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Sample records for acid-inducible gene-i rig-i

  1. Antiviral activity of human oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) is mediated by enhancing retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Yugen; Ghosh, Arundhati; Cuevas, Rolando A.; Forero, Adriana; Dhar, Jayeeta; Ibsen, Mikkel Søes; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan Leo; Schmidt, Tobias; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K.; Fujita, Takashi; Hartmann, Rune; Barik, Sailen; Hornung, Veit; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Virus infection is sensed in the cytoplasm by retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I, also known as DDX58), which requires RNA and polyubiquitin binding to induce type I interferon (IFN), and activate cellular innate immunity. We show that the human IFN-inducible oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) protein had antiviral activity and mediated RIG-I activation by mimicking polyubiquitin. Loss of OASL expression reduced RIG-I signaling and enhanced virus replication in human cells. Conversely, OASL expression suppressed replication of a number of viruses in a RIG-I-dependent manner and enhanced RIG-I-mediated IFN induction. OASL interacted and colocalized with RIG-I, and through its C-terminal ubiquitin-like domain specifically enhanced RIG-I signaling. Bone marrow derived macrophages from mice deficient for Oasl2 showed that among the two mouse orthologs of human OASL; Oasl2 is functionally similar to human OASL. Our findings show a mechanism by which human OASL contributes to host antiviral responses by enhancing RIG-I activation. PMID:24931123

  2. Critical Role of IRF-3 in the Direct Regulation of dsRNA-Induced Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene-I (RIG-I) Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hayakari, Ryo; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Xing, Fei; Yoshida, Hidemi; Hayakari, Makoto; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic viral sensor retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I), which is also known as an IFN-stimulated gene (ISG), senses viral RNA to activate antiviral signaling. It is therefore thought that RIG-I is regulated in a STAT1-dependent manner. Although RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling is indispensable for the induction of an appropriate adaptive immune response, the mechanism underlying the regulation of RIG-I expression remains elusive. Here, we examined the direct regulation of RIG-I expression by interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), which is an essential molecule for antiviral innate immunity. We initially found that RIG-I can be induced by dsRNA in both IFN-independent and IRF-3-dependent manners. A sequence analysis revealed that the RIG-I gene has putative IRF-3-binding sites in its promoter region. Using a combination of cellular, molecular biological, and mutational approaches, we first showed that IRF-3 can directly regulate the expression of RIG-I via a single IRF-element (IRF-E) site in the proximal promoter region of the RIG-I gene in response to dsRNA. IRF-3 is considered a master regulator in antiviral signaling for the generation of type I interferons (IFNs). Thus, our findings demonstrate that RIG-I expression induced by the IRF-3-mediated pathway may serve as a crucial antiviral factor for reinforcing a surveillance system against viral invasion through the regulation of the cytoplasmic viral sensor RIG-I. PMID:27662626

  3. Muscovy duck retinoic acid-induced gene I (MdRIG-I) functions in innate immunity against H9N2 avian influenza viruses (AIV) infections.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuqiang; Huang, Qingqing; Ji, Wenhui; Du, Bin; Fu, Qiang; An, Huiting; Li, Jing; Wang, Hengan; Yan, Yaxian; Ding, Chan; Sun, Jianhe

    2015-02-15

    Retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) is a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor that senses pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata) is a large duck different from other species of ducks, and is more susceptible to some microbial pathogens. In this study, the Muscovy duck RIG-I gene (MdRIG-I) was identified. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that MdRIG-I mRNA was widely expressed in different tissues, especially in those with mucosa. RIG-I null DF-1 cells transfected with DNA constructs encoding MdRIG-I or CARDs domain can activate IRF-3 and NF-κB to up-regulated activity of IFN-β promoter. The components of the signaling pathway downstream of RIG-I in mammalian cells including IRF-3, NF-κB, IFN-β and the IFN-stimulated genes Mx-1, PKR and MDA5 were significantly up-regulated in CARDs-overexpressing-DF-1 cells. Implicating RIG-I in the antiviral response to an infection in vivo, we found that RIG-I expression in brain, spleen, lung and bursa were up-regulated in ducks challenged with H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV), whose six internal genes were closely related to the H7N9 and H10N8 AIV. In vitro, DF-1 cells transfected with MdRIG-I plasmid can respond significantly to H9N2 AIV, evident through enhancement of IFN-β promoter activity and decreased virus titer. Altogether, these results indicated that MdRIG-I is a novel member of RLR gene family, engaging in the early stage of antiviral innate immunity.

  4. Interactions between the Influenza A Virus RNA Polymerase Components and Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene I

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weizhong; Chen, Hongjun; Sutton, Troy; Obadan, Adebimpe

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The influenza A virus genome possesses eight negative-strand RNA segments in the form of viral ribonucleoprotein particles (vRNPs) in association with the three viral RNA polymerase subunits (PB2, PB1, and PA) and the nucleoprotein (NP). Through interactions with multiple host factors, the RNP subunits play vital roles in replication, host adaptation, interspecies transmission, and pathogenicity. In order to gain insight into the potential roles of RNP subunits in the modulation of the host's innate immune response, the interactions of each RNP subunit with retinoic acid-inducible gene I protein (RIG-I) from mammalian and avian species were investigated. Studies using coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP), bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFc), and colocalization using confocal microscopy provided direct evidence for the RNA-independent binding of PB2, PB1, and PA with RIG-I from various hosts (human, swine, mouse, and duck). In contrast, the binding of NP with RIG-I was found to be RNA dependent. Expression of the viral NS1 protein, which interacts with RIG-I, did not interfere with the association of RNA polymerase subunits with RIG-I. The association of each individual virus polymerase component with RIG-I failed to significantly affect the interferon (IFN) induction elicited by RIG-I and 5′ triphosphate (5′ppp) RNA in reporter assays, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and IRF3 phosphorylation tests. Taken together, these findings indicate that viral RNA polymerase components PB2, PB1, and PA directly target RIG-I, but the exact biological significance of these interactions in the replication and pathogenicity of influenza A virus needs to be further clarified. IMPORTANCE RIG-I is an important RNA sensor to elicit the innate immune response in mammals and some bird species (such as duck) upon influenza A virus infection. Although the 5′-triphosphate double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) panhandle structure at the end of viral genome RNA is

  5. Identification of a retinoic acid-inducible gene I from Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) and expression analysis in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianjun; Guo, Songlin; Lin, Peng; Wang, Yilei; Zhang, Ziping; Zhang, Zaipeng; Yu, Lili

    2016-08-01

    RIG-I (retinoic acid inducible gene-I) is one of the key cytosolic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) for the recognition of cytosolic viral nucleic acids and the production of type I interferons (IFNs). The full-length cDNA sequence of RIG-I (AjRIG-I) in Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) was identified and characterized in this article. The full-length cDNA of AjRIG-I was 3468 bp, including a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 52 bp, a 3'-UTR of 617 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 2799 bp encoding a polypeptide of 933 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 106.2 kDa. NCBI CDD analysis showed that the AjRIG-I protein had the typical conserved domains, including two adjacent caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs), a DEXDc domain, a HELICc domain and a C-terminal regulatory domain (RD). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed a broad expression for AjRIG-I in a wide range of tissues, with the predominant expression in liver, followed by the gills, spleen, kidney, intestine, skin, and the very low expression in muscle and heart. The AjRIG-I expressions in liver, spleen and kidney were significantly induced following injection with LPS, the viral mimic poly I:C, and Aeromonas hydrophila infection. In vitro, the AjRIG-I transcripts of Japanese eel liver cells were significantly enhanced by poly I:C and PGN stimulation, down-regulated with CpG-DNA treatment whereas no change of the expression level was found post LPS challenge. These results collectively suggested AjRIG-I transcripts expression possibly play an important role in fish defense against viral and bacterial infection.

  6. Identification of a retinoic acid-inducible gene I from Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) and expression analysis in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianjun; Guo, Songlin; Lin, Peng; Wang, Yilei; Zhang, Ziping; Zhang, Zaipeng; Yu, Lili

    2016-08-01

    RIG-I (retinoic acid inducible gene-I) is one of the key cytosolic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) for the recognition of cytosolic viral nucleic acids and the production of type I interferons (IFNs). The full-length cDNA sequence of RIG-I (AjRIG-I) in Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) was identified and characterized in this article. The full-length cDNA of AjRIG-I was 3468 bp, including a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 52 bp, a 3'-UTR of 617 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 2799 bp encoding a polypeptide of 933 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 106.2 kDa. NCBI CDD analysis showed that the AjRIG-I protein had the typical conserved domains, including two adjacent caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs), a DEXDc domain, a HELICc domain and a C-terminal regulatory domain (RD). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed a broad expression for AjRIG-I in a wide range of tissues, with the predominant expression in liver, followed by the gills, spleen, kidney, intestine, skin, and the very low expression in muscle and heart. The AjRIG-I expressions in liver, spleen and kidney were significantly induced following injection with LPS, the viral mimic poly I:C, and Aeromonas hydrophila infection. In vitro, the AjRIG-I transcripts of Japanese eel liver cells were significantly enhanced by poly I:C and PGN stimulation, down-regulated with CpG-DNA treatment whereas no change of the expression level was found post LPS challenge. These results collectively suggested AjRIG-I transcripts expression possibly play an important role in fish defense against viral and bacterial infection. PMID:27238428

  7. RIG-I in RNA virus recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kell, Alison M.; Gale, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Antiviral immunity is initiated upon host recognition of viral products via non-self molecular patterns known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Such recognition initiates signaling cascades that induce intracellular innate immune defenses and an inflammatory response that facilitates development of the acquired immune response. The retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) protein family are key cytoplasmic pathogen recognition receptors that are implicated in the recognition of viruses across genera and virus families, including functioning as major sensors of RNA viruses, and promoting recognition of some DNA viruses. RIG-I, the charter member of the RLR family, is activated upon binding to PAMP RNA. Activated RIG-I signals by interacting with the adapter protein MAVS leading to a signaling cascade that activates the transcription factors IRF3 and NF-κB. These actions induce the expression of antiviral gene products and the production of type I and III interferons that lead to an antiviral state in the infected cell and surrounding tissue. RIG-I signaling is essential for the control of infection by many RNA viruses. Recently, RIG-I crosstalk with other pathogen recognition receptors and components of the inflammasome has been described. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge regarding the role of RIG-I in recognition of a variety of virus families and its role in programming the adaptive immune response through cross-talk with parallel arms of the innate immune system, including how RIG-I can be leveraged for antiviral therapy. PMID:25749629

  8. Goose RIG-I functions in innate immunity against Newcastle disease virus infections.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingjie; Ding, Na; Ding, Siyu Serena; Yu, Shengqing; Meng, Chunhun; Chen, Hongjun; Qiu, Xusheng; Zhang, Shilei; Yu, Yang; Zhan, Yuan; Ding, Chan

    2013-04-01

    Mammalian retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) is a chief antiviral gene sensing viral RNA molecules including Newcastle disease virus (NDV). In this study, goose RIG-I gene (gRIG-I) was identified. The 2805 bp-long gene encodes a gRIG-I protein that exhibits 93.8% amino acid identity to duck RIG-I. DF-1 chicken fibroblast cells transfected with full-length of gRIG-I or CARD domain of gRIG-I plasmids respond significantly to the agonist of 21-mer 5'ppp RNA, evident through enhancement of IFN-β promoter activity. Goose RIG-I transfected 293T/17 cells were then tested for the response to NDV infection, resulting in up-regulated activity of IFN-β promoter, and mRNA levels of IRF-3 and IFIT1, but decreased virus titer. Similar results were obtained in transfected DF-1 chicken fibroblast cells and goose embryo fibroblast cells in response to NDV infections Animal experiments further support a role of gRIG-I in goose innate immunity against NDV infections by showing increased gRIG-I mRNA levels and decreased virus titer in geese lung and air sac post-infection.

  9. Endothelial RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function

    SciTech Connect

    Asdonk, Tobias; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation alters HCAEC biology in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPC function is affected by RIG-I stimulation in vitro. -- Abstract: Background: Endothelial dysfunction is a crucial part of the chronic inflammatory atherosclerotic process and is mediated by innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) specialized in immunorecognition of nucleic acids may play an important role in endothelial biology in a proatherogenic manner. Here, we analyzed the impact of endothelial retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) activation upon vascular endothelial biology. Methods and results: Wild type mice were injected intravenously with 32.5 {mu}g of the RIG-ligand 3pRNA (RNA with triphosphate at the 5 Prime end) or polyA control every other day for 7 days. In 3pRNA-treated mice, endothelium-depended vasodilation was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticle (EMP) numbers significantly elevated compared to controls. To gain further insight in RIG-I dependent endothelial biology, cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were stimulated in vitro with 3pRNA. Both cells types express RIG-I and react with receptor upregulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is enhanced in both cell types, whereas apoptosis and proliferation is not significantly affected in HCAEC. Importantly, HCAEC release significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines in response to RIG-I stimulation. Conclusion: This study shows that activation of the cytoplasmatic nucleic acid receptor RIG-I leads to endothelial dysfunction. RIG-I induced endothelial damage could therefore be an important pathway in atherogenesis.

  10. Retinoic acid inducible gene-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 are induced but not essential for dengue virus induced type I interferon response.

    PubMed

    Qin, Cheng-Feng; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Zhong-Yu; Jiang, Tao; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Xu-Dong; Yu, Man; Qin, E-De

    2011-08-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) are important human pathogens that cause mild dengue fever, and severe dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome, and no vaccine or antiviral therapy are currently available. At the initial stage of DENV infection, host pattern recognition receptors are responsible for sensing viral proteins or nucleic acids and initiating innate antiviral responses, including the activation of type I interferon (IFN) and proinflammatory cytokines. Two RNA helicases, retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5), are recently identified as cytoplasmic PPRs for virus infection. Here, in this study the involvement of RIG-I and MDA5 in DENV-induced IFN-β response A549 cells were investigated. DENV infection readily up-regulated RIG-I expression, activated IRF-3 and RIG-I mRNA transcription, and induced the production of IFN-β in A549 cells in a strain- and serotype-independent manner. While gene silencing of RIG-I by small interfering RNAs failed to significantly inhibit IFN-β production induced by DENV infection. Further experiments demonstrated that MDA5 was also induced by DENV infection, and MDA5 knockout did not block DENV induced IFN-β production in A549 cells. Our results demonstrated that both RIG-I and MDA5 were induced but neither of the two was essential for DENV induced IFN IFN-β response in A549 cells. These findings suggest that innate immune pathway are involved in the recognition of DENV by human non-immune cells, and provide insights for the understanding of the molecular mechanism for DENV-induced antiviral response.

  11. Duck RIG-I CARD Domain Induces the Chicken IFN-β by Activating NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Huang, Zhengyang; Wang, Bin; Yu, Qinming; Liu, Ran; Xu, Qi; Chang, Guobin; Ding, Jiatong; Chen, Guohong

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I- (RIG-I-) like receptors (RLRs) have recently been identified as cytoplasmic sensors for viral RNA. RIG-I, a member of RLRs family, plays an important role in innate immunity. Although previous investigations have proved that RIG-I is absent in chickens, it remains largely unknown whether the chicken can respond to RIG-I ligand. In this study, the eukaryotic expression vectors encoding duRIG-I full length (duck RIG-I, containing all domains), duRIG-I N-terminal (containing the two caspase activation and recruitment domain, CARDs), and duRIG-I C-terminal (containing helicase and regulatory domains) labeled with 6∗His tags were constructed successfully and detected by western blotting. Luciferase reporter assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) detected the duRIG-I significantly activated NF-κB and induced the expression of IFN-β when polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly[I:C], synthetic double-stranded RNA) challenges chicken embryonic fibroblasts cells (DF1 cells), while the duRIG-I was inactive in the absence of poly[I:C]. Further analysis revealed that the CARDs (duRIG-I-N) induced IFN-β production regardless of the presence of poly[I:C], while the CARD-lacking duRIG-I (duRIG-I-C) was not capable of activating downstream signals. These results indicate that duRIG-I CARD domain plays an important role in the induction of IFN-β and provide a basis for further studying the function of RIG-I in avian innate immunity.

  12. Duck RIG-I CARD Domain Induces the Chicken IFN-β by Activating NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yang; Huang, Zhengyang; Wang, Bin; Yu, Qinming; Liu, Ran; Xu, Qi; Chang, Guobin; Ding, Jiatong; Chen, Guohong

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I- (RIG-I-) like receptors (RLRs) have recently been identified as cytoplasmic sensors for viral RNA. RIG-I, a member of RLRs family, plays an important role in innate immunity. Although previous investigations have proved that RIG-I is absent in chickens, it remains largely unknown whether the chicken can respond to RIG-I ligand. In this study, the eukaryotic expression vectors encoding duRIG-I full length (duck RIG-I, containing all domains), duRIG-I N-terminal (containing the two caspase activation and recruitment domain, CARDs), and duRIG-I C-terminal (containing helicase and regulatory domains) labeled with 6∗His tags were constructed successfully and detected by western blotting. Luciferase reporter assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) detected the duRIG-I significantly activated NF-κB and induced the expression of IFN-β when polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly[I:C], synthetic double-stranded RNA) challenges chicken embryonic fibroblasts cells (DF1 cells), while the duRIG-I was inactive in the absence of poly[I:C]. Further analysis revealed that the CARDs (duRIG-I-N) induced IFN-β production regardless of the presence of poly[I:C], while the CARD-lacking duRIG-I (duRIG-I-C) was not capable of activating downstream signals. These results indicate that duRIG-I CARD domain plays an important role in the induction of IFN-β and provide a basis for further studying the function of RIG-I in avian innate immunity. PMID:25918711

  13. Involvement of zebrafish RIG-I in NF-κB and IFN signaling pathways: insights into functional conservation of RIG-I in antiviral innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Nie, Li; Zhang, Ying-sheng; Dong, Wei-ren; Xiang, Li-xin; Shao, Jian-zhong

    2015-01-01

    The retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) is a critical sensor for host recognition of RNA virus infection and initiation of antiviral signaling pathways in mammals. However, data on the occurrence and functions of this molecule in lower vertebrates are limited. In this study, we characterized an RIG-I homolog (DrRIG-I) from zebrafish. Structurally, this DrRIG-I shares a number of conserved functional domains/motifs with its mammalian counterparts, namely, caspase activation and recruitment domain, DExD/H box, a helicase domain, and a C-terminal domain. Functionally, stimulation with DrRIG-I CARD in zebrafish embryos significantly activated the NF-κB and IFN signaling pathways, leading to the expression of TNF-α, IL-8 and IFN-induced Mx, ISG15, and viperin. However, knockdown of TRIM25 (a pivotal activator for RIG-I receptors) significantly suppressed the induced activation of IFN signaling. Results suggested the functional conservation of RIG-I receptors in the NF-κB and IFN signaling pathways between teleosts and mammals, providing a perspective into the evolutionary history of RIG-I-mediated antiviral innate immunity.

  14. Dependence of RIG-I Nucleic Acid-Binding and ATP Hydrolysis on Activation of Type I Interferon Response.

    PubMed

    Baek, Yu Mi; Yoon, Soojin; Hwang, Yeo Eun; Kim, Dong-Eun

    2016-08-01

    Exogenous nucleic acids induce an innate immune response in mammalian host cells through activation of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). We evaluated RIG-I protein for RNA binding and ATPase stimulation with RNA ligands to investigate the correlation with the extent of immune response through RIG-I activation in cells. RIG-I protein favored blunt-ended, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) ligands over sticky-ended dsRNA. Moreover, the presence of the 5'-triphosphate (5'-ppp) moiety in dsRNA further enhanced binding affinity to RIG-I. Two structural motifs in RNA, blunt ends in dsRNA and 5'-ppp, stimulated the ATP hydrolysis activity of RIG-I. These structural motifs also strongly induced IFN expression as an innate immune response in cells. Therefore, we suggest that IFN induction through RIG-I activation is mainly determined by structural motifs in dsRNA that increase its affinity for RIG-I protein and stimulate ATPase activity in RIG-I. PMID:27574504

  15. Dependence of RIG-I Nucleic Acid-Binding and ATP Hydrolysis on Activation of Type I Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Yu Mi; Yoon, Soojin; Hwang, Yeo Eun

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous nucleic acids induce an innate immune response in mammalian host cells through activation of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). We evaluated RIG-I protein for RNA binding and ATPase stimulation with RNA ligands to investigate the correlation with the extent of immune response through RIG-I activation in cells. RIG-I protein favored blunt-ended, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) ligands over sticky-ended dsRNA. Moreover, the presence of the 5'-triphosphate (5'-ppp) moiety in dsRNA further enhanced binding affinity to RIG-I. Two structural motifs in RNA, blunt ends in dsRNA and 5'-ppp, stimulated the ATP hydrolysis activity of RIG-I. These structural motifs also strongly induced IFN expression as an innate immune response in cells. Therefore, we suggest that IFN induction through RIG-I activation is mainly determined by structural motifs in dsRNA that increase its affinity for RIG-I protein and stimulate ATPase activity in RIG-I. PMID:27574504

  16. Negative Role of RIG-I Serine 8 Phosphorylation in the Regulatin of Interferon-beta Production

    SciTech Connect

    E Nistal-Villan; M Gack; G Martinez-Delgado; N Maharaj; K Inn; H Yang; R Wang; A Aggarwal; J Jung; A Garcia-Sastre

    2011-12-31

    RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I) and TRIM25 (tripartite motif protein 25) have emerged as key regulatory factors to induce interferon (IFN)-mediated innate immune responses to limit viral replication. Upon recognition of viral RNA, TRIM25 E3 ligase binds the first caspase recruitment domain (CARD) of RIG-I and subsequently induces lysine 172 ubiquitination of the second CARD of RIG-I, which is essential for the interaction with downstream MAVS/IPS-1/CARDIF/VISA and, thereby, IFN-beta mRNA production. Although ubiquitination has emerged as a major factor involved in RIG-I activation, the potential contribution of other post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, to the regulation of RIG-I activity has not been addressed. Here, we report the identification of serine 8 phosphorylation at the first CARD of RIG-I as a negative regulatory mechanism of RIG-I-mediated IFN-beta production. Immunoblot analysis with a phosphospecific antibody showed that RIG-I serine 8 phosphorylation steady-state levels were decreased upon stimulation of cells with IFN-beta or virus infection. Substitution of serine 8 in the CARD RIG-I functional domain with phosphomimetic aspartate or glutamate results in decreased TRIM25 binding, RIG-I ubiquitination, MAVS binding, and downstream signaling. Finally, sequence comparison reveals that only primate species carry serine 8, whereas other animal species carry an asparagine, indicating that serine 8 phosphorylation may represent a primate-specific regulation of RIG-I activation. Collectively, these data suggest that the phosphorylation of RIG-I serine 8 operates as a negative switch of RIG-I activation by suppressing TRIM25 interaction, further underscoring the importance of RIG-I and TRIM25 connection in type I IFN signal transduction.

  17. RIG-I Signaling Is Critical for Efficient Polyfunctional T Cell Responses during Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Matheswaran; Suryawanshi, Amol; Tundup, Smanla; Perez, Jasmine T.; Schmolke, Mirco; Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Manicassamy, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) is an innate RNA sensor that recognizes the influenza A virus (IAV) RNA genome and activates antiviral host responses. Here, we demonstrate that RIG-I signaling plays a crucial role in restricting IAV tropism and regulating host immune responses. Mice deficient in the RIG-I-MAVS pathway show defects in migratory dendritic cell (DC) activation, viral antigen presentation, and priming of CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses during IAV infection. These defects result in decreased frequency of polyfunctional effector T cells and lowered protection against heterologous IAV challenge. In addition, our data show that RIG-I activation is essential for protecting epithelial cells and hematopoietic cells from IAV infection. These diverse effects of RIG-I signaling are likely imparted by the actions of type I interferon (IFN), as addition of exogenous type I IFN is sufficient to overcome the defects in antigen presentation by RIG-I deficient BMDC. Moreover, the in vivo T cell defects in RIG-I deficient mice can be overcome by the activation of MDA5 –MAVS via poly I:C treatment. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that RIG-I signaling through MAVS is critical for determining the quality of polyfunctional T cell responses against IAV and for providing protection against subsequent infection from heterologous or novel pandemic IAV strains. PMID:27438481

  18. Negative regulation of RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling by TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Na-Rae; Shin, Han-Bo; Kim, Hye-In; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •TRK-fused gene product (TFG) interacts with TRIM25 upon viral infection. •TFG negatively regulates RIG-I mediated antiviral signaling. •TFG depletion leads to enhanced viral replication. •TFG act downstream of MAVS. -- Abstract: RIG-I (retinoic acid inducible gene I)-mediated antiviral signaling serves as the first line of defense against viral infection. Upon detection of viral RNA, RIG-I undergoes TRIM25 (tripartite motif protein 25)-mediated K63-linked ubiquitination, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production. In this study, we demonstrate that TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein, previously identified as a TRIM25-interacting protein, binds TRIM25 upon virus infection and negatively regulates RIG-I-mediated type-I IFN signaling. RIG-I-mediated IFN production and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways were upregulated by the suppression of TFG expression. Furthermore, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication was significantly inhibited by small inhibitory hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of TFG, supporting the suppressive role of TFG in RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling. Interestingly, suppression of TFG expression increased not only RIG-I-mediated signaling but also MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein)-induced signaling, suggesting that TFG plays a pivotal role in negative regulation of RNA-sensing, RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) family signaling pathways.

  19. Syndecan-4 negatively regulates antiviral signalling by mediating RIG-I deubiquitination via CYLD.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Lin, Haiyan; Li, Zexing; Sun, Xiaofeng; Xin, Di; Yang, Meng; Sun, Liwei; Li, Lin; Wang, Hongmei; Chen, Dahua; Sun, Qinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) plays important roles in pathogen recognition and antiviral signalling transduction. Here we show that syndecan-4 (SDC4) is a RIG-I-interacting partner identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen. We find that SDC4 negatively regulates the RIG-I-mediated antiviral signalling in a feedback-loop control manner. The genetic evidence obtained by using knockout mice further emphasizes this biological role of SDC4 in antiviral signalling. Mechanistically, we show that SDC4 interacts with both RIG-I and deubiquitinase CYLD via its carboxyl-terminal intracellular region. SDC4 likely promotes redistribution of RIG-I and CYLD in a perinuclear pattern post viral infection, and thus enhances the RIG-I-CYLD interaction and potentiates the K63-linked deubiquitination of RIG-I. Collectively, our findings uncover a mechanism by which SDC4 antagonizes the activation of RIG-I in a CYLD-mediated deubiquitination-dependent process, thereby balancing antiviral signalling to avoid deleterious effects on host cells. PMID:27279133

  20. RIG-I-mediated antiviral responses to single-stranded RNA bearing 5'-phosphates.

    PubMed

    Pichlmair, Andreas; Schulz, Oliver; Tan, Choon Ping; Näslund, Tanja I; Liljeström, Peter; Weber, Friedemann; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2006-11-10

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) produced during viral replication is believed to be the critical trigger for activation of antiviral immunity mediated by the RNA helicase enzymes retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5). We showed that influenza A virus infection does not generate dsRNA and that RIG-I is activated by viral genomic single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) bearing 5'-phosphates. This is blocked by the influenza protein nonstructured protein 1 (NS1), which is found in a complex with RIG-I in infected cells. These results identify RIG-I as a ssRNA sensor and potential target of viral immune evasion and suggest that its ability to sense 5'-phosphorylated RNA evolved in the innate immune system as a means of discriminating between self and nonself.

  1. Hepatitis C Virus Frameshift/Alternate Reading Frame Protein Suppresses Interferon Responses Mediated by Pattern Recognition Receptor Retinoic-Acid-Inducible Gene-I

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Bum; Seronello, Scott; Mayer, Wasima; Ojcius, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) actively evades host interferon (IFN) responses but the mechanisms of how it does so are not completely understood. In this study, we present evidence for an HCV factor that contributes to the suppression of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-mediated IFN induction. Expression of frameshift/alternate reading frame protein (F/ARFP) from HCV -2/+1 frame in Huh7 hepatoma cells suppressed type I IFN responses stimulated by HCV RNA pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and poly(IC). The suppression occurred independently of other HCV factors; and activation of interferon stimulated genes, TNFα, IFN-λ1, and IFN-λ2/3 was likewise suppressed by HCV F/ARFP. Point mutations in the full-length HCV sequence (JFH1 genotype 2a strain) were made to introduce premature termination codons in the -2/+1 reading frame coding for F/ARFP while preserving the original reading frame, which enhanced IFNα and IFNβ induction by HCV. The potentiation of IFN response by the F/ARFP mutations was diminished in Huh7.5 cells, which already have a defective RIG-I, and by decreasing RIG-I expression in Huh7 cells. Furthermore, adding F/ARFP back via trans-complementation suppressed IFN induction in the F/ARFP mutant. The F/ARFP mutants, on the other hand, were not resistant to exogenous IFNα. Finally, HCV-infected human liver samples showed significant F/ARFP antibody reactivity, compared to HCV-uninfected control livers. Therefore, HCV F/ARFP likely cooperates with other viral factors to suppress type I and III IFN induction occurring through the RIG-I signaling pathway. This study identifies a novel mechanism of pattern recognition receptor modulation by HCV and suggests a biological function of the HCV alternate reading frame in the modulation of host innate immunity. PMID:27404108

  2. Hepatitis C Virus Frameshift/Alternate Reading Frame Protein Suppresses Interferon Responses Mediated by Pattern Recognition Receptor Retinoic-Acid-Inducible Gene-I.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung Bum; Seronello, Scott; Mayer, Wasima; Ojcius, David M

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) actively evades host interferon (IFN) responses but the mechanisms of how it does so are not completely understood. In this study, we present evidence for an HCV factor that contributes to the suppression of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-mediated IFN induction. Expression of frameshift/alternate reading frame protein (F/ARFP) from HCV -2/+1 frame in Huh7 hepatoma cells suppressed type I IFN responses stimulated by HCV RNA pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and poly(IC). The suppression occurred independently of other HCV factors; and activation of interferon stimulated genes, TNFα, IFN-λ1, and IFN-λ2/3 was likewise suppressed by HCV F/ARFP. Point mutations in the full-length HCV sequence (JFH1 genotype 2a strain) were made to introduce premature termination codons in the -2/+1 reading frame coding for F/ARFP while preserving the original reading frame, which enhanced IFNα and IFNβ induction by HCV. The potentiation of IFN response by the F/ARFP mutations was diminished in Huh7.5 cells, which already have a defective RIG-I, and by decreasing RIG-I expression in Huh7 cells. Furthermore, adding F/ARFP back via trans-complementation suppressed IFN induction in the F/ARFP mutant. The F/ARFP mutants, on the other hand, were not resistant to exogenous IFNα. Finally, HCV-infected human liver samples showed significant F/ARFP antibody reactivity, compared to HCV-uninfected control livers. Therefore, HCV F/ARFP likely cooperates with other viral factors to suppress type I and III IFN induction occurring through the RIG-I signaling pathway. This study identifies a novel mechanism of pattern recognition receptor modulation by HCV and suggests a biological function of the HCV alternate reading frame in the modulation of host innate immunity. PMID:27404108

  3. Syndecan-4 negatively regulates antiviral signalling by mediating RIG-I deubiquitination via CYLD

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Lin, Haiyan; Li, Zexing; Sun, Xiaofeng; Xin, Di; Yang, Meng; Sun, Liwei; Li, Lin; Wang, Hongmei; Chen, Dahua; Sun, Qinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) plays important roles in pathogen recognition and antiviral signalling transduction. Here we show that syndecan-4 (SDC4) is a RIG-I-interacting partner identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen. We find that SDC4 negatively regulates the RIG-I-mediated antiviral signalling in a feedback-loop control manner. The genetic evidence obtained by using knockout mice further emphasizes this biological role of SDC4 in antiviral signalling. Mechanistically, we show that SDC4 interacts with both RIG-I and deubiquitinase CYLD via its carboxyl-terminal intracellular region. SDC4 likely promotes redistribution of RIG-I and CYLD in a perinuclear pattern post viral infection, and thus enhances the RIG-I–CYLD interaction and potentiates the K63-linked deubiquitination of RIG-I. Collectively, our findings uncover a mechanism by which SDC4 antagonizes the activation of RIG-I in a CYLD-mediated deubiquitination-dependent process, thereby balancing antiviral signalling to avoid deleterious effects on host cells. PMID:27279133

  4. Antiviral immunity via RIG-I-mediated recognition of RNA bearing 5′-diphosphates

    PubMed Central

    Deddouche, Safia; Pruijssers, Andrea J.; Zillinger, Thomas; Goldeck, Marion; Schuberth, Christine; Van der Veen, Annemarthe G.; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Rehwinkel, Jan; Iskarpatyoti, Jason A.; Barchet, Winfried; Ludwig, Janos; Dermody, Terence S.; Hartmann, Gunther; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mammalian cells possess mechanisms to detect and defend themselves from invading viruses. In the cytosol, the RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I; encoded by DDX58) and MDA5 (melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5; encoded by IFIH1) sense atypical RNAs associated with virus infection1,2. Detection triggers a signalling cascade via the adaptor MAVS that culminates in the production of type I interferons (IFN-α/β; hereafter IFN), key antiviral cytokines. RIG-I and MDA5 are activated by distinct viral RNA structures and much evidence indicates that RIG-I responds to RNAs bearing a triphosphate (ppp) moiety in conjunction with a blunt-ended, base-paired region at the 5′-end (reviewed in 1-3). Here we show that RIG-I also mediates antiviral responses to RNAs bearing 5′-diphosphates (5′pp). Genomes from mammalian reoviruses with 5′pp termini, 5′pp-RNA isolated from yeast L-A virus, and base-paired 5′pp-RNAs made by in vitro transcription or chemical synthesis, all bind to RIG-I and serve as RIG-I agonists. Furthermore, a RIG-I-dependent response to 5′pp-RNA is essential for controlling reovirus infection in cultured cells and in mice. Thus, the minimal determinant for RIG-I recognition is a base-paired RNA with 5′pp. Such RNAs are found in some viruses but not uninfected cells, indicating that recognition of 5′pp-RNA, like that of 5′ppp-RNA, acts as a powerful means of self/non-self discrimination by the innate immune system. PMID:25119032

  5. Influenza A Virus Panhandle Structure Is Directly Involved in RIG-I Activation and Interferon Induction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, GuanQun; Park, Hong-Su; Pyo, Hyun-Mi; Liu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) is an important innate immune sensor that recognizes viral RNA in the cytoplasm. Its nonself recognition largely depends on the unique RNA structures imposed by viral RNA. The panhandle structure residing in the influenza A virus (IAV) genome, whose primary function is to serve as the viral promoter for transcription and replication, has been proposed to be a RIG-I agonist. However, this has never been proved experimentally. Here, we employed multiple approaches to determine if the IAV panhandle structure is directly involved in RIG-I activation and type I interferon (IFN) induction. First, in porcine alveolar macrophages, we demonstrated that the viral genomic coding region is dispensable for RIG-I-dependent IFN induction. Second, using in vitro-synthesized hairpin RNA, we showed that the IAV panhandle structure could directly bind to RIG-I and stimulate IFN production. Furthermore, we investigated the contributions of the wobble base pairs, mismatch, and unpaired nucleotides within the wild-type panhandle structure to RIG-I activation. Elimination of these destabilizing elements within the panhandle structure promoted RIG-I activation and IFN induction. Given the function of the panhandle structure as the viral promoter, we further monitored the promoter activity of these panhandle variants and found that viral replication was moderately affected, whereas viral transcription was impaired dramatically. In all, our results indicate that the IAV panhandle promoter region adopts a nucleotide composition that is optimal for balanced viral RNA synthesis and suboptimal for RIG-I activation. IMPORTANCE The IAV genomic panhandle structure has been proposed to be an RIG-I agonist due to its partial complementarity; however, this has not been experimentally confirmed. Here, we provide direct evidence that the IAV panhandle structure is competent in, and sufficient for, RIG-I activation and IFN induction. By constructing

  6. Retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptor (RLR)-mediated antiviral innate immune responses in the lower respiratory tract: Roles of TRAF3 and TRAF5.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yuki; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Satoh, Tsugumi; Hayakari, Ryo; Furudate, Ken; Xing, Fei; Yoshida, Hidemi; Tanji, Kunikazu; Mizukami, Hiroki; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Ito, Etsuro

    2015-11-13

    Upon viral infection, the cytoplasmic viral sensor retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) recognizes viral RNA to activate antiviral signaling to induce type I interferon (IFN). RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) activate antiviral signaling in a tissue-specific manner. The molecular mechanism underlying antiviral signaling in the respiratory system remains unclear. We studied antiviral signaling in the lower respiratory tract (LRT), which is the site of many harmful viral infections. Epithelial cells of the LRT can be roughly divided into two groups: bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) and pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). These two cell types exhibit different phenotypes; therefore, we hypothesized that these cells may play different roles in antiviral innate immunity. We found that BECs exhibited higher antiviral activity than AECs. TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) has been shown to be a crucial molecule in RLR signaling. The expression levels of TRAF3 and TRAF5, which have conserved domains that are nearly identical, in the LRT were examined. We found that the bronchus exhibited the highest expression levels of TRAF3 and TRAF5 in the LRT. These findings suggest the importance of the bronchus in antiviral innate immunity in the LRT and indicate that TRAF3 and TRAF5 may contribute to RLR signaling. PMID:26454171

  7. RNAs Containing Modified Nucleotides Fail To Trigger RIG-I Conformational Changes for Innate Immune Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Durbin, Ann Fiegen; Wang, Chen; Marcotrigiano, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Invading pathogen nucleic acids are recognized and bound by cytoplasmic (retinoic acid-inducible gene I [RIG-I]-like) and membrane-bound (Toll-like) pattern recognition receptors to activate innate immune signaling. Modified nucleotides, when present in RNA molecules, diminish the magnitude of these signaling responses. However, mechanisms explaining the blunted signaling have not been elucidated. In this study, we used several independent biological assays, including inhibition of virus replication, RIG-I:RNA binding assays, and limited trypsin digestion of RIG-I:RNA complexes, to begin to understand how RNAs containing modified nucleotides avoid or suppress innate immune signaling. The experiments were based on a model innate immune activating RNA molecule, the polyU/UC RNA domain of hepatitis C virus, which was transcribed in vitro with canonical nucleotides or with one of eight modified nucleotides. The approach revealed signature assay responses associated with individual modified nucleotides or classes of modified nucleotides. For example, while both N-6-methyladenosine (m6A) and pseudouridine nucleotides correlate with diminished signaling, RNA containing m6A modifications bound RIG-I poorly, while RNA containing pseudouridine bound RIG-I with high affinity but failed to trigger the canonical RIG-I conformational changes associated with robust signaling. These data advance understanding of RNA-mediated innate immune signaling, with additional relevance for applying nucleotide modifications to RNA therapeutics. PMID:27651356

  8. Pigeon RIG-I Function in Innate Immunity against H9N2 IAV and IBDV

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenping; Shao, Qiang; Zang, Yunlong; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Yongchao; Li, Zandong

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I), a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor (PRR), can sense various RNA viruses, including the avian influenza virus (AIV) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), and trigger the innate immune response. Previous studies have shown that mammalian RIG-I (human and mice) and waterfowl RIG-I (ducks and geese) are essential for type I interferon (IFN) synthesis during AIV infection. Like ducks, pigeons are also susceptible to infection but are ineffective propagators and disseminators of AIVs, i.e., “dead end” hosts for AIVs and even highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). Consequently, we sought to identify pigeon RIG-I and investigate its roles in the detection of A/Chicken/Shandong/ZB/2007 (H9N2) (ZB07), Gansu/Tianshui (IBDV TS) and Beijing/CJ/1980 (IBDV CJ-801) strains in chicken DF-1 fibroblasts or human 293T cells. Pigeon mRNA encoding the putative pigeon RIG-I analogs was identified. The exogenous expression of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)-tagged pigeon RIG-I and caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs), strongly induced antiviral gene (IFN-β, Mx, and PKR) mRNA synthesis, decreased viral gene (M gene and VP2) mRNA expression, and reduced the viral titers of ZB07 and IBDV TS/CJ-801 virus strains in chicken DF-1 cells, but not in 293T cells. We also compared the antiviral abilities of RIG-I proteins from waterfowl (duck and goose) and pigeon. Our data indicated that waterfowl RIG-I are more effective in the induction of antiviral genes and the repression of ZB07 and IBDV TS/CJ-801 strain replication than pigeon RIG-I. Furthermore, chicken melanoma differentiation associated gene 5(MDA5)/ mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) silencing combined with RIG-I transfection suggested that pigeon RIG-I can restore the antiviral response in MDA5-silenced DF-1 cells but not in MAVS-silenced DF-1 cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that pigeon RIG-I and CARDs have a strong antiviral

  9. Pigeon RIG-I Function in Innate Immunity against H9N2 IAV and IBDV.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenping; Shao, Qiang; Zang, Yunlong; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Yongchao; Li, Zandong

    2015-07-22

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I), a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor (PRR), can sense various RNA viruses, including the avian influenza virus (AIV) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), and trigger the innate immune response. Previous studies have shown that mammalian RIG-I (human and mice) and waterfowl RIG-I (ducks and geese) are essential for type I interferon (IFN) synthesis during AIV infection. Like ducks, pigeons are also susceptible to infection but are ineffective propagators and disseminators of AIVs, i.e., "dead end" hosts for AIVs and even highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). Consequently, we sought to identify pigeon RIG-I and investigate its roles in the detection of A/Chicken/Shandong/ZB/2007 (H9N2) (ZB07), Gansu/Tianshui (IBDV TS) and Beijing/CJ/1980 (IBDV CJ-801) strains in chicken DF-1 fibroblasts or human 293T cells. Pigeon mRNA encoding the putative pigeon RIG-I analogs was identified. The exogenous expression of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)-tagged pigeon RIG-I and caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs), strongly induced antiviral gene (IFN-β, Mx, and PKR) mRNA synthesis, decreased viral gene (M gene and VP2) mRNA expression, and reduced the viral titers of ZB07 and IBDV TS/CJ-801 virus strains in chicken DF-1 cells, but not in 293T cells. We also compared the antiviral abilities of RIG-I proteins from waterfowl (duck and goose) and pigeon. Our data indicated that waterfowl RIG-I are more effective in the induction of antiviral genes and the repression of ZB07 and IBDV TS/CJ-801 strain replication than pigeon RIG-I. Furthermore, chicken melanoma differentiation associated gene 5(MDA5)/ mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) silencing combined with RIG-I transfection suggested that pigeon RIG-I can restore the antiviral response in MDA5-silenced DF-1 cells but not in MAVS-silenced DF-1 cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that pigeon RIG-I and CARDs have a strong antiviral ability

  10. Z proteins of New World arenaviruses bind RIG-I and interfere with type I interferon induction.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lina; Briese, Thomas; Lipkin, W Ian

    2010-02-01

    The retinoic acid-inducible gene I product (RIG-I) is a cellular sensor of RNA virus infection that regulates the cellular beta interferon (IFN-beta) response. The nucleoproteins (NP) of arenaviruses are reported to antagonize the IFN response by inhibiting interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3). Here, we demonstrate that the Z proteins of four New World (NW) arenaviruses, Guanarito virus (GTOV), Junin virus (JUNV), Machupo virus (MAVC), and Sabia virus (SABV), bind to RIG-I, resulting in downregulation of the IFN-beta response. We show that expression of the four NW arenavirus Z proteins inhibits IFN-beta mRNA induction in A549 cells in response to RNA bearing 5' phosphates (5'pppRNA). NW arenavirus Z proteins interact with RIG-I in coimmunoprecipitation studies and colocalize with RIG-I. Furthermore, expression of Z proteins interferes with the interaction between RIG-I and MAVS. Z expression also impedes the nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kappaB) and IRF-3 activation. Our results indicate that NW arenavirus Z proteins, but not Z protein of the Old World (OW) arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) or Lassa virus, bind to RIG-I and inhibit downstream activation of the RIG-I signaling pathway, preventing the transcriptional induction of IFN-beta.

  11. Activation of Duck RIG-I by TRIM25 Is Independent of Anchored Ubiquitin

    PubMed Central

    Miranzo-Navarro, Domingo; Magor, Katharine E.

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) is a viral RNA sensor crucial in defense against several viruses including measles, influenza A and hepatitis C. RIG-I activates type-I interferon signalling through the adaptor for mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS). The E3 ubiquitin ligase, tripartite motif containing protein 25 (TRIM25), activates human RIG-I through generation of anchored K63-linked polyubiquitin chains attached to lysine 172, or alternatively, through the generation of unanchored K63-linked polyubiquitin chains that interact non-covalently with RIG-I CARD domains. Previously, we identified RIG-I of ducks, of interest because ducks are the host and natural reservoir of influenza viruses, and showed it initiates innate immune signaling leading to production of interferon-beta (IFN-β). We noted that K172 is not conserved in RIG-I of ducks and other avian species, or mouse. Because K172 is important for both mechanisms of activation of human RIG-I, we investigated whether duck RIG-I was activated by TRIM25, and if other residues were the sites for attachment of ubiquitin. Here we show duck RIG-I CARD domains are ubiquitinated for activation, and ubiquitination depends on interaction with TRIM25, as a splice variant that cannot interact with TRIM25 is not ubiquitinated, and cannot be activated. We expressed GST-fusion proteins of duck CARD domains and characterized TRIM25 modifications of CARD domains by mass spectrometry. We identified two sites that are ubiquitinated in duck CARD domains, K167 and K193, and detected K63 linked polyubiquitin chains. Site directed mutagenesis of each site alone, does not alter the ubiquitination profile of the duck CARD domains. However, mutation of both sites resulted in loss of all attached ubiquitin and polyubiquitin chains. Remarkably, the double mutant duck RIG-I CARD still interacts with TRIM25, and can still be activated. Our results demonstrate that anchored ubiquitin chains are not necessary for TRIM25

  12. Structural features of influenza A virus panhandle RNA enabling the activation of RIG-I independently of 5′-triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Hee-Eun; Park, Eun-Byeol; Lee, Janghyun; Kim, Ki-Hun; Lim, Kyungeun; Yum, Seoyun; Lee, Young-Hoon; Kang, Suk-Jo; Lee, Joon-Hwa; Choi, Byong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) recognizes specific molecular patterns of viral RNAs for inducing type I interferon. The C-terminal domain (CTD) of RIG-I binds to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) with the 5′-triphosphate (5′-PPP), which induces a conformational change in RIG-I to an active form. It has been suggested that RIG-I detects infection of influenza A virus by recognizing the 5′-triphosphorylated panhandle structure of the viral RNA genome. Influenza panhandle RNA has a unique structure with a sharp helical bending. In spite of extensive studies of how viral RNAs activate RIG-I, whether the structural elements of the influenza panhandle RNA confer the ability to activate RIG-I signaling has been poorly explored. Here, we investigated the dynamics of the influenza panhandle RNA in complex with RIG-I CTD using NMR spectroscopy and showed that the bending structure of the panhandle RNA negates the requirement of a 5′-PPP moiety for RIG-I activation. PMID:27288441

  13. The first invertebrate RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) homolog gene in the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Yu, Feng; Li, Jun; Tong, Ying; Zhang, Yuehuan; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-10-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) is a pivotal receptor that detects numerous RNA and DNA viruses and mediates the innate induction of interferons and pro-inflammatory cytokines upon viral infection. In the present study, we cloned and characterized the first RIG-I gene in a marine mollusk, Crassostrea gigas, and designated it as CgRIG-I. The full-length CgRIG-I cDNA is 3436 bp, including 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) of 93 bp and 286 bp, respectively, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 3057 bp. The gene encodes a 1018 amino acid polypeptide with an estimated molecular mass of 116.5 kDa. SMART analysis showed that the CgRIG-I protein had the typical conserved domains, including the caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs), the RNA helicase domain and the C-terminal regulatory domain (RD). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that CgRIG-I was grouped into the clade of its vertebrate homologs. Moreover, CgRIG-I expression could be specifically increased after stimulation by poly(I:C) rather than by other PAMPs such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN), heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) and heat-killed Vibrio alginolyticus (HKVA). Meanwhile, six IRF, three STAT and one NF-κB predicted sites were identified in the CgRIG-I promoter, which was consistent with its high responsiveness to poly(I:C). In summary, this report provides the first CgRIG-I sequence of a mollusk, but its function in the antiviral immune response requires further investigation.

  14. RIG-I Mediates an Antiviral Response to Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Jessica R.; Patel, Jenish R.; Chakrabarti, Ayan K.; Zivcec, Marko; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Spiropoulou, Christina F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the cytoplasm, the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) senses the RNA genomes of several RNA viruses. RIG-I binds to viral RNA, eliciting an antiviral response via the cellular adaptor MAVS. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), a negative-sense RNA virus with a 5′-monophosphorylated genome, is a highly pathogenic zoonotic agent with significant public health implications. We found that, during CCHFV infection, RIG-I mediated a type I interferon (IFN) response via MAVS. Interfering with RIG-I signaling reduced IFN production and IFN-stimulated gene expression and increased viral replication. Immunostimulatory RNA was isolated from CCHFV-infected cells and from virion preparations, and RIG-I coimmunoprecipitation of infected cell lysates isolated immunostimulatory CCHFV RNA. This report serves as the first description of a pattern recognition receptor for CCHFV and highlights a critical signaling pathway in the antiviral response to CCHFV. IMPORTANCE CCHFV is a tick-borne virus with a significant public health impact. In order for cells to respond to virus infection, they must recognize the virus as foreign and initiate antiviral signaling. To date, the receptors involved in immune recognition of CCHFV are not known. Here, we investigate and identify RIG-I as a receptor involved in initiating an antiviral response to CCHFV. This receptor initially was not expected to play a role in CCHFV recognition because of characteristics of the viral genome. These findings are important in understanding the antiviral response to CCHFV and support continued investigation into the spectrum of potential viruses recognized by RIG-I. PMID:26223644

  15. Dose Dependent Activation of Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene-I Promotes Both Proliferation and Apoptosis Signals in Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ming; Zhu, Chao; Ye, Weimin; Zhu, Hanguang; Chen, Wantao; Zhang, Chenping; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2013-01-01

    The retinoic-acid-inducible gene (RIG)-like receptor (RLR) family proteins are major pathogen reorganization receptors (PRR) responsible for detection of viral RNA, which initiates antiviral response. Here, we evaluated the functional role of one RLR family member, RIG-I, in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). RIG-I is abundantly expressed both in poorly-differentiated primary cancer and lymph node metastasis, but not in normal adjacent tissues. Activation of RIG-I by transfection with low dose of 5′-triphosphate RNA (3p-RNA) induces low levels of interferon and proinflammatory cytokines and promotes NF-κB- and Akt-dependent cell proliferation, migration and invasion. In contrast, activation of RIG-I by a high dose of 3p-RNA induces robust mitochondria-derived apoptosis accompanied by decreased activation of Akt, which is independent of the interferon and TNFα receptor, but can be rescued by over-expression of constitutively active Akt. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that the CARD domain of RIG-I is essential for inducing apoptosis by interacting with caspase-9. Together, our results reveal a dual role of RIG-I in HNSCC through regulating activation of Akt, in which RIG-I activation by low-dose viral dsRNA increases host cell surviral, whereas higher level of RIG-I activation leads to apopotosis. These findings highlight the therapeutic potential of dsRNA mediated RIG-I activation in the treatment of HNSCC. PMID:23484008

  16. Structural basis of RNA recognition and activation by innate immune receptor RIG-I

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Fuguo; Ramanathan, Anand; Miller, Matthew T.; Tang, Guo-Qing; Gale, Jr., Michael; Patel, Smita S.; Marcotrigiano, Joseph

    2012-05-29

    Retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I; also known as DDX58) is a cytoplasmic pathogen recognition receptor that recognizes pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) motifs to differentiate between viral and cellular RNAs. RIG-I is activated by blunt-ended double-stranded (ds)RNA with or without a 5'-triphosphate (ppp), by single-stranded RNA marked by a 5'-ppp and by polyuridine sequences. Upon binding to such PAMP motifs, RIG-I initiates a signalling cascade that induces innate immune defences and inflammatory cytokines to establish an antiviral state. The RIG-I pathway is highly regulated and aberrant signalling leads to apoptosis, altered cell differentiation, inflammation, autoimmune diseases and cancer. The helicase and repressor domains (RD) of RIG-I recognize dsRNA and 5'-ppp RNA to activate the two amino-terminal caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) for signalling. Here, to understand the synergy between the helicase and the RD for RNA binding, and the contribution of ATP hydrolysis to RIG-I activation, we determined the structure of human RIG-I helicase-RD in complex with dsRNA and an ATP analogue. The helicase-RD organizes into a ring around dsRNA, capping one end, while contacting both strands using previously uncharacterized motifs to recognize dsRNA. Small-angle X-ray scattering, limited proteolysis and differential scanning fluorimetry indicate that RIG-I is in an extended and flexible conformation that compacts upon binding RNA. These results provide a detailed view of the role of helicase in dsRNA recognition, the synergy between the RD and the helicase for RNA binding and the organization of full-length RIG-I bound to dsRNA, and provide evidence of a conformational change upon RNA binding. The RIG-I helicase-RD structure is consistent with dsRNA translocation without unwinding and cooperative binding to RNA. The structure yields unprecedented insight into innate immunity and has a broader impact on other areas of biology, including RNA

  17. Structural basis for m7G recognition and 2'-O-methyl discrimination in capped RNAs by the innate immune receptor RIG-I.

    PubMed

    Devarkar, Swapnil C; Wang, Chen; Miller, Matthew T; Ramanathan, Anand; Jiang, Fuguo; Khan, Abdul G; Patel, Smita S; Marcotrigiano, Joseph

    2016-01-19

    RNAs with 5'-triphosphate (ppp) are detected in the cytoplasm principally by the innate immune receptor Retinoic Acid Inducible Gene-I (RIG-I), whose activation triggers a Type I IFN response. It is thought that self RNAs like mRNAs are not recognized by RIG-I because 5'ppp is capped by the addition of a 7-methyl guanosine (m7G) (Cap-0) and a 2'-O-methyl (2'-OMe) group to the 5'-end nucleotide ribose (Cap-1). Here we provide structural and mechanistic basis for exact roles of capping and 2'-O-methylation in evading RIG-I recognition. Surprisingly, Cap-0 and 5'ppp double-stranded (ds) RNAs bind to RIG-I with nearly identical Kd values and activate RIG-I's ATPase and cellular signaling response to similar extents. On the other hand, Cap-0 and 5'ppp single-stranded RNAs did not bind RIG-I and are signaling inactive. Three crystal structures of RIG-I complexes with dsRNAs bearing 5'OH, 5'ppp, and Cap-0 show that RIG-I can accommodate the m7G cap in a cavity created through conformational changes in the helicase-motif IVa without perturbing the ppp interactions. In contrast, Cap-1 modifications abrogate RIG-I signaling through a mechanism involving the H830 residue, which we show is crucial for discriminating between Cap-0 and Cap-1 RNAs. Furthermore, m7G capping works synergistically with 2'-O-methylation to weaken RNA affinity by 200-fold and lower ATPase activity. Interestingly, a single H830A mutation restores both high-affinity binding and signaling activity with 2'-O-methylated dsRNAs. Our work provides new structural insights into the mechanisms of host and viral immune evasion from RIG-I, explaining the complexity of cap structures over evolution. PMID:26733676

  18. The autoinhibitory CARD2-Hel2i Interface of RIG-I governs RNA selection

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Anand; Devarkar, Swapnil C.; Jiang, Fuguo; Miller, Matthew T.; Khan, Abdul G.; Marcotrigiano, Joseph; Patel, Smita S.

    2016-01-01

    RIG-I (Retinoic Acid Inducible Gene-I) is a cytosolic innate immune receptor that detects atypical features in viral RNAs as foreign to initiate a Type I interferon signaling response. RIG-I is present in an autoinhibited state in the cytoplasm and activated by blunt-ended double-stranded (ds)RNAs carrying a 5′ triphosphate (ppp) moiety. These features found in many pathogenic RNAs are absent in cellular RNAs due to post-transcriptional modifications of RNA ends. Although RIG-I is structurally well characterized, the mechanistic basis for RIG-I's remarkable ability to discriminate between cellular and pathogenic RNAs is not completely understood. We show that RIG-I's selectivity for blunt-ended 5′-ppp dsRNAs is ≈3000 times higher than non-blunt ended dsRNAs commonly found in cellular RNAs. Discrimination occurs at multiple stages and signaling RNAs have high affinity and ATPase turnover rate and thus a high katpase/Kd. We show that RIG-I uses its autoinhibitory CARD2-Hel2i (second CARD-helicase insertion domain) interface as a barrier to select against non-blunt ended dsRNAs. Accordingly, deletion of CARDs or point mutations in the CARD2-Hel2i interface decreases the selectivity from ≈3000 to 150 and 750, respectively. We propose that the CARD2-Hel2i interface is a ‘gate’ that prevents cellular RNAs from generating productive complexes that can signal. PMID:26612866

  19. Exonuclease Domain of the Lassa Virus Nucleoprotein Is Critical To Avoid RIG-I Signaling and To Inhibit the Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Reynard, Stéphanie; Russier, Marion; Fizet, Alexandra; Carnec, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV), which causes a viral hemorrhagic fever, inhibits the innate immune response. The exonuclease (ExoN) domain of its nucleoprotein (NP) is implicated in the suppression of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling. We show here that a LASV in which ExoN function has been abolished strongly activates innate immunity and that this effect is dependent on RIG-I signaling. These results highlight the key role of NP ExoN function in the immune evasion that occurs during LASV infection. PMID:25253344

  20. Gene expression profile after activation of RIG-I in 5'ppp-dsRNA challenged DF1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Xu, Qi; Li, Yang; Liu, Ran; Huang, Zhengyang; Wang, Bin; Chen, Guohong

    2016-12-01

    Retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) can recognize influenza viruses and evoke the innate immune response. RIG-I is absent in the chicken genome, but is conserved in the genome of ducks. Lack of RIG-I renders chickens more susceptible to avian influenza infection, and the clinical symptoms are more prominent than in other poultry. It is unknown whether introduction of duck RIG-I into chicken cells can establish the immunity as is seen in ducks and the role of RIG-I in established immunity is unknown. In this study, a chicken cell strain with stable expression of duRIG-I was established by lentiviral infection, giving DF1/LV5-RIG-I, and a control strain DF1/LV5 was established in parallel. To verify stable, high level expression of duRIG-I in DF1 cells, the levels of duRIG-I mRNA and protein were determined by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Further, 5'triphosphate double stranded RNA (5'ppp-dsRNA) was used to mimic an RNA virus infection and the infected DF1/LV5-RIG-I and DF1/LV5 cells were subjected to high-throughput RNA-sequencing, which yielded 193.46 M reads and 39.07 G bases. A total of 278 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), i.e., duRIG-I-mediated responsive genes, were identified by RNA-seq. Among the 278 genes, 120 DEGs are annotated in the KEGG database, and the most reliable KEGG pathways are likely to be the signaling pathways of RIG-I like receptors. Functional analysis by Gene ontology (GO) indicates that the functions of these DEGs are primarily related to Type I interferon (IFN) signaling, IFN-β-mediated cellular responses and up-regulation of the RIG-I signaling pathway. Based on the shared genes among different pathways, a network representing crosstalk between RIG-I and other signaling pathways was constructed using Cytoscape software. The network suggests that RIG-mediated pathway may crosstalk with the Jak-STAT signaling pathway, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, Wnt signaling pathway, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis

  1. RIG-I is required for VSV-induced cytokine production by murine glia and acts in combination with DAI to initiate responses to HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Crill, Emma K; Furr-Rogers, Samantha R; Marriott, Ian

    2015-12-01

    A defining feature of viral central nervous system (CNS) infection is the rapid onset of severe neuroinflammation. However, the mechanisms underlying glial responses to replicative neurotropic viruses are only now becoming apparent with the discovery of a number of cytosolic sensors for viral nucleic acids. We have described the expression by murine and human glial cells of two disparate pattern recognition receptors, retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and DNA-dependent activator of interferon regulatory factors (DAI), receptors for viral RNA and DNA moieties, respectively. In the present study, we demonstrate the functional significance of RIG-I expression in primary murine microglia and astrocytes. Our data indicate that murine glial immune responses to a model neurotropic RNA virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, are RIG-I dependent and independent of levels of DAI expression or RNA polymerase III activity. In contrast, maximal glial inflammatory and antiviral responses to the DNA virus herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) are dependent on the expression of both RIG-I and DAI, and require RNA polymerase III activity. These findings indicate that the RNA sensor, RIG-I, acts in parallel with DAI in an RNA polymerase III-dependent manner to initiate glial responses to HSV-1. We therefore suggest that RIG-I plays a significant role in the detection of both RNA and DNA pathogens by microglia and astrocytes.

  2. Comparative analysis of transcriptional profiles of retinoic-acid-induced gene I-like receptors and interferons in seven tissues from ducks infected with avian Tembusu virus.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guanghua; Chen, Cuiteng; Huang, Yu; Cheng, Longfei; Fu, Qiuling; Wan, Chunhe; Shi, Shaohua; Chen, Hongmei; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Avian Tembusu virus (ATV), an emerging virus that mainly infects laying and breeding ducks in China, has caused severe economic loss in duck industry. However, there have been no reports about host innate immune responses during ATV infection and its correlation with clinical signs or pathology. To identify the roles of these immune factors in the innate host response to ATV infection, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was used to analyze the transcriptional profiles on the genes encoding two retinoic-acid-induced gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) and two interferons (INF-α and INF-γ) in seven tissues of an ATV-infected shelduck. After infection with ATV, both RLR genes were significantly upregulated (P < 0.05) in all seven tissues. The peak expression levels of the two RLR genes were observed at 24 hours postinfection (hpi) and were higher in non-lymphoid tissues (liver, lung, kidney, and ovary) than in lymphoid tissues (thymus, spleen and bursa). Although the transcription levels of both IFN genes were also upregulated, they showed different time-dependent expression patterns compared with those of the RLR genes. In addition, the highest mRNA expression of the two IFN genes was observed in the ovary at 6 hpi. This observation suggests that the ovary is the primary target tissue in ATV infection and explains the clinical characteristics of the primary pathological changes in the ovaries of ATV-infected ducks. Our results, for the first time, elucidate the differential and coordinated expression profiles of two RLRs and two IFNs in an ATV-infected shelduck.

  3. Sequence-Specific Modifications Enhance the Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Response Activated by RIG-I Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Cindy; Beljanski, Vladimir; Yin, Kevin; Olagnier, David; Ben Yebdri, Fethia; Steel, Courtney; Goulet, Marie-Line; DeFilippis, Victor R.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Haddad, Elias K.; Trautmann, Lydie; Ross, Ted; Lin, Rongtuan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cytosolic RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I) receptor plays a pivotal role in the initiation of the immune response against RNA virus infection by recognizing short 5′-triphosphate (5′ppp)-containing viral RNA and activating the host antiviral innate response. In the present study, we generated novel 5′ppp RIG-I agonists of varieous lengths, structures, and sequences and evaluated the generation of the antiviral and inflammatory responses in human epithelial A549 cells, human innate immune primary cells, and murine models of influenza and chikungunya viral pathogenesis. A 99-nucleotide, uridine-rich hairpin 5′pppRNA termed M8 stimulated an extensive and robust interferon response compared to other modified 5′pppRNA structures, RIG-I aptamers, or poly(I·C). Interestingly, manipulation of the primary RNA sequence alone was sufficient to modulate antiviral activity and inflammatory response, in a manner dependent exclusively on RIG-I and independent of MDA5 and TLR3. Both prophylactic and therapeutic administration of M8 effectively inhibited influenza virus and dengue virus replication in vitro. Furthermore, multiple strains of influenza virus that were resistant to oseltamivir, an FDA-approved therapeutic treatment for influenza, were highly sensitive to inhibition by M8. Finally, prophylactic M8 treatment in vivo prolonged survival and reduced lung viral titers of mice challenged with influenza virus, as well as reducing chikungunya virus-associated foot swelling and viral load. Altogether, these results demonstrate that 5′pppRNA can be rationally designed to achieve a maximal RIG-I-mediated protective antiviral response against human-pathogenic RNA viruses. IMPORTANCE The development of novel therapeutics to treat human-pathogenic RNA viral infections is an important goal to reduce spread of infection and to improve human health and safety. This study investigated the design of an RNA agonist with enhanced antiviral and inflammatory

  4. Effect of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 on rotavirus replication and gene expressions of RIG-I signalling molecule in porcine rotavirus-infected IPEC-J2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ye; Yu, Bing; Mao, Xiangbing; He, Jun; Huang, Zhiqing; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Jie; Han, Guoquan; Liang, Xiaofang; Chen, Daiwen

    2015-01-01

    The study evaluated whether a 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25D3) supplementation decreases the replication of rotavirus by the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signalling pathway in a porcine small intestinal epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2). The results show that IPEC-J2 cells express high baseline levels of 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), which converts inactive 25D3 to the active 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3). Porcine rotavirus (PRV) infection alone resulted in a significant increase in CYP27B1 mRNA, which augmented the production of active vitamin D. Physiological concentrations of 25D3 were found to decrease PRV replication in IPEC-J2 cells. RIG-I plays an important role in the recognition of double-stranded RNA virus by host cells. Upon recognition, RIG-I triggers a series of signalling molecules such as interferon-β (IFN-β) promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1) leading to the expression of type I interferons (IFN-β). Active 25D3 that was generated by PRV-infected IPEC-J2 cells led to an increased expression of toll-like receptors 3 (TLR3), RIG-I, IPS-1, IFN-β and IFN-stimulated genes 15 (ISG15) with important innate immune functions. Inhibiting CYP27B1 also failed to increase RIG-I, IPS-1, IFN-β and ISG15 mRNA expression. These observations suggest that 25D3 can directly inhibit PRV in IPEC-J2 cells, which requires this active form of vitamin D. The anti-rotavirus effect of 25D3 is mediated at least in part by RIG-I signalling pathways in IPEC-J2 cells.

  5. Structural basis for m7G recognition and 2′-O-methyl discrimination in capped RNAs by the innate immune receptor RIG-I

    PubMed Central

    Devarkar, Swapnil C.; Wang, Chen; Miller, Matthew T.; Ramanathan, Anand; Jiang, Fuguo; Khan, Abdul G.; Patel, Smita S.; Marcotrigiano, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    RNAs with 5′-triphosphate (ppp) are detected in the cytoplasm principally by the innate immune receptor Retinoic Acid Inducible Gene-I (RIG-I), whose activation triggers a Type I IFN response. It is thought that self RNAs like mRNAs are not recognized by RIG-I because 5′ppp is capped by the addition of a 7-methyl guanosine (m7G) (Cap-0) and a 2′-O-methyl (2′-OMe) group to the 5′-end nucleotide ribose (Cap-1). Here we provide structural and mechanistic basis for exact roles of capping and 2′-O-methylation in evading RIG-I recognition. Surprisingly, Cap-0 and 5′ppp double-stranded (ds) RNAs bind to RIG-I with nearly identical Kd values and activate RIG-I’s ATPase and cellular signaling response to similar extents. On the other hand, Cap-0 and 5′ppp single-stranded RNAs did not bind RIG-I and are signaling inactive. Three crystal structures of RIG-I complexes with dsRNAs bearing 5′OH, 5′ppp, and Cap-0 show that RIG-I can accommodate the m7G cap in a cavity created through conformational changes in the helicase-motif IVa without perturbing the ppp interactions. In contrast, Cap-1 modifications abrogate RIG-I signaling through a mechanism involving the H830 residue, which we show is crucial for discriminating between Cap-0 and Cap-1 RNAs. Furthermore, m7G capping works synergistically with 2′-O-methylation to weaken RNA affinity by 200-fold and lower ATPase activity. Interestingly, a single H830A mutation restores both high-affinity binding and signaling activity with 2′-O-methylated dsRNAs. Our work provides new structural insights into the mechanisms of host and viral immune evasion from RIG-I, explaining the complexity of cap structures over evolution. PMID:26733676

  6. The RIG-I ATPase core has evolved a functional requirement for allosteric stabilization by the Pincer domain.

    PubMed

    Rawling, David C; Kohlway, Andrew S; Luo, Dahai; Ding, Steve C; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2014-10-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) is a pattern recognition receptor expressed in metazoan cells that is responsible for eliciting the production of type I interferons and pro-inflammatory cytokines upon detection of intracellular, non-self RNA. Structural studies of RIG-I have identified a novel Pincer domain composed of two alpha helices that physically tethers the C-terminal domain to the SF2 helicase core. We find that the Pincer plays an important role in mediating the enzymatic and signaling activities of RIG-I. We identify a series of mutations that additively decouple the Pincer motif from the ATPase core and show that this decoupling results in impaired signaling. Through enzymological and biophysical analysis, we further show that the Pincer domain controls coupled enzymatic activity of the protein through allosteric control of the ATPase core. Further, we show that select regions of the HEL1 domain have evolved to potentiate interactions with the Pincer domain, resulting in an adapted ATPase cleft that is now responsive to adjacent domains that selectively bind viral RNA.

  7. Stimulating the RIG-I pathway to kill cells in the latent HIV reservoir following viral reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peilin; Kaiser, Philipp; Lampiris, Harry W.; Kim, Peggy; Yukl, Steven A.; Havlir, Diane V.; Greene, Warner C.; Wong, Joseph K.

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of latent HIV proviruses in long-lived CD4+ T cells despite antiretroviral therapy (ART)1–3 is a major obstacle to viral eradication4–6. Because current candidate latency-reversing agents (LRAs) induce HIV transcription but fail to clear these cellular reservoirs,7–8 new approaches for killing these reactivated latent HIV reservoir cells are urgently needed. HIV latency depends upon transcriptional quiescence of the integrated provirus and circumvention of immune defense mechanisms4–6,9. These defenses include cell-intrinsic innate responses that use pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) to detect viral pathogens and subsequently induce apoptosis of the infected cell10. Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) forms one class of pattern-recognition receptors that mediates apoptosis and elimination of infected cells after recognition of viral RNA11–14. Here we show that acitretin, an FDA-approved retinoic-acid derivative, enhances RIG-I signaling ex vivo, increases HIV transcription, and induces preferential apoptosis of HIV-infected cells. These effects are abrogated by RIG-I knockdown. Acitretin also decreases proviral DNA levels in CD4+ T cells from HIV-infected subjects on suppressive ART, an effect amplified by combination with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Pharmacologic enhancement of an innate cellular defense network could provide a means to eliminate reactivated cells in the latent HIV reservoir. PMID:27294875

  8. The RNA sensor RIG-I dually functions as an innate sensor and direct antiviral factor for hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Sato, Seiichi; Li, Kai; Kameyama, Takeshi; Hayashi, Takaya; Ishida, Yuji; Murakami, Shuko; Watanabe, Tsunamasa; Iijima, Sayuki; Sakurai, Yu; Watashi, Koichi; Tsutsumi, Susumu; Sato, Yusuke; Akita, Hidetaka; Wakita, Takaji; Rice, Charles M; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Kohara, Michinori; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Takaoka, Akinori

    2015-01-20

    Host innate recognition triggers key immune responses for viral elimination. The sensing mechanism of hepatitis B virus (HBV), a DNA virus, and the subsequent downstream signaling events remain to be fully clarified. Here we found that type III but not type I interferons are predominantly induced in human primary hepatocytes in response to HBV infection, through retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-mediated sensing of the 5'-ε region of HBV pregenomic RNA. In addition, RIG-I could also counteract the interaction of HBV polymerase (P protein) with the 5'-ε region in an RNA-binding dependent manner, which consistently suppressed viral replication. Liposome-mediated delivery and vector-based expression of this ε region-derived RNA in liver abolished the HBV replication in human hepatocyte-chimeric mice. These findings identify an innate-recognition mechanism by which RIG-I dually functions as an HBV sensor activating innate signaling and to counteract viral polymerase in human hepatocytes. PMID:25557055

  9. RIG-I, MDA5 and TLR3 Synergistically Play an Important Role in Restriction of Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Thien, Peiling; Xu, Shengli; Lam, Kong-Peng; Liu, Ding Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DV) infection is one of the most common mosquito-borne viral diseases in the world. The innate immune system is important for the early detection of virus and for mounting a cascade of defense measures which include the production of type 1 interferon (IFN). Hence, a thorough understanding of the innate immune response during DV infection would be essential for our understanding of the DV pathogenesis. A recent application of the microarray to dengue virus type 1 (DV1) infected lung carcinoma cells revealed the increased expression of both extracellular and cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptors; retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I), melanoma differentiation associated gene-5 (MDA-5) and Toll-like receptor-3 (TLR3). These intracellular RNA sensors were previously reported to sense DV infection in different cells. In this study, we show that they are collectively involved in initiating an effective IFN production against DV. Cells silenced for these genes were highly susceptible to DV infection. RIG-I and MDA5 knockdown HUH-7 cells and TLR3 knockout macrophages were highly susceptible to DV infection. When cells were silenced for only RIG-I and MDA5 (but not TLR3), substantial production of IFN-β was observed upon virus infection and vice versa. High susceptibility to virus infection led to ER-stress induced apoptosis in HUH-7 cells. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that the intracellular RNA virus sensors (RIG-I, MDA5 and TLR3) are activated upon DV infection and are essential for host defense against the virus. PMID:21245912

  10. 5'-Triphosphate RNA is the ligand for RIG-I.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Veit; Ellegast, Jana; Kim, Sarah; Brzózka, Krzysztof; Jung, Andreas; Kato, Hiroki; Poeck, Hendrik; Akira, Shizuo; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Schlee, Martin; Endres, Stefan; Hartmann, Gunther

    2006-11-10

    The structural basis for the distinction of viral RNA from abundant self RNA in the cytoplasm of virally infected cells is largely unknown. We demonstrated that the 5'-triphosphate end of RNA generated by viral polymerases is responsible for retinoic acid-inducible protein I (RIG-I)-mediated detection of RNA molecules. Detection of 5'-triphosphate RNA is abrogated by capping of the 5'-triphosphate end or by nucleoside modification of RNA, both occurring during posttranscriptional RNA processing in eukaryotes. Genomic RNA prepared from a negative-strand RNA virus and RNA prepared from virus-infected cells (but not from noninfected cells) triggered a potent interferon-alpha response in a phosphatase-sensitive manner. 5'-triphosphate RNA directly binds to RIG-I. Thus, uncapped 5'-triphosphate RNA (now termed 3pRNA) present in viruses known to be recognized by RIG-I, but absent in viruses known to be detected by MDA-5 such as the picornaviruses, serves as the molecular signature for the detection of viral infection by RIG-I.

  11. RIG-I Works Double Duty

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ying Kai; Gack, Michaela U.

    2016-01-01

    The pathogen sensor RIG-I recognizes viral RNA and signals to induce an antiviral response. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Weber et al. (2015), along with recent work by Sato et al. (2015), demonstrate that RIG-I directly inhibits viral replication independent of antiviral signaling. PMID:25766287

  12. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Upregulates NLRC5 and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression through RIG-I Induction in Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xuancheng; Liu, Taixiang; Shi, Hengfei; Wang, Jingjing; Ji, Ping; Wang, Hongwei; Hou, Yayi; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of acute respiratory tract viral infection in infants, causing bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The host antiviral response to RSV acts via retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). We show here that RSV infection upregulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) expression through the induction of NLRC5, a NOD-like, CARD domain-containing intracellular protein that has recently been identified as a class I MHC transactivator (CITA). RSV infection of A549 cells promotes upregulation of NLRC5 via beta interferon (IFN-β) production, since the NLRC5-inducing activity in a conditioned medium from RSV-infected A549 cells was removed by antibody to IFN-β, but not by antibody to IFN-γ. RSV infection resulted in RIG-I upregulation and induction of NLRC5 and MHC-I. Suppression of RIG-I induction significantly blocked NLRC5, as well as MHC-I, upregulation and diminished IRF3 activation. Importantly, Vero cells deficient in interferon production still upregulated MHC-I following introduction of the RSV genome by infection or transfection, further supporting a key role for RIG-I. A model is therefore proposed in which the host upregulates MHC-I expression during RSV infection directly via the induction of RIG-I and NLRC5 expression. Since elevated expression of MHC-I molecules can sensitize host cells to T lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity or immunopathologic damage, the results have significant implications for the modification of immunity in RSV disease. IMPORTANCE Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and young children worldwide. Infection early in life is linked to persistent wheezing and allergic asthma in later life, possibly related to upregulation of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) on the cell surface, which facilitates cytotoxic T cell activation and antiviral immunity. Here, we show that RSV infection of lung epithelial

  13. Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Recognition of Hepatitis C Virus Transmitted/Founder Variants by RIG-I Is Dependent on U-Core Length

    PubMed Central

    Kell, Alison; Stoddard, Mark; Li, Hui; Marcotrigiano, Joe; Shaw, George M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the introduction of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs against hepatitis C virus (HCV), infection remains a major public health concern because DAA therapeutics do not prevent reinfection and patients can still progress to chronic liver disease. Chronic HCV infection is supported by a variety of viral immune evasion strategies, but, remarkably, 20% to 30% of acute infections spontaneously clear prior to development of adaptive immune responses, thus implicating innate immunity in resolving acute HCV infection. However, the virus-host interactions regulating acute infection are unknown. Transmission of HCV involves one or a few transmitted/founder (T/F) variants. In infected hepatocytes, the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) protein recognizes 5′ triphosphate (5′ppp) of the HCV RNA and a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) motif located within the 3′ untranslated region consisting of poly-U/UC. PAMP binding activates RIG-I to induce innate immune signaling and type 1 interferon antiviral defenses. HCV poly-U/UC sequences can differ in length and complexity, suggesting that PAMP diversity in T/F genomes could regulate innate immune control of acute HCV infection. Using 14 unique poly-U/UC sequences from HCV T/F genomes recovered from acute-infection patients, we tested whether RIG-I recognition and innate immune activation correlate with PAMP sequence characteristics. We show that T/F variants are recognized by RIG-I in a manner dependent on length of the U-core motif of the poly-U/UC PAMP and are recognized by RIG-I to induce innate immune responses that restrict acute infection. PAMP recognition of T/F HCV variants by RIG-I may therefore impart innate immune signaling and HCV restriction to impact acute-phase-to-chronic-phase transition. IMPORTANCE Recognition of nonself molecular patterns such as those seen with viral nucleic acids is an essential step in triggering the immune response to virus infection. Innate immunity is

  14. RIG-I inhibits pancreatic β cell proliferation through competitive binding of activated Src

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi; Li, GuangMing; Zhong, HengGao; Chen, MeiJuan; Chen, TingTing; Gao, LiLi; Wu, HuiWen; Guo, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition is a necessary condition for cell proliferation, including pancreatic β cells; however, over-nutrition, and the resulting obesity and glucolipotoxicity, is a risk factor for the development of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), and causes inhibition of pancreatic β-cells proliferation and their loss of compensation for insulin resistance. Here, we showed that Retinoic acid (RA)-inducible gene I (RIG-I) responds to nutrient signals and induces loss of β cell mass through G1 cell cycle arrest. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes (e.g., glucolipotoxicity, TNF-α and LPS) activate Src in pancreatic β cells. Elevated RIG-I modulated the interaction of activated Src and STAT3 by competitive binding to STAT3. Elevated RIG-I downregulated the transcription of SKP2, and increased the stability and abundance of P27 protein in a STAT3-dependent manner, which was associated with inhibition of β cell growth elicited by Src. These results supported a role for RIG-I in β cell mass loss under conditions of metabolic surplus and suggested that RIG-I-induced blocking of Src/STAT3 signalling might be involved in G1 phase cycle arrest through the Skp2/P27 pathway in pancreatic β cells. PMID:27349479

  15. Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Nsp4 Cleaves VISA to Impair Antiviral Responses Mediated by RIG-I-like Receptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen; Du, Yinping; Yu, Zhibin; Zhang, Qiong; Liu, Yihao; Tang, Jun; Shi, Jishu; Feng, Wen-Hai

    2016-06-22

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is one of the most significant etiological agents in the swine industry worldwide. It has been reported that PRRSV infection can modulate host immune responses, and innate immune evasion is thought to play a vital role in PRRSV pathogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) infection specifically down-regulated virus-induced signaling adaptor (VISA), a unique adaptor molecule that is essential for retinoic acid induced gene-I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation associated gene 5 (MDA5) signal transduction. Moreover, we verified that nsp4 inhibited IRF3 activation induced by signaling molecules, including RIG-I, MDA5, VISA, and TBK1, but not IRF3. Subsequently, we demonstrated that HP-PRRSV nsp4 down-regulated VISA and suppressed type I IFN induction. Importantly, VISA was cleaved by nsp4 and released from mitochondrial membrane, which interrupted the downstream signaling of VISA. However, catalytically inactive mutant of nsp4 abolished its ability to cleave VISA. Interestingly, nsp4 of typical PRRSV strain CH-1a had no effect on VISA. Taken together, these findings reveal a strategy evolved by HP-PRRSV to counteract anti-viral innate immune signaling, which complements the known PRRSV-mediated immune-evasion mechanisms.

  16. RIG-I and MDA-5 Detection of Viral RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase Activity Restricts Positive-Strand RNA Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Nikonov, Andrei; Mölder, Tarmo; Sikut, Rein; Kiiver, Kaja; Männik, Andres; Toots, Urve; Lulla, Aleksei; Lulla, Valeria; Utt, Age; Merits, Andres; Ustav, Mart

    2013-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFN) are important for antiviral responses. Melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA-5) and retinoic acid-induced gene I (RIG-I) proteins detect cytosolic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) or 5′-triphosphate (5′-ppp) RNA and mediate IFN production. Cytosolic 5′-ppp RNA and dsRNA are generated during viral RNA replication and transcription by viral RNA replicases [RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp)]. Here, we show that the Semliki Forest virus (SFV) RNA replicase can induce IFN-β independently of viral RNA replication and transcription. The SFV replicase converts host cell RNA into 5′-ppp dsRNA and induces IFN-β through the RIG-I and MDA-5 pathways. Inactivation of the SFV replicase RdRp activity prevents IFN-β induction. These IFN-inducing modified host cell RNAs are abundantly produced during both wild-type SFV and its non-pathogenic mutant infection. Furthermore, in contrast to the wild-type SFV replicase a non-pathogenic mutant replicase triggers increased IFN-β production, which leads to a shutdown of virus replication. These results suggest that host cells can restrict RNA virus replication by detecting the products of unspecific viral replicase RdRp activity. PMID:24039580

  17. Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Nsp4 Cleaves VISA to Impair Antiviral Responses Mediated by RIG-I-like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen; Du, Yinping; Yu, Zhibin; Zhang, Qiong; Liu, Yihao; Tang, Jun; Shi, Jishu; Feng, Wen-hai

    2016-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is one of the most significant etiological agents in the swine industry worldwide. It has been reported that PRRSV infection can modulate host immune responses, and innate immune evasion is thought to play a vital role in PRRSV pathogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) infection specifically down-regulated virus-induced signaling adaptor (VISA), a unique adaptor molecule that is essential for retinoic acid induced gene-I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation associated gene 5 (MDA5) signal transduction. Moreover, we verified that nsp4 inhibited IRF3 activation induced by signaling molecules, including RIG-I, MDA5, VISA, and TBK1, but not IRF3. Subsequently, we demonstrated that HP-PRRSV nsp4 down-regulated VISA and suppressed type I IFN induction. Importantly, VISA was cleaved by nsp4 and released from mitochondrial membrane, which interrupted the downstream signaling of VISA. However, catalytically inactive mutant of nsp4 abolished its ability to cleave VISA. Interestingly, nsp4 of typical PRRSV strain CH-1a had no effect on VISA. Taken together, these findings reveal a strategy evolved by HP-PRRSV to counteract anti-viral innate immune signaling, which complements the known PRRSV-mediated immune-evasion mechanisms. PMID:27329948

  18. A structure-based model of RIG-I activation

    PubMed Central

    Kolakofsky, Daniel; Kowalinski, Eva; Cusack, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A series of high-resolution crystal structures of RIG-I and RIG-I:dsRNA cocrystals has recently been reported. Comparison of these structures provides considerable insight into how this innate immune pattern recognition receptor is activated upon detecting and binding a certain class of viral RNAs. PMID:23118418

  19. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis Shows That SAV-3 Infection Upregulates Pattern Recognition Receptors of the Endosomal Toll-Like and RIG-I-Like Receptor Signaling Pathways in Macrophage/Dendritic Like TO-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Cheng; Evensen, Øystein; Mweemba, Hetron Munang’andu

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental step in cellular defense mechanisms is the recognition of “danger signals” made of conserved pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) expressed by invading pathogens, by host cell germ line coded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). In this study, we used RNA-seq and the Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) to identify PRRs together with the network pathway of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) that recognize salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 (SAV-3) infection in macrophage/dendritic like TO-cells derived from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L) headkidney leukocytes. Our findings show that recognition of SAV-3 in TO-cells was restricted to endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 3 and 8 together with RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) and not the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors NOD-like receptor (NLRs) genes. Among the RLRs, upregulated genes included the retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I), melanoma differentiation association 5 (MDA5) and laboratory of genetics and physiology 2 (LGP2). The study points to possible involvement of the tripartite motif containing 25 (TRIM25) and mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) in modulating RIG-I signaling being the first report that links these genes to the RLR pathway in SAV-3 infection in TO-cells. Downstream signaling suggests that both the TLR and RLR pathways use interferon (IFN) regulatory factors (IRFs) 3 and 7 to produce IFN-a2. The validity of RNA-seq data generated in this study was confirmed by quantitative real time qRT-PCR showing that genes up- or downregulated by RNA-seq were also up- or downregulated by RT-PCR. Overall, this study shows that de novo transcriptome assembly identify key receptors of the TLR and RLR sensors engaged in host pathogen interaction at cellular level. We envisage that data presented here can open a road map for future intervention strategies in SAV infection of salmon. PMID:27110808

  20. Structural insights into RNA recognition by RIG-I

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dahai; Ding, Steve C.; Vela, Adriana; Kohlway, Andrew; Lindenbach, Brett D.; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2011-01-01

    Summary Intracellular RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs, including RIG-I, MDA-5, and LGP-2) recognize viral RNAs as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and initiate an antiviral immune response. To understand the molecular basis of this process, we determined the crystal structure of RIG-I in complex with double-stranded RNA. The dsRNA is sheathed within a network of protein domains that include a conserved “helicase” domain (regions HEL1 and HEL2), a specialized insertion domain (HEL2i), and a C-terminal regulatory domain (CTD). A V-shaped pincer connects HEL2 and the CTD by gripping an α-helical shaft that extends from HEL1. In this way, the pincer coordinates functions of all the domains and couples RNA binding with ATP hydrolysis. RIG-I falls within the Dicer-RIG-I clade of super family 2 of helicases and this structure reveals complex interplay between motor domains, accessory mechanical domains and RNA that has implications for understanding the nanomechanical function this protein family and other ATPases more broadly. PMID:22000018

  1. Structural Insights into RNA Recognition by RIG-I

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Dahai; Ding, Steve C.; Vela, Adriana; Kohlway, Andrew; Lindenbach, Brett D.; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2011-10-27

    Intracellular RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs, including RIG-I, MDA-5, and LGP2) recognize viral RNAs as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and initiate an antiviral immune response. To understand the molecular basis of this process, we determined the crystal structure of RIG-I in complex with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The dsRNA is sheathed within a network of protein domains that include a conserved 'helicase' domain (regions HEL1 and HEL2), a specialized insertion domain (HEL2i), and a C-terminal regulatory domain (CTD). A V-shaped pincer connects HEL2 and the CTD by gripping an {alpha}-helical shaft that extends from HEL1. In this way, the pincer coordinates functions of all the domains and couples RNA binding with ATP hydrolysis. RIG-I falls within the Dicer-RIG-I clade of the superfamily 2 helicases, and this structure reveals complex interplay between motor domains, accessory mechanical domains, and RNA that has implications for understanding the nanomechanical function of this protein family and other ATPases more broadly.

  2. Viral pseudo-enzymes activate RIG-I via deamidation to evade cytokine production.

    PubMed

    He, Shanping; Zhao, Jun; Song, Shanshan; He, Xiaojing; Minassian, Arlet; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Junjie; Brulois, Kevin; Wang, Yuqi; Cabo, Jackson; Zandi, Ebrahim; Liang, Chengyu; Jung, Jae U; Zhang, Xuewu; Feng, Pinghui

    2015-04-01

    RIG-I is a pattern recognition receptor that senses viral RNA and is crucial for host innate immune defense. Here, we describe a mechanism of RIG-I activation through amidotransferase-mediated deamidation. We show that viral homologs of phosphoribosylformylglycinamidine synthetase (PFAS), although lacking intrinsic enzyme activity, recruit cellular PFAS to deamidate and activate RIG-I. Accordingly, depletion and biochemical inhibition of PFAS impair RIG-I deamidation and concomitant activation. Purified PFAS and viral homolog thereof deamidate RIG-I in vitro. Ultimately, herpesvirus hijacks activated RIG-I to avoid antiviral cytokine production; loss of RIG-I or inhibition of RIG-I deamidation results in elevated cytokine production. Together, these findings demonstrate a surprising mechanism of RIG-I activation that is mediated by an enzyme. PMID:25752576

  3. Viral Pseudo Enzymes Activate RIG-I via Deamidation to Evade Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    He, Shanping; Zhao, Jun; Song, Shanshan; He, Xiaojing; Minassian, Arlet; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Junjie; Brulois, Kevin; Wang, Yuqi; Cabo, Jackson; Zandi, Ebrahim; Liang, Chengyu; Jung, Jae U; Zhang, Xuewu; Feng, Pinghui

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY RIG-I is a pattern recognition receptor that senses viral RNA and is crucial for host innate immune defense. Here we describe a mechanism of RIG-I activation through amidotransferase-mediated deamidation. We show that viral homologues of phosphoribosylformyglycinamide synthase (PFAS), although lacking intrinsic enzyme activity, recruit cellular PFAS to deamidate and activate RIG-I. Accordingly, depletion and biochemical inhibition of PFAS impair RIG-I deamidation and concomitant activation. Purified PFAS and viral homologue thereof deamidate RIG-I in vitro. Ultimately, herpesvirus hijacks activated RIG-I to avoid antiviral cytokine production; loss of RIG-I or inhibition of RIG-I deamidation results in elevated cytokine production. Together, these findings demonstrate a surprising mechanism of RIG-I activation that is mediated by an enzyme. PMID:25752576

  4. Multilayered regulations of RIG-I in the anti-viral signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nari; Now, Hesung; Nguyen, Nhung T H; Yoo, Joo-Yeon

    2016-09-01

    RIG-I is a cytosolic receptor recognizing virus-specific RNA structures and initiates an antiviral signaling that induces the production of interferons and proinflammatory cytokines. Because inappropriate RIG-I signaling affects either viral clearance or immune toxicity, multiple regulations of RIG-I have been investigated since its discovery as the viral RNA detector. In this review, we describe the recent progress in research on the regulation of RIG-I activity or abundance. Specifically, we focus on the mechanism that modulates RIG-I-dependent antiviral response through post-translational modifications of or protein-protein interactions with RIG-I. PMID:27572506

  5. RIG-I and TLR3 are both required for maximum interferon induction by influenza virus in human lung alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenxin; Zhang, Wei; Duggan, Elizabeth S.; Booth, J. Leland; Zou, Ming-Hui; Metcalf, Jordan P.

    2015-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors, such as retinoic acid-inducible protein I (RIG-I), Toll-like receptors 3 and 7 (TLR3 and 7), and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing protein 2 (NOD2), play important roles in the recognition of influenza A virus (IAV), but their role in interferon (IFN) induction is still unclear, particularly in human lung. We investigated IFN induction by IAV in the A549 cell line as well as in primary human alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). TLR3/7, NOD2, RIG-I, and IFN expression levels were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA in cells infected with IAV PR8. We found that TLR7 and NOD2 were not involved in IFN induction by IAV in these cells. Neither RIG-I nor TLR3 siRNA alone completely blocked IFN induction. However, double knockdown of RIG-I and TLR3 completely inhibited IFN induction by influenza. Thus, signaling through both RIG-I and TLR3 is important for IFN induction by IAV in human lung AEC. PMID:25880109

  6. A RING finger protein 114 (RNF114) homolog from Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis) possesses immune-regulation properties via modulating RIG-I signaling pathway-mediated interferon expression.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhiyong; Chen, Xiaojun; Nie, Dongsong; Wang, Jiajia; Wu, Mingjiang

    2014-12-01

    Ubiquitin ligases play important roles in immune regulation. The human RNF114 (RING finger protein 114), an ubiquitin ligase, was recently reported to be involved in immune response to double-stranded RNA in disease pathogenesis. Here, we identified a RNF114 homolog in Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis) and investigated its potential role in immune response. The full-length cDNA of Chinese sturgeon RNF114 (csRNF114) contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 681 nucleotides coding a protein of 227 amino acids. csRNF114 shares the highest identity of 76% at amino acid level to other RNF114 homologs, clustering with bony fish RNF114s based on phylogenetic analysis. The main structural features of csRNF114, including a C3HC4 (Cys3-His-Cys4) RING domain, a C2HC (Cys2-His-Cys)-type zinc finger motif, a C2H2 (Cys2-His2)-type zinc finger motif, and a UIM (ubiquitin-interacting motif), take csRNF114 as an ubiquitin ligase. csRNF114 mRNA was widely expressed in various tissues and significantly up-regulated in poly(I:C)-treated Chinese sturgeon. Over-expression of csRNF114 in HEK293T cells significantly promoted both basal and poly(I:C)-induced activation of interferon regulatory transcription factor 3 (IRF3) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) downstream retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling pathway and expression of target genes type I interferon (IFN), which was nearly abolished by knockdown of RIG-I with specific human siRNA and by mutation of the C3HC4 RING domain (C28A/C31A) in csRNF114 as well. Furthermore, csRNF114 associated with ubiquitinated proteins in HEK293T cells, for which the C3HC4 RING domain was essential. These data suggested that an ubiquitin ligase RNF114 homolog with a potential role in antiviral response possibly through modulating RIG-I signaling pathway was cloned from Chinese sturgeon, which might contribute to our understanding of the immune biology of Chinese sturgeon.

  7. The powerstroke and camshaft of the RIG-I antiviral RNA detection machine.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Luke A J; Bowie, Andrew G

    2011-10-14

    The innate immune sensor RIG-I responds to infection by binding to viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). In this issue of Cell, Kowalinski et al. (2011) and Luo et al. (2011) reveal the structure of RIG-I, and in combination with functional analyses, they show how RIG-I recognizes viral RNA to initiate signaling and a type I interferon response.

  8. Pyruvate Carboxylase Activates the RIG-I-like Receptor-Mediated Antiviral Immune Response by Targeting the MAVS signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhongying; Zhou, Yaqin; Zhu, Shengli; Feng, Jian; Chen, Xueyuan; Liu, Shi; Peng, Nanfang; Yang, Xiaodan; Xu, Gang; Zhu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    When retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 protein (RIG-I)-like receptors sense viral dsRNA in the cytosol, RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) are recruited to the mitochondria to interact with mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) and initiate antiviral immune responses. In this study, we demonstrate that the biotin-containing enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (PC) plays an essential role in the virus-triggered activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling mediated by MAVS. PC contributes to the enhanced production of type I interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and PC knockdown inhibits the virus-triggered innate immune response. In addition, PC shows extensive antiviral activity against RNA viruses, including influenza A virus (IAV), human enterovirus 71 (EV71), and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Furthermore, PC mediates antiviral action by targeting the MAVS signalosome and induces IFNs and pro-inflammatory cytokines by promoting phosphorylation of NF-κB inhibitor-α (IκBα) and the IκB kinase (IKK) complex, as well as NF-κB nuclear translocation, which leads to activation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), including double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and myxovirus resistance protein 1 (Mx1). Our findings suggest that PC is an important player in host antiviral signaling. PMID:26906558

  9. Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Differentially Affects the Virus-Induced Type I Interferon Response and Mitochondrial Apoptosis Mediated by RIG-I/MAVS

    PubMed Central

    Pythoud, Christelle; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenaviruses are important emerging human pathogens maintained by noncytolytic persistent infection in their rodent reservoir hosts. Despite high levels of viral replication, persistently infected carrier hosts show only mildly elevated levels of type I interferon (IFN-I). Accordingly, the arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) has been identified as a potent IFN-I antagonist capable of blocking activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via the retinoic acid inducible gene (RIG)-I/mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. Another important mechanism of host innate antiviral defense is represented by virus-induced mitochondrial apoptosis via RIG-I/MAVS and IRF3. In the present study, we investigated the ability of the prototypic Old World arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) to interfere with RIG-I/MAVS-dependent apoptosis. We found that LCMV does not induce apoptosis at any time during infection. While LCMV efficiently blocked induction of IFN-I via RIG-I/MAVS in response to superinfection with cytopathic RNA viruses, virus-induced mitochondrial apoptosis remained fully active in LCMV-infected cells. Notably, in LCMV-infected cells, RIG-I was dispensable for virus-induced apoptosis via MAVS. Our study reveals that LCMV infection efficiently suppresses induction of IFN-I but does not interfere with the cell's ability to undergo virus-induced mitochondrial apoptosis as a strategy of innate antiviral defense. The RIG-I independence of mitochondrial apoptosis in LCMV-infected cells provides the first evidence that arenaviruses can reshape apoptotic signaling according to their needs. IMPORTANCE Arenaviruses are important emerging human pathogens that are maintained in their rodent hosts by persistent infection. Persistent virus is able to subvert the cellular interferon response, a powerful branch of the innate antiviral defense. Here, we investigated the ability of the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) to

  10. USP21 negatively regulates antiviral response by acting as a RIG-I deubiquitinase

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yihui; Mao, Renfang; Yu, Yang; Liu, Shangfeng; Shi, Zhongcheng; Cheng, Jin; Zhang, Huiyuan; An, Lei; Zhao, Yanling; Xu, Xin; Chen, Zhenghu; Kogiso, Mari; Zhang, Dekai; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Pumin; Jung, Jae U.; Li, Xiaonan

    2014-01-01

    Lys63-linked polyubiquitination of RIG-I is essential in antiviral immune defense, yet the molecular mechanism that negatively regulates this critical step is poorly understood. Here, we report that USP21 acts as a novel negative regulator in antiviral responses through its ability to bind to and deubiquitinate RIG-I. Overexpression of USP21 inhibited RNA virus–induced RIG-I polyubiquitination and RIG-I–mediated interferon (IFN) signaling, whereas deletion of USP21 resulted in elevated RIG-I polyubiquitination, IRF3 phosphorylation, IFN-α/β production, and antiviral responses in MEFs in response to RNA virus infection. USP21 also restricted antiviral responses in peritoneal macrophages (PMs) and bone marrow–derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). USP21-deficient mice spontaneously developed splenomegaly and were more resistant to VSV infection with elevated production of IFNs. Chimeric mice with USP21-deficient hematopoietic cells developed virus-induced splenomegaly and were more resistant to VSV infection. Functional comparison of three deubiquitinases (USP21, A20, and CYLD) demonstrated that USP21 acts as a bona fide RIG-I deubiquitinase to down-regulate antiviral response independent of the A20 ubiquitin-editing complex. Our studies identify a previously unrecognized role for USP21 in the negative regulation of antiviral response through deubiquitinating RIG-I. PMID:24493797

  11. The Z Proteins of Pathogenic but Not Nonpathogenic Arenaviruses Inhibit RIG-i-Like Receptor-Dependent Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Junji; Ly, Hinh

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenavirus pathogens cause a wide spectrum of diseases in humans ranging from central nervous system disease to lethal hemorrhagic fevers with few treatment options. The reason why some arenaviruses can cause severe human diseases while others cannot is unknown. We find that the Z proteins of all known pathogenic arenaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and Lassa, Junin, Machupo, Sabia, Guanarito, Chapare, Dandenong, and Lujo viruses, can inhibit retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-i) and Melanoma Differentiation-Associated protein 5 (MDA5), in sharp contrast to those of 14 other nonpathogenic arenaviruses. Inhibition of the RIG-i-like receptors (RLRs) by pathogenic Z proteins is mediated by the protein-protein interactions of Z and RLRs, which lead to the disruption of the interactions between RLRs and mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS). The Z-RLR interactive interfaces are located within the N-terminal domain (NTD) of the Z protein and the N-terminal CARD domains of RLRs. Swapping of the LCMV Z NTD into the nonpathogenic Pichinde virus (PICV) genome does not affect virus growth in Vero cells but significantly inhibits the type I interferon (IFN) responses and increases viral replication in human primary macrophages. In summary, our results show for the first time an innate immune-system-suppressive mechanism shared by the diverse pathogenic arenaviruses and thus shed important light on the pathogenic mechanism of human arenavirus pathogens. IMPORTANCE We show that all known human-pathogenic arenaviruses share an innate immune suppression mechanism that is based on viral Z protein-mediated RLR inhibition. Our report offers important insights into the potential mechanism of arenavirus pathogenesis, provides a convenient way to evaluate the pathogenic potential of known and/or emerging arenaviruses, and reveals a novel target for the development of broad-spectrum therapies to treat this group of diverse pathogens. More broadly, our

  12. Cancer therapies activate RIG-I-like receptor pathway through endogenous non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Ranoa, Diana Rose E; Parekh, Akash D; Pitroda, Sean P; Huang, Xiaona; Darga, Thomas; Wong, Anthony C; Huang, Lei; Andrade, Jorge; Staley, Jonathan P; Satoh, Takashi; Akira, Shizuo; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Khodarev, Nikolai N

    2016-05-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that ionizing radiation (IR) and chemotherapy activate Type I interferon (IFN) signaling in tumor and host cells. However, the mechanism of induction is poorly understood. We identified a novel radioprotective role for the DEXH box RNA helicase LGP2 (DHX58) through its suppression of IR-induced cytotoxic IFN-beta [1]. LGP2 inhibits activation of the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) pathway upon binding of viral RNA to the cytoplasmic sensors RIG-I (DDX58) and MDA5 (IFIH1) and subsequent IFN signaling via the mitochondrial adaptor protein MAVS (IPS1). Here we show that MAVS is necessary for IFN-beta induction and interferon-stimulated gene expression in the response to IR. Suppression of MAVS conferred radioresistance in normal and cancer cells. Germline deletion of RIG-I, but not MDA5, protected mice from death following total body irradiation, while deletion of LGP2 accelerated the death of irradiated animals. In human tumors depletion of RIG-I conferred resistance to IR and different classes of chemotherapy drugs. Mechanistically, IR stimulated the binding of cytoplasmic RIG-I with small endogenous non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs), which triggered IFN-beta activity. We demonstrate that the small nuclear RNAs U1 and U2 translocate to the cytoplasm after IR treatment, thus stimulating the formation of RIG-I: RNA complexes and initiating downstream signaling events. Taken together, these findings suggest that the physiologic responses to radio-/chemo-therapy converge on an antiviral program in recruitment of the RLR pathway by a sncRNA-dependent activation of RIG-I which commences cytotoxic IFN signaling. Importantly, activation of interferon genes by radiation or chemotherapy is associated with a favorable outcome in patients undergoing treatment for cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a cell-intrinsic response to clinically relevant genotoxic treatments mediated by an RNA-dependent mechanism.

  13. Nucleotide Sequences and Modifications That Determine RIG-I/RNA Binding and Signaling Activities ▿

    PubMed Central

    Uzri, Dina; Gehrke, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Cytoplasmic viral RNAs with 5′ triphosphates (5′ppp) are detected by the RNA helicase RIG-I, initiating downstream signaling and alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) expression that establish an antiviral state. We demonstrate here that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) 3′ untranslated region (UTR) RNA has greater activity as an immune stimulator than several flavivirus UTR RNAs. We confirmed that the HCV 3′-UTR poly(U/UC) region is the determinant for robust activation of RIG-I-mediated innate immune signaling and that its antisense sequence, poly(AG/A), is an equivalent RIG-I activator. The poly(U/UC) region of the fulminant HCV JFH-1 strain was a relatively weak activator, while the antisense JFH-1 strain poly(AG/A) RNA was very potent. Poly(U/UC) activity does not require primary nucleotide sequence adjacency to the 5′ppp, suggesting that RIG-I recognizes two independent RNA domains. Whereas poly(U) 50-nt or poly(A) 50-nt sequences were minimally active, inserting a single C or G nucleotide, respectively, into these RNAs increased IFN-β expression. Poly(U/UC) RNAs transcribed in vitro using modified uridine 2′ fluoro or pseudouridine ribonucleotides lacked signaling activity while functioning as competitive inhibitors of RIG-I binding and IFN-β expression. Nucleotide base and ribose modifications that convert activator RNAs into competitive inhibitors of RIG-I signaling may be useful as modulators of RIG-I-mediated innate immune responses and as tools to dissect the RNA binding and conformational events associated with signaling. PMID:19224987

  14. Cancer therapies activate RIG-I-like receptor pathway through endogenous non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ranoa, Diana Rose E.; Parekh, Akash D.; Pitroda, Sean P.; Huang, Xiaona; Darga, Thomas; Wong, Anthony C.; Huang, Lei; Andrade, Jorge; Staley, Jonathan P.; Satoh, Takashi; Akira, Shizuo

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that ionizing radiation (IR) and chemotherapy activate Type I interferon (IFN) signaling in tumor and host cells. However, the mechanism of induction is poorly understood. We identified a novel radioprotective role for the DEXH box RNA helicase LGP2 (DHX58) through its suppression of IR-induced cytotoxic IFN-beta [1]. LGP2 inhibits activation of the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) pathway upon binding of viral RNA to the cytoplasmic sensors RIG-I (DDX58) and MDA5 (IFIH1) and subsequent IFN signaling via the mitochondrial adaptor protein MAVS (IPS1). Here we show that MAVS is necessary for IFN-beta induction and interferon-stimulated gene expression in the response to IR. Suppression of MAVS conferred radioresistance in normal and cancer cells. Germline deletion of RIG-I, but not MDA5, protected mice from death following total body irradiation, while deletion of LGP2 accelerated the death of irradiated animals. In human tumors depletion of RIG-I conferred resistance to IR and different classes of chemotherapy drugs. Mechanistically, IR stimulated the binding of cytoplasmic RIG-I with small endogenous non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs), which triggered IFN-beta activity. We demonstrate that the small nuclear RNAs U1 and U2 translocate to the cytoplasm after IR treatment, thus stimulating the formation of RIG-I: RNA complexes and initiating downstream signaling events. Taken together, these findings suggest that the physiologic responses to radio-/chemo-therapy converge on an antiviral program in recruitment of the RLR pathway by a sncRNA-dependent activation of RIG-I which commences cytotoxic IFN signaling. Importantly, activation of interferon genes by radiation or chemotherapy is associated with a favorable outcome in patients undergoing treatment for cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a cell-intrinsic response to clinically relevant genotoxic treatments mediated by an RNA-dependent mechanism. PMID:27034163

  15. A Hierarchical Mechanism of RIG-I Ubiquitination Provides Sensitivity, Robustness and Synergy in Antiviral Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Xian, Huifang; Tian, Shuo; Sun, Tingzhe; Qin, Yunfei; Zhang, Shoutao; Cui, Jun

    2016-01-01

    RIG-I is an essential receptor in the initiation of the type I interferon (IFN) signaling pathway upon viral infection. Although K63-linked ubiquitination plays an important role in RIG-I activation, the optimal modulation of conjugated and unanchored ubiquitination of RIG-I as well as its functional implications remains unclear. In this study, we determined that, in contrast to the RIG-I CARD domain, full-length RIG-I must undergo K63-linked ubiquitination at multiple sites to reach full activity. A systems biology approach was designed based on experiments using full-length RIG-I. Model selection for 7 candidate mechanisms of RIG-I ubiquitination inferred a hierarchical architecture of the RIG-I ubiquitination mode, which was then experimentally validated. Compared with other mechanisms, the selected hierarchical mechanism exhibited superior sensitivity and robustness in RIG-I-induced type I IFN activation. Furthermore, our model analysis and experimental data revealed that TRIM4 and TRIM25 exhibited dose-dependent synergism. These results demonstrated that the hierarchical mechanism of multi-site/type ubiquitination of RIG-I provides an efficient, robust and optimal synergistic regulatory module in antiviral immune responses. PMID:27387525

  16. Comparative analysis of viral RNA signatures on different RIG-I-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez David, Raul Y; Combredet, Chantal; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Mura, Marie; Guerbois Galla, Mathilde; Despres, Philippe; Tangy, Frédéric; Komarova, Anastassia V

    2016-01-01

    The RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) play a major role in sensing RNA virus infection to initiate and modulate antiviral immunity. They interact with particular viral RNAs, most of them being still unknown. To decipher the viral RNA signature on RLRs during viral infection, we tagged RLRs (RIG-I, MDA5, LGP2) and applied tagged protein affinity purification followed by next-generation sequencing (NGS) of associated RNA molecules. Two viruses with negative- and positive-sense RNA genome were used: measles (MV) and chikungunya (CHIKV). NGS analysis revealed that distinct regions of MV genome were specifically recognized by distinct RLRs: RIG-I recognized defective interfering genomes, whereas MDA5 and LGP2 specifically bound MV nucleoprotein-coding region. During CHIKV infection, RIG-I associated specifically to the 3’ untranslated region of viral genome. This study provides the first comparative view of the viral RNA ligands for RIG-I, MDA5 and LGP2 in the presence of infection. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11275.001 PMID:27011352

  17. Leader-Containing Uncapped Viral Transcript Activates RIG-I in Antiviral Stress Granules

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seong-Wook; Onomoto, Koji; Wakimoto, Mai; Onoguchi, Kazuhide; Ishidate, Fumiyoshi; Fujiwara, Takahiro; Yoneyama, Mitsutoshi; Kato, Hiroki; Fujita, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    RIG-I triggers antiviral responses by recognizing viral RNA (vRNA) in the cytoplasm. However, the spatio-temporal dynamics of vRNA sensing and signal transduction remain elusive. We investigated the time course of events in cells infected with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), a non-segmented negative-strand RNA virus. RIG-I was recruited to viral replication complexes (vRC) and triggered minimal primary type I interferon (IFN) production. RIG-I subsequently localized to antiviral stress granules (avSG) induced after vRC formation. The inhibition of avSG attenuated secondary IFN production, suggesting avSG as a platform for efficient vRNA detection. avSG selectively captured positive-strand vRNA, and poly(A)+ RNA induced IFN production. Further investigations suggested that uncapped vRNA derived from read-through transcription was sensed by RIG-I in avSG. These results highlight how viral infections stimulate host stress responses, thereby selectively recruiting uncapped vRNA to avSG, in which RIG-I and other components cooperate in an efficient antiviral program. PMID:26862753

  18. Comparative analysis of viral RNA signatures on different RIG-I-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Sanchez David, Raul Y; Combredet, Chantal; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Mura, Marie; Guerbois Galla, Mathilde; Despres, Philippe; Tangy, Frédéric; Komarova, Anastassia V

    2016-01-01

    The RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) play a major role in sensing RNA virus infection to initiate and modulate antiviral immunity. They interact with particular viral RNAs, most of them being still unknown. To decipher the viral RNA signature on RLRs during viral infection, we tagged RLRs (RIG-I, MDA5, LGP2) and applied tagged protein affinity purification followed by next-generation sequencing (NGS) of associated RNA molecules. Two viruses with negative- and positive-sense RNA genome were used: measles (MV) and chikungunya (CHIKV). NGS analysis revealed that distinct regions of MV genome were specifically recognized by distinct RLRs: RIG-I recognized defective interfering genomes, whereas MDA5 and LGP2 specifically bound MV nucleoprotein-coding region. During CHIKV infection, RIG-I associated specifically to the 3' untranslated region of viral genome. This study provides the first comparative view of the viral RNA ligands for RIG-I, MDA5 and LGP2 in the presence of infection. PMID:27011352

  19. ATP-dependent effector-like functions of RIG-I like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Peisley, Alys; Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Gilmore, Rachel H.; Schmidt, Tobias; Schmidt-Burgk, Jonathan; Hornung, Veit; Rice, Charles M.; Hur, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Summary The vertebrate antiviral innate immune system is often considered to consist of two distinct groups of proteins: pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that detect viral infection and induce the interferon (IFN) signaling, and effectors that directly act against viral replication. Accordingly, previous studies on PRRs, such as RIG-I and MDA5, have primarily focused on their functions in viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) detection and consequent antiviral signaling. We here report that both RIG-I and MDA5 efficiently displace viral proteins pre-bound to dsRNA in a manner dependent on their ATP hydrolysis, and that this activity assists a dsRNA-dependent antiviral effector protein, PKR, and allows RIG-I to promote MDA5 signaling. Furthermore, truncated RIG-I/MDA5 lacking the signaling domain, and hence the IFN stimulatory activity, displace viral proteins and suppress replication of certain viruses in an ATP-dependent manner. Thus, this study reveals novel “effector-like” functions of RIG-I and MDA5 that challenge the conventional view of PRRs. PMID:25891073

  20. RIG-I ligand enhances the immunogenicity of recombinant H7HA protein.

    PubMed

    Cao, Weiping; Liepkalns, Justine S; Kamal, Ram P; Reber, Adrian J; Kim, Jin Hyang; Hofstetter, Amelia R; Amoah, Samuel; Stevens, James; Ranjan, Priya; Gangappa, Shivaprakash; York, Ian A; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2016-01-01

    Avian H7N9 influenza virus infection with fatal outcomes continues to pose a pandemic threat and highly immunogenic vaccines are urgently needed. In this report we show that baculovirus-derived recombinant H7 hemagglutinin protein, when delivered with RIG-I ligand, induced enhanced antibody and T cell responses and conferred protection against lethal challenge with a homologous H7N9 virus. These findings indicate the potential utility of RIG-I ligands as vaccine adjuvants to increase the immunogenicity of recombinant H7 hemagglutinin.

  1. ECSIT bridges RIG-I-like receptors to VISA in signaling events of innate antiviral responses.

    PubMed

    Lei, Cao-Qi; Zhang, Yu; Li, Mi; Jiang, Li-Qun; Zhong, Bo; Kim, Yong Ho; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Upon binding to RNA structures from invading viruses, RIG-I and MDA5 are recruited to mitochondria to interact with VISA and initiate antiviral type I interferon (IFN) responses. How this process is mediated is less understood. In this report, we demonstrate that ECSIT is an essential scaffolding protein that mediates the association of VISA and RIG-I or MDA5. Overexpression of ECSIT potentiated virus-triggered activation of IFN-regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and expression of IFNB1, whereas knockdown of ECSIT impaired viral infection-induced activation of IRF3 and expression of IFNB1 as well as cellular antiviral responses. Mechanistically, ECSIT was associated with VISA on mitochondria and important for bridging RIG-I and MDA5 to VISA. Our findings suggest that ECSIT mediates virus-triggered type I IFN induction by bridging RIG-I and MDA5 to the VISA complex, and provide new insights into the molecular events of innate antiviral immune responses.

  2. RIG-I Enhanced Interferon Independent Apoptosis upon Junin Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng; Smith, Jennifer K.; Poussard, Allison L.; Tian, Bing; Brasier, Allan R.; Peters, Clarence J.; Tseng, Chien-Te Kent; de la Torre, Juan C.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Junin virus (JUNV) is the etiological agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), a human disease with a high case-fatality rate. It is widely accepted that arenaviral infections, including JUNV infections, are generally non-cytopathic. In contrast, here we demonstrated apoptosis induction in human lung epithelial carcinoma (A549), human hepatocarcinoma and Vero cells upon infection with the attenuated Candid#1 strain of, JUNV as determined by phosphatidylserine (PS) translocation, Caspase 3 (CASP3) activation, Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and/or chromosomal DNA fragmentation. Moreover, as determined by DNA fragmentation, we found that the pathogenic Romero strain of JUNV was less cytopathic than Candid#1 in human hepatocarcinoma and Vero, but more apoptotic in A549 and Vero E6 cells. Additionally, we found that JUNV-induced apoptosis was enhanced by RIG-I signaling. Consistent with the previously reported role of RIG-I like helicase (RLH) signaling in initiating programmed cell death, we showed that cell death or DNA fragmentation of Candid#1-infected A549 cells was decreased upon siRNA or shRNA silencing of components of RIG-I pathway in spite of increased virus production. Similarly, we observed decreased DNA fragmentation in JUNV-infected human hepatocarcinoma cells deficient for RIG-I when compared with that of RIG-I-competent cells. In addition, DNA fragmentation detected upon Candid#1 infection of type I interferon (IFN)-deficient Vero cells suggested a type I IFN-independent mechanism of apoptosis induction in response to JUNV. Our work demonstrated for the first time apoptosis induction in various cells of mammalian origin in response to JUNV infection and partial mechanism of this cell death. PMID:24918927

  3. Loss of RIG-I leads to a functional replacement with MDA5 in the Chinese tree shrew.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ling; Yu, Dandan; Fan, Yu; Peng, Li; Wu, Yong; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-09-27

    The function of the RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs; including RIG-I, MDA5, and LGP2) as key cytoplasmic sensors of viral pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) has been subjected to numerous pathogenic challenges and has undergone a dynamic evolution. We found evolutionary evidence that RIG-I was lost in the Chinese tree shrew lineage. Along with the loss of RIG-I, both MDA5 (tMDA5) and LGP2 (tLGP2) have undergone strong positive selection in the tree shrew. tMDA5 or tMDA5/tLGP2 could sense Sendai virus (an RNA virus posed as a RIG-I agonist) for inducing type I IFN, although conventional RIG-I and MDA5 were thought to recognize distinct RNA structures and viruses. tMDA5 interacted with adaptor tMITA (STINGTMEM173/ERIS), which was reported to bind only with RIG-I. The positively selected sites in tMDA5 endowed the substitute function for the lost RIG-I. These findings provided insights into the adaptation and functional diversity of innate antiviral activity in vertebrates. PMID:27621475

  4. The Structural Basis of 5′ Triphosphate Double-stranded RNA Recognition by RIG-I C-terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cheng; Xu, Hengyu; Ranjith-Kumar, C. T.; Brooks, Monica T.; Hou, Tim Y.; Hu, Fuqu; Herr, Andrew B.; Strong, Roland K.; Kao, C. Cheng; Li, Pingwei

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY RIG-I is a cytosolic sensor of viral RNA that plays crucial roles in the induction of type I interferons. The C-terminal domain (CTD) of RIG-I is responsible for the recognition of viral RNA with 5′ triphosphate (5′ ppp). However, the mechanism of viral RNA recognition by RIG-I is still not fully understood. Here we show that RIG-I CTD binds 5′ ppp dsRNA or ssRNA, as well as blunt-ended dsRNA, and exhibits the highest affinity for 5′ ppp dsRNA. Crystal structures of RIG-I CTD bound to 5′ ppp dsRNA with GC- and AU- rich sequences revealed that RIG-I recognizes the termini of the dsRNA and interacts with the 5′ triphosphate through extensive electrostatic interactions. Mutagenesis and RNA binding studies demonstrated that similar binding surfaces are involved in the recognition of different forms of RNA. Mutations of key residues at the RNA binding surface affected RIG-I signaling in cells. PMID:20637642

  5. Molecular characterization of RIG-I, STAT-1 and IFN-beta in the horseshoe bat.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinju; Zhang, Guangxu; Cheng, Dalong; Ren, Hua; Qian, Min; Du, Bing

    2015-04-25

    Wild Chinese horseshoe bats have been proven to be natural reservoirs of SARS-like coronaviruses. However, the molecular characterization of key proteins in bats still needs to be explored further. In this study, we used cloning and bioinformatics to analyze the sequence of RIG-I, STAT-1 and IFN-β in the immortalized cell lines from Rhinolophus affinis and Rhinolophus sinicus. Then, we treated different bat cells, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and splenocytes with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (polyI:C) and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) to assess and compare antiviral immune responses between bats and mice. Our results demonstrated that bat RIG-I, STAT-1 and IFN-β showed close homology with human, mouse, pig and rhesus monkey. RIG-I and STAT-1 were both highly expressed in bat spleen. Furthermore, IFN-β was induced by polyI:C and VSV in both bat and mouse cells. These findings have provided new insight into the potential characteristics of the bat innate immune system against viral infection. PMID:25680291

  6. RIG-I Signaling Is Essential for Influenza B Virus-Induced Rapid Interferon Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Österlund, Pamela; Westenius, Veera; Latvala, Sinikka; Diamond, Michael S.; Gale, Michael; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza B virus causes annual epidemics and, along with influenza A virus, accounts for substantial disease and economic burden throughout the world. Influenza B virus infects only humans and some marine mammals and is not responsible for pandemics, possibly due to a very low frequency of reassortment and a lower evolutionary rate than that of influenza A virus. Influenza B virus has been less studied than influenza A virus, and thus, a comparison of influenza A and B virus infection mechanisms may provide new insight into virus-host interactions. Here we analyzed the early events in influenza B virus infection and interferon (IFN) gene expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells. We show that influenza B virus induces IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) activation and IFN-λ1 gene expression with faster kinetics than does influenza A virus, without a requirement for viral protein synthesis or replication. Influenza B virus-induced activation of IRF3 required the fusion of viral and endosomal membranes, and nuclear accumulation of IRF3 and viral NP occurred concurrently. In comparison, immediate early IRF3 activation was not observed in influenza A virus-infected macrophages. Experiments with RIG-I-, MDA5-, and RIG-I/MDA5-deficient mouse fibroblasts showed that RIG-I is the critical pattern recognition receptor needed for the influenza B virus-induced activation of IRF3. Our results show that innate immune mechanisms are activated immediately after influenza B virus entry through the endocytic pathway, whereas influenza A virus avoids early IRF3 activation and IFN gene induction. IMPORTANCE Recently, a great deal of interest has been paid to identifying the ligands for RIG-I under conditions of natural infection, as many previous studies have been based on transfection of cells with different types of viral or synthetic RNA structures. We shed light on this question by analyzing the earliest step in innate immune recognition of

  7. ATP hydrolysis by the viral RNA sensor RIG-I prevents unintentional recognition of self-RNA

    PubMed Central

    Lässig, Charlotte; Matheisl, Sarah; Sparrer, Konstantin MJ; de Oliveira Mann, Carina C; Moldt, Manuela; Patel, Jenish R; Goldeck, Marion; Hartmann, Gunther; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Hornung, Veit; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Beckmann, Roland; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The cytosolic antiviral innate immune sensor RIG-I distinguishes 5′ tri- or diphosphate containing viral double-stranded (ds) RNA from self-RNA by an incompletely understood mechanism that involves ATP hydrolysis by RIG-I's RNA translocase domain. Recently discovered mutations in ATPase motifs can lead to the multi-system disorder Singleton-Merten Syndrome (SMS) and increased interferon levels, suggesting misregulated signaling by RIG-I. Here we report that SMS mutations phenocopy a mutation that allows ATP binding but prevents hydrolysis. ATPase deficient RIG-I constitutively signals through endogenous RNA and co-purifies with self-RNA even from virus infected cells. Biochemical studies and cryo-electron microscopy identify a 60S ribosomal expansion segment as a dominant self-RNA that is stably bound by ATPase deficient RIG-I. ATP hydrolysis displaces wild-type RIG-I from this self-RNA but not from 5' triphosphate dsRNA. Our results indicate that ATP-hydrolysis prevents recognition of self-RNA and suggest that SMS mutations lead to unintentional signaling through prolonged RNA binding. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10859.001 PMID:26609812

  8. ATP hydrolysis by the viral RNA sensor RIG-I prevents unintentional recognition of self-RNA.

    PubMed

    Lässig, Charlotte; Matheisl, Sarah; Sparrer, Konstantin M J; de Oliveira Mann, Carina C; Moldt, Manuela; Patel, Jenish R; Goldeck, Marion; Hartmann, Gunther; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Hornung, Veit; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Beckmann, Roland; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2015-11-26

    The cytosolic antiviral innate immune sensor RIG-I distinguishes 5' tri- or diphosphate containing viral double-stranded (ds) RNA from self-RNA by an incompletely understood mechanism that involves ATP hydrolysis by RIG-I's RNA translocase domain. Recently discovered mutations in ATPase motifs can lead to the multi-system disorder Singleton-Merten Syndrome (SMS) and increased interferon levels, suggesting misregulated signaling by RIG-I. Here we report that SMS mutations phenocopy a mutation that allows ATP binding but prevents hydrolysis. ATPase deficient RIG-I constitutively signals through endogenous RNA and co-purifies with self-RNA even from virus infected cells. Biochemical studies and cryo-electron microscopy identify a 60S ribosomal expansion segment as a dominant self-RNA that is stably bound by ATPase deficient RIG-I. ATP hydrolysis displaces wild-type RIG-I from this self-RNA but not from 5' triphosphate dsRNA. Our results indicate that ATP-hydrolysis prevents recognition of self-RNA and suggest that SMS mutations lead to unintentional signaling through prolonged RNA binding.

  9. Ubiquitin-Induced Oligomerization of the RNA Sensors RIG-I and MDA5 Activates Antiviral Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaomo; Kinch, Lisa; Brautigam, Chad A.; Chen, Xiang; Du, Fenghe; Grishin, Nick; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY RIG-I and MDA5 detect viral RNA in the cytoplasm and activate signaling cascades leading to the production of type-I interferons. RIG-I is activated through sequential binding of viral RNA and unanchored lysine-63 (K63) polyubiquitin chains, but how polyubiquitin activates RIG-I and whether MDA5 is activated through a similar mechanism remain unresolved. Here we showed that the CARD domains of MDA5 bound to K63 polyubiquitin and that this binding was essential for MDA5 to activate the transcription factor IRF3. Mutations of conserved residues in MDA5 and RIG-I that disrupt their ubiquitin binding also abrogated their ability to activate IRF3. Polyubiquitin binding induced the formation of a large complex consisting of four RIG-I and four ubiquitin chains. This hetero-tetrameric complex was highly potent in activating the antiviral signaling cascades. These results suggest a unified mechanism of RIG-I and MDA5 activation and reveal a unique mechanism by which ubiquitin regulates cell signaling and immune response. PMID:22705106

  10. Molecular mechanisms of viral inhibitors of RIG-I-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Daisy W.; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of innate immune signaling pathways through cytosolic RIG-I like receptors (RLR) is a critical response that is antagonized by many viruses. A variety of RNA related pathogen associated molecular patterns have been identified and their role in RLR activation has been examined. Recent studies suggest that several virally encoded components that antagonize RLR signaling interact with and inhibit the interferon (IFN)-α/β activation pathway using both RNA-dependent and RNA-independent mechanisms. The structural basis for these RLR inhibitory mechanisms, as well as the multifunctional nature of viral RLR antagonists, is reviewed in the context of recent biochemical and structural studies. PMID:22325030

  11. Negative regulation of MDA5- but not RIG-I-mediated innate antiviral signaling by the dihydroxyacetone kinase.

    PubMed

    Diao, Feici; Li, Shu; Tian, Yang; Zhang, Min; Xu, Liang-Guo; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Rui-Peng; Chen, Danying; Zhai, Zhonghe; Zhong, Bo; Tien, Po; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2007-07-10

    Viral infection leads to activation of the transcription factors interferon regulatory factor-3 and NF-kappaB, which collaborate to induce type I IFNs. The RNA helicase proteins RIG-I and MDA5 were recently identified as two cytoplasmic viral RNA sensors that recognize different species of viral RNAs produced during viral replication. In this study, we identified DAK, a functionally unknown dihydroacetone kinase, as a specific MDA5-interacting protein. DAK was associated with MDA5, but not RIG-I, under physiological conditions. Overexpression of DAK inhibited MDA5- but not RIG-I- or TLR3-mediated IFN-beta induction. Overexpression of DAK also inhibited cytoplasmic dsRNA and SeV-induced activation of the IFN-beta promoter, whereas knockdown of endogenous DAK by RNAi activated the IFN-beta promoter, and increased cytoplasmic dsRNA- or SeV-triggered activation of the IFN-beta promoter. In addition, overexpression of DAK inhibited MDA5- but not RIG-I-mediated antiviral activity, whereas DAK RNAi increased cytoplasmic dsRNA-triggered antiviral activity. These findings suggest that DAK is a physiological suppressor of MDA5 and specifically inhibits MDA5- but not RIG-I-mediated innate antiviral signaling.

  12. NLRC5 interacts with RIG-I to induce a robust antiviral response against influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Priya; Singh, Neetu; Kumar, Amrita; Neerincx, Andreas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Cao, Weiping; Davis, William G; Katz, Jacqueline M; Gangappa, Shivaprakash; Lin, Rongtuan; Kufer, Thomas A; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2015-03-01

    The NLR protein, NLRC5 is an important regulator of MHC class I gene expression, however, the role of NLRC5 in other innate immune responses is less well defined. In the present study, we report that NLRC5 binds RIG-I and that this interaction is critical for robust antiviral responses against influenza virus. Overexpression of NLRC5 in the human lung epithelial cell line, A549, and normal human bronchial epithelial cells resulted in impaired replication of influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 virus (PR8) and enhanced IFN-β expression. Influenza virus leads to induction of IFN-β that drives RIG-I and NLRC5 expression in host cells. Our results suggest that NLRC5 extends and stabilizes influenza virus induced RIG-I expression and delays expression of the viral inhibitor protein NS1. We show that NS1 binds to NLRC5 to suppress its function. Interaction domain mapping revealed that NLRC5 interacts with RIG-I via its N-terminal death domain and that NLRC5 enhanced antiviral activity in an leucine-rich repeat domain independent manner. Taken together, our findings identify a novel role for NLRC5 in RIG-I-mediated antiviral host responses against influenza virus infection, distinguished from the role of NLRC5 in MHC class I gene regulation.

  13. RIG-I-like receptor regulation in virus infection and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ying Kai; Gack, Michaela U

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cells have the intrinsic capacity to detect viral pathogens and to initiate an antiviral response that is characterized by the induction of interferons (IFNs) and proinflammatory cytokines. A delicate regulation of the signaling pathways that lead to cytokine production is needed to ensure effective clearance of the virus, while preventing tissue damage caused by excessive cytokine release. Here, we focus on the mechanisms that modulate the signal transduction triggered by RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) and their adaptor protein MAVS, key components of the host machinery for sensing foreign RNA. Specifically, we summarize recent advances in understanding how RLR signaling is regulated by posttranslational and posttranscriptional mechanisms, microRNAs (miRNAs) and autophagy. We further discuss how viruses target these regulatory mechanisms for immune evasion. PMID:25644461

  14. RIG-I-dependent antiviral immunity is effective against an RNA virus encoding a potent suppressor of RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaoxu; Dong, Shuwei; Li, Yang; Ding, Shou-wei; Wang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Nodamura virus (NoV) lethally infects suckling mice and contains a segmented positive-strand RNA genome that encodes a potent suppressor of RNA interference (RNAi). Recent studies have demonstrated immune detection and subsequent processing of NoV dsRNA replicative intermediates by the mouse RNAi machinery. However, diverse RNA viruses, including Encephalomyocarditis virus that also triggers Dicer-dependent biogenesis of viral siRNAs in mouse cells, are targeted in mammals by RIG-I-like receptors that initiate an IFN-dependent antiviral response. Using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) for NoV infection, here we show that MEFs derived from mice knockout for RIG-I, but not those knockout for MDA5, LGP2, TLR3 or TLR7, exhibited an enhanced susceptibility to NoV. Further studies indicate that NoV infection induced an IFN-dependent antiviral response mediated by RIG-I. Our findings suggest that RIG-I directs a typical IFN-dependent antiviral response against an RNA virus capable of suppressing the RNAi response. PMID:25843799

  15. A deletion polymorphism in the Caenorhabditis elegans RIG-I homolog disables viral RNA dicing and antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ashe, Alyson; Bélicard, Tony; Le Pen, Jérémie; Sarkies, Peter; Frézal, Lise; Lehrbach, Nicolas J; Félix, Marie-Anne; Miska, Eric A

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference defends against viral infection in plant and animal cells. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and its natural pathogen, the positive-strand RNA virus Orsay, have recently emerged as a new animal model of host-virus interaction. Using a genome-wide association study in C. elegans wild populations and quantitative trait locus mapping, we identify a 159 base-pair deletion in the conserved drh-1 gene (encoding a RIG-I-like helicase) as a major determinant of viral sensitivity. We show that DRH-1 is required for the initiation of an antiviral RNAi pathway and the generation of virus-derived siRNAs (viRNAs). In mammals, RIG-I-domain containing proteins trigger an interferon-based innate immunity pathway in response to RNA virus infection. Our work in C. elegans demonstrates that the RIG-I domain has an ancient role in viral recognition. We propose that RIG-I acts as modular viral recognition factor that couples viral recognition to different effector pathways including RNAi and interferon responses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00994.001 PMID:24137537

  16. Structural and functional analysis reveals that human OASL binds dsRNA to enhance RIG-I signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ibsen, Mikkel Søes; Gad, Hans Henrik; Andersen, Line Lykke; Hornung, Veit; Julkunen, Ilkka; Sarkar, Saumendra N.; Hartmann, Rune

    2015-01-01

    The oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) enzymes are cytoplasmic dsRNA sensors belonging to the antiviral innate immune system. Upon binding to viral dsRNA, the OAS enzymes synthesize 2′-5′ linked oligoadenylates (2-5As) that initiate an RNA decay pathway to impair viral replication. The human OAS-like (OASL) protein, however, does not harbor the catalytic activity required for synthesizing 2-5As and differs from the other human OAS family members by having two C-terminal ubiquitin-like domains. In spite of its lack of enzymatic activity, human OASL possesses antiviral activity. It was recently demonstrated that the ubiquitin-like domains of OASL could substitute for K63-linked poly-ubiquitin and interact with the CARDs of RIG-I and thereby enhance RIG-I signaling. However, the role of the OAS-like domain of OASL remains unclear. Here we present the crystal structure of the OAS-like domain, which shows a striking similarity with activated OAS1. Furthermore, the structure of the OAS-like domain shows that OASL has a dsRNA binding groove. We demonstrate that the OAS-like domain can bind dsRNA and that mutating key residues in the dsRNA binding site is detrimental to the RIG-I signaling enhancement. Hence, binding to dsRNA is an important feature of OASL that is required for enhancing RIG-I signaling. PMID:25925578

  17. Structural basis for the activation of innate immune pattern-recognition receptor RIG-I by viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Kowalinski, Eva; Lunardi, Thomas; McCarthy, Andrew A; Louber, Jade; Brunel, Joanna; Grigorov, Boyan; Gerlier, Denis; Cusack, Stephen

    2011-10-14

    RIG-I is a key innate immune pattern-recognition receptor that triggers interferon expression upon detection of intracellular 5'triphosphate double-stranded RNA (5'ppp-dsRNA) of viral origin. RIG-I comprises N-terminal caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs), a DECH helicase, and a C-terminal domain (CTD). We present crystal structures of the ligand-free, autorepressed, and RNA-bound, activated states of RIG-I. Inactive RIG-I has an open conformation with the CARDs sequestered by a helical domain inserted between the two helicase moieties. ATP and dsRNA binding induce a major rearrangement to a closed conformation in which the helicase and CTD bind the blunt end 5'ppp-dsRNA with perfect complementarity but incompatibly with continued CARD binding. We propose that after initial binding of 5'ppp-dsRNA to the flexibly linked CTD, co-operative tight binding of ATP and RNA to the helicase domain liberates the CARDs for downstream signaling. These findings significantly advance our molecular understanding of the activation of innate immune signaling helicases.

  18. Species-specific inhibition of RIG-I ubiquitination and IFN induction by the influenza A virus NS1 protein.

    PubMed

    Rajsbaum, Ricardo; Albrecht, Randy A; Wang, May K; Maharaj, Natalya P; Versteeg, Gijs A; Nistal-Villán, Estanislao; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Gack, Michaela U

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A viruses can adapt to new host species, leading to the emergence of novel pathogenic strains. There is evidence that highly pathogenic viruses encode for non-structural 1 (NS1) proteins that are more efficient in suppressing the host immune response. The NS1 protein inhibits type-I interferon (IFN) production partly by blocking the TRIM25 ubiquitin E3 ligase-mediated Lys63-linked ubiquitination of the viral RNA sensor RIG-I, required for its optimal downstream signaling. In order to understand possible mechanisms of viral adaptation and host tropism, we examined the ability of NS1 encoded by human (Cal04), avian (HK156), swine (SwTx98) and mouse-adapted (PR8) influenza viruses to interact with TRIM25 orthologues from mammalian and avian species. Using co-immunoprecipitation assays we show that human TRIM25 binds to all tested NS1 proteins, whereas the chicken TRIM25 ortholog binds preferentially to the NS1 from the avian virus. Strikingly, none of the NS1 proteins were able to bind mouse TRIM25. Since NS1 can inhibit IFN production in mouse, we tested the impact of TRIM25 and NS1 on RIG-I ubiquitination in mouse cells. While NS1 efficiently suppressed human TRIM25-dependent ubiquitination of RIG-I 2CARD, NS1 inhibited the ubiquitination of full-length mouse RIG-I in a mouse TRIM25-independent manner. Therefore, we tested if the ubiquitin E3 ligase Riplet, which has also been shown to ubiquitinate RIG-I, interacts with NS1. We found that NS1 binds mouse Riplet and inhibits its activity to induce IFN-β in murine cells. Furthermore, NS1 proteins of human but not swine or avian viruses were able to interact with human Riplet, thereby suppressing RIG-I ubiquitination. In conclusion, our results indicate that influenza NS1 protein targets TRIM25 and Riplet ubiquitin E3 ligases in a species-specific manner for the inhibition of RIG-I ubiquitination and antiviral IFN production.

  19. Species-Specific Inhibition of RIG-I Ubiquitination and IFN Induction by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Rajsbaum, Ricardo; Albrecht, Randy A.; Wang, May K.; Maharaj, Natalya P.; Versteeg, Gijs A.; Nistal-Villán, Estanislao; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Gack, Michaela U.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A viruses can adapt to new host species, leading to the emergence of novel pathogenic strains. There is evidence that highly pathogenic viruses encode for non-structural 1 (NS1) proteins that are more efficient in suppressing the host immune response. The NS1 protein inhibits type-I interferon (IFN) production partly by blocking the TRIM25 ubiquitin E3 ligase-mediated Lys63-linked ubiquitination of the viral RNA sensor RIG-I, required for its optimal downstream signaling. In order to understand possible mechanisms of viral adaptation and host tropism, we examined the ability of NS1 encoded by human (Cal04), avian (HK156), swine (SwTx98) and mouse-adapted (PR8) influenza viruses to interact with TRIM25 orthologues from mammalian and avian species. Using co-immunoprecipitation assays we show that human TRIM25 binds to all tested NS1 proteins, whereas the chicken TRIM25 ortholog binds preferentially to the NS1 from the avian virus. Strikingly, none of the NS1 proteins were able to bind mouse TRIM25. Since NS1 can inhibit IFN production in mouse, we tested the impact of TRIM25 and NS1 on RIG-I ubiquitination in mouse cells. While NS1 efficiently suppressed human TRIM25-dependent ubiquitination of RIG-I 2CARD, NS1 inhibited the ubiquitination of full-length mouse RIG-I in a mouse TRIM25-independent manner. Therefore, we tested if the ubiquitin E3 ligase Riplet, which has also been shown to ubiquitinate RIG-I, interacts with NS1. We found that NS1 binds mouse Riplet and inhibits its activity to induce IFN-β in murine cells. Furthermore, NS1 proteins of human but not swine or avian viruses were able to interact with human Riplet, thereby suppressing RIG-I ubiquitination. In conclusion, our results indicate that influenza NS1 protein targets TRIM25 and Riplet ubiquitin E3 ligases in a species-specific manner for the inhibition of RIG-I ubiquitination and antiviral IFN production. PMID:23209422

  20. Arterivirus and Nairovirus Ovarian Tumor Domain-Containing Deubiquitinases Target Activated RIG-I To Control Innate Immune Signaling

    PubMed Central

    van Kasteren, Puck B.; Beugeling, Corrine; Ninaber, Dennis K.; Frias-Staheli, Natalia; van Boheemen, Sander; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Snijder, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune response constitutes the first line of defense against viral infection and is extensively regulated through ubiquitination. The removal of ubiquitin from innate immunity signaling factors by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) therefore provides a potential opportunity for viruses to evade this host defense system. It was previously found that specific proteases encoded by the unrelated arteri- and nairoviruses resemble the ovarian tumor domain-containing (OTU) family of DUBs. In arteriviruses, this domain has been characterized before as a papain-like protease (PLP2) that is also involved in replicase polyprotein processing. In nairoviruses, the DUB resides in the polymerase protein but is not essential for RNA replication. Using both in vitro and cell-based assays, we now show that PLP2 DUB activity is conserved in all members of the arterivirus family and that both arteri- and nairovirus DUBs inhibit RIG-I-mediated innate immune signaling when overexpressed. The potential relevance of RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) signaling for the innate immune response against arterivirus infection is supported by our finding that in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, the production of beta interferon primarily depends on the recognition of arterivirus RNA by the pattern-recognition receptor MDA5. Interestingly, we also found that both arteri- and nairovirus DUBs inhibit RIG-I ubiquitination upon overexpression, suggesting that both MDA5 and RIG-I have a role in countering infection by arteriviruses. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that arteri- and nairoviruses employ their deubiquitinating potential to inactivate cellular proteins involved in RLR-mediated innate immune signaling, as exemplified by the deubiquitination of RIG-I. PMID:22072774

  1. Uridine Composition of the Poly-U/UC Tract of HCV RNA Defines Non-Self Recognition by RIG-I

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Gretja; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Marcotrigiano, Joseph; Gale, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Viral infection of mammalian cells triggers the innate immune response through non-self recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in viral nucleic acid. Accurate PAMP discrimination is essential to avoid self recognition that can generate autoimmunity, and therefore should be facilitated by the presence of multiple motifs in a PAMP that mark it as non-self. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA is recognized as non-self by RIG-I through the presence of a 5′-triphosphate (5′-ppp) on the viral RNA in association with a 3′ poly-U/UC tract. Here we define the HCV PAMP and the criteria for RIG-I non-self discrimination of HCV by examining the RNA structure-function attributes that impart PAMP function to the poly-U/UC tract. We found that the 34 nucleotide poly-uridine “core” of this sequence tract was essential for RIG-I activation, and that interspersed ribocytosine nucleotides between poly-U sequences in the RNA were required to achieve optimal RIG-I signal induction. 5′-ppp poly-U/UC RNA variants that stimulated strong RIG-I activation efficiently bound purified RIG-I protein in vitro, and RNA interaction with both the repressor domain and helicase domain of RIG-I was required to activate signaling. When appended to 5′-ppp RNA that lacks PAMP activity, the poly-U/UC U-core sequence conferred non-self recognition of the RNA and innate immune signaling by RIG-I. Importantly, HCV poly-U/UC RNA variants that strongly activated RIG-I signaling triggered potent anti-HCV responses in vitro and hepatic innate immune responses in vivo using a mouse model of PAMP signaling. These studies define a multi-motif PAMP signature of non-self recognition by RIG-I that incorporates a 5′-ppp with poly-uridine sequence composition and length. This HCV PAMP motif drives potent RIG-I signaling to induce the innate immune response to infection. Our studies define a basis of non-self discrimination by RIG-I and offer insights into the antiviral therapeutic

  2. Type I interferons induce lung protease responses following respiratory syncytial virus infection via RIG-I-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Foronjy, Robert F.; Taggart, Clifford C.; Dabo, Abdoulaye J.; Weldon, Sinéad; Cummins, Neville; Geraghty, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The role of proteases in viral infection of the lung is poorly understood. Thus, we examined MMP and cathepsin proteases in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infected mouse lungs. RSV induced gene expression for matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) -2, -3, -7, -8, -9, -10, -12, -13, -14, -16, -17, -19, -20, -25, -27, -28 and cathepsins B, C, E, G, H, K, L1, S, W and Z in the airways of FVB/NJ mice. Increased proteases were present in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue during infection. Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (Mavs) and Trif deficient mice were exposed to RSV. Mavs deficient mice had significantly lower expression of airway MMP-2, -3, -7, -8, -9, -10, -12, -13 and -28 and cathepsins C, G, K, S, W and Z. In lung epithelial cells, retinoic acid–inducible gene-1 (RIG-I) was identified as the major RIG-I- like receptor (RLR) required for RSV induced protease expression via MAVS. Overexpression of RIG-I or treatment with IFN-β in these cells induced MMP and cathepsin gene and protein expression. The significance of RIG-1 protease induction was demonstrated by the fact that inhibiting proteases with batimastat, E64 or ribavirin prevented airway hyperresponsiveness and enhanced viral clearance in RSV infected mice. PMID:25005357

  3. Identification of a Natural Viral RNA Motif That Optimizes Sensing of Viral RNA by RIG-I

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Mercado-López, Xiomara; Grier, Jennifer T.; Kim, Won-keun; Chun, Lauren F.; Irvine, Edward B.; Del Toro Duany, Yoandris; Kell, Alison; Hur, Sun; Gale, Michael; Raj, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stimulation of the antiviral response depends on the sensing of viral pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by specialized cellular proteins. During infection with RNA viruses, 5′-di- or -triphosphates accompanying specific single or double-stranded RNA motifs trigger signaling of intracellular RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) and initiate the antiviral response. Although these molecular signatures are present during the replication of many viruses, it is unknown whether they are sufficient for strong activation of RLRs during infection. Immunostimulatory defective viral genomes (iDVGs) from Sendai virus (SeV) are among the most potent natural viral triggers of antiviral immunity. Here we describe an RNA motif (DVG70-114) that is essential for the potent immunostimulatory activity of 5′-triphosphate-containing SeV iDVGs. DVG70-114 enhances viral sensing by the host cell independently of the long stretches of complementary RNA flanking the iDVGs, and it retains its stimulatory potential when transferred to otherwise inert viral RNA. In vitro analysis showed that DVG70-114 augments the binding of RIG-I to viral RNA and promotes enhanced RIG-I polymerization, thereby facilitating the onset of the antiviral response. Together, our results define a new natural viral PAMP enhancer motif that promotes viral recognition by RLRs and confers potent immunostimulatory activity to viral RNA. PMID:26443454

  4. RIG-I-Mediated Antiviral Signaling Is Inhibited in HIV-1 Infection by a Protease-Mediated Sequestration of RIG-I▿

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Mayra; Nakhaei, Peyman; Jalalirad, Mohammad; Lacoste, Judith; Douville, Renée; Arguello, Meztli; Zhao, Tiejun; Laughrea, Michael; Wainberg, Mark A.; Hiscott, John

    2011-01-01

    The rapid induction of type I interferon (IFN) is essential for establishing innate antiviral responses. During infection, cytoplasmic viral RNA is sensed by two DExD/H box RNA helicases, RIG-I and MDA5, ultimately driving IFN production. Here, we demonstrate that purified genomic RNA from HIV-1 induces a RIG-I-dependent type I IFN response. Both the dimeric and monomeric forms of HIV-1 were sensed by RIG-I, but not MDA5, with monomeric RNA, usually found in defective HIV-1 particles, acting as a better inducer of IFN than dimeric RNA. However, despite the presence of HIV-1 RNA in the de novo infection of monocyte-derived macrophages, HIV-1 replication did not lead to a substantial induction of IFN signaling. We demonstrate the existence of an evasion mechanism based on the inhibition of the RIG-I sensor through the action of the HIV-1 protease (PR). Indeed, the ectopic expression of PR resulted in the inhibition of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) phosphorylation and decreased expression of IFN and interferon-stimulated genes. A downregulation of cytoplasmic RIG-I levels occurred in cells undergoing a single-cycle infection with wild-type provirus BH10 but not in cells transfected with a protease-deficient provirus, BH10-PR−. Cellular fractionation and confocal microscopy studies revealed that RIG-I translocated from the cytosol to an insoluble fraction during the de novo HIV-1 infection of monocyte-derived macrophages, in the presence of PR. The loss of cytoplasmic RIG-I was prevented by the lysosomal inhibitor E64, suggesting that PR targets RIG-I to the lysosomes. This study reveals a novel PR-dependent mechanism employed by HIV-1 to counteract the early IFN response to viral RNA in infected cells. PMID:21084468

  5. Enhanced Influenza Virus-Like Particle Vaccination with a Structurally Optimized RIG-I Agonist as Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Beljanski, Vladimir; Chiang, Cindy; Kirchenbaum, Greg A.; Olagnier, David; Bloom, Chalise E.; Wong, Terianne; Haddad, Elias K.; Trautmann, Lydie; Ross, Ted M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The molecular interaction between viral RNA and the cytosolic sensor RIG-I represents the initial trigger in the development of an effective immune response against infection with RNA viruses, resulting in innate immune activation and subsequent induction of adaptive responses. In the present study, the adjuvant properties of a sequence-optimized 5′-triphosphate-containing RNA (5′pppRNA) RIG-I agonist (termed M8) were examined in combination with influenza virus-like particles (VLP) (M8-VLP) expressing H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) as immunogens. In combination with VLP, M8 increased the antibody response to VLP immunization, provided VLP antigen sparing, and protected mice from a lethal challenge with H5N1 influenza virus. M8-VLP immunization also led to long-term protective responses against influenza virus infection in mice. M8 adjuvantation of VLP increased endpoint and antibody titers and inhibited influenza virus replication in lungs compared with approved or experimental adjuvants alum, AddaVax, and poly(I·C). Uniquely, immunization with M8-VLP stimulated a TH1-biased CD4 T cell response, as determined by increased TH1 cytokine levels in CD4 T cells and increased IgG2 levels in sera. Collectively, these data demonstrate that a sequence-optimized, RIG-I-specific agonist is a potent adjuvant that can be utilized to increase the efficacy of influenza VLP vaccination and dramatically improve humoral and cellular mediated protective responses against influenza virus challenge. IMPORTANCE The development of novel adjuvants to increase vaccine immunogenicity is an important goal that seeks to improve vaccine efficacy and ultimately prevent infections that endanger human health. This proof-of-principle study investigated the adjuvant properties of a sequence-optimized 5′pppRNA agonist (M8) with enhanced capacity to stimulate antiviral and inflammatory gene networks using influenza virus-like particles (VLP) expressing

  6. High-resolution HDX-MS reveals distinct mechanisms of RNA recognition and activation by RIG-I and MDA5

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Yong, Hui Yee; Panutdaporn, Nantika; Liu, Chuanfa; Tang, Kai; Luo, Dahai

    2015-01-01

    RIG-I and MDA5 are the major intracellular immune receptors that recognize viral RNA species and undergo a series of conformational transitions leading to the activation of the interferon-mediated antiviral response. However, to date, full-length RLRs have resisted crystallographic efforts and a molecular description of their activation pathways remains hypothetical. Here we employ hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to probe the apo states of RIG-I and MDA5 and to dissect the molecular details with respect to distinct RNA species recognition, ATP binding and hydrolysis and CARDs activation. We show that human RIG-I maintains an auto-inhibited resting state owing to the intra-molecular HEL2i-CARD2 interactions while apo MDA5 lacks the analogous intra-molecular interactions and therefore adopts an extended conformation. Our work demonstrates that RIG-I binds and responds differently to short triphosphorylated RNA and long duplex RNA and that sequential addition of RNA and ATP triggers specific allosteric effects leading to RIG-I CARDs activation. We also present a high-resolution protein surface mapping technique that refines the cooperative oligomerization model of neighboring MDA5 molecules on long duplex RNA. Taken together, our data provide a high-resolution view of RLR activation in solution and offer new evidence for the molecular mechanism of RLR activation. PMID:25539915

  7. Toll-like Receptor 3, RIG-I-like Receptors and the NLRP3 Inflammasome: Key Modulators of Innate Immune Responses to Double-stranded RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Man; Levine, Stewart J.

    2011-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), the genetic material for many RNA viruses, induces robust host immune responses via pattern recognition receptors, which include Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptors (RLRs) and the multi-protein NLRP3 inflammasome complex. The engagement of dsRNA receptors or inflammasome activation by viral dsRNA initiates complex intracellular signaling cascades that play essential roles in inflammation and innate immune responses, as well as the resultant development of adaptive immunity. This review focuses on signaling pathways mediated by TLR3, RLRs and the NLRP3 inflammasome, as well as the potential use of agonists and antagonists that target these pathways to treat disease. PMID:21466970

  8. Hepatitis B virus inhibits intrinsic RIG-I and RIG-G immune signaling via inducing miR146a

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Zhaohua; Zhang, Jian; Han, Qiuju; Su, Chenhe; Qu, Jing; Xu, Dongqing; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that hepatitis B virus (HBV), as a latency invader, attenuated host anti-viral immune responses. miRNAs were shown to be involved in HBV infection and HBV-related diseases, however, the precise role of miRNAs in HBV-mediated immunosuppression remains unclear. Here, we observed that down-regulated RIG-I like receptors might be one critical mechanism of HBV-induced suppression of type I IFN transcription in both HBV+ hepatoma cell lines and liver cancer tissues. Then, miR146a was demonstrated to negatively regulate the expression of RIG-I-like receptors by directly targeting both RIG-I and RIG-G. Further investigation showed that antagonizing miR146a by anti-sense inhibitors or sponge approach accelerated HBV clearance and reduced HBV load both in vitro and in a HBV-carrying mouse model. Therefore, our findings indicated that HBV-induced miR146a attenuates cell-intrinsic anti-viral innate immunity through targeting RIG-I and RIG-G, and silencing miR146a might be an effective target to reverse HBV-induced immune suppression. PMID:27210312

  9. Ftx non coding RNA-derived miR-545 promotes cell proliferation by targeting RIG-I in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Bowen; Xu, Meng; Ding, Linglong; Wang, Yufeng; Jia, Yuli; Li, Qing; Zhang, Hongyong; Tu, Kangsheng; Song, Tao; Liu, Qingguang

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Accumulating studies have demonstrated that aberrant expression of several lncRNAs was found to be involved in the hepatocarcinogenesis. In this study, a lncRNA Ftx was chosen to investigate its effects on HCC cells, and clarify the possible mechanism. We demonstrated that the lncRNA Ftx and Ftx-derived miR-545 were up-regulated in both HCC tissues and cells. MiR-545 was positively correlated with lncRNA Ftx expression. Notably, clinical association analysis revealed that the high expression of lncRNA Ftx and miR-545 was associated with poor prognostic features, and conferred a reduced 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of HCC patients. We found that miR-545 was a pivotal mediator in Ftx-induced promotion of HCC cell growth. Subsequently, we identified RIG-I as a direct target of miR-545. The expression of RIG-I was downregulated in HCC tissues and was inversely correlated with miR-545 expression. Our data revealed that ectopic expression of RIG-I abrogated the effects of lncRNA Ftx or miR-545 on HCC cells. LncRNA Ftx/miR-545-mediated downregulation of RIG-I led to increased Akt phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of Akt phosphorylation abolished the effects of lncRNA Ftx/miR-545 on HCC cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the novel pathway lncRNA Ftx/miR-545/RIG-I promotes HCC development by activating PI3K/Akt signaling, and it may serve as a novel prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:26992218

  10. Measuring Monomer-to-Filament Transition of MAVS as an In Vitro Activity Assay for RIG-I-Like Receptors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Huoh, Yu-San; Hur, Sun

    2016-01-01

    During viral infection, the innate immune RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) recognize viral double stranded RNA (dsRNA) and trigger filament assembly of the adaptor protein Mitochondrial Anti-viral Signaling protein (MAVS). The MAVS filament then activates anti-viral signaling events including the up-regulation of type I interferon expression. In recent years, much insight has been gained into how RLRs recognize dsRNA, but the precise mechanism of how activated RLRs stimulate MAVS filament formation remains less understood. In this chapter, we describe an in vitro reconstitution assay that we have previously developed to study the RLR-catalyzed filament assembly of MAVS. We provide technical guidance for purifying the caspase activation recruitment domain (CARD) of MAVS (MAVS(CARD)) as a functional monomer and also preformed filament seed. We also describe the methods to monitor the monomer-to-filament transition of MAVS(CARD) upon stimulation. This protocol provides a minimalist approach to studying RLR signaling events and can potentially be applied to elucidate signaling mechanisms of other innate immune receptors, such as Toll-like receptors and inflammasomes, that involve higher order assemblies of CARDs or related domains for their downstream signal activation.

  11. PACT- and RIG-I-Dependent Activation of Type I Interferon Production by a Defective Interfering RNA Derived from Measles Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ting-Hin; Kew, Chun; Lui, Pak-Yin; Chan, Chi-Ping; Satoh, Takashi; Akira, Shizuo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The live attenuated measles virus vaccine is highly immunostimulatory. Identification and characterization of its components that activate the innate immune response might provide new strategies and agents for the rational design and development of chemically defined adjuvants. In this study, we report on the activation of type I interferon (IFN) production by a defective interfering (DI) RNA isolated from the Hu-191 vaccine strain of measles virus. We found that the Hu-191 virus induced IFN-β much more potently than the Edmonston strain. In the search for IFN-inducing species in Hu-191, we identified a DI RNA specifically expressed by this strain. This DI RNA, which was of the copy-back type, was predicted to fold into a hairpin structure with a long double-stranded stem region of 206 bp, and it potently induced the expression of IFN-β. Its IFN-β-inducing activity was further enhanced when both cytoplasmic RNA sensor RIG-I and its partner, PACT, were overexpressed. On the contrary, this activity was abrogated in cells deficient in PACT or RIG-I. The DI RNA was found to be associated with PACT in infected cells. In addition, both the 5′-di/triphosphate end and the double-stranded stem region on the DI RNA were essential for its activation of PACT and RIG-I. Taken together, our findings support a model in which a viral DI RNA is sensed by PACT and RIG-I to initiate an innate antiviral response. Our work might also provide a foundation for identifying physiological PACT ligands and developing novel adjuvants or antivirals. IMPORTANCE The live attenuated measles virus vaccine is one of the most successful human vaccines and has largely contained the devastating impact of a highly contagious virus. Identifying the components in this vaccine that stimulate the host immune response and understanding their mechanism of action might help to design and develop better adjuvants, vaccines, antivirals, and immunotherapeutic agents. We identified and characterized

  12. Tripartite motif-containing protein 38 negatively regulates TLR3/4- and RIG-I-mediated IFN-β production and antiviral response by targeting NAP1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Lijuan; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Peng; Yuan, Chao; Qi, Jianni; Meng, Hong; Gao, Chengjiang

    2012-06-01

    Recognition of RNA virus through TLR and RIG-I-like receptor results in rapid expression of type I IFNs, which play an essential role in host antiviral responses. However, the mechanisms to terminate the production of type I IFNs are not well defined. In the current study, we identified a member of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family, TRIM38, as a negative regulator in TLR3/4- and RIG-I-mediated IFN-β signaling. Knockdown of TRIM38 expression by small interfering RNA resulted in augmented activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 and enhanced expression of IFN-β, whereas overexpression of TRIM38 had opposite effects. Coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization experiments demonstrated that TRIM38 interacted with NF-κB-activating kinase-associated protein 1 (NAP1), which is required for TLR-induced IFN regulatory factor 3 activation and IFN-β production. As an E3 ligase, TRIM38 promoted K48-linked polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of NAP1. Thus, knockdown of TRIM38 expression resulted in higher protein level of NAP1 in primary macrophages. Consistent with the inhibitory roles in TLR3/4- and RIG-I-mediated IFN-β signaling, knockdown of TRIM38 significantly inhibited the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus. Overexpression of TRIM38 resulted in enhanced replication of vesicular stomatitis virus. Therefore, our results demonstrate that TRIM38 is a negative regulator for TLR and RIG-I-mediated IFN-β production by targeting NAP1 for ubiquitination and subsequent proteasome-mediated degradation. PMID:22539786

  13. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis Provides Insights into Immune Related Genes and the RIG-I-Like Receptor Signaling Pathway in the Freshwater Planarian (Dugesia japonica)

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hongkuan; Zhang, Yichao; Sun, Xiaowen; Zhu, Guangzhong; Liu, Baohua; Zhao, Bosheng

    2016-01-01

    Background The freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica (D. japonica) possesses extraordinary ability to regenerate lost organs or body parts. Interestingly, in the process of regeneration, there is little wound infection, suggesting that D. japonica has a formidable innate immune system. The importance of immune system prompted us to search for immune-related genes and RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathways. Results Transcriptome sequencing of D. japonica was performed on an IlluminaHiSeq2000 platform. A total of 27,180 transcripts were obtained by Trinity assembler. CEGMA analysis and mapping of all trimmed reads back to the assembly result showed that our transcriptome assembly covered most of the whole transcriptome. 23,888 out of 27,180 transcripts contained ORF (open reading fragment), and were highly similar to those in Schistosoma mansoni using BLASTX analysis. 8,079 transcripts (29.7%) and 8,668 (31.9%) were annotated by Blast2GO and KEGG respectively. A DYNLRB-like gene was cloned to verify its roles in the immune response. Finally, the expression patterns of 4 genes (RIG-I, TRAF3, TRAF6, P38) in the RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway were detected, and the results showed they are very likely to be involved in planarian immune response. Conclusion RNA-Seq analysis based on the next-generation sequencing technology was an efficient approach to discover critical genes and to understand their corresponding biological functions. Through GO and KEGG analysis, several critical and conserved signaling pathways and genes related to RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway were identified. Four candidate genes were selected to identify their expression dynamics in the process of pathogen stimulation. These annotated transcripts of D. japonica provide a useful resource for subsequent investigation of other important pathways. PMID:26986572

  14. Identification of cellular microRNA-136 as a dual regulator of RIG-I-mediated innate immunity that antagonizes H5N1 IAV replication in A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lianzhong; Zhu, Jiping; Zhou, Hongbo; Zhao, Zongzheng; Zou, Zhong; Liu, Xiaokun; Lin, Xian; Zhang, Xue; Deng, Xuexia; Wang, Ruifang; Chen, Huanchun; Jin, Meilin

    2015-01-01

    H5N1 influenza A virus (IAV) causes severe respiratory diseases and high mortality rates in animals and humans. MicroRNAs are being increasingly studied to evaluate their potential as therapeutic entities to combat viral infection. However, mechanistic studies delineating the roles of microRNAs in regulating host-H5N1 virus interactions remain scarce. Here, we performed microRNA microarray analysis using A549 human lung epithelial cells infected with a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. The microRNA expression profile of infected cells identified a small number of microRNAs being dysregulated upon H5N1 influenza A virus infection. Of the differentially expressed microRNAs, miR-136 was up-regulated 5-fold and exhibited potent antiviral activity in vitro against H5N1 influenza A virus, as well as vesicular stomatitis virus. On the one hand, 3′-untranslated region (UTR) reporter analysis revealed a miR-136 binding site in the 3′ UTR of IL-6. However, on the other hand, we subsequently determined that miR-136 meanwhile acts as an immune agonist of retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I), thereby causing IL-6 and IFN-β accumulation in A549 cells. Overall, this study implicates the dual role of miRNA-136 in the regulation of host antiviral innate immunity and suggests an important role for the microRNA-activated pathway in viral infection via pattern recognition receptors. PMID:26450567

  15. Identification of cellular microRNA-136 as a dual regulator of RIG-I-mediated innate immunity that antagonizes H5N1 IAV replication in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lianzhong; Zhu, Jiping; Zhou, Hongbo; Zhao, Zongzheng; Zou, Zhong; Liu, Xiaokun; Lin, Xian; Zhang, Xue; Deng, Xuexia; Wang, Ruifang; Chen, Huanchun; Jin, Meilin

    2015-01-01

    H5N1 influenza A virus (IAV) causes severe respiratory diseases and high mortality rates in animals and humans. MicroRNAs are being increasingly studied to evaluate their potential as therapeutic entities to combat viral infection. However, mechanistic studies delineating the roles of microRNAs in regulating host-H5N1 virus interactions remain scarce. Here, we performed microRNA microarray analysis using A549 human lung epithelial cells infected with a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. The microRNA expression profile of infected cells identified a small number of microRNAs being dysregulated upon H5N1 influenza A virus infection. Of the differentially expressed microRNAs, miR-136 was up-regulated 5-fold and exhibited potent antiviral activity in vitro against H5N1 influenza A virus, as well as vesicular stomatitis virus. On the one hand, 3'-untranslated region (UTR) reporter analysis revealed a miR-136 binding site in the 3' UTR of IL-6. However, on the other hand, we subsequently determined that miR-136 meanwhile acts as an immune agonist of retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I), thereby causing IL-6 and IFN-β accumulation in A549 cells. Overall, this study implicates the dual role of miRNA-136 in the regulation of host antiviral innate immunity and suggests an important role for the microRNA-activated pathway in viral infection via pattern recognition receptors. PMID:26450567

  16. A RIG-I 2CARD-MAVS200 Chimeric Protein Reconstitutes IFN-β Induction and Antiviral Response in Models Deficient in Type I IFN Response.

    PubMed

    Nistal-Villán, Estanislao; Rodríguez-García, Estefanía; Di Scala, Marianna; Ferrero-Laborda, Roberto; Olagüe, Cristina; Vales, África; Carte-Abad, Beatriz; Crespo, Irene; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Prieto, Jesús; Larrea, Esther; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) are cellular sensor proteins that detect certain RNA species produced during viral infections. RLRs activate a signaling cascade that results in the production of IFN-β as well as several other cytokines with antiviral and proinflammatory activities. We explored the potential of different constructs based on RLRs to induce the IFN-β pathway and create an antiviral state in type I IFN-unresponsive models. A chimeric construct composed of RIG-I 2CARD and the first 200 amino acids of MAVS (2CARD-MAVS200) showed an enhanced ability to induce IFN-β when compared to other stimulatory constructs. Furthermore, this human chimeric construct showed a superior ability to activate IFN-β expression in cells from various species. This construct was found to overcome the restrictions of blocking IFN-β induction or signaling by a number of viral IFN-antagonist proteins. Additionally, the antiviral activity of this chimera was demonstrated in influenza virus and HBV infection mouse models using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors as a delivery vehicle. We propose that AAV vectors expressing 2CARD-MAVS200 chimeric protein can reconstitute IFN-β induction and recover a partial antiviral state in different models that do not respond to recombinant IFN-β treatment. PMID:25966783

  17. A RIG-I 2CARD-MAVS200 CHIMERIC PROTEIN RECONSTITUTES IFN-B INDUCTION AND ANTIVIRAL RESPONSE IN MODELS DEFICIENT IN TYPE I IFN RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Nistal-Villán, Estanislao; Rodríguez-García, Estefanía; Di Scala, Marianna; Ferrero-Laborda, Roberto; Olagüe, Cristina; Vales, África; Carte-Abad, Beatriz; Crespo, Irene; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Prieto, Jesús; Larrea, Esther; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) are cellular sensor proteins that detect certain RNA species produced during viral infections. RLRs activate a signaling cascade that results in the production of interferon-beta (IFN-β) as well as several other cytokines with antiviral and proinflammatory activities. We explored the potential of different constructs based on RLRs to induce the IFN-β pathway and create an antiviral state in type I IFN-unresponsive models. A chimeric construct composed of RIG-I 2CARD and the first 200 amino acids of MAVS (2CARD-MAVS200) showed an enhanced ability to induce IFN-β as compared to other stimulatory constructs. Furthermore, this human chimeric construct showed a superior ability to activate IFN-β expression in cells from various species. This construct was found to overcome the restrictions of blocking IFN-β induction or signaling by a number of viral antagonist proteins. Additionally, the antiviral activity of this chimera was demonstrated in influenza virus and HBV infection mouse models using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors as a delivery vehicle. We propose that AAV vectors expressing 2CARD-MAVS200 chimeric protein can reconstitute IFN-β induction and recover a partial antiviral state in different models that do not respond to recombinant IFN-β treatment. PMID:25966783

  18. Nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo

    2015-02-01

    Nucleic acids derived from viral pathogens are typical pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In mammals, the recognition of viral nucleic acids by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which include Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RLRs), induces the release of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferons (IFNs) through the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3/7 pathways, triggering the host antiviral state. However, whether nucleic acids can induce similar antiviral immunity in invertebrates remains ambiguous. Several studies have reported that nucleic acid mimics, especially dsRNA mimic poly(I:C), can strongly induce non-specific antiviral immune responses in insects, shrimp, and oyster. This behavior shows multiple similarities to the hallmarks of mammalian IFN responses. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates. We also discuss the potential recognition and regulatory mechanisms that confer non-specific antiviral immunity on invertebrate hosts.

  19. TRIM21 Promotes cGAS and RIG-I Sensing of Viral Genomes during Infection by Antibody-Opsonized Virus

    PubMed Central

    Watkinson, Ruth E.; McEwan, William A.; Tam, Jerry C. H.; Vaysburd, Marina; James, Leo C.

    2015-01-01

    Encapsidation is a strategy almost universally employed by viruses to protect their genomes from degradation and from innate immune sensors. We show that TRIM21, which targets antibody-opsonized virions for proteasomal destruction, circumvents this protection, enabling the rapid detection and degradation of viral genomes before their replication. TRIM21 triggers an initial wave of cytokine transcription that is antibody, rather than pathogen, driven. This early response is augmented by a second transcriptional program, determined by the nature of the infecting virus. In this second response, TRIM21-induced exposure of the viral genome promotes sensing of DNA and RNA viruses by cGAS and RIG-I. This mechanism allows early detection of an infection event and drives an inflammatory response in mice within hours of viral challenge. PMID:26506431

  20. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) is activated by influenza virus vRNA via the pathogen pattern receptor Rig-I to promote efficient type I interferon production.

    PubMed

    Hrincius, Eike R; Dierkes, Rüdiger; Anhlan, Darisuren; Wixler, Viktor; Ludwig, Stephan; Ehrhardt, Christina

    2011-12-01

    The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) was identified to be activated upon influenza A virus (IAV) infection. An early and transient induction of PI3K signalling is caused by viral attachment to cells and promotes virus entry. In later phases of infection the kinase is activated by the viral NS1 protein to prevent premature apoptosis. Besides these virus supporting functions, it was suggested that PI3K signalling is involved in dsRNA and IAV induced antiviral responses by enhancing the activity of interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF-3). However, molecular mechanisms of activation remained obscure. Here we show that accumulation of vRNA in cells infected with influenza A or B viruses results in PI3K activation. Furthermore, expression of the RNA receptors Rig-I and MDA5 was increased upon stimulation with virion extracted vRNA or IAV infection. Using siRNA approaches, Rig-I was identified as pathogen receptor necessary for influenza virus vRNA sensing and subsequent PI3K activation in a TRIM25 and MAVS signalling dependent manner. Rig-I induced PI3K signalling was further shown to be essential for complete IRF-3 activation and consequently induction of the type I interferon response. These data identify PI3K as factor that is activated as part of the Rig-I mediated anti-pathogen response to enhance expression of type I interferons.

  1. Dengue Virus NS Proteins Inhibit RIG-I/MAVS Signaling by Blocking TBK1/IRF3 Phosphorylation: Dengue Virus Serotype 1 NS4A Is a Unique Interferon-Regulating Virulence Determinant

    PubMed Central

    Dalrymple, Nadine A.; Cimica, Velasco

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV) replication is inhibited by the prior addition of type I interferon or by RIG-I agonists that elicit RIG-I/MAVS/TBK1/IRF3-dependent protective responses. DENV infection of primary human endothelial cells (ECs) results in a rapid increase in viral titer, which suggests that DENV inhibits replication-restrictive RIG-I/interferon beta (IFN-β) induction pathways within ECs. Our findings demonstrate that DENV serotype 4 (DENV4) nonstructural (NS) proteins NS2A and NS4B inhibited RIG-I-, MDA5-, MAVS-, and TBK1/IKKε-directed IFN-β transcription (>80%) but failed to inhibit IFN-β induction directed by STING or constitutively active IRF3-5D. Expression of NS2A and NS4B dose dependently inhibited the phosphorylation of TBK1 and IRF3, which suggests that they function at the level of TBK1 complex activation. NS2A and NS4B from DENV1/2/4, as well as the West Nile virus NS4B protein, commonly inhibited TBK1 phosphorylation and IFN-β induction. A comparative analysis of NS4A proteins across DENVs demonstrated that DENV1, but not DENV2 or DENV4, NS4A proteins uniquely inhibited TBK1. These findings indicate that DENVs contain conserved (NS2A/NS4B) and DENV1-specific (NS4A) mechanisms for inhibiting RIG-I/TBK1-directed IFN responses. Collectively, our results define DENV NS proteins that restrict IRF3 and IFN responses and thereby facilitate DENV replication and virulence. Unique DENV1-specific NS4A regulation of IFN induction has the potential to be a virulence determinant that contributes to the increased severity of DENV1 infections and the immunodominance of DENV1 responses during tetravalent DENV1-4 vaccination. PMID:25968648

  2. Ebola virus VP35 protein binds double-stranded RNA and inhibits alpha/beta interferon production induced by RIG-I signaling.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Washington B; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Gale, Michael; Hartman, Amy L; Kimberlin, Christopher R; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Basler, Christopher F

    2006-06-01

    The Ebola virus (EBOV) VP35 protein blocks the virus-induced phosphorylation and activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), a transcription factor critical for the induction of alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) expression. However, the mechanism(s) by which this blockage occurs remains incompletely defined. We now provide evidence that VP35 possesses double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding activity. Specifically, VP35 bound to poly(rI) . poly(rC)-coated Sepharose beads but not control beads. In contrast, two VP35 point mutants, R312A and K309A, were found to be greatly impaired in their dsRNA-binding activity. Competition assays showed that VP35 interacted specifically with poly(rI) . poly(rC), poly(rA) . poly(rU), or in vitro-transcribed dsRNAs derived from EBOV sequences, and not with single-stranded RNAs (ssRNAs) or double-stranded DNA. We then screened wild-type and mutant VP35s for their ability to target different components of the signaling pathways that activate IRF-3. These experiments indicate that VP35 blocks activation of IRF-3 induced by overexpression of RIG-I, a cellular helicase recently implicated in the activation of IRF-3 by either virus or dsRNA. Interestingly, the VP35 mutants impaired for dsRNA binding have a decreased but measurable IFN antagonist activity in these assays. Additionally, wild-type and dsRNA-binding-mutant VP35s were found to have equivalent abilities to inhibit activation of the IFN-beta promoter induced by overexpression of IPS-1, a recently identified signaling molecule downstream of RIG-I, or by overexpression of the IRF-3 kinases IKKepsilon and TBK-1. These data support the hypothesis that dsRNA binding may contribute to VP35 IFN antagonist function. However, additional mechanisms of inhibition, at a point proximal to the IRF-3 kinases, most likely also exist.

  3. HSCARG Negatively Regulates the Cellular Antiviral RIG-I Like Receptor Signaling Pathway by Inhibiting TRAF3 Ubiquitination via Recruiting OTUB1

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yanyan; Xu, Ruidan; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) recognize cytosolic viral RNA and initiate innate immunity; they increase the production of type I interferon (IFN) and the transcription of a series of antiviral genes to protect the host organism. Accurate regulation of the RLR pathway is important for avoiding tissue injury induced by excessive immune response. HSCARG is a newly reported negative regulator of NF-κB. Here we demonstrated that HSCARG participates in innate immunity. HSCARG inhibited the cellular antiviral response in an NF-κB independent manner, whereas deficiency of HSCARG had an opposite effect. After viral infection, HSCARG interacted with tumor necrosis receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) and inhibited its ubiquitination by promoting the recruitment of OTUB1 to TRAF3. Knockout of HSCARG attenuated the de-ubiquitination of TRAF3 by OTUB1, and knockdown of OTUB1 abolished the effect of HSCARG. HSCARG also interacted with Ikappa-B kinase epsilon (IKKε) after viral infection and impaired the association between TRAF3 and IKKε, which further decreased the phosphorylation of IKKε and interferon response factor 3 (IRF3), thus suppressed the dimerization and nuclear translocation of IRF3. Moreover, knockdown of TRAF3 dampened the inhibitory effect of IFN-β transcription by HSCARG, suggesting that TRAF3 is necessary for HSCARG to down-regulate RLR pathway. This study demonstrated that HSCARG is a negative regulator that enables balanced antiviral innate immunity. PMID:24763515

  4. Strategies of highly pathogenic RNA viruses to block dsRNA detection by RIG-I-like receptors: hide, mask, hit.

    PubMed

    Zinzula, Luca; Tramontano, Enzo

    2013-12-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is synthesized during the course of infection by RNA viruses as a byproduct of replication and transcription and acts as a potent trigger of the host innate antiviral response. In the cytoplasm of the infected cell, recognition of the presence of viral dsRNA as a signature of "non-self" nucleic acid is carried out by RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), a set of dedicated helicases whose activation leads to the production of type I interferon α/β (IFN-α/β). To overcome the innate antiviral response, RNA viruses encode suppressors of IFN-α/β induction, which block RLRs recognition of dsRNA by means of different mechanisms that can be categorized into: (i) dsRNA binding and/or shielding ("hide"), (ii) dsRNA termini processing ("mask") and (iii) direct interaction with components of the RLRs pathway ("hit"). In light of recent functional, biochemical and structural findings, we review the inhibition mechanisms of RLRs recognition of dsRNA displayed by a number of highly pathogenic RNA viruses with different disease phenotypes such as haemorrhagic fever (Ebola, Marburg, Lassa fever, Lujo, Machupo, Junin, Guanarito, Crimean-Congo, Rift Valley fever, dengue), severe respiratory disease (influenza, SARS, Hendra, Hantaan, Sin Nombre, Andes) and encephalitis (Nipah, West Nile).

  5. RIG-I-like helicases induce immunogenic cell death of pancreatic cancer cells and sensitize tumors toward killing by CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Duewell, P; Steger, A; Lohr, H; Bourhis, H; Hoelz, H; Kirchleitner, S V; Stieg, M R; Grassmann, S; Kobold, S; Siveke, J T; Endres, S; Schnurr, M

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by a microenvironment suppressing immune responses. RIG-I-like helicases (RLH) are immunoreceptors for viral RNA that induce an antiviral response program via the production of type I interferons (IFN) and apoptosis in susceptible cells. We recently identified RLH as therapeutic targets of pancreatic cancer for counteracting immunosuppressive mechanisms and apoptosis induction. Here, we investigated immunogenic consequences of RLH-induced tumor cell death. Treatment of murine pancreatic cancer cell lines with RLH ligands induced production of type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, tumor cells died via intrinsic apoptosis and displayed features of immunogenic cell death, such as release of HMGB1 and translocation of calreticulin to the outer cell membrane. RLH-activated tumor cells led to activation of dendritic cells (DCs), which was mediated by tumor-derived type I IFN, whereas TLR, RAGE or inflammasome signaling was dispensable. Importantly, CD8α+ DCs effectively engulfed apoptotic tumor material and cross-presented tumor-associated antigen to naive CD8+ T cells. In comparison, tumor cell death mediated by oxaliplatin, staurosporine or mechanical disruption failed to induce DC activation and antigen presentation. Tumor cells treated with sublethal doses of RLH ligands upregulated Fas and MHC-I expression and were effectively sensitized towards Fas-mediated apoptosis and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated lysis. Vaccination of mice with RLH-activated tumor cells induced protective antitumor immunity in vivo. In addition, MDA5-based immunotherapy led to effective tumor control of established pancreatic tumors. In summary, RLH ligands induce a highly immunogenic form of tumor cell death linking innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:25012502

  6. Signaling through RIG-I and type I interferon receptor: Immune activation by Newcastle disease virus in man versus immune evasion by Ebola virus (Review).

    PubMed

    Schirrmacher, Volker

    2015-07-01

    In this review, two types of RNA viruses are compared with regard to the type I interferon (IFN) response in order to obtain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of immune activation or evasion. Upon human infection, both viruses exert either beneficial or detrimental effects. The Newcastle disease virus (NDV), is a type strain for avian paramyxoviruses, while the Ebola virus (EBOV), is a virus affecting primates. During evolution, both viruses specifically adapted to their respective hosts, acquiring sophisticated viral escape mechanisms. Two types of receptors play an important role in the life cycle of these two viruses: cytoplasmic retinoic acid‑inducible gene I (RIG‑I) and membrane expressed type I IFN receptor (IFNAR). In mouse and human cells, NDV is a strong inducer of the type I IFN response. The early phase of this is initiated by signaling through RIG‑I and the late response by signaling through IFNAR. EBOV does not induce type I IFN responses in humans as it has viral proteins that specifically and strongly interfere with RIG‑I and IFNAR signaling, as well as immune activation. In this review, we discuss whether the beneficial effects of one virus can be exploited in the fight against the detrimental effects of the other.

  7. Regulation of MDA5-MAVS Antiviral Signaling Axis by TRIM25 through TRAF6-Mediated NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Na-Rae; Kim, Hye-In; Choi, Myung-Soo; Yi, Chae-Min; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Tripartite motif protein 25 (TRIM25), mediates K63-linked polyubiquitination of Retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) that is crucial for downstream antiviral interferon signaling. Here, we demonstrate that TRIM25 is required for melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) and MAVS mediated activation of NF-κB and interferon production. TRIM25 is required for the full activation of NF-κB at the downstream of MAVS, while it is not involved in IRF3 nuclear translocation. Mechanical studies showed that TRIM25 is involved in TRAF6-mediated NF-κB activation. These collectively indicate that TRIM25 plays an additional role in RIG-I/MDA5 signaling other than RIG-I ubiquitination via activation of NF-κB. PMID:26299329

  8. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid-induced pemphigus vulgaris: case report.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Adone; Russo, Teresa; Faccenda, Franco; Piccolo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced pemphigus is a well-established variety of pemphigus, presenting with clinical and histopathologic features identical to idiopathic form. Medical history plays a fundamental role in the diagnosis of drug-induced pemphigus. A large variety of drugs have been implicated in its pathogenesis and they may induce acantholysis via biochemical and/or immune mechanism. We present a case of a 69-year-old woman affected by amoxicillin/clavulanic acid-induced pemphigus and discuss its pathogenetic mechanism.

  9. Fine-Tuning of the RIG-I-Like Receptor/Interferon Regulatory Factor 3-Dependent Antiviral Innate Immune Response by the Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3/β-Catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Kashif Aziz; Dô, Florence; Marineau, Alexandre; Doyon, Priscilla; Clément, Jean-François; Woodgett, James R.; Doble, Bradley W.

    2015-01-01

    Induction of an antiviral innate immune response relies on pattern recognition receptors, including retinoic acid-inducible gene 1-like receptors (RLR), to detect invading pathogens, resulting in the activation of multiple latent transcription factors, including interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). Upon sensing of viral RNA and DNA, IRF3 is phosphorylated and recruits coactivators to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and selected sets of IRF3-regulated IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) such as those for ISG54 (Ifit2), ISG56 (Ifit1), and viperin (Rsad2). Here, we used wild-type, glycogen synthase kinase 3α knockout (GSK-3α−/−), GSK-3β−/−, and GSK-3α/β double-knockout (DKO) embryonic stem (ES) cells, as well as GSK-3β−/− mouse embryonic fibroblast cells in which GSK-3α was knocked down to demonstrate that both isoforms of GSK-3, GSK-3α and GSK-3β, are required for this antiviral immune response. Moreover, the use of two selective small-molecule GSK-3 inhibitors (CHIR99021 and BIO-acetoxime) or ES cells reconstituted with the catalytically inactive versions of GSK-3 isoforms showed that GSK-3 activity is required for optimal induction of antiviral innate immunity. Mechanistically, GSK-3 isoform activation following Sendai virus infection results in phosphorylation of β-catenin at S33/S37/T41, promoting IRF3 DNA binding and activation of IRF3-regulated ISGs. This study identifies the role of a GSK-3/β-catenin axis in antiviral innate immunity. PMID:26100021

  10. Ubiquitin-specific Protease 15 Negatively Regulates Virus-induced Type I Interferon Signaling via Catalytically-dependent and -independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huan; Wang, Dang; Zhong, Huijuan; Luo, Rui; Shang, Min; Liu, Dezhi; Chen, Huanchun; Fang, Liurong; Xiao, Shaobo

    2015-01-01

    Viral infection triggers a series of signaling cascades, which converge to activate the transcription factors nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), thereby inducing the transcription of type I interferons (IFNs). Although not fully characterized, these innate antiviral responses are fine-tuned by dynamic ubiquitination and deubiquitination processes. In this study, we report ubiquitin-specific protease (USP) 15 is involved in regulation of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-dependent type I IFN induction pathway. Knockdown of endogenous USP15 augmented cellular antiviral responses. Overexpression of USP15 inhibited the transcription of IFN-β. Further analyses identified histidine 862 as a critical residue for USP15’s catalytic activity. Interestingly, USP15 specifically removed lysine 63-linked polyubiquitin chains from RIG-I among the essential components in RIG-I-like receptor-dependent pathway. In addition, we demonstrated that in contrast to USP15 de-ubiquitinating (DUB) activity, USP15-mediated inhibition of IFN signaling was not abolished by mutations eliminating the catalytic activity, indicating that a fraction of USP15-mediated IFN antagonism was independent of the DUB activity. Catalytically inactive USP15 mutants, as did the wild-type protein, disrupted virus-induced interaction of RIG-I and IFN-β promoter stimulator 1. Taken together, our data demonstrate that USP15 acts as a negative regulator of RIG-I signaling via DUB-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:26061460

  11. γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid-Induced Electrographic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Joseph; Lucey, Brendan P.; Duntley, Stephen P.; Darken, Rachel S.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of absence-like electrographic seizures during NREM sleep in a patient who was taking sodium oxybate, a sodium salt of γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). An overnight full montage electroencephalography (EEG) study revealed numerous frontally predominant rhythmic 1.5-2 Hz sharp waves and spike-wave activity during stage N2 and N3 sleep at the peak dose time for sodium oxybate, resembling atypical absence-like electrographic seizures. The patient was later weaned off sodium oxybate, and a repeat study did not show any such electrographic seizures. Absence-like seizures induced by GHB had previously been described in experimental animal models. We present the first reported human case of absence-like electrographic seizure associated with sodium oxybate. Citation: Cheung J, Lucey BP, Duntley SP, Darken RS. γ-hydroxybutyric acid-induced electrographic seizures. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(7):811-812. PMID:25024661

  12. Increased isoprostane levels in oleic acid-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Koichi; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Tsushima, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Sumiko; Yokoyama, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Rikimaru; Obata, Toru

    2009-10-16

    The present study was performed to examine a role of oxidative stress in oleic acid-induced lung injury model. Fifteen anesthetized sheep were ventilated and instrumented with a lung lymph fistula and vascular catheters for blood gas analysis and measurement of isoprostanes (8-epi prostaglandin F2{alpha}). Following stable baseline measurements, oleic acid (0.08 ml/kg) was administered and observed 4 h. Isoprostane was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with the isotope dilution method. Isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph were significantly increased 2 h after oleic acid administration and then decreased at 4 h. The percent increases in isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph at 2 h were significantly correlated with deteriorated oxygenation at the same time point, respectively. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of the pulmonary fat embolism-induced acute lung injury model in sheep and that the increase relates with the deteriorated oxygenation.

  13. Proteomic study on usnic-acid-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Zhao, Xiaoping; Lu, Xiaoyan; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Yi

    2012-07-25

    Usnic acid, a lichen metabolite, is used as a dietary supplement for weight loss. However, clinical studies have shown that usnic acid causes hepatotoxicity. The present study aims to investigate the mechanism of usnic acid hepatotoxicity in vivo. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to analyze the expression profiles of differentially regulated and expressed proteins in rat liver after usnic acid administration. The results reveal the differential expression of 10 proteins in usnic-acid-treated rats compared to the normal controls. These proteins are associated with oxidative stress, lipid metabolism, and several other molecular pathways. The endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria may be the primary targets of usnic-acid-induced hepatotoxicity.

  14. Links between recognition and degradation of cytoplasmic viral RNA in innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Mifsud, Edin J; Daito, Takuji

    2016-03-01

    Recognition and degradation of viral RNA are essential for antiviral innate immune responses. Cytoplasmic viral RNA is recognized by retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors, which trigger type I interferon (IFN) production. Secreted type I IFN activates ubiquitously expressed type I IFN receptor and induces IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). To suppress viral replication, several nucleases degrade viral RNA. RNase L is an ISG with endonuclease activity that degrades viral RNA, producing small RNA that activates RIG-I, resulting in the amplification of type I IFN production. Moreover, recent studies have elucidated novel links between viral RNA recognition and degradation. The RNA exosome is a protein complex that includes nucleases and is essential for host and viral RNA decay. Although the small RNAs produced by the RNA exosome do not activate RIG-I, several accessory factors of the RNA exosome promote RIG-I activation. Zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP) is an accessory factor that recognizes viral RNA and promotes viral RNA degradation via the RNA exosome. ZAPS is an alternative splicing form of ZAP and promotes RIG-I oligomerization and ATPase activity, resulting in RIG-I activation. DDX60 is another cofactor involved in the viral RNA degradation via the RNA exosome. The DDX60 protein promotes RIG-I signaling in a cell-type specific manner. These observations imply that viral RNA degradation and recognition are linked to each other. In this review, I discuss the links between recognition and degradation of viral RNA. PMID:26643446

  15. Unsaturated fatty acids induce non-canonical autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Niso-Santano, Mireia; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Pietrocola, Federico; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Mariño, Guillermo; Cianfanelli, Valentina; Ben-Younès, Amena; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Markaki, Maria; Sica, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Chaba, Kariman; Bauvy, Chantal; Dupont, Nicolas; Kepp, Oliver; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Wolinski, Heimo; Madeo, Frank; Lavandero, Sergio; Codogno, Patrice; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Cecconi, Francesco; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-01-01

    To obtain mechanistic insights into the cross talk between lipolysis and autophagy, two key metabolic responses to starvation, we screened the autophagy-inducing potential of a panel of fatty acids in human cancer cells. Both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids such as palmitate and oleate, respectively, triggered autophagy, but the underlying molecular mechanisms differed. Oleate, but not palmitate, stimulated an autophagic response that required an intact Golgi apparatus. Conversely, autophagy triggered by palmitate, but not oleate, required AMPK, PKR and JNK1 and involved the activation of the BECN1/PIK3C3 lipid kinase complex. Accordingly, the downregulation of BECN1 and PIK3C3 abolished palmitate-induced, but not oleate-induced, autophagy in human cancer cells. Moreover, Becn1+/− mice as well as yeast cells and nematodes lacking the ortholog of human BECN1 mounted an autophagic response to oleate, but not palmitate. Thus, unsaturated fatty acids induce a non-canonical, phylogenetically conserved, autophagic response that in mammalian cells relies on the Golgi apparatus. PMID:25586377

  16. Characterization of salicylic acid-induced genes in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Park, Y-S; Min, H-J; Ryang, S-H; Oh, K-J; Cha, J-S; Kim, H Y; Cho, T-J

    2003-06-01

    Salicylic acid is a messenger molecule in the activation of defense responses in plants. In this study, we isolated four cDNA clones representing salicylic acid-induced genes in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis) by subtractive hybridization. Of the four clones, the BC5-2 clone encodes a putative glucosyltransferase protein. The BC5-3 clone is highly similar to an Arabidopsis gene encoding a putative metal-binding farnesylated protein. The BC6-1 clone is a chitinase gene with similarities to a rapeseed class IV chitinase. Class IV chitinases have deletions in the chitin-binding and catalytic domains and the BC6-1 chitinase has an additional deletion in the catalytic domain. The BCP8-1 clone is most homologous to an Arabidopsis gene that contains a tandem array of two thiJ-like sequences. These four cabbage genes were barely expressed in healthy leaves, but were strongly induced by salicylic acid and benzothiadiazole. Expression of the three genes represented by the BC5-2, BC5-3 and BCP8-1 clones were also induced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, a nonhost pathogen that elicits a hypersensitive response in Chinese cabbage. None of these four genes, however, was strongly induced by methyl jasmonate or by ethylene.

  17. Sulfuric acid-induced corrosion of aluminum surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Q.; Freedman, A.; Robinson, G.N.

    1995-12-01

    The sulfuric acid-induced corrosion of smooth (2 nm average roughness) aluminum surfaces has been studied in real times using an in situ Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectrometer and a quartz crystal microbalance. Submicron thick, 35 to 55 weight percent (5 to 12 molal), sulfuric acid films were formed on room temperature metal surfaces by the reaction of gas-phase SO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O vapor in a flowing gas system at a total pressure of {approximately}200 Torr. The deposition of the acid films and subsequent changes in their chemical composition resulting from corrosion of the aluminum substrate could be monitored using characteristic infrared absorption features. The corrosion process always significantly perturbed the spectral signature of the films from that which was observed on inert gold surfaces. Using changes in spectral features that are linked to the production of Al{sup 3+} as indicators of corrosion, the authors conclude the rate of corrosion of the metal is strongly enhanced by both higher relative humidities and increased rates of sulfuric acid deposition.

  18. Computerized image analysis for acetic acid induced intraepithelial lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Ferris, Daron G.; Lieberman, Rich W.

    2008-03-01

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) exhibits certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Immature and dysphasic cervical squamous epithelium turns white after application of acetic acid during the exam. The whitening process occurs visually over several minutes and subjectively discriminates between dysphasic and normal tissue. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician analyzing the acetic acid induced lesions (acetowhite region) in a fully automatic way. This paper reports a study designed to measure multiple parameters of the acetowhitening process from two images captured with a digital colposcope. One image is captured before the acetic acid application, and the other is captured after the acetic acid application. The spatial change of the acetowhitening is extracted using color and texture information in the post acetic acid image; the temporal change is extracted from the intensity and color changes between the post acetic acid and pre acetic acid images with an automatic alignment. The imaging and data analysis system has been evaluated with a total of 99 human subjects and demonstrate its potential to screening underserved women where access to skilled colposcopists is limited.

  19. Sphingoid bases inhibit acid-induced demineralization of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van 't Hof, Wim; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Sotres, Javier; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H(+) ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products.

  20. Influenza A/Hong Kong/156/1997(H5N1) virus NS1 gene mutations F103L and M106I both increase IFN antagonism, virulence and cytoplasmic localization but differ in binding to RIG-I and CPSF30

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The genetic basis for avian to mammalian host switching in influenza A virus is largely unknown. The human A/HK/156/1997 (H5N1) virus that transmitted from poultry possesses NS1 gene mutations F103L + M106I that are virulence determinants in the mouse model of pneumonia; however their individual roles have not been determined. The emergent A/Shanghai/patient1/2013(H7N9)-like viruses also possess these mutations which may contribute to their virulence and ability to switch species. Methods NS1 mutant viruses were constructed by reverse genetics and site directed mutagenesis on human and mouse-adapted backbones. Mouse infections assessed virulence, virus yield, tissue infection, and IFN induction. NS1 protein properties were assessed for subcellular distribution, IFN antagonism (mouse and human), CPSF30 and RIG-I domain binding, host transcription (microarray); and the natural prevalence of 103L and 106I mutants was assessed. Results Each of the F103L and M106I mutations contributes additively to virulence to reduce the lethal dose by >800 and >3,200 fold respectively by mediating alveolar tissue infection with >100 fold increased infectious yields. The 106I NS1 mutant lost CPSF binding but the 103L mutant maintained binding that correlated with an increased general decrease in host gene expression in human but not mouse cells. Each mutation positively modulated the inhibition of IFN induction in mouse cells and activation of the IFN-β promoter in human cells but not in combination in human cells indicating negative epistasis. Each of the F103L and M106I mutations restored a defect in cytoplasmic localization of H5N1 NS1 in mouse cells. Human H1N1 and H3N2 NS1 proteins bound to the CARD, helicase and RD RIG-I domains, whereas the H5N1 NS1 with the same consensus 103F and 106M mutations did not bind these domains, which was totally or partially restored by the M106I or F103L mutations respectively. Conclusions The F103L and M106I mutations in the H5N1 NS1

  1. Chrysophanic Acid Induces Necrosis but not Necroptosis in Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Caki-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chrysophanic acid, also known as chrysophanol, has a number of biological activities. It enhances memory and learning abilities, raises superoxide dismutase activity, and has anti-cancer effects in several model systems. According to previous reports, chrysophanic acid-induced cell death shares features of necrotic cell death. However, the molecular and cellular processes underlying chrysophanic acid-induced cell death remain poorly understood. Methods: Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was monitored by cell viability assay and Annexin V-propidium iodide (PI) staining of renal cell carcinoma Caki-2 cells. The induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by chrysophanic acid and the suppression of ROS by anti-oxidants were evaluated by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate staining. The expression and phosphorylation of proteins that are involved in apoptosis and necroptosis were detected by immunoblotting. Results: The extent of chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was concentration and time dependent, and dead cells mainly appeared in the PI-positive population, which is a major feature of necrosis, upon fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was associated with the generation of intracellular ROS, and this effect was reversed by pretreatment with N-acetyl cysteine. Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was not associated with changes in apoptotic or necroptotic marker proteins. Conclusions: The cell death induced by chrysophanic acid resembled neither apoptotic nor necroptotic cell death in human renal cell carcinoma Caki-2 cells. PMID:27390736

  2. TRIM13 Is a Negative Regulator of MDA5-Mediated Type I Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Kavitha; Waggoner, Lisa; Pham, Serena T.; Hendricks, Gabriel L.; Waggoner, Stephen N.; Conlon, Joseph; Wang, Jennifer P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) are essential intracellular detectors of viral RNA. They contribute to the type I interferon (IFN) response that is crucial for host defense against viral infections. Given the potent antiviral and proinflammatory activities elicited by the type I IFNs, induction of the type I IFN response is tightly regulated. Members of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family of proteins have recently emerged as key regulators of antiviral immunity. We show that TRIM13, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is expressed in immune cells and is upregulated in bone marrow-derived macrophages upon stimulation with inducers of type I IFN. TRIM13 interacts with MDA5 and negatively regulates MDA5-mediated type I IFN production in vitro, acting upstream of IFN regulatory factor 3. We generated Trim13−/− mice and show that upon lethal challenge with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), which is sensed by MDA5, Trim13−/− mice produce increased amounts of type I IFNs and survive longer than wild-type mice. Trim13−/− murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) challenged with EMCV or poly(I·C) also show a significant increase in beta IFN (IFN-β) levels, but, in contrast, IFN-β responses to the RIG-I-detected Sendai virus were diminished, suggesting that TRIM13 may play a role in positively regulating RIG-I function. Together, these results demonstrate that TRIM13 regulates the type I IFN response through inhibition of MDA5 activity and that it functions nonredundantly to modulate MDA5 during EMCV infection. IMPORTANCE The type I interferon (IFN) response is crucial for host defense against viral infections, and proper regulation of this pathway contributes to maintaining immune homeostasis. Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) are intracellular detectors of viral RNA that induce the type I IFN response. In this study, we show that expression of the

  3. Negative Regulation of Melanoma Differentiation-associated Gene 5 (MDA5)-dependent Antiviral Innate Immune Responses by Arf-like Protein 5B*

    PubMed Central

    Kitai, Yuichi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Kawasaki, Takumi; Ori, Daisuke; Sueyoshi, Takuya; Murase, Motoya; Akira, Shizuo; Kawai, Taro

    2015-01-01

    RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), including retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and MDA5, constitute a family of cytoplasmic RNA helicases that senses viral RNA and mounts antiviral innate immunity by producing type I interferons and inflammatory cytokines. Despite their essential roles in antiviral host defense, RLR signaling is negatively regulated to protect the host from excessive inflammation and autoimmunity. Here, we identified ADP-ribosylation factor-like protein 5B (Arl5B), an Arl family small GTPase, as a regulator of RLR signaling through MDA5 but not RIG-I. Overexpression of Arl5B repressed interferon β promoter activation by MDA5 but not RIG-I, and its knockdown enhanced MDA5-mediated responses. Furthermore, Arl5B-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblast cells exhibited increased type I interferon expression in response to MDA5 agonists such as poly(I:C) and encephalomyocarditis virus. Arl5B-mediated negative regulation of MDA5 signaling does not require its GTP binding ability but requires Arl5B binding to the C-terminal domain of MDA5, which prevents interaction between MDA5 and poly(I:C). Our results, therefore, suggest that Arl5B is a negative regulator for MDA5. PMID:25451939

  4. Herpes simplex virus type 2 virion host shutoff protein suppresses innate dsRNA antiviral pathways in human vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiao-Dan; Rosenthal, Kenneth Lee

    2011-09-01

    Viruses that establish persistent infections have evolved numerous strategies to evade host innate antiviral responses. We functionally assessed the role of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) virion host shutoff (vhs) protein on innate immune sensing pathways in human vaginal epithelial cells (VK2 ECs). Infection of cells with wild-type (WT) HSV-2 significantly decreased expression of innate immune sensors of viral infection, Toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR3, retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (Mda-5), relative to cells infected with a mutant that lacks vhs (vhsB) or mock-infected cells. Transfection with HSV-2 vhs similarly decreased expression of TLR2, TLR3, RIG-I and Mda-5, which was also confirmed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. vhsB infection of VK2 cells caused robust increases in the active form of interferon regulatory factor (IRF)3 and its translocation to the nucleus compared with the WT. Additionally, IRF3 activation by Sendai virus and polyinosinic : polycytidylic acid-induced stimulation of beta interferon (IFN-β) was significantly inhibited in vhs-transfected cells. Overall, our findings provide the first evidence that HSV-2 vhs plays roles in selectively inhibiting TLR3 and RIG-I/Mda-5, as well as TLR2-mediated antiviral pathways for sensing dsRNA and effectively suppresses IFN-β antiviral responses in human vaginal ECs.

  5. Acid-induced aggregation propensity of nivolumab is dependent on the Fc.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boning; Guo, Huaizu; Xu, Jin; Qin, Ting; Xu, Lu; Zhang, Junjie; Guo, Qingcheng; Zhang, Dapeng; Qian, Weizhu; Li, Bohua; Dai, Jianxin; Hou, Sheng; Guo, Yajun; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Nivolumab, an anti-programmed death (PD)1 IgG4 antibody, has shown notable success as a cancer treatment. Here, we report that nivolumab was susceptible to aggregation during manufacturing, particularly in routine purification steps. Our experimental results showed that exposure to low pH caused aggregation of nivolumab, and the Fc was primarily responsible for an acid-induced unfolding phenomenon. To compare the intrinsic propensity of acid-induced aggregation for other IgGs subclasses, tocilizumab (IgG1), panitumumab (IgG2) and atezolizumab (aglyco-IgG1) were also investigated. The accurate pH threshold of acid-induced aggregation for individual IgG Fc subclasses was identified and ranked as: IgG1 < aglyco-IgG1 < IgG2 < IgG4. This result was cross-validated by thermostability and conformation analysis. We also assessed the effect of several protein stabilizers on nivolumab, and found mannitol ameliorated the acid-induced aggregation of the molecule. Our results provide valuable insight into downstream manufacturing process development, especially for immune checkpoint modulating molecules with a human IgG4 backbone. PMID:27310175

  6. MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory


    MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated the hepatocarcinogenicity of DCA in rodents when administered in dri...

  7. Luteolin prevents uric acid-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Shi, Xuhui; Shuai, Xuanyu; Xu, Yuemei; Liu, Yun; Liang, Xiubin; Wei, Dong; Su, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Elevated uric acid causes direct injury to pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined the effects of luteolin, an important antioxidant, on uric acid-induced β-cell dysfunction. We first evaluated the effect of luteolin on nitric oxide (NO) formation in uric acid-stimulated Min6 cells using the Griess method. Next, we performed transient transfection and reporter assays to measure transcriptional activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Western blotting assays were also performed to assess the effect of luteolin on the expression of MafA and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in uric acid-treated cells. Finally, we evaluated the effect of luteolin on uric acid-induced inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in Min6 cells and freshly isolated mouse pancreatic islets. We found that luteolin significantly inhibited uric acid-induced NO production, which was well correlated with reduced expression of iNOS mRNA and protein. Furthermore, decreased activity of NF-κB was implicated in inhibition by luteolin of increased iNOS expression induced by uric acid. Besides, luteolin significantly increased MafA expression in Min6 cells exposed to uric acid, which was reversed by overexpression of iNOS. Moreover, luteolin prevented uric acid-induced inhibition of GSIS in both Min6 cells and mouse islets. In conclusion, luteolin protects pancreatic β-cells from uric acid-induced dysfunction and may confer benefit on the protection of pancreatic β-cells in hyperuricemia-associated diabetes. PMID:25050113

  8. Gene I, a potential cell-to-cell movement locus of cauliflower mosaic virus, encodes an RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Citovsky, V; Knorr, D; Zambryski, P

    1991-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) pararetrovirus capable of cell-to-cell movement presumably through intercellular connections, the plasmodesmata, of the infected plant. This movement is likely mediated by a specific viral protein encoded by the gene I locus. Here we report that the purified gene I protein binds RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) but not dsDNA regardless of nucleotide sequence specificity. The binding is highly cooperative, and the affinity of the gene I protein for RNA is 10-fold higher than for ssDNA. CaMV replicates by reverse transcription of a 358 RNA that is homologous to the entire genome. We propose that the 35S RNA may be involved in cell-to-cell movement of CaMV as an intermediate that is transported through plasmodesmata as an RNA-gene I protein complex. Images PMID:11607169

  9. Gene I, a potential cell-to-cell movement locus of cauliflower mosaic virus, encodes an RNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Citovsky, V.; Knorr, D.; Zambryski, P. )

    1991-03-15

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) pararetrovirus capable of cell-to-cell movement presumably through intercellular connections, the plasmodesmata, of the infected plant. This movement is likely mediated by a specific viral protein encoded by the gene I locus. Here we report that the purified gene I protein binds RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) but not dsDNA regardless of nucleotide sequence specificity. The binding is highly cooperative, and the affinity of the gene I protein for RNA is 10-fold higher than for ssDNA. CaMV replicates by reverse transcription of a 35S RNA that is homologous to the entire genome. The authors propose that the 35S RNA may be involved in cell-to-cell movement of CaMV as an intermediate that is transported through plasmodesmata as an RNA-gene I protein complex.

  10. TRIM11 negatively regulates IFNβ production and antiviral activity by targeting TBK1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Younglang; Song, Byeongwoon; Park, Chankyu; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune response is a host defense mechanism against infection by viruses and bacteria. Type I interferons (IFNα/β) play a crucial role in innate immunity. If not tightly regulated under normal conditions and during immune responses, IFN production can become aberrant, leading to inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In this study, we identified TRIM11 (tripartite motif containing 11) as a novel negative regulator of IFNβ production. Ectopic expression of TRIM11 decreased IFNβ promoter activity induced by poly (I:C) stimulation or overexpression of RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene-I) signaling cascade components RIG-IN (constitutively active form of RIG-I), MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein), or TBK1 (TANK-binding kinase-1). Conversely, TRIM11 knockdown enhanced IFNβ promoter activity induced by these stimuli. Moreover, TRIM11 overexpression inhibited the phosphorylation and dimerization of IRF3 and expression of IFNβ mRNA. By contrast, TRIM11 knockdown increased the IRF3 phosphorylation and IFNβ mRNA expression. We also found that TRIM11 and TBK1, a key kinase that phosphorylates IRF3 in the RIG-I pathway, interacted with each other through CC and CC2 domain, respectively. This interaction was enhanced in the presence of the TBK1 adaptor proteins, NAP1 (NF-κB activating kinase-associated protein-1), SINTBAD (similar to NAP1 TBK1 adaptor) or TANK (TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator). Consistent with its inhibitory role in RIG-I-mediated IFNβ signaling, TRIM11 overexpression enhanced viral infectivity, whereas TRIM11 knockdown produced the opposite effect. Collectively, our results suggest that TRIM11 inhibits RIG-I-mediated IFNβ production by targeting the TBK1 signaling complex. PMID:23675467

  11. Protective Effect of Ocimum basilicum Essential Oil Against Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Amir; Roohi, Parnia; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Ghannadi, Ali Reza; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Ocimum basilicum L has been traditionally used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in Iran. This study investigates the ameliorative effect of Ocimum basilicum essential oil on an acetic acid-induced colitis model in rats. Ocimum basilicum essential oil with 2 doses (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly ameliorated wet weight/length ratio of colonic tissue compared to the control group. Higher doses of essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly reduced ulcer severity, ulcer area, and ulcer index. On the other hand, histological examination revealed the diminution of total colitis index as a marker for inflammatory cell infiltration in the colonic segments of rats treated with Ocimum basilicum essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). The increased level of myeloperoxidase was significantly decreased after the treatment with the essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). These results suggest that Ocimum basilicum exhibits protective effect against acetic acid-induced colitis.

  12. Association of ACE Gene I/D polymorphism with migraine in Kashmiri population

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Irfan Yousuf; Sheikh, Saleem; Shah, Zafar Amin; Pandith, Arshid A.; Wani, Mushtaq; Asimi, Ravouf; Wani, Maqbool; Sheikh, Shahnawaz; Mehraj, Iqra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Migraine is a complex, recurrent headache disorder that is one of the most common complaints in neurology practice. The role of various genes in its pathogenesis is being studied. We did this study to see whether an association exists between ACE gene I/D polymorphism and migraine in our region. Materials and Methods: The study included 100 patients diagnosed with migraine and 121 healthy controls. The study subject were age and gender matched. The analysis was based on Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and included following steps: DNA extraction from blood, PCR and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP). Results: Out of 100 cases, 69 were females and 31 were males. Fifty-seven were having migraine without aura and 43 had migraine with aura. 45 of the cases had II polymorphism, 40 had ID polymorphism and 15 had DD polymorphism in ACE gene. Conclusion: We were not able to find a statistically significant association between ACE gene I/D polymorphism with migraine. The reason for difference in results between our study and other studies could be because of different ethnicity in study populations. So a continuous research is needed in this regard in order to find the genes and different polymorphism that increase the susceptibility of Kashmiri population to migraine. PMID:27011636

  13. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism.

  14. Protective effect of hispidulin on kainic acid-induced seizures and neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Su Jane; Huang, Shu Kuei

    2015-05-15

    Hispidulin is a flavonoid compound which is an active ingredient in a number of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs, and it has been reported to inhibit glutamate release. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hispidulin protects against seizures induced by kainic acid, a glutamate analog with excitotoxic properties. The results indicated that intraperitoneally administering hispidulin (10 or 50mg/kg) to rats 30 min before intraperitoneally injecting kainic acid (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and decreased seizure score. In addition, hispidulin substantially attenuated kainic acid-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the suppression of microglial activation and the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, hispidulin reduced kainic acid-induced c-Fos expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the hippocampus. These data suggest that hispidulin has considerable antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and antiinflammatory effects on kainic acid-induced seizures in rats. PMID:25746462

  15. Houttuyniae Herba Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Neurotoxicity via Calcium Response Modulation in the Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Jeong, Hyun Uk; Hong, Sung In; Oh, Myung Sook

    2015-12-01

    Epilepsy is a complex neurological disorder characterized by the repeated occurrence of electrical activity known as seizures. This activity induces increased intracellular calcium, which ultimately leads to neuronal damage. Houttuyniae Herba, the aerial part of Houttuynia cordata, has various pharmacological effects and is widely used as a traditional herb. In the present study, we evaluated the protective effects of Houttuyniae Herba water extract on kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. Kainic acid directly acts on calcium release, resulting in seizure behavior, neuronal damage, and cognitive impairment. In a rat primary hippocampal culture system, Houttuyniae Herba water extract significantly protected neuronal cells from kainic acid toxicity. In a seizure model where mice received intracerebellar kainic acid injections, Houttuyniae Herba water extract treatment resulted in a lower seizure stage score, ameliorated cognitive impairment, protected neuronal cells against kainic acid-induced toxicity, and suppressed neuronal degeneration in the hippocampus. In addition, Houttuyniae Herba water extract regulated increases in the intracellular calcium level, its related downstream pathways (reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial dysfunction), and calcium/calmodulin complex kinase type II immunoreactivity in the mouse hippocampus, which resulted from calcium influx stimulation induced by kainic acid. These results demonstrate the neuroprotective effects of Houttuyniae Herba water extract through inhibition of calcium generation in a kainic acid-induced epileptic model. PMID:26366753

  16. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism. PMID:26551768

  17. Benfotiamine attenuates nicotine and uric acid-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction in the rat.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Sharma, Ramica; Singh, Manjeet

    2008-01-01

    The study has been designed to investigate the effect of benfotiamine, a thiamine derivative, in nicotine and uric acid-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. Nicotine (2 mg kg(-1)day(-1), i.p., 4 weeks) and uric acid (150 mg kg(-1)day(-1), i.p., 3 weeks) were administered to produce VED in rats. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating serum and aortic concentration of nitrite/nitrate. Further, the integrity of vascular endothelium was assessed using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of thoracic aorta. Moreover, the oxidative stress was assessed by estimating serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and aortic superoxide anion generation. The administration of nicotine and uric acid produced VED by impairing the integrity of vascular endothelium and subsequently decreasing serum and aortic concentration of nitrite/nitrate and attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation. Further, nicotine and uric acid produced oxidative stress, which was assessed in terms of increase in serum TBARS and aortic superoxide generation. However, treatment with benfotiamine (70 mg kg(-1)day(-1), p.o.) or atorvastatin (30 mg kg(-1)day(-1) p.o., a standard agent) markedly prevented nicotine and uric acid-induced VED and oxidative stress by improving the integrity of vascular endothelium, increasing the concentration of serum and aortic nitrite/nitrate, enhancing the acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation and decreasing serum TBARS and aortic superoxide anion generation. Thus, it may be concluded that benfotiamine reduces the oxidative stress and consequently improves the integrity of vascular endothelium and enhances the generation of nitric oxide to prevent nicotine and uric acid-induced experimental VED. PMID:18951979

  18. Lipopolysaccharide Stimulates Butyric Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Fukushima, Kazuo; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that butyric acid, an extracellular metabolite from periodontopathic bacteria, induced apoptosis in murine thymocytes, splenic T cells, and human Jurkat T cells. In this study, we examined the ability of butyric acid to induce apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on this apoptosis. Butyric acid significantly inhibited the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody- and concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses in a dose-dependent fashion. This inhibition of PBMC growth by butyric acid depended on apoptosis in vitro. It was characterized by internucleosomal DNA digestion and revealed by gel electrophoresis followed by a colorimetric DNA fragmentation assay to occur in a concentration-dependent fashion. Butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis was accompanied by caspase-3 protease activity but not by caspase-1 protease activity. LPS potentiated butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed that LPS increased the proportion of sub-G1 cells and the number of late-stage apoptotic cells induced by butyric acid. Annexin V binding experiments with fractionated subpopulations of PBMC in flow cytometory revealed that LPS accelerated the butyric acid-induced CD3+-T-cell apoptosis followed by similar levels of both CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell apoptosis. The addition of LPS to PBMC cultures did not cause DNA fragmentation, suggesting that LPS was unable to induce PBMC apoptosis directly. These data suggest that LPS, in combination with butyric acid, potentiates CD3+ PBMC T-cell apoptosis and plays a role in the apoptotic depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. PMID:9864191

  19. The acid-induced folded state of Sac7d is the native state.

    PubMed Central

    Bedell, J. L.; McCrary, B. S.; Edmondson, S. P.; Shriver, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    Sac7d unfolds at low pH in the absence of salt, with the greatest extent of unfolding obtained at pH 2. We have previously shown that the acid unfolded protein is induced to refold by decreasing the pH to 0 or by addition of salt (McCrary BS, Bedell J. Edmondson SP, Shriver JW, 1998, J Mol Biol 276:203-224). Both near-ultraviolet circular dichroism spectra and ANS fluorescence enhancements indicate that the acid- and salt-induced folded states have a native fold and are not molten globular. 1H,15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR spectra confirm that the native, acid-, and salt-induced folded states are essentially identical. The most significant differences in amide 1H and 15N chemical shifts are attributed to hydrogen bonding to titrating carboxyl side chains and through-bond inductive effects. The 1H NMR chemical shifts of protons affected by ring currents in the hydrophobic core of the acid- and salt-induced folded states are identical to those observed in the native. The radius of gyration of the acid-induced folded state at pH 0 is shown to be identical to that of the native state at pH 7 by small angle X-ray scattering. We conclude that acid-induced collapse of Sac7d does not lead to a molten globule but proceeds directly to the native state. The folding of Sac7d as a function of pH and anion concentration is summarized with a phase diagram that is similar to those observed for other proteins that undergo acid-induced folding except that the A-state is encompassed by the native state. These results demonstrate that formation of a molten globule is not a general property of proteins that are refolded by acid. PMID:11106160

  20. Clavulanic acid induces penile erection and yawning in male rats: comparison with apomorphine.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Melis, Maria Rosaria; Angioni, Laura; Argiolas, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    The beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid induced penile erection and yawning in a dose dependent manner when given intraperitoneally (IP, 0.05-5mg/kg), perorally (OS, 0.1-5mg/kg) and intracereboventricularly (ICV, 0.01-5 μg/rat) to male rats. The effect resembles that of the dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine given subcutaneously (SC) (0.02-0.25mg/kg), although the responses of the latter followed a U inverted dose-response curve, disappearing at doses higher than 0.1mg/kg. Clavulanic acid responses were reduced by about 55% by haloperidol, a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist (0.1mg/kg IP), and by d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin, an oxytocin receptor antagonist (2 μg/rat ICV), both given 15 min before clavulanic acid. A higher reduction of clavulanic acid responses (more than 80%) was also found with morphine, an opioid receptor agonist (5mg/kg IP), and with mianserin, a serotonin 5HT(2c) receptor antagonist (0.2mg/kg SC). In contrast, no reduction was found with naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist (1mg/kg IP). The ability of haloperidol, d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin and morphine to reduce clavulanic acid induced penile erection and yawning suggests that clavulanic acid induces these responses, at least in part, by increasing central dopaminergic neurotransmission. Dopamine in turn activates oxytocinergic neurotransmission and centrally released oxytocin induces penile erection and yawning. However, since both penile erection and yawning episodes were reduced not only by the blockade of central dopamine and oxytocin receptors and by the stimulation of opioid receptors, which inhibits oxytocinergic neurotransmission, but also by mianserin, an increase of central serotonin neurotransmission is also likely to participate in these clavulanic acid responses.

  1. Unsaturated fatty acid-induced non-canonical autophagy: unusual? or unappreciated?

    PubMed Central

    Bankaitis, Vytas A

    2015-01-01

    The breakdown of cellular components via autophagy is crucial for cellular homeostasis. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Niso-Santano et al (2015) report the important observation that feeding cells with saturated or unsaturated fatty acids triggers mechanistically distinct autophagic responses. Feeding cells saturated fatty acid induced the canonical, BECN1/PI3K-dependent autophagy pathway. Conversely, the unsaturated fatty acid oleate triggered autophagic responses that were independent of the BECN1/PI3K complex, but that required a functional Golgi system. PMID:25762589

  2. Role of hepatocyte S6K1 in palmitic acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, lipotoxicity, insulin resistance and in oleic acid-induced protection.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Virginia; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Muntané, Jordi; Kozma, Sara C; Valverde, Ángela M

    2015-06-01

    The excess of saturated free fatty acids, such as palmitic acid, that induces lipotoxicity in hepatocytes, has been implicated in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease also associated with insulin resistance. By contrast, oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, attenuates the effects of palmitic acid. We evaluated whether palmitic acid is directly associated with both insulin resistance and lipoapoptosis in mouse and human hepatocytes and the impact of oleic acid in the molecular mechanisms that mediate both processes. In human and mouse hepatocytes palmitic acid at a lipotoxic concentration triggered early activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related kinases, induced the apoptotic transcription factor CHOP, activated caspase 3 and increased the percentage of apoptotic cells. These effects concurred with decreased IR/IRS1/Akt insulin pathway. Oleic acid suppressed the toxic effects of palmitic acid on ER stress activation, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance. Besides, oleic acid suppressed palmitic acid-induced activation of S6K1. This protection was mimicked by pharmacological or genetic inhibition of S6K1 in hepatocytes. In conclusion, this is the first study highlighting the activation of S6K1 by palmitic acid as a common and novel mechanism by which its inhibition by oleic acid prevents ER stress, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance in hepatocytes.

  3. Obestatin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Konturek, Peter; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide derived from the proghrelin, has been shown to exhibit some protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present study was to determine the effect of obestatin administration on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Obestatin was administered intraperitoneally twice a day at a dose of 8 nmol/kg, starting 24 h after the induction of colitis. Seven or 14 days after the induction of colitis, the healing rate of the colon was evaluated. Results. Treatment with obestatin after induction of colitis accelerated the healing of colonic wall damage and this effect was associated with a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase and content of interleukin-1β. Moreover, obestatin administration significantly reversed the colitis-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Conclusion. Administration of exogenous obestatin exhibits therapeutic effects in the course of acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect is related, at least in part, to the obestatin-evoked anti-inflammatory effect, an improvement of local blood flow, and an increase in cell proliferation in colonic mucosa.

  4. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis. PMID:27598133

  5. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis. PMID:27598133

  6. Icariin, a major constituent from Epimedium brevicornum, attenuates ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zong, Nan; Li, Fei; Deng, Yuanyuan; Shi, Jingshan; Jin, Feng; Gong, Qihai

    2016-10-15

    Excitotoxicity is one of the most extensively studied causes of neuronal death and plays an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Icariin is a flavonoid component of a traditional Chinese medicine reported to possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of icariin against learning and memory impairment induced by excitotoxicity. Here, we demonstrated that rats receiving intracerebroventricular injection of excitatory neurotoxin ibotenic acid exhibited impaired learning and memory. Oral administration of icariin at doses of 20 and 40mg/kg rescued behavioral performance and protected against neurotoxicity in rat hippocampus by suppressing ibotenic acid induced pro-apoptosis. Furthermore, Western blott of hippocampal specimens revealed that icariin up-regulated the expression of calbindin-D28k protein following ibotenic acid administration. Additionally, icariin inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family phosphorylation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling, implicating the MAPK signaling and NF-κB signaling pathways were involved in the mechanism underlying icariin-mediated neuroprotection against ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity. These data suggested that icariin could be a potential agent for treatment of excitotoxicity-related diseases, including AD. PMID:27368415

  7. Protective Effect of Ocimum basilicum Essential Oil Against Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Amir; Roohi, Parnia; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Ghannadi, Ali Reza; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Ocimum basilicum L has been traditionally used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in Iran. This study investigates the ameliorative effect of Ocimum basilicum essential oil on an acetic acid-induced colitis model in rats. Ocimum basilicum essential oil with 2 doses (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly ameliorated wet weight/length ratio of colonic tissue compared to the control group. Higher doses of essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly reduced ulcer severity, ulcer area, and ulcer index. On the other hand, histological examination revealed the diminution of total colitis index as a marker for inflammatory cell infiltration in the colonic segments of rats treated with Ocimum basilicum essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). The increased level of myeloperoxidase was significantly decreased after the treatment with the essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). These results suggest that Ocimum basilicum exhibits protective effect against acetic acid-induced colitis. PMID:26620574

  8. Comparative neuroprotective profile of statins in quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    A possible neuroprotective role has been recently suggested for 3H3MGCoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Here, we sought to determine neuroprotective effect of statins in quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats. Rats were surgically administered quinolinic acid and treated with Atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (15, 30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (5, 10 mg/kg) once daily up to 3 weeks. Atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (10 mg/kg) treatment significantly attenuated the quinolinic acid induced behavioral (locomotor activity, rotarod performance and beam walk test), biochemical (lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration, SOD and catalase), mitochondrial enzyme complex alterations in rats suggesting their free radical scavenging potential. Additionally, atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (10 mg/kg) significantly decrease the TNF-α level and striatal lesion volume in quinolinic acid treated animals indicating their anti-inflammatory effects. In comparing the protective effect of different statins, atorvastatin is effective at both the doses while simvastatin and fluvastatins at respective lower doses were not able to produce the protective effect in quinolinic acid treated animals. These modulations can account, at least partly, for the beneficial effect of statins in our rodent model of striatal degeneration. Our findings show that statins could be explored as possible neuroprotective agents for neurodegenerative disorders such as HD. PMID:20696189

  9. Licofelone attenuates quinolinic acid induced Huntington like symptoms: possible behavioral, biochemical and cellular alterations.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2011-03-30

    Cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase enzymes are involved in arachidonic acid metabolism. Emerging evidence indicates that cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors prevent neurodegenerative processes and related complications. Therefore, the present study has been designed to explore the neuroprotective potential of licofelone (dual COX-2/5-LOX inhibitor) against quinolinic acid induced Huntington like symptom in rats. Intrastriatal administration of quinolinic acid significantly caused reduction in body weight and motor function (locomotor activity, rotarod performance and beam walk test), oxidative defense (as evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration and decreased endogenous antioxidant enzymes), alteration in mitochondrial enzyme complex (I, II and IV) activities, raised TNF-α level and striatal lesion volume as compared to sham treated animals. Licofelone (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg) treatment significantly improved body weight, locomotor activity, rotarod performance, balance beam walk performance, oxidative defense, mitochondrial enzyme complex activities and attenuated TNF-α level and striatal lesion as compared to control (quinolinic acid). The present study highlights that licofelone attenuates behavioral, biochemical and cellular alterations against quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity and this could be an important therapeutic avenue to ameliorate the Huntington like symptoms. PMID:21237233

  10. Icariin, a major constituent from Epimedium brevicornum, attenuates ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zong, Nan; Li, Fei; Deng, Yuanyuan; Shi, Jingshan; Jin, Feng; Gong, Qihai

    2016-10-15

    Excitotoxicity is one of the most extensively studied causes of neuronal death and plays an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Icariin is a flavonoid component of a traditional Chinese medicine reported to possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of icariin against learning and memory impairment induced by excitotoxicity. Here, we demonstrated that rats receiving intracerebroventricular injection of excitatory neurotoxin ibotenic acid exhibited impaired learning and memory. Oral administration of icariin at doses of 20 and 40mg/kg rescued behavioral performance and protected against neurotoxicity in rat hippocampus by suppressing ibotenic acid induced pro-apoptosis. Furthermore, Western blott of hippocampal specimens revealed that icariin up-regulated the expression of calbindin-D28k protein following ibotenic acid administration. Additionally, icariin inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family phosphorylation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling, implicating the MAPK signaling and NF-κB signaling pathways were involved in the mechanism underlying icariin-mediated neuroprotection against ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity. These data suggested that icariin could be a potential agent for treatment of excitotoxicity-related diseases, including AD.

  11. Salicylic acid induces mitochondrial injury by inhibiting ferrochelatase heme biosynthesis activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipul; Liu, Shujie; Ando, Hideki; Ishii, Ryohei; Tateno, Shumpei; Kaneko, Yuki; Yugami, Masato; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Nureki, Osamu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Salicylic acid is a classic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Although salicylic acid also induces mitochondrial injury, the mechanism of its antimitochondrial activity is not well understood. In this study, by using a one-step affinity purification scheme with salicylic acid-immobilized beads, ferrochelatase (FECH), a homodimeric enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis in mitochondria, was identified as a new molecular target of salicylic acid. Moreover, the cocrystal structure of the FECH-salicylic acid complex was determined. Structural and biochemical studies showed that salicylic acid binds to the dimer interface of FECH in two possible orientations and inhibits its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis confirmed that Trp301 and Leu311, hydrophobic amino acid residues located at the dimer interface, are directly involved in salicylic acid binding. On a gel filtration column, salicylic acid caused a shift in the elution profile of FECH, indicating that its conformational change is induced by salicylic acid binding. In cultured human cells, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis, whereas salicylic acid did not exert its inhibitory effect in FECH knockdown cells. Concordantly, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis in zebrafish embryos. Strikingly, the salicylic acid-induced effect in zebrafish was partially rescued by FECH overexpression. Taken together, these findings illustrate that FECH is responsible for salicylic acid-induced inhibition of heme synthesis, which may contribute to its antimitochondrial and anti-inflammatory function. This study establishes a novel aspect of the complex pharmacological effects of salicylic acid.

  12. Evolutionary conservation of molecular structure and antiviral function of a viral receptor, LGP2, in amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shousheng; Liu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Shuangshuang; Huang, Youhua; Qin, Qiwei; Zhang, Shicui

    2015-12-01

    RIG-I-like (where RIG-I is retinoic acid inducible gene I) receptor LGP2 (where LGP2 is laboratory of genetics and physiology) is an important intracellular receptor that recognizes viral RNAs in innate immunity, but its origin and evolution remains unknown. Here we clearly demonstrate the presence of a RIG-I-like receptor, BjLGP2, in the basal chordate amphioxus. It is predominantly expressed in the hepatic caecum and hindgut, and is upregulated following challenge with poly(I:C). BjLGP2 is distributed in the cytoplasm of both grouper spleen and flounder gill (FG) cells, and the recombinant BjLGP2 interacts with poly(I:C). BjLGP2 can enhance the expression of IFN and IFN-inducible genes in FG cells upon poly(I:C) challenge. It also significantly induces the expression of the antiviral genes ifn-i and Mx as well as the signal transduction relevant genes MAVS, NF-κB, and IRF-3 in FG cells upon lymphocystis disease virus challenge. Moreover, BjLGP2 inhibits the replication of lymphocystis disease virus in FG cells and the gene transcription of Singapore grouper iridovirus in grouper spleen cells. This is the first report showing that a LGP2 protein in invertebrate species (amphioxus) is structurally conserved and plays an antiviral role similar to that of vertebrate LGP2 proteins.

  13. Evolutionary conservation of molecular structure and antiviral function of a viral receptor, LGP2, in amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shousheng; Liu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Shuangshuang; Huang, Youhua; Qin, Qiwei; Zhang, Shicui

    2015-12-01

    RIG-I-like (where RIG-I is retinoic acid inducible gene I) receptor LGP2 (where LGP2 is laboratory of genetics and physiology) is an important intracellular receptor that recognizes viral RNAs in innate immunity, but its origin and evolution remains unknown. Here we clearly demonstrate the presence of a RIG-I-like receptor, BjLGP2, in the basal chordate amphioxus. It is predominantly expressed in the hepatic caecum and hindgut, and is upregulated following challenge with poly(I:C). BjLGP2 is distributed in the cytoplasm of both grouper spleen and flounder gill (FG) cells, and the recombinant BjLGP2 interacts with poly(I:C). BjLGP2 can enhance the expression of IFN and IFN-inducible genes in FG cells upon poly(I:C) challenge. It also significantly induces the expression of the antiviral genes ifn-i and Mx as well as the signal transduction relevant genes MAVS, NF-κB, and IRF-3 in FG cells upon lymphocystis disease virus challenge. Moreover, BjLGP2 inhibits the replication of lymphocystis disease virus in FG cells and the gene transcription of Singapore grouper iridovirus in grouper spleen cells. This is the first report showing that a LGP2 protein in invertebrate species (amphioxus) is structurally conserved and plays an antiviral role similar to that of vertebrate LGP2 proteins. PMID:26442622

  14. Negative Regulation of Cytoplasmic RNA-Mediated Antiviral Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Komuro, Akihiko; Bamming, Darja

    2008-01-01

    The recent, rapid progress in our understanding of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral innate immune signaling was initiated by the discovery of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) as a sensor of viral RNA [1]. It is now widely recognized that RIG-I and related RNA helicases, melanoma differentiated-associated gene-5 (MDA5) and laboratory of genetics and physiology-2 (LGP2), can initiate and/or regulate RNA and virus -mediated type I IFN production and antiviral responses. As with other cytokine systems, production of type I IFN is a transient process, and can be hazardous to the host if unregulated, resulting in chronic cellular toxicity or inflammatory and autoimmune diseases [2-9]. In addition, the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) system is a fundamental target for virus-encoded immune suppression, with many indirect and direct examples of interference described. In this article, we review the current understanding of endogenous negative regulation in RLR signaling and explore direct inhibition of RLR signaling by viruses as a host immune evasion strategy. PMID:18703349

  15. (−)-Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Enhances Hepatitis C Virus Double-Stranded RNA Intermediates-Triggered Innate Immune Responses in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yizhong; Li, Jieliang; Wang, Xu; Peña, Juliet C.; Li, Kui; Zhang, Ting; Ho, Wenzhe

    2016-01-01

    (−)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major polyphenol component of green tea, has recently been identified as an inhibitor of hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry. Here, we examined whether EGCG can enhance hepatocyte-mediated intracellular innate immunity against HCV. HCV dsRNAs (Core, E1-P7, NS-3′NTR and NS5A) induced interferon-λ1 (IFN-λ1) expression in human hepatocytes. These HCV dsRNAs also induced the expression of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and several antiviral IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) expression. Although EGCG treatment of hepatocytes alone had little effect on TLR3 and RIG-I signaling pathways, EGCG significantly enhanced HCV dsRNAs-induced the expression of IFN-λ1, TLR3, RIG-I and antiviral ISGs in hepatocytes. Furthermore, treatment of HCV-infected hepatocytes with EGCG and HCV dsRNAs inhibited viral replication. Given that EGCG has the ability to enhance HCV dsRNAs-induced intracellular antiviral innate immunity against HCV, suggesting the potential application of EGCG as a new anti-HCV agent for HCV therapy. PMID:26879672

  16. Bovine chromosomal regions affecting rheological traits in acid-induced skim milk gels.

    PubMed

    Glantz, M; Gustavsson, F; Bertelsen, H P; Stålhammar, H; Lindmark-Månsson, H; Paulsson, M; Bendixen, C; Gregersen, V R

    2015-02-01

    The production of fermented milk products has increased worldwide during the last decade and is expected to continue to increase during the coming decade. The quality of these products may be optimized through breeding practices; however, the relations between cow genetics and technological properties of acid milk gels are not fully known. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify chromosomal regions affecting acid-induced coagulation properties and possible candidate genes. Skim milk samples from 377 Swedish Red cows were rheologically analyzed for acid-induced coagulation properties using low-amplitude oscillation measurements. The resulting traits, including gel strength, coagulation time, and yield stress, were used to conduct a genome-wide association study. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were identified using the BovineHD SNPChip (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA), resulting in almost 621,000 segregating markers. The genome was scanned for putative quantitative trait loci (QTL) regions, haplotypes based on highly associated SNP were inferred, and the additive genetic effects of haplotypes within each QTL region were analyzed using mixed models. A total of 8 genomic regions were identified, with large effects of the significant haplotype explaining between 4.8 and 9.8% of the phenotypic variance of the studied traits. One major QTL was identified to overlap between gel strength and yield stress, the QTL identified with the most significant SNP closest to the gene coding for κ-casein (CSN3). In addition, a chromosome-wide significant region affecting yield stress on BTA 11 was identified to be colocated with PAEP, coding for β-lactoglobulin. Furthermore, the coagulation properties of the genetic variants within the 2 genes were compared with the coagulation properties identified by the patterns of the haplotypes within the regions, and it was discovered that the haplotypes were more diverse and in one case slightly better at explaining the

  17. Valproic Acid-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis with Pseudocyst Formation: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Khamrui, Sujan; Kataria, Mohnish; Biswas, Jayanta; Saha, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid is the most widely used anti-epilep­tic drug in children, and it is probably the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. Outcomes for patients with valproic acid-associated pancreatitis vary from full recovery after discontinuation of the drug to severe acute pancreatitis and death. Here, we present a case of valproic acid-induced severe acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation in a 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy and generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no resolution of the pseudocyst after discontinuation of valproic acid. The patient became symptomatic with a progressive increase in the size of the pseudocyst. She was successfully treated with cystogastrostomy and was well at 12-month follow-up. PMID:26366333

  18. Effect of zinc sulphate on acetic acid-induced gastric ulceration in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, K M

    1990-09-01

    The effects of zinc sulphate on gastric ulcer healing rate and mucosal mucus content of acetic acid-induced ulceration in rats have been assessed. Daily treatment with zinc sulphate progressively accelerated ulcer healing in a dose-dependent manner with a significant increase observed on day 15 after ulcer induction in rats treated with 44 and 88 mg kg-1 zinc sulphate. A significant increase in gastric mucosal adherent mucus was also observed in those animals treated with 88 mg kg-1 zinc sulphate. The results suggest that a minimum treatment period of 15 days is needed for the zinc sulphate to be effective, and that zinc ions may promote gastric ulcer healing by enhancing mucus formation to prevent acid back-diffusion into the gastric mucosa.

  19. Esophageal Submucosal Injection of Capsaicin but Not Acid Induces Symptoms in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert H; Korsapati, Hariprasad; Bhalla, Vikas; Varki, Nissi; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is a candidate for mediating acid-induced symptoms in the esophagus. We conducted studies to determine if the presence of acid in the mucosa/submucosa and direct activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin elicited symptoms in normal healthy subjects. We also studied the presence of TRPV1 receptors in the esophagus. Methods Unsedated endoscopy was performed on healthy subjects with no symptoms. Using a sclerotherapy needle, normal saline (pH 2.0–7.5) was injected into the mucosa/submucosa, 5 cm above the Z line. In a separate group of healthy subjects, injection of capsaicin and vehicle was also studied. Quality of symptoms was reported using the McGill Pain Questionnaire, and symptom intensity using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Immunohistochemistry was performed on 8 surgical esophagus specimens using TRPV1 antibody. Results Acid injection either did not elicit or elicited mild symptoms in subjects at all pH solutions. Capsaicin but not the vehicle elicited severe heartburn/chest pain in all subjects. Mean VAS for capsaicin was 91 ± 3 and symptoms lasted for 25 ± 1 minutes. Immunohistochemistry revealed a linear TRPV1 staining pattern between the epithelial layer and the submucosa that extended into the papillae. Eighty-five percent of papillae stained positive for TRPV1 with a mean 1.1 positive papillae per high-powered field. Conclusions The mechanism of acid-induced heartburn and chest pain is not the simple interaction of hydrogen ions with afferents located in the esophageal mucosa and submucosa. TRPV1 receptors are present in the lamina propria and their activation induces heartburn and chest pain. PMID:26932896

  20. Proteomic investigation into betulinic acid-induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Pang, Qiuying; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Aiqin; Luo, Shaman; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid that exhibits anticancer functions in human cancer cells. This study provides evidence that betulinic acid is highly effective against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by inducing dose- and time-dependent apoptosis. The apoptotic process was further investigated using a proteomics approach to reveal protein expression changes in HeLa cells following betulinic acid treatment. Proteomic analysis revealed that there were six up- and thirty down-regulated proteins in betulinic acid-induced HeLa cells, and these proteins were then subjected to functional pathway analysis using multiple analysis software. UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decarboxylating, chain A Horf6-a novel human peroxidase enzyme that involved in redox process, was found to be down-regulated during the apoptosis process of the oxidative stress response pathway. Consistent with our results at the protein level, an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in betulinic acid-treated cells. The proteins glucose-regulated protein and cargo-selection protein TIP47, which are involved in the endoplasmic reticulum pathway, were up-regulated by betulinic acid treatment. Meanwhile, 14-3-3 family proteins, including 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε, were down-regulated in response to betulinic acid treatment, which is consistent with the decrease in expression of the target genes 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε. Furthermore, it was found that the antiapoptotic bcl-2 gene was down-regulated while the proapoptotic bax gene was up-regulated after betulinic acid treatment in HeLa cells. These results suggest that betulinic acid induces apoptosis of HeLa cells by triggering both the endoplasmic reticulum pathway and the ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

  1. Neuroprotective effects of butterbur and rough aster against kainic Acid-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang Hee; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2005-01-01

    The separate and combined neuroprotective effects of rough aster (Aster scaber) and butterbur (Petasite japonicus) extracts against oxidative damage in the brain of mice challenged with kainic acid were examined by comparing behavioral changes and biochemical parameters of oxidative stress. Rough aster butanol extract (400 mg/kg) and/or butterbur butanol extract (150 or 400 mg/kg) were administered to male ICR mice, 6-8 weeks old, through a gavage for 4 days consecutively, and on day 4, kainic acid (50 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally. Compared with the vehicle-treated control, no significant changes in body and brain weight were observed in mice administered rough aster or butterbur butanol extract. Administration of kainic acid only, causing a lethality of approximately 54%, resulted in a significant decrease of total glutathione level and increase of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) value in brain tissue. The administration of butterbur or rough aster extract (400 mg/kg) decreased the lethality (50%) of kainic acid to 25%, alleviated the behavioral signs of neurotoxicity, restored the cytosolic glutathione level of brain homogenate to approximately 80% (P < .05), and reduced kainic acid-induced increases in TBARS values. In contrast to no significant neuroprotection by butterbur extract at a low dose (150 mg/kg), the combination of rough aster extract and butterbur extract reduced the lethality to 12.5%. Moreover, the combination delayed the onset time of behavioral signs by twofold, and significantly preserved the level of cytosolic glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities. However, the other biochemical parameters were not altered significantly by the combination. Thus, the combination of two vegetable extracts significantly increased the neuroprotective action against kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. Based on these findings, the combination of butterbur extract and rough aster extract contains a functional agent or

  2. DIBROMOACETIC ACID-INDUCED ELEVATIONS IN CIRCULATING ESTRADIOL: EFFECTS IN BOTH CYCLING AND OVARIECTOMIZED/STEROID-PRIMED FEMALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    RTD-03-031
    Goldman, JM and Murr, AS. Dibromoacetic Acid-induced Elevations in Circulating Estradiol: Effects in Both Cycling and Ovariectomized/Steroid-primed Female Rats. Reproductive Toxicology (in press).

    Abstract

    Oral exposures to high concentrations of th...

  3. Gallic acid induces apoptosis in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancers by accelerating EGFR turnover.

    PubMed

    Nam, Boas; Rho, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Myung; Son, Jaekyoung

    2016-10-01

    Gallic acid is a common botanic phenolic compound, which is present in plants and foods worldwide. Gallic acid is implicated in various biological processes such as cell growth and apoptosis. Indeed, gallic acid has been shown to induce apoptosis in many cancer types. However, the molecular mechanisms of gallic acid-induced apoptosis in cancer, particularly lung cancer, are still unclear. Here, we report that gallic acid induces apoptosis in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, but not in EGFR-WT NSCLC cells. Treatment with gallic acid resulted in a significant reduction in proliferation and induction of apoptosis, only in EGFR-mutant NSCLC cells. Interestingly, treatment with gallic acid led to a robust decrease in EGFR levels, which is critical for NSCLC survival. Treatment with gallic acid had no significant effect on transcription, but induced EGFR turnover. Indeed, treatment with a proteasome inhibitor dramatically reversed gallic acid-induced EGFR downregulation. Moreover, treatment with gallic acid induced EGFR turnover leading to apoptosis in EGFR-TKI (tyrosine kinase inhibitor)-resistant cell lines, which are dependent on EGFR signaling for survival. Thus, these studies suggest that gallic acid can induce apoptosis in EGFR-dependent lung cancers that are dependent on EGFR for growth and survival via acceleration of EGFR turnover.

  4. Gallic acid induces apoptosis in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancers by accelerating EGFR turnover.

    PubMed

    Nam, Boas; Rho, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Myung; Son, Jaekyoung

    2016-10-01

    Gallic acid is a common botanic phenolic compound, which is present in plants and foods worldwide. Gallic acid is implicated in various biological processes such as cell growth and apoptosis. Indeed, gallic acid has been shown to induce apoptosis in many cancer types. However, the molecular mechanisms of gallic acid-induced apoptosis in cancer, particularly lung cancer, are still unclear. Here, we report that gallic acid induces apoptosis in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, but not in EGFR-WT NSCLC cells. Treatment with gallic acid resulted in a significant reduction in proliferation and induction of apoptosis, only in EGFR-mutant NSCLC cells. Interestingly, treatment with gallic acid led to a robust decrease in EGFR levels, which is critical for NSCLC survival. Treatment with gallic acid had no significant effect on transcription, but induced EGFR turnover. Indeed, treatment with a proteasome inhibitor dramatically reversed gallic acid-induced EGFR downregulation. Moreover, treatment with gallic acid induced EGFR turnover leading to apoptosis in EGFR-TKI (tyrosine kinase inhibitor)-resistant cell lines, which are dependent on EGFR signaling for survival. Thus, these studies suggest that gallic acid can induce apoptosis in EGFR-dependent lung cancers that are dependent on EGFR for growth and survival via acceleration of EGFR turnover. PMID:27597244

  5. DIBROMOACETIC ACID-INDUCED ELEVATIONS OF ESTRADIOL IN THE CYCLING AND OVARIECTOMOZED/ESTRADIOL-IMPLANTED FEMALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Goldman, JM and Murr, AS. Dibromoacetic Acid-induced Elevations of Estradiol in Both Cycling and Ovariectomized / Estradiol-implanted Female Rats

    ABSTRACT
    Haloacetic acids are one of the principal classes of disinfection by-products generated by the chlorination of mun...

  6. Phenylethanoids in the herb of Plantago lanceolata and inhibitory effect on arachidonic acid-induced mouse ear edema.

    PubMed

    Murai, M; Tamayama, Y; Nishibe, S

    1995-10-01

    The five phenylethanoids, acteoside (1), cistanoside F (2), lavandulifolioside (3), plantamajoside (4) and isoacteoside (5) were isolated from the herb of Plantago lanceolata L. (Plantaginaceae). Compounds 1, the major phenylethanoid in the herb of P. lanceolata L., and 4, the major phenylethanoid in the herb of P. asiatica L., showed inhibitory effects on arachidonic acid-induced mouse ear edema. PMID:7480214

  7. Effect of a novel NK1 receptor selective antagonist (NKP608) on citric acid induced cough and airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    El-Hashim, A Z; Wyss, D; Lewis, C

    2004-01-01

    The effects of an orally administered novel and selective NK1 antagonist, NKP608, on cough and airway obstruction, induced by citric acid in guinea pigs, were investigated. Guinea pigs were pre-treated with 0.03, 0.3 and 1 mg kg(-1) of NKP608, the NK2 antagonist, SR48968 or both 2 h prior to challenge with citric acid (0.6 M) for a 10 min period. Guinea pigs pre-treated with 0.03, 0.3 and 1mgkg(-1) of NKP608 exhibited a significant reduction of 77, 74 and 79%, respectively, in the numbers of cough compared to vehicle pre-treated animals (P<0.05). SR48968, 10 mg kg(-1), alone did not significantly affect the citric acid-induced cough but when co-administered with 1 mg kg(-1) of NKP608, there was a significant 90% reduction in cough. NKP608 did not significantly reduce the citric acid-induced increase in Penh at any of the doses used. SR48968 significantly reduced the citric acid induced airway obstruction by about 50%. However, when SR48968 was co-administered with NKP608, there was a greater (73%) decrease in the airway obstruction compared with SR48968 alone. These data show that NKP608, a selective NK1 receptor antagonist, is a potent inhibitor of citric acid induced cough in guinea pigs and may therefore have value in the therapy of clinical cough.

  8. Phenylethanoids in the herb of Plantago lanceolata and inhibitory effect on arachidonic acid-induced mouse ear edema.

    PubMed

    Murai, M; Tamayama, Y; Nishibe, S

    1995-10-01

    The five phenylethanoids, acteoside (1), cistanoside F (2), lavandulifolioside (3), plantamajoside (4) and isoacteoside (5) were isolated from the herb of Plantago lanceolata L. (Plantaginaceae). Compounds 1, the major phenylethanoid in the herb of P. lanceolata L., and 4, the major phenylethanoid in the herb of P. asiatica L., showed inhibitory effects on arachidonic acid-induced mouse ear edema.

  9. Double-stranded RNA induces biphasic STAT1 phosphorylation by both type I interferon (IFN)-dependent and type I IFN-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Dempoya, Junichi; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Hayakari, Ryo; Xing, Fei; Yoshida, Hidemi; Okumura, Ken; Satoh, Kei

    2012-12-01

    Upon viral infection, pattern recognition receptors sense viral nucleic acids, leading to the production of type I interferons (IFNs), which initiate antiviral activities. Type I IFNs bind to their cognate receptor, IFNAR, resulting in the activation of signal-transducing activators of transcription 1 (STAT1). Thus, it has long been thought that double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced STAT1 phosphorylation is mediated by the transactivation of type I IFN signaling. Foreign RNA, such as viral RNA, in cells is sensed by the cytoplasmic sensors retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA-5). In this study, we explored the molecular mechanism responsible for STAT1 phosphorylation in response to the sensing of dsRNA by cytosolic RNA sensors. Polyinosinic-poly(C) [poly(I:C)], a synthetic dsRNA that is sensed by both RIG-I and MDA-5, induces STAT1 phosphorylation. We found that the poly(I:C)-induced initial phosphorylation of STAT1 is dependent on the RIG-I pathway and that MDA-5 is not involved in STAT1 phosphorylation. Furthermore, pretreatment of the cells with neutralizing antibody targeting the IFN receptor suppressed the initial STAT1 phosphorylation in response to poly(I:C), suggesting that this initial phosphorylation event is predominantly type I IFN dependent. In contrast, neither the known RIG-I pathway nor type I IFN is involved in the late phosphorylation of STAT1. In addition, poly(I:C) stimulated STAT1 phosphorylation in type I IFN receptor-deficient U5A cells with delayed kinetics. Collectively, our study provides evidence of a comprehensive regulatory mechanism in which dsRNA induces STAT1 phosphorylation, indicating the importance of STAT1 in maintaining very tight regulation of the innate immune system.

  10. Multiple copies of a bile acid-inducible gene in Eubacterium sp. strain VPI 12708.

    PubMed Central

    Gopal-Srivastava, R; Mallonee, D H; White, W B; Hylemon, P B

    1990-01-01

    Eubacterium sp. strain VPI 12708 is an anaerobic intestinal bacterium which possesses inducible bile acid 7-dehydroxylation activity. Several new polypeptides are produced in this strain following induction with cholic acid. Genes coding for two copies of a bile acid-inducible 27,000-dalton polypeptide (baiA1 and baiA2) have been previously cloned and sequenced. We now report on a gene coding for a third copy of this 27,000-dalton polypeptide (baiA3). The baiA3 gene has been cloned in lambda DASH on an 11.2-kilobase DNA fragment from a partial Sau3A digest of the Eubacterium DNA. DNA sequence analysis of the baiA3 gene revealed 100% homology with the baiA1 gene within the coding region of the 27,000-dalton polypeptides. The baiA2 gene shares 81% sequence identity with the other two genes at the nucleotide level. The flanking nucleotide sequences associated with the baiA1 and baiA3 genes are identical for 930 bases in the 5' direction from the initiation codon and for at least 325 bases in the 3' direction from the stop codon, including the putative promoter regions for the genes. An additional open reading frame (occupying from 621 to 648 bases, depending on the correct start codon) was found in the identical 5' regions associated with the baiA1 and baiA3 clones. The 5' sequence 930 bases upstream from the baiA1 and baiA3 genes was totally divergent. The baiA2 gene, which is part of a large bile acid-inducible operon, showed no homology with the other two genes either in the 5' or 3' direction from the polypeptide coding region, except for a 15-base-pair presumed ribosome-binding site in the 5' region. These studies strongly suggest that a gene duplication (baiA1 and baiA3) has occurred and is stably maintained in this bacterium. Images PMID:2376563

  11. Rho Kinase ROCK2 Mediates Acid-Induced NADPH Oxidase NOX5-S Expression in Human Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weibiao

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of the progression from Barrett’s esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) are not fully understood. We have shown that NOX5-S may be involved in this progression. However, how acid upregulates NOX5-S is not well known. We found that acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression was significantly decreased by the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y27632 in BE mucosal biopsies and FLO-1 EA cells. In addition, acid treatment significantly increased the Rho kinase activity in FLO-1 cells. The acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production was significantly decreased by knockdown of Rho kinase ROCK2, but not by knockdown of ROCK1. Conversely, the overexpression of the constitutively active ROCK2, but not the constitutively active ROCK1, significantly enhanced the NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production. Moreover, the acid-induced increase in Rho kinase activity and in NOX5-S mRNA expression was blocked by the removal of calcium in both FLO-1 and OE33 cells. The calcium ionophore A23187 significantly increased the Rho kinase activity and NOX5-S mRNA expression. We conclude that acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production may depend on the activation of ROCK2, but not ROCK1, in EA cells. The acid-induced activation of Rho kinase may be mediated by the intracellular calcium increase. It is possible that persistent acid reflux present in BE patients may increase the intracellular calcium, activate ROCK2 and thereby upregulate NOX5-S. High levels of reactive oxygen species derived from NOX5-S may cause DNA damage and thereby contribute to the progression from BE to EA. PMID:26901778

  12. Unsaturated fatty acids induce calcium influx into keratinocytes and cause abnormal differentiation of epidermis.

    PubMed

    Katsuta, Yuji; Iida, Toshii; Inomata, Shinji; Denda, Mitsuhiro

    2005-05-01

    Abnormal follicular keratinization is involved in comedogenesis in acne vulgaris. We recently demonstrated that calcium influx into epidermal keratinocytes is associated with impaired skin barrier function and epidermal proliferation. Based on these results, we hypothesized that sebum components affect calcium dynamics in the keratinocyte and consequently induce abnormal keratinization. To test this idea, we first observed the effects of topical application of sebum components, triglycerides (triolein), saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid and stearic acid), and unsaturated fatty acids (oleic acid and palmitoleic acid) on hairless mouse skin. Neither triglyceride nor saturated fatty acids affected the skin surface morphology or epidermal proliferation. On the other hand, application of unsaturated fatty acids, oleic acid, and palmitoleic acid induced scaly skin, abnormal keratinization, and epidermal hyperplasia. Application of triglycerides and saturated fatty acids on cultured human keratinocytes did not affect the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), whereas unsaturated fatty acids increased the [Ca(2+)](i) of the keratinocytes. Moreover, application of oleic acid on hairless mouse skin induced an abnormal calcium distribution in the epidermis. These results suggest that unsaturated fatty acids in sebum alter the calcium dynamics in epidermal keratinocytes and induce abnormal follicular keratinization.

  13. Primary and secondary genetic responses after folic acid-induced acute renal injury in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Calvet, J P; Chadwick, L J

    1994-12-01

    Folic acid-induced acute renal injury results in dramatic changes in gene expression. Among the genes affected by folic acid treatment are the primary response genes, c-fos and c-myc, which are thought to function to initiate cell cycle events. In this report, changes in the expression of three other genes in response to folic acid injury have been investigated: ornithine decarboxylase, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2). Renal injury was found to cause a rapid decrease in EGF mRNA, which remained absent for several days after the initial injury, gradually returning to normal levels over an approximately 3-wk regeneration and recovery period. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA showed a similar decrease. In contrast, folic acid caused a rapid increase in SGP-2 mRNA, which peaked several days after treatment, decreasing to normal levels over the 3-wk period. The mRNAs for the primary response genes were superinduced in the injured kidneys in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. In contrast, the changes in EGF and SGP-2 mRNA levels were blocked by cycloheximide, indicating that these responses required new protein synthesis during the first few hours after folic acid injury. The opposite but parallel responses in the expression of the EGF and SGP-2 genes suggest that their regulation is coupled to the initial injury-induced dedifferentiation and subsequent return to the fully differentiated state.

  14. On the molecular mechanisms of the acid-induced dissociation of hydroxy-apatite in water.

    PubMed

    Hochrein, Oliver; Zahn, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    The enamel/saliva interface is mimicked by the comparably much simpler model of (001) surfaces of hydroxy-apatite ( Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)(OH)(2) ) in contact with aqueous solution. At neutral pH, the dissociation of ions is penalized by more than 150 kJ mol(-1) giving rise to very stable apatite-water interfaces. This picture changes drastically with decreasing pH, as the protonation of phosphate and hydroxide ions lowers the free energy of calcium ions dissociation. Our simulations suggest the mechanism of acid-induced apatite decomposition to i) require a considerable degree of protonation of the apatite surface. The first ion dissociation step ii) involves calcium ions which electrostatic binding has been locally destabilized through phosphate and hydroxide protonation. The depletion of calcium ions embedding the anions then allows iii) the dissociation of the anionic species. Along this line, the protective role of fluoride in caries prevention is related to the stabilization of the calcium triangles embedding the OH(-)/F(-) ions.

  15. PDIA3 Knockdown Exacerbates Free Fatty Acid-Induced Hepatocyte Steatosis and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chao-hui; Xu, Cheng-fu; Xu, Lei; Li, You-ming; Chen, Wei-xing

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as one of the most common chronic liver disease over the past decades. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) plays a pivotal role during the development of NAFLD. This study aims to analyze the potential role of protein disulfide isomerase A3 precursor (PDIA3), one of the ER chaperones, in free fatty acid-induced cell model of NAFLD. Human liver L02 cell line was treated with sodium palmitate for 24 hours, which developed severe intracellular lipid accumulation. The increased protein level of PDIA3 was detected via immunoblotting analysis in the fat loaded cell models of NAFLD. siRNA-mediated knockdown of PDIA3 in L02 cells not only increased the cellular lipid accumulation, but also exacerbated hepatocytes apoptosis induced by sodium palmitate. Further investigation revealed that knockdown of PDIA3 up-regulated protein expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS), a key enzyme involved in fatty acid synthesis. PDIA3 knockdown also up-regulated key molecules of ERS pathway, including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), phospho-PKR-like ER kinase (p-PERK), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Our results suggested that ER chaperone PDIA3 plays a pivotal role in FFA-induced hepatocyte steatosis and apoptosis. PMID:26214517

  16. Formic acid and acetic acid induce a programmed cell death in pathogenic Candida species.

    PubMed

    Lastauskienė, Eglė; Zinkevičienė, Auksė; Girkontaitė, Irutė; Kaunietis, Arnoldas; Kvedarienė, Violeta

    2014-09-01

    Cutaneous fungal infections are common and widespread. Antifungal agents used for the treatment of these infections often have undesirable side effects. Furthermore, increased resistance of the microorganisms to the antifungal drugs becomes the growing problem. Accordingly, the search for natural antifungal compounds continues to receive attention. Apoptosis is highly regulated programmed cell death. During yeast cell apoptosis, amino acids and peptides are released and can stimulate regeneration of human epithelium cells. Thus, detection of chemical compounds inducing apoptosis in yeast and nontoxic for humans is of great medical relevance. The aim of this study was to detect chemical compound inducing apoptosis in pathogenic Candida species with the lowest toxicity to the mammalian cells. Five chemical compounds--acetic acid, sodium bicarbonate, potassium carbonate, lithium acetate, and formic acid--were tested for evaluation of antifungal activity on C. albicans, C. guilliermondii, and C. lusitaniae. The results showed that acetic acid and formic acid at the lowest concentrations induced yeast cells death. Apoptosis analysis revealed that cells death was accompanied by activation of caspase. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of potassium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate induced Candida cells necrosis. Toxicity test with mammalian cell cultures showed that formic acid has the lowest effect on the growth of Jurkat and NIH 3T3 cells. In conclusion, our results show that a low concentration of formic acid induces apoptosis-like programmed cell death in the Candida yeast and has a minimal effect on the survivability of mammalian cells, suggesting potential applications in the treatment of these infections. PMID:24752490

  17. Anacardic acid induces apoptosis-like cell death in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Muzaffar, Suhail; Bose, Chinchu; Banerji, Ashok; Nair, Bipin G; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2016-01-01

    Anacardic acid (6-pentadecylsalicylic acid), extracted from cashew nut shell liquid, is a natural phenolic lipid well known for its strong antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities. Its effect has been well studied in bacterial and mammalian systems but remains largely unexplored in fungi. The present study identifies antifungal, cytotoxic, and antioxidant activities of anacardic acid in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. It was found that anacardic acid causes inhibition of conidial germination and mycelial growth in this ascomycetous fungus. Phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin condensation, DNA degradation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential suggest that growth inhibition of fungus is mainly caused by apoptosis-like cell death. Broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK treatment indicated that anacardic acid induces caspase-independent apoptosis in M. oryzae. Expression of a predicted ortholog of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was upregulated during the process of apoptosis, suggesting the possibility of mitochondria dependent apoptosis via activation of apoptosis-inducing factor. Anacardic acid treatment leads to decrease in reactive oxygen species rather than increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation normally observed during apoptosis, confirming the antioxidant properties of anacardic acid as suggested by earlier reports. Our study also shows that anacardic acid renders the fungus highly sensitive to DNA damaging agents like ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Treatment of rice leaves with anacardic acid prevents M. oryzae from infecting the plant without affecting the leaf, suggesting that anacardic acid can be an effective antifungal agent. PMID:26381667

  18. Ethanol promotes saturated fatty acid-induced hepatoxicity through endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hong-Wei; Ma, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Wang, Cui-Fen; Lu, Jian; Cao, Wei; Wu, Xu-Dong

    2015-04-01

    Serum palmitic acid (PA), a type of saturated fatty acid, causes lipid accumulation and induces toxicity in hepatocytes. Ethanol (EtOH) is metabolized by the liver and induces hepatic injury and inflammation. Herein, we analyzed the effects of EtOH on PA-induced lipotoxicity in the liver. Our results indicated that EtOH aggravated PA-induced apoptosis and lipid accumulation in primary rat hepatocytes in dose-dependent manner. EtOH intensified PA-caused endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in vitro and in vivo, and the expressions of CHOP, ATF4, and XBP-1 in nucleus were significantly increased. EtOH also increased PA-caused cleaved caspase-3 in cytoplasm. In wild type and CHOP(-/-) mice treated with EtOH and high fat diet (HFD), EtOH worsened the HFD-induced liver injury and dyslipidemia, while CHOP knockout blocked toxic effects of EtOH and PA. Our study suggested that targeting UPR-signaling pathways is a promising, novel approach to reducing EtOH and saturated fatty acid-induced metabolic complications.

  19. Saturated phosphatidic acids mediate saturated fatty acid-induced vascular calcification and lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Masashi; Miyazaki-Anzai, Shinobu; Keenan, Audrey L; Okamura, Kayo; Kendrick, Jessica; Chonchol, Michel; Offermanns, Stefan; Ntambi, James M; Kuro-O, Makoto; Miyazaki, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that saturated fatty acid-induced (SFA-induced) lipotoxicity contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms that underlie SFA-induced lipotoxicity remain unclear. Here, we have shown that repression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) enzymes, which regulate the intracellular balance of SFAs and unsaturated FAs, and the subsequent accumulation of SFAs in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), are characteristic events in the development of vascular calcification. We evaluated whether SMC-specific inhibition of SCD and the resulting SFA accumulation plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification and generated mice with SMC-specific deletion of both Scd1 and Scd2. Mice lacking both SCD1 and SCD2 in SMCs displayed severe vascular calcification with increased ER stress. Moreover, we employed shRNA library screening and radiolabeling approaches, as well as in vitro and in vivo lipidomic analysis, and determined that fully saturated phosphatidic acids such as 1,2-distearoyl-PA (18:0/18:0-PA) mediate SFA-induced lipotoxicity and vascular calcification. Together, these results identify a key lipogenic pathway in SMCs that mediates vascular calcification. PMID:26517697

  20. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is an acid-induced, chromosomally encoded virulence factor in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pu; Wood, Derek; Nester, Eugene W

    2005-09-01

    The pckA gene, encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, catalyzes the reversible decarboxylation and phosphorylation of oxaloacetate to form phosphoenolpyruvate. Located on the circular chromosome of Agrobacterium, this locus is adjacent to the loci chvG and chvI, encoding a two-component regulatory system that has been shown to be important in virulence. Using a reporter gene fusion, studies showed that the pckA gene is induced by acidic pH but not by acetosyringone. This acid induction is regulated by the chvG-chvI regulatory system, which controls acid-inducible genes. A pckA mutant had no demonstrable PckA enzyme activity and grew on AB minimal medium with glucose but did not grow on the same medium with succinate as the sole carbon source and was more inhibited in its growth than the wild-type strain by an acidic environment. A pckA mutant was highly attenuated in tumor-inducing ability on tobacco leaf disks and was severely attenuated in vir gene expression. Although vir gene induction was completely restored when a constitutive virG gene was introduced into the mutant strain, virulence was only partially restored. These results suggest that avirulence may be due to a combination of the inhibition of this mutant in the acidic plant wound environment and the poor induction of the vir genes. PMID:16109945

  1. Anti-osteoporosis activity of naringin in the retinoic acid-induced osteoporosis model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Yang, Zhonglin; Li, Ping; Zhang, Yabo; Sse, Wing Cho

    2007-01-01

    Isoflavonoids isolated from plants have been confirmed to fight osteoporosis and promote bone health. However, few studies have been conducted to describe the anti-osteoporosis activity of botanical flavonone. Based on the experimental outcomes, we demonstrated the ability of naringin to fight osteoporosis in vitro. We developed a retinoic acid-induced osteoporosis model of rats to assess whether naringin has similar bioactivity against osteoporosis in vitro. After a 14-day supplement of retinoic acid to induce osteoporosis, SD rats were administered naringin. A blood test showed that naringin-treated rats experienced significantly lower activity of serum alkaline phosphatase and had higher femur bone mineral density, compared to untreated rats. All three dosages of naringin improved the decrease in bone weight coefficient, the length and the diameter of the bone, the content of bone ash, calcium, and phosphorus content induced by retinoic acid. The data of histomorphological metrology of naringin groups showed no difference as compared to normal control rats. These outcomes suggest that naringin offer a potential in the management of osteoporosis in vitro. PMID:17708632

  2. SV40 enhancer activation during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of F9 embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sleigh, M J; Lockett, T J

    1985-01-01

    The transient expression vector pSV2CAT, which carries the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene under the control of the SV40 early promoter, was used to transfect the murine embryonal carcinoma cell line F9 at various times during the retinoic acid-induced differentiation of these cells. Expression of the CAT gene under SV40 promoter control was found to increase markedly on F9 cell differentiation, measured relative to expression from the thymidine kinase promoter in the same cells. A series of constructs was prepared to identify the features of the SV40 early promoter required for transcription in differentiated and undifferentiated cells, as well as the factors limiting transcription in each case. The increased transcription seen on F9 cell differentiation was not observed when cells were transfected with molecules lacking a functional enhancer. It appears that as embryonal carcinoma cells differentiate, increased SV40 transcription results from enhancer sequence activation. In both differentiated and undifferentiated cell types the level of transcription was found to be limited by the availability and/or activity of cellular factors necessary for enhancer function. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3004973

  3. Bile acid induced colonic irritation stimulates intracolonic nitric oxide release in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, F; Mourelle, M; Papo, M; Guarner, F; Antolin, M; Armengol, J R; Malagelada, J R

    1996-01-01

    AIM--To measure the intracolonic release of nitric oxide end products (nitrates plus nitrites) and eicosanoids in response to intraluminal irritation with deoxycholic acid (DCA). PATIENTS--Seven patients with irritable bowel syndrome. METHODS--The left colon was perfused with a solution with or without 3 mM deoxycholic acid. Aspirates were assayed for eicosanoids by specific radioimmuno-assay, and for nitrates plus nitrites by the Griess reaction. To confirm that stimulated colonic mucosa can produce nitric oxide (NO), ancillary studies were performed in vitro using samples of normal mucosa obtained from five surgically resected colons. Samples were incubated for 30 minutes in Kreb's solution, 3 mM DCA or DCA with 1 mM L-nitro-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME) to inhibit the NO synthase. Finally, NO synthase activity was measured in five samples of human colonic mucosa. RESULTS--Intracolonic release of nitrates plus nitrites was basally undetectable in six of seven patients. Bile acid considerably increased the release of prostaglandin E2 and nitrates plus nitrites (p < 0.01). By contrast, no increase in thromboxane and leukotriene was seen. In vitro mucosal incubation with DCA increased the production of NO synthase products, which was blocked by L-NAME. Activity of Ca+2 independent NO synthase was detectable in four of five samples of human colonic mucosa. CONCLUSION--The human colonic mucosa responds to bile acid induced irritation by a surge in NO generation via NO synthase. PMID:8707118

  4. A West Nile virus mutant with increased resistance to acid-induced inactivation.

    PubMed

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2011-04-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for epidemics of febrile illness, meningitis, encephalitis and flaccid paralysis. WNV gains entry into host cells through endocytosis. The acid pH inside endosomes triggers rapid conformational rearrangements of the flavivirus envelope (E) glycoprotein that result in fusion of the endosomal membrane with the virion envelope. Conformational rearrangements of the E glycoprotein can be induced by acid exposure in solution in the absence of target membranes, thus causing a loss of infectivity. Following a genetic approach to study this process, a WNV mutant with increased resistance to acid-induced inactivation was isolated and its complete genome was sequenced. A single amino acid substitution, T70I, in the E glycoprotein was found to be responsible for the increased acid resistance, which was linked to an increase in the sensitivity of infection to the chemical rise of endosomal pH, suggesting that the mutant required a more acid pH inside the endosomes for fusion. No alterations in viral infection kinetics, plaque size or induced mortality rates in mice of the mutant were noted. However, by means of virus competition assays, a reduction in viral fitness under standard culture conditions was observed for the mutant. These results provide new evidence of the adaptive flexibility to environmental factors--pH variation in this case--of WNV populations. Implications of the T70I replacement on the E glycoprotein structure-function relationship are discussed.

  5. Neuroprotective effects of MK-801 on L-2-chloropropionic acid-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Williams, R E; Lock, E A; Bachelard, H S

    2001-02-01

    L-2-Chloropropionic acid is selectively toxic to the cerebellum in rats; the granule cell necrosis observed within 48 h can be prevented by prior administration of MK-801. Short-term treatment (2 h) with L-2-chloropropionic acid has also been shown to activate the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in fasted adult rats. This study aimed to investigate the effect of prior exposure to MK-801 on the biochemical and neurotoxicological effects of L-2-chloropropionic acid. Extracts were prepared from the forebrain and cerebellum of animals that had been treated with L-2-chloropropionic acid, with and without prior treatment with MK-801, and were analysed using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and amino acid analysis. Glucose metabolism was studied by monitoring the metabolism of [1-(13)C]-glucose using GC/MS. L-2-Chloropropionic acid caused increased glucose metabolism in both brain regions 6 h after administration, confirming activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, which was not prevented by MK-801. After 48 h an increase in lactate and a decrease in N-acetylaspartate was observed only in the cerebellum, whereas phosphocreatine and ATP decreased in both tissues. MK-801 prevented the changes in lactate and N:-acetylaspartate, but not those on the energy state. These studies suggest that L-2-chloropropionic acid-induced neurotoxicity is only partly mediated by the NMDA subtype of glutamate receptor.

  6. Saturated phosphatidic acids mediate saturated fatty acid-induced vascular calcification and lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Masashi; Miyazaki-Anzai, Shinobu; Keenan, Audrey L; Okamura, Kayo; Kendrick, Jessica; Chonchol, Michel; Offermanns, Stefan; Ntambi, James M; Kuro-O, Makoto; Miyazaki, Makoto

    2015-10-26

    Recent evidence indicates that saturated fatty acid-induced (SFA-induced) lipotoxicity contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms that underlie SFA-induced lipotoxicity remain unclear. Here, we have shown that repression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) enzymes, which regulate the intracellular balance of SFAs and unsaturated FAs, and the subsequent accumulation of SFAs in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), are characteristic events in the development of vascular calcification. We evaluated whether SMC-specific inhibition of SCD and the resulting SFA accumulation plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification and generated mice with SMC-specific deletion of both Scd1 and Scd2. Mice lacking both SCD1 and SCD2 in SMCs displayed severe vascular calcification with increased ER stress. Moreover, we employed shRNA library screening and radiolabeling approaches, as well as in vitro and in vivo lipidomic analysis, and determined that fully saturated phosphatidic acids such as 1,2-distearoyl-PA (18:0/18:0-PA) mediate SFA-induced lipotoxicity and vascular calcification. Together, these results identify a key lipogenic pathway in SMCs that mediates vascular calcification.

  7. Role of neurosteroids in experimental 3-nitropropionic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pushpender; Kumar, Puneet; Khan, Aamir; Deshmukh, Rahul; Lal Sharma, Pyare

    2014-01-15

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant, progressive, and fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor and non-motor symptoms. Systemic administration of 3-nitropropionic acid, a complex II inhibitor of the electron transport chain induces selective striatal lesions in rodents. Neurosteroids are synthesized in central nervous system, able to modulate GABAA receptor function and has been reported to have neuroprotective action. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of neurosteroids such as progesterone and pregnenolone which are positive and negative modulators of GABA respectively against 3-nitropropionic acid induced experimental Huntington's disease. Systemic administration of 3-nitropropionic acid (10mg/kg i.p.) for 14 days significantly reduced body weight, locomotor activity, motor coordination, balance beam walk performance, antioxidant defense enzymes (reduced glutathione and catalase) and significantly increase oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxidation and nitrite level) in striatum and cortex. 3-Nitropropionic acid treatment also increases pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β) level in striatum. Progesterone (10, 20mg/kg/day i.p.) treatments for 14 days significantly reversed the behavioral, antioxidant defense enzymes, oxidative stress marker and pro-inflammatory cytokines as compared to the 3-Nitropropionic acid treated group. Pregnenolone (1 and 2mg/kg i.p.), a negative modulator of GABAA pretreatment significantly reversed the protective effect of progesterone on behavioral and biochemical parameters. The results of the present study suggest that the positive GABAergic modulation may be beneficial for the treatment of motor disorder. PMID:24333475

  8. Folic acid induces salicylic acid-dependent immunity in Arabidopsis and enhances susceptibility to Alternaria brassicicola.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Finni; Kanawati, Basem; Wenig, Marion; Hoffmann, Thomas; Franz-Oberdorf, Katrin; Schwab, Wilfried; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Vlot, A Corina

    2015-08-01

    Folates are essential for one-carbon transfer reactions in all organisms and contribute, for example, to de novo DNA synthesis. Here, we detected the folate precursors 7,8-dihydropteroate (DHP) and 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate (ADC) in extracts from Arabidopsis thaliana plants by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry. The accumulation of DHP, but not ADC, was induced after infection of plants with Pseudomonas syringae delivering the effector protein AvrRpm1. Application of folic acid or the DHP precursor 7,8-dihydroneopterin (DHN) enhanced resistance in Arabidopsis to P. syringae and elevated the transcript accumulation of the salicylic acid (SA) marker gene pathogenesis-related1 in both the treated and systemic untreated leaves. DHN- and folic acid-induced systemic resistance was dependent on SA biosynthesis and signalling. Similar to SA, folic acid application locally enhanced Arabidopsis susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola. Together, the data associate the folic acid pathway with innate immunity in Arabidopsis, simultaneously activating local and systemic SA-dependent resistance to P. syringae and suppressing local resistance to A. brassicicola.

  9. Inhibition of ascorbic acid-induced modifications in lens proteins by peptides.

    PubMed

    Argirova, Mariana; Argirov, Ognyan

    2003-03-01

    The effects of three dipeptides L-phenylalanyl-glybine, glycyl-L-phenylalanine,and aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine, methyl ester) as inhibitors of the ascorbic acid-induced modifications in lens proteins were studied. Their efficiency was compared to that of two known inhibitors--aminoguanidine and carnosine. The tested dipeptides diminished protein carbonyl content by 32-58% and most moderated the formation of chromophores, as measured by the absorbency at 325 nm of the glycated proteins. The appearance of non-tryptophan fluorescence (excitation 340 nm/emission 410 nm) was observed for proteins glycated with ascorbic acid. All of the dipeptides examined, as well as aminoguanidine, decreased this glycation-related fluorescence. The potential inhibitors prevented the intensive formation of very high molecular weight aggregates. A competitive mechanism of their inhibitory effect was proposed, based on the reactivity of individual substances toward ascorbic acid. These findings indicate that they have a potential for use as alternatives for aminoguanidine as an anti-glycation agent.

  10. Effect of galactose on acid induced molten globule state of Soybean Agglutinin: Biophysical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Parvez; Naseem, Farha; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2015-11-01

    In the present study the formation of molten globule-like unfolding intermediate Soybean Agglutinin (SBA) in acidic pH range has been established with the help of acrylamide quenching, intrinsic fluorescence, ANS fluorescence measurement, far UV CD and dynamic light scattering measurement. A marked increase in ANS fluorescence was observed at pH 2.2. Ksv of acrylamide quenching was found to be higher at pH 2.2 than that of native SBA at pH 7. Far UV CD spectra of pH induced state suggest that SBA shows significant retention of secondary structure closure to native. Hydrodynamic radius of SBA at pH 2.2 was found be more as compared to native state and also in other pH induced states. Further we checked the effect of galactose on the molten globule state of SBA. This study suggests that SBA exist as molten globule at pH 2.2 and this study will help in acid induced molten globule state of other proteins.

  11. Gene I mutants of peanut chlorotic streak virus, a caulimovirus, replicate in plants but do not move from cell to cell.

    PubMed Central

    Ducasse, D A; Mushegian, A R; Shepherd, R J

    1995-01-01

    Gene I of peanut chlorotic streak virus (PCISV), a caulimovirus, is homologous to gene I of other caulimoviruses and may encode a protein for virus movement. To evaluate the function of gene I, several mutations were created in this gene of an infectious, partially redundant clone of PCISV. Constructs with an in-frame deletion and a single amino acid substitution in gene I were not infectious. To test for replication of these mutants in primarily infected cells, an immunosorbent PCR technique was devised. Virus particles formed by mutants in plants were recovered by binding to antivirus antibodies on a solid matrix and DNase treated to discriminate against residual inoculum, and DNA of trapped virions was subjected to PCR amplification. Gene I mutants were shown to direct formation of encapsidated DNA as revealed by a PCR product. Control gene V mutants (reverse transcriptase essential for replication) did not yield a PCR product. Quantitative PCR allowed estimation of the proportion of cells initially infected by gene I mutants and the amount of extractable virus per cell. It is concluded that PCISV gene I encodes a movement protein and that the immunoselection-PCR technique is useful in studying subliminal virus infection in plants. PMID:7543587

  12. Tachykinin inhibition of acid-induced gastric hyperaemia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, A.; Jocic, M.; Herzeg, G.; Holzer, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. Primary afferent neurones releasing the vasodilator, calcitonin gene-related peptide, mediate the gastric hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion. The tachykinins neurokinin A (NKA) and substance P (SP) are located in the same neurones and are co-released with calcitonin gene-related peptide. In this study we investigated the effect and possible role of tachykinins in the acid-evoked gastric vasodilatation in urethane-anaesthetized rats. 2. Gastric acid back-diffusion, induced by perfusing the stomach with 15% ethanol in the presence of 0.05 M HCl, increased gastric mucosal blood flow by 60-90%, as determined by the hydrogen clearance technique. NKA and SP (0.14-3.78 nmol min-1 kg-1, infused intra-aortically) inhibited the gastric mucosal hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion in a dose-dependent manner, an effect that was accompanied by aggravation of ethanol/acid-induced macroscopic haemorrhagic lesions. 3. The inhibitory effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) on the acid-induced gastric mucosal vasodilatation was prevented by the tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonists, MEN 10,627 (200 nmol kg-1) but left unaltered by the NK1 receptor antagonist, SR 140,333 (300 nmol kg-1) and the mast-cell stabilizer, ketotifen (4.6 mumol kg-1). 4. Under basal conditions, with 0.05 M HCl being perfused through the stomach, NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) reduced gastric mucosal blood flow by about 25%, an effect that was abolished by SR 140,333 but not MEN 10,627 or ketotifen. 5. SR 140,333, MEN 10,627 or ketotifen had no significant effect on basal gastric mucosal blood flow nor did they modify the gastric mucosal hyperaemic reaction to acid back-diffusion. 6. The effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) in causing vasoconstriction and inhibiting the vasodilator response to acid back-diffusion was also seen when blood flow in the left gastric artery was measured with the ultrasonic transit time shift technique. 7. Arginine vasopressin (AVP, 0.1 nmol min-1 kg-1) induced gastric

  13. Loss of n-6 fatty acid induced pediatric obesity protects against acute murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy-Szakal, Dorottya; Mir, Sabina A. V.; Harris, R. Alan; Dowd, Scot E.; Yamada, Takeshi; Lacorazza, H. Daniel; Tatevian, Nina; Smith, C. Wayne; de Zoeten, Edwin F.; Klein, John; Kellermayer, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Dietary influences may affect microbiome composition and host immune responses, thereby modulating propensity toward inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs): Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Dietary n-6 fatty acids have been associated with UC in prospective studies. However, the critical developmental period when (n-6) consumption may induce UC is not known. We examined the effects of transiently increased n-6 consumption during pediatric development on subsequent dextran-sulfate-sodium (DSS)-induced acute murine colitis. The animals transiently became obese then rapidly lost this phenotype. Interestingly, mice were protected against DSS colitis 40 days after n-6 consumption. The transient high n-6-induced protection against colitis was fat type- and dietary reversal-dependent and could be transferred to germ-free mice by fecal microbiota transplantation. We also detected decreased numbers of chemokine receptor (Cxcr)5+ CD4+ T cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) of transiently n-6-fed mice. Further experiments revealed that anti-chemokine ligand (Cxcl)13 (the ligand of Cxcr5) antibody treatment decreased DSS colitis severity, implicating the importance of the Cxcr5-Cxcl13 pathway in mammalian colitis. Consecutively, we found elevated CXCL13 concentrations (CD: 1.8-fold, P = 0.0077; UC: 1.9-fold, P = 0.056) in the serum of untreated pediatric IBD patients. The human serologic observations supported the translational relevance of our findings.—Nagy-Szakal, D., Mir, S. A. V., Harris, R. A., Dowd, S. E., Yamada, T., Lacorazza, H. D., Tatevian, N., Smith, C. W., de Zoeten, E. F., Klein, J., Kellermayer, R. Loss of n-6 fatty acid induced pediatric obesity protects against acute murine colitis. PMID:25903104

  14. Helicobacter pylori impedes acid-induced tightening of gastric epithelial junctions

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Elizabeth A.; Vagin, Olga; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Sachs, George

    2013-01-01

    Gastric infection by Helicobacter pylori is the most common cause of ulcer disease and gastric cancer. The mechanism of progression from gastritis and inflammation to ulcers and cancer in a fraction of those infected is not definitively known. Significant acidity is unique to the gastric environment and is required for ulcer development. The interplay between gastric acidity and H. pylori pathogenesis is important in progression to advanced disease. The aim of this study was to characterize the impact of acid on gastric epithelial integrity and cytokine release and how H. pylori infection alters these responses. Human gastric epithelial (HGE-20) cells were grown on porous inserts, and survival, barrier function, and cytokine release were studied at various apical pH levels in the presence and absence of H. pylori. With apical acidity, gastric epithelial cells demonstrate increased barrier function, as evidenced by increased transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and decreased paracellular permeability. This effect is reduced in the presence of wild-type, but not urease knockout, H. pylori. The epithelial inflammatory response is also modulated by acidity and H. pylori infection. Without H. pylori, epithelial IL-8 release decreases in acid, while IL-6 release increases. In the presence of H. pylori, acidic pH diminishes the magnitude of the previously reported increase in IL-8 and IL-6 release. H. pylori interferes with the gastric epithelial response to acid, contributing to altered barrier function and inflammatory response. H. pylori diminishes acid-induced tightening of cell junctions in a urease-dependent manner, suggesting that local pH elevation promotes barrier compromise and progression to mucosal damage. PMID:23989011

  15. Intrarenal renin-angiotensin system mediates fatty acid-induced ER stress in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunling; Lin, Yu; Luo, Renfei; Chen, Shaoming; Wang, Feifei; Zheng, Peili; Levi, Moshe; Yang, Tianxin; Wang, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    Obesity-related kidney disease is related to caloric excess promoting deleterious cellular responses. Accumulation of saturated free fatty acids in tubular cells produces lipotoxicity involving significant cellular dysfunction and injury. The objectives of this study were to elucidate the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation in saturated fatty acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in cultured human proximal tubule epithelial cells (HK2) and in mice fed with a high-fat diet. Treatment with saturated fatty acid palmitic acid (PA; 0.8 mM) for 24 h induced ER stress in HK2, leading to an unfolded protein response as reflected by increased expressions of the ER chaperone binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and proapoptotic transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) protein as evaluated by immunoblotting. PA treatment also induced increased protein expression of inositol requiring protein 1α (IRE1α), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor-α (eIF2α), and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) as well as activation of caspase-3. PA treatment was associated with increased angiotensin II levels in cultured medium. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker valsartan or renin inhibitor aliskiren dramatically suppressed PA-induced upregulation of BiP, CHOP, IRE1α, p-eIF2α, and ATF4 in HK2 cells. In contrast, valsartan or aliskiren did not prevent ER stress induced by tunicamycin. C57BL/6 mice fed with a high-fat diet for 14 wk exhibited increased protein expressions of BiP and CHOP compared with control mice, which were significantly attenuated by the valsartan treatment. Increased angiotensin II levels in serum and urine were observed in mice fed with a high-fat diet when compared with controls. It is suggested that the intrarenal RAS activation may play an important role in diabetic kidney injury via mediating ER stress induced by saturated fatty acid. PMID:26672616

  16. Diets Rich in Saturated and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Induce Morphological Alterations in the Rat Ventral Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Furriel, Angélica; Campos-Silva, Pamella; Silva, Paola Cariello Guedes Picarote; Costa, Waldemar Silva; Sampaio, Francisco José Barcellos; Gregório, Bianca Martins

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the influence of dietary lipid quality on the body mass, carbohydrate metabolism and morphology of the rat ventral prostate. Materials and Methods Wistar rats were divided into four groups: SC (standard chow), HF-S (high-fat diet rich in saturated fatty acids), HF-P (high-fat diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids) and HF-SP (high-fat diet rich in saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids). We analyzed body mass, fat mass deposits, plasma blood, insulin resistance and the ventral prostate structure. Results Groups that received high-fat diets were heavier and presented larger fat deposits than SC group. The HF-S and HF-SP groups had higher glucose, insulin and total cholesterol serum levels and insulin resistance compared with the SC. The acinar area, epithelium height and area density of the lumen were higher in the HF-SP than in the other groups. The epithelium area density and epithelial cell proliferation were greater in the HF-P and HF-SP than in the SC group. All of the groups that received high-fat diets had greater area density of the stroma, area density of smooth muscle cells and stromal cell proliferation compared with the SC group. Conclusion Diets rich in saturated and/or polyunsaturated fatty acids induced overweight. Independently of insulin resistance, polyunsaturated fatty acids increased prostate stromal and epithelial cell proliferation. Saturated fatty acids influenced only stromal cellular proliferation. These structural and morphometric alterations may be considered risk factors for the development of adverse remodeling process in the rat ventral prostate. PMID:25029463

  17. A dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase protects against kainic acid-induced brain injury.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Marini, Herbert; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Bitto, Alessandra; Irrera, Natasha; Pizzino, Gabriele; Pallio, Giovanni; Calò, Margherita; Adamo, Elena Bianca; Trichilo, Vincenzo; Interdonato, Monica; Galfo, Federica; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2015-06-01

    Systemic administration of kainic acid causes inflammation and apoptosis in the brain, resulting in neuronal loss. Dual cyclooxygenase/5-lipoxygenase (COX/5-LOX) inhibitors could represent a possible neuroprotective approach in preventing glutamate excitotoxicity. Consequently, we investigated the effects of a dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX following intraperitoneal administration of kainic acid (KA, 10 mg/kg) in rats. Animals were randomized to receive either the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX (flavocoxid, 20 mg/kg i.p.) or its vehicle (1 ml/kg i.p.) 30 min after KA administration. Sham brain injury rats were used as controls. We evaluated protein expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK1/2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as well as levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in the hippocampus. Animals were also observed for monitoring behavioral changes according to Racine Scale. Finally, histological analysis and brain edema evaluation were carried out. Treatment with the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX decreased protein expression of p-ERK1/2 and TNF-α in hippocampus, markedly reduced MDA, LTB4 and PGE2 hippocampal levels, and also ameliorated brain edema. Histological analysis showed a reduction in cell damage in rats treated with the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX, particularly in hippocampal subregion CA3c. Moreover, flavocoxid significantly improved behavioral signs following kainic acid administration. Our results suggest that dual inhibition of COX/5-LOX by flavocoxid has neuroprotective effects during kainic acid-induced excitotoxicity. PMID:25893744

  18. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    SciTech Connect

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  19. Bile Acid-Induced Necrosis in Primary Human Hepatocytes and in Patients with Obstructive Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. PMID:25636263

  20. Human sweet taste receptor mediates acid-induced sweetness of miraculin.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Ayako; Tsuchiya, Asami; Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Ito, Keisuke; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko; Briand, Loïc; Asakura, Tomiko; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2011-10-01

    Miraculin (MCL) is a homodimeric protein isolated from the red berries of Richadella dulcifica. MCL, although flat in taste at neutral pH, has taste-modifying activity to convert sour stimuli to sweetness. Once MCL is held on the tongue, strong sweetness is sensed over 1 h each time we taste a sour solution. Nevertheless, no molecular mechanism underlying the taste-modifying activity has been clarified. In this study, we succeeded in quantitatively evaluating the acid-induced sweetness of MCL using a cell-based assay system and found that MCL activated hT1R2-hT1R3 pH-dependently as the pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.8, and that the receptor activation occurred every time an acid solution was applied. Although MCL per se is sensory-inactive at pH 6.7 or higher, it suppressed the response of hT1R2-hT1R3 to other sweeteners at neutral pH and enhanced the response at weakly acidic pH. Using human/mouse chimeric receptors and molecular modeling, we revealed that the amino-terminal domain of hT1R2 is required for the response to MCL. Our data suggest that MCL binds hT1R2-hT1R3 as an antagonist at neutral pH and functionally changes into an agonist at acidic pH, and we conclude this may cause its taste-modifying activity. PMID:21949380

  1. Role of ion transporters in the bile acid-induced esophageal injury.

    PubMed

    Laczkó, Dorottya; Rosztóczy, András; Birkás, Klaudia; Katona, Máté; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Tiszlavicz, László; Róka, Richárd; Wittmann, Tibor; Hegyi, Péter; Venglovecz, Viktória

    2016-07-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is considered to be the most severe complication of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), in which the prolonged, repetitive episodes of combined acidic and biliary reflux result in the replacement of the squamous esophageal lining by columnar epithelium. Therefore, the acid-extruding mechanisms of esophageal epithelial cells (EECs) may play an important role in the defense. Our aim was to identify the presence of acid/base transporters on EECs and to investigate the effect of bile acids on their expressions and functions. Human EEC lines (CP-A and CP-D) were acutely exposed to bile acid cocktail (BAC) and the changes in intracellular pH (pHi) and Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) were measured by microfluorometry. mRNA and protein expression of ion transporters was investigated by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. We have identified the presence of a Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE), Na(+)/HCO3 (-) cotransporter (NBC), and a Cl(-)-dependent HCO3 (-) secretory mechanism in CP-A and CP-D cells. Acute administration of BAC stimulated HCO3 (-) secretion in both cell lines and the NHE activity in CP-D cells by an inositol triphosphate-dependent calcium release. Chronic administration of BAC to EECs increased the expression of ion transporters compared with nontreated cells. A similar expression pattern was observed in biopsy samples from BE compared with normal epithelium. We have shown that acute administration of bile acids differently alters ion transport mechanisms of EECs, whereas chronic exposure to bile acids increases the expression of acid/base transporters. We speculate that these adaptive processes of EECs represent an important mucosal defense against the bile acid-induced epithelial injury. PMID:27198194

  2. Human sweet taste receptor mediates acid-induced sweetness of miraculin

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Ayako; Tsuchiya, Asami; Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Ito, Keisuke; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko; Briand, Loïc; Asakura, Tomiko; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2011-01-01

    Miraculin (MCL) is a homodimeric protein isolated from the red berries of Richadella dulcifica. MCL, although flat in taste at neutral pH, has taste-modifying activity to convert sour stimuli to sweetness. Once MCL is held on the tongue, strong sweetness is sensed over 1 h each time we taste a sour solution. Nevertheless, no molecular mechanism underlying the taste-modifying activity has been clarified. In this study, we succeeded in quantitatively evaluating the acid-induced sweetness of MCL using a cell-based assay system and found that MCL activated hT1R2-hT1R3 pH-dependently as the pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.8, and that the receptor activation occurred every time an acid solution was applied. Although MCL per se is sensory-inactive at pH 6.7 or higher, it suppressed the response of hT1R2-hT1R3 to other sweeteners at neutral pH and enhanced the response at weakly acidic pH. Using human/mouse chimeric receptors and molecular modeling, we revealed that the amino-terminal domain of hT1R2 is required for the response to MCL. Our data suggest that MCL binds hT1R2-hT1R3 as an antagonist at neutral pH and functionally changes into an agonist at acidic pH, and we conclude this may cause its taste-modifying activity. PMID:21949380

  3. The influence of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic-acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Maduzia, D; Matuszyk, A; Ceranowicz, D; Warzecha, Z; Ceranowicz, P; Fyderek, K; Galazka, K; Dembinski, A

    2015-12-01

    Ghrelin has been primarily shown to exhibit protective and therapeutic effect in the gut. Pretreatment with ghrelin inhibits the development of acute pancreatitis and accelerates pancreatic recovery in the course of this disease. In the stomach, ghrelin reduces gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol, stress or alendronate, as well as accelerates the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric and duodenal ulcer. The aim of present studies was to investigate the effect of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic acid-induced colitis. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Animals were treated intraperitoneally with saline (control) or ghrelin (4, 8 or 16 nmol/kg/dose). Saline or ghrelin was given twice: 8 and 1 h before induction of colitis. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 1 ml of 4% solution of acetic acid and the severity of colitis was assessed 1 or 24 hours after induction of inflammation. Rectal administration of acetic acid induced colitis in all animals. Damage of colonic wall was seen at the macroscopic and microscopic level. This effect was accompanied by a reduction in colonic blood flow and mucosal DNA synthesis. Moreover, induction of colitis significantly increased mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β), activity of myeloperoxidase and concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA). Mucosal activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was reduced. Pretreatment with ghrelin reduced the area and grade of mucosal damage. This effect was accompanied by an improvement of blood flow, DNA synthesis and SOD activity in colonic mucosa. Moreover, ghrelin administration reduced mucosal concentration of IL-1β and MDA, as well as decreased mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Administration of ghrelin protects the large bowel against the development of the acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect seems to be related to the ghrelin-evoked anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

  4. The influence of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic-acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Maduzia, D; Matuszyk, A; Ceranowicz, D; Warzecha, Z; Ceranowicz, P; Fyderek, K; Galazka, K; Dembinski, A

    2015-12-01

    Ghrelin has been primarily shown to exhibit protective and therapeutic effect in the gut. Pretreatment with ghrelin inhibits the development of acute pancreatitis and accelerates pancreatic recovery in the course of this disease. In the stomach, ghrelin reduces gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol, stress or alendronate, as well as accelerates the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric and duodenal ulcer. The aim of present studies was to investigate the effect of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic acid-induced colitis. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Animals were treated intraperitoneally with saline (control) or ghrelin (4, 8 or 16 nmol/kg/dose). Saline or ghrelin was given twice: 8 and 1 h before induction of colitis. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 1 ml of 4% solution of acetic acid and the severity of colitis was assessed 1 or 24 hours after induction of inflammation. Rectal administration of acetic acid induced colitis in all animals. Damage of colonic wall was seen at the macroscopic and microscopic level. This effect was accompanied by a reduction in colonic blood flow and mucosal DNA synthesis. Moreover, induction of colitis significantly increased mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β), activity of myeloperoxidase and concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA). Mucosal activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was reduced. Pretreatment with ghrelin reduced the area and grade of mucosal damage. This effect was accompanied by an improvement of blood flow, DNA synthesis and SOD activity in colonic mucosa. Moreover, ghrelin administration reduced mucosal concentration of IL-1β and MDA, as well as decreased mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Administration of ghrelin protects the large bowel against the development of the acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect seems to be related to the ghrelin-evoked anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects. PMID:26769837

  5. Attenuation of proinflammatory cytokines and apoptotic process by verapamil and diltiazem against quinolinic acid induced Huntington like alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2011-02-01

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disease with complex pathophysiology. Recently, role of neuroinflammation and interplay between various other cellular cascades have been suggested to be involved in pathophysiology of Huntington disease. Involvement of calcium overload mediated oxidative damage and excitotoxicity have been suggested to play a central role in quinolinic acid induced Huntington like symptoms. The present study has been carried out to investigate the neuroprotective effect of calcium channel blockers (verapamil and diltiazem) against quinolinic acid induced dysfunction in motor, biochemical and neuroinflammatory signaling in rats. Intrastriatal quinolinic acid administration leads to significant motor [locomotor (72% reduction), rotarod (55% reduction), balance beam walk performance] dysfunction coupled with the marked oxidative damage and increased neuroinflammatory markers [TNF-α (140%), IL-6 (115%), caspase-3(75%)] levels in striatum as compared to the sham treatment. Verapamil (10 and 20mg/kg), diltiazem (10 and 20mg/kg) drug treatment for 21days resulted in a significant improvement in the motor function (improvement in locomotor activity, rotarod and balance beam walk performance). Further, verapamil (10 and 20mg/kg), diltiazem (10 and 20mg/kg) treatment significantly attenuated oxidative damage, level of proinflammatory mediators (TNF-α IL-6 and caspase-3) in quinolinic acid treated animals. Results of the present study demonstrate that protective effect of these calcium channel blockers (verapamil, diltiazem) might be due to their inhibitory action on different neuroinflammatory pathways against quinolinic acid induced Huntington disease like symptoms in rats. PMID:21112316

  6. Effect of CMC Molecular Weight on Acid-Induced Gelation of Heated WPI-CMC Soluble Complex.

    PubMed

    Huan, Yan; Zhang, Sha; Vardhanabhuti, Bongkosh

    2016-02-01

    Acid-induced gelation properties of heated whey protein isolate (WPI) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) soluble complex were investigated as a function of CMC molecular weight (270, 680, and 750 kDa) and concentrations (0% to 0.125%). Heated WPI-CMC soluble complex with 6% protein was made by heating biopolymers together at pH 7.0 and 85 °C for 30 min and diluted to 5% protein before acid-induced gelation. Acid-induced gel formed from heated WPI-CMC complexes exhibited increased hardness and decreased water holding capacity with increasing CMC concentrations but gel strength decreased at higher CMC content. The highest gel strength was observed with CMC 750 k at 0.05%. Gels with low CMC concentration showed homogenous microstructure which was independent of CMC molecular weight, while increasing CMC concentration led to microphase separation with higher CMC molecular weight showing more extensive phase separation. When heated WPI-CMC complexes were prepared at 9% protein the acid gels showed improved gel hardness and water holding capacity, which was supported by the more interconnected protein network with less porosity when compared to complexes heated at 6% protein. It is concluded that protein concentration and biopolymer ratio during complex formation are the major factors affecting gel properties while the effect of CMC molecular weight was less significant.

  7. The role of IL-4 gene 70 bp VNTR and ACE gene I/D variants in Familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Serbülent; Tural, Sengul; Tekcan, Akın; Tasliyurt, Turker; Inanir, Ahmet; Uzunkaya, Süheyla; Kismali, Gorkem

    2014-05-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and inflammation in the peritoneum, synovium, or pleura, accompanied by pain. It is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the MEFV (MEditerranean FeVer) gene. Patients with similar genotypes exhibit phenotypic diversity. As a result, the variations in different genes could be responsible for the clinical findings of this disease. In previous studies genes encoding Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) and IL-4 (Interleukin-4) were found to be associated with rheumatologic and autoimmune diseases. In the present study we hypothesized whether ACE I/D or IL-4 70 bp variable tandem repeats (VNTR) genes are associated with FMF and its clinical findings in Turkish patients. Genomic DNA obtained from 670 persons (339 patients with FMF and 331 healthy controls) was used in the study. Genotypes for an ACE gene I/D polymorphism and IL-4 gene 70 bp VNTR were determined by polymerase chain reaction with specific primers. To our knowledge, this is the first study examining ACE gene I/D polymorphism and IL-4 gene 70 bp VNTR polymorphism in FMF patients. As a result, there was a statistically significant difference between the groups with respect to genotype distribution (p<0.001). According to our results, ACE gene DD genotype was associated with an increased risk in FMF [p<0.001; OR (95%): 7.715 (4.503-13.22)]. When we examined ACE genotype frequencies according to the clinical characteristics, we found a statistically significant association between DD+ID genotype and fever (p=0.04). In addition IL-4 gene P1P1 genotype was associated with FMF (p<0.001). We propose that D allele or DD genotype of ACE gene and P1 allele or P1P1 genotype of IL-4 gene may be important molecular markers for susceptibility of FMF.

  8. Genetic parameters for rennet- and acid-induced coagulation properties in milk from Swedish Red dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, F; Glantz, M; Poulsen, N A; Wadsö, L; Stålhammar, H; Andrén, A; Lindmark Månsson, H; Larsen, L B; Paulsson, M; Fikse, W F

    2014-01-01

    Milk coagulation is an important processing trait, being the basis for production of both cheese and fermented products. There is interest in including technological properties of these products in the breeding goal for dairy cattle. The aim of the present study was therefore to estimate genetic parameters for milk coagulation properties, including both rennet- and acid-induced coagulation, in Swedish Red dairy cattle using genomic relationships. Morning milk samples and blood samples were collected from 395 Swedish Red cows that were selected to be as genetically unrelated as possible. Using a rheometer, milk samples were analyzed for rennet- and acid-induced coagulation properties, including gel strength (G'), coagulation time, and yield stress (YS). In addition to the technological traits, milk composition was analyzed. A binary trait was created to reflect that milk samples that had not coagulated 40min after rennet addition were considered noncoagulating milk. The cows were genotyped by using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). Almost 600,000 markers remained after quality control and were used to construct a matrix of genomic relationships among the cows. Multivariate models including fixed effects of herd, lactation stage, and parity were fitted using the ASReml software to obtain estimates of heritabilities and genetic and phenotypic correlations. Heritability estimates (h(2)) for G' and YS in rennet and acid gels were found to be high (h(2)=0.38-0.62) and the genetic correlations between rennet-induced and acid-induced coagulation properties were weak but favorable, with the exception of YSrennet with G'acid and YSacid, both of which were strong. The high heritability (h(2)=0.45) for milk coagulating ability expressed as a binary trait suggests that noncoagulation could be eliminated through breeding. Additionally, the results indicated that the current breeding objective could increase the frequency of noncoagulating milk and

  9. Interferon Induction by RNA Viruses and Antagonism by Viral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Yuchen; Nan, Guoxin; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Interferons are a group of small proteins that play key roles in host antiviral innate immunity. Their induction mainly relies on host pattern recognition receptors (PRR). Host PRR for RNA viruses include Toll-like receptors (TLR) and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) like receptors (RLR). Activation of both TLR and RLR pathways can eventually lead to the secretion of type I IFNs, which can modulate both innate and adaptive immune responses against viral pathogens. Because of the important roles of interferons, viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade host TLR and RLR mediated signaling. This review focuses on the mechanisms of interferon induction and antagonism of the antiviral strategy by RNA viruses. PMID:25514371

  10. A DN-mda5 transgenic zebrafish model demonstrates that Mda5 plays an important role in snakehead rhabdovirus resistance.

    PubMed

    Gabor, K A; Charette, J R; Pietraszewski, M J; Wingfield, D J; Shim, J S; Millard, P J; Kim, C H

    2015-08-01

    Melanoma Differentiation-Associated protein 5 (MDA5) is a member of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) family, which is a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor that detects viral nucleic acids. Here we show an Mda5-dependent response to rhabdovirus infection in vivo using a dominant-negative mda5 transgenic zebrafish. Dominant-negative mda5 zebrafish embryos displayed an impaired antiviral immune response compared to wild-type counterparts that can be rescued by recombinant full-length Mda5. To our knowledge, we have generated the first dominant-negative mda5 transgenic zebrafish and demonstrated a critical role for Mda5 in the antiviral response to rhabdovirus.

  11. A DN-mda5 Transgenic Zebrafish 1 Model Demonstrates that Mda5 Plays an Important Role in Snakehead Rhabdovirus Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gabor, KA; Charette, JR; Pietraszewski, MJ; Wingfield, DJ; Shim, JS; Millard, PJ; Kim, CH

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma Differentiation-Associated protein 5 (MDA5) is a member of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) family, which is a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor that detects viral nucleic acids. Here we show an Mda5-dependent response to rhabdovirus infection in vivo using a dominant-negative mda5 transgenic zebrafish. Dominant-negative mda5 zebrafish embryos displayed an impaired antiviral immune response compared to wild-type counterparts that can be rescued by recombinant full-length Mda5. To our knowledge, we have generated the first dominant-negative mda5 transgenic zebrafish and demonstrated a critical role for Mda5 in the antiviral response to rhabdovirus. PMID:25634485

  12. Mitochondrial genome depletion in human liver cells abolishes bile acid-induced apoptosis: role of the Akt/mTOR survival pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jose J G; Hernandez, Alicia; Revuelta, Isabel E; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ester; Gonzalez-Buitrago, Jose M; Perez, Maria J

    2013-08-01

    Acute accumulation of bile acids in hepatocytes may cause cell death. However, during long-term exposure due to prolonged cholestasis, hepatocytes may develop a certain degree of chemoresistance to these compounds. Because mitochondrial adaptation to persistent oxidative stress may be involved in this process, here we have investigated the effects of complete mitochondrial genome depletion on the response to bile acid-induced hepatocellular injury. A subline (Rho) of human hepatoma SK-Hep-1 cells totally depleted of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was obtained, and bile acid-induced concentration-dependent activation of apoptosis/necrosis and survival signaling pathways was studied. In the absence of changes in intracellular ATP content, Rho cells were highly resistant to bile acid-induced apoptosis and partially resistant to bile acid-induced necrosis. In Rho cells, both basal and bile acid-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion, was decreased. Bile acid-induced proapoptotic signals were also decreased, as evidenced by a reduction in the expression ratios Bax-α/Bcl-2, Bcl-xS/Bcl-2, and Bcl-xS/Bcl-xL. This was mainly due to a downregulation of Bax-α and Bcl-xS. Moreover, in these cells the Akt/mTOR pathway was constitutively activated in a ROS-independent manner and remained similarly activated in the presence of bile acid treatment. In contrast, ERK1/2 activation was constitutively reduced and was not activated by incubation with bile acids. In conclusion, these results suggest that impaired mitochondrial function associated with mtDNA alterations, which may occur in liver cells during prolonged cholestasis, may activate mechanisms of cell survival accounting for an enhanced resistance of hepatocytes to bile acid-induced apoptosis. PMID:23597504

  13. Nicotinic acid induces secretion of prostaglandin D2 in human macrophages: an in vitro model of the niacin flush.

    PubMed

    Meyers, C Daniel; Liu, Paul; Kamanna, Vaijinath S; Kashyap, Moti L

    2007-06-01

    Nicotinic acid is a safe, broad-spectrum lipid agent shown to prevent cardiovascular disease, yet its widespread use is limited by the prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) mediated niacin flush. Previous research suggests that nicotinic acid-induced PGD2 secretion is mediated by the skin, but the exact cell type remains unclear. We hypothesized that macrophages are a source of nicotinic acid-induced PGD2 secretion and performed a series of experiments to confirm this. Nicotinic acid (0.1-3 mM) induced PGD2 secretion in cultured human macrophages, but not monocytes or endothelial cells. The PGD2 secretion was dependent on the concentration of nicotinic acid and the time of exposure. Nicotinuric acid, but not nicotinamide, also induced PGD2 secretion. Pre-incubation of the cells with aspirin (100 microM) entirely prevented the nicotinic acid effects on PGD2 secretion. The PGD2 secreting effects of nicotinic acid were additive to the effects of the calcium ionophore A23187 (6 microM), but were independent of extra cellular calcium. These findings, combined with recent in vivo work, provide evidence that macrophages play a significant role in mediating the niacin flush and may lead to better strategies to eliminate this limiting side effect.

  14. Effects of tumour necrosis factor-alpha synthesis inhibitors on rat trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced chronic colitis.

    PubMed

    Bobin-Dubigeon, C; Collin, X; Grimaud, N; Robert, J M; Le Baut, G; Petit, J Y

    2001-11-01

    The fact that tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is clearly involved in the pathogenesis of intestinal bowel disease, especially Crohn's disease, suggests that TNF-alpha synthesis inhibitors could be beneficial for treatment. The present study assessed the effect of chronic oral gavage of two in vitro TNF-alpha synthesis inhibitors, JM 34 maleate or [N-(4,6-dimethylpyridin-2-yl)-furane-2-carboxamide)] maleate and XC 21 or (N-betapicolyl-tetrafluorophtalimide), on colonic inflammation in trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rats received JM 34 maleate (100 mg/kg) and XC 21 (50 mg/kg) 1 h before colitis induction and then daily for 8 days by oral gavage. The colon was removed on day 8 and processed for clinical score, myeloperoxidase activity, and soluble TNF-alpha release. Treatment with XC 21, as well as dexamethasone and sulphasalazine, reduced colonic damage and decreased (except with dexamethasone) the incidence of diarrhoea. JM 34 maleate failed to improve the clinical signs of chronic colitis. After trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced colitis, myeloperoxidase activity and TNF-alpha colonic mucosal production were substantially increased compared to the control (saline instillation). Both of these inflammatory indicators were then significantly decreased (P< or =0.05) after the four chronic treatments (JM 34 maleate, XC 21, sulphasalazine, and dexamethasone). XC 21 appeared to be as efficient as sulphasalazine in improving colonic inflammation. PMID:11716848

  15. Allicin alleviates inflammation of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced rats and suppresses P38 and JNK pathways in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Lun, Weijian; Zhao, Xinmei; Lei, Shan; Guo, Yandong; Ma, Jiayi; Zhi, Fachao

    2015-01-01

    Background. Allicin has anti-inflammatory, antioxidative and proapoptotic properties. Aims. To evaluate the effects and investigate the mechanism of allicin on trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced colitis, specifically with mesalazine or sulfasalazine. Methods. 80 rats were divided equally into 8 groups: control; trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid; allicin prevention; allicin; mesalazine; sulfasalazine; allicin + sulfasalazine, and mesalazine + allicin. Systemic and colonic inflammation parameters were analysed. In addition, protein and culture medium of Caco-2 cells treated with various concentrations of IL-1β or allicin were collected for investigation of IL-8, NF-κB p65 P38, ERK, and JNK. One-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis H test were used for parametric and nonparametric tests, respectively. Results. Allicin reduced the body weight loss of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced rats, histological score, serum TNF-α and IL-1β levels, and colon IL-1β mRNA level and induced serum IL-4 level, particularly in combination with mesalazine. In addition, 1 ng/mL IL-1β stimulated the P38, ERK, and JNK pathways, whereas pretreatment with allicin depressed this phenomenon, except for the ERK pathway. Conclusions. The inflammation induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid is mitigated significantly by allicin treatment, particularly combined with mesalazine. Allicin inhibits the P38 and JNK pathways and the expression of NF-κB which explained the potential anti-inflammatory mechanisms of allicin. PMID:25729217

  16. Retinoic acid induced growth arrest of human breast carcinoma cells requires protein kinase C alpha expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y; Tighe, A P; Talmage, D A

    1997-09-01

    Retinoic acid inhibits proliferation of hormone-dependent, but not hormone-independent breast cancer cells. Retinoic acid-induced changes in cellular proliferation and differentiation are associated with disturbances in growth factor signaling and frequently with changes in protein kinase C expression. PKC delta, epsilon, and zeta are expressed in both hormone-dependent (T-47D) and hormone-independent (MDA-MB-231) cell lines. Retinoic acid arrested T-47D proliferation, induced PKC alpha expression and concomitantly repressed PKC zeta expression. The changes in PKC alpha and PKC zeta reflect retinoic acid-induced changes in mRNA. In contrast, retinoic acid had no effect on growth, or PKC expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. Growth arrest and the induction of PKC alpha, but not the reduction in PKC zeta, resulted from selective activation of RAR alpha. In total, these results support an important role for PKC alpha in mediating the anti-proliferative action of retinoids on human breast carcinoma cells.

  17. Protective effect of Agave americana Linn. leaf extract in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mannasaheb, Basheerahmed A.A.; Kulkarni, Preeti V.; Sangreskopp, Mashood Ahmed; Savant, Chetan; Mohan, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Natural plants always provide core compounds for new drug development. In the present life and food style, inflammatory bowel disease has become common and needs a lead compound for its drug development. Aim: To evaluate the effect of Agave americana Linn. leaf extract in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats based on its traditional anti-inflammatory use. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were pretreated with A. americana leaf extract in the dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg p.o. daily for 7 days. On 8th day, 2 ml of 4% v/v acetic acid in saline was instilled into rats’ rectum. Prednisolone was used as standard drug and it was administered on the day of acetic acid instillation and continued for 3 days. Extract treatment was continued till 11th day. Body weight, ulcer score, colonic muscle contraction, antioxidant activity and histopathology were studied. Statistical analysis was performed using Parametric one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's posttest. Results: A. americana have retained total body weight significantly (P < 0.01) and decreased colon weight/length ratio. Extract have shown a significant decrease (P < 0.001) in ulcer scores, myeloperoxidase, lipid peroxidase activity. Further, extract have shown significant improvement in colonic muscle contraction, histopathology of colon etc., which is comparable with standard drug. Conclusion: A. americana possess protective effect against acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. PMID:26730148

  18. Hepatitis B virus X protein suppresses virus-triggered IRF3 activation and IFN-beta induction by disrupting the VISA-associated complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianmiao; Li, Ying; Mao, Aiping; Li, Chao; Li, Yongkui; Tien, Po

    2010-09-01

    Viral RNAs produced during viral infection are recognized by the cytoplasmic RNA helicases retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5). A central adapter protein downstream of RIG-I and MDA5 is the mitochondrial membrane protein virus-induced signaling adaptor (VISA), which mediates the induction of type I interferons (IFNs) through the activation of transcription factors such as nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and IFN-regulatory factor-3 (IRF3). Here we found that hepatitis B virus (HBV)-encoded X protein (HBx) acts as an inhibitor of virus-triggered IRF3 activation and IFN-beta induction. Reporter and plaque assays indicate that HBx inhibits signaling by components upstream but not downstream of VISA. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that HBx interacts with VISA and disrupts the association of VISA with its upstream and downstream components. These findings suggest that HBx acts as a suppressor of virus-triggered induction of type I IFNs, which explains the observation that HBV causes transient and chronic infection in hepatocytes but fails to activate the pattern recognition receptor-mediated IFN induction pathways.

  19. Regulation of antiviral innate immune signaling by stress-induced RNA granules

    PubMed Central

    Yoneyama, Mitsutoshi; Jogi, Michihiko; Onomoto, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Activation of antiviral innate immunity is triggered by cellular pattern recognition receptors. Retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) detect viral non-self RNA in cytoplasm of virus-infected cells and play a critical role in the clearance of the invaded viruses through production of antiviral cytokines. Among the three known RLRs, RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 recognize distinct non-self signatures of viral RNA and activate antiviral signaling. Recent reports have clearly described the molecular machinery underlying the activation of RLRs and interactions with the downstream adaptor, mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS). RLRs and MAVS are thought to form large multimeric filaments around cytoplasmic organelles depending on the presence of Lys63-linked ubiquitin chains. Furthermore, RLRs have been shown to localize to stress-induced ribonucleoprotein aggregate known as stress granules and utilize them as a platform for recognition/activation of signaling. In this review, we will focus on the current understanding of RLR-mediated signal activation and the interactions with stress-induced RNA granules. PMID:26748340

  20. Poly I:C-induced tumor cell apoptosis mediated by pattern-recognition receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiangzhong; Ai, Miao; Guo, Yuqi; Zhou, Xianbin; Wang, Li; Li, Xia; Yao, Chengfang

    2012-11-01

    Poly I:C is a synthetic dsRNA that can imitate a viral infection and elicit host immune responses by triggering specific pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) such as toll-like receptor 3 and retinoic acid inducible gene I(RIG-I)-like receptors, including RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5. Activation of these PRRs by poly I:C triggers a signal transduction cascade that results in the activation of NF-κB and production of type I interferon. Poly I:C has been used as a vaccine adjuvant for cancer immunotherapy for several decades. Evidence from recent studies indicates that poly I:C can directly induce apoptosis in several types of tumor cells, thus providing a new therapeutic approach for cancer treatment. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the induction of apoptosis by poly I:C is still unclear. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of poly I:C-induced tumor cell apoptosis, focusing on the key molecules and pathways involved in this process.

  1. Characterization and expression analysis of laboratory of genetics and physiology 2 gene in sea perch, Lateolabrax japonicus.

    PubMed

    Jia, Peng; Zhang, Jing; Jin, Yilin; Zeng, Lin; Jia, Kuntong; Yi, Meisheng

    2015-11-01

    LGP2 (laboratory of genetics and physiology 2) as a key component of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs), plays a predominant role in modulating RLRs-mediated cellular antiviral signaling during viral infection. In the present study, we cloned the LGP2 gene from the sea perch (Lateolabrax japonicus) (LjLGP2), an economically important farmed fish. The complete cDNA sequence of LjLGP2 was 2790 nt and encoded a polypeptide of 682 amino acids which contains four main structural domains: one DEAD/DEAH box helicase domain, one conserved restriction domain of bacterial type III restriction enzyme, one helicase superfamily c-terminal domain and one C-terminal domain of RIG-I, similar to most vertebrate LGP2. Subcellular localization analysis showed that LjLGP2 spanned the entire cytosol. The LjLGP2 mRNA was widespread expressed in the tested 10 tissues of healthy fish and significantly up-regulated post NNV infection. Furthermore, time course analysis showed that LjLGP2 transcripts significantly increased in the spleen, kidney and liver tissues after NNV infection. LjLGP2 mRNA expression was rapidly and significantly up-regulated in LJB cells after poly I:C stimulation and NNV infection. The present results suggest that LjLGP2 may be involved in recognization of NNV and play a role in antiviral innate immune against NNV in sea perch.

  2. Desferrioxamine, an iron chelator, inhibits CXCL10 expression induced by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid in U373MG human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Sakashita, Nina; Mushiga, Yasuaki; Yoshida, Hidemi; Hayakari, Ryo; Xing, Fei; Wang, Liang; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Tanji, Kunikazu; Chiba, Yuki; Furudate, Ken; Kawaguchi, Shogo; Murakami, Manabu; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Although iron is essential in physiological processes, accumulation of iron in central nervous system is associated with various neurological diseases including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Innate immune reactions are involved in the pathogenesis of those diseases, but roles of iron in innate immunity are not known well. In the present study, pretreatment of U373MG human astrocytoma cells with an iron chelator desferrioxamine (DFX) inhibited the expression of CXCL10 induced by a Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) agonist polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly IC). Induction of interferon-β (IFN-β) was not affected, but phosphorylation of signal transducer and transcription 1 (STAT1) was decreased by DFX. We have previously reported that various IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) are involved in CXCL10 induction by poly IC. Pretreatment with DFX also decreased the expression of these ISGs. Pretreatment of cells with FeSO4 counteracted inhibitory effects of DFX on ISG56, retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I), CXCL10 and phosphorylation of STAT1. These results suggest that iron may positively regulate STAT1 phosphorylation and following signaling to express ISG56, RIG-I and CXCL10 in U373MG cells treated with poly IC. Iron may contribute to innate immune and inflammatory reactions elicited by the TLR3 signaling in astrocytes, and may play an important role in neuroinflammatory diseases.

  3. Combinatorial localized dissolution analysis: Application to acid-induced dissolution of dental enamel and the effect of surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Parker, Alexander S; Al Botros, Rehab; Kinnear, Sophie L; Snowden, Michael E; McKelvey, Kim; Ashcroft, Alexander T; Carvell, Mel; Joiner, Andrew; Peruffo, Massimo; Philpotts, Carol; Unwin, Patrick R

    2016-08-15

    A combination of scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to quantitatively study the acid-induced dissolution of dental enamel. A micron-scale liquid meniscus formed at the end of a dual barrelled pipette, which constitutes the SECCM probe, is brought into contact with the enamel surface for a defined period. Dissolution occurs at the interface of the meniscus and the enamel surface, under conditions of well-defined mass transport, creating etch pits that are then analysed via AFM. This technique is applied to bovine dental enamel, and the effect of various treatments of the enamel surface on acid dissolution (1mM HNO3) is studied. The treatments investigated are zinc ions, fluoride ions and the two combined. A finite element method (FEM) simulation of SECCM mass transport and interfacial reactivity, allows the intrinsic rate constant for acid-induced dissolution to be quantitatively determined. The dissolution of enamel, in terms of Ca(2+) flux ( [Formula: see text] ), is first order with respect to the interfacial proton concentration and given by the following rate law: [Formula: see text] , with k0=0.099±0.008cms(-1). Treating the enamel with either fluoride or zinc ions slows the dissolution rate, although in this model system the partly protective barrier only extends around 10-20nm into the enamel surface, so that after a period of a few seconds dissolution of modified surfaces tends towards that of native enamel. A combination of both treatments exhibits the greatest protection to the enamel surface, but the effect is again transient.

  4. Combinatorial localized dissolution analysis: Application to acid-induced dissolution of dental enamel and the effect of surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Parker, Alexander S; Al Botros, Rehab; Kinnear, Sophie L; Snowden, Michael E; McKelvey, Kim; Ashcroft, Alexander T; Carvell, Mel; Joiner, Andrew; Peruffo, Massimo; Philpotts, Carol; Unwin, Patrick R

    2016-08-15

    A combination of scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to quantitatively study the acid-induced dissolution of dental enamel. A micron-scale liquid meniscus formed at the end of a dual barrelled pipette, which constitutes the SECCM probe, is brought into contact with the enamel surface for a defined period. Dissolution occurs at the interface of the meniscus and the enamel surface, under conditions of well-defined mass transport, creating etch pits that are then analysed via AFM. This technique is applied to bovine dental enamel, and the effect of various treatments of the enamel surface on acid dissolution (1mM HNO3) is studied. The treatments investigated are zinc ions, fluoride ions and the two combined. A finite element method (FEM) simulation of SECCM mass transport and interfacial reactivity, allows the intrinsic rate constant for acid-induced dissolution to be quantitatively determined. The dissolution of enamel, in terms of Ca(2+) flux ( [Formula: see text] ), is first order with respect to the interfacial proton concentration and given by the following rate law: [Formula: see text] , with k0=0.099±0.008cms(-1). Treating the enamel with either fluoride or zinc ions slows the dissolution rate, although in this model system the partly protective barrier only extends around 10-20nm into the enamel surface, so that after a period of a few seconds dissolution of modified surfaces tends towards that of native enamel. A combination of both treatments exhibits the greatest protection to the enamel surface, but the effect is again transient. PMID:27209395

  5. L-arginine augments the antioxidant effect of garlic against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Harisa, Gamal Eldin I; Abo-Salem, Osama M; El-Sayed, El-Sayed M; Taha, Ehab I; El-Halawany, Nermin

    2009-10-01

    Garlic contains many sulfhydryl compounds that act as antioxidants. However, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in inflammation is controversial. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possible protective effect of garlic against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats, as well as the probable modulatory effect of L-arginine (NO precursor) on garlic activity. Intra-rectal inoculation of rats with 4% acetic acid for 3 consecutive days caused a significant increase in the colon weight and marked decrease in the colon length. In addition, acetic acid induced a significant increase in serum levels of nitrate as well as colonic tissue content of malondialdehyde (MDA). Moreover, colonic tissue contents of glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were markedly reduced. On the other hand, pre-treatment of rats with garlic (0.25 g/kgbwt, orally) for 4 consecutive weeks and 3 days during induction of colitis significantly reduced the increase in the colon weight induced by acetic acid and ameliorated alterations in oxidant and antioxidant parameters. Interestingly, oral co-administration of garlic (0.25 g/kgbwt) and L-arginine (625 mg/kgbwt) for the same period of garlic administration mitigated the changes in both colon weight and length induced by acetic acid and increased garlic effect on colon tissue contents of MDA and GSH. In conclusion, L-arginine can augment the protective effect of garlic against ulcerative colitis; an effect that might be mainly attributed to its NO donating property resulting in enhancement of garlic antioxidant effect. Further studies will be needed to determine which one of the active ingredients of garlic has the main antioxidant effect to be used with L-arginine. PMID:19783514

  6. Acid-induced molten globule state of a prion protein: crucial role of Strand 1-Helix 1-Strand 2 segment.

    PubMed

    Honda, Ryo P; Yamaguchi, Kei-ichi; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2014-10-31

    The conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to its pathogenic isoform (PrP(Sc)) is a critical event in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. Pathogenic conversion is usually associated with the oligomerization process; therefore, the conformational characteristics of the pre-oligomer state may provide insights into the conversion process. Previous studies indicate that PrP(C) is prone to oligomer formation at low pH, but the conformation of the pre-oligomer state remains unknown. In this study, we systematically analyzed the acid-induced conformational changes of PrP(C) and discovered a unique acid-induced molten globule state at pH 2.0 termed the "A-state." We characterized the structure of the A-state using far/near-UV CD, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate fluorescence, size exclusion chromatography, and NMR. Deuterium exchange experiments with NMR detection revealed its first unique structure ever reported thus far; i.e. the Strand 1-Helix 1-Strand 2 segment at the N terminus was preferentially unfolded, whereas the Helix 2-Helix 3 segment at the C terminus remained marginally stable. This conformational change could be triggered by the protonation of Asp(144), Asp(147), and Glu(196), followed by disruption of key salt bridges in PrP(C). Moreover, the initial population of the A-state at low pH (pH 2.0-5.0) was well correlated with the rate of the β-rich oligomer formation, suggesting that the A-state is the pre-oligomer state. Thus, the specific conformation of the A-state would provide crucial insights into the mechanisms of oligomerization and further pathogenic conversion as well as facilitating the design of novel medical chaperones for treating prion diseases. PMID:25217639

  7. Spring Viremia of Carp Virus N Protein Suppresses Fish IFNφ1 Production by Targeting the Mitochondrial Antiviral Signaling Protein.

    PubMed

    Lu, Long-Feng; Li, Shun; Lu, Xiao-Bing; LaPatra, Scott E; Zhang, Nu; Zhang, Xu-Jie; Chen, Dan-Dan; Nie, Pin; Zhang, Yong-An

    2016-05-01

    For a virus to replicate efficiently, it must try and inhibit host IFN expression because IFN is an important host defense at early stages after viral infection. For aquatic viruses, the mechanisms used to escape the hosts IFN system are still unclear. In this study, we show that the N protein of spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) inhibits zebrafish IFNφ1 production by degrading the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS). First, the upregulation of IFNφ1 promoter activity stimulated by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) or MAVS was suppressed by the SVCV infection. However, the upregulation by the downstream factor of the RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway, TANK-binding kinase 1, was not affected. Notably, at the protein level, MAVS decreased remarkably when cells were infected with SVCV. Second, consistent with the result of the SVCV infection, overexpression of the N protein of SVCV blocked the IFNφ1 transcription activated by MAVS and downregulated MAVS expression at the protein level but not at the mRNA level. Further analysis demonstrated that the N protein targeted MAVS for K48-linked ubiquitination, which promoted the degradation of MAVS. These data indicated that fish MAVS could be degraded by the N protein of SVCV through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first article of a fish RIG-I-like receptor pathway interfered by an aquatic virus in an ubiquitin-proteasome manner, suggesting that immune evasion of a virus also exists in lower vertebrates. PMID:26994222

  8. TBK1-like transcript negatively regulates the production of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes through RLRs-MAVS-TBK1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Chen, Wen Qin; Hu, Yi Wei; Wu, Xiao Man; Nie, P; Chang, Ming Xian

    2016-07-01

    TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) is an essential serine/threonine-protein kinase required for Toll-like receptor (TLR)- and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) -mediated induction of type I IFN and host antiviral defense. In the present study, TBK1-like transcript, namely TBK1L, was cloned from zebrafish. Compared with TBK1, TBK1L contains an incomplete S_TKc domain, and lacks UBL_TBK1_like domain. Realtime PCR showed that TBK1L was constitutively produced in embryos, early larvae and ZF4 cells, and unchanged in ZF4 cells following SVCV infection. Overexpression of TBK1 but not TBK1L resulted in significant activation of zebrafish IFN1 and IFN3 promoters. Similarly, TBK1L had little impact on the antiviral state of the cells. However, the overexpression of TBK1L negatively regulated the induction of zebrafish IFN1 and/or IFN3 promoters mediated by the retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors (RLRs), MAVS and TBK1. In addition, the overexpression of TBK1L in zebrafish embryos led to the decreased production of many IFN-stimulated genes induced by TBK1. Collectively, these data support that zebrafish TBK1L negatively regulates RLRs-MAVS-TBK1 pathway. PMID:27060200

  9. Global analysis of the acid-induced and urea-induced unfolding of staphylococcal nuclease and two of its variants.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, R M; Eftink, M R

    1997-02-01

    We have studied the equilibrium unfolding staphylococcal nuclease and two of its variants, V66W and V66W', over two perturbation axes (acid-induced unfolding as a function of urea concentration and urea-induced unfolding as a function of pH). The transitions were monitored by simultaneous measurements of circular dichroism and fluorescence. With this multidimensional array of data (2 perturbation axes and 2 signals), we present a strategy of performing a global analysis, over as many as 12 individual data sets, to test various models for the unfolding process, to determine with greater confidence the pertinent thermodynamic parameters, and to characterize unfolding intermediates. For example, wildtype nuclease shows a cooperative two-state transition with either urea or pH as denaturant, but the global fits are improved when the model is expanded to include a pH dependence of the urea m value or when two distinct classes of protonic groups are considered. The best fit for wild-type nuclease is with delta G degree 0,UN = 6.4 kcal/mol at pH 7, with the acid-induced unfolding being triggered by protonation of three to five carboxylate groups (with possible contribution from His121), and with the urea m = 2.5 kcal mol-1 M-1. V66W' lacks the last 13 amino acids on the C-terminus, has a tryptophan at position 66, has a predominantly beta-sheet structure, and is less stable than the wild type. For V66W', delta G degree 0,UN = 1.6 kcal/mol, m = 1.2 kcal mol-1 M-1, and there are two or three groups responsible for acid unfolding. V66W, a full-length mutant with two tryptophan residues, unfolds via a three-state mechanism: native reversible intermediate reversible unfolded. It appears that its beta-barrel subdomain retains structure in the intermediate state. Assuming that the unfolding of V66W' and the beta-barrel subdomain of V66W can be described by the same thermodynamic parameters, a global analysis enabled a description of the alpha subdomain of V66W with delta G

  10. Olodaterol attenuates citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wex, Eva; Bouyssou, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Excessive coughing is a common feature of airway diseases. Different G-protein coupled receptors, including β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-AR), have been implicated in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cough reflex. However, the potential antitussive property of β2-AR agonists in patients with respiratory disease is a matter of ongoing debate. The aim of our study was to test the efficacy of the long-acting β2-AR agonist olodaterol with regard to its antitussive property in a pre-clinical model of citric acid-induced cough in guinea pigs and to compare the results to different clinically relevant β2-AR agonists. In our study β2-AR agonists were intratracheally administered, as dry powder, into the lungs of naïve or ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs 15 minutes prior to induction of cough by exposure to citric acid. Cough events were counted over 15 minutes during the citric acid exposure. Olodaterol dose-dependently inhibited the number of cough events in naïve and even more potently and with a greater maximal efficacy in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs (p < 0.01). Formoterol and salmeterol showed a trend towards reducing cough. On the contrary, indacaterol demonstrated pro-tussive properties as it significantly increased the number of coughs, both in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized animals (p < 0.001). In conclusion, olodaterol, at doses eliciting bronchodilation, showed antitussive properties in a model of citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. This is in agreement with pre-clinical and clinical studies showing antitussive efficacy of β2-AR agonists. Indacaterol increased the number of coughs in this model, which concurs with clinical data where a transient cough has been observed after indacaterol inhalation. While the antitussive properties of β2-AR agonists can be explained by their ability to lead to the cAMP-induced hyperpolarization of the neuron membrane thereby inhibiting sensory nerve activation and the

  11. Olodaterol Attenuates Citric Acid-Induced Cough in Naïve and Ovalbumin-Sensitized and Challenged Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wex, Eva; Bouyssou, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Excessive coughing is a common feature of airway diseases. Different G-protein coupled receptors, including β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-AR), have been implicated in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cough reflex. However, the potential antitussive property of β2-AR agonists in patients with respiratory disease is a matter of ongoing debate. The aim of our study was to test the efficacy of the long-acting β2-AR agonist olodaterol with regard to its antitussive property in a pre-clinical model of citric acid-induced cough in guinea pigs and to compare the results to different clinically relevant β2-AR agonists. In our study β2-AR agonists were intratracheally administered, as dry powder, into the lungs of naïve or ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs 15 minutes prior to induction of cough by exposure to citric acid. Cough events were counted over 15 minutes during the citric acid exposure. Olodaterol dose-dependently inhibited the number of cough events in naïve and even more potently and with a greater maximal efficacy in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs (p < 0.01). Formoterol and salmeterol showed a trend towards reducing cough. On the contrary, indacaterol demonstrated pro-tussive properties as it significantly increased the number of coughs, both in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized animals (p < 0.001). In conclusion, olodaterol, at doses eliciting bronchodilation, showed antitussive properties in a model of citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. This is in agreement with pre-clinical and clinical studies showing antitussive efficacy of β2-AR agonists. Indacaterol increased the number of coughs in this model, which concurs with clinical data where a transient cough has been observed after indacaterol inhalation. While the antitussive properties of β2-AR agonists can be explained by their ability to lead to the cAMP-induced hyperpolarization of the neuron membrane thereby inhibiting sensory nerve activation and the

  12. Biocontrol agents-mediated suppression of oxalic acid induced cell death during Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-pea interaction.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akansha; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Surendra; Sarma, Birinchi Kumar; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2015-05-01

    Oxalic acid (OA) is an important pathogenic factor during early Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-host interaction and might work by reducing hydrogen peroxide production (H2 O2 ). In the present investigation, oxalic acid-induced cell death in pea was studied. Pea plants treated with biocontrol agents (BCAs) viz., Pseudomonas aeruginosa PJHU15, Bacillus subtilis BHHU100, and Trichoderma harzianum TNHU27 either singly and/or in consortium acted on S. sclerotiorum indirectly by enabling plants to inhibit the OA-mediated suppression of oxidative burst via induction of H2 O2 . Our results showed that BCA treated plants upon treatment with culture filtrate of the pathogen, conferred the resistance via. significantly decreasing relative cell death of pea against S. sclerotiorum compared to control plants without BCA treatment but treated with the culture filtrate of the pathogen. The results obtained from the present study indicate that the microbes especially in consortia play significant role in protection against S. sclerotiorum by modulating oxidative burst and partially enhancing tolerance by increasing the H2 O2 generation, which is otherwise suppressed by OA produced by the pathogen.

  13. Stearic acid induces proinflammatory cytokine production partly through activation of lactate-HIF1α pathway in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hongming; Chen, Liang; Hao, Lijun; Zhang, Xuan; Chen, Yujuan; Ruan, Zhihua; Liang, Houjie

    2015-01-01

    The biomechanics stress and chronic inflammation in obesity are causally linked to osteoarthritis. However, the metabolic factors mediating obesity-related osteoarthritis are still obscure. Here we scanned and identified at least two elevated metabolites (stearic acid and lactate) from the plasma of diet-induced obese mice. We found that stearic acid potentiated LDH-a-dependent production of lactate, which further stabilized HIF1α protein and increased VEGF and proinflammatory cytokine expression in primary mouse chondrocytes. Treatment with LDH-a and HIF1α inhibitors notably attenuated stearic acid-or high fat diet-stimulated proinflammatory cytokine production in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, positive correlation of plasma lactate, cartilage HIF1α and cytokine levels with the body mass index was observed in subjects with osteoarthritis. In conclusion, saturated free fatty acid induced proinflammatory cytokine production partly through activation of a novel lactate-HIF1α pathway in chondrocytes. Our findings hold promise of developing novel clinical strategies for the management of obesity-related diseases such as osteoarthritis.

  14. Possible protective role of pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile in lithocholic acid-induced hepatotoxicity through enhanced hepatic lipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Nomoto, Masahiro; Sotodate, Fumiaki; Mizuki, Tomohiro; Hori, Wataru; Nagayasu, Miho; Yokokawa, Shinya; Ninomiya, Shin-ichi; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2010-06-25

    Lithocholic acid (LCA) feeding causes both liver parenchymal and cholestatic damages in experimental animals. Although pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile (PCN)-mediated protection against LCA-induced hepatocyte injury may be explained by induction of drug metabolizing enzymes, the protection from the delayed cholestasis remains incompletely understood. Thus, the PCN-mediated protective mechanism has been studied from the point of modification of lipid metabolism. At an early stage of LCA feeding, an imbalance of biliary bile acid and phospholipid excretion was observed. Co-treatment with PCN reversed the increase in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities and hepatic hydrophobic bile acid levels. LCA feeding decreased hepatic mRNA levels of several fatty acid- and phospholipid-related genes before elevation of serum ALT and ALP activities. On the other hand, PCN co-treatment reversed the decrease in the mRNA levels and hepatic levels of phospholipids, triglycerides and free fatty acids. PCN co-treatment also reversed the decrease in biliary phospholipid output in LCA-fed mice. Treatment with PCN alone increased hepatic phospholipid, triglyceride and free fatty acid concentrations. Hepatic fatty acid and phosphatidylcholine synthetic activities increased in mice treated with PCN alone or PCN and LCA, compared to control mice, whereas these activities decreased in LCA-fed mice. These results suggest the possibility that PCN-mediated stimulation of lipogenesis contributes to the protection from lithocholic acid-induced hepatotoxicity.

  15. Protective Effect of Cod (Gadus macrocephalus) Skin Collagen Peptides on Acetic Acid-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Huina; Wang, Zhicong; Hou, Hu; Zhang, Zhaohui; Li, Bafang

    2016-07-01

    This research was performed to explore the protective effect of cod skin collagen peptides (CCP) on gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid. The CCP were fractionated into low molecular CCP (LMCCP, Mw < 3 kDa) and high molecular CCP (HMCCP, Mw > 3 kDa). In HMCCP and LMCCP, glycine of accounted for about one-third of the total amino acids without cysteine and tryptophan, and hydrophobic amino acids accounted for about 50%. After 21 d CCP treatment (60 or 300 mg/kg, p.o./daily), the healing effects on acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers were evaluated by macroscopic measure, microscopic measure, and immune histochemistry. Moreover, the expression levels of the growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), and the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was detected. The results showed that both LMCCP and HMCCP could significantly decrease the ulcer areas and promote the healing of the lesions. They also could improve the levels of hexosamine, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, and reduce the content of malondialdehyde and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In addition, the expression level of TGFβ1 gene and HSP70 mRNA was significantly improved by the treatment. It suggested that CCP could be able to improve symptoms of gastric ulcer and probably be used in the treatment of gastric ulcer. PMID:27219644

  16. Phenylbutyric acid induces the cellular senescence through an Akt/p21{sup WAF1} signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hag Dong; Jang, Chang-Young; Choe, Jeong Min; Sohn, Jeongwon; Kim, Joon

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenylbutyric acid induces cellular senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenylbutyric acid activates Akt kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The knockdown of PERK also can induce cellular senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt/p21{sup WAF1} pathway activates in PERK knockdown induced cellular senescence. -- Abstract: It has been well known that three sentinel proteins - PERK, ATF6 and IRE1 - initiate the unfolded protein response (UPR) in the presence of misfolded or unfolded proteins in the ER. Recent studies have demonstrated that upregulation of UPR in cancer cells is required to survive and proliferate. Here, we showed that long exposure to 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA), a chemical chaperone that can reduce retention of unfolded and misfolded proteins in ER, induced cellular senescence in cancer cells such as MCF7 and HT1080. In addition, we found that treatment with PBA activates Akt, which results in p21{sup WAF1} induction. Interestingly, the depletion of PERK but not ATF6 and IRE1 also induces cellular senescence, which was rescued by additional depletion of Akt. This suggests that Akt pathway is downstream of PERK in PBA induced cellular senescence. Taken together, these results show that PBA induces cellular senescence via activation of the Akt/p21{sup WAF1} pathway by PERK inhibition.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of trans-caryophyllene against kainic acid induced seizure activity and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Song, Zhi; Liao, Daguang; Zhang, Tianyi; Liu, Feng; Zhuang, Kai; Luo, Kui; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Trans-caryophyllene (TC), a component of essential oil found in many flowering plants, has shown its neuroprotective effects in various neurological disorders. However, the effects of TC on epilepsy haven't been reported before. In this study, we investigated the effect of TC on kainic acid-induced seizure activity caused by oxidative stress and pro-inflammation. We found that TC pretreatment significantly decreased seizure activity score compared to kainic acid treated group. Importantly, TC pretreatment leads to lowering the mortality in kainic acid treated mice. In addition, TC was found to significantly inhibit KA-induced generation of malondialdehyde. TC pretreatment also preserved the activity of GPx, SOD, and CAT. Notably, our data shows that an important property of TC is its capacity to exert cerebral anti-inflammatory effects by mitigating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β. These data suggest that TC has a potential protective effect on chemical induced seizure and brain damage. PMID:25417010

  18. Standardized Extract of Bacopa monniera Attenuates Okadaic Acid Induced Memory Dysfunction in Rats: Effect on Nrf2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Rajasekar; Hanif, Kashif; Siddiqui, Hefazat Husain; Nath, Chandishwar

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of standardized extract of Bacopa monnieri (memory enhancer) and Melatonin (an antioxidant) on nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway in Okadaic acid induced memory impaired rats. OKA (200 ng) was administered intracerebroventricularly (ICV) to induce memory impairment in rats. Bacopa monnieri (BM-40 and 80 mg/kg) and Melatonin (20 mg/kg) were administered 1 hr before OKA injection and continued daily up to day 13. Memory functions were assessed by Morris water maze test on days 13–15. Rats were sacrificed for biochemical estimations of oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, apoptosis, and molecular studies of Nrf2, HO1, and GCLC expressions in cerebral cortex and hippocampus brain regions. OKA caused a significant memory deficit with oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and neuronal loss which was concomitant with attenuated expression of Nrf2, HO1, and GCLC. Treatment with BM and Melatonin significantly improved memory dysfunction in OKA rats as shown by decreased latency time and path length. The treatments also restored Nrf2, HO1, and GCLC expressions and decreased oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and neuronal loss. Thus strengthening the endogenous defense through Nrf2 modulation plays a key role in the protective effect of BM and Melatonin in OKA induced memory impairment in rats. PMID:24078822

  19. Platelet-Rich Plasma in Treatment of Zoledronic Acid-Induced Bisphosphonate-related Osteonecrosis of the Jaws

    PubMed Central

    Sarkarat, Farzin; Kalantar Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein; Jahanbani, Jahanfar; Sepehri, Dena; Kahali, Roozbeh; Nematollahi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ) is a well-known challenging entity warranting management. Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) plays an important role in bone biology by enhancing bone repair and regeneration. Objectives: The aim of this animal study was to evaluate the effects of PRP on zoledronic acid-induced BRONJ. Materials and Methods: Seven rats were given 0.04 mg Zoledronic acid intravenously once a week for five weeks. Two weeks later, the animals underwent extraction of their first lower molars, bilaterally. After clinical confirmation of the osteonecrosis, PRP was injected randomly into one of the extraction sockets of each rat. Three weeks later, all rats were sacrificed in order to obtain histological sections. The analysis of epithelialization was performed by McNamar’s test, and the analysis of osteogenesis and angiogenesis was performed by the Wilcoxon Sign Rank test. P value was set at 0.05. Results: We found no significant differences between the two groups regarding the amount of epithelialization, angiogenesis or sequestrum formation (P > 0.05), but a significant difference was seen between the two groups regarding the amount of existing vital bone (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our study demonstrates positive results (preservation or regeneration of bone) using PRP in treatment of BRONJ. Although PRP may enhance osseous regeneration, long-term follow-ups are required to confirm its benefits. PMID:25032151

  20. Isobolographic analysis of interaction between cyclooxygenase inhibitors and tramadol in acetic acid-induced writhing in mice.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, Padi S V; Jain, Naveen K; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Shrinivas K

    2004-07-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and opioids are the most commonly used analgesics in the management of acute and chronic pain. Combined use of NSAIDs and opioids has been indicated for achieving better analgesia with reduced side effects. The present study was aimed at evaluating the combination of different NSAIDs, which inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes and tramadol against acetic acid-induced writhing in mice. The expected beneficial effect of combination regimen was analyzed by isobolographic analysis. The oral and intrathecally administered tramadol, a mu-opioid and naproxen, a nonselective COX inhibitor produced dose-dependent antinociception, however, rofecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor lacked analgesic efficacy in writhing test. Isobolographic analysis showed synergistic or supra-additive interactions for the combinations of naproxen and tramadol after oral and intrathecal administration. However, similar interaction was not observed when tramadol was combined with rofecoxib. Pretreatment with naloxone partially reversed the antinociceptive effect of tramadol per se and its combination with naproxen without modifying the per se effect of NSAID. The results demonstrated marked synergistic interaction between naproxen and tramadol and such interaction involved opioid as well as non-opioid mechanisms of tramadol and inhibition of COX-1 but not COX-2 by naproxen.

  1. A new 5-lipoxygenase selective inhibitor derived from Artocarpus communis strongly inhibits arachidonic acid-induced ear edema.

    PubMed

    Koshihara, Y; Fujimoto, Y; Inoue, H

    1988-06-01

    Natural compounds isolated from the Indonesian plant, Artocarpus communis, inhibit 5-lipoxygenase of cultured mastocytoma cells. One of five compounds, AC-5-1, strongly inhibits 5-lipoxygenase with a half-inhibition dose of 5 +/- 0.12 X 10(-8) M. However, prostaglandin synthesizing activity is not inhibited until 10(-5) M. AC-5-1 is a highly selective inhibitor for 5-lipoxygenase. The AC-5-1 at 10(-5) M inhibits 96% of leukotriene C4 synthesis of mouse peritoneal cells facilitated by calcium-ionophore. Arachidonic acid-induced ear edema of mice, an in vivo inflammatory model, involving leukotriene induction, is strongly inhibited by AC-5-1 in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition is the strongest of any inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase reported previously. Since the natural compound AC-5-1 can selectively inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and affect in vivo inflammation, it will be interesting to investigate the role of leukotrienes on inflammation and other physiological processes.

  2. DFT study of the molecular mechanism of Lewis acid induced [4 + 3] cycloadditions of 2-alkylacroleins with cyclopentadiene.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Arnó, Manuel; Sáez, José A

    2009-08-21

    The mechanism of the Lewis acid (AlCl(3)) induced [4 + 3] cycloaddition of 2-methylacrolein with cyclopentadiene (Cp) [ J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2004, 126, 2692] has been examined here through DFT calculations at the MPW1K(DCM)/6-31+G** level. Formation of these seven-membered carbocycles is a domino process that comprises three consecutive reactions. The first one is a polar Diels-Alder reaction that is initialized by the nucleophilic attack of Cp to the beta-conjugated position of acrolein, yielding the formation of the endo and exo [4 + 2] cycloadducts. The corresponding LA-[4 + 2] cycloadduct complexes equilibrate through a skeleton rearrangement with a low free activation energy with two seven-membered zwitterionic intermediates, which undergo a rapid intramolecular hydride shift to yield irreversibly the formally endo and exo [4 + 3] cycloadducts. A comparative analysis of this mechanism with that for the Lewis acid induced [4 + 3] cycloadditions of 2-silyloxyacroleins allows establishment of the requirements for the formation of the seven-membered carbocycles.

  3. Effect of ethanolic extract of leaves of Paederia foetida Linn. on acetic acid induced colitis in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Das, Swarnamoni; Kanodia, Lalit; Mukherjee, Apurba; Hakim, Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of ethanolic extract of leaves of Paederia foetida on acetic acid induced colitis in albino rats. Materials and Methods: Ethanolic extract of Paederia foetida (EEPF) was prepared by percolation method. Acute toxicity test was done by using Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development guidelines. Albino rats were divided into four groups of five animals each. Groups A and B received 3% gum acacia. Groups C and D received EEPF 500 mg/kg body weight (BW) and 5-aminosalisylic acid 100 mg/kg BW respectively. Colitis was induced by transrectal administration of 4% acetic acid on 5th day. All animals were sacrificed after 48 h of colitis induction and distal 10 cm of the colon was dissected. Colon was weighed for disease activity index (DAI) and scored macroscopically and microscopically. Biochemical assessment of tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was done in colonic tissue homogenate and malondialdehyde (MDA) was estimated in serum. Results: P. foetida showed significant (P < 0.05) reduction in DAI, macroscopic and microscopic lesion score as well as significant (P < 0.05) improvement in MPO, MDA, CAT, and SOD level as compared to Group B. Conclusions: The ethanolic extract of leaves of P. foetida showed significant amelioration of experimentally induced colitis, which may be attributed to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant property. PMID:24130378

  4. Relationship between the acid-induced cough response and airway responsiveness and obstruction in children with asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, T.; Mochizuki, H.; Tokuyama, K.; Morikawa, A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In children with asthma little is known about the direct effect of the bronchoconstrictor and bronchodilator response on the cough threshold, or the relationship between bronchial responsiveness and the cough threshold. A study was undertaken to determine the effect of histamine-induced bronchoconstriction and salbutamol-induced bronchodilatation on the cough threshold in response to inhaled acetic acid, and to examine the relationship between the acetic acid cough threshold and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to histamine in children with asthma. METHODS: Nineteen children with asthma (16 boys) of mean (SE) age 10.6 (0.6) years were enrolled in the study. On day 1 each underwent a histamine inhalation challenge to determine the provocative concentration causing a fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of more than 20% (PC20) as an index of individual bronchial hyperresponsiveness. On day 2 the acetic acid cough threshold was determined before and just after the inhalation of the PC20 concentration of histamine, and then salbutamol (1 mg/m2) was inhaled to relieve the bronchoconstriction. Ten of the 19 patients (eight boys) of mean age 12.2 (0.7) years also tried acetic acid inhalation challenge just after salbutamol inhalation. RESULTS: There was no relationship between the bronchial responsiveness to histamine and acetic acid cough threshold in these patients. The acetic acid cough threshold after histamine inhalation was similar to that before histamine, although FEV1 decreased after histamine. In the 10 patients who also tried acetic acid inhalation challenge after salbutamol the cough threshold did not change. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that acid-induced cough sensitivity and bronchomotor tone are independently regulated in children with asthma. PMID:8779132

  5. Dietary interesterified fat enriched with palmitic acid induces atherosclerosis by impairing macrophage cholesterol efflux and eliciting inflammation.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Milessa Silva; Lavrador, Maria Silvia Ferrari; Koike, Marcia Kiyomi; Cintra, Dennys Esper; Ferreira, Fabiana Dias; Nunes, Valeria Sutti; Castilho, Gabriela; Gioielli, Luiz Antonio; Paula Bombo, Renata; Catanozi, Sergio; Caldini, Elia Garcia; Damaceno-Rodrigues, Nilsa Regina; Passarelli, Marisa; Nakandakare, Edna Regina; Lottenberg, Ana Maria

    2016-06-01

    Interesterified fats are currently being used to replace trans fatty acids. However, their impact on biological pathways involved in the atherosclerosis development was not investigated. Weaning male LDLr-KO mice were fed for 16weeks on a high-fat diet (40% energy as fat) containing polyunsaturated (PUFA), TRANS, palmitic (PALM), palmitic interesterified (PALM INTER), stearic (STEAR) or stearic interesterified (STEAR INTER). Plasma lipids, lipoprotein profile, arterial lesion area, macrophage infiltration, collagen content and inflammatory response modulation were determined. Macrophage cholesterol efflux and the arterial expression of cholesterol uptake and efflux receptors were also performed. The interesterification process did not alter plasma lipid concentrations. Although PALM INTER did not increase plasma cholesterol concentration as much as TRANS, the cholesterol enrichment in the LDL particle was similar in both groups. Moreover, PALM INTER induced the highest IL-1β, MCP-1 and IL-6 secretion from peritoneal macrophages as compared to others. This inflammatory response elicited by PALM INTER was confirmed in arterial wall, as compared to PALM. These deleterious effects of PALM INTER culminate in higher atherosclerotic lesion, macrophage infiltration and collagen content than PALM, STEAR, STEAR INTER and PUFA. These events can partially be attributed to a macrophage cholesterol accumulation, promoted by apoAI and HDL2-mediated cholesterol efflux impairment and increased Olr-1 and decreased Abca1 and Nr1h3 expressions in the arterial wall. Interesterified fats containing palmitic acid induce atherosclerosis development by promoting cholesterol accumulation in LDL particles and macrophagic cells, activating the inflammatory process in LDLr-KO mice.

  6. Priming by Hexanoic Acid Induce Activation of Mevalonic and Linolenic Pathways and Promotes the Emission of Plant Volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Llorens, Eugenio; Camañes, Gemma; Lapeña, Leonor; García-Agustín, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Hexanoic acid (Hx) is a short natural monocarboxylic acid present in some fruits and plants. Previous studies reported that soil drench application of this acid induces effective resistance in tomato plants against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae and in citrus against Alternaria alternata and Xanthomonas citri. In this work, we performed an in deep study of the metabolic changes produced in citrus by the application of Hx in response to the challenge pathogen A. alternata, focusing on the response of the plant. Moreover, we used 13C labeled hexanoic to analyze its behavior inside the plants. Finally, we studied the volatile emission of the treated plants after the challenge inoculation. Drench application of 13C labeled hexanoic demonstrated that this molecule stays in the roots and is not mobilized to the leaves, suggesting long distance induction of resistance. Moreover, the study of the metabolic profile showed an alteration of more than 200 molecules differentially induced by the application of the compound and the inoculation with the fungus. Bioinformatics analysis of data showed that most of these altered molecules could be related with the mevalonic and linolenic pathways suggesting the implication of these pathways in the induced resistance mediated by Hx. Finally, the application of this compound showed an enhancement of the emission of 17 volatile metabolites. Taken together, this study indicates that after the application of Hx this compound remains in the roots, provoking molecular changes that may trigger the defensive response in the rest of the plant mediated by changes in the mevalonic and linolenic pathways and enhancing the emission of volatile compounds, suggesting for the first time the implication of mevalonic pathway in response to hexanoic application. PMID:27148319

  7. Excitatory amino acid transporter 2 downregulation correlates with thalamic neuronal death following kainic acid-induced status epilepticus in rat.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Masashi; Kurokawa, Haruna; Shimada, Akinori; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Miyata, Hajime; Morita, Takehito

    2015-02-01

    Recurrent seizures without interictal resumption (status epilepticus) have been reported to induce neuronal death in the midline thalamic region that has functional roles in memory and decision-making; however, the pathogenesis underlying status epilepticus-induced thalamic neuronal death is yet to be determined. We performed histological and immunohistochemical studies as well as cerebral blood flow measurement using 4.7 tesla magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer on midline thalamic region in Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 75, male, 7 weeks after birth, body weight 250-300 g) treated with intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (10 mg/kg) to induce status epilepticus (n = 55) or normal saline solution (n = 20). Histological study using paraffin-embedded specimens revealed neuronal death showing ischemic-like changes and Fluoro-Jade C positivity with calcium deposition in the midline thalamic region of epileptic rats. The distribution of neuronal death was associated with focal loss of immunoreactivity for excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2), stronger immunoreaction for glutamate and increase in number of Iba-1-positive microglial cells showing swollen cytoplasm and long processes. Double immunofluorescence study demonstrated co-expression of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) within microglial cells, and loss of EAAT2 immunoreactivity in reactive astrocytes. These microglial alterations and astrocytic EAAT2 downregulation were also observed in tissue without obvious neuronal death in kainic acid-treated rats. These results suggest the possible role of glutamate excitotoxicity in neuronal death in the midline thalamic region following kainic acid-induced status epilepticus due to astrocytic EAAT2 downregulation following microglial activation showing upregulation of IL-1β and iNOS.

  8. Anti-inflammatory effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. seeds on acetic acid-induced acute colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Minaiyan, Mohsen; Asghari, Gholamreza; Taheri, Diana; Saeidi, Mozhgan; Nasr-Esfahani, Salar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Anti-inflammatory, immuno-modulatory, and antioxidant properties of Moringa oleifera Lam. suggest that it might have beneficial effects on colitis. The present study was performed to investigate the anticolitis effect of Moringa oleifera seeds hydro-alcoholic extract (MSHE) and its chloroform fraction (MCF) on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods: Both MSHE and MCF with three increasing doses (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) were administered orally to separate groups of male Wistar rats, 2 h before ulcer induction (using acetic acid 4%) and continued for 5 days. Prednisolone (4 mg/kg) and normal saline (1 ml/kg) were used in reference and control groups, respectively. All rats were sacrificed 24 h after the last dose (at day 6) and tissue injuries were assessed macroscopically and pathologically. Results: Extracts with three doses mentioned before were effective to reduce weight of distal colon (8 cm) as a marker for inflammation and tissue edema. Three doses of MSHE and two greater doses of MCF (100 and 200 mg/kg) were effective to reduce ulcer severity, area, and index as well as mucosal inflammation severity and extent, crypt damage, invasion involvement, total colitis index, and MPO activity compared with controls. MCF (50 mg/kg) was not significantly effective in reducing evaluated parameters of colitis compared with controls. Conclusion: It is concluded that MSHE and MCF were both effective to treat experimental colitis and this might be attributed to their similar major components, biophenols and flavonoids. Since the efficacy was evident even in low doses of MSHE, presence of active constituents with high potency in seeds is persuasive. PMID:25050310

  9. The Healing Effect of Teucrium polium in Acetic Acid-Induced Ulcerative Colitis in the Dog as an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabani, Davood; Bahrami, Faranak; Hosseini, Seyed Vahid; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad; Tanideh, Nader; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Amini, Masoud; Amini, Afshin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which include ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD), are debilitating and chronic disorders with unpredictable courses and complicated treatment measures. Therefore, an efficient treatment protocol seems necessary as therapeutic prophylaxis for these disorders. This study aims to determine the healing effect of Teucrium polium (T. polium) in acetic acid-induced UC in an experimental dog model. METHODS From September to December 2010, eight male (20-25 kg) crossbred dogs were used for induction of UC by 6% acetic acid, transrectally. After one week, three biopsies (10, 20 and 30 cm proximal to the anal verge) were taken from the colon of each animal for histological studies. In the presence of UC, 400 mg/kg/day of T. polium extract was administered orally and transrectally (via enema) for 30 days in six of the dogs. The remaining two dogs were used as controls and did not receive T. polium. Multiple biopsies were taken 7, 14, and 30 days after discontinuation of T. polium in the same manner as before treatment. RESULTS After administration of acetic acid, we noted the presence of multiple ulcers, diffuse inflammation, PMN infiltration in the lamina propria, glandular destruction and goblet cell depletion. Treatment with T. polium restored the colonic architecture with an increased number of healthy cells and a reduction in inflammatory cells. Damage of the surface epithelial cells and mucosal layer of the lumen were reversed, which lead to faster ulcer healing. CONCLUSION T. polium may be a treatment choice for UC and can broaden the current therapy options for UC. PMID:24829634

  10. Functional and cellular characterization of human Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1) mutations associated with Smith-Magenis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Smith-Magenis Syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome in which the dosage sensitive gene has been identified: the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1). Little is known about the function of human RAI1. Results We generated the full-length cDNA of the wild type protein and five mutated forms: RAI1-HA 2687delC, RAI1-HA 3103delC, RAI1 R960X, RAI1-HA Q1562R, and RAI1-HA S1808N. Four of them have been previously associated with SMS clinical phenotype. Molecular weight, subcellular localization and transcription factor activity of the wild type and mutant forms were studied by western blot, immunofluorescence and luciferase assays respectively. The wild type protein and the two missense mutations presented a higher molecular weight than expected, localized to the nucleus and activated transcription of a reporter gene. The frameshift mutations generated a truncated polypeptide with transcription factor activity but abnormal subcellular localization, and the same was true for the 1-960aa N-terminal half of RAI1. Two different C-terminal halves of the RAI1 protein (1038aa-end and 1229aa-end) were able to localize into the nucleus but had no transactivation activity. Conclusion Our results indicate that transcription factor activity and subcellular localization signals reside in two separate domains of the protein and both are essential for the correct functionality of RAI1. The pathogenic outcome of some of the mutated forms can be explained by the dissociation of these two domains. PMID:20738874

  11. Retinoic Acid Induced 1, RAI1: A Dosage Sensitive Gene Related to Neurobehavioral Alterations Including Autistic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Mora, Paulina; Walz, Katherina

    2010-01-01

    Genomic structural changes, such as gene Copy Number Variations (CNVs) are extremely abundant in the human genome. An enormous effort is currently ongoing to recognize and catalogue human CNVs and their associations with abnormal phenotypic outcomes. Recently, several reports related neuropsychiatric diseases (i.e. autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, mental retardation, behavioral problems, epilepsy) with specific CNV. Moreover, for some conditions, both the deletion and duplication of the same genomic segment are related to the phenotype. Syndromes associated with CNVs (microdeletion and microduplication) have long been known to display specific neurobehavioral traits. It is important to note that not every gene is susceptible to gene dosage changes and there are only a few dosage sensitive genes. Smith-Magenis (SMS) and Potocki-Lupski (PTLS) syndromes are associated with a reciprocal microdeletion and microduplication within chromosome 17p11.2. in humans. The dosage sensitive gene responsible for most phenotypes in SMS has been identified: the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1). Studies on mouse models and humans suggest that RAI1 is likely the dosage sensitive gene responsible for clinical features in PTLS. In addition, the human RAI1 gene has been implicated in several neurobehavioral traits as spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA2), schizophrenia and non syndromic autism. In this review we discuss the evidence of RAI1 as a dosage sensitive gene, its relationship with different neurobehavioral traits, gene structure and mutations, and what is known about its molecular and cellular function, as a first step in the elucidation of the mechanisms that relate dosage sensitive genes with abnormal neurobehavioral outcomes. PMID:21629438

  12. Adipokines enhance oleic acid-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells by inducing CD36 expression.

    PubMed

    Schlich, Raphaela; Lamers, Daniela; Eckel, Jürgen; Sell, Henrike

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue is not only releasing lipids but also various adipokines that are both dysregulated in the obese state and may contribute to obesity-associated vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular risk. We have previously shown that the combination of adipocyte-conditioned medium (CM) and oleic acid (OA) increases proliferation of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in a synergistic way. We identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as a component within CM that is responsible for most of the observed effects. In this study, we investigate novel mechanisms that underlie the combined effects of adipokine and oleic acid-induced proliferation of VSMC. Oleic acid leads to significant lipid accumulation in VSMC that is further enhanced by the combined treatment with CM. Accordingly CM stimulates CD36 expression in VSMC while OA is not affecting CD36. Silencing of CD36 was established and prevents lipid accumulation in all tested conditions. CD36 silencing also abrogates CM- and OA-induced proliferation and considerably reduces proliferation induced by the combination of CM and OA. At the same time, VEGF secretion and VEGF-receptor 1 (VEGF-R1) by VSMC was not affected by CD36 silencing. However, VEGF was not able to induce any proliferation in VSMC after CD36 silencing that also blunted VEGF-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. Finally, combined silencing of CD36 together with a blocking antibody against VEGF prevented most of CMOA-induced proliferation. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that CD36 is mediating CM-induced proliferation of VSMC. Induction of CD36 by adipokines enhances the response of VSMC towards VEGF and OA.

  13. Stability of the acetic acid-induced bladder irritation model in alpha chloralose-anesthetized female cats.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, F Aura; Wells, Grace I; Langdale, Christopher L; Zheng, Jihong; Thor, Karl B

    2013-01-01

    Time- and vehicle-related variability of bladder and urethral rhabdosphincter (URS) activity as well as cardiorespiratory and blood chemistry values were examined in the acetic acid-induced bladder irritation model in α-chloralose-anesthetized female cats. Additionally, bladder and urethra were evaluated histologically using Mason trichrome and toluidine blue staining. Urodynamic, cardiovascular and respiratory parameters were collected during intravesical saline infusion followed by acetic acid (0.5%) to irritate the bladder. One hour after starting acetic acid infusion, a protocol consisting of a cystometrogram, continuous infusion-induced rhythmic voiding contractions, and a 5 min "quiet period" (bladder emptied without infusion) was precisely repeated every 30 minutes. Administration of vehicle (saline i.v.) occurred 15 minutes after starting each of the first 7 cystometrograms and duloxetine (1mg/kg i.v.) after the 8(th). Acetic acid infusion into the bladder increased URS-EMG activity, bladder contraction frequency, and decreased contraction amplitude and capacity, compared to saline. Bladder activity and URS activity stabilized within 1 and 2 hours, respectively. Duloxetine administration significantly decreased bladder contraction frequency and increased URS-EMG activity to levels similar to previous reports. Cardiorespiratory parameters and blood gas levels remained consistent throughout the experiment. The epithelium of the bladder and urethra were greatly damaged and edema and infiltration of neutrophils in the lamina propria of urethra were observed. These data provide an ample evaluation of the health of the animals, stability of voiding function and appropriateness of the model for testing drugs designed to evaluate lower urinary tract as well as cardiovascular and respiratory systems function. PMID:24040064

  14. Protective Effect of the Methanolic Extract of Malva parviflora L. leaves on Acetic Acid-induced Ulcerative Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dugani, Aisha; Dakhil, Bushra; Treesh, Soad

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a general term describing chronic, idiopathic relapsing, inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract of unknown etiology. Previous studies have indicated that Malva parviflora leaf extract possesses anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiulcerogenic activity. activity. This work aimed to investigatee the anti-inflammatory effect of the methanolic (MEMP) and aqueous (AEMP) extracts of M. parviflora leaves on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods: 42 male Wistar albino rats were divided into seven groups (n = 6). Group I: Normal saline control group with no colitis; Group II: Acetic acid colitis group; Group III: 100 mg/kg/5 d MEMP; Group IV: 200 mg/kg/5 d.MEMP; Group V: 100 mg/kg/5 d AEMP; Group VI: 200 mg/kg/5 d AEMP; Group VII: Prednisolone group (2 mg/kg/5 d). Treatments were followed by induction of colitis using intrarectal instillation of 2 mL of 4% acetic acid. Colon damage was evaluated macroscopically (spleen weight/body weight, colon weight/length ratio) and the histological changes were also recorded. Results: The results of this study showed that acetic acid caused severe inflammation of the colon and a significant increase in spleen weight/body weight, and an increase in colon weight/length ratio compared with normal control group. Pretreatment with MEMP and AEMP for 5 days followed by induction of colitis resulted in a significant attenuation of spleen weight and colon weight/length ratio compared with acetic acid control group. Methanolic extract provided better anticolitic effect than aqueous extract; the effect was prominent at the dose of 200 mg/kg. Histopathological findings confirmed the protective effect of the MEMP. Conclusion: In conclusion, MEMP could ameliorate mucosal damage in experimentally induced colitis when given orally. PMID:27184642

  15. Human myeloblastic leukemia cells (HL-60) express a membrane receptor for estrogen that signals and modulates retinoic acid-induced cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kauss, M. Ariel; Reiterer, Gudrun; Bunaciu, Rodica P.; Yen, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    Estrogen receptors are historically perceived as nuclear ligand activated transcription factors. An estrogen receptor has now been found localized to the plasma membrane of human myeloblastic leukemia cells (HL-60). Its expression occurs throughout the cell cycle, progressively increasing as cells mature from G{sub 1} to S to G{sub 2}/M. To ascertain that the receptor functioned, the effect of ligands, including a non-internalizable estradiol-BSA conjugate and tamoxifen, an antagonist of nuclear estrogen receptor function, were tested. The ligands caused activation of the ERK MAPK pathway. They also modulated the effect of retinoic acid, an inducer of MAPK dependent terminal differentiation along the myeloid lineage in these cells. In particular the ligands inhibited retinoic acid-induced inducible oxidative metabolism, a functional marker of terminal myeloid cell differentiation. To a lesser degree they also diminished retinoic acid-induced earlier markers of cell differentiation, namely CD38 and CD11b. However, they did not regulate retinoic acid-induced G{sub 0} cell cycle arrest. There is thus a membrane localized estrogen receptor in HL-60 myeloblastic leukemia cells that can cause ERK activation and modulates the response of these cells to retinoic acid, indicating crosstalk between the membrane estrogen and retinoic acid evoked pathways relevant to propulsion of cell differentiation.

  16. Sida rhomboidea.Roxb extract alleviates pathophysiological changes in experimental in vivo and in vitro models of high fat diet/fatty acid induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Thounaojam, Menaka C; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N; Dandekar, Deven S; Devkar, Ranjitsinh V; Ramachandran, A V

    2012-03-01

    The present study was aim to evaluate protective role of Sida rhomboidea.Roxb (SR) extract against high fat diet/fatty acid induced pathophysiological alterations in experimental model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Effect of SR extract on plasma levels of markers of hepatic damage, plasma and hepatic lipids, mitochondrial oxidative stress, status of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants and histopathological changes in liver tissue were evaluated in high fat diet fed C57BL/6J mice. Also, the effect of SR supplementation on lipid accumulation, lipid peroxidation, cytotoxicity and cell viability were evaluated in oleic acid treated HepG2 cells. Supplementation of NASH mice with SR extract prevented high fat diet induced elevation in plasma marker enzymes of liver damage, plasma and hepatic lipids, mitochondrial oxidative stress and compromised enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant status. Further, addition of SR extract to in vitro HepG2 cells minimized oleic acid induced lipid accumulation, higher lipid peroxidation, cytotoxicity and reduced cell viability. These in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that SR extract has the potential of preventing high fat/fatty acid induced NASH mainly due to its hypolipidemic and antioxidant activities.

  17. Crystal structure of human IPS-1/MAVS/VISA/Cardif caspase activation recruitment domain

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Jane A; Randall, Richard E; Taylor, Garry L

    2008-01-01

    Background IPS-1/MAVS/VISA/Cardif is an adaptor protein that plays a crucial role in the induction of interferons in response to viral infection. In the initial stage of the intracellular antiviral response two RNA helicases, retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-association gene 5 (MDA5), are independently able to bind viral RNA in the cytoplasm. The 62 kDa protein IPS-1/MAVS/VISA/Cardif contains an N-terminal caspase activation and recruitment (CARD) domain that associates with the CARD regions of RIG-I and MDA5, ultimately leading to the induction of type I interferons. As a first step towards understanding the molecular basis of this important adaptor protein we have undertaken structural studies of the IPS-1 MAVS/VISA/Cardif CARD region. Results The crystal structure of human IPS-1/MAVS/VISA/Cardif CARD has been determined to 2.1Å resolution. The protein was expressed and crystallized as a maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion protein. The MBP and IPS-1 components each form a distinct domain within the structure. IPS-1/MAVS/VISA/Cardif CARD adopts a characteristic six-helix bundle with a Greek-key topology and, in common with a number of other known CARD structures, contains two major polar surfaces on opposite sides of the molecule. One face has a surface-exposed, disordered tryptophan residue that may explain the poor solubility of untagged expression constructs. Conclusion The IPS-1/MAVS/VISA/Cardif CARD domain adopts the classic CARD fold with an asymmetric surface charge distribution that is typical of CARD domains involved in homotypic protein-protein interactions. The location of the two polar areas on IPS-1/MAVS/VISA/Cardif CARD suggest possible types of associations that this domain makes with the two CARD domains of MDA5 or RIG-I. The N-terminal CARD domains of RIG-I and MDA5 share greatest sequence similarity with IPS-1/MAVS/VISA/Cardif CARD and this has allowed modelling of their structures. These models show a very

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of nesfatin-1 in rats with acetic acid - induced colitis and underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, C C; Oktay, S; Yuksel, M; Akakin, D; Yarat, A; Kasimay Cakir, O

    2015-10-01

    Mucosal balance impairment, bacterial over-proliferation, cytokines, inflammatory mediators are known as responsible for inflammatory bowel disease. Besides known anorexigenic, neuroprotective, and anti-apoptotic effects, the major effect of nesfatin-1 on colitis is unknown. Our aim was to investigate the possible anti-inflammatory effects of nesfatin-1 in acetic acid induced colitis model and potential underlying mechanisms. Male Spraque-Dawley rats were anesthetized by intraperitoneal ketamine (100 mg/kg) and chlorpromazine (0.75 mg/kg). For nesfatin-1 and antagonist applications some of the rats were intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) cannulated. In colitis group, intrarectally (i.r.) 4% acetic acid solution (1 ml) and 10 minutes later i.c.v. nesfatin-1 (0.05 μg/5 μl) or vehicle (5 μl) were administered. Treatments continued for 3 days. In control group, physiological saline solution was used intrarectally. To identify the underlying effective mechanism of nesfatin-1, rats were divided into 3 subgroups, 5 minutes following colitis induction; i.c.v. atosiban (oxytocin receptor antagonist), SHU9119 (melanocortin receptor antagonist) or GHSR-1a antagonist (ghrelin receptor antagonist) were administered, 5 minutes later nesfatin-1 was administered for 3 days. On the fourth day, rats were decapitated, and colon tissues were sampled. Macroscopic and microscopic damage scores of distal colon, and colonic tissue malondialdehyde, glutathione, myeloperoxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, luminol and lucigenin chemiluminescence measurements were analysed. The increased myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde levels, luminol and lucigenin chemiluminescence measurements, macroscopic and microscopic damage scores with colitis induction (P < 0.05 - 0.001) were decreased with nesfatin-1 treatment (P < 0.05 - 0.001). Nesfatin-1 may show this effect by inhibiting neutrophil infiltration through tissues and by decreasing formation of free oxygen radicals. Atosiban and

  19. Docosahexaenoic acid and other fatty acids induce a decrease in pHi in Jurkat T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Aires, Virginie; Hichami, Aziz; Moutairou, Kabirou; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2003-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) induced rapid (t1/2=33 s) and dose-dependent decreases in pHi in BCECF-loaded human (Jurkat) T-cells. Addition of 5-(N,N-dimethyl)-amiloride, an inhibitor of Na+/H+ exchanger, prolonged DHA-induced acidification as a function of time, indicating that the exchanger is implicated in pHi recovery. Other fatty acids like oleic acid, arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, but not palmitic acid, also induced a fall in pHi in these cells. To assess the role of calcium in the DHA-induced acidification, we conducted experiments in Ca2+-free (0% Ca2+) and Ca2+-containing (100% Ca2+) buffer. We observed that there was no difference in the degree of DHA-induced transient acidification in both the experimental conditions, though pHi recovery was faster in 0% Ca2+ medium than that in 100% Ca2+ medium. In the presence of BAPTA, a calcium chelator, a rapid recovery of DHA-induced acidosis was observed. Furthermore, addition of CaCl2 into 0% Ca2+ medium curtailed DHA-evoked rapid pHi recovery. In 0% Ca2+ medium, containing BAPTA, DHA did not evoke increases in [Ca2+]i, though this fatty acid still induced a rapid acidification in these cells. These observations suggest that calcium is implicated in the long-lasting DHA-induced acidosis. DHA-induced rapid acidification may be due to its deprotonation in the plasma membrane (flip-flop model), as suggested by the following observations: (1) DHA with a –COOH group induced intracellular acidification, but this fatty acid with a –COOCH3 group failed to do so, and (2) DHA, but not propionic acid, -induced acidification was completely reversed by addition of fatty acid-free bovine serum albumin in these cells. These results suggest that DHA induces acidosis via deprotonation and Ca2+ mobilization in human T-cells. PMID:14645139

  20. Blueberry polyphenols attenuate kainic acid-induced decrements in cognition and alter inflammatory gene expression in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Lau, Francis C.; Carey, Amanda N.; Galli, Rachel L.; Spangler, Edward L.; Ingram, Donald K.; Joseph, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease may be partly due to long-term exposure and increased susceptibility to inflammatory insults. In the current study, we investigated whether polyphenols in blueberries can reduce the deleterious effects of inflammation induced by central administration of kainic acid by altering the expression of genes associated with inflammation. To this end, 4-month-old male Fischer-344 (F344) rats were fed a control, 0.015% piroxicam (an NSAID) or 2% blueberry diet for 8 weeks before either Ringer's buffer or kainic acid was bilaterally micro-infused into the hippocampus. Two weeks later, following behavioral evaluation, the rats were killed and total RNA from the hippocampus was extracted and used in real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) to analyze the expression of inflammation-related genes. Kainic acid had deleterious effects on cognitive behavior as kainic acid-injected rats on the control diet exhibited increased latencies to find a hidden platform in the Morris water maze compared to Ringer's buffer-injected rats and utilized non-spatial strategies during probe trials. The blueberry diet, and to a lesser degree the piroxicam diet, was able to improve cognitive performance. Immunohistochemical analyses of OX-6 expression revealed that kainic acid produced an inflammatory response by increasing the OX-6 positive areas in the hippocampus of kainic acid-injected rats. Kainic acid up-regulated the expression of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α, the neurotrophic factor IGF-1, and the transcription factor NF-κB. Blueberry and piroxicam supplementations were found to attenuate the kainic acid-induced increase in the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and NF-κB, while only blueberry was able to augment the increased IGF-1 expression. These results indicate that blueberry polyphenols attenuate learning impairments following neurotoxic insult and exert anti-inflammatory actions

  1. Schistosoma mansoni: possible involvement of protein kinase C in linoleic acid-induced proteolytic enzyme release from cercariae.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, K; Mitsui, Y; Sato, K; Sakamoto, M; Aoki, Y

    1991-04-01

    antagonist, trifluoperazine (TFP), a better calmodulin antagonist on schistosome, or by verapamil, a Ca2+ channel blocker. Linoleic acid-induced release of enzyme was partially inhibited by 0.5 and 5 mM of EGTA and by 1 to 100 microM of H-7. While it was not inhibited by N-[2-(methylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-8) and N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA-1004), inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase which were used as negative controls of H-7, W-7, TFP, 8-(N,N-diethylamino)octyl 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate (TMB-8), an intracellular Ca2+ antagonist, and verapamil.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2015870

  2. The Na+/H+ Exchanger Controls Deoxycholic Acid-Induced Apoptosis by a H+-Activated, Na+-Dependent Ionic Shift in Esophageal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Aaron; Chen, HwuDauRw; Khan, Mohammad R.; Roesly, Heather; Hill, Kimberly A.; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Mandal, Amritlal; Delamere, Nicholas A.; Dvorak, Katerina

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis resistance is a hallmark of cancer cells. Typically, bile acids induce apoptosis. However during gastrointestinal (GI) tumorigenesis the cancer cells develop resistance to bile acid-induced cell death. To understand how bile acids induce apoptosis resistance we first need to identify the molecular pathways that initiate apoptosis in response to bile acid exposure. In this study we examined the mechanism of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced apoptosis, specifically the role of Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE) and Na+ influx in esophageal cells. In vitro studies revealed that the exposure of esophageal cells (JH-EsoAd1, CP-A) to DCA (0.2 mM -0.5 mM) caused lysosomal membrane perturbation and transient cytoplasmic acidification. Fluorescence microscopy in conjunction with atomic absorption spectrophotometry demonstrated that this effect on lysosomes correlated with influx of Na+, subsequent loss of intracellular K+, an increase of Ca2+ and apoptosis. However, ethylisopropyl-amiloride (EIPA), a selective inhibitor of NHE, prevented Na+, K+ and Ca2+ changes and caspase 3/7 activation induced by DCA. Ouabain and amphotericin B, two drugs that increase intracellular Na+ levels, induced similar changes as DCA (ion imbalance, caspase3/7 activation). On the contrary, DCA-induced cell death was inhibited by medium with low a Na+ concentrations. In the same experiments, we exposed rat ileum ex-vivo to DCA with or without EIPA. Severe tissue damage and caspase-3 activation was observed after DCA treatment, but EIPA almost fully prevented this response. In summary, NHE-mediated Na+ influx is a critical step leading to DCA-induced apoptosis. Cells tolerate acidification but evade DCA-induced apoptosis if NHE is inhibited. Our data suggests that suppression of NHE by endogenous or exogenous inhibitors may lead to apoptosis resistance during GI tumorigenesis. PMID:21887327

  3. The role of amino acid-induced mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1(mTORC1) signaling in insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Choi, Cheol Soo

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) controls cell growth and metabolism in response to nutrients, energy, and growth factors. Recent findings have placed the lysosome at the core of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) regulation by amino acids. Two parallel pathways, Rag GTPase-Ragulator and Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1), regulate mTOR activation on the lysosome. This review describes the recent advances in understanding amino acid-induced mTOR signaling with a particular focus on the role of mTOR in insulin resistance. PMID:27534530

  4. Resistance to butyrate impairs bile acid-induced apoptosis in human colon adenocarcinoma cells via up-regulation of Bcl-2 and inactivation of Bax.

    PubMed

    Barrasa, Juan I; Santiago-Gómez, Angélica; Olmo, Nieves; Lizarbe, María Antonia; Turnay, Javier

    2012-12-01

    A critical risk factor in colorectal carcinogenesis and tumor therapy is the resistance to the apoptotic effects of different compounds from the intestinal lumen, among them butyrate (main regulator of colonic epithelium homeostasis). Insensitivity to butyrate-induced apoptosis yields resistance to other agents, as bile acids or chemotherapy drugs, allowing the selective growth of malignant cell subpopulations. Here we analyze bile acid-induced apoptosis in a butyrate-resistant human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (BCS-TC2.BR2) to determine the mechanisms that underlay the resistance to these agents in comparison with their parental butyrate-sensitive BCS-TC2 cells. This study demonstrates that DCA and CDCA still induce apoptosis in butyrate-resistant cells through increased ROS production by activation of membrane-associated enzymes and subsequent triggering of the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Although this mechanism is similar to that described in butyrate-sensitive cells, cell viability is significantly higher in resistant cells. Moreover, butyrate-resistant cells show higher Bcl-2 levels that confer resistance to bile acid-induced apoptosis sequestering Bax and avoiding Bax-dependent pore formation in the mitochondria. We have confirmed that this resistance is reverted using the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263, thus demonstrating that the lower sensitivity of butyrate-resistant cells to the apoptotic effects of bile acids is mainly due to increased Bcl-2 levels.

  5. Synergic Interaction of Rifaximin and Mutaflor (Escherichia coli Nissle 1917) in the Treatment of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Dembiński, Artur; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Dembiński, Marcin; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Gosiewski, Tomasz; Bulanda, Małgorzata; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Gałązka, Krystyna; Konturek, Peter Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background. Inflammatory bowel disease results from the dysregulation of immune response to environmental and microbial agents in genetically susceptible individuals. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of rifaximin and/or Mutaflor (Escherichia coli Nissle 1917, EcN) administration on the healing of acetic acid-induced colitis. Methods. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats by rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Rifaximin (50 mg/kg/dose) and/or Mutaflor (10(9) CFU/dose) were given intragastrically once a day. The severity of colitis was assessed at the 8th day after induction of inflammation. Results. Treatment with rifaximin significantly accelerated the healing of colonic damage. This effect was associated with significant reversion of the acetic acid-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Moreover, administration of rifaximin significantly reduced concentration of proinflammatory TNF-α and activity of myeloperoxidase in colonic mucosa. Mutaflor given alone was without significant effect on activity of colitis. In contrast, Mutaflor given in combination with rifaximin significantly enhanced therapeutic effect of rifaximin. Moreover, Mutaflor led to settle of the colon by EcN and this effect was augmented by pretreatment with rifaximin. Conclusion. Rifaximin and Mutaflor exhibit synergic anti-inflammatory and therapeutic effect in acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. PMID:27433160

  6. Baicalein, a Constituent of Scutellaria baicalensis, Reduces Glutamate Release and Protects Neuronal Cell Against Kainic Acid-Induced Excitotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi; Lu, Cheng Wei; Lin, Tzu Yu; Huang, Shu Kuei; Wang, Su Jane

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the health benefits of flavonoids, particularly their effects on neurodegenerative disease, is increasing. This study evaluated the role of baicalein, a flavonoid compound isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine Scutellaria baicalensis, in glutamate release and glutamate neurotoxicity in the rat hippocampus. In the rat hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes), baicalein inhibits depolarization-induced glutamate release, and this phenomenon is prevented by chelating the extracellular Ca[Formula: see text] ions and blocking presynaptic Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel activity. In slice preparations, whole cell patch-clamp experiments revealed that baicalein reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, without affecting their amplitude. In a kainic acid rat model, intraperitoneally administering baicalein to rats before the kainic acid intraperitoneal injection substantially attenuated kainic acid-induced neuronal cell death, c-Fos expression, and the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin in the hippocampus. This study is the first to demonstrate that the natural compound baicalein inhibits glutamate release from hippocampal nerve terminals, and executes a protective action against kainic acid-induced excitotoxicity in vivo. The findings enhance the understanding of baicalein's action in the brain, and suggest that this natural compound is valuable for treating brain disorders related to glutamate excitotoxicity. PMID:27430911

  7. Alpha-Linolenic Acid-Induced Increase in Neurogenesis is a Key Factor in the Improvement in the Passive Avoidance Task After Soman Exposure.

    PubMed

    Piermartiri, Tetsade C B; Pan, Hongna; Chen, Jun; McDonough, John; Grunberg, Neil; Apland, James P; Marini, Ann M

    2015-09-01

    Exposure to organophosphorous (OP) nerve agents such as soman inhibits the critical enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) leading to excessive acetylcholine accumulation in synapses, resulting in cholinergic crisis, status epilepticus and brain damage in survivors. The hippocampus is profoundly damaged after soman exposure leading to long-term memory deficits. We have previously shown that treatment with three sequential doses of alpha-linolenic acid, an essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, increases brain plasticity in naïve animals. However, the effects of this dosing schedule administered after a brain insult and the underlying molecular mechanisms in the hippocampus are unknown. We now show that injection of three sequential doses of alpha-linolenic acid after soman exposure increases the endogenous expression of mature BDNF, activates Akt and the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), increases neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, increases retention latency in the passive avoidance task and increases animal survival. In sharp contrast, while soman exposure also increases mature BDNF, this increase did not activate downstream signaling pathways or neurogenesis. Administration of the inhibitor of mTORC1, rapamycin, blocked the alpha-linolenic acid-induced neurogenesis and the enhanced retention latency but did not affect animal survival. Our results suggest that alpha-linolenic acid induces a long-lasting neurorestorative effect that involves activation of mTORC1 possibly via a BDNF-TrkB-mediated mechanism. PMID:25920465

  8. Use of Activated Carbon in Packaging to Attenuate Formaldehyde-Induced and Formic Acid-Induced Degradation and Reduce Gelatin Cross-Linking in Solid Dosage Forms.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Stephen T; Zelesky, Todd C; Chen, Raymond; Likar, Michael D; MacDonald, Bruce C; Hawkins, Joel M; Carroll, Sophia C; Johnson, Gail M; Space, J Sean; Jensen, James F; DeMatteo, Vincent A

    2016-07-01

    Formaldehyde and formic acid are reactive impurities found in commonly used excipients and can be responsible for limiting drug product shelf-life. Described here is the use of activated carbon in drug product packaging to attenuate formaldehyde-induced and formic acid-induced drug degradation in tablets and cross-linking in hard gelatin capsules. Several pharmaceutical products with known or potential vulnerabilities to formaldehyde-induced or formic acid-induced degradation or gelatin cross-linking were subjected to accelerated stability challenges in the presence and absence of activated carbon. The effects of time and storage conditions were determined. For all of the products studied, activated carbon attenuated drug degradation or gelatin cross-linking. This novel use of activated carbon in pharmaceutical packaging may be useful for enhancing the chemical stability of drug products or the dissolution stability of gelatin-containing dosage forms and may allow for the 1) extension of a drug product's shelf-life when the limiting attribute is a degradation product induced by a reactive impurity, 2) marketing of a drug product in hotter and more humid climatic zones than currently supported without the use of activated carbon, and 3) enhanced dissolution stability of products that are vulnerable to gelatin cross-linking.

  9. Synergic Interaction of Rifaximin and Mutaflor (Escherichia coli Nissle 1917) in the Treatment of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Dembiński, Marcin; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bulanda, Małgorzata; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Gałązka, Krystyna; Konturek, Peter Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background. Inflammatory bowel disease results from the dysregulation of immune response to environmental and microbial agents in genetically susceptible individuals. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of rifaximin and/or Mutaflor (Escherichia coli Nissle 1917, EcN) administration on the healing of acetic acid-induced colitis. Methods. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats by rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Rifaximin (50 mg/kg/dose) and/or Mutaflor (109 CFU/dose) were given intragastrically once a day. The severity of colitis was assessed at the 8th day after induction of inflammation. Results. Treatment with rifaximin significantly accelerated the healing of colonic damage. This effect was associated with significant reversion of the acetic acid-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Moreover, administration of rifaximin significantly reduced concentration of proinflammatory TNF-α and activity of myeloperoxidase in colonic mucosa. Mutaflor given alone was without significant effect on activity of colitis. In contrast, Mutaflor given in combination with rifaximin significantly enhanced therapeutic effect of rifaximin. Moreover, Mutaflor led to settle of the colon by EcN and this effect was augmented by pretreatment with rifaximin. Conclusion. Rifaximin and Mutaflor exhibit synergic anti-inflammatory and therapeutic effect in acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. PMID:27433160

  10. Intravenous anesthetic propofol suppresses prostaglandin E2 and cysteinyl leukotriene production and reduces edema formation in arachidonic acid-induced ear inflammation.

    PubMed

    Inada, Takefumi; Hirota, Kiichi; Shingu, Koh

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is an intravenous drug widely used for anesthesia and sedation. Previously, propofol was shown to inhibit cyclo-oxygenase (COX) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activities. Because these enzyme-inhibiting effects have only been demonstrated in vitro, this study sought to ascertain whether similar effects might also be observed in vivo. In the current studies, effects of propofol were tested in a murine model of arachidonic acid-induced ear inflammation. Specifically, propofol - as a pre-treatment -- was intraperitoneally and then topical application of arachidonic acid was performed. After 1 h, tissue biopsies were collected and tested for the presence of edema and for levels of inflammatory mediators. The results indicated that the administration of propofol significantly suppressed ear edema formation, tissue myeloperoxidase activity, and tissue production of both prostaglandin E2 and cysteinyl leukotrienes. From the data, it can be concluded that propofol could exert anti-COX and anti-5-LOX activities in an in vivo model and that these activities in turn could have, at least in part, suppressed arachidonic acid-induced edema formation in the ear.

  11. Smurf2 negatively modulates RIG-I-dependent antiviral response by targeting VISA/MAVS for ubiquitination and degradation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yu; Li, Rui; Meng, Jun-Ling; Mao, He-Ting; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Jun

    2014-05-15

    VISA (also known as MAVS, Cardif, IPS-1) is the essential adaptor protein for virus-induced activation of IFN regulatory factors 3 and 7 and production of type I IFNs. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms for VISA will provide detailed insights into the positive or negative regulation of innate immune responses. In this study, we identified Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor (Smurf) 2, one of the Smad ubiquitin regulator factor proteins, as an important negative regulator of virus-triggered type I IFN signaling, which targets at the VISA level. Overexpression of Smurf2 inhibits virus-induced IFN-β and IFN-stimulated response element activation. The E3 ligase defective mutant Smurf2/C716A loses the ability to suppress virus-induced type I IFN signaling, suggesting that the negative regulation is dependent on the ubiquitin E3 ligase activity of Smurf2. Further studies demonstrated that Smurf2 interacted with VISA and targeted VISA for K48-linked ubiquitination, which promoted the degradation of VISA. Consistently, knockout or knockdown of Smurf2 expression therefore promoted antiviral signaling, which was correlated with the increase in protein stability of VISA. Our findings suggest that Smurf2 is an important nonredundant negative regulator of virus-triggered type I IFN signaling by targeting VISA for K48-linked ubiquitination and degradation.

  12. Characterization and immune response expression of the Rig-I-like receptor mda5 in common carp Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y Y; Xing, W X; Shan, S J; Zhang, S Q; Li, Y Q; Li, T; An, L; Yang, G W

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the full-length complementary (c)DNA of common carp Cyprinus carpio melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (mda5) was cloned. The complete open reading frame of C. carpio mda5 contained 2982 bp and encodes 993 amino acids. The deduced amino acids contained six functional domains: two caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARD), a conserved restriction domain of bacterial type III restriction enzyme (ResIII), a DExD/H box-containing domain (DEXDc), a helicase super family C-terminal domain (HELICc) and a C-terminal regulatory domain (RD). The mda5 gene was expressed in all tested tissues, with high levels in the gills and spleen, while lower expressed in gonad and blood. The copy numbers of mda5 were increased in the liver, spleen, head kidney and the mucosal-associated immune tissues such as the foregut, hindgut, gills and skin after stimulation with polyinosinic polycytidylic [poly(I:C)] and Aeromonas hydrophila. The myxovirus resistance gene (mx) messenger (m)RNA levels in the spleen, head kidney, foregut and gills were significantly up-regulated after poly(I:C) injection. When injected with poly(I:C), mda5 and mx transcripts were also significantly induced in vitro. These results implied that mda5 might be involved in both antiviral and antibacterial innate immune processes in C. carpio. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. PMID:27108774

  13. Confocal Raman micro-spectroscopy for rapid and label-free detection of maleic acid-induced variations in human sperm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Chen, Diling; Xu, Yan; Liu, Songhao; Zhang, Heming

    2014-01-01

    Confocal Raman microspectroscopy is a valuable analytical tool in biological and medical research, allowing the detection of sample variations without external labels or extensive preparation. To determine whether this method can assess the effect of maleic acid on sperm, we prepared human sperm samples incubated in different concentrations of maleic acid, after which Raman spectra from the various regions of sperm cells were recorded. Following the maleic acid treatment, Raman spectra indicated significant changes. Combined with other means, we found that the structures and chemical compositions of sperm membranes were damaged, and even the sperm DNA was damaged by the incorporation of maleic acid. Thus, this technique can be used for detection and identification of maleic acid-induced changes in human sperm at a molecular level. Although this particular application of Raman microspectroscopy still requires further validation, it has potentially promise as a diagnostic tool for reproductive medicine. PMID:24877025

  14. Yogurt containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL 2716 (LG21 yogurt) accelerated the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masayuki; Shimizu, Kimiko; Kurakazu, Keiko

    2010-01-01

    We have reported that LG21 yogurt containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL 2716 (LG21 yogurt) inhibits the formation of HCl-induced acute gastric lesions through the generation of prostaglandin E₂. This study aimed to determine the role of viable Lactobacillus in the healing of acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcer. LG21 yogurt or γ-ray radiated LG21 yogurt was administered orally twice a day for 10 d at a dose of 5 ml/kg. LG21 yogurt significantly accelerated the healing of the ulcer, but γ-ray radiated LG21 yogurt did not. However, both yogurts significantly inhibited HCl-induced gastric erosive lesions and enhanced the generation of gastric mucosal prostaglandin E₂. From the above results, it was found that viable bacteria are needed to accelerate the healing of chronic gastric ulcer, but not to inhibit gastric lesions.

  15. [The influence of high pressure on the 3-indoleacetic-acid-induced curvature of Avena coleoptiles in the Went-test].

    PubMed

    Chrometzka, P

    1967-12-01

    1. High atmospheric pressure causes an increase of the 3-indoleacetic-acid-induced curvature of Avena coleoptiles in the Went-test, regardless of whether the applied gas is nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, or air. 2. The highest increase was caused by high pressure of oxygen, the lowest by lack of oxygen. 3. The high pressure effect was also observed with coleoptiles which were treated 20 hours prior to the test and which were then kept under normal pressure. 4. High pressure of oxygen for a long period (20 hours) had a poisonous effect on the coleoptiles. They ceased to grow. Preliminary studies have shown that the respiration is enhanced if the coleoptiles have been kept under high pressure. PMID:24554325

  16. Chemometrics-assisted Spectrofluorimetric Determination of Two Co-administered Drugs of Major Interaction, Methotrexate and Aspirin, in Human Urine Following Acid-induced Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Maher, Hadir M; Ragab, Marwa A A; El-Kimary, Eman I

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), mostly along with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the most common of which is aspirin or acetyl salicylic acid (ASA). Since NSAIDs impair MTX clearance and increase its toxicity, it was necessary to develop a simple and reliable method for the monitoring of MTX levels in urine samples, when coadministered with ASA. The method was based on the spectrofluorimetric measurement of the acid-induced hydrolysis product of MTX, 4-amino-4-deoxy-10-methylpteroic acid (AMP), along with the strongly fluorescent salicylic acid (SA), a product of acid-induced hydrolysis of aspirin and its metabolites in urine. The overlapping emission spectra were resolved using the derivative method (D method). In addition, the corresponding derivative emission spectra were convoluted using discrete Fourier functions, 8-points sin xi polynomials, (D/FF method) for better elimination of interferences. Validation of the developed methods was carried out according to the ICH guidelines. Moreover, the data obtained using derivative and convoluted derivative spectra were treated using the non-parametric Theil's method (NP), compared with the least-squares parametric regression method (LSP). The results treated with Theil's method were more accurate and precise compared with LSP since the former is less affected by the outliers. This work offers the potential of both derivative and convolution using discrete Fourier functions in addition to the effectiveness of using the NP regression analysis of data. The high sensitivity obtained by the proposed methods was promising for measuring low concentration levels of the two drugs in urine samples. These methods were efficiently used to measure the drugs in human urine samples following their co-administration. PMID:26234512

  17. Functional analysis of a tannic-acid-inducible and hypoviral-regulated small heat-shock protein Hsp24 from the chestnut blight fungus Cryphonectria parasitica.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jin-Ho; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jung-Mi; Oh, Jung-Mi; Park, Seung-Moon; Kim, Dae-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    A small heat-shock protein gene, CpHsp24, of Cryphonectria parasitica was selected based on its expression pattern, which showed that it was tannic acid inducible and that its induction was severely hampered by a hypovirus. The predicted protein sequence of CpHsp24 consisted of a hallmark α-crystalline domain flanked by a variable N-terminal and a short C-terminal region. Disruption of CpHsp24 resulted in a slow growth rate under standard growth conditions. The CpHsp24-null mutant showed enhanced sensitivity to heat shock, which was consistent with Northern and Western analyses displaying the heat-shock induction of the CpHsp24 gene and protein, respectively. Virulence tests on the excised bark revealed a severe decrease in the necrotic area of the CpHsp24-null mutant. When the hypovirus was transferred, virus-containing CpHsp24-null progeny displayed severely retarded growth patterns with hypovirulent characteristics of reduced pigmentation and sporulation. Because the tannic-acid-inducible and hypoviral-suppressible expression and the severely impaired virulence are also characteristics of the laccase3 gene (lac3), lac3 expression in the CpHsp24-null mutant was also examined. The resulting lac3 induction was severely affected in the CpHsp24-null mutant, suggesting that CpHsp24 is important for lac3 induction and that CpHsp24 may act as a molecular chaperone for the lac3 protein.

  18. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Gelsolin in Acetic Acid Induced Writhing, Tail Immersion and Carrageenan Induced Paw Edema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Parasar, Devraj; Sagar, Amin; Choudhary, Vikas; Chopra, Bhupinder Singh; Garg, Renu; Ashish; Khatri, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Plasma gelsolin levels significantly decline in several disease conditions, since gelsolin gets scavenged when it depolymerizes and caps filamentous actin released in the circulation following tissue injury. It is well established that our body require/implement inflammatory and analgesic responses to protect against cell damage and injury to the tissue. This study was envisaged to examine analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of exogenous gelsolin (8 mg/mouse) in mice models of pain and acute inflammation. Administration of gelsolin in acetic acid-induced writhing and tail immersion tests not only demonstrated a significant reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhing effects, but also exhibited an analgesic activity in tail immersion test in mice as compared to placebo treated mice. Additionally, anti-inflammatory function of gelsolin (8 mg/mouse) compared with anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium (10 mg/kg)] was confirmed in the carrageenan injection induced paw edema where latter was measured by vernier caliper and fluorescent tomography imaging. Interestingly, results showed that plasma gelsolin was capable of reducing severity of inflammation in mice comparable to diclofenac sodium. Analysis of cytokines and histo-pathological examinations of tissue revealed administration of gelsolin and diclofenac sodium significantly reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6. Additionally, carrageenan groups pretreated with diclofenac sodium or gelsolin showed a marked decrease in edema and infiltration of inflammatory cells in paw tissue. Our study provides evidence that administration of gelsolin can effectively reduce the pain and inflammation in mice model. PMID:26426535

  19. Nonstructural protein 1{alpha} subunit-based inhibition of NF-{kappa}B activation and suppression of interferon-{beta} production by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    SciTech Connect

    Song Cheng; Krell, Peter; Yoo, Dongwan

    2010-11-25

    Induction of type I interferon (IFN-{alpha}/{beta}) is an early antiviral response of the host, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been reported to downregulate the IFN response during infection in cells and pigs. We report that the PRRSV nonstructural protein 1{alpha} (Nsp1{alpha}) subunit of Nsp1 is a nuclear-cytoplasmic protein distributed to the nucleus and contains a strong suppressive activity for IFN-{beta} production that is mediated through the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling pathway. Nsp1{alpha} suppressed the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B when stimulated with dsRNA or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, and NF-{kappa}B suppression was RIG-I-dependent. The suppression of NF-{kappa}B activation was associated with the poor production of IFN-{beta} during PRRSV infection. The C-terminal 14 amino acids of the Nsp1{alpha} subunit were critical in maintaining immunosuppressive activity of Nsp1{alpha} for both IFN-{beta} and NF-{kappa}B, suggesting that the newly identified zinc finger configuration comprising of Met180 may be crucial for inhibitory activities. Nsp1{alpha} inhibited I{kappa}B phosphorylation and as a consequence NF-{kappa}B translocation to the nucleus was blocked, leading to the inhibition of NF-{kappa}B stimulated gene expression. Our results suggest that PRRSV Nsp1{alpha} is a multifunctional nuclear protein participating in the modulation of the host IFN system.

  20. Regulation of CXCL-8 (Interleukin-8) Induction by Double-Stranded RNA Signaling Pathways during Hepatitis C Virus Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Wagoner, Jessica; Austin, Michael; Green, Jamison; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Casola, Antonella; Brasier, Allan; Khabar, Khalid S. A.; Wakita, Takaji; Gale, Michael; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection induces the α-chemokine interleukin-8 (CXCL-8), which is regulated at the levels of transcription and mRNA stability. In the current study, CXCL-8 regulation by double-stranded (ds)RNA pathways was analyzed in the context of HCV infection. A constitutively active mutant of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I), RIG-N, activated CXCL-8 transcription. Promoter mutagenesis experiments indicated that NF-κB and interferon (IFN)-stimulated response element (ISRE) binding sites were required for the RIG-N induction of CXCL-8 transcription. IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1) expression also activated CXCL-8 transcription, and mutations of the ISRE and NF-κB binding sites reduced and abrogated CXCL-8 transcription, respectively. In the presence of wild-type RIG-I, transfection of JFH-1 RNA or JFH-1 virus infection of Huh7.5.1 cells activated the CXCL-8 promoter. Expression of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) stimulated transcription from both full-length and ISRE-driven CXCL-8 promoters. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that IRF-3 and NF-κB bound directly to the CXCL-8 promoter in response to virus infection and dsRNA transfection. RIG-N stabilized CXCL-8 mRNA via the AU-rich element in the 3′ untranslated region of CXCL-8 mRNA, leading to an increase in its half-life following tumor necrosis factor alpha induction. The data indicate that HCV infection triggers dsRNA signaling pathways that induce CXCL-8 via transcriptional activation and mRNA stabilization and define a regulatory link between innate antiviral and inflammatory cellular responses to virus infection. PMID:17035306

  1. Structural basis for Marburg virus VP35-mediated immune evasion mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Edwards, Megan R.; Shabman, Reed S.; Leung, Daisy W.; Endlich-Frazier, Ariel C.; Borek, Dominika M.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Liu, Gai; Huh, Juyoung; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.

    2013-07-22

    Filoviruses, marburgvirus (MARV) and ebolavirus (EBOV), are causative agents of highly lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans. MARV and EBOV share a common genome organization but show important differences in replication complex formation, cell entry, host tropism, transcriptional regulation, and immune evasion. Multifunctional filoviral viral protein (VP) 35 proteins inhibit innate immune responses. Recent studies suggest double-stranded (ds)RNA sequestration is a potential mechanism that allows EBOV VP35 to antagonize retinoic-acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) like receptors (RLRs) that are activated by viral pathogen–associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as double-strandedness and dsRNA blunt ends. Here, we show that MARV VP35 can inhibit IFN production at multiple steps in the signaling pathways downstream of RLRs. The crystal structure of MARV VP35 IID in complex with 18-bp dsRNA reveals that despite the similar protein fold as EBOV VP35 IID, MARV VP35 IID interacts with the dsRNA backbone and not with blunt ends. Functional studies show that MARV VP35 can inhibit dsRNA-dependent RLR activation and interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) phosphorylation by IFN kinases TRAF family member-associated NFkb activator (TANK) binding kinase-1 (TBK-1) and IFN kB kinase e (IKKe) in cell-based studies. We also show that MARV VP35 can only inhibit RIG-I and melanoma differentiation associated gene 5 (MDA5) activation by double strandedness of RNA PAMPs (coating backbone) but is unable to inhibit activation of RLRs by dsRNA blunt ends (end capping). In contrast, EBOV VP35 can inhibit activation by both PAMPs. Insights on differential PAMP recognition and inhibition of IFN induction by a similar filoviral VP35 fold, as shown here, reveal the structural and functional plasticity of a highly conserved virulence factor.

  2. Spleen Transcriptome Profile of Muscovy Ducklings in Response to Infection With Muscovy Duck Reovirus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanxi; Wu, Yijian; Cai, Yilong; Zhuang, Yubin; Xu, Lihui; Wu, Baocheng; Zhang, Yanding

    2015-06-01

    Muscovy duck reovirus (MDRV) causes high morbidity and mortality in ducklings. However, the molecular basis for pathogenesis of this virus remains poorly understood, and the complete genome sequence of Muscovy duck is lacking. Here we report the transcriptome profile of Muscovy ducks in response to MDRV infection. RNA sequencing technology was employed to obtain a representative complement of transcripts from the spleen of ducklings, and then differential gene expression was analyzed between MDRV-YB strain infected ducks and noninfected ducks. This analysis generated 65,536 unigenes. Of these, 6458 genes were found to be significantly differentially expressed between the infected and noninfected groups. The symptom and pathology of ducks infected with MDRV-YB was correlated with the greater proportion of decreased expression genes (4906) than increased expression (1552) level. Gene ontology analysis assigned differentially expressed genes to the categories: "biological processes," "cellular functions," and "molecular functions." Differentially expressed genes involved in the innate immune system were analyzed further, and 128 of these genes showed decreased expression and 86 showed increased expression between the infected and noninfected groups. These genes represented the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling pathway, and the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways and included interferon (IFN) α, IFNγ, interleukin 6, RIG-I, and TLR4. The data were verified by SYBR fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (SYBR-qPCR). Our findings offer new insight into the host immune response to MDRV infection.

  3. Duck MDA5 functions in innate immunity against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infections.

    PubMed

    Wei, Liangmeng; Cui, Jin; Song, Yafen; Zhang, Shuo; Han, Fei; Yuan, Runyu; Gong, Lang; Jiao, Peirong; Liao, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) is an important intracellular receptor that recognizes long molecules of viral double-stranded RNA in innate immunity. To understand the mechanism of duck MDA5-mediated innate immunity, we cloned the MDA5 cDNA from the Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata). Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicates that duck MDA5 mRNA was constitutively expressed in all sampled tissues. A significant increase of MDA5 mRNA was detected in the brain, spleen and lungs of ducks after infection with an H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV). We investigated the role of the predicted functional domains of MDA5. The results indicate the caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) of duck MDA5 had a signal transmission function through IRF-7-dependent signaling pathway. Overexpression of the CARD strongly activated the chicken IFN-β promoter and upregulated the mRNA expression of antiviral molecules (such as OAS, PKR and Mx), proinflammatory cytokines (such as IL-2, IL-6, IFN-α and IFN-γ, but not IL-1β and IL-8) and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLR) (RIG-I and LGP2) without exogenous stimulation. We also demonstrate the NS1 of the H5N1 HPAIV inhibited the duck MDA5-mediated signaling pathway in vitro. These results suggest that duck MDA5 is an important receptor for inducing antiviral activity in the host immune response of ducks.

  4. Chicken cells sense influenza A virus infection through MDA5 and CARDIF signaling involving LGP2.

    PubMed

    Liniger, Matthias; Summerfield, Artur; Zimmer, Gert; McCullough, Kenneth C; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses (AIV) raise worldwide veterinary and public health concerns due to their potential for zoonotic transmission. While infection with highly pathogenic AIV results in high mortality in chickens, this is not necessarily the case in wild birds and ducks. It is known that innate immune factors can contribute to the outcome of infection. In this context, retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) is the main cytosolic pattern recognition receptor known for detecting influenza A virus infection in mammalian cells. Chickens, unlike ducks, lack RIG-I, yet chicken cells do produce type I interferon (IFN) in response to AIV infection. Consequently, we sought to identify the cytosolic recognition elements in chicken cells. Chicken mRNA encoding the putative chicken analogs of CARDIF and LGP2 (chCARDIF and chLGP2, respectively) were identified. HT7-tagged chCARDIF was observed to associate with mitochondria in chicken DF-1 fibroblasts. The exogenous expression of chCARDIF, as well as of the caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs) of the chicken melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (chMDA5), strongly activated the chicken IFN-β (chIFN-β) promoter. The silencing of chMDA5, chCARDIF, and chIRF3 reduced chIFN-β levels induced by AIV, indicating their involvement in AIV sensing. As with mammalian cells, chLGP2 had opposing effects. While overexpression decreased the activation of the chIFN-β promoter, the silencing of endogenous chLGP2 reduced chIFN-β induced by AIV. We finally demonstrate that the chMDA5 signaling pathway is inhibited by the viral nonstructural protein 1. In conclusion, chicken cells, including DF-1 fibroblasts and HD-11 macrophage-like cells, employ chMDA5 for sensing AIV.

  5. Spleen Transcriptome Profile of Muscovy Ducklings in Response to Infection With Muscovy Duck Reovirus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanxi; Wu, Yijian; Cai, Yilong; Zhuang, Yubin; Xu, Lihui; Wu, Baocheng; Zhang, Yanding

    2015-06-01

    Muscovy duck reovirus (MDRV) causes high morbidity and mortality in ducklings. However, the molecular basis for pathogenesis of this virus remains poorly understood, and the complete genome sequence of Muscovy duck is lacking. Here we report the transcriptome profile of Muscovy ducks in response to MDRV infection. RNA sequencing technology was employed to obtain a representative complement of transcripts from the spleen of ducklings, and then differential gene expression was analyzed between MDRV-YB strain infected ducks and noninfected ducks. This analysis generated 65,536 unigenes. Of these, 6458 genes were found to be significantly differentially expressed between the infected and noninfected groups. The symptom and pathology of ducks infected with MDRV-YB was correlated with the greater proportion of decreased expression genes (4906) than increased expression (1552) level. Gene ontology analysis assigned differentially expressed genes to the categories: "biological processes," "cellular functions," and "molecular functions." Differentially expressed genes involved in the innate immune system were analyzed further, and 128 of these genes showed decreased expression and 86 showed increased expression between the infected and noninfected groups. These genes represented the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling pathway, and the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways and included interferon (IFN) α, IFNγ, interleukin 6, RIG-I, and TLR4. The data were verified by SYBR fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (SYBR-qPCR). Our findings offer new insight into the host immune response to MDRV infection. PMID:26473680

  6. NADPH Oxidase NOX5-S and Nuclear Factor κB1 Mediate Acid-Induced Microsomal Prostaglandin E Synthase-1 Expression in Barrett’s Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoxu; Li, Dan; Resnick, Murray B.; Wands, Jack

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of progression from Barrett’s esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) are not known. Cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been shown to be important in esophageal tumorigenesis. We have shown that COX-2 mediates acid-induced PGE2 production. The prostaglandin E synthase (PGES) responsible for acid-induced PGE2 production in BE, however, is not known. We found that microsomal PGES1 (mPGES1), mPGES2, and cytosolic PGES (cPGES) were present in FLO EA cells. Pulsed acid treatment significantly increased mPGES1 mRNA and protein levels but had little or no effect on mPGES2 or cPGES mRNA. Knockdown of mPGES1 by mPGES1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked acid-induced increase in PGE2 production and thymidine incorporation. Knockdown of NADPH oxidase, NOX5-S, a variant lacking calcium-binding domains, by NOX5 siRNA significantly inhibited acid-induced increase in mPGES1 expression, thymidine incorporation, and PGE2 production. Overexpression of NOX5-S significantly increased the luciferase activity in FLO cells transfected with a nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) in vivo activation reporter plasmid pNF-κB-Luc. Knockdown of NF-κB1 p50 by p50 siRNA significantly decreased acid-induced increase in mPGES1 expression, thymidine incorporation, and PGE2 production. Two novel NF-κB binding elements, GGAGTCTCCC and CGGGACACCC, were identified in the mPGES1 gene promoter. We conclude that mPGES1 mediates acid-induced increase in PGE2 production and cell proliferation. Acid-induced mPGES1 expression depends on activation of NOX5-S and NF-κB1 p50. Microsomal PGES1 may be a potential target to prevent or treat EA. PMID:23439561

  7. Modulation of innate immunity system by Epstein-Barr virus-encoded non-coding RNA and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Mrinal; Takada, Kenzo

    2010-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded small RNAs (EBERs) are polyA-, non-coding RNAs that are expressed abundantly in all forms of cells latently infected with EBV. EBERs (EBER1 and EBER2) contribute to the clonal proliferation of EBV-negative Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cells in soft agar, tumorigenicity in SCID mice, up-regulation of the bcl-2 oncoprotein, resistance to apoptosis, and maintenance of malignant phenotypes in BL cells. EBERs induce the expression of interleukin (IL)-10 in BL cells, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) in gastric and nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells, IL-9 in T cells, and IL-6 in lymphoblastoid cell lines. Additionally, each of these cytokines acts as an autocrine growth factor. In BL cells, EBERs bind the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase PKR, inhibit its phosphorylation, and thereby prevent IFN-alpha-mediated apoptosis. In epithelial cells, EBERs confer resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis by blocking PKR activity. EBERs form complexes with PKR, ribosomal protein L22, lupus erythematosis-associated antigen (La), and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). In BL cells, EBERs activate RIG-I signaling and induce the expression of type-I IFNs and interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) through the activation of RIG-I substrates, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB), and IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), and anti-inflamatory cytokine IL-10 through IRF-3 but not NF-kappaB signaling. EBERs also play critical roles in the growth transformation of B lymphocytes. Although EBER1 and EBER2 exhibit similarities in their primary (54%) and secondary structures, recent findings have shown that recombinant EBVs carrying only the EBER2 gene play a greater role in the growth transformation of B lymphocytes than EBVs carrying only the EBER1 gene. Thus, EBERs play multiple roles in various cell types, and we present a model that highlights the functions of EBERs in EBV-mediated oncogenesis in BL cells.

  8. Small self-RNA generated by RNase L amplifies antiviral innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Malathi, Krishnamurthy; Dong, Beihua; Gale, Michael; Silverman, Robert H

    2007-08-16

    Antiviral innate immunity is initiated in response to RNA molecules that are produced in virus-infected cells. These RNAs activate signalling cascades that activate the genes that encode alpha- and beta-interferon (IFN). Signalling occurs through the interaction of the RNAs with either of two pathogen recognition receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I, also known as DDX58) and melanoma differentiation associated gene-5 (MDA5, also known as IFIH1), which contain amino-terminal caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARD) and carboxy-terminal DExD/H Box RNA helicase motifs. RIG-I and MDA5 interact with another CARD protein, interferon-beta promotor stimulator protein-1 (IPS-1, also known as MAVS, VISA and Cardif), in the mitochondrial membrane, which relays the signal through the transcription factors interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB to the IFN-beta gene. Although the signalling pathway is well understood, the origin of the RNA molecules that initiate these processes is not. Here we show that activation of the antiviral endoribonuclease, RNase L, by 2',5'-linked oligoadenylate (2-5A) produces small RNA cleavage products from self-RNA that initiate IFN production. Accordingly, mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking RNase L were resistant to the induction of IFN-beta expression in response to 2-5A, dsRNA or viral infection. Single-stranded regions of RNA are cleaved 3' of UpUp and UpAp sequences by RNase L during viral infections, resulting in small, often duplex, RNAs. We show that small self-RNAs produced by the action of RNase L on cellular RNA induce IFN-beta expression and that the signalling involves RIG-I, MDA5 and IPS-1. Mice lacking RNase L produce significantly less IFN-beta during viral infections than infected wild-type mice. Furthermore, activation of RNase L with 2-5A in vivo induced the expression of IFN-beta in wild-type but not RNase L-deficient mice. Our results indicate that RNase L has an essential

  9. Activation of c-jun N-Terminal Kinase upon Influenza A Virus (IAV) Infection Is Independent of Pathogen-Related Receptors but Dependent on Amino Acid Sequence Variations of IAV NS1

    PubMed Central

    Nacken, Wolfgang; Anhlan, Darisuren; Hrincius, Eike R.; Mostafa, Ahmed; Wolff, Thorsten; Sadewasser, Anne; Pleschka, Stephan; Ehrhardt, Christina

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A hallmark cell response to influenza A virus (IAV) infections is the phosphorylation and activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). However, so far it is not fully clear which molecules are involved in the activation of JNK upon IAV infection. Here, we report that the transfection of influenza viral-RNA induces JNK in a retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-dependent manner. However, neither RIG-I-like receptors nor MyD88-dependent Toll-like receptors were found to be involved in the activation of JNK upon IAV infection. Viral JNK activation may be blocked by addition of cycloheximide and heat shock protein inhibitors during infection, suggesting that the expression of an IAV-encoded protein is responsible for JNK activation. Indeed, the overexpression of nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of certain IAV subtypes activated JNK, whereas those of some other subtypes failed to activate JNK. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments using NS1 of the IAV H7N7, H5N1, and H3N2 subtypes identified the amino acid residue phenylalanine (F) at position 103 to be decisive for JNK activation. Cleavage- and polyadenylation-specific factor 30 (CPSF30), whose binding to NS1 is stabilized by the amino acids F103 and M106, is not involved in JNK activation. Conclusively, subtype-specific sequence variations in the IAV NS1 protein result in subtype-specific differences in JNK signaling upon IAV infection. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus (IAV) infection leads to the activation or modulation of multiple signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), a long-known stress-activated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, is activated by RIG-I when cells are treated with IAV RNA. However, at the same time, nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of IAV has an intrinsic JNK-activating property that is dependent on IAV subtype-specific amino acid variations around position 103. Our findings identify two different and independent pathways that

  10. Evidence for genetic regulation of mRNA expression of the dosage-sensitive gene retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1) in human brain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Tao, Yu; Song, Fan; Yuan, Xi; Wang, Jian; Saffen, David

    2016-01-01

    RAI1 (retinoic acid induced-1) is a dosage-sensitive gene that causes Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) when mutated or deleted and Potocki-Lupski Syndrome (PTLS) when duplicated, with psychiatric features commonly observed in both syndromes. How common genetic variants regulate this gene, however, is unknown. In this study, we found that RAI1 mRNA expression in Chinese prefrontal and temporal cortex correlate with genotypes of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the RAI1 5′-upstream region. Using genotype imputation, “R2-Δ2” analysis, and data from the RegulomeDB database, we identified SNPs rs4925102 and rs9907986 as possible regulatory variants, accounting for approximately 30–40% of the variance in RAI1 mRNA expression in both brain regions. Specifically, rs4925102 and rs9907986 are predicted to disrupt the binding of retinoic acid RXR-RAR receptors and the transcription factor DEAF1 (Deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1), respectively. Consistent with these predictions, we observed binding of RXRα and RARα to the predicted RAI1 target in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Retinoic acid is crucial for early development of the central neural system, and DEAF1 is associated with intellectual disability. The observation that a significant portion of RAI1 mRNA expression is genetically controlled raises the possibility that common RAI1 5′-region regulatory variants contribute more generally to psychiatric disorders. PMID:26743651

  11. Receptor for advanced glycation end products plays a more important role in cellular survival than in neurite outgrowth during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sajithlal, Gangadharan; Huttunen, Henri; Rauvala, Heikki; Munch, Gerald

    2002-03-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is known to interact with amphoterin. This interaction has been proposed to play a role in neurite outgrowth and process elongation during neurodifferentiation. However, there is as yet no direct evidence of the relevance of this pathway to neurodifferentiation under physiological conditions. In this study we have investigated a possible role of RAGE and amphoterin in the retinoic acid-induced differentiation of neuroblastoma cells. The functional inactivation of RAGE by dominant negative and antisense strategies showed that RAGE is not required for process outgrowth or differentiation, although overexpression of RAGE accelerates the elongation of neuritic processes. Using the antisense strategy, amphoterin was shown to be essential for process outgrowth and differentiation, suggesting that amphoterin may interact with other molecules to exert its effect in this context. Interestingly, the survival of the neuroblastoma cells treated with retinoic acid was partly dependent on the expression of RAGE, and inhibition of RAGE function partially blocked the increase in anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 following retinoic acid treatment. Based on these results we propose that a combination therapy using RAGE blockers and retinoic acid may prove as a useful approach for chemotherapy for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  12. The protective effect of myo-inositol on hippocamal cell loss and structural alterations in neurons and synapses triggered by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Kotaria, Nato; Kiladze, Maia; Zhvania, Mzia G; Japaridze, Nadezhda J; Bikashvili, Tamar; Solomonia, Revaz O; Bolkvadze, Tamar

    2013-07-01

    It is known that myo-inositol pretreatment attenuates the seizure severity and several biochemical changes provoked by experimentally induced status epilepticus. However, it remains unidentified whether such properties of myo-inositol influence the structure of epileptic brain. In the present light and electron microscopic research we elucidate if pretreatment with myo-inositol has positive effect on hippocampal cell loss, and cell and synapses damage provoked by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. Adult male Wistar rats were treated with (i) saline, (ii) saline + kainic acid, (iii) myo-inositol + kainic acid. Assessment of cell loss at 2, 14, and 30 days after treatment demonstrate cytoprotective effect of myo-inositol in CA1 and CA3 areas. It was strongly expressed in pyramidal layer of CA1, radial and oriental layers of CA3 and in less degree-in other layers of both fields. Ultrastructural alterations were described in CA1, 14 days after treatment. The structure of neurons, synapses, and porosomes are well preserved in the rats pretreated with myo-inositol in comparing with rats treated with only kainic acid.

  13. Equilibrium titrations of acid-induced unfolding-refolding and salt-induced molten globule of cytochrome c by FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aichun; Lam, Troy

    2005-04-01

    Despite extensive investigations on the acid-unfolded and acid/salt-induced molten globule(-like) states of cytochrome c using variety of techniques, structural features of the acid-unfolded state in terms of residual secondary structures and the structural transition between the acid-unfolded and acid/salt-refolded states have not been fully characterized beyond the circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. It is unusual that secondary structure(s) of the unfolded state leading to the molten globule state, an important protein folding intermediate, as determined by CD was not fully corroborated by independent experimental method(s). In this study, we carried out an equilibrium titration of acid-induced unfolding and subsequent acid- and salt-induced refolding of cytochrome c using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The spectral profiles of the equilibrium titration reveal new structural details about the acid-unfolded state and the structural transition associated with the acid/salt-refolded molten globule(-like) states of cytochrome c.

  14. Gallic Acid Induces a Reactive Oxygen Species-Provoked c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase-Dependent Apoptosis in Lung Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiu-Yuan; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Liu, Hsiang-Chun; Hsu, Shih-Lan

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic lung disorder characterized by fibroblasts proliferation and extracellular matrix accumulation. Induction of fibroblast apoptosis therefore plays a crucial role in the resolution of this disease. Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid), a common botanic phenolic compound, has been reported to induce apoptosis in tumor cell lines and renal fibroblasts. The present study was undertaken to examine the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in lung fibroblasts apoptosis induced by gallic acid. We found that treatment with gallic acid resulted in activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and protein kinase B (PKB, Akt), but not p38MAPK, in mouse lung fibroblasts. Inhibition of JNK using pharmacologic inhibitor (SP600125) and genetic knockdown (JNK specific siRNA) significantly inhibited p53 accumulation, reduced PUMA and Fas expression, and abolished apoptosis induced by gallic acid. Moreover, treatment with antioxidants (vitamin C, N-acetyl cysteine, and catalase) effectively diminished gallic acid-induced hydrogen peroxide production, JNK and p53 activation, and cell death. These observations imply that gallic acid-mediated hydrogen peroxide formation acts as an initiator of JNK signaling pathways, leading to p53 activation and apoptosis in mouse lung fibroblasts. PMID:23533505

  15. Elucidation of Acid-induced Unfolding and Aggregation of Human Immunoglobulin IgG1 and IgG2 Fc

    PubMed Central

    Latypov, Ramil F.; Hogan, Sabine; Lau, Hollis; Gadgil, Himanshu; Liu, Dingjiang

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms of Fc aggregation is an important prerequisite for developing stable and efficacious antibody-based therapeutics. In our study, high resolution two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to probe structural changes in the IgG1 Fc. A series of 1H-15N heteronuclear single-quantum correlation NMR spectra were collected between pH 2.5 and 4.7 to assess whether unfolding of CH2 domains precedes that of CH3 domains. The same pH range was subsequently screened in Fc aggregation experiments that utilized molecules of IgG1 and IgG2 subclasses with varying levels of CH2 glycosylation. In addition, differential scanning calorimetry data were collected over a pH range of 3–7 to assess changes in CH2 and CH3 thermostability. As a result, compelling evidence was gathered that emphasizes the importance of CH2 stability in determining the rate and extent of Fc aggregation. In particular, we found that Fc domains of the IgG1 subclass have a lower propensity to aggregate compared with those of the IgG2 subclass. Our data for glycosylated, partially deglycosylated, and fully deglycosylated molecules further revealed the criticality of CH2 glycans in modulating Fc aggregation. These findings provide important insights into the stability of Fc-based therapeutics and promote better understanding of their acid-induced aggregation process. PMID:22084250

  16. Protective effect of hesperidin and naringin against 3-nitropropionic acid induced Huntington's like symptoms in rats: possible role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2010-01-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP) is a well known experimental model to study Huntington's disease (HD) and associated neuropsychiatric problems. Present study has been designed to explore the protective effects of hesperidin, naringin, and their nitric oxide mechanism (if any) against 3-nitropropionic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats. Systemic 3-nitropropionic acid (10 mg/kg) treatment for 14 days in rats significantly induced HD like symptoms in rats as indicated by reduced locomotor activity, body weight, grip strength, oxidative defense and mitochondrial complex enzymes (complex-I, -II, and -IV) activities in striatum. Naringin and hesperidin pretreatment significantly attenuated behavioral alterations, oxidative stress and mitochondrial enzymes complex dysfunction in 3-NP treated group. L-Arginine (50 mg/kg) pretreatment with lower dose of hesperidin (50 mg/kg) and naringin (50 mg/kg) significantly attenuated the protective effect of hesperidin and naringin respectively. Whereas L-NAME (10 mg/kg), a non-selective NOS inhibitor pretreatment with hesperidin (50 mg/kg) and naringin (50 mg/kg) significantly potentiated their protective effect which was significant as compared to their effect per se. Study highlights the therapeutic potential of hesperidin and naringin against Huntington's like conditions and further indicates that these drugs might act through nitric oxide mechanism. PMID:19716383

  17. Uric acid induces oxidative stress and growth inhibition by activating adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signal pathways in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongneng; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Hisatome, Ichiro; Li, Youfeng; Cheng, Weijie; Sun, Ning; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Tianliang; Zhu, Yuzhang; Li, Zhi; Jing, Xubin; Zhou, Rui; Cheng, Jidong

    2013-08-15

    Hyperuricaemia is a disorder of purine metabolism, and is strongly associated with insulin resistance and abnormal glucose metabolism. As the producer of insulin, pancreatic β cells might be affected by elevated serum uric acid levels and contribute to the disregulated glucose metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effect of high uric acid on rat pancreatic β cell function. Under high uric acid condition, proliferation of pancreatic β cells was inhibited, production of reactive oxygen species increased, and glucose stimulated insulin secretion was also compromised. Further examination on signal transduction pathways revealed that uric acid-induced ROS is involved in the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Pharmacological inhibition of ERK activation rescued β cells from growth inhibition. More importantly, activation of ERK induced by uric acid is significantly diminished by AMPK inhibitor, indicating ERK as a downstream target of AMPK in response to high uric acid condition. We also investigated the transportation channel for uric acid into pancreatic β cells. While major urate transporter URAT1 is not expressed in β cells, organic anion transporter (OAT) inhibitor successfully blocked the activation of ERK by uric acid. Our data indicate that high uric acid levels induce oxidative damage and inhibit growth of rat pancreatic β cells by activating the AMPK and ERK signal pathways. Hyperuricemia may contribute to abnormal glucose metabolism by causing oxidative damage and function inhibition of pancreatic β cells.

  18. Alkali- or acid-induced changes in structure, moisture absorption ability and deacetylating reaction of β-chitin extracted from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) pens.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jooyeoun; Zhao, Yanyun

    2014-01-01

    Alkali- or acid-induced structural modifications in β-chitin from squid (Dosidicus gigas, d'Orbigny, 1835) pens and their moisture absorption ability (MAA) and deacetylating reaction were investigated and compared with α-chitin from shrimp shells. β-Chitin was converted into the α-form after 3h in 40% NaOH or 1-3 h in 40% HCl solution, and α-chitin obtained from NaOH treatment had higher MAA than had native α-chitin, due to polymorphic destructions. In contrast, induced α-chitin from acid treatment of β-chitin had few polymorphic modifications, showing no significant change (P>0.05) in MAA. β-Chitin was more susceptible to alkali deacetylation than was α-chitin, and required a lower concentration of NaOH and shorter reaction time. These results demonstrate that alkali- or acid-treated β-chitin retained high susceptibility toward solvents, which in turn resulted in good biological activity of β-chitosan for use as a natural antioxidant and antimicrobial substance or application as edible coatings and films for various food applications.

  19. Music application alleviates short-term memory impairments through increasing cell proliferation in the hippocampus of valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Min; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Choi, Hyun-Hee

    2016-06-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder and this disorder shows impairment in reciprocal social interactions, deficits in communication, and restrictive and repetitive patterns of behaviors and interests. The effect of music on short-term memory in the view of cell proliferation in the hippocampus was evaluated using valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups. Animal model of autism was made by subcutaneous injection of 400-mg/kg valproic acid into the rat pups on the postnatal day 14. The rat pups in the music-applied groups were exposed to the 65-dB comfortable classic music for 1 hr once a day, starting postnatal day 15 and continued until postnatal day 28. In the present results, short-term memory was deteriorated by autism induction. The numbers of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyridine (BrdU)-positive, Ki-67-positive, and doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased by autism induction. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) expressions in the hippocampus were also suppressed in the autistic rat pups. Music application alleviated short-term memory deficits with enhancing the numbers of BrdU-positive, Ki-67-positive, and DCX-positive cells in the autistic rat pups. Music application also enhanced BDNF and TrkB expressions in the autistic rat pups. The present study show that application of music enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation and alleviated short-term memory impairment through stimulating BDNF-TrkB signaling in the autistic rat pups. Music can be suggested as the therapeutic strategy to overcome the autism-induced memory deficits. PMID:27419108

  20. Music application alleviates short-term memory impairments through increasing cell proliferation in the hippocampus of valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Min; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Choi, Hyun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder and this disorder shows impairment in reciprocal social interactions, deficits in communication, and restrictive and repetitive patterns of behaviors and interests. The effect of music on short-term memory in the view of cell proliferation in the hippocampus was evaluated using valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups. Animal model of autism was made by subcutaneous injection of 400-mg/kg valproic acid into the rat pups on the postnatal day 14. The rat pups in the music-applied groups were exposed to the 65-dB comfortable classic music for 1 hr once a day, starting postnatal day 15 and continued until postnatal day 28. In the present results, short-term memory was deteriorated by autism induction. The numbers of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyridine (BrdU)-positive, Ki-67-positive, and doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased by autism induction. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) expressions in the hippocampus were also suppressed in the autistic rat pups. Music application alleviated short-term memory deficits with enhancing the numbers of BrdU-positive, Ki-67-positive, and DCX-positive cells in the autistic rat pups. Music application also enhanced BDNF and TrkB expressions in the autistic rat pups. The present study show that application of music enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation and alleviated short-term memory impairment through stimulating BDNF-TrkB signaling in the autistic rat pups. Music can be suggested as the therapeutic strategy to overcome the autism-induced memory deficits. PMID:27419108

  1. Purple sweet potato color attenuates domoic acid-induced cognitive deficits by promoting estrogen receptor-α-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-mei; Zheng, Yuan-lin; Hu, Bin; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Zi-feng

    2012-02-01

    Recent findings suggest that endoplasmic reticulum stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of domoic acid-induced neurodegeneration. Purple sweet potato color, a class of naturally occurring anthocyanins, has beneficial health and biological effects. Recent studies have also shown that anthocyanins have estrogenic activity and can enhance estrogen receptor-α expression. In this study, we evaluated the effect of purple sweet potato color on cognitive deficits induced by hippocampal mitochondrial dysfunction in domoic acid-treated mice and explored the potential mechanisms underlying this effect. Our results showed that the oral administration of purple sweet potato color to domoic acid-treated mice significantly improved their behavioral performance in a step-through passive avoidance task and a Morris water maze task. These improvements were mediated, at least in part, by a stimulation of estrogen receptor-α-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis signaling and by decreases in the expression of p47phox and gp91phox. Decreases in reactive oxygen species and protein carbonylation were also observed, along with a blockade of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway. Furthermore, purple sweet potato color significantly suppressed endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis, which prevented neuron loss and restored the expression of memory-related proteins. However, knockdown of estrogen receptor-α using short hairpin RNA only partially blocked the neuroprotective effects of purple sweet potato color in the hippocampus of mice cotreated with purple sweet potato color and domoic acid, indicating that purple sweet potato color acts through multiple pathways. These results suggest that purple sweet potato color could be a possible candidate for the prevention and treatment of cognitive deficits in excitotoxic and other brain disorders.

  2. The histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid induces apoptosis, down-regulates the CXCR4 chemokine receptor and impairs migration of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Stamatopoulos, Basile; Meuleman, Nathalie; De Bruyn, Cécile; Delforge, Alain; Bron, Dominique; Lagneaux, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a neoplastic disorder that arises largely as a result of defective apoptosis leading to chemoresistance. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor, CXCR4, have been shown to play an important role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell trafficking and survival. Design and Methods Since histone acetylation is involved in the modulation of gene expression, we evaluated the effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells and in particular on cell survival, CXCR4 expression, migration, and drug sensitization. Results Here, we showed that treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (20 μM) for 48 hours induced a decrease in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell viability via apoptosis (n=20, P=0.0032). Using specific caspase inhibitors, we demonstrated the participation of caspases-3, -6 and -8, suggesting an activation of the extrinsic pathway. Additionally, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid significantly decreased CXCR4 mRNA (n=10, P=0.0010) and protein expression (n=40, P<0.0001). As a result, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell migration in response to stromal cell-derived factor-1 (n=23, P<0.0001) or through bone marrow stromal cells was dramatically impaired. Consequently, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid reduced the protective effect of the microenvironment and thus sensitized chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to chemotherapy such as fludarabine. Conclusions In conclusion, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid induces apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells via the extrinsic pathway and down-regulates CXCR4 expression leading to decreased cell migration. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in combination with other drugs represents a promising therapeutic approach to inhibiting migration, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell survival and potentially overcoming drug resistance. PMID:20145270

  3. Gibberellic Acid-Induced Aleurone Layers Responding to Heat Shock or Tunicamycin Provide Insight into the N-Glycoproteome, Protein Secretion, and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress1[W

    PubMed Central

    Barba-Espín, Gregorio; Dedvisitsakul, Plaipol; Hägglund, Per; Svensson, Birte; Finnie, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The growing relevance of plants for the production of recombinant proteins makes understanding the secretory machinery, including the identification of glycosylation sites in secreted proteins, an important goal of plant proteomics. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone layers maintained in vitro respond to gibberellic acid by secreting an array of proteins and provide a unique system for the analysis of plant protein secretion. Perturbation of protein secretion in gibberellic acid-induced aleurone layers by two independent mechanisms, heat shock and tunicamycin treatment, demonstrated overlapping effects on both the intracellular and secreted proteomes. Proteins in a total of 22 and 178 two-dimensional gel spots changing in intensity in extracellular and intracellular fractions, respectively, were identified by mass spectrometry. Among these are proteins with key roles in protein processing and secretion, such as calreticulin, protein disulfide isomerase, proteasome subunits, and isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase. Sixteen heat shock proteins in 29 spots showed diverse responses to the treatments, with only a minority increasing in response to heat shock. The majority, all of which were small heat shock proteins, decreased in heat-shocked aleurone layers. Additionally, glycopeptide enrichment and N-glycosylation analysis identified 73 glycosylation sites in 65 aleurone layer proteins, with 53 of the glycoproteins found in extracellular fractions and 36 found in intracellular fractions. This represents major progress in characterization of the barley N-glycoproteome, since only four of these sites were previously described. Overall, these findings considerably advance knowledge of the plant protein secretion system in general and emphasize the versatility of the aleurone layer as a model system for studying plant protein secretion. PMID:24344171

  4. Gambogic Acid Induces Apoptosis in Imatinib-Resistant Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells via Inducing Proteasome Inhibition and Caspase-Dependent Bcr-Abl Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xianping; Chen, Xin; Li, Xiaofen; Lan, Xiaoying; Zhao, Chong; Liu, Shouting; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Ningning; Liao, Siyan; Song, Wenbin; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Shunqing; Xu, Li; Wang, Xuejun; Dou, Q. Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is characterized by the constitutive activation of Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase. Bcr-Abl-T315I is the predominant mutation that causes resistance to imatinib, cytotoxic drugs, and the second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The emergence of imatinib resistance in patients with CML leads to searching for novel approaches to the treatment of CML. Gambogic acid, a small molecule derived from Chinese herb gamboges, has been approved for phase II clinical trial for cancer therapy by the Chinese Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In this study, we investigated the effect of gambogic acid on cell survival or apoptosis in CML cells bearing Bcr-Abl-T315I or wild-type Bcr-Abl. Experimental Design CML cell lines (KBM5, KBM5-T315I, and K562), primary cells from patients with CML with clinical resistance to imatinib, and normal monocytes from healthy volunteers were treated with gambogic acid, imatinib, or their combination, followed by measuring the effects on cell growth, apoptosis, and signal pathways. The in vivo antitumor activity of gambogic acid and its combination with imatinib was also assessed with nude xenografts. Results Gambogic acid induced apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition in CML cells and inhibited the growth of imatinib-resistant Bcr-Abl-T315I xenografts in nude mice. Our data suggest that GA-induced proteasome inhibition is required for caspase activation in both imatinib-resistant and -sensitive CML cells, and caspase activation is required for gambogic acid–induced Bcr-Abl downregulation and apoptotic cell death. Conclusions These findings suggest an alternative strategy to overcome imatinib resistance by enhancing Bcr-Abl downregulation with the medicinal compound gambogic acid, which may have great clinical significance in imatinib-resistant cancer therapy. PMID:24334603

  5. Effects of Abscisic Acid and Ethylene on the Gibberellic Acid-Induced Synthesis of α-Amylase by Isolated Wheat Aleurone Layers 1

    PubMed Central

    Varty, Keith; Arreguín, Barbarín L.; Gómez, Miguel T.; López, Pablo Jaime T.; Gómez, Miguel Angel L.

    1983-01-01

    Gibberellic acid-induced α-amylase synthesis in wheat aleurone layers (Triticum aestivum L. var Potam S-70) escaped from transcriptional control 30 h after addition of the hormone, as evidenced by the tissue's loss of susceptibility to cordycepin. Abscisic acid inhibited the accumulation of α-amylase activity when added to the tissue during this cordycepin-insensitive phase of enzyme induction. α-Amylase synthesis was not restored by the addition of cordycepin, indicating that the response to abscisic acid was not dependent upon the continuous synthesis of a short lived RNA. When ethylene was added simultaneously or some time after abscisic acid, the accumulation of α-amylase activity was sustained or quickly restored. The loss of susceptibility to cordycepin was completely prevented when aleurone layers were incubated with a combination of gibberellic and abscisic acids from the start of the induction period. This effect of abscisic acid was not reversed by ethylene. On the basis of these observations, it is suggested that abscisic acid inhibits both the transcription and translation of α-amylase mRNA, and that only the latter site of action is susceptible to reversal by ethylene. The rate of incorporation of [methyl-14C]choline into phospholipids was also inhibited by abscisic acid. Ethylene reversed this effect. The effects of abscisic acid and ethylene on phospholipid synthesis were not dependent upon the presence of gibberellic acid. No direct relationship was found between the control of α-amylase synthesis and membrane formation by abscisic acid and ethylene. PMID:16663284

  6. Calcium-dependent nitric oxide production is involved in the cytoprotective properties of n-acetylcysteine in glycochenodeoxycholic acid-induced cell death in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Rubio, Sandra; Linares, Clara I.; Bello, Rosario I.; Gonzalez, Raul; Ferrin, Gustavo; Hidalgo, Ana B.; Munoz-Gomariz, Elisa; Rodriguez, Blanca A.; Barrera, Pilar; Ranchal, Isidora; Duran-Prado, Mario; De la Mata, Manuel; Muntane, Jordi

    2010-01-15

    The intracellular oxidative stress has been involved in bile acid-induced cell death in hepatocytes. Nitric oxide (NO) exerts cytoprotective properties in glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)-treated hepatocytes. The study evaluated the involvement of Ca{sup 2+} on the regulation of NO synthase (NOS)-3 expression during N-acetylcysteine (NAC) cytoprotection against GCDCA-induced cell death in hepatocytes. The regulation of Ca{sup 2+} pools (EGTA or BAPTA-AM) and NO (L-NAME or NO donor) production was assessed during NAC cytoprotection in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The stimulation of Ca{sup 2+} entrance was induced by A23187 in HepG2. Cell death, Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, NOS-1, -2 and -3 expression, AP-1 activation, and NO production were evaluated. GCDCA reduced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration and NOS-3 expression, and enhanced cell death in HepG2. NO donor prevented, and L-NAME enhanced, GCDCA-induced cell death. The reduction of Ca{sup 2+} entry by EGTA, but not its release from intracellular stores by BAPTA-AM, enhanced cell death in GCDCA-treated cells. The stimulation of Ca{sup 2+} entrance by A23187 reduced cell death and enhanced NOS-3 expression in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The cytoprotective properties of NAC were related to the recovery of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration, NOS-3 expression and NO production induced by GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The increase of NO production by Ca{sup 2+}-dependent NOS-3 expression during NAC administration reduces cell death in GCDCA-treated hepatocytes.

  7. Citric acid induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis of human immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) via caspase- and mitochondrial-dependent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ying, Tsung-Ho; Chen, Chia-Wei; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Hung, Sung-Jen; Chung, Jing-Gung; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2013-10-01

    Citric acid is an alpha-hydroxyacid (AHA) widely used in cosmetic dermatology and skincare products. However, there is concern regarding its safety for the skin. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of citric acid on the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. HaCaT cells were treated with citric acid at 2.5-12.5 mM for different time periods. Cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis were investigated by 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining, flow cytometry, western blot and confocal microscopy. Citric acid not only inhibited proliferation of HaCaT cells in a dose-dependent manner, but also induced apoptosis and cell cycle-arrest at the G2/M phase (before 24 h) and S phase (after 24 h). Citric acid increased the level of Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX) and reduced the levels of B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2), B-cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL-XL) and activated caspase-9 and caspase-3, which subsequently induced apoptosis via caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways. Citric acid also activated death receptors and increased the levels of caspase-8, activated BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (BID) protein, Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and Endonuclease G (EndoG). Therefore, citric acid induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. The study results suggest that citric acid is cytotoxic to HaCaT cells via induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in vitro.

  8. Increased expression of retinoic acid-induced gene 1 in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression

    PubMed Central

    Haybaeck, Johannes; Postruznik, Magdalena; Miller, Christine L; Dulay, Jeannette R; Llenos, Ida C; Weis, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Background Retinoids regulate gene expression in different cells and tissues at the transcriptional level. Retinoic acid transcriptionally regulates downstream regulatory molecules, including enzymes, transcription factors, cytokines, and cytokine receptors. Animal models indicate an involvement of retinoid signaling pathways in the regulation of synaptic plasticity and learning, especially in the hippocampus. Retinoic acid-inducible or induced gene 1 (RAI-1) is induced during neuronal differentiation, and was associated with the severity of the phenotype and response to medication in schizophrenic patients. Methods In the present study, we used immunohistochemistry to investigate the expression of RAI-1 in 60 brains from the Stanley Neuropathology Consortium (15 cases each from controls and from patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression). Rating scores for density and intensity were determined in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Results All four groups showed high interindividual variation. RAI-1-positive cells were identified as neurons and astrocytes. Significantly increased intensities in cortical neurons were noted in all three major psychiatric groups compared with controls. The density of RAI-1-positive neurons was increased (P=0.06) in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. In bipolar disorder, RAI-1-positive astrocytes in gray matter showed a significantly increased intensity and compound value. Thus, a significant increase in the parameters measured was found in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression. Conclusion Our study shows a significant increase in expression of RAI-1 in the brains from patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depression. The increased expression might reflect altered signaling pathways, like that for retinoic acid. The underlying mechanisms leading to the increased expression and its functional consequences are so far unknown, and remain to be investigated in future studies

  9. A comparative study of the antitussive activity of levodropropizine and dropropizine in the citric acid-induced cough model in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, G; Cordaro, C I; Vanasia, M; Balzarotti, C; Camusso, L; Caiazzo, G; Maghini, L; Mazzocchi, M; Zennaro, M

    1992-01-01

    Levodropropizine is the levo-rotatory (S)-enantiomer of dropropizine, a racemic non-opiate antitussive agent which has been used clinically for many years. Compared with the racemic drug, levodropropizine exhibits in animal models similar antitussive activity but considerably lower central nervous system (CNS) depressant effects. It is also less likely to cause sedation in treated patients. Since the comparative antitussive potency of the two drugs in clinical experimental models has not been evaluated, the authors performed a randomized, double blind, cross over investigation in which the effects of single oral doses (60 and 90 mg) of levodropropizine and dropropizine were assessed by using the citric acid-induced cough model in eight normal volunteers. Stimulation tests involved inhalation of individual cumulative doses of citric acid (6.3 to 53.3 mg) which at pre-study assessment had been found to induce reproducibly at least ten coughs over a 30 sec period. Each subject was studied by repeating the citric acid stimulation test four times (0 h, 1 h, 2 h and 6 h) on each of five different days separated by intervals of at least three days. In the absence of drug administration (control session), cough response to citric inhalation was remarkably reproducible throughout the 6 h period of observation. A marked and statistically significant reduction in cough response (to about one third--one sixth of the pre-drug values) was observed 1 h after intake for both compounds. At subsequent testing 2 h and 6 h after dosing, cough response was still depressed and did not differ significantly from that observed at 1 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Molecular Analysis of the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 Gene (RAI1) in Patients with Suspected Smith-Magenis Syndrome without the 17p11.2 Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Vilboux, Thierry; Ciccone, Carla; Blancato, Jan K.; Cox, Gerald F.; Deshpande, Charu; Introne, Wendy J.; Gahl, William A.; Smith, Ann C. M.; Huizing, Marjan

    2011-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex neurobehavioral disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies. The syndrome is primarily ascribed to a ∼3.7 Mb de novo deletion on chromosome 17p11.2. Haploinsufficiency of multiple genes likely underlies the complex clinical phenotype. RAI1 (Retinoic Acid Induced 1) is recognized as a major gene involved in the SMS phenotype. Extensive genetic and clinical analyses of 36 patients with SMS-like features, but without the 17p11.2 microdeletion, yielded 10 patients with RAI1 variants, including 4 with de novo deleterious mutations, and 6 with novel missense variants, 5 of which were familial. Haplotype analysis showed two major RAI1 haplotypes in our primarily Caucasian cohort; the novel RAI1 variants did not occur in a preferred haplotype. RNA analysis revealed that RAI1 mRNA expression was significantly decreased in cells of patients with the common 17p11.2 deletion, as well as in those with de novo RAI1 variants. Expression levels varied in patients with familial RAI1 variants and in non-17p11.2 deleted patients without identified RAI1 defects. No correlation between SNP haplotype and RAI1 expression was found. Two clinical features, ocular abnormalities and polyembolokoilomania (object insertion), were significantly correlated with decreased RAI1 expression. While not significantly correlated, the presence of hearing loss, seizures, hoarse voice, childhood onset of obesity and specific behavioral aspects and the absence of immunologic abnormalities and cardiovascular or renal structural anomalies, appeared to be specific for the de novo RAI1 subgroup. Recognition of the combination of these features will assist in referral for RAI1 analysis of patients with SMS-like features without detectable microdeletion of 17p11.2. Moreover, RAI1 expression emerged as a genetic target for development of therapeutic interventions for SMS. PMID:21857958

  11. Gibberellic acid-induced aleurone layers responding to heat shock or tunicamycin provide insight into the N-glycoproteome, protein secretion, and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Barba-Espín, Gregorio; Dedvisitsakul, Plaipol; Hägglund, Per; Svensson, Birte; Finnie, Christine

    2014-02-01

    The growing relevance of plants for the production of recombinant proteins makes understanding the secretory machinery, including the identification of glycosylation sites in secreted proteins, an important goal of plant proteomics. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone layers maintained in vitro respond to gibberellic acid by secreting an array of proteins and provide a unique system for the analysis of plant protein secretion. Perturbation of protein secretion in gibberellic acid-induced aleurone layers by two independent mechanisms, heat shock and tunicamycin treatment, demonstrated overlapping effects on both the intracellular and secreted proteomes. Proteins in a total of 22 and 178 two-dimensional gel spots changing in intensity in extracellular and intracellular fractions, respectively, were identified by mass spectrometry. Among these are proteins with key roles in protein processing and secretion, such as calreticulin, protein disulfide isomerase, proteasome subunits, and isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase. Sixteen heat shock proteins in 29 spots showed diverse responses to the treatments, with only a minority increasing in response to heat shock. The majority, all of which were small heat shock proteins, decreased in heat-shocked aleurone layers. Additionally, glycopeptide enrichment and N-glycosylation analysis identified 73 glycosylation sites in 65 aleurone layer proteins, with 53 of the glycoproteins found in extracellular fractions and 36 found in intracellular fractions. This represents major progress in characterization of the barley N-glycoproteome, since only four of these sites were previously described. Overall, these findings considerably advance knowledge of the plant protein secretion system in general and emphasize the versatility of the aleurone layer as a model system for studying plant protein secretion.

  12. Molecular analysis of the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 gene (RAI1) in patients with suspected Smith-Magenis syndrome without the 17p11.2 deletion.

    PubMed

    Vilboux, Thierry; Ciccone, Carla; Blancato, Jan K; Cox, Gerald F; Deshpande, Charu; Introne, Wendy J; Gahl, William A; Smith, Ann C M; Huizing, Marjan

    2011-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex neurobehavioral disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies. The syndrome is primarily ascribed to a ∼3.7 Mb de novo deletion on chromosome 17p11.2. Haploinsufficiency of multiple genes likely underlies the complex clinical phenotype. RAI1 (Retinoic Acid Induced 1) is recognized as a major gene involved in the SMS phenotype. Extensive genetic and clinical analyses of 36 patients with SMS-like features, but without the 17p11.2 microdeletion, yielded 10 patients with RAI1 variants, including 4 with de novo deleterious mutations, and 6 with novel missense variants, 5 of which were familial. Haplotype analysis showed two major RAI1 haplotypes in our primarily Caucasian cohort; the novel RAI1 variants did not occur in a preferred haplotype. RNA analysis revealed that RAI1 mRNA expression was significantly decreased in cells of patients with the common 17p11.2 deletion, as well as in those with de novo RAI1 variants. Expression levels varied in patients with familial RAI1 variants and in non-17p11.2 deleted patients without identified RAI1 defects. No correlation between SNP haplotype and RAI1 expression was found. Two clinical features, ocular abnormalities and polyembolokoilomania (object insertion), were significantly correlated with decreased RAI1 expression. While not significantly correlated, the presence of hearing loss, seizures, hoarse voice, childhood onset of obesity and specific behavioral aspects and the absence of immunologic abnormalities and cardiovascular or renal structural anomalies, appeared to be specific for the de novo RAI1 subgroup. Recognition of the combination of these features will assist in referral for RAI1 analysis of patients with SMS-like features without detectable microdeletion of 17p11.2. Moreover, RAI1 expression emerged as a genetic target for development of therapeutic interventions for SMS.

  13. Acid-induced off-response of PKD2L1 channel in Xenopus oocytes and its regulation by Ca(2.).

    PubMed

    Hussein, Shaimaa; Zheng, Wang; Dyte, Chris; Wang, Qian; Yang, JungWoo; Zhang, Fan; Tang, Jingfeng; Cao, Ying; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) protein 2 Like 1 (PKD2L1), also called transient receptor potential polycystin-3 (TRPP3), regulates Ca(2+)-dependent hedgehog signalling in primary cilia, intestinal development and sour tasting but with an unclear mechanism. PKD2L1 is a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel that is activated by extracellular Ca(2+) (on-response) in Xenopus oocytes. PKD2L1 co-expressed with PKD protein 1 Like 3 (PKD1L3) exhibits extracellular acid-induced activation (off-response, i.e., activation following acid removal) but whether PKD1L3 participates in acid sensing remains unclear. Here we used the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp, site directed mutagenesis, Western blotting, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence, and showed that PKD2L1 expressed in oocytes exhibits sustained off-response currents in the absence of PKD1L3. PKD1L3 co-expression augmented the PKD2L1 plasma membrane localization but did not alter the observed properties of the off-response. PKD2L1 off-response was inhibited by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+). We also identified two intra-membrane residues aspartic acid 349 (D349) and glutamic acid 356 (E356) in the third transmembrane domain that are critical for PKD2L1 channel function. Our study suggests that PKD2L1 may itself sense acids and defines off-response properties in the absence of PKD1L3. PMID:26502994

  14. Music application alleviates short-term memory impairments through increasing cell proliferation in the hippocampus of valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Min; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Choi, Hyun-Hee

    2016-06-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder and this disorder shows impairment in reciprocal social interactions, deficits in communication, and restrictive and repetitive patterns of behaviors and interests. The effect of music on short-term memory in the view of cell proliferation in the hippocampus was evaluated using valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups. Animal model of autism was made by subcutaneous injection of 400-mg/kg valproic acid into the rat pups on the postnatal day 14. The rat pups in the music-applied groups were exposed to the 65-dB comfortable classic music for 1 hr once a day, starting postnatal day 15 and continued until postnatal day 28. In the present results, short-term memory was deteriorated by autism induction. The numbers of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyridine (BrdU)-positive, Ki-67-positive, and doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased by autism induction. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) expressions in the hippocampus were also suppressed in the autistic rat pups. Music application alleviated short-term memory deficits with enhancing the numbers of BrdU-positive, Ki-67-positive, and DCX-positive cells in the autistic rat pups. Music application also enhanced BDNF and TrkB expressions in the autistic rat pups. The present study show that application of music enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation and alleviated short-term memory impairment through stimulating BDNF-TrkB signaling in the autistic rat pups. Music can be suggested as the therapeutic strategy to overcome the autism-induced memory deficits.

  15. A comparative study of the antitussive activity of levodropropizine and dropropizine in the citric acid-induced cough model in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, G; Cordaro, C I; Vanasia, M; Balzarotti, C; Camusso, L; Caiazzo, G; Maghini, L; Mazzocchi, M; Zennaro, M

    1992-01-01

    Levodropropizine is the levo-rotatory (S)-enantiomer of dropropizine, a racemic non-opiate antitussive agent which has been used clinically for many years. Compared with the racemic drug, levodropropizine exhibits in animal models similar antitussive activity but considerably lower central nervous system (CNS) depressant effects. It is also less likely to cause sedation in treated patients. Since the comparative antitussive potency of the two drugs in clinical experimental models has not been evaluated, the authors performed a randomized, double blind, cross over investigation in which the effects of single oral doses (60 and 90 mg) of levodropropizine and dropropizine were assessed by using the citric acid-induced cough model in eight normal volunteers. Stimulation tests involved inhalation of individual cumulative doses of citric acid (6.3 to 53.3 mg) which at pre-study assessment had been found to induce reproducibly at least ten coughs over a 30 sec period. Each subject was studied by repeating the citric acid stimulation test four times (0 h, 1 h, 2 h and 6 h) on each of five different days separated by intervals of at least three days. In the absence of drug administration (control session), cough response to citric inhalation was remarkably reproducible throughout the 6 h period of observation. A marked and statistically significant reduction in cough response (to about one third--one sixth of the pre-drug values) was observed 1 h after intake for both compounds. At subsequent testing 2 h and 6 h after dosing, cough response was still depressed and did not differ significantly from that observed at 1 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1295724

  16. A combined physiological and proteomic approach to reveal lactic-acid-induced alterations in Lactobacillus casei Zhang and its mutant with enhanced lactic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Wei; Wang, Miao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei has traditionally been recognized as a probiotic and frequently used as an adjunct culture in fermented dairy products, where acid stress is an environmental condition commonly encountered. In the present study, we carried out a comparative physiological and proteomic study to investigate lactic-acid-induced alterations in Lactobacillus casei Zhang (WT) and its acid-resistant mutant. Analysis of the physiological data showed that the mutant exhibited 33.8% higher glucose phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system activity and lower glycolytic pH compared with the WT under acidic conditions. In addition, significant differences were detected in both cells during acid stress between intracellular physiological state, including intracellular pH, H(+)-ATPase activity, and intracellular ATP pool. Comparison of the proteomic data based on 2D-DIGE and i-TRAQ indicated that acid stress invoked a global change in both strains. The mutant protected the cells against acid damage by regulating the expression of key proteins involved in cellular metabolism, DNA replication, RNA synthesis, translation, and some chaperones. Proteome results were validated by Lactobacillus casei displaying higher intracellular aspartate and arginine levels, and the survival at pH 3.3 was improved 1.36- and 2.10-fold by the addition of 50-mM aspartate and arginine, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that aspartate may be involved in acid tolerance in Lactobacillus casei. Results presented here may help us understand acid resistance mechanisms and help formulate new strategies to enhance the industrial applications of this species. PMID:22159611

  17. Acid-induced sweetness of neoculin is ascribed to its pH-dependent agonistic-antagonistic interaction with human sweet taste receptor.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Morita, Yuji; Koizumi, Ayako; Asakura, Tomiko; Terada, Tohru; Ito, Keisuke; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko; Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2008-07-01

    Neoculin (NCL) is a sweet protein that also has taste-modifying activity to convert sourness to sweetness. However, it has been unclear how NCL induces this unique sensation. Here we quantitatively evaluated the pH-dependent acid-induced sweetness of NCL using a cell-based assay system. The human sweet taste receptor, hT1R2-hT1R3, was functionally expressed in HEK293T cells together with G alpha protein. When NCL was applied to the cells under different pH conditions, it activated hT1R2-hT1R3 in a pH-dependent manner as the condition changed from pH 8 to 5. The pH-response sigmoidal curve resembled the imidazole titration curve, suggesting that His residues were involved in the taste-modifying activity. We then constructed an NCL variant in which all His residues were replaced with Ala and found that the variant elicited strong sweetness at neutral pH as well as at acidic pH. Since NCL and the variant elicited weak and strong sweetness at the same neutral pH, respectively, we applied different proportions of NCL-variant mixtures to the cells at this pH. As a result, NCL competitively inhibits the variant-induced receptor activation. All these data suggest that NCL acts as an hT1R2-hT1R3 agonist at acidic pH but functionally changes into its antagonist at neutral pH.

  18. Gene expression profiling reveals the role of RIG1 like receptor signaling in p53 dependent apoptosis induced by PUVA in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Chowdhari, Shruti; Saini, Neeru

    2016-01-01

    Photochemotherapy using 8-methoxypsoralen in combination with UVA radiation (PUVA) is an effective treatment for various skin dermatosis including psoriasis however its molecular mechanism is not clear. Previously we demonstrated that PUVA differentially regulates miRNA expression profile with a significant up-regulation of hsa-miR-4516. To study in detail the molecular mechanism of PUVA in keratinocytes, we investigated the genome wide transcriptomic changes using Illumina whole genome gene expression beadchip. Microarray analysis revealed 1932 differentially expressed gene and their Insilico analysis revealed Retinoic Acid Inducible Gene-I (RIG-1) signaling, apoptosis and p53 pathway to be associated with PUVA induced effects. We demonstrate that miR-4516 mediated down-regulation of UBE2N promotes p53 nuclear translocation and pro-apoptotic activity of PUVA is independent of IRF3 but is mediated by the RIG-I in a p53 and NFκB dependent manner. Additionally, PUVA inactivated the AKT/mTOR pathway in concert with inhibition of autophagy and suppressed cell migration. Taken together this study broadens our understanding about the mechanism of action of PUVA providing possible new strategy targeting proapoptotic function of RIG-1, a regulator of innate immune response or p53 for psoriasis therapy. PMID:26518362

  19. Cleavage of interferon regulatory factor 7 by enterovirus 71 3C suppresses cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xiaobo; Xiao, Xia; Xue, Qinghua; Jin, Qi; He, Bin; Wang, Jianwei

    2013-02-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a positive-stranded RNA virus which is capable of inhibiting innate immunity. Among virus-encoded proteins, the 3C protein compromises the type I interferon (IFN-I) response mediated by retinoid acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) or Toll-like receptor 3 that activates interferon regulatory 3 (IRF3) and IRF7. In the present study, we report that enterovirus 71 downregulates IRF7 through the 3C protein, which inhibits the function of IRF7. When expressed in mammalian cells, the 3C protein mediates cleavage of IRF7 rather than that of IRF3. This process is insensitive to inhibitors of caspase, proteasome, lysosome, and autophagy. H40D substitution in the 3C active site abolishes its activity, whereas R84Q or V154S substitution in the RNA binding motif has no effect. Furthermore, 3C-mediated cleavage occurs at the Q189-S190 junction within the constitutive activation domain of IRF7, resulting in two cleaved IRF7 fragments that are incapable of activating IFN expression. Ectopic expression of wild-type IRF7 limits EV71 replication. On the other hand, expression of the amino-terminal domain of IRF7 enhances EV71 infection, which correlates with its ability to interact with and inhibit IRF3. These results suggest that control of IRF7 by the 3C protein may represent a viral mechanism to escape cellular responses. PMID:23175366

  20. Alteration of Antiviral Signalling by Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) of Mitochondrial Antiviral Signalling Protein (MAVS)

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fei; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Hayakari, Ryo; Yoshida, Hidemi; Kawaguchi, Shogo; Takahashi, Ippei; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation is associated with diseases. As a type of genetic variation occurring with certain regularity and frequency, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is attracting more and more attention because of its great value for research and real-life application. Mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS) acts as a common adaptor molecule for retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs), which can recognize foreign RNA, including viral RNA, leading to the induction of type I interferons (IFNs). Therefore, MAVS is thought to be a crucial molecule in antiviral innate immunity. We speculated that genetic variation of MAVS may result in susceptibility to infectious diseases. To assess the risk of viral infection based on MAVS variation, we tested the effects of twelve non-synonymous MAVS coding-region SNPs from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database that result in amino acid substitutions. We found that five of these SNPs exhibited functional alterations. Additionally, four resulted in an inhibitory immune response, and one had the opposite effect. In total, 1,032 human genomic samples obtained from a mass examination were genotyped at these five SNPs. However, no homozygous or heterozygous variation was detected. We hypothesized that these five SNPs are not present in the Japanese population and that such MAVS variations may result in serious immune diseases. PMID:26954674

  1. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  2. Cherry Valley Ducks Mitochondrial Antiviral-Signaling Protein-Mediated Signaling Pathway and Antiviral Activity Research

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Hong, Tianqi; Li, Rong; Wang, Yao; Guo, Mengjiao; Cao, Zongxi; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS), an adaptor protein of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs)-mediated signal pathway, is involved in innate immunity. In this study, Cherry Valley duck MAVS (duMAVS) was cloned from the spleen and analyzed. duMAVS was determined to have a caspase activation and recruitment domain at N-terminal, followed by a proline-rich domain and a transmembrane domain at C-terminal. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that duMAVS was expressed in all tissues tested across a broad expression spectrum. The expression of duMAVS was significantly upregulated after infection with duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV). Overexpression of duMAVS could drive the activation of interferon (IFN)-β, nuclear factor-κB, interferon regulatory factor 7, and many downstream factors (such as Mx, PKR, OAS, and IL-8) in duck embryo fibroblast cells. What is more, RNA interference further confirmed that duMAVS was an important adaptor for IFN-β activation. The antiviral assay showed that duMAVS could suppress the various viral replications (DTMUV, novel reovirus, and duck plague virus) at early stages of infection. Overall, these results showed that the main signal pathway mediated by duMAVS and it had a broad-spectrum antiviral ability. This research will be helpful to better understanding the innate immune system of ducks. PMID:27708647

  3. Engagement of Fas on Macrophages Modulates Poly I:C Induced Cytokine Production with Specific Enhancement of IP-10

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Caitriona; Fernandes, Philana; Fanning, Liam J.

    2015-01-01

    Viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is recognised by pathogen recognition receptors such as Toll-Like Receptor 3 (TLR3) and retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I), and results in cytokine and interferon production. Fas, a well characterised death receptor, has recently been shown to play a role in the inflammatory response. In this study we investigated the role of Fas in the anti-viral immune response. Stimulation of Fas on macrophages did not induce significant cytokine production. However, activation of Fas modified the response of macrophages to the viral dsRNA analogue poly I:C. In particular, poly I:C-induced IP-10 production was significantly enhanced. A similar augmentation of IP-10 by Fas was observed following stimulation with both poly A:U and Sendai virus. Fas activation suppressed poly I:C-induced phosphorylation of the MAP kinases p38 and JNK, while overexpression of the Fas adaptor protein, Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD), activated AP-1 and inhibited poly I:C-induced IP-10 production. Consistent with an inhibitory role for AP-1 in IP-10 production, mutation of the AP-1 binding site on the IP-10 promoter resulted in augmented poly I:C-induced IP-10. These results demonstrate that engagement of the Fas receptor plays a role in modifying the innate immune response to viral RNA. PMID:25849666

  4. PPM1A silences cytosolic RNA sensing and antiviral defense through direct dephosphorylation of MAVS and TBK1.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Weiwen; Zhang, Qian; Lin, Xia; Wu, Shiying; Zhou, Yao; Meng, Fansen; Fan, Yunyun; Shen, Tao; Xiao, Mu; Xia, Zongping; Zou, Jian; Feng, Xin-Hua; Xu, Pinglong

    2016-07-01

    Cytosolic RNA sensing is a prerequisite for initiation of innate immune response against RNA viral pathogens. Signaling through RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I)-like receptors (RLRs) to TBK1 (Tank-binding kinase 1)/IKKε (IκB kinase ε) kinases is transduced by mitochondria-associated MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein). However, the precise mechanism of how MAVS-mediated TBK1/IKKε activation is strictly controlled still remains obscure. We reported that protein phosphatase magnesium-dependent 1A (PPM1A; also known as PP2Cα), depending on its catalytic ability, dampened the RLR-IRF3 (interferon regulatory factor 3) axis to silence cytosolic RNA sensing signaling. We demonstrated that PPM1A was an inherent partner of the TBK1/IKKε complex, targeted both MAVS and TBK1/IKKε for dephosphorylation, and thus disrupted MAVS-driven formation of signaling complex. Conversely, a high level of MAVS can dissociate the TBK1/PPM1A complex to override PPM1A-mediated inhibition. Loss of PPM1A through gene ablation in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and mouse primary macrophages enabled robustly enhanced antiviral responses. Consequently, Ppm1a(-/-) mice resisted to RNA virus attack, and transgenic zebrafish expressing PPM1A displayed profoundly increased RNA virus vulnerability. These findings identify PPM1A as the first known phosphatase of MAVS and elucidate the physiological function of PPM1A in antiviral immunity on whole animals. PMID:27419230

  5. The Roles of RNase-L in Antimicrobial Immunity and the Cytoskeleton-Associated Innate Response

    PubMed Central

    Ezelle, Heather J.; Malathi, Krishnamurthy; Hassel, Bret A.

    2016-01-01

    The interferon (IFN)-regulated endoribonuclease RNase-L is involved in multiple aspects of the antimicrobial innate immune response. It is the terminal component of an RNA cleavage pathway in which dsRNA induces the production of RNase-L-activating 2-5A by the 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase. The active nuclease then cleaves ssRNAs, both cellular and viral, leading to downregulation of their expression and the generation of small RNAs capable of activating retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors or the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. This leads to IFNβ expression and IL-1β activation respectively, in addition to broader effects on immune cell function. RNase-L is also one of a growing number of innate immune components that interact with the cell cytoskeleton. It can bind to several cytoskeletal proteins, including filamin A, an actin-binding protein that collaborates with RNase-L to maintain the cellular barrier to viral entry. This antiviral activity is independent of catalytic function, a unique mechanism for RNase-L. We also describe here the interaction of RNase-L with the E3 ubiquitin ligase and scaffolding protein, ligand of nump protein X (LNX), a regulator of tight junction proteins. In order to better understand the significance and context of these novel binding partners in the antimicrobial response, other innate immune protein interactions with the cytoskeleton are also discussed. PMID:26760998

  6. Abortive infection of snakehead fish vesiculovirus in ZF4 cells was associated with the RLRs pathway activation by viral replicative intermediates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenwen; Asim, Muhammad; Yi, Lizhu; Hegazy, Abeer M; Hu, Xianqin; Zhou, Yang; Ai, Taoshan; Lin, Li

    2015-03-18

    Snakehead fish vesiculovirus (SHVV) is a negative strand RNA virus which can cause great economic losses in fish culture. To facilitate the study of SHVV-host interactions, the susceptibility of zebrafish embryonic fibroblast cell line (ZF4) to the SHVV was investigated in this report. The results showed that high amount of viral mRNAs and cRNAs were detected at the 3 h post-infection. However, the expressions of the viral mRNAs and cRNA were decreased dramatically after 6 h post-infection. In addition, the expressions of interferon (IFN) and interferon-induced GTP-binding protein Mx were all up regulated significantly at the late stage of the infection. Meanwhile, the expressions of Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and Melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) were also all up-regulated significantly during the infection. Two isoforms of DrLGP2 from zebrafish were also cloned and analyzed. Interestingly, the expression of DrLGP2a but not DrLGP2b was significantly up-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels, indicating that the two DrLGP2 isoforms might play different roles during the SHVV infection. Transfection experiment showed that viral replicative intermediates were required for the activation of IFN-α expression. Taken together, the abortive infection of SHVV in ZF4 cells was associated with the activation of RLRs pathway, which was activated by viral replicative intermediates.

  7. Insights into the Antiviral Immunity against Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) Reovirus (GCRV) in Grass Carp

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Global fish production from aquaculture has rapidly grown over the past decades, and grass carp shares the largest portion. However, hemorrhagic disease caused by grass carp reovirus (GCRV) results in tremendous loss of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) industry. During the past years, development of molecular biology and cellular biology technologies has promoted significant advances in the understanding of the pathogen and the immune system. Immunoprophylaxis based on stimulation of the immune system of fish has also got some achievements. In this review, authors summarize the recent progresses in basic researches on GCRV; viral nucleic acid sensors, high-mobility group box proteins (HMGBs); pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and retinoic acid inducible gene I- (RIG-I-) like receptors (RLRs); antiviral immune responses induced by PRRs-mediated signaling cascades of type I interferon (IFN-I) and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) activation. The present review also notices the potential applications of molecule genetic markers. Additionally, authors discuss the current preventive and therapeutic strategies (vaccines, RNAi, and prevention medicine) and highlight the importance of innate immunity in long term control for grass carp hemorrhagic disease. PMID:25759845

  8. Trehalose-Mediated Autophagy Impairs the Anti-Viral Function of Human Primary Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qun; Jiang, Di; Huang, Chunjian; van Dyk, Linda F.; Li, Liwu; Chu, Hong Wei

    2015-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) is the most common cause of acute exacerbations of chronic lung diseases including asthma. Impaired anti-viral IFN-λ1 production and increased HRV replication in human asthmatic airway epithelial cells may be one of the underlying mechanisms leading to asthma exacerbations. Increased autophagy has been shown in asthmatic airway epithelium, but the role of autophagy in anti-HRV response remains uncertain. Trehalose, a natural glucose disaccharide, has been recognized as an effective autophagy inducer in mammalian cells. In the current study, we used trehalose to induce autophagy in normal human primary airway epithelial cells in order to determine if autophagy directly regulates the anti-viral response against HRV. We found that trehalose-induced autophagy significantly impaired IFN-λ1 expression and increased HRV-16 load. Inhibition of autophagy via knockdown of autophagy-related gene 5 (ATG5) effectively rescued the impaired IFN-λ1 expression by trehalose and subsequently reduced HRV-16 load. Mechanistically, ATG5 protein interacted with retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1), two critical molecules involved in the expression of anti-viral interferons. Our results suggest that induction of autophagy in human primary airway epithelial cells inhibits the anti-viral IFN-λ1 expression and facilitates HRV infection. Intervention of excessive autophagy in chronic lung diseases may provide a novel approach to attenuate viral infections and associated disease exacerbations. PMID:25879848

  9. RIG-I–like receptor LGP2 protects tumor cells from ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Widau, Ryan C.; Parekh, Akash D.; Ranck, Mark C.; Golden, Daniel W.; Kumar, Kiran A.; Sood, Ravi F.; Pitroda, Sean P.; Liao, Zhengkai; Huang, Xiaona; Darga, Thomas E.; Xu, David; Huang, Lei; Andrade, Jorge; Roizman, Bernard; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Khodarev, Nikolai N.

    2014-01-01

    An siRNA screen targeting 89 IFN stimulated genes in 14 different cancer cell lines pointed to the RIG-I (retinoic acid inducible gene I)–like receptor Laboratory of Genetics and Physiology 2 (LGP2) as playing a key role in conferring tumor cell survival following cytotoxic stress induced by ionizing radiation (IR). Studies on the role of LGP2 revealed the following: (i) Depletion of LGP2 in three cancer cell lines resulted in a significant increase in cell death following IR, (ii) ectopic expression of LGP2 in cells increased resistance to IR, and (iii) IR enhanced LGP2 expression in three cell lines tested. Studies designed to define the mechanism by which LGP2 acts point to its role in regulation of IFNβ. Specifically (i) suppression of LGP2 leads to enhanced IFNβ, (ii) cytotoxic effects following IR correlated with expression of IFNβ inasmuch as inhibition of IFNβ by neutralizing antibody conferred resistance to cell death, and (iii) mouse embryonic fibroblasts from IFN receptor 1 knockout mice are radioresistant compared with wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The role of LGP2 in cancer may be inferred from cumulative data showing elevated levels of LGP2 in cancer cells are associated with more adverse clinical outcomes. Our results indicate that cytotoxic stress exemplified by IR induces IFNβ and enhances the expression of LGP2. Enhanced expression of LGP2 suppresses the IFN stimulated genes associated with cytotoxic stress by turning off the expression of IFNβ. PMID:24434553

  10. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  11. PPM1A silences cytosolic RNA sensing and antiviral defense through direct dephosphorylation of MAVS and TBK1.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Weiwen; Zhang, Qian; Lin, Xia; Wu, Shiying; Zhou, Yao; Meng, Fansen; Fan, Yunyun; Shen, Tao; Xiao, Mu; Xia, Zongping; Zou, Jian; Feng, Xin-Hua; Xu, Pinglong

    2016-07-01

    Cytosolic RNA sensing is a prerequisite for initiation of innate immune response against RNA viral pathogens. Signaling through RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I)-like receptors (RLRs) to TBK1 (Tank-binding kinase 1)/IKKε (IκB kinase ε) kinases is transduced by mitochondria-associated MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein). However, the precise mechanism of how MAVS-mediated TBK1/IKKε activation is strictly controlled still remains obscure. We reported that protein phosphatase magnesium-dependent 1A (PPM1A; also known as PP2Cα), depending on its catalytic ability, dampened the RLR-IRF3 (interferon regulatory factor 3) axis to silence cytosolic RNA sensing signaling. We demonstrated that PPM1A was an inherent partner of the TBK1/IKKε complex, targeted both MAVS and TBK1/IKKε for dephosphorylation, and thus disrupted MAVS-driven formation of signaling complex. Conversely, a high level of MAVS can dissociate the TBK1/PPM1A complex to override PPM1A-mediated inhibition. Loss of PPM1A through gene ablation in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and mouse primary macrophages enabled robustly enhanced antiviral responses. Consequently, Ppm1a(-/-) mice resisted to RNA virus attack, and transgenic zebrafish expressing PPM1A displayed profoundly increased RNA virus vulnerability. These findings identify PPM1A as the first known phosphatase of MAVS and elucidate the physiological function of PPM1A in antiviral immunity on whole animals.

  12. Acid-induced type VI secretion system is regulated by ExoR-ChvG/ChvI signaling cascade in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih-Feng; Lin, Jer-Sheng; Shaw, Gwo-Chyuan; Lai, Erh-Min

    2012-09-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a widespread, versatile protein secretion system in pathogenic Proteobacteria. Several T6SSs are tightly regulated by various regulatory systems at multiple levels. However, the signals and/or regulatory mechanisms of many T6SSs remain unexplored. Here, we report on an acid-induced regulatory mechanism activating T6SS in Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a plant pathogenic bacterium causing crown gall disease in a wide range of plants. We monitored the secretion of the T6SS hallmark protein hemolysin-coregulated protein (Hcp) from A. tumefaciens and found that acidity is a T6SS-inducible signal. Expression analysis of the T6SS gene cluster comprising the imp and hcp operons revealed that imp expression and Hcp secretion are barely detected in A. tumefaciens grown in neutral minimal medium but are highly induced with acidic medium. Loss- and gain-of-function analysis revealed that the A. tumefaciens T6SS is positively regulated by a chvG/chvI two-component system and negatively regulated by exoR. Further epistasis analysis revealed that exoR functions upstream of the chvG sensor kinase in regulating T6SS. ChvG protein levels are greatly increased in the exoR deletion mutant and the periplasmic form of overexpressed ExoR is rapidly degraded under acidic conditions. Importantly, ExoR represses ChvG by direct physical interaction, but disruption of the physical interaction allows ChvG to activate T6SS. The phospho-mimic but not wild-type ChvI response regulator can bind to the T6SS promoter region in vitro and activate T6SS with growth in neutral minimal medium. We present the first evidence of T6SS activation by an ExoR-ChvG/ChvI cascade and propose that acidity triggers ExoR degradation, thereby derepressing ChvG/ChvI to activate T6SS in A. tumefaciens. PMID:23028331

  13. Acid-Induced Type VI Secretion System Is Regulated by ExoR-ChvG/ChvI Signaling Cascade in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Gwo-Chyuan; Lai, Erh-Min

    2012-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a widespread, versatile protein secretion system in pathogenic Proteobacteria. Several T6SSs are tightly regulated by various regulatory systems at multiple levels. However, the signals and/or regulatory mechanisms of many T6SSs remain unexplored. Here, we report on an acid-induced regulatory mechanism activating T6SS in Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a plant pathogenic bacterium causing crown gall disease in a wide range of plants. We monitored the secretion of the T6SS hallmark protein hemolysin-coregulated protein (Hcp) from A. tumefaciens and found that acidity is a T6SS-inducible signal. Expression analysis of the T6SS gene cluster comprising the imp and hcp operons revealed that imp expression and Hcp secretion are barely detected in A. tumefaciens grown in neutral minimal medium but are highly induced with acidic medium. Loss- and gain-of-function analysis revealed that the A. tumefaciens T6SS is positively regulated by a chvG/chvI two-component system and negatively regulated by exoR. Further epistasis analysis revealed that exoR functions upstream of the chvG sensor kinase in regulating T6SS. ChvG protein levels are greatly increased in the exoR deletion mutant and the periplasmic form of overexpressed ExoR is rapidly degraded under acidic conditions. Importantly, ExoR represses ChvG by direct physical interaction, but disruption of the physical interaction allows ChvG to activate T6SS. The phospho-mimic but not wild-type ChvI response regulator can bind to the T6SS promoter region in vitro and activate T6SS with growth in neutral minimal medium. We present the first evidence of T6SS activation by an ExoR-ChvG/ChvI cascade and propose that acidity triggers ExoR degradation, thereby derepressing ChvG/ChvI to activate T6SS in A. tumefaciens. PMID:23028331

  14. Rice bran phytic acid induced apoptosis through regulation of Bcl-2/Bax and p53 genes in HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Fatlawi, Atheer Abbas; Al-Fatlawi, Anees Abbas; Irshad, Md; Zafaryab, Md; Rizvi, M Moshahid Alam; Ahmad, Ayaz

    2014-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been reported to have positive nutritional benefits and prevent cancer formation. This study investigated the anticancer activity of rice bran PA against hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. Cytotoxicty of PA (0.5 to 4mM) was examined by MTT and LDH assays after 24 and 48 h treatment. Apoptotic activity was evaluated by expression analysis of apoptosis-regulatory genes [i.e. p53, Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3 and -9] by reverse transcriptase-PCR and DNA fragmentation assay. The results showed antioxidant activity of PA in Fe3+ reducing power assay (p ≤ 0.03). PA inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells in a concentration dependent manner (p ≤ 0.04). After 48h treatment, cell viability was recorded 84.7, 74.4, 65.6, 49.6, 36.0 and 23.8% in MTT assay and 92.6, 77.0%, 66.8%, 51.2, 40.3 and 32.3% in LDH assay at concentrations of 1, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5mM, respectively. Hence, treatment of PA for 24h, recorded viability of cells 93.5, 88.6, 55.5, 34.6 and 24.4% in MTT assay and 94.2, 86.1%, 59.7%, 42.3 and 31.6%, in LDH assay at concentrations of 1, 2.2, 3.0, 3.6 and 4.0mM, respectively. PA treated HepG2 cells showed up-regulation of p53, Bax, Caspase-3 and -9, and down- regulation of Bcl-2 gene (p ≤ 0.01). At the IC50 (2.49 mM) of PA, the p53, Bax, Caspase-3 and-9 genes were up- regulated by 6.03, 7.37, 19.7 and 14.5 fold respectively. Also, the fragmented genomic DNA in PA treated cells provided evidence of apoptosis. Our study confirmed the biological activity of PA and demonstrated growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis in HepG2 cells with modulation of the expression of apoptosis-regulatory genes. PMID:24870784

  15. Evolution of the DEAD box helicase family in chicken: chickens have no DHX9 ortholog.

    PubMed

    Sato, Haruko; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Takaki, Hiromi; Hikono, Hirokazu; Seya, Tsukasa

    2015-10-01

    Viral RNA represents a pattern molecule that can be recognized by RNA sensors in innate immunity. Humans and mice possess cytoplasmic DNA/RNA sensors for detecting viral replication. There are a number of DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp; DExD/H) box-type helicases in mammals, among which retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA50) are indispensable for RNA sensing; however, they are functionally supported by a number of sensors that directly bind viral RNA or replicative RNA intermediates to convey signals to RIG-I and MDA5. Some DEAD box helicase members recognize DNA irrespective of the origin. These sensors transmit IFN-inducing signals through adaptors, including mitochondrial antiviral signaling. Viral double-stranded RNAs are reportedly sensed by the helicases DDX1, DDX21, DHX36, DHX9, DDX3, DDX41, LGP2 and DDX60, in addition to RIG-I and MDA5, and induce type I IFNs, thereby blocking viral replication. Humans and mice have all nucleic acid sensors listed here. In the RNA sensing system in chicken, it was found in the present study that most DEAD box helicases are conserved; however, DHX9 is genetically deficient in addition to reported RIG-I. Based on the current genome databases, similar DHX9 deficiency was observed in ducks and several other bird species. Because chicken, but not duck, was found to be deficient in RIG-I, the RNA-sensing system of chicken lacks RIG-I and DHX9 and is thus more fragile than that of duck or mammal. DHX9 may generally compensate for the function of RIG-I and deficiency of DHX9 possibly participates in exacerbations of viral infection such as influenza in chickens.

  16. Domain-confined catalytic soot combustion over Co3O4 anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst prepared by mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jiale; Yu, Yifu; Dai, Fangfang; Meng, Ming; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Hu, Tiandou

    2013-11-01

    Herein, we introduce a specially designed domain-confined macroporous catalyst, namely, the Co3O4 nanocrystals anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst, which was synthesized by using the mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting method. This catalyst exhibits much better performance for catalytic soot combustion than the conventional TiO2 powder supported one in gravitational contact mode (GMC).Herein, we introduce a specially designed domain-confined macroporous catalyst, namely, the Co3O4 nanocrystals anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst, which was synthesized by using the mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting method. This catalyst exhibits much better performance for catalytic soot combustion than the conventional TiO2 powder supported one in gravitational contact mode (GMC). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The images of XRD, UV-vis, EDX and soot-TPR. The table providing information on Co/Ti-NA catalysts. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03757f

  17. RIPK3 Is Largely Dispensable for RIG-I-Like Receptor- and Type I Interferon-Driven Transcriptional Responses to Influenza A Virus in Murine Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Justin P.; Thapa, Roshan J.; Balachandran, Siddharth

    2016-01-01

    The kinase RIPK3 is a key regulator of cell death responses to a growing number of viral and microbial agents. We have found that influenza A virus (IAV)-mediated cell death is largely reliant on RIPK3 and that RIPK3-deficient mice are notably more susceptible to lethal infection by IAV than their wild-type counterparts. Recent studies demonstrate that RIPK3 also participates in regulating gene transcription programs during host pro-inflammatory and innate-immune responses, indicating that this kinase is not solely an inducer of cell death and that RIPK3-driven transcriptional responses may collaborate with cell death in promoting clearance of IAV. Here, we carried out DNA microarray analyses to determine the contribution of RIPK3 to the IAV-elicited host transcriptional response. We report that RIPK3 does not contribute significantly to the RLR-activated transcriptome or to the induction of type I IFN genes, although, interestingly, IFN-β production at a post-transcriptional step was modestly attenuated in IAV-infected ripk3-/- fibroblasts. Overall, RIPK3 regulated the expression of <5% of the IAV-induced transcriptome, and no genes were found to be obligate RIPK3 targets. IFN-β signaling was also found to be largely normal in the absence of RIPK3. Together, these results indicate that RIPK3 is not essential for the host antiviral transcriptional response to IAV in murine fibroblasts. PMID:27391363

  18. Molecular characterization and expression analyses of three RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway genes (MDA5, LGP2 and MAVS) in Larimichthys crocea.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bin; Hu, Yiwen; Zhang, Shuyi; Zheng, Jialang; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Jianshe; Zhu, Aiyi; Wu, Changwen

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we sequenced and characterized melanoma differentiation-associated antigen 5 (LcMDA5), laboratory of genetics and physiology 2 (LcLGP2) and mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (LcMAVS) from large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea). The LcMDA5 encodes 969 amino acids and contains two caspase-associated and recruitment domains (CARDs), a DExDc (DExD/H box-containing domain), a HELICc (helicase superfamily C-terminal domain) and a C-terminal regulatory domain (RD). The LcLGP2 encodes 679 amino acids and contains a DExDc, a HELICc and a RD. The LcMAVS encodes 512 amino acids and contains a CARD, a proline-rich domain, a transmembrane helix domain and a putative TRAF2-binding motif ((269)PVQDT(273)). Phylogenetic analyses showed that all the three genes of large yellow croaker are clustered together with their counterparts from other teleost fishes. The Real-time PCR analyses showed that all the three genes were found to be constitutively expressed in all examined tissues in large yellow croaker, but all with relatively low expression levels. Expression analyses showed that the three genes were all rapidly and significantly upregulated in vivo after poly (I:C) challenge in peripheral blood, liver, spleen and head kidney tissues. The results indicate that the LcMDA5, LcLGP2 and LcMAVS might play important roles in antiviral immune responses. PMID:27346150

  19. Co-administration of α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine aggravates colon ulceration of acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis via facilitation of NO/COX-2/miR-210 cascade.

    PubMed

    El-Gowelli, Hanan M; Saad, Evan I; Abdel-Galil, Abdel-Galil A; Ibrahim, Einas R

    2015-11-01

    In this work, α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine demonstrated significant protection against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats. We proposed that α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine co-administration might modulate their individual effects. Induction of ulcerative colitis in rats was performed by intra-rectal acetic acid (5% v/v) administration for 3 consecutive days. Effects of individual or combined used of α-lipoic acid (35 mg/kg ip) or cyclosporine (5mg/kg sc) for 6 days starting 2 days prior to acetic acid were assessed. Acetic acid caused colon ulceration, bloody diarrhea and weight loss. Histologically, there was mucosal atrophy and inflammatory cells infiltration in submucosa, associated with depletion of colon reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and elevated colon malondialdehyde, serum C-reactive protein (C-RP) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Colon gene expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and miR-210 was also elevated. These devastating effects of acetic acid were abolished upon concurrent administration of α-lipoic acid. Alternatively, cyclosporine caused partial protection against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis. Cyclosporine did not restore colon reduced glutathione, catalase activity, serum C-RP or TNF-α. Unexpectedly, co-administration of α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine aggravated colon ulceration. Concomitant use of α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine significantly increased nitric oxide production, cyclooxygenase-2 and miR-210 gene expression compared to all other studied groups. The current findings suggest that facilitation of nitric oxide/cyclooxygenase-2/miR-210 cascade constitutes, at least partially, the cellular mechanism by which concurrent use of α-lipoic acid and cyclosporine aggravates colon damage. Collectively, the present work highlights the probable risk of using α-lipoic acid/cyclosporine combination in ulcerative colitis patients.

  20. c-Jun N-terminal Kinase-Dependent Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathway is Critically Involved in Arjunic Acid Induced Apoptosis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Joo, HyeEun; Lee, Hyun Joo; Shin, Eun Ah; Kim, Hangil; Seo, Kyeong-Hwa; Baek, Nam-In; Kim, Bonglee; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2016-04-01

    Though arjunic acid, a triterpene isolated from Terminalia arjuna, was known to have antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and cytotoxic effects, its underlying antitumor mechanism still remains unclear so far. Thus, in the present study, the molecular antitumor mechanism of arjunic acid was examined in A549 and H460 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Arjunic acid exerted cytotoxicity by 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and significantly increased sub-G1 population in A549 and H460 cells by cell cycle analysis. Consistently, arjunic acid cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), activated Bax, and phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), and also attenuated the expression of pro-caspase-3 and Bcl-2 in A549 and H460 cells. Furthermore, arjunic acid upregulated the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress proteins such as IRE1 α, ATF4, p-eIF2α, and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in A549 and H460 cells. Conversely, CHOP depletion attenuated the increase of sub-G1 population by arjunic acid, and also JNK inhibitor SP600125 blocked the cytotoxicity and upregulation of IRE1 α and CHOP induced by arjunic acid in A549 and H460 cells. Overall, our findings suggest that arjunic acid induces apoptosis in NSCLC cells via JNK mediated ER stress pathway as a potent chemotherapeutic agent for NSCLC. PMID:26787261

  1. Identification of the transcription factors NF-YA and NF-YB as factors A and B that bound to the promoter of the major histocompatibility complex class II gene I-A beta.

    PubMed Central

    Celada, A; McKercher, S R; Maki, R A

    1996-01-01

    The Y box is a conserved sequence in the promoter of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes, which contains a CCAAT sequence (CCAAT box). Previously, we partially purified the DNA-binding protein that recognizes the Y box of the I-A beta gene and showed that it consisted of two components (factors A and B) both of which were necessary for optimal DNA binding. The genes for the heteromeric protein NF-Y (NF-YA and NF-YB), which binds to the I-E alpha Y box have been cloned. We subsequently isolated the genes for NF-YA and NF-YB using oligonucleotides designed from the published sequences. NF-YA and NF-YB were tested for binding to the I-A beta and I-E alpha Y boxes. While neither NF-YA or NF-YB alone bound to the Y box, when the components were mixed the complex bound to the I-A beta Y box with high affinity. Moreover, NF-YA and NF-YB could be complemented for binding to DNA by factor B or factor A, respectively. These results suggest that the active binding protein is NF-YA in factor A extracts and NF-YB in factor B extracts. Finally, antibodies against NF-YA and NF-YB were shown to induce a supershift when nuclear extracts were added to the double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide covering the Y box of the I-A beta gene. Antisense expression constructs of both NF-YA and NF-YB were made and their effect on expression from the I-A beta promoter was tested. Either antisense construction, when transfected into cells, lowered the expression of a reporter gene linked to the I-A beta promoter. This study provides direct evidence of the identification of NF-YA and NF-YB as the previously described factors A and B. Moreover, these results strongly implicate NF-Y in the expression of the MHC class II gene I-A beta. PMID:8760361

  2. Interferon γ-inducible protein (IFI) 16 transcriptionally regulates type i interferons and other interferon-stimulated genes and controls the interferon response to both DNA and RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mikayla R; Sharma, Shruti; Atianand, Maninjay; Jensen, Søren B; Carpenter, Susan; Knipe, David M; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A

    2014-08-22

    The interferon γ-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) has recently been linked to the detection of nuclear and cytosolic DNA during infection with herpes simplex virus-1 and HIV. IFI16 binds dsDNA via HIN200 domains and activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING), leading to TANK (TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator)-binding kinase-1 (TBK1)-dependent phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and transcription of type I interferons (IFNs) and related genes. To better understand the role of IFI16 in coordinating type I IFN gene regulation, we generated cell lines with stable knockdown of IFI16 and examined responses to DNA and RNA viruses as well as cyclic dinucleotides. As expected, stable knockdown of IFI16 led to a severely attenuated type I IFN response to DNA ligands and viruses. In contrast, expression of the NF-κB-regulated cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β was unaffected in IFI16 knockdown cells, suggesting that the role of IFI16 in sensing these triggers was unique to the type I IFN pathway. Surprisingly, we also found that knockdown of IFI16 led to a severe attenuation of IFN-α and the IFN-stimulated gene retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) in response to cyclic GMP-AMP, a second messenger produced by cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) as well as RNA ligands and viruses. Analysis of IFI16 knockdown cells revealed compromised occupancy of RNA polymerase II on the IFN-α promoter in these cells, suggesting that transcription of IFN-stimulated genes is dependent on IFI16. These results indicate a broader role for IFI16 in the regulation of the type I IFN response to RNA and DNA viruses in antiviral immunity.

  3. Effect of age on the pathogenesis of DHV-1 in Pekin ducks and on the innate immune responses of ducks to infection.

    PubMed

    Song, Cuiping; Yu, Shengqing; Duan, Yunbing; Hu, Yue; Qiu, Xvsheng; Tan, Lei; Sun, Yingjie; Wang, Mingshu; Cheng, Anchun; Ding, Chan

    2014-05-01

    Duck hepatitis virus (DHV) affects 1-week-old but not 3-week-old ducks, and it causes a more severe disease in the younger ducks. These differences may be partially due to the host response to DHV infection. In order to understand this difference, we characterized the pathobiology of and innate immune response to DHV infection in 1-day-old (1D) and 3-week-old (3 W) ducks. Viral RNA was detected in duck livers at 24, 36 and 72 h after inoculation with DHV at a dose of 10(3) LD50. Virus-induced pathology ranged from no clinical signs to severe disease and death, and it was more severe in the 1D ducks. Infection with DHV induced up-regulation of gene expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-7, TLR3, retinoic-acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I), melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA-5), interleukin (IL)-6, interferon (IFN)-α, interferon-induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1), interferon-stimulated gene 12 (ISG12), and 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase-like gene (OASL) in the livers of 3 W ducks. Of these, IL-6, OASL and ISG12 mRNA levels were more than 100-fold higher in infected 3 W ducks than in mock-infected ducks of the same age. These genes were induced much less in infected 1D ducklings. We present evidence that a lower level of viral replication in the hepatocytes of 3 W ducks, whose basal level of cytokines is higher than that in 1D ducklings, may be related to the strong innate immunity induced. From our data, we conclude that duck age plays an important role in the pathogenicity of and innate immune responses to DHV.

  4. A functional C-terminal TRAF3-binding site in MAVS participates in positive and negative regulation of the IFN antiviral response.

    PubMed

    Paz, Suzanne; Vilasco, Myriam; Werden, Steven J; Arguello, Meztli; Joseph-Pillai, Deshanthe; Zhao, Tiejun; Nguyen, Thi Lien-Anh; Sun, Qiang; Meurs, Eliane F; Lin, Rongtuan; Hiscott, John

    2011-06-01

    Recognition of viral RNA structures by the cytosolic sensor retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) results in the activation of signaling cascades that culminate with the generation of the type I interferon (IFN) antiviral response. Onset of antiviral and inflammatory responses to viral pathogens necessitates the regulated spatiotemporal recruitment of signaling adapters, kinases and transcriptional proteins to the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS). We previously demonstrated that the serine/threonine kinase IKKε is recruited to the C-terminal region of MAVS following Sendai or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection, mediated by Lys63-linked polyubiquitination of MAVS at Lys500, resulting in inhibition of downstream IFN signaling (Paz et al, Mol Cell Biol, 2009). In this study, we demonstrate that C-terminus of MAVS harbors a novel TRAF3-binding site in the aa450-468 region of MAVS. A consensus TRAF-interacting motif (TIM), 455-PEENEY-460, within this site is required for TRAF3 binding and activation of IFN antiviral response genes, whereas mutation of the TIM eliminates TRAF3 binding and the downstream IFN response. Reconstitution of MAVS(-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts with a construct expressing a TIM-mutated version of MAVS failed to restore the antiviral response or block VSV replication, whereas wild-type MAVS reconstituted antiviral inhibition of VSV replication. Furthermore, recruitment of IKKε to an adjacent C-terminal site (aa 468-540) in MAVS via Lys500 ubiquitination decreased TRAF3 binding and protein stability, thus contributing to IKKε-mediated shutdown of the IFN response. This study demonstrates that MAVS harbors a functional C-terminal TRAF3-binding site that participates in positive and negative regulation of the IFN antiviral response.

  5. Abortive infection of snakehead fish vesiculovirus in ZF4 cells was associated with the RLRs pathway activation by viral replicative intermediates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenwen; Asim, Muhammad; Yi, Lizhu; Hegazy, Abeer M; Hu, Xianqin; Zhou, Yang; Ai, Taoshan; Lin, Li

    2015-01-01

    Snakehead fish vesiculovirus (SHVV) is a negative strand RNA virus which can cause great economic losses in fish culture. To facilitate the study of SHVV-host interactions, the susceptibility of zebrafish embryonic fibroblast cell line (ZF4) to the SHVV was investigated in this report. The results showed that high amount of viral mRNAs and cRNAs were detected at the 3 h post-infection. However, the expressions of the viral mRNAs and cRNA were decreased dramatically after 6 h post-infection. In addition, the expressions of interferon (IFN) and interferon-induced GTP-binding protein Mx were all up regulated significantly at the late stage of the infection. Meanwhile, the expressions of Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and Melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) were also all up-regulated significantly during the infection. Two isoforms of DrLGP2 from zebrafish were also cloned and analyzed. Interestingly, the expression of DrLGP2a but not DrLGP2b was significantly up-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels, indicating that the two DrLGP2 isoforms might play different roles during the SHVV infection. Transfection experiment showed that viral replicative intermediates were required for the activation of IFN-α expression. Taken together, the abortive infection of SHVV in ZF4 cells was associated with the activation of RLRs pathway, which was activated by viral replicative intermediates. PMID:25794284

  6. β-Glucan Derived from Aureobasidium pullulans Is Effective for the Prevention of Influenza in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Daisuke; Iwai, Atsushi; Aoki, Shiho; Uchiyama, Hirohumi; Kawata, Koji; Nakayama, Yosuke; Nikawa, Yasuhiro; Kusano, Kisato; Okabe, Mitsuyasu; Miyazaki, Tadaaki

    2012-01-01

    β-(1→3)-D-glucans with β-(1→6)-glycosidic linked branches produced by mushrooms, yeast and fungi are known to be an immune activation agent, and are used in anti-cancer drugs or health-promoting foods. In this report, we demonstrate that oral administration of Aureobasidium pullulans-cultured fluid (AP-CF) enriched with the β-(1→3),(1→6)-D-glucan exhibits efficacy to protect mice infected with a lethal titer of the A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8; H1N1) strain of influenza virus. The survival rate of the mice significantly increased by AP-CF administration after sublethal infection of PR8 virus. The virus titer in the mouse lung homogenates was significantly decreased by AP-CF administration. No significant difference in the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines, and in the population of lymphocytes was observed in the lungs of mice administered with AP-CF. Interestingly, expression level for the mRNA of virus sensors, RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene-I) and MDA5 (melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5) strongly increased at 5 hours after the stimulation of A. pullulans-produced purified β-(1→3),(1→6)-D-glucan (AP-BG) in murine macrophage-derived RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, the replication of PR8 virus was significantly repressed by pre-treatment of AP-BG. These findings suggest the increased expression of virus sensors is effective for the prevention of influenza by the inhibition of viral replication with the administration of AP-CF. PMID:22844473

  7. Methionine-101 from one strain of H5N1 NS1 protein determines its IFN-antagonizing ability and subcellular distribution pattern.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jin; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Zheng, Zhenhua; Liu, Yan; Wang, Hanzhong

    2012-11-01

    Influenza A virus NS1 protein has developed two main IFN-antagonizing mechanisms by inhibiting retinoic-acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signal transduction, or by suppressing cellular pre-mRNA processing through binding to cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor 30 (CPSF30). However, the precise effects of NS1 on suppressing type I IFN induction have not been well characterized. Here we report that compared with PR/8/34 NS1, which is localized partially in the cytoplasm and has strong IFN-antagonizing ability via specifically inhibiting IFN-β promoter activity, H5N1 NS1 has strikingly different characteristics. It mainly accumulates in the nucleus of transfected cells and exerts rather weak IFN-counteracting ability through suppression of the overall gene expression. The M101I mutation of H5N1 NS1, namely H5-M101I, fully reversed its functions. H5-M101I gained the ability to specifically inhibit IFN-β promoter activity, translocate to the cytoplasm, and release CPSF30. The previously reported NES (nuclear export signal) (residues 138-147) was unable to lead H5N1 NS1 to translocate. This suggests that other residues may serve as a potent NES. Findings indicated that together with leucine-100, methionine-101 enhanced the regional NES. In addition, methionine-101 was the key residue for the NS1-CPSF30 interaction. This study reveals the importance of methionine-101 in the influenza A virus life cycle and may provide valuable information for antiviral strategies.

  8. Abortive Infection of Snakehead Fish Vesiculovirus in ZF4 Cells Was Associated with the RLRs Pathway Activation by Viral Replicative Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenwen; Asim, Muhammad; Yi, Lizhu; Hegazy, Abeer M.; Hu, Xianqin; Zhou, Yang; Ai, Taoshan; Lin, Li

    2015-01-01

    Snakehead fish vesiculovirus (SHVV) is a negative strand RNA virus which can cause great economic losses in fish culture. To facilitate the study of SHVV-host interactions, the susceptibility of zebrafish embryonic fibroblast cell line (ZF4) to the SHVV was investigated in this report. The results showed that high amount of viral mRNAs and cRNAs were detected at the 3 h post-infection. However, the expressions of the viral mRNAs and cRNA were decreased dramatically after 6 h post-infection. In addition, the expressions of interferon (IFN) and interferon-induced GTP-binding protein Mx were all up regulated significantly at the late stage of the infection. Meanwhile, the expressions of Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and Melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) were also all up-regulated significantly during the infection. Two isoforms of DrLGP2 from zebrafish were also cloned and analyzed. Interestingly, the expression of DrLGP2a but not DrLGP2b was significantly up-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels, indicating that the two DrLGP2 isoforms might play different roles during the SHVV infection. Transfection experiment showed that viral replicative intermediates were required for the activation of IFN-α expression. Taken together, the abortive infection of SHVV in ZF4 cells was associated with the activation of RLRs pathway, which was activated by viral replicative intermediates. PMID:25794284

  9. Lysophosphatidic acid induces osteocyte dendrite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Karin, Norm J.

    2007-05-25

    A method was developed to measure dendrite formation in bone cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was found to stimulate dendrite outgrowth. It is postulated that LPA plays a role in regulating the osteocyte network in vivo.

  10. Ursodeoxycholic acid induced generalized fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Ozkol, Hatice Uce; Calka, Omer; Dulger, Ahmet Cumhur; Bulut, Gulay

    2014-09-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a rare form of drug allergies that recur at the same cutaneous or mucosal site in every usage of drug. Single or multiple round, sharply demarcated and dusky red plaques appear soon after drug exposure. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA: 3α,7β-dihydroxy-5β-cholanic acid) is used for the treatment of cholestatic liver diseases. Some side effects may be observed, such as diarrhea, dyspepsia, pruritus and headaches. We encountered only three cases of lichenoid reaction regarding the use of UDCA among previous studies. In this article, we reported a generalized FDE case related to UDCA intake in a 59-year-old male patient with cholestasis for the first time in the literature. PMID:24147950

  11. Uric acid attenuates nitric oxide production by decreasing the interaction between endothelial nitric oxide synthase and calmodulin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: a mechanism for uric acid-induced cardiovascular disease development.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Jin, Yoon Mi; Hwang, Soojin; Cho, Du-Hyong; Kang, Duk-Hee; Jo, Inho

    2013-08-01

    The elevated level of uric acid in the body is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, which is mediated by endothelial dysfunction. However, its underlying mechanism is not fully understood, although dysregulation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production is likely to be involved. Using human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), we explored the molecular mechanism of uric acid on endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. Although high dose of uric acid (12mg/dl for 24h treatment) significantly decreased eNOS activity and NO production, it did not alter eNOS expression and phosphorylations at eNOS-Ser(1177), eNOS-Thr(495) and eNOS-Ser(114). Under this condition, we also found no alterations in the dimerization and acetylation of eNOS, compared with the control. Furthermore, uric acid did not change the activity of arginase II, an enzyme degrading l-arginine, a substrate of eNOS, and intracellular level of calcium, a cofactor for eNOS activation. We also found that uric acid did not alter xanthine oxidase activity, suggesting no involvement of xanthine oxidase-derived O2(-) production in the observed inhibitory effects. In vitro and in cell coimmunoprecipitation studies, however, revealed that uric acid significantly decreased the interaction between eNOS and calmodulin (CaM), an eNOS activator, although it did not change the intracellular CaM level. Like in HUVEC, uric acid also decreased eNOS-CaM interaction in bovine aortic EC. Finally, uric acid attenuated ionomycin-induced increase in the interaction between eNOS and CaM. This study suggests firstly that uric acid decreased eNOS activity and NO production through reducing the binding between eNOS and CaM in EC. Our result may provide molecular mechanism by which uric acid induces endothelial dysfunction.

  12. Expression Analysis of SOX14 during Retinoic Acid Induced Neural Differentiation of Embryonal Carcinoma Cells and Assessment of the Effect of Its Ectopic Expression on SOXB Members in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Jelena; Stanisavljevic, Danijela; Schwirtlich, Marija; Klajn, Andrijana; Marjanovic, Jelena; Stevanovic, Milena

    2014-01-01

    SOX14 is a member of the SOXB2 subgroup of transcription factors implicated in neural development. Although the first SOX14 gene in vertebrates was cloned and characterized more than a decade ago and its expression profile during development was revealed in various animal model systems, the role of this gene during neural development is largely unknown. In the present study we analyzed the expression of SOX14 in human NT2/D1 and mouse P19 pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells. We demonstrated that it is expressed in both cell lines and upregulated during retinoic acid induced neural differentiation. We showed that SOX14 was expressed in both neuronal and non-neuronal differentiated derivatives, as revealed by immunocytochemistry. Since it was previously proposed that increased SOXB2 proteins level interfere with the activity of SOXB1 counteracting partners, we compared expression patterns of SOXB members during retinoic acid induction of embryonal carcinoma cells. We revealed that upregulation of SOX14 expression is accompanied by alterations in the expression patterns of SOXB1 members. In order to analyze the potential cross-talk between them, we generated SOX14 expression construct. The ectopic expression of SOX14 was demonstrated at the mRNA level in NT2/D1, P19 and HeLa cells, while an increased level of SOX14 protein was detected in HeLa cells only. By transient transfection experiments in HeLa cells we showed for the first time that ectopic expression of SOX14 repressed SOX1 expression, whereas no significant effect on SOX2, SOX3 and SOX21 was observed. Data presented here provide an insight into SOX14 expression during in vitro neural differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells and demonstrate the effect of its ectopic expression on protein levels of SOXB members in HeLa cells. Obtained results contribute to better understanding the role of one of the most conserved SOX proteins. PMID:24637840

  13. Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of Pyeongwisan on LPS-Stimulated Murine Macrophages and Mouse Models of Acetic Acid-Induced Writhing Response and Xylene-Induced Ear Edema

    PubMed Central

    Oh, You-Chang; Jeong, Yun Hee; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ha, Jeong-Ho; Gu, Min Jung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-01

    Pyeongwisan (PW) is an herbal medication used in traditional East Asian medicine to treat anorexia, abdominal distension, borborygmus and diarrhea caused by gastric catarrh, atony and dilatation. However, its effects on inflammation-related diseases are unknown. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of PW on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in macrophages and on local inflammation in vivo. We investigated the biological effects of PW on the production of inflammatory mediators, pro-inflammatory cytokines and related products as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Additionally, we evaluated the analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response and the inhibitory activity on xylene-induced ear edema in mice. PW showed anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In addition, PW strongly suppressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a NO synthesis enzyme, induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and inhibited NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation. Also, PW suppressed TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β cytokine production in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophage cells. Furthermore, PW showed an analgesic effect on the writhing response and an inhibitory effect on mice ear edema. We demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects and inhibitory mechanism in macrophages as well as inhibitory activity of PW in vivo for the first time. Our results suggest the potential value of PW as an inflammatory therapeutic agent developed from a natural substance. PMID:25569097

  14. Synthetic RNAs Mimicking Structural Domains in the Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Genome Elicit a Broad Innate Immune Response in Porcine Cells Triggered by RIG-I and TLR Activation.

    PubMed

    Borrego, Belén; Rodríguez-Pulido, Miguel; Revilla, Concepción; Álvarez, Belén; Sobrino, Francisco; Domínguez, Javier; Sáiz, Margarita

    2015-07-17

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against viral infections. Exploiting innate responses for antiviral, therapeutic and vaccine adjuvation strategies is being extensively explored. We have previously described, the ability of small in vitro RNA transcripts, mimicking the sequence and structure of different domains in the non-coding regions of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome (ncRNAs), to trigger a potent and rapid innate immune response. These synthetic non-infectious molecules have proved to have a broad-range antiviral activity and to enhance the immunogenicity of an FMD inactivated vaccine in mice. Here, we have studied the involvement of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) in the ncRNA-induced innate response and analyzed the antiviral and cytokine profiles elicited in swine cultured cells, as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs).

  15. Synthetic RNAs Mimicking Structural Domains in the Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Genome Elicit a Broad Innate Immune Response in Porcine Cells Triggered by RIG-I and TLR Activation

    PubMed Central

    Borrego, Belén; Rodríguez-Pulido, Miguel; Revilla, Concepción; Álvarez, Belén; Sobrino, Francisco; Domínguez, Javier; Sáiz, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against viral infections. Exploiting innate responses for antiviral, therapeutic and vaccine adjuvation strategies is being extensively explored. We have previously described, the ability of small in vitro RNA transcripts, mimicking the sequence and structure of different domains in the non-coding regions of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome (ncRNAs), to trigger a potent and rapid innate immune response. These synthetic non-infectious molecules have proved to have a broad-range antiviral activity and to enhance the immunogenicity of an FMD inactivated vaccine in mice. Here, we have studied the involvement of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) in the ncRNA-induced innate response and analyzed the antiviral and cytokine profiles elicited in swine cultured cells, as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PMID:26193305

  16. Role of double-stranded RNA pattern recognition receptors in rhinovirus-induced airway epithelial cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiong; Nagarkar, Deepti R.; Bowman, Emily R.; Schneider, Dina; Gosangi, Babina; Lei, Jing; Zhao, Ying; McHenry, Christina L.; Burgens, Richai V.; Miller, David J.; Sajjan, Umadevi; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2010-01-01

    Rhinovirus (RV), a single-stranded RNA virus of the picornavirus family, is a major cause of the common cold as well as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations. Viral double-stranded RNA produced during replication may be recognized by the host pattern recognition receptors Toll-like receptor (TLR)-3, retinoic acid inducible gene (RIG)-I and melanoma-differentiation-associated gene (MDA)-5. No study has yet identified the receptor required for sensing RV double-stranded (ds)-RNA. To examine this, BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells were infected with intact RV-1B or replication-deficient UV-irradiated virus, and interferon (IFN) and IFN-stimulated gene expression determined by quantitative PCR. The separate requirements of RIG-I, MDA5 and IFN response factor (IRF)-3 were determined using their respective siRNAs. The requirement of TLR3 was determined using siRNA against the TLR3 adaptor molecule TRIF. Intact RV-1B, but not UV-irradiated RV, induced IRF3 phosphorylation and dimerization, as well as mRNA expression of IFN-β̤, IFN-λ̣1, IFN-λ2/3, IRF7, RIG-I, MDA5, IP-10/CXCL10, IL-8/CXCL8 and GM-CSF. siRNA against IRF3, MDA5 and TRIF, but not RIG-I, decreased RV1B-induced expression of IFN-β̤ IFN-λ̣1, IFN-λ2/3, IRF7, RIG-I, MDA5 and IP-10/CXCL10, but had no effect on IL-8/CXCL8 and GM-CSF. siRNAs against MDA5 and TRIF also reduced IRF3 dimerization. Finally, in primary cells, transfection with MDA5 siRNA significantly reduced IFN expression, as it did in BEAS-2B cells. These results suggest that TLR3 and MDA5, but not RIG-I, are required for maximal sensing of RV dsRNA, and that TLR3 and MDA5 signal through a common downstream signaling intermediate, IRF3. PMID:19890046

  17. Antiviral function of grouper MDA5 against iridovirus and nodavirus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youhua; Yu, Yepin; Yang, Ying; Yang, Min; Zhou, Linli; Huang, Xiaohong; Qin, Qiwei

    2016-07-01

    Melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) is a critical member of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) family which can recognize viral RNA and enhances antiviral response in host cells. In this study, a MDA5 homolog from orange spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) (EcMDA5) was cloned, and its roles on grouper virus infection were characterized. The full-length EcMDA5 cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 982 amino acids with 74% identity with MDA5 homolog from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus). Amino acid alignment analysis indicated that EcMDA5 contained three functional domains: two caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARDs), a DEAD box helicase-like (DExDc) domain, a helicase superfamily C-terminal domain (HELICc), and a C-terminal regulatory domain (RD). Upon challenge with Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) or polyinosin-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), the transcript of EcMDA5 was significantly up-regulated especially at the early stage post-injection. Under fluorescence microscopy, we observed that EcMDA5 mostly localized in the cytoplasm of grouper spleen (GS) cells. Interestingly, during virus infection, the distribution pattern of EcMDA5 was significantly altered in SGIV infected cells, but not in red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) infected cells, suggested that EcMDA5 might interact with viral proteins during SGIV infection. The ectopic expression of EcMDA5 in vitro obviously delayed virus infection induced cytopathic effect (CPE) progression and significantly inhibited viral gene transcription of RGNNV and SGIV. Moreover, overexpression of EcMDA5 not only significantly increased interferon (IFN) and IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) promoter activities in a dose dependent manner, but also enhanced the expression of IRF3, IRF7 and TRAF6. In addition, the transcription level of the proinflammatory factors, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 were differently altered by EcMDA5 overexpression during SGIV or

  18. Antiviral function of grouper MDA5 against iridovirus and nodavirus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youhua; Yu, Yepin; Yang, Ying; Yang, Min; Zhou, Linli; Huang, Xiaohong; Qin, Qiwei

    2016-07-01

    Melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) is a critical member of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) family which can recognize viral RNA and enhances antiviral response in host cells. In this study, a MDA5 homolog from orange spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) (EcMDA5) was cloned, and its roles on grouper virus infection were characterized. The full-length EcMDA5 cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 982 amino acids with 74% identity with MDA5 homolog from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus). Amino acid alignment analysis indicated that EcMDA5 contained three functional domains: two caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARDs), a DEAD box helicase-like (DExDc) domain, a helicase superfamily C-terminal domain (HELICc), and a C-terminal regulatory domain (RD). Upon challenge with Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) or polyinosin-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), the transcript of EcMDA5 was significantly up-regulated especially at the early stage post-injection. Under fluorescence microscopy, we observed that EcMDA5 mostly localized in the cytoplasm of grouper spleen (GS) cells. Interestingly, during virus infection, the distribution pattern of EcMDA5 was significantly altered in SGIV infected cells, but not in red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) infected cells, suggested that EcMDA5 might interact with viral proteins during SGIV infection. The ectopic expression of EcMDA5 in vitro obviously delayed virus infection induced cytopathic effect (CPE) progression and significantly inhibited viral gene transcription of RGNNV and SGIV. Moreover, overexpression of EcMDA5 not only significantly increased interferon (IFN) and IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) promoter activities in a dose dependent manner, but also enhanced the expression of IRF3, IRF7 and TRAF6. In addition, the transcription level of the proinflammatory factors, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 were differently altered by EcMDA5 overexpression during SGIV or

  19. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J; Stahl, Shannon S

    2014-11-13

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered.

  20. Pyroglutamic acid-induced metabolic acidosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Luyasu, S; Wamelink, M M C; Galanti, L; Dive, A

    2014-06-01

    High anion gap metabolic acidosis due to pyroglutamic acid (5-oxoproline) is a rare complication of acetaminophen treatment (which depletes glutathione stores) and is often associated with clinically moderate to severe encephalopathy. Acquired 5-oxoprolinase deficiency (penicillins) or the presence of other risk factors of glutathione depletion such as malnutrition or sepsis seems to be necessary for symptoms development. We report the case of a 55-year-old women who developed a symptomatic overproduction of 5-oxoproline during flucloxacillin treatment for severe sepsis while receiving acetaminophen for fever control. Hemodialysis accelerated the clearance of the accumulated organic acid, and was followed by a sustained clinical improvement.

  1. ERK, synaptic plasticity and acid-induced muscle pain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hsiu-Wen; Yen, Chen-Tung; Chen, Chien-Chang; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Cheng, Sin-Jhong

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is characterized by post-injury pain hypersensitivity. Current evidence suggests that it might result from altered neuronal excitability and/or synaptic functions in pain-related pathways and brain areas, an effect known as central sensitization. Increased activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) has been well-demonstrated in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in chronic pain animal models. Recently, increased ERK activity has also been identified in two supraspinal areas, the central amygdala and the paraventricular thalamic nucleus anterior. Our recent work on the capsular central amygdala has shown that this increased ERK activity can enhance synaptic transmission, which might account for central sensitization and behavior hypersensitivity in animals receiving noxious stimuli. PMID:21966555

  2. Benzoic Acid-Inducible Gene Expression in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dragset, Marte S.; Barczak, Amy K.; Kannan, Nisha; Mærk, Mali; Flo, Trude H.; Valla, Svein; Rubin, Eric J.; Steigedal, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Conditional expression is a powerful tool to investigate the role of bacterial genes. Here, we adapt the Pseudomonas putida-derived positively regulated XylS/Pm expression system to control inducible gene expression in Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis. By making simple changes to a Gram-negative broad-host-range XylS/Pm-regulated gene expression vector, we prove that it is possible to adapt this well-studied expression system to non-Gram-negative species. With the benzoic acid-derived inducer m-toluate, we achieve a robust, time- and dose-dependent reversible induction of Pm-mediated expression in mycobacteria, with low background expression levels. XylS/Pm is thus an important addition to existing mycobacterial expression tools, especially when low basal expression is of particular importance. PMID:26348349

  3. Valproic Acid Induces Antimicrobial Compound Production in Doratomyces microspores.

    PubMed

    Zutz, Christoph; Bacher, Markus; Parich, Alexandra; Kluger, Bernhard; Gacek-Matthews, Agnieszka; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Wagner, Martin; Rychli, Kathrin; Strauss, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in public health is the rising number of antibiotic resistant pathogens and the lack of novel antibiotics. In recent years there is a rising focus on fungi as sources of antimicrobial compounds due to their ability to produce a large variety of bioactive compounds and the observation that virtually every fungus may still contain yet unknown so called "cryptic," often silenced, compounds. These putative metabolites could include novel bioactive compounds. Considerable effort is spent on methods to induce production of these "cryptic" metabolites. One approach is the use of small molecule effectors, potentially influencing chromatin landscape in fungi. We observed that the supernatant of the fungus Doratomyces (D.) microsporus treated with valproic acid (VPA) displayed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and two methicillin resistant clinical S. aureus isolates. VPA treatment resulted in enhanced production of seven antimicrobial compounds: cyclo-(L-proline-L-methionine) (cPM), p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, cyclo-(phenylalanine-proline) (cFP), indole-3-carboxylic acid, phenylacetic acid (PAA) and indole-3-acetic acid. The production of the antimicrobial compound phenyllactic acid was exclusively detectable after VPA treatment. Furthermore three compounds, cPM, cFP, and PAA, were able to boost the antimicrobial activity of other antimicrobial compounds. cPM, for the first time isolated from fungi, and to a lesser extent PAA, are even able to decrease the minimal inhibitory concentration of ampicillin in MRSA strains. In conclusion we could show in this study that VPA treatment is a potent tool for induction of "cryptic" antimicrobial compound production in fungi, and that the induced compounds are not exclusively linked to the secondary metabolism. Furthermore this is the first discovery of the rare diketopiperazine cPM in fungi. Additionally we could demonstrate that cPM and PAA boost antibiotic activity against antibiotic resistant strains, suggesting a possible application in combinatorial antibiotic treatment against resistant pathogens.

  4. Acetylsalicylic acid induces programmed cell death in Arabidopsis cell cultures.

    PubMed

    García-Heredia, José M; Hervás, Manuel; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Navarro, José A

    2008-06-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), a derivative from the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA), is a commonly used drug that has a dual role in animal organisms as an anti-inflammatory and anticancer agent. It acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenases (COXs), which catalyze prostaglandins production. It is known that ASA serves as an apoptotic agent on cancer cells through the inhibition of the COX-2 enzyme. Here, we provide evidences that ASA also behaves as an agent inducing programmed cell death (PCD) in cell cultures of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in a similar way than the well-established PCD-inducing agent H(2)O(2), although the induction of PCD by ASA requires much lower inducer concentrations. Moreover, ASA is herein shown to be a more efficient PCD-inducing agent than salicylic acid. ASA treatment of Arabidopsis cells induces typical PCD-linked morphological and biochemical changes, namely cell shrinkage, nuclear DNA degradation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and induction of caspase-like activity. However, the ASA effect can be partially reverted by jasmonic acid. Taking together, these results reveal the existence of common features in ASA-induced animal apoptosis and plant PCD, and also suggest that there are similarities between the pathways of synthesis and function of prostanoid-like lipid mediators in animal and plant organisms.

  5. Lysophosphatidic acid induces necrosis and apoptosis in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Holtsberg, F W; Steiner, M R; Keller, J N; Mark, R J; Mattson, M P; Steiner, S M

    1998-01-01

    A diverse body of evidence indicates a role for the lipid biomediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in the CNS. This study identifies and characterizes the induction of neuronal death by LPA. Treatment of cultured hippocampal neurons from embryonic rat brains with 50 microM LPA resulted in neuronal necrosis, as determined morphologically and by the release of lactate dehydrogenase. A concentration of LPA as low as 10 microM led to the release of lactate dehydrogenase. In contrast, treatment of neurons with 0.1 or 1.0 microM LPA resulted in apoptosis, as determined by chromatin condensation. In addition, neuronal death induced by 1 microM LPA was characterized as apoptotic on the basis of terminal dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining, externalization of phosphatidylserine, and protection against chromatin condensation, TUNEL staining, and phosphatidylserine externalization by treatment with N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of caspases, i.e., members of the interleukin-1beta converting enzyme family. Studies with antagonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors did not indicate a significant role for these receptors in apoptosis induced by 1 microM LPA. LPA (1 microM) also induced a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Moreover, pretreatment of neurons with cyclosporin A protected against the LPA-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and neuronal apoptosis. Thus, LPA, at pathophysiological levels, can induce neuronal apoptosis and could thereby participate in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:9422348

  6. Topiramate increases the risk of valproic acid-induced encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Noh, Young; Kim, Dong Wook; Chu, Kon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Moon, Hye-Jin; Lee, Sang Kun

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic encephalopathy is a rare but serious complication of valproic acid (VPA) therapy that usually presents with impaired consciousness or increased seizure frequency. Although it has been suggested that topiramate (TPM) increases the risk of VPA-induced encephalopathy, the additional risk in patients receiving TPM therapy has not been evaluated. We reviewed all adult patients who took VPA between January 2005 and February 2009 at the Seoul National University Hospital and identified patients with VPA-induced encephalopathy based on clinical and electroencephalography (EEG) data. Information on sex, age, serum ammonia level, serum VPA level, liver function test, and EEG was collected from patient registry and medical data. We enrolled 8,372 patients who received VPA therapy and 1,236 patients who received VPA/TPM combination therapy. We identified 11 patients with VPA-induced encephalopathy (0.13%), 7 of whom received a combination therapy of VPA and TPM. The odds ratio of VPA-induced encephalopathy with TPM over that without TPM was 10.16. There were no significant differences in sex distribution, number of antiepileptic agents, ammonia level, VPA serum level, underlying diseases, dosage of VPA, duration of VPA treatment, treatment of encephalopathy, and outcomes between the two groups. Our study showed that the prevalence of VPA-induced encephalopathy is approximately 0.1% among patients treated with VPA and that the risk of this condition, although still low, can increase by approximately 10 times in the presence of TPM therapy. Based on these results, we suggest that TPM should be carefully used in patients receiving VPA treatment.

  7. Acid-induced secretory cell metaplasia in hamster bronchi

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, T.G.; Lucey, E.C.; Breuer, R.; Snider, G.L.

    1988-02-01

    Hamsters were exposed to an intratracheal instillation of 0.5 ml of 0.08 N nitric, hydrochloric, or sulfuric acid to determine their airway epithelial response. Three weeks after exposure, the left intrapulmonary bronchi in Alcian blue/PAS-strained paraffin sections were evaluated for the amount of secretory product in the airway epithelium as a measure of secretory cell metaplasia (SCM). Compared to saline-treated control animals, all three acids caused statistically significant SCM. In addition to the bronchial lesion, all three acids caused similar interstitial fibrosis, bronchiolectasis, and bronchiolization of alveoli that varied in individual animals from mild to severe. In a separate experiment to study the persistence of the SCM, hamsters treated with a single instillation of 0.1 N nitric acid showed significant SCM 3, 7, and 17 weeks after exposure. There was a high correlation (r = 0.96) between a subjective assessment of SCM and objective assessment using a digital image-analysis system. We conclude that protons induce SCM independently of the associated anion; the SCM persists at least 17 weeks. Sulfuric acid is an atmospheric pollutant and nitric acid may form locally on the mucosa of lungs exposed to nitrogen dioxide. These acids may contribute to the development of maintenance of the SCM seen in the conducting airways of humans with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  8. Excessive dietary linoleic acid induces proinflammatory markers in rats.

    PubMed

    Marchix, Justine; Choque, Benjamin; Kouba, Maryline; Fautrel, Alain; Catheline, Daniel; Legrand, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Following the historical dietary recommendations, the substitution of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) for saturated fatty acids (SFAs) resulted in a dramatic increase of linoleic acid (LA) in the Western diet. While proatherogenic properties of SFAs have been described, the involvement of LA on the inflammatory process remains controversial. Herein, we evaluated the effects of an excessive LA intake on the cytokine-induced expression of endothelial adhesion molecules vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), through the nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway, in comparison with a control diet and regarding a "positive" SFA diet. Wistar rats were fed experimental diets - a control diet or diets enriched with LA or SFA - for 11 weeks. Plasma lipid parameters and proinflammatory cytokine production such as interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were analyzed. Expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and NF-κB was determined by immunohistochemical analysis. No difference was observed in body weight. The enriched diets did not affect triglyceride and total cholesterol levels in plasma. Our results demonstrated that excessive dietary LA intake increased TNF-α levels (P<.05) in plasma. Rats fed the LA-enriched diet showed a significantly higher expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and NF-κB in aortas. In addition, our results demonstrated that an excess of LA is more efficient to activate endothelial molecular process than an excess of SFA. The present study provides further support for the proinflammatory properties of LA and suggests an LA-derivatives pathway involved in the inflammatory process.

  9. Glycyrrhetinic acid-induced permeability transition in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Mauro; Fiore, Cristina; Armanini, Decio; Toninello, Antonio

    2003-12-15

    Glycyrrhetinic acid, a hydrolysis product of one of the main constituents of licorice, the triterpene glycoside of glycyrrhizic acid, when added to rat liver mitochondria at micromolar concentrations induces swelling, loss of membrane potential, pyridine nucleotide oxidation, and release of cytochrome c and apoptosis inducing factor. These changes are Ca(2+) dependent and are prevented by cyclosporin A, bongkrekic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide. All these observations indicate that glycyrrhetinic acid is a potent inducer of mitochondrial permeability transition and can trigger the pro-apoptotic pathway. PMID:14637195

  10. Monomethylarsonous acid induces transformation of human bladder cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bredfeldt, Tiffany G.; Jagadish, Bhumasamudram; Eblin, Kylee E.; Mash, Eugene A.; Gandolfi, A. Jay . E-mail: gandolfi@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2006-10-01

    Arsenic is a human bladder carcinogen. Arsenic is methylated to both monomethyl and dimethyl metabolites which have been detected in human urine. The trivalent methylated arsenicals are more toxic than inorganic arsenic. It is unknown if these trivalent methylated metabolites can directly cause malignant transformation in human cells. The goal of this study is determine if monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) can induce malignant transformation in a human bladder urothelial cell line. To address this goal, a non-tumorigenic human urothelial cell line (UROtsa) was continuously exposed to 0.05 {mu}M MMA{sup III} for 52 weeks. Hyperproliferation was the first phenotypic change observed in exposed UROtsa (URO-MSC). After 12 weeks of exposure, doubling time had decreased from 42 h in unexposed control cells to 27 h in URO-MSC. Hyperproliferation continued to be a quality possessed by the URO-MSC cells after both 24 and 52 weeks of exposure to MMA{sup III}, which had a 40-50% reduction in doubling time. Throughout the 52-week exposure, URO-MSC cells retained an epithelial morphology with subtle morphological differences from control cells. 24 weeks of MMA{sup III} exposure was required to induce anchorage-independent growth as detected by colony formation in soft agar, a characteristic not found in UROtsa cells. To further substantiate that malignant transformation had occurred, URO-MSC cells were tested after 24 and 52 weeks of exposure to MMA{sup III} for the ability to form tumors in SCID mice. Enhanced tumorigenicity in SCID mouse xenografts was observed after 52 weeks of treatment with MMA{sup III}. These observations are the first demonstration of MMA{sup III}-induced malignant transformation in a human bladder urothelial cell line and provide important evidence that MMA{sup III} may be carcinogenic in human tissues.

  11. Perflurooctanoic Acid Induces Developmental Cardiotoxicity in Chicken Embryos and Hatchlings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widespread environmental contaminant that is detectable in serum of the general U.S. population. PFOA is a known developmental toxicant that induces mortality in mammalian embryos and is thought to induce toxicity via interaction with the peroxi...

  12. Bile-acid-induced cell injury and protection

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Maria J; Briz, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have characterized the cellular and molecular mechanisms of hepatocyte injury caused by the retention of hydrophobic bile acids (BAs) in cholestatic diseases. BAs may disrupt cell membranes through their detergent action on lipid components and can promote the generation of reactive oxygen species that, in turn, oxidatively modify lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, and eventually cause hepatocyte necrosis and apoptosis. Several pathways are involved in triggering hepatocyte apoptosis. Toxic BAs can activate hepatocyte death receptors directly and induce oxidative damage, thereby causing mitochondrial dysfunction, and induce endoplasmic reticulum stress. When these compounds are taken up and accumulate inside biliary cells, they can also cause apoptosis. Regarding extrahepatic tissues, the accumulation of BAs in the systemic circulation may contribute to endothelial injury in the kidney and lungs. In gastrointestinal cells, BAs may behave as cancer promoters through an indirect mechanism involving oxidative stress and DNA damage, as well as acting as selection agents for apoptosis-resistant cells. The accumulation of BAs may have also deleterious effects on placental and fetal cells. However, other BAs, such as ursodeoxycholic acid, have been shown to modulate BA-induced injury in hepatocytes. The major beneficial effects of treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid are protection against cytotoxicity due to more toxic BAs; the stimulation of hepatobiliary secretion; antioxidant activity, due in part to an enhancement in glutathione levels; and the inhibition of liver cell apoptosis. Other natural BAs or their derivatives, such as cholyl-N-methylglycine or cholylsarcosine, have also aroused pharmacological interest owing to their protective properties. PMID:19360911

  13. [Elucidation of mechanisms underlying docosahexaenoic acid-induced antinociception].

    PubMed

    Nishinaka, Takashi; Matsumoto, Kengo; Nakamoto, Kazuo; Anbo, Akihiro; Mankura, Mitsumasa; Koyama, Yutaka; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2013-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a predominant of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), has numerous beneficial physiological effects, including neuroprotection and cardiovascular protection. Recently, a possible involvement of n-3 PUFA in pain control has gathered considerable attention because numerous studies have reported a regulatory role of n-3 PUFAs. However, the mechanisms underlying how DHA exerts antinociceptive effect remain unknown. Here, we performed elucidation of mechanisms underlying DHA-induced antinociception. DHA administration dose-dependently exerted an antinociceptive effect. This effect was abolished by pretreated with the β-funaltrexamine (β-FNA), a μ-opioid receptor antagonist, and the nartrindole (NTI), a δ-opioid receptor antagonist, but not by the nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI), a κ-opioid receptor antagonist. In the radioligand binding assay, DHA itself did not have the affinity for μ-, δ- and κ- opioid receptor. Furthermore, the pretreatment of anti β-endorphin antiserum inhibited DHA-induced antinociception. The plasma levels of β-endorphin increased 30 min after DHA administration. The β-endorphin immunoreactivity in the brain increased at 30 min after DHA treatment. Expression of GPR40 protein was widely observed in the brain as well as the spinal cord. The intracerebroventricular but not intrathecal injection of DHA and GW9508, a GPR40/GPR120 agonist, significantly reduced formalin-induced pain behavior. The β-endorphin immunoreactivity in the brain increased at 10 and 20 min after intracerebroventricular injection of DHA and GW9508. These findings suggest that DHA-induced antinociception via β-endorphin release may be mediated through GPR40 signaling in the supraspinal area. PMID:23649389

  14. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2014-11-01

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered.

  15. Valproic Acid Induces Antimicrobial Compound Production in Doratomyces microspores

    PubMed Central

    Zutz, Christoph; Bacher, Markus; Parich, Alexandra; Kluger, Bernhard; Gacek-Matthews, Agnieszka; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Wagner, Martin; Rychli, Kathrin; Strauss, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in public health is the rising number of antibiotic resistant pathogens and the lack of novel antibiotics. In recent years there is a rising focus on fungi as sources of antimicrobial compounds due to their ability to produce a large variety of bioactive compounds and the observation that virtually every fungus may still contain yet unknown so called “cryptic,” often silenced, compounds. These putative metabolites could include novel bioactive compounds. Considerable effort is spent on methods to induce production of these “cryptic” metabolites. One approach is the use of small molecule effectors, potentially influencing chromatin landscape in fungi. We observed that the supernatant of the fungus Doratomyces (D.) microsporus treated with valproic acid (VPA) displayed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and two methicillin resistant clinical S. aureus isolates. VPA treatment resulted in enhanced production of seven antimicrobial compounds: cyclo-(L-proline-L-methionine) (cPM), p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, cyclo-(phenylalanine-proline) (cFP), indole-3-carboxylic acid, phenylacetic acid (PAA) and indole-3-acetic acid. The production of the antimicrobial compound phenyllactic acid was exclusively detectable after VPA treatment. Furthermore three compounds, cPM, cFP, and PAA, were able to boost the antimicrobial activity of other antimicrobial compounds. cPM, for the first time isolated from fungi, and to a lesser extent PAA, are even able to decrease the minimal inhibitory concentration of ampicillin in MRSA strains. In conclusion we could show in this study that VPA treatment is a potent tool for induction of “cryptic” antimicrobial compound production in fungi, and that the induced compounds are not exclusively linked to the secondary metabolism. Furthermore this is the first discovery of the rare diketopiperazine cPM in fungi. Additionally we could demonstrate that cPM and PAA boost antibiotic activity against antibiotic resistant strains, suggesting a possible application in combinatorial antibiotic treatment against resistant pathogens. PMID:27148199

  16. Retinoic acid-induced neural differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jones-Villeneuve, E M; Rudnicki, M A; Harris, J F; McBurney, M W

    1983-01-01

    We have previously shown that the P19 line of embryonal carcinoma cells develops into neurons, astroglia, and fibroblasts after aggregation and exposure to retinoic acid. The neurons were initially identified by their morphology and by the presence of neurofilaments within their cytoplasm. We have more fully documented the neuronal nature of these cells by showing that their cell surfaces display tetanus toxin receptors, a neuronal cell marker, and that choline acetyl-transferase and acetyl cholinesterase activities appear coordinately in neuron-containing cultures. Several days before the appearance of neurons, there is a marked decrease in the amount of an embryonal carcinoma surface antigen, and at the same time there is a substantial decrease in the volumes of individual cells. Various retinoids were able to induce the development of neurons in cultures of aggregated P19 cells, but it did not appear that polyamine metabolism was involved in the effect. We have isolated a mutant clone which does not differentiate in the presence of any of the drugs which are normally effective in inducing differentiation of P19 cells. This mutant and others may help to elucidate the chain of events triggered by retinoic acid and other differentiation-inducing drugs. Images PMID:6656766

  17. Epigenetic modifications in valproic acid-induced teratogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Emily W.Y.; Winn, Louise M.

    2010-11-01

    Exposure to the anticonvulsant drug valproic acid (VPA) in utero is associated with a 1-2% increase in neural tube defects (NTDs), however the molecular mechanisms by which VPA induces teratogenesis are unknown. Previous studies demonstrated that VPA, a direct inhibitor of histone deacetylase, can induce histone hyperacetylation and other epigenetic changes such as histone methylation and DNA demethylation. The objective of this study was to determine if maternal exposure to VPA in mice has the ability to cause these epigenetic alterations in the embryo and thus contribute to its mechanism of teratogenesis. Pregnant CD-1 mice (GD 9.0) were administered a teratogenic dose of VPA (400 mg/kg, s.c.) and embryos extracted 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after injection. To assess embryonic histone acetylation and histone methylation, Western blotting was performed on whole embryo homogenates, as well as immunohistochemical staining on embryonic sections. To measure DNA methylation changes, the cytosine extension assay was performed. Results demonstrated that a significant increase in histone acetylation that peaked 3 h after VPA exposure was accompanied by an increase in histone methylation at histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) and a decrease in histone methylation at histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9). Immunohistochemical staining revealed increased histone acetylation in the neuroepithelium, heart, and somites. A decrease in methylated histone H3K9 staining was observed in the neuroepithelium and somites, METHYLATED histone H3K4 staining was observed in the neuroepithelium. No significant differences in global or CpG island DNA methylation were observed in embryo homogenates. These results support the possibility that epigenetic modifications caused by VPA during early mouse organogenesis results in congenital malformations.

  18. Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonemia in a Long Time Treated Patient

    PubMed Central

    Seide, Margaret; Stern, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a patient who had been on long time valproic acid for treatment of bipolar affective disorder. While being an inpatient, serology ammonia level testing revealed a very high ammonia level despite being asymptomatic. Dual therapy of carnitine and lactulose was provided to the patient for treatment of the hyperammonemia. It should also be noted that, during this treatment, valproic acid was not stopped. Consequently, this case illustrates that patients can present asymptomatically despite very high ammonia levels and hyperammonemia can occur in chronic valproic acid despite not increasing the dose of the medication and psychiatrists do not need to discontinue valproic acid in the presence of elevated levels of ammonia if the patient shows no signs of encephalopathy or delirium. PMID:27516916

  19. Bile acids induce hepatic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sawitza, Iris; Kordes, Claus; Götze, Silke; Herebian, Diran; Häussinger, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have the potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages and their therapeutic potential has become obvious. In the liver, MSC are represented by stellate cells which have the potential to differentiate into hepatocytes after stimulation with growth factors. Since bile acids can promote liver regeneration, their influence on liver-resident and bone marrow-derived MSC was investigated. Physiological concentrations of bile acids such as tauroursodeoxycholic acid were able to initiate hepatic differentiation of MSC via the farnesoid X receptor and transmembrane G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 5 as investigated with knockout mice. Notch, hedgehog, transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenic protein family and non-canonical Wnt signalling were also essential for bile acid-mediated differentiation, whereas β-catenin-dependent Wnt signalling was able to attenuate this process. Our findings reveal bile acid-mediated signalling as an alternative way to induce hepatic differentiaion of stem cells and highlight bile acids as important signalling molecules during liver regeneration. PMID:26304833

  20. Depressed phosphatidic acid-induced contractile activity of failing cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tappia, Paramjit S; Maddaford, Thane G; Hurtado, Cecilia; Panagia, Vincenzo; Pierce, Grant N

    2003-01-10

    The effects of phosphatidic acid (PA), a known inotropic agent, on Ca(2+) transients and contractile activity of cardiomyocytes in congestive heart failure (CHF) due to myocardial infarction were examined. In control cells, PA induced a significant increase (25%) in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. The phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, 2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl N,N-diphenylcarbonate, blocked the positive inotropic action induced by PA, indicating that PA induces an increase in contractile activity and Ca(2+) transients through stimulation of PLC. Conversely, in failing cardiomyocytes there was a loss of PA-induced increase in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. PA did not alter resting cell length. Both diastolic and systolic [Ca(2+)] were significantly elevated in the failing cardiomyocytes. In vitro assessment of the cardiac sarcolemmal (SL) PLC activity revealed that the impaired failing cardiomyocyte response to PA was associated with a diminished stimulation of SL PLC activity by PA. Our results identify an important defect in the PA-PLC signaling pathway in failing cardiomyocytes, which may have significant implications for the depressed contractile function during CHF.

  1. Orexin A attenuates palmitic acid-induced hypothalamic cell death.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Cayla M; Nixon, Joshua P; Butterick, Tammy A

    2016-09-01

    Palmitic acid (PA), an abundant dietary saturated fatty acid, contributes to obesity and hypothalamic dysregulation in part through increase in oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and neuroinflammation. Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of PA exposure contributes to the onset of neuronal apoptosis. Additionally, high fat diets lead to changes in hypothalamic gene expression profiles including suppression of the anti-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma 2 associated X protein (Bax). Orexin A (OXA), a hypothalamic peptide important in obesity resistance, also contributes to neuroprotection. Prior studies have demonstrated that OXA attenuates oxidative stress induced cell death. We hypothesized that OXA would be neuroprotective against PA induced cell death. To test this, we treated an immortalized hypothalamic cell line (designated mHypoA-1/2) with OXA and PA. We demonstrate that OXA attenuates PA-induced hypothalamic cell death via reduced caspase-3/7 apoptosis, stabilization of Bcl-2 gene expression, and reduced Bax/Bcl-2 gene expression ratio. We also found that OXA inhibits ROS production after PA exposure. Finally, we show that PA exposure in mHypoA-1/2 cells significantly reduces basal respiration, maximum respiration, ATP production, and reserve capacity. However, OXA treatment reverses PA-induced changes in intracellular metabolism, increasing basal respiration, maximum respiration, ATP production, and reserve capacity. Collectively, these results support that OXA protects against PA-induced hypothalamic dysregulation, and may represent one mechanism through which OXA can ameliorate effects of obesogenic diet on brain health. PMID:27449757

  2. Ameliorative effects of phycocyanin against gibberellic acid induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mohamed M A; Ali, Haytham A; Ahmed, Mona M

    2015-03-01

    Gibberellic acid (GA3) was used extensively unaware in agriculture in spite of its dangerous effects on human health. The current study was designed to investigate the ameliorative effects of the co-administration of phycocyanin with GA3 induced oxidative stress and histopathological changes in the liver. Forty male albino rats were randomly divided into four groups. Group I (control group) received normal saline for 6 weeks, Group II (GA3 treated group) received 3.85 mg/kg body weight GA3 once daily for 6 weeks, Group III (phycocyanin treated group) received Phycocyanin 200 mg/kg body weight/day for 6 weeks orally dissolved in distilled water and Group IV was treated with GA3 and phycocyanin at the same doses as groups 2 and 3. All treatments were given daily using intra-gastric intubation and continued for 6 weeks. Our results revealed significant downregulation of antioxidant enzyme activities and their mRNA levels (CAT, GPx and Cu-Zn, SOD) with marked elevation of liver enzymes and extensive fibrous connective tissue deposition with large biliary cells in hepatic tissue of GA3 treated rats, while treatment with phycocyanin improved the antioxidant defense system, liver enzymes and structural hepatocytes recovery in phycocyanin treated group with GA3. These data confirm the antioxidant potential of Phycocyanin and provide strong evidence to support the co-administration of Phycocyanin during using GA3. PMID:25868813

  3. Dynamic changes during acid-induced activation of influenza hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Natalie K.; Guttman, Miklos; Ebner, Jamie L.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Influenza hemagglutinin (HA) mediates virus attachment to host cells and fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes during entry. While high-resolution structures are available for the pre-fusion HA ectodomain and the post-fusion HA2 subunit, the sequence of conformational changes during HA activation has eluded structural characterization. Here we apply hydrogen-deuterium exchange with mass spectrometry to examine changes in structural dynamics of the HA ectodomain at various stages of activation, as well as to compare the soluble ectodomain with intact HA on virions. At pH conditions approaching activation (pH 6.0–5.5) HA exhibits increased dynamics at the fusion peptide and neighboring regions, while the interface between receptor-binding subunits (HA1) becomes stabilized. In contrast to many activation models, these data suggest that HA responds to endosomal acidification by releasing the fusion peptide prior to HA1 uncaging and the spring-loaded refolding of HA2. This staged process may facilitate efficient HA-mediated fusion. PMID:25773144

  4. Zoledronic acid induces apoptosis and autophagy in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Te; Chou, Shou-Chu; Lin, Ying-Chin

    2014-12-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common gynecological cancers in association with high mortality and morbidity. The present study was aimed to investigate the in vitro effects of zoledronic acid (ZA) on viability and induction of apoptosis and autophagy as well as inflammatory effects in three human cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa, SiHa, and CaSki). Cell viability was measured by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) assay. Induction of apoptosis was determined by quantitation of expression level of B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bax messenger RNA (mRNA) and identification of the proteolytic cleavage of poly (ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3. Autophagic effects were examined by quantitation of mRNA expression of autophagy protein 5 (ATG5) and beclin1 and identifying accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II. Inflammatory effect was determined by measuring expression and production of IL-6 and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2). The results showed ZA significantly inhibited cell viability of cervical cancer cells. ZA-induced cell death displayed features characteristic to both apoptosis and autophagy and was associated with different changes in the levels of Bcl-2 and Bax in the various cervical cancer lines. Expression of metastatic cytokines, IL-6 and Cox-2, was upregulated in the presence of ZA at low concentration. Our data revealed that ZA inhibits cervical cancer cells through the synergistic effect of apoptosis induction and autophagy activation.

  5. Capsaicin prevents kainic acid-induced epileptogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Hee; Lee, Jong-Geol; Yon, Jung-Min; Oh, Ki-Wan; Baek, In-Jeoung; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Lee, Beom Jun; Yun, Young Won; Nam, Sang-Yoon

    2011-05-01

    Epilepsy is a neurodegenerative disease with periodic occurrences of spontaneous seizures as the main symptom. The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of capsaicin, the major ingredient of hot peppers, in a kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus model. After intraperitoneal injections of KA (30mg/kg) in 8-week-old male ICR mice, the animals were treated subcutaneously with capsaicin (0.33mg/kg or 1mg/kg) and then examined for any anti-ictogenic, hypothermic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic effects of the capsaicin treatment 3 days after KA treatment. KA injections significantly enhanced neurodegenerative conditions but co-injection with capsaicin reduced the detrimental effects of KA in a dose-dependent manner in mice. The co-administered group that received KA and 1mg/kg of capsaicin showed significantly decreased behavioral seizure activity and body temperature for 3h and also remarkably blocked intense and high-frequency seizure discharges in the parietal cortex for 3 days compared with those that received KA alone. Capsaicin treatment significantly diminished the levels of oxidant activity and malondialdehyde concentration and increased the antioxidant activity in the blood and brain of KA-treated mice. In addition, capsaicin significantly lowered the KA-induced increase in the concentration of the cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α in the brain. Furthermore, co-treatment of KA and capsaicin (1mg/kg) resulted in considerably decreased apoptotic cell death in the cornu ammonis sections of the hippocampus compared with that seen in the KA-alone group. These findings indicate that capsaicin is preventative for the epileptogenesis induced by KA in mice.

  6. Albumin-associated free fatty acids induce macropinocytosis in podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jun-Jae; Huber, Tobias B.; Gödel, Markus; Jarad, George; Hartleben, Björn; Kwoh, Christopher; Keil, Alexander; Karpitskiy, Aleksey; Hu, Jiancheng; Huh, Christine J.; Cella, Marina; Gross, Richard W.; Miner, Jeffrey H.; Shaw, Andrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Podocytes are specialized epithelial cells in the kidney glomerulus that play important structural and functional roles in maintaining the filtration barrier. Nephrotic syndrome results from a breakdown of the kidney filtration barrier and is associated with proteinuria, hyperlipidemia, and edema. Additionally, podocytes undergo changes in morphology and internalize plasma proteins in response to this disorder. Here, we used fluid-phase tracers in murine models and determined that podocytes actively internalize fluid from the plasma and that the rate of internalization is increased when the filtration barrier is disrupted. In cultured podocytes, the presence of free fatty acids (FFAs) associated with serum albumin stimulated macropinocytosis through a pathway that involves FFA receptors, the Gβ/Gγ complex, and RAC1. Moreover, mice with elevated levels of plasma FFAs as the result of a high-fat diet were more susceptible to Adriamycin-induced proteinuria than were animals on standard chow. Together, these results support a model in which podocytes sense the disruption of the filtration barrier via FFAs bound to albumin and respond by enhancing fluid-phase uptake. The response to FFAs may function in the development of nephrotic syndrome by amplifying the effects of proteinuria. PMID:25915582

  7. Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonemia in a Long Time Treated Patient.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Rohit; Seide, Margaret; Stern, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a patient who had been on long time valproic acid for treatment of bipolar affective disorder. While being an inpatient, serology ammonia level testing revealed a very high ammonia level despite being asymptomatic. Dual therapy of carnitine and lactulose was provided to the patient for treatment of the hyperammonemia. It should also be noted that, during this treatment, valproic acid was not stopped. Consequently, this case illustrates that patients can present asymptomatically despite very high ammonia levels and hyperammonemia can occur in chronic valproic acid despite not increasing the dose of the medication and psychiatrists do not need to discontinue valproic acid in the presence of elevated levels of ammonia if the patient shows no signs of encephalopathy or delirium. PMID:27516916

  8. Bile acids but not acidic acids induce Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongfeng; Wang, Xiao; Gai, Zhibo; Song, Xiaoming; Jia, Xinyong; Tian, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is associated with the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Bile acids (BAs) refluxing into the esophagus contribute to esophageal injury, which results in BE and subsequent EAC. We developed two animal models to test the role of BAs in the pathogenesis of BE. We surgically generated BA reflux, with or without gastric acid, in rats. In a second experiment, we fed animals separately with BAs and gastric acid. Pathologic changes were examined and the expression of Muc2 and Cdx2 in BE tissue was tested by immunostaining. Inflammatory factors in the plasma, as well as differentiation genes in BE were examined through highly sensitive ELISA and semi-quantitative RT-PCR techniques. We found that BAs are sufficient for the induction of esophagitis and Barrett's-like metaplasia in the esophagus. Overexpression of inflammatory cells, IL-6, and TNF-α was observed both in animals fed with BAs and surgically generated BA reflux. Furthermore, elevated levels of Cdx2, Muc2, Bmp4, Kit19, and Tff2 (differentiation genes in BE) were found in BA-treated rats. In conclusion, BAs, but not gastric acid, are a major causative factor for BE. We confirmed that BAs contribute to the development of BE by inducing the inflammatory response in the esophagus. Inhibiting BAs may be a promising therapy for BE.

  9. Lysophosphatidic acid-induced chemotaxis of bone cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Masiello, Lisa M.; Bollinger, Nikki; Karin, Norm J.

    2006-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a platelet-derived bioactive lipid that is postulated to regulate wound healing. LPA activates G protein-coupled receptors to induce Ca2+ signaling in MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts, and is a potent chemotactic stimulus for these cells. Since bone fracture healing requires the migration of osteoblast progenitors, we postulate that LPA is among the factors that stimulate bone repair. UMR 106-01 cells, which express a more mature osteoblastic phenotype than MC3T3-E1 cells, did not migrate in response to LPA, although they express LPA receptors and exhibit LPA-induced Ca2+ signals. This suggests that LPA differentially induces pre-osteoblast chemotaxis, consistent with our hypothesis that LPA stimulates the motility of osteoblast progenitors during bone healing. LPA-stimulated MC3T3-E1 cells exhibit striking changes in morphology and F-actin architecture, and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) is required for motility-associated cytoskeletal rearrangements in many cell types. We found a dose-dependent reduction in LPA-induced osteoblast migration when cells also were treated with the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. Treatment of many cell types with LPA is associated with an autocrine/paracrine transactivation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) via shedding of surface-tethered EGFR ligands, a phenomenon often required for LPA-induced chemotaxis. MC3T3-E1 cells express multiple EGFR ligands (epigen, epiregulin, HB-EGF and amphiregulin) and migrated in response to EGF. However, while EGF-stimulated motility in MC3T3-E1 cells was blocked by an EGFR inhibitor, there was no significant effect on LPA-induced chemotaxis. Activation of MAP kinases is a hallmark of EGFR-mediated signaling, and EGF treatment of MC3T3-E1 cells led to a strong stimulation of ERK1/2 kinase. In contrast, LPA induced only a minor elevation in ERK activity. Thus, it is likely that the increase in ERK activity by LPA is related to cell proliferation associated with lipid treatment. We conclude that LPA-induced MC3T3-E1 cell chemotaxis requires PI3K-associated cytoskeletal changes, but not transactivation of the EGF receptor.

  10. Nitrous acid induced damage in T7 DNA and phage

    SciTech Connect

    Scearce, L.M.; Masker, W.E.

    1986-05-01

    The response of bacteriophage T7 to nitrous acid damage was investigated. The T7 system allows in vitro mimicry of most aspects of in vivo DNA metabolism. Nitrous acid is of special interest since it has been previously shown to induce deletions and point mutations as well as novel adducts in DNA. T7 phage was exposed to 56 mM nitrous acid at pH 4.6 in vivo, causing a time dependent 98% decrease in survival for each 10 min duration of exposure to nitrous acid. These studies were extended to include examination of pure T7 DNA exposed in vitro to nitrous acid conditions identical to those used in the in vivo survival studies. The treated DNA was dialyzed to remove the nitrous acid and the DNA was encapsulated into empty phage heads. These in vitro packaged phage showed a survival curve analogous to the in vivo system. There was no change in survival when either in vitro or in vivo exposed phage were grown on wild type E. coli or on E. coli strains deficient in DNA repair due to mutations in DNA polymerase I, exonuclease III or a uvrA mutation. Survival was not increased when nitrous acid treated T7 were grown on E. coli induced for SOS repair. In vitro replication of nitrous acid treated DNA showed a time dependent decrease in the total amount of DNA synthesized.

  11. Antiviral Efficacy and Host Innate Immunity Associated with SB 9200 Treatment in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Korolowicz, Kyle E.; Iyer, Radhakrishnan P.; Czerwinski, Stefanie; Suresh, Manasa; Yang, Junming; Padmanabhan, Seetharamaiyer; Sheri, Anjaneyulu; Pandey, Rajendra K.; Skell, Jeffrey; Marquis, Judith K.; Kallakury, Bhaskar V.; Tucker, Robin D.; Menne, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    SB 9200, an oral prodrug of the dinucleotide SB 9000, is being developed for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and represents a novel class of antivirals. SB 9200 is thought to activate the viral sensor proteins, retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) resulting in interferon (IFN) mediated antiviral immune responses in virus-infected cells. Additionally, the binding of SB 9200 to these sensor proteins could also sterically block the ability of the viral polymerase to access pre-genomic RNA for nucleic acid synthesis. The immune stimulating and direct antiviral properties of SB 9200 were evaluated in woodchucks chronically infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) by daily, oral dosing at 15 and 30 mg/kg for 12 weeks. Prolonged treatment resulted in 2.2 and 3.7 log10 reductions in serum WHV DNA and in 0.5 and 1.6 log10 declines in serum WHV surface antigen from pretreatment level with the lower or higher dose of SB 9200, respectively. SB 9200 treatment also resulted in lower hepatic levels of WHV nucleic acids and antigen and reduced liver inflammation. Following treatment cessation, recrudescence of viral replication was observed but with dose-dependent delays in viral relapse. The antiviral effects were associated with dose-dependent and long-lasting induction of IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-stimulated genes in blood and liver, which correlated with the prolonged activation of the RIG-I/NOD2 pathway and hepatic presence of elevated RIG-I protein levels. These results suggest that in addition to a direct antiviral activity, SB 9200 induces antiviral immunity during chronic hepadnaviral infection via activation of the viral sensor pathway. PMID:27552102

  12. Antiviral Efficacy and Host Innate Immunity Associated with SB 9200 Treatment in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Korolowicz, Kyle E; Iyer, Radhakrishnan P; Czerwinski, Stefanie; Suresh, Manasa; Yang, Junming; Padmanabhan, Seetharamaiyer; Sheri, Anjaneyulu; Pandey, Rajendra K; Skell, Jeffrey; Marquis, Judith K; Kallakury, Bhaskar V; Tucker, Robin D; Menne, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    SB 9200, an oral prodrug of the dinucleotide SB 9000, is being developed for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and represents a novel class of antivirals. SB 9200 is thought to activate the viral sensor proteins, retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) resulting in interferon (IFN) mediated antiviral immune responses in virus-infected cells. Additionally, the binding of SB 9200 to these sensor proteins could also sterically block the ability of the viral polymerase to access pre-genomic RNA for nucleic acid synthesis. The immune stimulating and direct antiviral properties of SB 9200 were evaluated in woodchucks chronically infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) by daily, oral dosing at 15 and 30 mg/kg for 12 weeks. Prolonged treatment resulted in 2.2 and 3.7 log10 reductions in serum WHV DNA and in 0.5 and 1.6 log10 declines in serum WHV surface antigen from pretreatment level with the lower or higher dose of SB 9200, respectively. SB 9200 treatment also resulted in lower hepatic levels of WHV nucleic acids and antigen and reduced liver inflammation. Following treatment cessation, recrudescence of viral replication was observed but with dose-dependent delays in viral relapse. The antiviral effects were associated with dose-dependent and long-lasting induction of IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-stimulated genes in blood and liver, which correlated with the prolonged activation of the RIG-I/NOD2 pathway and hepatic presence of elevated RIG-I protein levels. These results suggest that in addition to a direct antiviral activity, SB 9200 induces antiviral immunity during chronic hepadnaviral infection via activation of the viral sensor pathway. PMID:27552102

  13. Expression of pattern recognition receptors in cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Yun; Park, Moon Suh; Byun, Jae Yong; Kim, Young Il; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2014-02-01

    Although many immunologic mechanisms have been investigated in studies of the pathogenesis of cholesteatoma, the role of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) has not been fully determined. Therefore, we assessed innate immune responses in patients with cholesteatoma. We prospectively evaluated 21 patients with acquired cholesteatoma between August 2010 and July 2012. Cholesteatoma specimens were obtained during surgery, and skin from the external meatus of each patient was used as a control. RNA was extracted from these tissue samples, followed by real-time PCR to quantitatively assess the relative expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs), NOD-like receptors (NLRs), retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I, NO synthase (NOS) and cytokines. The levels of TLR-2, -3, -4, -6, -7, and -10, NOD-2, and IL-1 and -8 mRNAs were significantly higher in the cholesteatoma than in the skin specimens (p < .05). The expression levels of TLR-2 and -3, RIG-I, IL-6, and TNF-α mRNAs were significantly higher in cholesteatomas from women than from men. The levels of TLR-8, NOD-2, IL-12, and TNF-α mRNAs were significantly higher in recurrent than in initial cholesteatoma specimens (p < .05). Hearing level did not correlate with the levels of expression of mRNAs encoding TLRs, NLRs, NOS, RIG-I and related cytokines (p > .05). In conclusion, alterations in innate immunity triggered by PRRs are important in the pathophysiology of cholesteatoma. Gender differences and frequency of surgery may affect the expression of PRRs in cholesteatomas.

  14. Innate Immunity Evasion by Enteroviruses: Insights into Virus-Host Interaction.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xiaobo; Xiao, Xia; Wang, Jianwei

    2016-01-15

    Enterovirus genus includes multiple important human pathogens, such as poliovirus, coxsackievirus, enterovirus (EV) A71, EV-D68 and rhinovirus. Infection with EVs can cause numerous clinical conditions including poliomyelitis, meningitis and encephalitis, hand-foot-and-mouth disease, acute flaccid paralysis, diarrhea, myocarditis and respiratory illness. EVs, which are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses, trigger activation of the host antiviral innate immune responses through pathogen recognition receptors such as retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG-I)-likeand Toll-like receptors. In turn, EVs have developed sophisticated strategies to evade host antiviral responses. In this review, we discuss the interplay between the host innate immune responses and EV infection, with a primary focus on host immune detection and protection against EV infection and viral strategies to evade these antiviral immune responses.

  15. Innate Immunity Evasion by Enteroviruses: Insights into Virus-Host Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xiaobo; Xiao, Xia; Wang, Jianwei

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus genus includes multiple important human pathogens, such as poliovirus, coxsackievirus, enterovirus (EV) A71, EV-D68 and rhinovirus. Infection with EVs can cause numerous clinical conditions including poliomyelitis, meningitis and encephalitis, hand-foot-and-mouth disease, acute flaccid paralysis, diarrhea, myocarditis and respiratory illness. EVs, which are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses, trigger activation of the host antiviral innate immune responses through pathogen recognition receptors such as retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG-I)-likeand Toll-like receptors. In turn, EVs have developed sophisticated strategies to evade host antiviral responses. In this review, we discuss the interplay between the host innate immune responses and EV infection, with a primary focus on host immune detection and protection against EV infection and viral strategies to evade these antiviral immune responses. PMID:26784219

  16. Dengue subgenomic RNA binds TRIM25 to inhibit interferon expression for epidemiological fitness.

    PubMed

    Manokaran, Gayathri; Finol, Esteban; Wang, Chunling; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Bahl, Justin; Ong, Eugenia Z; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Sessions, October M; Ward, Alex M; Gubler, Duane J; Harris, Eva; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-10-01

    The global spread of dengue virus (DENV) infections has increased viral genetic diversity, some of which appears associated with greater epidemic potential. The mechanisms governing viral fitness in epidemiological settings, however, remain poorly defined. We identified a determinant of fitness in a foreign dominant (PR-2B) DENV serotype 2 (DENV-2) clade, which emerged during the 1994 epidemic in Puerto Rico and replaced an endemic (PR-1) DENV-2 clade. The PR-2B DENV-2 produced increased levels of subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) relative to genomic RNA during replication. PR-2B sfRNA showed sequence-dependent binding to and prevention of tripartite motif 25 (TRIM25) deubiquitylation, which is critical for sustained and amplified retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I)-induced type I interferon expression. Our findings demonstrate a distinctive viral RNA-host protein interaction to evade the innate immune response for increased epidemiological fitness.

  17. Pancreatic proglucagon processing: isolation and structures of glucagon and glucagon-like peptide from gene I.

    PubMed

    Nichols, R; Lee, T D; Andrews, P C

    1988-12-01

    The anglerfish endocrine pancreas expresses two different genes for preproglucagon. The regions of the two proglucagons that correspond to glucagon have different sequences, as do the two glucagon-like peptides (GLPs). The products derived from processing the more abundant proglucagon-II have recently been determined. However, it was not known whether proglucagon-I was processed to similar products. The two major biologically active products of preproglucagon-I processing (glucagon-I and GLP-I) have now been purified to homogeneity. Their structures were determined using automated gas phase Edman degradation, tryptic mapping, and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. The preproglucagon-I-processing sites were identified. Glucagon-I represents residues 53-81, and GLP-I corresponds to preproglucagon-I-(91-124) (numbering from the initiator Met). PMID:3058456

  18. Expression and localization of regenerating gene I in a rat liver regeneration model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jingshu; Koyota, Souichi; Zhou, Xiaoping; Ueno, Yasuharu; Ma Li; Kawagoe, Masami; Koizumi, Yukio; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Toshihiro

    2009-03-13

    Regenerating gene (Reg) I has been identified as a regenerative/proliferative factor for pancreatic islet cells. We examined Reg I expression in the regenerating liver of a rat model that had been administered 2-acetylaminofluorene and treated with 70% partial hepatectomy (2-AAF/PH model), where hepatocyte and cholangiocyte proliferation was suppressed and the hepatic stem cells and/or hepatic progenitor cells were activated. In a detailed time course study of activation of hepatic stem cells in the 2-AAF/PH model, utilizing immunofluorescence staining with antibodies of Reg I and other cell-type-specific markers, we found that Reg I-expressing cells are present in the bile ductules and increased during regeneration. Reg I-expressing cells were colocalized with CK19, OV6, and AFP. These results demonstrate that Reg I is significantly upregulated in the liver of the 2-AAF/PH rat model, accompanied by the formation of bile ductules during liver regeneration.

  19. [Somatic hypermutagenesis in immunoglobulin genes. I. Connection of somatic mutations with repeats. A statistical weighting method].

    PubMed

    Solov'ev, V V; Rogozin, I V; Kolchanov, N A

    1989-01-01

    Based on the analysis of a number of immunoglobulin genes' nucleotide sequences, it has been suggested, that somatic mutations emerge by means of imperfect duplexes correction, formed by mispairing of complementary regions of direct and inverted repeats. In the present work provides new data, confirming this mechanism of somatic hypermutagenesis. It has been shown that the presented sample of V- and J-segments of immunoglobulin genes is abundant in nonrandom imperfect direct repeats and complementary palindromes. To prove the connection of somatic mutations with the correction of imperfect duplexes, made up by the regions of these repeats, we have developed the method of statistical weights, permitting us to analyse the samples of mutations and repeats and to reveal the reliability of the connection between them. Using this method we have investigated the collection of 203 nucleotide substitutions in V- and J-segments and have shown a statistically reliable (P less than 10(-4) connection of these mutation positions with imperfect repeats.

  20. Neuroprotective effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester in 3-nitropropionic acid-induced striatal neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Jia; Kim, Hee Jung; Kim, Seong Yun

    2016-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), derived from honeybee hives, is a bioactive compound with strong antioxidant activity. This study was designed to test the neuroprotective effect of CAPE in 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP)-induced striatal neurotoxicity, a chemical model of Huntington's disease (HD). Initially, to test CAPE's antioxidant activity, a 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) antioxidant assay was employed, and CAPE showed a strong direct radical-scavenging eff ect. In addition, CAPE provided protection from 3NP-induced neuronal cell death in cultured striatal neurons. Based on these observations, the in vivo therapeutic potential of CAPE in 3NP-induced HD was tested. For this purpose, male C57BL/6 mice were repeatedly given 3NP to induce HD-like pathogenesis, and 30 mg/kg of CAPE or vehicle (5% dimethyl sulfoxide and 95% peanut oil) was administered daily. CAPE did not cause changes in body weight, but it reduced mortality by 29%. In addition, compared to the vehicle-treated group, robustly reduced striatal damage was observed in the CAPE-treated animals, and the 3NP-induced behavioral defi cits on the rotarod test were signifi cantly rescued after the CAPE treatment. Furthermore, immunohistochemical data showed that immunoreactivity to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and CD45, markers for astrocyte and microglia activation, respectively, were strikingly reduced. Combined, these data unequivocally indicate that CAPE has a strong antioxidant eff ect and can be used as a potential therapeutic agent against HD. PMID:27162482

  1. Kainic Acid-Induced Excitotoxicity Experimental Model: Protective Merits of Natural Products and Plant Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Sairazi, Nur Shafika; Sirajudeen, K. N. S.; Asari, Mohd Asnizam; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Mummedy, Swamy; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah

    2015-01-01

    Excitotoxicity is well recognized as a major pathological process of neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases involving the central nervous system (CNS). In the animal models of neurodegeneration, excitotoxicity is commonly induced experimentally by chemical convulsants, particularly kainic acid (KA). KA-induced excitotoxicity in rodent models has been shown to result in seizures, behavioral changes, oxidative stress, glial activation, inflammatory mediator production, endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and selective neurodegeneration in the brain upon KA administration. Recently, there is an emerging trend to search for natural sources to combat against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Natural products and plant extracts had attracted a considerable amount of attention because of their reported beneficial effects on the CNS, particularly their neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity. They provide significant reduction and/or protection against the development and progression of acute and chronic neurodegeneration. This indicates that natural products and plants extracts may be useful in protecting against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegeneration. Thus, targeting of multiple pathways simultaneously may be the strategy to maximize the neuroprotection effect. This review summarizes the mechanisms involved in KA-induced excitotoxicity and attempts to collate the various researches related to the protective effect of natural products and plant extracts in the KA model of neurodegeneration. PMID:26793262

  2. Determination of aminolevulinic-acid-induced protoporphyrin IX in mice skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolik, S.; Tomás, S. A.; Ramón-Gallegos, E.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Sánchez-Sinencio, F.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) production in mice skin was studied by photoacoustic spectroscopy. PpIX was induced in mice by intraperitoneal administration of δ-aminolevulinic acid (δ-ALA) in doses of 10, 20, and 30 mg/kg. Mice were sacrificed at specific times within an 8 h interval following δ-ALA administration, and their abdominal skin was excised for the optical measurements. The PpIX content was determined from the photoacoustic amplitude at 410 nm, where PpIX presents its Soret band. For each dose, maximum PpIX was observed at two points. The first maximum occurred at around 15-45 min, depending on the ALA dose, and the second one took place approximately 2 h after δ-ALA administration. These peaks are associated with PpIX production in blood vessels and tissue, respectively. Fluorescence measurements of the PpIX content in plasma extracted intracardiacally confirmed the previous statement. Finally, phase resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy was applied to evaluate the mean depth at which PpIX is generated within the mice skin. This evaluation confirms that the ALA-induced porphyrins in skin are rather produced in the epidermis than in the dermis.

  3. Para-aminosalicylic acid-induced hypoglycaemia in a patient with diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Dandona, P; Greenbury, E; Beckett, A G

    1980-02-01

    A 62-year-old Indian with diabetic nephropathy controlled with metformin, developed miliary tuberculosis for which he was treated with rifampicin, isoniazid and ethambutol. Soon afterwards he developed cholestatic hepatitis and visual disturbance. Rifampicin and ethambutol were stopped. Streptomycin caused vertigo and had to be stopped. The introduction of para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) led to hypoglycaemic coma. Metformin was stopped. Hypoglycaemic coma recurred. PAS was stopped and the patient's blood glucose concentrations became normal. Treatment with isoniazid and ethambutol led to total recovery from pulmonary tuberculosis. The induction of hypoglycaemia with PAS in this patient suggests a potential role for PAS in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  4. Para-aminosalicylic acid-induced hypoglycaemia in a patient with diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Dandona, P.; Greenbury, E.; Beckett, A. G.

    1980-01-01

    A 62-year-old Indian with diabetic nephropathy controlled with metformin, developed miliary tuberculosis for which he was treated with rifampicin, isoniazid and ethambutol. Soon afterwards he developed cholestatic hepatitis and visual disturbance. Rifampicin and ethambutol were stopped. Streptomycin caused vertigo and had to be stopped. The introduction of para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) led to hypoglycaemic coma. Metformin was stopped. Hypoglycaemic coma recurred. PAS was stopped and the patient's blood glucose concentrations became normal. Treatment with isoniazid and ethambutol led to total recovery from pulmonary tuberculosis. The induction of hypoglycaemia with PAS in this patient suggests a potential role for PAS in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:7393795

  5. On the protective effect of omega-3 against propionic acid-induced neurotoxicity in rat pups

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Backgrounds The investigation of the environmental contribution for developmental neurotoxicity is very important. Many environmental chemical exposures are now thought to contribute to the development of neurological disorders, especially in children. Results from animal studies may guide investigations of human populations toward identifying environmental contaminants and drugs that produce or protect from neurotoxicity and may help in the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. Objective To study the protective effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid on brain intoxication induced by propionic acid (PPA) in rats. Methods 24 young male Western Albino rats were enrolled in the present study. They were grouped into three equal groups; oral buffered PPA-treated group given a nuerotoxic dose of 250 mg/Kg body weight/day for 3 days; omega-3 - protected group given a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight/day omega-3 orally daily for 5 days followed by PPA for 3 days, and a third group as control given only phosphate buffered saline. Tumor necrosis factor-α, caspase-3, interlukin-6, gamma amino-buteric acid (GABA), serotonin, dopamine and phospholipids were then assayed in the rats brain's tissue of different groups. Results The obtained data showed that PPA caused multiple signs of brain toxicity as measured by depletion of gamaaminobyteric acid (GABA), serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) as three important neurotransmitters that reflect brain function. A high significant increase of interlukin-6 (Il-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as excellent markers of proinflammation and caspase-3 as a proapotic marker were remarkably elevated in the intoxicated group of rats. Moreover, brain phospholipid profile was impaired in PPA-treated young rats recording lower levels of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylcholine (PC). Conclusions Omega-3 fatty acids showed a protective effects on PPA - induced changes in rats as there was a remarkable amelioration of most of the measured parameters (i.e. higher GABA, 5HT, DA, PE, PS and PC) and lower Il-6, TNF-α and caspase-3. PMID:21854591

  6. A diet with lactosucrose supplementation ameliorates trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Ruan, Zheng; Zhou, Xiaoli; Huang, Xiaoliu; Li, Hua; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Cui; Liu, Shiqiang; Deng, Zeyuan; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Chronic intestinal inflammation contributes to an increased risk of colon cancer. Lactosucrose (LS), a kind of functional trisaccharide, can modulate immunity and promote microbe growth. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of LS on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis in rats. Rats were randomly divided into four treatment groups: the normal group, TNBS group, LS group, and salicylazosulfapyridine (SASP) group for five weeks. LS supplementation ameliorated TNBS-induced colitis. LS supplementation increased IL-10 production and suppressed the secretion of IL-12 in the colon, as compared to the TNBS group. LS decreased the production of TLR-2 protein and nuclear NF-κB p65 protein, as well as mRNA levels, as compared with colitic rats. These results indicate that chronic feeding of LS inhibited TNBS-induced chronic inflammation. LS has potential nutraceutical intervention to combat colitis.

  7. Multi-omics profile of the mouse dentate gyrus after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Marijn; Bielefeld, Pascal; Fratantoni, Silvina A; Hubens, Chantal J; Piersma, Sander R; Pham, Thang V; Voskuyl, Rob A; Lucassen, Paul J; Jimenez, Connie R; Fitzsimons, Carlos P

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) can develop from alterations in hippocampal structure and circuit characteristics, and can be modeled in mice by administration of kainic acid (KA). Adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) contributes to hippocampal functions and has been reported to contribute to the development of TLE. Some of the phenotypical changes include neural stem and precursor cells (NPSC) apoptosis, shortly after their birth, before they produce hippocampal neurons. Here we explored these early phenotypical changes in the DG 3 days after a systemic injection of KA inducing status epilepticus (KA-SE), in mice. We performed a multi-omics experimental setup and analyzed DG tissue samples using proteomics, transcriptomics and microRNA profiling techniques, detecting the expression of 2327 proteins, 13401 mRNAs and 311 microRNAs. We here present a description of how these data were obtained and make them available for further analysis and validation. Our data may help to further identify and characterize molecular mechanisms involved in the alterations induced shortly after KA-SE in the mouse DG. PMID:27529540

  8. Bile acids induce uncoupling protein 1-dependent thermogenesis and stimulate energy expenditure at thermoneutrality in mice.

    PubMed

    Zietak, Marika; Kozak, Leslie P

    2016-03-01

    It has been proposed that diet-induced obesity at thermoneutrality (TN; 29°C) is reduced by a UCP1-dependent thermogenesis; however, it has not been shown how UCP1-dependent thermogenesis can be activated in the absence of sympathetic activity. A recent study provides such a mechanism by showing that dietary bile acids (BAs) suppress obesity in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) by a mechanism dependent on type 2 deiodinase (DIO2); however, neither a role for UCP1 nor the influence of sympathetic activity was properly assessed. To test whether the effects of BAs on adiposity are independent of Ucp1 and cold-activated thermogenesis, obesity phenotypes were determined in C57BL6/J.(+)/(+) (WT) and C57BL6/J.Ucp1.(-)/(-) mice (Ucp1-KO) housed at TN and fed a HFD with or without 0.5% (wt/wt) cholic acid (CA) for 9 wk. CA in a HFD reduced adiposity and hepatic lipogenesis and improved glucose tolerance in WT but not in Ucp1-KO mice and was accompanied by increases in food intake and energy expenditure (EE). In iBAT, CA increased Ucp1 mRNA and protein levels 1.5- and twofold, respectively, and increased DIO2 and TGR5 protein levels in WT mice. Despite enhanced Dio2 expression in Ucp1-KO and Ucp1-KO-CA treated mice, this did not enhance the ability of BAs to reduce obesity. By comparing the effects of BAs on WT and Ucp1-KO mice at TN, our study showed that BAs suppress diet-induced obesity by increasing EE through a mechanism dependent on Ucp1 expression, which is likely independent of adrenergic signaling. PMID:26714852

  9. Changes in breath sound power spectra during experimental oleic acid-induced lung injury in pigs.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Jukka; Nemergut, Michael E; Gavriely, Noam

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of acute lung injury on the frequency spectra of breath sounds, we made serial acoustic recordings from nondependent, midlung and dependent regions of both lungs in ten 35- to 45-kg anesthetized, intubated, and mechanically ventilated pigs during development of acute lung injury induced with intravenous oleic acid in prone or supine position. Oleic acid injections rapidly produced severe derangements in the gas exchange and mechanical properties of the lung, with an average increase in venous admixture from 16 ± 12 to 62 ± 16% (P < 0.01), and a reduction in dynamic respiratory system compliance from 25 ± 4 to 14 ± 4 ml/cmH2O (P < 0.01). A concomitant increase in sound power was seen in all lung regions (P < 0.05), predominantly in frequencies 150-800 Hz. The deterioration in gas exchange and lung mechanics correlated best with concurrent spectral changes in the nondependent lung regions. Acute lung injury increases the power of breath sounds likely secondary to redistribution of ventilation from collapsed to aerated parts of the lung and improved sound transmission in dependent, consolidated areas.

  10. Arsanilic acid-induced blindness in swine: electroretinographic and visually evoked responses.

    PubMed

    Witzel, D A; Smith, E L; Beerwinkle, K R; Johnson, J H

    1976-05-01

    Arsanilic acid (1,000 ppm) caused blindness in pigs within 25 to 30 days. The visually evoked response was "nonrecordable" in blind pigs, but was consistently recordable in normal pigs. The electroretinographic response was recordable in both normal and blind pigs, and significant differences were not apparent between results of tests of the 2 groups. Optic disk atrophy was noted ophthalmoscopically; lesions of the optic nerve are probably responsible for the nonrecordable visually evoked response.

  11. Bcl-2 accelerates retinoic acid-induced growth arrest and recovery in human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chou, H K; Chen, S L; Hsu, C T; Chao, Y C; Tsao, Y P

    2000-01-01

    The role of Bcl-2 as an anti-apoptotic protein has been well documented. In the present work, we present evidence that Bcl-2 may also be involved in cell growth regulation. SC-M1 is an unique cell line which responds to retinoic acid (RA) treatment with reversible growth arrest [Shyu, Jiang, Huang, Chang, Wu, Roffler and Yeh (1995) Eur. J. Cancer 31, 237-243]. In this study, when treated with RA, SC-M1/Bcl2 cells, which were generated by transfecting SC-M1 cells with bcl-2 DNA, were growth-arrested two days earlier than SC-M1/neo cells, which were generated by transfecting SC-M1 cells with vector DNA. This indicates that Bcl-2 accelerates RA-induced growth arrest. In addition to the accelerated growth arrest, RA-treated SC-M1/Bcl2 cells also recovered from growth arrest two days faster than SC-M1/neo cells after the removal of RA. Previously, we had identified the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21((WAF1/CIP1)) (p21) as a mediator of RA-induced growth arrest [Tsao, Li, Kuo, Liu and Chen (1996) Biochem. J. 317, 707-711]. In a search for the mechanism by which Bcl-2 affects growth regulation, we found that p21 gene expression was more prominent in SC-M1/Bcl2 cells than in SC-M1/neo cells in the presence of RA, but when RA was removed, p21 gene expression levels in SC-M1/Bcl2 cells were also reduced earlier than in SC-M1/neo cells. The present report is the first to show that Bcl-2 accelerates not only growth arrest but also recovery from growth arrest. Moreover, the close correlation between the effect of Bcl-2 on both RA-induced growth arrest and RA-induced p21 gene expression suggests the possibility that Bcl-2 affects cell growth through the mechanism of p21. PMID:10816444

  12. Dietary linoleic acid-induced alterations in pro- and anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Amit; Majchrzak-Hong, Sharon F; Yang, Jun; Blanchard, Helene; Zamora, Daisy; Loewke, James D; Rapoport, Stanley I; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Davis, John M; Hammock, Bruce D; Taha, Ameer Y

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic idiopathic pain syndromes are major causes of personal suffering, disability, and societal expense. Dietary n-6 linoleic acid has increased markedly in modern industrialized populations over the past century. These high amounts of linoleic acid could hypothetically predispose to physical pain by increasing the production of pro-nociceptive linoleic acid-derived lipid autacoids and by interfering with the production of anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids derived from n-3 fatty acids. Here, we used a rat model to determine the effect of increasing dietary linoleic acid as a controlled variable for 15 weeks on nociceptive lipid autacoids and their precursor n-6 and n-3 fatty acids in tissues associated with idiopathic pain syndromes. Results Increasing dietary linoleic acid markedly increased the abundance of linoleic acid and its pro-nociceptive derivatives and reduced the abundance of n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and their anti-nociceptive monoepoxide derivatives. Diet-induced changes occurred in a tissue-specific manner, with marked alterations of nociceptive lipid autacoids in both peripheral and central tissues, and the most pronounced changes in their fatty acid precursors in peripheral tissues. Conclusions The present findings provide biochemical support for the hypothesis that the high linoleic acid content of modern industrialized diets may create a biochemical susceptibility to develop chronic pain. Dietary linoleic acid lowering should be further investigated as part of an integrative strategy for the prevention and management of idiopathic pain syndromes. PMID:27030719

  13. Acid-induced folding of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase under low pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Le, W P; Yan, S X; Zhang, Y X; Zhou, H M

    1996-04-01

    Under conditions of low pH, the conformational states of holo-YADH and apo-YADH were examined by protein intrinsic fluorescence, ANS fluorescence, and far-UV CD measurements. The results obtained show that a low ionic strength, with the addition of HCl, the holo- and apo- YADH denatured gradually to reach the ultimate unfolded conformation in the vicinity of pH 2.0 and 2.5, respectively. With the decrease of pH from 7.0 to 2.0, the fluorescence emission decreased markedly, with its emission maximum red-shifting from 335 to 355 nm, indicating complete exposure of the buried tryptophan residues to the solvent. The far-UV CD spectra show the loss of the arrayed secondary structure, though the acid-denatured enzyme still maintained a partially arrayed secondary structure. A further decrease in pH by increasing the concentration of HClO4 induced a cooperative folding of the denatured enzyme to a compact conformation with the properties of a molten globule, described previously by Goto et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87, 573-577 (1990)]. More extensive studies showed that although apo-YADH and holo-YADH exhibited similar behavior, the folding cooperative ability of apo-YADH was lower than that of the holo-enzyme. From the above results, it is suggested that the zinc ion plays an important role in the proper folding of YADH and in stabilizing its native conformation.

  14. Tungstenic acid induced assembly of hierarchical flower-like MoS{sub 2} spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Wanzhen Xu Zhude Liu Run; Ye Xianfu; Zheng Yifan

    2008-10-02

    Hierarchical flower-like MoS{sub 2} spheres with high purity were synthesized by hydrothermal method using WO{sub 3} nanorods or H{sub 2}WO{sub 4} as an additive. The flower-like spheres were about 1 {mu}m in diameter and built up with MoS{sub 2} thin flakes with thickness of several nanometers. Energy disperse X-ray spectrum showed that the spheres were only composed of Mo and S with atomic ratio of 2:1. Powder X-ray diffraction result further indicated that the products were MoS{sub 2}. The reaction mechanism is discussed and suggested that tungstenic acid played an important role on the formation of flower-like MoS{sub 2} spheres.

  15. Nutraceutical with Resveratrol and Omega-3 Fatty Acids Induces Autophagy in ARPE-19 Cells.

    PubMed

    Koskela, Ali; Reinisalo, Mika; Petrovski, Goran; Sinha, Debasish; Olmiere, Céline; Karjalainen, Reijo; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-05-11

    Impaired autophagic and proteasomal cleansing have been documented in aged retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Omega-3 fatty acids and resveratrol have many positive homeostatic effects in RPE cells. In this work, ARPE-19 cells were treated with 288 ng of Resvega, containing 30 mg of trans resveratrol and 665 mg of omega-3 fatty acids, among other nutrients, with proteasome inhibitor MG-132 or autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 up to 48 h. Autophagy markers p62/SQSTM1 (p62) and LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3) were analyzed by Western blotting. Fluorescence microscopy with mCherry-GFP-LC3 plasmid was applied to study the autophagy flux, and cytoprotective effects were investigated with colorimetric MTT and LDH assays. Resvega induced autophagy by showing increased autolysosome formation and autophagy flux, and the change in the p62 and LC3 protein levels further confirmed the fluorescent microscopy results. Moreover, Resvega provided a clear cytoprotection under proteasome inhibition. These findings highlight the potential of the nutraceuticals containing resveratrol, omega-3 fatty acids and other nutrients in the prevention of ARPE-19 cell damage.

  16. Retinoic acid induced myelomeningocele in fetal rats: characterization by histopathological analysis and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Danzer, E; Schwarz, U; Wehrli, S; Radu, A; Adzick, N S; Flake, A W

    2005-08-01

    The prevention of human neural tube defects by folic acid administration and the potential for fetal surgical intervention for myelomeningocele (MMC) have renewed interest in the molecular pathways and pathophysiology of spina bifida. Animal models for assessment of the early developmental biology and pathophysiology of this lesion are needed. The goal of this study was to develop and characterize a non-surgical rat model of MMC. Time-dated Sprague-Dawley rats were gavage fed different doses of retinoic acid (RA) dissolved in olive oil at E10 (maternal n = 55, fetal n = 505). Control animals received olive oil alone (maternal n = 20, fetal n = 265) or were untreated (maternal n = 5, fetal n = 63). Fetuses were analyzed by detailed histopathology and MRI. Overall, isolated MMC occurred in 60.7% (307/505) of RA-exposed fetuses and no controls. Histopathology confirmed the entire spectrum of severity observed in human MMC, ranging from exposure of the cord with intact neural elements to complete cord destruction. MRI of the brain of MMC fetuses confirmed structural changes similar to humans with Arnold-Chiari malformation, including downward displacement of the cerebellum to just above the foramen magnum and compression of the developing medulla into a small posterior fossa. In conclusion, the RA-induced rat model of MMC is developmentally and anatomically analogous to human MMC. This relatively efficient and cost-effective model of MMC should facilitate investigation of the developmental biology and pathophysiology of MMC, and may be useful for the evaluation of further strategies for prenatal treatment. PMID:15893307

  17. Oleanolic Acid Induces the Type III Secretion System of Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dousheng; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xuejiao; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, can naturally infect a wide range of host plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a major virulence determinant in this bacterium. Studies have shown that plant-derived compounds are able to inhibit or induce the T3SS in some plant pathogenic bacteria, though no specific T3SS inhibitor or inducer has yet been identified in R. solanacearum. In this study, a total of 50 different compounds were screened and almost half of them (22 of 50) significantly inhibited or induced the T3SS expression of R. solanacearum. Based on the strong induction activity on T3SS, the T3SS inducer oleanolic acid (OA) was chosen for further study. We found that OA induced the expression of T3SS through the HrpG-HrpB pathway. Some type III effector genes were induced in T3SS inducing medium supplemented with OA. In addition, OA targeted only the T3SS and did not affect other virulence determinants. Finally, we observed that induction of T3SS by OA accelerated disease progress on tobacco. Overall our results suggest that plant-derived compounds are an abundant source of R. solanacearum T3SS regulators, which could prove useful as tools to interrogate the regulation of this key virulence pathway. PMID:26732647

  18. Salicylic acid-induced superoxide generation catalyzed by plant peroxidase in hydrogen peroxide-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Makoto; Kawano, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that salicylic acid (SA) induces both immediate spike and long lasting phases of oxidative burst represented by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion radical (O2(•-)). In general, in the earlier phase of oxidative burst, apoplastic peroxidase are likely involved and in the late phase of the oxidative burst, NADPH oxidase is likely involved. Key signaling events connecting the 2 phases of oxidative burst are calcium channel activation and protein phosphorylation events. To date, the known earliest signaling event in response to exogenously added SA is the cell wall peroxidase-catalyzed generation of O2(•-) in a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent manner. However, this model is incomplete since the source of the initially required H2O2 could not be explained. Based on the recently proposed role for H2O2-independent mechanism for ROS production catalyzed by plant peroxidases (Kimura et al., 2014, Frontiers in Plant Science), we hereby propose a novel model for plant peroxidase-catalyzed oxidative burst fueled by SA.

  19. Compact acid-induced state of Clitoria ternatea agglutinin retains its biological activity.

    PubMed

    Naeem, A; Saleemuddin, M; Khan, R H

    2009-10-01

    The effects of pH on Clitoria ternatea agglutinin (CTA) were studied by spectroscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, and by measuring carbohydrate specificity. At pH 2.6, CTA lacks well-defined tertiary structure, as seen by fluorescence and near-UV CD spectra. Far-UV CD spectra show retention of 50% native-like secondary structure. The mean residue ellipticity at 217 nm plotted against pH showed a transition around pH 4.0 with loss of secondary structure leading to the formation of an acid-unfolded state. This state is relatively less denatured than the state induced by 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. With a further decrease in pH, this unfolded state regains ~75% secondary structure at pH 1.2, leading to the formation of the A-state with native-like near-UV CD spectral features. Enhanced 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonate binding was observed in A-state, indicating a "molten-globule" like conformation with exposed hydrophobic residues. Acrylamide quenching data exhibit reduced accessibility of quencher to tryptophan, suggesting a compact conformation at low pH. Size-exclusion chromatography shows the presence of a compact intermediate with hydrodynamic size corresponding to a monomer. Thermal denaturation of the native state was cooperative single-step transition and of the A-state was non-cooperative two-step transition. A-State regains 72% of the carbohydrate-binding activity. PMID:19916921

  20. Three-dimensional optical tomographic brain imaging during kainic-acid-induced seizures in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluestone, Avraham Y.; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Hielscher, Andreas H.; Stewart, Mark

    2005-04-01

    In this study, we explored the potential of diffuse optical tomography for brain oximetry and describe our efforts towards imaging hemodynamic changes in rat brains during kainic-acid (KA) induced seizures. Using electrophysiological techniques we first showed that KA induces a pronounced transient hypotension in urethane anesthetized rats that is coincident with seizure activity beginning in ventral and spreading to dorsal hippocampus. We observed sustained increases in vagus and sympathetic activity during generalized limbic seizure activity, which alters blood pressure regulation and heart rhythms. Subsequently, we used optical tomographic methods to study KA induced seizures in anesthetized animals to better define the hemodynamic cerebral vascular response. We observed a lateralized increase in deoxyhemoglobin after KA injection at the time when the blood pressure (BP) was decreased. By contrast, injection of phenylephrine produced a symmetric global increase in total hemoglobin. These findings indicate that our instrument is sensitive to the local hemodynamics, both in response to a global increase in blood pressure (phenylephrine injection) and a lateralized decrease in oxyhemoglobin produced by an asymmetric response to KA; a response that may be critically important for severe autonomic nervous system alterations during seizures. The results of this study provide the impetus for combining complimentary modalities, imaging and electrophysiological, to ultimately gain a better understanding of the underlying physiology of seizure activity in the rat.

  1. Loss of n-6 fatty acid induced pediatric obesity protects against acute murine colitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary influences may affect microbiome composition and host immune responses, thereby modulating propensity toward inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. Dietary n-6 fatty acids have been associated with ulcetative colitis in prospective studies. However, the critical d...

  2. Modeling and analysis of retinoic acid induced differentiation of uncommitted precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Tasseff, Ryan; Nayak, Satyaprakash; Song, Sang Ok; Yen, Andrew; Varner, Jeffrey D

    2011-05-01

    Manipulation of differentiation programs has therapeutic potential in a spectrum of human cancers and neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we integrated computational and experimental methods to unravel the response of a lineage uncommitted precursor cell-line, HL-60, to Retinoic Acid (RA). HL-60 is a human myeloblastic leukemia cell-line used extensively to study human differentiation programs. Initially, we focused on the role of the BLR1 receptor in RA-induced differentiation and G1/0-arrest in HL-60. BLR1, a putative G protein-coupled receptor expressed following RA exposure, is required for RA-induced cell-cycle arrest and differentiation and causes persistent MAPK signaling. A mathematical model of RA-induced cell-cycle arrest and differentiation was formulated and tested against BLR1 wild-type (wt) knock-out and knock-in HL-60 cell-lines with and without RA. The current model described the dynamics of 729 proteins and protein complexes interconnected by 1356 interactions. An ensemble strategy was used to compensate for uncertain model parameters. The ensemble of HL-60 models recapitulated the positive feedback between BLR1 and MAPK signaling. The ensemble of models also correctly predicted Rb and p47phox regulation and the correlation between p21-CDK4-cyclin D formation and G1/0-arrest following exposure to RA. Finally, we investigated the robustness of the HL-60 network architecture to structural perturbations and generated experimentally testable hypotheses for future study. Taken together, the model presented here was a first step toward a systematic framework for analysis of programmed differentiation. These studies also demonstrated that mechanistic network modeling can help prioritize experimental directions by generating falsifiable hypotheses despite uncertainty.

  3. Do pH and flavonoids influence hypochlorous acid-induced catalase inhibition and heme modification?

    PubMed

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2015-09-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), highly reactive oxidizing and chlorinating species, is formed in the immune response to invading pathogens by the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with chloride catalyzed by the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Catalase, an important antioxidant enzyme, catalyzing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, hampers in vitro HOCl formation, but is also one of the main targets for HOCl. In this work we have investigated HOCl-induced catalase inhibition at different pH, and the influence of flavonoids (catechin, epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin) on this process. It has been shown that HOCl-induced catalase inhibition is independent on pH in the range 6.0-7.4. Preincubation of catalase with epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin before HOCl treatment enhances the degree of catalase inhibition, whereas catechin does not affect this process. Our rapid kinetic measurements of absorption changes around the heme group have revealed that heme modification by HOCl is mainly due to secondary, intramolecular processes. The presence of flavonoids, which reduce active catalase intermediate, Compound I to inactive Compound II have not influenced the kinetics of HOCl-induced heme modification. Possible mechanisms of the reaction of hypochlorous acid with catalase are proposed and the biological consequences are discussed.

  4. Nuclear CD38 in retinoic acid-induced HL-60 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yalcintepe, Leman . E-mail: lemany@istanbul.edu.tr; Albeniz, Isil; Adin-Cinar, Suzan; Tiryaki, Demir; Bermek, Engin; Graeff, Richard M.; Lee, Hon Cheung

    2005-02-01

    The cell surface antigen, CD38, is a 45-kDa transmembrane protein which is predominantly expressed on hematopoietic cells during differentiation. As a bifunctional ectoenzyme, it catalyzes the synthesis of cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) from NAD{sup +} and hydrolysis of either NAD{sup +} or cADPR to ADP-ribose. All-trans-retinoic acid (RA) is a potent and specific inducer of CD38 in myeloid cells. In this report, we demonstrate that the nuclei of RA-treated human HL-60 myeloblastic cells reveal enzymatic activities inherent to CD38. Thus, GDP-ribosyl cyclase and NAD{sup +} glycohydrolase activities in the nuclear fraction increased very significantly in response to incubation with RA. With Western blotting, we detected in the nuclear protein fraction from RA-treated cells a {approx}43-kDa protein band which was reactive with the CD38-specific monoclonal antibody OKT10. The expression of CD38 in HL-60 nuclei was also shown with FACScan analysis. RA treatment gave rise to an increase in in vitro ADP ribosylation of the {approx}43-kDa nuclear protein. Moreover, nuclei isolated from RA-treated HL-60 cells revealed calcium release in response to cADPR, whereas a similar response was not observed in control nuclei. These results suggest that CD38 is expressed in HL-60 cell nuclei during RA-induced differentiation.

  5. Kainic Acid-Induced Excitotoxicity Experimental Model: Protective Merits of Natural Products and Plant Extracts.

    PubMed

    Mohd Sairazi, Nur Shafika; Sirajudeen, K N S; Asari, Mohd Asnizam; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Mummedy, Swamy; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah

    2015-01-01

    Excitotoxicity is well recognized as a major pathological process of neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases involving the central nervous system (CNS). In the animal models of neurodegeneration, excitotoxicity is commonly induced experimentally by chemical convulsants, particularly kainic acid (KA). KA-induced excitotoxicity in rodent models has been shown to result in seizures, behavioral changes, oxidative stress, glial activation, inflammatory mediator production, endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and selective neurodegeneration in the brain upon KA administration. Recently, there is an emerging trend to search for natural sources to combat against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Natural products and plant extracts had attracted a considerable amount of attention because of their reported beneficial effects on the CNS, particularly their neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity. They provide significant reduction and/or protection against the development and progression of acute and chronic neurodegeneration. This indicates that natural products and plants extracts may be useful in protecting against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegeneration. Thus, targeting of multiple pathways simultaneously may be the strategy to maximize the neuroprotection effect. This review summarizes the mechanisms involved in KA-induced excitotoxicity and attempts to collate the various researches related to the protective effect of natural products and plant extracts in the KA model of neurodegeneration.

  6. Aristolochic acids - Induced transcriptomic responses in rat renal proximal tubule cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Katarzyna M; Evans, Andrew; Lock, Edward A

    2015-09-01

    Aristolochic acids (AAs) are the active components of herbal drugs derived from Aristolochia species that have been used for medicinal purposes since antiquity. However, AAs have recently been discovered to be highly nephrotoxic and induced urothelial cancer in humans and malignant tumors in the kidney and urinary tract of rodents. In this study, we exposed rat renal proximal tubule cells in vitro to a sub-cytotoxic level of AAs at three different time points (6 h, 24 h and 72 h). We then analyzed the gene expression profile after the compound exposure. Functional analysis with Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and DAVID tools revealed that at the late time point (72 h) there are many significantly altered genes involved in cancer-related pathways such as p53 signaling. MIAMI-compliant microarray data are deposited in the NCBI GEO database under accession number GSE68687 and can be found at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE68687.

  7. Valproic acid-induced acute pancreatitis in pediatric age: case series and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    COFINI, M.; QUADROZZI, F.; FAVORITI, P.; FAVORITI, M.; COFINI, G.

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is commonly prescribed medication for epilepsy, migraine and bipolar disorder. Although the common adverse effect associated with VPA are typically benign, less common adverse effect can occur; these include hepatotixicity, teratogenicity and acute pancreatitis (AP). VPA-induced pancreatitis does not depend on valproic acid serum level and may occur anytime after onset of therapy. Re-challenge with VPA is dangerous and should be avoided. The diagnosis of VPA-induced pancreatitis seems to be underestimated because of difficulties in determining the causative agent and the need for a retrospective re-evaluation of the causative factor. More of idiopathic pancreatitis should be a drug-induced pancreatitis. We report four cases of VPA-induced AP found in a group of 52 cases of AP in children come to our attention from January 2008 to December 2012. The aim of these reports is to point out our experience about clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, outcome in children with VPA-induced AP and review of literature. PMID:26712070

  8. The N-acetylcysteine-insensitive acetic acid-induced yeast programmed cell death occurs without macroautophagy.

    PubMed

    Antonacci, Lucia; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Ždralevic, Maša; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2012-12-01

    Programmed cell death can occur through two separate pathways caused by treatment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with acetic acid (AA-PCD), which differ from one another essentially with respect to their sensitivity to N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and to the role played by cytochrome c and metacaspase YCA1. Moreover, yeast can also undergo macroautophagy which occurs in NAC-insensitive manner. In order to gain some insight into the relationship between AA-PCD and macroautophagy use was made of WT and knock-out cells lacking YCA1 and/or cytochrome c. We show that i. macroautophagy is modulated by YCA1 and by cytochrome c in a negative and positive manner, respectively, ii. the NAC-insensitive AA-PCD and macroautophagy differ from one another and iii. NAC-insensitive AA-PCD pathway takes place essentially without macroautophagy, even if the shift of extracellular pH to acidic values required for AA-PCD to occur leads itself to increased or decreased macroautophagy in YCA1 or cytochrome c-lacking cells. PMID:23072389

  9. Achievements and perspectives in yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Antonacci, Lucia; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2011-10-01

    The use of non-mammalian model organisms, including yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, can provide new insights into eukaryotic PCD (programmed cell death) pathways. In the present paper, we report recent achievements in the elucidation of the events leading to PCD that occur as a response to yeast treatment with AA (acetic acid). In particular, ROS (reactive oxygen species) generation, cyt c (cytochrome c) release and mitochondrial function and proteolytic activity will be dealt with as they vary along the AA-PCD time course by using both wild-type and mutant yeast cells. Two AA-PCD pathways are described sharing common features, but distinct from one another with respect to the role of ROS and mitochondria, the former in which YCA1 acts upstream of cyt c release and caspase-like activation in a ROS-dependent manner and the latter in which cyt c release does not occur, but caspase-like activity increases, in a ROS-independent manner. PMID:21936848

  10. Effects of L-carnitine pretreatment in methamphetamine and 3-nitropropionic acid-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Binienda, Zbigniew K; Przybyla, Beata D; Robinson, Bonnie L; Salem, Nadia; Virmani, Ashraf; Amato, Antonino; Ali, Syed F

    2006-08-01

    Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with 3-ni-tropropionic acid (3-NPA) at 30 mg/kg or methamphetamine (METH) at 20 mg/kg alone or following pretreatment with L-cartnitine (LC) at 100 mg/kg. Rectal temperature was measured before and 4 h following treatment. Animals were sacrificed at 4 h posttreatment. Monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT), and their metabolites were analyzed in the striatum using high-performance liquid chromatography method coupled with electrochemical detection (HPLC/ED). Transcripts of several genes related to DA metabolism were quantified using real time reverse transciption polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Core temperature decreased significantly after 3-NPA acid and increased in METH-treated rats (P < 0.05). Temperature change at 4 h exhibited a significant LC effect for 3-NPA, preventing hypothermia (P < 0.05) and no effect for METH. Concentration of DA and 5-HT, and their metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), increased significantly in 3-NPA and decreased in METH-treated rats. An increase in DOPAC/DA turnover and serotonin observed after 3-NPA was abolished in LC-/3-NPA-treated rats. In both 3-NPA- and METH-treated rats, LC prevented an increase in DA receptor D(1) gene expression. It appears that carnitine effect preventing hypothermia after 3-NPA treatments may be related not only to its mitochondriotropic actions but also to inhibitory effect on the DA and 5-HT systems activated after the exposure to 3-NPA. The same effect observed at the transcriptional level, at least for the DA receptor D(1), may account for protection against METH toxicity.

  11. Korean red ginseng ameliorates acute 3-nitropropionic acid-induced cochlear damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chunjie; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Young Chul; Park, Kyung Tae; Kim, Seung Won; Kim, Youn Ju; Lim, Hye Jin; Choung, Yun-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP), a mitochondrial toxin, has been reported to induce an acute cochlear damage. Korean red ginseng (KRG) is known to have protective effects from some types of hearing loss. This study aimed to observe the protective effect of KRG in an ototoxic animal model using 3-NP intratympanic injection. BALB/c mice were classified into 5 groups (n=15) and dose-dependent toxic effects after intratympanic injection with 3-NP (300-5000 mM) on the left ear were investigated to determine the appropriate toxicity level of 3-NP. For observation of the protective effects of KRG, 23 mice were grouped into 3-NP (500 mM, n=12) and KRG+3-NP groups (300 mg/kg KRG for 7 days before 500 mM 3-NP administration, n=11). Auditory brain response (ABR) and cochlear morphological evaluations were performed before and after drug administration. The ABR thresholds in the 800-5000 mM groups exceeded the maximum recording limit at 16 and 32 kHz 1 day after 3-NP administration. The ABR threshold in the 500 mM 3-NP+KRG group was significantly lower than that in the 500 mM 3-NP group from post 1 week to 1 month. The mean type II fibrocyte counts significantly differed between the control and 3-NP groups and between the 3-NP and 3-NP+KRG groups. Spiral ganglion cell degeneration in the 3-NP group was more severe than that in the 3-NP+KRG group. This animal model exhibited a dose-dependent hearing loss with histological changes. KRG administration ameliorated the deterioration of hearing by 3-NP. PMID:23164932

  12. Gambogic acid induces apoptosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells via inducing proteasome inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xianping; Lan, Xiaoying; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Chong; Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Shouting; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Ningning; Zang, Dan; Liao, Yuning; Zhang, Peiquan; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a great challenge to improving the survival of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), especially those with activated B-cell-like DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL). Therefore it is urgent to search for novel agents for the treatment of DLBCL. Gambogic acid (GA), a small molecule derived from Chinese herb gamboges, has been approved for Phase II clinical trial for cancer therapy by Chinese FDA. In the present study, we investigated the effect of GA on cell survival and apoptosis in DLBCL cells including both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells. We found that GA induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, which is associated with proteasome malfunction. These findings provide significant pre-clinical evidence for potential usage of GA in DLBCL therapy particularly in ABC-DLBCL treatment. PMID:25853502

  13. PEFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID-INDUCED IMMUNOMODULATION IN C57BL/6 FEMALE MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), used in fluoropolymer production, is environmentally persistent, present in human and wildlife populations worldwide, and associated with myriad health effects in laboratory animals. A preliminary risk assessment by the US EPA identified immunosuppr...

  14. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells' molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  15. Salicylic acid induced cysteine protease activity during programmed cell death in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Szepesi, Ágnes; Tari, Irma

    2016-06-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR), a type of programmed cell death (PCD) during biotic stress is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). The aim of this work was to reveal the role of proteolysis and cysteine proteases in the execution of PCD in response of SA. Tomato plants were treated with sublethal (0.1 mM) and lethal (1 mM) SA concentrations through the root system. Treatment with 1 mM SA increased the electrolyte leakage and proteolytic activity and reduced the total protein content of roots after 6 h, while the proteolytic activity did not change in the leaves and in plants exposed to 0.1 mM SA. The expression of the papain-type cysteine protease SlCYP1, the vacuolar processing enzyme SlVPE1 and the tomato metacaspase SlMCA1 was induced within the first three hours in the leaves and after 0.5 h in the roots in the presence of 1 mM SA but the transcript levels did not increase significantly at sublethal SA. The Bax inhibitor-1 (SlBI-1), an antiapoptotic gene was over-expressed in the roots after SA treatments and it proved to be transient in the presence of sublethal SA. Protease inhibitors, SlPI2 and SlLTC were upregulated in the roots by sublethal SA but their expression remained low at 1 mM SA concentration. It is concluded that in contrast to leaves the SA-induced PCD is associated with increased proteolytic activity in the root tissues resulting from a fast up-regulation of specific cysteine proteases and down-regulation of protease inhibitors. PMID:27165526

  16. The protective effect of blueberry anthocyanins against perfluorooctanoic acid-induced disturbance in planarian (Dugesia japonica).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zuoqing; Zhang, Jianyong; Tu, Changchao; Wang, Zhijing; Xin, Wenpeng

    2016-05-01

    The influence of blueberry anthocyanins on perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)-induced stress response in planarian mitochondria was investigated. PFOA at 15mg/L and anthocyanins at 10 or 20mg/L were individually and simultaneously administered to planarians for up to 10d. The results showed PFOA treatment induced an increase in mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and a decrease antioxidant capacity and enzyme activities. In anthocyanin treated animals, the activity of succinate dehydrogenase, cytochrome oxidase and monoamine oxidase increased, but mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening decreased and total antioxidant capacity increased. An improvement in above-mentioned physiological and biochemical parameters was found in the combined PFOA and anthocyanin treated animals, in a dose-dependent manner. Anthocyanins attenuated the PFOA induced toxicity; antioxidant capacity and enzyme activities are involved in the protective mechanism of anthocyanins. PMID:26836138

  17. Identification of okadaic acid-induced phosphorylation events by a mass spectrometry approach.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jennifer J; Callaghan, Deborah A; Ding, Wen; Kelly, John F; Chakravarthy, Balu R

    2006-04-14

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a widely used small-molecule phosphatase inhibitor that is thought to selectively inhibit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Multiple studies have demonstrated that PP2A activity is compromised in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Thus, we set out to determine changes in phosphorylation that occur upon OA treatment of neuronal cells. Utilizing isotope-coded affinity tags and mass spectrometry analysis, we determined the relative abundance of proteins in a phosphoprotein enriched fraction from control and OA-treated primary cortical neurons. We identified many proteins whose phosphorylation state is regulated by OA, including glycogen synthase kinase 3beta, collapsin-response mediator proteins (DRP-2, DPYSL-5, and CRMP-4), and the B subunit of PP2A itself. Most interestingly, we have found that complexin 2, an important regulator of neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity, is phosphorylated at serine 93 upon OA treatment of neurons. This is the first report of a phosphorylation site on complexin 2.

  18. Salicylic acid-induced abiotic stress tolerance and underlying mechanisms in plants

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Iqbal R.; Fatma, Mehar; Per, Tasir S.; Anjum, Naser A.; Khan, Nafees A.

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stresses (such as metals/metalloids, salinity, ozone, UV-B radiation, extreme temperatures, and drought) are among the most challenging threats to agricultural system and economic yield of crop plants. These stresses (in isolation and/or combination) induce numerous adverse effects in plants, impair biochemical/physiological and molecular processes, and eventually cause severe reductions in plant growth, development and overall productivity. Phytohormones have been recognized as a strong tool for sustainably alleviating adverse effects of abiotic stresses in crop plants. In particular, the significance of salicylic acid (SA) has been increasingly recognized in improved plant abiotic stress-tolerance via SA-mediated control of major plant-metabolic processes. However, the basic biochemical/physiological and molecular mechanisms that potentially underpin SA-induced plant-tolerance to major abiotic stresses remain least discussed. Based on recent reports, this paper: (a) overviews historical background and biosynthesis of SA under both optimal and stressful environments in plants; (b) critically appraises the role of SA in plants exposed to major abiotic stresses; (c) cross-talks potential mechanisms potentially governing SA-induced plant abiotic stress-tolerance; and finally (d) briefly highlights major aspects so far unexplored in the current context. PMID:26175738

  19. Characterization of the stable, acid-induced, molten globule-like state of staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Fink, A. L.; Calciano, L. J.; Goto, Y.; Nishimura, M.; Swedberg, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Titration of a salt-free solution of native staphylococcal nuclease by HCl leads to an unfolding transition in the vicinity of pH 4, as determined by near- and far-UV circular dichroism. At pH 2-3, the protein is substantially unfolded. The addition of further HCl results in a second transition, this one to a more structured species (the A state) with the properties of an expanded molten globule, namely substantial secondary structure, little or no tertiary structure, relatively compact size as determined by hydrodynamic radius, and the ability to bind the hydrophobic dye 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonic acid. The addition of anions, in the form of neutral salts, to the acid-unfolded state at pH 2 also causes a transition leading to the A state. Fourier transform infrared analysis of the amide I band was used to compare the amount and type of secondary structure in the native and A states. A significant decrease in alpha-helix structure, with a corresponding increase in beta or extended structure, was observed in the A state, compared to the native state. A model to account for such compact denatured states is proposed. PMID:8358298

  20. Binding of Folic Acid Induces Specific Self-Aggregation of Lactoferrin: Thermodynamic Characterization.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Guilherme M; Croguennec, Thomas; Lê, Sébastien; Lerideau, Olivia; Hamon, Pascaline; Carvalho, Antônio F; Bouhallab, Saïd

    2015-11-17

    In the study presented here, we investigated the interaction at pH 5.5 between folic acid (FA) and lactoferrin (LF), a positively charged protein. We found a binding constant Ka of 10(5) M(-1) and a high stoichiometry of 10 mol of FA/mol of LF. The size and charge of the complexes formed evolved during titration experiments. Increasing the ionic strength to 50 mM completely abolished the isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) signal, suggesting the predominance of electrostatic interactions in the exothermic binding obtained. We developed a theoretical model that explains the complex triphasic ITC profile. Our results revealed a two-step mechanism: FA/LF interaction followed by self-association of the complexes thus formed. We suggest that 10 FA molecules bind to LF to form saturated reactive complexes (FA10/LF) that further self-associate into aggregates with a finite size of around 15 nm. There is thus a critical saturation degree of the protein, above which the self-association can take place. We present here the first results that provide comprehensive details of the thermodynamics of FA/LF complexation-association. Given the high stoichiometry, allowing a load of 55 mg of FA/g of LF, we suggest that FA/LF aggregates would be an effective vehicle for FA in fortified drinks. PMID:26488446

  1. Concerted action of p62 and Nrf2 protects cells from palmitic acid-induced lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Su; Kang, Dong Hoon; Lee, Da Hyun; Bae, Soo Han

    2015-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), frequently associated with obesity and diabetes mellitus, is caused by the accumulation of excess fatty acids within liver cells. Palmitic acid (PA), a common saturated fatty acid found in mammals, induces the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and elicits apoptotic cell death, known as lipotoxicity. However, protective mechanisms against PA-induced lipotoxicity have not been elucidated. In this study, we aimed to clarify the role of p62, an adapter protein in the autophagic process, as well as the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway, in protecting cells from PA-induced lipotoxicity. The Nrf2-Keap1 pathway is essential for the protection of cells from oxidative stress. p62 enhances its binding to Keap1 and leads to Nrf2 activation. Here, we show that PA potentiates Keap1 degradation and thereby activates the transcription of Nrf2 target genes partially through autophagy. Furthermore, this PA-mediated Keap1 degradation depends on p62. Correspondingly, a lack of p62 attenuates the PA-mediated Nrf2 activation and increases the susceptibility of cells to oxidative stress. These results indicate that p62 plays an important role in protecting cells against lipotoxicity through Keap1 degradation-mediated Nrf2 activation. PMID:26325428