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Sample records for acid-neutralizing capacity anc

  1. Chapter A6. Section 6.6. Alkalinity and Acid Neutralizing Capacity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rounds, Stewart A.; Wilde, Franceska D.

    2002-01-01

    Alkalinity (determined on a filtered sample) and Acid Neutralizing Capacity (ANC) (determined on a whole-water sample) are measures of the ability of a water sample to neutralize strong acid. Alkalinity and ANC provide information on the suitability of water for uses such as irrigation, determining the efficiency of wastewater processes, determining the presence of contamination by anthropogenic wastes, and maintaining ecosystem health. In addition, alkalinity is used to gain insights on the chemical evolution of an aqueous system. This section of the National Field Manual (NFM) describes the USGS field protocols for alkalinity/ANC determination using either the inflection-point or Gran function plot methods, including calculation of carbonate species, and provides guidance on equipment selection.

  2. Stemflow Acid Neutralization Capacity in a Broadleaved Deciduous Forest: The Role of Edge Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levia, D. F., Jr.; Shiklomanov, A.

    2014-12-01

    The fragmentation of forests is occurring at an accelerated rate in parts of the United States. Forest fragmentation creates edge habitat that affects the biogeochemistry of forests. Atmospheric deposition is known to increase at the forest edge in comparison to the forest interior. Past research has demonstrated the critical role of edge effects on throughfall chemistry but no known work has examined the relationship between stemflow chemistry and edge effects. To fill this data gap, we quantified the stemflow acid neutralization capacity (ANC) of nineteen Liriodendron tulipifera L. (yellow poplar) trees between forest edge and interior locations in the Piedmont of the mid-Atlantic USA. ANC was measured directly by potentiometric titration. Both stemflow pH and ANC were higher for L. tulipifera trees on the forest edge as opposed to those in interior locations (p < 0.01), although marked variability was observed among individual trees. It is critical to note that the ANC of stemflow of edge trees is almost certainly contextual, depending on geographic locality. This is to say that stemflow from edge trees may neutralize acid inputs in some locations (as in our case) but lead to enhanced acidification of aqueous inputs to forest soils in other locales where the dry deposition of acid anions is high. The experimental results have ramifications for forest management schema seeking to increase or decrease the extent of edge habitat in forest fragments.

  3. Magnetic properties, acid neutralization capacity, and net acid production of rocks in the Animas River Watershed Silverton, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCafferty, Anne E.; Yager, Douglas B.; Horton, Radley M.; Diehl, Sharon F.

    2006-01-01

    Federal land managers along with local stakeholders in the Upper Animas River watershed near Silverton, Colorado are actively designing and implementing mine waste remediation projects to mitigate the effects of acid mine drainage from several abandoned hard rock metal mines and mills. Local source rocks with high acid neutralization capacity (ANC) within the watershed are of interest to land managers for use in these remediation projects. A suite of representative samples was collected from propylitic to weakly sericitic-altered volcanic and plutonic rocks exposed in outcrops throughout the watershed. Acid-base accounting laboratory methods coupled with mineralogic and geochemical characterization provide insight into lithologies that have a range of ANC and net acid production (NAP). Petrophysical lab determinations of magnetic susceptibility converted to estimates for percent magnetite show correlation with the environmental properties of ANC and NAP for many of the lithologies. A goal of our study is to interpret watershed-scale airborne magnetic data for regional mapping of rocks that have varying degrees of ANC and NAP. Results of our preliminary work are presented here.

  4. Acid neutralizing processes in an alpine watershed front range, Colorado, U.S.A.-1: Buffering capacity of dissolved organic carbon in soil solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iggy, Litaor M.; Thurman, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    Soil interstitial waters in the Green Lakes Valley, Front Range, Colorado were studied to evaluate the capacity of the soil system to buffer acid deposition. In order to determine the contribution of humic substances to the buffering capacity of a given soil, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and pH of the soil solutions were measured. The concentration of the organic anion, Ai-, derived from DOC at sample pH and the concentration of organic anion, Ax- at the equivalence point were calculated using carboxyl contents from isolated and purified humic material from soil solutions. Subtracting Ax- from Ai- yields the contribution of humic substances to the buffering capacity (Aequiv.-). Using this method, one can evaluate the relative contribution of inorganic and organic constituents to the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of the soil solutions. The relative contribution of organic acids to the overall ANC was found to be extremely important in the alpine wetland (52%) and the forest-tundra ecotone (40%), and somewhat less important in the alpine tundra sites (20%). A failure to recognize the importance of organic acids in soil solutions to the ANC will result in erroneous estimates of the buffering capacity in the alpine environment of the Front Range, Colorado. ?? 1988.

  5. Net Acid Production, Acid Neutralizing Capacity, and Associated Mineralogical and Geochemical Characteristics of Animas River Watershed Igneous Rocks Near Silverton, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Douglas B.; Choate, LaDonna; Stanton, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents results from laboratory and field studies involving the net acid production (NAP), acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), and magnetic mineralogy of 27 samples collected in altered volcanic terrain in the upper Animas River watershed near Silverton, Colo., during the summer of 2005. Sampling focused mainly on the volumetrically important, Tertiary-age volcanic and plutonic rocks that host base- and precious-metal mineralization in the study area. These rocks were analyzed to determine their potential for neutralization of acid-rock drainage. Rocks in the study area have been subjected to a regional propylitic alteration event, which introduced calcite, chlorite (clinochlore), and epidote that have varying amounts and rates of acid neutralizing capacity (ANC). Locally, hydrothermal alteration has consumed any ANC and introduced minerals, mainly pyrite, that have a high net acid production (NAP). Laboratory studies included hydrogen pyroxide (H2O2) acid digestion and subsequent sodium hydroxide (NaOH) titration to determine NAP, and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) acid titration experiments to determine ANC. In addition to these environmental rock-property determinations, mineralogical, chemical, and petrographic characteristics of each sample were determined through semiquantitative X-ray diffractometry (Rietveld method), optical mineralogy, wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence, total carbon-carbonate, and inductively coupled plasma?mass spectrometric analysis. An ANC ranking was assigned to rock samples based on calculated ANC quantity in kilograms/ton (kg/t) calcium carbonate equivalent and ratios of ANC to NAP. Results show that talus near the southeast Silverton caldera margin, composed of andesite clasts of the Burns Member of the Silverton Volcanics, has the highest ANC (>100 kg/t calcium carbonate equivalent) with little to no NAP. The other units found to have moderate to high ANC include (a) andesite lavas and volcaniclastic rocks of the San Juan

  6. Evaluation of buffering capacity and acid neutralizing-pH time profile of antacids.

    PubMed

    Lin, M S; Sun, P; Yu, H Y

    1998-10-01

    The antacid properties of seven antacids listed in the hospital formulary of a medical center were evaluated with in vitro tests. These included not only the preliminary antacid test and acid-neutralizing capacity test as described in the United States Pharmacopeia (USP XXIII), but also a buffering pH profile test. The preliminary antacid test measured the final pH of a 10-mL solution of 0.5 N HCl 10 minutes after addition of the minimum recommended dose of an antacid, while the neutralizing capacity test measured the amount (mEq) of HCl neutralized by the minimum recommended dose in 15 minutes. The buffering pH profile recorded the pH time course of dynamic simulated gastric fluid neutralization by a dose of an antacid. In the preliminary antacid test, magnesium oxide showed the highest pH (9.52 +/- 0.14, mean +/- standard deviation, n = 3); aluminum phosphate gel yielded a final pH of 2.51 +/- 0.01, thus failing to meet the criteria of an antacid (pH > 3.5). In the acid-neutralizing capacity test, hydrotalcite had the highest neutralizing capacity (28.26 +/- 0.3 mEq), while sodium bicarbonate had the lowest (7.40 +/- 0.12 mEq). In the buffering pH profile test, aluminum-magnesium hydroxide suspensions and hydrotalcite tablets maintained a steady optimum pH (3-5) for around 1.5 hours. One tablet of calcium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate or magnesium oxide could not raise the gastric pH to above 3, but two tablets increased the pH excessively (5.3 to 8.6). The higher dose (two tablets) of aluminum hydroxide hexitol complex could not raise the pH to the optimal level. These findings demonstrate that there is disparity in the antacid effectiveness estimated by the neutralizing capacity test and the buffering pH profile test and suggest that the efficacy of an antacid cannot be accurately predicted from its acid-neutralizing capacity. The dose of antacids greatly influences the neutralizing pH profiles. Aluminum-magnesium compounds appear to provide steadier buffering

  7. Acid neutralizing capacity and leachate results for igneous rocks, with associated carbon contents of derived soils, Animas River AML site, Silverton, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Douglas B.; Stanton, Mark R.; Choate, LaDonna M.; Burchell,

    2009-01-01

    Mine planning efforts have historically overlooked the possible acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) that local igneous rocks can provide to help neutralize acidmine drainage. As a result, limestone has been traditionally hauled to mine sites for use in neutralizing acid drainage. Local igneous rocks, when used as part of mine life-cycle planning and acid mitigation strategy, may reduce the need to transport limestone to mine sites because these rocks can contain acid neutralizing minerals. Igneous hydrothermal events often introduce moderately altered mineral assemblages peripheral to more intensely altered rocks that host metal-bearing veins and ore bodies. These less altered rocks can contain ANC minerals (calcite-chlorite-epidote) and are referred to as a propylitic assemblage. In addition, the carbon contents of soils in areas of new mining or those areas undergoing restoration have been historically unknown. Soil organic carbon is an important constituent to characterize as a soil recovery benchmark that can be referred to during mine cycle planning and restoration.
    This study addresses the mineralogy, ANC, and leachate chemistry of propylitic volcanic rocks that host polymetallic mineralization in the Animas River watershed near the historical Silverton, Colorado, mining area. Acid titration tests on volcanic rocks containing calcite (2 – 20 wt %) and chlorite (6 – 25 wt %), have ANC ranging from 4 – 146 kg/ton CaCO3 equivalence. Results from a 6-month duration, kinetic reaction vessel test containing layered pyritic mine waste and underlying ANC volcanic rock (saturated with deionized water) indicate that acid generating mine waste (pH 2.4) has not overwhelmed the ANC of propylitic volcanic rocks (pH 5.8). Sequential leachate laboratory experiments evaluated the concentration of metals liberated during leaching. Leachate concentrations of Cu-Zn-As-Pb for ANC volcanic rock are one-to-three orders of magnitude lower when compared to leached

  8. Sensitivity analyses of MAGIC modelled predictions of future impacts of whole-tree harvest on soil calcium supply and stream acid neutralizing capacity.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, Therese; Köhler, Stephan J; Löfgren, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Forest biofuel is a main provider of energy in Sweden and the market is expected to grow even further in the future. Removal of logging residues via harvest can lead to short-term acidification but the long-term effects are largely unknown. The objectives of this study were to 1) model the long-term effect of whole-tree harvest (WTH) on soil and stream water acidity and 2) perform sensitivity analyses by varying the amounts of logging residues, calcium (Ca(2+)) concentrations in tree biomass and site productivity in nine alternate scenarios. Data from three Swedish forested catchments and the Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments (MAGIC) were used to simulate changes in forest soil exchangeable Ca(2+) pools and stream water acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) at Gammtratten, Kindla and Aneboda. Large depletions in soil Ca(2+) supply and a reversal of the positive trend in stream ANC were predicted for all three sites after WTH. However, the magnitude of impact on stream ANC varied depending on site and the concentration of mobile strong acid anions. Contrary to common beliefs, the largest decrease in modelled ANC was observed at the well-buffered site Gammtratten. The effects at Kindla and Aneboda were much more limited and not large enough to offset the general recovery from acidification. Varying the tree biomass Ca(2+) concentrations exerted the largest impact on modelled outcome. Site productivity was the second most important variable whereas changing biomass amounts left on site only marginally affected the results. The outcome from the sensitivity analyses pointed in the same direction of change as in the base scenario, except for Kindla where soil Ca(2+) pools were predicted to be replenished under a given set of input data. The reliability of modelled outcome would increase by using site-specific Ca(2+) concentrations in tree biomass and field determined identification of site productivity.

  9. Long-term response of surface water acid neutralizing capacity in a central Appalachian (USA) river basin to declining acid deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, Kathleen M.; Eshleman, Keith N.; Garlitz, James E.; U'Ren, Sarah H.

    2016-12-01

    Long-term changes in acid-base chemistry resulting from declining regional acid deposition were examined using data from repeating synoptic surveys conducted within the 275 km2 Upper Savage River Watershed (USRW) in western Maryland (USA); a randomly-selected set of 40 stream reaches was sampled 36 times between 1999 and 2014 to: (1) repeatedly characterize the acid-base status of the entire river basin; (2) determine whether an extensive network of streams of varying order has shown signs of recovery in acid neutralizing capacity (ANC); and (3) understand the key factors controlling the rate of ANC recovery across the river network. Several non-parametric analyses of trends (i.e., Mann Kendall Trend: MKT tests; and Regional Kendall Trend: RKT) in streamwater acid-base chemistry suggest that USRW has significantly responded to declining acid deposition during the study period; the two most robust, statistically significant trends were decreasing surface water SO42- (∼1.5 μeq L-1 yr-1) and NO3- (∼1 μeq L-1 yr-1) concentrations-consistent with observed downward trends in regional wet S and N deposition. Basin-wide decreasing trends in K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ were also observed, while Na+ concentrations increased. Significant ANC recovery was observed in 10-20% of USRW stream reaches (depending on the p level used), but the magnitude of the trend relative to natural variability was apparently insufficient to allow detection of a basin-wide ANC trend using the RKT test. Watershed factors, such as forest disturbances and increased application of road deicing salts, appeared to contribute to substantial variability in concentrations of NO3- and Na+ in streams across the basin, but these factors did not affect our overall interpretation of the results as a systematic recovery of USRW from regional acidification. Methodologically, RKT appears to be a robust method for identifying basin-wide trends using synoptic data, but MKT results for individual systems should be

  10. Stream chemistry in the eastern United States. 2. Current sources of acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing-capacity streams

    SciTech Connect

    Herlihy, A.T.; Kaufmann, P.R.; Mitch, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    The authors examined anion composition in National Stream Survey (NSS) data in order to evaluate the most probable sources of current acidity in acidic and low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) streams in the eastern United States. Acidic streams that had almost no organic influence (less than 10% of total anions) and sulfate and nitrate concentrations indicative of evaporative concentration of atmospheric deposition were classified as acidic due to acidic deposition. These acidic streams were located in small forested watersheds in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands (an estimated 1950 km of stream length) and in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (1250 km). Acidic streams affected primarily by acidic deposition but also influenced by naturally occurring organic anions accounted for another 1180 km of acidic stream length and were located in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, plateau tops in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands, and the Florida Panhandle. The total length of streams acidic due to acid mine drainage in the NSS (4590 km) was about the same as the total length of acidic streams likely affected by acidic deposition (4380 km). Acidic streams whose acid anion composition was dominated by organics were located in Florida and the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. In Florida, most of the acidic streams were organic dominated, whereas about half of the streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain were organic dominated. Organic-dominated acidic streams were not observed in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands.

  11. Stream chemistry in the eastern United States, 2, Current sources of acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing capacity streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlihy, Alan T.; Kaufmann, Philip R.; Mitch, Mark E.

    1991-04-01

    We examined anion composition in National Stream Survey (NSS) data in order to evaluate the most probable sources of current acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) streams in the eastern United States. Acidic streams that had almost no organic influence (less than 10% of total anions) and sulfate and nitrate concentrations indicative of evaporative concentration of atmospheric deposition were classified as acidic due to acidic deposition. These acidic streams were located in small (<30 km2) forested watersheds in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands (an estimated 1950 km of stream length) and in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (1250 km). Acidic streams affected primarily by acidic deposition but also influenced by naturally occurring organic anions accounted for another 1180 km of acidic stream length and were located in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, plateau tops in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands, and the Florida Panhandle. The total length of streams acidic due to acid mine drainage in the NSS (4590 km) was about the same as the total length of acidic streams likely affected by acidic deposition (4380 km). Acidic streams whose acid anion composition was dominated by organics were located in Florida and the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. In Florida, most of the acidic streams were organic dominated, whereas about half of the streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain were organic dominated. Organic-dominated acidic streams were not observed in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands.

  12. Stream chemistry in the eastern United States. 2. Current sources of acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing capacity streams

    SciTech Connect

    Herlihy, A.T.; Kaufmann, P.R.; Mitch, M.E. )

    1991-04-01

    The authors examined anion composition in National Stream Survey (NSS) data in order to evaluate the most probably sources of current acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) streams in the eastern US. Acidic streams that had almost no organic influence (less than 10% of total anions) and sulfate and nitrate concentrations indicative of evaporative concentration of atmospheric deposition were classified as acidic due to acidic deposition. These acidic streams were located in small (<30 km{sup 2}) forested watersheds in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands (an estimated 1,950 km of stream length) and in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (1,250 km). Acidic streams affected primarily by acidic deposition but also influenced by naturally occurring organic anions accounted for another 1,180 km of acidic stream length, and were located in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, plateau tops in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands, and the Florida Panhandle. The total length of streams acidic due to acid mine drainage in the NSS (4,590 km) was about the same as the total length of acidic streams likely affected by acidic deposition (4,380 km). Acidic streams whose acid anion composition was dominated by organics were located in Florida and the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. In Florida, most of the acidic streams were organic dominated, whereas about half of the streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain were organic dominated. Organic-dominated acidic streams were not observed in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands.

  13. Recovery of young brown trout (Salmo trutta) in acidified streams: What are the critical values for acid-neutralizing capacity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesthagen, T.; Fiske, P.; Saksgård, R.

    2016-12-01

    The recovery of young allopatric brown trout (Salmo trutta) grouped into YoY (age 0+) and older parr (age ≥1+) fish, was studied in acid-sensitive streams in a Norwegian watershed during a 24-year-period (1987-2010). Their abundance was assessed by electrofishing. Most sites typically had 5.0-5.5 in pH, 0.4-0.7 mg L-1 Ca, 10-20 μg L-1 inorganic toxic aluminum (Ali) and acid-neutralizing capacity adjusted for organic acids (ANCOAA) of - 15 to +25 μeq L-1. Densities of both YoY and older parr increased significantly during the study period. Water quality also improved in recent years with respect to pH (5.8-6.0), Ali (5-15 μg L-1) and ANCOAA (10-20 μeq L-1). However, some negative trends in both fish density and water chemistry were found during both the first (1987-1993) and last years (2004-2008) of the study. Initially, YoY densities remained at about 16-20 specimens 100 m-2 (1987-1990), declined to 10-15 specimens 100 m-2 in the early/mid 1990s, and rosed to 30-50 specimens 100 m-2 in recent years (1997-2010). Their densities correlated significantly with ANCOAA, and at least three stages in the recovery process were recognised: (i) Low density with 10-20 specimens 100 m-2 at -18 to -5 μeq L-1, (ii) medium and unstable density with 20-30 specimens 100 m-2 at -5 to 10 μeq L-1, and (iii) increasing density to 40-50 specimens 100 m-2 at 10-25 μeq L-1. The decline in brown trout density in the early-mid 1990s coincided with high sea salt depositions, which caused increased acidification. Component 1 in a PCA explained 51% of the variation in fish densities, including conductivity, Mg, Ca, Na, alkalinity and TOC. Component 2 explained an additional 31% of the variation, including pH, Ali and ANCOAA. Multiple regression analysis coefficients showed that the two components explained 41% of the variance in total fish density. Young brown trout suffered a high mortality during the initial phase of the study in spite of relative low levels of Ali. This is

  14. Impact of the volume of gaseous phase in closed reactors on ANC results and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drapeau, Clémentine; Delolme, Cécile; Lassabatere, Laurent; Blanc, Denise

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of the geochemical behavior of polluted solid materials is often challenging and requires huge expenses of time and money. Nevertheless, given the increasing amounts of polluted solid materials and related risks for the environment, it is more and more crucial to understand the leaching of majors and trace metals elements from these matrices. In the designs of methods to quantify pollutant solubilization, the combination of experimental procedures with modeling approaches has recently gained attention. Among usual methods, some rely on the association of ANC and geochemical modeling. ANC experiments - Acid Neutralization Capacity - consists in adding known quantities of acid or base to a mixture of water and contaminated solid materials at a given liquid / solid ratio in closed reactors. Reactors are agitated for 48h and then pH, conductivity, redox potential, carbon, majors and heavy metal solubilized are quantified. However, in most cases, the amounts of matrix and water do not reach the total volume of reactors, leaving some space for air (gaseous phase). Despite this fact, no clear indication is given in standard procedures about the effect of this gaseous phase. Even worse, the gaseous phase is never accounted for when exploiting or modeling ANC data. The gaseous phase may exchange CO2 with the solution, which may, in turn, impact both pH and element release. This study lies within the most general framework for the use of geochemical modeling for the prediction of ANC results for the case of pure phases to real phase assemblages. In this study, we focus on the effect of the gaseous phase on ANC experiments on different mineral phases through geochemical modeling. To do so, we use PHREEQC code to model the evolution of pH and element release (including majors and heavy metals) when several matrices are put in contact with acid or base. We model the following scenarios for the gaseous phase: no gas, contact with the atmosphere (open system

  15. Acid neutralization within limestone sand reactors receiving coal mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Watten, Barnaby J; Sibrell, Philip L; Schwartz, Michael F

    2005-09-01

    Pulsed bed treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) uses CO2 to accelerate limestone dissolution and intermittent fluidization to abrade and carry away metal hydrolysis products. Tests conducted with a prototype of 60 L/min capacity showed effective removal of H+ acidity over the range 196-584 mg/L (CaCO3) while concurrently generating surplus acid neutralization capacity. Effluent alkalinity (mg/L CaCO3) rose with increases in CO2 (DC, mg/L) according to the model Alkalinity=31.22+2.97(DC)0.5, where DC was varied from 11-726 mg/L. Altering fluidization and contraction periods from 30s/30s to 10s/50s did not influence alkalinity but did increase energy dissipation and bed expansion ratios. Field trials with three AMD sources demonstrated the process is capable of raising AMD pH above that required for hydrolysis and precipitation of Fe3+ and Al3+ but not Fe2+ and Mn2+. Numerical modeling showed CO2 requirements are reduced as AMD acidity increases and when DC is recycled from system effluent.

  16. Acid neutralization within limestone sand reactors receiving coal mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watten, B.J.; Sibrell, P.L.; Schwartz, M.F.

    2005-01-01

    Pulsed bed treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) uses CO2 to accelerate limestone dissolution and intermittent fluidization to abrade and carry away metal hydrolysis products. Tests conducted with a prototype of 60 L/min capacity showed effective removal of H+ acidity over the range 196-584 mg/L (CaCO3) while concurrently generating surplus acid neutralization capacity. Effluent alkalinity (mg/L CaCO3) rose with increases in CO2 (DC, mg/L) according to the model Alkalinity = 31.22 + 2.97(DC)0.5, where DC was varied from 11-726 mg/L. Altering fluidization and contraction periods from 30 s/30 s to 10 s/50 s did not influence alkalinity but did increase energy dissipation and bed expansion ratios. Field trials with three AMD sources demonstrated the process is capable of raising AMD pH above that required for hydrolysis and precipitation of Fe3+ and Al3+ but not Fe2+ and Mn2+. Numerical modeling showed CO2 requirements are reduced as AMD acidity increases and when DC is recycled from system effluent. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. TES/Aura L2 Ancillary Data (TL2ANCS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-02-27

    TES/Aura L2 Ancillary Data (TL2ANCS) News:  TES News Join TES News List ... and Order:  Earthdata Search   FTP  Access:   Data Pool OPeNDAP Access: OPeNDAP Parameters:  ... Spacecraft Position Solar Azimuth Angle Order Data:  Search and Order:   Earthdata Search Guide ...

  18. TES/Aura L2 Ancillary Data (TL2ANCS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-02-27

    TES/Aura L2 Ancillary Data (TL2ANCS) Project Title:  TES Discipline:  ... and Order:  Earthdata Search   FTP  Access:   Data Pool OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  ... Solar Azimuth Angle Spacecraft Position Order Data:  Earthdata Search:   Order Data SCAR-B Block:  ...

  19. TES/Aura L2 Ancillary Data (TL2ANC)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-02-27

    TES/Aura L2 Ancillary Data (TL2ANC) News:  TES News Join TES News List ... and Order:  Earthdata Search   FTP  Access:   Data Pool OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Surface Pressure Emissivity Order Data:  Search and Order:   Earthdata Search Readme ...

  20. TES/Aura L2 Ancillary Data (TL2ANC)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-01-31

    TES/Aura L2 Ancillary Data (TL2ANC) News:  TES News Join TES News List ... Reverb   Reverb Tutorial FTP  Access:   Data Pool OPeNDAP Access: OPeNDAP Parameters:  Surface Pressure Emissivity Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data Guide Documents:  ...

  1. 40 CFR 417.30 - Applicability; description of the soap manufacturing by fatty acid neutralization subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the soap manufacturing by fatty acid neutralization subcategory. 417.30 Section 417.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT...

  2. 40 CFR 417.30 - Applicability; description of the soap manufacturing by fatty acid neutralization subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Applicability; description of the soap manufacturing by fatty acid neutralization subcategory. 417.30 Section 417.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT...

  3. 40 CFR 417.30 - Applicability; description of the soap manufacturing by fatty acid neutralization subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the soap manufacturing by fatty acid neutralization subcategory. 417.30 Section 417.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT...

  4. 40 CFR 417.30 - Applicability; description of the soap manufacturing by fatty acid neutralization subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the soap manufacturing by fatty acid neutralization subcategory. 417.30 Section 417.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT...

  5. 40 CFR 417.30 - Applicability; description of the soap manufacturing by fatty acid neutralization subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability; description of the soap manufacturing by fatty acid neutralization subcategory. 417.30 Section 417.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT...

  6. Broadly Neutralizing Antibody 8ANC195 Recognizes Closed and Open States of HIV-1 Env.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Louise; Wang, Haoqing; Gao, Han; Chen, Songye; McDowall, Alasdair W; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2015-09-10

    The HIV-1 envelope (Env) spike contains limited epitopes for broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs); thus, most neutralizing antibodies are strain specific. The 8ANC195 epitope, defined by crystal and electron microscopy (EM) structures of bNAb 8ANC195 complexed with monomeric gp120 and trimeric Env, respectively, spans the gp120 and gp41 Env subunits. To investigate 8ANC195's gp41 epitope at higher resolution, we solved a 3.58 Å crystal structure of 8ANC195 complexed with fully glycosylated Env trimer, revealing 8ANC195 insertion into a glycan shield gap to contact gp120 and gp41 glycans and protein residues. To determine whether 8ANC195 recognizes the CD4-bound open Env conformation that leads to co-receptor binding and fusion, one of several known conformations of virion-associated Env, we solved EM structures of an Env/CD4/CD4-induced antibody/8ANC195 complex. 8ANC195 binding partially closed the CD4-bound trimer, confirming structural plasticity of Env by revealing a previously unseen conformation. 8ANC195's ability to bind different Env conformations suggests advantages for potential therapeutic applications.

  7. Similar cation exchange capacities among bryophyte species refute a presumed mechanism of peatland acidification.

    PubMed

    Soudzilovskaia, N A; Cornelissen, J H C; During, H J; van Logtestijn, R S P; Lang, S I; Aerts, R

    2010-09-01

    Fen-bog succession is accompanied by strong increases of carbon accumulation rates. We tested the prevailing hypothesis that living Sphagna have extraordinarily high cation exchange capacity (CEC) and therefore acidify their environment by exchanging tissue-bound protons for basic cations in soil water. As Sphagnum invasion in a peatland usually coincides with succession from a brown moss-dominated alkaline fen to an acidic bog, the CEC of Sphagna is widely believed to play an important role in this acidification process. However, Sphagnum CEC has never been compared explicitly to that of a wide range of other bryophyte taxa. Whether high CEC directly leads to the ability to acidify the environment in situ also remains to be tested. We screened 20 predominant subarctic bryophyte species, including fen brown mosses and bog Sphagna for CEC, in situ soil water acidification capacity (AC), and peat acid neutralizing capacity (ANC). All these bryophyte species possessed substantial CEC, which was remarkably similar for brown mosses and Sphagna. This refutes the commonly accepted idea of living Sphagnum CEC being responsible for peatland acidification, as Sphagnum's ecological predecessors, brown mosses, can do the same job. Sphagnum AC was several times higher than that of other bryophytes, suggesting that CE (cation exchange) sites of Sphagna in situ are not saturated with basic cations, probably due to the virtual absence of these cations in the bog water. Together, these results suggest that Sphagna can not realize their CEC in bogs, while fen mosses can do so in fens. The fen peat ANC was 65% higher than bog ANC, indicating that acidity released by brown mosses in the CE process was neutralized, maintaining an alkaline environment. We propose two successional pathways indicating boundaries for a fen-bog shift with respect to bryophyte CEC. In neither of them is Sphagnum CE an important factor. We conclude that living Sphagnum CEC does not play any considerable role

  8. Validation and Verification of the Correct Operation of the Thermo Fisher Scientific’s Genesys 10S spectrometer used in ANC122 and NF-ANC122

    SciTech Connect

    Colletti, Lisa Michelle

    2016-02-19

    In December of 2015, the old qualified Prim UV-Vis instrument used in the ANC122 and NFANC122 procedures failed its monthly calibration check. Attempts to get the system to pass by cleaning flow cells, replacing the light bulb and realigning the light path failed to get sustained reproducible results from the system. As it could no longer pass QA/QC requirements the decision to take it out of service was made. To replace the system, a previously purchased Thermo Fisher Scientific UV-VIS spectrometer (model Genesys 10S; Serial #: 2L5R059137) was retrieved from storage. This report shows that the system is performing as required and meeting all QC requirements listed in ANC122 and NF-ANC122

  9. 13 CFR 124.604 - Report of benefits for firms owned by Tribes, ANCs, NHOs and CDCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... by Tribes, ANCs, NHOs and CDCs. 124.604 Section 124.604 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS..., NHOs and CDCs. As part of its annual review submission, each Participant owned by a Tribe, ANC, NHO or CDC must submit to SBA information showing how the Tribe, ANC, NHO or CDC has provided benefits to...

  10. 13 CFR 124.604 - Report of benefits for firms owned by Tribes, ANCs, NHOs and CDCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... by Tribes, ANCs, NHOs and CDCs. 124.604 Section 124.604 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS..., NHOs and CDCs. As part of its annual review submission, each Participant owned by a Tribe, ANC, NHO or CDC must submit to SBA information showing how the Tribe, ANC, NHO or CDC has provided benefits to...

  11. 13 CFR 124.604 - Report of benefits for firms owned by Tribes, ANCs, NHOs and CDCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... by Tribes, ANCs, NHOs and CDCs. 124.604 Section 124.604 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS..., NHOs and CDCs. As part of its annual review submission, each Participant owned by a Tribe, ANC, NHO or CDC must submit to SBA information showing how the Tribe, ANC, NHO or CDC has provided benefits to...

  12. Erratum to ATel 10194: Spectral classification of nuclear transient Gaia17anc as SN Ia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromadzki, M.; Hamanowicz, A.; Wyrzykowski, L.

    2017-03-01

    In the Atel #10194 we have reported incorrect name (Gaia17acn) for supernova Gaia17anc, both in the title and the body of the telegram. Here is the corrected text: Name | RA (J2000) | Dec (J2000) | Disc.

  13. South Africa: ANC Youth League President found guilty of hate speech.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Kelly

    2010-06-01

    On 15 March 2010, the Johannesburg Equality Court found African National Congress (ANC) Youth League President Julius Malema guilty of hate speech and harassment for his comments regarding rape survivors.

  14. Improving knowledge of antenatal care (ANC) among pregnant women: a field trial in central Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Nuraini, E; Parker, E

    2005-01-01

    The need for reducing maternal mortality has become a paramount concern in developing countries including Indonesia. One of the strategies for reducing maternal mortality in Indonesia is the provision of antenatal care (ANC). Previous studies have reported the advantages and disadvantages of ANC. The purpose of this study is to ascertain if a new approach to ANC can improve pregnant women's knowledge of its benefits. An experimental design with 60 pregnant women from 10 cluster villages is used in this study. The intervention group received the new approach to ANC, while the control group received routine ANC. The findings show that the improvement of knowledge in the intervention group is significant particularly in the knowledge about healthy pregnancy (p=0.012), pregnancy complications (p=0.01), safe birth (p=0.01) and taking care of the newborn (p=0.012). The improvement of knowledge was significantly influenced by the respondents' educational back ground (p=0.002) and socio-economic status (p=0.027). This study recommends that the new approach to ANC be considered to educate pregnant women regarding safe birth and it is considered as one of the strategies that may be adopted to reduce maternal mortality.

  15. Educating for a Change. An ANC Skillshop in Popular Education. Workshop Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doris Marshall Inst. for Education and Action, Toronto (Ontario).

    This manual provides materials for a 6-day workshop to develop skills in democratic learning and teaching practices. Goals of the workshop are as follows: (1) train facilitators to use the methodology; (2) introduce people in the African National Congress (ANC) to the potential of popular education methodology; (3) determine follow-up action to…

  16. South Africa: ANC Youth League President issues apology following conviction for hate speech.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shalini

    2011-10-01

    In June 2011, fifteen months after he had been found guilty of hate speech and discrimination, African National Congress (ANC)Youth President Julius issued a formal apology and agreed to pay a R50,000 (CAN$7,120) fine that was part of the conviction.

  17. ANC, BNC and mobilization of Cr from polluted sediments in function of pH changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtiza, A.; Swennen, R.; Cappuyns, V.; Tashko, A.

    2009-02-01

    During the manufacturing of chromate salts (1972-1992) large quantities of Chromite Ore Processing Residue (COPR) were released into a decantation pond east of the former chemical plant of Porto-Romano (Durres, Albania), giving rise to yellow colored pond sediments. These Cr(VI) bearing sediments were deposited upon Quaternary silty-clay lagoonal sediments rich in iron oxides and organic matter. The pH values in these lagoonal sediments vary around 6.6, while in the pond sediments, it is mainly acidic (due to the presence of the sulfur stock piles in the area and the release of the H2SO4 from the activity of the former chemical plant), varying between 1.4 and 3.8. Continuous leaching of the COPR waste resulted in yellow-colored surface water runoff. The prediction of pH changes in the different types of sediments based upon acid/base neutralizing capacity (ANC/BNC) jointly with the quantitative data on release of heavy metals and especially Cr is considered an important advantage of the pHstat leaching test if compared to conventional leaching procedures. Thus, factors controlling the leaching of Cr(VI), Cr(III), Ca, Al, Fe, Mg from the COPR were investigated by means of pHstat batch leaching tests and mineralogical analysis. Moreover, mathematical and geochemical modeling complemented the study. The COPR in the area contain very high concentrations of chromium 24,409 mg/kg, which mainly occurs as Cr(III) (75-90%) as well as Cr(VI) (25-10%). The leaching of Cr(VI) occurs in all the range (2-10) of the tested pH values, however, it decreases under acidic conditions. Beside some reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), the Cr(VI) content of the leachtes remains relatively high in the acidic environment, while the limning of Cr(VI) pond sediments will increase the release of the latter specie. The leaching of the Cr(III) occurs strictly under acidic conditions, whereby limning of these sediments will give rise to the lower solubility of Cr(III). The key mineral phases

  18. Episodic acidification of Adirondack lakes during snowmelt

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, D.A.; Driscoll, C.T.; Van Dreason, R.; Yatsko, C.P.

    1990-07-01

    Maximum values of acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in Adirondack, New York lake outlets generally occur during summer and autumn. During spring snowmelt, transport of acidic water through acid-sensitive watersheds causes depression of upper lake water ANC. In some systems lake outlet ANC reaches negative values. The authors examined outlet water chemistry from II Adirondack lakes during 1986 and 1987 snowmelts. In these lakes, SO concentrations were diluted during snowmelt and did not depress ANC. For lakes with high baseline ANC values, springtime ANC depressions were primarily accompanied by basic cation dilution. For lakes with low baseline ANC, No increases dominated ANC depressions. Lakes with intermediate baseline ANC were affected by both processes and exhibited larger ANC depressions. Ammonium dilution only affected wetland systems. A model predicting a linear relationship between outlet water ANC minima and autumn ANC was inappropriate. To assess watershed response to episodic acidification, hydrologic flow paths must be considered. (Copyright (c) 1990 by the American Geophysical Union.)

  19. Characterization of Acid-neutralizing Basic Monomers in Co-solvent Systems by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Laurence, Jennifer S.; Nelson, Benjamin N.; Ye, Qiang; Park, Jonggu; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic activity of the oral microbiota leads to acidification of the microenvironment and promotes demineralization of tooth structure at the margin of composite restorations. The pathogenic impact of the biofilm at the margin of the composite restoration could be reduced by engineering novel dentin adhesives that neutralize the acidic micro-environment. Integrating basic moieties into methacrylate derivatives has the potential to buffer against acid-induced degradation, and we are investigating basic monomers for this purpose. These monomers must be compatible with existing formulations, which are hydrophobic and marginally miscible with water. As such, cosolvent systems may be required to enable analysis of monomer function and chemical properties. Here we present an approach for examining the neutralizing capacity of basic methacrylate monomers in a water/ethanol co-solvent system using NMR spectroscopy. NMR is an excellent tool for monitoring the impact of co-solvent effects on pKa and buffering capacity of basic monomers because chemical shift is extremely sensitive to small changes that most other methods cannot detect. Because lactic acid (LA) is produced by oral bacteria and is prevalent in this microenvironment, LA was used to analyze the effectiveness of basic monomers to neutralize acid. The 13C chemical shift of the carbonyl in lactic acid was monitored as a function of ethanol and monomer concentration and each was correlated with pH to determine the functional buffering range. This study shows that the buffering capacity of even very poorly water-soluble monomers can be analyzed using NMR. PMID:25400302

  20. Influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of acidic, neutral and basic polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Chi; Zhao, Xia; Pu, Jiang-Hua; Luan, Xiao-Hong

    2016-06-05

    Monosaccharide composition analysis is important for structural characterization of polysaccharides. To investigate the influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides, we chose alginate, starch, chitosan and chondroitin sulfate as representative of acidic, neutral, basic and complex polysaccharides to compare the release degree of monosaccharides under different hydrolytic conditions. The hydrolysis stability of 10 monosaccharide standards was also explored. Results showed that the basic sugars were hard to release but stable, the acidic sugars (uronic acids) were easy to release but unstable, and the release and stability of neutral sugars were in between acidic and basic sugars. In addition, the hydrolysis process was applied to monosaccharide composition analysis of Hippocampus trimaculatus polysaccharide and the appropriate hydrolytic condition was accorded with that of the above four polysaccharides. Thus, different hydrolytic conditions should be used for the monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides based on their structural characteristics.

  1. Acid-neutralizing potential of minerals in intrusive rocks of the Boulder batholith in northern Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Desborough, George A.; Briggs, Paul H.; Mazza, Nilah; Driscoll, Rhonda

    1998-01-01

    Experimental studies show that fresh granitic rocks of the Boulder batholith in the Boulder River headwaters near Basin, Montana have significant acid-neutralizing potential and are capable of neutralizing acidic water derived from metal-mining related wastes or mine workings. Laboratory studies show that in addition to the acidneutralizing potential (ANP) of minor amounts of calcite in these rocks, biotite, tremolite, and feldspars will contribute significantly to long-term ANP. We produced 0.45 micrometer-filtered acidic (pH = 2.95) leachate for use in these ANP experiments by exposing metal-mining related wastes to deionized water in a waste:leachate ratio of 1:20. We then exposed these leachates to finely-ground and sized fractions of batholith rocks, and some of their mineral fractions for extended and repeated periods, for which results are reported here. The intent was to understand what reactions of metal-rich acidic water and fresh igneous rocks would produce. The reactions between the acidic leachates and the bulk rocks and mineral fractions are complex. Factors such as precipitation of phases like Fe-hydroxides and Alhydroxides and the balance between dissolved cations and anions that are sulfate dominated complicate analysis of the results. Research by others of acid neutralization by biotite and tremolite attributed a rise in pH to proton (H+) adsorption in sites vacated by K, Mg, and Ca. Destruction of the silicate framework and liberation of associated structural hydroxyl ions may contribute to ANP. Studies by others have indicated that the conversion of biotite to a vermiculite-type structure by removal of K at a pH of 4 consumes about six protons for every mole of biotite, but at a pH of 3 there is pronounced dissolution of the tetrahedral lattice. The ANP of fresh granitic rocks is much higher than anticipated. The three bulk Boulder igneous rock samples studied have minimum ANP equivalent to about 10-14 weight percent calcite. This ANP is in

  2. The Effects of Various Amendments on Trace Element Stabilization in Acidic, Neutral, and Alkali Soil with Similar Pollution Index.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Suk; Min, Hyun-Gi; Lee, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Jeong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have examined the application of soil amendments, including pH change-induced immobilizers, adsorbents, and organic materials, for soil remediation. This study evaluated the effects of various amendments on trace element stabilization and phytotoxicity, depending on the initial soil pH in acid, neutral, and alkali conditions. As in all types of soils, Fe and Ca were well stabilized on adsorption sites. There was an effect from pH control or adsorption mechanisms on the stabilization of cationic trace elements from inorganic amendments in acidic and neutral soil. Furthermore, acid mine drainage sludge has shown great potential for stabilizing most trace elements. In a phytotoxicity test, the ratio of the bioavailable fraction to the pseudo-total fraction significantly affected the uptake of trace elements by bok choy. While inorganic amendments efficiently decreased the bioavailability of trace elements, significant effects from organic amendments were not noticeable due to the short-term cultivation period. Therefore, the application of organic amendments for stabilizing trace elements in agricultural soil requires further study.

  3. The Effects of Various Amendments on Trace Element Stabilization in Acidic, Neutral, and Alkali Soil with Similar Pollution Index

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Suk; Min, Hyun-Gi; Lee, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Jeong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have examined the application of soil amendments, including pH change-induced immobilizers, adsorbents, and organic materials, for soil remediation. This study evaluated the effects of various amendments on trace element stabilization and phytotoxicity, depending on the initial soil pH in acid, neutral, and alkali conditions. As in all types of soils, Fe and Ca were well stabilized on adsorption sites. There was an effect from pH control or adsorption mechanisms on the stabilization of cationic trace elements from inorganic amendments in acidic and neutral soil. Furthermore, acid mine drainage sludge has shown great potential for stabilizing most trace elements. In a phytotoxicity test, the ratio of the bioavailable fraction to the pseudo-total fraction significantly affected the uptake of trace elements by bok choy. While inorganic amendments efficiently decreased the bioavailability of trace elements, significant effects from organic amendments were not noticeable due to the short-term cultivation period. Therefore, the application of organic amendments for stabilizing trace elements in agricultural soil requires further study. PMID:27835687

  4. Analysis and DSP implementation of an ANC system using a filtered-error neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ya-Li; Zhang, Qi-Zhi; Li, Xiao-Dong; Gan, Woon-Seng

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, feedforward active noise control (ANC) using a neural network (NN) based on filtered-error back-propagation (BP) algorithm is considered. The filtered-error BP NN (FEBPNN) algorithm is first derived, and the difference between the FEBPNN algorithm and the filtered-X BP NN (FXBPNN) algorithm is given to show that the FEBPNN algorithm offers computational advantage over the FXBPNN algorithm. Computer simulations are carried out to compare the FEBPNN algorithm with the filtered-X least mean square (FXLMS) algorithm and the FXBPNN algorithm. The controllers based on the FEBPNN algorithm and the FXLMS algorithm are implemented on a Texas Instruments digital signal processor (DSP) TMS320VC33. The simulations and the experimental verification tests show that the FEBPNN algorithm performs as well as the FXLMS algorithm for a linear control problem, and better for a nonlinear control problem, at the same time, the simulations and the experimental verification tests also show that the convergence rate of the FEBPNN is acceptable, and the FEBPNN has better tracking ability under changes of the primal signal, the primary path and the secondary path. The experiments also lead to the conclusion that more work is required to improve the predictability and consistency of the performance of the NN controller based on the FEBPNN algorithm.

  5. Development of 3D pseudo pin-by-pin calculation methodology in ANC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, B.; Mayhue, L.; Huria, H.; Ivanov, B.

    2012-07-01

    Advanced cores and fuel assembly designs have been developed to improve operational flexibility, economic performance and further enhance safety features of nuclear power plants. The simulation of these new designs, along with strong heterogeneous fuel loading, have brought new challenges to the reactor physics methodologies currently employed in the industrial codes for core analyses. Control rod insertion during normal operation is one operational feature in the AP1000{sup R} plant of Westinghouse next generation Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) design. This design improves its operational flexibility and efficiency but significantly challenges the conventional reactor physics methods, especially in pin power calculations. The mixture loading of fuel assemblies with significant neutron spectrums causes a strong interaction between different fuel assembly types that is not fully captured with the current core design codes. To overcome the weaknesses of the conventional methods, Westinghouse has developed a state-of-the-art 3D Pin-by-Pin Calculation Methodology (P3C) and successfully implemented in the Westinghouse core design code ANC. The new methodology has been qualified and licensed for pin power prediction. The 3D P3C methodology along with its application and validation will be discussed in the paper. (authors)

  6. The frog's dancing master: science, séances, and the transmission of myths.

    PubMed

    Piccolino, Marco; Wade, Nicholas J

    2013-01-01

    Myths are not uncommon in the history of neuroscience and their tenacity even when faced with suitable correctives is impressive. The possible origins and transmission of one such myth is examined: the oft repeated quotation, attributed to Luigi Galvani, that he was the "frog's dancing master." The statement does not occur in Galvani's writing and appears to have accrued features in the early nineteenth century, largely from French writers. In the 1870s, the quotation was used by William Crookes, the discoverer of thallium and inventor of Crookes' tube, in implicit support of his investigations into spiritualist phenomena. Crookes arranged séances with the psychic Daniel Dunglas Home and, being unable to explain them, introduced the concept of psychic force. A related myth concerns Galvani's accidental discovery of the neuromuscular action of electricity in the course of preparing a beneficial broth for his ailing wife. The two myths became entwined in the tangled web woven by commentators of Galvani's work. The myth-information is magnified by the World Wide Web.

  7. Do HIV Prevalence Trends in ANC Surveillance Represent Trends in the General Population in the ART Era? The Case of Manicaland, East Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Gregson, Simon; Dharmayat, Kanika; Pereboom, Monique; Takaruza, Albert; Mugurungi, Owen; Schur, Nadine; Nyamukapa, Constance A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective National estimates of HIV trends in generalised epidemics rely on HIV prevalence data from antenatal clinic (ANC) surveillance. We investigate whether HIV prevalence trends in ANC data reflect trends in men and women in the general population during the scale-up of anti-retroviral treatment (ART) in Manicaland, Zimbabwe. Methods Trends in HIV prevalence in local ANC attendees and adults aged 15-49yrs in towns, agricultural estates, and villages were compared using five rounds of parallel ANC (N≈1,200) and general-population surveys (N≈10,000) and multi-variable log-linear regression. Changes in the age-pattern of HIV prevalence and the age-distribution of ANC attendees were compared with those in the general population. Age-specific pregnancy prevalence rates were compared by HIV infection and ART status. Results Cumulatively, from 1998-2000 to 2009-2011, HIV prevalence fell by 60.0% (95% CI, 51.1%-67.3%) in ANC surveillance data and by 34.3% (30.8%-37.7%) in the general population. Most of the difference arose following the introduction of ART (2006-2011). The estates and villages reflected this overall pattern but HIV prevalence in the towns was lower at local ANCs than in the general population, largely due to attendance by pregnant women from outlying (lower prevalence) areas. The ageing of people living with HIV in the general population (52.4% aged >35yrs, 2009-2011) was under-represented in the ANC data (12.6%) due to lower fertility in older and HIV-infected women. Conclusion After the introduction of ART in Manicaland, HIV prevalence declined more steeply in ANC surveillance data than in the general population. Models used for HIV estimates must reflect this change in bias. PMID:26372390

  8. Effect of temperature, hydraulic residence time and elevated PCO2 on acid neutralization within a pulsed limestone bed reactor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watten, B.J.; Lee, P.C.; Sibrell, P.L.; Timmons, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    Limestone has potential for reducing reagent costs and sludge volume associated with treatment of acid mine drainage, but its use is restricted by slow dissolution rates and the deposition of Fe, Al and Mn-based hydrolysis products on reactive surfaces. We evaluated a pulsed limestone bed (PLB) reactor (15 L/min capacity) that uses a CO2 pretreatment step to accelerate dissolution and hydraulic shearing forces provided by intermittent fluidization to abrade and carry away surface scales. We established the effects of hydraulic residence time (HRT, 5.1-15.9 min), temperature (T, 12-22 ??C) and CO2 tension (PCO2, 34.5-206.8 kPa) on effluent quality when inlet acidity (Acy) was fixed at 440 mg/L (pH=2.48) with H2SO4. The PLB reactor neutralized all H+ acidity (N=80) while concurrently providing unusually high levels of effluent alkalinity (247-1028 mg/L as CaCO3) that allow for side-stream treatment with blending. Alkalinity (Alk) yields rose with increases in PCO2, HRT and settled bed height (BH, cm) and decreased with T following the relationship (R2=0.926; p<0.001): (Alk)non-filtered=-548.726+33.571??(PCO2)0.5+33.671??(HRT)+7.734??(BH)-5.197??(T). Numerical modeling showed CO2 feed requirements for a target Alk yield decrease with increases in HRT, T and the efficiency of off-gas (CO2) recycling. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Science anc Society

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    S.P.Worden, membre technique de l'U.S.délégation à Genève pour les négociations sur les armes nucléaires, est physicien, astronome, scientifique et officier de l'armée de l'air. Il parlera des technologies de défense stratégique

  10. Targeted toxicological screening for acidic, neutral and basic substances in postmortem and antemortem whole blood using simple protein precipitation and UPLC-HR-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Telving, Rasmus; Hasselstrøm, Jørgen Bo; Andreasen, Mette Findal

    2016-09-01

    A broad targeted screening method based on broadband collision-induced dissociation (bbCID) ultra-performance liquid chromatography high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-HR-TOF-MS) was developed and evaluated for toxicological screening of whole blood samples. The acidic, neutral and basic substances covered by the method were identified in postmortem and antemortem whole blood samples from forensic autopsy cases, clinical forensic cases and driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) cases by a reverse target database search. The screening method covered 467 substances. Validation was performed on spiked whole blood samples and authentic postmortem and antemortem whole blood samples. For most of the basic drugs, the established cut-off limits were very low, ranging from 0.25ng/g to 50ng/g. The established cut-off limits for most neutral and acidic drugs, were in the range from 50ng/g to 500ng/g. Sample preparation was performed using simple protein precipitation of 300μL of whole blood with acetonitrile and methanol. Ten microliters of the reconstituted extract were injected and separated within a 13.5min UPLC gradient reverse-phase run. Positive electrospray ionization (ESI) was used to generate the ions in the m/z range of 50-1000. Fragment ions were generated by bbCID. Identification was based on retention time, accurate mass, fragment ion(s) and isotopic pattern. A very sensitive broad toxicological screening method using positive electrospray ionization UPLC-HR-TOF-MS was achieved in one injection. This method covered basic substances, substances traditionally analyzed in negative ESI (e.g., salicylic acid), small highly polar substances such as beta- and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (BHB and GHB, respectively) and highly non-polar substances such as amiodarone. The new method was shown to combine high sensitivity with a very broad scope that has not previously been reported in toxicological whole blood screening when using only one injection.

  11. Evaluation of selected static methods used to estimate element mobility, acid-generating and acid-neutralizing potentials associated with geologically diverse mining wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hageman, Philip L.; Seal, Robert R.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Lowers, Heather

    2015-01-01

    A comparison study of selected static leaching and acid–base accounting (ABA) methods using a mineralogically diverse set of 12 modern-style, metal mine waste samples was undertaken to understand the relative performance of the various tests. To complement this study, in-depth mineralogical studies were conducted in order to elucidate the relationships between sample mineralogy, weathering features, and leachate and ABA characteristics. In part one of the study, splits of the samples were leached using six commonly used leaching tests including paste pH, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Field Leach Test (FLT) (both 5-min and 18-h agitation), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Method 1312 SPLP (both leachate pH 4.2 and leachate pH 5.0), and the USEPA Method 1311 TCLP (leachate pH 4.9). Leachate geochemical trends were compared in order to assess differences, if any, produced by the various leaching procedures. Results showed that the FLT (5-min agitation) was just as effective as the 18-h leaching tests in revealing the leachate geochemical characteristics of the samples. Leaching results also showed that the TCLP leaching test produces inconsistent results when compared to results produced from the other leaching tests. In part two of the study, the ABA was determined on splits of the samples using both well-established traditional static testing methods and a relatively quick, simplified net acid–base accounting (NABA) procedure. Results showed that the traditional methods, while time consuming, provide the most in-depth data on both the acid generating, and acid neutralizing tendencies of the samples. However, the simplified NABA method provided a relatively fast, effective estimation of the net acid–base account of the samples. Overall, this study showed that while most of the well-established methods are useful and effective, the use of a simplified leaching test and the NABA acid–base accounting method provide investigators fast

  12. Integration of TB-HIV services at an ANC facility in Frances Baard District, Northern Cape, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Peters, J A; Heunis, C; Kigozi, G; Osoba, T; van der Walt, M

    2015-03-21

    Contexte : Une offre de services intégrée de tuberculose et du virus de l’immunodéficience humaine (TB-VIH)—en tant qu’élément des services de santé maternelle, notamment des consultations prénatales (ANC)—est largement recommandée. Cette étude a évalué la mise en œuvre d’une offre de services intégrée TB-VIH dans une unité hospitalière de CPN.Méthodes : Les dossiers d’un échantillon aléatoire de 308 femmes enceintes qui ont fréquenté le service ANC entre avril 2011 et février 2012 ont été revus. Les données ont été extraites à partir des registres ainsi que des dossiers des patients. Les résultats attendus comprenaient la proportion de femmes bénéficiant d’un conseil et test VIH (HCT), d’un comptage des CD4, d’un traitement antirétroviral (ART), d’un traitement préventif par cotrimoxazole (CPT), d’un dépistage de TB et d’un traitement préventif par isoniazide (IPT). L’analyse a mesuré les variations des caractéristiques des patients associées à l’offre de services.Résultats : Toutes les femmes ont bénéficié du HCT et 80% de celles ayant eu un test VIH positif ont eu un dépistage de TB. La majorité (85,9%) des femmes VIH-positives ont eu un comptage des CD4. Cependant, seulement 12,9% des femmes éligibles ont reçu une prophylaxie ART sur place ; seulement 35,7% ont été référées pour une mise en route de l’ART ; seulement 42.3% ont commencé l’IPT ; et aucune n’a reçu de CPT ni d’autres investigations relatives à la TB. Les femmes VIH négatives avaient 2,6 fois (IC95% 1,3–5,3) plus de chances de bénéficier d’un dépistage de TB que leurs homologues VIH positives.Conclusions: L’identification des femmes VIH positives et de celles suspectes de TB a été satisfaisante, mais la mise en œuvre des autres activités de collaboration TB-VIH a été insuffisante.

  13. A REGIONAL ANALYSIS OF LAKE ACIDIFICATION TRENDS FOR THE NORTHEASTEN U.S., 1982-1994

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acidic deposition is a regional phenomenon, but its effects have traditionally been studied using site-specific, intensive monitoring. We present trends information for 36 lakes of high-to-moderate acid sensitivity (defined as acid neutralizing capacity [ANC] < 100 eq L-1),and 1...

  14. Maltase protein of Ogataea (Hansenula) polymorpha is a counterpart to the resurrected ancestor protein ancMALS of yeast maltases and isomaltases

    PubMed Central

    Viigand, Katrin; Visnapuu, Triinu; Mardo, Karin; Aasamets, Anneli

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Saccharomyces cerevisiae maltases use maltose, maltulose, turanose and maltotriose as substrates, isomaltases use isomaltose, α‐methylglucoside and palatinose and both use sucrose. These enzymes are hypothesized to have evolved from a promiscuous α‐glucosidase ancMALS through duplication and mutation of the genes. We studied substrate specificity of the maltase protein MAL1 from an earlier diverged yeast, Ogataea polymorpha (Op), in the light of this hypothesis. MAL1 has extended substrate specificity and its properties are strikingly similar to those of resurrected ancMALS. Moreover, amino acids considered to determine selective substrate binding are highly conserved between Op MAL1 and ancMALS. Op MAL1 represents an α‐glucosidase in which both maltase and isomaltase activities are well optimized in a single enzyme. Substitution of Thr200 (corresponds to Val216 in S. cerevisiae isomaltase IMA1) with Val in MAL1 drastically reduced the hydrolysis of maltose‐like substrates (α‐1,4‐glucosides), confirming the requirement of Thr at the respective position for this function. Differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) of the catalytically inactive mutant Asp199Ala of MAL1 in the presence of its substrates and selected monosaccharides suggested that the substrate‐binding pocket of MAL1 has three subsites (–1, +1 and +2) and that binding is strongest at the –1 subsite. The DSF assay results were in good accordance with affinity (K m) and inhibition (K i) data of the enzyme for tested substrates, indicating the power of the method to predict substrate binding. Deletion of either the maltase (MAL1) or α‐glucoside permease (MAL2) gene in Op abolished the growth of yeast on MAL1 substrates, confirming the requirement of both proteins for usage of these sugars. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26919272

  15. Where is information quality lost at clinical level? A mixed-method study on information systems and data quality in three urban Kenyan ANC clinics.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Daniel; Wanjala, Pepela; Marx, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Well-working health information systems are considered vital with the quality of health data ranked of highest importance for decision making at patient care and policy levels. In particular, health facilities play an important role, since they are not only the entry point for the national health information system but also use health data (and primarily) for patient care. Design A multiple case study was carried out between March and August 2012 at the antenatal care (ANC) clinics of two private and one public Kenyan hospital to describe clinical information systems and assess the quality of information. The following methods were developed and employed in an iterative process: workplace walkthroughs, structured and in-depth interviews with staff members, and a quantitative assessment of data quality (completeness and accurate transmission of clinical information and reports in ANC). Views of staff and management on the quality of employed information systems, data quality, and influencing factors were captured qualitatively. Results Staff rated the quality of information higher in the private hospitals employing computers than in the public hospital which relies on paper forms. Several potential threats to data quality were reported. Limitations in data quality were common at all study sites including wrong test results, missing registers, and inconsistencies in reports. Feedback was seldom on content or quality of reports and usage of data beyond individual patient care was low. Conclusions We argue that the limited data quality has to be seen in the broader perspective of the information systems in which it is produced and used. The combination of different methods has proven to be useful for this. To improve the effectiveness and capabilities of these systems, combined measures are needed which include technical and organizational aspects (e.g. regular feedback to health workers) and individual skills and motivation.

  16. Mental capacity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ruth

    2010-02-03

    Three short videos exploring some of the different principles in the Mental Capacity Act 2009 are available on Social Care TV, an online channel intended mainly for the social care sector, although the films are relevant to any professionals whose work is affected by the act. The dramas, which are set in a residential home, a person's own home and a residential school for young people with learning difficulties, concern thedecision-making process and can be viewed at www.scie.org.uk/socialcaretv/topic.asp?guid=377dbe1b-de0c-4d66-bb87-22a243542db2.

  17. Reaction rate of the 13C(α,n)16O neutron source using the ANC of the -3 keV resonance measured with the THM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Trippella, O.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Avila, M.; Guardo, G. L.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Lamia, L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Santiago, D.; Spartà, R.

    2016-01-01

    The s-process is responsible of the synthesis of most of the nuclei in the mass range 90 ≤ A ≤ 208. It consists in a series of neutron capture reactions on seed nuclei followed by β-decays, since the neutron accretion rate is slower than the β-decay rate. Such small neutron flux is supplied by the 13C(α,n)16O reaction. It is active inside the helium-burning shell of asymptotic giant branch stars, at temperatures < 108 K, corresponding to an energy interval of 140-230 keV. In this region, the astrophysical S (E)-factor is dominated by the -3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in 17O. In this work, we have applied the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to the 13C(6Li,n16O)d quasi-free reaction to extract the 6.356 MeV level resonance parameters, in particular the asymptotic normalization coefficient . A preliminary analysis of a partial data set has lead to , slightly larger than the values in the literature. However, the deduced 13C(α, n)16O reaction rate is in agreement with most results in the literature at ˜ 108 K, with enhanced accuracy thanks to our innovative approach merging together ANC and THM.

  18. TFG/TAF30/ANC1, a component of the yeast SWI/SNF complex that is similar to the leukemogenic proteins ENL and AF-9.

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, B R; Henry, N L; Kornberg, R D

    1996-01-01

    The SWI1/ADR6, SWI2/SNF2, SWI3, SNF5, and SNF6 gene products are all required for proper transcriptional control of many genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic studies indicated that these gene products might form a multiprotein SWI/SNF complex important for chromatin transitions preceding transcription from RNA polymerase II promoters. Biochemical studies identified a SWI/SNF complex containing these and at least six additional polypeptides. Here we show that the 29-kDa component of the SWI/SNF complex is identical to TFG3/TAF30/ANC1. Thus, a component of the SWI/SNF complex is also a member of the TFIIF and TFIID transcription complexes. TFG3 interacted with the SNF5 component of the SWI/SNF complex in protein interaction blots. TFG3 is significantly similar to ENL and AF-9, two proteins implicated in human acute leukemia. These results suggest that ENL and AF-9 proteins interact with the SNF5 component of the human SWI/SNF complex and raise the possibility that the SWI/SNF complex is involved in acute leukemia. PMID:8668146

  19. Regional Monitoring of Acidic Lakes and Streams

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This asset provides data on the acid-base status of lakes and streams. Key chemical indicators measured include: sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride, Acid Neutralizing Capacity (ANC), pH, base cations, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total aluminum. TIME and LTM are part of EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). Long-term monitoring of the acid-base status (pH, ANC, SO4, NO3, NH4, DOC, base cations, Al) in lakes and streams. Monitoring is conducted in acid sensitive regions of the Eastern U.S.

  20. Traitement de 46 malades porteurs de stades IV ORL par radiochimiothérapie concomitante selon un protocole permettant une radiosensibilisation de toutes les séances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillet, F.; Dessard-Diana, B.; Diana, C.; Simon, J. M.; Mazeron, J. J.; Pierga, J. Y.; Dendale, R.

    1998-04-01

    An external beam therapy with two fractions a day giving 48Gy with 16fractions and 45days, initialy palliative, has been shown to be well adapted for a simultaneous radiosensitizing chemotherapy employment. Associated to a cisplatin, fluorouracyl, etoposide and hydrea based chemotherapy, it has been applyed to 46patients with inoperable stages IV ORL tumors including 91% T4, 9% T3, 48% N2N3, 72% performans status equal or less than2. With a 30months observation median delay a clinical complete response at 4months is observed in 93%, with further locoregional relapses in 38%. One year survival is 58%, 2years 40%, 3years 35%. These results are equal or better than those obtained with hyperfractionnated, accelerated, hyper-fractionnated and accelerated, and classical radiotherapy. Une radiothérapie bifractionnée donnant 48 Gy en 16 séances et 45 jours, initialement palliative, s'est révélée bien adaptée pour l'emploi simultané d'une chimiothérapie radiosensibilisante. Associée à une chimiothérapie à base de cisplatine, fluoro-uracile, etoposide et hydrea, elle a été appliquée à 46 malades porteurs de cancers ORL de stade IV inopérables comprenant 91 % de T4, 9 % de T3, 48 % de N2N3, 72 % de performans status égaux ou inférieurs à 2. Avec un délai médian d'observation de 30 mois on observe 93 % de réponses cliniques complètes à 4 mois avec 38 % de récidives locorégionales ultérieures. La survie est de 58 % à 1 an, 40 % à 2 ans et de 35 % à 3 ans. Ces résultats sont égaux ou supérieurs à ceux qui ont été obtenus avec des radiothérapies hyperfractionnées, accélérées, hyperfractionnées et accélérées, et classiques.

  1. An evaluation and analysis of three dynamic watershed acidification codes (MAGIC, ETD, and ILWAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Jenne, E.A.; Eary, L.E.; Vail, L.W.; Girvin, D.C.; Liebetrau, A.M.; Hibler, L.F.; Miley, T.B.; Monsour, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency is currently using the dynamic watershed acidification codes MAGIC, ILWAS, and ETD to assess the potential future impact of the acidic deposition on surface water quality by simulating watershed acid neutralization processes. The reliability of forecasts made with these codes is of considerable concern. The present study evaluates the process formulations (i.e., conceptual and numerical representation of atmospheric, hydrologic geochemical and biogeochemical processes), compares their approaches to calculating acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), and estimates the relative effects (sensitivity) of perturbations in the input data on selected output variables for each code. Input data were drawn from three Adirondack (upstate New York) watersheds: Panther Lake, Clear Pond, and Woods Lake. Code calibration was performed by the developers of the codes. Conclusions focus on summarizing the adequacy of process formulations, differences in ANC simulation among codes and recommendations for further research to increase forecast reliability. 87 refs., 11 figs., 77 tabs.

  2. Complete epitopes for vaccine design derived from a crystal structure of the broadly neutralizing antibodies PGT128 and 8ANC195 in complex with an HIV-1 Env trimer.

    PubMed

    Kong, Leopold; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Deller, Marc C; Garces, Fernando; Sliepen, Kwinten; Hua, Yuanzi; Stanfield, Robyn L; Sanders, Rogier W; Wilson, Ian A

    2015-10-01

    The HIV-1 envelope gp160 glycoprotein (Env) is a trimer of gp120 and gp41 heterodimers that mediates cell entry and is the primary target of the humoral immune response. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to HIV-1 have revealed multiple epitopes or sites of vulnerability, but mapping of most of these sites is incomplete owing to a paucity of structural information on the full epitope in the context of the Env trimer. Here, a crystal structure of the soluble BG505 SOSIP gp140 trimer at 4.6 Å resolution with the bNAbs 8ANC195 and PGT128 reveals additional interactions in comparison to previous antibody-gp120 structures. For 8ANC195, in addition to previously documented interactions with gp120, a substantial interface with gp41 is now elucidated that includes extensive interactions with the N637 glycan. Surprisingly, removal of the N637 glycan did not impact 8ANC195 affinity, suggesting that the antibody has evolved to accommodate this glycan without loss of binding energy. PGT128 indirectly affects the N262 glycan by a domino effect, in which PGT128 binds to the N301 glycan, which in turn interacts with and repositions the N262 glycan, thereby illustrating the important role of neighboring glycans on epitope conformation and stability. Comparisons with other Env trimer and gp120 structures support an induced conformation for glycan N262, suggesting that the glycan shield is allosterically modified upon PGT128 binding. These complete epitopes of two broadly neutralizing antibodies on the Env trimer can now be exploited for HIV-1 vaccine design.

  3. On Gaussian feedback capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dembo, Amir

    1989-01-01

    Pinsker and Ebert (1970) proved that in channels with additive Gaussian noise, feedback at most doubles the capacity. Cover and Pombra (1989) proved that feedback at most adds half a bit per transmission. Following their approach, the author proves that in the limit as signal power approaches either zero (very low SNR) or infinity (very high SNR), feedback does not increase the finite block-length capacity (which for nonstationary Gaussian channels replaces the standard notion of capacity that may not exist). Tighter upper bounds on the capacity are obtained in the process. Specializing these results to stationary channels, the author recovers some of the bounds recently obtained by Ozarow.

  4. The value of building health promotion capacities within communities: evidence from a maternal health intervention in Guinea.

    PubMed

    Brazier, Ellen; Fiorentino, Renée; Barry, Mamadou Saidou; Diallo, Moustapha

    2015-09-01

    This article presents results from a study that explored the association between community capacity for maternal health promotion and women's use of preventive and curative maternal health services. Implemented in the Republic of Guinea, the intervention aimed to build the capacity of community-level committees to heighten awareness about maternal health risks and to promote use of professional maternal health services throughout pregnancy and childbirth. Data were collected through a population-based survey. A total of 2335 women of reproductive age were interviewed, including 878 with a live birth or stillbirth since the launch of the intervention. An index of community capacity was created to explore the effect of living in a community with strong community-level resources and support for maternal health. Other composite variables were created to measure the content of women's antenatal counselling and their individual exposure to maternal health promotion activities at the community level. Multivariate logistic regression was used to explore the effect of community capacity and individual exposure variables on women's use of antenatal care (ANC) (≥4 visits), institutional delivery, and care for complications. Our results show that women living in communities with a high score on the Community Capacity Index were more than twice as likely as women in communities with low score to attend at least four ANC visits, to deliver in a health facility, and to seek care for perceived complications. Building the capacity of community-level cadres to promote maternity care-seeking by women in their villages is an important complement to facility-level interventions to increase the availability, quality and utilization of essential health services.

  5. Heat Capacity Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    A. Findikakis

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide heat capacity values for the host and surrounding rock layers for the waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The heat capacity representations provided by this analysis are used in unsaturated zone (UZ) flow, transport, and coupled processes numerical modeling activities, and in thermal analyses as part of the design of the repository to support the license application. Among the reports that use the heat capacity values estimated in this report are the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' report, the ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' report, the ''Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, the Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms'' report, the ''Dike/Drift Interactions report, the Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'' report, and the ''In-Drift Natural Convection and Condensation'' report. The specific objective of this study is to determine the rock-grain and rock-mass heat capacities for the geologic stratigraphy identified in the ''Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170031], Table 1-1). This report provides estimates of the heat capacity for all stratigraphic layers except the Paleozoic, for which the mineralogic abundance data required to estimate the heat capacity are not available. The temperature range of interest in this analysis is 25 C to 325 C. This interval is broken into three separate temperature sub-intervals: 25 C to 95 C, 95 C to 114 C, and 114 C to 325 C, which correspond to the preboiling, trans-boiling, and postboiling regimes. Heat capacity is defined as the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of a unit mass of material by one degree (Nimick and Connolly 1991 [DIRS 100690], p. 5). The rock-grain heat capacity is defined as the heat capacity of the rock solids (minerals), and does not include the effect of water that exists in the rock pores. By comparison, the rock-mass heat capacity considers the heat capacity of both solids and pore

  6. Prediction of episodic acidification in North-eastern USA: An empirical/mechanistic approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, T.D.; Tranter, M.; Wigington, P.J.; Eshleman, K.N.; Peters, N.E.; Van Sickle, J.; DeWalle, David R.; Murdoch, Peter S.

    1999-01-01

    Observations from the US Environmental Protection Agency's Episodic Response Project (ERP) in the North-eastern United States are used to develop an empirical/mechanistic scheme for prediction of the minimum values of acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) during episodes. An acidification episode is defined as a hydrological event during which ANC decreases. The pre-episode ANC is used to index the antecedent condition, and the stream flow increase reflects how much the relative contributions of sources of waters change during the episode. As much as 92% of the total variation in the minimum ANC in individual catchments can be explained (with levels of explanation >70% for nine of the 13 streams) by a multiple linear regression model that includes pre-episode ANC and change in discharge as independent variable. The predictive scheme is demonstrated to be regionally robust, with the regional variance explained ranging from 77 to 83%. The scheme is not successful for each ERP stream, and reasons are suggested for the individual failures. The potential for applying the predictive scheme to other watersheds is demonstrated by testing the model with data from the Panola Mountain Research Watershed in the South-eastern United States, where the variance explained by the model was 74%. The model can also be utilized to assess 'chemically new' and 'chemically old' water sources during acidification episodes.Observations from the US Environmental Protection Agency's Episodic Response Project (ERP) in the Northeastern United States are used to develop an empirical/mechanistic scheme for prediction of the minimum values of acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) during episodes. An acidification episode is defined as a hydrological event during which ANC decreases. The pre-episode ANC is used to index the antecedent condition, and the stream flow increase reflects how much the relative contributions of sources of waters change during the episode. As much as 92% of the total variation in

  7. Problems of Excess Capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, G.

    1972-01-01

    The problems of excess capacity in the airline industry are discussed with focus on the following topics: load factors; fair rate of return on investment; service-quality rivalry among airlines; pricing (fare) policies; aircraft production; and the impacts of excess capacity on operating costs. Also included is a discussion of the interrelationships among these topics.

  8. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Scheibner, Karl F.; Ault, Earl R.

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  9. Nanofluid heat capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starace, Anne K.; Gomez, Judith C.; Wang, Jun; Pradhan, Sulolit; Glatzmaier, Greg C.

    2011-12-01

    Significant increases in the heat capacity of heat transfer fluids are needed not only to reduce the costs of liquid heating and cooling processes, but also to bring clean energy producing technologies like concentrating solar power (CSP) to price parity with conventional energy generation. It has been postulated that nanofluids could have higher heat capacities than conventional fluids. In this work, nano- and micron-sized particles were added to five base fluids (poly-α olefin, mineral oil, ethylene glycol, a mixture of water and ethylene glycol, and calcium nitrate tetrahydrate), and the resulting heat capacities were measured and compared with those of the neat base fluids and the weighted average of the heat capacities of the components. The particles used were inert metals and metal oxides that did not undergo any phase transitions over the temperature range studied. In the nanofluids studied here, we found no increase in heat capacity upon the addition of the particles larger than the experimental error.

  10. Who needs capacity?

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Alec

    2015-01-01

    The UK Law Commission's Discussion Paper, Criminal Liability: Insanity and Automatism, recommends introducing the concept of capacity to the insanity defence. The concept of capacity has an established role in those parts of the law that concern the validity of the decisions that people make, for instance in composing a will or entering into a contract. Making mental capacity a criterion for criminal responsibility in a mentally disordered defendant, however, is potentially problematic. First, the term capacity already has several different meanings in the literature on the jurisprudence of mental abnormality. Second, using the concept of capacity in the way that the Law Commission proposes poses difficulties that relate to the provision of testimony by expert witnesses.

  11. Refinery Capacity Report

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; and current and projected atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, and production capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions. The Refinery Capacity Report does not contain working and shell storage capacity data. This data is now being collected twice a year as of March 31 and September 30 on the Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report", and is now released as a separate report Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity.

  12. Panama Canal capacity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bronzini, M.S.

    1995-04-27

    Predicting the transit capacities of the various Panama Canal alternatives required analyzing data on present Canal operations, adapting and extending an existing computer simulation model, performing simulation runs for each of the alternatives, and using the simulation model outputs to develop capacity estimates. These activities are summarized in this paper. A more complete account may be found in the project final report (TAMS 1993). Some of the material in this paper also appeared in a previously published paper (Rosselli, Bronzini, and Weekly 1994).

  13. Uncertainty in adaptive capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adger, W. Neil; Vincent, Katharine

    2005-03-01

    The capacity to adapt is a critical element of the process of adaptation: it is the vector of resources that represent the asset base from which adaptation actions can be made. Adaptive capacity can in theory be identified and measured at various scales, from the individual to the nation. The assessment of uncertainty within such measures comes from the contested knowledge domain and theories surrounding the nature of the determinants of adaptive capacity and the human action of adaptation. While generic adaptive capacity at the national level, for example, is often postulated as being dependent on health, governance and political rights, and literacy, and economic well-being, the determinants of these variables at national levels are not widely understood. We outline the nature of this uncertainty for the major elements of adaptive capacity and illustrate these issues with the example of a social vulnerability index for countries in Africa. To cite this article: W.N. Adger, K. Vincent, C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  14. Panel on Capacity Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhadani, D.

    The demonstration was made that space technologies are an important tool for developing countries. But the fundamental question is how those countries could integrate such technologies, in an effective an operational way, in the process of resources management and administration. Capacity building is a cornerstone in any strategy to set up a national programme or infrastructure for the use of space technologies. The proposed presentation attempts to bring the first elements on the actual uses of space technology in developing countries compared to their needs, the role of training activities and programs in the capacity building process as well as the role of international cooperation and what are the required conditions to ensure sustainability of the established capacities.

  15. Dual capacity reciprocating compressor

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, R.W.

    1984-10-30

    A multi-cylinder compressor particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor rotation is provided with an eccentric cam on a crank pin under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180[degree] apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons whose connecting rods ride on a crank pin without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation. 6 figs.

  16. Dual capacity reciprocating compressor

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Robert W.

    1984-01-01

    A multi-cylinder compressor 10 particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor 16 rotation is provided with an eccentric cam 38 on a crank pin 34 under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180.degree. apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons 24 whose connecting rods 30 ride on a crank pin 36 without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation.

  17. Capacity Maximizing Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsoum, Maged; Jones, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Some non-traditional signal constellations have been proposed for transmission of data over the Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN) channel using such channel-capacity-approaching codes as low-density parity-check (LDPC) or turbo codes. Computational simulations have shown performance gains of more than 1 dB over traditional constellations. These gains could be translated to bandwidth- efficient communications, variously, over longer distances, using less power, or using smaller antennas. The proposed constellations have been used in a bit-interleaved coded modulation system employing state-ofthe-art LDPC codes. In computational simulations, these constellations were shown to afford performance gains over traditional constellations as predicted by the gap between the parallel decoding capacity of the constellations and the Gaussian capacity

  18. Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Mines; Jay Nathwani; Christopher Richard; Hillary Hanson; Rachel Wood

    2015-01-01

    The capacity factors recently provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) indicated this plant performance metric had declined for geothermal power plants since 2008. Though capacity factor is a term commonly used by geothermal stakeholders to express the ability of a plant to produce power, it is a term frequently misunderstood and in some instances incorrectly used. In this paper we discuss how this capacity factor is defined and utilized by the EIA, including discussion on the information that the EIA requests from operations in their 923 and 860 forms that are submitted both monthly and annually by geothermal operators. A discussion is also provided regarding the entities utilizing the information in the EIA reports, and how those entities can misinterpret the data being supplied by the operators. The intent of the paper is to inform the facility operators as the importance of the accuracy of the data that they provide, and the implications of not providing the correct information.

  19. Prise en charge d'une menace d'accouchement prématuré sur béance cervico-utérine au moyen d'un pessaire-cerclage obstétrical

    PubMed Central

    Nohuz, Erdogan; Albaut, Maël; Brunel, Angélique; Champel, Nadine; Pellizzaro, Julie; Gallot, Denis; Lemery, Didier; Vendittelli, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Nous rapportons le recours efficace à un pessaire dans la prise en charge d'une menace d'accouchement prématuré. Une patiente de 28 ans, G2P1, ayant présenté une fausse-couche tardive à 20 semaines d'aménorrhée (SA) un an auparavant, bénéficiait d'un cerclage cervical à 15 SA. L’échographie endovaginale réalisée à 24 SA (sensation de pesanteur pelvienne) révélait un funnelling majeur et une longueur cervicale à 7 mm. Un pessaire obstétrical permettait la poursuite de la grossesse jusqu'au terme de 36 SA. Ce dispositif semble intéressant chez des patientes présentant une béance cervico-isthmique et chez qui un cerclage cervical s'est révélé inefficace. PMID:26161207

  20. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsson, C. S.; Andrews, J. C.; Scully-Power, P.; Ball, S.; Speechley, G.; Latham, A. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The Tasman Front was delineated by airborne expendable bathythermograph survey; and an Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) IR image on the same day shows the same principal features as determined from ground-truth. It is clear that digital enhancement of HCMM images is necessary to map ocean surface temperatures and when done, the Tasman Front and other oceanographic features can be mapped by this method, even through considerable scattered cloud cover.

  1. Community Capacity Building

    PubMed Central

    Goytia, Crispin N.; Todaro-Rivera, Lea; Brenner, Barbara; Shepard, Peggy; Piedras, Veronica; Horowitz, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Background: Successful community–academic research partnerships require building the capacity of both community-based organizations (CBOs) and academics to conduct collaborative research of mutual interest and benefit. Yet, information about the needs and goals of research-interested CBOs is lacking. Our partnership aimed to conduct a community research needs assessment and to use results to develop future capacity-building programs for CBOs. Methods: Based on our review of the literature, informal interviews with research-interested CBOs and community-engaged research groups locally and nationally, we developed a needs assessment survey. Key domains of this survey included history and experience with research collaboration, interest in specific research topics, and preference for learning format and structure. We trained community health workers (CHWs) to recruit senior leaders from CBOs in New York City (NYC) and encourage them to complete an on-line survey. Results: Fully 54% (33/61) of CBOs completed the needs assessment. Most (69%) reported involvement with research or evaluation in the last 2 years and 33% had some funding for research. Although 75% had collaborated with academic institutions in the past, 58% did not rate this experience well. The four areas respondents prioritized for skills building were program evaluation, developing needs assessments, building surveys, and understanding statistical analyses. They were less interested in learning to build collaborations with academics. Conclusions: A formal needs assessment of research training and educational needs of CBOs revealed that most had experience, albeit negative, with academic collaborations. CBO leaders wanted to build skills to conduct and analyze assessments and program evaluations. Our community–academic partnership is using these findings to develop a research capacity-building course. Other partnerships should consider conducting such assessments to transform the capacity of CBOs to

  2. Enhancing capacity management.

    PubMed

    Rees, Susan; Houlahan, Beth; Lavrenz, Dennise

    2014-03-01

    It is essential for organizations to be able to accept patients requiring care. Capacity planning and management are necessary to ensure an organization has an accepting physician/service, an available bed, and staff to care for the patient and family. This organization implemented strategies including communication plans, staffing guidelines, morning rounds, proactive planning, and an escalation process to reverse the trend of not being able to accept all patients.

  3. Enabling Partner Capacity Building

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, (215) 662-5606. The Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S...valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) xx-03-2013 2. REPORT TYPE STRATEGY ...National Security Strategy emphasizes building the capacity of our allies and partner countries to share the burden of global leadership. The Army is

  4. CSTI high capacity power

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed.

  5. CSTI High Capacity Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Jerry M.

    1989-01-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY-86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase 1 of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY-88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA's new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed.

  6. Comparison of MAGIC and Diatom paleolimnological model hindcasts of lakewater acidification in the Adirondack region of New York

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Bernert, J.A.; Eliers, J.M. ); Jenne, E.A. ); Cosby, B.J. . School of Forestry and Environmental Studies); Charles, D.F.; Selle, A.R. . Environmental Research Lab.)

    1991-03-01

    Thirty-three lakes that had been statistically selected as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's Eastern Lake Survey and Direct Delayed Response Project (DDRP) were used to compare the MAGIC (watershed) and Diatom (paleolimnological) models. The study lakes represented a well-defined group of Adirondack lakes, each larger than 4 ha in area and having acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) <400 {mu}eq L{sup {minus}1}. The study first compared current and pre-industrial (before 1850) pH and ANC estimates from Diatom and MAGIC as they were calibrated in the preceding Paleocological Investigation of Recent Lake Acidification (PIRLA) and DDRP studies, respectively. Initially, the comparison of hindcasts of pre-industrial chemistry was confounded by seasonal and methodological differences in lake chemistry data used in calibration of the model. Although certain differences proved to be of little significance for comparison, MAGIC did predict significantly higher pre-industrial ANC and pH values than did Diatom, using calibrations in the preceding studies. Both models suggest acidification of low ANC Adirondack region lakes since preindustrial times, but differ primarily in that MAGIC inferred greater acidification and that acidification has occurred in all lakes in the comparison, whereas Diatom inferred that acidification has been restricted to low ANC lakes (

  7. Modélisation d'un alternateur automobile par un réseau de perméances couplé à des circuits électriques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecquet, M.; Brochet, P.

    1996-08-01

    We propose in this paper, a modeling and simulation method of a three dimensional (3D) machine by electric-magnetic coupled network, based on the permeance network. The proposed approach allows us to easily take into account non linearities such as saturation and rotor movement, with a very weak simulation time. We present the modeling of the automotive alternator, that is an axial flux machine called modified Lundell alternator. Different results of computations of two claw-pole alternators at no-load and at load are presented and compared with experimental results, showing that the proposed method is a satisfactory compromise between precision and simulation time for dynamic modeling of geometricaly complex electrical devices. Nous présentons, dans cet article, une approche de modélisation et de simulation d'une machine tridimensionnelle par un réseau de perméances couplé à des circuits électriques. La saturation des matériaux, le mouvement du rotor et le couplage avec un pont de diodes sont pris en compte alors que les temps de simulations restent très faibles. Cette approche est appliquée à la modélisation d'un alternateur automobile qui est une machine à flux axial de type Lundell. Les résultats de simulations sont comparés aux relevés expérimentaux pour deux appareils différents, à vide et en charge. La qualité des résultats obtenus montrent que la méthode proposée peut fournir des modèles dynamiques couplés magnétique-électrique de machines dont la géométrie est typiquement tridimensionnelle, avec un compromis temps de calcul-précision très satisfaisant.

  8. Chemical characteristics and temporal trends in eight streams of the Catskill Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murdoch, Peter S.; Stoddard, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Discharge to concentration relationships for eight streams studied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA) Long-Term Monitoring Project (1983-89) indicate acidification of some streams by H2SO4 and HNO3 in atmospheric deposition and by organic acids in soils. Concentrations of major ions in precipitation were similar to those reported at other sites in the northeastern United States. Average concentrations of SO42- and NO3- were similar among streams, but base cation concentrations differed widely, and these differences paralleled the differences in acid neutralizing capacity (ANC). Baseflow ANC is not a reliable predictor of stream acidity at high flow; some streams with high baseflow ANC (> 150 ??eq L-1) declined to near zero ANC at high flow, and one stream with low baseflow ANC (< 50 ??eq L-1) did not approach zero ANC as flow increased. Episodic decreases in ANC and pH during peak flows were associated with increased concentrations of NO3- and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Aluminum concentrations exceeding 300 ??g L-1 were observed during peak flows in headwater streams of the Neversink River and Rondout Creek. Seasonal Kendall Tau tests for temporal trends indicate that SO42- concentrations in streamwater generally decreased and NO3- concentrations increased during the period 1983-1989. Combined acid anion concentrations (SO42- + NO3-) were generally unchanged throughout the period of record, indicating both that the status of these streams with respect to acidic deposition is unchanged, and that NO3- is gradually replacing SO42- as the dominant acid anion in the Catskill streams.Discharge to concentration relationships for eight streams studied by the US Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (US EPA) Long-term monitoring project (19831-89) indicate acidification of some streams by H2SO4 and HNO3 in atmospheric deposition and by organic acids in soils

  9. Quantum reading capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirandola, Stefano; Lupo, Cosmo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Mancini, Stefano; Braunstein, Samuel L.

    2011-11-01

    The readout of a classical memory can be modelled as a problem of quantum channel discrimination, where a decoder retrieves information by distinguishing the different quantum channels encoded in each cell of the memory (Pirandola 2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 090504). In the case of optical memories, such as CDs and DVDs, this discrimination involves lossy bosonic channels and can be remarkably boosted by the use of nonclassical light (quantum reading). Here we generalize these concepts by extending the model of memory from single-cell to multi-cell encoding. In general, information is stored in a block of cells by using a channel-codeword, i.e. a sequence of channels chosen according to a classical code. Correspondingly, the readout of data is realized by a process of ‘parallel’ channel discrimination, where the entire block of cells is probed simultaneously and decoded via an optimal collective measurement. In the limit of a large block we define the quantum reading capacity of the memory, quantifying the maximum number of readable bits per cell. This notion of capacity is nontrivial when we suitably constrain the physical resources of the decoder. For optical memories (encoding bosonic channels), such a constraint is energetic and corresponds to fixing the mean total number of photons per cell. In this case, we are able to prove a separation between the quantum reading capacity and the maximum information rate achievable by classical transmitters, i.e. arbitrary classical mixtures of coherent states. In fact, we can easily construct nonclassical transmitters that are able to outperform any classical transmitter, thus showing that the advantages of quantum reading persist in the optimal multi-cell scenario.

  10. Heat Capacity in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Ninad V.; Sharp, Kim A.

    2005-05-01

    Heat capacity (Cp) is one of several major thermodynamic quantities commonly measured in proteins. With more than half a dozen definitions, it is the hardest of these quantities to understand in physical terms, but the richest in insight. There are many ramifications of observed Cp changes: The sign distinguishes apolar from polar solvation. It imparts a temperature (T) dependence to entropy and enthalpy that may change their signs and which of them dominate. Protein unfolding usually has a positive ΔCp, producing a maximum in stability and sometimes cold denaturation. There are two heat capacity contributions, from hydration and protein-protein interactions; which dominates in folding and binding is an open question. Theoretical work to date has dealt mostly with the hydration term and can account, at least semiquantitatively, for the major Cp-related features: the positive and negative Cp of hydration for apolar and polar groups, respectively; the convergence of apolar group hydration entropy at T ≈ 112°C; the decrease in apolar hydration Cp with increasing T; and the T-maximum in protein stability and cold denaturation.

  11. Early hominin auditory capacities

    PubMed Central

    Quam, Rolf; Martínez, Ignacio; Rosa, Manuel; Bonmatí, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Carlos; de Ruiter, Darryl J.; Moggi-Cecchi, Jacopo; Conde Valverde, Mercedes; Jarabo, Pilar; Menter, Colin G.; Thackeray, J. Francis; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Studies of sensory capacities in past life forms have offered new insights into their adaptations and lifeways. Audition is particularly amenable to study in fossils because it is strongly related to physical properties that can be approached through their skeletal structures. We have studied the anatomy of the outer and middle ear in the early hominin taxa Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus and estimated their auditory capacities. Compared with chimpanzees, the early hominin taxa are derived toward modern humans in their slightly shorter and wider external auditory canal, smaller tympanic membrane, and lower malleus/incus lever ratio, but they remain primitive in the small size of their stapes footplate. Compared with chimpanzees, both early hominin taxa show a heightened sensitivity to frequencies between 1.5 and 3.5 kHz and an occupied band of maximum sensitivity that is shifted toward slightly higher frequencies. The results have implications for sensory ecology and communication, and suggest that the early hominin auditory pattern may have facilitated an increased emphasis on short-range vocal communication in open habitats. PMID:26601261

  12. Early hominin auditory capacities.

    PubMed

    Quam, Rolf; Martínez, Ignacio; Rosa, Manuel; Bonmatí, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Carlos; de Ruiter, Darryl J; Moggi-Cecchi, Jacopo; Conde Valverde, Mercedes; Jarabo, Pilar; Menter, Colin G; Thackeray, J Francis; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2015-09-01

    Studies of sensory capacities in past life forms have offered new insights into their adaptations and lifeways. Audition is particularly amenable to study in fossils because it is strongly related to physical properties that can be approached through their skeletal structures. We have studied the anatomy of the outer and middle ear in the early hominin taxa Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus and estimated their auditory capacities. Compared with chimpanzees, the early hominin taxa are derived toward modern humans in their slightly shorter and wider external auditory canal, smaller tympanic membrane, and lower malleus/incus lever ratio, but they remain primitive in the small size of their stapes footplate. Compared with chimpanzees, both early hominin taxa show a heightened sensitivity to frequencies between 1.5 and 3.5 kHz and an occupied band of maximum sensitivity that is shifted toward slightly higher frequencies. The results have implications for sensory ecology and communication, and suggest that the early hominin auditory pattern may have facilitated an increased emphasis on short-range vocal communication in open habitats.

  13. Influence of binding pH and protein solubility on the dynamic binding capacity in hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Pascal; Baumgartner, Kai; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-05-29

    Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) is one of the most frequently used purification methods in biopharmaceutical industry. A major drawback of HIC, however, is the rather low dynamic binding capacity (DBC) obtained when compared to e.g. ion exchange chromatography (IEX). The typical purification procedure for HIC includes binding at neutral pH, independently of the proteins nature and isoelectric point. Most approaches to process intensification are based on resin and salt screenings. In this paper a combination of protein solubility data and varying binding pH leads to a clear enhancement of dynamic binding capacity. This is shown for three proteins of acidic, neutral, and alkaline isoelectric points. High-throughput solubility screenings as well as miniaturized and parallelized breakthrough curves on Media Scout RoboColumns (Atoll, Germany) were conducted at pH 3-10 on a fully automated robotic workstation. The screening results show a correlation between the DBC and the operational pH, the protein's isoelectric point and the overall solubility. Also, an inverse relationship of DBC in HIC and the binding kinetics was observed. By changing the operational pH, the DBC could be increased up to 30% compared to the standard purification procedure performed at neutral pH. As structural changes of the protein are reported during HIC processes, the applied samples and the elution fractions were proven not to be irreversibly unfolded.

  14. Hydrologic pathways and chemical composition of runoff during snowmelt in Loch Vale Watershed, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denning, A. Scott; Baron, Jill; Mast, M. Alisa; Arthur, Mary

    1991-01-01

    Intensive sampling of a stream draining an alpine-subalpine basin revealed that depressions in pH and acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of surface water at the beginning of the spring snowmelt in 1987 and 1988 were not accompanied by increases in strong acid anions, and that surface waters did not become acidic (ANC<0). Samples of meltwater collected at the base of the snowpack in 1987 were acidic and exhibited distinct ‘pulses’ of nitrate and sulfate. Solutions collected with lysimeters in forest soils adjacent to the stream revealed high levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total Al. Peaks in concentration of DOC, Al, and nutrient species in the stream samples indicate a flush of soil solution into the surface water at the beginning of the melt. Infiltration of meltwater into soils and spatial heterogeneity in the timing of melting across the basin prevented stream and lake waters from becoming acidic.

  15. Time series and recurrence interval models to predict the vulnerability of streams to episodic acidification in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deviney, F.A.; Rice, Karen C.; Hornberger, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Acid rain affects headwater streams by temporarily reducing the acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) of the water, a process termed episodic acidification. The increase in acidic components in stream water can have deleterious effects on the aquatic biota. Although acidic deposition is uniform across Shenandoah National Park (SNP) in north central Virginia, the stream water quality response during rain events varies substantially. This response is a function of the catchment's underlying geology and topography. Geologic and topographic data for SNP's 231 catchments are readily available; however, long-term measurements (tens of years) of ANC and accompanying discharge are not and would be prohibitively expensive to collect. Transfer function time series models were developed to predict hourly ANC from discharge for five SNP catchments with long-term water-quality and discharge records. Hourly ANC predictions over short time periods (≤1 week) were averaged, and distributions of the recurrence intervals of annual water-year minimum ANC values were model-simulated for periods of 6, 24, 72, and 168 hours. The distributions were extrapolated to the rest of the SNP catchments on the basis of catchment geology and topography. On the basis of the models, large numbers of SNP streams have 6- to 168-hour periods of low-ANC values, which may stress resident fish populations. Smaller catchments are more vulnerable to episodic acidification than larger catchments underlain by the same bedrock. Catchments with similar topography and size are more vulnerable if underlain by less basaltic/carbonate bedrock. Many catchments are predicted to have successive years of low-ANC values potentially sufficient to extirpate some species.

  16. Continuity of Quantum Channel Capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Debbie; Smith, Graeme

    2009-11-01

    We prove that a broad array of capacities of a quantum channel are continuous. That is, two channels that are close with respect to the diamond norm have correspondingly similar communication capabilities. We first show that the classical capacity, quantum capacity, and private classical capacity are continuous, with the variation on arguments {\\varepsilon} apart bounded by a simple function of {\\varepsilon} and the channel’s output dimension. Our main tool is an upper bound of the variation of output entropies of many copies of two nearby channels given the same initial state; the bound is linear in the number of copies. Our second proof is concerned with the quantum capacities in the presence of free backward or two-way public classical communication. These capacities are proved continuous on the interior of the set of non-zero capacity channels by considering mutual simulation between similar channels.

  17. Assessment of lake sensitivity to acidic deposition in national parks of the Rocky Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nanus, L.; Williams, M.W.; Campbell, D.H.; Tonnessen, K.A.; Blett, T.; Clow, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    The sensitivity of high-elevation lakes to acidic deposition was evaluated in five national parks of the Rocky Mountains based on statistical relations between lake acid-neutralizing capacity concentrations and basin characteristics. Acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) of 151 lakes sampled during synoptic surveys and basin-characteristic information derived from geographic information system (GIS) data sets were used to calibrate the statistical models. The explanatory basin variables that were considered included topographic parameters, bedrock type, and vegetation type. A logistic regression model was developed, and modeling results were cross-validated through lake sampling during fall 2004 at 58 lakes. The model was applied to lake basins greater than 1 ha in area in Glacier National Park (n = 244 lakes), Grand Teton National Park (n = 106 lakes), Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve (n = 11 lakes), Rocky Mountain National Park (n = 114 lakes), and Yellowstone National Park (n = 294 lakes). Lakes that had a high probability of having an ANC concentration 3000 m, with 80% of the catchment bedrock having low buffering capacity. The modeling results indicate that the most sensitive lakes are located in Rocky Mountain National Park and Grand Teton National Park. This technique for evaluating the lake sensitivity to acidic deposition is useful for designing long-term monitoring plans and is potentially transferable to other remote mountain areas of the United States and the world.

  18. Bioethics for clinicians: 3. Capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Etchells, E; Sharpe, G; Elliott, C; Singer, P A

    1996-01-01

    In the context of patient consent, "capacity" refers to the patient's ability to understand information relevant to a treatment decision and to appreciate the reasonably foreseeable consequences of a decision or lack of decision. A person may be "capable" with respect to one decision but not with respect to another. Clinicians can usually identify patients who are clearly capable or incapable, but in some cases a clinical capacity assessment is required. Such assessment may consist of cognitive status testing, general impressions of capacity or specific capacity assessment. Specific capacity assessment, in which the clinician evaluates the patient's ability to understand pertinent information and appreciate its implications, is probably the optimal method. When conducting a specific capacity assessment, the clinician must ensure that the disclosure of information is effective and must evaluate the patient's reason for his or her decision. If the assessment suggests that the patient is incapable, further assessment is generally recommended. PMID:8823211

  19. The Capacity to Build Organizational Capacity in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, M. Bruce; Bouchard, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Reformers, policymakers, and researchers have given considerable attention to organizational capacity in schools, especially in those schools that perpetuate or exacerbate achievement gaps among diverse student groups and reproduce social inequalities. There is an emerging consensus about key dimensions of school capacity and how they can…

  20. Concrete Operations and Attentional Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Michael; Lindenberger, Ulman

    1989-01-01

    To test predictions regarding the attentional capacity requirements of Piaget's stage of concrete operations, a battery of concrete operational tasks and two measures of attentional capacity were administered to 120 first-, second-, and third-graders. Findings concern class inclusion, transitivity of length and weight, and multiplication of…

  1. Heat capacity, configurational heat capacity and fragility of hydrous magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Genova, D.; Romano, C.; Giordano, D.; Alletti, M.

    2014-10-01

    The glassy and liquid heat capacities of four series of dry and hydrous natural glasses and magma as a function of temperature and water content (up to 19.9 mol%) were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The analyzed compositions are basalt, latite, trachyte and pantellerite. The results of this study indicate that the measured heat capacity of glasses (Cpg) is a linear function of composition and is well reproduced by the empirical model of Richet (1987). For the investigated glasses, the partial molar heat capacity of water can be considered as independent of composition, in agreement with Bouhifd et al. (2006). For hydrous liquids, the heat capacity (Cpliq) decreases nonlinearly with increasing water content. Previously published models, combined with the partial molar heat capacity of water from the literature, are not able to reproduce our experimental data in a satisfactory way. We estimated the partial molar heat capacity of water (CpH2O) in hydrous magma over a broad compositional range. The proposed value is 41 ± 3 J mol-1 K-1. Water strongly affects the configurational heat capacity at the glass transition temperature [Cpconf (Tg)]. An increases of Cpconf (Tg) with water content was measured for the polymerized liquids (trachyte and pantellerite), while the opposite behavior was observed for the most depolymerized liquids (basalt and latite). Structural and rheological implications of this behavior are discussed in light of the presented results.

  2. Reutilization of granite powder as an amendment and fertilizer for acid soils.

    PubMed

    Barral Silva, M T; Silva Hermo, B; García-Rodeja, E; Vázquez Freire, N

    2005-11-01

    The properties of granite powders--a granite manufacturing waste product-were analyzed to assess their potential use as amendments and fertilizers on acid soils. Two types of powders were characterized: one produced during cutting of granite with a diamond-edged disc saw, comprising only rock powder, the other produced during cutting with a multi-blade bandsaw, containing calcium hydroxide and metal filings added during the cutting procedure. The acid neutralizing capacity of the granite powders was assessed in short- (2-3 h) and medium-term (1-30 d) experiments. The powders showed a buffering capacity at around pH 8, which corresponded to the rapid dissolution of basic cations, and another buffering effect at pH<4.5, attributable to the dissolution of Fe and Al. The acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) determined in the short-term experiments, to a final pH of 4.5, varied between 5 and 61 cmol H+kg(-1) powder. The ANC to pH 4.5 obtained in the medium-term experiments was much higher than that obtained in the short-term experiments, reaching a maximum ANC value of 200 cmol H+kg(-1) powder. There was no great difference in the neutralizing capacity determined at between 1 and 30 d. The most abundant elements in acid solutions obtained at the end of medium-term experiments were Mg and Ca for disc saw powders, whereas Ca and Fe (at pH<5) were the most soluble elements in the bandsaw powders. The rapid release of these cations suggests the possible effective use of the granite powders as a source of nutrients on being added to acid soils.

  3. Long-term recovery of lakes in the Adirondack region of New York to decreases in acidic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, Kristin; Driscoll, Charles; Lynch, Jason; Newcomb, Dani; Roy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    After years of adverse impacts to the acid-sensitive ecosystems of the eastern United States, the Acid Rain Program and Nitrogen Budget Program were developed to control sulfur dioxide (SO 2) and nitrogen oxide (NO x) emissions through market-based cap and trade systems. We used data from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program's National Trends Network (NTN) and the U.S. EPA Temporally Integrated Monitoring of Ecosystems (TIME) program to evaluate the response of lake-watersheds in the Adirondack region of New York to changes in emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides resulting from the Acid Rain Program and the Nitrogen Budget Program. TIME is a long-term monitoring program designed to sample statistically selected subpopulations of lakes and streams across the eastern U.S. to quantify regional trends in surface water chemistry due to changes in atmospheric deposition. Decreases in wet sulfate deposition for the TIME lake-watersheds from 1991 to 2007 (-1.04 meq m -2-yr) generally corresponded with decreases in estimated lake sulfate flux (-1.46 ± 0.72 meq m -2-yr), suggesting declines in lake sulfate were largely driven by decreases in atmospheric deposition. Decreases in lake sulfate and to a lesser extent nitrate have generally coincided with increases in acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) resulting in shifts in lakes among ANC sensitivity classes. The percentage of acidic Adirondack lakes (ANC <0 μeq L -1) decreased from 15.5% (284 lakes) to 8.3% (152 lakes) since the implementation of the Acid Rain Program and the Nitrogen Budget Program. Two measures of ANC were considered in our analysis: ANC determined directly by Gran plot analysis (ANC G) and ANC calculated by major ion chemistry (ANC calc = CB - CA). While these two metrics should theoretically show similar responses, ANC calc (+2.03 μeq L -1-yr) increased at more than twice the rate as ANC G (+0.76 μeq L -1-yr). This discrepancy has important implications for assessments of lake recovery

  4. Large capacity temporary visual memory

    PubMed Central

    Endress, Ansgar D.; Potter, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    Visual working memory (WM) capacity is thought to be limited to three or four items. However, many cognitive activities seem to require larger temporary memory stores. Here, we provide evidence for a temporary memory store with much larger capacity than past WM capacity estimates. Further, based on previous WM research, we show that a single factor — proactive interference — is sufficient to bring capacity estimates down to the range of previous WM capacity estimates. Participants saw a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) of 5 to 21 pictures of familiar objects or words presented at rates of 4/s or 8/s, respectively, and thus too fast for strategies such as rehearsal. Recognition memory was tested with a single probe item. When new items were used on all trials, no fixed memory capacities were observed, with estimates of up to 9.1 retained pictures for 21-item lists, and up to 30.0 retained pictures for 100-item lists, and no clear upper bound to how many items could be retained. Further, memory items were not stored in a temporally stable form of memory, but decayed almost completely after a few minutes. In contrast, when, as in most WM experiments, a small set of items was reused across all trials, thus creating proactive interference among items, capacity remained in the range reported in previous WM experiments. These results show that humans have a large-capacity temporary memory store in the absence of proactive interference, and raise the question of whether temporary memory in everyday cognitive processing is severely limited as in WM experiments, or has the much larger capacity found in the present experiments. PMID:23937181

  5. A California generation capacity market

    SciTech Connect

    Conkling, R.L.

    1998-10-01

    California, overconfident with its new Power Exchange spot market, seems unaware that it could be afflicted by the same turmoil that bludgeoned the Midwest in June. An electricity capacity market should be put in place before crisis strikes. This article outlines a framework for adding an electricity capacity market in California. The new market would not create a new bureaucracy but would function within the state`s now operational PX and independent system operator (ISO) mechanisms. It would be an open market, in which capacity would be traded transparently, with freedom of entree for all willing sellers and all willing buyers.

  6. To build capacity, build confidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitson, Bruce

    2015-07-01

    The history of attempts to spread scientific know-how beyond western centres of excellence is littered with failures. Capacity building needs long-term commitment, a critical mass of trainees, and a supportive home environment.

  7. Capacity Markets and Market Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, Hoff

    2006-04-15

    The good news is that market stability can be achieved through a combination of longer-term contracts, auctions for far enough in the future to permit new entry, a capacity management system, and a demand curve. The bad news is that if and when stable capacity markets are designed, the markets may seem to be relatively close to where we started - with integrated resource planning. Market ideologues will find this anathema. (author)

  8. Maximizing the optical network capacity

    PubMed Central

    Bayvel, Polina; Maher, Robert; Liga, Gabriele; Shevchenko, Nikita A.; Lavery, Domaniç; Killey, Robert I.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the digital data transmitted are carried by optical fibres, forming the great part of the national and international communication infrastructure. The information-carrying capacity of these networks has increased vastly over the past decades through the introduction of wavelength division multiplexing, advanced modulation formats, digital signal processing and improved optical fibre and amplifier technology. These developments sparked the communication revolution and the growth of the Internet, and have created an illusion of infinite capacity being available. But as the volume of data continues to increase, is there a limit to the capacity of an optical fibre communication channel? The optical fibre channel is nonlinear, and the intensity-dependent Kerr nonlinearity limit has been suggested as a fundamental limit to optical fibre capacity. Current research is focused on whether this is the case, and on linear and nonlinear techniques, both optical and electronic, to understand, unlock and maximize the capacity of optical communications in the nonlinear regime. This paper describes some of them and discusses future prospects for success in the quest for capacity. PMID:26809572

  9. Use of regression-based models to map sensitivity of aquatic resources to atmospheric deposition in Yosemite National Park, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, David W.; Nanus, Leora; Huggett, Brian

    2010-01-01

    An abundance of exposed bedrock, sparse soil and vegetation, and fast hydrologic flushing rates make aquatic ecosystems in Yosemite National Park susceptible to nutrient enrichment and episodic acidification due to atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S). In this study, multiple linear regression (MLR) models were created to estimate fall-season nitrate and acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in surface water in Yosemite wilderness. Input data included estimated winter N deposition, fall-season surface-water chemistry measurements at 52 sites, and basin characteristics derived from geographic information system layers of topography, geology, and vegetation. The MLR models accounted for 84% and 70% of the variance in surface-water nitrate and ANC, respectively. Explanatory variables (and the sign of their coefficients) for nitrate included elevation (positive) and the abundance of neoglacial and talus deposits (positive), unvegetated terrain (positive), alluvium (negative), and riparian (negative) areas in the basins. Explanatory variables for ANC included basin area (positive) and the abundance of metamorphic rocks (positive), unvegetated terrain (negative), water (negative), and winter N deposition (negative) in the basins. The MLR equations were applied to 1407 stream reaches delineated in the National Hydrography Data Set for Yosemite, and maps of predicted surface-water nitrate and ANC concentrations were created. Predicted surface-water nitrate concentrations were highest in small, high-elevation cirques, and concentrations declined downstream. Predicted ANC concentrations showed the opposite pattern, except in high-elevation areas underlain by metamorphic rocks along the Sierran Crest, which had relatively high predicted ANC (>200 μeq L-1). Maps were created to show where basin characteristics predispose aquatic resources to nutrient enrichment and acidification effects from N and S deposition. The maps can be used to help guide development of

  10. Capacities of quantum amplifier channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Haoyu; Wilde, Mark M.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum amplifier channels are at the core of several physical processes. Not only do they model the optical process of spontaneous parametric down-conversion, but the transformation corresponding to an amplifier channel also describes the physics of the dynamical Casimir effect in superconducting circuits, the Unruh effect, and Hawking radiation. Here we study the communication capabilities of quantum amplifier channels. Invoking a recently established minimum output-entropy theorem for single-mode phase-insensitive Gaussian channels, we determine capacities of quantum-limited amplifier channels in three different scenarios. First, we establish the capacities of quantum-limited amplifier channels for one of the most general communication tasks, characterized by the trade-off between classical communication, quantum communication, and entanglement generation or consumption. Second, we establish capacities of quantum-limited amplifier channels for the trade-off between public classical communication, private classical communication, and secret key generation. Third, we determine the capacity region for a broadcast channel induced by the quantum-limited amplifier channel, and we also show that a fully quantum strategy outperforms those achieved by classical coherent-detection strategies. In all three scenarios, we find that the capacities significantly outperform communication rates achieved with a naive time-sharing strategy.

  11. Boomerang pillows and respiratory capacity.

    PubMed

    Roberts, K L; Brittin, M; Cook, M A; deClifford, J

    1994-05-01

    An experimental study was done to determine whether subjects placed on boomerang pillows would have lower vital capacities than subjects placed on straight pillows after 30 minutes. A sample of 42 subjects took part in the study in a nursing laboratory. A crossover design was used in which subjects were measured in both conditions. The findings indicated that there was no significant difference in the vital capacities of subjects in the two conditions. An associated finding was that the vital capacities were significantly lower in a semi-Fowler's position than in a straight chair. It was concluded that boomerang pillows are safe to use for persons without respiratory problems. Further research is needed into the effect of boomerang pillows on persons with respiratory deficits.

  12. Buffer Capacity: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Steven O.; Hanania, George I. H.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a quantitative experiment designed to demonstrate buffer action and the measurement of buffer capacity. Discusses how to make acetate buffers, determine their buffer capacity, plot the capacity/pH curve, and interpret the data obtained. (TW)

  13. Superadditivity of classical capacity revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Pilyavets, Oleg V.; Karpov, Evgueni A.; Schäfer, Joachim

    2014-12-04

    We introduce new type of superadditivity for classical capacity of quantum channels, which involves the properties of channels’ environment. By imposing different restrictions on the total energy contained in channels’ environment we can consider different types of superadditivity. Using lossy bosonic and additive noise quantum channels as examples, we demonstrate that their capacities can be either additive or superadditive depending on the values of channels parameters. The parameters corresponding to transition between the additive and superadditive cases are related with recently found critical and supercritical parameters for Gaussian channels.

  14. Free Energy and Heat Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Kurata, Masaki; Devanathan, Ramaswami

    2015-10-13

    Free energy and heat capacity of actinide elements and compounds are important properties for the evaluation of the safety and reliable performance of nuclear fuel. They are essential inputs for models that describe complex phenomena that govern the behaviour of actinide compounds during nuclear fuel fabrication and irradiation. This chapter introduces various experimental methods to measure free energy and heat capacity to serve as inputs for models and to validate computer simulations. This is followed by a discussion of computer simulation of these properties, and recent simulations of thermophysical properties of nuclear fuel are briefly reviewed.

  15. The effects of liming an Adirondack lake watershed on downstream water chemistry: Effects of liming on stream chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.

    1996-01-01

    Calcite treatment of chronically acidic lakes has improved fish habitat, but the effects on downstream water quality have not previously been examined. In this study, the spatial and temporal effects of watershed CaCO3 treatment on the chemistry of a lake outlet stream in the Adirondack Mountains of New York were examined. Before CaCO3 treatment, the stream was chronically acidic. During spring snowmelt before treatment, pH and acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) in the outlet stream declined, and NO3- and inorganic monomeric aluminum (AlIM) concentrations increased sharply. During that summer, SO42- and NO3- concentrations decreased downstream, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and ANC increased, in association with the seasonal increase in decomposition of organic matter and the attendant SO42--reduction process. A charge-balance ANC calculation closely matched measured downstream changes in ANC in the summer and indicated that SO42- reduction was the major process contributing to summer increases in ANC. Increases in Ca2+ concentration and ANC began immediately after CaCO3 application, and within 3 months, exceeded their pretreatment values by more than 130 ??eq/L. Within 2 months after treatment, downstream decreases in Ca2+ concentration, ANC, and pH, were noted. Stream mass balances between the lake and the sampling site 1.5 km downstream revealed that the transport of all chemical constituents was dominated by conservative mixing with tributaries and ground water; however, non-conservative processes resulted in significant Ca2+ losses during the 13-month period after CaCO3 treatment. Comparison of substrate samples from the buffered outlet stream with those from its untreated tributaries showed that the percentage of cation-exchange sites occupied by Ca2+, as well as non-exchangeable Ca, were higher in the outlet-stream substrate than in tributary-stream substrate. Mass-balance data for Ca2+, H+, AlIM, and DOC revealed net downstream losses of

  16. Target loads of atmospheric sulfur deposition for the protection and recovery of acid-sensitive streams in the Southern Blue Ridge Province.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Timothy J; Cosby, Bernard J; Jackson, William A

    2011-11-01

    An important tool in the evaluation of acidification damage to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems is the critical load (CL), which represents the steady-state level of acidic deposition below which ecological damage would not be expected to occur, according to current scientific understanding. A deposition load intended to be protective of a specified resource condition at a particular point in time is generally called a target load (TL). The CL or TL for protection of aquatic biota is generally based on maintaining surface water acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) at an acceptable level. This study included calibration and application of the watershed model MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) to estimate the target sulfur (S) deposition load for the protection of aquatic resources at several future points in time in 66 generally acid-sensitive watersheds in the southern Blue Ridge province of North Carolina and two adjoining states. Potential future change in nitrogen leaching is not considered. Estimated TLs for S deposition ranged from zero (ecological objective not attainable by the specified point in time) to values many times greater than current S deposition depending on the selected site, ANC endpoint, and evaluation year. For some sites, one or more of the selected target ANC critical levels (0, 20, 50, 100μeq/L) could not be achieved by the year 2100 even if S deposition was reduced to zero and maintained at that level throughout the simulation. Many of these highly sensitive streams were simulated by the model to have had preindustrial ANC below some of these target values. For other sites, the watershed soils contained sufficiently large buffering capacity that even very high sustained levels of atmospheric S deposition would not reduce stream ANC below common damage thresholds.

  17. Building Capacity and Sustaining Endeavors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraybill, Anne; Din, Herminia

    2015-01-01

    In this article, institutional capacity and sustainability is considered. The authors explore a case study from Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art as an example of how museums can leverage not only online technologies to reach more learners regardless of geography, but to increase their reach through strategic partnerships.

  18. [Fasting and physical endurance capacity].

    PubMed

    Schürch, P M

    1993-03-01

    Fasting, or zero calorie diets are used not only by overweight people as a means of losing weight, but by athletes too. Their use is then explained on philosophical grounds, with the aim of even enhancing sports performance. The purpose of this investigation consisted of quantifying the effects of a 10-day fast on maximum performance capacity and endurance (as measured on a bicycle ergometer) of 12 female students of physical education of normal weight. The measurements included resting and exercise metabolism determinants, as well as weight and lean body mass. The main results show that after the diet period the maximum ergometric performance was lower in absolute terms as well as in relation to weight or lean body mass. Performance capacity for submaximal exercise was also reduced. Fat combustion was enhanced both at rest and during exercise. The reduction of maximum performance and endurance capacity may be explained by an enhanced muscle breakdown, an efficiency drop of muscular work, and an inadequate glycogen content of the acting muscles. Shorter fasting periods of 24-36 hours also lead to a lower performance level for exercise bouts extending from several minutes to 1-3 hours. An enhancement of fat combustion was always conspicuous. One may conclude that optimal physical performance is dependent on full hepatic and muscle glycogen stores. Glycogen concentration in the liver decreases sharply as a matter of fact after merely one day of carbohydrate shortage. Zero calorie or low carbohydrate diets are thus at variance with an optimal physical work capacity.

  19. Capacity Issue Looms for Vouchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    State-level momentum in support of vouchers and tax credits that help students go to private schools highlights what has been a largely theoretical issue: private school capacity to support voucher-financed enrollment. Academics say the national supply of seats in secular and religious private schools is sufficient to meet short-term demand from…

  20. Forced vital capacity, slow vital capacity, or inspiratory vital capacity: which is the best measure of vital capacity?

    PubMed

    Chhabra, S K

    1998-01-01

    Vital capacity can be measured as forced vital capacity (FVC), slow vital capacity (SVC), and inspiratory vital capacity (IVC). Although it is well known that the latter two are generally greater, a systematic comparison of the three in subjects with different degrees of airways obstruction has not been made. Sixty asthmatics and 20 normal subjects performed maneuvers for measurement of FVC, SVC, and IVC on a dry, rolling-seal spirometer. The severity of airways obstruction in asthmatics was classified as mild, moderate, and severe. There was no significant difference between FVC, SVC, and IVC in normal subjects. However, the three measurements of vital capacity were significantly different in all subgroups of asthmatics. FVC was smaller than both SVC and IVC. The differences were more marked in patients with moderate and severe degrees of airways obstruction. The differences between SVC and IVC were small and clinically not important. Forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) expressed as percent of FVC, SVC, and IVC, was not different in normals and asthmatics with mild airways obstruction. The ratios were significantly different in asthmatics with moderate and severe airways obstruction. FEV1/IVC ratio was the lowest in both the groups followed by FEV1/SVC and FEV1/FVC. IVC and SVC are greater than FVC in patients with airways obstruction. This difference increases as the degree of obstruction increases. The difference between SVC or IVC and FVC serves as an indicator of air trapping. Both FVC and IVC could be measured and the largest VC used to calculate the FEV1/VC ratio because this increases the sensitivity of spirometry in detecting airways obstruction.

  1. 10 CFR 904.9 - Excess capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excess capacity. 904.9 Section 904.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... Marketing § 904.9 Excess capacity. (a) If the Uprating Program results in Excess Capacity, Western shall be entitled to such Excess Capacity to integrate the operation of the Boulder City Area Projects and...

  2. High capacity carbon dioxide sorbent

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Steven Dean; Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan

    2015-09-01

    The present invention provides a sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a CO.sub.2 capacity of at least 9 weight percent when measured at 22.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; an H.sub.2O capacity of at most 15 weight percent when measured at 25.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; and an isosteric heat of adsorption of from 5 to 8.5 kilocalories per mole of CO.sub.2. The invention also provides a carbon sorbent in a powder, a granular or a pellet form for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a carbon content of at least 90 weight percent; a nitrogen content of at least 1 weight percent; an oxygen content of at most 3 weight percent; a BET surface area from 50 to 2600 m.sup.2/g; and a DFT micropore volume from 0.04 to 0.8 cc/g.

  3. Capacity is the Wrong Paradigm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Florida Gainesville, FL 32611-6120 ABSTRACT At present, \\capacity" is the prevailing paradigm for covert channels. With respect to steganography ...INTRODUCTION Steganography is the art and science of sending a hidden message from Alice to Bob, so that an eavesdropper is not aware that this hidden...discussed a di erent new paradigm con- cerning steganography . The concern of that new paradigm was \\when is something discovered." We feel that both

  4. High Information Capacity Quantum Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-19

    High Capacity Quantum Imaging Robert W. Boyd, John C. Howell Department of Physics and Astronomy , University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, 14627...breadth of fields from magnetic resonance imaging [83] to radio astronomy [84] to entanglement characterization [85, 86]. B. Adapting Single Photon...L. Starck, and R. Ottensamer, “Compressed sensing in astronomy ,” Selected Topics in Signal Processing, IEEE Journal of 2, 718–726 (2008). [85] S. T

  5. High capacity immobilized amine sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gray, McMahan L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Soong, Yee; Filburn, Thomas

    2007-10-30

    A method is provided for making low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. The improved method entails treating an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnating the amine in a porous solid support. The method increases the CO.sub.2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of utilizing an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO.sub.2 capture systems.

  6. Information capacity of specific interactions

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, Miriam H.; Murugan, Arvind; Brenner, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Specific interactions are a hallmark feature of self-assembly and signal-processing systems in both synthetic and biological settings. Specificity between components may arise from a wide variety of physical and chemical mechanisms in diverse contexts, from DNA hybridization to shape-sensitive depletion interactions. Despite this diversity, all systems that rely on interaction specificity operate under the constraint that increasing the number of distinct components inevitably increases off-target binding. Here we introduce “capacity,” the maximal information encodable using specific interactions, to compare specificity across diverse experimental systems and to compute how specificity changes with physical parameters. Using this framework, we find that “shape” coding of interactions has higher capacity than chemical (“color”) coding because the strength of off-target binding is strongly sublinear in binding-site size for shapes while being linear for colors. We also find that different specificity mechanisms, such as shape and color, can be combined in a synergistic manner, giving a capacity greater than the sum of the parts. PMID:27155013

  7. Solubilisation capacity of Brij surfactants.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Maria E N P; de Moura, Carolina L; Vieira, Mariano G S; Gramosa, Nilce V; Chaibundit, Chiraphon; de Mattos, Marcos C; Attwood, David; Yeates, Stephen G; Nixon, S Keith; Ricardo, Nágila M P S

    2012-10-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of selected Brij non-ionic surfactants for enhancing the solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs. Griseofulvin was selected as a model drug candidate enabling comparisons to be made with the solubilisation capacities of other poly(ethylene oxide)-based copolymers. UV/Vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopies were used to quantify the enhancement of solubility of griseofulvin in 1 wt% aqueous micellar solutions of Brij 78 (C(18)H(37)E(20)), Brij 98 (C(18)H(35)E(20)) and Brij 700 (C(18)H(37)E(100)) (where E represents the OCH(2)CH(2) unit of the poly(ethylene oxide) chain) at 25, 37 and 40 °C. Solubilisation capacities (S(cp) expressed as mg griseofulvin per g Brij) were similar for Brij 78 and 98 (range 6-11 mg g(-1)) but lower for Brij 700 (3-4 mg g(-1)) as would be expected for the surfactant with the higher ethylene oxide content. The drug loading capacity of micelles of Brij 78 was higher than many di- and triblock copolymers with hydrophilic E-blocks specifically designed for enhancement of drug solubility.

  8. Flying Training Capacity Model: Initial Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-21

    numbers by base • FTRAP model is not versatile • Excel spreadsheets based on corporate knowledge • Requires flying training subject matter expert ( SME ... IFR & VFR operations • Capacity given in terms of runway operations per year • AETC Capacity Metrics - Graduates • Based on sortie generation • Consider...Pilots (IPs) from each course • Airspace capacities from base operations SMEs • Runway capacities • Military Operating Area capacities (including aux

  9. Theatre fleet's vital additional capacity.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Vanguard Healthcare's fleet of mobile surgical facilities has been deployed to healthcare sites throughout Europe and beyond for over a decade, providing vital additional clinical capacity when existing buildings are refurbished or upgraded, in the event of flood or fire, or simply to help hospitals cater for rising demand. It is a combination of careful planning, teamwork, and the specialist expertise of Vanguard's personnel--many with a clinical background--that ensures not only each unit's successful installation, but equally its subsequent running, servicing, and maintenance, the company explains.

  10. Developing Ministerial Collaborative Planning Capacity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-14

    the MNSTC-I era and, its successor organization the Iraq Training and Advisory Mission for the Ministry of Interior ( ITAM -MoI) that focused on the...organization can exercise influence over.26 The training partnership between the DRMI and the MoI was one of the few success stories in ITAM -MoI’s...efforts to develop institutional capacity within the MoI. Over a nineteen-month period, the DRMI, MoI JRC, and ITAM -MoI partnered to host 14

  11. The lake acidification mitigation project (LAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Porcella, D.P. )

    1987-01-01

    In areas where there is limited capacity to resist input of acid deposition, acid soils and surface waters have affected natural communities and man's uses of the environment. In response to problems of acid soils, farmers added limestone materials to their soil during Roman times; this method of agricultural management continues today. The addition of limestone (CaCo/sub 3/), called liming, has been used more recently to mitigate acidic conditions in lakes and streams. Liming neutralizes acidity directly, provides buffering as acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) or alkalinity, and increases calcium ion concentration which mitigates toxicity in low ionic strength waters. The Lake Acidification Mitigation Project (LAMP) has the objective of identifying and quantifying environmental impacts of liming, and evaluating the effectiveness of liming and stocking procedures in restoring acid lakes. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of LAMP and to summarize results from the initial phases of the project.

  12. Blast furnace slags as sorbents of phosphate from water solutions.

    PubMed

    Kostura, Bruno; Kulveitová, Hana; Lesko, Juraj

    2005-05-01

    The paper is focused on the sorption of phosphorus from aqueous solutions by crystalline and amorphous blast furnace slags. Slag sorption kinetics were measured, adsorption tests were carried out and the effect of acidification on the sorption properties of slags was studied. The kinetic measurements confirmed that the sorption of phosphorus on crystalline as well as amorphous slags can be described by a model involving pseudo-second-order reactions. For all slag types, phosphorus sorption follows the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The acid neutralizing capacities of crystalline and amorphous slags were determined. In the case of the crystalline slags, buffering intervals were found to exist during which the slag minerals dissolve in the sequence bredigite-gehlenite-diaspor. There is a high correlation (R2=0.9989) between ANC3.8 and the saturation capacities of crystalline and amorphous slags.

  13. Episodic acidification of small streams in the northeastern united states: ionic controls of episodes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wigington, P.J.; DeWalle, David R.; Murdoch, Peter S.; Kretser, W.A.; Simonin, H.A.; Van Sickle, J.; Baker, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the Episodic Response Project (ERP), we intensively monitored discharge and stream chemistry of 13 streams located in the Northern Appalachian region of Pennsylvania and in the Catskill and Adirondack Mountains of New York from fall 1988 to spring 1990. The ERP clearly documented the occurrence of acidic episodes with minimum episodic pH ??? 5 and inorganic monomeric Al (Alim) concentrations >150 ??g/L in at least two study streams in each region. Several streams consistently experienced episodes with maximum Alim concentrations >350 ??g/L. Acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) depressions resulted from complex interactions of multiple ions. Base cation decreases often made the most important contributions to ANC depressions during episodes. Organic acid pulses were also important contributors to ANC depressions in the Adirondack streams, and to a lesser extent, in the Catskill and Pennsylvania streams. Nitrate concentrations were low in the Pennsylvania streams, whereas the Catskill and Adirondack study streams had high NO3- concentrations and large episodic pulses (???54 ??eq/L). Most of the Pennsylvania study streams also frequently experienced episodic pulses of SO42- (???78 ??eq/L), whereas the Adirondack and Catskill streams did not. High baseline concentrations of SO42- (all three study areas) and NO3- (Adirondacks and Catskills) reduced episodic minimum ANC, even when these ions did not change during episodes. The ion changes that controlled the most severe episodes (lowest minimum episodic ANC) differed from the ion changes most important to smaller, more frequent episodes. Pulses of NO3- (Catskills and Adirondacks), SO42- (Pennsylvania), or organic acids became more important during major episodes. Overall, the behavior of streamwater SO42- and NO4- is an indicator that acidic deposition has contributed to the severity of episodes in the study streams.

  14. Solidified structure and leaching properties of metallurgical wastewater treatment sludge after solidification/stabilization process.

    PubMed

    Radovanović, Dragana Đ; Kamberović, Željko J; Korać, Marija S; Rogan, Jelena R

    2016-01-01

    The presented study investigates solidification/stabilization process of hazardous heavy metals/arsenic sludge, generated after the treatment of the wastewater from a primary copper smelter. Fly ash and fly ash with addition of hydrated lime and Portland composite cement were studied as potential binders. The effectiveness of the process was evaluated by unconfined compressive strength (UCS) testing, leaching tests (EN 12457-4 and TCLP) and acid neutralization capacity (ANC) test. It was found that introduction of cement into the systems increased the UCS, led to reduced leaching of Cu, Ni and Zn, but had a negative effect on the ANC. Gradual addition of lime resulted in decreased UCS, significant reduction of metals leaching and high ANC, due to the excess of lime that remained unreacted in pozzolanic reaction. Stabilization of more than 99% of heavy metals and 90% of arsenic has been achieved. All the samples had UCS above required value for safe disposal. In addition to standard leaching tests, solidificates were exposed to atmospheric conditions during one year in order to determine the actual leaching level of metals in real environment. It can be concluded that the EN 12457-4 test is more similar to the real environmental conditions, while the TCLP test highly exaggerates the leaching of metals. The paper also presents results of differential acid neutralization (d-AN) analysis compared with mineralogical study done by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The d-AN coupled with Eh-pH (Pourbaix) diagrams were proven to be a new effective method for analysis of amorphous solidified structure.

  15. Control Capacity in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Tao; Liu, Yang-Yu; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2012-02-01

    By combining tools from control theory and network science, an efficient methodology was proposed to identify the minimum sets of driver nodes, whose time-dependent control can guide the whole network to any desired final state. Yet, this minimum driver set (MDS) is usually not unique, but one can often achieve multiple potential control configurations with the same number of driver nodes. Given that some nodes may appear in some MDSs but not in other, a crucial question remain unanswered: what is the role of individual node in controlling a complex system? We first classify a node as critical, redundant, or ordinary if it appears in all, no, or some MDSs. Then we introduce the concept of control capacity as a measure of the frequency that a node is in the MDSs, which quantifies the importance of a given node in maintaining Controllability. To avoid impractical enumeration of all MDSs, we propose an algorithm that uniformly samples the MDS. We use it to explore the control capacity of nodes in complex networks and study how it is related to other characteristics of the network topology.

  16. 47 CFR 80.919 - Required capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... capacity. If either the main or reserve power supply includes batteries, these batteries must have sufficient reserve capacity to permit proper operation of the required transmitter and receiver for at...

  17. U.S. Refining Capacity Utilization

    EIA Publications

    1995-01-01

    This article briefly reviews recent trends in domestic refining capacity utilization and examines in detail the differences in reported crude oil distillation capacities and utilization rates among different classes of refineries.

  18. Earnings Capacity, Economic Status, and Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfinkel, Irwin; Haveman, Robert

    1977-01-01

    "Earnings capacity" is suggested as an alternative to "annual money income" as an indicator of economic status. The socioeconomic and demographic determinants of poverty as measured by earnings capacity and by annual money income are compared and contrasted. (WL)

  19. Pattern of solute movement from snow into an upper Michigan stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stottlemyer, R.; Toczydlowski, D.

    1990-01-01

    Precipitation, snowpack, snowmelt, and streamwater samples were collected in a small gauged watershed draining into Lake Superior during winter 1987–88 to assess the importance of snowmelt pattern and meltwater pathways in the occurrence of solute pulses in streamwater. The snowpack along the south shore of Lake Superior can contain 50% of annual precipitation inputs and 38% of annual ionic inputs including moderate levels of strong acids. Throughout winter, thawed surface soils and small but steady snowpack moisture release promoted movement of snowpack solutes to surface mineral soils. Preferential elution of K+, NH4+, and H+ from the snowpack occurred with the initial thaw. Most ions exhibited pulses in snowmelt. Transport of snowpack solutes to the stream during snowmelt was through near-surface soil macropores and overland flow. For those ions with concentrations higher in the snowpack than in the premelt streamwater, K+, NH4+, and H+, the earliest snowmelt pulses had the greatest influence on streamwater chemistry. Unlike other portions of the region with resistant bedrock, the widespread presence of alkaline glacial till provides excess stream acid neutralization capacity (ANC) to buffer acidic inputs. Peak winter streamwater ANC reduction was caused principally by spring melt dilution of base cations and associated alkalinity, constant high SO42- levels, and an increase in NO3-. The maximum reduction in stream ANC was concurrent with overland flow. Relative to its snowmelt concentration, NO3- was highest in streamwater with some stream input likely the result of nitrification and N mineralization.

  20. Contemporary Trends in the Acid-Base Status of the Two Acid-Sensitive Streams in Western Maryland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, Keith N.; Kline, Kathleen M.; Morgan, Raymond P., II; Castro, Nancy M.; Negley, Timothy L.

    2008-01-01

    Recovery of streamwater acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) resulting from declines in regional acid deposition was examined using contemporary (1990-2005) data from two long-term monitoring stations located on the Appalachian Plateau in western Maryland, U.S. Two computational methods were used to estimate daily, monthly, and annual fluxes and discharge-weighted concentrations of ANC, sulfate, nitrate, and base cations over the period of record, and two statistical methods were used to evaluate long-term trends in fluxes and concentrations. The methods used to estimate concentrations, as well as the, statistical techniques, produced very similar results, underlining the robustness of the identified trends. We found clear evidence that streamwater sulfate concentrations have declined at an average rate of about 3 (microns)eq L(exp -1) yr(exp -1) at the two sites due to a 34% reduction in wet atmospheric sulfur deposition. Trends in nitrate concentrations appear to be related to other watershed factors, especially forest disturbance. The best evidence of recovery is based on a doubling of ANC (from 21 to 42 (microns)eq L(exp -1) at the more acid-sensitive site over the 16-year period. A slowing, or possible reversal, in the sulfate, nitrate, and SBC trends is evident in our data and may portend a decline in the rate of--or end to--further recovery.

  1. Rehabilitation Medicine Summit: Building Research Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frontera, Walter R.; Fuhrer, Marcus J.; Jette, Alan M.; Chan, Leighton; Cooper, Rory A.; Duncan, Pamela W.; Kemp, John D.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Peckham, P. Hunter; Roth, Elliot J.; Tate, Denise G.

    2006-01-01

    The general objective of the "Rehabilitation Medicine Summit: Building Research Capacity" was to advance and promote research in medical rehabilitation by making recommendations to expand research capacity. The 5 elements of research capacity that guided the discussions were (a) researchers; (b) research culture, environment, and infrastructure;…

  2. 14 CFR 25 - Traffic and Capacity Elements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Traffic and Capacity Elements Section 25... Traffic Reporting Requirements Section 25 Traffic and Capacity Elements General Instructions. (a) All prescribed reporting for traffic and capacity elements shall conform with the data compilation standards...

  3. 25 CFR 167.6 - Carrying capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carrying capacities. 167.6 Section 167.6 Indians BUREAU... Carrying capacities. (a) The Commissioner of Indian Affairs on June 26, 1943, promulgated the authorized carrying capacity for each land management district of the Navajo Reservation. (b) Recommended...

  4. 25 CFR 167.6 - Carrying capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Carrying capacities. 167.6 Section 167.6 Indians BUREAU OF... capacities. (a) The Commissioner of Indian Affairs on June 26, 1943, promulgated the authorized carrying... carrying capacities shall be referred by the Superintendent to District Grazing Committee, Central...

  5. 25 CFR 167.6 - Carrying capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carrying capacities. 167.6 Section 167.6 Indians BUREAU... Carrying capacities. (a) The Commissioner of Indian Affairs on June 26, 1943, promulgated the authorized carrying capacity for each land management district of the Navajo Reservation. (b) Recommended...

  6. 25 CFR 167.6 - Carrying capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carrying capacities. 167.6 Section 167.6 Indians BUREAU... Carrying capacities. (a) The Commissioner of Indian Affairs on June 26, 1943, promulgated the authorized carrying capacity for each land management district of the Navajo Reservation. (b) Recommended...

  7. Compressibility and heat capacity of rotating plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyko, V. I.; Fisch, N. J.

    2017-02-01

    A rotating plasma column is shown to exhibit unusual heat capacity effects under compression. For near equilibrium thermodynamics and smooth wall conditions, the heat capacity depends on the plasma density, on the speed of the rotation, and on the mass ratio. For a certain range of parameters, the storage of energy in the electric field produces a significant increase in the heat capacity.

  8. 10 CFR 904.9 - Excess capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Excess capacity. 904.9 Section 904.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.9 Excess capacity. (a) If the Uprating Program results in Excess Capacity, Western shall...

  9. 10 CFR 904.9 - Excess capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Excess capacity. 904.9 Section 904.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.9 Excess capacity. (a) If the Uprating Program results in Excess Capacity, Western shall...

  10. 10 CFR 904.9 - Excess capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Excess capacity. 904.9 Section 904.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.9 Excess capacity. (a) If the Uprating Program results in Excess Capacity, Western shall...

  11. 10 CFR 904.9 - Excess capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Excess capacity. 904.9 Section 904.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.9 Excess capacity. (a) If the Uprating Program results in Excess Capacity, Western shall...

  12. 30 CFR 56.19001 - Rated capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rated capacities. 56.19001 Section 56.19001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... § 56.19001 Rated capacities. Hoists shall have rated capacities consistent with the loads handled...

  13. 30 CFR 57.19001 - Rated capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rated capacities. 57.19001 Section 57.19001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Hoists § 57.19001 Rated capacities. Hoists shall have rated capacities consistent with the loads...

  14. 47 CFR 80.861 - Required capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Required capacity. 80.861 Section 80.861... Required capacity. If the main power supply or the reserve power supply provided for the purpose of... capacity available at all times while the vessel is leaving or attempting to leave a harbor or port for...

  15. 40 CFR 35.2123 - Reserve capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reserve capacity. 35.2123 Section 35... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2123 Reserve capacity. EPA will limit grant assistance for reserve capacity as follows: (a) If EPA awarded a grant for a Step...

  16. 30 CFR 77.1402 - Rated capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rated capacity. 77.1402 Section 77.1402 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY... § 77.1402 Rated capacity. Hoists and elevators shall have rated capacities consistent with the...

  17. 30 CFR 56.19001 - Rated capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rated capacities. 56.19001 Section 56.19001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... § 56.19001 Rated capacities. Hoists shall have rated capacities consistent with the loads handled...

  18. 30 CFR 56.19001 - Rated capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rated capacities. 56.19001 Section 56.19001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... § 56.19001 Rated capacities. Hoists shall have rated capacities consistent with the loads handled...

  19. 30 CFR 56.19001 - Rated capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rated capacities. 56.19001 Section 56.19001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... § 56.19001 Rated capacities. Hoists shall have rated capacities consistent with the loads handled...

  20. 40 CFR 35.2123 - Reserve capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reserve capacity. 35.2123 Section 35... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2123 Reserve capacity. EPA will limit grant assistance for reserve capacity as follows: (a) If EPA awarded a grant for a Step...

  1. 30 CFR 57.19001 - Rated capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rated capacities. 57.19001 Section 57.19001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Hoists § 57.19001 Rated capacities. Hoists shall have rated capacities consistent with the loads...

  2. 47 CFR 80.919 - Required capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Required capacity. 80.919 Section 80.919... capacity. If either the main or reserve power supply includes batteries, these batteries must have sufficient reserve capacity to permit proper operation of the required transmitter and receiver for at...

  3. 40 CFR 35.2123 - Reserve capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reserve capacity. 35.2123 Section 35... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2123 Reserve capacity. EPA will limit grant assistance for reserve capacity as follows: (a) If EPA awarded a grant for a Step...

  4. 24 CFR 574.410 - Capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Capacity. 574.410 Section 574.410... Project Sponsors § 574.410 Capacity. The grantee shall ensure that any project sponsor with which the grantee contracts to carry out an activity under this part has the capacity and capability to...

  5. 40 CFR 35.2123 - Reserve capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reserve capacity. 35.2123 Section 35... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2123 Reserve capacity. EPA will limit grant assistance for reserve capacity as follows: (a) If EPA awarded a grant for a Step...

  6. 30 CFR 77.1402 - Rated capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rated capacity. 77.1402 Section 77.1402 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY... § 77.1402 Rated capacity. Hoists and elevators shall have rated capacities consistent with the...

  7. 47 CFR 80.861 - Required capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Required capacity. 80.861 Section 80.861... Required capacity. If the main power supply or the reserve power supply provided for the purpose of... capacity available at all times while the vessel is leaving or attempting to leave a harbor or port for...

  8. 47 CFR 80.861 - Required capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Required capacity. 80.861 Section 80.861... Required capacity. If the main power supply or the reserve power supply provided for the purpose of... capacity available at all times while the vessel is leaving or attempting to leave a harbor or port for...

  9. 40 CFR 35.2123 - Reserve capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reserve capacity. 35.2123 Section 35... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2123 Reserve capacity. EPA will limit grant assistance for reserve capacity as follows: (a) If EPA awarded a grant for a Step...

  10. 47 CFR 80.861 - Required capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Required capacity. 80.861 Section 80.861... Required capacity. If the main power supply or the reserve power supply provided for the purpose of... capacity available at all times while the vessel is leaving or attempting to leave a harbor or port for...

  11. 47 CFR 80.861 - Required capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Required capacity. 80.861 Section 80.861... Required capacity. If the main power supply or the reserve power supply provided for the purpose of... capacity available at all times while the vessel is leaving or attempting to leave a harbor or port for...

  12. 30 CFR 77.1402 - Rated capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rated capacity. 77.1402 Section 77.1402 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY... § 77.1402 Rated capacity. Hoists and elevators shall have rated capacities consistent with the...

  13. 47 CFR 80.919 - Required capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Required capacity. 80.919 Section 80.919... capacity. If either the main or reserve power supply includes batteries, these batteries must have sufficient reserve capacity to permit proper operation of the required transmitter and receiver for at...

  14. 47 CFR 80.919 - Required capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Required capacity. 80.919 Section 80.919... capacity. If either the main or reserve power supply includes batteries, these batteries must have sufficient reserve capacity to permit proper operation of the required transmitter and receiver for at...

  15. 47 CFR 80.919 - Required capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Required capacity. 80.919 Section 80.919... capacity. If either the main or reserve power supply includes batteries, these batteries must have sufficient reserve capacity to permit proper operation of the required transmitter and receiver for at...

  16. 24 CFR 574.410 - Capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Capacity. 574.410 Section 574.410... Project Sponsors § 574.410 Capacity. The grantee shall ensure that any project sponsor with which the grantee contracts to carry out an activity under this part has the capacity and capability to...

  17. 30 CFR 56.19001 - Rated capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rated capacities. 56.19001 Section 56.19001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... § 56.19001 Rated capacities. Hoists shall have rated capacities consistent with the loads handled...

  18. 30 CFR 77.1402 - Rated capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rated capacity. 77.1402 Section 77.1402 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY... § 77.1402 Rated capacity. Hoists and elevators shall have rated capacities consistent with the...

  19. 30 CFR 57.19001 - Rated capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rated capacities. 57.19001 Section 57.19001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Hoists § 57.19001 Rated capacities. Hoists shall have rated capacities consistent with the loads...

  20. 24 CFR 574.410 - Capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Capacity. 574.410 Section 574.410... Project Sponsors § 574.410 Capacity. The grantee shall ensure that any project sponsor with which the grantee contracts to carry out an activity under this part has the capacity and capability to...

  1. 30 CFR 57.19001 - Rated capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rated capacities. 57.19001 Section 57.19001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Hoists § 57.19001 Rated capacities. Hoists shall have rated capacities consistent with the loads...

  2. 30 CFR 77.1402 - Rated capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rated capacity. 77.1402 Section 77.1402 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY... § 77.1402 Rated capacity. Hoists and elevators shall have rated capacities consistent with the...

  3. 30 CFR 57.19001 - Rated capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rated capacities. 57.19001 Section 57.19001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Hoists § 57.19001 Rated capacities. Hoists shall have rated capacities consistent with the loads...

  4. Understanding Dimensions of Organizational Evaluation Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourgeois, Isabelle; Cousins, J. Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Organizational evaluation capacity building has been a topic of increasing interest in recent years. However, the actual dimensions of evaluation capacity have not been clearly articulated through empirical research. This study sought to address this gap by identifying the key dimensions of evaluation capacity in Canadian federal government…

  5. Partnership to build research capacity.

    PubMed

    Boland, Mary G; Kamikawa, Cindy; Inouye, Jillian; Latimer, Renee W; Marshall, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Today's nursing leaders are setting the stage for the next evolution--bringing together skilled clinicians and administrators with peers in education to create new approaches to leading the profession forward. Partnerships share goals, common purpose, mutual respect, willingness to negotiate and compromise, informed participation, information giving, and shared decision making. The shared practice academia effort between a public university and a private health care system situated in the island state of Hawai'i is described. The medical center and school of nursing pursued individual strategic efforts to build research capacity and used the opportunity to fund academic practice research projects. The mutual need and recognition of the high stakes involved, in concert with stable, committed leaders at all levels, were key to the early success of their efforts. Through the formal research partnership mechanism, a discrete focus was created for efforts and used to move to tactical, operational, and interpersonal integration in this relationship.

  6. Working capacity and cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Martikainen, Kirsti K; Luukkaala, Tiina H; Marttila, Reijo J

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this questionnaire study was to assess the effect of cervical dystonia on patients' working capacity. Of the 303 working-aged members of the Finnish Dystonia Association (N = 433) who participated in the study 247 (82%) had cervical dystonia. Their median age was 50 years, the median duration of CD symptoms was 12.3 years. Most (78%) subjects were on botulinum toxin treatment. Ninety-seven (39%) had retired because of CD at a median age of 48 years; 96 (39%) of the subjects were working: 87 full-time and 9 part-time. The remaining participants were on sick leave, unemployed, studying or retired of other reasons. Retirement occurred more than ten years earlier compared with the general Finnish population. All possibilities to help CD patients to continue longer in work should be considered early.

  7. High current capacity electrical connector

    DOEpatents

    Bettis, Edward S.; Watts, Harry L.

    1976-01-13

    An electrical connector is provided for coupling high current capacity electrical conductors such as copper busses or the like. The connector is arranged in a "sandwiched" configuration in which a conductor plate contacts the busses along major surfaces thereof clamped between two stainless steel backing plates. The conductor plate is provided with a plurality of contact buttons affixed therein in a spaced array such that the caps of the buttons extend above the conductor plate surface to contact the busses. When clamping bolts provided through openings in the sandwiched arrangement are tightened, Belleville springs provided under the rim of each button cap are compressed and resiliently force the caps into contact with the busses' contacting surfaces to maintain a predetermined electrical contact area provided by the button cap tops. The contact area does not change with changing thermal or mechanical stresses applied to the coupled conductors.

  8. Storage capacity of correlated perceptrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malzahn, D.; Engel, A.; Kanter, I.

    1997-06-01

    We consider an ensemble of K single-layer perceptrons exposed to random inputs and investigate the conditions under which the couplings of these perceptrons can be chosen such that prescribed correlations between the outputs occur. A general formalism is introduced using a multiperceptron cost function that allows one to determine the maximal number of random inputs as a function of the desired values of the correlations. Replica-symmetric results for K=2 and K=3 are compared with properties of two-layer networks of tree-structure and fixed Boolean function between hidden units and output. The results show which correlations in the hidden layer of multilayer neural networks are crucial for the value of the storage capacity.

  9. Programming placental nutrient transport capacity

    PubMed Central

    Fowden, A L; Ward, J W; Wooding, F P B; Forhead, A J; Constancia, M

    2006-01-01

    Many animal studies and human epidemiological findings have shown that impaired growth in utero is associated with physiological abnormalities in later life and have linked this to tissue programming during suboptimal intrauterine conditions at critical periods of development. However, few of these studies have considered the contribution of the placenta to the ensuing adult phenotype. In mammals, the major determinant of intrauterine growth is the placental nutrient supply, which, in turn, depends on the size, morphology, blood supply and transporter abundance of the placenta and on synthesis and metabolism of nutrients and hormones by the uteroplacental tissues. This review examines the regulation of placental nutrient transfer capacity and the potential programming effects of nutrition and glucocorticoid over-exposure on placental phenotype with particular emphasis on the role of the Igf2 gene in these processes. PMID:16439433

  10. [Research progress on environmental carrying capacity].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Sun, Tieheng; Li, Peijun; Li, Fayun

    2005-04-01

    To study the theories and quantification methods of environmental carrying capacity is of significance in reality for directing human beings economic behaviors and harmonizing the relationships between social development and environment. In this paper, the definition of environmental carrying capacity was introduced from the aspects of "capacity", "threshold" and "capability", with the main characteristics of objective and subjective, regional and temporal, and dynamic and adjustable, and its research progress was reviewed. On the basis of these, the quantification methods of environmental carrying capacity, including exponential assessment, carrying rate assessment, system dynamics, and multi-objective optimization, were analyzed, and the research perspectives of environmental carrying capacity were discussed.

  11. Mammalian cell culture capacity for biopharmaceutical manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Dawn M; Ransohoff, Thomas C

    2014-01-01

    : With worldwide sales of biopharmaceuticals increasing each year and continuing growth on the horizon, the manufacture of mammalian biopharmaceuticals has become a major global enterprise. We describe the current and future industry wide supply of manufacturing capacity with regard to capacity type, distribution, and geographic location. Bioreactor capacity and the use of single-use products for biomanufacturing are also profiled. An analysis of the use of this capacity is performed, including a discussion of current trends that will influence capacity growth, availability, and utilization in the coming years.

  12. Removal of trivalent chromium from aqueous solution by zeolite synthesized from coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Wu, Deyi; Sui, Yanming; He, Shengbing; Wang, Xinze; Li, Chunjie; Kong, Hainan

    2008-07-15

    The capability of 14 zeolites synthesized from different fly ashes (ZFAs) to sequestrate Cr(III) from aqueous solutions was investigated in a batch mode. The influence of pH on the sorption of Cr(III) was examined. ZFAs had a much greater ability than fly ash to remove Cr(III), due to the high cation exchange capacity (CEC) and the high acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of ZFAs. The mechanism of Cr(III) removal by ZFAs involved ion exchange and precipitation. A high-calcium content in both the fly ashes and ZFAs resulted in a high ANC value and, as a result, a high immobilization capacity for Cr(III). The pH strongly influenced Cr(III) removal by ZFAs. Inside the solubility range, removal of chromium increased with increasing pH. Hydroxysodalite made from a high-calcium fly ash had a higher sorptive capacity for Cr(III) than the NaP1 zeolite from medium- and low-calcium fly ashes. On the other hand, at pH values above the solubility range, the efficiency of chromium removal by the ZFAs approached 100% due to the precipitation of Cr(OH)3 on the sorbent surfaces. It is concluded that ZFAs and high-calcium fly ashes may be promising materials for the purification of Cr(III) from water/wastewater.

  13. Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

    2011-06-01

    This study estimates the capacity value of a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant at a variety of locations within the western United States. This is done by optimizing the operation of the CSP plant and by using the effective load carrying capability (ELCC) metric, which is a standard reliability-based capacity value estimation technique. Although the ELCC metric is the most accurate estimation technique, we show that a simpler capacity-factor-based approximation method can closely estimate the ELCC value. Without storage, the capacity value of CSP plants varies widely depending on the year and solar multiple. The average capacity value of plants evaluated ranged from 45%?90% with a solar multiple range of 1.0-1.5. When introducing thermal energy storage (TES), the capacity value of the CSP plant is more difficult to estimate since one must account for energy in storage. We apply a capacity-factor-based technique under two different market settings: an energy-only market and an energy and capacity market. Our results show that adding TES to a CSP plant can increase its capacity value significantly at all of the locations. Adding a single hour of TES significantly increases the capacity value above the no-TES case, and with four hours of storage or more, the average capacity value at all locations exceeds 90%.

  14. Assessing urban adaptive capacity to climate change.

    PubMed

    Araya-Muñoz, Dahyann; Metzger, Marc J; Stuart, Neil; Wilson, A Meriwether W; Alvarez, Luis

    2016-12-01

    Despite the growing number of studies focusing on urban vulnerability to climate change, adaptive capacity, which is a key component of the IPCC definition of vulnerability, is rarely assessed quantitatively. We examine the capacity of adaptation in the Concepción Metropolitan Area, Chile. A flexible methodology based on spatial fuzzy modelling was developed to standardise and aggregate, through a stepwise approach, seventeen indicators derived from widely available census statistical data into an adaptive capacity index. The results indicate that all the municipalities in the CMA increased their level of adaptive capacity between 1992 and 2002. However, the relative differences between municipalities did not change significantly over the studied timeframe. Fuzzy overlay allowed us to standardise and to effectively aggregate indicators with differing ranges and granularities of attribute values into an overall index. It also provided a conceptually sound and reproducible means of exploring the interplay of many indicators that individually influence adaptive capacity. Furthermore, it captured the complex, aggregated and continued nature of the adaptive capacity, favouring to deal with gaps of data and knowledge associated with the concept of adaptive capacity. The resulting maps can help identify municipalities where adaptive capacity is weak and identify which components of adaptive capacity need strengthening. Identification of these capacity conditions can stimulate dialogue amongst policymakers and stakeholders regarding how to manage urban areas and how to prioritise resources for urban development in ways that can also improve adaptive capacity and thus reduce vulnerability to climate change.

  15. Novelties that change carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Douglas H

    2012-09-01

    Comparative developmental studies have revealed a rich array of details about the patterns and processes of morphological change in animals and increasingly in plants. But, applying these insights to the study of major episodes of evolutionary innovation requires understanding how these novel morphologies become established and sufficiently abundant (either as individuals within a species or as a clade of species) to be preserved in the fossil record, and, in many cases, to influence ecological processes. Evolutionary novelties may: (1) disappear without changing the species; (2) be associated with the generation (through selection or drift) of a new species; and if the latter (3) may or may not become ecologically significant. Only the latter are commonly preserved in the fossil record. These alternatives mirror the distinction among historians of technology between innovation and invention. Here, I argue that specific sorts of evolutionary inventions drive ecological transformation, essentially constructing an environment for themselves and ancillary organisms through ecological spillover effects, increasing the "carrying capacity" of an ecosystem.

  16. Advancing leadership capacity in nursing.

    PubMed

    Scott, Elaine S; Miles, Jane

    2013-01-01

    To address the potential shortage of nurse leaders, the profession must evaluate current strategies in both education and practice. While many new graduates dream of becoming a nurse practitioner or nurse anesthetist, few transition into practice with the goal of becoming a nurse leader. To increase the number of nurses capable of leadership, the profession must address 2 critical issues. First, effort must be made to augment faculty and students' conceptualization of nursing such that leadership is seen as a dimension of practice for all nurses, not just those in formal leadership roles. In so doing, leadership identity development would be seen as a part of becoming an expert nurse. Second, a comprehensive conceptual framework for lifelong leadership development of nurses needs to be designed. This framework should allow for baseline leadership capacity building in all nurses and advanced leadership development for those in formal administrative and advanced practice roles. The knowledge and skill requirements for quality improvement and patient safety have been explored and recommendations made for Quality and Safety Education for Nurses, but parallel work needs to be done to outline educational content, objectives, and effective pedagogy for advancing leadership development in nursing students at all levels.

  17. Assessment of lake sensitivity to acidic deposition in national parks of the Rocky Mountains.

    PubMed

    Nanus, L; Williams, M W; Campbell, D H; Tonnessen, K A; Blett, T; Clow, D W

    2009-06-01

    The sensitivity of high-elevation lakes to acidic deposition was evaluated in five national parks of the Rocky Mountains based on statistical relations between lake acid-neutralizing capacity concentrations and basin characteristics. Acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) of 151 lakes sampled during synoptic surveys and basin-characteristic information derived from geographic information system (GIS) data sets were used to calibrate the statistical models. The explanatory basin variables that were considered included topographic parameters, bedrock type, and vegetation type. A logistic regression model was developed, and modeling results were cross-validated through lake sampling during fall 2004 at 58 lakes. The model was applied to lake basins greater than 1 ha in area in Glacier National Park (n = 244 lakes), Grand Teton National Park (n = 106 lakes), Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve (n = 11 lakes), Rocky Mountain National Park (n = 114 lakes), and Yellowstone National Park (n = 294 lakes). Lakes that had a high probability of having an ANC concentration <100 microeq/L, and therefore sensitive to acidic deposition, are located in basins with elevations >3000 m, with <30% of the catchment having northeast aspect and with >80% of the catchment bedrock having low buffering capacity. The modeling results indicate that the most sensitive lakes are located in Rocky Mountain National Park and Grand Teton National Park. This technique for evaluating the lake sensitivity to acidic deposition is useful for designing long-term monitoring plans and is potentially transferable to other remote mountain areas of the United States and the world.

  18. [Regeneration capacity of skeletal muscle].

    PubMed

    Wernig, A

    2003-07-01

    The organotypic stem cell of skeletal muscle has previously been known as satellite cell. They allow muscle fiber growth during ontogenesis, enable fiber hypertrophy and are responsible for the very efficient repair of muscle fibers. This efficient apparatus is to some degree counterbalanced by an enormous use of the satellite cell pool: fiber atrophy probably is accompanied by loss of myonuclei such that every reversal of atrophy is bound to use new myonuclei i.e. satellite cells. How often in life does this occur? Hard to say. Moreover, the potent repair capacity is challenged by an unexpected vulnerability of skeletal muscle fibers: Passive stretching of contracted muscles may cause multiple "microdamage," disruption of contractile elements or tiny areas of true necrosis (focal necrosis). How often does this happen? Well, for many of us at least once per year when we go up and down mountains during vacation time, followed by sour muscles. Others may decide to change his/her (locomotor) behaviour by severe onset of jogging; it may happen that they suffer kidney failure on Monday due to muscle microdamage and the transfer of myoproteins into the serum over weekend. Also 20 minutes of stepping up and down something like a chair will do: There is a remarkable increase in kreatin kinase and other muscle derived proteins which lasts for days and is bound to reflect some muscle damage. How about sportsmen and worker who repeatedly use their muscles in such a way? We don't have answers yet to most of these questions, but considerable amount of information has been collected over the last years both in animal and--less--in human. What is common in all cases of growth and repair is the proliferation of the satellite cells and their consequent incorporation and fusion with the parent fiber. This way focal damage is repaired often without visible reminders. We would run out of satellite cells were they not stem cells: After division one daughter remains a satellite cell

  19. North Dakota Refining Capacity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Hill; Kurt Swenson; Carl Tuura; Jim Simon; Robert Vermette; Gilberto Marcha; Steve Kelly; David Wells; Ed Palmer; Kuo Yu; Tram Nguyen; Juliam Migliavacca

    2011-01-05

    According to a 2008 report issued by the United States Geological Survey, North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation. With the size and remoteness of the discovery, the question became 'can a business case be made for increasing refining capacity in North Dakota?' And, if so what is the impact to existing players in the region. To answer the question, a study committee comprised of leaders in the region's petroleum industry were brought together to define the scope of the study, hire a consulting firm and oversee the study. The study committee met frequently to provide input on the findings and modify the course of the study, as needed. The study concluded that the Petroleum Area Defense District II (PADD II) has an oversupply of gasoline. With that in mind, a niche market, naphtha, was identified. Naphtha is used as a diluent used for pipelining the bitumen (heavy crude) from Canada to crude markets. The study predicted there will continue to be an increase in the demand for naphtha through 2030. The study estimated the optimal configuration for the refinery at 34,000 barrels per day (BPD) producing 15,000 BPD of naphtha and a 52 percent refinery charge for jet and diesel yield. The financial modeling assumed the sponsor of a refinery would invest its own capital to pay for construction costs. With this assumption, the internal rate of return is 9.2 percent which is not sufficient to attract traditional investment given the risk factor of the project. With that in mind, those interested in pursuing this niche market will need to identify incentives to improve the rate of return.

  20. Dating human cultural capacity using phylogenetic principles.

    PubMed

    Lind, J; Lindenfors, P; Ghirlanda, S; Lidén, K; Enquist, M

    2013-01-01

    Humans have genetically based unique abilities making complex culture possible; an assemblage of traits which we term "cultural capacity". The age of this capacity has for long been subject to controversy. We apply phylogenetic principles to date this capacity, integrating evidence from archaeology, genetics, paleoanthropology, and linguistics. We show that cultural capacity is older than the first split in the modern human lineage, and at least 170,000 years old, based on data on hyoid bone morphology, FOXP2 alleles, agreement between genetic and language trees, fire use, burials, and the early appearance of tools comparable to those of modern hunter-gatherers. We cannot exclude that Neanderthals had cultural capacity some 500,000 years ago. A capacity for complex culture, therefore, must have existed before complex culture itself. It may even originated long before. This seeming paradox is resolved by theoretical models suggesting that cultural evolution is exceedingly slow in its initial stages.

  1. Heat Capacity of 1D Molecular Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagatskii, M. I.; Barabashko, M. S.; Sumarokov, V. V.; Jeżowski, A.; Stachowiak, P.

    2017-04-01

    The heat capacity of 1D chains of nitrogen and methane molecules (adsorbed in the outer grooves of bundles of closed-cap single-walled carbon nanotubes) has been studied in the temperature ranges 2-40 and 2-60 K, respectively. The temperature dependence of the heat capacity of 1D chains of nitrogen molecules below 3 K is close to a linear. It was found that the rotational heat capacity of methane molecules is a significant part of the total heat capacity of the chains throughout the whole investigated temperature range, whereas in the case of nitrogen, the librations are significant only above 15 K. The dependence of the heat capacity for methane below 10 K indicates the presence of a Schottky anomaly caused by the tunneling between the lowest energy levels of the CH4 molecule rotational spectra. Characteristic features observed in the temperature dependence of the heat capacity of 1D methane crystals are also discussed.

  2. 29 CFR 778.600 - Veterans' subsistence allow- ances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS OVERTIME COMPENSATION... subsistence allowances provided by Public Law 346 for payment to veterans are not paid as compensation...

  3. Process for producing ceramic nitrides anc carbonitrides and their precursors

    DOEpatents

    Brown, G.M.; Maya, L.

    1987-02-25

    A process for preparing ceramic nitrides and carbon nitrides in the form of very pure, fine particulate powder. Appropriate precursors is prepared by reaching a transition metal alkylamide with ammonia to produce a mixture of metal amide and metal imide in the form of an easily pyrolyzable precipitate.

  4. Large capacity cryopropellant orbital storage facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    A comprehensive study was performed to develop the major features of a large capacity orbital propellant storage facility for the space-based cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle. Projected propellant usage and delivery schedules can be accommodated by two orbital tank sets of 100,000 lb storage capacity, with advanced missions expected to require increased capacity. Information is given on tank pressurization schemes, propellant transfer configurations, pump specifications, the refrigeration system, and flight tests.

  5. Assured load carrying capability and capacity credit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, H.

    1981-04-01

    The determination of assured load carrying capability and the capacity credit for use in planning windpowered electric generation facilities is considered. Calculation of the available capacity of thermal power plants is described and compared with calculation of available capacity for wind turbines, taking into account outages caused by the unavailability of the primary energy, wind. The assured load carrying capability of power plants is defined. An operational definition of the capacity credit of wind turbines as related to a fixed time t Epsilon T is presented and extended to the period T.

  6. Population growth and earth's human carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J E

    1995-07-21

    Earth's capacity to support people is determined both by natural constraints and by human choices concerning economics, environment, culture (including values and politics), and demography. Human carrying capacity is therefore dynamic and uncertain. Human choice is not captured by ecological notions of carrying capacity that are appropriate for nonhuman populations. Simple mathematical models of the relation between human population growth and human carrying capacity can account for faster-than-exponential population growth followed by a slowing population growth rate, as observed in recent human history.

  7. Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures. Part II. Capacity fade analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadass, P.; Haran, Bala; White, Ralph; Popov, Branko N.

    A complete capacity fade analysis was carried out for Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures. The major causes of capacity loss were identified and a complete capacity fade balance was carried out to account for the total capacity loss of Li-ion battery as a function of cycle number and temperature. The three most significant parameters that cause capacity loss were loss of secondary active material (LiCoO 2/carbon) and primary active material (Li +) and the rate capability losses. Intrinsic capacity measurements for both positive and negative electrode has been used to estimate the capacity loss due to secondary active material and a charge balance gives the capacity lost due to primary active material (Li +). Capacity fade has been quantified with secondary active material loss dominating the other losses.

  8. Emergent Biosynthetic Capacity in Simple Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hsuan-Chao; Levy, Roie; Borenstein, Elhanan

    2014-01-01

    Microbes have an astonishing capacity to transform their environments. Yet, the metabolic capacity of a single species is limited and the vast majority of microorganisms form complex communities and join forces to exhibit capabilities far exceeding those achieved by any single species. Such enhanced metabolic capacities represent a promising route to many medical, environmental, and industrial applications and call for the development of a predictive, systems-level understanding of synergistic microbial capacity. Here we present a comprehensive computational framework, integrating high-quality metabolic models of multiple species, temporal dynamics, and flux variability analysis, to study the metabolic capacity and dynamics of simple two-species microbial ecosystems. We specifically focus on detecting emergent biosynthetic capacity – instances in which a community growing on some medium produces and secretes metabolites that are not secreted by any member species when growing in isolation on that same medium. Using this framework to model a large collection of two-species communities on multiple media, we demonstrate that emergent biosynthetic capacity is highly prevalent. We identify commonly observed emergent metabolites and metabolic reprogramming patterns, characterizing typical mechanisms of emergent capacity. We further find that emergent secretion tends to occur in two waves, the first as soon as the two organisms are introduced, and the second when the medium is depleted and nutrients become limited. Finally, aiming to identify global community determinants of emergent capacity, we find a marked association between the level of emergent biosynthetic capacity and the functional/phylogenetic distance between community members. Specifically, we demonstrate a “Goldilocks” principle, where high levels of emergent capacity are observed when the species comprising the community are functionally neither too close, nor too distant. Taken together, our results

  9. Emergent biosynthetic capacity in simple microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hsuan-Chao; Levy, Roie; Borenstein, Elhanan

    2014-07-01

    Microbes have an astonishing capacity to transform their environments. Yet, the metabolic capacity of a single species is limited and the vast majority of microorganisms form complex communities and join forces to exhibit capabilities far exceeding those achieved by any single species. Such enhanced metabolic capacities represent a promising route to many medical, environmental, and industrial applications and call for the development of a predictive, systems-level understanding of synergistic microbial capacity. Here we present a comprehensive computational framework, integrating high-quality metabolic models of multiple species, temporal dynamics, and flux variability analysis, to study the metabolic capacity and dynamics of simple two-species microbial ecosystems. We specifically focus on detecting emergent biosynthetic capacity--instances in which a community growing on some medium produces and secretes metabolites that are not secreted by any member species when growing in isolation on that same medium. Using this framework to model a large collection of two-species communities on multiple media, we demonstrate that emergent biosynthetic capacity is highly prevalent. We identify commonly observed emergent metabolites and metabolic reprogramming patterns, characterizing typical mechanisms of emergent capacity. We further find that emergent secretion tends to occur in two waves, the first as soon as the two organisms are introduced, and the second when the medium is depleted and nutrients become limited. Finally, aiming to identify global community determinants of emergent capacity, we find a marked association between the level of emergent biosynthetic capacity and the functional/phylogenetic distance between community members. Specifically, we demonstrate a "Goldilocks" principle, where high levels of emergent capacity are observed when the species comprising the community are functionally neither too close, nor too distant. Taken together, our results

  10. Episodic acidification of streams in the northeastern United States: Chemical and biological results of the episodic response project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wigington, P.J.; Baker, J.P.; DeWalle, D.R.; Kretser, W.A.; Murdoch, P.S.

    1993-10-01

    The document is the result of a cooperative research effort involving scientists from several agencies as part of the Aquatic Effects Research Program (AERP) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The Episodic Response Project (ERP) is an intensive study conducted at a limited number of sites, rather than an extensive regional study. The three areas targeted by the ERP are the Northern Appalachian Plateau of Pennsylvania, and the Adirondack and Catskill Mountains of New York. Each stream was monitored from fall 1988 through spring 1990, with continuous measurement of discharge and automated water sampling at fixed time intervals or at specified stage level changes. The water samples underwent chemical analysis for acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), pH, total dissolved aluminum, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), sulfate, nitrate, chloride, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium. Furthermore, a subset of samples were analyzed for inorganic aluminum. Specific streams, participating institutions and cooperators, methods, and results are presented in the report.

  11. Geology-based method of assessing sensitivity of streams to acidic deposition in Charles and Anne Arundel Counties, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Karen C.; Bricker, Owen P.

    1991-01-01

    The report describes the results of a study to assess the sensitivity of streams to acidic deposition in Charles and Anne Arundel Counties, Maryland using a geology-based method. Water samples were collected from streams in July and August 1988 when streams were at base-flow conditions. Eighteen water samples collected from streams in Charles County, and 17 water samples from streams in Anne Arundel County were analyzed in the field for pH, specific conductance, and acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC); 8 water samples from streams in Charles County were analyzed in the laboratory for chloride and sulfate concentrations. The assessment revealed that streams in these counties are sensitive to acidification by acidic deposition.

  12. Storage capacity of the Tilinglike Learning Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhot, Arnaud; Gordon, Mirta B.

    2001-02-01

    The storage capacity of an incremental learning algorithm for the parity machine, the Tilinglike Learning Algorithm, is analytically determined in the limit of a large number of hidden perceptrons. Different learning rules for the simple perceptron are investigated. The usual Gardner-Derrida rule leads to a storage capacity close to the upper bound, which is independent of the learning algorithm considered.

  13. 15 CFR 241.1 - Capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... OTHER DRY COMMODITIES, AND FOR CRANBERRIES § 241.1 Capacities. (a) The capacities of the standard barrel for fruits, vegetables, and other dry commodities, other than cranberries, and its subdivisions, are... standard cranberry barrel and its subdivisions are as follows: Size Cubic inches Bushels 1 Quarts...

  14. 15 CFR 241.1 - Capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... OTHER DRY COMMODITIES, AND FOR CRANBERRIES § 241.1 Capacities. (a) The capacities of the standard barrel for fruits, vegetables, and other dry commodities, other than cranberries, and its subdivisions, are... standard cranberry barrel and its subdivisions are as follows: Size Cubic inches Bushels 1 Quarts...

  15. 15 CFR 241.1 - Capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... OTHER DRY COMMODITIES, AND FOR CRANBERRIES § 241.1 Capacities. (a) The capacities of the standard barrel for fruits, vegetables, and other dry commodities, other than cranberries, and its subdivisions, are... standard cranberry barrel and its subdivisions are as follows: Size Cubic inches Bushels 1 Quarts...

  16. 15 CFR 241.1 - Capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OTHER DRY COMMODITIES, AND FOR CRANBERRIES § 241.1 Capacities. (a) The capacities of the standard barrel for fruits, vegetables, and other dry commodities, other than cranberries, and its subdivisions, are... standard cranberry barrel and its subdivisions are as follows: Size Cubic inches Bushels 1 Quarts...

  17. 15 CFR 241.1 - Capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... OTHER DRY COMMODITIES, AND FOR CRANBERRIES § 241.1 Capacities. (a) The capacities of the standard barrel for fruits, vegetables, and other dry commodities, other than cranberries, and its subdivisions, are... standard cranberry barrel and its subdivisions are as follows: Size Cubic inches Bushels 1 Quarts...

  18. Vertical boring mill capacity is increased

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. J.

    1968-01-01

    Commercially available vertical boring mill with a nominal capacity to 27 feet in diameter of workpiece has been modified in-shop to handle work up to 36 feet in diameter. Capacity was increased by adding extension saddles to the mill support columns on each side.

  19. The Heat Capacity of Ideal Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    The heat capacity of an ideal gas has been shown to be calculable directly by statistical mechanics if the energies of the quantum states are known. However, unless one makes careful calculations, it is not easy for a student to understand the qualitative results. Why there are maxima (and occasionally minima) in heat capacity-temperature curves…

  20. Liberating Leadership Capacity: Pathways to Educational Wisdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Linda; Zimmerman, Diane P.; Gardner, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    During the past quarter century, conceptions of leadership have evolved in concert with breakthrough discoveries in science and generative learning. "Liberating Leadership Capacity" captures these new ideas through the integration of the authors' earlier works in constructivist leadership and leadership capacity. What emerges is a…

  1. 25 CFR 168.5 - Grazing capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Grazing capacity. 168.5 Section 168.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING REGULATIONS FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.5 Grazing capacity. (a) The Area Director shall prescribe the maximum number of...

  2. 25 CFR 168.5 - Grazing capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Grazing capacity. 168.5 Section 168.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING REGULATIONS FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.5 Grazing capacity. (a) The Area Director shall prescribe the maximum number of...

  3. Assessment of capacity in an aging society.

    PubMed

    Moye, Jennifer; Marson, Daniel C; Edelstein, Barry

    2013-04-01

    Over the past 40 years, the assessment and scientific study of capacity in older adults has emerged as a distinct field of clinical and research activity for psychologists. This new field reflects the convergence of several trends: the aging of American society, the growing incidence and prevalence of dementia, and the patient rights, deinstitutionalization, and disability rights movements. Because of these forces, capacity issues now permeate the fabric of everyday life, whether in the form of guardianship petitions, questions of capacity to consent to treatment, the ability to make a new will, or participation in human research. In seeking to resolve these issues, families, clinicians, and legal professionals increasingly turn to psychologists to assess a capacity and to provide empirically supported judgments that properly balance autonomy and protection for the individual. Psychologists have taken a leading role in the development of functional assessment instruments that measure important aspects of the capacity construct. In addition, psychology has been a major contributor to the scientific study of capacity. In collaboration with colleagues from medicine and law, psychologists have articulated crucial theoretical frameworks that integrate legal, clinical, and ethical dimensions of the capacity problem. This article focuses on the evolution of theory, law, science, and practice in the evaluation of capacity in older adults and its recent culmination in a series of interdisciplinary handbooks sponsored by the American Psychological Association and the American Bar Association.

  4. REDUCTION CAPACITY OF SALTSTONE AND SALTSTONE COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.

    2009-11-30

    The duration that saltstone retains its ability to immobilize some key radionuclides, such as technetium (Tc), plutonium (Pu), and neptunium (Np), depends on its capacity to maintain a low redox status (or low oxidation state). The reduction capacity is a measure of the mass of reductants present in the saltstone; the reductants are the active ingredients that immobilize Tc, Pu, and Np. Once reductants are exhausted, the saltstone loses its ability to immobilize these radionuclides. The reduction capacity values reported here are based on the Ce(IV)/Fe(II) system. The Portland cement (198 {micro}eq/g) and especially the fly ash (299 {micro}eq/g) had a measurable amount of reduction capacity, but the blast furnace slag (820 {micro}eq/g) not surprisingly accounted for most of the reduction capacity. The blast furnace slag contains ferrous iron and sulfides which are strong reducing and precipitating species for a large number of solids. Three saltstone samples containing 45% slag or one sample containing 90% slag had essentially the same reduction capacity as pure slag. There appears to be some critical concentration between 10% and 45% slag in the Saltstone formulation that is needed to create the maximum reduction capacity. Values from this work supported those previously reported, namely that the reduction capacity of SRS saltstone is about 820 {micro}eq/g; this value is recommended for estimating the longevity that the Saltstone Disposal Facility will retain its ability to immobilize radionuclides.

  5. Thinking about Community Capacity Building & Asset Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Building Resources, Spruce Grove (Alberta).

    This book describes the mindshift that is the key to successful community capacity building and to the development of social and economic structures that nurture local sustainability. Its focus is how the development of community, through community capacity building, connects, animates, and informs citizens. Chapter I introduces community building…

  6. Measuring Fiscal Capacity of School Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Harry A.

    Ways of measuring the fiscal capacity of school systems are examined in this paper, which presents a representative tax system model. Fiscal capacity is influenced by factors other than tax base size; the "ideal" model should address adjustments for variations in cost across communities and school systems. The first section examines the…

  7. UNDERSTANDING, DERIVING, AND COMPUTING BUFFER CAPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Derivation and systematic calculation of buffer capacity is a topic that seems often to be neglected in chemistry courses and given minimal treatment in most texts. However, buffer capacity is very important in the chemistry of natural waters and potable water. It affects corro...

  8. A capacity assessment towards more resilient societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlicke, C.; Steinführer, A.

    2012-04-01

    Social capacity building for natural hazards is a topic increasingly gaining relevance not only for so-called developing countries but also for European welfare states which are continuously challenged by the social, economic and ecological impacts of natural hazards. Following an outline of recent governance changes with regard to natural hazards, we develop a heuristic model of social capacity building by taking into account a wide range of existing expertise from different fields of research. Particular attention is paid to social vulnerability and its assessment, as well as to risk communication and risk education as specific strategies of social capacity building. We propose to distinguish between interventionist and participatory approaches, thus enabling for a better understanding of existing practices of social capacity building as well as their particular strengths and weaknesses. It is from this typology the presentation will develop two kinds of operational social capacity audits; one for communities and one for organisations. These assessments aim to identify appropriate measures and strategies regarding how to enhance, develop and build different kinds of capacities. By using these assessments participants will be able to identify strong capacities and can refer to the recommendations for tips on how to improve capacities identified as weak. That way deficits and outcomes are defined by those who are most likely to be affected by a future hazard event and most likely to be implementing improvements towards resilience.

  9. Working Memory Capacity, Confidence and Scientific Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Ahmadi, Fatheya; Oraif, Fatima

    2009-01-01

    Working memory capacity is now well established as a rate determining factor in much learning and assessment, especially in the sciences. Most of the research has focussed on performance in tests and examinations in subject areas. This paper outlines some exploratory work in which other outcomes are related to working memory capacity. Confidence…

  10. 25 CFR 168.5 - Grazing capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Grazing capacity. 168.5 Section 168.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING REGULATIONS FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.5 Grazing capacity. (a) The Area Director shall prescribe the maximum number of...

  11. 25 CFR 168.5 - Grazing capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Grazing capacity. 168.5 Section 168.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING REGULATIONS FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.5 Grazing capacity. (a) The Area Director shall prescribe the maximum number of...

  12. 25 CFR 168.5 - Grazing capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Grazing capacity. 168.5 Section 168.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING REGULATIONS FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.5 Grazing capacity. (a) The Area Director shall prescribe the maximum number of...

  13. Wind Capacity Credit in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.; Porter, K.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide an analysis and comparison of recent studies on the capacity credit of wind in the United States. We offer suggestions and recommendations for future studies, based on the recent work. We examine key wind capacity studies in the United States, emphasizing those done in the past three years.

  14. 49 CFR 1572.109 - Mental capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... health facility. (b) An applicant is adjudicated as lacking mental capacity if— (1) A court, board... committed to a mental health facility if he or she is formally committed to a mental health facility by a... lacking mental capacity, mental illness, and drug use. This does not include commitment to a mental...

  15. 49 CFR 1572.109 - Mental capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... health facility. (b) An applicant is adjudicated as lacking mental capacity if— (1) A court, board... committed to a mental health facility if he or she is formally committed to a mental health facility by a... lacking mental capacity, mental illness, and drug use. This does not include commitment to a mental...

  16. 49 CFR 1572.109 - Mental capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... health facility. (b) An applicant is adjudicated as lacking mental capacity if— (1) A court, board... committed to a mental health facility if he or she is formally committed to a mental health facility by a... lacking mental capacity, mental illness, and drug use. This does not include commitment to a mental...

  17. 49 CFR 1572.109 - Mental capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... health facility. (b) An applicant is adjudicated as lacking mental capacity if— (1) A court, board... committed to a mental health facility if he or she is formally committed to a mental health facility by a... lacking mental capacity, mental illness, and drug use. This does not include commitment to a mental...

  18. 49 CFR 1572.109 - Mental capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... health facility. (b) An applicant is adjudicated as lacking mental capacity if— (1) A court, board... committed to a mental health facility if he or she is formally committed to a mental health facility by a... lacking mental capacity, mental illness, and drug use. This does not include commitment to a mental...

  19. Assessment of Capacity in an Aging Society

    PubMed Central

    Moye, Jennifer; Marson, Daniel C.; Edelstein, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, the assessment and scientific study of capacity in older adults has emerged as a distinct field of clinical and research activity for psychologists. This new field reflects the convergence of several trends: the aging of American society, the growing incidence and prevalence of dementia, and the patient rights, deinstitutionalization, and disability rights movements. Because of these forces, capacity issues now permeate the fabric of everyday life, whether in the form of guardianship petitions, questions of capacity to consent to treatment, the ability to make a new will, or participation in human research. In seeking to resolve these issues, families, clinicians, and legal professionals increasingly turn to psychologists to assess a capacity and to provide empirically supported judgments that properly balance autonomy and protection for the individual. Psychologists have taken a leading role in the development of functional assessment instruments that measure important aspects of the capacity construct. In addition, psychology has been a major contributor to the scientific study of capacity. In collaboration with colleagues from medicine and law, psychologists have articulated crucial theoretical frameworks that integrate legal, clinical, and ethical dimensions of the capacity problem. This article focuses on the evolution of theory, law, science, and practice in the evaluation of capacity in older adults and its recent culmination in a series of interdisciplinary handbooks sponsored by the American Psychological Association and the American Bar Association. PMID:23586491

  20. 24 CFR 574.410 - Capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Capacity. 574.410 Section 574.410... ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT... Project Sponsors § 574.410 Capacity. The grantee shall ensure that any project sponsor with which...

  1. Correlates of functional capacity among centenarians.

    PubMed

    Martin, Peter; MacDonald, Maurice; Margrett, Jennifer; Siegler, Ilene; Poon, Leonard W; Jazwinski, S M; Green, R C; Gearing, M; Markesbery, W R; Woodard, J L; Johnson, M A; Tenover, J S; Rodgers, W L; Hausman, D B; Rott, C; Davey, A; Arnold, J

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated correlates of functional capacity among participants of the Georgia Centenarian Study. Six domains (demographics and health, positive and negative affect, personality, social and economic support, life events and coping, distal influences) were related to functional capacity for 234 centenarians and near centenarians (i.e., 98 years and older). Data were provided by proxy informants. Domain-specific multiple regression analyses suggested that younger centenarians, those living in the community and rated to be in better health were more likely to have higher functional capacity scores. Higher scores in positive affect, conscientiousness, social provisions, religious coping, and engaged lifestyle were also associated with higher levels of functional capacity. The results suggest that functional capacity levels continue to be associated with age after 100 years of life and that positive affect levels and past lifestyle activities as reported by proxies are salient factors of adaptation in very late life.

  2. Dating human cultural capacity using phylogenetic principles

    PubMed Central

    Lind, J.; Lindenfors, P.; Ghirlanda, S.; Lidén, K.; Enquist, M.

    2013-01-01

    Humans have genetically based unique abilities making complex culture possible; an assemblage of traits which we term “cultural capacity”. The age of this capacity has for long been subject to controversy. We apply phylogenetic principles to date this capacity, integrating evidence from archaeology, genetics, paleoanthropology, and linguistics. We show that cultural capacity is older than the first split in the modern human lineage, and at least 170,000 years old, based on data on hyoid bone morphology, FOXP2 alleles, agreement between genetic and language trees, fire use, burials, and the early appearance of tools comparable to those of modern hunter-gatherers. We cannot exclude that Neanderthals had cultural capacity some 500,000 years ago. A capacity for complex culture, therefore, must have existed before complex culture itself. It may even originated long before. This seeming paradox is resolved by theoretical models suggesting that cultural evolution is exceedingly slow in its initial stages. PMID:23648831

  3. Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity is the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) report containing storage capacity data for crude oil, petroleum products, and selected biofuels. The report includes tables detailing working and net available shell storage capacity by type of facility, product, and Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PAD District). Net available shell storage capacity is broken down further to show the percent for exclusive use by facility operators and the percent leased to others. Crude oil storage capacity data are also provided for Cushing, Oklahoma, an important crude oil market center. Data are released twice each year near the end of May (data for March 31) and near the end of November (data for September 30).

  4. Measurement of anaerobic work capacities in humans.

    PubMed

    Green, S

    1995-01-01

    The development of simple, noninvasive tests of work capacities, underpinned primarily by anaerobic metabolism, proliferated in the early 1970s. A 30-second maximal cycle test developed at the Wingate Institute initiated efforts to develop work tests of anaerobic capacities. Such tests can be developed using any ergometer which simulates competitive conditions and enables an accurate determination of mechanical work output. A 10-second all-out test is commonly used to measure maximal work output generated primarily via the hydrolysis of high-energy phosphagens (i.e. the alactic work capacity). In contrast, a variety of constant-load and all-out tests of anaerobic (alactic plus lactic) work capacity have been proposed. It has been suggested that all-out tests provide more information about physiological capabilities and are easier to apply than constant-load tests. The optimal duration for an all-out test of anaerobic work capacity is proposed at 30 seconds, a duration which may also provide the basis for the development of accurate field tests of anaerobic capacity. There is evidence that the y-intercept of the maximal work-derivation regression is a valid work estimate of anaerobic capacity in athletes, although its utility is undermined by the number of tests required for its derivation.

  5. Photovoltaics effective capacity: Interim final report 2

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, R.; Seals, R.

    1997-11-01

    The authors provide solid evidence, based on more than 8 million data points, that regional photovoltaic (PV) effective capacity is largely unrelated to the region`s solar resource. They confirm, however, that effective capacity is strongly related to load-shape characteristics. The load-shape effective-capacity relationship appears to be valid for end-use loads as small as 100 kW, except possibly in the case of electrically heated buildings. This relationship was used as a tool to produce a US map of PV`s effective capacity. The regions of highest effective capacities include (1) the central US from the northern Great Plains to the metropolitan areas of Chicago and Detroit, down to the lower Mississippi Valley, (2) California and western Arizona, and (3) the northeast metropolitan corridor. The features of this map are considerably different from the traditional solar resource maps. They tend to reflect the socio-economic and climatic factors that indirectly drive PV`s effective capacity: e.g., commercial air-conditioning, little use of electric heat, and strong summer heat waves. The map provides a new and significant insight to a comprehensive valuation of the PV resource. The authors assembled preliminary evidence showing that end-use load type may be related to PV`s effective capacity. Highest effective capacities were found for (nonelectrically heated) office buildings, followed by hospitals. Lowest capacities were found for airports and residences. Many more data points are needed, however, to ascertain and characterize these preliminary findings.

  6. Rehabilitation Medicine Summit: building research capacity.

    PubMed

    Frontera, Walter R; Fuhrer, Marcus J; Jette, Alan M; Chan, Leighton; Cooper, Rory A; Duncan, Pamela W; Kemp, John D; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Peckham, P Hunter; Roth, Elliot J; Tate, Denise G

    2005-12-01

    The general objective of the "Rehabilitation Medicine Summit: Building Research Capacity" was to advance and promote research in medical rehabilitation by making recommendations to expand research capacity. The five elements of research capacity that guided the discussions were: 1) researchers; 2) research culture, environment, and infrastructure; 3) funding; 4) partnerships; and 5) metrics. The 100 participants included representatives of professional organizations, consumer groups, academic departments, researchers, governmental funding agencies, and the private sector. The small group discussions and plenary sessions generated an array of problems, possible solutions, and recommended actions. A post-Summit, multi-organizational initiative is called for to pursue the agendas outlined in this report.

  7. Ethylene capacity tops 77 million mty

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.; Knott, D.

    1995-04-17

    World ethylene production capacity is 77.8 million metric tons/year (mty). This total represents an increase of more than 6 million mty, or almost 9%, over last year`s survey. The biggest reason for the large change is more information about plants in the CIS. Also responsible for the increase in capacity is the start-up of several large ethylene plants during the past year. The paper discusses construction of ethylene plants, feedstocks, prices, new capacity, price outlook, and problems in Europe`s ethylene market.

  8. Hydrogeologic controls of surface-water chemistry in the Adirondack region of New York State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Driscoll, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    Relationships between surface-water discharge, water chemistry, and watershed geology were investigated to evaluate factors affecting the sensitivity of drainage waters in the Adirondack region of New York to acidification by atmospheric deposition. Instantaneous discharge per unit area was derived from relationships between flow and staff-gage readings at 10 drainage basins throughout the region. The average chemical composition of the waters was assessed from monthly samples collected from July 1982 through July 1984. The ratio of flow at the 50-percent exceedence level to the flow at the 95-percent exceedence level of flow duration was negatively correlated with mean values of alkalinity or acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC), sum of basic cations (SBC), and dissolved silica, for basins containing predominantly aluminosilicate minerals and little or no carbonate-bearing minerals. Low ratios are indicative of systems in which flow is predominately derived from surface- and ground-water storage, whereas high ratios are characteristic of watersheds with variable flow that is largely derived from surface runoff. In an evaluation of two representative surface-water sites, concentrations of ANC, SBC, and dissolved silica, derived primarily from soil mineral weathering reactions. decreased with increasing flow. Furthermore, the ANC was highest at low flow when the percentage of streamflow derived from ground water was maximum. As flow increased, the ANC decreased because the contribution of dilute surface runoff and lateral flow through the shallow acidic soil horizons to total flow increased. Basins having relatively high ground-water contributions to total flow, in general, have large deposits of thick till or stratified drift. A major factor controlling the sensitivity of these streams and lakes to acidification is the relative contribution of ground water to total discharge. ?? 1987 Martinus Nijhoff/Dr W. Junk Publishers.

  9. Representation of the Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

    2014-08-01

    An important emerging issue is the estimation of renewables' contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly, effective load-carrying capacity (ELCC), are considered to be the most robust techniques for addressing this resource variability. The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model and other long-term electricity capacity planning models require an approach to estimating CV for generalized PV and system configurations with low computational and data requirements. In this paper we validate treatment of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity value by ReEDS capacity expansion model by comparing model results to literature for a range of energy penetration levels. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons--despite not being resolved at an hourly scale.

  10. Computer analysis of slow vital capacity spirograms.

    PubMed

    Primiano, F P; Bacevice, A E; Lough, M D; Doershuk, C F

    1982-01-01

    We have developed a digital computer program which evaluates the vital capacity and its subdivisions, expiratory reserve volume and inspiratory capacity. The algorithm examines the multibreath spirogram, a continuous record of quiet breathing interspersed among repeated slow, large volume maneuvers. Quiet breaths are recognized by comparing features of each breath to the respective average and variation of these features for all breaths. A self-scaling, iterative procedure is used to identify those end-tidal points that most likely represent the subject's functional residual capacity. A least-squared error baseline is then fit through these points to partition the vital capacity. Twenty-three spirograms from patients with documented pulmonary disease were independently analyzed by the computer, a pulmonary function technician, and the laboratory supervisor. No practical differences were found among the results. However, the computer's values, in contrast to those of the technician, were reproducible on repeated trials and free of computational and transcriptional errors.

  11. The Irony of the Capac Nan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    Presents information on the Capac Nan, the highway system of the Incas. Describes its use by the Spanish conquistadors in the destruction of the Incan empire. Includes suggested classroom uses for the article, a homework assignment, and discussion topics. (DK)

  12. Enhancing climate Adaptation Capacity for Drinking Water ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Journal article This paper considers the adaptation capacity of conventional water treatment systems. A modeling framework is used to illustrate climate adaptation mechanisms that could enable conventional treatment systems to accommodate water quality impairments.

  13. 24 CFR 574.410 - Capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT... Project Sponsors § 574.410 Capacity. The grantee shall ensure that any project sponsor with which...

  14. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Determining Coverage of Forage Intended for Animal Consumption § 1437.402 Carrying capacity. (a) CCC will... management and maintenance practices are improvements over those practices generally associated with...

  15. Capacity of the generalized PPM channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamkins, Jon; Klimesh, Matt; McEliece, Bob; Moision, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    We show the capacity of a generalized pulse-position-modulation (PPM) channel, where the input vectors may be any set that allows a transitive group of coordinate permutations, is achieved by a uniform input distribution.

  16. Some Underexamined Aspects of Evaluation Capacity Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Laura C.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation capacity building (ECB) has progressed as a concept since it was the conference theme of the American Evaluation Association in the year 2000. This commentary poses some questions about underexamined issues in ECB about organizations, evaluators, and funders.

  17. Heat Capacity of Hydrous Silicate Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, G.; Whittington, A. G.; Stechern, A.; Behrens, H.

    2015-12-01

    We determined the heat capacities of four series of glasses and liquids of basaltic and basaltic andesite compositions including two natural remelts from Fuego volcano, Guatemala, and two Fe-free analogs. The samples are low-alkali, Ca- and Mg-rich aluminosilicates with non-bridging oxygen to tetrahedrally-coordinated cation ratios (NBO/T) ranging between 0.33 and 0.67. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements were performed at atmospheric pressure between room temperature and ≈100 K above the glass transition for hydrous samples and up to ≈1800 K for dry samples. The water contents investigated range up to 5.34 wt.% (16.4 mol%). Water does not measurably affect the heat capacity of glasses (T capacity, which generally gets larger with increasing water content and with decreasing polymerization. The onset of the glass transition in hydrous samples also occurs below the Dulong-Petit limit of 3R/g atom. We see little change in liquid heat capacity with increasing water content; hydrous liquid heat capacities are within 3-6% of the dry liquid, at low temperatures just above the glass transition. However, dry liquids show a decrease in heat capacity with increasing temperature above the glass transition, from supercooled to superliquidus temperatures. Liquid heat capacity values just above the glass transition range between 95-100 J/mol K, whereas liquid heat capacity values at superliquidus temperatures are between 85-91 J/mol K. Comparison with other studies of the heat capacity of hydrous glasses and liquids shows that the liquid heat capacity of strongly depolymerized samples (NBO/T ≥ 0.8) increases with increasing water content, whereas depolymerized samples (0.4 ≤ NBO/T ≤ 0.8) or polymerized samples (NBO/T ≤ 0.4) generally show little change or a moderate decrease in liquid heat capacity with increasing water content.

  18. Functional capacity evaluation: an empirical approach.

    PubMed

    Jette, A M

    1980-02-01

    This paper presents an empirical approach to selecting activities of daily living (ADL) to assess the functional capacity of noninstitutionalized individuals with polyarticular disability. The results of structural analyses illustrate the feasibility of substantially reducing the task of assessing functional capacity with a subset of ADL items without sacrificing the comprehensiveness of the assessment. The analyses reveal 5 common functional categories: physical mobility, transfers, home chores, kitchen chores, and personal care, which account for over 50% of the variance in the data.

  19. Heat Capacity, Body Temperature, and Hypothermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrough, Doris R.

    1998-01-01

    Even when air and water are at the same temperature, water will "feel" distinctly colder to us. This difference is due to the much higher heat capacity of water than of air. Offered here is an interesting life science application of water's high heat capacity and its serious implications for the maintenance of body temperature and the prevention of hypothermia in warm-blooded animals.

  20. Adaptability of the oxidative capacity of motoneurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalmers, G. R.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that a chronic change in neuronal activation can produce a change in soma oxidative capacity, suggesting that: (i) these 2 variables are directly related in neurons and (ii) ion pumping is an important energy requiring activity of a neuron. Most of these studies, however, have focused on reduced activation levels of sensory systems. In the present study the effect of a chronic increase or decrease in motoneuronal activity on motoneuron oxidative capacity and soma size was studied. In addition, the effect of chronic axotomy was studied as an indicator of whether cytoplasmic volume may also be related to the oxidative capacity of motoneurons. A quantitative histochemical assay for succinate dehydrogenase activity was used as a measure of motoneuron oxidative capacity in experimental models in which chronic electromyography has been used to verify neuronal activity levels. Spinal transection reduced, and spinal isolation virtually eliminated lumbar motoneuron electrical activity. Functional overload of the plantaris by removal of its major synergists was used to chronically increase neural activity of the plantaris motor pool. No change in oxidative capacity or soma size resulted from either a chronic increase or decrease in neuronal activity level. These data indicate that the chronic modulation of ionic transport and neurotransmitter turnover associated with action potentials do not induce compensatory metabolic responses in the metabolic capacity of the soma of lumbar motoneurons. Soma oxidative capacity was reduced in the axotomized motoneurons, suggesting that a combination of axoplasmic transport, intracellular biosynthesis and perhaps neurotransmitter turnover represent the major energy demands on a motoneuron. While soma oxidative capacity may be closely related to neural activity in some neural systems, e.g. visual and auditory, lumbar motoneurons appear to be much less sensitive to modulations in chronic activity levels.

  1. The heat capacity of solid antimony selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashinkin, A. S.; Malkova, A. S.; Mikhailova, M. S.

    2008-06-01

    The literature data on the heat capacity of solid antimony selenide over the temperature range 53 K- T m were analyzed. The heat capacity of Sb2Se3 was measured from 350 to 600 K on a DSM-2M calorimeter. The experimental data were used to calculate the dependence C p = a + bT + cT -2 and the thermodynamic functions of solid Sb2Se3 over the temperature range 298.15 700 K.

  2. Working Memory Capacity as a Dynamic Process

    PubMed Central

    Simmering, Vanessa R.; Perone, Sammy

    2013-01-01

    A well-known characteristic of working memory (WM) is its limited capacity. The source of such limitations, however, is a continued point of debate. Developmental research is positioned to address this debate by jointly identifying the source(s) of limitations and the mechanism(s) underlying capacity increases. Here we provide a cross-domain survey of studies and theories of WM capacity development, which reveals a complex picture: dozens of studies from 50 papers show nearly universal increases in capacity estimates with age, but marked variation across studies, tasks, and domains. We argue that the full pattern of performance cannot be captured through traditional approaches emphasizing single causes, or even multiple separable causes, underlying capacity development. Rather, we consider WM capacity as a dynamic process that emerges from a unified cognitive system flexibly adapting to the context and demands of each task. We conclude by enumerating specific challenges for researchers and theorists that will need to be met in order to move our understanding forward. PMID:23335902

  3. Assessment of uncertainty in long-term mass balances for acidification assessments: a MAGIC model exercise.

    PubMed

    Köhler, S J; Zetterberg, T; Futter, M N; Fölster, J; Löfgren, S

    2011-12-01

    Long-term (1860-2010) catchment mass balance calculations rely on models and assumptions which are sources of uncertainty in acidification assessments. In this article, we report on an application of MAGIC to model acidification at the four Swedish IM forested catchments that have been subject to differing degrees of acidification stress. Uncertainties in the modeled mass balances were mainly associated with the deposition scenario and assumptions about sulfate adsorption and soil mass. Estimated base cation (BC) release rates (weathering) varied in a relatively narrow range of 47-62 or 42-47 meq m(-2) year(-1), depending on assumptions made about soil cation exchange capacity and base saturation. By varying aluminum solubility or introducing a dynamic weathering feedback that allowed BC release to increase at more acidic pHs, a systematic effect on predicted changes in acid neutralizing capacityANC ca. 10-41 μeq l(-1)) and pH (ca. ΔpH = 0.1-0.6) at all sites was observed. More robust projections of future changes in pH and ANC are dependent on reducing uncertainties in BC release rates, the timing, and extent of natural acidification through BC uptake by plants, temporal changes in soil element pools, and fluxes of Al between compartments.

  4. Pullout capacity of batter pile in sand

    PubMed Central

    Nazir, Ashraf; Nasr, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Many offshore structures are subjected to overturning moments due to wind load, wave pressure, and ship impacts. Also most of retaining walls are subjected to horizontal forces and bending moments, these forces are due to earth pressure. For foundations in such structures, usually a combination of vertical and batter piles is used. Little information is available in the literature about estimating the capacity of piles under uplift. In cases where these supporting piles are not vertical, the behavior under axial pullout is not well established. In order to delineate the significant variables affecting the ultimate uplift shaft resistance of batter pile in dry sand, a testing program comprising 62 pullout tests was conducted. The tests are conducted on model steel pile installed in loose, medium, and dense sand to an embedded depth ratio, L/d, vary from 7.5 to 30 and with various batter angles of 0°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Results indicate that the pullout capacity of a batter pile constructed in dense and/or medium density sand increases with the increase of batter angle attains maximum value and then decreases, the maximum value of Pα occurs at batter angle approximately equal to 20°, and it is about 21–31% more than the vertical pile capacity, while the pullout capacity for batter pile that constructed in loose sand decreases with the increase of pile inclination. The results also indicated that the circular pile is more resistant to pullout forces than the square and rectangular pile shape. The rough model piles tested is experienced 18–75% increase in capacity compared with the smooth model piles. The suggested relations for the pullout capacity of batter pile regarding the vertical pile capacity are well predicted. PMID:25685412

  5. Heat capacity of poly(trimethylene terephthalate)

    SciTech Connect

    Pyda, M.; Boller, A.; Wunderlich, B. |; Grebowicz, J.; Chuah, H.

    1997-12-01

    Thermal analysis of poly(trimethylene terephthalate) (PTT) has been carried out using standard differential scanning calorimetry and temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry. Heat capacities of the solid and liquid states of semicrystalline PTT are reported from 190 K to 570 K. The semicrystalline PTT has a glass transition temperature of about 331 K. Between 460 K and 480 K, PTT shows an exothermic ordering. The melting endotherm occurs between 480 K and 505 K with an onset temperature of 489.15 K (216 C). The heat of fusion of typical semicrystalline samples is 13.8 kJ/mol. For 100% crystalline PTT the heat of fusion is estimated to be 28--30 kJ/mol. The heat capacity of solid PTT is linked to an approximate group vibrational spectrum, and the Tarasov equation is used to estimate the skeletal vibrational heat capacity ({Theta}{sub 1} = 542 K and {Theta}{sub 3} = 42 K). A comparison of calculation and experimental heat capacities show agreement of better than {+-}2% between 190--300 K. The experimental heat capacity of liquid PTT can be expressed as a linear function of temperature: C{sub p} {sup L}(exp) = 211.6 + 0.434 T J/(K mol) and compares well with estimations from the ATHAS data bank using group contributions of other polymers with the same constituent groups ({+-} 0.5%). The change of heat capacity at T{sub g} of amorphous PTT has been estimated from the heat capacities of liquid and solid to be 86.4 J/(K mol). Knowing C{sub p} of the solid, liquid, and the transition parameters, the thermodynamic functions: enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs function were obtained.

  6. Refrigerator with variable capacity compressor and cycle priming action through capacity control and associated methods

    DOEpatents

    Gomes, Alberto Regio; Litch, Andrew D.; Wu, Guolian

    2016-03-15

    A refrigerator appliance (and associated method) that includes a condenser, evaporator and a multi-capacity compressor. The appliance also includes a pressure reducing device arranged within an evaporator-condenser refrigerant circuit, and a valve system for directing or restricting refrigerant flow through the device. The appliance further includes a controller for operating the compressor upon the initiation of a compressor ON-cycle at a priming capacity above a nominal capacity for a predetermined or calculated duration.

  7. 33 CFR 183.23 - Capacity marking required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Capacity marking required. 183.23...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Display of Capacity Information § 183.23 Capacity marking... persons capacity in whole numbers of persons and in pounds, the maximum weight capacity in...

  8. 33 CFR 183.23 - Capacity marking required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Capacity marking required. 183.23...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Display of Capacity Information § 183.23 Capacity marking... persons capacity in whole numbers of persons and in pounds, the maximum weight capacity in...

  9. 33 CFR 183.23 - Capacity marking required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Capacity marking required. 183.23...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Display of Capacity Information § 183.23 Capacity marking... persons capacity in whole numbers of persons and in pounds, the maximum weight capacity in...

  10. 33 CFR 183.23 - Capacity marking required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Capacity marking required. 183.23...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Display of Capacity Information § 183.23 Capacity marking... persons capacity in whole numbers of persons and in pounds, the maximum weight capacity in...

  11. 33 CFR 183.23 - Capacity marking required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Capacity marking required. 183.23...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Display of Capacity Information § 183.23 Capacity marking... persons capacity in whole numbers of persons and in pounds, the maximum weight capacity in...

  12. An Investigation of the Acid Rock Drainage Generation from the Road Cut Slope in the Middle Part of South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, S.; Cheong, Y.; Yim, G.

    2006-05-01

    To examine the Acid Rock Drainage (ARD) generation from the road cut slope, a prediction study including Acid-Base Accounting (ABA) test and Net Acid Generation (NAG) test was performed for road cut rock samples (20 samples) at the new construction site of a highway in the middle part of South Korea. This slope is composed of slate and phyllite. It was a pit wall which was operated as a quarry which produced materials for roofing. pH1:2 and EC1:2 measurements were performed to evaluate free hydrogen ion contents and salts in samples. ABA test was performed to estimate the balance of the acid generating minerals (mainly pyrite) and the acid neutralizing minerals (mainly carbonates) in rock samples. Total sulfur was analyzed by sulfur analyzer, and then the maximum potential acidity (MPA, kg H2SO4/t) was calculated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was performed to identify the mineral composition of rock samples. Acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) test, after the Sobek et al. (1978), was performed to estimate the amount of acid originated from the oxidation of sulfide minerals. NAPP (Net Acid Producing Potential) was calculated by total sulfur (MPA) and ANC. NAG test was performed with grounded samples and 15 % hydrogen peroxide, and then NAG was analyzed by measuring pH (NAGpH) of the mixed solution. pH1:2 and EC1:2 ranged from 2.95 to 7.23 and 17.1 to 3070.0 ¥ìS/cm, respectively. MPA of samples was ranged from 0.0 to 79.9 kg H2SO4/t. From the XRD analysis pyrite was found at the most samples. In the sample from highly weathered dike, goethite was found. Results of the ANC tests indicated that the value of ANC reached up to 59.36 kg H2SO4/t. Rock samples could be classified as Potential Acid Forming rock (PAF) and Non- Acid Forming rock (NAF) by plotting NAPP versus NAGpH. In this study 17 samples were classified as PAF rock. It means that this slope would generate ARD when they reacted with rain. Two samples were grouped as NAF. By application this ARD prediction

  13. Excess capacity: markets regulation, and values.

    PubMed Central

    Madden, C W

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the conceptual bases for the conflicting views of excess capacity in healthcare markets and their application in the context of today's turbulent environment. STUDY SETTING: The policy and research literature of the past three decades. STUDY DESIGN: The theoretical perspectives of alternative economic schools of thought are used to support different policy positions with regard to excess capacity. Changes in these policy positions over time are linked to changes in the economic and political environment of the period. The social values implied by this history are articulated. DATA COLLECTION: Standard library search procedures are used to identify relevant literature. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Alternative policy views of excess capacity in healthcare markets rely on differing theoretical foundations. Changes in the context in which policy decisions are made over time affect the dominant theoretical framework and, therefore, the dominant policy view of excess capacity. CONCLUSIONS: In the 1990s, multiple perspectives of optimal capacity still exist. However, our evolving history suggests a set of persistent values that should guide future policy in this area. PMID:10029502

  14. Metapopulation capacity of evolving fluvial landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuzzo, Enrico; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The form of fluvial landscapes is known to attain stationary network configurations that settle in dynamically accessible minima of total energy dissipation by landscape-forming discharges. Recent studies have highlighted the role of the dendritic structure of river networks in controlling population dynamics of the species they host and large-scale biodiversity patterns. Here, we systematically investigate the relation between energy dissipation, the physical driver for the evolution of river networks, and the ecological dynamics of their embedded biota. To that end, we use the concept of metapopulation capacity, a measure to link landscape structures with the population dynamics they host. Technically, metapopulation capacity is the leading eigenvalue λM of an appropriate "landscape" matrix subsuming whether a given species is predicted to persist in the long run. λM can conveniently be used to rank different landscapes in terms of their capacity to support viable metapopulations. We study how λM changes in response to the evolving network configurations of spanning trees. Such sequence of configurations is theoretically known to relate network selection to general landscape evolution equations through imperfect searches for dynamically accessible states frustrated by the vagaries of Nature. Results show that the process shaping the metric and the topological properties of river networks, prescribed by physical constraints, leads to a progressive increase in the corresponding metapopulation capacity and therefore on the landscape capacity to support metapopulations—with implications on biodiversity in fluvial ecosystems.

  15. Selection History Modulates Working Memory Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Bo-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that past selection history affects the allocation of attention on target selection. However, it is unclear whether context-driven selection history can modulate the efficacy of attention allocation on working memory (WM) representations. This study tests the influences of selection history on WM capacity. A display of one item (low load) or three/four items (high load) was shown for the participants to hold in WM in a delayed response task. Participants then judged whether a probe item was in the memory display or not. Selection history was defined as the number of items attended across trials in the task context within a block, manipulated by the stimulus set-size in the contexts with fewer possible stimuli (4-item or 5-item context) or more possible stimuli (8-item or 9-item context) from which the memorized content was selected. The capacity measure (i.e., the K measure) was estimated to reflect the number of items that can be held in WM. Across four behavioral experiments, the results revealed that the capacity was significantly reduced in the context with more possible stimuli relative to the context with fewer possible stimuli. Moreover, the reduction in capacity was significant for high WM load and not observed when the focus was on only a single item. Together, these findings indicate that context-driven selection history and focused attention influence WM capacity. PMID:27774082

  16. Capacity building in public health nutrition.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present paper is to review capacity building in public health nutrition (PHN), the need for which has been stressed for many years by a range of academics, national and international organisations. Although great strides have been made worldwide in the science of nutrition, there remain many problems of undernutrition and increasingly of obesity and related chronic diseases. The main emphasis in capacity building has been on the nutrition and health workforce, but the causes of these health problems are multifactorial and require collaboration across sectors in their solution. This means that PHN capacity building has to go beyond basic nutrition and beyond the immediate health workforce to policy makers in other sectors. The present paper provides examples of capacity building activities by various organisations, including universities, industry and international agencies. Examples of web-based courses are given including an introduction to the e-Nutrition Academy. The scope is international but with a special focus on Africa. In conclusion, there remains a great need for capacity building in PHN but the advent of the internet has revolutionised the possibilities.

  17. Polydisperse suspensions: Erosion, deposition, and flow capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorrell, R. M.; Hogg, A. J.; Pritchard, D.

    2013-09-01

    Deposition from particle-laden flows is often described in terms of the capacity and competence of the flow, but robust definitions of these terms have proved elusive. In this paper we provide a mathematical modeling framework within which erosion and deposition of polydisperse sediment, and thus flow capacity and competence, can be rigorously defined. This framework explicitly captures the coupling between the suspension and an active layer of sediment at the top of the bed, and is capable of describing both depositional and erosional flows over both erodible and nonerodible beds. Crucially, the capacity of a flow is shown to depend on the erosional and depositional history because these processes determine the composition of the active layer. This dependence is explored within models of bidisperse and polydisperse suspensions. It is further demonstrated that monodisperse representations of suspended sediment transport may severely underpredict actual flow capacity. The polydisperse model is validated against recent experimental studies of the evolution of suspended material in waning turbulent flows, and is used to demonstrate that loss of capacity is the principal driver of sediment deposition.

  18. SERVIR Science Applications for Capacity Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limaye, Ashutosh; Searby, Nancy D.; Irwin, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    SERVIR is a regional visualization and monitoring system using Earth observations to support environmental management, climate adaptation, and disaster response in developing countries. SERVIR is jointly sponsored by NASA and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). SERVIR has been instrumental in development of science applications to support the decision-making and capacity building in the developing countries with the help of SERVIR Hubs. In 2011, NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) included a call for proposals to form SERVIR Applied Sciences Team (SERVIR AST) under Applied Sciences Capacity Building Program. Eleven proposals were selected, the Principal Investigators of which comprise the core of the SERVIR AST. The expertise on the Team span several societal benefit areas including agriculture, disasters, public health and air quality, water, climate and terrestrial carbon assessments. This presentation will cover the existing SERVIR science applications, capacity building components, overview of SERVIR AST projects, and anticipated impacts.

  19. DOE mixed waste treatment capacity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.A.; Wehrman, R.R.; Young, J.R.; Shaver, S.R.

    1994-06-01

    This initial DOE-wide analysis compares the reported national capacity for treatment of mixed wastes with the calculated need for treatment capacity based on both a full treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes to the Land Disposal Restrictions and on treatment of transuranic wastes to the WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The status of treatment capacity is reported based on a fifty-element matrix of radiation-handling requirements and functional treatment technology categories. The report defines the classifications for the assessment, describes the models used for the calculations, provides results from the analysis, and includes appendices of the waste treatment facilities data and the waste stream data used in the analysis.

  20. Optimal growth trajectories with finite carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, F; Sindoni, L; Caccioli, F; Ududec, C

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of finding optimal strategies that maximize the average growth rate of multiplicative stochastic processes. For a geometric Brownian motion, the problem is solved through the so-called Kelly criterion, according to which the optimal growth rate is achieved by investing a constant given fraction of resources at any step of the dynamics. We generalize these finding to the case of dynamical equations with finite carrying capacity, which can find applications in biology, mathematical ecology, and finance. We formulate the problem in terms of a stochastic process with multiplicative noise and a nonlinear drift term that is determined by the specific functional form of carrying capacity. We solve the stochastic equation for two classes of carrying capacity functions (power laws and logarithmic), and in both cases we compute the optimal trajectories of the control parameter. We further test the validity of our analytical results using numerical simulations.

  1. Autonomous decision making and moral capacities.

    PubMed

    Moser, Albine; Houtepen, Rob; van der Bruggen, Harry; Spreeuwenberg, Cor; Widdershoven, Guy

    2009-03-01

    This article examines how people with type 2 diabetes perceive autonomous decision making and which moral capacities they consider important in diabetes nurses' support of autonomous decision making. Fifteen older adults with type 2 diabetes were interviewed in a nurse-led unit. First, the data were analysed using the grounded theory method. The participants described a variety of decision-making processes in the nurse and family care-giver context. Later, descriptions of the decision-making processes were analysed using hermeneutic text interpretation. We suggest first- and second-order moral capacities that nurses specializing in diabetes need to promote the autonomous decision making of their patients. We recommend nurses to engage in ongoing, interactive reflective practice to further develop these moral capacities.

  2. Building academic capacity through statewide partnerships.

    PubMed

    Green, Alexia; Mancini, Mary E; Flemming, Sondra; Bingle, Catherine; Jordan, Clair; Kishi, Aileen; Fowler, Chris; Thomas, Kathy; Sjoberg, Elizabeth; Walker, Scheleen

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, Texas was challenged by the Center to Champion Nursing in America, an initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and AARP, to join a nationwide campaign for action to increase nursing education capacity. This article describes how one state created academic partnerships to achieve capacity building and strengthened relationships and commitments to invest in nursing education. Three year outcomes include a) the creation of a statewide team to address nursing education capacity, b) progress toward doubling the number of nursing graduates from the state's schools of nursing, c) strengthening and emphasizing retention efforts across the state, d) regionalization, including implementation of a $1 million grant and e) transitioning the statewide team to a broader focus and commitment to the Initiative on the Future of Nursing via the formation of a Regional Action Coalition.

  3. Evolution of isoprene emission capacity in plants.

    PubMed

    Dani, K G Srikanta; Jamie, Ian M; Prentice, I Colin; Atwell, Brian J

    2014-07-01

    Light-dependent de novo volatile isoprene emission by terrestrial plants (approximately 2% of carbon fixed during photosynthesis) contributes as much as 0.5 PgC/year to the global carbon cycle. Although most plant taxa exhibit either constitutive or inducible monoterpene emissions, the evolution of isoprene emission capacity in multiple lineages has remained unexplained. Based on the predominant occurrence of isoprene emission capacity in long-lived, fast-growing woody plants; the relationship between 'metabolic scope' of tree genera and their species richness; and the proposed role of high growth rates and long generation times in accelerating molecular evolution, we hypothesise that long-lived plant genera with inherently high speciation rates have repeatedly acquired and lost the capacity to emit isoprene in their evolutionary history.

  4. Psychomotor capacity and occurrence of wrist tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Viikari-Juntura, E; Hietanen, M; Kurppa, K; Huuskonen, M; Kuosma, E; Mutanen, P

    1994-01-01

    A case-referent study was carried out among meatcutters, sausage markers, and packers in a large meat-processing plant to investigate the association between psychomotor capacity and occurrence of tenosynovitis. Reaction time, movement time, manual dexterity, visual attention and visuospatial ability were measured in 26 cases with a history of two or more episodes of tenosynovitis and 26 referents of similar gender, occupation, age, and job seniority with no episodes of the disease. No differences were found between the cases and the referents in any of the tests of psychomotor capacity. The results suggest that psychomotor capacity, as measured with the tests of this study, is a poor predictor of wrist tenosynovitis.

  5. Optimal growth trajectories with finite carrying capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caravelli, F.; Sindoni, L.; Caccioli, F.; Ududec, C.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of finding optimal strategies that maximize the average growth rate of multiplicative stochastic processes. For a geometric Brownian motion, the problem is solved through the so-called Kelly criterion, according to which the optimal growth rate is achieved by investing a constant given fraction of resources at any step of the dynamics. We generalize these finding to the case of dynamical equations with finite carrying capacity, which can find applications in biology, mathematical ecology, and finance. We formulate the problem in terms of a stochastic process with multiplicative noise and a nonlinear drift term that is determined by the specific functional form of carrying capacity. We solve the stochastic equation for two classes of carrying capacity functions (power laws and logarithmic), and in both cases we compute the optimal trajectories of the control parameter. We further test the validity of our analytical results using numerical simulations.

  6. Early nutrition and later physical work capacity.

    PubMed

    Haas, J D; Murdoch, S; Rivera, J; Martorell, R

    1996-02-01

    Several important studies within the past 20 years have examined the impact of acute nutrient deficiencies upon physical work capacity. Spurr et al. and Satyanarayana et al. extended that line of research to explore the apparent effects of chronic or lifelong undernutrition upon the work capacity of adolescent males. These studies conducted in Colombia and India, as well as others in Tanzania and Guatemala, are discussed. The authors believe that there is enough evidence to conclude that poor early childhood nutritional status, as indicated by the low dietary energy intakes and subsequent stunted growth, leads to many undesirable functional consequences. The studies of physical work capacity, together with other measures such as cognitive functioning and reproductive performance, provide strong evidence in support of policies and programs designed to eliminate the causes of environmental stunting in poor populations.

  7. Storage capacity of a constructive learning algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhot, Arnaud; Gordon, Mirta B.

    2000-03-01

    Upper and lower bounds for the typical storage capacity of a constructive algorithm, the tilinglike learning algorithm for the parity machine (Biehl M and Opper M 1991 Phys. Rev. A 44 6888), are determined in the asymptotic limit of large training set sizes. The properties of a perceptron with threshold, learning a training set of patterns having a biased distribution of targets, needed as an intermediate step in the capacity calculation, are determined analytically. The lower bound for the capacity, determined with a cavity method, is proportional to the number of hidden units. The upper bound, obtained with the hypothesis of replica symmetry, is close to the one predicted by Mitchinson and Durbin (1989 Biol. Cybern. 60 345).

  8. Capacities of linear quantum optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Pirandola, Stefano; Mancini, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth

    2012-06-01

    A wide variety of communication channels employ the quantized electromagnetic field to convey information. Their communication capacity crucially depends on losses associated to spatial characteristics of the channel such as diffraction and antenna design. Here we focus on the communication via a finite pupil, showing that diffraction is formally described as a memory channel. By exploiting this equivalence we then compute the communication capacity of an optical refocusing system, modeled as a converging lens. Even though loss of information originates from the finite pupil of the lens, we show that the presence of the refocusing system can substantially enhance the communication capacity. We mainly concentrate on communication of classical information, the extension to quantum information being straightforward.

  9. Aviation system capacity improvements through technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. Don

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted with the primary objective of determining the impact of technology on capacity improvements in the U.S. air transportation system and, consequently, to assess the areas where NASA's expertise and technical contributions would be the most beneficial. The outlook of the study is considered both near- and long-term (5 to 25 years). The approach was that of actively working with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Flight Transportation Laboratory and included interactions with 'users' outside of both agencies as well as with organizations within. This report includes an overall survey of what are believed to be the causes of the capacity problems, ongoing work with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to alleviate the problems, and identifies improvements in technology that would increase capacity and reduce delays.

  10. Representation of Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

    2014-03-01

    An important issue for electricity system operators is the estimation of renewables' capacity contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to the resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly assessment of the Effective Load-Carrying Capacity, are considered to be the most robust and widely-accepted techniques for addressing this resource variability. This report compares estimates of solar PV capacity value by the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model against two sources. The first comparison is against values published by utilities or other entities for known electrical systems at existing solar penetration levels. The second comparison is against a time-series ELCC simulation tool for high renewable penetration scenarios in the Western Interconnection. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons, despite being resolved at a super-hourly temporal resolution. Two results are relevant for other capacity-based models that use a super-hourly resolution to model solar capacity value. First, solar capacity value should not be parameterized as a static value, but must decay with increasing penetration. This is because -- for an afternoon-peaking system -- as solar penetration increases, the system's peak net load shifts to later in the day -- when solar output is lower. Second, long-term planning models should determine system adequacy requirements in each time period in order to approximate LOLP calculations. Within the ReEDS model we resolve these issues by using a capacity value estimate that varies by time-slice. Within each time period the net load and shadow price on ReEDS's planning reserve constraint signals the relative importance of additional firm capacity.

  11. Storage capacity of ultrametric committee machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neirotti, J. P.

    2014-02-01

    The problem of computing the storage capacity of a feed-forward network, with L hidden layers, N inputs, and K units in the first hidden layer, is analyzed using techniques from statistical mechanics. We found that the storage capacity strongly depends on the network architecture \\hat{\\alpha }_{c}\\sim (log K)^{1-1/2^{L}} and that the number of units K limits the number of possible hidden layers L through the relationship 2L - 1 < 2log K.

  12. Mental capacity and borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ayre, Karyn; Owen, Gareth S.; Moran, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The use of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 in assessing decision-making capacity in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) is inconsistent. We believe this may stem from persisting confusion regarding the nosological status of personality disorder and also a failure to recognise the fact that emotional dysregulation and characteristic psychodynamic abnormalities may cause substantial difficulties in using and weighing information. Clearer consensus on these issues is required in order to provide consistent patient care and reduce uncertainty for clinicians in what are often emergency and high-stakes clinical scenarios. PMID:28184315

  13. A high capacity 3D steganography algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chao, Min-Wen; Lin, Chao-hung; Yu, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a very high-capacity and low-distortion 3D steganography scheme. Our steganography approach is based on a novel multilayered embedding scheme to hide secret messages in the vertices of 3D polygon models. Experimental results show that the cover model distortion is very small as the number of hiding layers ranges from 7 to 13 layers. To the best of our knowledge, this novel approach can provide much higher hiding capacity than other state-of-the-art approaches, while obeying the low distortion and security basic requirements for steganography on 3D models.

  14. 'Reverse triage' adds to surge capacity.

    PubMed

    2009-06-01

    Providing adequate surge capacity during a disaster is one of the greatest challenges of emergency response. Now, researchers have proposed a new process called "reverse triage" to help create surge capacity that otherwise would not exist. Patients who have only a slight chance of experiencing an adverse event within four days of leaving the hospital may be discharged to free bed space. ED staff can provide a daily initial reverse triage score for patients being admitted, even if a disaster is not imminent. While general guidelines can have great value, take the interests of the patient and their family into account when making discharge decisions.

  15. Building community capacity for violence prevention.

    PubMed

    Sabol, William J; Coulton, Claudia J; Korbin, Jill E

    2004-03-01

    The capacity of communities to prevent violence is examined from three perspectives: youth violence, child maltreatment, and intimate partner violence. The analysis suggests that community social control and collective efficacy are significant protective factors for all three types of violence, but these need to be further distinguished for their relationships to private, parochial, and state controls. It is argued that strong interpersonal ties are not the only contributor to collective efficacy and violence prevention. Weak ties, including those outside the community, and organizational ties are also seen as necessary. Violence prevention programs should be structured in ways that contribute to the communities' own capacity to prevent violence.

  16. MEASUREMENT OF SPECIFIC HEAT CAPACITY OF SALTSTONE

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V

    2008-09-29

    One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify (and quantify the impact of) the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone grout mixtures. The heat capacity of the Saltstone waste form is one of the important properties of Saltstone mixes that was last measured at SRNL in 1997. It is therefore important to develop a core competency for rapid and accurate analysis of the specific heat capacity of the Saltstone mixes in order to quantify the impact of compositional and operational variations on this property as part of the variability study. The heat capacity, coupled with the heat of hydration data obtained from isothermal calorimetry for a given Saltstone mix, can be used to predict the maximum temperature increase in the cells within the vaults of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The temperature increase controls the processing rate and the pour schedule. The maximum temperature is also important to the performance properties of the Saltstone. For example, in mass pours of concrete or grout of which Saltstone is an example, the maximum temperature increase and the maximum temperature difference (between the surface and the hottest location) are controlled to ensure durability of the product and prevent or limit the cracking caused by the thermal gradients produced during curing. This report details the development and implementation of a method for the measurement of the heat capacities of Saltstone mixes as well as the heat capacities of the cementitious materials of the premix and the simulated salt solutions used to batch the mixes. The developed method utilizes the TAM Air isothermal calorimeter and takes advantage of the sophisticated heat flow measurement capabilities of the instrument. Standards and reference materials were identified and used to validate the procedure and ensure accuracy of testing. Heat capacities of Saltstone mixes were

  17. Meteorite heat capacities: Results to date

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolmagno, G.; Macke, R.; Britt, D.

    2014-07-01

    Heat capacity is an essential thermal property for modeling asteroid internal metamorphism or differentiation, and dynamical effects like YORP or Yarkovsky perturbations. We have developed a rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive method for measuring the heat capacity of meteorites at low temperature [1]. A sample is introduced into a dewar of liquid nitrogen and an electronic scale measures the amount of nitrogen boiled away as the sample is cooled from the room temperature to the liquid nitrogen temperature; given the heat of vaporization of liquid nitrogen, one can then calculate the heat lost from the sample during the cooling process. Note that heat capacity in this temperature range is a strong function of temperature, but this functional relation is essentially the same for all materials; the values we determine are equivalent to the heat capacity of the sample at 175 K. To correct for systematic errors, samples of laboratory-grade quartz are measured along with the meteorite samples. To date, more than 70 samples of more than 50 different meteorites have been measured in this way, including ordinary chondrites [1], irons [2], basaltic achondrites [3], and a limited number of carbonaceous chondrites [1]. In general, one can draw a number of important conclusions from these results. First, the heat capacity of a meteorite is a function of its mineral composition, independent of shock, metamorphism, or other physical state. Second, given this relation, heat capacity can be strongly altered by terrestrial weathering. Third, the measurement of heat capacity in small (less than 1 g) samples as done typically by commercial systems runs a serious risk of giving misleading results for samples that are heterogeneous on scales of tens of grams or more. Finally, we demonstrate that heat capacity is a useful tool for determining and classifying a sample, especially if used in conjunction with other intrinsic variables such as grain density and magnetic susceptibility

  18. Capacity of a single spiking neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Shiro; Manton, Jonathan H.

    2009-12-01

    It is widely believed the neurons transmit information in the form of spikes. Since the spike patterns are known to be noisy, the neuron information channel is noisy. We have investigated the channel capacity of this "Spiking neuron channel" for both of the "temporal coding" and the "rate coding," which are two main coding considered in the neuroscience [1, 2]. As the result, we've proved that the distribution of inputs, which achieves the channel capacity, is a discrete distribution with finite mass points for temporal and rate coding under a reasonable assumption. In this draft, we show the details of the proof.

  19. Comparison of episodic acidification of Mid-Atlantic Upland and Coastal Plain streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Anne K.; Rice, Karen C.; Kennedy, Margaret M.; Bricker, Owen P.

    1993-09-01

    Episodic acidification was examined in five mid-Atlantic watersheds representing three physiographic provinces: Coastal Plain, Valley and Ridge, and Blue Ridge. Each of the watersheds receives a similar loading of atmospheric pollutants (SO42- and NO3-) and is underlain by different bedrock type. The purpose of this research was to quantify and compare the episodic variability in storm flow chemistry in Reedy Creek, Virginia (Coastal Plain), Mill Run and Shelter Run, Virginia (Valley and Ridge), and Fishing Creek Tributary and Hunting Creek, Maryland (Blue Ridge). Because episodic responses were similar from storm to storm in each of the watersheds, a representative storm from each watershed was discussed. Acidification, defined as the loss of acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC), was observed in all streams except Mill Run. Mill Run chemistry showed little episodic variability. During storms in the other streams, pH decreased while SO42-, NO3-, and K+ concentrations increased. Concentrations of Mg2+ and Ca2+ increased in Reedy Creek and Fishing Creek Tributary, but decreased in Shelter Run and Hunting Creek. Therefore the net effect of episodic changes on the acid-base status differed among the streams. In general, greater losses of ANC were observed during storms at Shelter Run and Hunting Creek, watersheds underlain by reactive bedrock (carbonate, metabasalt); comparatively smaller losses in ANC were observed at Reedy Creek and Fishing Creek Tributary, watersheds underlain by quartzites and unconsolidated quartz sands and cobbles. Increased SO42- concentrations were most important during storms at Reedy Creek and Fishing Creek Tributary, but organic anions (inferred by anion deficit) were also a factor in causing the loss of ANC. Dilution of base cations was the most important factor in the loss of ANC at Shelter Run. Both increased sulfate and dilution of base flow were important in causing the episodic acidification at Hunting Creek. The role of SO42- in

  20. Comparison of episodic acidification of mid-Atlantic upland and Coastal Plain streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Brien, Anne K.; Rice, Karen C.; Kennedy, Margaret M.; Bricker, Owen P.

    1993-01-01

    Episodic acidification was examined in five mid-Atlantic watersheds representing three physiographic provinces: Coastal Plain, Valley and Ridge, and Blue Ridge. Each of the watersheds receives a similar loading of atmospheric pollutants (SO42− and NO3−) and is underlain by different bedrock type. The purpose of this research was to quantify and compare the episodic variability in storm flow chemistry in Reedy Creek, Virginia (Coastal Plain), Mill Run and Shelter Run, Virginia (Valley and Ridge), and Fishing Creek Tributary and Hunting Creek, Maryland (Blue Ridge). Because episodic responses were similar from storm to storm in each of the watersheds, a representative storm from each watershed was discussed. Acidification, defined as the loss of acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC), was observed in all streams except Mill Run. Mill Run chemistry showed little episodic variability. During storms in the other streams, pH decreased while SO42−, NO3−, and K+ concentrations increased. Concentrations of Mg2+ and Ca2+ increased in Reedy Creek and Fishing Creek Tributary, but decreased in Shelter Run and Hunting Creek. Therefore the net effect of episodic changes on the acid-base status differed among the streams. In general, greater losses of ANC were observed during storms at Shelter Run and Hunting Creek, watersheds underlain by reactive bedrock (carbonate, metabasalt); comparatively smaller losses in ANC were observed at Reedy Creek and Fishing Creek Tributary, watersheds underlain by quartzites and unconsolidated quartz sands and cobbles. Increased SO42− concentrations were most important during storms at Reedy Creek and Fishing Creek Tributary, but organic anions (inferred by anion deficit) were also a factor in causing the loss of ANC. Dilution of base cations was the most important factor in the loss of ANC at Shelter Run. Both increased sulfate and dilution of base flow were important in causing the episodic acidification at Hunting Creek. The role of SO42

  1. Empirical Relationships Between Watershed Attributes and Headwater Lake Chemistry in the Adirondack Region

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsaker, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    Surface water acidification may be caused or influenced by both natural watershed processes and anthropogenic actions. Empirical models and observational data can be useful for identifying watershed attributes or processes that require further research or that should be considered in the development of process models. This study focuses on the Adirondack region of New York and has two purposes: to (1) develop empirical models that can be used to assess the chemical status of lakes for which no chemistry data exist and (2) determine on a regional scale watershed attributes that account for variability in lake pH and acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). Headwater lakes, rather than lakes linked to upstream lakes, were selected for initial analysis. The Adirondacks Watershed Data Base (AWDB), part of the Acid Deposition Data Network maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), integrates data on physiography, bedrock, soils, land cover, wetlands, disturbances, beaver activity, land use, and atmospheric deposition with the water chemistry and morphology for the watersheds of 463 headwater lakes. The AWD8 facilitates both geographic display and statistical analysis of the data. The report, An Adirondack Watershed Data Base: Attribute and Mapping Information for Regional Acidic Deposition Studies (ORNL/TM--10144), describes the AWDB. Both bivariate (correlations and Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests) and multivariate analyses were performed. Fifty-seven watershed attributes were selected as input variables to multiple linear regression and discriminant analysis. For model development -200 lakes for which pH and ANC data exist were randomly subdivided into a specification and a verification data set. Several indices were used to select models for predicting lake pH (31 variables) and ANC (27 variables). Twenty-five variables are common to the pH and ANC models: four lake morphology, nine soil/geology, eight land cover, three disturbance, and one watershed aspect. An

  2. The effects of acidic deposition on streams in the Appalachian Mountain and Piedmont region of the mid-Atlantic United States

    SciTech Connect

    Herlihy, A.T.; Kaufman, P.R. ); Church, M.R.; Wigington, P.J. Jr. ); Webb, J.R. ); Sale, M.J. )

    1993-08-01

    Streams in the Appalachian Mountain area of the mid-Atlantic receive some of the largest acidic deposition loadings of any region of the US. A synthesis of the survey data from the mid-Appalachians yields a consistent picture of the acid base status of streams. Acidic streams, and streams with very low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), are almost all located in small (<20 km[sup 2]), upland, forested catchments in areas of base-poor bedrock. In the subpopulation in the mid-Appalachian area, data from various local surveys show that 6-27% of the streams are acidic, and about 25-50% have ANC less than 50 [mu]eq L[sup [minus]1]. After excluding streams with acid mine drainage, National Stream Survey estimates for the whole region show that there are 2330 km of acidic streams and 7500 km of streams with ANC less than 50 [mu]eq L[sup [minus]1]. Many of the streams with base flow ANC less than 50 [mu]eq L[sup [minus]1] become acidic during storm or snowmelt episodes. Sulfate from atmospheric deposition is the dominant source of strong acid anions in acid mid-Appalachian streams. Their low pH (median, 4.9) and high levels of inorganic monomeric aluminum (median, 129 [mu]g L[sup [minus]1]) leached through soils by acidic deposition are causing damage to aquatic biota. Quantification of the extent of biological effects, however, is not possible with available data. Localized studies have shown that stream water ANC is closely related to bedrock mineralogy. Attempts to quantify this relationship across the mid-Appalachians, however, were frustrated by the lack of adequate scale geologic mapping throughout the region. Sulfate mass balance analyses indicate that soils and surface waters of the region have not yet realized the full effects of elevated sulfur deposition due to watershed sulfate retention. Sulfur retention is likely to decrease in the future, resulting in further losses of stream ANC. 70 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Relational Capacity: Broadening the Notion of Decision-Making Capacity in Paediatric Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Ruhe, Katharina M; De Clercq, Eva; Wangmo, Tenzin; Elger, Bernice S

    2016-12-01

    Problems arise when applying the current procedural conceptualization of decision-making capacity to paediatric healthcare: Its emphasis on content-neutrality and rational cognition as well as its implicit assumption that capacity is an ability that resides within a person jeopardizes children's position in decision-making. The purpose of the paper is to challenge this dominant account of capacity and provide an alternative for how capacity should be understood in paediatric care. First, the influence of developmental psychologist Jean Piaget upon the notion of capacity is discussed, followed by an examination of Vygostky's contextualist view on children's development, which emphasizes social interactions and learning for decision-making capacity. In drawing parallels between autonomy and capacity, substantive approaches to relational autonomy are presented that underline the importance of the content of a decision. The authors then provide a relational reconceptualization of capacity that leads the focus away from the individual to include important social others such as parents and physicians. Within this new approach, the outcome of adults' decision-making processes is accepted as a guiding factor for a good decision for the child. If the child makes a choice that is not approved by adults, the new conceptualization emphasizes mutual exchange and engagement by both parties.

  4. Capacity Building for School Improvement or Creating Capacity for Learning? A Changing Landscape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoll, Louise

    2009-01-01

    In fewer than 10 years since the year 2000, systems around the world have been affected by global changes and new understandings that challenge what it means to improve schools and build capacity for improvement. This article examines seven issues in the last decade and their implications for "building capacity for improvement". It concludes that…

  5. Capacity loss on storage and possible capacity recovery for HST nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, John E.

    1992-01-01

    Negatively precharged nickel hydrogen cells will experience a useable capacity loss during extended open circuit storage periods. Some of the lost capacity can be recovered through cycling. Capacity recovery through cycling can be enhanced by cycling at high depths of discharge (DOD). The most timely procedure for recovering the faded capacity is to charge the cell fully and allow the cell to sit open-circuit at room temperature. This procedure seems to be effective in part because of the enlarged structure of the active materials. The compounds that formed during storage at the low electrode potentials can more easily dissolve and redistribute. All of the original capacity cannot be recovered because the lattice structure of the active material is irreversibly altered during storage. The recommendation is to use positively precharged cells activated with 26 percent KOH if possible. In aerospace applications, the benefits of negative precharge are offset by the possibility of delays and storage periods.

  6. Capacity value assessments of wind power: Capacity value assessments of wind power

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, Michael; Frew, Bethany; Ibanez, Eduardo; Kiviluoma, Juha; Holttinen, Hannele; Söder, Lennart

    2016-10-05

    This article describes some of the recent research into the capacity value of wind power. With the worldwide increase in wind power during the past several years, there is increasing interest and significance regarding its capacity value because this has a direct influence on the amount of other (nonwind) capacity that is needed. We build on previous reviews from IEEE and IEA Wind Task 25a and examine recent work that evaluates the impact of multiple-year data sets and the impact of interconnected systems on resource adequacy. We also provide examples that explore the use of alternative reliability metrics for wind capacity value calculations. We show how multiple-year data sets significantly increase the robustness of results compared to single-year assessments. Assumptions regarding the transmission interconnections play a significant role. To date, results regarding which reliability metric to use for probabilistic capacity valuation show little sensitivity to the metric.

  7. Visual memory capacity in transsaccadic integration.

    PubMed

    Prime, Steven L; Tsotsos, Lia; Keith, Gerald P; Crawford, J Douglas

    2007-07-01

    How we perceive the visual world as stable and unified suggests the existence of transsaccadic integration that retains and integrates visual information from one eye fixation to another eye fixation across saccadic eye movements. However, the capacity of transsaccadic integration is still a subject of controversy. We tested our subjects' memory capacity of two basic visual features, i.e. luminance (Experiment 1) and orientation (Experiment 2), both within a single fixation (i.e. visual working memory) and between separate fixations (i.e. transsaccadic memory). Experiment 2 was repeated, but attention allocation was manipulated using attentional cues at either the target or distracter (Experiment 3). Subjects were able to retain 3-4 objects in transsaccadic memory for luminance and orientation; errors generally increased as saccade size increased; and, subjects were more accurate when attention was allocated to the same location as the impending target. These results were modelled by inputting a noisy extra-retinal signal into an eye-centered feature map. Our results suggest that transsaccadic memory has a similar capacity for storing simple visual features as basic visual memory, but this capacity is dependent both on the metrics of the saccade and allocation of attention.

  8. Does Active Memory Capacity Change with Age?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halford, Graeme S.; And Others

    A series of experiments, which used the primary memory paradigm of Wickens et al. (1981, 1985) with university students, adults, and 8- and 9-year-old children, found an increase in primary memory capacity with age. Primary memory differs from secondary memory in that the latter is susceptible to proactive interference, whereas the former is not.…

  9. Capacity retention in hydrogen storage alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anani, A.; Visintin, A.; Srinivasan, S.; Appleby, A. J.; Reilly, J. J.; Johnson, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of our examination of the properties of several candidate materials for hydrogen storage electrodes and their relation to the decrease in H-storage capacity upon open-circuit storage over time are reported. In some of the alloy samples examined to date, only about 10 percent of the hydrogen capacity was lost upon storage for 20 days, while in others, this number was as high as 30 percent for the same period of time. This loss in capacity is attributed to two separate mechanisms: (1) hydrogen desorbed from the electrode due to pressure differences between the cell and the electrode sample; and (2) chemical and/or electrochemical degradation of the alloy electrode upon exposure to the cell environment. The former process is a direct consequence of the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the hydride alloy phase and the partial pressure of hydrogen in the hydride phase in equilibrium with that in the electrolyte environment, while the latter is related to the stability of the alloy phase in the cell environment. Comparison of the equilibrium gas-phase dissociation pressures of these alloys indicate that reversible loss of hydrogen capacity is higher in alloys with P(eqm) greater than 1 atm than in those with P(eqm) less than 1 atm.

  10. Electricity market module: Electricity capacity planning submodule

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe modifications to the Electricity Capacity Planning Submodule (ECP) for the Annual Energy Outlook 1996. It describes revisions to enhance the representation of planned maintenance, incorporate technological improvements in operating efficiencies, revise the algorithm for determining international firm power imports, and include risk premiums for new plant construction.

  11. A Computational Model of Spatial Visualization Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, Don R.; Gunzelmann, Glenn; Gluck, Kevin A.

    2008-01-01

    Visualizing spatial material is a cornerstone of human problem solving, but human visualization capacity is sharply limited. To investigate the sources of this limit, we developed a new task to measure visualization accuracy for verbally-described spatial paths (similar to street directions), and implemented a computational process model to…

  12. Building Leadership Capacity on a Budget

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andes, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    Since September 2002, business leaders and educators have been examining the differences in business and educational leadership in a professional development partnership, titled, The Academy for Leadership in Education (ALE). This organization was created as a program to encourage the study of leadership and develop the capacity for mentoring new…

  13. Strengthening Board Capacity for Overseeing College Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellman, Jane V.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series of reports and initiatives that will constitute AGB's Cost Project. The project is designed to build governing board capacity to monitor institutional costs effectively and strategically. Costs and productivity are not new issues in higher education. AGB and its member governing boards have long recognized the…

  14. Working Memory Capacity: An Individual Differences Approach.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-11

    a % - AV ~ ~ 2 a . a’* - Working memory capacity -54- Experiment 5 Some researchers (e.g, Klapp , et al. (1983) and Brainerd and Kingma (1984, 1985...Psychological Review. 85,363-394. Klapp , S. T., Marshbum, E. A & Lester, P. T. (1983). Short term memory does not Involve the ’Worklng memory,* of

  15. Preeclampsia, biomarkers, syncytiotrophoblast stress, and placental capacity.

    PubMed

    Redman, Christopher W G; Staff, Anne Cathrine

    2015-10-01

    The maternal syndrome of preeclampsia is mediated by dysfunctional syncytiotrophoblast (STB). When this is stressed by uteroplacental malperfusion, its signaling to the mother changes, as part of a highly coordinated stress response. The STB signals are both proinflammatory and dysangiogenic such that the preeclamptic mother has a stronger vascular inflammatory response than normal, with an antiangiogenic bias. Angiogenic factors have limitations as preeclampsia biomarkers, especially for prediction and diagnosis of preeclampsia at term. However, if they are recognized as markers of STB stress, their physiological changes at term demonstrate that STB stress develops in all pregnancies. The biomarkers reveal that the duration of pregnancies is restricted by placental capacity, such that there is increasing placental dysfunction, at and beyond term. This capacity includes limitations imposed by the size of the uterus, the capacity of the uteroplacental circulation and, possibly, the supply of villous progenitor trophoblast cells. Limited placental capacity explains the increasing risks of postmaturity, including preeclampsia. Early-onset preeclampsia is predictable because STB stress and changes in its biomarkers are intrinsic to poor placentation, an early pregnancy pathology. Prediction of preeclampsia at term is not good because there is no early STB pathology. Moreover, biomarkers cannot accurately diagnose term preeclampsia against a background of universal STB dysfunction, which may or may not be clinically revealed before spontaneous or induced delivery. In this sense, postterm pregnancy is, at best, a pseudonormal state. However, the markers may prove useful in screening for women with more severe problems of postmaturity.

  16. 7 CFR 983.27 - Proprietary capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Proprietary capacity. 983.27 Section 983.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  17. 7 CFR 983.27 - Proprietary capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Proprietary capacity. 983.27 Section 983.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  18. Circadian rhythm in anaerobic power and capacity.

    PubMed

    Hill, D W; Smith, J C

    1991-03-01

    Anaerobic power and capacity were measured in nine college-age men at four different times of day: 03.00 h, 09.00 h, 15.00 h, and 21.00 h. Modified Wingate tests were performed against a common resistance of 5.5 kg (0.074 +/- 0.004 kg per kg body mass). Peak power was defined as the highest power output during a 5-s period in the test, and anaerobic capacity was defined as the total external work during the 30-s test. Peak power tended to differ across testing times (F = 2.50, p = .10), with the mean at 21.00 h about 8% higher (p less than .05) than at 03.00 h. Anaerobic capacity differed across the times of day (F = 9.58, p less than .01), with the means at 15.00 h and 21.00 h about 5% higher (p less than .05) than at 03.00 h and 09.00 h. These results suggest that there are circadian rhythms in anaerobic power and capacity.

  19. Increased carrying capacity with perennial forage kochia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrying capacity can be increased on grass-dominated rangeland pastures by including perennial forage kochia (Kochia prostrata) as one of the plant components. The objectives of the study reported here were to compare the differences of traditional winter pastures versus pastures with forage kochi...

  20. Some legal aspects of mental capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Arie, T.

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses some practical matters which arise when competence to make decisions is in question. Consent, testamentary capacity, powers of attorney, the Court of Protection, "living wills," and research on people with dementia are briefly considered. Images p156-a PMID:8688779

  1. Working Memory Capacity and Resistance to Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberauer, Klaus; Lange, Elke; Engle, Randall W.

    2004-01-01

    Single-task and dual-task versions of verbal and spatial serial order memory tasks were administered to 120 students tested for working memory capacity with four previously validated measures. In the dual-task versions, similarity between the memory material and the material of the secondary processing task was varied. With verbal material, three…

  2. 7 CFR 983.27 - Proprietary capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Proprietary capacity. 983.27 Section 983.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  3. 7 CFR 983.27 - Proprietary capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Proprietary capacity. 983.27 Section 983.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  4. 7 CFR 983.27 - Proprietary capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Proprietary capacity. 983.27 Section 983.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  5. Efficient high-capacity steganography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulla, Alan A.; Jassim, Sabah A.; Sellahewa, Harin

    2013-05-01

    Performance indicators characterizing modern steganographic techniques include capacity (i.e. the quantity of data that can be hidden in the cover medium), stego quality (i.e. artifacts visibility), security (i.e. undetectability), and strength or robustness (intended as the resistance against active attacks aimed to destroy the secret message). Fibonacci based embedding techniques have been researched and proposed in the literature to achieve efficient steganography in terms of capacity with respect to stego quality. In this paper, we investigated an innovative idea that extends Fibonacci-like steganography by bit-plane(s) mapping instead of bit-plane(s) replacement. Our proposed algorithm increases embedding capacity using bit-plane mapping to embed two bits of the secret message in three bits of a pixel of the cover, at the expense of a marginal loss in stego quality. While existing Fibonacci embedding algorithms do not use certain intensities of the cover for embedding due to the limitation imposed by the Zeckendorf theorem, our proposal solve this problem and make all intensity values candidates for embedding. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed technique double the embedding capacity when compared to existing Fibonacci methods, and it is secure against statistical attacks such as RS, POV, and difference image histogram (DIH).

  6. Increasing Capacity for Statewide Dissemination. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This report describes the Oregon Department of Education's 5-year Capacity Building Program (CBP), which had as its primary goal the development of a management plan and an information network to provide access to educational resources in response to state and local needs. A discussion of program goals is followed by a review of CBP management…

  7. Organizational Capacity Building for Sexual Health Promotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colarossi, Lisa G.; Dean, Randa; Balakumar, Kavitha; Stevens, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    We present an organizational capacity building program that is a systemic approach to training professionals, creating organizational policies and practices, and enhancing the physical environment with materials about sexual and reproductive health. The evaluation of four different organizations showed increases over six months in: staff reports…

  8. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... acreage upward for the crop year NAP assistance is requested by: (1) Three percent when at least 1... have a positive impact on the forage's carrying capacity in the crop year NAP assistance is requested... crop year NAP assistance is requested; and (3) Greater than 5 percent when producers provide...

  9. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... acreage upward for the crop year NAP assistance is requested by: (1) Three percent when at least 1... have a positive impact on the forage's carrying capacity in the crop year NAP assistance is requested... crop year NAP assistance is requested; and (3) Greater than 5 percent when producers provide...

  10. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... acreage upward for the crop year NAP assistance is requested by: (1) Three percent when at least 1... have a positive impact on the forage's carrying capacity in the crop year NAP assistance is requested... crop year NAP assistance is requested; and (3) Greater than 5 percent when producers provide...

  11. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... acreage upward for the crop year NAP assistance is requested by: (1) Three percent when at least 1... have a positive impact on the forage's carrying capacity in the crop year NAP assistance is requested... crop year NAP assistance is requested; and (3) Greater than 5 percent when producers provide...

  12. Cation exchange capacity of pine bark substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cation exchange capacity (CEC) is an important soil and substrate chemical property. It describes a substrate's ability to retain cation nutrients. Higher CEC values for a substrate generally result in greater amounts of nutrients retained in the substrate and available for plant uptake, and great...

  13. Heat capacity mapping radiometer for AEM spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnek, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    The operation, maintenance, and integration of the applications explorer mission heat capacity mapping radiometer is illustrated in block diagrams and detail schematics of circuit functions. Data format and logic timing diagrams are included along with radiometric and electronic calibration data. Mechanical and electrical configuration is presented to provide interface details for integration of the HCMR instrument to AEM spacecraft.

  14. Water holding capacity in poultry breast meat.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The underlying mechanisms that control water-holding capacity (WHC) in pale broiler meat are not well-established. The objectives of the two studies reported here were: 1) to determine the relationship between WHC and protein denaturation in broiler breast meat exhibiting divergent WHC attributes,...

  15. Enhancing Capacity to Improve Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayotte, Gail; Wei, Dan; Lamphier, Sarah; Doyle, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Professional development provides a means to build capacity among school personnel when it is delivered as part of a systematic, long-term approach to school and teacher improvement. This research examines a sustained, diocesan-wide professional development model, called the ACE Collaborative for Academic Excellence, that aims to build capacity…

  16. Assessment of Capacity in an Aging Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moye, Jennifer; Marson, Daniel C.; Edelstein, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, the assessment and scientific study of capacity in older adults has emerged as a distinct field of clinical and research activity for psychologists. This new field reflects the convergence of several trends: the aging of American society, the growing incidence and prevalence of dementia, and the patient rights,…

  17. Strengthening Board Capacity for Strategic Financial Oversight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellman, Jane V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is the last in a series of reports and initiatives in AGB's Cost Project. The project was designed to build governing board capacity to monitor institutional costs effectively and strategically. Costs and productivity are not new issues in higher education. AGB and its member governing boards have long recognized the importance of…

  18. Community Capacity and Resource Mapping: Model Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dedrick, Angie; Mitchell, Graham

    This document explains the use of a model for mapping community capacity and resources that was developed by the community development office of a health group in Edmonton, Alberta, and applied in a collaborative pilot project in preparation for development of a community health plan. A brief discussion of the factors leading to development of the…

  19. Teachers' Pedagogical Design Capacity for Scientific Argumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knigh-Bardsley Amanda; McNeill, Katherine L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being identified as an essential scientific practice, argumentation is rarely integrated into instruction. This could be influenced by teachers' pedagogical design capacity (PDC), which considers teaching as a design activity influenced by both instructional resources (such as tools and professional development (PD)) and teacher resources…

  20. The capacity of the Hopfield associative memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, Robert J.; Posner, Edward C.; Rodemich, Eugene R.; Venkatesh, Santosh S.

    1987-01-01

    Techniques from coding theory are applied to study rigorously the capacity of the Hopfield associative memory. Such a memory stores n-tuple of + or - 1s. The components change depending on a hard-limited version of linear functions of all other components. With symmetric connections between components, a stable state is ultimately reached. By building up the connection matrix as a sum-of-outer products of m fundamental memories, it may be possible to recover a certain one of the m memories by using an initial n-tuple probe vector less than a Hamming distance n/2 away from the fundamental memory. If m fundamental memories are chosen at random, the maximum asymptotic value of m in order that most of the m original memories are exactly recoverable is n/(2 log n). With the added restriction that every one of the m fundamental memories be recoverable exactly, m can be no more than n/(4 log n) asymptotically as n approaches infinity. Extensions are also considered, in particular to capacity under quantization of the outer-product connection matrix. This quantized memory-capacity problem is closely related to the capacity of the quantized Gaussian channel.

  1. Veterinarians in biomedical research: building national capacity.

    PubMed

    Buss, Daryl D; Atchison, Michael L; Corps, Kara N; Falkowski, Lauren B; Fox, James G; Hendricks, Joan C; Mexas, Angela M; Rosol, Thomas J; Stromberg, Bert E

    2009-01-01

    This Executive Summary provides the conclusions from the presentations and discussions at the conference Veterinarians in Biomedical Research-Building National Capacity, a meeting coordinated by the AAVMC and held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, August 1-4, 2007.

  2. Early Education: The Creation of Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumin, Melvin

    Every human being is always open to some degree; for example, open for learning, experience, change, improvement, or further degradation by his own standards or those of others. Every experience alters an individual's learning capacity. Therefore, to say a child is naturally of high or low intelligence with unlimited or limited learning power is…

  3. Error propagation in energetic carrying capacity models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Stafford, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation objectives derived from carrying capacity models have been used to inform management of landscapes for wildlife populations. Energetic carrying capacity models are particularly useful in conservation planning for wildlife; these models use estimates of food abundance and energetic requirements of wildlife to target conservation actions. We provide a general method for incorporating a foraging threshold (i.e., density of food at which foraging becomes unprofitable) when estimating food availability with energetic carrying capacity models. We use a hypothetical example to describe how past methods for adjustment of foraging thresholds biased results of energetic carrying capacity models in certain instances. Adjusting foraging thresholds at the patch level of the species of interest provides results consistent with ecological foraging theory. Presentation of two case studies suggest variation in bias which, in certain instances, created large errors in conservation objectives and may have led to inefficient allocation of limited resources. Our results also illustrate how small errors or biases in application of input parameters, when extrapolated to large spatial extents, propagate errors in conservation planning and can have negative implications for target populations.

  4. Examining Community Needs through a Capacity Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieto, Ruben D.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Emerging community issues and concerns were identified in focus groups of 104 Defiance County (Ohio) citizens and survey responses from 180 of 380 households. The research demonstrated the usefulness of capacity assessment as a participatory process in which community members are actively involved in identifying community assets as well as…

  5. Integrating social capacity into risk reduction strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneiderbauer, S.; Pedoth, L.; Zebisch, M.

    2012-04-01

    The reduction of risk to impacts from external stresses and shocks is an important task in communities worldwide at all government levels and independent of the development status. The importance of building social capacity as part of risk reduction strategies is increasingly recognized. However, there is space for improvement to incorporate related activities into a holistic risk governance approach. Starting point for such enhancements is to promote and improve assessments of what is called 'sensitivity' or 'adaptive capacity' in the climate change community and what is named 'vulnerability' or 'resilience' in the hazard risk community. Challenging issues that need to be tackled in this context are the integration of concepts and method as well as the fusion of data. Against this background we introduce a method to assess regional adaptive capacity to climate change focusing on mountain areas accounting for sector specific problems. By considering three levels of specificity as base for the selection of most appropriate indicators the study results have the potential to support decision making regarding most appropriate adaptation actions. Advantages and shortcomings of certain aspects of adaptive capacity assessment in general and of the proposed method in particular are presented.

  6. Quantum Biological Channel Modeling and Capacity Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Djordjevic, Ivan B.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum mechanics has an important role in photosynthesis, magnetoreception, and evolution. There were many attempts in an effort to explain the structure of genetic code and transfer of information from DNA to protein by using the concepts of quantum mechanics. The existing biological quantum channel models are not sufficiently general to incorporate all relevant contributions responsible for imperfect protein synthesis. Moreover, the problem of determination of quantum biological channel capacity is still an open problem. To solve these problems, we construct the operator-sum representation of biological channel based on codon basekets (basis vectors), and determine the quantum channel model suitable for study of the quantum biological channel capacity and beyond. The transcription process, DNA point mutations, insertions, deletions, and translation are interpreted as the quantum noise processes. The various types of quantum errors are classified into several broad categories: (i) storage errors that occur in DNA itself as it represents an imperfect storage of genetic information, (ii) replication errors introduced during DNA replication process, (iii) transcription errors introduced during DNA to mRNA transcription, and (iv) translation errors introduced during the translation process. By using this model, we determine the biological quantum channel capacity and compare it against corresponding classical biological channel capacity. We demonstrate that the quantum biological channel capacity is higher than the classical one, for a coherent quantum channel model, suggesting that quantum effects have an important role in biological systems. The proposed model is of crucial importance towards future study of quantum DNA error correction, developing quantum mechanical model of aging, developing the quantum mechanical models for tumors/cancer, and study of intracellular dynamics in general. PMID:25371271

  7. Novel cost effective full scale mussel shell bioreactors for metal removal and acid neutralization.

    PubMed

    DiLoreto, Z A; Weber, P A; Olds, W; Pope, J; Trumm, D; Chaganti, S R; Heath, D D; Weisener, C G

    2016-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) impacted waters are a worldwide concern for the mining industry and countries dealing with this issue; both active and passive technologies are employed for the treatment of such waters. Mussel shell bioreactors (MSB) represent a passive technology that utilizes waste from the shellfish industry as a novel substrate. The aim of this study is to provide insight into the biogeochemical dynamics of a novel full scale MSB for AMD treatment. A combination of water quality data, targeted geochemical extractions, and metagenomic analyses were used to evaluate MSB performance. The MSB raised the effluent pH from 3.4 to 8.3 while removing up to ∼99% of the dissolved Al, and Fe and >90% Ni, Tl, and Zn. A geochemical gradient was observed progressing from oxidized to reduced conditions with depth. The redox conditions helped define the microbial consortium that consists of a specialized niche of organisms that influence elemental cycling (i.e. complex Fe and S cycling). MSB technology represents an economic and effective means of full scale, passive AMD treatment that is an attractive alternative for developing economies due to its low cost and ease of implementation.

  8. Development of multidimensional scales to measure key leaders' perceptions of community capacity and organizational capacity for teen pregnancy prevention.

    PubMed

    Griffin, S F; Reininger, B M; Parra-Medina, D; Evans, A E; Sanderson, M; Vincent, M L

    2005-01-01

    This study discusses the development of scales to measure key leaders' self-reported involvement in community capacity building, perceptions of organizational capacity for teen pregnancy prevention, and the relationship between capacity and teen pregnancy rates. Data were collected from 1,516 key leaders across a rural southern state. Findings indicate that key leaders' perceptions of organizational capacity are related to their involvement in community capacity building efforts and community capacity is associated with teen pregnancy rates. This research represents progress toward measuring community and organizational capacity and may be used to inform future work focusing on developing quantitative measures of community capacity.

  9. Research about Short- Term Production Capacity Decision-Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    bi-xi, Zhang; jing, Song; xiu-li, Yu

    Under the circumstances of uncertain fluctuation of market demand, the degree of matching between production capacity and customers demand can affect the cost, the efficiency and the profits of an enterprise. Choosing the appropriate production capacity level is an important task for decision makers. The paper analyzes the characters of the short-term demand variation, the matching between the capacity and the demand, and its influence on the enterprise. Supposing the short-term demand varies seasonally, and the objective is minimum the loss of mismatch between the production capacity and market demand.Then,short-term production capacity decision model has been developed.Based on the model, this paper has probed into the mismatching loss of three strategies: fixed capacity strategy, subsection adjustment capacity strategy and dynamic adjustment capacity strategy,and an optimal capacity strategy is provided. By fixing the capacity-demand mismatching loss and changing the capacity adjustment rate, this paper also studies the sensitivity of the capacity strategy. The result shows that, firstly, as the capacity adjustment rate is less than a certain numerical value, the dynamic adjustment capacity is the optimal choice; secondly, as the capacity adjustment rate exceeds a certain numerical value, the optimal one is fixed capacity strategy; finally, as the rate falls in some specific area, the optimal one is subsection adjustment capacity strategy. One practical example is provided to prove the model's validity.

  10. Antioxidant capacity of different broccoli (Brassica oleracea) genotypes using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay.

    PubMed

    Kurilich, Anne C; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Juvik, John A; Wallig, Matthew A; Klein, Barbara P

    2002-08-28

    Antioxidant capacity of hydrophilic and lipophilic extracts from eight broccoli genotypes was compared using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. Each genotype was analyzed for carotenoid, tocopherol, ascorbic acid, and flavonoid content. Results indicate that the antioxidant capacity of hydrophilic extracts ranged from 65.8 to 121.6 micromol trolox equivalents (TE)/g of tissue, and the capacity of lipophilic extracts ranged from 3.9 to 17.5 micromol TE/g. Ascorbic acid and flavonoid content of the hydrophilic extracts did not explain the total variation in antioxidant capacity of those extracts, suggesting either the presence of other antioxidant components that have yet to be identified or that the known antioxidants are producing synergistic effects. The carotenoids did correlate with antioxidant capacity of the lipophilic extracts and accounted for the majority of the variability in that fraction. The variability in hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidant capacity found among these genotypes suggests that potential efficacy from antioxidants will vary considerably from genotype to genotype.

  11. [Exercise capacity after heart valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Horstkotte, D; Niehues, R; Schulte, H D; Strauer, B E

    1994-01-01

    Exercise capacity following heart-valve replacement is dependent on how close to normal the artificial device can restore valve function, to what degree a preoperative impaired myocardial function and/or an increased pulmonary vascular resistance is normalized. The postoperative functional result can be determined by the subjective improvement of the patient, his functional capacity, exercise capacity, the central hemodynamics at rest and during exercise, and the systolic and diastolic function of the left and right ventricular myocardium. The subjective improvement of individual symptoms is obviously dependent on the degree of postoperative normalization of hemodynamics, especially of pressures in the pulmonary circulation. Subjective improvement can be objectified by comparing the functional capacities before and after surgery. Post-operative normalization of central hemodynamics and myocardial function does not happen immediately but within 3 to more than 12 months. A 12-month period can generally be expected in patients with mitral stenosis and increased pulmonary vascular resistance (> 400 dyn.sec.cm-5) prior to surgery. In patients with mitral and aortic regurgitation as well as with aortic stenosis and preoperative decrease of their left ventricular ejection fraction during exercise, continuous improvement of left ventricular pump function also may need up to 12 months. Physiological hemodynamic conditions generally are not restored by valve replacement. All prostheses are stenotic to forward blood flow because of the obstruction created by the narrowing of the valve area by sewing cuff and valve poppet. This may result in a hemodynamically important stenosis, especially after atrio-ventricular valve implantation, and may limit subjective and functional improvement. Exercise capacity after aortic valve replacement depends mainly on whether or not myocardial damage persists postoperatively. A workload of 1.5 w/kg body weight (BW) has been performed by 100% of

  12. Long-term changes in acidity and DOC in throughfall and soil water in Finnish forests.

    PubMed

    Ukonmaanaho, Liisa; Starr, Mike; Lindroos, Antti-Jussi; Nieminen, Tiina M

    2014-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine if any detectable trends in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), sulphate (SO4-S) concentrations and acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in throughfall (TF) and soil water (SW) could be found during 1990-2010 and to relate them to recent changes in decreased acid deposition. The study was conducted in seven boreal coniferous forest sites: four of which are managed and three unmanaged forests sites. Generally, temporal trend showed a significant decrease in SO4-S concentrations in bulk precipitation (BP), TF and SW. At some of the sites, there was an increasing tendency in BP and TF in the DOC concentrations. This feature coincides with decreasing SO4-S concentration, indicating that SO4-S may be an important driver of DOC release from the canopy. However, a slightly increased temperature, larger senescing needle mass and consequently increased decaying activity in the canopy may partly explain the increasing trend in DOC. In SW, no consistent DOC trend was seen. At some sites, the decreased base cation concentrations mostly account for the decrease in the ANC values in SW and TF.

  13. Effects of basin size on low-flow stream chemistry and subsurface contact time in the neversink river watershed, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolock, D.M.; Fan, J.; Lawrence, G.B.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of basin size on low-flow stream chemistry and subsurface contact time were examined for a part of the Neversink River watershed in southern New York State. Acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), the sum of base cation concentrations (SBC), pH and concentrations of total aluminum (Al), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and silicon (Si) were measured during low stream flow at the outlets of nested basins ranging in size from 0.2 to 166.3 km2. ANC, SBC, pH, Al and DOC showed pronounced changes as basin size increased from 0.2 to 3 km2, but relatively small variations were observed as basin size increased beyond 3 km2. An index of subsurface contact time computed from basin topography and soil hydraulic conductivity also showed pronounced changes as basin size increased from 0.2 to 3 km2 and smaller changes as basin size increased beyond 3 km2. These results suggest that basin size affects low-flow stream chemistry because of the effects of basin size on subsurface contact time. ?? 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Predicting the vulnerability of streams to episodic acidification and potential effects on aquatic biota in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Karen C.; Deviney, Frank A.; Hornberger, George M.; Webb, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Acidic deposition is one of the most serious environmental problems affecting Shenandoah National Park in north-central Virginia. The park is the third most contaminated park in the National Park System because of the deposition of acid rain. Acid rain affects headwater streams in the park by temporarily reducing the acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) of the water, a process termed episodic acidification. In turn, the increase in acidic components in streamwater can have deleterious effects on the aquatic biota.Although acidic deposition to the park is relatively uniform across its land area, the water-quality response of streamwater during rain events varies substantially. This response is a function of the underlying geology and topographic attributes of watersheds.Geologic and topographic data for the park's 231 watersheds are readily available; however, long-term (years and tens of years) measurements of streamwater ANC and accompanying discharge are not and would be prohibitively expensive to collect. Modeled predictions of the vulnerability of the park's streams to episodic acidification are an alternative to long-term water-quality monitoring. These predictions can aid park officials in making management decisions.

  15. How much acidification has occurred in Adirondack region lakes (New York, USA) since preindustrial times

    SciTech Connect

    Cumming, B.F.; Smol, J.P.; Kingston, J.C.; Charles, D.F.; Birks, H.J.B.

    1992-01-01

    Preindustrial and present-day lake water pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), total monomeric aluminum Al(sub m), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were inferred from the species composition of diatom and chrysophyte microfossils in the tops (present-day inferences) and bottoms (pre-1850 inferences) of sediment cores collected from a statistically selected set of Adirondack lakes. Results from the study lakes were extrapolated to a predefined target population of 675 low-alkalinity Adirondack region lakes. Estimates of preindustrial to present-day changes in lake water chemistry show that approximately 25-35% of the target population has acidified. The magnitude of acidification was greatest in the low-alkalinity lakes of the southwestern Adirondacks, an area with little geological ability to neutralize acidic deposition and receives the highest annual average rainfall in the region. The authors estimate that approximately 80% of the target population lakes with present-day measured pH = or < 5.2 and 30-45% of lakes with pH between 5.2 and 6.0 have undergone large declines in pH and ANC, and concomitant increases in Al(sub m). Estimated changes in (DOC) were small and show no consistent pattern in the acidified lakes. The study provides the first statistically based regional evaluation of the extent of lake acidification in the Adirondacks.

  16. Properties of steel foundry electric arc furnace dust solidified/stabilized with Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Salihoglu, Guray; Pinarli, Vedat; Salihoglu, Nezih Kamil; Karaca, Gizem

    2007-10-01

    Electric arc furnace dust from steel production is generated in considerable amounts worldwide and needs to be treated as hazardous waste. The aim of this study was to investigate the properties of electric arc furnace dust solidified/stabilized by using Portland cement. Mortar and paste samples were prepared with varying waste-to-binder ratios between 0% and 90%. A comprehensive experimental program was designed including XRF characterization, setting time, unconfined compressive strength, and toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP), synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), and acid neutralization capacity (ANC) tests. The results were evaluated in order to determine if the solidified /stabilized product can be disposed of at a landfill site with domestic waste or at a segregated landfill. The effect of using sand on S/S performance was also investigated. The results indicated that the solidification /stabilization process using PC helps the heavy metals to be bound in the cement matrix, but the TCLP leaching results exceeded the EPA landfilling limits. The SPLP leaching results conformed to the limits implying that the waste or S/S products can be disposed of at a segregated landfill; however the low ANC of the S/S products reveals that there may be leaching in the long-term. The sand used in the mortar samples adversely affected the S/S performance, causing higher heavy metal leaching levels, and lower pH levels in the leachate after the TCLP extraction than those measured in the leachate of the paste samples.

  17. High-calorific biogas production by selective CO₂ retention at autogenerated biogas pressures up to 20 bar.

    PubMed

    Lindeboom, Ralph E F; Weijma, Jan; van Lier, Jules B

    2012-02-07

    Autogenerative high pressure digestion (AHPD) is a novel configuration of anaerobic digestion, in which micro-organisms produce autogenerated biogas pressures up to 90 bar with >90% CH(4)-content in a single step reactor. (1) The less than 10% CO(2)-content was postulated to be resulting from proportionally more CO(2) dissolution relative to CH(4) at increasing pressure. However, at 90 bar of total pressure Henry's law also predicts dissolution of 81% of produced CH(4). Therefore, in the present research we studied whether CO(2) can be selectively retained in solution at moderately high pressures up to 20 bar, aiming to produce high-calorific biogas with >90% methane. Experiments were performed in an 8 L closed fed-batch pressure digester fed with acetate as the substrate. Experimental results confirmed CH(4) distribution over gas and liquid phase according to Henry's law, but the CO(2)-content of the biogas was only 1-2%, at pH 7, that is, much lower than expected. By varying the ratio between acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and total inorganic carbon (TIC(produced)) of the substrate between 0 and 1, the biogas CO(2)-content could be controlled independently of pressure. However, by decreasing the ANC relative to the TIC(produced) CO(2) accumulation in the aqueous medium caused acidification to pH 5, but remarkably, acetic acid was still converted into CH(4) at a rate comparable to neutral conditions.

  18. Spatial patterns of mercury in biota of Adirondack, New York lakes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xue; Driscoll, Charles T; Montesdeoca, Mario; Evers, David; Duron, Melissa; Williams, Kate; Schoch, Nina; Kamman, Neil C

    2011-10-01

    We studied the spatial distribution patterns of mercury (Hg) in lake water, littoral sediments, zooplankton, crayfish, fish, and common loons in 44 lakes of the Adirondacks of New York State, USA, a region that has been characterized as a "biological Hg hotspot". Our study confirmed this pattern, finding that a substantial fraction of the lakes studied had fish and loon samples exceeding established criteria for human and wildlife health. Factors accounting for the spatial variability of Hg in lake water and biota were lake chemistry (pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), percent carbon in sediments), biology (taxa presence, trophic status) and landscape characteristics (land cover class, lake elevation). Hg concentrations in zooplankton, fish and common loons were negatively associated with the lake water acid-base status (pH, ANC). Bioaccumulation factors (BAF) for methyl Hg (MeHg) increased from crayfish (mean log(10) BAF = 5.7), to zooplankton (5.9), to prey fish (6.2), to larger fish (6.3), to common loons (7.2). MeHg BAF values in zooplankton, crayfish, and fish (yellow perch equivalent) all increased with increasing lake elevation. Our findings support the hypothesis that bioaccumulation of MeHg at the base of the food chain is an important controller of Hg concentrations in taxa at higher trophic levels. The characteristics of Adirondack lake-watersheds (sensitivity to acidic deposition; significant forest and wetland land cover; and low nutrient inputs) contribute to elevated Hg concentrations in aquatic biota.

  19. Target loads of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition for protection of acid sensitive aquatic resources in the Adirondack Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, T.J.; Cosby, B.J.; Driscoll, C.T.; McDonnell, T.C.; Herlihy, A.T.; Burns, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic watershed acid-base chemistry model of acidification of groundwater in catchments (MAGIC) was used to calculate target loads (TLs) of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition expected to be protective of aquatic health in lakes in the Adirondack ecoregion of New York. The TLs were calculated for two future dates (2050 and 2100) and three levels of protection against lake acidification (acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of 0, 20, and 50 eq L -1). Regional sulfur and nitrogen deposition estimates were combined with TLs to calculate exceedances. Target load results, and associated exceedances, were extrapolated to the regional population of Adirondack lakes. About 30% of Adirondack lakes had simulated TL of sulfur deposition less than 50 meq m -2 yr to protect lake ANC to 50 eq L -1. About 600 Adirondack lakes receive ambient sulfur deposition that is above this TL, in some cases by more than a factor of 2. Some critical criteria threshold values were simulated to be unobtainable in some lakes even if sulfur deposition was to be decreased to zero and held at zero until the specified endpoint year. We also summarize important lessons for the use of target loads in the management of acid-impacted aquatic ecosystems, such as those in North America, Europe, and Asia. Copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. 49 CFR 237.71 - Determination of bridge load capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Determination of bridge load capacities. 237.71... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRIDGE SAFETY STANDARDS Capacity of Bridges § 237.71 Determination of bridge load capacities. (a) Each track owner shall determine the load capacity of each of...

  1. 49 CFR 237.71 - Determination of bridge load capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Determination of bridge load capacities. 237.71... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRIDGE SAFETY STANDARDS Capacity of Bridges § 237.71 Determination of bridge load capacities. (a) Each track owner shall determine the load capacity of each of...

  2. 49 CFR 237.71 - Determination of bridge load capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Determination of bridge load capacities. 237.71... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRIDGE SAFETY STANDARDS Capacity of Bridges § 237.71 Determination of bridge load capacities. (a) Each track owner shall determine the load capacity of each of...

  3. 49 CFR 237.71 - Determination of bridge load capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Determination of bridge load capacities. 237.71... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRIDGE SAFETY STANDARDS Capacity of Bridges § 237.71 Determination of bridge load capacities. (a) Each track owner shall determine the load capacity of each of...

  4. 49 CFR 179.200-14 - Expansion capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Expansion capacity. 179.200-14 Section 179.200-14...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-14 Expansion capacity. (a) Tanks shall have expansion capacity as prescribed in this subchapter. This capacity shall be provided in the tank for...

  5. 49 CFR 179.200-14 - Expansion capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Expansion capacity. 179.200-14 Section 179.200-14...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-14 Expansion capacity. (a) Tanks shall have expansion capacity as prescribed in this subchapter. This capacity shall be provided in the tank for...

  6. 49 CFR 179.200-14 - Expansion capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Expansion capacity. 179.200-14 Section 179.200-14...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-14 Expansion capacity. (a) Tanks shall have expansion capacity as prescribed in this subchapter. This capacity shall be provided in the tank for...

  7. 49 CFR 179.200-14 - Expansion capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Expansion capacity. 179.200-14 Section 179.200-14...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-14 Expansion capacity. (a) Tanks shall have expansion capacity as prescribed in this subchapter. This capacity shall be provided in the tank for...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1097 - Carburetor deicing fluid system capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carburetor deicing fluid system capacity... Powerplant Induction System § 23.1097 Carburetor deicing fluid system capacity. (a) The capacity of each... operation. (b) If the available preheat exceeds 50 °F. but is less than 100 °F., the capacity of the...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1097 - Carburetor deicing fluid system capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carburetor deicing fluid system capacity... Powerplant Induction System § 23.1097 Carburetor deicing fluid system capacity. (a) The capacity of each... operation. (b) If the available preheat exceeds 50 °F. but is less than 100 °F., the capacity of the...

  10. 49 CFR 230.48 - Number and capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Number and capacity. 230.48 Section 230.48... Safety Relief Valves § 230.48 Number and capacity. (a) Number and capacity. Every boiler shall be.... An FRA inspector may require verification of sufficient safety valve relieving capacity....

  11. 49 CFR 230.48 - Number and capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Number and capacity. 230.48 Section 230.48... Safety Relief Valves § 230.48 Number and capacity. (a) Number and capacity. Every boiler shall be.... An FRA inspector may require verification of sufficient safety valve relieving capacity....

  12. 49 CFR 230.48 - Number and capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Number and capacity. 230.48 Section 230.48... Safety Relief Valves § 230.48 Number and capacity. (a) Number and capacity. Every boiler shall be.... An FRA inspector may require verification of sufficient safety valve relieving capacity....

  13. 16 CFR 305.7 - Determinations of capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Determinations of capacity. 305.7 Section... LABELING RULEâ) Testing § 305.7 Determinations of capacity. The capacity of covered products shall be determined as follows: (a) Refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers. The capacity shall be the...

  14. 5 CFR 844.402 - Restoration of earning capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Restoration of earning capacity. 844.402... Reinstatement of Disability Annuity § 844.402 Restoration of earning capacity. (a) Earning capacity... capacity is considered to be restored. The disability annuity will terminate on the June 30 after the...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1097 - Carburetor deicing fluid system capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carburetor deicing fluid system capacity... Powerplant Induction System § 23.1097 Carburetor deicing fluid system capacity. (a) The capacity of each... operation. (b) If the available preheat exceeds 50 °F. but is less than 100 °F., the capacity of the...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1097 - Carburetor deicing fluid system capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carburetor deicing fluid system capacity... Powerplant Induction System § 23.1097 Carburetor deicing fluid system capacity. (a) The capacity of each... operation. (b) If the available preheat exceeds 50 °F. but is less than 100 °F., the capacity of the...

  17. 5 CFR 844.402 - Restoration of earning capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Restoration of earning capacity. 844.402... Reinstatement of Disability Annuity § 844.402 Restoration of earning capacity. (a) Earning capacity... capacity is considered to be restored. The disability annuity will terminate on the June 30 after the...

  18. 49 CFR 230.48 - Number and capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Number and capacity. 230.48 Section 230.48... Safety Relief Valves § 230.48 Number and capacity. (a) Number and capacity. Every boiler shall be.... An FRA inspector may require verification of sufficient safety valve relieving capacity....

  19. 37 CFR 11.114 - Client with diminished capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... capacity. 11.114 Section 11.114 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK... diminished capacity. (a) When a client's capacity to make adequately considered decisions in connection with... capacity, is at risk of substantial physical, financial or other harm unless action is taken and...

  20. 37 CFR 11.114 - Client with diminished capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... capacity. 11.114 Section 11.114 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK... diminished capacity. (a) When a client's capacity to make adequately considered decisions in connection with... capacity, is at risk of substantial physical, financial or other harm unless action is taken and...

  1. 5 CFR 844.402 - Restoration of earning capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Restoration of earning capacity. 844.402... Reinstatement of Disability Annuity § 844.402 Restoration of earning capacity. (a) Earning capacity... capacity is considered to be restored. The disability annuity will terminate on the June 30 after the...

  2. 5 CFR 844.402 - Restoration of earning capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Restoration of earning capacity. 844.402... Reinstatement of Disability Annuity § 844.402 Restoration of earning capacity. (a) Earning capacity... capacity is considered to be restored. The disability annuity will terminate on the June 30 after the...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1097 - Carburetor deicing fluid system capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carburetor deicing fluid system capacity... Powerplant Induction System § 23.1097 Carburetor deicing fluid system capacity. (a) The capacity of each... operation. (b) If the available preheat exceeds 50 °F. but is less than 100 °F., the capacity of the...

  4. 2 CFR 200.446 - Idle facilities and idle capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Idle facilities and idle capacity. 200.446... Cost § 200.446 Idle facilities and idle capacity. (a) As used in this section the following terms have... are excess to the non-Federal entity's current needs. (3) Idle capacity means the unused capacity...

  5. Capacity for visual features in mental rotation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yangqing; Franconeri, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Although mental rotation is a core component of scientific reasoning, we still know little about its underlying mechanism. For instance - how much visual information can we rotate at once? Participants rotated a simple multi-part shape, requiring them to maintain attachments between features and moving parts. The capacity of this aspect of mental rotation was strikingly low – only one feature could remain attached to one part. Behavioral and eyetracking data showed that this single feature remained ‘glued’ via a singular focus of attention, typically on the object’s top. We argue that the architecture of the human visual system is not suited for keeping multiple features attached to multiple parts during mental rotation. Such measurement of the capacity limits may prove to be a critical step in dissecting the suite of visuospatial tools involved in mental rotation, leading to insights for improvement of pedagogy in science education contexts. PMID:26174781

  6. Argentine plant increases capacity, improves NGL recoveries

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, J.T.; Fernandez, C.L.

    1997-10-06

    Total cryogenic processing capacity at Transportadora de Gas del Sur S.A.`s (TGS) Cerri complex in Bahia Blanca, Argentina, is being increased from 22 MMcmd to 40 MMcmd (776 to 1,410 MMcfd) with a future ethane-recovery capacity of 1,900 metric tons/day (mtd; 33,600 b/d) using Ortloff technology. Very high propane recovery can be maintained as the ethane recovery is controlled over a range of 1,000--1,900 mtd as needed to meet local ethane demand. Total NGL recovery can be increased from 2,600 mtd to 4,500 mtd without additional compression. The paper describes current operations, inlet-residue compression, train retrofit, C{sub 3} recovery, C{sub 2} rejection, C{sub 2} recovery, and the final dual-mode design.

  7. Improved Global Capacity for Influenza Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Outin-Blenman, Sajata; Moen, Ann C.

    2016-01-01

    During 2004–2009, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) partnered with 39 national governments to strengthen global influenza surveillance. Using World Health Organization data and program evaluation indicators collected by CDC in 2013, we retrospectively evaluated progress made 4–9 years after the start of influenza surveillance capacity strengthening in the countries. Our results showed substantial increases in laboratory and sentinel surveillance capacities, which are essential for knowing which influenza strains circulate globally, detecting emergence of novel influenza, identifying viruses for vaccine selection, and determining the epidemiology of respiratory illness. Twenty-eight of 35 countries responding to a 2013 questionnaire indicated that they have leveraged routine influenza surveillance platforms to detect other pathogens. This additional surveillance illustrates increased health-system strengthening. Furthermore, 34 countries reported an increased ability to use data in decision making; data-driven decisions are critical for improving local prevention and control of influenza around the world. PMID:27192395

  8. Capacity and interference in a PCS system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, William C. Y.

    1991-01-01

    In order to increase the capacity of a Personal Communication Service (PCS) system, the PCS system environment needs to be understood. The PCS system environment is briefly described in this paper. Because the frequency reuse concept is used to increase the capacity of PCS, the cochannel cells created cause cochannel interference. There are two approaches to reduce cochannel interference. One is the microcell approach (within the existing system) and the other is the reduction of cochannel cell separation approach (developing a new system). In-building communications using PCS systems has been addressed. Also, the Intelligent Network (IN) is described to show its importance. The cellular system has great potential to be the future PCS system.

  9. Variation in Base Excision Repair Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, David M.; Kim, Daemyung; Berquist, Brian R.; Sigurdson, Alice J.

    2010-01-01

    The major DNA repair pathway for coping with spontaneous forms of DNA damage, such as natural hydrolytic products or oxidative lesions, is base excision repair (BER). In particular, BER processes mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions such as non-bulky base modifications, abasic sites, and a range of chemically distinct single-strand breaks. Defects in BER have been linked to cancer predisposition, neurodegenerative disorders, and immunodeficiency. Recent data indicate a large degree of sequence variability in DNA repair genes and several studies have associated BER gene polymorphisms with disease risk, including cancer of several sites. The intent of this review is to describe the range of BER capacity among individuals and the functional consequences of BER genetic variants. We also discuss studies that associate BER deficiency with disease risk and the current state of BER capacity measurement assays. PMID:21167187

  10. The Capacity of Color Histogram Indexing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    AD-A279 031 94-13058 0 LT D lE dE AtEL ECTE APR 2 01994 The Capacity of Color Histogram Indexing F Markus Stricker Michael Swain Communications... Technology Laboratory Department of Computer Science Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH The University of Chicago CH-8092 Zirich, Switzerland...kinds of color histograms as the features vectors promising way of quickly indexing into a large image to be stored in the index ([Swain and Ballard

  11. Evidence for capacity sharing when stopping.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Frederick; Logan, Gordon D

    2015-09-01

    Research on multitasking indicates that central processing capacity is limited, resulting in a performance decrement when central processes overlap in time. A notable exception seems to be stopping responses. The main theoretical and computational accounts of stop performance assume that going and stopping do not share processing capacity. This independence assumption has been supported by many behavioral studies and by studies modeling the processes underlying going and stopping. However, almost all previous investigations of capacity sharing between stopping and going have manipulated the difficulty of the go task while keeping the stop task simple. In the present study, we held the difficulty of the go task constant and manipulated the difficulty of the stop task. We report the results of four experiments in which subjects performed a selective stop-change task, which required them to stop and change a go response if a valid signal occurred, but to execute the go response if invalid signals occurred. In the consistent-mapping condition, the valid signal stayed the same throughout the whole experiment; in the varied-mapping condition, the valid signal changed regularly, so the demands on the rule-based system remained high. We found strong dependence between stopping and going, especially in the varied-mapping condition. We propose that in selective stop tasks, the decision to stop or not will share processing capacity with the go task. This idea can account for performance differences between groups, subjects, and conditions. We discuss implications for the wider stop-signal and dual-task literature.

  12. The concept of transport capacity in geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, John; Parsons, Anthony J.; Cooper, James R.; Gao, Peng; Gillies, John A.; Mao, Luca; Orford, Julian D.; Knight, Peter G.

    2015-12-01

    The notion of sediment-transport capacity has been engrained in geomorphological and related literature for over 50 years, although its earliest roots date back explicitly to Gilbert in fluvial geomorphology in the 1870s and implicitly to eighteenth to nineteenth century developments in engineering. Despite cross fertilization between different process domains, there seem to have been independent inventions of the idea in aeolian geomorphology by Bagnold in the 1930s and in hillslope studies by Ellison in the 1940s. Here we review the invention and development of the idea of transport capacity in the fluvial, aeolian, coastal, hillslope, débris flow, and glacial process domains. As these various developments have occurred, different definitions have been used, which makes it both a difficult concept to test, and one that may lead to poor communications between those working in different domains of geomorphology. We argue that the original relation between the power of a flow and its ability to transport sediment can be challenged for three reasons. First, as sediment becomes entrained in a flow, the nature of the flow changes and so it is unreasonable to link the capacity of the water or wind only to the ability of the fluid to move sediment. Secondly, environmental sediment transport is complicated, and the range of processes involved in most movements means that simple relationships are unlikely to hold, not least because the movement of sediment often changes the substrate, which in turn affects the flow conditions. Thirdly, the inherently stochastic nature of sediment transport means that any capacity relationships do not scale either in time or in space. Consequently, new theories of sediment transport are needed to improve understanding and prediction and to guide measurement and management of all geomorphic systems.

  13. OXIDATION-REDUCTION CAPACITIES OF AQUIFER SOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of the oxidation (i.e., of aqueous Cr2+) and reduction (i.e., of aqueous Cr2O72- and H202) capacities of aquifer solids and groundwater have been made on samples from a sand-and-gravel aquifer. The gro...

  14. Heat capacity change for ribonuclease A folding.

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. N.; Grimsley, G. R.; Thomas, S. T.; Makhatadze, G. I.

    1999-01-01

    The change in heat capacity deltaCp for the folding of ribonuclease A was determined using differential scanning calorimetry and thermal denaturation curves. The methods gave equivalent results, deltaCp = 1.15+/-0.08 kcal mol(-1) K(-1). Estimates of the conformational stability of ribonuclease A based on these results from thermal unfolding are in good agreement with estimates from urea unfolding analyzed using the linear extrapolation method. PMID:10422839

  15. Hubble Space Telescope: Battery Capacity Trend Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. Gopalakrishna; Hollandsworth, Roger; Armantrout, Jon

    2004-01-01

    Battery cell wear out mechanisms and signatures are examined and compared to orbital data from the six on-orbit Hubble Space Telescope (HST) batteries, and the Flight Spare Battery (FSB) Test Bed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), which is instrumented with individual cell voltage monitoring. Capacity trend data is presented which suggests HST battery replacement is required in 2005-2007 or sooner.

  16. Information capacity of genetic regulatory elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkačik, Gašper; Callan, Curtis G., Jr.; Bialek, William

    2008-07-01

    Changes in a cell’s external or internal conditions are usually reflected in the concentrations of the relevant transcription factors. These proteins in turn modulate the expression levels of the genes under their control and sometimes need to perform nontrivial computations that integrate several inputs and affect multiple genes. At the same time, the activities of the regulated genes would fluctuate even if the inputs were held fixed, as a consequence of the intrinsic noise in the system, and such noise must fundamentally limit the reliability of any genetic computation. Here we use information theory to formalize the notion of information transmission in simple genetic regulatory elements in the presence of physically realistic noise sources. The dependence of this “channel capacity” on noise parameters, cooperativity and cost of making signaling molecules is explored systematically. We find that, in the range of parameters probed by recent in vivo measurements, capacities higher than one bit should be achievable. It is of course generally accepted that gene regulatory elements must, in order to function properly, have a capacity of at least one bit. The central point of our analysis is the demonstration that simple physical models of noisy gene transcription, with realistic parameters, can indeed achieve this capacity: it was not self-evident that this should be so. We also demonstrate that capacities significantly greater than one bit are possible, so that transcriptional regulation need not be limited to simple “on-off” components. The question whether real systems actually exploit this richer possibility is beyond the scope of this investigation.

  17. Effects of xenobiotics on total antioxidant capacity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article was to review the effects of xenobiotics on total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Measurement of TAC is appropriate for evaluation of the total antioxidant defenses of blood, cells, and different kinds of tissues and organs. TAC is reduced by alcoholism, smoking, and exposure to radiation, herbicides, carbon monoxide, carbon tetrachloride, lead, arsenic, mercury, cadmium, aluminum, and other toxic elements. The test is also an important tool in evaluating environmental and occupational exposure. PMID:23554550

  18. Oscillatory dynamics of investment and capacity utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenblatt, R. E.

    2017-01-01

    Capitalist economic systems display a wide variety of oscillatory phenomena whose underlying causes are often not well understood. In this paper, I consider a very simple model of the reciprocal interaction between investment, capacity utilization, and their time derivatives. The model, which gives rise periodic oscillations, predicts qualitatively the phase relations between these variables. These predictions are observed to be consistent in a statistical sense with econometric data from the US economy.

  19. CO2 sequestration: Storage capacity guideline needed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frailey, S.M.; Finley, R.J.; Hickman, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    Petroleum reserves are classified for the assessment of available supplies by governmental agencies, management of business processes for achieving exploration and production efficiency, and documentation of the value of reserves and resources in financial statements. Up to the present however, the storage capacity determinations made by some organizations in the initial CO2 resource assessment are incorrect technically. New publications should thus cover differences in mineral adsorption of CO2 and dissolution of CO2 in various brine waters.

  20. Building research capacity: the role of partnerships.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Wayne A; Brown, Margaret

    2005-12-01

    What "connections"--a broader term than "partnerships"--need to be made to build research capacity? Connections build capacity to the degree that they augment the skills, knowledge and resources of the focal investigator or investigating entity. We suggest that the goal of capacity building through partnerships/connections is to maximize research utility, i.e., its potential to effect desired changes in targeted systems. Specifically, an investigator or research organization must create connections that will enable: the selection and framing of research questions to address matters of importance to relevant stakeholders, especially and necessarily responding to the needs of people with disabilities; the development of a research design adhering to the highest standards of science; and the translation of new knowledge into messages about the results useful to those who are potential beneficiaries, tailoring the message so that it will be clearly "heard" by each respective target audience (including clinicians, other researchers, administrators and/or people with disabilities and their family members). Utility of research traditionally has not comprised the standard for judging research. However, the current focus in Federal funding appears to be shifting, with a demand to assess outcomes (i.e., utility) of research, thus, bolstering the argument to strengthen research utility through creating appropriate partnerships.

  1. Communication networks beyond the capacity crunch

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, A. D.; Suibhne, N. Mac; Saad, D.; Payne, D. N.

    2016-01-01

    This issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, Part A represents a summary of the recent discussion meeting ‘Communication networks beyond the capacity crunch’. The purpose of the meeting was to establish the nature of the capacity crunch, estimate the time scales associated with it and to begin to find solutions to enable continued growth in a post-crunch era. The meeting confirmed that, in addition to a capacity shortage within a single optical fibre, many other ‘crunches’ are foreseen in the field of communications, both societal and technical. Technical crunches identified included the nonlinear Shannon limit, wireless spectrum, distribution of 5G signals (front haul and back haul), while societal influences included net neutrality, creative content generation and distribution and latency, and finally energy and cost. The meeting concluded with the observation that these many crunches are genuine and may influence our future use of technology, but encouragingly noted that research and business practice are already moving to alleviate many of the negative consequences. PMID:26809575

  2. Decisional Capacity in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Khin Khin, Eindra; Minor, Darlinda; Holloway, Amanda; Pelleg, Ayla

    2015-06-01

    The cognitive and behavioral changes that can be observed in the neurodegenerative terminal disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), once characterized as purely a motor neuron disease, have become increasingly recognized over the past century. Detecting cognitive deficits earlier and identifying continued changes at regular intervals can lead to improved care, proactive treatments, and earlier discussions about end-of-life wishes. Although medical decisional capacity is required for every treatment decision made, its importance becomes paramount when making decisions on complex medical treatments that will invariably and significantly affect quality of life or life itself. In this review, we conducted a critical analysis of the evidence-based literature on the cognitive and behavioral impairments in ALS that can compromise medical decisional capacity. We review specific ALS-related clinical scenarios in which decisional capacity is of utmost importance and discuss a practical framework for cognitive and behavioral assessment that can be routinely and efficiently used, while being mindful of the confounding factors associated with ALS. Finally, we review models for preserving patient choices that can be used in patients with ALS to help safeguard autonomy and retain dignity toward the end of life.

  3. Metallic materials for mechanical damping capacity applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crăciun, R. C.; Stanciu, S.; Cimpoeșu, R.; (Dragoș Ursanu, A. I.; Manole, V.; Paraschiv, P.; Chicet, D. L.

    2016-08-01

    Some metallic materials exhibit good damping capacity of mechanical energy into thermal energy. This property along with the others metallic characteristics make this materials interesting for a big number of applications. These materials can be used as bumpers in different applications including automotive field. Beside grey cast iron and shape memory alloys few new metallic materials are presented for the supposition of high damping capacity. We analyze the causes that increase the internal friction of some metallic materials and possibilities to enhance this property through different mechanical, physical or chemical methods. Shape memory alloys, especially those based on copper, present a different damping capacity on martensite, austenite or transition state. In the transformation range M ↔A, which in case of copper base shape memory alloys is quite large, the metallic intelligent materials present a high internal friction, almost comparable with natural rubber behavior that can transform mechanical energy into thermal energy till a certain value of the external solicitation. These materials can be used as noise or small vibrations bumpers or even as shock absorbers in automotive industry.

  4. Buffering Mechanism of the Atmospheric Oxidation Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Gromov, S.; Pozzer, A.; Taraborrelli, D.

    2015-12-01

    Millions of tons pollutant and greenhouse gases per year are emitted and subsequently removed from the atmosphere through oxidation reactions. The oxidation products are typically more soluble or have a low vapor pressure so that they become subject to deposition processes. The atmospheric oxidation capacity is primarily maintained by hydroxyl (OH) radicals, which initiate reaction chains that can recycle or destroy OH. Key questions are if the oxidation capacity is affected by growing pollution emissions, to what extent it is buffered by OH recycling, and how regions with specific photochemical and pollution characteristics act together through atmospheric transport at a global scale. While previous generations atmospheric chemistry-transport models have discounted OH recycling with schemes that lumped or truncated reaction sequences, we present an approach that does justice to the intricate interactions between reactive carbon, nitrogen and oxygen species. This gives rise to a global buffering mechanism of the oxidation capacity that explains the observed small variability of methane and other gases that are removed by reaction with OH.

  5. PRMT7 Preserves Satellite Cell Regenerative Capacity.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Roméo Sébastien; Vogel, Gillian; Chen, Taiping; Crist, Colin; Richard, Stéphane

    2016-02-16

    Regeneration of skeletal muscle requires the continued presence of quiescent muscle stem cells (satellite cells), which become activated in response to injury. Here, we report that whole-body protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT7(-/-) adult mice and mice conditionally lacking PRMT7 in satellite cells using Pax7-CreERT2 both display a significant reduction in satellite cell function, leading to defects in regenerative capacity upon muscle injury. We show that PRMT7 is preferentially expressed in activated satellite cells and, interestingly, PRMT7-deficient satellite cells undergo cell-cycle arrest and premature cellular senescence. These defects underlie poor satellite cell stem cell capacity to regenerate muscle and self-renew after injury. PRMT7-deficient satellite cells express elevated levels of the CDK inhibitor p21CIP1 and low levels of its repressor, DNMT3b. Restoration of DNMT3b in PRMT7-deficient cells rescues PRMT7-mediated senescence. Our findings define PRMT7 as a regulator of the DNMT3b/p21 axis required to maintain muscle stem cell regenerative capacity.

  6. Evaluating school capacity to implement new programs.

    PubMed

    Roberts-Gray, Cynthia; Gingiss, Phyllis M; Boerm, Melynda

    2007-08-01

    An eight-factor survey-based Bayesian model (Bridge-It) for assessing school capacity to implement health and education programs was tested in secondary analyses of data from 47 schools in the Texas Tobacco Prevention Initiative (TTPI). Bridge-It was used during the pre-implementation phase and again at mid-course of the TTPI 2 years later. Achieved implementation status was evaluated in follow-up almost 4 years after the start of the TTPI. The Bridge-It score aggregated across all eight of the capacity factors predicted both quality of adherence to the Guidelines for School Programs to Prevent Tobacco Use and Addiction and quantity of implementing activity. The school-based leadership factor was an independent predictor of quality of adherence whereas the facilitation processes factor predicted quantity of implementing activity. Integration of Bridge-It, or comparable multi-attribute tools, into the planning and evaluation of school-centered programs can increase understanding of factors that influence implementation and provide guidance for capacity building.

  7. Forecast Mekong 2012: Building scientific capacity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stefanov, James E.

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary R. Clinton joined the Foreign Ministers of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam in launching the Lower Mekong Initiative to enhance U.S. engagement with the countries of the Lower Mekong River Basin in the areas of environment, health, education, and infrastructure. The U.S. Geological Survey Forecast Mekong supports the Lower Mekong Initiative through a variety of activities. The principal objectives of Forecast Mekong include the following: * Build scientific capacity in the Lower Mekong Basin and promote cooperation and collaboration among scientists working in the region. * Provide data, information, and scientific models to help resource managers there make informed decisions. * Produce forecasting and visualization tools to support basin planning, including climate change adaptation. The focus of this product is Forecast Mekong accomplishments and current activities related to the development of scientific capacity at organizations and institutions in the region. Building on accomplishments in 2010 and 2011, Forecast Mekong continues to enhance scientific capacity in the Lower Mekong Basin with a suite of activities in 2012.

  8. Estimating heat capacity and heat content of rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Eugene C.; Hemingway, Bruch S.

    1995-01-01

    Our measured heat-capacity values for rocks and other measurements of heat capacity or heat content of rocks found in the literature have been compared with estimated rock heat capacities calculated from the summation of heat capacities of both minerals and oxide components. The validity of calculating the heat content or heat capacity of rocks to better than about ± 3% from its mineral or chemical composition is well demonstrated by the data presented here.

  9. On channels with positive quantum zero-error capacity having vanishing n-shot capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokov, M. E.

    2015-08-01

    We show that unbounded number of channel uses may be necessary for perfect transmission of quantum information. For any n, we explicitly construct low-dimensional quantum channels (input dimension 4, Choi rank 2 or 4) whose quantum zero-error capacity is positive, but the corresponding n-shot capacity is zero. We give estimates for quantum zero-error capacity of such channels as a function of n and show that these channels can be chosen in any small vicinity (in the -norm) of a classical-quantum channel. Mathematically, this property means appearance of an ideal (noiseless) subchannel only in sufficiently large tensor power of a channel. Our approach (using special continuous deformation of a maximal commutative -subalgebra of ) also gives low-dimensional examples of the superactivation of 1-shot quantum zero-error capacity. Finally, we consider multi-dimensional construction which increases the estimate for quantum zero-error capacity of channels having vanishing n-shot capacity.

  10. Assessing institutional capacities to adapt to climate change - integrating psychological dimensions in the Adaptive Capacity Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothmann, T.; Grecksch, K.; Winges, M.; Siebenhüner, B.

    2013-03-01

    Several case studies show that "soft social factors" (e.g. institutions, perceptions, social capital) strongly affect social capacities to adapt to climate change. Many soft social factors can probably be changed faster than "hard social factors" (e.g. economic and technological development) and are therefore particularly important for building social capacities. However, there are almost no methodologies for the systematic assessment of soft social factors. Gupta et al. (2010) have developed the Adaptive Capacity Wheel (ACW) for assessing the adaptive capacity of institutions. The ACW differentiates 22 criteria to assess six dimensions: variety, learning capacity, room for autonomous change, leadership, availability of resources, fair governance. To include important psychological factors we extended the ACW by two dimensions: "adaptation motivation" refers to actors' motivation to realise, support and/or promote adaptation to climate. "Adaptation belief" refers to actors' perceptions of realisability and effectiveness of adaptation measures. We applied the extended ACW to assess adaptive capacities of four sectors - water management, flood/coastal protection, civil protection and regional planning - in North Western Germany. The assessments of adaptation motivation and belief provided a clear added value. The results also revealed some methodological problems in applying the ACW (e.g. overlap of dimensions), for which we propose methodological solutions.

  11. Assessing institutional capacities to adapt to climate change: integrating psychological dimensions in the Adaptive Capacity Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothmann, T.; Grecksch, K.; Winges, M.; Siebenhüner, B.

    2013-12-01

    Several case studies show that social factors like institutions, perceptions and social capital strongly affect social capacities to adapt to climate change. Together with economic and technological development they are important for building social capacities. However, there are almost no methodologies for the systematic assessment of social factors. After reviewing existing methodologies we identify the Adaptive Capacity Wheel (ACW) by Gupta et al. (2010), developed for assessing the adaptive capacity of institutions, as the most comprehensive and operationalised framework to assess social factors. The ACW differentiates 22 criteria to assess 6 dimensions: variety, learning capacity, room for autonomous change, leadership, availability of resources, fair governance. To include important psychological factors we extended the ACW by two dimensions: "adaptation motivation" refers to actors' motivation to realise, support and/or promote adaptation to climate; "adaptation belief" refers to actors' perceptions of realisability and effectiveness of adaptation measures. We applied the extended ACW to assess adaptive capacities of four sectors - water management, flood/coastal protection, civil protection and regional planning - in northwestern Germany. The assessments of adaptation motivation and belief provided a clear added value. The results also revealed some methodological problems in applying the ACW (e.g. overlap of dimensions), for which we propose methodological solutions.

  12. A Latent Variable Analysis of Working Memory Capacity, Short-Term Memory Capacity, Processing Speed, and General Fluid Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Andrew R. A.; Cowan, Nelsin; Bunting, Michael F.; Therriault, David J.; Minkoff, Scott R. B.

    2002-01-01

    Studied the interrelationships among general fluid intelligence, short-term memory capacity, working memory capacity, and processing speed in 120 young adults and used structural equation modeling to determine the best predictor of general fluid intelligence. Results suggest that working memory capacity, but not short-term memory capacity or…

  13. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) Notification Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    To encourage wide use of the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) data, especially among the scientific community, special notifications were prepared to inform them about the data's availability, its form, and the procedures for obtaining them. To achieve the widest distribution to the primary audiences of interest, mailings were made to scientists associated with the OSTA Resource Observation Division programs and to scientific and professional societies and journals. Accompanying the notifications to the societies and journals were samples of the HCMM imagery and a description of the image's predominant characteristics. A follow-up survey was completed to determine the effectiveness of the HCMM notifications.

  14. SPACEHAB - Augmenting the Shuttle's middeck capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Barbara A.; Rossi, David A.

    1992-01-01

    SPACEHAB, Inc. is developing a pressurized laboratory which fits in the forward portion of the Space Shuttle payload bay and connects to the crew compartment through an airlock. SPACEHAB's standard middeck-type lockers offer crew-tended access to the microgravity environment for experimentation, technology development, and small-scale production. NASA's Office of Commercial Programs has contracted with SPACEHAB to lease two-thirds of the SPACEHAB's module capacity over the first six missions for commercial research initiatives. Use of SPACELAB modules also offers an economical intermediate step prior to making a full commitment for commercial use of Space Station Freedom.

  15. [Parenting capacity of mothers with schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Arvaniti, A; Spyropoulou, A; Zervas, I

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the pregnancy rates of mothers with schizophrenia do not differ significantly from those of the general population. Mothers' severe mental illness, combined with poor social support and comorbidity, may significantly affect her parenting capacity. However, the poor quality of parenting by psychotic mothers should not be taken for granted, in advance. Some of them may become excellent parents while other may abuse their children and finally lose custody because of this. The parenting capacity is significantly influenced by the existing insight of patient-parent's disease. Assessing the parenting capacity comprises the measurement of insight and of the risk of child abuse as well. Factors associated with increased risk for child abuse are: (a) active psychiatric symptomatology, (b) history of violent behavior in the past, (c) maternal history of abuse during childhood, (d) dangerous domestic environment, (e) stressful events and poor social support to the mother and (f) unrealistic parental expectations. These factors should be assessed both clinically and by using the appropriate psychometric tools. Tools which have been widely used for this purpose are: (a) "Schedule for Assessment of Insight-SAI", (b) "Childhood Trauma Interview", (c) "Home Observation for the Measurement of the Environment Inventory-HOME" and "Home Screening Questionnaire -HSQ", (d) "Parental Stress Inventory-PSI", "Swedish Parenthood Stress Questionnaire-SPSQ", "Arizona Social Support Inventory" (e) "Parent Opinion Questionnaire-POQ". Interventions to ensure a more adequate parenting capacity should be focused on family planning: mothers with severe mental illness have poor knowledge about reproductive and contraception issues. Their pregnancies are mostly not planned. It is important for the family planning to be tailored according to the specific needs of schizophrenic mothers and to take into account the following issues: (a) the severity and the duration

  16. Production of high-capacity adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Kreppel, Florian

    2014-01-01

    High-capacity adenoviral vectors (HC-Ad), also known as "helper-dependent" (HD-Ad), "gutless", "gutted", or "third-generation" Ad vectors, are devoid of all viral coding sequences and have shown promising potential for a wide variety of different applications-from classic gene therapy to genetic vaccination and tumor treatment. However, compared to first-generation adenoviral vectors their production is more complex and requires specific in-depth knowledge. This chapter delivers a detailed protocol for the successful production of HC-Ad vectors to high titers.

  17. Information storage capacity of discrete spin systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Beni

    2013-11-15

    Understanding the limits imposed on information storage capacity of physical systems is a problem of fundamental and practical importance which bridges physics and information science. There is a well-known upper bound on the amount of information that can be stored reliably in a given volume of discrete spin systems which are supported by gapped local Hamiltonians. However, all the previously known systems were far below this theoretical bound, and it remained open whether there exists a gapped spin system that saturates this bound. Here, we present a construction of spin systems which saturate this theoretical limit asymptotically by borrowing an idea from fractal properties arising in the Sierpinski triangle. Our construction provides not only the best classical error-correcting code which is physically realizable as the energy ground space of gapped frustration-free Hamiltonians, but also a new research avenue for correlated spin phases with fractal spin configurations. -- Highlights: •We propose a spin model with fractal ground states and study its coding properties. •We show that the model asymptotically saturates a theoretical limit on information storage capacity. •We discuss its relations to various theoretical physics problems.

  18. Functional residual capacity: the human windbag.

    PubMed

    Villars, Penelope S; Kanusky, Joseph T; Levitzky, Michael G

    2002-10-01

    Like the windbag of a bagpipe, the functional residual capacity (FRC) is the lung volume that acts as a reservoir of air for physiologic use. This reserve volume is particularly important during the period of apnea that occurs during induction of general anesthesia. The balance of the inward elastic recoil of the lung and the outward chest wall forces determines the FRC. Inward recoil forces are dependent on the interaction between the fibrous skeleton of the lung tissue and the alveolar surface tension regulated by pulmonary surfactant. Positioning and the use of inhaled and intravenous anesthetics influence outward chest wall forces. Factors that affect the FRC may be altered by volume recruitment maneuvers such as administration of vital capacity breaths, the application of positive end-expiratory pressure, and/or maintenance of anesthesia with a fraction of inspired oxygen of less than 1.0. This course reviews the basic anatomy and physiology of the FRC during the perioperative period. Understanding the processes that contribute to intraoperative loss of lung volume and knowledge of interventions that can allay them are paramount to providing a reliable and safe general anesthetic.

  19. Capacity additions ease tight methanol supply

    SciTech Connect

    Greek, B.F. )

    1988-10-03

    Two menthanol plants now in operation - one in the U.S., the other in Chile - will boost global supplies of methanol more than 375 million gal annually. This large capacity addition and smaller expansions in other parts of the world will exceed demand growth during 1988 and 1989, easing the squeeze on supplies. As the result of increased supplies, methanol prices could slip slightly in the fourth quarter. They are more likely to decline next year, however. The two plants, which started up in August, are owned and operated by Tenneco Oil Co. Processing and Marketing and by Cape Horn Methanol (CHM). The Tenneco plant, located in Pasadena, Tex., was restarted after a shutdown in 1982 when prices for methanol were low. It now is running at full capacity of 125 million gal per year. The plant uses the low-pressure process technology of Lurgi, reportedly requiring for feedstock and energy between 100,000 and 125,000 cu ft of methane per gallon. Global trade in methanol smooths out the supply and demand inconsistencies. Surging methanol demand in the U.S. and in Western Europe has been met by imports from areas where methanol production is most economical - that is, where natural gas is readily available and has no other application as high in value. Canada, Chile, and Trinidad are examples of those areas.

  20. Changing recruitment capacity in global fish stocks.

    PubMed

    Britten, Gregory L; Dowd, Michael; Worm, Boris

    2016-01-05

    Marine fish and invertebrates are shifting their regional and global distributions in response to climate change, but it is unclear whether their productivity is being affected as well. Here we tested for time-varying trends in biological productivity parameters across 262 fish stocks of 127 species in 39 large marine ecosystems and high-seas areas (hereafter LMEs). This global meta-analysis revealed widespread changes in the relationship between spawning stock size and the production of juvenile offspring (recruitment), suggesting fundamental biological change in fish stock productivity at early life stages. Across regions, we estimate that average recruitment capacity has declined at a rate approximately equal to 3% of the historical maximum per decade. However, we observed large variability among stocks and regions; for example, highly negative trends in the North Atlantic contrast with more neutral patterns in the North Pacific. The extent of biological change in each LME was significantly related to observed changes in phytoplankton chlorophyll concentration and the intensity of historical overfishing in that ecosystem. We conclude that both environmental changes and chronic overfishing have already affected the productive capacity of many stocks at the recruitment stage of the life cycle. These results provide a baseline for ecosystem-based fisheries management and may help adjust expectations for future food production from the oceans.

  1. Capacity building in food composition for Africa.

    PubMed

    Schönfeldt, Hettie C; Hall, Nicolette

    2013-10-01

    Capacity building in food and nutrition involves more than formal training and individual development. Such a process is long term and continues, requiring lasting mentorship, coaching and leadership development, including individual commitment to continued self-development. It expands to include the development of knowledge and skills of an individual within his/her organizational or institutional arrangements, and requires buy-in and support from his/her institution or organization, as well as other funding bodies involved in agriculture and health. It needs to be supported by government and be part of the regional and international agenda for agriculture and health. Under the auspices of International Network of Food Data Systems (INFOODS), an African Network of Food Data Systems (AFROFOODS) was established in September 1994, and a number of training courses, educational and scientific publications, posters, presentations and visits were hosted, organized and delivered with the aim to build enthusiasm, long term commitment and capacity in food composition within the AFROFOODS region. Formal training and human resource development were the major focus to take food composition forward in Africa. Significant progress was made in food composition activities, but constraints including lack of organizational and institutional commitment and financial support are straining the pace of progress.

  2. [Depression and legal capacity to stand trial].

    PubMed

    Bolechała, Filip; Skupień, Elzbieta

    2006-01-01

    The criteria for assessment of legal capacity to stand trial have long been a significant issue in the Polish criminal law. The main problem in opinionating practice is the fact that the code of penal procedure and the executive penal code do not provide any univocal criteria of a mental disease that should be met according to the legal regulations in force. Because of their nature and lack of uniformity, depression and affective disorders pose a particularly great problem for experts who should opinionate on the legal capacity of the suspected and the accused to stand trial. On the one hand, it cannot be accepted that a mental illness renders a person unable to substantially understand legal proceedings and to make a rational defense. On the other hand, however, emotional reactions and mild-degree depression disorders that are only natural when an individual violates law should not be allowed to be regarded as a grave disease and to paralyze legal proceedings. In the present study, the authors have attempted to describe the guidelines that should be followed by court-appointed experts in psychiatry that are commissioned by the court to assess the mental state of an individual. The report emphasizes that in such cases, a thorough analysis, based on medical and legal premises and the experience of the involved court experts are necessary.

  3. Changing recruitment capacity in global fish stocks

    PubMed Central

    Britten, Gregory L.; Dowd, Michael; Worm, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Marine fish and invertebrates are shifting their regional and global distributions in response to climate change, but it is unclear whether their productivity is being affected as well. Here we tested for time-varying trends in biological productivity parameters across 262 fish stocks of 127 species in 39 large marine ecosystems and high-seas areas (hereafter LMEs). This global meta-analysis revealed widespread changes in the relationship between spawning stock size and the production of juvenile offspring (recruitment), suggesting fundamental biological change in fish stock productivity at early life stages. Across regions, we estimate that average recruitment capacity has declined at a rate approximately equal to 3% of the historical maximum per decade. However, we observed large variability among stocks and regions; for example, highly negative trends in the North Atlantic contrast with more neutral patterns in the North Pacific. The extent of biological change in each LME was significantly related to observed changes in phytoplankton chlorophyll concentration and the intensity of historical overfishing in that ecosystem. We conclude that both environmental changes and chronic overfishing have already affected the productive capacity of many stocks at the recruitment stage of the life cycle. These results provide a baseline for ecosystem-based fisheries management and may help adjust expectations for future food production from the oceans. PMID:26668368

  4. Storage capacity of holo-interferograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharnoff, Mark

    2003-12-01

    The practical storage capacity of a holographic medium can be found by finely comparing reconstructions from independent holograms of an information-dense object wave. With the help of two orthogonally polarized reference waves, a pair of volume holograms is recorded simultaneously at imprint densities as high as 4.1 × 1010 bits/cm3. As a consequence of polarization, the holograms are not mutually coherent, and the twin encodings of the object wave can be reconstructed separately. These are brought into fine registration interferometrically and then scanned by a CCD camera. Experiments on glass-mounted Agfa 8E56, a fine-grained silver halide emulsion designed for holography, are reported. When the object wave was moderately dense in information, grain noise was the main cause of the reconstruction errors. Emulsional plasticity was the more significant factor both when the object wave was optically sparse and when it was extremely dense. Plasticity noise limited the information that could be retrieved to 2.7 × 1010 bits/cm3, which is 2 orders of magnitude below the capacity suggested by the emulsion's bandwidth and grain-noise figures alone.

  5. Capacity Building in Global Mental Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Thornicroft, Graham; Cooper, Sara; Van Bortel, Tine; Kakuma, Ritsuko; Lund, Crick

    2012-01-01

    Research-generated information about mental disorders is crucial in order to establish the health needs in a given setting, to propose culturally apt and cost-effective individual and collective interventions, to investigate their implementation, and to explore the obstacles that prevent recommended strategies from being implemented. Yet the capacity to undertake such research in low- and middle-income countries is extremely limited. This article describes two methods that have proved successful in strengthening, or that have the potential to strengthen, mental health research capacity in low-resource settings. We identify the central challenges to be faced, review current programs offering training and mentorship, and summarize the key lessons learned. A structured approach is proposed for the career development of research staff at every career stage, to be accompanied by performance monitoring and support. A case example from the Mental Health and Poverty Project in sub-Saharan Africa illustrates how this approach can be put into practice—in particular, by focusing upon training in core transferrable research skills. (harv rev psychiatry 2012;20:13–24.) PMID:22335179

  6. Sleep loss, learning capacity and academic performance.

    PubMed

    Curcio, Giuseppe; Ferrara, Michele; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2006-10-01

    At a time when several studies have highlighted the relationship between sleep, learning and memory processes, an in-depth analysis of the effects of sleep deprivation on student learning ability and academic performance would appear to be essential. Most studies have been naturalistic correlative investigations, where sleep schedules were correlated with school and academic achievement. Nonetheless, some authors were able to actively manipulate sleep in order to observe neurocognitive and behavioral consequences, such as learning, memory capacity and school performance. The findings strongly suggest that: (a) students of different education levels (from school to university) are chronically sleep deprived or suffer from poor sleep quality and consequent daytime sleepiness; (b) sleep quality and quantity are closely related to student learning capacity and academic performance; (c) sleep loss is frequently associated with poor declarative and procedural learning in students; (d) studies in which sleep was actively restricted or optimized showed, respectively, a worsening and an improvement in neurocognitive and academic performance. These results may been related to the specific involvement of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in vulnerability to sleep loss. Most methodological limitations are discussed and some future research goals are suggested.

  7. Electrical Generating Capacities of Geothermal Slim Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchett, J.W.

    1998-10-01

    Theoretical calculations are presented to estimate the electrical generating capacity of the hot fluids discharged from individual geothermal wells using small wellhead generating equipment over a wide range of reservoir and operating conditions. The purpose is to appraise the possibility of employing slim holes (instead of conventional production-size wells) to power such generators for remote off-grid applications such as rural electrification in developing countries. Frequently, the generating capacity desired is less than one megawatt, and can be as low as 100 kilowatts; if slim holes can be usefully employed, overall project costs will be significantly reduced. This report presents the final results of the study. Both self-discharging wells and wells equipped with downhole pumps (either of the ''lineshaft'' or the ''submersible'' type) are examined. Several power plant designs are considered, including conventional single-flash backpressure and condensing steam turbines, binary plants, double-flash steam plants, and steam turbine/binary hybrid designs. Well inside diameters from 75 mm to 300 mm are considered; well depths vary from 300 to 1200 meters. Reservoir temperatures from 100 C to 240 C are examined, as are a variety of reservoir pressures and CO2 contents and well productivity index values.

  8. High-Capacity Communications from Martian Distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. Dan; Collins, Michael; Hodges, Richard; Orr, Richard S.; Sands, O. Scott; Schuchman, Leonard; Vyas, Hemali

    2007-01-01

    High capacity communications from Martian distances, required for the envisioned human exploration and desirable for data-intensive science missions, is challenging. NASA s Deep Space Network currently requires large antennas to close RF telemetry links operating at kilobit-per-second data rates. To accommodate higher rate communications, NASA is considering means to achieve greater effective aperture at its ground stations. This report, focusing on the return link from Mars to Earth, demonstrates that without excessive research and development expenditure, operational Mars-to-Earth RF communications systems can achieve data rates up to 1 Gbps by 2020 using technology that today is at technology readiness level (TRL) 4-5. Advanced technology to achieve the needed increase in spacecraft power and transmit aperture is feasible at an only moderate increase in spacecraft mass and technology risk. In addition, both power-efficient, near-capacity coding and modulation and greater aperture from the DSN array will be required. In accord with these results and conclusions, investment in the following technologies is recommended:(1) lightweight (1 kg/sq m density) spacecraft antenna systems; (2) a Ka-band receive ground array consisting of relatively small (10-15 m) antennas; (3) coding and modulation technology that reduces spacecraft power by at least 3 dB; and (4) efficient generation of kilowatt-level spacecraft RF power.

  9. Chemical and biological status of lakes and streams in the upper midwest: assessment of acidic deposition effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiener, J.G.; Eilers, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Many lakes in three areas in the Upper Midwest - northeastern Minnesota, northern Wisconsin, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan - have low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and may be susceptible to change by acidic deposition. Northcentral Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan together contain about 150-300 acidic lakes (ANC ≤ 0), whereas none have been found in Minnesota. These acidic lakes are precipitation-dominated, Clearwater seepage lakes having small surface area, shallow depth, and low concentrations of dissolved organic carbon. The spatial distribution of these acidic lakes parallels a west to east gradient of increasing sulfate and hydrogen ion deposition. Several of these acidic lakes exhibit chemical characteristics and biological changes consistent with those observed elsewhere in waters reported to be acidified by acidic deposition. However, an hypothesis of recent lake acidification is not supported by analyses of either historical chemical data or diatom remains in lake sediments, and natural sources of acidity and alternative ecological processes have not been conclusively eliminated as causative factors. Streams in this three-state region have high ANC and appear to be insensitive to acidic deposition. The species richness and composition of lacustrine fish communities in the region are partly related to pH and associated chemical factors. Sport fishes considered acid-sensitive and of primary concern with regard to acidification include walleye, smallmouth bass, and black crappie. The fishery in at least one lake, Morgan Lake in Wisconsin (pH 4.6), may have declined because of acidification. Given the general lack of quantitative fishery data for acidic Wisconsin and Michigan lakes, however, more general conclusions concerning impacts or the absence of impacts of acidification on the region's fishery resources are not possible.

  10. Response of surface water chemistry to reduced levels of acid precipitation: Comparison of trends in two regions of New York, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.; McHale, M.R.; Driscoll, C.T.; Roy, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    In light of recent reductions in sulphur (S) and nitrogen (N) emissions mandated by Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, temporal trends and trend coherence in precipitation (1984-2001 and 1992-2001) and surface water chemistry (1992-2001) were determined in two of the most acid-sensitive regions of North America, i.e. the Catskill and Adirondack Mountains of New York. Precipitation chemistry data from six sites located near these regions showed decreasing sulphate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-), and base cation (CB) concentrations and increasing pH during 1984-2001, but few significant trends during 1992-2001. Data from five Catskill streams and 12 Adirondack lakes showed decreasing trends in SO42- concentrations at all sites, and decreasing trends in NO3-, CB, and H+ concentrations and increasing trends in dissolved organic carbon at most sites. In contrast, acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC increased significantly at only about half the Adirondack lakes and in one of the Catskill streams. Flow correction prior to trend analysis did not change any trend directions and had little effect on SO42- trends, but it caused several significant non-flow-corrected trends in NO3- and ANC to become non-significant, suggesting that trend results for flow-sensitive constituents are affected by flow-related climate variation. SO42- concentrations showed high temporal coherence in precipitation, surface waters, and in precipitation-surface water comparisons, reflecting a strong link between S emissions, precipitation SO42- concentrations, and the processes that affect S cycling within these regions. NO3- and H+ concentrations and ANC generally showed weak coherence, especially in surface waters and in precipitation-surface water comparisons, indicating that variation in local-scale processes driven by factors such as climate are affecting trends in acid-base chemistry in these two regions. Copyright ?? 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Detection of water quality trends at high, median, and low flow in a Catskill Mountain stream, New York, through a new statistical method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murdoch, Peter S.; Shanley, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of changes in acid deposition rates resulting from the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 should first appear in stream waters during rainstorms and snowmelt, when the surface of the watershed is most hydrologically connected to the stream. Early detection of improved stream water quality is possible if trends at high flow could be separately determined. Trends in concentrations of sulfate (8042-), nitrate (NO3-), calcium plus magnesium (Ca2++Mg 2+), and acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) in Biscuit Brook, Catskill Mountains, New York, were assessed through segmented regression analysis (SRA). The method uses annual concentration-to-discharge relations to predict concentrations for specific discharges, then compares those annual values to determine trends at specific discharge levels. Median-flow trends using SRA were comparable to those predicted by the seasonal Kendall tau test and a multiple regression residual analysis. All of these methods show that stream water SO42- concentrations have decreased significantly since 1983; Ca2++Mg2+ concentrations have decreased at a steady but slower rate than SO42-; and ANC shows no trend. The new SRA method, however, reveals trends that differ at specified flow levels. ANC has increased, and NO3- concentrations have decreased at high flows, but neither has changed as significantly at low flows. The general downward trend in SO42- flattened at median flow and reversed at high flow between 1997 and 2002. The reversal of the high-flow SO42- trend is consistent with increases in SO 42- concentrations in both precipitation and soil solutions at Biscuit Brook. Separate calculation of high-flow trends provides resource managers with an early detection system for assessing changes in water quality resulting from changes in acidic deposition. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Recovery from chronic and snowmelt acidification: Long-term trends in stream and soil water chemistry at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuss, Colin B.; Driscoll, Charles T.; Campbell, John L.

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric acid deposition of sulfate and nitrate has declined markedly in the northeastern United States due to emissions controls. We investigated long-term trends in soil water (1984-2011) and stream water (1982-2011) chemistry along an elevation gradient of a forested watershed to evaluate the progress of recovery of drainage waters from acidic deposition at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, USA. We found slowed losses of base cations from soil and decreased mobilization of dissolved inorganic aluminum. Stream water pH at the watershed outlet increased at a rate of 0.01 units yr-1, and the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) gained 0.88 µeq L-1 yr-1. Dissolved organic carbon generally decreased in stream water and soil solutions, contrary to trends observed at many North American and European sites. We compared whole-year hydrochemical trends with those during snowmelt, which is the highest-flow and lowest ANC period of the year, indicative of episodic acidification. Stream water during snowmelt had long-term trends of increasing ANC and pH at a rate very similar to the whole-year record, with closely related steady decreases in sulfate. A more rapid decline in stream water nitrate during snowmelt compared with the whole-year trend may be due, in part, to the marked decrease in atmospheric nitrate deposition during the last decade. The similarity between the whole-year trends and those of the snowmelt period is an important finding that demonstrates a consistency between recovery from chronic acidification during base flow and abatement of snowmelt acidification.

  13. Microbial survival in strongly lithifying hotspring environments, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, A. J.; Borrelli, C.; Chen, X. H.; Srain, B. M.; Hanselmann, K.; Berelson, W.; Caporaso, J. G.; Coleman, M.; Corsetti, F. A.; Dawson, S.; Johnson, H.; Petryshyn, V.; Sessions, A. L.; Shapiro, R. S.; Spear, J. R.; Stevenson, B. S.; Williamson, C. H.; 2011 International Geobiology Course

    2011-12-01

    A new hotspring near the Narrow Gauge thermal feature in Yellowstone National Park is ~10 month old, rapidly-precipitates carbonate and hosts a diversity of microbial communities across a range of temperature and pH. The organisms that began to colonize different sites along the apron facies must avoid lithification for survival, and it is hypothesized that they achieve this by employing acid producing metabolic reactions. Oxidation of sulfur, for example, will yield protons, locally delaying CaCO3 precipitation by decreasing the acid neutralizing capacity of the water (ANC = [HCO3-] + 2[CO32-] + [OH-] - [H+]). Genomic and geochemical approaches were utilized to explore the microbial communities and some metabolic processes. Samples were collected for 16S rRNA gene sequencing, microscopy, membrane lipids analyses and both aqueous and rock geochemistry. Temperature and pH were determined in the field. The water chemistry indicates a source similar to other Mammoth Hot Springs and ∂13C analyses of aqueous and solid phases indicate localized changes due to CO2 fixation and respiration, as well as CO2 degassing from the source vent. Limited genomic diversity and differences in the membrane fatty acid patterns indicate highly selective conditions for communities with CO2 fixing and S-oxidizing metabolisms. Genes for key enzymes involved in these processes have been identified. Fatty acid composition corresponds with genomic data, indicating a difference in community structure between sites. CO2 fixation at two sites increases ANC, but S-oxidation and respiration decrease ANC, preventing the lithification of these communities. These analyses collectively indicate that microorganisms are able to stave off lithification long enough to form healthy microbial communities which then affect the rate of carbonate precipitation and likely affect facies development.

  14. Leaching characteristics of selected South African fly ashes: Effect of pH on the release of major and trace species

    SciTech Connect

    Gitari, W.M.; Fatoba, O.O.; Petrik, L.F.; Vadapalli, V.R.K.

    2009-07-01

    Fly ash samples from two South African coal-fired power stations were subjected to different leaching tests under alkaline and acidic conditions in an attempt to assess the effect of pH on the leachability of species from the fly ashes and also assess the potential impact of the fly ashes disposal on groundwater and the receiving environment. To achieve this, German Standard leaching (DIN-S4) and Acid Neutralization Capacity (ANC) tests were employed. Ca, Mg, Na, K and SO{sub 4} were significantly leached into solution under the two leaching conditions with the total amounts in ANC leachates higher than that of DIN-S4. This indicates that a large fraction of the soluble salts in unweathered fly ash are easily leached. These species represents the fraction that can be flushed off initially from the surface of ash particles on contacting the ash with water. The amounts of toxic trace elements such as As, Se, Cd, Cr and Pb leached out of the fly ashes when in contact with de-mineralized water (DIN-S4 test) were low and below the Target Water Quality Range (TWQR) of South Africa. This is explained by their low concentrations in the fly ashes and their solubility dependence on the pH of the leaching solution. However the amounts of some minor elements such as B, Mn, Fe, As and Se leached out at lower pH ranging between 10 to 4 (ANC test) were slightly higher than the TWQR, an indication that the pH of the leaching solution plays a significant role on the leaching of species in fly ash. The high concentrations of the toxic elements released from the fly ashes at lower pH gives an indication that the disposal of the fly ash could have adverse effects on the receiving environment if the pH of the solution contacting the ashes is not properly monitored.

  15. Solute chemistry of snowmelt and runoff in an alpine basin, Sierra Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.W.; Melack, J.M. )

    1991-07-01

    Snowpack runoff contributions to the hydrochemistry of an alpine catchment in the Sierra Nevada were evaluated n 1986 and 1987 by analyzing snowpack, meltwater, and stream water samples for major inorganic ions, conductance, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), and silicate. Maximum concentrations of ions in meltwater were inversely related to the rate of snowmelt. Hydrogen concentration in meltwater was buffered by ANC produced in part by the dissolution of particulates. The anionic pulse in meltwater was observed in stream waters during the first 30 days of snowpack runoff, with NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} concentrations in stream waters at this time about 1.6-fold greater than the average NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} concentration for the time period of snowpack runoff, Cl{sup {minus}} about 1.5-fold greater and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} about 1.3-fold greater. Maximum H{sup +} concentration during snowpack runoff (increase of 170% over winter concentrations) occurred near maximum discharge. ANC minima occurred at maximum discharge as a result of dilution, with a decrease from winter concentrations of 70% in 1986 and 60% in 1987. Eighty to ninety percent of the H{sup +} stored in the snowpack was consumed before it reached the base of the catchment. Soils were a sink for NH{sub 4}{sup +} from snowpack was consumed before it reached the base of the catchment. Soils were a sink for NH{sub 4}{sup +} from snowpack meltwater, with less than 1% of the NH{sub 4}{sup +}{sub 4} released from snowpack storage exported from the basin as NH{sub 4}{sup +}. Sulfate concentrations in stream waters were less variable than NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} or Cl{sup {minus}} concentrations.

  16. Steady-state sulfur critical loads and exceedances for protection of aquatic ecosystems in the U.S. Southern Appalachian Mountains.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Todd C; Sullivan, Timothy J; Hessburg, Paul F; Reynolds, Keith M; Povak, Nicholas A; Cosby, Bernard J; Jackson, William; Salter, R Brion

    2014-12-15

    Atmospherically deposited sulfur (S) causes stream water acidification throughout the eastern U.S. Southern Appalachian Mountain (SAM) region. Acidification has been linked with reduced fitness and richness of aquatic species and changes to benthic communities. Maintaining acid-base chemistry that supports native biota depends largely on balancing acidic deposition with the natural resupply of base cations. Stream water acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) is maintained by base cations that mostly originate from weathering of surrounding lithologies. When ambient atmospheric S deposition exceeds the critical load (CL) an ecosystem can tolerate, stream water chemistry may become lethal to biota. This work links statistical predictions of ANC and base cation weathering for streams and watersheds of the SAM region with a steady-state model to estimate CLs and exceedances. Results showed that 20.1% of the total length of study region streams displayed ANC <100 μeq∙L(-1), a level at which effects to biota may be anticipated; most were 4th or lower order streams. Nearly one-third of the stream length within the study region exhibited CLs of S deposition <50 meq∙m(-2)∙yr(-1), which is less than the regional average S deposition of 60 meq∙m(-2)∙yr(-1). Owing to their geologic substrates, relatively high elevation, and cool and moist forested conditions, the percentage of stream length in exceedance was highest for mountain wilderness areas and in national parks, and lowest for privately owned valley bottom land. Exceedance results were summarized by 12-digit hydrologic unit code (subwatershed) for use in developing management goals and policy objectives, and for long-term monitoring.

  17. Response of fish assemblages to declining acidic deposition in Adirondack Mountain lakes, 1984-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldigo, B. P.; Roy, K. M.; Driscoll, C. T.

    2016-12-01

    Adverse effects of acidic deposition on the chemistry and fish communities were evident in Adirondack Mountain lakes during the 1980s and 1990s. Fish assemblages and water chemistry in 43 Adirondack Long-Term Monitoring (ALTM) lakes were sampled by the Adirondack Lakes Survey Corporation and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation during three periods (1984-87, 1994-2005, and 2008-12) to document regional impacts and potential biological recovery associated with the 1990 amendments to the 1963 Clean Air Act (CAA). We assessed standardized data from 43 lakes sampled during the three periods to quantify the response of fish-community richness, total fish abundance, and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) abundance to declining acidity that resulted from changes in U.S. air-quality management between 1984 and 2012. During the 28-year period, mean acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) increased significantly from 3 to 30 μeq/L and mean inorganic monomeric Al concentrations decreased significantly from 2.22 to 0.66 μmol/L, yet mean species richness, all species or total catch per net night (CPNN), and brook trout CPNN did not change significantly in the 43 lakes. Regression analyses indicate that fishery metrics were not directly related to the degree of chemical recovery and that brook trout CPNN may actually have declined with increasing ANC. While the richness of fish communities increased with increasing ANC as anticipated in several Adirondack lakes, observed improvements in water quality associated with the CAA have generally failed to produce detectable shifts in fish assemblages within a large number of ALTM lakes. Additional time may simply be needed for biological recovery to progress, or else more proactive efforts may be necessary to restore natural fish assemblages in Adirondack lakes in which water chemistry is steadily recovering from acidification.

  18. Hydrogeomorphology explains acidification-driven variation in aquatic biological communities in the Neversink Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harpold, Adrian A.; Burns, Douglas A.; Walter, M.T.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2013-01-01

    Describing the distribution of aquatic habitats and the health of biological communities can be costly and time-consuming; therefore, simple, inexpensive methods to scale observations of aquatic biota to watersheds that lack data would be useful. In this study, we explored the potential of a simple “hydrogeomorphic” model to predict the effects of acid deposition on macroinvertebrate, fish, and diatom communities in 28 sub-watersheds of the 176-km2 Neversink River basin in the Catskill Mountains of New York State. The empirical model was originally developed to predict stream-water acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) using the watershed slope and drainage density. Because ANC is known to be strongly related to aquatic biological communities in the Neversink, we speculated that the model might correlate well with biotic indicators of ANC response. The hydrogeomorphic model was strongly correlated to several measures of macroinvertebrate and fish community richness and density, but less strongly correlated to diatom acid tolerance. The model was also strongly correlated to biological communities in 18 sub-watersheds independent of the model development, with the linear correlation capturing the strongly acidic nature of small upland watersheds (2). Overall, we demonstrated the applicability of geospatial data sets and a simple hydrogeomorphic model for estimating aquatic biological communities in areas with stream-water acidification, allowing estimates where no direct field observations are available. Similar modeling approaches have the potential to complement or refine expensive and time-consuming measurements of aquatic biota populations and to aid in regional assessments of aquatic health.

  19. Response of fish assemblages to declining acidic deposition in Adirondack Mountain lakes, 1984–2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldigo, Barry P.; Roy, Karen; Driscoll, Charles T.

    2016-01-01

    Adverse effects of acidic deposition on the chemistry and fish communities were evident in Adirondack Mountain lakes during the 1980s and 1990s. Fish assemblages and water chemistry in 43 Adirondack Long-Term Monitoring (ALTM) lakes were sampled by the Adirondack Lakes Survey Corporation and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation during three periods (1984–87, 1994–2005, and 2008–12) to document regional impacts and potential biological recovery associated with the 1990 amendments to the 1963 Clean Air Act (CAA). We assessed standardized data from 43 lakes sampled during the three periods to quantify the response of fish-community richness, total fish abundance, and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) abundance to declining acidity that resulted from changes in U.S. air-quality management between 1984 and 2012. During the 28-year period, mean acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) increased significantly from 3 to 30 μeq/L and mean inorganic monomeric Al concentrations decreased significantly from 2.22 to 0.66 μmol/L, yet mean species richness, all species or total catch per net night (CPNN), and brook trout CPNN did not change significantly in the 43 lakes. Regression analyses indicate that fishery metrics were not directly related to the degree of chemical recovery and that brook trout CPNN may actually have declined with increasing ANC. While the richness of fish communities increased with increasing ANC as anticipated in several Adirondack lakes, observed improvements in water quality associated with the CAA have generally failed to produce detectable shifts in fish assemblages within a large number of ALTM lakes. Additional time may simply be needed for biological recovery to progress, or else more proactive efforts may be necessary to restore natural fish assemblages in Adirondack lakes in which water chemistry is steadily recovering from acidification.

  20. Policy Capacity in the Learning Healthcare System Comment on "Health Reform Requires Policy Capacity".

    PubMed

    Gardner, William

    2015-08-07

    Pierre-Gerlier Forest and his colleagues make a strong argument for the need to expand policy capacity among healthcare actors. In this commentary, I develop an additional argument in support of Forest et al view. Forest et al rightly point to the need to have embedded policy experts to successfully translate healthcare reform policy into healthcare change. Translation of externally generated innovation policy into local solutions is only one source of healthcare system change. We also need to build learning healthcare systems that can discover new health solutions at the frontline of care. Enhanced policy capacity staffing in those organizations will be key to building continuously learning health systems.

  1. USING ISOTHERMS TO PREDICT GAC'S CAPACITY FOR SYNTHETIC ORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This investigation involved operating a pilot granular activated carbon (GAC) plant to obtain capacity data under typical field conditions, determining isotherms for selected synthetic organic chemicals, and comparing the capacity predicted by the isotherm data with the pilot-pla...

  2. NiH2 capacity fade during early cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zagrodnik, Jeffrey P.

    1993-01-01

    Tests were conducted on nickel hydrogen batteries to determine the charge efficiency of the nickel electrode as a function of rate and temperature, cell discharge capacity, and capacity fade. Test procedures and results are presented in outline and graphic form.

  3. 97. #2 LAUNDRY AFT LOOKING FORWARD SHOWING LARGE CAPACITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. #2 LAUNDRY - AFT LOOKING FORWARD SHOWING LARGE CAPACITY WASHER, WASHING MACHINE AND TWO (2) LARGE CAPACITY DRYERS. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  4. The Solid-State Heat-Capacity Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Rotter, M D; Dane, C B; Gonzales, S A; Merrill, R D; Mitchell, S C; Parks, C W; Yamamoto, R M

    2003-12-08

    Heat-capacity operation of a laser is a novel method by which high average powers can be generated. In this paper, we present the principles behind heat-capacity operation, in addition to describing the results of recent experiments.

  5. Cytokine production capacity in depression and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Vogelzangs, N; de Jonge, P; Smit, J H; Bahn, S; Penninx, B W

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that immune function may be dysregulated in persons with depressive and anxiety disorders. Few studies examined the expression of cytokines in response to ex vivo stimulation of blood by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to study the innate production capacity of cytokines in depression and anxiety. To investigate this, baseline data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) were used, including persons (18–65 years; 66% women) with current (that is, past month; N=591) or remitted (N=354) DSM-IV depressive or anxiety disorders and healthy controls (N=297). Depressive and anxiety symptoms were measured by means of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Using Multi-Analyte Profiling technology, plasma levels of 13 cytokines were assayed after whole blood stimulation by addition of LPS. Basal plasma levels of C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α were also available. A basal and a LPS summary index were created. Results show that LPS-stimulated inflammation was associated with increased odds of current depressive/anxiety disorders (odds ratio (OR)=1.28, P=0.009), as was the case for basal inflammation (OR=1.28, P=0.001). These associations were no longer significant after adjustment for lifestyle and health (OR=1.13, P=0.21; OR=1.07, P=0.45, respectively). After adjustment for lifestyle and health, interleukin-8 was associated with both remitted (OR=1.25, P=0.02) and current (OR=1.28, P=0.005) disorders. In addition, LPS-stimulated inflammation was associated with more severe depressive (β=0.129, P<0.001) and anxiety (β=0.165, P<0.001) symptoms, as was basal inflammation. Unlike basal inflammation, LPS-stimulated inflammation was still associated with (anxiety) symptom severity after adjustment for lifestyle and health (IDS: IL-8, MCP-1, MMP2; BAI: LPS index, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-18, MCP-1, MMP2, TNF-β). To conclude, lifestyle and health factors may

  6. Bathymetry and capacity of Chambers Lake, Chester County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gyves, Matthew C.

    2015-10-26

    This report describes the methods used to create a bathymetric map of Chambers Lake for the computation of reservoir storage capacity as of September 2014. The product is a bathymetric map and a table showing the storage capacity of the reservoir at 2-foot increments from minimum usable elevation up to full capacity at the crest of the auxiliary spillway.

  7. Continuing Studies of Air Traffic Control System Capacity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The goals of the work are: To define the capacity of an ATC system and its major elements; To find quantitative relations between capacity and the...overall performance of the air transportation system; and To find quantitative relations between capacity and the specifications, operating parameters, and environment of the ATC system.

  8. 14 CFR Section 25 - Traffic and Capacity Elements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Traffic and Capacity Elements Section 25... Traffic Reporting Requirements Section 25 Traffic and Capacity Elements General Instructions. (a) All prescribed reporting for traffic and capacity elements shall conform with the data compilation standards...

  9. 14 CFR Section 25 - Traffic and Capacity Elements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Traffic and Capacity Elements Section 25... Traffic Reporting Requirements Section 25 Traffic and Capacity Elements General Instructions. (a) All prescribed reporting for traffic and capacity elements shall conform with the data compilation standards...

  10. 14 CFR Section 25 - Traffic and Capacity Elements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Traffic and Capacity Elements Section 25... Traffic Reporting Requirements Section 25 Traffic and Capacity Elements General Instructions. (a) All prescribed reporting for traffic and capacity elements shall conform with the data compilation standards...

  11. Challenges of Capacity Building in Multisector Community Health Alliances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Jeffrey A.; Christianson, Jon B.; Hearld, Larry R.; Hurley, Robert; Scanlon, Dennis P.

    2010-01-01

    Capacity building is often described as fundamental to the success of health alliances, yet there are few evaluations that provide alliances with clear guidance on the challenges related to capacity building. This article attempts to identify potential challenges of capacity building in multistakeholder health alliances. The study uses a multiple…

  12. 24 CFR 3285.202 - Soil classifications and bearing capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Soil classifications and bearing... Soil classifications and bearing capacity. The soil classification and bearing capacity of the soil... bearing capacity must be determined by one or more of the following methods, unless the soil...

  13. 24 CFR 3285.202 - Soil classifications and bearing capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Soil classifications and bearing... Soil classifications and bearing capacity. The soil classification and bearing capacity of the soil... bearing capacity must be determined by one or more of the following methods, unless the soil...

  14. 24 CFR 3285.202 - Soil classifications and bearing capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Soil classifications and bearing... Soil classifications and bearing capacity. The soil classification and bearing capacity of the soil... bearing capacity must be determined by one or more of the following methods, unless the soil...

  15. 24 CFR 3285.202 - Soil classifications and bearing capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Soil classifications and bearing... Soil classifications and bearing capacity. The soil classification and bearing capacity of the soil... bearing capacity must be determined by one or more of the following methods, unless the soil...

  16. 24 CFR 3285.202 - Soil classifications and bearing capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Soil classifications and bearing... Soil classifications and bearing capacity. The soil classification and bearing capacity of the soil... bearing capacity must be determined by one or more of the following methods, unless the soil...

  17. 30 CFR 75.513 - Electric conductor; capacity and insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... § 75.513 Electric conductor; capacity and insulation. All electric conductors shall be sufficient in size and have adequate current carrying capacity and be of such construction that a rise in temperature... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electric conductor; capacity and insulation....

  18. 30 CFR 75.513 - Electric conductor; capacity and insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 75.513 Electric conductor; capacity and insulation. All electric conductors shall be sufficient in size and have adequate current carrying capacity and be of such construction that a rise in temperature... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric conductor; capacity and insulation....

  19. 30 CFR 75.513 - Electric conductor; capacity and insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 75.513 Electric conductor; capacity and insulation. All electric conductors shall be sufficient in size and have adequate current carrying capacity and be of such construction that a rise in temperature... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electric conductor; capacity and insulation....

  20. 30 CFR 77.503 - Electric conductors; capacity and insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.503 Electric conductors; capacity and insulation. Electric conductors shall be sufficient in size and have adequate current carrying capacity and be of such... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electric conductors; capacity and...

  1. 30 CFR 77.503 - Electric conductors; capacity and insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.503 Electric conductors; capacity and insulation. Electric conductors shall be sufficient in size and have adequate current carrying capacity and be of such... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electric conductors; capacity and...

  2. 30 CFR 77.503 - Electric conductors; capacity and insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.503 Electric conductors; capacity and insulation. Electric conductors shall be sufficient in size and have adequate current carrying capacity and be of such... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric conductors; capacity and...

  3. 30 CFR 77.503 - Electric conductors; capacity and insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.503 Electric conductors; capacity and insulation. Electric conductors shall be sufficient in size and have adequate current carrying capacity and be of such... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electric conductors; capacity and...

  4. 30 CFR 75.513 - Electric conductor; capacity and insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 75.513 Electric conductor; capacity and insulation. All electric conductors shall be sufficient in size and have adequate current carrying capacity and be of such construction that a rise in temperature... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electric conductor; capacity and insulation....

  5. 30 CFR 77.503 - Electric conductors; capacity and insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.503 Electric conductors; capacity and insulation. Electric conductors shall be sufficient in size and have adequate current carrying capacity and be of such... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electric conductors; capacity and...

  6. 30 CFR 75.513 - Electric conductor; capacity and insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... § 75.513 Electric conductor; capacity and insulation. All electric conductors shall be sufficient in size and have adequate current carrying capacity and be of such construction that a rise in temperature... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electric conductor; capacity and insulation....

  7. Quasi-superactivation for the classical capacity of quantum channels

    SciTech Connect

    Gyongyosi, Laszlo; Imre, Sandor

    2014-12-04

    The superactivation effect has its roots in the extreme violation of additivity of the channel capacity and enables to reliably transmit quantum information over zero-capacity quantum channels. In this work we demonstrate a similar effect for the classical capacity of a quantum channel which previously was thought to be impossible.

  8. 46 CFR 154.806 - Capacity of pressure relief valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Capacity of pressure relief valves. 154.806 Section 154... Equipment Cargo Vent Systems § 154.806 Capacity of pressure relief valves. Pressure relief valves for each cargo tank must have a combined relief capacity, including the effects of back pressure from vent...

  9. 33 CFR 183.41 - Persons capacity: Outboard boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Persons capacity: Outboard boats... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Safe Loading § 183.41 Persons capacity: Outboard boats. (a) The persons capacity in pounds marked on a boat that is designed to use one or more...

  10. Measuring School Capacity, Maximizing School Improvement. Policy Brief. RB-53

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Jessica K.; Weinbaum, Elliot H.

    2012-01-01

    It is an oft-heard refrain in schools: "These schools lack the capacity they need." Or, "We need to build capacity in schools so that students can achieve." In district offices, statehouses, and elsewhere, the sentiment is repeated in various forms, but the term "capacity" is almost always used. What do education…

  11. 46 CFR 154.806 - Capacity of pressure relief valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Capacity of pressure relief valves. 154.806 Section 154... Equipment Cargo Vent Systems § 154.806 Capacity of pressure relief valves. Pressure relief valves for each cargo tank must have a combined relief capacity, including the effects of back pressure from vent...

  12. 30 CFR 75.1401 - Hoists; rated capacities; indicators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hoists; rated capacities; indicators. 75.1401... Hoists; rated capacities; indicators. Hoists shall have rated capacities consistent with the loads handled. An accurate and reliable indicator of the position of the cage, platform, skip, bucket, or...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2181 - Impoundment capacity: LNG storage tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Impoundment capacity: LNG storage tanks. 193.2181... Impoundment capacity: LNG storage tanks. Each impounding system serving an LNG storage tank must have a minimum volumetric liquid impoundment capacity of: (a) 110 percent of the LNG tank's maximum...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2181 - Impoundment capacity: LNG storage tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... minimum volumetric liquid impoundment capacity of: (a) 110 percent of the LNG tank's maximum liquid capacity for an impoundment serving a single tank; (b) 100 percent of all tanks or 110 percent of the largest tank's maximum liquid capacity, whichever is greater, for the impoundment serving more than...

  15. 7 CFR 3565.153 - Experience and capacity of borrower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Experience and capacity of borrower. 3565.153 Section....153 Experience and capacity of borrower. At the time of application, the lender must certify that the... financial capacity to meet all of the obligations of the loan; and (c) Has the ability and experience...

  16. 46 CFR 160.035-9 - Cubic capacity of lifeboats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cubic capacity of lifeboats. 160.035-9 Section 160.035-9...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Lifeboats for Merchant Vessels § 160.035-9 Cubic capacity of... its cubic capacity. (1) Length (L). The length is the distance in feet from the inside of the...

  17. 37 CFR 1.34 - Acting in a representative capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... capacity. 1.34 Section 1.34 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... of Application and Appointment of Attorney Or Agent § 1.34 Acting in a representative capacity. When a patent practitioner acting in a representative capacity appears in person or signs a paper...

  18. 38 CFR 36.4331 - Capacity of parties to contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Capacity of parties to... Capacity of parties to contract. Nothing in §§ 36.4800 through 36.4880 shall be construed to relieve any lender of responsibility otherwise existing, for any loss caused by the lack of legal capacity of...

  19. The Development of Visual Working Memory Capacity during Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmering, Vanessa R.

    2012-01-01

    The change detection task has been used in dozens of studies with adults to measure visual working memory capacity. Two studies have recently tested children in this task, suggesting a gradual increase in capacity from 5 years to adulthood. These results contrast with findings from an infant looking paradigm suggesting that capacity reaches…

  20. 38 CFR 36.4213 - Capacity of parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Capacity of parties. 36... Preparation General Provisions § 36.4213 Capacity of parties. Nothing in the § 36.4200 series shall be construed to relieve any lender of responsibility for any loss caused by lack of legal capacity of...

  1. 38 CFR 3.355 - Testamentary capacity for insurance purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Testamentary capacity for... Purposes § 3.355 Testamentary capacity for insurance purposes. When cases are referred to a rating agency involving the testamentary capacity of the insured to execute designations or changes of beneficiary,...

  2. 24 CFR 58.11 - Legal capacity and performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Legal capacity and performance. 58... RESPONSIBILITIES General Policy: Responsibilities of Responsible Entities § 58.11 Legal capacity and performance. (a) A responsible entity which believes that it does not have the legal capacity to carry out...

  3. 38 CFR 36.4213 - Capacity of parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Capacity of parties. 36... Preparation General Provisions § 36.4213 Capacity of parties. Nothing in the § 36.4200 series shall be construed to relieve any lender of responsibility for any loss caused by lack of legal capacity of...

  4. 38 CFR 36.4331 - Capacity of parties to contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Capacity of parties to... Capacity of parties to contract. Nothing in §§ 36.4800 through 36.4880 shall be construed to relieve any lender of responsibility otherwise existing, for any loss caused by the lack of legal capacity of...

  5. 24 CFR 115.302 - Capacity building funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Capacity building funds. 115.302 Section 115.302 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development OFFICE... Assistance Program § 115.302 Capacity building funds. (a) Capacity building (CB) funds are funds that HUD...

  6. 38 CFR 3.355 - Testamentary capacity for insurance purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Testamentary capacity for... Purposes § 3.355 Testamentary capacity for insurance purposes. When cases are referred to a rating agency involving the testamentary capacity of the insured to execute designations or changes of beneficiary,...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1401 - Hoists; rated capacities; indicators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hoists; rated capacities; indicators. 75.1401 Section 75.1401 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... Hoists; rated capacities; indicators. Hoists shall have rated capacities consistent with the...

  8. 7 CFR 3565.153 - Experience and capacity of borrower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Experience and capacity of borrower. 3565.153 Section....153 Experience and capacity of borrower. At the time of application, the lender must certify that the... financial capacity to meet all of the obligations of the loan; and (c) Has the ability and experience...

  9. 32 CFR 776.33 - Client with diminished capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Client with diminished capacity. 776.33 Section... Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.33 Client with diminished capacity. (a) Client with diminished capacity: (1) When a client's ability to make adequately considered decisions in connection with...

  10. 46 CFR 154.806 - Capacity of pressure relief valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Capacity of pressure relief valves. 154.806 Section 154... Equipment Cargo Vent Systems § 154.806 Capacity of pressure relief valves. Pressure relief valves for each cargo tank must have a combined relief capacity, including the effects of back pressure from vent...

  11. 46 CFR 154.548 - Cargo piping: Flow capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo piping: Flow capacity. 154.548 Section 154.548... and Process Piping Systems § 154.548 Cargo piping: Flow capacity. Piping with an excess flow valve must have a vapor or liquid flow capacity that is greater than the rated closing flow under § 154.546....

  12. 46 CFR 154.548 - Cargo piping: Flow capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo piping: Flow capacity. 154.548 Section 154.548... and Process Piping Systems § 154.548 Cargo piping: Flow capacity. Piping with an excess flow valve must have a vapor or liquid flow capacity that is greater than the rated closing flow under § 154.546....

  13. 46 CFR 154.806 - Capacity of pressure relief valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Capacity of pressure relief valves. 154.806 Section 154... Equipment Cargo Vent Systems § 154.806 Capacity of pressure relief valves. Pressure relief valves for each cargo tank must have a combined relief capacity, including the effects of back pressure from vent...

  14. 46 CFR 154.806 - Capacity of pressure relief valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Capacity of pressure relief valves. 154.806 Section 154... Equipment Cargo Vent Systems § 154.806 Capacity of pressure relief valves. Pressure relief valves for each cargo tank must have a combined relief capacity, including the effects of back pressure from vent...

  15. 7 CFR 3565.153 - Experience and capacity of borrower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Experience and capacity of borrower. 3565.153 Section....153 Experience and capacity of borrower. At the time of application, the lender must certify that the... financial capacity to meet all of the obligations of the loan; and (c) Has the ability and experience...

  16. 38 CFR 3.355 - Testamentary capacity for insurance purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Testamentary capacity for... Purposes § 3.355 Testamentary capacity for insurance purposes. When cases are referred to a rating agency involving the testamentary capacity of the insured to execute designations or changes of beneficiary,...

  17. 30 CFR 75.1401 - Hoists; rated capacities; indicators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hoists; rated capacities; indicators. 75.1401 Section 75.1401 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... Hoists; rated capacities; indicators. Hoists shall have rated capacities consistent with the...

  18. 24 CFR 58.11 - Legal capacity and performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Legal capacity and performance. 58... RESPONSIBILITIES General Policy: Responsibilities of Responsible Entities § 58.11 Legal capacity and performance. (a) A responsible entity which believes that it does not have the legal capacity to carry out...

  19. 30 CFR 75.1401 - Hoists; rated capacities; indicators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hoists; rated capacities; indicators. 75.1401 Section 75.1401 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... Hoists; rated capacities; indicators. Hoists shall have rated capacities consistent with the...

  20. 24 CFR 115.302 - Capacity building funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Capacity building funds. 115.302 Section 115.302 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development OFFICE... Assistance Program § 115.302 Capacity building funds. (a) Capacity building (CB) funds are funds that HUD...