin inhibited 78.1% (3.2 ± 0.1 × 106 leukocytes/mL; p < 0.01). Based on the results obtained in this study, we conclude that BT-MeOH has peripheral antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities. However, more studies need

  2. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of iridoid glycosides extract of Lamiophlomis rotata (Benth.) Kudo.

    PubMed

    Li, Maoxing; Shang, Xiaofei; Zhang, Ruxue; Jia, Zhengping; Fan, Pengcheng; Ying, Qiang; Wei, Lili

    2010-04-01

    Lamiophlomis rotata (Benth.) Kudo is a perennial herb (Labiatae) used as the Tibetan traditional medicine with the effects of alleviating pain, detumescence, hemostasis, promoting blood circulation to remove blood stasis and reinforcing marrow. In this study, we investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of iridoid glycosides extract of L. rotata (IGLR) in mice. Our results showed that the iridoid glycosides extract could decrease acetic-acid-induced writhings times and formalin-induced lickings times, inhibit carrageenan-induced hind paw edema and xylene-induced ear swelling, and suppress peritoneal capillary permeability and leukocyte infiltration also induced by acetic acid in mice. All of these results suggested that the iridoid glycosides extract possesses the significant antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities.

  3. Rationally designed benzopyran fused isoxazolidines and derived β(2,3,3)-amino alcohols as potent analgesics: Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular docking analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gagandeep; Singh, Gurjit; Bhatti, Rajbir; Gupta, Vivek; Mahajan, Ajay; Singh, Palwinder; Singh Ishar, Mohan Paul

    2017-02-15

    Based on structure activity analysis of morphine related opiates, we have synthesized some novel benzopyran fused isoxazolidines (2a-e) and derived conformationally constrained β(2,3,3)-amino alcohols (3a-e), which were evaluated in vivo for their anti-nociceptive activity through acetic acid induced writhing test (peripheral) and formalin induced algesia (central). Results showed that, compound 2a possesses significant opioid agonist activity. Further, molecular docking analysis reveals that compound 2a binds to δ-opioid receptor (DOR) with comparatively better D-score than to μ (MOR) and κ (KOR) receptors. Compound 2a did not show any toxicity up to a 2000 mg kg(-1) dose.

  4. Antinociceptive Activity of Ethanol Extract from Duguetia chrysocarpa Maas (Annonaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva; Araújo, Edigênia Cavalcante da Cruz; Ribeiro, Luciano Augusto de Araújo; de Lima, Julianeli Tolentino; Nunes, Xirley Pereira; Lúcio, Ana Sílvia Suassuna Carneiro; Agra, Maria de Fátima; Barbosa Filho, José Maria

    2012-01-01

    The ethanol extract from the fruits of Duguetia chrysocarpa was evaluated for its antinociceptive activity in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. The intraperitoneal administration of the ethanol extract (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg body weight) showed a dose-dependent inhibition of acetic-acid-induced abdominal writhes. The extract also produced a significant inhibition of both phases of the formalin test in all doses tested and increased the reaction time in hot-plate test at dose of 200 mg/kg. The data obtained suggest that the antinociceptive effect of the extract may be mediated via both peripheral and central mechanisms. The phytochemical investigation yielded the isolation of the benzenoid derivative 3-methoxy-4-ethoxy benzoic acid which is being reported for the first time in this genus. PMID:22645460

  5. Antinociceptive activity of ethanol extract from Duguetia chrysocarpa Maas (Annonaceae).

    PubMed

    Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva; Araújo, Edigênia Cavalcante da Cruz; Ribeiro, Luciano Augusto de Araújo; de Lima, Julianeli Tolentino; Nunes, Xirley Pereira; Lúcio, Ana Sílvia Suassuna Carneiro; Agra, Maria de Fátima; Barbosa Filho, José Maria

    2012-01-01

    The ethanol extract from the fruits of Duguetia chrysocarpa was evaluated for its antinociceptive activity in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. The intraperitoneal administration of the ethanol extract (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg body weight) showed a dose-dependent inhibition of acetic-acid-induced abdominal writhes. The extract also produced a significant inhibition of both phases of the formalin test in all doses tested and increased the reaction time in hot-plate test at dose of 200 mg/kg. The data obtained suggest that the antinociceptive effect of the extract may be mediated via both peripheral and central mechanisms. The phytochemical investigation yielded the isolation of the benzenoid derivative 3-methoxy-4-ethoxy benzoic acid which is being reported for the first time in this genus.

  6. The acid-inducible asr gene in Escherichia coli: transcriptional control by the phoBR operon.

    PubMed

    Suziedeliené, E; Suziedélis, K; Garbenciūté, V; Normark, S

    1999-04-01

    Escherichia coli responds to external acidification (pH 4.0 to 5.0) by synthesizing a newly identified, approximately 450-nucleotide RNA component. At maximal levels of induction it is one of the most abundant small RNAs in the cell and is relatively stable bacterial RNA. The acid-inducible RNA was purified, and the gene encoding it, designated asr (for acid shock RNA), mapped at 35.98 min on the E. coli chromosome. Analysis of the asr DNA sequence revealed an open reading frame coding for a 111-amino-acid polypeptide with a deduced molecular mass of approximately 11.6 kDa. According to computer-assisted analysis, the predicted polypeptide contains a typical signal sequence of 30 amino acids and might represent either a periplasmic or an outer membrane protein. The asr gene cloned downstream from a T7 promoter was translated in vivo after transcription using a T7 RNA polymerase transcription system. Expression of a plasmid-encoded asr::lacZ fusion under a native asr promoter was reduced approximately 15-fold in a complex medium, such as Luria-Bertani medium, versus the minimal medium. Transcription of the chromosomal asr was abolished in the presence of a phoB-phoR (a two-component regulatory system, controlling the pho regulon inducible by phosphate starvation) deletion mutant. Acid-mediated induction of the asr gene in the Delta(phoB-phoR) mutant strain was restored by introduction of the plasmid with cloned phoB-phoR genes. Primer extension analysis of the asr transcript revealed a region similar to the Pho box (the consensus sequence found in promoters transcriptionally activated by the PhoB protein) upstream from the determined transcription start. The asr promoter DNA region was demonstrated to bind PhoB protein in vitro. We discuss our results in terms of how bacteria might employ the phoB-phoR regulatory system to sense an external acidity and regulate transcription of the asr gene.

  7. The Study of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Oil-Based Dill (Anethum graveolens L.) Extract Used Topically in Formalin-Induced Inflammation Male Rat Paw.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Mohsen; Mojab, Faraz; Khodadoost, Mahmood; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Davati, Ali; Choopani, Rasol; Hasheminejad, Abbas; Bararpoor, Zahra; Shariatpanahi, Shamsa; Emtiazy, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is one of the symptoms of many common and harmful diseases. As it is incurable through chemical drugs, the study on this ailment using new methods and drugs seems necessary. In addition, the adverse effects of the present anti-inflammatory drugs like NSAIDS and Glucocorticoid appeared in the long time use make such study more demanded. Accordingly, in this study we examined the effects of aerial organs' extract and seed of a plant commonly used in Iranian traditional medicine named Dill on the inflammation caused by plantar injection of formalin in rats and compared them with Diclofenac-gel. One of the methods used for the inflammation assessment is injecting formalin in the rat paw and then measuring the paw volume by the new plethysmometer (weighing method). The assessment is done at a specific time on day for 8 days and then recorded. This study includes 3 groups of 6 male rats: Formalin, Dill-Oil and Diclofenac-gel groups. The Dill-Oil group received 2 g of Dill-Oil, containing 100 mg Dill-extract and the Diclofenac group received 2 g gel containing, 20 mg Diclofenac Na. Data were analyzed with SPSS 17 using ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and Repeated-Measures. The average paw volumes changes in these groups after Formalin-induced inflammation on 1st day, were 0.31 (standard error (SEM) = 0.02), 0.30 (SEM = 0.01) and 0.32 (SEM = 0.05) respectively, with no significant difference. Regarding the peak of inflammation on the 2nd day, it was indicated that the average inflammations in Formalin, Dill-Oil and Diclofenac-gel groups were 0.44 (SEM = 0.03), 0.15 (SEM = 0.04) and 0.36 (SEM = 0.08), respectively. The paw volume changes in groups receiving Dill-oil and Diclofenac-gel, after the daily formalin injection in 8 days compared to the blank group, had a significant decrease (p < 0.001). The Dill group showed even more decrease in the paw volume compared to the Diclofenac one. The results of paw volume measurement analyzed by the Plethysmometer manifest that

  8. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of rosmarinic acid isolated from Thunbergia laurifolia Lindl.

    PubMed

    Boonyarikpunchai, Wanvisa; Sukrong, Suchada; Towiwat, Pasarapa

    2014-09-01

    Rosmarinic acid (RA) was isolated from an ethanolic extract of Thunbergia laurifolia leaves. The antinociceptive activity of RA was assessed in mice using hot-plate, acetic acid-induced writhing, and formalin tests. The anti-inflammatory effects of RA were determined in two mouse models of carrageenan-induced paw edema and cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation. Orally administered RA (50, 100, and 150 mg/kg) showed significant (p<0.001) antinociceptive activity in the hot-plate test and this effect was reversed by naloxone. RA at doses of 50 and 100mg/kg significantly reduced acetic acid-induced writhing by 52% (p<0.01) and 85% (p<0.001), respectively, and RA at 100mg/kg also caused significant inhibition of formalin-induced pain in the early and late phases (p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively). RA at 100mg/kg significantly suppressed carrageenan-induced paw edema at 3, 4, 5 and 6h after carrageenan injection (p<0.01, p<0.05 p<0.01, and p<0.05, respectively) and showed significant activity against PGE2-induced paw edema. RA at 100mg/kg also inhibited cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation in mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate that RA possesses both central and peripheral antinociceptive activities and has anti-inflammatory effects against acute and chronic inflammation. While further evaluation regarding the safety profile of RA is needed, these data may provide a basis for the rational use of RA and T. laurifolia for treatment of pain and inflammatory disorders.

  9. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities of Caesalpinia decapetala

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, Amna; Sajid Hamid Akash, Muhammad; Rehman, Kanwal; Mahmood, Qaisar; Qadir, Muhammad Imran

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In many pathological conditions, pain, inflammation and fever are interdependent to each other. Due to the use of synthetic drugs, many unwanted effects usually appear. Various studies have been conducted on Caesalpinia decapetala (C. decapetala) to evaluate its effects in the treatment of various diseases but no sufficient scientific literature is available online to prove its analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities. Methods: The analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities of 70% aqueous methanolic and n-hexane extracts of C. decapetala was evaluated using Swiss albino mice (20-30 g). Results: The results showed that aqueous methanolic extract of C. decapetala at the dose of 100 mg/kg exhibited significant (p< 0.05) activities in various pain models including acetic acid-induced writhing (18.4 ± 0.53), formalin-induced licking (275 ± 4.18) and hot plate method (2.3 ± 0.0328); whereas,  n-hexane extract showed its effects in acetic acid-induced writhing (20 ± 0.31), formalin-induced licking (293 ± 1.20) and hot plate method (2.224 ± 0.029) compared to the effects observed in control group animals. Similarly, the aqueous methanolic extract of C. decapetala after 2 h of treatment exhibited more significant anti-inflammatory (0.66 ± 0.06) and anti-pyretic (38.81 ± 0.05) activities compared to the control group animals. Conclusion: From the findings of our present study, we concluded that the aqueous methanolic extract of C. decapetala has stronger analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic effects than its n-hexane extract. Further studies are required to investigate the active constituents of C. decapetala that exhibit analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities. PMID:24790898

  10. Cyclo-Gly-Pro, a cyclic dipeptide, attenuates nociceptive behaviour and inflammatory response in mice.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Jamylle Nunes de Souza; de Aquino, Fernanda Lima Torres; de Brito, Renan Guedes; dos Santos, Priscila Laíse; Quintans, Jullyana de Souza Siqueira; de Souza, Lucas Costa; de Araújo, Almair Ferreira; Diaz, Bruno Lourenço; Lucca-Júnior, Waldecy; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo José; Barreto, Emiliano

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the cyclic dipeptide cyclo-Gly-Pro (CGP) in mice. Antinociceptive activity was assessed by employing different pain models, such as formalin test, acetic acid-induced writhing, hot plate test, and carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia, in mice. The number of c-Fos-immunoreactive cells in the periaqueductal gray (PAG) was evaluated in CGP-treated mice. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using paw oedema induced by carrageenan, compound 48/80, serotonin, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and analyzed by plethysmometry. Quantitation of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the paw was carried out to analyze the presence of neutrophils in the tissue. Intraperitoneal injection of CGP produced a significant inhibition in both neurogenic and inflammatory phases of formalin-induced pain. The antinociceptive effect of CGP, evaluated in the acetic acid-induced writhing test, was detected for up to 6 h after treatment. Further, in the hot plate test, antinociceptive behaviour was evoked by CGP, and this response was inhibited by naloxone. Animals treated with CGP did not present changes in motor performance. In CGP-treated mice there was an increase in the number of c-Fos-positive neurons in the periaqueductal gray. In another set of experiments, CGP attenuated the hyperalgesic response induced by carrageenan. Furthermore, CGP also reduced the carrageenan-increased MPO activity in paws. In addition, CGP also reduced the paw oedema evoked by compound 48/80, serotonin, and PGE2 . Taken together, these results may support a possible therapeutic application of the cyclic dipeptide cyclo-Gly-Pro toward alleviating nociception and damage caused by inflammation conditions.

  11. Isofraxidin exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and inhibited TNF-α production in LPS-induced mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro via the MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Xing, Wei; Li, Weifeng; Fan, Ting; Hu, Hua; Li, Yongmei

    2012-10-01

    Isofraxidin (IF) is a Coumarin compound that can be isolated from medicinal plants, such as Sarcandra glabra (Thunb.). Nakai is widely used in Asian countries for the treatment of anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumour action. The present investigation was designed to evaluate the effect of IF on inflammation and nociception. In addition, we investigated a potential novel mechanism to explain the anti-inflammatory properties of IF. In vivo, xylene-induced mouse ear edema, carrageenan-induced rat paw edema, LPS-induced mouse endotoxic shock, acetic acid-induced mice writhing and formalin-induced mouse pain models were used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of IF. In vitro, we examined the effects of IF inhibition on TNF-α production and the regulation of ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation activity in LPS-induced mouse peritoneal macrophages. Our results demonstrated that IF can significantly decrease xylene-induced ear edema, carrageenan-induced paw edema, acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin-induced pain. Moreover, IF greatly inhibited the production of TNF-α in the serum of LPS-stimulated mice and peritoneal macrophages, and it decreased phospho-p38 and ERK1/2 protein expression in LPS-stimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages. Overall, our data suggest that IF possesses significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities that may be mediated through the regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and the phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2.

  12. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of Torenia concolor Lindley var. formosana Yamazaki and betulin in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Chih; Cheng, Hao-Yuan; Huang, Tai-Hung; Huang, Hsin-Wei; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Peng, Wen-Huang

    2009-01-01

    The present study was intended to examine the analgesic effect of the 70% methanol extract of Torenia concolor Lindley var. formosana Yamazaki (TC(MeOH)) and betulin using models of acetic acid-induced writhing response and formalin test. In addition, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of TC(MeOH) and betulin using model of lambda-carrageenan-induced paw edema. We observed the activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GPx and GR) in the liver and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) in the edema paw. The results showed that TC(MeOH) (1.0 and 2.0 g/kg) and betulin (30 and 90 mg/kg), significantly inhibited the acetic acid-induced writhing response. TC(MeOH) (2.0 g/kg) and betulin (30 and 90 mg/kg) significantly inhibited formalin-induced licking time during both the early and late phases. TC(MeOH) (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg) and betulin (30 and 90 mg/kg) also significantly decreased the paw edema at the 4th hour after lambda-carrageenan injection. Furthermore, TC(MeOH) and betulin treatment also significantly increased the activities of SOD, GR and GPx in the liver while decreasing the level of MDA in the edema paw. Finally, betulin (30 and 90 mg/kg) also caused considerable reduction of NO level in the edema paw. Taken together, the present results indicated that TC(MeOH) and betulin possessed analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of TC(MeOH) and betulin may be related to decreasing the levels of MDA and NO in the edema paw by increasing the activities of antioxidant enzymes in the liver.

  13. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Rosa taiwanensis Nakai in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Der-Shiang; Huang, Mei-Hsuen; Tsai, Jen-Chieh; Chang, Yuan-Shuang; Chiu, Yung-Jia; Lin, Yen-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we evaluated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of a 70% ethanol extract from Rosa taiwanensis Nakai (RTEtOH). The analgesic effect was determined using acetic acid-induced writhing response and formalin test. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by λ-carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of RTEtOH was examined by measuring the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the paw edema tissue and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GRd) in the liver tissue. The betulinic acid and oleanolic acid contents of RTEtOH were assayed by HPLC. The results showed that RTEtOH decreased the acetic acid-induced writhing responses (1.0 g/kg) and the late phase of the formalin-induced licking time (0.5 and 1.0 g/kg). In the anti-inflammatory models, RTEtOH (0.5 and 1.0 g/kg) reduced the paw edema at 3, 4, and 5 h after λ-carrageenan administration. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory mechanisms might be due to the decreased levels of COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, as well as the inhibition of NO and MDA levels through increasing the activities of SOD, GPx, and GRd. The contents of two active compounds, betulinic acid and oleanolic acid, were quantitatively determined. This study demonstrated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of RTEtOH and provided evidence to support its therapeutic use in inflammatory diseases. PMID:25494361

  14. Antinociceptive Activity of Melicope ptelefolia Ethanolic Extract in Experimental Animals

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan; Mohd Padzil, Azyyati; Shaari, Khozirah; Khalid, Syamimi; Shaik Mossadeq, Wan Mastura; Mohamad, Azam Shah; Ahmad, Syahida; Akira, Ahmad; Israf, Daud; Lajis, Nordin

    2010-01-01

    Melicope ptelefolia is a medicinal herb commonly used in Malaysia to treat fever, pain, wounds, and itches. The present study was conducted to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of the Melicope ptelefolia ethanolic extract (MPEE) using animal models of nociception. The antinociceptive activity of the extract was assessed using acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing, hot-plate, and formalin-induced paw licking tests. Oral administration of MPEE produced significant dose-dependent antinociceptive effects when tested in mice and rats using acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test and on the second phase of the formalin-induced paw licking test, respectively. It was also demonstrated that MPEE had no effect on the response latency time to the heat stimulus in the thermal model of the hot-plate test. In addition, the antinociception produced by MPEE was not blocked by naloxone. Furthermore, oral administration of MPEE did not produce any effect in motor performance of the rota-rod test and in acute toxicity study no abnormal behaviors as well as mortality were observed up to a dose level of the extract of 5 g/kg. These results indicated that MPEE at all doses investigated which did not produce any sedative and toxic effects exerted pronounce antinociceptive activity that acts peripherally in experimental animals. PMID:21274262

  15. The alga Bryothamnion seaforthii contains carbohydrates with antinociceptive activity.

    PubMed

    Vieira, L A P; Freitas, A L P; Feitosa, J P A; Silva, D C; Viana, G S B

    2004-07-01

    Bryothamnion seaforthii, a red alga common to the Northeastern coast of Brazil, was used to prepare the protein fraction F0/60 by ammonium sulfate precipitation. The chromatography of F0/60 on DEAE-Sephadel column resulted in two lectin fractions, PI and PII, which have antinociceptive properties in rodents. We determined the antinociceptive activity of the PII fraction and of a carbohydrate-containing fraction (CF) in mice. The CF was prepared from the dried algae, after digestion with 100 mM sodium acetate, pH 6.0, containing 5 mM cysteine, EDTA and 0.4% papain, at 60 masculine C. A 10% cetylpyridinium chloride was added to the filtrate, and the precipitate was dissolved with 2 M NaCl:ethanol (100:15, v/v) followed by the carbohydrate precipitation with ethanol. The final precipitate, in acetone, was dried at 25 masculine C. The PII fraction markedly inhibited acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing after ip administration (control: 27.1 +/- 2.20; PII 0.1 mg/kg: 5.5 +/- 1.85; 1 mg/kg: 1.6 +/- 0.72 writhes/20 min) and after oral administration (control: 32.0 +/- 3.32; PII 0.1 mg/kg: 13.1 +/- 2.50; 1 mg/kg: 9.4 +/- 3.96 writhes/20 min). PII was also effective against both phases of pain induced by 1% formalin (control, ip: 48.2 +/- 2.40 and 27.7 +/- 2.56 s; PII: 1 mg/kg, ip: 34.3 +/- 5.13 and 5.6 +/- 2.14 s; control, po: 44.5 +/- 3.52 and 25.6 +/- 2.39 s; PII 5 mg/kg, po: 26.5 +/- 4.67 and 15.3 +/- 3.54 s for the 1st and 2nd phases, respectively) and in the hot-plate test. The CF (ip) also displayed significant antinociceptive properties in all tests but at higher doses (1 and 5 mg/kg, ip and po). Thus, CF at the dose of 5 mg/kg significantly inhibited writhes (ip: 7.1 +/- 2.47 and po: 14.5 +/- 2.40 writhes/20 min) as well as the 1st (po: 19.6 +/- 1.74 s) and 2nd (po: 7.1 +/- 2.24 s) phases of the formalin test compared to controls ip and po. The antinociceptive effects of both the PII and CF in the formalin and hot-plate tests were prevented at least partially by

  16. Plectoneme tip bubbles: Coupled denaturation and writhing in supercoiled DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matek, Christian; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-01-01

    We predict a novel conformational regime for DNA, where denaturation bubbles form at the tips of plectonemes, and study its properties using coarse-grained simulations. For negative supercoiling, this regime lies between bubble-dominated and plectoneme-dominated phases, and explains the broad transition between the two observed in experiment. Tip bubbles cause localisation of plectonemes within thermodynamically weaker AT-rich sequences, and can greatly suppress plectoneme diffusion by a pinning mechanism. They occur for supercoiling densities and forces that are typically encountered for DNA in vivo, and may be exploited for biological control of genomic processes.

  17. Antinociceptive effect of butyl (2-phenylethynyl) selenide on formalin test in mice: Evidences for the involvement of serotonergic and adenosinergic systems.

    PubMed

    Luchese, Cristiane; Prigol, Marina; Acker, Carmine Inês; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2010-10-10

    The present study investigated the effect of per oral (p.o.) administration of butyl (2-phenylethynyl) selenide (1-50mg/kg) on formalin-induced nociception in mice. The involvement of serotonergic, adenosinergic, muscarinic cholinergic and opioid mechanisms in the antinociceptive effect was also investigated. Butyl (2-phenylethynyl) selenide inhibited both neurogenic (at doses equal or higher than 10mg/kg) and inflammatory (at doses equal or higher than 25mg/kg) phases of the nociception caused by intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of 2.5% formalin solution (20 microl), with ID(50) values of 36.7 (29.28-46.0) and 20.37 (15.74-26.36) mg/kg, respectively. This compound reduced the formalin-induced paw oedema formation (55 + or - 4%) at doses equal or higher than 25mg/kg. The antinociceptive effect of compound (25mg/kg, p.o.) was reversed by ondansetron (0.5mg/kg, a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist) and caffeine (3mg/kg, a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist), but not by atropine (0.1mg/kg, a non selective muscarinic antagonist), WAY100635 (0.1mg/kg, a selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist), ritanserin (1mg/kg, a 5-HT(2) receptor antagonist) and naloxone (1mg/kg, a non selective opioid receptor antagonist). These results indicate that butyl (2-phenylethynyl) selenide produced antinociception in the formalin test through mechanisms that involve an interaction with serotonergic (5-HT(3)) and adenosinergic systems.

  18. Role of the thalamic submedius nucleus histamine H1 and H 2 and opioid receptors in modulation of formalin-induced orofacial pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Erfanparast, Amir; Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Taati, Mina; Dabaghi, Milad

    2015-10-01

    Histamine and opioid systems are involved in supraspinal modulation of pain. In this study, we investigated the effects of separate and combined microinjections of agonists and antagonists of histamine H1 and H2 and opioid receptors into the thalamic submedius (Sm) nucleus on the formalin-induced orofacial pain. Two guide cannulas were implanted into the right and left sides of the Sm in ketamine- and xylazine-anesthetized rats. Orofacial formalin pain was induced by subcutaneous injection of a diluted formalin solution (50 μl, 1.5%) into the vibrissa pad. Face rubbing durations were recorded at 3-min blocks for 45 min. Formalin produced a biphasic pain response (first phase: 0-3 min and second phase: 15-33 min). Separate and combined microinjections of histamine H1 and H2 receptor agonists, 2-pyridylethylamine (2-PEA) and dimaprit, respectively, and opioid receptor agonist, morphine, attenuated the second phase of pain. The analgesic effects induced by 2-PEA, dimaprit, and morphine were blocked by prior microinjections of fexofenadine (a histamine H1 receptor antagonist), famotidine (a histamine H2 receptor antagonist), and naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist), respectively. Naloxone also prevented 2-PEA- and dimaprit-induced antinociception, and the analgesic effect induced by morphine was inhibited by fexofenadine and famotidine. These results showed the involvement of histamine H1 and H2 and opioid receptors in the Sm modulation of orofacial pain. Opioid receptor might be involved in analgesia induced by activation of histamine H1 and H2 receptors and vice versa.

  19. Clonidine Reduces Nociceptive Responses in Mouse Orofacial Formalin Model: Potentiation by Sigma-1 Receptor Antagonist BD1047 without Impaired Motor Coordination.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kang, Suk-Yun; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Hyung-Chan; Roh, Dae-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Although the administration of clonidine, an alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist, significantly attenuates nociception and hyperalgesia in several pain models, clinical trials of clonidine are limited by its side effects such as drowsiness, hypotension and sedation. Recently, we determined that the sigma-1 receptor antagonist BD1047 dose-dependently reduced nociceptive responses in a mouse orofacial formalin model. Here we examined whether intraperitoneal injection of clonidine suppressed the nociceptive responses in the orofacial formalin test, and whether co-administration with BD1047 enhances lower-dose clonidine-induced anti-nociceptive effects without the disruption of motor coordination and blood pressure. Formalin (5%, 10 µL) was subcutaneously injected into the right upper lip, and the rubbing responses with the ipsilateral fore- or hind-paw were counted for 45 min. Clonidine (10, 30 or 100 µg/kg) was intraperitoneally administered 30 min before formalin injection. Clonidine alone dose-dependently reduced nociceptive responses in both the first and second phases. Co-localization for alpha-2A adrenoceptors and sigma-1 receptors was determined in trigeminal ganglion cells. Interestingly, the sub-effective dose of BD1047 (3 mg/kg) significantly potentiated the anti-nociceptive effect of lower-dose clonidine (10 or 30 µg/kg) in the second phase. In particular, the middle dose of clonidine (30 µg/kg) in combination with BD1047 produced an anti-nociceptive effect similar to that of the high-dose clonidine, but without a significant motor dysfunction or hypotension. In contrast, mice treated with the high dose of clonidine developed severe impairment in motor coordination and blood pressure. These data suggest that a combination of low-dose clonidine with BD1047 may be a novel and safe therapeutic strategy for orofacial pain management.

  20. DNIC-mediated analgesia produced by a supramaximal electrical or a high-dose formalin conditioning stimulus: roles of opioid and α2-adrenergic receptors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC) can be produced by different types of conditioning stimuli, but the analgesic properties and underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to differentiate the induction of DNIC analgesia between noxious electrical and inflammatory conditioning stimuli. Methods First, rats subjected to either a supramaximal electrical stimulation or an injection of high-dose formalin in the hind limb were identified to have pain responses with behavioral evidence and spinal Fos-immunoreactive profiles. Second, suppression of tail-flick latencies by the two noxious stimuli was assessed to confirm the presence of DNIC. Third, an opioid receptor antagonist (naloxone) and an α2-adrenoreceptor antagonist (yohimbine) were injected, intraperitoneally and intrathecally respectively, before conditioning noxious stimuli to test the involvement of descending inhibitory pathways in DNIC-mediated analgesia. Results An intramuscular injection of 100 μl of 5% formalin produced noxious behaviors with cumulative pain scores similar to those of 50 μl of 2% formalin in the paw. Both electrical and chemical stimulation significantly increased Fos expression in the superficial dorsal horns, but possessed characteristic distribution patterns individually. Both conditioning stimuli prolonged the tail-flick latencies indicating a DNIC response. However, the electrical stimulation-induced DNIC was reversed by yohimbine, but not by naloxone; whereas noxious formalin-induced analgesia was both naloxone- and yohimbine-reversible. Conclusions It is demonstrated that DNIC produced by different types of conditioning stimuli can be mediated by different descending inhibitory controls, indicating the organization within the central nervous circuit is complex and possibly exhibits particular clinical manifestations. PMID:20302612

  1. Pharmacological evidence for systemic and peripheral antinociceptive activities of pioglitazone in the rat formalin test: Role of PPARγ and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Naghizadeh, Bahareh; Ghorbanzadeh, Behnam; Rajabi, Hossein; Pashmforoush, Marzieh

    2017-03-09

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in numerous physiological processes of the central and peripheral nervous system. This study aimed to evaluate the involvement of PPARγ and NO pathway in the systemic and peripheral antinociceptive effect pioglitazone (Pio) using formalin test in rats. After allocation, rats were injected with 2.5% formalin solution and the flinching behaviors were recorded for 5min (phase 1) and 15-60min (phase 2). Pioglitazone was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) at doses (10-50mg/kg) and intraplantarly (i.pl.) at doses (10-30μg/paw) 60 and 20min before test, respectively. To investigate the mechanism involved, rats were given GW-9662 (a PPARγ antagonist), L-NAME (NO synthase inhibitor), L-arginine (NO precursor), or l-NAME+GW-9662 along with pioglitazone. Results showed that both of i.p. and i.pl. routes of pioglitazone administration produced antinociception in both phases of formalin-induced pain. Antinociception caused by i.p. and i.pl. pioglitazone was blocked by GW-9662 at doses 2mg/kg (i.p.) and 3μg/paw (i.pl.) in both phases of the test, respectively. The antinociceptive effects of i.p. and i.pl. pioglitazone were significantly reduced by l-arginine, but were augmented by l-NAME in second phase of test. However, pre-treatment with GW-9662 inhibited the enhanced antinociceptive effect of l-NAME on pioglitazone in second phase of formalin test during i.p. and i.pl. administration. Furthermore, the antinociceptive effect of systemic pioglitazone was antagonized by i.pl. administration of GW-9662 (3μg/paw). Our data suggest that local and systemic antinociceptive activity of pioglitazone is mediated partly through PPARγ in collaboration with NO pathway. Moreover, the cumulative results suggest a close link of interaction between PPARγ and NO.

  2. Role of 5-HT5A and 5-HT1B/1D receptors in the antinociception produced by ergotamine and valerenic acid in the rat formalin test.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Cantú, Guadalupe C; Jiménez-Hernández, Mildred; Rocha-González, Héctor I; Villalón, Carlos M; Granados-Soto, Vinicio; Muñoz-Islas, Enriqueta

    2016-06-15

    Sumatriptan, dihydroergotamine and methysergide inhibit 1% formalin-induced nociception by activation of peripheral 5-HT1B/1D receptors. This study set out to investigate the pharmacological profile of the antinociception produced by intrathecal and intraplantar administration of ergotamine (a 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT5A/5B receptor agonist) and valerenic acid (a partial agonist at 5-HT5A receptors). Intraplantar injection of 1% formalin in the right hind paw resulted in spontaneous flinching behavior of the injected hindpaw of female Wistar rats. Intrathecal ergotamine (15nmol) or valerenic acid (1 nmol) blocked in a dose dependent manner formalin-induced nociception. The antinociception by intrathecal ergotamine (15nmol) or valerenic acid (1nmol) was partly or completely blocked by intrathecal administration of the antagonists: (i) methiothepin (non-selective 5-HT5A/5B; 0.01-0.1nmol); (ii) SB-699551 (selective 5-HT5A; up to 10nmol); (iii) anti-5-HT5A antibody; (iv) SB-224289 (selective 5-HT1B; 0.1-1nmol); or (v) BRL-15572 (selective 5-HT1D; 0.1-1nmol). Likewise, antinociception by intraplantar ergotamine (15nmol) and valerenic acid (10nmol) was: (i) partially blocked by methiothepin (1nmol), SB-699551 (10nmol) or SB-224289 (1nmol); and (ii) abolished by BRL-15572 (1nmol). The above doses of antagonists (which did not affect per se the formalin-induced nociception) were high enough to completely block their respective receptors. Our results suggest that ergotamine and valerenic acid produce antinociception via 5-HT5A and 5-HT1B/1D receptors located at both spinal and peripheral sites. This provides new evidence for understanding the modulation of nociceptive pathways in inflammatory pain.

  3. Validation of the Lung Subtyping Panel in Multiple Fresh-Frozen and Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Lung Tumor Gene Expression Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Faruki, Hawazin; Mayhew, Gregory M; Fan, Cheng; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Parker, Scott; Kam-Morgan, Lauren; Eisenberg, Marcia; Horten, Bruce; Hayes, D Neil; Perou, Charles M; Lai-Goldman, Myla

    2016-06-01

    Context .- A histologic classification of lung cancer subtypes is essential in guiding therapeutic management. Objective .- To complement morphology-based classification of lung tumors, a previously developed lung subtyping panel (LSP) of 57 genes was tested using multiple public fresh-frozen gene-expression data sets and a prospectively collected set of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung tumor samples. Design .- The LSP gene-expression signature was evaluated in multiple lung cancer gene-expression data sets totaling 2177 patients collected from 4 platforms: Illumina RNAseq (San Diego, California), Agilent (Santa Clara, California) and Affymetrix (Santa Clara) microarrays, and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Gene centroids were calculated for each of 3 genomic-defined subtypes: adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and neuroendocrine, the latter of which encompassed both small cell carcinoma and carcinoid. Classification by LSP into 3 subtypes was evaluated in both fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples, and agreement with the original morphology-based diagnosis was determined. Results .- The LSP-based classifications demonstrated overall agreement with the original clinical diagnosis ranging from 78% (251 of 322) to 91% (492 of 538 and 869 of 951) in the fresh-frozen public data sets and 84% (65 of 77) in the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded data set. The LSP performance was independent of tissue-preservation method and gene-expression platform. Secondary, blinded pathology review of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples demonstrated concordance of 82% (63 of 77) with the original morphology diagnosis. Conclusions .- The LSP gene-expression signature is a reproducible and objective method for classifying lung tumors and demonstrates good concordance with morphology-based classification across multiple data sets. The LSP panel can supplement morphologic assessment of lung cancers, particularly

  4. PCR detection of Clostridium chauvoei in pure cultures and in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Uzal, F A; Hugenholtz, P; Blackall, L L; Petray, S; Moss, S; Assis, R A; Fernandez Miyakawa, M; Carloni, G

    2003-02-02

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify specific segments of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of Clostridium chauvoei, a major pathogen of ruminants. Three sets of primers were used to produce amplicons of 159, 836 and 959 base pairs (bp), respectively. The PCR was evaluated by testing clinically important strains of Clostridium, including 21 strains of C. chauvoei, five strains each of Clostridium septicum and Clostridium perfringens and two strains each of Clostridium novyi, Clostridium histolyticum and Clostridium sordellii. Both purified DNA and biomass from pure cultures of each of these microorganisms were evaluated as templates in the PCR. In addition, extracts of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of eight sheep experimentally inoculated with C. chauvoei or C. septicum (four animals each) were also tested by the PCR using the three sets of primers. Purified DNA template of all C. chauvoei strains produced PCR amplicons of the expected size for all three primer pairs. However, when biomass from pure cultures of C. chauvoei or tissue extracts were used as templates, only the primer pair designed to produce the 159bp amplicon gave consistently positive results. No positive results were obtained with any primer pair when purified DNA or biomass from pure cultures of non-target clostridial species were used as templates. Therefore, the PCR primer sets appear to be very specific for identifying C. chauvoei in both cultures and tissues.

  5. High-mass-resolution MALDI mass spectrometry imaging of metabolites from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Ly, Alice; Buck, Achim; Balluff, Benjamin; Sun, Na; Gorzolka, Karin; Feuchtinger, Annette; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Kuppen, Peter J K; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Weirich, Gregor; Erlmeier, Franziska; Langer, Rupert; Aubele, Michaela; Zitzelsberger, Horst; McDonnell, Liam; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel

    2016-08-01

    Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens are the gold standard for histological examination, and they provide valuable molecular information in tissue-based research. Metabolite assessment from archived tissue samples has not been extensively conducted because of a lack of appropriate protocols and concerns about changes in metabolite content or chemical state due to tissue processing. We present a protocol for the in situ analysis of metabolite content from FFPE samples using a high-mass-resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-FT-ICR-MSI) platform. The method involves FFPE tissue sections that undergo deparaffinization and matrix coating by 9-aminoacridine before MALDI-MSI. Using this platform, we previously detected ∼1,500 m/z species in the mass range m/z 50-1,000 in FFPE samples; the overlap compared with fresh frozen samples is 72% of m/z species, indicating that metabolites are largely conserved in FFPE tissue samples. This protocol can be reproducibly performed on FFPE tissues, including small samples such as tissue microarrays and biopsies. The procedure can be completed in a day, depending on the size of the sample measured and raster size used. Advantages of this approach include easy sample handling, reproducibility, high throughput and the ability to demonstrate molecular spatial distributions in situ. The data acquired with this protocol can be used in research and clinical practice.

  6. Detection of immunoglobulins and complement components in formalin fixed and paraffin embedded renal biopsy material by immunoflourescence technique

    PubMed Central

    Mubarak, Muhammed; Kazi Javed, I; Kulsoom, Umme; Ishaque, Muhammed

    2012-01-01

    Background The technique of direct immunoflourescence (IF) is essential in the accurate diagnosis of renal glomerular diseases. The optimal results are obtained when the procedure is done on fresh frozen tissue (IF-F). However, techniques are available for IF study on formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) renal biopsy specimens with variable reported success rates. Objectives We evaluated three such techniques on FFPE tissue and compared the results with those obtained by IF-F from the same patients. Materials and Methods Heat treatment with Tris buffer and citrate buffer, and pronase treatment of the FFPE material was carried out. Direct IF was done for renal panel immunoglobulins and complement components on all biopsies and the results were compared with the historical IF-F study. Results When compared to the IF-F, the immunoflourescence staining on the paraffin sections was less sensitive and less intense in all immune complex-mediated renal diseases, but the diagnostic findings were detected in majority of the cases. Conclusions In conclusion, it is possible to establish the diagnosis in most cases of immune complex-mediated glomerular diseases with IF on paraffin embedded tissue specimens. PMID:24475396

  7. Comparison of Different Buffers for Protein Extraction from Formalin-Fixed and Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Specimens.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kaini; Sun, Jian; Cao, Xinxin; Zhou, Daobin; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We determined the best extraction buffer for proteomic investigation using formalin-fixation and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens. A Zwittergent 3-16 based buffer, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-containing buffer with/without polyethylene glycol 20000 (PEG20000), urea-containing buffer, and FFPE-FASP protein preparation kit were compared for protein extraction from different types of rat FFPE tissues, including the heart, brain, liver, lung, and kidney. All of the samples were divided into two groups of laser microdissected (LMD) and non-LMD specimens. For both kinds of specimens, Zwittergent was the most efficient buffer for identifying peptides and proteins, was broadly applicable to different tissues without impairing the enzymatic digestion, and was well compatible with mass spectrometry analysis. As a high molecular weight carrier substance, PEG20000 improved the identification of peptides and proteins; however, such an advantage is limited to tissues containing submicrograms to micrograms of protein. Considering its low lytic strength, urea-containing buffer would not be the first alternative for protein recovery. In conclusion, Zwittergent 3-16 is an effective buffer for extracting proteins from FFPE specimens for downstream proteomics analysis.

  8. Modeling formalin fixation and antigen retrieval with bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A: I—Structural and functional alterations

    PubMed Central

    Rait, Vladimir K; O’Leary, Timothy J; Mason, Jeffrey T

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the chemistry of protein modification by formaldehyde is central to developing improved methods to recover proteins from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues for proteomic analysis and to improve protein immunoreactivity for immunohistochemical studies. We used biophysical techniques to investigate the effects of formaldehyde treatment on bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A). Treatment of RNase A with formaldehyde was shown by gel electrophoresis to lead to the rapid formation of intra- and intermolecular protein cross-links. Thermal studies revealed that these protein cross-links significantly increased the thermal denaturation temperature of RNase A preparations. Analysis of formaldehyde-treated RNase A oligomers isolated by gel chromatography revealed that intramolecular protein cross-links are primarily responsible for the increase in protein thermostability. Formaldehyde treatment also lowered the isoelectric point of the enzyme from 9.45 to the 6.0–7.4 range. Optical spectroscopic studies demonstrated that the formaldehyde-induced modifications did not significantly alter the secondary or tertiary structure of RNase A. Heating formaldehyde-treated RNase A at 65°C resulted in a significant reversal of the protein intra- and intermolecular cross-links and led to a partial restoration of enzymatic activity. PMID:14968117

  9. Opioid Mechanism Involvement in the Synergism Produced by the Combination of Diclofenac and Caffeine in the Formalin Model

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Ramos, José María; Díaz-Reval, M. Irene

    2013-01-01

    Analgesics can be administered in combination with caffeine for improved analgesic effectiveness in a process known as synergism. The mechanisms by which these combinations produce synergism are not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to analyze whether the administration of diclofenac combined with caffeine produced antinociceptive synergism and whether opioid mechanisms played a role in this event. The formalin model was used to evaluate the antinociception produced by the oral administration of diclofenac, caffeine, or their combination. Opioid involvement was analyzed through intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of naloxone followed by the oral administration of the study drugs. Diclofenac presented a dose-dependent effect, with a mean effective dose (ED50) of 6.7 mg/kg. Caffeine presented an analgesic effect with a 17–36% range. The combination of subeffective doses of each of the two drugs presented the greatest synergism with an effect of 57.7 ± 5.6%. The maximal antinociceptive effect was obtained with the combination of 10.0 mg/kg diclofenac and 1.0 mg/kg of caffeine, with an effect of 76.7 ± 5.6%. The i.c.v. administration of naloxone inhibited the effect of diclofenac, both separately and combined. In conclusion, caffeine produces antinociceptive synergism when administered in combination with diclofenac, and this synergism is partially mediated by opioid mechanisms at the central level. PMID:27335871

  10. Double immunofluorescent staining of rat macrophages in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue using two monoclonal mouse antibodies.

    PubMed

    Isidro, Raymond A; Isidro, Angel A; Cruz, Myrella L; Hernandez, Siomara; Appleyard, Caroline B

    2015-12-01

    The conventional approach of double immunostaining to visualize more than one protein in tissues or cells using antibodies from two different host species is not always feasible due to limitations with antibody availability. Previously reported methodologies for performing multiple immunostains on the same tissue or cells with antibodies originating from the same species are varied in their complexity, sensitivity, and approach to prevent unwanted interactions between antibodies. In the ever-expanding field of macrophage biology, much more is known about mouse and human macrophages than their rat counterparts. The limited availability of validated and well-characterized monoclonal antibodies from different species is one factor responsible for preventing advances in rat macrophage biology. Here we describe an immunostaining method for identifying and examining rat macrophages that is sufficiently sensitive for use in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue and that uses only commercially available reagents and antibodies. This method can be used to help characterize both physiological and pathophysiological processes in rat macrophages and can be adapted for use with any two antibodies from the same species of origin as long as one of the antibodies is biotinylated.

  11. Optimization of Single- and Dual-Color Immunofluorescence Protocols for Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Archival Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kajimura, Junko; Ito, Reiko; Manley, Nancy R.; Hale, Laura P.

    2015-01-01

    Performance of immunofluorescence staining on archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human tissues is generally not considered to be feasible, primarily due to problems with tissue quality and autofluorescence. We report the development and application of procedures that allowed for the study of a unique archive of thymus tissues derived from autopsies of individuals exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima, Japan in 1945. Multiple independent treatments were used to minimize autofluorescence and maximize fluorescent antibody signals. Treatments with NH3/EtOH and Sudan Black B were particularly useful in decreasing autofluorescent moieties present in the tissue. Deconvolution microscopy was used to further enhance the signal-to-noise ratios. Together, these techniques provide high-quality single- and dual-color fluorescent images with low background and high contrast from paraffin blocks of thymus tissue that were prepared up to 60 years ago. The resulting high-quality images allow the application of a variety of image analyses to thymus tissues that previously were not accessible. Whereas the procedures presented remain to be tested for other tissue types and archival conditions, the approach described may facilitate greater utilization of older paraffin block archives for modern immunofluorescence studies. PMID:26392518

  12. Analgesic Effects of Danggui-Shaoyao-San on Various "Phenotypes" of Nociception and Inflammation in a Formalin Pain Model.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun-Bin; Zhou, Ke-Cheng; Wu, Huang-Hui; Hu, Wei; Ding, Tan; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Li-Ying; Kou, Jun-Ping; Kaye, Alan David; Wang, Wen

    2016-12-01

    Danggui-Shaoyao-San (DSS) is a traditional Chinese medicine, which has long been used for pain treatment and has been demonstrated to possess anti-oxidative, cognitive enhancement, and anti-depressant effects. In the present study, the effects of aqueous extracts of DSS on spontaneous pain behaviors and long-term hyperalgesia were examined to investigate the anti-nociceptive effects and underlying mechanisms. Single pretreatment of DSS dose-dependently reduced spontaneous flinches/licking time in the second, rather than the first, phase after subcutaneous injection of 5 % formalin into one hindpaw, in doses of 2.4 and 9.6 g/kg. DSS also dose-dependently inhibited FOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in both superficial and deep layers within the spinal dorsal horn. Further, DSS reduced hypoalgesia in the injected paw from 1 to 3 days and produced anti-hyperalgesic actions in both the injected paw after 3 days and non-injected paw. These data suggest involvement of enhancement of descending pain inhibition by suppression of 5-HTT levels in the spinal dorsal horn and reduction of peripheral long-term inflammation, including paw edema and ulcers. These findings suggest that DSS may be a useful therapeutic agent for short- and long-term inflammation induced pain, through both anti-inflammatory and suppression of central sensitization mechanisms.

  13. In Silico Analysis Validates Proteomic Findings of Formalin-fixed Paraffin Embedded Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma Tissue

    PubMed Central

    AZIMI, ALI; L. KAUFMAN, KIMBERLEY; ALI, MARINA; KOSSARD, STEVEN; FERNANDEZ-PENAS, PABLO

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is a common type of skin cancer but there are no comprehensive proteomic studies on this entity. Materials and Methods: We employed liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cSCC material to study the tumor and normal skin tissue proteomes. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was used to interpret the role of altered proteins in cSCC pathophysiology. Results were validated using the Human Protein Atlas and Oncomine database in silico. Results: Of 1,310 unique proteins identified, expression of an average of 144 and 88 proteins were significantly (p<0.05) increased and decreased, respectively, in the tumor samples compared to their normal counterparts. IPA analysis revealed disruptions in proteins associated with cell proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. In silico analysis confirmed that proteins corresponding to 12 antibodies, and genes corresponding to 18 proteins were differentially expressed between the two categories, validating our proteomic measurements. Conclusion: Label-free MS-based proteomics is useful for analyzing FFPE cSCC tissues. PMID:27807068

  14. Use of pooled sodium acetate acetic acid formalin-preserved fecal specimens for the detection of intestinal parasites.

    PubMed

    Gaafar, Maha R

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at comparing detection of intestinal parasites from single unpreserved stool sample vs. sodium acetate acetic acid formalin (SAF)-preserved pooled samples, and stained with chlorazol black dye in routine practice. Unpreserved samples were collected from 120 patients and represented as Group I. Other three SAF-preserved samples were collected from the same patients over a 6-day period and represented as Groups IIa, IIb, and IIc. The latter groups were equally subdivided into two subgroups. The first subgroup of each of the three samples was examined individually, whereas the second subgroup of each were pooled and examined as a single specimen. All groups were examined by the routine diagnostic techniques; however, in group II when the diagnosis was uncertain, the chlorazol black dye staining procedure was carried out. Results demonstrated that out of 74 patients who continued the study, 12 cases (16%) were positive in group I, compared with 29 (39%) in the subgroups examined individually, and 27 (36%) in the pooled subgroups. Therefore, pooling of preserved fecal samples is an efficient and economical procedure for the detection of parasites. Furthermore, the chlorazol black dye was simple and effective in detecting the nuclear details of different parasites.

  15. Robust transcriptional tumor signatures applicable to both formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded and fresh-frozen samples

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jun; He, Jun; Liu, Huaping; Cai, Hao; Hong, Guini; Zhang, Jiahui; Li, Na; Ao, Lu; Guo, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples represent a valuable resource for clinical researches. However, FFPE samples are usually considered an unreliable source for gene expression analysis due to the partial RNA degradation. In this study, through comparing gene expression profiles between FFPE samples and paired fresh-frozen (FF) samples for three cancer types, we firstly showed that expression measurements of thousands of genes had at least two-fold change in FFPE samples compared with paired FF samples. Therefore, for a transcriptional signature based on risk scores summarized from the expression levels of the signature genes, the risk score thresholds trained from FFPE (or FF) samples could not be applied to FF (or FFPE) samples. On the other hand, we found that more than 90% of the relative expression orderings (REOs) of gene pairs in the FF samples were maintained in their paired FFPE samples and largely unaffected by the storage time. The result suggested that the REOs of gene pairs were highly robust against partial RNA degradation in FFPE samples. Finally, as a case study, we developed a REOs-based signature to distinguish liver cirrhosis from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using FFPE samples. The signature was validated in four datasets of FFPE samples and eight datasets of FF samples. In conclusion, the valuable FFPE samples can be fully exploited to identify REOs-based diagnostic and prognostic signatures which could be robustly applicable to both FF samples and FFPE samples with degraded RNA. PMID:28036264

  16. Tramadol and Tramadol+Caffeine Synergism in the Rat Formalin Test Are Mediated by Central Opioid and Serotonergic Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Munguía, Norma; González-Trujano, Ma Eva; Huerta, Miguel; Trujillo, Xochitl; Díaz-Reval, M Irene

    2015-01-01

    Different analgesic combinations with caffeine have shown this drug to be capable of increasing the analgesic effect. Many combinations with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been carried out, but, in regard to opioids, only combinations with morphine and tramadol have been reported. The antinociceptive synergism mechanism of these combinations is not well understood. The purpose of the present study was to determine the participation of spinal and supraspinal opioidergic and serotonergic systems in the synergic effect of the tramadol+caffeine combination in the rat formalin test. At the supraspinal level, the opioid antagonist, naloxone, completely reversed the effect of the drug combination, whereas ketanserin, a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, inhibited the effect by 60%; however, ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, did not alter the combination effect. When the antagonists were intrathecally administered, there was a significant reduction in all tramadol-caffeine combination effects. With respect to tramadol alone, there was significant participation of the opioid system at the supraspinal level, whereas it was the serotonergic system that participated at the spinal level by means of the two receptors studied. In conclusion, the tramadol+caffeine combination synergically activated the opioid and serotonergic systems at the supraspinal level, as well as at the spinal level, to produce the antinociception.

  17. Quantification of DNA Extracted from Formalin Fixed Paraffin-Embeded Tissue Comparison of Three Techniques: Effect on PCR Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Manoj Kumar; Suryavanshi, Moushumi; Mehta, Anurag; Saikia, Kandarpa Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mutation detection from Formalin Fixed Paraffin-Embedding (FFPE) tissue in molecular lab became a necessary tool for defining potential targeted drug. Accurate quantification of DNA extracted from FFPE tissue is necessary for downstream applications like Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), sequencing etc. Aim To check and define which method for FFPE DNA quantification is suitable for downstream processes. Materials and Methods In this experimental experience study Biorad Smartspec Plus spectrophotomery, Qubit Fluorometer, and Qiagen Rotorgene qPCR was used to compare 20 FFPE DNA quantification in Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre, in 2015 and quantified amount of DNA used for PCR reaction. Results The average concentration of DNA extracted from FFPE tissue measured using the spectrophotometer was much higher than the concentration measured using the Qubit Fluorometer and qPCR. Conclusion Results varied depending upon the technique used. A fluorometric analysis may be more suitable for quantification of DNA samples extracted from FFPE tissue compared with spectrophotometric analysis. But qPCR is the best technique because it details DNA quantity along with quality of amplifiable DNA from FFPE tissue. PMID:27790419

  18. Acquisition of biologically relevant gene expression data by Affymetrix microarray analysis of archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumours

    PubMed Central

    Linton, K M; Hey, Y; Saunders, E; Jeziorska, M; Denton, J; Wilson, C L; Swindell, R; Dibben, S; Miller, C J; Pepper, S D; Radford, J A; Freemont, A J

    2008-01-01

    Robust protocols for microarray gene expression profiling of archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPET) are needed to facilitate research when availability of fresh-frozen tissue is limited. Recent reports attest to the feasibility of this approach, but the clinical value of these data is poorly understood. We employed state-of-the-art RNA extraction and Affymetrix microarray technology to examine 34 archival FFPET primary extremity soft tissue sarcomas. Nineteen arrays met stringent QC criteria and were used to model prognostic signatures for metastatic recurrence. Arrays from two paired frozen and FFPET samples were compared: although FFPET sensitivity was low (∼50%), high specificity (95%) and positive predictive value (92%) suggest that transcript detection is reliable. Good agreement between arrays and real time (RT)–PCR was confirmed, especially for abundant transcripts, and RT–PCR validated the regulation pattern for 19 of 24 candidate genes (overall R2=0.4662). RT–PCR and immunohistochemistry on independent cases validated prognostic significance for several genes including RECQL4, FRRS1, CFH and MET – whose combined expression carried greater prognostic value than tumour grade – and cmet and TRKB proteins. These molecules warrant further evaluation in larger series. Reliable clinically relevant data can be obtained from archival FFPET, but protocol amendments are needed to improve the sensitivity and broad application of this approach. PMID:18382428

  19. Acquisition of biologically relevant gene expression data by Affymetrix microarray analysis of archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumours.

    PubMed

    Linton, K M; Hey, Y; Saunders, E; Jeziorska, M; Denton, J; Wilson, C L; Swindell, R; Dibben, S; Miller, C J; Pepper, S D; Radford, J A; Freemont, A J

    2008-04-22

    Robust protocols for microarray gene expression profiling of archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPET) are needed to facilitate research when availability of fresh-frozen tissue is limited. Recent reports attest to the feasibility of this approach, but the clinical value of these data is poorly understood. We employed state-of-the-art RNA extraction and Affymetrix microarray technology to examine 34 archival FFPET primary extremity soft tissue sarcomas. Nineteen arrays met stringent QC criteria and were used to model prognostic signatures for metastatic recurrence. Arrays from two paired frozen and FFPET samples were compared: although FFPET sensitivity was low ( approximately 50%), high specificity (95%) and positive predictive value (92%) suggest that transcript detection is reliable. Good agreement between arrays and real time (RT)-PCR was confirmed, especially for abundant transcripts, and RT-PCR validated the regulation pattern for 19 of 24 candidate genes (overall R(2)=0.4662). RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry on independent cases validated prognostic significance for several genes including RECQL4, FRRS1, CFH and MET - whose combined expression carried greater prognostic value than tumour grade - and cmet and TRKB proteins. These molecules warrant further evaluation in larger series. Reliable clinically relevant data can be obtained from archival FFPET, but protocol amendments are needed to improve the sensitivity and broad application of this approach.

  20. Identification and expression profile of multiple genes in Nile tilapia in response to formalin killed Streptococcus iniae vaccination.

    PubMed

    Pridgeon, Julia W; Klesius, Phillip H

    2011-08-15

    Twenty-eight expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated from a Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) vaccinated vs non-vaccinated subtractive library at 12-h post injection of a formalin killed Streptococcus iniae ARS-98-60 vaccine. The 28 ESTs were classified in terms of their putative functions. Half of the ESTs identified were unknown proteins. Of the remaining half ESTs, 17% have putative functions in protein biosynthesis and 11% have putative functions in immunity, energy production, and signal transduction, respectively. Immunity-related ESTs identified included high density lipoprotein-binding protein vigilin, immunoglobulin heavy chain, and QM-like protein. Quantitative PCR revealed that one EST (cytochrome c oxidase subunit II) was highly upregulated (1825 ± 336 fold) in vaccinated fish compared to that in non-vaccinated fish. Of the remaining 27 ESTs, nine were significantly (P<0.05) upregulated (<20 fold) in vaccinated fish. The nine significantly upregulated genes included five unknown or hypothetical proteins and four known proteins (high density lipoprotein-binding protein vigilin, QM-like protein, ribosomal protein S13, and ribosomal protein L5). The upregulation of these genes induced by killed S. iniae vaccines suggest that they might play important role in Nile tilapia defense against S. iniae infection.

  1. Molecular genotyping of Echinococcus granulosus using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded preparations from human isolates in unusual tissue sites.

    PubMed

    Hizem, A; M'rad, S; Oudni-M'rad, M; Mestiri, S; Hammedi, F; Mezhoud, H; Zakhama, A; Mokni, M; Babba, H

    2016-07-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by Echinococcus granulosus remains a serious problem worldwide for issues relating to public health and the economy. The most predominantly affected sites are the liver and the lungs, but other organs such as the heart, the spleen and the peritoneum can also be infected. Access to cysts from uncommon sites has limited genomic and molecular investigations. In the present study, genotypes of E. granulosus sensu lato were identified from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues (FF-PETs) implicated in human CE. Tissue samples were obtained from 57 patients with histologically confirmed CE. DNA samples were analysed using Egss 1 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) specific to the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene of E. granulosus sensu stricto. All cysts were typed as E. granulosus sensu stricto with up to 35% of the liver and 16.6% of lungs being the most frequently infected, and up to 48.4% of samples being from rare sites. No correlation was found between cyst site and either the gender or the age of patients. This study demonstrates the possibility of exploiting atypical cysts using FF-PET samples and highlights the predominance of E. granulosus sensu stricto species in the Tunisian population, even in unusual infection sites.

  2. HaloPlex Targeted Resequencing for Mutation Detection in Clinical Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tumor Samples.

    PubMed

    Moens, Lotte N J; Falk-Sörqvist, Elin; Ljungström, Viktor; Mattsson, Johanna; Sundström, Magnus; La Fleur, Linnéa; Mathot, Lucy; Micke, Patrick; Nilsson, Mats; Botling, Johan

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the advent of massively parallel next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled substantial advances in the study of human diseases. Combined with targeted DNA enrichment methods, high sequence coverage can be obtained for different genes simultaneously at a reduced cost per sample, creating unique opportunities for clinical cancer diagnostics. However, the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) process of tissue samples, routinely used in pathology departments, results in DNA fragmentation and nucleotide modifications that introduce a number of technical challenges for downstream biomolecular analyses. We evaluated the HaloPlex target enrichment system for somatic mutation detection in 80 tissue fractions derived from 20 clinical cancer cases with paired tumor and normal tissue available in both FFPE and fresh-frozen format. Several modifications to the standard method were introduced, including a reduced target fragment length and two strand capturing. We found that FFPE material can be used for HaloPlex-based target enrichment and next-generation sequencing, even when starting from small amounts of DNA. By specifically capturing both strands for each target fragment, we were able to reduce the number of false-positive errors caused by FFPE-induced artifacts and lower the detection limit for somatic mutations. We believe that the HaloPlex method presented here will be broadly applicable as a tool for somatic mutation detection in clinical cancer settings.

  3. Measuring expression levels of small regulatory RNA molecules from body fluids and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples.

    PubMed

    Gyongyosi, Adrienn; Docs, Otto; Czimmerer, Zsolt; Orosz, Laszlo; Horvath, Attila; Török, Olga; Mehes, Gabor; Nagy, Laszlo; Balint, Balint L

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are involved in the regulation of various pathophysiological processes such as immune regulation and cancer. Next-generation sequencing methods enable us to monitor their presence in various types of samples but we need flexible methods for validating datasets generated by high-throughput methods. Here we describe the detailed protocols to be used with our MiRNA Primer Design Tool assay design system. The presented methods allow the flexible design of the oligonucleotides needed for the RT-qPCR detection of any variant of small regulatory RNA molecules from virtually any species. This method can be used to measure miRNA levels from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples and various body fluids. As an example, we show the results of the hsa-miR-515-3p, hsa-miR-325, and hsa-miR-155 quantification using a specific UPL probe (Universal Probe Library) and a stem-loop RT-qPCR assay. The small nucleolar RNA RNU43 is used as endogenous control for normalization of the results. Urine from healthy pregnant women and FFPE samples from patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer and treated with antibody-based anti-EGFR monotherapy were used as samples.

  4. Optimization of Single- and Dual-Color Immunofluorescence Protocols for Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Archival Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kajimura, Junko; Ito, Reiko; Manley, Nancy R; Hale, Laura P

    2016-02-01

    Performance of immunofluorescence staining on archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human tissues is generally not considered to be feasible, primarily due to problems with tissue quality and autofluorescence. We report the development and application of procedures that allowed for the study of a unique archive of thymus tissues derived from autopsies of individuals exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima, Japan in 1945. Multiple independent treatments were used to minimize autofluorescence and maximize fluorescent antibody signals. Treatments with NH3/EtOH and Sudan Black B were particularly useful in decreasing autofluorescent moieties present in the tissue. Deconvolution microscopy was used to further enhance the signal-to-noise ratios. Together, these techniques provide high-quality single- and dual-color fluorescent images with low background and high contrast from paraffin blocks of thymus tissue that were prepared up to 60 years ago. The resulting high-quality images allow the application of a variety of image analyses to thymus tissues that previously were not accessible. Whereas the procedures presented remain to be tested for other tissue types and archival conditions, the approach described may facilitate greater utilization of older paraffin block archives for modern immunofluorescence studies.

  5. The paraffin-embedded RNA metric (PERM) for RNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Chung, Joon-Yong; Cho, Hanbyoul; Hewitt, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    RNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is commonly evaluated in both investigative and diagnostic pathology. However, the quality of the data is directly impacted by RNA quality. The RNA integrity number (RIN), an algorithm based on a combination of electrophoretic features, is widely applied to RNA isolated from paraffin-embedded tissue, but it is a poor indicator of the quality of that RNA. Here we describe the novel paraffin-embedded RNA metric (PERM) for quantifying the quality of RNA from FFPE tissue. The PERM is based on a formula that approximates a weighted area-under-the-curve analysis of an electropherogram of the extracted RNA. Using biochemically degraded RNAs prepared from experimentally fixed mouse kidney specimens, we demonstrate that PERM values correlate with mRNA transcript measurements determined using the QuantiGene system. Furthermore, PERM values correlate with real-time PCR data. Our results demonstrate that the PERM can be used to qualify RNA for different end-point studies and may be a valuable tool for molecular studies using RNA extracted from FFPE tissue.

  6. RNA-Seq-based toxicogenomic assessment of fresh frozen and formalin-fixed tissues yields similar mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Scott S; Phadke, Dhiral P; Mav, Deepak; Holmgren, Stephanie; Gao, Yuan; Xie, Bin; Shin, Joo Heon; Shah, Ruchir R; Merrick, B Alex; Tice, Raymond R

    2015-07-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) pathology specimens represent a potentially vast resource for transcriptomic-based biomarker discovery. We present here a comparison of results from a whole transcriptome RNA-Seq analysis of RNA extracted from fresh frozen and FFPE livers. The samples were derived from rats exposed to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 ) and a corresponding set of control animals. Principal components analysis indicated that samples were separated in the two groups representing presence or absence of chemical exposure, both in fresh frozen and FFPE sample types. Sixty-five percent of the differentially expressed transcripts (AFB1 vs. controls) in fresh frozen samples were also differentially expressed in FFPE samples (overlap significance: P < 0.0001). Genomic signature and gene set analysis of AFB1 differentially expressed transcript lists indicated highly similar results between fresh frozen and FFPE at the level of chemogenomic signatures (i.e., single chemical/dose/duration elicited transcriptomic signatures), mechanistic and pathology signatures, biological processes, canonical pathways and transcription factor networks. Overall, our results suggest that similar hypotheses about the biological mechanism of toxicity would be formulated from fresh frozen and FFPE samples. These results indicate that phenotypically anchored archival specimens represent a potentially informative resource for signature-based biomarker discovery and mechanistic characterization of toxicity.

  7. Comparison of fresh versus sodium acetate acetic acid formalin preserved stool specimens for diagnosis of intestinal protozoal infections.

    PubMed

    Mank, T G; Zaat, J O; Blotkamp, J; Polderman, A M

    1995-12-01

    The use of sodium acetate acetic acid formalin (SAF)-preserved stool specimens was compared with that of nonpreserved specimens for the recovery of intestinal protozoa. A total of 247 patients, 170 with diarrhea of more than one week's duration and 77 refugees, were asked to collect a stool specimen. Each specimen was placed into two vials, one empty, the other containing SAF fixative. Laboratory investigations included microscopic examination of the concentrated sediment and direct wet smears from both types of stool specimens and the microscopic examination of a permanent stained smear from the unsedimented, SAF-preserved stool specimens. Examination of SAF-preserved stool specimens revealed intestinal protozoa in 149 of the 247 patients. With the conventional procedure using unpreserved stool specimens, intestinal protozoa were found in 89 of the 247 patients. The results show that the examination of SAF-preserved stool specimens, consisting of the microscopic examination of both the concentrated sediment and the permanent stained smear from the unsedimented material, increases the chance of recovering intestinal protozoa as compared to the conventional procedure.

  8. Tramadol and Tramadol+Caffeine Synergism in the Rat Formalin Test Are Mediated by Central Opioid and Serotonergic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Munguía, Norma; González-Trujano, Ma. Eva; Huerta, Miguel; Trujillo, Xochitl; Díaz-Reval, M. Irene

    2015-01-01

    Different analgesic combinations with caffeine have shown this drug to be capable of increasing the analgesic effect. Many combinations with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been carried out, but, in regard to opioids, only combinations with morphine and tramadol have been reported. The antinociceptive synergism mechanism of these combinations is not well understood. The purpose of the present study was to determine the participation of spinal and supraspinal opioidergic and serotonergic systems in the synergic effect of the tramadol+caffeine combination in the rat formalin test. At the supraspinal level, the opioid antagonist, naloxone, completely reversed the effect of the drug combination, whereas ketanserin, a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, inhibited the effect by 60%; however, ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, did not alter the combination effect. When the antagonists were intrathecally administered, there was a significant reduction in all tramadol-caffeine combination effects. With respect to tramadol alone, there was significant participation of the opioid system at the supraspinal level, whereas it was the serotonergic system that participated at the spinal level by means of the two receptors studied. In conclusion, the tramadol+caffeine combination synergically activated the opioid and serotonergic systems at the supraspinal level, as well as at the spinal level, to produce the antinociception. PMID:26146627

  9. The effects of acute restraint stress on nociceptive responses evoked by the injection of formalin into the temporomandibular joint of female rats.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Ana Paula; Gameiro, Gustavo Hauber; Tuma, Carlos Eduardo da Silva Nossa; Marcondes, Fernanda Klein; de Arruda Veiga, Maria Cecília Ferraz

    2010-05-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) formalin test was used to evaluate the effects of acute restraint stress on the nociceptive behavioral responses of female rats during proestrus and estrus phases of the estrous cycle. Rats were subjected to one session of restraint stress (15, 30 min or 1 h). They were then either immediately killed to allow the collection of blood for hormonal radioimmunoassay determinations or subjected to TMJ formalin test to evaluate nociception. All stress protocols significantly raised the plasma concentrations of corticosterone. The performance of rats subjected to 15 and 30 min of restraint stress was similar to that of control rats, whereas rats that were stressed for 1 h showed a decrease in nociceptive responses, during both proestrus and estrus phases. The stress-induced analgesia (SIA) was greater in the proestrus phase. To evaluate the role of kappa-opioid receptors, the selective receptor kappa-opioid antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI; 200 microg or saline) was injected into the TMJ 24 h prior to the 1 h stress period and the TMJ formalin test. The local administration of nor-BNI partially reversed the SIA during the proestrus phase. These findings suggest that (1) acute stress for 1 h can produce analgesia both during proestrus and estrus phases; this effect is greater during the proestrus phase and (2) kappa-opioid receptor activation is involved in the SIA observed in the proestrus phase.

  10. Localization of a wide-ranging panel of antigens in the rat retina by immunohistochemistry: comparison of Davidson's solution and formalin as fixatives.

    PubMed

    Chidlow, Glyn; Daymon, Mark; Wood, John P M; Casson, Robert J

    2011-10-01

    The preferred fixative for whole eyes is Davidson's solution, which provides optimal tissue preservation while avoiding retinal detachment. Hitherto, the compatibility of Davidson's solution with immunohistochemistry has been largely untested. The goal of the present study was to compare the immunolabeling patterns of a wide-ranging panel of commercially available, previously validated antibodies in formalin- and Davidson's-fixed retinas. Immunohistochemistry was performed in normal pigmented rat eyes and, to facilitate localization of inducible proteins, eyes injected with the bacterial toxin lipopolysaccharide or subjected to laser-induced photoreceptor damage. Specificity of labeling was judged by the morphology and distribution of immunopositive cells, by the absence of signal in appropriate controls, and by comparison with expected staining patterns. Retinas fixed in formalin displayed only adequate morphological integrity but were highly compatible with all 39 antibodies evaluated. Retinas fixed in Davidson's solution displayed morphological integrity superior to those fixed in formalin. Generally, the cellular and subcellular patterns and intensities of immunoreactivities obtained with each fixative were identical; however, Davidson's fixative was less compatible with certain antibodies, such as the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid, the microglial marker iba1, the macroglial stress protein nestin, and the small heat shock proteins Hsp27 and αB-crystallin, shortfalls that somewhat temper enthusiasm concerning its use.

  11. Spinal Noradrenergic Modulation and the Role of the Alpha-2 Receptor in the Antinociceptive Effect of Intrathecal Nefopam in the Formalin Test

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Shin Ho; Heo, Bong Ha; Park, Sun Hong; Kim, Woong Mo; Lee, Hyung Gon; Yoon, Myung Ha

    2014-01-01

    Background Nefopam has shown an analgesic effect on acute pain including postoperative pain. The reuptake of monoamines including serotonin and noradrenaline has been proposed as the mechanism of the analgesic action of nefopam, but it remains unclear. Although alpha-adrenergic agents are being widely used in the perioperative period, the role of noradrenergic modulation in the analgesic effect of nefopam has not been fully addressed. Methods Changes in the antinociceptive effect of intrathecal (i.t.) nefopam against formalin-elicited flinching responses were explored in Sprague-Dawley rats pretreated with i.t. 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), which depletes spinal noradrenaline. In addition, antagonism to the effect of nefopam by prazosin and yohimbine was evaluated to further elucidate the antinociceptive mechanism of i.t. nefopam. Results Pretreatment with i.t. 6-OHDA alone did not alter the flinching responses in either phase of the formalin test, while it attenuated the antinociceptive effect of i.t. nefopam significantly during phase 1, but not phase 2. The antagonist of the alpha-2 receptor, but not the alpha-1 receptor, reduced partially, but significantly, the antinociceptive effect of i.t. nefopam during phase 1, but not during phase 2. Conclusions This study demonstrates that spinal noradrenergic modulation plays an important role in the antinociceptive effect of i.t. nefopam against formalin-elicited acute initial pain, but not facilitated pain, and this action involves the spinal alpha-2 but not the alpha-1 receptor. PMID:24478897

  12. Involvement of nitric oxide and ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the peripheral antinoceptive action of a tramadol-dexketoprofen combination in the formalin test.

    PubMed

    Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario A; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury; Pérez-Urizar, José; Chavarría-Bolaños, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Systemic coadministration of tramadol and dexketoprofen can produce antinociceptive synergism in animals. There has been only limited evaluation of this drug combination in the peripheral nervous system in terms of the antinociceptive interaction and its mechanisms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the peripheral antinociceptive interaction between tramadol and dexketoprofen in the formalin test and the involvement of the nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway and ATP-sensitive K(+) channels. Different doses of tramadol or dexketoprofen were administered locally to the formalin-injured mouse paw and the antinociceptive effect evaluated. ED50 values were calculated for both drugs alone and in combination. Coadministration of tramadol and dexketoprofen produced an antinociceptive synergistic interaction during the second phase of the formalin test. Pretreatment with NO antagonists, including l-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester and 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]-quinoxalin-1-one, or the ATP-sensitive K(+) channel antagonist glibenclamide reversed the antinociceptive synergistic effect of the tramadol-dexketoprofen combination, suggesting that NO and ATP-sensitive K(+) channels were involved.

  13. Identification of monoclonal antibodies for immunohistochemical staining of feline B lymphocytes in frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Monteith, C E; Chelack, B J; Davis, W C; Haines, D M

    1996-01-01

    Commercially-available monoclonal antibodies to B lymphocytes were evaluated for immunohistochemical staining of feline B lymphocytes in frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues using an avidin biotin complex immunoperoxidase immunohistochemical technique. Three monoclonal antibodies: F46A and F72A raised to "carnivore" B lymphocytes and RA3.6B2 raised to murine B lymphocytes, stained B lymphocyte-dependent areas of frozen feline lymphoid tissue. In addition, antibody RA3.6B2 stained B lymphocyte dependent areas in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded feline tissues. There was no staining of T lymphocyte-dependent areas in either frozen or formalin-fixed tissues. Dual parameter flow cytometry, using an anti-pan-T lymphocyte antibody, revealed that greater than 99% of the cells stained by RA3.6B2 are a population distinct from T lymphocytes. F46A was shown to stain a sub-population of those cells stained with RA3.6B2. These antibodies may be useful in the identification of feline B lymphocytes using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry and thereby provide additional tools to study B lymphocyte ontogeny and the significance of lymphocyte phenotype in lymphoid neoplasia in cats. Images Figure 1. PMID:8809382

  14. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue as a source for quantitation of carcinogen DNA adducts: aristolochic acid as a prototype carcinogen.

    PubMed

    Yun, Byeong Hwa; Yao, Lihua; Jelaković, Bojan; Nikolić, Jovan; Dickman, Kathleen G; Grollman, Arthur P; Rosenquist, Thomas A; Turesky, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    DNA adducts are a measure of internal exposure to genotoxicants. However, the measurement of DNA adducts in molecular epidemiology studies often is precluded by the lack of fresh tissue. In contrast, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues frequently are accessible, although technical challenges remain in retrieval of high quality DNA suitable for biomonitoring of adducts. Aristolochic acids (AA) are human carcinogens found in Aristolochia plants, some of which have been used in the preparation of traditional Chinese herbal medicines. We previously established a method to measure DNA adducts of AA in FFPE tissue. In this study, we examine additional features of formalin fixation that could impact the quantity and quality of DNA and report on the recovery of AA-DNA adducts in mice exposed to AA. The yield of DNA isolated from tissues fixed with formalin decreased over 1 week; however, the levels of AA-DNA adducts were similar to those in fresh frozen tissue. Moreover, DNA from FFPE tissue served as a template for PCR amplification, yielding sequence data of comparable quality to DNA obtained from fresh frozen tissue. The estimates of AA-DNA adducts measured in freshly frozen tissue and matching FFPE tissue blocks of human kidney stored for 9 years showed good concordance. Thus, DNA isolated from FFPE tissues may be used to biomonitor DNA adducts and to amplify genes used for mutational analysis, providing clues regarding the origin of human cancers for which an environmental cause is suspected.

  15. The role of peripheral 5HT2A and 5HT1A receptors on the orofacial formalin test in rats with persistent temporomandibular joint inflammation.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, K; Imbe, H; Tashiro, A; Kimura, A; Donishi, T; Tamai, Y; Senba, E

    2005-01-01

    The role of peripheral serotonin (5HT) 2A and 5HT1A receptors on the orofacial nocifensive behavioral activities evoked by the injection of formalin into the masseter muscle was evaluated in the rats with persistent temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation evoked by Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA). The orofacial nocifensive behavioral activities evoked by the injection of formalin into masseter muscle were significantly enhanced at 1 day (CFA day 1 group) or 7 days (CFA day 7 group) during TMJ inflammation. Pretreatment with local administration of 5HT2A receptor antagonist, ketanserin (0.01, 0.1 mg/rat) into the masseter muscle or systemic administration of ketanserin via i.p. injection (1 mg/kg) reduced the orofacial nocifensive behavioral activities of the late phase evoked by formalin injection into masseter muscle on the side of TMJ inflammation (CFA day 7 group). However, local (0.001-0.1 mg/rat) or systemic (1 mg/kg) administration of 5HT1A receptor antagonist, propranolol, into masseter muscle did not produce the antinociceptive effect in CFA day 7 group. Moreover, local administration of ketanserin (0.1 mg) or propranolol (0.1 mg) into masseter muscle did not inhibit nocifensive orofacial behavior in rats without TMJ inflammation. These data suggest that persistent TMJ inflammation causes the elevation of the orofacial nocifensive behavior, and peripheral 5HT2A receptors play an important role in mediating the deep craniofacial tissue nociception in rats with TMJ inflammation.

  16. TMJ inflammation increases Fos expression in the nucleus raphe magnus induced by subsequent formalin injection of the masseter or hindpaw of rats.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang-Hoon; Imbe, Hiroki; Iwai-Liao, Yasutomo

    2006-08-01

    The study was designed to examine the effect of persistent temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation on neuronal activation in the descending pain modulatory system in response to noxious stimulus. Formalin was injected into the left masseter muscle or hindpaw of rats 10 days after injection of the left TMJ with saline or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The results showed that 10-day persistent TMJ inflammation (induced by CFA) alone did not induce a significant increase in Fos-like immunoreactive (Fos-LI) neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) or locus coeruleus (LC), but that formalin injection of the masseter muscle or hindpaw induced a significant increase in Fos-LI neurons in the RVM and LC of rats with and without TMJ inflammation (P < 0.05). However, persistent TMJ inflammation significantly increased Fos-LI neurons in the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) induced by subsequent formalin injection of the masseter muscle and hindpaw (70.2% increase and 53.8% increase, respectively, over the control TMJ-saline-injected rats; P < 0.05). The results suggest that persistent TMJ inflammation increases neuronal activity, in particularly in the NRM, by the plastic change of the descending pain modulatory system after ipsilateral application of a noxious stimulus to either orofacial area or a spatially remote body area.

  17. Amplification of Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 and Human Herpes Virus Type 5 Polymerase Gene Segment From Formalin-Fixed Brain Tissue From Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    and newborn infants exposed in utero, active HHV5 infection only occurs in individuals with 2 immune defects such as AIDS and immunosuppressed organ...described PCR based detection of HSV1 viral DNA in specific formalin-fixed brain tissue regions of Alzheimer patients (14). Recently, Hemling and coworkers...Texas. Formalin-fixed Alzheimer patient brain tissue was obtained from the Honolulu Heart Program, Honolulu, Hawaii. 5 METHODS The extraction and

  18. The Na+/H+ exchanger controls deoxycholic acid-induced apoptosis by a H+-activated, Na+-dependent ionic shift in esophageal cells.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Aaron; Chen, HwuDauRw; Khan, Mohammad R; Roesly, Heather; Hill, Kimberly A; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Mandal, Amritlal; Delamere, Nicholas A; Dvorak, Katerina

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis resistance is a hallmark of cancer cells. Typically, bile acids